Science.gov

Sample records for 21ne production rates

  1. Subterranean production of neutrons, 39Ar and 21Ne: Rates and uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šrámek, Ondřej; Stevens, Lauren; McDonough, William F.; Mukhopadhyay, Sujoy; Peterson, R. J.

    2017-01-01

    Accurate understanding of the subsurface production rate of the radionuclide 39Ar is necessary for argon dating techniques and noble gas geochemistry of the shallow and the deep Earth, and is also of interest to the WIMP dark matter experimental particle physics community. Our new calculations of subsurface production of neutrons, 21Ne , and 39Ar take advantage of the state-of-the-art reliable tools of nuclear physics to obtain reaction cross sections and spectra (TALYS) and to evaluate neutron propagation in rock (MCNP6). We discuss our method and results in relation to previous studies and show the relative importance of various neutron, 21Ne , and 39Ar nucleogenic production channels. Uncertainty in nuclear reaction cross sections, which is the major contributor to overall calculation uncertainty, is estimated from variability in existing experimental and library data. Depending on selected rock composition, on the order of 107-1010 α particles are produced in one kilogram of rock per year (order of 1-103 kg-1 s-1); the number of produced neutrons is lower by ∼ 6 orders of magnitude, 21Ne production rate drops by an additional factor of 15-20, and another one order of magnitude or more is dropped in production of 39Ar. Our calculation yields a nucleogenic 21Ne /4He production ratio of (4.6 ± 0.6) ×10-8 in Continental Crust and (4.2 ± 0.5) ×10-8 in Oceanic Crust and Depleted Mantle. Calculated 39Ar production rates span a great range from 29 ± 9 atoms kg-rock-1 yr-1 in the K-Th-U-enriched Upper Continental Crust to (2.6 ± 0.8) × 10-4 atoms kg-rock-1 yr-1 in Depleted Upper Mantle. Nucleogenic 39Ar production exceeds the cosmogenic production below ∼700 m depth and thus, affects radiometric ages of groundwater. The 39Ar chronometer, which fills in a gap between 3H and 14C , is particularly important given the need to tap deep reservoirs of ancient drinking water.

  2. The production rate of cosmogenic 21-Ne in chondrites deduced from 81-Kr measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, L.; Freundel, M.

    1986-01-01

    Cosmogenic Ne-21 is used widely to calculate exposure ages of stone meteorites. In order to do so, the production rate P(21) must be known. This rate, however, is dependent on the chemical composition of the meteorite as well as the mass of, and position within, the meteoroid during its exposure to the cosmic radiation. Even for a mean shielding the production rates determined from measurments of different radionuclides vary by a factor of two. A method that can be used to determine exposure ages of meteorites that avoids shielding and chemical composition corrections is the -81-Kr-Kr-method. However, for chondrites, in many cases, the direct determination of production rates for the Kr isotopes is prevented by the trapped gases and the neutron effects on bromine. Therefore, this method was applied to four eucrite falls and then their 81-Kr-83-Kr-ages were compared to their cosmogenic Ne-21 and Ar-38 concentrations. The eucrites Bouvante-le-Haut, Juvinas, Sioux County, and Stannern were chosen for these measurements because of their similar chemical composition regarding the major elements.

  3. A High Sensitive Atomic Co-magnetometer for Rotation Rate Measurement Based on K-Rb-21Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yao; Zou, Sheng; Quan, Wei; Lu, Yan; Ding, Ming; Fang, Jiancheng

    2016-05-01

    Atomic co-magnetometers use two spin ensembles occupying the same volume in glass vapor cells to suppress their sensitivity to magnetic field noise and leave them sensitive to rotation rate, anomalous fields, etc. Due to the small gyromagnetic ratio of the 21 Ne atom, an atomic co-magnetometer based on 21Ne is very suitable for rotation rate measurement. Thus, we focus on and report a co-magnetometer for rotation rate measurement based on K-Rb-21Ne. We have developed a rotating co-magnetometer which is calibrated by the rotation of the earth. All the optics in the co-magnetometer have been encased in a bell jar in which the air is pumped away to suppress the air density fluctuation noise. MnZn ferrite is also utilized in the inner most magnetic field shielding system to suppress the magnetic field noise. We have reached rotation rate sensitivity of 2.1 * 10-8 rad/ s / sqrt(Hz) or equivalent magnetic field noise level of 1.4 fT / sqrt(Hz) . The K-Rb-21Ne co-magnetometer has many potential applications for precision measurements, including spin dependent force detecting, Electric Dipole Moment measurement and fundamental symmetry test.

  4. Geochronometry and thermochronometry using nucleogenic 21Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farley, K. A.; Flowers, R. M.; Vasconcelos, P. M.

    2011-12-01

    Nucleogenic 21Ne is produced by the interaction of α particles with 18O. While the cross section for this reaction is small (about 1 α in 25 million participates), 21Ne excesses can be measured in a variety of minerals, forming the basis of (U-Th)/Ne chronometry. Previous work focused on thermochronometry of U, Th rich trace minerals. For example, Gautheron et al. (2005) studied nucleogenic Ne in zircon and inferred a closure temperature of ~400 C. Our preliminary Ne diffusion data on Durango apatite suggests Tc ~280 C. The method can also be applied to phases with much lower U and Th contents in which the 21Ne is measurable on old and/or large specimens. We have obtained (U-Th)/Ne ages on ~50 mg samples of iron oxides with ppm-level U and Th and Ne ages of 50-500 Ma. For example, hematites from the Neoproterozoic (?) Urucum BIF yield a 21Ne age of 470 ± 15 Ma and post-depositional hydrothermal hematite in the Redwall Limestone in the Grand Canyon yields an age of 251 ± 11 Ma. In both cases (U-Th)/He ages are more than 100 Myr younger. Outstanding issues with this method are 1) the diffusivity of Ne - are we measuring cooling ages or formation ages?, 2) how well known is the production rate?, and 3) in what minerals is the air component sufficiently small to permit precision measurements of 21Ne excesses?

  5. Erosion rate study at the Allchar deposit (Macedonia) based on radioactive and stable cosmogenic nuclides (26 Al, 36 Cl, 3 He, and 21 Ne)

    PubMed Central

    Cvetković, V.; Niedermann, S.; Pejović, V.; Amthauer, G.; Boev, B.; Bosch, F.; Aničin, I.; Henning, W. F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This paper focuses on constraining the erosion rate in the area of the Allchar Sb‐As‐Tl‐Au deposit (Macedonia). It contains the largest known reserves of lorandite (TlAsS2), which is essential for the LORanditeEXperiment (LOREX), aimed at determining the long‐term solar neutrino flux. Because the erosion history of the Allchar area is crucial for the success of LOREX, we applied terrestrial in situ cosmogenic nuclides including both radioactive (26Al and 36Cl) and stable (3He and 21Ne) nuclides in quartz, dolomite/calcite, sanidine, and diopside. The obtained results suggest that there is accordance in the values obtained by applying 26Al, 36Cl, and 21Ne for around 85% of the entire sample collection, with resulting erosion rates varying from several tens of m/Ma to ∼165 m/Ma. The samples from four locations (L‐8 CD, L1b/R, L1c/R, and L‐4/ADR) give erosion rates between 300 and 400 m/Ma. Although these localities reveal remarkably higher values, which may be explained by burial events that occurred in part of Allchar, the erosion rate estimates mostly in the range between 50 and 100 m/Ma. This range further enables us to estimate the vertical erosion rate values for the two main ore bodies Crven Dol and Centralni Deo. We also estimate that the lower and upper limits of average paleo‐depths for the ore body Centralni Deo from 4.3 Ma to the present are 250–290 and 750–790 m, respectively, whereas the upper limit of paleo‐depth for the ore body Crven Dol over the same geological age is 860 m. The estimated paleo‐depth values allow estimating the relative contributions of 205Pb derived from pp‐neutrino and fast cosmic‐ray muons, respectively, which is an important prerequisite for the LOREX experiment. PMID:27587984

  6. Erosion rate study at the Allchar deposit (Macedonia) based on radioactive and stable cosmogenic nuclides ((26)Al, (36)Cl, (3)He, and (21)Ne).

    PubMed

    Pavićević, M K; Cvetković, V; Niedermann, S; Pejović, V; Amthauer, G; Boev, B; Bosch, F; Aničin, I; Henning, W F

    2016-02-01

    This paper focuses on constraining the erosion rate in the area of the Allchar Sb-As-Tl-Au deposit (Macedonia). It contains the largest known reserves of lorandite (TlAsS2), which is essential for the LORanditeEXperiment (LOREX), aimed at determining the long-term solar neutrino flux. Because the erosion history of the Allchar area is crucial for the success of LOREX, we applied terrestrial in situ cosmogenic nuclides including both radioactive ((26)Al and (36)Cl) and stable ((3)He and (21)Ne) nuclides in quartz, dolomite/calcite, sanidine, and diopside. The obtained results suggest that there is accordance in the values obtained by applying (26)Al, (36)Cl, and (21)Ne for around 85% of the entire sample collection, with resulting erosion rates varying from several tens of m/Ma to ∼165 m/Ma. The samples from four locations (L-8 CD, L1b/R, L1c/R, and L-4/ADR) give erosion rates between 300 and 400 m/Ma. Although these localities reveal remarkably higher values, which may be explained by burial events that occurred in part of Allchar, the erosion rate estimates mostly in the range between 50 and 100 m/Ma. This range further enables us to estimate the vertical erosion rate values for the two main ore bodies Crven Dol and Centralni Deo. We also estimate that the lower and upper limits of average paleo-depths for the ore body Centralni Deo from 4.3 Ma to the present are 250-290 and 750-790 m, respectively, whereas the upper limit of paleo-depth for the ore body Crven Dol over the same geological age is 860 m. The estimated paleo-depth values allow estimating the relative contributions of (205)Pb derived from pp-neutrino and fast cosmic-ray muons, respectively, which is an important prerequisite for the LOREX experiment.

  7. Erosion rate study at the Allchar deposit (Macedonia) based on radioactive and stable cosmogenic nuclides (26Al, 36Cl, 3He, and 21Ne)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavićević, M. K.; Cvetković, V.; Niedermann, S.; Pejović, V.; Amthauer, G.; Boev, B.; Bosch, F.; Aničin, I.; Henning, W. F.

    2016-02-01

    This paper focuses on constraining the erosion rate in the area of the Allchar Sb-As-Tl-Au deposit (Macedonia). It contains the largest known reserves of lorandite (TlAsS2), which is essential for the LORanditeEXperiment (LOREX), aimed at determining the long-term solar neutrino flux. Because the erosion history of the Allchar area is crucial for the success of LOREX, we applied terrestrial in situ cosmogenic nuclides including both radioactive (26Al and 36Cl) and stable (3He and 21Ne) nuclides in quartz, dolomite/calcite, sanidine, and diopside. The obtained results suggest that there is accordance in the values obtained by applying 26Al, 36Cl, and 21Ne for around 85% of the entire sample collection, with resulting erosion rates varying from several tens of m/Ma to ˜165 m/Ma. The samples from four locations (L-8 CD, L1b/R, L1c/R, and L-4/ADR) give erosion rates between 300 and 400 m/Ma. Although these localities reveal remarkably higher values, which may be explained by burial events that occurred in part of Allchar, the erosion rate estimates mostly in the range between 50 and 100 m/Ma. This range further enables us to estimate the vertical erosion rate values for the two main ore bodies Crven Dol and Centralni Deo. We also estimate that the lower and upper limits of average paleo-depths for the ore body Centralni Deo from 4.3 Ma to the present are 250-290 and 750-790 m, respectively, whereas the upper limit of paleo-depth for the ore body Crven Dol over the same geological age is 860 m. The estimated paleo-depth values allow estimating the relative contributions of 205Pb derived from pp-neutrino and fast cosmic-ray muons, respectively, which is an important prerequisite for the LOREX experiment.

  8. Reconstructing the cosmogenic 21Ne inventory of Neogene sedimentary sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, Finlay; Sinclair, Hugh; McCann, Louise

    2016-04-01

    The cosmogenic radionuclides, in particular 10Be, have found use in modern sediments as a way of determining the erosion rate of river catchments. Cosmogenic 21Ne in quartz is easier and faster to measure than 10Be and has the potential to record erosion rates back 10s million years. However the routine use of cosmogenic 21Ne in quartz sand is hampered by ubiquitous nucleogenic 21Ne. When the eroding lithology can be identified it is possible to measure the nucleogenic in samples that are shielded from cosmic rays and correct for it in exposed bedrock [1]. However, identifying the lithologies that contributes quartz sand in large river catchments, and determining precise nucleogenic contributions is more problematic. The North and South Platte rivers drain early Prototerozoic lithologies of the Laramie and Front Ranges in the high Rockies of Wyoming. They have deposited several km of coarse clastic fluvial deposits on the Great Plains of Nebraska and Colorado up to 200 km from the mountain front. Quartz from shielded samples of granite and gneiss - the dominant quartz-bearing rocks - has high concentrations of nucleogenic 21Ne (60-140 e6 atoms/g). The 21Ne concentration in modern sand from the river (n=10) overlaps that measured in the shielded granite and gneiss. The sand data rarely lie on the air-spallation mixing line in the Ne three isotope plot indicating that it is dominantly derived from the granite and gneiss and has no resolvable cosmogenic 21Ne. Building on previous studies of cosmogenic 21Ne in pebbles [2] we have started a programme of analysis of pebbles derived from the Medicine Bow quartzite that are abundant throughout the Cenozoic alluvial sequence. Nucleogenic 21Ne in shielded quartzite is lower than granites (3-7 e6 atoms/g, n=4) and the data tend to lie on the air-spallation mixing line. All pebbles (n=14) from modern sediments analysed so far contain 2-80 times more excess 21Ne than the highest shielded quartzite suggesting that cosmogenic 21

  9. Atmospheric 21Ne abundance determined by the Helix-MC Plus mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, M.; Zhang, X.; Phillips, D.; Hamilton, D.; Deerberg, M.; Schwieters, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    Analyses of noble gas isotopes by multi-collector, high resolution mass spectrometry have the potential to revolutionise applications in the cosmo-geo-sciences. The Helix-MC Plus noble gas mass spectrometer installed at the Australian National University (ANU) is equipped with unique high mass resolution collectors [mass resolution (MR): ~1,800 and mass resolving power (MRP): ~8,000], including fixed axial (Ax), adjustable high mass (H2) and adjustable low mass (L2) detectors. The high mass resolution of the L2, Ax and H2 collectors permits complete separation of 20Ne (measured on L2 detector) from doubly charged interfering 40Ar (required MR of 1,777), 1H19F (MR = 1450), 1H218O (MR = 894) and partial separation of the 21Ne peak (on Ax detector) from interfering 20Ne1H (MR = 3,271), and 22Ne (on H2 detector) from interfering doubly charged CO2 (MR = 6,231). Because of the high MRP of ~8,000, 21Ne can be measured, essentially without interference from 20Ne1H, by setting the magnet position on a 20Ne1H interference-free position. This capability provides an important opportunity to re-evaluate the 21Ne abundance in the atmosphere. Our analyses demonstrate that 20Ne1H contributes ~4% to atmospheric 21Ne measurements, with the corresponding production ratio of 20Ne1H to 20Ne being ~1E-4. We calculate a new atmospheric 21Ne/20Ne ratio of 0.00287 relative to an atmospheric 22Ne/20Ne ratio of 0.102; this new value is distinctly lower than the current IUPAC recommended 21Ne/20Ne value of 0.00298. There are several significant implications ensuing from the newly determined atmospheric 21Ne abundance. For example, in the area of Earth sciences the most critical issue relates to cosmogenic 21Ne surface exposure ages, which involve the calculation of 21Ne concentrations from excess 21Ne, relative to the atmospheric 21Ne/20Ne ratio. For young samples, where cosmogenic 21Ne contents are small and the 21Ne/20Ne ratio is close to the atmospheric value, the revised value could

  10. Neogene basin infilling from cosmogenic nuclides (10Be and 21Ne) in Atacama, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Caroline; Regard, Vincent; Carretier, Sébastien; Riquelme, Rodrigo; Blard, Pierre-Henri; Campos, Eduardo; Brichau, Stéphanie; Lupker, Marteen; Hérail, Gérard

    2017-04-01

    In the hyperarid Atacama Desert, northern Chile, Neogene sediments host copper rich layers (exotic supergene mineralization). Current mines are excavated into relatively thin (<200-300 m) Neogene basins whose infilling chronology is poorly constrained. We took advantage of one of these mining pits, and sampled for 10Be and 21Ne cosmogenic nuclide dosing. These cosmogenic nuclides help constraining the infilling chronology. Indeed, basin sediments were deposited with a cosmogenic nuclide content acquired on hillslopes. Then within the basin, cosmogenic nuclide concentrations evolved through the competing production (quickly decreasing with depth) and disintegration (not for 21Ne). Sampling depths are at ˜100 m and at ˜50 m below the desert surface. First, 21Ne gives lower boundaries for upstream erosion rates or local sedimentation rate. These bounds are between 2 and 10 m/Ma, which is quite important for the area. The ratio between the two cosmogenic nuclides indicate a maximum burial age of 12 Ma (minimal erosion rate of 15 m/Ma) and is surprisingly similar from bottom to top, indicating a probable rapid infilling. We finally processed a Monte-Carlo inversion. This inversion helps taking into account the post-deposition muonic production of cosmogenic nuclides. Inversion results is dependent on the muonic production scheme. Interestingly, the similarity in concentrations from bottom to top pleads for quite low production at depth. Our data finally indicates a quick infilling between 12.5 and 10 Ma BP accounting for ˜100 m of deposition (minimum sedimentation rate of 40 m/Ma).

  11. Direct measurement of neon production rates by (α,n) reactions in minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Stephen E.; Farley, Kenneth A.; Cherniak, Daniele J.

    2015-01-01

    The production of nucleogenic neon from alpha particle capture by 18O and 19F offers a potential chronometer sensitive to temperatures higher than the more widely used (U-Th)/He chronometer. The accuracy depends on the cross sections and the calculated stopping power for alpha particles in the mineral being studied. Published 18O(α,n)21Ne production rates are in poor agreement and were calculated from contradictory cross sections, and therefore demand experimental verification. Similarly, the stopping powers for alpha particles are calculated from SRIM (Stopping Range of Ions in Matter software) based on a limited experimental dataset. To address these issues we used a particle accelerator to implant alpha particles at precisely known energies into slabs of synthetic quartz (SiO2) and barium tungstate (BaWO4) to measure 21Ne production from capture by 18O. Within experimental uncertainties the observed 21Ne production rates compare favorably to our predictions using published cross sections and stopping powers, indicating that ages calculated using these quantities are accurate at the ∼3% level. In addition, we measured the 22Ne/21Ne ratio and (U-Th)/He and (U-Th)/Ne ages of Durango fluorapatite, which is an important model system for this work because it contains both oxygen and fluorine. Finally, we present 21Ne/4He production rate ratios for a variety of minerals of geochemical interest along with software for calculating neon production rates and (U-Th)/Ne ages.

  12. Fluvial terrace dating using in situ cosmogenic {sup 21}Ne

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, E.; Caffee, M.

    1994-12-01

    Through the analysis of cosmic-ray produced radio-genic and stable nuclide concentrations, specifically {sup 21}Ne, we hope to date certain geomorphic features located along the tributaries of the Colorado River in the Eastern Grand Canyon and the Rainbow Plateau located in Utah. During the Quaternary, the Colorado River system was fed by glacial melting and run-off from the Wind River and Colorado Mountain Ranges. Past periods of aggradation allowed the emplacement of terrace features from debris flow activity. By dating such features we can further constrain the timing of key events such as river down cutting, terrace genesis/exposure age, and rates of surface erosion. Knowing the age and elevation of each terrace we can determine an average rate of down cutting of this river system. This, in turn, will offer information regarding alpine glaciation which is a sensitive indicator of global climate change. Studying the relative concentrations of these isotopic species in surface rocks can be useful in researching glacial periodicity and the relationship between solar activity and climate.

  13. Diffusion kinetics of 3He and 21Ne in quartz and implications for cosmogenic noble gas paleothermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Marissa M.; Shuster, David L.; Balco, Greg

    2014-10-01

    The simultaneous production and diffusion of cosmogenic noble gases offers the potential to constrain past temperatures on Earth and other planetary surfaces. Knowledge of both the production rate and diffusion kinetics of cosmogenic nuclide pairs is required to utilize this open-system behavior for paleothermometry. Here, we investigate the diffusion kinetics of spallogenic 3He and 21Ne in quartz through a series of step-degassing experiments on individual, proton-irradiated quartz grains. Quartz often, but not always, exhibits two stages of linear Arrhenius behavior, with He and Ne exhibiting similar release patterns. This two-stage behavior does not appear to correlate with heating-induced structural changes or anisotropy, nor is it an artifact of proton irradiation. The behavior may instead be associated with a sample-specific property such as radiation damage, mineral inclusions, fluid inclusions, or structural defects. We interpret these two Arrhenius arrays to represent multiple diffusion domain (MDD)-type behavior in quartz, as two-domain models closely reproduce the experimental data. However, we are currently unable to link this behavior with a clear physical mechanism; a different, more mechanistic model may be more appropriate in future studies. For both He and Ne, modeled Arrhenius diffusion parameters (activation energy, Ea, and pre-exponential factor, D0) display a range of values in the quartz samples analyzed. For 3He, Ea ranges from 73.0 to 99.8 kJ/mol and D0 from 5.9 × 100 to 1.0 × 104 cm2 s-1 for the initial, low-temperature linear Arrhenius arrays; when observed, a second array at higher temperatures corresponds to Ea ranging from 85.2 to 106.4 kJ/mol and D0 from 1.7 × 10-1 to 3.5 × 100 cm2 s-1. For 21Ne, Ea ranges from 95.7 to 153.8 kJ/mol and D0 from 6.6 × 10-1 to 3.2 × 103 cm2 s-1 for the initial, low-temperature array; linearity at high temperatures is not well constrained, likely because the α- to β-quartz transition occurs during

  14. Age and stability of sublimation till over buried glacier ice, inferred from 21Ne measurements, Ong Valley, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibby, T.; Putkonen, J.; Morgan, D. J.; Balco, G.

    2014-12-01

    Ong Valley, in the Central Transantarctic Mountains, contains three distinct glacial drifts deposited by past advances of the Argosy glacier into the valley. Massive ice occurs below two of the till deposits. Potentially, such buried ice under shallow regolith cover could provide access to past climate and biological records more easily than deep ice coring. We measured cosmic-ray produced 21Ne in these tills as a means of constraining the age and stability of the three drifts, as well as the ice below them. We collected samples in vertical profiles from two hand-dug sections through each drift. The pits from two drifts overlying buried ice extended to the buried ice surface. The hypothesis that these are sublimation tills implies that 21Ne concentrations are a function of i) any inheritance from prior exposure; ii) the age since emplacement of the ice and till; iii) the sublimation rate of the ice; and iv) the surface erosion rate of the till. 21Ne concentrations in the youngest drift are ca. 10 M atoms/g and invariant with depth, indicating that they are predominantly due to inheritance, and provide only a weak maximum age constraint of ca. 0.1 Mya. The two older drifts have surface 21Ne concentrations of 200-250 M atoms/ g and depth concentration profiles consistent with a sublimation till origin. Given that 21Ne concentrations in the deepest samples in each of the two older drifts provide an upper limit on the inherited 21Ne concentration, these imply minimum ages of 1 Mya for the middle drift and 1.6 Mya for the oldest. This implies a 1 Mya minimum age for the ice underlying the middle drift.

  15. Understanding complex exposure history of Mount Hampton, West Antarctica using cosmogenic 3He, 21Ne and 10Be in olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carracedo, Ana; Rodes, Angel; Stuart, Finlay; Smellie, John

    2016-04-01

    Combining stable and radioactive cosmogenic nuclides is an established tool for revealing the complexities of long-term landscape development. To date most studies have concentrated on 21Ne and 10Be in quartz. We have combined different chemical protocols for extraction of cosmogenic 10Be from olivine, and measured concentrations in olivine from lherzolite xenoliths from the peak of Mount Hampton (~3,200 m), an 11 Ma shield volcano on the West Antarctic rift flank. We combine this data with cosmogenic 3He (and 21Ne) in the olivines in order to unravel the long-term environmental history of the region. The mean 3He/21Ne ratio (1.98 ± 0.22) is consistent with the theoretical value and previous determinations. 10Be/3He ratios (0.012 to 0.018) are significantly lower than the instantaneous production ratio (~0.045). The data are consistent with 1-3 Ma of burial. The altitude of the volcano rules out over-topping of the peak by the West Antarctic Ice Sheet only possible burial could be generated by the growth of an ice cap although this contradicts the absence of evidence for ice cover. The 3He-10Be data can also be generated during episodic erosion of the volcanic ash over the last few million years. The data requires a minimum depth of 1 to 2.5 m for the samples during a minimum age of 5 Ma and maximum long-term erosion rate of ~0.5 m/Ma with at least one erosive episode reflecting short-term erosion rate of ~7 m/Ma that would have brought the samples into the surface during the last ~350 ka. Erosion in this type of landscape could be related to interglacial periods where cryostatic erosion can occur generating an increase in the erosion rate. This study shows that episodic erosion can produce stable-radioactive cosmogenic isotope systematics that are similar to those generated by exposure-burial cycles.

  16. {sup 17}O({alpha},{gamma}){sup 21}Ne and {sup 17}O({alpha},n){sup 20}Ne for the weak s process

    SciTech Connect

    Best, A.; Goerres, J.; Beard, M.; Couder, M.; Boer, R. de; Falahat, S.; Gueray, R. T.; Kontos, A.; Kratz, K.-L.; LeBlanc, P. J.; Li, Q.; O'Brien, S.; Oezkan, N.; Pignatari, M.; Sonnabend, K.; Talwar, R.; Tan, W.; Uberseder, E.; Wiescher, M.

    2012-11-20

    The ratio of the reaction rates of the competing channels {sup 17}O({alpha}{gamma}){sup 21}Ne and {sup 17}O({alpha},n){sup 20}Ne determines the efficiency of {sup 16}O as a neutron poison in the s process in low metallicity rotating stars. It has a large impact on the element production, either producing elements to the mass range of A=90 in case of a significant poisoning effect or extending the mass range up to the region of A=150 if the {gamma} channel is of negligible strength. We present an improved study of the reaction {sup 17}O({alpha},n){sup 20}Ne, including an independent measurement of the {sup 17}O({alpha},n{sub 1}){sup 20}Ne channel. A simultaneous R-Matrix fit to both the n{sub 0} and the n{sub 1} channels has been performed. New reaction rates, including recent data on the {sup 17}O({alpha},{gamma}){sup 21}Ne reaction, have been calculated and used as input for stellar network calculations and their impact on the s process in rotating massive stars is discussed.

  17. The production rate of cosmogenic deuterium at the Moon's surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füri, Evelyn; Deloule, Etienne; Trappitsch, Reto

    2017-09-01

    The hydrogen (D/H) isotope ratio is a key tracer for the source of planetary water. However, secondary processes such as solar wind implantation and cosmic ray induced spallation reactions have modified the primordial D/H signature of 'water' in all rocks and soils recovered on the Moon. Here, we re-evaluate the production rate of cosmogenic deuterium (D) at the Moon's surface through ion microprobe analyses of hydrogen isotopes in olivines from eight Apollo 12 and 15 mare basalts. These in situ measurements are complemented by CO2 laser extraction-static mass spectrometry analyses of cosmogenic noble gas nuclides (3He, 21Ne, 38Ar). Cosmic ray exposure (CRE) ages of the mare basalts, derived from their cosmogenic 21Ne content, range from 60 to 422 Ma. These CRE ages are 35% higher, on average, than the published values for the same samples. The amount of D detected in the olivines increases linearly with increasing CRE ages, consistent with a production rate of (2.17 ± 0.11) ×10-12 mol(g rock)-1 Ma-1. This value is more than twice as high as previous estimates for the production of D by galactic cosmic rays, indicating that for water-poor lunar samples, i.e., samples with water concentrations ≤50 ppm, corrected D/H ratios have been severely overestimated.

  18. Cosmogenic Nuclides 10Be-21Ne Burial Dating of Middle Miocene Sedimentary Formation of the Hongliu Valley in Southern Ningxia Basin: A Case of Isotopic Geochronology Study for the Cenozoic Sedimentary Strata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yan; Zhang, Huiping; Wang, Weitao; Pang, Jianzhang; Zheng, Dewen

    2016-04-01

    Chronology studies for the Cenozoic sedimentary strata based on the magnetostratigraphy cannot afford the unique chronological sequences in the absence of absolute ages from biostratigraphy or volcanic ash chronology. In situ-produced cosmogenic nuclides provide a powerful tool for the sediment dating based on the time-dependent concentration ratio of two nuclides, which are produced in the same mineral but with different half-lives. Thereinto,10Be-26Al is the most widely used nuclide pairs, of which the available dating range spans the Plio-Pleistocene. But the coupling of 10Be with the stable nuclide 21Ne would significantly improve the burial dating range up to the middle Miocene, which is promising in revolutionizing the chronology study for the Late Cenozoic terrestrial sedimentary sequences. We have applied 10Be-21Ne pair for dating the middle Miocene sediments of the Hongliu Valley in southern Ningxia basin. Two major features of the sediments are involved in our study: (1) sediments originated from the steady erosion of the source area, and (2) the burial depth of our sample after deposition is time dependent due to the gradual accumulation of sediments into basin. The post-burial nuclide production is estimated to be less than 3%, including the contribution by muon interactions, of the total nuclide concentrations measured in our sample. Our 10Be-21Ne analysis demonstrates the age of the burial sample is 12.4(+0.6/-0.4) Ma, and the erosion rate at the source area is 0.26±0.01 cm ka-1. The sample's burial age is consistent with the age constraint set by the Hongliugou Formation (16.7-5.4 Ma) which we collected the sample in. Vertebrate fossils of Platybelodon tongxinensis with an age between 12 and 15 Ma exhumated along with our sample further verifies the reliability of our dating results for the middle Miocene sediments.This study has shown the improved age range of cosmogenic-nuclide burial dating method by incorporating the stable nuclide 21Ne, and has

  19. Artificial Targets to Refine Production Rate Scaling Factors for Surface Exposure Dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strasky, S.; Vermeesch, P.; Baur, H.; Kober, F.; Schlüchter, C.; Wieler, R.

    2005-12-01

    To determine surface exposure ages, an obviously crucial parameter is the production rate of a nuclide of interest at the site of exposure of a given sample. As the cosmic ray intensity depends on the exact location within the troposphere, also the cosmogenic nuclide production rates vary with the geographical position. Accurate scaling of cosmogenic nuclide production rates from a calibration site to another with different geomagnetic latitude and altitude is therefore required. The international community initiated the CRONUS (Cosmic-Ray-Originated NUclide Systematics) project to improve the knowledge on production systematics of cosmogenic nuclides on earth. In our project we approach the "scaling problem'' by measuring the variability of production rates of cosmogenic noble gases (3He and 21Ne) as a function of the geographical position in artificial targets. The idea is to expose artificial targets along altitude and latitude transects during 1-2 years and subsequently measure the cosmic-ray produced 3He and 21Ne concentrations. The vacuum containers built for the experiment are inconel stainless steel tubes. The main target material is quartz, as quartz is the most commonly used mineral for exposure dating and both, cosmogenic helium and neon are produced and retained in the target container. Each target contains 1 kg of artificial quartz sand, and is degassed in vacuum prior to exposure. Blank measurements are carried out after degassing. So far, four artificial targets have been exposed in Antarctica and Tibet. Further targets will be exposed along an altitude transect between sea level and about 4500 m altitude and a latitude transect between 20-50 degrees. Blank measurements for the first exposed targets revealed 21Ne- and 3He-concentrations of about 5·105 and 5·104 atoms per container, respectively. After 1-2 years of exposure we should be able to measure the cosmogenic excess over blank with sufficient accuracy.

  20. Inter-comparison of cosmogenic in-situ 3He, 21Ne and 36Cl at low latitude along an altitude transect on the SE slope of the Kilimanjaro volcano (3°S, Tanzania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimmelpfennig, I.; Williams, A.; Pik, R.; Burnard, P.; Niedermann, S.; Finkel, R. C.; Benedetti, L.; Schneider, B.

    2010-12-01

    Because the intensity and energy spectrum of the cosmic ray flux is affected by atmospheric depth and geomagnetic-field strength, cosmogenic nuclide production rates increase considerably with altitude and to a lesser degree with latitude. The scaling methods used to account for spatial variability in production rates assume that all cosmogenic nuclides have the same altitude dependence. In this study we evaluate whether the production rates of cosmogenic 36Cl, 3He and 21Ne change differently with altitude, which is plausible due to the different energy-thresholds of their production reactions. If so, nuclide-specific scaling factors would be required. Concentrations of the three cosmogenic nuclides were determined in mafic phenocrysts over an altitude transect between 1000 and 4300 m at Kilimanjaro volcano (3° S). Altitude-dependence of relative production rates was assessed in two ways: by determination of concentration ratios and by calculation of apparent exposure age ratios for all nuclide pairs. The latter accounts for characteristics of 36Cl that the stable nuclides 3He and 21Ne do not possess (radioactive decay, high sensitivity to mineral composition and significant contributions from production reactions other than spallation). All ratios overlap within error over the entire transect, and altitudinal variation in relative production rates is not therefore evident. This suggests that nuclide-specific scaling factors are not required for the studied nuclides at this low latitude location. However, because previous studies [1,2] documented anomalous altitude-dependent variations of 3He production at mid-latitude sites, the effect of latitude on cross-calibrations should be further evaluated. We determined cosmogenic 21Ne/3He concentration ratios of 0.187 ± 0.010 in pyroxenes and 0.375 ± 0.015 in olivines, agreeing with those reported in previous studies. Despite the absence of independently determined ages for the studied lava surfaces, the consistency in

  1. Possible shape coexistence and magnetic dipole transitions in {sup 17}C and {sup 21}Ne

    SciTech Connect

    Sagawa, H.; Zhou, X. R.; Suzuki, Toshio; Yoshida, N.

    2008-10-15

    Magnetic dipole (M1) transitions of N=11 nuclei {sup 17}C and {sup 21}Ne are investigated by using shell model and deformed Skyrme Hartree-Fock + blocked BCS wave functions. Shell model calculations predict well observed energy spectra and magnetic dipole transitions in {sup 21}Ne, while the results are rather poor to predict these observables in {sup 17}C. In the deformed HF calculations, the ground states of the two nuclei are shown to have large prolate deformations close to {beta}{sub 2}=0.4. It is also pointed out that the first K{sup {pi}}=1/2{sup +} state in {sup 21}Ne is prolately deformed, while the first K{sup {pi}}=1/2{sup +} state in {sup 17}C is predicted to have a large oblate deformation close to the ground state in energy, We point out that the experimentally observed large hindrance of the M1 transition between I{sup {pi}}=1/2{sup +} and 3/2{sup +} in {sup 17}C can be attributed to a shape coexistence near the ground state of {sup 17}C.

  2. Pressure broadening and shift of K D1 and D2 lines in the presence of 3He and 21Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rujie; Li, Yang; Jiang, Liwei; Quan, Wei; Ding, Ming; Fang, Jiancheng

    2016-06-01

    Due to the collisions with alkali-metal atoms, the buffer gases used in spin-exchange optical pumping systems induce a broadening of spectral profiles and a shift in the resonance frequency. Here we report the pressure broadening and shift rates of K D 1 and D 2 lines in the presence of 21Ne for the first time and values for 3He have been reinvestigated by means of laser absorption spectroscopy. We have also examined the temperature dependence of these collisional effects in a range of 435-458 K. A comparison for the broadening and shift rates to those of other isotopes, 4He and 20Ne, is presented.

  3. Coulomb excitation of radioactive {sup 21}Na and its stable mirror {sup 21}Ne

    SciTech Connect

    Schumaker, M. A.; Svensson, C. E.; Demand, G. A.; Finlay, P.; Garrett, P. E.; Green, K. L.; Grinyer, G. F.; Leach, K. G.; Phillips, A. A.; Wong, J.; Cline, D.; Hayes, A. B.; Whitbeck, A.; Hackman, G.; Morton, A. C.; Pearson, C. J.; Andreyev, A.; Ball, G. C.; Buchmann, L.; Churchman, R.

    2008-10-15

    The low-energy structures of the mirror nuclei {sup 21}Ne and radioactive {sup 21}Na have been examined by using Coulomb excitation at the TRIUMF-ISAC radioactive ion beam facility. Beams of {approx}5x10{sup 6} ions/s were accelerated to 1.7 MeV/A and Coulomb excited in a 0.5 mg/cm{sup 2} {sup nat}Ti target. Scattered beam and target particles were detected by the segmented Si detector BAMBINO, while {gamma} rays were observed by using two TIGRESS HPGe clover detectors perpendicular to the beam axis. For each isobar, Coulomb excitation from the (3/2){sup +} ground state to the first excited (5/2){sup +} state was observed and B(E2) values were determined by using the 2{sup +}{yields}0{sup +} de-excitation in {sup 48}Ti as a reference. The {phi} segmentation of BAMBINO was used to deduce tentative assignments for the signs of the mixing ratios between the E2 and M1 components of the transitions. The resulting B(E2){up_arrow} values are 131{+-}9 e{sup 2} fm{sup 4} (25.4{+-}1.7 W.u.) for {sup 21}Ne and 205{+-}14 e{sup 2} fm{sup 4} (39.7{+-}2.7 W.u.) for {sup 21}Na. The fit to the present data and the known lifetimes determined E2/M1 mixing ratios and B(M1){down_arrow} values of {delta}=(-)0.0767{+-}0.0027 and 0.1274{+-}0.0025 {mu}{sub N}{sup 2} and {delta}=(+)0.0832{+-}0.0028 and 0.1513{+-}0.0017 {mu}{sub N}{sup 2} for {sup 21}Ne and {sup 21}Na, respectively (with Krane and Steffen sign convention). By using the effective charges e{sub p}=1.5e and e{sub n}=0.5e, the B(E2) values produced by the p-sd shell model are 30.7 and 36.4 W.u. for {sup 21}Ne and {sup 21}Na, respectively. This analysis resolves a significant discrepancy between a previous experimental result for {sup 21}Na and shell-model calculations.

  4. Test of Lorentz Invariance with a RB-21NE Comagnetometer at the South Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smiciklas, M. A.; Romalis, M. V.

    2014-01-01

    Atomic spin comagnetometers are among the most sensitive devices for testing Lorentz symmetry of fermions. In Princeton, we have used our rotating comagnetometer to set the most stringent limits on CPT-odd and CPT-even Lorentz violating effects in neutrons. However, gyroscopic pickup of the Earth's rotation represents a significant systematic effect limiting sensitivity. To suppress this systematic, we have installed a Rb-21Ne comagnetometer at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station with data collection being performed over the course of the austral winter.

  5. Eroding and Inflating the Atacama Desert, Chile: Insights Through Cosmogenic 10-Be, 26-Al and 21-Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimsath, A. M.; Jungers, M. C.; Amundson, R.; Balco, G.; Shuster, D. L.

    2010-12-01

    Enigmas of the Atacama Desert are as abundant as the hypotheses formulated to explain them. This fascinating and extreme landscape attracts scientists from disparate disciplines, spawning remarkable insights into the connections between climate, tectonics, biota and landscape evolution. Recent work explores such connections on timescales ranging from millions to thousands of years. Both the timing of the onset of hyperaridity in the Atacama and its relationship to the uplift of the Andes are especially well-debated topics. Similarly enigmatic, but less widely studied, are the connections between the timing of hyperaridity and the surface morphology of the region. Specifically, the extent, nature, and timing of formation for the extensive salars across the Atacama are undeniably linked to the climate history of the region. Adjacent to the extensive salars are landscapes that appear to be shaped by processes more typically associated with temperate landscapes: rilling and gullying, extensive terrace deposition, steep fault scarps, landslide deposits, and extensive fan and paleosurface deposits. Our primary goal in this project is to establish chronologies and rates for the surface processes driving landscape evolution for two field regions in the Atacama. To achieve this goal we are also testing and expanding upon the burial dating methodology (Balco and Shuster, 2009) that couples the stable cosmogenic nuclide, 21Ne, with the radiogenic nuclides, 10Be and 26Al. Here we present new results from remarkably different field settings from the north-central Atacama. The southern region, inland from Antofagasta, is relatively well studied to determine how the onset of hyperaridity impacted water-driven processes. The northern region, north of the Rio Loa and Calama, differs most notably by the enormous basin fills of salt (e.g. Salar de Llamara and Salar Grande) and evidence of more extensive recently active salars. Across both regions we use in 10Be, 26Al, and 21Ne to

  6. New test of local Lorentz invariance using a 21Ne-Rb-K comagnetometer.

    PubMed

    Smiciklas, M; Brown, J M; Cheuk, L W; Smullin, S J; Romalis, M V

    2011-10-21

    We develop a new comagnetometer using (21)Ne atoms with nuclear spin I=3/2 and Rb atoms polarized by spin exchange with K atoms to search for tensor interactions that violate local Lorentz invariance. We frequently reverse the orientation of the experiment and search for signals at the first and second harmonics of the sidereal frequency. We constrain 4 of the 5 spatial Lorentz-violating coefficients c(jk)(n) that parametrize anisotropy of the maximum attainable velocity of a neutron at a level of 10(-29), improving previous limits by 2 to 4 orders of magnitude and placing the most stringent constraint on deviations from local Lorentz invariance. © 2011 American Physical Society

  7. Isotopic Fractionation of 20Ne, 21Ne, and 22Ne in a Simulated Thermal Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jester, B.; Dominguez, G.

    2014-12-01

    Computer simulations allow for the analysis of the thermodynamic properties of systems which are difficult or impossible to do experimentally. Isotopic fractionation in thermal gradients is an example of a system which is not fully understood but could provide background for understanding variations in fractionations like those observed for noble gases in terrestrial and extraterrestrial material. Using a recently developed molecular dynamics simulation focused on the accuracy of the simulated physics, the isotopic fractionation of Neon in a thermal gradient was analyzed in order to provide a correlation between the fractionation and the experimental system's properties. Various ratios of isotopes 20Ne, 21Ne, and 22Ne were simulated in a thermal gradient ranging from 218 K to 233 K for a variety of time scales. Data was collected for various configurations including box sizes on the order of 1 nm to 100 μm. The simulated thermal conductivity was determined and compared with known values. The analysis indicates that the dimensions of the box heavily influence the magnitude of the isotopic fractionation in the thermal gradient.

  8. Morphogenetic evolution of the Têt river valley (eastern Pyrenees) using 10Be/21Ne cosmogenic burial dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartégou, Amandine; Blard, Pierre-Henri; Braucher, Régis; Bourlès, Didier L.; Calvet, Marc; Zimmermann, Laurent; Tibari, Bouchaïb; Hez, Gabriel; Gunnell, Yanni; Aumaitre, Georges; Keddadouche, Karim

    2016-04-01

    The rates and chronologies of valley incision are closely modulated by the tectonic uplift of active mountain ranges and were controlled by repeated climate changes during the Quaternary. The continental collision between the Iberian and Eurasian plates induced a double vergence orogen, the Pyrenees, which has been considered as a mature mountain range in spite of significant seismicity (e.g. Chevrot et al., 2011) and evidence of neotectonics (e.g. Goula et al., 1999). Nevertheless, recent studies indicate that the range may have never reached a steady state (Ford et al., in press). One option for resolving this controversy is to quantify the incision rates since the Miocene by reconstructing the vertical movement of geometric markers such as fluvial terraces. However, the few available ages from the Pyrenean terrace systems do not exceed the middle Pleistocene. Thus, to enlarge the time span of this dataset, we studied alluvium-filled horizontal epiphreatic passages in limestone karstic networks. Such landforms are used as substitutes of fluvial terraces because they represent former valley floors (e.g. Palmer, 2007; Audra et al., 2013). They record the transient position of former local base levels during the process of valley deepening. The Têt river valley (southern Pyrenees) was studied near the Villefranche-de-Conflent limestone gorge where 8 cave levels have been recognized over a vertical height of 600 meters. Given that 26Al/10Be cosmogenic burial dating in this setting was limited to the last ~5 Ma (Calvet et al., 2015), here we used the cosmogenic 10Be/21Ne method in order to restore a more complete chronology of valley incision (e.g. Balco & Shuster, 2009; McPhilipps et al., 2016). Burial age results for alluvial deposits from 12 caves document incision rates since the Langhian (~14 Ma). Preliminary results indicate a history of valley deepening in successive stages. The data show a regular incision rate of 70-80 mm/a from the Langhian to the Messinian

  9. Suppression of the cross-talk effect in a dual-axis K -Rb -21Ne comagnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Liwei; Quan, Wei; Li, Rujie; Duan, Lihong; Fan, Wenfeng; Wang, Zhuo; Liu, Feng; Xing, Li; Fang, Jiancheng

    2017-06-01

    A compact dual-axis K -Rb -21Ne comagnetometer with one circularly polarized pump beam and two orthogonal linearly polarized probe beams is presented. It can be exploited for rotation sensing by operating in the spin-exchange relaxation-free regime. Due to the light shift arising from the pump laser, there is a cross-talk effect between the two sensitive axes, which limits the comagnetometer applications. To eliminate this effect, an external field parallel to the direction of the pump beam is used to compensate the light-shift field. It is validated theoretically and experimentally in the dual-axis K -Rb -21Ne comagnetometer. With the cross-talk effect suppressed, the comagnetometer can carry out high-precision rotation sensing along two sensitive axes simultaneously and independently.

  10. The Search for Meterorites with Complex Exposure Histories Amoung Ordinary Chondrites with Low 3HE/21NE Ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Welton, K C; Nishiizumi, K; Caffee, M W

    2001-04-30

    In calculating cosmic-ray exposure ages of meteorites it is generally assumed that the meteoroids were expelled from a shielded position within their parent body and then experienced a single stage exposure before colliding with Earth. The combination of noble gas and radionuclide measurements in several large meteorites, such as Jilin and Bur Ghelaui, have revealed complex exposure histories: i.e. an initial exposure on the surface of an asteroid (or within meter-sized meteoroid), followed by a second exposure as a smaller object. In fact, orbital dynamics calculations predicted that at least 30% of the meteorites arriving on Earth experienced two- or multiple-stage exposure histories [1]. More recently, after the recognition that the Yarkovsky effect plays an important role in delivering meteorites from the asteroid belt to Earth-crossing orbits, it was confirmed that complex exposure histories should be common [2]. Nevertheless, despite the ability to measure a wide range of radionuclides with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), only a few meteorites with complex exposure histories have been identified [e.g. 3,4]. The question is whether the relatively paucity of complex exposure histories is real or have we simply overlooked complex-exposure histories. In this work we focus on meteorites with low {sup 3}He/{sup 21}Ne ratios, since it is known that most meteorites with complex exposure histories have relatively low {sup 3}He/{sup 21}Ne ratios, i.e. the {sup 3}He/{sup 21}Ne ratio is below the ''Bern-line''. Several hypotheses have been suggested for these low {sup 3}He/{sup 21}Ne ratios, including solar heating in low-perihelion orbits, shock-related diffusion of He during the collision that ejected the meteoroid, or an artifact of high shielding conditions [4]. The first two hypotheses seem to be supported by low radiogenic {sup 4}He concentrations in samples with low {sup 3}He, whereas Monte Carlo calculations have shown that some of the low {sup 3}He/{sup 21

  11. Landscape evolution of a bedrock peneplain on the southern Tibetan Plateau revealed by in situ-produced cosmogenic 10Be and 21Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strobl, M.; Hetzel, R.; Niedermann, S.; Ding, L.; Zhang, L.

    2012-06-01

    Low-relief bedrock surfaces that occur at high altitude are a common feature of Cenozoic mountain belts and have often been used to infer a significant amount of rock uplift after their generation at low elevation. The timescale over which such surfaces can be preserved at high elevation and the rate at which they are modified by weathering and erosion are poorly known. Here we use cosmogenic 10Be and 21Ne to quantify the landscape evolution of a bedrock peneplain in southern Tibet that occurs at an altitude of ~ 5300 m. The peneplain is developed in Cretaceous granitoids and Jurassic metasediments of the northern Lhasa block (90°E, 31°N) and originally had a minimum extent of ~ 150 km east-west and ~ 75 km north-south. It has been dissected by small rivers that generated a few hundred meters of relief and formed additional bedrock surfaces of limited extent at lower elevation. Local denudation rates for the peneplain and the lower bedrock surfaces - based on 10Be concentrations in grus samples and amalgamated quartz clasts - cluster between 5 and 11 m Ma- 1 (mean = 8.1 m Ma- 1) and are thought to be representative for the long-term rate of downwearing of these surfaces. Samples from bedrock outcrops and bedrock blocks yield more variable rates (3-20 m Ma- 1), which partly overestimate the long-term lowering rate, presumably due to block tilting and bedrock inhomogeneity. Spatially averaged 10Be denudation rates for small river catchments range from 9 to 16 m Ma- 1 (mean = 11.8 m Ma- 1) and are only slightly higher than the local denudation rates. Hence, the incision and widening of valleys proceeds at low rates, which demonstrates that the landscape of the peneplain region is remarkably stable. The combined 21Ne and 10Be data in a subset of the samples suggest that the bedrock surfaces have experienced a simple exposure history without periods of burial. Thus, our data do not provide any evidence for extended periods of shielding by ice during past glaciations

  12. Calibrating a physical model based on Geant4 to calculate cosmogenic nuclide production rates on lunar surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian; Dong, Tiekuang; Ren, Zhongzhou

    2017-04-01

    A physical model based on the open-source toolkit Geant4 for production rates of cosmogenic nuclei on the lunar surface is proposed and calibrated. The fluxes of proton and neutron beneath the lunar surface are obtained by simulating the physical processes between the cosmic-ray particles and the lunar surface material. By combining the experimental proton cross sections and the a posteriori neutron cross sections, we calculate the production rate depth profiles of long-lived nuclei (10Be, 14C, 26Al, 36Cl, and 53Mn). Through comparing experimental and theoretical data for these nuclei, we find that for all the selected nuclei, experimental and theoretical production rate depth profiles agree well with each other by introducing a single normalization factor. It means that the physical model based on Geant4 can also reproduce the depth profiles of cosmogenic nuclei, and that this model can be used by everyone worldwide. In addition, we predict the production rates of three stable nuclei (21Ne, 22Ne, and 38Ar).

  13. Intercalibration of 3He and Other Cosmogenic Nuclide Production Rates In Multiple Mineral Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farley, K. A.; Amidon, W. H.; Renne, P. R.; Simon, J. I.; Burbank, D. W.

    2007-12-01

    To extend the applicability of cosmogenic 3He dating beyond minerals restricted to mafic rocks (i.e., olivine and pyroxene), we have been assessing the suitability of 3He dating of additional minerals, e.g., zircon. A key aspect of this undertaking is the calibration of spallation production rates. Because the production rate of 3He varies from element to element in a fashion that is not yet well known, an empirical approach is necessary. Our recent work has focused on the Devil's Kitchen rhyolite, Coso Volcanic Field, SE California. This rhyolite has a 587 ka K/Ar age, which will be verified with a new 40Ar/39Ar age on sanidine. The attraction of this rhyolite is its extraordinary mineral assemblage arising from both the rhyolite itself and abundant mafic inclusions. From two individual rocks we obtained separates and measured 3He in the following minerals: olivine, clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene, garnet, zircon, apatite, hornblende, and ilmenite. In addition we intend to measure 21Ne in quartz and sanidine, 38Ar in sanidine, and 10Be and 26Al in quartz. We sampled two surfaces: one with tension gashes documenting an original flow surface, and a protruding rock fin. The sample with primary surface morphology is apparently uneroded, but preliminary 3He analyses of olivine suggest the surface has been buried for a substantial part of its history. Olivine 3He analyses from the fin indicate exposure ages consistent with the eruption age, so this sample may allow absolute calibration of production rates. In either case we can use these samples to inter-calibrate production rates in a large number of minerals using multiple cosmogenic isotopes.

  14. NPP ATMS Snowfall Rate Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, Huan; Ferraro, Ralph; Kongoli, Cezar; Wang, Nai-Yu; Dong, Jun; Zavodsky, Bradley; Yan, Banghua

    2015-01-01

    Passive microwave measurements at certain high frequencies are sensitive to the scattering effect of snow particles and can be utilized to retrieve snowfall properties. Some of the microwave sensors with snowfall sensitive channels are Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) and Advance Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS). ATMS is the follow-on sensor to AMSU and MHS. Currently, an AMSU and MHS based land snowfall rate (SFR) product is running operationally at NOAA/NESDIS. Based on the AMSU/MHS SFR, an ATMS SFR algorithm has been developed recently. The algorithm performs retrieval in three steps: snowfall detection, retrieval of cloud properties, and estimation of snow particle terminal velocity and snowfall rate. The snowfall detection component utilizes principal component analysis and a logistic regression model. The model employs a combination of temperature and water vapor sounding channels to detect the scattering signal from falling snow and derive the probability of snowfall (Kongoli et al., 2015). In addition, a set of NWP model based filters is also employed to improve the accuracy of snowfall detection. Cloud properties are retrieved using an inversion method with an iteration algorithm and a two-stream radiative transfer model (Yan et al., 2008). A method developed by Heymsfield and Westbrook (2010) is adopted to calculate snow particle terminal velocity. Finally, snowfall rate is computed by numerically solving a complex integral. NCEP CMORPH analysis has shown that integration of ATMS SFR has improved the performance of CMORPH-Snow. The ATMS SFR product is also being assessed at several NWS Weather Forecast Offices for its usefulness in weather forecast.

  15. 21Ne, 10Be and 26Al cosmogenic burial ages of near-surface eolian sand from the Packard Dune field, McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, David; Augustinus, Paul; Rhodes, Ed; Bristow, Charles; Balco, Greg

    2015-04-01

    The McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, have been ice-free for at least 10 Ma. In Victoria Valley, the largest of the Dry Valleys, permafrosted yet still actively migrating dune-fields, occupy an area of ~8 km2 with dune thicknesses varying from ~5 to 70 meters. High-resolution ground penetrating radar (GPR) imaging of selected dunes reveal numerous unconformities and complex stratigraphy inferring cycles of sand accretion and deflation from westerly katabatic winter winds sourced from the East Antarctic Ice Sheet and anabatic summer winds sourced from the Ross Sea. Samples above permafrost depth were taken for OSL and cosmogenic 26Al/10Be burial ages. OSL ages from shallow (<1m) pits range from modern to ~1.3ka suggesting that deposition/reworking of the dunes is on-going and their present configuration is a late Holocene feature. The same 7 samples gave a mean 26Al/10Be = 4.53 +/- 5% with an average apparent continuous 10Be surface exposure age of 525 +/- 25 ka surprisingly indicating a common pre-history independent of depth. Correcting for minor post-burial production based on OSL ages, the minimum (integrated) burial period for these sand grains is 0.51+/- 0.12 Ma which represents the burial age at the time of arrival at the dune. A possible explanation is that this common burial signal reflects recycling episodes of exposure, deposition, burial and deflation, sufficiently frequent to move all grains towards a common pre-dune deposition history. However, it is unclear over what length of time this processes has been active and fraction of time the sand has been buried. Consequently we also analysed purified quartz aliquots of the same samples for a third and stable nuclide, 21Ne, to determine the total surface and burial exposure periods. Using the 21Ne/10Be system we obtain burial ages of 1.10 +/- 0.10 Ma. Further coring below permafrost is planned for austral summer 2015.

  16. 30 CFR 250.1632 - Production rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Production rates. 250.1632 Section 250.1632 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... § 250.1632 Production rates. Each sulphur deposit shall be produced at rates that will provide...

  17. Spin exchange broadening of magnetic resonance lines in a high-sensitivity rotating K-Rb-(21)Ne co-magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao; Quan, Wei; Zou, Sheng; Lu, Yan; Duan, Lihong; Li, Yang; Zhang, Hong; Ding, Ming; Fang, Jiancheng

    2016-11-10

    Atomic co-magnetometers can be utilized for high-precision angular velocity sensing or fundamental physics tests. The sensitivity of a co-magnetometer determines the angle random walk of an angular velocity sensor and the detection limit for a fundamental physics test. A high-sensitivity K-Rb-(21)Ne co-magnetometer, which is utilized for angular velocity sensing, is presented in this paper. A new type of spin relaxation of Rb atom spins, which can broaden the zero-field magnetic resonance lines of the co-magnetometer, is discovered. Further studies show that the spin relaxation of Rb atoms is caused by a high Rb electron magnetization field. With this discovery, the total relaxation rate of Rb atoms is optimized to improve the sensitivity of the co-magnetometer. Moreover, its sensitivity is optimized by suppressing various noises. Especially, to suppress laser-related noises, the co-magnetometer is designed such that the sensitive axis of the co-magnetometer can be fixed to the direction in which the projection input of the earth's rotation is 0. This is called a rotating co-magnetometer. A magnetic field sensitivity of 1.0 fT/Hz(-1/2)@5 Hz, which is equal to an angular velocity sensitivity of 2.1 × 10(-8) rad s(-1) Hz(-1/2)@5 Hz, is demonstrated using a spherical vapour cell with a diameter of 14 mm.

  18. Spin exchange broadening of magnetic resonance lines in a high-sensitivity rotating K-Rb-21Ne co-magnetometer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yao; Quan, Wei; Zou, Sheng; Lu, Yan; Duan, Lihong; Li, Yang; Zhang, Hong; Ding, Ming; Fang, Jiancheng

    2016-01-01

    Atomic co-magnetometers can be utilized for high-precision angular velocity sensing or fundamental physics tests. The sensitivity of a co-magnetometer determines the angle random walk of an angular velocity sensor and the detection limit for a fundamental physics test. A high-sensitivity K-Rb-21Ne co-magnetometer, which is utilized for angular velocity sensing, is presented in this paper. A new type of spin relaxation of Rb atom spins, which can broaden the zero-field magnetic resonance lines of the co-magnetometer, is discovered. Further studies show that the spin relaxation of Rb atoms is caused by a high Rb electron magnetization field. With this discovery, the total relaxation rate of Rb atoms is optimized to improve the sensitivity of the co-magnetometer. Moreover, its sensitivity is optimized by suppressing various noises. Especially, to suppress laser-related noises, the co-magnetometer is designed such that the sensitive axis of the co-magnetometer can be fixed to the direction in which the projection input of the earth’s rotation is 0. This is called a rotating co-magnetometer. A magnetic field sensitivity of 1.0 fT/Hz−1/2@5 Hz, which is equal to an angular velocity sensitivity of 2.1 × 10−8 rad s−1 Hz−1/2@5 Hz, is demonstrated using a spherical vapour cell with a diameter of 14 mm. PMID:27830744

  19. Spin exchange broadening of magnetic resonance lines in a high-sensitivity rotating K-Rb-21Ne co-magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yao; Quan, Wei; Zou, Sheng; Lu, Yan; Duan, Lihong; Li, Yang; Zhang, Hong; Ding, Ming; Fang, Jiancheng

    2016-11-01

    Atomic co-magnetometers can be utilized for high-precision angular velocity sensing or fundamental physics tests. The sensitivity of a co-magnetometer determines the angle random walk of an angular velocity sensor and the detection limit for a fundamental physics test. A high-sensitivity K-Rb-21Ne co-magnetometer, which is utilized for angular velocity sensing, is presented in this paper. A new type of spin relaxation of Rb atom spins, which can broaden the zero-field magnetic resonance lines of the co-magnetometer, is discovered. Further studies show that the spin relaxation of Rb atoms is caused by a high Rb electron magnetization field. With this discovery, the total relaxation rate of Rb atoms is optimized to improve the sensitivity of the co-magnetometer. Moreover, its sensitivity is optimized by suppressing various noises. Especially, to suppress laser-related noises, the co-magnetometer is designed such that the sensitive axis of the co-magnetometer can be fixed to the direction in which the projection input of the earth’s rotation is 0. This is called a rotating co-magnetometer. A magnetic field sensitivity of 1.0 fT/Hz‑1/2@5 Hz, which is equal to an angular velocity sensitivity of 2.1 × 10‑8 rad s‑1 Hz‑1/2@5 Hz, is demonstrated using a spherical vapour cell with a diameter of 14 mm.

  20. Cosmogenic Noble Gases and Their Production Rates in Eucrites, Diogenites, and Howardites: Common Asteroid Break-up Events 38 Ma, 21 Ma, and 6 MA Ago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eugster, O.; Michel, Th.

    1993-07-01

    It is likely that the eucrites and their associates, the howardites and diogenites, sample the surface and shallow interior of a single parent body, possibly 4 Vesta (cf. [1] and [2]). A break-up event that reaches deep enough may, thus, eject asteroidal fragments representing meteorites from all three classes. In this work we present a comprehensive investigation of the exposure age clusters for howardites, eucrites, and diogenites (HEDs). Cosmic-ray exposure ages critically depend on the production rates for cosmic-ray produced nuclei. For eucrites shielding independent production rates for ^21Ne and ^38Ar have been determined previously [3,4]. We now present production rates of ^3He, ^21Ne, ^33Ar, ^78Kr, ^83Kr, and ^126Xe for eucrites, howardites, and diogenites as a function of shielding, where appropriate, and of target element abundances as derived on the basis of ^81Kr-Kr ages. E.g., for ^21Ne we obtain: P(sub)21 (EUC) = 8.43 P^1(sub)21 [16.1 (^22Ne/^21Ne)(sub)c - 10.3]^-1, P(sub)21 (HOW) = 6.16 P^1(sub)21 [18.1 (^22Ne/^21Ne)(sub)c - 14.1]^-1, P(sub)21 (DIO) = 4.81 P^1(sub)21 [25.7 (^22Ne/^21Ne)(sub)c - 23.7]^-1, where P^1(sub)21 = 1.63 [Mg] + 0.6 [Al] + 0.32 [Si] + 0.22 [S] + 0.07 [Ca] + 0.021 [Fe + Ni] as given by [3]. (Elemental abundance [x] in weight %, P(sub)21 in 10^10 cm^3 STP/g, Ma). Average cosmic-ray exposure ages were derived from as many nuclei as possible for 14 HEDs analyzed by us (see also [5,6]) and for those compiled by [7]. Two major exposure age clusters at 21 and 38 Ma are represented in all three meteorite classes (Fig. 1). In the cluster at 21 +- 4 Ma are 12 out of 39 eucrites, 6 out of 14 howardites, and 7out of 12 diogenites. In the cluster at 38 +- 8 Ma are 6 eucrites, 5 howardites, and 4 diogenites. A third common break-up event at 5 +- 1 Ma is indicated by the remaining diogenite, three eucrites, and one howardite. Schultz [8] found major clusters for eucrites at 13, 21, 26, and 40 Ma for howardites around 10 and 24 Ma, and for

  1. 30 CFR 250.1632 - Production rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Production rates. 250.1632 Section 250.1632 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Sulphur Operations § 250.1632 Production rates. Each...

  2. Effect of seeding rate on organic production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Increased demand for organic rice (Oryza sativa L.) has incentivized producer conversion from conventional to organically-managed rice production in the U.S. Little is known on the impacts of seeding rate on organic rice production. A completely randomized factorial design with four replications was...

  3. 30 CFR 250.1632 - Production rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Sulphur Operations § 250.1632 Production rates. Each sulphur deposit shall be produced at rates that will provide economic development and depletion of the deposit in a manner that would maximize the ultimate recovery of sulphur without resulting...

  4. 30 CFR 250.1632 - Production rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Sulphur Operations § 250.1632 Production rates. Each sulphur deposit shall be produced at rates that will provide economic development and depletion of the deposit in a manner that would maximize the ultimate recovery of sulphur without resulting...

  5. 30 CFR 250.1632 - Production rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Sulphur Operations § 250.1632 Production rates. Each sulphur deposit shall be produced at rates that will provide economic development and depletion of the deposit in a manner that would maximize the ultimate recovery of sulphur without resulting...

  6. Rate of nova production in the Galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Liller, W.; Mayer, B.

    1987-07-01

    The ongoing PROBLICOM program in the Southern Hemisphere now makes it possible to derive a reliable value for the overall production rate of Galactic novae. The results, 73 + or - 24/y, indicates that the Galaxy outproduces M 31 by a factor of two or three. It is estimated that the rate of supernova ejecta is one and a half orders of magnitude greater than that of novae in the Galaxy. 15 references.

  7. MASCOT: a new mass-spectrometer facility dedicated to the analysis of cosmogenic noble gases (3He and 21Ne) from terrestrial samples (Institute of Geological Sciences - University of Bern, Switzerland).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delunel, Romain; Enderli, Patrick; Jenni, Hans-Erich; Leya, Ingo; Schlunegger, Fritz

    2017-04-01

    In the past years, terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides have been successfully used for dating exposure history of landforms and measuring erosional processes on Earth's surface. In this context, quantifications of landscape change have mainly been accomplished through the use of radioactive cosmogenic nuclides such as 10Be and 26Al, but their application has generally been restricted to Quaternary time scales because of their relatively short half-lives. The results are 10Be and 26Al concentrations that are below the detection limit of available accelerator mass spectrometers if the samples have a Late Miocene or even a Pliocene age. Contrariwise, cosmogenic noble gases such as 3He and 21Ne do not experience any radioactive decay through time, which places these isotopes in an unbeatable position for measuring paleo-denudation rates preserved in detrital material even if the ages of these deposits are up to 10 Ma and even older. These isotopes are thus keys for assessing the interplays between tectonic, climate and surface processes involved in the long-term evolution of mountain belts. Here we report the technical specifications of a noble gas analytical system that we have developed and set up at the Institute of Geological Sciences of the University of Bern, Switzerland, with the motivations to get dates and rates of erosion processes from the measurement of cosmogenic noble gases (3He and 21Ne) concentrations from terrestrial samples. This new facility, hosted at the Institute of Geological Sciences of the University of Bern, combines a MAP215-50 mass spectrometer fitted with a new high-sensitivity channel electron multiplier with an all-metal extraction and purification line. This later system thus comprises: (i) a double vacuum resistance furnace loaded by a 22-samples carrousel, (ii) three in-vacuo crushers (iii) an ultra high vacuum pumping system (<10-8 mbar) composed of turbo-molecular, ion-getter pumps and backed by a scroll pump, (iv) the line itself made

  8. Towards a Model for Protein Production Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, J. J.; Schmittmann, B.; Zia, R. K. P.

    2007-07-01

    In the process of translation, ribosomes read the genetic code on an mRNA and assemble the corresponding polypeptide chain. The ribosomes perform discrete directed motion which is well modeled by a totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP) with open boundaries. Using Monte Carlo simulations and a simple mean-field theory, we discuss the effect of one or two "bottlenecks" (i.e., slow codons) on the production rate of the final protein. Confirming and extending previous work by Chou and Lakatos, we find that the location and spacing of the slow codons can affect the production rate quite dramatically. In particular, we observe a novel "edge" effect, i.e., an interaction of a single slow codon with the system boundary. We focus in detail on ribosome density profiles and provide a simple explanation for the length scale which controls the range of these interactions.

  9. ATMS Snowfall Rate Product and Its Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, H.; Kongoli, C.; Dong, J.; Wang, N. Y.; Ferraro, R. R.; Zavodsky, B.; Banghua Yan, B.

    2015-12-01

    A snowfall rate (SFR) algorithm has been developed for the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) aboard S-NPP and future JPSS satellites. The product is based on the NOAA/NESDIS operational Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) SFR but with several key advancements. The algorithm has benefited from continuous development to improve accuracy and snowfall detection efficiency. The enhancements also expand the applicable temperature range for the algorithm and allow significantly more snowfall to be detected than the operational SFR. Another major improvement is the drastically reduced product latency by using Direct Broadcast (DB) data. The new developments have also been implemented in the MHS SFR to ensure product consistency across satellites. Currently, there are five satellites that carry either ATMS or MHS: S-NPP, NOAA-18/-19 and Metop-A/-B. The combined satellites deliver up to ten SFR estimates a day at any location over land in mid-latitudes. The product provides much needed winter precipitation estimates for applications such as weather forecasting and hydrology. Both ATMS and MHS SFR serve as input to a global precipitation analysis product, the NOAA/NCEP CMORPH-Snow. SFR is the sole satellite-based snowfall estimates in the blended product. In addition, ATMS and MHS SFR was assessed at several NWS Weather Forecast Offices (WFOs) and NESDIS/Satellite Analysis Branch (SAB) for its operational values in winter 2015. This is a joint effort among NASA/SPoRT, NOAA/NESDIS, University of Maryland/CICS, and the WFOs. The feedback from the assessment indicated that SFR provides useful information for snowfall forecast. It is especially valuable for areas with poor radar coverage and ground observations. The feedback also identified some limitations of the product such as inadequate detection of shallow snowfall. The algorithm developers will continue to improve product quality as well as developing SFR for new microwave sensors and over ocean in a project

  10. Maximum entropy production rate in quantum thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beretta, Gian Paolo

    2010-06-01

    In the framework of the recent quest for well-behaved nonlinear extensions of the traditional Schrödinger-von Neumann unitary dynamics that could provide fundamental explanations of recent experimental evidence of loss of quantum coherence at the microscopic level, a recent paper [Gheorghiu-Svirschevski 2001 Phys. Rev. A 63 054102] reproposes the nonlinear equation of motion proposed by the present author [see Beretta G P 1987 Found. Phys. 17 365 and references therein] for quantum (thermo)dynamics of a single isolated indivisible constituent system, such as a single particle, qubit, qudit, spin or atomic system, or a Bose-Einstein or Fermi-Dirac field. As already proved, such nonlinear dynamics entails a fundamental unifying microscopic proof and extension of Onsager's reciprocity and Callen's fluctuation-dissipation relations to all nonequilibrium states, close and far from thermodynamic equilibrium. In this paper we propose a brief but self-contained review of the main results already proved, including the explicit geometrical construction of the equation of motion from the steepest-entropy-ascent ansatz and its exact mathematical and conceptual equivalence with the maximal-entropy-generation variational-principle formulation presented in Gheorghiu-Svirschevski S 2001 Phys. Rev. A 63 022105. Moreover, we show how it can be extended to the case of a composite system to obtain the general form of the equation of motion, consistent with the demanding requirements of strong separability and of compatibility with general thermodynamics principles. The irreversible term in the equation of motion describes the spontaneous attraction of the state operator in the direction of steepest entropy ascent, thus implementing the maximum entropy production principle in quantum theory. The time rate at which the path of steepest entropy ascent is followed has so far been left unspecified. As a step towards the identification of such rate, here we propose a possible, well

  11. Chipping and grinding production rate calculator

    Treesearch

    Mathew. Smidt; Dana Mitchell

    2014-01-01

    The data for individual chipper and grinder production estimates were recorded with all the attributes available. If a study provided more than one production estimate and there was sufficient detail to describe each estimate, we entered multiple production estimates.

  12. The cosmogenic record of mountain erosion transmitted across a foreland basin: Source-to-sink analysis of in situ10Be, 26Al and 21Ne in sediment of the Po river catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, Hella; Malusà, Marco G.; Resentini, Alberto; Garzanti, Eduardo; Niedermann, Samuel

    2016-10-01

    We analyze the source-to-sink variations of in situ10Be, 26Al and 21Ne concentrations in modern sediment of the Po river catchment, from Alpine, Apennine, floodplain, and delta samples, in order to investigate how the cosmogenic record of orogenic erosion is transmitted across a fast-subsiding foreland basin. The in situ10Be concentrations in the analyzed samples range from ∼ 0.8 ×104 at /gQTZ to ∼ 6.5 ×104 at /gQTZ. The 10Be-derived denudation rates range from 0.1 to 1.5 mm/yr in the Alpine source areas and from 0.3 to 0.5 mm/yr in the Apenninic source areas. The highest 10Be-derived denudation rates are found in the western Central Alps (1.5 mm/yr). From these data, we constrain a sediment flux leaving the Alpine and the Apenninic source areas (>27 Mt/yr and ca. 5 Mt/yr, respectively) that is notably higher than the estimates of sediment export provided by gauging (∼10 Mt/yr at the Po delta). We observe a high variability in 10Be concentrations and 10Be-derived denudation rates in the source areas. In the Po Plain, little variability is observed, and at the same time, the area-weighed 10Be concentration of (2.29 ± 1.57) ×104 at /gQTZ (±1 SD of the dataset) from both the Alps and the Apennines is poorly modified (by tributary input) in sediment of the Po Plain ((2.68 ± 0.78 , ± 1 SD) ×104 at /gQTZ). The buffering effect of the Po floodplain largely removes scatter in 10Be signals. We test for several potential perturbations of the cosmogenic nuclide record during source to sink transfer in the Po basin. We find that sediment trapping in deep glacial lakes or behind dams does not significantly change the 10Be-mountain record. For example, similar 10Be concentrations are measured upstream and downstream of the postglacial Lake Maggiore, suggesting that denudation rates prior to lake formation were similar to today's. On the scale of the entire basin, the 10Be concentration of basins with major dams is similar to those without major dams. A potential

  13. Krypton Production Cross Sections and Production Rates in Simulation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilabert, E.; Lavielle, B.; Schiekel, Th.; Herpers, U.; Neumann, S.; Michel, R.

    1995-09-01

    The stacked-foil technique was used to measured proton induced excitation functions from Sr targets (SrF2). The irradiations were performed at the Laboratoire National Saturne in Saclay (F), the Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala (S) and the Paul Scherrer Institute in Villigen (CH) with primary energies from 45 to 400 MeV. After gamma-spectrometric measurement of short and medium-lived radionuclides and after sufficient cooling, stable and long lived Kr isotopes were measured at Centre Etude Nucleaire in Bordeaux (F). Deduced cross sections were corrected for the production of secondary protons and neutrons by a method developed by Lupke[1]. There are no literature data which can be compared with the cross sections from this work. Theoretical calculations of cross sections were performed using two approaches. The first one was using the hybrid model of preequilibrium reactions with the code AREL[2]. The second was using the Intra-Nuclear-Cascade/Evaporation model in the form of the High Energy Transport Code (HETC)[3]. This study shows that for energies above 200 MeV, the spallation model is better suited to explain the nuclear reactions whereas the preequilibrium model leads to underestimation of the experimental data. For energies above 200 MeV, HETC should be preferred to AREL calculations. In physical models describing galactic cosmic ray (GCR) interactions with matter [4], cross sections of both, proton and neutron-induced reactions, are important parameters. Using the measured cross sections for proton-induced reactions from this work and the experimental Kr depth profiles obtained from Sr targets in the LNS172 simulation experiment [5], we established a set of excitation functions for neutron-induced reactions, which now excellently describes the production rate depth profiles from the simulation experiment. Before measuring experimental cross sections for Kr from Sr, the theoretical depth profiles calculated with pure theoretical excitation functions showed

  14. Estimating Virus Production Rates in Aquatic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Matteson, Audrey R.; Budinoff, Charles R.; Campbell, Claire E.; Buchan, Alison; Wilhelm, Steven W.

    2010-01-01

    Viruses are pervasive components of marine and freshwater systems, and are known to be significant agents of microbial mortality. Developing quantitative estimates of this process is critical as we can then develop better models of microbial community structure and function as well as advance our understanding of how viruses work to alter aquatic biogeochemical cycles. The virus reduction technique allows researchers to estimate the rate at which virus particles are released from the endemic microbial community. In brief, the abundance of free (extracellular) viruses is reduced in a sample while the microbial community is maintained at near ambient concentration. The microbial community is then incubated in the absence of free viruses and the rate at which viruses reoccur in the sample (through the lysis of already infected members of the community) can be quantified by epifluorescence microscopy or, in the case of specific viruses, quantitative PCR. These rates can then be used to estimate the rate of microbial mortality due to virus-mediated cell lysis. PMID:20972392

  15. An ETAS model with varying productivity rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harte, D. S.

    2014-07-01

    We present an epidemic type aftershock sequenc (ETAS) model where the offspring rates vary both spatially and temporally. This is achieved by distinguishing between those space-time volumes where the interpoint space and time distances are small, and those where they are considerably larger. We also question the nature of the background component in the ETAS model. Is it simply a temporal boundary correction (t = 0) or does it represent an additional tectonic process not described by the aftershock component? The form of these stochastic models should not be considered to be fixed. As we accumulate larger and better earthquake catalogues, GPS data, strain rates, etc., we have the ability to ask more complex questions about the nature of the process. By fitting modified models consistent with such questions, we should gain a better insight into the earthquake process. Hence, we consider a sequence of incrementally modified ETAS type models rather than `the' ETAS model.

  16. The global joule heat production rate and the AE index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, S.; Ahn, B.-H.; Akasofu, S.-I.

    1985-01-01

    The degree of accuracy with which the AE index may be used as a measure of the joule heat production rate is evaluated for a typical substorm event on March 18, 1978, by estimating the global joule heat production rate as a function of time on the basis of data obtained from the IMS's six meridian chains. It is found that, although the AE index is statistically linearly related to the global joule heat production rate, caution is required when one assumes that details of AE index time variations during individual events are representative of those of the joule heat production rate.

  17. Radiolytic hydrogen production from process vessels in HB line - production rates compared to evolution rates and discussion of LASL reviews

    SciTech Connect

    Bibler, N.E.

    1992-11-12

    Hydrogen production from radiolysis of aqueous solutions can create a safety hazard since hydrogen is flammable. At times this production can be significant, especially in HB line where nitric acid solutions containing high concentrations of Pu-238, an intense alpha emitter, are processed. The hydrogen production rates from these solutions are necessary for safety analyses of these process systems. The methods and conclusions of hydrogen production rate tests are provided in this report.

  18. Graduation Rates and Accountability: Regressions versus Production Frontiers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archibald, Robert B.; Feldman, David H.

    2008-01-01

    This paper suggests an alternative to the standard practice of measuring the graduation rate performance using regression analysis. The alternative is production frontier analysis. Production frontier analysis is appealing because it compares an institution's graduation rate to the best performance instead of the average performance. The paper…

  19. Graduation Rates and Accountability: Regressions versus Production Frontiers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archibald, Robert B.; Feldman, David H.

    2008-01-01

    This paper suggests an alternative to the standard practice of measuring the graduation rate performance using regression analysis. The alternative is production frontier analysis. Production frontier analysis is appealing because it compares an institution's graduation rate to the best performance instead of the average performance. The paper…

  20. Production rates for crews using hand tools on firelines

    Treesearch

    Lisa Haven; T. Parkin Hunter; Theodore G. Storey

    1982-01-01

    Reported rates at which hand crews construct firelines can vary widely because of differences in fuels, fire and measurement conditions, and fuel resistance-to-control classification schemes. Real-time fire dispatching and fire simulation planning models, however, require accurate estimates of hand crew productivity. Errors in estimating rate of fireline production...

  1. Regulation of primary productivity rate in the equatorial Pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, R.T. ); Chavez, F.P. )

    1991-12-01

    Analysis of the Chl-specific rate of primary productivity (P{sup B}) as a function of subsurface nutrient concentration at >300 equatorial stations provides an answer to the question: What processes regulate primary productivity rate in the high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll waters of the equatorial Pacific In the western Pacific where there is a gradient in 60-m (NO{sub 3}) from 0 to {approximately}12 {mu}M, the productivity rate is a linear function of nutrient concentration; in the eastern Pacific where the gradient is from 12 to 28 {mu}M, the productivity rate is independent of nutrient concentration and limited to {approximately}36 mg C(mg Chl){sup {minus}1} d{sup {minus}1}, or a mean euphotic zone C-specific growth rate ({mu}) of 0.47 d{sup {minus}1}. However, rates downstream of the Galapagos Islands are not limited; they are 46.4 mg C(mg Chl){sup {minus}1} d{sup {minus}1} and {mu} = 0.57 d{sup {minus}1}, very close to the predicted nutrient-regulated rates in the absence of other limitation. This pattern of rate regulation can be accounted for by a combination of eolian Fe, subsurface nutrients, and sedimentary Fe derived from the Galapagos platform. In the low-nutrient western Pacific the eolian supply of Fe is adequate to allow productivity rate to be set by subsurface nutrient concentration. In the nutrient-rich easter equatorial region eolian Fe is inadequate to support productivity rates proportional to the higher nutrient concentrations, so in this region eolian Fe is rate limiting. Around the Galapagos Islands productivity rates reach levels consistent with nutrient concentrations; sedimentary Fe from the Galapagos platform seems adequate to support increased nutrient-regulated productivity rates in this region.

  2. Black Hole Production Rates at the LHC: Still Large

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2001-11-19

    We examine the rates for the production of black holes(BH) at the LHC in light of the exponential suppression of the geometric cross section estimate proposed by Voloshin. We show that these rates will still be quite large over a reasonable range of model parameters. While BH production may not be the dominant process, its unique signature will ensure observability over conventional backgrounds.

  3. Stocking rate effects in a tilapia biofloc production system

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Production efficiency is improved when the culture organism can grow rapidly to the desired target weight. Stocking rate is known to affect fish growth, but little information is available for tilapia grown in a biofloc technology (BFT) production system. The objective of this study was to quantify ...

  4. Mapping {sup 15}O Production Rate for Proton Therapy Verification

    SciTech Connect

    Grogg, Kira; Alpert, Nathaniel M.; Zhu, Xuping; Min, Chul Hee; Testa, Mauro; Winey, Brian; Normandin, Marc D.; Shih, Helen A.; Paganetti, Harald; Bortfeld, Thomas; El Fakhri, Georges

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: This work was a proof-of-principle study for the evaluation of oxygen-15 ({sup 15}O) production as an imaging target through the use of positron emission tomography (PET), to improve verification of proton treatment plans and to study the effects of perfusion. Methods and Materials: Dynamic PET measurements of irradiation-produced isotopes were made for a phantom and rabbit thigh muscles. The rabbit muscle was irradiated and imaged under both live and dead conditions. A differential equation was fitted to phantom and in vivo data, yielding estimates of {sup 15}O production and clearance rates, which were compared to live versus dead rates for the rabbit and to Monte Carlo predictions. Results: PET clearance rates agreed with decay constants of the dominant radionuclide species in 3 different phantom materials. In 2 oxygen-rich materials, the ratio of {sup 15}O production rates agreed with the expected ratio. In the dead rabbit thighs, the dynamic PET concentration histories were accurately described using {sup 15}O decay constant, whereas the live thigh activity decayed faster. Most importantly, the {sup 15}O production rates agreed within 2% (P>.5) between conditions. Conclusions: We developed a new method for quantitative measurement of {sup 15}O production and clearance rates in the period immediately following proton therapy. Measurements in the phantom and rabbits were well described in terms of {sup 15}O production and clearance rates, plus a correction for other isotopes. These proof-of-principle results support the feasibility of detailed verification of proton therapy treatment delivery. In addition, {sup 15}O clearance rates may be useful in monitoring permeability changes due to therapy.

  5. Mapping (15)O production rate for proton therapy verification.

    PubMed

    Grogg, Kira; Alpert, Nathaniel M; Zhu, Xuping; Min, Chul Hee; Testa, Mauro; Winey, Brian; Normandin, Marc D; Shih, Helen A; Paganetti, Harald; Bortfeld, Thomas; El Fakhri, Georges

    2015-06-01

    This work was a proof-of-principle study for the evaluation of oxygen-15 ((15)O) production as an imaging target through the use of positron emission tomography (PET), to improve verification of proton treatment plans and to study the effects of perfusion. Dynamic PET measurements of irradiation-produced isotopes were made for a phantom and rabbit thigh muscles. The rabbit muscle was irradiated and imaged under both live and dead conditions. A differential equation was fitted to phantom and in vivo data, yielding estimates of (15)O production and clearance rates, which were compared to live versus dead rates for the rabbit and to Monte Carlo predictions. PET clearance rates agreed with decay constants of the dominant radionuclide species in 3 different phantom materials. In 2 oxygen-rich materials, the ratio of (15)O production rates agreed with the expected ratio. In the dead rabbit thighs, the dynamic PET concentration histories were accurately described using (15)O decay constant, whereas the live thigh activity decayed faster. Most importantly, the (15)O production rates agreed within 2% (P>.5) between conditions. We developed a new method for quantitative measurement of (15)O production and clearance rates in the period immediately following proton therapy. Measurements in the phantom and rabbits were well described in terms of (15)O production and clearance rates, plus a correction for other isotopes. These proof-of-principle results support the feasibility of detailed verification of proton therapy treatment delivery. In addition, (15)O clearance rates may be useful in monitoring permeability changes due to therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Oxygen transfer and uptake rates during xanthan gum production.

    PubMed

    García-Ochoa; Castro; Santos

    2000-11-15

    Oxygen uptake rate and oxygen mass transfer rate have been studied during xanthan gum production process in stirred tank bioreactor. Empirical equations for the oxygen mass transfer coefficient have been obtained taking into account several variables such as air flow rate, stirrer speed and apparent viscosity. Oxygen uptake rate evolution in the course fermentation has been measured, obtaining an equation as a function of biomass concentration, including overall growth and non growth-associated oxygen uptake. A metabolic kinetic model has been employed for xanthan gum production description including oxygen mass transfer and uptake rates. The results point out that this model is able to describe adequately not only oxygen dissolved evolution, but also of the production of xanthan and substrate consumption. Also, the influence of several parameters (k(L)a, air flow rate and dissolved oxygen) in the evolution of the key compounds of the system have been studied. The results of the simulation shown that an increasing of dissolved oxygen concentration favor the xanthan gum production.

  7. The effect of direct positron production on relativistic feedback rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodopiyanov, I. B.; Dwyer, J. R.; Lucia, R. J.; Cramer, E. S.; Arabshahi, S.; Rassoul, H.

    2013-12-01

    Relativistic feedback produces a self-sustaining runaway electron discharge via the production of backward propagating positrons and back-scattered x-rays. To date, only positrons created from pair-production by gamma-rays interacting with the air have been considered. In contrast, direct pair-production involves the creation of electron-positron pairs directly from the interaction of energetic runaway electrons with nuclei, and so it does not require the generation of bremsstrahlung gamma-rays. For high electric fields, where the runaway electron avalanche length scales are short, pair-production involving bremsstrahlung gamma-rays makes a smaller contribution to the total relativistic feedback rates than at lower fields, since both the bremsstrahlung interaction and the pair-production need to occur over a short length. On the other hand, for high fields, because direct positron production only involves one interaction, it may make a significant contribution to relativistic feedback rates in some cases. In this poster, we shall present the direct positron production cross-sections and calculate the effects on the relativistic feedback rates due to this process.

  8. Refinement of the Air Force Systems Command Production Rate Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    the recommended modified formulations. The relationship between production rate and production ratio has a definite influence on the model’s ability to...1984 7 36 21.954 370.00 1985 8 48 21.017 412.00 A- 3 Table A.2.8 F-15E Cost/Quantity Data Fiscal Year Lot Quntit Recurring Unit Cost LPP 1986 1 60

  9. Predicting the production rates of cosmogenic nuclides in extraterrestrial matter

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    The production rates of nuclides made by the galactic and solar cosmic rays are important in the interpretations of measurements made with lunar samples, meteorites, and cosmic spherules. Production rates of cosmogenic nuclides have been predicted by a variety of methods that are reviewed in this paper, ranging from systematic studies of one or a group of meteorites to purely theoretical calculations. Production rates can vary with the chemical composition and the preatmospheric depth of the sample and with the size and shape of the object. While the production systematics for cosmogenic nuclides are fairly well known, our ability to predict their production rates can be improved, with a corresponding increase in the scientific return. Additional detailed studies of cosmogenic nuclides in extraterrestrial objects are needed, especially for fairly small and very large objects. Nuclides made in simulation experiments and cross sections for many major nuclear reactions should be measured. Such studies are especially needed for the long-lived radionuclides that have only recently become readily measurable by accelerator mass spectrometry. 34 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Cosmogenic Chlorine-36 Global Production Rate Parameter Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrero, S.; Borchers, B.; Phillips, F. M.; Aumer, R.; Stone, J.

    2010-12-01

    As part of the CRONUS-Earth project, geological calibrations of in-situ production rates of cosmogenic nuclides, including chlorine-36, are being conducted as part of a larger project to improve the accuracy of techniques employing cosmogenic nuclides. Previous chlorine-36 production rate calibrations have been particularly difficult, likely due to the multiple production pathways. We are performing a step-wise calibration in order to specifically address the uncertainties and problems in previous studies. The low-energy neutrons will be constrained first using a depth profile analysis and then the spallation rates will be calibrated using surface and depth profile samples from five additional sites. This study will produce production rate parameters for each of the main spallation reactions (K, Ca) as well as the production by low-energy neutrons from Cl. Muons are based on Heisinger, 2002 and are not calibrated in this study. The geological calibration locations include the Peruvian Andes; Lake Bonneville, UT; Isle of Skye, Scotland; Hawaii; Dry Valleys of Antactica; and Copper Canyon, NM.

  11. Wastewater treatment high rate algal ponds for biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Park, J B K; Craggs, R J; Shilton, A N

    2011-01-01

    While research and development of algal biofuels are currently receiving much interest and funding, they are still not commercially viable at today's fossil fuel prices. However, a niche opportunity may exist where algae are grown as a by-product of high rate algal ponds (HRAPs) operated for wastewater treatment. In addition to significantly better economics, algal biofuel production from wastewater treatment HRAPs has a much smaller environmental footprint compared to commercial algal production HRAPs which consume freshwater and fertilisers. In this paper the critical parameters that limit algal cultivation, production and harvest are reviewed and practical options that may enhance the net harvestable algal production from wastewater treatment HRAPs including CO(2) addition, species control, control of grazers and parasites and bioflocculation are discussed.

  12. Proceedings of a Workshop on Cosmogenic Nuclide Production Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englert, Peter A. J. (Editor); Reedy, Robert C. (Editor); Michel, Rolf (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    Abstracts of reports from the proceedings are presented. The presentations were divided into discussion topics. The following general topic areas were used: (1) measured cosmogenic noble gas and radionuclide production rates in meteorite and planetary surface samples; (2) cross-section measurements and simulation experiments; and (3) interpretation of sample studies and simulation experiments.

  13. RADIOLYTIC GAS PRODUCTION RATES OF POLYMERS EXPOSED TO TRITIUM GAS

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.

    2013-08-31

    Data from previous reports on studies of polymers exposed to tritium gas is further analyzed to estimate rates of radiolytic gas production. Also, graphs of gas release during tritium exposure from ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE, a trade name is Teflon®), and Vespel® polyimide are re-plotted as moles of gas as a function of time, which is consistent with a later study of tritium effects on various formulations of the elastomer ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM). These gas production rate estimates may be useful while considering using these polymers in tritium processing systems. These rates are valid at least for the longest exposure times for each material, two years for UHMW-PE, PTFE, and Vespel®, and fourteen months for filled and unfilled EPDM. Note that the production “rate” for Vespel® is a quantity of H{sub 2} produced during a single exposure to tritium, independent of length of time. The larger production rate per unit mass for unfilled EPDM results from the lack of filler- the carbon black in filled EPDM does not produce H{sub 2} or HT. This is one aspect of how inert fillers reduce the effects of ionizing radiation on polymers.

  14. [Morbidity rate among Georgian sodium cyanide production workers].

    PubMed

    Kverenchkhiladze, G

    2005-09-01

    With the purpose of evaluation of the role of production-professional factors on the health status of sodium cyanide production workers, the working conditions (pollution of the air by chemical substances, microclimate, noise, vibration) were examined and the data on temporary work incapacity during 2000-2004 years were analyzed. Among the production-professional factors the pollution of the air of working surroundings by toxic substances, as well as the high temperature of air, noise and vibration were leading causes. It is shown that the working conditions have certain influence on the morbidity rate among the workers. Morbidity rate in the main group was 1,7 times higher. In the morbidity structure, diseases of respiratory, cardio-vascular, nervous, digestive and musculoskeletal systems were leading.

  15. Drill-in fluid reduces formation damage, increases production rates

    SciTech Connect

    Hands, N.; Kowbel, K.; Nouris, R.

    1998-07-13

    A sodium formate drill-in fluid system reduced formation damage, resulting in better-than-expected production rates for an off-shore Dutch development well. Programmed to optimize production capacity and reservoir drainage from a Rotliegend sandstone gas discovery, the 5-7/8-in. subhorizontal production interval was drilled and completed barefoot with a unique, rheologically engineered sodium formate drill-in fluid system. The new system, consisting of a sodium formate (NaCOOH) brine as the base fluid and properly sized calcium carbonate as the formation-bridging agent, was selected on the basis of its well-documented record in reducing solids impairment and formation damage in similar sandstone structures in Germany. The system was engineered around the low-shear-rate viscosity (LSRV) concept, designed to provide exceptional rheological properties. After describing the drilling program, the paper gives results on the drilling and completion.

  16. Production rates of neon xenon isotopes by energetic neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leich, D. A.; Borg, R. J.; Lanier, V. B.

    1986-01-01

    As a first step in an experimental program to study the behavior of noble gases produced in situ in minerals, a suite of minerals and pure chemicals were irradiated with 14.5 MeV neutrons at LLNL's Rotating Target Neutron Source (RTNS-II) and production rates for noble gases were determined. While neutron effects in meteorites and lunar samples are dominated by low-energy neutron capture, more energetic cosmic-ray secondary neutrons can provide significant depth-dependent contributions to production of cosmogenic nuclides through endothermic reactions such as (n,2n), (n,np), (n,d) and (n,alpha). Production rates for nuclides produced by cosmic-ray secondary neutrons are therefore useful in interpreting shielding histories from the relative abundances of cosmogenic nuclides. Absolute production cross sections were calculated from isotope dilution analyses of NaCl, Mg, CsCl, and Ba(NO3)2 samples, assuming purity, stoichiometry, and quantitative noble gas retention and extraction. Relative production cross sections determined from neon isotopic ratios in the mineral samples were also considered in evaluating the neon production cross sections. Results are presented.

  17. THE PRODUCTION RATE OF SN Ia EVENTS IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Washabaugh, Pearce C.; Bregman, Joel N. E-mail: jbregman@umich.edu

    2013-01-01

    In globular clusters, dynamical evolution produces luminous X-ray emitting binaries at a rate about 200 times greater than in the field. If globular clusters also produce SN Ia at a high rate, it would account for many of the SN Ia production in early-type galaxies and provide insight into their formation. Here we use archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images of nearby galaxies that have hosted an SN Ia to examine the rate at which globular clusters produce these events. The location of the SN Ia is registered on an HST image obtained before the event or after the supernova (SN) faded. Of the 36 nearby galaxies examined, 21 had sufficiently good data to search for globular cluster hosts. None of the 21 SNe have a definite globular cluster counterpart, although there are some ambiguous cases. This places an upper limit to the enhancement rate of SN Ia production in globular clusters of about 42 at the 95% confidence level, which is an order of magnitude lower than the enhancement rate for luminous X-ray binaries. Even if all of the ambiguous cases are considered as having a globular cluster counterpart, the upper bound for the enhancement rate is 82 at the 95% confidence level, still a factor of several below that needed to account for half of the SN Ia events. Barring unforeseen selection effects, we conclude that globular clusters are not responsible for producing a significant fraction of the SN Ia events in early-type galaxies.

  18. Automated Production of High Rep Rate Foam Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, F.; Spindloe, C.; Haddock, D.; Tolley, M.; Nazarov, W.

    2016-04-01

    Manufacturing low density targets in the numbers needed for high rep rate experiments is highly challenging. This report summarises advances from manual production to semiautomated and the improvements that follow both in terms of production time and target uniformity. The production process is described and shown to be improved by the integration of an xyz robot with dispensing capabilities. Results are obtained from manual and semiautomated production runs and compared. The variance in the foam thickness is reduced significantly which should decrease experimental variation due to target parameters and could allow for whole batches to be characterised by the measurement of a few samples. The work applies to both foil backed and free standing foam targets.

  19. Production rate calculations for a secondary beam facility

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, C.L.; Back, B.B.; Rehm, K.E.

    1995-08-01

    In order to select the most cost-effective method for the production of secondary ion beams, yield calculations for a variety of primary beams were performed ranging in mass from protons to {sup 18}O with energies of 100-200 MeV/u. For comparison, production yields for 600-1000 MeV protons were also calculated. For light ion-(A < {sup 4}He) induced reactions at energies above 50 MeV/u the LAHET code was used while the low energy calculations were performed with LPACE. Heavy-ion-induced production rates were calculated with the ISAPACE program. The results of these codes were checked against each other and wherever possible a comparison with experimental data was performed. These comparisons extended to very exotic reaction channels, such as the production of {sup 100}Sn from {sup 112}Sn and {sup 124}Xe induced fragmentation reactions. These comparisons indicate that the codes are able to predict production rates to within one order of magnitude.

  20. Light dose versus rate of delivery: implications for macroalgal productivity.

    PubMed

    Desmond, Matthew J; Pritchard, Daniel W; Hepburn, Christopher D

    2017-04-07

    The role of how light is delivered over time is an area of macroalgal photosynthesis that has been overlooked but may play a significant role in controlling rates of productivity and the structure and persistence of communities. Here we present data that quantify the relative influence of total quantum dose and delivery rate on the photosynthetic productivity of five ecologically important Phaeophyceae species from southern New Zealand. Results suggested that greater net oxygen production occurs when light is delivered at a lower photon flux density (PFD) over a longer period compared to a greater PFD over a shorter period, given the same total dose. This was due to greater efficiency (α) at a lower PFD which, for some species, meant a compensatory effect can occur. This resulted in equal or greater productivity even when the total quantum dose of the lower PFD was significantly reduced. It was also shown that light limitation at Huriawa Peninsula, where macroaglae were sourced, may be restricting the acclimation potential of species at greater depths, and that even at shallow depth periods of significant light limitation are likely to occur. This research is of particular interest as the variability of light delivery to coastal reef systems increases as a result of anthropogenic disturbances, and as the value of in situ community primary productivity estimates is recognised.

  1. Developing ratings for food products: lessons learned from media rating systems.

    PubMed

    Kunkel, Dale; McKinley, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    Children regularly consume low-nutrient, high-calorie food that is not consistent with a healthful diet, contributing to an increasing epidemic of overweight and obesity. Among the multiple causes of this problem is the food industry's emphasis on marketing calorie-dense food products to children. The Institute of Medicine (IOM) has recommended that industry adopt a uniform system of simplified food ratings to convey the nutritional qualities of food in a manner that is understandable and appealing to children and youth. This report analyzes the need for such a system in a food marketing environment that increasingly identifies healthful products for the consumer in inconsistent fashion. It considers evidence regarding current usage of food labeling and draws parallels with media rating systems in discussing the prospects for a uniform food rating system that would accomplish the IOM's objective.

  2. Entropy production rate as a constraint for collisionless fluid closures

    SciTech Connect

    Fleurence, E.; Sarazin, Y.; Garbet, X.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Grandgirard, V.; Ottaviani, M.

    2006-11-30

    A novel method is proposed to construct collisionless fluid closures accounting for some kinetic properties. The first dropped fluid moment is assumed to be a linear function of the lower order ones. Optimizing the agreement between the fluid and kinetic entropy production rates is used to constrain the coefficients of the linear development. This procedure is applied to a reduced version of the interchange instability. The closure, involving the absolute value of the wave vector, is non-local in real space. In this case, the linear instability thresholds are the same, and the linear growth rates exhibit similar characteristics. Such a method is applicable to other models and classes of instabilities.

  3. Entropy production rate as a constraint for collisionless fluid closures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleurence, E.; Sarazin, Y.; Garbet, X.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Grandgirard, V.; Ottaviani, M.

    2006-11-01

    A novel method is proposed to construct collisionless fluid closures accounting for some kinetic properties. The first dropped fluid moment is assumed to be a linear function of the lower order ones. Optimizing the agreement between the fluid and kinetic entropy production rates is used to constrain the coefficients of the linear development. This procedure is applied to a reduced version of the interchange instability. The closure, involving the absolute value of the wave vector, is non-local in real space. In this case, the linear instability thresholds are the same, and the linear growth rates exhibit similar characteristics. Such a method is applicable to other models and classes of instabilities.

  4. The global-average production rate of Be-10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaghan, M. C.; Krishnaswami, S.; Turekian, K. K.

    1986-01-01

    Precipitation collected in continuously open containers for about a year at seven sites around the United States was analyzed for Be-10, Sr-90, Pb-210, and U-238. Based on these data and long-term precipitation, Sr-90 and Pb-210 delivery patterns, the stratospheric, tropospheric and recycled Be-10 components in the collections were estimated and the global Be-10 production rate was assessed. Single station production rate estimates range from 0.52 x 10 to the 6th to 2.64 x 10 to the 6th atoms/sq cm per year. The mean value is 1.21 x 10 to the 6th atoms/sq cm per year with a standard error of 0.26 x 10 to he 6th atoms/per year

  5. Production rates of cosmogenic nuclides in stony meteorites

    SciTech Connect

    Divadeenam, M.; Gabriel, T.A.; Lazareth, O.W.; Spergel, M.S.; Ward, T.E.

    1989-01-01

    Monte Carlo calculations of /sup 26/Al and /sup 53/Mn production due to spallation induced by cosmogenic protons in model meteorite composition similar to L Chondrite has yielded predictions which are consistent with the observed decay rates in L Chondrite stony meteorites. The calculated /sup 26/Al production rate (54 dpm/kg) in a 1 m diameter meteorite is within 1/2 S.D. of the mean (49 +- 11 dpm/kg) taken from 100 bulk determinations in L Chondrite samples compiled in Nishiizumi (1987). Similarly calculated average value for /sup 53/Mn (223 dpm/kg) is consistent with one S.D. off the mean in the widely scattered /sup 53/Mn data (362 +- 113 dpm/kg) compiled by Nishiizumi (1987). 9 refs.

  6. Measurements of in situ chemical ozone (oxidant) production rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hao; Faloon, Kate; Najera, Juan; Bloss, William

    2013-04-01

    Tropospheric ozone is a major air pollutant, harmful to human health, agricultural crops and vegetation, the main precursor to the atmospheric oxidants which initiate the degradation of most reactive gases emitted to the atmosphere, and an important greenhouse gas in its own right. The capacity to understand and predict tropospheric ozone levels is a key goal for atmospheric science - but one which is challenging, as ozone is formed in the atmosphere from the complex oxidation of VOCs in the presence of NOx and sunlight, on a timescale such that in situ chemical processes, deposition and transport all affect ozone levels. Known uncertainties in emissions, chemistry, dynamics and deposition affect the accuracy of predictions of current and future ozone levels, and hinder development of optimal air quality policies to mitigate against ozone exposure. Recently new approaches to directly measure the local chemical ozone production rate, bypassing the many uncertainties in emissions and chemical schemes, have been developed (Cazorla & Brune, AMT 2010). Here, we describe the development of an analogous Ozone Production Rate (OPR) approach: Air is sampled into parallel reactors, within which ozone formation either occurs as in the ambient atmosphere, or is suppressed. Comparisons of ozone levels exiting a pair of such reactors determines the net chemical oxidant production rate, after correction for perturbation of the NOx-O3 photochemical steady state, and when operated under conditions such that wall effects are minimised. We report preliminary measurements of local chemical ozone production made during the UK NERC ClearfLo (Clean Air for London) campaign at an urban background location in London in January and July 2012. The OPR system was used to measure the local chemical oxidant formation rate, which is compared with observed trends in O3 and NOx and the prevailing meteorology, and with the predictions of a detailed zero-dimensional atmospheric chemistry model

  7. Success rates for product development strategies in new drug development.

    PubMed

    Dahlin, E; Nelson, G M; Haynes, M; Sargeant, F

    2016-04-01

    While research has examined the likelihood that drugs progress across phases of clinical trials, no research to date has examined the types of product development strategies that are the most likely to be successful in clinical trials. This research seeks to identify the strategies that are most likely to reach the market-those generated using a novel product development strategy or strategies that combine a company's expertise with both drugs and indications, which we call combined experience strategies. We evaluate the success of product development strategies in the drug development process for a sample of 2562 clinical trials completed by 406 US pharmaceutical companies. To identify product development strategies, we coded each clinical trial according to whether it consisted of an indication or a drug that was new to the firm. Accordingly, a clinical trial that consists of both an indication and a drug that were both new to the firm represents a novel product development strategy; indication experience is a product development strategy that consists of an indication that a firm had tested previously in a clinical trial, but with a drug that was new to the firm; drug experience is a product development strategy that consists of a drug that the firm had prior experience testing in clinical trials, but with an indication that was new to the firm; combined experience consists of both a drug and an indication that the firm had experience testing in clinical trials. Success rates for product development strategies across clinical phases were calculated for the clinical trials in our sample. Combined experience strategies had the highest success rate. More than three and a half percent (0·036) of the trials that combined experience with drugs and indications eventually reached the market. The next most successful strategy is drug experience (0·025) with novel strategies trailing closely (0·024). Indication experience strategies are the least successful (0·008

  8. Photochemical free radical production rates in the eastern Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dister, Brian; Zafiriou, Oliver C.

    1993-02-01

    Potential photochemical production rates of total (NO-scavengeable) free radicals were surveyed underway (> 900 points) in the eastern Caribbean and Orinoco delta in spring and fall 1988. These data document seasonal trends and large-scale (˜ 10-1000 km) variability in the pools of sunlight-generated reactive transients, which probably mediate a major portion of marine photoredox transformations. Radical production potential was detectable in all waters and was reasonably quantifiable at rates above 0.25 nmol L-1 min-1 sun-1. Radical production rates varied from ˜ 0.1-0.5 nmol L-1 min-1 of full-sun illumination in "blue water" to > 60 nmol L-1 min-1 in some estuarine waters in the high-flow season. Qualitatively, spatiotemporal potential rate distributions strikingly resembled that of "chlorophyll" (a riverine-influence tracer of uncertain specificity) in 1979-1981 CZCS images of the region [Müller-Karger et al., 1988] at all scales. Basin-scale occurrence of greatly enhanced rates in fall compared to spring is attributed to terrestrial chromophore inputs, primarily from the Orinoco River, any contributions from Amazon water and nutrient-stimulus effects could not be resolved. A major part of the functionally photoreactive colored organic matter (COM) involved in radical formation clearly mixes without massive loss out into high-salinity waters, although humic acids may flocculate in estuaries. A similar conclusion applies over smaller scales for COM as measured optically [Blough et al., this issue]. Furthermore, optical absorption and radical production rates were positively correlated in the estuarine region in fall. These cruises demonstrated that photochemical techniques are now adequate to treat terrestrial photochemical chromophore inputs as an estuarine mixing problem on a large scale, though the ancillary data base does not currently support such an analysis in this region. Eastern Caribbean waters are not markedly more reactive at comparable salinities

  9. Evaluating ventilation rates based on new heat and moisture production data for swine production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Heat and moisture production (HMP) rates of animals are used for calculation of ventilation rate (VR) in animal housing. New swine HMP data revealed considerable differences from previously reported data. This project determined new design VR and evaluated differences from previously recommended VRs...

  10. Zymomonas mobilis mutants with an increased rate of alcohol production

    SciTech Connect

    Osman, Y.A.; Ingram, L.O.

    1987-07-01

    Two new derivatives of Zymomonas mobilis CP4 were isolated from enrichment cultures after 18 months of serial transfer. These new strains were selected for the ability to grow and produce ethanol rapidly on transfer into fresh broth containing ethanol and allyl alcohol. Ethanol production by these strains was examined in batch fermentations under three sets of conditions. Both new derivatives were found to be superior to the parent strain CP4 with respect to the speed and completeness of glucose conversion to ethanol. The best of these, strain YO2, produced 9.5% ethanol (by weight; 11.9% by volume) after 17.4 h compared with 31.8 h for the parent strain CP4. The addition of 1 mM magnesium sulfate improved ethanol production in all three strains. Two factors contributed to the decrease in fermentation time required by the mutants: more rapid growth with minimal lag on subculturing and the retention of higher rates of ethanol production as fermentation proceeded. Alcohol dehydrogenase isozymes were altered in both new strains and no longer catalyzed the oxidation of allyl alcohol into the toxic product acrolein. This loss of allyl alcohol-oxidizing capacity is proposed as a primary factor contributing to increased allyl alcohol resistance, although it is likely that other mutations affecting glycolysis also contribute to the improvement in ethanol production.

  11. Estimates of Biogenic Methane Production Rates in Deep Marine Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colwell, F. S.; Boyd, S.; Delwiche, M. E.; Reed, D. W.

    2004-12-01

    Much of the methane in natural gas hydrates in marine sediments is made by methanogens. Current models used to predict hydrate distribution and concentration in these sediments require estimates of microbial methane production rates. However, accurate estimates are difficult to achieve because of the bias introduced by sampling and because methanogen activities in these sediments are low and not easily detected. To derive useful methane production rates for marine sediments we have measured the methanogen biomass in samples taken from different depths in Hydrate Ridge (HR) sediments off the coast of Oregon and, separately, the minimal rates of activity for a methanogen in a laboratory reactor. For methanogen biomass, we used a polymerase chain reaction assay in real time to target the methanogen-specific mcr gene. Using this method we found that a majority of the samples collected from boreholes at HR show no evidence of methanogens (detection limit: less than 100 methanogens per g of sediment). Most of the samples with detectable numbers of methanogens were from shallow sediments (less than 10 meters below seafloor [mbsf]) although a few samples with apparently high numbers of methanogens (greater than 10,000 methanogens per g) were from as deep as 230 mbsf and were associated with notable geological features (e.g., the bottom-simulating reflector and an ash-bearing zone with high fluid movement). Laboratory studies with Methanoculleus submarinus (isolated from a hydrate zone at the Nankai Trough) maintained in a biomass recycle reactor showed that when this methanogen is merely surviving, as is likely the case in deep marine sediments, it produces approximately 0.06 fmol methane per cell per day. This is far lower than rates reported for methanogens in other environments. By combining this estimate of specific methanogenic rates and an extrapolation from the numbers of methanogens at selected depths in the sediment column at HR sites we have derived a maximum

  12. 5 CFR 532.253 - Special rates or rate ranges for leader, supervisory, and production facilitating positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special rates or rate ranges for leader, supervisory, and production facilitating positions. 532.253 Section 532.253 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PREVAILING RATE SYSTEMS Prevailing Rate Determinations § 532.253 Special rates or rate...

  13. 5 CFR 532.253 - Special rates or rate ranges for leader, supervisory, and production facilitating positions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Special rates or rate ranges for leader....253 Special rates or rate ranges for leader, supervisory, and production facilitating positions. (a) When special rates or rate ranges are established for nonsupervisory positions, a lead agency...

  14. 30 CFR 250.1159 - May the Regional Supervisor limit my well or reservoir production rates?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... reservoir production rates? 250.1159 Section 250.1159 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE... Gas Production Requirements Production Rates § 250.1159 May the Regional Supervisor limit my well or reservoir production rates? (a) The Regional Supervisor may set a Maximum Production Rate (MPR) for a...

  15. Universal scaling of production rates across mammalian lineages

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Marcus J.; Davidson, Ana D.; Sibly, Richard M.; Brown, James H.

    2011-01-01

    Over many millions of years of independent evolution, placental, marsupial and monotreme mammals have diverged conspicuously in physiology, life history and reproductive ecology. The differences in life histories are particularly striking. Compared with placentals, marsupials exhibit shorter pregnancy, smaller size of offspring at birth and longer period of lactation in the pouch. Monotremes also exhibit short pregnancy, but incubate embryos in eggs, followed by a long period of post-hatching lactation. Using a large sample of mammalian species, we show that, remarkably, despite their very different life histories, the scaling of production rates is statistically indistinguishable across mammalian lineages. Apparently all mammals are subject to the same fundamental metabolic constraints on productivity, because they share similar body designs, vascular systems and costs of producing new tissue. PMID:20798111

  16. Production of carboxylates from high rate activated sludge through fermentation.

    PubMed

    Cagnetta, C; Coma, M; Vlaeminck, S E; Rabaey, K

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this work was to study the key parameters affecting fermentation of high rate activated A-sludge to carboxylates, including pH, temperature, inoculum, sludge composition and iron content. The maximum volatile fatty acids production was 141mgCg(-1) VSSfed, at pH 7. Subsequently the potential for carboxylate and methane production for A-sludge from four different plants at pH 7 and 35°C were compared. Initial BOD of the sludge appeared to be key determining carboxylate yield from A-sludge. Whereas methanogenesis could be correlated linearly to the quantity of ferric used for coagulation, fermentation did not show a dependency on iron presence. This difference may enable a strategy whereby A-stage sludge is separated to achieve fermentation, and iron dosing for phosphate removal is only implemented at the B-stage.

  17. Universal scaling of production rates across mammalian lineages.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Marcus J; Davidson, Ana D; Sibly, Richard M; Brown, James H

    2011-02-22

    Over many millions of years of independent evolution, placental, marsupial and monotreme mammals have diverged conspicuously in physiology, life history and reproductive ecology. The differences in life histories are particularly striking. Compared with placentals, marsupials exhibit shorter pregnancy, smaller size of offspring at birth and longer period of lactation in the pouch. Monotremes also exhibit short pregnancy, but incubate embryos in eggs, followed by a long period of post-hatching lactation. Using a large sample of mammalian species, we show that, remarkably, despite their very different life histories, the scaling of production rates is statistically indistinguishable across mammalian lineages. Apparently all mammals are subject to the same fundamental metabolic constraints on productivity, because they share similar body designs, vascular systems and costs of producing new tissue.

  18. The Production Rate and Employment of Ph.D. Astronomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, Travis S.

    2007-05-01

    As in many sciences, the production rate of new Ph.D. astronomers is decoupled from the global demand for trained scientists. As noted by Thronson (1991, PASP, 103, 90), overproduction appears to be built into the system, making the mathematical formulation of surplus astronomer production similar to that for industrial pollution models -- an unintended side effect of the process. Following Harris (1994, ASP Conf., 57, 12), I document the production of Ph.D. astronomers from 1990 to 2005 using the online Dissertation Abstracts database. To monitor the changing patterns of employment, I examine the number of postdoctoral, tenure-track, and other jobs advertised in the AAS Job Register during this same period. Although the current situation is clearly unsustainable, it was much worse a decade ago with nearly 7 new Ph.D. astronomers in 1995 for every new tenure-track job. While the number of new permanent positions steadily increased throughout the late 1990's, the number of new Ph.D. recipients gradually declined. After the turn of the century, the production of new astronomers leveled off, but new postdoctoral positions grew dramatically. There has also been recent growth in the number of non-tenure-track lecturer, research, and support positions. This is just one example of a larger cultural shift to temporary employment that is happening throughout society -- it is not unique to astronomy.

  19. The Production Rate and Employment of Ph.D. Astronomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, Travis S.

    2008-02-01

    In an effort to encourage self-regulation of the astronomy job market, I examine the supply of, and demand for, astronomers over time. On the supply side, I document the production rate of Ph.D. astronomers from 1970 to 2006 using the UMI Dissertation Abstracts database, along with data from other independent sources. I compare the long-term trends in Ph.D. production with federal astronomy research funding over the same time period, and I demonstrate that additional funding is correlated with higher subsequent Ph.D. production. On the demand side, I monitor the changing patterns of employment using statistics about the number and types of jobs advertised in the AAS Job Register from 1984 to 2006. Finally, I assess the sustainability of the job market by normalizing this demand by the annual Ph.D. production. The most recent data suggest that there are now annual advertisements for about one postdoctoral job, half a faculty job, and half a research/support position for every new domestic Ph.D. recipient in astronomy and astrophysics. The average new astronomer might expect to hold up to 3 jobs before finding a steady position.

  20. Forest turnover rates follow global and regional patterns of productivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephenson, N.L.; van Mantgem, P.J.

    2005-01-01

    Using a global database, we found that forest turnover rates (the average of tree mortality and recruitment rates) parallel broad-scale patterns of net primary productivity. First, forest turnover was higher in tropical than in temperate forests. Second, as recently demonstrated by others, Amazonian forest turnover was higher on fertile than infertile soils. Third, within temperate latitudes, turnover was highest in angiosperm forests, intermediate in mixed forests, and lowest in gymnosperm forests. Finally, within a single forest physiognomic type, turnover declined sharply with elevation (hence with temperature). These patterns of turnover in populations of trees are broadly similar to the patterns of turnover in populations of plant organs (leaves and roots) found in other studies. Our findings suggest a link between forest mass balance and the population dynamics of trees, and have implications for understanding and predicting the effects of environmental changes on forest structure and terrestrial carbon dynamics. ??2005 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  1. Buyer-vendor coordination for fixed lifetime product with quantity discount under finite production rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qinghong; Luo, Jianwen; Duan, Yongrui

    2016-03-01

    Buyer-vendor coordination has been widely addressed; however, the fixed lifetime of the product is seldom considered. In this paper, we study the coordination of an integrated production-inventory system with quantity discount for a fixed lifetime product under finite production rate and deterministic demand. We first derive the buyer's ordering policy and the vendor's production batch size in decentralised and centralised systems. We then compare the two systems and show the non-coordination of the ordering policies and the production batch sizes. To improve the supply chain efficiency, we propose quantity discount contract and prove that the contract can coordinate the buyer-vendor supply chain. Finally, we present analytically tractable solutions and give a numerical example to illustrate the benefits of the proposed quantity discount strategy.

  2. Pair production rates in mildly relativistic, magnetized plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, M. L.; Harding, A. K.

    1984-01-01

    Electron-positron pairs may be produced by either one or two photons in the presence of a strong magnetic field. In magnetized plasmas with temperatures kT approximately sq mc, both of these processes may be important and could be competitive. The rates of one-photon and two-photon pair production by photons with Maxwellian, thermal bremsstrahlung, thermal synchrotron and power law spectra are calculated as a function of temperature or power law index and field strength. This allows a comparison of the two rates and a determination of the conditions under which each process may be a significant source of pairs in astrophysical plasmas. It is found that for photon densities n(gamma) or = 10 to the 25th power/cu cm and magnetic field strengths B or = 10 to the 12th power G, one-photon pair production dominates at kT approximately sq mc for a Maxwellian, at kT approximately 2 sq mc for a thermal bremsstrahlung spectrum, at all temperatures for a thermal synchrotron spectrum, and for power law spectra with indices s approximately 4.

  3. Estrogen elevates the peak overnight production rate of acylated ghrelin.

    PubMed

    Paulo, Remberto C; Brundage, Richard; Cosma, Mihaela; Mielke, Kristi L; Bowers, Cyril Y; Veldhuis, Johannes D

    2008-11-01

    Acylated ghrelin is the putatively bioactive GH secretagogue. Estradiol (E2) stimulates the synthesis rather than inhibits the metabolic clearance of acylated ghrelin. The study took place at an academic medical center. Healthy postmenopausal women participated. Interventions included prospectively randomized, double-blind separate-day iv infusions of saline or five graded doses of ghrelin in estrogen-deficient (n=12) and E2-supplemented (n=8) women. Metabolic clearance rate (MCR), volume of distribution, half-life, and secretion rate of acylated ghrelin were assessed. In pilot iv bolus ghrelin infusions, the median half-lives of acylated and total ghrelin were 21 and 36 min (P<0.01), MCRs 58 and 8.1 liters/kg.d (P<0.01), and volumes of distribution of 1.0 and 0.32 liters/kg (P<0.01), respectively. Transdermal E2 supplementation for 3 wk increased peak nighttime acylated ghrelin concentrations from 99+/-12 to 141+/-34 pg/ml (P=0.039). Exposure to E2 did not alter the linear relationships between 1) plasma acylated ghrelin concentration and ghrelin infusion rate (638+/-12 slope units), 2) MCR of acylated ghrelin and ghrelin infusion rate (10+/-2.5 slope units), and 3) MCR and plasma concentration of acylated ghrelin (0.017+/-0.004 slope units). These data predict peak nighttime production rates of acylated ghrelin of 3.8+/-0.9 (E2) and 1.9+/-0.2 (no E2) ng/kg.min (P=0.039). Acylated ghrelin has a multifold larger distribution volume and MCR than total ghrelin. An estrogenic milieu augments synthesis and/or acylation of ghrelin peptide without altering its MCR.

  4. Calculation of in-target production rates for radioactive isotope beam production at TRIUMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Fatima; Andreoiu, Corina; Kunz, Peter; Laxdal, Aurelia

    2016-09-01

    Rare Isotope Beam (RIB) facilities around the world, such as TRIUMF, work towards development of new target materials to generate exotic species. Access to these rare radioactive isotopes is key for applications in nuclear medicine, astrophysics and fundamental nuclear science. To better understand production from these and other materials, we have built a computer simulation of the RIB targets used at the TRIUMF Isotope Separation and ACceleration (ISAC) facility, to support new target material development. Built at Simon Fraser University, the simulation runs in the GEANT4 nuclear transport toolkit, and can simulate the production rate of isotopes from a given set of beam and target characteristics. The simulation models the bombardment of a production target by an incident high-energy proton beam and calculates isotope in-target production rates different nuclear reactions. Results from the simulation will be presented, along with an evaluation of various nuclear reaction models and a experimentally determined RIB yields at the ISAC Yield Station.

  5. Substrate inhibition and control for high rate biogas production

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, H.S.

    1982-01-01

    This research addresses a critical aspect of the technical feasibility of biogas recovery with poultry manure using anaerobic digestion, namely, inhibition and toxicity factors limiting methane generation under high rate conditions. The research was designed to identify the limiting factors and to examine alternative pretreatment and in situ control methods for the anaerobic digestion of poultry manure as an energy producing system. Biogas production was indicated by the daily gas volume produced per unit digester capacity. Enhanced biogas generation from the anaerobic digester systems using poultry manure was studied in laboratory- and pilot-scale digester operations. It was found that ammonia nitrogen concentration above 4000 mg/l was inhibitory to biogas production. Pretreatment of the manure by elutriation was effective for decreasing inhibitory/toxic conditions. Increased gas production resulted without an indication of serious inhibition by increased volatile acids, indicating a limitation of available carbon sources. For poultry manure digestion, the optimum pH range was 7.1 to 7.6. Annual costs for pretreatment/biogas systems for 10,000, 30,000 and 50,000 birds were estimated and compared with annual surplus energy produced. The economic break-even point was achieved in digesters for greater than 30,000 birds. Capital cost of the digester system was estimated to be $18,300 with annual costs around $4000. It is anticipated that the digester system could be economically applied to smaller farms as energy costs increase.

  6. 78 FR 39784 - International Product Change-Priority Mail International Regional Rate Boxes-Non-Published Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office POSTAL SERVICE International Product Change--Priority Mail International Regional Rate Boxes--Non-Published Rates AGENCY: Postal...-Published Rates to the Competitive Products List. DATES: As of: July 2, 2013. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...

  7. Enhancing microalgal photosynthesis and productivity in wastewater treatment high rate algal ponds for biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Donna L; Howard-Williams, Clive; Turnbull, Matthew H; Broady, Paul A; Craggs, Rupert J

    2015-05-01

    With microalgal biofuels currently receiving much attention, there has been renewed interest in the combined use of high rate algal ponds (HRAP) for wastewater treatment and biofuel production. This combined use of HRAPs is considered to be an economically feasible option for biofuel production, however, increased microalgal productivity and nutrient removal together with reduced capital costs are needed before it can be commercially viable. Despite HRAPs being an established technology, microalgal photosynthesis and productivity is still limited in these ponds and is well below the theoretical maximum. This paper critically evaluates the parameters that limit microalgal light absorption and photosynthesis in wastewater HRAPs and examines biological, chemical and physical options for improving light absorption and utilisation, with the view of enhancing biomass production and nutrient removal.

  8. Production rates of terrestrial in-situ-produced cosmogenic nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, R.C.; Tuniz, C.; Fink, D.

    1993-12-31

    Production rates of cosmogenic nuclides made in situ in terrestrial samples and how they are applied to the interpretation of measured radionuclide concentrations were discussed at a one-day Workshop held 2 October 1993 in Sydney, Australia. The status of terrestrial in-situ studies using the long-lived radionuclides {sup 10}Be, {sup 14}C, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl, and {sup 41}Ca and of various modeling and related studies were presented. The relative uncertainties in the various factors that go into the interpretation of these terrestrial in-situ cosmogenic nuclides were discussed. The magnitudes of the errors for these factors were estimated and none dominated the final uncertainty.

  9. Changes in atmospheric composition inferred from ionospheric production rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titheridge, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    Changes in the total electron content of the ionosphere near sunrise are used to determine the integrated production rate in the ionosphere (Q) from 1965 to 1971 at latitudes of 34S, 20N, and 34N. The observed regular semiannual variation in Q through a range of 1:3:1 is interpreted as an increase in the ratio O/N2 (relative densities) near the equinoxes. It follows that there is a worldwide semiannual variation in atmospheric composition, with the above ratio maximum just after the equinoxes. There is a large seasonal variation in the Northern hemisphere with a maximum in mid-summer. This effect is absent in the Southern hemisphere. At all times except solar maximum in the Northern hemisphere there is a global asymmetry. The ratio O/N2 is about three times as large in the Northern hemisphere. The overall mechanism appears to be N2 absorption.

  10. Recent developments in cosmogenic nuclide production rate scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifton, N. A.

    2013-12-01

    A new cosmogenic nuclide production rate scaling model based on analytical fits to Monte Carlo simulations of atmospheric cosmic ray flux spectra (both of which agree well with measured spectra) enables identification and quantification of the biases in previously published models (Lifton, N., Sato, T., Dunai, T., in review, Earth and Planet. Sci. Lett.). Scaling predictions derived from the new model (termed LSD) suggest two potential sources of bias in the previous models: different energy responses of the secondary neutron detectors used in developing the models, and different geomagnetic parameterizations. In addition, the particle flux spectra generated by the LSD model allow one to generate nuclide-specific scaling factors that reflect the influences of the flux energy distribution and the relevant excitation functions (probability of nuclide production in a given nuclear reaction as a function of energy). Resulting scaling factors indicate 3He shows the strongest positive deviation from the flux-based scaling, while 14C exhibits a negative deviation. These results are consistent with previous studies showing an increasing 3He/10Be ratio with altitude in the Himalayas, but with a much lower magnitude for the effect. Furthermore, the new model provides a flexible framework for exploring the implications of future advances in model inputs. For example, the effects of recently updated paleomagnetic models (e.g. Korte et al., 2011, Earth and Planet Sci. Lett. 312, 497-505) on scaling predictions will also be presented.

  11. Global bioenergy capacity as constrained by observed biospheric productivity rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, W. K.; Zhao, M.; Running, S. W.

    2011-12-01

    Virtually all global energy forecasts include an expectation that bioenergy will be a substantial energy source for the future. Multiple current estimates of global bioenergy potential (GBP) range from 500-1,500 EJ yr-1 or 100-300% of 2009 global primary energy consumption (GPEC09), suggesting bioenergy could conceivably replace fossil fuels entirely. However, these estimates are based on extrapolation of plot-level production rates which largely neglect complex global climatic and land-use constraints. We estimated GBP using satellite-derived, observed global primary productivity data from 2000-2006, which integrates global climate data and detects seasonal vegetation dynamics. Land-use constraints were then applied to account for current crop and forestry harvest requirements, human-controlled pasturelands, remote regions, and nature conservation areas. We show GBP is limited to 52-248 EJ yr-1 or 10-49% of GPEC09, a range lower than many current GBP estimates by a factor of four. Even attaining the low-end of this range requires utilization of all harvest residues over 31 million km2 (Mkm2), while the high-end requires additional harvest over 41 Mkm2, an area roughly three times current global cropland extent. Although, exploitation of pasture and remote land could significantly contribute to GBP, the availability of these land areas remains controversial due to critical concerns regarding indirect land-use change and carbon debt. Future energy policy is of unparalleled importance to humanity, and our results are critical in estimating quantitative limitations on the overall potential for global bioenergy production.

  12. Freely expanding detonation products: Scaling of rate processes

    SciTech Connect

    Greiner, N.R.

    1988-01-01

    Using the Los Alamos reactive hydrodynamics code KIVA, calculations have been made to simulate the free expansion of cylinders of detonation products into a high vacuum. The emphasis of this paper is on the scaling of rate processes with cylinder size and initial conditions as a function of position in the expanding mass. The processes considered include diffusion, unimolecular decomposition, biomolecular radical reactions, and vibrational relaxation. The calculations also give time-dependent velocity fields; schlieren images; and profiles of density, pressure, and temperature. Many features of the calculations can be compared with experimental observations, including time-delayed schlieren and shadowgraph snapshots, time-dependent absorption spectra, and time-of-arrival profiles of molecular species. Some unexpected insights, such as the effect of the equation of state on the shape of the expanding plume and the effect of position on the rate of quenching, are discussed. These calculations are being used to interpret the available experimental data and to design future experiments. 6 refs., 13 figs.

  13. Synechococcus production and grazing loss rates in nearshore tropical waters.

    PubMed

    Heng, Pei Li; Lim, Joon Hai; Lee, Choon Weng

    2017-03-01

    Temporal variation of Synechococcus, its production (μ) and grazing loss (g) rates were studied for 2 years at nearshore stations, i.e. Port Dickson and Port Klang along the Straits of Malacca. Synechococcus abundance at Port Dickson (0.3-2.3 × 10(5) cell ml(-1)) was always higher than at Port Klang (0.3-7.1 × 10(4) cell ml(-1)) (p < 0.001). μ ranged up to 0.98 day(-1) (0.51 ± 0.29 day(-1)), while g ranged from 0.02 to 0.31 day(-1) (0.15 ± 0.07 day(-1)) at Port Klang. At Port Dickson, μ and g averaged 0.47 ± 0.13 day(-1) (0.29-0.82 day(-1)) and 0.31 ± 0.14 day(-1) (0.13-0.63 day(-1)), respectively. Synechococcus abundance did not correlate with temperature (p > 0.25), but nutrient and light availability were important factors for their distribution. The relationship was modelled as log Synechococcus = 0.37Secchi - 0.01DIN + 4.52 where light availability (as Secchi disc depth) was a more important determinant. From a two-factorial experiment, nutrients were not significant for Synechococcus growth as in situ nutrient concentrations exceeded the threshold for saturated growth. However, light availability was important and elevated Synechococcus growth rates especially at Port Dickson (F = 5.94, p < 0.05). As for grazing loss rates, they were independent of either nutrients or light intensity (p > 0.30). In nearshore tropical waters, an estimated 69 % of Synechococcus production could be grazed.

  14. 50 CFR Table 3 to Part 679 - Product Recovery Rates for Groundfish Species and Conversion Rates for Pacific Halibut

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Product Recovery Rates for Groundfish Species and Conversion Rates for Pacific Halibut 3 Table 3 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY... Rates for Groundfish Species and Conversion Rates for Pacific Halibut ER28JA02.074 ER10JY02.000...

  15. 50 CFR Table 3 to Part 679 - Product Recovery Rates for Groundfish Species and Conversion Rates for Pacific Halibut

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Product Recovery Rates for Groundfish Species and Conversion Rates for Pacific Halibut 3 Table 3 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY... Rates for Groundfish Species and Conversion Rates for Pacific Halibut ER11JY11.007 ER11JY11.008...

  16. Analysis of two production inventory systems with buffer, retrials and different production rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jose, K. P.; Nair, Salini S.

    2017-02-01

    This paper considers the comparison of two ( {s,S} ) production inventory systems with retrials of unsatisfied customers. The time for producing and adding each item to the inventory is exponentially distributed with rate β . However, a production rate α β higher than β is used at the beginning of the production. The higher production rate will reduce customers' loss when inventory level approaches zero. The demand from customers is according to a Poisson process. Service times are exponentially distributed. Upon arrival, the customers enter into a buffer of finite capacity. An arriving customer, who finds the buffer full, moves to an orbit. They can retry from there and inter-retrial times are exponentially distributed. The two models differ in the capacity of the buffer. The aim is to find the minimum value of total cost by varying different parameters and compare the efficiency of the models. The optimum value of α corresponding to minimum total cost is an important evaluation. Matrix analytic method is used to find an algorithmic solution to the problem. We also provide several numerical or graphical illustrations.

  17. Analysis of two production inventory systems with buffer, retrials and different production rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jose, K. P.; Nair, Salini S.

    2017-02-01

    This paper considers the comparison of two ( {s,S} ) production inventory systems with retrials of unsatisfied customers. The time for producing and adding each item to the inventory is exponentially distributed with rate β. However, a production rate α β higher than β is used at the beginning of the production. The higher production rate will reduce customers' loss when inventory level approaches zero. The demand from customers is according to a Poisson process. Service times are exponentially distributed. Upon arrival, the customers enter into a buffer of finite capacity. An arriving customer, who finds the buffer full, moves to an orbit. They can retry from there and inter-retrial times are exponentially distributed. The two models differ in the capacity of the buffer. The aim is to find the minimum value of total cost by varying different parameters and compare the efficiency of the models. The optimum value of α corresponding to minimum total cost is an important evaluation. Matrix analytic method is used to find an algorithmic solution to the problem. We also provide several numerical or graphical illustrations.

  18. 30 CFR 250.1159 - May the Regional Supervisor limit my well or reservoir production rates?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... reservoir production rates? 250.1159 Section 250.1159 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL... my well or reservoir production rates? (a) The Regional Supervisor may set a Maximum Production Rate (MPR) for a producing well completion, or set a Maximum Efficient Rate (MER) for a reservoir, or...

  19. 30 CFR 250.1159 - May the Regional Supervisor limit my well or reservoir production rates?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... reservoir production rates? 250.1159 Section 250.1159 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT... Supervisor limit my well or reservoir production rates? (a) The Regional Supervisor may set a Maximum Production Rate (MPR) for a producing well completion, or set a Maximum Efficient Rate (MER) for a...

  20. 30 CFR 250.1159 - May the Regional Supervisor limit my well or reservoir production rates?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... reservoir production rates? 250.1159 Section 250.1159 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL... my well or reservoir production rates? (a) The Regional Supervisor may set a Maximum Production Rate (MPR) for a producing well completion, or set a Maximum Efficient Rate (MER) for a reservoir, or...

  1. 30 CFR 250.1159 - May the Regional Supervisor limit my well or reservoir production rates?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... reservoir production rates? 250.1159 Section 250.1159 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL... my well or reservoir production rates? (a) The Regional Supervisor may set a Maximum Production Rate (MPR) for a producing well completion, or set a Maximum Efficient Rate (MER) for a reservoir, or...

  2. Cortisol production rates measured by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Esteban, N.V.; Yergey, A.L. )

    1990-04-01

    Cortisol production rates (FPRs) in physiologic and pathologic states in humans have been investigated over the past 30 years. However, there has been conflicting evidence concerning the validity of the currently accepted value of FPRs in humans (12 to 15 mg/m2/d) as determined by radiotracer methodology. The present study reviews previous methods proposed for the measurement of FPRs in humans and discusses the applications of the first method for the direct determination of 24-hour plasma FPRs during continuous administration of a stable isotope, using a thermospray high-pressure liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry technique. The technique is fast, sensitive, and, unlike gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methods, does not require derivatization, allowing on-line detection and quantification of plasma cortisol after a simple extraction procedure. The results of determination of plasma FPRs by stable tracer/mass spectrometry are directly in units of mass/time and, unlike radiotracer methods, are independent of any determination of volume of distribution or cortisol concentration. Our methodology offers distinct advantages over radiotracer techniques in simplicity and reliability since only single measurements of isotope ratios are required. The technique was validated in adrenalectomized patients. Circadian variations in daily FRPs were observed in normal volunteers, and, to date, results suggest a lower FRP in normal children and adults than previously believed. 88 references.

  3. Rate of phytochelatin production: Importance to metal tolerance. [Deschampsia caespitosa

    SciTech Connect

    Cureton-Brown, M.; Rauser, W.E. )

    1989-04-01

    Low molecular weight, cysteine-rich metal-binding peptides are produced in plants exposed to metals. This study focuses on the hypothesis that the rate of phytochelatin production is important to metal tolerance. Four clones of Deschampsia caespitosa tolerant of Cu and Ni, and one non-tolerant clone, were exposed to Cu and Ni for various times up to 24h. Root extracts were chromatographed on an anion exchange column to separate the metal-peptide fraction from unbound metal. In three metal-tolerant clones up to 95% of the buffer-soluble Cu and Ni was found in the metal-peptide fraction after 1h of exposure, with little change occurring subsequently. The non-tolerant clone bound only 2% of the metal after 1h. Copper remained low over 24h while Ni increased in the peptide fraction to the levels found in the tolerant clones. One metal tolerant clone did not conform to the patterns found in the other three. These data support the hypothesis that metal tolerance is, in some cases, related to the ability of roots to rapidly bind the metal that enters cells.

  4. Decline and depletion rates of oil production: a comprehensive investigation.

    PubMed

    Höök, Mikael; Davidsson, Simon; Johansson, Sheshti; Tang, Xu

    2014-01-13

    Two of the most fundamental concepts in the current debate about future oil supply are oilfield decline rates and depletion rates. These concepts are related, but not identical. This paper clarifies the definitions of these concepts, summarizes the underlying theory and empirically estimates decline and depletion rates for different categories of oilfield. A database of 880 post-peak fields is analysed to determine typical depletion levels, depletion rates and decline rates. This demonstrates that the size of oilfields has a significant influence on decline and depletion rates, with generally high values for small fields and comparatively low values for larger fields. These empirical findings have important implications for oil supply forecasting.

  5. Determination of optimal lot size and production rate for multi-production channels with limited capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yeu-Shiang; Wang, Ruei-Pei; Ho, Jyh-Wen

    2015-07-01

    Due to the constantly changing business environment, producers often have to deal with customers by adopting different procurement policies. That is, manufacturers confront not only predictable and regular orders, but also unpredictable and irregular orders. In this study, from the perspective of upstream manufacturers, both regular and irregular orders are considered in coping with the situation in which an uncertain demand is faced by the manufacturer, and a capacity confirming mechanism is used to examine such demand. If the demand is less than or equal to the capacity of the ordinary production channel, the general supply channel is utilised to fully account for the manufacturing process, but if the demand is greater than the capacity of the ordinary production channel, the contingency production channel would be activated along with the ordinary channel to satisfy the upcoming high demand. Besides, the reproductive property of the probability distribution is employed to represent the order quantity of the two types of demand. Accordingly, the optimal production rates and lot sizes for both channels are derived to provide managers with insights for further production planning.

  6. INTERWELL CONNECTIVITY AND DIAGNOSIS USING CORRELATION OF PRODUCTION AND INJECTION RATE DATA IN HYDROCARBON PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry L. Jensen; Larry W. Lake; Thang D. Bui; Ali Al-Yousef; Pablo Gentil

    2004-08-01

    This report details much of the progress on inferring interwell communication from well rate fluctuations. The goal of the project was to investigate the feasibility of inferring reservoir properties through weights derived from correlations between injection and production rates. We have focused on and accomplished the following items: (1) We have identified two possible causes for the source of negative weights. These are colinearity between injectors, and nonstationarity of be production data. (2) Colinearity has been addressed through ridge regression. Though there is much to be done here, such regression represents a trade-off between a minimum variance estimator and a biased estimator. (3) We have applied the ridge regression and the original Albertoni procedure to field data from the Magnus field. (4) The entire procedure (with several options) has been codified as a spreadsheet add-in. (5) Finally, we have begun, and report on, an extension of the method to predicting oil rates. Successful completion of these items will constitute the bulk of the final year's report.

  7. 76 FR 2930 - International Product Change-Global Expedited Package Services-Non- Published Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-18

    ... Product Change--Global Expedited Package Services-- Non- Published Rates AGENCY: Postal Service\\TM... Commission to add Global Expedited Package Services-- Non-Published Rates 2 to the Competitive Products List... Service to add Global Expedited Package Services--Non-Published Rates, to the Competitive Products List...

  8. 78 FR 70633 - Change in Rates and Classes of General Applicability for Competitive Products

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-26

    ... Service Change in Rates and Classes of General Applicability for Competitive Products; Notice #0;#0... SERVICE Change in Rates and Classes of General Applicability for Competitive Products AGENCY: Postal Service. ACTION: Notice of a change in rates of general applicability for competitive products....

  9. Enhanced capture rate for haze defects in production wafer inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auerbach, Ditza; Shulman, Adi; Rozentsvige, Moshe

    2010-03-01

    Photomask degradation via haze defect formation is an increasing troublesome yield problem in the semiconductor fab. Wafer inspection is often utilized to detect haze defects due to the fact that it can be a bi-product of process control wafer inspection; furthermore, the detection of the haze on the wafer is effectively enhanced due to the multitude of distinct fields being scanned. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel application for enhancing the wafer inspection tool's sensitivity to haze defects even further. In particular, we present results of bright field wafer inspection using the on several photo layers suffering from haze defects. One way in which the enhanced sensitivity can be achieved in inspection tools is by using a double scan of the wafer: one regular scan with the normal recipe and another high sensitivity scan from which only the repeater defects are extracted (the non-repeater defects consist largely of noise which is difficult to filter). Our solution essentially combines the double scan into a single high sensitivity scan whose processing is carried out along two parallel routes (see Fig. 1). Along one route, potential defects follow the standard recipe thresholds to produce a defect map at the nominal sensitivity. Along the alternate route, potential defects are used to extract only field repeater defects which are identified using an optimal repeater algorithm that eliminates "false repeaters". At the end of the scan, the two defect maps are merged into one with optical scan images available for all the merged defects. It is important to note, that there is no throughput hit; in addition, the repeater sensitivity is increased relative to a double scan, due to a novel runtime algorithm implementation whose memory requirements are minimized, thus enabling to search a much larger number of potential defects for repeaters. We evaluated the new application on photo wafers which consisted of both random and haze defects. The evaluation procedure

  10. Optimal Spray Application Rates for Ornamental Nursery Liner Production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Spray deposition and coverage at different application rates for nursery liners of different sizes were investigated to determine the optimal spray application rates. Experiments were conducted on two and three-year old red maple liners. A traditional hydraulic sprayer with vertical booms was used t...

  11. Improved estimates of environmental copper release rates from antifouling products.

    PubMed

    Finnie, Alistair A

    2006-01-01

    The US Navy Dome method for measuring copper release rates from antifouling paint in-service on ships' hulls can be considered to be the most reliable indicator of environmental release rates. In this paper, the relationship between the apparent copper release rate and the environmental release rate is established for a number of antifouling coating types using data from a variety of available laboratory, field and calculation methods. Apart from a modified Dome method using panels, all laboratory, field and calculation methods significantly overestimate the environmental release rate of copper from antifouling coatings. The difference is greatest for self-polishing copolymer antifoulings (SPCs) and smallest for certain erodible/ablative antifoulings, where the ASTM/ISO standard and the CEPE calculation method are seen to typically overestimate environmental release rates by factors of about 10 and 4, respectively. Where ASTM/ISO or CEPE copper release rate data are used for environmental risk assessment or regulatory purposes, it is proposed that the release rate values should be divided by a correction factor to enable more reliable generic environmental risk assessments to be made. Using a conservative approach based on a realistic worst case and accounting for experimental uncertainty in the data that are currently available, proposed default correction factors for use with all paint types are 5.4 for the ASTM/ISO method and 2.9 for the CEPE calculation method. Further work is required to expand this data-set and refine the correction factors through correlation of laboratory measured and calculated copper release rates with the direct in situ environmental release rate for different antifouling paints under a range of environmental conditions.

  12. Radio-frequency wave enhanced runaway production rate

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, V.S.; McClain, F.W.

    1983-06-01

    Enhancement of runaway electron production (over that of an Ohmic discharge) can be achieved by the addition of radio-frequency waves. This effect is studied analytically and numerically using a two-dimensional Fokker--Planck quasilinear equation.

  13. The Hydroxyl Radical Reaction Rate Constant and Products of Cyclohexanol

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    atmospheric degradation mechanism. The observed products and their formation yields were: cyclohexanone (0.55 0.06), hexanedial (0.32 0.15), 3...COL, tridecane, and decane were obtained from Aldrich with a purity of 99%. Pentanal (99%) and cyclohexanone (99%) were purchased through Ultra... Cyclohexanone (CON) was the only OH COL re- action product observed during the initial kinetic ex- periments. Its presence was also detected later using

  14. Interwell Connectivity and Diagnosis Using Correlation of Production and Injection Rate Data in Hydrocarbon Production

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry L. Jensen; Larry W. Lake; Ali Al-Yousef; Dan Weber; Ximing Liang; T.F. Edgar; Nazli Demiroren; Danial Kaviani

    2007-03-31

    This report details progress and results on inferring interwell communication from well rate fluctuations. Starting with the procedure of Albertoni and Lake (2003) as a foundation, the goal of the project was to develop further procedures to infer reservoir properties through weights derived from correlations between injection and production rates. A modified method, described in Yousef and others (2006a,b), and herein referred to as the 'capacitance model', is the primary product of this research project. The capacitance model (CM) produces two quantities, {lambda} and {tau}, for each injector-producer well pair. For the CM, we have focused on the following items: (1) Methods to estimate {lambda} and {tau} from simulated and field well rates. The original method uses both non-linear and linear regression and lacks the ability to include constraints on {lambda} and {tau}. The revised method uses only non-linear regression, permitting constraints to be included as well as accelerating the solution so that problems with large numbers of wells are more tractable. (2) Approaches to integrate {lambda} and {tau} to improve connectivity evaluations. Interpretations have been developed using Lorenz-style and log-log plots to assess heterogeneity. Testing shows the interpretations can identify whether interwell connectivity is controlled by flow through fractures, high-permeability layers, or due to partial completion of wells. Applications to the South Wasson and North Buck Draw Fields show promising results. (3) Optimization of waterflood injection rates using the CM and a power law relationship for watercut to maximize economic return. Tests using simulated data and a range of oil prices show the approach is working. (4) Investigation of methods to increase the robustness of {lambda} and {tau} estimates. Human interventions, such as workovers, also cause rate fluctuations and can be misinterpreted by the model if bottom hole pressure data are not available. A revised

  15. The Rate of Expanded Inner Speech During Spontaneous Sentence Productions.

    PubMed

    Netsell, Ronald; Kleinsasser, Steven; Daniel, Todd

    2016-10-01

    The rate of expanded inner speech and speech aloud was compared in 20 typical adults (3 males, 17 females; M age = 24 years, SD = 4). Participants generated and timed spontaneous sentences with both expanded inner speech and speech aloud following the instruction to say "the first thing that comes to mind." The rate of expanded inner speech was slightly, but significantly, faster than the rate of speech aloud. The findings supported the hypothesis that expanded inner speech was faster than speech aloud because of the time required to move the articulators in the latter. Physical measures of speaking rate are needed to validate self-timed measures. Limitations of the study and directions for research are discussed. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. r-PROCESS LANTHANIDE PRODUCTION AND HEATING RATES IN KILONOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Lippuner, Jonas; Roberts, Luke F.

    2015-12-20

    r-process nucleosynthesis in material ejected during neutron star mergers may lead to radioactively powered transients called kilonovae. The timescale and peak luminosity of these transients depend on the composition of the ejecta, which determines the local heating rate from nuclear decays and the opacity. Kasen et al. and Tanaka and Hotokezaka pointed out that lanthanides can drastically increase the opacity in these outflows. We use the new general-purpose nuclear reaction network SkyNet to carry out a parameter study of r-process nucleosynthesis for a range of initial electron fractions Y{sub e}, initial specific entropies s, and expansion timescales τ. We find that the ejecta is lanthanide-free for Y{sub e} ≳ 0.22−0.30, depending on s and τ. The heating rate is insensitive to s and τ, but certain, larger values of Y{sub e} lead to reduced heating rates, due to individual nuclides dominating the heating. We calculate approximate light curves with a simplified gray radiative transport scheme. The light curves peak at about a day (week) in the lanthanide-free (-rich) cases. The heating rate does not change much as the ejecta becomes lanthanide-free with increasing Y{sub e}, but the light-curve peak becomes about an order of magnitude brighter because it peaks much earlier when the heating rate is larger. We also provide parametric fits for the heating rates between 0.1 and 100 days, and we provide a simple fit in Y{sub e}, s, and τ to estimate whether or not the ejecta is lanthanide-rich.

  17. r-process Lanthanide Production and Heating Rates in Kilonovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippuner, Jonas; Roberts, Luke F.

    2015-12-01

    r-process nucleosynthesis in material ejected during neutron star mergers may lead to radioactively powered transients called kilonovae. The timescale and peak luminosity of these transients depend on the composition of the ejecta, which determines the local heating rate from nuclear decays and the opacity. Kasen et al. and Tanaka & Hotokezaka pointed out that lanthanides can drastically increase the opacity in these outflows. We use the new general-purpose nuclear reaction network SkyNet to carry out a parameter study of r-process nucleosynthesis for a range of initial electron fractions Ye, initial specific entropies s, and expansion timescales τ. We find that the ejecta is lanthanide-free for Ye ≳ 0.22-0.30, depending on s and τ. The heating rate is insensitive to s and τ, but certain, larger values of Ye lead to reduced heating rates, due to individual nuclides dominating the heating. We calculate approximate light curves with a simplified gray radiative transport scheme. The light curves peak at about a day (week) in the lanthanide-free (-rich) cases. The heating rate does not change much as the ejecta becomes lanthanide-free with increasing Ye, but the light-curve peak becomes about an order of magnitude brighter because it peaks much earlier when the heating rate is larger. We also provide parametric fits for the heating rates between 0.1 and 100 days, and we provide a simple fit in Ye, s, and τ to estimate whether or not the ejecta is lanthanide-rich.

  18. Survey of Productivity Rates Used for Highway Construction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    compared to other industries. INDUSTRY PRODUCTIVITY INCREASE % Agriculture 3.64 Construction 0.80 Government 1.64 0 Manufacturing 2.60 Mining 3.17...FROM TEE IVERAGI 4., Table 3.14 UF Survey Seed and Mulch 78 .2. cont. SEED AND MULCH SQUARI IAED) LCCL CCNDITIONS TRAFFIC :41jS RURAL URBAIN LIMITED

  19. High rate of methane leakage from natural gas production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2013-10-01

    Natural gas production is growing as the United States seeks domestic sources of relatively clean energy. Natural gas combustion produces less carbon dioxide emissions than coal or oil for the amount of energy produced. However, one source of concern is that some natural gas leaks to the atmosphere from the extraction point, releasing methane, a potent greenhouse gas.

  20. 75 FR 47650 - International Product Change-Global Expedited Package Services-Non-Published Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-06

    ... Product Change--Global Expedited Package Services-- Non-Published Rates AGENCY: Postal Service\\TM\\ ACTION... Service to add Global Expedited Package Contracts--Non-Published Rates to the Competitive Products List... Commission to add Global Expedited Package Services Contracts--Non-Published Rates to the Competitive...

  1. SAW with multiple electrodes achieves high production rates

    SciTech Connect

    Tusek, J.

    1996-08-01

    Increased demands for higher productivity in the production of welded structures dictate the use of new higher-performance welding procedures. Submerged arc welding (SAW) is already one of the highest performing arc welding processes, but with certain improved variants, its performance can be increased. These variants are multiple-head welding, double electrode welding and submerged arc welding with metal powder addition. These three variations of submerged arc welding have been put into practice and are extensively treated in the welding literature. The application of welding with more than three wires in a joint contact tube is rare, however, and rarely mentioned. The purpose of this article is to show the basic characteristics and eventual applications of SAW using multiple electrodes.

  2. Effects of culture (China vs. US) and task on perceived hazard: Evidence from product ratings, label ratings, and product to label matching.

    PubMed

    Lesch, Mary F; Rau, Pei-Luen Patrick; Choi, YoonSun

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, 44 Chinese and 40 US college students rated their perceived hazard in response to warning labels and products and attempted to match products with warning labels communicating the same level of hazard. Chinese participants tended to provide lower ratings of hazard in response to labels, but hazard perceived in response to products did not significantly differ as a function of culture. When asked to match a product with a warning label, Chinese participants' hazard perceptions appeared to be better calibrated, than did US participants', across products and labels. The results are interpreted in terms of constructivist theory which suggests that risk perceptions vary depending on the "frame of mind" evoked by the environment/context. Designers of warnings must be sensitive to the fact that product users' cognitive representations develop within a culture and that risk perceptions will vary based on the context in which they are derived.

  3. Interwell Connectivity and Diagnosis Using Correlation of Production and Injection Rate Data in Hydrocarbon Production

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry L. Jensen; Larry W. Lake; Ali Al-Yousef; Pablo Gentil; Nazli Demiroren

    2005-05-31

    This report details progress on inferring interwell communication from well rate fluctuations. Starting with the procedure of Albertoni and Lake (2003) as a foundation, the goal of the project is to develop further procedures to infer reservoir properties through weights derived from correlations between injection and production rates. A modified method, described in Jensen et al. (2005) and Yousef et al. (2005), and herein referred to as the ''capacitance model'', produces two quantities, {lambda} and {tau}, for each injector-producer well pair. We have focused on the following items: (1) Approaches to integrate {lambda} and {tau} to improve connectivity evaluations. Interpretations have been developed using Lorenz-style and log-log plots to assess heterogeneity. Testing shows the interpretations can identify whether interwell connectivity is controlled by flow through fractures, high-permeability layers, or due to partial completion of wells. Applications to the South Wasson and North Buck Draw Fields show promising results. (2) Optimization of waterflood injection rates using the capacitance model and a power law relationship for watercut to maximize economic return. Initial tests using simulated data and a range of oil prices show the approach is working. (3) Spectral analysis of injection and production data to estimate interwell connectivity and to assess the effects of near-wellbore gas on the results. Development of methods and analysis are ongoing. (4) Investigation of methods to increase the robustness of the capacitance method. These methods include revising the solution method to simultaneously estimate {lambda} and {tau} for each well pair. This approach allows for further constraints to be imposed during the computation, such as limiting {tau} to a range of values defined by the sampling interval and duration of the field data. This work is proceeding. Further work on this project includes the following: (1) Refinement and testing of the waterflood

  4. High hydrogen production rate of microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) with reduced electrode spacing.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shaoan; Logan, Bruce E

    2011-02-01

    Practical applications of microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) require high hydrogen production rates and a compact reactor. These goals can be achieved by reducing electrode spacing but high surface area anodes are needed. The brush anode MEC with electrode spacing of 2 cm had a higher hydrogen production rate and energy efficiency than an MEC with a flat cathode and a 1-cm electrode spacing. The maximum hydrogen production rate with a 2 cm electrode spacing was 17.8 m(3)/m(3)d at an applied voltage of E(ap)=1 V. Reducing electrode spacing increased hydrogen production rates at the lower applied voltages, but not at the higher (>0.6 V) applied voltages. These results demonstrate that reducing electrode spacing can increase hydrogen production rate, but that the closest electrode spacing do not necessarily produce the highest possible hydrogen production rates.

  5. Experimental particle formation rates spanning tropospheric sulfuric acid and ammonia abundances, ion production rates, and temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kürten, Andreas; Bianchi, Federico; Almeida, Joao; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Dunne, Eimear M.; Duplissy, Jonathan; Williamson, Christina; Barmet, Peter; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M.; Flagan, Richard C.; Franchin, Alessandro; Gordon, Hamish; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Ickes, Luisa; Jokinen, Tuija; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Onnela, Antti; Ortega, Ismael K.; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P.; Rondo, Linda; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Smith, James N.; Steiner, Gerhard; Stozhkov, Yuri; Tomé, António; Tröstl, Jasmin; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Wagner, Paul E.; Wimmer, Daniela; Ye, Penglin; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Ken; Kulmala, Markku; Curtius, Joachim

    2016-10-01

    Binary nucleation of sulfuric acid and water as well as ternary nucleation involving ammonia are thought to be the dominant processes responsible for new particle formation (NPF) in the cold temperatures of the middle and upper troposphere. Ions are also thought to be important for particle nucleation in these regions. However, global models presently lack experimentally measured NPF rates under controlled laboratory conditions and so at present must rely on theoretical or empirical parameterizations. Here with data obtained in the European Organization for Nuclear Research CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber, we present the first experimental survey of NPF rates spanning free tropospheric conditions. The conditions during nucleation cover a temperature range from 208 to 298 K, sulfuric acid concentrations between 5 × 105 and 1 × 109 cm-3, and ammonia mixing ratios from zero added ammonia, i.e., nominally pure binary, to a maximum of 1400 parts per trillion by volume (pptv). We performed nucleation studies under pure neutral conditions with zero ions being present in the chamber and at ionization rates of up to 75 ion pairs cm-3 s-1 to study neutral and ion-induced nucleation. We found that the contribution from ion-induced nucleation is small at temperatures between 208 and 248 K when ammonia is present at several pptv or higher. However, the presence of charges significantly enhances the nucleation rates, especially at 248 K with zero added ammonia, and for higher temperatures independent of NH3 levels. We compare these experimental data with calculated cluster formation rates from the Atmospheric Cluster Dynamics Code with cluster evaporation rates obtained from quantum chemistry.

  6. Kinetic modeling of hydrogen production rate by photoautotrophic cyanobacterium A. variabilis ATCC 29413 as a function of both CO2 concentration and oxygen production rate.

    PubMed

    Salleh, Siti Fatihah; Kamaruddin, Azlina; Uzir, Mohamad Hekarl; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman; Shamsuddin, Abdul Halim

    2017-02-07

    Hydrogen production by cyanobacteria could be one of the promising energy resources in the future. However, there is very limited information regarding the kinetic modeling of hydrogen production by cyanobacteria available in the literature. To provide an in-depth understanding of the biological system involved during the process, the Haldane's noncompetitive inhibition equation has been modified to determine the specific hydrogen production rate (HPR) as a function of both dissolved CO2 concentration (CTOT) and oxygen production rate (OPR). The highest HPR of 15 [Formula: see text] was found at xCO2 of 5% vol/vol and the rate consequently decreased when the CTOT and OPR were 0.015 k mol m(-3) and 0.55 mL h(-1), respectively. The model provided a fairly good estimation of the HPR with respect to the experimental data collected.

  7. Outdoor pilot-scale production of Nannochloropsis gaditana: influence of culture parameters and lipid production rates in tubular photobioreactors.

    PubMed

    San Pedro, A; González-López, C V; Acién, F G; Molina-Grima, E

    2014-10-01

    This work studied outdoor pilot scale production of Nannochloropsis gaditana in tubular photobioreactors. The growth and biomass composition of the strain were studied under different culture strategies: continuous-mode (varying nutrient supply and dilution rate) and two-stage cultures aiming lipid enhancement. Besides, parameters such as irradiance, specific nitrate input and dilution rate were used to obtain models predicting growth, lipid and fatty acids production rates. The range of optimum dilution rate was 0.31-0.351/day with maximum biomass, lipid and fatty acids productivities of 590, 110 and 66.8 mg/l day, respectively. Nitrate limitation led to an increase in lipid and fatty acids contents (from 20.5% to 38.0% and from 16.9% to 23.5%, respectively). Two-stage culture strategy provided similar fatty acids productivities (56.4 mg/l day) but the neutral lipids content was doubled.

  8. Short- and long-run exchange rate effects on forest product trade: evidence from panel data

    Treesearch

    Torjus F. Bolksejo; Joseph Buongiorno

    2006-01-01

    Impacts of exchange rates on international forest products trade are widely debated, but the empirical evidence regarding this issue is still inconclusive. Here, we report findings of the impacts of the exchange rates on the main forest product imports and exports of the US, from January 1989 to November 2004. Export data consisted of monthly series of the main...

  9. 76 FR 80987 - International Product Change-Global Expedited Package Services-Non-Published Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-27

    ... Product Change--Global Expedited Package Services-- Non-Published Rates AGENCY: Postal Service TM . ACTION... Commission to add Global Expedited Package Services-- Non-Published Rates 3 (GEPS--NPR 3) to the Competitive Products List. DATES: December 27, 2011. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Margaret M. Falwell, (202) 268...

  10. 78 FR 1277 - International Product Change-Global Expedited Package Services-Non-Published Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ... Product Change--Global Expedited Package Services-- Non-Published Rates AGENCY: Postal Service TM . ACTION... Commission to add Global Expedited Package Services-- Non-Published Rates 4 (GEPS-NPR 4) to the Competitive Products List. DATES: Effective date: January 8, 2013. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Patricia A. Fortin...

  11. Using Self-Management Strategies to Increase the Production Rates of Workers with Severe Handicaps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Stephen C.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The investigation assessed effects of a self-management training program on the production rates of four severely mentally retarded workers. The program comprised self-instructions, goal setting, and self-reinforcement. Results indicated that the program substantially improved the production rates for all workers for up to three months. (Author/DB)

  12. Cosmogenic Ne-21 Production Rates in H-Chondrites Based on Cl-36 - Ar-36 Ages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leya, I.; Graf, Th.; Nishiizumi, K.; Guenther, D.; Wieler, R.

    2000-01-01

    We measured Ne-21 production rates in 14 H-chondrites in good agreement with model calculations. The production rates are based on Ne-21 concentrations measured on bulk samples or the non-magnetic fraction and Cl-36 - Ar-36 ages determined from the metal phase.

  13. Cosmogenic Ne-21 Production Rates in H-Chondrites Based on Cl-36 - Ar-36 Ages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leya, I.; Graf, Th.; Nishiizumi, K.; Guenther, D.; Wieler, R.

    2000-01-01

    We measured Ne-21 production rates in 14 H-chondrites in good agreement with model calculations. The production rates are based on Ne-21 concentrations measured on bulk samples or the non-magnetic fraction and Cl-36 - Ar-36 ages determined from the metal phase.

  14. Correlation of gene expression and protein production rate - a system wide study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Growth rate is a major determinant of intracellular function. However its effects can only be properly dissected with technically demanding chemostat cultivations in which it can be controlled. Recent work on Saccharomyces cerevisiae chemostat cultivations provided the first analysis on genome wide effects of growth rate. In this work we study the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei (Hypocrea jecorina) that is an industrial protein production host known for its exceptional protein secretion capability. Interestingly, it exhibits a low growth rate protein production phenotype. Results We have used transcriptomics and proteomics to study the effect of growth rate and cell density on protein production in chemostat cultivations of T. reesei. Use of chemostat allowed control of growth rate and exact estimation of the extracellular specific protein production rate (SPPR). We find that major biosynthetic activities are all negatively correlated with SPPR. We also find that expression of many genes of secreted proteins and secondary metabolism, as well as various lineage specific, mostly unknown genes are positively correlated with SPPR. Finally, we enumerate possible regulators and regulatory mechanisms, arising from the data, for this response. Conclusions Based on these results it appears that in low growth rate protein production energy is very efficiently used primarly for protein production. Also, we propose that flux through early glycolysis or the TCA cycle is a more fundamental determining factor than growth rate for low growth rate protein production and we propose a novel eukaryotic response to this i.e. the lineage specific response (LSR). PMID:22185473

  15. The Effect of Humic Substances on the Production Rate of Alkyl Nitrates in Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiss, E. M.; Dahl, E. E.

    2008-12-01

    Alkyl nitrates are produced photochemically in seawater by the reaction of organic peroxy radicals and nitric oxide (ROO + NO). Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is a source of organic peroxy radicals in seawater, but it is unclear as to which fraction of DOM is important for alkyl nitrate formation. Dissolved humics may be important to alkyl nitrate production. The production rates of C1-C3 alkyl nitrates were observed in 0.2 μm filtered open ocean seawater as a function of nitrite concentration. The net production rates of methyl, ethyl, isopropyl, and n-propyl nitrate increased with increasing nitrite concentrations. Suwannee River humics were added to seawater samples and the net production rates of alkyl nitrates were determined. The production rate of ethyl nitrate increased at nitrite concentrations above 20 μM nitrite by a factor of ~5 with the addition of humic substances. The addition of humic substances to the water samples also resulted in an increase in the ratio of isopropyl nitrate production to ethyl nitrate production by a factor of ~3 compared to nitrite only additions. The ratio of isopropyl to ethyl nitrate production with additional humics is also greater than production rates determined using open ocean water in previous studies. The ratios of methyl nitrate and n-propyl nitrate production to ethyl nitrate production did not change significantly. The minimal change in alkyl nitrate production rates at nitrite concentrations below 20 μM indicates that NO may be the limiting reactant in this particular water sample. The effect of the humics at high nitrite concentrations shows that organic peroxy radicals are an important reactant in the production of alkyl nitrates. The difference between production rate patterns with the addition of humics compared to the nitrite only incubations indicate that humics are not the only source of organic peroxy radicals affecting open ocean water alkyl nitrate formation.

  16. Effective helium burning rates and the production of the neutrino nuclei.

    PubMed

    Austin, Sam M; West, Christopher; Heger, Alexander

    2014-03-21

    Effective values for the key helium burning reaction rates, triple-α and (12)C(α, γ)(16)O, are obtained by adjusting their strengths so as to obtain the best match with the solar abundance pattern of isotopes uniquely or predominately made in core-collapse supernovae. These effective rates are then used to determine the production of the neutrino isotopes. The use of effective rates considerably reduces the uncertainties in the production factors arising from uncertainties in the helium burning rates, and improves our ability to use the production of B11 to constrain the neutrino emission from supernovae.

  17. Calculating Subsurface Nucleonic Production of Noble Gas Nuclides: Implications on Crustal and Mantle K, Th, U Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sramek, O.; McDonough, W. F.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Stevens, L.; Siegel, J.

    2013-12-01

    While atmospheric concentration of some noble gas nuclides is controlled by their cosmogenic production (e.g., 39Ar), nucleonic production dominates in subsurface environments. Nucleogenic production rates, which involve alpha-induced reactions, depend on Th and U abundances in the source rock. Production rates of 39Ar and 40Ar scale with K abundance in the source. Consequently, observed isotopic ratio of noble gas in crustal fluids and mantle-derived lavas can be compared to calculated predictions in order to constrain heat producing element abundances in the source rock. In particular, 39Ar/40Ar, 39Ar/21Ne, and 40Ar/21Ne inform us about U+Th abundance, K abundance, and K/U ratio. We calculate subsurface production rates for these nuclides for various assumed rock compositions. A discrepancy in existing evaluations of 39Ar production rates is noted. While Mei et al. (2010) predict a production rate of 5 atoms of 39Ar per kg per year for a K=2 %, Th=5 ppm, U=2 ppm (by weight) rock, Yokochi et al. (2012) evaluate 39Ar production rate, in number of atoms / (kg yr), at 24, and Yokochi et al. (2013) results range between 50-80. Efforts are underway to understand these differences. Experimental methods of 39Ar counting have advanced significantly in recent years, a development driven to large extent by the needs of experimental particle physics community in their search for dark matter using argon-based WIMP detectors. Measurement techniques now allow determination of 39Ar/40Ar ratios in crustal rocks and are approaching the detectability of 39Ar/40Ar ratio predicted for a mantle source. We discuss how the noble gas ratio measurements can be harnessed to gain insight into source rock's abundances of heat producing elements including mantle K/U ratio. Mei, D.-M. et al., 2010. Phys. Rev. C 81, 055802, doi:10.1103/PhysRevC.81.055802 Yokochi, R. et al., 2012. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 88, 19-26, doi:10.1016/j.gca.2012.04.034 Yokochi, R. et al., 2013. Chem. Geol. 339, 43

  18. Considerations in Dealing with Low Production Rates of Severely Retarded Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horner, Robert H.; And Others

    Reported are four studies on methods to increase the production rates of severely and profoundly retarded adults in the sheltered workshop setting. It is explained that all four Ss had undergone intensive training on a complex task, were able to perform the task at a reasonably high rate, but did not usually maintain a high rate in the production…

  19. Exact solutions for the entropy production rate of several irreversible processes.

    PubMed

    Ross, John; Vlad, Marcel O

    2005-11-24

    We investigate thermal conduction described by Newton's law of cooling and by Fourier's transport equation and chemical reactions based on mass action kinetics where we detail a simple example of a reaction mechanism with one intermediate. In these cases we derive exact expressions for the entropy production rate and its differential. We show that at a stationary state the entropy production rate is an extremum if and only if the stationary state is a state of thermodynamic equilibrium. These results are exact and independent of any expansions of the entropy production rate. In the case of thermal conduction we compare our exact approach with the conventional approach based on the expansion of the entropy production rate near equilibrium. If we expand the entropy production rate in a series and keep terms up to the third order in the deviation variables and then differentiate, we find out that the entropy production rate is not an extremum at a nonequilibrium steady state. If there is a strict proportionality between fluxes and forces, then the entropy production rate is an extremum at the stationary state even if the stationary state is far away from equilibrium.

  20. Free energy and entropy production rate for a Brownian particle that walks on overdamped medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taye, Mesfin Asfaw

    2016-09-01

    We derive general expressions for the free energy, entropy production, and entropy extraction rates for a Brownian particle that walks in a viscous medium where the dynamics of its motion is governed by the Langevin equation. It is shown that, when the system is out of equilibrium, it constantly produces entropy and at the same time extracts entropy out of the system. Its entropy production and extraction rates decrease in time and saturate to a constant value. In the long-time limit, the rate of entropy production balances the rate of entropy extraction and, at equilibrium, both entropy production and extraction rates become zero. Moreover, considering different model systems, not only do we investigate how various thermodynamic quantities behave in time but also we discuss the fluctuation theorem in detail.

  1. Titan-like exoplanets: Variations in geometric albedo and effective transit height with haze production rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Checlair, Jade; McKay, Christopher P.; Imanaka, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    Extensive studies characterizing Titan present an opportunity to study the atmospheric properties of Titan-like exoplanets. Using an existing model of Titan's atmospheric haze, we computed geometric albedo spectra and effective transit height spectra for six values of the haze production rate (zero haze to twice present) over a wide range of wavelengths (0.2-2 μm). In the geometric albedo spectra, the slope in the UV-visible changes from blue to red when varying the haze production rate values from zero to twice the current Titan value. This spectral feature is the most effective way to characterize the haze production rates. Methane absorption bands in the visible-NIR compete with the absorbing haze, being more prominent for smaller haze production rates. The effective transit heights probe a region of the atmosphere where the haze and gas are optically thin and that is thus not effectively probed by the geometric albedo. The effective transit height decreases smoothly with increasing wavelength, from 376 km to 123 km at 0.2 and 2 μm, respectively. When decreasing the haze production rate, the methane absorption bands become more prominent, and the effective transit height decreases with a steeper slope with increasing wavelength. The slope of the geometric albedo in the UV-visible increases smoothly with increasing haze production rate, while the slope of the effective transit height spectra is not sensitive to the haze production rate other than showing a sharp rise when the haze production rate increases from zero. We conclude that geometric albedo spectra provide the most sensitive indicator of the haze production rate and the background Rayleigh gas. Our results suggest that important and complementary information can be obtained from the geometric albedo and motivates improvements in the technology for direct imaging of nearby exoplanets.

  2. Titan-Like Exoplanets: Variations in Geometric Albedo and Effective Transit Height with Haze Production Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Checlair, Jade; McKay, Christopher P.; Imanaka, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Extensive studies characterizing Titan present an opportunity to study the atmospheric properties of Titan-like exoplanets. Using an existing model of Titan's atmospheric haze, we computed geometric albedo spectra and effective transit height spectra for six values of the haze production rate (zero haze to twice present) over a wide range of wavelengths (0.2-2 microns). In the geometric albedo spectra, the slope in the UV-visible changes from blue to red when varying the haze production rate values from zero to twice the current Titan value. This spectral feature is the most effective way to characterize the haze production rates. Methane absorption bands in the visible-NIR compete with the absorbing haze, being more prominent for smaller haze production rates. The effective transit heights probe a region of the atmosphere where the haze and gas are optically thin and that is thus not effectively probed by the geometric albedo. The effective transit height decreases smoothly with increasing wavelength, from 376 km to 123 km at 0.2 and 2 microns, respectively. When decreasing the haze production rate, the methane absorption bands become more prominent, and the effective transit height decreases with a steeper slope with increasing wavelength. The slope of the geometric albedo in the UV-visible increases smoothly with increasing haze production rate, while the slope of the effective transit height spectra is not sensitive to the haze production rate other than showing a sharp rise when the haze production rate increases from zero. We conclude that geometric albedo spectra provide the most sensitive indicator of the haze production rate and the background Rayleigh gas. Our results suggest that important and complementary information can be obtained from the geometric albedo and motivates improvements in the technology for direct imaging of nearby exoplanets.

  3. 40 CFR Table I-4 to Subpart I of... - Default Emission Factors (1-Uij) for Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Emission Factors (1-Uij) for Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates (Bijk) for Semiconductor Manufacturing for... Factors(1-Uij) for Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates (Bijk) for Semiconductor...

  4. 40 CFR Table I-3 to Subpart I of... - Default Emission Factors (1-Uij) for Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Emission Factors (1-Uij) for Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates (Bijk) for Semiconductor Manufacturing for... Factors (1-Uij) for Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates (Bijk) for Semiconductor...

  5. Measurements of radon exhalation rate in NORM used as consumer products in Japan.

    PubMed

    Iwaoka, Kazuki; Hosoda, Masahiro; Yajima, Kazuaki; Tokonami, Shinji

    2017-01-25

    Twenty-five beauty products known to contain natural radionuclides were collected, and their (222)Rn mass exhalation rates were measured. The effective doses to workers due to (222)Rn exhaled from these products were estimated. The (222)Rn mass exhalation rates of these products were below 177 μBq kg(-1) s(-1) and were almost identical to those of natural rocks in Japan. The maximum effective dose of (222)Rn exhaled from these products was 71 μSv y(-1).

  6. High Acetic Acid Production Rate Obtained by Microbial Electrosynthesis from Carbon Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Jourdin, Ludovic; Grieger, Timothy; Monetti, Juliette; Flexer, Victoria; Freguia, Stefano; Lu, Yang; Chen, Jun; Romano, Mark; Wallace, Gordon G; Keller, Jurg

    2015-11-17

    High product specificity and production rate are regarded as key success parameters for large-scale applicability of a (bio)chemical reaction technology. Here, we report a significant performance enhancement in acetate formation from CO2, reaching comparable productivity levels as in industrial fermentation processes (volumetric production rate and product yield). A biocathode current density of -102 ± 1 A m(-2) and an acetic acid production rate of 685 ± 30 (g m(-2) day(-1)) have been achieved in this study. High recoveries of 94 ± 2% of the CO2 supplied as the sole carbon source and 100 ± 4% of electrons into the final product (acetic acid) were achieved after development of a mature biofilm, reaching an elevated product titer of up to 11 g L(-1). This high product specificity is remarkable for mixed microbial cultures, which would make the product downstream processing easier and the technology more attractive. This performance enhancement was enabled through the combination of a well-acclimatized and enriched microbial culture (very fast start-up after culture transfer), coupled with the use of a newly synthesized electrode material, EPD-3D. The throwing power of the electrophoretic deposition technique, a method suitable for large-scale production, was harnessed to form multiwalled carbon nanotube coatings onto reticulated vitreous carbon to generate a hierarchical porous structure.

  7. Rapid rates of soil production in the western Southern Alps, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, I. J.; Almond, P. C.; Eger, A.; Stone, J. O.; Malcolm, B.; Montgomery, D. R.

    2012-12-01

    Quantifying rates of soil production is necessary for determining the relative magnitude of the processes that drive the evolution of mountain topography and for assessing proposed links among tectonic uplift, erosion, weathering, and global biogeochemical cycles. However, little is known about the role soil production plays in the denudation of rapidly uplifting mountains. We addressed this problem by sampling soil and river sediment from five catchments in the rapidly uplifting and high rainfall portion of the western Southern Alps, New Zealand. Soils were sampled from ridgetops with subalpine forest and dense alpine shrubland vegetation. Results from 11 measurements of in situ-produced 10Be in soils from three catchments show that rock is rapidly converted to soil, with the highest measured rate approaching 2 mm yr-1. Soil production rates at two of the ridgetops decline exponentially as soil depth increases, consistent with previously proposed soil production functions. The third site exhibits an ambiguous soil production rate-depth relationship. The y-intercepts, or maximum predicted soil production rate where the soil depth is equal to zero, at the sites with well-defined soil production functions are 7-9 times greater than those in other tectonically-active mountains and 1-2 orders of magnitude greater than values from drier and more tectonically-quiescent landscapes, indicating that rock can be converted to soil at substantially higher rates than previously recognized. The maximum predicted soil production rate values are 1.5 to 2.5 times lower than watershed-scale denudation rates inferred from in situ 10Be concentrations in stream sediment, indicating that soil production rates approach, but do not reach catchment-averaged values, which also reflect denudation by bedrock landslides. Ongoing work on additional samples will lead to a refinement of the soil production functions and provide rates for two additional sites. In-progress measurement of zirconium

  8. Variability in root production, phenology, and turnover rate among 12 temperate tree species.

    PubMed

    McCormack, M Luke; Adams, Thomas S; Smithwick, Erica A H; Eissenstat, David M

    2014-08-01

    The timing of fine root production and turnover strongly influences both the seasonal potential for soil resource acquisition among competing root systems and the plant fluxes of root carbon into soil pools. However, basic patterns and variability in the rates and timing or fine root production and turnover are generally unknown among perennial plants species. We address this shortfall using a heuristic model relating root phenology to turnover together with three years of minirhizotron observations of root dynamics in 12 temperate tree species grown in a common garden. We specifically investigated how the amount and the timing of root production differ among species and how they impact estimates of fine root turnover. Across the 12 species, there was wide variation in the timing of root production with some species producing a single root flush in early summer and others producing roots either more uniformly over the growing season or in multiple pulses. Additionally, the pattern and timing of root production appeared to be consistent across years for some species but varied in others. Root turnover rate was related to total root production (P < 0.001) as species with greater root production typically had faster root turnover rates. We also found that, within species, annual root production varied up to a threefold increase between years, which led to large interannual differences in turnover rate. Results from the heuristic model indicated that shifting the pattern or timing of root production can impact estimates of root turnover rates for root populations with life spans less than one year while estimates of root turnover rate for longer lived roots were unaffected by changes in root phenology. Overall, we suggest that more detailed observations of root phenology and production will improve fidelity of root turnover estimates. Future efforts should link patterns of root phenology and production with whole-plant life history traits and variation in annual and

  9. Production Rates of Cosmogenic Nuclides in the Knyahinya L-Chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K. J.; Reedy, R. C.

    2004-01-01

    The production rates of spallogenic radionuclides and stable isotopes in the L-chondrite Knyahinya were investigated using the MCNPX code. Numerous cosmogenic nuclides had been measured in many Knyahinya samples. The pre-atmospheric size and sample locations of Knyahinya are well known, thus Knyahinya is a good test case for cosmogenic-nuclide production-rate calculations. Our calculated profiles were compared to the measurements to determine effective proton fluxes.

  10. Assessing the Impact of Low Rate Initial Production on Army Missile System Procurement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    is not presently configured as a "fire and forget" weapon. The system utilizes semiactive laser or radar guidance against heavily armored vehicles at...Low Rate Initial Production (LRIP) has upon Army missile system development. It focuses on: (1) regulatory guidance on the use of LRIP in the...Low Rate Initial Production (LRIP) has upon Army missile system development. It focuses on: (1) regulatory guidance on the use of LRIP in the

  11. Effect of heparin on cleavage rates and embryo production with four bovine sperm preparation protocols.

    PubMed

    Mendes, J O B; Burns, P D; De La Torre-Sanchez, J F; Seidel, G E

    2003-07-01

    Heparin is often added to fertilization media to induce sperm capacitation. However, recent observations from the bovine IVF industry have indicated that heparin may not be necessary to induce sperm capacitation when cryopreserved bovine sperm are separated through Percoll gradients. The objective of these studies was to determine if the addition of heparin to fertilization media was required following separation of frozen-thawed bovine sperm. Experiment 1 was conducted to determine the effect of heparin on cleavage rates and embryo production when using Percoll, BSA or washing sperm separation protocols. Experiment 2 was conducted to determine the effect of heparin on cleavage rates and embryonic development when using a new sperm separation protocol (PureSperm). In Experiment 1, regardless of sperm separation protocol, heparin increased cleavage rates and embryo production (P<0.05). Further, cleavage rates and embryo production were higher for the Percoll procedure compared to either BSA or washing sperm separation protocols (P<0.05). In Experiment 2, there was no difference between Percoll and PureSperm separation protocols on cleavage rates or embryo production (P>0.05). However, heparin increased cleavage rates for both protocols and improved embryo production for the PureSperm protocol (P<0.05). In conclusion, use of heparin in fertilization media improves in vitro embryo production when using cryopreserved bovine sperm. Furthermore, PureSperm can be used as an alternative to Percoll for bovine sperm separation.

  12. N2O production rate of an enriched ammonia-oxidising bacteria culture exponentially correlates to its ammonia oxidation rate.

    PubMed

    Law, Yingyu; Ni, Bing-Jie; Lant, Paul; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2012-06-15

    The relationship between the ammonia oxidation rate (AOR) and nitrous oxide production rate (N(2)OR) of an enriched ammonia-oxidising bacteria (AOB) culture was investigated. The AOB culture was enriched in a nitritation system fed with synthetic anaerobic digester liquor. The AOR was controlled by adjusting the dissolved oxygen (DO) and pH levels and also by varying the initial ammonium (NH(4)(+)) concentration in batch experiments. Tests were also performed directly on the parent reactor where a stepwise decrease/increase in DO was implemented to alter AOR. The experimental data indicated a clear exponential relationship between the biomass specific N(2)OR and AOR. Four metabolic models were used to analyse the experimental data. The metabolic model formulated based on aerobic N(2)O production from the decomposition of nitrosyl radical (NOH) predicted the exponential correlation observed experimentally. The experimental data could not be reproduced by models developed on the basis of N(2)O production through nitrite (NO(2)(-)) and nitric oxide (NO) reduction by AOB.

  13. Systematic analysis of astrophysical S-factors and thermonuclear reaction rates

    SciTech Connect

    Katsuma, M.

    2008-05-12

    The astrophysical S-factors of the {sup 13}C({alpha},n){sup 16}O, {sup 17}O({alpha},n){sup 20}Ne, {sup 21}Ne({alpha},n){sup 24}Mg and {sup 25}Mg({alpha},n){sup 28}Si reactions are analyzed with DWBA. The gross structures of the experimental data are reproduced by the DWBA calculations. The resulting reaction rates are compared with those in the CF88 and NACRE compilations.

  14. The rate of decay of fresh fission products from a nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolan, David J.

    Determining the rate of decay of fresh fission products from a nuclear reactor is complex because of the number of isotopes involved, different types of decay, half-lives of the isotopes, and some isotopes decay into other radioactive isotopes. Traditionally, a simplified rule of 7s and 10s is used to determine the dose rate from nuclear weapons and can be to estimate the dose rate from fresh fission products of a nuclear reactor. An experiment was designed to determine the dose rate with respect to time from fresh fission products of a nuclear reactor. The experiment exposed 0.5 grams of unenriched Uranium to a fast and thermal neutron flux from a TRIGA Research Reactor (Lakewood, CO) for ten minutes. The dose rate from the fission products was measured by four Mirion DMC 2000XB electronic personal dosimeters over a period of six days. The resulting dose rate following a rule of 10s: the dose rate of fresh fission products from a nuclear reactor decreases by a factor of 10 for every 10 units of time.

  15. Specific growth rate and substrate dependent polyhydroxybutyrate production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kocharin, Kanokarn; Nielsen, Jens

    2013-03-21

    Production of the biopolymer polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae starts at the end of exponential phase particularly when the specific growth rate is decreased due to the depletion of glucose in the medium. The specific growth rate and the type of carbon source (fermentable/non-fermentable) have been known to influence the cell physiology and hence affect the fermentability of S. cerevisiae. The production of PHB utilizes cytosolic acetyl-CoA as a precursor and the S. cerevisiae employed in this study is therefore a strain with the enhanced cytosolic acetyl-CoA supply. Growth and PHB production at different specific growth rates were evaluated on glucose, ethanol and a mixture of glucose and ethanol as carbon source. Ethanol as carbon source yielded a higher PHB production compared to glucose since it can be directly used for cytosolic acetyl-CoA production and hence serves as a precursor for PHB production. However, this carbon source results in lower biomass yield and hence it was found that to ensure both biomass formation and PHB production a mixture of glucose and ethanol was optimal, and this resulted in the highest volumetric productivity of PHB, 8.23 mg/L · h-1, at a dilution rate of 0.1 h-1.

  16. Ethylene Production and Ethylene Effects on Respiration Rate of Postharvest Sugarbeet Roots

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ethylene elevates respiration, is induced by wounding, and contributes to wound-induced respiration in most postharvest plant products. Ethylene production and its effects on respiration rate, however, have not been determined in sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) root, even though any elevation in respi...

  17. Cable logging production rate equations for thinning young-growth Douglas-fir

    Treesearch

    Chris B. LeDoux; Lawson W. Starnes

    1986-01-01

    A cable logging thinning simulation model and field study data from cable thinning production studies have been assembled and converted into a set of simple equations. These equations can be used to estimate the hourly production rates of various cable thinning machines operating in the mountainous terrain of western Oregon and western Washington. The equations include...

  18. 78 FR 41129 - Market Test of Experimental Product - International Merchandise Return Service-Non-Published Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-09

    ... will begin a market test of its International Merchandise Return Service (IMRS) Non-published Rate (NPR... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office POSTAL SERVICE Market Test of Experimental Product -- International Merchandise Return Service--Non-Published Rates AGENCY: U.S...

  19. 76 FR 396 - Product Change-Priority Mail-Non-Published Rates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office POSTAL SERVICE Product Change--Priority Mail--Non-Published Rates AGENCY: Postal Service TM . ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Postal...-Published Rates and Notice of Filing Materials Under Seal. Documents are available at http://www.prc.gov...

  20. Survey response rates in the forest products literature from 2000 to 2015

    Treesearch

    Matt Bumgardner; Iris Montague; Jan Wiedenbeck

    2017-01-01

    A literature analysis was conducted to synthesize typical response rates from forest-productsindustry- based survey studies published from 2000 to mid-2015. One hundred and ninety-five surveys published in several forest products and forestry journals and proceedings (mostly North American based) were analyzed. Overall, the typical response rate was found to be about...

  1. Production and Recoil Loss of Cosmogenic Nuclides in Presolar Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trappitsch, Reto; Leya, Ingo

    2016-05-01

    Presolar grains are small particles that condensed in the vicinity of dying stars. Some of these grains survived the voyage through the interstellar medium (ISM) and were incorporated into meteorite parent bodies at the formation of the Solar System. An important question is when these stellar processes happened, i.e., how long presolar grains were drifting through the ISM. While conventional radiometric dating of such small grains is very difficult, presolar grains are irradiated with galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) in the ISM, which induce the production of cosmogenic nuclides. This opens the possibility to determine cosmic-ray exposure (CRE) ages, i.e., how long presolar grains were irradiated in the ISM. Here, we present a new model for the production and loss of cosmogenic 3He, 6,7Li, and 21,22Ne in presolar SiC grains. The cosmogenic production rates are calculated using a state-of-the-art nuclear cross-section database and a GCR spectrum in the ISM consistent with recent Voyager data. Our findings are that previously measured 3He and 21Ne CRE ages agree within the (sometimes large) 2σ uncertainties and that the CRE ages for most presolar grains are smaller than the predicted survival times. The obtained results are relatively robust since interferences from implanted low-energy GCRs into the presolar SiC grains and/or from cosmogenic production within the meteoroid can be neglected.

  2. Impact of mixtures of different fresh-cut fruits on respiration and ethylene production rates.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Pramod V; Luca, Alexandru; Edelenbos, Merete

    2014-07-01

    Packaging and storage of fresh-cut fruits and vegetables are a challenging task, since fresh produce continue to respire and senesce after harvest and processing accelerates the physiological processes. The response on respiration and ethylene production rates of fresh produce to changes in O2 and CO2 concentrations and temperature has been extensively studied for whole fruits but literature is limited on processed and mixed fresh-cut fruits. This study aimed to investigate the effects of mixing various proportions of fresh-cut fruits (melon chunks, apple slices, and pineapples cubes) on respiration and ethylene production rates and to develop predictive models for modified atmosphere packaging. The experiment was designed according to a simplex lattice method and respiration and ethylene production rates were measured at 10 °C. Results showed that single component pineapple cubes, apple slices, and melon chunks, in this order, had significant constant coefficients (P = 0.05) and the greatest impact on respiration rate while the interactive binary and tertiary coefficients were insignificant. For ethylene production rates, single component apple slices, melon chunks, and pineapple cubes, and their 3-component mixtures, in this order, had significant constant coefficients (P = 0.05) while binary coefficients were insignificant. Mathematical models were developed and validated; the cubical model was the best to describe the influence of proportion of fruit on respiration and ethylene production rates, however, considering simplicity the linear part of the model is recommended to quantify respiration and ethylene production rates of mixed fresh-cut fruits. This research helps to quantify the ethylene production and respiration rates of multicomponent mixed fresh-cut fruit, which then can be used for packaging design of fresh-cut produce. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  3. Phenotypic engineering of sperm-production rate confirms evolutionary predictions of sperm competition theory

    PubMed Central

    Sekii, Kiyono; Vizoso, Dita B.; Kuales, Georg; De Mulder, Katrien; Ladurner, Peter; Schärer, Lukas

    2013-01-01

    Sperm production is a key male reproductive trait and an important parameter in sperm competition theory. Under sperm competition, paternity success is predicted to depend strongly on male allocation to sperm production. Furthermore, because sperm production is inherently costly, individuals should economize in sperm expenditure, and conditional adjustment of the copulation frequency according to their sperm availability may be expected. However, experimental studies showing effects of sperm production on mating behaviour and paternity success have so far been scarce, mainly because sperm production is difficult to manipulate directly in animals. Here, we used phenotypic engineering to manipulate sperm-production rate, by employing dose-dependent RNA interference (RNAi) of a spermatogenesis-specific gene, macbol1, in the free-living flatworm Macrostomum lignano. We demonstrate (i) that our novel dose-dependent RNAi approach allows us to induce high variability in sperm-production rate; (ii) that a reduced sperm-production rate is associated with a decreased copulation frequency, suggesting conditional adjustment of mating behaviour; and (iii) that both sperm production and copulation frequency are important determinants of paternity success in a competitive situation, as predicted by sperm competition theory. Our study clearly documents the potential of phenotypic engineering via dose-dependent RNAi to test quantitative predictions of evolutionary theory. PMID:23446521

  4. Logging production rates in young-growth, mixed-conifer stands in north central California

    Treesearch

    Philip M. McDonald

    1972-01-01

    To quantify production rates for small trees, this study examined the components of log-making and tractor yarding at the Challenge Experimental Forest, Yuba County, California. Rates were calculated over a range of 12 to 40 inches d.b.h. The rate for incense-cedar was lowest; for ponderosa pine it was intermediate; and for Douglas-fir, white fir, and sugar pine...

  5. Production Rates for Comets 17P/Holmes and 8P/Tuttle from Narrowband Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleicher, David G.; Bair, A. N.

    2008-09-01

    Numerous sets of narrowband filter photometry were obtained for Comets 17P/Holmes and 8P/Tuttle from Lowell and Perth Observatories during the interval of November 2007 to April 2008. Our Holmes observations began 1 week following its extreme outburst, at which time the measured water production rate was 5x1029 and the derived proxy of dust production, Afrho, was about 5x105. An exponential decay in measured production rates was observed for all species, with each species dropping by factors of about 200-500 after 125 days. Gas species all exhibited clear and similar trends with aperture size, with large apertures yielding larger production rates, qualitatively consistent with the strong decrease of outgassing with time. This probably implies that the bulk of fresh volatiles were confined to the nucleus and near-nucleus regime, rather than from ice in the ejecta cloud. The much larger aperture trends observed in dust Afrho values are consistent with dust having lower velocities and longer effective lifetimes than the gas species. Comet Tuttle exhibits a strong pre-/post-perihelion asymmetry in production rates. At a heliocentric distance of 1.4 AU, production rates were about 4x greater outbound as compared to inbound. This strong seasonal effect implies one or more strong source regions began to "turn on" shortly prior to perihelion, presumably associated with a significant obliquity of the rotation axis. These and other results will be presented. This research is supported by NASA's Planetary Astronomy Program.

  6. Measurements of Diel Rates of Bacterial Secondary Production in Aquatic Environments †

    PubMed Central

    Riemann, Bo; Søndergaard, Morten

    1984-01-01

    Measurements of bacterial secondary production were carried out during 13 diel studies at one coastal marine station and in five lakes differing with respect to nutrient concentration and primary production. Bacterial secondary production was measured in situ every 3 to 5 h by [3H]thymidine incorporation into DNA. In some of the diel studies, these results were compared with results obtained from dark 14CO2 uptake and frequency of dividing cells. Only minor diel changes were observed. The rate of [3H]thymidine incorporation into DNA and the frequency of dividing cells varied from 23 to 194% of the diel mean. The dark CO2 uptake rate varied from 12 to 259% of the diel mean. An analysis of variance demonstrated that no specific time periods during 24 h showed significantly different production rates, supporting the idea that bacterial activities in natural assemblages are controlled by a variety of events. The best correction (r2 = 0.74) was obtained between the [3H]thymidine incorporation and frequency of dividing cells procedures from the lake water samples. The actual production rates calculated by [3H]thymidine incorporation into DNA were appreciably lower than those obtained by the frequency of dividing cells and the dark CO2 uptake techniques. Diel rates of bacterial production are discussed in relation to sampling frequency, statistical errors, and choice of method. PMID:16346505

  7. Greater soil carbon stocks and faster turnover rates with increasing agricultural productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanderman, Jonathan; Creamer, Courtney; Baisden, W. Troy; Farrell, Mark; Fallon, Stewart

    2017-01-01

    Devising agricultural management schemes that enhance food security and soil carbon levels is a high priority for many nations. However, the coupling between agricultural productivity, soil carbon stocks and organic matter turnover rates is still unclear. Archived soil samples from four decades of a long-term crop rotation trial were analyzed for soil organic matter (SOM) cycling-relevant properties: C and N content, bulk composition by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, amino sugar content, short-term C bioavailability assays, and long-term C turnover rates by modeling the incorporation of the bomb spike in atmospheric 14C into the soil. After > 40 years under consistent management, topsoil carbon stocks ranged from 14 to 33 Mg C ha-1 and were linearly related to the mean productivity of each treatment. Measurements of SOM composition demonstrated increasing amounts of plant- and microbially derived SOM along the productivity gradient. Under two modeling scenarios, radiocarbon data indicated overall SOM turnover time decreased from 40 to 13 years with increasing productivity - twice the rate of decline predicted from simple steady-state models or static three-pool decay rates of measured C pool distributions. Similarly, the half-life of synthetic root exudates decreased from 30.4 to 21.5 h with increasing productivity, indicating accelerated microbial activity. These findings suggest that there is a direct feedback between accelerated biological activity, carbon cycling rates and rates of carbon stabilization with important implications for how SOM dynamics are represented in models.

  8. Enhanced sophorolipid production by feeding-rate-controlled fed-batch culture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Bum; Yun, Hyun Shik; Kim, Eun-Ki

    2009-12-01

    To develop the easier control method for fed-batch culture of sophorolipid production, we chose rapeseed oil as the most productive oil and compared their productivities in relation to different concentrations of glucose. The optimal concentration of glucose was 30 g/L for sophorolipid production. A fed-batch method was conducted using Candida bombicola ATCC 22214 with rapeseed oil as a secondary substrate. The feeding rate of rapeseed oil was dependent on pH and was calculated by the consumption rate of NaOH and rapeseed oil. The glucose concentration was constantly maintained between 30 and 40 g/L. As a result, we have produced a crude sophorolipid up to 365 g/L for 8 days through a feeding-rate-controlled fed-batch process.

  9. On the increase in rate of heat production caused by stretch in frog's skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Clinch, N. F.

    1968-01-01

    1. The increase in rate of heat production caused by stretch in the unstimulated frog's sartorius (stretch response) has been measured using a conventional thermopile technique. 2. The rate of heat production was found constant between l0 (the distance in vivo between the tendons when the legs were in a straight line) and 1·2 l0, and rose rapidly above this length to reach 3-5 times the basal rate at 1·3 l0. Stretching to greater lengths appeared to damage the muscles. 3. The stretch response is increased by several substances which increase the duration of the active state. 4. Unlike the rate of heat production at l0, the stretch response is increased by procaine; while the presence of CO2 greatly reduces it. 5. Evidence is presented supporting the hypothesis that the stretch response is associated with the appearance of tension in the sarcolemma. ImagesFig. 2 PMID:5652883

  10. HCHO Activity Gauges Ozone Production and Aerosol Production Rates in Both Urban and Far-Downwind Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatfield, R. B.; Ren, X.; Brune, W. H.; Fried, A.; Schwab, J.; Shetter, R. E.

    2008-12-01

    We have found a surprisingly informative decomposition of the complex question of smoggy ozone production in a set of of expanding investigations starting from modestly smoggy Eastern North America (by NASA aircraft, INTEX, July 2004) to rather polluted Flushing, NYC (Queens College, CAPTEX, July, 2001). In both rural and very polluted situations, we find that a simple "contour graph" parameterization of the local principal ozone production rate can be estimated using only the variables [NO] and jrads [HCHO]: Po(O3) = c (jrads [HCHO])a [NO]b. The method immediately suggests a local interpretation for concepts of VOC limitation and NOx limitation. We believe that the product jrads [HCHO] gauges the oxidation rate of observed VOC mixtures in a way that also provides [HO2] useful for the principle ozone production rate k [HO2] [NO], Mechanisms suggest that ozone production due to RO2 is proportional to the HO2 process, hence we may capture all ozone chemical production. The success of the method suggests that dominant urban primary-HCHO sources may transition to secondary plume-HCHO sources, so that HCHO is never too far away from an evolving steady state with VOC reactivity. Are there other, simple, near-terminal oxidized VOC's which help gauge ozone production and aerosol particle formation? Regarding particles, we report on suggestive relationships between far-downwind (Atlantic PBL) HCHO and very fine aerosol. Since jrads [HCHO] provides a reactive-flux rate, we may understand distant-plume particle production in a more quantitative manner. Additionally, we report on a statistical search in the nearer field for relationships between glyoxals (important penultimate aromatic and isoprene reaction products) with ozone and aerosol production, looking for VOC's that might be most implicated, e.g., aromatics and biogenics. Note that all three of our variables jrads, [HCHO], and [NO] are relatively easily measured in widespread air pollution networks, and all are

  11. Quantifying VOC-Reaction Tracers, Ozone Production, and Continuing Aerosol Production Rates in Urban and Far-Downwind Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatfield, Robert; Ren, X.; Brune, W.; Fried, A.; Schwab, J.

    2008-01-01

    We have found a surprisingly informative decomposition of the complex question of smoggy ozone production (basically, [HO2] in a more locally determined field of [NO]) in the process of linked investigations of modestly smoggy Eastern North America (by NASA aircraft, July 2004) and rather polluted Flushing, NYC (Queens College, July, 2001). In both rural and very polluted situations, we find that a simple contour graph parameterization of the local principal ozone production rate can be estimated using only the variables [NO] and j(sub rads) [HCHO]: Po(O3) = c (j(sub rads) [HCHO])(sup a) [HCHO](sup b). Here j(sub rads) is the photolysis of HCHO to radicals, presumably capturing many harder-UV photolytic processes and the principle ozone production is that due to HO2; mechanisms suggest that ozone production due to RO2 is closely correlated, often suggesting a limited range of different proportionality factors. The method immediately suggests a local interpretation for concepts of VOC limitation and NOx limitation. We believe that the product j(sub rads) [HCHO] guages the oxidation rate of observed VOC mixtures in a way that also provides [HO2] useful for the principle ozone production rate k [HO2] [NO], and indeed, all ozone chemical production. The success of the method suggests that dominant urban primary-HCHO sources may transition to secondary plume-HCHO sources in a convenient way. Are there other, simple, near-terminal oxidized VOC's which help guage ozone production and aerosol particle formation? Regarding particles, we report on, to the extent NASA Research resources allow, on appealing relationships between far-downwind (Atlantic PBL) HCHO and very fine aerosol (including sulfate. Since j(sub rads) [HCHO] provides a time-scale, we may understand distant-plume particle production in a more quantitative manner. Additionally we report on a statistical search in the nearer field for relationships between glyoxals (important near-terminal aromatic and isoprene

  12. Quantifying VOC-Reaction Tracers, Ozone Production, and Continuing Aerosol Production Rates in Urban and Far-Downwind Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatfield, Robert; Ren, X.; Brune, W.; Fried, A.; Schwab, J.

    2008-01-01

    We have found a surprisingly informative decomposition of the complex question of smoggy ozone production (basically, [HO2] in a more locally determined field of [NO]) in the process of linked investigations of modestly smoggy Eastern North America (by NASA aircraft, July 2004) and rather polluted Flushing, NYC (Queens College, July, 2001). In both rural and very polluted situations, we find that a simple contour graph parameterization of the local principal ozone production rate can be estimated using only the variables [NO] and j(sub rads) [HCHO]: Po(O3) = c (j(sub rads) [HCHO])(sup a) [HCHO](sup b). Here j(sub rads) is the photolysis of HCHO to radicals, presumably capturing many harder-UV photolytic processes and the principle ozone production is that due to HO2; mechanisms suggest that ozone production due to RO2 is closely correlated, often suggesting a limited range of different proportionality factors. The method immediately suggests a local interpretation for concepts of VOC limitation and NOx limitation. We believe that the product j(sub rads) [HCHO] guages the oxidation rate of observed VOC mixtures in a way that also provides [HO2] useful for the principle ozone production rate k [HO2] [NO], and indeed, all ozone chemical production. The success of the method suggests that dominant urban primary-HCHO sources may transition to secondary plume-HCHO sources in a convenient way. Are there other, simple, near-terminal oxidized VOC's which help guage ozone production and aerosol particle formation? Regarding particles, we report on, to the extent NASA Research resources allow, on appealing relationships between far-downwind (Atlantic PBL) HCHO and very fine aerosol (including sulfate. Since j(sub rads) [HCHO] provides a time-scale, we may understand distant-plume particle production in a more quantitative manner. Additionally we report on a statistical search in the nearer field for relationships between glyoxals (important near-terminal aromatic and isoprene

  13. The drainage of the Baltic Ice Lake and a new Scandinavian reference 10Be production rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroeven, Arjen P.; Heyman, Jakob; Fabel, Derek; Björck, Svante; Caffee, Marc W.; Fredin, Ola; Harbor, Jonathan M.

    2015-04-01

    An important constraint on the reliability of cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating is the derivation of tightly controlled production rates. We present a new dataset for 10Be production rate calibration from Mount Billingen, southern Sweden, the site of the final drainage of the Baltic Ice Lake, an event dated to 11,620 ± 100 cal yr BP. Nine samples of flood-scoured bedrock surfaces and depositional boulders and cobbles unambiguously connected to the drainage event yield a reference 10Be production rate of 4.09 ± 0.22 atoms g-1 yr-1 for the CRONUS Lm scaling and 3.93 ± 0.21 atoms g-1 yr-1 for the LSD general spallation scaling. We also recalibrate the reference 10Be production rates for four sites in Norway and combine these with the Billingen results to derive a tightly clustered Scandinavian reference 10Be production rate of 4.12 ± 0.10 (4.12 ± 0.25 for altitude scaling) atoms g-1 yr-1 for the Lm scaling scheme and 3.96 ± 0.10 (3.96 ± 0.24 for altitude scaling) atoms g-1 yr-1 for the LSD scaling scheme.

  14. Reduced metabolic rate and oxygen radicals production in stored insect sperm.

    PubMed

    Ribou, Anne-Cécile; Reinhardt, Klaus

    2012-06-07

    Females of internally fertilizing species can significantly extend sperm lifespan and functionality during sperm storage. The mechanisms for such delayed cellular senescence remain unknown. Here, we apply current hypotheses of cellular senescence developed for diploid cells to sperm cells, and empirically test opposing predictions on the relationship between sperm metabolic rate and oxygen radical production in an insect model, the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus. Using time-resolved microfluorimetry, we found a negative correlation between metabolic rate (proportion of protein-bound NAD[P]H) and in situ intracellular oxygen radicals production in freshly ejaculated sperm. In contrast, sperm stored by females for periods of 1 h to 26 days showed a positive correlation between metabolic rate and oxygen radicals production. At the same time, stored sperm showed a 37 per cent reduced metabolic rate, and 42 per cent reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, compared with freshly ejaculated sperm. Rank differences between males in ROS production and metabolic rate observed in ejaculated sperm did not predict rank differences in stored sperm. Our method of simultaneously measuring ROS production and metabolic rate of the same sample has the advantage of providing data that are independent of sperm density and any extracellular antioxidants that are proteins. Our method also excludes effects owing to accumulated hydrogen peroxide. Our results unify aspects of competing theories of cellular ageing and suggest that reducing metabolic rate may be an important means of extending stored sperm lifespan and functionality in crickets. Our data also provide a possible explanation for why traits of ejaculates sampled from the male may be rather poor predictors of paternity in sexual selection studies and likelihood of pregnancy in reproductive medicine.

  15. Causes and implications of the correlation between forest productivity and tree mortality rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephenson, Nathan L.; van Mantgem, Philip J.; Bunn, Andrew G.; Bruner, Howard; Harmon, Mark E.; O'Connell, Kari B.; Urban, Dean L.; Franklin, Jerry F.

    2011-01-01

    For only one of these four mechanisms, competition, can high mortality rates be considered to be a relatively direct consequence of high NPP. The remaining mechanisms force us to adopt a different view of causality, in which tree growth rates and probability of mortality can vary with at least a degree of independence along productivity gradients. In many cases, rather than being a direct cause of high mortality rates, NPP may remain high in spite of high mortality rates. The independent influence of plant enemies and other factors helps explain why forest biomass can show little correlation, or even negative correlation, with forest NPP.

  16. Rates of hydroxyl radical production from transition metals and quinones in a surrogate lung fluid

    PubMed Central

    Charrier, Jessica G.; Anastasio, Cort

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxyl radical (.OH) is the most reactive, and perhaps most detrimental to health, of the reactive oxygen species. .OH production in lungs following inhalation of particulate matter (PM) can result from redox-active chemicals, including iron and copper, but the relative importance of these species is unknown. This work investigates .OH production from iron, copper, and quinones, both individually and in mixtures at atmospherically relevant concentrations. Iron, copper and three of the four quinones (1,2-naphthoquinone, phenanthrenequinone and 1,4-naphthoquinone) produce .OH. Mixtures of copper or quinones with iron synergistically produce .OH at a rate 20 - 130% higher than the sum of the rates of the individual redox-active species. We developed a regression equation from 20 mixtures to predict the rate of .OH production from the particle composition. For typical PM compositions, iron and copper account for most .OH production, while quinones are a minor source, although they can contribute if present at very high concentrations. This work shows that Cu contributes significantly to .OH production in ambient PM; other work has shown that Cu appears to be the primary driver of HOOH production and dithiothreitol (DTT) loss in ambient PM extracts. Taken together, these results indicate that copper appears to be the most important individual contributor to direct oxidant production from inhaled PM. PMID:26153923

  17. Emission rates of formaldehyde from materials and consumer products found in California homes

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, T.J.; Smith, D.L.; Satola, J.

    1999-01-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is a toxic air contaminant released indoors from pressed-wood materials and numerous consumer products. Formaldehyde emission data are needed for modeling of indoor personal exposures, health risks, and risk reduction measures. This study determined HCHO emission rates from 55 diverse materials and consumer products under two realistic chamber test conditions, using both time-integrated and continuous real-time measurements. Among dry products, relatively high emissions were found from bare pressed-wood materials made with urea-formaldehyde (UF) resins, and from new (unwashed) permanent press fabrics. UF materials with paper, vinyl, laminate, and other coatings showed HCHO emissions lower by about a factor of 10 than those from bare UF materials. Among wet products, an acid-cured floor finish showed the highest HCHO emissions, greatly exceeding those of any dry product even 24 h after application. Fingernail polish and hardener showed relatively high emission rates, and latex paint and wallpaper relatively low emission rates, but these products emit similar amounts of HCHO because of widely different surface areas of application. Acid-cured finishes, and personal activity patterns and exposures during application of wet products, are key areas for further study.

  18. Picoplankton contribution to biogenic silica stocks and production rates in the Sargasso Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Jeffrey W.; Brzezinski, Mark A.; Baines, Stephen B.; Collier, Jackie L.; Twining, Benjamin S.; Ohnemus, Daniel C.

    2017-05-01

    Picocyanobacteria in the Sargasso Sea accumulate significant amounts of Si, a finding which questions how we interpret previous regional measurements of biogenic silica (bSi) production and the role of diatoms in the open ocean. The picoplankton (<3 μm cells) contributed a measurable, and at times significant, proportion of both the total bSi standing stock and its rate of production. The 100 m integrated bSi stock and bSi production rate in the <3 μm size fraction averaged 14% and 16%, respectively, of the total. At some stations, specific rates of bSi production in the <3 μm cells were up to threefold higher than for larger cells. But among all stations and depths, the two size fractions had statistically indistinguishable specific production rates ( 0.35 day-1). The estimated contributions of Synechococcus alone to the 100 m integrated bSi stock and bSi production in cells <3 μm were 15% and 55%, respectively, suggesting that half of bSi production in this small size fraction could be sustained by Synechococcus, but a majority of the bSi was not associated with living Synechococcus. Our results suggest that picoplankton have a small but persistent regional contribution to bSi stocks, which is masked by a dynamic bSi pool driven by larger cells. While a significant fraction of bSi production is attributable to picoplankton, their contributions are likely to have been included in previous analyses, making prior regional budgets still relevant. However, our understanding of the factors controlling regional bSi production and our interpretations of particulate matter elemental ratios (e.g., Si:C) may require revision.

  19. Feeding, egg production, and respiration rate of pteropods Limacina in Arctic seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasternak, A. F.; Drits, A. V.; Flint, M. V.

    2017-01-01

    The feeding, egg production, and respiration rate of the dominant pteropod Limacina helicina have been studied in Russia's Arctic seas. The sinking rates of fecal pellets and dead individuals have been measured to estimate their role in vertical carbon flux. As has been shown, the rate of ecophysiological processes taking place in the pteropods is higher than that of copepods, the main consumers of phytoplankton. The gut pigment content in Limacina (3084 ng ind-1 as a maximum) was two orders of magnitude higher than in copepods. The egg production rate in Limacina even without feeding reached 4000 eggs ind-1 versus 350-450 egg ind-1 typical of the dominant copepods even with excess food. A close correlation between the pteropod feeding rate and individual body weight was observed for Limacina rather than a correlation with food concentration. The experimentally estimated sinking rate of Limacina fecal pellets was 270 m day-1, higher than for most copepods. The sinking rate of dead pteropods reaches 2000 m day-1. According to the literature, discarded mucous feeding nets sink at a rate of 80 to 1080 m day-1. Evidently, pteropods play a significant role in biogeochemical cycles by accelerating sedimentation. High rates of all studied processes suggest that Limacina are an important component of plankton communities and play the most important role in trophodynamics at sites of their accumulation.

  20. Methane production rate studies and gas flow modeling for the fresh kills landfill. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, C.O.; Lu, A.H.

    1980-11-01

    Methane is produced in landfills by anaerobic bacteria in the digestion of various organic materials found in the wastes. With the increasing cost of fuels the recovery of methane can be economic from some landfills. The rate of methane production can vary widely depending on factors such as the moisture content of the wastes, the pH, toxicity, temperature and amount of organic material available. Information regarding the rate of gas production and gas flow during pumping is needed to determine the potential of a site for methane recovery and in the design of a recovery system. The primary objective of this study was to develop gas flow models based on measurements of the pressure differential between landfill gas and atmospheric pressure that would enable the rate of gas production to be estimated. In the course of this investigation two landfill gas flow models were developed; a static model and a dynamic model.

  1. Methane-production-rate studies and gas-flow modeling for the Fresh Kills landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, C.O.; Lu, A.H.

    1980-11-01

    Methane is produced in landfills by anaerobic bacteria in the digestion of various organic materials found in the wastes. With the increasing cost of fuels the recovery of methane can be economic for some landfills. The rate of methane production can vary widely depending on factors such as the moisture content of the wastes, the pH, toxicity, temperature and the amount of organic material available. Information regarding the rate of gas production and gas flow during pumping is needed to determine the potential of a site for methane recovery and in the design of a recovery system. The primary objective of this study was to develop gas flow models based on measurements of the pressure differential between landfill gas and atmospheric pressure that would enable the rate of gas production to be estimated. In the course of this investigation two landfill gas flow models were developed; a static model and a dynamic model.

  2. Investigating nutrient profiling and Health Star Ratings on core dairy products in Australia.

    PubMed

    Wellard, Lyndal; Hughes, Clare; Watson, Wendy L

    2016-10-01

    To determine whether the ratings from the Australian front-of-pack labelling scheme, Health Star Rating (HSR), and the ability to carry health claims using the Nutrient Profiling Scoring Criterion (NPSC) for core dairy products promote foods consistent with the Australian Dietary Guidelines. The Australian nutrient profiling model used for assessing eligibility for health claims was compared with the nutrient profiling model underpinning the HSR system to determine their agreement when assessing dairy products. Agreement between the extent to which products met nutrient profiling criteria and scored three stars or over using the HSR calculator was determined using Cohen's kappa tests. The four largest supermarket chains in Sydney, Australia. All available products in the milk, hard cheese, soft cheese and yoghurt categories (n 1363) were surveyed in March-May 2014. Nutrition composition and ingredients lists were recorded for each product. There was 'good' agreement between NPSC and HSR overall (κ=0·78; 95 % CI 0·75, 0·81; P<0·001), for hard cheeses (κ=0·72; 95 % CI 0·65, 0·79; P<0·001) and yoghurt (κ=0·79; 95 % CI 0·73, 0·86; P<0·001). There was 'fair' agreement for milk (κ=0·33; 95 % CI 0·20, 0·45; P<0·001) and 'very good' agreement for soft cheese (κ=0·84; 95 % CI 0·75, 0·92; P<0·001). Generally, products tended to have HSR consistent with other products of a similar type within their categories. For dairy products, the HSR scheme largely aligned with the NPSC used for determining eligibility for health claims. Both systems appeared be consistent with the Australian Dietary Guidelines for dairy products, with lower-fat products rating higher.

  3. Simulation of the production rates of cosmogenic nuclides on the Moon based on Geant4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Zhang, Xiaoping; Dong, Wudong; Ren, Zhongzhou; Dong, Tiekuang; Xu, Aoao

    2017-02-01

    A numerical simulation model is built to simulate the production of cosmogenic nuclides based on Geant4 (GEometry ANd Tracking). Some modifications have been made for cross sections in Geant4 using the experimental data or the other proper model and the contributions of all secondary particles caused by cosmic rays are included in our simulation model. Our simulation results suggest a substantial contribution of the secondary charged pions to the production rates of 10Be and 14C, as high as 21.04% for 10Be and 21.36% for 14C, respectively. Within one set of self-consistent parameters, the simulation results of the production rates of the cosmogenic nuclides, 53Mn, 36Cl, 41Ca, 26Al, 10Be, and 14C, agree well with the measured data from Apollo 15 drill core. This model provides users a validated approach to study the production of cosmogenic nuclides on the planet surface and in the meteorites.

  4. Relation of rate of urine production to oxygen tension in small-for-gestational-age fetuses.

    PubMed

    Nicolaides, K H; Peters, M T; Vyas, S; Rabinowitz, R; Rosen, D J; Campbell, S

    1990-02-01

    Hourly fetal urine production rate was determined by real-time ultrasonography immediately before cordocentesis for blood gas analysis in 27 small-for-gestational-age fetuses at 20 to 37 weeks' gestation; in 14 cases there was associated oligohydramnios. The values were compared with those of 101 appropriate-for-gestational-age fetuses. The hourly fetal urine production rate was significantly lower in the small-for-gestational-age fetuses than in the appropriate-for-gestational-age fetuses. Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between the degree of decrease in urine production and both the degree of fetal hypoxemia and the degree of fetal smallness. There was no significant difference between the oligohydramnios and nonoligohydramnios groups in either the degree of decrease in urine production or the degree of fetal hypoxemia.

  5. Measurement of broiler litter production rates and nutrient content using recycled litter.

    PubMed

    Coufal, C D; Chavez, C; Niemeyer, P R; Carey, J B

    2006-03-01

    It is important for broiler producers to know litter production rates and litter nutrient content when developing nutrient management plans. Estimation of broiler litter production varies widely in the literature due to factors such as geographical region, type of housing, size of broiler produced, and number of flocks reared on the same litter. Published data for N, P, and K content are also highly variable. In addition, few data are available regarding the rate of production, characteristics, and nutrient content of caked litter (cake). In this study, 18 consecutive flocks of broilers were reared on the same litter in experimental pens under simulated commercial conditions. The mass of litter and cake produced was measured after each flock. Samples of all litter materials were analyzed for pH, moisture, N, P, and K. Average litter and cake moisture content were 26.4 and 46.9%, respectively. Significant variation in litter and cake nutrient content was observed and can largely be attributed to ambient temperature differences. Average litter, cake, and total litter (litter plus cake) production rates were 153.3, 74.8, and 228.2 g of dry litter material per kg of live broiler weight (g/kg) per flock, respectively. Significant variation in litter production rates among flocks was also observed. Cumulative litter, cake, and total litter production rates after 18 flocks were 170.3, 78.7, and 249.0 g/kg, respectively. The data produced from this research can be used by broiler producers to estimate broiler litter and cake production and the nutrient content of these materials.

  6. The kinematic and microphysical control of lightning rate, extent, and NOX production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, Lawrence D.; Koshak, William; Peterson, Harold; Mecikalski, Retha M.

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates the kinematic and microphysical control of lightning properties, particularly those that may govern the production of nitrogen oxides (NOX = NO + NO2) via lightning (LNOX), such as flash rate, type, and extent. The NASA Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) is applied to lightning observations following multicell thunderstorms through their lifecycle in a Lagrangian sense over Northern Alabama on 21 May 2012 during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) experiment. LNOM provides estimates of flash rate, type, channel length distributions, channel segment altitude distributions (SADs), and LNOX production profiles. The LNOM-derived lightning characteristics and LNOX production are compared to the evolution of radar-inferred updraft and precipitation properties. Intercloud, intracloud (IC) flash SAD comprises a significant fraction of the total (IC + cloud-to-ground [CG]) SAD, while increased CG flash SAD at altitudes >6 km occurs after the simultaneous peaks in several thunderstorm properties (i.e., total [IC + CG] and IC flash rate, graupel volume/mass, convective updraft volume, and maximum updraft speed). At heights <6 km, the CG LNOX production dominates the column-integrated total LNOX production. Unlike the SAD, total LNOX production consists of a more equal contribution from IC and CG flashes for heights >6 km. Graupel volume/mass, updraft volume, and maximum updraft speed are all well correlated to the total flash rate (correlation coefficient, ρ ≥ 0.8) but are less correlated to total flash extent (ρ ≥ 0.6) and total LNOX production (ρ ≥ 0.5). Although LNOM transforms lightning observations into LNOX production values, these values are estimates and are subject to further independent validation.

  7. The cancer Warburg effect may be a testable example of the minimum entropy production rate principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marín, Dolores; Sabater, Bartolomé

    2017-04-01

    Cancer cells consume more glucose by glycolytic fermentation to lactate than by respiration, a characteristic known as the Warburg effect. In contrast with the 36 moles of ATP produced by respiration, fermentation produces two moles of ATP per mole of glucose consumed, which poses a puzzle with regard to the function of the Warburg effect. The production of free energy (ΔG), enthalpy (ΔH), and entropy (ΔS) per mole linearly varies with the fraction (x) of glucose consumed by fermentation that is frequently estimated around 0.9. Hence, calculation shows that, in respect to pure respiration, the predominant fermentative metabolism decreases around 10% the production of entropy per mole of glucose consumed in cancer cells. We hypothesize that increased fermentation could allow cancer cells to accomplish the Prigogine theorem of the trend to minimize the rate of production of entropy. According to the theorem, open cellular systems near the steady state could evolve to minimize the rates of entropy production that may be reached by modified replicating cells producing entropy at a low rate. Remarkably, at CO2 concentrations above 930 ppm, glucose respiration produces less entropy than fermentation, which suggests experimental tests to validate the hypothesis of minimization of the rate of entropy production through the Warburg effect.

  8. Species-Level Variability in Extracellular Production Rates of Reactive Oxygen Species by Diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Robin J.; Roe, Kelly L.; Hansel, Colleen M.; Voelker, Bettina M.

    2016-01-01

    Biological production and decay of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide (O2-) likely have significant effects on the cycling of trace metals and carbon in marine systems. In this study, extracellular production rates of H2O2 and O2- were determined for five species of marine diatoms in the presence and absence of light. Production of both ROS was measured in parallel by suspending cells on filters and measuring the ROS downstream using chemiluminescence probes. In addition, the ability of these organisms to break down O2- and H2O2 was examined by measuring recovery of O2- and H2O2 added to the influent medium. O2- production rates ranged from undetectable to 7.3 × 10−16 mol cell−1 h−1, while H2O2 production rates ranged from undetectable to 3.4 × 10−16 mol cell−1 h−1. Results suggest that extracellular ROS production occurs through a variety of pathways even amongst organisms of the same genus. Thalassiosira spp. produced more O2- in light than dark, even when the organisms were killed, indicating that O2- is produced via a passive photochemical process on the cell surface. The ratio of H2O2 to O2- production rates was consistent with production of H2O2 solely through dismutation of O2- for T. oceanica, while T. pseudonana made much more H2O2 than O2-. T. weissflogii only produced H2O2 when stressed or killed. P. tricornutum cells did not make cell-associated ROS, but did secrete H2O2-producing substances into the growth medium. In all organisms, recovery rates for killed cultures (94–100% H2O2; 10–80% O2-) were consistently higher than those for live cultures (65–95% H2O2; 10–50% O2-). While recovery rates for killed cultures in H2O2 indicate that nearly all H2O2 was degraded by active cell processes, O2- decay appeared to occur via a combination of active and passive processes. Overall, this study shows that the rates and pathways for ROS production and decay vary greatly among diatom species, even

  9. Species-level variability in extracellular production rates of reactive oxygen species by diatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Robin; Roe, Kelly; Hansel, Colleen; Voelker, Bettina

    2016-03-01

    Biological production and decay of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide (O2-) likely have significant effects on the cycling of trace metals and carbon in marine systems. In this study, extracellular production rates of H2O2 and O2- were determined for five species of marine diatoms in the presence and absence of light. Production of both ROS was measured in parallel by suspending cells on filters and measuring the ROS downstream using chemiluminescence probes. In addition, the ability of these organisms to break down O2- and H2O2 was examined by measuring recovery of O2- and H2O2 added to the influent medium. O2- production rates ranged from undetectable to 7.3 x 10-16 mol cell-1 hr-1, while H2O2 production rates ranged from undetectable to 3.4 x 10-16 mol cell-1 hr-1. Results suggest that extracellular ROS production occurs through a variety of pathways even amongst organisms of the same genus. Thalassiosira spp. produced more O2- in light than dark, even when the organisms were killed, indicating that O2- is produced via a passive photochemical process on the cell surface. The ratio of H2O¬2 to O2- production rates was consistent with production of H2O2 solely through dismutation of O2- for T. oceanica, while T. pseudonana made much more H2O2 than O2 . T. weissflogii only produced H2O2 when stressed or killed. P. tricornutum cells did not make cell-associated ROS, but did secrete H2O2-producing substances into the growth medium. In all organisms, recovery rates for killed cultures (94-100% H2O2; 10-80% O2-) were consistently higher than those for live cultures (65-95% H2O2; 10-50% O2-). While recovery rates for killed cultures in H2O2 indicate that nearly all H2O2 was degraded by active cell processes, O2- decay appeared to occur via a combination of active and passive processes. Overall, this study shows that the rates and pathways for ROS production and decay vary greatly among diatom species, even between those that are

  10. Rates of nitrous oxide production in the oxidation of hydroxylamine by iron(III)

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, J.H.; Gordon, L.I.

    1986-12-03

    The dependence of the rate of N/sub 2/O formation on the reactants and on pH in the oxidation of NH/sub 2/OH by Fe(III) has been investigated over a range of reactant concentrations, with emphasis on low concentrations of hydroxylamine. The production rate of N/sub 2/O was pseudo first order with respect to total iron, pseudo first order or less with respect to total hydroxylamine, and inversely proportional to (H/sup +/)/sup 2.5/. The reaction is highly sensitive to temperature. Of the competing reactions producing nitrogenous products other than N/sub 2/O, at least one is catalyzed by light. An empirical rate law, based on the total concentrations of the reactants, is presented, and a more general rate law, based on the concentrations of presumed reactive species, is derived.

  11. Cosmic-ray-produced stable nuclides: various production rates and their implications

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, R.C.

    1981-06-15

    The rates for a number of reactions producing certain stable nuclides, such as /sup 3/He and /sup 4/He, and fission in the moon are calculated for galactic-cosmic-ray particles and for solar protons. Solar-proton-induced reactions with bromine usually are not an important source of cosmogenic Kr isotopes. The /sup 130/Ba(n,p) reaction cannot account for the undercalculation of /sup 130/Xe production rates. Calculated production rates of /sup 15/N, /sup 13/C, and /sup 2/H agree fairly well with rates inferred from measured excesses of these isotopes in samples with long exposure ages. Cosmic-ray-induced fission of U and Th can produce significant amounts of fission tracks and of /sup 86/Kr, /sup 134/Xe, and /sup 136/Xe, especially in samples with long exposures to cosmic-ray particles.

  12. Carbon limitation of biomass production in high-rate oxidation ponds.

    PubMed

    Azov, Y; Shelef, G; Moraine, R

    1982-03-01

    Theoretical considerations confirmed by outdoor experiments indicated carbon limitation of biomass production in high-rate oxidation ponds at certain seasonal and operational conditions. Apparently, free carbon dioxide concentration in the pond is the major determinant of carbonlimiting algal photosynthesis. High concentrations of free CO(2) are provided through bacterial respiration which is the main contributor to algal photosynthesis. At high photosynthetic activities and low organic loadings, free CO(2) concentrations are low; its flux into algal cells determines photosynthesis and biomass production rate in the pond.

  13. Production rate of second KK gauge bosons in UED models at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Shigeki; Sato, Joe; Yamanaka, Masato; Senami, Masato

    2009-04-17

    We calculate the production rates of the second KK photons and the second KK Z bosons at the LHC in a framework of universal extra dimension models. In the hadron collider experiment, it can be difficult to distinguish the signal of KK particles in universal extra dimension models from that of unknown heavy particles in TeV scale new models. For the discrimination, the second KK gauge bosons play an important role. Thus we calculate the production rates of the second KK gauge bosons at the LHC including all significant processes, and discuss the feasibility to confirm universal extra dimension models at the LHC.

  14. Mass-Specific Metabolic Rate Influences Sperm Performance through Energy Production in Mammals.

    PubMed

    Tourmente, Maximiliano; Roldan, Eduardo R S

    2015-01-01

    Mass-specific metabolic rate, the rate at which organisms consume energy per gram of body weight, is negatively associated with body size in metazoans. As a consequence, small species have higher cellular metabolic rates and are able to process resources at a faster rate than large species. Since mass-specific metabolic rate has been shown to constrain evolution of sperm traits, and most of the metabolic activity of sperm cells relates to ATP production for sperm motility, we hypothesized that mass-specific metabolic rate could influence sperm energetic metabolism at the cellular level if sperm cells maintain the metabolic rate of organisms that generate them. We compared data on sperm straight-line velocity, mass-specific metabolic rate, and sperm ATP content from 40 mammalian species and found that the mass-specific metabolic rate positively influences sperm swimming velocity by (a) an indirect effect of sperm as the result of an increased sperm length, and (b) a direct effect independent of sperm length. In addition, our analyses show that species with higher mass-specific metabolic rate have higher ATP content per sperm and higher concentration of ATP per μm of sperm length, which are positively associated with sperm velocity. In conclusion, our results suggest that species with high mass-specific metabolic rate have been able to evolve both long and fast sperm. Moreover, independently of its effect on the production of larger sperm, the mass-specific metabolic rate is able to influence sperm velocity by increasing sperm ATP content in mammals.

  15. Mass-Specific Metabolic Rate Influences Sperm Performance through Energy Production in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Tourmente, Maximiliano; Roldan, Eduardo R. S.

    2015-01-01

    Mass-specific metabolic rate, the rate at which organisms consume energy per gram of body weight, is negatively associated with body size in metazoans. As a consequence, small species have higher cellular metabolic rates and are able to process resources at a faster rate than large species. Since mass-specific metabolic rate has been shown to constrain evolution of sperm traits, and most of the metabolic activity of sperm cells relates to ATP production for sperm motility, we hypothesized that mass-specific metabolic rate could influence sperm energetic metabolism at the cellular level if sperm cells maintain the metabolic rate of organisms that generate them. We compared data on sperm straight-line velocity, mass-specific metabolic rate, and sperm ATP content from 40 mammalian species and found that the mass-specific metabolic rate positively influences sperm swimming velocity by (a) an indirect effect of sperm as the result of an increased sperm length, and (b) a direct effect independent of sperm length. In addition, our analyses show that species with higher mass-specific metabolic rate have higher ATP content per sperm and higher concentration of ATP per μm of sperm length, which are positively associated with sperm velocity. In conclusion, our results suggest that species with high mass-specific metabolic rate have been able to evolve both long and fast sperm. Moreover, independently of its effect on the production of larger sperm, the mass-specific metabolic rate is able to influence sperm velocity by increasing sperm ATP content in mammals. PMID:26371474

  16. A model for GCR-particle fluxes in stony meteorites and production rates of cosmogenic nuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reedy, R. C.

    1985-02-01

    A model is presented for the differential fluxes of galactic-cosmic-ray (GCR) particles with energies above 1 MeV inside any spherical stony meteorite as a function of the meteorite's radius and the sample's depth. This model is based on the Reedy-Arnold equations for the energy-dependent fluxes of GCR particles in the moon and is an extension of flux parameters that were derived for several meteorites of various sizes. This flux is used to calculate the production rates of many cosmogenic nuclides as a function of radius and depth. The peak production rates for most nuclides made by the reactions and energetic GCR particles occur near the centers of meteorites with radii of 40 to 70 g/cm (2). Although the model has some limitations, it reproduces well the basic trends for the depth-dependent production of cosmogenic nuclides in stony meteorites of various radii. These production profiles agree fairly well with measurments of cosmogenic nuclides in meteorites. Some of these production profiles are different than those calculated by others. The chemical dependence of the production rates for several nuclides varies with size and depth.

  17. Model for GCR-particle fluxes in stony meteorites and production rates of cosmogenic nuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    A model is presented for the differential fluxes of galactic-cosmic-ray (GCR) particles with energies above 1 MeV inside any spherical stony meteorite as a function of the meteorite's radius and the sample's depth. This model is based on the Reedy-Arnold equations for the energy-dependent fluxes of GCR particles in the moon and is an extension of flux parameters that were derived for several meteorites of various sizes. This flux is used to calculate the production rates of many cosmogenic nuclides as a function of radius and depth. The peak production rates for most nuclides made by the reactions of energetic GCR particles occur near the centers of meteorites with radii of 40 to 70 g cm/sup -2/. Although the model has some limitations, it reproduces well the basic trends for the depth-dependent production of cosmogenic nuclides in stony meteorites of various radii. These production profiles agree fairly well with measurements of cosmogenic nuclides in meteorites. Some of these production profiles are different than those calculated by others. The chemical dependence of the production rates for several nuclides varies with size and depth. 25 references, 8 figures.

  18. The Hydroxyl Radical Reaction Rate Constant and Products of Dimethyl Succinate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    AFRL-RX-TY-TR-2008-4522 THE HYDROXYL RADICAL REACTION RATE CONSTANT AND PRODUCTS OF DIMETHYL SUCCINATE Sheryl E. Calidonna and...the gas-phase hydroxyl radical reaction with dimethyl succinate. Additional reports and publications resulting from this work unit are not described...herein but are listed below for reference. Baxley, J.Steven and J.R. Wells, “The Hydroxyl Radical Rate Constant and Atmospheric Transforamtion

  19. Multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic muon-proton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Salgado, C.W. )

    1992-02-01

    Measurements of forward multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic muon-proton scattering are presented. Data were taken with a 490 GeV muon beam incident on a hydrogen target. Jets were defined using the JADE jet finding algorithm. The measured rates are presented as function of W, the hadronic center-of-mass energy and the jet resolution parameter, [ital y][sub [ital cut

  20. Potential methane production and methane oxidation rates in peatland ecosystems of the Appalachian Mountains, United States

    SciTech Connect

    Yavitt, J.B.; Lang, G.E.; Downey, D.M. )

    1988-09-01

    Potential rates of methane production and carbon dioxide production were measured on 11 dates in 1986 in peat from six plant communities typical of moss-dominated peatlands in the Appalachian Mountains. Annual methane production ranged from 2.7 to 17.5 mol/sq m, and annual carbon dioxide production ranged from 30.6 to 79.0 mol/sq m. The wide range in methane production values among the communities found within a single peatland indicates that obtaining one production value for a peatland may not be appropriate. Low temperature constrained the potential for methane production in winter, while the chemical quality of the peat substrate appears to control methane production in the summer. Methane oxidation was measured throughout the peat profile to a depth of 30 cm. Values for methane oxidation ranged from 0.08 to 18.7 microM/hr among the six plant communities. Aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria probably mediated most of the activity. On a daily basis during the summer, between 11 and 100% of the methane produced is susceptible to oxidation within the peat column. Pools of dissolved methane and dissolved carbon dioxide in pore waters were less than 0.2 and less than 1.0 mol/sq m, respectively, indicating that methane does not accumulate in the pore waters. Peatlands have been considered as an important source of biologically produced methane. Despite the high rates of methane production, the high rates of methane oxidation dampen the potential emission of methane to the atmosphere. 41 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Stable isotope labeling tandem mass spectrometry (SILT) to quantify protein production and clearance rates.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Randall J; Munsell, Ling Y; Chen, Xianghong; Holtzman, David M; Yarasheski, Kevin E

    2007-06-01

    In all biological systems, protein amount is a function of the rate of production and clearance. The speed of a response to a disturbance in protein homeostasis is determined by turnover rate. Quantifying alterations in protein synthesis and clearance rates is vital to understanding disease pathogenesis (e.g., aging, inflammation). No methods currently exist for quantifying production and clearance rates of low-abundance (femtomole) proteins in vivo. We describe a novel, mass spectrometry-based method for quantitating low-abundance protein synthesis and clearance rates in vitro and in vivo in animals and humans. The utility of this method is demonstrated with amyloid-beta (Abeta), an important low-abundance protein involved in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. We used in vivo stable isotope labeling, immunoprecipitation of Abeta from cerebrospinal fluid, and quantitative liquid chromatography electrospray-ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-tandem MS) to quantify human Abeta protein production and clearance rates. The method is sensitive and specific for stable isotope-labeled amino acid incorporation into CNS Abeta (+/-1% accuracy). This in vivo method can be used to identify pathophysiologic changes in protein metabolism and may serve as a biomarker for monitoring disease risk, progression, or response to novel therapeutic agents. The technique is adaptable to other macromolecules, such as carbohydrates or lipids.

  2. Phytoplankton production and taxon-specific growth rates in the Costa Rica Dome

    PubMed Central

    Selph, Karen E.; Landry, Michael R.; Taylor, Andrew G.; Gutiérrez-Rodríguez, Andrés; Stukel, Michael R.; Wokuluk, John; Pasulka, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    During summer 2010, we investigated phytoplankton production and growth rates at 19 stations in the eastern tropical Pacific, where winds and strong opposing currents generate the Costa Rica Dome (CRD), an open-ocean upwelling feature. Primary production (14C-incorporation) and group-specific growth and net growth rates (two-treatment seawater dilution method) were estimated from samples incubated in situ at eight depths. Our cruise coincided with a mild El Niño event, and only weak upwelling was observed in the CRD. Nevertheless, the highest phytoplankton abundances were found near the dome center. However, mixed-layer growth rates were lowest in the dome center (∼0.5–0.9 day−1), but higher on the edge of the dome (∼0.9–1.0 day−1) and in adjacent coastal waters (0.9–1.3 day−1). We found good agreement between independent methods to estimate growth rates. Mixed-layer growth rates of Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus were largely balanced by mortality, whereas eukaryotic phytoplankton showed positive net growth (∼0.5–0.6 day−1), that is, growth available to support larger (mesozooplankton) consumer biomass. These are the first group-specific phytoplankton rate estimates in this region, and they demonstrate that integrated primary production is high, exceeding 1 g C m−2 day−1 on average, even during a period of reduced upwelling. PMID:27275025

  3. Al-26-production rates and Mn-53/Al-26 production rate ratios in nonantarctic chondrites and their application to bombardment histories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herpers, U.; Englert, P.

    1983-11-01

    The long-lived spallogenic radionuclides Al-26 and Mn-53 were systematically studied in a large number of nonantarctic meteorites by nondestructive gamma-gamma-coincidence technique and neutron activation, respectively. From the Al-26-activities normalized to the main target element, silicon, an average production rate of 298 + or - 55 (dpm/kg Si/equ/) was derived. Baed on 15 chondrites with exposure ages equal to or greater than 12,000,000 a and depth profiles of Dhurmsala and Keyes, an average production rate ratio (Mn-53/Al-26)(prod) = 1.48 + or - 0.15 (dpm/kg Fe / dpm/kg Si/equ/) was calculated, which seems to be depth-independent for meteorites with preatmospheric radii R less than 35 cm. Mn-53/Al-26-radiation ages for 29 stones with short exposure ages were determined. A comparison of the results with the respective Mn-53 and Ne-21-exposure ages generally shows a good agreement. The cosmic ray bombardment age scale covered by this method is the range for T(rad) from 1,000,000 to 10,000,000 a.

  4. Linear extension rates and gross carbonate production of Acropora cervicornis at Coral Gardens, Belize.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peeling, E.; Greer, L.; Lescinsky, H.; Humston, R.; Wirth, K. R.; Baums, I. B.; Curran, A.

    2014-12-01

    Branching Acropora coral species have fast growth and carbonate production rates, and thus have functioned as important reef-building species throughout the Pleistocene and Holocene. Recently, net carbonate production (kg CaCO3 m-2 year-1) has been recognized as an important measure of reef health, especially when monitoring endangered species, such as Acropora cervicornis. This study examines carbonate production in a thriving population of A. cervicornis at the Coral Gardens reef in Belize. Photographic surveys were conducted along five transects of A. cervicornis-dominated reefs from 2011-2014. Matching photographs from 2013 and 2014 were scaled to 1 m2 and compared to calculate 84 individual A. cervicornis linear extension rates across the reef. Linear extension rates averaged 12.4 cm/yr and were as high as 17 cm/yr in some areas of the reef. Carbonate production was calculated two ways. The first followed the standard procedure of multiplying percent live coral cover, by the linear extension rate and skeletal density. The second used the number of live coral tips per square meter in place of percent live coral multiplied by the average cross-sectional area of the branches. The standard method yielded a carbonate production rate of 113 kg CaCO3 m-2 year-1 for the reef, and the tip method yielded a rate of 6 kg m-2 year-1. We suggest that the tip method is a more accurate measure of production, because A. cervicornis grows primarily from the live tips, with only limited radial growth and resheeting over dead skeleton. While this method omits the contributions of radial growth and resheeting, and is therefore somewhat of an underestimate, our future work will quantify these aspects of growth in a more complete carbonate budget. Still, our estimate suggests a carbonate production rate per unit area of A. cervicornis that is on par with other Caribbean coral species, rather than two orders of magnitude higher as reported by Perry et al (2013). Although gross coral

  5. Atmospheric Pb and Ti accumulation rates from Sphagnum moss: dependence upon plant productivity.

    PubMed

    Kempter, H; Krachler, M; Shotyk, W

    2010-07-15

    The accumulation rates of atmospheric Pb and Ti were obtained using the production rates of Sphagnum mosses collected in four ombrotrophic bogs from two regions of southern Germany: Upper Bavaria (Oberbayern, OB) and the Northern Black Forest (Nordschwarzwald, NBF). Surfaces of Sphagnum carpets were marked with plastic mesh and one year later the production of plant matter was harvested. Metal concentrations were determined in acid digests using sector field ICP-MS employing well established analytical procedures. Up to 12 samples (40 x 40 cm) were collected per site, and 6-10 sites were investigated per bog. Variations within a given sampling site were in the range 2.3-4x for Pb concentrations, 1.8-2.5x for Ti concentrations, 3-8.3x for Pb/Ti, 5.6-7.8x for Pb accumulation rates, and 2.3-6.4x for Ti accumulation rates. However, the median values of these parameters for the sites (6-10 per bog) were quite consistent. The mosses from the bogs in NBF exhibited significantly greater productivity (187-202 g m(-2) a(-1)) compared to the OB peat bogs (71-91 g m(-2) a(-1)), and these differences had a pronounced effect on the Pb and Ti accumulation rates. Highly productive mosses showed no indication of a "dilution effect" of Pb or Ti concentrations, suggesting that more productive plants were simply able to accumulate more particles from the air. The median rates of net Pb accumulation by the mosses are in excellent agreement with the fluxes obtained by direct atmospheric measurements at nearby monitoring stations in both regions (EMEP and MAPESI data).

  6. In-situ Measurements of Ozone Production Rates and Comparisons to Model-derived Production Rates During the Houston, TX and Denver, CO DISCOVER-AQ Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baier, B. C.; Brune, W. H.; Miller, D. O.; Lefer, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone (O3) is a secondary pollutant that has harmful effects on human and plant life. The climate and urban emissions in Houston, TX and Denver, CO can be conducive for significant ozone production and thus, high ozone events. Tighter government strategies for ozone mitigation have been proposed, which involve reducing the current EPA eight-hour ozone standard from 75 ppb to 65-70 ppb. These strategies rely on the reduction of ozone precursors in order to decrease the ozone production rate, P(O3). The changes in the ozone concentration at a certain location are dependent upon P(O3), so decreasing P(O3) can decrease ozone levels provided that it has not been transported from other areas. Air quality models test reduction strategies before they are implemented, locate ozone sources, and predict ozone episodes. Traditionally, P(O3) has been calculated by models. However, large uncertainties in model emissions inventories, chemical mechanisms, and meteorology can reduce confidence in this approach. A new instrument, the Measurement of Ozone Production Sensor (MOPS) directly measures P(O3) and can provide an alternate approach to determining P(O3). An updated version of the Penn State MOPS (MOPSv2.0) was deployed to Houston, TX and Denver, CO as a part of NASA's DISCOVER-AQ field campaign in the summers of 2013 and 2014, respectively. We present MOPS directly-measured P(O3) rates from these areas, as well as comparisons to zero-dimensional and three-dimensional modeled P(O3) using the RACM2 and MCMv2.2 mechanisms. These comparisons demonstrate the potential of the MOPS to test and evaluate model-derived P(O3), to advance the understanding of model chemical mechanisms, and to improve predictions of high ozone events.

  7. Temperature response of denitrification rate and greenhouse gas production in agricultural river marginal wetland soils.

    PubMed

    Bonnett, S A F; Blackwell, M S A; Leah, R; Cook, V; O'Connor, M; Maltby, E

    2013-05-01

    Soils are predicted to exhibit significant feedback to global warming via the temperature response of greenhouse gas (GHG) production. However, the temperature response of hydromorphic wetland soils is complicated by confounding factors such as oxygen (O2 ), nitrate (NO3-) and soil carbon (C). We examined the effect of a temperature gradient (2-25 °C) on denitrification rates and net nitrous oxide (N2 O), methane (CH4 ) production and heterotrophic respiration in mineral (Eutric cambisol and Fluvisol) and organic (Histosol) soil types in a river marginal landscape of the Tamar catchment, Devon, UK, under non-flooded and flooded with enriched NO3- conditions. It was hypothesized that the temperature response is dependent on interactions with NO3--enriched flooding, and the physicochemical conditions of these soil types. Denitrification rate (mean, 746 ± 97.3 μg m(-2)  h(-1) ), net N2 O production (mean, 180 ± 26.6 μg m(-2)  h(-1) ) and net CH4 production (mean, 1065 ± 183 μg m(-2)  h(-1) ) were highest in the organic Histosol, with higher organic matter, ammonium and moisture, and lower NO3- concentrations. Heterotrophic respiration (mean, 127 ± 4.6 mg m(-2)  h(-1) ) was not significantly different between soil types and dominated total GHG (CO2 eq) production in all soil types. Generally, the temperature responses of denitrification rate and net N2 O production were exponential, whilst net CH4 production was unresponsive, possibly due to substrate limitation, and heterotrophic respiration was exponential but limited in summer at higher temperatures. Flooding with NO3- increased denitrification rate, net N2 O production and heterotrophic respiration, but a reduction in net CH4 production suggests inhibition of methanogenesis by NO3- or N2 O produced from denitrification. Implications for management and policy are that warming and flood events may promote microbial interactions in soil between distinct microbial communities and increase

  8. The Effects of Different Sets of Disclosure Instructions on Subject Productivity and Rated Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Sheldon Norman

    1978-01-01

    Investigated the effects of different sets of instructions (feeling disclosure, logical disclosure, placebo control, and control) to discuss personal concerns on subject productivity and subject satisfaction ratings. Analyses indicated the instructional manipulation was effective in producing different kinds and amounts of talk by condition.…

  9. Coal flow aids reduce coke plant operating costs and improve production rates

    SciTech Connect

    Bedard, R.A.; Bradacs, D.J.; Kluck, R.W.; Roe, D.C.; Ventresca, B.P.

    2005-06-01

    Chemical coal flow aids can provide many benefits to coke plants, including improved production rates, reduced maintenance and lower cleaning costs. This article discusses the mechanisms by which coal flow aids function and analyzes several successful case histories. 2 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  10. An expert system for estimating production rates and costs for hardwood group-selection harvests

    Treesearch

    Chris B. LeDoux; B. Gopalakrishnan; R. S. Pabba

    2003-01-01

    As forest managers shift their focus from stands to entire ecosystems alternative harvesting methods such as group selection are being used increasingly. Results of several field time and motion studies and simulation runs were incorporated into an expert system for estimating production rates and costs associated with harvests of group-selection units of various size...

  11. Effect of phosphorus placement methods and rates on sugarbeet production under strip tillage in southern Idaho

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Strip tillage usage is increasing in the sugarbeet production systems of the Pacific Northwest and research data to guide phosphorus placement options and application rate for those options need to be acquired. The effects of phosphorus application method (surface and subsurface band) and phosphorus...

  12. Deterioration rates of blowndown timber and potential problems associated with product recovery.

    Treesearch

    Paul E. Aho; James M. Cahill

    1984-01-01

    This paper summarizes published reports of deterioration and product recovery studies conducted on dead timber. Decay rates experienced in blowndown timber are presented for western redcedar (Thuja plicata Donn ex D. Don), Douglasfir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco), western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla (Raf.) Sarg.), and...

  13. Production rates for United States Forest Service brush disposal planning in the northern Rocky Mountains

    Treesearch

    Dan Loeffler; Stu Hoyt; Nathaniel Anderson

    2017-01-01

    Timber harvesting operations generate brush and other vegetative debris, which often has no marketable value. In many western U.S. forests, these materials represent a fire hazard and a potential threat to forest health and must be removed or burned for disposal. Currently, there is no established, consistent method to estimate brush disposal production rates in the U....

  14. Development of variable-rate precision spraying systems for tree crop production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Excessive pesticides are often applied to target and non-target areas in orchards and nurseries, resulting in greater production costs, worker exposure to unnecessary pesticide risks, and adverse contamination of the environment. To improve spray application efficiency, two types of variable-rate pr...

  15. The effect of soil moisture on nitrous oxide production rates in large enclosed ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Haren, J.; Colodner, D.; Lin, G.; Murthy, R.

    2001-12-01

    On land, nitrous oxide (N2O) is mainly produced in soils by bacterial processes such as nitrification and denitrification. Once in the atmosphere N2O contributes to the greenhouse effect and stratospheric ozone destruction. Nitrification and denitrification are strongly dependent on soil moisture content, amongst other soil parameters. At Biosphere 2 Center we have begun to test the utility of meso-scale closed systems for understanding the relationship between soil properties and trace gas production at larger scales. We investigated the relationship between soil moisture content and soil N2O efflux in two large experimental closed systems (Tropical Rainforest (TR) and Intensive Forestry (IF) Mesocosms) at Biosphere 2 Center. N2O was measured every hour with an automated GC system. The daily N2O production rate was calculated as the rate of increase of N2O during the daytime, when the mesocosm was materially closed. We furthermore measured N2O and nitrate concentrations in the soil, as well as nitrate and N2O production rates in local areas. In the Rainforest Mesocosm, we found a very reproducible relationship between soil moisture content and N2O efflux, including the transient spikes in production rate upon wetting. In the Forestry Mesocosm the relation between soil moisture and N2O efflux was less clearcut.

  16. Investigation of OxProduction Rates in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area during MILAGRO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusanter, S.; Molina, L. T.; Stevens, P. S.

    2009-12-01

    Understanding the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere and the formation of secondary pollutants are important issues in atmospheric chemistry. For instance, the photochemical production of tropospheric ozone (O3) is of particular interest due to its detrimental effects on both human health and agricultural ecosystems. A detailed characterization of tropospheric O3 production rates will help in the development of effective control strategies. The 2006 Mexico City Metropolitan Area field campaign (MCMA-2006) was one of four components of MILAGRO (Megacity Initiative: Local And Global Research Observations) intended to collect information on the impact of megacity emissions on local, regional and global scales. In this presentation, rates of production of Ox (Ox = O3 + NO2) species during MCMA-2006 at the supersite T0 (Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo) will be presented using different approaches based on measured and modeled concentrations of ROx (OH + HO2 + RO2) radicals. In addition, we will examine both the reactivity of OH and the contribution of specific peroxy radicals to the oxidation rate of NO to estimate the contribution of groups of VOCs (alkanes, alkenes, aromatics, oxygenated and biogenic VOCs) to the total production rate of Ox species.

  17. 27 CFR 19.246 - Computing the effective tax rate for a product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... the effective tax rate according to the following formula: (1) Numerator. The numerator will be the... following is an example of the use of the formula. 1 Proof gallons by which distilled spirits derived from... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Computing the effective...

  18. 27 CFR 19.246 - Computing the effective tax rate for a product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... the effective tax rate according to the following formula: (1) Numerator. The numerator will be the... following is an example of the use of the formula. 1 Proof gallons by which distilled spirits derived from... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Computing the effective...

  19. 27 CFR 19.246 - Computing the effective tax rate for a product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... the effective tax rate according to the following formula: (1) Numerator. The numerator will be the... following is an example of the use of the formula. 1 Proof gallons by which distilled spirits derived from... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Computing the effective...

  20. 27 CFR 19.246 - Computing the effective tax rate for a product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the effective tax rate according to the following formula: (1) Numerator. The numerator will be the... following is an example of the use of the formula. Batch Record Distilled spirits 2249.1 proof gallons... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Computing the effective...

  1. Reduced rates and alternatives to methyl bromide for snapdragon production in Florida

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A field trial was conducted to evaluate soil solarization, Midas™ (iodomethane:chloropicrin 50:50, Arysta LifeScience Corp., Cary, NC) and different rates and formulations of methyl bromide under standard and metalized films for the production of snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus) in Martin County, Flor...

  2. Neutron capture production rates of cosmogenic 60Co, 59Ni and 36Cl in stony meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spergel, M. S.; Reedy, R. C.; Lazareth, O. W.; Levy, P. W.

    1986-01-01

    Results for neutron flux calculations in stony meteoroids (of various radii and compositions) and production rates for Cl-36, Ni-59, and Co-60 are reported. The Ni-59/Co-60 ratio is nearly constant with depth in most meteorites: this effect is consistent with the neutron flux and capture cross section properties. The shape of the neutron flux energy spectrum, varies little with depth in a meteorite. The size of the parent meteorite can be determined from one of its fragments, using the Ni-59/Co-60 ratios, if the parent meteorite was less than 75 g/cm(2) in radius. If the parent meteorite was larger, a lower limit on the size of the parent meteorite can be determined from a fragment. In C3 chondrites this is not possible. In stony meteorites with R less than 50 g/cm(2) the calculated Co-60 production rates (mass less than 4 kg), are below 1 atom/min g-Co. The highest Co-60 production rates occur in stony meteorites with radius about 250 g/cm(2) (1.4 m across). In meteorites with radii greater than 400 g/cm(2), the maximum Co-60 production rate occurs at a depth of about 175 g/cm(2) in L-chondrite, 125 g/cm(2) in C3 chrondrite, and 190 g/cm(2) in aubrites.

  3. The production rate of cosmogenic 10Be at the Koefels rockslide site, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Kerschner, Hanns; Kober, Florian; Salcher, Bernhard; Christl, Marcus; Schluechter, Christian

    2017-04-01

    The Koefels rockslide, with a volume of 2-3 km3, involved sliding of predominantly orthogneiss (granitic and augen gneiss) from the Schartle ridge on the west side of Ötztal eastward into the mouth of Horlachtal. The dating of compressed wood fragments found in a tunnel built for a later abandoned waterworks project in the 1960s indicated an early Holocene age. In the 1990s we initiated a study to use the Koefels rockslide as a calibration site for cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al production rates. As the Koefels production rates were markedly higher than those from other sites, the Koefels site was not included in the final CRONUS-Earth calibration data set (Borchers et al. 2016). We discuss a re-assessment of the geomorphological interpretation of the 27 boulder and bedrock 10Be exposure dates, nine of which were previously published. In light of recent dating of further buried wood pieces to 9527-9498 yr ago (Nicolussi et al. 2015), we present the 10Be production rate calculated based on the Koefels data. Borchers B. et al. 2016. Geological calibration of spallation production rates in the CRONUS-Earth project. Quaternary Geochronology 31: 188-198. Nicolussi K. et al. 2015. Precise radiocarbon dating of the giant Köfels landslide (Eastern Alps, Austria). Geomorphology 243: 87-91.

  4. Ethylene production and its effect on storage respiration rate in wounded and unwounded sugarbeet roots

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ethylene is produced by all seed plants and stimulates respiration in most plant tissues and organs. To understand how this plant hormone may affect postharvest sugarbeet root respiration, a series of experiments were conducted to determine (1) the rate of ethylene production in wounded and unwound...

  5. Production rates and costs of cable yarding wood residue from clearcut units

    Treesearch

    Chris B. LeDoux

    1984-01-01

    Wood residue is a little used source of fiber, chips, and fuel because harvest costs are largely unknown. This study calculates incremental production rates and costs for yarding and loading logging residue in clearcut old-growth Douglas-fir/western hemlock forests. Harvest operations were observed for two timber sales in western Oregon. Three different cable yarding...

  6. Production rates of strange vector mesons at the Z0 resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Dima, Mihai O.

    1997-05-01

    This dissertation presents a study of strange vector meson production, "leading particle" effect and a first direct measurement of the strangeness suppression parameter in hadronic decays of the neutral electroweak boson, Z. The measurements were performed in e+e- collisions at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) with the SLC Large Detector (SLD) experiment. A new generation particle ID system, the SLD Cerenkov Ring Imaging Detector (CRID) is used to discriminate kaons from pions, enabling the reconstruction of the vector mesons over a wide momentum range. The inclusive production rates of ρ and K*0 and the differential rates versus momentum were measured and are compared with those of other experiments and theoretical predictions. The high longitudinal polarisation of the SLC electron beam is used in conjunction with the electroweak quark production asymmetries to separate quark jets from antiquark jets. K*0 production is studied separately in these samples, and the results show evidence for the "leading particle" effect. The difference between K*0 production rates at high momentum in quark and antiquark jets yields a first direct measurement of strangeness suppression in jet fragmentation.

  7. Growth rates are related to production efficiencies in juveniles of the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus.

    PubMed

    Heflin, L E; Gibbs, V K; Jones, W T; Makowsky, R; Lawrence, A L; Watts, S A

    2013-09-01

    Growth rates of newly-metamorphosed urchins from a single spawning event (three males and three females) were highly variable, despite being held en masse under identical environmental and nutritional conditions. As individuals reached ~5 mm diameter (0.07-0.10 g wet weight), they were placed in growth trials (23 dietary treatments containing various nutrient profiles). Elapsed time from the first individual entering the growth trials to the last individual entering was 121 days (N = 170 individuals). During the five-week growth trials, urchins were held individually and proffered a limiting ration to evaluate growth rate and production efficiency. Growth rates among individuals within each dietary treatment remained highly variable. Across all dietary treatments, individuals with an initially high growth rate (entering the study first) continued to grow at a faster rate than those with an initially low growth rate (entering the study at a later date), regardless of feed intake. Wet weight gain (ranging from 0.13 -3.19 g, P < 0.0001, R(2) = 0.5801) and dry matter production efficiency (ranging from 25.2-180.5%, P = 0.0003, R(2) = 0.6162) were negatively correlated with stocking date, regardless of dietary treatment. Although canalization of growth rate during en masse early post-metamorphic growth is possible, we hypothesize that intrinsic differences in growth rates are, in part, the result of differences (possibly genetic) in production efficiencies of individual Lytechinus variegatus. That is, some sea urchins are more efficient in converting feed to biomass. We further hypothesize that this variation may have evolved as an adaptive response to selective pressure related to food availability.

  8. Growth rates are related to production efficiencies in juveniles of the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus

    PubMed Central

    Heflin, L.E.; Gibbs, V.K.; Jones, W.T.; Makowsky, R.; Lawrence, A.L.; Watts, S.A.

    2014-01-01

    Growth rates of newly-metamorphosed urchins from a single spawning event (three males and three females) were highly variable, despite being held en masse under identical environmental and nutritional conditions. As individuals reached ~5 mm diameter (0.07–0.10 g wet weight), they were placed in growth trials (23 dietary treatments containing various nutrient profiles). Elapsed time from the first individual entering the growth trials to the last individual entering was 121 days (N = 170 individuals). During the five-week growth trials, urchins were held individually and proffered a limiting ration to evaluate growth rate and production efficiency. Growth rates among individuals within each dietary treatment remained highly variable. Across all dietary treatments, individuals with an initially high growth rate (entering the study first) continued to grow at a faster rate than those with an initially low growth rate (entering the study at a later date), regardless of feed intake. Wet weight gain (ranging from 0.13 −3.19 g, P < 0.0001, R2 = 0.5801) and dry matter production efficiency (ranging from 25.2–180.5%, P = 0.0003, R2 = 0.6162) were negatively correlated with stocking date, regardless of dietary treatment. Although canalization of growth rate during en masse early post-metamorphic growth is possible, we hypothesize that intrinsic differences in growth rates are, in part, the result of differences (possibly genetic) in production efficiencies of individual Lytechinus variegatus. That is, some sea urchins are more efficient in converting feed to biomass. We further hypothesize that this variation may have evolved as an adaptive response to selective pressure related to food availability. PMID:25435593

  9. Aftershock decay, productivity, and stress rates in Hawaii: Indicators of temperature and stress from magma sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klein, Fred W.; Wright, Tom; Nakata, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    We examined dozens of aftershock sequences in Hawaii in terms of Gutenberg-Richter and modified Omori law parameters. We studied p, the rate of aftershock decay; Ap, the aftershock productivity, defined as the observed divided by the expected number of aftershocks; and c, the time delay when aftershock rates begin to fall. We found that for earthquakes shallower than 20 km, p values >1.2 are near active magma centers. We associate this high decay rate with higher temperatures and faster stress relaxation near magma reservoirs. Deep earthquakes near Kilauea's inferred magma transport path show a range of p values, suggesting the absence of a large, deep magma reservoir. Aftershock productivity is >4.0 for flank earthquakes known to be triggered by intrusions but is normal (0.25 to 4.0) for isolated main shocks. We infer that continuing, post-main shock stress from the intrusion adds to the main shock's stress step and causes higher Ap. High Ap in other zones suggests less obvious intrusions and pulsing magma pressure near Kilauea's feeding conduit. We calculate stress rates and stress rate changes from pre-main shock and aftershock rates. Stress rate increased after many intrusions but decreased after large M7–8 earthquakes. Stress rates are highest in the seismically active volcano flanks and lowest in areas far from volcanic centers. We found sequences triggered by intrusions tend to have high Ap, high (>0.10 day) c values, a stress rate increase, and sometimes a peak in aftershock rate hours after the main shock. We interpret these values as indicating continuing intrusive stress after the main shock.

  10. Follicle recruitment determines IVF productivity rate via the number of embryos frozen and subsequent transfers.

    PubMed

    Stanger, James D; Yovich, John L

    2013-09-01

    IVF productivity rate is an index defined as the sum of all live births from either fresh or frozen embryo transfers arising from a single oocyte collection. This retrospective analysis over 9 continuous years used this index to understand the potential impact on pregnancy rates of milder stimulation regimens with associated reduced egg numbers. The productivity rate per collection increased in a linear and significant rate as more oocytes were recovered, more embryos frozen and more frozen embryo transfers contributed to pregnancy. This observation was true for women aged <35 years and less so for women aged 35-39 years but not for women aged 40 years and older. The contribution of frozen embryo transfer to the productivity rate rose in a linear manner, reaching over 40% of all live births with nine oocytes. The number of live births per oocyte, pronuclear embryos and thawed embryos decreased significantly but the number of live births per embryo transferred (fresh or frozen) rose with rising oocyte numbers, reflecting increasing opportunity for embryo selection. This study suggests that optimal benefits with minimal risks are gained from a model that includes both fresh and frozen transfers under stimulation generating between 8 and 12 eggs.

  11. Chlorine-36 Production Rate Calibration by the CRONUS-Earth Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, F. M.; Marrero, S.; Stone, J. O.; Lifton, N. A.

    2012-12-01

    Among the cosmogenic nuclides commonly used for Quaternary geochronology and geomorphology (36Cl, 10Be, 26Al, 3He, and 14C), the production rate of 36Cl has proved particularly difficult to calibrate because of the multiple nuclear reactions that lead to its production (3 major reactions and 5 minor ones). Achieving a consensus on the production constants for 36Cl has therefore been a major emphasis of the NSF-funded Cosmic Ray Produced Nuclide Systematics on Earth (CRONUS-Earth) Project. The most suitable for 36Cl calibration of the sites sampled by CRONUS-Earth proved to be ignimbrites from Younger Dryas-correlative moraines near the Quelccaya Ice Cap in Peru, basalts from the similar-aged Tabernacle Hill flow in Utah, and granodiorite boulders on a similar-aged moraine at Baboon Lakes in the Sierra Nevada, California. Production rates were estimated by minimizing 36Cl concentration residuals, with production scaled between the sites using the recently developed Lifton-Sato formulation. The scaling parameters employed were cut-off rigidity of 0 GV, solar modulation parameter of 587.4 MV, and air pressure of 1013.25 hPa; production-rate parameters obtained using this scaling approach are not directly comparable to those previously estimated using alternative scaling methods. This approach yielded sea-level high-latitude production rates of 55±2 atoms 36Cl (g Ca)-1 yr-1, 157±5 atoms 36Cl (g K)-1 yr-1, and 704±140 neutrons (g air)-1 yr-1. The results from the minimization did not meet tests for statistical significance and therefore the parameter-rate uncertainties could not be determined directly from the calibration data set. An independent secondary data set consisting of 82 samples from 16 localities and compiled from 7 separate published studies was therefore employed for this purpose. Average deviations of calculated 36Cl ages from independently determined ages increased from about 10% for samples where 36Cl production was nearly all from spallation

  12. Improvement on droplet production rate of ultrasonic - nebulizer in spray pyrolysis process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panatarani, Camellia; Demen, Tuti Aryati; Men, Liu Kin; Maulana, Dwindra Wilham; Hidayat, Darmawan; Joni, I. Made

    2013-09-01

    Atomization is an important part in Spray Pyrolysis (SP) process which is applied to synthesize submicron or nano sized particles or to deposit thin film. Ultrasonic Nebulizer (UN) is usually use in SP due to its homogeneous droplets production with size between 1-5 μm. The drawback of the UN is low droplets production rate. In this research, we successfully developed a Digital Ultrasonic Nebulizer (DUN) with high droplets production rate using two ultrasonic traducers with applied frequency of 2.4 MHz. The result of DUN atomization was improved 4-6 fold compare to the conventional UN. The DUN also has an additional digital features such as pushbutton, LCD and microcontroller which is allow to set duration and applied voltage.

  13. Mass Customization Production Planning System by Advance Demand Information Based on Unfulfilled-order-rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Nobuyuki; Kawasaki, Masaya; Okuhara, Koji

    In this paper, we try to model for ‘Naiji System’ which is a unique corporation between a maker and suppliers in Japan. We propose Mass Customization Production Planning & Management System (MCPS) based on unfulfilled-order-rate by using Advance Demand Information, which is called ‘Naiji’. This model is formulated as a nonlinear stochastic programming problem which minimizes the sum of production cost and inventory holding cost subject to the set of probabilistic constraint and some linear production constraints. We propose the new upper bound SOn (ρmin) to estimate the unfulfilled-order-rate more strictly. The procedure to find a good solution is developed by solving the linear programming problem repeatedly on the basic solution strategy that is ‘relaxation’. A computational load to obtain a solution by the proposed indicator is shown to be very small. Finally, an availability of the procedure is shown.

  14. A computer program for estimating fish population sizes and annual production rates

    SciTech Connect

    Railsback, S.F.; Holcomb, B.D.; Ryon, M.G.

    1989-10-01

    This report documents a program that estimates fish population sizes and annual production rates in small streams from multiple-pass sampling data. A maximum weighted likelihood method is used to estimate population sizes (Carle and Strub, 1978), and a size-frequency method is used to estimate production (Garman and Waters, 1983). The program performs the following steps: (1) reads in the data and performs error checking; (2) where required, uses length-weight regression to fill in missing weights; (3) assigns length classes to the fish; (4) for each date, species, and length class, estimates the population size and its variance; (5) for each date and species, estimates the total population size and its variance; and (6) for each species, estimates the annual production rate and its variance between sampling dates selected by the user. If data from only date are used, only populations are estimated. 9 refs.

  15. Production rates of 36Cl in basalts from the calibration site of Fuerteventura, Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai, K.

    2009-09-01

    Age determination based on cosmogenic nuclides is an important tool to investigate landscape development and age relations of geologically very young materials. The aim of this study is to contribute data to establish age determination of the basis of cosmogenic 36Cl production as a generally reliable method. 36Cl is a radionuclide that is in situ produced by cosmic radiation at the earth surface. It is formed by spallation from Ca, K, Ti, and Fe, by thermal neutron capture in 35Cl, and by muogenic production from Ca and K. The concentration of the cosmogenic nuclide provides a measure of the exposure age of the surface, but also of the exposure history which may include periods of burial or erosion. Several factors such as the geographic position of the site, the topographic shielding of the surrounding hillside and the sample thickness or sampling depth influence the effective amount of radiation hitting the surface and are taken into account by applying appropriate scaling factors. Basalt samples from the mid-latitude, low altitude calibration site of Fuerteventura, Canary Islands were collected and the production rates of 36Cl were determined. Geologically young samples covering an age range of approximately 50 to 400 ka could be collected from a number of flows, which suit the time span that can be covered with 36Cl age determination. The age was independently determined with the 40Ar/39Ar method. From nine lava flows 7 or 8 samples were collected whose surface structures indicated as little erosion as possible. ICP and XRF measurements proved that the basalts were very similar in chemical composition. The preparation of the AMS samples followed generally the procedure established by Stone et al. (1996b). The measurements were performed at the AMS facility at the University of Utrecht. From the results of the measurements total chlorine concentrations the amount of 36Cl, and the production rates were deduced. The high variability of the production rates for

  16. Experimental productivity rate optimization of rare earth element separation through preparative solid phase extraction chromatography.

    PubMed

    Knutson, Hans-Kristian; Max-Hansen, Mark; Jönsson, Christian; Borg, Niklas; Nilsson, Bernt

    2014-06-27

    Separating individual rare earth elements from a complex mixture with several elements is difficult and this is emphasized for the middle elements: Samarium, Europium and Gadolinium. In this study we have accomplished an overloaded one-step separation of these rare earth elements through preparative ion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography with an bis (2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid impregnated column and nitric acid as eluent. An inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry unit was used for post column element detection. The main focus was to optimize the productivity rate, subject to a yield requirement of 80% and a purity requirement of 99% for each element, by varying the flow rate and batch load size. The optimal productivity rate in this study was 1.32kgSamarium/(hmcolumn(3)), 0.38kgEuropium/(hmcolumn(3)) and 0.81kgGadolinium/(hmcolumn(3)).

  17. Multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic muon-proton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Salgado, C.W.

    1992-10-01

    Measurements of forward multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic muonproton scattering are presented. Data were taken with a 490 GeV muon beam incident on a hydrogen target. Jets were defined using the JADE jet finding algorithm. The measured rates are presented as function of W, the hadronic center-of-mass energy and the jet resolution parameter, y[sub cut], in energies up to W=33 GeV. Good agreement is found in comparisons with predictions of the QCD-inspired Lund Monte Carlo models. Non-perturbative QCD production mechanisms, inside the Lund Model, can not reproduce the results for energies greater than W [approx equal] 20 GeV. Sensitivities of the jet rate measurements to the low x (x [approx equal] 0.02) gluon content of the nucleon and the evolution of [alpha][sub s], are studied.

  18. Multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic muon-proton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Salgado, C.W.; E665 Collaboration

    1992-10-01

    Measurements of forward multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic muonproton scattering are presented. Data were taken with a 490 GeV muon beam incident on a hydrogen target. Jets were defined using the JADE jet finding algorithm. The measured rates are presented as function of W, the hadronic center-of-mass energy and the jet resolution parameter, y{sub cut}, in energies up to W=33 GeV. Good agreement is found in comparisons with predictions of the QCD-inspired Lund Monte Carlo models. Non-perturbative QCD production mechanisms, inside the Lund Model, can not reproduce the results for energies greater than W {approx_equal} 20 GeV. Sensitivities of the jet rate measurements to the low x (x {approx_equal} 0.02) gluon content of the nucleon and the evolution of {alpha}{sub s}, are studied.

  19. Effect of aeration rate on production of xylitol from corncob hemicellulose hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xinghong; Xia, Liming

    2006-06-01

    The effects of different aeration conditions on xylitol production from corncob hemicellulose hydrolysate by Candida sp. ZU04 were investigated. Batch fermentations were carried out in a 3.7-L fermentor at 30 degrees C, pH 5.5, and agitation of 300 rpm. It was found that the two-phase aeration process was more effective than the one-phase aeration process in xylitol production. In the first 24 h of the aerobic phase, a high aeration rate was applied, glucose was soon consumed, and biomass increased quickly. In the second fermentation phase, aeration rate was reduced and an improved xylitol yield was obtained. The maximum xylitol yield (0.76 g/g) was obtained with an aeration rate of 1.5 vvm (KLa of 37 h-1) for the first 24 h and 0.3 vvm (KLa of 6 h-1) from 24 to 96 h.

  20. Performance of Fast Repetition Rate fluorometry based estimates of primary productivity in coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, C.; Suggett, D. J.; Cherukuru, N.; Ralph, P. J.; Doblin, M. A.

    2014-11-01

    Capturing the variability of primary productivity in highly dynamic coastal ecosystems remains a major challenge to marine scientists. To test the suitability of Fast Repetition Rate fluorometry (FRRf) for rapid assessment of primary productivity in estuarine and coastal locations, we conducted a series of paired analyses estimating 14C carbon fixation and primary productivity from electron transport rates with a Fast Repetition Rate fluorometer MkII, from waters on the Australian east coast. Samples were collected from two locations with contrasting optical properties and we compared the relative magnitude of photosynthetic traits, such as the maximum rate of photosynthesis (Pmax), light utilisation efficiency (α) and minimum saturating irradiance (EK) estimated using both methods. In the case of FRRf, we applied recent algorithm developments that enabled electron transport rates to be determined free from the need for assumed constants, as in most previous studies. Differences in the concentration and relative proportion of optically active substances at the two locations were evident in the contrasting attenuation of PAR (400-700 nm), blue (431 nm), green (531 nm) and red (669 nm) wavelengths. FRRF-derived estimates of photosynthetic parameters were positively correlated with independent estimates of 14C carbon fixation (Pmax: n = 19, R2 = 0.66; α: n = 21, R2 = 0.77; EK: n = 19, R2 = 0.45; all p < 0.05), however primary productivity was frequently underestimated by the FRRf method. Up to 81% of the variation in the relationship between FRRf and 14C estimates was explained by the presence of pico-cyanobacteria and chlorophyll-a biomass, and the proportion of photoprotective pigments, that appeared to be linked to turbidity. We discuss the potential importance of cyanobacteria in influencing the underestimations of FRRf productivity and steps to overcome this potential limitation.

  1. Are Methods for Estimating Primary Production and the Growth Rates of Phytoplankton Approaching Agreement?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cullen, J. J.

    2016-02-01

    During the 1980s, estimates of primary productivity and the growth rates of phytoplankton in oligotrophic waters were controversial, in part because rates based on seasonal accumulations of oxygen in the shallow oxygen maximum were reported to be much higher than could be accounted for with measurements of photosynthesis based on incubations with C-14. Since then, much has changed: tested and standardized methods have been employed to collect comprehensive time-series observations of primary production and related oceanographic properties in oligotrophic waters of the North Pacific subtropical gyre and the Sargasso Sea; technical and theoretical advances have led to new tracer-based estimates of photosynthesis (e.g., oxygen/argon and triple isotopes of dissolved oxygen); and biogeochemical sensor systems on ocean gliders and profiling floats can describe with unprecedented resolution the dynamics of phytoplankton, oxygen and nitrate as driven by growth, loss processes including grazing, and vertical migration for nutrient acquisition. Meanwhile, the estimation of primary productivity, phytoplankton biomass and phytoplankton growth rates from remote sensing of ocean color has matured, complementing biogeochemical models that describe and predict these key properties of plankton dynamics. In a selective review focused on well-studied oligotrophic waters, I compare methods for estimating the primary productivity and growth rates of phytoplankton to see if they are converging on agreement, not only in the estimated rates, but also in the underlying assumptions, such as the ratio of gross- to net primary production — and how this relates to the measurement — and the ratio of chlorophyll to carbon in phytoplankton. Examples of agreement are encouraging, but some stark contrasts illustrate the need for improved mechanistic understanding of exactly what each method is measuring.

  2. Constraints on Chlorine-36 Production Rates Using Beryllium-10 at Lake Bonneville, UT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrero, S. M.; Phillips, F. M.; Caffee, M.

    2007-12-01

    The CRONUS-Earth geological calibration at the Lake Bonneville shoreline has provided a unique opportunity to constrain the chlorine-36 production rates based on the well-known beryllium-10 production rate by comparing the inventories of both nuclides in the same samples. Lake Bonneville, an ancient glacial lake, occupied a large area surrounding the current Great Salt Lake in Utah during the last glacial period. The highest stage, called the Bonneville shoreline, was very brief and lasted from 18.9-17.2 cal ka before catastrophic flooding lowered the lake level to the Provo shoreline. The geological calibration at Lake Bonneville shoreline consists of two different sites: the Tabernacle Hill basalt and the Promontory Point quartzite. The Tabernacle Hill basalt is a radiocarbon age-constrained flow that represents the Provo shoreline. The basalt erupted after the catastrophic flood into the Provo lake based on the dating of the bounding flood and tufa deposits. The Promontory Point site is a quartzite wave-cut bench at the Bonneville shoreline level. The cutting action of the waves removed significant amounts of rock and exposed a fresh surface at the base of the current cliffs. The sampling was done close to the cliffs in order to minimize the possible effects of muon production prior to exposure by the cutting action and flood. The first chlorine-36 results from Tabernacle Hill have shown that most samples fall within the time frame indicated by the carbon-14 dating and the average (16.7 +/- 0.8 ka) is within one sigma of the lower age limit. Each sample was sent to several labs and analyzed for multiple cosmogenic nuclides. The comparison of beryllium-10 concentrations from the Promontory Point quartzite with chlorine-36 inventories in rocks of varying chemistry enables closer constraints to be placed on chlorine-36 production rates. This new information will allow tests to be performed on the current production schemes and provide insight into the chlorine-36

  3. In vitro O 2 fluxes compared with 14C production and other rate terms during the JGOFS Equatorial Pacific experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Michael; Orchardo, Joe; Dickson, Mary-Lynn; Barber, Richard; Lindley, Steven

    1999-04-01

    We report rates of gross and net O 2 production measured in vitro during JGOFS cruises in the equatorial Pacific in spring and fall, 1992. We scale O 2 productivities to net and gross C production. We then compare the calculated rates with 14C production and with new/export production measured by various techniques. 14C productivities in samples incubated for 24 h are about 45% of gross carbon production rates calculated from gross O 2 production. The difference is compatible with expected rates of the Mehler reaction, photorespiration, excretion, and community mitochondrial respiration. 14C production rates are similar to net carbon production rates in the upper half of the euphotic zone. At lower irradiances, where net C production can be zero or less, 14C productivities lie between net community production and gross primary production. Net carbon production rates in vitro are a factor of =4-20 times greater than estimates from drifting sediment trap and tracer transport studies. This difference probably reflects anomalous accumulation of POC in bottles because of the exclusion of grazers.

  4. Biodiesel from wastewater: lipid production in high rate algal pond receiving disinfected effluent.

    PubMed

    Assemany, Paula Peixoto; Calijuri, Maria Lucia; do Couto, Eduardo de Aguiar; Santiago, Aníbal Fonseca; Dos Reis, Alberto José Delgado

    2015-01-01

    The production of different species of microalgae in consortium with other micro-organisms from wastewaters may represent an alternative process, to reduce the costs, for obtaining biofuels. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of pre-ultraviolet disinfection (UV) in the production of lipids from biomass produced in high rate ponds. Two high rate algal ponds were evaluated: a pond that received domestic sewage without disinfection and the other receiving domestic sewage previously disinfected by UV radiation (uvHRAP). The UV disinfection did not lead to significant differences in fatty acid profile and total lipid productivities, although it increased algal biomass concentration and productivity as well as lipid content. Moreover, the overall biomass concentrations and productivities decreased with the UV disinfection, mostly as a consequence of a loss in bacterial load. We thus conclude that uvHRAP disinfection may represent a potential strategy to promote the cleaner and safer growth of algal biomass when cultivated in consortium with other micro-organisms. Mainly regarding the use of wastewater as culture medium, together with a cheaper production of lipids for biodiesel, pre-disinfection may represent an advance since extraction costs could be significantly trimmed due to the increase in lipid content.

  5. Wastewater treatment and algal production in high rate algal ponds with carbon dioxide addition.

    PubMed

    Park, J B K; Craggs, R J

    2010-01-01

    High rate algal ponds (HRAPs) provide improved wastewater treatment over conventional wastewater stabilisation ponds; however, algal production and recovery of wastewater nutrients as algal biomass is limited by the low carbon:nitrogen ratio of wastewater. This paper investigates the influence of CO(2) addition (to augment daytime carbon availability) on wastewater treatment performance and algal production of two pilot-scale HRAPs operated with different hydraulic retention times (4 and 8 days) over a New Zealand Summer (November-March, 07/08). Weekly measurements were made of influent and effluent flow rate and water qualities, algal and bacterial biomass production, and the percentage of algae biomass harvested in gravity settling units. This research shows that the wastewater treatment HRAPs with CO(2) addition achieved a mean algal productivity of 16.7 g/m(2)/d for the HRAP(4d) (4 d HRT, maximum algae productivity of 24.7 g/m(2)/d measured in January 08) and 9.0 g/m(2)/d for the HRAP(8d) (8 d HRT)). Algae biomass produced in the HRAPs was efficiently harvested by simple gravity settling units (mean harvested algal productivity: 11.5 g/m(2)/d for the HRAP(4d) and 7.5 g/m(2)/d for the HRAP(8d) respectively). Higher bacterial composition and the larger size of algal/bacterial flocs of the HRAP(8d) biomass increased harvestability (83%) compared to that of HRAP(4d) biomass (69%).

  6. Ozone interactions with human hair: Ozone uptake rates and product formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandrangi, Lakshmi S.; Morrison, Glenn C.

    In this study, the cumulative ozone uptake, the ozone reaction probability and product yields of volatile aldehydes and ketones were quantified for human scalp hair. Hair was chosen because ozone reacts readily with skin oils and the personal-care products that coat hair. Due to their proximity to the breathing zone, these reactions can influence personal exposure to ozone and its volatile reaction products. Hair samples were collected before and after washing and/or application of personal hair-care products. Samples were exposed to ozone for 24 h in a tubular Teflon reactor; ozone consumption rates and product emission rates were quantified. The mean values of integrated ozone uptake, initial and final follicle reaction probability values for eight washed and unwashed samples were, respectively, 5.1±4.4 μmol O 3 g -1, (13±8)×10 -5, and (1.0±1.3)×10 -5. Unwashed hair taken close to the scalp exhibited the highest integrated ozone uptake and reaction probability, indicating that scalp oils are responsible for much of the ozone reactivity. Otherwise there was no significant difference between washed and unwashed hair. Compounds (geranyl acetone, 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one, and decanal) associated with ozone reacting with sebum were observed as secondary products more frequently from unwashed hair than for washed hair and the summed yield of aldehydes ranged from 0.00 to 0.86. Based on reaction probabilities, cumulative ozone uptake and typical sebum generation rates, ozone flux to skin and hair is anticipated to be nearly transport limited, reducing personal exposure to ozone and increasing exposure to reaction products.

  7. Maximising electricity production by controlling the biofilm specific growth rate in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Ledezma, Pablo; Greenman, John; Ieropoulos, Ioannis

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this work is to study the relationship between growth rate and electricity production in perfusion-electrode microbial fuel cells (MFCs), across a wide range of flow rates by co-measurement of electrical output and changes in population numbers by viable counts and optical density. The experiments hereby presented demonstrate, for the first time to the authors' knowledge, that the anodic biofilm specific growth rate can be determined and controlled in common with other loose matrix perfusion systems. Feeding with nutrient-limiting conditions at a critical flow rate (50.8 mL h(-1)) resulted in the first experimental determination of maximum specific growth rate μ(max) (19.8 day(-1)) for Shewanella spp. MFC biofilms, which is considerably higher than those predicted or assumed via mathematical modelling. It is also shown that, under carbon-energy limiting conditions there is a strong direct relationship between growth rate and electrical power output, with μ(max) coinciding with maximum electrical power production.

  8. Volumetric flow rate comparisons for water and product on pasteurization systems.

    PubMed

    Schlesser, J E; Stroup, W H; McKinstry, J A

    1994-04-01

    A flow calibration tube system was assembled to determine the volumetric flow rates for water and various dairy products through a holding tube, using three different flow promotion methods. With the homogenizer, the volumetric flow rates of water and reconstituted skim milk were within 1.5% of each other. With the positive displacement pump, the flow rate for reconstituted skim milk increased compared with that for water as the pressure increased or temperature decreased. The largest increase in flow rate was at 310-kPa gauge and 20 degrees C. On a magnetic flow meter system, the volumetric flow rates of water and reconstituted skim milk were within .5% of the flow rate measured from the volume collected in a calibrated tank. The flow rate of whole milk was similar to that of skim milk on the three flow promoters evaluated. Ice milk mix increased the flow rate of the positive displacement pump, but not the homogenizer and magnetic flow meter system.

  9. Depth-dependence of the production rate of in-situ 14-C in quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupker, Maarten; Hippe, Kristina; Kober, Florian; Wacker, Lukas; Braucher, Régis; Bourlès, Didier; Vidal Romani, Juan; Wieler, Rainer

    2013-04-01

    Terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides provide a means to document and quantify the rates of changes of the landscape at the Earth's surface and have therefore received an increasing attention over the past decade. The short lived in-situ produced 14-C has recently emerged as a complement to other longer lived cosmogenic nuclides such as 10-Be or 26-Al. The short half-life (5730 yr) of 14-C makes it suitable to investigate surface processes such as denudation rates or sediment residence times on ka scales. The wide application of in-situ 14-C for quantitative studies is however bound to the proper calibration of its production mechanisms and rates. As other cosmogenic nuclides, 14-C is produced at the Earth's surface by nuclear reactions with incoming neutrons and muons. The production rate of 14-C has been determined for quartz exposed at the surface where neutrons dominate the overall production [1]. At depth, however, the muon production pathway starts to dominate, because the mean attenuation length of muons is considerably longer than that of neutrons. So far, the muon derived in-situ 14-C production rate is solely based on theoretical and experimental work [2] that has not been tested on natural objects. We measured the 14-C concentration in quartz along the Leymon High core (42.065 N, 7.014 E - alt: 1277 m; Northwestern Spain) using the ETH 14-C extraction line [3] and the MICADAS gas source AMS [4]. This core has been drilled down to 20 m in a quartz dyke and has already been used to refine the depth-dependent production rate of 10-Be and 26-Al [5]. Our results on 14 samples of this core spanning a depth range from 1 to 1545 cm allow us to estimate the muogenic contribution to the overall 14-C concentrations measured along the core. This data set yields a local surface muon production rate of 3.9 (+3.1, -0.6) at.g-1.yr-1, which translates into a surface Sea Level High Latitude muon production rate of 2.2 (+1.8, -0.4) at.g-1.yr-1. This is ca. 17 % of the SLHL

  10. Inventory model with two rates of production for deteriorating items with permissible delay in payments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Ajanta; Samanta, G. P.

    2011-08-01

    Goyal (1985) ['Economic Order Quantity Under Conditions of Permissible Delay in Payments', Journal of Operational research Society, 36, 35-38] assumed that unit selling price and unit purchasing price are equal. But in real-life the scenario is different. The purpose of this article is to reflect the real life problem by allowing unit selling price and purchasing price to be unequal. Our model is a continuous production control inventory model for deteriorating items in which two different rates of production are available. The results are illustrated with the help of a numerical example. We discuss the sensitivity of the solution together with the changes of the values of the parameters associated with the model. Our model may be applicable in many manufacturing planning situations where management practices for deterioration are stringent; e.g. the two-production rate will be more profitable than the one-production rate in the manufacture of cold, asthma and allergy medicine. Our proposed model might be applicable to develop a prototype advance planning system for those manufacturers to integrate the management science techniques into commercial planning.

  11. Variation in the production rate of biosonar signals in freshwater porpoises.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Satoko; Akamatsu, Tomonari; Wang, Ding; Li, Songhai; Wang, Kexiong; Yoda, Ken

    2013-05-01

    The biosonar (click train) production rate of ten Yangtze finless porpoises and their behavior were examined using animal-borne data loggers. The sound production rate varied from 0 to 290 click trains per 10-min time interval. Large individual differences were observed, regardless of body size. Taken together, however, sound production did not differ significantly between daytime and nighttime. Over the 172.5 h of analyzed recordings, an average of 99.0% of the click trains were produced within intervals of less than 60 s, indicating that during a 1-min interval, the number of click trains produced by each porpoise was typically greater than one. Most of the porpoises exhibited differences in average swimming speed and depth between day and night. Swimming speed reductions and usage of short-range sonar, which relates to prey-capture attempts, were observed more often during nighttime. However, biosonar appears to be affected not only by porpoise foraging, but also by their sensory environment, i.e., the turbid Yangtze River system. These features will be useful for passive acoustic detection of the porpoises. Calculations of porpoise density or abundance should be conducted carefully because large individual differences in the sound production rate will lead to large estimation error.

  12. Improved dissolution rate and oral bioavailability of lovastatin in red yeast rice products.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Hao; Yang, Jyh-Chin; Uang, Yow-Shieng; Lin, Chun-Jung

    2013-02-28

    Lovastatin, categorized as a class II compound according to the Biopharmaceutics Classification System, is mainly responsible for the blood cholesterol lowering effect of red yeast rice (RYR). The aim of this study was to compare the dissolution rate, physical state, and oral bioavailability of lovastatin in three RYR products (LipoCol Forte, Cholestin, or Xuezhikang) to those of two lovastatin tablets (Mevacor or Lovasta). The results showed that the dissolution rate of lovastatin in various dissolution media in the registered RYR products was faster and higher than that of lovastatin in lovastatin tablets. Powder X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry patterns showed that the crystallinity of lovastatin was reduced in RYR products. In human studies, the AUC and Cmax values for both lovastatin and its active metabolite, lovastatin acid, were significantly higher in volunteers receiving LipoCol Forte capsules or powder than in those receiving lovastatin tablets or powder. In addition, shorter and less variable Tmax values were observed in volunteers taking LipoCol Forte than in those taking lovastatin tablets. These findings suggest that the oral bioavailability of lovastatin is significantly improved in RYR products as a result of a higher dissolution rate and reduced crystallinity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Composition and production rate of pharmaceutical and chemical waste from Xanthi General Hospital in Greece

    SciTech Connect

    Voudrias, Evangelos; Goudakou, Lambrini; Kermenidou, Marianthi; Softa, Aikaterini

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied pharmaceutical and chemical waste production in a Greek hospital. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pharmaceutical waste comprised 3.9% w/w of total hazardous medical waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unit production rate for total pharmaceutical waste was 12.4 {+-} 3.90 g/patient/d. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemical waste comprised 1.8% w/w of total hazardous medical waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unit production rate for total chemical waste was 5.8 {+-} 2.2 g/patient/d. - Abstract: The objective of this work was to determine the composition and production rates of pharmaceutical and chemical waste produced by Xanthi General Hospital in Greece (XGH). This information is important to design and cost management systems for pharmaceutical and chemical waste, for safety and health considerations and for assessing environmental impact. A total of 233 kg pharmaceutical and 110 kg chemical waste was collected, manually separated and weighed over a period of five working weeks. The total production of pharmaceutical waste comprised 3.9% w/w of the total hazardous medical waste produced by the hospital. Total pharmaceutical waste was classified in three categories, vial waste comprising 51.1%, syringe waste with 11.4% and intravenous therapy (IV) waste with 37.5% w/w of the total. Vial pharmaceutical waste only was further classified in six major categories: antibiotics, digestive system drugs, analgesics, hormones, circulatory system drugs and 'other'. Production data below are presented as average (standard deviation in parenthesis). The unit production rates for total pharmaceutical waste for the hospital were 12.4 (3.90) g/patient/d and 24.6 (7.48) g/bed/d. The respective unit production rates were: (1) for vial waste 6.4 (1.6) g/patient/d and 13 (2.6) g/bed/d, (2) for syringe waste 1.4 (0.4) g/patient/d and 2.8 (0.8) g/bed/d and (3) for IV waste 4.6 (3.0) g/patient/d and 9.2 (5.9) g/bed/d. Total chemical waste

  14. Life-history Constraints on the Mechanisms that Control the Rate of ROS Production

    PubMed Central

    Aledo, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The quest to understand why and how we age has led to numerous lines of investigation that have gradually converged to consider mitochondrial metabolism as a major player. During mitochondrial respiration a small and variable amount of the consumed oxygen is converted to reactive species of oxygen (ROS). For many years, these ROS have been perceived as harmful by-products of respiration. However, evidence from recent years indicates that ROS fulfill important roles as cellular messengers. Results obtained using model organisms suggest that ROS-dependent signalling may even activate beneficial cellular stress responses, which eventually may lead to increased lifespan. Nevertheless, when an overload of ROS cannot be properly disposed of, its accumulation generates oxidative stress, which plays a major part in the ageing process. Comparative studies about the rates of ROS production and oxidative damage accumulation, have led to the idea that the lower rate of mitochondrial oxygen radical generation of long-lived animals with respect to that of their short-lived counterpart, could be a primary cause of their slow ageing rate. A hitherto largely under-appreciated alternative view is that such lower rate of ROS production, rather than a cause may be a consequence of the metabolic constraints imposed for the large body sizes that accompany high lifespans. To help understanding the logical underpinning of this rather heterodox view, herein I review the current literature regarding the mechanisms of ROS formation, with particular emphasis on evolutionary aspects. PMID:24955029

  15. The trend of production rates with heliocentric distance for comet P/Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Uwe

    1994-01-01

    Comet P/Halley was observed spectroscopically in the wavelength range 5200-10,400 A during 10 observing runs, roughly a month apart from 1985 August 28 to 1986 June 6. The observations span a heliocentric distance from 0.73 to 2.52 AU. This data set is analyzed to determine the course of the production rate with heliocentric distance for C2, NH2, CN, and the continuum. The effect of changing the Haser scale lengths and their heliocentric distance dependence is examined. The production rate ratios to water change only in a minor way, but the absolute values of the production rates are more severely affected. Fluorescent efficiencies, or g-factors for the CN red system are calculated, and band intensity ratios for NH2 and CN are presented. Using presently available fluorescence efficiencies and Haser scale lengths, mixing ratios for the parents of C2, CN, and NH2 with respect to water are: 0.34 +/- 0.07%, 0.15 +/- 0.04%, and 0.13 +/- 0.05%. It is found that these mixing ratios are essentially constant over the heliocentric distance range of the observations, implying a rather uniform nucleus and uniform outgassing characteristics, although there are indications of smaller scale day-to-day variations. The results provide strong observational confirmation that water evaporation controls the activity of the comet over the distance range studied. Continuum values Af rho are determined, and their ratios to QH2O are found to have a clear dependence with heliocentric distance approximately r(exp -1.0) with a post-perihelion enhancement. No correlation of the production rate ratios with light curve of P/Halley were found, nor was there any correlation of the C2 or CN production with the dust.

  16. The trend of production rates with heliocentric distance for comet P/Halley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, U.

    1994-03-01

    Comet P/Halley was observed spectroscopically in the wavelength range 5200-10,400 A during 10 observing runs, roughly a month apart from 1985 August 28 to 1986 June 6. The observations span a heliocentric distance from 0.73 to 2.52 AU. This data set is analyzed to determine the course of the production rate with heliocentric distance for C2, NH2, CN, and the continuum. The effect of changing the Haser scale lengths and their heliocentric distance dependence is examined. The production rate ratios to water change only in a minor way, but the absolute values of the production rates are more severely affected. Fluorescent efficiencies, or g-factors for the CN red system are calculated, and band intensity ratios for NH2 and CN are presented. Using presently available fluorescence efficiencies and Haser scale lengths, mixing ratios for the parents of C2, CN, and NH2 with respect to water are: 0.34 +/- 0.07%, 0.15 +/- 0.04%, and 0.13 +/- 0.05%. It is found that these mixing ratios are essentially constant over the heliocentric distance range of the observations, implying a rather uniform nucleus and uniform outgassing characteristics, although there are indications of smaller scale day-to-day variations. The results provide strong observational confirmation that water evaporation controls the activity of the comet over the distance range studied. Continuum values Af rho are determined, and their ratios to QH2O are found to have a clear dependence with heliocentric distance approximately r-1.0 with a post-perihelion enhancement. No correlation of the production rate ratios with light curve of P/Halley were found, nor was there any correlation of the C2 or CN production with the dust.

  17. Contamination rates and antimicrobial resistance in bacteria isolated from "grass-fed" labeled beef products.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiayi; Wall, Samantha K; Xu, Li; Ebner, Paul D

    2010-11-01

    Grass-fed and organic beef products make up a growing share of the beef market in the United States. While processing, animal handling, and farm management play large roles in determining the safety of final beef products, grass-fed beef products are often marketed as safer alternatives to grain-finished beef products based on the potential effects of all-forage diets on host microbiota. We conducted a series of experiments examining bacterial contamination rates in 50 beef products labeled as "grass-fed" versus 50 conventionally raised retail beef products. Coliform concentrations did not differ between conventional and grass-fed beef (conventional: 2.6 log(10) CFU/mL rinsate; grass-fed: 2.7 log(10) CFU/mL rinsate). The percentages of Escherichia coli positive samples did not differ between the two groups (44% vs. 44%). Enterococcus spp. were frequently isolated from both grass-fed beef products (44%) and conventional beef products (62%; p = 0.07). No Salmonella or E. coli O157:H7 isolates were recovered from any of the meat samples. Enterococcus spp. isolates from conventional beef were more frequently resistant to daptomycin and linezolid (p < 0.05). Resistance to some antimicrobials (e.g., chloramphenicol, erythromycin, flavomycin, penicillin, and tetracyline) was high in Enterococcus spp. isolated from both conventional and grass-fed beef. There were no differences in the percentages of antimicrobial resistant E. coli isolates between the two groups. Taken together, these data indicate that there are no clear food safety advantages to grass-fed beef products over conventional beef products.

  18. Research for full-term forecasting model of production rate with multiple life cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wende, Yan; Yingzhong, Yuan; Jun, Liu; Zhilin, Qi; Jiqiang, Li; Qianhua, Xiao

    2017-04-01

    Based on generalized production forecasting model, in the case of oil production with multiple production peak value and multiple life cycle, a multi-peak forecasting model is proposed, which can describe full course of rise, growth, maturity and decline for every life cycle. Linear trial-and-error method, binary regression method and ternary regression method are used to resolve the parameters of production forecasting model. The results indicate that parameters in linear trial-and-error method are not resolved simultaneously and the solutions are usually not the best matching. Parameters in multi-variant regression method are resolved simultaneously with the best correlation factor, and the solution is more accurate than linear trial-and-error method. Growth factor including cumulative production rate term and exponential function term of time are considered simultaneously in ternary regression method, and the solution is more accurate than binary regression method. For actual example with three-peak production, ternary regression method are used to resolve the parameters of multi-peak production forecasting model, and matching accuracy is greatly improved.

  19. Sea-ice algal primary production and nitrogen uptake rates off East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roukaerts, Arnout; Cavagna, Anne-Julie; Fripiat, François; Lannuzel, Delphine; Meiners, Klaus M.; Dehairs, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Antarctic pack ice comprises about 90% of the sea ice in the southern hemisphere and plays an important structuring role in Antarctic marine ecosystems, yet measurements of ice algal primary production and nitrogen uptake rates remain scarce. During the early austral spring of 2012, measurements for primary production rates and uptake of two nitrogen substrates (nitrate and ammonium) were conducted at 5 stations in the East Antarctic pack ice (63-66°S, 115-125°E). Carbon uptake was low (3.52 mg C m-2 d-1) but a trend of increased production was observed towards the end of the voyage suggesting pre-bloom conditions. Significant snow covers reaching, up to 0.8 m, induced strong light limitation. Two different regimes were observed in the ice with primarily nitrate based 'new' production (f-ratio: 0.80-0.95) at the bottom of the ice cover, due to nutrient-replete conditions at the ice-water interface, and common for pre-bloom conditions. In the sea-ice interior, POC:PN ratios (20-70) and higher POC:Chl a ratios suggested the presence of large amounts of detrital material trapped in the ice and here ammonium was the prevailing nitrogen substrate. This suggests that most primary production in the sea-ice interior was regenerated and supported by a microbial food web, recycling detritus.

  20. Voice recognition versus transcriptionist: error rates and productivity in MRI reporting.

    PubMed

    Strahan, Rodney H; Schneider-Kolsky, Michal E

    2010-10-01

    Despite the frequent introduction of voice recognition (VR) into radiology departments, little evidence still exists about its impact on workflow, error rates and costs. We designed a study to compare typographical errors, turnaround times (TAT) from reported to verified and productivity for VR-generated reports versus transcriptionist-generated reports in MRI. Fifty MRI reports generated by VR and 50 finalized MRI reports generated by the transcriptionist, of two radiologists, were sampled retrospectively. Two hundred reports were scrutinised for typographical errors and the average TAT from dictated to final approval. To assess productivity, the average MRI reports per hour for one of the radiologists was calculated using data from extra weekend reporting sessions. Forty-two % and 30% of the finalized VR reports for each of the radiologists investigated contained errors. Only 6% and 8% of the transcriptionist-generated reports contained errors. The average TAT for VR was 0 h, and for the transcriptionist reports TAT was 89 and 38.9 h. Productivity was calculated at 8.6 MRI reports per hour using VR and 13.3 MRI reports using the transcriptionist, representing a 55% increase in productivity. Our results demonstrate that VR is not an effective method of generating reports for MRI. Ideally, we would have the report error rate and productivity of a transcriptionist and the TAT of VR. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology © 2010 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  1. Exceptionally High Rates of Biological Hydrogen Production by Biomimetic In Vitro Synthetic Enzymatic Pathways.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eui-Jin; Wu, Chang-Hao; Adams, Michael W W; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2016-11-02

    Hydrogen production by water splitting energized by biomass sugars is one of the most promising technologies for distributed green H2 production. Direct H2 generation from NADPH, catalysed by an NADPH-dependent, soluble [NiFe]-hydrogenase (SH1) is thermodynamically unfavourable, resulting in slow volumetric productivity. We designed the biomimetic electron transport chain from NADPH to H2 by the introduction of an oxygen-insensitive electron mediator benzyl viologen (BV) and an enzyme (NADPH rubredoxin oxidoreductase, NROR), catalysing electron transport between NADPH and BV. The H2 generation rates using this biomimetic chain increased by approximately five-fold compared to those catalysed only by SH1. The peak volumetric H2 productivity via the in vitro enzymatic pathway comprised of hyperthermophilic glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconolactonase, and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, NROR, and SH1 was 310 mmol H2 /L h(-1) , the highest rate yet reported. The concept of biomimetic electron transport chains could be applied to both in vitro and in vivo H2 production biosystems and artificial photosynthesis.

  2. Penetration of hydrogen peroxide and degradation rate of different bleaching products.

    PubMed

    Marson, F C; Gonçalves, R S; Silva, C O; Cintra, L T Â; Pascotto, R C; Santos, P H Dos; Briso, A L F

    2015-01-01

    This study's aim was to evaluate the degradation rate of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and to quantify its penetration in tooth structure, considering the residence time of bleaching products on the dental enamel. For this study, bovine teeth were randomly divided according to the bleaching product received: Opalescence Xtra Boost 38%, White Gold Office 35%, Whiteness HP Blue 35%, Whiteness HP Maxx 35%, and Lase Peroxide Sensy 35%. To analyze the degradation of H2O2, the titration of bleaching agents with potassium permanganate was used, while the penetration of H2O2 was measured via spectrophotometric analysis of the acetate buffer solution, collected from the artificial pulp chamber. The analyses were performed immediately as well as 15 minutes, 30 minutes, and 45 minutes after product application. The data of degradation rate of H2O2 were submitted to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey tests, while ANOVA and Fisher tests were used for the quantification of H2O2, at the 5% level. The results showed that all products significantly reduced the concentration of H2O2 activates at the end of 45 minutes. It was also verified that the penetration of H2O2 was enhanced by increasing the residence time of the product on the tooth surface. It was concluded that the bleaching gels retained substantial concentrations of H2O2 after 45 minutes of application, and penetration of H2O2 in the dental structure is time-dependent.

  3. Optimising stocking rate and grazing management to enhance environmental and production outcomes for native temperate grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badgery, Warwick; Zhang, Yingjun; Huang, Ding; Broadfoot, Kim; Kemp, David; Mitchell, David

    2015-04-01

    Stocking rate and grazing management can be altered to enhance the sustainable production of grasslands but the relative influence of each has not often been determined for native temperate grasslands. Grazing management can range from seasonal rests through to intensive rotational grazing involving >30 paddocks. In large scale grazing, it can be difficult to segregate the influence of grazing pressure from the timing of utilisation. Moreover, relative grazing pressure can change between years as seasonal conditions influence grassland production compared to the relative constant requirements of animals. This paper reports on two studies in temperate native grasslands of northern China and south eastern Australia that examined stocking rate and regionally relevant grazing management strategies. In China, the grazing experiment involved combinations of a rest, moderate or heavy grazing pressure of sheep in spring, then moderate or heavy grazing in summer and autumn. Moderate grazing pressure at 50% of the current district average, resulted in the better balance between maintaining productive and diverse grasslands, a profitable livestock system, and mitigation of greenhouse gases through increased soil carbon, methane uptake by the soil, and efficient methane emissions per unit of weight gain. Spring rests best maintained a desirable grassland composition, but had few other benefits and reduced livestock productivity due to lower feed quality from grazing later in the season. In Australia, the grazing experiment compared continuous grazing to flexible 4- and 20-paddock rotational grazing systems with sheep. Stocking rates were adjusted between systems biannually based on the average herbage mass of the grassland. No treatment degraded the perennial pasture composition, but ground cover was maintained at higher levels in the 20-paddock system even though this treatment had a higher stocking rate. Overall there was little difference in livestock production (e.g. kg

  4. Rate of production, dissolution and accumulation of biogenic solids in the ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrhenius, G.

    1988-01-01

    The equatorial current system, by its response to global circulation changes, provides a unique recording mechanism for long range climatic oscillations. A permanent record of the changes in rate of upwelling and organic production is generated in the equatorial deep sea sediments, particularly by such biogenic components which are unaffected by secondary dissolution. In order to determine the rates of accumulation of various sedimentary components, a reliable differential measurement of age of the strata must be obtained. Various approaches to this problem are reviewed, and sources of error discussed. Secondary dissolution of calcium carbonate introduces a substantial and variable difference between the dissolution-modified, and hence a priori unknown, rate of deposition on one hand and the rate of accumulation, derivable from the observed concentration, on the other. The cause and magnitude of these variations are of importance, particularly since some current dating schemes are based on assumed constancy in the rate of accumulation of this and, in some cases, also all other sedimentary components. The concepts used in rate evaluation are discussed with emphasis on the difference between the state of dissolution, an observable property of the sediment, and the rate of dissolution, a parameter that requires deduction of the carbonate fraction dissolved, and of the time differential. As a most likely cause of the enhanced state of dissolution of the interglacial carbonate sediments is proposed the lowered rates of biogenic production and deposition, which cause longer exposure of the carbonate microfossils to corrosion in the bioturbated surface layer of the sediment. Historical perspective is included in the discussion in view of the dedication of the Symposium to Hans Pettersson, the leader of the Swedish Deep Sea Expedition 1947-1948, an undertaking that opened a new era in deep sea research and planetary dynamics.

  5. Rate of production, dissolution and accumulation of biogenic solids in the ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrhenius, G.

    1988-01-01

    The equatorial current system, by its response to global circulation changes, provides a unique recording mechanism for long range climatic oscillations. A permanent record of the changes in rate of upwelling and organic production is generated in the equatorial deep sea sediments, particularly by such biogenic components which are unaffected by secondary dissolution. In order to determine the rates of accumulation of various sedimentary components, a reliable differential measurement of age of the strata must be obtained. Various approaches to this problem are reviewed, and sources of error discussed. Secondary dissolution of calcium carbonate introduces a substantial and variable difference between the dissolution-modified, and hence a priori unknown, rate of deposition on one hand and the rate of accumulation, derivable from the observed concentration, on the other. The cause and magnitude of these variations are of importance, particularly since some current dating schemes are based on assumed constancy in the rate of accumulation of this and, in some cases, also all other sedimentary components. The concepts used in rate evaluation are discussed with emphasis on the difference between the state of dissolution, an observable property of the sediment, and the rate of dissolution, a parameter that requires deduction of the carbonate fraction dissolved, and of the time differential. As a most likely cause of the enhanced state of dissolution of the interglacial carbonate sediments is proposed the lowered rates of biogenic production and deposition, which cause longer exposure of the carbonate microfossils to corrosion in the bioturbated surface layer of the sediment. Historical perspective is included in the discussion in view of the dedication of the Symposium to Hans Pettersson, the leader of the Swedish Deep Sea Expedition 1947-1948, an undertaking that opened a new era in deep sea research and planetary dynamics.

  6. Rate of production, dissolution and accumulation of biogenic solids in the ocean.

    PubMed

    Arrhenius, G

    1988-01-01

    The equatorial current system, by its response to global circulation changes, provides a unique recording mechanism for long range climatic oscillations. A permanent record of the changes in rate of upwelling and organic production is generated in the equatorial deep sea sediments, particularly by such biogenic components which are unaffected by secondary dissolution. In order to determine the rates of accumulation of various sedimentary components, a reliable differential measurement of age of the strata must be obtained. Various approaches to this problem are reviewed, and sources of error discussed. Secondary dissolution of calcium carbonate introduces a substantial and variable difference between the dissolution-modified, and hence a priori unknown, rate of deposition on one hand and the rate of accumulation, derivable from the observed concentration, on the other. The cause and magnitude of these variations are of importance, particularly since some current dating schemes are based on assumed constancy in the rate of accumulation of this and, in some cases, also all other sedimentary components. The concepts used in rate evaluation are discussed with emphasis on the difference between the state of dissolution, an observable property of the sediment, and the rate of dissolution, a parameter that requires deduction of the carbonate fraction dissolved, and of the time differential. As a most likely cause of the enhanced state of dissolution of the interglacial carbonate sediments is proposed the lowered rates of biogenic production and deposition, which cause longer exposure of the carbonate microfossils to corrosion in the bioturbated surface layer of the sediment. Historical perspective is included in the discussion in view of the dedication of the Symposium to Hans Pettersson, the leader of the Swedish Deep Sea Expedition 1947-1948, an undertaking that opened a new era in deep sea research and planetary dynamics.

  7. Harvesting costs and production rates for seed-tree removal in young-growth, mixed-conifer stands

    Treesearch

    Philip M. McDonald

    1969-01-01

    Ponderosa pine seed trees left from a previous cutting on the Challenge Experimental Forest, California, were removed in October 1963. Logging costs and production rates were compared with those for a seed-tree cutting on an area nearby. Production rates for seed-tree removal greatly exceeded those for the operation as a whole. Skidding production increased by 38...

  8. Effect of stocking rate on pasture production, milk production, and reproduction of dairy cows in pasture-based systems.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, K A; Penno, J W; Lancaster, J A S; Roche, J R

    2008-05-01

    Ninety-four cows were randomly allocated to 1 of 5 stocking rates (2.2, 2.7, 3.1, 3.7, and 4.3 cows/ha) in a completely randomized design for 3 years. Herds were seasonal calving, with only minor differences in grazing management to optimize the profitability of each stocking rate (SR). Pasture production and quality data, milk and milk component data, and reproduction data were collected, averaged for SR treatment, and linear and quadratic contrasts on SR were evaluated. In addition, the Wilmink exponential model (y(t) = a + b x e((-0.05t) )+ c x t) was fitted to milk yield within lactation, and the parameters were averaged by SR treatment and analyzed as above. The median variation explained by the function for individual lactations was 84%. The amount of pasture grown tended to increase, and the quality of the pasture on offer increased linearly with increasing SR, reducing some of the negative impact of SR on the availability of pasture per cow. Milk production per cow declined linearly with increasing SR, although there was a tendency for most production variables to decline quadratically, with the negative effect of SR declining with increasing SR. The effect on milk production per cow was primarily because of a lower peak milk yield and a greater post-peak decline (less persistent milk profile), although a decline in lactation length with increasing SR was responsible for 24% of the effect of SR on milk yield. Milk production per hectare increased linearly with increasing SR, and there was only a small difference (approximately 3%/cow per ha) in the efficiency of converting feed dry matter into milk energy. Stocking rate did not affect reproductive success. The data are consistent with the need for a more robust measure of SR than cows per hectare because farms will differ in the genetic merit of their cows and in the potential to produce pasture. We introduce the concept of a comparative SR, whereby the carrying capacity of the farm is defined by the BW of

  9. Scalable Method for Extracting Soiling Rates from PV Production Data: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Deceglie, Michael G.; Muller, Matthew; Kurtz, Sarah; Defreitas, Zoe

    2016-06-21

    We present a method for analyzing time series production data from photovoltaic systems to extract the rate at which energy yield is affected by the accumulation of dust, dirt, and other forms of soiling. We describe an approach that is based on prevailing methods which consider the change in energy production during dry periods. The method described here builds upon these methods by considering a statistical sample of soiling intervals from each site under consideration. The method enables straightforward application to a large number of sites with minimal parameterization of data-filtering requirements. Furthermore, it enables statistical confidence intervals and comparisons between sites.

  10. A Scalable Method for Extracting Soiling Rates from PV Production Data

    SciTech Connect

    Deceglie, Michael G.; Muller, Matthew; Defreitas, Zoe; Kurtz, Sarah

    2016-11-21

    We present a method for analyzing time series production data from photovoltaic systems to extract the rate at which energy yield is affected by the accumulation of dust, dirt, and other forms of soiling. We describe an approach that is based on prevailing methods which consider the change in energy production during dry periods. The method described here builds upon these methods by considering a statistical sample of soiling intervals from each site under consideration. The method enables straightforward application to a large number of sites with minimal parameterization of data-filtering requirements. Furthermore, it enables statistical confidence intervals and comparisons between sites.

  11. Oxygen production/consumption rates in the upper layer of the northwestern subtropical North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubono, K.; Suga, T.; Sukigara, C.; Kobayashi, T.; Hosoda, S.

    2010-12-01

    The cycling of nutrients in the subtropical gyre is crucial in sustaining primary production and the biological pump. Recently it has been proposed that subtropical mode water (STMW) and its subduction processes play a major role in sustaining nutrient distribution in the permanent pycnocline in the subtropical gyres and also facilitating nutrient supply to the euphotic zone. It is not easy, however, to describe temporal evolution of nutrients themselves associated with those processes over a few months to a year or so. As an alternative approach, we examine temporal evolution of dissolved oxygen, which increases or decreases associated with the nutrient utilization by primary production or its production by remineralization. We analyze time-series data of dissolved oxygen obtained by profiling floats drifting over several months to a year in the upper layer of the northwestern subtropical North Pacific. The purpose of this study is to document the temporal variation of dissolved oxygen in STMW and its adjacent layers, to estimate oxygen production/consumption rates at each vertical level, and to discuss their implication in nutrient cycle. The dissolved oxygen in the subsurface layer centered at 50-70 m continuously increased over a few months after the formation of the seasonal pycnocline, resulting in a distinctive shallow oxygen maximum (SOM). Since the SOM is insulated from the atmosphere, the net increase in its oxygen concentration must be attributable to biological oxygen production. On the other hand, a continuous decrease in dissolved oxygen over several months is observed in the layer below 100 m probably due to biological consumption. The estimation of the oxygen production/consumption rates is done by applying the least square method for the time series of dissolved oxygen either at each depth or each isopycnal surface. The Net Community Production (NCP) is estimated for the depth range of 0-100m, where the remarkable oxygen increase occurs. The

  12. Development and field deployment of an instrument to measure ozone production rates in the troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sklaveniti, S.; Locoge, N.; Dusanter, S.; Leonardis, T.; Lew, M.; Bottorff, B.; Sigler, P. S. R.; Stevens, P. S.; Wood, E. C. D.; Kundu, S.; Gentner, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    Ozone is a greenhouse gas and a primary constituent of urban smog, irritating the respiratory system and damaging the vegetation. The current understanding of ozone chemistry in the troposphere indicates that net ozone production P(O3) occurs when peroxy radicals (HO2+RO2) react with NO producing NO2, whose photolysis leads to O3 formation. P(O3) values can be calculated from peroxy radical concentrations, either from ambient measurements or box model outputs. These two estimation methods often disagree for NOx mixing ratios higher than a few ppb, questioning our ability to measure peroxy radicals under high NOx conditions or indicating that there are still unknowns in our understanding of the radical and ozone production chemistry. Direct measurements of ozone production rates will help to address this issue and improve air quality regulations. We will present the development of an instrument for direct measurements of ozone production rates (OPR). The OPR instrument consists of three parts: (i) two quartz flow tubes sampling ambient air ("Ambient" and "Reference" flow tube), (ii) an O3-to-NO2 conversion unit, and (iii) a Cavity Attenuated Phase Shift (CAPS) monitor to measure NO2. The air in the Ambient flow tube undergoes the same photochemistry as in ambient air, while the Reference flow tube is covered by a UV filter limiting the formation of ozone. Exiting the flow tubes, ozone is converted into NO2 and the sum O3+NO2 (Ox) is measured by the CAPS monitor. The difference in Ox between the two flow tubes divided by the residence time yields the Ox production rate, P(Ox). P(O3) is assumed to be equal to P(Ox) when NO2 is efficiently photolyzed during daytime. We will present preliminary results from the Indiana Radical, Reactivity and Ozone Production Intercomparison (IRRONIC) campaign in Bloomington, Indiana, during July 2015, where ozone production rates were measured by introducing various amounts of NO inside the flow tubes to investigate the ozone

  13. Rerouting Cellular Electron Flux To Increase the Rate of Biological Methane Production

    PubMed Central

    Catlett, Jennie L.; Ortiz, Alicia M.

    2015-01-01

    Methanogens are anaerobic archaea that grow by producing methane, a gas that is both an efficient renewable fuel and a potent greenhouse gas. We observed that overexpression of the cytoplasmic heterodisulfide reductase enzyme HdrABC increased the rate of methane production from methanol by 30% without affecting the growth rate relative to the parent strain. Hdr enzymes are essential in all known methane-producing archaea. They function as the terminal oxidases in the methanogen electron transport system by reducing the coenzyme M (2-mercaptoethane sulfonate) and coenzyme B (7-mercaptoheptanoylthreonine sulfonate) heterodisulfide, CoM-S-S-CoB, to regenerate the thiol-coenzymes for reuse. In Methanosarcina acetivorans, HdrABC expression caused an increased rate of methanogenesis and a decrease in metabolic efficiency on methylotrophic substrates. When acetate was the sole carbon and energy source, neither deletion nor overexpression of HdrABC had an effect on growth or methane production rates. These results suggest that in cells grown on methylated substrates, the cell compensates for energy losses due to expression of HdrABC with an increased rate of substrate turnover and that HdrABC lacks the appropriate electron donor in acetate-grown cells. PMID:26162885

  14. Rerouting Cellular Electron Flux To Increase the Rate of Biological Methane Production.

    PubMed

    Catlett, Jennie L; Ortiz, Alicia M; Buan, Nicole R

    2015-10-01

    Methanogens are anaerobic archaea that grow by producing methane, a gas that is both an efficient renewable fuel and a potent greenhouse gas. We observed that overexpression of the cytoplasmic heterodisulfide reductase enzyme HdrABC increased the rate of methane production from methanol by 30% without affecting the growth rate relative to the parent strain. Hdr enzymes are essential in all known methane-producing archaea. They function as the terminal oxidases in the methanogen electron transport system by reducing the coenzyme M (2-mercaptoethane sulfonate) and coenzyme B (7-mercaptoheptanoylthreonine sulfonate) heterodisulfide, CoM-S-S-CoB, to regenerate the thiol-coenzymes for reuse. In Methanosarcina acetivorans, HdrABC expression caused an increased rate of methanogenesis and a decrease in metabolic efficiency on methylotrophic substrates. When acetate was the sole carbon and energy source, neither deletion nor overexpression of HdrABC had an effect on growth or methane production rates. These results suggest that in cells grown on methylated substrates, the cell compensates for energy losses due to expression of HdrABC with an increased rate of substrate turnover and that HdrABC lacks the appropriate electron donor in acetate-grown cells.

  15. Repeal of unneeded Outer Continental Shelf production rate-setting functions would cut costs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-09-10

    Under various laws, the Department of the Interior requires operators of Outer Continental Shelf leases to submit information regarding the rate at which oil and gas can and will be produced. Three different rates of production are currently compiled by the Department's Minerals Management Service. However, GAO found that most of the data are not useful or necessary. Congressional relief for the Department from some statutory requirements and consolidating the existing data submittal requirements would allow both the Department and industry to better use their resources to serve higher priority needs.

  16. Corrosion rate estimations of microscale zerovalent iron particles via direct hydrogen production measurements.

    PubMed

    Velimirovic, Milica; Carniato, Luca; Simons, Queenie; Schoups, Gerrit; Seuntjens, Piet; Bastiaens, Leen

    2014-04-15

    In this study, the aging behavior of microscale zerovalent iron (mZVI) particles was investigated by quantifying the hydrogen gas generated by anaerobic mZVI corrosion in batch degradation experiments. Granular iron and nanoscale zerovalent iron (nZVI) particles were included in this study as controls. Firstly, experiments in liquid medium (without aquifer material) were performed and revealed that mZVI particles have approximately a 10-30 times lower corrosion rate than nZVI particles. A good correlation was found between surface area normalized corrosion rate (RSA) and reaction rate constants (kSA) of PCE, TCE, cDCE and 1,1,1-TCA. Generally, particles with higher degradation rates also have faster corrosion rates, but exceptions do exists. In a second phase, the hydrogen evolution was also monitored during batch tests in the presence of aquifer material and real groundwater. A 4-9 times higher corrosion rate of mZVI particles was observed under the natural environment in comparison with the aquifer free artificial condition, which can be attributed to the low pH of the aquifer and its buffer capacity. A corrosion model was calibrated on the batch experiments to take into account the inhibitory effects of the corrosion products (dissolved iron, hydrogen and OH(-)) on the iron corrosion rate.

  17. Meta-analysis of the impact of stocking rate on the productivity of pasture-based milk production systems.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, B; Delaby, L; Pierce, K M; Journot, F; Horan, B

    2011-04-01

    The objective of this study is to quantify the milk production response per cow and per hectare (ha) for an incremental stocking rate (SR) change, based on a meta-analysis of published research papers. Suitable experiments for inclusion in the database required a comparison of at least two SRs under the same experimental conditions in addition to details on experimental length and milk production results per cow and per ha. Each additional increased SR treatment was also described in terms of the relative milk production change per cow and per ha compared to the lower base SR (b_SR). A database containing 109 experiments of various lengths with 131 comparisons of SR was sub-divided into Type I experiments (common experimental lengths) and Type II experiments (variable experimental lengths). Actual and proportional changes in milk production according to SR change were analysed using linear mixed model procedures with study included as a random effect in the model. Low residual standard errors indicated a good precision of the predictive equations with the exception of proportional change in milk production per cow. For all milk yield variables analysed, the results illustrate that while production per cow is reduced, a strong positive relationship exists between SR and milk production per ha. An SR increase of one cow/ha resulted in a decrease in daily milk yield per cow of 7.4% and 8.7% for Type I and Type II data, respectively, whereas milk yield per ha increased by 20.1% and 19.6%, respectively. Within the Type II data set, a one cow/ha increase in SR also resulted in a 15.1% reduction in lactation length (equivalent to 42 days). The low predictability of proportional change in milk production per cow according to the classical SR definition of cows per ha over a defined period suggests that SR may be more appropriately defined in terms of the change in available feed offered per animal within each treatment.

  18. The exposure history of Jilin and production rates of cosmogenic nuclides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heusser, G.

    1986-01-01

    Jilin, the largest known story meteorite, is a very suitable object for studying the systematics of cosmic ray produced nuclides in stony meteorites. Its well established two stage exposure history even permits to gain information about two different irradiation geometries (2pi and 4pi). All stable and long-lived cosmogenic nuclides measured in Jilin so far correlate well with each other. An example is shown where the Al-26 activities are plotted vs. the spallogenic Ne-21 concentration. These records of cosmic-ray interaction in Jilin can be used both to determine the history of the target and to study the nature of production rate profiles. This is unavoidably a bootstrap process, involving studying one with assumption about the other. Production rate equations are presented and discussed.

  19. The exposure history of Jilin and production rates of cosmogenic nuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heusser, G.

    Jilin, the largest known story meteorite, is a very suitable object for studying the systematics of cosmic ray produced nuclides in stony meteorites. Its well established two stage exposure history even permits to gain information about two different irradiation geometries (2pi and 4pi). All stable and long-lived cosmogenic nuclides measured in Jilin so far correlate well with each other. An example is shown where the Al-26 activities are plotted vs. the spallogenic Ne-21 concentration. These records of cosmic-ray interaction in Jilin can be used both to determine the history of the target and to study the nature of production rate profiles. This is unavoidably a bootstrap process, involving studying one with assumption about the other. Production rate equations are presented and discussed.

  20. Experimental investigation of particle dissolution rates in aqueous solutions for hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jianu, O. A.; Wang, Z.; Rosen, M. A.; Naterer, G. F.

    2016-10-01

    Results of reaction kinetics studies of chemical processes related to materials integration of the thermochemical copper-chlorine cycle for hydrogen production are reported. The reaction rate of solid cuprous chloride (CuCl) in liquid hydrochloric acid is investigated experimentally for various acid concentrations. A rate constant—a function of constituent concentrations—describes how quickly the reactants are converted into products in satisfying the activation energy to enable the reaction to move forward. In this paper, the change in area of a solid CuCl particle is examined, rather than concentration in previous studies. New predictive models are developed to describe the characteristics of the chemical reaction in terms of its transition states and reaction mechanisms.

  1. Succinic acid production with Actinobacillus succinogenes: rate and yield analysis of chemostat and biofilm cultures.

    PubMed

    Brink, Hendrik Gideon; Nicol, Willie

    2014-08-19

    Succinic acid is well established as bio-based platform chemical with production quantities expecting to increase exponentially within the next decade. Actinobacillus succinogenes is by far the most studied wild organism for producing succinic acid and is known for high yield and titre during production on various sugars in batch culture. At low shear conditions continuous fermentation with A. succinogenes results in biofilm formation. In this study, a novel shear controlled fermenter was developed that enabled: 1) chemostat operation where self-immobilisation was opposed by high shear rates and, 2) in-situ removal of biofilm by increasing shear rates and subsequent analysis thereof. The volumetric productivity of the biofilm fermentations were an order of magnitude more than the chemostat runs. In addition the biofilm runs obtained substantially higher yields. Succinic acid to acetic acid ratios for chemostat runs were 1.28±0.2 g.g(-1), while the ratios for biofilm runs started at 2.4 g.g(-1) and increased up to 3.3 g.g(-1) as glucose consumption increased. This corresponded to an overall yield on glucose of 0.48±0.05 g.g(-1) for chemostat runs, while the yields varied between 0.63 g.g(-1) and 0.74 g.g(-1) for biofilm runs. Specific growth rates (μ) were shown to be severely inhibited by the formation of organic acids, with μ only 12% of μ(max) at a succinic acid titre of 7 g.L(-1). Maintenance production of succinic acid was shown to be dominant for the biofilm runs with cell based production rates (extracellular polymeric substance removed) decreasing as SA titre increases. The novel fermenter allowed for an in-depth bioreaction analysis of A. succinogenes. Biofilm cells achieve higher SA yields than suspended cells and allow for operation at higher succinic acid titre. Both growth and maintenance rates were shown to drastically decrease with succinic acid titre. The A. succinogenes biofilm process has vast potential, where self-induced high cell densities

  2. Development of a portable instrument to measure ozone production rates in the troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sklaveniti, Sofia; Locoge, Nadine; Stevens, Philip; Kumar, Vinod; Sinha, Vinayak; Dusanter, Sébastien

    2015-04-01

    Ground-level ozone is a key species related to air pollution, causing respiratory problems, damaging crops and forests, and affecting the climate. Our current understanding of the tropospheric ozone-forming chemistry indicates that net ozone production occurs via reactions of peroxy radicals (HO2 + RO2) with NO producing NO2, whose photolysis leads to O3 formation. Production rates of tropospheric ozone, P(O3), depend on concentrations of oxides of nitrogen (NOx = NO + NO2) and Volatile Organic Compounds (V OCs), but also on production rates of ROx radicals (OH + HO2 + RO2). The formation of ozone follows a complex nonlinear chemistry that makes strategies for reducing ozone difficult to implement. In this context, atmospheric chemistry models are used to develop emission regulations, but there are still uncertainties associated with the chemical mechanisms used in these models. Testing the ozone formation chemistry in atmospheric models is needed, in order to ensure the development of effective strategies for ozone reduction. We will present the development of an instrument for direct measurements of ozone production rates (OPR) in ambient air. The OPR instrument is made of three components: (i) two quartz flow tubes to sample ambient air, one exposed to solar radiation and one covered by a UV filter, (ii) a NO2-to-O3 conversion unit, and (iii) an ozone analyzer. The total amount of ozone exiting each flow tube is conserved in the form of Ox = NO2 + O3. Ozone production rates P(O3) are derived from the difference in Ox concentration between the two flow tubes, divided by the exposure time of air inside the flow tubes. We will present studies that were carried out in the laboratory to characterize each part of the instrument and we will discuss the performances of the OPR instrument based on experiments carried out using synthetic air mixtures of known composition (NOx and V OCs). Chemical modeling will also be presented to assess the reliability of ozone

  3. Masses, lifetimes and production rates of Ξ- and Ξbar+ at LEP 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, J.; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alderweireld, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P. P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J. E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G. J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Berntzon, L.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bluj, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J. M.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Castro, N.; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, S. U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M. J.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; Dalmau, J.; da Silva, T.; da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; de Angelis, A.; de Boer, W.; de Clercq, C.; de Lotto, B.; de Maria, N.; de Min, A.; de Paula, L.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Drees, J.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Espirito Santo, M. C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Hennecke, M.; Herr, H.; Hoffman, J.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holt, P. J.; Houlden, M. A.; Jackson, J. N.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, E. K.; Johansson, P. D.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, F.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B. P.; Kerzel, U.; King, B. T.; Kjaer, N. J.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez, J. M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; Mc Nulty, R.; Meroni, C.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moenig, K.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nikolenko, M.; Niss, P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J. P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Pozdniakov, V.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Rames, J.; Read, A.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rivero, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Sander, C.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwickerath, U.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, M.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli, T.; Taffard, A. C.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, J.; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.-L.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; van Dam, P.; van Eldik, J.; van Remortel, N.; van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Walck, C.; Washbrook, A. J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimin, N. I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zupan, M.; Delphi Collaboration

    2006-08-01

    Measurements of the Ξ- and Ξbar+ masses, mass differences, lifetimes and lifetime differences are presented. The Ξbar+ sample used is much larger than those used previously for such measurements. In addition, the Ξ production rates in Z → bbbar and Z → qqbar events are compared and the position ξ∗ of the maximum of the ξ distribution in Z → qqbar events is measured.

  4. Masses, lifetimes and production rates of Ξ and Ξ at LEP 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DELPHI Collaboration; Abdallah, J.; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alderweireld, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P. P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J. E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G. J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Berntzon, L.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bluj, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J. M.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Castro, N.; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, S. U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M. J.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; Dalmau, J.; da Silva, T.; da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; de Angelis, A.; de Boer, W.; de Clercq, C.; de Lotto, B.; de Maria, N.; de Min, A.; de Paula, L.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Drees, J.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Espirito Santo, M. C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Hennecke, M.; Herr, H.; Hoffman, J.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holt, P. J.; Houlden, M. A.; Jackson, J. N.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, E. K.; Johansson, P. D.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, F.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B. P.; Kerzel, U.; King, B. T.; Kjaer, N. J.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez, J. M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; Mc Nulty, R.; Meroni, C.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moenig, K.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nikolenko, M.; Niss, P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J. P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Pozdniakov, V.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Rames, J.; Read, A.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rivero, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Sander, C.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwickerath, U.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, M.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli, T.; Taffard, A. C.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, J.; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.-L.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; van Dam, P.; van Eldik, J.; van Remortel, N.; van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Walck, C.; Washbrook, A. J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimin, N. I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zupan, M.

    2006-08-01

    Measurements of the Ξ and Ξ masses, mass differences, lifetimes and lifetime differences are presented. The Ξ sample used is much larger than those used previously for such measurements. In addition, the Ξ production rates in Z→bb¯ and Z→qq¯ events are compared and the position ξ of the maximum of the ξ distribution in Z→qq¯ events is measured.

  5. Measurement of HOxproduction rate due to radon decay in air

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Huiling

    1993-08-01

    Radon in indoor air may cause the exposure of the public to excessive radioactivity. Radiolysis of water vapor in indoor air due to radon decay could produce (•OH and HO2 •) that may convert atmospheric constituents to compounds of lower vapor pressure. These lower vapor pressure compounds might then nucleate to form new particles in the indoor atmosphere. Chemical amplification was used to determine HOxproduction rate in indoor air caused by radon decay. Average HOxproduction rate was found to be (4.31±0.07) x 105 HOx• per Rn decay per second (Bq) 3.4 to 55.0% at 22C. This work provided G(HOx•)-value, 7.86±0.13 No./100 eV in air by directly measuring [HOx•] formed from the radiolysis procedure. This G value implies that HOx• produced by radon decay in air might be formed by multiple processes and may be result of positive ion-molecule reactions, primary radiolysis, and radical reactions. There is no obvious relation between HOxproduction rate and relative humidity. A laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) system has been used for •OH production rate measurement; it consists of an excimer laser, a dye laser, a frequency doubler, a gaseous fluorescence chamber, and other optical and electronic parts. This system needs to be improved to eliminate the interferences of light scattering and artificial •OH produced from the photolysis of O3/H2O.

  6. Expressed microRNA associated with high rate of egg production in chicken ovarian follicles.

    PubMed

    Wu, N; Gaur, U; Zhu, Q; Chen, B; Xu, Z; Zhao, X; Yang, M; Li, D

    2016-10-26

    MicroRNA (miRNA) is a highly conserved class of small noncoding RNA about 19-24 nucleotides in length that function in a specific manner to post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression in organisms. Tissue miRNA expression studies have discovered a myriad of functions for miRNAs in various aspects, but a role for miRNAs in chicken ovarian tissue at 300 days of age has not hitherto been reported. In this study, we performed the first miRNA analysis of ovarian tissues in chickens with low and high rates of egg production using high-throughput sequencing. By comparing low rate of egg production chickens with high rate of egg production chickens, 17 significantly differentially expressed miRNAs were found (P < 0.05), including 11 known and six novel miRNAs. We found that all 11 known miRNAs were involved mainly in pathways of reproduction regulation, such as steroid hormone biosynthesis and dopaminergic synapse. Additionally, expression profiling of six randomly selected differentially regulated miRNAs were validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Some miRNAs, such as gga-miR-34b, gga-miR-34c and gga-miR-216b, were reported to regulate processes such as proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis and metastasis and were expressed differentially in ovaries of chickens with high rates of egg production, suggesting that these miRNAs have an important role in ovary development and reproductive management of chicken. Furthermore, we uncovered that a significantly up-regulated miRNA-gga-miR-200a-3p-is ubiquitous in reproduction-regulation-related pathways. This miRNA may play a special central role in the reproductive management of chicken, and needs to be further studied for confirmation.

  7. The Kinematic and Microphysical Control of Lightning Rate, Extent and NOX Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, Lawrence; Koshak, William; Peterson, Harold; Matthee, Retha; Bain, A. Lamont

    2014-01-01

    The Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) experiment seeks to quantify the relationship between storm physics, lightning characteristics and the production of nitrogen oxides via lightning (LNOx). The focus of this study is to investigate the kinematic and microphysical control of lightning properties, particularly those that may govern LNOx production, such as flash rate, type and extent across Alabama during DC3. Prior studies have demonstrated that lightning flash rate and type is correlated to kinematic and microphysical properties in the mixed-phase region of thunderstorms such as updraft volume and graupel mass. More study is required to generalize these relationships in a wide variety of storm modes and meteorological conditions. Less is known about the co-evolving relationship between storm physics, morphology and three-dimensional flash extent, despite its importance for LNOx production. To address this conceptual gap, the NASA Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) is applied to North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA) and Vaisala National Lightning Detection Network(TM) (NLDN) observations following ordinary convective cells through their lifecycle. LNOM provides estimates of flash rate, flash type, channel length distributions, lightning segment altitude distributions (SADs) and lightning NOx production profiles. For this study, LNOM is applied in a Lagrangian sense to multicell thunderstorms over Northern Alabama on two days during DC3 (21 May and 11 June 2012) in which aircraft observations of NOx are available for comparison. The LNOM lightning characteristics and LNOX production estimates are compared to the evolution of updraft and precipitation properties inferred from dual-Doppler and polarimetric radar analyses applied to observations from a nearby radar network, including the UAH Advanced Radar for Meteorological and Operational Research (ARMOR). Given complex multicell evolution, particular attention is paid to storm morphology, cell

  8. Investigating why recycling gravity harvested algae increases harvestability and productivity in high rate algal ponds.

    PubMed

    Park, J B K; Craggs, R J; Shilton, A N

    2013-09-15

    It has previously been shown that recycling gravity harvested algae promotes Pediastrum boryanum dominance and improves harvestability and biomass production in pilot-scale High Rate Algal Ponds (HRAPs) treating domestic wastewater. In order to confirm the reproducibility of these findings and investigate the mechanisms responsible, this study utilized twelve 20 L outdoor HRAP mesocosms operated with and without algal recycling. It then compared the recycling of separated solid and liquid components of the harvested biomass against un-separated biomass. The work confirmed that algal recycling promoted P. boryanum dominance, improved 1 h-settleability by >20% and increased biomass productivity by >25% compared with controls that had no recycling. With regard to the improved harvestability, of particular interest was that recycling the liquid fraction alone caused a similar improvement in settleability as recycling the solid fraction. This may be due to the presence of extracellular polymeric substances in the liquid fraction. While there are many possible mechanisms that could account for the increased productivity with algal recycling, all but two were systematically eliminated: (i) the mean cell residence time was extended thereby increasing the algal concentration and more fully utilizing the incident sunlight and, (ii) the relative proportions of algal growth stages (which have different specific growth rates) was changed, resulting in a net increase in the overall growth rate of the culture. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The catalytic efficiency of yeast ribonuclease III depends on substrate specific product release rate

    PubMed Central

    Comeau, Marc-Andre; Lafontaine, Daniel A.; Abou Elela, Sherif

    2016-01-01

    Members of the ribonuclease III (RNase III) family regulate gene expression by triggering the degradation of double stranded RNA (dsRNA). Hundreds of RNase III cleavage targets have been identified and their impact on RNA maturation and stability is now established. However, the mechanism defining substrates’ reactivity remains unclear. In this study, we developed a real-time FRET assay for the detection of dsRNA degradation by yeast RNase III (Rnt1p) and characterized the kinetic bottlenecks controlling the reactivity of different substrates. Surprisingly, the results indicate that Rnt1p cleavage reaction is not only limited by the rate of catalysis but can also depend on base-pairing of product termini. Cleavage products terminating with paired nucleotides, like the degradation signals found in coding mRNA sequence, were less reactive and more prone to inhibition than products having unpaired nucleotides found in non-coding RNA substrates. Mutational analysis of U5 snRNA and Mig2 mRNA confirms the pairing of the cleavage site as a major determinant for the difference between cleavage rates of coding and non-coding RNA. Together the data indicate that the base-pairing of Rnt1p substrates encodes reactivity determinants that permit both constitutive processing of non-coding RNA while limiting the rate of mRNA degradation. PMID:27257067

  10. High rate production of hydrogen/methane from various substrates and wastes.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Naomichi; Nakashimada, Yutaka

    2004-01-01

    To treat soluble and solid wastes and recover energy from them, high rate methane fermentation, especially using the UASB (upflow anaerobic sludge blanket) reactor, and hydrogen fermentation using various microorganisms and microbial consortia have been investigated intensively in Japan. In this chapter, recent works on high rate methane fermentation in Japan are reviewed, focusing on: 1) basic studies into the applicability of the UASB reactor for various substrates such as propionate, lactate, ethanol, glucose and phenol; 2) its applications to unfeasible conditions, such as lipid and protein containing wastes, low temperature and high salt-containing wastes; 3) progress made in the field of advanced UASB reactors, and; 4) research into methane fermentation from solid wastes, such as from cellulosic materials, municipal sewage sludge, and mud sediments. Following this, although hydrogen fermentation with photosynthetic microorganisms or anaerobic bacteria was researched, for this review we have focused on fermentative hydrogen production using strictly or facultative anaerobes and microbial consortia in Japan, since high rate production of hydrogen-methane via a two-stage process was judged to be more attractive for biological hydrogen production and wastewater treatments.

  11. Effect of growth rate on plasmid DNA production and metabolic performance of engineered Escherichia coli strains.

    PubMed

    Wunderlich, Martin; Taymaz-Nikerel, Hilal; Gosset, Guillermo; Ramírez, Octavio T; Lara, Alvaro R

    2014-03-01

    Two engineered Escherichia coli strains, designated VH33 and VH34, were compared to their parent strain W3110 in chemostat mode during plasmid DNA (pDNA) production. In strain VH33 the glucose uptake system was modified with the aim of reducing overflow metabolism. The strain VH34 has an additional deletion of the pyruvate kinase A gene (pykA) to increase pDNA formation. pDNA formation rates as well as kinetic and stoichiometric parameters were investigated in dependence of the growth rate within a range from 0.02 to 0.25 h(-1). Differences between strains were found in terms of the biomass yields on nitrogen and oxygen, as well as on the cell maintenance coefficients. The deletion of pykA led to a significantly increased pDNA yield and productivity. At an optimal growth rate of 0.20 h(-1) it was nearly 60% higher than that of W3110 and VH33. Metabolic fluxes calculated by metabolite balance analysis showed differences mainly in reactions catalyzed by pyruvate kinase and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase. The obtained data are useful for the design of cultivation schemes for pDNA production by E. coli.

  12. Critical behavior of entropy production and learning rate: Ising model with an oscillating field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yirui; Barato, Andre C.

    2016-11-01

    We study the critical behavior of the entropy production of the Ising model subject to a magnetic field that oscillates in time. The mean-field model displays a phase transition that can be either first or second-order, depending on the amplitude of the field and on the frequency of oscillation. Within this approximation the entropy production rate is shown to have a discontinuity when the transition is first-order and to be continuous, with a jump in its first derivative, if the transition is second-order. In two dimensions, we find with numerical simulations that the critical behavior of the entropy production rate is the same, independent of the frequency and amplitude of the field. Its first derivative has a logarithmic divergence at the critical point. This result is in agreement with the lack of a first-order phase transition in two dimensions. We analyze a model with a field that changes at stochastic time-intervals between two values. This model allows for an informational theoretic interpretation, with the system as a sensor that follows the external field. We calculate numerically a lower bound on the learning rate, which quantifies how much information the system obtains about the field. Its first derivative with respect to temperature is found to have a jump at the critical point.

  13. Dispensing Rates of Four Common Hearing Aid Product Features: Associations With Variations in Practice Among Audiologists

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Earl E.; Ricketts, Todd A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to develop and examine a list of potential variables that may account for variability in the dispensing rates of four common hearing aid features. A total of 29 potential variables were identified and placed into the following categories: (1) characteristics of the audiologist, (2) characteristics of the hearing aids dispensed by the audiologist, (3) characteristics of the audiologist's patient population, and (4) evidence-based practice grades of recommendation for each feature. The potentially associative variables then were examined using regression analyses from the responses of 257 audiologists to a dispensing practice survey. There was a direct relation between price and level of hearing aid technology with the frequency of dispensing product features. There was also a direct relation between the belief by the audiologist that a feature might benefit patients and the frequency of dispensing that feature. In general, the results suggested that personal differences among audiologists and the hearing aids audiologists choose to dispense are related more strongly to dispensing rates of product features than to differences in characteristics of the patient population served by audiologists. An additional finding indicated that evidence-based practice recommendations were inversely related to dispensing rates of product features. This finding, however, may not be the result of dispensing trends as much as hearing aid manufacturing trends. PMID:20457726

  14. Gas-phase reaction of ( E)-β-farnesene with ozone: Rate coefficient and carbonyl products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourtchev, Ivan; Bejan, Iustinian; Sodeau, John R.; Wenger, John C.

    The gas-phase ozonolysis of ( E)-β-farnesene was investigated in a 3.91 m 3 atmospheric simulation chamber at 296 ± 2 K and relative humidity of around 0.1%. The relative rate method was used to determine the reaction rate coefficient of (4.01 ± 0.17) × 10 -16 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1, where the indicated errors are two least-squares standard deviations and do not include uncertainties in the rate coefficients for the reference compounds (γ-terpinene, cis-cyclooctene and 1,5-cyclooctadiene). Gas phase carbonyl products were collected using a denuder sampling technique and analyzed with GC/MS following derivatization with O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl) hydroxylamine (PFBHA). The reaction products detected were acetone, 4-oxopentanal, methylglyoxal, 4-methylenehex-5-enal, 6-methylhept-5-en-2-one, and ( E)-4-methyl-8-methylenedeca-4,9-dienal. A detailed mechanism for the gas-phase ozonolysis of ( E)-β-farnesene is proposed, which accounts for all of the products observed in this study. The results of this work indicate that the atmospheric reaction of ( E)-β-farnesene with ozone has a lifetime of around 1 h and is another possible source of the ubiquitous carbonyls, acetone, 4-oxopentanal and 6-methylhept-5-en-2-one in the atmosphere.

  15. The effect of temperature and effluent recycle rate on hydrogen production by undefined bacterial granules.

    PubMed

    Ngoma, L; Masilela, P; Obazu, F; Gray, V M

    2011-10-01

    Biohydrogen production in an anaerobic fluidized granular bed bioreactor was strongly dependent on temperature and effluent recycle rates. At 45 °C as the effluent recycle rate was increased from 1.3 to 3.5 L/min, the total H₂ output for the bioreactor increased from 10.6 to 43.2 L/h. Volumetric H(2) productivity also increased from 2.1 to 8.7 L H₂/L/h. At 70°C as the effluent recycle was increased from 1.3 to 3.5 L/min, the total H₂ output for the bioreactor increased from 13.8 to 73.8L/h. At 70 °C volumetric H(2) productivities increased from 2.8 to 14.8L H₂/L/h as the effluent recycle rate was increased from 1.3 to 3.5 L/min. At 45 °C % H₂ was 45% and reached 67% at 70 °C. Maximum hydrogen yields at 45 °C were 1.24 and 2.2 mol H₂/mol glucose at 70 °C.

  16. Effects of allometry, productivity and lifestyle on rates and limits of body size evolution.

    PubMed

    Okie, Jordan G; Boyer, Alison G; Brown, James H; Costa, Daniel P; Ernest, S K Morgan; Evans, Alistair R; Fortelius, Mikael; Gittleman, John L; Hamilton, Marcus J; Harding, Larisa E; Lintulaakso, Kari; Lyons, S Kathleen; Saarinen, Juha J; Smith, Felisa A; Stephens, Patrick R; Theodor, Jessica; Uhen, Mark D; Sibly, Richard M

    2013-08-07

    Body size affects nearly all aspects of organismal biology, so it is important to understand the constraints and dynamics of body size evolution. Despite empirical work on the macroevolution and macroecology of minimum and maximum size, there is little general quantitative theory on rates and limits of body size evolution. We present a general theory that integrates individual productivity, the lifestyle component of the slow-fast life-history continuum, and the allometric scaling of generation time to predict a clade's evolutionary rate and asymptotic maximum body size, and the shape of macroevolutionary trajectories during diversifying phases of size evolution. We evaluate this theory using data on the evolution of clade maximum body sizes in mammals during the Cenozoic. As predicted, clade evolutionary rates and asymptotic maximum sizes are larger in more productive clades (e.g. baleen whales), which represent the fast end of the slow-fast lifestyle continuum, and smaller in less productive clades (e.g. primates). The allometric scaling exponent for generation time fundamentally alters the shape of evolutionary trajectories, so allometric effects should be accounted for in models of phenotypic evolution and interpretations of macroevolutionary body size patterns. This work highlights the intimate interplay between the macroecological and macroevolutionary dynamics underlying the generation and maintenance of morphological diversity.

  17. Estimating long-term exposure levels in process-type industries using production rates.

    PubMed

    Kalliokoski, P

    1990-06-01

    Exposure to toluene in two publication rotogravure plants was investigated to examine how accurately long-term exposure can be estimated on the basis of production rate. Toluene consumption was used as the measure of production rate. Continuous area monitoring was used to find a correlation between production rate and airborne level of toluene. Workers' exposure levels were first estimated by combining data on toluene concentrations in various monitoring sites with data supplied by the workers on the time spent in these areas. These calculated exposure levels were found to correlate well with the actual exposure levels obtained by breathing zone sampling. There was also a fairly high correlation between the concentration of toluene in front of the press and the consumption of toluene if the process conditions remained stable. It was, however, necessary to investigate this association separately for the situations where the degree of enclosure of the press or number of emission sources were unusual or when the workers stayed in the control rooms, which were separated from the other pressroom areas. A reasonably high correlation between the variables of the main interest, that is, the calculated toluene exposures and the consumption of toluene, was found in one of the plants investigated, whereas this correlation was low in the other plant. Even though this kind of estimation procedure does not always lead to accurate exposure levels, it helps in understanding how those are affected by the process parameters.

  18. Effects of allometry, productivity and lifestyle on rates and limits of body size evolution

    PubMed Central

    Okie, Jordan G.; Boyer, Alison G.; Brown, James H.; Costa, Daniel P.; Ernest, S. K. Morgan; Evans, Alistair R.; Fortelius, Mikael; Gittleman, John L.; Hamilton, Marcus J.; Harding, Larisa E.; Lintulaakso, Kari; Lyons, S. Kathleen; Saarinen, Juha J.; Smith, Felisa A.; Stephens, Patrick R.; Theodor, Jessica; Uhen, Mark D.; Sibly, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    Body size affects nearly all aspects of organismal biology, so it is important to understand the constraints and dynamics of body size evolution. Despite empirical work on the macroevolution and macroecology of minimum and maximum size, there is little general quantitative theory on rates and limits of body size evolution. We present a general theory that integrates individual productivity, the lifestyle component of the slow–fast life-history continuum, and the allometric scaling of generation time to predict a clade's evolutionary rate and asymptotic maximum body size, and the shape of macroevolutionary trajectories during diversifying phases of size evolution. We evaluate this theory using data on the evolution of clade maximum body sizes in mammals during the Cenozoic. As predicted, clade evolutionary rates and asymptotic maximum sizes are larger in more productive clades (e.g. baleen whales), which represent the fast end of the slow–fast lifestyle continuum, and smaller in less productive clades (e.g. primates). The allometric scaling exponent for generation time fundamentally alters the shape of evolutionary trajectories, so allometric effects should be accounted for in models of phenotypic evolution and interpretations of macroevolutionary body size patterns. This work highlights the intimate interplay between the macroecological and macroevolutionary dynamics underlying the generation and maintenance of morphological diversity. PMID:23760865

  19. Direct Measurement of the Unimolecular Decay Rate of Criegee Intermediates to OH Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fang; Fang, Yi; Klippenstein, Stephen; McCoy, Anne; Lester, Marsha

    Ozonolysis of alkenes is an important non-photolytic source of OH radicals in the troposphere. The production of OH radicals proceeds though formation and unimolecular decay of Criegee intermediates such as syn-CH3CHOO and (CH3)2COO. These alkyl-substituted Criegee intermediates can undergo a 1,4-H transfer reaction to form an energized vinyl hydroperoxide species, which breaks apart to OH and vinoxy products. Recently, this laboratory used IR excitation in the C-H stretch overtone region to initiate the unimolecular decay of syn-CH3CHOO and (CH3)2COO Criegee intermediates, leading to OH formation. Here, direct time-domain measurements are performed to observe the rate of appearance of OH products under collision-free conditions utilizing UV laser-induced fluorescence for detection. The experimental rates are in excellent agreement with statistical RRKM calculations using barrier heights predicted from high-level electronic structure calculations. Accurate determination of the rates and barrier heights for unimolecular decay of Criegee intermediates is essential for modeling the kinetics of alkene ozonolysis reactions, a significant OH radical source in atmospheric chemistry, as well as the steady-state concentration of Criegee intermediates in the atmosphere. This research was supported through the National Science Foundation under grant CHE-1362835.

  20. Herschel/SPIRE observations of water production rates and ortho-to-para ratios in comets★

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Thomas G.; Rawlings, Jonathan M. C.; Swinyard, Bruce M.

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents Herschel/SPIRE (Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver) spectroscopic observations of several fundamental rotational ortho- and para-water transitions seen in three Jupiter-family comets and one Oort-cloud comet. Radiative transfer models that include excitation by collisions with neutrals and electrons, and by solar infrared radiation, were used to produce synthetic emission line profiles originating in the cometary coma. Ortho-to-para ratios (OPRs) were determined and used to derived water production rates for all comets. Comparisons are made with the water production rates derived using an OPR of 3. The OPR of three of the comets in this study is much lower than the statistical equilibrium value of 3; however they agree with observations of comets 1P/Halley and C/2001 A2 (LINEAR), and the protoplanetary disc TW Hydrae. These results provide evidence suggesting that OPR variation is caused by post-sublimation gas-phase nuclear-spin conversion processes. The water production rates of all comets agree with previous work and, in general, decrease with increasing nucleocentric offset. This could be due to a temperature profile, additional water source or OPR variation in the comae, or model inaccuracies.

  1. Optimization of 2,3-butanediol production by Klebsiella oxytoca through oxygen transfer rate control

    SciTech Connect

    Beronio, P.B. Jr. . Amoco Research Center); Tsao, G.T. . Lab. of Renewable Resources Engineering)

    1993-12-01

    Production of 2,3-butanediol by Klebsiella oxytoca is influenced by the degree of oxygen limitation. During batch culture studies, two phases of growth are observed: energy-coupled growth, during which cell growth and oxygen supply are coupled; and, energy-uncoupled growth, which arises when the degree of oxygen limitation reaches a critical value. Optimal 2,3-butanediol productivity occurs during the energy-coupled growth phase. In this article, a control system which maintains the batch culture at a constant level of oxygen limitation in the energy-coupled growth regime has been designed. Control, which involves feedback control on the oxygen transfer coefficient, is achieved by continually increasing the partial pressure of oxygen in the feed gas, which in turn continually increases the oxygen transfer rate. Control has resulted in a balanced state of growth, a repression of ethanol formation, and an increase in 2,3-butanediol productivity of 18%.

  2. Gradient perception of children's productions of /s/ and /θ/: A comparative study of rating methods.

    PubMed

    Schellinger, Sarah K; Munson, Benjamin; Edwards, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Past studies have shown incontrovertible evidence for the existence of covert contrasts in children's speech, i.e. differences between target productions that are nonetheless transcribed with the same phonetic symbol. Moreover, there is evidence that these are relevant to forming prognoses and tracking progress in children with speech sound disorder. A challenge remains to determine the most efficient and reliable methods for assessing covert contrasts. This study investigates how readily listeners can identify covert contrasts in children's speech when using a continuous rating scale in the form of a visual analogue scale (VAS) to denote children's productions. Individual listeners' VAS responses were found to correlate statistically significantly with a variety of continuous measures of children's production accuracy, including judgements of binary accuracy pooled over a large set of listeners. These findings reinforce the growing body of evidence that VAS judgements are potentially useful clinical measures of covert contrast.

  3. Maximizing the xylitol production from sugar cane bagasse hydrolysate by controlling the aeration rate

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, S.S.; Ribeiro, J.D.; Felipe, M.G.A.; Vitolo, M.

    1997-12-31

    Batch fermentations of sugar cane bagasse hemicellulosic hydrolysate treated for removing the inhibitors of the fermentation were performed by Candida guilliermondii FTI 20037 for xylitol production. The fermentative parameters agitation and aeration rate were studied aiming the maximization of xylitol production from this agroindustrial residue. The maximal xylitol volumetric productivity (0.87 g/L {center_dot} h) and yield (0.67 g/g) were attained at 400/min and 0.45 v.v.m. (K{sub L}a 27/h). According to the results, a suitable control of the oxygen input permitting the xylitol formation from sugar cane bagasse hydrolysate is required for the development of an efficient fermentation process for large-scale applications. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Influence of light absorption rate by Nannochloropsis oculata on triglyceride production during nitrogen starvation.

    PubMed

    Kandilian, Razmig; Pruvost, Jérémy; Legrand, Jack; Pilon, Laurent

    2014-07-01

    This study aims to understand the role of light transfer in triglyceride fatty-acid (TG-FA) cell content and productivity from microalgae during nitrogen starvation. Large amounts of TG-FA can be produced via nitrogen starvation of microalgae in photobioreactors exposed to intense light. First, spectral absorption and scattering cross-sections of N. oculata were measured at different times during nitrogen starvation. They were used to relate the mean volumetric rate of energy absorption (MVREA) per unit mass of microalgae to the TG-FA productivity and cell content. TG-FA productivity correlated with the MVREA and reached a maximum for MVREA of 13 μmol hν/gs. This indicated that TG-FA synthesis was limited by the photon absorption rate in the PBR. A minimum MVREA of 13 μmol hν/gs was also necessary at the onset of nitrogen starvation to trigger large accumulation of TG-FA in cells. These results will be instrumental in defining protocols for TG-FA production in scaled-up photobioreactors.

  5. α-Terpineol reactions with the nitrate radical: Rate constant and gas-phase products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Brian T.; Ham, Jason E.

    The bimolecular rate constant of k rad +α-terpineol (16 ± 4) × 10 -12 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 was measured using the relative rate technique for the reaction of the nitrate radical (NO 3rad ) with α-terpineol (2-(4-methyl-1-cyclohex-3-enyl)propan-2-ol) at 297 ± 3 K and 1 atmosphere total pressure. To more clearly define part of α-terpineol's indoor environment degradation mechanism, the products of α-terpineol + NO 3rad reaction were investigated. The identified reaction products were: acetone, glyoxal (HC( dbnd O)C( dbnd O)H), and methylglyoxal (CH 3C( dbnd O)C( dbnd O)H). The use of derivatizing agents O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine (PFBHA) and N, O-bis(trimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) were used to propose the other major reaction products: 6-hydroxyhept-5-en-2-one, 4-(1-hydroxy-1-methylethyl)-1-methyl-2-oxocyclohexyl nitrate, 5-(1-hydroxy-1-methylethyl)-2-oxocyclohexyl nitrate, 1-formyl-5-hydroxy-4-(hydroxymethyl)-1,5-dimethylhexyl nitrate, and 1,4-diformyl-5-hydroxy-1,5-dimethylhexyl nitrate. The elucidation of these products was facilitated by mass spectrometry of the derivatized reaction products coupled with plausible α-terpineol + NO 3rad reaction mechanisms based on previously published volatile organic compound + NO 3rad gas-phase mechanisms. The additional gas-phase products (2,6,6-trimethyltetrahydro-2 H-pyran-2,5-dicarbaldehyde and 2,2-dimethylcyclohexane-1,4-dicarbaldehyde) are proposed to be the result of cyclization through a reaction intermediate.

  6. Effects of heating rate on slow pyrolysis behavior, kinetic parameters and products properties of moso bamboo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dengyu; Zhou, Jianbin; Zhang, Qisheng

    2014-10-01

    Effects of heating rate on slow pyrolysis behaviors, kinetic parameters, and products properties of moso bamboo were investigated in this study. Pyrolysis experiments were performed up to 700 °C at heating rates of 5, 10, 20, and 30 °C/min using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and a lab-scale fixed bed pyrolysis reactor. The results show that the onset and offset temperatures of the main devolatilization stage of thermogravimetry/derivative thermogravimetry (TG/DTG) curves obviously shift toward the high-temperature range, and the activation energy values increase with increasing heating rate. The heating rate has different effects on the pyrolysis products properties, including biochar (element content, proximate analysis, specific surface area, heating value), bio-oil (water content, chemical composition), and non-condensable gas. The solid yields from the fixed bed pyrolysis reactor are noticeably different from those of TGA mainly because the thermal hysteresis of the sample in the fixed bed pyrolysis reactor is more thorough.

  7. Translation elicits a growth rate-dependent, genome-wide, differential protein production in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Borkowski, Olivier; Goelzer, Anne; Schaffer, Marc; Calabre, Magali; Mäder, Ulrike; Aymerich, Stéphane; Jules, Matthieu; Fromion, Vincent

    2016-05-17

    Complex regulatory programs control cell adaptation to environmental changes by setting condition-specific proteomes. In balanced growth, bacterial protein abundances depend on the dilution rate, transcript abundances and transcript-specific translation efficiencies. We revisited the current theory claiming the invariance of bacterial translation efficiency. By integrating genome-wide transcriptome datasets and datasets from a library of synthetic gfp-reporter fusions, we demonstrated that translation efficiencies in Bacillus subtilis decreased up to fourfold from slow to fast growth. The translation initiation regions elicited a growth rate-dependent, differential production of proteins without regulators, hence revealing a unique, hard-coded, growth rate-dependent mode of regulation. We combined model-based data analyses of transcript and protein abundances genome-wide and revealed that this global regulation is extensively used in B. subtilis We eventually developed a knowledge-based, three-step translation initiation model, experimentally challenged the model predictions and proposed that a growth rate-dependent drop in free ribosome abundance accounted for the differential protein production. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  8. Scaling of heat production by thermogenic flowers: limits to floral size and maximum rate of respiration.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Roger S

    2010-09-01

    Effect of size of inflorescences, flowers and cones on maximum rate of heat production is analysed allometrically in 23 species of thermogenic plants having diverse structures and ranging between 1.8 and 600 g. Total respiration rate (, micromol s(-1)) varies with spadix mass (M, g) according to in 15 species of Araceae. Thermal conductance (C, mW degrees C(-1)) for spadices scales according to C = 18.5M(0.73). Mass does not significantly affect the difference between floral and air temperature. Aroids with exposed appendices with high surface area have high thermal conductance, consistent with the need to vaporize attractive scents. True flowers have significantly lower heat production and thermal conductance, because closed petals retain heat that benefits resident insects. The florets on aroid spadices, either within a floral chamber or spathe, have intermediate thermal conductance, consistent with mixed roles. Mass-specific rates of respiration are variable between species, but reach 900 nmol s(-1) g(-1) in aroid male florets, exceeding rates of all other plants and even most animals. Maximum mass-specific respiration appears to be limited by oxygen delivery through individual cells. Reducing mass-specific respiration may be one selective influence on the evolution of large size of thermogenic flowers.

  9. Egg production rates of two common copepods in the Barents Sea in summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvoretsky, Vladimir G.; Dvoretsky, Alexander G.

    2014-09-01

    Small copepod species play important roles in the pelagic food webs of the Arctic Ocean, linking primary producers to higher trophic levels. The egg production rates (EPs) and weight-specific egg production rates (SEPs) of two common copepods, Acartia longiremis and Temora longicornis, were studied under experimental conditions in Dalnezelenetskaya Bay (southern Barents Sea) during summer. The average EP and SEP at 5-10 °C were 4.7 ± 0.4 eggs female-1 day-1 and 0.025 ± 0.002 day-1, respectively, for A. longiremis and 13.1 ± 0.9 eggs female-1 day-1 and 0.075 ± 0.006 day-1, respectively, for T. longicornis. EP and SEP were significantly higher at 10°C than at 5°C for both species. The mean egg diameter correlated positively and significantly with female prosome length (PL) in each species. SEP of T. longicornis correlated negatively and significantly with PL. Daily EP and SEP were similar to rates recorded for other Acartia and Temora species in temperate and warm regions. The influence of environmental factors (temperature, salinity, and phytoplankton concentration) on EP of both species is discussed. We conclude that temperature is the main factor determining the reproduction rate and timing in A. longiremis and T. longicornis in the Barents Sea.

  10. The influence of product packaging on young people's palatability rating for RTDS and other alcoholic beverages.

    PubMed

    Gates, Peter; Copeland, Jan; Stevenson, Richard J; Dillon, Paul

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the influence of product packaging of ready to drink (RTD), or pre-mixed drinks, and other alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages on the palatability ratings of adolescents and adults. Respondents were interviewed at their own schools or a campus of the University of NSW. The experiment tested palatability ratings in blind and non-blind conditions with a selection of 12- to 30-year-old Australians (140 adolescents and 210 adults) from seven private schools across NSW and students from the University of NSW and Macquarie University. Beverage palatability was measured utilizing an interval ratio scale from 1 to 7 before and after packaging was presented. Views on whether the beverage packaging was designed to appeal to the participant were also analysed. In general, the alcoholic beverage packaging was thought to be designed to appeal more to adults and palatability ratings significantly increased in the non-blind conditions. In contrast, the Bacardi Breezer packaging was especially palatable to younger participants. Although most alcoholic beverage packaging was not of particular appeal to adolescents, some RTD beverages may be appealing more to adolescents. Unlike other alcoholic products, the difference in palatability ratings for the Bacardi Breezer, from blind to non-blind conditions, was greater for younger participants.

  11. Effect of ammonia on methane production pathways and reaction rates in acetate-fed biogas processes.

    PubMed

    Hao, L P; Mazéas, L; Lü, F; Grossin-Debattista, J; He, P J; Bouchez, T

    2017-04-01

    In order to understand the correlation between ammonia and methanogenesis metabolism, methane production pathways and their specific rates were studied at total ammonium nitrogen (TAN) concentrations of 0.14-9 g/L in three methanogenic sludges fed with acetate, at both mesophilic and thermophilic conditions. Results showed that high levels of TAN had significant inhibition on methanogenesis; this could, however, be recovered via syntrophic acetate oxidation (SAO) coupled with Hydrogenotrophic Methanogenesis (HM) performed by acetate oxidizing syntrophs or through Acetoclastic Methanogenesis (AM) catalyzed by Methanosarcinaceae, after a long lag phase >50 d. Free ammonia (NH3) was the active component for this inhibition, of which 200 mg/L is suggested as the threshold for the pathway shift from AM to SAO-HM. Methane production rate via SAO-HM at TAN of 7-9 g/L was about 5-9-fold lower than that of AM at TAN of 0.14 g/L, which was also lower than the rate of AM pathway recovered at TAN of 7 g/L in the incubations with a French mesophilic inoculum. Thermophilic condition favored the establishment of the SAO-catalyzing microbial community, as indicated by the higher reaction rate and shorter lag phase. The operational strategy is thus suggested to be adjusted when NH3 exceeds 200 mg/L.

  12. Soil production rates on silicate parent material in high-mountains: different approaches - different results?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egli, Markus; Dahms, Dennis; Norton, Kevin

    2013-04-01

    High-mountain soils develop in particularly sensitive environments. Consequently, deciphering and predicting what drives the rates of soil formation in such environments is a major challenge. In terms of soil production from chemical weathering, the predominating perception for high-mountain soils and cold environments often is that the chemical weathering 'portion' of soil development is temperature-inhibited, often to the point of non-occurrence. Several concepts exist to determine long-term rates of soil formation and development. We present three different approaches: (1) quantification of soil formation from minimally eroded soils of known age using chronosequences (known surface age and soil thickness - SAST), (2) determination of soil residence times (SRT) and production rates through chemical weathering using (un)stable isotopes (e.g. 230Th / 234U activity ratios), and (3) a steady state approach using cosmogenic isotopes (e.g. 10Be). Data form different climate zones, and particularly from high-mountains (alpine environment), were compared. The SAST and steady state approach gave quite similar results for alpine environments (European Alps and the Wind River Range (Rocky Mountains USA)). Soil formation rates in mountain areas (but having a temperate climate) using the SRT approach, did not differ greatly from the SAST and Steady State approaches. Independent of the chosen approach, the results seem moderately comparable. Soil formation rates in high-mountain areas (alpine climate) ranged from very low to extremely high values and showed a clear decreasing tendency with time. Very young soils have up to 3 - 4 orders of magnitude higher rates of development than old soils (105 to 106 years). This is due to the fact that weathering is kinetically limited in regions having young surfaces and supply limited on old surfaces. Soil production rates cannot be infinitely high. Consequently, a speed limit must exist. In the literature, this limit has been set at

  13. An Exploration of Methods for Rating Children’s Productions of Sibilant Fricatives

    PubMed Central

    Munson, Benjamin; Carlson, Kari Urberg

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines three methods for providing ratings of within-category detail in children’s productions of /s/ and /ʃ/. A group of listeners (n=61) participated in a rating task in which a forced-choice phoneme identification task was followed by one of three measures of phoneme goodness: visual analog scaling, direct magnitude estimation, or a Likert scale judgment. All three types of ratings were similarly correlated with sounds’ acoustic characteristics. Visual analog scaling and Likert scale judgments had higher intra-rater reliability than did direct magnitude estimation. Moreover, both of them elicited a wider range of judgments than did direct magnitude estimation. Based on our evaluation, Likert scale judgments and visual analog scaling are equally useful tasks for eliciting within-category judgments. Of these two, visual analog scaling may be preferable because it allows for more distinct levels of response. PMID:27158499

  14. An Exploration of Methods for Rating Children's Productions of Sibilant Fricatives.

    PubMed

    Munson, Benjamin; Carlson, Kari Urberg

    This paper examines three methods for providing ratings of within-category detail in children's productions of /s/ and /ʃ/. A group of listeners (n=61) participated in a rating task in which a forced-choice phoneme identification task was followed by one of three measures of phoneme goodness: visual analog scaling, direct magnitude estimation, or a Likert scale judgment. All three types of ratings were similarly correlated with sounds' acoustic characteristics. Visual analog scaling and Likert scale judgments had higher intra-rater reliability than did direct magnitude estimation. Moreover, both of them elicited a wider range of judgments than did direct magnitude estimation. Based on our evaluation, Likert scale judgments and visual analog scaling are equally useful tasks for eliciting within-category judgments. Of these two, visual analog scaling may be preferable because it allows for more distinct levels of response.

  15. Alpha-decay branching ratios of near-threshold states in 19Ne and the astrophysical rate of 15O(α,γ)19Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davids, B.; van den Berg, A. M.; Dendooven, P.; Fleurot, F.; Hunyadi, M.; de Huu, M. A.; Rehm, K. E.; Segel, R. E.; Siemssen, R. H.; Wilschut, H. W.; Wörtche, H. J.; Wuosmaa, A. H.

    2003-05-01

    The 15O(α, γ)19Ne reaction is one of two routes for breakout from the hot CNO cycles into the rp process in accreting neutron stars. Its astrophysical rate depends critically on the decay properties of excited states in 19Ne lying just above the 15O + α threshold. We have measured the α-decay branching ratios for these states using the p(21Ne,t)19Ne reaction at 43 MeV/u.

  16. Growth rates and production of heterotrophic bacteria and phytoplankton in the North Pacific subtropical gyre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, David R.; Karl, David M.; Laws, Edward A.

    1996-10-01

    In field work conducted at 26°N, 155°W, in the North Pacific subtropical gyre, phytoplankton growth rates μp estimated from 14C labeling of chlorophyll a (chl a) averaged approximately one doubling per day in the euphotic zone (0-150 m). Microbial (microalgal plus heterotrophic bacterial) growth rates μm calculated from the incorporation of 3H-adenine into DNA were comparable to or exceeded phytoplankton growth rates at most depths in the euphotic zone. Photosynthetic rates averaged 727 mg C m -2 day -1 Phytoplankton carbon biomass, calculated from 14C labeling of chl a, averaged 7.2 mg m -3 in the euphotic zone. Vertical profiles of particulate DNA and ATP suggested that no more than 15% of particulate DNA was associated with actively growing cells. Heterotrophic bacterial carbon biomass was estimated from a two-year average at station ALOHA (22°45'N, 158°W) of flow cytometric counts of unpigmented, bacteria-size particles which bound DAPI on the assumption that 15% of the particles were actively growing cells and that heterotrophic bacterial cells contained 20 fg C cell -1 The heterotrophic bacterial carbon so calculated averaged 1.1 mg m -3 in the euphotic zone. Heterotrophic bacterial production was estimated to be 164 mg C m -2 day -1 or 23% of the calculated photosynthetic rate. Estimated heterotrophic bacterial growth rates averaged 0.97 day -1 in the euphotic zone and reached 4.7 day - at a depth of 20 m. Most heterotrophic bacterial production occurred in the upper 40 m of the euphotic zone, suggesting that direct excretion by phytoplankton, perhaps due to photorespiration or ultraviolet light effects, was a significant source of dissolved organic carbon for the bacteria.

  17. Quantification of Viral and Prokaryotic Production Rates in Benthic Ecosystems: A Methods Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Rastelli, Eugenio; Dell’Anno, Antonio; Corinaldesi, Cinzia; Middelboe, Mathias; Noble, Rachel T.; Danovaro, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Viruses profoundly influence benthic marine ecosystems by infecting and subsequently killing their prokaryotic hosts, thereby impacting the cycling of carbon and nutrients. Previously conducted studies, based on different methodologies, have provided widely differing estimates of the relevance of viruses on benthic prokaryotes. There has been no attempt so far to compare these independent approaches, including contextual comparisons among different approaches for sample manipulation (i.e., dilution or not of the sediments during incubations), between methods based on epifluorescence microscopy (EFM) or radiotracers, and between the use of different radiotracers. Therefore, it has been difficult to identify the most suitable methodologies and protocols to be used as standard approaches for the quantification of viral infections of prokaryotes. Here, we compared for the first time different methods for determining viral and prokaryotic production rates in marine sediments collected at two benthic sites, differing in depth and environmental conditions. We used a highly replicated experimental design, testing the potential biases associated to the incubation of sediments as diluted or undiluted. In parallel, we also compared EFM counts with the 3H-thymidine incubations for the determination of viral production rates, and the use of 3H-thymidine versus 3H-leucine radiotracers for the determination of prokaryotic production. We show here that, independent from sediment dilution, EFM-based values of viral production ranged from 1.4 to 4.6 × 107 viruses g-1 h-1, and were similar but overall less variable compared to those obtained by the 3H-thymidine method (0.3 to 9.0 × 107 viruses g-1h-1). In addition, the prokaryotic production rates were not affected by sediment dilution, and the use of different radiotracers provided very consistent estimates (10.3–35.1 and 9.3–34.6 ngC g-1h-1 using the 3H-thymidine or 3H-leucine method, respectively). These results indicated

  18. Quantification of Viral and Prokaryotic Production Rates in Benthic Ecosystems: A Methods Comparison.

    PubMed

    Rastelli, Eugenio; Dell'Anno, Antonio; Corinaldesi, Cinzia; Middelboe, Mathias; Noble, Rachel T; Danovaro, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Viruses profoundly influence benthic marine ecosystems by infecting and subsequently killing their prokaryotic hosts, thereby impacting the cycling of carbon and nutrients. Previously conducted studies, based on different methodologies, have provided widely differing estimates of the relevance of viruses on benthic prokaryotes. There has been no attempt so far to compare these independent approaches, including contextual comparisons among different approaches for sample manipulation (i.e., dilution or not of the sediments during incubations), between methods based on epifluorescence microscopy (EFM) or radiotracers, and between the use of different radiotracers. Therefore, it has been difficult to identify the most suitable methodologies and protocols to be used as standard approaches for the quantification of viral infections of prokaryotes. Here, we compared for the first time different methods for determining viral and prokaryotic production rates in marine sediments collected at two benthic sites, differing in depth and environmental conditions. We used a highly replicated experimental design, testing the potential biases associated to the incubation of sediments as diluted or undiluted. In parallel, we also compared EFM counts with the (3)H-thymidine incubations for the determination of viral production rates, and the use of (3)H-thymidine versus (3)H-leucine radiotracers for the determination of prokaryotic production. We show here that, independent from sediment dilution, EFM-based values of viral production ranged from 1.4 to 4.6 × 10(7) viruses g(-1) h(-1), and were similar but overall less variable compared to those obtained by the (3)H-thymidine method (0.3 to 9.0 × 10(7) viruses g(-1)h(-1)). In addition, the prokaryotic production rates were not affected by sediment dilution, and the use of different radiotracers provided very consistent estimates (10.3-35.1 and 9.3-34.6 ngC g(-1)h(-1) using the (3)H-thymidine or (3)H-leucine method, respectively

  19. Wastewater treatment high rate algal ponds (WWT HRAP) for low-cost biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Mehrabadi, Abbas; Craggs, Rupert; Farid, Mohammed M

    2015-05-01

    Growing energy demand and water consumption have increased concerns about energy security and efficient wastewater treatment and reuse. Wastewater treatment high rate algal ponds (WWT HRAPs) are a promising technology that could help solve these challenges concurrently where climate is favorable. WWT HRAPs have great potential for biofuel production as a by-product of WWT, since the costs of algal cultivation and harvest for biofuel production are covered by the wastewater treatment function. Generally, 800-1400 GJ/ha/year energy (average biomass energy content: 20 GJ/ton; HRAP biomass productivity: 40-70 tons/ha/year) can be produced in the form of harvestable biomass from WWT HRAP which can be used to provide community-level energy supply. In this paper the benefits of WWT HRAPs are compared with conventional mass algal culture systems. Moreover, parameters to effectively increase algal energy content and overall energy production from WWT HRAP are discussed including selection of appropriate algal biomass biofuel conversion pathways.

  20. Quantifying the controls on potential soil production rates: a case study of the San Gabriel Mountains, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelletier, Jon D.

    2017-08-01

    The potential soil production rate, i.e., the upper limit at which bedrock can be converted into transportable material, limits how fast erosion can occur in mountain ranges in the absence of widespread landsliding in bedrock or intact regolith. Traditionally, the potential soil production rate has been considered to be solely dependent on climate and rock characteristics. Data from the San Gabriel Mountains of California, however, suggest that topographic steepness may also influence potential soil production rates. In this paper I test the hypothesis that topographically induced stress opening of preexisting fractures in the bedrock or intact regolith beneath hillslopes of the San Gabriel Mountains increases potential soil production rates in steep portions of the range. A mathematical model for this process predicts a relationship between potential soil production rates and average slope consistent with published data. Once the effects of average slope are accounted for, a small subset of the data suggests that cold temperatures may limit soil production rates at the highest elevations of the range due to the influence of temperature on vegetation growth. These results suggest that climate and rock characteristics may be the sole controls on potential soil production rates as traditionally assumed but that the porosity of bedrock or intact regolith may evolve with topographic steepness in a way that enhances the persistence of soil cover in compressive-stress environments. I develop an empirical equation that relates potential soil production rates in the San Gabriel Mountains to the average slope and a climatic index that accounts for temperature limitations on soil production rates at high elevations. Assuming a balance between soil production and erosion rates on the hillslope scale, I illustrate the interrelationships among potential soil production rates, soil thickness, erosion rates, and topographic steepness that result from the feedbacks among

  1. Metabolic differentiation in biofilms as indicated by carbon dioxide production rates.

    PubMed

    Bester, Elanna; Kroukamp, Otini; Wolfaardt, Gideon M; Boonzaaier, Leandro; Liss, Steven N

    2010-02-01

    The measurement of carbon dioxide production rates as an indication of metabolic activity was applied to study biofilm development and response of Pseudomonas sp. biofilms to an environmental disturbance in the form of a moving air-liquid interface (i.e., shear). A differential response in biofilm cohesiveness was observed after bubble perturbation, and the biofilm layers were operationally defined as either shear-susceptible or non-shear-susceptible. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and image analysis showed a significant reduction in biofilm thickness and biomass after the removal of the shear-susceptible biofilm layer, as well as notable changes in the roughness coefficient and surface-to-biovolume ratio. These changes were accompanied by a 72% reduction of whole-biofilm CO2 production; however, the non-shear-susceptible region of the biofilm responded rapidly after the removal of the overlying cells and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) along with the associated changes in nutrient and O2 flux, with CO2 production rates returning to preperturbation levels within 24 h. The adaptable nature and the ability of bacteria to respond to environmental conditions were further demonstrated by the outer shear-susceptible region of the biofilm; the average CO2 production rate of cells from this region increased within 0.25 h from 9.45 +/- 5.40 fmol of CO2 x cell(-1) x h(-1) to 22.6 +/- 7.58 fmol of CO2 x cell(-1) x h(-1) when cells were removed from the biofilm and maintained in suspension without an additional nutrient supply. These results also demonstrate the need for sufficient monitoring of biofilm recovery at the solid substratum if mechanical methods are used for biofouling control.

  2. Comparison of Chlorine-36 Production Rates Using the Radiocarbon-Age-Constrained Lake Bonneville Shoreline, UT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGee, S. L.; Phillips, F. M.

    2005-12-01

    As part of the CRONUS-Earth project, geological calibrations for in-situ production of cosmogenic nuclides, including chlorine-36, are being conducted as part of a larger project to improve the accuracy of techniques employing cosmogenic nuclides. For these calibration purposes, samples were taken from two age-constrained locations representing the Lake Bonneville shoreline: Tabernacle Hill and Promontory Point. Lake Bonneville is an ancient glacial lake that occupied a large area surrounding what is currently the Great Salt Lake in Utah during the last glacial period. This lake reached its highest level, the Bonneville stage, and remained there for only a short period of time (18.9-17.2 cal ka) before a catastrophic flood lowered the lake level to the Provo stage. This is a good calibration site because of the numerous radiocarbon dates available and the short time-frame of the events. Tabernacle Hill is a basalt flow which erupted shortly after the Lake Bonneville flood, during the Provo stage and provides a boundary on the Bonneville flood age. Surface samples exhibiting flow characteristics indicative of the original surface were collected using a rock saw and chisels. At Promontory Point, the original surfaces that were sampled are wave-polished outcrops on the wave-cut bench corresponding to the Lake Bonneville shoreline. The objective of this study is to use these age-constrained samples to compare the previously-published in-situ chlorine-36 production rates. The age of the two calibration surfaces will be calculated using the production rates from the literature. These ages based on existing calibrations will be compared to the independent age determined by radiocarbon dating. This comparison will be used to evaluate the accuracy of the previous production rates at these sites.

  3. Controls and rates of acid production in commercial-scale sulfur blocks.

    PubMed

    Birkham, T K; Hendry, M J; Barbour, S L; Lawrence, J R

    2010-01-01

    Acidic drainage (pH 0.4-1.0) from oxidizing elemental sulfur (S(0)) blocks is an environmental concern in regions where S(0) is stockpiled. In this study, the locations, controls, and rates of H(2)SO(4) production in commercial-scale S(0) blocks ( approximately 1-2 x 10(6) m(3)) in northern Alberta, Canada, were estimated. In situ modeling of O(2) concentrations ([O(2)]) suggest that 70 to >97% of the annual H(2)SO(4) production occurs in the upper 1 m of the blocks where temperatures increase to >15 degrees C during the summer. Laboratory experiments show that S(0) oxidation rates are sensitive to temperature (Q(10) = 4.3) and dependent on the activity of autotrophic S(0)-oxidizing microbes. The annual efflux of SO(4) in drainage water from a S(0) block (5.5 x 10(5) kg) was within the estimated range of SO(4) production within the block (2.7 x 10(5) to 1.2 x 10(6) kg), suggesting that H(2)SO(4) production and removal rates were approximately equal during the study period. The low mean relative humidity within the block (68%; SD = 17%; n = 21) was attributed to osmotic suction from elevated H(2)SO(4) concentrations and suggests a mean in situ pH of approximately -2.1. The low pH of drainage waters was attributed to the mixing of fresh infiltrating water and low-pH in situ water. Heat generation during S(0) oxidation was an important factor in maintaining elevated temperatures (mean, 11.1 degrees C) within the block. The implications of this research are relevant globally because construction methods and the physical properties of S(0) blocks are similar worldwide.

  4. Gas Generation Rates as an Indicator for the Long Term Stability of Radioactive Waste Products

    SciTech Connect

    Steyer, S.; Brennecke, P.; Bandt, G.; Kroger, H.

    2007-07-01

    Pursuant to the 'Act on the Peaceful Utilization of Atomic Energy and the Protection against its Hazards' (Atomic Energy Act) the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, BfS) is legally responsible for the construction and operation of federal facilities for the disposal of radioactive waste. Within the scope of this responsibility, particular due to par. 74(1) Ordinance on Radiation Protection, BfS defines all safety-related requirements on waste packages envisaged for disposal, establishes guidelines for the conditioning of radioactive waste and approves the fulfillment of the waste acceptance requirements within the radioactive waste quality control system. BfS also provides criteria to enable the assessment of methods for the treatment and packaging of radioactive waste to produce waste packages suitable for disposal according to par. 74(2) Ordinance on Radiation Protection. Due to the present non-availability of a repository in Germany, quality control measures for all types of radioactive waste products are carried out prior to interim storage with respect to the future disposal. As a result BfS approves the demonstrated properties of the radioactive waste packages and confirms the fulfillment of the respective requirements. After several years of storage the properties of waste packages might have changed. By proving, that such changes have no significant impact on the quality of the waste product, the effort of requalification could be minimized. Therefore, data on the long-term behavior of radioactive waste products need to be acquired and indicators to prove the long-term stability have to be quantified. Preferably, such indicators can be determined easily with non-destructive methods, even for legacy waste packages. A promising parameter is the gas generation rate. The relationship between gas generation rate and long term stability is presented as first result of an ongoing study on behalf of BfS. Permissible gas

  5. Phosphine resistance, respiration rate and fitness consequences in stored-product insects.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Marco Aurélio G; Faroni, Lêda Rita D'A; Tótola, Marcos R; Guedes, Raul Narciso C

    2007-09-01

    Resistance to fumigants has been frequently reported in insect pests of stored products and is one of the obstacles in controlling these pests. The authors studied phosphine resistance and its physiological basis in adult insects of 12 populations of Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Tenebrionidae), ten populations of Rhyzopertha dominica (F.) (Bostrichidae) and eight populations of Oryzaephilus surinamensis L. (Silvanidae) from Brazil, and the possible existence of fitness costs associated with phosphine resistance in the absence of this fumigant. The bioassays for the detection of phosphine resistance followed the FAO standard method. The production of carbon dioxide and the instantaneous rate of population increase (r(i)) of each population of each species were correlated with their resistance ratios at the LC(50). The resistance ratio at LC(50) in T. castaneum ranged from 1.0- to 186.2-fold, in R. dominica from 2.0- to 71.0-fold and in O. surinamensis from 1.9- to 32.2-fold. Ten populations of T. castaneum, nine populations of R. dominica and seven populations of O. surinamensis were resistant to phosphine. In all three species there was significant association (P < 0.05) between respiration rate and phosphine resistance. The populations with lower carbon dioxide production showed a higher resistance ratio, suggesting that the lower respiration rate is the physiological basis of phosphine resistance by reducing the fumigant uptake in the resistant insects. Conversely, populations with higher r(i) showed lower resistance ratios, which could indicate a lower rate of reproduction of the resistant populations compared with susceptible populations. Thus, management strategies based on the interruption of phosphine fumigation may result in reestablishment of susceptibility, and shows good potential for more effective management of phosphine-resistant populations.

  6. 40 CFR Table I-5 to Subpart I of... - Default Emission Factors (1-Uij) for Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates (Bijk) for MEMS Manufacturing I Table I-5 to Subpart I of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electronics Manufacturing Pt. 98, Subpt. I, Table...

  7. 40 CFR Table I-6 to Subpart I of... - Default Emission Factors (1-Uij) for Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates(Bijk) for LCD Manufacturing I Table I-6 to Subpart I of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electronics Manufacturing Pt. 98, Subpt. I, Table I-6 Table...

  8. 40 CFR Table I-7 to Subpart I of... - Default Emission Factors (1-Uij) for Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates (Bijk) for PV Manufacturing I Table I-7 to Subpart I of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) MANDATORY GREENHOUSE GAS REPORTING Electronics Manufacturing Pt. 98, Subpt. I, Table I-7 Table...

  9. 40 CFR Table I-11 to Subpart I of... - Default Emission Factors (1-Uij) for Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Emission Factors (1-Uij) for Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates (Bijk) for Semiconductor Manufacturing for... (Bijk) for Semiconductor Manufacturing for Use With the Stack Test Method (150 mm and 200 mm Wafers...

  10. 40 CFR Table I-12 to Subpart I of... - Default Emission Factors (1-Uij) for Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Emission Factors (1-Uij) for Gas Utilization Rates (Uij) and By-Product Formation Rates (Bijk) for Semiconductor Manufacturing for... (Bijk) for Semiconductor Manufacturing for Use With the Stack Test Method (300 mm and 450 mm Wafers...

  11. Heart Rate Variability in Association with Frequent Use of Household Sprays and Scented Products in SAPALDIA

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Martin; Schaffner, Emmanuel; Barthélémy, Jean-Claude; Carballo, David; Gaspoz, Jean-Michel; Rochat, Thierry; Schindler, Christian; Schwartz, Joel; Zock, Jan-Paul; Künzli, Nino; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Team, SAPALDIA

    2012-01-01

    Background: Household cleaning products are associated with adverse respiratory health outcomes, but the cardiovascular health effects are largely unknown. Objective: We determined if long-term use of household sprays and scented products at home was associated with reduced heart rate variability (HRV), a marker of autonomic cardiac dysfunction. Methods: We recorded 24-hr electrocardiograms in a cross-sectional survey of 581 Swiss adults, ≥ 50 years of age, who answered a detailed questionnaire regarding their use of household cleaning products in their homes. The adjusted average percent changes in standard deviation of all normal-to-normal intervals in 24 hr (24-hr SDNN) and total power (TP) were estimated in multiple linear regression in association with frequency [< 1, 1–3, or 4–7 days/week, unexposed (reference)] of using cleaning sprays, air freshening sprays, and scented products. Results: Decreases in 24-hr SDNN and TP were observed with frequent use of all product types, but the strongest reductions were associated with air freshening sprays. Compared with unexposed participants, we found that using air freshening sprays 4–7 days/week was associated with 11% [95% confidence interval (CI): –20%, –2%] and 29% (95% CI: –46%, –8%) decreases in 24-hr SDNN and TP, respectively. Inverse associations of 24-SDNN and TP with increased use of cleaning sprays, air freshening sprays, and scented products were observed mainly in participants with obstructive lung disease (p < 0.05 for interactions). Conclusions: In predominantly older adult women, long-term frequent use of household spray and scented products was associated with reduced HRV, which suggests an increased risk of cardiovascular health hazards. People with preexisting pulmonary conditions may be more susceptible. PMID:22538298

  12. Specific light uptake rates can enhance astaxanthin productivity in Haematococcus lacustris.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ho-Sang; Kim, Z-Hun; Park, Hanwool; Lee, Choul-Gyun

    2016-05-01

    Lumostatic operation was applied for efficient astaxanthin production in autotrophic Haematococcus lacustris cultures using 0.4-L bubble column photobioreactors. The lumostatic operation in this study was performed with three different specific light uptake rates (q(e)) based on cell concentration, cell projection area, and fresh weight as one-, two- and three-dimensional characteristics values, respectively. The q(e) value from the cell concentration (q(e1D)) obtained was 13.5 × 10⁻⁸ μE cell⁻¹ s⁻¹, and the maximum astaxanthin concentration was increased to 150 % compared to that of a control with constant light intensity. The other optimum q e values by cell projection area (q(e2D)) and fresh weight (q( e3D)) were determined to be 195 μE m⁻² s⁻¹ and 10.5 μE g⁻¹ s⁻¹ for astaxanthin production, respectively. The maximum astaxanthin production from the lumostatic cultures using the parameters controlled by cell projection area (2D) and fresh weight (3D) also increased by 36 and 22% over that of the controls, respectively. When comparing the optimal q e values among the three different types, the lumostatic cultures using q(e) based on fresh weight showed the highest astaxanthin productivity (22.8 mg L⁻¹ day⁻¹), which was a higher level than previously reported. The lumostatic operations reported here demonstrated that more efficient and effective astaxanthin production was obtained by H. lacustris than providing a constant light intensity, regardless of which parameter is used to calculate the specific light uptake rate.

  13. Technologies that affect the weaning rate in beef cattle production systems.

    PubMed

    Dill, Matheus Dhein; Pereira, Gabriel Ribas; Costa, João Batista Gonçalves; Canellas, Leonardo Canali; Peripolli, Vanessa; Neto, José Braccini; Sant'Anna, Danilo Menezes; McManus, Concepta; Barcellos, Júlio Otávio Jardim

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the differences between weaning rates and technologies adopted by farmers in cow-calf production systems in Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. Interviews were carried out with 73 farmers about 48 technologies that could affect reproductive performance. Data were analyzed by multivariate analysis using a non-hierarchical cluster method. The level of significance was set at P < 0.05. Three distinct clusters of farmers were created (R (2) = 0.90), named as low (LWR), intermediate (IWR), and high (HWR) weaning rate, with 100, 91, and 96 % of the farmers identified within their respective groups and average weaning rates of 59, 72, and 83 %, respectively. IWR and HWR farmers used more improved natural pasture, fixed-time artificial insemination, selection for birth weight, and proteinated salt compared to LWR. HWR farmers used more stocking rate control, and IWR farmers used more ultrasound to evaluate reproductive performance compared to the LWR group. IWR and HWR adopted more technologies related to nutrition and reproductive aspects of the herd in comparison to LWR. We concluded that farmers with higher technology use on farm had higher weaning rates which could be used to benefit less efficient farmers.

  14. Effect of water chemistry on the dissolution rate of the lead corrosion product hydrocerussite.

    PubMed

    Noel, James D; Wang, Yin; Giammar, Daniel E

    2014-05-01

    Hydrocerussite (Pb3(CO3)2(OH)2) is widely observed as a corrosion product in drinking water distribution systems. Its equilibrium solubility and dissolution rate can control lead concentrations in drinking water. The dissolution rate of hydrocerussite was investigated as a function of pH, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), and orthophosphate concentrations at conditions relevant to drinking water distribution using continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTRs). In the absence of DIC and orthophosphate, the dissolution rate decreased with increasing pH. Addition of DIC inhibited the dissolution of hydrocerussite. The addition of orthophosphate significantly decreased the dissolution rate of hydrocerussite. At conditions with orthophosphate and without DIC, a lead(II) phosphate solid hydroxylpyromorphite (Pb5(PO4)3OH) was observed after reaction, and orthophosphate's inhibitory effect can be attributed to the formation of this low-solubility lead(II) phosphate solid. In the presence of both orthophosphate and DIC, no lead(II) phosphate solid was observed, but the rate was still lowered by the presence of orthophosphate, which might be due to the adsorption of orthophosphate to block reactive sites on the hydrocerussite surface. For systems in which hydroxylpyromorphite was present, the steady-state effluent lead concentrations from the CSTRs were close to the predicted equilibrium solubility of hydroxylpyromorphite. In the absence of orthophosphate rapid equilibration of hydrocerussite was observed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Potential resolution of discrepancies between scaling models for in situ cosmogenic nuclide production rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifton, N. A.

    2010-12-01

    Two main types of theoretical models are used currently for scaling in situ cosmogenic nuclide (CN) production rates in time and space, distinguished primarily by the data on which they are based. The first of these, that of Lal (1991, EPSL 104, p. 424, reparameterized by Stone, 2000, JGR 105, p. 23,753), is based on atmospheric measurements of nuclear disintegrations in photographic emulsions combined with data from various neutron detectors sensitive to different portions of the secondary cosmic-ray spectrum. The other published models for scaling CN production rates (Dunai, 2001, EPSL 193, p 197; Lifton et al. 2005, EPSL 239, p. 140; Desilets and Zreda, 2006, EPSL 206, p 21) are based (either largely or entirely) on data from neutron monitors, which all sample similar portions of the cosmic-ray spectrum. A further distinction is that the neutron monitor-based models accommodate a time-dependent geomagnetic field, while the Lal model does not. While both model types yield similar predictions for sites in middle to high latitudes and low to middle altitudes (<2 km), predictions diverge at low latitudes and high altitudes. This discrepancy arises primarily from the different altitude dependences of each data source - neutron monitor-based models predict a faster increase in cosmic ray intensity with altitude than does the Lal model. Unfortunately, previously published production rate calibration data (e.g., Balco et al., 2008, Quat. Geochron. 3, p. 174) were neither sufficiently consistent among sites nor adequately precise to identify which of these models was correct. The CRONUS-Earth Project, which aims to better characterize production rate systematics for all commonly measured CNs, has been working to resolve this discrepancy. A potential solution may be found in the atmospheric cosmic ray flux models of Sato and Niita (2006, Radiation Res. 166, p. 544) and Sato et al. (2008, Radiation Res. 170, p. 244), combined with new, high-precision in situ cosmogenic 10

  16. Composition and production rate of pharmaceutical and chemical waste from Xanthi General Hospital in Greece.

    PubMed

    Voudrias, Evangelos; Goudakou, Lambrini; Kermenidou, Marianthi; Softa, Aikaterini

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this work was to determine the composition and production rates of pharmaceutical and chemical waste produced by Xanthi General Hospital in Greece (XGH). This information is important to design and cost management systems for pharmaceutical and chemical waste, for safety and health considerations and for assessing environmental impact. A total of 233 kg pharmaceutical and 110 kg chemical waste was collected, manually separated and weighed over a period of five working weeks. The total production of pharmaceutical waste comprised 3.9% w/w of the total hazardous medical waste produced by the hospital. Total pharmaceutical waste was classified in three categories, vial waste comprising 51.1%, syringe waste with 11.4% and intravenous therapy (IV) waste with 37.5% w/w of the total. Vial pharmaceutical waste only was further classified in six major categories: antibiotics, digestive system drugs, analgesics, hormones, circulatory system drugs and "other". Production data below are presented as average (standard deviation in parenthesis). The unit production rates for total pharmaceutical waste for the hospital were 12.4 (3.90) g/patient/d and 24.6 (7.48) g/bed/d. The respective unit production rates were: (1) for vial waste 6.4 (1.6) g/patient/d and 13 (2.6) g/bed/d, (2) for syringe waste 1.4 (0.4) g/patient/d and 2.8 (0.8) g/bed/d and (3) for IV waste 4.6 (3.0) g/patient/d and 9.2 (5.9) g/bed/d. Total chemical waste was classified in four categories, chemical reagents comprising 18.2%, solvents with 52.3%, dyes and tracers with 18.2% and solid waste with 11.4% w/w of the total. The total production of chemical waste comprised 1.8% w/w of the total hazardous medical waste produced by the hospital. Thus, the sum of pharmaceutical and chemical waste was 5.7% w/w of the total hazardous medical waste produced by the hospital. The unit production rates for total chemical waste for the hospital were 5.8 (2.2) g/patient/d and 1.1 (0.4) g/exam/d. The respective

  17. Cosmogenic Cl-36 production rates in meteorites and the lunar surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishiizumi, K.; Arnold, J. R.; Kubik, P. W.; Elmore, D.; Reedy, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    Activity vs. depth profiles of cosmic ray produced Cl-36 were measured in metal from two cores each in the St. Severin and Jilin chondrites and in lunar core 15008. Production of Cl-36 in these samples range from high-energy reactions with Fe and Ni to low-energy reactions with Ca and K and possibly neutron-capture reactions with Cl-36. The cross sections used in the Reedy-Arnold model for neutron-induced reactions were adjusted to get production rates that fit the measured Cl-36 activities in St. Severin metal and in the lunar soil of core 15008. The Cl-36 in metal from St. Severin has a fairly flat activity-vs-depth profile, unlike most other cosmogenic nuclides in bulk samples from St. Severin, which increase in concentration with depth. In metal from Jilin, a decrease in Cl-36 was observed near its center. The length of Jilin's most recent cosmic-ray exposure was approximately 0.5 My. Lunar core 15008 has an excess in Cl-36 of about 4 dpm/kg near its surface that was produced by solar-proton-induced reactions. The calculated production rates are consistent with these measured trends in 15008.

  18. A novel tubular microbial electrolysis cell for high rate hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Kun; Prévoteau, Antonin; Rabaey, Korneel

    2017-07-01

    Practical application of microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) for hydrogen production requires scalable reactors with low internal resistance, high current density, and high hydrogen recovery. This work reports a liter scale tubular MEC approaching these requirements. The tubular cell components (a platinum-coated titanium mesh cathode, an anion exchange membrane, and a pleated stainless steel felt anode) were arranged in a concentric configuration. The reactor had a low internal resistance (0.325 Ω, 19.5 mΩ m2) due to the high conductivity of the electrodes, a compact reactor configuration, and proper mixing. With acetate as electron donor, the MEC achieved a volumetric current density of 654 ± 22 mA L-1 (projected current density, 1.09 ± 0.04 mA cm-2) and a volumetric hydrogen production rate of 7.10 ± 0.01 L L-1 d-1 at an applied voltage of 1 V. The reactor also showed high hydrogen recovery (∼100%), high hydrogen purity (>98%), and excellent operational stability during the 3 weeks of operation. These results demonstrated that high hydrogen production rate could be achieved on larger scale MEC and this tubular MEC holds great potential for scaling up.

  19. Cosmogenic /sup 36/Cl production rates in meteorites and the lunar surface

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiizumi, K.; Kubik, P.W.; Elmore, D.; Reedy, R.C.; Arnold, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    Activity-versus-depth profiles of cosmic-ray-produced /sup 36/Cl were measured in metal from two cores each in the St. Severin and Jilin chondrites and in lunar core 15008. Production of /sup 36/Cl in these samples range from high-energy reactions with Fe and Ni to low-energy reactions with Ca and K and possibly neutron-capture reactions with /sup 35/Cl. The cross sections used in the Reedy-Arnold model for neutron-induced reactions were adjusted to get production rates that fit the measured /sup 36/Cl activities in St. Severin metal and in the lunar soil of core 15008. The /sup 36/Cl in metal from St. Severin has a fairly flat activity-versus-depth profile, unlike most other cosmogenic nuclides in bulk samples from St. Severin, which increase in concentration with depth. In metal from Jilin, a decrease in /sup 36/Cl was observed near its center. The length of Jilin's most recent cosmic-ray exposure was /approximately/0.5 My. Lunar core 15008 has an excess in /sup 36/Cl of about 4 dpm/kg near its surface that was produced by solar-proton-induced reactions. The calculated production rates are consistent with these measured trends in 15008. 39 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Measuring Ozone Production Rates in the Troposphere: Performances and Limitations of the Mines Douai instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusanter, S.; Sklaveniti, S.; Stevens, P. S.; Locoge, N.

    2016-12-01

    Ozone is a greenhouse gas and a primary constituent of urban smog, irritating the respiratory system and damaging the vegetation. Our current understanding of tropospheric ozone formation is directly linked to the peroxy radical chemistry, which may not be well described by atmospheric models in NOx-rich areas as shown by recent studies of radical chemistry conducted in urban environments. There are still unknowns in our understanding of ozone formation and direct measurements of ozone production rates can provide additional constrains to help addressing this issue. We will describe an instrument developed to measure ozone production rates (OPR) in the troposphere. The OPR instrument is based on the principle proposed by Cazorla and Brune (AMT, 2010) and consists in measuring the amount of ozone produced in ambient air exposed to solar radiations (within a sampling chamber) over a short duration time. This instrument was characterized through laboratory and modeling experiments, as well as field testing over the last 2 years. We will present its current performances and limitations and recent measurements performed during the Indiana Radical, Reactivity and Ozone Production Intercomparison (IRRONIC) and the Program for Research on Oxidants: PHotochemisty, Emissions, & Transport - Atmospheric Measurements of Oxidants in Summer (PROPHET 2016 - AMOS) field campaigns.

  1. Direct Measurements of the Local Ozone Production Rate in the Pollution Outflow from a Megacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crilley, L.; Kramer, L. J.; Woodward-Massey, R.; Cryer, D. R.; Whalley, L. K.; Heard, D. E.; Reeves, C.; Forster, G.; Oram, D.; Bandy, B.; Reed, C.; Lee, J. D.; Bloss, W.

    2015-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone (O3) is major secondary air pollutant that is formed in the atmosphere through the complex oxidation of volatile organic carbon compounds (VOCs) in the presence of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and sunlight. In order to effectively implement control measures to reduce O3 levels, it is necessary to understand the chemical processes that in part govern O3 concentration, and to disaggregate local chemical O3 production from transport. To address this issue, a major field campaign was organised at the Weybourne Atmospheric Observatory (WAO), a coastal site in the UK that is regularly within the pollution outflow from London and Western Europe. As part of this campaign, a novel approach to directly measure in situ the rate of local O3 production was employed along with a range of instrumentation to measure concentrations of different radical species as well as with detailed VOC and NOx speciation. We will present preliminary findings from a major O3 pollution event (~120 ppb) that occurred during the campaign as a case study for investigating the contributing factors influencing O3 formation at a NOx limited site. Direct measurements of local chemical O3 production rates are compared with those inferred from a range of indirect approaches.

  2. Fission Product Appearance Rate Coefficients in Design Basis Source Term Determinations - Past and Present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Pedro B.; Hamawi, John N.

    2017-09-01

    Nuclear power plant radiation protection design features are based on radionuclide source terms derived from conservative assumptions that envelope expected operating experience. Two parameters that significantly affect the radionuclide concentrations in the source term are failed fuel fraction and effective fission product appearance rate coefficients. Failed fuel fraction may be a regulatory based assumption such as in the U.S. Appearance rate coefficients are not specified in regulatory requirements, but have been referenced to experimental data that is over 50 years old. No doubt the source terms are conservative as demonstrated by operating experience that has included failed fuel, but it may be too conservative leading to over-designed shielding for normal operations as an example. Design basis source term methodologies for normal operations had not advanced until EPRI published in 2015 an updated ANSI/ANS 18.1 source term basis document. Our paper revisits the fission product appearance rate coefficients as applied in the derivation source terms following the original U.S. NRC NUREG-0017 methodology. New coefficients have been calculated based on recent EPRI results which demonstrate the conservatism in nuclear power plant shielding design.

  3. Seasonal predator removal relative to hatch rate of duck nests in waterfowl production areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sargeant, A.B.; Sovada, M.A.; Shaffer, T.L.

    1995-01-01

    These authors report that hatch rates of duck nests were related to removal of predators from waterfowl production areas. Cost effectiveness of such efforts is questioned. The prairie pothole region (PPR) is the primary breeding ground of several species of North American ducks (Bellrose 1980). Much habitat of breeding ducks in the PPR has been destroyed or degraded by intensive agriculture (e.g., Kiel et al. 1972, Bellrose 1980, Sugden and Beyersbergen 1984, Boyd 1985), resulting in high predation rates on duck nests (Sargeant and Raveling 1992). Because of predation, hatch rate (HR) of duck nests in Waterfowl Production Areas (WPA's) in the PPR is often less than the 15-20% suggested for stability of populations of the 5 most common species of dabbling ducks (e.g., Cowardin et al. 1985, Greenwood 1986, Klett et al. 1988, Greenwood et al. 1990). Managers seek ways to reduce depredations of duck clutches in WPA's, but little information is available concerning effects of predator removal. We evaluated seasonal (spring and early summer) removal of predators from WPA's in Minnesota and North Dakota. Our objectives were to compare HR in uplands of WPA's with and without predators removed and to determine functional aspects of conducting predator removal.

  4. Species production and heat release rates in two-layered natural gas fires

    SciTech Connect

    Zukoski, E.E.; Morehart, J.H.; Kubota, T.; Toner, S.J. )

    1991-02-01

    A fire burning in an enclosure with restricted ventilation will result in the accumulation of a layer of warm products of combustion mixed with entrained air adjacent to the ceiling. For many conditions, the depth of this layer will extend to occupy a significant fraction of the volume of the room. Eventually, the interface between this vitiated ceiling layer and the uncontaminated environment below will position itself so that a large portion of the combustion processes occur in this vitiated layer. A description is given of experimental work concerning the rates of formation of product species and heat release in a turbulent, buoyant natural gas diffusion flame burning in this two-layered configuration. The enclosure was modeled by placing a hood above a burner so that it accumulated the plume gases, and the unsteady development of the ceiling layer was modeled by the direct addition of air into the upper portion of the hood. Measurements of the composition of these gases allowed the computation of stoichiometries and heat release rates. These investigations showed that the species produced in the flame depend primarily on the stoichiometry of the gases present in the ceiling layer and weakly on the temperature of the layer, but are independent of the fuel pair ratio of the mass transported into the layer by the plume. Heat release rates in the fires were compared to a theoretical limit based on a stoichiometric reaction of fuel and air with excess components left unchanged by the combustion.

  5. Comparing Occupational Health and Safety Management System Programming with Injury Rates in Poultry Production.

    PubMed

    Autenrieth, Daniel A; Brazile, William J; Douphrate, David I; Román-Muñiz, Ivette N; Reynolds, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Effective methods to reduce work-related injuries and illnesses in animal production agriculture are sorely needed. One approach that may be helpful for agriculture producers is the adoption of occupational health and safety management systems. In this replication study, the authors compared the injury rates on 32 poultry growing operations with the level of occupational health and safety management system programming at each farm. Overall correlations between injury rates and programming level were determined, as were correlations between individual management system subcomponents to ascertain which parts might be the most useful for poultry producers. It was found that, in general, higher levels of occupational health and safety management system programming were associated with lower rates of workplace injuries and illnesses, and that Management Leadership was the system subcomponent with the strongest correlation. The strength and significance of the observed associations were greater on poultry farms with more complete management system assessments. These findings are similar to those from a previous study of the dairy production industry, suggesting that occupational health and safety management systems may hold promise as a comprehensive way for producers to improve occupational health and safety performance. Further research is needed to determine the effectiveness of such systems to reduce farm work injuries and illnesses. These results are timely given the increasing focus on occupational safety and health management systems.

  6. Exposure of human megakaryocytes to high shear rates accelerates platelet production.

    PubMed

    Dunois-Lardé, Claire; Capron, Claude; Fichelson, Serge; Bauer, Thomas; Cramer-Bordé, Elisabeth; Baruch, Dominique

    2009-08-27

    Platelets originate from megakaryocytes (MKs) by cytoplasmic elongation into proplatelets. Direct platelet release is not seen in bone marrow hematopoietic islands. It was suggested that proplatelet fragmentation into platelets can occur intravascularly, yet evidence of its dependence on hydrodynamic forces is missing. Therefore, we investigated whether platelet production from MKs could be up-regulated by circulatory forces. Human mature MKs were perfused at a high shear rate on von Willebrand factor. Cells were observed in real time by videomicroscopy, and by confocal and electron microscopy after fixation. Dramatic cellular modifications followed exposure to high shear rates: 30% to 45% adherent MKs were converted into proplatelets and released platelets within 20 minutes, contrary to static conditions that required several hours, often without platelet release. Tubulin was present in elongated proplatelets and platelets, thus ruling out membrane tethers. By using inhibitors, we demonstrated the fundamental roles of microtubule assembly and MK receptor GPIb. Secretory granules were present along the proplatelet shafts and in shed platelets, as shown by P-selectin labeling. Platelets generated in vitro were functional since they responded to thrombin by P-selectin expression and cytoskeletal reorganization. In conclusion, MK exposure to high shear rates promotes platelet production via GPIb, depending on microtubule assembly and elongation.

  7. Language-independent talker-specificity in first-language and second-language speech production by bilingual talkers: L1 speaking rate predicts L2 speaking rate.

    PubMed

    Bradlow, Ann R; Kim, Midam; Blasingame, Michael

    2017-02-01

    Second-language (L2) speech is consistently slower than first-language (L1) speech, and L1 speaking rate varies within- and across-talkers depending on many individual, situational, linguistic, and sociolinguistic factors. It is asked whether speaking rate is also determined by a language-independent talker-specific trait such that, across a group of bilinguals, L1 speaking rate significantly predicts L2 speaking rate. Two measurements of speaking rate were automatically extracted from recordings of read and spontaneous speech by English monolinguals (n = 27) and bilinguals from ten L1 backgrounds (n = 86): speech rate (syllables/second), and articulation rate (syllables/second excluding silent pauses). Replicating prior work, L2 speaking rates were significantly slower than L1 speaking rates both across-groups (monolinguals' L1 English vs bilinguals' L2 English), and across L1 and L2 within bilinguals. Critically, within the bilingual group, L1 speaking rate significantly predicted L2 speaking rate, suggesting that a significant portion of inter-talker variation in L2 speech is derived from inter-talker variation in L1 speech, and that individual variability in L2 spoken language production may be best understood within the context of individual variability in L1 spoken language production.

  8. Probabilistic exposure assessment model to estimate aseptic-UHT product failure rate.

    PubMed

    Pujol, Laure; Albert, Isabelle; Magras, Catherine; Johnson, Nicholas Brian; Membré, Jeanne-Marie

    2015-01-02

    Aseptic-Ultra-High-Temperature (UHT) products are manufactured to be free of microorganisms capable of growing in the food at normal non-refrigerated conditions at which the food is likely to be held during manufacture, distribution and storage. Two important phases within the process are widely recognised as critical in controlling microbial contamination: the sterilisation steps and the following aseptic steps. Of the microbial hazards, the pathogen spore formers Clostridium botulinum and Bacillus cereus are deemed the most pertinent to be controlled. In addition, due to a relatively high thermal resistance, Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores are considered a concern for spoilage of low acid aseptic-UHT products. A probabilistic exposure assessment model has been developed in order to assess the aseptic-UHT product failure rate associated with these three bacteria. It was a Modular Process Risk Model, based on nine modules. They described: i) the microbial contamination introduced by the raw materials, either from the product (i.e. milk, cocoa and dextrose powders and water) or the packaging (i.e. bottle and sealing component), ii) the sterilisation processes, of either the product or the packaging material, iii) the possible recontamination during subsequent processing of both product and packaging. The Sterility Failure Rate (SFR) was defined as the sum of bottles contaminated for each batch, divided by the total number of bottles produced per process line run (10(6) batches simulated per process line). The SFR associated with the three bacteria was estimated at the last step of the process (i.e. after Module 9) but also after each module, allowing for the identification of modules, and responsible contamination pathways, with higher or lower intermediate SFR. The model contained 42 controlled settings associated with factory environment, process line or product formulation, and more than 55 probabilistic inputs corresponding to inputs with variability

  9. Large-scale production of kappa-carrageenan droplets for gel-bead production: theoretical and practical limitations of size and production rate.

    PubMed

    Hunik, J H; Tramper, J

    1993-01-01

    Immobilization of biocatalysts in kappa-carrageenan gel beads is a widely used technique nowadays. Several methods are used to produce the gel beads. The gel-bead production rate is usually sufficient to make the relatively small quantities needed for bench-scale experiments. The droplet diameter can, within limits, be adjusted to the desired size, but it is difficult to predict because of the non-Newtonian fluid behavior of the kappa-carrageenan solution. Here we present the further scale-up of the extrusion technique with the theory to predict the droplet diameters for non-Newtonian fluids. The emphasis is on the droplet formation, which is the rate-limiting step in this extrusion technique. Uniform droplets were formed by breaking up a capillary jet with a sinusoidal signal of a vibration exciter. At the maximum production rate of 27.6 dm3/h, uniform droplets with a diameter of (2.1 +/- 0.12) x 10(-3) m were obtained. This maximum flow rate was limited by the power transfer of the vibration exciter to the liquid flow. It was possible to get a good prediction of the droplet diameter by estimating the local viscosity from shear-rate calculations and an experimental relation between the shear rate and viscosity. In this way the theory of Newtonian fluids could be used for the non-Newtonian kappa-carrageenan solution. The calculated optimal break-up frequencies and droplet sizes were in good agreement with those found in the experiments.

  10. Algal production in wastewater treatment high rate algal ponds for potential biofuel use.

    PubMed

    Park, J B K; Craggs, R J

    2011-01-01

    Wastewater treatment High Rate Algal Ponds with CO2 addition could provide cost-effective and efficient tertiary-level wastewater treatment with the co-benefit of algal biomass production for biofuel use. Wastewater grown algal biomass can have a lipid content of 10-30% of dry weight, which could be used to make biodiesel. This research investigated algal biomass and total lipid production by two pilot-scale wastewater treatment HRAP(S) (4-day HRT) with and without CO2 addition under New Zealand mid summer (Nov-Jan) conditions. The influence of CO2 addition on wastewater treatment performance was also determined. CO2 was added to one of the HRAPs (the HRAP(E)) by maintaining the maximum pH of the pond below 8. Measurements of HRAP influent and effluent water qualities, total lipid content and algal biomass production were made twice a week over the experimental period. Both HRAP(S) achieved high levels of organic compound and nutrient removal, with >85% SBOD5, >92 NH4(+)-N and >70% DRP removal. Algal/bacterial biomass production in the HRAP(E) (15.2 g/m2/d) was improved by CO2 addition by approximately 30% compared with that of the control HRAP(W) (10.6 g/m2/d). Total lipid content of the biomass grown on both HRAP(S) was slightly reduced (from 25% to 20%) with CO2 addition and the maximum total lipid content of approximately 40% was observed in the HRAP(W) when low NH4(+)-N concentration (<0.5 mg/L) and high maximum pH (>10.0) occurred. Total lipid content of the biomass increased by approximately 15% under nitrogen limiting conditions, however, overall algal/bacterial biomass production was reduced by half during the period of nitrogen limitation. More research is required to maintain algal production under near nitrogen-limiting conditions.

  11. Calibration of cosmogenic 3He and 10Be production rates in the High Tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blard, Pierre-Henri; Martin, Léo; Lavé, Jérôme; Charreau, Julien; Condom, Thomas; Lupker, Maarten; Braucher, Régis; Bourlès, Didier

    2014-05-01

    It is critical to refine both the accuracy and the precision of the in situ cosmogenic dating tool, especially for establishing reliable glacial chronologies that can be compared to other paleoclimatic records. Recent cross-calibrations of cosmogenic 3He in pyroxene and 10Be in quartz [1, 2] showed that, both at low (1300 m) and high elevation (4850 m), the 3He/10Be production ratio was probably ~40% higher than the value of ~23 initially defined in the 90's. This recent update is consistent with the last independent determinations of the sea level high latitude production rates of 10Be and 3He, that are about 4 and 125 at.g-1.yr-1, respectively [e.g. 3, 4]. However, major questions remain about these production rates at high elevation, notably because existing calibration sites for both 3He and 10Be are scarce above 2000 m. It is thus crucial to produce new high precision calibration data at high elevation. Here we report cosmogenic 10Be data from boulders sampled on a glacial fan located at 3800 m in the Central Altiplano (Bolivia), whose age is independently constrained by stratigraphic correlations and radiocarbon dating at ca. 16 ka. These data can be used to calibrate the production rate of 10Be at high elevation, in the Tropics. After scaling to sea level and high latitude, these data yield a sea level high latitude P10 ranging from 3.8 to 4.2 at.g-1.yr-1, depending on the used scaling scheme. These new calibration data are in good agreement with recent absolute and cross-calibration of 3He in pyroxenes and 10Be in quartz, from dacitic moraines located at 4850 m in the Southern Altiplano (22° S, Tropical Andes) [2,5]. The so-obtained 3He/10Be production ratio of 33.3±0.9 (1σ) combined with an absolute 3He production rate locally calibrated in the Central Altiplano, at 3800 m, indeed yielded a sea level high latitude P10 ranging from 3.7±0.2 to 4.1±0.2 at.g-1.yr-1, depending on the scaling scheme [2,5]. These values are also consistent with the 10Be

  12. Heat production rate from radioactive elements in igneous and metamorphic rocks in Eastern Desert, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Abbady, Adel G E; El-Arabi, A M; Abbady, A

    2006-01-01

    Radioactive heat-production data of Igneous and Metamorphic outcrops in the Eastern Desert are presented. Samples were analysed using a low level gamma-ray spectrometer (HPGe) in the laboratory. A total of 205 rock samples were investigated, covering all major rock types of the area. The heat-production rate of igneous rocks ranges from 0.11 (basalt) to 9.53 microWm(-3) (granite). In metamorphic rocks it varies from 0.28 (serpentinite ) to 0.91 microWm(-3) (metagabbro). The contribution due to U is about 51%, as that from Th is 31% and 18% from K. The corresponding values in igneous rocks are 76%, 19% and 5%, respectively. The calculated values showed good agreement with global values except in some areas containing granites.

  13. Long-range Cooper pair splitter with high entanglement production rate

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Shi, D. N.; Xing, D. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Cooper pairs in the superconductor are a natural source of spin entanglement. The existing proposals of the Cooper pair splitter can only realize a low efficiency of entanglement production, and its size is constrained by the superconducting coherence length. Here we show that a long-range Cooper pair splitter can be implemented in a normal metal-superconductor-normal metal (NSN) junction by driving a supercurrent in the S. The supercurrent results in a band gap modification of the S, which significantly enhances the crossed Andreev reflection (CAR) of the NSN junction and simultaneously quenches its elastic cotunneling. Therefore, a high entanglement production rate close to its saturation value can be achieved by the inverse CAR. Interestingly, in addition to the conventional entangled electron states between opposite energy levels, novel entangled states with equal energy can also be induced in our proposal. PMID:25556521

  14. The Water Production Rate of Comet 2009 P1 (Garradd) throughout the 2011-2012 Apparition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combi, Michael R.; Mäkinen, J. T. T.; Bertaux, J.; Quémerais, E.; Ferron, S.

    2012-10-01

    The all-sky hydrogen Lyman-alpha camera, SWAN (Solar Wind Anisotropies), on the SOlar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) satellite made observations of the hydrogen coma of comet 2009 P1 (Garradd) throughout its apparition from August 15, 2011 through April 6, 2012. SOHO has been operating in a halo orbit around the Earth-Sun L1 Lagrange point since its launch in late 1995. Most water vapor produced by the comet is ultimately photodissociated into two H atoms and one O atom producing a huge atomic hydrogen coma that is routinely observed in the daily full-sky SWAN images in comets of sufficient brightness. Water production rates were calculated from 117 images over 8 months of the apparition using our time-resolved model (Mäkinen & Combi, 2005, Icarus 177, 217), yielding about 1 observation every 2 days on the average. The activity during much of the pre-perihelion leg was dominated by likely seasonal variability rather than a consistent increasing trend with decreasing heliocentric distance and varied between 1 and 3 x 1029 s-1. A single peak value for the water production rate (4 x 1029 s-1) was found on November 3, 2011, 50 days before perihelion. On the other hand during the post-perihelion leg the production rate decreased rather consistently from 2 x 1029 s-1at perihelion, approximately as r-4.6, where r is the heliocentric distance. The overall shape of the variation with time over the apparition shows many of the same general features as the visual light curve of Yoshida (http://www.aerith.net/comet/catalog/index-T-earth.html). SOHO is an international cooperative mission between ESA and NASA. Support from grant NNX11AH50G from the NASA Planetary Astronomy Program is also acknowledged.

  15. 50 CFR Table 3 to Part 679 - Product Recovery Rates for Groundfish Species and Conversion Rates for Pacific Halibut

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OF THE EXCLUSIVE ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 3 Table 3 to Part 679—Product Recovery...

  16. Biomass rather than growth rate determines variation in net primary production by giant kelp.

    PubMed

    Reed, Daniel C; Rassweiler, Andrew; Arkema, Katie K

    2008-09-01

    Net primary production (NPP) is influenced by disturbance-driven fluctuations in foliar standing crop (FSC) and resource-driven fluctuations in rates of recruitment and growth, yet most studies of NPP have focused primarily on factors influencing growth. We quantified NPP, FSC, recruitment, and growth rate for the giant kelp, Macrocystis pyrifera, at three kelp forests in southern California, U.S.A., over a 54-month period and determined the relative roles of FSC, recruitment, and growth rate in contributing to variation in annual NPP. Net primary production averaged between 0.42 and 2.38 kg dry mass x m(-2) x yr(-1) at the three sites. The initial FSC present at the beginning of the growth year and the recruitment of new plants during the year explained 63% and 21% of the interannual variation observed in NPP, respectively. The previous year's NPP and disturbance from waves collectively accounted for 80% of the interannual variation in initial FSC. No correlation was found between annual growth rate (i.e., the amount of new kelp mass produced per unit of existing kelp mass) and annual NPP (i.e., the amount of new kelp mass produced per unit area of ocean bottom), largely because annual growth rate was consistent compared to initial FSC and recruitment, which fluctuated greatly among years and sites. Although growth rate was a poor predictor of variation in annual NPP, it was principally responsible for the high mean values observed for NPP by Macrocystis. These high mean values reflected rapid growth (average of approximately 2% per day) of a relatively small standing crop (maximum annual mean = 444 g dry mass/m2) that replaced itself approximately seven times per year. Disturbance-driven variability in FSC may be generally important in explaining variation in NPP, yet it is rarely examined because cycles of disturbance and recovery occur over timescales of decades or more in many systems. Considerable insight into how variation in FSC drives variation in NPP may

  17. Gas-phase ozonolysis of β-ocimene: Temperature dependent rate coefficients and product distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaona-Colmán, Elizabeth; Blanco, María B.; Barnes, Ian; Teruel, Mariano A.

    2016-12-01

    Rate coefficients for the reaction of β-ocimene with O3 molecules have been determined over the temperature range 288-311 K at 750 Torr total pressure of nitrogen using the relative rate technique. The investigations were performed in a large volume reaction vessel using long-path in-situ Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to monitor the reactants and products. A value of k(β-ocimene + O3) = (3.74 ± 0.92) × 10-16 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 has been obtained for the reaction at 298 K. The temperature dependence of the reaction is best described by the Arrhenius expression k = (1.94 ± 0.02) × 10-14 exp [(-1181 ± 51)/T] cm3 molecule-1 s-1. In addition, a product study has been carried out at 298 K in 750 Torr of synthetic air and the following products with yields in molar % were observed: formaldehyde (36 ± 2), acetone (15 ± 1), methylglyoxal (9.5 ± 0.4) and hydroxyacetone (19 ± 1). The formation of formaldehyde can be explained by the addition of O3 to the C1sbnd C2 double bond of the β-ocimene. Addition of O3 to the C6sbnd C7 double bond leads to the formation of acetone and the CH3C·(OO·)CH3 biradical, which can through isomerization/stabilization form methylglyoxal (hydroperoxide channel) and hydroxyacetone. The formed products will contribute to the formation of PAN and derivatives in polluted environments and also the oxidation capacity of the atmosphere.

  18. Determination of in Situ Rates of Methane Production and Oxidation From Terrestrial Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoemaker, J. K.; Schrag, D. P.

    2005-12-01

    Wetlands are responsible for over 70% of non-anthropogenic methane emissions. We present a method, using the δ13C of CO2 in pore water, to obtain the in situ rates of methanogenesis occurring beneath the wetland surface. This method allows us to distinguish methanogenesis from methane oxidation during escape, both of which contribute to the net methane flux. The δ13C of CO2(aq) - the dominant form of DIC in acidic natural waters - reflects the processes occurring at that location modified by transport of gas from surrounding depths. Methane production and oxidation are imprinted in the δ13C signature of the aqueous CO2 with heaviest values at depth resulting from the fractionation associated with methane production. We measured δ13C profiles with depth along with CO2 and CH4 concentrations from Sallie's Fen in Barrington, NH. Although the δ13C profiles varied considerably between locations and seasons, the logarithmic shape of the curves showed that methane production was restricted below a certain depth in the sediment - sometimes as shallow as 30 cm. Using a one-dimensional diffusion-reaction model, we are able to estimate rates of methane oxidation and successfully reproduce features present in the data's seasonal cycle. Features of the data not reproducible by the model indicate the importance of alternate gas transport routes such as ebullition and plant-mediated transport. The model also provides evidence for low-level oxygen availability during the winter-spring transition and narrow zones of very high productivity at depths of 60-70cm during the winter. We suggest that this method provides insight directly into the processes that determine methane fluxes from natural wetlands and has great potential for improving our understanding of the biogeochemistry of these systems.

  19. 19 CFR 132.17 - Export certificate for sugar-containing products subject to tariff-rate quota.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Export certificate for sugar-containing products subject to tariff-rate quota. 132.17 Section 132.17 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION... certificate for sugar-containing products subject to tariff-rate quota. (a) Requirement. For sugar-containing...

  20. 19 CFR 132.17 - Export certificate for sugar-containing products subject to tariff-rate quota.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Export certificate for sugar-containing products subject to tariff-rate quota. 132.17 Section 132.17 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION... certificate for sugar-containing products subject to tariff-rate quota. (a) Requirement. For sugar-containing...

  1. 19 CFR 132.17 - Export certificate for sugar-containing products subject to tariff-rate quota.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Export certificate for sugar-containing products subject to tariff-rate quota. 132.17 Section 132.17 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION... certificate for sugar-containing products subject to tariff-rate quota. (a) Requirement. For sugar-containing...

  2. 19 CFR 132.17 - Export certificate for sugar-containing products subject to tariff-rate quota.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Export certificate for sugar-containing products subject to tariff-rate quota. 132.17 Section 132.17 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION... certificate for sugar-containing products subject to tariff-rate quota. (a) Requirement. For sugar-containing...

  3. 19 CFR 132.17 - Export certificate for sugar-containing products subject to tariff-rate quota.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Export certificate for sugar-containing products subject to tariff-rate quota. 132.17 Section 132.17 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION... certificate for sugar-containing products subject to tariff-rate quota. (a) Requirement. For sugar-containing...

  4. 7 CFR 457.3 - Premium rates, production guarantees or amounts of insurance, coverage levels, and prices at...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FEDERAL CROP INSURANCE CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMON CROP INSURANCE REGULATIONS § 457.3 Premium rates, production guarantees or... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Premium rates, production guarantees or amounts of...

  5. 7 CFR 457.3 - Premium rates, production guarantees or amounts of insurance, coverage levels, and prices at...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FEDERAL CROP INSURANCE CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMON CROP INSURANCE REGULATIONS § 457.3 Premium rates, production guarantees or... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Premium rates, production guarantees or amounts of...

  6. FST-technologies for high rep-rate production of HiPER scale cryogenic targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrova, I. V.; Belolipetskiy, A. A.; Kalabuhov, V. A.; Koresheva, E. R.; Koshelev, E. L.; Kutergin, A. I.; Nikitenko, A. I.; Osipov, I. E.; Panina, L. V.; Safronov, A. I.; Timasheva, T. P.; Timofeev, I. D.; Usachev, G. S.; Chtcherbakov, V. I.; Tolley, M.; Edwards, C.; Spindloe, C.

    2011-06-01

    The target factory of an Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) power plant (or reactor) must supply the targets with a rate of 1-10 Hz including their injection and transport through the chamber. HiPER is a proposed European High Power laser Energy Research facility dedicated to demonstrate the feasibility of laser driven fusion for IFE reactor. The work of HiPER facility requires formation & delivery of cryogenic free-standing targets with a rate of more than 1 Hz. To meet these requirements, an approach to fuel layering based on conduction cooling of a batch of moving spherical targets has been developed at the Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI). The approach demands to use free-standing targets in each production step: fuel filling, fuel layering, target characterization and injection. In this report, the expert results on the development of a specialized layering module prototype for a high reprate FST formation of HiPER cryogenic targets are presented.

  7. Protease increases fermentation rate and ethanol yield in dry-grind ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Johnston, David B; McAloon, Andrew J

    2014-02-01

    The effects of acid protease and urea addition during the fermentation step were evaluated. The fermentations were also tested with and without the addition of urea to determine if protease altered the nitrogen requirements of the yeast. Results show that the addition of the protease had a statistically significant effect on the fermentation rate and yield. Fermentation rates and yields were improved with the addition of the protease over the corresponding controls without protease. Protease addition either with or with added urea resulted in a higher final ethanol yield than without the protease addition. Urea addition levels >1200 ppm of supplemental nitrogen inhibited ethanol production. The economic effects of the protease addition were evaluated by using process engineering and economic models developed at the Eastern Regional Research Center. The decrease in overall processing costs from protease addition was as high as $0.01/L (4 ¢/gal) of denatured ethanol produced.

  8. Comparison of water production rates from UV spectroscopy and visual magnitudes for some recent comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roettger, E. E.; Feldman, P. D.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Festou, M. C.

    1990-01-01

    IUE data on the UV and visible coma emissions of the comets Bradfield, P/Tempel 2, Wilson, and P/Halley, are presently compared with the visual lightcurves from magnitudes reported in the IAU circulars to consider the temporal evolution of these comets. While the water-production rates obtainable from visual magnitudes on the basis of Newburn's (1984) method are consistent with OH-derived rates to first order, they are sometimes either displaced or unable to exhibit the same pre/postperihelion asymmetry. The best agreement is obtained for the relatively dust-free Comet P/Tempel 2. IUE Fine Error Sensor lightcurves are generally in agreement with curves based on total visual magnitude.

  9. Entanglement Entropy and Mutual Information Production Rates in Acoustic Black Holes

    SciTech Connect

    Giovanazzi, Stefano

    2011-01-07

    A method to investigate acoustic Hawking radiation is proposed, where entanglement entropy and mutual information are measured from the fluctuations of the number of particles. The rate of entropy radiated per one-dimensional (1D) channel is given by S={kappa}/12, where {kappa} is the sound acceleration on the sonic horizon. This entropy production is accompanied by a corresponding formation of mutual information to ensure the overall conservation of information. The predictions are confirmed using an ab initio analytical approach in transonic flows of 1D degenerate ideal Fermi fluids.

  10. Entanglement entropy and mutual information production rates in acoustic black holes.

    PubMed

    Giovanazzi, Stefano

    2011-01-07

    A method to investigate acoustic Hawking radiation is proposed, where entanglement entropy and mutual information are measured from the fluctuations of the number of particles. The rate of entropy radiated per one-dimensional (1D) channel is given by S=κ/12, where κ is the sound acceleration on the sonic horizon. This entropy production is accompanied by a corresponding formation of mutual information to ensure the overall conservation of information. The predictions are confirmed using an ab initio analytical approach in transonic flows of 1D degenerate ideal Fermi fluids.

  11. Cosmic ray production rates of Be-10 and Al-26 in quartz from glacially polished rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishiizumi, K.; Kohl, C. P.; Winterer, E. L.; Klein, J.; Middleton, R.

    1989-01-01

    The concentrations of Be-10 and Al-26 in quartz crystals extracted from glacially polished granitic surfaces from the Sierra Nevada range are studied. These surfaces are identified with the glacial advance during the Tioga period about 11,000 yr ago. The measurements yield the most accurate estimates to date for the absolute production rates of three nuclides in SiO2 due to cosmic ray nucleons and muons for geomagnetic latitudes 43.8-44.6 N and altitudes 2.1-3.6 km.

  12. Linking soil DOC production rates and transport processes from landscapes to sub-basin scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y. Q.; Yu, Q.; Li, J.; Ye, C.

    2014-12-01

    Recent research rejects the traditional perspective that dissolved organic carbon (DOC) component in global carbon cycle are simply trivial, and in fact evidence demonstrates that lakes likely mediate carbon dynamics on a global scale. Riverine and estuarine carbon fluxes play a critical role in transporting and recycling carbon and nutrients, not only within watersheds but in their receiving waters. However, the underlying mechanisms that drive carbon fluxes, from land to rivers, lake and oceans, remain poorly understood. This presentation will report a research result of the scale-dependent DOC production rate in coastal watersheds and DOC transport processes in estuarine regions. We conducted a series of controlled experiments and field measurements for examining biogeochemical, biological, and geospatial variables that regulate downstream processing on global-relevant carbon fluxes. Results showed that increased temperatures and raised soil moistures accelerate decomposition rates of organic matter with significant variations between vegetation types. The measurements at meso-scale ecosystem demonstrated a good correlation to bulk concentration of DOC monitored in receiving waters at the outlets of sub-basins (R2 > 0.65). These field and experimental measurements improved the model of daily carbon exports through below-ground processes as a function of the organic matter content of surface soils, forest litter supply, and temperature. The study demonstrated a potential improvement in modeling the co-variance of CDOM and DOC with the unique terrestrial sources. This improvement indicated a significant promise for monitoring riverine and estuarine carbon flux from satellite images. The technical innovations include deployments of 1) mini-ecosystem (mesocosms) with soil as replicate controlled experiments for DOC production and leaching rates, and 2) aquatic mesocosms for co-variances of DOC and CDOM endmembers, and an instrumented incubation experiment for

  13. Nitrogen Source and Rate Management Improve Maize Productivity of Smallholders under Semiarid Climates

    PubMed Central

    Amanullah; Iqbal, Asif; Ali, Ashraf; Fahad, Shah; Parmar, Brajendra

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen is one of the most important factor affecting maize (Zea mays L.) yield and income of smallholders under semiarid climates. Field experiments were conducted to investigate the impact of different N-fertilizer sources [urea, calcium ammonium nitrate (CAN), and ammonium sulfate (AS)] and rates (50, 100, 150, and 200 kg ha−1) on umber of rows ear−1 (NOR ear−1), number of seeds row−1 (NOS row−1), number of seeds ear−1 (NOS ear−1), number of ears per 100 plants (NOEP 100 plants−1), grain yield plant−1, stover yield (kg ha−1), and shelling percentage (%) of maize genotypes “Local cultivars (Azam and Jalal) vs. hybrid (Pioneer-3025).” The experiment was conducted at the Agronomy Research Farm of the University of Agriculture Peshawar during summers of 2008 (year one) and 2010 (year two). The results revealed that the N treated (rest) plots (the average of all the experimental plots treated with N) had produced higher yield and yield components, and shelling percentage over N-control plots (plots where N was not applied). Application of nitrogen at the higher rate increased yield and yield components in maize (200 > 150 > 100 > 50 kg N ha−1). Application of AS and CAN had more beneficial impact on yield and yield components of maize as compared to urea (AS > CAN > urea). Hybrid maize (P-3025) produced significantly higher yield and yield components as well as higher shelling percentage than the two local cultivars (P-3025 > Jalal = Azam). Application of ammonium sulfate at the rate of 200 kg N ha−1 to hybrid maize was found most beneficial in terms of higher productivity and grower's income in the study area. For the two local cultivars, application of 150 kg N ha−1 was found more beneficial over 120 kg N ha−1 (recommended N rate) in terms of greater productivity and growers income. PMID:27965685

  14. Variability among electronic cigarettes in the pressure drop, airflow rate, and aerosol production.

    PubMed

    Williams, Monique; Talbot, Prue

    2011-12-01

    This study investigated the performance of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes), compared different models within a brand, compared identical copies of the same model within a brand, and examined performance using different protocols. Airflow rate required to generate aerosol, pressure drop across e-cigarettes, and aerosol density were examined using three different protocols. First 10 puff protocol: The airflow rate required to produce aerosol and aerosol density varied among brands, while pressure drop varied among brands and between the same model within a brand. Total air hole area correlated with pressure drop for some brands. Smoke-out protocol: E-cigarettes within a brand generally performed similarly when puffed to exhaustion; however, there was considerable variation between brands in pressure drop, airflow rate required to produce aerosol, and the total number of puffs produced. With this protocol, aerosol density varied significantly between puffs and gradually declined. CONSECUTIVE TRIAL PROTOCOL: Two copies of one model were subjected to 11 puffs in three consecutive trials with breaks between trials. One copy performed similarly in each trial, while the second copy of the same model produced little aerosol during the third trial. The different performance properties of the two units were attributed to the atomizers. There was significant variability between and within brands in the airflow rate required to produce aerosol, pressure drop, length of time cartridges lasted, and production of aerosol. Variation in performance properties within brands suggests a need for better quality control during e-cigarette manufacture.

  15. Mass Customization Production Planning System by Advance Demand Information Based on Unfulfilled-order-rate II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Nobuyuki; Kadomoto, Kiyotaka; Okuhara, Koji

    In the previous paper, we proposed Mass Customization Production Planning & Management System (MCPS) based on unfulfilled-order-rate by using Advance Demand Information which is called ‘Naiji System’ as an unique corporation between a maker and suppliers in Japan, and 3 indicators to estimate the unfulfilled-order-rate. Applying these indicators to the model, we investigated the behavior of unfulfilled-order-rate at the final period in the planning horizon. In this paper, we propose a new model for purchasing, and investigate the unfulfilled-order-rate at each period and the impact to the total inventory. We find that the total inventories become 5.9%-20.0% decreases by using SOn rather than by using SOn(0). And we enhance a base-stock policy to a new one with multi-period. We prove that the MCPS model for purchasing by using SOn(0) is equivalent to the base-stock policy with multi-period under the specified condition. Under this condition, the proposed model by using SOn decreases inventories more than the base-stock policy with multi-period.

  16. Assessing Sub-Antarctic Zone primary productivity from fast repetition rate fluorometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheah, Wee; McMinn, Andrew; Griffiths, F. Brian; Westwood, Karen J.; Wright, Simon W.; Molina, Ernesto; Webb, Jason P.; van den Enden, Rick

    2011-11-01

    In situ primary productivity (PP) in the Sub-Antarctic Zone (SAZ) and the Polar Frontal Zone (PFZ) south of Australia was estimated using fast repetition rate fluorometry (FRRF). FRRF-derived PP at Process station 3 (P3) southeast of Tasmania (46°S, 153°E) were higher than P1 in the southwest of Tasmania (46°S, 140°E) and P2 in the Polar Frontal Zone (54°S, 146°E). The FRRF-derived PP rates were well correlated with 14C-uptake rates from one-hour incubations ( r2=0.85, slope=1.23±0.05, p<0.01, n=85) but the relationship between both methods differed vertically and spatially. There was a linear relationship between FRRF-based PP and 14C-based PP under light-limited conditions in deeper waters. Under light-saturated conditions near the surface (0-45 m), the relationship was less clear. This was likely associated with the effects of physiological processes such as cyclic electron flow and the Mehler reaction, which are stimulated at high irradiance. Our results indicate that FRRF can be used to estimate photosynthesis rates in the SAZ and PFZ but to derive an accurate estimation of C-fixation requires a detailed understanding of the physiological properties of the cells and their response to oceanographic parameters under different environmental conditions.

  17. Rate and yield relationships in the production of xanthan gum by batch fermentations using complex and chemically defined growth media

    SciTech Connect

    Pinches, A.; Pallent, L.J.

    1986-10-01

    Rate and yield information relating to biomass and product formation and to nitrogen, glucose and oxygen consumption are described for xanthan gum batch fermentations in which both chemically defined (glutamate nitrogen) and complex (peptone nitrogen) media are employed. Simple growth and product models are used for data interpretation. For both nitrogen sources, rate and yield parameter estimates are shown to be independent of initial nitrogen concentrations. For stationary phases, specific rates of gum production are shown to be independent of nitrogen source but dependent on initial nitrogen concentration. The latter is modeled empirically and suggests caution in applying simple product models to xanthan gum fermentations. 13 references.

  18. Algal biomass production and wastewater treatment in high rate algal ponds receiving disinfected effluent.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Aníbal Fonseca; Calijuri, Maria Lucia; Assemany, Paula Peixoto; Calijuri, Maria do Carmo; dos Reis, Alberto José Delgado

    2013-01-01

    Algal biomass production associated with wastewater is usually carried out in high rate algal ponds (HRAPs), which are concomitantly used in the treatment of such effluent. However, most types of wastewater have high levels of bacteria that can inhibit the growth of algal biomass by competing for space and nutrients. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of ultraviolet (UV) pre-disinfection on the performance of HRAPs used for wastewater treatment and algal biomass production. Two HRAPs were tested: one received effluent from an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor- HRAP -and the second received UASB effluent pre-disinfected by UV radiation-(UV)HRAP. Physical, chemical and microbiological parameters were monitored, as well as algal biomass productivity and daily pH and dissolved oxygen (DO) variation. The (UV)HRAP presented highest DO and pH values, as well as greater percentage of chlorophyll a in the biomass, which indicates greater algal biomass productivity. The average percentages of chlorophyll a found in the biomass obtained from the HRAP and the (UV)HRAP were 0.95 +/- 0.65% and 1.58 +/- 0.65%, respectively. However, total biomass productivity was greater in the HRAP (11.4 gVSSm(-2) day(-1)) compared with the (UV)HRAP (9.3 gVSSm(-2) day(-1)). Mean pH values were 7.7 +/- 0.7 in the HRAP and 8.1 +/- 1.0 in the (UV)HRAP, and mean values of DO percent saturation were 87 +/- 26% and 112 +/- 31% for the HRAP and the (UV)HRAP, respectively. Despite these differences, removal efficiencies of organic carbon, chemical oxygen demand, ammoniacal nitrogen and soluble phosphorus were statistically equal at the 5% significance level.

  19. Hydrogen Production Using Nickel Electrocatalysts with Pendant Amines: Ligand Effects on Rates and Overpotentials

    SciTech Connect

    Wiese, Stefan; Kilgore, Uriah J.; Ho, Ming-Hsun; Raugei, Simone; DuBois, Daniel L.; Bullock, R. Morris; Helm, Monte L.

    2013-11-01

    A Ni-based electrocatalyst for H2 production, [Ni(8PPh2NC6H4Br)2](BF4)2, featuring eight-membered cyclic diphosphine ligands incorporating a single amine base, 1-para-bromo-phenyl-3,7-triphenyl-1-aza-3,7-diphosphacycloheptane (8PPh2NC6H4Br) has been synthesized and characterized. X-ray diffraction studies reveal that the cation of [Ni(8PPh2NC6H4Br)2(CH3CN)](BF4)2 has a distorted trigonal bipyramidal geometry. In CH3CN [Ni(8PPh2NC6H4Br)2]2+ is an electrocatalyst for reduction of protons, and it has a maximum turnover frequency for H2 production of 800 s-1 with a 700 mV overpotential (at Ecat/2) when using [(DMF)H]OTf as the acid. Addition of H2O to acidic CH3CN solutions of [Ni(8PPh2NC6H4Br)2]2+ results in an increase of the turnover frequency for H2 production to a maximum of 3,300 s-1 with an overpotential of 760 mV at Ecat/2. Computational studies carried out on [Ni(8PPh2NC6H4Br)2]2+ indicate the observed catalytic rate is limited by formation of non-productive protonated isomers, diverting active catalyst from the catalytic cycle. The results of this research show that proton delivery from the exogenous acid to the correct position on the proton relay of the metal complex is essential for fast H2 production. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  20. Invariant scaling relationships for interspecific plant biomass production rates and body size

    PubMed Central

    Niklas, Karl J.; Enquist, Brian J.

    2001-01-01

    The allometric relationships for plant annualized biomass production (“growth”) rates, different measures of body size (dry weight and length), and photosynthetic biomass (or pigment concentration) per plant (or cell) are reported for multicellular and unicellular plants representing three algal phyla; aquatic ferns; aquatic and terrestrial herbaceous dicots; and arborescent monocots, dicots, and conifers. Annualized rates of growth G scale as the 3/4-power of body mass M over 20 orders of magnitude of M (i.e., G ∝ M3/4); plant body length L (i.e., cell length or plant height) scales, on average, as the 1/4-power of M over 22 orders of magnitude of M (i.e., L ∝ M1/4); and photosynthetic biomass Mp scales as the 3/4-power of nonphotosynthetic biomass Mn (i.e., Mp ∝ Mn3/4). Because these scaling relationships are indifferent to phylogenetic affiliation and habitat, they have far-reaching ecological and evolutionary implications (e.g., net primary productivity is predicted to be largely insensitive to community species composition or geological age). PMID:11226342

  1. Mass transport around comets and its impact on the seasonal differences in water production rates

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, M.; Altwegg, K.; Thomas, N.; Fougere, N.; Combi, M. R.; Tenishev, V. M.; Le Roy, L.

    2014-06-20

    Comets are surrounded by a thin expanding atmosphere, and although the nucleus' gravity is small, some molecules and grains, possibly with the inclusion of ices, can get transported around the nucleus through scattering (atoms/molecules) and gravitational pull (grains). Based on the obliquity of the comet, it is also possible that volatile material and icy grains get trapped in regions, which are in shadow until the comet passes its equinox. When the Sun rises above the horizon and the surface starts to heat up, this condensed material starts to desorb and icy grains will sublimate off the surface, possibly increasing the comet's neutral gas production rate on the outbound path. In this paper we investigate the mass transport around the nucleus, and based on a simplified model, we derive the possible contribution to the asymmetry in the seasonal gas production rate that could arise from trapped material released from cold areas once they come into sunlight. We conclude that the total amount of volatiles retained by this effect can only contribute up to a few percent of the asymmetry observed in some comets.

  2. Calculations of cosmogenic nuclide production rates in the Earth's atmosphere and their inventories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, K.

    1986-01-01

    The production rates of cosmogenic isotopes in the Earth's atmosphere and their resulting terrestrial abundances have been calculated, taking into account both geomagnetic and solar-modulatory effects. The local interstellar flux was assumed to be that of Garcia-Munoz, et al. Solar modulation was accounted for using the heliocentric potential model and expressed in terms of the Deep River neutron monitor count rates. The geomagnetic field was presented by vertical cutoffs calculated by Shea and Smart and the non-vertical cutoffs calculated using ANGRI. The local interstellar particle flux was first modulated using the heliocentric potential field. The modulated cosmic-ray fluxes reaching the earth's orbit then interacted with the geomagnetic field as though it were a high-pass filter. The interaction of the cosmic radiation with the Earth's atmosphere was calculated utilizing the Bolztmann transport equation. Spallation cross sections for isotope production were calculated using the formalism of Silberberg and Tsao and other cross sections were taken from standard sources. Inventories were calculated by accounting from the variation in solar modulation and geomagnetic field strength with time. Results for many isotope, including C-14, Be-7 and Be-10 are in generally good agreement with existing data. The C-14 inventory, for instance, amounts to 1.75/sq cm(e)/s, in excellent agreement with direct estimates.

  3. Comet 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3: O(1D) and H2O Production Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Tanya L.; Mierkiewicz, E. J.; Haffner, L. M.; Roesler, F. L.; Harris, W. M.

    2006-12-01

    In May 2006, comet 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 (SW3) made the closest approach (0.075 AU) to the Earth of a short period comet in more than 75 years. During the comet's 1995/1996 apparition it split into several fragments and, as of March 2006, SW3 was in eight major pieces. From May 1, 2006 through May 6, 2006 we performed a series of [OI] and NH2 (near 6300 Å) observations of the two brightest fragments, SW3-B and SW3-C, using the dual-etalon Fabry-Perot spectrometer that comprises the Wisconsin H-alpha Mapper (WHAM). At the time of our observations the Doppler shift of the comet was within a few km/s of the spectral resolving limit of WHAM (12 km/s), and great care was needed to isolate the blended cometary [OI] emission from the bright terrestrial [OI] emission line. In this poster we will discuss our analysis procedure and our preliminary total O(1D) production rates. Given the photodissociation of H2O and OH as sources of O(1D), we will also present an estimate of the H2O production rates for fragments SW3-B and SW3-C based on our WHAM O(1D) observations. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation's REU program and the Department of Defense's ASSURE program through NSF Award AST-0453442

  4. Verification of energy dissipation rate scalability in pilot and production scale bioreactors using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Chris; Natarajan, Venkatesh; Antoniou, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Suspension mammalian cell cultures in aerated stirred tank bioreactors are widely used in the production of monoclonal antibodies. Given that production scale cell culture operations are typically performed in very large bioreactors (≥ 10,000 L), bioreactor scale-down and scale-up become crucial in the development of robust cell-culture processes. For successful scale-up and scale-down of cell culture operations, it is important to understand the scale-dependence of the distribution of the energy dissipation rates in a bioreactor. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations can provide an additional layer of depth to bioreactor scalability analysis. In this communication, we use CFD analyses of five bioreactor configurations to evaluate energy dissipation rates and Kolmogorov length scale distributions at various scales. The results show that hydrodynamic scalability is achievable as long as major design features (# of baffles, impellers) remain consistent across the scales. Finally, in all configurations, the mean Kolmogorov length scale is substantially higher than the average cell size, indicating that catastrophic cell damage due to mechanical agitation is highly unlikely at all scales. © 2014 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  5. Variations in Amazon forest productivity correlated with foliar nutrients and modelled rates of photosynthetic carbon supply.

    PubMed

    Mercado, Lina M; Patiño, Sandra; Domingues, Tomas F; Fyllas, Nikolaos M; Weedon, Graham P; Sitch, Stephen; Quesada, Carlos Alberto; Phillips, Oliver L; Aragão, Luiz E O C; Malhi, Yadvinder; Dolman, A J; Restrepo-Coupe, Natalia; Saleska, Scott R; Baker, Timothy R; Almeida, Samuel; Higuchi, Niro; Lloyd, Jon

    2011-11-27

    The rate of above-ground woody biomass production, W(P), in some western Amazon forests exceeds those in the east by a factor of 2 or more. Underlying causes may include climate, soil nutrient limitations and species composition. In this modelling paper, we explore the implications of allowing key nutrients such as N and P to constrain the photosynthesis of Amazon forests, and also we examine the relationship between modelled rates of photosynthesis and the observed gradients in W(P). We use a model with current understanding of the underpinning biochemical processes as affected by nutrient availability to assess: (i) the degree to which observed spatial variations in foliar [N] and [P] across Amazonia affect stand-level photosynthesis; and (ii) how these variations in forest photosynthetic carbon acquisition relate to the observed geographical patterns of stem growth across the Amazon Basin. We find nutrient availability to exert a strong effect on photosynthetic carbon gain across the Basin and to be a likely important contributor to the observed gradient in W(P). Phosphorus emerges as more important than nitrogen in accounting for the observed variations in productivity. Implications of these findings are discussed in the context of future tropical forests under a changing climate.

  6. Variations in Amazon forest productivity correlated with foliar nutrients and modelled rates of photosynthetic carbon supply

    PubMed Central

    Mercado, Lina M.; Patiño, Sandra; Domingues, Tomas F.; Fyllas, Nikolaos M.; Weedon, Graham P.; Sitch, Stephen; Quesada, Carlos Alberto; Phillips, Oliver L.; Aragão, Luiz E. O. C.; Malhi, Yadvinder; Dolman, A. J.; Restrepo-Coupe, Natalia; Saleska, Scott R.; Baker, Timothy R.; Almeida, Samuel; Higuchi, Niro; Lloyd, Jon

    2011-01-01

    The rate of above-ground woody biomass production, WP, in some western Amazon forests exceeds those in the east by a factor of 2 or more. Underlying causes may include climate, soil nutrient limitations and species composition. In this modelling paper, we explore the implications of allowing key nutrients such as N and P to constrain the photosynthesis of Amazon forests, and also we examine the relationship between modelled rates of photosynthesis and the observed gradients in WP. We use a model with current understanding of the underpinning biochemical processes as affected by nutrient availability to assess: (i) the degree to which observed spatial variations in foliar [N] and [P] across Amazonia affect stand-level photosynthesis; and (ii) how these variations in forest photosynthetic carbon acquisition relate to the observed geographical patterns of stem growth across the Amazon Basin. We find nutrient availability to exert a strong effect on photosynthetic carbon gain across the Basin and to be a likely important contributor to the observed gradient in WP. Phosphorus emerges as more important than nitrogen in accounting for the observed variations in productivity. Implications of these findings are discussed in the context of future tropical forests under a changing climate. PMID:22006971

  7. Production rates of bacterial tetraether lipids and fatty acids in peatland under varying oxygen concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huguet, Arnaud; Meador, Travis B.; Laggoun-Défarge, Fatima; Könneke, Martin; Wu, Weichao; Derenne, Sylvie; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2017-04-01

    Interpretations of the abundance and distribution of branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (brGDGT) lipids have been increasingly applied to infer changes in paleoenvironment and to estimate terrigenous organic matter inputs into estuarine and marine sediments. However, only preliminary information is known regarding the ecology and physiology of the source organisms of these biomarkers. We assessed the production rates of brGDGTs under different redox conditions in peat, where these lipids are found in high concentrations, particularly at greater depths below the fluctuating water table. The incorporation of hydrogen relative to carbon into lipids observed in our dual stable isotope probing assay indicates that brGDGTs were produced by heterotrophic bacteria. Unexpectedly, incubations with stable isotope tracers of the surface horizon (5-20 cm) initiated under oxic conditions before turning suboxic and eventually anoxic exhibited up to one order of magnitude higher rates of brGDGT production (16-87 ng cm-3 y-1) relative to the deeper, anoxic zone (20-35 cm; ca. 7 ng cm-3 y-1), and anoxic incubations of the surface horizon (<3 ng cm-3 y-1). Turnover times of brGDGTs in the surface horizon ranged between 8 and 41 years in the incubations initiated under oxic conditions, in contrast to 123-742 years in anoxic incubations. As brGDGTs were actively produced during both anoxic incubations and those exposed to oxygen, we conclude that their source organisms are likely facultative aerobic heterotrophs that are particularly active in the peat acrotelm. Production rates of bacterial fatty acids (ca. 2 μg cm-3 y-1) were roughly two orders of magnitude higher than those of brGDGTs, suggesting that brGDGT producers are a minor constituent of the microbial community or that brGDGTs are a small component of the microbial cell membrane in comparison to fatty acids, despite the typically high brGDGT concentrations observed in peat. Multivariate analysis identified two

  8. Composition and production rate of medical waste from a small producer in Greece.

    PubMed

    Graikos, Anastasios; Voudrias, Evangelos; Papazachariou, Athanasios; Iosifidis, Nikolaos; Kalpakidou, Maria

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this work was to determine the composition and production rate of medical waste from the health care facility of social insurance institute, a small waste producer in Xanthi, Greece. Specifically, produced medical waste from the clinical pathology (medical microbiology) laboratory, the X-ray laboratory and the surgery and injection therapy departments of the health facility was monitored for six working weeks. A total of 240 kg medical solid waste was manually separated and weighed and 330 L of liquid medical waste was measured and classified. The hazardous waste fraction (%w/w) of the medical solid waste was 91.6% for the clinical pathology laboratory, 12.9% for the X-ray laboratory, 24.2% for the surgery departments and 17.6% for the injection therapy department. The infectious waste fraction (%w/w) of the hazardous medical solid waste was 75.6% for the clinical pathology laboratory, 0% for the X-ray laboratory, 100% for the surgery departments and 75.6% for the injection therapy department. The total hazardous medical solid waste production rate was 64+/-15 g/patient/d for the clinical pathology laboratory, 7.2+/-1.6 g/patient/d for the X-ray laboratory, 8.3+/-5.1 g/patient/d for the surgery departments and 24+/-9 g/patient/d for the injection therapy department. Liquid waste was produced by the clinical pathology laboratory (infectious-and-toxic) and the X-ray laboratory (toxic). The production rate for the clinical pathology laboratory was 0.03+/-0.003 L/patient/d and for the X-ray laboratory was 0.06+/-0.006 L/patient/d. Due to the small amount produced, it was suggested that the most suitable management scheme would be to transport the hazardous medical waste, after source-separation, to the Prefectural Hospital of Xanthi to be treated with the hospital waste. Assuming this data is representative of other small medical facilities, medical waste production can be estimated for such facilities distributed around Greece.

  9. Greater carbon stocks and faster turnover rates with increasing agricultural productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanderman, J.; Fallon, S.; Baisden, T. W.

    2013-12-01

    H.H. Janzen (2006) eloquently argued that from an agricultural perspective there is a tradeoff between storing carbon as soil organic matter (SOM) and the soil nutrient and energy benefit provided during SOM mineralization. Here we report on results from the Permanent Rotation Trial at the Waite Agricultural Institute, South Australia, indicating that shifting to an agricultural management strategy which returns more carbon to the soil, not only leads to greater carbon stocks but also increases the rate of carbon cycling through the soil. The Permanent Rotation Trial was established on a red Chromosol in 1925 with upgrades made to several treatments in 1948. Decadal soil samples were collected starting in 1963 at two depths, 0-10 and 10-22.5 cm, by compositing 20 soil cores taken along the length of each plot. We have chosen to analyze five trials representing a gradient in productivity: permanent pasture (Pa), wheat-pasture rotation (2W4Pa), continuous wheat (WW), wheat-oats-fallow rotation (WOF) and wheat-fallow (WF). For each of the soil samples (40 in total), the radiocarbon activity in the bulk soil as well as size-fractionated samples was measured by accelerator mass spectrometry at ANU's Radiocarbon Dating Laboratory (Fallon et al. 2010). After nearly 70 years under each rotation, SOC stocks increased linearly with productivity data across the trials from 24 to 58 tC ha-1. Importantly, these differences were due to greater losses over time in the low productivity trials rather than gains in SOC in any of the trials. Uptake of the bomb-spike in atmospheric 14C into the soil was greatest in the trials with the greatest productivity. The coarse size fraction always had greater Δ14C values than the bulk soil samples. Several different multi-pool steady state and non-steady state models were used to interpret the Δ14C data in terms of SOC turnover rates. Regardless of model choice, either the decay rates of all pools needed to increase or the allocation of C to

  10. 19 CFR 351.525 - Calculation of ad valorem subsidy rate and attribution of subsidy to a product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calculation of ad valorem subsidy rate and... Countervailable Subsidies § 351.525 Calculation of ad valorem subsidy rate and attribution of subsidy to a product. (a) Calculation of ad valorem subsidy rate. The Secretary will calculate an ad valorem subsidy...

  11. 19 CFR 351.525 - Calculation of ad valorem subsidy rate and attribution of subsidy to a product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calculation of ad valorem subsidy rate and... Countervailable Subsidies § 351.525 Calculation of ad valorem subsidy rate and attribution of subsidy to a product. (a) Calculation of ad valorem subsidy rate. The Secretary will calculate an ad valorem subsidy...

  12. Scaling in situ cosmogenic nuclide production rates using analytical approximations to atmospheric cosmic-ray fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifton, Nathaniel; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Dunai, Tibor J.

    2014-01-01

    Several models have been proposed for scaling in situ cosmogenic nuclide production rates from the relatively few sites where they have been measured to other sites of interest. Two main types of models are recognized: (1) those based on data from nuclear disintegrations in photographic emulsions combined with various neutron detectors, and (2) those based largely on neutron monitor data. However, stubborn discrepancies between these model types have led to frequent confusion when calculating surface exposure ages from production rates derived from the models. To help resolve these discrepancies and identify the sources of potential biases in each model, we have developed a new scaling model based on analytical approximations to modeled fluxes of the main atmospheric cosmic-ray particles responsible for in situ cosmogenic nuclide production. Both the analytical formulations and the Monte Carlo model fluxes on which they are based agree well with measured atmospheric fluxes of neutrons, protons, and muons, indicating they can serve as a robust estimate of the atmospheric cosmic-ray flux based on first principles. We are also using updated records for quantifying temporal and spatial variability in geomagnetic and solar modulation effects on the fluxes. A key advantage of this new model (herein termed LSD) over previous Monte Carlo models of cosmogenic nuclide production is that it allows for faster estimation of scaling factors based on time-varying geomagnetic and solar inputs. Comparing scaling predictions derived from the LSD model with those of previously published models suggest potential sources of bias in the latter can be largely attributed to two factors: different energy responses of the secondary neutron detectors used in developing the models, and different geomagnetic parameterizations. Given that the LSD model generates flux spectra for each cosmic-ray particle of interest, it is also relatively straightforward to generate nuclide-specific scaling

  13. Reservoir characterization based on tracer response and rank analysis of production and injection rates

    SciTech Connect

    Refunjol, B.T.; Lake, L.W.

    1997-08-01

    Quantification of the spatial distribution of properties is important for many reservoir-engineering applications. But, before applying any reservoir-characterization technique, the type of problem to be tackled and the information available should be analyzed. This is important because difficulties arise in reservoirs where production records are the only information for analysis. This paper presents the results of a practical technique to determine preferential flow trends in a reservoir. The technique is a combination of reservoir geology, tracer data, and Spearman rank correlation coefficient analysis. The Spearman analysis, in particular, will prove to be important because it appears to be insightful and uses injection/production data that are prevalent in circumstances where other data are nonexistent. The technique is applied to the North Buck Draw field, Campbell County, Wyoming. This work provides guidelines to assess information about reservoir continuity in interwell regions from widely available measurements of production and injection rates at existing wells. The information gained from the application of this technique can contribute to both the daily reservoir management and the future design, control, and interpretation of subsequent projects in the reservoir, without the need for additional data.

  14. Effects of organic loading rate on biogas production from macroalgae: Performance and microbial community structure.

    PubMed

    Sun, Meng-Ting; Fan, Xiao-Lei; Zhao, Xiao-Xian; Fu, Shan-Fei; He, Shuai; Manasa, M R K; Guo, Rong-Bo

    2017-07-01

    Macroalgae biomass has been considered as a promising feedstock for biogas production. In order to improve the efficiency of anaerobic digestion (AD) of macroalgae, semi-continuous fermentation was conducted to examine the effects of organic loading rate (OLR) on biogas production from Macrocystis pyrifer. Results showed that, under OLRs of 1.37, 2.74, 4.12 and 6.85kgVSsubstrate/(m(3)·d), the average unit biogas yields were 438.9, 477.3, 480.1 and 188.7mL/(gVSsubstrated), respectively. It indicated that biogas production was promoted by the increased OLR in an appropriate range while inhibited by the OLR beyond the appropriate range. The investigation on physical-chemical parameters revealed that unfavorable VFAs concentration, pH and salinity might be the main causes for system failure due to the overrange OLR, while the total phenols failed to reach the inhibitory concentration. Microbial community analysis demonstrated that several bacterial and archaeal phyla altered with increase in OLR apparently. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Optimization of pilot high rate algal ponds for simultaneous nutrient removal and lipids production.

    PubMed

    Arbib, Zouhayr; de Godos, Ignacio; Ruiz, Jesús; Perales, José A

    2017-07-01

    Special attention is required to the removal of nitrogen and phosphorous in treated wastewaters. Although, there are a wide range of techniques commercially available for nutrient up-take, these processes entail high investment and operational costs. In the other hand, microalgae growth can simultaneously remove inorganic constituents of wastewater and produce energy rich biomass. Among all the cultivation technologies, High Rate Algae Ponds (HRAPs), are accepted as the most appropriate system. However, the optimization of the operation that maximizes the productivity, nutrient removal and lipid content in the biomass generated has not been established. In this study, the effect of two levels of depth and the addition of CO2 were evaluated. Batch essays were used for the calculation of the kinetic parameters of microbial growth that determine the optimum conditions for continuous operation. Nutrient removal and lipid content of the biomass generated were analyzed. The best conditions were found at depth of 0.3m with CO2 addition (biomass productivity of 26.2gTSSm(-2)d(-1) and a lipid productivity of 6.0glipidsm(-2)d(-1)) in continuous mode. The concentration of nutrients was in all cases below discharge limits established by the most restrictive regulation for wastewater discharge.

  16. E-beam treatment of trichloroethylene-air mixtures: Products and rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mill, Theodore; Su, Minggong; David Yao, C. C.; Matthews, Stephen M.; Wang, Francis T. S.

    1997-09-01

    Electron beam (E-beam) treatment of 3000 ppmv trichloroethylene (TCE) vapor in dry and wet air led to rapid, nearly quantitative, conversion of TCE to dichloroacetyl chloride, plus small amounts of phosgene. Higher E-beam doses, up to 110 kGy, led to oxidation of the initial products to CO, CO 2, HCl and Cl 2. The results parallel results found for photo- and Cl-atom initiated oxidation of TCE vapor, and are accounted for by an efficient Cl-atom chain oxidation. Lack of effect of 28,000 ppmv water vapor (90% RH) on rates or products reflects a very high efficiency for the Cl-atom chain oxidation and the very slow reaction of vapor phase water with acyl halides. Irradiation experiments conducted with TCE dissolved in aerated and deaerated water at 10 and 300 ppm showed marked differences in radiolytic products from those found in the vapor phase. A preliminary cost estimate indicates that E-beam treatment of TCE vapor is very competitive with conventional activated carbon treatment and catalytic oxidation.

  17. Application of oxygen uptake rate and response surface methodology for erythromycin production by Saccharopolyspora erythraea.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiang; Hang, Hai-feng; Chen, Chang-fa; Chu, Ju; Zhuang, Ying-ping; Zhang, Si-liang

    2008-12-01

    A process for efficient production of erythromycin by Saccharopolyspora erythraea using statistical designs and feeding strategy was developed. The critical nutrient components were selected in accordance with fractional factorial design and were further optimized via response surface methodology. Three significant components (ZnSO(4), citric acid threonine) were identified for the optimization study. The optimum levels of these significant variables were determined with Box-Behnken design, which were ZnSO(4) 0.039 g/l, citric acid 0.24 g/l and threonine 0.42 g/l, respectively. A novel feeding strategy based on oxygen uptake rate (OUR) measurement was developed successfully to increase the flux of erythromycin biosynthesis, in which the optimized nutrient components was fed in the 50 l stirred bioreactor when OUR began to decline at 46 h. The maximum erythromycin production reached 10,622 U/ml, which was 11.7% higher than the control in the same cultivation conditions. It was the first report to integrate physiological parameter OUR and statistical methods to optimize erythromycin production.

  18. The effect of organic loading rate and retention time on hydrogen production from a methanogenic CSTR.

    PubMed

    Pakarinen, O; Kaparaju, P; Rintala, J

    2011-10-01

    The possibility of shifting a methanogenic process for hydrogen production by changing the process parameters viz., organic loading rate (OLR) and hydraulic retention time (HRT) was evaluated. At first, two parallel semi-continuously fed continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTR) were operated as methanogenic reactors (M1 and M2) for 78 days. Results showed that a methane yield of 198-218 L/kg volatile solids fed (VS(fed)) was obtained when fed with grass silage at an OLR of 2 kgVS/m³/d and HRT of 30 days. After 78 days of operation, hydrogen production was induced in M2 by increasing the OLR from 2 to 10 kgVS/m³/d and shortening the HRT from 30 to 6 days. The highest H₂ yield of 42 L/kgVS(fed) was obtained with a maximum H₂ content of 24%. The present results thus demonstrate that methanogenic process can be shifted towards hydrogen production by increasing the OLR and decreasing HRT.

  19. Increasing flux rate to shorten leaching period and ramp-up production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngantung, Billy; Agustin, Riska; Ravi'i

    2017-01-01

    J Resources Bolaang Mongondow (JBRM) has operated a dynamic heap leach in its Bakan Gold Mine since late 2013. After successfully surpassing its name plate capacity of 2.6 MT/annum in 2014, the clayey and transition ore become the next operational challenge. The presence of transition and clayey ore requires longer leaching period, hence reducing the leach pad capacity which then caused reduced production. Maintaining or even increasing production with such longer leaching ore types can be done by expanding the leach pad area which means an additional capital investment, and/or shortening the leaching cycle which compromise a portion of gold extraction. JBRM has been successfully increasing the leach pad production from 2.6 MT/annum to 3.8 MT/annum, whilst improving the gold extraction from around 70% to around 80%. This was achieved by managing the operation of the leach pad which is shortening the leach cycle by identifying and combining the optimal flux rate application versus the tonne processed in each cell, at no capital investment for expanding the cell capacity.

  20. Rate of warming affects temperature sensitivity of anaerobic peat decomposition and greenhouse gas production.

    PubMed

    Sihi, Debjani; Inglett, Patrick W; Gerber, Stefan; Inglett, Kanika S

    2017-07-26

    Temperature sensitivity of anaerobic carbon mineralization in wetlands remains poorly represented in most climate models and is especially unconstrained for warmer subtropical and tropical systems which account for a large proportion of global methane emissions. Several studies of experimental warming have documented thermal acclimation of soil respiration involving adjustments in microbial physiology or carbon use efficiency (CUE), with an initial decline in CUE with warming followed by a partial recovery in CUE at a later stage. The variable CUE implies that the rate of warming may impact microbial acclimation and the rate of carbon-dioxide (CO2 ) and methane (CH4 ) production. Here, we assessed the effects of warming rate on the decomposition of subtropical peats, by applying either a large single-step (10°C within a day) or a slow ramping (0.1°C/day for 100 days) temperature increase. The extent of thermal acclimation was tested by monitoring CO2 and CH4 production, CUE, and microbial biomass. Total gaseous C loss, CUE, and MBC were greater in the slow (ramp) warming treatment. However, greater values of CH4 -C:CO2 -C ratios lead to a greater global warming potential in the fast (step) warming treatment. The effect of gradual warming on decomposition was more pronounced in recalcitrant and nutrient-limited soils. Stable carbon isotopes of CH4 and CO2 further indicated the possibility of different carbon processing pathways under the contrasting warming rates. Different responses in fast vs. slow warming treatment combined with different endpoints may indicate alternate pathways with long-term consequences. Incorporations of experimental results into organic matter decomposition models suggest that parameter uncertainties in CUE and CH4 -C:CO2 -C ratios have a larger impact on long-term soil organic carbon and global warming potential than uncertainty in model structure, and shows that particular rates of warming are central to understand the response of

  1. Effect of heterologous xylose transporter expression in Candida tropicalis on xylitol production rate.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Woo Young; Shim, Woo Yong; Lee, Sung Hyeon; Choi, Joon Ho; Kim, Jung Hoe

    2013-06-01

    Xylose utilization is inhibited by glucose uptake in xylose-assimilating yeasts, including Candida tropicalis, resulting in limitation of xylose uptake during the fermentation of glucose/xylose mixtures. In this study, a heterologous xylose transporter gene (At5g17010) from Arabidopsis thaliana was selected because of its high affinity for xylose and was codon-optimized for functional expression in C. tropicalis. The codon-optimized gene was placed under the control of the GAPDH promoter and was integrated into the genome of C. tropicalis strain LXU1 which is xyl2-disrupted and NXRG (codon-optimized Neurospora crassa xylose reductase) introduced. The xylose uptake rate was increased by 37-73 % in the transporter expression-enhanced strains depending on the glucose/xylose mixture ratio. The recombinant strain LXT2 in 500-mL flask culture using glucose/xylose mixtures showed a xylose uptake rate that was 29 % higher and a xylitol volumetric productivity (1.14 g/L/h) that was 25 % higher than the corresponding rates for control strain LXU1. Membrane protein extraction and Western blot analysis confirmed the successful heterologous expression and membrane localization of the xylose transporter in C. tropicalis.

  2. Effects of irregular cerebrospinal fluid production rate in human brain ventricular system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadzri, Edi Azali; Shamsudin, Amir Hamzah; Osman, Kahar; Abdul Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq; Aziz, Azian Abd

    2012-06-01

    Hydrocephalus is an abnormal accumulation of fluid in the ventricles and cavities in the brain. It occurs when the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow or absorption is blocked or when excessive CSF is secreted. The excessive accumulation of CSF results in an abnormal widening of the ventricles. This widening creates potentially harmful pressure on the tissues of the brain. In this study, flow analysis of CSF was conducted on a three-dimensional model of the third ventricle and aqueduct of Sylvius, derived from MRI scans. CSF was modeled as Newtonian Fluid and its flow through the region of interest (ROI) was done using EFD. Lab software. Different steady flow rates through the Foramen of Monro, classified by normal and hydrocephalus cases, were modeled to investigate its effects. The results show that, for normal and hydrocephalus cases, the pressure drop of CSF flow across the third ventricle was observed to be linearly proportionally to the production rate increment. In conclusion, flow rates that cause pressure drop of 5 Pa was found to be the threshold for the initial sign of hydrocephalus.

  3. Scattering rates for leptogenesis: Damping of lepton flavour coherence and production of singlet neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbrecht, Björn; Glowna, Frank; Schwaller, Pedro

    2013-12-01

    Using the Closed Time Path (CTP) approach, we perform a systematic leading order calculation of the relaxation rate of flavour correlations of left-handed Standard Model leptons. This quantity is of pivotal relevance for flavoured leptogenesis in the Early Universe, and we find it to be 5.19×10-3T at T=107 GeV and 4.83×10-3T at T=1013 GeV, in substantial agreement with estimates used in previous phenomenological analyses. These values apply to the Standard Model with a Higgs-boson mass of 125 GeV. The dependence of the numerical coefficient on the temperature T is due to the renormalisation group running. The leading linear and logarithmic dependencies of the flavour relaxation rate on the gauge and top-quark couplings are extracted, such that the results presented in this work can readily be applied to extensions of the Standard Model. We also derive the production rate of light (compared to the temperature) sterile right-handed neutrinos, a calculation that relies on the same methods. We confirm most details of earlier results, but find a substantially larger contribution from the t-channel exchange of fermions.

  4. SIZE DISTRIBUTION AND RATE OF PRODUCTION OF AIRBORNE PARTICULATE MATTER GENERATED DURING METAL CUTTING

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.; S.K. Dua, Ph.D., C.H.P.; Hillol Guha, Ph.D.

    2001-01-01

    During deactivation and decommissioning activities, thermal cutting tools, such as plasma torch, laser, and gasoline torch, are used to cut metals. These activities generate fumes, smoke and particulates. These airborne species of matter, called aerosols, may be inhaled if suitable respiratory protection is not used. Inhalation of the airborne metallic aerosols has been reported to cause ill health effects, such as acute respiratory syndrome and chromosome damage in lymphocytes. In the nuclear industry, metals may be contaminated with radioactive materials. Cutting these metals, as in size reduction of gloveboxes and tanks, produces high concentrations of airborne transuranic particles. Particles of the respirable size range (size < 10 {micro}m) deposit in various compartments of the respiratory tract, the fraction and the site in the respiratory tract depending on the size of the particles. The dose delivered to the respiratory tract depends on the size distribution of the airborne particulates (aerosols) and their concentration and radioactivity/toxicity. The concentration of airborne particulate matter in an environment is dependent upon the rate of their production and the ventilation rate. Thus, measuring aerosol size distribution and generation rate is important for (1) the assessment of inhalation exposures of workers, (2) the selection of respiratory protection equipment, and (3) the design of appropriate filtration systems. Size distribution of the aerosols generated during cutting of different metals by plasma torch was measured. Cutting rates of different metals, rate of generation of respirable mass, as well as the fraction of the released kerf that become respirable were determined. This report presents results of these studies. Measurements of the particles generated during cutting of metal plates with a plasma arc torch revealed the presence of particles with mass median aerodynamic diameters of particles close to 0.2 {micro}m, arising from

  5. Employee self-rated productivity and objective organizational production levels: effects of worksite health interventions involving reduced work hours and physical exercise.

    PubMed

    von Thiele Schwarz, Ulrica; Hasson, Henna

    2011-08-01

    To investigate how worksite health interventions involving a 2.5-hour reduction of weekly working hours with (PE) or without (RWH) mandatory physical exercise affects productivity. Six workplaces in dental health care were matched and randomized to three conditions (PE, RWH and referents). Employees' (N = 177) self-rated productivity and the workplaces' production levels (number of patients) were examined longitudinally. Number of treated patients increased in all conditions during the intervention year. While RWH showed the largest increase in this measure, PE showed significant increases in self-rated productivity, that is, increased quantity of work and work-ability and decreased sickness absence. A reduction in work hours may be used for health promotion activities with sustained or improved production levels, suggesting an increased productivity since the same, or higher, production level can be achieved with lesser resources.

  6. Crypt cell production rate in the small intestine of the zinc-supplemented mouse.

    PubMed

    Duff, Michael; Ettarh, Rajunor R

    2002-01-01

    Zinc is a trace element which is necessary in the body and the daily requirement is usually provided mainly through food intake. The effects of zinc deficiency are multisystemic and in the gastrointestinal tract include ulceration and inflammation. Many of these effects in the mammalian small intestine are reversible by zinc replenishment in a manner that is thought to be linked to the effect of this element on intestinal mucosal cell kinetics. However, the effects of continued replenishment (supplementation) have not been closely examined. This study examined the effects of zinc supplementation on gut crypt cell production in zinc-replete animals. Fifteen CD-1 mice were given zinc sulphate (0.3 mmol/l) in tap water while a second (control) group of 15 mice received only tap water. After 14 days, the small intestine was removed, measured and divided into four equal lengths and then sampled at the midpoint of each of the resulting four segments. Whole crypt numbers and crypt cell production rate were determined for each intestinal site for both groups of mice. While crypt dimensions and crypt numbers in zinc-fed mice showed no significant change from control levels, the crypt cell production in zinc-fed mice was significantly increased and duration of mitosis reduced in the third (distal) intestinal segment when compared to values from control mice. These findings show that the addition of subtoxic quantities of zinc to diet in zinc-replete animals enhances cell production and indicate that the reversal of zinc deficiency-induced gut damage following dietary zinc replenishment may be due to a direct effect on cell kinetics. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  7. Impact of ambient odors on food intake, saliva production and appetite ratings.

    PubMed

    Proserpio, Cristina; de Graaf, Cees; Laureati, Monica; Pagliarini, Ella; Boesveldt, Sanne

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ambient odor exposure on appetite, salivation and food intake. 32 normal-weight young women (age: 21.4±5.3year; BMI: 21.7±1.9kg/m(2)) attended five test sessions in a non-satiated state. Each participant was exposed to ambient odors (chocolate, beef, melon and cucumber), in a detectable but mild concentration, and to a control condition (no-odor exposure). During each condition, at different time points, participants rated appetite for 15 food products, and saliva was collected. After approximately 30min, ad libitum intake was measured providing a food (chocolate rice, high-energy dense product) that was congruent with one of the odors they were exposed to. A significant odor effect on food intake (p=0.034) and salivation (p=0.017) was found. Exposure to odors signaling high-energy dense products increased food intake (243.97±22.84g) compared to control condition (206.94±24.93g; p=0.03). Consistently, salivation was increased significantly during chocolate and beef exposure (mean: 0.494±0.050g) compared to control condition (0.417±0.05g; p=0.006). Even though odor exposure did not induce specific appetite for congruent products (p=0.634), appetite scores were significantly higher during odor exposure (p<0.0001) compared to the no-odor control condition and increased significantly over time (p=0.010). Exposure to food odors seems to drive behavioral and physiological responses involved in eating behavior, specifically for odors and foods that are high in energy density. This could have implications for steering food intake and ultimately influencing the nutritional status of people.

  8. The impact of dehydration rate on the production and cellular location of reactive oxygen species in an aquatic moss.

    PubMed

    Cruz de Carvalho, Ricardo; Catalá, Myriam; Marques da Silva, Jorge; Branquinho, Cristina; Barreno, Eva

    2012-10-01

    The aquatic moss Fontinalis antipyretica requires a slow rate of dehydration to survive a desiccation event. The present work examined whether differences in the dehydration rate resulted in corresponding differences in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and therefore in the amount of cell damage. Intracellular ROS production by the aquatic moss was assessed with confocal laser microscopy and the ROS-specific chemical probe 2,7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. The production of hydrogen peroxide was also quantified and its cellular location was assessed. The rehydration of slowly dried cells was associated with lower ROS production, thereby reducing the amount of cellular damage and increasing cell survival. A high oxygen consumption burst accompanied the initial stages of rehydration, perhaps due to the burst of ROS production. A slow dehydration rate may induce cell protection mechanisms that serve to limit ROS production and reduce the oxidative burst, decreasing the number of damaged and dead cells due upon rehydration.

  9. A general correction to catalytic rates determined for nonprocessive exo-depolymerases acting on both substrate and product in the initial-rate measurement.

    PubMed

    Stoller, J Rose; Wagschal, Kurt; Lee, Charles C; Jordan, Douglas B

    2017-04-15

    We recently reported on the kinetics of the polygalacturonase TtGH28 acting on trimer and dimer substrates. When the starting substrate for hydrolysis is the trimer, the product dimer is also subject to hydrolysis, resulting in discrepancies when either the concentration of dimer or monomer product is used for analysis of trimer hydrolysis. Here, we derive a method for determining catalytic rates of exo-hydrolases acting on trimer (and higher order) substrates when products may also be substrates for hydrolysis and show how this correction may be applied for TtGH28. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Investigating statistical techniques to infer interwell connectivity from production and injection rate fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Yousef, Ali Abdallah

    Reservoir characterization is one of the most important factors in successful reservoir management. In water injection projects, a knowledge of reservoir heterogeneities and discontinuities is particularly important to maximize oil recovery. This research project presents a new technique to quantify communication between injection and production wells in a reservoir based on temporal fluctuations in rates. The technique combines a nonlinear signal processing model and multiple linear regression (MLR) to provide information about permeability trends and the presence of flow barriers. The method was tested in synthetic fields using rates generated by a numerical simulator and then applied to producing fields in Argentina, the North Sea, Texas, and Wyoming. Results indicate that the model coefficients (weights) between wells are consistent with the known geology and relative location between wells; they are independent of injection/production rates. The developed procedure provides parameters (time constants) that explicitly indicate the attenuation and time lag between injector and producer pairs. The new procedure allows for a better insight into the well-to-well connectivities for the fields than MLR. Complex geological conditions are often not easily identified using the weights and time constants values individually. However, combining both sets of parameters in certain representations enhances the inference about the geological features. The applications of the new representations to numerically simulated fields and then to real fields indicate that these representations are capable of identifying whether the connectivity of an injector-producer well pair is through fractures, a high-permeability layer, or through partially completed wells. The technique may produce negative weights for some well pairs. Because there is no physical explanation in waterfloods for negative weights, these are also investigated. The negative weights have at least three causes

  11. A CCD spectrum and production rates for Comet P/Temple 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Uwe; Hicks, Michael

    1991-01-01

    Now that comet P/Tempel 2 has been resurrected as the primary target for the CRAF mission, an analysis is presented of a 20 minute exposure taken Oct. 9, 1988. The comet displays a typical spectrum with no unusual omissions or additions. The comet therefore appears to be quite suitable for detailed spacecraft study as a representative object. Strong emissions by C2, NH2, CN, and OI sup 1 D are exhibited. Compared to the emissions, the continuum is moderately strong but appears somewhat weaker than for P/Halley. Production rates for H2O (from OI sup 1 D) and the parent of C2, NH2, and CN is presented and compared to P/Halley.

  12. Measurement of tritium production rate distribution for a fusion-fission hybrid conceptual reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin-Hua; Guo, Hai-Ping; Mou, Yun-Feng; Zheng, Pu; Liu, Rong; Yang, Xiao-Fei; Yang, Jian

    2013-05-01

    A fusion-fission hybrid conceptual reactor is established. It consists of a DT neutron source and a spherical shell of depleted uranium and hydrogen lithium. The tritium production rate (TPR) distribution in the conceptual reactor was measured by DT neutrons using two sets of lithium glass detectors with different thicknesses in the hole in the vertical direction with respect to the D+ beam of the Cockcroft-Walton neutron generator in direct current mode. The measured TPR distribution is compared with the calculated results obtained by the three-dimensional Monte Carlo code MCNP5 and the ENDF/B-VI data file. The discrepancy between the measured and calculated values can be attributed to the neutron data library of the hydrogen lithium lack S(α, β) thermal scattering model, so we show that a special database of low-energy and thermal neutrons should be established in the physics design of fusion-fission hybrid reactors.

  13. Calculation of Neutron Production Rates and Spectra from Compounds of Actinides and Light Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlaskin, Gennady; Khomiakov, Yuriy

    2017-09-01

    The code NEDIS allows the calculation of neutron production rate and continuous energy spectra due to (α,n) reaction on Li, Be, B, C, O, F, Ne, Na Mg, Al, Si, P, S, Cl, Ar, K, and Ca. It accounts for anisotropic angular distribution of neutrons of (α,n) reaction in centre-of- mass system and dimensions of alpha emitting source material particles. Spontaneous fission spectra are calculated with evaluated half-life, spontaneous fission branching, ν- averaged per fission, and Watt spectrum parameters. The results of calculations by NEDIS can be used as input for Monte Carlo simulation for materials that will be used in radiation shielding and for underground neutron experiments

  14. Relative rates of nitric oxide and nitrous oxide production by nitrifiers, denitrifiers, and nitrate respirers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, I. C.; Levine, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    An account is given of the atmospheric chemical and photochemical effects of biogenic nitric and nitrous oxide emissions. The magnitude of the biogenic emission of NO is noted to remain uncertain. Possible soil sources of NO and N2O encompass nitrification by autotropic and heterotropic nitrifiers, denitrification by nitrifiers and denitrifiers, nitrate respiration by fermenters, and chemodenitrification. Oxygen availability is the primary determinant of these organisms' relative rates of activity. The characteristics of this major influence are presently investigated in light of the effect of oxygen partial pressure on NO and N2O production by a wide variety of common soil-nitrifying, denitrifying, and nitrate-respiring bacteria under laboratory conditions. The results obtained indicate that aerobic soils are primary sources only when there is sufficient moisture to furnish anaerobic microsites for denitrification.

  15. Relative rates of nitric oxide and nitrous oxide production by nitrifiers, denitrifiers, and nitrate respirers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, I. C.; Levine, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    An account is given of the atmospheric chemical and photochemical effects of biogenic nitric and nitrous oxide emissions. The magnitude of the biogenic emission of NO is noted to remain uncertain. Possible soil sources of NO and N2O encompass nitrification by autotropic and heterotropic nitrifiers, denitrification by nitrifiers and denitrifiers, nitrate respiration by fermenters, and chemodenitrification. Oxygen availability is the primary determinant of these organisms' relative rates of activity. The characteristics of this major influence are presently investigated in light of the effect of oxygen partial pressure on NO and N2O production by a wide variety of common soil-nitrifying, denitrifying, and nitrate-respiring bacteria under laboratory conditions. The results obtained indicate that aerobic soils are primary sources only when there is sufficient moisture to furnish anaerobic microsites for denitrification.

  16. The Ne-21 production rate in stony meteorites estimated from Be-10 and other radionuclides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moniot, R. K.; Kruse, T. H.; Hall, G. S.; Milazzo, T.; Pal, D.; Herzog, G. F.; Tuniz, C.; Savin, W.

    1983-01-01

    The Be-10 contents of 28 stony meteorites with known Ne-21 contents range from 0.97 to 23 dpm/kg and give an average Ne-21 production rate (P sub 21) of (0.28 + or - 0.02) x 10 to the -8th cu cm STP/g-My for shielding conditions corresponding to Ne-22/Ne-21 = 1.114 in an H-chondrite. This P sub 21 (Be) agrees with others' P sub 21 based on Na-22, Kr-81, and Mn-53, but not an Al-26. Temporal variations in the cosmic ray flux do not explain the disagreement satisfactorily; major errors in the radionuclide half-lives are not indicated. The discrepancy seems rooted in the data selection and the difficulties of making accurate corrections for shielding, chemical composition and other sources of variability.

  17. Local Entropy Production Rates in a Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemer, Marc; Marquardt, Tobias; Valadez Huerta, Gerardo; Kabelac, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    A modeling study on a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell by means of non-equilibrium thermodynamics is presented. The developed model considers a one-dimensional cell in steady-state operation. The temperature, concentration and electric potential profiles are calculated for every domain of the cell. While the gas diffusion and the catalyst layers are calculated with established classical modeling approaches, the transport processes in the membrane are calculated with the phenomenological equations as dictated by the non-equilibrium thermodynamics. This approach is especially instructive for the membrane as the coupled transport mechanisms are dominant. The needed phenomenological coefficients are approximated on the base of conventional transport coefficients. Knowing the fluxes and their intrinsic corresponding forces, the local entropy production rate is calculated. Accordingly, the different loss mechanisms can be detected and quantified, which is important for cell and stack optimization.

  18. Combined Results on b-Hadron Production Rates and Decay Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Dong

    2002-09-11

    Combined results on b-hadron lifetimes, b-hadron production rates, B{sub d}{sup 0}-{bar B}{sub d}{sup 0} and B{sub s}{sup 0}-{bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} oscillations, the decay width difference between the mass eigenstates of the B{sub s}{sup 0}-{bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} system, the average number of c and {bar c} quarks in b-hadron decays, and searches for CP violation in the B{sub d}{sup 0}-{bar B}{sub d}{sup 0} system are presented. They have been obtained from published and preliminary measurements available in Summer 2000 from the ALEPH, CDF, DELPHI, L3, OPAL and SLD Collaborations. These results have been used to determine the parameters of the CKM unitarity triangle.

  19. Combined results on b-hadron production rates, lifetimes, oscillations and semileptonic decays

    SciTech Connect

    WIllocq, stephane

    2000-08-02

    Combined results on b-hadron lifetimes, b-hadron production rates B{sub d}{sup 0}--Anti-B{sub d}{sup 0} and B{sub s}{sup 0}--Anti-B{sub s}{sup 0} oscillations, the decay width difference between the mass eigenstates of the B{sub s}{sup 0}--Anti-B{sub s}{sup 0} system, and the values of the CKM matrix elements {vert_bar}V{sub cb}{vert_bar} and {vert_bar}V{sub ub}{vert_bar} are obtained from published and preliminary measurements available in Summer 99 from the ALEPH, CDF, DELPHI, L3, OPAL and SLD Collaborations.

  20. Microalgae from domestic wastewater facility's high rate algal pond: Lipids extraction, characterization and biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Drira, Neila; Piras, Alessandra; Rosa, Antonella; Porcedda, Silvia; Dhaouadi, Hatem

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the harvesting of a biomass from a high rate algal pond (HRAP) of a real-scale domestic wastewater treatment facility and its potential as a biomaterial for the production of biodiesel were investigated. Increasing the medium pH to 12 induced high flocculation efficiency of up to 96% of the biomass through both sweep flocculation and charge neutralization. Lipids extracted by ultrasounds from this biomass contained around 70% of fatty acids, with palmitic and stearic acids being the most abundant. The extract obtained by supercritical CO2 contained 86% of fatty acids. Both conventional solvents extracts contained only around 10% of unsaturated fats, whereas supercritical CO2 extract contained more than 40% of unsaturated fatty acids. This same biomass was also subject to direct extractive-transesterification in a microwave reactor to produce fatty acid methyl esters, also known as, raw biodiesel.

  1. Expressed transcripts associated with high rates of egg production in chicken ovarian follicles.

    PubMed

    Yang, K T; Lin, C Y; Huang, H L; Liou, J S; Chien, C Y; Wu, C P; Huang, C W; Ou, B R; Chen, C F; Lee, Y P; Lin, E C; Tang, P C; Lee, W C; Ding, S T; Cheng, W T K; Huang, M C

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize differentially expressed transcripts associated with varying rates of egg production in Taiwan country chickens. Ovarian follicles were isolated from two strains of chicken which showed low (B) or high (L2) rates of egg production, then processed for RNA extraction and cDNA library construction. Three thousand and eight forty clones were randomly selected from the cDNA library and amplified by PCR, then used in microarray analysis. Differentially expressed transcripts (P<0.05, log(2)> or = 1.75) were sequenced, and aligned using GenBank. This analysis revealed 20 non-redundant sequences which corresponded to known transcripts. Eight transcripts were expressed at a higher level in ovarian tissue prepared from chicken strain B, and 12 transcripts were expressed at a higher level in L2 birds. These differential patterns of expression were confirmed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. We show that transcripts of cyclin B2 (cycB2), ferritin heavy polypeptide 1 (FTH1), Gag-Pol polyprotein, thymosin beta4 (TB4) and elongation factor 1 alpha1 (EEF1A1) were enriched in B strain ovarian follicles. In contrast, thioredoxin (TXN), acetyl-CoA dehydrogenase long chain (ACADL), inhibitor of growth family member 4 (ING4) and annexin II (ANXA2) were expressed in at higher levels in the L2 strain. We suggest that our approach may lead to the isolation of effective molecular markers that can be used in selection programs in Taiwan country chickens.

  2. Trade-off between mesophilic and thermophilic denitrification: rates vs. sludge production, settleability and stability.

    PubMed

    Courtens, Emilie N P; Vlaeminck, Siegfried E; Vilchez-Vargas, Ramiro; Verliefde, Arne; Jauregui, Ruy; Pieper, Dietmar H; Boon, Nico

    2014-10-15

    The development of thermophilic nitrogen removal strategies will facilitate sustainable biological treatment of warm nitrogenous wastewaters. Thermophilic denitrification was extensively compared to mesophilic denitrification for the first time in this study. Two sequential batch reactors (SBR) at 34 °C and 55 °C were inoculated with mesophilic activated sludge (26 °C), fed with synthetic influent in a first phase. Subsequently, the carbon source was switched from acetate to molasses, whereas in a third phase, the nitrate source was fertilizer industry wastewater. The denitrifying sludge maintained its activity at 55 °C, resulting in an immediate process start-up, obtaining nitrogen removal rates higher than 500 mg N g(-1) VSS d(-1) in less than one week. Although the mesophilic SBR showed twice as high specific nitrogen removal rates, the maximum thermophilic denitrifying activity in this study was nearly 10 times higher than the activities reported thus far. The thermophilic SBR moreover had a 73% lower sludge volume index, a 45% lower sludge production and a higher resilience towards a change in carbon source compared with the mesophilic SBR. The higher resilience was potentially related to a higher microbial diversity and evenness of the thermophilic community at the end of the synthetic feeding period. The thermophilic microbial community showed a higher similarity over the different feeding periods implying a more stable community. Overall, this study showed the capability of mesophilic denitrifiers to maintain their activity after a large temperature increase. Existing mesophilic process systems with cooling for the treatment of warm wastewaters could thus efficiently be converted to thermophilic systems with low sludge production and good settling properties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Peak capacity, peak-capacity production rate, and boiling point resolution for temperature-programmed GC with very high programming rates

    PubMed

    Grall; Leonard; Sacks

    2000-02-01

    Recent advances in column heating technology have made possible very fast linear temperature programming for high-speed gas chromatography. A fused-silica capillary column is contained in a tubular metal jacket, which is resistively heated by a precision power supply. With very rapid column heating, the rate of peak-capacity production is significantly enhanced, but the total peak capacity and the boiling-point resolution (minimum boiling-point difference required for the separation of two nonpolar compounds on a nonpolar column) are reduced relative to more conventional heating rates used with convection-oven instruments. As temperature-programming rates increase, elution temperatures also increase with the result that retention may become insignificant prior to elution. This results in inefficient utilization of the down-stream end of the column and causes a loss in the rate of peak-capacity production. The rate of peak-capacity production is increased by the use of shorter columns and higher carrier gas velocities. With high programming rates (100-600 degrees C/min), column lengths of 6-12 m and average linear carrier gas velocities in the 100-150 cm/s range are satisfactory. In this study, the rate of peak-capacity production, the total peak capacity, and the boiling point resolution are determined for C10-C28 n-alkanes using 6-18 m long columns, 50-200 cm/s average carrier gas velocities, and 60-600 degrees C/min programming rates. It was found that with a 6-meter-long, 0.25-mm i.d. column programmed at a rate of 600 degrees C/min, a maximum peak-capacity production rate of 6.1 peaks/s was obtained. A total peak capacity of about 75 peaks was produced in a 37-s long separation spanning a boiling-point range from n-C10 (174 degrees C) to n-C28 (432 degrees C).

  4. Magma production rate along the Ninetyeast Ridge and its relationship to Indian plate motion and Kerguelen hot spot activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreejith, K. M.; Krishna, K. S.

    2015-02-01

    The Ninetyeast Ridge, a linear trace of the Kerguelen hot spot in the Indian Ocean, was emplaced on a rapidly drifting Indian plate. Magma production rates along the ridge track are computed using gravity-derived excess crustal thickness data. The production rates change between 2 and 15 m3/s over timescales of 3-16 Myr. Major variations in magma production rates are primarily associated with significant changes in the Indian plate velocity with low-production phases linked to high plate velocity periods. The lowest magma production rate (2 m3/s) at 62 Ma is associated with the rapid northward drift of Indian plate under the influence of the Reunion mantle plume. The contemporaneous slowing of the African plate coincides with increase in magma production rate along the Walvis Ridge in the Atlantic Ocean. The present study suggests that variations in the Indian plate motion and frequent ridge jumps have a major role in controlling the magma production, particularly on long-period cycles (~16 Myr). Short-period variations (~5 Myr) in magma productions may be associated with intrinsic changes in the plume, possibly due to the presence of solitary waves in the plume conduit.

  5. Rapid Production of Bose-Einstein Condensates at a 1 Hz Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkas, Daniel; Ramirez-Serrano, Jaime; Salim, Evan

    2013-05-01

    The speed at which Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) can be produced is a key metric for the performance of ultracold-atom inertial sensors, gravimeters, and magnetometers, where production cycle time of ultracold atoms determines sensor bandwidth. Here, we demonstrate production of 87Rb BECs at rates exceeding 1 Hz. Not only can we create a BEC from a hot vapor in less than one second, but we can continuously repeat the process for several cycles. Such speeds are possible because of the short evaporation times that result when atoms are confined in tight traps. In our case, we magnetically trap atoms with an atom chip that seals the top of one of ColdQuanta's RuBECi®vacuum cells. With RF evaporative cooling sequences as short as 450 ms, we attain nearly pure condensates of 2 × 104 atoms. In the future, the apparatus described here will be integrated into a portable system that houses all of the components needed to produce BECs (e.g. lasers, vacuum, electronics, imaging, etc.) in a volume less than 0.3 m3. This work was supported by the Office of Naval Research (SBIR contract N00014-10-C-0282).

  6. Spectral conversion of light for enhanced microalgae growth rates and photosynthetic pigment production.

    PubMed

    Mohsenpour, Seyedeh Fatemeh; Richards, Bryce; Willoughby, Nik

    2012-12-01

    The effect of light conditions on the growth of green algae Chlorella vulgaris and cyanobacteria Gloeothece membranacea was investigated by filtering different wavelengths of visible light and comparing against a model daylight source as a control. Luminescent acrylic sheets containing violet, green, orange or red dyes illuminated by a solar simulator produced the desired wavelengths of light for this study. From the experimental results the highest specific growth rate for C. vulgaris was achieved using the orange range whereas violet light promoted the growth of G. membranacea. Red light exhibited the least efficiency in conversion of light energy into biomass in both strains of microalgae. Photosynthetic pigment formation was examined and maximum chlorophyll-a production in C. vulgaris was obtained by red light illumination. Green light yielded the best chlorophyll-a production in G. membranacea. The proposed illumination strategy offers improved microalgae growth without resorting to artificial light sources, reducing energy use and costs of cultivation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. High flow rate nozzle system with production of uniform size droplets

    DOEpatents

    Stockel, I.H.

    1990-10-16

    Method steps for production of substantially uniform size droplets from a flow of liquid include forming the flow of liquid, periodically modulating the momentum of the flow of liquid in the flow direction at controlled frequency, generating a cross flow direction component of momentum and modulation of the cross flow momentum of liquid at substantially the same frequency and phase as the modulation of flow direction momentum, and spraying the so formed modulated flow through a first nozzle outlet to form a desired spray configuration. A second modulated flow through a second nozzle outlet is formed according to the same steps, and the first and second modulated flows impinge upon each other generating a liquid sheet. Nozzle apparatus for modulating each flow includes rotating valving plates interposed in the annular flow of liquid. The plates are formed with radial slots. Rotation of the rotating plates is separably controlled at differential angular velocities for a selected modulating frequency to achieve the target droplet size and production rate for a given flow. The counter rotating plates are spaced to achieve a desired amplitude of modulation in the flow direction, and the angular velocity of the downstream rotating plate is controlled to achieve the desired amplitude of modulation of momentum in the cross flow direction. Amplitude of modulation is set according to liquid viscosity. 5 figs.

  8. High flow rate nozzle system with production of uniform size droplets

    DOEpatents

    Stockel, Ivar H.

    1990-01-01

    Method steps for production of substantially uniform size droplets from a flow of liquid include forming the flow of liquid, periodically modulating the momentum of the flow of liquid in the flow direction at controlled frequency, generating a cross flow direction component of momentum and modulation of the cross flow momentum of liquid at substantially the same frequency and phase as the modulation of flow direction momentum, and spraying the so formed modulated flow through a first nozzle outlet to form a desired spray configuration. A second modulated flow through a second nozzle outlet is formed according to the same steps, and the first and second modulated flows impinge upon each other generating a liquid sheet. Nozzle apparatus for modulating each flow includes rotating valving plates interposed in the annular flow of liquid. The plates are formed with radial slots. Rotation of the rotating plates is separably controlled at differential angular velocities for a selected modulating frequency to achieve the target droplet size and production rate for a given flow. The counter rotating plates are spaced to achieve a desired amplitude of modulation in the flow direction, and the angular velocity of the downstream rotating plate is controlled to achieve the desired amplitude of modulation of momentum in the cross flow direction. Amplitude of modulation is set according to liquid viscosity.

  9. Biodiesel production potential of wastewater treatment high rate algal pond biomass.

    PubMed

    Mehrabadi, Abbas; Craggs, Rupert; Farid, Mohammed M

    2016-12-01

    This study investigates the year-round production potential and quality of biodiesel from wastewater treatment high rate algal pond (WWT HRAP) biomass and how it is affected by CO2 addition to the culture. The mean monthly pond biomass and lipid productivities varied between 2.0±0.3 and 11.1±2.5gVSS/m(2)/d, and between 0.5±0.1 and 2.6±1.1g/m(2)/d, respectively. The biomass fatty acid methyl esters were highly complex which led to produce low-quality biodiesel so that it cannot be used directly as a transportation fuel. Overall, 0.9±0.1g/m(2)/d (3.2±0.5ton/ha/year) low-quality biodiesel could be produced from WWT HRAP biomass which could be further increased to 1.1±0.1g/m(2)/d (4.0ton/ha/year) by lowering culture pH to 6-7 during warm summer months. CO2 addition, had little effect on both the biomass lipid content and profile and consequently did not change the quality of biodiesel.

  10. Wastewater treatment high rate algal pond biomass for bio-crude oil production.

    PubMed

    Mehrabadi, Abbas; Craggs, Rupert; Farid, Mohammed M

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the production potential of bio-crude from wastewater treatment high rate algal pond (WWT HRAP) biomass in terms of yield, elemental/chemical composition and higher heating value (HHV). Hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) of the biomass slurry (2.2wt% solid content, 19.7kJ/g HHV) was conducted at a range of temperatures (150-300°C) for one hour. The bio-crude yield and HHV varied in range of 3.1-24.9wt% and 37.5-38.9kJ/g, respectively. The bio-crudes were comprised of 71-72.4wt% carbon, 0.9-4.8wt% nitrogen, 8.7-9.8wt% hydrogen and 12-15.7wt% oxygen. GC-MS analysis indicated that pyrroles, indoles, amides and fatty acids were the most abundant bio-crude compounds. HTL of WWT HRAP biomass resulted, also, in production of 10.5-26wt% water-soluble compounds (containing up to 293mg/L ammonia), 1.0-9.3wt% gas and 44.8-85.5wt% solid residue (12.2-18.1kJ/g). The aqueous phase has a great potential to be used as an ammonia source for further algal cultivation and the solid residue could be used as a process fuel source.

  11. Product release is rate-limiting for catalytic processing by the Dengue virus protease

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, A. E.; Pedroso, M. M.; Chappell, K. J.; Watterson, D.; Liebscher, S.; Kok, W. M.; Fairlie, D. P.; Schenk, G.; Young, P. R.

    2016-01-01

    Dengue Virus (DENV) is the most prevalent global arbovirus, yet despite an increasing burden to health care there are currently no therapeutics available to treat infection. A potential target for antiviral drugs is the two-component viral protease NS2B-NS3pro, which is essential for viral replication. Interactions between the two components have been investigated here by probing the effect on the rate of enzyme catalysis of key mutations in a mobile loop within NS2B that is located at the interface of the two components. Steady-state kinetic assays indicated that the mutations greatly affect catalytic turnover. However, single turnover and fluorescence experiments have revealed that the mutations predominantly affect product release rather than substrate binding. Fluorescence analysis also indicated that the addition of substrate triggers a near-irreversible change in the enzyme conformation that activates the catalytic centre. Based on this mechanistic insight, we propose that residues within the mobile loop of NS2B control product release and present a new target for design of potent Dengue NS2B-NS3 protease inhibitors. PMID:27897196

  12. Estimating methane production rates in bogs and landfills by deuterium enrichment of pore water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Siegel, D.I.; Chanton, J.P.; Glaser, P.H.; Chasar, L.S.; Rosenberry, D.O.

    2001-01-01

    Raised bogs and municipal waste landfills harbor large populations of methanogens within their domed deposits of anoxic organic matter. Although the methane emissions from these sites have been estimated by various methods, limited data exist on the activity of the methanogens at depth. We therefore analyzed the stable isotopic signature of the pore waters in two raised bogs from northern Minnesota to identify depth intervals in the peat profile where methanogenic metabolism occurs. Methanogenesis enriched the deuterium (2H) content of the deep peat pore waters by as much as +11% (Vienna Standard Mean Sea Water), which compares to a much greater enrichment factor of +70% in leachate from New York City's Fresh Kills landfill. The bog pore waters were isotopically dated by tritium (3H) to be about 35 years old at 1.5 m depth, whereas the landfill leachate was estimated as ~ 17 years old from Darcy flow calculations. According to an isotopic mass balance the observed deuterium enrichment indicates that about 1.2 g of CH4m-3 d-1 were produced within the deeper peat, compared to about 2.8 g CH4 m-3 d-1 in the landfill. The values for methane production in the bog peat are substantially higher than the flux rates measured at the surface of the bogs or at the landfill, indicating that deeper methane production may be much higher than was previously assumed.

  13. Effect of the organic loading rate on biogas composition in continuous fermentative hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Spagni, Alessandro; Casu, Stefania; Farina, Roberto

    2010-10-01

    Some systems did not select for hydrogen-producing microorganisms and an unexpected growth of hydrogenotrophic methanogens was observed, although the reactors were operated under well-defined operating conditions that could result in biohydrogen production. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the organic loading rate (OLR) on the hydrogen and methane composition of the biogas produced in dark fermentative processes. The study was carried out using an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor in order to evaluate the OLR effect in systems with sludge retention. During continuous operation, the UASB reactor showed the slow development of methanogenic activity, related to the applied OLR. The results demonstrate that operating an UASB reactor at pH 5.5 is not enough to prevent the acclimation of methanogens to the acidic pH and therefore long-term biohydrogen production cannot be achieved. Moreover, this study demonstrates that OLR also has an effect on the biogas composition, where the higher the OLR the greater the biogas H2 content.

  14. Cryogenic Treatment of Production Components in High-Wear Rate Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Milliken, M.

    2002-04-29

    Deep Cryogenic Tempering (DCT) is a specialized process whereby the molecular structure of a material is ''re-trained'' through cooling to -300 F and then heating to +175-1100 F. Cryocon, Inc. (hereafter referred to as Cryocon) and RMOTC entered an agreement to test the process on oilfield production components, including rod pumps, rods, couplings, and tubing. Three Shannon Formation wells were selected (TD about 500 ft) based on their proclivity for high component wear rates. Phase 1 of the test involved operation for a nominal 120 calendar day period with standard, non-treated components. In Phase 2, treated components were installed and operated for another nominal 120 calendar day period. Different cryogenic treatment profiles were used for components in each well. Rod pumps (two treated and one untreated) were not changed between test phases. One well was operated in pumped-off condition, resulting in abnormal wear and disqualification from the test. Testing shows that cryogenic treatment reduced wear of rods, couplers, and pump barrels. Testing of production tubing produced mixed results.

  15. Composition and production rate of dental solid waste and associated management practices in Hamadan, Iran.

    PubMed

    Nabizadeh, Ramin; Koolivand, Ali; Jafari, Ahmad Jonidi; Yunesian, Massoud; Omrani, Gasemali

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the components, composition and production rate of dental solid waste and associated management practices in dental offices in Hamadan. A total of 28 offices, including ten general dentist offices, eight specialist dentist offices, five practical dentist offices and five denture maker offices were selected in a random way. Three samples from each selected type were taken and the waste was manually separated into 74 sub-fractions and each sub-fraction was weighed. The results showed that the total annual dental waste production in dental offices was 41947.43 kg. Domestic type, potentially infectious, chemical and pharmaceutical and toxic waste constituted 71.15, 21.40, 7.26 and 0.18%, respectively of this amount. Only seven fractions including gypsum, latex gloves, nylon, dental impression material, used medicine ampoules, saliva-contaminated paper towels and saliva ejectors constituted about 80% of the waste. It was also indicated that there were no effective activity for waste minimization, separation, reuse and recycling in dental offices and the management of sharps, potentially infectious waste and other hazardous waste was poor.

  16. Formaldehyde photodissociation: molecular beam, product appearance rate, and carbon-14 isotopic-enrichment studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, P.

    1981-12-01

    Several aspects of the formaldehyde photopredissociation mechanism were studied. The technique of crossed laser and molecular beams was used to study the system under collisionless conditions. Detection of the molecular product CO after excitation of H/sub 2/CO near the S/sub 1/ origin gives strong support to the sequential decay model for fast nonradiative decay of S/sub 1/ states. For H/sub 2/CO excitation at 283.9 nm, formation of the radical product HCO dominates dissociation to molecular products by an order of magnitude. CO appearance rates for H/sub 2/CO excitation at 354.7, 317.0, 298.5 and 283.9 nm were measured by time-resolved absorption of a CO laser, and were the same within approx. 20%. These measurements could be complicated by rotational relaxation; an impulse approximation calculation using the CO translational energy distribution from the molecular beam experiment suggests that CO should be formed in high J states. The evidence for an intermediate in H/sub 2/CO photodissociation may thus be compromised. Simultaneous high resolution spectra of H/sub 2//sup 14/CO and H/sub 2//sup 12/CO between 290 and 345 nm were measured. About 30 lines with spectra selectivities C greater than or equal to 50 were found. Photolysis on one such line at 326.9 nm of a dilute mixture of H/sub 2//sup 14/CO in natural H/sub 2/CO gave one-step enrichment factors of up to 150. Since a factor of 150 in /sup 14/C concentration corresponds to approx. 7.2 half-lives, or 41,000 years, laser enrichment of archaeological samples could greatly improve the range of radiocarbon dating.

  17. Ejection fractions and pressure-heart rate product to evaluate cardiac efficiency. Continuous, real-time diagnosis using blood pressure and heart rate.

    PubMed

    Kunig, H; Tassani-Prell, P; Engelmann, L

    2014-04-01

    Ejection fractions, derived from ventricular volumes, and double product, related to myocardial oxygen consumption, are important diagnostic parameters, as they describe the efficiency with which oxygen is consumed. Present technology often allows only intermittent determination of physiological status. This deficiency may be overcome if ejection fractions and myocardial oxygen consumption could be determined from continuous blood pressure and heart rate measurements. The purpose of this study is to determine the viability of pressure-derived ejection fractions and pressure-heart rate data in a diverse patient population and the use of ejection fractions to monitor patient safety. Volume ejection fractions, derived from ventricular volumes, EF(V), are defined by the ratio of the difference of end-diastolic volume, EDV, and end-systolic volume, ESV, to EDV. In analogy, pressure ejection fraction, EF(P), may be defined by the ratio of the difference of systolic arterial pressure, SBP, and diastolic arterial pressure, DBP, to SBP. The pressure-heart rate (heart rate: HR) is given by the product of systolic pressure and heart rate, SBP × HR. EF(P) and SBP × HR data were derived for all patients (n = 824) who were admitted in 2008 to the ICU of a university hospital at the specific time 30 min prior to leaving the ICU whether as survivors or non-survivors. The results are displayed in an efficiency/pressure-heart rate diagram. The efficiency/pressure-heart rate diagram reveals one subarea populated exclusively by survivors, another subarea populated statistically significant by non-survivors, and a third area shared by survivors and non-survivors. The efficiency/pressure-heart rate product relationship may be used as an outcome criterion to assess survival and to noninvasively monitor improvement or deterioration in real time to improve safety in patients with diverse dysfunctions.

  18. Right-handed neutrino production rate at T>160 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Ghisoiu, I.; Laine, M.

    2014-12-16

    The production rate of right-handed neutrinos from a Standard Model plasma at a temperature above a hundred GeV has previously been evaluated up to NLO in Standard Model couplings (g∼2/3) in relativistic (M∼πT) and non-relativistic regimes (M≫πT), and up to LO in an ultrarelativistic regime (M≲gT). The last result necessitates an all-orders resummation of the loop expansion, accounting for multiple soft scatterings of the nearly light-like particles participating in 1↔2 reactions. In this paper we suggest how the regimes can be interpolated into a result applicable for any right-handed neutrino mass and at all temperatures above 160 GeV. The results can also be used for determining the lepton number washout rate in models containing right-handed neutrinos. Numerical results are given in a tabulated form permitting for their incorporation into leptogenesis codes. We note that due to effects from soft Higgs bosons there is a narrow intermediate regime around M∼g{sup 1/2}T in which our interpolation is phenomenological and a more precise study would be welcome.

  19. Non-UV light influences the degradation rate of crop protection products.

    PubMed

    Davies, Lawrence O; Bramke, Irene; France, Emma; Marshall, Samantha; Oliver, Robin; Nichols, Carol; Schäfer, Hendrik; Bending, Gary D

    2013-08-06

    Crop protection products (CPPs) are subject to strict regulatory evaluation, including laboratory and field trials, prior to approval for commercial use. Laboratory tests lack environmental realism, while field trials are difficult to control. Addition of environmental complexity to laboratory systems is therefore desirable to mimic a field environment more effectively. We investigated the effect of non-UV light on the degradation of eight CPPs (chlorotoluron, prometryn, cinosulfuron, imidacloprid, lufenuron, propiconazole, fludioxonil, and benzovindiflupyr) by addition of non-UV light to standard OECD 307 guidelines. Time taken for 50% degradation of benzovindiflupyr was halved from 373 to 183 days with the inclusion of light. Similarly, time taken for 90% degradation of chlorotoluron decreased from 79 to 35 days under light conditions. Significant reductions in extractable parent compound occurred under light conditions for prometryn (4%), imidacloprid (8%), and fludioxonil (24%) compared to dark controls. However, a significantly slower rate of cinosulfuron (14%) transformation was observed under light compared to dark conditions. Under light conditions, nonextractable residues were significantly higher for seven of the CPPs. Soil biological and chemical analyses suggest that light stimulates phototroph growth, which may directly and/or indirectly impact CPP degradation rates. The results of this study strongly suggest that light is an important parameter affecting CPP degradation, and inclusion of light into regulatory studies may enhance their environmental realism.

  20. Right-handed neutrino production rate at T > 160 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Ghisoiu, I.; Laine, M. E-mail: laine@itp.unibe.ch

    2014-12-01

    The production rate of right-handed neutrinos from a Standard Model plasma at a temperature above a hundred GeV has previously been evaluated up to NLO in Standard Model couplings (g ∼ 2/3) in relativistic (M ∼ πT) and non-relativistic regimes (M >> πT), and up to LO in an ultrarelativistic regime (M ∼< gT). The last result necessitates an all-orders resummation of the loop expansion, accounting for multiple soft scatterings of the nearly light-like particles participating in 1 ↔ 2 reactions. In this paper we suggest how the regimes can be interpolated into a result applicable for any right-handed neutrino mass and at all temperatures above 160GeV. The results can also be used for determining the lepton number washout rate in models containing right-handed neutrinos. Numerical results are given in a tabulated form permitting for their incorporation into leptogenesis codes. We note that due to effects from soft Higgs bosons there is a narrow intermediate regime around (M ∼ g{sup 1/2}T in which our interpolation is phenomenological and a more precise study would be welcome.

  1. Fast pyrolysis kinetics of alkali lignin: Evaluation of apparent rate parameters and product time evolution.

    PubMed

    Ojha, Deepak Kumar; Viju, Daniel; Vinu, R

    2017-10-01

    In this study, the apparent kinetics of fast pyrolysis of alkali lignin was evaluated by obtaining isothermal mass loss data in the timescale of 2-30s at 400-700°C in an analytical pyrolyzer. The data were analyzed using different reaction models to determine the rate constants and apparent rate parameters. First order and one dimensional diffusion models resulted in good fits with experimental data with apparent activation energy of 23kJmol(-1). Kinetic compensation effect was established using a large number of kinetic parameters reported in the literature for pyrolysis of different lignins. The time evolution of the major functional groups in the pyrolysate was analyzed using in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Maximum production of the volatiles occurred around 10-12s. A clear transformation of guaiacols to phenol, catechol and their derivatives, and aromatic hydrocarbons was observed with increasing temperature. The plausible reaction steps involved in various transformations are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaporation Rate Study and NDMA Formation from UDMH/NO2 Reaction Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchanan, Vanessa D.; Dee, Louis A.; Baker, David L.

    2003-01-01

    Laboratory samples of uns-dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) fuel/oxidizer (nitrogen dioxide) non-combustion reaction products (UFORP) were prepared using a unique permeation tube technology. Also, a synthetic UFORP was prepared from UDMH, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), dimethylammonium nitrate, sodium nitrite and purified water. The evaporation rate of UFORP and synthetic UFORP was determined under space vacuum (approx 10(exp -3) Torr) at -40 ?C and 0 ?C. The material remaining was analyzed and showed that the UFORP weight and NDMA concentration decreased over time; however, NDMA had not completely evaporated. Over 85% of the weight was removed by subjecting the UFORP to 10(-3) Torr for 7 hours at -40 ?C and 4 hours at 0 ?C. A mixture of dimethylammonium nitrate and sodium nitrite formed NDMA at a rapid rate in a moist air environment. A sample of UFORP residue was analyzed for formation of NDMA under various conditions. It was found that NDMA was not formed unless nitrite was added.

  3. Effect of intermediate compounds and products on wet oxidation and biodegradation rates of pharmaceutical compounds.

    PubMed

    Collado, Sergio; Laca, Adriana; Diaz, Mario

    2013-06-01

    Kinetics of pure compounds in batch agitated reactors are useful data to clarify the characteristics of a given reaction, but they frequently do not provide the required information to design industrial mixed continuous processes because in this case the final and intermediate products interact with the reaction of interest, due to backmixing effects. Simultaneously, the presence and transformations of other compounds, frequent in industrial wastewater treatments, adds more complexity to these types of interactions, whose effect can be different, favorable or unfavorable, for chemical or biological reactions. In this work, batch laboratory reactor data were obtained for the wet oxidation and biodegradation of four phenolic compounds present in a pharmaceutical wastewater and then compared with those collected from industrial continuous stirred tank reactors. For wet oxidation, batch laboratory degradation rates were significantly lower than those found in industrial continuous stirred operation. This behavior was explained by a different distribution of intermediate compounds in lab and industrial treatments, caused by the degree of backmixing and the synergistic effects between phenolic compounds (matrix effects). On the other hand, the specific utilization rates during aerobic biodegradation in the continuous industrial operation were lower than those measured in the laboratory, due to the simultaneous presence of the four pollutants in the industrial process (matrix effects) increasing the inhibitory effects of these compounds and its intermediates.

  4. Methyl Chavicol: Characterization of its Biogenic Emission Rate, Abundance, and Oxidation Products in the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvier-Brown, N. C.; Goldstein, A. H.; Worton, D. R.; Matross, D. M.; Gilman, J.; Kuster, W.; Degouw, J.; Cahill, T. M.; Holzinger, R.

    2008-12-01

    We report quantitative measurements of ambient atmospheric mixing ratios for methyl chavicol and determine its biogenic emission rate. Methyl chavicol, a biogenic oxygenated aromatic compound, is abundant within and above Blodgett Forest, a ponderosa pine forest in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California. Methyl chavicol was detected simultaneously by three in-situ instruments: gas chromatograph with mass spectrometer detector (GC-MS), proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS), and thermal desorption aerosol GC-MS (TAG). Previously identified as a potential bark beetle disruptant, methyl chavicol atmospheric mixing ratios are strongly correlated with 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO), a light and temperature dependent biogenic emission from the ponderosa pine trees at Blodgett Forest. Scaling from this correlation, methyl chavicol emissions account for 4-68 % of the carbon mass emitted as MBO in the daytime, depending on the season. From this relationship, we estimate a daytime basal emission rate of 0.72-10.2 μ gCg-1h-1, depending on needle age and seasonality. We also present the first observations of its oxidation products (4-methoxybenzaldehyde and 4-methyoxy benzene acetaldehyde) in the ambient atmosphere. Methyl chavicol is a major essential oil component of many species. We propose this newly- characterized biogenic compound should be included explicitly in both biogenic volatile organic carbon emission and atmospheric chemistry models.

  5. Group differences in measures of voice production and revised values of maximum airflow declination rate.

    PubMed

    Perkell, J S; Hillman, R E; Holmberg, E B

    1994-08-01

    In previous reports, aerodynamic and acoustic measures of voice production were presented for groups of normal male and female speakers [Holmberg et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 84, 511-529 (1988); J. Voice 3, 294-305 (1989)] that were used as norms in studies of voice disorders [Hillman et al., J. Speech Hear. Res. 32, 373-392 (1989); J. Voice 4, 52-63 (1990)]. Several of the measures were extracted from glottal airflow waveforms that were derived by inverse filtering a high-time-resolution oral airflow signal. Recently, the methods have been updated and a new study of additional subjects has been conducted. This report presents previous (1988) and current (1993) group mean values of sound pressure level, fundamental frequency, maximum airflow declination rate, ac flow, peak flow, minimum flow, ac-dc ratio, inferred subglottal air pressure, average flow, and glottal resistance. Statistical tests indicate overall group differences and differences for values of several individual parameters between the 1988 and 1993 studies. Some inter-study differences in parameter values may be due to sampling effects and minor methodological differences; however, a comparative test of 1988 and 1993 inverse filtering algorithms shows that some lower 1988 values of maximum flow declination rate were due at least in part to excessive low-pass filtering in the 1988 algorithm. The observed differences should have had a negligible influence on the conclusions of our studies of voice disorders.

  6. Dust production rate of asymptotic giant branch stars in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Raffaella; Valiante, Rosa; Ventura, Paolo; dell'Agli, Flavia; Di Criscienzo, Marcella; Hirashita, Hiroyuki; Kemper, Francisca

    2014-08-01

    We compare theoretical dust yields for stars with masses 1 ≤ mstar ≤ 8 M⊙ and metallicities 0.001 ≤ Z ≤ 0.008 with observed dust production rates (DPRs) using carbon-rich and oxygen-rich asymptotic giant branch (C-AGB and O-AGB) stars in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC). The measured DPR of C-AGB stars in the LMC are reproduced only if the mass loss from AGB stars is very efficient during the carbon-star stage. The same yields overpredict the observed DPR in the SMC, suggesting a stronger metallicity dependence of the mass-loss rates during the carbon-star stage. The DPRs of O-AGB stars suggest that rapid silicate dust enrichment occurs as a result of efficient hot bottom burning if mstar ≥ 3 M⊙ and Z ≥ 0.001. When compared to the most recent observations, our models support a stellar origin for the existing dust mass, if no significant destruction in the interstellar medium occurs, with a contribution from AGB stars of 70 per cent in the LMC and 15 per cent in the SMC.

  7. Influence of pH and temperature on alunite dissolution rates and products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acero, Patricia; Hudson-Edwards, Karen

    2015-04-01

    Aluminium is one of the main elements in most mining-affected environments, where it may influence the mobility of other elements and play a key role on pH buffering. Moreover, high concentrations of Al can have severe effects on ecosystems and humans; Al intake, for example, has been implicated in neurological pathologies (e.g., Alzheimer's disease; Flaten, 2001). The behaviour of Al in mining-affected environments is commonly determined, at least partially, by the dissolution of Al sulphate minerals and particularly by the dissolution of alunite (KAl3(SO4)2(OH)6), which is one of the most important and ubiquitous Al sulphates in mining-affected environments (Nordstrom, 2011). The presence of alunite has been described in other acid sulphate environments, including some soils (Prietzel & Hirsch, 1998) and on the surface of Mars (Swayze et al., 2008). Despite the important role of alunite, its dissolution rates and products, and their controlling factors under conditions similar to those found in these environments, remain largely unknown. In this work, batch dissolution experiments have been carried out in order to shed light on the rates, products and controlling factors of alunite dissolution under different pH conditions (between 3 and 8) and temperatures (between 279 and 313K) similar to those encountered in natural systems. The obtained initial dissolution rates using synthetic alunite, based on the evolution of K concentrations, are between 10-9.7 and 10-10.9 mol-m-2-s-1, with the lowest rates obtained at around pH 4.8, and increases in the rates recorded with both increases and decreases in pH. Increases of temperature in the studied range also cause increases in the dissolution rates. The dissolution of alunite dissolution is incongruent, as has been reported for jarosite (isostructural with alunite) by Welch et al. (2008). Compared with the stoichiometric ratio in the bulk alunite (Al/K=3), K tends to be released to the solution preferentially over Al

  8. The production of cosmogenic nuclides by GCR-particles for 2 pi exposure geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leya, I.; Neumann, S.; Wieler, R.; Michel, R.

    2001-11-01

    We present a purely physical model for the calculation of depth dependent production rates in 2 pi exposure geometries by galactic cosmic rays (GCR). Besides the spectra of primary and secondary particles and the excitation functions of the underlying nuclear reactions, the model is based on the integral number of GCR particles in the lunar orbit. We derived this value from adjusting modeled depth profiles for 10Be, 26Al, and 53Mn to measured data from the Apollo 15 drill core. The J0,GCR-value of 4.54 cm-2 s-1 and the solar modulation parameter of M = 490 MeV determined this way for 1 AU is in reasonable agreement with the J0,GCR-value derived recently for the meteoroid orbits (Leya et al., 2000b). We also show that the mean GCR proton spectrum in the lunar orbit has not changed substantially over about the last 10 Myr. For the major target elements we present depth dependent production rates for 10Be, 14C, 26Al, 36Cl and 53Mn, as well as for the rare gas isotopes 20,21,22Ne. In addition we present production rates for 36,38Ar from Fe and Ni. The new results are consistent with the data for stony meteoroids presented recently by our group (Leya et al., 2000b), but for the rare gas isotopes the new production rates sometimes differ significantly from earlier estimates. The applicability of the 22Ne/21Ne ratio as a shielding parameter is also discussed.

  9. Boulder Distributions at Legacy Landing Sites: Assessing Regolith Production Rates and Landing Site Hazards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, R. N.; Jolliff, B. L.; Lawrence, S. J.; Hayne, P. O.; Ghent, R. R.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding how the distribution of boulders on the lunar surface changes over time is key to understanding small-scale erosion processes and the rate at which rocks become regolith. Boulders degrade over time, primarily as a result of micrometeorite bombardment so their residence time at the surface can inform the rate at which rocks become regolith or become buried within regolith. Because of the gradual degradation of exposed boulders, we expect that the boulder population around an impact crater will decrease as crater age increases. Boulder distributions around craters of varying ages are needed to understand regolith production rates, and Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) images provide one of the best tools for conducting these studies. Using NAC images to assess how the distribution of boulders varies as a function of crater age provides key constraints for boulder erosion processes. Boulders also represent a potential hazard that must be addressed in the planning of future lunar landings. A boulder under a landing leg can contribute to deck tilt, and boulders can damage spacecraft during landing. Using orbital data to characterize boulder populations at locations where landers have safely touched down (Apollo, Luna, Surveyor, Chang'e-3) provides validation for landed mission hazard avoidance planning. Additionally, counting boulders at legacy landing sites is useful because: 1) LROC has extensive coverage of these sites at high resolutions (approximately 0.5 meters per pixel). 2) Returned samples from craters at these sites have been radiometrically dated, allowing assessment of how boulder distributions vary as a function of crater age. 3) Surface photos at these sites can be used to correlate with remote sensing measurements.

  10. Comparing Time-Dependent Geomagnetic and Atmospheric Effects on Cosmogenic Nuclide Production Rate Scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lifton, N. A.

    2014-12-01

    A recently published cosmogenic nuclide production rate scaling model based on analytical fits to Monte Carlo simulations of atmospheric cosmic ray flux spectra (both of which agree well with measured spectra) (Lifton et al., 2014, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 386, 149-160: termed the LSD model) provides two main advantages over previous scaling models: identification and quantification of potential sources of bias in the earlier models, and the ability to generate nuclide-specific scaling factors easily for a wide range of input parameters. The new model also provides a flexible framework for exploring the implications of advances in model inputs. In this work, the scaling implications of two recent time-dependent spherical harmonic geomagnetic models spanning the Holocene will be explored. Korte and Constable (2011, Phys. Earth Planet. Int. 188, 247-259) and Korte et al. (2011, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 312, 497-505) recently updated earlier spherical harmonic paleomagnetic models used by Lifton et al. (2014) with paleomagnetic measurements from sediment cores in addition to archeomagnetic and volcanic data. These updated models offer improved accuracy over the previous versions, in part to due to increased temporal and spatial data coverage. With the new models as input, trajectory-traced estimates of effective vertical cutoff rigidity (RC- the standard method for ordering cosmic ray data) yield significantly different time-integrated scaling predictions when compared to the earlier models. These results will be compared to scaling predictions using another recent time-dependent spherical harmonic model of the Holocene geomagnetic field by Pavón-Carrasco et al. (2014, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 388, 98-109), based solely on archeomagnetic and volcanic paleomagnetic data, but extending to 14 ka. In addition, the potential effects of time-dependent atmospheric models on LSD scaling predictions will be presented. Given the typical dominance of altitudinal over

  11. Investigation of the Photochemistry in Saturn's Ring Shadowed Atmosphere: Production Rates of Key Atmospheric Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgington, S. G.; Atreya, S. K.; Wilson, E. H.; Baines, K. H.; West, R. A.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Fletcher, L.

    2011-12-01

    Cassini has been orbiting Saturn for well over seven years. During this epoch, the ring shadow has changed from shading a large portion of the northern hemisphere to shading a small region just south of the equator and is continuing southward. At Saturn Orbit Insertion (July 1, 2004), the ring plane was inclined by ~24 degrees relative to the Sun-Saturn vector. The projection of the B-ring onto Saturn reached as far as 40N along the central meridian (~52N at the terminator). At its maximum extent, the ring shadow can reach as far as 48N (~58N at the terminator). The net result, is that the intensity of both ultraviolet and visible sunlight penetrating into any particular northern/southern latitude will vary depending on Saturn's tilt relative to the Sun and the optical thickness of each ring system. Previous work [1] looked at the variation of the solar flux as a function of solar inclination, i.e. season (see Figure 1). The current work looks at the impact of the oscillating ring shadow on the photodissociation and production rates of key molecules in Saturn's stratosphere and upper troposphere over time. Beginning with methane, the impact on production and loss rates of the long-lived photochemical hydrocarbons leading to haze formation are examined at several latitudes over a Saturn year. We also look at the impacts on phosphine abundance, a disequilibrium species whose presence in the upper troposphere is a tracer of convection processes in the deep atmosphere. Comparison to the corresponding photodissociation rates for a clear atmosphere and the effect of dynamical mixing will be presented. [1] Edgington,S.G., et al., 2006. Adaptation of a 2-D Photochemical Model to Improve Our Understanding of Saturn's Atmosphere. B.A.A.S., 38, 499 (#11.23). The research described in this paper was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  12. Revised Production Rates for Na-22 and Mn-54 in Meteorites Using Cross Sections Measured for Neutron-induced Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisterson, J. M.; Kim, K. J.; Reedy, R. C.

    2004-01-01

    The interactions of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) with extraterrestrial bodies produce small amounts of radionuclides and stable isotopes. The production rates of many relatively short-lived radionuclides, including 2.6-year Na-22 and 312-day Mn-54, have been measured in several meteorites collected very soon after they fell. Theoretical models used to calculate production rates for comparison with the measured values rely on input data containing good cross section measurements for all relevant reactions. Most GCR particles are protons, but secondary neutrons make most cosmogenic nuclides. Calculated production rates using only cross sections for proton-induced reactions do not agree well with measurements. One possible explanation is that the contribution to the production rate from reactions initiated by secondary neutrons produced in primary GCR interactions should be included explicitly. This, however, is difficult to do because so few of the relevant cross sections for neutron-induced reactions have been measured.

  13. Production rate enhancement of size-tunable silicon nanoparticles by temporally shaping femtosecond laser pulses in ethanol.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Zhang, Guangming; Jiang, Lan; Shi, Xuesong; Zhang, Kaihu; Rong, Wenlong; Duan, Ji'an; Lu, Yongfeng

    2015-02-23

    This paper proposes an efficient approach for production-rate enhancement and size reduction of silicon nanoparticles produced by femtosecond (fs) double-pulse ablation of silicon in ethanol. Compared with a single pulse, the production rate is ~2.6 times higher and the mean size of the NPs is reduced by ~1/5 with a delay of 2 ps. The abnormal enhancement in the production rate is obtained at pulse delays Δt > 200 fs. The production-rate enhancement is mainly attributed to high photon absorption efficiency. It is caused by an increase in localized transient electron density, which results from the first sub-pulse ionization of ethanol molecules before the second sub-pulse arrives. The phase-change mechanism at a critical point might reduce nanoparticle size.

  14. Revised Production Rates for Na-22 and Mn-54 in Meteorites Using Cross Sections Measured for Neutron-induced Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisterson, J. M.; Kim, K. J.; Reedy, R. C.

    2004-01-01

    The interactions of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) with extraterrestrial bodies produce small amounts of radionuclides and stable isotopes. The production rates of many relatively short-lived radionuclides, including 2.6-year Na-22 and 312-day Mn-54, have been measured in several meteorites collected very soon after they fell. Theoretical models used to calculate production rates for comparison with the measured values rely on input data containing good cross section measurements for all relevant reactions. Most GCR particles are protons, but secondary neutrons make most cosmogenic nuclides. Calculated production rates using only cross sections for proton-induced reactions do not agree well with measurements. One possible explanation is that the contribution to the production rate from reactions initiated by secondary neutrons produced in primary GCR interactions should be included explicitly. This, however, is difficult to do because so few of the relevant cross sections for neutron-induced reactions have been measured.

  15. Effects of dietary starch content and rate of fermentation on methane production in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Hatew, B; Podesta, S C; Van Laar, H; Pellikaan, W F; Ellis, J L; Dijkstra, J; Bannink, A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of starch varying in rate of fermentation and level of inclusion in the diet in exchange for fiber on methane (CH4) production of dairy cows. Forty Holstein-Friesian lactating dairy cows of which 16 were rumen cannulated were grouped in 10 blocks of 4 cows each. Cows received diets consisting of 60% grass silage and 40% concentrate (dry matter basis). Cows within block were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 different diets composed of concentrates that varied in rate of starch fermentation [slowly (S) vs. rapidly (R) rumen fermentable; native vs. gelatinized corn grain] and level of starch (low vs. high; 270 vs. 530g/kg of concentrate dry matter). Results of rumen in situ incubations confirmed that the fractional rate of degradation of starch was higher for R than S starch. Effective rumen degradability of organic matter was higher for high than low starch and also higher for R than S starch. Increased level of starch, but not starch fermentability, decreased dry matter intake and daily CH4 production. Milk yield (mean 24.0±1.02kg/d), milk fat content (mean 5.05±0.16%), and milk protein content (mean 3.64±0.05%) did not differ between diets. Methane expressed per kilogram of fat- and protein-corrected milk, per kilogram of dry matter intake, or as a fraction of gross energy intake did not differ between diets. Methane expressed per kilogram of estimated rumen-fermentable organic matter (eRFOM) was higher for S than R starch-based diets (47.4 vs. 42.6g/kg of eRFOM) and for low than high starch-based diets (46.9 vs. 43.1g/kg of eRFOM). Apparent total-tract digestibility of neutral detergent fiber and crude protein were not affected by diets, but starch digestibility was higher for diets based on R starch (97.2%) compared with S starch (95.5%). Both total volatile fatty acid concentration (109.2 vs. 97.5mM) and propionate proportion (16.5 vs. 15.8mol/100mol) were higher for R starch- compared with S starch

  16. Growth-rate dependency of de novo resveratrol production in chemostat cultures of an engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain.

    PubMed

    Vos, Tim; de la Torre Cortés, Pilar; van Gulik, Walter M; Pronk, Jack T; Daran-Lapujade, Pascale

    2015-09-14

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has become a popular host for production of non-native compounds. The metabolic pathways involved generally require a net input of energy. To maximize the ATP yield on sugar in S. cerevisiae, industrial cultivation is typically performed in aerobic, sugar-limited fed-batch reactors which, due to constraints in oxygen transfer and cooling capacities, have to be operated at low specific growth rates. Because intracellular levels of key metabolites are growth-rate dependent, slow growth can significantly affect biomass-specific productivity. Using an engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain expressing a heterologous pathway for resveratrol production as a model energy-requiring product, the impact of specific growth rate on yeast physiology and productivity was investigated in aerobic, glucose-limited chemostat cultures. Stoichiometric analysis revealed that de novo resveratrol production from glucose requires 13 moles of ATP per mole of produced resveratrol. The biomass-specific production rate of resveratrol showed a strong positive correlation with the specific growth rate. At low growth rates a substantial fraction of the carbon source was invested in cellular maintenance-energy requirements (e.g. 27 % at 0.03 h(-1)). This distribution of resources was unaffected by resveratrol production. Formation of the by-products coumaric, phloretic and cinnamic acid had no detectable effect on maintenance energy requirement and yeast physiology in chemostat. Expression of the heterologous pathway led to marked differences in transcript levels in the resveratrol-producing strain, including increased expression levels of genes involved in pathways for precursor supply (e.g. ARO7 and ARO9 involved in phenylalanine biosynthesis). The observed strong differential expression of many glucose-responsive genes in the resveratrol producer as compared to a congenic reference strain could be explained from higher residual glucose concentrations and higher

  17. Elemental weathering fluxes and saprolite production rate in a Central African lateritic terrain (Nsimi, South Cameroon)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Jean-Jacques; Marechal, Jean-Christophe; Riotte, Jean; Boeglin, Jean-Loup; Bedimo Bedimo, Jean-Pierre; Ndam Ngoupayou, Jules Remy; Nyeck, Brunot; Robain, Henri; Sekhar, M.; Audry, Stéphane; Viers, Jérôme

    2012-12-01

    are exported from the lateritic regolith and maybe due to the dissolution of kaolinite crystals. Compared to the other immobile elements (Zr, Hf, Nb and Th), Ti is significantly exported. Among redox-sensitive elements (Fe, V, Cr, Mn, Ce), only Ce and Mn are exported out of the hillside system. The other elements (Fe, V, Cr) are likely able to be mobilized but over a short distance only. Rb, Sr, Ba, Ni, Cu, Zn are affected by export processes. LREE and Y are exported but in very low amounts (in the range from μmol/ha/yr to mmol/ha/yr) while HREE and U are exported in negligible quantities. A first attempt is carried out to compare the mature ridge top profile from Nsimi SEW with the immature ridge top weathering profile from the Mule Hole SEW (South India), developed on similar granodioritic basement, in order to get deeper insight into (i) the contemporary saprolite production rates and (ii) the combined effect of precipitation (in terms of Mean Annual Rainfall, MAR) and evapotranspiration on the aggressiveness of the draining solutions. Considering (i) the contemporary Na flux as representative of the dissolution of plagioclase crystals and conservative during saprolitization processes and (ii) steady state of the inter-annual recharge (R) over a 10 years period, the current saprolite production rates (σr) are of 22 mm/kyr for Mule Hole SEW and 2 mm/kyr for Nsimi SEW, respectively. Even with a very low R/MAR ratio (0.04) compared to Nsimi, the chemical weathering at Mule Hole is active and related to the groundwater exports. At Mule Hole, plagioclase crystals are still present in the saprolite and the soil cover leading to a diffuse weathering front. The high Nsimi R/MAR ratio (0.2) allows the solution to be still aggressive with respect to the plagioclase and other weatherable minerals at the bedrock interface resulting in their complete breakdown in a few centimetres (sharp weathering front) leading to a mature saprolite. For the Nsimi SEW, if we consider (i

  18. Excitation Functions and Production Rates of Radionuclides Produced in the Proton Bombardment of natPr and natLa

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeulen, C.; Steyn, G.F.; Walt, T.N. van der; Nortier, F.M.; Szelecsenyi, F.; Kovacs, Z.

    2005-05-24

    Excitation functions and production rates are presented for various radionuclides formed in the bombardment of natPr and natLa with protons. Comparisons are made with theoretical predictions based on the geometry dependent hybrid model. Alternative production routes for 139Pr and 139Ce are investigated.

  19. Quantifying melt production and degassing rate at mid-ocean ridges from global mantle convection models with plate motion history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mingming; Black, Benjamin; Zhong, Shijie; Manga, Michael; Rudolph, Maxwell L.; Olson, Peter

    2016-07-01

    The Earth's surface volcanism exerts first-order controls on the composition of the atmosphere and the climate. On Earth, the majority of surface volcanism occurs at mid-ocean ridges. In this study, based on the dependence of melt fraction on temperature, pressure, and composition, we compute melt production and degassing rate at mid-ocean ridges from three-dimensional global mantle convection models with plate motion history as the surface velocity boundary condition. By incorporating melting in global mantle convection models, we connect deep mantle convection to surface volcanism, with deep and shallow mantle processes internally consistent. We compare two methods to compute melt production: a tracer method and an Eulerian method. Our results show that melt production at mid-ocean ridges is mainly controlled by surface plate motion history, and that changes in plate tectonic motion, including plate reorganizations, may lead to significant deviation of melt production from the expected scaling with seafloor production rate. We also find a good correlation between melt production and degassing rate beneath mid-ocean ridges. The calculated global melt production and CO2 degassing rate at mid-ocean ridges varies by as much as a factor of 3 over the past 200 Myr. We show that mid-ocean ridge melt production and degassing rate would be much larger in the Cretaceous, and reached maximum values at ˜150-120 Ma. Our results raise the possibility that warmer climate in the Cretaceous could be due in part to high magmatic productivity and correspondingly high outgassing rates at mid-ocean ridges during that time.

  20. Determination of water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) of HDPE bottles for pharmaceutical products.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yisheng; Li, Yanxia

    2008-06-24

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of experimental conditions for measuring the water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) bottles using a steady-state sorption method. Bottles were filled with desiccant, closed with caps and heat induction sealed, and then stored in stability chambers at controlled temperature and relative humidity. Weight gain of the bottles was determined every 1 or 2 weeks until a linear weight gain profile was obtained. WVTR of the bottles was determined from the slope of the linear portion of the weight gain versus time profile. The effects of desiccants and temperature/humidity were studied. Results show that, with a sufficient amount of anhydrous calcium chloride in bottles, a negligibly low and sufficiently constant headspace humidity is maintained, and a steady-state permeation rate is achieved. For all 8 sizes of bottles used in this study, steady-state was achieved in 1 or 2 weeks after the experiment was started. This method provided reproducible WVTR data for HDPE bottles. Apparent moisture permeability of all 8 sizes of bottles was (2.3+/-0.3)x10(-7), (2.6+/-0.2)x10(-7), and (3.4+/-0.2)x10(-7)cm(2)/s at 25 degrees C, 30 degrees C, 40 degrees C, respectively. Moisture permeability determined from the current study was similar to data reported in the literature, indicating that the steady-state weight gain method can be used to obtain reliable WVTR of containers for pharmaceutical products.

  1. Oxidation of dimethylselenide by δMnO2: oxidation product and factors affecting oxidation rate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Bronwen; Burau, Richard G.

    1995-01-01

    Volatile dimethylselenide (DMSe) was transformed to a nonvolatile Se compound in a ??-MnO2 suspension. The nonvolatile product was a single compound identified as dimethylselenoxide based on its mass spectra pattern. After 24 h, 100% of the DMSe added to a ??-MnO2 suspension was converted to nonpurgable Se as opposed to 20%, 18%, and 4% conversion for chromate, permanganate, and the filtrate from the suspension, respectively. Manganese was found in solution after reaction. These results imply that the reaction between manganese oxide and DMSe was a heterogeneous redox reaction involving solid phase ??-MnO2 and solution phase DMSe. Oxidation of DMSe to dimethylselenoxide [OSe(CH3)2] by a ??-MnO2 suspension appears to be first order with respect to ??-MnO2, to DMSe, and to hydrogen ion with an overall rate law of d[OSe(CH3)2 ]/dt = 95 M-2 min-1 [MnO2]1[DMSe]1[H+]1 for the MnO2 concentration range of 0.89 ?? 10-3 - 2.46 ?? 10-3 M, the DMSe concentration range of 3.9 ?? 10-7 - 15.5 ?? 10-7 M Se, and a hydrogen ion concentation range of 7.4 ?? 10-6 -9.5 ?? 10-8 M. A general surface site adsorption model is consistent with this rate equation if the uncharged |OMnOH is the surface adsorption site. DMSe acts as a Lewis base, and the manganese oxide surface acts as a Lewis acid. DMSe adsorption to |OMnOH can be viewed as a Lewis acid/ base complex between the largely p orbitals of the DMSe lone pair and the unoccupied eg orbitals on manganese oxide. For such a complex, frontier molecular orbital theory predicts electron transfer to occur via an inner-sphere complex between the DMSe and the manganese oxide. ?? 1995 American Chemical Society.

  2. EFFECTS OF REACTION PARAMETERS ON ELECTROCHEMICAL DECHLORINATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE RATE AND BY-PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) was electrochemically dechlorinated in aqueous environments using granular graphite cathode in a mixed reactor. Effects of pH, current, electrolyte type, and flow rate on TCE dechlorination rate were evaluated. TCE dechlorination rate constant and gas prod...