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Sample records for 236pu tracer anion

  1. Adsorption behaviour of PuF6 on UO2F2 by the use of 236Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Nobuaki; Matsuda, Minoru; Mitsugashira, Toshiaki; Kirishima, Akira

    2010-03-01

    To know the behavior of plutonium in the fluoride volatility process (FLUOREX PROCESS) for the spent nuclear fuel, both UO2 and PuO2 are fluorinated by fluorine forming volatile UF6 and PuF6, respectively. Then PuF6 is separated and recovered from UF6 by using adsorption materials such as uranyl fluoride UO2F2. In this paper, adsorption behavior of PuF6on UO2F2 was examined by the use of 236Pu tracer. First, the stability of UO2F2 in F2atmosphere was analyzed by TG-DTA method showing that uranium volatilized completely over 350 °C by the formation of UF6 and the adsorption of plutonium by UO2F2 should be done at temperatures lower than 250 °C. The behavior of PtF6 as a chemical analogue of PuF6 was also conducted for comparison and it showed that the deposition of PtF4 on UO2F2 at 200 °C. When the 236Pu doped U3O8 was reacted with 10%F2-He gas, the PuF6 vaporized at ca. 600 °C. Then adsorption of 236Pu on UO2F2 was observed by α ray measurement. The adsorption mechanism of Pu on UO2F2 was discussed with experimental data and thermodynamic consideration.

  2. Levels of 232U fed in 236Pu α decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardisson, G.; Hussonnois, M.; Ledu, J. F.; Trubert, D.; Lederer, C. M.

    1994-06-01

    The γ spectrum following the α decay of 236Pu has been reinvestigated with a high-resolution HPGe detector. Accurate energies and intensities are reported for 26 γ transitions, of which 20 were observed for the first time. A decay scheme is constructed using the Ritz combination principle, γγ coincidence data, and previously known data from nuclear reactions and from232Pa β- decay. We observe feeding of the ground-state rotational band up to spin 8, the β vibrational band to spin 4, the K=0 octupole vibrational band to spin 5, and the bandhead of the γ vibrational band. New states of 232U at 927.3 and 967.7 keV, populated with low α-decay hindrance factors, are assigned as members of a second-excited Kπ=0+ band. The ratio of E1/E2 transitions in the decay of these states suggests that the E1 transitions to members of the K=0 octupole band may be rather fast (~=10-3 Weisskopf units). Systematics of hindrance factors for α decay to vibrational states are presented.

  3. Tracer Migration in a Radially Divergent Flow Field: Longitudinal Dispersivity and Anionic Tracer Retardation

    SciTech Connect

    Seaman, J.C., P.M. Bertsch, M. Wilson, J. Singer, F. Majs and S.A. Aburime

    2007-01-01

    uniform flow solution, as indicated by the coefficient of determination, r{sup 2}, yielding lower {alpha}{sub L} while accounting for breakthrough tailing inherent to radial flow conditions. Complex multiple-peak breakthrough patterns were observed within certain sampling zones, indicative of multiple major flow paths and the superposition of resulting breakthrough curves. A strong correlation was found between {alpha}L and arrival times observed from one experiment to the next, indicative of the general reproducibility of the tracer results. Temporal moment analysis was used to evaluate tracer migration rate as an indicator of variations in hydraulic conductivity and flow velocity, as well as mass recovery and retardation for the ionic solutes compared with tritiated water. Retardation factors for Br{sup -} ranged from 0.99 to 1.67 with no clear trend with respect to transport distance; however, Br{sup -} mass recovery decreased with distance, suggesting that the retardation values are biased in terms of early arrival because of limited detection and an insufficient monitoring duration. Anion retardation was attributed to sorption by iron oxides. Similar results were observed for the FBA tracers. The assumption of conservative behavior for the anionic tracers would generally result in higher {alpha}L values and lower estimated flow velocities.

  4. Deducing the 236Pu(n,f) and 237Pu(n,f) cross sections via the surrogate ratio method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, R. O.; Beausang, C. W.; Ross, T. J.; Burke, J. T.; Casperson, R. J.; McCleskey, M.; Cooper, N.; Escher, J. E.; Gell, K. B.; Good, E.; Humby, P.; Saastimoinen, A.; Tarlow, T. D.

    2013-10-01

    The short half-lives associated with certain minor actinide nuclei that are relevant to stockpile stewardship pursuits and the development of next-generation nuclear reactors make direct neutron measurements very challenging. In certain cases, a stable beam and target ``surrogate reaction'' can be used in lieu of the neutron-induced reaction, and the (n,f) cross section can then be deduced indirectly. Agreement between surrogate and direct measurements for (n,f) cross sections in actinide nuclei is usually within 10%. The present work reports on the measurement of the 236Pu(n,f) and 237Pu(n,f) cross sections via 239Pu(p,tf) and 239Pu(p,df) surrogate reactions, respectively. The experiment was performed at the Texas A&M University Cyclotron Facility using a 28.5 MeV proton beam to bombard 239Pu and 235U targets. Outgoing light ions were detected in coincidence with fission fragments using the STAR-LiTe detector array. Results of the analysis will be presented. This work was supported by DoE Grant Numbers: DE-FG52-09NA29454 and DE-FG02-05ER41379 (Richmond), DE-AC52-07NA27344 (LLNL) and DE-FG52-09NA29467 (TAMU).

  5. Identifiability of diffusion and retention parameters of anionic tracers from the diffusion and retention (DR) experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Shuping; Samper, Javier; Naves, Acacia; Soler, Josep M.

    2012-06-01

    SummaryIn situ diffusion experiments in low-permeability rocks are performed to study radionuclide diffusion and sorption and investigate scale effects. They are carried out in a packed-off interval of a borehole having a circulation system in which tracers are injected and allowed to diffuse into the rock. Tracer concentrations are monitored at the tracer interval during the experiment (dilution data) and measured at the end of the experiment in rock cores (overcoring data). The interpretation of in situ diffusion experiments in clay formations is challenging due to the influence of the filter, the gap between the filter and the borehole wall and the borehole disturbed zone (BDZ). The impact of the filter, the gap and the BDZ on the estimates of the accessible porosity and the effective diffusion, De, of the rock in the presence of random noise has been evaluated for the anionic tracers with synthetic experiments having the geometry and parameters of the in situ diffusion and retention (DR) experiment performed on Opalinus clay. The component of De of the clay parallel to the bedding can be estimated properly from dilution data when the standard deviation of the noise of the data is smaller than 0.05, but the component of De normal to the bedding cannot be estimated from dilution data. On the other hand, both components of De can be estimated properly from noisy overcoring data. Although the parameters of the BDZ and the undisturbed clay cannot be estimated simultaneously from noisy dilution data, they can be estimated from noisy overcoring data when the standard deviation of the noise is smaller than 0.05. Parameter estimation errors are large when the assumption about the BDZ is incorrect. The uncertainties in the De of the filter and in the volume of the circulation system have a noticeable impact on the estimates of the diffusion and porosity of the clay derived from dilution data. On the other hand, acceptable parameter estimates are obtained from overcoring

  6. INL Tracer Interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    2007-03-27

    This spreadsheet application is for tracer test analysis. The analyses are based on the first temporal moment of a tracer. The governing equations are briefly discussed, and the individual steps required of the user are outlined. A series of Excel macros written in Visual Basic calculate mean residence time, swept pore volume, and flow-storage geometry from a tracer history.

  7. Biological tracer method

    DOEpatents

    Strong-Gunderson, Janet M.; Palumbo, Anthony V.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a biological tracer method for characterizing the movement of a material through a medium, comprising the steps of: introducing a biological tracer comprising a microorganism having ice nucleating activity into a medium; collecting at least one sample of the medium from a point removed from the introduction point; and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. The present invention is also a method for using a biological tracer as a label for material identification by introducing a biological tracer having ice nucleating activity into a material, collecting a sample of a portion of the labelled material and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer.

  8. Biological tracer method

    DOEpatents

    Strong-Gunderson, J.M.; Palumbo, A.V.

    1998-09-15

    The present invention is a biological tracer method for characterizing the movement of a material through a medium, comprising the steps of: introducing a biological tracer comprising a microorganism having ice nucleating activity into a medium; collecting at least one sample of the medium from a point removed from the introduction point; and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. The present invention is also a method for using a biological tracer as a label for material identification by introducing a biological tracer having ice nucleating activity into a material, collecting a sample of a portion of the labelled material and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. 2 figs.

  9. Tracer attenuation in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetkovic, Vladimir

    2011-12-01

    The self-purifying capacity of aquifers strongly depends on the attenuation of waterborne contaminants, i.e., irreversible loss of contaminant mass on a given scale as a result of coupled transport and transformation processes. A general formulation of tracer attenuation in groundwater is presented. Basic sensitivities of attenuation to macrodispersion and retention are illustrated for a few typical retention mechanisms. Tracer recovery is suggested as an experimental proxy for attenuation. Unique experimental data of tracer recovery in crystalline rock compare favorably with the theoretical model that is based on diffusion-controlled retention. Non-Fickian hydrodynamic transport has potentially a large impact on field-scale attenuation of dissolved contaminants.

  10. New physical Lagrangian tracer

    SciTech Connect

    Zak, B.D.

    1984-01-01

    A physical Lagrangian tracer will be operational and available for use within the near future. The tracer is an adjustable buoyancy constant volume balloon with an onboard microprocessor to serve an appropriate array of sensors, and to control buoyancy. Tracking and data reporting is to be accomplished via the ARGOS satellite-borne data system, yielding both a local and a world-wide capability. 5 references, 1 figure.

  11. Anion exchange membrane

    DOEpatents

    Verkade, John G; Wadhwa, Kuldeep; Kong, Xueqian; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2013-05-07

    An anion exchange membrane and fuel cell incorporating the anion exchange membrane are detailed in which proazaphosphatrane and azaphosphatrane cations are covalently bonded to a sulfonated fluoropolymer support along with anionic counterions. A positive charge is dispersed in the aforementioned cations which are buried in the support to reduce the cation-anion interactions and increase the mobility of hydroxide ions, for example, across the membrane. The anion exchange membrane has the ability to operate at high temperatures and in highly alkaline environments with high conductivity and low resistance.

  12. Anions in Cometary Comae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, Steven B.

    2011-01-01

    The presence of negative ions (anions) in cometary comae is known from Giotto mass spectrometry of IP/Halley. The anions 0-, OH-, C-, CH- and CN- have been detected, as well as unidentified anions with masses 22-65 and 85-110 amu (Chaizy et al. 1991). Organic molecular anions are known to have a significant impact on the charge balance of interstellar clouds and circumstellar envelopes and have been shown to act as catalysts for the gas-phase synthesis of larger hydrocarbon molecules in the ISM, but their importance in cometary comae has not yet been explored. We present details of the first attempt to model the chemistry of anions in cometary comae. Based on the combined chemical and hydro dynamical model of Rodgers & Charnley (2002), we investigate the role of large carbon-chain anions in cometary coma chemistry. We calculate the effects of these anions on coma thermodynamics, charge balance and examine their impact on molecule formation.

  13. Tracer Simulation Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1972-04-01

    32 3. Measurement of Ignition Time ......... . . ... 34 4. Relative Reflectance Measurement .... ............ . 36 5. Laser...most reflective. Conversely, the same anomaly that was true for the laser ignition performance and for ignition energy was also true for the reflectance ... measurement ; the best weapon performance lot was not the least reflective. The use of the laser for igniting spinning tracer bullets is a practical

  14. Mobility of Metal Tracers in Unsaturated Tuffs of Busted Butte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groffman, A. R.

    2001-12-01

    A complex tracer mixture was injected continuously for over two years into a 10 m x 10 m x 7 m block of unsaturated tuff as part of the Busted Butte unsaturated-zone tracer test at Yucca Mountain. The test was designed to measure tracer transport within the Topopah Springs and Calico Hills tuffs, units that occur between the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain and the water table below. The mixture included nonreactive (Br, I, and fluorinated benzoic acids (FBAs)) and reactive tracers (Li, Ce, Sm, Ni, Co, and Mn). Bromide, I, FBAs, and Li were detected during the test on absorbent pads emplaced in a series of solute collection boreholes located beneath the injectors but the more strongly sorbing metals did not reach the collection boreholes during this period. To determine the distribution and mobility of these metals, tracer constituents were extracted from tuff samples collected during overcoring and mineback of the test block. Tracers were extracted from the tuff samples by leaching with a 5% nitric acid solution for metals and a bicarbonate-carbonate buffer for anions. Results from the overcore sample suite show that metals have migrated through the tuff in the region adjacent to and immediately below the tracer injectors. Consistent with laboratory sorption measurements and observed breakthrough in the collection boreholes, rock analyses showed that Li is the most mobile of the metals. Co and Ni behave similarly, traveling tens of cm from the injection sites, while Sm and Ce moved far less, possibly due to precipitation reactions in addition to sorption. Determination of Mn transport is complicated by high background concentrations in the tuff; additional background samples are currently being evaluated. As expected, our rock analyses show that the nonreactive tracers Br and FBAs have moved beyond the overcore region, corroborating results from collection boreholes.

  15. Tracer for circulation determinations

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, H.; Santos, S.; Wysong, R. D.

    1985-03-19

    An improved tracer particle is described comprising an ion exchange core having a polymer coating thereon, the coated ion exchange core having a reaction site capable of reacting with a compound containing an oxirane group, said coated ion exchange core having been treated with a compound containing an oxirane group to react with said coated ion exchange core causing an increase in mass of the tracer particle. Preferably, the ion exchange core is labelled with a radionuclide. These particles have improved characteristics including improved stability against leaching and improved handling properties. Such particles are useful in circulatory determinations involving the injection of the particles as a suspension in a physiologically acceptable carrier or medium into the circulatory system of animals.

  16. URCHIN: Reverse ray tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altay, Gabriel; Theuns, Tom

    2014-12-01

    URCHIN is a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) reverse ray tracer (i.e. from particles to sources). It calculates the amount of shielding from a uniform background that each particle experiences. Preservation of the adaptive density field resolution present in many gas dynamics codes and uniform sampling of gas resolution elements with rays are two of the benefits of URCHIN; it also offers preservation of Galilean invariance, high spectral resolution, and preservation of the standard uniform UV background in optically thin gas.

  17. Journal: Efficient Hydrologic Tracer-Test Design for Tracer ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Hydrological tracer testing is the most reliable diagnostic technique available for the determination of basic hydraulic and geometric parameters necessary for establishing operative solute-transport processes. Tracer-test design can be difficult because of a lack of prior knowledge of the basic hydraulic and geometric parameters desired and the appropriate tracer mass to release. A new efficient hydrologic tracer-test design (EHTD) methodology has been developed to facilitate the design of tracer tests by root determination of the one-dimensional advection-dispersion equation (ADE) using a preset average tracer concentration which provides a theoretical basis for an estimate of necessary tracer mass. The method uses basic measured field parameters (e.g., discharge, distance, cross-sectional area) that are combined in functional relatipnships that descrive solute-transport processes related to flow velocity and time of travel. These initial estimates for time of travel and velocity are then applied to a hypothetical continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) as an analog for the hydrological-flow system to develop initial estimates for tracer concentration, tracer mass, and axial dispersion. Application of the predicted tracer mass with the hydraulic and geometric parameters in the ADE allows for an approximation of initial sample-collection time and subsequent sample-collection frequency where a maximum of 65 samples were determined to be necessary for descri

  18. Tracer tomography (in) rocks!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somogyvári, Márk; Jalali, Mohammadreza; Jimenez Parras, Santos; Bayer, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Physical behavior of fractured aquifers is rigorously controlled by the presence of interconnected conductive fractures, as they represent the main pathways for flow and transport. Ideally, they are simulated as a discrete fracture network (DFN) in a model to capture the role of fracture system geometry, i.e. fracture length, height, and width (aperture/transmissivity). Such network may be constrained by prior geological information or direct data resources such as field mapping, borehole logging and geophysics. With the many geometric features, however, calibration of a DFN to measured data is challenging. This is especially the case when spatial properties of a fracture network need to be calibrated to flow and transport data. One way to increase the insight in a fractured rock is by combining the information from multiple field tests. In this study, a tomographic configuration that combines multiple tracer tests is suggested. These tests are conducted from a borehole with different injection levels that act as sources. In a downgradient borehole, the tracer is recorded at different levels or receivers, in order to maximize insight in the spatial heterogeneity of the rock. As tracer here we chose heat, and temperature breakthrough curves are recorded. The recorded tracer data is inverted using a novel stochastic trans-dimensional Markov Chain Monte Carlo procedure. An initial DFN solution is generated and sequentially modified given available geological information, such as expected fracture density, orientation, length distribution, spacing and persistency. During this sequential modification, the DFN evolves in a trans-dimensional inversion space through adding and/or deleting fracture segments. This stochastic inversion algorithm requires a large number of thousands of model runs to converge, and thus using a fast and robust forward model is essential to keep the calculation efficient. To reach this goal, an upwind coupled finite difference method is employed

  19. Tracers and Tracer Testing: Design, Implementation, Tracer Selection, and Interpretation Methods

    SciTech Connect

    G. Michael Shook; Shannon L.; Allan Wylie

    2004-01-01

    Conducting a successful tracer test requires adhering to a set of steps. The steps include identifying appropriate and achievable test goals, identifying tracers with the appropriate properties, and implementing the test as designed. When these steps are taken correctly, a host of tracer test analysis methods are available to the practitioner. This report discusses the individual steps required for a successful tracer test and presents methods for analysis. The report is an overview of tracer technology; the Suggested Reading section offers references to the specifics of test design and interpretation.

  20. Anions coordinating anions: analysis of the interaction between anionic Keplerate nanocapsules and their anionic ligands.

    PubMed

    Melgar, Dolores; Bandeira, Nuno A G; Bonet Avalos, Josep; Bo, Carles

    2017-02-15

    Keplerates are a family of anionic metal oxide spherical capsules containing up to 132 metal atoms and some hundreds of oxygen atoms. These capsules holding a high negative charge of -12 coordinate both mono-anionic and di-anionic ligands thus increasing their charge up to -42, even up to -72, which is compensated by the corresponding counter-cations in the X-ray structures. We present an analysis of the relative importance of several energy terms of the coordinate bond between the capsule and ligands like carbonate, sulphate, sulphite, phosphinate, selenate, and a variety of carboxylates, of which the overriding component is contributed by solvation/de-solvation effects.

  1. Tracer-Test Planning Using the Efficient Hydrologic Tracer ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Hydrological tracer testing is the most reliable diagnostic technique available for establishing flow trajectories and hydrologic connections and for determining basic hydraulic and geometric parameters necessary for establishing operative solute-transport processes. Tracer-test design can be difficult because of a lack of prior knowledge of the basic hydraulic and geometric parameters desired and the appropriate tracer mass to release. A new efficient hydrologic tracer-test design (EHTD) methodology has been developed that combines basic measured field parameters (e.g., discharge, distance, cross-sectional area) in functional relationships that describe solute-transport processes related to flow velocity and time of travel. The new method applies these initial estimates for time of travel and velocity to a hypothetical continuously stirred tank reactor as an analog for the hydrologic flow system to develop initial estimates for tracer concentration and axial dispersion, based on a preset average tracer concentration. Root determination of the one-dimensional advection-dispersion equation (ADE) using the preset average tracer concentration then provides a theoretical basis for an estimate of necessary tracer mass.Application of the predicted tracer mass with the hydraulic and geometric parameters in the ADE allows for an approximation of initial sample-collection time and subsequent sample-collection frequency where a maximum of 65 samples were determined to be

  2. R type anion channel

    PubMed Central

    Diatloff, Eugene; Peyronnet, Rémi; Colcombet, Jean; Thomine, Sébastien; Barbier-Brygoo, Hélène

    2010-01-01

    Plant genomes code for channels involved in the transport of cations, anions and uncharged molecules through membranes. Although the molecular identity of channels for cations and uncharged molecules has progressed rapidly in the recent years, the molecular identity of anion channels has lagged behind. Electrophysiological studies have identified S-type (slow) and R-type (rapid) anion channels. In this brief review, we summarize the proposed functions of the R-type anion channels which, like the S-type, were first characterized by electrophysiology over 20 years ago, but unlike the S-type, have still yet to be cloned. We show that the R-type channel can play multiple roles. PMID:21051946

  3. Anion-π catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yingjie; Beuchat, César; Domoto, Yuya; Gajewy, Jadwiga; Wilson, Adam; Mareda, Jiri; Sakai, Naomi; Matile, Stefan

    2014-02-05

    The introduction of new noncovalent interactions to build functional systems is of fundamental importance. We here report experimental and theoretical evidence that anion-π interactions can contribute to catalysis. The Kemp elimination is used as a classical tool to discover conceptually innovative catalysts for reactions with anionic transition states. For anion-π catalysis, a carboxylate base and a solubilizer are covalently attached to the π-acidic surface of naphthalenediimides. On these π-acidic surfaces, transition-state stabilizations up to ΔΔGTS = 31.8 ± 0.4 kJ mol(-1) are found. This value corresponds to a transition-state recognition of KTS = 2.7 ± 0.5 μM and a catalytic proficiency of 3.8 × 10(5) M(-1). Significantly increasing transition-state stabilization with increasing π-acidity of the catalyst, observed for two separate series, demonstrates the existence of "anion-π catalysis." In sharp contrast, increasing π-acidity of the best naphthalenediimide catalysts does not influence the more than 12 000-times weaker substrate recognition (KM = 34.5 ± 1.6 μM). Together with the disappearance of Michaelis-Menten kinetics on the expanded π-surfaces of perylenediimides, this finding supports that contributions from π-π interactions are not very important for anion-π catalysis. The linker between the π-acidic surface and the carboxylate base strongly influences activity. Insufficient length and flexibility cause incompatibility with saturation kinetics. Moreover, preorganizing linkers do not improve catalysis much, suggesting that the ideal positioning of the carboxylate base on the π-acidic surface is achieved by intramolecular anion-π interactions rather than by an optimized structure of the linker. Computational simulations are in excellent agreement with experimental results. They confirm, inter alia, that the stabilization of the anionic transition states (but not the neutral ground states) increases with the π-acidity of the

  4. Exotic tracers for atmospheric studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovelock, James E.; Ferber, Gilbert J.

    Tracer materials can be injected into the atmosphere to study transport and dispersion processes and to validate air pollution model calculations. Tracers should be inert, non-toxic and harmless to the environment. Tracers for long-range experiments, where dilution is very great, must be measurable at extremely low concentrations, well below the parts per trillion level. Compounds suitable for long-range tracer work are rare and efforts should be made to reserve them for meteorological studies, barring them from commercial uses which would increase atmospheric background concentrations. The use of these exotic tracers, including certain perfluorocarbons and isotopically labelled methanes, should be coordinated within the meteorological community to minimize interferences and maximize research benefits.

  5. Simultaneous Analyses and Applications of Multiple Fluorobenzoate and Halide Tracers in Hydrologic Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Q; Moran, J E

    2004-01-22

    An analytical method that employs ion chromatography has been developed to more fully exploit the use of fluorobenzoic acids (FBAs) and halides as hydrologic tracers. In a single run, this reliable, sensitive, and robust method can simultaneously separate and quantify halides (fluoride, chloride, bromide, and iodide) and up to seven FBAs from other common groundwater constituents (e.g., nitrate and sulfate). The usefulness of this ion chromatographic (IC) analytical method is demonstrated in both field and laboratory tracer experiments. Field experiments in unsaturated tuff featuring fractures or a fault show that this efficient and cost-effective method helps achieve the objectives of tracer studies that use multiple FBAs and/or diffusivity tracers (simultaneous use of one or more FBA and halide). The field study examines the hydrologic response of fractures and the matrix to different flow rates and the contribution of matrix diffusion in chemical transport. Laboratory tracer experiments with eight geologic media from across the United States--mostly from Department of Energy facilities where groundwater contamination is prevalent and where subsurface characterization employing tracers has been ongoing or is in need--reveal several insights about tracer transport behavior: (1) Bromide and FBAs are not always transported conservatively. (2) The delayed transport of these anionic tracers is likely related to geologic media characteristics, such as organic matter, pH, iron oxide content, and clay mineralogy. (3) Any use of iodine as a hydrologic tracer should take into account the different sorption behaviors of iodide and iodate and the possible conversion of iodine's initial chemical form. (4) The transport behavior of potential FBA and halide tracers under relevant geochemical conditions should be evaluated before beginning ambitious, large-scale field tracer experiments.

  6. Tracer airflow measurement system (TRAMS)

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Duo

    2007-04-24

    A method and apparatus for measuring fluid flow in a duct is disclosed. The invention uses a novel high velocity tracer injector system, an optional insertable folding mixing fan for homogenizing the tracer within the duct bulk fluid flow, and a perforated hose sampling system. A preferred embodiment uses CO.sub.2 as a tracer gas for measuring air flow in commercial and/or residential ducts. In extant commercial buildings, ducts not readily accessible by hanging ceilings may be drilled with readily plugged small diameter holes to allow for injection, optional mixing where desired using a novel insertable foldable mixing fan, and sampling hose.

  7. Complex anion inclusion compounds: flexible anion-exchange materials.

    PubMed

    Williams, Edward R; Leithall, Rebecca M; Raja, Robert; Weller, Mark T

    2013-01-11

    Copper chloropyrophosphate frameworks have been synthesised with a wide variety of complex inorganic anions trapped in a large, flexible, one-dimensional pore, with anions including chloride, bromide, phosphate and the complex metal halo-anions PtCl(4)(2-), PdBr(4)(2-), CuCl(4)(2-) and AuCl(4)(-).

  8. Photodetachment of Lanthanide Oxide Anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covington, A. M.; Emmons, E. D.; Kraus, R. G.; Thompson, J. S.; Calabrese, D.; Davis, V. T.

    2007-06-01

    Laser photodetached electron spectroscopy (LPES) has been used to study the structure and collision properties of lanthanide oxide anions including LaOn^- and CeOn^-. Preliminary photoelectron spectra from these anions will be presented along with ion beam production data from these and other lanthanide oxide anions.

  9. Driven tracers in narrow channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cividini, J.; Mukamel, D.; Posch, H. A.

    2017-01-01

    Steady-state properties of a driven tracer moving in a narrow two-dimensional (2D) channel of quiescent medium are studied. The tracer drives the system out of equilibrium, perturbs the density and pressure fields, and gives the bath particles a nonzero average velocity, creating a current in the channel. Three models in which the confining effect of the channel is probed are analyzed and compared in this study: the first is the simple symmetric exclusion process (SSEP), for which the stationary density profile and the pressure on the walls in the frame of the tracer are computed. We show that the tracer acts like a dipolar source in an average velocity field. The spatial structure of this 2D strip is then simplified to a one-dimensional (1D) SSEP, in which exchanges of position between the tracer and the bath particles are allowed. Using a combination of mean-field theory and exact solution in the limit where no exchange is allowed gives good predictions of the velocity of the tracer and the density field. Finally, we show that results obtained for the 1D SSEP with exchanges also apply to a gas of overdamped hard disks in a narrow channel. The correspondence between the parameters of the SSEP and of the gas of hard disks is systematic and follows from simple intuitive arguments. Our analytical results are checked numerically.

  10. Hydrated hydride anion clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Han Myoung; Kim, Dongwook; Singh, N. Jiten; Kołaski, Maciej; Kim, Kwang S.

    2007-10-01

    On the basis of density functional theory (DFT) and high level ab initio theory, we report the structures, binding energies, thermodynamic quantities, IR spectra, and electronic properties of the hydride anion hydrated by up to six water molecules. Ground state DFT molecular dynamics simulations (based on the Born-Oppenheimer potential surface) show that as the temperature increases, the surface-bound hydride anion changes to the internally bound structure. Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations are also carried out for the spectral analysis of the monohydrated hydride. Excited-state ab initio molecular dynamics simulations show that the photoinduced charge-transfer-to-solvent phenomena are accompanied by the formation of the excess electron-water clusters and the detachment of the H radical from the clusters. The dynamics of the detachment process of a hydrogen radical upon the excitation is discussed.

  11. Anion permselective membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgdon, R. B.; Waite, W. A.; Alexander, S. S.

    1984-07-01

    Two polymer ion exchange membranes were synthesized to fulfill the needs of both electrical resistivity and anolyte/catholyte separation for utility load leveling utilizing the DOE/NASA mixed electrolyte REDOX battery. Both membranes were shown to meet mixed electrolyte utility load leveling criteria. Several modifications of an anion exchange membrane failed to meet utility load leveling REDOX battery criteria using the unmixed electrolyte REDOX cell.

  12. Anion permselective membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodgdon, R. B.; Waite, W. A.; Alexander, S. S.

    1984-01-01

    Two polymer ion exchange membranes were synthesized to fulfill the needs of both electrical resistivity and anolyte/catholyte separation for utility load leveling utilizing the DOE/NASA mixed electrolyte REDOX battery. Both membranes were shown to meet mixed electrolyte utility load leveling criteria. Several modifications of an anion exchange membrane failed to meet utility load leveling REDOX battery criteria using the unmixed electrolyte REDOX cell.

  13. Hydrogen tracer diffusion in LiBH4 measured by spatially resolved Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Borgschulte, A; Gremaud, R; Łodziana, Z; Züttel, A

    2010-05-21

    The hydrogen tracer diffusion in LiBH(4) has been determined by spatially resolved Raman spectroscopy. The measurements give direct evidence of a macroscopic diffusion of BH ions as well as atomic exchange of hydrogen between the anions. An effective tracer diffusion coefficient of deuterium in LiBH(4) of D approximately 7 x 10(-14) m(2) s(-1) at 473 K is derived. The direct exchange rate of hydrogen between BH(4) units is 10 orders of magnitude slower, i.e. the relatively fast effective hydrogen diffusion has its origin in the fast diffusion of BH(4) units.

  14. Identification and characterization of conservative organic tracers for use as hydrologic tracers for the Yucca Mountain site characterization study. Progress report, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Stetzenbach, K.; Farnham, I.

    1994-12-31

    The bromide anion has been used extensively as a tracer for mapping the flow of groundwater. It has proven to be both a safe and reliable groundwater tracer. The goal in this study is to find several tracing compounds with characteristics similar to the bromide anion to be used in multiple well tracing tests. Four groups of fluorinated organic acids were selected as candidates for groundwater tracers. These groups include fluorinated benzoic acids (FBA), fluorinated salicylic acids (FSA), fluorinated toluic acids (FTA), and fluorinated cinnamic acids (FCA). These compounds have been shown to move readily with the flow of water and do not adsorb to soil. They are also non-toxic. In this study, the retention of the fluorinated organic acids on to a soil column is compared to that of the bromide ion. The time required for the elution of each analyte from the soil column is measured using a UV-Vis detector. The soils consist of the light, medium, and dark tuffs used in the batch study. The work performed during this quarter consists of the continuation of the batch studies for the fluorinated benzoic acids and column studies for several potential tracer compounds.

  15. Dyes as tracers for vadose zone hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flury, Markus; Wai, Nu Nu

    2003-03-01

    Dyes are important tracers to investigate subsurface water movement. For more than a century, dye tracers have provided clues about the hydrological cycle as well as flow and transport processes in the subsurface. Groundwater contamination often originates in the vadose zone. Agrochemicals applied to the soil surface, toxic compounds accidentally spilled by human activities, and contaminants released from waste repositories leach through the vadose zone and can ultimately pollute groundwater resources. Dyes are an important tool to assess flow pathways of such contaminants. This review compiles information on dyes used as hydrological tracers, with particular emphasis on vadose zone hydrology. We summarize briefly different human-applied tracers, including nondye tracers. We then provide a historical sketch of the use of dyes as tracers and describe newer developments in visualization and quantification of tracer experiments. Relevant chemical properties of dyes used as tracers are discussed and illustrated with dye intermediates and selected dye tracers. The types of dyes used as tracers in subsurface hydrology are summarized, and recommendations are made regarding the use of dye tracers. The review concludes with a toxicological assessment of dyes used as hydrological tracers. Many different dyes have been proposed as tracers for water movement in the subsurface. All of these compounds, however, are to some degree retarded by the subsurface medium. Nevertheless, dyes are useful tracers to visualize flow pathways.

  16. Variability of Interhemispheric Tracer Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X.; Waugh, D.; Orbe, C.; Yang, H.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the interhemispheric transport helps us track the movement of air and potential dispersion of pollutions. Here we examine variations of the transport from NH mid-latitudes using NCAR CAM-chem model simulations of an idealized clock tracer (that yields the "mean age") and idealized tracers with 5-day and 50-day decay times. We examine the seasonal and interannual variations in the tracers (and inferred transport time scales), and relate to meteorological processes and climate modes. It is shown that there are large seasonal variations in the interhemispheric transport time scales but generally smaller interannual variations. The significant interannual variations are found over the Indian Ocean, and linked to the Asian monsoon and seasonal movement of intense convection. Smaller variations are found over the Eastern Pacific and linked to seasonality of the ITCZ and ENSO.

  17. Anion permselective membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodgdon, R. B.; Waite, W. A.

    1980-01-01

    The efforts on the synthesis of polymer anion redox membranes were mainly concentrated in two areas, membrane development and membrane fabrication. Membrane development covered the preparation and evaluation of experimental membranes systems with improved resistance stability and/or lower permeability. Membrane fabrication covered the laboratory scale production of prime candidate membranes in quantities of up to two hundred and sizes up to 18 inches x 18 inches (46 cm x 46 cm). These small (10 in x 11 in) and medium sized membranes were mainly for assembly into multicell units. Improvements in processing procedures and techniques for preparing such membrane sets lifted yields to over 90 percent.

  18. Mixed Anion Heterostructure Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-01

    data presented Sb(g) Sb(ads) Sb(s) Kads D (1) (2)Very low + GaAs no reaction ( 3 ) kexch 33 for As2 which indicates that the...Kads D (1) (2) ( 3 ) Anion Exchange kexch (4) Isoelectronic AsSb formation Favoured by As4 +As GaAsySb1-y + Sby(s) GaSb1-y + AsSby(s) +As kiso (5...experiment implemented for this investigation provided a basis for modeling the P(g) P(ads) P(s) + GaAs Kads D (1) (2) ( 3 ) kexch (4) +P GaPyAs1-y

  19. Anion permselective membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodgdon, R. B.; Waite, W. A.

    1982-01-01

    The synthesis and fabrication of polymeric anion permselective membranes for redox systems are discussed. Variations of the prime candidate anion membrane formulation to achieve better resistance and/or lower permeability were explored. Processing parameters were evaluated to lower cost and fabricate larger sizes. The processing techniques to produce more membranes per batch were successfully integrated with the fabrication of larger membranes. Membranes of about 107 cm x 51 cm were made in excellent yield. Several measurements were made on the larger sample membranes. Among the data developed were water transport and transference numbers for these prime candidate membranes at 20 C. Other work done on this system included characterization of a number of specimens of candidate membranes which had been returned after service lives of up to sixteen months. Work with new polymer constituents, with new N.P.'s, catalysts and backing fabrics is discussed. Some work was also done to evaluate other proportions of the ingredients of the prime candidate system. The adoption of a flow selectivity test at elevated temperature was explored.

  20. Pseudorotation in fullerene anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Janette L.; Hands, Ian D.; Bates, Colin A.

    2007-07-01

    Jahn-Teller (JT) problems are often characterised by an adiabatic potential energy surface (APES) containing either a set of isoenergetic wells or a trough of equivalent-energy points, which may be warped by higher-order coupling terms or anisotropic effects. In all three cases, the JT effect will be dynamic. Either tunnelling between the wells or rotation (of a distortion) around the trough will restore the original symmetry of the system. This motion is referred to as pseudorotation. It should be possible to observe a JT system in a distorted geometry if measurements are made on a sufficiently short timescale. In various cubic systems, this timescale has been calculated to be the order of picoseconds. Such timescales are accessible using modern methods of ultrafast spectroscopy. Measurements of pseudorotation rates can lead to important information on the strength and nature of the JT coupling present. We will present analytical calculations that allow the rate of pseudorotation to be determined in terms of the vibronic coupling parameters. We will show how these results can be applied to E ⊗ e systems and then to the more complicated system applicable to C60- anions. This is of particular interest because of the high icosahedral symmetry of fullerene ions and also because of the many potential uses of materials containing these ions. We conclude by outlining experiments that should be capable of measuring pseudorotation in C 60 anions.

  1. Dynamic chemistry of anion recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Custelcean, Radu

    2012-01-01

    In the past 40 years, anion recognition by synthetic receptors has grown into a rich and vibrant research topic, developing into a distinct branch of Supramolecular Chemistry. Traditional anion receptors comprise organic scaffolds functionalized with complementary binding groups that are assembled by multistep organic synthesis. Recently, a new approach to anion receptors has emerged, in which the host is dynamically self-assembled in the presence of the anionic guest, via reversible bond formation between functional building units. While coordination bonds were initially employed for the self-assembly of the anion hosts, more recent studies demonstrated that reversible covalent bonds can serve the same purpose. In both cases, due to their labile connections, the molecular constituents have the ability to assemble, dissociate, and recombine continuously, thereby creating a dynamic combinatorial library (DCL) of receptors. The anionic guests, through specific molecular recognition, may then amplify (express) the formation of a particular structure among all possible combinations (real or virtual) by shifting the equilibria involved towards the most optimal receptor. This approach is not limited to solution self-assembly, but is equally applicable to crystallization, where the fittest anion-binding crystal may be selected. Finally, the pros and cons of employing dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) vs molecular design for developing anion receptors, and the implications of both approaches to selective anion separations, will be discussed.

  2. Following Footsteps: ECD Tracer Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smale, Jim, Editor

    2002-01-01

    This document consists of the single 2002 issue of The Bernard van Leer Foundation's "Early Childhood Matters," a periodical addressed to practitioners in the field of early childhood education and including information on projects funded by the Foundation. Articles in this issue focus on early childhood development tracer studies of…

  3. Bioethics. LC Science Tracer Bullet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Cathy, Comp.; Cadoree, Michelle

    This guide lists published materials on many aspects of bioethics, the literature of which is varied and scattered. Related guides in the LC Science Tracer Bullet series are TB 80-9, Terminal Care, TB 80-11, Drug Research on Human Subjects, TB 83-4, Science Policy, and TB 84-7, Biotechnology. Not intended to be a comprehensive bibliography, this…

  4. Anion permselective membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, S.; Hodgdon, R. B.

    1977-01-01

    The objective of NAS 3-20108 was the development and evaluation of improved anion selective membranes useful as efficient separators in a redox power storage cell system being constructed. The program was divided into three parts, (a) optimization of the selected candidate membrane systems, (b) investigation of alternative membrane/polymer systems, and (c) characterization of candidate membranes. The major synthesis effort was aimed at improving and optimizing as far as possible each candidate system with respect to three critical membrane properties essential for good redox cell performance. Substantial improvements were made in 5 candidate membrane systems. The critical synthesis variables of cross-link density, monomer ratio, and solvent composition were examined over a wide range. In addition, eight alternative polymer systems were investigated, two of which attained candidate status. Three other alternatives showed potential but required further research and development. Each candidate system was optimized for selectivity.

  5. Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptides

    PubMed Central

    Stieger, Bruno; Hagenbuch, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptides or OATPs are central transporters in the disposition of drugs and other xenobiotics. In addition, they mediate transport of a wide variety of endogenous substrates. The critical role of OATPs in drug disposition has spurred research both in academia and in the pharmaceutical industry. Translational aspects with clinical questions are the focus in academia, while the pharmaceutical industry tries to define and understand the role these transporters play in pharmacotherapy. The present overview summarizes our knowledge on the interaction of food constituents with OATPs, and on the OATP transport mechanisms. Further, it gives an update on the available information on the structure-function relationship of the OATPs, and finally, covers the transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of OATPs. PMID:24745984

  6. Anion transport and supramolecular medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Gale, Philip A; Davis, Jeffery T; Quesada, Roberto

    2017-04-05

    New approaches to the transmembrane transport of anions are discussed in this review. Advances in the design of small molecule anion carriers are reviewed in addition to advances in the design of synthetic anion channels. The application of anion transporters to the potential future treatment of disease is discussed in the context of recent findings on the selectivity of anion transporters.

  7. Glomerular anionic site distribution in nonproteinuric rats. A computer-assisted morphometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Pilia, P A; Swain, R P; Williams, A V; Loadholt, C B; Ainsworth, S K

    1985-12-01

    The cationic ultrastructural tracer polyethyleneimine (PEI: pI approximately equal to 11.0), binds electrophysically to uniformly spaced discrete electron-dense anionic sites present in the laminae rarae of the rat glomerular basement membrane (GBM), mesangial reflections of the GBM, Bowman's capsule, and tubular basement membranes when administered intravenously. Computer-assisted morphometric analysis of glomerular anionic sites reveals that the maximum concentration of stainable lamina rara externa (lre) sites (21/10,000 A GBM) occurs 60 minutes after PEI injection with a site-site interspacing of 460 A. Lamina rara interna (lri) sites similarly demonstrate a maximum concentration (20/10,000 A GBM) at 60 minutes with a periodicity of 497 A. The concentration and distribution of anionic sites within the lri was irregular in pattern and markedly decreased in number, while the lre possesses an electrical field that is highly regular at all time intervals analyzed (15, 30, 60, 120, 180, 240, and 300 minutes). Immersion and perfusion of renal tissue with PEI reveals additional heavy staining of the epithelial and endothelial cell sialoprotein coatings. PEI appears to bind to glomerular anionic sites reversibly: ie, between 60 and 180 minutes the concentration of stained sites decreases. At 300 minutes, the interspacing once again approaches the 60-minute concentration. This suggests a dynamic turnover or dissociation followed by a reassociation of glomerular negatively charged PEI binding sites. In contrast, morphometric analysis of anionic sites stained with lysozyme and protamine sulfate reveals interspacings of 642 A and 585 A, respectively; in addition, these tracers produce major glomerular ultrastructural alterations and induce transient proteinuria. PEI does not induce proteinuria in rats, nor does it produce glomerular morphologic alterations when ten times the tracer dosage is administered intravenously. These findings indicate that the choice of

  8. Resonant spectra of quadrupolar anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossez, K.; Mao, Xingze; Nazarewicz, W.; Michel, N.; Garrett, W. R.; Płoszajczak, M.

    2016-09-01

    In quadrupole-bound anions, an extra electron is attached at a sufficiently large quadrupole moment of a neutral molecule, which is lacking a permanent dipole moment. The nature of the bound states and low-lying resonances of such anions is of interest for understanding the threshold behavior of open quantum systems in general. In this work, we investigate the properties of quadrupolar anions as halo systems, the formation of rotational bands, and the transition from a subcritical to supercritical electric quadrupole moment. We solve the electron-plus-rotor problem using a nonadiabatic coupled-channel formalism by employing the Berggren ensemble, which explicitly contains bound states, narrow resonances, and the scattering continuum. The rotor is treated as a linear triad of point charges with zero monopole and dipole moments and nonzero quadrupole moment. We demonstrate that binding energies and radii of quadrupolar anions strictly follow the scaling laws for two-body halo systems. Contrary to the case of dipolar anions, ground-state band of quadrupolar anions smoothly extend into the continuum, and many rotational bands could be identified above the detachment threshold. We study the evolution of a bound state of an anion as it dives into the continuum at a critical quadrupole moment and we show that the associated critical exponent is α =2 . Everything considered, quadrupolar anions represent a perfect laboratory for the studies of marginally bound open quantum systems.

  9. Bound Anionic States of Aadenine

    SciTech Connect

    Haranczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej S.; Li, Xiang; Bowen, Kit H.

    2007-03-20

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Anionic states of nucleic acid bases are involved in DNA damage by low-energy electrons and in charge transfer through DNA. Previous gas phase studies of free, unsolvated nucleic acid base parent anions probed only dipole-bound states, which are not present in condensed phase environments, but did not observe valence anionic states, which for purine bases are thought to be adiabatically unbound. Contrary to this expectation,wehave demonstrated that some thus far ignored tautomers of adenine, which result from enamine-imine transformations, support valence anionic states with electron vertical detachment energies as large as 2.2 eV, and at least one of these anionic tautomers is adiabatically bound. Moreover, we predict that the new anionic tautomers should also dominate in solutions and should be characterized by larger values of electron vertical detachment energy than the canonical valence anion. All of the newfound anionic tautomers might be formed in the course of dissociative electron attachment followed by a hydrogen atom attachment to a carbon atom, and they might affect the structure and properties of DNA and RNA exposed to low-energy electrons. The new valence states observed here, unlike the dipole-bound state, could exist in condensed phases and might be relevant to radiobiological damage. The discovery of these valence anionic states of adenine was facilitated by the development of (i) an experimental method for preparing parent anions of nucleic acid bases for photoelectron experiments, and (ii) a combinatorial/quantum chemical approach for identification of the most stable tautomers of organic molecules.

  10. Bound Anionic States of Adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Haranczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej S.; Li, Xiang; Bowen, Kit H.

    2007-03-20

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Anionic states of nucleic acid bases are involved in DNA damage by low-energy electrons and in charge transfer through DNA. Previous gas phase studies of free, unsolvated nucleic acid base parent anions probed only dipole-bound states, which are not present in condensed phase environments, but did not observe valence anionic states, which for purine bases are thought to be adiabatically unbound. Contrary to this expectation, we have demonstrated that some thus far ignored tautomers of adenine, which result from enamine-imine transformations, support valence anionic states with electron vertical detachment energies as large as 2.2 eV, and at least one of these anionic tautomers is adiabatically bound. Moreover, we predict that the new anionic tautomers should also dominate in solutions and should be characterized by larger values of electron vertical detachment energy than the canonical valence anion. All of the newfound anionic tautomers might be formed in the course of dissociative electron attachment followed by a hydrogen atom attachment to a carbon atom, and they might affect the structure and properties of DNA and RNA exposed to low-energy electrons. The new valence states observed here, unlike the dipole-bound state, could exist in condensed phases and might be relevant to radiobiological damage. The discovery of these valence anionic states of adenine was facilitated by the development of (i) an experimental method for preparing parent anions of nucleic acid bases for photoelectron experiments, and (it) a combinatorial/quantum chemical approach for identification of the most stable tautomers of organic molecules.

  11. Anion-exchange nanospheres as titration reagents for anionic analytes.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Jingying; Xie, Xiaojiang; Bakker, Eric

    2015-08-18

    We present here anion-exchange nanospheres as novel titration reagents for anions. The nanospheres contain a lipophilic cation for which the counterion is initially Cl(-). Ion exchange takes place between Cl(-) in the nanospheres and a more lipophilic anion in the sample, such as ClO4(-) and NO3(-). Consecutive titration in the same sample solution for ClO4(-) and NO3(-) were demonstrated. As an application, the concentration of NO3(-) in spinach was successfully determined using this method.

  12. Anion selectivity in biological systems.

    PubMed

    Wright, E M; Diamond, J M

    1977-01-01

    As background for appreciating the still-unsolved problems of monovalent anion selectivity, we summarize the facts and intepretations that seem reasonably well established. In section II we saw that specific effects of monovalent anions on biological and physical systems define qualitative patterns, in that only certain sequences of anion effects are observed. For example, the 4 halides can be permitted on paper as 4! = 24 sequences, yet only 5 of these sequences have been observed in nature as potency sequences. In addition, there are quantitative regularities in anion potency that permit the construction of so-called empirical selectivity isotherms (Figs. 4 and 13). That is, a given potency sequence is found to be associated with only a certain modest range of selectivity ratios. The sequences and isotherms apply to effects with a nonequilibrium component (e.g., permeability and conductance sequences) as well as to purely equilibrium effects. Since students of cation selectivity have had difficulty accepting this conclusion, we discuss the reasons why it is not as paradoxical as it at first seems. In sections III and IV we develop four theoretical models to account for the observed anion potency sequences as sequences of equilibrium binding energies. Two of these models involve calculation of electrostatic binding energies between anions and monopolar or dipolar cationic sites, assuming anions as well as sites to be rigid and nonpolarizable. The other two models use thermochemically measured binding energies between anions and thealkali cations or occasionally alkaline-earth cations, which in fact approximate rigid, nonpolarizable spheres. All four models consider the anion selectivity pattern of a given cationic site to be determined by anion differences in the balance between hydration energies and ion-site binding energies. Site differences in anion selectivity pattern are attributed to site differences in radius, charge, coordination number, or dipole length

  13. Tracer diffusion inside fibrinogen layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieśla, Michał; Gudowska-Nowak, Ewa; Sagués, Francesc; Sokolov, Igor M.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the obstructed motion of tracer (test) particles in crowded environments by carrying simulations of two-dimensional Gaussian random walk in model fibrinogen monolayers of different orientational ordering. The fibrinogen molecules are significantly anisotropic and therefore they can form structures where orientational ordering, similar to the one observed in nematic liquid crystals, appears. The work focuses on the dependence between level of the orientational order (degree of environmental crowding) of fibrinogen molecules inside a layer and non-Fickian character of the diffusion process of spherical tracer particles moving within the domain. It is shown that in general particles motion is subdiffusive and strongly anisotropic, and its characteristic features significantly change with the orientational order parameter, concentration of fibrinogens, and radius of a diffusing probe.

  14. Multiple-tracer gas analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Uhl, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    A multi-gas tracer system has been designed, built, and used on an explosively fractured oil shale rubble bed. This paper deals exclusively with the hardware, software, and overall operation of the tracer system. This system is a field portable, self-contained unit, which utilizes a mass spectrometer for gas analysis. The unit has a 20 channel sample port capability and is controlled by a desk top computer. The system is configured to provide a dynamic sensitivity range of up to six orders of magnitude. A roots blower is manifolded to the unit to provide continuous flow in all sample lines. The continuous flow process allows representative samples as well as decreasing the time between each measurement. Typical multiplex cycle time to evaluate four unique gases is approximately 12 seconds.

  15. Measurement of discharge using tracers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kilpatrick, F.A.; Cobb, Ernest D.

    1985-01-01

    The development of fluorescent dyes and fluorometers that can measure these dyes at very low concentrations has made dye-dilution methods practical for measuring discharge. These methods are particularly useful for determining discharge under certain flow conditions that are unfavorable for current meter measurements. These include small streams, canals, and pipes where 1. Turbulence is excessive for current-meter measurement but conducive to good mixing. 2. Moving rocks and debris may damage instruments placed in the flow. 3. Cross-sectional areas or velocities are indeterminate or changing. 4. The flow is unsteady, such as the flow that exists with storm-runoff events on small streams and urban storm-sewer systems. 5. The flow is physically inaccessible or unsafe. From a practical standpoint, such methods are limited primarily to small streams, because of the excessively long channel-mixing lengths required for larger streams. Very good accuracy can be obtained provided that 1. Adequate mixing length and time are allowed. 2. Careful field and laboratory techniques are used. 3. Dye losses are not significant. This manual describes the slug-injection and constant-rate injection methods of performing tracer-dilution measurements. Emphasis is on the use of fluorescent dyes as tracers and the equipment, field methods, and laboratory procedures for performing such measurements. The tracer-velocity method is also briefly discussed.

  16. Tracer mixing at fracture intersections

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guomin

    2001-02-10

    Discrete network models are one of the approaches used to simulate a dissolved contaminant, which is usually represented as a tracer in modeling studies, in fractured rocks. The discrete models include large numbers of individual fractures within the network structure, with flow and transport described on the scale of an individual fracture. Numerical simulations for the mixing characteristics and transfer probabilities of a tracer through a fracture intersection are performed for this study. A random-walk, particle-tracking model is applied to simulate tracer transport in fracture intersections by moving particles through space using individual advective and diffusive steps. The simulation results are compared with existing numerical and analytical solutions for a continuous intersection over a wide range of Peclet numbers. This study attempts to characterize the relative concentration at the outflow branches for a continuous intersection with different flow fields. The simulation results demonstrate that the mixing characteristics at the fracture intersections are a function not only of the Peclet number but also of the flow field pattern.

  17. Tracer tests in geothermal resource management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axelsson, G.

    2013-05-01

    Geothermal reinjection involves injecting energy-depleted fluid back into geothermal systems, providing an effective mode of waste-water disposal as well as supplementary fluid recharge. Cooling of production boreholes is one of the main disadvantages associated with reinjection, however. Tracer testing is an important tool for reinjection studies because tracer tests actually have a predictive power since tracer transport is orders of magnitude faster than cold-front advancement around reinjection boreholes. A simple and efficient method of tracer test interpretation, assuming specific flow channels connecting reinjection and production boreholes, is available. It simulates tracer return profiles and estimates properties of the flow channels, which are consequently used for predicting the production borehole cooling. Numerous examples are available worldwide on the successful application of tracer tests in geothermal management, many involving the application of this interpretation technique. Tracer tests are also used for general subsurface hydrological studies in geothermal systems and for flow rate measurements in two-phase geothermal pipelines. The tracers most commonly used in geothermal applications are fluorescent dyes, chemical substances and radioactive isotopes. New temperature-resistant tracers have also been introduced and high-tech tracers are being considered.

  18. Comparative mobility of sulfonamides and bromide tracer in three soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurwadkar, S.T.; Adams, C.D.; Meyer, M.T.; Kolpin, D.W.

    2011-01-01

    In animal agriculture, sulfonamides are one of the routinely used groups of antimicrobials for therapeutic and sub-therapeutic purposes. It is observed that, the animals when administered the antimicrobials, often do not completely metabolize them; and excrete the partially metabolized forms into the environment. Due to the continued use of antimicrobials and disposal of untreated waste, widespread occurrence of partially metabolized antimicrobials in aquatic and terrestrial environments has been reported in various scientific journals. In this research, the mobility of two sulfonamides - sulfamethazine (SMN), sulfathiazole (STZ) and a conservative bromide tracer was investigated in three soils collected from regions in the United States with large number of concentrated animal-feed operations. Results of a series of column studies indicate that the mobility of these two sulfonamides was dependent on pH, soil charge density, and contact time. At low pH and high charge density, substantial retention of sulfonamides was observed in all three soils investigated, due to the increased fraction of cationic and neutral forms of the sulfonamides. Conversely, enhanced mobility was observed at high pH, where the sulfonamides are predominantly in the anionic form. The results indicate that when both SMN and STZ are predominantly in anionic forms, their mobility approximates the mobility of a conservative bromide tracer. This observation is consistent for the mobility of both SMN and STZ individually, and also in the presence of several other antimicrobials in all three soils investigated. Higher contact time indicates lower mobility due to increased interaction with soil material. ?? 2011.

  19. Anion transporters and biological systems.

    PubMed

    Gale, Philip A; Pérez-Tomás, Ricardo; Quesada, Roberto

    2013-12-17

    In this Account, we discuss the development of new lipid bilayer anion transporters based on the structure of anionophoric natural products (the prodigiosins) and purely synthetic supramolecular systems. We have studied the interaction of these compounds with human cancer cell lines, and, in general, the most active anion transporter compounds possess the greatest anti-cancer properties. Initially, we describe the anion transport properties of synthetic molecules that are based on the structure of the family of natural products known as the prodiginines. Obatoclax, for example, is a prodiginine derivative with an indole ring that is currently in clinical trials for use as an anti-cancer drug. The anion transport properties of the compounds were correlated with their toxicity toward small cell human lung cancer GLC4 cells. We studied related compounds with enamine moieties, tambjamines, that serve as active transporters. These molecules and others in this series could depolarize acidic compartments within GLC4 cells and trigger apoptosis. In a study of the variation of lipophilicity of a series of these compounds, we observed that, as log P increases, the anion transport efficiency reaches a peak and then decreases. In addition, we discuss the anion transport properties of series of synthetic supramolecular anion receptor species. We synthesized trisureas and thioureas based on the tren backbone, and found that the thiourea compounds effectively transport anions. Fluorination of the pendant phenyl groups in this series of compounds greatly enhances the transport properties. Similar to our earlier results, the most active anion transporters reduced the viability of human cancer cell lines by depolarizing acidic compartments in GLC4 cells and triggering apoptosis. In an attempt to produce simpler transporters that obey Lipinski's Rule of Five, we synthesized simpler systems containing a single urea or thiourea group. Once again the thiourea systems, and in particular

  20. Petroleum characterization by perfluorocarbon tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Senum, G.I.; Fajer, R.W. ); Harris, B.R. Jr. ); DeRose, W.E. ); Ottaviani, W.L. )

    1992-02-01

    Perfluorocarbon tracers (PFTs), a class of six compounds, were used to help characterize the Shallow Oil Zone (SOZ) reservoir at the Naval Petroleum Reserve in California (NPRC) at Elk Hills. The SOZ reservoir is undergoing a pilot gas injection program to assess the technical feasibility and economic viability of injecting gas into the SOZ for improved oil recovery. PFTs were utilized in the pilot gas injection to qualitatively assess the extent of the pilot gas injection so as to determine the degree of gas containment within the SOZ reservoir.

  1. Anion exchange polymer electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Yu Seung; Kim, Dae Sik; Lee, Kwan-Soo

    2013-07-23

    Solid anion exchange polymer electrolytes and compositions comprising chemical compounds comprising a polymeric core, a spacer A, and a guanidine base, wherein said chemical compound is uniformly dispersed in a suitable solvent and has the structure: ##STR00001## wherein: i) A is a spacer having the structure O, S, SO.sub.2, --NH--, --N(CH.sub.2).sub.n, wherein n=1-10, --(CH.sub.2).sub.n--CH.sub.3--, wherein n=1-10, SO.sub.2-Ph, CO-Ph, ##STR00002## wherein R.sub.5, R.sub.6, R.sub.7 and R.sub.8 each are independently --H, --NH.sub.2, F, Cl, Br, CN, or a C.sub.1-C.sub.6 alkyl group, or any combination of thereof; ii) R.sub.9, R.sub.10, R.sub.11, R.sub.12, or R.sub.13 each independently are --H, --CH.sub.3, --NH.sub.2, --NO, --CH.sub.nCH.sub.3 where n=1-6, HC.dbd.O--, NH.sub.2C.dbd.O--, --CH.sub.nCOOH where n=1-6, --(CH.sub.2).sub.n--C(NH.sub.2)--COOH where n=1-6, --CH--(COOH)--CH.sub.2--COOH, --CH.sub.2--CH(O--CH.sub.2CH.sub.3).sub.2, --(C.dbd.S)--NH.sub.2, --(C.dbd.NH)--N--(CH.sub.2).sub.nCH.sub.3, where n=0-6, --NH--(C.dbd.S)--SH, --CH.sub.2--(C.dbd.O)--O--C(CH.sub.3).sub.3, --O--(CH.sub.2).sub.n--CH--(NH.sub.2)--COOH, where n=1-6, --(CH.sub.2).sub.n--CH.dbd.CH wherein n=1-6, --(CH.sub.2).sub.n--CH--CN wherein n=1-6, an aromatic group such as a phenyl, benzyl, phenoxy, methylbenzyl, nitrogen-substituted benzyl or phenyl groups, a halide, or halide-substituted methyl groups; and iii) wherein the composition is suitable for use in a membrane electrode assembly.

  2. Bound anionic states of adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Haranczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej S; Li, Xiang; Bowen, Kit H

    2007-03-20

    Anionic states of nucleic acid bases are involved in DNA damage by low-energy electrons and in charge transfer through DNA. Previous gas phase studies of free, unsolvated nucleic acid base parent anions probed only dipole-bound states, which are not present in condensed phase environments, but did not observe valence anionic states, which for purine bases, are thought to be adiabatically unbound. Contrary to this expectation, we have demonstrated that some thus far ignored tautomers of adenine, which result from enamine-imine transformations, support valence anionic states with electron vertical detachment energies as large as 2.2 eV, and at least one of these anionic tautomers is adiabatically bound. Moreover, we predict that the new anionic tautomers should also dominate in solutions and should be characterized by larger values of electron vertical detachment energy than the canonical valence anion. All of the new-found anionic tautomers might be formed in the course of dissociative electron attachment followed by a hydrogen atom attachment to a carbon atom, and they might affect the structure and properties of DNA and RNA exposed to low-energy electrons. The discovery of these valence anionic states of adenine was facilitated by the development of: (i) a new experimental method for preparing parent anions of nucleic acid bases for photoelectron experiments, and (ii) a new combinatorial/ quantum chemical approach for identification of the most stable tautomers of organic molecules. The computational portion of this work was supported by the: (i) Polish State Committee for Scientific Research (KBN) Grants: DS/8000-4-0140-7 (M.G.) and N204 127 31/2963 (M.H.), (ii) European Social Funds (EFS) ZPORR/2.22/II/2.6/ARP/U/2/05 (M.H.), and (iii) US DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Low Dose Radiation Research Program (M.G.). M.H. holds the Foundation for Polish Science (FNP) award for young scientists. The calculations were performed at the Academic

  3. Effects of submesoscale turbulence on ocean tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Katherine M.; Hamlington, Peter E.; Fox-Kemper, Baylor

    2016-01-01

    Ocean tracers such as carbon dioxide, nutrients, plankton, and oil advect, diffuse, and react primarily in the oceanic mixed layer where air-sea gas exchange occurs and light is plentiful for photosynthesis. There can be substantial heterogeneity in the spatial distributions of these tracers due to turbulent stirring, particularly in the submesoscale range where partly geostrophic fronts and eddies and small-scale three-dimensional turbulence are simultaneously active. In this study, a large eddy simulation spanning horizontal scales from 20 km down to 5 m is used to examine the effects of multiscale turbulent mixing on nonreactive passive ocean tracers from interior and sea-surface sources. The simulation includes the effects of both wave-driven Langmuir turbulence and submesoscale eddies, and tracers with different initial and boundary conditions are examined in order to understand the respective impacts of small-scale and submesoscale motions on tracer transport. Tracer properties are characterized using spatial fields and statistics, multiscale fluxes, and spectra, and the results detail how tracer mixing depends on air-sea tracer flux rate, tracer release depth, and flow regime. Although vertical fluxes of buoyancy by submesoscale eddies compete with mixing by Langmuir turbulence, vertical fluxes of tracers are often dominated by Langmuir turbulence, particularly for tracers that are released near the mixed-layer base or that dissolve rapidly through the surface, even in regions with pronounced submesoscale activity. Early in the evolution of some tracers, negative eddy diffusivities occur co-located with regions of negative potential vorticity, suggesting that symmetric instabilities or other submesoscale phenomenon may act to oppose turbulent mixing.

  4. EFFICIENT HYDROLOGICAL TRACER-TEST DESIGN (EHTD ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Hydrological tracer testing is the most reliable diagnostic technique available for establishing flow trajectories and hydrologic connections and for determining basic hydraulic and geometric parameters necessary for establishing operative solute-transport processes. Tracer-test design can be difficult because of a lack of prior knowledge of the basic hydraulic and geometric parameters desired and the appropriate tracer mass to release. A new efficient hydrologic tracer-test design (EHTD) methodology has been developed that combines basic measured field parameters (e.g., discharge, distance, cross-sectional area) in functional relationships that describe solute-transport processes related to flow velocity and time of travel. The new method applies these initial estimates for time of travel and velocity to a hypothetical continuously stirred tank reactor as an analog for the hydrologic flow system to develop initial estimates for tracer concentration and axial dispersion, based on a preset average tracer concentration. Root determination of the one-dimensional advection-dispersion equation (ADE) using the preset average tracer concentration then provides a theoretical basis for an estimate of necessary tracer mass.Application of the predicted tracer mass with the hydraulic and geometric parameters in the ADE allows for an approximation of initial sample-collection time and subsequent sample-collection frequency where a maximum of 65 samples were determined to

  5. Doublet Tracer Testing in Klamath Falls, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Gudmundsson, J.S.; Johnson, S.E.; Horne, R.N.; Jackson, P.B.; Culver, G.G.

    1983-12-15

    A tracer test was carried out in a geothermal doublet system to study the injection behavior of a developed reservoir known to be fractured. The doublet produces about 320 gpm of 160 F water that is used for space heating and then injected; the wells are spaced 250 ft apart. Tracer breakthrough was observed in 2 hours and 45 minutes in the production well, indicating fracture flow. However, the tracer concentrations were low and indicated porous media flow; the tracers mixed with a reservoir volume much larger than a fracture.

  6. Tracer-Test Planning Using the Efficient Hydrologic Tracer-Test Design (Ehtd) Program (2003)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrological tracer testing is the most reliable diagnostic technique available for establishing flow trajectories and hydrologic connections and for determining basic hydraulic and geometric parameters necessary for establishing operative solute-transport processes. Tracer-test ...

  7. Balloon tracer for atmospheric pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Lichfield, E.W.; Ivey, M.D.; Zak, B.D.; Church, H.W.

    1985-01-01

    An operational prototype of the Balloon Tracer was developed and described. This prototype was designed to be capable of meeting all of the desired specifications for the Balloon Tracer. Its buoyancy adjustment subsystem is shown. Three Gilian instrument pumps operating in parallel provide a flow of about 12 litres per minute, depending upon backpressure. The miniature Klippard mechanical valves are actuated by a servo mechanism which only requires power when the state of the valves is being changed. The balloon itself for the operational prototype is just under 3 meters in diameter. A block diagram of the operational prototype payload measures ambient pressure, temperature, and humidity obtained from AIR which outputs its data in ASCII format. The vertical anemometer, which has a measured starting speed of under 2 cm/s, makes use of a Gill styrofoam propeller and a Spaulding Instruments rotation sendor. The command decoder is built around a chip developed originally for remote control television tuners. The command receiver operating on 13.8035 MHz was developed and built by Hock Engineering. The Argos transmitter is a Telonics platform transmitter terminal. The heart of the control system is an Intel 8052AH BASIC microcomputer with both random access and read only memory.

  8. Tracers of Past Ocean Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch-Stieglitz, J.

    2003-12-01

    Information about how the ocean circulated during the past is useful in understanding changes in ocean and atmospheric chemistry, changes in the fluxes of heat and freshwater between the ocean and atmosphere, and changes in global wind patterns. The circulation of surface waters in the ocean leaves an imprint on sea surface temperature, and is also inextricably linked to the patterns of oceanic productivity. Much valuable information about past ocean circulation has been inferred from reconstructions of surface ocean temperature and productivity, which are covered in separate chapters. Here the focus is on the geochemical tracers that are used to infer the flow patterns and mixing of subsurface water masses.Several decades ago it was realized that chemistry of the shells of benthic foraminifera (carbon isotope and Cd/Ca ratios) carried an imprint of the nutrient content of deep-water masses (Shackleton, 1977; Broecker, 1982; Boyle, 1981). This led rapidly to the recognition that the water masses in the Atlantic Ocean were arrayed differently during the last glacial maximum than they are today, and the hypothesis that the glacial arrangement reflected a diminished contribution of low-nutrient North Atlantic deep water (NADW) ( Curry and Lohmann, 1982; Boyle and Keigwin, 1982). More detailed spatial reconstructions indicated a shallow nutrient-depleted water mass overlying a more nutrient-rich water mass in the glacial Atlantic. These findings spurred advances not only in geochemistry but in oceanography and climatology, as workers in these fields attempted to simulate the inferred glacial circulation patterns and assess the vulnerability of the modern ocean circulation to changes such as observed for the last ice age.While the nutrient distributions in the glacial Atlantic Ocean were consistent with a diminished flow of NADW, they also could have reflected an increase in inflow from the South Atlantic and/or a shallower yet undiminished deep-water mass. Clearly

  9. Hydrogen in anion vacancies of semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Mao-Hua; Singh, David J

    2009-01-01

    Density functional calculations show that, depending on the anion size, hydrogen in anion vacancies of various II-VI semiconductors can be either two-fold or four-fold coordinated, and has either amphoteric or shallow donor character. In general, the multi-coordination of hydrogen in an anion vacancy is the indication of an anionic H, H { ion, in the relatively ionic environment. In more covalent semiconductors, H would form a single cation-H bond in the anion vacancy.

  10. Organic anion uptake by hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Wolkoff, Allan W

    2014-10-01

    Many of the compounds taken up by the liver are organic anions that circulate tightly bound to protein carriers such as albumin. The fenestrated sinusoidal endothelium of the liver permits these compounds to have access to hepatocytes. Studies to characterize hepatic uptake of organic anions through kinetic analyses, suggested that it was carrier-mediated. Attempts to identify specific transporters by biochemical approaches were largely unsuccessful and were replaced by studies that utilized expression cloning. These studies led to identification of the organic anion transport proteins (oatps), a family of 12 transmembrane domain glycoproteins that have broad and often overlapping substrate specificities. The oatps mediate Na(+)-independent organic anion uptake. Other studies identified a seven transmembrane domain glycoprotein, Na(+)/taurocholate transporting protein (ntcp) as mediating Na(+)-dependent uptake of bile acids as well as other organic anions. Although mutations or deficiencies of specific members of the oatp family have been associated with transport abnormalities, there have been no such reports for ntcp, and its physiologic role remains to be determined, although expression of ntcp in vitro recapitulates the characteristics of Na(+)-dependent bile acid transport that is seen in vivo. Both ntcp and oatps traffic between the cell surface and intracellular vesicular pools. These vesicles move through the cell on microtubules, using the microtubule based motors dynein and kinesins. Factors that regulate this motility are under study and may provide a unique mechanism that can alter the plasma membrane content of these transporters and consequently their accessibility to circulating ligands.

  11. Potentiometric enzyme immunoassay using miniaturized anion-selective electrodes for detection

    PubMed Central

    Szűcs, Júlia; Pretsch, Ernö; Gyurcsányi, Róbert E.

    2010-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for prostate specific antigen (PSA) detection in human serum was developed based on the potentiometric detection of 6,8-difluoro-4-methylumbelliferone (DiFMU). The assays were carried out in anti-human PSA capture-antibody modified microtiter plates (150 µl volume). After incubation in the PSA containing serum samples, β-galactosidase-labeled PSA tracer antibody was added. The β-galactosidase label catalyzed the hydrolysis of 6,8-difluoro-4-methylumbelliferyl-β-D-galactopyranoside (DiFMUG) and the resulting DiFMU− anion was detected by potentiometric microelectrodes with anion-exchanger membrane. The selectivity of the anion-exchanger electrode is governed by the lipophilicity of the anions in the sample. Since DiFMU− is much more lipophilic (log P = 1.83) than any of the inorganic anions normally present in the working buffers and occurs in its anionic form at the physiological pH (pKa = 4.19), it was chosen as the species to be detected. The potentiometric ELISA-based method detects PSA in serum with a linear concentration range of 0.1–50 ng/mL. These results confirm the applicability of potentiometric detection in diagnostic PSA assays. Owing to simple methodology and low cost, potentiometric immunoassays seem to offer a feasible alternative to the development of in vitro diagnostic platforms. PMID:20448926

  12. Tracers for Characterizing Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Karen Wright; George Redden; Carl D. Palmer; Harry Rollins; Mark Stone; Mason Harrup; Laurence C. Hull

    2010-02-01

    Information about the times of thermal breakthrough and subsequent rates of thermal drawdown in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) is necessary for reservoir management, designing fracture stimulation and well drilling programs, and forecasting economic return. Thermal breakthrough in heterogeneous porous media can be estimated using conservative tracers and assumptions about heat transfer rates; however, tracers that undergo temperature-dependent changes can provide more detailed information about the thermal profile along the flow path through the reservoir. To be effectively applied, the thermal reaction rates of such temperature sensitive traces must be well characterized for the range of conditions that exist in geothermal systems. Reactive tracers proposed in the literature include benzoic and carboxylic acids (Adams) and organic esters and amides (Robinson et al.); however, the practical temperature range over which these tracers can be applied (100-275°C) is somewhat limited. Further, for organic esters and amides, little is known about their sorption to the reservoir matrix and how such reactions impact data interpretation. Another approach involves tracers where the reference condition is internal to the tracer itself. Two examples are: 1) racemization of polymeric amino acids, and 2) mineral thermoluminescence. In these cases internal ratios of states are measured rather than extents of degradation and mass loss. Racemization of poly-L-lactic acid (for example) is temperature sensitive and therefore can be used as a temperature-recording tracer depending on the rates of racemization and stability of the amino acids. Heat-induced quenching of thermoluminescence of pre-irradiated LiF can also be used. To protect the tracers from alterations (extraneous reactions, dissolution) in geothermal environments we are encapsulating the tracers in core-shell colloidal structures that will subsequently be tested for their ability to be transported and to protect the

  13. Anions in Nucleic Acid Crystallography.

    PubMed

    D'Ascenzo, Luigi; Auffinger, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid crystallization buffers contain a large variety of chemicals fitting specific needs. Among them, anions are often solely considered for pH-regulating purposes and as cationic co-salts while their ability to directly bind to nucleic acid structures is rarely taken into account. Here we review current knowledge related to the use of anions in crystallization buffers along with data on their biological prevalence. Chloride ions are frequently identified in crystal structures but display low cytosolic concentrations. Hence, they are thought to be distant from nucleic acid structures in the cell. Sulfate ions are also frequently identified in crystal structures but their localization in the cell remains elusive. Nevertheless, the characterization of the binding properties of these ions is essential for better interpreting the solvent structure in crystals and consequently, avoiding mislabeling of electron densities. Furthermore, understanding the binding properties of these anions should help to get clues related to their potential effects in crowded cellular environments.

  14. Pu Anion Exchange Process Intensification

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2015-10-08

    This project seeks to improve the efficiency of the plutonium anion-exchange process for purifying Pu through the development of alternate ion-exchange media. The objective of the project in FY15 was to develop and test a porous foam monolith material that could serve as a replacement for the current anion-exchange resin, Reillex® HPQ, used at the Savannah River Site (SRS) for purifying Pu. The new material provides advantages in efficiency over the current resin by the elimination of diffusive mass transport through large granular resin beads. By replacing the large resin beads with a porous foam there is much more efficient contact between the Pu solution and the anion-exchange sites present on the material. Several samples of a polystyrene based foam grafted with poly(4-vinylpyridine) were prepared and the Pu sorption was tested in batch contact tests.

  15. USING TRACERS TO DESCRIBE NAPL HETEROGENEITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tracers are frequently used to estimate both the average travel time for water flow through the tracer swept volume and NAPL saturation. The same data can be used to develop a statistical distribution describing the hydraulic conductivity in the sept volume and a possible distri...

  16. Effect of tracer buoyancy on tracer experiments conducted in fractured crystalline bedrock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Matthew W.

    2003-02-01

    Tracer buoyancy has been shown to influence breakthrough from two-well tracer experiments conducted in porous media. Two-well tracer experiments are presented from fractured crystalline bedrock, in which the specific gravity of the tracer injectate varied from 1.0002 to 1.0133. Under the forced hydraulic conditions imposed, no difference in breakthrough was noted for the three experiments. These results show that even relatively dense tracer injectate solutions may have an insignificant effect on breakthrough when imposed gradients are sufficiently large.

  17. The Art of Tomographic Tracer Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirpka, O. A.; Leven, C.; Doro, K. O.; Sanchez-Leon, E. E.

    2015-12-01

    In tracer tomography several tracer tests are performed within an aquifer and breakthrough curves are observed at multiple observation points. In the analysis, hydraulic conductivity is estimated as spatially variable, 3-D field subject to some smoothness constraint. Coupled flow and transport models using this conductivity fields are requested to meet observed tracer data. The approach can be combined with hydraulic tomography.We have performed hydraulic-tomography and tracer-tomography tests using heat and fluorescein as tracers at a field site close to Tübingen, Germany. The aquifer consists of 8-9m alluvials sands and gravels overlain by 1-2m alluvial fines. The hydraulic setup consists of a forced flow field between an injection/extraction well couple, embedded in the forced flow field of another well couple. By turning injection to extraction wells, and vice versa, two different flow fields were considered. Injection wells were separated into several sections by packers, and water was injected into each section proportional to its transmissivity. The water injected into one of the sections contained the tracer. Multi-level observation wells were equiped with thermometers (for heat-tracer tests), on-line fluoremeters (for teh dye tracers), and pressure transducers. Processing of the breakthrough curves included data cleaning, non-parametric deconvolution, and calculation of temperal moments of the estimated transfer functions.The joint inversion of hydraulic-head measurements and temporal moments of heat-tracer transfer functions was done by the quasi-linear geostatistical approach on a computing cluster. As alternative, we directly invert the time series (without temporal moments) by Ensemble-Kalman filtering.The high diffusion coefficient of temperature diminishes the penetration of the heat-tracer into the aquifer, which can partially be compensated by reverting the flow field and repeating the tracer tests. In tests with fluorscent tracers the signal

  18. Estimation of Blood Flow With Radioactive Tracers

    PubMed Central

    Bassingthwaighte, James B.; Holloway, G. Allen

    2010-01-01

    The techniques of tracer dilution in the circulation, and of tracer uptake by and washout from an organ, may be described using expressions that are general and are not dependent on specific models such as exponentials. The expressions have been applied to the measurement of cardiac output using impulse and constant rate injection techniques. Further expressions have been given for estimating organ blood flow from inflow/outflow concentration-time curves, washout curves, and from the distribution of deposited tracer. Some problems with respect to the use of deposition techniques as they are ordinarily applied to the estimation of regional blood flow must be considered, particularly where there are capillary beds in series or where there is countercurrent diffusional shunting of diffusible tracers between inflow and outflow. This review deals with these various aspects of tracer theory as they relate to the measurement of blood flow. PMID:775641

  19. Anion binding in biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiters, Martin C.; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Kostenko, Alexander V.; Soldatov, Alexander V.; Leblanc, Catherine; Michel, Gurvan; Potin, Philippe; Küpper, Frithjof C.; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Locher, Kaspar P.; Bevers, Loes E.; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Hagen, Wilfred R.

    2009-11-01

    We compare aspects of biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of cations and anions, and report on some examples of anion binding in biological systems. Brown algae such as Laminaria digitata (oarweed) are effective accumulators of I from seawater, with tissue concentrations exceeding 50 mM, and the vanadate-containing enzyme haloperoxidase is implicated in halide accumulation. We have studied the chemical state of iodine and its biological role in Laminaria at the I K edge, and bromoperoxidase from Ascophyllum nodosum (knotted wrack) at the Br K edge. Mo is essential for many forms of life; W only for certain archaea, such as Archaeoglobus fulgidus and the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, and some bacteria. The metals are bound and transported as their oxo-anions, molybdate and tungstate, which are similar in size. The transport protein WtpA from P. furiosus binds tungstate more strongly than molybdate, and is related in sequence to Archaeoglobus fulgidus ModA, of which a crystal structure is known. We have measured A. fulgidus ModA with tungstate at the W L3 (2p3/2) edge, and compared the results with the refined crystal structure. XAS studies of anion binding are feasible even if only weak interactions are present, are biologically relevant, and give new insights in the spectroscopy.

  20. Using Tracer Technology to Characterize Contaminated Pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Maresca, Joseph, W., Jr., Ph.D.; Bratton, Wesley, L., Ph.D., P.E.; Dickerson, Wilhelmina; Hales, Rochelle

    2005-12-30

    The Pipeline Characterization Using Tracers (PCUT) technique uses conservative and partitioning, reactive or other interactive tracers to remotely determine the amount of contaminant within a run of piping or ductwork. The PCUT system was motivated by a method that has been successfully used to characterize subsurface soil contaminants and is similar in operation to that of a gas chromatography column. By injecting a ?slug? of both conservative and partitioning tracers at one end (or section) of the piping and measuring the time history of the concentration of the tracers at the other end (or another section) of the pipe, the presence, location, and amount of contaminant within the pipe or duct can be determined. The tracers are transported along the pipe or duct by a gas flow field, typically air or nitrogen, which has a velocity that is slow enough so that the partitioning tracer has time to interact with the contaminant before the tracer slug completely passes over the contaminate region. PCUT not only identifies the presence of contamination, it also can locate the contamination along the pipeline and quantify the amount of residual. PCUT can be used in support of deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of piping and ducts that may have been contaminated with hazardous chemicals such as chlorinated solvents, petroleum products, radioactive materials, or heavy metals, such as mercury.

  1. Tracer design for magnetic particle imaging (invited)

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, R. Matthew; Khandhar, Amit P.; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) uses safe iron oxide nanoparticle tracers to offer fundamentally new capabilities for medical imaging, in applications as vascular imaging and ultra-sensitive cancer therapeutics. MPI is perhaps the first medical imaging platform to intrinsically exploit nanoscale material properties. MPI tracers contain magnetic nanoparticles whose tunable, size-dependent magnetic properties can be optimized by selecting a particular particle size and narrow size-distribution. In this paper we present experimental MPI measurements acquired using a homemade MPI magnetometer: a zero-dimensional MPI imaging system designed to characterize tracer performance by measuring the derivative of the time-varying tracer magnetization, M’(H(t)), at a driving frequency of 25 kHz. We show that MPI performance is optimized by selecting phase-pure magnetite tracers of a particular size and narrow size distribution; in this work, tracers with 20 nm median diameter, log-normal distribution shape parameter, σv, equal to 0.26, and hydrodynamic diameter equal to 30 nm showed the best performance. Furthermore, these optimized MPI tracers show 4 × greater signal intensity (measured at the third harmonic) and 20% better spatial resolution compared with commercial nanoparticles developed for MRI. PMID:22434939

  2. Wanted: Scalable Tracers for Diffusion Measurements

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Scalable tracers are potentially a useful tool to examine diffusion mechanisms and to predict diffusion coefficients, particularly for hindered diffusion in complex, heterogeneous, or crowded systems. Scalable tracers are defined as a series of tracers varying in size but with the same shape, structure, surface chemistry, deformability, and diffusion mechanism. Both chemical homology and constant dynamics are required. In particular, branching must not vary with size, and there must be no transition between ordinary diffusion and reptation. Measurements using scalable tracers yield the mean diffusion coefficient as a function of size alone; measurements using nonscalable tracers yield the variation due to differences in the other properties. Candidate scalable tracers are discussed for two-dimensional (2D) diffusion in membranes and three-dimensional diffusion in aqueous solutions. Correlations to predict the mean diffusion coefficient of globular biomolecules from molecular mass are reviewed briefly. Specific suggestions for the 3D case include the use of synthetic dendrimers or random hyperbranched polymers instead of dextran and the use of core–shell quantum dots. Another useful tool would be a series of scalable tracers varying in deformability alone, prepared by varying the density of crosslinking in a polymer to make say “reinforced Ficoll” or “reinforced hyperbranched polyglycerol.” PMID:25319586

  3. Wanted: scalable tracers for diffusion measurements.

    PubMed

    Saxton, Michael J

    2014-11-13

    Scalable tracers are potentially a useful tool to examine diffusion mechanisms and to predict diffusion coefficients, particularly for hindered diffusion in complex, heterogeneous, or crowded systems. Scalable tracers are defined as a series of tracers varying in size but with the same shape, structure, surface chemistry, deformability, and diffusion mechanism. Both chemical homology and constant dynamics are required. In particular, branching must not vary with size, and there must be no transition between ordinary diffusion and reptation. Measurements using scalable tracers yield the mean diffusion coefficient as a function of size alone; measurements using nonscalable tracers yield the variation due to differences in the other properties. Candidate scalable tracers are discussed for two-dimensional (2D) diffusion in membranes and three-dimensional diffusion in aqueous solutions. Correlations to predict the mean diffusion coefficient of globular biomolecules from molecular mass are reviewed briefly. Specific suggestions for the 3D case include the use of synthetic dendrimers or random hyperbranched polymers instead of dextran and the use of core-shell quantum dots. Another useful tool would be a series of scalable tracers varying in deformability alone, prepared by varying the density of crosslinking in a polymer to make say "reinforced Ficoll" or "reinforced hyperbranched polyglycerol."

  4. Tracer Developments: Results of Experimental Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.C.; Ahn, J.H.; Bentley, H.; Moore, J.N.; Veggeberg, S.

    1986-01-21

    Tracers can be used to monitor the movement of groundwaters and geothermal fluids and they can be used as a reference to quantify changes in fluid chemistry as a result of injection. Despite their potential importance to the geothermal operator, very few tracers are presently available and of those that are, little is known about their stability or behavior at the elevated temperatures that typify resources capable of electric power generation. During the past two years the University of Utah Research Institute has been involved in tracer research and testing, largely through the DOE Injection Research Program. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the results of these laboratory and field investigations.

  5. Tracking groundwater with fluoride tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, S.P.; Carey, P.J.; Fitzsimmons, J.H.

    1995-10-01

    A municipality on Long Island, NY, owns and operates a solid waste landfill that is currently affecting groundwater quality. Specifically, groundwater monitoring in wells downgradient from the facility indicates the presence of organic and inorganic constituents in excess of New York state groundwater quality standards and guidance values. The municipality wishes to expand its existing facility by constructing a new cell adjacent to the old unlined facility. The new cell will incorporate state-of-the-art landfill design. A double-composite baseliner system--mandated by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC)--will be constructed to minimize the potential for leakage of leachate into the groundwater system. The downgradient groundwater flow paths from the existing and the proposed facility will overlap. As such, using conventional monitoring approaches, differentiating known groundwater quality impacts from the existing facility with potential impacts from the new cell could be extremely difficult. To consider the application for the landfill expansion, NYSDEC requested that a study be conducted to determine whether the incorporation of a tracer into the liner design for the new cell could help to differentiate potential future water quality impacts from those impacts presently exerted by the existing landfill.

  6. Ion exchange polymers for anion separations

    DOEpatents

    Jarvinen, Gordon D.; Marsh, S. Fredric; Bartsch, Richard A.

    1997-01-01

    Anion exchange resins including at least two positively charged sites and a ell-defined spacing between the positive sites are provided together with a process of removing anions or anionic metal complexes from aqueous solutions by use of such resins. The resins can be substituted poly(vinylpyridine) and substituted polystyrene.

  7. Ion exchange polymers for anion separations

    DOEpatents

    Jarvinen, G.D.; Marsh, S.F.; Bartsch, R.A.

    1997-09-23

    Anion exchange resins including at least two positively charged sites and a well-defined spacing between the positive sites are provided together with a process of removing anions or anionic metal complexes from aqueous solutions by use of such resins. The resins can be substituted poly(vinylpyridine) and substituted polystyrene.

  8. Binding Hydrated Anions with Hydrophobic Pockets.

    PubMed

    Sokkalingam, Punidha; Shraberg, Joshua; Rick, Steven W; Gibb, Bruce C

    2016-01-13

    Using a combination of isothermal titration calorimetry and quantum and molecular dynamics calculations, we demonstrate that relatively soft anions have an affinity for hydrophobic concavity. The results are consistent with the anions remaining partially hydrated upon binding, and suggest a novel strategy for anion recognition.

  9. Anion Solvation in Carbonate Electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhengcheng

    2015-11-16

    With the correlation between Li+ solvation and interphasial chemistry on anodes firmly established in Li-ion batteries, the effect of cation–solvent interaction has gone beyond bulk thermodynamic and transport properties and become an essential element that determines the reversibility of electrochemistry and kinetics of Li-ion intercalation chemistries. As of now, most studies are dedicated to the solvation of Li+, and the solvation of anions in carbonate-based electrolytes and its possible effect on the electrochemical stability of such electrolytes remains little understood. As a mirror effort to prior Li+ solvation studies, this work focuses on the interactions between carbonate-based solvents and two anions (hexafluorophosphate, PF6–, and tetrafluoroborate, BF4–) that are most frequently used in Li-ion batteries. The possible correlation between such interaction and the interphasial chemistry on cathode surface is also explored.

  10. Polymerization of anionic wormlike micelles.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhiyuan; González, Yamaira I; Xu, Hangxun; Kaler, Eric W; Liu, Shiyong

    2006-01-31

    Polymerizable anionic wormlike micelles are obtained upon mixing the hydrotropic salt p-toluidine hydrochloride (PTHC) with the reactive anionic surfactant sodium 4-(8-methacryloyloxyoctyl)oxybenzene sulfonate (MOBS). Polymerization captures the cross-sectional radius of the micelles (approximately 2 nm), induces micellar growth, and leads to the formation of a stable single-phase dispersion of wormlike micellar polymers. The unpolymerized and polymerized micelles were characterized using static and dynamic laser light scattering, small-angle neutron scattering, 1H NMR, and stopped-flow light scattering. Stopped-flow light scattering was also used to measure the average lifetime of the unpolymerized wormlike micelles. A comparison of the average lifetime of unpolymerized wormlike micelles with the surfactant monomer propagation rate was used to elucidate the mechanism of polymerization. There is a significant correlation between the ratio of the average lifetime to the monomer propagation rate and the average aggregation number of the polymerized wormlike micelles.

  11. Monitoring High Velocity Salt Tracer via 4D Electrical Resistivity Tomography - Possibility for Salt Tracer Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doro, K. O.; Cirpka, O. A.; Patzelt, A.; Leven, C.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrogeological testing in a tomographic sequence as shown by the use of hydraulic tomography, allows an improvement of the spatial resolution of subsurface parameters. In this regard, recent studies show increasing interest in tracer tomography which involves sequential and spatially separated tracer injections and the measurement of their corresponding tracer breakthrough at different locations and depths. Such concentration measurements however require large experimental efforts and can be simplified by geophysical tracer monitoring techniques such as electrical resistivity. In this study, we present the use of 4-D, cross-hole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) for monitoring salt tracer experiments in high velocity flow fields. For our study, we utilized a set up that enables the conduction of salt tracer experiments with complete recovery within 84 hours over a transport distance of 16 m. This allows the repetition of the experiments with different injection depths for a tomographic salt tracer testing. For ERT monitoring, we designed modular borehole electrodes for repeated usage in a flexible manner. We also assess the use of a high speed resistivity data acquisition mode for field scale tracer monitoring ensuring high spatial and temporal resolution without sacrificing data accuracy. We applied our approach at the Lauswiesen test site, Tübingen, Germany. In our 10 m × 10 m tracer monitoring domain with 16 borehole electrodes, we acquired 4650 data points in less than 18 minutes for each monitoring cycle. Inversion results show that the tracer could be successfully imaged using this approach. The results show that repeated salt tracer tests can be efficiently monitored at a high resolution with ERT which gives the possibility for salt tracer tomography at field scale. Our results also provide a data base for extending current hydrogeophysical inversion approaches to field scale data.

  12. Aza compounds as anion receptors

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Hung Sui; Yang, Xiao-Qing; McBreen, James

    1998-01-06

    A family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of Li.sup.+ ion in alkali metal batteries.

  13. Aza compounds as anion receptors

    DOEpatents

    Lee, H.S.; Yang, X.Q.; McBreen, J.

    1998-01-06

    A family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of Li{sup +} ion in alkali metal batteries. 3 figs.

  14. Hosting anions. The energetic perspective.

    PubMed

    Schmidtchen, Franz P

    2010-10-01

    Hosting anions addresses the widely spread molecular recognition event of negatively charged species by dedicated organic compounds in condensed phases at equilibrium. The experimentally accessible energetic features comprise the entire system including the solvent, any buffers, background electrolytes or other components introduced for e.g. analysis. The deconvolution of all these interaction types and their dependence on subtle structural variation is required to arrive at a structure-energy correlation that may serve as a guide in receptor construction. The focus on direct host-guest interactions (lock-and-key complementarity) that have dominated the binding concepts of artificial receptors in the past must be widened in order to account for entropic contributions which constitute very significant fractions of the total free energy of interaction. Including entropy necessarily addresses the ambiguity and fuzziness of the host-guest structural ensemble and requires the appreciation of the fact that most liquid phases possess distinct structures of their own. Apparently, it is the perturbation of the intrinsic solvent structure occurring upon association that rules ion binding in polar media where ions are soluble and abundant. Rather than specifying peculiar structural elements useful in anion binding this critical review attempts an illumination of the concepts and individual energetic contributions resulting in the final observation of specific anion recognition (95 references).

  15. Covalent Polymers Containing Discrete Heterocyclic Anion Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambo, Brett M.; Silver, Eric S.; Bielawski, Christopher W.; Sessler, Jonathan L.

    This chapter covers recent advances in the development of polymeric materials containing discrete heterocyclic anion receptors, and focuses on advances in anion binding and chemosensor chemistry. The development of polymers specific for anionic species is a relatively new and flourishing area of materials chemistry. The incorporation of heterocyclic receptors capable of complexing anions through noncovalent interactions (e.g., hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions) provides a route to not only sensitive but also selective polymeric materials. Furthermore, these systems have been utilized in the development of polymers capable of extracting anionic species from aqueous media. These latter materials may lead to advances in water purification and treatment of diseases resulting from surplus ions.

  16. From anion receptors to transporters.

    PubMed

    Gale, Philip A

    2011-03-15

    Cystic fibrosis is the most well-known of a variety of diseases termed channelopathies, in which the regulation of ion transport across cell membranes is so disrupted that the threshold of a pathology is passed. The human toll exacted by these diseases has led a number of research groups, including our own, to create compounds that mediate ion transport across lipid bilayers. In this Account, we discuss three classes of synthetic compounds that were refined to bind and transport anions across lipid bilayer membranes. All of the compounds were originally designed as anion receptors, that is, species that would simply create stable complexes with anions, but were then further developed as transporters. By studying structurally simple systems and varying their properties to change the degree of preorganization, the affinity for anions, or the lipophilicity, we have begun to rationalize why particular anion transport mechanisms (cotransport or antiport processes) occur in particular cases. For example, we have studied the chloride transport properties of receptors based on the closely related structures of isophthalamide and pyridine-2,6-dicarboxamide: the central ring in each case was augmented with pendant methylimidazole groups designed to cotransport H(+) and Cl(-). We observed that the more preorganized pyridine-based receptor was the more efficient transporter, a finding replicated with a series of isophthalamides in which one contained hydroxyl groups designed to preorganize the receptor. This latter class of compound, together with the natural product prodigiosin, can transport bicarbonate (as part of a chloride/bicarbonate antiport process) across lipid bilayer membranes. We have also studied the membrane transport properties of calix[4]pyrroles. Although the parent meso-octamethylcalix[4]pyrrole functions solely as a Cs(+)/Cl(-) cotransporter, other compounds with increased anion affinities can function through an antiport process. One example is octafluoro

  17. Analysis of tracer and thermal transients during reinjection

    SciTech Connect

    Kocabas, I.

    1989-10-01

    This work studied tracer and thermal transients during reinjection in geothermal reserviors and developed a new technique which combines the results from interwell tracer tests and thermal injection-backflow tests to estimate the thermal breakthrough times. Tracer tests are essential to determine the degree of connectivity between the injection wells and the producing wells. To analyze the tracer return profiles quantitatively, we employed three mathematical models namely, the convection-dispersion (CD) model, matrix diffusion (MD) model, and the Avodnin (AD) model, which were developed to study tracer and heat transport in a single vertical fracture. We considered three types of tracer tests namely, interwell tracer tests without recirculation, interwell tracer tests with recirculation, and injection-backflow tracer tests. To estimate the model parameters, we used a nonlinear regression program to match tracer return profiles to the solutions.

  18. Transient tracer applications in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stöven, T.; Tanhua, T.; Hoppema, M.

    2014-10-01

    Transient tracers can be used to constrain the Inverse-Gaussian transit time distribution (IG-TTD) and thus provide information about ocean ventilation. Individual transient tracers have different time and application ranges which are defined by their atmospheric history (chronological transient tracers) or their decay rate (radioactive transient tracers). The classification ranges from tracers for highly ventilated water masses, e.g. sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), the decay of Tritium (δ3H) and to some extent also dichlorodifluoromethane (CFC-12) to tracers for less ventilated deep ocean basins, e.g. CFC-12, Argon-39 (39Ar) and radiocarbon (14C). The IG-TTD can be empirically constrained by using transient tracer couples with sufficiently different input functions. Each tracer couple has specific characteristics which influence the application limit of the IG-TTD. Here we provide an overview of commonly used transient tracer couples and their validity areas within the IG-TTD by using the concept of tracer age differences (TAD). New measured CFC-12 and SF6 data from a section along 10° E in the Southern Ocean in 2012 are presented. These are combined with a similar data set of 1998 along 6° E in the Southern Ocean as well as with 39Ar data from the early 1980s in the western Atlantic Ocean and the Weddell Sea for investigating the application limit of the IG-TTD and to analyze changes in ventilation in the Southern Ocean. We found that the IG-TTD can be constrained south to 46° S which corresponds to the Subantarctic Front (SAF) denoting the application limit. The constrained IG-TTD north of the SAF shows a slight increase in mean ages between 1998 and 2012 in the upper 1200 m between 42-46° S. The absence of SF6 inhibits ventilation analyses below this depth. The time lag analysis between the 1998 and 2012 data shows an increase in ventilation down to 1000 m and a steady ventilation between 2000 m-bottom south of the SAF between 51-55° S.

  19. Journal: A Review of Some Tracer-Test Design Equations for Tracer-Mass Estimation and Sample Collection Frequency

    EPA Science Inventory

    Determination of necessary tracer mass, initial sample-collection time, and subsequent sample-collection frequency are the three most difficult aspects to estimate for a proposed tracer test prior to conducting the tracer test. To facilitate tracer-mass estimation, 33 mass-estima...

  20. Tracer-based prediction of thermal reservoir lifetime: scope, limitations, and the role of thermosensitive tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghergut, I.; Behrens, H.; Karmakar, S.; Licha, T.; Nottebohm, M.; Sauter, M.

    2012-04-01

    Thermal-lifetime prediction is a traditional endeavour of inter-well tracer tests conducted in geothermal reservoirs. Early tracer test signals (detectable within the first few years of operation) are expected to correlate with late-time production temperature evolutions ('thermal breakthrough', supposed to not occur before some decades of operation) of a geothermal reservoir. Whenever a geothermal reservoir can be described as a single-fracture system, its thermal lifetime will, ideally, be determined by two parameters (say, fracture aperture and porosity), whose inversion from conservative-tracer test signals is straightforward and non-ambiguous (provided that the tracer tests, and their interpretation, are performed in accordance to the rules of the art). However, as soon as only 'few more' fractures are considered, this clear-cut correlation is broken. A given geothermal reservoir can simultaneously feature a single-fracture behaviour, in terms of heat transport, and a multiple-fracture behaviour, in terms of solute tracer transport (or vice-versa), whose effective values of fracture apertures, spacings, and porosities are essentially uncorrelated between heat and solute tracers. Solute transport parameters derived from conservative-tracer tests will no longer characterize the heat transport processes (and thus temperature evolutions) taking place in the same reservoir. Parameters determining its thermal lifetime will remain 'invisible' to conservative tracers in inter-well tests. We demonstrate this issue at the example of a five-fracture system, representing a deep-geothermal reservoir, with well-doublet placement inducing fluid flow 'obliquely' to the fractures. Thermal breakthrough in this system is found to strongly depend on fracture apertures, whereas conservative-solute tracer signals from inter-well tests in the same system do not show a clear-cut correlation with fracture apertures. Only by using thermosensitive substances as tracers, a reliable

  1. Long residence times - bad tracer tests?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghergut, Julia; Behrens, Horst; Sauter, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Tracer tests conducted at geothermal well doublets or triplets in the Upper Rhine Rift Valley [1] all face, with very few exceptions so far, one common issue: lack of conclusive tracer test results, or tracer signals still undetectable for longer than one or two years after tracer injection. While the reasons for this surely differ from site to site (Riehen, Landau, Insheim, Bruchsal, ...), its effects on how the usefulness of tracer tests is perceived by the non-tracer community are pretty much the same. The 'poor-signal' frustration keeps nourishing two major 'alternative' endeavours : (I) design and execute tracer tests in single-well injection-withdrawal (push-pull), 'instead of' inter-well flow-path tracing configurations; (II) use 'novel' tracer substances instead of the 'old' ones which have 'obviously failed'. Frustration experienced with most inter-well tracer tests in the Upper Rhine Rift Valley has also made them be regarded as 'maybe useful for EGS' ('enhanced', or 'engineered' geothermal systems, whose fluid RTD typically include a major share of values below one year), but 'no longer worthwhile a follow-up sampling' in natural, large-scale hydrothermal reservoirs. We illustrate some of these arguments with the ongoing Bruchsal case [2]. The inter-well tracer test conducted at Bruchsal was (and still is!) aimed at assessing inter-well connectivity, fluid residence times, and characterizing the reservoir structure [3]. Fluid samples taken at the geothermal production well after reaching a fluid turnover of about 700,000 m3 showed tracer concentrations in the range of 10-8 Minj per m3, in the liquid phase of each sample (Minj being the total quantity of tracer injected as a short pulse at the geothermal re-injection well). Tracer signals might actually be higher, owing to tracer amounts co-precipitated and/or adsorbed onto the solid phase whose accumulation in the samples was unavoidable (due to pressure relief and degassing during the very sampling

  2. Boussinesq modeling of HB06 tracer releases Part 2: Tracer plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. B.; Feddersen, F.; Guza, R. T.

    2010-12-01

    Tracer plumes simulated with a Boussinesq surfzone model (funwaveC) are compared with 5 plumes observed during the HB06 experiment (Huntington Beach, Fall 2006). Surfzone tracer plumes were formed by continuously releasing dye tracer into the wave-driven alongshore current. Bulk cross-shore eddy diffusivities, O(1 m2 s-1), were estimated from the observed plumes and agreed best with a mixing-length scaling based on large 2D eddies [Clark et al., JGR, in press 2010]. The mechanisms for surfzone cross-shore tracer dispersion are not well known, and are explored here with the time-dependent, wave and horizontal eddy resolving, funwaveC model. The funwaveC model is run with observed bathymetry, and initialized in 4m depth with the observed obliquely incident and directionally spread waves. Modeled and observed waves and currents are similar, and discussed in Part 1. Model tracer is dispersed by the surfzone horizontal eddy field, a breaking wave eddy diffusivity, and a small O(0.01 m2 s-1) background diffusivity. Modeled and observed mean plume structures agree, but can be degraded by a mismatch between observed and modeled alongshore currents, especially near the tracer source. Bulk tracer eddy diffusivities agree with HB06 observations, and the long narrow plume assumption (used for diffusion analysis) is discussed with modeled tracer fluxes. The model suggests that cross-shore mixing at time scales of many wave periods is dominated by horizontal eddies, not by the breaking eddy diffusivity.

  3. Testing and comparison of four ionic tracers to measure stream flow loss by multiple tracer injection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zellweger, G.W.

    1994-01-01

    An injectate containing lithium, sodium, chloride and bromide was added continuously at five sites along a 507 m study reach of St Kevin Gulch, Lake County, Colorado to determine which sections of the stream were losing water to the stream bed and to ascertain how well the four tracers performed. The acidity of the stream (pH 3.6) made it possible for lithium and sodium, which are normally absorbed by ion exchange with stream bed sediment, to be used as conservative tracers. Net flow losses as low as 0.81 s-1, or 8% of flow, were calculated between measuring sites. By comparing the results of simultaneous injection it was determined whether subsections of the study reach were influent or effluent. Evaluation of tracer concentrations along 116 m of stream indicated that all four tracers behaved conservatively. Discharges measured by Parshall flumes were 4-18% greater than discharges measured by tracer dilution. -from Author

  4. Exploring Hydrofluorocarbons as Groundwater Age Tracers (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, K. B.; Busenberg, E.; Plummer, L. N.; Casile, G.; Sanford, W. E.

    2013-12-01

    Groundwater dating tracers are an essential tool for analyzing hydrologic conditions in groundwater systems. Commonly used tracers for dating post-1940's groundwater include sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), 3H-3He, and other isotopic tracers (85Kr, δ2H and δ18O isotopes, etc.). Each tracer carries a corresponding set of advantages and limitations imposed by field, analytical, and interpretive methods. Increasing the number available tracers is appealing, particularly if they possess inert chemical properties and unique temporal emission histories from other tracers. Atmospherically derived halogenated trace gases continue to hold untapped potential for new tracers, as they are generally inert and their emission histories are well documented. SF5CF3, and CFC-13 were previously shown to have application as dating tracers, though their low mixing ratios and low solubility require large amounts of water to be degassed for their quantification. Two related groups of compounds, hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are hypothesized to be potential age tracers, having similar mixing ratios to the CFCs and relatively high solubility. However, these compounds yield gas chromatography electron capture detector (GC-ECD) responses that are 10-2 -10-5 less than CFC-12, making purge and trap or field stripping GC-ECD approaches impractical. Therefore, in order to use dissolved HCFCs and HFCs as age tracers, different approaches are needed. To solve this problem, we developed an analytical method that uses an atomic emission detector (GC-AED) in place of an ECD to detect fluorinated compounds. In contrast to the ECD, the AED is a universally sensitive, highly linear, elementally specific detector. The new GC-AED system is being used to measure chlorodifluoromethane (HCFC-22), 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134a), and other fluorinated compounds in one liter water samples to study their potential as age dating tracers. HCFC-22 is a

  5. TRACER - TRACING AND CONTROL OF ENGINEERING REQUIREMENTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, P. R.

    1994-01-01

    TRACER (Tracing and Control of Engineering Requirements) is a database/word processing system created to document and maintain the order of both requirements and descriptive material associated with an engineering project. A set of hierarchical documents are normally generated for a project whereby the requirements of the higher level documents levy requirements on the same level or lower level documents. Traditionally, the requirements are handled almost entirely by manual paper methods. The problem with a typical paper system, however, is that requirements written and changed continuously in different areas lead to misunderstandings and noncompliance. The purpose of TRACER is to automate the capture, tracing, reviewing, and managing of requirements for an engineering project. The engineering project still requires communications, negotiations, interactions, and iterations among people and organizations, but TRACER promotes succinct and precise identification and treatment of real requirements separate from the descriptive prose in a document. TRACER permits the documentation of an engineering project's requirements and progress in a logical, controllable, traceable manner. TRACER's attributes include the presentation of current requirements and status from any linked computer terminal and the ability to differentiate headers and descriptive material from the requirements. Related requirements can be linked and traced. The program also enables portions of documents to be printed, individual approval and release of requirements, and the tracing of requirements down into the equipment specification. Requirement "links" can be made "pending" and invisible to others until the pending link is made "binding". Individuals affected by linked requirements can be notified of significant changes with acknowledgement of the changes required. An unlimited number of documents can be created for a project and an ASCII import feature permits existing documents to be incorporated

  6. Thermal Stability of Chelated Indium Activable Tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Chrysikopoulos, Costas; Kruger, Paul

    1986-01-21

    The thermal stability of indium tracer chelated with organic ligands ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) was measured for reservoir temperatures of 150, 200, and 240 C. Measurements of the soluble indium concentration was made as a function of time by neutron activation analysis. From the data, approximate thermal decomposition rates were estimated. At 150 C, both chelated tracers were stable over the experimental period of 20 days. At 200 C, the InEDTA concentration remained constant for 16 days, after which the thermal decomposition occurred at a measured rate constant of k = 0.09 d{sup -1}. The thermal decomposition of InNTA at 200 C showed a first order reaction with a measured rate constant of k = 0.16 d{sup -1}. At 240 C, both indium chelated tracers showed rapid decomposition with rate constants greater than 1.8 d{sup -1}. The data indicate that for geothermal reservoir with temperatures up to about 200 C, indium chelated tracers can be used effectively for transit times of at least 20 days. These experiments were run without reservoir rock media, and do not account for concomitant loss of indium tracer by adsorption processes.

  7. Pyrazole complexes as anion receptors.

    PubMed

    Nieto, Sonia; Pérez, Julio; Riera, Lucía; Riera, Víctor; Miguel, Daniel

    2006-03-01

    The behavior of the receptors [Re(CO)3(Hdmpz)3]BAr'4 (Hdmpz = 3,5-dimethylpyrazole) (1) and [Re(CO)3(HtBupz)3]BAr'4 (HtBupz = 3(5)-tert-butylpyrazole) (2; Ar' = 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl) toward the anions fluoride, chloride, bromide, iodide, hydrogensulfate, dihydrogenphosphate, nitrate, and perrhenate was studied in CD3CN solution. In most cases, the receptors were stable. Anion exchange was fast, and binding constants were calculated from the NMR titration profiles. The structure of the adduct [Re(CO)3(HtBupz)3] x NO3 (3) was determined by X-ray diffraction. Two pyrazole moieties are hydrogen-bonded to one nitrate oxygen atom, and the third pyrazole moiety is hydrogen-bonded to an oxygen atom of an adjacent nitrate, leading to infinite chains. The structure of the adduct [Re(CO)3(Hdmpz)3]BAr'4acetone (4), also determined by X-ray diffraction, showed a similar interaction of two pyrazole N-H groups with the acetone oxygen atom. F- and H2PO4(-) deprotonate the receptors, and HSO4(-) decomposed 1. The structure of one of the decomposition products (5), determined by X-ray diffraction, is consistent with pyrazole protonation and substitution by sulfate.

  8. Enhanced Oil Recovery: Aqueous Flow Tracer Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Rovani; John Schabron

    2009-02-01

    A low detection limit analytical method was developed to measure a suite of benzoic acid and fluorinated benzoic acid compounds intended for use as tracers for enhanced oil recovery operations. Although the new high performance liquid chromatography separation successfully measured the tracers in an aqueous matrix at low part per billion levels, the low detection limits could not be achieved in oil field water due to interference problems with the hydrocarbon-saturated water using the system's UV detector. Commercial instrument vendors were contacted in an effort to determine if mass spectrometry could be used as an alternate detection technique. The results of their work demonstrate that low part per billion analysis of the tracer compounds in oil field water could be achieved using ultra performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry.

  9. Tunable electronic interactions between anions and perylenediimide.

    PubMed

    Goodson, Flynt S; Panda, Dillip K; Ray, Shuvasree; Mitra, Atanu; Guha, Samit; Saha, Sourav

    2013-08-07

    Over the past decade anion-π interaction has emerged as a new paradigm of supramolecular chemistry of anions. Taking advantage of the electronic nature of anion-π interaction, we have expanded its boundaries to charge-transfer (CT) and formal electron transfer (ET) events by adjusting the electron-donating and accepting abilities of anions and π-acids, respectively. To establish that ET, CT, and anion-π interactions could take place between different anions and π-acids as long as their electronic and structural properties are conducive, herein, we introduce 3,4,9,10-perylenediimide (PDI-1) that selectively undergoes thermal ET from strong Lewis basic hydroxide and fluoride anions, but remains electronically and optically silent to poor Lewis basic anions, as ET and CT events are turned OFF. These interactions have been fully characterized by UV/Vis, NMR, and EPR spectroscopies. These results demonstrate the generality of anion-induced ET events in aprotic solvents and further refute a notion that strong Lewis basic hydroxide and fluoride ions can only trigger nucleophilic attack to form covalent bonds instead of acting as sacrificial electron donors to π-acids under appropriate conditions.

  10. Density tracers give option to float

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.J.; Wood, C.J.; Lyman, G.J.

    1986-05-01

    Density tracers, that is, particles of precisely known specific gravities, offer alternative to the float-sink technique for determining separation densities. Usually made of plastic and dosed with heavy metal salts to obtain the desired specific gravity, the tracers are added to the separator feed, collected by hand from the product and reject streams, and sorted into appropriate increments on the basis of color-coding or other markings. After counting, the partition number for each specific gravity is calculated and the circuit partition or tromp curve drawn.

  11. Method of dispersing particulate aerosol tracer

    DOEpatents

    O'Holleran, Thomas P.

    1988-01-01

    A particulate aerosol tracer which comprises a particulate carrier of sheet silicate composition having a particle size up to one micron, and a cationic dopant chemically absorbed in solid solution in the carrier. The carrier is preferably selected from the group consisting of natural mineral clays such as bentonite, and the dopant is selected from the group consisting of rare earth elements and transition elements. The tracers are dispersed by forming an aqueous salt solution with the dopant present as cations, dispersing the carriers in the solution, and then atomizing the solution under heat sufficient to superheat the solution droplets at a level sufficient to prevent reagglomeration of the carrier particles.

  12. Radiopharmaceutical Tracers for Neural Progenitor Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mangner, Thomas J.

    2006-09-29

    The Technical Report summarizes the results of the synthesis and microPET animal scanning of several compounds labeled with positron-emitting isotopes in normal, neonatal and kainic acid treated (seizure induced) rats as potential PET tracers to image the process of neurogenesis using positron emission tomography (PET). The tracers tested were 3'-deoxy-3'-[F-18]fluorothymidine ([F-18]FLT) and 5'-benzoyl-FTL, 1-(2'-deoxy-2'-[F-18]fluoro-B-D-arabinofuranosyl)-5-bromouracil (FBAU) and 3',5'-dibenzoyl-FBAU, N-[F-18]fluoroacetyl-D-glucosamine (FLAG) and tetraacetyl-FLAG, and L-[1-C-11]leucine.

  13. A review of methods for modelling environmental tracers in groundwater: Advantages of tracer concentration simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnadge, Chris; Smerdon, Brian D.

    2014-11-01

    Mathematical models of varying complexity have been developed since the 1960s to interpret environmental tracer concentrations in groundwater flow systems. This review examines published studies of model-based environmental tracer interpretation, the progress of different modelling approaches, and also considers the value of modelling tracer concentrations directly rather than estimations of groundwater age. Based on citation metrics generated using the Web of Science and Google Scholar reference databases, the most highly utilised interpretation approaches are lumped parameter models (421 citations), followed closely by direct age models (220 citations). A third approach is the use of mixing cell models (99 citations). Although lumped parameter models are conceptually simple and require limited data, they are unsuitable for characterising the internal dynamics of a hydrogeological system and/or under conditions where large scale anthropogenic stresses occur within a groundwater basin. Groundwater age modelling, and in particular, the simulation of environmental tracer transport that explicitly accounts for the accumulation and decay of tracer mass, has proven to be highly beneficial in constraining numerical models. Recent improvements in computing power have made numerical simulation of tracer transport feasible. We argue that, unlike directly simulated ages, the results of tracer mass transport simulation can be compared directly to observations, without needing to correct for apparent age bias or other confounding factors.

  14. Anion adsorption induced surface reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Lei

    2005-11-01

    Surface stress plays an important role in the behavior of solid surfaces. Potential-controlled anion adsorption in electrolytes alters the surface stress of the electrode and results in morphology changes to the surfaces. With a combination of potential-induced surface stress measurement and in situ electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), it is demonstrated that anion adsorption induces changes in structure of thin films and modifies the growth morphology and stress evolution in epitaxially grown films. Surface structural transitions in the heteroepitaxial system consisting of one to two gold monolayers on platinum substrates were observed. By increasing the potential, structural transitions, from (1 x 1), to a striped phase, to a hexagonal structure, occurred in the gold bilayer. This hexagonal structure was related to the formation of an ordered sulfate adlayer with a ( 3x7 ) structure. Such transitions were repeatable by cycling the potential. Furthermore, the transitions between various dislocation structures were affected by anion adsorption. The surface composition of the gold bilayer on Pt was measured by underpotential deposition of copper. By subtracting the contribution of a pure Pt surface from the gold bi-layer on Pt, a stress change of -2.4 N/m was observed, which agrees with the stress change of -2.46 N/m predicted to accompany formation of 1.5 MLs of coherent Au on Pt(111) from epitaxy theory. The Cu monolayer deposited on Au(111) from an acid sulfate electrolyte was found to be pseudomorphic while the Cu monolayer formed on Au(111) in vacuum was incoherent. The stress-thickness change associated with the coherent monolayer of copper on Au(111) in electrolyte was -0.6 N/m, while conventional epitaxy theories predict a value of +7.76 N/m. STM results elucidated the sulfate adsorption on the copper monolayer caused an expansion of the layer as evidenced by a Moire Structure. For the Cu monolayer on Au(111), the sulfate-induced expansion

  15. Nexal membrane permeability to anions

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    The permeability of the septa of the earthworm in the median axon has been calculated for the anions fluorescein and its halogen derivatives. The values ranged from 5.4 X 10(-5) to 4 X 10(-6) cm/s. Previously, the septa had been shown to contain nexuses. By using freeze-fracture material, the surface area of nexus on the septal membranes was determined to be 4.5%, very similar to the percentage of nexus in the intercalated disk of mammalian myocardium. Plasma membrane permeability to these dyes was also calculated and shown to be much less than that of the septal membranes. In addition, an estimate of cytoplasmic binding for each dye was made, and most dyes showed little or no binding with the exception of aminofluorescein. PMID:702107

  16. Using Neural Networks to Describe Tracer Correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lary, D. J.; Mueller, M. D.; Mussa, H. Y.

    2003-01-01

    Neural networks are ideally suited to describe the spatial and temporal dependence of tracer-tracer correlations. The neural network performs well even in regions where the correlations are less compact and normally a family of correlation curves would be required. For example, the CH4-N2O correlation can be well described using a neural network trained with the latitude, pressure, time of year, and CH4 volume mixing ratio (v.m.r.). In this study a neural network using Quickprop learning and one hidden layer with eight nodes was able to reproduce the CH4-N2O correlation with a correlation co- efficient of 0.9995. Such an accurate representation of tracer-tracer correlations allows more use to be made of long-term datasets to constrain chemical models. Such as the dataset from the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) which has continuously observed CH4, (but not N2O) from 1991 till the present. The neural network Fortran code used is available for download.

  17. Travel-time-based thermal tracer tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somogyvári, Márk; Bayer, Peter; Brauchler, Ralf

    2016-05-01

    Active thermal tracer testing is a technique to get information about the flow and transport properties of an aquifer. In this paper we propose an innovative methodology using active thermal tracers in a tomographic setup to reconstruct cross-well hydraulic conductivity profiles. This is facilitated by assuming that the propagation of the injected thermal tracer is mainly controlled by advection. To reduce the effects of density and viscosity changes and thermal diffusion, early-time diagnostics are used and specific travel times of the tracer breakthrough curves are extracted. These travel times are inverted with an eikonal solver using the staggered grid method to reduce constraints from the pre-defined grid geometry and to improve the resolution. Finally, non-reliable pixels are removed from the derived hydraulic conductivity tomograms. The method is applied to successfully reconstruct cross-well profiles as well as a 3-D block of a high-resolution fluvio-aeolian aquifer analog data set. Sensitivity analysis reveals a negligible role of the injection temperature, but more attention has to be drawn to other technical parameters such as the injection rate. This is investigated in more detail through model-based testing using diverse hydraulic and thermal conditions in order to delineate the feasible range of applications for the new tomographic approach.

  18. Blood Tracer Kinetics in the Arterial Tree

    PubMed Central

    Kellner, Elias; Gall, Peter; Günther, Matthias; Reisert, Marco; Mader, Irina; Fleysher, Roman; Kiselev, Valerij G.

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of blood supply of different organs relies on labeling blood with a suitable tracer. The tracer kinetics is linear: Tracer concentration at an observation site is a linear response to an input somewhere upstream the arterial flow. The corresponding impulse response functions are currently treated empirically without incorporating the relation to the vascular morphology of an organ. In this work we address this relation for the first time. We demonstrate that the form of the response function in the entire arterial tree is reduced to that of individual vessel segments under approximation of good blood mixing at vessel bifurcations. The resulting expression simplifies significantly when the geometric scaling of the vascular tree is taken into account. This suggests a new way to access the vascular morphology in vivo using experimentally determined response functions. However, it is an ill-posed inverse problem as demonstrated by an example using measured arterial spin labeling in large brain arteries. We further analyze transport in individual vessel segments and demonstrate that experimentally accessible tracer concentration in vessel segments depends on the measurement principle. Explicit expressions for the response functions are obtained for the major middle part of the arterial tree in which the blood flow in individual vessel segments can be treated as laminar. When applied to the analysis of regional cerebral blood flow measurements for which the necessary arterial input is evaluated in the carotid arteries, present theory predicts about 20% underestimation, which is in agreement with recent experimental data. PMID:25299048

  19. Subsurface barrier integrity verification using perfluorocarbon tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, T.M.; Heiser, J.; Milian, L.; Senum, G.

    1996-12-01

    Subsurface barriers are an extremely promising remediation option to many waste management problems. Gas phase tracers include perfluorocarbon tracers (PFT`s) and chlorofluorocarbon tracers (CFC`s). Both have been applied for leak detection in subsurface systems. The focus of this report is to describe the barrier verification tests conducted using PFT`s and analysis of the data from the tests. PFT verification tests have been performed on a simulated waste pit at the Hanford Geotechnical facility and on an actual waste pit at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The objective of these tests were to demonstrate the proof-of-concept that PFT technology can be used to determine if small breaches form in the barrier and for estimating the effectiveness of the barrier in preventing migration of the gas tracer to the monitoring wells. The subsurface barrier systems created at Hanford and BNL are described. The experimental results and the analysis of the data follow. Based on the findings of this study, conclusions are offered and suggestions for future work are presented.

  20. Nanoparticle tracers in calcium carbonate porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan Vivian; Cathles, Lawrence M.; Archer, Lynden A.

    2014-08-01

    Tracers are perhaps the most direct way of diagnosing subsurface fluid flow pathways for ground water decontamination and for natural gas and oil production. Nanoparticle tracers could be particularly effective because they do not diffuse away from the fractures or channels where flow occurs and thus take much less time to travel between two points. In combination with a chemical tracer they can measure the degree of flow concentration. A prerequisite for tracer applications is that the particles are not retained in the porous media as the result of aggregation or sticking to mineral surfaces. By screening eight nanoparticles (3-100 nm in diameter) for retention when passed through calcium carbonate packed laboratory columns in artificial oil field brine solutions of variable ionic strength we show that the nanoparticles with the least retention are 3 nm in diameter, nearly uncharged, and decorated with highly hydrophilic polymeric ligands. The details of these column experiments and the tri-modal distribution of zeta potential of the calcite sand particles in the brine used in our tests suggests that parts of the calcite surface have positive zeta potential and the retention of negatively charged nanoparticles occurs at these sites. Only neutral nanoparticles are immune to at least some retention.

  1. Hybrid tracers for sentinel node biopsy.

    PubMed

    Van Den Berg, N S; Buckle, T; Kleinjan, G I; Klop, W M; Horenblas, S; Van Der Poel, H G; Valdés-Olmos, R A; Van Leeuwen, F I

    2014-06-01

    Conventional sentinel node (SN) mapping is performed by injection of a radiocolloid followed by lymphoscintigraphy to identify the number and location of the primary tumor draining lymph node(s), the so-called SN(s). Over the last decade research has focused on the introduction of new imaging agents that can further aid (surgical) SN identification. Different tracers for SN mapping, with varying sizes and isotopes have been reported, most of which have proven their value in a clinical setting. A major challenge lies in transferring this diagnostic information obtained at the nuclear medicine department to the operating theatre thereby providing the surgeon with (image) guidance. Conventionally, an intraoperative injection of vital blue dye or a fluorescence dye is given to allow intraoperative optical SN identification. However, for some indications, the radiotracer-based approach remains crucial. More recently, hybrid tracers, that contain both a radioactive and fluorescent label, were introduced to allow for direct integration of pre- and intraoperative guidance technologies. Their potential is especially high when they are used in combination with new surgical imaging modalities and navigation tools. Next to a description of the known tracers for SN mapping, this review discusses the application of hybrid tracers during SN biopsy and how the introduction of these new techniques can further aid in translation of nuclear medicine information into the operating theatre.

  2. Tripodal Receptors for Cation and Anion Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Kuswandi, Bambang; Nuriman; Verboom, Willem; Reinhoudt, David N.

    2006-01-01

    This review discusses different types of artificial tripodal receptors for the selective recognition and sensing of cations and anions. Examples on the relationship between structure and selectivity towards cations and anions are described. Furthermore, their applications as potentiometric ion sensing are emphasised, along with their potential applications in optical sensors or optodes.

  3. Tracer injection techniques in flowing surface water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wörman, A.

    2009-04-01

    Residence time distributions for flowing water and reactive matter are commonly used integrated properties of the transport process for determining technical issues of water resource management and in eco-hydrological science. Two general issues for tracer techniques are that the concentration-vs-time relation following a tracer injection (the breakthrough curve) gives unique transport information in different parts of the curve and separation of hydromechanical and reactive mechanisms often require simultaneous tracer injections. This presentation discusses evaluation methods for simultaneous tracer injections based on examples of tracer experiments in small rivers, streams and wetlands. Tritiated water is used as a practically inert substance to reflect the actual hydrodynamics, but other involved tracers are Cr(III)-51, P-32 and N-15. Hydromechanical, in-stream dispersion is reflected as a symmetrical spreading of the spatial concentration distribution. This requires that the transport distance over water depth is larger than about five times the flow Peclet number. Transversal retention of both inert and reactive solutes is reflected in terms of the tail of the breakthrough curve. Especially, reactive solutes can have a substantial magnification of the tailing behaviour depending on reaction rates or partitioning coefficients. To accurately discriminate between the effects of reactions and hydromechanical mixing its is relevant to use simultaneous injections of inert and reactive tracers with a sequential or integrated evaluation procedure. As an example, the slope of the P-32 tailing is consistently smaller than that of a simultaneous tritium injection in Ekeby wetland, Eskilstuna. The same applies to N-15 injected in the same experiment, but nitrogen is affected also by a systematic loss due to denitrification. Uptake in stream-bed sediments can be caused by a pumping effect arising when a variable pressure field is created on the stream bottom due to bed

  4. Halon-1301, a new Groundwater Age Tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, Monique; van der Raaij, Rob; Morgenstern, Uwe; Jackson, Bethanna

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater dating is an important tool to assess groundwater resources in regards to direction and time scale of groundwater flow and recharge and to assess contamination risks and manage remediation. To infer groundwater age information, a combination of different environmental tracers, such as tritium and SF6, are commonly used. However ambiguous age interpretations are often faced, due to a limited set of available tracers and limitations of each tracer method when applied alone. There is a need for additional, complementary groundwater age tracers. We recently discovered that Halon-1301, a water soluble and entirely anthropogenic gaseous substance, may be a promising candidate [Beyer et al, 2014]. Halon-1301 can be determined along with SF6, SF5CF3 and CFC-12 in groundwater using a gas chromatography setup with attached electron capture detector developed by Busenberg and Plummer [2008]. Halon-1301 has not been assessed in groundwater. This study assesses the behaviour of Halon-1301 in water and its suitability as a groundwater age tracer. We determined Halon-1301 in 17 groundwater and various modern (river) waters sites located in 3 different groundwater systems in the Wellington Region, New Zealand. These waters have been previously dated with tritium, CFC-12, CFC-11 and SF6 with mean residence times ranging from 0.5 to over 100 years. The waters range from oxic to anoxic and some show evidence of CFC contamination or degradation. This allows us to assess the different properties affecting the suitability of Halon-1301 as groundwater age tracer, such as its conservativeness in water and local contamination potential. The samples are analysed for Halon-1301 and SF6simultaneously, which allows identification of issues commonly faced when using gaseous tracers such as contamination with modern air during sampling. Overall we found in the assessed groundwater samples Halon-1301 is a feasible new groundwater tracer. No sample indicated significantly elevated

  5. AIR INFILTRATION MEASUREMENTS USING TRACER GASES: A LITERATURE REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a literature review of air filtration measurements using tracer gases, including sulfur hexafluoride, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and radioactive argon and krypton. Sulfur hexafluoride is the commonest tracer gas of choice...

  6. Creating molecular macrocycles for anion recognition

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary The creation and functionality of new classes of macrocycles that are shape persistent and can bind anions is described. The genesis of triazolophane macrocycles emerges out of activity surrounding 1,2,3-triazoles made using click chemistry; and the same triazoles are responsible for anion capture. Mistakes made and lessons learnt in anion recognition provide deeper understanding that, together with theory, now provides for computer-aided receptor design. The lessons are acted upon in the creation of two new macrocycles. First, cyanostars are larger and like to capture large anions. Second is tricarb, which also favors large anions but shows a propensity to self-assemble in an orderly and stable manner, laying a foundation for future designs of hierarchical nanostructures. PMID:27340452

  7. Covalent Polymers Containing Discrete Heterocyclic Anion Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Rambo, Brett M.; Silver, Eric S.; Bielawski, Christopher W.; Sessler, Jonathan L.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter covers recent advances in the development of polymeric materials containing discrete heterocyclic anion receptors, and focuses on advances in anion binding and chemosensor chemistry. The development of polymers specific for anionic species is a relatively new and flourishing area of materials chemistry. The incorporation of heterocyclic receptors capable of complexing anions through non-covalent interactions (e.g., hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions) provides a route to not only sensitive but also selective polymer materials. Furthermore, these systems have been utilized in the development of polymers capable of extracting anionic species from aqueous environments. These latter materials may lead to advances in water purification and treatment of diseases resulting from surplus ions. PMID:20871791

  8. Polymers for anion recognition and sensing.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Ali; Taylor, Mark S

    2012-01-16

    In biological systems, the selective and high-affinity recognition of anionic species is accomplished by macromolecular hosts (anion-binding proteins) that have been "optimized" through evolution. Surprisingly, it is only recently that chemists have systematically attempted to develop anion-responsive synthetic macromolecules for potential applications in medicine, national security, or environmental monitoring. Recent results indicating that unique features of polymeric systems such as signal amplification, multivalency, and cooperative behavior may be exploited productively in the context of anion recognition and sensing are documented. The wide variety of interactions-including Lewis acid/base, ion-pairing, and hydrogen bonding-that have been employed for this purpose is reflected in the structural diversity of anion-responsive macromolecules identified to date.

  9. Closing the gap on unmeasured anions

    PubMed Central

    Kellum, John A

    2003-01-01

    Many critically ill and injured patients, especially those with metabolic acidosis, have abnormally high levels of unmeasured anions in their blood. At the same time, such patients are prone to hypoalbuminemia, which makes the traditional anion gap calculation inaccurate. Thus, little is known about the epidemiology and clinical consequences of an excess in unmeasured anions in the blood. Indeed, even the etiology of these "missing ions" is often unclear. Unfortunately, more precise means of quantifying unmeasured anions, such as the strong ion gap (SIG), are cumbersome to use clinically. However, a simple means of correcting the anion gap can be used to estimate SIG and may provide additional insight into this common clinical problem. PMID:12793870

  10. Asymmetric Anion-π Catalysis on Perylenediimides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Miros, François N; Mareda, Jiri; Sakai, Naomi; Matile, Stefan

    2016-11-07

    Anion-π catalysis, that is the stabilization of anionic transition states on π-acidic aromatic surfaces, has so far been developed with naphthalenediimides (NDIs). This report introduces perylenediimides (PDIs) to anion-π catalysis. The quadrupole moment of PDIs (+23.2 B) is found to exceed that of NDIs and reach new records with acceptors in the core (+70.9 B), and their larger surface provides space to better accommodate chemical transformations. Unlike NDIs, the activity of PDI catalysts for enolate and enamine addition is determined by the twist of their π surface rather than their reducibility. These results, further strengthened by nitrate inhibition and circular dichroism spectroscopy, support an understanding of anion-π interactions centered around quadrupole moments, i.e., electrostatic contributions, rather than redox potentials and charge transfer. The large PDI surfaces provide access to the highest enantioselectivities observed so far in anion-π catalysis (96 % ee).

  11. Tracer Interpretation Using Temporal Moments on a Spreadsheet

    SciTech Connect

    G. Michael Shook; J. Hope Forsmann

    2005-06-01

    This report presents a method for interpreting geothermal tracer tests. The method is based on the first temporal moment (mean residence time) of the tracer in the subsurface. The individual steps required to interpret a tracer test are reviewed and discussed. And an example tracer test directs the user through the interpretation method. An Excel spreadsheet application of the interpretation method is a companion document to this report.

  12. Anion stripping as a general method to create cationic porous framework with mobile anions.

    PubMed

    Mao, Chengyu; Kudla, Ryan A; Zuo, Fan; Zhao, Xiang; Mueller, Leonard J; Bu, Xianhui; Feng, Pingyun

    2014-05-28

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with cationic frameworks and mobile anions have many applications from sensing, anion exchange and separation, to fast ion conductivity. Despite recent progress, the vast majority of MOFs have neutral frameworks. A common mechanism for the formation of neutral frameworks is the attachment of anionic species such as F(-) or OH(-) to the framework metal sites, neutralizing an otherwise cationic scaffolding. Here, we report a general method capable of converting such neutral frameworks directly into cationic ones with concurrent generation of mobile anions. Our method is based on the differential affinity between distinct metal ions with framework anionic species. Specifically, Al(3+) is used to strip F(-) anions away from framework Cr(3+) sites, leading to cationic frameworks with mobile Cl(-) anions. The subsequent anion exchange with OH(-) further leads to a porous network with mobile OH(-) anions. New materials prepared by anion stripping can undergo ion exchange with anionic organic dyes and also exhibit much improved ionic conductivity compared to the original unmodified MOFs.

  13. Industrial tracer application in People's Republic of China

    SciTech Connect

    Maoyi, S.

    1988-01-01

    A number of important applications of radioisotopes and their compounds used as tracers in petroleum industry, metallurgical industry, mechanical industry, chemical industry, electronic industry, hydrology and water conservancy in China are introduced in this paper. The tracer technique applied to entomology is also mentioned. The industrial tracer applications are successful and beneficial in People's Republic of China from the examples given.

  14. Anionic Derivatives of Perfluorinated Trimethylgold.

    PubMed

    Menjón, Babil; Pérez-Bitrián, Alberto; Martínez-Salvador, Sonia; Baya, Miguel; Casas, José María; Martín, Antonio; Orduna, Jesús

    2017-03-20

    The homoleptic compound [PPh₄][CF₃AuCF₃] cleanly undergoes photoinduced oxidative addition of CF₃I to afford the organogold(III) derivative [PPh₄][(CF₃)₃AuI] in good yield and under mild conditions. This compound provides a convenient entry to the chemistry of the perfluorinated (CF₃)₃Au fragment whose properties are analyzed with the aid of DFT methods and compared with those of the homologous non-fluorinated (CH₃)₃Au moiety. It is found that reductive elimination of CX₃-CX₃ in the former (X = F) requires a much higher energy barrier than in the latter (X = H) and is therefore considerably less favored. This can be considered as one of the main features underlying the significantly higher stability associated to the (CF₃)₃Au fragment and its derivatives. This unsaturated, 14-electron species can be stabilized by coordination of any of the halide ligands, including fluoride. In fact, the whole series of anionic [PPh₄][(CF₃)₃AuX] complexes (X = F, Cl, Br, I, CN) has now been isolated and conveniently characterized. Evidence for intermolecular decomposition pathways upon thermolysis in the condensed phase is presented.

  15. Anion conductance selectivity mechanism of the CFTR chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Linsdell, Paul

    2016-04-01

    All ion channels are able to discriminate between substrate ions to some extent, a process that involves specific interactions between permeant anions and the so-called selectivity filter within the channel pore. In the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion-selective channel, both anion relative permeability and anion relative conductance are dependent on anion free energy of hydration--anions that are relatively easily dehydrated tend to show both high permeability and low conductance. In the present work, patch clamp recording was used to investigate the relative conductance of different anions in CFTR, and the effect of mutations within the channel pore. In constitutively-active E1371Q-CFTR channels, the anion conductance sequence was Cl(-) > NO3(-) > Br(-) > formate > SCN(-) > I(-). A mutation that disrupts anion binding in the inner vestibule of the pore (K95Q) disrupted anion conductance selectivity, such that anions with different permeabilities showed almost indistinguishable conductances. Conversely, a mutation at the putative narrowest pore region that is known to disrupt anion permeability selectivity (F337A) had minimal effects on anion relative conductance. Ion competition experiments confirmed that relatively tight binding of permeant anions resulted in relatively low conductance. These results suggest that the relative affinity of ion binding in the inner vestibule of the pore controls the relative conductance of different permeant anions in CFTR, and that the pore has two physically distinct anion selectivity filters that act in series to control anion conductance selectivity and anion permeability selectivity respectively.

  16. Dense nonaqueous phase liquid tracer tests: experimental results.

    PubMed

    Burt, R A; Christians, G L; Williams, S P; Wilson, D J

    2001-12-01

    Two dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) tracer tests were carried out in a shallow aquifer north of Fort Worth, TX. i-Propanol was used as the nonpartitioning tracer: n-hexanol and n-octanol were the partitioning tracers. Field data, mathematical modeling, the results of column tests, and field tracer tests with NaCl were used in designing the DNAPL tracer tests. The results indicated the presence of DNAPL at both sites tested; semi-quantitative estimates of the amounts of DNAPL present were obtained by mathematical modeling. Interpretation was complicated by heterogeneity of the aquifer and mass transport effects.

  17. Photoelectron spectroscopy of nitromethane anion clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruitt, Carrie Jo M.; Albury, Rachael M.; Goebbert, Daniel J.

    2016-08-01

    Nitromethane anion and nitromethane dimer, trimer, and hydrated cluster anions were studied by photoelectron spectroscopy. Vertical detachment energies, estimated electron affinities, and solvation energies were obtained from the photoelectron spectra. Cluster structures were investigated using theoretical calculations. Predicted detachment energies agreed with experiment. Calculations show water binds to nitromethane anion through two hydrogen bonds. The dimer has a non-linear structure with a single ionic Csbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond. The trimer has two different solvent interactions, but both involve the weak Csbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond.

  18. Anion photoelectron imaging spectroscopy of glyoxal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Tian; Dixon, Andrew R.; Sanov, Andrei

    2016-09-01

    We report a photoelectron imaging study of the radical-anion of glyoxal. The 532 nm photoelectron spectrum provides the first direct spectroscopic determination of the adiabatic electron affinity of glyoxal, EA = 1.10 ± 0.02 eV. This assignment is supported by a Franck-Condon simulation of the experimental spectrum that successfully reproduces the observed spectral features. The vertical detachment energy of the radical-anion is determined as VDE = 1.30 ± 0.04 eV. The reported EA and VDE values are attributed to the most stable (C2h symmetry) isomers of the neutral and the anion.

  19. Interpreting tracer breakthrough tailing from different forced-gradient tracer experiment configurations in fractured bedrock

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becker, M.W.; Shapiro, A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Conceptual and mathematical models are presented that explain tracer breakthrough tailing in the absence of significant matrix diffusion. Model predictions are compared to field results from radially convergent, weak-dipole, and push-pull tracer experiments conducted in a saturated crystalline bedrock. The models are based upon the assumption that flow is highly channelized, that the mass of tracer in a channel is proportional to the cube of the mean channel aperture, and the mean transport time in the channel is related to the square of the mean channel aperture. These models predict the consistent -2 straight line power law slope observed in breakthrough from radially convergent and weak-dipole tracer experiments and the variable straight line power law slope observed in push-pull tracer experiments with varying injection volumes. The power law breakthrough slope is predicted in the absence of matrix diffusion. A comparison of tracer experiments in which the flow field was reversed to those in which it was not indicates that the apparent dispersion in the breakthrough curve is partially reversible. We hypothesize that the observed breakthrough tailing is due to a combination of local hydrodynamic dispersion, which always increases in the direction of fluid velocity, and heterogeneous advection, which is partially reversed when the flow field is reversed. In spite of our attempt to account for heterogeneous advection using a multipath approach, a much smaller estimate of hydrodynamic dispersivity was obtained from push-pull experiments than from radially convergent or weak dipole experiments. These results suggest that although we can explain breakthrough tailing as an advective phenomenon, we cannot ignore the relationship between hydrodynamic dispersion and flow field geometry at this site. The design of the tracer experiment can severely impact the estimation of hydrodynamic dispersion and matrix diffusion in highly heterogeneous geologic media.

  20. Blood-nerve barrier: distribution of anionic sites on the endothelial plasma membrane and basal lamina of dorsal root ganglia.

    PubMed

    Bush, M S; Reid, A R; Allt, G

    1991-09-01

    Previous investigations of the blood-nerve barrier have correlated the greater permeability of ganglionic endoneurial vessels, compared to those of nerve trunks, with the presence of fenestrations and open intercellular junctions. Recent studies have demonstrated reduced endothelial cell surface charge in blood vessels showing greater permeability. To determine the distribution of anionic sites on the plasma membranes and basal laminae of endothelial cells in dorsal root ganglia, cationic colloidal gold and cationic ferritin were used. Electron microscopy revealed the existence of endothelial microdomains with differing labelling densities. Labelling indicated that caveolar and fenestral diaphragms and basal laminae are highly anionic at physiological pH, luminal plasma membranes and endothelial processes are moderately charged and abluminal plasma membranes are weakly anionic. Tracers did not occur in caveolae or cytoplasmic vesicles. In vitro tracer experiments at pH values of 7.3, 5.0, 3.5 and 2.0 indicated that the anionic charge on the various endothelial domains was contributed by chemical groups with differing pKa values. In summary, the labelling of ganglionic and sciatic nerve vessels was similar except for the heavy labelling of diaphragms in a minority of endoneurial vessels in ganglia. This difference is likely to account in part for the greater permeability of ganglionic endoneurial vessels. The results are discussed with regard to the blood-nerve and -brain barriers and vascular permeability in other tissues and a comparison made between the ultrastructure and anionic microdomains of epi-, peri- and endoneurial vessels of dorsal root ganglia and sciatic nerves.

  1. Dispersion in the Surfzone: Tracer Dispersion Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    objective is to improve understanding and modeling of dispersion of tracers (pol­ lution, fecal indicator bacteria, fine sediments) within the...discussed further here. Stochastic Particle Simulation for Surfzone Dispersion Drifter-derived diffusivities are time-dependent. In an unbounded...diffusion. Here HB06 particle trajectories are stochastically simulated with the Langevin equations with a shoreline boundary to explain the observed

  2. Tracer-based Metabolomics: Concepts and Practices

    PubMed Central

    Lee, W-N. Paul; Wahjudi, Paulin N.; Xu, Jun; Go, Vay Liang

    2010-01-01

    Tracer-based metabolomics is a systems biology tool that combines advances in tracer methodology for physiological studies, high throughput “-omics” technologies and constraint based modeling of metabolic networks. It is different from the commonly known metabolomics or metabonomics in that it is a targeted approach based on a metabolic network model in cells. Because of its complexity, it is the least understood among the various “-omics”. In this review, the development of concepts and practices of tracer-based metabolomics is traced from the early application of radioactive isotopes in metabolic studies to the recent application of stable isotopes and isotopomer analysis using mass spectrometry; and from the modeling of biochemical reactions using flux analysis to the recent theoretical formulation of the constraint based modeling. How these newer experimental methods and concepts of constraint-based modeling approaches can be applied to metabolic studies is illustrated by examples of studies in determining metabolic responses of cells to pharmacological agents and nutrient environment changes. PMID:20713038

  3. Kinetics and mechanism of exogenous anion exchange in FeFbpA-NTA: significance of periplasmic anion lability and anion binding activity of ferric binding protein A.

    PubMed

    Heymann, Jared J; Gabricević, Mario; Mietzner, Timothy A; Crumbliss, Alvin L

    2010-02-01

    The bacterial transferrin ferric binding protein A (FbpA) requires an exogenous anion to facilitate iron sequestration, and subsequently to shuttle the metal across the periplasm to the cytoplasmic membrane. In the diverse conditions of the periplasm, numerous anions are known to be present. Prior in vitro experiments have demonstrated the ability of multiple anions to fulfill the synergistic iron-binding requirement, and the identity of the bound anion has been shown to modulate important physicochemical properties of iron-bound FbpA (FeFbpA). Here we address the kinetics and mechanism of anion exchange for the FeFbpA-nitrilotriacetate (NTA) assembly with several biologically relevant anions (citrate, oxalate, phosphate, and pyrophosphate), with nonphysiologic NTA serving as a representative synergistic anion/chelator. The kinetic data are consistent with an anion-exchange process that occurs in multiple steps, dependent on the identity of both the entering anion and the leaving anion. The exchange mechanism may proceed either as a direct substitution or through an intermediate FeFbpA-X* assembly based on anion (X) identity. Our kinetic results further develop an understanding of exogenous anion lability in the periplasm, as well as address the final step of the iron-free FbpA (apo-FbpA)/Fe(3+) sequestration mechanism. Our results highlight the kinetic significance of the FbpA anion binding site, demonstrating a correlation between apo-FbpA/anion affinity and the FeFbpA rate of anion exchange, further supporting the requirement of an exogenous anion to complete tight sequestration of iron by FbpA, and developing a mechanism for anion exchange within FeFbpA that is dependent on the identity of both the entering anion and the leaving anion.

  4. A new class of organocatalysts: sulfenate anions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mengnan; Jia, Tiezheng; Yin, Haolin; Carroll, Patrick J; Schelter, Eric J; Walsh, Patrick J

    2014-09-26

    Sulfenate anions are known to act as highly reactive species in the organic arena. Now they premiere as organocatalysts. Proof of concept is offered by the sulfoxide/sulfenate-catalyzed (1-10 mol%) coupling of benzyl halides in the presence of base to generate trans-stilbenes in good to excellent yields (up to 99%). Mechanistic studies support the intermediacy of sulfenate anions, and the deprotonated sulfoxide was determined to be the resting state of the catalyst.

  5. Anionic Lewis Acids. A Chemical Oxymoron.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-10-17

    NUMBER OF PAGES12 anionic lewis acid ab initio synthesis 1 2 methide FT NMR 16. PRICE CODE imide multi-nule r 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 18...chemically robust, thermally stable, non-toxic, environmentally safe, and cost-effective. One of our current areas of interest involves the synthesis and...developing a predictive knowledge base that can be used to guide the synthesis of new locally electron-deficient anions. Additionally, we proposed to

  6. Fluorescence-lifetime-based sensors for anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teichmann, Maria; Draxler, Sonja; Kieslinger, Dietmar; Lippitsch, Max E.

    1997-05-01

    Sensing of anions has been investigated using the fluorescence decaytime as the information carrier. The sensing mechanism is based on the coextraction of an anion and a proton, and the presence of a fluorophore with a rather long fluorescence decaytime inside the membrane to act as a pH indicator. The relevant theory is discussed shortly. As an example a sensor for nitrate is shown, and the influence of ionic additives on the working function has been investigated.

  7. Asian Tracer Experiment and Atmospheric Modeling (TEAM) Project: Draft Field Work Plan for the Asian Long-Range Tracer Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Allwine, K Jerry; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2007-08-01

    This report provides an experimental plan for a proposed Asian long-range tracer study as part of the international Tracer Experiment and Atmospheric Modeling (TEAM) Project. The TEAM partners are China, Japan, South Korea and the United States. Optimal times of year to conduct the study, meteorological measurements needed, proposed tracer release locations, proposed tracer sampling locations and the proposed durations of tracer releases and subsequent sampling are given. Also given are the activities necessary to prepare for the study and the schedule for completing the preparation activities leading to conducting the actual field operations. This report is intended to provide the TEAM members with the information necessary for planning and conducting the Asian long-range tracer study. The experimental plan is proposed, at this time, to describe the efforts necessary to conduct the Asian long-range tracer study, and the plan will undoubtedly be revised and refined as the planning goes forward over the next year.

  8. High Performance Anion Chromatography of Gadolinium Chelates.

    PubMed

    Hajós, Peter; Lukács, Diana; Farsang, Evelin; Horváth, Krisztian

    2016-11-01

    High performance anion chromatography (HPIC) method to separate ionic Gd chelates, [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and free matrix anions was developed. At alkaline pHs, polydentate complexing agents such as ethylene-diamine-tetraacetate, diethylene-triamine pentaacetate and trans-1,2-diamine-cyclohexane-tetraacetate tend to form stable Gd chelate anions and can be separated by anion exchange. Separations were studied in the simple isocratic chromatographic run over the wide range of pH and concentration of carbonate eluent using suppressed conductivity detection. The ion exchange and complex forming equilibria were quantitatively described and demonstrated in order to understand major factors in the control of selectivity of Gd chelates. Parameters of optimized resolution between concurrent ions were presented on a 3D resolution surface. The applicability of the developed method is represented by the simultaneous analysis of Gd chelates and organic/inorganic anions. Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy  (ICP-AES) analysis was used for confirmation of HPIC results for Gd. Collection protocols for the heart-cutting procedure of chromatograms were applied. SPE procedures were also developed not only to extract traces of free gadolinium ions from samples, but also to remove the high level of interfering anions of the complex matrices. The limit of detection, the recoverability and the linearity of the method were also presented.

  9. Recover Act. Verification of Geothermal Tracer Methods in Highly Constrained Field Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Matthew W.

    2014-05-16

    pumping tests in identifying a poorly connected well. As a result, we were able to predict which well pairs would demonstrate channelized flow. The focus of the tracer investigation was multi-ionic tests. In multi-ionic tests several ionic tracers are injected simultaneously and the detected in a nearby pumping well. The time history of concentration, or breakthrough curve, will show a separation of the tracers. Anionic tracers travel with the water but cationic tracer undergo chemical exchange with cations on the surface of the rock. The degree of separation is indicative of the surface area exposed to the tracer. Consequently, flow channelization will tend to decrease the separation in the breakthrough. Estimation of specific surface area (the ration of fracture surface area to formation volume) is performed through matching the breakthrough curve with a transport model. We found that the tracer estimates of surface area were confirmed the prediction of channelized flow between well pairs produced by the periodic hydraulic tests. To confirm that the hydraulic and tracer tests were correctly predicting channelize flow, we imaged the flow field using surface GPR. Saline water was injected between the well pairs which produced a change in the amplitude and phase of the reflected radar signal. A map was produced of the migration of saline tracer from these tests which qualitatively confirmed the flow channelization predicted by the hydraulic and tracer tests. The resolution of the GPR was insufficient to quantitatively estimate swept surface area, however. Surface GPR is not applicable in typical geothermal fields because the penetration depths do not exceed 10’s of meters. Nevertheless, the method of using of phase to measure electrical conductivity and the assessment of antennae polarization represent a significant advancement in the field of surface GPR. The effect of flow character on fracture / rock thermal exchange was evaluated using heated water as a tracer. Water

  10. Distribution of Isotopic and Environmental Tracers in Groundwater, Northern Ada County, Southwestern Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adkins, Candice B.; Bartolino, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Residents of northern Ada County, Idaho, depend on groundwater for domestic and agricultural uses. The population of this area is growing rapidly and groundwater resources must be understood for future water-resource management. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Idaho Department of Water Resources, used a suite of isotopic and environmental tracers to gain a better understanding of groundwater ages, recharge sources, and flowpaths in northern Ada County. Thirteen wells were sampled between September and October 2009 for field parameters, major anions and cations, nutrients, oxygen and hydrogen isotopes, tritium, radiocarbon, chlorofluorocarbons, and dissolved gasses. Well depths ranged from 30 to 580 feet below land surface. Wells were grouped together based on their depth and geographic location into the following four categories: shallow aquifer, intermediate/deep aquifer, Willow Creek aquifer, and Dry Creek aquifer. Major cations and anions indicated calcium-bicarbonate and sodium-bicarbonate water types in the study area. Oxygen and hydrogen isotopes carried an oxygen-18 excess signature, possibly indicating recharge from evaporated sources or water-rock interactions in the subsurface. Chlorofluorocarbons detected modern (post-1940s) recharge in every well sampled; tritium data indicated modern water (post-1951) in seven, predominantly shallow wells. Nutrient concentrations tended to be greater in wells signaling recent recharge based on groundwater age dating, thus confirming the presence of recent recharge in these wells. Corrected radiocarbon results generated estimated residence times from modern to 5,100 years before present. Residence time tended to increase with depth, as confirmed by all three age-tracers. The disagreement among residence times indicates that samples were well-mixed and that the sampled aquifers contain a mixture of young and old recharge. Due to a lack of data, no conclusions about sources of recharge could be drawn

  11. Reliable determination of 237Np in environmental solid samples using 242Pu as a potential tracer.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jixin; Hou, Xiaolin; Roos, Per; Miró, Manuel

    2011-04-15

    This paper reports an analytical method for rapid determination of neptunium ((237)Np) in environmental solid samples exploiting automated sequential injection (SI)-based anion exchange separation. Pivotal issues on analytical method performance were investigated including sorption behavior of (237)Np onto various AG 1-type anion exchangers; suitability of (242)Pu as a tracer for (237)Np determination in environmental solid samples; and long-term chemical stability of tetravalent Np. Experimental results revealed that the degree of resin cross-linking has a significant influence on the separation efficiency in terms of chemical yields of (237)Np and removal of interfering nuclides. Although ca. 30% of sorbed Np onto AG 1- × 4 was stripped out during HCl rinsing step for the removal of Th, chemical yield ratios of (237)Np to (242)Pu were proven steady with an average value of 0.67 ± 0.04 (n=15) under selected experimental conditions. Disulfite-8M HNO(3) was selected as a redox pair for valence adjustment to Np(IV) and the tetravalent Np in the sample solution was demonstrated to be stabilized for up to 5 days under 3°C. The analytical results for reference materials showed a good agreement with the expected values, thereby demonstrating the usefulness of (242)Pu as a non-isotopic tracer for (237)Np chemical yield monitoring. The on-column separation procedure fosters rapid analysis as required in emergency situations since each individual sample can be handled within 2.5h, and leads to a significant decrease in labor intensity compared to conventional batch-wise protocols.

  12. Studies of anions sorption on natural zeolites.

    PubMed

    Barczyk, K; Mozgawa, W; Król, M

    2014-12-10

    This work presents results of FT-IR spectroscopic studies of anions-chromate, phosphate and arsenate - sorbed from aqueous solutions (different concentrations of anions) on zeolites. The sorption has been conducted on natural zeolites from different structural groups, i.e. chabazite, mordenite, ferrierite and clinoptilolite. The Na-forms of sorbents were exchanged with hexadecyltrimethylammonium cations (HDTMA(+)) and organo-zeolites were obtained. External cation exchange capacities (ECEC) of organo-zeolites were measured. Their values are 17mmol/100g for chabazite, 4mmol/100g for mordenite and ferrierite and 10mmol/100g for clinoptilolite. The used initial inputs of HDTMA correspond to 100% and 200% ECEC of the minerals. Organo-modificated sorbents were subsequently used for immobilization of mentioned anions. It was proven that aforementioned anions' sorption causes changes in IR spectra of the HDTMA-zeolites. These alterations are dependent on the kind of anions that were sorbed. In all cases, variations are due to bands corresponding to the characteristic Si-O(Si,Al) vibrations (occurring in alumino- and silicooxygen tetrahedra building spatial framework of zeolites). Alkylammonium surfactant vibrations have also been observed. Systematic changes in the spectra connected with the anion concentration in the initial solution have been revealed. The amounts of sorbed CrO4(2-), AsO4(3-) and PO4(3-) ions were calculated from the difference between their concentrations in solutions before (initial concentration) and after (equilibrium concentration) sorption experiments. Concentrations of anions were determined by spectrophotometric method.

  13. Tracer Transport in the Middle Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Neil F.

    1990-01-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. The discovery of the ozone 'hole' over Antarctica has stimulated a great deal of interest in the interaction between dynamics, radiation and chemistry in the middle atmosphere. In this thesis, a hierarchy of tracer transport models has been adopted to help to understand the results of satellite observations and detailed computer simulations. Zonally averaged models have met with some success in simulating the atmosphere because it is close to radiative/chemical equilibrium in the summer. A zonally averaged circulation derived from satellite observations of temperature and ozone was used here to test various advection schemes and to reproduce the zonal mean seasonal cycle of long-lived tropospheric source gases. Three-dimensional models impose more severe demands and so a number of finite difference schemes have been reviewed and tested under idealized atmospheric conditions. To reduce the computational effort, winds were generated by the Meteorological Office Stratosphere Mesosphere model (SMM) and passed to a transport model. The best transport scheme was the one which most closely resembled that used for heat and momentum transport. Time averaging of the winds was necessary to produce representative fields in the mesosphere. When the transport scheme was incorporated into the SMM, agreement between the dynamically derived potential temperature and potential vorticity and the tracer equivalents were very good. During a major warming, the discrepancy between the vortex maximum between the model potential vorticity and the equivalent material tracer fields was 12% in the middle stratosphere and 50% in the upper stratosphere after twenty days. Most of this difference was due to the sensitivity of the potential vorticity to diabatic heating. Extensions of the work to include chemistry and more sophisticated satellite-derived circulations were suggested.

  14. Radon as a Tracer for Lunar Volatiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friesen, Larry Jay

    1992-01-01

    Radon and its decay product polonium can be used as tracers to search for lunar volatiles. One effective technique to look for them would be by using alpha-particle spectrometers from lunar orbit. Alpha spectrometers were flown in the Apollo Service Modules during the Apollo 15 and 16 missions, and did observe Rn-222 and its decay product Po-210 on the lunar surface from orbit. This demonstrates that radon and polonium can be observed from orbit; what must next be shown is that such observations can reveal something about the locations of volatiles on the Moon.

  15. Radon as a tracer for lunar volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friesen, Larry Jay

    Radon and its decay product polonium can be used as tracers to search for lunar volatiles. One effective technique to look for them would be by using alpha-particle spectrometers from lunar orbit. Alpha spectrometers were flown in the Apollo Service Modules during the Apollo 15 and 16 missions, and did observe Rn-222 and its decay product Po-210 on the lunar surface from orbit. This demonstrates that radon and polonium can be observed from orbit; what must next be shown is that such observations can reveal something about the locations of volatiles on the Moon.

  16. Pharmaceuticals as Groundwater Tracers - Applications and Limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheytt, T. J.; Mersmann, P.; Heberer, T.

    2003-12-01

    Pharmaceutically active substances and metabolites are found at concentrations up to the microgram/L-level in groundwater samples from the Berlin (Germany) area and from several other places world wide. Among the compounds detected in groundwater are clofibric acid, propyphenazone, diclofenac, ibuprofen, and carbamazepine. Clofibric acid, the active metabolite of clofibrate and etofibrate (blood lipid regulators) is detected in groundwater at maximum concentrations of 7300 ng/L. Among the most important input paths of drugs are excretion and disposal into the sewage system. Groundwater contamination is likely to be due to leaky sewage systems, influent streams, bank filtration, and irrigation with effluent water from sewage treatment plants. There are no known natural sources of the above mentioned pharmaceuticals. The use of pharmaceuticals as tracers may include: (a) Quantification of infiltration from underground septic tanks (b) Detection of leaky sewage systems / leaky sewage pipes (c) Estimation of the effectiveness of sewage treatment plants (d) Identification of transport pathways of other organic compounds (e) Quantification of surface water / groundwater interaction (f) Characterization of the biodegradation potential. The use of pharmaceuticals as tracers is limited by variations in input. These variations depend on the amount of drugs prescribed and used in the study area, the social structure of the community, the amount of hospital discharge, and temporal concentration variations. Furthermore, the analysis of trace amounts of pharmaceuticals is sophisticated and expensive and may therefore limit the applicability of pharmaceuticals as tracers. Finally, the transport and degradation behavior of pharmaceuticals is not fully understood. Preliminary experiments in the laboratory were conducted using sediment material and groundwater from the Berlin area to evaluate the transport and sorption behavior of selected drugs. Results of the column experiments

  17. Determination of stream reaeration coefficients by use of tracers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kilpatrick, F.A.; Rathbun, R.E.; Yotsukura, Nobuhiro; Parker, G.W.; DeLong, L.L.

    1987-01-01

    Stream reaeration is the physical absorption of oxygen from the atmosphere by a flowing stream. This is the primary process by which a stream replenishes the oxygen consumed in the biodegradation of organic wastes. Prior to 1965, reaeration rate coefficients could be estimated only by indirect methods. In 1965, a direct method of measuring stream reaeration coefficients was developed in which a radioactive tracer gas was injected into a stream--the tracer gas being desorbed from the stream inversely to how oxygen would be absorbed. The technique has since been modified by substituting hydrocarbon gases for the radioactive tracer gas. The slug-injection and constant-rate injection methods of performing gas tracer desorption measurements are described. Emphasis is on the use of rhodamine WT dye as a relatively conservative tracer and propane as the nonconservative gas tracer, on planning field tests, methods of injection, sampling and analysis, and computational techniques to compute desorption and reaeration coefficients. (Author 's abstract)

  18. Supramolecular Chemistry of Selective Anion Recognition for Anions of Environmental Relevance

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman-James, K.; Wilson, G.; Moyer, B. A.

    2004-12-11

    This project involves the design and synthesis of receptors for oxoanions of environmental importance, including emphasis on high level and low activity waste. Target anions have included primarily oxoanions and a study of the basic concepts behind selective binding of target anions. A primary target has been sulfate because of its deleterious influence on the vitrification of tank wastes

  19. Isatinphenylsemicarbazones as efficient colorimetric sensors for fluoride and acetate anions - anions induce tautomerism.

    PubMed

    Jakusová, Klaudia; Donovalová, Jana; Cigáň, Marek; Gáplovský, Martin; Garaj, Vladimír; Gáplovský, Anton

    2014-04-05

    The anion induced tautomerism of isatin-3-4-phenyl(semicarbazone) derivatives is studied herein. The interaction of F(-), AcO(-), H2PO4(-), Br(-) or HSO4(-) anions with E and Z isomers of isatin-3-4-phenyl(semicarbazone) and N-methylisatin-3-4-phenyl(semicarbazone) as sensors influences the tautomeric equilibrium of these sensors in the liquid phase. This tautomeric equilibrium is affected by (1) the inter- and intra-molecular interactions' modulation of isatinphenylsemicarbazone molecules due to the anion induced change in the solvation shell of receptor molecules and (2) the sensor-anion interaction with the urea hydrogens. The acid-base properties of anions and the difference in sensor structure influence the equilibrium ratio of the individual tautomeric forms. Here, the tautomeric equilibrium changes were indicated by "naked-eye" experiment, UV-VIS spectral and (1)H NMR titration, resulting in confirmation that appropriate selection of experimental conditions leads to a high degree of sensor selectivity for some investigated anions. Sensors' E and Z isomers differ in sensitivity, selectivity and sensing mechanism. Detection of F(-) or CH3COO(-) anions at high weakly basic anions' excess is possible.

  20. Supramolecular Chemistry of Selective Anion Recognition for Anions of Environmental Relevance

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman-James, Kristen

    2004-12-01

    This project have focuses on the basic chemical aspects of anion receptor design of functional pH independent systems, with the ultimate goal of targeting the selective binding of sulfate, as well as design of separations strategies for selective and efficient removal of targeted anions. Key findings include: (1) the first synthetic sulfate-selective anion-binding agents; (2) simple, structure-based methods for modifying the intrinsic anion selectivity of a given class of anion receptors; and (3) the first system capable of extracting sulfate anion from acidic, nitrate-containing aqueous media. Areas probed during the last funding period include: the design, synthesis, and physical and structural characterization of receptors and investigation of anion and dual ion pair extraction using lipophilic amide receptors for anion binding. A new collaboration has been added to the project in addition to the one with Dr. Bruce Moyer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, with Professor Jonathan Sessler at the University of Texas at Austin.

  1. Lidar Tracking of Multiple Fluorescent Tracers: Method and Field Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhard, Wynn L.; Willis, Ron J.

    1992-01-01

    Past research and applications have demonstrated the advantages and usefulness of lidar detection of a single fluorescent tracer to track air motions. Earlier researchers performed an analytical study that showed good potential for lidar discrimination and tracking of two or three different fluorescent tracers at the same time. The present paper summarizes the multiple fluorescent tracer method, discusses its expected advantages and problems, and describes our field test of this new technique.

  2. Putting anion-π interactions into perspective.

    PubMed

    Frontera, Antonio; Gamez, Patrick; Mascal, Mark; Mooibroek, Tiddo J; Reedijk, Jan

    2011-10-04

    Supramolecular chemistry is a field of scientific exploration that probes the relationship between molecular structure and function. It is the chemistry of the noncovalent bond, which forms the basis of highly specific recognition, transport, and regulation events that actuate biological processes. The classic design principles of supramolecular chemistry include strong, directional interactions like hydrogen bonding, halogen bonding, and cation-π complexation, as well as less directional forces like ion pairing, π-π, solvophobic, and van der Waals potentials. In recent years, the anion-π interaction (an attractive force between an electron-deficient aromatic π system and an anion) has been recognized as a hitherto unexplored noncovalent bond, the nature of which has been interpreted through both experimental and theoretical investigations. The design of selective anion receptors and channels based on this interaction represent important advances in the field of supramolecular chemistry. The objectives of this Review are 1) to discuss current thinking on the nature of this interaction, 2) to survey key experimental work in which anion-π bonding is demonstrated, and 3) to provide insights into the directional nature of anion-π contact in X-ray crystal structures.

  3. Infrared spectroscopy of anionic hydrated fluorobenzenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Holger; Vogelhuber, Kristen M.; Weber, J. Mathias

    2007-09-01

    We investigate the structural motifs of anionic hydrated fluorobenzenes by infrared photodissociation spectroscopy and density functional theory. Our calculations show that all fluorobenzene anions under investigation are strongly distorted from the neutral planar molecular geometries. In the anions, different F atoms are no longer equivalent, providing structurally different binding sites for water molecules and giving rise to a multitude of low-lying isomers. The absorption bands for hexa- and pentafluorobenzene show that only one isomer for the respective monohydrate complexes is populated in our experiment. For C6F6-•H2O, we can assign these bands to an isomer where water forms a weak double ionic hydrogen bond with two F atoms in the ion, in accord with the results of Bowen et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 127, 014312 (2007), following paper.] The spectroscopic motif of the binary complexes changes slightly with decreasing fluorination of the aromatic anion. For dihydrated hexafluorobenzene anions, several isomers are populated in our experiments, some of which may be due to hydrogen bonding between water molecules.

  4. Cytotoxic mechanisms of hydrosulfide anion and cyanide anion in primary rat hepatocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Rodney W; Valentine, Holly L; Valentine, William M

    2003-06-30

    Hydrogen sulfide and hydrogen cyanide are known to compromise mitochondrial respiration through inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase and this is generally considered to be their primary mechanism of toxicity. Experimental studies and the efficiency of current treatment protocols suggest that H(2)S may exert adverse physiological effects through additional mechanisms. To evaluate the role of alternative mechanisms in H(2)S toxicity, the relative contributions of electron transport inhibition, uncoupling of mitochondrial respiration, and opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) to hydrosulfide and cyanide anion cytotoxicity in primary hepatocyte cultures were examined. Supplementation of hepatocytes with the glycolytic substrate, fructose, rescued hepatocytes from cyanide anion induced toxicity, whereas fructose supplementation increased hydrosulfide anion toxicity suggesting that hydrosulfide anion may compromise glycolysis in hepatocytes. Although inhibitors of the MPTP opening were protective for hydrosulfide anion, they had no effect on cyanide anion toxicity, consistent with an involvement of the permeability transition pore in hydrosulfide anion toxicity but not cyanide anion toxicity. Exposure of isolated rat liver mitochondria to hydrosulfide did not result in large amplitude swelling suggesting that if H(2)S induces the permeability transition it does so indirectly through a mechanism requiring other cellular components. Hydrosulfide anion did not appear to be an uncoupler of mitochondrial respiration in hepatocytes based upon the inability of oligomycin and fructose to protect hepatocytes from hydrosulfide anion toxicity. These findings support mechanisms additional to inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase in hydrogen sulfide toxicity. Further investigations are required to assess the role of the permeability transition in H(2)S toxicity, determine whether similar affects occur in other cell types or in vivo and evaluate whether this may

  5. PET Tracers Based on Zirconium-89

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yin; Hong, Hao; Cai, Weibo

    2011-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies has always been a dynamic area in molecular imaging. With decay half-life (3.3 d) well matched to the circulation half-lives of antibodies (usually on the order of days), 89Zr has been extensively studied over the last decade. This review article will give a brief overview on 89Zr isotope production, the radiochemistry generally used for 89Zr-labeling, and the PET tracers that have been developed using 89Zr. To date, 89Zr-based PET imaging has been investigated for a wide variety of cancer-related targets, which include human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, epidermal growth factor receptor, prostate-specific membrane antigen, splice variant v6 of CD44, vascular endothelial growth factor, carbonic anhydrase IX, insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor, among others. With well-developed radiochemistry, commercial availability of chelating agents for 89Zr labeling, increasingly widely available isotope supply, as well as successful proof-of-principle in pilot human studies, it is expected that PET imaging with 89Zr-based tracers will be a constantly evolving and highly vibrant field in the near future. PMID:22191652

  6. Tracers and Modeling (Paper 7R0316)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarmiento, J. L.

    1987-07-01

    The major tracer activity of the last four years was the completion in 1983 of a survey of the North and Tropical Atlantic begun in 1981 as part of the Transient Tracers in the Ocean (TTO) project (Brewer, et al., 1985). An early set of papers (Brewer et al., 1983, and Swift, 1984) discussed evidence from these observations for the freshening of the North Atlantic due to cessation of overflow across the Iceland-Scotland ridge in the period between Geosecs and TTO. Broecker et al. (1985a) examined observations further south within the deep Northeastern Atlantic and showed that there was no change of nutrient contents in this region during the same time span, consistent with their conclusion that there is no ventilation of this region from the north. Kawase and Sarmiento (1985 and 1986) used the TTO data to produce a series of nutrient and salinity maps and property-property plots on density surfaces in the thermocline and middepth waters. Of particular interest in these studies is the evidence from silica-salinity observations of strong cross-isopycnal mixing and advection in the equatorial region.

  7. Tracer exchange between tropics and middle latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rood, Richard; Douglass, Anne; Weaver, Clark

    1992-01-01

    The interaction between the tropics and middle latitudes is studied using a tracer emitted at 50 hPa along a great circle route between Los Angeles, USA and Sydney, Australia. Though designed to examine the impact of stratospheric aircraft, the study more generally addresses the transport between tropics and middle latitudes for a three month period from January through March 1989. The results show that air is transported from the tropics to middle latitudes by planetary scale and tropospheric cyclonic scale waves. Except for intrusions by these wave events, the tropics are substantially isolated throughout the lower stratosphere. These waves draw material out of the tropics which ends up in the middle latitude westerly jets, with little material entering the winter polar latitudes prior to the springtime transition. The summer Southern Hemisphere is characterized by tracer being drawn out in streamers that extend from north and west to south and east. The material in the tropics is zonally asymmetric. The material that reaches the troposphere comes down in the synoptic scale eddies and is concentrated in the middle latitude jet stream. These characteristics are similar to those observed during the dispersion of volcanic clouds.

  8. Progress in isotope tracer hydrology in Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, J. J.; Edwards, T. W. D.; Birks, S. J.; St Amour, N. A.; Buhay, W. M.; McEachern, P.; Wolfe, B. B.; Peters, D. L.

    2005-01-01

    An overview of current research in isotope hydrology, focusing on recent Canadian contributions, is discussed under the headings: precipitation networks, hydrograph separation and groundwater studies, river basin hydrology, lake and catchment water balance, and isotope palaeohydrology from lake sediment records. Tracer-based techniques, relying primarily on the naturally occurring environmental isotopes, have been integrated into a range of hydrological and biogeochemical research programmes, as they effectively complement physical and chemical techniques. A significant geographic focus of Canadian isotope hydrology research has been on the Mackenzie River basin, forming contributions to programmes such as the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment. Canadian research has also directly supported international efforts such as the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) Global Network for Isotopes in Precipitation and IAEAs Coordinated Research Project on Large River Basins. One significant trend in Canadian research is toward sustained long-term monitoring of precipitation and river discharge to enable better characterization of spatial and temporal variability in isotope signatures and their underlying causes. One fundamental conclusion drawn from previous studies in Canada is that combined use of 18O and 2H enables the distinction of precipitation variability from evaporation effects, which offers significant advantages over use of the individual tracers alone. The study of hydrological controls on water chemistry is one emerging research trend that stems from the unique ability to integrate isotope sampling within both water quality and water quantity surveys. Copyright

  9. How to chase a tracer - combining conventional salt tracer testing and direct push electrical conductivity profiling for enhanced aquifer characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vienken, Thomas; Huber, Emanuel; Kreck, Manuel; Huggenberger, Peter; Dietrich, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Tracer testing is a well-established technique in hydrogeological site characterization. However, certain a priori knowledge of the hydraulic regime is required beforehand to avoid test failure, e.g. miss of tracer. In this study, we propose a novel tracer test concept for the hydraulic characterization of shallow unconsolidated sedimentary deposits when only scarce a priori information on the hydraulic regime is available. Therefore, we combine conventional salt tracer testing with direct push vertical high resolution electrical conductivity logging. The proposed tracer test concept was successfully tested on coarse, braided river deposits of the Tagliamento River, Italy. With limited a priori information available two tracer tests were performed in three days to reliably determine ground water flow direction and velocity allowing on-site decision-making to adaptively install observation wells for reliable breakthrough curve measurements. Furthermore, direct push vertical electrical profiling provided essential information about the plume characteristics with outstanding measurement resolution and efficiency.

  10. Sulfate transport mediated by the mammalian anion exchangers in reconstituted proteoliposomes.

    PubMed

    Sekler, I; Lo, R S; Mastrocola, T; Kopito, R R

    1995-05-12

    The kinetic properties of sulfate transport mediated by the anion exchangers AE1 and AE2 have been examined. Microsomes isolated from HEK cells transiently overexpressing either protein were reconstituted in unilamellar, 200-600-nm diameter proteoliposomes. Transport mediated by the exchangers was monitored by loading the reconstituted proteoliposomes with the slowly transportable anion SO4(2-) using [35S]SO4(2-) as a tracer and performing [35S]SO4(2-)/SO4(2-) exchange. The following data suggest that AE1 and AE2 have been functionally reconstituted: (i) the rate of SO4(2-) transport in AE1 and AE2 containing proteoliposomes was 10-20 times higher than in proteoliposomes derived from control microsomes; (ii) the transport of SO4(2-) was strongly dependent on the presence of a trans anion; and (iii) the anion exchanger inhibitors, 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonate (DIDS) and 4,4'-dinitrostilbene-2,2'-di-sulfonate (DIDS) totally abolished SO4(2-) transport. furthermore, DIDS inhibits SO4(2-) transport only when occluded inside the vesicles, indicating a uniform, asymmetrical, inside-out orientation of the reconstituted exchangers. The Ki values of the stilbene disulfonate compound DNDS were 2.5 and 4 microM for AE1 and AE2, respectively, suggesting that the two exchangers possess similar high affinity sites for stilbene compounds. Both AE1 and AE2 showed the same steep pH dependence of sulfate transport, which was maximal at pH 5.5 and reduced to less than 10% (of the value at pH 5.5) at pH 8.5, suggesting that an acidic residue shared by AE1 and AE2 participates in the pH regulation of sulfate transport.

  11. Vibrational spectroscopy of microhydrated conjugate base anions.

    PubMed

    Asmis, Knut R; Neumark, Daniel M

    2012-01-17

    Conjugate-base anions are ubiquitous in aqueous solution. Understanding the hydration of these anions at the molecular level represents a long-standing goal in chemistry. A molecular-level perspective on ion hydration is also important for understanding the surface speciation and reactivity of aerosols, which are a central component of atmospheric and oceanic chemical cycles. In this Account, as a means of studying conjugate-base anions in water, we describe infrared multiple-photon dissociation spectroscopy on clusters in which the sulfate, nitrate, bicarbonate, and suberate anions are hydrated by a known number of water molecules. This spectral technique, used over the range of 550-1800 cm(-1), serves as a structural probe of these clusters. The experiments follow how the solvent network around the conjugate-base anion evolves, one water molecule at a time. We make structural assignments by comparing the experimental infrared spectra to those obtained from electronic structure calculations. Our results show how changes in anion structure, symmetry, and charge state have a profound effect on the structure of the solvent network. Conversely, they indicate how hydration can markedly affect the structure of the anion core in a microhydrated cluster. Some key results include the following. The first few water molecules bind to the anion terminal oxo groups in a bridging fashion, forming two anion-water hydrogen bonds. Each oxo group can form up to three hydrogen bonds; one structural result, for example, is the highly symmetric, fully coordinated SO(4)(2-)(H(2)O)(6) cluster, which only contains bridging water molecules. Adding more water molecules results in the formation of a solvent network comprising water-water hydrogen bonding in addition to hydrogen bonding to the anion. For the nitrate, bicarbonate, and suberate anions, fewer bridging sites are available, namely, three, two, and one (per carboxylate group), respectively. As a result, an earlier onset of water

  12. Krebs cycle anions in metabolic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Bowling, Francis G; Morgan, Thomas J

    2005-10-05

    For many years it has been apparent from estimates of the anion gap and the strong ion gap that anions of unknown identity can be generated in sepsis and shock states. Evidence is emerging that at least some of these are intermediates of the citric acid cycle. The exact source of this disturbance remains unclear, because a great many metabolic blocks and bottlenecks can disturb the anaplerotic and cataplerotic pathways that enter and leave the cycle. These mechanisms require clarification with the use of tools such as gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

  13. Templating irreversible covalent macrocyclization by using anions.

    PubMed

    Kataev, Evgeny A; Kolesnikov, Grigory V; Arnold, Rene; Lavrov, Herman V; Khrustalev, Victor N

    2013-03-11

    Inorganic anions were used as templates in the reaction between a diamine and an activated diacid to form macrocyclic amides. The reaction conditions were found to perform the macrocyclization sufficiently slow to observe a template effect. A number of analytical methods were used to clarify the reaction mechanisms and to show that the structure of the intermediate plays a decisive role in determining the product distribution. For the macrocyclization under kinetic control, it was shown that the amount of a template, the conformational rigidity of building blocks, and the anion affinities of reaction components and intermediates are important parameters that one should take into consideration to achieve high yields.

  14. Electron anions and the glass transition temperature

    PubMed Central

    Sushko, Peter V.; Tomota, Yudai; Hosono, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    Properties of glasses are typically controlled by judicious selection of the glass-forming and glass-modifying constituents. Through an experimental and computational study of the crystalline, molten, and amorphous [Ca12Al14O32]2+ ⋅ (e–)2, we demonstrate that electron anions in this system behave as glass modifiers that strongly affect solidification dynamics, the glass transition temperature, and spectroscopic properties of the resultant amorphous material. The concentration of such electron anions is a consequential control parameter: It invokes materials evolution pathways and properties not available in conventional glasses, which opens a unique avenue in rational materials design. PMID:27559083

  15. Tracer Dispersion Within an Urban Environment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, D.; Shallcross, D.; Price, C.; Nickless, G.; Simmonds, P.

    2003-12-01

    The transport and dispersion of pollutants has extremely important implications for the environment on urban, regional and global scales. At the urban level localised emissions of both biogenic and anthropogenic pollutants can directly impact the health of the inhabitants. The DAPPLE (Dispersion of Air Pollutants and their Penetration into the Local Environment) project is a consortium of six universities, which involves a multidisciplinary approach to characterise relatively small-scale urban atmospheric dispersion including wind tunnel modelling, computer simulations, fieldwork and analysis. This work describes the tracer technology used to characterise atmospheric dispersion as well as preliminary results from the first tracer release experiment in Central London. A steady state finite duration release of both perfluoromethylcyclohexane (PMCH) and Sulfur Hexafluoride (SF6 ) was performed as part of the first DAPPLE campaign. These compounds were released over a fifteen-minute integrated time period with the SF6 release staggered one and a half minutes behind the PMCH. The low background concentrations of PMCH (~ 5 x 10-3 pptv) and SF6 (~5pptv) along with non-depositing and non-reactive characteristics allow for the implementation of near ideal fluid dynamic experiments. Sampling consists of a multiport ladder fitting with solenoid valves onto which a succession of sampling bags is attached. These are electrically actuated in sequential order with an integrated sampling time of three minutes. The samplers are placed at various receptor positions in the DAPPLE zone in predefined positions designed to best validate these model simulated meteorological dispersion processes. Analysis of PMCH is carried out using sample enrichment on carbon based adsorbents, separation by capillary Gas Chromatography and Negative Ion Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometry detection (GC-MS-NICI). SF6 concentrations are determined using fixed volume loop injections with Gas

  16. 10 CFR 39.45 - Subsurface tracer studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Subsurface tracer studies. 39.45 Section 39.45 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.45 Subsurface tracer studies. (a) The licensee shall require all personnel handling...

  17. 10 CFR 39.45 - Subsurface tracer studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Subsurface tracer studies. 39.45 Section 39.45 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.45 Subsurface tracer studies. (a) The licensee shall require all personnel handling...

  18. 10 CFR 39.45 - Subsurface tracer studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Subsurface tracer studies. 39.45 Section 39.45 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.45 Subsurface tracer studies. (a) The licensee shall require all personnel handling...

  19. 10 CFR 39.45 - Subsurface tracer studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Subsurface tracer studies. 39.45 Section 39.45 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.45 Subsurface tracer studies. (a) The licensee shall require all personnel handling...

  20. 10 CFR 39.45 - Subsurface tracer studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Subsurface tracer studies. 39.45 Section 39.45 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.45 Subsurface tracer studies. (a) The licensee shall require all personnel handling...

  1. ANALYTICAL METHOD DEVELOPMENTS TO SUPPORT PARTITIONING INTERWELL TRACER TESTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Partitioning Interwell Tracer Testing (PITT) uses alcohol tracer compounds in estimating subsurface contamination from non-polar pollutants. PITT uses the analysis of water samples for various alcohols as part of the overall measurement process. The water samples may contain many...

  2. Urban Pollutant Transport and Infiltration into Buildings Using Perfluorocarbon Tracers

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, James C.; Bacak, Asan; Khan, M. Anwar H.; Wright, Matthew D.; Priestley, Michael; Martin, Damien; Percival, Carl J.; Shallcross, Dudley E.

    2017-01-01

    People spend the majority of their time indoors and therefore the quality of indoor air is worthy of investigation; indoor air quality is affected by indoor sources of pollutants and from pollutants entering buildings from outdoors. In this study, unique perfluorocarbon tracers were released in five experiments at a 100 m and ~2 km distance from a large university building in Manchester, UK and tracer was also released inside the building to measure the amount of outdoor material penetrating into buildings and the flow of material within the building itself. Air samples of the tracer were taken in several rooms within the building, and a CO2 tracer was used within the building to estimate air-exchange rates. Air-exchange rates were found to vary between 0.57 and 10.90 per hour. Indoor perfluorocarbon tracer concentrations were paired to outdoor tracer concentrations, and in-out ratios were found to vary between 0.01 and 3.6. The largest room with the lowest air-exchange rate exhibited elevated tracer concentrations for over 60 min after the release had finished, but generally had the lowest concentrations, the room with the highest ventilation rates had the highest concentration over 30 min, but the peak decayed more rapidly. Tracer concentrations indoors compared to outdoors imply that pollutants remain within buildings after they have cleared outside, which must be considered when evaluating human exposure to outdoor pollutants. PMID:28230812

  3. Urban Pollutant Transport and Infiltration into Buildings Using Perfluorocarbon Tracers.

    PubMed

    Matthews, James C; Bacak, Asan; Khan, M Anwar H; Wright, Matthew D; Priestley, Michael; Martin, Damien; Percival, Carl J; Shallcross, Dudley E

    2017-02-21

    People spend the majority of their time indoors and therefore the quality of indoor air is worthy of investigation; indoor air quality is affected by indoor sources of pollutants and from pollutants entering buildings from outdoors. In this study, unique perfluorocarbon tracers were released in five experiments at a 100 m and ~2 km distance from a large university building in Manchester, UK and tracer was also released inside the building to measure the amount of outdoor material penetrating into buildings and the flow of material within the building itself. Air samples of the tracer were taken in several rooms within the building, and a CO₂ tracer was used within the building to estimate air-exchange rates. Air-exchange rates were found to vary between 0.57 and 10.90 per hour. Indoor perfluorocarbon tracer concentrations were paired to outdoor tracer concentrations, and in-out ratios were found to vary between 0.01 and 3.6. The largest room with the lowest air-exchange rate exhibited elevated tracer concentrations for over 60 min after the release had finished, but generally had the lowest concentrations, the room with the highest ventilation rates had the highest concentration over 30 min, but the peak decayed more rapidly. Tracer concentrations indoors compared to outdoors imply that pollutants remain within buildings after they have cleared outside, which must be considered when evaluating human exposure to outdoor pollutants.

  4. Tracer diffusion in silica inverse opals.

    PubMed

    Cherdhirankorn, Thipphaya; Retsch, Markus; Jonas, Ulrich; Butt, Hans-Juergen; Koynov, Kaloian

    2010-06-15

    We employed fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to study the diffusion of small fluorescence tracers in liquid filled silica inverse opals. The inverse opals consisted of a nanoporous silica scaffold spanning a hexagonal crystal of spherical voids of 360 nm diameter connected by circular pores of 70 nm diameter. The diffusion of Alexa Fluor 488 in water and of perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic diimide (PDI) in toluene was studied. Three diffusion modes could be distinguished: (1) Free diffusion limited by the geometric constraints given by the inverse opal, where, as compared to the free solution, this diffusion is slowed down by a factor of 3-4, (2) slow diffusion inside the nanoporous matrix of the silica scaffold, and (3) diffusion limited by adsorption. On the length scale of the focus of a confocal microscope of roughly 400 nm diffusion was non-Fickian in all cases.

  5. Tracer studies of nitrogen assimilation in yeast.

    PubMed

    ABRAMS, R; HAMMARSTEN, E

    1949-01-01

    By using N(15) as a tracer the assimilation of ammonia by the yeast, Torulopsis utilis, has been studied. It has been shown that: 1. There was no measurable incorporation of N in the protein or polynucleotide purine of carbon-starved yeast. 2. When ammonia is added to nitrogen-starved yeast there is a long lag period before division begins during which the yeast rapidly synthesizes protein, this process being accompanied by a turnover of polynucleotide purine. There was no significant dilution of the N(15)H(4) (+) of the medium by ordinary NH(4) (+). 3. When yeast containing N(15) is allowed to divide and grow in ordinary ammonia, the total amount of N(15) in the yeast remains constant. The dicarboxylic amino acids are most diluted, while arginine and nucleic acid guanine are not diluted at all.

  6. National Biomedical Tracer Facility. Project definition study

    SciTech Connect

    Schafer, R.

    1995-02-14

    We request a $25 million government-guaranteed, interest-free loan to be repaid over a 30-year period for construction and initial operations of a cyclotron-based National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF) in North Central Texas. The NBTF will be co-located with a linear accelerator-based commercial radioisotope production facility, funded by the private sector at approximately $28 million. In addition, research radioisotope production by the NBTF will be coordinated through an association with an existing U.S. nuclear reactor center that will produce research and commercial radioisotopes through neutron reactions. The combined facilities will provide the full range of technology for radioisotope production and research: fast neutrons, thermal neutrons, and particle beams (H{sup -}, H{sup +}, and D{sup +}). The proposed NBTF facility includes an 80 MeV, 1 mA H{sup -} cyclotron that will produce proton-induced (neutron deficient) research isotopes.

  7. Anion-conducting polymer, composition, and membrane

    DOEpatents

    Pivovar, Bryan S.; Thorn, David L.

    2010-12-07

    Anion-conducing polymers and membranes with enhanced stability to aqueous alkali include a polymer backbone with attached sulfonium, phosphazenium, phosphazene, and guanidinium residues. Compositions also with enhanced stability to aqueous alkali include a support embedded with sulfonium, phosphazenium, and guanidinium salts.

  8. Anion-conducting polymer, composition, and membrane

    DOEpatents

    Pivovar, Bryan S.; Thorn, David L.

    2009-09-01

    Anion-conducing polymers and membranes with enhanced stability to aqueous alkali include a polymer backbone with attached sulfonium, phosphazenium, phosphazene, and guanidinium residues. Compositions also with enhanced stability to aqueous alkali include a support embedded with sulfonium, phosphazenium, and guanidinium salts.

  9. Photoelectron spectroscopic studies of 5-halouracil anions

    SciTech Connect

    Radisic, Dunja; Ko, Yeon Jae; Nilles, John M.; Stokes, Sarah T.; Bowen, Kit H.; Sevilla, Michael D.; Rak, Janusz

    2011-01-07

    The parent negative ions of 5-chlorouracil, UCl{sup -} and 5-fluorouracil, UF{sup -} have been studied using anion photoelectron spectroscopy in order to investigate the electrophilic properties of their corresponding neutral halouracils. The vertical detachment energies (VDE) of these anions and the adiabatic electron affinities (EA) of their neutral molecular counterparts are reported. These results are in good agreement with the results of previously published theoretical calculations. The VDE values for both UCl{sup -} and UF{sup -} and the EA values for their neutral molecular counterparts are much greater than the corresponding values for both anionic and neutral forms of canonical uracil and thymine. These results are consistent with the observation that DNA is more sensitive to radiation damage when thymine is replaced by halouracil. While we also attempted to prepare the parent anion of 5-bromouracil, UBr{sup -}, we did not observe it, the mass spectrum exhibiting only Br{sup -} fragments, i.e., 5-bromouracil apparently underwent dissociative electron attachment. This observation is consistent with a previous assessment, suggesting that 5-bromouracil is the best radio-sensitizer among these three halo-nucleobases.

  10. Photoelectron spectroscopic studies of 5-halouracil anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radisic, Dunja; Ko, Yeon Jae; Nilles, John M.; Stokes, Sarah T.; Sevilla, Michael D.; Rak, Janusz; Bowen, Kit H.

    2011-01-01

    The parent negative ions of 5-chlorouracil, UCl- and 5-fluorouracil, UF- have been studied using anion photoelectron spectroscopy in order to investigate the electrophilic properties of their corresponding neutral halouracils. The vertical detachment energies (VDE) of these anions and the adiabatic electron affinities (EA) of their neutral molecular counterparts are reported. These results are in good agreement with the results of previously published theoretical calculations. The VDE values for both UCl- and UF- and the EA values for their neutral molecular counterparts are much greater than the corresponding values for both anionic and neutral forms of canonical uracil and thymine. These results are consistent with the observation that DNA is more sensitive to radiation damage when thymine is replaced by halouracil. While we also attempted to prepare the parent anion of 5-bromouracil, UBr-, we did not observe it, the mass spectrum exhibiting only Br- fragments, i.e., 5-bromouracil apparently underwent dissociative electron attachment. This observation is consistent with a previous assessment, suggesting that 5-bromouracil is the best radio-sensitizer among these three halo-nucleobases.

  11. Superelectrophilic amidine dications: dealkylation by triflate anion.

    PubMed

    Kovacevic, Luka S; Idziak, Christopher; Markevicius, Augustinas; Scullion, Callum; Corr, Michael J; Kennedy, Alan R; Tuttle, Tell; Murphy, John A

    2012-08-20

    Superelectrophiles: Formamides were designed that when treated with triflic anhydride would be transformed into superelectrophilic amidine dications. These dications were so electrophilic that they underwent in situ dealkylation by the triflate anion (see scheme; Tf = trifluoromethanesulfonyl). DFT calculations were used to determine the mechanistic details of the dealkylation reaction.

  12. Anion-conducting polymer, composition, and membrane

    DOEpatents

    Pivovar, Bryan S [Los Alamos, NM; Thorn, David L [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-11-22

    Anion-conducing polymers and membranes with enhanced stability to aqueous alkali include a polymer backbone with attached sulfonium, phosphazenium, phosphazene, and guanidinium residues. Compositions also with enhanced stability to aqueous alkali include a support embedded with sulfonium, phosphazenium, and guanidinium salts.

  13. Anion-Conducting Polymer, Composition, and Membrane

    DOEpatents

    Pivovar, Bryan S.; Thorn, David L.

    2008-10-21

    Anion-conducing polymers and membranes with enhanced stability to aqueous alkali include a polymer backbone with attached sulfonium, phosphazenium, phosphazene, and guanidinium residues. Compositions also with enhanced stability to aqueous alkali include a support embedded with sulfonium, phosphazenium, and guanidinium salts.

  14. The random walk of tracers through river catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Atreyee

    2012-08-01

    River catchments play critical roles in regional economies and in the global economy. In addition, rivers carry large volumes of nutrients, pollutants, and several other forms of tracers into the ocean. An intricate system of pathways and channels, both on the surface and in the subsurface of catchments, allows rivers to carry large volumes of tracers. However, scientists do not yet fully understand how pollutants and other tracers travel through the intricate web of channels in the catchment areas of rivers. In a new study, Cvetkovic et al show that the travel path of tracers through channels can be modeled as a random walk, which is mathematically similar to the path an animal would trace when foraging. Previous studies have applied the random walk approach to understand the behavior of fluids flowing through aquifers and soils but not to model the transport mechanism of tracers that travel passively with water flowing through catchments.

  15. Effects of Submesoscale Ocean Turbulence on Buoyant and Passive Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, K.; Fox-Kemper, B.; Hamlington, P.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that submesoscale processes greatly influence the dynamics and structure of the oceanic mixed layer. These processes have a substantial impact, in particular, on the transport of momentum, buoyancy, and passive tracers such as carbonate chemical species, nutrients, and plankton. It has been suggested that the vertical transfer of both active buoyancy and passive tracers can be described by the same vertical flux profile, thus permitting the use of one flux profile when parameterizing the effects of submoescale processes on tracer transport. Within the submesoscale range, however, both partly geostrophic fronts and eddies, which act to restratify the mixed layer, and small-scale three-dimensional turbulence, which acts to enhance vertical mixing, are simultaneously active, thus giving rise to complex multiscale interactions between turbulence and tracer dynamics. In this talk, large eddy simulations spanning the range of scales from 20km down to 5m are used to examine the role of multiscale turbulent mixing on both an active buoyancy tracer and several nonreactive passive ocean tracers from interior and sea-surface sources. The simulations include the effects of both small-scale wave-driven Langmuir turbulence and larger submesoscale eddies. Tracer properties are characterized using spatial fields and statistics, multiscale fluxes, and spectra. Results show that while submesoscale eddies transport buoyancy upward to extract potential energy, the same is not true of passive tracers. Instead, the suppression of turbulent vertical mixing in active submesoscale regions leads to suppressed entrainment of tracers, implying weaker transport by submesoscale activity. These results along with implications for the development of reduced order tracer models will be discussed.

  16. Anionic phospholipids modulate peptide insertion into membranes.

    PubMed

    Liu, L P; Deber, C M

    1997-05-06

    While the insertion of a hydrophobic peptide or membrane protein segment into the bilayer can be spontaneous and driven mainly by the hydrophobic effect, anionic lipids, which comprise ca. 20% of biological membranes, provide a source of electrostatic attractions for binding of proteins/peptides into membranes. To unravel the interplay of hydrophobicity and electrostatics in the binding of peptides into membranes, we designed peptides de novo which possess the typical sequence Lys-Lys-Ala-Ala-Ala-X-Ala-Ala-Ala-Ala-Ala-X-Ala-Ala-Trp-Ala-Ala-X-Ala-Al a-Ala-Lys-Lys-Lys-Lys-amide, where X residues correspond to "guest" residues which encompass a range of hydrophobicity (Leu, Ile, Gly, and Ser). Circular dichroism spectra demonstrated that peptides were partially (40-90%) random in aqueous buffer but were promoted to form 100% alpha-helical structures by anionic lipid micelles. In neutral lipid micelles, only the relatively hydrophobic peptides (X = L and I) spontaneously adopted the alpha-helical conformation, but when 25% of negatively charged lipids were mixed in to mimic the content of anionic lipids in biomembranes, the less hydrophobic (X = S and G) peptides then formed alpha-helical conformations. Consistent with these findings, fluorescence quenching by the aqueous-phase quencher iodide indicated that in anionic (dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol) vesicles, the peptide Trp residue was buried in the lipid vesicle hydrophobic core, while in neutral (dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine) vesicles, only hydrophobic (X = L and I) peptides were shielded from the aqueous solution. Trp emission spectra of peptides in the presence of phospholipids doxyl-labeled at the 5-, 7-, 10-, 12-, and 16-fatty acid positions implied not only a transbilayer orientation for inserted peptides but also that mixed peptide populations (transbilayer + surface-associated) may arise. Overall results suggest that for hydrophobic peptides with segmental threshold hydrophobicity below that which

  17. Bipyrrole-Strapped Calix[4]pyrroles: Strong Anion Receptors That Extract the Sulfate Anion

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sung Kuk; Lee, Juhoon; Williams, Neil J; Lynch, Vincent M.; Hay, Benjamin; Moyer, Bruce A; Sessler, Jonathan L.

    2014-01-01

    Cage-type calix[4]pyrroles 2 and 3 bearing two additional pyrrole groups on the strap have been synthesized. Compared with the parent calix[4]pyrrole (1), they were found to exhibit remarkably enhanced affinities for anions, including the sulfate anion (TBA+ salts), in organic media (CD2Cl2). This increase is ascribed to participation of the bipyrrole units in anion binding. Receptors 2 and 3 extract the hydrophilic sulfate anion (as the methyltrialkyl(C8-10)ammonium (A336+) salt)) from aqueous media into a chloroform phase with significantly improved efficiency (>10-fold relative to calix[4]pyrrole 1). These two receptors also solubilize into chloroform the otherwise insoluble sulfate salt, (TMA)2SO4 (tetramethylammonium sulfate).

  18. Methods and systems using encapsulated tracers and chemicals for reservoir interrogation and manipulation

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, Jeffery; Aines, Roger D; Duoss, Eric B; Spadaccini, Christopher M

    2014-11-04

    An apparatus, method, and system of reservoir interrogation. A tracer is encapsulating in a receptacle. The receptacle containing the tracer is injected into the reservoir. The tracer is analyzed for reservoir interrogation.

  19. Journal: Efficient Hydrologic Tracer-Test Design for Tracer-Mass Estimation and Sample Collection Frequency, 1 Method Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrological tracer testing is the most reliable diagnostic technique available for the determination of basic hydraulic and geometric parameters necessary for establishing operative solute-transport processes. Tracer-test design can be difficult because of a lack of prior knowl...

  20. Estimating groundwater recharge in Hebei Plain, China under varying land use practices using tritium and bromide tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bingguo; Jin, Menggui; Nimmo, John R.; Yang, Lei; Wang, Wenfeng

    2008-07-01

    SummaryTritium and bromide were used as applied tracers to determine groundwater recharge in Hebei Plain, North China, to evaluate the impacts of different soil types, land use, irrigation, and crop cultivation practice on recharge. Additional objectives were to evaluate temporal variability of recharge and the effect on results of the particular tracer used. Thirty-nine profiles at representative locations were chosen for investigation. Average recharge rates and recharge coefficient determined by tritium and bromide tracing for different sites were 0.00-1.05 mm/d and 0.0-42.5%, respectively. The results showed relative recharge rates for the following paired influences (items within each pair are listed with the influence producing greater recharge first): flood-irrigated cropland and non-irrigated non-cultivation land, flood irrigation (0.42-0.58 mm/d) and sprinkling irrigation (0.17-0.23 mm/d), no stalk mulch (0.56-0.80 mm/d) and stalk mulch (0.44-0.60 mm/d), vegetable (e.g. Chinese cabbage and garlic, 0.70 mm/d) and wheat-maize (0.38 mm/d), peanut (0.51 mm/d) and peach (0.43 mm/d). The results also showed greater recharge for the first year of tracer travel than for the second. Because total precipitation and irrigation were greater in the first year than in the second, this may reflect temporal variability of recharge. The method may not be applicable where the water table is shallow (less than 3 m). A comparison of the near-ideal tritium tracer with the more common but less ideal bromide showed that bromide moved approximately 23% faster than tritiated water, perhaps because of anion exclusion.

  1. Estimating groundwater recharge in Hebei Plain, China under varying land use practices using tritium and bromide tracers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, B.; Jin, M.; Nimmo, J.R.; Yang, L.; Wang, W.

    2008-01-01

    Tritium and bromide were used as applied tracers to determine groundwater recharge in Hebei Plain, North China, to evaluate the impacts of different soil types, land use, irrigation, and crop cultivation practice on recharge. Additional objectives were to evaluate temporal variability of recharge and the effect on results of the particular tracer used. Thirty-nine profiles at representative locations were chosen for investigation. Average recharge rates and recharge coefficient determined by tritium and bromide tracing for different sites were 0.00-1.05 mm/d and 0.0-42.5%, respectively. The results showed relative recharge rates for the following paired influences (items within each pair are listed with the influence producing greater recharge first): flood-irrigated cropland and non-irrigated non-cultivation land, flood irrigation (0.42-0.58 mm/d) and sprinkling irrigation (0.17-0.23 mm/d), no stalk mulch (0.56-0.80 mm/d) and stalk mulch (0.44-0.60 mm/d), vegetable (e.g. Chinese cabbage and garlic, 0.70 mm/d) and wheat-maize (0.38 mm/d), peanut (0.51 mm/d) and peach (0.43 mm/d). The results also showed greater recharge for the first year of tracer travel than for the second. Because total precipitation and irrigation were greater in the first year than in the second, this may reflect temporal variability of recharge. The method may not be applicable where the water table is shallow (less than 3 m). A comparison of the near-ideal tritium tracer with the more common but less ideal bromide showed that bromide moved approximately 23% faster than tritiated water, perhaps because of anion exclusion. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  2. Supramolecular Chemistry of Selective Anion Recognition for Anions of Environmental Relevance

    SciTech Connect

    Jonathan L. Sessler

    2007-09-21

    The major thrust of this project, led by the University of Kansas (Prof. Kristin Bowman-James), entails an exploration of the basic determinants of anion recognition and their application to the design, synthesis, and testing of novel sulfate extractants. A key scientific inspiration for the work comes from the need, codified in simple-to-appreciate terms by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory component of the team (viz. Dr. Bruce Moyer), for chemical entities that can help in the extractive removal of species that have low solubilities in borosilicate glass. Among such species, sulfate anion, has been identified as particularly insidious. Its presence interferes with the vitrification process, thus rendering the remediation of tank waste from, e.g., the Hanford site far more difficult and expensive. The availability of effective extractants, that would allow for the separation of separating sulfate from the major competing anions in the waste, especially nitrate, could allow for pre-vitrification removal of sulfate via liquid-liquid extraction. The efforts at The University of Texas, the subject of this report, have thus concentrated on the development of new sulfate receptors. These systems are designed to increase our basic understanding of anion recognition events and set the stage for the development of viable sulfate anion extractants. In conjunction with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) members of the research team, several of these new receptors were studied as putative extractants, with two of the systems being shown to act as promising synergists for anion exchange.

  3. Understanding and modeling removal of anionic organic contaminants (AOCs) by anion exchange resins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huichun; Shields, Anthony J; Jadbabaei, Nastaran; Nelson, Maurice; Pan, Bingjun; Suri, Rominder P S

    2014-07-01

    Ionic organic contaminants (OCs) are a growing concern for water treatment and the environment and are removed inefficiently by many existing technologies. This study examined removal of anionic OCs by anion exchange resins (AXRs) as a promising alternative. Results indicate that two polystyrene AXRs (IRA910 and IRA96) have higher sorption capacities and selectivity than a polyacrylate resin (A860). For the polystyrene resins, selectivity follows: phenolates ≥ aromatic dicarboxylates > aromatic monocarboxylates > benzenesulfonate > aliphatic carboxylates. This trend can be explained based on hydration energy, the number of exchange groups, and aromaticity and hydrophobicity of the nonpolar moiety (NPM) of the anions. For A860, selectivity only varies within a narrow range (0.13-1.64). Despite the importance of the NPM of the anions, neutral solutes were sorbed much less, indicating synergistic combinations of electrostatic and nonelectrostatic interactions in the overall sorption. By conducting multiple linear regression between Abraham's descriptors and nature log of selectivity, induced dipole-related interactions and electrostatic interactions were found to be the most important interaction forces for sorption of the anions, while solute H-bond basicity has a negative effect. A predictive model was then developed for carboxylates and phenolates based on the poly parameter linear free energy relationships established for a diverse range of 16 anions and 5 neutral solutes, and was validated by accurate prediction of sorption of five test solutes within a wide range of equilibrium concentrations and that of benzoate at different pH.

  4. Anion-π interactions involving [MX(n)](m-) anions: a comprehensive theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Estarellas, Carolina; Quiñonero, David; Deyà, Pere M; Frontera, Antonio

    2013-01-14

    In this manuscript we perform a systematic study on the geometric and energetic features of anion-π complexes, wherein the anion is a metal complex of variable shapes and charges. Such a study is lacking in the literature. For the calculations we used the ab initio RI-MP2/def2-TZVPP level of theory. A search in the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) provides the experimental starting point that inspired the subsequent theoretical study. The influence of [MX(n)](m-) on the anion-π interaction was analyzed in terms of energetic, geometric, and charge transfer properties and Bader's theory of "atom-in-molecules" (AIM). The binding energy depends on the coordination index, geometric features and different orientations adopted by the metallic anion. The binding mode resembling a stacking interaction for linear, trigonal planar and square-planar anions is the most favorable. For tetrahedral and octahedral anions the most favorable orientation is the one with three halogen atoms pointing to the ring.

  5. Three hydroxy aurone compounds as chemosensors for cyanide anions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huihui; Sun, Yunhui; Zhou, Chuanjian; Cao, Duxia; Liu, Zhiqiang; Ma, Lin

    2013-12-01

    Three new 4-hydroxy aurone compounds 1-3 with dimethylamino (1), bromine (2) and cyano (3) as terminal group have been synthesized. Their photophysical properties as well as recognition properties for cyanide anions in acetonitrile and aqueous solution have also been examined. These compounds exhibit remarkable response to cyanide anions with obvious color and fluorescence change owing to hydrogen bonding reaction between cyanide anions and the O-H moiety of the sensors, which allows naked eye detection of cyanide anions.

  6. Evaluating uncertainties in the calibration of isotopic reference materials and multi-element isotopic tracers (EARTHTIME Tracer Calibration Part II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, Noah M.; Condon, Daniel J.; Schoene, Blair; Bowring, Samuel A.

    2015-09-01

    A statistical approach to evaluating uncertainties in the calibration of multi-element isotopic tracers has been developed and applied to determining the isotopic composition of mixed U-Pb (202 Pb-205 Pb-233 U-235 U) tracers used for accurate isotope dilution U-Pb geochronology. Our experiment, part of the EARTHTIME initiative, directly links the tracer calibration to first-principles measurements of mass and purity that are all traceable to SI units, thereby quantifying the accuracy and precision of U-Pb dates in absolute time. The calibration incorporates new more accurate and precise purity measurements for a number of commonly used Pb and U reference materials, and requires inter-relating their isotopic compositions and uncertainties. Similar methods can be used for other isotope systems that utilize multiple isotopic standards for calibration purposes. We also detail the inter-calibration of three publicly available U-Pb gravimetric solutions, which can be used to bring the same first-principles traceability to in-house U-Pb tracers from other laboratories. Accounting for uncertainty correlations in the tracer isotope ratios yields a tracer calibration contribution to the relative uncertainty of a 206 Pb/238 U date that is only half of the relative uncertainty in the 235 U/205 Pb ratio of the tracer, which was historically used to approximate the tracer related uncertainty contribution to 206 Pb/238 U dates. The tracer uncertainty contribution to 206 Pb/238 U dates has in this way been reduced to <300 ppm when using the EARTHTIME and similarly calibrated tracers.

  7. Acyl anion free N-heterocyclic carbene organocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Sarah J; Candish, Lisa; Lupton, David W

    2013-06-21

    Reaction discovery using N-heterocyclic carbene organocatalysis has been dominated by the chemistry of acyl anion equivalents. Recent studies demonstrate that NHCs are far more diverse catalysts, with a variety of reactions discovered that proceed without acyl anion equivalent formation. In this tutorial review selected examples of acyl anion free NHC catalysis using carbonyl compounds are presented.

  8. Comparison of different tracers for PIV measurements in EHD airflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdi, M.; Havet, M.; Rouaud, O.; Tarlet, D.

    2014-04-01

    In this study, a proposed method for selecting a tracer for particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) measurement in electrohydrodynamics flows was developed. To begin with, several published studies were identified that exploit different tracers, such as oil smoke, cigarette smoke and titanium dioxide (TiO2). An assortment of tracers was then selected based on comparisons with conventional dimensionless numbers; Stokes number ( St), Archimedes number ( Ar) and electrical mobility ratio ( M). Subsequently, an experimental study for testing tracers was developed, which enabled the velocity profile of an ionic wind generated by a needle/ring configuration to be measured. Air velocity measurements carried out with a Pitot tube, considered as the reference measurements, were compared to PIV measurements for each tracer. In addition, the current-voltage curves and the evolution of the current during seeding were measured. All the experimental results show that TiO2, SiO2 microballoons and incense smoke are the ideal tracers in the series of tracers investigated.

  9. Dispersion of a tracer in the deep Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledwell, James R.; He, Ruoying; Xue, Zuo; DiMarco, Steven F.; Spencer, Laura J.; Chapman, Piers

    2016-02-01

    A 25 km streak of CF3SF5 was released on an isopycnal surface approximately 1100 m deep, and 150 m above the bottom, along the continental slope of the northern Gulf of Mexico, to study stirring and mixing of a passive tracer. The location and depth of the release were near those of the deep hydrocarbon plume resulting from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil well rupture. The tracer was sampled between 5 and 12 days after release, and again 4 and 12 months after release. The tracer moved along the slope at first but gradually moved into the interior of the Gulf. Diapycnal spreading of the patch during the first 4 months was much faster than it was between 4 and 12 months, indicating that mixing was greatly enhanced over the slope. The rate of lateral homogenization of the tracer was much greater than observed in similar experiments in the open ocean, again possibly enhanced near the slope. Maximum concentrations found in the surveys had fallen by factors of 104, 107, and 108, at 1 week, 4 months, and 12 months, respectively, compared with those estimated for the initial tracer streak. A regional ocean model was used to simulate the tracer field and help interpret its dispersion and temporal evolution. Model-data comparisons show that the model simulation was able to replicate statistics of the observed tracer distribution that would be important in assessing the impact of oil releases in the middepth Gulf.

  10. Fractal continuum model for tracer transport in a porous medium.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Hernández, E C; Coronado, M; Hernández-Coronado, H

    2013-12-01

    A model based on the fractal continuum approach is proposed to describe tracer transport in fractal porous media. The original approach has been extended to treat tracer transport and to include systems with radial and uniform flow, which are cases of interest in geoscience. The models involve advection due to the fluid motion in the fractal continuum and dispersion whose mathematical expression is taken from percolation theory. The resulting advective-dispersive equations are numerically solved for continuous and for pulse tracer injection. The tracer profile and the tracer breakthrough curve are evaluated and analyzed in terms of the fractal parameters. It has been found in this work that anomalous transport frequently appears, and a condition on the fractal parameter values to predict when sub- or superdiffusion might be expected has been obtained. The fingerprints of fractality on the tracer breakthrough curve in the explored parameter window consist of an early tracer breakthrough and long tail curves for the spherical and uniform flow cases, and symmetric short tailed curves for the radial flow case.

  11. Mass transfer of single- and double-charged anions through an MA-41L anion-exchange membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Kulikova, O.M.; Sharkova, O.V.; Kulikov, S.M.

    1995-02-20

    Selective anion transfer through an MA-41L anion-exchange membrane in the Cl{sup -}-F{sup -}, Cl{sup -}-SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, F{sup -}-SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, and F{sup -}-CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} systems has been studied. The feasibility of partial anion separation in the chloride-sulfate system has been demonstrated. The separation of fluoride ions from accompanying anions was found to be practically impossible.

  12. Some design considerations for the proposed Dixie Valley tracer test

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, C.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1988-06-01

    A tracer test for the Dixie Valley, Nevada, geothermal resource is planned for the summer of 1988, in order to study the fluid flow paths that will develop under typical operating conditions. During the test six production wells will provide the power plant with steam sufficient for generation of 60 MWe, requiring fluid production at a rate of approximately 600 kg/sec. Up to 75% by mass of the extracted fluid will be reinjected into the reservoir, using four injection wells. Tracer will be added to the injected fluid for a twenty-minute period, and subsequently the produced fluid will be monitored for the tracer. 5 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Tracer transport by the diabatic circulation deduced from satellite observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, S.; Kiehl, J. T.; Garcia, R. R.; Grose, W.

    1986-01-01

    Nimbus-7 sensor data were used to track the diabatic circulation in the stratosphere to study the advective transport of CH4 and N2O as tracer species. Advective transport by the mean circulation was found to be a function of the temperature field and associated deviations from radiative equilibrium. A photochemical model was applied to account for the disappearance of the tracer species from the stratosphere. Comparisons between the SAMS data and modeling on the basis of the chemical loss rates of the tracers and the LIMS circulation data showed that the model predictions underestimated the resident abundances, although the global distributions and circulations exhibited a good match.

  14. Anion Solvation in Carbonate-Based Electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    von Wald Cresce, Arthur; Gobet, Mallory; Borodin, Oleg; Peng, Jing; Russell, Selena M.; Wikner, Emily; Fu, Adele; Hu, Libo; Lee, Hung-Sui; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Greenbaum, Steven; Amine, Khalil; Xu, Kang

    2015-11-16

    The correlation between Li+ solvation and interphasial chemistry on anodes firmly established in Li-ion batteries, the effect of cation–solvent interaction has gone beyond bulk thermodynamic and transport properties and become an essential element that determines the reversibility of electrochemistry and kinetics of Li-ion intercalation chemistries. Now, most studies are dedicated to the solvation of Li+, and the solvation of anions in carbonate-based electrolytes and its possible effect on the electrochemical stability of such electrolytes remains little understood. Moreover, as a mirror effort to prior Li+ solvation studies, this work focuses on the interactions between carbonate-based solvents and two anions (hexafluorophosphate, PF6–, and tetrafluoroborate, BF4–) that are most frequently used in Li-ion batteries. The possible correlation between such interaction and the interphasial chemistry on cathode surface is also explored.

  15. Electron anions and the glass transition temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Lewis E.; Sushko, Peter V.; Tomota, Yudai; Hosono, Hideo

    2016-08-24

    Properties of glasses are typically controlled by judicious selection of the glass-forming and glass-modifying constituents. Through an experimental and computational study of the crystalline, molten, and amorphous [Ca12Al14O32]2+ ∙ (e)2, we demonstrate that electron anions in this system behave as glass-modifiers that strongly affect solidification dynamics, the glass transition temperature, and spectroscopic properties of the resultant amorphous material. Concentration of such electron anions is a consequential control parameter: it invokes materials evolution pathways and properties not available in conventional glasses, which opens a new avenue in rational materials design.

  16. Specific anion effects in Artemia salina.

    PubMed

    Lo Nostro, Pierandrea; Ninham, Barry W; Carretti, Emiliano; Dei, Luigi; Baglioni, Piero

    2015-09-01

    The specific anion effect on the vitality of Artemia salina was investigated by measuring the Lethal Time LT50 of the crustaceans in the presence of different sodium salts solutions at room temperature and at the same ionic strength as natural seawater. Fluoride, thiocyanate and perchlorate are the most toxic agents, while chloride, bromide and sulfate are well tolerated. The rates of oxygen consumption of brine shrimps were recorded in mixed NaCl+NaF or NaCl+NaSCN solutions as a function of time. The results are discussed in terms of the Hofmeister series, and suggest that, besides the biochemical processes that involve F(-), SCN(-) and ClO4(-), the different physico-chemical properties of the strong kosmotropic and chaotropic anions may contribute in determining their strong toxicity for A. salina.

  17. Nanoheterostructure cation exchange: anionic framework conservation.

    PubMed

    Jain, Prashant K; Amirav, Lilac; Aloni, Shaul; Alivisatos, A Paul

    2010-07-28

    In ionic nanocrystals the cationic sublattice can be replaced with a different metal ion via a fast, simple, and reversible place exchange, allowing postsynthetic modification of the composition of the nanocrystal, while preserving its size and shape. Here, we demonstrate that, during such an exchange, the anionic framework of the crystal is preserved. When applied to nanoheterostructures, this phenomenon ensures that compositional interfaces within the heterostructure are conserved throughout the transformation. For instance, a morphology composed of a CdSe nanocrystal embedded in a CdS rod (CdSe/CdS) was exchanged to a PbSe/PbS nanorod via a Cu(2)Se/Cu(2)S structure. During every exchange cycle, the seed size and position within the nanorod were preserved, as evident by excitonic features, Z-contrast imaging, and elemental line scans. Anionic framework conservation extends the domain of cation exchange to the design of more complex and unique nanostructures.

  18. An intracellular anion channel critical for pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Bellono, Nicholas W; Escobar, Iliana E; Lefkovith, Ariel J; Marks, Michael S; Oancea, Elena

    2014-12-16

    Intracellular ion channels are essential regulators of organellar and cellular function, yet the molecular identity and physiological role of many of these channels remains elusive. In particular, no ion channel has been characterized in melanosomes, organelles that produce and store the major mammalian pigment melanin. Defects in melanosome function cause albinism, characterized by vision and pigmentation deficits, impaired retinal development, and increased susceptibility to skin and eye cancers. The most common form of albinism is caused by mutations in oculocutaneous albinism II (OCA2), a melanosome-specific transmembrane protein with unknown function. Here we used direct patch-clamp of skin and eye melanosomes to identify a novel chloride-selective anion conductance mediated by OCA2 and required for melanin production. Expression of OCA2 increases organelle pH, suggesting that the chloride channel might regulate melanin synthesis by modulating melanosome pH. Thus, a melanosomal anion channel that requires OCA2 is essential for skin and eye pigmentation.

  19. Anion Solvation in Carbonate-Based Electrolytes

    DOE PAGES

    von Wald Cresce, Arthur; Gobet, Mallory; Borodin, Oleg; ...

    2015-11-16

    The correlation between Li+ solvation and interphasial chemistry on anodes firmly established in Li-ion batteries, the effect of cation–solvent interaction has gone beyond bulk thermodynamic and transport properties and become an essential element that determines the reversibility of electrochemistry and kinetics of Li-ion intercalation chemistries. Now, most studies are dedicated to the solvation of Li+, and the solvation of anions in carbonate-based electrolytes and its possible effect on the electrochemical stability of such electrolytes remains little understood. Moreover, as a mirror effort to prior Li+ solvation studies, this work focuses on the interactions between carbonate-based solvents and two anions (hexafluorophosphate,more » PF6–, and tetrafluoroborate, BF4–) that are most frequently used in Li-ion batteries. The possible correlation between such interaction and the interphasial chemistry on cathode surface is also explored.« less

  20. Lowest autodetachment state of the water anion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houfek, Karel; Čížek, Martin

    2016-05-01

    The potential energy surface of the ground state of the water anion H2O- is carefully mapped using multireference CI calculations for a large range of molecular geometries. Particular attention is paid to a consistent description of both the O-+H2 and OH-+H asymptotes and to a relative position of the anion energy to the ground state energy of the neutral molecule. The autodetachment region, where the anion state crosses to the electronic continuum is identified. The local minimum in the direction of the O- + H2 channel previously reported by Werner et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 87, 2913 (1987)] is found to be slighly off the linear geometry and is separated by a saddle from the autodetachment region. The autodetachment region is directly accessible from the OH-+H asymptote. For the molecular geometries in the autodetachment region and in its vicinity we also performed fixed-nuclei electron-molecule scattering calculations using the R-matrix method. Tuning of consistency of a description of the correlation energy in both the multireference CI and R-matrix calculations is discussed. Two models of the correlation energy within the R-matrix method that are consistent with the quantum chemistry calculations are found. Both models yield scattering quantities in a close agreement. The results of this work will allow a consistent formulation of the nonlocal resonance model of the water anion in a future publication. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  1. Aza crown ether compounds as anion receptors

    DOEpatents

    Lee, H.S.; Yang, X.O.; McBreen, J.

    1998-08-04

    A family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the new family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of LI{sup +} ion in alkali metal batteries. 3 figs.

  2. Aza crown ether compounds as anion receptors

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Hung Sui; Yang, Xiao-Oing; McBreen, James

    1998-08-04

    A family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the new family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of LI.sup.+ ion in alkali metal batteries.

  3. Tracer study of San Vicente reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.T.

    1996-11-01

    The City of San Diego remains on the cutting edge of water conservation. With an unwavering commitment to maintain an adequate water supply for the future, water repurification is now being considered. The City of San Diego and San Diego Water Authority (CWA) have proposed to recycle repurified water through San Vicente Reservoir. A key component of assessing the feasibility of such a project is to calculate the retention time of repurified water in the reservoir. Working with engineering consultant team (Montgomery-Watson Engineers and Flow Science, Incorporated) two tracer studies were conducted to model the circulation and mixing of repurified water introduced into the reservoir. The goal was to determine whether repurified water recycled through San Vicente will meet the retention time criteria established by the Department of Health Services. This presentation however, will not attempt to interpret the results of the study, that aspect will be evaluated by the Flow Scientist. The objective here is to explain how the project was carried out and to focus mostly on the analytical work performed on the samples by the chemist in the City of San Diego Water Quality Laboratory.

  4. Cumulus cloud transport of transient tracers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gidel, L. T.

    1983-01-01

    A theoretical framework is developed for including cumulus cloud transport, rainout of water soluble gases, and aqueous phase chemistry into gas phase photochemical models. Cloud populations are represented as ensemble distributions of individual clouds of various heights. An individual cloud is represented as a one-dimensional, steady state plume with height-independent radius entraining air from the boundary of the cloud. The model is applied to several hypothetical atmospheric tracers to show how clouds may affect the tropospheric distributions of ozone, NO(y), SO2, peroxyacetylnitrate, hydrocarbons, and other gases. Although the numerical experiments were based on cloud mass fluxes from diagnostic studies in the tropics and thus are not representative of the entire globe, it was found that an increasing mixing ratio with height in the free troposphere can be produced for some gases with only a surface source when clouds are present. This suggests that some reactive tropospheric species with primarily surface sources may play a somewhat more important role in tropospheric chemistry than is presently believed depending on the global distribution of cloud mass fluxes. Deficiencies in existing photochemical models due to the way clouds are typically treated are discussed.

  5. National Biomedical Tracer Facility: Project definition study

    SciTech Connect

    Heaton, R.; Peterson, E.; Smith, P.

    1995-05-31

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory is an ideal institution and New Mexico is an ideal location for siting the National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). The essence of the Los Alamos proposal is the development of two complementary irradiation facilities that combined with our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities and waste handling and disposal facilities provide a low cost alternative to other proposals that seek to satisfy the objectives of the NBTF. We propose the construction of a 30 MeV cyclotron facility at the site of the radiochemical facilities, and the construction of a 100 MeV target station at LAMPF to satisfy the requirements and objectives of the NBTF. We do not require any modifications to our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities or our waste treatment and disposal facilities to accomplish the objectives of the NBTF. The total capital cost for the facility defined by the project definition study is $15.2 M. This cost estimate includes $9.9 M for the cyclotron and associated facility, $2.0 M for the 100 MeV target station at LAMPF, and $3.3 M for design.

  6. Neuroblastoma: MIBG Imaging and New Tracers.

    PubMed

    Pfluger, Thomas; Piccardo, Arnoldo

    2017-03-01

    Neuroblastoma is an embryonic tumor of the peripheral sympathetic nervous system, and is metastatic or otherwise high risk for relapse in nearly 50% of cases, with a long-term survival of <40%. Therefore, exact staging with radiological and nuclear medicine imaging methods is crucial for finding the adequate therapeutic choice. The tumor cells express the norepinephrine transporter, which makes metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), an analogue of norepinephrine, an ideal tumor-specific agent for imaging. On the contrary, MIBG imaging has several disadvantages such as limited spatial resolution, limited sensitivity in small lesions, need for two or even more acquisition sessions, and a delay between the start of the examination and result. Most of these limitations can be overcome with positron emission tomography (PET) using different radiotracers. Furthermore, for operative or biopsy planning, a combination with morphological imaging methods is indispensable. This article would discuss the therapeutic strategy for primary and follow-up diagnosis in neuroblastoma using MIBG scintigraphy and different new PET tracers as well as multimodality imaging.

  7. Donnan membrane technique (DMT) for anion measurement.

    PubMed

    Vega, Flora Alonso; Weng, Liping; Temminghoff, Erwin J M; Van Riemsdijk, Willem H

    2010-04-01

    Donnan membrane technique (DMT) is developed and tested for determination of free anion concentrations. Time needed to reach the Donnan membrane equilibrium depends on type of ions and the background. The Donnan membrane equilibrium is reached in 1 day for Cl(-), 1-2 days for NO(3)(-), 1-4 days for SO(4)(2-) and SeO(4)(2-), and 1-14 days for H(2)PO(4)(-) in a background of 2-200 mM KCl or K(2)SO(4). The strongest effect of ionic strength on equilibrium time is found for H(2)PO(4)(-), followed by SO(4)(2-) and SeO(4)(2-), and then by Cl(-) and NO(3)(-). The negatively charged organic particles of fulvic and humic acids do not pass the membrane. Two approaches for the measurement of different anion species of the same element, such as SeO(4)(2-) and HSeO(3)(-), using DMT are proposed and tested. These two approaches are based on transport kinetics or response to ionic strength difference. A transport model that was developed previously for cation DMT is applied in this work to analyze the rate-limiting step in the anion DMT. In the absence of mobile/labile complexes, transport tends to be controlled by diffusion in solution at a low ionic strength, whereas at a higher ionic strength, diffusion in the membrane starts to control the transport.

  8. Ferrocenylbenzobisimidazoles for recognition of anions and cations.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, María; Tárraga, Alberto; Molina, Pedro

    2013-07-01

    The preparation of 2,7-disubstituted benzobisimidazoles decorated with substituents displaying different electrooptical properties is described. The presence of redox, chromogenic, and fluorescent groups at the heteroaromatic core, which acts as ditopic binding site, made these receptors potential candidates as multichannel probes for ions. The triad 4 behaves as a selective redox and fluorescent chemosensor for HSO4(-) and Hg(2+) ions, whereas receptor 5 acts as a redox and chromogenic chemosensor molecule for AcO(-) and SO4(2-) anions. The change in the absorption spectra is accompanied by a color change from yellow to orange, while sensing of Zn(2+), Hg(2+), and Pb(2+) cations is carried out only by electrochemical techniques. Receptor 6 exhibits a remarkable cathodic shift of the oxidation wave only in the presence of AcO(-), H2PO4(-), and HP2O7(3-) anions, whereas addition of Pb(2+) induces an anodic shift. A new low energy band in the absorption spectra, which is responsible for the color change from colorless to pale yellow, and an important increase of the monomer emission band is observed only in the presence of H2PO4(-), and HP2O7(3-) anions. The most salient feature of the receptor 6 is its ability to act as a multichannel (redox, chromogenic, and fluorescent) chemodosimeter for Cu(2+), and Hg(2+) metal cations.

  9. Several hemicyanine dyes as fluorescence chemosensors for cyanide anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Muhan; Wang, Kangnan; Guan, Ruifang; Liu, Zhiqiang; Cao, Duxia; Wu, Qianqian; Shan, Yanyan; Xu, Yongxiao

    2016-05-01

    Four hemicyanine dyes as chemosensors for cyanide anions were synthesized easily. Their photophysical properties and recognition properties for cyanide anions were investigated. The results indicate that all the dyes can recognize cyanide anions with obvious color, absorption and fluorescence change. The recognition mechanism analysis basing on in situ 1H NMR and Job plot data indicates that to the compounds with hydroxyl group, the recognition mechanism is intramolecular hydrogen bonding interaction. However, to the compounds without hydroxyl group, cyanide anion is bonded to carbon-carbon double bond in conjugated bridge and induces N+ CH3 to neutral NCH3. Fluorescence of the compounds is almost quenched upon the addition of cyanide anions.

  10. A Systematic Method For Tracer Test Analysis: An Example Using Beowawe Tracer Data

    SciTech Connect

    G. Michael Shook

    2005-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of tracer data using moment analysis requires a strict adherence to a set of rules which include data normalization, correction for thermal decay, deconvolution, extrapolation, and integration. If done correctly, the method yields specific information on swept pore volume, flow geometry and fluid velocity, and an understanding of the nature of reservoir boundaries. All calculations required for the interpretation can be done in a spreadsheet. The steps required for moment analysis are reviewed in this paper. Data taken from the literature is used in an example calculation.

  11. Anion order in perovskites: a group-theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Talanov, M V; Shirokov, V B; Talanov, V M

    2016-03-01

    Anion ordering in the structure of cubic perovskite has been investigated by the group-theoretical method. The possibility of the existence of 261 ordered low-symmetry structures, each with a unique space-group symmetry, is established. These results include five binary and 14 ternary anion superstructures. The 261 idealized anion-ordered perovskite structures are considered as aristotypes, giving rise to different derivatives. The structures of these derivatives are formed by tilting of BO6 octahedra, distortions caused by the cooperative Jahn-Teller effect and other physical effects. Some derivatives of aristotypes exist as real substances, and some as virtual ones. A classification of aristotypes of anion superstructures in perovskite is proposed: the AX class (the simultaneous ordering of A cations and anions in cubic perovskite structure), the BX class (the simultaneous ordering of B cations and anions) and the X class (the ordering of anions only in cubic perovskite structure). In most perovskites anion ordering is accompanied by cation ordering. Therefore, the main classes of anion order in perovskites are the AX and BX classes. The calculated structures of some anion superstructures are reported. Comparison of predictions and experimentally investigated anion superstructures shows coherency of theoretical and experimental results.

  12. Membrane process for separating contaminant anions from aqueous solutions of valuable metal anions

    SciTech Connect

    Hepworth, M.T.; Laferty, J.M.

    1980-11-18

    An aqueous solution of at least one valuable oxyanion containing molybdenum, tungsten, vanadium, or uranium is refined to lower the content of contaminant anions such as PO/sub 4//sup -3/, SO/sub 4//sup -2/, NO/sub 3//sup -/, Cl/sup -/, ClO/sub 3//sup -/, and ClO/sub 4//sup -/, by subjecting the solution to electrolysis at a ph of from 0.5 to 4.0 between a cation-permselective membrane and an anion-permselective membrane having tertiary amine or quaternary ammonium anion exchange groups, to cause contaminant anions to pass from the solution into the anolyte. Ammonium molybdates, tungstates, vanadates, and uranates are formed from the thus-refined solution by subjecting it to a second stage of electrolysis at a ph of at least 7 between a cation-permselective membrane and an anion-permselective membrane to cause valuable oxyanions to pass from the solution into an anolyte which comprises an aqueous solution of ammonia and to form the desired ammonium compound.

  13. The benzene radical anion: A computationally demanding prototype for aromatic anions

    SciTech Connect

    Bazante, Alexandre P. Bartlett, Rodney J.; Davidson, E. R.

    2015-05-28

    The benzene radical anion is studied with ab initio coupled-cluster theory in large basis sets. Unlike the usual assumption, we find that, at the level of theory investigated, the minimum energy geometry is non-planar with tetrahedral distortion at two opposite carbon atoms. The anion is well known for its instability to auto-ionization which poses computational challenges to determine its properties. Despite the importance of the benzene radical anion, the considerable attention it has received in the literature so far has failed to address the details of its structure and shape-resonance character at a high level of theory. Here, we examine the dynamic Jahn-Teller effect and its impact on the anion potential energy surface. We find that a minimum energy geometry of C{sub 2} symmetry is located below one D{sub 2h} stationary point on a C{sub 2h} pseudo-rotation surface. The applicability of standard wave function methods to an unbound anion is assessed with the stabilization method. The isotropic hyperfine splitting constants (A{sub iso}) are computed and compared to data obtained from experimental electron spin resonance experiments. Satisfactory agreement with experiment is obtained with coupled-cluster theory and large basis sets such as cc-pCVQZ.

  14. Tracking thermal fronts with temperature-sensitive, chemically reactive tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, B.A.; Birdsell, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    Los Alamos is developing tracer techniques using reactive chemicals to track thermal fronts in fractured geothermal reservoirs. If a nonadsorbing tracer flowing from the injection to production well chemically reacts, its reaction rate will be a strong function of temperature. Thus the extent of chemical reaction will be greatest early in the lifetime of the system, and less as the thermal front progresses from the injection to production well. Early laboratory experiments identified tracers with chemical kinetics suitable for reservoirs in the temperature range of 75 to 100/sup 0/C. Recent kinetics studies have focused on the kinetics of hydrolysis of derivatives of bromobenzene. This class of reactions can be used in reservoirs ranging in temperature from 150 to 275/sup 0/C, which is of greater interest to the geothermal industry. Future studies will include laboratory adsorption experiments to identify possibly unwanted adsorption on granite, development of sensitive analytical techniques, and a field demonstration of the reactive tracer concept.

  15. Ensemble Neuron Tracer for 3D Neuron Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching-Wei; Lee, Yu-Ching; Pradana, Hilmil; Zhou, Zhi; Peng, Hanchuan

    2017-02-09

    Tracing of neuron paths is important in neuroscience. Recent studies have shown that it is possible to segment and reconstruct three-dimensional morphology of axons and dendrites using fully automatic neuron tracing methods. A specific tracer may be better than others for a specific dataset, but another tracer could perform better for some other datasets. Ensemble of learners is an effective way to improve learning accuracy in machine learning. We developed automatic ensemble neuron tracers, which consistently perform well on 57 datasets of 5 species collected from 7 laboratories worldwide. Quantitative evaluation based on the data generated by human annotators shows that the proposed ensemble tracers are valuable for 3D neuron tracing and can be widely applied to different datasets.

  16. Unraveling complex hydrogeologic systems using field tracer tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dam, William A.; Nicholson, Thomas

    Tracking the movement of underground contaminants is vital to protecting public health and the environment worldwide. Scientific efforts using field tracer techniques to solve contaminant migration problems are rapidly evolving to fill critical information gaps and provide confirmation of laboratory data and numerical models. Various chemical tracers are being used to formulate and evaluate alternative conceptual hydrogeologic modelssemi; namely, to constrain hydraulic properties of geologic systems, identify sources of groundwater, flow paths, and rates, and determine mechanisms that affect contaminant transport. Naturally occurring elements and environmental isotopes from atmospheric and underground nuclear testing can make excellent tracers. In addition, characterizing sites of future waste disposal, such as the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, requires new and innovative techniques like injecting surrogate tracers that simulate potential contaminants and shed light on mechanisms that could control future contaminant migration.

  17. Microfluidics for synthesis of peptide-based PET tracers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Tian, Mei; Zhang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a powerful noninvasive tool for acquisition of the physiological parameters in human and animals with the help of PET tracers. Among all the PET tracers, radiolabeled peptides have been widely explored for cancer-related receptor imaging due to their high affinity and specificity to receptors. But radiochemistry procedures for production of peptide-based PET tracers are usually complex, which makes large-scale clinical studies relatively challenging. New radiolabeling technologies which could simplify synthesis and purification procedures, are extremely needed. Over the last decade, microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip (LOC) technology have boomed as powerful tools in the field of organic chemistry, which potentially provide significant help to the PET chemistry. In this minireview, microfluidic radiolabeling technology is described and its application for synthesis of peptide-based PET tracers is summarized and discussed.

  18. Fundamentals of tracer kinetics for dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI.

    PubMed

    Koh, Tong San; Bisdas, Sotirios; Koh, Dow Mu; Thng, Choon Hua

    2011-12-01

    Tracer kinetic methods employed for quantitative analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) share common roots with earlier tracer studies involving arterial-venous sampling and other dynamic imaging modalities. This article reviews the essential foundation concepts and principles in tracer kinetics that are relevant to DCE MRI, including the notions of impulse response and convolution, which are central to the analysis of DCE MRI data. We further examine the formulation and solutions of various compartmental models frequently used in the literature. Topics of recent interest in the processing of DCE MRI data, such as the account of water exchange and the use of reference tissue methods to obviate the measurement of an arterial input, are also discussed. Although the primary focus of this review is on the tracer models and methods for T(1) -weighted DCE MRI, some of these concepts and methods are also applicable for analysis of dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced MRI data.

  19. Advanced Tracers in PET Imaging of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Wu, Hua; Liu, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. Molecular imaging with targeted tracers by positron emission tomography (PET) allows for the noninvasive detection and characterization of biological changes at the molecular level, leading to earlier disease detection, objective monitoring of therapies, and better prognostication of cardiovascular diseases progression. Here we review, the current role of PET in cardiovascular disease, with emphasize on tracers developed for PET imaging of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25389529

  20. Perspectives of transient tracer applications and limiting cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stöven, T.; Tanhua, T.; Hoppema, M.; Bullister, J. L.

    2015-09-01

    Currently available transient tracers have different application ranges that are defined by their temporal input (chronological transient tracers) or their decay rate (radioactive transient tracers). Transient tracers range from tracers for highly ventilated water masses such as sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) through tritium (3H) and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) up to tracers for less ventilated deep ocean basins such as argon-39 (39Ar) and radiocarbon (14C). In this context, highly ventilated water masses are defined as water masses that have been in contact with the atmosphere during the last decade. Transient tracers can be used to empirically constrain the transit time distribution (TTD), which can often be approximated with an inverse Gaussian (IG) distribution. The IG-TTD provides information about ventilation and the advective/diffusive characteristics of a water parcel. Here we provide an overview of commonly used transient tracer couples and the corresponding application range of the IG-TTD by using the new concept of validity areas. CFC-12, CFC-11 and SF6 data from three different cruises in the South Atlantic Ocean and Southern Ocean as well as 39Ar data from the 1980s and early 1990s in the eastern Atlantic Ocean and the Weddell Sea are used to demonstrate this method. We found that the IG-TTD can be constrained along the Greenwich Meridian south to 46° S, which corresponds to the Subantarctic Front (SAF) denoting the application limit. The Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) describes the limiting water layer in the vertical. Conspicuous high or lower ratios between the advective and diffusive components describe the transition between the validity area and the application limit of the IG-TTD model rather than describing the physical properties of the water parcel. The combination of 39Ar and CFC data places constraints on the IG-TTD in the deep water north of the SAF, but not beyond this limit.

  1. Quantification of brain perfusion with tracers retained by the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Pupi, A.; Bacciottini, L.; De Cristofaro, M.T.R.; Formiconi, A.R.; Castagnoli, A.

    1991-12-31

    Almost a decade ago, tracers, labelled with {sup 123}I and {sup 99m}Tc, that are retained by the brain, started to be used for studies of regional brain perfusion (regional cerebral blood flow, rCBF). To date, these tracers have been used for brain perfusion imaging with SPECT in brain disorders as well as for physiological activation protocols. Only seldom, however, have they been used in protocols that quantitatively measure rCBF. Nevertheless, comparative studies with perfusion reference tracers have repeatedly demonstrated that the brain uptake of these brain-retained tracers is correlated to perfusion, the major determinant of the distribution of these tracers in the brain. The brain kinetics of {sup 99m}Tc HMPAO, which is the tracer most commonly used, was described with a two-compartment tissue model. The theoretical approach, which is, in itself, sufficient for modeling quantitative measurements with {sup 99m}Tc HMPAO, initially suggested the possibility of empirically narrowing the distance between the brain`s regional uptake of the tracer and rCBF with a linearization algorithm which uses the cerebellum as the reference region. The value of this empirical method is hampered by the fact that the cerebellum can be involved in cerebrovascular disease (i.e. cerebellar diaschisis) as well as in several other brain disorders (e.g. anxiety, and dementia of the Alzheimer type). It also was proposed that different reference regions (occipital, whole slice, or whole brain) should be selected in relation to the brain disorder under study. However, this approach does not solve the main problem because it does not equip us with a reliable tool to evaluate rCBF with a high predictive value, and, at the same time, to reduce intersubject variability. The solution would be to measure a quantitative parameter which directly reflects rCBF, such as the unidirectional influx constant of the freely diffusible flow-limited tracers. 45 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Sand Tracer Movement Measured in a Strong Rip Current

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    and colleagues performed a trial sand tracer experiment in a strong rip current on Ajigaura Beach, Japan , a sandy beach facing the Pacific Ocean...demonstrates that such measurements are possible. Introduction As part of a series of intensive field data collection studies in Japan (Horikawa and...the planned experiment area at Ajigaura Beach, Japan , facing the Pacific Ocean, and it was decided to perform a trial sand tracer experiment in the

  3. Natural iodine-129 as an environmental tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabryka-Martin, J.; Bentley, H.; Elmore, D.; Airey, P. L.

    1985-02-01

    Iodine-129 ( t 1/2, 16 My) is a naturally-occurring tracer which can be used to study hydrologic and geologic processes on time scales up to 100 My. The pre-bomb atmospheric ratio 129I /I should have been constant in time and space and is the starting value in ground-water recharge. Subsequent ratio changes in ground water should be determined by isotope contributions from three sources: recharge water, iodine leached from the formation, and in situ uranium fission. The mathematical expression of these time-dependent processes forms the basis for dating and tracing applications. The expected behavior of natural 129I in ground water is compared to results from field studies. Ground-water samples from the Great Artesian Basin, Australia, provide an estimate of the atmospheric equilibrium ratio, 6 × 10 -13. Down-gradient changes in water up to 1 My old suggest that subsurface production can be significant. The usefulness of 129I as an indicator of brine source and age is verified in brines collected in and around Louisiana salt domes. The method leads to ages of 7 and 9 My for two brine pockets trapped within Jurassic salt, and 32 to >40 My for oil-field brines in Miocene sands adjacent to the domes. The results demonstrate the capability of tandem accelerator mass spectrometry to measure as few as 10 7 atoms of 129I in 10 mg I with 10% precision. Although such atom sensitivity can be achieved otherwise, the accelerator technique is necessary to measure naturally low pre-1945 cosmogenic isotope ratios.

  4. Expanded Porphyrin-Anion Supramolecular Assemblies: Environmentally Responsive Sensors for Organic Solvents and Anions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhan; Kim, Dong Sub; Lin, Chung-Yon; Zhang, Huacheng; Lammer, Aaron D; Lynch, Vincent M; Popov, Ilya; Miljanić, Ognjen Š; Anslyn, Eric V; Sessler, Jonathan L

    2015-06-24

    Porphyrins have been used frequently to construct supramolecular assemblies. In contrast, noncovalent ensembles derived from expanded porphyrins, larger congeners of naturally occurring tetrapyrrole macrocycles, are all but unknown. Here we report a series of expanded porphyrin-anion supramolecular assemblies. These systems display unique environmentally responsive behavior. Addition of polar organic solvents or common anions to the ensembles leads to either a visible color change, a change in the fluorescence emission features, or differences in solubility. The actual response, which could be followed easily by the naked eye, was found to depend on the specifics of the assembly, as well as the choice of analyte. Using the ensembles of this study, it proved possible to differentiate between common solvents, such as diethyl ether, THF, ethyl acetate, acetone, alcohol, acetonitrile, DMF, and DMSO, identify complex solvent systems, as well as distinguish between the fluoride, chloride, bromide, nitrate, and sulfate anions.

  5. Cross-shore surfzone tracer dispersion in an alongshore current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, David B.; Feddersen, Falk; Guza, R. T.

    2010-10-01

    Cross-shore surfzone tracer dispersion in a wave driven alongshore current is examined over a range of wave and current conditions with 6 continuous dye releases, each roughly 1-2 hours in duration, at Huntington Beach, California. Fluorescent dye tracer released near the shoreline formed shore parallel plumes that were sampled on repeated cross-shore transects with a jet ski mounted fluorometer. Ensemble averaged cross-shore tracer concentration profiles are generally shoreline attached (maximum at or near the shoreline), with increasing cross-shore widths and decreasing peak values with downstream distance. More than a few 100 m from the source, tracer is often well mixed across the surfzone (i.e., saturated) with decreasing tracer concentrations farther seaward. For each release, cross-shore surfzone absolute diffusivities are estimated using a simple Fickian diffusion solution with a no-flux boundary at the shoreline, and range from 0.5-2.5 m2 s-1. Surfzone diffusivity scalings based on cross-shore bore dispersion, surfzone eddy mixing length, and undertow driven shear dispersion are examined. The mixing-length scaling has correlation r2 = 0.59 and the expected best-fit slope <1, indicating that horizontal rotational motions are important for cross-shore tracer dispersion in the surfzone.

  6. Determination of stream reaeration coefficients by use of tracers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kilpatrick, F.A.; Rathbun, R.E.; Yotsukura, Nobuhiro; Parker, G.W.; DeLong, L.L.

    1989-01-01

    Stream reaeration is the physical absorption of oxygen from the atmosphere by a flowing stream. This is the primary process by which a stream replenishes the oxygen consumed in the biodegradation of organic wastes. Prior to 1965, reaeration rate coefficients could be estimated only by indirect methods. In 1965, a direct method of measuring stream reaeration coefficients was developed whereby a radioactive tracer gas was injected into a stream-the principle being that the tracer gas would be desorbed from the stream inversely to how oxygen would be absorbed. The technique has since been modified by substituting hydrocarbon gases for the radioactive tracer gas. This manual describes the slug-injection and constant-rate-injection methods of measuring gas-tracer desorption. Emphasis is on the use of rhodamine WT dye as a relatively conservative tracer and propane as the nonconservative gas tracer, on planning field tests, on methods of injection, sampling, and analysis, and on techniques for computing desorption and reaeration coefficients.

  7. Tracer Lamination in the Stratosphere: A Global Climatology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appenzeller, Christof; Holton, James R.

    1997-01-01

    Vertical soundings of stratospheric ozone often exhibit laminated tracer structures characterized by strong vertical tracer gradients. The change in time of these gradients is used to define a tracer lamination rate. It is shown that this quantity can be calculated by the cross product of the horizontal temperature and horizontal tracer gradients. A climatology based on UARS satellite-borne ozone data and on ozone-like pseudotracer data is presented. Three stratospheric regions with high lamination rates were found: the part of the stratospheric overworld which is influenced by the polar vortex, the part of the lowermost stratosphere which is influenced by the tropopause and a third region in the subtropical lower stratosphere mainly characterized with strong vertical shear. High lamination rates in the stratospheric overworld were absent during summer, whereas in the lowermost stratosphere high lamination rates were found year-round. This is consistent with the occurrence and seasonal variation of the horizontal tracer gradient and vertical shear necessary for tilting the tracer surfaces. During winter, high lamination rates associated with the stratospheric polar vortex are present down to approximately 100 hPa. Several features of the derived climatology are roughly consistent with earlier balloon-borne studies. The patterns in the southern and northern hemisphere are comparable, but details differ as anticipated from a less disturbed and more symmetric southern polar vortex.

  8. Quantifying solute transport processes: are chemically "conservative" tracers electrically conservative?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singha, Kamini; Li, Li; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Regberg, Aaron B.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of a nonreactive or conservative tracer, commonly invoked in investigations of solute transport, requires additional study in the context of electrical geophysical monitoring. Tracers that are commonly considered conservative may undergo reactive processes, such as ion exchange, thus changing the aqueous composition of the system. As a result, the measured electrical conductivity may reflect not only solute transport but also reactive processes. We have evaluated the impacts of ion exchange reactions, rate-limited mass transfer, and surface conduction on quantifying tracer mass, mean arrival time, and temporal variance in laboratory-scale column experiments. Numerical examples showed that (1) ion exchange can lead to resistivity-estimated tracer mass, velocity, and dispersivity that may be inaccurate; (2) mass transfer leads to an overestimate in the mobile tracer mass and an underestimate in velocity when using electrical methods; and (3) surface conductance does not notably affect estimated moments when high-concentration tracers are used, although this phenomenon may be important at low concentrations or in sediments with high and/or spatially variable cation-exchange capacity. In all cases, colocated groundwater concentration measurements are of high importance for interpreting geophysical data with respect to the controlling transport processes of interest.

  9. Constraining Glacial Runoff Contributions to Water Resources in the Cordillera Real, Bolivia using Environmental Tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guido, Z.; McIntosh, J. C.; Papuga, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    Warming temperatures in recent decades have contributed to substantial reductions in glaciers in many mountain regions around the globe, including the South American Andes. Melting of these glaciers taps water resources accumulated in past climates, and the diminishing ice marks a decrease in a nonrenewable water source that begs the question: how will future water supplies be impacted by climate change. Water resource management and climate adaptation efforts can be informed by knowledge of the extent to which glaciers contribute to seasonal streamflows, but remote locations and scant monitoring often limit this quantification. In Bolivia, more than two million people draw water from watersheds fed, in part, by glaciers. The amount to which these glaciers contribute to the water supply, however, is not well constrained. We apply elemental and isotopic tracers in an end-member mixing model to quantify glacial runoff contributions to local water supplies. We present oxygen and deuterium isotopes and major anion concentrations (sulfate and chloride) of shallow groundwater, streams, reservoirs, small arroyos, and glacial runoff. Isotopic and anion mixing models suggest between 45-67% of the water measured in high altitude streams originated from within the glacial footprint during the 2011 wet season, while glacial runoff contributed about 42-53% of the water in reservoirs in the 2012 dry season. Data also show that shallow groundwater is connected to glacial-fed streams. Any future decrease in glacial runoff may contribute to a reduction in surface water supplies and lower groundwater levels downstream, perhaps below the depth of hand-dug wells common in rural communities.

  10. HYDROGEL TRACER BEADS: THE DEVELOPMENT, MODIFICATION, AND TESTING OF AN INNOVATIVE TRACER FOR BETTER UNDERSTANDING LNAPL TRANSPORT IN KARST AQUIFERS

    SciTech Connect

    Amanda Laskoskie, Harry M. Edenborn, and Dorothy J. Vesper

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this specific research task is to develop proxy tracers that mimic contaminant movement to better understand and predict contaminant fate and transport in karst aquifers. Hydrogel tracer beads are transported as a separate phase than water and can used as a proxy tracer to mimic the transport of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL). They can be constructed with different densities, sizes & chemical attributes. This poster describes the creation and optimization of the beads and the field testing of buoyant beads, including sampling, tracer analysis, and quantitative analysis. The buoyant beads are transported ahead of the dissolved solutes, suggesting that light NAPL (LNAPL) transport in karst may occur faster than predicted from traditional tracing techniques. The hydrogel beads were successful in illustrating this enhanced transport.

  11. Analysis of Particle Transport Using a Particulate Tracer Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Linker, L. C.; Lung, W.; Batiuk, R. A.

    2002-05-01

    Understanding the transport of dissolved and particulate materials in the Chesapeake Bay estuary is critical to allocating nutrient and sediment load reduction goals to the seven watershed states. A computer simulation of a particulate conservative tracer was conducted to help determine the transport mechanism. Tracers were loaded daily at the fall-line of Potomac River (a middle Bay's tributary). The settling rate is set at 0.1 m/day, with the assumption of neither scour nor re-suspension of tracer from the bed to allow continuous accumulation of tracers on bed. The low settling rate was used to allow tracer to transport widely in the estuary to provide information on the transport of fine particulates such as dead algae. After the tracers reach the mouth of Potomac River, most of them are further transported into the lower main-stem Bay. Flood tide is the main force for tracers transported north to the upper main-stem Bay and to the upstream of non-source rivers. In the main stem of the Bay, there exist concentration gradients from the Potomac River mouth to the opposite shore (the Maryland and Virginia eastern shore), to the lower Bay, and to the upper Bay. Concentration gradients also exist from the fall-line to the mouth in the source river, and from the mouth to the upstream in non-source rivers. These gradients are usually disturbed across trenches, due to a so-called "trench effect". A trench either deposits more or less tracers than its shallower sides, depending on the trench to be hydrologically landward from the source (i.e., the Potomac fall line) or the sub-source (e.g., the Rappahannock River mouth for the trench in the upstream of Rappahannock River), or hydrologically seaward from the source or the sub-source. Depending on the layer (saline water-rich or fresh water-rich) in which tracers reside and the direction (landward or seaward) along which tracers transport, the transport/deposit of tracer may be favored along trench over its shallower sides

  12. Infared Spectroscopy of Discrete Uranyl Anion Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, G. S.; Gianotto, Anita K.; McIIwain, Michael E.; Van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Kullman, Michael; Moore, David T.; Polfer, Nick; Oomens, Jos; Infante, Ivan A.; Visscher, Lucas; Siboulet, Bertrand; De Jong, Wibe A.

    2008-01-24

    The Free-Electron Laser for Infrared Experiments (FELIX) w 1 as used to study the wavelength-resolved multiple photon photodissociation of discrete, gas phase uranyl (UO2 2 2+) complexes containing a single anionic ligand (A), with or without ligated solvent molecules (S). The uranyl antisymmetric and symmetric stretching frequencies were measured for complexes with general formula [UO2A(S)n]+, where A was either hydroxide, methoxide, or acetate; S was water, ammonia, acetone, or acetonitrile; and n = 0-3. The values for the antisymmetric stretching frequency for uranyl ligated with only an anion ([UO2A]+) were as low or lower than measurements for [UO2]2+ ligated with as many as five strong neutral donor ligands, and are comparable to solution phase values. This result was surprising because initial DFT calculations predicted values that were 30–40 cm-1 higher, consistent with intuition but not with the data. Modification of the basis sets and use of alternative functionals improved computational accuracy for the methoxide and acetate complexes, but calculated values for the hydroxide were greater than the measurement regardless of the computational method used. Attachment of a neutral donor ligand S to [UO2A]+ produced [UO2AS]+, which produced only very modest changes to the uranyl antisymmetric stretch frequency, and did not universally shift the frequency to lower values. DFT calculations for [UO2AS]+ were in accord with trends in the data, and showed that attachment of the solvent was accommodated by weakening of the U-anion bond as well as the uranyl. When uranyl frequencies were compared for [UO2AS]+ species having different solvent neutrals, values decreased with increasing neutral nucleophilicity.

  13. Photoelectron spectroscopy of pyrene anion clusters: Autodetachment via excited states of anion and intermolecular interactions in anion clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong Hyun; Lee, Sang Hak; Song, Jae Kyu

    2009-03-01

    This study examined the anion clusters of pyrene (Py) by mass spectrometry, photoelectron spectroscopy, and theoretical calculations. The photoelectron spectra of Pyn- (n =1-4) were obtained at various photon energies. A change in photodetachment wavelength resulted in a large change in the relative intensities of vibrational progression in the photoelectron spectra. It is proposed that the observed modulation of the Franck-Condon factors by the different photon energies reflects autodetachment via the excited states of anion. The photoelectron spectra of Pyn- at 355 nm showed a broad band structure between the S0 and T1 states, which is also due to the autodetachment via a Feshbach resonance state. The photoelectron spectra of Py2- suggest the presence of a unique dimeric interaction between the two pyrene moieties, whereas the spectral features of Py3- are similar to those of Py1-. The stable structures of Py2- and Py3- obtained by density functional theory calculations support the experimental findings, where different intermolecular interactions govern the stabilization of these two species.

  14. Fluorescent bioaerosol particle, molecular tracer, and fungal spore concentrations during dry and rainy periods in a semi-arid forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ila Gosselin, Marie; Rathnayake, Chathurika M.; Crawford, Ian; Pöhlker, Christopher; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine; Schmer, Beatrice; Després, Viviane R.; Engling, Guenter; Gallagher, Martin; Stone, Elizabeth; Pöschl, Ulrich; Huffman, J. Alex

    2016-12-01

    Bioaerosols pose risks to human health and agriculture and may influence the evolution of mixed-phase clouds and the hydrological cycle on local and regional scales. The availability and reliability of methods and data on the abundance and properties of atmospheric bioaerosols, however, are rather limited. Here we analyze and compare data from different real-time ultraviolet laser/light-induced fluorescence (UV-LIF) instruments with results from a culture-based spore sampler and offline molecular tracers for airborne fungal spores in a semi-arid forest in the southern Rocky Mountains of Colorado. Commercial UV-APS (ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer) and WIBS-3 (wideband integrated bioaerosol sensor, version 3) instruments with different excitation and emission wavelengths were utilized to measure fluorescent aerosol particles (FAPs) during both dry weather conditions and periods heavily influenced by rain. Seven molecular tracers of bioaerosols were quantified by analysis of total suspended particle (TSP) high-volume filter samples using a high-performance anion-exchange chromatography system with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD). From the same measurement campaign, Huffman et al. (2013) previously reported dramatic increases in total and fluorescent particle concentrations during and immediately after rainfall and also showed a strong relationship between the concentrations of FAPs and ice nuclei (Huffman et al., 2013; Prenni et al., 2013). Here we investigate molecular tracers and show that during rainy periods the atmospheric concentrations of arabitol (35.2 ± 10.5 ng m-3) and mannitol (44.9 ± 13.8 ng m-3) were 3-4 times higher than during dry periods. During and after rain, the correlations between FAP and tracer mass concentrations were also significantly improved. Fungal spore number concentrations on the order of 104 m-3, accounting for 2-5 % of TSP mass during dry periods and 17-23 % during rainy periods, were obtained from scaling the

  15. Probes for anionic cell surface detection

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Bradley D.

    2013-03-05

    Embodiments of the present invention are generally directed to compositions comprising a class of molecular probes for detecting the presence of anionic cell surfaces. Embodiments include compositions that are enriched for these compositions and preparations, particularly preparations suitable for use as laboratory/clinical reagents and diagnostic indicators, either alone or as part of a kit. An embodiment of the invention provides for a highly selective agent useful in the discernment and identification of dead or dying cells, such as apoptotic cells, in a relatively calcium-free environment. An embodiment of the invention provides a selective agent for the identification of bacteria in a mixed population of bacterial cells and nonbacterial cells.

  16. Anionic States of LiFLi

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-22

    EUIYCASFCTO 9 SECURITT12b CLSIIAIONT0.RIMITTION CODE TRC UNIDCLASIFEDT HCAS SIFIAPRO ED UNCPBICR LEASSEFIEDUNITE SALE IT.OO.0S50 DItTRdarIO Ior UNLIMITED-89 13...core Is atomic orbitals were doubly occupied in every configuration state function (CSF). The neglected core-core and core- valence correlation...has 2s and 2p valence orbitals to use but H has only Is valence orbitals. B. The Anion The ground electronic state of LiFLi- has a linear equilibrium

  17. Multiple Tracer Tests in Porous Media During Clogging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englert, A.; Banning, A.; Siegmund, J.; Freye, S.; Goekpinar, T.

    2015-12-01

    Transport processes are known to be governed by the physical and chemical heterogeneity of the subsurface. Clogging processes can alter this heterogeneity as function of time and thus can modify transport. To understand transport under clogging conditions and to unravel the potential of multiple tracer tests to characterize such transport process we perform column and sandbox experiments. Our recently developed column and sandbox experiments are used to perform multiple tracer tests during clogging. In a first set of experiments, a cubic cell of 0.1 m x 0.1 m x 0.1 m is used to experimentally estimate flow and transport characteristics of an unconsolidated sediment through Darcy and tracer experiments. The water streaming through the experiment is amended with ammonium sulfate permanently. Salt tracers are added to the streaming water repeatedly, to be detected at micro electrodes at the inflow and the outflow of the cubic cell. Through repeated syringe injections of a barium chloride solution into the center of the cubic cell clogging processes are forced to occur around the mixing zone of the injected and streaming water by precipitation of barium sulfate. In a second set of experiments, a sandbox model including a sediment body of 0.3 m x 0.3 m x 0.1 m is used. Tracer, streaming, and injection water chemistry is kept similar to the cubic cell experiments. However, tracer breakthrough is now detected at nine positions within the experiment and at the inflow and the outflow of the sandbox model. Injection of barium chloride solution is now at two locations around the center of the sandbox model. Flow and transport characteristics of the sediment body are estimated based on Darcy and tracer experiments, which are performed repeatedly. Combined analysis of local and ensemble breakthrough curves and integrated numerical modeling will be used to understand effective and local flow and transport in a in a porous medium during clogging.

  18. Stable isotope tracers and exercise physiology: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Daniel J; Brook, Matthew S; Smith, Kenneth; Atherton, Philip J

    2016-09-09

    Stable isotope tracers have been invaluable assets in physiological research for over 80 years. The application of substrate-specific stable isotope tracers has permitted exquisite insight into amino acid, fatty-acid and carbohydrate metabolic regulation (i.e. incorporation, flux, and oxidation, in a tissue-specific and whole-body fashion) in health, disease and response to acute and chronic exercise. Yet, despite many breakthroughs, there are limitations to 'substrate-specific' stable isotope tracers, which limit physiological insight, e.g. the need for intravenous infusions and restriction to short-term studies (hours) in controlled laboratory settings. In recent years significant interest has developed in alternative stable isotope tracer techniques that overcome these limitations, in particular deuterium oxide (D2 O or heavy water). The unique properties of this tracer mean that through oral administration, the turnover and flux through a number of different substrates (muscle proteins, lipids, glucose, DNA (satellite cells)) can be monitored simultaneously and flexibly (hours/weeks/months) without the need for restrictive experimental control. This makes it uniquely suited for the study of 'real world' human exercise physiology (amongst many other applications). Moreover, using D2 O permits evaluation of turnover of plasma and muscle proteins (e.g. dynamic proteomics) in addition to metabolomics (e.g. fluxomics) to seek molecular underpinnings, e.g. of exercise adaptation. Here, we provide insight into the role of stable isotope tracers, from substrate-specific to novel D2 O approaches, in facilitating our understanding of metabolism. Further novel potential applications of stable isotope tracers are also discussed in the context of integration with the snowballing field of 'omic' technologies.

  19. Testing fundamentals: The chemical state of geochemical tracers in biominerals.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branson, O.; Redfern, S. A. T.; Read, E.; Elderfield, H.

    2015-12-01

    The use of many carbonate-derived geochemical proxies is underpinned by the assumption that tracer elements are incorporated 'ideally' as impurities the mineral lattice, following relatively straightforward kinetic and thermodynamic drives. This allows comparison to inorganic precipitation experiments, and provides a systematic starting point from which to translate geochemical tracers to environmental records. Biomineral carbonates are a prominent source of geochemical proxy material, and are far from an ideal inorganic system. They are structurally and compositionally heterogeneous mineral-organic composites, produced in tightly controlled biological environments, possibly via non-classical crystal growth mechanisms. Biominerals offer numerous opportunities for tracers to be incorporated in a 'non-ideal' state. For instance, tracers could be hosted within the organic component of the structure, in interstitial micro-domains of a separate mineral phase, or in localized high-impurity clusters. If a proxy element is hosted in a non-ideal state, our understanding of its incorporation and preservation is flawed, and the theoretical basis behind the proxies derived from it must be reevaluated. Thus far, the assumption of ideal tracer incorporation has remained largely untested, owing to the spatial resolution and sensitivity limits of available techniques. Developments in high-resolution, high-sensitivity X-ray spectroscopy at Scanning Transmission X-Ray Microscopes (STXMs) have allowed us to measure trace element coordination in foraminiferal calcite, at length-scales relevant to biomineralisation processes and tracer incorporation. This instrument has allowed us to test the fundamental assumptions behind several geochemical proxy elements. We present a summary of four STXM studies, assessing the chemical state and distribution of Mg (Branson et al, 2014), B (Branson et al, 2015), S and Na (unpub.), and highlight the implications of these data for the use of these

  20. Transport of Passive Tracers in Baroclinic Wave Life Cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Elizabeth M.; Randel, William J.; Stanford, John L.

    1999-01-01

    The transport of passive tracers in idealized baroclinic wave life cycles is studied using output from the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate Model (CCM2). Two life cycles, LCn and LCs, are simulated, starting with baroclinically unstable initial conditions similar to those used by Thorncroft et al. in their study of two life cycle paradigms. The two life cycles LCn and LCs have different initial horizontal wind shear structures that result in distinctive nonlinear development. In terms of potential vorticity-potential temperature (PV-theta) diagnostics, the LCn case is characterized by thinning troughs that are advected anti-cyclonically and equatorward, while the LCs case has broadening troughs that wrap up cyclonically and poleward. Four idealized passive tracers are included in the model to be advected by the semi-Lagrangian transport scheme of the CCM2, and their evolutions are investigated throughout the life cycles. Tracer budgets are analyzed in terms of the transformed Eulerian mean constituent transport formalism in pressure coordinates and also in isentropic coordinates. Results for both LCn and LCs show transport that is downgradient with respect to the background structure of the tracer field, but with a characteristic spatial structure that maximizes in the middle to high latitudes. For the idealized tropospheric tracers in this study, this represents a net upward and poleward transport that enhances concentrations at high latitudes. These results vary little with the initial distribution of the constituent field. The time tendency of the tracer is influenced most strongly by the eddy flux term. with the largest transport occurring during the nonlinear growth stage of the life cycle. The authors also study the transport of a lower-stratospheric tracer, to examine stratosphere-troposphere exchange for baroclinic waves.

  1. Field measurements of tracer gas transport by barometric pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Lagus, P.L.; McKinnis, W.B.; Hearst, J.R.; Burkhard, N.R.; Smith, C.F.

    1994-07-28

    Vertical gas motions induced by barometric pressure variations can carry radioactive gases out of the rubblized region produced by an underground nuclear explosion, through overburden rock, into the atmosphere. To better quantify transit time and amount of transport, field experiments were conducted at two sites on Pahute Mesa, Kapelli and Tierra, where radioactive gases had been earlier detected in surface cracks. At each site, two tracer gases were injected into the rubblized chimney 300-400 m beneath the surface and their arrival was monitored by concentration measurements in gas samples extracted from shallow collection holes. The first ``active`` tracer was driven by a large quantity of injected air; the second ``passive`` tracer was introduced with minimal gas drive to observe the natural transport by barometric pumping. Kapelli was injected in the fall of 1990, followed by Tierra in the fall of 1991. Data was collected at both sites through the summer of 1993. At both sites, no surface arrival of tracer was observed during the active phase of the experiment despite the injection of several million cubic feet of air, suggesting that cavity pressurization is likely to induce horizontal transport along high permeability layers rather than vertical transport to the surface. In contrast, the vertical pressure gradients associated with barometric pumping brought both tracers to the surface in comparable concentrations within three months at Kapelli, whereas 15 months elapsed before surface arrival at Tierra. At Kapelli, a quasisteady pumping regime was established, with tracer concentrations in effluent gases 1000 times smaller than concentrations thought to exist in the chimney. Tracer concentrations observed at Tierra were typically an order of magnitude smaller. Comparisons with theoretical calculations suggest that the gases are traveling through {approximately}1 millimeter vertical fractures spaced 2 to 4 meters apart. 6 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. [Application of high performance anion exchange chromatography for trace analysis of polarizable anions].

    PubMed

    Mo, Shumin; Liang, Lina; Cai, Yaqi; Mou, Shifen; Wen, Meijuan

    2005-11-01

    Polarizable anions such as Br-, S2O3(2-), I- and SCN- were separated using 45 mmol/L sodium hydroxide solution as the mobile phase on a high hydrophilic IonPac AS16 column. With a pulsed amperometric detector, the detection limits were 0.5, 0.2, 0.05 and 2 microg/L (25.0 microL injected, signal-to-noise ratio of 3) for Br-, S2O3(2-), I- and SCN. The relative standard deviation (RSD) range of trace anions was from 0.8% to 3.7% (n = 9). Under the same chromatographic conditions, these anions were also determined using a suppressed conductivity detector and the detection limits were 1, 1, 2 and 10 microg/L (25 microL injected, signal-to-noise ratio of 3), respectively. The RSD range was from 0.9% to 4.7% (n = 9). Comparing a pulsed amperometric detector with a conductivity detector, the former is 2 to 40 times more sensitive than the latter. For the determination of polarizable anions, a pulsed amperometric detector has higher selectivity, precision and sensitivity.

  3. Perspective: Electrospray photoelectron spectroscopy: From multiply-charged anions to ultracold anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2015-07-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) has become an essential tool in chemical physics and physical chemistry for the production of novel molecular ions from solution samples for a variety of spectroscopic experiments. ESI was used to produce free multiply-charged anions (MCAs) for photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) in the late 1990 s, allowing many interesting properties of this class of exotic species to be investigated. Free MCAs are characterized by strong intramolecular Coulomb repulsions, which create a repulsive Coulomb barrier (RCB) for electron emission. The RCB endows many fascinating properties to MCAs, giving rise to meta-stable anions with negative electron binding energies. Recent development in the PES of MCAs includes photoelectron imaging to examine the influence of the RCB on the electron emission dynamics, pump-probe experiments to examine electron tunneling through the RCB, and isomer-specific experiments by coupling PES with ion mobility for biological MCAs. The development of a cryogenically cooled Paul trap has led to much better resolved PE spectra for MCAs by creating vibrationally cold anions from the room temperature ESI source. Recent advances in coupling the cryogenic Paul trap with PE imaging have allowed high-resolution PE spectra to be obtained for singly charged anions produced by ESI. In particular, the observation of dipole-bound excited states has made it possible to conduct vibrational autodetachment spectroscopy and resonant PES, which yield much richer vibrational spectroscopic information for dipolar free radicals than traditional PES.

  4. Perspective: Electrospray photoelectron spectroscopy: From multiply-charged anions to ultracold anions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2015-07-28

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) has become an essential tool in chemical physics and physical chemistry for the production of novel molecular ions from solution samples for a variety of spectroscopic experiments. ESI was used to produce free multiply-charged anions (MCAs) for photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) in the late 1990 s, allowing many interesting properties of this class of exotic species to be investigated. Free MCAs are characterized by strong intramolecular Coulomb repulsions, which create a repulsive Coulomb barrier (RCB) for electron emission. The RCB endows many fascinating properties to MCAs, giving rise to meta-stable anions with negative electron binding energies. Recent development in the PES of MCAs includes photoelectron imaging to examine the influence of the RCB on the electron emission dynamics, pump-probe experiments to examine electron tunneling through the RCB, and isomer-specific experiments by coupling PES with ion mobility for biological MCAs. The development of a cryogenically cooled Paul trap has led to much better resolved PE spectra for MCAs by creating vibrationally cold anions from the room temperature ESI source. Recent advances in coupling the cryogenic Paul trap with PE imaging have allowed high-resolution PE spectra to be obtained for singly charged anions produced by ESI. In particular, the observation of dipole-bound excited states has made it possible to conduct vibrational autodetachment spectroscopy and resonant PES, which yield much richer vibrational spectroscopic information for dipolar free radicals than traditional PES.

  5. Functional anion concept: effect of fluorine anion on hydrogen storage of sodium alanate.

    PubMed

    Yin, Li-Chang; Wang, Ping; Kang, Xiang-Dong; Sun, Cheng-Hua; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2007-03-28

    Doping NaAlH(4) with Ti-catalyst has produced a promising hydrogen storage system that can be reversibly operated at moderate temperature conditions. Of the various dopant precursors, TiCl(3) was well recognized due to its pronounced catalytic effect on the reversible dehydrogenation processes of sodium aluminium hydrides. Quite recently we experimentally found that TiF(3) was even better than TiCl(3) in terms of the critical hydrogen storage properties of the doped hydrides, in particular the dehydriding performance at Na(3)AlH(6)/NaH + Al step at moderate temperature. We present here the DFT calculation results of the TiF(3) or TiCl(3) doped Na(3)AlH(6). Our computational studies have demonstrated that F(-) and Cl(-) anions differ substantially from each other with regard to the state and function in the doped sodium aluminium hydride. In great contrast to the case of chloride doping where Cl(-) anion constitutes the "dead weight" NaCl, the fluoride doping results in a substitution of H(-) by F(-) anion in the hydride lattice and accordingly, a favorable thermodynamics adjustment. These results well explain the observed dehydriding performance associated with TiF(3)/TiCl(3)-doping. More significantly, the coupled computational and experimental efforts allow us to put forward a "functional anion" concept. This renews the current mechanism understanding in the catalytically enhanced sodium alanate.

  6. The roles of anion channels in Arabidopsis immunity

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wei; Wang, Chengcheng; Zuo, Zhangli; Qiu, Jin-Long

    2014-01-01

    Anion efflux is one of the most immediate responses of plant cells to pathogen attacks, suggesting that anion channels may play a role in plant defense. Recently we reported that the chloride channel AtCLCd negatively regulates Arabidopsis pathogen-associated molecular pattern-triggered immunity (PTI), probably by affecting trafficking of the pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). Since AtCLCd is localized to the trans-Golgi network, it is not likely to be directly involved in anion flux across the plasma membrane. Here, we used a pharmacological approach to explore further the function of plasma membrane-localized R-type and S-type anion channels in plant immunity. We found that the R-type and S-type anion channels play opposite roles in Arabidopsis innate immunity. Inhibition of the R-type anion channels enhances, whereas inhibition of the S-type channels inhibits PTI and effector-triggered immunity (ETI). PMID:25763497

  7. Palladium-Catalyzed Arylation of Alkyl Sulfenate Anions.

    PubMed

    Jia, Tiezheng; Zhang, Mengnan; Jiang, Hui; Wang, Carol Y; Walsh, Patrick J

    2015-11-04

    A unique palladium-catalyzed arylation of alkyl sulfenate anions is introduced that affords aryl alkyl sulfoxides in high yields. Due to the base sensitivity of the starting sulfoxides, sulfenate anion intermediates, and alkyl aryl sulfoxide products, the use of a mild method to generate alkyl sulfenate anions was crucial to the success of this process. Thus, a fluoride triggered elimination strategy was employed with alkyl 2-(trimethylsilyl)ethyl sulfoxides to liberate the requisite alkyl sulfenate anion intermediates. In the presence of palladium catalysts with bulky monodentate phosphines (SPhos and Cy-CarPhos) and aryl bromides or chlorides, alkyl sulfenate anions were readily arylated. Moreover, the thermal fragmentation and the base promoted elimination of alkyl sulfoxides was overridden. The alkyl sulfenate anion arylation exhibited excellent chemoselectivity in the presence of functional groups, such as anilines and phenols, which are also known to undergo palladium catalyzed arylation reactions.

  8. Process for removing sulfate anions from waste water

    DOEpatents

    Nilsen, David N.; Galvan, Gloria J.; Hundley, Gary L.; Wright, John B.

    1997-01-01

    A liquid emulsion membrane process for removing sulfate anions from waste water is disclosed. The liquid emulsion membrane process includes the steps of: (a) providing a liquid emulsion formed from an aqueous strip solution and an organic phase that contains an extractant capable of removing sulfate anions from waste water; (b) dispersing the liquid emulsion in globule form into a quantity of waste water containing sulfate anions to allow the organic phase in each globule of the emulsion to extract and absorb sulfate anions from the waste water and (c) separating the emulsion including its organic phase and absorbed sulfate anions from the waste water to provide waste water containing substantially no sulfate anions.

  9. Zero-point energy effects in anion solvation shells.

    PubMed

    Habershon, Scott

    2014-05-21

    By comparing classical and quantum-mechanical (path-integral-based) molecular simulations of solvated halide anions X(-) [X = F, Cl, Br and I], we identify an ion-specific quantum contribution to anion-water hydrogen-bond dynamics; this effect has not been identified in previous simulation studies. For anions such as fluoride, which strongly bind water molecules in the first solvation shell, quantum simulations exhibit hydrogen-bond dynamics nearly 40% faster than the corresponding classical results, whereas those anions which form a weakly bound solvation shell, such as iodide, exhibit a quantum effect of around 10%. This observation can be rationalized by considering the different zero-point energy (ZPE) of the water vibrational modes in the first solvation shell; for strongly binding anions, the ZPE of bound water molecules is larger, giving rise to faster dynamics in quantum simulations. These results are consistent with experimental investigations of anion-bound water vibrational and reorientational motion.

  10. Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Theoretical Studies of Anion-pi Interactions: Binding Strength and Anion Specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jian; Zhou, Bin; Sun, Zhenrong; Wang, Xue B.

    2015-01-01

    Proposed in theory and confirmed to exist, anion–π interactions have been recognized as new and important non-covalent binding forces. Despite extensive theoretical studies, numerous crystal structural identifications, and a plethora of solution phase investigations, intrinsic anion–π interaction strengths that are free from complications of condensed phases’ environments, have not been directly measured in the gas phase. Herein we present a joint photoelectron spectroscopic and theoretical study on this subject, in which tetraoxacalix[2]arene[2]triazine 1, an electron-deficient and cavity self-tunable macrocyclic was used as a charge-neutral molecular host to probe its interactions with a series of anions with distinctly different shapes and charge states (spherical halides Cl⁻, Br⁻, I⁻, linear thiocyanate SCN⁻, trigonal planar nitrate NO₃⁻, pyramidic iodate IO₃⁻, and tetrahedral sulfate SO₄²⁻). The binding energies of the resultant gaseous 1:1 complexes (1•Cl⁻,1•Br⁻, 1•I⁻, 1•SCN⁻, 1•NO₃⁻, 1•IO₃⁻ and 1•SO₄²⁻) were directly measured experimentally, exhibiting substantial non-covalent interactions with pronounced anion specific effects. The binding strengths of Cl⁻, NO₃⁻, IO₃⁻ with 1 are found to be strongest among all singly charged anions, amounting to ca. 30 kcal/mol, but only about 40% of that between 1 and SO₄²⁻. Quantum chemical calculations reveal that all anions reside in the center of the cavity of 1 with anion–π binding motif in the complexes’ optimized structures, where 1 is seen to be able to self-regulate its cavity structure to accommodate anions of different geometries and three-dimensional shapes. Electron density surface and natural bond orbital charge distribution analysis further support anion–π binding formation. The calculated binding energies of the anions and 1 nicely reproduce the experimentally estimated electron binding energy increase. This work

  11. Advancements in Anion Exchange Membrane Cations

    SciTech Connect

    Sturgeon, Matthew R.; Long, Hai; Park, Andrew M.; Pivovar, Bryan S.

    2015-10-15

    Anion-exchange membrane fuel cells (AME-FCs) are of increasingly popular interest as they enable the use of non-Pt fuel cell catalysts, the primary cost limitation of proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Benzyltrimethyl ammonium (BTMA) is the standard cation that has historically been utilized as the hydroxide conductor in AEMs. Herein we approach AEMs from two directions. First and foremost we study the stability of several different cations in a hydroxide solution at elevated temperatures. We specifically targeted BTMA and methoxy and nitro substituted BTMA. We've also studied the effects of adding an akyl spacer units between the ammonium cation and the phenyl group. In the second approach we use computational studies to predict stable ammonium cations, which are then synthesized and tested for stability. Our unique method to study cation stability in caustic conditions at elevated temperatures utilizes Teflon Parr reactors suitable for use under various temperatures and cation concentrations. NMR analysis was used to determine remaining cation concentrations at specific time points with GCMS analysis verifying product distribution. We then compare the experimental results with calculated modeling stabilities. Our studies show that the electron donating methoxy groups slightly increase stability (compared to that of BTMA), while the electron withdrawing nitro groups greatly decrease stability in base. These results give insight into possible linking strategies to be employed when tethering a BTMA like ammonium cation to a polymeric backbone; thus synthesizing an anion exchange membrane.

  12. Anion photoelectron spectroscopy of radicals and clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, Taylor R.

    1999-12-01

    Anion photoelectron spectroscopy is used to study free radicals and clusters. The low-lying 2Σ and 2π states of C2nH (n = 1--4) have been studied. The anion photoelectron spectra yielded electron affinities, term values, and vibrational frequencies for these combustion and astrophysically relevant species. Photoelectron angular distributions allowed the author to correctly assign the electronic symmetry of the ground and first excited states and to assess the degree of vibronic coupling in C2H and C4H. Other radicals studied include NCN and I3. The author was able to observe the low-lying singlet and triplet states of NCN for the first time. Measurement of the electron affinity of I3 revealed that it has a bound ground state and attachment of an argon atom to this moiety enabled him to resolve the symmetric stretching progression.

  13. Isatin phenylhydrazones: anion enhanced photochromic behaviour.

    PubMed

    Cigáň, M; Jakusová, K; Gáplovský, M; Filo, J; Donovalová, J; Gáplovský, A

    2015-11-01

    The photochemical properties of two basic easily synthesized isatin N(2)-phenylhydrazones were investigated. Contrary to the corresponding isatin N(2)-diphenylhydrazones, only Z-isomers were isolated from the reaction mixtures during the synthesis due to their stabilization by intramolecular hydrogen bonding. Although the presence of the C=N double bond creates conditions for the formation of a simple on-off photoswitch, the low photochemical quantum yield and particularly the low switching amplitude in absorbance hamper their photochromic applications. However, the addition of strongly basic anions to phenylhydrazone solutions leads to isatin NH group deprotonation and creates a new diazene T-type Vis-Vis photochromic system with sufficiently separated absorption maxima. Interestingly, although the thermally stable A-form is also photostable in ambient light, its irradiation with a stronger LED source leads to thermally unstable B-form formation which rapidly isomerizes back to the corresponding A-form. The process is reversible and switching cycles can be repeated in both directions. The important advantages of this two-component organic chromophore-inorganic anion photochromic system are its easy synthesis, easy handling due to its insensitivity to room light, easy further structural modification and reversibility. The corresponding photochemical quantum yield, however, remains relatively low (Φ ∼ 0.001). The theoretically calculated properties are in agreement with the obtained experimental results and support the proposed reaction mechanism.

  14. Isobar Separator for Anions: Current status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alary, Jean-François; Javahery, Gholamreza; Kieser, William; Zhao, Xiao-Lei; Litherland, Albert; Cousins, Lisa; Charles, Christopher

    2015-10-01

    The Isobar Separator for Anions (ISA) is an emerging separation technique of isobars applied first to the selective removal of 36S from 36Cl, achieving a relative suppression ratio of 6 orders of magnitude. Using a radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) column incorporating low energy gas cells, this innovative technique enables the use of a wide range of low energy ion-molecule reactions and collisional-induced dissociation processes for suppressing specific atomic of molecular anions with a high degree of selectivity. Other elemental pairs (analyte/isobar) successfully separated at AMS level include Ca/K, Sr/(Y, Zr), Cs/Ba, Hf/W and Pu/U. In view of these initial successes, an effort to develop a version of the ISA that can be used as a robust technique for routine AMS analysis has been undertaken. We will discuss the detailed layout of a practical ISA and the functional requirements that a combined ISA/AMS should meet. These concepts are currently being integrated in a pre-commercial ISA system that will be installed soon at the newly established A.E. Lalonde Laboratory in Ottawa, Canada.

  15. Porating anion-responsive copolymeric gels.

    PubMed

    England, Dustin; Yan, Feng; Texter, John

    2013-09-24

    A polymerizable ionic liquid surfactant, 1-(11-acryloyloxyundecyl)-3-methylimidiazolium bromide (ILBr), was copolymerized with methyl methacrylate (MMA) in aqueous microemulsions at 30% (ILBr w/w) and various water to MMA ratios. The ternary phase diagram of the ILBr/MMA/water system was constructed at 25 and 60 °C. Homopolymers and copolymers of ILBr and MMA were produced by thermally initiated chain radical microemulsion polymerization at various compositions in bicontinuous and reverse microemulsion subdomains. Microemulsion polymerization reaction products varied from being gel-like to solid, and these materials were analyzed by thermal and scanning electron microscopy methods. Microemulsion polymerized materials were insoluble in all solvents tested, consistent with light cross-linking. Ion exchange between Br(-) and PF6(-) in these copolymeric materials resulted in the formation of open-cell porous structures in some of these materials, as was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Several compositions illustrate the capture of prepolymerization nanoscale structure by thermally initiated polymerization, expanding the domain of compositions exhibiting this feat and yet to be demonstrated in any other system. Regular cylindrical pores in interpenetrating ILBr-co-MMA and PMMA networks are produced by anion exchange in the absence of templates. A percolating cluster/bicontinuous transition is "captured" by SEM after using anion exchange to visualize the mixed cluster/pore morphology. Some design principles for achieving this capture and for obtaining stimuli responsive solvogels are articulated, and the importance of producing solvogels in capturing the nanoscale is highlighted.

  16. Nanoheterostructure Cation Exchange: Anionic Framework Conservation

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Prashant K.; Amirav, Lilac; Aloni, Shaul; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2010-05-11

    In ionic nanocrystals the cationic sub-lattice can be replaced with a different metal ion via a fast, simple, and reversible place-exchange, allowing post-synthetic modification of the composition of the nanocrystal, while preserving its size and shape. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that during such an exchange, the anionic framework of the crystal is preserved. When applied to nanoheterostructures, this phenomenon ensures that compositional interfaces within the heterostructure are conserved throughout the transformation. For instance, a morphology composed of a CdSe nanocrystal embedded in a CdS rod (CdSe/CdS) was exchanged to a PbSe/PbS nanorod via a Cu2Se/Cu2S structure. During every exchange cycle, the seed size and position within the nanorod were preserved, as evident by excitonic features, Z-contrast imaging, and elemental line-scans. Anionic framework conservation extends the domain of cation exchange to the design of more complex and unique nanostructures.

  17. The production of Neptunium-236g.

    PubMed

    Jerome, S M; Ivanov, P; Larijani, C; Parker, D J; Regan, P H

    2014-12-01

    Radiochemical analysis of (237)Np is important in a number of fields, such as nuclear forensics, environmental analysis and measurements throughout the nuclear fuel cycle. However analysis is complicated by the lack of a stable isotope of neptunium. Although various tracers have been used, including (235)Np, (239)Np and even (236)Pu, none are entirely satisfactory. However, (236g)Np would be a better candidate for a neptunium yield tracer, as its long half-life means that it is useable as both a radiometric and mass spectrometric measurements. This radionuclide is notoriously difficult to prepare, and limited in scope. In this paper, we examine the options for the production of (236g)Np, based on work carried out at NPL since 2011. However, this work was primarily aimed at the production of (236)Pu, and not (236g)Np and therefore the rate of production are based on the levels of (236)Pu generated in the irradiation of (i) (238)U with protons, (ii) (235)U with deuterons, (iii) (236)U with protons and (iv) (236)U with deuterons. The derivation of a well-defined cross section is complicated by the relevant paucity of information on the variation of the (236m)Np:(236g)Np production ratio with incident particle energy. Furthermore, information on the purity of (236g)Np so produced is similarly sparse. Accordingly, the existing data is assessed and a plan for future work is presented.

  18. LARGE-SCALE NATURAL GRADIENT TRACER TEST IN SAND AND GRAVEL, CAPE COD, MASSACHUSETTS - 1. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN AND OBSERVED TRACER MOVEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A large-scale natural gradient tracer experiment was conducted on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, to examine the transport and dispersion of solutes in a sand and gravel aquifer. The nonreactive tracer, bromide, and the reactive tracers, lithium and molybdate, were injected as a pulse i...

  19. TracerLPM (Version 1): An Excel® workbook for interpreting groundwater age distributions from environmental tracer data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jurgens, Bryant C.; Böhlke, J.K.; Eberts, Sandra M.

    2012-01-01

    TracerLPM is an interactive Excel® (2007 or later) workbook program for evaluating groundwater age distributions from environmental tracer data by using lumped parameter models (LPMs). Lumped parameter models are mathematical models of transport based on simplified aquifer geometry and flow configurations that account for effects of hydrodynamic dispersion or mixing within the aquifer, well bore, or discharge area. Five primary LPMs are included in the workbook: piston-flow model (PFM), exponential mixing model (EMM), exponential piston-flow model (EPM), partial exponential model (PEM), and dispersion model (DM). Binary mixing models (BMM) can be created by combining primary LPMs in various combinations. Travel time through the unsaturated zone can be included as an additional parameter. TracerLPM also allows users to enter age distributions determined from other methods, such as particle tracking results from numerical groundwater-flow models or from other LPMs not included in this program. Tracers of both young groundwater (anthropogenic atmospheric gases and isotopic substances indicating post-1940s recharge) and much older groundwater (carbon-14 and helium-4) can be interpreted simultaneously so that estimates of the groundwater age distribution for samples with a wide range of ages can be constrained. TracerLPM is organized to permit a comprehensive interpretive approach consisting of hydrogeologic conceptualization, visual examination of data and models, and best-fit parameter estimation. Groundwater age distributions can be evaluated by comparing measured and modeled tracer concentrations in two ways: (1) multiple tracers analyzed simultaneously can be evaluated against each other for concordance with modeled concentrations (tracer-tracer application) or (2) tracer time-series data can be evaluated for concordance with modeled trends (tracer-time application). Groundwater-age estimates can also be obtained for samples with a single tracer measurement at one

  20. Hydrodynamic tracer diffusion in suspensions of swimming bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasyap, T. V.; Koch, Donald L.; Wu, Mingming

    2014-08-01

    We present theoretical predictions, simulations, and experimental measurements of the diffusion of passive, Brownian tracer particles in the bulk of three-dimensional suspensions of swimming bacteria performing run-tumble random walks. In the theory, we derive an explicit expression for the "hydrodynamic" tracer diffusivity that results from the fluid disturbances created by a slender-body model of bacteria by ensemble averaging the mass conservation equation of the tracer over the space of tracer-bacterium interactions which are assumed to be binary. The theory assumes that the orientations of the bacterium before and after a tumble are uncorrelated and the fluid velocity disturbance created by the bacterium is small compared to its swimming speed. The dependence of the non-dimensional hydrodynamic diffusivity widetilde{D_h} obtained by scaling the dimensional hydrodynamic diffusivity by nL3UsL on the persistence in bacterial swimming and the Brownian diffusivity of the tracer are studied in detail through two nondimensional parameters—a Peclet number Pe = UsL/D which is the ratio of the time scale of bacterial swimming to the tracer diffusion time scale and a non-dimensional persistence time τ* = Usτ/L obtained by scaling the dimensional bacterial persistence time by the time that a bacterium takes to swim over a distance equal to its length. Here, n, Us, τ, and L are the concentration, swimming speed, tumbling time, and the overall length of the bacteria, respectively, and D is the Brownian diffusivity of the tracer. widetilde{D_h} is found to be a monotonically increasing function of τ* and a non-monotonic function of Pe with a Pe1/2 scaling in the Pe ≪ 1 limit, an intermediate peak and a constant value in the Pe ≫ 1 limit for the typical case of wild-type bacteria with τ* = O(1). In the simulation study we compute the bacterial contribution to the tracer diffusivity from explicit numerical simulations of binary tracer-bacterium interactions to

  1. Partitioning Gas Tracer Technology for Measuring Water in Landfills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briening, M. L.; Jakubowitch, A.; Imhoff, P. T.; Chiu, P. C.; Tittlebaum, M. E.

    2002-12-01

    Unstable landfills can result in significant environmental contamination and can become a risk to public health. To reduce this risk, water may be added to landfills to ensure that enough moisture exists for biodegradation of organic wastes. In this case risks associated with future breaks in the landfill cap are significantly reduced because organic material is degraded more rapidly. To modify moisture conditions and enhance biodegradation, leachate is typically collected from the bottom of the landfill and then recirculated near the top. It is difficult, though, to know how much leachate to add and where to add it to achieve uniform moisture conditions. This situation is exacerbated by the heterogeneous nature of landfill materials, which is known to cause short circuiting of infiltrating water, a process that has been virtually impossible to measure or model. Accurate methods for measuring the amount of water in landfills would be valuable aids for implementing leachate recirculation systems. Current methods for measuring water are inadequate, though, since they provide point measurements and are frequently affected by heterogeneity of the solid waste composition and solid waste compaction. The value of point measurements is significantly reduced in systems where water flows preferentially, such as in landfills. Here, spatially integrated measurements might be of greater value. In this research we are evaluating a promising technology, the partitioning gas tracer test, to measure the water saturation within landfills, the amount of free water in solid waste divided by the volume of the voids. The partitioning gas tracer test was recently developed by researchers working in the vadose zone. In this methodology two gas tracers are injected into a landfill. One tracer is non-reactive with landfill materials, while the second partitions into and out of free water trapped within the pore space of the solid waste. Chromatographic separation of the tracers occurs

  2. Applied gas tracers for subsurface and surface hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliot, T.; Kalin, R. M.; MacKinnon, P. A.; McNeill, G. W.; Murphy, J. L.

    2003-04-01

    Tracer methods can be broadly taken to be techniques for obtaining information about an environmental and/or engineering system or some part of a system (eg transit times in media, permeability, dispersivity, internal structure, subsurface activities, etc.) by observing the behaviour of a specific substance (natural or anthropogenic) either injected into or inherently added within that system. Recent studies at QUB have focussed on applied tracer methods using dissolved inert gases both as geochemically conservative tracers in groundwater systems (providing structural information, flow-paths, transit times, physical transport properties) and also as non-conservative, bulk partitioning agents to determine re-aeration coefficients (K_2 values) in surface stream systems or for characterising the presence and extent of nonaqueous phases in subsurface groundwater systems (eg NAPLs at contaminated land sites). Noble gas applications as applied tracers particularly are being investigated because of their low natural background levels and high sensitivity of determination (by GC-MS), and lack of any taste, odour, colour and toxicity problems -- these latter properties suggesting a more "environmentally-friendly" type of tracer either to protect potable water (eg public) supplies under investigation or so as not to impact intrinsic reactive processes in the system being traced. Both laboratory column investigations and field studies are presented, emphasising the utility of applied gas tracing for hydrological investigations. Mackinnon, P.A., Elliot, T., Zhao, Y.Q., Murphy, J.L. &Kalin, R.M. (2002) Evaluation of a novel technique for measuring reaeration in rivers. In C.A. Brebbia, P. Zanetti (Eds.) Development and Application of Computer Techniques to Environmental Studies IX. WIT Press, Southampton, UK. pp.531--540. McNeill, G.W., Yang, Y.S., Elliot, T., Kalin, R.M. (2001) Krypton gas as a novel applied tracer of groundwater flow in a fissured sandstone aquifer. In K

  3. A model for underpotential deposition in the presence of anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giménez, M. C.; Ramirez-Pastor, A. J.; Leiva, E. P. M.

    2010-05-01

    A simple model to study the effect of on top coadsorption of anions in underpotential deposition is formulated. It considers a lattice-gas model with pair potential interactions between nearest neighbors. As test system, the electrodeposition of silver on gold is studied by means of grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. The influence of anions on the adsorption isotherms is analyzed. It is found that as the interaction between silver atoms and anions increases, the monolayer adsorbs at more negative chemical potentials. For large interactions between silver atoms and anions, a expanded structure occurs for the silver monolayer.

  4. Inhibition of nuclear waste solutions containing multiple aggressive anions

    SciTech Connect

    Congdon, J.W.

    1988-05-01

    The inhibition of localized corrosion of carbon steel in caustic, high-level radioactive waste solutions was studied using cyclic potentiodynamic polarization scans supplemented by partially immersed coupon tests. The electrochemical tests provided a rapid and accurate means of determining the relationship between the minimum inhibitor requirements and the concentration of the aggressive anions in this system. Nitrate, sulfate, chloride, and fluoride were identified as aggressive anions; however, no synergistic effects were observed between these anions. This observation may have important theoretical implications because it tends to contradict the behavior of aggressive anions as predicted by existing theories for localized corrosion.

  5. Monitoring trace anion contamination in disk drive components.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Edward; Rohrer, Jeff; Campbell, Faye

    2003-05-16

    Ion chromatography was used to determine trace anionic contamination on the surface of hard disk drive components. These contaminants can have a detrimental effect on device reliability and yield. Disk drive components were soaked in deionized water and these extracts were analyzed for anions. The anions fluoride, acetate, formate, acrylate, methacrylate, chloride, nitrite, bromide, nitrate, benzoate, sulfate, oxalate, phthalate and phosphate were separated on a high-performance anion-exchange column and determined at concentrations less than 1 microg/l with suppressed conductivity detection. The extract solutions were analyzed either by injecting 1 ml or by preconcentrating 5 ml. We evaluated the performance of both methods.

  6. Purification Or Organic Acids Using Anion Exchange Chromatography.

    DOEpatents

    Ponnampalam; Elankovan

    2001-09-04

    Disclosed is a cost-effective method for purifying and acidifying carboxylic acids, including organic acids and amino acids. The method involves removing impurities by allowing the anionic form of the carboxylic acid to bind to an anion exchange column and washing the column. The carboxylic anion is displaced as carboxylic acid by washing the resin with a strong inorganic anion. This method is effective in removing organic carboxylic acids and amino acids from a variety of industrial sources, including fermentation broths, hydrolysates, and waste streams.

  7. A new tracer-density criterion for heterogeneous porous media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barth, G.R.; Illangasekare, T.H.; Hill, M.C.; Rajaram, H.

    2001-01-01

    Tracerexperiments provide information about aquifer material properties vital for accurate site characterization. Unfortunately, density-induced sinking can distort tracer movement, leading to an inaccurate assessment of material properties. Yet existing criteria for selecting appropriate tracer concentrations are based on analysis of homogeneous media instead of media with heterogeneities typical of field sites. This work introduces a hydraulic-gradient correction for heterogeneous media and applies it to a criterion previously used to indicate density-induced instabilities in homogeneous media. The modified criterion was tested using a series of two-dimensional heterogeneous intermediate-scale tracer experiments and data from several detailed field tracer tests. The intermediate-scale experimental facility (10.0 ?? 1.2 ?? 0.06 m) included both homogeneous and heterogeneous (??2/In ?? = 1.22) zones. The field tracer tests were less heterogeneous (0.24 < ??2/ln ?? < 0.37), but measurements were sufficient to detect density-induced sinking. Evaluation of the modified criterion using the experiments and field tests demonstrates that the new criterion appears to account for the change in density-induced sinking due to heterogeneity. The criterion demonstrates the importance of accounting for heterogeneity to predict density-induced sinking and differences in the onset of density induced sinking in two-and three-dimensional systems.

  8. Tracer Particle Response in High-Gradient Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, Joshua; Rothamer, David

    2016-11-01

    Many laser-based fluid velocity measurements depend on the motion of tracer particles seeded into the flow. In most cases, the tracers are assumed to follow the flow exactly. However, this is not always the case. The actual motion of a tracer particle is dependent on the properties of both the particle and the fluid surrounding it. Previous analysis for spherical particles in the Stokes regime (assumes Re << 1) shows that the absolute difference between the particle and fluid velocity exponentially decays in time, with the relaxation time constant dependent on particle diameter, free stream velocity, Reynolds number, and both particle and fluid mass density. For all cases, it is necessary to accurately describe the physics of the tracer particle motion to perform rigorous quantitative studies with particle-based techniques. This study aims to measure and describe particle response to a step change in velocity in a uniform flow. Velocity profiles of solid tracer particles ranging from 300 to 3800 nm in diameter, with initial particle Reynolds numbers up to 100, were measured in a shock tube using particle image velocimetry. The goal of this study is to assess velocity relaxation estimates and assumptions for particle-based velocimetry techniques.

  9. Natural organic compounds as tracers for biomass combustion in aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Simoneit, B.R.T. |; Abas, M.R. bin |; Cass, G.R. |; Rogge, W.F. |; Mazurek, M.A.; Standley, L.J.; Hildemann, L.M.

    1995-08-01

    Biomass combustion is an important primary source of carbonaceous particles in the global atmosphere. Although various molecular markers have already been proposed for this process, additional specific organic tracers need to be characterized. The injection of natural product organic tracers to smoke occurs primarily by direct volatilization/steam stripping and by thermal alteration based on combustion temperature. The degree of alteration increases as the burn temperature rises and the moisture content of the fuel decreases. Although the molecular composition of organic matter in smoke particles is highly variable, the molecular structures of the tracers are generally source specific. The homologous compound series and biomarkers present in smoke particles are derived directly from plant wax, gum and resin by volatilization and secondarily from pyrolysis of biopolymers, wax, gum and resin. The complexity of the organic components of smoke aerosol is illustrated with examples from controlled burns of temperate and tropical biomass fuels. Burning of biomass from temperate regions (i.e., conifers) yields characteristic tracers from diterpenoids as well as phenolics and other oxygenated species, which are recognizable in urban airsheds. The major organic components of smoke particles from tropical biomass are straight-chain, aliphatic and oxygenated compounds and triterpenoids. The precursor-to-product approach of organic geochemistry can be applied successfully to provide tracers for studying smoke plume chemistry and dispersion.

  10. Lattice-Boltzmann simulations of microswimmer-tracer interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, Joost; Stenhammar, Joakim

    2017-02-01

    Hydrodynamic interactions in systems composed of self-propelled particles, such as swimming microorganisms and passive tracers, have a significant impact on the tracer dynamics compared to the equivalent "dry" sample. However, such interactions are often difficult to take into account in simulations due to their computational cost. Here, we perform a systematic investigation of swimmer-tracer interaction using an efficient force-counterforce-based lattice-Boltzmann (LB) algorithm [De Graaf et al., J. Chem. Phys. 144, 134106 (2016), 10.1063/1.4944962] in order to validate its ability to capture the relevant low-Reynolds-number physics. We show that the LB algorithm reproduces far-field theoretical results well, both in a system with periodic boundary conditions and in a spherical cavity with no-slip walls, for which we derive expressions here. The force-lattice coupling of the LB algorithm leads to a "smearing out" of the flow field, which strongly perturbs the tracer trajectories at close swimmer-tracer separations, and we analyze how this effect can be accurately captured using a simple renormalized hydrodynamic theory. Finally, we show that care must be taken when using LB algorithms to simulate systems of self-propelled particles, since its finite momentum transport time can lead to significant deviations from theoretical predictions based on Stokes flow. These insights should prove relevant to the future study of large-scale microswimmer suspensions using these methods.

  11. Spectral analysis for evaluation of myocardial tracers for medical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Huesman, Ronald H.; Reutter, Bryan W.; Marshall, Robert C.

    2000-10-11

    Kinetic analysis of dynamic tracer data is performed with the goal of evaluating myocardial radiotracers for cardiac nuclear medicine imaging. Data from experiments utilizing the isolated rabbit heart model are acquired by sampling the venous blood after introduction of a tracer of interest and a reference tracer. We have taken the approach that the kinetics are properly characterized by an impulse response function which describes the difference between the reference molecule (which does not leave the vasculature) and the molecule of interest which is transported across the capillary boundary and is made available to the cell. Using this formalism we can model the appearance of the tracer of interest in the venous output of the heart as a convolution of the appearance of the reference tracer with the impulse response. In this work we parameterize the impulse response function as the sum of a large number of exponential functions whose predetermined decay constants form a spectrum, and each is required only to have a nonnegative coefficient. This approach, called spectral analysis, has the advantage that it allows conventional compartmental analysis without prior knowledge of the number of compartments which the physiology may require or which the data will support.

  12. Lattice-Boltzmann simulations of microswimmer-tracer interactions.

    PubMed

    de Graaf, Joost; Stenhammar, Joakim

    2017-02-01

    Hydrodynamic interactions in systems composed of self-propelled particles, such as swimming microorganisms and passive tracers, have a significant impact on the tracer dynamics compared to the equivalent "dry" sample. However, such interactions are often difficult to take into account in simulations due to their computational cost. Here, we perform a systematic investigation of swimmer-tracer interaction using an efficient force-counterforce-based lattice-Boltzmann (LB) algorithm [De Graaf et al., J. Chem. Phys. 144, 134106 (2016)JCPSA60021-960610.1063/1.4944962] in order to validate its ability to capture the relevant low-Reynolds-number physics. We show that the LB algorithm reproduces far-field theoretical results well, both in a system with periodic boundary conditions and in a spherical cavity with no-slip walls, for which we derive expressions here. The force-lattice coupling of the LB algorithm leads to a "smearing out" of the flow field, which strongly perturbs the tracer trajectories at close swimmer-tracer separations, and we analyze how this effect can be accurately captured using a simple renormalized hydrodynamic theory. Finally, we show that care must be taken when using LB algorithms to simulate systems of self-propelled particles, since its finite momentum transport time can lead to significant deviations from theoretical predictions based on Stokes flow. These insights should prove relevant to the future study of large-scale microswimmer suspensions using these methods.

  13. Chemical tracers of particulate emissions from commercial shipping.

    PubMed

    Viana, Mar; Amato, Fulvio; Alastuey, Andrés; Querol, Xavier; Moreno, Teresa; Dos Santos, Saúl García; Herce, María Dolores; Fernández-Patier, Rosalía

    2009-10-01

    Despite the increase of commercial shipping around the world, data are yet relatively scarce on the contribution of these emissions to ambient air particulates. One of the reasons is the complexity in the detection and estimation of shipping contributions to ambient particulates in harbor and urban environments, given the similarity with tracers of other combustion sources. This study aimed to identify specific tracers of shipping emissions in a Mediterranean city with an important harbor (Melilla, Spain). Results showed that for 24 h PM10 and PM2.5 samples, valid tracers of commercial shipping emissions were ratios of V/Ni = 4-5 and V/EC < 2, whereas V/EC > 8 excluded the influence of shipping emissions. Other ratios (V/ S, La/Ce, Zn/Ni, Pb/Zn, OC/EC) and tracers (Pb, Zn) were also tested but did not correlate with this source. Due to the changing composition of diesel fuels, tracers in the Mediterranean Sea may not be representative in other regions of the world and vice versa. The contribution of shipping emissions to ambient particulate matter (PM) urban background levels was quantified by positive matrix factorization (PMF), resulting in 2% and 4% of mean annual PM10 levels (0.8 microg/m3 primary particles and 1.7 microg/m3 secondary particles, with 20% uncertainty) and 14% of mean annual PM2.5 levels (2.6 microg/m3).

  14. Monodisperse magnetite nanoparticle tracers for in vivo magnetic particle imaging

    PubMed Central

    Khandhar, Amit P; Ferguson, R Matthew; Arami, Hamed; Krishnan, Kannan M

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a new biomedical imaging modality that produces real-time, high-resolution tomographic images of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticle tracer distributions. In this study, we synthesized monodisperse tracers for enhanced MPI performance and investigated both, their blood clearance time using a 25 kHz magnetic particle spectrometer (MPS), and biodistribution using a combination of quantitative T2-weighted MRI and tissue histology. In vitro and in vivo MPI performance of our magnetic nanoparticle tracers (MNTs), subject to biological constraints, were compared to commercially available SPIOs (Resovist). Monodisperse MNTs showed a 2-fold greater signal per unit mass, and 20% better spatial resolution. In vitro evaluation of tracers showed that MPI performance of our MNTs is preserved in blood, serum-rich cell culture medium and gel; thus independent of changes in hydrodynamic volume and fluid viscosity – a critical prerequisite for in vivo MPI. In a rodent model, our MNTs circulated for 15 minutes – 3× longer than Resovist – and supported our in vitro evaluation that MPI signal is preserved in the physiological environment. Furthermore, MRI and histology analysis showed that MNTs distribute in the reticuloendothelial system (RES) in a manner similar to clinically approved SPIO agents. MNTs demonstrating long-circulation times and optimized MPI performance show potential as angiography tracers and blood-pool agents for the emerging MPI imaging modality. PMID:23434348

  15. Quantifying capture efficiency of gas collection wells with gas tracers.

    PubMed

    Yazdani, Ramin; Imhoff, Paul; Han, Byunghyun; Mei, Changen; Augenstein, Don

    2015-09-01

    A new in situ method for directly measuring the gas collection efficiency in the region around a gas extraction well was developed. Thirteen tests were conducted by injecting a small volume of gas tracer sequentially at different locations in the landfill cell, and the gas tracer mass collected from each test was used to assess the collection efficiency at each injection point. For 11 tests the gas collection was excellent, always exceeding 70% with seven tests showing a collection efficiency exceeding 90%. For one test the gas collection efficiency was 8±6%. Here, the poor efficiency was associated with a water-laden refuse or remnant daily cover soil located between the point of tracer injection and the extraction well. The utility of in situ gas tracer tests for quantifying landfill gas capture at particular locations within a landfill cell was demonstrated. While there are certainly limitations to this technology, this method may be a valuable tool to help answer questions related to landfill gas collection efficiency and gas flow within landfills. Quantitative data from tracer tests may help assess the utility and cost-effectiveness of alternative cover systems, well designs and landfill gas collection management practices.

  16. Anion-Channel Blockers Inhibit S-Type Anion Channels and Abscisic Acid Responses in Guard Cells.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, A.; Ilan, N.; Schwarz, M.; Scheaffer, J.; Assmann, S. M.; Schroeder, J. I.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of anion-channel blockers on light-mediated stomatal opening, on the potassium dependence of stomatal opening, on stomatal responses to abscisic acid (ABA), and on current through slow anion channels in the plasma membrane of guard cells were investigated. The anion-channel blockers anthracene-9-carboxylic acid (9-AC) and niflumic acid blocked current through slow anion channels of Vicia faba L. guard cells. Both 9-AC and niflumic acid reversed ABA inhibition of stomatal opening in V. faba L. and Commelina communis L. The anion-channel blocker probenecid also abolished ABA inhibition of stomatal opening in both species. Additional tests of 9-AC effects on stomatal aperture in Commelina revealed that application of this anion-channel blocker allowed wide stomatal opening under low (1 mM) KCI conditions and increased the rate of stomatal opening under both low and high (100 mM) KCI conditions. These results indicate that anion channels can function as a negative regulator of stomatal opening, presumably by allowing anion efflux and depolarization, which prohibits ion up-take in guard cells. Furthermore, 9-AC prevented ABA induction of stomatal closure. A model in which ABA activation of anion channels contributes a rate-limiting mechanism during ABA-induced stomatal closure and inhibition of stomatal opening is discussed. PMID:12228619

  17. Anion-Channel Blockers Inhibit S-Type Anion Channels and Abscisic Acid Responses in Guard Cells.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, A.; Ilan, N.; Schwarz, M.; Scheaffer, J.; Assmann, S. M.; Schroeder, J. I.

    1995-10-01

    The effects of anion-channel blockers on light-mediated stomatal opening, on the potassium dependence of stomatal opening, on stomatal responses to abscisic acid (ABA), and on current through slow anion channels in the plasma membrane of guard cells were investigated. The anion-channel blockers anthracene-9-carboxylic acid (9-AC) and niflumic acid blocked current through slow anion channels of Vicia faba L. guard cells. Both 9-AC and niflumic acid reversed ABA inhibition of stomatal opening in V. faba L. and Commelina communis L. The anion-channel blocker probenecid also abolished ABA inhibition of stomatal opening in both species. Additional tests of 9-AC effects on stomatal aperture in Commelina revealed that application of this anion-channel blocker allowed wide stomatal opening under low (1 mM) KCI conditions and increased the rate of stomatal opening under both low and high (100 mM) KCI conditions. These results indicate that anion channels can function as a negative regulator of stomatal opening, presumably by allowing anion efflux and depolarization, which prohibits ion up-take in guard cells. Furthermore, 9-AC prevented ABA induction of stomatal closure. A model in which ABA activation of anion channels contributes a rate-limiting mechanism during ABA-induced stomatal closure and inhibition of stomatal opening is discussed.

  18. Orbits and radial migration of galactic tracers using Gaia+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Gómez, M.; Figueras, F.; Miret-Roig, N.; Roca-Fàbrega, S.; Antoja, T.

    2017-03-01

    It will be in the forthcoming years that a large set of stars with full 6D phase space information will be available. In this contribution, we focus on the study of the radial migration stellar kinematic tracers may suffer. By assuming a potential for the Milky Way, we analyze the capabilities of Gaia and future spectroscopic data to trace back in time the orbital evolution of both, Red Clump stars, excellent tracers of large scale disc structure, and the members of the Young Local Associations, nearby stars with accurate astrometry in the upcoming TGAS catalog. By considering different mechanisms causing radial migration, namely the bar and/or the spiral arms, we study future capabilities to ascertain a single origin to these tracers.

  19. Do CH-Anion and Anion-π Interactions Alter the Mechanism of 2:1 Host-Guest Complexation in Arylethynyl Monourea Anion Receptors?

    PubMed

    Eytel, Lisa M; Gilbert, Annie K; Görner, Paul; Zakharov, Lev N; Johnson, Darren W; Haley, Michael M

    2017-03-23

    Selective tuning of arylethynyl urea scaffolds for anionic guests requires an understanding of preferred binding motifs of the host-guest interaction. To investigate the binding preference of receptors without a pre-organized binding pocket, two electron-deficient phenylacetylene receptors with a single urea moiety have been prepared and were found to bind halides as 2:1 host-guest complexes that feature key CH-anion or anion-π interactions. These supporting interactions also appear to influence the mechanism of the 2:1 binding event.

  20. Identification and characterization of conservative organic tracers for use as hydrologic tracers for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Study; Progress report, July 1, 1991--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Dombrowski, T.; Stetzenbach, K.

    1991-12-31

    Studies continued on organic tracers for use as hydrologic tracers as part of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization project. Tracers studied include benzoic acids, cinnamic acids, and salicylic acids. The main focus of the work performed during the time period from 07/01/91 to 12/31/91 has been the continuation of (1) LC-MS optimization for tracer identification, (2) batch sorption and degradation studies, (3) neoprene tubing evaluation studies, and (4) soil column evaluation of tracer compounds. All of these areas of research (except perhaps the neoprene tubing evaluation) are ongoing and will continue throughout the coming year.

  1. Diffusion of ionic tracers in the Callovo-Oxfordian clay-rock using the Donnan equilibrium model and the formation factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jougnot, D.; Revil, A.; Leroy, P.

    2009-05-01

    The transient diffusion of cationic and anionic tracers through clay-rocks is usually modeled with parameters like porosity, tortuosity (and/or constrictivity), sorption coefficients, and anionic exclusion. Recently, a new pore scale model has been developed by Revil and Linde [Revil A. and Linde N. (2006) Chemico-electromechanical coupling in microporous media. J. Colloid Interface Sci.302, 682-694]. This model is based on a volume-averaging approach of the Nernst-Planck equation. The influence of the electrical diffuse layer is accounted for by a generalized Donnan equilibrium model through the whole connected pore space that is valid for a multicomponent electrolyte. This new model can be used to determine the composition of the pore water of the Callovo-Oxfordian clay-rock, the osmotic efficiency of bentonite as a function of salinity, the osmotic pressure, and the streaming potential coupling coefficient of clay-rocks. This pore scale model is used here to model the transient diffusion of ionic tracers ( 22Na +, 36Cl -, and 35SO42-) through the Callovo-Oxfordian clay-rock. Speciation of SO42- shows that ˜1/3 of the SO 4 is tied-up in different complexes. Some of these complexes are neutral and are therefore only influence by the tortuosity of the pore space. Using experimental data from the literature, we show that all the parameters required to model the flux of ionic tracers (especially the mean electrical potential of the pore space and the formation factor) are in agreement with independent evaluations of these parameters using the osmotic pressure determined from in situ pressure measurements and HTO diffusion experiments.

  2. Once upon anion: a tale of photodetachment.

    PubMed

    Lineberger, W Carl

    2013-01-01

    This contribution is very much a personal history of a journey through the wonderful world of anion chemistry, and a tale of how advances in laser technologies, theoretical methods, and computational capabilities continuously enabled advances in our understanding. It is a story of the excitement and joy that come from the opportunity to add to the fabric of science, and to do so by working as a group of excited explorers with common goals. The participants in this journey include me, my students and postdoctoral associates, my collaborators, and our many generous colleagues. It all happened, in the words of the Beatles, "with a little help from my friends." Actually, it was so much more than a little help!

  3. Once upon Anion: A Tale of Photodetachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lineberger, W. Carl

    2013-04-01

    This contribution is very much a personal history of a journey through the wonderful world of anion chemistry, and a tale of how advances in laser technologies, theoretical methods, and computational capabilities continuously enabled advances in our understanding. It is a story of the excitement and joy that come from the opportunity to add to the fabric of science, and to do so by working as a group of excited explorers with common goals. The participants in this journey include me, my students and postdoctoral associates, my collaborators, and our many generous colleagues. It all happened, in the words of the Beatles, “with a little help from my friends.” Actually, it was so much more than a little help!

  4. Structural evolution of small ruthenium cluster anions

    SciTech Connect

    Waldt, Eugen; Hehn, Anna-Sophia; Ahlrichs, Reinhart; Kappes, Manfred M.; Schooss, Detlef

    2015-01-14

    The structures of ruthenium cluster anions have been investigated using a combination of trapped ion electron diffraction and density functional theory computations in the size range from eight to twenty atoms. In this size range, three different structural motifs are found: Ru{sub 8}{sup −}–Ru{sub 12}{sup −} have simple cubic structures, Ru{sub 13}{sup −}–Ru{sub 16}{sup −} form double layered hexagonal structures, and larger clusters form close packed motifs. For Ru{sub 17}{sup −}, we find hexagonal close packed stacking, whereas octahedral structures occur for Ru{sub 18}{sup −}–Ru{sub 20}{sup −}. Our calculations also predict simple cubic structures for the smaller clusters Ru{sub 4}{sup −}–Ru{sub 7}{sup −}, which were not accessible to electron diffraction measurements.

  5. Anion channelrhodopsins for inhibitory cardiac optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Govorunova, Elena G.; Cunha, Shane R.; Sineshchekov, Oleg A.; Spudich, John L.

    2016-01-01

    Optical control of the heart muscle is a promising strategy for cardiology because it is more specific than traditional electrical stimulation, and allows a higher temporal resolution than pharmacological interventions. Anion channelrhodopsins (ACRs) from cryptophyte algae expressed in cultured neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes produced inhibitory currents at less than one-thousandth of the light intensity required by previously available optogenetic tools, such as the proton pump archaerhodopsin-3 (Arch). Because of their greater photocurrents, ACRs permitted complete inhibition of cardiomyocyte electrical activity under conditions in which Arch was inefficient. Most importantly, ACR expression allowed precisely controlled shortening of the action potential duration by switching on the light during its repolarization phase, which was not possible with previously used optogenetic tools. Optical shortening of cardiac action potentials may benefit pathophysiology research and the development of optogenetic treatments for cardiac disorders such as the long QT syndrome. PMID:27628215

  6. Collisional decoherence of a tracer particle moving in one dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Kamleitner, Ingo

    2010-11-15

    We study decoherence of the external degree of freedom of a tracer particle moving in a one-dimensional dilute Boltzmann gas. We find that phase averaging is the dominant decoherence effect, rather than information exchange between tracer and gas particles. While a coherent superposition of two wave packets with different mean positions quickly turns into a mixed state, it is demonstrated that such superpositions of different momenta are robust to phase averaging, until the two wave packets acquire a different position due to the different velocity of each wave packet.

  7. Tracer Cycles and Water Ages in Heterogeneous Catchments and Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, J. W.; Jasechko, S.

    2015-12-01

    Estimates of catchment mean transit times are often based on seasonal cycles of stable isotope tracers in precipitation and streamflow. In many cases these transit time estimates are derived directly from sine-wave fitting to the observed seasonal isotope cycles. Broadly similar results are also obtained from time-domain convolutions or explicit tracer modeling, because here too the dominant tracer signal that these techniques seek to match is the seasonal isotopic cycle. Here I use simple benchmark tests to show that estimates of mean transit times based on seasonal tracer cycles will typically be wrong by several hundred percent, when applied to catchments with realistic degrees of spatial heterogeneity. This aggregation bias arises from the strong nonlinearity in the relationship between tracer cycle amplitude and mean travel time. A similar bias arises in estimates of mean transit times in nonstationary catchments. Since typical real-world catchments are both spatially heterogeneous and nonstationary, this analysis poses a fundamental challenge to tracer-based estimates of mean transit times. I propose an alternative storage metric, the fraction of "young water" in streamflow, defined as the fraction of runoff with transit times of less than roughly 0.2 years. I show that young water fractions are virtually free of aggregation bias; that is, they can be accurately estimated from tracer cycles in highly heterogeneous mixtures of subcatchments with strongly contrasting transit time distributions. They can also be reliably estimated in strongly nonstationary catchments. Young water fractions can be estimated separately for individual flow regimes, allowing direct determination of how shifts in hydraulic regime alter the fraction of water reaching the stream by fast flowpaths. One can also estimate the chemical composition of idealized "young water" and "old water" end-members, using relationships between young water fractions and solute concentrations across

  8. Interpreting Multiple Environmental Tracer Data in a Perialpine Catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onnis, G. A.; Althaus, R.; Klump, S.; Purtschert, R.; Kipfer, R.; Hendricks-Franssen, H.; Stauffer, F.; Kinzelbach, W.

    2008-12-01

    A case study for the environmental tracers Tritium, Helium-3 and Krypton-85 in a small sand-gravel aquifer catchment in Northern Switzerland is presented. The groundwater flow is determined by means of Stochastic Inverse Modelling, using available transient hydraulic head and transmissivity (T) data to calibrate the transmissivity field with the Sequential Self-Calibration Technique as implemented in the code INVERTO. The evaluation of the aquifer recharge and its discharge via natural springs is independently performed and confirmed through comparison of simulated and observed head after the inversion procedure. A number of equally-likely transmissivity field realizations honoring both transmissivity and transient head measurements is generated, establishing the basis for environmental tracer transport modeling. The impact of the spatially-variable, thick unsaturated zone (>10 m) on tracer transport is accounted for by means of a numerical solution to the vertical advection-dispersion equation. Starting from the measured tracer concentrations in the atmosphere, the input history to the saturated zone is reconstructed for different groundwater table depths. Environmental tracer transport in the saturated zone is investigated for each calibrated T -realization. The transport simulation results are in general fair for all tracers and can well reproduce the tracer data at most observation locations, with a small uncertainty bandwidth related to the T -parameter. Ad-hoc zonation of transport parameters (vadose zone gas-phase tortuosity and saturated porosity) can help in achieving a simultaneous match of the tracer data at all locations. However, the model can account for only 20% of the amplitude of the high-frequency oscillations in Krypton-85 concentrations observed at one pumping station. Short term variations of the recharge rate and of the actual pumping rate can account for a further 10% each to the Krypton-85 concentration fluctuations amplitudes. The origin of

  9. Use of dye tracers to collect hydrologic data in Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, D.D.; Sanderson, R.B.

    1968-01-01

    Dye tracers have been used in Oregon in the Collection of hydrologic data on 2,350 miles of stream channels in the Long Tom, Umpqua, Willmette, and John Day River basins, and in the Carmen‐Smith power tunnel. These investigations demonstrated the usefulness, of dye tracers for determining: (1) estimates of traveltimes and travel rates of water, (2) discharge where standard methods of measuring are not applicable, and (3) dispersion characteristics of streams. Illustrations are used to present the results of time‐of‐travel studies in simple, concise, and readily interpreted form. 

  10. Radioactive γ/β tracer to explore dangerous technogenic phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagorsky, P. M.; Yakovleva, V. S.; Makarov, E. O.; Firstov, P. P.; Kondratyeva, A. G.; Stepanenko, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    A radioactive γ/β tracer to explore dangerous technogenic phenomena has been proposed: the ratio of the measured flux density of β- and γ-radiations in the surface layer of the atmosphere. The time dependence analysis of the ratio of β- and γ-pulse count rate has been carried out. A significant increase of the γ/β ratio was recorded under the cyclone passing through Japan (Fukushima) to Kamchatka. The proposed γ/β tracer can be a very sensitive indicator of nonstationary processes related to hazardous natural and technogenic phenomena.

  11. Development of luminescent bacteria as tracers for geological reservoir characterization

    SciTech Connect

    King, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    This research project resulted from recognizing the problem of being unable to accurately distinguish communication between wells in producing oil zones which may or may not be continuous. Such a determination is necessary when considering Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) whether it is water flooding, carbon dioxide, or other methods which increase the sweep efficiency. Various kinds of chemical tracers are available, but they are expensive and many might be considered hazardous for underground aquifers. Other biological tracers are available, but have never been developed for oil reservoir conditions. Bioluminescent bacteria seemed an obvious candidate because they thrive in saline waters (usually 3% salt) which have been contaminated by oil spills.

  12. Experiments to Evaluate and Implement Passive Tracer Gas Methods to Measure Ventilation Rates in Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Lunden, Melissa; Faulkner, David; Heredia, Elizabeth; Cohn, Sebastian; Dickerhoff, Darryl; Noris, Federico; Logue, Jennifer; Hotchi, Toshifumi; Singer, Brett; Sherman, Max H.

    2012-10-01

    This report documents experiments performed in three homes to assess the methodology used to determine air exchange rates using passive tracer techniques. The experiments used four different tracer gases emitted simultaneously but implemented with different spatial coverage in the home. Two different tracer gas sampling methods were used. The results characterize the factors of the execution and analysis of the passive tracer technique that affect the uncertainty in the calculated air exchange rates. These factors include uncertainties in tracer gas emission rates, differences in measured concentrations for different tracer gases, temporal and spatial variability of the concentrations, the comparison between different gas sampling methods, and the effect of different ventilation conditions.

  13. Study of stability zone influences and tracer patterns from the 1987 ANATEX (Across North America Tracer Experiment) experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Porch, W.M.; Gifford, F.A.; Hoard, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper, we will show preliminary results which appear to connect much of the hit and miss behavior of the surface tracer samples to large scale stability zones 100 to 1000 km wide. With these wintertime stability effects in mind, we have done the best we can to characterize the observed overall tracer patterns as well as individual tracer releases. This type of survey information is important to numerical model development. Diagnostic models often have difficulty reproducing surface plume concentrations where transport over stable layers have occurred. Prognostic models can, in theory, model effects of strong stable layers. However, these models would have great difficulty predicting large scale stable regions such as those observed during ANATEX. Also, though these models have ways of budging in synoptic wind fields, temperature observations are presently ignored. This is because if both wind and temperature observations are forced too strongly into the model, conflicting results may be produced. 12 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Anion-promoted cation motion and conduction in zeolites.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Edgar; Bell, Robert G; Wilmer, Dirk; Koller, Hubert

    2006-01-18

    The motion of sodium cations in sodalite and cancrinite has been investigated by force field calculations, solid-state NMR, and impedance spectroscopy. Special emphasis is dedicated to the influence of anions on sodium mobilities. Local cation motion is promoted when they interact with anions. However, not all systems with high local mobilities exhibit good ion conductivities, as cooperativity of the motion appears to be an important factor, as well. The activation barrier for local sodium motion (calculations) and long-range transport (dc conductivities) is lowered in sodalite when halogenide anions, Cl(-), Br(-), or I(-), are present. The activation barriers increase with increasing size of the anion and decreasing coordination in the transition state. On the basis of (23)Na solid-state NMR data, all the sodium ions in the dense sodalite structure are rather rigid up to 470 K. All the cations in chromate sodalite, and Na(+) in the small cancrinite epsilon-cages without anion interactions, show a restricted local motion at higher temperatures. There is a selective high local motion of Na(+) in the neighborhood of chromate anions in the more open channel system of cancrinite. These results suggest that sodium migration can be enhanced, at least locally, in open channel systems by anion interactions. A dynamics coupling between anion reorientation and cation mobility was not observed.

  15. Trifluoromethylsulfonyl derivatives of benzofuroxane and their anionic sigma-complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Yagupol'skii, L.M.; Gogoman, I.V.; Shchupak, G.M.; Boiko, V.N.

    1986-09-10

    Syntheses are reported for 4-nitro-6-trifluoromethylsulfonyl- and 4,6-bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)benzofuroxanes and their anionic sigma-complexes with hydroxide and methylate anions. In contrast to its 4,6-dinitro analog, 4,6-bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)benzofuroxane forms stable sigma-complexes with sodium acetate and sodium azide and has higher acidity by an order of magnitude.

  16. 8. VIEW OF GLOVE BOXES USED IN THE ANION EXCHANGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF GLOVE BOXES USED IN THE ANION EXCHANGE PROCESS. THE ANION EXCHANGE PROCESS PURIFIED AND CONCENTRATED PLUTONIUM-BEARING NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS TO MAKE THEM ACCEPTABLE AS FEED FOR CONVERSION TO METAL. (6/20/60) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Recovery & Fabrication Facility, North-central section of plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  17. Extraction of monoclonal antibodies (IgG1) using anionic and anionic/nonionic reverse micelles.

    PubMed

    George, Daliya A; Stuckey, David C

    2010-01-01

    Purification schemes for antibody production based on affinity chromatography are trying to keep pace with increases in cell culture expression levels and many current research initiatives are focused on finding alternatives to chromatography for the purification of Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). In this article, we have investigated an alternative separation technique based on liquid-liquid extraction called the reverse micellar extraction. We extracted MAb (IgG1) using reverse micelles of an anionic surfactant, sodium bis 2-ethyl-hexyl sulfosuccinate (AOT) and a combination of anionic (AOT) and nonionic surfactants (Brij-30, Tween-85, Span-85) using isooctane as the solvent system. The extraction efficiency of IgG1 was studied by varying parameters, such as pH of the aqueous phase, cation concentration, and type and surfactant concentration. Using the AOT/Isooctane reverse micellar system, we could achieve good overall extraction of IgG1 (between 80 and 90%), but only 30% of the bioactivity of IgG1 could be recovered at the end of the extraction by using its binding to affinity chromatography columns as a surrogate measure of activity. As anionic surfactants were suspected as being one of the reasons for the reduced activity, we decided to combine a nonionic surfactant with an anionic surfactant and then study its effect on the extraction efficiency and bioactivity. The best results were obtained using an AOT/Brij-30/Isooctane reverse micellar system, which gave an overall extraction above 90 and 59% overall activity recovery. An AOT/Tween-85/Isooctane reverse micellar system gave an overall extraction of between 75 and 80% and overall activity recovery of around 40-45%. The results showed that the activity recovery of IgG1 can be significantly enhanced using different surfactant combination systems, and if the recovery of IgG1 can be further enhanced, the technique shows considerable promise for the downstream purification of MAbs.

  18. Supramolecular Chemistry of Selective Anion Recognition for Anions of Environmental Relevance

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, Bruce a.; Bostick, Debra A.; Fowler, Christopher J.; Kang, Hyun-Ah; Ruas, Alexandre; Delmau, Laetitia H.; Haverlock, Tamara J.; Llinares, Jose M.; Hossain, Alamgir; Kang, S. O.; Bowman-James, Kristin; Shriver, James A.; Marquez, Manuel; Sessler, Jonathan L.

    2005-09-22

    The major thrust of this project led by the University of Kansas (Prof. Kristin Bowman-Jones) entails the exploration of the principles of recognition and separation of sulfate by the design, synthesis, and testing of novel sulfate extractants. A key science need for the cleanup of tank wastes at Hanford has been identified in developing methods to separate those bulk waste components that have low solubilities in borosilicate glass. Sulfate has been identified as a particularly difficult and expensive problem in that its concentration in the waste is relatively high, its solubility in glass is especially low, and it interferes with the performance of both vitrification equipment and the glass waste form. The new extractants will be synthesized by the University of Kansas and the University of Texas, Austin. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is subjecting the new extractants to experiments that will determine their properties and effectiveness in separating sulfate from the major competing anions in the waste, especially nitrate. Such experiments will entail primarily liquid-liquid extraction. Current efforts focus on exciting new systems in which the anion receptors act as synergists for anion exchange.

  19. Superoxide anion production by human neutrophils activated by Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyun-Ouk; Ryu, Jae-Sook

    2013-08-01

    Neutrophils are the predominant inflammatory cells found in vaginal discharges of patients infected with Trichomonas vaginalis. In this study, we examined superoxide anion (O2 (.-)) production by neutrophils activated by T. vaginalis. Human neutrophils produced superoxide anions when stimulated with either a lysate of T. vaginalis, its membrane component (MC), or excretory-secretory product (ESP). To assess the role of trichomonad protease in production of superoxide anions by neutrophils, T. vaginalis lysate, ESP, and MC were each pretreated with a protease inhibitor cocktail before incubation with neutrophils. Superoxide anion production was significantly decreased by this treatment. Trichomonad growth was inhibited by preincubation with supernatants of neutrophils incubated for 3 hr with T. vaginalis lysate. Furthermore, myeloperoxidase (MPO) production by neutrophils was stimulated by live trichomonads. These results indicate that the production of superoxide anions and MPO by neutrophils stimulated with T. vaginalis may be a part of defense mechanisms of neutrophils in trichomoniasis.

  20. An ab initio study on anionic aerogen bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esrafili, Mehdi D.; Mohammadian-Sabet, Fariba

    2017-01-01

    An ab initio study is carried out to investigate the anionic aerogen bonds in complexes of KrO3, XeO3 and XeOF2 with F-, Cl-, Br-, CN-, NC-, N3-, SH-, SCN-, NCS-, OH- and OCH3- anions. All of the anionic aerogen bonds analyzed here have a partial covalent character. Charge transfer from the anion to the Kr-O or Xe-O σ∗ orbital stabilizes these complexes and leads to a sizable redshift in the corresponding stretching frequencies. The J(Kr-O) or J(Xe-O) spin-spin coupling constants can be regarded as a useful tool for the characterization of strength of the anionic aerogen-bonded complexes.

  1. Enhanced anion binding by heteroatom replacement in bambusurils.

    PubMed

    Solel, Ephrath; Singh, Mandeep; Reany, Ofer; Keinan, Ehud

    2016-05-11

    This study was driven by the hypothesis that heteroatom replacement in bambusurils could significantly modify their anion binding properties. Indeed, calculations with various glycoluril and bambusuril analogs predict that such replacements significantly alter their molecular electrostatic potential and binding properties. Both polarization and electrostatic interactions contribute to anion binding, leading to a general trend of affinity among the neutral molecules: X = S > O > NH. In bambusurils the heteroatom replacement at the portal carbonyls affect the induced dipole more significantly than replacements at the equatorial carbonyls. The stronger polarization and stronger anion binding manifest the increased aptitude of the portal heteroatoms as electron sinks. Notably, this study predicts that protonated aza-bambusurils would not only bind multiple anions along their main axis, but could also function as synthetic anion channels.

  2. Fe electron transfer and atom exchange in goethite: influence of Al-substitution and anion sorption.

    PubMed

    Latta, Drew E; Bachman, Jonathan E; Scherer, Michelle M

    2012-10-02

    The reaction of Fe(II) with Fe(III) oxides and hydroxides is complex and includes sorption of Fe(II) to the oxide, electron transfer between sorbed Fe(II) and structural Fe(III), reductive dissolution coupled to Fe atom exchange, and, in some cases mineral phase transformation. Much of the work investigating electron transfer and atom exchange between aqueous Fe(II) and Fe(III) oxides has been done under relatively simple aqueous conditions in organic buffers to control pH and background electrolytes to control ionic strength. Here, we investigate whether electron transfer is influenced by cation substitution of Al(III) in goethite and the presence of anions such as phosphate, carbonate, silicate, and natural organic matter. Results from (57)Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy indicate that both Al-substitution (up to 9%) and the presence of common anions (PO(4)(3-), CO(3)(2-), SiO(4)(4-), and humic acid) does not inhibit electron transfer between aqueous Fe(II) and Fe(III) in goethite under the conditions we studied. In contrast, sorption of a long-chain phospholipid completely shuts down electron transfer. Using an enriched isotope tracer method, we found that Al-substitution in goethite (10%), does, however, significantly decrease the extent of atom exchange between Fe(II) and goethite (from 43 to 12%) over a month's time. Phosphate, somewhat surprisingly, appears to have little effect on the rate and extent of atom exchange between aqueous Fe(II) and goethite. Our results show that electron transfer between aqueous Fe(II) and solid Fe(III) in goethite can occur under wide range of geochemical conditions, but that the extent of redox-driven Fe atom exchange may be dependent on the presence of substituting cations such as Al.

  3. Selectivity control in synergistic liquid-liquid anion exchange of univalent anions via structure-specific cooperativity between quaternary ammonium cations and anion receptors.

    PubMed

    Borman, Christopher J; Bonnesen, Peter V; Moyer, Bruce A

    2012-10-02

    Two anion receptors enhance liquid-liquid anion exchange when added to quaternary alkylammonium chloride anion exchangers, but with a striking dependence on the structure of the alkylammonium cation that suggests a supramolecular cooperative effect. Two anion receptors were investigated, meso-octamethylcalix[4]pyrrole (C4P) and the bisthiourea tweezer 1,1'-(propane-1,3-diyl)bis(3-(4-sec-butylphenyl)thiourea (BTU). Whereas synergism is comparatively weak when either methyltri(C(8,10))alkylammonium chloride (Aliquat 336) or tetraheptylammonium chloride is used with the BTU receptor, synergism between C4P and Aliquat 336 is so pronounced that anion exchange prefers chloride over more extractable nitrate and trifluoroacetate, effectively overcoming the ubiquitous Hofmeister bias. A thermochemical analysis of synergistic anion exchange has been provided for the first time, resulting in the estimation of binding constants for C4P with the ion pairs of A336(+) with Cl(-), Br(-), OAc(F3)(-), NO(3)(-), and I(-).

  4. Effect of the synergistic anion on electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of iron-transferrin anion complexes is consistent with bidentate binding of the anion.

    PubMed Central

    Dubach, J; Gaffney, B J; More, K; Eaton, G R; Eaton, S S

    1991-01-01

    Continuous wave (cw) X-band EPR spectra at approximately 90 K were obtained for iron-transferrin-anion complexes with 18 anions. Each anion had a carboxylate group and at least one other polar moiety. As the second polar group was varied from hydroxyl to carbonyl to amine to carboxylate, the EPR spectra changed from a dominant signal at g' approximately 4.3 with a second smaller peak at g' approximately 9 to a broad signal with intensity between g' approximately 5 and 7. Computer simulation indicated that the changes in the EPR spectra were due to changes in the zero field splitting parameter ratio, E/D, from approximately 1/3 for carbonate anion to approximately 0.04 for malonate anion. Observation of iron-13C coupling in the electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) for iron transferrin [1-13C]pyruvate indicated that the carboxylate group was bound to the iron. It is proposed that all of the anions behave as bidentate ligands, with coordination to the iron through both the carboxylate and proximal groups, and the carboxyl group serves as a bridge between the iron and a positively charged group on the protein. PMID:1651123

  5. Microfluidics: a groundbreaking technology for PET tracer production?

    PubMed

    Rensch, Christian; Jackson, Alexander; Lindner, Simon; Salvamoser, Ruben; Samper, Victor; Riese, Stefan; Bartenstein, Peter; Wängler, Carmen; Wängler, Björn

    2013-07-05

    Application of microfluidics to Positron Emission Tomography (PET) tracer synthesis has attracted increasing interest within the last decade. The technical advantages of microfluidics, in particular the high surface to volume ratio and resulting fast thermal heating and cooling rates of reagents can lead to reduced reaction times, increased synthesis yields and reduced by-products. In addition automated reaction optimization, reduced consumption of expensive reagents and a path towards a reduced system footprint have been successfully demonstrated. The processing of radioactivity levels required for routine production, use of microfluidic-produced PET tracer doses in preclinical and clinical imaging as well as feasibility studies on autoradiolytic decomposition have all given promising results. However, the number of microfluidic synthesizers utilized for commercial routine production of PET tracers is very limited. This study reviews the state of the art in microfluidic PET tracer synthesis, highlighting critical design aspects, strengths, weaknesses and presenting several characteristics of the diverse PET market space which are thought to have a significant impact on research, development and engineering of microfluidic devices in this field. Furthermore, the topics of batch- and single-dose production, cyclotron to quality control integration as well as centralized versus de-centralized market distribution models are addressed.

  6. A Tracer Study of Lebanese Upper Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vlaardingerbroek, Barend; Dallal, Kamel; Rizkallah, George; Rabah, Jihan

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents data arising from a tracer study of 90 terminating Beirut upper secondary school students. Nearly all the students intended to transit to university, about half of them to science and technology programmes, and subsequently did so. Median anticipated earnings upon graduation were realistic, but a lack of information or guidance…

  7. Studies of thunderstorm transport processes with aircraft using tracer techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Detwiler, A.G.; Smith, P.L.; Stith, J.L.

    1996-10-01

    Instrumented aircraft can provide in situ measurements of winds and turbulence useful for studying transport and dispersion in clouds. Using inert artificial gases as tracers, and fast response analyzers on aircraft, time-resolved observations of transport and dispersion have been obtained. Examples are shown of these types of observations in and around cumulus and cumulonimbus clouds. 23 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Bridging the gaps in 18F PET tracer development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Michael G.; Mercier, Joel; Genicot, Christophe; Gouverneur, Véronique; Hooker, Jacob M.; Ritter, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    As compared to the drug discovery process, the development of new 18F PET tracers lacks a well-established pipeline that advances compounds from academic research to candidacy for (pre)clinical imaging. In order to bridge the gaps between methodological advances and clinical success, we must rethink the development process from training to implementation.

  9. TRACER DISPERSION STUDIES FOR HYDRAULIC CHARACTERIZATION OF PIPES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of experiments were conducted at the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Test & Evaluation (T&E) Facility in Cincinnati, Ohio, to quantify longitudinal dispersion of a sodium fluoride tracer in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe and ductile iron pipe under laminar, tr...

  10. Noninvasive Imaging of Tracer Experiments in a Soil Column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelinkova, V.; Pohlmeier, A.; van Dusschoten, D.; Vereecken, H.; Cislerova, M.

    2008-12-01

    A set of tracer-infiltration experiments on soil columns by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed. Computed tomography (CT) was applied in order to map the spatial distribution of porous media, namely the local densities and porosities, and their variation within the soil sample under test. The CT visualisation was done in order to trace disturbances in the structure as a possible source of preferential flow. By means of MRI the flow paths during the infiltration experiment were visualized using a tracer pulse containing Ni(NO3)2 in a concentration of 0.05 mol/litre. The pulse was added under hydraulic steady state conditions. The tracer motion was monitored through its effect on the signal relaxation of 1H using a 7 Tesla vertical magnet system equipped with a 40 mm RF probe. The boundary condition at the top of the soil columns was maintained using a dripping system connected to a HPLC pump with flow rate set to 0.5 ml/min. Free outflow was used as the bottom boundary condition. The vertical component of the local velocity value was calculated after the experiment. Small disturbances in the tracer front observed during the break-through could be related to the preferential flow phenomena in combination with the air bubble entrapment. This research has been supported by research project SP/2e7/229/07 and DBU - Deutsche Bundesstiftung Umwelt.

  11. Granulation of Pyrotechnic Tracer Composition R284T

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-01

    Properties of Materials used in Pyrotechnic Compositions (1963). Engineering Design Handbook - Military Pyrotechnic Series Part 3. AMPC 706-187. 4...Ml Cartridge AMPC 706-185 APPLICATION: Main Tracer Charge TM9-1910 Ellern STORAGE: NATO DoD McIntyre Hazards Class (Q/D 1.1 7 Cabbaje & Ewing

  12. Tracer Studies In A Laboratory Beach Subjected To Waves

    EPA Science Inventory

    This work investigated the washout of dissolved nutrients from beaches due to waves by conducting tracer studies in a laboratory beach facility. The effects of waves were studied in the case where the beach was subjected to the tide, and that in which no tidal action was present...

  13. 45. BUILDING NO. 462, CHEMISTRY LAB (FORMERLY TRACER LOADING BUILDING), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. BUILDING NO. 462, CHEMISTRY LAB (FORMERLY TRACER LOADING BUILDING), VIEW LOOKING SOUTHEAST AT WEST SIDE. BUILDING NO. 462-B, GENERAL PURPOSE MAGAZINE, AT LEFT. - Picatinny Arsenal, 400 Area, Gun Bag Loading District, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  14. Correlative microscopy of densely labeled projection neurons using neural tracers.

    PubMed

    Oberti, Daniele; Kirschmann, Moritz A; Hahnloser, Richard H R

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional morphological information about neural microcircuits is of high interest in neuroscience, but acquiring this information remains challenging. A promising new correlative technique for brain imaging is array tomography (Micheva and Smith, 2007), in which series of ultrathin brain sections are treated with fluorescent antibodies against neurotransmitters and synaptic proteins. Treated sections are repeatedly imaged in the fluorescence light microscope (FLM) and then in the electron microscope (EM). We explore a similar correlative imaging technique in which we differentially label distinct populations of projection neurons, the key routers of electrical signals in the brain. In songbirds, projection neurons can easily be labeled using neural tracers, because the vocal control areas are segregated into separate nuclei. We inject tracers into areas afferent and efferent to the main premotor area for vocal production, HVC, to retrogradely and anterogradely label different classes of projection neurons. We optimize tissue preparation protocols to achieve high fluorescence contrast in the FLM and good ultrastructure in the EM (using osmium tetroxide). Although tracer fluorescence is lost during EM preparation, we localize the tracer molecules after fixation and embedding by using fluorescent antibodies against them. We detect signals mainly in somata and dendrites, allowing us to classify synapses within a single ultrathin section as belonging to a particular type of projection neuron. The use of our method will be to provide statistical information about connectivity among different neuron classes, and to elucidate how signals in the brain are processed and routed among different areas.

  15. Unit vent airflow measurements using a tracer gas technique

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.G.; Lagus, P.L.; Fleming, K.M.

    1997-08-01

    An alternative method for assessing flowrates that does not depend on point measurements of air flow velocity is the constant tracer injection technique. In this method one injects a tracer gas at a constant rate into a duct and measures the resulting concentration downstream of the injection point. A simple equation derived from the conservation of mass allows calculation of the flowrate at the point of injection. Flowrate data obtained using both a pitot tube and a flow measuring station were compared with tracer gas flowrate measurements in the unit vent duct at the Callaway Nuclear Station during late 1995 and early 1996. These data are presented and discussed with an eye toward obtaining precise flowrate data for release rate calculations. The advantages and disadvantages of the technique are also described. In those test situations for which many flowrate combinations are required, or in large area ducts, a tracer flowrate determination requires fewer man-hours than does a conventional traverse-based technique and does not require knowledge of the duct area. 6 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. Simple Spreadsheet Models For Interpretation Of Fractured Media Tracer Tests

    EPA Science Inventory

    An analysis of a gas-phase partitioning tracer test conducted through fractured media is discussed within this paper. The analysis employed matching eight simple mathematical models to the experimental data to determine transport parameters. All of the models tested; two porous...

  17. Diagnostic Implications of the Reactivity of Fluorescence Tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Sick, V; Westbrook, C

    2008-07-14

    Measurements of fuel concentration distributions with planar laser induced fluorescence of tracer molecules that are added to a base fuel are commonly used in combustion research and development. It usually is assumed that the tracer concentration follows the parent fuel concentration if physical properties such as those determining evaporation are matched. As an example to address this general issue a computational study of combustion of biacetyl/iso-octane mixtures was performed to investigate how well the concentration of biacetyl represents the concentration of iso-octane. For premixed mixture conditions with flame propagation the spatial concentration profiles of the two species in the flame front are separated by 110 {micro}m at 1 bar and by 11 {micro}m at 10 bar. For practical applications this spatial separation is insignificantly small. However, for conditions that mimic ignition and combustion in diesel and HCCI-like operation the differences in tracer and fuel concentration can be significant, exceeding hundreds of percent. At low initial temperature biacetyl was found to be more stable whereas at higher temperature (>1000K) iso-octane is more stable. Similar findings were obtained for a multi-component fuel comprised of iso-octane, n-heptane, methylcyclohexane, and toluene. It may be assumed that similar differences can exist for other tracer/fuel combinations. Caution has therefore to be applied when interpreting PLIF measurements in homogeneous reaction conditions such as in HCCI engine studies.

  18. Tracer Modeling with the Hybrid Coordinates Ocean Model (hycom)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garraffo, Z. D.; Kim, H.; Li, B.; Mehra, A.; Rivin, I.; Spindler, T.; Tolman, H. L.

    2012-12-01

    A series of tracer simulations have been started at NCEP/NWS aiming to a variety of applications, from dispersion of contaminants in estimations motivated by the Japanese nuclear accident near Fukushima, to nutrient estimations. The tracer capabilities of HYCOM are used, in regional domains, nested to daily nowcast/forecast fields from 1/12 HYCOM (RTOFS-Global) model output. A Fukushima Cs-137 simulation is now run in operational mode (RTOFS_ET). The simulation was initialized at the time of the Fukushima nuclear accident, and includes atmospheric deposition of Cs-137 and coastal discharge from a high resolution coastal model (ROMS done at NOAA/NOS). Almost all tracer moved offshore before the end of the first year after the accident. The tracer initially deposited in the Pacific ocean through the atmosphere slowly moves eastward and to deeper waters following the 3D ocean circulation. A series of simulations were started for nutrient estimations in the Gulf Stream and Mid Atlantic Bight region. Initially the capabilities implemented in HYCOM are used. The work aims to monitoring nutrients in the chosen region. Work is done in collaboration with Victoria Coles of U. Maryland.

  19. Sediment tracers in water erosion studies: Current approaches and challenges

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The interest in the use of sediment tracers as a complementary tool to traditional water soil erosion or deposition measurements or assessment has increased due to the additional information they may provide such as sediment source identification and tracking of sediment movement over the landscape ...

  20. How to Program a Domain Independent Tracer for Explanations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ishizaka, Alessio; Lusti, Markus

    2006-01-01

    Explanations are essential in the teaching process. Tracers are one possibility to provide students with explanations in an intelligent tutoring system. Their development can be divided into four steps: (a) the definition of the trace model; (b) the extraction of the information from this model; (c) the analysis and abstraction of the extracted…

  1. Study of North Atlantic ventilation using transient tracers. Doctoral Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Doney, S.C.

    1991-08-01

    Tritium, (3)He, and chlorofluorocarbon distributions in the North Atlantic provide constraints on the ventilation time-scales for the thermocline and abyssal water. A new model function based on a factor analysis of the WMO/IAEA precipitation data set is developed for predicting the spatial and temporal patterns of bomb-tritium in precipitation. Model atmospheric and advective tritium inputs to the North Atlantic are compared with the observed bomb-tritium inventories calculated from the 1972 GEOSECS and 1981-1983 TTO data sets. The observed growth of bomb-tritium levels in the deep North Atlantic are used, along with the tracer gradients ((3)H and (3)He) in the Deep Western Boundary Current, to estimate abyssal ventilation rates and boundary current recirculation. The surface boundary conditions for different transient tracers are found to profoundly effect thermocline ventilation rates estimates. Tracers that equilibrate rapidly with the atmosphere, such as (3)He and the CFCs, have faster apparent ventilation rates and are more appropriate for estimating oxygen utilization rates than tracers that are reset slowly in the surface ocean (e.g. (3)H and (14)C). The chlorofluorocarbon data for a new section in the eastern North Atlantic are presented and used to illustrate the ventilation time-scales for the major water masses in the region. (Copyright (c) Scott C. Doney, 1991.)

  2. Development of Kinetic Interface Sensitive Tracers (KIS-Tracer) for Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Injections into Deep Saline Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffer, M.; Maier, F.; Licha, T.; Sauter, M.

    2012-04-01

    The storage of captured CO2 into geological formations is recently one of the most promising technologies to mitigate anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions into the earth's atmosphere. Deep saline aquifers are considered as the most potential sequestration sites of CO2 due to their huge storage capacities of several thousand Gt. Ongoing research deals mainly with the investigation of relevant physico-chemical processes, the fate of CO2 and the risk assessment during and after supercritical CO2 (scCO2) injections. The occurring processes at the interface between injected scCO2 and formation brine play a major role to evaluate the fate and behavior of scCO2 in the reservoir. This is because the interface represents a reactive zone where numerous physico-chemical processes like dissolution of scCO2 in water as well as dissolution and precipitation of minerals take place. In most cases it is desired to maximize the interface size to increase the storage efficiency. Therefore, knowledge on interface size and dynamics would allow the observation of plume spreading and the detection of mixing or fingering effects. In order to gain this information innovative tracers are necessary which are able to quantify the temporal and spatial development of scCO2/water interfaces. As a result, it may be possible to assess the storage efficiency and to optimize subsequent injections. Up to now, such time-dependent tracers for reservoir studies are not available and limited to equilibrium tracers (known as partitioning and interfacial tracers, respectively). Therefore, novel reactive tracers (KIS-Tracers) are developed to overcome this gap. The idea is to find suitable molecules which allow the implementation of a defined chemical reaction at the interface. Due to the known kinetic constants the change of interface size can be characterized over time. The new tracer is injected together with the supercritical CO2 (scCO2) into a deep saline aquifer. Afterwards, the tracer adsorbs at

  3. Synthesis and characterization of environmentally friendly fluorescent particle tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauro, Flavia; Porfiri, Maurizio; Rapiti, Emiliano; Grimaldi, Salvatore

    2013-04-01

    Tracers are widely used in experimental fluid mechanics and hydrology to investigate complex flows and water cycle processes. Commonly used tracers include dyes, artificial tracers, naturally occurring isotopes and chemicals, microorganisms, and DNA-based systems. Tracers should be characterized by low detection limits and high accuracy in following water paths and flow structures. For natural studies, tracers are also expected to be nontoxic and with low sorption affinity to natural substrates to minimize losses in the environment. In this context, while isotopes are completely natural, their use in field studies is limited by their ubiquity and, therefore, by the high uncertainty in data processing methodologies. Further, the use of dyes and artificial tracers can be hampered by extremely low detection limits due to dilution in natural streams and microorganisms, while DNA-based system may require physical sampling and time-consuming functionalization and detection procedures. In this work, we present the synthesis and characterization of fluorescent beads incorporating an eco-compatible fluorophore for environmental and laboratory applications. The particles are synthesized from natural beeswax through an inexpensive thermal procedure and can be engineered to present variable densities and diameters. A thorough characterization of their surface morphology at the nanoscale, crystal structure and size, chemical composition, and dye incorporation into the beeswax matrix is described by using a wide array of microscopy techniques. In addition, the particle fluorescence response is studied by performing excitation and emission scans on melted beeswax bead samples. The feasibility of using the synthesized particles in environmental settings is assessed through the design of ad-hoc weathering agent experiments where the beads are exposed to high energy radiation and hot water. Further, a proof of concept test is described to understand the particles' potential as a

  4. Assessment of Halon-1301 as a groundwater age tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, M.; van der Raaij, R.; Morgenstern, U.; Jackson, B.

    2015-06-01

    Groundwater dating is an important tool to assess groundwater resources in regards to their dynamics, i.e. direction and timescale of groundwater flow and recharge, contamination risks and manage remediation. To infer groundwater age information, a combination of different environmental tracers, such as tritium and SF6, are commonly used. However, ambiguous age interpretations are often faced, due to a limited set of available tracers and their individual restricted application ranges. For more robust groundwater dating multiple tracers need to be applied complementarily (or other characterisation methods need to be used to complement tracer information). It is important that additional, groundwater age tracers are found to ensure robust groundwater dating in future. We have recently suggested that Halon-1301, a water soluble and entirely anthropogenic gaseous substance, may be a promising candidate, but its behaviour in water and suitability as a groundwater age tracer had not yet been assessed in detail. In this study, we determined Halon-1301 and inferred age information in 17 New Zealand groundwater samples and various modern (river) water samples. The samples were simultaneously analysed for Halon-1301 and SF6, which allowed for identification of issues such as contamination of the water with modern air during sampling. All analysed groundwater sites had also been previously dated with tritium, CFC-12, CFC-11 and SF6, and exhibited mean residence times ranging from modern (close to 0 years) to over 100 years. The investigated groundwater samples ranged from oxic to highly anoxic. All samples with available CFC data were degraded and/or contaminated in one or both of CFC-11 and CFC-12. This allowed us to make a first attempt of assessing the conservativeness of Halon-1301 in water, in terms of presence of local sources and its sensitivity towards degradation, which could affect the suitability of Halon-1301 as groundwater age tracer. Overall we found Halon-1301

  5. Sediment tracers in water erosion studies: Current approaches and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, Gema; Quinton, John N.; Nearing, Mark A.; Mabit, Lionel; Giráldez, Juan V.; Gómez, José A.

    2013-04-01

    The quest for alternative methods of soil losses assessment, due to water erosion to complement and enhance existing methods has directed attention to the use of tracing approaches because of the additional information they provide, such as sediment source identification, tracking of sediment movement across the landscape at various temporal and spatial scales and soil erosion rates. For these reasons, the utility and robustness of sediment tracing approaches using a wide range of substances and soil properties have been evaluated in numerous studies. A comprehensive literature review on tracing approaches used in water erosion studies was carried out in June 2011 using the Web of Science database and as search terms in the title or as keywords: "erosion AND tracer" OR "sediment AND tracer" OR "sediment AND tracking". The search excluded reviews and tillage and/or wind erosion studies. Only studies that used tracers to make a determination of water erosion or sedimentation rates, or in some cases relative erosion contribution, were considered in this study, and were further refined by manually checking that the articles corresponded to experiments involving sediment studies using tracers, as defined within the context of this review. Five distinct groups of tracing approaches were identified: fallout radionuclides, rare earth elements, soil magnetism and magnetic substances, other tracers, and sediment fingerprinting techniques. This abstract presents a synthesis of the current approaches of each of the tracing techniques identified in assessing soil erosion and sediment redistribution and a summary with the commonalities and differences between the approaches and identifying research gaps and future trends.

  6. Quantifying Urban Water Subsidies with Hydrological Tracers of Domestic Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bain, D. J.; Sikora, M. T.; Wozniak, E.; Fisher, K. R.; Carr, J.; Elliott, E. M.

    2011-12-01

    Connections between urban hydrological systems and human water infrastructure are well established. Interactions between these systems occur at a wide range of scales, from large inter-basin transfers to individual leaking pipes. However, much of the interest in these connections arises from practical considerations, for example, substantially altered in-stream flow or the presence/absence of sewage in surface water systems. Less recognized is that in smaller urban catchments, daily water flux through human water distribution systems is often much larger than low flow surface water flux from the catchment. As infrastructure ages and cross-connections grow, transfers from the substantial human fluxes to the catchment will increasingly subsidize urban water budgets. Tools for quantifying the contribution of this subsidy to urban hydrological systems can clarify both practical questions for urban managers and our understanding of flow generation in catchments. Stream water chemistry from a multi-year sampling campaign in Nine Mile Run (Pittsburgh, PA) is used to examine potential hydrological tracers of human domestic water. In particular, we examine the use of fluoride added in precise quantities as a dental health supplement as a tracer of human domestic water (e.g., drinking and waste water). While fluoride is not necessarily a conservative tracer, equilibrium reactions governing fluoride solubility generally require substantially higher cationic concentrations than those observed in surface water chemistry. Further, during periods where human subsidies dominate (e.g., water line breaks or hydrant flushes discharging to the stream) fluoride concentrations generally approach the concentration added to domestic water. We use multiple modeling approaches to demonstrate the appropriateness of fluoride as a tracer, infer contributions of human domestic water to the hydrologic budget, and explore fluoride dynamics in the Nine Mile Run basin. A fluoride tracer is

  7. Dynamics of ellipsoidal tracers in swimming algal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ou; Peng, Yi; Liu, Zhengyang; Tang, Chao; Xu, Xinliang; Cheng, Xiang

    2016-10-01

    Enhanced diffusion of passive tracers immersed in active fluids is a universal feature of active fluids and has been extensively studied in recent years. Similar to microrheology for equilibrium complex fluids, the unusual enhanced particle dynamics reveal intrinsic properties of active fluids. Nevertheless, previous studies have shown that the translational dynamics of spherical tracers are qualitatively similar, independent of whether active particles are pushers or pullers—the two fundamental classes of active fluids. Is it possible to distinguish pushers from pullers by simply imaging the dynamics of passive tracers? Here, we investigated the diffusion of isolated ellipsoids in algal C. reinhardtii suspensions—a model for puller-type active fluids. In combination with our previous results on pusher-type E. coli suspensions [Peng et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 068303 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.068303], we showed that the dynamics of asymmetric tracers show a profound difference in pushers and pullers due to their rotational degree of freedom. Although the laboratory-frame translation and rotation of ellipsoids are enhanced in both pushers and pullers, similar to spherical tracers, the anisotropic diffusion in the body frame of ellipsoids shows opposite trends in the two classes of active fluids. An ellipsoid diffuses fastest along its major axis when immersed in pullers, whereas it diffuses slowest along the major axis in pushers. This striking difference can be qualitatively explained using a simple hydrodynamic model. In addition, our study on algal suspensions reveals that the influence of the near-field advection of algal swimming flows on the translation and rotation of ellipsoids shows different ranges and strengths. Our work provides not only new insights into universal organizing principles of active fluids, but also a convenient tool for detecting the class of active particles.

  8. Isotope tracers in catchment hydrology: How far can we go?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonnell, J. J.

    2009-05-01

    The use of stable isotopes as tracers of water has fundamentally changed the way that we view catchment hydrology. Tracer-based mass balance mixing studies in the past decades have revealed that most of the water comprising the storm hydrograph (in humid areas) is dominated by pre-event water. Furthermore, using the convolution integral approach to long term isotopic time series, studies have revealed a wide range of streamwater residence times (focused mostly on baseflow), from months to decades, but with most on the order of 1-3 years. These findings have now matured to the point where such information is informing rainfall- runoff model testing. As a result, stable isotope tracers offer new and orthogonal data measures for rejecting model structures. Similarly, scaling relations detected in streamwater residence time data offer hope for a new pathway to understand and quantify multi-scale catchment response patterns. So how far can we go with stable isotope tracers in catchment hydrology? Here I offer some suggestions on new research avenues that capitalize on the use of laser spectrometers and how the resulting increased sample frequencies in time and space (with laser specs in the lab and in the field) may offer new hydrological insights. Examples are given that apply to ecohydrological studies in catchments to resolve how vegetation and streams appear to return different pools of water to the hydrosphere; virtual experiments with catchment models to assess the fundamental controls on catchment residence time distribution; multi-tracer approaches to streamwater residence time to reconcile the striking differences in residence time estimates between oxygen-18 and tritium; and labeled isotope additions at the plot, hillslope and catchment scale under controlled input conditions for resolving the age, origin and pathway of flow.

  9. Gallium based low-interaction anions

    DOEpatents

    King, Wayne A.; Kubas, Gregory J.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides: a composition of the formula M.sup.+x (Ga(Y).sub.4.sup.-).sub.x where M is a metal selected from the group consisting of lithium, sodium, potassium, cesium, calcium, strontium, thallium, and silver, x is an integer selected from the group consisting of 1 or 2, each Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl, hydride and halide with the proviso that at least one Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl and halide; a composition of the formula (R).sub.x Q.sup.+ Ga(Y).sub.4.sup.- where Q is selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, phosphorus and oxygen, each R is a ligand selected from the group consisting of alkyl, aryl, and hydrogen, x is an integer selected from the group consisting of 3 and 4 depending upon Q, and each Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl, hydride and halide with the proviso that at least one Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl and halide; an ionic polymerization catalyst composition including an active cationic portion and a gallium based weakly coordinating anion; and bridged anion species of the formula M.sup.+x.sub.y [X(Ga(Y.sub.3).sub.z ].sup.-y.sub.x where M is a metal selected from the group consisting of lithium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, cesium, calcium, strontium, thallium, and silver, x is an integer selected from the group consisting of 1 or 2, X is a bridging group between two gallium atoms, y is an integer selected from the group consisting 1 and 2, z is an integer of at least 2, each Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl, hydride and halide with the proviso that at least one Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl and halide.

  10. Single-scan dual-tracer FLT+FDG PET tumor characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadrmas, Dan J.; Rust, Thomas C.; Hoffman, John M.

    2013-02-01

    Rapid multi-tracer PET aims to image two or more tracers in a single scan, simultaneously characterizing multiple aspects of physiology and function without the need for repeat imaging visits. Using dynamic imaging with staggered injections, constraints on the kinetic behavior of each tracer are applied to recover individual-tracer measures from the multi-tracer PET signal. The ability to rapidly and reliably image both 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and 18F-fluorothymidine (FLT) would provide complementary measures of tumor metabolism and proliferative activity, with important applications in guiding oncologic treatment decisions and assessing response. However, this tracer combination presents one of the most challenging dual-tracer signal-separation problems—both tracers have the same radioactive half-life, and the injection delay is short relative to the half-life and tracer kinetics. This work investigates techniques for single-scan dual-tracer FLT+FDG PET tumor imaging, characterizing the performance of recovering static and dynamic imaging measures for each tracer from dual-tracer datasets. Simulation studies were performed to characterize dual-tracer signal-separation performance for imaging protocols with both injection orders and injection delays of 10-60 min. Better performance was observed when FLT was administered first, and longer delays before administration of FDG provided more robust signal-separation and recovery of the single-tracer imaging measures. An injection delay of 30 min led to good recovery (R > 0.96) of static image values (e.g. SUV), Knet, and K1 as compared to values from separate, single-tracer time-activity curves. Recovery of higher order rate parameters (k2, k3) was less robust, indicating that information regarding these parameters was harder to recover in the presence of statistical noise and dual-tracer effects. Performance of the dual-tracer FLT(0 min)+FDG(32 min) technique was further evaluated using PET/CT imaging studies in

  11. Chemical tracer test at the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada. Geothermal Reservoir Technology research program

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.C.; Moore, J.N.; Benoit, W.R.; Doughty, C.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1993-10-01

    In the injection test described, chemical tracers established the fluid flow between one injection well and one production well. Measured tracer concentrations, calculated flow rates, sampling schedules, and the daily events of the tracer test are documented. This experiment was designed to test the application of organic tracers, to further refine the predictive capability of the reservoir model, and to improve the effectiveness of Oxbow`s injection strategy.

  12. Effect of anionic salts in prepartum diets based on alfalfa.

    PubMed

    Joyce, P W; Sanchez, W K; Goff, J P

    1997-11-01

    This study compared prepartum diets based on grass, alfalfa, or alfalfa and anionic salts to investigate their effect on Ca metabolism, acid-base status, endocrine response, disease incidence, and lactational performance of periparturient dairy cows. Forty-five nonlactating Holstein cows in their last 3 wk of gestation were fed a control diet based on grass hay with a dietary cation-anion difference [expressed as milli-equivalents of ((Na + K) - (Cl + S))/100 g of dietary dry matter] of +30 or diets based on alfalfa with a dietary cation-anion difference of either +35 or -7. Cows fed the diet with the dietary cation-anion difference of -7 had the lowest urine pH prepartum and had the highest concentrations of ionized Ca in blood and total Ca in serum at parturition. Increases in 1,25-(OH)2 vitamin D per unit decrease in total Ca in serum were greatest for cows fed the diet with a dietary cation-anion difference of -7. Also, cows fed this same diet consumed the most dry matter postpartum. Incidences of health disorders were 13% (10 of 75), 12% (9 of 75), and 5% (4 of 75) for cows fed the diets with dietary cation-anion differences of +30, +35, and -7, respectively. Results indicate that alfalfa, when supplemented with anionic salts, is a viable forage for prepartum dairy cows.

  13. Globins Scavenge Sulfur Trioxide Anion Radical*

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Paul R.; Gardner, Daniel P.; Gardner, Alexander P.

    2015-01-01

    Ferrous myoglobin was oxidized by sulfur trioxide anion radical (STAR) during the free radical chain oxidation of sulfite. Oxidation was inhibited by the STAR scavenger GSH and by the heme ligand CO. Bimolecular rate constants for the reaction of STAR with several ferrous globins and biomolecules were determined by kinetic competition. Reaction rate constants for myoglobin, hemoglobin, neuroglobin, and flavohemoglobin are large at 38, 120, 2,600, and ≥ 7,500 × 106 m−1 s−1, respectively, and correlate with redox potentials. Measured rate constants for O2, GSH, ascorbate, and NAD(P)H are also large at ∼100, 10, 130, and 30 × 106 m−1 s−1, respectively, but nevertheless allow for favorable competition by globins and a capacity for STAR scavenging in vivo. Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking sulfite oxidase and deleted of flavohemoglobin showed an O2-dependent growth impairment with nonfermentable substrates that was exacerbated by sulfide, a precursor to mitochondrial sulfite formation. Higher O2 exposures inactivated the superoxide-sensitive mitochondrial aconitase in cells, and hypoxia elicited both aconitase and NADP+-isocitrate dehydrogenase activity losses. Roles for STAR-derived peroxysulfate radical, superoxide radical, and sulfo-NAD(P) in the mechanism of STAR toxicity and flavohemoglobin protection in yeast are suggested. PMID:26381408

  14. Lysozyme binding onto cat-anionic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Bonincontro, A; Spigone, E; Ruiz Peña, M; Letizia, C; La Mesa, C

    2006-12-15

    Mixing aqueous sodium dodecylsulfate with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide solutions in mole ratios close to (1.7/1.0) allows the formation of cat-anionic vesicles with an excess of negative charges on the outer surface. The vesicular dispersions are mixed with lysozyme, and interact electrostatically with the positive charges on the protein, forming lipo-plexes. Dielectric relaxation, zeta-potential, and light scattering indicate the occurrence of interactions between vesicles and the protein. According to CD, the vesicle-adsorbed protein retains its native conformation. Binding and surface saturation, inferred by dielectric relaxation and zeta-potential, fulfil a charge neutralisation stoichiometry. Adsorbed lysozyme promotes the vesicle clustering and is concomitant with the lipo-plexes flocculation. Above the charge neutralisation threshold, lysozyme in excess remains dispersed in molecular form. Attempts were made to determine in what conditions protein release from the vesicles occurs. Accordingly, the full neutralisation of sodium dodecylsulfate in excess by cetyltrimethylammonium bromide ensures the lipo-plexes break-up, the precipitation of the mixed surfactants and the protein release in native form.

  15. Globins Scavenge Sulfur Trioxide Anion Radical.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Paul R; Gardner, Daniel P; Gardner, Alexander P

    2015-11-06

    Ferrous myoglobin was oxidized by sulfur trioxide anion radical (STAR) during the free radical chain oxidation of sulfite. Oxidation was inhibited by the STAR scavenger GSH and by the heme ligand CO. Bimolecular rate constants for the reaction of STAR with several ferrous globins and biomolecules were determined by kinetic competition. Reaction rate constants for myoglobin, hemoglobin, neuroglobin, and flavohemoglobin are large at 38, 120, 2,600, and ≥ 7,500 × 10(6) m(-1) s(-1), respectively, and correlate with redox potentials. Measured rate constants for O2, GSH, ascorbate, and NAD(P)H are also large at ∼100, 10, 130, and 30 × 10(6) m(-1) s(-1), respectively, but nevertheless allow for favorable competition by globins and a capacity for STAR scavenging in vivo. Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking sulfite oxidase and deleted of flavohemoglobin showed an O2-dependent growth impairment with nonfermentable substrates that was exacerbated by sulfide, a precursor to mitochondrial sulfite formation. Higher O2 exposures inactivated the superoxide-sensitive mitochondrial aconitase in cells, and hypoxia elicited both aconitase and NADP(+)-isocitrate dehydrogenase activity losses. Roles for STAR-derived peroxysulfate radical, superoxide radical, and sulfo-NAD(P) in the mechanism of STAR toxicity and flavohemoglobin protection in yeast are suggested.

  16. Anionic biopolymers as blood flow sensors.

    PubMed

    Siegel, G; Walter, A; Kauschmann, A; Malmsten, M; Buddecke, E

    1996-01-01

    The finding of flow-dependent vasodilation rests on the basic observation that with an increase in blood flow the vessels become wider, with a decrease the vascular smooth muscle cells contract. Proteoheparan sulphate could be the sensor macromolecule at the endothelial cell membrane-blood interface, that reacts on the shear stress generated by the flowing blood, and that informs and regulates the vascular smooth muscle cells via a signal transduction chain. This anionic biopolyelectrolyte possesses viscoelastic and specific ion binding properties which allow a change of its configuration in dependence on shear stress and electrostatic charge density. The blood flow sensor undergoes a conformational transition from a random coil to an extended filamentous state with increasing flow, whereby Na+ ions from the blood are bound. Owing to the intramolecular elastic recoil forces of proteoheparan sulphate the slowing of a flow rate causes an entropic coiling, the expulsion of Na+ ions and thus an interruption of the signal chain. Under physiological conditions, the conformation and Na+ binding proved to be extremely Ca(2+)-sensitive while K+ and Mg2+ ions play a minor role for the susceptibility of the sensor. Via counterion migration of the bound Na+ ions along the sensor glycosaminoglycan side chains and following Na+ passage through an unspecific ion channel in the endothelial cell membrane, the signal transduction chain leads to a membrane depolarization with Ca2+ influx into the cells. This stimulates the EDRF/NO production and release from the endothelial cells. The consequence is vasodilation.

  17. Neptunium Valence Chemistry in Anion Exchange Processing

    SciTech Connect

    KYSER, EDWARD

    2003-02-01

    The current anion resin in use in HB-Line Phase II, Reillex{trademark} HPQ, was tested in the laboratory under expected plant conditions for Np processing and was found to load between 50 and 70 g Np per liter of resin. Losses varied from 0.2 to 15 percent depending on a number of parameters. Hydrazine in the feed at 0.02 to 0.05 M appeared to keep the Np from oxidizing and increasing the losses within four to seven days after the FS addition. Losses of up to three percent were observed five days after FS addition when hydrazine was not used in the feed, compared with 0.3 percent when the feed was loaded immediately after FS addition. Based on these test results the following processing conditions are recommended: (1) Feed conditions: 8 M HNO{sub 3}, 0.02 M hydrazine, 0.05 M excess FS, less than 5 days storage of solution after FS addition. (2) Wash conditions: 100 liters of 8 M HNO{sub 3}, no FS, no hydrazine. (3) Elution conditions: 0.17 M HNO{sub 3}, 0.05 M hydrazine, no FS. (4) Precipitation feed conditions: 0.03 M excess ascorbic acid, no additional hydrazine, no FS, precipitation within three days.

  18. Anion binding to the ubiquitin molecule.

    PubMed Central

    Makhatadze, G. I.; Lopez, M. M.; Richardson, J. M.; Thomas, S. T.

    1998-01-01

    Effects of different salts (NaCl, MgCl2, CaCl2, GdmCl, NaBr, NaClO4, NaH2PO4, Na2SO4) on the stability of the ubiquitin molecule at pH 2.0 have been studied by differential scanning calorimetry, circular dichroism, and Tyr fluorescence spectroscopies. It is shown that all of the salts studied significantly increase the thermostability of the ubiquitin molecule, and that this stabilization can be interpreted in terms of anion binding. Estimated thermodynamic parameters of binding for Cl- show that this binding is relatively weak (Kd = 0.15 M) and is characterized by a negative enthalpy of -15 kJ/mol per site. Particularly surprising was the observed stabilizing effect of GdmCl through the entire concentration range studied (0.01-2 M), however, to a lesser extent than stabilization by NaCl. This stabilizing effect of GdmCl appears to arise from the binding of Cl- ions. Analysis of the observed changes in the stability of the ubiquitin molecule in the presence of GdmCl can be adequately described by combining the thermodynamic model of denaturant binding with Cl- binding effects. PMID:9541401

  19. Rotational auto-detachment of dipole-bound anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ard, S. G.; Compton, R. N.; Garrett, W. R.

    2016-04-01

    Rotational auto-detachment of acetonitrile, trimethyl-acetonitrile, acetone, and cyclobutanone dipole-bound anions was studied under varying conditions in a Rydberg electron transfer (RET) time-of-flight apparatus. Varying amounts of auto-detachment was observed for anions with similar electron affinity and dipole moment, but different moments of inertia. These results were found to be consistent with predictions based on the calculated rotational spectra for these anions, highlighting the importance of critical binding properties in understanding the stability and lifetime of dipole bound systems.

  20. Survey of organic acid eluents for anion chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Book, D.E.

    1981-10-01

    Of all the potential eluents surveyed (including aromatic, sulfonic, phosphonic, among other acids), only the carboxylic acids and the nitrophenols are recommended as eluents for anion chromatography. The concentration of the eluent should be in the range 5 x 10/sup -5/ to 1 x 10/sup -3/ M. The eluent should have the same charge as inorganic anions, a higher charge than organic acid samples. Choice of eluents for separation of halides, chloride and sulfate, multivalent inorganic anions, small alkyl acids, and aromatic acids is discussed. (DLC)

  1. Assessment of Halon-1301 as a groundwater age tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, M.; van der Raaij, R.; Morgenstern, U.; Jackson, B.

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater dating is an important tool to assess groundwater resources in regards to their dynamics, i.e. direction and time scale of groundwater flow and recharge, to assess contamination risks and manage remediation. To infer groundwater age information, a combination of different environmental tracers, such as tritium and SF6, are commonly used. However, ambiguous age interpretations are often faced, due to a limited set of available tracers and their individual restricted application ranges. For more robust groundwater dating multiple tracers need to be applied complementarily and it is vital that additional, groundwater age tracers are found to ensure robust groundwater dating in future. We recently suggested that Halon-1301, a water soluble and entirely anthropogenic gaseous substance, may be a promising candidate, but its behaviour in water and suitability as a groundwater age tracer had not yet been assessed in detail. In this study, we determine Halon-1301 and infer age information in 17 New Zealand groundwaters and various modern (river) water samples. The samples are simultaneously analysed for Halon-1301 and SF6, which allows identification of issues such as contamination of the water with modern air during sampling. Water at all analysed groundwater sites have also been previously dated with tritium, CFC-12, CFC-11 and SF6, and exhibit mean residence times ranging from modern (close to 0 years) to over 100 years. The investigated groundwater ranged from oxic to highly anoxic, and some showed evidence of CFC contamination or degradation. This allowed us to make a first attempt of assessing the conservativeness of Halon-1301 in water, in terms of presence of local sources and its sensitivity towards degradation etc., which could affect the suitability of Halon-1301 as groundwater age tracer. Overall we found Halon-1301 reliably inferred the mean residence time of groundwater recharged between 1980 and 2014. Where direct age comparison could be made 71

  2. Identification and characterization of conservative organic tracers for use as hydrologic tracers for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Study; Progress report, June 1--December 31, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Stetzenbach, K.J.

    1990-12-31

    Ground water tracers are solutes dissolved in or carried by ground water to delineate flow pathways. Tracers provide information on direction and speed of water movement and that of contaminants that might be conveyed by the water. Tracers can also be used to measure effective porosity, hydraulic conductivity, dispersivity and solute distribution coefficients. For most applications tracers should be conservative, that is, move at the same rate as the water and not sorb to aquifer materials. Tracers must have a number of properties to be functional. Regardless of the desired properties, the chemical and physical behavior of a tracer in ground water and the porous medium under study must be understood. Good estimates of tracer behavior can be obtained from laboratory studies. Studies in this proposal will address tracer properties with analytical method development, static sorption and degradation studies and column transport studies, Mutagenicity tests will be performed on promising candidates. The tracers that will be used for these experiments are fluorinated organic acids and other organic compounds that have the chemical and biological stability necessary to be effective in the Yucca Mountain environment. Special emphasis will be placed on compounds that fluoresce or have very large ultraviolet absorption coefficients for very high analytical sensitivity.

  3. Unmeasured anions in metabolic acidosis: unravelling the mystery.

    PubMed

    Forni, Lui G; McKinnon, William; Hilton, Philip J

    2006-01-01

    In the critically ill, metabolic acidosis is a common observation and, in clinical practice, the cause of this derangement is often multi-factorial. Various measures are often employed to try and characterise the aetiology of metabolic acidosis, the most popular of which is the anion gap. The purpose of the anion gap can be perceived as a means by which the physician is alerted to the presence of unmeasured anions in plasma that contribute to the observed acidosis. In many cases, the causative ion may be easily identified, such as lactate, but often the causative ion(s) remain unidentified, even after exclusion of the 'classic' causes. We describe here the various attempts in the literature that have been made to address this observation and highlight recent studies that reveal potential sources of such hitherto unmeasured anions.

  4. An anion channel in Arabidopsis hypocotyls activated by blue light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, M. H.; Spalding, E. P.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    A rapid, transient depolarization of the plasma membrane in seedling stems is one of the earliest effects of blue light detected in plants. It appears to play a role in transducing blue light into inhibition of hypocotyl (stem) elongation, and perhaps other responses. The possibility that activation of a Cl- conductance is part of the depolarization mechanism was raised previously and addressed here. By patch clamping hypocotyl cells isolated from dark-grown (etiolated) Arabidopsis seedlings, blue light was found to activate an anion channel residing at the plasma membrane. An anion-channel blocker commonly known as NPPB 15-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid] potently and reversibly blocked this anion channel. NPPB also blocked the blue-light-induced depolarization in vivo and decreased the inhibitory effect of blue light on hypocotyl elongation. These results indicate that activation of this anion channel plays a role in transducing blue light into growth inhibition.

  5. Is Nitrate Anion Photodissociation Mediated by Singlet-Triplet Absorption?

    PubMed

    Svoboda, Ondřej; Slavíček, Petr

    2014-06-05

    Photolysis of the nitrate anion is involved in the oxidation processes in the hydrosphere, cryosphere, and stratosphere. While it is known that the nitrate photolysis in the long-wavelength region proceeds with a very low quantum yield, the mechanism of the photodissociation remains elusive. Here, we present the quantitative modeling of singlet-singlet and singlet-triplet absorption spectra in the atmospherically relevant region around 300 nm, and we argue that a spin-forbidden transition between the singlet ground state and the first triplet state contributes non-negligibly to the nitrate anion photolysis. We further propose that the nitrate anion excited into the first singlet excited state relaxes nonradiatively into its ground state. The full understanding of the nitrate anion photolysis can improve modeling of the asymmetric solvation in the atmospheric processes, e.g., photolysis on the surfaces of ice or snow.

  6. New stationary phase for anion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Auler, Lúcia M L A; Silva, César R; Collins, Kenneth E; Collins, Carol H

    2005-05-06

    This work describes the preparation of an anion-exchange phase based on silica, using a two-step modification process. First, 10 microm Davisil silica particles were silanized with chloropropyltrimethoxysilane to yield chloropropyl silica. The modified silica was then reacted with pyridine to produce positively charged propylpyridinium groups on the surface, the anion-exchange sites. The phase was characterized by thermogravimetric analysis and infrared and solid state 13C and 29Si NMR spectroscopies. HPLC separations of common inorganic anions, including chloride, nitrite, bromide and nitrate, were performed using 150 x 3.9 HPLC columns packed with the phase, using a phthalate buffer solution as mobile phase with non-suppressed conductivity detection. Efficiency and resolution were calculated and the results show that the new phase has significant promise for the analysis of these anions in environmental samples.

  7. An anion channel in Arabidopsis hypocotyls activated by blue light.

    PubMed Central

    Cho, M H; Spalding, E P

    1996-01-01

    A rapid, transient depolarization of the plasma membrane in seedling stems is one of the earliest effects of blue light detected in plants. It appears to play a role in transducing blue light into inhibition of hypocotyl (stem) elongation, and perhaps other responses. The possibility that activation of a Cl- conductance is part of the depolarization mechanism was raised previously and addressed here. By patch clamping hypocotyl cells isolated from dark-grown (etiolated) Arabidopsis seedlings, blue light was found to activate an anion channel residing at the plasma membrane. An anion-channel blocker commonly known as NPPB 15-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid] potently and reversibly blocked this anion channel. NPPB also blocked the blue-light-induced depolarization in vivo and decreased the inhibitory effect of blue light on hypocotyl elongation. These results indicate that activation of this anion channel plays a role in transducing blue light into growth inhibition. PMID:8755616

  8. Anion-cation induction coupling in organic superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castet, F.; Ducasse, L.; Fritsch, A.

    2000-06-01

    Within the framework of the valence bond/Hartree-Fock (VB/HF) formalism, [Castet et al., J. Phys. I (France) 6, 583 (1996); L. Ducasse et al., Synth. Metals 85, 1627 (1997); F. Castet et al., Chem. Phys. 232, 37 (1998); Synth. Metals 103, 1799 (1999)] anion-cation induction interactions are evaluated in organic superconductors derived from the Bechgaard salts. The calculation scheme is based on an extension of the VB/HF model, so as to incorporate the effect of the distinct anion polarization states in the calculation of the VB Hamiltonian matrix elements. The induction mechanism involves a charge displacement on the counteranions in the electrostatic field of adjacent positively charged organic molecules. Anion-cation interactions are calculated for the β-BEDTTTF2I3 structure [A. J. Schultz et al., J. Am. Chem Soc. 108, 7853 (1986)], which involves highly polarizable anions.

  9. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for stable isotope metabolic tracer studies of living systems

    SciTech Connect

    Luong, Elise

    1999-05-10

    This dissertation focuses on the development of methods for stable isotope metabolic tracer studies in living systems using inductively coupled plasma single and dual quadrupole mass spectrometers. Sub-nanogram per gram levels of molybdenum (Mo) from human blood plasma are isolated by the use of anion exchange alumina microcolumns. Million-fold more concentrated spectral and matrix interferences such as sodium, chloride, sulfate, phosphate, etc. in the blood constituents are removed from the analyte. The recovery of Mo from the alumina column is 82 ± 5% (n = 5). Isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID-ICP-MS) is utilized for the quantitative ultra-trace concentration determination of Mo in bovine and human blood samples. The average Mo concentration in reference bovine serum determined by this method is 10.2 ± 0.4 ng/g, while the certified value is 11.5 ± 1.1 ng/g (95% confidence interval). The Mo concentration of one pool of human blood plasma from two healthy male donors is 0.5 ± 0.1 ng/g. The inductively coupled plasma twin quadrupole mass spectrometer (ICP-TQMS) is used to measure the carbon isotope ratio from non-volatile organic compounds and bio-organic molecules to assess the ability as an alternative analytical method to gas chromatography combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-combustion-IRMS). Trytophan, myoglobin, and β-cyclodextrin are chosen for the study, initial observation of spectral interference of 13C+ with 12C 1H+ comes from the incomplete dissociation of myoglobin and/or β-cyclodextrin.

  10. Tracers and buoyancy driven dispersion in permeable rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, A.

    2015-12-01

    In this presentation, a series of new experiments and supporting theoretical models will be presented to illustrate some of the controls on the dispersal of tracers spreading through both homogeneous and heterogeneous porous media as governed by a buoyancy driven flow. Such flows may arise when water is injected into reservoirs, to displace oil, or during the injection of CO2 into deep saline aquifers as part of a geosequestration scheme. Tracers, which can be used to help identify the flow pattern and flow speed, can exhibit unusual trajectories within a porous layer when controlled by buoyancy driven flow, and may be hostage to the mixing effects of buoyancy driven shear dispersion. The effects of capillarity on such dispersion will also be discussed. A series of idealised models of the flow will be presented to illustrate some of the key phenomena through a combination of analogue bead pack experiments and theoretical calculations of the associated flow processes.

  11. Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Creation in Engineered Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, Peter; Harris, Joel

    2014-05-08

    The aim of this proposal is to develop, through novel high-temperature-tracing approaches, three technologies for characterizing fracture creation within Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS). The objective of a first task is to identify, develop and demonstrate adsorbing tracers for characterizing interwell reservoir-rock surface areas and fracture spacing. The objective of a second task is to develop and demonstrate a methodology for measuring fracture surface areas adjacent to single wells. The objective of a third task is to design, fabricate and test an instrument that makes use of tracers for measuring fluid flow between newly created fractures and wellbores. In one method of deployment, it will be used to identify qualitatively which fractures were activated during a hydraulic stimulation experiment. In a second method of deployment, it will serve to measure quantitatively the rate of fluid flowing from one or more activated fracture during a production test following a hydraulic stimulation.

  12. Conservative tracers for the C-well hydraulic testing

    SciTech Connect

    Dombrowski, T.; Coates, G.; Stetzenbach, K.J.

    1992-11-01

    This paper reports that work is being done to identify and characterize conservative organic tracers for use as groundwater tracers at the C-well complex. An evaluation of the chemical and biological stability of several compounds including fluorinated aliphatic and aromatic acids, fluorinated salicylic acids, and fluorinated cinnamic acids was carried out using tuff samples from the Yucca Mountain area and J13 or de-ionized water. Samples were monitored over a 60-day period for any decrease in concentration; the resulting data was evaluated for possible sorption or biological degradation of the candidate compound. The fluorinated benzoic acids show the greatest stability over the 60-day period. All analyses were carried out using an HPLC system, with either a fluorescence detector, a variable wavelength UV-VIS detector, or a quadrupole mass spectrometer.

  13. 13C Tracer Studies of Metabolism in Mouse Tumor Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Andrew N.; Yan, Jun; Fan, Teresa W-M.

    2015-01-01

    Mice are widely used for human tumor xenograft studies of cancer development and drug efficacy and toxicity. Stable isotope tracing coupled with metabolomic analysis is an emerging approach for assaying metabolic network activity. In mouse models there are several routes of tracer introduction, which have particular advantages and disadvantages that depend on the model and the questions addressed. This protocol describes the bolus i.v. route via repeated tail vein injections of solutions of stable isotope enriched tracers including 13C6-glucose and 13C5,15N2-glutamine. Repeated injections give higher enrichments and over longer labeling periods than a single bolus. Multiple injections of glutamine are necessary to achieve adequate enrichment in engrafted tumors. PMID:26693168

  14. The extended use of tracers in teaching coal preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, S.N.; Smith, P.; Horsfall, D.W.

    1995-08-01

    This paper discusses further the use of density tracers and coloured particles in the teaching of coal preparation and associated subjects. It is a follow up to the paper presented at Coal Prep `94 {open_quotes}Miniature Beneficiation{close_quotes}. As described in that paper, current uses include demonstrating gravity separation processes, and exercises to illustrate the principles of sampling and beneficiation plant efficiency testing. Future uses for tracers include a novel method to demonstrate the principles of practical dense medium separation and float and sink analysis; as well as programme to increase the students` awareness of sampling standards. The last-named applications has indicated possible deficiencies in the present system of sampling hard coal when seeking to determine certain analytical parameters.

  15. Vascular tracers alter hemodynamics and airway pressure in anesthetized sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Albertine, K.H.; Staub, N.C.

    1986-11-01

    The technique of vascular labeling was developed to mark sites of increased microvascular permeability. We used the vascular labeling technique in anesthetized sheep and found that hemodynamics and airway pressure were adversely affected by intraarterial infusions of two vascular tracers. Monastral blue (nine sheep) immediately caused systemic arterial hypotension, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and bronchoconstriction. All three physiological responses were partially blocked by a cyclooxygenase inhibitor (indomethacin) but not by an H1-antihistamine (chlorpheniramine). Colloidal gold (nine sheep) caused immediate, but less dramatic, pulmonary arterial hypertension which was not attenuated by the blocking agents. We conclude that these two vascular tracers caused detrimental physiological side effects in sheep at the usual doses used to label injured microvessels in other species.

  16. Artificial sweeteners as potential tracers of municipal landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Roy, James W; Van Stempvoort, Dale R; Bickerton, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Artificial sweeteners are gaining acceptance as tracers of human wastewater in the environment. The 3 artificial sweeteners analyzed in this study were detected in leachate or leachate-impacted groundwater at levels comparable to those of untreated wastewater at 14 of 15 municipal landfill sites tested, including several closed for >50 years. Saccharin was the dominant sweetener in old (pre-1990) landfills, while newer landfills were dominated by saccharin and acesulfame (introduced 2 decades ago; dominant in wastewater). Cyclamate was also detected, but less frequently. A case study at one site illustrates the use of artificial sweeteners to identify a landfill-impacted groundwater plume discharging to a stream. The study results suggest that artificial sweeteners can be useful tracers for current and legacy landfill contamination, with relative abundances of the sweeteners potentially providing diagnostic ability to distinguish different landfills or landfill cells, including crude age-dating, and to distinguish landfill and wastewater sources.

  17. Photoelectron spectroscopic study of carbon aluminum hydride cluster anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinxing; Wang, Haopeng; Ganteför, Gerd; Eichhorn, Bryan W.; Kiran, Boggavarapu; Bowen, Kit H.

    2016-10-01

    Numerous previously unknown carbon aluminum hydride cluster anions were generated in the gas phase, identified by time-of-flight mass spectrometry and characterized by anion photoelectron spectroscopy, revealing their electronic structure. Density functional theory calculations on the CAl5-9H- and CAl5-7H2- found that several of them possess unusually high carbon atom coordination numbers. These cluster compositions have potential as the basis for new energetic materials.

  18. Photoelectron spectroscopic study of carbon aluminum hydride cluster anions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinxing; Wang, Haopeng; Ganteför, Gerd; Eichhorn, Bryan W; Kiran, Boggavarapu; Bowen, Kit H

    2016-10-21

    Numerous previously unknown carbon aluminum hydride cluster anions were generated in the gas phase, identified by time-of-flight mass spectrometry and characterized by anion photoelectron spectroscopy, revealing their electronic structure. Density functional theory calculations on the CAl5-9H(-) and CAl5-7H2(-) found that several of them possess unusually high carbon atom coordination numbers. These cluster compositions have potential as the basis for new energetic materials.

  19. Characterization of a Saturated and Flexible Aliphatic Polyol Anion Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Shokri, Alireza; Schmidt, Jacob C.; Wang, Xue B.; Kass, Steven R.

    2012-10-17

    Nature employs flexible molecules to bind anions in a variety of physiologically important processes whereas supramolecular chemists have been designing rigid substrates that minimize or eliminate intramolecular hydrogen bond interactions to carry out anion recogni-tion. Herein, the association of a flexible polyhydroxy alkane with chloride ion is described and the bound re-ceptor is characterized by infrared and photoelectron spectroscopy in the gas phase, computations, and its bind-ing constant as a function of temperature in acetonitrile.

  20. Gas-Grain Models for Interstellar Anion Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordiner, M. A.; Charnely, S. B.

    2012-01-01

    Long-chain hydrocarbon anions C(sub n) H(-) (n = 4, 6, 8) have recently been found to be abundant in a variety of interstellar clouds. In order to explain their large abundances in the denser (prestellar/protostellar) environments, new chemical models are constructed that include gas-grain interactions. Models including accretion of gas-phase species onto dust grains and cosmic-ray-induced desorption of atoms are able to reproduce the observed anion-to-neutral ratios, as well as the absolute abundances of anionic and neutral carbon chains, with a reasonable degree of accuracy. Due to their destructive effects, the depletion of oxygen atoms onto dust results in substantially greater polyyne and anion abundances in high-density gas (with n(sub H2) approx > / cubic cm). The large abundances of carbon-chain-bearing species observed in the envelopes of protostars such as L1527 can thus be explained without the need for warm carbon-chain chemistry. The C6H(-) anion-to-neutral ratio is found to be most sensitive to the atomic O and H abundances and the electron density. Therefore, as a core evolves, falling atomic abundances and rising electron densities are found to result in increasing anion-to-neutral ratios. Inclusion of cosmic-ray desorption of atoms in high-density models delays freeze-out, which results in a more temporally stable anion-to-neutral ratio, in better agreement with observations. Our models include reactions between oxygen atoms and carbon-chain anions to produce carbon-chain-oxide species C6O, C7O, HC6O, and HC7O, the abundances of which depend on the assumed branching ratios for associative electron detachment

  1. Boron compounds as anion binding agents for nonaqueous battery electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Hung Sui; Yang, Xia-Oing; McBreen, James; Xiang, Caili

    2000-02-08

    Novel fluorinated boron-based compounds which act as anion receptors in non-aqueous battery electrolytes are provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the fluorinated boron-based compounds of the invention enhance ionic conductivity and cation transference number of non-aqueous electrolytes. The fluorinated boron-based anion receptors include borane and borate compounds bearing different fluorinated alkyl and aryl groups.

  2. GAS-GRAIN MODELS FOR INTERSTELLAR ANION CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Cordiner, M. A.; Charnley, S. B.

    2012-04-20

    Long-chain hydrocarbon anions C{sub n}H{sup -} (n = 4, 6, 8) have recently been found to be abundant in a variety of interstellar clouds. In order to explain their large abundances in the denser (prestellar/protostellar) environments, new chemical models are constructed that include gas-grain interactions. Models including accretion of gas-phase species onto dust grains and cosmic-ray-induced desorption of atoms are able to reproduce the observed anion-to-neutral ratios, as well as the absolute abundances of anionic and neutral carbon chains, with a reasonable degree of accuracy. Due to their destructive effects, the depletion of oxygen atoms onto dust results in substantially greater polyyne and anion abundances in high-density gas (with n{sub H{sub 2}}{approx}>10{sup 5} cm{sup -3}). The large abundances of carbon-chain-bearing species observed in the envelopes of protostars such as L1527 can thus be explained without the need for warm carbon-chain chemistry. The C{sub 6}H{sup -} anion-to-neutral ratio is found to be most sensitive to the atomic O and H abundances and the electron density. Therefore, as a core evolves, falling atomic abundances and rising electron densities are found to result in increasing anion-to-neutral ratios. Inclusion of cosmic-ray desorption of atoms in high-density models delays freeze-out, which results in a more temporally stable anion-to-neutral ratio, in better agreement with observations. Our models include reactions between oxygen atoms and carbon-chain anions to produce carbon-chain-oxide species C{sub 6}O, C{sub 7}O, HC{sub 6}O, and HC{sub 7}O, the abundances of which depend on the assumed branching ratios for associative electron detachment.

  3. A Comparison of Spiral Tracers in M81: Erratum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Michele; Bash, Frank N.; Hine, Butler; Rots, Arnold H.; Elmegreen, Debra M.; Hodge, Paul W.

    1990-05-01

    In the paper "A Comparison of Spiral Tracers in M81" by Michele Kaufman, Frank N. Bash, Butler Hine, Arnold H. Rots, Debra M. Elmegreen, and Paul W. Hodge (Ap. J., 345, 674 [1989]), Figure 1 (Plate 7) was miscentered, and as a result the labels on be vertical axis on the left-hand side of the H I image were cut off. The separation between tick marks on the vertical axis is 200", the same as on the horizontal axis.

  4. Hanford facilities tracer study report (315 Water Treatment Facility)

    SciTech Connect

    Ambalam, T.

    1995-04-14

    This report presents the results and findings of a tracer study to determine contact time for the disinfection process of 315 Water Treatment Facility that supplies sanitary water for the 300 Area. The study utilized fluoride as the tracer and contact times were determined for two flow rates. Interpolation of data and short circuiting effects are also discussed. The 315 Water Treatment Facility supplies sanitary water for the 300 Area to various process and domestic users. The Surface Water Treatment Rule (SWTR), outlined in the 1986 Safe Drinking Water Act Amendments enacted by the EPA in 1989 and regulated by the Washington State Department of Health (DOH) in Section 246-290-600 of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC), stipulates filtration and disinfection requirements for public water systems under the direct influence of surface water. The SWTR disinfection guidelines require that each treatment system achieves predetermined inactivation ratios. The inactivation by disinfection is approximated with a measure called CxT, where C is the disinfectant residual concentration and T is the effective contact time of the water with the disinfectant. The CxT calculations for the Hanford water treatment plants were derived from the total volume of the contact basin(s). In the absence of empirical data to support CxT calculations, the DOH determined that the CxT values used in the monthly reports for the water treatment plants on the Hanford site were invalid and required the performance of a tracer study at each plant. In response to that determination, a tracer study will be performed to determine the actual contact times of the facilities for the CxT calculations.

  5. Transient Tracers as a Problem in Control Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-15

    New Yoik, 1979. discrete one. There may be difficult questions of what consti- Meditch , J. S., A survey of data smoothing for linear and nonlinear...tracer concentrations at earlier times using a smoothing filter. 1. INTRODUCTION problem was solved. By regularization is meant the problem Direct...onboundaries and in the interior.) The question leads to the Kalman "smoother" we follow Liebelt [1967, p. 198] and Meditch [1973] and use the Rauch

  6. Thermal tracer tomography: from numerical simulation to field implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somogyvári, Márk; Brauchler, Ralf; Bayer, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Choosing heat for subsurface investigations is attractive because changes in temperature can be easily measured, and natural variations are typically slower than the timescale of the experiments. The tomographical setup expands the applicability of such tests to reconstruct the spatial distribution of hydraulic aquifer properties. A new inversion methodology is presented for thermal tracer tomography, using tracer travel times to invert the hydraulic conductivity distribution of the aquifer. If we can assume that heat transport is driven by advection, the travel time of the thermal tracer can be related to the hydraulic parameters of the aquifer. With this assumption other thermal effects such as thermal diffusion or density driven flow appear as noise in the results. To reduce these effects the early time diagnostics of the recorded breakthrough curves are used, focusing on the fastest transport routes between the sources and receivers. The inverse problem of the experiment thus can be formulated as a classical travel time problem, and it can be solved using standard eikonal solver algorithms known from seismic or hydraulic tomography. The method is demonstrated with a high resolution 3-D aquifer analog dataset. The generated 3-D reconstruction reveals the potential of the method, especially in finding the preferential flow paths within the aquifer. Aside from this, the developed method is computationally efficient and can provide results in a fragment of the time required for full-physics model calibration. The method is also tested under field conditions. Four heat tracer injections were performed during a three day field campaign at the Widen field site in northeast Switzerland. Pulse signals were used and the temperature evolution was measured downstream using a distributed measurement system. The preliminary results of the tomographic inversion correspond well with the findings of earlier studies from the field site imaging the same geological features as

  7. Development of luminescent bacteria as tracers for geological reservoir characterization

    SciTech Connect

    King, J.W.

    1990-09-01

    This research project resulted from recognizing the problem of being unable to accurately distinguish communication between wells in producing oil zones which may or may not be continuous. Bioluminescent bacteria are being developed for use as tracers in reservoir characterization. A pure culture of Photobacterium phosphoreum is being studied in the laboratory for accurate monitoring schemes. A search of the literature and communications with marine microbiologists indicate that bioluminescent bacteria can be easily studied in vitro.

  8. Myocardial uptake of a bone tracer associated with hypercalcemia

    SciTech Connect

    Atkins, H.L.; Oster, Z.H.

    1984-11-01

    A patient with end-stage renal disease and hypercalcemia was referred for a radionuclide bone imaging study. Deposition of Tc-99m hydroxymethylenediphosphonate was apparent in the lungs and myocardium as well as in the skeleton. Renal uptake was also noted, despite anuria. Computed tomography demonstrated nephrocalcinosis but no myocardial calcification. The cause of myocardial uptake of tracer is unknown. Amyloidosis is suggested as a possibility but is not validated in this case.

  9. Tracers as Tools in Characterizing Watersheds as Integrated Hydroecological Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soulsby, C.; Tetzlaff, D.; Malcolm, I. A.; Waldron, S.; Dunn, S. M.

    2006-12-01

    Increasingly characterization of watersheds is involving integrating hydrologic, geomorphic and ecological perspectives on how freshwater systems function as a scientific basis for sustainable management. Environmental tracers have great potential for integrated characterization of watersheds at a range of spatial and temporal scales: They can be used, for example, to examine residence time distributions and runoff source dynamics. In recent years, tracer data sets have become available for increasing numbers of catchments and more sites have longer-term (>10 years) records. These data resources are improving insights into how hydrological functional descriptors - such as mean residence time - can vary with spatial scale, and how they are affected by climatic variability at different temporal scales. Combining such tracer- based conceptualization of hydrology with GIS analysis of catchment characteristics has powerful potential in identifying the relative importance of varying landscape controls on hydrological response and facilitate process conceptualization of larger mesoscale (>100km2) catchments where management decisions are needed - rather than traditional small (1km2) experimental basins. Such GIS analysis also allows the hydrological function of larger catchments to be related to their geomorphic structure and landscape organization. In this contribution, analysis of tracer data sets from mesoscale experimental basins in Scotland, will be integrated with GIS-based analysis to characterize hydrological functioning and identify the dominant landscape controls at different spatial scales. This is then used to help understand the dynamics of the physico-chemical processes that provide the physical template of ecological habitats in river systems in mesoscale watershed. The biological responses to such dynamic hydrological characteristics will be illustrated with respect to Atlantic salmon rivers.

  10. Non-universal tracer diffusion in crowded media of non-inert obstacles.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Surya K; Cherstvy, Andrey G; Metzler, Ralf

    2015-01-21

    We study the diffusion of a tracer particle, which moves in continuum space between a lattice of excluded volume, immobile non-inert obstacles. In particular, we analyse how the strength of the tracer-obstacle interactions and the volume occupancy of the crowders alter the diffusive motion of the tracer. From the details of partitioning of the tracer diffusion modes between trapping states when bound to obstacles and bulk diffusion, we examine the degree of localisation of the tracer in the lattice of crowders. We study the properties of the tracer diffusion in terms of the ensemble and time averaged mean squared displacements, the trapping time distributions, the amplitude variation of the time averaged mean squared displacements, and the non-Gaussianity parameter of the diffusing tracer. We conclude that tracer-obstacle adsorption and binding triggers a transient anomalous diffusion. From a very narrow spread of recorded individual time averaged trajectories we exclude continuous type random walk processes as the underlying physical model of the tracer diffusion in our system. For moderate tracer-crowder attraction the motion is found to be fully ergodic, while at stronger attraction strength a transient disparity between ensemble and time averaged mean squared displacements occurs. We also put our results into perspective with findings from experimental single-particle tracking and simulations of the diffusion of tagged tracers in dense crowded suspensions. Our results have implications for the diffusion, transport, and spreading of chemical components in highly crowded environments inside living cells and other structured liquids.

  11. Hemibonding of hydroxyl radical and halide anion in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Makoto

    2011-12-29

    Molecular geometries and properties of the possible reaction products between the hydroxyl radical and the halide anions in aqueous solution were investigated. The formation of two-center three-electron bonding (hemibonding) between the hydroxyl radical and halide anions (Cl, Br, I) was examined by density functional theory (DFT) calculation with a range-separated hybrid (RSH) exchange-correlation functional. The long-range corrected hybrid functional (LC-ωPBE), which have given quantitatively satisfactory results for odd electron systems and excited states, was examined by test calculations for dihalogen radical anions (X(2)(-); X = Cl, Br, I) and hydroxyl radical-water clusters. Equilibrium geometries with hemibonding between the hydroxyl radical and halide anions were located by including four hydrogen-bonded water molecules. Excitation energies and oscillator strengths of σ-σ* transitions calculated by the time-dependent DFT method showed good agreement with observed values. Calculated values of the free energy of reaction on the formation of hydroxyl halide radical anion from the hydroxyl radical and halide anion were endothermic for chloride but exothermic for bromide and iodide, which is consistent with experimental values of equilibrium constants.

  12. Grain boundary mobility in anion doped MgO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapadia, C. M.; Leipold, M. H.

    1973-01-01

    Certain anions OH(-), F(-) and Gl(-) are shown to enhance grain growth in MgO. The magnitude of their effect decreases in the order in which the anions are listed and depends on their location (solid-solution, second phase) in the MgO lattice. As most anions exhibit relatively high vapor pressures at sintering temperatures, they retard densification and invariably promote residual porosity. The role of anions on grain growth rates was studied in relation to their effect on pore mobility and pore removal; the atomic process controlling the actual rates was determined from observed kinetics in conjunction with the microstructural features. With respect to controlling mechanisms, the effects of all anions are not the same. OH(-) and F(-) control behavior through creation of a defect structure and a grain boundary liquid phase while Cl(-) promotes matter transport within pores by evaporation-condensation. Studies on an additional anion, S to the minus 2nd power gave results which were no different from undoped MgO, possibly because of evaporative losses during hot pressing. Hence, the effect of sulphur is negligible or undetermined.

  13. Counterion-mediated pattern formation in membranes containing anionic lipids

    PubMed Central

    Slochower, David R.; Wang, Yu-Hsiu; Tourdot, Richard W.; Radhakrishnan, Ravi; Janmey, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Most lipid components of cell membranes are either neutral, like cholesterol, or zwitterionic, like phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin. Very few lipids, such as sphingosine, are cationic at physiological pH. These generally interact only transiently with the lipid bilayer, and their synthetic analogs are often designed to destabilize the membrane for drug or DNA delivery. However, anionic lipids are common in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cell membranes. The net charge per anionic phospholipid ranges from −1 for the most abundant anionic lipids such has phosphatidylserine, to near −7 for phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5 trisphosphate, although the effective charge depends on many environmental factors. Anionic phospholipids and other negatively charged lipids such as lipopolysaccharides are not randomly distributed in the lipid bilayer, but are highly restricted to specific leaflets of the bilayer and to regions near transmembrane proteins or other organized structures within the plane of the membrane. This review highlights some recent evidence that counterions, in the form of monovalent or divalent metal ions, polyamines, or cationic protein domains, have a large influence of the lateral distribution of anionic lipids within the membrane, and that lateral demixing of anionic lipids has effects on membrane curvature and protein function that are important for biological control. PMID:24556233

  14. Plutonium isotopes as tracers for ocean processes: a review.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Patric; Lee, Sang-Han; Worsfold, Paul; Keith-Roach, Miranda

    2010-03-01

    Since the first nuclear weapons tests in the 1940s, pulsed inputs of plutonium isotopes have served as excellent tracers for understanding sources, pathways, dynamics and the fate of pollutants and particles in the marine environment. Due to the well-defined spatial and temporal inputs of Pu, the long half-lives of (240)Pu and (239)Pu and its unique chemical properties, Pu is a potential tracer for various physical and biogeochemical ocean processes, including circulation, sedimentation and biological productivity, and hence a means of assessing the impacts of global climate change. Due to the source dependency of the Pu isotopic signature, plutonium isotopes are beginning to be exploited as tools for the evaluation and improvement of regional and global ocean models that will enhance understanding of past and future changes in the oceans. This paper addresses the major sources of Pu and the physical and biogeochemical behaviour in the marine environment. Finally, the use of Pu isotopes as tracers for various oceanic processes (e.g. water mass transport, particle export, and sedimentation) is considered.

  15. Compact microfluidic device for rapid concentration of PET tracers

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Wei-Yu; van Dam, R. Michael

    2015-01-01

    HPLC purification and reformulation of positron emission tomography (PET) tracers can lead to significant dilution of the final product, making it difficult to produce a sufficiently high radioactivity concentration for some applications (e.g. small animal imaging, in vitro assays, and labelling of proteins with prosthetic groups). This is especially true for molecules with lengthy or low-yield syntheses. Starting the synthesis with more radioactivity increases the final radioactivity concentration but increases hazards and complexity of handling. An alternative is to concentrate the final product by a process such as rotary evaporation prior to downstream use. Because a rotovap requires significant space within a hot cell that could be put to more productive use, we developed a compact microfluidic system for concentration of PET tracers. This system also provides advantages in terms of repeatability, interfacing and potential for automation. We present here the design and performance characterization of the system, and demonstrate the concentration of several tracers in aqueous-based HPLC mobile phases. PMID:24825578

  16. Using atmospheric tracers to reduce uncertainty in groundwater recharge areas.

    PubMed

    Starn, J Jeffrey; Bagtzoglou, Amvrossios C; Robbins, Gary A

    2010-01-01

    A Monte Carlo-based approach to assess uncertainty in recharge areas shows that incorporation of atmospheric tracer observations (in this case, tritium concentration) and prior information on model parameters leads to more precise predictions of recharge areas. Variance-covariance matrices, from model calibration and calculation of sensitivities, were used to generate parameter sets that account for parameter correlation and uncertainty. Constraining parameter sets to those that met acceptance criteria, which included a standard error criterion, did not appear to bias model results. Although the addition of atmospheric tracer observations and prior information produced similar changes in the extent of predicted recharge areas, prior information had the effect of increasing probabilities within the recharge area to a greater extent than atmospheric tracer observations. Uncertainty in the recharge area propagates into predictions that directly affect water quality, such as land cover in the recharge area associated with a well and the residence time associated with the well. Assessments of well vulnerability that depend on these factors should include an assessment of model parameter uncertainty. A formal simulation of parameter uncertainty can be used to delineate probabilistic recharge areas, and the results can be expressed in ways that can be useful to water-resource managers. Although no one model is the correct model, the results of multiple models can be evaluated in terms of the decision being made and the probability of a given outcome from each model.

  17. A tracer-kinetic field theory for medical imaging.

    PubMed

    Sourbron, Steven

    2014-04-01

    Dynamic imaging data are currently analyzed with a tracer-kinetic theory developed for individual time curves measured over whole organs. The assumption is that voxels represent isolated systems which all receive indicator through the same arterial inlet. This leads to well-known systematic errors, but also fails to exploit the spatial structure of the data. In this study, a more general theoretical framework is developed which makes full use of the specific structure of image data. The theory encodes the fact that voxels receive indicator from their immediate neighbors rather than from an upstream arterial input. This results in a tracer-kinetic field theory where the tissue parameters are functions of space which can be measured by analyzing the temporal and spatial patterns in the concentrations. The implications are evaluated through a number of field models for common tissue types. The key benefits of a tracer-kinetic field theory are that: 1) long-standing systematic errors can be corrected, specifically the issue of bolus dispersion and the contamination of large-vessel blood flow on tissue perfusion measurements; 2) additional tissue parameters can be measured that characterize convective or diffusive exchange between voxels; 3) the need to measure a separate arterial input function can be eliminated.

  18. An investigation of radial tracer flow in naturally fractured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Jetzabeth, Ramirez-Sabag; Fernando, Samaniego V.; Jesus, Rivera R.; Fernando Rodriguez

    1991-01-01

    This study presents a general solution for the radial flow of tracers in naturally fractured reservoirs. Continuous and finite step injection of chemical and radioactive tracers are considered. The reservoir is treated as being composed of two regions: a mobile region where longitudinal dispersion and convection take place and a stagnant region where only diffusion and adsorption are allowed. Radioactive decay is considered in both regions. The model of this study is thoroughly compared to those previously presented in literature by Moench and Ogata, Tang et al., Chen et al., and Hsieh et al. The solution is numerically inverted by means of the Crump algorithm. A detailed validation of the model with respect to solutions previously presented and/or simplified physical conditions solutions (i.e., homogeneous case) or limit solutions (i.e., for short times) was carried out. The influence of various dimensionless parameters that enter into the solution was investigated. A discussion of results obtained through the Crump and Stehfest algorithm is presented, concluding that the Crump method provides more reliable tracer concentrations.

  19. Metal stable isotope signatures as tracers in environmental geochemistry.

    PubMed

    Wiederhold, Jan G

    2015-03-03

    The biogeochemical cycling of metals in natural systems is often accompanied by stable isotope fractionation which can now be measured due to recent analytical advances. In consequence, a new research field has emerged over the last two decades, complementing the traditional stable isotope systems (H, C, O, N, S) with many more elements across the periodic table (Li, B, Mg, Si, Cl, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ge, Se, Br, Sr, Mo, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Te, Ba, W, Pt, Hg, Tl, U) which are being explored and potentially applicable as novel geochemical tracers. This review presents the application of metal stable isotopes as source and process tracers in environmental studies, in particular by using mixing and Rayleigh model approaches. The most important concepts of mass-dependent and mass-independent metal stable isotope fractionation are introduced, and the extent of natural isotopic variations for different elements is compared. A particular focus lies on a discussion of processes (redox transformations, complexation, sorption, precipitation, dissolution, evaporation, diffusion, biological cycling) which are able to induce metal stable isotope fractionation in environmental systems. Additionally, the usefulness and limitations of metal stable isotope signatures as tracers in environmental geochemistry are discussed and future perspectives presented.

  20. Development of perfluorocarbon tracer technology for underground leak location.

    PubMed

    Hassoun, S; McBride, T; Russell, D A

    2000-10-01

    A method has been developed for the atmospheric sampling and analysis of four perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) compounds simultaneously at the parts per trillion (ppt) level. PFTs were pre-concentrated using adsorbent tube air sampling. Analysis was achieved by thermal desorption (TD) and gas chromatography (GC) with electron capture detection (ECD). Efficient separation of the PFTs from the other sample constituents was achieved by use of a capillary porous layer open tubular (PLOT) GC column without the need to cool the GC oven to sub-ambient temperatures using liquid coolants (M. de Bortoli and E. Pecchio, J. High Resolut. Chromatogr., 1985, 8, 422) or for a catalytic destruction step to remove interferents (T. W. D'Ottavio, R. W. Goodrich and R. N. Dietz, Environ. Sci. Technol., 1986, 20, 100). Results from test field trials with two volatile PFTs that were buried to simulate an underground leaking cable were successful. The PFTs were detected above ground level to pinpoint the leak position. The highest tracer concentrations were detected within 1 m of the simulated leak positions 2 days after tracer burial. The developed technology was applied to an oil leaking high voltage electricity cable. One PFT was added to the cable oil which enabled detection of the oil leak to within 3 m. The reported method has many advantages over currently used leak detection methods and could, in the future, be applied to the detection of underground leaks in a variety of cables and pipes.

  1. Evaluation of new stratospheric age tracers and SF6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laube, J. C.; Gallacher, E.; Oram, D.; Boenisch, H.; Engel, A.; Fraser, P. J.; Röckmann, T.; Sturges, W. T.

    2015-12-01

    Sulphur hexafluoride (SF6) is a very long-lived, potent greenhouse gas. Its abundances continue to increase in the atmosphere. Due to its inert behaviour it has also been extensively used as a tracer of transport in the ocean, the troposphere and the stratosphere. We here combine long-term tropospheric records obtained from the Cape Grim Baseline station, Tasmania, with stratospheric data from high-altitude aircraft and balloon campaigns. We then assess the novel use of several alternative transport tracers (e.g. C2F6, C3F8 and HFC-23) in the stratosphere. The results indicate good suitability for some of these gases in terms of their inertness, tropospheric growth rates and measurement precisions. In addition we and compare the derived mean ages to those obtained from SF6 and find indications for the possibility of the existence of a stratospheric SF6 sink. The latter finding would also imply that the total atmospheric lifetime of SF6 is substantially shorter than previously believed, with further implications for its use as a transport tracer in the stratosphere.

  2. Radioisotope tracer study in a sludge hygienization research irradiator (SHRI).

    PubMed

    Pant, H J; Thýn, J; Zitný, R; Bhatt, B C

    2001-01-01

    A radioisotope tracer study has been carried out in a batch type sludge hygienization research irradiator with flow from top to bottom, the objective being to measure flow rate, circulation and mixing times and to investigate the hydrodynamic behaviour of the irradiator for identifying the cause(s) of malfunction. A stimulus-response technique with NH4(82)Br as a tracer was used to measure the above parameters. Experiments were carried out at three different flow rates, i.e 1.0, 0.64 and 0.33 m3/min. Three combined models based on a set of differential equations are proposed and used to simulate the measured tracer concentration curves. The obtained parameters were used to estimate dead volume and analyse hydrodynamic behaviour of the irradiator. The nonlinear regression problem of model parameter estimation was solved using the Marquardt-Levenberg method. The measured flow rate was found to be in good agreement with the values shown by the flow meter. The circulation times were found to be half of the mixing times. A simple approach for estimation of dose based on a known vertical dose-rate profile inside the irradiator is presented. About one-fourth of the volume of the irradiator was found to be dead at lower flow rates and this decreased with increase in flow rate. At higher flow rates, a semi stagnant volume was found with slow exchange of flow between the active and dead volumes.

  3. Radioactive tracers facilitate stimulation job evaluation. Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, K.; Walker, R.; Dunleavy, R.; Woodroof, B.; Crabb, H.

    1995-02-01

    Logging tools can now quantify multiple isotopes, including the volume of individual isotopes present and their radial position away from the well bore. In conjunction with those improvements, tracers have been developed that eliminate wash off effects of conventional tracers. By precisely locating the presence and concentration of traced proppant at the well bore, better evaluations can be made of vertical and radial proppant distribution near the well bore and fracture aperture width. A comprehensive study of 98 wells with 136 fracture stages in four different basins has been completed. Each stage was traced and logged. Spectral gamma ray logs were compared with conventional openhole logs, sonic stress logs where available, and cased hole logs such as cement bond and production logs. This data was then compared on a well-by-well basis with the fracture design program, post treatment stimulation reports and production history. Several trends were identified while building this massive stimulation evaluation database. Problems that potentially could be solved using tracer technology are: fracture height greater than design; unstimulated perforation sets within a stage; understimulated pay intervals.

  4. Entropically induced asymmetric passage times of charged tracers across corrugated channels

    SciTech Connect

    Malgaretti, Paolo; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Miguel Rubi, J.

    2016-01-21

    We analyze the diffusion of charged and neutral tracers suspended in an electrolyte embedded in a channel of varying cross section. Making use of systematic approximations, the diffusion equation governing the motion of tracers is mapped into an effective 1D equation describing the dynamics along the longitudinal axis of the channel where its varying-section is encoded as an effective entropic potential. This simplified approach allows us to characterize tracer diffusion under generic confinement by measuring their mean first passage time (MFPT). In particular, we show that the interplay between geometrical confinement and electrostatic interactions strongly affect the MFTP of tracers across corrugated channels hence leading to alternative means to control tracers translocation across charged pores. Finally, our results show that the MFPTs of a charged tracer in opposite directions along an asymmetric channel may differ We expect our results to be relevant for biological as well synthetic devices whose dynamics is controlled by the detection of diluted tracers.

  5. In-Situ Characterization of Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Using Partitioning Tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Gary A. Pope; Daene C. McKinney; Akhil Datta Gupta; Richard E. Jackson; Minquan Jin

    2000-03-20

    Majors advances have been made during the past three years in our research on interwell partitioning tracers tests (PITTs). These advances include (1) progress on the inverse problem of how to estimate the three-dimensional distribution of NAPL in aquifers from the tracer data, (2) the first ever partitioning tracer experiments in dual porosity media, (3) the first modeling of partitioning tracers in dual porosity media (4) experiments with complex NAPLs such as coal tar, (5) the development of an accurate and simple method to predict partition coefficients using the equivalent alkane carbon number approach, (6) partitioning tracer experiments in large model aquifers with permeability layers, (7) the first ever analysis of partitioning tracer data to estimate the change in composition of a NAPL before and after remediation (8) the first ever analysis of partitioning tracer data after a field demonstration of surfactant foam to remediate NAPL and (9) experiments at elevated temperatures .

  6. Identification of runoff generation processes using hydrometric and tracer methods in a meso-scale catchment in Rwanda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munyaneza, O.; Wenninger, J.; Uhlenbrook, S.

    2012-07-01

    Understanding of dominant runoff generation processes in the meso-scale Migina catchment (257.4 km2) in southern Rwanda was improved using analysis of hydrometric data and tracer methods. The paper examines the use of hydrochemical and isotope parameters for separating streamflow into different runoff components by investigating two flood events which occurred during the rainy season "Itumba" (March-May) over a period of 2 yr at two gauging stations. Dissolved silica (SiO2), electrical conductivity (EC), deuterium (2H), oxygen-18 (18O), major anions (Cl- and SO2-4) and major cations (Na+, K+, Mg2+ and Ca2+) were analyzed during the events. 2H, 18O, Cl- and SiO2 were finally selected to assess the different contributing sources using mass balance equations and end member mixing analysis for two- and three-component hydrograph separation models. The results obtained by applying two-component hydrograph separations using dissolved silica and chloride as tracers are generally in line with the results of three-component separations using dissolved silica and deuterium. Subsurface runoff is dominating the total discharge during flood events. More than 80% of the discharge was generated by subsurface runoff for both events. This is supported by observations of shallow groundwater responses in the catchment (depth 0.2-2 m), which show fast infiltration of rainfall water during events. Consequently, shallow groundwater contributes to subsurface stormflow and baseflow generation. This dominance of subsurface contributions is also in line with the observed low runoff coefficient values (16.7 and 44.5%) for both events. Groundwater recharge during the wet seasons leads to a perennial river system. These results are essential for better water resources planning and management in the region, which is characterized by very highly competing demands (domestic vs. agricultural vs. industrial uses).

  7. Identification of runoff generation processes using hydrometric and tracer methods in a meso-scale catchment in Rwanda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munyaneza, O.; Wenninger, J.; Uhlenbrook, S.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding of dominant runoff generation processes in the meso-scale Migina catchment (257.4 km2) in Southern Rwanda was improved using analysis of hydrometric data and tracer methods. The paper examines the use of hydrochemical and isotope parameters for separating streamflow into different runoff components by investigating two flood events occurred during the rainy season "Itumba" (March-May) over the period of 2 yr at two gauging stations. Dissolved silica (SiO2), electrical conductivity (EC), deuterium (2H), oxygen-18 (18O), major anions (Cl- and SO42-) and major cations (Na+, K+, Mg2+ and Ca2+) were analyzed during the events. 2H, 18O, Cl- and SiO2 were finally selected to assess the different contributing sources using mass balance equations and end member mixing analysis for two- and three-component hydrograph separation models. The results obtained applying two-component hydrograph separations using dissolved silica and chloride as tracers are generally in line with the results of three-component separations using dissolved silica and deuterium. Subsurface runoff is dominating the total discharge during flood events, More than 80% of the discharge was generated by subsurface runoff for both events. This is supported by observations of shallow groundwater responses in the catchment (depth 0.2-2 m), which show fast infiltration of rainfall water during events. Consequently, shallow groundwater and contributes to subsurface stormflow and baseflow generation. This dominance of subsurface contributions is also in line with the observed low runoff coefficient values (16.7-44.5%) for both events. Groundwater recharge during the wet seasons leads to a perennial river system, and wet season recharge is isotopically characterising all discharge components.

  8. Innovative techniques for the description of reservoir heterogeneity using tracers. Final report, October 1992--December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, G.A.; Sepehrnoori, K.; Delshad, M.; Ferreira, L.; Gupta, A.; Maroongroge, V.

    1994-11-01

    This is the final report of a three year research project on the use of tracers for reservoir characterization. The objective of this research was to develop advanced, innovative techniques for the description of reservoir characteristics using both single-well backflow and interwell tracer tests. (1) The authors implemented and validated tracer modeling features in a compositional simulator (UTCOMP). (2) They developed and applied a new single well tracer test for estimating reservoir heterogeneity. (3) They developed and applied a new single well tracer test for estimating reservoir wettability in-situ. (4) They developed a new, simple and efficient method to analyze two well tracer tests based upon type curve matching and illustrated its use with actual field tracer data. (5) They developed a new method for deriving an integrated reservoir description based upon combinatorial optimization schemes. (6) They developed a new, interwell tracer test for reservoir heterogeneity called vertical tracer profiling (VTP) and demonstrated its advantages over conventional interwell tracer testing. (7) They developed a simple and easy analytical method to estimate swept pore volume from interwell tracer data and showed both the theoretical basis for this method and its practical utility. (8) They made numerous enhancements to our compositional reservoir simulator such as including the full permeability tensor, adding faster solvers, improving its speed and robustness and making it easier to use (better I/0) for tracer simulation problems. (9) They applied the enhanced version of UTCOMP to the analysis of interwell tracer data using perfluorocarbons at Elks Hill Naval Petroleum Reserve. All of these accomplishments taken together have significantly improved the state of reservoir tracer technology and have demonstrated that it is a far more powerful and useful tool for quantitative reservoir characterization than previously realized or practiced by the industry.

  9. Estimation of Fluorescent Dye Amount in Tracer Dye Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekkan, Emrah; Balkan, Erman; Balkan, Emir

    2015-04-01

    Karstic groundwater is more influenced by human than the groundwater that disperse in pores. On the other hand karstic groundwater resources, in addition to providing agricultural needs, livestock breeding, drinking and domestic water in most of the months of the year, they also supply drinking water to the wild life at high altitudes. Therefore sustainability and hydrogeological investigation of karstic resources is critical. Tracing techniques are widely used in hydrologic and hydrogeologic studies to determine water storage, flow rate, direction and protection area of groundwater resources. Karanfil Mountain (2800 m), located in Adana, Turkey, is one of the karstic recharge areas of the natural springs spread around its periphery. During explorations of the caves of Karanfil mountain, a 600 m deep cave was found by the Turkish and Polish cavers. At the bottom of the cave there is an underground river with a flow rate of approximately 0.5 m3/s during August 2014. The main spring is located 8 km far from the cave's entrance and its mean flow rate changes between 3.4 m3/s and 0.21 m3/s in March and September respectively according to a flowrate observation station of Directorate of Water Works of Turkey. As such frequent storms, snowmelt and normal seasonal variations in rainfall have a significant and rapid effect on the volume of this main spring resource. The objective of our research is to determine and estimate dye amount before its application on the field inspired from the previously literature on the subject. This estimation is intended to provide a preliminary application of a tracer test of a karstic system. In this study dye injection, inlet point will be an underground river located inside the cave and the observation station will be the spring that is approximately 8 km far from the cave entrance. On the other hand there is 600 meter elevation difference between cave entrance and outlet spring. In this test Rodamin-WT will be used as tracer and the

  10. Macro and micro scale interactions between cohesive sediment tracers and natural mud.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Kate; Manning, Andrew; Droppo, Ian; Leppard, Gary; Benson, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    Understanding the dispersion patterns of fine, cohesive sediment (< 63 micron) is fundamental to the sustainable management of aquatic environments. In order to develop sediment transport models and predict sediment dispersion, accurate field techniques for the measurement of sediment transport are required. Although this is relatively simple for the sand sized fraction, measuring transport pathways for cohesive sediment is more problematic. Cohesive sediment tracers developed for this purpose include synthetic tracer particles (e.g. polymers) and labelled natural clays (e.g. Mahler et al. 1998, Yin et al. 1999, Krezoski 1985; Spencer et al. 2007) and a fundamental assumption is that the tracer has the same physical properties as natural sediment. For the cohesive fraction this means that the tracer must be incorporated into and transported via floc aggregates (Black et al. 2006). A few studies have examined the physical behaviour of cohesive tracers (e.g. Manning et al. in press) but most are limited to the examination of gross settling characteristics (e.g. Louisse et al. 1986) rather than floc formation and behaviour. This work focuses on a labelled natural clay; a Ho-montmorillonite (see Spencer et al. 2007). The aims of this work were to examine the physical characteristics, internal structure and settling dynamics of the tracer and to determine whether the tracer flocculated and interacted with natural estuarine muds at both macro- and microscales. To our knowledge, this is the first study to present data examining the flocculation characteristics and structure of cohesive sediment tracers and their interaction with natural sediment. Macroscale floc characteristics such as floc size and settling velocity measurements were obtained using the LabSFLOC - Laboratory Spectral Flocculation Characteristics - instrument. Floc density, porosity, dry mass, and mass settling flux were then calculated. Floc internal microstructure (1-2 nm) and elemental floc composition

  11. MULTISPECIES REACTIVE TRACER TEST IN A SAND AND GRAVEL AQUIFER, CAPE COD, MASSACHUSETTS: PART 2: TRANSPORT OF CHROMIUM (VI) AND LEAD-, COPPER-, AND ZINC-EDTA TRACERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report discusses the transport of a group of reactive tracers over the course of a large-scale, natural gradient tracer test conducted at the USGS Cape Cod Toxic Substances Hydrology Research site, near Falmouth, Massachusetts. The overall objectives of the experiment were ...

  12. Anisotropic diffusion at the field scale in a 4-year multi-tracer diffusion and retention experiment - I: Insights from the experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimmi, Thomas; Leupin, Olivier X.; Eikenberg, Jost; Glaus, Martin A.; Van Loon, Luc R.; Waber, H. Niklaus; Wersin, Paul; Wang, Hao A. O.; Grolimund, Daniel; Borca, Camelia N.; Dewonck, Sarah; Wittebroodt, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Claystones are considered worldwide as barrier materials for nuclear waste repositories. In the Mont Terri underground research laboratory (URL), a nearly 4-year diffusion and retention (DR) experiment has been performed in Opalinus Clay. It aimed at (1) obtaining data at larger space and time scales than in laboratory experiments and (2) under relevant in situ conditions with respect to pore water chemistry and mechanical stress, (3) quantifying the anisotropy of in situ diffusion, and (4) exploring possible effects of a borehole-disturbed zone. The experiment included two tracer injection intervals in a borehole perpendicular to bedding, through which traced artificial pore water (APW) was circulated, and a pressure monitoring interval. The APW was spiked with neutral tracers (HTO, HDO, H2O-18), anions (Br, I, SeO4), and cations (Na-22, Ba-133, Sr-85, Cs-137, Co-60, Eu-152, stable Cs, and stable Eu). Most tracers were added at the beginning, some were added at a later stage. The hydraulic pressure in the injection intervals was adjusted according to the measured value in the pressure monitoring interval to ensure transport by diffusion only. Concentration time-series in the APW within the borehole intervals were obtained, as well as 2D concentration distributions in the rock at the end of the experiment after overcoring and subsampling which resulted in ∼250 samples and ∼1300 analyses. As expected, HTO diffused the furthest into the rock, followed by the anions (Br, I, SeO4) and by the cationic sorbing tracers (Na-22, Ba-133, Cs, Cs-137, Co-60, Eu-152). The diffusion of SeO4 was slower than that of Br or I, approximately proportional to the ratio of their diffusion coefficients in water. Ba-133 diffused only into ∼0.1 m during the ∼4 a. Stable Cs, added at a higher concentration than Cs-137, diffused further into the rock than Cs-137, consistent with a non-linear sorption behavior. The rock properties (e.g., water contents) were rather homogeneous at the

  13. Anion transport by the cochlear motor protein prestin.

    PubMed

    Schänzler, Michael; Fahlke, Christoph

    2012-01-15

    Prestin is a member of the SLC26 solute carrier family and functions as a motor protein in cochlear outer hair cells. While other SLC26 homologues were demonstrated to transport a wide variety of anions, no electrogenic transport activity has been assigned so far to mammalian prestin. We here use heterologous expression in mammalian cells, patch clamp recordings and measurements of expression levels of individual cells to study anion transport by rat prestin. We demonstrated that cells expressing rat prestin exhibit SCN(-) currents that are proportional to the number of prestin molecules. Variation of the SCN(-) concentration resulted in changes of the current reversal potential that obey the Nernst equation indicating that SCN(-) transport is not stoichiometrically coupled to other anions. Application of external SCN(-) causes large increases of anion currents, but only minor changes in non-linear charge movements suggesting that only a very small percentage of prestin molecules function as SCN(-) transporters under these conditions. Unitary current amplitudes are below the resolution limit of noise analysis and thus much smaller than expected for pore-mediated anion transport. A comparison with a non-mammalian prestin from D. rerio - recently shown to function as Cl(-)/SO(4)(2-) antiporter - and an SLC26 anion channel, human SLC26A7, revealed that SCN(-) transport is conserved in these distinct members of the SLC26 family. We conclude that mammalian prestin is capable of mediating electrogenic anion transport and suggest that SLC26 proteins converting membrane voltage oscillations into conformational changes and those functioning as channels or transporters share certain transport capabilities.

  14. Discovery of Interstellar Anions in Cepheus and Auriga

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordiner, M. A.; Charnely, S. B.; Buckle, J. V.; Walsh, C.

    2011-01-01

    We report the detection of microwave emission lines from the hydrocarbon anion C6H(-) and its parent neutral C6H in the star-forming region LI251 A (in Cepheus), and the pre-stellar core LI512 (in Auriga). The carbon chain-bearing species C4H, HC3N, HC5N, HC7N, and C3S are also detected in large abundances. The observations of L1251A constitute the first detections of anions and long-chain polyynes and cyanopolyynes (with more than five carbon atoms) in the Cepheus Flare star-forming region, and the first detection of anions in the vicinity of a protostar outside of the Taurus molecular cloud complex, indicating a possible wider importance for anions in the chemistry of star formation. Rotational excitation temperatures have been derived from the HC3N hyperfine structure lines and are found to be 6.2 K for L1251A and 8.7 K for LI5l2. The anion-to-neutral ratios are 3.6% and 4.1%, respectively, which are within the range of values previously observed in the interstellar medium, and suggest a relative uniformity in the processes governing anion abundances in different dense interstellar clouds. This research contributes toward the growing body of evidence that carbon chain anions are relatively abundant in interstellar clouds throughout the Galaxy, but especially in the regions of relatively high density and high depletion surrounding pre-stellar cores and young, embedded protostars.

  15. The role of catalyst precursor anions in coal gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Abotsi, G.M.K.

    1992-08-28

    The aims of the proposed project are to enrich our understanding of the roles of various aqueous soluble catalyst precursor anions on the surface electrical properties of coal and to ascertain the influence of the surface charge on the adsorption, dispersion, and activities of calcium and potassium. These goals will be achieved by impregnating a North Dakota lignite (PSOC 1482) and its demineralized derivative with calcium or potassium catalyst precursors containing acetate (CH{sub 3}COO{sup {minus}}), chloride (Cl{sup {minus}}), nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}), sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}), and carbonate (CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}) anions. Catalyst loading will be conducted under well-controlled conditions of solution pH and ionic strength. In the last quarter, the surface charge properties of the coal was determined as a function of acetate (CH{sub 3}COO{sup {minus}}), chloride (Cl{sup {minus}}), nitrate (NO{sup 3}{sup {minus}}), carbonate (CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}) or sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}})concentration using the respective potassium salts of these anions. In general, low anion concentrations (10{sup {minus}3} or 10{sup {minus}2} mol/L) had little effect on the zeta potentials of the coals. However, the surface charge densities of the coal become less negative at 10-1 mol/L of the nitrate, carbonate or sulfate anions. These trends suggest that the surface charge density of the coal is controlled by the adsorption of potassium ions (K{sup +}) onto the coal particles. The net negative charge on the coal panicles creates a repulsive force between the anions and the coal surface and prevents the anions from exerting any significant effect on the coal's electrokinetic properties.

  16. DISCOVERY OF INTERSTELLAR ANIONS IN CEPHEUS AND AURIGA

    SciTech Connect

    Cordiner, M. A.; Charnley, S. B.; Buckle, J. V.; Walsh, C.; Millar, T. J.

    2011-04-01

    We report the detection of microwave emission lines from the hydrocarbon anion C{sub 6}H{sup -} and its parent neutral C{sub 6}H in the star-forming region L1251A (in Cepheus), and the pre-stellar core L1512 (in Auriga). The carbon-chain-bearing species C{sub 4}H, HC{sub 3}N, HC{sub 5}N, HC{sub 7}N, and C{sub 3}S are also detected in large abundances. The observations of L1251A constitute the first detections of anions and long-chain polyynes and cyanopolyynes (with more than five carbon atoms) in the Cepheus Flare star-forming region, and the first detection of anions in the vicinity of a protostar outside of the Taurus molecular cloud complex, indicating a possible wider importance for anions in the chemistry of star formation. Rotational excitation temperatures have been derived from the HC{sub 3}N hyperfine structure lines and are found to be 6.2 K for L1251A and 8.7 K for L1512. The anion-to-neutral ratios are 3.6% and 4.1%, respectively, which are within the range of values previously observed in the interstellar medium, and suggest a relative uniformity in the processes governing anion abundances in different dense interstellar clouds. This research contributes toward the growing body of evidence that carbon chain anions are relatively abundant in interstellar clouds throughout the Galaxy, but especially in the regions of relatively high density and high depletion surrounding pre-stellar cores and young, embedded protostars.

  17. Laboratory characterization of non-aqueous phase liquid/tracer interaction in support of a vadose zone partitioning interwell tracer test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeds, Neil E.; McKinney, Daene C.; Pope, Gary A.

    2000-01-01

    Contaminant characterization is important for successful remediation of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in the unsaturated zone. A partitioning interwell tracer test (PITT) can provide a good estimate of average subsurface NAPL saturations. Screening experiments were completed in the laboratory to evaluate several gas tracers for a PITT study to be completed in the vadose zone at Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, NM. Four perfluorocarbon tracers were found to be suitable for this PITT. Further laboratory column studies were completed using contaminated field soil to measure the partition coefficients between the tracers and the NAPL. The results from the column studies showed that the air/NAPL tracer partition coefficients ranged from 8.8±0.6 to 71±3. This range of partition coefficients is suitable for detection of NAPL saturations in the field of 0.002 to 0.14.

  18. Influence of Transport on Two-Dimensional Model Simulation. Tracer Sensitivity to 2-D Model Transport. 1; Long Lived Tracers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, Eric L.; Jackman, Charles H.; Considine, David B.; Stolarski, Richard S.

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we examine the sensitivity of long lived tracers to changes in the base transport components in our 2-D model. Changes to the strength of the residual circulation in the upper troposphere and stratosphere and changes to the lower stratospheric K(sub zz) had similar effects in that increasing the transport rates decreased the overall stratospheric mean age, and increased the rate of removal of material from the stratosphere. Increasing the stratospheric K(sub yy) increased the mean age due to the greater recycling of air parcels through the middle atmosphere, via the residual circulation, before returning to the troposphere. However, increasing K(sub yy) along with self-consistent increases in the corresponding planetary wave drive, which leads to a stronger residual circulation, more than compensates for the K(sub yy)-effect, and produces significantly younger ages throughout the stratosphere. Simulations with very small tropical stratospheric K(sub yy) decreased the globally averaged age of air by as much as 25% in the middle and upper stratosphere, and resulted in substantially weaker vertical age gradients above 20 km in the extratropics. We found only very small stratospheric tracer sensitivity to the magnitude of the horizontal mixing across the tropopause, and to the strength of the mesospheric gravity wave drag and diffusion used in the model. We also investigated the transport influence on chemically active tracers and found a strong age-tracer correlation, both in concentration and calculated lifetimes. The base model transport gives the most favorable overall comparison with a variety of inert tracer observations, and provides a significant improvement over our previous 1995 model transport. Moderate changes to the base transport were found to provide modest agreement with some of the measurements. Transport scenarios with residence times ranging from moderately shorter to slightly longer relative to the base case simulated N2O lifetimes

  19. Journal: A Review of Some Tracer-Test Design Equations for ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Determination of necessary tracer mass, initial sample-collection time, and subsequent sample-collection frequency are the three most difficult aspects to estimate for a proposed tracer test prior to conducting the tracer test. To facilitate tracer-mass estimation, 33 mass-estimation equations are reviewed here, 32 of which were evaluated using previously published tracer-test design examination parameters. Comparison of the results produced a wide range of estimated tracer mass, but no means is available by which one equation may be reasonably selected over the others. Each equation produces a simple approximation for tracer mass. Most of the equations are based primarily on estimates or measurements of discharge, transport distance, and suspected transport times. Although the basic field parameters commonly employed are appropriate for estimating tracer mass, the 33 equations are problematic in that they were all probably based on the original developers' experience in a particular field area and not necessarily on measured hydraulic parameters or solute-transport theory. Suggested sampling frequencies are typically based primarily on probable transport distance, but with little regard to expected travel times. This too is problematic in that tends to result in false negatives or data aliasing. Simulations from the recently developed efficient hydrologic tracer-test design methodology (EHTD) were compared with those obtained from 32 of the 33 published tracer-

  20. Development of Models to Simulate Tracer Tests for Characterization of Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Mark D.; Reimus, Paul; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Rose, Peter; Dean, Cynthia A.; Watson, Tom B.; Newell, D.; Leecaster, Kevin; Brauser, Eric

    2013-05-01

    A recent report found that power and heat produced from enhanced (or engineered) geothermal systems (EGSs) could have a major impact on the U.S energy production capability while having a minimal impact on the environment. EGS resources differ from high-grade hydrothermal resources in that they lack sufficient temperature distribution, permeability/porosity, fluid saturation, or recharge of reservoir fluids. Therefore, quantitative characterization of temperature distributions and the surface area available for heat transfer in EGS is necessary for the design and commercial development of the geothermal energy of a potential EGS site. The goal of this project is to provide integrated tracer and tracer interpretation tools to facilitate this characterization. This project was initially focused on tracer development with the application of perfluorinated tracer (PFT) compounds, non-reactive tracers used in numerous applications from atmospheric transport to underground leak detection, to geothermal systems, and evaluation of encapsulated PFTs that would release tracers at targeted reservoir temperatures. After the 2011 midyear review and subsequent discussions with the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Technology Program (GTP), emphasis was shifted to interpretive tool development, testing, and validation. Subsurface modeling capabilities are an important component of this project for both the design of suitable tracers and the interpretation of data from in situ tracer tests, be they single- or multi-well tests. The purpose of this report is to describe the results of the tracer and model development for simulating and conducting tracer tests for characterizing EGS parameters.

  1. A tracer-based inversion method for diagnosing eddy-induced diffusivity and advection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachman, S. D.; Fox-Kemper, B.; Bryan, F. O.

    2015-02-01

    A diagnosis method is presented which inverts a set of tracer flux statistics into an eddy-induced transport intended to apply for all tracers. The underlying assumption is that a linear flux-gradient relationship describes eddy-induced tracer transport, but a full tensor coefficient is assumed rather than a scalar coefficient which allows for down-gradient and skew transports. Thus, Lagrangian advection and anisotropic diffusion not necessarily aligned with the tracer gradient can be diagnosed. In this method, multiple passive tracers are initialized in an eddy-resolving flow simulation. Their spatially-averaged gradients form a matrix, where the gradient of each tracer is assumed to satisfy an identical flux-gradient relationship. The resulting linear system, which is overdetermined when using more than three tracers, is then solved to obtain an eddy transport tensor R which describes the eddy advection (antisymmetric part of R) and potentially anisotropic diffusion (symmetric part of R) in terms of coarse-grained variables. The mathematical basis for this inversion method is presented here, along with practical guidelines for its implementation. We present recommendations for initialization of the passive tracers, maintaining the required misalignment of the tracer gradients, correcting for nonconservative effects, and quantifying the error in the diagnosed transport tensor. A method is proposed to find unique, tracer-independent, distinct rotational and divergent Lagrangian transport operators, but the results indicate that these operators are not meaningfully relatable to tracer-independent eddy advection or diffusion. With the optimal method of diagnosis, the diagnosed transport tensor is capable of predicting the fluxes of other tracers that are withheld from the diagnosis, including even active tracers such as buoyancy, such that relative errors of 14% or less are found.

  2. Technical Note: Coupling of chemical processes with the Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy) submodel TRACER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jöckel, P.; Kerkweg, A.; Buchholz, J.; Tost, H.; Sander, R.; Pozzer, A.

    2007-11-01

    The implementation of processes related to chemistry into Earth System Models and their coupling within such systems requires the consistent description of the chemical species involved. We provide a tool (written in Fortran95) to structure and manage information about constituents, herein after referred to as tracers, namely the Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy) generic (i.e., infrastructure) submodel TRACER. With TRACER it is possible to define a multitude of tracer sets, depending on the spatio-temporal representation (i.e., the grid structure) of the model. The required information about a specific chemical species is split into the static meta-information about the characteristics of the species, and its (generally in time and space variable) abundance in the corresponding representation. TRACER moreover includes two submodels. One is TRACER_FAMILY, an implementation of the tracer family concept. It distinguishes between two types: type-1 families are usually applied to handle strongly related tracers (e.g., fast equilibrating species) for a specific process (e.g., advection). In contrast to this, type-2 families are applied for tagging techniques, in which specific species are artificially decomposed and associated with additional information, in order to conserve the linear relationship between the family and its members. The second submodel is TRACER_PDEF, which corrects and budgets numerical negative overshoots that arise in many process implementations due to the numerical limitations (limited precision, rounding errors). The submodel therefore guarantees the positive definiteness of the tracers and stabilises the integration scheme. As a by-product, it further provides a global tracer mass diagnostic. Last but not least, we present the submodel PTRAC for the definition of prognostic tracers via a Fortran95 namelist. TRACER with its submodels and PTRAC can readily be applied to a variety of models without further requirements. The code and a

  3. Flow-through column experiments to determine the geochemical behavior of common hydrological tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moola, P. S. N.; Sigfússon, B.; Stefansson, A.

    2015-12-01

    Tracer testing is one of the most effective methods used to study groundwater flow, reservoir characteristics and subsurface properties in geohydrology. Hydrological tracer tests were conducted with the basic assumption that the tracer is chemically inert and non-reactive. However, not all tracers behave non-reactive at different pH conditions, the particular tracer may interact with mineral surfaces in the reservoir. In order to study the geochemical behavior of some common hydrological tracers flow-through column experiments were conducted at 25°C. Six common hydrological tracers were investigated, amino G acid, fluorescein, napthionic acid, pyranine, rhodamine B and rhodamine G in porous rocks consisting of basaltic glass, quartz or rhyolite at pH 3, 6.5 and 9. Homogenous porous material of fixed grain size 45-125μm were dry packed in the column to conduct flow through column experiments. Tracers were pumped at fixed flow rates for 20 minutes and switched back to experimental blank solution and the tracer concentration monitored at the outlet. The measured break-through tracer curves were compared to theoretical 1-D reactive transport simulations calculated using the PHREEQC program (Parkhurst and Appelo, 1999). The data obtained from the breakthrough curves suggest that the tracers may be reactive, non-reactive and partially reactive depending on the rock type and solution pH. The tracers that were observed to be reactive showed the influence of adsorption and desorption. The results suggest that some tracers commonly used in ground water hydrology are not suitable under all conditions as they may react with the rocks of the groundwater system.

  4. Impact of solvent granularity and layering on tracer hydrodynamics in confinement.

    PubMed

    Bollinger, Jonathan A; Carmer, James; Jain, Avni; Truskett, Thomas M

    2016-11-28

    Classic hydrodynamic arguments establish that when a spherical tracer particle is suspended between parallel walls, tracer-wall coupling mediated by the solvent will cause the tracer to exhibit position-dependent diffusivity. We investigate how the diffusivity profiles of confined tracers are impacted by the diameter size-ratio of the tracer to solvent: starting from the classic limit of infinite size-ratio (i.e., continuum solvent), we consider size-ratios of four or less to examine how hydrodynamic predictions are disrupted for systems where the tracer and solvent are of similar scale. We use computer simulations and techniques based on the Fokker-Planck formalism to calculate the diffusivity profiles of hard-sphere tracer particles in hard-sphere solvents, focusing on the dynamics perpendicular to the walls. Given wall separations of several tracer diameters, we first consider confinement between hard walls, where anisotropic structuring at the solvent lengthscale generates inhomogeneity in the tracer free-energy landscape and undermines hydrodynamic predictions locally. We then introduce confining planes that we term transparent walls, which restrict tracer and solvent center-accessibilities while completely eliminating static anisotropy, and reveal position-dependent signatures in tracer diffusivity solely attributable to confinement. With or without suppressing static heterogeneity, we find that tracer diffusivity increasingly deviates on a local basis from hydrodynamic predictions at smaller size-ratios. However, hydrodynamic theory still approximately captures spatially-averaged dynamics across the pores even for very small tracer-solvent size-ratios over a wide range of solvent densities and wall separations.

  5. REACTIVITY OF ANIONS IN INTERSTELLAR MEDIA: DETECTABILITY AND APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Senent, M. L.; Hochlaf, M. E-mail: hochlaf@univ-mlv.fr

    2013-05-01

    We propose a general rule to distinguish between detectable and undetectable astronomical anions. We believe that only few anions live long enough in the interstellar medium and thus can be detected. Our method is based on quantum mechanical calculations capable of describing accurately the evolution of electronic states during chemical processes. The still not fully understood reactivity at low temperatures is discussed considering non-adiabatic effects. The role of excited states has usually been neglected in previous works which basically focused on the ground electronic state for interpretations of experimental observations. Here, we deal with unsaturated carbon chains (e.g., C{sub n} H{sup -}), which show a high density of electronic states close to their corresponding ground electronic states, complex molecular dynamics, and non-adiabatic phenomena. Our general rule shows that it is not sufficient that anions exist in the gas phase (in the laboratory) to be present in media such as astrophysical media, since formation and decomposition reactions of these anions may allow the population of anionic electronic states to autodetach, forming neutrals. For C{sub n} H, reactivity depends strongly on n, where long and short chains behave differently. Formation of linear chains is relevant.

  6. Photoinduced Bimolecular Electron Transfer from Cyano Anions in Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Wu, Boning; Liang, Min; Maroncelli, Mark; Castner, Edward W

    2015-11-19

    Ionic liquids with electron-donating anions are used to investigate rates and mechanisms of photoinduced bimolecular electron transfer to the photoexcited acceptor 9,10-dicyanoanthracene (9,10-DCNA). The set of five cyano anion ILs studied comprises the 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium cation paired with each of these five anions: selenocyanate, thiocyanate, dicyanamide, tricyanomethanide, and tetracyanoborate. Measurements with these anions dilute in acetonitrile and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide show that the selenocyanate and tricyanomethanide anions are strong quenchers of the 9,10-DCNA fluorescence, thiocyanate is a moderately strong quencher, dicyanamide is a weak quencher, and no quenching is observed for tetracyanoborate. Quenching rates are obtained from both time-resolved fluorescence transients and time-integrated spectra. Application of a Smoluchowski diffusion-and-reaction model showed that the complex kinetics observed can be fit using only two adjustable parameters, D and V0, where D is the relative diffusion coefficient between donor and acceptor and V0 is the value of the electronic coupling at donor-acceptor contact.

  7. Vertical detachment energies of anionic thymidine: Microhydration effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sunghwan; Schaefer, Henry F.

    2010-10-01

    Density functional theory has been employed to investigate microhydration effects on the vertical detachment energy (VDE) of the thymidine anion by considering the various structures of its monohydrates. Structures were located using a random searching procedure. Among 14 distinct structures of the anionic thymidine monohydrate, the low-energy structures, in general, have the water molecule bound to the thymine base unit. The negative charge developed on the thymine moiety increases the strength of the intermolecular hydrogen bonding between the water and base units. The computed VDE values of the thymidine monohydrate anions are predicted to range from 0.67 to 1.60 eV and the lowest-energy structure has a VDE of 1.32 eV. The VDEs of the monohydrates of the thymidine anion, where the N1H hydrogen of thymine has been replaced by a 2'-deoxyribose ring, are greater by ˜0.30 eV, compared to those of the monohydrates of the thymine anion. The results of the present study are in excellent agreement with the accompanying experimental results of Bowen and co-workers [J. Chem. Phys. 133, 144304 (2010)].

  8. Reversible Intercalation of Fluoride-Anion Receptor Complexes in Graphite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, William C.; Whitacre, Jay F.; Leifer, Nicole; Greenbaum, Steve; Smart, Marshall; Bugga, Ratnakumar; Blanco, Mario; Narayanan, S. R.

    2007-01-01

    We have demonstrated a route to reversibly intercalate fluoride-anion receptor complexes in graphite via a nonaqueous electrochemical process. This approach may find application for a rechargeable lithium-fluoride dual-ion intercalating battery with high specific energy. The cell chemistry presented here uses graphite cathodes with LiF dissolved in a nonaqueous solvent through the aid of anion receptors. Cells have been demonstrated with reversible cathode specific capacity of approximately 80 mAh/g at discharge plateaus of upward of 4.8 V, with graphite staging of the intercalant observed via in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction during charging. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and B-11 nuclear magnetic resonance studies suggest that cointercalation of the anion receptor with the fluoride occurs during charging, which likely limits the cathode specific capacity. The anion receptor type dictates the extent of graphite fluorination, and must be further optimized to realize high theoretical fluorination levels. To find these optimal anion receptors, we have designed an ab initio calculations-based scheme aimed at identifying receptors with favorable fluoride binding and release properties.

  9. Contamination of an anion-exchange membrane by glutathione.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, T; Kikuchi, K

    2000-01-01

    Electrodialysis, which can separate electrolytes under mild conditions by using ion-exchange membranes, is a strong candidate for separation of GSH from yeast extracts, because GSH is unstable and easily oxidized forming a disulfide bond especially under alkali conditions. In this paper, sorption behavior of GSH on an anion-exchange membrane, in the pH 3-6 region that is expected to be the most preferable for its electro-dialytic separation, was examined. Sorption of GSH on a Selemion-AMV anion-exchange membrane was accelerated as the pH of the membrane-contact solution increased, and there was a good correlation between the sorbed amounts and the molar fraction of monovalent anionic species of GSH. However, the amounts of GSH desorbed from the membrane by a NaCl desorbing solution were much lower than the initial sorbed amounts, and the difference between them was enlarged with increasing pH. The GSH which was lost could be recovered by the addition of DTT in the membrane-contact and desorbing solutions. Similar results were also obtained with Cys. We thus concluded that an anion-exchange membrane would be contaminated by thiol compounds, such as GSH and Cys, through oxidative binding of the thiol group with the membrane, the local OH- concentration in which was enhanced due to attraction by the positively charged anion-exchange membrane.

  10. Anion competition for a volume-regulated current.

    PubMed Central

    Levitan, I; Garber, S S

    1998-01-01

    We have examined whether the anionic amino acids, glutamate and aspartate, permeate through the same volume-regulated conductance permeant to Cl- ions. Cell swelling was initiated in response to establishing a whole-cell configuration in the presence of a hyposmotic gradient. Volume-regulated anion currents carried by Cl-, glutamate, or aspartate developed with similar time courses and showed similar voltage-dependent inactivation. Permeability ratios (Paa/PCl) calculated from measured reversal potentials were dependent on the mole fraction ratio (MFR) of the permeant anions ([aa]/([aa] + [Cl-])). MFR was varied from 0.00 to 0.97. As the fraction of amino acid increased, Paa/PCl decreased. Current amplitude was similarly dependent on MFR. These results show that the permeation of anionic amino acids and that of Cl- ions are not independent of each other, indicating that the ion channel underlying the volume-regulated conductance can be occupied by more than one ion at a time. Application of Eyring rate theory indicated that the major barrier to Cl- ion permeation is at the intracellular side of the membrane, and that the major barrier to amino acid permeation is at the extracellular side of the membrane. The interactions between these permeant ions may have a physiological modulatory role in volume regulation through a volume-regulated anion conductance. PMID:9649382

  11. North beach (Nazaré) sand tracer experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, João; Taborda, Rui; Ribeiro, Mónica; Cascalho, João; Silva, Ana; Bosnic, Ivana

    2014-05-01

    The littoral in the vicinity of Nazaré (West Portuguese coast) is characterized by two distinct coastal stretches separated by Nazaré headland: a northern sector (Norte beach) characterized by a high energetic continuous sandy beach and a southern sector (Nazaré bay beach) that corresponds to an embayed beach, sheltered by the Nazaré headland. The bay is a geomorphological expression of the Nazaré canyon head, which acts as powerful sediment sink, capturing the large longshore net southward transport at Norte beach generated by the north Atlantic high energetic swell. The northern side of the canyon head is carved on highly resistant Cretaceous limestone sustaining an underwater vertical relief that emerges on the Nazaré headland, creating a unusual nearshore wave pattern. This wave pattern not only concentrates high energy levels at the Norte beach but also contributes to local complex longshore drift gradients capable of inducing beach seasonal cross-shore variations of more than 200 m. The main factors that influence local sediment budget are: (1) canyon head capturing and (2) headland sediment bypassing. To obtain a direct measure of the net longshore drift at Norte beach (upstream boundary of the system) a large scale fluorescent tracer experiment was performed. The data will be used to validate longshore transport formulas in a high energetic environment and to access Nazaré canyon head sediment loss. Considering the anticipation of high transport rates, approximately 10 tonnes of native sand where coated with orange fluorescent ink using a set of concrete mixers. The experiment took place on the 9th to 15th September 2013 period and followed the continuous injection method (CIM). The CIM approach was justified by the expected high energy levels that inhibits sediment sampling across the surf zone. During the tracer injection procedure (approx. 5 hours), sediment sampling was performed at 13 sites along a rectilinear coastal stretch extended through

  12. Anthropogenic contaminants as tracers in an urbanizing karst aquifer.

    PubMed

    Mahler, Barbara; Massei, Nicolas

    2007-04-01

    Karst aquifers are uniquely vulnerable to contamination. In the Barton Springs segment of the karstic Edwards aquifer (Texas, U.S.A.), urban contaminants such as pesticides and volatile organic compounds frequently are detected in spring base flow. To determine whether contaminant concentrations change in response to storms, and if they therefore might act as tracers of focused recharge, samples were collected from Barton Springs at closely spaced intervals following three storms. Two herbicides (atrazine and simazine), two insecticides (carbaryl and diazinon), and a solvent (tetrachloroethene) described breakthrough curves over a 1-week period following one or more storms. The breakthrough curves were decomposed into two to five log-normal subcurves, which were interpreted as representing pulses of contaminants moving through the aquifer. Each subcurve could be used in the same way as an artificial tracer to determine travel time to and recovery at the spring. The contaminants have several advantages over artificial tracers: they represent the actual compounds of interest, they are injected essentially simultaneously at several points, and they are injected under those conditions when transport is of the most interest, i.e., following storms. The response of storm discharge, specific conductance, and contaminant loading at the spring depended on initial aquifer flow conditions, which varied from very low (spring discharge of 0.48 m3/s) to high (spring discharge of 2.7 m3/s): concentrations and recovery were the highest when initial aquifer flow conditions were low. This behavior provides information about aquifer structure and the influence of aquifer flow condition on transport properties.

  13. A new aquifer assessment tool using reactive tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKnight, D.; Smalley, A. L.; Banwart, S. A.; Lerner, D. N.; Thomson, N. R.; Thornton, S. F.; Wilson, R. D.

    2003-04-01

    A major obstacle to making informed decisions about trigger levels for restoration and choosing remediation options is that current Site Investigation (SI) practice fails to make optimal use of available SI techniques resulting in poor value for money in conceptual site models. Often it is simply too expensive to obtain the type of site data required to build the case for natural attenuation, even though this restoration option may be relatively cheaper than a pump-and-treat system. In particular, aquifer property measurement techniques for groundwater transport and reactions are too costly and this results in over-reliance on literature values or model assumptions. This results in overly uncertain predictions of in situ performance and therefore unnecessarily cautious risk assessment and costly remediation strategies. Therefore, cost-effective SI tools that have the capability of producing high quality characterisation data are required. The dipole flow test which circulates groundwater between isolated injection (source) and extraction (sink) chambers within a single borehole has been used successfully by others to delineate heterogeneous hydraulic properties in both highly permeable and fractured rock aquifers. We propose to extend this approach by adding a suite of reactive tracers into a dipole flow field to assess the geochemical properties and biodegradation potential of aquifers. If successful this will provide a method to ascertain site-specific parameters for use in appropriate reactive transport models. The initial phase of this project involves the construction of a laboratory-scale physical model of a dipole probe to investigate the utility of the dipole flow and reactive tracer test (DFRTT) as an aquifer assessment tool. This phase will also serve as the developmental stage between mathematical theory and a host of planned field trials. The development of the laboratory-scale DFRTT including initial scoping calculations, numerical simulation results

  14. Granular controls on the dispersion of bed load tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerolmack, D. J.; Martin, R. L.; Phillips, C. B.

    2014-12-01

    Coarse particles are transported in a river as bed load, i.e., they move in frequent contact with and are supported by the granular bed. This movement is typically intermittent and may be described by a series of steps are rests, the distributions of which determine particle dispersion. Laboratory and field studies of bed load tracer dispersion have reported sub- and super-diffusive behavior, both of which have been successfully reproduced with stochastic transport models. Although researchers have invoked heavy-tailed step lengths as the cause of anomalous dispersion, most observations report thin-tailed distributions. Little attention has been paid to rest periods, and stochastic transport models have not been connected to the underlying mechanics of particle motion. Based on theoretical and experimental evidence, we argue that step lengths are thin-tailed and do not control the longterm dispersion of bed load tracers; they are determined by momentum balance between the fluid and solid. Using laboratory experiments with both marbles and natural sediments, we demonstrate that the rest time distribution is power law, and argue that this distribution controls asymptotic dispersion. Observed rest times far exceed any hydrodynamic timescale. Experiments reveal that rest times of deposited particles are governed by fluctuations in river bed elevation; in particular, the return time for the bed to scour to the base of a deposited particle. Stochastic fluctuations in bed elevation are describable by an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (mean-reverting random walk) model that contains two parameters, which we show are directly related to the granular shear rate and range of bed elevation fluctuations, respectively. Combining these results with the theory of asymmetric random walks (particles only move downstream), we predict superdiffusive behavior that is in quantitative agreement with our observations of tracer dispersion in a natural river.

  15. A novel PET tracer for evaluation of gene therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, S.; Monclus, M.; Cool, V.

    1996-05-01

    A promising approach of gene therapy for cancer consist in the transduction of neoplastic cells with the herpes virus thymidine-kinase gene (HSV-tk) which renders transduced cells sensitive to the lethal effect of anti-viral agent such as ganciclovir (GCV). Pet with adapted radiotracers represents an adequate tool to determine in vivo the level of HSV-tk expression and to establish the optimal protocol of gene and GCV administrations in human. We have developed a new potential PET tracer, 9-((1-[F-18]fluoro-3-hydroxy-2-propoxy)methyl)guanine [F-18]FHPG should theoretically accumulate in cells expressing HSV-tk. [F-18]FHPG was obtained by nucleophilic substitution on a ditosylate precursor followed by hydrolysis. To determine the biological behavior of this compound, we synthetized the corresponding non radioactive fluorinated analog (FHPG) and tested its inhibitory activity on HSV-tk transduced 9L gliosarcoma cells maintained in culture. FHPG at 100 {mu}M suppress cell growth by 50% while GCV and acyclovir induced 100% suppression at 10 and 100 {mu}M, respectively. We then tested the in vitro uptake of n.c.a. [F-18]FHPG in cultured cells transduced with HSV-tk or a control gene (neomycin). Ratio of [F-18]FHPG uptake in HSV-tk versus control cells was 240 after 6 hours of incubation. In vivo uptake of [F-18]FHPG was tested in experimental tumors obtained by stereotactical implantion of transduced 9L cells in the brain of male Fischer 344 rats. Ratio of [F-18]FHPG uptake in HSV-tk versus control tumors was 2.5, 3 hours after intravenous tracer injection. Uptake in HSV-tk tumor was 19-fold higher than in the cortex. We concluded that [F-18]FHPG is a promising PET tracer for the evaluation of gene therapy involving viral thymidine kinase genes.

  16. Titan's winter polar vortex structure revealed by chemical tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teanby, N. A.; de Kok, R.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Osprey, S.; Vinatier, S.; Gierasch, P. J.; Read, P. L.; Flasar, F. M.; Conrath, B. J.; Achterberg, R. K.; Bézard, B.; Nixon, C. A.; Calcutt, S. B.

    2008-12-01

    The winter polar vortex on Saturn's largest moon Titan has profound effects on atmospheric circulation and chemistry and for the current northern midwinter season is the major dynamical feature of Titan's stratosphere and mesosphere. We use 2 years of observations from Cassini's composite infrared spectrometer to determine cross sections of five independent chemical tracers (HCN, HC3N, C2H2, C3H4, and C4H2), which are then used to probe dynamical processes occurring within the vortex. Our results provide compelling evidence that the vortex acts as a strong mixing barrier in the stratosphere and mesosphere, effectively separating a tracer-enriched air mass in the north from air at lower latitudes. In the mesosphere, above the level of the vortex jet, a tracer-depleted zone extends away from the north pole toward the equator and enrichment is confined to high northern latitudes. However, below this level, mixing processes cause tongues of gas to extend away from the polar region toward the equator. These features are not reproduced by current general circulation models and suggest that a residual polar circulation is present and that waves and instabilities form a more important part of Titan's atmospheric dynamics than previously thought. We also observe an unexpected enrichment of C4H2 in the northern stratosphere, which suggests photochemical polymerization of C2H2. Our observations provide stringent new constraints for dynamical and photochemical models and identify key polar processes for the first time. Some of the processes we see have analogues in Earth's polar vortex, while others are unique to Titan.

  17. Anthropogenic contaminants as tracers in an urbanizing karst aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahler, B.; Massei, N.

    2007-01-01

    Karst aquifers are uniquely vulnerable to contamination. In the Barton Springs segment of the karstic Edwards aquifer (Texas, U.S.A.), urban contaminants such as pesticides and volatile organic compounds frequently are detected in spring base flow. To determine whether contaminant concentrations change in response to storms, and if they therefore might act as tracers of focused recharge, samples were collected from Barton Springs at closely spaced intervals following three storms. Two herbicides (atrazine and simazine), two insecticides (carbaryl and diazinon), and a solvent (tetrachloroethene) described breakthrough curves over a 1-week period following one or more storms. The breakthrough curves were decomposed into two to five log-normal subcurves, which were interpreted as representing pulses of contaminants moving through the aquifer. Each subcurve could be used in the same way as an artificial tracer to determine travel time to and recovery at the spring. The contaminants have several advantages over artificial tracers: they represent the actual compounds of interest, they are injected essentially simultaneously at several points, and they are injected under those conditions when transport is of the most interest, i.e., following storms. The response of storm discharge, specific conductance, and contaminant loading at the spring depended on initial aquifer flow conditions, which varied from very low (spring discharge of 0.48??m3/s) to high (spring discharge of 2.7??m3/s): concentrations and recovery were the highest when initial aquifer flow conditions were low. This behavior provides information about aquifer structure and the influence of aquifer flow condition on transport properties. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Innovative techniques for the description of reservoir heterogeneity using tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, G.; Sepehrnoori, K.

    1991-09-01

    The objective of this research is to develop an advanced, innovative technique for the description of reservoir heterogeneity. This proposed method consists of using tracers in single-well backflow tests. The general idea is to make use of fluid drift in the reservoir either due to naturally occurring pressure gradients in the reservoir, or by deliberately imposed pressure gradients using adjacent injection and production wells in the same reservoir. The analytical tool that will be used to design and interpret these tests is a compositional reservoir simulator with special features added and tested specifically for this purpose. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Flexible tools for interpreting tracer measurements and recent applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusyev, M.; Stewart, M.

    2012-04-01

    Steady increase of groundwater abstraction and nitrate concentrations in groundwater due to agricultural and industrial practices is a major concern for groundwater availability and deterioration of groundwater quality in New Zealand. Studies on groundwater in the Waimea Plains (for example) have shown effects of nitrate input from both diffuse and point sources since 1940. Groundwaters in gravel aquifers under Christchurch have also been studied since 1970 to characterise their flowpaths and recharge sources. In these and other cases, the mixing of waters from different recharge sources following different flow paths can be determined with the use of various tracers and the future course of nitrate concentration in the groundwaters predicted. The input of radionuclides to hydrological systems from nuclear weapons testing in the 1950s and 60s revealed that outflows from such systems often comprise mixtures of water with very wide ranges of ages. Many authors have described methods of deconvolving such outputs with the use of lumped parameter models (LPMs). LPMs are evaluated using specialized software or Excel spreadsheets to compute simulations to measurements of system outputs and therefore estimate parameters of the age distribution. Excel allows easy modification of the code to enable application to individual hydrological features and for a variety of isotopes and chemicals. For the New Zealand studies, Excel spreadsheets with coded Visual Basic functions are used to deduce age distributions based on stable isotope, SF6, CFCs, 3H and 14C data (in order of ages). In particular, 3H is becoming increasingly useful as an age tracer due to the decrease of ambiguity from nuclear testing provided that the measurements can be made with high accuracy (Stewart et al., 2012).These age distributions allow us to derive the input histories of chemicals (e.g. nitrate) and the groundwater recharge sources. In addition, recent developments in modelling groundwater flow and

  20. Radiocarbon tracer measurements of atmospheric hydroxyl radical concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, M. J.; Farmer, J. C.; Fitzner, C. A.; Henry, M. N.; Sheppard, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    The usefulness of the C-14 tracer in measurements of atmospheric hydroxyl radical concentration is discussed. The apparatus and the experimental conditions of three variations of a radiochemical method of atmosphere analysis are described and analyzed: the Teflon bag static reactor, the flow reactor (used in the Wallops Island tests), and the aircraft OH titration reactor. The procedure for reduction of the aircraft reactor instrument data is outlined. The problems connected with the measurement of hydroxyl radicals are discussed. It is suggested that the gas-phase radioisotope methods have considerable potential in measuring tropospheric impurities present in very low concentrations.

  1. Evaluation of anthropogenic secondary organic aerosol tracers from aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Naiema, Ibrahim M.; Stone, Elizabeth A.

    2017-02-01

    Products of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) - 2,3-dihydroxy-4-oxopentanoic acid, dicarboxylic acids, nitromonoaromatics, and furandiones - were evaluated for their potential to serve as anthropogenic SOA tracers with respect to their (1) ambient concentrations and detectability in PM2.5 in Iowa City, IA, USA; (2) gas-particle partitioning behaviour; and (3) source specificity by way of correlations with primary and secondary source tracers and literature review. A widely used tracer for toluene-derived SOA, 2,3-dihydroxy-4-oxopentanoic acid was only detected in the particle phase (Fp = 1) at low but consistently measurable ambient concentrations (averaging 0.3 ng m-3). Four aromatic dicarboxylic acids were detected at relatively higher concentrations (9.1-34.5 ng m-3), of which phthalic acid was the most abundant. Phthalic acid had a low particle-phase fraction (Fp = 0.26) likely due to quantitation interferences from phthalic anhydride, while 4-methylphthalic acid was predominantly in the particle phase (Fp = 0.82). Phthalic acid and 4-methylphthalic acid were both highly correlated with 2,3-dihydroxy-4-oxopentanoic acid (rs = 0.73, p = 0.003; rs = 0.80, p < 0.001, respectively), suggesting that they were derived from aromatic VOCs. Isophthalic and terephthalic acids, however, were detected only in the particle phase (Fp = 1), and correlations suggested association with primary emission sources. Nitromonoaromatics were dominated by particle-phase concentrations of 4-nitrocatechol (1.6 ng m-3) and 4-methyl-5-nitrocatechol (1.6 ng m-3) that were associated with biomass burning. Meanwhile, 4-hydroxy-3-nitrobenzyl alcohol was detected in a lower concentration (0.06 ng m-3) in the particle phase only (Fp = 1) and is known as a product of toluene photooxidation. Furandiones in the atmosphere have only been attributed to the photooxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons; however the substantial partitioning toward the gas phase

  2. Water Vapor Tracers as Diagnostics of the Regional Hydrologic Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Schubert, Siegfried; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Numerous studies suggest that local feedback of evaporation on precipitation, or recycling, is a significant source of water for precipitation. Quantitative results on the exact amount of recycling have been difficult to obtain in view of the inherent limitations of diagnostic recycling calculations. The current study describes a calculation of the amount of local and remote sources of water for precipitation, based on the implementation of passive constituent tracers of water vapor (termed water vapor tracers, WVT) in a general circulation model. In this case, the major limitation on the accuracy of the recycling estimates is the veracity of the numerically simulated hydrological cycle, though we note that this approach can also be implemented within the context of a data assimilation system. In this approach, each WVT is associated with an evaporative source region, and tracks the water until it precipitates from the atmosphere. By assuming that the regional water is well mixed with water from other sources, the physical processes that act on the WVT are determined in proportion to those that act on the model's prognostic water vapor. In this way, the local and remote sources of water for precipitation can be computed within the model simulation, and can be validated against the model's prognostic water vapor. Furthermore, estimates of precipitation recycling can be compared with bulk diagnostic approaches. As a demonstration of the method, the regional hydrologic cycles for North America and India are evaluated for six summers (June, July and August) of model simulation. More than 50% of the precipitation in the Midwestern United States came from continental regional tracers, and the local source was the largest of the regional tracers (14%). The Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic 2 regions contributed 18% of the water for Midwestern precipitation, but further analysis suggests that the greater region of the Tropical Atlantic Ocean may also contribute significantly. In

  3. Water Vapor Tracers as Diagnostics of the Regional Hydrologic Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Schubert, Siegfried D.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Numerous studies suggest that local feedback of surface evaporation on precipitation, or recycling, is a significant source of water for precipitation. Quantitative results on the exact amount of recycling have been difficult to obtain in view of the inherent limitations of diagnostic recycling calculations. The current study describes a calculation of the amount of local and remote geographic sources of surface evaporation for precipitation, based on the implementation of three-dimensional constituent tracers of regional water vapor sources (termed water vapor tracers, WVT) in a general circulation model. The major limitation on the accuracy of the recycling estimates is the veracity of the numerically simulated hydrological cycle, though we note that this approach can also be implemented within the context of a data assimilation system. In the WVT approach, each tracer is associated with an evaporative source region for a prognostic three-dimensional variable that represents a partial amount of the total atmospheric water vapor. The physical processes that act on a WVT are determined in proportion to those that act on the model's prognostic water vapor. In this way, the local and remote sources of water for precipitation can be predicted within the model simulation, and can be validated against the model's prognostic water vapor. As a demonstration of the method, the regional hydrologic cycles for North America and India are evaluated for six summers (June, July and August) of model simulation. More than 50% of the precipitation in the Midwestern United States came from continental regional sources, and the local source was the largest of the regional tracers (14%). The Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic regions contributed 18% of the water for Midwestern precipitation, but further analysis suggests that the greater region of the Tropical Atlantic Ocean may also contribute significantly. In most North American continental regions, the local source of precipitation is

  4. ALPHA SPECTROMETRIC EVALUATION OF SRM-995 AS A POTENTIAL URANIUM/THORIUM DOUBLE TRACER SYSTEM FOR AGE-DATING URANIUM MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Beals, D.

    2011-12-06

    Uranium-233 (t{sub 1/2} {approx} 1.59E5 years) is an artificial, fissile isotope of uranium that has significant importance in nuclear forensics. The isotope provides a unique signature in determining the origin and provenance of uranium-bearing materials and is valuable as a mass spectrometric tracer. Alpha spectrometry was employed in the critical evaluation of a {sup 233}U standard reference material (SRM-995) as a dual tracer system based on the in-growth of {sup 229}Th (t{sub 1/2} {approx} 7.34E3 years) for {approx}35 years following radiochemical purification. Preliminary investigations focused on the isotopic analysis of standards and unmodified fractions of SRM-995; all samples were separated and purified using a multi-column anion-exchange scheme. The {sup 229}Th/{sup 233}U atom ratio for SRM-995 was found to be 1.598E-4 ({+-} 4.50%) using recovery-corrected radiochemical methods. Using the Bateman equations and relevant half-lives, this ratio reflects a material that was purified {approx} 36.8 years prior to this analysis. The calculated age is discussed in contrast with both the date of certification and the recorded date of last purification.

  5. Development and Validation of Water Vapor Tracers as Diagnostics for the Atmospheric Hydrologic Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Schubert, Siegfried D.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Understanding of the local and remote sources of water vapor can be a valuable diagnostic in understanding the regional atmospheric hydrologic cycle. In the present study, we have implemented passive tracers as prognostic variables to follow water vapor evaporated in predetermined regions until the water tracer precipitates. The formulation of the sources and sinks of tracer water is generally proportional to the prognostic water vapor variable. Because all water has been accounted for in tracers, the water vapor variable provides the validation of the tracer water and the formulation of the sources and sinks. The tracers have been implemented in a GEOS General Circulation Model (GCM) simulation consisting of several summer periods to determine the source regions of precipitation for the United States and India. The recycling of water and interannual variability of the sources of water will be examined. Potential uses in GCM sensitivity studies, predictability studies and data assimilation will be discussed.

  6. Effect of anions on the electrochemistry of zinc tetraphenylporphyrin

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, G.R.; Gust, D.; Moore, T.A.; Moore, A.L. )

    1994-10-13

    Accurate measurements of porphyrin redox potentials are essential for the prediction and rationalization of the rates of electron transfer reactions involving these biologically important electron-donating and accepting chromophores. The present work describes a survey of redox potentials of zinc tetraphenylporphyrin obtained by cyclic voltammetry in dichloromethane, with tetrabutylammonium salts containing a variety of anions as electrolytes. Of the anions tested, hexafluorophosphate appears to have the least ability to ligate the metal, so that potentials measured in its presence as electrolyte should most closely approach those of the unligated porphyrin. With perchlorate electrolyte, the potential for one-electron oxidation is approximately 80 mV lower, enough to affect the interpretation of photochemical electron transfer rates. In general, anions bind much more strongly to the cation radical than to zinc tetraphenylporphyrin itself. The use of reference redox systems based on thymoquinone and ferrocene carboxylate enabled comparison of potentials measured with different electrolytes. 30 refs., 2 tabs.

  7. Dissecting Anion Effects in Gold(I)-Catalyzed Intermolecular Cycloadditions

    PubMed Central

    Homs, Anna; Obradors, Carla; Lebœuf, David; Echavarren, Antonio M

    2014-01-01

    From a series of gold complexes of the type [t-BuXPhosAu(MeCN)]X (X=anion), the best results in intermolecular gold(I)-catalyzed reactions are obtained with the complex with the bulky and soft anion BAr4F− [BAr4F−=3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenylborate] improving the original protocols by 10–30% yield. A kinetic study on the [2+2] cycloaddition reaction of alkynes with alkenes is consistent with an scenario in which the rate-determining step is the ligand exchange to generate the (η2-phenylacetylene)gold(I) complex. We have studied in detail the subtle differences that can be attributed to the anion in this formation, which result in a substantial decrease in the formation of unproductive σ,π-(alkyne)digold(I) complexes by destabilizing the conjugated acid formed. PMID:26190958

  8. Cell wall bound anionic peroxidases from asparagus byproducts.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo-Carmona, Sara; López, Sergio; Vazquez-Castilla, Sara; Jimenez-Araujo, Ana; Rodriguez-Arcos, Rocio; Guillen-Bejarano, Rafael

    2014-10-08

    Asparagus byproducts are a good source of cationic soluble peroxidases (CAP) useful for the bioremediation of phenol-contaminated wastewaters. In this study, cell wall bound peroxidases (POD) from the same byproducts have been purified and characterized. The covalent forms of POD represent >90% of the total cell wall bound POD. Isoelectric focusing showed that whereas the covalent fraction is constituted primarily by anionic isoenzymes, the ionic fraction is a mixture of anionic, neutral, and cationic isoenzymes. Covalently bound peroxidases were purified by means of ion exchange chromatography and affinity chromatography. In vitro detoxification studies showed that although CAP are more effective for the removal of 4-CP and 2,4-DCP, anionic asparagus peroxidase (AAP) is a better option for the removal of hydroxytyrosol (HT), the main phenol present in olive mill wastewaters.

  9. Solubility and transport of cationic and anionic patterned nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jiaye; Guo, Hongxia; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica

    2012-02-01

    Diffusion and transport of nanoparticles (NPs) though nanochannels is important for desalination, drug delivery, and biomedicine. Their surface composition dictate their efficiency separating them by reverse osmosis, delivering into into cells, as well as their toxicity. We analyze bulk diffusion and transport through nanochannels of NPs with different hydrophobic-hydrophilic patterns achieved by coating a fraction of the NP sites with positive or negative charges via explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations. The cationic NPs are more affected by the patterns, less water soluble, and have higher diffusion constants and fluxes than their anionic NPs counterparts. The NP-water interaction dependence on surface pattern and field strength explains these observations. For equivalent patterns, anionic NPs solubilize more than cationic NPs since the Coulomb interaction of free anionic NPs, which are much stronger than hydrophobic NP-water interactions, are about twice that of cationic NPs.

  10. Hydrothermal carbonaceous sphere based stationary phase for anion exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiming; Wu, Shuchao; Zhang, Peimin; Zhu, Yan

    2017-01-15

    Monodisperse carbonaceous spheres produced by the hydrothermal carbonization of sucrose were first applied as green stationary phase for ion chromatography after quaternization. Depending on the polycondensation of methylamine and 1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether, polymer containing quaternary ammonium groups were facilely grafted onto the surfaces of hydrothermal carbonaceous spheres (HCSs). The quaternized HCSs with different number of polyelectrolyte layers were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, brunauer-emmett-teller, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and elemental analysis. The measurements of breakthrough curves demonstrated that more layers of grafted polyelectrolyte resulted in higher anion exchange capacity of stationary phase. With good stability, common inorganic anions, monocarboxylic acids, polarizable anions and carbohydrates were effectively separated on the stationary phases, respectively. The high hydrophilicity of HCS surface afforded excellent peak symmetry for all analytes. Furthermore, high-capacity HCSs stationary phase was successfully applied to detect fluoride in tea samples.

  11. Stabilizing electrodeposition in elastic solid electrolytes containing immobilized anions

    PubMed Central

    Tikekar, Mukul D.; Archer, Lynden A.; Koch, Donald L.

    2016-01-01

    Ion transport–driven instabilities in electrodeposition of metals that lead to morphological instabilities and dendrites are receiving renewed attention because mitigation strategies are needed for improving rechargeability and safety of lithium batteries. The growth rate of these morphological instabilities can be slowed by immobilizing a fraction of anions within the electrolyte to reduce the electric field at the metal electrode. We analyze the role of elastic deformation of the solid electrolyte with immobilized anions and present theory combining the roles of separator elasticity and modified transport to evaluate the factors affecting the stability of planar deposition over a wide range of current densities. We find that stable electrodeposition can be easily achieved even at relatively high current densities in electrolytes/separators with moderate polymer-like mechanical moduli, provided a small fraction of anions are immobilized in the separator. PMID:27453943

  12. Organization and function of anionic phospholipids in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ti-Yu; Weibel, Douglas B

    2016-05-01

    In addition to playing a central role as a permeability barrier for controlling the diffusion of molecules and ions in and out of bacterial cells, phospholipid (PL) membranes regulate the spatial and temporal position and function of membrane proteins that play an essential role in a variety of cellular functions. Based on the very large number of membrane-associated proteins encoded in genomes, an understanding of the role of PLs may be central to understanding bacterial cell biology. This area of microbiology has received considerable attention over the past two decades, and the local enrichment of anionic PLs has emerged as a candidate mechanism for biomolecular organization in bacterial cells. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of anionic PLs in bacteria, including their biosynthesis, subcellular localization, and physiological relevance, discuss evidence and mechanisms for enriching anionic PLs in membranes, and conclude with an assessment of future directions for this area of bacterial biochemistry, biophysics, and cell biology.

  13. High-throughput sequential injection method for simultaneous determination of plutonium and neptunium in environmental solids using macroporous anion-exchange chromatography, followed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jixin; Hou, Xiaolin; Roos, Per; Miró, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports an automated analytical method for rapid and simultaneous determination of plutonium and neptunium in soil, sediment, and seaweed, with detection via inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). A chromatographic column packed with a macroporous anion exchanger (AG MP-1 M) was incorporated in a sequential injection (SI) system for the efficient retrieval of plutonium, along with neptunium, from matrix elements and potential interfering nuclides. The sorption and elution behavior of plutonium and neptunium onto AG MP-1 M resin was compared with a commonly utilized AG 1-gel-type anion exchanger. Experimental results reveal that the pore structure of the anion exchanger plays a pivotal role in ensuring similar separation behavior of plutonium and neptunium along the separation protocol. It is proven that plutonium-242 ((242)Pu) performs well as a tracer for monitoring the chemical yield of neptunium when using AG MP-1 M resin, whereby the difficulties in obtaining a reliable and practicable isotopic neptunium tracer are overcome. An important asset of the SI setup is the feasibility of processing up to 100 g of solid substrates using a small-sized (ca. 2 mL) column with chemical yields of neptunium and plutonium being ≥79%. Analytical results of three certified/standard reference materials and two solid samples from intercomparison exercises are in good agreement with the reference values at the 0.05 significance level. The overall on-column separation can be completed within 3.5 h for 10 g of soil samples. Most importantly, the anion-exchange mini-column suffices to be reused up to 10-fold with satisfactory chemical yields (>70%), as demanded in environmental monitoring and emergency scenarios, making the proposed automated assembly well-suited for unattended and high-throughput analysis.

  14. Anionic solid lipid nanoparticles supported on protamine/DNA complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jiesheng; Wang, Aihua; Liu, Chunxi; Chen, Zhijin; Zhang, Na

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this study was to design novel anionic ternary nanoparticles for gene delivery. These ternary nanoparticles were equipped with protamine/DNA binary complexes (150-200 nm) as the support, and the anionic formation was achieved by absorption of anionic solid lipid nanoparticles (<=20 nm) onto the surface of the binary complexes. The small solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) were prepared by a modified film dispersion-ultrasonication method, and adsorption of the anionic SLNs onto the binary complexes was typically carried out in water via electrostatic interaction. The formulated ternary nanoparticles were found to be relatively uniform in size (257.7 ± 10.6 nm) with a 'bumpy' surface, and the surface charge inversion from 19.28 ± 1.14 mV to -17.16 ± 1.92 mV could be considered as evidence of the formation of the ternary nanoparticles. The fluorescence intensity measurements from three batches of the ternary nanoparticles gave a mean adsorption efficiency of 96.75 ± 1.13%. Circular dichroism spectra analysis showed that the protamine/DNA complexes had been coated by small SLNs, and that the anionic ternary nanoparticles formed did not disturb the construction of the binary complexes. SYBR Green I analysis suggested that the ternary nanoparticles could protect the DNA from nuclease degradation, and cell viability assay results showed that they exhibit lower cytotoxicity to A549 cells compared with the binary complexes and lipofectamine. The transfection efficiency of the ternary nanoparticles was better than that of naked DNA and the binary complexes, and almost equal to that of lipofectamine/DNA complexes, as revealed by inversion fluorescence microscope observation. These results indicated that the anionic ternary nanoparticles could facilitate gene transfer in cultured cells, and might alleviate the drawbacks of the conventional cationic vector/DNA complexes for gene delivery in vivo.

  15. Infrared Predissociation Spectroscopy of H_2-TAGGED Dicarboxylic Acid Anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolk, Arron B.; Kamrath, Michael Z.; Leavitt, Christopher M.; Johnson, Mark A.

    2011-06-01

    Singly charged dicarboxylic acid anions, studied in depth by Wang et al. offer insight into the role of ring strain and conformation on the formation of intramolecular hydrogen bonds. These shared proton bonds, common in proteins and polymer systems, can be crucial in secondary and tertiary structure formation. By tracking the infrared spectra of dicarboxylic acid anions as charge and aliphatic chain length are varied, the tendency of these anions to form ring-like structures with an internally shared proton can be asssesed. To adapt the time-of-flight mass spectrometry/infrared presdissociation experiment to larger systems with significant latent vibrational energy and negligible vapor pressure, an electrospray ionization (ESI)/cryogenic quadrupole trap ion source has been interfaced to the Yale time of flight mass spectrometer. Infrared predissociation spectroscopy is carried out on a series of carboxylate anions cooled to 10K and H_2-tagged in a cryogenic ion trap, underscoring the power of this technique to vibrationally quench and structurally characterize large (> 20 atoms) gaseous ions. This technique recovers sharp transitions (~6 cm^-^1 FWHM) in the linear single photon absorption regime which greatly facilitates comparison with ab initio calculations. The methodology used to condense H_2 on these ions is described, revealing the benefits of a pulsed trapping gas paired with a time delay before ion extraction. The sensitivity of the perturbed H_2 transition to charge center exposure is probed by varying the charge and aliphatic chain length of carboxylate anions. Finally, the structure of four carboxylate anions are characterized using their predissociation spectra. H. K. Woo, X. B. Wang, K. C. Lau and L. S. Wang J. Chem. Phys. A 110, 7801-7805 2006.

  16. Surfactant behavior of "ellipsoidal" dicarbollide anions: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Chevrot, G; Schurhammer, R; Wipff, G

    2006-05-18

    We report a molecular dynamics study of cobalt bis(dicarbollide) anions [(B(9)C(2)H(8)X(3))(2)Co](-) (XCD(-)) commonly used in liquid-liquid extraction (X = H, Me, Cl, or Br), showing that these anions, although lacking the amphiphilic topology, behave as anionic surfactants. In pure water, they display "hydrophobic attractions", leading to the formation of aggregates of different sizes and shapes depending on the counterions. When simulated at a water/"oil" interface, the different anions (HCD(-), MeCD(-), CCD(-), and BrCD(-)) are found to be surface active. As a result, the simulated M(n+) counterions (M(n+) = Na(+), K(+), Cs(+), H(3)O(+), UO(2)(2+), Eu(3+)) concentrate on the aqueous side of the interface, forming a "double layer" whose characteristics are modulated by the hydrophobic character of the anion and by M(n+). The highly hydrophilic Eu(3+) or UO(2)(2+) cations that are generally "repelled" by aqueous interfaces are attracted by dicarbollides near the interface, which is crucial as far as the mechanism of assisted cation extraction to the oil phase is concerned. These cations interact with interfacial XCD(-) in their fully hydrated Eu(H(2)O)(9)(3+) and UO(2)(H(2)O)(5)(2+) forms, whereas the less hydrophilic monocharged cations display intimate contacts via their X substituents. The results obtained with the TIP3P and OPLS models for the solvents are confirmed with other water models (TIP5P or a polarizable 4P-Pol water) and with more polar "oil" models. The importance of interfacial phenomena is further demonstrated by simulations with a high oil-water ratio, leading to the formation of a micelle covered with CCD's. We suggest that the interfacial activity of dicarbollides and related hydrophobic anions is an important feature of synergism in liquid-liquid extraction of hard cations (e.g., for nuclear waste partitioning).

  17. Electron localization of anions probed by nitrile vibrations

    DOE PAGES

    Mani, Tomoyasu; Grills, David C.; Newton, Marshall D.; ...

    2015-08-02

    Localization and delocalization of electrons is a key concept in chemistry, and is one of the important factors determining the efficiency of electron transport through organic conjugated molecules, which have potential to act as “molecular wires”. This, in turn, substantially influences the efficiencies of organic solar cells and other molecular electronic devices. It is also necessary to understand the electronic energy landscape and the dynamics of electrons through molecular chain that govern their transport capabilities in one-dimensional conjugated chains so that we can better define the design principles of conjugated molecules for their applications. We show that nitrile ν(C≡N) vibrationsmore » respond to the degree of electron localization in nitrile-substituted organic anions by utilizing time-resolved infrared (TRIR) detection combined with pulse radiolysis. Measurements of a series of aryl nitrile anions allow us to construct a semi-empirical calibration curve between the changes in the ν(C≡N) IR shifts and the changes in the electronic charges from the neutral to the anion states in the nitriles; more electron localization in the nitrile anion results in larger IR shifts. Furthermore, the IR linewidth in anions can report a structural change accompanying changes in the electronic density distribution. Probing the shift of the nitrile ν(C≡N) IR vibrational bands enables us to determine how the electron is localized in anions of nitrile-functionalized oligofluorenes, considered as organic mixed-valence compounds. We estimate the diabatic electron transfer distance, electronic coupling strengths, and energy barriers in these organic mixed-valence compounds. The analysis reveals a dynamic picture, showing that the electron is moving back and forth within the oligomers with a small activation energy of ≤ kBT, likely controlled by the movement of dihedral angles between monomer units. Thus, implications for the electron transport capability

  18. Orientational Jumps in (Acetamide + Electrolyte) Deep Eutectics: Anion Dependence.

    PubMed

    Das, Suman; Biswas, Ranjit; Mukherjee, Biswaroop

    2015-08-27

    All-atom molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out to investigate orientation jumps of acetamide molecules in three different ionic deep eutectics made of acetamide (CH3CONH2) and lithium salts of bromide (Br(–)), nitrate (NO3(–)) and perchlorate (ClO4(–)) at approximately 80:20 mole ratio and 303 K. Orientational jumps have been dissected into acetamide–acetamide and acetamide–ion catagories. Simulated jump characteristics register a considerable dependence on the anion identity. For example, large angle jumps are relatively less frequent in the presence of NO3(–) than in the presence of the other two anions. Distribution of jump angles for rotation of acetamide molecules hydrogen bonded (H-bonded) to anions has been found to be bimodal in the presence of Br(–) and is qualitatively different from the other two cases. Estimated energy barrier for orientation jumps of these acetamide molecules (H-bonded to anions) differ by a factor of ∼2 between NO3(–) and ClO4(–), the barrier height for the latter being lower and ∼0.5kBT. Relative radial and angular displacements during jumps describe the sequence ClO(4)– > NO3(–) > Br(–) and follow a reverse viscosity trend. Jump barrier for acetamide–acetamide pairs reflects weak dependence on anion identity and remains closer to the magnitude (∼0.7kBT) found for orientation jumps in molten acetamide. Jump time distributions exhibit a power law dependence of the type, P(tjump) ∝ A(tjump/τ)(−β), with both β and τ showing substantial anion dependence. The latter suggests the presence of dynamic heterogeneity in these systems and supports earlier conclusions from time-resolved fluorescence measurements.

  19. Electron localization of anions probed by nitrile vibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Mani, Tomoyasu; Grills, David C.; Newton, Marshall D.; Miller, John R.

    2015-08-02

    Localization and delocalization of electrons is a key concept in chemistry, and is one of the important factors determining the efficiency of electron transport through organic conjugated molecules, which have potential to act as “molecular wires”. This, in turn, substantially influences the efficiencies of organic solar cells and other molecular electronic devices. It is also necessary to understand the electronic energy landscape and the dynamics of electrons through molecular chain that govern their transport capabilities in one-dimensional conjugated chains so that we can better define the design principles of conjugated molecules for their applications. We show that nitrile ν(C≡N) vibrations respond to the degree of electron localization in nitrile-substituted organic anions by utilizing time-resolved infrared (TRIR) detection combined with pulse radiolysis. Measurements of a series of aryl nitrile anions allow us to construct a semi-empirical calibration curve between the changes in the ν(C≡N) IR shifts and the changes in the electronic charges from the neutral to the anion states in the nitriles; more electron localization in the nitrile anion results in larger IR shifts. Furthermore, the IR linewidth in anions can report a structural change accompanying changes in the electronic density distribution. Probing the shift of the nitrile ν(C≡N) IR vibrational bands enables us to determine how the electron is localized in anions of nitrile-functionalized oligofluorenes, considered as organic mixed-valence compounds. We estimate the diabatic electron transfer distance, electronic coupling strengths, and energy barriers in these organic mixed-valence compounds. The analysis reveals a dynamic picture, showing that the electron is moving back and forth within the oligomers with a small activation energy of ≤ kBT, likely controlled by the movement of dihedral angles between monomer units. Thus, implications for the electron transport

  20. COMPARISON OF THREE TRACER TESTS AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Earl D Mattson; Mitchell Plummer; Carl Palmer; Larry Hull; Samantha Miller; Randy Nye

    2011-02-01

    Three conservative tracer tests have been conducted through the Bridge Fault fracture zone at the Raft River Geothermal (RRG) site. All three tests were conducted between injection well RRG-5 and production wells RRG-1 (790 m distance) and RRG-4 (740 m distance). The injection well is used during the summer months to provide pressure support to the production wells. The first test was conducted in 2008 using 136 kg of fluorescein tracer. Two additional tracers were injected in 2010. The first 2010 tracer injected was 100 kg fluorescein disodium hydrate salt on June, 21. The second tracer (100 kg 2,6-naphthalene disulfonic acid sodium salt) was injected one month later on July 21. Sampling of the two productions wells is still being performed to obtain the tail end of the second 2010 tracer test. Tracer concentrations were measured using HPLC with a fluorescence detector. Results for the 2008 test, suggest 80% tracer recover at the two production wells. Of the tracer recovered, 85% of tracer mass was recovered in well RRG-4 indicating a greater flow pathway connection between injection well and RRG-4 than RRG-1. Fluorescein tracer results appear to be similar between the 2008 and 2010 tests for well RRG-4 with peak concentrations arriving approximately 20 days after injection despite the differences between the injection rates for the two tests (~950 gpm to 475 gpm) between the 2008 and 2010. The two 2010 tracer tests will be compared to determine if the results support the hypothesis that rock contraction along the flow pathway due to the 55 oC cooler water injection alters the flow through the ~140 oC reservoir.

  1. Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry for Mg Tracer Diffusion: Issues and Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Tuggle, Jay; Giordani, Andrew; Kulkarni, Nagraj S; Warmack, Robert J Bruce; Coffey, Kevin; Sohn, Yong Ho; HunterJr., Jerry

    2014-01-01

    A Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) method has been developed to measure stable Mg isotope tracer diffusion. This SIMS method was then used to calculate Mg self- diffusivities and the data was verified against historical data measured using radio tracers. The SIMS method has been validated as a reliable alternative to the radio-tracer technique for the measurement of Mg self-diffusion coefficients and can be used as a routine method for determining diffusion coefficients.

  2. Final Progress Report for Project Entitled: Quantum Dot Tracers for Use in Engineered Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, Peter; Bartl, Michael; Reimus, Paul; Williams, Mark; Mella, Mike

    2015-09-12

    The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate a new class of tracers that offer great promise for use in characterizing fracture networks in EGS reservoirs. From laboratory synthesis and testing through numerical modeling and field demonstrations, we have demonstrated the amazing versatility and applicability of quantum dot tracers. This report summarizes the results of four years of research into the design, synthesis, and characterization of semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots) for use as geothermal tracers.

  3. Reorientional dynamics of water molecules in anionic hydration shells

    PubMed Central

    Laage, Damien; Hynes, James T.

    2007-01-01

    Water molecule rotational dynamics within a chloride anion's first hydration shell are investigated through simulations. In contrast to recent suggestions that the ion's hydration shell is rigid during a water's reorientation, we find a labile hydration sphere, consistent with previous assessments of chloride as a weak structure breaker. The nondiffusive reorientation mechanism found involves a hydrogen-bond partner switch with a large amplitude angular jump and the water's departure from the anion's shell. An analytic extended jump model accounts for the simulation results, as well as available NMR and ultrafast spectroscopic data, and resolves the discrepancy between them. PMID:17581877

  4. Mixed anion materials and compounds for novel proton conducting membranes

    DOEpatents

    Poling, Steven Andrew; Nelson, Carly R.; Martin, Steve W.

    2006-09-05

    The present invention provides new amorphous or partially crystalline mixed anion chalcogenide compounds for use in proton exchange membranes which are able to operate over a wide variety of temperature ranges, including in the intermediate temperature range of about 100 .degree. C. to 300.degree. C., and new uses for crystalline mixed anion chalcogenide compounds in such proton exchange membranes. In one embodiment, the proton conductivity of the compounds is between about 10.sup.-8 S/cm and 10.sup.-1 S/cm within a temperature range of between about -60 and 300.degree. C. and a relative humidity of less than about 12%..

  5. Anionic fluoroquinolones as antibacterials against biofilm-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Long, Timothy E; Keding, Lexie C; Lewis, Demetria D; Anstead, Michael I; Withers, T Ryan; Yu, Hongwei D

    2016-02-15

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common biofilm-forming bacterial pathogen implicated in diseases of the lungs. The extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of respiratory Pseudomonas biofilms are largely comprised of anionic molecules such as rhamnolipids and alginate that promote a mucoid phenotype. In this Letter, we examine the ability of negatively-charged fluoroquinolones to transverse the EPS and inhibit the growth of mucoid P. aeruginosa. Anionic fluoroquinolones were further compared with standard antibiotics via a novel microdiffusion assay to evaluate drug penetration through pseudomonal alginate and respiratory mucus from a patient with cystic fibrosis.

  6. Predicting Carbonate Species Ionic Conductivity in Alkaline Anion Exchange Membranes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    anion exchange membranes. Andrew M. Kiss, Timothy D . Myles, Kyle N. Grew, Aldo A. Peracchio, George J. Nelson, and Wilson K. S. Chiu University of...Alkaline Anion Exchange Membranes Andrew M. Kiss1, Timothy D . Myles1, Kyle N. Grew2, Aldo A. Peracchio1, George J. Nelson1, and Wilson K. S. Chiu1* 1...Vol. 301, 93-106, 2007. 16. Satterfleld,M.B., Benziger,J.B., J. Phys. Chem. B, Vol. 112,12, 3693 -3704, 2008. 17. Motupally,S., Becker,A.J

  7. Human calcium metabolism including bone resorption measured with {sup 41}Ca tracer

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, S.P.H.T.; King, J.C.; Vieira, N.E.; Woodhouse, L.R.; Yergey, A.L.

    1996-08-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry is so sensitive to small quantities of {sup 41}Ca that it might be used as a tracer in the study of human calcium kinetics to generate unique kinds of data. In contrast with the use of other Ca isotopic tracers, {sup 41}Ca tracer can be so administered that the tracer movements between the various body pools achieve a quasi steady state. Resorbing bone may thus be directly measured. We have tested such a protocol against a conventional stable isotope experiment with good agreement.

  8. Inert and Reacting Tracers for Reservoir Sizing in Fractured, Hot Dry Rock Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tester, J.W.; Robinson, B.A.; Ferguson, J.H.

    1986-01-21

    Flow characterization and volumetric sizing techniques using tracers in fractured hot dry rock reservoirs are discussed. Statistical methods for analyzing the residence time distribution (RTD) are presented. Tracer modal volumes and RTD shape are correlated with reservoir performance parameters such as active heat transfer area and dispersion levels. Chemically reactive tracers are proposed for mapping advance rates of cooled regions in HDR reservoirs, providing early warning of thermal drawdown. Important reaction rate parameters are identified for screening potential tracers. Current laboratory research and field work is reviewed.

  9. Wirelessly powered micro-tracer enabled by miniaturized antenna and microfluidic channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, G.; Zhao, X.; Seren, H. R.; Chen, C.; Zhang, X.

    2015-12-01

    A miniaturized antenna, 380μm by 380μm in size, was fabricated and integrated with a commercialized passive RFID chip to form a micro-tracer, whose size was 2mm by 1mm in total. The micro-tracer was wirelessly powered and interrogated by a single layer spiral reader antenna through near field coupling. To maximize the working distance, the resonant frequency of micro-tracer and reader antenna were matched at 840MHz. Due to the ultra small size of the tracer antenna, power transfer efficiency decreased dramatically as the distance between tracer antenna and reader antenna increased, thus the working distance of the microtracer was limited within 1mm. To achieve massive operation of the micro-tracer, a microfluidic platform was fabricated with in channel focusing and separation. Acrylic sheets were laser cut to define the channel and cover structure, then bonded together layer by layer with a glass substrate, on which reader antenna was integrated. Pump oil was used as the fluidic media carrying the micro-tracer flowing inside the microfluidic channel. The wireless power transfer and real-time communication was demonstrated with the micro-tracer flowing above the reader antenna, as the ID of the micro-tracer was retrieved and displayed on a computer screen.

  10. Tracer transport in fractured crystalline rock: Evidence of nondiffusive breakthrough tailing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becker, M.W.; Shapiro, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    Extended tailing of tracer breakthrough is often observed in pulse injection tracer tests conducted in fractured geologic media. This behavior has been attributed to diffusive exchange of tracer between mobile fluids traveling through channels in fractures and relatively stagnant fluid between fluid channels, along fracture walls, or within the bulk matrix. We present a field example where tracer breakthrough tailing apparently results from nondiffusive transport. Tracer tests were conducted in a fractured crystalline rock using both a convergent and weak dipole injection and pumping scheme. Deuterated water, bromide, and pentafluorobenzoic acid were selected as tracers for their wide range in molecular diffusivity. The late time behavior of the normalized breakthrough curves were consistent for all tracers, even when the pumping rate was changed. The lack of separation between tracers of varying diffusivity indicates that strong breakthrough tailing in fractured geologic media may be caused by advective transport processes. This finding has implications for the interpretation of tracer tests designed to measure matrix diffusion in situ and the prediction of contaminant transport in fractured rock.

  11. Definition, properties, and Atlantic Ocean distribution of the new tracer TrOCA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touratier, Franck; Goyet, Catherine

    2004-05-01

    Natural and anthropogenic tracers in the ocean are widely used not only to better understand water masses circulation and mixing but also to understand and quantify the ocean uptake and storage capacity of greenhouse gases. However, since each tracer is different, it is best to use the complementarity of several tracers to unequivocally identify the various water masses. Here we illustrate the conservative properties and the spatial distribution of the new composite tracer TrOCA ( Tracer combining Oxygen, inorganic Carbon, and total Alkalinity) using oxygen (O 2), dissolved inorganic carbon (TCO 2), and total alkalinity (TA), from the Atlantic Ocean. The significant accuracy improvement of TCO 2 and TA measurements since the 1970s, combined to a large effort in measuring these parameters during large scale cruises throughout the Atlantic Ocean, makes this tracer TrOCA an additional tool in analyzing water mass distribution. This tracer is shown to be conservative in intermediate, deep, and bottom waters. For instance, we show that the independence of TrOCA from other tracers provides further information on the origin and mixing of the main Atlantic water masses. Furthermore, TrOCA combined with the composite tracer NO, in particular the ratio TrOCA/NO, can be used to unequivocally identify and separate the Antarctic Intermediate Water, the Antarctic Bottom Water, and the North Atlantic Deep Water.

  12. USE OF PERFLUOROCARBON TRACER (PFT) TECHNOLOGY FOR SUBSURFACE BARRIER INTEGRITY VERIFICATION AT THE WALDO TEST SITE.

    SciTech Connect

    SULLIVAN,T.

    1999-06-01

    Testing of perfluorocarbon gas tracers (PFT) on a subsurface barrier with known flaws was conducted at the Waldo Test Site operated by Science and Engineering Associates, Inc (SEA). The tests involved the use of five unique PFTs with a different tracer injected along the interior of each wall of the barrier. A fifth tracer was injected exterior to the barrier to examine the validity of diffusion controlled transport of the PFTs. The PFTs were injected for three days at a nominal flow rate of 15 cm{sup 3}/min and concentrations in the range of a few hundred ppm. Approximately 65 liters of air laced with tracer was injected for each tracer. The tracers were able to accurately detect the presence of the engineered flaws. Two flaws were detected on the north and east walls, and one flaw was detected on the south and west walls. In addition, one non-engineered flaw at the seam between the north and east walls was also detected. The use of multiple tracers provided independent confirmation of the flaws and permitted a distinction between tracers arriving at a monitoring port after being released from a nearby flaw and non-engineered flaws. The PFTs detected the smallest flaw, 0.5 inches in diameter. Visual inspection of the data showed excellent agreement with the known flaw locations and the relative size of the flaws was accurately estimated. Simultaneous with the PFT tests, SEA conducted tests with another gas tracer sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}).

  13. USE OF PERFLUOROCARBON TRACER (PFT) TECHNOLOGY FOR SUBSURFACE BARRIER INTEGRITY VERIFICATION AT THE WALDO TEST SITE

    SciTech Connect

    SULLIVAN,T.; HEISER,J.; SENUM,G.; MILLIAN,L.

    2000-02-27

    Researchers from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) tested perfluorocarbon (PFT) gas tracers on a subsurface barrier with known flaws at the Waldo test facility [operated by Science and Engineering Associates, Inc (SEA)]. The tests involved the use of five unique PFT tracers with a different tracer injected along the interior of each wall of the barrier. A fifth tracer was injected exterior to the barrier to examine the validity of diffusion controlled transport of the PFTs. The PFTs were injected for three days at a nominal flow rate of 15 cm{sup 3}/min and a concentrations in the range of a few hundred ppm. Approximately 65 liters of air laced with tracer was injected for each tracer. The tracers were able to accurately detect the presence of the engineered flaws. Two flaws were detected on the north and east walls and lane flaw was detected on the south and west walls. In addition, one non-engineered flaw at the seam between the north and east walls was also detected. The use of multiple tracers provided independent confirmation of the flaws and permitted a distinction between tracers arriving at a monitoring port after being released from a nearby flaw and non-engineered flaws. The PFTs detected the smallest flaw, 0.5 inches in diameter. Visual inspection of the data showed excellent agreement with the known flaw locations and the relative size of the flaws was accurately estimated.

  14. The use of synthetic colloids in tracer transport experiments in saturated rock fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, Paul William

    1995-08-01

    Studies of groundwater flow and contaminant transport in saturated, fractured geologic media are of great interest to researchers studying the potential long-term storage of hazardous wastes in or near such media. A popular technique for conducting such studies is to introduce tracers having different chemical and physical properties into a system and then observe the tracers at one or more downstream locations, inferring flow and transport mechanisms from the breakthrough characteristics of the different tracers. Many tracer studies have been conducted in saturated, fractured media to help develop and/or refine models capable of predicting contaminant transport over large scales in such media.

  15. Numerical Modeling for Integrated Design of a DNAPL Partitioning Tracer Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCray, J. E.; Divine, C. E.; Dugan, P. J.; Wolf, L.; Boving, T.; Louth, M.; Brusseau, M. L.; Hayes, D.

    2002-12-01

    Partitioning tracer tests (PTTs) are commonly used to estimate the location and volume of nonaqueous-phase liquids (NAPLs) at contaminated groundwater sites. PTTs are completed before and after remediation efforts as one means to assess remediation effectiveness. PTT design is complex. Numerical models are invaluable tools for designing a PTT, particularly for designing flow rates and selecting tracers to ensure proper tracer breakthrough times, spatial design of injection-extraction wells and rates to maximize tracer capture, well-specific sampling density and frequency, and appropriate tracer-chemical masses. Generally, the design requires consideration of the following factors: type of contaminant; distribution of contaminant at the site, including location of hot spots; site hydraulic characteristics; measurement of the partitioning coefficients for the various tracers; the time allotted to conduct the PTT; evaluation of the magnitude and arrival time of the tracer breakthrough curves; duration of the tracer input pulse; maximum tracer concentrations; analytical detection limits for the tracers; estimation of the capture zone of the well field to tracer ensure mass balance and to limit residual tracer concentrations left in the subsurface; effect of chemical remediation agents on the PTT results, and disposal of the extracted tracer solution. These design principles are applied to a chemical-enhanced remediation effort for a chlorinated-solvent dense NAPL (DNAPL) site at Little Creek Naval Amphibious Base in Virginia Beach, Virginia. For this project, the hydrology and pre-PTT contaminant distribution were characterized using traditional methods (slug tests, groundwater and soil concentrations from monitoring wells, and geoprobe analysis), as well as membrane interface probe analysis. Additional wells were installed after these studies. Partitioning tracers were selected based on the primary DNAPL contaminants at the site, expected NAPL saturations

  16. Plan for radionuclide tracer studies of the residence time distribution in the Wilsonville dissolver and preheater

    SciTech Connect

    Jolley, R.L.; Begovich, J.M.; Brashear, H.R.; Case, N.; Clark, T.G.; Emery, J.F.; Patton, B.D.; Rodgers, B.R.; Villiers-Fisher, J.F.; Watson, J.S.

    1983-12-01

    Stimulus-response measurements using radiotracers to measure residence time distribution (RTD) and hydrodynamic parameters for the preheaters and dissolvers at the Ft. Lewis Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) and the Exxon Donor Solvent (EDS) coal conversion pilot plants are reviewed. A plan is also presented for a series of radioactive tracer studies proposed for the Advanced Coal Liquefaction Facility at Wilsonville, Alabama, to measure the RTD for the preheater and dissolvers in the SRC-I mode. The tracer for the gas phase will be /sup 133/Xe, and /sup 198/Au (on carbonized resin or as an aqueous colloidal suspension) will be used as the slurry tracer. Four experimental phases are recommended for the RTD tracer studies: (1) preheater; (2) dissolver with 100% takeoff; (3) dissolver with 100% takeoff and solids withdrawal; and (4) dissolver with 50% takeoff. Eighteen gas-tracer and 22 liquid-tracer injections are projected to accomplish the four experimental phases. Two to four tracer injections are projected for preliminary tests to ensure the capability of safe injection of the radiotracers and the collection of statistically significant data. A complete projected cost and time schedule is provided, including procurement of necessary components, preparation of the radiotracers, assembly and testing of tracer injection apparatus and detection systems, onsite work and tracer injections, laboratory experimentation, data analysis, and report writing.

  17. Use of deuterated water as a conservative artificial ground water tracer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Becker, M.W.; Coplen, T.B.

    2001-01-01

    Conservative tracers are necessary to obtain groundwater transport velocities at the field scale. Deuterated water is an effective tracer for this purpose due to its similarity to water, chemical stability, non-reactivity, ease of handling and sampling, relatively neutral buoyancy, and reasonable price. Reliable detection limits of 0.1 mg deuterium/L may be obtained in field tests. A field example is presented in which deuterated water, bromide, and pentafluorobenzoic acid are used as groundwater tracers. Deuterated water appeared to be transported conservatively, producing almost identical breakthrough curves as that of other soluble tracers. ?? Springer-Verlag 2001.

  18. Human calcium metabolism including bone resorption measured with 41Ca tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Stewart P. H. T.; King, Janet C.; Vieira, Nancy E.; Woodhouse, Leslie R.; Yergey, Alfred L.

    1997-03-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry is so sensitive to small quantities of 41Ca that it might be used as a tracer in the study of human calcium kinetics to generate unique kinds of data. In contrast with the use of other Ca isotopic tracers, 41Ca tracer can be so administered that the tracer movements between the various body pools achieve a quasi steady state. Resorbing bone may thus be directly measured. We have tested such a protocol against a conventional stable isotope experiment with good agreement.

  19. Geometry of tracer trajectories in turbulent rotating convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alards, Kim; Rajaei, Hadi; Kunnen, Rudie; Toschi, Federico; Clercx, Herman

    2016-11-01

    In Rayleigh-Bénard convection rotation is known to cause transitions in flow structures and to change the level of anisotropy close to the horizontal plates. To analyze this effect of rotation, we collect curvature and torsion statistics of passive tracer trajectories in rotating Rayleigh-Bénard convection, using both experiments and direct numerical simulations. In previous studies, focusing on homogeneous isotropic turbulence (HIT), curvature and torsion PDFs are found to reveal pronounced power laws. In the center of the convection cell, where the flow is closest to HIT, we recover these power laws, regardless of the rotation rate. However, near the top plate, where we expect the flow to be anisotropic, the scaling of the PDFs deviates from the HIT prediction for lower rotation rates. This indicates that anisotropy clearly affects the geometry of tracer trajectories. Another effect of rotation is observed as a shift of curvature and torsion PDFs towards higher values. We expect this shift to be related to the length scale of typical flow structures. Using curvature and torsion statistics, we can characterize how these typical length scales evolve under rotation and moreover analyze the effect of rotation on more complicated flow characteristics, such as anisotropy.

  20. A Bayesian geostatistical transfer function approach to tracer test analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fienen, Michael N.; Luo, Jian; Kitanidis, Peter K.

    2006-07-01

    Reactive transport modeling is often used in support of bioremediation and chemical treatment planning and design. There remains a pressing need for practical and efficient models that do not require (or assume attainable) the high level of characterization needed by complex numerical models. We focus on a linear systems or transfer function approach to the problem of reactive tracer transport in a heterogeneous saprolite aquifer. Transfer functions are obtained through the Bayesian geostatistical inverse method applied to tracer injection histories and breakthrough curves. We employ nonparametric transfer functions, which require minimal assumptions about shape and structure. The resulting flexibility empowers the data to determine the nature of the transfer function with minimal prior assumptions. Nonnegativity is enforced through a reflected Brownian motion stochastic model. The inverse method enables us to quantify uncertainty and to generate conditional realizations of the transfer function. Complex information about a hydrogeologic system is distilled into a relatively simple but rigorously obtained function that describes the transport behavior of the system between two wells. The resulting transfer functions are valuable in reactive transport models based on traveltime and streamline methods. The information contained in the data, particularly in the case of strong heterogeneity, is not overextended but is fully used. This is the first application of Bayesian geostatistical inversion to transfer functions in hydrogeology but the methodology can be extended to any linear system.

  1. Single well tracer method to evaluate enhanced recovery

    DOEpatents

    Sheely, Jr., Clyde Q.; Baldwin, Jr., David E.

    1978-01-01

    Data useful to evaluate the effectiveness of or to design an enhanced recovery process (the recovery process involving mobilizing and moving hydrocarbons through a hydrocarbon-bearing subterranean formation from an injection well to a production well by injecting a mobilizing fluid into the injection well) are obtained by a process which comprises sequentially: determining hydrocarbon saturation in the formation in a volume in the formation near a well bore penetrating the formation, injecting sufficient of the mobilizing fluid to mobilize and move hydrocarbons from a volume in the formation near the well bore penetrating the formation, and determining by the single well tracer method a hydrocarbon saturation profile in a volume from which hydrocarbons are moved. The single well tracer method employed is disclosed by U.S. Pat. No. 3,623,842. The process is useful to evaluate surfactant floods, water floods, polymer floods, CO.sub.2 floods, caustic floods, micellar floods, and the like in the reservoir in much less time at greatly reduced costs, compared to conventional multi-well pilot test.

  2. Isotopologues of dense gas tracers in NGC 1068

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Junzhi; Qiu, Jianjie; Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Shi, Yong; Zhang, Jiangshui; Fang, Min

    2014-11-20

    We present observations of isotopic lines of dense gas tracers toward the nuclear region of nearby Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 1068 with the IRAM 30 m telescope and the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) 12 m telescope. We detected four isotopic lines (H{sup 13}CN 1-0, H{sup 13}CO{sup +} 1-0, HN{sup 13}C 1-0, and HC{sup 18}O{sup +} 1-0) at the 3 mm band with the IRAM 30 m telescope and obtained upper limits of other lines. We calculated optical depths of dense gas tracers with the detected isotopic lines of HCN 1-0, HCO{sup +} 1-0, and HNC 1-0. We find that the {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N abundance ratio is greater than 420 if we adopt the upper limit of HC{sup 15}N(1-0) emission. Combining this with fluxes of 1-0 lines from IRAM 30 m observations and the upper limit of 3-2 lines from APEX 12 m observations, we also estimated the excitation condition of molecular gas in the nuclear region of NGC 1068, which is less dense than that in the extreme starburst regions of galaxies.

  3. Defining groundwater transport times near ASR facilities using geochemical tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, J. F.

    2001-12-01

    Determining groundwater transport and travel times between recharge facilities and wells has become increasingly important in managing Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) projects. This is especially true in the State of California where water reuse rules that consider groundwater travel time in the permitting process are being discussed. Fundamental geochemical approaches for investigating transport include tritium/helium-3 dating and the addition of sulfur hexafluoride tracer in controlled experiments. When combined, groundwater flow can be imaged with time scales on the order of days to decades. The Orange County Water District recharges to their groundwater basin approximately 250,000 acre-ft of surface water annually from a series of spreading ponds and a 9-km section of the Santa Ana River. Sulfur hexafluoride gas was injected into the Santa Ana River over a period of 2 weeks, tagging approximately 3,000 acre-ft of recharged water. Groundwater flow and transport from the river has been determined for more than three years. Results of the gas tracer experiment demonstrate that linear groundwater flow velocities range from less than 1 km/yr to more than 5 km/yr and that the groundwater flow system is stratified. These results will be used to verify and refine numerical models of transport near the ASR facilities in Orange County and have been used to establish flowlines so that in situ water quality changes can be quantified.

  4. Simulating conservative tracers in fractured till under realistic timescales.

    PubMed

    Helmke, M F; Simpkins, W W; Horton, R

    2005-01-01

    Discrete-fracture and dual-porosity models are infrequently used to simulate solute transport through fractured unconsolidated deposits, despite their more common application in fractured rock where distinct flow regimes are hypothesized. In this study, we apply four fracture transport models--the mobile-immobile model (MIM), parallel-plate discrete-fracture model (PDFM), and stochastic and deterministic discrete-fracture models (DFMs)--to demonstrate their utility for simulating solute transport through fractured till. Model results were compared to breakthrough curves (BTCs) for the conservative tracers potassium bromide (KBr), pentafluorobenzoic acid (PFBA), and 1,4-piperazinediethanesulfonic acid (PIPES) in a large-diameter column of fractured till. Input parameters were determined from independent field and laboratory methods. Predictions of Br BTCs were not significantly different among models; however, the stochastic and deterministic DFMs were more accurate than the MIM or PDFM when predicting PFBA and PIPES BTCs. DFMs may be more applicable than the MIM for tracers with small effective diffusion coefficients (De) or for short timescales due to differences in how these models simulate diffusion or incorporate heterogeneities by their fracture networks. At large scales of investigation, the more computationally efficient MIM and PDFM may be more practical to implement than the three-dimensional DFMs, or a combination of model approaches could be employed. Regardless of the modeling approach used, fractures should be incorporated routinely into solute transport models in glaciated terrain.

  5. Bed Mobility on the Deschutes River, Oregon: Tracer Gravel Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondolf, G. M.; Williams, J.

    2003-12-01

    The Deschutes River, drainage area 20,250 km2 near Madras, Oregon, is a gravel-bedded river, impounded since 1957 by three dams in the Pelton-Round Butte hydroelectric project, operated by Portland General Electric (PGE). Salmon spawning has declined in the reach below the dams since their construction, so possible project effects on spawning habitat are an issue of concern in relicensing of the project. Consultants to PGE applied the Parker bedload transport function to several sites below the hydroelectric dams; they concluded that the entrainment threshold flow was 340 m3s-1, and that the bed had been mobile only 25 days in the 72-year period of record from 1925-1996. However, their model was not calibrated with any actual field data of bed mobility or bedload transport, and the calculations were for full bed mobility, ignoring potentially significant bedload transport that might occur at a condition of partial mobility. To redress that lack of field data, we placed tracer gravels in the bed at three sites below the dams. In 2002 tracer gravels moved at one of the three sites after a flow of 150 m3s-1 (128-mm stones moved up to 1 m). The minor movement suggests that the bed is just beginning to move at 150 m3s-1, but indicates that the previously assumed entrainment threshold of 340 m3s-1 is too high.

  6. Using biofuel tracers to study alternative combustion regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mack, J. H.; Flowers, D. L.; Buchholz, B. A.; Dibble, R. W.

    2007-06-01

    Interest in the use of alternative fuels and engines is increasing as the price of petroleum climbs. The inherently higher efficiency of Diesel engines has led to increased adoption of Diesels in Europe, capturing approximately 40% of the new passenger car market. Unfortunately, lower CO2 emissions are countered with higher nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions and higher noise. Adding oxygenated compounds to the fuel helps reduce PM emissions. However, relying on fuel alone to reduce PM is unrealistic due to economic constraints and difficult due to the emerging PM standards. Keeping peak combustion temperature below 1700 K inhibits NOx formation. Altering the combustion regime to burn at temperatures below the NOx threshold and accept a wide variety of fuels seems like a promising alternative for future engines. Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) is a possible solution. Fuel and air are well mixed prior to intake into a cylinder (homogeneous charge) and ignition occurs by compression of the fuel-air mixture by the piston. HCCI is rapid and relatively cool, producing little NOx and PM. Unfortunately, it is hard to control since HCCI is initiated by temperature and pressure instead of a spark or direct fuel injection. We investigate biofuel HCCI combustion, and use intrinsically labeled biofuels as tracers of HCCI combustion. Data from tracer experiments are used to improve our combustion modeling.

  7. Nitrated Secondary Organic Tracer Compounds in Biomass Burning Smoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iinuma, Y.; Böge, O.; Gräfe, R.; Herrmann, H.

    2010-12-01

    Natural and human-initiated biomass burning releases large amounts of gases and particles into the atmosphere, impacting climate, environment and affecting public health. Several hundreds of compounds are emitted from biomass burning and these compounds largely originate from the pyrolysis of biopolymers such as lignin, cellulose and hemicellulose. Some of compounds are known to be specific to biomass burning and widely recognized as tracer compounds that can be used to identify the presence of biomass burning PM. Detailed chemical analysis of biomass burning influenced PM samples often reveals the presence compounds that correlated well with levoglucosan, a known biomass burning tracer compound. In particular, nitrated aromatic compounds correlated very well with levoglucosan, indicating that biomass burning as a source for this class of compounds. In the present study, we present evidence for the presence of biomass burning originating secondary organic aerosol (BSOA) compounds in biomass burning influenced ambient PM. These BSOA compounds are typically nitrated aromatic compounds that are produced in the oxidation of precursor compounds in the presence of NOx. The precursor identification was performed from a series of aerosol chamber experiments. m-Cresol, which is emitted from biomass burning at significant levels, is found to be a major precursor compounds for nitrated BSOA compounds found in the ambient PM. We estimate that the total concentrations of these compounds in the ambient PM are comparable to biogenic SOA compounds in winter months, indicating the BSOA contributes important amounts to the regional organic aerosol loading.

  8. Evaluate cement with radioactive tracers, directional gamma ray logs

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    Use of radioactive tracers to evaluate hydraulic fractures has recently been extended through the use of directional gamma ray measurements. The directional gamma ray logging tool determines the azimuthal direction of gamma rays from radioactive isotope-tagged fracture proppants to estimate the fracture direction in well-controlled circumstances. The technology also provides new ways of evaluating primary and squeeze cement jobs by enhancing information from directional gamma ray data with advanced image processing techniques. By tagging the cement with a uniform quantity per unit volume of radioactivity, different levels of gamma ray log response must be attributed to variances in cement quality. Cement evaluation with tracers can help detect: thin cement sheaths; light-weight or low compressive strength cements where the acoustic impedance is near that of water; gas cut cement where the acoustic signal is attenuated; wells with microannulus that cannot be pressured to obtain valid log data; poor casing centralization; and multiple cement stage placement. The paper describes the logging tool, operational procedures, and a log example.

  9. Study of stomach motility using the relaxation of magnetic tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carneiro, A. A.; Baffa, O.; Oliveira, R. B.

    1999-07-01

    Magnetic tracers can be observed in the interior of the human body to give information about their quantity, position and state of order. With the aim of detecting and studying the degree of disorder of these tracers after they have been previously magnetized inside the stomach, a system composed of magnetization coils and magnetic detectors was developed. Helmholtz coils of diameter 84 cm were used to magnetize the sample and the remanent magnetization (RM) was detected with two first-order gradiometric fluxgate arrays each with a 15 cm base line, sensitivity of 0.5 nT and common mode rejection (CMR) of at least 10. The system allows simultaneous measurement in the anterior and posterior projections of the stomach. Measurements of the time evolution of the RM were performed in vitro and in normal subjects after the ingestion of a test meal labelled with magnetic particles. The data were fitted with an exponential curve and the relaxation time tau was obtained. Initial studies were performed to ascertain the action of a drug that is known to affect the gastric motility, showing that the decay of the remanent magnetization was indeed due to stomach contractions.

  10. Multiple Tracers of Structure, Substructure, and Dynamics of Galaxy Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanowsky, Aaron

    2015-08-01

    I will present a suite of results on the fundamental properties of galaxy halos, using a variety of observational tracers for a range of galaxy types, from giant ellipticals to spirals to dwarfs, along with comparisons to numerical simulations. The tracers include diffuse stellar light spectroscopy up to ~4 Re, resolved stellar photometry and spectroscopy, metal-poor and metal-rich globular cluster subpopulations, and planetary nebulae. The results include extended rotation and metallicity profiles, scaling relations for total angular momentum, shape inferences for the halos, orbital anisotropy estimates, kinematically "decoupled" halos, surprisingly homogeneous total mass profiles, and both detection and chemodynamical mapping of streams, shells, and other substructures. Connections are made to simulations of idealized galaxy mergers and of full cosmological formation histories, using the observed properties to make inferences about the assembly mechanisms of individual galaxies and of different galaxy types. Detailed models of stellar streams are used to infer their progenitor properties and to probe the gravitational potentials of the host galaxies. Novel observations are presented of compact stellar systems (globular clusters, ultra-compact dwarfs, compact ellipticals, and transition objects), with implications for the merger histories of their host halos.

  11. Turbulence characteristics in grassland canopies and implications for tracer transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemitz, E.; Loubet, B.; Lehmann, B. E.; Cellier, P.; Neftel, A.; Jones, S. K.; Hensen, A.; Ihly, B.; Tarakanov, S. V.; Sutton, M. A.

    2009-08-01

    In-canopy turbulence is a required input to study pollutant cycling and chemistry within plant canopies and to link concentrations and sources. Despite the importance of grasslands worldwide, most previous work has focused on forests and crops. Here, turbulence parameters in a mature agricultural grassland canopy were measured with a combination of a small ultrasonic anemometer, hotwire anemometry and a radon (Rn) tracer technique, as part of a measurement to study ammonia (NH3) exchange with grassland. The measurements are used to derive vertical profiles of basic turbulent parameters, for quadrant-hole analysis of the two-parametric frequency distributions of u'-w' and to derive in-canopy eddy diffusivities as input for models of in-canopy tracer transport. The results are in line with previous measurements on taller canopies, but shows increased decoupling between in-canopy flow and above-canopy turbulence. The comparison of sonic anemometry and Rn measurements implies that Lagrangian time-scales must decrease sharply at the ground, with important implications for estimating the magnitude of ground-level and soil emissions from concentration measurements. Atmospheric stability above and within the canopy has little influence on the standard deviation of vertical wind component inside the canopy. Use of the turbulence parameters in an analytical Lagrangian framework, which is here validated for heat transfer, suggests that measured in-canopy profiles of NH3 are consistent with a ground-level source, presumably from senescent plant parts, which is recaptured by the overlying canopy.

  12. Turbulence characteristics in grassland canopies and implications for tracer transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemitz, E.; Loubet, B.; Lehmann, B. E.; Cellier, P.; Neftel, A.; Jones, S. K.; Hensen, A.; Ihly, B.; Tarakanov, S. V.; Sutton, M. A.

    2009-01-01

    In-canopy turbulence is a required input to study pollutant cycling and chemistry within plant canopies and to link concentrations and sources. Despite the importance of grasslands worldwide, most previous work has focused on forests and crops. Here, turbulence parameters in a mature agricultural grassland canopy were measured with a combination of a small ultrasonic anemometer, hotwire anemometry and a radon (Rn) tracer technique, as part of a measurement to study ammonia (NH3) exchange with grassland. The measurements are used to derive vertical profiles of basic turbulent parameters, for quadrant-hole analysis of the two-parametric frequency distributions of u'-w' and to derive in-canopy eddy diffusivities as input for models of in-canopy tracer transport. The results are in line with previous measurements on taller canopies, but shows increased decoupling between in-canopy flow and above-canopy turbulence. The comparison of sonic anemometry and Rn measurements implies that Lagrangian time-scales must decrease sharply at the ground, with important implications for estimating the magnitude of ground-level and soil emissions from concentration measurements. Atmospheric stability above and within the canopy has little influence on the standard deviation of vertical wind component inside the canopy. Use of the turbulence parameters in an analytical Lagrangian framework, which is here validated for heat transfer, suggests that measured in-canopy profiles of NH3 are consistent with a ground-level source, presumably from senescent plant parts, which is recaptured by the overlying canopy.

  13. Inferences from catchment-scale tracer circulation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botter, G.; Milan, E.; Bertuzzo, E.; Zanardo, S.; Marani, M.; Rinaldo, A.

    2009-05-01

    SummaryIn this paper the mechanisms determining the mobilization and transport of solutes driven by rainfall through runoff pathways at catchment scales are investigated through the analysis of tracer experiments. The hydro-chemical response of a small catchment in Northern Italy has been monitored in continuous during 4 weeks by properly measuring rainfall rates, streamflows and stream flux concentrations. The chemical response has been analyzed by employing two different tracers: nitrates from diffuse agricultural sources (NO3-) and lithium from a point injection (Li +). A modelling exercise simulating the observed hydro-chemical response of the test catchment has also been carried out. Inferences from the comparative analyses prove instructive, in particular concerning the scaling of mobilization processes and the age of runoff water. Indeed, the interactions between old and new water were found to be central to understand the mechanisms driving the transfer of solutes and pollutants from soil to stream water. The modeling exercises also evidenced the noteworthy potential of the formulation of transport by residence time distributions to describe large scale solute transport processes.

  14. Development of a new tracer-encapsulated solid pellet injection system for more precise control of tracer-impurity-deposit location in LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, N.; Shoji, M.; Suzuki, C.; Funaba, H.; Hayashi, H.; Maeno, H.; Yokota, M.; Ogawa, H.; Sudo, S.

    2016-11-01

    A new tracer-encapsulated solid pellet (TESPEL) injection system has been developed additionally for the LHD heliotron. This system has three-dimensionally bended guide tubes, which allows us to inject the TESPEL obliquely on a poloidal cross-section of the LHD plasma. Consequently, this system enables us to control a tracer-impurity-deposited location more precisely. Moreover, this system can make it possible for the tracer impurity to be deposited even only inside the ergodic region (outside a last closed flux surface of the LHD plasma). A stereoscopic fast camera system has been also developed for capturing a three-dimensional TESPEL trajectory.

  15. 2D ERT imaging of tracer dispersion in laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekmine, G.; Pessel, M.; Auradou, H.

    2009-12-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography applied in cross-borehole is a method often used to follow the invasion process of pollutants. The aim of this work is to test experimentally the electrode arrays and inversion processes used to obtain a spatial representation of tracer propagation in porous media. Experiments were conducted in a plexiglass container with glass beads of 166 microns in diameter. The height of the container is 275 mm, its width 85 mm and its thickness 10 mm. 21 electrodes, equally spaced, are placed along each of the lateral sides of the porous medium : these electrodes are used to perform the electrical measurements. The device is lightened from behind and a video camera records the fluid propagation. The tracer (i.e the pollutant) is a water solution containing a known amount of dye together with NaCl (0.5g/l up to 1.5g/l). The medium is first saturated by a water solution containing a slight concentration of NaCl so that its density is smaller than the tracer’s. An upward flow is first established, the denser fluid is injected at the bottom and over the full width of the medium. In this way, the flow is stabilized by gravity avoiding the development of unstable fingers. Still, the fluids are miscible and a mixing front develops during the flow: in the present study, the interest is to estimate the 2D tracer front dispersion by both optical and electrical imaging. The comparison of the two techniques allows to study the ability of the inversion process to quantify the solute transport. A sensitivity analysis is led in order to determine the best measurement sequence to monitor the tracer’s front evolution through the entire volume of the medium. Hence, each time step is constituted by the same 190 transverse dipole-dipole set of lasting 5 minutes between the first and the last measurement. At the laboratory scale, the experimental design affects the measurements through edges effects: most of these artefacts can be partially suppressed by using

  16. Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Rare-Gas Solvated Nucleobase Anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonaugurio, Angela M.; Chen, Jing; Bowen, Kit H.

    2012-06-01

    Gas-phase polar molecular anions [uracil (U^-), thymine (T^-), 1-3 dimethyluracil (DMU^-)] solvated by rare gas atoms were studied by means of negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy. The photoelectron spectrum (PES) of U^-, T^-, and DMU^- each exhibit a distinctive dipole-bound (DB) spectral signature. The spectra of U^-, U^- (Ar)_1,2 and U^- (Kr)_1 also only displayed the DB anion feature. Upon the solvation of more rare gas atoms, the spectra of U^- (Ar)_3, U^- (Kr)_2, and U^- (Xe)1-3 not only retained the DB signature but also exhibited the valence anion features. Moreover, the DB and the valence features shifted together to higher electron binding energies (EBEs) with increasing numbers of rare gas solvent atoms. Therefore, the co-existing DB and the valence anions appeared to be strongly coupled with each other, i.e. they effectively form a single state that is a superposition of both DB and valence anion states. For both U^- and T^- series, the ``onset size" of the Xe, Kr, and Ar solvents for the co-existing of the two anionic states was 1, 2, and 3 respectively. In addition, a minimum of 2 methane (CH_4) molecules or 1 ethane (C_2H_6) molecule were required to induce the coupling between the two states in the T^- series. Thus, the nucleobase anion interaction with non-polar solvent atoms tracks as the sum of the solvent polarizabilities. However for the DMU- series, the DB and the valence anions of DMU^-(Xe)_1, DMU^-(Kr)_2, and DMU^-(Ar)_3 were completely absent in both the mass spectra and the PES. Beyond these ``holes", their PES displayed the similar behaviors to the U^- and T^- series. Extrapolated EA values for these missing species were at or very close to zero, which may explain why they were not seen. However, why this was the case is not clear. With better Franck-Condon overlap between the origins of the NB^- (Rg)_n valence anion and the neutral NB(Rg)n than between those of the NB^- (H2O)n valence anion and the neutral NB(H2O)n, extrapolation of

  17. Anion-Anion Bonding and Topology in Ternary Iridium Seleno-Stannides.

    PubMed

    Trump, Benjamin A; Tutmaher, Jake A; McQueen, Tyrel M

    2015-12-21

    The synthesis and physical properties of two new and one known Ir-Sn-Se compound are reported. Their crystal structures are elucidated with transmission electron microscopy and powder X-ray diffraction. IrSn0.45Se1.55 is a pyrite phase which consists of tilted corner-sharing IrX6 octahedra with randomly distributed (Sn-Se)(4-) and (Se-Se)(2-) dimers. Ir2Sn3Se3 is a known trigonally distorted skutterudite that consists of cooperatively tilted corner-sharing IrSn3Se3 octahedra with ordered (Sn-Se)2(4-) tetramers. Ir2SnSe5 is a layered, distorted β-MnO2 (pyrolusite) structure consisting of a double IrSe6 octrahedral row, corner sharing in the a direction and edge sharing in the b direction. This distorted pyrolusite contains (Se-Se)(2-) dimers and Se(2-) anions, and each double row is "capped" with a (Sn-Se)n polymeric chain. Resistivity, specific heat, and magnetization measurements show that all three have insulating and diamagnetic behavior, indicative of low-spin 5d(6) Ir(3+). Electronic structure calculations on Ir2Sn3Se3 show a single, spherical, nonspin-orbit split valence band and suggest that Ir2Sn3Se3 is topologically nontrivial under tensile strain due to inversion of Ir-d and Se-p states.

  18. A new anionic exchange stir bar sorptive extraction coating based on monolithic material for the extraction of inorganic anion.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaojia; Lin, Jianbing; Yuan, Dongxing

    2010-07-23

    A novel anionic exchange stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) coating based on poly(2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyltrimethylammonium chloride-co-divinylbenzene) monolithic material for the extraction of inorganic anion was prepared. The effect of preparation conditions such as ratio of functional monomer to cross-linker, content of porogenic solvent on the extraction efficiencies were investigated in detailed. The monolithic material was characterized by elemental analysis, scanning electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy. In order to investigate the extraction capacity of the new coating for inorganic anion, the new SBSE was combined with ionic chromatography with conductivity detection, Br-, NO3-, PO4(3-) and SO4(2-) were selected as detected solutes. Several extractive parameters, including pH value and ionic strength in sample matrix, desorption solvent, extraction and desorption time were optimized. The results showed that strongly ionic strength did not favor the extraction of anlaytes. Under the optimum experimental conditions, low detection limits (S/N=3) and quantification limits (S/N=10) of the proposed method for the target anions were achieved within the range of 0.92-2.62 and 3.03-9.25 microg/L, respectively. The method also showed good linearity, simplicity, practicality and low cost for the extraction inorganic anions. Finally, the proposed method was successfully used to detect the two different trademarks of commercial purified water with satisfactory recovery in the range of 70.0-92.6%. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first to use SBSE to enrich inorganic anions.

  19. Extracellular superoxide anion production contributes to the virulence of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Pang, Xinyue; Zhi, Dejuan; Wang, Jinsheng; Li, Minquan; Li, Hongyu

    2009-02-01

    Endogenous superoxide anion production was determined by electron spin resonance in wild-type strains and avrXa7 mutants of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. The localization of superoxide anion was carried out in the intra- and extra-cellular fractions. Results showed the presence of superoxide anion in multi-locations of X. oryzae pv. oryzae cells. The extracellular fraction was the major location of superoxide anion production. Furthermore, a positive relationship was shown between the levels of endogenous superoxide anion and the virulence of strains. These indubitable results suggested that the superoxide anion contributes to the virulence of X. oryzae pv. oryzae.

  20. CH as a Molecular Gas Tracer and C-shock Tracer Across a Molecular Cloud Boundary in Taurus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Duo; Li, Di

    2016-12-01

    We present new observations of all three ground-state transitions of the methylidyne (CH) radical and all four ground-state transitions of the hydroxyl (OH) radical toward a sharp boundary region of the Taurus molecular cloud. These data were analyzed in conjunction with existing CO and dust images. The derived CH abundance is consistent with previous observations of translucent clouds (0.8 ≤ A v ≤ 2.1 mag). The X(CH)-factor is nearly a constant (1.0 ± 0.06) × 1022 cm-2 K-1 km-1 s in this extinction range, with less dispersion than that of the more widely used molecular tracers CO and OH. CH turns out be a better tracer of total column density in such an intermediate extinction range than CO or OH. Compared with previous observations, CH is overabundant below 1 mag extinction. Such an overabundance of CH is consistent with the presence of a C-shock. CH has two kinematic components, one of which shifts from 5.3 to 6 km s-1, while the other stays at 6.8 km s-1 when moving from outside toward inside of the cloud. These velocity behaviors exactly match previous OH observation. The shifting of the two kinematic components indicates colliding streams or gas flow at the boundary region, which could be the cause of the C-shock.