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Sample records for 23rd digital avionics

  1. Digital Avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koelbl, Terry G.; Ponchak, Denise; Lamarche, Teresa

    2002-01-01

    The field of digital avionics experienced another year of important advances in civil aviation, military systems, and space applications. As a result of the events of 9/11/2001, NASA has pursued activities to apply its aerospace technologies toward improved aviation security. Both NASA Glenn Research Center and Langley Research Center have performed flight research demonstrations using advanced datalink concepts to transmit live pictures from inside a jetliner, and to downlink the contents of the plane's 'black box' recorder in real time. The U.S. Navy and General Electric demonstrated survivable engine control (SEC) algorithms during engine ground tests at the Weapons Survivability Laboratory at China Lake. The scientists at Boeing Satellite Systems advanced the field of stellar inertial technology with the development of a new method for positioning optical star trackers on satellites.

  2. Advanced Digital Avionics System for general aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyth, R. K.; Hoh, R. H.; Teper, G. L.

    1977-01-01

    Objectives and functions of the Advanced Digital Avionics System (ADAS) for general aviation are outlined with particular reference to navigation, flight control, engine management, ATC surveillance, flight management, communications, and the pilot controls and displays. The resulting ADAS design comprises the selection of off-the-shelf avionics to be integrated with ADAS-unique elements including new pilot displays and controls along with a microcomputer control complex (MCC). Reasons for which the ADAS achieves increased avionics capability are mentioned, including overall system integration through the MCC and pilot orientation from navigation map display.

  3. Digital avionics: A cornerstone of aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spitzer, Cary R.

    1990-01-01

    Digital avionics is continually expanding its role in communication (HF and VHF, satellite, data links), navigation (ground-based systems, inertial and satellite-based systems), and flight-by-wire control. Examples of electronic flight control system architecture, pitch, roll, and yaw control are presented. Modeling of complex hardware systems, electromagnetic interference, and software are discussed.

  4. Integrated digital avionic systems - Promise and threats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zempolich, B. A.

    1983-10-01

    The progress being made in effective systems design implementation for digital equipment for aircraft avionics sytems is assayed. The history of digital systems integration in avionics hardware is traced from use of 16-transistor chips to emerging 100,000 gate chips, and attention is given to architectural considerations for future hardware. Design considerations include top-down or bottom-up architecture, distributed microprocessor and computer resources, integrated components or data fusion, etc. Systems decomposition practices in design permit separate design of flight safety systems, redundancy, fault tolerance, and identifying components that feature different technologies. Present flight control systems sport a MBTF of 1,000,000 hr when separate controls are installed for each flight system.

  5. Digital avionics design and reliability analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The description and specifications for a digital avionics design and reliability analyzer are given. Its basic function is to provide for the simulation and emulation of the various fault-tolerant digital avionic computer designs that are developed. It has been established that hardware emulation at the gate-level will be utilized. The primary benefit of emulation to reliability analysis is the fact that it provides the capability to model a system at a very detailed level. Emulation allows the direct insertion of faults into the system, rather than waiting for actual hardware failures to occur. This allows for controlled and accelerated testing of system reaction to hardware failures. There is a trade study which leads to the decision to specify a two-machine system, including an emulation computer connected to a general-purpose computer. There is also an evaluation of potential computers to serve as the emulation computer.

  6. Rotorcraft digital advanced avionics system (RODAAS) functional description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, E. M.; Bailey, J.; Mcmanus, T. J.

    1985-01-01

    A functional design of a rotorcraft digital advanced avionics system (RODAAS) to transfer the technology developed for general aviation in the Demonstration Advanced Avionics System (DAAS) program to rotorcraft operation was undertaken. The objective was to develop an integrated avionics system design that enhances rotorcraft single pilot IFR operations without increasing the required pilot training/experience by exploiting advanced technology in computers, busing, displays and integrated systems design. A key element of the avionics system is the functionally distributed architecture that has the potential for high reliability with low weight, power and cost. A functional description of the RODAAS hardware and software functions is presented.

  7. Digital avionics systems - Principles and practices (2nd revised and enlarged edition)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spitzer, Cary R.

    1993-01-01

    The state of the art in digital avionics systems is surveyed. The general topics addressed include: establishing avionics system requirements; avionics systems essentials in data bases, crew interfaces, and power; fault tolerance, maintainability, and reliability; architectures; packaging and fitting the system into the aircraft; hardware assessment and validation; software design, assessment, and validation; determining the costs of avionics.

  8. HH-65A Dolphin digital integrated avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huntoon, R. B.

    1984-01-01

    Communication, navigation, flight control, and search sensor management are avionics functions which constitute every Search and Rescue (SAR) operation. Routine cockpit duties monopolize crew attention during SAR operations and thus impair crew effectiveness. The United States Coast Guard challenged industry to build an avionics system that automates routine tasks and frees the crew to focus on the mission tasks. The HH-64A SAR avionics systems of communication, navigation, search sensors, and flight control have existed independently. On the SRR helicopter, the flight management system (FMS) was introduced. H coordinates or integrates these functions. The pilot interacts with the FMS rather than the individual subsystems, using simple, straightforward procedures to address distinct mission tasks and the flight management system, in turn, orchestrates integrated system response.

  9. Digital Avionics Information System (DAIS): Training Requirements Analysis Model (TRAMOD).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czuchry, Andrew J.; And Others

    The training requirements analysis model (TRAMOD) described in this report represents an important portion of the larger effort called the Digital Avionics Information System (DAIS) Life Cycle Cost (LCC) Study. TRAMOD is the second of three models that comprise an LCC impact modeling system for use in the early stages of system development. As…

  10. IEEE/AIAA/NASA Digital Avionics Systems Conference, 9th, Virginia Beach, VA, Oct. 15-18, 1990, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The present conference on digital avionics discusses vehicle-management systems, spacecraft avionics, special vehicle avionics, communication/navigation/identification systems, software qualification and quality assurance, launch-vehicle avionics, Ada applications, sensor and signal processing, general aviation avionics, automated software development, design-for-testability techniques, and avionics-software engineering. Also discussed are optical technology and systems, modular avionics, fault-tolerant avionics, commercial avionics, space systems, data buses, crew-station technology, embedded processors and operating systems, AI and expert systems, data links, and pilot/vehicle interfaces.

  11. Integration of digital avionics components for guided weapons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henne, A. M.; Geyer, D. W.

    1980-10-01

    The current approach for guided weapon avionics is to use custom digital computational elements connected together with large cables. If these computational tasks can be partitioned into common tasks, and if standard interfaces can be defined, it would promote interchangeable missile guidance and control components and enhance interoperability. The digital integrating subsystem (DIS) program is a current effort to establish these standards and procedures. In the digital integrating subsystem concept, the total data processing requirements of a typical standoff weapon are met by utilizing a number of individual microcomputers that communicate with each other on a serial multiplex bus, the number of microcomputers being dependent upon the total data processing work load of the weapon. Each microcomputer is tasked to do calculations associated with a particular avionics function. Once the computations are completed, the results are "broadcast" on the multiplex bus. Each computer also listens for only the data it requires on the bus. System design, details on the interface characteristics, and a progress report on the construction of brassboard units are presented.

  12. High density monolithic packaging technology for digital/microwave avionics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fertig, Timothy; Walter, Theresa; Gaver, Eric; Leahy, Kevin

    1994-10-01

    There has been a need for generic technologies and common approaches in design, development, and manufacturing of military and commercial products. This need is more pronounced and pressing today than ever before. With the objective to dramatically enhance avionics reliability, maintainability and availability (RM&A), an integrated, generic technology for packaging, cooling, and interconnection of high density and high performance circuits was developed. It is named High Density Monolithic Packaging (HDMP). Under the sponsorship of Wright Laboratory, a two-part complementary program (1990-1994), named Advanced Radio-Frequency Packaging/ARFP was contracted to Westinghouse. Under the ARFP program, the HDMP technology is being applied and its promising capability is being assessed for its ability to reduce the low power RF avionics life-cycle cost. Being better than half way through the program, the results and projections have been extremely promising. The technology assessment is approximately 50 percent complete and initial results have been extremely successful. Although the focus of the development effort has been on RF subsystems, the basic elements of HDMP technology have applications beyond RF/microwave subsystems. As digital processing speeds increase, RF/microwave design techniques must be applied to maintain high speed digital signal integrity. The basic elements of the HDMP technology are: low temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC), solderless interconnects, multichip modules (MCM's), and composite heatsink materials. The key technology element, in this avionics availability enabling technology, is LTCC. LTCC material technology is a monolithic multilayered ceramic and conductor/metallization structure used as a substrate to support dense co-habitation of high density electronic circuits, their interconnections, and the electromechanical integrity of the integrated constituents.

  13. Using Modern Design Tools for Digital Avionics Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyde, David W.; Lakin, David R., II; Asquith, Thomas E.

    2000-01-01

    Using Modem Design Tools for Digital Avionics Development Shrinking development time and increased complexity of new avionics forces the designer to use modem tools and methods during hardware development. Engineers at the Marshall Space Flight Center have successfully upgraded their design flow and used it to develop a Mongoose V based radiation tolerant processor board for the International Space Station's Water Recovery System. The design flow, based on hardware description languages, simulation, synthesis, hardware models, and full functional software model libraries, allowed designers to fully simulate the processor board from reset, through initialization before any boards were built. The fidelity of a digital simulation is limited to the accuracy of the models used and how realistically the designer drives the circuit's inputs during simulation. By using the actual silicon during simulation, device modeling errors are reduced. Numerous design flaws were discovered early in the design phase when they could be easily fixed. The use of hardware models and actual MIPS software loaded into full functional memory models also provided checkout of the software development environment. This paper will describe the design flow used to develop the processor board and give examples of errors that were found using the tools. An overview of the processor board firmware will also be covered.

  14. Measurement of fault latency in a digital avionic miniprocessor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgough, J. G.; Swern, F. L.

    1981-01-01

    The results of fault injection experiments utilizing a gate-level emulation of the central processor unit of the Bendix BDX-930 digital computer are presented. The failure detection coverage of comparison-monitoring and a typical avionics CPU self-test program was determined. The specific tasks and experiments included: (1) inject randomly selected gate-level and pin-level faults and emulate six software programs using comparison-monitoring to detect the faults; (2) based upon the derived empirical data develop and validate a model of fault latency that will forecast a software program's detecting ability; (3) given a typical avionics self-test program, inject randomly selected faults at both the gate-level and pin-level and determine the proportion of faults detected; (4) determine why faults were undetected; (5) recommend how the emulation can be extended to multiprocessor systems such as SIFT; and (6) determine the proportion of faults detected by a uniprocessor BIT (built-in-test) irrespective of self-test.

  15. Digital Avionics Information System (DAIS): Reliability and Maintainability Model. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czuchry, Andrew J.; And Others

    The reliability and maintainability (R&M) model described in this report represents an important portion of a larger effort called the Digital Avionics Information System (DAIS) Life Cycle Cost (LCC) Study. The R&M model is the first of three models that comprise a modeling system for use in LCC analysis of avionics systems. The total…

  16. Digital Avionics Information System (DAIS): Mid-1980's Maintenance Task Analysis. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czuchry, Andrew J.; And Others

    The fundamental objective of the Digital Avionics Information System (DAIS) Life Cycle Cost (LCC) Study is to provide the Air Force with an enhanced in-house capability to incorporate LCC considerations during all stages of the system acquisition process. The purpose of this report is to describe the technical approach, results, and conclusions…

  17. Digital avionics susceptibility to high energy radio frequency fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, William E.

    1988-01-01

    Generally, noncritical avionic systems for transport category aircraft have been designed to meet radio frequency (RF) susceptibility requirements set forth in RTCA DO 160B, environmental conditions and test procedures for airborne equipment. Section 20 of this document controls the electromagnetic interference (EMI) hardening for avionics equipment to levels of 1 and 2 V/m. Currently, US equipment manufacturers are designing flight-critical fly-by-wire avionics to a much higher level. The US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has requested that the RTCA SC-135 high-energy radio frequency (HERF) working group develop appropriate testing procedures for section 20 of RTCA DO 160B for radiated and conducted susceptibility at the box and systems level. The FAA has also requested the SAE AE4R committee to address installed systems testing, airframe shielding effects and RF environment monitoring. Emitters of interest include radar (ground, ship, and aircraft) commercial broadcast and TV station, mobile communication, and other transmitters that could possibly affect commercial aircraft.

  18. Wavelength-Division Multiplexing Of Avionic Digital Control Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, James D.; Palumbo, Daniel L.

    1993-01-01

    Proposed wavelength-division multiplexing optoelectronic system aboard aircraft transmits digital control signals from central flight-control computer via optical fibers to multiple distributed processors, actuators, and sensors. In comparison with serial TDM communication systems, this system offers potentially higher data throughput, greater tolerance to transient induced faults, and lower bit-error rates. Also immune to electromagnetic interference at suboptical frequencies.

  19. Methodology for measurement of fault latency in a digital avionic miniprocessor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgough, J. G.; Swern, F.; Bavuso, S. J.

    1981-01-01

    Investigations regarding the synthesis of a reliability assessment capability for fault-tolerant computer-based systems have been conducted for several years. In 1978 a pilot study was conducted to test the feasibility of measuring detection coverage and investigating the dynamics of fault propagation in a digital computer. A description is presented of an investigation concerned with the applicability of previous results to a real avionics processor. The obtained results show that emulation is a practicable approach to failure modes and effects analysis of a digital processor. The run time of the emulated processor on a PDP-10 host computer is only 20,000 to 25,000 times slower than the actual processor. As a consequence large numbers of faults can be studied at relatively little cost and in a timely manner.

  20. Applying emerging digital video interface standards to airborne avionics sensor and digital map integrations: benefits outweigh the initial costs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehl, C. Stephen

    1996-06-01

    Video signal system performance can be compromised in a military aircraft cockpit management system (CMS) with the tailoring of vintage Electronics Industries Association (EIA) RS170 and RS343A video interface standards. Video analog interfaces degrade when induced system noise is present. Further signal degradation has been traditionally associated with signal data conversions between avionics sensor outputs and the cockpit display system. If the CMS engineering process is not carefully applied during the avionics video and computing architecture development, extensive and costly redesign will occur when visual sensor technology upgrades are incorporated. Close monitoring and technical involvement in video standards groups provides the knowledge-base necessary for avionic systems engineering organizations to architect adaptable and extendible cockpit management systems. With the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in the process of adopting the Digital HDTV Grand Alliance System standard proposed by the Advanced Television Systems Committee (ATSC), the entertainment and telecommunications industries are adopting and supporting the emergence of new serial/parallel digital video interfaces and data compression standards that will drastically alter present NTSC-M video processing architectures. The re-engineering of the U.S. Broadcasting system must initially preserve the electronic equipment wiring networks within broadcast facilities to make the transition to HDTV affordable. International committee activities in technical forums like ITU-R (former CCIR), ANSI/SMPTE, IEEE, and ISO/IEC are establishing global consensus on video signal parameterizations that support a smooth transition from existing analog based broadcasting facilities to fully digital computerized systems. An opportunity exists for implementing these new video interface standards over existing video coax/triax cabling in military aircraft cockpit management systems. Reductions in signal

  1. Digital Avionics Information System (DAIS): Reliability and Maintainability Model Users Guide. Final Report, May 1975-July 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czuchry, Andrew J.; And Others

    This report provides a complete guide to the stand alone mode operation of the reliability and maintenance (R&M) model, which was developed to facilitate the performance of design versus cost trade-offs within the digital avionics information system (DAIS) acquisition process. The features and structure of the model, its input data…

  2. Avionics systems integration technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stech, George; Williams, James R.

    1988-01-01

    A very dramatic and continuing explosion in digital electronics technology has been taking place in the last decade. The prudent and timely application of this technology will provide Army aviation the capability to prevail against a numerically superior enemy threat. The Army and NASA have exploited this technology explosion in the development and application of avionics systems integration technology for new and future aviation systems. A few selected Army avionics integration technology base efforts are discussed. Also discussed is the Avionics Integration Research Laboratory (AIRLAB) that NASA has established at Langley for research into the integration and validation of avionics systems, and evaluation of advanced technology in a total systems context.

  3. International society for antiviral research - 23rd international conference.

    PubMed

    Mason, Vicki L

    2010-06-01

    The 23rd International Conference on Antiviral Research (ICAR), organized by the International Society for Antiviral Research (ISAR) and held in San Francisco, included topics covering new therapeutic developments in the field of antivirals. This conference report highlights selected presentations on CD4-BFFI (Roche Holding AG), a CD4 mAb-based bifunctional HIV entry inhibitor; a CLDC-HBsAg vaccine (Juvaris BioTherapeutics Inc/China National Biotec Group) against HBV; ODE-(S)-MPMPA (University of California San Diego), a potent anti-HCV compound; the anti-human CMV activity exhibited by tricin; the protective activity of Ingavirin against influenza A; and Prosetta Bioconformatics's approach to identifying small-molecule antivirals.

  4. A Search for 23rd Magnitude Kuiper Belt Comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luu, Jane

    1997-01-01

    The goal of the project was to identify a statistically significant sample of large (200 km-sized) Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs), by covering 10 sq. degrees of the sky to a red limiting magnitude m(sub R) = 23. This work differs from, but builds on, previous surveys of the outer solar system in that it will cover a large area to a limiting magnitude that is deep enough to guarantee positive results. The proposed work should provide us with a significant number of 200 km-size KBOs (approx. 20 are expected) for subsequent studies. Such a sample is crucial if we are to investigate the statistical properties of the Belt and its members. It was modified the original research strategy to accommodate unanticipated problems such as the urgent need for follow-up observations,the original goal was still reached: we have substantially increased the number of Kuiper Belt Objects brighter than 23rd mag.

  5. The implementation of fail-operative functions in integrated digital avionics systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osoer, S. S.

    1976-01-01

    System architectures which incorporate fail operative flight guidance functions within a total integrated avionics complex are described. It is shown that the mixture of flight critical and nonflight critical functions within a common computer complex is an efficient solution to the integration of navigation, guidance, flight control, display, and flight management. Interfacing subsystems retain autonomous capability to avoid vulnerability to total avionics system shutdown as a result of only a few failures.

  6. Optimized Computer Systems for Avionics Applications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    Signal Processing 66 2.5. 1 Study of Current Avionics Digital Signal Processing 66 2.5.2 Identify and Characterize Avionics Signal Processing Kernels...study of current avionics digital signal processing; 2. to identify and characterize avionics signal processing kernels; 3. to investigate adaptive...COMMUNICATION AND IMAGE PROCESSING SYSTEMS During the last several years there has been a growing interest in the use of digital signal processing in

  7. EDITORIAL: 23rd International Laser Physics Workshop (LPHYS'14)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-03-01

    Dear Readers, The 23rd annual International Laser Physics Workshop, LPHYS'14, took place in the City of Sofia, Bulgaria. 361 participants from 35 countries attended the conference. It was hosted by the Institute of Electronics at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. This year's Workshop was dedicated to paying tribute to two major events: • 50th anniversary of 1964 Nobel Prize in physics, • 145th anniversary of the establishment of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. LPHYS'14 has been taken under the High Patronage of Rosen Plevneliev, President of the Republic of Bulgaria. The LPHYS'14 Steering Committee and the Advisory & Program Committee would like to extend their sincere gratitude to Professor Sanka Gateva (Co-Chair) and Professor Ekaterina Borisova (Head of the Local Organizing Committee) and to their team for the outstanding job performed in organizing, arranging, managing and putting in order the conference. Their combined efforts lead to a successful result. In this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series you will find selected proceedings of the Workshop in Sofia. Please make a note that the 24th annual International Laser Physics Workshop (LPHYS'15) will take place from August 21 to August 25, 2015 in the city of Shanghai, China hosted by Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics at the Chinese Academy of Sciences. With kind regards, Steering and Advisory & Program committees LPHYS'14

  8. Development of a Comprehensive Digital Avionics Curriculum for the Aeronautical Engineer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    1 1.1 General Discussion.................................................................................................1...Introduction 1.1 General Discussion Today’s advanced commercial and military aircraft are highly dependent upon the sophisticated avionics they carry as...microprocessor architectures, field programmable logic arrays ( FPGA ), static and dynamic memory systems, and inter-computer communications. A brief

  9. Space shuttle avionics system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanaway, John F.; Moorehead, Robert W.

    1989-01-01

    The Space Shuttle avionics system, which was conceived in the early 1970's and became operational in the 1980's represents a significant advancement of avionics system technology in the areas of systems and redundacy management, digital data base technology, flight software, flight control integration, digital fly-by-wire technology, crew display interface, and operational concepts. The origins and the evolution of the system are traced; the requirements, the constraints, and other factors which led to the final configuration are outlined; and the functional operation of the system is described. An overall system block diagram is included.

  10. Error propagation in a digital avionic processor: A simulation-based study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lomelino, D.; Iyer, R. K.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental analysis to study error propagation from the gate to the chip level is described. The target system is the CPU in the Bendix BDX-930, an avionic miniprocessor. Error activity data for the study was collected via a gate-level simulation. A family of distributions to characterize the error propagation, both within the chip and at the pins, was then generated. Based on these distributions, measures of error propagation and severity were defined. The analysis quantifies the dependency of the measured error propagation on the location of the fault and the type of instruction/microinstruction executed.

  11. Methodology for measurement of fault latency in a digital avionic miniprocessor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgough, J. C.; Swern, F.; Bavuso, S. J.

    1981-01-01

    Using a gate level emulation of a typical avionics miniprocessor, fault injection experiments were performed to (1) determine the time to detect a fault by comparison monitoring, (2) forecast a program's ability to detect faults and (3) validate the fault detection coverage of a typical self test program. To estimate time to detect, six programs ranging in complexity from 6 to 147 instructions, were emulated. Each program was executed repetitively in the presence of a single stuck at fault at a gate node or device pin. Detection was assumed to occur whenever the computed outputs differed from the corresponding outputs of the same program executed in a nonfaulted processor. Histograms of faults detected versus number of repetitions to detection were tabulated. Using a simple model of fault detection, which was based in an analog with the selection of balls in an urn, distributions of time to detect were computed and compared with those obtained empirically. A self test program of 2,000 executable instructions was designed expressly for the study. The only requirement imposed on the design was that it should achieve 95% coverage. The program was executed in the presence of a single stuck-at fault at a gate node on device pin. The proportion of detected faults are tabulated. In all experiments faults were selected at random over gate nodes or device pins.

  12. A knowledge-based flight status monitor for real-time application in digital avionics systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, E. L.; Disbrow, J. D.; Butler, G. F.

    1989-01-01

    The Dryden Flight Research Facility of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center (Ames-Dryden) is the principal NASA facility for the flight testing and evaluation of new and complex avionics systems. To aid in the interpretation of system health and status data, a knowledge-based flight status monitor was designed. The monitor was designed to use fault indicators from the onboard system which are telemetered to the ground and processed by a rule-based model of the aircraft failure management system to give timely advice and recommendations in the mission control room. One of the important constraints on the flight status monitor is the need to operate in real time, and to pursue this aspect, a joint research activity between NASA Ames-Dryden and the Royal Aerospace Establishment (RAE) on real-time knowledge-based systems was established. Under this agreement, the original LISP knowledge base for the flight status monitor was reimplemented using the intelligent knowledge-based system toolkit, MUSE, which was developed under RAE sponsorship. Details of the flight status monitor and the MUSE implementation are presented.

  13. Annual State of Michigan Personnel Officers Conference. (23rd, Cadillac, Michigan, September 15-17, 1969).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Dept. of Civil Service, Lansing.

    The 23rd Annual State of Michigan Personnel Officers' Conference examined the workings of employee relations with employee organizations. The highlights are reported in this manual. A panel of speakers from industry and education provided conference participants with different points of view and a broadened outlook in the difficult areas of…

  14. Neil Simon's "Laughter on the 23rd Floor." Spotlight on Theater Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, John C.

    This booklet presents a variety of materials concerning Neil Simon's play "Laughter on the 23rd Floor." After a brief introduction to the play, the booklet presents a profile of the playwright, several lists of his accomplishments, information on his work for television, a quiz about plays, biographical information on the producer,…

  15. Digital Systems Validation Handbook. Volume 2. Chapter 18. Avionic Data Bus Integration Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-11-01

    U.S. Department of Transportation PFe 1rs Aviation Administration DOT/FAA/CT-88/10 HANDBOOK- VOLUME H DIGITAL SYSTEMS VALIDATION - CHAPTER 18 tw...18-29 improve identification, control, and auditing of software. SCM and SQA methods in RTCA/DO-178A are drawn directly from proven methods of hardware...procedures, and practices; reviews and audits ; configuration management; medium control; testing; supplier control; and appropriate records. A brief

  16. V/STOL AND digital avionics system for UH-1H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liden, S.

    1978-01-01

    A hardware and software system for the Bell UH-1H helicopter was developed that provides sophisticated navigation, guidance, control, display, and data acquisition capabilities for performing terminal area navigation, guidance and control research. Two Sperry 1819B general purpose digital computers were used. One contains the development software that performs all the specified system flight computations. The second computer is available to NASA for experimental programs that run simultaneously with the other computer programs and which may, at the push of a button, replace selected computer computations. Other features that provide research flexibility include keyboard selectable gains and parameters and software generated alphanumeric and CRT displays.

  17. Measurement of fault latency in a digital avionic mini processor, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgough, J.; Swern, F.

    1983-01-01

    The results of fault injection experiments utilizing a gate-level emulation of the central processor unit of the Bendix BDX-930 digital computer are described. Several earlier programs were reprogrammed, expanding the instruction set to capitalize on the full power of the BDX-930 computer. As a final demonstration of fault coverage an extensive, 3-axis, high performance flght control computation was added. The stages in the development of a CPU self-test program emphasizing the relationship between fault coverage, speed, and quantity of instructions were demonstrated.

  18. Modeling pilot interaction with automated digital avionics systems: Guidance and control algorithms for contour and nap-of-the-Earth flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Ronald A.

    1990-01-01

    A collection of technical papers are presented that cover modeling pilot interaction with automated digital avionics systems and guidance and control algorithms for contour and nap-of-the-earth flight. The titles of the papers presented are as follows: (1) Automation effects in a multiloop manual control system; (2) A qualitative model of human interaction with complex dynamic systems; (3) Generalized predictive control of dynamic systems; (4) An application of generalized predictive control to rotorcraft terrain-following flight; (5) Self-tuning generalized predictive control applied to terrain-following flight; and (6) Precise flight path control using a predictive algorithm.

  19. V/STOLAND digital avionics system for XV-15 tilt rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liden, S.

    1980-01-01

    A digital flight control system for the tilt rotor research aircraft provides sophisticated navigation, guidance, control, display and data acquisition capabilities for performing terminal area navigation, guidance and control research. All functions of the XV-15 V/STOLAND system were demonstrated on the NASA-ARC S-19 simulation facility under a comprehensive dynamic acceptance test. The most noteworthy accomplishments of the system are: (1) automatic configuration control of a tilt-rotor aircraft over the total operating range; (2) total hands-off landing to touchdown on various selectable straight-in glide slopes and on a flight path that includes a two-revolution helix; (3) automatic guidance along a programmed three-dimensional reference flight path; (4) navigation data for the automatic guidance computed on board, based on VOR/DME, TACAN, or MLS navid data; and (5) integration of a large set of functions in a single computer, utilizing 16k words of storage for programs and data.

  20. Proceedings of the Joint Seminar; Hydrogen Management in Steel Weldments, Melbourne, Australia, 23rd October 1996.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-01-01

    TECHNOLOGY ORGANISATION Sponsored by US Army Research Office HYDROGEN MANAGEMENT IN STEEL WELDMENTS Joint Seminar Melbourne, Australia 23rd...HYDROGEN MANAGEMENT IN STEEL WELDMENTS • Table of Contents • Preface J.C. Ritter, DSTO Introduction J.L.Dauidson, DSTO and D.L. Olson...Colorado School of Mines Hydrogen Management in High Strength Steel Weldments 1 D.L.Olson, LMaroef, C.Lensing, R.D.Smith, W.W.Wang, S.Liu, T.Wildeman and

  1. Conference Support, 23rd Western Photosynthesis Conference 2014, Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wachter, Rebekka

    2015-01-12

    The Western Photosynthesis Conference is a regional conference that is held on an annual basis to bring together researchers primarily from the Western United States to share their newest research advances on photosynthetic processes. The 23rd conference was focused on both fundamental and more applied research on the biological conversion of solar energy to various energy storage forms. Several particular areas of solar energy conversion were emphasized in this conference (see below). Some of these topics, such as carbon limitations on photosynthesis, biomimicry and phenotyping, have traditionally not been incorporated extensively in the Western Photosynthesis Conference. We found that these topics have substantially broadened of the scope of this meeting.

  2. Space Weather and the Ground-Level Solar Proton Events of the 23rd Solar Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, M. A.; Smart, D. F.

    2012-10-01

    Solar proton events can adversely affect space and ground-based systems. Ground-level events are a subset of solar proton events that have a harder spectrum than average solar proton events and are detectable on Earth's surface by cosmic radiation ionization chambers, muon detectors, and neutron monitors. This paper summarizes the space weather effects associated with ground-level solar proton events during the 23rd solar cycle. These effects include communication and navigation systems, spacecraft electronics and operations, space power systems, manned space missions, and commercial aircraft operations. The major effect of ground-level events that affect manned spacecraft operations is increased radiation exposure. The primary effect on commercial aircraft operations is the loss of high frequency communication and, at extreme polar latitudes, an increase in the radiation exposure above that experienced from the background galactic cosmic radiation. Calculations of the maximum potential aircraft polar route exposure for each ground-level event of the 23rd solar cycle are presented. The space weather effects in October and November 2003 are highlighted together with on-going efforts to utilize cosmic ray neutron monitors to predict high energy solar proton events, thus providing an alert so that system operators can possibly make adjustments to vulnerable spacecraft operations and polar aircraft routes.

  3. Proceedings of the 23rd Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Sydnor, R.L.

    1992-07-01

    A compilation of technical papers, from the 23rd annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Applications and Planning Meeting, is presented. Papers were given in the following categories: (1) developments in rubidium, cesium, and hydrogen-based frequency standards, and in cryogenic and trapped-ion technology; (2) international and transnational applications of PTTI technology with emphasis on satellite laser tracking networks, GLONASS timing, comparison of national time scales and international communications; (3) applications of PTTI technology to the telecommunications, power distribution, platform positioning, and geophysical survey industries; (4) applications of PTTI technology to evolving military communications and navigation systems; and (5) dissemination of precise time and frequency by means of GPS, GLONASS, MILSTAR, Loran, and synchronous communications satellites.

  4. Final report: ES11: The 23rd Annual Workshop on Electronic Structure Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Rappe, Andrew M.

    2011-08-31

    ES11: the 23rd Annual Workshop on Electronic Structure Methods was held from June 6-9, 2011 at the University of Pennsylvania. The local organizing committee (see Section II) led by PI Andrew M. Rappe supervised the organization of the conference, before, during, and after the meeting itself. The national organizing committee set the technical program of talks, and provided support and advice in various ways. The conference was well-attended (see Section III). An important feature of this conference was a series of panel discussions (see Section IV) to discuss the field of electronic structure and to set new directions. The technical program was of extraordinarily high quality (see Section V). The host institution, the University of Pennsylvania, provided a supportive environment for this meeting (see Section VI).

  5. Avionic Data Bus Integration Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    address the hardware-software interaction between a digital data bus and an avionic system. Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) ICs and multiversion ...the SCP. In 1984, the Sperry Corporation developed a fault tolerant system which employed multiversion programming, voting, and monitoring for error... MULTIVERSION PROGRAMMING. N-version programming. 226 N-VERSION PROGRAMMING. The independent coding of a number, N, of redundant computer programs that

  6. Flight Avionics Hardware Roadmap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodson, Robert; McCabe, Mary; Paulick, Paul; Ruffner, Tim; Some, Rafi; Chen, Yuan; Vitalpur, Sharada; Hughes, Mark; Ling, Kuok; Redifer, Matt; Wallace, Shawn

    2013-01-01

    As part of NASA's Avionics Steering Committee's stated goal to advance the avionics discipline ahead of program and project needs, the committee initiated a multi-Center technology roadmapping activity to create a comprehensive avionics roadmap. The roadmap is intended to strategically guide avionics technology development to effectively meet future NASA missions needs. The scope of the roadmap aligns with the twelve avionics elements defined in the ASC charter, but is subdivided into the following five areas: Foundational Technology (including devices and components), Command and Data Handling, Spaceflight Instrumentation, Communication and Tracking, and Human Interfaces.

  7. CALL Communities & Culture: Short Papers from EUROCALL 2016 (23rd, Limassol, Cyprus, August 24-27, 2016)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papadima-Sophocleous, Salomi, Ed.; Bradley, Linda, Ed.; Thouësny, Sylvie, Ed.

    2016-01-01

    The 23rd EUROCALL conference was held in Cyprus from the 24th to the 27th of August 2016. The theme of the conference this year was "CALL Communities and Culture." It offered a unique opportunity to hear from real-world CALL practitioners on how they practice CALL in their communities, and how the CALL culture has developed in local and…

  8. Proceedings of the 23rd Seismic Research Symposium: Worldwide Monitoring of Nuclear Explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, N. Jill; Chavez, Francesca C.

    2001-10-02

    These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 23rd Seismic Research Review: Worldwide Monitoring of Nuclear Explosions, held 2-5 October, 2001 in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. These papers represent the combined research related to ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), Air Force Technical Applications Center (AFTAC), the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), and other invited sponsors. The scientific objectives of the research are to improve the United States capability to detect, locate, and identify nuclear explosions. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the sponsoring agencies, as well as potential users, an opportunity to review research accomplished during the preceding year and to discuss areas of investigation for the coming year. For the researchers, it provides a forum for the exchange of scientific information toward achieving program goals, and an opportunity to discuss results and future plans. Paper topics include: seismic regionalization and calibration; detection and location of sources; wave propagation from source to receiver; the nature of seismic sources, including mining practices; hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide methods; on-site inspection; and data processing.

  9. Satellite observations of the volcanic plume from the 23rd April 2015 eruption of Calbuco volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayer, Catherine; Carboni, Elisa; Ventress, Lucy; Povey, Adam; Grainger, Roy

    2016-04-01

    Calbuco volcano, Chile, erupted on 23rd April 2015, producing an eruption column reported to reach 17 km. The eruption was captured on the IASI NRT website (http://www.nrt-atmos.cems.rl.ac.uk/). The data were then reprocessed using the iterative optimal estimation retrieval developed by the EODG group at University of Oxford to determine the SO2 atmospheric loading and the altitude of the plume over time. The atmospheric loading was measured as 0.3 - 0.4 Tg of SO2 over the first 2 days. It is thought that the eruption was relatively ash poor, with the majority of the ash falling out within the first couple of days. The retrieved altitude of the plume is consistent with the range initially reported, with the core of the plume reaching 15 - 18 km. When the SO2 plume reached the west coast of South Africa, it was caught in a cyclonic system, causing it to remain in the same region for several days with a highly constrained core. A SO2 depletion rate and conversion time to H2SO4 are calculated from this data. The data from the IASI instruments are compared to CALIOP lidar overpasses as well as data from the MLS & OSIRIS instruments. The HYSPLIT trajectory model is used to investigate the evolution of the plume and to corroborate the altitudes retrieved by IASI.

  10. PREFACE: 23rd European Cosmic Ray Symposium (and 32nd Russian Cosmic Ray Conference)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlykin, A. D.; Kokoulin, R. P.; Lidvansky, A. S.; Meroshnichenko, L. I.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Panov, A. D.; Wolfendale, A. W.

    2013-02-01

    The 23rd European Cosmic Ray Symposium (ECRS) took place in Moscow at the Lomonosov Moscow State University (3-7 July 2012), and was excellently organized by the Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Lomonosov Moscow State University, with the help of the Russian Academy of Sciences and the Council on the Complex Problem of Cosmic Rays of the Russian Academy of Sciences. The first symposia were held in 1968 in Lodz, Poland (high energy, extensive air showers and astrophysical aspects) and in Bern (solar and heliospheric phenomena) and the two 'strands' joined together in 1976 with the meeting in Leeds. Since then the symposia, which have been very successful, have covered all the major topics with some emphasis on European collaborations and on meeting the demands of young scientists. Initially, a driving force was the need to overcome the divisions caused by the 'Cold War' but the symposia continued even when that threat ceased and they have shown no sign of having outlived their usefulness. 2012 has been an important year in the history of cosmic ray studies, in that it marked the centenary of the discovery of enigmatic particles in the perilous balloon ascents of Victor Hess. A number of conferences have taken place in Western Europe during the year, but this one took place in Moscow as a tribute to the successful efforts of many former USSR and other Eastern European scientists in discovering the secrets of the subject, often under very difficult conditions. The symposium covers a wide range of scientific issues divided into the following topics: PCR-IPrimary cosmic rays I (E < 1015 eV) PCR-IIPrimary cosmic rays II (E > 1015 eV) MNCosmic ray muons and neutrinos GAGeV and TeV gamma astronomy SHEnergetic particles in the heliosphere (solar and anomalous CRs and GCR modulation) GEOCosmic rays and geophysics (energetic particles in the atmosphere and magnetosphere of the Earth) On a personal note, as I step down as co-founder and chairman of the

  11. Avionics technology - system concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, J. S.; Huntoon, R. B.

    1984-01-01

    Avionics System Concepts to meet technology needs of advanced helicopter integrated cockpit design are identified. Specific avionics system concepts which should be conducted and/or support by NASA to most effectively aid industry in advanced helicopter integrated cockpit design are also identified. Candidate Missions and Mission Requirements to meet technology needs are considered.

  12. Avionics System Architecture Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chau, Savio; Hall, Ronald; Traylor, marcus; Whitfield, Adrian

    2005-01-01

    Avionics System Architecture Tool (ASAT) is a computer program intended for use during the avionics-system-architecture- design phase of the process of designing a spacecraft for a specific mission. ASAT enables simulation of the dynamics of the command-and-data-handling functions of the spacecraft avionics in the scenarios in which the spacecraft is expected to operate. ASAT is built upon I-Logix Statemate MAGNUM, providing a complement of dynamic system modeling tools, including a graphical user interface (GUI), modeling checking capabilities, and a simulation engine. ASAT augments this with a library of predefined avionics components and additional software to support building and analyzing avionics hardware architectures using these components.

  13. LPHYS'14: 23rd International Laser Physics Workshop (Sofia, Bulgaria, 14-18 July 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yevseyev, Alexander V.

    2014-04-01

    The 23rd annual International Laser Physics Workshop (LPHYS14) will be held from 14 July to 18 July 2014 in the city of Sofia, Bulgaria, at the Ramada Sofia Hotel hosted this year by the Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. LPHYS14 continues a series of workshops that took place in Dubna,1992; Dubna/Volga river tour, 1993; New York, 1994; Moscow/Volga river tour (jointly with NATO SILAP Workshop), 1995; Moscow, 1996; Prague, 1997; Berlin, 1998; Budapest, 1999; Bordeaux, 2000; Moscow, 2001; Bratislava, 2002; Hamburg, 2003; Trieste, 2004; Kyoto, 2005; Lausanne, 2006; Len, 2007; Trondheim, 2008; Barcelona, 2009; Foz do Iguau, 2010; Sarajevo, 2011; Calgary, 2012 and Prague, 2013. The total number of participants this year is expected to be about 400. In the past, annual participation was typically from over 30 countries. 2014 Chairpersons Sanka Gateva (Bulgaria), Pavel Pashinin (Russia) LPHYS14 will offer eight scientific section seminars and one general symposium: Seminar 1 Modern Trends in Laser Physics Seminar 2 Strong Field and Attosecond Physics Seminar 3 Biophotonics Seminar 4 Physics of Lasers Seminar 5 Nonlinear Optics and Spectroscopy Seminar 6 Physics of Cold Trapped Atoms Seminar 7 Quantum Information Science Seminar 8 Fiber Optics Symposium Extreme Light Technologies, Science and Applications Abstract of your presentation A one-page abstract should contain: title; list of all co-authors (the name of the speaker underlined); affiliations; correspondence addresses including phone numbers, fax numbers, e-mail addresses; and the text of the abstract. Abstracts should be sent to the following co-chairs of the scientific seminars and the symposium: Kirill A Prokhorov (Seminar 1) E-mail: cyrpro@gpi.ru Mikhail V Fedorov (Seminar 2) E-mail: fedorov@ran.gpi.ru Sergey A Gonchukov (Seminar 3) E-mail: gonchukov@mephi.ru Ivan A Shcherbakov (Seminar 4) E-mail: gbufetova@lsk.gpi.ru Vladimir A Makarov (Seminar 5) E-mail: makarov@msu.ilc.edu.ru Vyacheslav

  14. PREFACE: 23rd Congress of the International Commission for Optics (ICO 23)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgueiro, J. R.; Flores-Arias, M. T.; Vázquez-Dorrío, J. B.; Guzmán, Á.; Arakawa, Y.

    2015-04-01

    The 23rd Congress of the International Commission for Optics (ICO) was held in Santiago de Compostela (Spain) 26-29 August 2014, organized by the Universities of Vigo and Santiago de Compostela. Approximately 450 people attended the conference, sharing their knowledge in the cheerful, warm atmosphere of this lovely city. The conference was extremely successful in contributing to the mission of the ICO: to contribute worldwide, on an international basis, to the progress and diffusion of scientific and technological knowledge on optics and photonics. Optics and photonics have reached a critical level of importance for the development of our societies and are present in a great many aspects of our technological progress, from communication systems supporting the Internet to the most modern techniques in medicine. Consistent with the conference slogan Enlightening the Future, the meeting stressed the importance of optical science as a key to technological progress in the coming years. UNESCO's designation of 2015 as the International Year of Light and Light-Based Technologies (www.light2015.org) acknowledges the importance of raising global awareness of how light and light-based technologies are present in a large fraction of today's advances and how they can address challenges in important areas such as energy, education, agriculture, and health. The four-day conference highlighted eleven plenary talks by outstanding scientists working in important areas of optics and photonics. A. Aspect, T. Kippenberg (2013 ICO Prize awardee) and K. Razewski (2013 ICO Galileo Galilei Award) spoke on quantum optics; P. Russell and Yu. Kivshar lectured on topics related to optical processing devices as optical fibers and metamaterials for light shaping; N. X. Fang (2011 ICO Prize), U. Woggon, and A. Alú (2013 IUPAP Young Scientists Prize) discussed applications of optics to nanoscience; and K. Dholakia and J. Widjaja (2008 Galileo Galilei Award) presented in their plenaries

  15. Strategic avionics technology planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Kenneth J.; Brown, Don C.

    1991-01-01

    NASA experience in development and insertion of technology into programs had led to a recognition that a Strategic Plan for Avionics is needed for space. In the fall of 1989 an Avionics Technology Symposium was held in Williamsburg, Virginia. In early 1990, as a followon, a NASA wide Strategic Avionics Technology Working Group was chartered by NASA Headquarters. This paper will describe the objectives of this working group, technology bridging, and approaches to incentivize both the federal and commercial sectors to move toward rapidly developed, simple, and reliable systems with low life cycle cost.

  16. Strategic avionics technology planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Kenneth J.; Brown, Don C.

    NASA experience in development and insertion of technology into programs had led to a recognition that a Strategic Plan for Avionics is needed for space. In the fall of 1989 an Avionics Technology Symposium was held in Williamsburg, Virginia. In early 1990, as a followon, a NASA wide Strategic Avionics Technology Working Group was chartered by NASA Headquarters. This paper will describe the objectives of this working group, technology bridging, and approaches to incentivize both the federal and commercial sectors to move toward rapidly developed, simple, and reliable systems with low life cycle cost.

  17. Space tug avionics definition study. Volume 3: Avionics baseline configuration definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The baseline avionics systems for the space tug is comprised of a central digital computer that integrates the functions of all of the tug's subsystems by means of a redundant digital data bus. The major subsystems of the avionics system are: data management; communications; guidance, navigation, and control; rendezvous and docking; electrical power; and instrumentation. The baseline avionics system for the space tug resulting from system and subsystem trade studies is defined. Tug interfaces with the spacecraft, orbiter and the ground, and the baseline philosophy and configuration for onboard checkout of the tug are included. Baseline configurations, functional and operational features, component details and characteristics, and the supporting software are included in the subsystem descriptions.

  18. PREFACE: 23rd National Symposium on Plasma Science & Technology (PLASMA-2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mago, V. K.; Ananthapadmanabhan, P. V.; Patil, D. S.; Das, A. K.

    2010-01-01

    It is our pleasure to present the proceedings of the 23rd National Symposium on Plasma Science and Technology (PLASMA-2008) held at Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai, 10- December 2008 in association with the Plasma Science Society of India. The Plasma Science Society of India has been holding regular symposia on general topics related to Plasma. The symposium was designed to provide a forum for young researchers in Plasma Science and Technology to interact with eminent plasma scientists from India and abroad and to present their work. The scope of the symposium included frontline research in Basic Plasma Physics as well as significant advances in Plasma Technology. In view of the ever-growing importance of Plasma Science and Technology to India's Nuclear Energy program, the focal theme of the symposium was chosen as 'Plasmas in Nuclear Fuel Cycle'. The scientific program of this four day symposium consisted of review talks, invited topical lectures, contributed oral and poster presentations in the following areas of Plasma Science & Technology. Basic Plasma Physics, simulations and modeling (BP) Nuclear fusion and Technology (NF) Space & Astrophysical Plasma(SA) Exotic Plasmas, Non-linear Dynamics(EP) Laser Plasma Interaction and Beam Physics (LP) Industrial applications of plasmas (IP) Plasma Diagnostics(PD) Plasmas and clean environment(PC) There was also a Special Session devoted to the focal theme Plasmas in Nuclear Fuel Cycle (PANFC) Applications in Nuclear Fusion Technology (ANFT) Physics and technology of Processing Plasmas in Nuclear Fuel Cycle (PPNFC). Plasma Technology finds wide applications not only in nuclear, space and defense-related industries but also in medical, nano-technology and semiconductor industries. Plasma technologies have distinguished themselves in terms of compactness, process efficiency, techno economics and innovative possibilities. As we advance into the new technology era, there is a need for evolving strategies to apply the

  19. Ares I Avionics Introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchant, Christopher C.

    2009-01-01

    The Ares I is the next generation human-rated launcher for the United States Constellation program. This system is required to provide single fault tolerance within defined crew safety and mission reliability limits. As part of the effort to achieve those safety goals, Ares I includes an avionics subsystem built as a multistring, voting architecture. The avionics design draws upon experience gained from building fly-by-wire systems for Shuttle, X- 38, and Seawolf. Architectural drivers for the avionics design include using proven technologies with existing suppliers of space rated parts for critical functions (to reduce overall development risk), easing the software development effort by using an off-theshelf, DO-178B certifiable, ARINC-653 operating system in the main flight computers, minimizing mutual data and power connections that might lead to a common-mode hardware failure of the redundant avionics strings, and centralizing overall Ares I command & control within the Upper Stage.

  20. Basic avionics module design for general aviation aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyth, R. K.; Smyth, D. E.

    1978-01-01

    The design of an advanced digital avionics system (basic avionics module) for general aviation aircraft operated with a single pilot under IFR conditions is described. The microprocessor based system provided all avionic functions, including flight management, navigation, and lateral flight control. The mode selection was interactive with the pilot. The system used a navigation map data base to provide operation in the current and planned air traffic control environment. The system design included software design listings for some of the required modules. The distributed microcomputer uses the IEEE 488 bus for interconnecting the microcomputer and sensors.

  1. Measurement of polar stratospheric NO2 from the 23rd and 24th Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition (JARE) balloon experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shibasaki, K.; Iwagami, N.; Ogawa, T.

    1985-01-01

    As a part of the Japanese activities of MAP in the Antarctica, balloon-borne measurements of the stratospheric NO2 profile were planned and carried out by the JARE 23rd and 24th wintering parties. Few results have been reported so far as the stratospheric NO2 profile at high latitude. There were no reported balloon measurements carried out in the Southern Hemisphere. Profiles are presented for the first balloon-borne measurement of the stratospheric NO2 in the Antarctica. Three balloons named JA21, JA25 and JA26 were launched from Syowa Station (69 deg S, 35.6 deg E) using 5000 cu. cm plastic balloons. JA21 balloon was launched on November 24, 1982, and JA25 and JA26 balloons on November 12 and 20, 1983, respectively.

  2. Influence of the solar UV-radiation intensity on the 630-nm nightglow emission in the 23rd solar cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ievenko, I. B.; Alekseev, V. N.; Parnikov, S. G.

    2011-10-01

    It is well known that the 630-nm nightglow emission intensity in midlatitudes increases by more than a factor of 2 during a sunspot maximum. It has been assumed that the phenomenon is caused by variations in solar UV radiation during a solar cycle (Fishkova, 1983). We present the results of photometric measurements of the nightglow 630.0 nm emission intensity at a latitude of 63° E and longitude of 130° E (Yakutsk) in 1990-2007. The dependence of the 630-nm emission intensity on solar activity on magnetically quiet days in the 22nd and 23rd solar cycles is shown. The close relationship between the 630-nm nightglow intensity and the intensity of extreme UV (EUV) with a correlation coefficient of 0.8-0.9 in 1997-2007 is ascertained from the SOHO/SEM data. The dominance of solar EUV in the excitation of nightglow 630-nm emission has thus been experimentally proved.

  3. Flight Avionics Hardware Roadmap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Some, Raphael; Goforth, Monte; Chen, Yuan; Powell, Wes; Paulick, Paul; Vitalpur, Sharada; Buscher, Deborah; Wade, Ray; West, John; Redifer, Matt; Partridge, Harry; Sherman, Aaron; McCabe, Mary

    2014-01-01

    The Avionics Technology Roadmap takes an 80% approach to technology investment in spacecraft avionics. It delineates a suite of technologies covering foundational, component, and subsystem-levels, which directly support 80% of future NASA space mission needs. The roadmap eschews high cost, limited utility technologies in favor of lower cost, and broadly applicable technologies with high return on investment. The roadmap is also phased to support future NASA mission needs and desires, with a view towards creating an optimized investment portfolio that matures specific, high impact technologies on a schedule that matches optimum insertion points of these technologies into NASA missions. The roadmap looks out over 15+ years and covers some 114 technologies, 58 of which are targeted for TRL6 within 5 years, with 23 additional technologies to be at TRL6 by 2020. Of that number, only a few are recommended for near term investment: 1. Rad Hard High Performance Computing 2. Extreme temperature capable electronics and packaging 3. RFID/SAW-based spacecraft sensors and instruments 4. Lightweight, low power 2D displays suitable for crewed missions 5. Radiation tolerant Graphics Processing Unit to drive crew displays 6. Distributed/reconfigurable, extreme temperature and radiation tolerant, spacecraft sensor controller and sensor modules 7. Spacecraft to spacecraft, long link data communication protocols 8. High performance and extreme temperature capable C&DH subsystem In addition, the roadmap team recommends several other activities that it believes are necessary to advance avionics technology across NASA: center dot Engage the OCT roadmap teams to coordinate avionics technology advances and infusion into these roadmaps and their mission set center dot Charter a team to develop a set of use cases for future avionics capabilities in order to decouple this roadmap from specific missions center dot Partner with the Software Steering Committee to coordinate computing hardware

  4. Affordable Vehicle Avionics Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockrell, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Public and private launch vehicle developers are reducing the cost of propulsion for small commercial launchers, but conventional high-performance, high-reliability avionics remain the disproportionately high cost driver for launch. AVA technology performs as well or better than conventional launch vehicle avionics, but with a fraction of the recurring costs. AVA enables small launch providers to offer affordable rides to LEO to nano-satellites as primary payloads meaning, small payloads can afford to specify their own launch and orbit parameters

  5. Affordable Vehicle Avionics Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockrell, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Public and private launch vehicle developers are reducing the cost of propulsion for small commercial launchers, but conventional high-performance, high-reliability avionics remain the disproportionately high cost driver for launch. AVA technology performs as well or better than conventional launch vehicle avionics, but with a fraction of the recurring costs. AVA enables small launch providers to offer affordable rides to LEO to nano-satellites as primary payloads meaning, small payloads can afford to specify their own launch and orbit parameters.

  6. Avionic standard module development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maki, Stanley C.; Cormier, Edmond P.; Piszkin, Thomas A.

    Avionics standard modules with redundancy offer substantial economic benefits compared to special-purpose processor units for the orbital transfer vehicle and advanced launch vehicle programs. A fiber optic, serial vehicle bus provides high throughput with modest hardware. A bistage, split tapered, star optical coupler uses a token-pass/token-demand protocol. It is reported that a standard module implementation of the above is a feasible, cost-effective approach to avionics design using standard buses and standard packaging. The VHSIC integrated package readily accommodates higher-speed VLSI chips as they become available.

  7. Investigation of an advanced fault tolerant integrated avionics system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, W. R.; Cottrell, D.; Flanders, J.; Javornik, A.; Rusovick, M.

    1986-01-01

    Presented is an advanced, fault-tolerant multiprocessor avionics architecture as could be employed in an advanced rotorcraft such as LHX. The processor structure is designed to interface with existing digital avionics systems and concepts including the Army Digital Avionics System (ADAS) cockpit/display system, navaid and communications suites, integrated sensing suite, and the Advanced Digital Optical Control System (ADOCS). The report defines mission, maintenance and safety-of-flight reliability goals as might be expected for an operational LHX aircraft. Based on use of a modular, compact (16-bit) microprocessor card family, results of a preliminary study examining simplex, dual and standby-sparing architectures is presented. Given the stated constraints, it is shown that the dual architecture is best suited to meet reliability goals with minimum hardware and software overhead. The report presents hardware and software design considerations for realizing the architecture including redundancy management requirements and techniques as well as verification and validation needs and methods.

  8. General Aviation Avionics Statistics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    No. 2. Government Accession No. 3. Recipient’s Catalog No. 5" FAA-MS-80-7* a and. SubtitleDecember 1&80 "GENERAL AVIATION AVIONICS STATISTICS 0 6...Altimeter 8. Fuel gage 3. Compass 9. Landing gear 4. Tachometer 10. Belts 5. Oil temperature 11. Special equipment for 6. Emergency locator over water

  9. Teaching of Psychology: Ideas and Innovations. Proceedings of the Annual Conference on Undergraduate Teaching of Psychology (23rd, Tarrytown, New York, March 20-21, 2009)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell-Carter, Marya, Ed.; Gonder, Jennifer, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    The document is a summary of the conference proceedings for the 23rd Annual Farmingdale State College Teaching of Psychology Conference held on March 20-21, 2009 at the DoubleTree Hotel in Tarrytown, New York. The conference featured a keynote address by Dr. Jeffrey Nevid on Reaching and teaching the millennials: Helping today's students become…

  10. A Mission To Teach: The California State University, Channel Islands. A Review of the Board of Trustees' Proposal To Build a 23rd Campus. Commission Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Postsecondary Education Commission, Sacramento.

    This report reviews the proposal by the California State University (CSU) to establish a 23rd campus to be know as California State University, Channel Islands. The proposed institution will be a full-service campus with a lower division, upper division, and graduate educational services, located in a former state hospital in Ventura County. The…

  11. "Intelligence and Civilisation": A Ludwig Mond Lecture Delivered at the University of Manchester on 23rd October 1936 by Godfrey H. Thomson. A Reprinting with Background and Commentary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deary, Ian J.; Lawn, Martin; Brett, Caroline E.; Bartholomew, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Here we reprint, and provide background and a commentary on, a recently-rediscovered lecture by Godfrey H. Thomson entitled, "Intelligence and civilisation." It was delivered at the University of Manchester, UK, on 23rd October, 1936, printed in 1937 in the short-lived "Journal of the University of Manchester" and as a pamphlet…

  12. Integrated avionics reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alikiotis, Dimitri

    1988-01-01

    The integrated avionics reliability task is an effort to build credible reliability and/or performability models for multisensor integrated navigation and flight control. The research was initiated by the reliability analysis of a multisensor navigation system consisting of the Global Positioning System (GPS), the Long Range Navigation system (Loran C), and an inertial measurement unit (IMU). Markov reliability models were developed based on system failure rates and mission time.

  13. General aviation avionics equipment maintenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, C. D.; Tommerdahl, J. B.

    1978-01-01

    Maintenance of general aviation avionics equipment was investigated with emphasis on single engine and light twin engine general aviation aircraft. Factors considered include the regulatory agencies, avionics manufacturers, avionics repair stations, the statistical character of the general aviation community, and owners and operators. The maintenance, environment, and performance, repair costs, and reliability of avionics were defined. It is concluded that a significant economic stratification is reflected in the maintenance problems encountered, that careful attention to installations and use practices can have a very positive impact on maintenance problems, and that new technologies and a general growth in general aviation will impact maintenance.

  14. Very Bright, Very Hot and Very Long: Swift Observations of the DG CVn "Superflare" of April 23rd, 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Stephen Alan; Osten, Rachel A.; Page, Kim L; Kennea, Jamie A; Oates, Samantha R; Krimm, Hans A; Gehrels, Neil; Page, Mathew J; Kowalski, Adam

    2014-08-01

    On April 23rd this year, one of the 2 stars in the close visual binary dM4e system DG CVn flared to a level bright enough 300 milliCrab in the 15-150 keV band) that it triggered the Swift Burst Alert Telescope. Two minutes later, after Swift had slewed to the direction of this source, the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT) and the Ultraviolet Optical Telescope (UVOT) commenced observing this flare. These observations continued (intermittently) for about 20 days and yielded a fascinating case history of this colossal event, the decay of which took more than a week in the UV and soft X-ray regions, and included several smaller superimposed secondary flares. The peak 0.3-10 keV luminosity observed by the XRT of 1.9e32 erg/s at the 18 pc distance of this system is 1.5 times the 'normal' combined systemic bolometric luminosity of 1.3e32 erg/s, making this event a super-bolometric flare similar to the 2008 flare of EV Lac (also detected by Swift). The BAT and XRT spectra of this flare in the first 6 minutes indicate that the emission was dominated by very hot (>>10 keV) plasma and/or a non-thermal power-law emission. This flare is arguably the longest, most X-ray luminous and hottest flare ever seen for an M dwarf in the solar neighborhood, and is reminiscent of the 9 days long flare of the RS CVn binary CF Tuc detected by ROSAT. We discuss how these exceptional characteristics may be related to the known properties of this system, specifically to its youth (30 Myr) and rapid rotation (55 km/s).

  15. Space Transportation Avionics Technology Symposium. Volume 2: Conference Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The focus of the symposium was to examine existing and planned avionics technology processes and products and to recommend necessary changes for strengthening priorities and program emphases. Innovative changes in avionics technology development and design processes are needed to support the increasingly complex, multi-vehicle, integrated, autonomous space-based systems. Key technology advances make such a major initiative viable at this time: digital processing capabilities, integrated on-board test/checkout methods, easily reconfigurable laboratories, and software design and production techniques.

  16. Space Transportation Avionics Technology Symposium. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The focus of the symposium was to examine existing and planned avionics technology processes and products and to recommend necessary changes for strengthening priorities and program emphases. Innovative changes in avionics technology development and design processes, identified during the symposium, are needed to support the increasingly complex, multi-vehicle, integrated, autonomous space-based systems. Key technology advances make such a major initiative viable at this time: digital processing capabilities, integrated on-board test/checkout methods, easily reconfigurable laboratories, and software design and production techniques.

  17. Space Tug avionics definition study. Volume 2: Avionics functional requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Flight and ground operational phases of the tug/shuttle system are analyzed to determine the general avionics support functions that are needed during each of the mission phases and sub-phases. Each of these general support functions is then expanded into specific avionics system requirements, which are then allocated to the appropriate avionics subsystems. This process is then repeated at the next lower level of detail where these subsystem requirements are allocated to each of the major components that comprise a subsystem.

  18. Demonstration Advanced Avionics System (DAAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of developing an integrated avionics system suitable for general aviation was determined. A design of reliable integrated avionics which provides expanded functional capability that significantly enhances the utility and safety of general aviation at a cost commensurate with the general aviation market was developed. The use of a data bus, microprocessors, electronic displays and data entry devices, and improved function capabilities were emphasized. An avionics system capable of evaluating the most critical and promising elements of an integrated system was designed, built and flight tested in a twin engine general aviation aircraft.

  19. Trends in transport aircraft avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkstresser, B. K.

    1973-01-01

    A survey of avionics onboard present commercial transport aircraft was conducted to identify trends in avionics systems characteristics and to determine the impact of technology advances on equipment weight, cost, reliability, and maintainability. Transport aircraft avionics systems are described under the headings of communication, navigation, flight control, and instrumentation. The equipment included in each section is described functionally. However, since more detailed descriptions of the equipment can be found in other sources, the description is limited and emphasis is put on configuration requirements. Since airborne avionics systems must interface with ground facilities, certain ground facilities are described as they relate to the airborne systems, with special emphasis on air traffic control and all-weather landing capability.

  20. V/STOLAND avionics system flight-test data on a UH-1H helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, F. A.; Jaynes, D. N.; Corliss, L. D.; Liden, S.; Merrick, R. B.; Dugan, D. C.

    1980-01-01

    The flight-acceptance test results obtained during the acceptance tests of the V/STOLAND (versatile simplex digital avionics system) digital avionics system on a Bell UH-1H helicopter in 1977 at Ames Research Center are presented. The system provides navigation, guidance, control, and display functions for NASA terminal area VTOL research programs and for the Army handling qualities research programs at Ames Research Center. The acceptance test verified system performance and contractual acceptability. The V/STOLAND hardware navigation, guidance, and control laws resident in the digital computers are described. Typical flight-test data are shown and discussed as documentation of the system performance at acceptance from the contractor.

  1. Will Today's Electronic Journals Be Accessible in the 23rd Century: Issues in Long-Term Archiving (SIG STI, IFP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lippert, Margaret

    2000-01-01

    This abstract of a planned session on access to scientific and technical journals addresses policy and standard issues related to long-term archives; digital archiving models; economic factors; hardware and software issues; multi-publisher electronic journal content integration; format considerations; and future data migration needs. (LRW)

  2. Nano-Satellite Avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culver, Harry

    1999-01-01

    Abstract NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is currently developing a new class of satellites called the nano-satellite (nano-sat). A major objective of this development effort is to provide the technology required to enable a constellation of tens to hundreds of nano-satellites to make both remote and in-situ measurements from space. The Nano-sat will be a spacecraft weighing a maximum of 10 kg, including the propellant mass, and producing at least 5 Watts of power to operate the spacecraft. The electronics are required to survive a total radiation dose rate of 100 krads for a mission lifetime of two years. There are many unique challenges that must be met in order to develop the avionics for such a spacecraft. The first challenge is to develop an architecture that will operate on the allotted 5 Watts and meet the diverging requirements of multiple missions. This architecture will need to incorporate a multitude of new advanced microelectronic technologies. The microelectronics developed must be a modular and scalable packaging of technology to solve the problem of developing a solution to both reduce cost and meet the requirements of various missions. This development will utilize the most cost effective approach, whether infusing commercially driven semiconductor devices into spacecraft applications or partnering with industry to design and develop low cost, low power, low mass, and high capacity data processing devices. This paper will discuss the nano-sat architecture and the major technologies that will be developed. The major technologies that will be covered include: (1) Light weight Low Power Electronics Packaging, (2) Radiation Hard/Tolerant, Low Power Processing Platforms, (3) High capacity Low Power Memory Systems (4) Radiation Hard reconfiguragble field programmable gate array (rFPGA)

  3. Avionics test bed development plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, L. H.; Parks, J. M.; Murdock, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    A development plan for a proposed avionics test bed facility for the early investigation and evaluation of new concepts for the control of large space structures, orbiter attached flex body experiments, and orbiter enhancements is presented. A distributed data processing facility that utilizes the current laboratory resources for the test bed development is outlined. Future studies required for implementation, the management system for project control, and the baseline system configuration are defined. A background analysis of the specific hardware system for the preliminary baseline avionics test bed system is included.

  4. Security audit for embedded avionics systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, K. N.

    The design of security audit subsystems for real-time embedded avionics systems is described. The selection criteria of auditable events and the design of the audit functions are described. The data storage requirements and the data compression features of embedded avionics systems are analyzed. Two data compression algorithms applicable to avionics systems are described. Huffman encoding is optimal, but Fibonacci encoding is shown to be nearly optimal and better suited for airborne avionics systems. The memory capacity needed for audit data storage is computed for typical avionics missions.

  5. Avionics Maintenance Technology Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This program guide presents the avionics maintenance technology curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. The general information section contains the following for both the diploma program and the associate degree program: purpose and objectives; program description, including admissions, typical job titles, and accreditation and…

  6. Advanced Avionics Architecture and Technology Review. Executive Summary and Volume 1, Avionics Technology. Volume 2. Avionics Systems Engineering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-06

    VOLUME 1 - AVIONICS TECHNOLOGYI VOLUME 2-AVIONICS SYSTEMS ENGINEERING 6 August 1993 Under the Direction of Avionics Systems Engineering Division...of the signal and power MESFET process work begun during Phase 1; b.) a 0.25 jim Pseudomorphic High Electron Mobility Transistor (PHEMT) processes...Field-Effect Transistors (FETs), High Electron Mobility Transistors (HIEMTs) and Heterojunction Bipolar Transistors (HBTs). From these foundries four

  7. NAVAIR Avionics Master Plan.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-26

    characterization and qualifi - -cation of materials and processes, and optimization of the technology for application to high speed digital and RF circuitry...demonstrated increasing reluctance to respond to the 󈧰 stringent military needs for qualified ICs and low volume custom devices. In order to reverse...driving the entire program is to reach the capability for advanced systems based on an availability of military- qualified integrated circuits with sub

  8. Digital Avionics Information System (DAIS) Documentation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    maintaining the DAIS library, (2) generating certain specifications, plans, drawings and/or test reports, (3) performing configuration audits per MIL- STD ...1521, (4) assuring that DAIS documents conformed to MIL- STD -490 and 483, (5) technical editing and DO I’FAN 7 1473 EDITION OF I NOV LIIS OBSOLETE...programs on how to properly document their efforts in MIL- STD format.,/’ , lI UNCLASS IFIED SECURITY CLASSIFICAION OF THIS PAOR(VPMS 0Di Ent1m0

  9. Modeling the Europa Pathfinder avionics system with a model based avionics architecture tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chau, S.; Traylor, M.; Hall, R.; Whitfield, A.

    2002-01-01

    In order to shorten the avionics architecture development time, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory has developed a model-based architecture simultion tool called the Avionics System Architecture Tool (ASAT).

  10. Advanced Avionics Breadboard Executive Design and Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, L. R.

    1972-01-01

    The advanced avionics breadboard (AAB) executive evolved from an effort to design and develop an avionics system. This executive is unique in that it supervises a triple redundant avionics computer system. Three IBM System 4 Pi/CP computers, operating synchronously and executing identical software, comprise the central processors which route data to and from a data bus via an input/output controller. The executive's basic function is to provide application programs with an efficient software structure within which to perform specific avionics application tasks. Although implemented in a triplex data management system, the AAB executive contains the flexibility to be adapted to other systems with minimal change.

  11. SOFIA Gets Avionics and Mission Systems Upgrades

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, or SOFIA, has received major upgrades to its telescope control and avionics systems that will significantly improve their efficiency and ope...

  12. Selected papers from the 23rd MicroMechanics and Microsystems Europe Workshop (MME 2012) (Ilmenau, Germany, September 9-12, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Martin

    2013-07-01

    In September 2012, the 23rd MicroMechanics Europe Workshop (MME) took place in Ilmenau, Germany. With about 120 participants from 20 countries and 76 accepted presentations, the workshop series turned out to be a successful platform for young scientists to present their work to our scientific community. Traditionally, the interaction is an important aspect of this workshop: while short presentations introduce the posters, an extended poster session allows intensive discussion which is quite useful to the participants. The discussion very often extends into the breaks and the evening events. It is also encouraging for them that the best presentations are selected and invited to submit a full paper to this journal. Thanks to the support of IOP Publishing, this next logical step to present work to the scientific world is made possible. In this issue, you can find the best papers that have been selected by a committee during the workshop taking the written workshop contribution, the poster and the presentation into account. Again, all areas of micromechanics from new technology developments up to systems integration were presented at the workshop at different levels of completion. The selected papers present those results which are almost complete. Nevertheless, it is nice to see that in some cases topics grow over the years from 'nice ideas' to realized system concepts. And although this is the 23rd workshop, it is clear that micromechanics is a topic that is not running short of new ideas. First, I would like to thank the authors of the selected papers for each of their individual excellent contributions. My gratitude also goes to my fellow members in the programme committee (Per Ohlckers, Martin Hill and Sami Franssila) for their cooperation in the selection of invited speakers and submitted papers, as well as the anonymous Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering (JMM) reviewers for their careful selection of the final papers presented here. Last, but not

  13. Philosophy of Education, 1974-1975. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Far Western Philosophy of Education Society (23rd, Long Beach, California, December 6-7, 1974).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelinek, James J., Ed.

    The proceedings of the 23rd annual meeting of the Far Western Philosophy of Education Society in 1974 are presented. The proceedings consist of 16 addresses. Titles include (1) Leonard Abraham Fels, 1911-1974: A Memoriale; (2) Trying to Make Sense out of "Existential Thought and Education"; (3) Making Sense out of "Existential Thought and…

  14. Mathematics Education beyond 2000: Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia (23rd, Fremantle, Western Australia, Australia, July 5-9, 2000). Volume 1 [and] Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bana, Jack, Ed.; Chapman, Anne, Ed.

    This document contains Volumes 1 and 2 of the proceedings of the 23rd annual conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia Incorporated (MERGA) held at Fremantle, Western Australia, July 5-9, 2000. Papers in Volume 1 include: (1) "Bridging Practices: Intertwining Content and Pedagogy in Teaching and Learning To Teach"…

  15. Transmission of RF Signals Over Optical Fiber for Avionics Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaveski, Filip; Sluss, James, Jr.; Atiquzzaman, Mohammed; Hung, Nguyen; Ngo, Duc

    2002-01-01

    During flight, aircraft avionics transmit and receive RF signals to/from antennas over coaxial cables. As the density and complexity of onboard avionics increases, the electromagnetic interference (EM) environment degrades proportionately, leading to decreasing signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and potential safety concerns. The coaxial cables are inherently lossy, limiting the RF signal bandwidth while adding considerable weight. To overcome these limitations, we have investigated a fiber optic communications link for aircraft that utilizes wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) to support the simultaneous transmission of multiple signals (including RF) over a single optical fiber. Optical fiber has many advantages over coaxial cable, particularly lower loss, greater bandwidth, and immunity to EM. In this paper, we demonstrate that WDM can be successfully used to transmit multiple RF signals over a single optical fiber with no appreciable signal degradation. We investigate the transmission of FM and AM analog modulated signals, as well as FSK digital modulated signals, over a fiber optic link (FOL) employing WDM. We present measurements of power loss, delay, SNR, carrier-to-noise ratio (CNR), total harmonic distortion (THD), and bit error rate (BER). Our experimental results indicate that WDM is a fiber optic technology suitable for avionics applications.

  16. ARINC 818 specification revisions enable new avionics architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunwald, Paul

    2014-06-01

    The ARINC 818 Avionics Digital Video Bus is the standard for cockpit video that has gained wide acceptance in both the commercial and military cockpits. The Boeing 787, A350XWB, A400M, KC-46A, and many other aircraft use it. The ARINC 818 specification, which was initially release in 2006, has recently undergone a major update to address new avionics architectures and capabilities. Over the seven years since its release, projects have gone beyond the specification due to the complexity of new architectures and desired capabilities, such as video switching, bi-directional communication, data-only paths, and camera and sensor control provisions. The ARINC 818 specification was revised in 2013, and ARINC 818-2 was approved in November 2013. The revisions to the ARINC 818-2 specification enable switching, stereo and 3-D provisions, color sequential implementations, regions of interest, bi-directional communication, higher link rates, data-only transmission, and synchronization signals. This paper discusses each of the new capabilities and the impact on avionics and display architectures, especially when integrating large area displays, stereoscopic displays, multiple displays, and systems that include a large number of sensors.

  17. Fiber-Optic Network Architectures for Onboard Avionics Applications Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Ngo, Duc H.

    2003-01-01

    This project is part of a study within the Advanced Air Transportation Technologies program undertaken at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The main focus of the program is the improvement of air transportation, with particular emphasis on air transportation safety. Current and future advances in digital data communications between an aircraft and the outside world will require high-bandwidth onboard communication networks. Radiofrequency (RF) systems, with their interconnection network based on coaxial cables and waveguides, increase the complexity of communication systems onboard modern civil and military aircraft with respect to weight, power consumption, and safety. In addition, safety and reliability concerns from electromagnetic interference between the RF components embedded in these communication systems exist. A simple, reliable, and lightweight network that is free from the effects of electromagnetic interference and capable of supporting the broadband communications needs of future onboard digital avionics systems cannot be easily implemented using existing coaxial cable-based systems. Fiber-optical communication systems can meet all these challenges of modern avionics applications in an efficient, cost-effective manner. The objective of this project is to present a number of optical network architectures for onboard RF signal distribution. Because of the emergence of a number of digital avionics devices requiring high-bandwidth connectivity, fiber-optic RF networks onboard modern aircraft will play a vital role in ensuring a low-noise, highly reliable RF communication system. Two approaches are being used for network architectures for aircraft onboard fiber-optic distribution systems: a hybrid RF-optical network and an all-optical wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) network.

  18. Marshall Avionics Testbed System (MAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Wayne D.

    1989-01-01

    Work accomplished in the summer of 1989 in association with the NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Research Fellowship Program at Marshall Space Flight Center is summarized. The project was aimed at developing detailed specifications for the Marshall Avionics System Testbed (MAST). This activity was to include the definition of the testbed requirements and the development of specifications for a set of standard network nodes for connecting the testbed to a variety of networks. The project was also to include developing a timetable for the design, implementation, programming and testing of the testbed. Specifications of both hardware and software components for the system were to be included.

  19. IBC’s 23rd Annual Antibody Engineering, 10th Annual Antibody Therapeutics International Conferences and the 2012 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society

    PubMed Central

    Klöhn, Peter-Christian; Wuellner, Ulrich; Zizlsperger, Nora; Zhou, Yu; Tavares, Daniel; Berger, Sven; Zettlitz, Kirstin A.; Proetzel, Gabriele; Yong, May; Begent, Richard H.J.; Reichert, Janice M

    2013-01-01

    The 23rd Annual Antibody Engineering, 10th Annual Antibody Therapeutics international conferences, and the 2012 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, organized by IBC Life Sciences with contributions from The Antibody Society and two Scientific Advisory Boards, were held December 3–6, 2012 in San Diego, CA. The meeting drew over 800 participants who attended sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to antibody research and development. As a prelude to the main events, a pre-conference workshop held on December 2, 2012 focused on intellectual property issues that impact antibody engineering. The Antibody Engineering Conference was composed of six sessions held December 3–5, 2012: (1) From Receptor Biology to Therapy; (2) Antibodies in a Complex Environment; (3) Antibody Targeted CNS Therapy: Beyond the Blood Brain Barrier; (4) Deep Sequencing in B Cell Biology and Antibody Libraries; (5) Systems Medicine in the Development of Antibody Therapies/Systematic Validation of Novel Antibody Targets; and (6) Antibody Activity and Animal Models. The Antibody Therapeutics conference comprised four sessions held December 4–5, 2012: (1) Clinical and Preclinical Updates of Antibody-Drug Conjugates; (2) Multifunctional Antibodies and Antibody Combinations: Clinical Focus; (3) Development Status of Immunomodulatory Therapeutic Antibodies; and (4) Modulating the Half-Life of Antibody Therapeutics. The Antibody Society’s special session on applications for recording and sharing data based on GIATE was held on December 5, 2012, and the conferences concluded with two combined sessions on December 5–6, 2012: (1) Development Status of Early Stage Therapeutic Antibodies; and (2) Immunomodulatory Antibodies for Cancer Therapy. PMID:23575266

  20. An avionics scenario and command model description for Space Generic Open Avionics Architecture (SGOAA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stovall, John R.; Wray, Richard B.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a description of a model for a space vehicle operational scenario and the commands for avionics. This model will be used in developing a dynamic architecture simulation model using the Statemate CASE tool for validation of the Space Generic Open Avionics Architecture (SGOAA). The SGOAA has been proposed as an avionics architecture standard to NASA through its Strategic Avionics Technology Working Group (SATWG) and has been accepted by the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) for conversion into an SAE Avionics Standard. This architecture was developed for the Flight Data Systems Division (FDSD) of the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) by the Lockheed Engineering and Sciences Company (LESC), Houston, Texas. This SGOAA includes a generic system architecture for the entities in spacecraft avionics, a generic processing external and internal hardware architecture, and a nine class model of interfaces. The SGOAA is both scalable and recursive and can be applied to any hierarchical level of hardware/software processing systems.

  1. Space Generic Open Avionics Architecture (SGOAA): Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wray, Richard B.; Stovall, John R.

    1992-01-01

    A space generic open avionics architecture created for NASA is described. It will serve as the basis for entities in spacecraft core avionics, capable of being tailored by NASA for future space program avionics ranging from small vehicles such as Moon ascent/descent vehicles to large ones such as Mars transfer vehicles or orbiting stations. The standard consists of: (1) a system architecture; (2) a generic processing hardware architecture; (3) a six class architecture interface model; (4) a system services functional subsystem architectural model; and (5) an operations control functional subsystem architectural model.

  2. Recovery of the Space Shuttle Columbia Avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hames, Kevin L.

    2003-01-01

    Lessons Learned: a) Avionics data can playa critical role in the investigation of a "close call" or accident. b) Avionics designers should think about the role their systems might play in an investigation. c) Know your data, down to the bit level. d) Know your spacecraft - follow the data. e) Internal placement of circuit cards can affect their survivability. f) Think about how to reconstruct nonvolatile memory (e.g. serialize IC's, etc.) g) Use of external assets can aid in extracting data from avionics.

  3. Generalized Nanosatellite Avionics Testbed Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Chad R.; Sorgenfrei, Matthew C.; Nehrenz, Matt

    2015-01-01

    The Generalized Nanosatellite Avionics Testbed (G-NAT) lab at NASA Ames Research Center provides a flexible, easily accessible platform for developing hardware and software for advanced small spacecraft. A collaboration between the Mission Design Division and the Intelligent Systems Division, the objective of the lab is to provide testing data and general test protocols for advanced sensors, actuators, and processors for CubeSat-class spacecraft. By developing test schemes for advanced components outside of the standard mission lifecycle, the lab is able to help reduce the risk carried by advanced nanosatellite or CubeSat missions. Such missions are often allocated very little time for testing, and too often the test facilities must be custom-built for the needs of the mission at hand. The G-NAT lab helps to eliminate these problems by providing an existing suite of testbeds that combines easily accessible, commercial-offthe- shelf (COTS) processors with a collection of existing sensors and actuators.

  4. Non-functional Avionics Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulitsch, Michael; Ruess, Harald; Sorea, Maria

    Embedded systems in aerospace become more and more integrated in order to reduce weight, volume/size, and power of hardware for more fuel-effi ciency. Such integration tendencies change architectural approaches of system ar chi tec tures, which subsequently change non-functional requirements for plat forms. This paper provides some insight into state-of-the-practice of non-func tional requirements for developing ultra-critical embedded systems in the aero space industry, including recent changes and trends. In particular, formal requi re ment capture and formal analysis of non-functional requirements of avionic systems - including hard-real time, fault-tolerance, reliability, and per for mance - are exemplified by means of recent developments in SAL and HiLiTE.

  5. Demonstration Advanced Avionics System (DAAS), Phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, A. J.; Bailey, D. G.; Gaabo, R. J.; Lahn, T. G.; Larson, J. C.; Peterson, E. M.; Schuck, J. W.; Rodgers, D. L.; Wroblewski, K. A.

    1981-01-01

    Demonstration advanced anionics system (DAAS) function description, hardware description, operational evaluation, and failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) are provided. Projected advanced avionics system (PAAS) description, reliability analysis, cost analysis, maintainability analysis, and modularity analysis are discussed.

  6. Avionics and controls research and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rediess, H. A. (Editor); Mciver, D. E. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    The workshop provided a forum for industry and universities to discuss the state-of-the-art, identify the technology needs and opportunities, and describe the role of NASA in avionics and controls research.

  7. Avionics Box Cold Plate Damage Prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stambolian, Damon; Larcher, Steven; Henderson, Gena; Tran, Donald

    2011-01-01

    Over the years there have been several occurrences of damage to Space Shuttle Orbiter cold plates during removal and replacement of avionics boxes. Thus a process improvement team was put together to determine ways to prevent these kinds of damage. From this effort there were many solutions including, protective covers, training, and improved operations instructions. The focus of this paper is to explain the cold plate damage problem and the corrective actions for preventing future damage to aerospace avionics cold plate designs.

  8. Avionics Simulation, Development and Software Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    During this reporting period, all technical responsibilities were accomplished as planned. A close working relationship was maintained with personnel of the MSFC Avionics Department Software Group (ED14), the MSFC EXPRESS Project Office (FD31), and the Huntsville Boeing Company. Accomplishments included: performing special tasks; supporting Software Review Board (SRB), Avionics Test Bed (ATB), and EXPRESS Software Control Panel (ESCP) activities; participating in technical meetings; and coordinating issues between the Boeing Company and the MSFC Project Office.

  9. Kiloelectronvolt X-rays Emitted from the Earth's Atmosphere During the Peak and Descending Phases of the 23rd Solar Activity Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spjeldvik, Walther; Gusev, Anatoly; Pugacheva, Galina; Martin, Inacio

    We have studied long-term observations of the low-energy, 3 to 8 keV, X-ray emission during the period July 2001 through December 2005. The data were obtained with CadmiumTelluride (CdTe) solid state detectors flown on the LEO CORONAS-F satellite and used to assess the dynamics of X-ray fluxes radiated by the Earth’s upper atmosphere during the peak and declining phases of the 23rd solar cycle as observed within the shadowed segments of the spacecraft trajectory. We present empirical maps of near-global distributions soft X-ray luminescence with data emphasis on northern hemisphere summer and winter conditions. These observations reveal some irregularities, and the maximum X-ray photon energy does not exceed about 8 keV. We found that the X-rays exhibit seasonal variations in addition to the expected dependence on solar activity levels, and there are definite latitudinal and longitudinal patterns. In year 2001, during the solar maximum activity, the 3 to 8 keV X-ray flux reached a maximum of 170 photons/(cm2 s sr) in the geographic northwestern part of the Earth. The luminosity of the brightest soft X-ray atmospheric emission spot was about 40 kW integrated over an upward atmospheric emission geographic area of 200º longitude and 20º latitude as seem at altitude of about 500 km. For comparison, typical auroral emissions in this soft X-ray band is around 10 to 30 MW. We argue that these X-ray fluxes cannot be scattered solar X-rays since solar X-rays are most often lower in photon energy (< 2 keV) and also lower in intensity -- except in short-lived events. We interpret our observations as being due to Bremsstrahlung X-rays resulting from magnetospheric electrons precipitating into the atmosphere from the radiation belts and depositing their kinetic energy there, an energetic electron precipitation flux that is modulated by electromagnetic disturbances such as magnetospheric ELF waves during and following magnetic storms and substorms, terrestrial lightning

  10. IBC's 23rd Antibody Engineering and 10th Antibody Therapeutics Conferences and the Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society: December 2-6, 2012, San Diego, CA.

    PubMed

    Marquardt, John; Begent, Richard H J; Chester, Kerry; Huston, James S; Bradbury, Andrew; Scott, Jamie K; Thorpe, Philip E; Veldman, Trudi; Reichert, Janice M; Weiner, Louis M

    2012-01-01

    Now in its 23rd and 10th years, respectively, the Antibody Engineering and Antibody Therapeutics conferences are the Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society. The scientific program covers the full spectrum of challenges in antibody research and development from basic science through clinical development. In this preview of the conferences, the chairs provide their thoughts on sessions that will allow participants to track emerging trends in (1) the development of next-generation immunomodulatory antibodies; (2) the complexity of the environment in which antibodies must function; (3) antibody-targeted central nervous system (CNS) therapies that cross the blood brain barrier; (4) the extension of antibody half-life for improved efficacy and pharmacokinetics (PK)/pharmacodynamics (PD); and (5) the application of next generation DNA sequencing to accelerate antibody research. A pre-conference workshop on Sunday, December 2, 2012 will update participants on recent intellectual property (IP) law changes that affect antibody research, including biosimilar legislation, the America Invents Act and recent court cases. Keynote presentations will be given by Andreas Plückthun (University of Zürich), who will speak on engineering receptor ligands with powerful cellular responses; Gregory Friberg (Amgen Inc.), who will provide clinical updates of bispecific antibodies; James D. Marks (University of California, San Francisco), who will discuss a systems approach to generating tumor targeting antibodies; Dario Neri (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zürich), who will speak about delivering immune modulators at the sites of disease; William M. Pardridge (University of California, Los Angeles), who will discuss delivery across the blood-brain barrier; and Peter Senter (Seattle Genetics, Inc.), who will present his vision for the future of antibody-drug conjugates. For more information on these meetings or to register to attend, please visit www

  11. Space Tug Avionics Definition Study. Volume 5: Cost and Programmatics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The baseline avionics system features a central digital computer that integrates the functions of all the space tug subsystems by means of a redundant digital data bus. The central computer consists of dual central processor units, dual input/output processors, and a fault tolerant memory, utilizing internal redundancy and error checking. Three electronically steerable phased arrays provide downlink transmission from any tug attitude directly to ground or via TDRS. Six laser gyros and six accelerometers in a dodecahedron configuration make up the inertial measurement unit. Both a scanning laser radar and a TV system, employing strobe lamps, are required as acquisition and docking sensors. Primary dc power at a nominal 28 volts is supplied from dual lightweight, thermally integrated fuel cells which operate from propellant grade reactants out of the main tanks.

  12. Alternate concepts study extension. Volume 2: Part 4: Avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    A recommended baseline system is presented along with alternate avionics systems, Mark 2 avionics, booster avionics, and a cost summary. Analyses and discussions are included on the Mark 1 orbiter avionics subsystems, electrical ground support equipment, and the computer programs. Results indicate a need to define all subsystems of the baseline system, an installation study to determine the impact on the crew station, and a study on access for maintenance.

  13. Avionics-compatible video facial cognizer for detection of pilot incapacitation.

    PubMed

    Steffin, Morris

    2006-01-01

    High-acceleration loss of consciousness is a serious problem for military pilots. In this laboratory, a video cognizer has been developed that in real time detects facial changes closely coupled to the onset of loss of consciousness. Efficient algorithms are compatible with video digital signal processing hardware and are thus configurable on an autonomous single board that generates alarm triggers to activate autopilot, and is avionics-compatible.

  14. Human Exploration and Avionic Technology Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benjamin, Andrew L.

    2005-01-01

    For this workshop, I will identify critical avionic gaps, enabling technologies, high-pay off investment opportunities, promising capabilities, and space applications for human lunar and Mars exploration. Key technology disciplines encompass fault tolerance, miniaturized instrumentation sensors, MEMS-based guidance, navigation, and controls, surface communication networks, and rendezvous and docking. Furthermore, I will share bottom-up strategic planning relevant to manned mission -driven needs. Blending research expertise, facilities, and personnel with internal NASA is vital to stimulating collaborative technology solutions that achieve NASA grand vision. Retaining JSC expertise in unique and critical areas is paramount to our long-term success. Civil servants will maintain key roles in setting technology agenda, ensuring quality results, and integrating technologies into avionic systems and manned missions. Finally, I will present to NASA, academia, and the aerospace community some on -going and future advanced avionic technology programs and activities that are relevant to our mission goals and objectives.

  15. Avionic System for the CIRA USV Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capuano, G.; Longobardi, P.; Cacace, F.; Richiello, C.; Di Donato, M. P.

    2007-08-01

    This paper describes the Avionic System that TSDev has developed for the Centro Italiano Ricerche Aerospaziali (CIRA) Flight Test Bed (FTB) in the framework of the Italian Unmanned Space Vehicle (USV) program. The FTB Avionic System is composed by a number of units able to provide the vehicle with all the functionality required by an unmanned aerospace flight. The architecture of the avionics has been defined so to guarantee modularity, upgradeability, and high performances. Custom solutions for most of the required functionality have allowed to fulfil the very demanding requirements in terms of mass, power, and volume. Very interesting reliability levels have been obtained by properly selecting the components and adopting hot redundancy at least for the most critical functions.

  16. Projection display technology for avionics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmanash, Michael H.; Tompkins, Richard D.

    2000-08-01

    Avionics displays often require custom image sources tailored to demanding program needs. Flat panel devices are attractive for cockpit installations, however recent history has shown that it is not possible to sustain a business manufacturing custom flat panels in small volume specialty runs. As the number of suppliers willing to undertake this effort shrinks, avionics programs unable to utilize commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) flat panels are placed in serious jeopardy. Rear projection technology offers a new paradigm, enabling compact systems to be tailored to specific platform needs while using a complement of COTS components. Projection displays enable improved performance, lower cost and shorter development cycles based on inter-program commonality and the wide use of commercial components. This paper reviews the promise and challenges of projection technology and provides an overview of Kaiser Electronics' efforts in developing advanced avionics displays using this approach.

  17. Systems Engineering and Reusable Avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, James M.; Murphy, Gloria

    2010-01-01

    One concept for future space flights is to construct building blocks for a wide variety of avionics systems. Once a unit has served its original purpose, it can be removed from the original vehicle and reused in a similar or dissimilar function, depending on the function blocks the unit contains. For example: Once a lunar lander has reached the moon's surface, an engine controller for the Lunar Decent Module would be removed and used for a lunar rover motor control unit or for a Environmental Control Unit for a Lunar Habitat. This senior design project included the investigation of a wide range of functions of space vehicles and possible uses. Specifically, this includes: (1) Determining and specifying the basic functioning blocks of space vehicles. (2) Building and demonstrating a concept model. (3) Showing high reliability is maintained. The specific implementation of this senior design project included a large project team made up of Systems, Electrical, Computer, and Mechanical Engineers/Technologists. The efforts were made up of several sub-groups that each worked on a part of the entire project. The large size and complexity made this project one of the more difficult to manage and advise. Typical projects only have 3-4 students, but this project had 10 students from five different disciplines. This paper describes the difference of this large project compared to typical projects, and the challenges encountered. It also describes how the systems engineering approach was successfully implemented so that the students were able to meet nearly all of the project requirements.

  18. Infrared Avionics Signal Distribution Using WDM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atiquzzaman, Mohammed; Sluss, James J., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Supporting analog RF signal transmission over optical fibers, this project demonstrates a successful application of wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) to the avionics environment. We characterize the simultaneous transmission of four RF signals (channels) over a single optical fiber. At different points along a fiber optic backbone, these four analog channels are sequentially multiplexed and demultiplexed to more closely emulate the conditions in existing onboard aircraft. We present data from measurements of optical power, transmission response (loss and gain), reflection response, group delay that defines phase distortion, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and dynamic range that defines nonlinear distortion. The data indicate that WDM is very suitable for avionics applications.

  19. Payload accommodations. Avionics payload support architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creasy, Susan L.; Levy, C. D.

    1990-01-01

    Concepts for vehicle and payload avionics architectures for future NASA programs, including the Assured Shuttle Access program, Space Station Freedom (SSF), Shuttle-C, Advanced Manned Launch System (AMLS), and the Lunar/Mars programs are discussed. Emphasis is on the potential available to increase payload services which will be required in the future, while decreasing the operational cost/complexity by utilizing state of the art advanced avionics systems and a distributed processing architecture. Also addressed are the trade studies required to determine the optimal degree of vehicle (NASA) to payload (customer) separation and the ramifications of these decisions.

  20. Avionics Architectures for Exploration: Building a Better Approach for (Human) Spaceflight Avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goforth, Montgomery B.; Ratliff, James E.; Hames, Kevin L.; Vitalpur, Sharada V.

    2014-01-01

    The field of Avionics is advancing far more rapidly in terrestrial applications than in space flight applications. Spaceflight Avionics are not keeping pace with expectations set by terrestrial experience, nor are they keeping pace with the need for increasingly complex automation and crew interfaces as we move beyond Low Earth Orbit. NASA must take advantage of the strides being made by both space-related and terrestrial industries to drive our development and sustaining costs down. This paper describes ongoing efforts by the Avionics Architectures for Exploration (AAE) project chartered by NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Program to evaluate new avionic architectures and technologies, provide objective comparisons of them, and mature selected technologies for flight and for use by other AES projects. Results from the AAE project's FY13 efforts are discussed, along with the status of FY14 efforts and future plans.

  1. Nuclear Science Symposium, 23rd, Scintillation and Semiconductor Counter Symposium, 15th, and Nuclear Power Systems Symposium, 8th, New Orleans, La., October 20-22, 1976, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, L. J.

    1977-01-01

    The volume includes papers on semiconductor radiation detectors of various types, components of radiation detection and dosimetric systems, digital and microprocessor equipment in nuclear industry and science, and a wide variety of applications of nuclear radiation detectors. Semiconductor detectors of X-rays, gamma radiation, heavy ions, neutrons, and other nuclear particles, plastic scintillator arrays, drift chambers, spark wire chambers, and radiation dosimeter systems are reported on. Digital and analog conversion systems, digital data and control systems, microprocessors, and their uses in scientific research and nuclear power plants are discussed. Large-area imaging and biomedical nucleonic instrumentation, nuclear power plant safeguards, reactor instrumentation, nuclear power plant instrumentation, space instrumentation, and environmental instrumentation are dealt with. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  2. Reuse and Interoperability of Avionics for Space Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodson, Robert F.

    2007-01-01

    The space environment presents unique challenges for avionics. Launch survivability, thermal management, radiation protection, and other factors are important for successful space designs. Many existing avionics designs use custom hardware and software to meet the requirements of space systems. Although some space vendors have moved more towards a standard product line approach to avionics, the space industry still lacks similar standards and common practices for avionics development. This lack of commonality manifests itself in limited reuse and a lack of interoperability. To address NASA s need for interoperable avionics that facilitate reuse, several hardware and software approaches are discussed. Experiences with existing space boards and the application of terrestrial standards is outlined. Enhancements and extensions to these standards are considered. A modular stack-based approach to space avionics is presented. Software and reconfigurable logic cores are considered for extending interoperability and reuse. Finally, some of the issues associated with the design of reusable interoperable avionics are discussed.

  3. On-Board Fiber-Optic Network Architectures for Radar and Avionics Signal Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alam, Mohammad F.; Atiquzzaman, Mohammed; Duncan, Bradley B.; Nguyen, Hung; Kunath, Richard

    2000-01-01

    Continued progress in both civil and military avionics applications is overstressing the capabilities of existing radio-frequency (RF) communication networks based on coaxial cables on board modem aircrafts. Future avionics systems will require high-bandwidth on- board communication links that are lightweight, immune to electromagnetic interference, and highly reliable. Fiber optic communication technology can meet all these challenges in a cost-effective manner. Recently, digital fiber-optic communication systems, where a fiber-optic network acts like a local area network (LAN) for digital data communications, have become a topic of extensive research and development. Although a fiber-optic system can be designed to transport radio-frequency (RF) signals, the digital fiber-optic systems under development today are not capable of transporting microwave and millimeter-wave RF signals used in radar and avionics systems on board an aircraft. Recent advances in fiber optic technology, especially wavelength division multiplexing (WDM), has opened a number of possibilities for designing on-board fiber optic networks, including all-optical networks for radar and avionics RF signal distribution. In this paper, we investigate a number of different novel approaches for fiber-optic transmission of on-board VHF and UHF RF signals using commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components. The relative merits and demerits of each architecture are discussed, and the suitability of each architecture for particular applications is pointed out. All-optical approaches show better performance than other traditional approaches in terms of signal-to-noise ratio, power consumption, and weight requirements.

  4. Payload accommodations: Avionics payload support architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Technology issues/trade studies; candidate programs; key contacts/facilities: milestones; accomplishments; and major objectives of the payload accommodation are outlined. Topics covered include: avionics payload support architecture; satellite serving; P/L deploy systems and advanced manipulators; advanced telemetry systems; and on-board abort planning. This presentation is represented by viewgraphs only.

  5. Avionics. Progress Record and Theory Outline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut State Dept. of Education, Hartford. Div. of Vocational-Technical Schools.

    This combination progress record and course outline is designed for use by individuals teaching a course in avionics that is intended to prepare students for employment in the field of aerospace electronics. Included among the topics addressed in the course are the following: shop practices, aircraft and the theory of flight, electron physics,…

  6. Reference Avionics Architecture for Lunar Surface Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somervill, Kevin M.; Lapin, Jonathan C.; Schmidt, Oron L.

    2010-01-01

    Developing and delivering infrastructure capable of supporting long-term manned operations to the lunar surface has been a primary objective of the Constellation Program in the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate. Several concepts have been developed related to development and deployment lunar exploration vehicles and assets that provide critical functionality such as transportation, habitation, and communication, to name a few. Together, these systems perform complex safety-critical functions, largely dependent on avionics for control and behavior of system functions. These functions are implemented using interchangeable, modular avionics designed for lunar transit and lunar surface deployment. Systems are optimized towards reuse and commonality of form and interface and can be configured via software or component integration for special purpose applications. There are two core concepts in the reference avionics architecture described in this report. The first concept uses distributed, smart systems to manage complexity, simplify integration, and facilitate commonality. The second core concept is to employ extensive commonality between elements and subsystems. These two concepts are used in the context of developing reference designs for many lunar surface exploration vehicles and elements. These concepts are repeated constantly as architectural patterns in a conceptual architectural framework. This report describes the use of these architectural patterns in a reference avionics architecture for Lunar surface systems elements.

  7. Avionics Instrument Systems Specialist (AFSC 32551).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Lawrence B.; Crowcroft, Robert A.

    This six-volume student text is designed for use by Air Force personnel enrolled in a self-study extension course for avionics instrument systems specialists. Covered in the individual volumes are career field familiarization (career field progression and training, security, occupational safety and health, and career field reference material);…

  8. Simulating Avionics Upgrades to the Space Shuttles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deger, Daniel; Hill, Kenneth; Braaten, Karsten E.

    2008-01-01

    Cockpit Avionics Prototyping Environment (CAPE) is a computer program that simulates the functions of proposed upgraded avionics for a space shuttle. In CAPE, pre-existing space-shuttle-simulation programs are merged with a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) display-development program, yielding a package of software that enables high-fi46 NASA Tech Briefs, September 2008 delity simulation while making it possible to rapidly change avionic displays and the underlying model algorithms. The pre-existing simulation programs are Shuttle Engineering Simulation, Shuttle Engineering Simulation II, Interactive Control and Docking Simulation, and Shuttle Mission Simulator playback. The COTS program Virtual Application Prototyping System (VAPS) not only enables the development of displays but also makes it possible to move data about, capture and process events, and connect to a simulation. VAPS also enables the user to write code in the C or C++ programming language and compile that code into the end-product simulation software. As many as ten different avionic-upgrade ideas can be incorporated in a single compilation and, thus, tested in a single simulation run. CAPE can be run in conjunction with any or all of four simulations, each representing a different phase of a space-shuttle flight.

  9. Developing Generic Software for Spacecraft Avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Joseph

    2003-01-01

    A proposed approach to the development of software for spacecraft avionics is based partly on a concept of generic software that could be tailored to satisfy requirements for specific missions. The proposed approach would stand in contrast to the conventional approach of first defining avionics requirements for a specific mission, then developing software specific to those requirements. The proposed approach might also be adaptable to programming computers that control and monitor other complex equipment systems that range in scale from automobiles to factories. The concept of a spacecraft avionics functional model (SAFM) is a major element of the proposed approach. An SAFM would be, essentially, a systematic and hierarchical description of the functionality required of the avionics software (and hardware) for a given mission. Although the initial input information used to start the construction of an SAFM would typically amount to a high-level description, the SAFM would thereafter be decomposed to a low level. The resulting low-level version of the model would be used to develop a set of generic requirements that could be expected to include a large fraction of all requirements for a large fraction of all missions. The generic requirements would be used to develop software modules that could be included in, or excluded from, the final flight software to satisfy the requirements of a specific mission.

  10. Reliability measurement for operational avionics software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thacker, J.; Ovadia, F.

    1979-01-01

    Quantitative measures of reliability for operational software in embedded avionics computer systems are presented. Analysis is carried out on data collected during flight testing and from both static and dynamic simulation testing. Failure rate is found to be a useful statistic for estimating software quality and recognizing reliability trends during the operational phase of software development.

  11. Hardware survey for the avionics test bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cobb, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    A survey of maor hardware items that could possibly be used in the development of an avionics test bed for space shuttle attached or autonomous large space structures was conducted in NASA Johnson Space Center building 16. The results of the survey are organized to show the hardware by laboratory usage. Computer systems in each laboratory are described in some detail.

  12. Avionics system design for high energy fields: A guide for the designer and airworthiness specialist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcconnell, Roger A.

    1987-01-01

    Because of the significant differences in transient susceptibility, the use of digital electronics in flight critical systems, and the reduced shielding effects of composite materials, there is a definite need to define pracitices which will minimize electromagnetic susceptibility, to investigate the operational environment, and to develop appropriate testing methods for flight critical systems. The design practices which will lead to reduced electromagnetic susceptibility of avionics systems in high energy fields is described. The levels of emission that can be anticipated from generic digital devices. It is assumed that as data processing equipment becomes an ever larger part of the avionics package, the construction methods of the data processing industry will increasingly carry over into aircraft. In Appendix 1 tentative revisions to RTCA DO-160B, Environmental Conditions and Test Procedures for Airborne Equipment, are presented. These revisions are intended to safeguard flight critical systems from the effects of high energy electromagnetic fields. A very extensive and useful bibliography on both electromagnetic compatibility and avionics issues is included.

  13. SMART: The Future of Spaceflight Avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean C.; Howard, David E.

    2010-01-01

    A novel avionics approach is necessary to meet the future needs of low cost space and lunar missions that require low mass and low power electronics. The current state of the art for avionics systems are centralized electronic units that perform the required spacecraft functions. These electronic units are usually custom-designed for each application and the approach compels avionics designers to have in-depth system knowledge before design can commence. The overall design, development, test and evaluation (DDT&E) cycle for this conventional approach requires long delivery times for space flight electronics and is very expensive. The Small Multi-purpose Advanced Reconfigurable Technology (SMART) concept is currently being developed to overcome the limitations of traditional avionics design. The SMART concept is based upon two multi-functional modules that can be reconfigured to drive and sense a variety of mechanical and electrical components. The SMART units are key to a distributed avionics architecture whereby the modules are located close to or right at the desired application point. The drive module, SMART-D, receives commands from the main computer and controls the spacecraft mechanisms and devices with localized feedback. The sensor module, SMART-S, is used to sense the environmental sensors and offload local limit checking from the main computer. There are numerous benefits that are realized by implementing the SMART system. Localized sensor signal conditioning electronics reduces signal loss and overall wiring mass. Localized drive electronics increase control bandwidth and minimize time lags for critical functions. These benefits in-turn reduce the main processor overhead functions. Since SMART units are standard flight qualified units, DDT&E is reduced and system design can commence much earlier in the design cycle. Increased production scale lowers individual piece part cost and using standard modules also reduces non-recurring costs. The benefit list

  14. STS-2: SAIL non-avionics subsystems math model requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, W. P.; Herold, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    Simulation of the STS-2 Shuttle nonavionics subsystems in the shuttle avionics integration laboratory (SAIL) is necessary for verification of the integrated shuttle avionics system. The math model (simulation) requirements for each of the nonavionics subsystems that interfaces with the Shuttle avionics system is documented and a single source document for controlling approved changes (by the SAIL change control panel) to the math models is provided.

  15. Prognostics for Electronics Components of Avionics Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Celaya, Jose R.; Saha, Bhaskar; Wysocki, Philip F.; Goebel, Kai F.

    2009-01-01

    Electronics components have and increasingly critical role in avionics systems and for the development of future aircraft systems. Prognostics of such components is becoming a very important research filed as a result of the need to provide aircraft systems with system level health management. This paper reports on a prognostics application for electronics components of avionics systems, in particular, its application to the Isolated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT). The remaining useful life prediction for the IGBT is based on the particle filter framework, leveraging data from an accelerated aging tests on IGBTs. The accelerated aging test provided thermal-electrical overstress by applying thermal cycling to the device. In-situ state monitoring, including measurements of the steady-state voltages and currents, electrical transients, and thermal transients are recorded and used as potential precursors of failure.

  16. Demonstration Advanced Avionics System (DAAS) function description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, A. J.; Bailey, D. G.; Gaabo, R. J.; Lahn, T. G.; Larson, J. C.; Peterson, E. M.; Schuck, J. W.; Rodgers, D. L.; Wroblewski, K. A.

    1982-01-01

    The Demonstration Advanced Avionics System, DAAS, is an integrated avionics system utilizing microprocessor technologies, data busing, and shared displays for demonstrating the potential of these technologies in improving the safety and utility of general aviation operations in the late 1980's and beyond. Major hardware elements of the DAAS include a functionally distributed microcomputer complex, an integrated data control center, an electronic horizontal situation indicator, and a radio adaptor unit. All processing and display resources are interconnected by an IEEE-488 bus in order to enhance the overall system effectiveness, reliability, modularity and maintainability. A detail description of the DAAS architecture, the DAAS hardware, and the DAAS functions is presented. The system is designed for installation and flight test in a NASA Cessna 402-B aircraft.

  17. Space Application Requirements for Organic Avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael D.; Minow, Joseph; Altstatt, Richard; Wertz, George; Semmel, Charles; Edwards, David; Ashley, Paul R.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is currently evaluating polymer based components for application in launch vehicle and propulsion system avionics systems. Organic polymers offer great advantages over inorganic corollaries. Unlike inorganics with crystalline structures defining their sensing characteristics, organic polymers can be engineered to provide varying degrees of sensitivity for various parameters including electro-optic response, second harmonic generation, and piezoelectric response. While great advantages in performance can be achieved with organic polymers, survivability in the operational environment is a key aspect for their practical application. The space environment in particular offers challenges that must be considered in the application of polymer based devices. These challenges include: long term thermal stability for long duration missions, extreme thermal cycling, space radiation tolerance, vacuum operation, low power operation, high operational reliability. Requirements for application of polymer based devices in space avionics systems will be presented and discussed in light of current polymer materials.

  18. An Integrated Modular Avionics Development Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoofs, T.; Santos, S.; Tatibana, C.; Anjos, J.; Rufino, J.; Windsor, J.

    2009-05-01

    The ARINC 653 standard has taken a leading role within the aeronautical industry in the development of safety-critical systems based upon the Integrated Modular Avionics (IMA) concept. The related cost savings in reduced integration, verification and validation effort has raised interest in the European space industry for developing a spacecraft IMA approach and for the definition of an ARINC 653-for-Space software framework. As part of this process, it is necessary to establish an effective way to develop, test and analyse on-board applications without having access to the final IMA target platform for all engineers. Target platforms are usually extremely expensive considering hardware and software prices as well as training costs. This paper describes the architecture of an Integrated Modular Avionics Development Environment (IMADE) based on the Linux Operating System and the ARINC 653 simulator for Modular On-Board Applications that was developed by Skysoft Portugal, S.A. In cooperation with ESA, 2007-2008.

  19. Integration of Passive Components for Spacecraft Avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, E. J.; Wesseling, E.; White, V.; Lieneweg, U.; Mojarradi, M.; Ulrich, R.; Wasef, M.; Mantooth, A.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA roadmap outlining future deep space missions to Europa and other outer planetary destinations calls for continued reductions in the mass and volume of the spacecraft avionics. Spacecraft power electronics, including the power switches and converters, remain difficult to miniaturize due to the need for large numbers of discrete passive components such as resistors, capacitors, inductors and transformers. As part of the System-on-a-chip program at the Center for Integrated Space Microsystems and at the University of Arkansas, we are working to develop integrated or embedded passive components geared specifically for use in power management and distribution (PMAD) in future avionics over the next five to ten years. This will not only enable a scaling down of the power subsystems, but will make possible new architectures such as "distributed" PMAD. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  20. Genes, brain, and behavior: development gone awry in autism? A report on the 23rd Annual International Symposium of the Center for the Study of Gene Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Michael J; Dictenberg, Jason B

    2010-09-01

    Autism and its highly variable symptomology were the themes of the 23rd Annual International Symposium of the Center for the Study of Gene Structure and Function at Hunter College in New York City, held 15 January 2010. The meeting explored the extensive research on autism from several perspectives-integrating research on genetics, neuroscience, and behavior-from researchers presenting new and innovative approaches to understanding the autism spectrum. Early diagnosis, intervention, and genetics were major themes because they are seen as essential areas in which progress is needed before the rise in numbers of cases of autism throughout the world, which some describe as approaching an epidemic, can be stemmed. Several genetic, neurobiological, and behavioral markers of autism have been identified that may ultimately provide the basis for early identification, and that presently define the key areas requiring intensive intervention.

  1. Ultra long-life avionics architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chau, S. N.; Sengupta, A.; Tran, T.; Bakhshi, A.; Kia, T.

    2002-01-01

    For survival and achieving reliability in ultra long-life missions, fault tolerant design techniques need to handle the predominant failure mode, which is the wear-out of components. Conventional design methodologies will need excessive redundancy to achieve the required reliability. The objective of this paper is to present a new approach to design a more efficient fault-tolerant avionics system architecture that requires significantly fewer redundant components.

  2. Power, Avionics and Software Communication Network Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Sands, Obed S.; Bakula, Casey J.; Oldham, Daniel R.; Wright, Ted; Bradish, Martin A.; Klebau, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    This document describes the communication architecture for the Power, Avionics and Software (PAS) 2.0 subsystem for the Advanced Extravehicular Mobile Unit (AEMU). The following systems are described in detail: Caution Warn- ing and Control System, Informatics, Storage, Video, Audio, Communication, and Monitoring Test and Validation. This document also provides some background as well as the purpose and goals of the PAS project at Glenn Research Center (GRC).

  3. Corrosion Control Test Method for Avionic Components

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-25

    pin conn’ecLor adsemblies *Electronic test articles exposed in an avionic box The following test parameters were used: Environment A - Modified Sulfur Dic...carrier correlation criteria in Table IV. The modified sulfur dioxide/salt fog test showed the best correlation with the carrier exposed test arti...capacitor. The HCl/H 2 SO3 environment and the S2C12 environment, as expected, produced more electrical failures than the modified sulfur dioxide test

  4. New Technologies for Space Avionics, 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aibel, David W.; Harris, David R.; Bartlett, Dave; Black, Steve; Campagna, Dave; Fernald, Nancy; Garbos, Ray

    1993-01-01

    The report reviews a 1993 effort that investigated issues associated with the development of requirements, with the practice of concurrent engineering and with rapid prototyping, in the development of a next-generation Reaction Jet Drive Controller. This report details lessons learned, the current status of the prototype, and suggestions for future work. The report concludes with a discussion of the vision of future avionics architectures based on the principles associated with open architectures and integrated vehicle health management.

  5. Study objectives: Will commercial avionics do the job? Improvements needed?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nasr, Hatem

    1992-01-01

    Improvements in commercial avionics are covered in a viewgraph format. Topics include the following: computer architecture, user requirements, Boeing 777 aircraft, cost effectiveness, and implemention.

  6. Aircrew displays and avionics for application in a future national airspace system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salmirs, S.

    1979-01-01

    A concept for increased pilot involvement in a future National Airspace System was evolved during the FAA New Initiatives in Engineering and Development Users responsibilities and ways in which they might interact. The technical feasibility of the system is indicated by the sophisticated level of presently manufactured digital computers and display avionics, and the application of that technology under design by the major airframe manufacturers. Data collected during simulations and flights with the Terminal Configured Vehicle Program B-737 airplane are shown to have direct application to the new system concept. The adoption of the operational changes envisioned, offers some potentially significant advantages to the user.

  7. Micro-Scale Avionics Thermal Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Matthew E.

    2001-01-01

    Trends in the thermal management of avionics and commercial ground-based microelectronics are converging, and facing the same dilemma: a shortfall in technology to meet near-term maximum junction temperature and package power projections. Micro-scale devices hold the key to significant advances in thermal management, particularly micro-refrigerators/coolers that can drive cooling temperatures below ambient. A microelectromechanical system (MEMS) Stirling cooler is currently under development at the NASA Glenn Research Center to meet this challenge with predicted efficiencies that are an order of magnitude better than current and future thermoelectric coolers.

  8. Evolution of the Space Shuttle Primary Avionics Software and Avionics for Shuttle Derived Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Roscoe C.

    2011-01-01

    As a result of recommendation from the Augustine Panel, the direction for Human Space Flight has been altered from the original plan referred to as Constellation. NASA s Human Exploration Framework Team (HEFT) proposes the use of a Shuttle Derived Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle (SDLV) and an Orion derived spacecraft (salvaged from Constellation) to support a new flexible direction for space exploration. The SDLV must be developed within an environment of a constrained budget and a preferred fast development schedule. Thus, it has been proposed to utilize existing assets from the Shuttle Program to speed development at a lower cost. These existing assets should not only include structures such as external tanks or solid rockets, but also the Flight Software which has traditionally been a "long pole" in new development efforts. The avionics and software for the Space Shuttle was primarily developed in the 70 s and considered state of the art for that time. As one may argue that the existing avionics and flight software may be too outdated to support the new SDLV effort, this is a fallacy if they can be evolved over time into a "modern avionics" platform. The technology may be outdated, but the avionics concepts and flight software algorithms are not. The reuse of existing avionics and software also allows for the reuse of development, verification, and operations facilities. The keyword is evolve in that these assets can support the fast development of such a vehicle, but then be gradually evolved over time towards more modern platforms as budget and schedule permits. The "gold" of the flight software is the "control loop" algorithms of the vehicle. This is the Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GNC) software algorithms. This software is typically the most expensive to develop, test, and verify. Thus, the approach is to preserve the GNC flight software, while first evolving the supporting software (such as Command and Data Handling, Caution and Warning, Telemetry, etc

  9. Self Contained Test for Digital Avionics. Designers Guide,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-01

    32 * DESIGNERS GUIDE PAGE NAEC MISC 92-0369 LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS FIGURE PAGE 1-1 SCT Fault Detection and Isolation (without feedback...TO NOL. A through once to check the feedback line. FIGURE 1-1. SCT Fault Detection and Isolation This procedure continues through module (without...comparison. SCT design is direct and test equipmen can be more nearly systematic. Fault detection and isolation in standardized, and the prime

  10. The 23rd Stirling Physics Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-01-01

    This was how the chairman, Dennis Chisholm, described the morning's major topic `Higher Still' - the proposed successor to the Scottish Higher Grade and Sixth Year Studies Certificates. It was chosen for this one-day conference on 21 May as the documentation for it had been promised for 1 May. Alas, as the main speaker, Mary Webster, admitted, the materials were still `sitting in a warehouse in Dundee' and the programme has now been postponed for a year! Nevertheless the team, which included Rothwell Glen and Tony Keeley, bravely fielded a series of awkward questions from a critical audience of over 200 physics teachers. Physics with gusto If `Higher Still' was a damp squib Rebecca Crawford's team from Glasgow Science and Technology Outreach set the place ablaze. In their first spectacular demonstration Rebecca lay on a bed of sharp nails while someone stood on top of her! This was followed by a deafening explosion produced by cornflour powder igniting in a tin can used to model a grain silo. Hydrogen was then produced by aluminium foil in a solution of caustic soda, and used to inflate a balloon before exploding it with a flaming torch. Using two 2 mW lasers the green spot produced by one was shown to appear much brighter than the red spot from the other, The Australian demonstrator explained that some of their fire engines were now being painted green instead of red as our eyes are more sensitive to green. A small low-inertia electric motor turned when attached to copper and zinc electrodes inserted first in a glass of Coke and then in a fresh grapefruit. Gas-filled sausage balloons were packed into a flask of liquid nitrogen where they collapsed as the gas inside liquefied. When the bunch of deflated balloons was removed and thrown on to the bench the results were dramatic. As you might expect, the `best wine' was kept to the last. Kenneth Skeldon and two colleagues in the University of Glasgow have built a high voltage generator based on a resonant transformer derived from a standard Tesla coil with a high-Q secondary. This is capable of delivering around a million volts, which produce fantastic lightning flashes. A volunteer from the audience was invited to enter a huge Faraday Cage which was then subjected to these high voltage sparks! For a while the door of the cage jammed but eventually the victim emerged unscathed! This is, of course, not just an entertainment. The Gusto show is taken into schools and targeted at lower secondary pupils about to make their subject choices. The team also gives large scale physics demonstration lectures and could play to 10 000 children in a month. So physics is fun and physics is relevant to everyday life! Support for physics teachers Lesley Glasser chaired the afternoon session, which she opened by introducing the Institute's Education Officer. The Stirling Meeting would not be the same without the `commercial slot' presented again so ably by Catherine Wilson. Physics teachers are an endangered species and the Institute is determined to do whatever it can to support them. Plans are afoot to make sure the Schools Lectures are modified, if necessary, to take account of the educational differences in Scotland. The London-based `Physics in Perspective' course not only introduces sixth-formers to some of the frontiers of physics but gives enough free time for them to visit places of interest in the city - from the Science Museum to Soho. `So they associate physics with enjoyment!' Another Scottish Update Course is planned for teachers, and a brand new glossy booklet, sent free to all schools, will show pupils that choosing physics is a `Smart Move'. Finally the Institute has just started a major post-16 curriculum project which will include a variety of support materials to keep teachers abreast of continuing developments in physics. Each year, IoP Teacher of Physics Awards are given to `outstanding teachers of physics who inspire others to continue with and enjoy their physics'. Ann Jarvie, Deputy Head of St Ninian's High School in Kirkintilloch, certainly felt that this was a fitting description of their physics master Pat Cleary, who was presented with his Award at the Stirling Meeting. Of him she said `He encourages and supports his pupils. He doesn't talk down to them and he is concerned about all pupils, not just the high fliers. He has a great sense of humour and enthuses his pupils. Pat's passion for physics is all-consuming; he will beg, borrow and (almost) steal for physics! He only tolerates senior management because they supply him with money for physics!' Before giving his keynote lecture Professor Russell Stannard presented Pat Cleary with his Award. Venturing beyond physics In this stimulating presentation Russell Stannard not only summarized current thinking in cosmology, he also considered possible theological implications. The universe is a big place consisting of 1011 galaxies each containing 1011 stars. It may be that 1030 stars have planets and so the universe could be teeming with millions of different forms of life. Is size then the most important thing for us? What goes on in the human head is much more interesting than the nuclear reactions of the sun. Surely human consciousness, associated with the complexity of the brain, is of more importance to us than mere size. In the beginning If we ask about the origin of the universe, e.g. `How did it get started?' then we look to science for an answer. On the other hand we might ask a theological question about creation, e.g. `Why is there something rather than nothing?' Current ideas of the Big Bang are based on several independent strands of evidence which Russell discussed in some detail. Space-time `It is idle to look for time before creation, as if time can be found before time.... We should say that time began with creation rather than creation began with time.' This amazingly modern concept - that space and time were created together - was asserted by St Augustine 1500 years ago! If time and space are `welded' together time didn't exist before the Big Bang and so we cannot ask what caused the Big Bang. Cause precedes effect. The future The universe is expanding but at a reduced rate. Will it eventually stop expanding and start to contract? If so, will it reach a point where it again stops and starts to expand again - the Big Bounce? Or will it collapse completely - the Big Crunch? Alternatively will the universe go on expanding forever? The answers to these questions depend on the density of the universe. The density needed to make the universe start to contract is called the critical density. At present the observed density is around 0.3% of critical density. This would suggest that the universe should continue expanding forever. However, the movements of galaxies and clusters of galaxies indicate that there must be some undetected `dark matter' which, calculations show, increases the density of the universe to within a factor of two of critical density. If this is correct the density at the early stages of the Big Bang would have had to be correct to within 1 part in 1060. DIY universe A final word of warning to anyone who aspires to building a better universe! If you make your Big Bang less violent the universe will expand and then collapse to a Big Crunch before life has time to develop. Make it more violent and gases will disperse quickly so that stars and planets cannot form. If you make gravity (G) weaker, nuclear reactions won't be triggered and only brown dwarfs will form. Life will be impossible. Make gravity stronger and only fast-burning massive stars will form. These blue giants last for only a million years and there will be no time for life to evolve. In summary: are we in one of an infinite number of universes because the conditions happen to be just right for us or is this universe a one-off put-up job designed by God? Cosmology neither proves nor disproves the existence of God. However if, on other grounds, you are a believer, current thinking in cosmology shouldn't worry you. Thanks To circle the world in 80 days may be interesting. To encompass the universe in less than 80 minutes is, in the chairperson's words, mind-blowing. The day ended with votes of thanks to all contributors and to Jack Woolsey and his team for organizing the meeting. Jim Jardine

  11. The 23rd Annual Consortium of Geologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cronin, Jim

    2008-01-01

    Today's scientific theories are the result of a long collaborative process, sometimes over centuries, among many different scientists from various parts of the world. To communicate this concept to middle school students and introduce them to the theory of plate tectonics and continental drift, they are placed in the role of geologists attending a…

  12. The 23rd Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Technological areas covered include space lubrication, bearings, aerodynamic devices, spacecraft latches, deployment, positioning, and pointing. Devices for Space Station docking and manipulator and teleoperator mechanisms are also described.

  13. Digital signal conditioning for flight test instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bever, Glenn A.

    1991-01-01

    An introduction to digital measurement processes on aircraft is provided. Flight test instrumentation systems are rapidly evolving from analog-intensive to digital intensive systems, including the use of onboard digital computers. The topics include measurements that are digital in origin, as well as sampling, encoding, transmitting, and storing data. Particular emphasis is placed on modern avionic data bus architectures and what to be aware of when extracting data from them. Examples of data extraction techniques are given. Tradeoffs between digital logic families, trends in digital development, and design testing techniques are discussed. An introduction to digital filtering is also covered.

  14. General Aviation Activity and Avionics Survey 1981.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    SFIGURE 12. GENERAL AVIATION ACTIVE FLEET SIZE 19?7 1981 1-6 --.4 ,3 1, ,,, " .’𔃿 43- .340 I - 0 ’, Z 41- 0%’ 41.016 S ,’ /.- \\40.704 39, 3.409 7 38...8217 ,. . ... * . , , ... . ., o-- .. sm6 mm th 7 111 AXW OF3 P3OWOWIIOAL I A CARIER L’ oo, 00 ON-, z -m 001 PERCENT OF ACTIVE GENERAL AVIATION...AVIONICS EQUIPMENT IN THE 1961 GENERAL AVIATION AIRCRAFT FLEET 1-19 22LOWN Z 1 TRA5PONMU p .e go =1 imLww in NO ’RAJNSxoNmIR ,’: 44 sot w FIGURE

  15. Avionics electromagnetic interference immunity and environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, C. A.

    1986-01-01

    Aircraft electromagnetic spectrum and radio frequency (RF) field strengths are charted, profiling the higher levels of electromagnetic voltages encountered by the commercial aircraft wiring. Selected military, urban, and rural electromagnetic field levels are plotted and provide a comparison of radiation amplitudes. Low frequency magnetic fields and electric fields from 400 H(Z) power systems are charted versus frequency and wire separation to indicate induced voltages on adjacent or neighboring circuits. Induced EMI levels and attenuation characteristics of electric, magnetic, RF fields, and transients are plotted and graphed for common types of wire circuits. The significance of wire circuit returns and shielding is emphasized to highlight the techniques that help block the paths of electromagnetic interference and maintain avionic interface signal quality.

  16. Industry perspectives on Plug-& -Play Spacecraft Avionics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franck, R.; Graven, P.; Liptak, L.

    This paper describes the methodologies and findings from an industry survey of awareness and utility of Spacecraft Plug-& -Play Avionics (SPA). The survey was conducted via interviews, in-person and teleconference, with spacecraft prime contractors and suppliers. It focuses primarily on AFRL's SPA technology development activities but also explores the broader applicability and utility of Plug-& -Play (PnP) architectures for spacecraft. Interviews include large and small suppliers as well as large and small spacecraft prime contractors. Through these “ product marketing” interviews, awareness and attitudes can be assessed, key technical and market barriers can be identified, and opportunities for improvement can be uncovered. Although this effort focuses on a high-level assessment, similar processes can be used to develop business cases and economic models which may be necessary to support investment decisions.

  17. Tanker avionics and aircrew complement evaluation.

    PubMed

    Moss, R W; Barbato, G J

    1982-11-01

    This paper describes an effort to determine control and display criteria for operating SAC's KC-135 tanker with a reduced crew complement. The Tanker Avionics and Aircrew Complement Evaluation (TAACE) Program was a four-phase effort addressing the control and display design issues associated with operating the tanker without the navigator position. Discussed are: the mission analysis phase, during which the tanker's operational responsibilities were defined and documented; the design phase, during which alternative crew station design concepts were developed; the mockup evaluation phase, which accomplished initial SAC crew member assessment of cockpit designs; and the simulation phase, which validated the useability of the crew system redesign. The paper also describes a recommended crew station configuration and discusses some of the philosophy underlying the selection of cockpit hardware and systems.

  18. Assessment of avionics technology in European aerospace organizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinec, D. A.; Baumbick, Robert; Hitt, Ellis; Leondes, Cornelius; Mayton, Monica; Schwind, Joseph; Traybar, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    This report provides a summary of the observations and recommendations made by a technical panel formed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The panel, comprising prominent experts in the avionics field, was tasked to visit various organizations in Europe to assess the level of technology planned for use in manufactured civil avionics in the future. The primary purpose of the study was to assess avionics systems planned for implementation or already employed on civil aircraft and to evaluate future research, development, and engineering (RD&E) programs, address avionic systems and aircraft programs. The ultimate goal is to ensure that the technology addressed by NASa programs is commensurate with the needs of the aerospace industry at an international level. The panel focused on specific technologies, including guidance and control systems, advanced cockpit displays, sensors and data networks, and fly-by-wire/fly-by-light systems. However, discussions the panel had with the European organizations were not limited to these topics.

  19. Overview of Avionics and Electrical Ground Support Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Sean C.

    2011-01-01

    Presents an overview of the Crew Module Avionics and the associated Electrical Ground Support Equipment for the Pad Abort 1 flight test of the Orion Program. A limited selection of the technical challenges and solutions are highlighted.

  20. Design of a Low Cost Avionics System for Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Kevin; Wallace, Shawn

    1998-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center has long been one of the leaders in development of propulsion systems. Due to current launch vehicle costs, Marshall Space Flight Centers (MSFC) Advanced Space Transportation Program (ASTP) office has emphasized the development of low cost launch vehicles. The Bantam launch vehicle is one of the primary programs that has low cost as a requirement. One of the driving factors for a low cost launch vehicle is a low cost avionics system. This paper will summarize MSFC's Astrionics Laboratories efforts in designing a low cost avionics system. MSFC has done Phase A avionics system design and has been working with various contractors on a Phase B preliminary avionics design. Deriving the major requirements, trade studies and cost drivers are some of the topics to be discussed.

  1. Space Generic Open Avionics Architecture (SGOAA) standard specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wray, Richard B.; Stovall, John R.

    1994-01-01

    This standard establishes the Space Generic Open Avionics Architecture (SGOAA). The SGOAA includes a generic functional model, processing structural model, and an architecture interface model. This standard defines the requirements for applying these models to the development of spacecraft core avionics systems. The purpose of this standard is to provide an umbrella set of requirements for applying the generic architecture models to the design of a specific avionics hardware/software processing system. This standard defines a generic set of system interface points to facilitate identification of critical services and interfaces. It establishes the requirement for applying appropriate low level detailed implementation standards to those interfaces points. The generic core avionics functions and processing structural models provided herein are robustly tailorable to specific system applications and provide a platform upon which the interface model is to be applied.

  2. Space Generic Open Avionics Architecture (SGOAA) reference model technical guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wray, Richard B.; Stovall, John R.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents a full description of the Space Generic Open Avionics Architecture (SGOAA). The SGOAA consists of a generic system architecture for the entities in spacecraft avionics, a generic processing architecture, and a six class model of interfaces in a hardware/software system. The purpose of the SGOAA is to provide an umbrella set of requirements for applying the generic architecture interface model to the design of specific avionics hardware/software systems. The SGOAA defines a generic set of system interface points to facilitate identification of critical interfaces and establishes the requirements for applying appropriate low level detailed implementation standards to those interface points. The generic core avionics system and processing architecture models provided herein are robustly tailorable to specific system applications and provide a platform upon which the interface model is to be applied.

  3. Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) Avionics Integration Laboratory (CAIL) Independent Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Mitchell L.; Aguilar, Michael L.; Mora, Victor D.; Regenie, Victoria A.; Ritz, William F.

    2009-01-01

    Two approaches were compared to the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) Avionics Integration Laboratory (CAIL) approach: the Flat-Sat and Shuttle Avionics Integration Laboratory (SAIL). The Flat-Sat and CAIL/SAIL approaches are two different tools designed to mitigate different risks. Flat-Sat approach is designed to develop a mission concept into a flight avionics system and associated ground controller. The SAIL approach is designed to aid in the flight readiness verification of the flight avionics system. The approaches are complimentary in addressing both the system development risks and mission verification risks. The following NESC team findings were identified: The CAIL assumption is that the flight subsystems will be matured for the system level verification; The Flat-Sat and SAIL approaches are two different tools designed to mitigate different risks. The following NESC team recommendation was provided: Define, document, and manage a detailed interface between the design and development (EDL and other integration labs) to the verification laboratory (CAIL).

  4. System Engineering Issues for Avionics Survival in the Space Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavelitz, Steven

    1999-01-01

    This paper examines how the system engineering process influences the design of a spacecraft's avionics by considering the space environment. Avionics are susceptible to the thermal, radiation, plasma, and meteoroids/orbital debris environments. The environment definitions for various spacecraft mission orbits (LEO/low inclination, LEO/Polar, MEO, HEO, GTO, GEO and High ApogeeElliptical) are discussed. NASA models and commercial software used for environment analysis are reviewed. Applicability of technical references, such as NASA TM-4527 "Natural Orbital Environment Guidelines for Use in Aerospace Vehicle Development" is discussed. System engineering references, such as the MSFC System Engineering Handbook, are reviewed to determine how the environments are accounted for in the system engineering process. Tools and databases to assist the system engineer and avionics designer in addressing space environment effects on avionics are described and usefulness assessed.

  5. Transcription of the Workshop on General Aviation Advanced Avionics Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tashker, M. (Editor)

    1975-01-01

    Papers are presented dealing with the design of reliable, low cost, advanced avionics systems applicable to general aviation in the 1980's and beyond. Sensors, displays, integrated circuits, microprocessors, and minicomputers are among the topics discussed.

  6. Facility Requirements of the Air Force Avionics Laboratory. Revision,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-05-01

    a dozen locations in Area B, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. The Base Master Plan proposes eventually to consolidate the Avionics Laboratory in...only. To reassess the requirement for the planned third increment of Building 620, the Commander of the Avionics Laboratory contracted with the...alternative is to take no action other than the moves now planned . The second alternative is to move the Commander, his immediate staff and the one

  7. An Analysis of the Modes and States for Generic Avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wray, Richard B.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a topology for describing the behavior of mission, vehicle and system/substem entities in new flight vehicle designs based on the use of open standards. It also had to define and describe the modes and states which may be used in generic avionics behavioral descriptions, describe their interrelationships, and establish a method for applying generic avionics to actual flight vehicle designs.

  8. Avionics Architectures for Exploration: Wireless Technologies and Human Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goforth, Montgomery B.; Ratliff, James E.; Barton, Richard J.; Wagner, Raymond S.; Lansdowne, Chatwin

    2014-01-01

    The authors describe ongoing efforts by the Avionics Architectures for Exploration (AAE) project chartered by NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Program to evaluate new avionics architectures and technologies, provide objective comparisons of them, and mature selected technologies for flight and for use by other AES projects. The AAE project team includes members from most NASA centers and from industry. This paper provides an overview of recent AAE efforts, with particular emphasis on the wireless technologies being evaluated under AES to support human spaceflight.

  9. Cost-Benefit Analysis Tools for Avionics Parts Obsolescence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-04-01

    analysis tools for comparing the resolution options exist, they could be instrumental for program/item managers to assist in timely solution decisions...AU/ACSC/02-103/2002-04 AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS TOOLS FOR AVIONICS PARTS OBSOLESCENCE by Luvenia...Analysis Tools For Avionics Parts Obsolescence 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e

  10. Wireless avionics for space applications of fundamental physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Linna; Zeng, Guiming

    2016-07-01

    Fundamental physics (FP) research in space relies on a strong support of spacecraft. New types of spacecraft including reusable launch vehicles, reentry space vehicles, long-term on-orbit spacecraft or other new type of spacecraft will pave the way for FP missions. In order to test FP theories in space, flight conditions have to be controlled to a very high precision, data collection and handling abilities have to be improved, real-time and reliable communications in critical environments are needed. These challenge the existing avionics of spacecraft. Avionics consists of guidance, navigation & control, TT&C, the vehicle management, etc. Wireless avionics is one of the enabling technologies to address the challenges. Reasons are expatiated of why it is of great advantage. This paper analyses the demands for wireless avionics by reviewing the FP missions and on-board wireless systems worldwide. Main types of wireless communication are presented. Preliminary system structure of wireless avionics are given. The characteristics of wireless network protocols and wireless sensors are introduced. Key technologies and design considerations for wireless avionics in space applications are discussed.

  11. IBC's 23rd Annual Antibody Engineering, 10th Annual Antibody Therapeutics international conferences and the 2012 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society: December 3-6, 2012, San Diego, CA.

    PubMed

    Klöhn, Peter-Christian; Wuellner, Ulrich; Zizlsperger, Nora; Zhou, Yu; Tavares, Daniel; Berger, Sven; Zettlitz, Kirstin A; Proetzel, Gabriele; Yong, May; Begent, Richard H J; Reichert, Janice M

    2013-01-01

    The 23rd Annual Antibody Engineering, 10th Annual Antibody Therapeutics international conferences, and the 2012 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, organized by IBC Life Sciences with contributions from The Antibody Society and two Scientific Advisory Boards, were held December 3-6, 2012 in San Diego, CA. The meeting drew over 800 participants who attended sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to antibody research and development. As a prelude to the main events, a pre-conference workshop held on December 2, 2012 focused on intellectual property issues that impact antibody engineering. The Antibody Engineering Conference was composed of six sessions held December 3-5, 2012: (1) From Receptor Biology to Therapy; (2) Antibodies in a Complex Environment; (3) Antibody Targeted CNS Therapy: Beyond the Blood Brain Barrier; (4) Deep Sequencing in B Cell Biology and Antibody Libraries; (5) Systems Medicine in the Development of Antibody Therapies/Systematic Validation of Novel Antibody Targets; and (6) Antibody Activity and Animal Models. The Antibody Therapeutics conference comprised four sessions held December 4-5, 2012: (1) Clinical and Preclinical Updates of Antibody-Drug Conjugates; (2) Multifunctional Antibodies and Antibody Combinations: Clinical Focus; (3) Development Status of Immunomodulatory Therapeutic Antibodies; and (4) Modulating the Half-Life of Antibody Therapeutics. The Antibody Society's special session on applications for recording and sharing data based on GIATE was held on December 5, 2012, and the conferences concluded with two combined sessions on December 5-6, 2012: (1) Development Status of Early Stage Therapeutic Antibodies; and (2) Immunomodulatory Antibodies for Cancer Therapy.

  12. The Space Technology 5 Avionics System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speer, Dave; Jackson, George; Stewart, Karen; Hernandez-Pellerano, Amri

    2004-01-01

    The Space Technology 5 (ST5) mission is a NASA New Millennium Program project that will validate new technologies for future space science missions and demonstrate the feasibility of building launching and operating multiple, miniature spacecraft that can collect research-quality in-situ science measurements. The three satellites in the ST5 constellation will be launched into a sun-synchronous Earth orbit in early 2006. ST5 fits into the 25-kilogram and 24-watt class of very small but fully capable spacecraft. The new technologies and design concepts for a compact power and command and data handling (C&DH) avionics system are presented. The 2-card ST5 avionics design incorporates new technology components while being tightly constrained in mass, power and volume. In order to hold down the mass and volume, and quali& new technologies for fUture use in space, high efficiency triple-junction solar cells and a lithium-ion battery were baselined into the power system design. The flight computer is co-located with the power system electronics in an integral spacecraft structural enclosure called the card cage assembly. The flight computer has a full set of uplink, downlink and solid-state recording capabilities, and it implements a new CMOS Ultra-Low Power Radiation Tolerant logic technology. There were a number of challenges imposed by the ST5 mission. Specifically, designing a micro-sat class spacecraft demanded that minimizing mass, volume and power dissipation would drive the overall design. The result is a very streamlined approach, while striving to maintain a high level of capability, The mission's radiation requirements, along with the low voltage DC power distribution, limited the selection of analog parts that can operate within these constraints. The challenge of qualifying new technology components for the space environment within a short development schedule was another hurdle. The mission requirements also demanded magnetic cleanliness in order to reduce

  13. Future space transportation system architecture avionics requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Howard; Engelund, Walt

    1993-01-01

    NASA began a multi-center study in January 1993 to examine options for providing the most cost effective space transportation system in the future. The key advanced avionics requirements for these vehicle concepts are envisioned to provide significantly improved operational efficiency and effectiveness. It is very desirable to have adaptive guidance, navigation, and control approaches that will allow launch and return in almost any weather condition. The vehicles must be able to accommodate atmospheric density variations and winds without software changes. The flight operations must become much more autonomous in all flight regimes like an aircraft, and preflight checkout should make use of the onboard systems. When the vehicle returns to the launch site, subsystem health must be known and maintenance tasks scheduled accordingly. Ground testing of most subsystems must be eliminated. Also, the health monitoring system must be designed to enhance the ability to abort the mission significantly and save the crew and the vehicle. The displays and controls must be much less complex than current systems and must significantly reduce pilot work load. It is important to have low power, light weight displays and controls. Rendezvous and docking and all flight phases must have autopilot capability to reduce pilot work load for routine operations and in abort situations. The vehicles must have the demonstrated ability to return to the launch site. Abort from all mission phases can put additional demands on the communications system.

  14. Electronic/electric technology benefits study. [avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howison, W. W.; Cronin, M. J.

    1982-01-01

    The benefits and payoffs of advanced electronic/electric technologies were investigated for three types of aircraft. The technologies, evaluated in each of the three airplanes, included advanced flight controls, advanced secondary power, advanced avionic complements, new cockpit displays, and advanced air traffic control techniques. For the advanced flight controls, the near term considered relaxed static stability (RSS) with mechanical backup. The far term considered an advanced fly by wire system for a longitudinally unstable airplane. In the case of the secondary power systems, trades were made in two steps: in the near term, engine bleed was eliminated; in the far term bleed air, air plus hydraulics were eliminated. Using three commercial aircraft, in the 150, 350, and 700 passenger range, the technology value and pay-offs were quantified, with emphasis on the fiscal benefits. Weight reductions deriving from fuel saving and other system improvements were identified and the weight savings were cycled for their impact on TOGW (takeoff gross weight) and upon the performance of the airframes/engines. Maintenance, reliability, and logistic support were the other criteria.

  15. Defense Acquisitions: Assessment of Institute for Defense Analyses C-130 Avionics Modernization Program Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-29

    Page 1 GAO-14-547R C-130 Avionics Modernization Program 441 G St. N.W. Washington, DC 20548 May 29, 2014...Congressional Committees Defense Acquisitions: Assessment of Institute for Defense Analyses’ C-130 Avionics Modernization Program Analysis The Air...Force’s C-130 Avionics Modernization Program (AMP), which entered development in 2001, was to standardize and upgrade the cockpit and avionics for

  16. Avionic architecture requirements for Space Exploration Initiative systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbella, C. G.; Brown, D. C.

    1991-01-01

    The authors discuss NASA's Strategic Avionics Technology Working Group (SATWG) and the results of the first study commissioned by the SATWG, the Space Avionics Requirements Study (SARS). The goal of the SARS task was to show that an open avionics architecture, using modular, standardized components, could be applied across the wide range of systems that comprise the Space Exploration Initiative. The study addressed systems ranging from expendable launch vehicles and the space station to surface systems such as Mars or lunar rovers and habitats. Top-level avionics requirements were derived from characterizations of each of the systems considered. Then a set of avionics subsystems were identified, along with estimates of the numbers and types of modules needed to meet the requirements. Applicability of these results across the infrastructure was then illustrated. In addition to these tasks, critical technologies were identified, characterized, and assessed in terms of their criticality and impact on the program. Design, development, test, and evaluation methods were addressed to identify potential areas of improvement.

  17. Proceedings Papers of the AFSC (Air Force Systems Command) Avionics Standardization Conference (2nd) Held at Dayton, Ohio on 30 November-2 December 1982. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    rit.-rioi Servio., Medal with one oak leaf cluster, Air Medal with 15 oak Th :f chister.;-, and Air Force -crvir•dation Medal with tr oak . leaf ...DI9efus- Industry Attitudes About Air Force Interface Standards Report of an Electronics Industries - Association Survey. A D-P0)3 571 Digital Avionics...Lovelace joined NASA in 1974 as Associate Administrator for the * Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology. He was named Deputy Adminis- - trator in

  18. NASA Affordable Vehicle Avionics (AVA): Common Modular Avionics System for Nano-Launchers Offering Affordable Access to Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockrell, James

    2015-01-01

    Small satellites are becoming ever more capable of performing valuable missions for both government and commercial customers. However, currently these satellites can only be launched affordably as secondary payloads. This makes it difficult for the small satellite mission to launch when needed, to the desired orbit, and with acceptable risk. NASA Ames Research Center has developed and tested a prototype low-cost avionics package for space launch vehicles that provides complete GNC functionality in a package smaller than a tissue box with a mass less than 0.84 kg. AVA takes advantage of commercially available, low-cost, mass-produced, miniaturized sensors, filtering their more noisy inertial data with realtime GPS data. The goal of the Advanced Vehicle Avionics project is to produce and flight-verify a common suite of avionics and software that deliver affordable, capable GNC and telemetry avionics with application to multiple nano-launch vehicles at 1 the cost of current state-of-the-art avionics.

  19. Time Triggered Protocol (TTP) for Integration Modular Avionics (IMA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwaltney, David A.; Bauer, Guenther; Jakovljevic, Mirko; Gagea,Leonard; Motzet, Guenter

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation is a review of the Time Triggered Protocol, designed to work with NASA's Integrated Safety-Critical Advanced Avionics Communication and Control (ISAACC) system. ISAACC is the product of the Propulsion High-Impact Avionics Technologies (PHIAT) project at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) during FY03 to the end of FY05. The goal is an avionics architecture suitable for control and monitoring of safety critical systems of manned spacecraft. It must be scalable to allow its use in robotic vehicles or launch pad and propulsion test stand monitoring and control systems. The developed IMA should have: a common power supply and rugged chassis for a set of modules, many upgradeable software functions on one module (i.e. processing unit Reduced weight, straightforward update and system integration. It is also important that it have Partitioning and a Memory Management Unit (MMU)

  20. Software fault tolerance for real-time avionics systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, T.; Knight, J. C.

    1983-01-01

    Avionics systems have very high reliability requirements and are therefore prime candidates for the inclusion of fault tolerance techniques. In order to provide tolerance to software faults, some form of state restoration is usually advocated as a means of recovery. State restoration can be very expensive for systems which utilize concurrent processes. The concurrency present in most avionics systems and the further difficulties introduced by timing constraints imply that providing tolerance for software faults may be inordinately expensive or complex. A straightforward pragmatic approach to software fault tolerance which is believed to be applicable to many real-time avionics systems is proposed. A classification system for software errors is presented together with approaches to recovery and continued service for each error type.

  1. HLLV avionics requirements study and electronic filing system database development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This final report provides a summary of achievements and activities performed under Contract NAS8-39215. The contract's objective was to explore a new way of delivering, storing, accessing, and archiving study products and information and to define top level system requirements for Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle (HLLV) avionics that incorporate Vehicle Health Management (VHM). This report includes technical objectives, methods, assumptions, recommendations, sample data, and issues as specified by DPD No. 772, DR-3. The report is organized into two major subsections, one specific to each of the two tasks defined in the Statement of Work: the Index Database Task and the HLLV Avionics Requirements Task. The Index Database Task resulted in the selection and modification of a commercial database software tool to contain the data developed during the HLLV Avionics Requirements Task. All summary information is addressed within each task's section.

  2. An assessment of General Aviation utilization of advanced avionics technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinby, G. F.

    1980-01-01

    Needs of the general aviation industry for services and facilities which might be supplied by NASA were examined. In the data collection phase, twenty-one individuals from nine manufacturing companies in general aviation were interviewed against a carefully prepared meeting format. General aviation avionics manufacturers were credited with a high degree of technology transfer from the forcing industries such as television, automotive, and computers and a demonstrated ability to apply advanced technology such as large scale integration and microprocessors to avionics functions in an innovative and cost effective manner. The industry's traditional resistance to any unnecessary regimentation or standardization was confirmed. Industry's self sufficiency in applying advanced technology to avionics product development was amply demonstrated. NASA research capability could be supportive in areas of basic mechanics of turbulence in weather and alternative means for its sensing.

  3. Heavy Lift Vehicle (HLV) Avionics Flight Computing Architecture Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodson, Robert F.; Chen, Yuan; Morgan, Dwayne R.; Butler, A. Marc; Sdhuh, Joseph M.; Petelle, Jennifer K.; Gwaltney, David A.; Coe, Lisa D.; Koelbl, Terry G.; Nguyen, Hai D.

    2011-01-01

    A NASA multi-Center study team was assembled from LaRC, MSFC, KSC, JSC and WFF to examine potential flight computing architectures for a Heavy Lift Vehicle (HLV) to better understand avionics drivers. The study examined Design Reference Missions (DRMs) and vehicle requirements that could impact the vehicles avionics. The study considered multiple self-checking and voting architectural variants and examined reliability, fault-tolerance, mass, power, and redundancy management impacts. Furthermore, a goal of the study was to develop the skills and tools needed to rapidly assess additional architectures should requirements or assumptions change.

  4. Space Tug avionics definition study. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A top down approach was used to identify, compile, and develop avionics functional requirements for all flight and ground operational phases. Such requirements as safety mission critical functions and criteria, minimum redundancy levels, software memory sizing, power for tug and payload, data transfer between payload, tug, shuttle, and ground were established. Those functional requirements that related to avionics support of a particular function were compiled together under that support function heading. This unique approach provided both organizational efficiency and traceability back to the applicable operational phase and event. Each functional requirement was then allocated to the appropriate subsystems and its particular characteristics were quantified.

  5. Impact of Advanced Avionics Technology on Ground Attack Weapon Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    coiae Ions d’une acquisition directe par un capteur aur l’avion. L’autonomie accrue des armements, s’accunpagne donc d’une plus grande pr~paration des...dsnt - se servir des autres avions d’attaque cocme autant de capteurs intdgr~s dana un dispositif coop~ratif. En dehors des besoins ds performances...pour Les capteurs d’acquisition des objectifs, il faut insister sur la n~cessit6 de disposer de mayens de transmission en temps r~ei pour: - Ia

  6. Advanced Avionics and Processor Systems for Space and Lunar Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, Andrew S.; Adams, James H.; Ray, Robert E.; Johnson, Michael A.; Cressler, John D.

    2009-01-01

    NASA's newly named Advanced Avionics and Processor Systems (AAPS) project, formerly known as the Radiation Hardened Electronics for Space Environments (RHESE) project, endeavors to mature and develop the avionic and processor technologies required to fulfill NASA's goals for future space and lunar exploration. Over the past year, multiple advancements have been made within each of the individual AAPS technology development tasks that will facilitate the success of the Constellation program elements. This paper provides a brief review of the project's recent technology advancements, discusses their application to Constellation projects, and addresses the project's plans for the coming year.

  7. Space Generic Open Avionics Architecture (SGOAA) standard specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wray, Richard B.; Stovall, John R.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this standard is to provide an umbrella set of requirements for applying the generic architecture interface model to the design of a specific avionics hardware/software system. This standard defines a generic set of system interface points to facilitate identification of critical interfaces and establishes the requirements for applying appropriate low level detailed implementation standards to those interface points. The generic core avionics system and processing architecture models provided herein are robustly tailorable to specific system applications and provide a platform upon which the interface model is to be applied.

  8. Standard Avionics Packaging, Mounting, and Cooling Baseline Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-31

    scale fuselage sections (F-16A and F-16B) that are used as metal mock-ups for verifying installation of avionics hardware. Avionics equipment locations... metallic surface of a printed circuit board is to be used as a conductive heat-transfer device, the layout of the board is critical to its thermal...Modification Cost Element Full Rack / LPU Environ- Common PME Mnting ackagin i m,,ntal -o%5c r Inter faec Engineering/Design Less Less L so Same Sam,, Test and

  9. Preliminary design of the Shuttle-C avionics recovery system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brookfield, Morgan; Decker, Deron; Gilbert, Harold; Moore, David; Rist, Mark

    1989-01-01

    The analysis done in developing a recovery system for the Shuttle-C cargo vehicle is presented. This recovery system is comprised of a reentry capsule which houses the vehicles avionics. The avionics are contained in a single package which is extracted from the capsule by the parachute recovery system. The Shuttle-C will be able to satisfy NASA's design and mission requirements. Included, is an analysis of the structural, thermal protection, and parachute recovery systems. A discussion of the merits of the proposed system is also included.

  10. Enabling Wireless Avionics Intra-Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, Omar; Nguyen, Truong; Mackenzie, Anne

    2016-01-01

    to model the propagation of a system in a "deployed" configuration versus a "stowed" configuration. The differences in relative field strength provide valuable information about the distribution of the field that can be used to engineer RF links with optimal radiated power and antenna configuration that accomplish the intended system reliability. Such modeling will be necessary in subsequent studies for managing multipath propagation characteristics inside a main cabin and to understand more complex environments, such as the inside wings, landing gear bays, cargo bays, avionics bays, etc. The results of the short research effort are described in the present document. The team puts forth a set of recommendations with the intention of informing the project and program leadership of the future work that, in the opinion of the EWAIC team, would assist the ECON team reach the intended goal of developing an all-wireless aircraft.

  11. Digital signal conditioning for flight test, volume 19

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bever, G. A.

    1991-01-01

    Flight test instrumentation engineers are provided with an introduction to digital processes on aircraft. Flight test instrumentation systems are rapidly evolving from analog intensive to digital intensive systems, including the use of onboard digital computers. Topics include: measurements that are digital in origin, sampling, encoding, transmitting, and storing of data. Particular emphasis is placed on modern avionic data bus architectures and what to be aware of when extracting data from them. Some example data extractions are given. Tradeoffs between digital logic families, trends in digital development, and design testing techniques are discussed. An introduction to digital filtering is also covered.

  12. Avionics Technology Contract Project Report Phase I with Research Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sappe', Hoyt; Squires, Shiela S.

    This document reports on Phase I of a project that examined the occupation of avionics technician, established appropriate committees, and conducted task verification. Results of this phase provide the basic information required to develop the program standards and to guide and set up the committee structure to guide the project. Section 1…

  13. Proposed MIL-STD for Avionics Installation Interfaces,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This paper describes the Military Standard (MIL- STD ) now in development for avionics installation interface standardization. Originally based upon...the interface standard used by the commercial airlines, this new MIL- STD , now extensively revised, is scheduled for coordination at the end of 1982. The

  14. Demonstration Advanced Avionics System (DAAS). Phase 1 report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    An integrated avionics system which provides expanded functional capabilities that significantly enhance the utility and safety of general aviation at a cost commensurate with the general aviation market is discussed. Displays and control were designed so that the pilot can use the system after minimum training. Functional and hardware descriptions, operational evaluation and failure modes effects analysis are included.

  15. Preliminary design document: Ground based testbed for avionics systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The design and interface requirements for an avionics Ground Based Test bed (GBT) to support Heavy Lift Cargo Vehicles (HLCV) is presented. It also contains data on the vehicle subsystem configurations that are to be supported during their early, pre-PDR developmental phases. Several emerging technologies are also identified for support. A Preliminary Specification Tree is also presented.

  16. An Analysis of Combat Aircraft Avionics Production Costs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    Naviqetion ITI Corr. (Federal Labs.) Republic Electrcuics ARN-92 LORIA C/D Haviqation ITT Corp. (Federal Labs.) - - - 1 1 -81- Table A-6 (Page 2 of 2) TECHNO...the Air Force, USAF Cost and Planning Factors, Volume 1, AFR 173-10, May 2, 1977. Daniels , J. M., Estimating Avionics Equipment Costs for Military

  17. Optimizing the Design of Avionics Lightning Suppression Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCreary, Clay Allen

    This dissertation documents research into optimizing the design of lightning suppression circuits for electronic equipment used on aircraft (avionics). Aircraft manufacturers are increasingly using carbon composite material for the fabrication of the airframe instead of aluminum, and avionics have become more integrated. This has resulted in avionics with higher signal density at the interface being exposed to transients with wider pulse widths and increased levels from the indirect effects of lightning. This dissertation details the development of techniques to select the smallest components and minimum printed circuit board trace dimensions that can tolerate given lightning transient levels. Also, there is a desire to upgrade existing avionics to tolerate the more severe indirect effects of lightning requirements for composite aircraft. This requires evaluation of the immunity of existing designs to new transient levels and different waveforms than those to which they are certified. This evaluation determines if additional protection is needed. The evaluation technique is described, and methods for providing additional protection are given within this document. Lastly, graphical user interfaces (GUI) are created to perform all of the calculations for component selection, minimum PCB trace width, and the first step in evaluating existing designs against new requirements.

  18. Case Study of the Space Shuttle Cockpit Avionics Upgrade Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Roscoe C.; Thompson, Hiram C.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the Space Shuttle Cockpit Avionics Upgrade project was to reduce crew workload and improve situational awareness. The upgrade was to augment the Shuttle avionics system with new hardware and software. An early version of this system was used to gather human factor statistics in the Space Shuttle Motion Simulator of the Johnson Space Center for one month by multiple teams of astronauts. The results were compiled by NASA Ames Research Center and it was was determined that the system provided a better than expected increase in situational awareness and reduction in crew workload. Even with all of the benefits nf the system, NASA cancelled the project towards the end of the development cycle. A major success of this project was the validation of the hardware architecture and software design. This was significant because the project incorporated new technology and approaches for the development of human rated space software. This paper serves as a case study to document knowledge gained and techniques that can be applied for future space avionics development efforts. The major technological advances were the use of reflective memory concepts for data acquisition and the incorporation of Commercial off the Shelf (COTS) products in a human rated space avionics system. The infused COTS products included a real time operating system, a resident linker and loader, a display generation tool set, and a network data manager. Some of the successful design concepts were the engineering of identical outputs in multiple avionics boxes using an event driven approach and inter-computer communication, a reconfigurable data acquisition engine, the use of a dynamic bus bandwidth allocation algorithm. Other significant experiences captured were the use of prototyping to reduce risk, and the correct balance between Object Oriented and Functional based programming.

  19. Lamp-life predictive model for avionics backlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Richard P.; Nelson, Leonard Y.

    1998-09-01

    Active Matrix Liquid Crystal Displays (AMLCDs) used in avionics applications require high luminance, high efficacy, and long-life backlights. Currently, fluorescent lamps are the favored light sources for these high performance avionics backlights. Their spectral characteristics and high electrical efficiency are well suited to illuminating AMLCDs used in avionics applications. Fluorescent lamps, however, suffer gradual reduction in luminance output caused by various degradation mechanisms. Korry Electronics Co. recently developed a mathematical model for predicting fluorescent lamp life. The model's basis is the well characterized exponential decay of the phosphor output. The primary luminance degradation mechanism of a fluorescent lamp is related to the arc discharge. Consequently, phosphor depreciation is proportional to the discharge arc power divided by the phosphor surface area. This 'wall loading' is a parameter in the computer model developed to extrapolate long-term luminance performance. Our model predicts a rapidly increasing decay rate of the lamp output as the input power is increased to sustain constant luminance. Eventually, a run-away condition occurs -- lamp arc power must be increased by unrealistically large factors (greater than 5x) to maintain the required luminance output. This condition represents the end of the useful lamp life. The lamp life model requires the definition of several key parameters in order to accurately predict the useful lamp life of an avionics backlight. These important factors include the construction of the lamp, lamp arc power, a decay constant based on the phosphor loading, and the operational profile. Based on the above-mentioned factors, our model approximates the useful lamp life of an avionics backlight using fluorescent lamp technology. Comparisons between calculated and experimental lamp depreciation are presented.

  20. Avionics Configuration Assessment for Flightdeck Interval Management: A Comparison of Avionics and Notification Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latorella, Kara A.

    2015-01-01

    Flightdeck Interval Management is one of the NextGen operational concepts that FAA is sponsoring to realize requisite National Airspace System (NAS) efficiencies. Interval Management will reduce variability in temporal deviations at a position, and thereby reduce buffers typically applied by controllers - resulting in higher arrival rates, and more efficient operations. Ground software generates a strategic schedule of aircraft pairs. Air Traffic Control (ATC) provides an IM clearance with the IM spacing objective (i.e., the TTF, and at which point to achieve the appropriate spacing from this aircraft) to the IM aircraft. Pilots must dial FIM speeds into the speed window on the Mode Control Panel in a timely manner, and attend to deviations between actual speed and the instantaneous FIM profile speed. Here, the crew is assumed to be operating the aircraft with autothrottles on, with autopilot engaged, and the autoflight system in Vertical Navigation (VNAV) and Lateral Navigation (LNAV); and is responsible for safely flying the aircraft while maintaining situation awareness of their ability to follow FIM speed commands and to achieve the FIM spacing goal. The objective of this study is to examine whether three Notification Methods and four Avionics Conditions affect pilots' performance, ratings on constructs associated with performance (workload, situation awareness), or opinions on acceptability. Three Notification Methods (alternate visual and aural alerts that notified pilots to the onset of a speed target, conformance deviation from the required speed profile, and reminded them if they failed to enter the speed within 10 seconds) were examined. These Notification Methods were: VVV (visuals for all three events), VAV (visuals for all three events, plus an aural for speed conformance deviations), and AAA (visual indications and the same aural to indicate all three of these events). Avionics Conditions were defined by the instrumentation (and location) used to

  1. Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) Avionics and Software Integration Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monell, Donald W.; Flynn, Kevin C.; Maroney, Johnny

    2006-01-01

    On January 14, 2004, the President of the United States announced a new plan to explore space and extend a human presence across our solar system. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) established the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) to develop and field a Constellation Architecture that will bring the Space Exploration vision to fruition. The Constellation Architecture includes a human-rated Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) segment, managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), comprised of the First Stage (FS), Upper Stage (US), and Upper Stage Engine (USE) elements. The CLV s purpose is to provide safe and reliable crew and cargo transportation into Low Earth Orbit (LEO), as well as insertion into trans-lunar trajectories. The architecture's Spacecraft segment includes, among other elements, the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), managed by the Johnson Space Flight Center (JSC), which is launched atop the CLV. MSFC is also responsible for CLV and CEV stack integration. This paper provides an overview of the Avionics and Software integration approach (which includes the Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) functions), both within the CLV, and across the CEV interface; it addresses the requirements to be met, logistics of meeting those requirements, and the roles of the various groups. The Avionics Integration and Vehicle Systems Test (ANST) Office was established at the MSFC with system engineering responsibilities for defining and developing the integrated CLV Avionics and Software system. The AIVST Office has defined two Groups, the Avionics and Software Integration Group (AVSIG), and the Integrated System Simulation and Test Integration Group (ISSTIG), and four Panels which will direct trade studies and analyses to ensure the CLV avionics and software meet CLV system and CEV interface requirements. The four panels are: 1) Avionics Integration Panel (AIP), 2) Software Integration Panel, 3) EEE Panel, and 4) Systems Simulation

  2. Design of an Ada expert system shell for the VHSIC avionic modular flight processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanning, F. Jesse

    1992-01-01

    The Embedded Computer System Expert System Shell (ES Shell) is an Ada-based expert system shell developed at the Avionics Laboratory for use on the VHSIC Avionic Modular Processor (VAMP) running under the Ada Avionics Real-Time Software (AARTS) Operating System. The ES Shell provides the interface between the expert system and the avionics environment, and controls execution of the expert system. Testing of the ES Shell in the Avionics Laboratory's Integrated Test Bed (ITB) has demonstrated its ability to control a non-deterministic software application executing on the VAMP's which can control the ITB's real-time closed-loop aircraft simulation. The results of these tests and the conclusions reached in the design and development of the ES Shell have played an important role in the formulation of the requirements for a production-quality expert system inference engine, an ingredient necessary for the successful use of expert systems on the VAMP embedded avionic flight processor.

  3. Computer simulation incorporating a helicopter model for evaluation of aircraft avionics systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostroff, A. J.; Wood, R. B.

    1977-01-01

    A computer program was developed to integrate avionics research in navigation, guidance, controls, and displays with a realistic aircraft model. A user oriented program is described that allows a flexible combination of user supplied models to perform research in any avionics area. A preprocessor technique for selecting various models without significantly changing the memory storage is included. Also included are mathematical models for several avionics error models and for the CH-47 helicopter used in this program.

  4. NASA Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle Upper Stage Avionics and Software Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, Charles L.; Blue, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    Building on the heritage of the Saturn and Space Shuttle Programs for the Design, Development, Test, and Evaluation (DDT and E) of avionics and software for NASA's Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV), the Ares I Upper Stage Element is a vital part of the Constellation Program's transportation system. The Upper Stage Element's Avionics Subsystem is actively proceeding toward its objective of delivering a flight-certified Upper Stage Avionics System for the Ares I CLV.

  5. A study of software standards used in the avionics industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayhurst, Kelly J.

    1994-01-01

    Within the past decade, software has become an increasingly common element in computing systems. In particular, the role of software used in the aerospace industry, especially in life- or safety-critical applications, is rapidly expanding. This intensifies the need to use effective techniques for achieving and verifying the reliability of avionics software. Although certain software development processes and techniques are mandated by government regulating agencies, no one methodology has been shown to consistently produce reliable software. The knowledge base for designing reliable software simply has not reached the maturity of its hardware counterpart. In an effort to increase our understanding of software, the Langley Research Center conducted a series of experiments over 15 years with the goal of understanding why and how software fails. As part of this program, the effectiveness of current industry standards for the development of avionics is being investigated. This study involves the generation of a controlled environment to conduct scientific experiments on software processes.

  6. Sail GTS ground system analysis: Avionics system engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawton, R. M.

    1977-01-01

    A comparison of two different concepts for the guidance, navigation and control test set signal ground system is presented. The first is a concept utilizing a ground plate to which crew station, avionics racks, electrical power distribution system, master electrical common connection assembly and marshall mated elements system grounds are connected by 4/0 welding cable. An alternate approach has an aluminum sheet interconnecting the signal ground reference points between the crew station and avionics racks. The comparison analysis quantifies the differences between the two concepts in terms of dc resistance, ac resistance and inductive reactance. These parameters are figures of merit for ground system conductors in that the system with the lowest impedance is the most effective in minimizing noise voltage. Although the welding cable system is probably adequate, the aluminum sheet system provides a higher probability of a successful system design.

  7. Avionics architecture studies for the entry research vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dzwonczyk, M. J.; Mckinney, M. F.; Adams, S. J.; Gauthier, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    This report is the culmination of a year-long investigation of the avionics architecture for NASA's Entry Research Vehicle (ERV). The Entry Research Vehicle is conceived to be an unmanned, autonomous spacecraft to be deployed from the Shuttle. It will perform various aerodynamic and propulsive maneuvers in orbit and land at Edwards AFB after a 5 to 10 hour mission. The design and analysis of the vehicle's avionics architecture are detailed here. The architecture consists of a central triply redundant ultra-reliable fault tolerant processor attached to three replicated and distributed MIL-STD-1553 buses for input and output. The reliability analysis is detailed here. The architecture was found to be sufficiently reliable for the ERV mission plan.

  8. Avionics System Development for a Rotary Wing Unmanned Aerial Vehicle.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-06-01

    PAGE Form Approved OMBNo. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response , including...successful Rapid Flight Test Prototyping System (RFTPS) for the development of software for remote computer control of fixed wing Unmanned Aerial...architecture. Flight testing revealed severe vibrations throughout the helicopter. An alternative avionics package of reduced size was constructed to house

  9. Preliminary candidate advanced avionics system for general aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccalla, T. M.; Grismore, F. L.; Greatline, S. E.; Birkhead, L. M.

    1977-01-01

    An integrated avionics system design was carried out to the level which indicates subsystem function, and the methods of overall system integration. Sufficient detail was included to allow identification of possible system component technologies, and to perform reliability, modularity, maintainability, cost, and risk analysis upon the system design. Retrofit to older aircraft, availability of this system to the single engine two place aircraft, was considered.

  10. Description of the Experimental Avionics Systems Integration Laboratory (EASILY)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Outlaw, Bruce K. E.

    1994-01-01

    The Experimental Avionics Systems Integration Laboratory (EASILY) is a comprehensive facility used for development, integration, and preflight validation of hardware and software systems for the Terminal Area Productivity (TAP) Program's Transport Systems Research Vehicle (TSRV) experimental transport aircraft. This report describes the history, capabilities, and subsystems of EASILY. A functional description of the many subsystems is provided to give potential users the necessary knowledge of the capabilities of this facility.

  11. COTS Multicore Processors in Avionics Systems: Challenges and Solutions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-06

    Bank n Scheduler ... Channel Scheduler Memory scheduler Read/ Write Buffers DRAM address/command buses Processor data bus DRAM data bus Memory...COTS Multicore Processors in Avionics Systems: Challenges and Solutions Dionisio de Niz Bjorn Andersson and Lutz Wrage dionisio@sei.cmu.edu...information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and

  12. Aging Avionics- A Science & Technology Challenge or Acquisition Challenge?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    to individually authored sections f proceedings, annals, symposia, ect . However, the component should be considered within he context of the overall...will have to make sense to the weapons system avionics system to be recertified, which became a program director, while providing capabilities and...solved without the make direct re-hosting of the code nearly defining context of a specific system architecture, impossible. Several approaches

  13. NextGen Avionics Roadmap Version 2.0

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    temperature, turbulence, icing, and winds. These sensors improve atmospheric sampling, from the atmospheric boundary layer up through maxi - mum...operators is shared. Far-term 2017 2023 Avionics Roadmap, Version 2.0 Joint Planning and Development Office n www.jpdo.gov Table 3 –Far-term...makers are guided by NAS-wide objectives and test solutions to identify interference and conflicts with other initiatives. Far-term 2017 2023 108105 Flow

  14. Definition of avionics concepts for a heavy lift cargo vehicle, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    A cost effective, multiuser simulation, test, and demonstration facility to support the development of avionics systems for future space vehicles is defined. The technology needs and requirements of future Heavy Lift Cargo Vehicles (HLCVs) are analyzed and serve as the basis for sizing of the avionics facility although the lab is not limited in use to support of HLCVs. Volume 2 is the technical volume and provides the results of the vehicle avionics trade studies, the avionics lab objectives, the lab's functional requirements and design, physical facility considerations, and a summary cost estimate.

  15. Spacelab system analysis: A study of the Marshall Avionics System Testbed (MAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingels, Frank M.; Owens, John K.; Daniel, Steven P.; Ahmad, F.; Couvillion, W.

    1988-01-01

    An analysis of the Marshall Avionics Systems Testbed (MAST) communications requirements is presented. The average offered load for typical nodes is estimated. Suitable local area networks are determined.

  16. Definition of avionics concepts for a heavy lift cargo vehicle. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    A cost effective, multiuser simulation, test, and demonstration facility to support the development of avionics systems for future space vehicles is examined. The technology needs and requirements of future Heavy Lift Cargo Vehicles (HLCVs) are analyzed and serve as the basis for sizing of the avionics facility, although the lab is not limited in use to support of HLCVs. Volume 1 provides a summary of the vehicle avionics trade studies, the avionics lab objectives, a summary of the lab's functional requirements and design, physical facility considerations, and cost estimates.

  17. Scheduling Independent Partitions in Integrated Modular Avionics Systems

    PubMed Central

    Du, Chenglie; Han, Pengcheng

    2016-01-01

    Recently the integrated modular avionics (IMA) architecture has been widely adopted by the avionics industry due to its strong partition mechanism. Although the IMA architecture can achieve effective cost reduction and reliability enhancement in the development of avionics systems, it results in a complex allocation and scheduling problem. All partitions in an IMA system should be integrated together according to a proper schedule such that their deadlines will be met even under the worst case situations. In order to help provide a proper scheduling table for all partitions in IMA systems, we study the schedulability of independent partitions on a multiprocessor platform in this paper. We firstly present an exact formulation to calculate the maximum scaling factor and determine whether all partitions are schedulable on a limited number of processors. Then with a Game Theory analogy, we design an approximation algorithm to solve the scheduling problem of partitions, by allowing each partition to optimize its own schedule according to the allocations of the others. Finally, simulation experiments are conducted to show the efficiency and reliability of the approach proposed in terms of time consumption and acceptance ratio. PMID:27942013

  18. Time Triggered Protocol (TTP) for Integrated Modular Avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motzet, Guenter; Gwaltney, David A.; Bauer, Guenther; Jakovljevic, Mirko; Gagea, Leonard

    2006-01-01

    Traditional avionics computing systems are federated, with each system provided on a number of dedicated hardware units. Federated applications are physically separated from one another and analysis of the systems is undertaken individually. Integrated Modular Avionics (IMA) takes these federated functions and integrates them on a common computing platform in a tightly deterministic distributed real-time network of computing modules in which the different applications can run. IMA supports different levels of criticality in the same computing resource and provides a platform for implementation of fault tolerance through hardware and application redundancy. Modular implementation has distinct benefits in design, testing and system maintainability. This paper covers the requirements for fault tolerant bus systems used to provide reliable communication between IMA computing modules. An overview of the Time Triggered Protocol (TTP) specification and implementation as a reliable solution for IMA systems is presented. Application examples in aircraft avionics and a development system for future space application are covered. The commercially available TTP controller can be also be implemented in an FPGA and the results from implementation studies are covered. Finally future direction for the application of TTP and related development activities are presented.

  19. OMAC4S- Open Modular Avionics for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herpel, H.-J.; Willich, G.; Vogel, T.; Schuettauf, A.; Pletner, S.; Schoen, F.; Fidi, C.; Loetzke, M.; Dittrich, L.; Schuelke, P.; Wolf, T.

    2013-08-01

    Today's spacecraft avionics architecture is characterised by a broad variety of processing modules, operating systems and interfaces for exchanging data between different processing modules. The software that implements most of the satellite functionality has to deal with this fact and is one of the reasons why software has become one of the major cost drivers in satellite projects. Similar problems have triggered developments in other industrial domains like AUTOSAR in the automotive area or Integrated Modular Architecture (IMA) in the aerospace industry [8]. All these initiatives are based on the definition of standards for computing platforms and the interfaces between these platforms. The goals of the Open Modular Avionics Architecture for Space Applications (OMAC4S) initiative started by Astrium, Fraunhofer FOKUS, STI, SYSGO and TTTech are to outline a solution that helps to reduce complexity and costs for space avionics significantly. This initiative is partly funded by the German national space agency (DLR) through the project On-Board Computer System Architecture (OBC-SA). In this paper we describe how standardization and the usage of already proven technologies from other industrial domains will help to limit the effect of the software development on schedule and costs of satellite projects. In addition we will demonstrate a migration path to make these technologies available for space applications.

  20. Scheduling Independent Partitions in Integrated Modular Avionics Systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinchao; Du, Chenglie; Han, Pengcheng

    2016-01-01

    Recently the integrated modular avionics (IMA) architecture has been widely adopted by the avionics industry due to its strong partition mechanism. Although the IMA architecture can achieve effective cost reduction and reliability enhancement in the development of avionics systems, it results in a complex allocation and scheduling problem. All partitions in an IMA system should be integrated together according to a proper schedule such that their deadlines will be met even under the worst case situations. In order to help provide a proper scheduling table for all partitions in IMA systems, we study the schedulability of independent partitions on a multiprocessor platform in this paper. We firstly present an exact formulation to calculate the maximum scaling factor and determine whether all partitions are schedulable on a limited number of processors. Then with a Game Theory analogy, we design an approximation algorithm to solve the scheduling problem of partitions, by allowing each partition to optimize its own schedule according to the allocations of the others. Finally, simulation experiments are conducted to show the efficiency and reliability of the approach proposed in terms of time consumption and acceptance ratio.

  1. Comparison of Communication Architectures for Spacecraft Modular Avionics Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwaltney, D. A.; Briscoe, J. M.

    2006-01-01

    This document is a survey of publicly available information concerning serial communication architectures used, or proposed to be used, in aeronautic and aerospace applications. It focuses on serial communication architectures that are suitable for low-latency or real-time communication between physically distributed nodes in a system. Candidates for the study have either extensive deployment in the field, or appear to be viable for near-term deployment. Eleven different serial communication architectures are considered, and a brief description of each is given with the salient features summarized in a table in appendix A. This survey is a product of the Propulsion High Impact Avionics Technology (PHIAT) Project at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). PHIAT was originally funded under the Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) Program to develop avionics technologies for control of next generation reusable rocket engines. After the announcement of the Space Exploration Initiative, the scope of the project was expanded to include vehicle systems control for human and robotics missions. As such, a section is included presenting the rationale used for selection of a time-triggered architecture for implementation of the avionics demonstration hardware developed by the project team

  2. Reference Architecture Test-Bed for Avionics (RASTA): A Software Building Blocks Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viana Sanchez, Aitor; Taylor, Chris

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Reference Architecture System Test-bed for Avionics (RASTA) being developed within the ESA Estec Data Systems Division. This activity aims to benefit from interface standardization to provide a hardware/software reference infrastructure into which incoming R&D activities can be integrated, thus providing a generic but standardized test and development environment rather than dedicated facilities for each activity. Rasta is composed of by both HW and SW building blocks constituting the main elements of a typical Data Handling System. This includes a core processor (LEON2), Telemetry and Telecommand links, digital interfaces, and mass memory. The range of digital serial interfaces includes CAN bus, MIL-STD-1553 and SpaceWire. The paper will focus on the Software aspects of RASTA and in particular the software building blocks provided to ease development activities and allow hardware independency. To support the take-up of RASTA by European Industry, all RASTA software developed internally by ESA is provided free under license. Significant outputs are already available and include: Basic SW and SW drivers (CAN/1553/SpW, TT&C), OS abstraction layer, CFDP flight implementation, highly portable and independent file system for space, ground segment telecommand/telemetry router. In the future, additional SW building blocks are planned (e.g. ECSS CAN library). The present focus of RASTA is related to a prototype implementation of the SOIS services and protocols under development by the CCSDS (Consultative committee for Space Data Standards)

  3. Avionics Architectures for Exploration: Ongoing Efforts in Human Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goforth, Montgomery B.; Ratliff, James E.; Hames, Kevin L.; Vitalpur, Sharada V.; Woodman, Keith L.

    2014-01-01

    The field of Avionics is advancing far more rapidly in terrestrial applications than in spaceflight applications. Spaceflight Avionics are not keeping pace with expectations set by terrestrial experience, nor are they keeping pace with the need for increasingly complex automation and crew interfaces as we move beyond Low Earth Orbit. NASA must take advantage of the strides being made by both space-related and terrestrial industries to drive our development and sustaining costs down. This paper describes ongoing efforts by the Avionics Architectures for Exploration (AAE) project chartered by NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Program to evaluate new avionic architectures and technologies, provide objective comparisons of them, and mature selected technologies for flight and for use by other AES projects. The AAE project team includes members from most NASA centers, and from industry. It is our intent to develop a common core avionic system that has standard capabilities and interfaces, and contains the basic elements and functionality needed for any spacecraft. This common core will be scalable and tailored to specific missions. It will incorporate hardware and software from multiple vendors, and be upgradeable in order to infuse incremental capabilities and new technologies. It will maximize the use of reconfigurable open source software (e.g., Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC's) Core Flight Software (CFS)). Our long-term focus is on improving functionality, reliability, and autonomy, while reducing size, weight, and power. Where possible, we will leverage terrestrial commercial capabilities to drive down development and sustaining costs. We will select promising technologies for evaluation, compare them in an objective manner, and mature them to be available for future programs. The remainder of this paper describes our approach, technical areas of emphasis, integrated test experience and results as of mid-2014, and future plans. As a part of the AES

  4. Micro-Inspector Avionics Module (MAM): A Self-Contained Low Power, Reconfigurable Avionics Platform for Small Spacecrafts and Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashtijou, Mohammad; He, Yutao; Watson, R. Kevin; Bolotin, Gary S.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes development of a radiation tolerant, low power, reconfigurable avionics module aimed at meeting the avionics needs of the JPL Micro-Inspector spacecraft. This module represents a complete avionics system, consisting of two PowerPC 405 CPUs embedded within a reconfigurable FPGA fabric of over 8 Million logic gates, 64MB of EDAC protected Flash storage and 128MB of EDAC protected DDR SDRAM or SDRAM memories, along with FPGA SEU mitigation logic, and all necessary power conversion. Processor SEU mitigation is achieved by running the two processors in a lock-step and compare configuration. All of these building blocks are integrated into a double sided circuit board that takes as little as 6 square inches of board space. This module can be embedded into a user system as part of a bigger circuit assembly or as a self contained module. This module is being developed as part of a JPL led Micro-Inspector Program, funded by NASA ESMD aimed at producing a 10Kg micro spacecraft.

  5. A Library of Rad Hard Mixed-Voltage/Mixed-Signal Building Blocks for Integration of Avionics Systems for Deep Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mojarradi, M. M.; Blaes, B.; Kolawa, E. A.; Blalock, B. J.; Li, H. W.; Buck, K.; Houge, D.

    2001-01-01

    To build the sensor intensive system-on-a-chip for the next generation spacecrafts for deep space, Center for Integration of Space Microsystems at JPL (CISM) takes advantage of the lower power rating and inherent radiation resistance of Silicon on Insulator technology (SOI). We are developing a suite of mixed-voltage and mixed-signal building blocks in Honeywell's SOI process that can enable the rapid integration of the next generation avionics systems with lower power rating, higher reliability, longer life, and enhanced radiation tolerance for spacecrafts such as the Europa Orbiter and Europa Lander. The mixed-voltage building blocks are predominantly for design of adaptive power management systems. Their design centers around an LDMOS structure that is being developed by Honeywell, Boeing Corp, and the University of Idaho. The mixed-signal building blocks are designed to meet the low power, extreme radiation requirement of deep space applications. These building blocks are predominantly used to interface analog sensors to the digital CPU of the next generation avionics system on a chip. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. Electronics Principles Avionics Aerospace Ground Equipment (AGE) Career Ladder AFSCS 326X0A, B, C, D.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-12-27

    This report summarizes the results of the administration of the Electronics Principles survey to airmen assigned to the Avionics Aerospace Ground Equipment (AGE) specialties, including 326XOA, Manually Operated Avionics AGE; 326XOB, Automatic Avionics AGE; 326XOC, F/RF-4 Peculiar AGE, and 326XOD, A-7D Avionics AGE. The report gives a detailed listing of the technical tasks and knowledge needed to

  7. Formal verification of an avionics microprocessor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivas, Mandayam, K.; Miller, Steven P.

    1995-01-01

    Formal specification combined with mechanical verification is a promising approach for achieving the extremely high levels of assurance required of safety-critical digital systems. However, many questions remain regarding their use in practice: Can these techniques scale up to industrial systems, where are they likely to be useful, and how should industry go about incorporating them into practice? This report discusses a project undertaken to answer some of these questions, the formal verification of the AAMPS microprocessor. This project consisted of formally specifying in the PVS language a rockwell proprietary microprocessor at both the instruction-set and register-transfer levels and using the PVS theorem prover to show that the microcode correctly implemented the instruction-level specification for a representative subset of instructions. Notable aspects of this project include the use of a formal specification language by practicing hardware and software engineers, the integration of traditional inspections with formal specifications, and the use of a mechanical theorem prover to verify a portion of a commercial, pipelined microprocessor that was not explicitly designed for formal verification.

  8. Shuttle avionics software trials, tribulations and success

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, O. L.

    1985-01-01

    The early problems and the solutions developed to provide the required quality software needed to support the space shuttle engine development program are described. The decision to use a programmable digital control system on the space shuttle engine was primarily based upon the need for a flexible control system capable of supporting the total engine mission on a large complex pump fed engine. The mission definition included all control phases from ground checkout through post shutdown propellant dumping. The flexibility of the controller through reprogrammable software allowed the system to respond to the technical challenges and innovation required to develop both the engine and controller hardware. This same flexibility, however, placed a severe strain on the capability of the software development and verification organization. The overall development program required that the software facility accommodate significant growth in both the software requirements and the number of software packages delivered. This challenge was met by reorganization and evolution in the process of developing and verifying software.

  9. Definition of avionics concepts for a heavy lift cargo vehicle, appendix A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The major objective of the study task was to define a cost effective, multiuser simulation, test, and demonstration facility to support the development of avionics systems for future space vehicles. This volume provides the results of the main simulation processor selection study and describes some proof-of-concept demonstrations for the avionics test bed facility.

  10. FPGA for Power Control of MSL Avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Duo; Burke, Gary R.

    2011-01-01

    A PLGT FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) is included in the LCC (Load Control Card), GID (Guidance Interface & Drivers), TMC (Telemetry Multiplexer Card), and PFC (Pyro Firing Card) boards of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) spacecraft. (PLGT stands for PFC, LCC, GID, and TMC.) It provides the interface between the backside bus and the power drivers on these boards. The LCC drives power switches to switch power loads, and also relays. The GID drives the thrusters and latch valves, as well as having the star-tracker and Sun-sensor interface. The PFC drives pyros, and the TMC receives digital and analog telemetry. The FPGA is implemented both in Xilinx (Spartan 3- 400) and in Actel (RTSX72SU, ASX72S). The Xilinx Spartan 3 part is used for the breadboard, the Actel ASX part is used for the EM (Engineer Module), and the pin-compatible, radiation-hardened RTSX part is used for final EM and flight. The MSL spacecraft uses a FC (Flight Computer) to control power loads, relays, thrusters, latch valves, Sun-sensor, and star-tracker, and to read telemetry such as temperature. Commands are sent over a 1553 bus to the MREU (Multi-Mission System Architecture Platform Remote Engineering Unit). The MREU resends over a remote serial command bus c-bus to the LCC, GID TMC, and PFC. The MREU also sends out telemetry addresses via a remote serial telemetry address bus to the LCC, GID, TMC, and PFC, and the status is returned over the remote serial telemetry data bus.

  11. ISHM-oriented adaptive fault diagnostics for avionics based on a distributed intelligent agent system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiuping; Zhong, Zhengqiang; Xu, Lei

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, an integrated system health management-oriented adaptive fault diagnostics and model for avionics is proposed. With avionics becoming increasingly complicated, precise and comprehensive avionics fault diagnostics has become an extremely complicated task. For the proposed fault diagnostic system, specific approaches, such as the artificial immune system, the intelligent agents system and the Dempster-Shafer evidence theory, are used to conduct deep fault avionics diagnostics. Through this proposed fault diagnostic system, efficient and accurate diagnostics can be achieved. A numerical example is conducted to apply the proposed hybrid diagnostics to a set of radar transmitters on an avionics system and to illustrate that the proposed system and model have the ability to achieve efficient and accurate fault diagnostics. By analyzing the diagnostic system's feasibility and pragmatics, the advantages of this system are demonstrated.

  12. GPM Avionics Module Heat Pipes Design and Performance Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ottenstein, Laura; DeChristopher, Mike

    2011-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an international network of satellites that provide the next-generation global observations of rain and snow. The GPM core satellite carries an advanced radar / radiometer system to measure precipitation from space and serve as a reference standard to unify precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational satellites. Through improved measurements of precipitation globally, the GPM mission will help to advance our understanding of Earth's water and energy cycle, improve forecasting of extreme events that cause natural hazards and disasters, and extend current capabilities in using accurate and timely information of precipitation to directly benefit society. The avionics module on the core satellite contains a number of electronics boxes which are cooled by a network of aluminum/ammonia heat pipes and a honeycomb radiator which contains thirteen embedded aluminum/ammonia heat pipes. All heat pipes were individually tested by the vendor (Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc.) prior to delivery. Following delivery to NASA, the flight avionics radiator and the flight spare transport heat pipes were mounted to flight-like test structure and a system level thermal vacuum test was performed. This test, which used simulators in place of all electronics boxes, was done to verify the operation of the thermal control system as a whole. This presentation will discuss the design of the avionics module heat pipes, and then discuss performance tests results for the individual heat pipes prior to delivery and for the system level thermal vacuum test. All heat pipes met their performance requirements. However, it was found that the power was too low in some instances to start all of the smaller radiator spreader heat pipes when they were tested in a reflux configuration (which is the nominal test configuration). Although this lowered the efficiency of the radiator somewhat, it did not impact the operating

  13. C-130 Automated Digital Data System (CADDS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scofield, C. P.; Nguyen, Chien

    1991-01-01

    Real time airborne data acquisition, archiving and distribution on the NASA/Ames Research Center (ARC) C-130 has been improved over the past three years due to the implementation of the C-130 Automated Digital Data System (CADDS). CADDS is a real time, multitasking, multiprocessing ROM-based system. CADDS acquires data from both avionics and environmental sensors inflight for all C-130 data lines. The system also displays the data on video monitors throughout the aircraft.

  14. Technology research for digital flight control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carestia, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    The use of advanced digital systems for flight control and guidance for a specific mission is investigated. The research areas include advanced electronic system architectures, tests with the global positioning system (GPS) in a helicopter, and advanced integrated systems concept for rotorcraft. Emphasis is on a search and rescue mission, differential global positioning systems to provide a data base of performance information for navigation, and a study to determine the present usage and trends of microcomputers and microcomputer components in the avionics industries.

  15. A Strategy for Reforming Avionics Acquisition and Support

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    9OS/2-AF S1’ A4-VSM r J. C, Geb ma n. H. L. Shulman ATA 4Qy-r7’-777 SECURITY CLASSIFICATION O. TNIS P&Gg (Whom D & tritedf) REPORT DOCUMENTATION...Range Planning & Doctrine Div, (AF/XOXFP) July 1988 Directorate of Plans, Ofc DCS/Plans & Operations I3. NUMUEROFPAGES Hq USAF, Washington, D . C...avionics subsystems. Results from exploratory applications of the concept to the fire control radars on the F-15 C/ D and the F-16 A/B indicate that the Air

  16. Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Power, Avionics, and Software (PAS) 101

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irimies, David

    2011-01-01

    EVA systems consist of a spacesuit or garment, a PLSS, a PAS system, and spacesuit interface hardware. The PAS system is responsible for providing power for the suit, communication of several types of data between the suit and other mission assets, avionics hardware to perform numerous data display and processing functions, and information systems that provide crewmembers data to perform their tasks with more autonomy and efficiency. Irimies discussed how technology development efforts have advanced the state-of-the-art in these areas and shared technology development challenges.

  17. A Wideband Satcom Based Avionics Network with CDMA Uplink and TDM Downlink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, D.; Johnson, B. S.; Madhow, U.; Ramchandran, K.; Chun, K. S.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe some key technical ideas behind our vision of a future satcom based digital communication network for avionics applications The key features of our design are as follows: (a) Packetized transmission to permit efficient use of system resources for multimedia traffic; (b) A time division multiplexed (TDM) satellite downlink whose physical layer is designed to operate the satellite link at maximum power efficiency. We show how powerful turbo codes (invented originally for linear modulation) can be used with nonlinear constant envelope modulation, thus permitting the satellite amplifier to operate in a power efficient nonlinear regime; (c) A code division multiple access (CDMA) satellite uplink, which permits efficient access to the satellite from multiple asynchronous users. Closed loop power control is difficult for bursty packetized traffic, especially given the large round trip delay to the satellite. We show how adaptive interference suppression techniques can be used to deal with the ensuing near-far problem; (d) Joint source-channel coding techniques are required both at the physical and the data transport layer to optimize the end-to-end performance. We describe a novel approach to multiple description image encoding at the data transport layer in this paper.

  18. Integrated Modular Avionics for Spacecraft Software Architecture and Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deredempt, Marie-Helene; Rossignol, Alain; Windsor, James; De-Ferluc, Regis; Sanmarti, Joaquim; Thorn, Jason; Parisis, Paul; Quartier, Fernand; Vatrinet, Francis; Schoofs, Tobias; Crespo, Alfons; Galizzi, Julien; Garcia, Gerald; Arberet, Paul

    2012-08-01

    Space industries designers, for scientific, observation, exploration and telecom missions are now facing requirements such as long lifetime, autonomy and safe operation guarantee in case of failure. New technical and industrial challenges will add complexity. The key point to ensure the success of future industrial projects is to answer on board processing increasing demand by designing more scalable and modular architectures in order to allow new missions whilst improving lifecycle, costs of design, qualification, and security.Focusing on data processing, new technology such as time and space partitioning as part of Integrated Modular Avionics (IMA) experimented by aeronautical domain and industrialized in the new generation of aircraft, was analyzed first for security and feasibility in space domain by an ESA project on secure partitioning and working group. In order to complete these studies, Integrated Modular Avionics for Space, as current ESA project, has the objective to confirm the feasibility of Time and Space Partitioning in space domain using existing hardware and based on ARINC653.By combining the efforts of industrial partners, the IMA for Space (IMA SP) project main goals are to focus first on some major topics such as computational model, impact of caches, impact on process and tools, Failure Detection and Isolation Recovery (FDIR), maintenance and I/O management in order to consolidate requirements, then to develop software solutions that meet requirements and lastly to implement these solutions in a demonstration phase with operational software.

  19. IXV avionics architecture: Design, qualification and mission results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Succa, Massimo; Boscolo, Ilario; Drocco, Alessandro; Malucchi, Giovanni; Dussy, Stephane

    2016-07-01

    The paper details the IXV avionics presenting the architecture and the constituting subsystems and equipment. It focuses on the novelties introduced, such as the Ethernet-based protocol for the experiment data acquisition system, and on the synergy with Ariane 5 and Vega equipment, pursued in order to comply with the design-to-cost requirement for the avionics system development. Emphasis is given to the adopted model philosophy in relation to OTS/COTS items heritage and identified activities necessary to extend the qualification level to be compliant with the IXV environment. Associated lessons learned are identified. Then, the paper provides the first results and interpretation from the flight recorders telemetry, covering the behavior of the Data Handling System, the quality of telemetry recording and real-time/delayed transmission, the performance of the batteries and the Power Protection and Distribution Unit, the ground segment coverage during visibility windows and the performance of the GNC sensors (IMU and GPS) and actuators. Finally, some preliminary tracks of the IXV follow on are given, introducing the objectives of the Innovative Space Vehicle and the necessary improvements to be developed in the frame of PRIDE.

  20. Flight Avionics Sequencing Telemetry (FAST) DIV Latching Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Engineering (NE) Directorate at Kennedy Space Center provides engineering services to major programs such as: Space Shuttle, Inter national Space Station, and the Launch Services Program (LSP). The Av ionics Division within NE, provides avionics and flight control syste ms engineering support to LSP. The Launch Services Program is respons ible for procuring safe and reliable services for transporting critical, one of a kind, NASA payloads into orbit. As a result, engineers mu st monitor critical flight events during countdown and launch to asse ss anomalous behavior or any unexpected occurrence. The goal of this project is to take a tailored Systems Engineering approach to design, develop, and test Iris telemetry displays. The Flight Avionics Sequen cing Telemetry Delta-IV (FAST-D4) displays will provide NASA with an improved flight event monitoring tool to evaluate launch vehicle heal th and performance during system-level ground testing and flight. Flight events monitored will include data from the Redundant Inertial Fli ght Control Assembly (RIFCA) flight computer and launch vehicle comma nd feedback data. When a flight event occurs, the flight event is ill uminated on the display. This will enable NASA Engineers to monitor c ritical flight events on the day of launch. Completion of this project requires rudimentary knowledge of launch vehicle Guidance, Navigatio n, and Control (GN&C) systems, telemetry, and console operation. Work locations for the project include the engineering office, NASA telem etry laboratory, and Delta launch sites.

  1. A Formal Model of Partitioning for Integrated Modular Avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiVito, Ben L.

    1998-01-01

    The aviation industry is gradually moving toward the use of integrated modular avionics (IMA) for civilian transport aircraft. An important concern for IMA is ensuring that applications are safely partitioned so they cannot interfere with one another. We have investigated the problem of ensuring safe partitioning and logical non-interference among separate applications running on a shared Avionics Computer Resource (ACR). This research was performed in the context of ongoing standardization efforts, in particular, the work of RTCA committee SC-182, and the recently completed ARINC 653 application executive (APEX) interface standard. We have developed a formal model of partitioning suitable for evaluating the design of an ACR. The model draws from the mathematical modeling techniques developed by the computer security community. This report presents a formulation of partitioning requirements expressed first using conventional mathematical notation, then formalized using the language of SRI'S Prototype Verification System (PVS). The approach is demonstrated on three candidate designs, each an abstraction of features found in real systems.

  2. An electronic flight bag for NextGen avionics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelazo, D. Eyton

    2012-06-01

    The introduction of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) initiative by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) will impose new requirements for cockpit avionics. A similar program is also taking place in Europe by the European Organisation for the Safety of Air Navigation (Eurocontrol) called the Single European Sky Air Traffic Management Research (SESAR) initiative. NextGen will require aircraft to utilize Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) in/out technology, requiring substantial changes to existing cockpit display systems. There are two ways that aircraft operators can upgrade their aircraft in order to utilize ADS-B technology. The first is to replace existing primary flight displays with new displays that are ADS-B compatible. The second, less costly approach is to install an advanced Class 3 Electronic Flight Bag (EFB) system. The installation of Class 3 EFBs in the cockpit will allow aircraft operators to utilize ADS-B technology in a lesser amount of time with a decreased cost of implementation and will provide additional benefits to the operator. This paper describes a Class 3 EFB, the NexisTM Flight-Intelligence System, which has been designed to allow users a direct interface with NextGen avionics sensors while additionally providing the pilot with all the necessary information to meet NextGen requirements.

  3. Assured crew return capability Crew Emergency Return Vehicle (CERV) avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Harvey Dean

    1990-01-01

    The Crew Emergency Return Vehicle (CERV) is being defined to provide Assured Crew Return Capability (ACRC) for Space Station Freedom. The CERV, in providing the standby lifeboat capability, would remain in a dormat mode over long periods of time as would a lifeboat on a ship at sea. The vehicle must be simple, reliable, and constantly available to assure the crew's safety. The CERV must also provide this capability in a cost effective and affordable manner. The CERV Project philosophy of a simple vehicle is to maximize its useability by a physically deconditioned crew. The vehicle reliability goes unquestioned since, when needed, it is the vehicle of last resort. Therefore, its systems and subsystems must be simple, proven, state-of-the-art technology with sufficient redundancy to make it available for use as required for the life of the program. The CERV Project Phase 1'/2 Request for Proposal (RFP) is currently scheduled for release on October 2, 1989. The Phase 1'/2 effort will affirm the existing project requirements or amend and modify them based on a thorough evaluation of the contractor(s) recommendations. The system definition phase, Phase 2, will serve to define CERV systems and subsystems. The current CERV Project schedule has Phase 2 scheduled to begin October 1990. Since a firm CERV avionics design is not in place at this time, the treatment of the CERV avionics complement for the reference configuration is not intended to express a preference with regard to a system or subsystem.

  4. On the criticality of parameter data transfer in avionic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teichgraeber, Richard D.

    2007-04-01

    In many PC-based simulations, message passing is commonly used for transfer of dynamic data between software models. Parameter definition and/or initialization are typically handled differently and may suffer because that data is not transferred to all the required models at any time during a simulation run. Instead multiple and often dissimilar initializations of the same parameters occur in various software modules, much to the chagrin of the configuration control personnel and test engineers. Results from using this approach can be particularly damaging for navigation sensor simulations such as a GPS-aided inertial mode and for flight program software evaluation and validation, where extreme accuracy of results is required. The paper proposes solutions to prevent parameter data mismatch and/or compromise. These solutions are based upon doing a thorough job of critical parameter definition and initialization, given the simulation computer architecture. The solutions are discussed and explained. Included are descriptions of actual cases - examples of parameter mismatch in medium to large scale avionic simulations where accuracy was critical to performance evaluation. Parameter categories critical to accurate evaluations of avionic simulation performance are identified and discussed.

  5. The effect of requirements prioritization on avionics system conceptual design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorentz, John

    This dissertation will provide a detailed approach and analysis of a new collaborative requirements prioritization methodology that has been used successfully on four Coast Guard avionics acquisition and development programs valued at $400M+. A statistical representation of participant study results will be discussed and analyzed in detail. Many technically compliant projects fail to deliver levels of performance and capability that the customer desires. Some of these systems completely meet "threshold" levels of performance; however, the distribution of resources in the process devoted to the development and management of the requirements does not always represent the voice of the customer. This is especially true for technically complex projects such as modern avionics systems. A simplified facilitated process for prioritization of system requirements will be described. The collaborative prioritization process, and resulting artifacts, aids the systems engineer during early conceptual design. All requirements are not the same in terms of customer priority. While there is a tendency to have many thresholds inside of a system design, there is usually a subset of requirements and system performance that is of the utmost importance to the design. These critical capabilities and critical levels of performance typically represent the reason the system is being built. The systems engineer needs processes to identify these critical capabilities, the associated desired levels of performance, and the risks associated with the specific requirements that define the critical capability. The facilitated prioritization exercise is designed to collaboratively draw out these critical capabilities and levels of performance so they can be emphasized in system design. Developing the purpose, scheduling and process for prioritization events are key elements of systems engineering and modern project management. The benefits of early collaborative prioritization flow throughout the

  6. Avionics equipment failure prediction based on genetic programming and grey model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xiujian; Luo, Qiang; Zhao, Yiyang; Feng, Qi

    2017-01-01

    Avionics equipment failure prediction by conventional GM (Grey Model) may yield large forecasting errors. Combining GM (1, 1) model with genetic programming algorithm, a kind of GP-GM (1, 1) forecast model was established to minimize such errors. Forecasting sequence was calculated by means of GM (1, 1) model, then genetic programming algorithm was used to modify them further, and the degradation trend prediction of characteristic parameters of avionics equipment was realized. The validity of GP-GM (1, 1) prediction model was testified by tracking and forecasting the experiment data of avionics equipment in real environment.

  7. Integrated Modular Avionics for Spacecraft: Earth Observation Use Case Demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deredempt, Marie-Helene; Rossignol, Alain; Hyounet, Philippe

    2013-08-01

    Integrated Modular Avionics (IMA) for Space, as European Space Agency initiative, aimed to make applicable to space domain the time and space partitioning concepts and particularly the ARINC 653 standard [1][2]. Expected benefits of such an approach are development flexibility, capability to provide differential V&V for different criticality level functionalities and to integrate late or In-Orbit delivery. This development flexibility could improve software subcontracting, industrial organization and software reuse. Time and space partitioning technique facilitates integration of software functions as black boxes and integration of decentralized function such as star tracker in On Board Computer to save mass and power by limiting electronics resources. In aeronautical domain, Integrated Modular Avionics architecture is based on a network of LRU (Line Replaceable Unit) interconnected by AFDX (Avionic Full DupleX). Time and Space partitioning concept is applicable to LRU and provides independent partitions which inter communicate using ARINC 653 communication ports. Using End System (LRU component) intercommunication between LRU is managed in the same way than intercommunication between partitions in LRU. In such architecture an application developed using only communication port can be integrated in an LRU or another one without impacting the global architecture. In space domain, a redundant On Board Computer controls (ground monitoring TM) and manages the platform (ground command TC) in terms of power, solar array deployment, attitude, orbit, thermal, maintenance, failure detection and recovery isolation. In addition, Payload units and platform units such as RIU, PCDU, AOCS units (Star tracker, Reaction wheels) are considered in this architecture. Interfaces are mainly realized through MIL-STD-1553B busses and SpaceWire and this could be considered as the main constraint for IMA implementation in space domain. During the first phase of IMA SP project, ARINC653

  8. Strategically Planning Avionics Laboratory’s Facilities for the Future

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    Existing Building 620 Occupancy and Floor Plans H buum Loopfft bond. w 8trm besscf &"ss fe 135 Dingsw**p cm sht &"II 927 D Ril tmll Toos grow 1574 Dm...Space In°•ventory V410lMrammn Air FoameBan 06&20932 Avioni Lmb - Swau~ Fe ~ds. Fint hPa I base bWaniy by Grou AesM Unassgned224.662 AA Avionic...26.25 ELOD m ro-ptics Detecto, r kancl 1.1a2 ELR Reeeerch Division 7.205 Tatm om. $97.050 V40m bmm i Foos m Urn @6A A, imI L*b- Son%* Fes ~s Pi pop I ftý4

  9. Evolution of shuttle avionics redundancy management/fault tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boykin, J. C.; Thibodeau, J. R.; Schneider, H. E.

    1985-01-01

    The challenge of providing redundancy management (RM) and fault tolerance to meet the Shuttle Program requirements of fail operational/fail safe for the avionics systems was complicated by the critical program constraints of weight, cost, and schedule. The basic and sometimes false effectivity of less than pure RM designs is addressed. Evolution of the multiple input selection filter (the heart of the RM function) is discussed with emphasis on the subtle interactions of the flight control system that were found to be potentially catastrophic. Several other general RM development problems are discussed, with particular emphasis on the inertial measurement unit RM, indicative of the complexity of managing that three string system and its critical interfaces with the guidance and control systems.

  10. The vulnerability of commercial aircraft avionics to carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, J. A.; Salmirs, S.

    1980-01-01

    Avionics components commonly used in commercial aircraft were tested for vulnerability to failure when operated in an environment with a high density of graphite fibers. The components were subjected to a series of exposures to graphite fibers of different lengths. Lengths used for the tests were (in order) 1 mm, 3 mm, and 10 mm. The test procedure included subjecting the equipment to characteristic noise and shock environments. Most of the equipment was invulnerable or did not fail until extremely high average exposures were reached. The single exception was an air traffic control transponder produced in the early 1960's. It had the largest case open area through which fibers could enter and it had no coated boards.

  11. Partitioning in Avionics Architectures: Requirements, Mechanisms, and Assurance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rushby, John

    1999-01-01

    Automated aircraft control has traditionally been divided into distinct "functions" that are implemented separately (e.g., autopilot, autothrottle, flight management); each function has its own fault-tolerant computer system, and dependencies among different functions are generally limited to the exchange of sensor and control data. A by-product of this "federated" architecture is that faults are strongly contained within the computer system of the function where they occur and cannot readily propagate to affect the operation of other functions. More modern avionics architectures contemplate supporting multiple functions on a single, shared, fault-tolerant computer system where natural fault containment boundaries are less sharply defined. Partitioning uses appropriate hardware and software mechanisms to restore strong fault containment to such integrated architectures. This report examines the requirements for partitioning, mechanisms for their realization, and issues in providing assurance for partitioning. Because partitioning shares some concerns with computer security, security models are reviewed and compared with the concerns of partitioning.

  12. Comparison of custom versus COTS AMLCDs for military and avionic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelo, Van

    1997-07-01

    AMLCD's are currently the flat panel technology of choice for military systems and civil transport avionic applications, both new and retrofit. Historically, military and avionic displays have ben custom designed and have generally been specific to each application. Two recent developments have given display system designers a choice between a custom military/avionic solution or a ruggedized commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) implementation. The first development is the widespread availability of various consumer and automotive AMLCD panels at low prices. The second is the change in the policy of defense departments, notably the US Department of Defense, to procure COTS components instead of developing custom solutions. This paper assesses and analyzes the key differences in characteristics, performance and logistical supportability of military and avionic AMLCD's and presents the tradeoffs involved in making the optimum choice between custom and COTS.

  13. The development process for the space shuttle primary avionics software system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, T. W.

    1987-01-01

    Primary avionics software system; software development approach; user support and problem diagnosis; software releases and configuration; quality/productivity programs; and software development/production facilities are addressed. Also examined are the external evaluations of the IBM process.

  14. Lifelong Learning: An Imperative for Employment in Part of the Avionics Sector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodie, Ian

    2001-01-01

    Describes technological developments in the British avionics industry that have engendered higher skill requirements. Discusses challenges of using National Vocational Qualifications in the industry. Reviews implications for employers, workers, and trainers. (SK)

  15. Estimation of Airline Benefits from Avionics Upgrade under Preferential Merge Re-sequence Scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotegawa, Tatsuya; Cayabyab, Charlene Anne; Almog, Noam

    2013-01-01

    Modernization of the airline fleet avionics is essential to fully enable future technologies and procedures for increasing national airspace system capacity. However in the current national airspace system, system-wide benefits gained by avionics upgrade are not fully directed to aircraft/airlines that upgrade, resulting in slow fleet modernization rate. Preferential merge re-sequence scheduling is a best-equipped-best-served concept designed to incentivize avionics upgrade among airlines by allowing aircraft with new avionics (high-equipped) to be re-sequenced ahead of aircraft without the upgrades (low-equipped) at enroute merge waypoints. The goal of this study is to investigate the potential benefits gained or lost by airlines under a high or low-equipped fleet scenario if preferential merge resequence scheduling is implemented.

  16. Flight evaluation results from the general-aviation advanced avionics system program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callas, G. P.; Denery, D. G.; Hardy, G. H.; Nedell, B. F.

    1983-01-01

    A demonstration advanced avionics system (DAAS) for general-aviation aircraft was tested at NASA Ames Research Center to provide information required for the design of reliable, low-cost, advanced avionics systems which would make general-aviation operations safer and more practicable. Guest pilots flew a DAAS-equipped NASA Cessna 402-B aircraft to evaluate the usefulness of data busing, distributed microprocessors, and shared electronic displays, and to provide data on the DAAS pilot/system interface for the design of future integrated avionics systems. Evaluation results indicate that the DAAS hardware and functional capability meet the program objective. Most pilots felt that the DAAS representative of the way avionics systems would evolve and felt the added capability would improve the safety and practicability of general-aviation operations. Flight-evaluation results compiled from questionnaires are presented, the results of the debriefings are summarized. General conclusions of the flight evaluation are included.

  17. Preliminary Candidate Advanced Avionics System (PCAAS). [reduction in single pilot workload during instrument flight rules flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teper, G. L.; Hon, R. H.; Smyth, R. K.

    1977-01-01

    Specifications which define the system functional requirements, the subsystem and interface needs, and other requirements such as maintainability, modularity, and reliability are summarized. A design definition of all required avionics functions and a system risk analysis are presented.

  18. Flight Deck Interval Management Avionics: Eye-Tracking Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latorella, Kara; Harden, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Interval Management (IM) is one NexGen method for achieving airspace efficiencies. In order to initiate IM procedures, Air Traffic Control provides an IM clearance to the IM aircraft's pilots that indicates an intended spacing from another aircraft (the target to follow - or TTF) and the point at which this should be achieved. Pilots enter the clearance in the flight deck IM (FIM) system; and once the TTF's Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast signal is available, the FIM algorithm generates target speeds to meet that IM goal. This study examined four Avionics Conditions (defined by the instrumentation and location presenting FIM information) and three Notification Methods (defined by the visual and aural alerts that notified pilots to IM-related events). Current commercial pilots flew descents into Dallas/Fort-Worth in a high-fidelity commercial flight deck simulation environment with realistic traffic and communications. All 12 crews experienced each Avionics Condition, where order was counterbalanced over crews. Each crew used only one of the three Notification Methods. This paper presents results from eye tracking data collected from both pilots, including: normalized number of samples falling within FIM displays, normalized heads-up time, noticing time, dwell time on first FIM display look after a new speed, a workload-related metric, and a measure comparing the scan paths of pilot flying and pilot monitoring; and discusses these in the context of other objective (vertical and speed profile deviations, response time to dial in commanded speeds, out-of-speed-conformance and reminder indications) and subjective measures (workload, situation awareness, usability, and operational acceptability).

  19. Organization and use of a Software/Hardware Avionics Research Program (SHARP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karmarkar, J. S.; Kareemi, M. N.

    1975-01-01

    The organization and use is described of the software/hardware avionics research program (SHARP) developed to duplicate the automatic portion of the STOLAND simulator system, on a general-purpose computer system (i.e., IBM 360). The program's uses are: (1) to conduct comparative evaluation studies of current and proposed airborne and ground system concepts via single run or Monte Carlo simulation techniques, and (2) to provide a software tool for efficient algorithm evaluation and development for the STOLAND avionics computer.

  20. Space Shuttle Program Primary Avionics Software System (PASS) Success Legacy - Quality and Reliability Date

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, James K.; Peltier, Daryl

    2010-01-01

    Thsi slide presentation reviews the avionics software system on board the space shuttle, with particular emphasis on the quality and reliability. The Primary Avionics Software System (PASS) provides automatic and fly-by-wire control of critical shuttle systems which executes in redundant computers. Charts given show the number of space shuttle flights vs time, PASS's development history, and other charts that point to the reliability of the system's development. The reliability of the system is also compared to predicted reliability.

  1. An engineering approach to the use of expert systems technology in avionics applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, E. L.; Regenie, V. A.; Brazee, M.; Brumbaugh, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    The concept of using a knowledge compiler to transform the knowledge base and inference mechanism of an expert system into a conventional program is presented. The need to accommodate real-time systems requirements in applications such as embedded avionics is outlined. Expert systems and a brief comparison of expert systems and conventional programs are reviewed. Avionics applications of expert systems are discussed before the discussions of applying the proposed concept to example systems using forward and backward chaining.

  2. Avionics architecture for the U.S. segment of the international space station alpha

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Joseph F.; McDonald, Mark; Suchting, Steve; Schikner, Jeff

    The International Space Station Alpha (ISSA) is a joint project between the United States, European Space Agency, Japan, Canada and Russia to develop and fly a space station in the later part of the 1990s. The United States will be the largest hardware contributor to this project, and this paper will describe the avionics architecture for the U.S. provided pressurized modules and truss segments. The avionics contained within these U.S. modules and segments will perform many of the core engineering and payload support functions for the ISSA. These functions include: the command and data handling, communications and tracking, guidance navigation and control (in partnership with the Russian elements), and electrical power generation and distribution. This paper will describe the architecture of the avionics systems that will perform these core engineering avionics functions, as well as provide a discussion on the avionics necessary for the proper functioning of the core engineering avionics supported functions such as thermal control, life support, and mechanisms.

  3. Implementing the space shuttle data processing system with the space generic open avionics architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wray, Richard B.; Stovall, John R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the application of the Space Generic Open Avionics Architecture (SGOAA) to the Space Shuttle Data Processing System (DPS) architecture design. This application has been performed to validate the SGOAA, and its potential use in flight critical systems. The paper summarizes key elements of the Space Shuttle avionics architecture, data processing system requirements and software architecture as currently implemented. It then summarizes the SGOAA architecture and describes a tailoring of the SGOAA to the Space Shuttle. The SGOAA consists of a generic system architecture for the entities in spacecraft avionics, a generic processing external and internal hardware architecture, a six class model of interfaces and functional subsystem architectures for data services and operations control capabilities. It has been proposed as an avionics architecture standard with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), through its Strategic Avionics Technology Working Group, and is being considered by the Society of Aeronautic Engineers (SAE) as an SAE Avionics Standard. This architecture was developed for the Flight Data Systems Division of JSC by the Lockheed Engineering and Sciences Company, Houston, Texas.

  4. Avionics architecture for the U.S. segment of the international space station alpha

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Joseph F.; Mcdonald, Mark; Suchting, Steve; Schikner, Jeff

    1995-01-01

    The International Space Station Alpha (ISSA) is a joint project between the United States, European Space Agency, Japan, Canada and Russia to develop and fly a space station in the later part of the 1990s. The United States will be the largest hardware contributor to this project, and this paper will describe the avionics architecture for the U.S. provided pressurized modules and truss segments. The avionics contained within these U.S. modules and segments will perform many of the core engineering and payload support functions for the ISSA. These functions include: the command and data handling, communications and tracking, guidance navigation and control (in partnership with the Russian elements), and electrical power generation and distribution. This paper will describe the architecture of the avionics systems that will perform these core engineering avionics functions, as well as provide a discussion on the avionics necessary for the proper functioning of the core engineering avionics supported functions such as thermal control, life support, and mechanisms.

  5. Analysis of technology requirements and potential demand for general aviation avionics systems for operation in the 1980's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohn, D. M.; Kayser, J. H.; Senko, G. M.; Glenn, D. R.

    1974-01-01

    Avionics systems are identified which promise to reduce economic constraints and provide significant improvements in performance, operational capability and utility for general aviation aircraft in the 1980's.

  6. Industrial Arts for the Elementary School: 23rd Yearbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thrower, Robert G., Ed.; Weber, Robert D., Ed.

    Fourth in a series of yearbooks presenting an overview of industrial arts at the various levels of education, the yearbook clarifies the contribution of industrial arts at the elementary school level. Fifteen educators from industrial arts and related field have authored the 12 chapters of the yearbook. Chapter 1 (Mary-Margaret Scobey and Grace…

  7. NREL preprints for the 23rd IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, M.

    1993-05-01

    Topics covered include various aspects of solar cell fabrication and performance. Aluminium-gallium arsenides, cadmium telluride, amorphous silicon, and copper-indium-gallium selenides are all characterized in their applicability in solar cells.

  8. Minutes of the 23rd Explosives Safety Seminar, volume 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1988-08-01

    Some topics of the conference include: Fragment hazards; Airblast interactions; Explosives risk assessment; Structural damage from blast; Demilitarization, disposal, decontamination; Quantity distance application; Fire protection - deluge systems; Debris hazards testing and analysis; Far field airblast effects and mitigation designs consideration; Electrostatic discharge (ESD); Underground explosion effects - large scale tests; Wall and window response to blast loads; Explosives facility design considerations, Accident/explosion effects; and Shock sensitivity of explosives.

  9. The SSRT in the 23rd Cycle of Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandanov, V. G.; Altyntsev, A. T.; Lesovoi, S. V.

    1999-12-01

    We present a sketch of the project to upgrade the Siberian Solar Radio Telescope. We suggest expanding the spectral range of receiving frequencies from a single frequency (5.7~GHz) to five frequencies and to considerably improve the sensitivity of instrument.

  10. Council on Library Resources, Inc. 23rd Annual Report, 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council on Library Resources, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This report describes the activities and financial status of the Council on Library Resources (CLR) during the 1978-79 fiscal year. Contents include: listings of the members of CLR, its board of directors, the council committees and officers, and the council staff; an essay on CLR's 1978-79 year and its future; program highlights; a list of…

  11. Use of Field Programmable Gate Array Technology in Future Space Avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Roscoe C.; Tate, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Fulfilling NASA's new vision for space exploration requires the development of sustainable, flexible and fault tolerant spacecraft control systems. The traditional development paradigm consists of the purchase or fabrication of hardware boards with fixed processor and/or Digital Signal Processing (DSP) components interconnected via a standardized bus system. This is followed by the purchase and/or development of software. This paradigm has several disadvantages for the development of systems to support NASA's new vision. Building a system to be fault tolerant increases the complexity and decreases the performance of included software. Standard bus design and conventional implementation produces natural bottlenecks. Configuring hardware components in systems containing common processors and DSPs is difficult initially and expensive or impossible to change later. The existence of Hardware Description Languages (HDLs), the recent increase in performance, density and radiation tolerance of Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs), and Intellectual Property (IP) Cores provides the technology for reprogrammable Systems on a Chip (SOC). This technology supports a paradigm better suited for NASA's vision. Hardware and software production are melded for more effective development; they can both evolve together over time. Designers incorporating this technology into future avionics can benefit from its flexibility. Systems can be designed with improved fault isolation and tolerance using hardware instead of software. Also, these designs can be protected from obsolescence problems where maintenance is compromised via component and vendor availability.To investigate the flexibility of this technology, the core of the Central Processing Unit and Input/Output Processor of the Space Shuttle AP101S Computer were prototyped in Verilog HDL and synthesized into an Altera Stratix FPGA.

  12. Semiautonomous Avionics-and-Sensors System for a UAV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar

    2006-01-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) autonomous or remotely controlled pilotless aircraft have been recently thrust into the spotlight for military applications, for homeland security, and as test beds for research. In addition to these functions, there are many space applications in which lightweight, inexpensive, small UAVS can be used e.g., to determine the chemical composition and other qualities of the atmospheres of remote planets. Moreover, on Earth, such UAVs can be used to obtain information about weather in various regions; in particular, they can be used to analyze wide-band acoustic signals to aid in determining the complex dynamics of movement of hurricanes. The Advanced Sensors and Electronics group at Langley Research Center has developed an inexpensive, small, integrated avionics-and-sensors system to be installed in a UAV that serves two purposes. The first purpose is to provide flight data to an AI (Artificial Intelligence) controller as part of an autonomous flight-control system. The second purpose is to store data from a subsystem of distributed MEMS (microelectromechanical systems) sensors. Examples of these MEMS sensors include humidity, temperature, and acoustic sensors, plus chemical sensors for detecting various vapors and other gases in the environment. The critical sensors used for flight control are a differential- pressure sensor that is part of an apparatus for determining airspeed, an absolute-pressure sensor for determining altitude, three orthogonal accelerometers for determining tilt and acceleration, and three orthogonal angular-rate detectors (gyroscopes). By using these eight sensors, it is possible to determine the orientation, height, speed, and rates of roll, pitch, and yaw of the UAV. This avionics-and-sensors system is shown in the figure. During the last few years, there has been rapid growth and advancement in the technological disciplines of MEMS, of onboard artificial-intelligence systems, and of smaller, faster, and

  13. The X-38 Spacecraft Fault-Tolerant Avionics System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouba,Coy; Buscher, Deborah; Busa, Joseph

    2003-01-01

    In 1995 NASA began an experimental program to develop a reusable crew return vehicle (CRV) for the International Space Station. The purpose of the CRV was threefold: (i) to bring home an injured or ill crewmember; (ii) to bring home the entire crew if the Shuttle fleet was grounded; and (iii) to evacuate the crew in the case of an imminent Station threat (i.e., fire, decompression, etc). Built at the Johnson Space Center, were two approach and landing prototypes and one spacecraft demonstrator (called V201). A series of increasingly complex ground subsystem tests were completed, and eight successful high-altitude drop tests were achieved to prove the design concept. In this program, an unprecedented amount of commercial-off-the-shelf technology was utilized in this first crewed spacecraft NASA has built since the Shuttle program. Unfortunately, in 2002 the program was canceled due to changing Agency priorities. The vehicle was 80% complete and the program was shut down in such a manner as to preserve design, development, test and engineering data. This paper describes the X-38 V201 fault-tolerant avionics system. Based on Draper Laboratory's Byzantine-resilient fault-tolerant parallel processing system and their "network element" hardware, each flight computer exchanges information on a strict timescale to process input data, compare results, and issue voted vehicle output commands. Major accomplishments achieved in this development include: (i) a space qualified two-fault tolerant design using mostly COTS (hardware and operating system); (ii) a single event upset tolerant network element board, (iii) on-the-fly recovery of a failed processor; (iv) use of synched cache; (v) realignment of memory to bring back a failed channel; (vi) flight code automatically generated from the master measurement list; and (vii) built in-house by a team of civil servants and support contractors. This paper will present an overview of the avionics system and the hardware

  14. The Cognitive Pilot Helmet: enabling pilot-aware smart avionics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnell, Thomas; Melzer, James E.; Robbins, Steve J.

    2009-05-01

    We hypothesize that human-aware helmet display systems can drastically improve situation awareness (SA), reduce workload, and become the cognitive gateway to two-way human-systems information. We designed a ruggedized prototype helmet liner that was fitted with active electroencephalogram (EEG) electrodes and pulse oxymetry sensor. This liner was integrated into a helmet that was fitted with a binocular SR-100A helmet mounted display. We modified the SR-100A to include dual-eye tracking capability. The resulting system is able to pick up physiological signals from the wearer in real-time for cognitive state characterization by the Cognitive Avionics Tool Set (CATS). We conducted a preliminary test of the cognitive state estimation system in a simulated close-air-support task in the laboratory and found that workload throughout the mission could be gauged using physiological parameters. Cognitively-linked helmet systems can increase situation awareness by metering the amount of information based on available cognitive bandwidth and eventually, we feel that they will be able to provide anticipatory information to the user by means of cognitive intent recognition. Considerable design challenges lie ahead to create robust models of cognitive state characterization and intent recognition. However, the rewards of such efforts could be systems that allow a dramatic increase in human decision making ability and productivity in dynamical complex situations such as air combat or surface warfare.

  15. AMLCD head-down displays for avionic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Alan J.

    1997-02-01

    Smiths Industries has been involved in the design, manufacture and supply of products used for the presentation of information, in one form or another, from its early pioneering years through to the present day. In the mid 1980s Smiths Industries began to invest in the then emerging active matrix liquid crystal display (AMLCD) technology which the company believed would eventually take over from the cathode ray tube. To date Smiths Industries has made a significant investment in acquiring the enabling technology needed to produce active matrix liquid crystal color head- down displays for fast jet, helicopter and civil aircraft applications. The significant improvement in AMLCD product quality and manufacturing capability over recent years has enabled market penetration of AMLCD technology products to be achieved in military and civil avionic markets. Virtually all new contracts for head-down displays are now demanding the use of AMLCD technology rather than the cathode ray tube. A significant decision to move to AMLCD technology was made by McDonnell Douglas Helicopters in 1995, when a contract to supply over 4000 head-down display products for the Apache Helicopter was let. This has paved the way for the future of AMLCD technology.

  16. MIDEX Advanced Modular and Distributed Spacecraft Avionics Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruffa, John A.; Castell, Karen; Flatley, Thomas; Lin, Michael

    1998-01-01

    MIDEX (Medium Class Explorer) is the newest line in NASA's Explorer spacecraft development program. As part of the MIDEX charter, the MIDEX spacecraft development team has developed a new modular, distributed, and scaleable spacecraft architecture that pioneers new spaceflight technologies and implementation approaches, all designed to reduce overall spacecraft cost while increasing overall functional capability. This resultant "plug and play" system dramatically decreases the complexity and duration of spacecraft integration and test, providing a basic framework that supports spacecraft modularity and scalability for missions of varying size and complexity. Together, these subsystems form a modular, flexible avionics suite that can be modified and expanded to support low-end and very high-end mission requirements with a minimum of redesign, as well as allowing a smooth, continuous infusion of new technologies as they are developed without redesigning the system. This overall approach has the net benefit of allowing a greater portion of the overall mission budget to be allocated to mission science instead of a spacecraft bus. The MIDEX scaleable architecture is currently being manufactured and tested for use on the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP), an inhouse program at GSFC.

  17. System Software Framework for System of Systems Avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Roscoe C.; Peterson, Benjamin L; Thompson, Hiram C.

    2005-01-01

    Project Constellation implements NASA's vision for space exploration to expand human presence in our solar system. The engineering focus of this project is developing a system of systems architecture. This architecture allows for the incremental development of the overall program. Systems can be built and connected in a "Lego style" manner to generate configurations supporting various mission objectives. The development of the avionics or control systems of such a massive project will result in concurrent engineering. Also, each system will have software and the need to communicate with other (possibly heterogeneous) systems. Fortunately, this design problem has already been solved during the creation and evolution of systems such as the Internet and the Department of Defense's successful effort to standardize distributed simulation (now IEEE 1516). The solution relies on the use of a standard layered software framework and a communication protocol. A standard framework and communication protocol is suggested for the development and maintenance of Project Constellation systems. The ARINC 653 standard is a great start for such a common software framework. This paper proposes a common system software framework that uses the Real Time Publish/Subscribe protocol for framework-to-framework communication to extend ARINC 653. It is highly recommended that such a framework be established before development. This is important for the success of concurrent engineering. The framework provides an infrastructure for general system services and is designed for flexibility to support a spiral development effort.

  18. Serial Back-Plane Technologies in Advanced Avionics Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varnavas, Kosta

    2005-01-01

    Current back plane technologies such as VME, and current personal computer back planes such as PCI, are shared bus systems that can exhibit nondeterministic latencies. This means a card can take control of the bus and use resources indefinitely affecting the ability of other cards in the back plane to acquire the bus. This provides a real hit on the reliability of the system. Additionally, these parallel busses only have bandwidths in the 100s of megahertz range and EMI and noise effects get worse the higher the bandwidth goes. To provide scalable, fault-tolerant, advanced computing systems, more applicable to today s connected computing environment and to better meet the needs of future requirements for advanced space instruments and vehicles, serial back-plane technologies should be implemented in advanced avionics architectures. Serial backplane technologies eliminate the problem of one card getting the bus and never relinquishing it, or one minor problem on the backplane bringing the whole system down. Being serial instead of parallel improves the reliability by reducing many of the signal integrity issues associated with parallel back planes and thus significantly improves reliability. The increased speeds associated with a serial backplane are an added bonus.

  19. Advanced Launch System Multi-Path Redundant Avionics Architecture Analysis and Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the Multi-Path Redundant Avionics Suite (MPRAS) program is the development of a set of avionic architectural modules which will be applicable to the family of launch vehicles required to support the Advanced Launch System (ALS). To enable ALS cost/performance requirements to be met, the MPRAS must support autonomy, maintenance, and testability capabilities which exceed those present in conventional launch vehicles. The multi-path redundant or fault tolerance characteristics of the MPRAS are necessary to offset a reduction in avionics reliability due to the increased complexity needed to support these new cost reduction and performance capabilities and to meet avionics reliability requirements which will provide cost-effective reductions in overall ALS recurring costs. A complex, real-time distributed computing system is needed to meet the ALS avionics system requirements. General Dynamics, Boeing Aerospace, and C.S. Draper Laboratory have proposed system architectures as candidates for the ALS MPRAS. The purpose of this document is to report the results of independent performance and reliability characterization and assessment analyses of each proposed candidate architecture and qualitative assessments of testability, maintainability, and fault tolerance mechanisms. These independent analyses were conducted as part of the MPRAS Part 2 program and were carried under NASA Langley Research Contract NAS1-17964, Task Assignment 28.

  20. Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS)-based fault tolerant avionics architecture for launch vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lala, Jaynarayan H.; Harper, Richard E.; Jaskowiak, Kenneth R.; Rosch, Gene; Alger, Linda S.; Schor, Andrei L.

    1990-01-01

    An avionics architecture for the advanced launch system (ALS) that uses validated hardware and software building blocks developed under the advanced information processing system program is presented. The AIPS for ALS architecture defined is preliminary, and reliability requirements can be met by the AIPS hardware and software building blocks that are built using the state-of-the-art technology available in the 1992-93 time frame. The level of detail in the architecture definition reflects the level of detail available in the ALS requirements. As the avionics requirements are refined, the architecture can also be refined and defined in greater detail with the help of analysis and simulation tools. A useful methodology is demonstrated for investigating the impact of the avionics suite to the recurring cost of the ALS. It is shown that allowing the vehicle to launch with selected detected failures can potentially reduce the recurring launch costs. A comparative analysis shows that validated fault-tolerant avionics built out of Class B parts can result in lower life-cycle-cost in comparison to simplex avionics built out of Class S parts or other redundant architectures.

  1. SAR Aircrew--HH-3F Avionics and HH-3F Flight Preparation. ACH3AV-0442. Second Edition, Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coast Guard Inst., Oklahoma City, OK.

    This document contains two U.S. Coast Guard self-study pamphlets that provide training in helicopter flight preparation and avionics duties. Each pamphlet consists of a number of lessons that include objectives, information illustrated with line drawings and/or photographs, and self-quizzes with answers. The avionics course covers the following…

  2. Rendezvous strategy impacts on CTV avionics design, system reliability requirements, and available collision avoidance maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donovan, William J.; Davis, John E.

    1991-01-01

    Rockwell International is conducting an ongoing program to develop avionics architectures that provide high intrinsic value while meeting all mission objectives. Studies are being conducted to determine alternative configurations that have low life-cycle cost and minimum development risk, and that minimize launch delays while providing the reliability level to assure a successful mission. This effort is based on four decades of providing ballistic missile avionics to the United States Air Force and has focused on the requirements of the NASA Cargo Transfer Vehicle (CTV) program in 1991. During the development of architectural concepts it became apparent that rendezvous strategy issues have an impact on the architecture of the avionics system. This is in addition to the expected impact on propulsion and electrical power duration, flight profiles, and trajectory during approach.

  3. Avionics Systems Laboratory/Building 16. Historical Documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slovinac, Patricia; Deming, Joan

    2011-01-01

    As part of this nation-wide study, in September 2006, historical survey and evaluation of NASA-owned and managed facilities that was conducted by NASA s Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas. The results of this study are presented in a report entitled, "Survey and Evaluation of NASA-owned Historic Facilities and Properties in the Context of the U.S. Space Shuttle Program, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas," prepared in November 2007 by NASA JSC s contractor, Archaeological Consultants, Inc. As a result of this survey, the Avionics Systems Laboratory (Building 16) was determined eligible for listing in the NRHP, with concurrence by the Texas State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO). The survey concluded that Building 5 is eligible for the NRHP under Criteria A and C in the context of the U.S. Space Shuttle program (1969-2010). Because it has achieved significance within the past 50 years, Criteria Consideration G applies. At the time of this documentation, Building 16 was still used to support the SSP as an engineering research facility, which is also sometimes used for astronaut training. This documentation package precedes any undertaking as defined by Section 106 of the NHPA, as amended, and implemented in 36 CFR Part 800, as NASA JSC has decided to proactively pursue efforts to mitigate the potential adverse affects of any future modifications to the facility. It includes a historical summary of the Space Shuttle program; the history of JSC in relation to the SSP; a narrative of the history of Building 16 and how it supported the SSP; and a physical description of the structure. In addition, photographs documenting the construction and historical use of Building 16 in support of the SSP, as well as photographs of the facility documenting the existing conditions, special technological features, and engineering details, are included. A contact sheet printed on archival paper, and an electronic copy of the work product on CD, are

  4. Advanced information processing system for advanced launch system: Avionics architecture synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lala, Jaynarayan H.; Harper, Richard E.; Jaskowiak, Kenneth R.; Rosch, Gene; Alger, Linda S.; Schor, Andrei L.

    1991-01-01

    The Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS) is a fault-tolerant distributed computer system architecture that was developed to meet the real time computational needs of advanced aerospace vehicles. One such vehicle is the Advanced Launch System (ALS) being developed jointly by NASA and the Department of Defense to launch heavy payloads into low earth orbit at one tenth the cost (per pound of payload) of the current launch vehicles. An avionics architecture that utilizes the AIPS hardware and software building blocks was synthesized for ALS. The AIPS for ALS architecture synthesis process starting with the ALS mission requirements and ending with an analysis of the candidate ALS avionics architecture is described.

  5. Avionics system design for requirements for the United States Coast Guard HH-65A Dolphin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    Aerospatiale Helicopter Corporation (AHC) was awarded a contract by the United States Coast Guard for a new Short Range Recovery (SRR) Helicopter on 14 June 1979. The award was based upon an overall evaluation of performance, cost, and technical suitability. In this last respect, the SRR helicopter was required to meet a wide variety of mission needs for which the integrated avionics system has a high importance. This paper illustrates the rationale for the avionics system requirements, the system architecture, its capabilities and reliability and its adaptability to a wide variety of military and commercial purposes.

  6. Automatic Implementation of Ttethernet-Based Time-Triggered Avionics Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorcitz, Raul Adrian; Carle, Thomas; Lesens, David; Monchaux, David; Potop-Butucaruy, Dumitru; Sorel, Yves

    2015-09-01

    The design of safety-critical embedded systems such as those used in avionics still involves largely manual phases. But in avionics the definition of standard interfaces embodied in standards such as ARINC 653 or TTEthernet should allow the definition of fully automatic code generation flows that reduce the costs while improving the quality of the generated code, much like compilers have done when replacing manual assembly coding. In this paper, we briefly present such a fully automatic implementation tool, called Lopht, for ARINC653-based time-triggered systems, and then explain how it is currently extended to include support for TTEthernet networks.

  7. Predicting Cost/Reliability/Maintainability of Advanced General Aviation Avionics Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, M. R.; Kamins, M.; Mooz, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    A methodology is provided for assisting NASA in estimating the cost, reliability, and maintenance (CRM) requirements for general avionics equipment operating in the 1980's. Practical problems of predicting these factors are examined. The usefulness and short comings of different approaches for modeling coast and reliability estimates are discussed together with special problems caused by the lack of historical data on the cost of maintaining general aviation avionics. Suggestions are offered on how NASA might proceed in assessing cost reliability CRM implications in the absence of reliable generalized predictive models.

  8. The Application of Fiber Optic Wavelength Division Multiplexing in RF Avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ngo, Duc; Nguyen, Hung; Atiquzzaman, Mohammed; Sluss, James J., Jr.; Refai, Hakki H.

    2004-01-01

    This paper demonstrates a successful application of wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) to the avionics environment to support analog RF signal transmission. We investigate the simultaneous transmission of four RF signals (channels) over a single optical fiber. These four analog channels are sequentially multiplexed and demultiplexed at different points along a fiber optic backbone to more closely emulate the conditions found onboard aircraft. We present data from measurements of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), transmission response (loss and gain), group delay that defines phase distortion, and dynamic range that defines nonlinear distortion. The data indicate that WDM is well-suited for avionics applications.

  9. Validation of Digital Systems in Avionics and Flight Control Applications Handbook. Volume 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-01

    correctness. Elastic Mode Active control to increase the damping of Suppression (EMS) lightly damped structural bending modes excited by gusts. Electrical...CRITICAL 0ES160 TEST 00101,L111 PREPARE OLEI Psreet THRj AR’ CORDUCT ASSETS msTEL PlMs RAILS TEST PLAS ERUPENDERiT PREPARE $SSTEM1 PREP6RE CPI IV I...trajectory that may be described as: (a) Two dimensional (2D) - latitude, longitude. (b) Three dimension ( 3D ) - latitude, longitude, altitude. (c

  10. Digital Avionics Information System (DAIS). Volume II. Impact of DAIS Concept on Life Cycle Cost. Supplement.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    package. This was chosen as being representative of current non-DAIS software in that it is coded in assembly language; it is monolithic as opposed to...expression below. NNII(I) = I + PA() + PP(I) PA Number of new P coded repairable assemblies within the LRU. PP Number of new P coded consumable items...expression by adding the value SP to the NNII term. BLII(I) = I + PA() + PP() SP(I) PA Number of new P coded repairable assemblies within the LRU. PP Number

  11. Development and flight test experiences with a flight-crucial digital control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackall, Dale A.

    1988-01-01

    Engineers and scientists in the advanced fighter technology integration (AFTI) F-16 program investigated the integration of emerging technologies into an advanced fighter aircraft. AFTI's three major technologies included: flight-crucial digital control, decoupled aircraft flight control, and integration of avionics, flight control, and pilot displays. In addition to investigating improvements in fighter performance, researchers studied the generic problems confronting the designers of highly integrated flight-crucial digital control. An overview is provided of both the advantages and problems of integration digital control systems. Also, an examination of the specification, design, qualification, and flight test life-cycle phase is provided. An overview is given of the fault-tolerant design, multimoded decoupled flight control laws, and integrated avionics design. The approach to qualifying the software and system designs is discussed, and the effects of design choices on system qualification are highlighted.

  12. Infrared Avionics Signal Distribution using Wavelength Division Multiplexing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atiquzzaman, Mohammed; Sluss, Jim; Nguyen, Hung; Ngo, Duc

    2003-01-01

    Pilots in the cockpits of aircrafts currently communicate with ground stations using Radio Frequency (RF) signals. Antennas mounted outside the aircraft receive and transmit RF signals from and to the ground stations. The RF signals received at the antennas are sent to the cockpit using coaxial cables. As the number of antennas needed to provide more than one frequency band in aircrafts increases, RF distribution media (such as coaxial cable) adds to the complexity and weight of the cockpit wiring. Concomitantly, the safety and signal to noise ratio also decreases due to the use of RF signals. The University of Oklahoma is collaborating with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to develop optical fiber based schemes to replace the coaxial cable used for RF signal distribution within an aircraft. The project aims at exploiting emerging Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) techniques to reduce the weight of cabling, and increase the signal to noise ratio and reliability. This will be achieved by wavelength division multiplexing the signals from the various antennas and then demultiplexing the signals to recover the original signals at the cockpit. This paper will show that (i) RF signals can not only be wavelength multiplexed at the end of a fiber, but additional signals can be inserted into the middle of the fiber using WDM technology, and (ii) the signals can also be successfully extracted by tapping into the middle of the fiber. We are currently extending our previous laboratory prototype (which could multiplex signals only at the end of the fiber) to include additional multiplexing and demultiplexing of RF signals from the middle of the optical backbone with a view to validating the proof of concept, and carrying out measurements to determine the effectiveness of Wavelength Division Multiplexing for avionics applications. A test bed to perform measurements of several relevant parameters for various modulation schemes and frequencies (such as VHF

  13. Orion MPCV Service Module Avionics Ring Pallet Testing, Correlation, and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staab, Lucas; Akers, James; Suarez, Vicente; Jones, Trevor

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) is being designed to replace the Space Shuttle as the main manned spacecraft for the agency. Based on the predicted environments in the Service Module avionics ring, an isolation system was deemed necessary to protect the avionics packages carried by the spacecraft. Impact, sinusoidal, and random vibration testing were conducted on a prototype Orion Service Module avionics pallet in March 2010 at the NASA Glenn Research Center Structural Dynamics Laboratory (SDL). The pallet design utilized wire rope isolators to reduce the vibration levels seen by the avionics packages. The current pallet design utilizes the same wire rope isolators (M6-120-10) that were tested in March 2010. In an effort to save cost and schedule, the Finite Element Models of the prototype pallet tested in March 2010 were correlated. Frequency Response Function (FRF) comparisons, mode shape and frequency were all part of the correlation process. The non-linear behavior and the modeling the wire rope isolators proved to be the most difficult part of the correlation process. The correlated models of the wire rope isolators were taken from the prototype design and integrated into the current design for future frequency response analysis and component environment specification.

  14. Guidelines for application of fluorescent lamps in high-performance avionic backlight systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syroid, Daniel D.

    1997-07-01

    Fluorescent lamps have proven to be well suited for use in high performance avionic backlight systems as demonstrated by numerous production applications for both commercial and military cockpit displays. Cockpit display applications include: Boeing 777, new 737s, F-15, F-16, F-18, F-22, C- 130, Navy P3, NASA Space Shuttle and many others. Fluorescent lamp based backlights provide high luminance, high lumen efficiency, precision chromaticity and long life for avionic active matrix liquid crystal display applications. Lamps have been produced in many sizes and shapes. Lamp diameters range from 2.6 mm to over 20 mm and lengths for the larger diameter lamps range to over one meter. Highly convoluted serpentine lamp configurations are common as are both hot and cold cathode electrode designs. This paper will review fluorescent lamp operating principles, discuss typical requirements for avionic grade lamps, compare avionic and laptop backlight designs and provide guidelines for the proper application of lamps and performance choices that must be made to attain optimum system performance considering high luminance output, system efficiency, dimming range and cost.

  15. 78 FR 70892 - Airworthiness Directives; ATR-GIE Avions de Transport Régional Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-27

    ... directive (AD) 2009-18- 18, which applies to certain ATR--GIE Avions de Transport R gional Model ATR42 and ATR72 airplanes. AD 2009-18-18 requires repetitive inspections for damage and absence of repair of the cockpit forward side windows, and replacement if necessary. Since we issued that AD, we received...

  16. Silicon Nitride and Silicon Carbide Ceramics Structural Components in Avionics and Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berroth, Karl

    2014-06-01

    In the paper, Silicon Nitride and silicon carbide components for avionics and space are described. These lightweight stiff and strong materials with low and very low CTE and high thermal conductivity provide means for new designs and higher resolution in passive structures for optical instruments. Material properties and application examples are discussed.

  17. Space shuttle program: Shuttle Avionics Integration Laboratory. Volume 7: Logistics management plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The logistics management plan for the shuttle avionics integration laboratory defines the organization, disciplines, and methodology for managing and controlling logistics support. Those elements requiring management include maintainability and reliability, maintenance planning, support and test equipment, supply support, transportation and handling, technical data, facilities, personnel and training, funding, and management data.

  18. General aviation activity and avionics survey. Annual summary report, CY 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-03-01

    This report presents the results and a description of the 1985 General Aviation Activity and Avionics Survey. The survey was conducted during 1986 by the FAA to obtain information on the activity and avionics of the United States registered general aviation aircraft fleet, the dominant component of civil aviation in the U.S. The survey was based on a statistically selected sample of about 10.3 percent of the general aviation fleet. A responses rate of 63.7 percent was obtained. Survey results based upon response but are expanded upward to represent the total population. Survey results revealed that during 1985 an estimated 34.1 million hours of flying time were logged and 88.7 million operations were performed by the 210,654 active general aviation aircraft in the U.S. fleet. The mean annual flight time per aircraft was 158.2 hours. The active aircraft represented about 77.9 percent of the registered general aviation fleet. The report contains breakdowns of these and other statistics by manufacturer/model group, aircraft, state and region of based aircraft, and primary use. Also included are fuel consumption, lifetime airframe hours, avionics, engine hours, and miles flown estimates, as well as tables for detailed analysis of the avionics capabilities of the general aviation fleet. New to the report this year are estimates of the number of landings, IFR hours flown, and the cost and grade of fuel consumed by the GA fleet.

  19. Avionics Instrument Systems Specialist Career Ladder: AFSCs 32531, 32551, 31571, and 32591. Occupational Survey Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Air Force Occupational Measurement Center, Lackland AFB, TX.

    The Avionics Instrument Systems career ladder (AFSC 325X1) provides flight line and shop maintenance training on aircraft instrument systems, electromechancial instruments, components, and test equipment. Duties involve inspecting, removing, installing, repairing, operating, troubleshooting, overhauling, and modifying systems such as flight and…

  20. Quantitative EOH and FEM hybrid study of vibration characteristics of avionics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leak, Chris E.; Pryputniewicz, Ryszard J.

    1995-06-01

    One of the major challenges in the development of avionics is the requirement to assure their reliable functionality while subjected to the actual operating conditions which are static and dynamic in nature. Of particular interest to the developments presented in this paper are the dynamic loading conditions. Because the avionics have certain mass and elasticity, they respond to the loads encountered during operation with a specific vibration behavior. Therefore, development of reliable avionics packages depends upon our ability to determine the dynamic characteristics which define and control their vibration behavior, particularly as it relates to the dynamic environment within an aircraft which is a major contributor to the failure of airborne avionic systems. In this paper, computational and experimental hybrid methodolgy is used to quantitatively study the vibration characteristics of avionics. The computational methodology is based on the finite element method. The experimental methodology is based on the electro-optic holography method, which allows direct electro- optic recording, processing, and display of the laser holograms at the rate of 30 holograms per second, making it capable of producing quantitative data in nearly real-time. Using the electro- optic holography method, displacement magnitudes in the submicron range are measured noninvasively over the full field of view, as a function of the resonance frequencies. Although some of the experimentally observed mode shapes were not predicted using the computational model employed in this study, the correlation between the results obtained using the finite element and the electro-optic holography methods was otherwise good and the agreement between the corresponding resonance frequencies was within 2%.

  1. Spacecraft Avionics Software Development Then and Now: Different but the Same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangieri, Mark L.; Garman, John (Jack); Vice, Jason

    2012-01-01

    NASA has always been in the business of balancing new technologies and techniques to achieve human space travel objectives. NASA s historic Software Production Facility (SPF) was developed to serve complex avionics software solutions during an era dominated by mainframes, tape drives, and lower level programming languages. These systems have proven themselves resilient enough to serve the Shuttle Orbiter Avionics life cycle for decades. The SPF and its predecessor the Software Development Lab (SDL) at NASA s Johnson Space Center (JSC) hosted flight software (FSW) engineering, development, simulation, and test. It was active from the beginning of Shuttle Orbiter development in 1972 through the end of the shuttle program in the summer of 2011 almost 40 years. NASA s Kedalion engineering analysis lab is on the forefront of validating and using many contemporary avionics HW/SW development and integration techniques, which represent new paradigms to NASA s heritage culture in avionics software engineering. Kedalion has validated many of the Orion project s HW/SW engineering techniques borrowed from the adjacent commercial aircraft avionics environment, inserting new techniques and skills into the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) Orion program. Using contemporary agile techniques, COTS products, early rapid prototyping, in-house expertise and tools, and customer collaboration, NASA has adopted a cost effective paradigm that is currently serving Orion effectively. This paper will explore and contrast differences in technology employed over the years of NASA s space program, due largely to technological advances in hardware and software systems, while acknowledging that the basic software engineering and integration paradigms share many similarities.

  2. Wireless Avionics Packet to Support Fault Tolerance for Flight Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Block, Gary L.; Whitaker, William D.; Dillon, James W.; Lux, James P.; Ahmad, Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    In this protocol and packet format, data traffic is monitored by all network interfaces to determine the health of transmitter and subsystems. When failures are detected, the network inter face applies its recover y policies to provide continued service despite the presence of faults. The protocol, packet format, and inter face are independent of the data link technology used. The current demonstration system supports both commercial off-the-shelf wireless connections and wired Ethernet connections. Other technologies such as 1553 or serial data links can be used for the network backbone. The Wireless Avionics packet is divided into three parts: a header, a data payload, and a checksum. The header has the following components: magic number, version, quality of service, time to live, sending transceiver, function code, payload length, source Application Data Interface (ADI) address, destination ADI address, sending node address, target node address, and a sequence number. The magic number is used to identify WAV packets, and allows the packet format to be updated in the future. The quality of service field allows routing decisions to be made based on this value and can be used to route critical management data over a dedicated channel. The time to live value is used to discard misrouted packets while the source transceiver is updated at each hop. This information is used to monitor the health of each transceiver in the network. To identify the packet type, the function code is used. Besides having a regular data packet, the system supports diagnostic packets for fault detection and isolation. The payload length specifies the number of data bytes in the payload, and this supports variable-length packets in the network. The source ADI is the address of the originating interface. This can be used by the destination application to identify the originating source of the packet where the address consists of a subnet, subsystem class within the subnet, a subsystem unit

  3. An avionics sensitivity study. Volume 2: Evaluation of airborne navigation system performance during RNAV/MLS transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heine, W.

    1976-01-01

    A computer simulation was modified to generate a suitable data base for performance of an avionics sensitivity study during RNAV/MLS transition. The avionics sensitivity data provides information necessary to establish requirements for additional guidance law design during transition and to establish airspace requirements for maneuvering to null out any residual RNAV errors upon MLS transition. The data base is also beneficial as planning information for subsequent flight testing.

  4. Spacecraft guidance, navigation, and control requirements for an intelligent plug-n-play avionics (PAPA) architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Nilesh; Krishnakumar, Kalmaje

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this research is to design an intelligent plug-n-play avionics system that provides a reconfigurable platform for supporting the guidance, navigation and control (GN&C) requirements for different elements of the space exploration mission. The focus of this study is to look at the specific requirements for a spacecraft that needs to go from earth to moon and back. In this regard we will identify the different GN&C problems in various phases of flight that need to be addressed for designing such a plug-n-play avionics system. The Apollo and the Space Shuttle programs provide rich literature in terms of understanding some of the general GN&C requirements for a space vehicle. The relevant literature is reviewed which helps in narrowing down the different GN&C algorithms that need to be supported along with their individual requirements.

  5. EXOMARS Composite Avionics Description and its Validation on the Test Benches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagna, M.; Capuano, M.; Cassi, C.

    2008-08-01

    The paper describes the Exomars avionics concept with emphasis on the proposed approach for its validation during various project phases. After a brief description of the three modules composing Exomars, the Carrier Module (CM), the Descent Module (DM) and the Rover Module (RM), the current status of the design of the composite avionics based on the presence of a single computer shared between the Carrier and the Descent modules is presented. Details will be given in particular on development testing of the GNC SW to be used in the Entry Descent and Landing phase handled by the Descent Module. The description of the End to End Entry simulator and its usage in the validation phase is also provided.

  6. Workstation-Based Avionics Simulator to Support Mars Science Laboratory Flight Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriquez, David; Canham, Timothy; Chang, Johnny T.; McMahon, Elihu

    2008-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory developed the WorkStation TestSet (WSTS) to support flight software development. The WSTS is the non-real-time flight avionics simulator that is designed to be completely software-based and run on a workstation class Linux PC. This provides flight software developers with their own virtual avionics testbed and allows device-level and functional software testing when hardware testbeds are either not yet available or have limited availability. The WSTS has successfully off-loaded many flight software development activities from the project testbeds. At the writing of this paper, the WSTS has averaged an order of magnitude more usage than the project's hardware testbeds.

  7. Hardware Implementation of COTS Avionics System on Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Yoo-Hsiu; Kumar, Parth; Ishihara, Abraham; Ippolito, Corey

    2010-01-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) can serve as low cost and low risk platforms for flight testing in Aeronautics research. The NASA Exploration Aerial Vehicle (EAV) and Experimental Sensor-Controlled Aerial Vehicle (X-SCAV) UAVs were developed in support of control systems research at NASA Ames Research Center. The avionics hardware for both systems has been redesigned and updated, and the structure of the EAV has been further strengthened. Preliminary tests show the avionics operate properly in the new configuration. A linear model for the EAV also was estimated from flight data, and was verified in simulation. These modifications and results prepare the EAV and X-SCAV to be used in a wide variety of flight research projects.

  8. The 727 approach energy management system avionics specification (preliminary)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, D. O.; Lambregts, A. A.

    1976-01-01

    Hardware and software requirements for an Approach Energy Management System (AEMS) consisting of an airborne digital computer and cockpit displays are presented. The displays provide the pilot with a visual indication of when to manually operate the gear, flaps, and throttles during a delayed flap approach so as to reduce approach time, fuel consumption, and community noise. The AEMS is an independent system that does not interact with other navigation or control systems, and is compatible with manually flown or autopilot coupled approaches. Operational use of the AEMS requires a DME ground station colocated with the flight path reference.

  9. Navy Should Join the Air Force and Army Program to Develop an Advanced Integrated Avionics System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-17

    to be consolidated into a single package to conserve space, save weight, and reduce costs. This report points out the potential benefits of avionics...consolidation and recommends the Navy join in a demonstration program now being conducted by the Air Force and Army to exploit such benefits . Lii LLq...the cost of a separate Navy development program. Navy officials acknowledge the benefits of ICNIA, and recognize that it will cost more for the Navy

  10. Avionic technology testing by using a cognitive neurometric index: A study with professional helicopter pilots.

    PubMed

    Borghini, Gianluca; Aricò, Pietro; Di Flumeri, Gianluca; Salinari, Serenella; Colosimo, Alfredo; Bonelli, Stefano; Napoletano, Linda; Ferreira, Ana; Babiloni, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the possibility to evaluate the impact of different avionic technologies on the mental workload of helicopter's pilots by measuring their brain activity with the EEG during a series of simulated missions carried out at AgustaWestland facilities in Yeovil (UK). The tested avionic technologies were: i) Head-Up Display (HUD); ii) Head-Mounted Display (HMD); iii) Full Conformal symbology (FC); iv) Flight Guidance (FG) symbology; v) Synthetic Vision System (SVS); and vi) Radar Obstacles (RO) detection system. It has been already demonstrated that in cognitive tasks, when the cerebral workload increases the EEG power spectral density (PSD) in theta band over frontal areas increases, and the EEG PSD in alpha band decreases over parietal areas. A mental workload index (MWL) has been here defined as the ratio between the frontal theta and parietal alpha EEG PSD values. Such index has been used for testing and comparing the different avionic technologies. Results suggested that the HUD provided a significant (p<;.05) workload reduction across all the flight scenarios with respect to the other technologies. In addition, the simultaneous use of FC and FG technologies (FC+FG) produced a significant decrement of the workload (p<;.01) with respect to the use of only the FC. Moreover, the use of the SVS technology provided on Head Down Display (HDD) with the simultaneous use of FC+FG and the RO seemed to produce a lower cerebral workload when compared with the use of only the FC. Interestingly, the workload estimation by means of subjective measures, provided by pilots through a NASA-TLX questionnaire, did not provide any significant differences among the different flight scenarios. These results suggested that the proposed MWL cognitive neurometrics could be used as a reliable measure of the user's mental workload, being a valid indicator for the comparison and the test of different avionic technologies.

  11. Minimizing the Risks of Diminishing Manufacturing Sources and Material Shortages: Evaluating Electronic Avionics Lifecycle Sustainment Strategies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    RESEARCH PROJECT Presented to the Faculty Graduate School of Logistics and Acquisition Management Air Force Institute of Technology Air...avionic components. The overall research question asks how obsolescence management can be improved in the Air Force. This project utilizes two... production lines and in many cases to new firms all together. Gertler projects that production lines manufacturing parts and assemblies used early in the F

  12. Demonstration Advanced Avionics System (DAAS) functional description. [Cessna 402B aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    A comprehensive set of general aviation avionics were defined for integration into an advanced hardware mechanization for demonstration in a Cessna 402B aircraft. Block diagrams are shown and system and computer architecture as well as significant hardware elements are described. The multifunction integrated data control center and electronic horizontal situation indicator are discussed. The functions that the DAAS will perform are examined. This function definition is the basis for the DAAS hardware and software design.

  13. Development of a production process for COTS glass remanufacture for use in avionic displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogg, David; MacKenzie, Iain C.

    2001-09-01

    The use of commercially available AMLCD panels to satisfy existing avionic apertures often requires re-manufacturing of the native 4:3 aspect ration panels. The approach adopted by BAE SYSTEMS to develop a robust production process to enable this is described in detail. Evidence and test results are presented which indicates that the cutting process has not compromised the seal integrity of the re- manufactured panels.

  14. A COTS-derived NVG compatible 20.1" avionics display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, J.; Cavalcanti, A.

    2007-04-01

    Many avionics displays, particularly for cockpit applications require NVG compatibility. Unusually, the mission definition for a new maritime helicopter has identified a need for NVG compatibility for all of the mission-system displays, including the 20.1" diagonal, SXGA resolution Tactical Workstation Display (TWD) located in the rear cabin. This paper will describe some design tradeoff considerations and describe both some required and measured performance parameters.

  15. Advanced Avionics and Processor Systems for a Flexible Space Exploration Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, Andrew S.; Adams, James H.; Smith, Leigh M.; Johnson, Michael A.; Cressler, John D.

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Avionics and Processor Systems (AAPS) project, formerly known as the Radiation Hardened Electronics for Space Environments (RHESE) project, endeavors to develop advanced avionic and processor technologies anticipated to be used by NASA s currently evolving space exploration architectures. The AAPS project is a part of the Exploration Technology Development Program, which funds an entire suite of technologies that are aimed at enabling NASA s ability to explore beyond low earth orbit. NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) manages the AAPS project. AAPS uses a broad-scoped approach to developing avionic and processor systems. Investment areas include advanced electronic designs and technologies capable of providing environmental hardness, reconfigurable computing techniques, software tools for radiation effects assessment, and radiation environment modeling tools. Near-term emphasis within the multiple AAPS tasks focuses on developing prototype components using semiconductor processes and materials (such as Silicon-Germanium (SiGe)) to enhance a device s tolerance to radiation events and low temperature environments. As the SiGe technology will culminate in a delivered prototype this fiscal year, the project emphasis shifts its focus to developing low-power, high efficiency total processor hardening techniques. In addition to processor development, the project endeavors to demonstrate techniques applicable to reconfigurable computing and partially reconfigurable Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs). This capability enables avionic architectures the ability to develop FPGA-based, radiation tolerant processor boards that can serve in multiple physical locations throughout the spacecraft and perform multiple functions during the course of the mission. The individual tasks that comprise AAPS are diverse, yet united in the common endeavor to develop electronics capable of operating within the harsh environment of space. Specifically, the AAPS tasks for

  16. The Effect of Failing to Recapitalize the B-52H Defensive Avionics System on Future Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    The Air Force has recently upgraded the B-52 aircraft with an Avionics Midlife Improvement program. This program is focused on the offensive...from the data gathered and survey results do not support the thesis conclusion that there is an immediate crisis or impending failure of the current...of these actions listed above are just alleviating a potential current MICAP situation by crisis management and focusing funding on the current

  17. Validation Methods for Fault-Tolerant avionics and control systems, working group meeting 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The proceedings of the first working group meeting on validation methods for fault tolerant computer design are presented. The state of the art in fault tolerant computer validation was examined in order to provide a framework for future discussions concerning research issues for the validation of fault tolerant avionics and flight control systems. The development of positions concerning critical aspects of the validation process are given.

  18. A Costas loop with tangent error signal for use in Navstar GPS avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Painter, J. H.; Mcclung, D. A.; Reininger, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    This paper describes an augmented Costas loop for use in low-cost avionics for the Navstar Global Positioning System. A standard loop has been augmented with supplementing feed-back to give a tracking error voltage proportional to the tangent of the phase error, rather than to the sine. The augmented loop yields increased performance in the presence of input phase acceleration and jerk, as caused by maneuvers of the GPS user vehicle. Many Monte Carlo simulation results are given.

  19. An overview of the demonstration advanced avionics system guest pilot evaluation conducted at Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callas, G. P.; Hardy, G. H.; Denery, D. G.

    1983-01-01

    The guest pilot flight evaluation of the Demonstration Advanced Avionics System (DAAS) is discussed. The results are based on the fifty-nine questionnaires that were completed by the participants. The primary purpose of the pilot evaluation was to expose the Demonstration Advanced Avionics System to the various segments of the general aviation community and solicit comments in order to determine the effectiveness of integrated avionics for general aviation. Segments of the community that were represented in the evaluation are listed. A total of sixty-four (64) flights were conducted in which one hundred and seventeen (117) pilots and observers participated. It was felt that the exposure each subject had with the DAAS was too short to adequately assess the training requirements, pilot workload, and the reconfiguration concept of the DAAS. It is recommended that an operational evaluation of the DAAS be made to assess: the training requirements or varying experience levels, the pilot workload in the ATC environment with unplanned route changes, and the viability of the reconfiguration concept for failures.

  20. An integrated autonomous rendezvous and docking system architecture using Centaur modern avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Kurt

    1991-01-01

    The avionics system for the Centaur upper stage is in the process of being modernized with the current state-of-the-art in strapdown inertial guidance equipment. This equipment includes an integrated flight control processor with a ring laser gyro based inertial guidance system. This inertial navigation unit (INU) uses two MIL-STD-1750A processors and communicates over the MIL-STD-1553B data bus. Commands are translated into load activation through a Remote Control Unit (RCU) which incorporates the use of solid state relays. Also, a programmable data acquisition system replaces separate multiplexer and signal conditioning units. This modern avionics suite is currently being enhanced through independent research and development programs to provide autonomous rendezvous and docking capability using advanced cruise missile image processing technology and integrated GPS navigational aids. A system concept was developed to combine these technologies in order to achieve a fully autonomous rendezvous, docking, and autoland capability. The current system architecture and the evolution of this architecture using advanced modular avionics concepts being pursued for the National Launch System are discussed.

  1. NEXUS Scalable and Distributed Next-Generation Avionics Bus for Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Yutao; Shalom, Eddy; Chau, Savio N.; Some, Raphael R.; Bolotin, Gary S.

    2011-01-01

    A paper discusses NEXUS, a common, next-generation avionics interconnect that is transparently compatible with wired, fiber-optic, and RF physical layers; provides a flexible, scalable, packet switched topology; is fault-tolerant with sub-microsecond detection/recovery latency; has scalable bandwidth from 1 Kbps to 10 Gbps; has guaranteed real-time determinism with sub-microsecond latency/jitter; has built-in testability; features low power consumption (< 100 mW per Gbps); is lightweight with about a 5,000-logic-gate footprint; and is implemented in a small Bus Interface Unit (BIU) with reconfigurable back-end providing interface to legacy subsystems. NEXUS enhances a commercial interconnect standard, Serial RapidIO, to meet avionics interconnect requirements without breaking the standard. This unified interconnect technology can be used to meet performance, power, size, and reliability requirements of all ranges of equipment, sensors, and actuators at chip-to-chip, board-to-board, or box-to-box boundary. Early results from in-house modeling activity of Serial RapidIO using VisualSim indicate that the use of a switched, high-performance avionics network will provide a quantum leap in spacecraft onboard science and autonomy capability for science and exploration missions.

  2. Silicon Carbide Mixers Demonstrated to Improve the Interference Immunity of Radio-Based Aircraft Avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.

    1998-01-01

    Concern over the interference of stray radiofrequency (RF) emissions with key aircraft avionics is evident during takeoff and landing of every commercial flight when the flight attendant requests that all portable electronics be switched off. The operation of key radio-based avionics (such as glide-slope and localizer approach instruments) depends on the ability of front-end RF receivers to detect and amplify desired information signals while rejecting interference from undesired RF sources both inside and outside the aircraft. Incidents where key navigation and approach avionics malfunction because of RF interference clearly represent an increasing threat to flight safety as the radio spectrum becomes more crowded. In an initial feasibility experiment, the U.S. Army Research Laboratory and the NASA Lewis Research Center recently demonstrated the strategic use of silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor components to significantly reduce the susceptibility of an RF receiver circuit to undesired RF interference. A pair of silicon carbide mixer diodes successfully reduced RF interference (intermodulation distortion) in a prototype receiver circuit by a factor of 10 (20 dB) in comparison to a pair of commercial silicon-based mixer diodes.

  3. General aviation activity and avionics survey. 1978. Annual summary report cy 1978

    SciTech Connect

    Schwenk, J.C.

    1980-03-01

    This report presents the results and a description of the 1978 General Aviation Activity and Avionics Survey. The survey was conducted during early 1979 by the FAA to obtain information on the activity and avionics of the United States registered general aviation aircraft fleet, the dominant component of civil aviation in the U.S. The survey was based on a statistically selected sample of about 13.3 percent of the general aviation fleet and obtained a response rate of 74 percent. Survey results are based upon responses but are expanded upward to represent the total population. Survey results revealed that during 1978 an estimated 39.4 million hours of flying time were logged by the 198,778 active general aviation aircraft in the U.S. fleet, yielding a mean annual flight time per aircraft of 197.7 hours. The active aircraft represented 85 percent of the registered general aviation fleet. The report contains breakdowns of these and other statistics by manufacturer/model group, aircraft type, state and region of based aircraft, and primary use. Also included are fuel consumption, lifetime airframe hours, avionics, and engine hours estimates.

  4. A Fault Tolerant System for an Integrated Avionics Sensor Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caglayan, A. K.; Lancraft, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    An aircraft sensor fault tolerant system methodology for the Transport Systems Research Vehicle in a Microwave Landing System (MLS) environment is described. The fault tolerant system provides reliable estimates in the presence of possible failures both in ground-based navigation aids, and in on-board flight control and inertial sensors. Sensor failures are identified by utilizing the analytic relationships between the various sensors arising from the aircraft point mass equations of motion. The estimation and failure detection performance of the software implementation (called FINDS) of the developed system was analyzed on a nonlinear digital simulation of the research aircraft. Simulation results showing the detection performance of FINDS, using a dual redundant sensor compliment, are presented for bias, hardover, null, ramp, increased noise and scale factor failures. In general, the results show that FINDS can distinguish between normal operating sensor errors and failures while providing an excellent detection speed for bias failures in the MLS, indicated airspeed, attitude and radar altimeter sensors.

  5. Digital Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Edward A.; Urs, Shalini R.

    2002-01-01

    Provides an overview of digital libraries research, practice, and literature. Highlights include new technologies; redefining roles; historical background; trends; creating digital content, including conversion; metadata; organizing digital resources; services; access; information retrieval; searching; natural language processing; visualization;…

  6. An Integrated Approach to Functional Engineering: An Engineering Database for Harness, Avionics and Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piras, Annamaria; Malucchi, Giovanni

    2012-08-01

    In the design and development phase of a new program one of the critical aspects is the integration of all the functional requirements of the system and the control of the overall consistency between the identified needs on one side and the available resources on the other side, especially when both the required needs and available resources are not yet consolidated, but they are evolving as the program maturity increases.The Integrated Engineering Harness Avionics and Software database (IDEHAS) is a tool that has been developed to support this process in the frame of the Avionics and Software disciplines through the different phases of the program. The tool is in fact designed to allow an incremental build up of the avionics and software systems, from the description of the high level architectural data (available in the early stages of the program) to the definition of the pin to pin connectivity information (typically consolidated in the design finalization stages) and finally to the construction and validation of the detailed telemetry parameters and commands to be used in the test phases and in the Mission Control Centre. The key feature of this approach and of the associated tool is that it allows the definition and the maintenance / update of all these data in a single, consistent environment.On one side a system level and concurrent approach requires the feasibility to easily integrate and update the best data available since the early stages of a program in order to improve confidence in the consistency and to control the design information.On the other side, the amount of information of different typologies and the cross-relationships among the data imply highly consolidated structures requiring lot of checks to guarantee the data content consistency with negative effects on simplicity and flexibility and often limiting the attention to special needs and to the interfaces with other disciplines.

  7. AVION: A detailed report on the preliminary design of a 79-passenger, high-efficiency, commercial transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayfield, William; Perkins, Brett; Rogan, William; Schuessler, Randall; Stockert, Joe

    1990-01-01

    The Avion is the result of an investigation into the preliminary design for a high-efficiency commercial transport aircraft. The Avion is designed to carry 79 passengers and a crew of five through a range of 1,500 nm at 455 kts (M=0.78 at 32,000 ft). It has a gross take-off weight of 77,000 lb and an empty weight of 42,400 lb. Currently there are no American-built aircraft designed to fit the 60 to 90 passenger, short/medium range marketplace. The Avion gathers the premier engineering achievements of flight technology and integrates them into an aircraft which will challenge the current standards of flight efficiency, reliability, and performance. The Avion will increase flight efficiency through reduction of structural weight and the improvement of aerodynamic characteristics and propulsion systems. Its design departs from conventional aircraft design tradition with the incorporation of a three-lifting-surface (or tri-wing) configuration. Further aerodynamic improvements are obtained through modest main wing forward sweeping, variable incidence canards, aerodynamic coupling between the canard and main wing, leading edge extensions, winglets, an aerodynamic tailcone, and a T-tail empennage. The Avion is propelled by propfans, which are one of the most promising developments for raising propulsive efficiencies at high subsonic Mach numbers. Special attention is placed on overall configuration, fuselage layout, performance estimations, component weight estimations, and planform design. Leading U.S. technology promises highly efficient flight for the 21st century; the Avion will fulfill this promise to passenger transport aviation.

  8. Description of a dual fail operational redundant strapdown inertial measurement unit for integrated avionics systems research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, W. H.; Morrell, F. R.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental redundant strapdown inertial measurement unit (RSDIMU) is developed as a link to satisfy safety and reliability considerations in the integrated avionics concept. The unit includes four two degree-of-freedom tuned rotor gyros, and four accelerometers in a skewed and separable semioctahedral array. These sensors are coupled to four microprocessors which compensate sensor errors. These microprocessors are interfaced with two flight computers which process failure detection, isolation, redundancy management, and general flight control/navigation algorithms. Since the RSDIMU is a developmental unit, it is imperative that the flight computers provide special visibility and facility in algorithm modification.

  9. Cycle O (CY 1991) NLS trade studies and analyses, book 2. Part 1: Avionics and systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Richard; Kirkland, Zach

    1992-01-01

    An assessment was conducted to determine the maximum LH2 tank stretch capability based on the constraints of the manufacturing, tooling and facilities at the Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans, Louisiana. The maximum tank stretch was determined to be 5 ft. with minor or no modifications, a stretch of 11 ft. with some possible facility modifications and beyond 11 ft. significant new facilities are required. A cost analysis was performed to evaluate the impacts for various stretch lengths. Tasks that were defined to perform trades and studies regarding the best approach to meet requirements for the National Launch System Avionics are also discussed.

  10. Customer Avionics Interface Development and Analysis (CAIDA) Lab DEWESoft Display Creation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffey, Connor

    2015-01-01

    The Customer Avionics Interface Development and Analysis (CAIDA) Lab supports the testing of the Launch Control System (LCS), NASA's command and control system for the Space Launch System (SLS), Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV), and ground support equipment. The objectives of the year-long internship were to support day-to-day operations of the CAIDA Lab, create prelaunch and tracking displays for Orion's Exploration Flight Test 1 (EFT-1), and create a program to automate the creation of displays for SLS and MPCV to be used by CAIDA and the Record and Playback Subsystem (RPS).

  11. Investigation of RF Emissions From Wireless Networks as a Threat to Avionic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salud, Maria Theresa P.; Williams, Reuben A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The paper focuses on understanding and obtaining preliminary measurements of radiated field (RF) emissions of laptop/wireless local area network (WLAN) systems. This work is part of a larger research project to measure radiated emissions of wireless devices to provide a better understanding for potential interference with crucial aircraft avionics systems. A reverberation chamber data collection process is included, as well as recommendations for additional tests. Analysis of measurements from devices under test (DUTs) proved inconclusive for addressing potential interference issues. Continued effort is expected to result in a complete easily reproducible test protocol. The data and protocol presented here are considered preliminary.

  12. Avionics sensor simulation and prototype design workstation using COTS reconfigurable computing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falasco, James

    2007-04-01

    This paper reviews hardware and software solutions that allow for rapid prototyping of new or modified embedded avionics sensor designs, mission payloads and functional sub assemblies. We define reconfigurable computing in the context of being able to place various PMC modules depending upon mission scenarios onto a base SBC (Single Board Computer). This SBC could be either a distributed or shared memory architecture concept and have either two or four PPC7447 A/7448 processor clusters. In certain scenarios, various combinations of boards could be combined in order to provide a heterogeneous computing environment.

  13. Strategic avionics technology definition studies. Subtask 3-1A: Electrical Actuation (ELA) systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lum, Ben T. F.; Pond, Charles; Dermott, William

    1993-01-01

    This interim report presents the preliminary results of an electrical actuation (ELA) system study (subtask TA3-1A) to support the NASA strategic avionics technology definition studies. The final report of this ELA study is scheduled for September 30, 1993. The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following ELA technology demonstration testing; ELA system baseline; power and energy requirements for shuttle effector systems; power efficiency and losses of ELA effector systems; and power and energy requirements for ELA power sources.

  14. Modeling and Simulation of Avionics Systems and Command, Control and Communications Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    SIMULATORS FOR MILITARY TRAINING by JOrlansky and JStrlnS 22 UTILISATION D’UN LANGAGE EVOLUE POUR LES SIMULATEURS D’AVIONS par M.G.Dreyfus 23 SIMULATION OF...require one single word of memory comprising 60 bits (for a CDC computer). This is a memory utilisation of only 1.7%. To keep storage requirements...threat, computer proIrams separate from the system’s real time software are involved. * These programs utilise flight-path models using known aircraft

  15. Description of a dual fail-operational redundant strapdown inertial measurement unit for integrated avionics systems research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, W. H.; Morrell, F. R.

    1981-01-01

    Attention is given to a redundant strapdown inertial measurement unit for integrated avionics. The system consists of four two-degree-of-freedom turned rotor gyros and four two-degree-of-freedom accelerometers in a skewed and separable semi-octahedral array. The unit is coupled through instrument electronics to two flight computers which compensate sensor errors. The flight computers are interfaced to the microprocessors and process failure detection, isolation, redundancy management and flight control/navigation algorithms. The unit provides dual fail-operational performance and has data processing frequencies consistent with integrated avionics concepts presently planned.

  16. Digital control of highly augmented combat rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, Mark B.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed concepts for the next generation of combat helicopters are to be embodied in a complex, highly maneuverable, multiroled vehicle with avionics systems. Single pilot and nap-of-the-Earth operations require handling qualities which minimize the involvement of the pilot in basic stabilization tasks. To meet these requirements will demand a full authority, high-gain, multimode, multiply-redundant, digital flight-control system. The gap between these requirements and current low-authority, low-bandwidth operational rotorcraft flight-control technology is considerable. This research aims at smoothing the transition between current technology and advanced concept requirements. The state of the art of high-bandwidth digital flight-control systems are reviewed; areas of specific concern for flight-control systems of modern combat are exposed; and the important concepts are illustrated in design and analysis of high-gain, digital systems with a detailed case study involving a current rotorcraft system. Approximate and exact methods are explained and illustrated for treating the important concerns which are unique to digital systems.

  17. Space shuttle digital flight control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minott, G. M.; Peller, J. B.; Cox, K. J.

    1976-01-01

    The space shuttle digital, fly by wire, flight control system presents an interesting challenge in avionics system design. In residence in each of four redundant general purpose computers at lift off are the guidance, navigation, and control algorithms for the entire flight. The mission is divided into several flight segments: first stage ascent, second stage ascent; abort to launch site, abort once around; on orbit operations, entry, terminal area energy management; and approach and landing. The FCS is complicated in that it must perform the functions to fly the shuttle as a boost vehicle, as a spacecraft, as a reentry vehicle, and as a conventional aircraft. The crew is provided with both manual and automatic modes of operations in all flight phases including touchdown and rollout.

  18. Development of Integrated Modular Avionics Application Based on Simulink and XtratuM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fons-Albert, Borja; Usach-Molina, Hector; Vila-Carbo, Joan; Crespo-Lorente, Alfons

    2013-08-01

    This paper presents an integral approach for designing avionics applications that meets the requirements for software development and execution of this application domain. Software design follows the Model-Based design process and is performed in Simulink. This approach allows easy and quick testbench development and helps satisfying DO-178B requirements through the use of proper tools. The software execution platform is based on XtratuM, a minimal bare-metal hypervisor designed in our research group. XtratuM provides support for IMA-SP (Integrated Modular Avionics for Space) architectures. This approach allows the code generation of a Simulink model to be executed on top of Lithos as XtratuM partition. Lithos is a ARINC-653 compliant RTOS for XtratuM. The paper concentrates in how to smoothly port Simulink designs to XtratuM solving problems like application partitioning, automatic code generation, real-time tasking, interfacing, and others. This process is illustrated with an autopilot design test using a flight simulator.

  19. Integrated Avionics System (IAS), Integrating 3-D Technology On A Spacecraft Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Don J.; Halpert, Gerald

    1999-01-01

    As spacecraft designs converge toward miniaturization, and with the volumetric and mass challenges placed on avionics, programs will continue to advance the "state of the art" in spacecraft system development with new challenges to reduce power, mass and volume. Traditionally, the trend is to focus on high-density 3-D packaging technologies. Industry has made significant progress in 3-D technologies, and other related internal and external interconnection schemes. Although new technologies have improved packaging densities, a system packaging architecture is required that not only reduces spacecraft volume and mass budgets, but increase integration efficiencies, provide modularity and flexibility to accommodate multiple missions while maintaining a low recurring cost. With these challenges in mind, a novel system packaging approach incorporates solutions that provide broader environmental applications, more flexible system interconnectivity, scalability, and simplified assembly test and integration schemes. The Integrated Avionics System (IAS) provides for a low-mass, modular distributed or centralized packaging architecture which combines ridged-flex technologies, high-density COTS hardware and a new 3-D mechanical packaging approach, Horizontal Mounted Cube (HMC). This paper will describe the fundamental elements of the IAS, HMC hardware design, system integration and environmental test results.

  20. Aerodynamics of the advanced launch system (ALS) propulsion and avionics (P/A) module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Stan; Savage, Dick

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the design and testing of candidate Advanced Launch System (ALS) Propulsion and Avionics (P/A) Module configurations. The P/A Module is a key element of future launch systems because it is essential to the recovery and reuse of high-value propulsion and avionics hardware. The ALS approach involves landing of first stage (booster) and/or second stage (core) P/A modules near the launch site to minimize logistics and refurbishment cost. The key issue addressed herein is the aerodynamic design of the P/A module, including the stability characteristics and the lift-to-drag (L/D) performance required to achieve the necessary landing guidance accuracy. The reference P/A module configuration was found to be statically stable for the desired flight regime, to provide adequate L/D for targeting, and to have effective modulation of the L/D performance using a body flap. The hypersonic aerodynamic trends for nose corner radius, boattail angle and body flap deflections were consistent with pretest predictions. However, the levels for the L/D and axial force for hypersonic Mach numbers were overpredicted by impact theories.

  1. Search and Rescue Aircrewman/HH3F Avionics, 2-11. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This self-paced, individualized course, adapted from military curriculum materials for use in vocational and technical education, teaches students the skills needed to become a qualified avionics worker and aircrew rescuer on the HH-3F helicopter. The course materials consist of four pamphlets: two student workbooks and two student syllabuses. The…

  2. Digital imaging.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Gregory B

    2009-07-01

    Medical imaging is rapidly moving toward a digital-based image system. An understanding of the principles of digital imaging is necessary to evaluate features of imaging systems and can play an important role in purchasing decisions.

  3. Digital Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Les

    1996-01-01

    Defines a digital photograph as a numerical record of light electronically measured and recorded by a computer's scanner. States that most personal computers cannot do digital photography successfully and that digital pictures can be hard to manage and present a storage problem. Finds that, once the school has the hardware/software, picture…

  4. Digital Citizenship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isman, Aytekin; Canan Gungoren, Ozlem

    2014-01-01

    Era in which we live is known and referred as digital age.In this age technology is rapidly changed and developed. In light of these technological advances in 21st century, schools have the responsibility of training "digital citizen" as well as a good citizen. Digital citizens must have extensive skills, knowledge, Internet and …

  5. Investigation of HZETRN 2010 as a Tool for Single Event Effect Qualification of Avionics Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Koontz, Steve; Atwell, William; Boeder, Paul

    2014-01-01

    NASA's future missions are focused on long-duration deep space missions for human exploration which offers no options for a quick emergency return to Earth. The combination of long mission duration with no quick emergency return option leads to unprecedented spacecraft system safety and reliability requirements. It is important that spacecraft avionics systems for human deep space missions are not susceptible to Single Event Effect (SEE) failures caused by space radiation (primarily the continuous galactic cosmic ray background and the occasional solar particle event) interactions with electronic components and systems. SEE effects are typically managed during the design, development, and test (DD&T) phase of spacecraft development by using heritage hardware (if possible) and through extensive component level testing, followed by system level failure analysis tasks that are both time consuming and costly. The ultimate product of the SEE DD&T program is a prediction of spacecraft avionics reliability in the flight environment produced using various nuclear reaction and transport codes in combination with the component and subsystem level radiation test data. Previous work by Koontz, et al.1 utilized FLUKA, a Monte Carlo nuclear reaction and transport code, to calculate SEE and single event upset (SEU) rates. This code was then validated against in-flight data for a variety of spacecraft and space flight environments. However, FLUKA has a long run-time (on the order of days). CREME962, an easy to use deterministic code offering short run times, was also compared with FLUKA predictions and in-flight data. CREME96, though fast and easy to use, has not been updated in several years and underestimates secondary particle shower effects in spacecraft structural shielding mass. Thus, this paper will investigate the use of HZETRN 20103, a fast and easy to use deterministic transport code, similar to CREME96, that was developed at NASA Langley Research Center primarily for

  6. Digital Natives or Digital Tribes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Ian Robert

    2013-01-01

    This research builds upon the discourse surrounding digital natives. A literature review into the digital native phenomena was undertaken and found that researchers are beginning to identify the digital native as not one cohesive group but of individuals influenced by other factors. Primary research by means of questionnaire survey of technologies…

  7. Modular, Cost-Effective, Extensible Avionics Architecture for Secure, Mobile Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.

    2007-01-01

    Current onboard communication architectures are based upon an all-in-one communications management unit. This unit and associated radio systems has regularly been designed as a one-off, proprietary system. As such, it lacks flexibility and cannot adapt easily to new technology, new communication protocols, and new communication links. This paper describes the current avionics communication architecture and provides a historical perspective of the evolution of this system. A new onboard architecture is proposed that allows full use of commercial-off-the-shelf technologies to be integrated in a modular approach thereby enabling a flexible, cost-effective and fully deployable design that can take advantage of ongoing advances in the computer, cryptography, and telecommunications industries.

  8. Modular, Cost-Effective, Extensible Avionics Architecture for Secure, Mobile Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.

    2006-01-01

    Current onboard communication architectures are based upon an all-in-one communications management unit. This unit and associated radio systems has regularly been designed as a one-off, proprietary system. As such, it lacks flexibility and cannot adapt easily to new technology, new communication protocols, and new communication links. This paper describes the current avionics communication architecture and provides a historical perspective of the evolution of this system. A new onboard architecture is proposed that allows full use of commercial-off-the-shelf technologies to be integrated in a modular approach thereby enabling a flexible, cost-effective and fully deployable design that can take advantage of ongoing advances in the computer, cryptography, and telecommunications industries.

  9. Next-generation avionics packaging and cooling 'test results from a prototype system'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seals, J. D.

    The author reports on the design, material characteristics, and test results obtained under the US Air Force's advanced aircraft avionics packaging technologies (AAAPT) program, whose charter is to investigate new designs and technologies for reliable packaging, interconnection, and thermal management. Under this program, AT&T Bell Laboratories has completed the preliminary testing of and is evaluating a number of promising materials and technologies, including conformal encapsulation, liquid flow-through cooling, and a cyanate ester backplane. A fifty-two module system incorporating these and and other technologies has undergone preliminary cooling efficiency, shock, sine and random vibration, and maintenance testing. One of the primary objectives was to evaluate the interaction compatibility of new materials and designs with other components in the system.

  10. Power, Avionics and Software - Phase 1.0:. [Subsystem Integration Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivancic, William D.; Sands, Obed S.; Bakula, Casey J.; Oldham, Daniel R.; Wright, Ted; Bradish, Martin A.; Klebau, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes Power, Avionics and Software (PAS) 1.0 subsystem integration testing and test results that occurred in August and September of 2013. This report covers the capabilities of each PAS assembly to meet integration test objectives for non-safety critical, non-flight, non-human-rated hardware and software development. This test report is the outcome of the first integration of the PAS subsystem and is meant to provide data for subsequent designs, development and testing of the future PAS subsystems. The two main objectives were to assess the ability of the PAS assemblies to exchange messages and to perform audio testing of both inbound and outbound channels. This report describes each test performed, defines the test, the data, and provides conclusions and recommendations.

  11. GR712RC- The Dual-Core LEON3FT System-on-Chip Avionics Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habinc, Sandi; Glembo, Kristoffer; Gaisler, Jiri

    2010-08-01

    The GR712RC System-on-Chip (SoC) is a dual core LEON3FT system suitable for advanced high reliability space avionics. Fault tolerance features from Aeroflex Gaisler's GRLIB IP library [1][2] and an implementation using Ramon Chips RadSafe cell library enables superior radiation hardness. The GR712RC device has been designed to provide high processing power by including two LEON3FT 32-bit SPARC V8 processors, each with its own high-performance IEEE754 compliant floating-point-unit and SPARC reference memory management unit. This high processing power is combined with a large number of serial interfaces, ranging from high-speed links for data transfers to low-speed control buses for commanding and status acquisition.

  12. Applications of Formal Methods to Specification and Safety of Avionics Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, D. N.; Guaspari, David; Humenn, Polar

    1996-01-01

    This report treats several topics in applications of formal methods to avionics software development. Most of these topics concern decision tables, an orderly, easy-to-understand format for formally specifying complex choices among alternative courses of action. The topics relating to decision tables include: generalizations fo decision tables that are more concise and support the use of decision tables in a refinement-based formal software development process; a formalism for systems of decision tables with behaviors; an exposition of Parnas tables for users of decision tables; and test coverage criteria and decision tables. We outline features of a revised version of ORA's decision table tool, Tablewise, which will support many of the new ideas described in this report. We also survey formal safety analysis of specifications and software.

  13. Shuttle avionics and the goal language including the impact of error detection and redundancy management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flanders, J. H.; Helmers, C. T.; Stanten, S. F.

    1973-01-01

    The relationship is examined between the space shuttle onboard avionics and the ground test computer language GOAL when used in the onboard computers. The study is aimed at providing system analysis support to the feasibility analysis of a GOAL to HAL translator, where HAL is the language used to program the onboard computers for flight. The subject is dealt with in three aspects. First, the system configuration at checkout, the general checkout and launch sequences, and the inventory of subsystems are described. Secondly, the hierarchic organization of onboard software and different ways of introducing GOAL-derived software onboard are described. Also the flow of commands and test data during checkout is diagrammed. Finally, possible impact of error detection and redundancy management on the GOAL language is discussed.

  14. "STEPS" Avionics for Exploration Systems the Achieved Results and the Next "STEPS-2"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martelli, Andrea; Perino, Maria Antonietta; Gaia, Enrico; Paccagnini, Carlo

    2013-08-01

    This paper presents the STEPS project reached results in the avionics domains like: vision-based GNC for Mars Descent & Landing, Hazard avoidance and complete spacecraft autonomy; Autonomous Rover Navigation, based on perception, 3D map reconstruction and path planning; Mobility & Mechanisms providing an Integrated Ground Mobility System, Rendezvous & Docking equipment, and protection from Environment effects; Human-machine interface features of a predictive Command and Control System;; novel Design & Development Tools, such as a Rover S/W simulator and prototypes of the DEM viewer and of a S/W Rock Creator/visualizator. This paper presents also the STEPS 2 project that started January 2013 and is aimed at improving the development of the most promising technologies, selected from the results of the first STEP phase, and addressing the needs of the exploration missions as defined in the 2012 ministerial conference, with the ultimate goal of an in-flight validation within next five years.

  15. Proven high-reliability assembly methods applied to avionics fiber-optics high-speed transceivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauzon, Jocelyn; Leduc, Lorrain; Bessette, Daniel; Bélanger, Nicolas; Larose, Robert; Dion, Bruno

    2012-06-01

    Harsh environment avionics applications require operating temperature ranges that can extend to, and exceed -50 to 115°C. For obvious maintenance, management and cost arguments, product lifetimes as long as 20 years are also sought. This leads to mandatory long-term hermeticity that cannot be obtained with epoxy or silicone sealing; but only with glass seal or metal solder or brazing. A hermetic design can indirectly result in the required RF shielding of the component. For fiber-optics products, these specifications need to be compatible with the smallest possible size, weight and power consumption. The products also need to offer the best possible high-speed performances added to the known EMI immunity in the transmission lines. Fiber-optics transceivers with data rates per fiber channel up to 10Gbps are now starting to be offered on the market for avionics applications. Some of them are being developed by companies involved in the "normal environment" telecommunications market that are trying to ruggedize their products packaging in order to diversify their customer base. Another approach, for which we will present detailed results, is to go back to the drawing boards and design a new product that is adapted to proven MIL-PRF-38534 high-reliability packaging assembly methods. These methods will lead to the introduction of additional requirements at the components level; such as long-term high-temperature resistance for the fiber-optic cables. We will compare both approaches and demonstrate the latter, associated with the redesign, is the preferable one. The performance of the fiber-optic transceiver we have developed, in terms of qualification tests such as temperature cycling, constant acceleration, hermeticity, residual gaz analysis, operation under random vibration and mechanical shocks and accelerated lifetime tests will be presented. The tests are still under way, but so far, we have observed no performance degradation of such a product after more than

  16. Digital Avionics Information System (DAIS): Life Cycle Cost Impact Modeling System Reliability, Maintainability, and Cost Model (RMCM) - Description, Users Guide.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    27 2.2.2.2 Cost of Support (CS) 27 2.2.3 Disposal Costs ( CDP ) 28 2.3 Time Value of Money 282.4 General Assumptions of the RMCM 31 III. DATA FILE...NRC + RC + 2CDP + + 4 NRC Nonrecurring cost total using a baseline year value. RC Recurring cost total using a baseline year value. CDP Cost of system...application, the availability of data, and assurance that costs are not duplicated between cost elements. 27 2.2.3 Disposal Costs ( CDP ) The disposal costs

  17. Digital Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Digital Imaging is the computer processed numerical representation of physical images. Enhancement of images results in easier interpretation. Quantitative digital image analysis by Perceptive Scientific Instruments, locates objects within an image and measures them to extract quantitative information. Applications are CAT scanners, radiography, microscopy in medicine as well as various industrial and manufacturing uses. The PSICOM 327 performs all digital image analysis functions. It is based on Jet Propulsion Laboratory technology, is accurate and cost efficient.

  18. Digital metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Della Giovampaola, Cristian; Engheta, Nader

    2014-12-01

    Balancing complexity and simplicity has played an important role in the development of many fields in science and engineering. One of the well-known and powerful examples of such balance can be found in Boolean algebra and its impact on the birth of digital electronics and the digital information age. The simplicity of using only two numbers, '0' and '1', in a binary system for describing an arbitrary quantity made the fields of digital electronics and digital signal processing powerful and ubiquitous. Here, inspired by the binary concept, we propose to develop the notion of digital metamaterials. Specifically, we investigate how one can synthesize an electromagnetic metamaterial with a desired permittivity, using as building blocks only two elemental materials, which we call 'metamaterial bits', with two distinct permittivity functions. We demonstrate, analytically and numerically, how proper spatial mixtures of such metamaterial bits lead to elemental 'metamaterial bytes' with effective material parameters that are different from the parameters of the metamaterial bits. We then apply this methodology to several design examples of optical elements, such as digital convex lenses, flat graded-index digital lenses, digital constructs for epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) supercoupling and digital hyperlenses, thus highlighting the power and simplicity of the methodology.

  19. Digital printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobotka, Werner K.

    1997-02-01

    Digital printing is described as a tool to replace conventional printing machines completely. Still this goal was not reached until now with any of the digital printing technologies to be described in the paper. Productivity and costs are still the main parameters and are not really solved until now. Quality in digital printing is no problem anymore. Definition of digital printing is to transfer digital datas directly on the paper surface. This step can be carried out directly or with the use of an intermediate image carrier. Keywords in digital printing are: computer- to-press; erasable image carrier; image carrier with memory. Digital printing is also the logical development of the new digital area as it is pointed out in Nicholas Negropotes book 'Being Digital' and also the answer to networking and Internet technologies. Creating images text and color in one country and publishing the datas in another country or continent is the main advantage. Printing on demand another big advantage and last but not least personalization the last big advantage. Costs and being able to coop with this new world of prepress technology is the biggest disadvantage. Therefore the very optimistic growth rates for the next few years are really nonexistent. The development of complete new markets is too slow and the replacing of old markets is too small.

  20. An innovative approach to supplying an environment for the integration and test of the Space Station distributed avionics systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Thomas; Scheffer, Terrance; Small, L. R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes an innovative approach to supplying an environment for the integration and testing of the Space Station distributed avionics systems. The environment's relationship to the process flow of the Space Station verification from systems development to on-orbit verification is presented. This paper also describes the uses of the environment's hardware implementation called Data Management System (DMS) kits. The way in which this environment allows system developers to independently verify their system's performance, fault detection, and recovery capability is explained.

  1. The Conflicting Forces Driving Future Avionics Acquisition (Les Arguments Contradictoires pour les Futurs Achats d’Equipements d’Avionique)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    les donn~es souvent contradictoires qui sont la base de lorentaton des efforts de d6veloppement dans cc domarne. Ces tendarices. ces conflits et ces dr...isation/recalagos Approche Gostion du vol *Communications (modes clair et brouill~s) -Identification - Gestion dos syst~mos avions (servitudes) *Interface H...omme/Systbme (IHS) * Gestion des pannos et des alarmes *Maintenance en ligno -Pr6paration/rbtstitution de mission *Conduites do fir Air/Air -Conduites

  2. Validation Methods Research for Fault-Tolerant Avionics and Control Systems Sub-Working Group Meeting. CARE 3 peer review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trivedi, K. S. (Editor); Clary, J. B. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    A computer aided reliability estimation procedure (CARE 3), developed to model the behavior of ultrareliable systems required by flight-critical avionics and control systems, is evaluated. The mathematical models, numerical method, and fault-tolerant architecture modeling requirements are examined, and the testing and characterization procedures are discussed. Recommendations aimed at enhancing CARE 3 are presented; in particular, the need for a better exposition of the method and the user interface is emphasized.

  3. TechEdSat - An Educational 1U CubeSat Architecture Using Plug-and-Play Avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Chad

    2015-01-01

    Mission Objectives: build a 1U cubesat within 6 months from kickoff to launch. Demonstrate and evaluate the Space Plug-and-Play avionics hardware and software from ÅAC Microtec; investigate both Iridium and Orbcomm intersatellite communication as a method of eliminating the requirement for a physical ground station in Nano satellite missions; demonstrate the capabilities of the JAXA J-SSOD aboard the ISS, and be one of the first cubesats to be deployed from the ISS.

  4. Digitizing Preservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Paul

    1994-01-01

    Discussion of digital imaging technology focuses on its potential use for preservation of library materials. Topics addressed include converting microfilm to digital; the high cost of conversion from paper or microfilm; quality; indexing; database management issues; incompatibility among imaging systems; longevity; cooperative pilot projects; and…

  5. Digital Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blansett, Jim

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, the Internet has become a digital commons of commerce and education. However, accessibility standards have often been overlooked online, and the digital equivalents to curb-cuts and other physical accommodations have only rarely been implemented to serve those with print disabilities. (A print disability can be a learning…

  6. Digital TMI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rios, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Presenting the current status of the Digital TMI project to visiting members of the FAA Command Center. Digital TMI is an effort to store national-level traffic management initiatives in a standards-compliant manner. Work is funded by the FAA.

  7. Digital Ethics/Going Digital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Bradley

    1996-01-01

    Finds that the recent National Press Photographers Association code of ethics can serve as a model for any photography staff. Discusses how digital imaging is becoming commonplace in classrooms, due to decreasing costs and easier software. Explains digital terminology. Concludes that time saved in the darkroom and at the printer is now spent on…

  8. Intermediate Experimental Vehicle (IXV): Avionics and Software of the ESA Reentry Demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malucchi, Giovanni; Dussy, Stephane; Camuffo, Fabrizio

    2012-08-01

    The IXV project is conceived as a technology platform that would perform the step forward with respect to the Atmospheric Reentry Demonstrator (ARD), by increasing the system maneuverability and verifying the critical technology performances against a wider re- entry corridor.The main objective is to design, develop and to perform an in-flight verification of an autonomous lifting and aerodynamically controlled (by a combined use of thrusters and aerodynamic surfaces) reentry system.The project also includes the verification and experimentation of a set of critical reentry technologies and disciplines:Thermal Protection System (TPS), for verification and characterization of thermal protection technologies in representative operational environment;Aerodynamics - Aerthermodynamics (AED-A TD), for understanding and validation of aerodynamics and aerothermodyamics phenomena with improvement of design tools;Guidance, Navigation and Control (GNC), for verification of guidance, navigation and control techniques in representative operational environment (i.e. reentry from Low Earth Orbit);Flight dynamics, to update and validate the vehicle model during actual flight, focused on stability and control derivatives.The above activities are being performed through the implementation of a strict system design-to-cost approach with a proto-flight model development philosophy.In 2008 and 2009, the IXV project activities reached the successful completion of the project Phase-B, including the System PDR, and early project Phase-C.In 2010, following a re-organization of the industrial consortium, the IXV project successfully completed a design consolidation leading to an optimization of the technical baseline including the GNC, avionics (i.e. power, data handling, radio frequency and telemetry), measurement sensors, hot and cold composite structures, thermal protections and control, with significant improvements of the main system budgets.The project has successfully closed the

  9. Testing of the high accuracy inertial navigation system in the Shuttle Avionics Integration Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strachan, Russell L.; Evans, James M.

    1991-01-01

    The description, results, and interpretation is presented of comparison testing between the High Accuracy Inertial Navigation System (HAINS) and KT-70 Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU). The objective was to show the HAINS can replace the KT-70 IMU in the space shuttle Orbiter, both singularly and totally. This testing was performed in the Guidance, Navigation, and Control Test Station (GTS) of the Shuttle Avionics Integration Lab (SAIL). A variety of differences between the two instruments are explained. Four, 5 day test sessions were conducted varying the number and slot position of the HAINS and KT-70 IMUs. The various steps in the calibration and alignment procedure are explained. Results and their interpretation are presented. The HAINS displayed a high level of performance accuracy previously unseen with the KT-70 IMU. The most significant improvement of the performance came in the Tuned Inertial/Extended Launch Hold tests. The HAINS exceeded the 4 hr specification requirement. The results obtained from the SAIL tests were generally well beyond the requirements of the procurement specification.

  10. Miniature High-Let Radiation Spectrometer for Space and Avionics Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stassinopoulos, E. G.; Stauffer, Craig A.; Brucker, G. J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports on the design and characterization of a small, low power, and low weight instrument, a High-LET Radiation Spectrometer (HiLRS), that measures energy deposited by heavy ions in microelectronic devices. The HILRS operates on pulse-height analysis principles and is designed for space and avionics applications. The detector component in the instrument is based on large scale arrays of p-n junctions. In this system, the pulse amplitude from a particle hit is directly proportional to the particle LET. A prototype flight unit has been fabricated and calibrated using several heavy ions with varying LETs and protons with several energies. The unit has been delivered to the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) c/o the Air Force Research Laboratory in Albuquerque, NM, for integration into the military Space Technology Research Vehicle (STRV), a US-UK cooperative mission. Another version of HILRS is being prepared for delivery in April to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) project, to fly on the HST Orbital Systems Test (HOST) Platform on a shuttle mission.

  11. Model-Driven Development of Reliable Avionics Architectures for Lunar Surface Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borer, Nicholas; Claypool, Ian; Clark, David; West, John; Somervill, Kevin; Odegard, Ryan; Suzuki, Nantel

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses a method used for the systematic improvement of NASA s Lunar Surface Systems avionics architectures in the area of reliability and fault-tolerance. This approach utilizes an integrated system model to determine the effects of component failure on the system s ability to provide critical functions. A Markov model of the potential degraded system modes is created to characterize the probability of these degraded modes, and the system model is run for each Markov state to determine its status (operational or system loss). The probabilistic results from the Markov model are first produced from state transition rates based on NASA data for heritage failure rate data of similar components. An additional set of probabilistic results are created from a representative set of failure rates developed for this study, for a variety of component quality grades (space-rated, mil-spec, ruggedized, and commercial). The results show that careful application of redundancy and selected component improvement should result in Lunar Surface Systems architectures that exhibit an appropriate degree of fault-tolerance, reliability, performance, and affordability.

  12. High-performance 4x4-inch AMLCD for avionic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syroid, Daniel D.; Hansen, Glenn A.; Boling, Ed

    1996-05-01

    There is a need for high performance flat panel displays to replace and upgrade the electromechanical flight indicators and CRT based displays used in the cockpits of many older aircraft that are in active service today. The need for replacement of these older generation instruments is well known in the industry and was discussed in a previous paper by Duane Grave of Rockwell Collins. Furthermore, because of the limited activity in new aircraft development today, the need to upgrade existing aircraft avionics is accelerating. Many of the electromechanical instruments currently provide flight indications to the pilot and include horizontal situation (HSI) and attitude director indicators (ADI). These instruments are used on both military and commercial aircraft. The indicators are typically housed in a 5ATI case that slides into a 5 inch square opening in the cockpit. Image Quest has developed a 4 by 4 inch active area, flight quality, high resolution, full color, high luminance, wide temperature range display module based on active matrix liquid crystal display (AMLCD) technology that has excellent contrast in full sunlight. The display module is well suited for use in electronic instruments to replace or upgrade the electro-mechanical 5ATI flight indicators. THe AMLCD based display offers greatly improved display format flexibility, operating reliability and display contrast in all ambient lighting conditions as well as significant short and long term cost of ownership advantages.

  13. Self-Contained Avionics Sensing and Flight Control System for Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Logan, Michael J. (Inventor); Fox, Robert L. (Inventor); Fox, legal representative, Christopher L. (Inventor); Fox, legal representative, Melanie L. (Inventor); Ingham, John C. (Inventor); Laughter, Sean A. (Inventor); Kuhn, III, Theodore R. (Inventor); Adams, James K. (Inventor); Babel, III, Walter C. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A self-contained avionics sensing and flight control system is provided for an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). The system includes sensors for sensing flight control parameters and surveillance parameters, and a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver. Flight control parameters and location signals are processed to generate flight control signals. A Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) is configured to provide a look-up table storing sets of values with each set being associated with a servo mechanism mounted on the UAV and with each value in each set indicating a unique duty cycle for the servo mechanism associated therewith. Each value in each set is further indexed to a bit position indicative of a unique percentage of a maximum duty cycle for the servo mechanism associated therewith. The FPGA is further configured to provide a plurality of pulse width modulation (PWM) generators coupled to the look-up table. Each PWM generator is associated with and adapted to be coupled to one of the servo mechanisms.

  14. Expanding AirSTAR Capability for Flight Research in an Existing Avionics Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughter, Sean A.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Airborne Subscale Transport Aircraft Research (AirSTAR) project is an Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) test bed for experimental flight control laws and vehicle dynamics research. During its development, the test bed has gone through a number of system permutations, each meant to add functionality to the concept of operations of the system. This enabled the build-up of not only the system itself, but also the support infrastructure and processes necessary to support flight operations. These permutations were grouped into project phases and the move from Phase-III to Phase-IV was marked by a significant increase in research capability and necessary safety systems due to the integration of an Internal Pilot into the control system chain already established for the External Pilot. The major system changes in Phase-IV operations necessitated a new safety and failsafe system to properly integrate both the Internal and External Pilots and to meet acceptable project safety margins. This work involved retrofitting an existing data system into the evolved concept of operations. Moving from the first Phase-IV aircraft to the dynamically scaled aircraft further involved restructuring the system to better guard against electromagnetic interference (EMI), and the entire avionics wiring harness was redesigned in order to facilitate better maintenance and access to onboard electronics. This retrofit and harness re-design will be explored and how it integrates with the evolved Phase-IV operations.

  15. Autonomous safety and reliability features of the K-1 avionics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, George E.; Kohrs, Dick; Bailey, Richard; Lai, Gary

    2004-03-01

    Kistler Aerospace Corporation is developing the K-1, a fully reusable, two-stage-to-orbit launch vehicle. Both stages return to the launch site using parachutes and airbags. Initial flight operations will occur from Woomera, Australia. K-1 guidance is performed autonomously. Each stage of the K-1 employs a triplex, fault tolerant avionics architecture, including three fault tolerant computers and three radiation hardened Embedded GPS/INS units with a hardware voter. The K-1 has an Integrated Vehicle Health Management (IVHM) system on each stage residing in the three vehicle computers based on similar systems in commercial aircraft. During first-stage ascent, the IVHM system performs an Instantaneous Impact Prediction (IIP) calculation 25 times per second, initiating an abort in the event the vehicle is outside a predetermined safety corridor for at least 3 consecutive calculations. In this event, commands are issued to terminate thrust, separate the stages, dump all propellant in the first-stage, and initiate a normal landing sequence. The second-stage flight computer calculates its ability to reach orbit along its state vector, initiating an abort sequence similar to the first stage if it cannot. On a nominal mission, following separation, the second-stage also performs calculations to assure its impact point is within a safety corridor. The K-1's guidance and control design is being tested through simulation with hardware-in-the-loop at Draper Laboratory. Kistler's verification strategy assures reliable and safe operation of the K-1.

  16. Digital Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Salathé, Marcel; Bengtsson, Linus; Bodnar, Todd J.; Brewer, Devon D.; Brownstein, John S.; Buckee, Caroline; Campbell, Ellsworth M.; Cattuto, Ciro; Khandelwal, Shashank; Mabry, Patricia L.; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Mobile, social, real-time: the ongoing revolution in the way people communicate has given rise to a new kind of epidemiology. Digital data sources, when harnessed appropriately, can provide local and timely information about disease and health dynamics in populations around the world. The rapid, unprecedented increase in the availability of relevant data from various digital sources creates considerable technical and computational challenges. PMID:22844241

  17. Digital Collections, Digital Libraries & the Digitization of Cultural Heritage Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Clifford

    2002-01-01

    Discusses digital collections and digital libraries. Topics include broadband availability; digital rights protection; content, both non-profit and commercial; digitization of cultural content; sustainability; metadata harvesting protocol; infrastructure; authorship; linking multiple resources; data mining; digitization of reference works;…

  18. Embedded algorithms for the SS-411 digital sun sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enright, John; Sinclair, Doug; Li, Chris

    2009-05-01

    This paper discusses the evolution of the SS-411 series digital sun sensor. The earlier SS-256 and SS-330 models have proven themselves in orbit on low-cost satellite missions. The SS-411 represents a further hardware revision with enhanced robustness and improved attitude estimation performance. To complement the latest hardware improvements, researchers in the Space Avionics and Instrumentation Laboratory (SAIL) at Ryerson University in Toronto have developed advanced signal processing routines compatible with the SS-411. These routines significantly improve the accuracy of the sensor's estimation without increasing manufacturing complexity. With this advanced processing, the sensor maintains a 2-σ accuracy of 0.11° over the entire field-of-view.

  19. 23RD International Conference on Phenomena in Ionized Gases, Volume 5

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-12-01

    outer earthed electrode. variation of dielectric constant with magnetic fields. In The radial distribution of the ion density was measured this paper...insulated phenomena of corona and leader formation were both from its supporting tripod and the earthed vessel. affected by variations in humidity...the current flowing in the gap before with a 75CI resistance and earthed . Any current flowing breakdown. The time of occurrence of the impulse- in the

  20. High Achievers: 23rd Annual Survey. Attitudes and Opinions from the Nation's High Achieving Teens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Who's Who among American High School Students, Northbrook, IL.

    This report presents data from an annual survey of high school student leaders and high achievers. It is noted that of the nearly 700,000 high achievers featured in this edition, 5,000 students were sent the survey and 2,092 questionnaires were completed. Subjects were high school juniors and seniors selected for recognition by their principals or…

  1. Current research in nuclear medicine and molecular imaging: highlights of the 23rd Annual EANM Congress.

    PubMed

    Carrió, Ignasi

    2011-02-01

    The most recent research developments in nuclear medicine and molecular imaging were presented at the 2010 Annual Congress of the EANM. This review summarizes some of the most relevant contributions made in the fields of oncology, cardiovascular science, neurology and psychiatry, technological innovation and novel tracers. Presentations covered basic and clinical research in nuclear medicine and molecular imaging, and diagnostic and therapeutic applications of radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals on a global scale. The results reported demonstrate that investigative strategies using nuclear medicine techniques facilitate effective diagnosis and management of patients with most prevalent disease states. At the same time novel tracers and technologies are being explored, which hold promise for future new applications of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging in research and clinical practice.

  2. Proceedings of the Annual State Conference on Educational Research "Accountability and the Curriculum" (23rd).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Advisory Council on Educational Research, Burlingame.

    Papers presented at the Conference include: "Biopsy of an Educational Growth" (J.R. Harsh), "Performance Contracting--The Dallas Experiment" (D.R. Waldrip), "Teaching Performance Tests at Three Levels of Accountability" (W.J. Popham), "Problems of Implementing the Writing of Behavioral Objectives" (R.M. Carson), "Program Planning Impact…

  3. CRYSTAL-FACE Analysis and Simulations of the July 23rd Extended Anvil Case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, David

    2003-01-01

    A key focus of CRYSTAL-FACE (Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and cirrus Layers - Florida Area Cirrus Experiment) was the generation and subsequent evolution of cirrus outflow from deep convective cloud systems. Present theoretical background and motivations will be discussed. An integrated look at the observations of an extended cirrus anvil cloud system observed on 23 July 2002 will be presented, including lidar and millimeter radar observation; from NASA s ER-2 and in-situ observations from NASA s WB-57 and University of North Dakota Citation. The observations will be compared to results of simulations using 1-D and 2-D high-resolution (100 meter) cloud resolving models. The CRMs explicitly account for cirrus microphysical development by resolving the evolving ice crystal size distribution (bin model) in time and space. Both homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation are allowed in the model. The CRM simulations are driven using the output of regional simulations using MM5 that produces deep convection similar to what was observed. The MM5 model employs a 2 km inner grid (32 layers) over a 360 km domain, nested within a 6-km grid over a 600-km domain. Initial and boundary conditions for the 36-hour MM5 simulation are taken from NCEP Eta model analysis at 32 km resolution. Key issues to be explored are the settling of the observed anvil versus the model simulations, and comparisons of dynamical properties, such as vertical motions, occurring in the observations and models. The former provides an integrated measure of the validity of the model microphysics (fallspeed) while the latter is the key factor in forcing continued ice generation.

  4. International SAMPE Technical Conference, 23rd, Kiamesha Lake, NY, Oct. 21-24, 1991, Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Carri, R.L.; Poveromo, L.M.; Gauland, J. )

    1991-01-01

    The present conference discusses the cost of composite structures, microwave processing of thermoset resin-matrix composites at high pressure, the impact damage-tolerance of helicopter sandwich structures, novel fluorinated polybenzoxazole thermoplastics, low expansion coefficient polyimides containing metal-ion additives, thermoplastic polyimides for supersonic airframes, material properties and laser cutting of composites, fiber-matrix bond tests in composites, and a global/local stress analysis of stitched composites. Also discussed are moldless composite aircraft wing structural design modifications, advances in anhydride epoxy systems, medical applications of advanced composites, metal-joining processes for space fabrication, close-tolerance plastic master molds, the ballistic energy absorption of composites, soft and hard composite armors, resin-transfer molding of 3D composites, toughened cyanate ester resins, and thermoforming of thermoplastics.

  5. Proceedings of the Conference on the Design of Experiments (23rd) S

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-07-01

    uaaaa m W W Na~~S ww W V60 VAW0W ~ B W0~ £9 ON .9a 9k 9 wil9 IS99 ’A R A O Z"P sw OPO £W ’ V WeIN gmsN𔃾I 4W "-P(~V aW 0 &h.EaU b. w 4. It mama ...adjunct to surgery and radiation in the treatment of childhood rhabdomyosarcoma. The endpoint for analysis was the re-appearance of tumor , whether at the...group IB were concurrently randomized with the controls, both these groups having apparently had their tumors completely resected; while IIA

  6. 23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference: Summary Of Sessions EX/C and ICC

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, R J

    2011-01-05

    An overview is given of recent experimental results in the areas of innovative confinement concepts, operational scenarios and confinement experiments as presented at the 2010 IAEA Fusion Energy Conference. Important new findings are presented from fusion devices worldwide, with a strong focus towards the scientific and technical issues associated with ITER and W7-X devices, presently under construction.

  7. International Symposium on Combustion (23rd) Held in Orleans, France on 22-27 July 1990

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    they nition of stretch’ 9 escape the type of complications mentioned above. A number of theoretical analyses of spherical flames F = ( l /A) dA/dt, (1...assumed, for the purposes of acoustic analysis, to be concentrated at a fixed axial station x = Li. In the present analyses , L , is taken to be the...SylpOSi~~iI- 16. itl SOL M P ) u B. AN C LK T, M. B. S e - tcfltil~I)on CoilI~wI. .275 The Corn- te31t Theoinl (1nelat l ~) o C mh, h u stio nst o n

  8. FOREWORD: 23rd National Symposium on Plasma Science & Technology (PLASMA-2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, A. K.

    2010-01-01

    The Twentieth Century has been a defining period for Plasma Science and Technology. The state of ionized matter, so named by Irving Langmuir in the early part of twentieth century, has now evolved in to a multidisciplinary area with scientists and engineers from various specializations working together to exploit the unique properties of the plasma medium. There have been great improvements in the basic understanding of plasmas as a many body system bound by complex collective Coulomb interactions of charges, atoms, molecules, free radicals and photons. Simultaneously, many advanced plasma based technologies are increasingly being implemented for industrial and societal use. The emergence of the multination collaborative project International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project has provided the much needed boost to the researchers working on thermonuclear fusion plasmas. In addition, the other plasma applications like MHD converters, hydrogen generation, advanced materials (synthesis, processing and surface modification), environment (waste beneficiation, air and water pollution management), nanotechnology (synthesis, deposition and etching), light production, heating etc are actively being pursued in governmental and industrial sectors. For India, plasma science and technology has traditionally remained an important area of research. It was nearly a century earlier that the Saha ionization relation pioneered the way to interpret experimental data from a vast range of near equilibrium plasmas. Today, Indian research contributions and technology demonstration capabilities encompass thermonuclear fusion devices, nonlinear plasma phenomena, plasma accelerators, beam plasma interactions, dusty and nonneutral plasmas, industrial plasmas and plasma processing of materials, nano synthesis and structuring, astrophysical and space plasmas etc. India's participation in the ITER programme is now reflected in increased interest in the research and development efforts on Tokamak technology and physics of magnetized fusion plasmas. Our industries have already adopted a large number of plasma processes related to manufacturing, lighting and surface engineering. Indian universities and National Institutes have successfully taken up research projects and building of demonstration equipment that are being used in strategic as well as other industrial applications. In addition, and more importantly, plasma science has triggered research and development effort in many related areas like power supplies, specialized instrumentation and controls, magnets, diagnostics and monitoring, lasers, electron beams, vacuum systems, thermal engineering, material science, fluid dynamics, molecular and nano engineering, molecular chemistry etc. In short, plasma science and technology in India has reached a stage of maturity that can be harnessed for industrial and societal use. The expertise and core competence developed over the years need to be sustained through interactions among researchers as well as nurturing of new research efforts. The Annual Plasma Symposiums have eminently worked towards achievement of that purpose. Like all years, Plasma - 2008 is built around the entire national effort in this field with a special focus on 'Plasmas in Nuclear Fuel Cycle (PANFC)'. The program includes several plenary lectures, invited talks and contributed papers. The manuscripts have been peer reviewed and compiled in the form of Conference Proceedings. I am sure that the online proceedings will be useful and serve as a valuable reference material for active researchers in this field. I would like to take this opportunity to gratefully acknowledge the help and guidance of the National Advisory Committee Chaired by Professor P K Kaw, Director, Institute of Plasma Research, Gandhinagar during the organization of this symposium. My sincere thanks to Dr S Banerjee, Director, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, an acknowledged expert in the field of Materials Science and Technology, for delivering the key note address to set the tenor of the symposium. I would also like to thank the Plasma Science Society of India (PSSI) for agreeing to hold this important event at BARC. Thanks are due to Dr L M Gantayet, Director, BTDG, BARC and chairman, Scientific Program Committee and all my colleagues in the Symposium Organizing Committee who have made this symposium possible. Finally, our thanks to all the Funding agencies, Board of Research in Nuclear Science, Department of Science and Technology, The Board of Fusion Research, and all industrial exhibitor and sponsors for their unstinted support and encouragement. Dr A K Das Chairman, Organizing Committee Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai

  9. Solar modulation of GCR electrons over the 23rd solar minimum with PAMELA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munini, R.; Di Felice, V.; Adriani, O.; Barbarino, G. C.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Bellotti, R.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bongi, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Bottai, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Carlson, P.; Casolino, M.; Castellini, G.; De Donato, C.; De Santis, C.; De Simone, N.; Formato, V.; Galper, A. M.; Karelin, A. V.; Koldashov, S. V.; Koldobskiy, S.; Krutkov, S. Y.; Kvashnin, A. N.; Leonov, A.; Malakhov, V.; Marcelli, L.; Martucci, M.; Mayorov, A. G.; Menn, W.; Merge, M.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Monaco, A.; Mori, N.; Osteria, G.; Palma, F.; Panico, B.; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Ricci, M.; Ricciarini, S. B.; Sarkar, R.; Scotti, V.; Simon, M.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Y. I.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G.; Voronov, S. A.; Yurkin, Y. T.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.; Potgieter, M. S.; Vos, E. E.

    2015-08-01

    The satellite-borne PAMELA experiment has been continuously collecting data since 15th June 2006, when it was launched from the Baikonur cosmodrome to detect the charged component of cosmic rays over a wide energy range and with unprecedented statistics. The apparatus design is particularly suited for particle and antiparticle identification. The PAMELA experiment has measured the electron spectrum at Earth in great detail, extending up to about 100 GeV and down to about 200 MeV. The galactic cosmic ray electron spectra for 2007 and 2009, i.e. measured during the A<0 solar minimum of solar cycle 23, are presented. These fluxes provide important information for the study of charge dependent solar modulation effects.

  10. Mosquito vector biology and control in Latin America - a 23rd symposium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 23nd Annual Latin American Symposium presented by the American Mosquito Control Association (AMCA) was held as part of the 79th Annual Meeting in Atlantic City, NJ in February 2013. The principal objective, as for the previous 22 symposia, was to promote participation in the AMCA by vector contr...

  11. Kokes Awards for the 23rd North American Catalysis Society Meeting

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Gary

    2014-01-31

    The Tri-State Catalysis Society awarded 107 Kokes Travel Awards. The program was very successful and to date this was the most Kokes Travel Awards ever awarded at a North American Catalysis Society Meeting. It provided students who merited an award the opportunity to attend the meeting, present a paper in the form of either an oral presentation or a poster presentation, and to serve the North American Catalysis Society by participating in the organization of the meeting. Students worked very hard during the week of the meeting to make it a success. Financial support for the Kokes awards was provided by DOE, NSF, NACS, as well as the Tri-State Catalysis Society, the latter through fund raising activities, and other donations. AT the meeting, each student received over $1050 in kind to offset the costs of registration fees ($260), hotel accommodations ($295.7), transportation ($400 travel allowance), as well as T-shirts ($20), and banquet tickets ($95 provided by donations from society members). In addition, for the first time, students received certificates that were signed by the President of NACS, Professor Enrique Iglesia, and by the Kokes Awards Chair, Gary Jacobs (see last page). A list of meeting co-chairs (i.e., Uschi M. Graham, Umit S. Ozkan, and Madan Bhassin) and the honorary chair (Burtron H. Davis) was also included on the certificate, along with the name of the recipient. The awardees were chosen on a merit-based guideline which also included the requirements of having a presentation accepted at the meeting and being a student at a North American University. The Richard J. Kokes Student Travel Award Committee (Gary Jacobs, Rodney Andrews, and Peter Smirniotis) with help from the Organizing Committee were able to secure money from four sources as detailed in Table 1. As detailed by our Treasurer, Dr. Helge Toufar of Clariant, the total amount spent was $105,000.

  12. Higher Education and Service to Our States. Proceedings of the 23rd Legislative Work Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    Papers include: Faculty Collective Bargaining in Higher Education; The University in Service to State Government; The New Environment for State Planning and Coordination of Higher Education; American Medical Education in the Year 209; Meeting the Needs of the States for Optometrists; and Meeting the Needs of States in Veterinary Medicine. (MJM)

  13. Preliminary Analysis and Simulations of July 23rd Extended Anvil Case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R.-F.; Demoz, B.; McGill, M.; Heymsfield, G.; Sassen, K.; Bui, P.; Heymsfield, A.; Halverson, J.; Rickenbach, T.; Poellot, M.; Lare, A.

    2003-01-01

    A key focus of CRYSTAL-FACE (Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and cirrus Layers - Florida Area Cirrus Experiment) was the generation and subsequent evolution of cirrus outflow from deep convective cloud systems. A preliminary integrated look at the observations of an extended cirrus anvil cloud system observed on 23 July 2002 will be presented, including lidar and millimeter radar observations from NASA's ER-2 and in- situ observations from NASA's WB-57 and University of North Dakota Citation. The observations will be compared to preliminary results of simulations using 1-D and 2-D high-resolution (100 meter) cloud resolving models. The CRMs explicitly account for cirrus microphysical development by resolving the evolving ice crystal size distribution (bin model) in time and space. Both homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation are allowed in the model. The CRM simulations are driven using the output of regional simulations using MM5 that produces deep convection similar to what was observed. The MM5 model employs a 2 km inner grid (32 layers) over a 360 km domain, nested within a 6 km grid over a 600 km domain. Initial and boundary conditions for the 36- hour MM5 simulation are taken from NCEP Eta model analysis at 32 km resolution. Key issues to be explored are the settling of the observed anvil versus the model simulations, and comparisons of dynamical properties, such as vertical motions, occurring in the observations and models. The former provides an integrated measure of the validity of the model microphysics (fallspeed) while the latter is the key factor in forcing continued ice generation.

  14. Reading and the Exceptional Child; Highlights of the Annual Reading Conference (23rd, Lehigh University).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kender, Joseph P., Ed.

    This book presents eleven papers on reading and the exceptional child. Part 1, "Development of Positive Self-Concept in Readers," contains: "In Search of Self" by Marvin D. Glock, "A Mental Hygiene Approach to Reading" By Ruth Jackson, and "The Videotape Playback as an Adjunct to Developing Positive Self-Regard" by Joan C. Barth. Part 2, "Teaching…

  15. Preliminary Inventories: Vietnam War Collection, 23rd Infantry (Americal) Division, 1967-1971.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-01

    too 0in06s WWuS "M USES eased ~.. Somd osm -dbdrV EIQDA Records Managemnt Division s.m-m 11S * now isral The Adjutant Cenerl’s Office NINE UAYU3U(Ch P ...Records Management Division 1 July 1982 Department of the Am (DARO-AMR- P ) 14 NUMBER OF PAGES Alexandria. Virginia 22331 203 14 MONITORING AGENCY NAME...A AODREII 19ferinI 1 CoR&Idbd 0Mmid) IS. SECURITY CLASS. W. SN. uqpslj Programs Branch (Records Management Division) Department of the Army (DAG-AMR- P

  16. Preliminary assessment of landslides resulting from the earthquake of 23rd November 1980 in Southern Italy.

    PubMed

    Alexander, D

    1981-12-01

    This paper examines the hazards, mechanisms and effects of landsliding provoked by the 1980 earthquake in Campania and Basilicata Regions, Southern Italy. The effects of seismically-induced mass-movement are assessed with respect to slope stability and damage to both settlements and roads. Whereas the mechanism of cyclic loading of soils, which can give rise to landslides, is different from the pore-pressure, gravity loading and strength-reduction mechanisms that normally cause slope failure, the morphology of slides is often indistinguishable and this made it difficult to identify which slides were directly caused by the earthquake. However, creep in potential shear planes undoubtably became more widespread, and the incidence of small, bowl-shaped slides Increased as a direct result of the earthquake. Although variations in the detailed stress-pattern within individual slopes meant that some very mobile soil and rock masses did not move, 36 settlements reported landslide damage and 29 roads were affected by landslides occurring during the earthquake and its immediate aftermath. A full assessment of the disaster, together with an explanation of the geography of the disaster area, can be found in Alexander (1982).

  17. 23RD International Conference on Phenomena in Ionized Gases, Volume 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    P.Andre’, Yu.A.Barinov 2 G.Faure1, V.B.Kaplan 2 , A.Lefort1, S.M. Shkol’nik2 . 1. LAEPT. CNRS URA 828, University. Blaise Pascal , 24, Avenue des...Lorthioir S., Blaise G., Fiala A., Pitchford L.C. CHARACTERISTICS OF LOW POWER HF 10-CM TECHNOLOGICAL ION SOURCE 111-88 Kondranin S.G., Kralkina E.A...spectrometric analysis. S. Baude*, S Lorthioir*, G. Blaise **, A. Fiala*** and L.C. Pitchford*** *CEA, Centre d’Etudes de Bruyhres-le-Chatel BP12

  18. 23RD International Conference on Phenomena in Ionized Gases, Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Universitd Blaise Pascal , 24, Avenue des Landais, F 63177 Aubi~re cedex, France. 2. LMCTS ,CNRS URA 320, Universitd de Limoges, 123, Av. Albet Thomas, 87060...252 Badie J.M. IV- 192 Bisch C. IV-192 Andreazza-Vignolles C. IV-252 Bagatin M. 11-262 Blaise G. 111-86 Andrieux M. IV-192 IV-134 Blanc E. 11-10 Anikin

  19. 23RD International Conference on Phenomena in Ionized Gases, Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-12-01

    Gary Universit6 Blaise Pascal de Clermont-Ferrand. Laboratoire d’Electrotechnique de Montluqon. Av. A. Briand 03100 MONTLUQON. FRANCE S. Servant...CNRS Universitd Blaise Pascal , 24 avenue des landais, 63177 AUBIERE Cedex France. INTRODUCTION Carbon dioxide is one of the most abundant chemical found...Baclawski A. II-110 Birau M. 111-46 Andreazza P. IV-252 Badie J.M. IV-192 Bisch C. IV-192 Andreazza-Vignolles C. IV-252 Bagatin M. 11-262 Blaise G. 111-86

  20. Digital Radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    System One, a digital radiography system, incorporates a reusable image medium (RIM) which retains an image. No film is needed; the RIM is read with a laser scanner, and the information is used to produce a digital image on an image processor. The image is stored on an optical disc. System allows the radiologist to "dial away" unwanted images to compare views on three screens. It is compatible with existing equipment and cost efficient. It was commercialized by a Stanford researcher from energy selective technology developed under a NASA grant.

  1. Digital karyotyping.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tian-Li; Maierhofer, Christine; Speicher, Michael R; Lengauer, Christoph; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Velculescu, Victor E

    2002-12-10

    Alterations in the genetic content of a cell are the underlying cause of many human diseases, including cancers. We have developed a method, called digital karyotyping, that provides quantitative analysis of DNA copy number at high resolution. This approach involves the isolation and enumeration of short sequence tags from specific genomic loci. Analysis of human cancer cells by using this method identified gross chromosomal changes as well as amplifications and deletions, including regions not previously known to be altered. Foreign DNA sequences not present in the normal human genome could also be readily identified. Digital karyotyping provides a broadly applicable means for systematic detection of DNA copy number changes on a genomic scale.

  2. Space Shuttle Program Primary Avionics Software System (PASS) Success Legacy - Major Accomplishments and Lessons Learned Detail Historical Timeline Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, James K.

    2010-01-01

    This presentation focuses on the Space Shuttle Primary Avionics Software System (PASS) and the people who developed and maintained this system. One theme is to provide quantitative data on software quality and reliability over a 30 year period. Consistent data relates to code break discrepancies. Requirements were supplied from external sources. Requirement inspections and measurements not implemented until later, beginning in 1985. Second theme is to focus on the people and organization of PASS. Many individuals have supported the PASS project over the entire period while transitioning from company to company and contract to contract. Major events and transitions have impacted morale (both positively and negatively) across the life of the project.

  3. Aircraft Trajectories Computation-Prediction-Control (La Trajectoire de l’Avion Calcul-Prediction-Controle). Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-01

    compatibles, d’une part, avec une juste ponddration de critbres tels que ia conservation des ressources naturelles (Ics combustibles, les terres, I’espace... naturelles et ndcessit6 absolue de r~aliser des 6conomies. La 26me crise p~trolZbre (1979-1980) devait agraver d’autant cette situation. Les...tripl6 en g&ral- des capteurs et us clavier pour 1’introauctlon des donn~.es) A bord des avions do beauccoip do canpagnies conduit a poser le probl~ne

  4. Managing Complexity in the MSL/Curiosity Entry, Descent, and Landing Flight Software and Avionics Verification and Validation Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stehura, Aaron; Rozek, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    The complexity of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission presented the Entry, Descent, and Landing systems engineering team with many challenges in its Verification and Validation (V&V) campaign. This paper describes some of the logistical hurdles related to managing a complex set of requirements, test venues, test objectives, and analysis products in the implementation of a specific portion of the overall V&V program to test the interaction of flight software with the MSL avionics suite. Application-specific solutions to these problems are presented herein, which can be generalized to other space missions and to similar formidable systems engineering problems.

  5. A 3D Model to Compute Lightning and HIRF Coupling Effects on Avionic Equipment of an Aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, E.; Tristant, F.; Guiffaut, C.; Terrade, F.; Reineix, A.

    2012-05-01

    This paper describes the 3D FDTD model of an aircraft developed to compute the lightning and HIRF (High Intentity Radiated Fields) coupling effects on avionic equipment and all the wire harness associated. This virtual prototype aims at assisting the aircraft manufacturer during the lightning and HIRF certification processes. The model presented here permits to cover a frequency range from lightning spectrum to the low frequency HIRF domain, i.e. 0 to 100 MHz. Moreover, the entire aircraft, including the frame, the skin, the wire harness and the equipment are taken into account in only one model. Results obtained are compared to measurements on a real aircraft.

  6. MB-339CD Aircraft Development COTS Integration in a Modern Avionics Architecture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    generates analog signals acquired and processed by Key feature of the equipment is that the mass memory the Mission Processor to provide height digital...from remote off-the-shelf equipment. The development of controls to transceivers is completely digital. customised equipment was therefore limited to...interfaces for the electronic Customisation of existing equipment became a possible equipment). solution thanks to the capability of autonomously In order

  7. Digital psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Tang, S; Helmeste, D

    2000-02-01

    The American managed care movement has been viewed as a big experiment and is being watched closely by the rest of the world. In the meanwhile, computer-based information technology (IT) is changing the practice of medicine, much more rapidly than managed care. A New World of digitized knowledge and information has been created. Although literature on IT in psychiatry is largely absent in peer-reviewed psychiatric journals, IT is finding its way into all aspects of medicine, particularly psychiatry. Telepsychiatry programs are becoming very popular. At the same time, medical information sites are flourishing and evolving into a new health-care industry. Patient-physician information asymmetry is decreasing as patients are gaining easy access to medical information hitherto only available to professionals. Thus, psychiatry is facing another paradigm shift, at a time when most attention has been focused on managed care. In this new digital world, knowledge and information are no longer the sole property of professionals. Value will migrate from traditional in-person office-based therapy to digital clinical products, from in-person library search and classroom didactic instruction to interactive on-line searches and distance learning. In this time of value migration, psychiatrists have to determine what their 'distinctive competence' is and where best to add value in the health-care delivery value chain. The authors assess the impact of IT on clinical psychiatry and review how clinical practice, education and research in psychiatry are expected to change in this emerging digital world.

  8. Digital books.

    PubMed

    Wink, Diane M

    2011-01-01

    In this bimonthly series, the author examines how nurse educators can use the Internet and Web-based computer technologies such as search, communication, and collaborative writing tools; social networking and social bookmarking sites; virtual worlds; and Web-based teaching and learning programs. This article describes digital books.

  9. Digital Tidbits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumaran, Maha; Geary, Joe

    2011-01-01

    Technology has transformed libraries. There are digital libraries, electronic collections, online databases and catalogs, ebooks, downloadable books, and much more. With free technology such as social websites, newspaper collections, downloadable online calendars, clocks and sticky notes, online scheduling, online document sharing, and online…

  10. Digital Badges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frederiksen, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Unlike so much of the current vocabulary in education and technology that seems to stir more confusion than clarity, most public service librarians may already have a general idea about digital badges. As visual representations of individual accomplishments, competencies or skills that are awarded by groups, institutions, or organizations, they…

  11. Investigation of HZETRN 2010 as a Tool for Single Event Effect Qualification of Avionics Systems - Part II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Koontz, Steve; Reddell, Brandon; Atwell, William; Boeder, Paul

    2015-01-01

    An accurate prediction of spacecraft avionics single event effect (SEE) radiation susceptibility is key to ensuring a safe and reliable vehicle. This is particularly important for long-duration deep space missions for human exploration where there is little or no chance for a quick emergency return to Earth. Monte Carlo nuclear reaction and transport codes such as FLUKA can be used to generate very accurate models of the expected in-flight radiation environment for SEE analyses. A major downside to using a Monte Carlo-based code is that the run times can be very long (on the order of days). A more popular choice for SEE calculations is the CREME96 deterministic code, which offers significantly shorter run times (on the order of seconds). However, CREME96, though fast and easy to use, has not been updated in several years and underestimates secondary particle shower effects in spacecraft structural shielding mass. Another modeling option to consider is the deterministic code HZETRN 20104, which includes updates to address secondary particle shower effects more accurately. This paper builds on previous work by Rojdev, et al. to compare the use of HZETRN 2010 against CREME96 as a tool to verify spacecraft avionics system reliability in a space flight SEE environment. This paper will discuss modifications made to HZETRN 2010 to improve its performance for calculating SEE rates and compare results with both in-flight SEE rates and other calculation methods.

  12. Acceleration ground test program to verify GAS payload No. 559 structure/support avionics and experiment structural integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassanto, John M.; Cassanto, Valerie A.

    1988-01-01

    Acceleration ground tests were conducted on the Get Away Special (GAS) payload 559 to verify the structural integrity of the structure/support avionics and two of the planned three flight experiments. The ITA (Integrated Test Area) Standardized Experiment Module (ISEM) structure was modified to accommodate the experiments for payload 559. The ISEM avionics consisted of a heavy duty sliver zinc power supply, three orthogonal-mounted low range microgravity accelerometers, a tri-axis high range accelerometer, a solid state recorder/programmer sequencer, and pressure and temperature sensors. The tests were conducted using the Gravitational Plant Physiology Laboratory Centrifuge of the University City Science Center in Philadelphia, PA. The launch-powered flight steady state acceleration profile of the shuttle was simulated from lift-off through jettison of the External Tank (3.0 g's). Additional tests were conducted at twice the nominal powered flight acceleration levels (6 g's) and an over-test condition of four times the powered flight loads to 12.6 g's. The present test program has demonstrated the value of conducting ground tests to verify GAS payload experiment integrity and operation before flying on the shuttle.

  13. [Digital radiography].

    PubMed

    Haendle, J

    1983-03-01

    Digital radiography is a generally accepted term comprising all x-ray image systems producing a projected image which resembles the conventional x-ray film image, and which are linked to any type of digital image processing. Fundamental criteria of differentiation are based on the production and detection method of the x-ray image. Various systems are employed, viz. the single-detector, line-detector or fanbeam detector and the area-beam or area-detector image converters, which differ from one another mainly in the manner of conversion of the radiation produced by the x-ray tube. The article also deals with the pros and cons of the various principles, the multitude of systems employed, and the varying frequency of their use in x-ray diagnosis work.

  14. Multi-objective optimisation of aircraft flight trajectories in the ATM and avionics context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardi, Alessandro; Sabatini, Roberto; Ramasamy, Subramanian

    2016-05-01

    The continuous increase of air transport demand worldwide and the push for a more economically viable and environmentally sustainable aviation are driving significant evolutions of aircraft, airspace and airport systems design and operations. Although extensive research has been performed on the optimisation of aircraft trajectories and very efficient algorithms were widely adopted for the optimisation of vertical flight profiles, it is only in the last few years that higher levels of automation were proposed for integrated flight planning and re-routing functionalities of innovative Communication Navigation and Surveillance/Air Traffic Management (CNS/ATM) and Avionics (CNS+A) systems. In this context, the implementation of additional environmental targets and of multiple operational constraints introduces the need to efficiently deal with multiple objectives as part of the trajectory optimisation algorithm. This article provides a comprehensive review of Multi-Objective Trajectory Optimisation (MOTO) techniques for transport aircraft flight operations, with a special focus on the recent advances introduced in the CNS+A research context. In the first section, a brief introduction is given, together with an overview of the main international research initiatives where this topic has been studied, and the problem statement is provided. The second section introduces the mathematical formulation and the third section reviews the numerical solution techniques, including discretisation and optimisation methods for the specific problem formulated. The fourth section summarises the strategies to articulate the preferences and to select optimal trajectories when multiple conflicting objectives are introduced. The fifth section introduces a number of models defining the optimality criteria and constraints typically adopted in MOTO studies, including fuel consumption, air pollutant and noise emissions, operational costs, condensation trails, airspace and airport operations

  15. Investigation of HZETRN 2010 as a Tool for Single Event Effect Qualification of Avionics Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Atwell, William; Boeder, Paul; Koontz, Steve

    2014-01-01

    NASA's future missions are focused on deep space for human exploration that do not provide a simple emergency return to Earth. In addition, the deep space environment contains a constant background Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) radiation exposure, as well as periodic Solar Particle Events (SPEs) that can produce intense amounts of radiation in a short amount of time. Given these conditions, it is important that the avionics systems for deep space human missions are not susceptible to Single Event Effects (SEE) that can occur from radiation interactions with electronic components. The typical process to minimizing SEE effects is through using heritage hardware and extensive testing programs that are very costly. Previous work by Koontz, et al. [1] utilized an analysis-based method for investigating electronic component susceptibility. In their paper, FLUKA, a Monte Carlo transport code, was used to calculate SEE and single event upset (SEU) rates. This code was then validated against in-flight data. In addition, CREME-96, a deterministic code, was also compared with FLUKA and in-flight data. However, FLUKA has a long run-time (on the order of days), and CREME-96 has not been updated in several years. This paper will investigate the use of HZETRN 2010, a deterministic transport code developed at NASA Langley Research Center, as another tool that can be used to analyze SEE and SEU rates. The benefits to using HZETRN over FLUKA and CREME-96 are that it has a very fast run time (on the order of minutes) and has been shown to be of similar accuracy as other deterministic and Monte Carlo codes when considering dose [2, 3, 4]. The 2010 version of HZETRN has updated its treatment of secondary neutrons and thus has improved its accuracy over previous versions. In this paper, the Linear Energy Transfer (LET) spectra are of interest rather than the total ionizing dose. Therefore, the LET spectra output from HZETRN 2010 will be compared with the FLUKA and in-flight data to validate

  16. The Integrated Safety-Critical Advanced Avionics Communication and Control (ISAACC) System Concept: Infrastructure for ISHM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwaltney, David A.; Briscoe, Jeri M.

    2005-01-01

    Integrated System Health Management (ISHM) architectures for spacecraft will include hard real-time, critical subsystems and soft real-time monitoring subsystems. Interaction between these subsystems will be necessary and an architecture supporting multiple criticality levels will be required. Demonstration hardware for the Integrated Safety-Critical Advanced Avionics Communication & Control (ISAACC) system has been developed at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. It is a modular system using a commercially available time-triggered protocol, ?Tp/C, that supports hard real-time distributed control systems independent of the data transmission medium. The protocol is implemented in hardware and provides guaranteed low-latency messaging with inherent fault-tolerance and fault-containment. Interoperability between modules and systems of modules using the TTP/C is guaranteed through definition of messages and the precise message schedule implemented by the master-less Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA) communications protocol. "Plug-and-play" capability for sensors and actuators provides automatically configurable modules supporting sensor recalibration and control algorithm re-tuning without software modification. Modular components of controlled physical system(s) critical to control algorithm tuning, such as pumps or valve components in an engine, can be replaced or upgraded as "plug and play" components without modification to the ISAACC module hardware or software. ISAACC modules can communicate with other vehicle subsystems through time-triggered protocols or other communications protocols implemented over Ethernet, MIL-STD- 1553 and RS-485/422. Other communication bus physical layers and protocols can be included as required. In this way, the ISAACC modules can be part of a system-of-systems in a vehicle with multi-tier subsystems of varying criticality. The goal of the ISAACC architecture development is control and monitoring of safety critical systems of a

  17. Global system data bus using the Digital Autonomous Terminal Access Communication protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, David C. E.

    1986-01-01

    Modern digital avionic systems with distributed processing require networking to connect the many elements. Digital Autonomous Terminal Access Communication (DATAC) is one of many such networks. DATAC has been implemented on the Transport Systems Research Vehicle (TSRV), a Boeing 737 aircraft operated by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Advanced Transport Operating Systems Program Office (ATOPS). This paper presents the TSRV implementation of the DATAC bus, a description of the DATAC system, a synchronization mechanism, details of data flow throughout the system, and a discussion of the modes available with DATAC. Numerous flight tests have been conducted using DATAC as the only means of communication between systems with outstanding results. DATAC is now an integral part of the TSRV and is expected to satisfy near term as well as future requirements for growth and flexibility.

  18. Development and modification of a digital program for final approach to landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duff, W. G.; Guarino, C. R.

    1974-01-01

    The development and implementation of a dynamic digital computer simulator which may be used to evaluate aircraft performance when operating under the control and guidance of various navigation, landing, and flight control systems are discussed. The digital computer program may be used to simulate and evaluate the relationships and interactions between various factors such as the microwave landing system, avionics receivers and onboard processors, aircraft aerodynamics, aircraft automatic control systems, control surfaces, and wind and other external effects. The models used to represent aircraft aerodynamics, control system and control surfaces; weather and wind effects; and the microwave landing system are described. Example results are presented for a simulation of a Boeing 737 using two sample control systems while subjected to various atmospheric conditions and microwave landing system errors. The limitations and performance capabilities of these control systems are discussed in terms of their ability to utilize the microwave landing system signal.

  19. Space tug point design study. Volume 3: Design definition. Part 1: Propulsion and mechanical, avionics, thermal control and electrical power subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the configuration and performance of a space tug. Details of the space tug systems are presented to include: (1) propulsion systems, (2) avionics, (3) thermal control, and (4) electric power subsystems. The data generated include engineering drawings, schematics, subsystem operation, and component description. Various options investigated and the rational for the point design selection are analyzed.

  20. Space shuttle orbiter avionics software: Post review report for the entry FACI (First Article Configuration Inspection). [including orbital flight tests integrated system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markos, H.

    1978-01-01

    Status of the computer programs dealing with space shuttle orbiter avionics is reported. Specific topics covered include: delivery status; SSW software; SM software; DL software; GNC software; level 3/4 testing; level 5 testing; performance analysis, SDL readiness for entry first article configuration inspection; and verification assessment.

  1. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education. Avionics Instrument Systems Specialist. POI C3ABR32531 000. Classroom Course 2-7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This high school-postsecondary-level course for avionics instrument systems specialist is one of a number of military-developed curriculum packages selected for adaptation to vocational instruction and curriculum development in a civilian setting. A plan of instruction outlines five blocks of instruction (281 hours of instruction). Block 1,…

  2. Definition, analysis and development of an optical data distribution network for integrated avionics and control systems. Part 2: Component development and system integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, H. W.; Morrison, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    Fiber optic transmission is emerging as an attractive concept in data distribution onboard civil aircraft. Development of an Optical Data Distribution Network for Integrated Avionics and Control Systems for commercial aircraft will provide a data distribution network that gives freedom from EMI-RFI and ground loop problems, eliminates crosstalk and short circuits, provides protection and immunity from lightning induced transients and give a large bandwidth data transmission capability. In addition there is a potential for significantly reducing the weight and increasing the reliability over conventional data distribution networks. Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) is a candidate method for data communication between the various avionic subsystems. With WDM all systems could conceptually communicate with each other without time sharing and requiring complicated coding schemes for each computer and subsystem to recognize a message. However, the state of the art of optical technology limits the application of fiber optics in advanced integrated avionics and control systems. Therefore, it is necessary to address the architecture for a fiber optics data distribution system for integrated avionics and control systems as well as develop prototype components and systems.

  3. Digital Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Beaujardiere, J.

    2001-05-01

    Digital Earth (DE) seeks to make geospatial information broadly and easily available. Vast amounts of natural and cultural information are gathered about the Earth, but it is often difficult to find needed data, to share knowledge across disciplines, and to combine information from several sources. DE defines a framework for interoperability by selecting relevant open standards from the information technology community. These standards specify the technical means by which publishers can provide or sell their data, and by which client applications can find and access data in an automated fashion. The standardized DE framework enables many types of clients--from web browsers to museum kiosks to research-grade virtual environments--to use a common geospatial information infrastructure. Digital Earth can benefit Earth system education in general, and DLESE in particular, in several ways. First, educators, students and creators of instructional material will benefit from standardized access to georeferenced data. Secondly, educational lesson plans that focus on a region or aspect of the Earth can themselves be considered geospatial information resources that could be cataloged and retrieved through DE. Finally, general public knowledge about our planet will by increased by Digital Earth.

  4. Scanning for Digitization Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wentzel, Larry

    2007-01-01

    Librarians and archivists find themselves facing the prospect of digitization. Everyone is doing it, everyone needs it. Discussions rage nationally and internationally concerning what to digitize and the best means to present and retain digital objects. Digitization is the act of making something digital, expressing a physical object "in numerical…

  5. Simulation modeling based method for choosing an effective set of fault tolerance mechanisms for real-time avionics systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhmurov, A. G.; Balashov, V. V.; Glonina, A. B.; Pashkov, V. N.; Smeliansky, R. L.; Volkanov, D. Yu.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, the reliability allocation problem (RAP) for real-time avionics systems (RTAS) is considered. The proposed method for solving this problem consists of two steps: (i) creation of an RTAS simulation model at the necessary level of abstraction and (ii) application of metaheuristic algorithm to find an optimal solution (i. e., to choose an optimal set of fault tolerance techniques). When during the algorithm execution it is necessary to measure the execution time of some software components, the simulation modeling is applied. The procedure of simulation modeling also consists of the following steps: automatic construction of simulation model of the RTAS configuration and running this model in a simulation environment to measure the required time. This method was implemented as an experimental software tool. The tool works in cooperation with DYANA simulation environment. The results of experiments with the implemented method are presented. Finally, future plans for development of the presented method and tool are briefly described.

  6. A tutorial on the CARE III approach to reliability modeling. [of fault tolerant avionics and control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trivedi, K. S.; Geist, R. M.

    1981-01-01

    The CARE 3 reliability model for aircraft avionics and control systems is described by utilizing a number of examples which frequently use state-of-the-art mathematical modeling techniques as a basis for their exposition. Behavioral decomposition followed by aggregration were used in an attempt to deal with reliability models with a large number of states. A comprehensive set of models of the fault-handling processes in a typical fault-tolerant system was used. These models were semi-Markov in nature, thus removing the usual restrictions of exponential holding times within the coverage model. The aggregate model is a non-homogeneous Markov chain, thus allowing the times to failure to posses Weibull-like distributions. Because of the departures from traditional models, the solution method employed is that of Kolmogorov integral equations, which are evaluated numerically.

  7. Digital demodulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shull, T. A. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A digital demodulator for converting pulse code modulated data from phase shift key (PSK) to non return to zero (NRZ) and to biphase data is described. The demodulator is composed of standard integrated logic circuits. The key to the demodulation function is a pair of cross coupled one shot multivibrators and which with a flip-flop produce the NRZ-L is all that is required, the circuitry is greatly simplified and the 2(v) times bit rate contraint can be removed from the carrier. A flip-flop, an OR gate, and AND gate and a binary counter generate the bit rate clock (BTCK) for the NRZ-L. The remainder of the circuitry is for converting the NRZ-L and BTCK into biphase data. The device was designed for use in the space shuttle bay environment measurements.

  8. Digital structural

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dohm, J.M.; Anderson, R.C.; Tanaka, K.L.

    1998-01-01

    Magmatic and tectonic activity have both contributed significantly to the surface geology of Mars. Digital structural mapping techniques have now been used to classify and date centers of tectonic activity in the western equatorial region. For example, our results show a center of tectonic activity at Valles Marineris, which may be associated with uplift caused by intrusion. Such evidence may help explain, in part, the development of the large troughs and associated outflow channels and chaotic terrain. We also find a local centre of tectonic activity near the source region of Warrego Valles. Here, we suggest that the valley system may have resulted largely from intrusive-related hydrothermal activity. We hope that this work, together with the current Mars Global Surveyor mission, will lead to a better understanding of the geological processes that shaped the Martian surface.

  9. Combat Aircraft Noise held in Bonn, Germany on 23-25 October 1991 (Le Bruit Genere par les Avions de Combat)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-01

    sollicitations naturelles (vent) ou Ilides A I& vie moderns (trafic noutier), loa bangs focalisis no peuvent avoir d’action our des structures sainos ot...oxpdrimentalement. Los dimensions do ha zono affectdo par Ia focalisation sont naturellement dipendantos do l’acc~ldration de l’avion ;pour fixer lee iddos...du biung dipalsant 5. Catte valour panalt itre tan minimum compta tanu do Is difficulti qulil y a A placer un capteur do assure auffisammont proche

  10. Mission Planning for Tactical Aircraft (Preflight and In-Flight) (Systemes de Planification des Missions Pour Avions Tactiques) (Avant Vol et en Vol).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    pre- flight activities are less time-criticail Skil are developed through extensive training and practice (e.g. flight control, weapon aiming). Skills... activity , to the air, where it is an inte- station -based applications. Again as reported in Aviation Week gral part of performing the mission, brings a whole...Pierre Pagniez US Army’ Avionics R&D Activity Dassault Aviation Attn: SAVAA-T 78 Quai Marcel Dassault Fort Monmouth. NJ 07703-5401 92214 Saint Cloud

  11. Digital Sensor Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Ted Quinn; Jerry Mauck; Richard Bockhorst; Ken Thomas

    2013-07-01

    The nuclear industry has been slow to incorporate digital sensor technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns with digital qualification issues. However, the benefits of digital sensor technology for nuclear plant instrumentation are substantial in terms of accuracy, reliability, availability, and maintainability. This report demonstrates these benefits in direct comparisons of digital and analog sensor applications. It also addresses the qualification issues that must be addressed in the application of digital sensor technology.

  12. Computer architecture for efficient algorithmic executions in real-time systems: New technology for avionics systems and advanced space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, Chester C.; Youngblood, John N.; Saha, Aindam

    1987-01-01

    Improvements and advances in the development of computer architecture now provide innovative technology for the recasting of traditional sequential solutions into high-performance, low-cost, parallel system to increase system performance. Research conducted in development of specialized computer architecture for the algorithmic execution of an avionics system, guidance and control problem in real time is described. A comprehensive treatment of both the hardware and software structures of a customized computer which performs real-time computation of guidance commands with updated estimates of target motion and time-to-go is presented. An optimal, real-time allocation algorithm was developed which maps the algorithmic tasks onto the processing elements. This allocation is based on the critical path analysis. The final stage is the design and development of the hardware structures suitable for the efficient execution of the allocated task graph. The processing element is designed for rapid execution of the allocated tasks. Fault tolerance is a key feature of the overall architecture. Parallel numerical integration techniques, tasks definitions, and allocation algorithms are discussed. The parallel implementation is analytically verified and the experimental results are presented. The design of the data-driven computer architecture, customized for the execution of the particular algorithm, is discussed.

  13. Neutron Radiation Tolerance of Two Benchmark Thiophene-Based Conjugated Polymers: the Importance of Crystallinity for Organic Avionics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paternò, G. M.; Robbiano, V.; Fraser, K. J.; Frost, C.; García Sakai, V.; Cacialli, F.

    2017-01-01

    Aviation and space applications can benefit significantly from lightweight organic electronics, now spanning from displays to logics, because of the vital importance of minimising payload (size and mass). It is thus crucial to assess the damage caused to such materials by cosmic rays and neutrons, which pose a variety of hazards through atomic displacements following neutron-nucleus collisions. Here we report the first study of the neutron radiation tolerance of two poly(thiophene)s-based organic semiconductors: poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl), P3HT, and the liquid-crystalline poly(2,5-bis (3-tetradecylthiophen-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene), PBTTT. We combine spectroscopic investigations with characterisation of intrinsic charge mobility to show that PBTTT exhibits significantly higher tolerance than P3HT. We explain this in terms of a superior chemical, structural and conformational stability of PBTTT, which can be ascribed to its higher crystallinity, in turn induced by a combination of molecular design features. Our approach can be used to develop design strategies for better neutron radiation-tolerant materials, thus paving the way for organic semiconductors to enter avionics and space applications.

  14. Neutron Radiation Tolerance of Two Benchmark Thiophene-Based Conjugated Polymers: the Importance of Crystallinity for Organic Avionics

    PubMed Central

    Paternò, G. M.; Robbiano, V.; Fraser, K. J.; Frost, C.; García Sakai, V.; Cacialli, F.

    2017-01-01

    Aviation and space applications can benefit significantly from lightweight organic electronics, now spanning from displays to logics, because of the vital importance of minimising payload (size and mass). It is thus crucial to assess the damage caused to such materials by cosmic rays and neutrons, which pose a variety of hazards through atomic displacements following neutron-nucleus collisions. Here we report the first study of the neutron radiation tolerance of two poly(thiophene)s-based organic semiconductors: poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl), P3HT, and the liquid-crystalline poly(2,5-bis (3-tetradecylthiophen-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene), PBTTT. We combine spectroscopic investigations with characterisation of intrinsic charge mobility to show that PBTTT exhibits significantly higher tolerance than P3HT. We explain this in terms of a superior chemical, structural and conformational stability of PBTTT, which can be ascribed to its higher crystallinity, in turn induced by a combination of molecular design features. Our approach can be used to develop design strategies for better neutron radiation-tolerant materials, thus paving the way for organic semiconductors to enter avionics and space applications. PMID:28112195

  15. Neutron Radiation Tolerance of Two Benchmark Thiophene-Based Conjugated Polymers: the Importance of Crystallinity for Organic Avionics.

    PubMed

    Paternò, G M; Robbiano, V; Fraser, K J; Frost, C; García Sakai, V; Cacialli, F

    2017-01-23

    Aviation and space applications can benefit significantly from lightweight organic electronics, now spanning from displays to logics, because of the vital importance of minimising payload (size and mass). It is thus crucial to assess the damage caused to such materials by cosmic rays and neutrons, which pose a variety of hazards through atomic displacements following neutron-nucleus collisions. Here we report the first study of the neutron radiation tolerance of two poly(thiophene)s-based organic semiconductors: poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl), P3HT, and the liquid-crystalline poly(2,5-bis (3-tetradecylthiophen-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene), PBTTT. We combine spectroscopic investigations with characterisation of intrinsic charge mobility to show that PBTTT exhibits significantly higher tolerance than P3HT. We explain this in terms of a superior chemical, structural and conformational stability of PBTTT, which can be ascribed to its higher crystallinity, in turn induced by a combination of molecular design features. Our approach can be used to develop design strategies for better neutron radiation-tolerant materials, thus paving the way for organic semiconductors to enter avionics and space applications.

  16. Digital image processing.

    PubMed

    Seeram, Euclid

    2004-01-01

    Digital image processing is now commonplace in radiology, nuclear medicine and sonography. This article outlines underlying principles and concepts of digital image processing. After completing this article, readers should be able to: List the limitations of film-based imaging. Identify major components of a digital imaging system. Describe the history and application areas of digital image processing. Discuss image representation and the fundamentals of digital image processing. Outline digital image processing techniques and processing operations used in selected imaging modalities. Explain the basic concepts and visualization tools used in 3-D and virtual reality imaging. Recognize medical imaging informatics as a new area of specialization for radiologic technologists.

  17. Digital communications: Microwave applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feher, K.

    Transmission concepts and techniques of digital systems are presented; and practical state-of-the-art implementation of digital communications systems by line-of-sight microwaves is described. Particular consideration is given to statistical methods in digital transmission systems analysis, digital modulation methods, microwave amplifiers, system gain, m-ary and QAM microwave systems, correlative techniques and applications to digital radio systems, hybrid systems, digital microwave systems design, diversity and protection switching techniques, measurement techniques, and research and development trends and unsolved problems.

  18. Digital rectal exam

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007069.htm Digital rectal exam To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A digital rectal exam is an examination of the lower ...

  19. X-ray digital imaging petrography of lunar mare soils: modal analyses of minerals and glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, L. A.; Patchen, A.; Taylor, D. H.; Chambers, J. G.; McKay, D. S.

    1996-01-01

    It is essential that accurate modal (i.e., volume) percentages of the various mineral and glass phases in lunar soils be used for addressing and resolving the effects of space weathering upon reflectance spectra, as well as for their calibration such data are also required for evaluating the resource potential of lunar minerals for use at a lunar base. However, these data are largely lacking. Particle-counting information for lunar soils, originally obtained to study formational processes, does not provide these necessary data, including the percentages of minerals locked in multi-phase lithic fragments and fused-soil particles, such as agglutinates. We have developed a technique for modal analyses, sensu stricto, of lunar soils, using digital imaging of X-ray maps obtained with an energy-dispersive spectrometer mounted on an electron microprobe. A suite of nine soils (90 to 150 micrometers size fraction) from the Apollo 11, 12, 15, and 17 mare sites was used for this study. This is the first collection of such modal data on soils from all Apollo mare sites. The abundances of free-mineral fragments in the mare soils are greater for immature and submature soils than for mature soils, largely because of the formation of agglutinitic glass as maturity progresses. In considerations of resource utilization at a lunar base, the best lunar soils to use for mineral beneficiation (i.e., most free-mineral fragments) have maturities near the immature/submature boundary (Is/FeO approximately or = 30), not the mature soils with their complications due to extensive agglutination. The particle data obtained from the nine mare soils confirm the generalizations for lunar soils predicted by L.A. Taylor and D.S. McKay (1992, Lunar Planet Sci. Conf. 23rd, pp. 1411-1412 [Abstract]).

  20. X-ray digital imaging petrography of lunar mare soils: modal analyses of minerals and glasses.

    PubMed

    Taylor, L A; Patchen, A; Taylor, D H; Chambers, J G; McKay, D S

    1996-12-01

    It is essential that accurate modal (i.e., volume) percentages of the various mineral and glass phases in lunar soils be used for addressing and resolving the effects of space weathering upon reflectance spectra, as well as for their calibration such data are also required for evaluating the resource potential of lunar minerals for use at a lunar base. However, these data are largely lacking. Particle-counting information for lunar soils, originally obtained to study formational processes, does not provide these necessary data, including the percentages of minerals locked in multi-phase lithic fragments and fused-soil particles, such as agglutinates. We have developed a technique for modal analyses, sensu stricto, of lunar soils, using digital imaging of X-ray maps obtained with an energy-dispersive spectrometer mounted on an electron microprobe. A suite of nine soils (90 to 150 micrometers size fraction) from the Apollo 11, 12, 15, and 17 mare sites was used for this study. This is the first collection of such modal data on soils from all Apollo mare sites. The abundances of free-mineral fragments in the mare soils are greater for immature and submature soils than for mature soils, largely because of the formation of agglutinitic glass as maturity progresses. In considerations of resource utilization at a lunar base, the best lunar soils to use for mineral beneficiation (i.e., most free-mineral fragments) have maturities near the immature/submature boundary (Is/FeO approximately or = 30), not the mature soils with their complications due to extensive agglutination. The particle data obtained from the nine mare soils confirm the generalizations for lunar soils predicted by L.A. Taylor and D.S. McKay (1992, Lunar Planet Sci. Conf. 23rd, pp. 1411-1412 [Abstract]).

  1. Digital flight control research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, J. E.; Stern, R. G.; Smith, T. B.; Sinha, P.

    1974-01-01

    The results of studies which were undertaken to contribute to the design of digital flight control systems, particularly for transport aircraft are presented. In addition to the overall design considerations for a digital flight control system, the following topics are discussed in detail: (1) aircraft attitude reference system design, (2) the digital computer configuration, (3) the design of a typical digital autopilot for transport aircraft, and (4) a hybrid flight simulator.

  2. TELEMETRY EQUIPMENT WITH DIGITAL READING,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Contents: Basic peculiarities of telemetry equipment with digital reading ; Elements of pulse technology applied in telemetry equipment with digital... reading ; Digital reading systems; Telemetry systems with digital reading . (Author)

  3. Digital Ink and Notetaking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colwell, Kenneth E.

    2004-01-01

    Tablet PCs and graphics tablets employ digital ink technology. In this paper the author introduces the reader to digital ink technology with the aim of promoting its use in various instructional or training settings, with the goal of improving instructor-learner dialogue and student learning. The potential of digital ink for improved instructional…

  4. Digital Language Death

    PubMed Central

    Kornai, András

    2013-01-01

    Of the approximately 7,000 languages spoken today, some 2,500 are generally considered endangered. Here we argue that this consensus figure vastly underestimates the danger of digital language death, in that less than 5% of all languages can still ascend to the digital realm. We present evidence of a massive die-off caused by the digital divide. PMID:24167559

  5. Reconceptualising Critical Digital Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pangrazio, Luciana

    2016-01-01

    While it has proved a useful concept during the past 20 years, the notion of "critical digital literacy" requires rethinking in light of the fast-changing nature of young people's digital practices. This paper contrasts long-established notions of "critical digital literacy" (based primarily around the critical consumption of…

  6. Digital Literacy. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    21st Century students need a complex set of skills to be successful in a digital environment. Digital literacy, similar to traditional definitions of literacy, is a set of skills students use to locate, organize, understand, evaluate and create information. The difference is that it occurs in an environment where a growing set of digital tools…

  7. Mass Digitization of Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyle, Karen

    2006-01-01

    Mass digitization of the bound volumes that we generally call "books" has begun, and, thanks to the interest in Google and all that it does, it is getting widespread media attention. The Open Content Alliance (OCA), a library initiative formed after Google announced its library book digitization project, has brought library digitization projects…

  8. Bridging the Digital Divide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Alan; Milner, Helen; Killer, Terry; Dixon, Genny

    2008-01-01

    As the Government publishes its action plan for consultation on digital inclusion, the authors consider some of the challenges and opportunities for the delivery of digital inclusion. Clarke argues that digital inclusion requires more than access to technology or the skills to use it effectively, it demands information and media literacy. Milner…

  9. Digital Mammography and Digital Breast Tomosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Moseley, Tanya W

    2016-06-01

    Breast imaging technology has advanced significantly from the 1930s until the present. American women have a 1 in 8 chance of developing breast cancer. Mammography has been proven in multiple clinical trials to reduce breast cancer mortality. Although a mainstay of breast imaging and improved from film-screen mammography, digital mammography is not a perfect examination. Overlapping obscuring breast tissue limits mammographic interpretation. Breast digital tomosynthesis reduces and/or eliminates overlapping obscuring breast tissue. Although there are some disadvantages with digital breast tomosynthesis, this relatively lost-cost technology may be used effectively in the screening and diagnostic settings.

  10. Validation of fault-free behavior of a reliable multiprocessor system - FTMP: A case study. [Fault-Tolerant Multi-Processor avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clune, E.; Segall, Z.; Siewiorek, D.

    1984-01-01

    A program of experiments has been conducted at NASA-Langley to test the fault-free performance of a Fault-Tolerant Multiprocessor (FTMP) avionics system for next-generation aircraft. Baseline measurements of an operating FTMP system were obtained with respect to the following parameters: instruction execution time, frame size, and the variation of clock ticks. The mechanisms of frame stretching were also investigated. The experimental results are summarized in a table. Areas of interest for future tests are identified, with emphasis given to the implementation of a synthetic workload generation mechanism on FTMP.

  11. The Unmanned Combat Aircraft (UCAV): The Point of View of an Aircraft Manufacturer (Les Avions de Combat Non Habites (UCAV) Le point de vue d’un avionneur)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-04-01

    mes qu’ils ont con~us et plate-forme et son environnement (par d ~velopp6s diff~re des hypoth~ses qu’ils avaient prises exemple : I’anti-collision sol...dans lequel un intir&t sont des solutions techniquement envisageables croissant a pit se d ~gager pour promouvoir le pouvant pr6tendre r~pondre a ces...conception que permet d’envisager l’absence opirationnels- ii est possible d’envisager des concepts d 𔄀quipage A bord de ]a plate-formne. novateurs d ’avions

  12. Digital Collections, Digital Libraries and the Digitization of Cultural Heritage Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Clifford

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the development of digital collections and digital libraries. Topics include digitization of cultural heritage information; broadband issues; lack of compelling content; training issues; types of materials being digitized; sustainability; digital preservation; infrastructure; digital images; data mining; and future possibilities for…

  13. Digital rights management for digital cinema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirovski, Darko; Peinado, Marcus; Petitcolas, Fabien A. P.

    2001-12-01

    There is a wide consensus among the feature film production studios that the Internet era brings a new paradigm for film distribution to cinemas worldwide. The benefits of digital cinema to both producers and cinemas are numerous: significantly lower distribution and maintenance costs, immediate access to film libraries, higher presentation quality, and strong potential for developing new business models. Despite these advantages, the studios are still reluctant to jump into the digital age. The main showstopper for digital cinema is the danger of widespread piracy. Piracy already costs Hollywood an estimated two billion dollars annually and digital cinema without proper copyright enforcement could increase this number. In this paper, we present a copyright management system that aims at providing the set of necessary security tools: standard cryptographic primitives and copyright protection mechanisms that enable a reliable and secure feature film delivery system.

  14. Digital Monopulse Receivers for Phase Modulated Signals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-14

    comunicaciones ación... e Madrid s/n...θ1k Σ+j∆ ∆ digital Σ digital Signal formation ∆ digit Σ digitdigit Σ digitRCHITECTURES BASED ON AMPLITUDE MEASUREMENT e architectures perform the

  15. Light weight, high-speed, and self-powered wireless fiber optic sensor (WiFOS) structural health monitor system for avionics and aerospace environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Edgar A.; Kempen, Cornelia; Sun, Sunjian; Esterkin, Yan

    2014-09-01

    This paper describes recent progress towards the development of an innovative light weight, high-speed, and selfpowered wireless fiber optic sensor (WiFOS™) structural health monitor system suitable for the onboard and in-flight unattended detection, localization, and classification of load, fatigue, and structural damage in advanced composite materials commonly used in avionics and aerospace systems. The WiFOS™ system is based on ROI's advancements on monolithic photonic integrated circuit microchip technology, integrated with smart power management, on-board data processing, wireless data transmission optoelectronics, and self-power using energy harvesting tools such as solar, vibration, thermoelectric, and magneto-electric. The self-powered, wireless WiFOS™ system offers a versatile and powerful SHM tool to enhance the reliability and safety of avionics platforms, jet fighters, helicopters, commercial aircraft that use lightweight composite material structures, by providing comprehensive information about the structural integrity of the structure from a large number of locations. Immediate SHM applications are found in rotorcraft and aircraft, ships, submarines, and in next generation weapon systems, and in commercial oil and petrochemical, aerospace industries, civil structures, power utilities, portable medical devices, and biotechnology, homeland security and a wide spectrum of other applications.

  16. Digital work-flow

    PubMed Central

    MARSANGO, V.; BOLLERO, R.; D’OVIDIO, N.; MIRANDA, M.; BOLLERO, P.; BARLATTANI, A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective. The project presents a clinical case in which the digital work-flow procedure was applied for a prosthetic rehabilitation in natural teeth and implants. Materials. Digital work-flow uses patient’s photo for the aesthetic’s planning, digital smile technology for the simulation of the final restoration and real time scanning to register the two arches. Than the scanning are sent to the laboratory that proceed with CAD-CAM production. Results. Digital work-flow offers the opportunities to easily speak with laboratory and patients, gives better clinical results and demonstrated to be a less invasiveness method for the patient. Conclusion. Intra-oral scanner, digital smile design, preview using digital wax-up, CAD-CAM production, are new predictable opportunities for prosthetic team. This work-flow, compared with traditional methods, is faster, more precise and predictable. PMID:25694797

  17. Digital radiography: an overview.

    PubMed

    Parks, Edwin T; Williamson, Gail F

    2002-11-15

    Since the discovery of X-rays in 1895, film has been the primary medium for capturing, displaying, and storing radiographic images. It is a technology that dental practitioners are the most familiar and comfortable with in terms of technique and interpretation. Digital radiography is the latest advancement in dental imaging and is slowly being adopted by the dental profession. Digital imaging incorporates computer technology in the capture, display, enhancement, and storage of direct radiographic images. Digital imaging offers some distinct advantages over film, but like any emerging technology, it presents new and different challenges for the practitioner to overcome. This article presents an overview of digital imaging including basic terminology and comparisons with film-based imaging. The principles of direct and indirect digital imaging modalities, intraoral and extraoral applications, image processing, and diagnostic efficacy will be discussed. In addition, the article will provide a list of questions dentists should consider prior to purchasing digital imaging systems for their practice.

  18. Saving Amputated Digits

    PubMed Central

    Frykman, Gary K.; Wood, Virchel E.

    1974-01-01

    Since the advent of microsurgery in the 1960's it has become possible to sucessfully repair vessels as small as 0.5 mm in diameter, which makes the replantation of totally severed digits possible. Some centers have reported 50 to 60 percent survival of completely severed digits and up to 100 percent survival of amputated hands and of partially amputed but otherwise non-viable digits that were reattached. In view of this success, severed members should be considered as potentially replantable. The recommended indications for replantation are: (1) multiple digital amputations at or proximal to the proximal interphalangeal joint; (2) amputation of the thumb; (3) amputation of the wrist or hand; (4) partially attached digits that are non-viable without reattachment. The surviving replanted digits give functional improvement to the hand and prove cosmetically acceptable. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:4608643

  19. Digital Natives and Digital Divide: Analysing Perspective for Emerging Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onye, Uriel U.; Du, Yunfei

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the concepts of digital natives and digital divide from the perspective of the digital outsiders (part of digital natives). It takes a critical look at the implications of available ICT in both developed and underdeveloped countries in the fight against digital divide. The major contribution to literature is by drawing…

  20. Digital Sensor Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Ken D.; Quinn, Edward L.; Mauck, Jerry L.; Bockhorst, Richard M.

    2015-02-01

    The nuclear industry has been slow to incorporate digital sensor technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns with digital qualification issues. However, the benefits of digital sensor technology for nuclear plant instrumentation are substantial in terms of accuracy and reliability. This paper, which refers to a final report issued in 2013, demonstrates these benefits in direct comparisons of digital and analog sensor applications. Improved accuracy results from the superior operating characteristics of digital sensors. These include improvements in sensor accuracy and drift and other related parameters which reduce total loop uncertainty and thereby increase safety and operating margins. An example instrument loop uncertainty calculation for a pressure sensor application is presented to illustrate these improvements. This is a side-by-side comparison of the instrument loop uncertainty for both an analog and a digital sensor in the same pressure measurement application. Similarly, improved sensor reliability is illustrated with a sample calculation for determining the probability of failure on demand, an industry standard reliability measure. This looks at equivalent analog and digital temperature sensors to draw the comparison. The results confirm substantial reliability improvement with the digital sensor, due in large part to ability to continuously monitor the health of a digital sensor such that problems can be immediately identified and corrected. This greatly reduces the likelihood of a latent failure condition of the sensor at the time of a design basis event. Notwithstanding the benefits of digital sensors, there are certain qualification issues that are inherent with digital technology and these are described in the report. One major qualification impediment for digital sensor implementation is software common cause failure (SCCF).

  1. Digital Longitudinal Tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimkus, Daniel Steven

    1985-12-01

    The purpose of this dissertation was to investigate the clinical utility of digital longitudinal tomosynthesis in radiology. By acquiring a finite group of digital images during a longitudinal tomographic exposure, and processing these images, tomographic planes, other than the fulcrum plane, can be reconstructed. This process is now termed "tomosynthesis". A prototype system utilizing this technique was developed. Both phantom and patient studies were done with this system. The phantom studies were evaluated by subjective, visual criterion and by quantitative analysis of edge sharpness and noise in the reconstructions. Two groups of patients and one volunteer were studied. The first patient group consisted of 8 patients undergoing intravenous urography (IVU). These patients had digital tomography and film tomography of the abdomen. The second patient group consisted of 4 patients with lung cancer admitted to the hospital for laser resection of endobronchial tumor. These patients had mediastinal digital tomograms to evaluate the trachea and mainstem bronchi. The knee of one volunteer was imaged by film tomography and digital tomography. The results of the phantom studies showed that the digital reconstructions accurately produced images of the desired planes. The edge sharpness of the reconstructions approached that of the acquired images. Adequate reconstructions were achieved with as few as 5 images acquired during the exposure, with the quality of the reconstructions improving as the number of images acquired increased. The IVU patients' digital studies had less contrast and spatial resolution than the film tomograms. The single renal lesion visible on the film tomograms was also visible in the digital images. The digital mediastinal studies were felt by several radiologists to be superior to a standard chest xray in evaluating the airways. The digital images of the volunteer's knee showed many of the same anatomic features as the film tomogram, but the digital

  2. 75 FR 71183 - 23rd Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 206: EUROCAE WG 76 Plenary: AIS and MET Data Link Services

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-22

    ... Services and a revised Terms of Reference (TOR) for SC-206 has been approved by the RTCA Program Management... receipt, a Concept of Use for AIS and MET Data Link Services and an AIS and MET Services Delivery Architecture Recommendations are included in the TOR deliverables. The Concept of Use for AIS and MET Data...

  3. Publication of Papers Presented at URSI 23RD General Assembly as a Special Section of Radio Science

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-15

    the been determined in Figure I as black dots, and the spaced direction finding measurements made in conjugate point of the ionospheric exit region of...In section 2, like Maslov (19651, Ludwig [1966], and others. In Rytov’s method is generalized to the form of an the applied form, Maslov’s method is...IN INHOMOGENEOUS IONOSPHERE I is expanded, where e(r) is relative dielectric permit- I I tivity, k = adc is wave number in free space , w = a P 4 40 2

  4. Minutes of the Explosives Safety Seminar (23rd) Held at Atlanta, Georgia on 9-11 August 1988. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    evce Securing the lift truck load was also considered for mitigating the accident involving a drop which resulted in a detonation. Using battery...15 1/30 < a/z < 1/15 1.0 >15 > 1/15 Figur. 4 Pressurs-Ir.oulse Relation fnP Stpl A2m 407 p peak applied pressure (F/L 2 ) i applied specific impulse

  5. Symposium (International) on Combustion, 23rd, Universite d'Orleans, France, July 22-27, 1990, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The present symposium on combustion discusses reaction kinetics, NO(x) kinetics, premixed, diffusion, and nonsteady flames, turbulent combustion, hazardous waste, fluidized bed combustion, coal boilers and furnaces, engines, heterogeneous kinetics, heterogeneous, droplet, and microgravity combustion, and high-temperature synthesis. Attention is given to reactions of biphenyl, methylnaphthalenes, and phenanthrene with atomic oxygen in the gas phase, the oxidation of ortho-xylene, the effects of water on combustion kinetics at high pressure, and the formation and measurement of N2O in combustion systems. Topics addressed include large ions in premixed benzene-oxygen flames, the structure and kinetics of CH4/N2O flames, the propagation of unsteady hydrogen premixed flames near flammability limits, and the basic structure of lean propane flames. Also considered are OH measurements of piloted diffusion flames of nitrogen-diluted methane near extinction, waste combustion, preferential oxidation of carbon surfaces, and reburning mechanisms in a pulverized coal combustor.

  6. International Conference on Coordination Chemistry (23rd) Held at Boulder, Colorado on 29 July-3 August, 1984.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-09-26

    Reactivity and Redox Pathways-Theory and Experiment- Unusual Oxidation States C. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Transition Metal Compound Reactions D...Wilke of West Germany, Professor Richard Holm of the United States, and Henry Taube of the United States, and reci- pient of the 1983 Nobel Prize in...Energetics and Dynamics-Kinetics and Mechanisms ; 2) Energetics and Dynamt cs-E lectrochmt stry/Thermodynamic s; 3) Biotnorgantc-Metalloenzyms; 4) Synthesis

  7. Proceedings of the Annual Adult Education Research Conference (23rd, Lincoln, Nebraska, April 1-3, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebraska Univ., Lincoln. Dept. of Adult and Continuing Education.

    These proceedings of a conference on research in the field of adult education contain the texts of 40 conference papers and 4 symposia. Included among the areas examined in the individual reports are the following: education participation scale factor structure and correlates for 12,000 learners, a comparative analysis of adult education research…

  8. 1986 Annual Conference on Nuclear and Space Radiation Effects, 23rd, Providence, RI, July 21-23, 1986, Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Thomas D. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    The present conference on the effects of nuclear and space radiation on electronic hardware gives attention to topics in the basic mechanisms of radiation effects, dosimetry and energy-dependent effects, electronic device radiation hardness assurance, SOI/SOS radiation effects, spacecraft charging and space radiation, IC radiation effects and hardening, single-event upset (SEU) phenomena and hardening, and EMP/SGEMP/IEMP phenomena. Specific treatments encompass the generation of interface states by ionizing radiation in very thin MOS oxides, the microdosimetry of meson energy deposited on 1-micron sites in Si, total dose radiation and engineering studies, plasma interactions with biased concentrator solar cells, the transient imprint memory effect in MOS memories, mechanisms leading to SEU, and the vaporization and breakdown of thin columns of water.

  9. 76 FR 1065 - Security Zone; 23rd Annual North American International Auto Show, Detroit River, Detroit, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-07

    ... Auto Show, Detroit River, Detroit, MI AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY... Auto Show (NAIAS) being held at Cobo Hall in downtown Detroit, MI. DATES: This rule is effective from 9... Auto Show (NAIAS) being held at Cobo Hall in downtown Detroit, MI from possible sabotage or...

  10. Research: Reflecting Practice. Papers from the SCUTREA Annual Conference (23rd, Manchester, England, July 6-8, 1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Nod, Ed.; Jones, David J., Ed.

    The following papers are included: "Social Classification of Women's Work" (Benn, Burton); "Developing Models of Learning from Experience" (Boud, Walker); "'Research Reflecting Practice?'" (Edwards, Usher); "Metaphors and Their Implications for Research and Practice in Adult and Community Education" (Hunt); "'Common-Sense' Approach to Reflection"…

  11. Minutes of the Explosives Safety Seminar (23rd) Held at Atlanta, Georgia on 9-11 August 1988. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    blending of different fibres (in textile industry) etc. 4.4 Acceleration of the rate of decay of the charge is feasible by adoption of measures like ...R. Smith Underground Storage in Unlined Rock Tunnels: Rock Mechanics Considerations in Estimating Damage Levels ...1270 20 8 cc 40 II’ ii.0CC w~I1w 1. 1271 AM upper level of the building for unpacking and processing. On the upper A level , the pellets of munitions

  12. International Applied Military Psychology Symposium (23rd) Held in Lisbon, Portugal on June 1-5, 1987

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-30

    questions of a social combination of accelerated resignations, psychological nature follow on the heels a drop in the birth rate, and reductions of the...of the limits of the military, such men have families, suffer stress, The first speaker to address the debate social questions, and participate...fluctuations the data may be used to assess the ef- usually on the order of 1-2 percent. fects of variations in social , political, Turnover thus was

  13. Proceedings of the 23rd Annual Penn Linguistics Colloquium. University of Pennsylvania Working Papers in Linguistics, Volume 6, Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Jim, Ed.; Han, Na-Rae, Ed.; Fox, Michelle Minnick, Ed.

    This issue includes the following articles: "Assimilation to the Unmarked" (Eric Bakovic); "On the Non-Universality of Functional Projections and the Effects on Parametrized Variation: Evidence from Creoles" (Marlyse Baptista); "What Turkish Acquisition Tells Us about Underlying Word Order and Scrambling" (Natalie Batman-Ratyosyan, Karin…

  14. International Conference on Coordination Chemistry (23rd) Held at Boulder, Colorado on 29 July - 3 August 1984. Abstracts of Paper.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-03

    Institut Le Bel, Universit6 Louis Pasteur, 4, rue Blaise Pascal , 67000 Strasbourg, France Binuclear copper sites have been implicated in several copper...univtsitd Louis Pasteur, 4, rue laise Pascal , 67000 Stvashouri, Prance. (a) Laboratoires do Chisie (LA CONS 321), Ddpartinsnt do Rchezcb* Fondamntals...Cours do Ia Libdration, 33405 Talence - France, and * Sciences des Hstdriaux, ISC, 1, rue laise Pascal , 67008 Strasbourg Cedox - France. Clusters of

  15. Digital In, Digital Out: Digital Editing with Firewire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, Bob; Sauer, Jeff

    1997-01-01

    Reviews linear and nonlinear digital video (DV) editing equipment and software, using the IEEE 1394 (FireWire) connector. Includes a chart listing specifications and rating eight DV editing systems, reviews two DV still-photo cameras, and previews beta DV products. (PEN)

  16. Digitization Best Practices

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Fei; Holtkamp, Irma S.; Knudson, Frances L.

    2012-07-31

    This project involved performing tests and documenting results to determine best practices for digitizing older print documents. The digitization process is complicated, especially when original documents exhibit non-standard fonts and are faded. Tests focused on solutions to improve high quality scanning, increase OCR accuracy, and efficiently use embedded metadata. Results are summarized. From the test results on the right sides, we know that when we plan to digitize documents, we should balance Quantity and Quality based on our expectation, and then make final decision for the digitization process.

  17. Digital Electronic Still Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Samuel D.; Yeates, Herbert D.

    1993-01-01

    Digital electronic still camera part of electronic recording, processing, tansmitting, and displaying system. Removable hard-disk drive in camera serves as digital electronic equivalent of photographic film. Images viewed, analyzed, or transmitted quickly. Camera takes images of nearly photographic quality and stores them in digital form. Portable, hand-held, battery-powered unit designed for scientific use. Camera used in conjunction with playback unit also serving as transmitting unit if images sent to remote station. Remote station equipped to store, process, and display images. Digital image data encoded with error-correcting code at playback/transmitting unit for error-free transmission to remote station.

  18. Experiments in digital literacy.

    PubMed

    Eshet-Alkali, Yoram; Amichai-Hamburger, Yair

    2004-08-01

    Having digital literacy requires more than just the ability to use software or to operate a digital device; it includes a large variety of complex skills such as cognitive, motoric, sociological, and emotional that users need to have in order to use digital environments effectively. A conceptual model that was recently described by the authors suggests that digital literacy comprises five major digital skills: photo-visual skills ("reading" instructions from graphical displays), reproduction skills (utilizing digital reproduction to create new, meaningful materials from preexisting ones), branching skills (constructing knowledge from non-linear, hypertextual navigation), information skills (evaluating the quality and validity of information), and socio-emotional skills (understanding the "rules" that prevail in cyberspace and applying this understanding in online cyberspace communication). The present paper presents results from a performance-based pioneer study that investigated the application of the above digital literacy skills conceptual model among different groups of scholars. Results clearly indicate that the younger participants performed better than the older ones, with photo-visual and branching literacy tasks, whereas the older participants were found to be more literate in reproduction and information literacy tasks. Research results shed light on the cognitive skills that users utilize in performing with digital environments, and provide educators and software developers with helpful guidelines for designing better user-centered digital environments.

  19. Exploring digital professionalism.

    PubMed

    Ellaway, Rachel H; Coral, Janet; Topps, David; Topps, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    The widespread use of digital media (both computing devices and the services they access) has blurred the boundaries between our personal and professional lives. Contemporary students are the last to remember a time before the widespread use of the Internet and they will be the first to practice in a largely e-health environment. This article explores concepts of digital professionalism and their place in contemporary medical education, and proposes a series of principles of digital professionalism to guide teaching, learning and practice in the healthcare professions. Despite the many risks and fears surrounding their use, digital media are not an intrinsic threat to medical professionalism. Professionals should maintain the capacity for deliberate, ethical, and accountable practice when using digital media. The authors describe a digital professionalism framework structured around concepts of proficiency, reputation, and responsibility. Digital professionalism can be integrated into medical education using strategies based on awareness, alignment, assessment, and accountability. These principles of digital professionalism provide a way for medical students and medical practitioners to embrace the positive aspects of digital media use while being mindful and deliberate in its use to avoid or minimize any negative consequences.

  20. Optical digital techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Optical interface losses between transmitter-to-fiber interface, connector-to-connector interface, and fiber-to-receiver interface were studied. System effects such as pulse dispersion, risetimes of the sources and detectors, type of fibers used, output power of the sources, and detector sensitivity were considered. Data bus systems such as TEE, Star, and Hybrid were analyzed. The matter of single fiber versus bundle technologies for future avionics systems was considered. The existing data bus system on Space Shuttle was examined and an optical analog was derived for a fiber bundle system, along with the associated power margin. System tests were performed on a feasibility model of a 9-port Star data bus system including BER, star losses, connector losses, etc. The same system was subjected to EMI between the range of 200 Hz to 10 GHz at 20V/m levels. A lightning test was also performed which simulated the conditions similar to those on Space Shuttle. The data bus system was found to be EMI and lightning hard. It is concluded that an optical data bus system is feasible for shuttle orbiter type vehicles.

  1. Digital ureteroscopes: technology update

    PubMed Central

    Gridley, Chad M; Knudsen, Bodo E

    2017-01-01

    The field of ureteroscopy has undergone a continual evolution since the first ureteroscopes were introduced. Over the past 10 years, we have entered into the digital era of ureteroscopy with both semirigid and flexible options becoming available. The following review looks at the benefits and drawbacks of digital flexible ureteroscopes as well as the current commercially available options. PMID:28203551

  2. Occupying the Digital Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    This essay questions the digital humanities' dependence on interpretation and critique as strategies for reading and responding to texts. Instead, the essay proposes suggestion as a digital rhetorical practice, one that does not replace hermeneutics, but instead offers alternative ways to respond to texts. The essay uses the Occupy movement as an…

  3. Digital Media and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, 2012

    2012-01-01

    MacArthur launched the digital media and learning initiative in 2006 to explore how digital media are changing the way young people learn, socialize, communicate, and play. Since 2006, the Foundation has awarded grants totaling more than $100 million for research, development of innovative new technologies, new learning environments for youth,…

  4. Creating Digital Authors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zoch, Melody; Langston-DeMott, Brooke; Adams-Budde, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Elementary students find themselves engaged and learning at a digital writing camp. The authors find that such elementary students usually have limited access to technology at home and school, and posit that teachers should do all they can to give them more access to and experience in digital composing. Students were motivated and learned to use…

  5. Digital Collections Inventory Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClung, Patricia A.

    This report is intended to inform and stimulate discussion on digital library programs as well as the potential usefulness, scope, and desired features of future inventories of online digital collections. It describes a joint project by the Commission on Preservation and Access and the Council on Library Resources to determine the extent to which…

  6. Shaping Digital Library Content.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Rush G.

    2002-01-01

    Explores issues related to the selection and purchase of digital content in academic libraries, including commercially-produced databases, electronic journals, and books and other electronic resources that are purchased from vendors; and in-house digitization projects. Considers the degree to which standard collection management principles apply.…

  7. Digital Video Editing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConnell, Terry

    2004-01-01

    Monica Adams, head librarian at Robinson Secondary in Fairfax country, Virginia, states that librarians should have the technical knowledge to support projects related to digital video editing. The process of digital video editing and the cables, storage issues and the computer system with software is described.

  8. Digital communications study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boorstyn, R. R.

    1973-01-01

    Research is reported dealing with problems of digital data transmission and computer communications networks. The results of four individual studies are presented which include: (1) signal processing with finite state machines, (2) signal parameter estimation from discrete-time observations, (3) digital filtering for radar signal processing applications, and (4) multiple server queues where all servers are not identical.

  9. Improved digital thermometer design.

    PubMed

    Swift, C S

    1981-01-01

    A simple digital thermometer design using a self-contained 3 1/2 digit LCD meter module is presented. The Celsius-reading (Centigrade) thermometer is powered by a single 9-V battery, has very low power drain, and uses an inexpensive NPN silicon transistor for the temperature sensor. A short bibliography on temperature measurement instrumentation is included.

  10. Will Digital Texts Succeed?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acker, Stephen R.

    2008-01-01

    With faculty changing instructional practices to take advantage of customizable, focused content (and digital delivery of that content), many people assume that digital distribution is the answer to bringing the costs of course content delivery in line. But the picture just isn't that simple. A wide continuum of options is available to faculty and…

  11. Digital Image Access & Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heidorn, P. Bryan, Ed.; Sandore, Beth, Ed.

    Recent technological advances in computing and digital imaging technology have had immediate and permanent consequences for visual resource collections. Libraries are involved in organizing and managing large visual resource collections. The central challenges in working with digital image collections mirror those that libraries have sought to…

  12. Fundamentals of Digital Logic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noell, Monica L.

    This course is designed to prepare electronics personnel for further training in digital techniques, presenting need to know information that is basic to any maintenance course on digital equipment. It consists of seven study units: (1) binary arithmetic; (2) boolean algebra; (3) logic gates; (4) logic flip-flops; (5) nonlogic circuits; (6)…

  13. Digital Libraries: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Candy

    2000-01-01

    Provides an overview of the basic components of a digital library. Highlights include library collections; metadata; services, including information seeking and retrieval, reference query fulfillment, and user training; user interaction with digital libraries, including searching, browsing, and navigation; economic support; maintenance;…

  14. Digital Readiness Gaps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horrigan, John B.

    2016-01-01

    For many years concerns about "digital divides" centered primarily on whether people had "access" to digital technologies. Now, those worried about these issues also focus on the degree to which people succeed or struggle when they use technology to try to navigate their environments, solve problems, and make decisions. This…

  15. Digital Knowledge Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandian, M. Paul

    2008-01-01

    Technology has revolutionized the concept of libraries. Networking and computing technologies have now become sufficiently advanced to support the design and deployment of large digital libraries which are capable of supporting the conventional end-user functions. Digital libraries are a natural extension of the evolution in which libraries have…

  16. Music Instruction Goes Digital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demski, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Faced with meager enrollment in band, orchestra, and choir programs, schools are using digital technology to excite students about creating music on today's terms. This article discusses how music educators reinvent their profession by acknowledging and incorporating the way students interact with music today--digitally. Bill Evans, a music…

  17. Digitized synchronous demodulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodhouse, Christopher E. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A digitized synchronous demodulator is constructed entirely of digital components including timing logic, an accumulator, and means to digitally filter the digital output signal. Indirectly, it accepts, at its input, periodic analog signals which are converted to digital signals by traditional analog-to-digital conversion techniques. Broadly, the input digital signals are summed to one of two registers within an accumulator, based on the phase of the input signal and medicated by timing logic. At the end of a predetermined number of cycles of the inputted periodic signals, the contents of the register that accumulated samples from the negative half cycle is subtracted from the accumulated samples from the positive half cycle. The resulting difference is an accurate measurement of the narrow band amplitude of the periodic input signal during the measurement period. This measurement will not include error sources encountered in prior art synchronous demodulators using analog techniques such as offsets, charge injection errors, temperature drift, switching transients, settling time, analog to digital converter missing code, and linearity errors.

  18. Digital Signature Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassler, Vesna; Biely, Helmut

    1999-01-01

    Describes the Digital Signature Project that was developed in Austria to establish an infrastructure for applying smart card-based digital signatures in banking and electronic-commerce applications. Discusses the need to conform to international standards, an international certification infrastructure, and security features for a public directory…

  19. Writing and Digital Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Waes, Luuk, Ed.; Leijten, Marielle, Ed.; Neuwirth, Chris, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    Digital media has become an increasingly powerful force in modern society. This volume brings together outstanding European, American and Australian research in "writing and digital media" and explores its cognitive, social and cultural implications. In addition to presenting programs of original research by internationally known…

  20. Digital rotation measurement unit

    DOEpatents

    Sanderson, S.N.

    1983-09-30

    A digital rotation indicator is disclosed for monitoring the position of a valve member having a movable actuator. The indicator utilizes mercury switches adapted to move in cooperation with the actuator. Each of the switches produces an output as it changes state when the actuator moves. A direction detection circuit is connected to the switches to produce a first digital signal indicative of the direction of rotation of the actuator. A count pulse generating circuit is also connected to the switches to produce a second digital pulse signal having count pulses corresponding to a change of state of any of the mercury switches. A reset pulse generating circuit is provided to generate a reset pulse each time a count pulse is generated. An up/down counter is connected to receive the first digital pulse signal and the second digital pulse signal and to count the pulses of the second digital pulse signal either up or down depending upon the instantaneous digital value of the first digital signal whereby a running count indicative of the movement of the actuator is maintained.