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Sample records for 23s ribosomal rna

  1. Sequence specific detection of bacterial 23S ribosomal RNA by TLR13

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Dong; Chen, Zhijian J

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) detect microbial infections and trigger innate immune responses. Among vertebrate TLRs, the role of TLR13 and its ligand are unknown. Here we show that TLR13 detects the 23S ribosomal RNA of both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. A sequence containing 13 nucleotides near the active site of 23S rRNA ribozyme, which catalyzes peptide bond synthesis, was both necessary and sufficient to trigger TLR13-dependent interleukin-1β production. Single point mutations within this sequence destroyed the ability of the 23S rRNA to stimulate the TLR13 pathway. Knockout of TLR13 in mice abolished the induction of interleukin-1β and other cytokines by the 23S rRNA sequence. Thus, TLR13 detects bacterial RNA with exquisite sequence specificity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00102.001 PMID:23110254

  2. Helix 69 of E. coli 23S ribosomal RNA as a peptide nucleic acid target.

    PubMed

    Kulik, Marta; Markowska-Zagrajek, Agnieszka; Wojciechowska, Monika; Grzela, Renata; Wituła, Tomasz; Trylska, Joanna

    2017-04-07

    A fragment of 23S ribosomal RNA (nucleotides 1906-1924 in E. coli), termed Helix 69, forms a hairpin that is essential for ribosome function. Helix 69 forms a conformationally flexible inter-subunit connection with helix 44 of 16S ribosomal RNA, and the nucleotide A1913 of Helix 69 influences decoding accuracy. Nucleotides U1911 and U1917 are post-transcriptionally modified with pseudouridines () and U1915 with 3-methyl-. We investigated Helix 69 as a target for a complementary synthetic oligonucleotide - peptide nucleic acid (PNA). We determined thermodynamic properties of Helix 69 and its complexes with PNA. We also verified the performance of PNA targeted at Helix 69 in inhibiting translation in cell-free extracts and growth of E. coli cells. First, we examined the interactions of a PNA oligomer complementary to the G1907-A1919 fragment of Helix 69 with the sequences corresponding to human and bacterial species (with or without pseudouridine modifications). PNA invades the Helix 69 hairpin creating stable complexes and PNA binding to the pseudouridylated bacterial sequence is stronger than to Helix 69 without any modifications. Second, we confirmed the binding of PNA to 23S rRNA and 70S ribosomes. Third, we verified the efficiency of translation inhibition of these PNA oligomers in the cell-free translation/transcription E. coli system, which turned out to be in a similar range as tetracycline. Next, we confirmed that PNA conjugated to the (KFF)3K transporter peptide inhibited E. coli growth in micromolar concentrations. Overall, targeting Helix 69 with PNA or other sequence-specific oligomers could be a promising way to inhibit bacterial translation.

  3. RISSC: a novel database for ribosomal 16S–23S RNA genes spacer regions

    PubMed Central

    García-Martínez, Jesús; Bescós, Ignacio; Rodríguez-Sala, Jesús Javier; Rodríguez-Valera, Francisco

    2001-01-01

    A novel database, under the acronym RISSC (Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Sequence Collection), has been created. It compiles more than 1600 entries of edited DNA sequence data from the 16S–23S ribosomal spacers present in most prokaryotes and organelles (e.g. mitochondria and chloroplasts) and is accessible through the Internet (http://ulises.umh.es/RISSC), where systematic searches for specific words can be conducted, as well as BLAST-type sequence searches. Additionally, a characteristic feature of this region, the presence/absence and nature of tRNA genes within the spacer, is included in all the entries, even when not previously indicated in the original database. All these combined features could provide a useful documen­tation tool for studies on evolution, identification, typing and strain characterization, among others. PMID:11125084

  4. Mutations at position A960 of E. coli 23 S ribosomal RNA influence the structure of 5 S ribosomal RNA and the peptidyltransferase region of 23 S ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed

    Sergiev, P V; Bogdanov, A A; Dahlberg, A E; Dontsova, O

    2000-06-02

    The proximity of loop D of 5 S rRNA to two regions of 23 S rRNA, domain II involved in translocation and domain V involved in peptide bond formation, is known from previous cross-linking experiments. Here, we have used site-directed mutagenesis and chemical probing to further define these contacts and possible sites of communication between 5 S and 23 S rRNA. Three different mutants were constructed at position A960, a highly conserved nucleotide in domain II previously crosslinked to 5 S rRNA, and the mutant rRNAs were expressed from plasmids as homogeneous populations of ribosomes in Escherichia coli deficient in all seven chromosomal copies of the rRNA operon. Mutations A960U, A960G and, particularly, A960C caused structural rearrangements in the loop D of 5 S rRNA and in the peptidyltransferase region of domain V, as well as in the 960 loop itself. These observations support the proposal that loop D of 5 S rRNA participates in signal transmission between the ribosome centers responsible for peptide bond formation and translocation. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  5. Structural and functional analysis of Escherichia coli ribosomes containing small deletions around position 1760 in the 23S ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed

    Zweib, C; Dahlberg, A E

    1984-09-25

    Three different small deletions were produced at a single Pvu 2 restriction site in E. coli 23S rDNA of plasmid pKK 3535 using exonuclease Bal 31. The deletions were located around position 1760 in 23S rRNA and were characterized by DNA sequencing as well as by direct fingerprinting and S1-mapping of the rRNA. Two of the mutant plasmids, Pvu 2-32 and Pvu 2-33, greatly reduced the growth rate of transformed cells while the third mutant, Pvu 2-14 grew as fast as cells containing the wild-type plasmid pKK 3535. All three mutant 23S rRNAs were incorporated into 50S-like particles and were even found in 70S ribosomes and polysomes in vivo. The conformation of mutant 23S rRNA in 50S subunits was probed with a double-strand specific RNase from cobra venom. These analyses revealed changes in the accessibility of cleavage sites near the deletions around position 1760 and in the area around position 800 in all three mutant rRNAs. We suggest, that an altered conformation of the rRNAs at the site of the deletion is responsible for the slow growth of cells containing mutant plasmids Pvu 2-32 and Pvu 2-33.

  6. Structural and functional analysis of Escherichia coli ribosomes containing small deletions around position 1760 in the 23S ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Zweib, C; Dahlberg, A E

    1984-01-01

    Three different small deletions were produced at a single Pvu 2 restriction site in E. coli 23S rDNA of plasmid pKK 3535 using exonuclease Bal 31. The deletions were located around position 1760 in 23S rRNA and were characterized by DNA sequencing as well as by direct fingerprinting and S1-mapping of the rRNA. Two of the mutant plasmids, Pvu 2-32 and Pvu 2-33, greatly reduced the growth rate of transformed cells while the third mutant, Pvu 2-14 grew as fast as cells containing the wild-type plasmid pKK 3535. All three mutant 23S rRNAs were incorporated into 50S-like particles and were even found in 70S ribosomes and polysomes in vivo. The conformation of mutant 23S rRNA in 50S subunits was probed with a double-strand specific RNase from cobra venom. These analyses revealed changes in the accessibility of cleavage sites near the deletions around position 1760 and in the area around position 800 in all three mutant rRNAs. We suggest, that an altered conformation of the rRNAs at the site of the deletion is responsible for the slow growth of cells containing mutant plasmids Pvu 2-32 and Pvu 2-33. Images PMID:6091057

  7. Random pseuoduridylation in vivo reveals critical region of Escherichia coli 23S rRNA for ribosome assembly

    PubMed Central

    Leppik, Margus; Liiv, Aivar

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Pseudouridine is the most common modified nucleoside in RNA, which is found in stable RNA species and in eukaryotic mRNAs. Functional analysis of pseudouridine is complicated by marginal effect of its absence. We demonstrate that excessive pseudouridines in rRNA inhibit ribosome assembly. Ten-fold increase of pseudouridines in the 16S and 23S rRNA made by a chimeric pseudouridine synthase leads to accumulation of the incompletely assembled large ribosome subunits. Hyper modified 23S rRNA is found in the r-protein assembly defective particles and are selected against in the 70S and polysome fractions showing modification interference. Eighteen positions of 23S rRNA were identified where isomerization of uridines interferes with ribosome assembly. Most of the interference sites are located in the conserved core of the large subunit, in the domain 0 of 23S rRNA, around the peptide exit tunnel. A plausible reason for pseudouridine-dependent inhibition of ribosome assembly is stabilization of rRNA structure, which leads to the folding traps of rRNA and to the retardation of the ribosome assembly. PMID:28334881

  8. Random pseuoduridylation in vivo reveals critical region of Escherichia coli 23S rRNA for ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Leppik, Margus; Liiv, Aivar; Remme, Jaanus

    2017-06-02

    Pseudouridine is the most common modified nucleoside in RNA, which is found in stable RNA species and in eukaryotic mRNAs. Functional analysis of pseudouridine is complicated by marginal effect of its absence. We demonstrate that excessive pseudouridines in rRNA inhibit ribosome assembly. Ten-fold increase of pseudouridines in the 16S and 23S rRNA made by a chimeric pseudouridine synthase leads to accumulation of the incompletely assembled large ribosome subunits. Hyper modified 23S rRNA is found in the r-protein assembly defective particles and are selected against in the 70S and polysome fractions showing modification interference. Eighteen positions of 23S rRNA were identified where isomerization of uridines interferes with ribosome assembly. Most of the interference sites are located in the conserved core of the large subunit, in the domain 0 of 23S rRNA, around the peptide exit tunnel. A plausible reason for pseudouridine-dependent inhibition of ribosome assembly is stabilization of rRNA structure, which leads to the folding traps of rRNA and to the retardation of the ribosome assembly. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. Ribosomal protein L3 bound to 23S precursor rRNA stimulates its maturation by Mini-III ribonuclease.

    PubMed

    Redko, Yulia; Condon, Ciarán

    2009-03-01

    Ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) are processed from larger primary transcripts in every living system known. The maturation of 23S rRNA in Bacillus subtilis is catalysed by Mini-III, a member of the RNase III family of enzymes that lacks the characteristic double-stranded RNA binding domain of its relatives. We have previously shown that Mini-III processing of 23S precursor rRNA in assembled 50S ribosomal subunits is much more efficient than a substrate with no ribosomal proteins bound, suggesting that one or more large subunit proteins act as a cofactor for Mini-III cleavage. Here we show that this cofactor is ribosomal protein L3. Stimulation of the Mini-III cleavage reaction is through L3 binding to its normal site at the 3' end of 23S rRNA. We present indirect evidence that suggests that L3 acts at the level of substrate, rather than enzyme conformation. We also discuss the potential implication of using ribosomal protein cofactors in rRNA processing for ribosome quality control.

  10. Coregulation of processing and translation: mature 5' termini of Escherichia coli 23S ribosomal RNA form in polysomes.

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, A K; Schlessinger, D

    1988-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the final maturation of rRNA occurs in precursor particles, and recent experiments have suggested that ongoing protein synthesis may somehow be required for maturation to occur. The protein synthesis requirement for the formation of the 5' terminus of 23S rRNA has been clarified in vitro by varying the substrate of the reaction. In cell extracts, pre-23S rRNA in free ribosomes was not matured, but that in polysomes was efficiently processed. The reaction occurred in polysomes without the need for an energy source or other additives required for protein synthesis. Furthermore, when polysomes were dissociated into ribosomal subunits, they were no longer substrates for maturation; but the ribosomes became substrates again when they once more were incubated in the conditions for protein synthesis. All of these results are consistent with the notion that protein synthesis serves to form a polysomal complex that is the true substrate for maturation. Ribosomes in polysomes, possibly in the form of 70S initiation complexes, may more easily adopt a conformation that facilitates maturation cleavage. As a result, the rates of ribosome formation and protein synthesis could be coregulated. Images PMID:3050989

  11. Structure modulation of helix 69 from Escherichia coli 23S ribosomal RNA by pseudouridylations.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jun; Aduri, Raviprasad; Chow, Christine S; SantaLucia, John

    2014-04-01

    Helix 69 (H69) is a 19-nt stem-loop region from the large subunit ribosomal RNA. Three pseudouridine (Ψ) modifications clustered in H69 are conserved across phylogeny and known to affect ribosome function. To explore the effects of Ψ on the conformations of Escherichia coli H69 in solution, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to reveal the structural differences between H69 with (ΨΨΨ) and without (UUU) Ψ modifications. Comparison of the two structures shows that H69 ΨΨΨ has the following unique features: (i) the loop region is closed by a Watson-Crick base pair between Ψ1911 and A1919, which is potentially reinforced by interactions involving Ψ1911N1H and (ii) Ψ modifications at loop residues 1915 and 1917 promote base stacking from Ψ1915 to A1918. In contrast, the H69 UUU loop region, which lacks Ψ modifications, is less organized. Structure modulation by Ψ leads to alteration in conformational behavior of the 5' half of the H69 loop region, observed as broadening of C1914 non-exchangeable base proton resonances in the H69 ΨΨΨ nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, and plays an important biological role in establishing the ribosomal intersubunit bridge B2a and mediating translational fidelity.

  12. Structure modulation of helix 69 from Escherichia coli 23S ribosomal RNA by pseudouridylations

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jun; Aduri, Raviprasad; Chow, Christine S.; SantaLucia, John

    2014-01-01

    Helix 69 (H69) is a 19-nt stem-loop region from the large subunit ribosomal RNA. Three pseudouridine (Ψ) modifications clustered in H69 are conserved across phylogeny and known to affect ribosome function. To explore the effects of Ψ on the conformations of Escherichia coli H69 in solution, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to reveal the structural differences between H69 with (ΨΨΨ) and without (UUU) Ψ modifications. Comparison of the two structures shows that H69 ΨΨΨ has the following unique features: (i) the loop region is closed by a Watson–Crick base pair between Ψ1911 and A1919, which is potentially reinforced by interactions involving Ψ1911N1H and (ii) Ψ modifications at loop residues 1915 and 1917 promote base stacking from Ψ1915 to A1918. In contrast, the H69 UUU loop region, which lacks Ψ modifications, is less organized. Structure modulation by Ψ leads to alteration in conformational behavior of the 5' half of the H69 loop region, observed as broadening of C1914 non-exchangeable base proton resonances in the H69 ΨΨΨ nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, and plays an important biological role in establishing the ribosomal intersubunit bridge B2a and mediating translational fidelity. PMID:24371282

  13. The role of 23S ribosomal RNA residue A2451 in peptide bond synthesis revealed by atomic mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Lang, Kathrin; Erlacher, Matthias; Wilson, Daniel N; Micura, Ronald; Polacek, Norbert

    2008-05-01

    Peptide bond formation is a fundamental reaction in biology, catalyzed by the ribosomal peptidyl-transferase ribozyme. Although all active-site 23S ribosomal RNA nucleotides are universally conserved, atomic mutagenesis suggests that these nucleobases do not carry functional groups directly involved in peptide bond formation. Instead, a single ribose 2'-hydroxyl group at A2451 was identified to be of pivotal importance. Here, we altered the chemical characteristics by replacing its 2'-hydroxyl with selected functional groups and demonstrate that hydrogen donor capability is essential for transpeptidation. We propose that the A2451-2'-hydroxyl directly hydrogen bonds to the P-site tRNA-A76 ribose. This promotes an effective A76 ribose C2'-endo conformation to support amide synthesis via a proton shuttle mechanism. Simultaneously, the direct interaction of A2451 with A76 renders the intramolecular transesterification of the peptide from the 3'- to 2'-oxygen unfeasible, thus promoting effective peptide bond synthesis.

  14. Macrolides and lincomycin susceptibility of Mycoplasma hyorhinis and variable mutation of domain II and V in 23S ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hideki; Nakajima, Hiromi; Shimizu, Yuka; Eguchi, Masashi; Hata, Eiji; Yamamoto, Koshi

    2005-08-01

    A total of 151 strains of Mycoplasma hyorhinis isolated from porcine lung lesions (weaned pigs, n=71, and finishers, n=80) were investigated for their in vitro susceptibility to 10 antimicrobial agents. Thirty-one strains (28 from weaned pigs and 3 from finishers) showed resistance to 16-membered macrolide antibiotics and lincomycin. The prevalence of the 16-membered macrolide-resistant M. hyorhinis strain in weaned pigs from Japanese herds has approximately quadrupled in the past 10 years. Several of the 31 strains were examined for mutations in the 23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA). All field strains tested showed a transition of A to G at position 2059 of 23S rRNA-rendered Escherichia coli. On the other hand, individual tylosin- and lincomycin-resistant mutants of M. hyorhinis were selected in vitro from the susceptible type strain BTS7 by 3 to 9 serial passages in subinhibitory concentrations of each antibiotic. The 23S rRNA sequences of both tylosin and lincomycin-resistant mutants were compared with that of the radical BTS7 strain. The BTS7 mutant strain selected by tylosin showed the same transition as the field-isolated strains of A2059G. However, the transition selected in lincomycin showed mutations in domains II and V of 23S rRNA, G2597U, C2611U in domain V, and the addition of an adenine at the pentameric adenine loop in domain II. The strain selected by lincomycin showed an additional point mutation of A2062G selected by tylosin.

  15. Single methylation of 23S rRNA triggers late steps of 50S ribosomal subunit assembly.

    PubMed

    Arai, Taiga; Ishiguro, Kensuke; Kimura, Satoshi; Sakaguchi, Yuriko; Suzuki, Takeo; Suzuki, Tsutomu

    2015-08-25

    Ribosome biogenesis requires multiple assembly factors. In Escherichia coli, deletion of RlmE, the methyltransferase responsible for the 2'-O-methyluridine modification at position 2552 (Um2552) in helix 92 of the 23S rRNA, results in slow growth and accumulation of the 45S particle. We demonstrate that the 45S particle that accumulates in ΔrlmE is a genuine precursor that can be assembled into the 50S subunit. Indeed, 50S formation from the 45S precursor could be promoted by RlmE-mediated Um2552 formation in vitro. Ribosomal protein L36 (encoded by rpmJ) was completely absent from the 45S precursor in ΔrlmE, and we observed a strong genetic interaction between rlmE and rpmJ. Structural probing of 23S rRNA and high-salt stripping of 45S components revealed that RlmE-mediated methylation promotes interdomain interactions via the association between helices 92 and 71, stabilized by the single 2'-O-methylation of Um2552, in concert with the incorporation of L36, triggering late steps of 50S subunit assembly.

  16. Single methylation of 23S rRNA triggers late steps of 50S ribosomal subunit assembly

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Taiga; Ishiguro, Kensuke; Kimura, Satoshi; Sakaguchi, Yuriko; Suzuki, Takeo; Suzuki, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis requires multiple assembly factors. In Escherichia coli, deletion of RlmE, the methyltransferase responsible for the 2′-O-methyluridine modification at position 2552 (Um2552) in helix 92 of the 23S rRNA, results in slow growth and accumulation of the 45S particle. We demonstrate that the 45S particle that accumulates in ΔrlmE is a genuine precursor that can be assembled into the 50S subunit. Indeed, 50S formation from the 45S precursor could be promoted by RlmE-mediated Um2552 formation in vitro. Ribosomal protein L36 (encoded by rpmJ) was completely absent from the 45S precursor in ΔrlmE, and we observed a strong genetic interaction between rlmE and rpmJ. Structural probing of 23S rRNA and high-salt stripping of 45S components revealed that RlmE-mediated methylation promotes interdomain interactions via the association between helices 92 and 71, stabilized by the single 2′-O-methylation of Um2552, in concert with the incorporation of L36, triggering late steps of 50S subunit assembly. PMID:26261349

  17. Decreased Susceptibility to Macrolide-Lincosamide in Mycoplasma synoviae Is Associated with Mutations in 23S Ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed

    Lysnyansky, Inna; Gerchman, Irena; Flaminio, Barbara; Catania, Salvatore

    2015-12-01

    The mechanism responsible for acquired decreased susceptibility to macrolides (14-membered erythromycin [Ery], 16-membered tylosin [Ty] and tilmicosin [Tm]) and to lincosamides (lincomycin [Ln]) was investigated in Mycoplasma synoviae, a pathogen that causes respiratory infections and synovitis in chicken and turkey. Sequence analysis of domains II and V of the two 23S rRNA alleles and ribosomal proteins L4 and L22 was performed on 49 M. synoviae isolates, M. synoviae type strain WVU1853, and reference strain FMT showing minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) to Ty (≤ 0.015 to 2 μg/ml), Tm (0.03 to ≥ 8 μg/ml), and Ln (0.125 to 8 μg/ml); MICs to Ery ranged from 32 to ≥ 128 μg/ml. Our results showed that the nucleotide substitution G748A (Escherichia coli numbering) in domain II of one or both 23S rRNA alleles may account for a slight increase in MICs to Ty and Tm (up to 0.5 and 2 μg/ml, respectively). No correlation between the presence of G748A and decreased susceptibility to Ln was found. However, the presence of the point mutations A2058G or A2059G in domain V of one or both alleles of the 23S rRNAs was correlated with a more significant decrease in susceptibility to Ty (1-2 μg/ml), Tm (≥ 8 μg/ml), and Ln (≥ 8 μg/ml). All M. synoviae isolates tested had a G2057A transition in the 23S rRNAs consistent with previously described intrinsic resistance to Ery. Mutations G64E (one isolate) and Q90K/H (two isolates) were identified in the L4 and L22 proteins, respectively, but their impact on decreased susceptibility to macrolides and lincomycin was not clear.

  18. Mini-III, a fourth class of RNase III catalyses maturation of the Bacillus subtilis 23S ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed

    Olmedo, Gabriela; Guzmán, Plinio

    2008-06-01

    Ribonuclease III (RNase III) type of enzymes are double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-specific endoribonucleases that have important roles in RNA maturation and mRNA decay. They are involved in processing precursors of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) in bacteria as well as precursors of short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) in eukaryotes. RNase III proteins have been grouped in three major classes according to their domain organization. In this issue of Molecular Microbiology, Redko et al. identified a novel class of bacterial RNase III, named Mini-III, consisting only of the RNase III catalytic domain and functioning in the maturation of the 23S rRNA in Bacillus subtilis. Its absence from proteobacteria reveals that this step is mechanistically different from the corresponding step in Escherichia coli. The fact that Mini-III orthologues are present in unicellular photosynthetic eukaryotes and in plants opens new opportunities for functional studies of this type of RNases.

  19. Importance of tRNA interactions with 23S rRNA for peptide bond formation on the ribosome: studies with substrate analogs.

    PubMed

    Beringer, Malte; Rodnina, Marina V

    2007-07-01

    The major enzymatic activity of the ribosome is the catalysis of peptide bond formation. The active site -- the peptidyl transferase center -- is composed of ribosomal RNA (rRNA), and interactions between rRNA and the reactants, peptidyl-tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA, are crucial for the reaction to proceed rapidly and efficiently. Here, we describe the influence of rRNA interactions with cytidine residues in A-site substrate analogs (C-puromycin or CC-puromycin), mimicking C74 and C75 of tRNA on the reaction. Base-pairing of C75 with G2553 of 23S rRNA accelerates peptide bond formation, presumably by stabilizing the peptidyl transferase center in its productive conformation. When C74 is also present in the substrate analog, the reaction is slowed down considerably, indicating a slow step in substrate binding to the active site, which limits the reaction rate. The tRNA-rRNA interactions lead to a robust reaction that is insensitive to pH changes or base substitutions in 23S rRNA at the active site of the ribosome.

  20. Identification and characterization of an intervening sequence within the 23S ribosomal RNA genes of Edwardsiella ictaluri

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Comparison of the 23S rRNA gene sequences of Edwardsiella tarda and Edwardsiella ictaluri confirmed a close phylogenetic relationship between these two fish pathogen species and a distant relation with the 'core' members of the Enterobacteriaceae family. Analysis of the rrl gene for 23S rRNA in E. i...

  1. Heterogeneity within the gram-positive anaerobic cocci demonstrated by analysis of 16S-23S intergenic ribosomal RNA polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Hill, K E; Davies, C E; Wilson, M J; Stephens, P; Lewis, M A O; Hall, V; Brazier, J; Thomas, D W

    2002-11-01

    Peptostreptococci are gram-positive, strictly anaerobic bacteria which, although regarded as members of the commensal human microflora, are also frequently isolated from sites of clinical infection. The study of this diverse group of opportunist pathogens has been hindered by an inadequate taxonomy and the lack of a valid identification scheme. Recent re-classification of the Peptostreptococcus family into five distinct genus groups has helped to clarify the situation. However, this has been on the basis of 16S rRNA sequence determinations, which are both time-consuming and expensive. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the use of PCR-amplified ribosomal DNA spacer polymorphisms for the rapid differentiation of the currently recognised taxa within the group of anaerobic gram-positive cocci. A collection comprising 19 reference strains with representatives of each of the 15 species, two close relatives and two of the well-characterised groups, together with 38 test strains was studied. All strains were identified to species group level by phenotypic means. Amplification of the 16S-23S intergenic spacer region (ISR) with universal primers produced distinct banding patterns for all the 19 reference strains and the patterns could be differentiated easily visually. However, of the 38 test strains, less than half could be speciated from ISR analysis alone. Only five groups produced correlating banding patterns for all members tested (Peptoniphilus lacrimalis, P. ivorii, Anaerococcus octavius, Peptostreptococcus anaerobius and Micromonas micros). For other species, either the type strain differed significantly from other species members (e.g., A. hydrogenalis) or there appeared to be considerable intra-species variation (e.g., A. vaginalis). Partial 16S rRNA gene sequences for the 'trisimilis' and 'betaGAL' groups showed that both are most closely related to the Anaerococcus group. This work highlights the heterogeneous nature of a number of Peptostreptococcus

  2. Mini-III, an unusual member of the RNase III family of enzymes, catalyses 23S ribosomal RNA maturation in B. subtilis.

    PubMed

    Redko, Yulia; Bechhofer, David H; Condon, Ciarán

    2008-06-01

    The late steps of both 16S and 5S ribosomal RNA maturation in the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis have been shown to be catalysed by ribonucleases that are not present in the Gram-negative paradigm, Escherichia coli. Here we present evidence that final maturation of the 5' and 3' extremities of B. subtilis 23S rRNA is also performed by an enzyme that is absent from the Proteobacteria. Mini-III contains an RNase III-like catalytic domain, but curiously lacks the double-stranded RNA binding domain typical of RNase III itself, Dicer, Drosha and other well-known members of this family of enzymes. Cells lacking Mini-III accumulate precursors and alternatively matured forms of 23S rRNA. We show that Mini-III functions much more efficiently on precursor 50S ribosomal subunits than naked pre-23S rRNA in vitro, suggesting that maturation occurs primarily on assembled subunits in vivo. Lastly, we provide a model for how Mini-III recognizes and cleaves double-stranded RNA, despite lacking three of the four RNA binding motifs of RNase III.

  3. Functional interaction between bases C1049 in domain II and G2751 in domain VI of 23S rRNA in Escherichia coli ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Miyoshi, Tomohiro; Uchiumi, Toshio

    2008-01-01

    The factor-binding center within the Escherichia coli ribosome is comprised of two discrete domains of 23S rRNA: the GTPase-associated region (GAR) in domain II and the sarcin–ricin loop in domain VI. These two regions appear to collaborate in the factor-dependent events that occur during protein synthesis. Current X-ray crystallography of the ribosome shows an interaction between C1049 in the GAR and G2751 in domain VI. We have confirmed this interaction by site-directed mutagenesis and chemical probing. Disruption of this base pair affected not only the chemical modification of some bases in domains II and VI and in helix H89 of domain V, but also ribosome function dependent on both EF-G and EF-Tu. Mutant ribosomes carrying the C1049 to G substitution, which show enhancement of chemical modification at G2751, were used to probe the interactions between the regions around 1049 and 2751. Binding of EF-G-GDP-fusidic acid, but not EF-G-GMP-PNP, to the ribosome protected G2751 from modification. The G2751 protection was also observed after tRNA binding to the ribosomal P and E sites. The results suggest that the interactions between the bases around 1049 and 2751 alter during different stages of the translation process. PMID:18252772

  4. Mutations in 23S rRNA and Ribosomal Protein L4 Account for Resistance in Pneumococcal Strains Selected In Vitro by Macrolide Passage

    PubMed Central

    Tait-Kamradt, A.; Davies, T.; Cronan, M.; Jacobs, M. R.; Appelbaum, P. C.; Sutcliffe, J.

    2000-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae mutants, selected from susceptible strains by serial passage in azithromycin, were investigated. These mutants were resistant to 14- and 15-membered macrolides, but resistance could not be explained by any clinically relevant resistance determinant [mef(A), erm(A), erm(B), erm(C), erm(TR), msr(A), mph(A), mph(B), mph(C), ere(A), ere(B)]. An investigation into the sequences of 23S rRNAs in the mutant and parental strains revealed individual changes of C2611A, C2611G, A2058G, and A2059G (Escherichia coli numbering) in four mutants. Mutations at these residues in domain V of 23S rRNA have been noted to confer erythromycin resistance in other species. Not all four 23S rRNA alleles have to contain the mutation to confer resistance. Some of the mutations also confer coresistance to streptogramin B (C2611A, C2611G, and A2058G), 16-membered macrolides (all changes), and clindamycin (A2058G and A2059G). Interestingly, none of these mutations confer high-level resistance to telithromycin (HMR-3647). Further, two of the mutants which had no changes in their 23S rRNA sequences had changes in a highly conserved stretch of amino acids (63KPWRQKGTGRAR74) in ribosomal protein L4. One mutant contained a single amino acid change (G69C), while the other mutant had a 6-base insert, resulting in two amino acids (S and Q) being inserted between amino acids Q67 and K68. To our knowledge, this is the first description of mutations in 23S rRNA genes or ribosomal proteins in macrolide-resistant S. pneumoniae strains. PMID:10898684

  5. The importance of highly conserved nucleotides in the binding region of chloramphenicol at the peptidyl transfer centre of Escherichia coli 23S ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed

    Vester, B; Garrett, R A

    1988-11-01

    The peptidyl transfer site has been localized at the centre of domain V of 23S-like ribosomal RNA (rRNA) primarily on the basis of a chloramphenicol binding site. The implicated region constitutes an unstructured circle in the current secondary structural model which contains several universally conserved nucleotides. With a view to investigate the function of this RNA region further, four of these conserved nucleotides, including one indirectly implicated in chloramphenicol binding, were selected for mutation in Escherichia coli 23S rRNA using oligonucleotide primers. Mutant RNAs were expressed in vivo on a plasmid-encoded rRNA (rrnB) operon and each one yielded dramatically altered phenotypes. Cells exhibiting A2060----C or A2450----C transversions were inviable and it was shown by inserting the mutated genes after a temperature-inducible promoter that the mutant RNAs were directly responsible. In addition, a G2502----A transition caused a decreased growth rate, probably due to a partial selection against mutant ribosome incorporation into polysomes, while an A2503----C transversion produced a decreased growth rate and conferred resistance to chloramphenicol. All of the mutant RNAs were incorporated into 50S subunits, but while the two lethal mutant RNAs were strongly selected against in 70S ribosomes, the plasmid-encoded A2503----C RNA was preferred over the chromosome-encoded RNA, contrary to current regulatory theories. The results establish the critical structural and functional importance of highly conserved nucleotides in the chloramphenicol binding region. A mechanistic model is also presented to explain the disruptive effect of chloramphenicol (and other antibiotics) on peptide bond formation at the ribosomal subunit interface.

  6. Molecular characterization of the full-length 23S and 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes of Taylorella asinigenitalis.

    PubMed

    Tazumi, Akihiro; Saito, Satoru; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Murayama, Ohoshi; Takamiya, Shinzaburo; Moore, John E; Millar, B Cherie; Matsuda, Motoo

    2007-08-01

    An approximately 4.2 kbp region encoding 23S and 5S rRNA genes was identified when recombinant plasmid DNAs from two genomic DNA libraries and an inverse PCR product of Taylorella asinigenitalis UK-1 isolate were analyzed. Full-length genes of 23S rRNA (3,225 bp) and 5S rRNA (117 bp) of T. asinigenitalis are described. The present sequence analysis identified a non-coding hypothetically intrinsic transcription terminator region downstream of the 5S rRNA gene. The sequence, however, downstream of the 5S rRNA gene did not show any distal tRNA genes. Surprisingly, an intervening sequence (IVS) of 270 bp in length, including two specific tandem repeat units of 80 bp and one partial unit of 48 bp with unknown functions was identified in the first quarter of the 23S rRNA gene sequence. A second IVS of 70 bp in length was also identified in the central region of the 23S rRNA gene. In addition, by using PCR and sequencing procedures, two T. asinigenitalis isolates, UK-1 and UK-2, carried multiple IVSs in the first quarter and central regions. Moreover, the 23S rRNA fragmentation occurred in the UK-1 isolate. A phylogenetic analysis was first carried out based on the 23S rRNA sequence data from T. asinigenitalis UK-1 and 13 other beta-Proteobacteria. This is the first report of IVSs in the 23S rRNA gene from the beta-Proteobacteria.

  7. Mutations at three sites in the Escherichia coli 23S ribosomal RNA binding region for protein L11 cause UGA-specific suppression and conditional lethality.

    PubMed

    Murgola, E J; Xu, W; Arkov, A L

    1995-01-01

    A single nucleotide change, G to A, at nucleotide position 1093 of E. coli 23S ribosomal RNA was found to cause UGA-specific suppression (D.K. Jemiolo, F.T. Pagel and E.J. Murgola, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, in press). To obtain new kinds of UGA-specific suppressors in 23S rRNA, we used segment-directed mutagenic PCR, and targeted first the 1405 nucleotide SnaBI/I-CeuI segment, which includes position 1093, of the rrnB operon cloned into a multicopy plasmid. The mutagenized fragments were subcloned into the plasmid vector and used to transform to ampicillin resistance (Ampr) a recipient strain containing a UGA mutation in trpA. The Ampr transformants were then screened for suppression of UGA. After purification, Trp+ transformants were tested for association of the suppressor phenotype first with the plasmid and then specifically with the SnaBI/I-CeuI fragment. In one screening, four different kinds of mutational change were found, all at three sites within a highly conserved hexanucleotide loop in domain II of 23S rRNA. This region is part of the site for binding of the large subunit protein L11, which has been shown to be involved in peptide chain termination in a specific way. All of the mutants (G1093A, G1093 delta, A1095 delta, and U1097 delta) suppress UGA mutations, but not UAA or UAG mutations, and all four types exhibit high-temperature conditional lethality when highly expressed. Several mechanisms can be suggested for the UGA-specific suppression exhibited by these mutants, including altered interaction with protein L11, Second-site mutations that overcome the conditional lethality of G1093A indicate that intramolecular interactions within 23S rRNA may play a role in peptide chain termination at the UGA stop codon.

  8. Peptidyl transferase antibiotics perturb the relative positioning of the 3'-terminal adenosine of P/P'-site-bound tRNA and 23S rRNA in the ribosome.

    PubMed Central

    Kirillov, S V; Porse, B T; Garrett, R A

    1999-01-01

    A range of antibiotic inhibitors that act within the peptidyl transferase center of the ribosome were examined for their capacity to perturb the relative positioning of the 3' end of P/P'-site-bound tRNA and the Escherichia coli ribosome. The 3'-terminal adenosines of deacylated tRNA and N-Ac-Phe-tRNA were derivatized at the 2 position with an azido group and the tRNAs were cross-linked to the ribosome on irradiation with ultraviolet light at 365 nm. The cross-links were localized on the rRNA within extended versions of three previously characterized 23S rRNA fragments F1', F2', and F4' at nucleotides C2601/A2602, U2584/U2585 (F1'), U2506 (F2'), and A2062/C2063 (F4'). Each of these nucleotides lies within the peptidyl transferase loop region of the 23S rRNA. Cross-links were also formed with ribosomal proteins L27 (strong) and L33 (weak), as shown earlier. The antibiotics sparsomycin, chloramphenicol, the streptogramins pristinamycin IA and IIA, gougerotin, lincomycin, and spiramycin were tested for their capacity to alter the identities or yields of each of the cross-links. Although no new cross-links were detected, each of the drugs produced major changes in cross-linking yields, mainly decreases, at one or more rRNA sites but, with the exception of chloramphenicol, did not affect cross-linking to the ribosomal proteins. Moreover, the effects were closely similar for both deacylated and N-Ac-Phe-tRNAs, indicating that the drugs selectively perturb the 3' terminus of the tRNA. The strongest decreases in the rRNA cross-links were observed with pristinamycin IIA and chloramphenicol, which correlates with their both producing complex chemical footprints on 23S rRNA within E. coli ribosomes. Furthermore, gougerotin and pristinamycin IA strongly increased the yields of fragments F2' (U2506) and F4' (U2062/C2063), respectively. The results obtained with an RNAse H approach correlate well with primer extension data implying that cross-linking occurs primarily to the

  9. The NMR Structure of an Internal Loop from 23S Ribosomal RNA Differs from its Structure in Crystals of 50S Ribosomal Subunits

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Neelaabh; Kennedy, Scott D.; Chen, Gang; Krugh, Thomas R.; Turner, Douglas H.

    2014-01-01

    Internal loops play an important role in structure and folding of RNA and in RNA recognition by other molecules such as proteins and ligands. An understanding of internal loops with propensities to form a particular structure will help predict RNA structure, recognition, and function. The structures of internal loops 5'1009CUAAG10133'3'1168GAAGC11645' and 5'998CUAAG10023'3'1157GAAGC11535' from helix 40 of the large subunit rRNA in Deinococcus radiodurans and Escherichia coli, respectively, are phylogenetically conserved, suggesting functional relevance. The energetics and NMR solution structure of the loop were determined in the duplex, 5'1GGCUAAGAC93'3'18CCGAAGCUG105' The internal loop forms a different structure in solution than in the crystal structures of the ribosomal subunits. In particular, the crystal structures have a bulged out adenine at the equivalent of position A15 and a reverse Hoogsteen UA pair (trans Watson-Crick/Hoogsteen UA) at the equivalent of U4 and A14, whereas the solution structure has a single hydrogen bond UA pair (cis Watson-Crick/sugar edge A15U4) between U4 and A15 and a sheared AA pair (trans Hoogsteen/sugar edge A14A5) between A5 and A14. There is cross-strand stacking between A6 and A14 (A6/A14/A15 stacking pattern) in the NMR structure. All three structures have a sheared GA pair (trans Hoogsteen/sugar edge A6G13) at the equivalent of A6 and G13. The internal loop has contacts with ribosomal protein L20 and other parts of the RNA in the crystal structures. These contacts presumably provide the free energy to rearrange the base pairing in the loop. Evidently, molecular recognition of this internal loop involves induced fit binding, which could confer several advantages. The predicted thermodynamic stability of the loop agrees with the experimental value, even though the thermodynamic model assumes a Watson–Crick UA pair. PMID:17002278

  10. Crystallization of the two-domain N-terminal fragment of the archaeal ribosomal protein L10(P0) in complex with a specific fragment of 23S rRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Kravchenko, O. V.; Mitroshin, I. V.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Nikonov, S. V.; Garber, M. B.

    2011-07-15

    Lateral L12-stalk (P1-stalk in Archaea, P1/P2-stalk in eukaryotes) is an obligatory morphological element of large ribosomal subunits in all organisms studied. This stalk is composed of the complex of ribosomal proteins L10(P0) and L12(P1) and interacts with 23S rRNA through the protein L10(P0). L12(P1)-stalk is involved in the formation of GTPase center of the ribosome and plays an important role in the ribosome interaction with translation factors. High mobility of this stalk puts obstacles in determination of its structure within the intact ribosome. Crystals of a two-domain N-terminal fragment of ribosomal protein L10(P0) from the archaeon Methanococcus jannaschii in complex with a specific fragment of rRNA from the same organism have been obtained. The crystals diffract X-rays at 3.2 Angstrom-Sign resolution.

  11. Determination of the nucleotide sequence of the 23S ribosomal RNA and flanking spacers of an Enterococcus faecium strain, reveals insertion-deletion events in the ribosomal spacer 1 of enterococci.

    PubMed

    Naimi, A; Beck, G; Monique, M; Lefèbvre, G; Branlanti, C

    1999-02-01

    The usefulness of 16S-23S (ITS1) and 23S-5S (ITS2) ribosomal spacer nucleotide sequence determination, as a complementary approach to the biochemical tests traditionally used for enterococcal species identification, is shown by its application to the identification of a strain, E27, isolated from a natural bacteria mixture used for cheese production. Using combined approaches we showed, unambiguously, that strain E27 belongs to the Enterococcus faecium species. However, its ITS1 region has an interesting peculiarity. In our previous study of ITS1s from various enterococcal species (NAIMI et al., 1997, Microbiology 143, 823-834), the ITS1s of the two E. faecium strains studied, were found to contain an additional 115-nt long stem-loop structure as compared to the ITS1s of other enterococci, only one out of the 3 ITS1s of E. hirae ATCC 9790, was found to contain a similar 107-nt long stem-loop structure. The ITS1 of strain E27 is 100% identical to that of E. faecium ATCC 19434T, except that the 115-nt additional fragment is absent. This strongly suggests the existence of lateral DNA transfer or DNA recombination events at a hot spot position of the ITS1s from E. faecium and E. hirae. Small and large ITS1 nucleotide sequence determination for strain E27 generalized the notion of two kinds of ITSs in enterococci: one with a tRNA(Ala) gene, one without tRNA gene. To complete strain E27 characterization, its 23S rRNA sequence was established. This is the first complete 23S rRNA nucleotide sequence determined for an enterococcal species.

  12. The last rRNA methyltransferase of E. coli revealed: The yhiR gene encodes adenine-N6 methyltransferase specific for modification of A2030 of 23S ribosomal RNA

    PubMed Central

    Golovina, Anna Y.; Dzama, Margarita M.; Osterman, Ilya A.; Sergiev, Petr V.; Serebryakova, Marina V.; Bogdanov, Alexey A.; Dontsova, Olga A.

    2012-01-01

    The ribosomal RNA (rRNA) of Escherichia coli contains 24 methylated residues. A set of 22 methyltransferases responsible for modification of 23 residues has been described previously. Herein we report the identification of the yhiR gene as encoding the enzyme that modifies the 23S rRNA nucleotide A2030, the last methylated rRNA nucleotide whose modification enzyme was not known. YhiR prefers protein-free 23S rRNA to ribonucleoprotein particles containing only part of the 50S subunit proteins and does not methylate the assembled 50S subunit. We suggest renaming the yhiR gene to rlmJ according to the rRNA methyltransferase nomenclature. The phenotype of yhiR knockout gene is very mild under various growth conditions and at the stationary phase, except for a small growth advantage at anaerobic conditions. Only minor changes in the total E. coli proteome could be observed in a cell devoid of the 23S rRNA nucleotide A2030 methylation. PMID:22847818

  13. Single 23S rRNA mutations at the ribosomal peptidyl transferase centre confer resistance to valnemulin and other antibiotics in Mycobacterium smegmatis by perturbation of the drug binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Long, Katherine S; Poehlsgaard, Jacob; Hansen, Lykke H; Hobbie, Sven N; Böttger, Erik C; Vester, Birte

    2009-03-01

    Tiamulin and valnemulin target the peptidyl transferase centre (PTC) on the bacterial ribosome. They are used in veterinary medicine to treat infections caused by a variety of bacterial pathogens, including the intestinal spirochetes Brachyspira spp. Mutations in ribosomal protein L3 and 23S rRNA have previously been associated with tiamulin resistance in Brachyspira spp. isolates, but as multiple mutations were isolated together, the roles of the individual mutations are unclear. In this work, individual 23S rRNA mutations associated with pleuromutilin resistance at positions 2055, 2447, 2504 and 2572 (Escherichia coli numbering) are introduced into a Mycobacterium smegmatis strain with a single rRNA operon. The single mutations each confer a significant and similar degree of valnemulin resistance and those at 2447 and 2504 also confer cross-resistance to other antibiotics that bind to the PTC in M. smegmatis. Antibiotic footprinting experiments on mutant ribosomes show that the introduced mutations cause structural perturbations at the PTC and reduced binding of pleuromutilin antibiotics. This work underscores the fact that mutations at nucleotides distant from the pleuromutilin binding site can confer the same level of valnemulin resistance as those at nucleotides abutting the bound drug, and suggests that the former function indirectly by altering local structure and flexibility at the drug binding pocket.

  14. Gateway role for rRNA precursors in ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Gutgsell, Nancy S; Jain, Chaitanya

    2012-12-01

    In Escherichia coli, rRNAs are initially transcribed with precursor sequences, which are subsequently removed through processing reactions. To investigate the role of precursor sequences, we analyzed ribosome assembly in strains containing mutations in the processing RNases. We observed that defects in 23S rRNA processing resulted in an accumulation of ribosomal subunits and caused a significant delay in ribosome assembly. These observations suggest that precursor residues in 23S rRNA control ribosome assembly and could be serving a regulatory role to couple ribosome assembly to rRNA processing. The possible mechanisms through which rRNA processing and ribosome assembly could be linked are discussed.

  15. Diversity of 23S rRNA genes within individual prokaryotic genomes.

    PubMed

    Pei, Anna; Nossa, Carlos W; Chokshi, Pooja; Blaser, Martin J; Yang, Liying; Rosmarin, David M; Pei, Zhiheng

    2009-01-01

    The concept of ribosomal constraints on rRNA genes is deduced primarily based on the comparison of consensus rRNA sequences between closely related species, but recent advances in whole-genome sequencing allow evaluation of this concept within organisms with multiple rRNA operons. Using the 23S rRNA gene as an example, we analyzed the diversity among individual rRNA genes within a genome. Of 184 prokaryotic species containing multiple 23S rRNA genes, diversity was observed in 113 (61.4%) genomes (mean 0.40%, range 0.01%-4.04%). Significant (1.17%-4.04%) intragenomic variation was found in 8 species. In 5 of the 8 species, the diversity in the primary structure had only minimal effect on the secondary structure (stem versus loop transition). In the remaining 3 species, the diversity significantly altered local secondary structure, but the alteration appears minimized through complex rearrangement. Intervening sequences (IVS), ranging between 9 and 1471 nt in size, were found in 7 species. IVS in Deinococcus radiodurans and Nostoc sp. encode transposases. T. tengcongensis was the only species in which intragenomic diversity >3% was observed among 4 paralogous 23S rRNA genes. These findings indicate tight ribosomal constraints on individual 23S rRNA genes within a genome. Although classification using primary 23S rRNA sequences could be erroneous, significant diversity among paralogous 23S rRNA genes was observed only once in the 184 species analyzed, indicating little overall impact on the mainstream of 23S rRNA gene-based prokaryotic taxonomy.

  16. Interaction of tRNA with domain II of 23S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Hill, W E; Tassanakajohn, A; Tapprich, W E

    1990-08-27

    The interaction of tRNA with domain II of 23S rRNA in E. coli ribosomes has been probed using short, complementary DNA oligodeoxyribonucleotides. Specifically, cDNA oligomers to the region 801-811 of the 23S rRNA were used to ascertain the interaction of this region with tRNA. It was found that when tRNA was bound to the P site, considerable competition occurred between tRNA and the cDNA oligomers which base paired with the nucleotides 807-811. However, A-site bound tRNA neither displaced, nor was displaced, by cDNA oligomers to this region. Additionally, the binding of tRNA lacking the CACCA nucleotides on the 3' terminus was unaffected by the presence a cDNA oligomer complementary to nucleotides 803-811, indicating that the cDNA-tRNA competition was dependent on the 3' terminal nucleotides of tRNA.

  17. Specific binding of tRNAMet to 23S rRNA of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Dahlberg, J E; Kintner, C; Lund, E

    1978-01-01

    tRNAMetf binds to 23S rRNA of Escherichia coli, forming a complex with a melting temperature of 75 degrees (in 0.6 M NaCl). The regions within the RNAs that bind to each other have been isolated and their nucleotide sequences have been determined. The interacting region in tRNAMetf is 17 nucleotides long, extending from G5 in the acceptor stem to D21 (D = 5.6-dihydrouridine) in the D loop. The sequence in 23S rRNA is complementary to that sequence except for an extra Up in the middle and allowing a Gp.D base pair. We propose that association of these two sequences may play a role in initiation of protein synthesis by tRNAMetf. In addition, part of this sequence in 23S rRNA may also stabilize tRNA binding to the ribosome during elongation of nascent polypeptides. Images PMID:349554

  18. Sites of interaction of the CCA end of peptidyl-tRNA with 23S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Moazed, D; Noller, H F

    1991-05-01

    Oligonucleotide fragments derived from the 3' CCA terminus of acylated tRNA, such as CACCA-(AcPhe), UACCA-(AcLeu), and CAACCA-(fMet), bind specifically to ribosomes in the presence of sparsomycin and methanol [Monro, R. E., Celma, M. L. & Vazquez, D. (1969) Nature (London) 222, 356-358]. All three oligonucleotides protect a characteristic set of bases in 23S rRNA from chemical probes: G2252, G2253, A2439, A2451, U2506, and U2585. A2602 shows enhanced reactivity. These account for most of the same bases that are protected when peptidyl-tRNA analogues such as AcPhe-tRNA are bound to the ribosomal P site, and correspond precisely to those bases whose protection is abolished by removal of the 3'-CA end of tRNA. We conclude that most of the observed interactions between tRNA and 23S rRNA in the 50S ribosomal P site involve the conserved CCA terminus of tRNA. Sparsomycin may inhibit protein synthesis by stabilizing interaction between the peptidyl-CCA and the 23S P site, preventing formation of the intermediate A/P hybrid state.

  19. Sites of interaction of the CCA end of peptidyl-tRNA with 23S rRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Moazed, D; Noller, H F

    1991-01-01

    Oligonucleotide fragments derived from the 3' CCA terminus of acylated tRNA, such as CACCA-(AcPhe), UACCA-(AcLeu), and CAACCA-(fMet), bind specifically to ribosomes in the presence of sparsomycin and methanol [Monro, R. E., Celma, M. L. & Vazquez, D. (1969) Nature (London) 222, 356-358]. All three oligonucleotides protect a characteristic set of bases in 23S rRNA from chemical probes: G2252, G2253, A2439, A2451, U2506, and U2585. A2602 shows enhanced reactivity. These account for most of the same bases that are protected when peptidyl-tRNA analogues such as AcPhe-tRNA are bound to the ribosomal P site, and correspond precisely to those bases whose protection is abolished by removal of the 3'-CA end of tRNA. We conclude that most of the observed interactions between tRNA and 23S rRNA in the 50S ribosomal P site involve the conserved CCA terminus of tRNA. Sparsomycin may inhibit protein synthesis by stabilizing interaction between the peptidyl-CCA and the 23S P site, preventing formation of the intermediate A/P hybrid state. Images PMID:2023922

  20. [Ribosomal RNA Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    It is generally believed that an RNA World existed at an early stage in the history of life. During this early period, RNA molecules are seen to be potentially involved in both catalysis and the storage of genetic information. Translation presents several interrelated themes of inquiry for exobiology. First, it is essential, for understanding the very origin of life, how peptides and eventually proteins might have come to be made on the early Earth in a template directed manner. Second, it is necessary to understand how a machinery of similar complexity to that found in the ribosomes of modern organisms came to exist by the time of the last common ancestor (as detected by 16S rRNA sequence studies). Third, the ribosomal RNAs themselves likely had a very early origin and studies of their history may be very informative about the nature of the RNA World. Moreover, studies of these RNAs will contribute to a better understanding of the potential roles of RNA in early evolution.During the past year we have ave conducted a comparative study of four completely sequenced bacterial genoames. We have focused initially on conservation of gene order. The second component of the project continues to build on the model system for studying the validity of variant 5S rRNA sequences in the vicinity of the modern Vibrio proteolyticus 5S rRNA that we established earlier. This system has made it possible to conduct a detailed and extensive analysis of a local portion of the sequence space. These core methods have been used to construct numerous mutants during the last several years. Although it has been a secondary focus, this work has continued over the last year such that we now have in excess of 125 V. proteolyticus derived constructs which have been made and characterized. We have also continued high resolution NMR work on RNA oligomers originally initiated by G. Kenneth Smith who was funded by a NASA Graduate Student Researcher's Fellowship Award until May of 1996. Mr. Smith

  1. Sequestration of Ribosome during Protein Aggregate Formation: Contribution of ribosomal RNA

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Bani K.; Mondal, Surojit; Banerjee, Senjuti; Ghosh, Amar Nath; Barat, Chandana

    2017-01-01

    An understanding of the mechanisms underlying protein aggregation and cytotoxicity of the protein aggregates is crucial in the prevention of several diseases in humans. Ribosome, the cellular protein synthesis machine is capable of acting as a protein folding modulator. The peptidyltransferase center residing in the domain V of large ribosomal subunit 23S rRNA is the centre for the protein folding ability of the ribosome and is also the cellular target of several antiprion compounds. Our in vitro studies unexpectedly reveal that the partial unfolding or aggregation of lysozyme under reducing conditions in presence of the ribosome can induce aggregation of ribosomal components. Electrostatic interactions complemented by specific rRNA-protein interaction drive the ribosome-protein aggregation process. Under similar conditions the rRNA, especially the large subunit rRNA and in vitro transcribed RNA corresponding to domain V of 23S rRNA (bDV RNA) stimulates lysozyme aggregation leading to RNA-protein aggregate formation. Protein aggregation during the refolding of non-disulfide containing protein BCAII at high concentrations also induces ribosome aggregation. BCAII aggregation was also stimulated in presence of the large subunit rRNA. Our observations imply that the specific sequestration of the translation machine by aggregating proteins might contribute to their cytotoxicity. PMID:28169307

  2. NMR characterisation of a highly conserved secondary structural RNA motif of Halobacterium halobium 23S rRNA.

    PubMed

    King, John; Shammas, Christos; Nareen, Misbah; Lelli, Moreno; Ramesh, Vasudevan

    2013-05-28

    The highly conserved 29-mer RNA motif corresponding to the peptidyl transferase central circle region of the domain V of Halobacterium halobium 23S rRNA has been characterised by multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. The NMR structure has a good all atom average RMSD of 1.28 Å and a stable A-form helical conformation. The NMR structure differs from the X-ray crystal structure of an analogous motif, contained within the Escherichia coli ribosome, as none of the bases are flipped out and a number of non-canonical base pairs are formed in the solution structure. Thus in the observed NMR structure, the predicted A7 to U30 base pair is not seen and a non-canonical U6 to U30 base pair was formed in its place. Similarly the predicted A9 to U26 base pair was also not observed and another non-canonical A9 to A27 base pair was formed. It was also seen from the conformational analysis that the steps near the bulges had the greatest deviation from the canonical Watson-Crick base pair step parameters. Despite these differences, the 29-mer structure provides a working model of the RNA within the ribosome in a more natural solution state than that observed in the intact ribosome crystal structures, particularly around the A27 residue. The NMR structure determination of the 29-mer RNA motif provides a solid foundation for determining the NMR structure of the RNA-amicetin complex in the next step. To extend the above study, a fully (13)C and (15)N isotopically labelled 37-mer RNA version of the Halobacterium halobium RNA sample has been characterised using ultra high field 1 GHz spectroscopy. The results have been used to demonstrate the advantages conferred by the use of a 1 GHz spectrometer frequency over 800 MHz in terms of superior sensitivity and greater spectral dispersion achieved in the spectrum of the RNA.

  3. Eukaryotic ribosomes that lack a 5.8S RNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vossbrinck, C. R.; Woese, C. R.

    1986-01-01

    The 5.8S ribosomal RNA is believed to be a universal eukaryotic characteristic. It has no (size) counterpart among the prokaryotes, although its sequence is homologous with the first 150 or so nucleotides of the prokaryotic large subunit (23S) ribosomal RNA. An exception to this rule is reported here. The microsporidian Vairimorpha necatrix is a eukaryote that has no 5.8S rRNA. As in the prokaryotes, it has a single large subunit rRNA, whose 5-prime region corresponds to the 5.8S rRNA.

  4. In vitro integration of ribosomal RNA synthesis, ribosome assembly, and translation

    PubMed Central

    Jewett, Michael C; Fritz, Brian R; Timmerman, Laura E; Church, George M

    2013-01-01

    Purely in vitro ribosome synthesis could provide a critical step towards unraveling the systems biology of ribosome biogenesis, constructing minimal cells from defined components, and engineering ribosomes with new functions. Here, as an initial step towards this goal, we report a method for constructing Escherichia coli ribosomes in crude S150 E. coli extracts. While conventional methods for E. coli ribosome reconstitution are non-physiological, our approach attempts to mimic chemical conditions in the cytoplasm, thus permitting several biological processes to occur simultaneously. Specifically, our integrated synthesis, assembly, and translation (iSAT) technology enables one-step co-activation of rRNA transcription, assembly of transcribed rRNA with native ribosomal proteins into functional ribosomes, and synthesis of active protein by these ribosomes in the same compartment. We show that iSAT makes possible the in vitro construction of modified ribosomes by introducing a 23S rRNA mutation that mediates resistance against clindamycin. We anticipate that iSAT will aid studies of ribosome assembly and open new avenues for making ribosomes with altered properties. PMID:23799452

  5. In vitro integration of ribosomal RNA synthesis, ribosome assembly, and translation.

    PubMed

    Jewett, Michael C; Fritz, Brian R; Timmerman, Laura E; Church, George M

    2013-06-25

    Purely in vitro ribosome synthesis could provide a critical step towards unraveling the systems biology of ribosome biogenesis, constructing minimal cells from defined components, and engineering ribosomes with new functions. Here, as an initial step towards this goal, we report a method for constructing Escherichia coli ribosomes in crude S150 E. coli extracts. While conventional methods for E. coli ribosome reconstitution are non-physiological, our approach attempts to mimic chemical conditions in the cytoplasm, thus permitting several biological processes to occur simultaneously. Specifically, our integrated synthesis, assembly, and translation (iSAT) technology enables one-step co-activation of rRNA transcription, assembly of transcribed rRNA with native ribosomal proteins into functional ribosomes, and synthesis of active protein by these ribosomes in the same compartment. We show that iSAT makes possible the in vitro construction of modified ribosomes by introducing a 23S rRNA mutation that mediates resistance against clindamycin. We anticipate that iSAT will aid studies of ribosome assembly and open new avenues for making ribosomes with altered properties.

  6. AMPLIFICATION OF RIBOSOMAL RNA SEQUENCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This book chapter offers an overview of the use of ribosomal RNA sequences. A history of the technology traces the evolution of techniques to measure bacterial phylogenetic relationships and recent advances in obtaining rRNA sequence information. The manual also describes procedu...

  7. AMPLIFICATION OF RIBOSOMAL RNA SEQUENCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This book chapter offers an overview of the use of ribosomal RNA sequences. A history of the technology traces the evolution of techniques to measure bacterial phylogenetic relationships and recent advances in obtaining rRNA sequence information. The manual also describes procedu...

  8. RNA folding and ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Woodson, Sarah A

    2008-12-01

    Ribosome synthesis is a tightly regulated process that is crucial for cell survival. Chemical footprinting, mass spectrometry, and cryo-electron microscopy are revealing how these complex cellular machines are assembled. Rapid folding of the rRNA provides a platform for protein-induced assembly of the bacterial 30S ribosome. Multiple assembly pathways increase the flexibility of the assembly process, while accessory factors and modification enzymes chaperone the late stages of assembly and control the quality of the mature subunits.

  9. Ribosomal RNA processing in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Pendrak, Michael L.; Roberts, David D.

    2011-01-01

    Ribosome assembly begins with conversion of a polycistronic precursor into 18S, 5.8S, and 25S rRNAs. In the ascomycete fungus Candida albicans, rRNA transcription starts 604 nt upstream of the 18S rRNA junction (site A1). One major internal processing site in the 5′ external transcribed spacer (A0) occurs 108 nt from site A1. The A0–A1 fragment persists as a stable species during log phase growth and can be used to assess proliferation rates. Separation of the small and large subunit pre-rRNAs occurs at sites A2 and A3 in internal transcribed spacer-1 Saccharomyces cerevisiae pre-rRNA. However, the 5′ end of the 5.8S rRNA is represented by only a 5.8S (S) form, and a 7S rRNA precursor of the 5.8S rRNA extends into internal transcribed spacer 1 to site A2, which differs from S. cerevisiae. External transcribed spacer 1 and internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2 show remarkable structural similarity with S. cerevisiae despite low sequence identity. Maturation of C. albicans rRNA resembles other eukaryotes in that processing can occur cotranscriptionally or post-transcriptionally. During rapid proliferation, U3 snoRNA-dependent processing occurs before large and small subunit rRNA separation, consistent with cotranscriptional processing. As cells pass the diauxic transition, the 18S pre-rRNA accumulates into stationary phase as a 23S species, possessing an intact 5′ external transcribed spacer extending to site A3. Nutrient addition to starved cells results in the disappearance of the 23S rRNA, indicating a potential role in normal physiology. Therefore, C. albicans reveals new mechanisms that regulate post- versus cotranscriptional rRNA processing. PMID:22028364

  10. Essential role of conserved DUF177A protein in plastid 23S rRNA accumulation and plant embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jiani; Suzuki, Masaharu; McCarty, Donald R.

    2016-01-01

    DUF177 proteins are nearly universally conserved in bacteria and plants except the Chlorophyceae algae. Thus far, duf177 mutants in bacteria have not established a function. In contrast, duf177a mutants have embryo lethal phenotypes in maize and Arabidopsis. In maize inbred W22, duf177a mutant embryos arrest at an early transition stage, whereas the block is suppressed in the B73 inbred background, conditioning an albino seedling phenotype. Background-dependent embryo lethal phenotypes are characteristic of maize plastid gene expression mutants. Consistent with the plastid gene expression hypothesis, quantitative real-time PCR revealed a significant reduction of 23S rRNA in an Escherichia coli duf177 knockout. Plastid 23S rRNA contents of duf177a mutant tissues were also markedly reduced compared with the wild-type, whereas plastid 16S, 5S, and 4.5S rRNA contents were less affected, indicating that DUF177 is specifically required for accumulation of prokaryote-type 23S rRNA. An AtDUF177A–green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene controlled by the native AtDUF177A promoter fully complemented the Arabidopsis atduf177a mutant. Transient expression of AtDUF177A–GFP in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves showed that the protein was localized in chloroplasts. The essential role of DUF177A in chloroplast–ribosome formation is reminiscent of IOJAP, another highly conserved ribosome-associated protein, suggesting that key mechanisms controlling ribosome formation in plastids evolved from non-essential pathways for regulation of the prokaryotic ribosome. PMID:27574185

  11. Sequence homologies between eukaryotic 5.8S rRNA and the 5' end of prokaryotic 23S rRNa: evidences for a common evolutionary origin.

    PubMed Central

    Jacq, B

    1981-01-01

    The question of the evolutionary origin of eukaryotic 5.8S rRNA was re-examined after the recent publication of the E. coli 23S rRNA sequence (26,40). A region of the 23S RNA located at its 5' end was found to be approximately 50% homologous to four different eukaryotic 5.8S rRNAs. A computer comparison analysis indicates that no other region of the E. coli ribosomal transcription unit (greater than 5 000 nucleotides in length) shares a comparable homology with 5.8S rRNA. Homology between the 5' end of e. coli 23S and four different eukaryotic 5.8S rRNAs falls within the same range as that between E. coli 5S RNA from the same four eukaryotic species. All these data strongly suggest that the 5' end of prokaryotic 23S rRNA and eukaryotic 5.8S RNA have a common evolutionary origin. Secondary structure models are proposed for the 5' region of E. coli 23S RNA. Images PMID:7024907

  12. Cleavage of the sarcin–ricin loop of 23S rRNA differentially affects EF-G and EF-Tu binding

    PubMed Central

    García-Ortega, Lucía; Álvarez-García, Elisa; Gavilanes, José G.; Martínez-del-Pozo, Álvaro; Joseph, Simpson

    2010-01-01

    Ribotoxins are potent inhibitors of protein biosynthesis and inactivate ribosomes from a variety of organisms. The ribotoxin α-sarcin cleaves the large 23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) at the universally conserved sarcin–ricin loop (SRL) leading to complete inactivation of the ribosome and cellular death. The SRL interacts with translation factors that hydrolyze GTP, and it is important for their binding to the ribosome, but its precise role is not yet understood. We studied the effect of α-sarcin on defined steps of translation by the bacterial ribosome. α-Sarcin-treated ribosomes showed no defects in mRNA and tRNA binding, peptide-bond formation and sparsomycin-dependent translocation. Cleavage of SRL slightly affected binding of elongation factor Tu ternary complex (EF-Tu•GTP•tRNA) to the ribosome. In contrast, the activity of elongation factor G (EF-G) was strongly impaired in α-sarcin-treated ribosomes. Importantly, cleavage of SRL inhibited EF-G binding, and consequently GTP hydrolysis and mRNA–tRNA translocation. These results suggest that the SRL is more critical in EF-G than ternary complex binding to the ribosome implicating different requirements in this region of the ribosome during protein elongation. PMID:20215430

  13. The "DEAD box" protein DbpA interacts specifically with the peptidyltransferase center in 23S rRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Nicol, S M; Fuller-Pace, F V

    1995-01-01

    The Escherichia coli DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) box protein DbpA is a putative RNA helicase and established RNA-dependent ATPase and is the only member of the DEAD box protein family for which a specific RNA substrate, bacterial 23S rRNA, has been identified. We have investigated the nature of this specificity in depth and have localized by deletion mutagenesis and PCR a single region of 93 bases (bases 2496-2588) in 23S rRNA that is both necessary and sufficient for complete activation of ATPase activity of DbpA. This target region forms part of the peptidyltransferase center and includes many bases involved in interaction with the 3' terminal adenosines of both A- and P-site tRNAs. Deletion of stem loops within the 93-base segment abolished ATPase activation. Similarly, point mutations that disrupt base pairing within stem structures ablated stimulation of ATPase activity. These data are consistent with roles for DbpA either in establishing and/or maintaining the correct three-dimensional structure of the peptidyltransferase center in 23S rRNA during ribosome assembly or in the peptidyltransferase reaction. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8524828

  14. Restriction Profiling of 23S Microheterogenic Ribosomal Repeats for Detection and Characterizing of E. coli and Their Clonal, Pathogenic, and Phylogroups

    PubMed Central

    Jayasree Rajagopalan Nair, Parvathi

    2015-01-01

    Correlating ribosomal microheterogenicity with unique restriction profiles can prove to be an efficacious and cost-effective approach compared with sequencing for microbial identification. An attempt to peruse restriction profiling of 23S ribosomal assemblage was ventured; digestion patterns with Bfa I discriminated E. coli from its colony morphovars, while Hae III profiles assisted in establishing distinct clonal groups. Among the gene pool of 399 ribosomal sequences extrapolated from 57 E. coli genomes, varying degree of predominance (I > III > IV > II) of Hae III pattern was observed. This was also corroborated in samples collected from clinical, commensal, and environmental origin. K-12 and its descendants showed type I pattern whereas E. coli-B and its descendants exhibited type IV, both of these patterns being exclusively present in E. coli. A near-possible association between phylogroups and Hae III profiles with presumable correlation between the clonal groups and different pathovars was established. The generic nature, conservation, and barcode gap of 23S rRNA gene make it an ideal choice and substitute to 16S rRNA gene, the most preferred region for molecular diagnostics in bacteria. PMID:26885397

  15. Development of Specific Nested Oligonucleotide PCR Primers for the Streptococcus iniae 16S-23S Ribosomal DNA Intergenic Spacer

    PubMed Central

    Berridge, Brian R.; Fuller, Jeffrey D.; de Azavedo, Joyce; Low, Donald E.; Bercovier, Herve; Frelier, Paul F.

    1998-01-01

    Streptococcus iniae is a cause of septicemia, meningoencephalitis, and death in farmed fish and of cellulitis in human beings. A set of nested oligonucleotide PCR primers that specifically amplified a 373-bp subunit from a variety of clinical isolates from farmed fish and human patients were constructed from a 524-bp consensus sequence of the S. iniae 16S-23S ribosomal DNA intergenic spacer. PMID:9705438

  16. Specificity and kinetics of 23S rRNA modification enzymes RlmH and RluD.

    PubMed

    Ero, Rya; Leppik, Margus; Liiv, Aivar; Remme, Jaanus

    2010-11-01

    Along the ribosome assembly pathway, various ribosomal RNA processing and modification reactions take place. Stem-loop 69 in the large subunit of Escherichia coli ribosomes plays a substantial role in ribosome functioning. It contains three highly conserved pseudouridines synthesized by pseudouridine synthase RluD. One of the pseudouridines is further methylated by RlmH. In this paper we show that RlmH has unique substrate specificity among rRNA modification enzymes. It preferentially methylates pseudouridine and less efficiently uridine. Furthermore, RlmH is the only known modification enzyme that is specific to 70S ribosomes. Kinetic parameters determined for RlmH are the following: The apparent K(M) for substrate 70S ribosomes is 0.51 ± 0.06 μM, and for cofactor S-adenosyl-L-methionine 27 ± 3 μM; the k(cat) values are 4.95 ± 1.10 min⁻¹ and 6.4 ± 1.3 min⁻¹, respectively. Knowledge of the substrate specificity and the kinetic parameters of RlmH made it possible to determine the kinetic parameters for RluD as well. The K(M) value for substrate 50S subunits is 0.98 ± 0.18 μM and the k(cat) value is 1.97 ± 0.46 min⁻¹. RluD is the first rRNA pseudouridine synthase to be kinetically characterized. The determined rates of RluD- and RlmH-directed modifications of 23S rRNA are compatible with the rate of 50S assembly in vivo. The fact that RlmH requires 30S subunits demonstrates the dependence of 50S subunit maturation on the simultaneous presence of 30S subunits.

  17. Specificity and kinetics of 23S rRNA modification enzymes RlmH and RluD

    PubMed Central

    Ero, Rya; Leppik, Margus; Liiv, Aivar; Remme, Jaanus

    2010-01-01

    Along the ribosome assembly pathway, various ribosomal RNA processing and modification reactions take place. Stem–loop 69 in the large subunit of Escherichia coli ribosomes plays a substantial role in ribosome functioning. It contains three highly conserved pseudouridines synthesized by pseudouridine synthase RluD. One of the pseudouridines is further methylated by RlmH. In this paper we show that RlmH has unique substrate specificity among rRNA modification enzymes. It preferentially methylates pseudouridine and less efficiently uridine. Furthermore, RlmH is the only known modification enzyme that is specific to 70S ribosomes. Kinetic parameters determined for RlmH are the following: The apparent KM for substrate 70S ribosomes is 0.51 ± 0.06 μM, and for cofactor S-adenosyl-L-methionine 27 ± 3 μM; the kcat values are 4.95 ± 1.10 min−1 and 6.4 ± 1.3 min−1, respectively. Knowledge of the substrate specificity and the kinetic parameters of RlmH made it possible to determine the kinetic parameters for RluD as well. The KM value for substrate 50S subunits is 0.98 ± 0.18 μM and the kcat value is 1.97 ± 0.46 min−1. RluD is the first rRNA pseudouridine synthase to be kinetically characterized. The determined rates of RluD- and RlmH-directed modifications of 23S rRNA are compatible with the rate of 50S assembly in vivo. The fact that RlmH requires 30S subunits demonstrates the dependence of 50S subunit maturation on the simultaneous presence of 30S subunits. PMID:20817755

  18. Use of whole-genome sequencing data to analyze 23S rRNA-mediated azithromycin resistance.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Steven R; Grad, Yonatan; Abrams, A Jeanine; Pettus, Kevin; Trees, David L

    2017-02-01

    The whole-genome sequences of 24 isolates of Neisseria gonorrhoeae with elevated minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) to azithromycin (≥2.0 µg/mL) were analyzed against a modified sequence derived from the whole-genome sequence of N. gonorrhoeae FA1090 to determine, by signal ratio, the number of mutant copies of the 23S rRNA gene and the copy number effect on 50S ribosome-mediated azithromycin resistance. Isolates that were predicted to contain four mutated copies were accurately identified compared with the results of direct sequencing. Fewer than four mutated copies gave less accurate results but were consistent with elevated MICs.

  19. 5S rRNA and ribosome.

    PubMed

    Gongadze, G M

    2011-12-01

    5S rRNA is an integral component of the ribosome of all living organisms. It is known that the ribosome without 5S rRNA is functionally inactive. However, the question about the specific role of this RNA in functioning of the translation apparatus is still open. This review presents a brief history of the discovery of 5S rRNA and studies of its origin and localization in the ribosome. The previously expressed hypotheses about the role of this RNA in the functioning of the ribosome are discussed considering the unique location of 5S rRNA in the ribosome and its intermolecular contacts. Based on analysis of the current data on ribosome structure and its functional complexes, the role of 5S rRNA as an intermediary between ribosome functional domains is discussed.

  20. Complete nucleotide sequence of the 23S rRNA gene of the Cyanobacterium, Anacystis nidulans.

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, S E; Doolittle, W F

    1984-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the Anacystis nidulans 23S rRNA gene, including the 5'- and 3'-flanking regions has been determined. The gene is 2876 nucleotides long and shows higher primary sequence homology to the 23S rRNAs of plastids (84.5%) than to that of E. coli (79%). The predicted rRNA transcript also shares many secondary structural features with those of plastids, reinforcing the endosymbiont hypothesis for the origin of these organelles. PMID:6326060

  1. Mutations in 23S rRNA Account for Intrinsic Resistance to Macrolides in Mycoplasma hominis and Mycoplasma fermentans and for Acquired Resistance to Macrolides in M. hominis

    PubMed Central

    Pereyre, S.; Gonzalez, P.; de Barbeyrac, B.; Darnige, A.; Renaudin, H.; Charron, A.; Raherison, S.; Bébéar, C.; Bébéar, C. M.

    2002-01-01

    The mechanisms of intrinsic resistance of Mycoplasma hominis to 14- and 15-membered macrolides were investigated in comparison with those of M. pneumoniae, which is naturally susceptible to macrolides. Radiolabeled erythromycin was not accumulated by M. hominis PG21, but addition of an ABC transporter inhibitor increased the level of erythromycin uptake more than two times, suggesting the existence of an active efflux process. The affinity of [14C]erythromycin to ribosomes isolated from M. hominis was dramatically reduced relative to that to ribosomes isolated from M. pneumoniae. The nucleotide sequences of 23S rRNA of both ribosomal operons rrnA and rrnB and ribosomal proteins L4 and L22 of M. hominis were obtained. Compared to the sequence of M. pneumoniae, M. hominis harbored a G2057A transition in its 23S rRNA sequence, as did M. fermentans, another mycoplasma that is erythromycin resistant. An additional C2610U change was also found in the sequence of M. hominis. Moreover, two M. hominis clinical isolates with acquired resistance to 16-membered macrolides were examined for mutations in domain II and domain V of 23S rRNA and in ribosomal proteins L4 and L22. Compared to the sequence of reference strain PG21, one isolate harbored a A2059G transition and a C2611U transition in one of the two rrn operons, while the other one was mutated only at position 2059, also on the same operon. No mutation was found in the two ribosomal protein sequences. Overall, the present study is an exhaustive characterization of the intrinsic resistance of M. hominis to 14- and 15-membered macrolides and the first description of mycoplasma clinical isolates resistant to macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin antibiotics harboring a mutation at position 2611 in the 23S rRNA. PMID:12234836

  2. Mutations in 23S rRNA gene associated with decreased susceptibility to tiamulin and valnemulin in Mycoplasma gallisepticum.

    PubMed

    Li, Bei-Bei; Shen, Jian-Zhong; Cao, Xing-Yuan; Wang, Yang; Dai, Lei; Huang, Si-Yang; Wu, Cong-Ming

    2010-07-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum is a major etiological agent of chronic respiratory disease (CRD) in chickens and sinusitis in turkeys. The pleuromutilin antibiotics tiamulin and valnemulin are currently used in the treatment of M. gallisepticum infection. We studied the in vitro development of pleuromutilin resistance in M. gallisepticum and investigated the molecular mechanisms involved in this process. Pleuromutilin-resistant mutants were selected by serial passages of M. gallisepticum strains PG31 and S6 in broth medium containing subinhibitory concentrations of tiamulin or valnemulin. A portion of the gene encoding 23S rRNA gene (domain V) and the gene encoding ribosome protein L3 were amplified and sequenced. No mutation could be detected in ribosome protein L3. Mutations were found at nucleotide positions 2058, 2059, 2061, 2447 and 2503 of 23S rRNA gene (Escherichia coli numbering). Although a single mutation could cause elevation of tiamulin and valnemulin MICs, combinations of two or three mutations were necessary to produce high-level resistance. All the mutants were cross-resistant to lincomycin, chloramphenicol and florfenicol. Mutants with the A2058G or the A2059G mutation exhibited cross-resistance to macrolide antibiotics erythromycin, tilmicosin and tylosin.

  3. Transition mutations in the 23S rRNA of erythromycin-resistant isolates of Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Lucier, T S; Heitzman, K; Liu, S K; Hu, P C

    1995-01-01

    Erythromycin is the drug of choice for treatment of Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections due to its susceptibility to low levels of this antibiotic. After exposure of susceptible strains to erythromycin in vitro and in vivo, mutants resistant to erythromycin and other macrolides were isolated. Their phenotypes have been characterized, but the genetic basis for resistance has never been determined. We isolated two resistant mutants (M129-ER1 and M129-ER2) by growing M. pneumoniae M129 on agar containing different amounts of erythromycin. In broth dilution tests both strains displayed resistance to high levels of several macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLS) antibiotics. In binding studies, ribosomes isolated from the resistant strains exhibited significantly lower affinity for [14C]erythromycin than did ribosomes from the M129 parent strain. Sequencing of DNA amplified from the region of the 2S rRNA gene encoding domain V revealed an A-to-G transition in the central loop at position 2063 of M129-ER1 and a similar A-to-G transition at position 2064 in M129-ER2. Transitions at homologous locations in the 23S rRNA from other organisms have been shown to result in resistance to MLS antibiotics. Thus, MLS-like resistance can occur in M. pneumoniae as the result of point mutations in the 23S rRNA gene which reduce the affinity of these antibiotics for the ribosome. Since they involve only single-base changes, development of resistance to erythromycin in vivo by these mechanisms could be relatively frequent event. PMID:8593017

  4. Single-base mutations at position 2661 of Escherichia coli 23S rRNA increase efficiency of translational proofreading.

    PubMed Central

    Melançon, P; Tapprich, W E; Brakier-Gingras, L

    1992-01-01

    Two single-base substitutions were constructed in the 2660 loop of Escherichia coli 23S rRNA (G2661-->C or U) and were introduced into the rrnB operon cloned in plasmid pKK3535. Ribosomes were isolated from bacteria transformed with the mutated plasmids and assayed in vitro in a poly(U)-directed system for their response to the misreading effect of streptomycin, neomycin, and gentamicin, three aminoglycoside antibiotics known to impair the proofreading control of translational accuracy. Both mutations decreased the stimulation of misreading by these drugs, but neither interfered with their binding to the ribosome. The response of the mutant ribosomes to these drugs suggests that the 2660 loop, which belongs to the elongation factor Tu binding site, is involved in the proofreading step of the accuracy control. In vivo, both mutations reduced read-through of nonsense codons and frameshifting, which can also be related to the increased efficiency in proofreading control which they confer to ribosomes. PMID:1281147

  5. Lessons from an evolving rRNA: 16S and 23S rRNA structures from a comparative perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Gutell, R R; Larsen, N; Woese, C R

    1994-01-01

    The 16S and 23S rRNA higher-order structures inferred from comparative analysis are now quite refined. The models presented here differ from their immediate predecessors only in minor detail. Thus, it is safe to assert that all of the standard secondary-structure elements in (prokaryotic) rRNAs have been identified, with approximately 90% of the individual base pairs in each molecule having independent comparative support, and that at least some of the tertiary interactions have been revealed. It is interesting to compare the rRNAs in this respect with tRNA, whose higher-order structure is known in detail from its crystal structure (36) (Table 2). It can be seen that rRNAs have as great a fraction of their sequence in established secondary-structure elements as does tRNA. However, the fact that the former show a much lower fraction of identified tertiary interactions and a greater fraction of unpaired nucleotides than the latter implies that many of the rRNA tertiary interactions remain to be located. (Alternatively, the ribosome might involve protein-rRNA rather than intramolecular rRNA interactions to stabilize three-dimensional structure.) Experimental studies on rRNA are consistent to a first approximation with the structures proposed here, confirming the basic assumption of comparative analysis, i.e., that bases whose compositions strictly covary are physically interacting. In the exhaustive study of Moazed et al. (45) on protection of the bases in the small-subunit rRNA against chemical modification, the vast majority of bases inferred to pair by covariation are found to be protected from chemical modification, both in isolated small-subunit rRNA and in the 30S subunit. The majority of the tertiary interactions are reflected in the chemical protection data as well (45). On the other hand, many of the bases not shown as paired in Fig. 1 are accessible to chemical attack (45). However, in this case a sizeable fraction of them are also protected against chemical

  6. Lessons from an evolving rRNA: 16S and 23S rRNA structures from a comparative perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutell, R. R.; Larsen, N.; Woese, C. R.

    1994-01-01

    The 16S and 23S rRNA higher-order structures inferred from comparative analysis are now quite refined. The models presented here differ from their immediate predecessors only in minor detail. Thus, it is safe to assert that all of the standard secondary-structure elements in (prokaryotic) rRNAs have been identified, with approximately 90% of the individual base pairs in each molecule having independent comparative support, and that at least some of the tertiary interactions have been revealed. It is interesting to compare the rRNAs in this respect with tRNA, whose higher-order structure is known in detail from its crystal structure (36) (Table 2). It can be seen that rRNAs have as great a fraction of their sequence in established secondary-structure elements as does tRNA. However, the fact that the former show a much lower fraction of identified tertiary interactions and a greater fraction of unpaired nucleotides than the latter implies that many of the rRNA tertiary interactions remain to be located. (Alternatively, the ribosome might involve protein-rRNA rather than intramolecular rRNA interactions to stabilize three-dimensional structure.) Experimental studies on rRNA are consistent to a first approximation with the structures proposed here, confirming the basic assumption of comparative analysis, i.e., that bases whose compositions strictly covary are physically interacting. In the exhaustive study of Moazed et al. (45) on protection of the bases in the small-subunit rRNA against chemical modification, the vast majority of bases inferred to pair by covariation are found to be protected from chemical modification, both in isolated small-subunit rRNA and in the 30S subunit. The majority of the tertiary interactions are reflected in the chemical protection data as well (45). On the other hand, many of the bases not shown as paired in Fig. 1 are accessible to chemical attack (45). However, in this case a sizeable fraction of them are also protected against chemical

  7. Lessons from an evolving rRNA: 16S and 23S rRNA structures from a comparative perspective.

    PubMed

    Gutell, R R; Larsen, N; Woese, C R

    1994-03-01

    The 16S and 23S rRNA higher-order structures inferred from comparative analysis are now quite refined. The models presented here differ from their immediate predecessors only in minor detail. Thus, it is safe to assert that all of the standard secondary-structure elements in (prokaryotic) rRNAs have been identified, with approximately 90% of the individual base pairs in each molecule having independent comparative support, and that at least some of the tertiary interactions have been revealed. It is interesting to compare the rRNAs in this respect with tRNA, whose higher-order structure is known in detail from its crystal structure (36) (Table 2). It can be seen that rRNAs have as great a fraction of their sequence in established secondary-structure elements as does tRNA. However, the fact that the former show a much lower fraction of identified tertiary interactions and a greater fraction of unpaired nucleotides than the latter implies that many of the rRNA tertiary interactions remain to be located. (Alternatively, the ribosome might involve protein-rRNA rather than intramolecular rRNA interactions to stabilize three-dimensional structure.) Experimental studies on rRNA are consistent to a first approximation with the structures proposed here, confirming the basic assumption of comparative analysis, i.e., that bases whose compositions strictly covary are physically interacting. In the exhaustive study of Moazed et al. (45) on protection of the bases in the small-subunit rRNA against chemical modification, the vast majority of bases inferred to pair by covariation are found to be protected from chemical modification, both in isolated small-subunit rRNA and in the 30S subunit. The majority of the tertiary interactions are reflected in the chemical protection data as well (45). On the other hand, many of the bases not shown as paired in Fig. 1 are accessible to chemical attack (45). However, in this case a sizeable fraction of them are also protected against chemical

  8. Lessons from an evolving rRNA: 16S and 23S rRNA structures from a comparative perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutell, R. R.; Larsen, N.; Woese, C. R.

    1994-01-01

    The 16S and 23S rRNA higher-order structures inferred from comparative analysis are now quite refined. The models presented here differ from their immediate predecessors only in minor detail. Thus, it is safe to assert that all of the standard secondary-structure elements in (prokaryotic) rRNAs have been identified, with approximately 90% of the individual base pairs in each molecule having independent comparative support, and that at least some of the tertiary interactions have been revealed. It is interesting to compare the rRNAs in this respect with tRNA, whose higher-order structure is known in detail from its crystal structure (36) (Table 2). It can be seen that rRNAs have as great a fraction of their sequence in established secondary-structure elements as does tRNA. However, the fact that the former show a much lower fraction of identified tertiary interactions and a greater fraction of unpaired nucleotides than the latter implies that many of the rRNA tertiary interactions remain to be located. (Alternatively, the ribosome might involve protein-rRNA rather than intramolecular rRNA interactions to stabilize three-dimensional structure.) Experimental studies on rRNA are consistent to a first approximation with the structures proposed here, confirming the basic assumption of comparative analysis, i.e., that bases whose compositions strictly covary are physically interacting. In the exhaustive study of Moazed et al. (45) on protection of the bases in the small-subunit rRNA against chemical modification, the vast majority of bases inferred to pair by covariation are found to be protected from chemical modification, both in isolated small-subunit rRNA and in the 30S subunit. The majority of the tertiary interactions are reflected in the chemical protection data as well (45). On the other hand, many of the bases not shown as paired in Fig. 1 are accessible to chemical attack (45). However, in this case a sizeable fraction of them are also protected against chemical

  9. Infective Arthritis: Bacterial 23S rRNA Gene Sequencing as a Supplementary Diagnostic Method

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Claus; Andresen, Keld; Kjerulf, Anne; Salamon, Suheil; Kemp, Michael; Christensen, Jens Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    Consecutively collected synovial fluids were examined for presence of bacterial DNA (a 700-bp fragment of the bacterial 23S rRNA gene) followed by DNA sequencing of amplicons, and by conventional bacteriological methods. One or more microorganisms were identified in 22 of the 227 synovial fluids (9,7%) originating from 17 patients. Sixteen of the patients had clinical signs of arthritis. For 11 patients molecular and conventional bacterial examinations were in agreement. Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis and Streptococcus pneumoniae, were detected in synovial fluids from 6, 2 and 2 patients, respectively. In 3 patients only 23S rRNA analysis was positive; 2 synovial fluids contained S. dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis and 1 S. pneumoniae). The present study indicates a significant contribution by PCR with subsequent DNA sequencing of the 23S rRNA gene analysis in recognizing and identification of microorganisms from synovial fluids. PMID:19088916

  10. 23S rRNA as an a-Maz-ing new bacterial toxin target.

    PubMed

    Schifano, Jason M; Woychik, Nancy A

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis in humans, is a bacterium with the unique ability to persist for years or decades as a latent infection. This latent state, during which bacteria have a markedly altered physiology and are thought to be dormant, is crucial for the bacteria to survive the stressful environments it encounters in the human host. Importantly, M. tuberculosis cells in the dormant state are generally refractory to antibiotics, most of which target cellular processes occurring in actively replicating bacteria. The molecular switches that enable M. tuberculosis to slow or stop its replication and become dormant remain unknown. However, the slow growth and dormant state that are hallmarks of latent tuberculosis infection have striking parallels to the "quasi-dormant" state of Escherichia coli cells caused by the toxin components of chromosomal toxin-antitoxin (TA) modules. An unusually large number of TA modules in M. tuberculosis, including nine in the mazEF family, may contribute to initiating this latent state or to adapting to stress conditions in the host. Toward filling the gap in our understanding of the physiological role of TA modules in M. tuberculosis, we are interested in identifying their molecular mechanisms to better understand how toxins impart growth control. Our recent publication (1) uncovered a novel function of a MazF toxin in M. tuberculosis that had not been associated with any other MazF ortholog. This toxin, MazF-mt6, can disrupt protein synthesis by cleavage of 23S rRNA at a single location in an evolutionarily conserved five-base sequence in the ribosome active center.

  11. Variation in 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer regions in Photobacterium damselae: a mosaic-like structure.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Carlos R; Collins, Matthew D; Romalde, Jesús L; Toranzo, Alicia E

    2005-02-01

    Phenotypically, Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida and P. damselae subsp. damselae are easily distinguished. However, their 16S rRNA gene sequences are identical, and attempts to discriminate these two subspecies by molecular tools are hampered by their high level of DNA-DNA similarity. The 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacers (ITS) were sequenced in two strains of Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida and two strains of P. damselae subsp. damselae to determine the level of molecular diversity in this DNA region. A total of 17 different ITS variants, ranging from 803 to 296 bp were found, some of which were subspecies or strain specific. The largest ITS contained four tRNA genes (tDNAs) coding for tRNA(Glu(UUC)), tRNA(Lys(UUU)), tRNA(Val(UAC)), and tRNA(Ala(GGC)). Five amplicons contained tRNA(Glu(UUC)) combined with two additional tRNA genes, including tRNA(Lys(UUU)), tRNA(Val(UAC)), or tRNA(Ala(UGC)). Five amplicons contained tRNA(Ile(GAU)) and tRNA(Ala(UGC)). Two amplicons contained tRNA(Glu(UUC)) and tRNA(Ala(UGC)). Two different isoacceptor tRNA(Ala) genes (GGC and UGC anticodons) were found. The five smallest amplicons contained no tRNA genes. The tRNA-gene combinations tRNA(Glu(UUC))-tRNA(Val(UAC))-tRNA(Ala(UGC)) and tRNA(Glu(UUC))-tRNA(Ala(UGC)) have not been previously reported in bacterial ITS regions. The number of copies of the ribosomal operon (rrn) in the P. damselae chromosome ranged from at least 9 to 12. For ITS variants coexisting in two strains of different subspecies or in strains of the same subspecies, nucleotide substitution percentages ranged from 0 to 2%. The main source of variation between ITS variants was due to different combinations of DNA sequence blocks, constituting a mosaic-like structure.

  12. Methylation of 23S rRNA caused by tlrA (ermSF), a tylosin resistance determinant from Streptomyces fradiae.

    PubMed Central

    Zalacain, M; Cundliffe, E

    1989-01-01

    Ribosomes from Streptomyces griseofuscus expressing tlrA, a resistance gene isolated from the tylosin producer Streptomyces fradiae, are resistant to macrolide and lincosamide antibiotics in vitro. The tlrA product was found to be a methylase that introduces two methyl groups into a single base within 23S rRNA, generating N6,N6-dimethyladenine at position 2058. This activity is therefore similar to the ermE resistance mechanism in Saccharopolyspora erythraea (formerly Streptomyces erythraeus). Images PMID:2753855

  13. DbpA: a DEAD box protein specifically activated by 23s rRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Fuller-Pace, F V; Nicol, S M; Reid, A D; Lane, D P

    1993-01-01

    The Escherichia coli protein DbpA is a member of the 'DEAD box' family of putative RNA-dependent ATPases and RNA helicases, so called because they share the highly conserved motif Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp, together with several other conserved elements. We have investigated DbpA expression under conditions where an endogenous promoter is used. In this context, translation initiation does not occur at the previously identified AUG, but at an upstream, in-frame GUG. Mutation of the GUG initiation codon to AUG virtually abolishes DbpA expression, suggesting an unusual translation initiation mechanism. Using an inducible overexpression plasmid, we have purified milligram quantities of DbpA to homogeneity and shown that the purified protein hydrolyses ATP in an RNA-dependent manner. This ATPase activity is interesting in that, unlike that of other DEAD box proteins investigated to date, it absolutely requires a specific bacterial RNA, which we have identified as 23S rRNA. This observation is particularly significant since DbpA will bind other RNAs and DNA, but will only hydrolyse ATP in the presence of 23S rRNA. Images PMID:8253085

  14. Reconstitution of functional eukaryotic ribosomes from Dictyostelium discoideum ribosomal proteins and RNA.

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, G; Chiaberge, S

    1997-08-08

    40 and 60 S ribosomal subunits have been reconstituted in vitro from purified ribosomal RNA and ribosomal proteins of Dictyostelium discoideum. The functionality of the reconstituted ribosomes was demonstrated in in vitro mRNA-directed protein synthesis. The reassembly proceeded well with immature precursors of ribosomal RNA but poorly if at all with mature cytoplasmic RNA species. Reassembly also required a preparation of small nuclear RNA(s), acting as morphopoietic factor(s).

  15. An A to U transversion at position 1067 of 23 S rRNA from Escherichia coli impairs EF-Tu and EF-G function.

    PubMed

    Saarma, U; Remme, J; Ehrenberg, M; Bilgin, N

    1997-09-26

    Escherichia coli ribosomes with an A to U transversion at nucleotide 1067 of their 23 S rRNA are impaired in their effective association rate constants (kcat/KM) for both EF-Tu and EF-G binding. In addition, the times that EF-G and EF-Tu spend on the ribosome during elongation are significantly increased by the A to U transversion. The U1067 mutation impairs EF-Tu function more than EF-G function. The increase in the time that EF-Tu remains bound to ribosome is caused, both by a slower rate of GTP-hydrolysis in ternary complex and by a slower EF-Tu.GDP release from the mutated ribosomes. There is, at the same time, no change in ribosomal accuracy for aminoacyl-tRNA recognition. With support from these new data we propose that nucleotide 1067 is part of the ribosomal A-site where it directly interacts with both EF-G and EF-Tu.

  16. Different sensitivity of H69 modification enzymes RluD and RlmH to mutations in Escherichia coli 23S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Leppik, Margus; Ero, Rya; Liiv, Aivar; Kipper, Kalle; Remme, Jaanus

    2012-05-01

    Nucleoside modifications are introduced into the ribosomal RNA during the assembly of the ribosome. The number and the localization of the modified nucleosides in rRNAs are known for several organisms. In bacteria, rRNA modified nucleosides are synthesized by a set of specific enzymes, the majority of which have been identified in Escherichia coli. Each rRNA modification enzyme recognizes its substrate nucleoside(s) at a specific stage of ribosome assembly. Not much is known about the specificity determinants involved in the substrate recognition of the modification enzymes. In order to shed light on the substrate specificity of RluD and RlmH, the enzymes responsible for the introduction of modifications into the stem-loop 69 (H69), we monitored the formation of H69 pseudouridines (Ψ) and methylated pseudouridine (m3Ψ) in vitro on ribosomes with alterations in 23S rRNA. While the synthesis of Ψs in H69 by RluD is relatively insensitive to the point mutations at neighboring positions, methylation of one of the Ψs by RlmH exhibited a much stronger sensitivity. Apparently, in spite of synthesizing modifications in the same region or even at the same position of rRNA, the two enzymes employ different substrate recognition mechanisms.

  17. 23S rRNA base pair 2057–2611 determines ketolide susceptibility and fitness cost of the macrolide resistance mutation 2058A→G

    PubMed Central

    Pfister, Peter; Corti, Natascia; Hobbie, Sven; Bruell, Christian; Zarivach, Raz; Yonath, Ada; Böttger, Erik C.

    2005-01-01

    The 23S rRNA A2058G alteration mediates macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B resistance in the bacterial domain and determines the selectivity of macrolide antibiotics for eubacterial ribosomes, as opposed to eukaryotic ribosomes. However, this mutation is associated with a disparate resistance phenotype: It confers high-level resistance to ketolides in mycobacteria but only marginally affects ketolide susceptibility in streptococci. We used site-directed mutagenesis of nucleotides within domain V of 23S rRNA to study the molecular basis for this disparity. We show that mutational alteration of the polymorphic 2057–2611 base pair from A-U to G-C in isogenic mutants of Mycobacterium smegmatis significantly affects susceptibility to ketolides but does not influence susceptibility to other macrolide antibiotics. In addition, we provide evidence that the 2057–2611 polymorphism determines the fitness cost of the 23S rRNA A2058G resistance mutation. Supported by structural analysis, our results indicate that polymorphic nucleotides mediate the disparate phenotype of genotypically identical resistance mutations and provide an explanation for the large species differences in the epidemiology of defined drug resistance mutations. PMID:15795375

  18. Radical SAM-Mediated Methylation of Ribosomal RNA

    PubMed Central

    Stojkovic, Vanja; Fujimori, Danica Galonić

    2015-01-01

    Post-transcriptional modifications of RNA play an important role in a wide range of biological processes. In ribosomal RNA (rRNA), methylation of nucleotide bases is the predominant modification. In recent years, methylation of adenosine 2503 (A2503) in bacterial 23S rRNA has attracted significant attention due to both the unusual regioselectivity of the methyl group incorporation, as well as the pathophysiological roles of the resultant methylations. Specifically, A2503 is methylated at the C2 and C8 positions of the adenine ring, and the introduced modifications have a profound impact on translational fidelity and antibiotic resistance, respectively. These modifications are performed by RlmN and Cfr, two members, of the recently discovered class of radical S-adenosylmethionine (radical SAM) methylsynthases. Here, we present several methods that can be used to evaluate the activity of these enzymes, under both in vivo and in vitro conditions. PMID:26253978

  19. 23S rRNA domain V, a fragment that can be specifically methylated in vitro by the ErmSF (TlrA) methyltransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Kovalic, D; Giannattasio, R B; Jin, H J; Weisblum, B

    1994-01-01

    The DNA sequence that encodes 23S rRNA domain V of Bacillus subtilis, nucleotides 2036 to 2672 (C. J. Green, G. C. Stewart, M. A. Hollis, B. S. Vold, and K. F. Bott, Gene 37:261-266, 1985), was cloned and used as a template from which to transcribe defined domain V RNA in vitro. The RNA transcripts served as a substrate in vitro for specific methylation of B. subtilis adenine 2085 (adenine 2058 in Escherichia coli 23S rRNA) by the ErmSF methyltransferase, an enzyme that confers resistance to the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B group of antibiotics on Streptomyces fradiae NRRL 2702, the host from which it was cloned. Thus, neither RNA sequences belonging to domains other than V nor the association of 23S rRNA with ribosomal proteins is needed for the specific methylation of adenine that confers resistance to the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B group of antibiotics. Images PMID:7961463

  20. Structure of 23S rRNA hairpin 35 and its interaction with the tylosin-resistance methyltransferase RlmAII

    PubMed Central

    Lebars, Isabelle; Yoshizawa, Satoko; Stenholm, Anne R.; Guittet, Eric; Douthwaite, Stephen; Fourmy, Dominique

    2003-01-01

    The bacterial rRNA methyltransferase RlmAII (formerly TlrB) contributes to resistance against tylosin-like 16-membered ring macrolide antibiotics. RlmAII was originally discovered in the tylosin-producer Streptomyces fradiae, and members of this subclass of methyltransferases have subsequently been found in other Gram-positive bacteria, including Streptococcus pneumoniae. In all cases, RlmAII methylates 23S rRNA at nucleotide G748, which is situated in a stem–loop (hairpin 35) at the macrolide binding site of the ribosome. The conformation of hairpin 35 recognized by RlmAII is shown here by NMR spectroscopy to resemble the anticodon loop of tRNA. The loop folds independently of the rest of the 23S rRNA, and is stabilized by a non-canonical G–A pair and a U-turn motif, rendering G748 accessible. Binding of S.pneumoniae RlmAII induces changes in NMR signals at specific nucleotides that are involved in the methyltransferase–RNA interaction. The conformation of hairpin 35 that interacts with RlmAII is radically different from the structure this hairpin adopts within the 50S subunit. This indicates that the hairpin undergoes major structural rearrangement upon interaction with ribosomal proteins during 50S assembly. PMID:12514124

  1. Cloning and sequence analysis of two copies of a 23S rRNA gene from Helicobacter pylori and association of clarithromycin resistance with 23S rRNA mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, D E; Ge, Z; Purych, D; Lo, T; Hiratsuka, K

    1997-01-01

    In this study, two identical copies of a 23S-5S gene cluster, which are separately situated within the Helicobacter pylori UA802 chromosome, were cloned and sequenced. Comparison of the DNA sequence of the H. pylori 23S rRNA gene with known sequences of other bacterial 23S rRNA genes indicated that the H. pylori UA802 23S rRNA genes are closely related to those of Campylobacter spp. and therefore belong in the proposed Proteobacteria subdivision. The 5'-terminal nucleotide T or A of the 23S rRNA is close to a Pribnow box which could be a -10 region of the transcription promoter for the 23S rRNA gene, suggesting that a posttranscriptional process is likely not involved in the maturation of the H. pylori 23S rRNA. Clinical isolates of H. pylori resistant to clarithromycin were examined by using natural transformation and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Cross-resistance to clarithromycin and erythromycin, which was transferred by natural transformation from the Cla(r) Ery(r) donor strain H. pylori E to the Cla(s) Ery(s) recipient strain H. pylori UA802, was associated with an single A-to-G transition mutation at position 2142 of both copies of the 23S rRNA in UA802 Cla(r) Ery(r) mutants. The transformation frequency for Cla(r) and Ery(r) was found to be approximately 2 x 10(-6) transformants per viable cell, and the MICs of both clarithromycin and erythromycin for the Cla(r) Ery(r) mutants were equal to those for the donor isolate. Our results confirmed the previous findings that mutations at positions 2142 and 2143 of the H. pylori 23S rRNA gene are responsible for clarithromycin resistance and suggest that acquisition of clarithromycin resistance in H. pylori could also result from horizontal transfer. PMID:9420030

  2. Ketolide Antimicrobial Activity Persists after Disruption of Interactions with Domain II of 23S rRNA

    PubMed Central

    Novotny, Guy W.; Jakobsen, Lene; Andersen, Niels M.; Poehlsgaard, Jacob; Douthwaite, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    Ketolides are the latest derivatives developed from the macrolide erythromycin to improve antimicrobial activity. All macrolides and ketolides bind to the 50S ribosomal subunit, where they come into contact with adenosine 2058 (A2058) within domain V of the 23S rRNA and block protein synthesis. An additional interaction at nucleotide A752 in the rRNA domain II is made via the synthetic carbamate-alkyl-aryl substituent in the ketolides HMR3647 (telithromycin) and HMR3004, and this interaction contributes to their improved activities. Only a few macrolides, including tylosin, come into contact with domain II of the rRNA and do so via interactions with nucleotides G748 and A752. We have disrupted these macrolide-ketolide interaction sites in the rRNA to assess their relative importance for binding. Base substitutions at A752 were shown to confer low levels of resistance to telithromycin but not to HMR3004, while deletion of A752 confers low levels of resistance to both ketolides. Mutations at position 748 confer no resistance. Substitution of guanine at A2058 gives rise to the MLSB (macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B) phenotype, which confers resistance to all the drugs. However, resistance to ketolides was abolished when the mutation at position 2058 was combined with a mutation in domain II of the same rRNA. In contrast, the same dual mutations in rRNAs conferred enhanced resistance to tylosin. Our results show that the domain II interactions of telithromycin and HMR3004 differ from each other and from those of tylosin. The data provide no indication that mutations within domain II, either alone or in combination with an A2058 mutation, can confer significant levels of telithromycin resistance. PMID:15388419

  3. SOT1, a pentatricopeptide repeat protein with a small MutS-related domain, is required for correct processing of plastid 23S-4.5S rRNA precursors in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenjuan; Liu, Sheng; Ruwe, Hannes; Zhang, Delin; Melonek, Joanna; Zhu, Yajuan; Hu, Xupeng; Gusewski, Sandra; Yin, Ping; Small, Ian D; Howell, Katharine A; Huang, Jirong

    2016-03-01

    Ribosomal RNA processing is essential for plastid ribosome biogenesis, but is still poorly understood in higher plants. Here, we show that SUPPRESSOR OF THYLAKOID FORMATION1 (SOT1), a plastid-localized pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) protein with a small MutS-related domain, is required for maturation of the 23S-4.5S rRNA dicistron. Loss of SOT1 function leads to slower chloroplast development, suppression of leaf variegation, and abnormal 23S and 4.5S processing. Predictions based on the PPR motif sequences identified the 5' end of the 23S-4.5S rRNA dicistronic precursor as a putative SOT1 binding site. This was confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay, and by loss of the abundant small RNA 'footprint' associated with this site in sot1 mutants. We found that more than half of the 23S-4.5S rRNA dicistrons in sot1 mutants contain eroded and/or unprocessed 5' and 3' ends, and that the endonucleolytic cleavage product normally released from the 5' end of the precursor is absent in a sot1 null mutant. We postulate that SOT1 binding protects the 5' extremity of the 23S-4.5S rRNA dicistron from exonucleolytic attack, and favours formation of the RNA structure that allows endonucleolytic processing of its 5' and 3' ends. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Subribosomal particle analysis reveals the stages of bacterial ribosome assembly at which rRNA nucleotides are modified

    PubMed Central

    Siibak, Triinu; Remme, Jaanus

    2010-01-01

    Modified nucleosides of ribosomal RNA are synthesized during ribosome assembly. In bacteria, each modification is made by a specialized enzyme. In vitro studies have shown that some enzymes need the presence of ribosomal proteins while other enzymes can modify only protein-free rRNA. We have analyzed the addition of modified nucleosides to rRNA during ribosome assembly. Accumulation of incompletely assembled ribosomal particles (25S, 35S, and 45S) was induced by chloramphenicol or erythromycin in an exponentially growing Escherichia coli culture. Incompletely assembled ribosomal particles were isolated from drug-treated and free 30S and 50S subunits and mature 70S ribosomes from untreated cells. Nucleosides of 16S and 23S rRNA were prepared and analyzed by reverse-phase, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Pseudouridines were identified by the chemical modification/primer extension method. Based on the results, the rRNA modifications were divided into three major groups: early, intermediate, and late assembly specific modifications. Seven out of 11 modified nucleosides of 16S rRNA were late assembly specific. In contrast, 16 out of 25 modified nucleosides of 23S rRNA were made during early steps of ribosome assembly. Free subunits of exponentially growing bacteria contain undermodified rRNA, indicating that a specific set of modifications is synthesized during very late steps of ribosome subunit assembly. PMID:20719918

  5. Subribosomal particle analysis reveals the stages of bacterial ribosome assembly at which rRNA nucleotides are modified.

    PubMed

    Siibak, Triinu; Remme, Jaanus

    2010-10-01

    Modified nucleosides of ribosomal RNA are synthesized during ribosome assembly. In bacteria, each modification is made by a specialized enzyme. In vitro studies have shown that some enzymes need the presence of ribosomal proteins while other enzymes can modify only protein-free rRNA. We have analyzed the addition of modified nucleosides to rRNA during ribosome assembly. Accumulation of incompletely assembled ribosomal particles (25S, 35S, and 45S) was induced by chloramphenicol or erythromycin in an exponentially growing Escherichia coli culture. Incompletely assembled ribosomal particles were isolated from drug-treated and free 30S and 50S subunits and mature 70S ribosomes from untreated cells. Nucleosides of 16S and 23S rRNA were prepared and analyzed by reverse-phase, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Pseudouridines were identified by the chemical modification/primer extension method. Based on the results, the rRNA modifications were divided into three major groups: early, intermediate, and late assembly specific modifications. Seven out of 11 modified nucleosides of 16S rRNA were late assembly specific. In contrast, 16 out of 25 modified nucleosides of 23S rRNA were made during early steps of ribosome assembly. Free subunits of exponentially growing bacteria contain undermodified rRNA, indicating that a specific set of modifications is synthesized during very late steps of ribosome subunit assembly.

  6. The ribosome challenge to the RNA world.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Jessica C; Hud, Nicholas V; Williams, Loren Dean

    2015-04-01

    An RNA World that predated the modern world of polypeptide and polynucleotide is one of the most widely accepted models in origin of life research. In this model, the translation system shepherded the RNA World into the extant biology of DNA, RNA, and protein. Here, we examine the RNA World Hypothesis in the context of increasingly detailed information available about the origins, evolution, functions, and mechanisms of the translation system. We conclude that the translation system presents critical challenges to RNA World Hypotheses. Firstly, a timeline of the RNA World is problematic when the ribosome is incorporated. The mechanism of peptidyl transfer of the ribosome appears distinct from evolved enzymes, signaling origins in a chemical rather than biological milieu. Secondly, we have no evidence that the basic biochemical toolset of life is subject to substantive change by Darwinian evolution, as required for the transition from the RNA world to extant biology. Thirdly, we do not see specific evidence for biological takeover of ribozyme function by protein enzymes. Finally, we can find no basis for preservation of the ribosome as ribozyme or the universality of translation, if it were the case that other information transducing ribozymes, such as ribozyme polymerases, were replaced by protein analogs and erased from the phylogenetic record. We suggest that an updated model of the RNA World should address the current state of knowledge of the translation system.

  7. A conserved secondary structural motif in 23S rRNA defines the site of interaction of amicetin, a universal inhibitor of peptide bond formation.

    PubMed Central

    Leviev, I G; Rodriguez-Fonseca, C; Phan, H; Garrett, R A; Heilek, G; Noller, H F; Mankin, A S

    1994-01-01

    The binding site and probable site of action have been determined for the universal antibiotic amicetin which inhibits peptide bond formation. Evidence from in vivo mutants, site-directed mutations and chemical footprinting all implicate a highly conserved motif in the secondary structure of the 23S-like rRNA close to the central circle of domain V. We infer that this motif lies at, or close to, the catalytic site in the peptidyl transfer centre. The binding site of amicetin is the first of a group of functionally related hexose-cytosine inhibitors to be localized on the ribosome. Images PMID:8157007

  8. Chloroplast RNA-Binding Protein RBD1 Promotes Chilling Tolerance through 23S rRNA Processing in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Leiyun; Yang, Fen; Wang, Yi; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Hua, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Plants have varying abilities to tolerate chilling (low but not freezing temperatures), and it is largely unknown how plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana achieve chilling tolerance. Here, we describe a genome-wide screen for genes important for chilling tolerance by their putative knockout mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana. Out of 11,000 T-DNA insertion mutant lines representing half of the genome, 54 lines associated with disruption of 49 genes had a drastic chilling sensitive phenotype. Sixteen of these genes encode proteins with chloroplast localization, suggesting a critical role of chloroplast function in chilling tolerance. Study of one of these proteins RBD1 with an RNA binding domain further reveals the importance of chloroplast translation in chilling tolerance. RBD1 is expressed in the green tissues and is localized in the chloroplast nucleoid. It binds directly to 23S rRNA and the binding is stronger under chilling than at normal growth temperatures. The rbd1 mutants are defective in generating mature 23S rRNAs and deficient in chloroplast protein synthesis especially under chilling conditions. Together, our study identifies RBD1 as a regulator of 23S rRNA processing and reveals the importance of chloroplast function especially protein translation in chilling tolerance. PMID:27138552

  9. Fragmentation of 23S rRNA in Strains of Proteus and Providencia Results from Intervening Sequences in the rrn (rRNA) Genes

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Wayne L.; Pabbaraju, Kanti; Sanderson, Kenneth E.

    2000-01-01

    Intervening sequences (IVSs) were originally identified in the rrl genes for 23S rRNA (rrl genes, for large ribosomal subunit, part of rrn operon encoding rRNA) of Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium LT2 and Arizonae. These sequences are transcribed but later removed during RNase III processing of the rRNA, resulting in fragmentation of the 23S species; IVSs are uncommon, but have been reported in at least 10 bacterial genera. Through PCR amplification of IVS-containing regions of the rrl genes we showed that most Proteus and Providencia strains contain IVSs similar to those of serovar Typhimurium in distribution and location in rrl genes. By extraction and Northern blotting of rRNA, we also found that these IVSs result in rRNA fragmentation. We report the first finding of two very different sizes of IVS (113 bp and 183 to 187 bp) in different rrl genes in the same strain, in helix 25 of Proteus and Providencia spp.; IVSs from helix 45 are 113 to 123 bp in size. Analysis of IVS sequence and postulated secondary structure reveals striking similarities of Proteus and Providencia IVSs to those of serovar Typhimurium, with the stems of the smaller IVSs from helix 25 being similar to those of Salmonella helix 25 IVSs and with both the stem and the central loop domain of helix 45 IVSs being similar. Thus, IVSs of related sequences are widely distributed throughout the Enterobacteriaceae, in Salmonella, Yersinia, Proteus, and Providencia spp., but we did not find them in Escherichia coli, Citrobacter, Enterobacter, Klebsiella, or Morganella spp.; the sporadic distribution of IVSs of related sequence indicates that lateral genetic transfer has occurred. PMID:10648538

  10. Networks of interactions in the secondary and tertiary structure of ribosomal RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang-Yong; Lee, Jung C.; Gutell, Robin R.

    2007-12-01

    We construct four different structural networks for both the secondary and tertiary structures of the 16S and 23S ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) in the high-resolution crystal structures of the Thermus thermophilus 30S and Haloarcula marismortui 50S ribosomal subunits, and investigate topological characteristics of the rRNA structures by determining relevant measures, such as the characteristic path length, the clustering coefficient, and the helix betweenness. This study reveals that the 23S rRNA network is more compact than the 16S rRNA networks, reflecting the more globular overall structure of the 23S rRNA relative to the 16S rRNA. In particular, the large number of tertiary interactions in the 23S rRNA tends to cluster, accounting for its small-world network properties. In addition, although the rRNA networks are not the scale-free network, their helix betweenness has a power-law distribution and is correlated with the phylogenetic conservation of helices. The higher the helix betweenness, the more conserved the helix. These results suggest a potential role of the rRNA network as a new quantitative approach in rRNA research.

  11. Emergence of Macrolide-Resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae with a 23S rRNA Gene Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Morozumi, Miyuki; Hasegawa, Keiko; Kobayashi, Reiko; Inoue, Nagako; Iwata, Satoshi; Kuroki, Haruo; Kawamura, Naohisa; Nakayama, Eiichi; Tajima, Takeshi; Shimizu, Kouichi; Ubukata, Kimiko

    2005-01-01

    A total of 195 Mycoplasma pneumoniae strains were isolated from 2,462 clinical specimens collected between April 2002 and March 2004 from pediatric outpatients with respiratory tract infections. Susceptibilities to six macrolide antibiotics (ML), telithromycin, minocycline, levofloxacin, and sitafloxacin were determined by the microdilution method using PPLO broth. A total of 183 M. pneumoniae isolates were susceptible to all agents and had excellent MIC90s in the following order: 0.00195 μg/ml for azithromycin and telithromycin, 0.0078 μg/ml for clarithromycin, 0.0156 μg/ml for erythromycin, 0.0625 μg/ml for sitafloxacin, 0.5 μg/ml for minocycline, and 1 μg/ml for levofloxacin. Notably, 12 ML-resistant M. pneumoniae strains were isolated from patients with pneumonia (10 strains) or acute bronchitis (2 strains). These strains showed resistance to ML with MICs of ≥1 μg/ml, except to rokitamycin. Transition mutations of A2063G or A2064G, which correspond to A2058 and A2059 in Escherichia coli, in domain V on the 23S rRNA gene in 11 ML-resistant strains were identified. By pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing, these strains were classified into groups I and Vb, as described previously (A. Cousin-Allery, A. Charron, B. D. Barbeyrac, G. Fremy, J. S. Jensen, H. Renaudin, and C. Bebear, Epidemiol. Infect. 124:103-111, 2000). These findings suggest that excessive usage of MLs acts as a trigger to select mutations on the corresponding 23S rRNA gene with the resultant occurrence of ML-resistant M. pneumoniae. Monitoring ML susceptibilities for M. pneumoniae is necessary in the future. PMID:15917525

  12. Identification of a Novel G2073A Mutation in 23S rRNA in Amphenicol-Selected Mutants of Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Naren, Gaowa; Li, Hui; Xia, Xi; Wu, Congming; Shen, Jianzhong; Zhang, Qijing; Wang, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to examine the development and molecular mechanisms of amphenicol resistance in Campylobacter jejuni by using in vitro selection with chloramphenicol and florfenicol. The impact of the resistance development on growth rates was also determined using in vitro culture. Methods Chloramphenicol and florfenicol were used as selection agents to perform in vitro stepwise selection. Mutants resistant to the selective agents were obtained from the selection process. The mutant strains were compared with the parent strain for changes in MICs and growth rates. The 23S rRNA gene and the L4 and L22 ribosomal protein genes in the mutant strains and the parent strain were amplified and sequenced to identify potential resistance-associated mutations. Results C. jejuni strains that were highly resistant to chloramphenicol and florfenicol were obtained from in vitro selection. A novel G2073A mutation in all three copies of the 23S rRNA gene was identified in all the resistant mutants examined, which showed resistance to both chloramphenicol and florfenicol. In addition, all the mutants selected by chloramphenicol also exhibited the G74D modification in ribosomal protein L4, which was previously shown to confer a low-level erythromycin resistance in Campylobacter species. The mutants selected by florfenicol did not have the G74D mutation in L4. Notably, the amphenicol-resistant mutants also exhibited reduced susceptibility to erythromycin, suggesting that the selection resulted in cross resistance to macrolides. Conclusions This study identifies a novel point mutation (G2073A) in 23S rRNA in amphenicol-selected mutants of C. jejuni. Development of amphenicol resistance in Campylobacter likely incurs a fitness cost as the mutant strains showed slower growth rates in antibiotic-free media. PMID:24728007

  13. RlmCD-mediated U747 methylation promotes efficient G748 methylation by methyltransferase RlmAII in 23S rRNA in Streptococcus pneumoniae; interplay between two rRNA methylations responsible for telithromycin susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Tatsuma; Takaya, Akiko; Sato, Yoshiharu; Kimura, Satoshi; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Yamamoto, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Adenine at position 752 in a loop of helix 35 from positions 745 to 752 in domain II of 23S rRNA is involved in binding to the ribosome of telithromycin (TEL), a member of ketolides. Methylation of guanine at position 748 by the intrinsic methyltransferase RlmAII enhances binding of telithromycin (TEL) to A752 in Streptococcus pneumoniae. We have found that another intrinsic methylation of the adjacent uridine at position 747 enhances G748 methylation by RlmAII, rendering TEL susceptibility. U747 and another nucleotide, U1939, were methylated by the dual-specific methyltransferase RlmCD encoded by SP_1029 in S. pneumoniae. Inactivation of RlmCD reduced N1-methylated level of G748 by RlmAII in vivo, leading to TEL resistance when the nucleotide A2058, located in domain V of 23S rRNA, was dimethylated by the dimethyltransferase Erm(B). In vitro methylation of rRNA showed that RlmAII activity was significantly enhanced by RlmCD-mediated pre-methylation of 23S rRNA. These results suggest that RlmCD-mediated U747 methylation promotes efficient G748 methylation by RlmAII, thereby facilitating TEL binding to the ribosome. PMID:26365244

  14. Specific Detection of Bradyrhizobium and Rhizobium Strains Colonizing Rice (Oryza sativa) Roots by 16S-23S Ribosomal DNA Intergenic Spacer-Targeted PCR

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Zhiyuan; Hurek, Thomas; Vinuesa, Pablo; Müller, Peter; Ladha, Jagdish K.; Reinhold-Hurek, Barbara

    2001-01-01

    In addition to forming symbiotic nodules on legumes, rhizobial strains are members of soil or rhizosphere communities or occur as endophytes, e.g., in rice. Two rhizobial strains which have been isolated from root nodules of the aquatic legumes Aeschynomene fluminensis (IRBG271) and Sesbania aculeata (IRBG74) were previously found to promote rice growth. In addition to analyzing their phylogenetic positions, we assessed the suitability of the 16S-23S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) intergenic spacer (IGS) sequences for the differentiation of closely related rhizobial taxa and for the development of PCR protocols allowing the specific detection of strains in the environment. 16S rDNA sequence analysis (sequence identity, 99%) and phylogenetic analysis of IGS sequences showed that strain IRBG271 was related to but distinct from Bradyrhizobium elkanii. Rhizobium sp. (Sesbania) strain IRBG74 was located in the Rhizobium-Agrobacterium cluster as a novel lineage according to phylogenetic 16S rDNA analysis (96.8 to 98.9% sequence identity with Agrobacterium tumefaciens; emended name, Rhizobium radiobacter). Strain IRBG74 harbored four copies of rRNA operons whose IGS sequences varied only slightly (2 to 9 nucleotides). The IGS sequence analyses allowed intraspecies differentiation, especially in the genus Bradyrhizobium, as illustrated here for strains of Bradyrhizobium japonicum, B. elkanii, Bradyrhizobium liaoningense, and Bradyrhizobium sp. (Chamaecytisus) strain BTA-1. It also clearly differentiated fast-growing rhizobial species and strains, albeit with lower statistical significance. Moreover, the high sequence variability allowed the development of highly specific IGS-targeted nested-PCR assays. Strains IRBG74 and IRBG271 were specifically detected in complex DNA mixtures of numerous related bacteria and in the DNA of roots of gnotobiotically cultured or even of soil-grown rice plants after inoculation. Thus, IGS sequence analysis is an attractive technique for both microbial

  15. RlmN and Cfr are Radical SAM Enzymes Involved in Methylation of Ribosomal RNA

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Feng; LaMarre, Jacqueline M.; Röhrich, Rene; Wiesner, Jochen; Jomaa, Hassan; Mankin, Alexander S.; Fujimori, Danica Galonić

    2010-01-01

    Posttranscriptional modifications of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) nucleotides are a common mechanism of modulating the ribosome’s function and conferring bacterial resistance to ribosome-targeting antibiotics. One such modification is methylation of an adenosine nucleotide within the peptidyl transferase center of the ribosome mediated by the indigenous methyltransferase RlmN and its evolutionary-related resistance enzyme Cfr. These methyltransferases catalyze methyl transfer to aromatic carbon atoms of the adenosine within a complex 23S rRNA substrate to form the 2,8-dimethylated product. RlmN and Cfr are members of the Radical SAM superfamily, and contain the characteristic cysteine rich CX3CX2C motif. We demonstrate that both enzymes are capable of accommodating the requisite [4Fe-4S] cluster. S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) is both the methyl donor and the source of a 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical, which activates the substrate for methylation. Detailed analyses of the rRNA requirements show that the enzymes can utilize protein-free 23S rRNA as a substrate, but not the fully-assembled large ribosomal subunit, suggesting that the methylations take place during the assembly of the ribosome. The key recognition elements in the 23S rRNA are helices 90–92 and the adjacent single stranded RNA that encompasses A2503. To our knowledge, this study represents the first in vitro description of a methyl transfer catalyzed by a member of Radical SAM superfamily, and it expands the catalytic repertoire of this diverse enzyme class. Furthermore, by providing information on both the timing of methylation and its substrate requirements, our findings have important implications for the functional consequences of Cfr-mediated modification of rRNA in acquisition of antibiotic resistance. PMID:20184321

  16. Crystal structure of RlmM, the 2′O-ribose methyltransferase for C2498 of Escherichia coli 23S rRNA

    PubMed Central

    Punekar, Avinash S.; Shepherd, Tyson R.; Liljeruhm, Josefine; Forster, Anthony C.; Selmer, Maria

    2012-01-01

    RlmM (YgdE) catalyzes the S-adenosyl methionine (AdoMet)-dependent 2′O methylation of C2498 in 23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) of Escherichia coli. Previous experiments have shown that RlmM is active on 23S rRNA from an RlmM knockout strain but not on mature 50S subunits from the same strain. Here, we demonstrate RlmM methyltransferase (MTase) activity on in vitro transcribed 23S rRNA and its domain V. We have solved crystal structures of E. coli RlmM at 1.9 Å resolution and of an RlmM–AdoMet complex at 2.6 Å resolution. RlmM consists of an N-terminal THUMP domain and a C-terminal catalytic Rossmann-like fold MTase domain in a novel arrangement. The catalytic domain of RlmM is closely related to YiiB, TlyA and fibrillarins, with the second K of the catalytic tetrad KDKE shifted by two residues at the C-terminal end of a beta strand compared with most 2′O MTases. The AdoMet-binding site is open and shallow, suggesting that RNA substrate binding may be required to form a conformation needed for catalysis. A continuous surface of conserved positive charge indicates that RlmM uses one side of the two domains and the inter-domain linker to recognize its RNA substrate. PMID:22923526

  17. Mutations in the 23S rRNA gene of Helicobacter pylori associated with clarithromycin resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Suk; Kang, Jung Oak; Eun, Chang Soo; Han, Dong Soo; Choi, Tae Yeal

    2002-01-01

    Among 12 clarithromycin-resistant Helicobacter pylori strains isolated in Guri, Korea, 8 showed an adenine to guanine mutation at position 2143 (formerly A2144G or E. coli 2059) in the 23S rRNA gene by the PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) method. The remaining 4 strains, digested by neither BsaI nor BbsI, showed a thymine to cytosine mutation at position 2182 (T2182C) by direct sequencing of the PCR products. The T2182C mutants showed a tendency of higher levels of minimum inhibitory concentration to clarithromycin than the A2143G mutants. In conclusion, either the A2143G or the T2182C mutation was present in 100% of clarithromycin-resistant H. pylori isolates examined. The PCR-RFLP technique with restriction enzymes BbsI and BsaI was a rapid and relatively simple method to detect the clarithromycin resistance. But undigested isolates were quite frequent among our isolates (33.3%), the PCR-RFLP method with restriction enzymes BbsI and BsaI should not be used alone, and development of other rapid detection method for clarithromycin resistance is mandatory. PMID:12378008

  18. Large Variations in Bacterial Ribosomal RNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Kyungtaek; Furuta, Yoshikazu; Kobayashi, Ichizo

    2012-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, essential to all forms of life, have been viewed as highly conserved and evolutionarily stable, partly because very little is known about their natural variations. Here, we explored large-scale variations of rRNA genes through bioinformatic analyses of available complete bacterial genomic sequences with an emphasis on formation mechanisms and biological significance. Interestingly, we found bacterial genomes in which no 16S rRNA genes harbor the conserved core of the anti–Shine-Dalgarno sequence (5′-CCTCC-3′). This loss was accompanied by elimination of Shine-Dalgarno–like sequences upstream of their protein-coding genes. Those genomes belong to 1 or 2 of the following categories: primary symbionts, hemotropic Mycoplasma, and Flavobacteria. We also found many rearranged rRNA genes and reconstructed their history. Conjecturing the underlying mechanisms, such as inversion, partial duplication, transposon insertion, deletion, and substitution, we were able to infer their biological significance, such as co-orientation of rRNA transcription and chromosomal replication, lateral transfer of rRNA gene segments, and spread of rRNA genes with an apparent structural defect through gene conversion. These results open the way to understanding dynamic evolutionary changes of rRNA genes and the translational machinery. PMID:22446745

  19. The two faces of the Escherichia coli 23 S rRNA sarcin/ricin domain: the structure at 1.11 A resolution.

    PubMed

    Correll, C C; Wool, I G; Munishkin, A

    1999-09-17

    The sarcin/ricin domain of 23 S - 28 S ribosomal RNA is essential for protein synthesis because it forms a critical part of the binding site for elongation factors. A crystal structure of an RNA of 27 nucleotides that mimics the domain in Escherichia coli 23 S rRNA was determined at 1.11 A resolution. The domain folds into a hairpin distorted by four non-canonical base-pairs and one base triple. The fold is stabilized by cross-strand and intra-stand stacking; no intramolecular stabilizing metal ions are observed. This is the first structure to reveal in great detail the geometry and the hydration of two common motifs that are conserved in this rRNA domain, a GAGA tetraloop and a G-bulged cross-strand A stack. Differences in the region connecting these motifs to the stem in the E. coli and in the rat sarcin/ricin domains may contribute to the species-specific binding of elongation factors. Correlation of nucleotide protection data with the structure indicates that the domain has two surfaces. One surface is accessible, lies primarily in the major groove, and is likely to bind the elongation factors. The second lies primarily in the minor groove, and is likely to be buried in the ribosome. This minor groove surface includes the Watson-Crick faces of the cytosine bases in the unusual A2654.C2666 and U2653.C2667 water-mediated base-pairs. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  20. Occurrence of 20S RNA and 23S RNA replicons in industrial yeast strains and their variation under nutritional stress conditions.

    PubMed

    López, Victoria; Gil, Rosario; Vicente Carbonell, José; Navarro, Alfonso

    2002-04-01

    We have characterized industrial yeast strains used in the brewing, baking, and winemaking industries for the presence or absence of cytoplasmic single-stranded 20S and 23S RNAs. Furthermore, the variation of intracellular concentrations of these replicons in brewing and laboratory strains under nutritional stress conditions was determined. Our results show a correlation between the relative abundance of these replicons and exposure of yeast to nutritionally stressful conditions, indicating that these RNAs could be employed as molecular probes to evaluate the exposure of 20S(+) and/or 23S(+) yeast strains to stress situations during industrial manipulation. During this study, several 20S(-)23S(+) Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were isolated and identified. This is the first time that a yeast strain containing only 23S RNA has been reported, demonstrating that 20S RNA is not required for 23S RNA replication. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Elucidation of pathways of ribosomal RNA degradation: an essential role for RNase E

    PubMed Central

    Sulthana, Shaheen; Basturea, Georgeta N.; Deutscher, Murray P.

    2016-01-01

    Although normally stable in growing cells, ribosomal RNAs are degraded under conditions of stress, such as starvation, and in response to misassembled or otherwise defective ribosomes in a process termed RNA quality control. Previously, our laboratory found that large fragments of 16S and 23S rRNA accumulate in strains lacking the processive exoribonucleases RNase II, RNase R, and PNPase, implicating these enzymes in the later steps of rRNA breakdown. Here, we define the pathways of rRNA degradation in the quality control process and during starvation, and show that the essential endoribonuclease, RNase E, is required to make the initial cleavages in both degradative processes. We also present evidence that explains why the exoribonuclease, RNase PH, is required to initiate the degradation of rRNA during starvation. The data presented here provide the first detailed description of rRNA degradation in bacterial cells. PMID:27298395

  2. A detailed view of a ribosomal active site: the structure of the L11-RNA complex.

    PubMed

    Wimberly, B T; Guymon, R; McCutcheon, J P; White, S W; Ramakrishnan, V

    1999-05-14

    We report the crystal structure of a 58 nucleotide fragment of 23S ribosomal RNA bound to ribosomal protein L11. This highly conserved ribonucleoprotein domain is the target for the thiostrepton family of antibiotics that disrupt elongation factor function. The highly compact RNA has both familiar and novel structural motifs. While the C-terminal domain of L11 binds RNA tightly, the N-terminal domain makes only limited contacts with RNA and is proposed to function as a switch that reversibly associates with an adjacent region of RNA. The sites of mutations conferring resistance to thiostrepton and micrococcin line a narrow cleft between the RNA and the N-terminal domain. These antibiotics are proposed to bind in this cleft, locking the putative switch and interfering with the function of elongation factors.

  3. Nonenzymatic microorganism identification based on ribosomal RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ives, Jeffrey T.; Pierini, Alicia M.; Stokes, Jeffrey A.; Wahlund, Thomas M.; Read, Betsy; Bechtel, James H.; Bronk, Burt V.

    1999-11-01

    Effective defense against biological warfare (BW) agents requires rapid, fieldable and accurate systems. For micro- organisms like bacteria and viruses, ribosomal RNA (rRNA) provides a valuable target with multiple advantages of species specificity and intrinsic target amplification. Vegetative and spore forms of bacteria contain approximately 104 copies of rRNA. Direct detection of rRNA copies can eliminate some of the interference and preparation difficulties involved in enzymatic amplification methods. In order to apply the advantages of rRNA to BW defense, we are developing a fieldable system based on 16S rRNA, physical disruption of the micro-organism, solid phase hybridization, and fluorescence detection. Our goals include species-specific identification, complete operation from raw sample to identification in 15 minutes or less, and compact, fieldable instrumentation. Initial work on this project has investigated the lysis and hybridization steps, the species-specificity of oligonucleotides probes, and the development of a novel electromagnetic method to physically disrupt the micro- organisms. Target bacteria have been Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis). Continuing work includes further development of methods to rapidly disrupt the micro-organisms and release the rRNA, improved integration and processing, and extension to bacterial and mammalian viruses like MS2 and vesicular stomatitis virus.

  4. 23S rRNA gene mutations contributing to macrolide resistance in Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Operon specific 23S rRNA mutations affecting minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of macrolides (erythromycin [ERY], azithromycin [AZM], tylosin [TYL]) and a lincosamide (clindamycin [CLI]) were examined in a collection of Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli isolates. The three copies of the Campy...

  5. [Value of detecting bacterial 16S and 23S rRNA in interface membrane in diagnosis of periprosthetic joint infection].

    PubMed

    An, Sen-Bo; Cai, Peng-de; Wang, Long; Hu, Yi-He

    2016-02-01

    To explore the value of detecting bacterial 16S rRNA with 23S rRNA in the diagnosis of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI). A prospective study was conducted among 67 patients with previous total hip arthroplasty (THA) undergoing a reoperation for infection (23 patients) or aseptic loosening (44 patients). Bacterial 16S rRNA and 23S rRNA in the interface membrane were detected by real-time PCR and their value in diagnosis of PJI was assessed. The 16S rRNA and 23S rRNA showed no significant difference in their power in the diagnosis of PJI. The detection of 16S rRNA/23S rRNA showed a higher sensitivity and a greater negative predictive value in PJI diagnosis than the detection of 16S rRNA+23S rRNA (95.7% vs 52.2%, P<0.01; 97.6% vs 79.6%, P=0.01). The specificity, positive predictive value, and accuracy of the 4 diagnostic strategies were not significantly different. The diagnostic power of 16S rRNA and 23S rRNA was similar in detecting PJI. Compared with the diagnostic strategy with 16S rRNA+23S rRNA, 16S rRNA/23S rRNA is more sensitive in detecting PJI.

  6. Mutations affecting domain V of the 23S rRNA gene in Helicobacter pylori from Cairo, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Ghaith, Doaa; Elzahry, Mohammad; Mostafa, Gehan; Mostafa, Sally; Elsherif, Rasha; Ramzy, Iman

    2016-10-01

    Clarithromycin is a main component of the recommended first-line triple therapy for Helicobacter pylori in Egypt. We aimed in our study to investigate the prevalence of clarithromycin-resistant H. pylori strains due to the point mutations at domain V of the H. pylori 23S rRNA among the Egyptian population using the polymerase chain reaction/restricted fragment length polymorphism (PCR/RFLP) assay. Gastric biopsies obtained from 100 dyspeptic patients who consecutively attended at Cairo University Hospital during the period from January to November 2013 were subjected to PCR/RFLP in order to detect the point mutations at domain V of the H. pylori 23S rRNA associated with clarithromycin resistance. The PCR amplicon of the 23S H. pylori rRNA is restricted with MboII for detection of A2142G mutation and with BsaI for A2143G mutation. The prevalence of H. pylori infection among 100 patients was 70%; clarithromycin resistance was detected in 39/70 (57.7%) of positive H. pylori isolates. Occurrence of 23S rRNA A2142G mutations resulted in two DNA fragments (418 and 350 bp) by PCR-RFLP; on the other hand, no A2143G mutations were detected. The high prevalence of clarithromycin resistance (57.7%) caused by A2142G mutations at domain V of the H. pylori 23S rRNA may mandate changing of the standard clarithromycin-containing triple therapy. The PCR/RFLP assay was a rapid and accurate method for molecular detection of H. pylori infection in addition to determination of different nucleotide mutations causing clarithromycin resistance.

  7. Regulating the Ribosome: A Spotlight on RNA Dark Matter

    PubMed Central

    Lintner, Nathanael G.; Cate, Jamie H.D.

    2014-01-01

    In this issue Pircher et al.(2014) show that an abundant ribosome-associated 18-nt noncoding RNA (ncRNA),derived from the open reading frame of an mRNA,acts directly on the ribosome and regulates global translation levels in response to hypertonic shock. PMID:24725592

  8. Structure of a mitochondrial ribosome with minimal RNA

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Manjuli R.; Booth, Timothy M.; Simpson, Larry; Maslov, Dmitri A.; Agrawal, Rajendra K.

    2009-01-01

    The Leishmania tarentolae mitochondrial ribosome (Lmr) is a minimal ribosomal RNA (rRNA)-containing ribosome. We have obtained a cryo-EM map of the Lmr. The map reveals several features that have not been seen in previously-determined structures of eubacterial or eukaryotic (cytoplasmic or organellar) ribosomes to our knowledge. Comparisons of the Lmr map with X-ray crystallographic and cryo-EM maps of the eubacterial ribosomes and a cryo-EM map of the mammalian mitochondrial ribosome show that (i) the overall structure of the Lmr is considerably more porous, (ii) the topology of the intersubunit space is significantly different, with fewer intersubunit bridges, but more tunnels, and (iii) several of the functionally-important rRNA regions, including the α-sarcin-ricin loop, have different relative positions within the structure. Furthermore, the major portions of the mRNA channel, the tRNA passage, and the nascent polypeptide exit tunnel contain Lmr-specific proteins, suggesting that the mechanisms for mRNA recruitment, tRNA interaction, and exiting of the nascent polypeptide in Lmr must differ markedly from the mechanisms deduced for ribosomes in other organisms. Our study identifies certain structural features that are characteristic solely of mitochondrial ribosomes and other features that are characteristic of both mitochondrial and chloroplast ribosomes (i.e., organellar ribosomes). PMID:19497863

  9. Higher order structure in ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed

    Gutell, R R; Noller, H F; Woese, C R

    1986-05-01

    The only reliable general method currently available for determining precise higher order structure in the large ribosomal RNAs is comparative sequence analysis. The method is here applied to reveal 'tertiary' structure in the 16S-like rRNAs, i.e. structure more complex than simple double-helical, secondary structure. From a list of computer-generated potential higher order interactions within 16S rRNA one such interaction considered likely was selected for experimental test. The putative interaction involves a Watson-Crick one to one correspondence between positions 570 and 866 in the molecule (E. coli numbering). Using existing oligonucleotide catalog information several organisms were selected whose 16S rRNA sequences might test the proposed co-variation. In all of the (phylogenetically independent) cases selected, full sequence evidence confirms the predicted one to one (Watson-Crick) correspondence. An interaction between positions 570 and 866 is, therefore, considered proven phylogenetically.

  10. Structural features of the tmRNA-ribosome interaction.

    PubMed

    Bugaeva, Elizaveta Y; Surkov, Serhiy; Golovin, Andrey V; Ofverstedt, Lars-Göran; Skoglund, Ulf; Isaksson, Leif A; Bogdanov, Alexey A; Shpanchenko, Olga V; Dontsova, Olga A

    2009-12-01

    Trans-translation is a process which switches the synthesis of a polypeptide chain encoded by a nonstop messenger RNA to the mRNA-like domain of a transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA). It is used in bacterial cells for rescuing the ribosomes arrested during translation of damaged mRNA and directing this mRNA and the product polypeptide for degradation. The molecular basis of this process is not well understood. Earlier, we developed an approach that allowed isolation of tmRNA-ribosomal complexes arrested at a desired step of tmRNA passage through the ribosome. We have here exploited it to examine the tmRNA structure using chemical probing and cryo-electron microscopy tomography. Computer modeling has been used to develop a model for spatial organization of the tmRNA inside the ribosome at different stages of trans-translation.

  11. Mapping the interaction of SmpB with ribosomes by footprinting of ribosomal RNA

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Natalia; Pavlov, Michael Y.; Bouakaz, Elli; Ehrenberg, Måns; Schiavone, Lovisa Holmberg

    2005-01-01

    In trans-translation transfer messenger RNA (tmRNA) and small protein B (SmpB) rescue ribosomes stalled on truncated or in other ways problematic mRNAs. SmpB promotes the binding of tmRNA to the ribosome but there is uncertainty about the number of participating SmpB molecules as well as their ribosomal location. Here, the interaction of SmpB with ribosomal subunits and ribosomes was studied by isolation of SmpB containing complexes followed by chemical modification of ribosomal RNA with dimethyl sulfate, kethoxal and hydroxyl radicals. The results show that SmpB binds 30S and 50S subunits with 1:1 molar ratios and the 70S ribosome with 2:1 molar ratio. SmpB-footprints are similar on subunits and the ribosome. In the 30S subunit, SmpB footprints nucleotides that are in the vicinity of the P-site facing the E-site, and in the 50S subunit SmpB footprints nucleotides that are located below the L7/L12 stalk in the 3D structure of the ribosome. Based on these results, we suggest a mechanism where two molecules of SmpB interact with tmRNA and the ribosome during trans-translation. The first SmpB molecule binds near the factor-binding site on the 50S subunit helping tmRNA accommodation on the ribosome, whereas the second SmpB molecule may functionally substitute for a missing anticodon stem–loop in tmRNA during later steps of trans-translation. PMID:15972795

  12. Compilation of small ribosomal subunit RNA structures.

    PubMed Central

    Neefs, J M; Van de Peer, Y; De Rijk, P; Chapelle, S; De Wachter, R

    1993-01-01

    The database on small ribosomal subunit RNA structure contained 1804 nucleotide sequences on April 23, 1993. This number comprises 365 eukaryotic, 65 archaeal, 1260 bacterial, 30 plastidial, and 84 mitochondrial sequences. These are stored in the form of an alignment in order to facilitate the use of the database as input for comparative studies on higher-order structure and for reconstruction of phylogenetic trees. The elements of the postulated secondary structure for each molecule are indicated by special symbols. The database is available on-line directly from the authors by ftp and can also be obtained from the EMBL nucleotide sequence library by electronic mail, ftp, and on CD ROM disk. PMID:8332525

  13. Helicobacter pylori specific nested PCR assay for the detection of 23S rRNA mutation associated with clarithromycin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, S; Yoshida, H; Ogura, K; Kanai, F; Shiratori, Y; Omata, M

    1998-01-01

    Background—Clarithromycin is one of the most important antibiotics for Helicobacter pylori eradication. However, 5-10% of strains are reported to be resistant. It has been shown that one point mutation in the 23S rRNA gene is associated with resistance to clarithromycin. 
Aims—To establish a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system which amplifies a segment of the 23S rRNA gene containing the mutation points with primers specific for H pylori, so that H pylori infection and the mutation associated with clarithromycin resistance can be examined simultaneously. 
Methods—To detect H pylori infection and the mutation simultaneously, primers specific for the H pylori 23S rRNA gene were designed based on sequence conservation among H pylori strains and sequence specificity as compared with other bacteria. DNA from 57 cultured strains and from 39 gastric juice samples was amplified in the seminested 23S rRNA PCR. Clinical applicability was evaluated in 85patients. 
Results—DNA samples from 57 cultured strains were all amplified. The novel assay and the urease A PCR agreed in 37/39 gastric juice samples with no false positives. The assay did not amplify the DNA of bacteria other than H pylori. Eight of 85 samples had the mutation before treatment. In clarithromycin based treatment, eradication was achieved in 2/5 (40%) with the mutation and 29/34 (85%) without the mutation. 
Conclusion—The assay using gastric juice is quick (within 12 hours) and non-invasive (endoscopy not required), enabling rapid initiation of appropriate antibiotic treatment. 

 Keywords: Helicobacter pylori; eradication; clarithromycin; resistance; point mutation PMID:9863474

  14. An overview of pre-ribosomal RNA processing in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Henras, Anthony K; Plisson-Chastang, Célia; O'Donohue, Marie-Françoise; Chakraborty, Anirban; Gleizes, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomal RNAs are the most abundant and universal noncoding RNAs in living organisms. In eukaryotes, three of the four ribosomal RNAs forming the 40S and 60S subunits are borne by a long polycistronic pre-ribosomal RNA. A complex sequence of processing steps is required to gradually release the mature RNAs from this precursor, concomitant with the assembly of the 79 ribosomal proteins. A large set of trans-acting factors chaperone this process, including small nucleolar ribonucleoparticles. While yeast has been the gold standard for studying the molecular basis of this process, recent technical advances have allowed to further define the mechanisms of ribosome biogenesis in animals and plants. This renewed interest for a long-lasting question has been fueled by the association of several genetic diseases with mutations in genes encoding both ribosomal proteins and ribosome biogenesis factors, and by the perspective of new anticancer treatments targeting the mechanisms of ribosome synthesis. A consensus scheme of pre-ribosomal RNA maturation is emerging from studies in various kinds of eukaryotic organisms. However, major differences between mammalian and yeast pre-ribosomal RNA processing have recently come to light. WIREs RNA 2015, 6:225–242. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1269 PMID:25346433

  15. The Expression of Antibiotic Resistance Methyltransferase Correlates with mRNA Stability Independently of Ribosome Stalling

    PubMed Central

    Dzyubak, Ekaterina

    2016-01-01

    Members of the Erm methyltransferase family modify 23S rRNA of the bacterial ribosome and render cross-resistance to macrolides and multiple distantly related antibiotics. Previous studies have shown that the expression of erm is activated when a macrolide-bound ribosome stalls the translation of the leader peptide preceding the cotranscribed erm. Ribosome stalling is thought to destabilize the inhibitory stem-loop mRNA structure and exposes the erm Shine-Dalgarno (SD) sequence for translational initiation. Paradoxically, mutations that abolish ribosome stalling are routinely found in hyper-resistant clinical isolates; however, the significance of the stalling-dead leader sequence is largely unknown. Here, we show that nonsense mutations in the Staphylococcus aureus ErmB leader peptide (ErmBL) lead to high basal and induced expression of downstream ErmB in the absence or presence of macrolide concomitantly with elevated ribosome methylation and resistance. The overexpression of ErmB is associated with the reduced turnover of the ermBL-ermB transcript, and the macrolide appears to mitigate mRNA cleavage at a site immediately downstream of the ermBL SD sequence. The stabilizing effect of antibiotics on mRNA is not limited to ermBL-ermB; cationic antibiotics representing a ribosome-stalling inducer and a noninducer increase the half-life of specific transcripts. These data unveil a new layer of ermB regulation and imply that ErmBL translation or ribosome stalling serves as a “tuner” to suppress aberrant production of ErmB because methylated ribosome may impose a fitness cost on the bacterium as a result of misregulated translation. PMID:27645242

  16. tmRNA on its way through the ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jie; Hashem, Yaser; Wower, Jacek

    2011-01-01

    Trans-translation is a universal quality-control process eubacteria use to degrade incompletely synthesized proteins and rescue ribosome stalled on defective mRNAs. This process is facilitated by a ribonucleoprotein complex composed of transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA)—a chimera made of a tRNA-like molecule and a short open reading frame (ORF)—and small protein B (SmpB). Determination of the structure of tmRNA and SmpB in complex with the ribosome, at the stage when translation has resumed on tmRNA, has provided an increased understanding of the structure of tmRNA as it transits the ribosome and unique insights into the complex mechanism of template switching on the ribosome and SmpB-driven selection of the correct reading frame on tmRNA's ORF. PMID:21593606

  17. Mapping the messenger RNA within the elongating ribosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jünemann, R.; Wadzack, J.; Burkhardt, N.; Schmitt, M.; Zhao, J.; Stuhrmann, H. B.; Nierhaus, K. H.

    1997-02-01

    The method of proton-spin contrast-variation was applied for determining the position of the messenger RNA within the elongating ribosome. Using an artificial mRNA fragment the mass center of the mRNA sequence covered by the ribosome could be localized for the pre- and the post-translocational elongation states. The mass center moves about 12 ± 5 Å upon translocation. The radius of gyration was 12 ± e Å. The data give an independent contribution for refining a structural model including the RNA ligands of the elongating ribosome.

  18. Changes in the conformation of 5S rRNA cause alterations in principal functions of the ribosomal nanomachine.

    PubMed

    Kouvela, Ekaterini C; Gerbanas, George V; Xaplanteri, Maria A; Petropoulos, Alexandros D; Dinos, George P; Kalpaxis, Dimitrios L

    2007-01-01

    5S rRNA is an integral component of the large ribosomal subunit in virtually all living organisms. Polyamine binding to 5S rRNA was investigated by cross-linking of N1-azidobenzamidino (ABA)-spermine to naked 5S rRNA or 50S ribosomal subunits and whole ribosomes from Escherichia coli cells. ABA-spermine cross-linking sites were kinetically measured and their positions in 5S rRNA were localized by primer extension analysis. Helices III and V, and loops A, C, D and E in naked 5S rRNA were found to be preferred polyamine binding sites. When 50S ribosomal subunits or poly(U)-programmed 70S ribosomes bearing tRNA(Phe) at the E-site and AcPhe-tRNA at the P-site were targeted, the susceptibility of 5S rRNA to ABA-spermine was greatly reduced. Regardless of 5S rRNA assembly status, binding of spermine induced significant changes in the 5S rRNA conformation; loop A adopted an apparent 'loosening' of its structure, while loops C, D, E and helices III and V achieved a more compact folding. Poly(U)-programmed 70S ribosomes possessing 5S rRNA cross-linked with spermine were more efficient than control ribosomes in tRNA binding, peptidyl transferase activity and translocation. Our results support the notion that 5S rRNA serves as a signal transducer between regions of 23S rRNA responsible for principal ribosomal functions.

  19. Two Cases of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia with A2063G Mutation in the 23S rRNA Gene in Siblings

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Joo Hee; Chun, Jin Kyong; Oh, Ki Jin; Kim, Juwon; Yoon, Kap Jun

    2013-01-01

    We describe 2 cases of pneumonia caused by the same macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae in siblings. M. pneumoniae was identified using real-time PCR. Direct sequence analysis of the 23S rRNA gene revealed a point mutation in V domain (A2063G) of the 23S rRNA gene. PMID:23301225

  20. Mutational Evidence for a Functional Connection between Two Domains of 23S rRNA in Translation Termination

    PubMed Central

    Arkov, Alexey L.; Hedenstierna, Klas O. F.; Murgola, Emanuel J.

    2002-01-01

    Nucleotide 1093 in domain II of Escherichia coli 23S rRNA is part of a highly conserved structure historically referred to as the GTPase center. The mutation G1093A was previously shown to cause readthrough of nonsense codons and high temperature-conditional lethality. Defects in translation termination caused by this mutation have also been demonstrated in vitro. To identify sites in 23S rRNA that may be functionally associated with the G1093 region during termination, we selected for secondary mutations in 23S rRNA that would compensate for the temperature-conditional lethality caused by G1093A. Here we report the isolation and characterization of such a secondary mutation. The mutation is a deletion of two consecutive nucleotides from helix 73 in domain V, close to the peptidyltransferase center. The deletion results in a shortening of the CGCG sequence between positions 2045 and 2048 by two nucleotides to CG. In addition to restoring viability in the presence of G1093A, this deletion dramatically decreased readthrough of UGA nonsense mutations caused by G1093A. An analysis of the amount of mutant rRNA in polysomes revealed that this decrease cannot be explained by an inability of G1093A-containing rRNA to be incorporated into polysomes. Furthermore, the deletion was found to cause UGA readthrough on its own, thereby implicating helix 73 in termination for the first time. These results also indicate the existence of a functional connection between the G1093 region and helix 73 during translation termination. PMID:12193621

  1. Methylation of 23S rRNA Nucleotide G748 by RlmAII Methyltransferase Renders Streptococcus pneumoniae Telithromycin Susceptible

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yoshiharu; Shoji, Tatsuma; Yamamoto, Tomoko

    2013-01-01

    Several posttranscriptional modifications of bacterial rRNAs are important in determining antibiotic resistance or sensitivity. In all Gram-positive bacteria, dimethylation of nucleotide A2058, located in domain V of 23S rRNA, by the dimethyltransferase Erm(B) results in low susceptibility and resistance to telithromycin (TEL). However, this is insufficient to produce high-level resistance to TEL in Streptococcus pneumoniae. Inactivation of the methyltransferase RlmAII, which methylates the N-1 position of nucleotide G748, located in hairpin 35 of domain II of 23S rRNA, results in increased resistance to TEL in erm(B)-carrying S. pneumoniae. Sixteen TEL-resistant mutants (MICs, 16 to 32 μg/ml) were obtained from a clinically isolated S. pneumoniae strain showing low TEL susceptibility (MIC, 2 μg/ml), with mutation resulting in constitutive dimethylation of A2058 because of nucleotide differences in the regulatory region of erm(B) mRNA. Primer extension analysis showed that the degree of methylation at G748 in all TEL-resistant mutants was significantly reduced by a mutation in the gene encoding RlmAII to create a stop codon or change an amino acid residue. Furthermore, RNA footprinting with dimethyl sulfate and a molecular modeling study suggested that methylation of G748 may contribute to the stable interaction of TEL with domain II of 23S rRNA, even after dimethylation of A2058 by Erm(B). This novel finding shows that methylation of G748 by RlmAII renders S. pneumoniae TEL susceptible. PMID:23716046

  2. DExD/H-box RNA helicases in ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Roman; Straub, Annika U.; Doebele, Carmen; Bohnsack, Markus T.

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome synthesis requires a multitude of cofactors, among them DExD/H-box RNA helicases. Bacterial RNA helicases involved in ribosome assembly are not essential, while eukaryotes strictly require multiple DExD/H-box proteins that are involved in the much more complex ribosome biogenesis pathway. Here, RNA helicases are thought to act in structural remodeling of the RNPs including the modulation of protein binding, and they are required for allowing access or the release of specific snoRNPs from pre-ribosomes. Interestingly, helicase action is modulated by specific cofactors that can regulate recruitment and enzymatic activity. This review summarizes the current knowledge and focuses on recent findings and open questions on RNA helicase function and regulation in ribosome synthesis. PMID:22922795

  3. Sequence diversity in the 16S-23S intergenic spacer region (ISR) of the rRNA operons in representatives of the Escherichia coli ECOR collection.

    PubMed

    Antón, A I; Martínez-Murcia, A J; Rodríguez-Valera, F

    1998-07-01

    The ribosomal RNA multigene family in Escherichia coli comprises seven rrn operons of similar, but not identical, sequence. Four operons (rrnC, B, G, and E) contain genes in the 16S-23S intergenic spacer region (ISR) for tRNA(Glu-2) and three (rrnA, D, and H) contain genes for tRNA(Ile-1) and tRNA(Ala-1B). To increase our understanding of their molecular evolution, we have determined the ISR sequence of the seven operons in a set of 12 strains from the ECOR collection. Each operon was specifically amplified using polymerase chain reaction primers designed from genes or open reading frames located upstream of the 16S rRNA genes in E. coli K12. With a single exception (ECOR 40), ISRs containing one or two tRNA genes were found at the same respective loci as those of strain K12. Intercistronic heterogeneity already found in K12 was representative of most variation among the strains studied and the location of polymorphic sites was the same. Dispersed nucleotide substitutions were very few but 21 variable sites were found grouped in a stem-loop, although the secondary structure was conserved. Some regions were found in which a stretch of nucleotides was substituted in block by one alternative, apparently unrelated, sequence (as illustrated by the known putative insertion of rsl in K12). Except for substitutions of different sizes and insertions/deletions found in the ISR, the pattern of nucleotide variation is very similar to that found for the 16S rRNA gene in E. coli. Strains K12 and ECOR 40 showed the highest intercistronic heterogeneity. Most strains showed a strong tendency to homogenization. Concerted evolution could explain the notorious conservation of this region that is supposed to have low functional restrictions.

  4. Sequence Analysis and Comparison of 16S rRNA, 23S rRNA and 16S/23S Intergenic Spacer Region of Greening Bacterium Associated with Yellowing Disease (Huanglongbing) of Kinnow Mandarin.

    PubMed

    Gupta, K N; Baranwal, V K; Haq, Q M R

    2012-03-01

    High incidence (up to 40%) of symptoms of yellowing and yellow mottling was observed in 5-8 years old orchards of kinnow mandarin {Citrus reticulate Balanco ('King' × 'Willow mandarin')} in the Punjab state of India during a survey in January 2007. These symptoms are often confused with nutrient deficiency and other stress related disorders. However, a greening bacterium has been attributed to cause the disease. The disease was graft transmissible and sequencing of 16S rRNA, 16S/23S intergenic spacer region and 23S rRNA of the greening bacterium associated with yellowing disease in kinnow mandarin confirmed it to be Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus ('Ca L. asiaticus') showing maximum identity of 95.9% with 'Ca L. asiaticus' from USA and Brazil in 16S rRNA. The study indicates definite association of 'Ca L. asiaticus' with yellowing/chlorotic mottling symptoms of greening disease of kinnow mandarin in Punjab state of India.

  5. Designation of Streptomycete 16S and 23S rRNA-based target regions for oligonucleotide probes.

    PubMed

    Stackebrandt, E; Witt, D; Kemmerling, C; Kroppenstedt, R; Liesack, W

    1991-05-01

    The 16S and 23S rRNA of various Streptomyces species were partially sequenced and screened for the presence of stretches that could define all members of the genus, groups of species, or individual species. Nucleotide 929 (Streptomyces ambofaciens nomenclature [J.L. Pernodet, M.T. Alegre, F. Boccard, and M. Guerineau, Gene 79:33-46, 1989]) is a nucleotide highly unique to Streptomyces species which, in combination with flanking regions, allowed the designation of a genus-specific probe. Regions 158 through 203 of the 16S rRNA and 1518 through 1645 of the 23S rRNA (helix 54 [Pernodet et al., Gene 79:33-46, 1989]) have a high potential to define species, whereas the degree of variation in regions 982 through 998 and 1102 through 1122 of the 16S rRNA is less pronounced but characteristic for at least certain species. Alone or in combination with each other, these regions may serve as target sites for synthetic oligonucleotide probes and primers to be used in the determination of pure cultures and in the characterization of community structures. The specificity of several probes is demonstrated by dot blot hybridization.

  6. Binding of tRNA to the ribosomal A and P sites protects two distinct sets of nucleotides in 16 S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Moazed, D; Noller, H F

    1990-01-05

    Transfer RNA protects a characteristic set of bases in 16 S rRNA from chemical probes when it binds to ribosomes. We used several criteria, based on construction of well-characterized in vitro ribosome-tRNA complexes, to assign these proteins to A or P-site binding. All of these approaches lead to similar conclusions. In the A site, tRNA caused protection of G529, G530, A1492 and A1493 (strongly), and A1408 and G1494 (weakly). In the P site, the protected bases are G693, A794, C795, G926 and G1401 (strong), and A532, G966, G1338 and G1339 (weak). In contrast to what is observed for 23 S rRNA, blocking the release of EF-Tu.GDP from the ribosome by kirromycin has no detectable effect on the protection of bases in 16 S rRNA.

  7. Ribosomal RNA sequence suggest microsporidia are extremely ancient eukaryotes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vossbrinck, C. R.; Maddox, J. V.; Friedman, S.; Debrunner-Vossbrinck, B. A.; Woese, C. R.

    1987-01-01

    A comparative sequence analysis of the 18S small subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA) of the microsporidium Vairimorpha necatrix is presented. The results show that this rRNA sequence is more unlike those of other eukaryotes than any known eukaryote rRNA sequence. It is concluded that the lineage leading to microsporidia branched very early from that leading to other eukaryotes.

  8. Ribosomal RNA sequence suggest microsporidia are extremely ancient eukaryotes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vossbrinck, C. R.; Maddox, J. V.; Friedman, S.; Debrunner-Vossbrinck, B. A.; Woese, C. R.

    1987-01-01

    A comparative sequence analysis of the 18S small subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA) of the microsporidium Vairimorpha necatrix is presented. The results show that this rRNA sequence is more unlike those of other eukaryotes than any known eukaryote rRNA sequence. It is concluded that the lineage leading to microsporidia branched very early from that leading to other eukaryotes.

  9. Cut in translation: ribosome-dependent mRNA decay.

    PubMed

    Lalaouna, David; Massé, Eric

    2017-05-02

    Transcription and translation are two complex mechanisms that are tightly coupled in prokaryotic cells. Even before the completion of transcription, ribosomes attach to the nascent mRNA and initiate protein synthesis. Remarkably, recent publications have indicated an association between translation and decay of certain mRNAs. In this issue of The EMBO Journal, Leroy et al (2017) depicts a fascinating mechanism of mRNA degradation, which involves the ribosome-associated ribonuclease Rae1 in Bacillus subtilis In a translation-dependent manner, Rae1 binds the ribosomal aminoacylation (A)-site and cleaves between specific codons of the targeted mRNA. © 2017 The Authors.

  10. Ribosomal RNA characterization in the leech Hirudo medicinalis.

    PubMed

    Macchi, M; Durante, M; Bernardi, R; Traina, G

    2008-09-01

    In the present study the ribosomal RNA of the leech Hirudo medicinalis has been characterized at the aim of identifying possible analogies with other invertebrates. Upon electrophoresis on denaturating gels, ribosomal RNA fraction of H. medicinalis exhibited a remarkable thermal instability by dissociating into two hydrogen-bonded components when heated at 60 degrees C, at variance with the behaviour of the rat rRNA, which does not show this process. This result suggests a functional role in leech ribosome organisation that requires deeper structural studies.

  11. The three-dimensional structure of the RNA-binding domain of ribosomal protein L2; a protein at the peptidyl transferase center of the ribosome.

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, A; Nakashima, T; Taniguchi, M; Hosaka, H; Kimura, M; Tanaka, I

    1999-01-01

    Ribosomal protein L2 is the largest protein component in the ribosome. It is located at or near the peptidyl transferase center and has been a prime candidate for the peptidyl transferase activity. It binds directly to 23S rRNA and plays a crucial role in its assembly. The three-dimensional structure of the RNA-binding domain of L2 from Bacillus stearothermophilus has been determined at 2.3 A resolution by X-ray crystallography using the selenomethionyl MAD method. The RNA-binding domain of L2 consists of two recurring motifs of approximately 70 residues each. The N-terminal domain (positions 60-130) is homologous to the OB-fold, and the C-terminal domain (positions 131-201) is homologous to the SH3-like barrel. Residues Arg86 and Arg155, which have been identified by mutation experiments to be involved in the 23S rRNA binding, are located at the gate of the interface region between the two domains. The molecular architecture suggests how this important protein has evolved from the ancient nucleic acid-binding proteins to create a 23S rRNA-binding domain in the very remote past. PMID:10075918

  12. Arabidopsis protein arginine methyltransferase 3 is required for ribosome biogenesis by affecting precursor ribosomal RNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Runlai; Liu, Chunyan; Ahmad, Ayaz; Zhang, Yong; Lu, Falong; Cao, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a fundamental and tightly regulated cellular process, including synthesis, processing, and assembly of rRNAs with ribosomal proteins. Protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) have been implicated in many important biological processes, such as ribosome biogenesis. Two alternative precursor rRNA (pre-rRNA) processing pathways coexist in yeast and mammals; however, how PRMT affects ribosome biogenesis remains largely unknown. Here we show that Arabidopsis PRMT3 (AtPRMT3) is required for ribosome biogenesis by affecting pre-rRNA processing. Disruption of AtPRMT3 results in pleiotropic developmental defects, imbalanced polyribosome profiles, and aberrant pre-rRNA processing. We further identify an alternative pre-rRNA processing pathway in Arabidopsis and demonstrate that AtPRMT3 is required for the balance of these two pathways to promote normal growth and development. Our work uncovers a previously unidentified function of PRMT in posttranscriptional regulation of rRNA, revealing an extra layer of complexity in the regulation of ribosome biogenesis. PMID:25352672

  13. Impact of P-Site tRNA and Antibiotics on Ribosome Mediated Protein Folding: Studies Using the Escherichia coli Ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Surojit; Pathak, Bani Kumar; Ray, Sutapa; Barat, Chandana

    2014-01-01

    Background The ribosome, which acts as a platform for mRNA encoded polypeptide synthesis, is also capable of assisting in folding of polypeptide chains. The peptidyl transferase center (PTC) that catalyzes peptide bond formation resides in the domain V of the 23S rRNA of the bacterial ribosome. Proper positioning of the 3′ –CCA ends of the A- and P-site tRNAs via specific interactions with the nucleotides of the PTC are crucial for peptidyl transferase activity. This RNA domain is also the center for ribosomal chaperoning activity. The unfolded polypeptide chains interact with the specific nucleotides of the PTC and are released in a folding competent form. In vitro transcribed RNA corresponding to this domain (bDV RNA) also displays chaperoning activity. Results The present study explores the effects of tRNAs, antibiotics that are A- and P-site PTC substrate analogs (puromycin and blasticidin) and macrolide antibiotics (erythromycin and josamycin) on the chaperoning ability of the E. coli ribosome and bDV RNA. Our studies using mRNA programmed ribosomes show that a tRNA positioned at the P-site effectively inhibits the ribosome's chaperoning function. We also show that the antibiotic blasticidin (that mimics the interaction between 3′–CCA end of P/P-site tRNA with the PTC) is more effective in inhibiting ribosome and bDV RNA chaperoning ability than either puromycin or the macrolide antibiotics. Mutational studies of the bDV RNA could identify the nucleotides U2585 and G2252 (both of which interact with P-site tRNA) to be important for its chaperoning ability. Conclusion Both protein synthesis and their proper folding are crucial for maintenance of a functional cellular proteome. The PTC of the ribosome is attributed with both these abilities. The silencing of the chaperoning ability of the ribosome in the presence of P-site bound tRNA might be a way to segregate these two important functions. PMID:25000563

  14. RNA tertiary interactions in the large ribosomal subunit: The A-minor motif

    SciTech Connect

    Nissen, Poul; Ippolito, Joseph A.; Ban, Nenad; Moore, Peter B.; Steitz, Thomas A.

    2009-10-07

    Analysis of the 2.4-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the large ribosomal subunit from Haloarcula marismortui reveals the existence of an abundant and ubiquitous structural motif that stabilizes RNA tertiary and quaternary structures. This motif is termed the A-minor motif, because it involves the insertion of the smooth, minor groove edges of adenines into the minor groove of neighboring helices, preferentially at C-G base pairs, where they form hydrogen bonds with one or both of the 2' OHs of those pairs. A-minor motifs stabilize contacts between RNA helices, interactions between loops and helices, and the conformations of junctions and tight turns. The interactions between the 3' terminal adenine of tRNAs bound in either the A site or the P site with 23S rRNA are examples of functionally significant A-minor interactions. The A-minor motif is by far the most abundant tertiary structure interaction in the large ribosomal subunit; 186 adenines in 23S and 5S rRNA participate, 68 of which are conserved. It may prove to be the universally most important long-range interaction in large RNA structures.

  15. Model of ribosome translation and mRNA unwinding.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ping

    2013-05-01

    A ribosome is an enzyme that catalyzes translation of the genetic information encoded in messenger RNA (mRNA) into proteins. Besides translation through the single-stranded mRNA, the ribosome is also able to translate through the duplex region of mRNA via unwinding the duplex. Here, based on our proposed ribosome translation model, we study analytically the dynamics of Escherichia coli ribosome translation through the duplex region of mRNA, and compare with the available single molecule experimental data. It is shown that the ribosome uses only one active mechanism (mechanical unwinding), rather than two active mechanisms (open-state stabilization and mechanical unwinding), as proposed before, to unwind the duplex. The reduced rate of translation through the duplex region is due to the occurrence of futile transitions, which are induced by the energy barrier from the duplex unwinding to the forward translocation along the single-stranded mRNA. Moreover, we also present predicted results of the average translation rate versus the external force acting on the ribosome translating through the duplex region and through the single-stranded region of mRNA, which can be easily tested by future experiments.

  16. Evolution of the plastid ribosomal RNA operon in a nongreen parasitic plant: accelerated sequence evolution, altered promoter structure, and tRNA pseudogenes.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, K H; Katz-Downie, D S; Morden, C W; Palmer, J D

    1992-04-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a 7.4 kb region containing the entire plastid ribosomal RNA operon of the nongreen parasitic plant Epifagus virginiana has been determined. Analysis of the sequence indicates that all four rRNA genes are intact and almost certainly functional. In contrast, the split genes for tRNA(Ile) and tRNA(Ala) present in the 16S-23S rRNA spacer region have become pseudogenes, and deletion upstream of the 16S rRNA gene has removed a tRNA(Val) gene and most of the promoter region for the rRNA operon. The rate of nucleotide substitution in 16S and 23S rRNAs is several times higher in Epifagus than in tobacco, a related photosynthetic plant. Possible reasons for this, including relaxed translational constraints, are discussed.

  17. Translating Ribosomes Inhibit Poliovirus Negative-Strand RNA Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Barton, David J.; Morasco, B. Joan; Flanegan, James B.

    1999-01-01

    Poliovirus has a single-stranded RNA genome of positive polarity that serves two essential functions at the start of the viral replication cycle in infected cells. First, it is translated to synthesize viral proteins and, second, it is copied by the viral polymerase to synthesize negative-strand RNA. We investigated these two reactions by using HeLa S10 in vitro translation-RNA replication reactions. Preinitiation RNA replication complexes were isolated from these reactions and then used to measure the sequential synthesis of negative- and positive-strand RNAs in the presence of different protein synthesis inhibitors. Puromycin was found to stimulate RNA replication overall. In contrast, RNA replication was inhibited by diphtheria toxin, cycloheximide, anisomycin, and ricin A chain. Dose-response experiments showed that precisely the same concentration of a specific drug was required to inhibit protein synthesis and to either stimulate or inhibit RNA replication. This suggested that the ability of these drugs to affect RNA replication was linked to their ability to alter the normal clearance of translating ribosomes from the input viral RNA. Consistent with this idea was the finding that the protein synthesis inhibitors had no measurable effect on positive-strand synthesis in normal RNA replication complexes. In marked contrast, negative-strand synthesis was stimulated by puromycin and was inhibited by cycloheximide. Puromycin causes polypeptide chain termination and induces the dissociation of polyribosomes from mRNA. Cycloheximide and other inhibitors of polypeptide chain elongation “freeze” ribosomes on mRNA and prevent the normal clearance of ribosomes from viral RNA templates. Therefore, it appears that the poliovirus polymerase was not able to dislodge translating ribosomes from viral RNA templates and mediate the switch from translation to negative-strand synthesis. Instead, the initiation of negative-strand synthesis appears to be coordinately regulated

  18. Database on the structure of large ribosomal subunit RNA.

    PubMed Central

    De Rijk, P; Van de Peer, Y; Chapelle, S; De Wachter, R

    1994-01-01

    A database on large ribosomal subunit RNA is made available. It contains 258 sequences. It provides sequence, alignment and secondary structure information in computer-readable formats. Files can be obtained using ftp. PMID:7524023

  19. Ribosomal RNA methylation in Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli: effect of the "MLS" (erythromycin resistance) methylase.

    PubMed

    Thakker-Varia, S; Ranzini, A C; Dubin, D T

    1985-09-01

    Classical acquired resistance to erythromycin in Staphylococcus aureus ("MLS," or macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin, resistance) was shown by Weisblum and colleagues to be a direct consequence of the conversion of one or more adenosine residues of 23S rRNA, within the subsequence(s) GA3G, to N6-dimethyladenosine (m62A). The methylation reaction is effected by a class of methylase, whose genes are typically plasmid- or transposon-associated, and whose synthesis is inducible by erythromycin. Using a recently obtained clinical MLS isolate of S. aureus, we have further defined the methylation locus as YGG X m62A X AAGAC; and have shown that this subsequence occurs once in the 23S RNA and that it is essentially completely methylated in all copies of 23S RNA that accumulate in induced cultures. Similar findings were obtained with laboratory S. aureus strains containing two well-characterized evolutionary variants (ermB, ermC) of MLS methylase genes. Analyses of a strain of E. coli containing the ermC gene indicated that the specificity of the methylase gene was unchanged, but that its expression was muted. Even after prolonged periods of induction, the strain manifested only partial resistance to erythromycin, and only about one-third of the copies of the MLS subsequence were methylated in such "induced" cultures. Since the E. coli 23S RNA sequence is known in its entirety, localization of the MLS subsequence is in this case unambiguous; as inferred by homology arguments applied earlier to the S. aureus data, the subsequence is in a highly conserved region of 23S RNA considered to contribute to the peptidyl transferase center of the ribosome.

  20. Sequence variation of the 16S to 23S rRNA spacer region in Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Christensen, H; Møller, P L; Vogensen, F K; Olsen, J E

    2000-01-01

    The possibility for identification of Salmonella enterica serotypes by sequence analysis of the 16S to 23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer was investigated by direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction-amplified DNA from all operons simultaneously in a collection of 25 strains of 18 different serotypes of S. enterica, and by sequencing individual cloned operons from a single strain. It was only possible to determine the first 117 bases upstream from the 23S rRNA gene by direct sequencing because of variation between the rrn operons. Comparison of sequences from this region allowed separation of only 15 out of the 18 serotypes investigated and was not specific even at the subspecies level of S. enterica. To determine the differences between internal transcribed spacers in more detail, the individual rrn operons of strain JEO 197, serotype IV 43:z4,z23:-, were cloned and sequenced. The strain contained four short internal transcribed spacer fragments of 382-384 bases in length, which were 98.4-99.7% similar to each other and three long fragments of 505 bases with 98.0-99.8% similarity. The study demonstrated a higher degree of interbacterial variation than intrabacterial variation between operons for serotypes of S. enterica.

  1. Identification of the sites of action of SrmB, a DEAD-box RNA helicase involved in Escherichia coli ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Proux, Florence; Dreyfus, Marc; Iost, Isabelle

    2011-10-01

    DEAD-box RNA-dependent ATPases are ubiquitous enzymes that participate in nearly all processes involving RNA, but their detailed molecular functions remain generally unknown. SrmB, one of the five Escherichia coli DEAD-box proteins, participates in the assembly of the large ribosomal subunit notably by facilitating the incorporation of L13, one of the ribosomal proteins that bind 23S rRNA earliest. Previously, we showed that SrmB is tethered to nascent ribosome through interactions with L4, L24 and the region from domain I of 23S rRNA that binds them. To identify the sites of action of SrmB, we have characterized rRNA mutations that bypass SrmB requirement. Five of them affect the same position from two repeated heptanucleotides in domain II of 23S rRNA, whereas two others affect a complementary hexanucleotide in 5S rRNA. Thus the sites of action of SrmB differ from its tethering site. In the mature ribosome, one of the heptanucleotides participates in a highly compact structure that contacts L13, the '1024 G-ribo wrench'. In addition, we have observed that the assembly defect of ΔsrmB cells worsens as rRNA synthesis increases. Based on these results, we propose two non-exclusive scenarios for the role of SrmB in ribosome assembly. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Epigenetic engineering of ribosomal RNA genes enhances protein production.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Raffaella; Lienemann, Philipp; Fussenegger, Martin

    2009-08-14

    Selection of mammalian high-producer cell lines remains a major challenge for the biopharmaceutical manufacturing industry. Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes encode the major component of the ribosome but many rRNA gene copies are not transcribed due to epigenetic silencing by the nucleolar remodelling complex (NoRC) [6], which may limit the cell's full production capacity. Here we show that the knockdown of TIP5, a subunit of NoRC, decreases the number of silent rRNA genes, upregulates rRNA transcription, enhances ribosome synthesis and increases production of recombinant proteins. However, general enhancement of rRNA transcription rate did not stimulate protein synthesis. Our data demonstrates that the number of transcriptionally competent rRNA genes limits efficient ribosome synthesis. Epigenetic engineering of ribosomal RNA genes offers new possibilities for improving biopharmaceutical manufacturing and provides novel insights into the complex regulatory network which governs the translation machinery in normal cellular processes as well as in pathological conditions like cancer.

  3. Identification to the species level of Lactobacillus isolated in probiotic prospecting studies of human, animal or food origin by 16S-23S rRNA restriction profiling

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, João Luiz S; Mota, Rodrigo M; Horta, Maria F; Teixeira, Santuza MR; Neumann, Elisabeth; Nicoli, Jacques R; Nunes, Álvaro C

    2005-01-01

    Background The accurate identification of Lactobacillus and other co-isolated bacteria during microbial ecological studies of ecosystems such as the human or animal intestinal tracts and food products is a hard task by phenotypic methods requiring additional tests such as protein and/or lipids profiling. Results Bacteria isolated in different probiotic prospecting studies, using de Man, Rogosa and Sharpe medium (MRS), were typed at species level by PCR amplification of 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacers using universal primers that anneal within 16S and 23S genes, followed by restriction digestion analyses of PCR products. The set of enzymes chosen differentiates most species of Lactobacillus genus and also co-isolated bacteria such as Enterococcus, Streptococcus, Weissella, Staphylococcus, and Escherichia species. The in silico predictions of restriction patterns generated by the Lactobacillus shorter spacers digested with 11 restriction enzymes with 6 bp specificities allowed us to distinguish almost all isolates at the species level but not at the subspecies one. Simultaneous theoretical digestions of the three spacers (long, medium and short) with the same set of enzymes provided more complex patterns and allowed us to distinguish the species without purifying and cloning of PCR products. Conclusion Lactobacillus isolates and several other strains of bacteria co-isolated on MRS medium from gastrointestinal ecosystem and fermented food products could be identified using DNA fingerprints generated by restriction endonucleases. The methodology based on amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) is easier, faster and more accurate than the current methodologies based on fermentation profiles, used in most laboratories for the purpose of identification of these bacteria in different prospecting studies. PMID:15788104

  4. Spontaneous Erythromycin Resistance Mutation in a 23S rRNA Gene, rrlA, of the Extreme Thermophile Thermus thermophilus IB-21

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Steven T.; Cate, Jamie H. D.; Dahlberg, Albert E.

    2001-01-01

    Spontaneous, erythromycin-resistant mutants of Thermus thermophilus IB-21 were isolated and found to carry the mutation A2058G in one of two 23S rRNA operons. The heterozygosity of these mutants indicates that A2058G confers a dominant or codominant phenotype in this organism. This mutation provides a valuable tool for the genetic manipulation of the 23S rRNA genes of Thermus. PMID:11418580

  5. Resistance to the macrolide antibiotic tylosin is conferred by single methylations at 23S rRNA nucleotides G748 and A2058 acting in synergy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mingfu; Douthwaite, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    The macrolide antibiotic tylosin has been used extensively in veterinary medicine and exerts potent antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria. Tylosin-synthesizing strains of the Gram-positive bacterium Streptomyces fradiae protect themselves from their own product by differential expression of four resistance determinants, tlrA, tlrB, tlrC, and tlrD. The tlrB and tlrD genes encode methyltransferases that add single methyl groups at 23S rRNA nucleotides G748 and A2058, respectively. Here we show that methylation by neither TlrB nor TlrD is sufficient on its own to give tylosin resistance, and resistance is conferred by the G748 and A2058 methylations acting together in synergy. This synergistic mechanism of resistance is specific for the macrolides tylosin and mycinamycin that possess sugars extending from the 5- and 14-positions of the macrolactone ring and is not observed for macrolides, such as carbomycin, spiramycin, and erythromycin, that have different constellations of sugars. The manner in which the G748 and A2058 methylations coincide with the glycosylation patterns of tylosin and mycinamycin reflects unambiguously how these macrolides fit into their binding site within the bacterial 50S ribosomal subunit. PMID:12417742

  6. Resistance to the macrolide antibiotic tylosin is conferred by single methylations at 23S rRNA nucleotides G748 and A2058 acting in synergy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingfu; Douthwaite, Stephen

    2002-11-12

    The macrolide antibiotic tylosin has been used extensively in veterinary medicine and exerts potent antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria. Tylosin-synthesizing strains of the Gram-positive bacterium Streptomyces fradiae protect themselves from their own product by differential expression of four resistance determinants, tlrA, tlrB, tlrC, and tlrD. The tlrB and tlrD genes encode methyltransferases that add single methyl groups at 23S rRNA nucleotides G748 and A2058, respectively. Here we show that methylation by neither TlrB nor TlrD is sufficient on its own to give tylosin resistance, and resistance is conferred by the G748 and A2058 methylations acting together in synergy. This synergistic mechanism of resistance is specific for the macrolides tylosin and mycinamycin that possess sugars extending from the 5- and 14-positions of the macrolactone ring and is not observed for macrolides, such as carbomycin, spiramycin, and erythromycin, that have different constellations of sugars. The manner in which the G748 and A2058 methylations coincide with the glycosylation patterns of tylosin and mycinamycin reflects unambiguously how these macrolides fit into their binding site within the bacterial 50S ribosomal subunit.

  7. Insights into the structure, function and evolution of the radical-SAM 23S rRNA methyltransferase Cfr that confers antibiotic resistance in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kaminska, Katarzyna H.; Purta, Elzbieta; Hansen, Lykke H.; Bujnicki, Janusz M.; Vester, Birte; Long, Katherine S.

    2010-01-01

    The Cfr methyltransferase confers combined resistance to five classes of antibiotics that bind to the peptidyl tranferase center of bacterial ribosomes by catalyzing methylation of the C-8 position of 23S rRNA nucleotide A2503. The same nucleotide is targeted by the housekeeping methyltransferase RlmN that methylates the C-2 position. Database searches with the Cfr sequence have revealed a large group of closely related sequences from all domains of life that contain the conserved CX3CX2C motif characteristic of radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) enzymes. Phylogenetic analysis of the Cfr/RlmN family suggests that the RlmN subfamily is likely the ancestral form, whereas the Cfr subfamily arose via duplication and horizontal gene transfer. A structural model of Cfr has been calculated and used as a guide for alanine mutagenesis studies that corroborate the model-based predictions of a 4Fe–4S cluster, a SAM molecule coordinated to the iron–sulfur cluster (SAM1) and a SAM molecule that is the putative methyl group donor (SAM2). All mutations at predicted functional sites affect Cfr activity significantly as assayed by antibiotic susceptibility testing and primer extension analysis. The investigation has identified essential amino acids and Cfr variants with altered reaction mechanisms and represents a first step towards understanding the structural basis of Cfr activity. PMID:20007606

  8. Differentiation of Acinetobacter baumannii biotypes by amplification of 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer sequences.

    PubMed

    Garcia, A; Montoya, R; Bello, H; Gonzalez, G; Dominguez, M; Zemelman, R

    1996-01-01

    Isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii (32 strains) from blood samples obtained from patients in five Chilean hospitals were identified and biotyped according to their phenotypic properties. They were also submitted to random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) using eight randomly designed 10-mers and the core sequence of M13 phage (15-mers) as well as amplification of the spacer regions between 16S and 23S genes in the prokaryotic rRNA genetic loci. With some primers, RAPD discriminated between biotypes, whereas with others each isolate showed a particular profile. When amplification of spacer regions was performed, a clear correlation between patterns and biotypes was found. This last technique allowed correct biotyping of clinical isolates. Both genetic methods might be used for the identification of A. baumannii biotypes.

  9. Rapid differentiation of Francisella species and subspecies by fluorescent in situ hybridization targeting the 23S rRNA

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Francisella (F.) tularensis is the causative agent of tularemia. Due to its low infectious dose, ease of dissemination and high case fatality rate, F. tularensis was the subject in diverse biological weapons programs and is among the top six agents with high potential if misused in bioterrorism. Microbiological diagnosis is cumbersome and time-consuming. Methods for the direct detection of the pathogen (immunofluorescence, PCR) have been developed but are restricted to reference laboratories. Results The complete 23S rRNA genes of representative strains of F. philomiragia and all subspecies of F. tularensis were sequenced. Single nucleotide polymorphisms on species and subspecies level were confirmed by partial amplification and sequencing of 24 additional strains. Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH) assays were established using species- and subspecies-specific probes. Different FISH protocols allowed the positive identification of all 4 F. philomiragia strains, and more than 40 F. tularensis strains tested. By combination of different probes, it was possible to differentiate the F. tularensis subspecies holarctica, tularensis, mediasiatica and novicida. No cross reactivity with strains of 71 clinically relevant bacterial species was observed. FISH was also successfully applied to detect different F. tularensis strains in infected cells or tissue samples. In blood culture systems spiked with F. tularensis, bacterial cells of different subspecies could be separated within single samples. Conclusion We could show that FISH targeting the 23S rRNA gene is a rapid and versatile method for the identification and differentiation of F. tularensis isolates from both laboratory cultures and clinical samples. PMID:20205957

  10. A Molecular Titration System Coordinates Ribosomal Protein Gene Transcription with Ribosomal RNA Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Albert, Benjamin; Knight, Britta; Merwin, Jason; Martin, Victoria; Ottoz, Diana; Gloor, Yvonne; Bruzzone, Maria Jessica; Rudner, Adam; Shore, David

    2016-11-17

    Cell growth potential is determined by the rate of ribosome biogenesis, a complex process that requires massive and coordinated transcriptional output. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ribosome biogenesis is highly regulated at the transcriptional level. Although evidence for a system that coordinates ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and ribosomal protein gene (RPG) transcription has been described, the molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we show that an interaction between the RPG transcriptional activator Ifh1 and the rRNA processing factor Utp22 serves to coordinate RPG transcription with that of rRNA. We demonstrate that Ifh1 is rapidly released from RPG promoters by a Utp22-independent mechanism following growth inhibition, but that its long-term dissociation requires Utp22. We present evidence that RNA polymerase I activity inhibits the ability of Utp22 to titrate Ifh1 from RPG promoters and propose that a dynamic Ifh1-Utp22 interaction fine-tunes RPG expression to coordinate RPG and rRNA transcription. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Ribosome-messenger recognition: mRNA target sites for ribosomal protein S1.

    PubMed Central

    Boni, I V; Isaeva, D M; Musychenko, M L; Tzareva, N V

    1991-01-01

    Ribosomal protein S1 is known to play an important role in translational initiation, being directly involved in recognition and binding of mRNAs by 30S ribosomal particles. Using a specially developed procedure based on efficient crosslinking of S1 to mRNA induced by UV irradiation, we have identified S1 binding sites on several phage RNAs in preinitiation complexes. Targets for S1 on Q beta and fr RNAs are localized upstream from the coat protein gene and contain oligo(U)-sequences. In the case of Q beta RNA, this S1 binding site overlaps the S-site for Q beta replicase and the site for S1 binding within a binary complex. It is reasonable that similar U-rich sequences represent S1 binding sites on bacterial mRNAs. To test this idea we have used E. coli ssb mRNA prepared in vitro with the T7 promoter/RNA polymerase system. By the methods of toeprinting, enzymatic footprinting, and UV crosslinking we have shown that binding of the ssb mRNA to 30S ribosomes is S1-dependent. The oligo(U)-sequence preceding the SD domain was found to be the target for S1. We propose that S1 binding sites, represented by pyrimidine-rich sequences upstream from the SD region, serve as determinants involved in recognition of mRNA by the ribosome. Images PMID:2011495

  12. Bayesian prediction of RNA translation from ribosome profiling.

    PubMed

    Malone, Brandon; Atanassov, Ilian; Aeschimann, Florian; Li, Xinping; Großhans, Helge; Dieterich, Christoph

    2017-01-26

    Ribosome profiling via high-throughput sequencing (ribo-seq) is a promising new technique for characterizing the occupancy of ribosomes on messenger RNA (mRNA) at base-pair resolution. The ribosome is responsible for translating mRNA into proteins, so information about its occupancy offers a detailed view of ribosome density and position which could be used to discover new translated open reading frames (ORFs), among other things. In this work, we propose Rp-Bp, an unsupervised Bayesian approach to predict translated ORFs from ribosome profiles. We use state-of-the-art Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques to estimate posterior distributions of the likelihood of translation of each ORF. Hence, an important feature of Rp-Bp is its ability to incorporate and propagate uncertainty in the prediction process. A second novel contribution is automatic Bayesian selection of read lengths and ribosome P-site offsets (BPPS). We empirically demonstrate that our read length selection technique modestly improves sensitivity by identifying more canonical and non-canonical ORFs. Proteomics- and quantitative translation initiation sequencing-based validation verifies the high quality of all of the predictions. Experimental comparison shows that Rp-Bp results in more peptide identifications and proteomics-validated ORF predictions compared to another recent tool for translation prediction.

  13. Bayesian prediction of RNA translation from ribosome profiling

    PubMed Central

    Atanassov, Ilian; Aeschimann, Florian; Li, Xinping; Großhans, Helge

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Ribosome profiling via high-throughput sequencing (ribo-seq) is a promising new technique for characterizing the occupancy of ribosomes on messenger RNA (mRNA) at base-pair resolution. The ribosome is responsible for translating mRNA into proteins, so information about its occupancy offers a detailed view of ribosome density and position which could be used to discover new translated open reading frames (ORFs), among other things. In this work, we propose Rp-Bp, an unsupervised Bayesian approach to predict translated ORFs from ribosome profiles. We use state-of-the-art Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques to estimate posterior distributions of the likelihood of translation of each ORF. Hence, an important feature of Rp-Bp is its ability to incorporate and propagate uncertainty in the prediction process. A second novel contribution is automatic Bayesian selection of read lengths and ribosome P-site offsets (BPPS). We empirically demonstrate that our read length selection technique modestly improves sensitivity by identifying more canonical and non-canonical ORFs. Proteomics- and quantitative translation initiation sequencing-based validation verifies the high quality of all of the predictions. Experimental comparison shows that Rp-Bp results in more peptide identifications and proteomics-validated ORF predictions compared to another recent tool for translation prediction. PMID:28126919

  14. Dynamic relationships between ribosomal conformational and RNA positional changes during ribosomal translocation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ping

    2016-12-01

    Ribosomal translocation catalyzed by EF-G hydrolyzing GTP entails multiple conformational changes of ribosome and positional changes of tRNAs and mRNA in the ribosome. However, the detailed dynamic relations among these changes and EF-G sampling are not clear. Here, based on our proposed pathway of ribosomal translocation, we study theoretically the dynamic relations among these changes exhibited in the single molecule data and those exhibited in the ensemble kinetic data. It is shown that the timing of these changes in the single molecule data and that in the ensemble kinetic data show very different. The theoretical results are in agreement with both the available ensemble kinetic experimental data and the single molecule experimental data.

  15. The binding sites for tRNA on eukaryotic ribosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Leader, D P; Machray, G C

    1975-01-01

    We have studied the non-enzymic binding of phe-tRNA to ribosomes from rat liver using deacylated tRNA to inhibit binding to the P-site and puromycin (5 x 10-minus3M) to inhibit binding to the A-site. We conclude that at a low concentration of magnesium ions (10mM) phe-tRNA is bound only at the A-site of 80S irbosomes, whereas at a high concentration of magnesium ions (40mM) phe-tRNA is also bound at the P-site. Studies with edeine indicate that, during non-enzymic binding of phe-tRNA, eukaryotic ribosomes (in contrast to prokarotic ribosomes) have the A-site of the 60S subunit and the initiation site of the 40S subunit juxtaposed. This may account for the differences observed, in formation of diphenylalanyl-tRNA and phenylalanyl-puromycin, between phe-tRNA bound non-enzymically to the P-sites of eukaryotic and prokaryotic ribosomes. PMID:1098024

  16. The binding sites for tRNA on eukaryotic ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Leader, D P; Machray, G C

    1975-07-01

    We have studied the non-enzymic binding of phe-tRNA to ribosomes from rat liver using deacylated tRNA to inhibit binding to the P-site and puromycin (5 x 10-minus3M) to inhibit binding to the A-site. We conclude that at a low concentration of magnesium ions (10mM) phe-tRNA is bound only at the A-site of 80S irbosomes, whereas at a high concentration of magnesium ions (40mM) phe-tRNA is also bound at the P-site. Studies with edeine indicate that, during non-enzymic binding of phe-tRNA, eukaryotic ribosomes (in contrast to prokarotic ribosomes) have the A-site of the 60S subunit and the initiation site of the 40S subunit juxtaposed. This may account for the differences observed, in formation of diphenylalanyl-tRNA and phenylalanyl-puromycin, between phe-tRNA bound non-enzymically to the P-sites of eukaryotic and prokaryotic ribosomes.

  17. Protein-guided RNA dynamics during early ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hajin; Abeysirigunawarden, Sanjaya C; Chen, Ke; Mayerle, Megan; Ragunathan, Kaushik; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida; Ha, Taekjip; Woodson, Sarah A

    2014-02-20

    The assembly of 30S ribosomes requires the precise addition of 20 proteins to the 16S ribosomal RNA. How early binding proteins change the ribosomal RNA structure so that later proteins may join the complex is poorly understood. Here we use single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to observe real-time encounters between Escherichia coli ribosomal protein S4 and the 16S 5' domain RNA at an early stage of 30S assembly. Dynamic initial S4-RNA complexes pass through a stable non-native intermediate before converting to the native complex, showing that non-native structures can offer a low free-energy path to protein-RNA recognition. Three-colour FRET and molecular dynamics simulations reveal how S4 changes the frequency and direction of RNA helix motions, guiding a conformational switch that enforces the hierarchy of protein addition. These protein-guided dynamics offer an alternative explanation for induced fit in RNA-protein complexes.

  18. Protein-guided RNA dynamics during early ribosome assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hajin; Abeysirigunawarden, Sanjaya C.; Chen, Ke; Mayerle, Megan; Ragunathan, Kaushik; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida; Ha, Taekjip; Woodson, Sarah A.

    2014-02-01

    The assembly of 30S ribosomes requires the precise addition of 20 proteins to the 16S ribosomal RNA. How early binding proteins change the ribosomal RNA structure so that later proteins may join the complex is poorly understood. Here we use single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to observe real-time encounters between Escherichia coli ribosomal protein S4 and the 16S 5' domain RNA at an early stage of 30S assembly. Dynamic initial S4-RNA complexes pass through a stable non-native intermediate before converting to the native complex, showing that non-native structures can offer a low free-energy path to protein-RNA recognition. Three-colour FRET and molecular dynamics simulations reveal how S4 changes the frequency and direction of RNA helix motions, guiding a conformational switch that enforces the hierarchy of protein addition. These protein-guided dynamics offer an alternative explanation for induced fit in RNA-protein complexes.

  19. Regulation of mammalian ribosomal gene transcription by RNA polymerase I.

    PubMed

    Grummt, I

    1999-01-01

    All cells, from prokaryotes to vertebrates, synthesize vast amounts of ribosomal RNA to produce the several million new ribosomes per generation that are required to maintain the protein synthetic capacity of the daughter cells. Ribosomal gene (rDNA) transcription is governed by RNA polymerase I (Pol I) assisted by a dedicated set of transcription factors that mediate the specificity of transcription and are the targets of the pleiotrophic pathways the cell uses to adapt rRNA synthesis to cell growth. In the past few years we have begun to understand the specific functions of individual factors involved in rDNA transcription and to elucidate on a molecular level how transcriptional regulation is achieved. This article reviews our present knowledge of the molecular mechanism of rDNA transcriptional regulation.

  20. Structure and RNA recognition of ribosome assembly factor Utp30.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianfei; Zhu, Xing; Ye, Keqiong

    2017-09-26

    The 90S pre-ribosomes are gigantic early assembly intermediates of small ribosomal subunits. Cryo-EM structures of 90S were recently determined, but many of its components have not been accurately modelled. Here we determine the crystal structure of yeast Utp30, a ribosomal L1 domain-containing protein in 90S, at 2.65 Å resolution, revealing a classic two-domain fold. The structure of Utp30 fits well into the cryo-EM density of 90S, confirming its previously assigned location. Utp30 binds to the rearranged helix 41 of 18S rRNA and helix 4 of 5' external transcribed spacer in 90S. Comparison of RNA-binding modes of different L1 domains illustrates that they consistently recognize a short RNA duplex with the concaved surface of domain I, but are versatile in RNA recognition outside the core interface. Cic1 is a paralog of Utp30 associating with large subunit pre-ribosomes. Utp30 and Cic1 share similar RNA binding mode, suggesting that their distinct functions may be executed by a single protein in other organisms. Deletion of Utp30 does not affect the composition of 90S. The nonessential role of Utp30 could be ascribed to its peripheral localization and redundant interactions in 90S. Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  1. Evaluation of ribosomal RNA removal protocols for Salmonella RNA-Seq projects

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Next generation sequencing is a powerful technology and its application to sequencing entire RNA populations of food-borne pathogens will provide valuable insights. A problem unique to prokaryotic RNA-Seq is the massive abundance of ribosomal RNA. Unlike eukaryotic messenger RNA (mRNA), bacterial ...

  2. Arabidopsis small nucleolar RNA monitors the efficient pre-rRNA processing during ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Pan; Wang, Yuqiu; Qin, Nanxun; Wang, Feng; Wang, Jia; Deng, Xing Wang; Zhu, Danmeng

    2016-10-18

    Ribosome production in eukaryotes requires the complex and precise coordination of several hundred assembly factors, including many small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs). However, at present, the distinct role of key snoRNAs in ribosome biogenesis remains poorly understood in higher plants. Here we report that a previously uncharacterized C (RUGAUGA)/D (CUGA) type snoRNA, HIDDEN TREASURE 2 (HID2), acts as an important regulator of ribosome biogenesis through a snoRNA-rRNA interaction. Nucleolus-localized HID2 is actively expressed in Arabidopsis proliferative tissues, whereas defects in HID2 cause a series of developmental defects reminiscent of ribosomal protein mutants. HID2 associates with the precursor 45S rRNA and promotes the efficiency and accuracy of pre-rRNA processing. Intriguingly, disrupting HID2 in Arabidopsis appears to impair the integrity of 27SB, a key pre-rRNA intermediate that generates 25S and 5.8S rRNA and is known to be vital for the synthesis of the 60S large ribosomal subunit and also produces an imbalanced ribosome profile. Finally, we demonstrate that the antisense-box of HID2 is both functionally essential and highly conserved in eukaryotes. Overall, our study reveals the vital and possibly conserved role of a snoRNA in monitoring the efficiency of pre-rRNA processing during ribosome biogenesis.

  3. Cooperation between translating ribosomes and RNA polymerase in transcription elongation.

    PubMed

    Proshkin, Sergey; Rahmouni, A Rachid; Mironov, Alexander; Nudler, Evgeny

    2010-04-23

    During transcription of protein-coding genes, bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) is closely followed by a ribosome that translates the newly synthesized transcript. Our in vivo measurements show that the overall elongation rate of transcription is tightly controlled by the rate of translation. Acceleration and deceleration of a ribosome result in corresponding changes in the speed of RNAP. Moreover, we found an inverse correlation between the number of rare codons in a gene, which delay ribosome progression, and the rate of transcription. The stimulating effect of a ribosome on RNAP is achieved by preventing its spontaneous backtracking, which enhances the pace and also facilitates readthrough of roadblocks in vivo. Such a cooperative mechanism ensures that the transcriptional yield is always adjusted to translational needs at different genes and under various growth conditions.

  4. A minimal ribosomal RNA: sequence and secondary structure of the 9S kinetoplast ribosomal RNA from Leishmania tarentolae.

    PubMed Central

    de la Cruz, V F; Lake, J A; Simpson, A M; Simpson, L

    1985-01-01

    The portion of the Leishmania tarentolae kinetoplast maxicircle DNA encoding the 9S RNA gene was sequenced, and the 5' and 3' ends of the transcript were determined. A secondary structure for the 9S RNA was determined based on the Escherichia coli 16S model. The 610-nucleotide 9S RNA exhibits a minimal secondary structure in which all four domains of the E. coli 16S structure are preserved. Within domains, however, some stems and loops have been greatly reduced or eliminated entirely. It is presumed that these reduced domains represent the minimal essential small ribosomal RNA secondary structures necessary for a functional ribosome. Alignment of the L. tarentolae 9S rRNA sequence with the published Trypanosoma brucei 9S rRNA sequence shows a nucleotide similarity of 84% and a transversion/transition ratio of 1.66. Images PMID:3856267

  5. Ribosomal RNA: a key to phylogeny

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, G. J.; Woese, C. R.

    1993-01-01

    As molecular phylogeny increasingly shapes our understanding of organismal relationships, no molecule has been applied to more questions than have ribosomal RNAs. We review this role of the rRNAs and some of the insights that have been gained from them. We also offer some of the practical considerations in extracting the phylogenetic information from the sequences. Finally, we stress the importance of comparing results from multiple molecules, both as a method for testing the overall reliability of the organismal phylogeny and as a method for more broadly exploring the history of the genome.

  6. Ribosomal RNA: a key to phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Olsen, G J; Woese, C R

    1993-01-01

    As molecular phylogeny increasingly shapes our understanding of organismal relationships, no molecule has been applied to more questions than have ribosomal RNAs. We review this role of the rRNAs and some of the insights that have been gained from them. We also offer some of the practical considerations in extracting the phylogenetic information from the sequences. Finally, we stress the importance of comparing results from multiple molecules, both as a method for testing the overall reliability of the organismal phylogeny and as a method for more broadly exploring the history of the genome.

  7. Reverse Translocation of tRNA in the Ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Shinichiro; Walker, Sarah E.; Fredrick, Kurt

    2009-01-01

    Summary A widely held view is that directional movement of tRNA in the ribosome is determined by an intrinsic mechanism and driven thermodynamically by transpeptidation. Here, we show that, in certain ribosomal complexes, the pretranslocation (PRE) state is thermodynamically favored over the posttranslocation (POST) state. Spontaneous and efficient conversion from the POST to PRE state is observed when EF-G is depleted from ribosomes in the POST state or when tRNA is added to the E site of ribosomes containing P-site tRNA. In the latter assay, the rate of tRNA movement is increased by streptomycin and neomycin, decreased by tetracycline, and not affected by the acylation state of the tRNA. In one case, we provide evidence that complex conversion occurs by reverse translocation (i.e., direct movement of the tRNAs from the E and P sites to the P and A sites, respectively). These findings have important implications for the energetics of translocation. PMID:17189194

  8. Arabidopsis small nucleolar RNA monitors the efficient pre-rRNA processing during ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Pan; Wang, Yuqiu; Qin, Nanxun; Wang, Feng; Wang, Jia; Deng, Xing Wang; Zhu, Danmeng

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome production in eukaryotes requires the complex and precise coordination of several hundred assembly factors, including many small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs). However, at present, the distinct role of key snoRNAs in ribosome biogenesis remains poorly understood in higher plants. Here we report that a previously uncharacterized C (RUGAUGA)/D (CUGA) type snoRNA, HIDDEN TREASURE 2 (HID2), acts as an important regulator of ribosome biogenesis through a snoRNA–rRNA interaction. Nucleolus-localized HID2 is actively expressed in Arabidopsis proliferative tissues, whereas defects in HID2 cause a series of developmental defects reminiscent of ribosomal protein mutants. HID2 associates with the precursor 45S rRNA and promotes the efficiency and accuracy of pre-rRNA processing. Intriguingly, disrupting HID2 in Arabidopsis appears to impair the integrity of 27SB, a key pre-rRNA intermediate that generates 25S and 5.8S rRNA and is known to be vital for the synthesis of the 60S large ribosomal subunit and also produces an imbalanced ribosome profile. Finally, we demonstrate that the antisense-box of HID2 is both functionally essential and highly conserved in eukaryotes. Overall, our study reveals the vital and possibly conserved role of a snoRNA in monitoring the efficiency of pre-rRNA processing during ribosome biogenesis. PMID:27708161

  9. A new RNA-RNA crosslinking reagent and its application to ribosomal 5S RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, R; Garrett, R A

    1978-01-01

    The synthesis of a new RNA specific bifunctional crosslinking reagent, 1.4-phenyl-diglyoxal, is described which reacts exclusively with guanosines. The properties of the crosslinked products enabled us to develop a straightforward method for identifying the reacted nucleotides. Results obtained with ribosomal 5S RNA of Escherichia coli demonstrate the formation of an intramolecular crosslink between guanosine-2 and guanosine-112 in the stem region. Images PMID:724507

  10. Positive modulation of RNA polymerase III transcription by ribosomal proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Dieci, Giorgio; Carpentieri, Andrea; Amoresano, Angela; Ottonello, Simone

    2009-02-06

    A yeast nuclear fraction of unknown composition, named TFIIIE, was reported previously to enhance transcription of tRNA and 5S rRNA genes in vitro. We show that TFIIIE activity co-purifies with a specific subset of ribosomal proteins (RPs) which, as revealed by chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis, generally interact with tRNA and 5S rRNA genes, but not with a Pol II-specific promoter. Only Rpl6Ap and Rpl6Bp, among the tested RPs, were found associated to a TATA-containing tRNA{sup Ile}(TAT) gene. The RPL6A gene also emerged as a strong multicopy suppressor of a conditional mutation in the basal transcription factor TFIIIC, while RPL26A and RPL14A behaved as weak suppressors. The data delineate a novel extra-ribosomal role for one or a few RPs which, by influencing 5S rRNA and tRNA synthesis, could play a key role in the coordinate regulation of the different sub-pathways required for ribosome biogenesis and functionality.

  11. Protein-guided RNA dynamics during early ribosome assembly

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hajin; Abeysirigunawardena, Sanjaya C.; Chen, Ke; Mayerle, Megan; Ragunathan, Kaushik; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida; Ha, Taekjip; Woodson, Sarah A.

    2014-01-01

    The assembly of 30S ribosomes requires the precise addition of 20 proteins to the 16S ribosomal RNA. How early binding proteins change the rRNA structure so that later proteins may join the complex is poorly understood. Here we use single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) to observe real-time encounters between ribosomal protein S4 and the 16S 5′ domain RNA at an early stage of 30S assembly. Dynamic initial S4-RNA complexes pass through a stable non-native intermediate before converting to the native complex, showing that non-native structures can offer a low free energy path to protein-RNA recognition. Three-color FRET and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations reveal how S4 changes the frequency and direction of RNA helix motions, guiding a conformational switch that enforces the hierarchy of protein addition. This protein-guided dynamics offers an alternative explanation for induced fit in RNA-protein complexes. PMID:24522531

  12. Clarithromycin resistance and 23S rRNA gene point mutations of Helicobacter pylori infection in children.

    PubMed

    Çağan-Appak, Yeliz; Gazi, Hörü; Ayhan, Semin; Cengiz-Özyurt, Beyhan; Kurutepe, Semra; Kasırga, Erhun

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate Helicobacter pylori with clarithromycin resistant genotypes in Manisa region, Turkey. Two hundred patients, who received diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection histopathologically, were included. The sex, age and endoscopy indications of the patients were recorded. Polymerase chain reaction method was applied to determine the clarithromycin resistance rate and resistance genotypes at the histologic sections prepared from gastric biopsies that had been embedded in paraffin after fixation by formalin. Helicobacter pylori resistance to clarithromycin was found in 19/200 (9.5%) patients. 10/19 (52.6%) of these clarithromycin-resistant patients had A2143G mutation and 9/19 (47.4%) had A2142G mutation. A2142C mutation on 23S rRNA gene was not detected for any of the patients. Clarithromycin can be used as a first step treatment in the eradication of Helicobacter pylori for the children in our region; if the treatment fails for some patients, clarithromycin resistance, especially A2143G and A2142G mutations should be considered.

  13. Clinical and Microbiological Aspects of Linezolid Resistance Mediated by the cfr Gene Encoding a 23S rRNA Methyltransferase▿

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Cesar A.; Vallejo, Martha; Reyes, Jinnethe; Panesso, Diana; Moreno, Jaime; Castañeda, Elizabeth; Villegas, Maria V.; Murray, Barbara E.; Quinn, John P.

    2008-01-01

    The cfr (chloramphenicol-florfenicol resistance) gene encodes a 23S rRNA methyltransferase that confers resistance to linezolid. Detection of linezolid resistance was evaluated in the first cfr-carrying human hospital isolate of linezolid and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (designated MRSA CM-05) by dilution and diffusion methods (including Etest). The presence of cfr was investigated in isolates of staphylococci colonizing the patient's household contacts and clinical isolates recovered from patients in the same unit where MRSA CM-05 was isolated. Additionally, 68 chloramphenicol-resistant Colombian MRSA isolates recovered from hospitals between 2001 and 2004 were screened for the presence of the cfr gene. In addition to erm(B), the erm(A) gene was also detected in CM-05. The isolate belonged to sequence type 5 and carried staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec type I. We were unable to detect the cfr gene in any of the human staphylococci screened (either clinical or colonizing isolates). Agar and broth dilution methods detected linezolid resistance in CM-05. However, the Etest and disk diffusion methods failed to detect resistance after 24 h of incubation. Oxazolidinone resistance mediated by the cfr gene is rare, and acquisition by a human isolate appears to be a recent event in Colombia. The detection of cfr-mediated linezolid resistance might be compromised by the use of the disk diffusion or Etest method. PMID:18174304

  14. The Ribosome Holds the RNA Polymerase on Track in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Klaholz, Bruno P

    2017-09-01

    The central dogma of molecular biology comprises two fundamental mechanistic steps of gene expression (transcription and translation), which, in bacteria, are coupled. A recent study provides structural insights into a supercomplex between the RNA polymerase and the ribosome, thus highlighting the synergy between two key macromolecular machineries in the cell. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The path of messenger RNA through the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Yusupova, G Z; Yusupov, M M; Cate, J H; Noller, H F

    2001-07-27

    Using X-ray crystallography, we have directly observed the path of mRNA in the 70S ribosome in Fourier difference maps at 7 A resolution. About 30 nucleotides of the mRNA are wrapped in a groove that encircles the neck of the 30S subunit. The Shine-Dalgarno helix is bound in a large cleft between the head and the back of the platform. At the interface, only about eight nucleotides (-1 to +7), centered on the junction between the A and P codons, are exposed, and bond almost exclusively to 16S rRNA. The mRNA enters the ribosome around position +13 to +15, the location of downstream pseudoknots that stimulate -1 translational frame shifting.

  16. PCR-based method for targeting 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer regions among Vibrio species

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The genus Vibrio is a diverse group of Gram-negative bacteria comprised of 74 species. Furthermore, the genus has and is expected to continue expanding with the addition of several new species annually. Consequently, it is of paramount importance to have a method which is able to reliably and efficiently differentiate the numerous Vibrio species. Results In this study, a novel and rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based intergenic spacer (IGS)-typing system for vibrios was developed that is based on the well-known IGS regions located between the 16S and 23S rRNA genes on the bacterial chromosome. The system was optimized to resolve heteroduplex formation as well as to take advantage of capillary gel electrophoresis technology such that reproducible analyses could be achieved in a rapid manner. System validation was achieved through testing of 69 archetypal Vibrio strains, representing 48 Vibrio species, from which an 'IGS-type' profile database was generated. These data, presented here in several cluster analyses, demonstrated successful differentiation of the 69 type strains showing that this PCR-based fingerprinting method easily discriminates bacterial strains at the species level among Vibrio. Furthermore, testing 36 strains each of V. parahaemolyticus and V. vulnificus, important food borne pathogens, isolated from a variety of geographical locations with the IGS-typing method demonstrated distinct IGS-typing patterns indicative of subspecies divergence in both populations making this technique equally useful for intraspecies differentiation, as well. Conclusion This rapid, reliable and efficient IGS-typing system, especially in combination with 16S rRNA gene sequencing, has the capacity to not only discern and identify vibrios at the species level but, in some cases, at the sub-species level, as well. This procedure is particularly well-suited for preliminary species identification and, lends itself nicely to epidemiological investigations

  17. Use of 16S rRNA, 23S rRNA, and gyrB gene sequence analysis to determine phylogenetic relationships of Bacillus cereus group.

    SciTech Connect

    Bayvkin, S. G.; Lysov, Y. P.; Zakhariev, V.; Kelly, J. J.; Jackman, J.; Stahl, D. A.; Cherni, A.; Engelhardt Inst. of Molecular Biology; Loyola Univ.; Johns Hopkins Univ.; Univ. of Washington

    2004-08-01

    In order to determine if variations in rRNA sequence could be used for discrimination of the members of the Bacillus cereus group, we analyzed 183 16S rRNA and 74 23S rRNA sequences for all species in the B. cereus group. We also analyzed 30 gyrB sequences for B. cereus group strains with published 16S rRNA sequences. Our findings indicated that the three most common species of the B. cereus group, B. cereus, Bacillus thuringiensis, and Bacillus mycoides, were each heterogeneous in all three gene sequences, while all analyzed strains of Bacillus anthracis were found to be homogeneous. Based on analysis of 16S and 23S rRNA sequence variations, the microorganisms within the B. cereus group were divided into seven subgroups, Anthracis, Cereus A and B, Thuringiensis A and B, and Mycoides A and B, and these seven subgroups were further organized into two distinct clusters. This classification of the B. cereus group conflicts with current taxonomic groupings, which are based on phenotypic traits. The presence of B. cereus strains in six of the seven subgroups and the presence of B. thuringiensis strains in three of the subgroups do not support the proposed unification of B. cereus and B. thuringiensis into one species. Analysis of the available phenotypic data for the strains included in this study revealed phenotypic traits that may be characteristic of several of the subgroups. Finally, our results demonstrated that rRNA and gyrB sequences may be used for discriminating B. anthracis from other microorganisms in the B. cereus group.

  18. Use of 16S rRNA, 23S rRNA, and gyrB Gene Sequence Analysis To Determine Phylogenetic Relationships of Bacillus cereus Group Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Bavykin, Sergei G.; Lysov, Yuri P.; Zakhariev, Vladimir; Kelly, John J.; Jackman, Joany; Stahl, David A.; Cherni, Alexey

    2004-01-01

    In order to determine if variations in rRNA sequence could be used for discrimination of the members of the Bacillus cereus group, we analyzed 183 16S rRNA and 74 23S rRNA sequences for all species in the B. cereus group. We also analyzed 30 gyrB sequences for B. cereus group strains with published 16S rRNA sequences. Our findings indicated that the three most common species of the B. cereus group, B. cereus, Bacillus thuringiensis, and Bacillus mycoides, were each heterogeneous in all three gene sequences, while all analyzed strains of Bacillus anthracis were found to be homogeneous. Based on analysis of 16S and 23S rRNA sequence variations, the microorganisms within the B. cereus group were divided into seven subgroups, Anthracis, Cereus A and B, Thuringiensis A and B, and Mycoides A and B, and these seven subgroups were further organized into two distinct clusters. This classification of the B. cereus group conflicts with current taxonomic groupings, which are based on phenotypic traits. The presence of B. cereus strains in six of the seven subgroups and the presence of B. thuringiensis strains in three of the subgroups do not support the proposed unification of B. cereus and B. thuringiensis into one species. Analysis of the available phenotypic data for the strains included in this study revealed phenotypic traits that may be characteristic of several of the subgroups. Finally, our results demonstrated that rRNA and gyrB sequences may be used for discriminating B. anthracis from other microorganisms in the B. cereus group. PMID:15297521

  19. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that RNA three-way junctions can act as flexible RNA structural elements in the ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Beššeová, Ivana; Réblová, Kamila; Leontis, Neocles B.; Šponer, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    We present extensive explicit solvent molecular dynamics analysis of three RNA three-way junctions (3WJs) from the large ribosomal subunit: the 3WJ formed by Helices 90–92 (H90–H92) of 23S rRNA; the 3WJ formed by H42–H44 organizing the GTPase associated center (GAC) of 23S rRNA; and the 3WJ of 5S rRNA. H92 near the peptidyl transferase center binds the 3′-CCA end of amino-acylated tRNA. The GAC binds protein factors and stimulates GTP hydrolysis driving protein synthesis. The 5S rRNA binds the central protuberance and A-site finger (ASF) involved in bridges with the 30S subunit. The simulations reveal that all three 3WJs possess significant anisotropic hinge-like flexibility between their stacked stems and dynamics within the compact regions of their adjacent stems. The A-site 3WJ dynamics may facilitate accommodation of tRNA, while the 5S 3WJ flexibility appears to be essential for coordinated movements of ASF and 5S rRNA. The GAC 3WJ may support large-scale dynamics of the L7/L12-stalk region. The simulations reveal that H42–H44 rRNA segments are not fully relaxed and in the X-ray structures they are bent towards the large subunit. The bending may be related to L10 binding and is distributed between the 3WJ and the H42–H97 contact. PMID:20507916

  20. Modified ribosome profiling reveals high abundance of ribosome protected mRNA fragments derived from 3′ untranslated regions

    PubMed Central

    Miettinen, Teemu P.; Björklund, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Ribosome profiling identifies ribosome positions on translated mRNAs. A prominent feature of published datasets is the near complete absence of ribosomes in 3′ untranslated regions (3′UTR) although substantial ribosome density can be observed on non-coding RNAs. Here we perform ribosome profiling in cultured Drosophila and human cells and show that different features of translation are revealed depending on the nuclease and the digestion conditions used. Most importantly, we observe high abundance of ribosome protected fragments in 3′UTRs of thousands of genes without manipulation of translation termination. Affinity purification of ribosomes indicates that the 3′UTR reads originate from ribosome protected fragments. Association of ribosomes with the 3′UTR may be due to ribosome migration through the stop codon or 3′UTR mRNA binding to ribosomes on the coding sequence. This association depends primarily on the relative length of the 3′UTR and may be related to translational regulation or ribosome recycling, for which the efficiency is known to inversely correlate with 3′UTR length. Together our results indicate that ribosome profiling is highly dependent on digestion conditions and that ribosomes commonly associate with the 3′UTR, which may have a role in translational regulation. PMID:25550424

  1. Database on the structure of large ribosomal subunit RNA.

    PubMed Central

    De Rijk, P; Caers, A; Van de Peer, Y; De Wachter, R

    1998-01-01

    The rRNA WWW Server at URL http://rrna.uia.ac.be/ now provides a database of 496 large subunit ribosomal RNA sequences. All these sequences are aligned, incorporate secondary structure information, and can be obtained in a number of formats. Other information about the sequences, such as literature references, accession numbers and taxonomic information is also available and searchable. If necessary, the data on the server can also be obtained by anonymous ftp. PMID:9399830

  2. Release, Identification, and Isolation of Messenger RNA from Mammalian Ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Blobel, Günter

    1971-01-01

    The puromycin-induced dissociation, at high ionic strength, of active ribosomes from reticulocytes resulted in the release of protein-free, apparently undegraded, messenger RNA for globin, which was identified by centrifugation on a sucrose density gradient. This procedure should make messenger RNA from various cells available for isolation on a large scale, and has several advantages over procedures that use detergents or magnesium chelators. PMID:5279524

  3. Cis-regulatory RNA elements that regulate specialized ribosome activity

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Shifeng; Barna, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has shown that the ribosome itself can play a highly regulatory role in the specialized translation of specific subpools of mRNAs, in particular at the level of ribosomal proteins (RP). However, the mechanism(s) by which this selection takes place has remained poorly understood. In our recent study, we discovered a combination of unique RNA elements in the 5′UTRs of mRNAs that allows for such control by the ribosome. These mRNAs contain a Translation Inhibitory Element (TIE) that inhibits general cap-dependent translation, and an Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES) that relies on a specific RP for activation. The unique combination of an inhibitor of general translation and an activator of specialized translation is key to ribosome-mediated control of gene expression. Here we discuss how these RNA regulatory elements provide a new level of control to protein expression and their implications for gene expression, organismal development and evolution. PMID:26327194

  4. A major family of motifs involving G.A mismatches in ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed

    Gautheret, D; Konings, D; Gutell, R R

    1994-09-09

    G.A oppositions and their flanking nucleotides in the internal loops of 16 S and 23 S rRNA were analyzed from a comparative structure perspective, resulting in an unexpectedly high incidence of the sequence motifs [formula: see text], [formula: see text] and [formula: see text]. The first two motifs can form similar three-dimensional structures containing sheared G.A or A.A pair conformations. Comparative sequence analysis revealed numerous sites in ribosomal RNAs with distinct combinations of nucleotides capable of forming this specific structure. In some cases, the sequence variations provide strong evidence for the sheared tandem structure occurring. Interestingly, the sequence changes would maintain a similar exposure of two adenines in the minor groove, suggesting the possibility that they are serving as a recognition or anchoring unit. These tandem conformations are related to that of the [formula: see text] tandem observed in 5 S and 28 S rRNA.

  5. Ribosome-dependent conversion of polyA-containing heterogenous nuclear RNA into smaller RNA molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Grozdanovic, J; Hradec, J

    1975-01-01

    The polyA-containing heterogenous nuclear RNA fraction separated from total rat liver nRNA by gel filtration on Sepharose 4B followed by affinity chromatography on polyU-Sepharose and containing predominantly the 45S components becomes enzymatically bound to homologous 80S ribosomes and polyribosomes at 0 degree C. If 80S ribosomes or polyribosomes with bound poly-a-containing HnRNA are subjected to a further incubation at 37 degree C, the original 45S RNA is gradually converted into smaller RNA species of 10- 35S which remain bound to the particle. This ribosome-dependent cleavage of larger HnRNA species into smaller RNA molecules may represent the ultimate step of mRNA maturation. PMID:1144064

  6. RNA polymerase and the ribosome: the close relationship.

    PubMed

    McGary, Katelyn; Nudler, Evgeny

    2013-04-01

    In bacteria transcription and translation are linked in time and space. When coupled to RNA polymerase (RNAP), the translating ribosome ensures transcriptional processivity by preventing RNAP backtracking. Recent advances in the field have characterized important linker proteins that bridge the gap between transcription and translation: In particular, the NusE(S10):NusG complex and the NusG homolog, RfaH. The direct link between the moving ribosome and RNAP provides a basis for maintaining genomic integrity while enabling efficient transcription and timely translation of various genes within the bacterial cell. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Ribosomal RNA structure in the diploid and phylogenetically polyploid amphibian species Hyla and Odontophrynus.

    PubMed

    Leipoldt, M; Kellner, M

    1984-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA of the diploid amphibian species Hyla chrysoscelis and Odontophrynus americanus is structurally modified by hidden breaks. Phylogenetically polyploid related species like the tetraploid Hyla versicolor, the tetraploid Odontophrynus americanus and the octoploid Ceratophrys ornata do not show hidden breaks in ribosomal RNA. Structural modifications of rRNA molecules in diploid amphibians has no detectable effect on the ribosomal activity in vitro.

  8. Effect of ribosome shielding on mRNA stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deneke, Carlus; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Valleriani, Angelo

    2013-08-01

    Based on the experimental evidence that translating ribosomes stabilize the mRNAs, we introduce and study a theoretical model for the dynamic shielding of mRNA by ribosomes. We present an improved fitting of published decay assay data in E. coli and show that only one third of the decay patterns are exponential. Our new transcriptome-wide estimate of the average lifetimes and mRNA half-lives shows that these timescales are considerably shorter than previous estimates. We also explain why there is a negative correlation between mRNA length and average lifetime when the mRNAs are subdivided in classes sharing the same degradation parameters. As a by-product, our model indicates that co-transcriptional translation in E. coli may be less common than previously believed.

  9. A Single Acetylation of 18 S rRNA Is Essential for Biogenesis of the Small Ribosomal Subunit in Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Satoshi; Akamatsu, Yu; Noma, Akiko; Kimura, Satoshi; Miyauchi, Kenjyo; Ikeuchi, Yoshiho; Suzuki, Takeo; Suzuki, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    Biogenesis of eukaryotic ribosome is a complex event involving a number of non-ribosomal factors. During assembly of the ribosome, rRNAs are post-transcriptionally modified by 2′-O-methylation, pseudouridylation, and several base-specific modifications, which are collectively involved in fine-tuning translational fidelity and/or modulating ribosome assembly. By mass-spectrometric analysis, we demonstrated that N4-acetylcytidine (ac4C) is present at position 1773 in the 18 S rRNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In addition, we found an essential gene, KRE33 (human homolog, NAT10), that we renamed RRA1 (ribosomal RNA cytidine acetyltransferase 1) encoding an RNA acetyltransferase responsible for ac4C1773 formation. Using recombinant Rra1p, we could successfully reconstitute ac4C1773 in a model rRNA fragment in the presence of both acetyl-CoA and ATP as substrates. Upon depletion of Rra1p, the 23 S precursor of 18 S rRNA was accumulated significantly, which resulted in complete loss of 18 S rRNA and small ribosomal subunit (40 S), suggesting that ac4C1773 formation catalyzed by Rra1p plays a critical role in processing of the 23 S precursor to yield 18 S rRNA. When nuclear acetyl-CoA was depleted by inactivation of acetyl-CoA synthetase 2 (ACS2), we observed temporal accumulation of the 23 S precursor, indicating that Rra1p modulates biogenesis of 40 S subunit by sensing nuclear acetyl-CoA concentration. PMID:25086048

  10. Site-Specific Cleavage of Ribosomal RNA in Escherichia coli-Based Cell-Free Protein Synthesis Systems

    PubMed Central

    Failmezger, Jurek; Nitschel, Robert; Sánchez-Kopper, Andrés; Kraml, Michael; Siemann-Herzberg, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Cell-free protein synthesis, which mimics the biological protein production system, allows rapid expression of proteins without the need to maintain a viable cell. Nevertheless, cell-free protein expression relies on active in vivo translation machinery including ribosomes and translation factors. Here, we examined the integrity of the protein synthesis machinery, namely the functionality of ribosomes, during (i) the cell-free extract preparation and (ii) the performance of in vitro protein synthesis by analyzing crucial components involved in translation. Monitoring the 16S rRNA, 23S rRNA, elongation factors and ribosomal protein S1, we show that processing of a cell-free extract results in no substantial alteration of the translation machinery. Moreover, we reveal that the 16S rRNA is specifically cleaved at helix 44 during in vitro translation reactions, resulting in the removal of the anti-Shine-Dalgarno sequence. These defective ribosomes accumulate in the cell-free system. We demonstrate that the specific cleavage of the 16S rRNA is triggered by the decreased concentrations of Mg2+. In addition, we provide evidence that helix 44 of the 30S ribosomal subunit serves as a point-of-entry for ribosome degradation in Escherichia coli. Our results suggest that Mg2+ homeostasis is fundamental to preserving functional ribosomes in cell-free protein synthesis systems, which is of major importance for cell-free protein synthesis at preparative scale, in order to create highly efficient technical in vitro systems. PMID:27992588

  11. Ribosomal 18S rRNA base pairs with mRNA during eukaryotic translation initiation

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Franck; Ménétret, Jean-François; Simonetti, Angelita; Myasnikov, Alexander G.; Vicens, Quentin; Prongidi-Fix, Lydia; Natchiar, S. Kundhavai; Klaholz, Bruno P.; Eriani, Gilbert

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic mRNAs often contain a Kozak sequence that helps tether the ribosome to the AUG start codon. The mRNA of histone H4 (h4) does not undergo classical ribosome scanning but has evolved a specific tethering mechanism. The cryo-EM structure of the rabbit ribosome complex with mouse h4 shows that the mRNA forms a folded, repressive structure at the mRNA entry site on the 40S subunit next to the tip of helix 16 of 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Toe-printing and mutational assays reveal that an interaction exists between a purine-rich sequence in h4 mRNA and a complementary UUUC sequence of helix h16. Together the present data establish that the h4 mRNA harbours a sequence complementary to an 18S rRNA sequence which tethers the mRNA to the ribosome to promote proper start codon positioning, complementing the interactions of the 40S subunit with the Kozak sequence that flanks the AUG start codon. PMID:27554013

  12. Fasciola hepatica - where is 28S ribosomal RNA?

    PubMed

    Haçarız, Orçun; Sayers, Gearóid

    2013-10-01

    Advanced molecular biology techniques are currently used to develop new effective strategies against fasciolosis. Assessment of the quality of extracted total RNA is an important step prior to commencing many molecular biology methods such as transcriptomics. However, RNA quality assessment is complicated for some organisms, including Fasciola hepatica, by the absence of a 28S rRNA peak/band, when assessed with modern protocols. In this study, electrophoretic profiles of F. hepatica ribosomal RNAs were evaluated using microfluidics capillary based and conventional non-denaturing gel electrophoresis methods. An important modification to recommended protocols, the exclusion of heat-denaturation step, in the microfluidics capillary based electrophoresis is critical to visualise the expected 28S rRNA and obtain an RNA integrity number (RIN). The intensity of the 28S rRNA band is reduced by the effect of non-denaturing gel electrophoresis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Antibiotic resistance evolved via inactivation of a ribosomal RNA methylating enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Stojković, Vanja; Noda-Garcia, Lianet; Tawfik, Dan S.; Fujimori, Danica Galonić

    2016-01-01

    Modifications of the bacterial ribosome regulate the function of the ribosome and modulate its susceptibility to antibiotics. By modifying a highly conserved adenosine A2503 in 23S rRNA, methylating enzyme Cfr confers resistance to a range of ribosome-targeting antibiotics. The same adenosine is also methylated by RlmN, an enzyme widely distributed among bacteria. While RlmN modifies C2, Cfr modifies the C8 position of A2503. Shared nucleotide substrate and phylogenetic relationship between RlmN and Cfr prompted us to investigate evolutionary origin of antibiotic resistance in this enzyme family. Using directed evolution of RlmN under antibiotic selection, we obtained RlmN variants that mediate low-level resistance. Surprisingly, these variants confer resistance not through the Cfr-like C8 methylation, but via inhibition of the endogenous RlmN C2 methylation of A2503. Detection of RlmN inactivating mutations in clinical resistance isolates suggests that the mechanism used by the in vitro evolved variants is also relevant in a clinical setting. Additionally, as indicated by a phylogenetic analysis, it appears that Cfr did not diverge from the RlmN family but from another distinct family of predicted radical SAM methylating enzymes whose function remains unknown. PMID:27496281

  14. Effects on translation pausing of alterations in protein and RNA components of the ribosome exit tunnel.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Marlon G; Lindahl, Lasse; Zengel, Janice M

    2008-09-01

    Amino acids are polymerized into peptides in the peptidyl transferase center of the ribosome. The nascent peptides then pass through the exit tunnel before they reach the extraribosomal environment. A number of nascent peptides interact with the exit tunnel and stall elongation at specific sites within their peptide chain. Several mutational changes in RNA and protein components of the ribosome have previously been shown to interfere with pausing. These changes are localized in the narrowest region of the tunnel, near a constriction formed by ribosomal proteins L4 and L22. To expand our knowledge about peptide-induced pausing, we performed a comparative study of pausing induced by two peptides, SecM and a short peptide, Crb(CmlA), that requires chloramphenicol as a coinducer of pausing. We analyzed the effects of 15 mutational changes in L4 and L22, as well as the effects of methylating nucleotide A2058 of 23S rRNA, a nucleotide previously implicated in pausing and located close to the L4-L22 constriction. Our results show that methylation of A2058 and most mutational changes in L4 and L22 have differential effects on pausing in response to Crb(CmlA) and SecM. Only one change, a 6-amino-acid insertion after amino acid 72 in L4, affects pausing in both peptides. We conclude that the two peptides interact with different regions of the exit tunnel. Our results suggest that either the two peptides use different mechanisms of pausing or they interact differently but induce similar inhibitory conformational changes in functionally important regions of the ribosome.

  15. Effects on Translation Pausing of Alterations in Protein and RNA Components of the Ribosome Exit Tunnel▿

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Marlon G.; Lindahl, Lasse; Zengel, Janice M.

    2008-01-01

    Amino acids are polymerized into peptides in the peptidyl transferase center of the ribosome. The nascent peptides then pass through the exit tunnel before they reach the extraribosomal environment. A number of nascent peptides interact with the exit tunnel and stall elongation at specific sites within their peptide chain. Several mutational changes in RNA and protein components of the ribosome have previously been shown to interfere with pausing. These changes are localized in the narrowest region of the tunnel, near a constriction formed by ribosomal proteins L4 and L22. To expand our knowledge about peptide-induced pausing, we performed a comparative study of pausing induced by two peptides, SecM and a short peptide, CrbCmlA, that requires chloramphenicol as a coinducer of pausing. We analyzed the effects of 15 mutational changes in L4 and L22, as well as the effects of methylating nucleotide A2058 of 23S rRNA, a nucleotide previously implicated in pausing and located close to the L4-L22 constriction. Our results show that methylation of A2058 and most mutational changes in L4 and L22 have differential effects on pausing in response to CrbCmlA and SecM. Only one change, a 6-amino-acid insertion after amino acid 72 in L4, affects pausing in both peptides. We conclude that the two peptides interact with different regions of the exit tunnel. Our results suggest that either the two peptides use different mechanisms of pausing or they interact differently but induce similar inhibitory conformational changes in functionally important regions of the ribosome. PMID:18586934

  16. Physicochemical characterization of the ribosomal RNA species of the Mollusca. Molecular weight, integrity and secondary-structure features of the RNA of the large and small ribosomal subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Cammarano, P; Londei, P; Mazzei, F; Felsani, A

    1980-01-01

    1. The rRNA species of the Cephalopoda Octopus vulgaris and Loligo vulgaris were found to have unexpectedly high sedimentation coefficients and molecular weights. In 0.1 M-NaCl the L-rRNA (RNA from large ribosomal subunit) has the same s20 value as the L-rRNA of the mammals (30.7S), whereas the S-rRNA (RNA from small ribosomal subunit) sediments at a faster rate (20.1S) than the S-rRNA of both the mammals and the fungi (Neurospora crassa) (17.5S). The molecular weights of the L-rRNA were determined by gel electrophoresis in formamide and found to be 1.66 X 10(6) (Octupus) and 1.89 X 10(6) (Loligo); the mol.wt. of the S-rRNA of both species is 0.96 X 10(6), i.e. much larger than that of the mammals (0.65 X 10(6)) and almost coincident with that of the '23S' RNA of the prokaryotes. 2. By contrast, the less evolved Gastropoda and Lamellibranchiata (Murex trunculus and Macrocallista chione) have S-rRNA and L-rRNA species with mol.wts. of 0.65 X 10(6) and approx. 1.40 X 10(6).3. All the mature L-rRNA molecules of the cephalopoda are composed of two unequal fragments held together by regions of hydrogen-bonding having a similar, low, thermal stability in the two species; the molecular weights of the two fragments composing the L-rRNA are estimated to be 0.96 X 10(6) and 0.88 X 10(6) (Loligo) and 0.96 X 10(6) and 0.65 X 10(6) (Octupus). THe S-rRNA of both species is a continuous chain with exactly the same molecular weight (0.96 X 10(6)) as the heavier of the two fragments of the L-rRNA. 4. The secondary-structure features of the L-rRNA and S-rRNA species of the Caphalopoda were investigated by thermal 'melting' analysis in 4.0 M-guanidinium chloride; 60-70% of the residues are estimated to form short, independently 'melting' bihelical segments not more than 10 base-pairs in length. 5. Bases are unevenly distributed between non-helical and bihelical portions of the rRNA molecules, G and C residues being preferentially concentrated in bihelical comains. 6. The secondary

  17. Analysis of the genetic diversity of Legionella by sequencing the 23S-5S ribosomal intergenic spacer region: from phylogeny to direct identification of isolates at the species level from clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Grattard, Florence; Ginevra, Christophe; Riffard, Serge; Ros, Alain; Jarraud, Sophie; Etienne, Jerome; Pozzetto, Bruno

    2006-01-01

    This study focuses on the interest of the hypervariable 23S-5S ribosomal intergenic spacer region (ISR) of the genus Legionella to analyze the phylogenic diversity of Legionella at the species and subspecies levels and to identify isolates directly from clinical specimens. The method, using a real-time PCR assay with a single primer pair followed by sequencing, was able to identify correctly 49 reference strains of Legionella belonging to 37 different species, including those implicated in human infections, and to clearly differentiate the three subspecies of L. pneumophila. Based on sequence similarities, the 23S-5S ISR sequences were much more variable than the rpoB and mip sequences (P<0.0001 by the Wilcoxon signed rank test). The 23S-5S ISR method was able to cluster Legionella species in accordance with phenotypic traits, such as autofluorescence or fatty acid membrane composition. Using maximum parsimony methods, the rpoB and 23S-5S ISR data sets were shown to be incongruent (P<0.001). In contrast, the 23S-5S ISR and the mip data sets were found to be congruent (P=0.313), suggesting the interest of combining these two regions to demonstrate phylogenetic links between Legionella species. This molecular assay was shown able to both detect Legionella DNA directly in respiratory specimens from patients exhibiting a Legionella infection and provide accurate identification of the bacterium at the species level in the tested specimens. These properties open a wide range of applications to the 23S-5S ISR sequencing method, from taxonomic analyses to clinical and epidemiological investigations.

  18. c-Myc co-ordinates mRNA cap methylation and ribosomal RNA production.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Sianadh; Lombardi, Olivia; Cowling, Victoria H

    2017-02-01

    The mRNA cap is a structure added to RNA pol II transcripts in eukaryotes, which recruits factors involved in RNA processing, nuclear export and translation initiation. RNA guanine-7 methyltransferase (RNMT)-RNA-activating miniprotein (RAM), the mRNA cap methyltransferase complex, completes the basic functional mRNA cap structure, cap 0, by methylating the cap guanosine. Here, we report that RNMT-RAM co-ordinates mRNA processing with ribosome production. Suppression of RNMT-RAM reduces synthesis of the 45S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) precursor. RNMT-RAM is required for c-Myc expression, a major regulator of RNA pol I, which synthesises 45S rRNA. Constitutive expression of c-Myc restores rRNA synthesis when RNMT-RAM is suppressed, indicating that RNMT-RAM controls rRNA production predominantly by controlling c-Myc expression. We report that RNMT-RAM is recruited to the ribosomal DNA locus, which may contribute to rRNA synthesis in certain contexts.

  19. c-Myc co-ordinates mRNA cap methylation and ribosomal RNA production

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Sianadh; Lombardi, Olivia; Cowling, Victoria H.

    2017-01-01

    The mRNA cap is a structure added to RNA pol II transcripts in eukaryotes, which recruits factors involved in RNA processing, nuclear export and translation initiation. RNA guanine-7 methyltransferase (RNMT)–RNA-activating miniprotein (RAM), the mRNA cap methyltransferase complex, completes the basic functional mRNA cap structure, cap 0, by methylating the cap guanosine. Here, we report that RNMT–RAM co-ordinates mRNA processing with ribosome production. Suppression of RNMT–RAM reduces synthesis of the 45S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) precursor. RNMT–RAM is required for c-Myc expression, a major regulator of RNA pol I, which synthesises 45S rRNA. Constitutive expression of c-Myc restores rRNA synthesis when RNMT–RAM is suppressed, indicating that RNMT–RAM controls rRNA production predominantly by controlling c-Myc expression. We report that RNMT–RAM is recruited to the ribosomal DNA locus, which may contribute to rRNA synthesis in certain contexts. PMID:27934633

  20. Deciphering Poxvirus Gene Expression by RNA Sequencing and Ribosome Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Shuai; Martens, Craig A.; Porcella, Stephen F.; Xie, Zhi; Ma, Ming; Shen, Ben

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The more than 200 closely spaced annotated open reading frames, extensive transcriptional read-through, and numerous unpredicted RNA start sites have made the analysis of vaccinia virus gene expression challenging. Genome-wide ribosome profiling provided an unprecedented assessment of poxvirus gene expression. By 4 h after infection, approximately 80% of the ribosome-associated mRNA was viral. Ribosome-associated mRNAs were detected for most annotated early genes at 2 h and for most intermediate and late genes at 4 and 8 h. Cluster analysis identified a subset of early mRNAs that continued to be translated at the later times. At 2 h, there was excellent correlation between the abundance of individual mRNAs and the numbers of associated ribosomes, indicating that expression was primarily transcriptionally regulated. However, extensive transcriptional read-through invalidated similar correlations at later times. The mRNAs with the highest density of ribosomes had host response, DNA replication, and transcription roles at early times and were virion components at late times. Translation inhibitors were used to map initiation sites at single-nucleotide resolution at the start of most annotated open reading frames although in some cases a downstream methionine was used instead. Additional putative translational initiation sites with AUG or alternative codons occurred mostly within open reading frames, and fewer occurred in untranslated leader sequences, antisense strands, and intergenic regions. However, most open reading frames associated with these additional translation initiation sites were short, raising questions regarding their biological roles. The data were used to construct a high-resolution genome-wide map of the vaccinia virus translatome. IMPORTANCE This report contains the first genome-wide, high-resolution analysis of poxvirus gene expression at both transcriptional and translational levels. The study was made possible by recent methodological

  1. Database on the structure of small ribosomal subunit RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Van de Peer, Y; Caers, A; De Rijk, P; De Wachter, R

    1998-01-01

    About 8600 complete or nearly complete sequences are now available from the Antwerp database on small ribosomal subunit RNA. All these sequences are aligned with one another on the basis of the adopted secondary structure model, which is corroborated by the observation of compensating substitutions in the alignment. Literature references, accession numbers and detailed taxonomic information are also compiled. The database can be consulted via the World Wide Web at URL http://rrna.uia.ac.be/ssu/ PMID:9399829

  2. Database on the structure of large ribosomal subunit RNA.

    PubMed Central

    De Rijk, P; Van de Peer, Y; De Wachter, R

    1996-01-01

    Our database on large ribosomal subunit RNA contained 334 sequences in July, 1995. All sequences in the database are aligned, taking into account secondary structure. The aligned sequences are provided, together with incorporated secondary structure information, in several computer-readable formats. These data can easily be obtained through the World Wide Web. The files in the database are also available via anonymous ftp. PMID:8594610

  3. Transformation of Chloroplast Ribosomal RNA Genes in Chlamydomonas: Molecular and Genetic Characterization of Integration Events

    PubMed Central

    Newman, S. M.; Boynton, J. E.; Gillham, N. W.; Randolph-Anderson, B. L.; Johnson, A. M.; Harris, E. H.

    1990-01-01

    Transformation of chloroplast ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes in Chlamydomonas has been achieved by the biolistic process using cloned chloroplast DNA fragments carrying mutations that confer antibiotic resistance. The sites of exchange employed during the integration of the donor DNA into the recipient genome have been localized using a combination of antibiotic resistance mutations in the 16S and 23S rRNA genes and restriction fragment length polymorphisms that flank these genes. Complete or nearly complete replacement of a region of the chloroplast genome in the recipient cell by the corresponding sequence from the donor plasmid was the most common integration event. Exchange events between the homologous donor and recipient sequences occurred preferentially near the vector:insert junctions. Insertion of the donor rRNA genes and flanking sequences into one inverted repeat of the recipient genome was followed by intramolecular copy correction so that both copies of the inverted repeat acquired identical sequences. Increased frequencies of rRNA gene transformants were achieved by reducing the copy number of the chloroplast genome in the recipient cells and by decreasing the heterology between donor and recipient DNA sequences flanking the selectable markers. In addition to producing bona fide chloroplast rRNA transformants, the biolistic process induced mutants resistant to low levels of streptomycin, typical of nuclear mutations in Chlamydomonas. PMID:1981764

  4. Detection of the new cosmopolitan genus Thermoleptolyngbya (Cyanobacteria, Leptolyngbyaceae) using the 16S rRNA gene and 16S-23S ITS region.

    PubMed

    Sciuto, Katia; Moro, Isabella

    2016-12-01

    Cyanobacteria are widespread prokaryotes that are able to live in extreme conditions such as thermal springs. Strains attributable to the genus Leptolyngbya are among the most common cyanobacteria sampled from thermal environments. Leptolyngbya is a character-poor taxon that was demonstrated to be polyphyletic based on molecular analyses. The recent joining of 16S rRNA gene phylogenies with 16S-23S ITS secondary structure analysis is a useful approach to detect new cryptic taxa and has led to the separation of new genera from Leptolyngbya and to the description of new species inside this genus and in other related groups. In this study, phylogenetic investigations based on both the 16S rRNA gene and the 16S-23S ITS region were performed alongside 16S rRNA and 16S-23S ITS secondary structure analyses on cyanobacteria of the family Leptolyngbyaceae. These analyses focused on filamentous strains sampled from thermal springs with a morphology ascribable to the genus Leptolyngbya. The phylogenetic reconstructions showed that the Leptolyngbya-like thermal strains grouped into a monophyletic lineage that was distinct from Leptolyngbya. The 16S-23S ITS secondary structure results supported the separation of this cluster. A new genus named Thermoleptolyngbya was erected to encompass these strains, and two species were described inside this new taxon: T. albertanoae and T. oregonensis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Length-dependent translation of messenger RNA by ribosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valleriani, Angelo; Zhang, Gong; Nagar, Apoorva; Ignatova, Zoya; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2011-04-01

    A simple measure for the efficiency of protein synthesis by ribosomes is provided by the steady state amount of protein per messenger RNA (mRNA), the so-called translational ratio, which is proportional to the translation rate. Taking the degradation of mRNA into account, we show theoretically that both the translation rate and the translational ratio decrease with increasing mRNA length, in agreement with available experimental data for the prokaryote Escherichia coli. We also show that, compared to prokaryotes, mRNA degradation in eukaryotes leads to a less rapid decrease of the translational ratio. This finding is consistent with the fact that, compared to prokaryotes, eukaryotes tend to have longer proteins.

  6. Structural insights into substrate selectivity of ribosomal RNA methyltransferase RlmCD.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yiyang; Li, Fudong; Wu, Jihui; Shi, Yunyu; Gong, Qingguo

    2017-01-01

    RlmCD has recently been identified as the S-adenosyl methionine (SAM)-dependent methyltransferase responsible for the formation of m5U at U747 and U1939 of 23S ribosomal RNA in Streptococcus pneumoniae. In this research, we determine the high-resolution crystal structures of apo-form RlmCD and its complex with SAH. Using an in-vitro methyltransferase assay, we reveal the crucial residues for its catalytic functions. Furthermore, structural comparison between RlmCD and its structural homologue RumA, which only catalyzes the m5U1939 in Escherichia coli, implicates that a unique long linker in the central domain of RlmCD is the key factor in determining its substrate selectivity. Its significance in the enzyme activity of RlmCD is further confirmed by in-vitro methyltransferase assay.

  7. The sequence of Methanospirillum hungatei 23S rRNA confirms the specific relationship between the extreme halophiles and the Methanomicrobiales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burggraf, S.; Ching, A.; Stetter, K. O.; Woese, C. R.

    1991-01-01

    We have determined the sequence of the 23S rRNA from the methanogenic archaeon Methanospirillum hungatei. This is the first such sequence from a member of the Methanomicrobiales. Moreover, it brings additional evidence to bear on the possible specific relationship between this particular group of methanogens and the extreme halophiles. Such evidence is critical in that several new (and relatively untested) methods of phylogenetic inference have lead to the controversial conclusion that the extreme halophiles are either not related to the archaea, or are only peripherally so. Analysis of the Methanospirillum hungatei 23S rRNA sequence shows the Methanomicrobiales are indeed a sister group of the extreme halophiles, further strengthening the conclusions reached from analysis of 16S rRNA sequences.

  8. Discrimination of Bacillus anthracis from closely related microorganisms by analysis of 16S and 23S rRNA with oligonucleotide microchips

    DOEpatents

    Bavykin, Sergei G.; Mirzabekova, legal representative, Natalia V.; Mirzabekov, deceased, Andrei D.

    2007-12-04

    The present invention relates to methods and compositions for using nucleotide sequence variations of 16S and 23S rRNA within the B. cereus group to discriminate a highly infectious bacterium B. anthracis from closely related microorganisms. Sequence variations in the 16S and 23S rRNA of the B. cereus subgroup including B. anthracis are utilized to construct an array that can detect these sequence variations through selective hybridizations and discriminate B. cereus group that includes B. anthracis. Discrimination of single base differences in rRNA was achieved with a microchip during analysis of B. cereus group isolates from both single and in mixed samples, as well as identification of polymorphic sites. Successful use of a microchip to determine the appropriate subgroup classification using eight reference microorganisms from the B. cereus group as a study set, was demonstrated.

  9. The sequence of Methanospirillum hungatei 23S rRNA confirms the specific relationship between the extreme halophiles and the Methanomicrobiales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burggraf, S.; Ching, A.; Stetter, K. O.; Woese, C. R.

    1991-01-01

    We have determined the sequence of the 23S rRNA from the methanogenic archaeon Methanospirillum hungatei. This is the first such sequence from a member of the Methanomicrobiales. Moreover, it brings additional evidence to bear on the possible specific relationship between this particular group of methanogens and the extreme halophiles. Such evidence is critical in that several new (and relatively untested) methods of phylogenetic inference have lead to the controversial conclusion that the extreme halophiles are either not related to the archaea, or are only peripherally so. Analysis of the Methanospirillum hungatei 23S rRNA sequence shows the Methanomicrobiales are indeed a sister group of the extreme halophiles, further strengthening the conclusions reached from analysis of 16S rRNA sequences.

  10. The sequence of Methanospirillum hungatei 23S rRNA confirms the specific relationship between the extreme halophiles and the Methanomicrobiales.

    PubMed

    Burggraf, S; Ching, A; Stetter, K O; Woese, C R

    1991-01-01

    We have determined the sequence of the 23S rRNA from the methanogenic archaeon Methanospirillum hungatei. This is the first such sequence from a member of the Methanomicrobiales. Moreover, it brings additional evidence to bear on the possible specific relationship between this particular group of methanogens and the extreme halophiles. Such evidence is critical in that several new (and relatively untested) methods of phylogenetic inference have lead to the controversial conclusion that the extreme halophiles are either not related to the archaea, or are only peripherally so. Analysis of the Methanospirillum hungatei 23S rRNA sequence shows the Methanomicrobiales are indeed a sister group of the extreme halophiles, further strengthening the conclusions reached from analysis of 16S rRNA sequences.

  11. Database on the structure of large ribosomal subunit RNA.

    PubMed Central

    De Rijk, P; Van de Peer, Y; De Wachter, R

    1997-01-01

    The latest release of the large ribosomal subunit RNA database contains 429 sequences. All these sequences are aligned, and incorporate secondary structure information. The rRNA WWW Server at URL http://rrna.uia.ac.be/ provides researchers with an easily accessible resource to obtain the data in this database in a number of computer-readable formats. A new query interface has been added to the server. If necessary, the data can also be obtained by anonymous ftp from the same site. PMID:9016517

  12. Phylogenetic relationships of Cryptosporidium determined by ribosomal RNA sequence comparison.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A M; Fielke, R; Lumb, R; Baverstock, P R

    1990-04-01

    Reverse transcription of total cellular RNA was used to obtain a partial sequence of the small subunit ribosomal RNA of Cryptosporidium, a protist currently placed in the phylum Apicomplexa. The semi-conserved regions were aligned with homologous sequences in a range of other eukaryotes, and the evolutionary relationships of Cryptosporidium were determined by two different methods of phylogenetic analysis. The prokaryotes Escherichia coli and Halobacterium cuti were included as outgroups. The results do not show an especially close relationship of Cryptosporidium to other members of the phylum Apicomplexa.

  13. Simple and inexpensive ribosome profiling analysis of mRNA translation.

    PubMed

    Reid, David W; Shenolikar, Shirish; Nicchitta, Christopher V

    2015-12-01

    The development and application of ribosome profiling has markedly advanced our understanding of ribosomes and mRNA translation. The experimental approach, which relies on deep sequencing of ribosome-protected mRNA fragments generated by treatment of polyribosomes with exogenous nucleases, provides a transcriptome-wide assessment of translation. The broad application of ribosome profiling has been slowed by the complexity and expense of the protocol. Here, we provide a simplified ribosome profiling method that uses micrococcal nuclease to generate ribosome footprints in crude cellular extracts, which are then purified simply by size selection via polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This simplification removes the laborious or expensive purification of ribosomes that has typically been used. This direct extraction method generates gene-level ribosome profiling data that are similar to a method that includes ribosome purification. This protocol should significantly ease the barrier to entry for research groups interested in employing ribosome profiling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cisplatin inhibits synthesis of ribosomal RNA in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, P; Carmo-Fonseca, M

    1998-01-01

    Cis -diammininedichloroplatinum(II) (cisplatin or cis -DDP) is a DNA-damaging agent that is widely used in cancer chemotherapy. Cisplatin crosslinks DNA and the resulting adducts interact with proteins that contain high-mobility-group (HMG) domains, such as UBF(upstream binding factor). UBF is a transcription factor that binds to the promoter of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes thereby supporting initiation of transcription by RNA polymerase I. Here we report that cisplatin causes a redistribution of UBF in the nucleolus of human cells, similar to that observed after inhibition of rRNA synthesis. A similar redistribution was observed for the major components of the rRNA transcription machinery, namely TBP, TAFIs and RNA polymerase I. Furthermore, we provide for the first time direct in vivo evidence that cisplatin blocks synthesis of rRNA, while activity of RNA polymerase II continues to be detected throughout the nucleus. The clinically ineffective trans isomer (trans -DDP) does not alter the localization of either UBF or other components of the RNA polymerase I transcription machinery. These results suggest that disruption of rRNA synthesis, which is stimulated in proliferating cells, plays an important role in the clinical success of cisplatin. PMID:9611224

  15. Depletion of Ribosomal RNA Sequences from Single-Cell RNA-Sequencing Library.

    PubMed

    Fang, Nan; Akinci-Tolun, Rumeysa

    2016-07-01

    Recent advances in single-cell RNA sequencing technologies have revealed high heterogeneity of gene expression profiles in individual cells. However, most current single-cell RNA-seq methods use oligo-dT priming in the reverse transcription steps and detect only polyA-positive for more accuracy, since there are also polyA-positive non-coding RNAs transcripts, not other important RNA species, such as polyA-negative noncoding RNA. Reverse transcription using random oligos enables detection of not only the noncoding RNA species without polyA tails, but also ribosomal RNA (rRNA). rRNA comprises more than 90% of the total RNA and should be depleted from the RNA-seq library to ensure efficient usage of the sequencing capacity. Commonly used hybridization-based rRNA depletion methods can preserve noncoding RNA in the standard RNA-seq library. However, such rRNA depletion methods require high input amounts of total RNA and do not work at the single-cell level or with limited input DNA. This unit describes a novel procedure for RNA-seq library construction from single cells or a minimal amount of RNA. A thermostable duplex-specific nuclease is used in this method to effectively remove ribosomal RNA sequences following whole-transcriptome amplification and sequencing library construction. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. Novel Diagnostic Algorithm for Identification of Mycobacteria Using Genus-Specific Amplification of the 16S-23S rRNA Gene Spacer and Restriction Endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Andreas; Reischl, Udo; Streubel, Anna; Naumann, Ludmila; Kroppenstedt, Reiner M.; Habicht, Marion; Fischer, Marga; Mauch, Harald

    2000-01-01

    A novel genus-specific PCR for mycobacteria with simple identification to the species level by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) was established using the 16S-23S ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) spacer as a target. Panspecificity of primers was demonstrated on the genus level by testing 811 bacterial strains (122 species in 37 genera from 286 reference strains and 525 clinical isolates). All mycobacterial isolates (678 strains among 48 defined species and 5 indeterminate taxons) were amplified by the new primers. Among nonmycobacterial isolates, only Gordonia terrae was amplified. The RFLP scheme devised involves estimation of variable PCR product sizes together with HaeIII and CfoI restriction analysis. It yielded 58 HaeIII patterns, of which 49 (84%) were unique on the species level. Hence, HaeIII digestion together with CfoI results was sufficient for correct identification of 39 of 54 mycobacterial taxons and one of three or four of seven RFLP genotypes found in Mycobacterium intracellulare and Mycobacterium kansasii, respectively. Following a clearly laid out diagnostic algorithm, the remaining unidentified organisms fell into five clusters of closely related species (i.e., the Mycobacterium avium complex or Mycobacterium chelonae-Mycobacterium abscessus) that were successfully separated using additional enzymes (TaqI, MspI, DdeI, or AvaII). Thus, next to slowly growing mycobacteria, all rapidly growing species studied, including M. abscessus, M. chelonae, Mycobacterium farcinogenes, Mycobacterium fortuitum, Mycobacterium peregrinum, and Mycobacterium senegalense (with a very high 16S rDNA sequence similarity) were correctly identified. A high intraspecies sequence stability and the good discriminative power of patterns indicate that this method is very suitable for rapid and cost-effective identification of a wide variety of mycobacterial species without the need for sequencing. Phylogenetically, spacer sequence data stand in good agreement with 16S r

  17. RNA-structural mimicry in Escherichia coli ribosomal protein L4-dependent regulation of the S10 operon.

    PubMed

    Stelzl, Ulrich; Zengel, Janice M; Tovbina, Marina; Walker, Marquis; Nierhaus, Knud H; Lindahl, Lasse; Patel, Dinshaw J

    2003-07-25

    Ribosomal protein L4 regulates the 11-gene S10 operon in Escherichia coli by acting, in concert with transcription factor NusA, to cause premature transcription termination at a Rho-independent termination site in the leader sequence. This process presumably involves L4 interaction with the leader mRNA. Here, we report direct, specific, and independent binding of ribosomal protein L4 to the S10 mRNA leader in vitro. Most of the binding energy is contributed by a small hairpin structure within the leader region, but a 64-nucleotide sequence is required for the bona fide interaction. Binding to the S10 leader mRNA is competed by the 23 S rRNA L4 binding site. Although the secondary structures of the mRNA and rRNA binding sites appear different, phosphorothioate footprinting of the L4-RNA complexes reveals close structural similarity in three dimensions. Mutational analysis of the mRNA binding site is compatible with the structural model. In vitro binding of L4 induces structural changes of the S10 leader RNA, providing a first clue for how protein L4 may provoke transcription termination.

  18. RNA-structural Mimicry in Escherichia coli Ribosomal Protein L4-dependent Regulation of the S10 Operon*

    PubMed Central

    Stelzl, Ulrich; Zengel, Janice M.; Tovbina, Marina; Walker, Marquis; Nierhaus, Knud H.; Lindahl, Lasse; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomal protein L4 regulates the 11-gene S10 operon in Escherichia coli by acting, in concert with transcription factor NusA, to cause premature transcription termination at a Rho-independent termination site in the leader sequence. This process presumably involves L4 interaction with the leader mRNA. Here, we report direct, specific, and independent binding of ribosomal protein L4 to the S10 mRNA leader in vitro. Most of the binding energy is contributed by a small hairpin structure within the leader region, but a 64-nucleotide sequence is required for the bona fide interaction. Binding to the S10 leader mRNA is competed by the 23 S rRNA L4 binding site. Although the secondary structures of the mRNA and rRNA binding sites appear different, phosphorothioate footprinting of the L4-RNA complexes reveals close structural similarity in three dimensions. Mutational analysis of the mRNA binding site is compatible with the structural model. In vitro binding of L4 induces structural changes of the S10 leader RNA, providing a first clue for how protein L4 may provoke transcription termination. PMID:12738792

  19. Mechanisms for ribotoxin-induced ribosomal RNA cleavage

    SciTech Connect

    He, Kaiyu; Zhou, Hui-Ren; Pestka, James J.

    2012-11-15

    The Type B trichothecene deoxynivalenol (DON), a ribotoxic mycotoxin known to contaminate cereal-based foods, induces ribosomal RNA (rRNA) cleavage in the macrophage via p38-directed activation of caspases. Here we employed the RAW 264.7 murine macrophage model to test the hypothesis that this rRNA cleavage pathway is similarly induced by other ribotoxins. Capillary electrophoresis confirmed that the antibiotic anisomycin (≥ 25 ng/ml), the macrocylic trichothecene satratoxin G (SG) (≥ 10 ng/ml) and ribosome-inactivating protein ricin (≥ 300 ng/ml) induced 18s and 28s rRNA fragmentation patterns identical to that observed for DON. Also, as found for DON, inhibition of p38, double-stranded RNA-activated kinase (PKR) and hematopoietic cell kinase (Hck) suppressed MAPK anisomycin-induced rRNA cleavage, while, in contrast, their inhibition did not affect SG- and ricin-induced rRNA fragmentation. The p53 inhibitor pifithrin-μ and pan caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK suppressed rRNA cleavage induced by anisomycin, SG and ricin, indicating that these ribotoxins shared with DON a conserved downstream pathway. Activation of caspases 8, 9 and 3 concurrently with apoptosis further suggested that rRNA cleavage occurred in parallel with both extrinsic and intrinsic pathways of programmed cell death. When specific inhibitors of cathepsins L and B (lysosomal cysteine cathepsins active at cytosolic neutral pH) were tested, only the former impaired anisomycin-, SG-, ricin- and DON-induced rRNA cleavage. Taken together, the data suggest that (1) all four ribotoxins induced p53-dependent rRNA cleavage via activation of cathepsin L and caspase 3, and (2) activation of p53 by DON and anisomycin involved p38 whereas SG and ricin activated p53 by an alternative mechanism. Highlights: ► Deoxynivalenol (DON) anisomycin, satratoxin G (SG) and ricin are ribotoxins. ► Ribotoxins induce 18s and 28s rRNA cleavage in the RAW 264.7 macrophage model. ► Ribotoxins induce rRNA cleavage via

  20. The RNA-binding domain of ribosomal protein L11 recognizes an rRNA tertiary structure stabilized by both thiostrepton and magnesium ion

    PubMed Central

    Blyn, Lawrence B.; Risen, Lisa M.; Griffey, Richard H.; Draper, David E.

    2000-01-01

    Antibiotics that inhibit ribosomal function may do so by one of several mechanisms, including the induction of incorrect RNA folding or prevention of protein and/or RNA conformational transitions. Thiostrepton, which binds to the ‘GTPase center’ of the large subunit, has been postulated to prevent conformational changes in either the L11 protein or rRNA to which it binds. Scintillation proximity assays designed to look at the binding of the L11 C-terminal RNA-binding domain to a 23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) fragment, as well as the ability of thiostrepton to induce that binding, were used to demonstrate the role of Mg2+, L11 and thiostrepton in the formation and maintenance of the rRNA fragment tertiary structure. Experiments using these assays with both an Escherichia coli rRNA fragment and a thermostable variant of that RNA show that Mg2+, L11 and thiostrepton all induce the RNA to fold to an essentially identical tertiary structure. PMID:10734197

  1. Crosslinking of Ribosomal Proteins to RNA in Maize Ribosomes by UV-B and Its Effects on Translation1[w

    PubMed Central

    Casati, Paula; Walbot, Virginia

    2004-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B (UV-B) photons can cause substantial cellular damage in biomolecules, as is well established for DNA. Because RNA has the same absorption spectrum for UV as DNA, we have investigated damage to this cellular constituent. In maize (Zea mays) leaves, UV-B radiation damages ribosomes by crosslinking cytosolic ribosomal proteins S14, L23a, and L32, and chloroplast ribosomal protein L29 to RNA. Ribosomal damage accumulated during a day of UV-B exposure correlated with a progressive decrease in new protein production; however, de novo synthesis of some ribosomal proteins is increased after 6 h of UV-B exposure. After 16 h without UV-B, damaged ribosomes were eliminated and translation was restored to normal levels. Ribosomal protein S6 and an S6 kinase are phosphorylated during UV-B exposure; these modifications are associated with selective translation of some ribosomal proteins after ribosome damage in mammalian fibroblast cells and may be an adaptation in maize. Neither photosynthesis nor pigment levels were affected significantly by UV-B, demonstrating that the treatment applied is not lethal and that maize leaf physiology readily recovers. PMID:15466230

  2. Transcriptional activation of ribosomal RNA genes during compensatory renal hypertrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Ouellette, A.J.; Moonka, R.; Zelenetz, A.; Malt, R.A.

    1986-05-01

    The overall rate of rDNA transcription increases by 50% during the first 24 hours of compensatory renal hypertrophy in the mouse. To study mechanisms of ribosome accumulation after uninephrectomy, transcription rates were measured in isolated kidneys by transcriptional runoff. /sup 32/P-labeled nascent transcripts were hybridized to blots containing linearized, denatured cloned rDNA, and hybridization was quantitated autoradiographically and by direct counting. Overall transcriptional activity of rDNA was increased by 30% above control levels at 6 hrs after nephrectomy and by 50% at 12, 18, and 24 hrs after operation. Hybridizing RNA was insensitive to inhibiby alpha-amanitin, and no hybridization was detected to vector DNA. Thus, accelerated rDNA transcription is one regulatory element in the accretion of ribosomes in renal growth, and the regulatory event is an early event. Mechanisms of activation may include enhanced transcription of active genes or induction of inactive DNA.

  3. Panel of 23S rRNA Gene-Based Real-Time PCR Assays for Improved Universal and Group-Specific Detection of Phytoplasmas▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Hodgetts, Jennifer; Boonham, Neil; Mumford, Rick; Dickinson, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Primers and probes based on the 23S rRNA gene have been utilized to design a range of real-time PCR assays for routine phytoplasma diagnostics. These assays have been authenticated as phytoplasma specific and shown to be at least as sensitive as nested PCR. A universal assay to detect all phytoplasmas has been developed, along with a multiplex assay to discriminate 16SrI group phytoplasmas from members of all of the other 16Sr groups. Assays for the 16SrII, 16SrIV, and 16SrXII groups have also been developed to confirm that the 23S rRNA gene can be used to design group-specific assays. PMID:19270148

  4. The study of mutation in 23S rRNA resistance gene of Helicobacter pylori to clarithromycin in patients with gastrointestinal disorders in Isfahan - Iran.

    PubMed

    Khademi, Farzad; Faghri, Jamshid; Moghim, Sharareh; Esfahani, Bahram Nasr; Fazeli, Hossein; Poursina, Farkhondeh; Adibi, Peyman; Madhi, Masoumeh; Safaei, Hajieh Ghasemian

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori antimicrobial resistance is an important factor responsible for treatment failure. The purpose of this study was evaluating the prevalence of point mutations in clarithromycin-resistant clinical isolates of H. pylori in Isfahan city of Iran. Thirty isolates of H. pylori from 130 biopsy specimens were isolated by culture and confirmed by biochemical and PCR tests. The MIC of clarithromycin antibiotic for 30 clinical isolates of H. pylori was determined by E-test method. The point mutations in the 288 bp of 23S rRNA gene of H. pylori were investigated in four clarithromycin-resistant clinical isolates by PCR followed by sequencing. Among 30 isolates of H. pylori, 4 cases were resistant to clarithromycin. One point mutation was found at position T2243C in the 23S rRNA gene in all resistance isolates. In our study, H. pylori resistance to clarithromycin associated with point mutation at position 2243 (T2243C).

  5. Transfer RNA-mediated regulation of ribosome dynamics during protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Fei, Jingyi; Richard, Arianne C; Bronson, Jonathan E; Gonzalez, Ruben L

    2011-08-21

    Translocation of tRNAs through the ribosome during protein synthesis involves large-scale structural rearrangement of the ribosome and ribosome-bound tRNAs that is accompanied by extensive and dynamic remodeling of tRNA-ribosome interactions. How the rearrangement of individual tRNA-ribosome interactions influences tRNA movement during translocation, however, remains largely unknown. To address this question, we used single-molecule FRET to characterize the dynamics of ribosomal pretranslocation (PRE) complex analogs carrying either wild-type or systematically mutagenized tRNAs. Our data reveal how specific tRNA-ribosome interactions regulate the rate of PRE complex rearrangement into a critical, on-pathway translocation intermediate and how these interactions control the stability of the resulting configuration. Notably, our results suggest that the conformational flexibility of the tRNA molecule has a crucial role in directing the structural dynamics of the PRE complex during translocation.

  6. Binding site for Xenopus ribosomal protein L5 and accompanying structural changes in 5S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Scripture, J Benjamin; Huber, Paul W

    2011-05-10

    The structure of the eukaryotic L5-5S rRNA complex was investigated in protection and interference experiments and is compared with the corresponding structure (L18-5S rRNA) in the Haloarcula marismortui 50S subunit. In close correspondence with the archaeal structure, the contact sites for the eukaryotic ribosomal protein are located primarily in helix III and loop C and secondarily in loop A and helix V. While the former is unique to L5, the latter is also a critical contact site for transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA), accounting for the mutually exclusive binding of these two proteins to 5S RNA. The binding of L5 causes structural changes in loops B and C that expose nucleotides that contact the Xenopus L11 ortholog in H. marismortui. This induced change in the structure of the RNA reveals the origins of the cooperative binding to 5S rRNA that has been observed for the bacterial counterparts of these proteins. The native structure of helix IV and loop D antagonizes binding of L5, indicating that this region of the RNA is dynamic and also influenced by the protein. Examination of the crystal structures of Thermus thermophilus ribosomes in the pre- and post-translocation states identified changes in loop D and in the surrounding region of 23S rRNA that support the proposal that 5S rRNA acts to transmit information between different functional domains of the large subunit.

  7. Domain movements of elongation factor eEF2 and the eukaryotic 80S ribosome facilitate tRNA translocation

    PubMed Central

    Spahn, Christian MT; Gomez-Lorenzo, Maria G; Grassucci, Robert A; Jørgensen, Rene; Andersen, Gregers R; Beckmann, Roland; Penczek, Pawel A; Ballesta, Juan PG; Frank, Joachim

    2004-01-01

    An 11.7-Å-resolution cryo-EM map of the yeast 80S·eEF2 complex in the presence of the antibiotic sordarin was interpreted in molecular terms, revealing large conformational changes within eEF2 and the 80S ribosome, including a rearrangement of the functionally important ribosomal intersubunit bridges. Sordarin positions domain III of eEF2 so that it can interact with the sarcin–ricin loop of 25S rRNA and protein rpS23 (S12p). This particular conformation explains the inhibitory action of sordarin and suggests that eEF2 is stalled on the 80S ribosome in a conformation that has similarities with the GTPase activation state. A ratchet-like subunit rearrangement (RSR) occurs in the 80S·eEF2·sordarin complex that, in contrast to Escherichia coli 70S ribosomes, is also present in vacant 80S ribosomes. A model is suggested, according to which the RSR is part of a mechanism for moving the tRNAs during the translocation reaction. PMID:14976550

  8. RNA-protein distance patterns in ribosomes reveal the mechanism of translational attenuation.

    PubMed

    Yu, DongMei; Zhang, Chao; Qin, PeiWu; Cornish, Peter V; Xu, Dong

    2014-11-01

    Elucidating protein translational regulation is crucial for understanding cellular function and drug development. A key molecule in protein translation is ribosome, which is a super-molecular complex extensively studied for more than a half century. The structure and dynamics of ribosome complexes were resolved recently thanks to the development of X-ray crystallography, Cryo-EM, and single molecule biophysics. Current studies of the ribosome have shown multiple functional states, each with a unique conformation. In this study, we analyzed the RNA-protein distances of ribosome (2.5 MDa) complexes and compared these changes among different ribosome complexes. We found that the RNA-protein distance is significantly correlated with the ribosomal functional state. Thus, the analysis of RNA-protein binding distances at important functional sites can distinguish ribosomal functional states and help understand ribosome functions. In particular, the mechanism of translational attenuation by nascent peptides and antibiotics was revealed by the conformational changes of local functional sites.

  9. Translational feedback regulation of the gene for L35 in Escherichia coli requires binding of ribosomal protein L20 to two sites in its leader mRNA: a possible case of ribosomal RNA-messenger RNA molecular mimicry.

    PubMed Central

    Guillier, Maude; Allemand, Frédéric; Raibaud, Sophie; Dardel, Frédéric; Springer, Mathias; Chiaruttini, Claude

    2002-01-01

    In addition to being a component of the large ribosomal subunit, ribosomal protein L20 of Escherichia coli also acts as a translational repressor. L20 is synthesized from the IF3 operon that contains three cistrons coding for IF3, and ribosomal proteins L35 and L20. L20 directly represses the expression of the gene encoding L35 and the expression of its own gene by translational coupling. All of the cis-acting sequences required for repression by L20, called the operator, are found on an mRNA segment extending from the middle of the IF3 gene to the start of the L35 gene. L20-mediated repression requires a long-range base-pairing interaction between nucleotide residues within the IF3 gene and residues just upstream of the L35 gene. This interaction results in the formation of a pseudoknot. Here we show that L20 causes protection of nucleotide residues in two regions of the operator in vitro. The first region is the pseudoknot itself and the second lies in an irregular stem located upstream of the L35 gene. By primer extension analysis, we show that L20 specifically induces reverse transcriptase stops in both regions. Therefore, these two regions define two L20-binding sites in the operator. Using mutations and deletions of rpml'-'lacZ fusions, we show that both sites are essential for repression in vivo. However L20 can bind to each site independently in vitro. One site is similar to the L20-binding site on 23S rRNA. Here we propose that L20 recognizes its mRNA and its rRNA in similar way. PMID:12166643

  10. The Conserved Endoribonuclease YbeY Is Required for Chloroplast Ribosomal RNA Processing in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinwen; Zhou, Wenbin; Liu, Guifeng; Yang, Chuanping; Sun, Yi; Wu, Wenjuan; Cao, Shenquan; Wang, Chong; Hai, Guanghui; Wang, Zhifeng; Bock, Ralph; Huang, Jirong

    2015-01-01

    Maturation of chloroplast ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) comprises several endoribonucleolytic and exoribonucleolytic processing steps. However, little is known about the specific enzymes involved and the cleavage steps they catalyze. Here, we report the functional characterization of the single Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) gene encoding a putative YbeY endoribonuclease. AtYbeY null mutants are seedling lethal, indicating that AtYbeY function is essential for plant growth. Knockdown plants display slow growth and show pale-green leaves. Physiological and ultrastructural analyses of atybeY mutants revealed impaired photosynthesis and defective chloroplast development. Fluorescent microcopy analysis showed that, when fused with the green fluorescence protein, AtYbeY is localized in chloroplasts. Immunoblot and RNA gel-blot assays revealed that the levels of chloroplast-encoded subunits of photosynthetic complexes are reduced in atybeY mutants, but the corresponding transcripts accumulate normally. In addition, atybeY mutants display defective maturation of both the 5′ and 3′ ends of 16S, 23S, and 4.5S rRNAs as well as decreased accumulation of mature transcripts from the transfer RNA genes contained in the chloroplast rRNA operon. Consequently, mutant plants show a severe deficiency in ribosome biogenesis, which, in turn, results in impaired plastid translational activity. Furthermore, biochemical assays show that recombinant AtYbeY is able to cleave chloroplast rRNAs as well as messenger RNAs and transfer RNAs in vitro. Taken together, our findings indicate that AtYbeY is a chloroplast-localized endoribonuclease that is required for chloroplast rRNA processing and thus for normal growth and development. PMID:25810095

  11. Database on the structure of small ribosomal subunit RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Van de Peer, Y; Nicolaï, S; De Rijk, P; De Wachter, R

    1996-01-01

    The Antwerp database on small ribosomal subunit RNA offers over 4300 nucleotide sequences (August 1995). All these sequences are stored in the form of an alignment based on the adopted secondary structure model, which in turn is corroborated by the observation of compensating substitutions in the alignment. Besides the primary and secondary structure information, literature references, accession numbers and detailed taxonomic information are also compiled. The complete database is made available to the scientific community through anonymous ftp and World Wide Web(WWW). PMID:8594609

  12. Database on the structure of small ribosomal subunit RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Van de Peer, Y; Jansen, J; De Rijk, P; De Wachter, R

    1997-01-01

    The Antwerp database on small ribosomal subunit RNA now offers more than 6000 nucleotide sequences (August 1996). All these sequences are stored in the form of an alignment based on the adopted secondary structure model, which is corroborated by the observation of compensating substitutions in the alignment. Besides the primary and secondary structure information, literature references, accession numbers and detailed taxonomic information are also compiled. For ease of use, the complete database is made available to the scientific community via World Wide Web at URL http://rrna.uia.ac.be/ssu/ . PMID:9016516

  13. Database on the structure of small ribosomal subunit RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Van de Peer, Y; Van den Broeck, I; De Rijk, P; De Wachter, R

    1994-01-01

    The database on small ribosomal subunit RNA structure contains (June 1994) 2824 nucleotide sequences. All these sequences are stored in the form of an alignment based on the adopted secondary structure model, which in turn is corroborated by the observation of compensating substitutions in the alignment. The complete database is made available to the scientific community through anonymous ftp on our server in Antwerp. A special effort was made to improve electronic retrieval and a program is supplied that allows to create different file formats. The database can also be obtained from the EMBL nucleotide sequence library. PMID:7524022

  14. Structures of the Bacterial Ribosome in Classical and Hybrid States of tRNA Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Dunkle, Jack A.; Wang, Leyi; Feldman, Michael B.; Pulk, Arto; Chen, Vincent B.; Kapral, Gary J.; Noeske, Jonas; Richardson, Jane S.; Blanchard, Scott C.; Cate, Jamie H. Doudna

    2011-09-06

    During protein synthesis, the ribosome controls the movement of tRNA and mRNA by means of large-scale structural rearrangements. We describe structures of the intact bacterial ribosome from Escherichia coli that reveal how the ribosome binds tRNA in two functionally distinct states, determined to a resolution of {approx}3.2 angstroms by means of x-ray crystallography. One state positions tRNA in the peptidyl-tRNA binding site. The second, a fully rotated state, is stabilized by ribosome recycling factor and binds tRNA in a highly bent conformation in a hybrid peptidyl/exit site. The structures help to explain how the ratchet-like motion of the two ribosomal subunits contributes to the mechanisms of translocation, termination, and ribosome recycling.

  15. Comparison of ribosomal RNA removal methods for transcriptome sequencing workflows in teleost fish

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) is becoming the standard for transcriptome analysis. Removal of contaminating ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is a priority in the preparation of libraries suitable for sequencing. rRNAs are commonly removed from total RNA via either mRNA selection or rRNA depletion. These methods have...

  16. The impact of transcriptional tuning on in vitro integrated rRNA transcription and ribosome construction

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Brian R.; Jewett, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    In vitro ribosome construction could enable studies of ribosome assembly and function, provide a route toward constructing minimal cells for synthetic biology, and permit the construction of ribosome variants with new functions. Toward these long-term goals, we recently reported on an integrated, one-pot ribosomal RNA synthesis (rRNA), ribosome assembly, and translation technology (termed iSAT) for the construction of Escherichia coli ribosomes in crude ribosome-free S150 extracts. Here, we aimed to improve the activity of iSAT through transcriptional tuning. Specifically, we increased transcriptional efficiency through 3′ modifications to the rRNA gene sequences, optimized plasmid and polymerase concentrations, and demonstrated the use of a T7-promoted rRNA operon for stoichiometrically balanced rRNA synthesis and native rRNA processing. Our modifications produced a 45-fold improvement in iSAT protein synthesis activity, enabling synthesis of 429 ± 15 nmol/l green fluorescent protein in 6 h batch reactions. Further, we show that the translational activity of ribosomes purified from iSAT reactions is about 20% the activity of native ribosomes purified directly from E. coli cells. Looking forward, we believe iSAT will enable unique studies to unravel the systems biology of ribosome biogenesis and open the way to new methods for making and studying ribosomal variants. PMID:24792158

  17. Molecular analysis of the 16S-23S rDNA internal spacer region (ISR) and truncated tRNA(Ala) gene segments in Campylobacter lari.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, K; Tazumi, A; Nakanishi, S; Nakajima, T; Matsubara, K; Ueno, H; Moore, J E; Millar, B C; Matsuda, M

    2012-06-01

    Following PCR amplification and sequencing, nucleotide sequence alignment analyses demonstrated the presence of two kinds of 16S-23S rDNA internal spacer regions (ISRs), namely, long length ISRs of 837-844 base pair (bp) [n = six for urease-negative (UN) Campylobacter lari isolates, UN C. lari JCM2530(T), RM2100, 176, 293, 299 and 448] and short length ISRs of 679-725 bp [n = six for UN C. lari: n = 14 for urease-positive thermophilic Campylobacter (UPTC) isolates]. The analyses also indicated that the short length ISRs mainly lacked the 156 bp sequence from the nucleotide positions 122-277 bp in long length ISRs for UN C. lari JCM2530(T). The 156 bp sequences shared 94.9-96.8 % sequence similarity among six isolates. Surprisingly, atypical tRNA(Ala) gene segment (5' end 35 bp), which was extremely truncated, occurred within the 156 bp sequences in the long length ISRs, as an unexpected tRNA(Ala) pseudogene. An order of the intercistronic tRNA genes within the short nucleotide spacer of 5'-16S rDNA-tRNA(Ala)-tRNA(Ile)-23S rDNA-3' occurred in all the C. lari isolates examined.

  18. Rattus norvegicus BN/SHR liver and heart left ventricle ribosomal RNA depleted directional RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wyler, Emanuel; van Heesch, Sebastiaan; Adami, Eleonora; Hubner, Norbert; Landthaler, Markus

    2017-08-11

    The spontaneously hypertensive rat strain is a frequently used disease model. In a previous study, we measured translational efficiency from this strain and BN-Lx animals. Here, we describe long RNA sequencing reads from ribosomal RNA depleted samples from the same animals. This data can be used to investigate splicing-related events. RNA was extracted from rat liver and heart left ventricle from BN-Lx and SHR/Ola rats in biological replicates. Ribosomal RNA was removed and the samples subjected to directional high-throughput RNA-sequencing. Read and alignment statistics indicate high quality of the data. The raw sequencing reads are freely available on the NCBI short read archive and can be used for further research on tissue and strain differences, or analysed together with other published high-throughput data from the same animals.

  19. An mRNA-Derived Noncoding RNA Targets and Regulates the Ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Pircher, Andreas; Bakowska-Zywicka, Kamilla; Schneider, Lukas; Zywicki, Marek; Polacek, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Summary The structural and functional repertoire of small non-protein-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) is central for establishing gene regulation networks in cells and organisms. Here, we show that an mRNA-derived 18-nucleotide-long ncRNA is capable of downregulating translation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by targeting the ribosome. This 18-mer ncRNA binds to polysomes upon salt stress and is crucial for efficient growth under hyperosmotic conditions. Although the 18-mer RNA originates from the TRM10 locus, which encodes a tRNA methyltransferase, genetic analyses revealed the 18-mer RNA nucleotide sequence, rather than the mRNA-encoded enzyme, as the translation regulator. Our data reveal the ribosome as a target for a small regulatory ncRNA and demonstrate the existence of a yet unkown mechanism of translation regulation. Ribosome-targeted small ncRNAs are found in all domains of life and represent a prevalent but so far largely unexplored class of regulatory molecules. PMID:24685157

  20. Identification of dairy lactic acid bacteria by tRNAAla-23S rDNA-RFLP.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Andrea; Lazzi, Camilla; Bernini, Valentina; Neviani, Erasmo; Gatti, Monica

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of target tRNA(Ala)-23S ribosomal DNA for identification of lactic acid bacteria strains associated with dairy ecosystem. For this purpose tRNA(Ala)-23S ribosomal DNA Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (tRNA(Ala)-23S rDNA-RFLP) was compared with two widely used DNA fingerprinting methods - P1 Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD), (GTG)5 repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR (rep-PCR) - for their ability to identify different species on a set of 10 type and 34 reference strains. Moreover, 75 unknown isolates collected during different stages of Grana Padano cheese production and ripening were identified using tRNA(Ala)-23S rDNA-RFLP and compared to the RFLP profiles of the strains in the reference database. This study demonstrated that the target tRNA(Ala)-23S rDNA has high potential in bacterial identification and tRNA(Ala)-23S rDNA-RFLP is a promising method for reliable species-level identification of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in dairy products.

  1. UtpA and UtpB chaperone nascent pre-ribosomal RNA and U3 snoRNA to initiate eukaryotic ribosome assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunziker, Mirjam; Barandun, Jonas; Petfalski, Elisabeth; Tan, Dongyan; Delan-Forino, Clémentine; Molloy, Kelly R.; Kim, Kelly H.; Dunn-Davies, Hywel; Shi, Yi; Chaker-Margot, Malik; Chait, Brian T.; Walz, Thomas; Tollervey, David; Klinge, Sebastian

    2016-06-01

    Early eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis involves large multi-protein complexes, which co-transcriptionally associate with pre-ribosomal RNA to form the small subunit processome. The precise mechanisms by which two of the largest multi-protein complexes--UtpA and UtpB--interact with nascent pre-ribosomal RNA are poorly understood. Here, we combined biochemical and structural biology approaches with ensembles of RNA-protein cross-linking data to elucidate the essential functions of both complexes. We show that UtpA contains a large composite RNA-binding site and captures the 5' end of pre-ribosomal RNA. UtpB forms an extended structure that binds early pre-ribosomal intermediates in close proximity to architectural sites such as an RNA duplex formed by the 5' ETS and U3 snoRNA as well as the 3' boundary of the 18S rRNA. Both complexes therefore act as vital RNA chaperones to initiate eukaryotic ribosome assembly.

  2. Homoduplex and Heteroduplex Polymorphisms of the Amplified Ribosomal 16S-23S Internal Transcribed Spacers Describe Genetic Relationships in the “Bacillus cereus Group”

    PubMed Central

    Daffonchio, Daniele; Cherif, Ameur; Borin, Sara

    2000-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus mycoides, Bacillus pseudomycoides, Bacillus thuringiensis, and Bacillus weihenstephanensis are closely related in phenotype and genotype, and their genetic relationship is still open to debate. The present work uses amplified 16S-23S internal transcribed spacers (ITS) to discriminate between the strains and species and to describe the genetic relationships within the “B. cereus group,” advantage being taken of homoduplex-heteroduplex polymorphisms (HHP) resolved by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining. One hundred forty-one strains belonging to the six species were investigated, and 73 ITS-HHP pattern types were distinguished by MDE, a polyacrylamide matrix specifically designed to resolve heteroduplex and single-strand conformation polymorphisms. The discriminating bands were confirmed as ITS by Southern hybridization, and the homoduplex or heteroduplex nature was identified by single-stranded DNA mung bean nuclease digestion. Several of the ITS-HHP types corresponded to specific phenotypes such as B. anthracis or serotypes of B. thuringiensis. Unweighted pair group method arithmetic average cluster analysis revealed two main groups. One included B. mycoides, B. weihenstephanensis, and B. pseudomycoides. The second included B. cereus and B. thuringiensis, B. anthracis appeared as a lineage of B. cereus. PMID:11097928

  3. Differentiation of acetic acid bacteria based on sequence analysis of 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer sequences.

    PubMed

    González, Angel; Mas, Albert

    2011-06-30

    The 16S-23S gene internal transcribed spacer sequence of sixty-four strains belonging to different acetic acid bacteria genera were analyzed, and phylogenetic trees were generated for each genera. The topologies of the different trees were in accordance with the 16S rRNA gene trees, although the similarity percentages obtained between the species was shown to be much lower. These values suggest the usefulness of including the 16S-23S gene internal transcribed spacer region as a part of the polyphasic approach required for the further classification of acetic acid bacteria. Furthermore, the region could be a good target for primer and probe design. It has also been validated for use in the identification of unknown samples of this bacterial group from wine vinegar and fruit condiments.

  4. A conserved heptamer motif for ribosomal RNA transcription termination in animal mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Valverde, J R; Marco, R; Garesse, R

    1994-01-01

    A search of sequence data bases for a tridecamer transcription termination signal, previously described in human mtDNA as being responsible for the accumulation of mitochondrial ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) in excess over the rest of mitochondrial genes, has revealed that this termination signal occurs in equivalent positions in a wide variety of organisms from protozoa to mammals. Due to the compact organization of the mtDNA, the tridecamer motif usually appears as part of the 3' adjacent gene sequence. Because in phylogenetically widely separated organisms the mitochondrial genome has experienced many rearrangements, it is interesting that its occurrence near the 3' end of the large rRNA is independent of the adjacent gene. The tridecamer sequence has diverged in phylogenetically widely separated organisms. Nevertheless, a well-conserved heptamer--TGGCAGA, the mitochondrial rRNA termination box--can be defined. Although extending the experimental evidence of its role as a transcription termination signal in humans will be of great interest, its evolutionary conservation strongly suggests that mitochondrial rRNA transcription termination could be a widely conserved mechanism in animals. Furthermore, the conservation of a homologous tridecamer motif in one of the last 3' secondary loops of nonmitochondrial 23S-like rRNAs suggests that the role of the sequence has changed during mitochondrial evolution. PMID:7515499

  5. In vitro transcription of a cloned mouse ribosomal RNA gene.

    PubMed Central

    Mishima, Y; Yamamoto, O; Kominami, R; Muramatsu, M

    1981-01-01

    An in vitro transcription system which utilizes cloned mouse ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) fragments and a mouse cell extract has been developed. RNA polymerases I is apparently responsible for this transcription as evidenced by the complete resistance to a high concentration (200 micrograms/ml) of alpha-amanitin. Run-off products obtained with three different truncated rDNA fragments indicated that RNA was transcribed from a unique site of rDNA. The S1 nuclease protection mapping of the in vitro product and of in vivo 45S RNA confirmed this site, indicating that, in this in vitro system, transcription of rDNA started from the same site as in vivo. This site is located at several hundred nucleotides upstream from the putative initiation site reported by us (1) and by others (2). Some sequence homology surrounding this region was noted among mouse, Xenopus laevis and Drosophila melanogaster. The data also suggest that some processing of the primary transcript occurs in this in vitro system. Images PMID:6278446

  6. A model for the study of ligand binding to the ribosomal RNA helix h44

    SciTech Connect

    Dibrov, Sergey M.; Parsons, Jerod; Hermann, Thomas

    2010-09-02

    Oligonucleotide models of ribosomal RNA domains are powerful tools to study the binding and molecular recognition of antibiotics that interfere with bacterial translation. Techniques such as selective chemical modification, fluorescence labeling and mutations are cumbersome for the whole ribosome but readily applicable to model RNAs, which are readily crystallized and often give rise to higher resolution crystal structures suitable for detailed analysis of ligand-RNA interactions. Here, we have investigated the HX RNA construct which contains two adjacent ligand binding regions of helix h44 in 16S ribosomal RNA. High-resolution crystal structure analysis confirmed that the HX RNA is a faithful structural model of the ribosomal target. Solution studies showed that HX RNA carrying a fluorescent 2-aminopurine modification provides a model system that can be used to monitor ligand binding to both the ribosomal decoding site and, through an indirect effect, the hygromycin B interaction region.

  7. Discrimination of bacillus anthracis and closely related microorganisms by analysis of 16S and 23S rRNA with oligonucleotide microarray.

    SciTech Connect

    Bavykin, S. G.; Mikhailovich, V. M.; Zakharyev, V. M.; Lysov, Y. P.; Kelly, J. J.; Alferov, O. S.; Jackman, J.; Stahl, D. A.; Mirzabekov, A. D.; Gavin, I. M.; Kukhtin, A. V.; Chandler, D.

    2008-01-30

    Analysis of 16S rRNA sequences is a commonly used method for the identification and discrimination of microorganisms. However, the high similarity of 16S and 23S rRNA sequences of Bacillus cereus group organisms (up to 99-100%) and repeatedly failed attempts to develop molecular typing systems that would use DNA sequences to discriminate between species within this group have resulted in several suggestions to consider B. cereus and B. thuringiensis, or these two species together with B. anthracis, as one species. Recently, we divided the B. cereus group into seven subgroups, Anthracis, Cereus A and B, Thuringiensis A and B, and Mycoides A and B, based on 16S rRNA, 23S rRNA and gyrB gene sequences and identified subgroup-specific makers in each of these three genes. Here we for the first time demonstrated discrimination of these seven subgroups, including subgroup Anthracis, with a 3D gel element microarray of oligonucleotide probes targeting 16S and 23S rRNA markers. This is the first microarray enabled identification of B. anthracis and discrimination of these seven subgroups in pure cell cultures and in environmental samples using rRNA sequences. The microarray bearing perfect match/mismatch (p/mm) probe pairs was specific enough to discriminate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and was able to identify targeted organisms in 5 min. We also demonstrated the ability of the microarray to determine subgroup affiliations for B. cereus group isolates without rRNA sequencing. Correlation of these seven subgroups with groupings based on multilocus sequence typing (MLST), fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis (AFLP) and multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MME) analysis of a wide spectrum of different genes, and the demonstration of subgroup-specific differences in toxin profiles, psychrotolerance, and the ability to harbor some plasmids, suggest that these seven subgroups are not based solely on neutral genomic polymorphisms, but instead reflect

  8. Ralstonia paucula (Formerly CDC group IV c-2): unsuccessful strain differentiation with PCR-based methods, study of the 16S-23S spacer of the rRNA operon, and comparison with other Ralstonia species (R. eutropha, R. pickettii, R. gilardii, and R. solanacearum).

    PubMed

    Moissenet, D; Bidet, P; Garbarg-Chenon, A; Arlet, G; Vu-Thien, H

    2001-01-01

    Ralstonia paucula (formerly CDC group IV c-2) can cause serious human infections. Confronted in 1995 with five cases of nosocomial bacteremia, we found that pulsed-field gel electrophoresis could not distinguish between the isolates and that randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis was poorly discriminatory. In this study, we used PCR-ribotyping and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the spacer 16S-23S ribosomal DNA (rDNA); both methods were unable to differentiate R. paucula isolates. Eighteen strains belonging to other Ralstonia species (one R. eutropha strain, six R. pickettii strains, three R. solanacearum strains, and eight R. gilardii strains) were also tested by PCR-ribotyping, which failed to distinguish between the four species. The 16S-23S rDNA intergenic spacer of R. paucula contains the tRNA(Ile) and tRNA(Ala) genes, which are identical to genes described for R. pickettii and R. solanacearum.

  9. A putative precursor for the small ribosomal RNA from mitochondria of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Osinga, K A; Evers, R F; Van der Laan, J C; Tabak, H F

    1981-01-01

    We have characterized a putative precursor RNA (15.5S) for the 15S ribosomal RNA in mitochondria of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Hybrids were formed with mitochondrial RNA and mtDNA fragments terminally labelled at restriction sites located within the gene coding for 15S ribosomal RNA and treated with S1 nuclease (Berk, A.J. and Sharp, J.A. (1977) 12, 721-732). Sites of resistant hybrids were measured by agarose gel electrophoresis and end points of RNAs determined. The 15.5S RNA is approximately 80 nucleotides longer than the 15S ribosomal RNA, with the extra sequences being located at the 5'-end. Both 15S ribosomal RNA and 15.5S RNA are fully localised within a 2000 base pair HapII fragment. This putative precursor and the mature 15S ribosomal RNA are also found in petite mutants which retain the 15S ribosomal RNA gene. The petite mutant with the smallest genetic complexity has its end point of deletion (junction) just outside the HapII site located in the 5' flank of the 15S ribosomal RNA genes as determined by S1 nuclease analysis. This leaves a DNA stretch approximately 300 base pairs long where an initiation signal for mitochondrial transcription may be present. Images PMID:6262728

  10. Dual detection of Legionella pneumophila and Legionella species by real-time PCR targeting the 23S-5S rRNA gene spacer region.

    PubMed

    Yang, G; Benson, R; Pelish, T; Brown, E; Winchell, J M; Fields, B

    2010-03-01

    Although the majority of cases of Legionnaires' disease (LD) are caused by Legionella pneumophila, an increasing number of other Legionella species have been reported to cause human disease. There are no clinical presentations unique to LD and hence accurate laboratory tests are required for early diagnosis. Therefore, we designed a real-time PCR assay that targets the 23S-5S rRNA intergenic spacer region (23S-5S PCR) and allows for detection of all Legionella species and discrimination of L. pneumophila from other Legionella species. In total, 271 isolates representing 50 Legionella species were tested and the assay was validated using 39 culture-positive and 110 culture-negative patient specimens collected between 1989 and 2006. PCR-positive results were obtained with all 39 culture-positive samples (100% sensitivity). Specimens that tested positive according to 23S-5S PCR, but were culture-negative, were further analysed by DNA sequencing of the amplicon or the macrophage infectivity potentiator (mip) gene. In addition to L. pneumophila, Legionella longbeachae, Legionella cincinnatiensis and Legionella micdadei were identified in the specimens. The assay showed a 7-log dynamic range displaying a sensitivity of 7.5 CFU/mL or three genome equivalents per reaction. Sixty-one specimens containing viruses or bacteria other than Legionellae were negative according to 23S-5S PCR, demonstrating its specificity. Use of this assay should contribute to the earlier detection of respiratory disease caused by Legionella species, as well as to increased rates of detection.

  11. Inhibition by Elongation Factor EF G of Aminoacyl-tRNA Binding to Ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Cabrer, Bartolomé; Vázquez, David; Modolell, Juan

    1972-01-01

    Elongation factor G (EF G), bound to ribosomes either with GMPPCP or with fusidic acid and GDP, inhibits elongation factor Tu (EF Tu)-dependent binding of Phe-tRNA on the ribosome-poly(U) complex and binding of Ala-tRNA on the initiation complex formed with RNA from bacteriophage R17; GTP hydrolysis associated with Phe-tRNA binding is also inhibited. Moreover, nonenzymic binding of Phe-tRNA at high Mg++ concentration is completely blocked by EF G. Thus, EF G appears to bind at a site that overlaps or interacts with the ribosomal A-site. PMID:4551985

  12. The Ribosomal RNA is a Useful Marker to Visualize Rhizobia Interacting with Legume Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinaudi, Luciana; Isola, Maria C.; Giordano, Walter

    2004-01-01

    Symbiosis between rhizobia and leguminous plants leads to the formation of nitrogen-fixing root nodules. In the present article, we recommend the use of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) isolated from legume nodules in an experimental class with the purpose of introducing students to the structure of eukaryotic and prokaryotic ribosomes and of…

  13. The Ribosomal RNA is a Useful Marker to Visualize Rhizobia Interacting with Legume Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinaudi, Luciana; Isola, Maria C.; Giordano, Walter

    2004-01-01

    Symbiosis between rhizobia and leguminous plants leads to the formation of nitrogen-fixing root nodules. In the present article, we recommend the use of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) isolated from legume nodules in an experimental class with the purpose of introducing students to the structure of eukaryotic and prokaryotic ribosomes and of…

  14. Evidence for several higher order structural elements in ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed

    Woese, C R; Gutell, R R

    1989-05-01

    Comparative analysis of small subunit ribosomal RNA sequences suggests the existence of two new higher order interactions: (i) a double-helical structure involving positions 505-507 and 524-526 (Escherichia coli numbering) and (ii) an interaction between the region of position 130 and the helix located approximately between positions 180 and 195. In the first of these, one of the strands of the helix exists in the bulge loop, and the other strand exists in the terminal loop of a previously recognized compound helix involving positions 500-545. Therefore, the new structure formally represents a pseudoknot. In the second, the insertion/deletion of a nucleotide in the vicinity of position 130 correlates with the length of the helix in the 180-195 region, the latter having a 3-base-pair stalk when the base in question is deleted and a stalk of approximately 10 pairs when it is inserted.

  15. Evidence for several higher order structural elements in ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Woese, C R; Gutell, R R

    1989-01-01

    Comparative analysis of small subunit ribosomal RNA sequences suggests the existence of two new higher order interactions: (i) a double-helical structure involving positions 505-507 and 524-526 (Escherichia coli numbering) and (ii) an interaction between the region of position 130 and the helix located approximately between positions 180 and 195. In the first of these, one of the strands of the helix exists in the bulge loop, and the other strand exists in the terminal loop of a previously recognized compound helix involving positions 500-545. Therefore, the new structure formally represents a pseudoknot. In the second, the insertion/deletion of a nucleotide in the vicinity of position 130 correlates with the length of the helix in the 180-195 region, the latter having a 3-base-pair stalk when the base in question is deleted and a stalk of approximately 10 pairs when it is inserted. PMID:2654936

  16. Inversions between ribosomal RNA genes of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, C W; Harnish, B W

    1981-01-01

    It might be anticipated that the presence of redundant but oppositely oriented sequences in a chromosome could allow inversion of the intervening material through homologous recombination. For example, the ribosomal RNA gene rrnD of Escherichia coli has the opposite orientation fro rrnB and rrnE and is separated from these genes by roughly 20% of the chromosome. Starting with a derivative of Cavalli Hfr, we have constructed mutants that have an inversion of the segment between rrnD and either rrnB or rrnE. These mutants are generally quite viable but do exhibit a slight reduction in growth rate relative to the parental strain. A major line of laboratory E. coli, W3110 and its derivatives, also has an inversion between rrnD and rrnE, probably created directly by a recombinational event between these highly homologous genes. Images PMID:6273909

  17. Superresolution Imaging of Ribosomes and RNA Polymerase in Live Escherichia coli Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bakshi, Somenath; Siryaporn, Albert; Goulian, Mark; Weisshaar, James C.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Quantitative spatial distributions of ribosomes (S2-YFP) and RNA polymerase (β′-yGFP) in live E. coli are measured by superresolution fluorescence microscopy. In moderate growth conditions, Nucleoid-ribosome segregation is strong, and RNAP localizes to the nucleoid lobes. The mean copy numbers per cell are 4600 RNAPs and 55,000 ribosomes. Only 10–15% of the ribosomes lie within the densest part of the nucleoid lobes, and at most 4% of the RNAPs lie in the two ribosome-rich endcaps. The predominant observed diffusion coefficient of ribosomes is Dribo = 0.04 μm2/s, attributed to free mRNA being translated by one or more 70S ribosomes. We find no clear evidence of sub-diffusion, as would arise from tethering of ribosomes. The degree of DNA-ribosome segregation strongly suggests that in E. coli most translation occurs on free mRNA transcripts that have diffused into the ribosome-rich regions. Both RNAP and ribosome radial distributions extend to the cytoplasmic membrane, consistent with the transertion hypothesis. However, few if any RNAP copies lie near the membrane of the endcaps. This suggests that if transertion occurs, it exerts a direct radially expanding force on the nucleoid, but not a direct axially expanding force. PMID:22624875

  18. Superresolution imaging of ribosomes and RNA polymerase in live Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Bakshi, Somenath; Siryaporn, Albert; Goulian, Mark; Weisshaar, James C

    2012-07-01

    Quantitative spatial distributions of ribosomes (S2-YFP) and RNA polymerase (RNAP; β'-yGFP) in live Escherichia coli are measured by superresolution fluorescence microscopy. In moderate growth conditions, nucleoid-ribosome segregation is strong, and RNAP localizes to the nucleoid lobes. The mean copy numbers per cell are 4600 RNAPs and 55,000 ribosomes. Only 10-15% of the ribosomes lie within the densest part of the nucleoid lobes, and at most 4% of the RNAPs lie in the two ribosome-rich endcaps. The predominant observed diffusion coefficient of ribosomes is D(ribo) = 0.04 µm(2) s(-1), attributed to free mRNA being translated by one or more 70S ribosomes. We find no clear evidence of subdiffusion, as would arise from tethering of ribosomes to the DNA. The degree of DNA-ribosome segregation strongly suggests that in E. coli most translation occurs on free mRNA transcripts that have diffused into the ribosome-rich regions. Both RNAP and ribosome radial distributions extend to the cytoplasmic membrane, consistent with the transertion hypothesis. However, few if any RNAP copies lie near the membrane of the endcaps. This suggests that if transertion occurs, it exerts a direct radially expanding force on the nucleoid, but not a direct axially expanding force.

  19. Specific contacts between protein S4 and ribosomal RNA are required at multiple stages of ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Mayerle, Megan; Woodson, Sarah A

    2013-04-01

    Assembly of bacterial 30S ribosomal subunits requires structural rearrangements to both its 16S rRNA and ribosomal protein components. Ribosomal protein S4 nucleates 30S assembly and associates rapidly with the 5' domain of the 16S rRNA. In vitro, transformation of initial S4-rRNA complexes to long-lived, mature complexes involves refolding of 16S helix 18, which forms part of the decoding center. Here we use targeted mutagenesis of Geobacillus stearothermophilus S4 to show that remodeling of S4-rRNA complexes is perturbed by ram alleles associated with reduced translational accuracy. Gel mobility shift assays, SHAPE chemical probing, and in vivo complementation show that the S4 N-terminal extension is required for RNA binding and viability. Alanine substitutions in Y47 and L51 that interact with 16S helix 18 decrease S4 affinity and destabilize the helix 18 pseudoknot. These changes to the protein-RNA interface correlate with no growth (L51A) or cold-sensitive growth, 30S assembly defects, and accumulation of 17S pre-rRNA (Y47A). A third mutation, R200A, over-stabilizes the helix 18 pseudoknot yet results in temperature-sensitive growth, indicating that complex stability is finely tuned by natural selection. Our results show that early S4-RNA interactions guide rRNA folding and impact late steps of 30S assembly.

  20. Proteomic Analysis of Ribosomes: Translational Control of mRNA populations by Glycogen Synthase GYS1

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Gabriele; Diges, Camille; Kohlstaedt, Lori A.; Wehner, Karen A.; Sarnow, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Ribosomes exist as a heterogenous pool of macromolecular complexes composed of ribosomal RNA molecules, ribosomal proteins and numerous associated, “non-ribosomal” proteins. To identify non-ribosomal proteins that may modulate ribosome activity, we examined the composition of translationally active and inactive ribosomes using a proteomic multidimensional protein identification technology. Notably, the phosphorylated isoform of glycogen synthase, GYS1, was preferentially associated with elongating ribosomes. Depletion of GYS1 affected the translation of a subset of cellular mRNAs, some of which encode proteins that modulate protein biosynthesis. These findings argue that GYS1 abundance, and by virtue of its ribosomal association, provide a feedback loop between the energy state of the cells and the translation machinery. PMID:21570405

  1. Roles of eukaryotic ribosomal proteins in maturation and transport of pre-18S rRNA and ribosome function.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Cerca, Sébastien; Pöll, Gisela; Gleizes, Pierre-Emmanuel; Tschochner, Herbert; Milkereit, Philipp

    2005-10-28

    Despite the rising knowledge about ribosome function and structure and how ribosomal subunits assemble in vitro in bacteria, the in vivo role of many ribosomal proteins remains obscure both in pro- and eukaryotes. Our systematic analysis of yeast ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) of the small subunit revealed that most eukaryotic r-proteins fulfill different roles in ribosome biogenesis, making them indispensable for growth. Different r-proteins control distinct steps of nuclear and cytoplasmic pre-18S rRNA processing and, thus, ensure that only properly assembled ribosomes become engaged in translation. Comparative analysis of dynamic and steady-state maturation assays revealed that several r-proteins are required for efficient nuclear export of pre-18S rRNA, suggesting that they form an interaction platform with the export machinery. In contrast, the presence of other r-proteins is mainly required before nuclear export is initiated. Our studies draw a correlation between the in vitro assembly, structural localization, and in vivo function of r-proteins.

  2. Distinct tmRNA sequence elements facilitate RNase R engagement on rescued ribosomes for selective nonstop mRNA decay

    PubMed Central

    Venkataraman, Krithika; Zafar, Hina; Karzai, A. Wali

    2014-01-01

    trans-Translation, orchestrated by SmpB and tmRNA, is the principal eubacterial pathway for resolving stalled translation complexes. RNase R, the leading nonstop mRNA surveillance factor, is recruited to stalled ribosomes in a trans-translation dependent process. To elucidate the contributions of SmpB and tmRNA to RNase R recruitment, we evaluated Escherichia coli–Francisella tularensis chimeric variants of tmRNA and SmpB. This evaluation showed that while the hybrid tmRNA supported nascent polypeptide tagging and ribosome rescue, it suffered defects in facilitating RNase R recruitment to stalled ribosomes. To gain further insights, we used established tmRNA and SmpB variants that impact distinct stages of the trans-translation process. Analysis of select tmRNA variants revealed that the sequence composition and positioning of the ultimate and penultimate codons of the tmRNA ORF play a crucial role in recruiting RNase R to rescued ribosomes. Evaluation of defined SmpB C-terminal tail variants highlighted the importance of establishing the tmRNA reading frame, and provided valuable clues into the timing of RNase R recruitment to rescued ribosomes. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that productive RNase R-ribosomes engagement requires active trans-translation, and suggest that RNase R captures the emerging nonstop mRNA at an early stage after establishment of the tmRNA ORF as the surrogate mRNA template. PMID:25200086

  3. Distinct tmRNA sequence elements facilitate RNase R engagement on rescued ribosomes for selective nonstop mRNA decay.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, Krithika; Zafar, Hina; Karzai, A Wali

    2014-01-01

    trans-Translation, orchestrated by SmpB and tmRNA, is the principal eubacterial pathway for resolving stalled translation complexes. RNase R, the leading nonstop mRNA surveillance factor, is recruited to stalled ribosomes in a trans-translation dependent process. To elucidate the contributions of SmpB and tmRNA to RNase R recruitment, we evaluated Escherichia coli-Francisella tularensis chimeric variants of tmRNA and SmpB. This evaluation showed that while the hybrid tmRNA supported nascent polypeptide tagging and ribosome rescue, it suffered defects in facilitating RNase R recruitment to stalled ribosomes. To gain further insights, we used established tmRNA and SmpB variants that impact distinct stages of the trans-translation process. Analysis of select tmRNA variants revealed that the sequence composition and positioning of the ultimate and penultimate codons of the tmRNA ORF play a crucial role in recruiting RNase R to rescued ribosomes. Evaluation of defined SmpB C-terminal tail variants highlighted the importance of establishing the tmRNA reading frame, and provided valuable clues into the timing of RNase R recruitment to rescued ribosomes. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that productive RNase R-ribosomes engagement requires active trans-translation, and suggest that RNase R captures the emerging nonstop mRNA at an early stage after establishment of the tmRNA ORF as the surrogate mRNA template.

  4. Binding Site of Macrolide Antibiotics on the Ribosome: New Resistance Mutation Identifies a Specific Interaction of Ketolides with rRNA

    PubMed Central

    Garza-Ramos, Georgina; Xiong, Liqun; Zhong, Ping; Mankin, Alexander

    2001-01-01

    Macrolides represent a clinically important class of antibiotics that block protein synthesis by interacting with the large ribosomal subunit. The macrolide binding site is composed primarily of rRNA. However, the mode of interaction of macrolides with rRNA and the exact location of the drug binding site have yet to be described. A new class of macrolide antibiotics, known as ketolides, show improved activity against organisms that have developed resistance to previously used macrolides. The biochemical reasons for increased potency of ketolides remain unknown. Here we describe the first mutation that confers resistance to ketolide antibiotics while leaving cells sensitive to other types of macrolides. A transition of U to C at position 2609 of 23S rRNA rendered E. coli cells resistant to two different types of ketolides, telithromycin and ABT-773, but increased slightly the sensitivity to erythromycin, azithromycin, and a cladinose-containing derivative of telithromycin. Ribosomes isolated from the mutant cells had reduced affinity for ketolides, while their affinity for erythromycin was not diminished. Possible direct interaction of ketolides with position 2609 in 23S rRNA was further confirmed by RNA footprinting. The newly isolated ketolide-resistance mutation, as well as 23S rRNA positions shown previously to be involved in interaction with macrolide antibiotics, have been modeled in the crystallographic structure of the large ribosomal subunit. The location of the macrolide binding site in the nascent peptide exit tunnel at some distance from the peptidyl transferase center agrees with the proposed model of macrolide inhibitory action and explains the dominant nature of macrolide resistance mutations. Spatial separation of the rRNA residues involved in universal contacts with macrolides from those believed to participate in structure-specific interactions with ketolides provides the structural basis for the improved activity of the broader spectrum group of

  5. Analysis of 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer regions in Pasteurellaceae isolated from laboratory rodents.

    PubMed

    Benga, Laurentiu; Benten, W Peter M; Engelhardt, Eva; Christensen, Henrik; Sager, Martin

    2012-09-01

    The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of members of Pasteurellaceae isolated from rodents, including the [Pasteurella] pneumotropica biotypes Jawetz and Heyl, [Actinobacillus] muris, "Hemophilus influenzaemurium" and Bisgaard taxon 17 were studied and their feasibility to discriminate these species was analyzed. The reference strains of all species analyzed showed unique species-specific ITS patterns which were further present in 49 clinical isolates of [P.] pneumotropica biotypes Jawetz and Heyl and [A.] muris allowing their identification by comparison to the reference strains pattern. Sequence analysis of the amplified fragments revealed in all species, with exception of "H. influenzaemurium", a larger ITS(ile+ala) which contained the genes for tRNA(Ile(GAU)) and tRNA(Ala(UGC)) and a smaller ITS(glu) with the tRNA(Glu(UUC)) gene. "H. influenzaemurium" revealed two each of the larger and respectively the smaller ITS fragments. Both the length and the sequence of each ITS type were highly conserved within the [P.] pneumotropica biotypes Jawetz and Heyl and [A.] muris strains tested. On the contrary, ITS sequences revealed significant interspecies variations with identity levels ranging from 61.2 to 89.5% for ITS(ile+ala) and 56.5 to 86.8% for ITS(glu). Sequences regions with significant interspecies variation but highly conserved within the species were identified and might be used to design probes for the identification of rodent Pasteurellaceae to the species level. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The pleuromutilin drugs tiamulin and valnemulin bind to the RNA at the peptidyl transferase centre on the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, S M; Karlsson, M; Johansson, L B; Vester, B

    2001-09-01

    The pleuromutilin antibiotic derivatives, tiamulin and valnemulin, inhibit protein synthesis by binding to the 50S ribosomal subunit of bacteria. The action and binding site of tiamulin and valnemulin was further characterized on Escherichia coli ribosomes. It was revealed that these drugs are strong inhibitors of peptidyl transferase and interact with domain V of 23S RNA, giving clear chemical footprints at nucleotides A2058-9, U2506 and U2584-5. Most of these nucleotides are highly conserved phylogenetically and functionally important, and all of them are at or near the peptidyl transferase centre and have been associated with binding of several antibiotics. Competitive footprinting shows that tiamulin and valnemulin can bind concurrently with the macrolide erythromycin but compete with the macrolide carbomycin, which is a peptidyl transferase inhibitor. We infer from these and previous results that tiamulin and valnemulin interact with the rRNA in the peptidyl transferase slot on the ribosomes in which they prevent the correct positioning of the CCA-ends of tRNAs for peptide transfer.

  7. The study of mutation in 23S rRNA resistance gene of Helicobacter pylori to clarithromycin in patients with gastrointestinal disorders in Isfahan — Iran

    PubMed Central

    Khademi, Farzad; Faghri, Jamshid; Moghim, Sharareh; Esfahani, Bahram Nasr; Fazeli, Hossein; Poursina, Farkhondeh; Adibi, Peyman; Madhi, Masoumeh; Safaei, Hajieh Ghasemian

    2014-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori antimicrobial resistance is an important factor responsible for treatment failure. The purpose of this study was evaluating the prevalence of point mutations in clarithromycin-resistant clinical isolates of H. pylori in Isfahan city of Iran. Materials and Methods: Thirty isolates of H. pylori from 130 biopsy specimens were isolated by culture and confirmed by biochemical and PCR tests. The MIC of clarithromycin antibiotic for 30 clinical isolates of H. pylori was determined by E-test method. The point mutations in the 288 bp of 23S rRNA gene of H. pylori were investigated in four clarithromycin-resistant clinical isolates by PCR followed by sequencing. Results: Among 30 isolates of H. pylori, 4 cases were resistant to clarithromycin. One point mutation was found at position T2243C in the 23S rRNA gene in all resistance isolates. Conclusions: In our study, H. pylori resistance to clarithromycin associated with point mutation at position 2243 (T2243C). PMID:24800187

  8. 23S rRNA gene-based enterococci community signatures in Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana, USA, following urban runoff inputs after Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Bae, Hee-Sung; Hou, Aixin

    2013-02-01

    Little is known about the impacts of fecal polluted urban runoff inputs on the structure of enterococci communities in estuarine waters. This study employed a 23S rRNA gene-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay with newly designed genus-specific primers, Ent127F-Ent907R, to determine the possible impacts of Hurricane Katrina floodwaters via the 17th Street Canal discharge on the community structure of enterococci in Lake Pontchartrain. A total of 94 phylotypes were identified through the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) screening of 494 clones while only 8 phylotypes occurred among 88 cultivated isolates. Sequence analyses of representative phylotypes and their temporal and spatial distribution in the lake and the canal indicated the Katrina floodwater input introduced a large portion of Enterococcus flavescens, Enterococcus casseliflavus, and Enterococcus dispar into the lake; typical fecal groups Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus durans, Enterococcus hirae, and Enterococcus mundtii were detected primarily in the floodwater-impacted waters. This study provides a global picture of enterococci in estuarine waters impacted by Hurricane Katrina-derived urban runoff. It also demonstrates the culture-independent PCR approach using 23S rRNA gene as a molecular marker could be a good alternative in ecological studies of enterococci in natural environments to overcome the limitation of conventional cultivation methods.

  9. G.U base pairing motifs in ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed

    Gautheret, D; Konings, D; Gutell, R R

    1995-10-01

    An increasing number of recognition mechanisms in RNA are found to involve G.U base pairs. In order to detect new functional sites of this type, we exhaustively analyzed the sequence alignments and secondary structures of eubacterial and chloroplast 16S and 23S rRNA, seeking positions with high levels of G.U pairs. Approximately 120 such sites were identified and classified according to their secondary structure and sequence environment. Overall biases in the distribution of G.U pairs are consistent with previously proposed structural rules: the side of the wobble pair that is subject to a loss of stacking is preferentially exposed to a secondary structure loop, where stacking is not as essential as in helical regions. However, multiple sites violate these rules and display highly conserved G.U pairs in orientations that could cause severe stacking problems. In addition, three motifs displaying a conserved G.U pair in a specific sequence/structure environment occur at an unusually high frequency. These motifs, of which two had not been reported before, involve sequences 5'UG3' 3'GA5' and 5'UG3' 3'GU5', as well as G.U pairs flanked by a bulge loop 3' of U. The possible structures and functions of these recurrent motifs are discussed.

  10. G.U base pairing motifs in ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Gautheret, D; Konings, D; Gutell, R R

    1995-01-01

    An increasing number of recognition mechanisms in RNA are found to involve G.U base pairs. In order to detect new functional sites of this type, we exhaustively analyzed the sequence alignments and secondary structures of eubacterial and chloroplast 16S and 23S rRNA, seeking positions with high levels of G.U pairs. Approximately 120 such sites were identified and classified according to their secondary structure and sequence environment. Overall biases in the distribution of G.U pairs are consistent with previously proposed structural rules: the side of the wobble pair that is subject to a loss of stacking is preferentially exposed to a secondary structure loop, where stacking is not as essential as in helical regions. However, multiple sites violate these rules and display highly conserved G.U pairs in orientations that could cause severe stacking problems. In addition, three motifs displaying a conserved G.U pair in a specific sequence/structure environment occur at an unusually high frequency. These motifs, of which two had not been reported before, involve sequences 5'UG3' 3'GA5' and 5'UG3' 3'GU5', as well as G.U pairs flanked by a bulge loop 3' of U. The possible structures and functions of these recurrent motifs are discussed. PMID:7493326

  11. Identification of Lactobacillus isolates from the gastrointestinal tract, silage, and yoghurt by 16S-23S rRNA gene intergenic spacer region sequence comparisons.

    PubMed

    Tannock, G W; Tilsala-Timisjarvi, A; Rodtong, S; Ng, J; Munro, K; Alatossava, T

    1999-09-01

    Lactobacillus isolates were identified by PCR amplification and sequencing of the region between the 16S and 23S rRNA genes (spacer region). The sequences obtained from the isolates were compared to those of reference strains held in GenBank. A similarity of 97.5% or greater was considered to provide identification. To check the reliability of the method, the V2-V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified and sequenced in the case of isolates whose spacer region sequences were less than 99% similar to that of a reference strain. Confirmation of identity was obtained in all instances. Spacer region sequencing provided rapid and accurate identification of Lactobacillus isolates obtained from gastrointestinal, yoghurt, and silage samples. It had an advantage over 16S V2-V3 sequence comparisons because it distinguished between isolates of Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus rhamnosus.

  12. Discrimination of Bacillus anthracis from closely related microorganisms by analysis of 16S and 23S rRNA with oligonucleotide microchips

    DOEpatents

    Bavykin, Sergei G.; Mirzabekov, Andrei D.

    2007-10-30

    The present invention is directed to a novel method of discriminating a highly infectious bacterium Bacillus anthracis from a group of closely related microorganisms. Sequence variations in the 16S and 23S rRNA of the B. cereus subgroup including B. anthracis are utilized to construct an array that can detect these sequence variations through selective hybridizations. The identification and analysis of these sequence variations enables positive discrimination of isolates of the B. cereus group that includes B. anthracis. Discrimination of single base differences in rRNA was achieved with a microchip during analysis of B. cereus group isolates from both single and in mixed probes, as well as identification of polymorphic sites. Successful use of a microchip to determine the appropriate subgroup classification using eight reference microorganisms from the B. cereus group as a study set, was demonstrated.

  13. Eukaryote-specific rRNA expansion segments function in ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Madhumitha; Woolford, John L.

    2016-01-01

    The secondary structure of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is largely conserved across all kingdoms of life. However, eukaryotes have evolved extra blocks of rRNA sequences, relative to those of prokaryotes, called expansion segments (ES). A thorough characterization of the potential roles of ES remains to be done, possibly because of limitations in the availability of robust systems to study rRNA mutants. We sought to systematically investigate the potential functions, if any, of the ES in 25S rRNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by deletion mutagenesis. We deleted 14 of the 16 different eukaryote-specific ES in yeast 25S rRNA individually and assayed their phenotypes. Our results show that all but two of the ES tested are necessary for optimal growth and are required for production of 25S rRNA, suggesting that ES play roles in ribosome biogenesis. Further, we classified expansion segments into groups that participate in early nucleolar, middle, and late nucleoplasmic steps of ribosome biogenesis, by assaying their pre-rRNA processing phenotypes. This study is the first of its kind to systematically identify the functions of eukaryote-specific expansion segments by showing that they play roles in specific steps of ribosome biogenesis. The catalog of phenotypes we identified, combined with previous investigations of the roles ribosomal proteins in large subunit biogenesis, leads us to infer that assembling ribosomes are composed of distinct RNA and protein structural neighborhood clusters that participate in specific steps of ribosome biogenesis. PMID:27317789

  14. tmRNA on its way through the ribosome: two steps of resume, and what next?

    PubMed

    Fu, Jie; Hashem, Yaser; Wower, Jacek; Frank, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Trans-translation is a universal quality-control process eubacteria use to degrade incompletely synthesized proteins and rescue ribosome stalled on defective mRNAs. This process is facilitated by a ribonucleoprotein complex composed of transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA)-a chimera made of a tRNA-like molecule and a short open reading frame (ORF) -and small protein B (SmpB). Determination of the structure of tmRNA and SmpB in complex with the ribosome, at the stage when translation has resumed on tmRNA, has provided an increased understanding of the structure of tmRNA as it transits the ribosome, and unique insights into the complex mechanism of template switching on the ribosome and SmpB-driven selection of the correct reading frame on tmRNA's ORF.

  15. Structural insights into the role of rRNA modifications in protein synthesis and ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Polikanov, Yury S; Melnikov, Sergey V; Söll, Dieter; Steitz, Thomas A

    2015-04-01

    We report crystal structures of the Thermus thermophilus ribosome at 2.3- to 2.5-Å resolution, which have enabled modeling of rRNA modifications. The structures reveal contacts of modified nucleotides with mRNA and tRNAs or protein pY, and contacts within the ribosome interior stabilizing the functional fold of rRNA. Our work provides a resource to explore the roles of rRNA modifications and yields a more comprehensive atomic model of a bacterial ribosome.

  16. A novel RNA-binding motif in omnipotent suppressors of translation termination, ribosomal proteins and a ribosome modification enzyme?

    PubMed

    Koonin, E V; Bork, P; Sander, C

    1994-06-11

    Using computer methods for database search, multiple alignment, protein sequence motif analysis and secondary structure prediction, a putative new RNA-binding motif was identified. The novel motif is conserved in yeast omnipotent translation termination suppressor SUP1, the related DOM34 protein and its pseudogene homologue; three groups of eukaryotic and archaeal ribosomal proteins, namely L30e, L7Ae/S6e and S12e; an uncharacterized Bacillus subtilis protein related to the L7A/S6e group; and Escherichia coli ribosomal protein modification enzyme RimK. We hypothesize that a new type of RNA-binding domain may be utilized to deliver additional activities to the ribosome.

  17. Evolution of protein-coupled RNA dynamics during hierarchical assembly of ribosomal complexes.

    PubMed

    Abeysirigunawardena, Sanjaya C; Kim, Hajin; Lai, Jonathan; Ragunathan, Kaushik; Rappé, Mollie C; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida; Ha, Taekjip; Woodson, Sarah A

    2017-09-08

    Assembly of 30S ribosomes involves the hierarchical addition of ribosomal proteins that progressively stabilize the folded 16S rRNA. Here, we use three-color single molecule FRET to show how combinations of ribosomal proteins uS4, uS17 and bS20 in the 16S 5' domain enable the recruitment of protein bS16, the next protein to join the complex. Analysis of real-time bS16 binding events shows that bS16 binds both native and non-native forms of the rRNA. The native rRNA conformation is increasingly favored after bS16 binds, explaining how bS16 drives later steps of 30S assembly. Chemical footprinting and molecular dynamics simulations show that each ribosomal protein switches the 16S conformation and dampens fluctuations at the interface between rRNA subdomains where bS16 binds. The results suggest that specific protein-induced changes in the rRNA dynamics underlie the hierarchy of 30S assembly and simplify the search for the native ribosome structure.Ribosomes assemble through the hierarchical addition of proteins to a ribosomal RNA scaffold. Here the authors use three-color single-molecule FRET to show how the dynamics of the rRNA dictate the order in which multiple proteins assemble on the 5' domain of the E. coli 16S rRNA.

  18. The mRNA of human cytoplasmic arginyl-tRNA synthetase recruits prokaryotic ribosomes independently.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fang; Ji, Quan-Quan; Ruan, Liang-Liang; Ye, Qing; Wang, En-Duo

    2014-07-25

    There are two isoforms of cytoplasmic arginyl-tRNA synthetase (hcArgRS) in human cells. The long form is a component of the multiple aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complex, and the other is an N-terminal truncated form (NhcArgRS), free in the cytoplasm. It has been shown that the two forms of ArgRS arise from alternative translational initiation in a single mRNA. The short form is produced from the initiation at a downstream, in-frame AUG start codon. Interestingly, our data suggest that the alternative translational initiation of hcArgRS mRNA also takes place in Escherichia coli transformants. When the gene encoding full-length hcArgRS was overexpressed in E. coli, two forms of hcArgRS were observed. The N-terminal sequencing experiment identified that the short form was identical to the NhcArgRS in human cytoplasm. By constructing a bicistronic system, our data support that the mRNA encoding the N-terminal extension of hcArgRS has the capacity of independently recruiting E. coli ribosomes. Furthermore, two critical elements for recruiting prokaryotic ribosomes were identified, the “AGGA” core of the Shine-Dalgarno sequence and the “A-rich” sequence located just proximal to the alternative in-frame initiation site. Although the mechanisms of prokaryotic and eukaryotic translational initiation are distinct, they share some common features. The ability of the hcArgRS mRNA to recruit the prokaryotic ribosome may provide clues for shedding light on the mechanism of alternative translational initiation of hcArgRS mRNA in eukaryotic cells.

  19. EttA regulates translation by binding to the ribosomal E site and restricting ribosome-tRNA dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bo; Boël, Grégory; Hashem, Yaser; Ning, Wei; Fei, Jingyi; Wang, Chi; Gonzalez, Ruben L.; Hunt, John F.; Frank, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Cells express many ribosome-interacting factors whose functions and molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Here, we elucidate the mechanism of a newly characterized regulatory translation factor, Energy-dependent Translational Throttle A (EttA), which is an Escherichia coli representative of the ATP-binding cassette F (ABC-F) protein family. Using cryo-EM, we demonstrate that the ATP-bound form of EttA binds to the ribosomal tRNA exit (E) site, where it forms bridging interactions between the ribosomal L1 stalk and the tRNA bound in the peptidyl-tRNA binding (P) site. Using single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET), we show that the ATP-bound form of EttA restricts ribosome and tRNA dynamics required for protein synthesis. This work represents the first example, to our knowledge, where the detailed molecular mechanism of any ABC-F family protein has been determined and establishes a framework for elucidating the mechanisms of other regulatory translation factors. PMID:24389465

  20. rRNA maturation as a "quality" control step in ribosomal subunit assembly in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, G; Chiaberge, S; Bulfone, S

    1997-10-31

    In Dictyostelium discoideum, newly assembled ribosomal subunits enter polyribosomes while they still contain immature rRNA. rRNA maturation requires the engagement of the subunits in protein synthesis and leads to stabilization of their structure. Maturation of pre-17 S rRNA occurs only after the newly formed 40 S ribosomal particle has entered an 80 S ribosome and participated at least in the formation of one peptide bond or in one translocation event; maturation of pre-26 S rRNA requires the presence on the 80 S particle of a peptidyl-tRNA containing at least 6 amino acids. Newly assembled particles that cannot fulfill these requirements for structural reasons are disassembled into free immature rRNA and ribosomal proteins.

  1. The pathway of hepatitis C virus mRNA recruitment to the human ribosome.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Christopher S; Hershey, John W B; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2009-04-01

    Eukaryotic protein synthesis begins with mRNA positioning in the ribosomal decoding channel in a process typically controlled by translation-initiation factors. Some viruses use an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) in their mRNA to harness ribosomes independently of initiation factors. We show here that a ribosome conformational change that is induced upon hepatitis C viral IRES binding is necessary but not sufficient for correct mRNA positioning. Using directed hydroxyl radical probing to monitor the assembly of IRES-containing translation-initiation complexes, we have defined a crucial step in which mRNA is stabilized upon initiator tRNA binding. Unexpectedly, however, this stabilization occurs independently of the AUG codon, underscoring the importance of initiation factor-mediated interactions that influence the configuration of the decoding channel. These results reveal how an IRES RNA supplants some, but not all, of the functions normally carried out by protein factors during initiation of protein synthesis.

  2. Development of a signature probe targeting the 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer of a ruminal Ruminococcus flavefaciens isolate from reindeer.

    PubMed

    Præsteng, K E; Mackie, R I; Cann, I K O; Mathiesen, S D; Sundset, M A

    2011-03-01

    The cellulolytic Ruminococcus flavefaciens has previously been introduced into the ruminant rumen to increase microbial degradation of plant cell wall carbohydrates. The functional effect of an introduced bacterium depends on its ability to establish in the digestive tract, and signature probes can be used as a tool to track and quantify introduced strains. The purpose of this current study was to develop an oligonucleotide signature probe targeting the 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of a putative probiotic cellulolytic isolate (R. flavefaciens strain 8/94-32) from the rumen of reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus). The 16S-23S rRNA gene ITS of three Ruminococcus strains; R. flavefaciens strain 8/94-32, R. flavefaciens FD-1 and Ruminococcus albus Ra-8, was investigated. The ITS region has been reported to vary more between closely related bacteria compared to the widely used 16S rRNA gene, and a high degree of sequence polymorphism was indeed detected between the three Ruminococcus strains studied. Based on observed sequence differences, two oligonucloetide probes, ITSRumi1 and ITSRumi2, targeting the ITS region of the R. flavefaciens isolate 8/94-32 were developed. Probe specificity was evaluated in dot blot hybridisations with R. flavefaciens isolate 8/94-32 and four other Ruminococcus-strains tested. The probe ITSRumi1 gave positive signals for the R. flavefaciens isolate 8/94-32 only, while probe ITSRumi2 gave positive signals for R. flavefaciens isolate 8/94-32 as well as for R. albus Ra-8. The result of hybridisations with the probe ITSRumi1 indicates that the probe is specific for the R. flavefaciens strain 8/94-32 amongst the four Ruminococcus-strains tested, and is promising for further studies using it as a signature probe for tracking this strain when re-introduced to the reindeer rumen.

  3. Global Analysis of Truncated RNA Ends Reveals New Insights into Ribosome Stalling in Plants[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wen‐Chi; Chou, Hsiao‐Chun; Chen, Ai‐Ping; Chou, Shu‐Jen

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput approaches for profiling the 5′ ends of RNA degradation intermediates on a genome-wide scale are frequently applied to analyze and validate cleavage sites guided by microRNAs (miRNAs). However, the complexity of the RNA degradome other than miRNA targets is currently largely uncharacterized, and this limits the application of RNA degradome studies. We conducted a global analysis of 5′-truncated mRNA ends that mapped to coding sequences (CDSs) of Arabidopsis thaliana, rice (Oryza sativa), and soybean (Glycine max). Based on this analysis, we provide multiple lines of evidence to show that the plant RNA degradome contains in vivo ribosome-protected mRNA fragments. We observed a 3-nucleotide periodicity in the position of free 5′ RNA ends and a bias toward the translational frame. By examining conserved peptide upstream open reading frames (uORFs) of Arabidopsis and rice, we found a predominance of 5′ termini of RNA degradation intermediates that were separated by a length equal to a ribosome-protected mRNA fragment. Through the analysis of RNA degradome data, we discovered uORFs and CDS regions potentially associated with stacked ribosomes in Arabidopsis. Furthermore, our analysis of RNA degradome data suggested that the binding of Arabidopsis ARGONAUTE7 to a noncleavable target site of miR390 might directly hinder ribosome movement. This work demonstrates an alternative use of RNA degradome data in the study of ribosome stalling. PMID:27742800

  4. Clinical resistance to erythromycin and clindamycin in cutaneous propionibacteria isolated from acne patients is associated with mutations in 23S rRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, J I; Eady, E A; Cove, J H; Jones, C E; Ratyal, A H; Miller, Y W; Vyakrnam, S; Cunliffe, W J

    1997-01-01

    The genetic basis of erythromycin resistance in cutaneous propionibacteria was determined by comparing the nucleotide sequences of the peptidyl transferase region in the 23S rRNAs from 9 susceptible and 26 resistant clinical isolates as well as 4 laboratory-selected erythromycin-resistant mutants of a susceptible strain. In 13 isolates and the 4 laboratory mutants, cross-resistance to macrolides, lincosamides, and B-type streptogramins was associated with an A-->G transition at a position cognate with Escherichia coli 23S rRNA base 2058. These strains were resistant to > or = 512 microg of erythromycin per ml. Two other mutations were identified, an A-->G transition at base 2059 in seven strains, associated with high-level resistance to all macrolides, and a G-->A transition at base 2057 in six strains, associated with low-level resistance to erythromycin. These mutations correspond to three of four phenotypic classes previously identified by using MIC determinations. PMID:9145890

  5. Requirement of rRNA Methylation for 80S Ribosome Assembly on a Cohort of Cellular Internal Ribosome Entry Sites▿

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Abhijit; Das, Priyanka; Chaudhuri, Sujan; Bevilacqua, Elena; Andrews, Joel; Barik, Sailen; Hatzoglou, Maria; Komar, Anton A.; Mazumder, Barsanjit

    2011-01-01

    Protein syntheses mediated by cellular and viral internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs) are believed to have many features in common. Distinct mechanisms for ribosome recruitment and preinitiation complex assembly between the two processes have not been identified thus far. Here we show that the methylation status of rRNA differentially influenced the mechanism of 80S complex formation on IRES elements from the cellular sodium-coupled neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2) versus the hepatitis C virus mRNA. Translation initiation involves the assembly of the 48S preinitiation complex, followed by joining of the 60S ribosomal subunit and formation of the 80S complex. Abrogation of rRNA methylation did not affect the 48S complex but resulted in impairment of 80S complex assembly on the cellular, but not the viral, IRESs tested. Impairment of 80S complex assembly on the amino acid transporter SNAT2 IRES was rescued by purified 60S subunits containing fully methylated rRNA. We found that rRNA methylation did not affect the activity of any of the viral IRESs tested but affected the activity of numerous cellular IRESs. This work reveals a novel mechanism operating on a cohort of cellular IRESs that involves rRNA methylation for proper 80S complex assembly and efficient translation initiation. PMID:21930789

  6. Signal recognition particle RNA localization within the nucleolus differs from the classical sites of ribosome synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Politz, Joan C.; Lewandowski, Laura B.; Pederson, Thoru

    2002-01-01

    The nucleolus is the site of ribosome biosynthesis, but is now known to have other functions as well. In the present study we have investigated how the distribution of signal recognition particle (SRP) RNA within the nucleolus relates to the known sites of ribosomal RNA synthesis, processing, and nascent ribosome assembly (i.e., the fibrillar centers, the dense fibrillar component (DFC), and the granular component). Very little SRP RNA was detected in fibrillar centers or the DFC of the nucleolus, as defined by the RNA polymerase I–specific upstream binding factor and the protein fibrillarin, respectively. Some SRP RNA was present in the granular component, as marked by the protein B23, indicating a possible interaction with ribosomal subunits at a later stage of maturation. However, a substantial portion of SRP RNA was also detected in regions of the nucleolus where neither B23, UBF, or fibrillarin were concentrated. Dual probe in situ hybridization experiments confirmed that a significant fraction of nucleolar SRP RNA was not spatially coincident with 28S ribosomal RNA. These results demonstrate that SRP RNA concentrates in an intranucleolar location other than the classical stations of ribosome biosynthesis, suggesting that there may be nucleolar regions that are specialized for other functions. PMID:12427865

  7. Generation of chemically engineered ribosomes for atomic mutagenesis studies on protein biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Erlacher, Matthias D; Chirkova, Anna; Voegele, Paul; Polacek, Norbert

    2011-05-01

    The protocol describes the site-specific chemical modification of 23S rRNA of Thermus aquaticus ribosomes. The centerpiece of this 'atomic mutagenesis' approach is the site-specific incorporation of non-natural nucleoside analogs into 23S rRNA in the context of the entire 70S ribosome. This technique exhaustively makes use of the available crystallographic structures of the ribosome for designing detailed biochemical experiments aiming at unraveling molecular insights of ribosomal functions. The generation of chemically engineered ribosomes carrying a particular non-natural 23S rRNA residue at the site of interest, a procedure that typically takes less than 2 d, allows the study of translation at the molecular level and goes far beyond the limits of standard mutagenesis approaches. This methodology, in combination with the presented tests for ribosomal functions adapted to chemically engineered ribosomes, allows unprecedented molecular insight into the mechanisms of protein biosynthesis.

  8. Mutations in ribosomal proteins S4 and S12 influence the higher order structure of 16 S ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed

    Allen, P N; Noller, H F

    1989-08-05

    We have studied the effects of protein mutations on the higher order structure of 16 S rRNA in Escherichia coli ribosomes, using a set of structure-sensitive chemical probes. Ten mutant strains were studied, which contained alterations in ribosomal proteins S4 and S12, including double mutants containing both altered S4 and S12. Two ribosomal ambiguity (ram) S4 mutant strains, four streptomycin resistant (SmR) S12 mutant strains, one streptomycin pseudodependent (SmP) S12 mutant strain, one streptomycin dependent (SmD) S12 mutant strain and two streptomycin independent (Sm1) double mutants (containing both-SmD and ram mutations) were probed and compared to an isogenic wild-type strain. In ribosomes from strains containing S4 ram mutations, nucleotides A8 and A26 become more reactive to dimethyl sulfate (DMS) at their N-1 positions. In ribosomes from strains bearing the SmD allele, A908, A909, A1413 and G1487 are significantly less reactive to chemical probes. These same effects are observed when the S4 and S12 mutations are present simultaneously in the double mutants. An interesting correlation is found between the reactivity of A908 and the miscoding potential of SmR, SmD, SmP and wild-type ribosomes; the reactivity of A908 increases as the translational error frequency of the ribosomes increases. In the case of ram ribosomes, the reactivity of A908 resembles that of wild-type, unless tRNA is bound, in which case it becomes hyper-reactive. Similarly, streptomycin has little effect on A908 in wild-type ribosomes unless tRNA is bound, in which case its reactivity increases to resemble that of ram ribosomes with bound tRNA. Finally, interaction of streptomycin with SmP and SmD ribosomes causes the reactivity of A908 to increase to near-wild-type levels. A simple model is proposed, in which the reactivity of A908 reflects the position of an equilibrium between two conformational states of the 30 S subunit, one of which is DMS-reactive, and the other DMS

  9. Specialized Yeast Ribosomes: A Customized Tool for Selective mRNA Translation

    PubMed Central

    Haubenreisser, Olaf; Wimmer, Bjoern; Weber, Manuela; Karl, Thomas; Klausegger, Alfred; Breitenbach, Michael; Hintner, Helmut; von der Haar, Tobias; Tuite, Mick F.; Breitenbach-Koller, Lore

    2013-01-01

    Evidence is now accumulating that sub-populations of ribosomes - so-called specialized ribosomes - can favour the translation of subsets of mRNAs. Here we use a large collection of diploid yeast strains, each deficient in one or other copy of the set of ribosomal protein (RP) genes, to generate eukaryotic cells carrying distinct populations of altered ‘specialized’ ribosomes. We show by comparative protein synthesis assays that different heterologous mRNA reporters based on luciferase are preferentially translated by distinct populations of specialized ribosomes. These mRNAs include reporters carrying premature termination codons (PTC) thus allowing us to identify specialized ribosomes that alter the efficiency of translation termination leading to enhanced synthesis of the wild-type protein. This finding suggests that these strains can be used to identify novel therapeutic targets in the ribosome. To explore this further we examined the translation of the mRNA encoding the extracellular matrix protein laminin β3 (LAMB3) since a LAMB3-PTC mutant is implicated in the blistering skin disease Epidermolysis bullosa (EB). This screen identified specialized ribosomes with reduced levels of RP L35B as showing enhanced synthesis of full-length LAMB3 in cells expressing the LAMB3-PTC mutant. Importantly, the RP L35B sub-population of specialized ribosomes leave both translation of a reporter luciferase carrying a different PTC and bulk mRNA translation largely unaltered. PMID:23861776

  10. Specialized yeast ribosomes: a customized tool for selective mRNA translation.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Johann W; Brandl, Clemens; Haubenreisser, Olaf; Wimmer, Bjoern; Weber, Manuela; Karl, Thomas; Klausegger, Alfred; Breitenbach, Michael; Hintner, Helmut; von der Haar, Tobias; Tuite, Mick F; Breitenbach-Koller, Lore

    2013-01-01

    Evidence is now accumulating that sub-populations of ribosomes - so-called specialized ribosomes - can favour the translation of subsets of mRNAs. Here we use a large collection of diploid yeast strains, each deficient in one or other copy of the set of ribosomal protein (RP) genes, to generate eukaryotic cells carrying distinct populations of altered 'specialized' ribosomes. We show by comparative protein synthesis assays that different heterologous mRNA reporters based on luciferase are preferentially translated by distinct populations of specialized ribosomes. These mRNAs include reporters carrying premature termination codons (PTC) thus allowing us to identify specialized ribosomes that alter the efficiency of translation termination leading to enhanced synthesis of the wild-type protein. This finding suggests that these strains can be used to identify novel therapeutic targets in the ribosome. To explore this further we examined the translation of the mRNA encoding the extracellular matrix protein laminin β3 (LAMB3) since a LAMB3-PTC mutant is implicated in the blistering skin disease Epidermolysis bullosa (EB). This screen identified specialized ribosomes with reduced levels of RP L35B as showing enhanced synthesis of full-length LAMB3 in cells expressing the LAMB3-PTC mutant. Importantly, the RP L35B sub-population of specialized ribosomes leave both translation of a reporter luciferase carrying a different PTC and bulk mRNA translation largely unaltered.

  11. Sequencing of the intergenic 16S-23S rRNA spacer (ITS) region of Mollicutes species and their identification using microarray-based assay and DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Volokhov, Dmitriy V; George, Joseph; Liu, Sue X; Ikonomi, Pranvera; Anderson, Christine; Chizhikov, Vladimir

    2006-08-01

    We have completed sequencing the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS) region of most known Mycoplasma , Acholeplasma , Ureaplasma , Mesoplasma , and Spiroplasma species. Analysis of the sequence data revealed a significant interspecies variability and low intraspecies polymorphism of the ITS region among Mollicutes . This finding enabled the application of a combined polymerase chain reaction-microarray technology for identifying Mollicutes species. The microarray included individual species-specific oligonucleotide probes for characterizing human Mollicutes species and other species known to be common cell line contaminants. Evaluation of the microarray was conducted using multiple, previously characterized, Mollicutes species. The microarray analysis of the samples used demonstrated a highly specific assay, which is capable of rapid and accurate discrimination among Mollicutes species.

  12. Methylation of ribosomal RNA by NSUN5 is a conserved mechanism modulating organismal lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Schosserer, Markus; Minois, Nadege; Angerer, Tina B.; Amring, Manuela; Dellago, Hanna; Harreither, Eva; Calle-Perez, Alfonso; Pircher, Andreas; Gerstl, Matthias Peter; Pfeifenberger, Sigrid; Brandl, Clemens; Sonntagbauer, Markus; Kriegner, Albert; Linder, Angela; Weinhäusel, Andreas; Mohr, Thomas; Steiger, Matthias; Mattanovich, Diethard; Rinnerthaler, Mark; Karl, Thomas; Sharma, Sunny; Entian, Karl-Dieter; Kos, Martin; Breitenbach, Michael; Wilson, Iain B.H.; Polacek, Norbert; Grillari-Voglauer, Regina; Breitenbach-Koller, Lore; Grillari, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Several pathways modulating longevity and stress resistance converge on translation by targeting ribosomal proteins or initiation factors, but whether this involves modifications of ribosomal RNA is unclear. Here, we show that reduced levels of the conserved RNA methyltransferase NSUN5 increase the lifespan and stress resistance in yeast, worms and flies. Rcm1, the yeast homologue of NSUN5, methylates C2278 within a conserved region of 25S rRNA. Loss of Rcm1 alters the structural conformation of the ribosome in close proximity to C2278, as well as translational fidelity, and favours recruitment of a distinct subset of oxidative stress-responsive mRNAs into polysomes. Thus, rather than merely being a static molecular machine executing translation, the ribosome exhibits functional diversity by modification of just a single rRNA nucleotide, resulting in an alteration of organismal physiological behaviour, and linking rRNA-mediated translational regulation to modulation of lifespan, and differential stress response. PMID:25635753

  13. Choreography of molecular movements during ribosome progression along mRNA.

    PubMed

    Belardinelli, Riccardo; Sharma, Heena; Caliskan, Neva; Cunha, Carlos E; Peske, Frank; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang; Rodnina, Marina V

    2016-04-01

    During translation elongation, ribosome translocation along an mRNA entails rotations of the ribosomal subunits, swiveling motions of the small subunit (SSU) head and stepwise movements of the tRNAs together with the mRNA. Here, we reconstructed the choreography of the collective motions of the Escherichia coli ribosome during translocation promoted by elongation factor EF-G, by recording the fluorescence signatures of nine different reporters placed on both ribosomal subunits, tRNA and mRNA. We captured an early forward swiveling of the SSU head taking place while the SSU body rotates in the opposite, clockwise direction. Backward swiveling of the SSU head starts upon tRNA translocation and continues until the post-translocation state is reached. This work places structures of translocation intermediates along a time axis and unravels principles of the motions of macromolecular machines.

  14. Isolation of a 5S RNA-Protein Complex from Mammalian Ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Blobel, Günter

    1971-01-01

    5S RNA is removed from the large ribosomal subunit of both rat liver and rabbit reticulocyte ribosomes by treatment with EDTA to remove magnesium ions. The RNA is removed not as a naked molecule, but in association with a single ribosomal protein (molecular weight about 35,000) as a ribonucleoprotein, sedimenting at about 7 S. Conditions for the exclusive removal of the 5S RNA-protein complex have been established. Both ribosomal subunits undergo distinct changes in their sedimentation rate, concomitant with the loss of their biological activity, when sedimented into sucrose gradients containing high concentrations of monovalent ions and low concentrations of magnesium. Under these conditions the large subunit loses 5S RNA, the 5S RNA-associated protein, and several more proteins. Images PMID:5001943

  15. Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp. in rainwater tank samples: comparison of culture-based methods and 23S rRNA gene quantitative PCR assays.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, W; Richardson, K; Sidhu, J P S; Toze, S

    2012-10-16

    In this study, culture-based methods and quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays were compared with each other for the measurement of Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp. in water samples collected from rainwater tanks in Southeast Queensland, Australia. Among the 50 rainwater tank samples tested, 26 (52%) and 46 (92%) samples yielded E. coli numbers as measured by EPA Method 1603 and E. coli 23S rRNA gene qPCR assay, respectively. Similarly, 49 (98%) and 47 (94%) samples yielded Enterococcus spp. numbers as measured by EPA Method 1600 and Enterococcus spp. 23S rRNA gene qPCR assay, respectively. The mean E. coli (2.49 ± 0.85) log(10) and Enterococcus spp. (2.72 ± 0.32) log(10) numbers as measured by qPCR assays were significantly (P < 0001) different than E. coli (0.91 ± 0.80) log(10) and Enterococcus spp. (1.86 ± 0.60) log(10) numbers as measured by culture-based method. Weak but significant correlations were observed between both EPA Method 1603 and the E. coli qPCR assay (r = 0.47, P = 0.0009), and EPA Method 1600 and the Enterococcus spp. qPCR assay (r = 0.42, P = 0.002). Good qualitative agreement was found between the culture-based method and the Enterococcus spp. qPCR assay in terms of detecting fecal pollution in water samples from the studied rainwater tanks. More research studies, however, are needed to shed some light on the discrepancies associated with the culture-based methods and qPCR assays for measuring fecal indicator bacteria.

  16. The human Shwachman-Diamond syndrome protein, SBDS, associates with ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed

    Ganapathi, Karthik A; Austin, Karyn M; Lee, Chung-Sheng; Dias, Anusha; Malsch, Maggie M; Reed, Robin; Shimamura, Akiko

    2007-09-01

    Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by bone marrow failure, exocrine pancreatic dysfunction, and leukemia predisposition. Mutations in the SBDS gene are identified in most patients with SDS. SBDS encodes a highly conserved protein of unknown function. Data from SBDS orthologs suggest that SBDS may play a role in ribosome biogenesis or RNA processing. Human SBDS is enriched in the nucleolus, the major cellular site of ribosome biogenesis. Here we report that SBDS nucleolar localization is dependent on active rRNA transcription. Cells from patients with SDS or Diamond-Blackfan anemia are hypersensitive to low doses of actinomycin D, an inhibitor of rRNA transcription. The addition of wild-type SBDS complements the actinomycin D hypersensitivity of SDS patient cells. SBDS migrates together with the 60S large ribosomal subunit in sucrose gradients and coprecipitates with 28S ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Loss of SBDS is not associated with a discrete block in rRNA maturation or with decreased levels of the 60S ribosomal subunit. SBDS forms a protein complex with nucleophosmin, a multifunctional protein implicated in ribosome biogenesis and leukemogenesis. Our studies support the addition of SDS to the growing list of human bone marrow failure syndromes involving the ribosome.

  17. Heritability and Variability in Ribosomal RNA Genes of Vicia faba

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Scott O.; Bendich, Arnold J.

    1987-01-01

    We have compared the restriction patterns and copy numbers of ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA) between and within individuals of Vicia faba . While the EcoRI blot-hybridization patterns changed only after one to two generations, copy number changes were found among different tissues of the same plant. Copy number differences among individuals in the population were as great as 95-fold, whereas as much as a 12-fold variation was seen among tissues of the same plant. Among individual F1 progeny from genetic crosses, nearly an 8-fold variation was seen, and among individuals of the F2 generation a spread of 22-fold was measured. Among individual siblings of self-pollinated parents, up to 7-fold variation was observed. However, changes in copy number did not necessarily indicate changes in rDNA EcoRI blot-hybridization pattern, and vice versa. Furthermore, nearest neighbor analysis of R-loop experiments showed that the arrangement of members of the "nontranscribed" spacer (NTS) size classes along the chromosome was not random, but some clustering was indicated. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that sister chromatid exchange in somatic cells of V. faba is the primary mechanism for altering the rDNA copy number as well as causing the extreme variation observed in the NTS. Variation among individuals in rDNA blot-hybridization pattern was also observed for Vicia villosa, Vicia dasycarpa, Vicia benghalensis and Vicia pannonica. PMID:17246404

  18. Detection of Ralstonia solanacearum, Which Causes Brown Rot of Potato, by Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization with 23S rRNA-Targeted Probes

    PubMed Central

    Wullings, B. A.; Van Beuningen, A. R.; Janse, J. D.; Akkermans, A. D. L.

    1998-01-01

    During the past few years, Ralstonia (Pseudomonas) solanacearum race 3, biovar 2, was repeatedly found in potatoes in Western Europe. To detect this bacterium in potato tissue samples, we developed a method based on fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). The nearly complete genes encoding 23S rRNA of five R. solanacearum strains and one Ralstonia pickettii strain were PCR amplified, sequenced, and analyzed by sequence alignment. This resulted in the construction of an unrooted tree and supported previous conclusions based on 16S rRNA sequence comparison in which R. solanacearum strains are subdivided into two clusters. Based on the alignments, two specific probes, RSOLA and RSOLB, were designed for R. solanacearum and the closely related Ralstonia syzygii and blood disease bacterium. The specificity of the probes was demonstrated by dot blot hybridization with RNA extracted from 88 bacterial strains. Probe RSOLB was successfully applied in FISH detection with pure cultures and potato tissue samples, showing a strong fluorescent signal. Unexpectedly, probe RSOLA gave a less intense signal with target cells. Potato samples are currently screened by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF). By simultaneously applying IIF and the developed specific FISH, two independent targets for identification of R. solanacearum are combined, resulting in a rapid (1-day), accurate identification of the undesired pathogen. The significance of the method was validated by detecting the pathogen in soil and water samples and root tissue of the weed host Solanum dulcamara (bittersweet) in contaminated areas. PMID:9797321

  19. Domain organization and crystal structure of the catalytic domain of E.coli RluF, a pseudouridine synthase that acts on 23S rRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sunita,S.; Zhenxing, H.; Swaathi, J.; Cygler, M.; Matte, A.; Sivaraman, J.

    2006-01-01

    Pseudouridine synthases catalyze the isomerization of uridine to pseudouridine ({psi}) in rRNA and tRNA. The pseudouridine synthase RluF from Escherichia coli (E.C. 4.2.1.70) modifies U2604 in 23S rRNA, and belongs to a large family of pseudouridine synthases present in all kingdoms of life. Here we report the domain architecture and crystal structure of the catalytic domain of E. coli RluF at 2.6 Angstroms resolution. Limited proteolysis, mass spectrometry and N-terminal sequencing indicate that RluF has a distinct domain architecture, with the catalytic domain flanked at the N and C termini by additional domains connected to it by flexible linkers. The structure of the catalytic domain of RluF is similar to those of RsuA and TruB. RluF is a member of the RsuA sequence family of {psi}-synthases, along with RluB and RluE. Structural comparison of RluF with its closest structural homologues, RsuA and TruB, suggests possible functional roles for the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of RluF.

  20. Molecular breeding of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with high RNA content by harnessing essential ribosomal RNA transcription regulator.

    PubMed

    Sasano, Yu; Kariya, Takahiro; Usugi, Shogo; Sugiyama, Minetaka; Harashima, Satoshi

    2017-12-01

    As yeast is commonly used for RNA production, it is industrially important to breed strains with high RNA contents. The upstream activating factor (UAF) plays an important role in transcription of ribosomal RNA (rRNA), a major constituent of intracellular RNA species. Here, we targeted the essential rRNA transcription regulator Rrn5 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a component of the UAF complex, and disrupted the genomic RRN5 gene using a helper plasmid carrying an RRN5 gene. Then we isolated nine suppressor mutants (Sup mutants) of RRN5 gene disruption, causing deficiency in rRNA transcription. The Sup mutants had RNA contents of approximately 40% of the wild type level and expansion of rDNA repeats to ca. 400-700 copies. Reintroduction of a functional RRN5 gene into Sup mutants caused a reduction in the number of rDNA repeats to close to the wild type level but did not change RNA content. However, we found that reintroduction of RRN5 into the Sup16 mutant (in which the FOB1 gene encoding the rDNA replication fork barrier site binding protein was disrupted) resulted in a significant increase (17%) in RNA content compared with wild type, although the rDNA repeat copy number was almost identical to the wild type strain. In this case, upregulated transcription of non-transcribed spacers (NTS) occurred, especially in the NTS2 region; this was likely mediated by RNA polymerase II and accounted for the increased RNA content. Thus, we propose a novel breeding strategy for developing high RNA content yeast by harnessing the essential rRNA transcription regulator.

  1. Transcription of ribosomal RNA: the role of antitermination of RNA polymerase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klumpp, Stefan; Hwa, Terry

    2007-03-01

    The genes encoding ribosomal RNA are transcribed at high rates of 1-2 transcripts per second. These high transcription rates are crucial to maintain the large concentration of ribosomes necessary in fast growing bacteria. To understand how transcription is regulated under these conditions, we developed a model for the traffic of transcribing RNA polymerases (RNAP). Our simulations show that the transcription rate is limited by the elongation stage of transcription rather than by transcript initiation. The maximal transcription rate is severly impaired by RNAP pausing with pause durations in the second range which is ubiquitous under single-molecule conditions. We propose that ribosomal antitermination reduces pauses and thereby increases the transcription rate. This idea is in quantitative agreement with the observed increase of the elongation rate due to antitermination and predicts a two-fold increase of the transcription rate. Antitermination must be highly efficient, since incomplete antitermination with only a few percent of non-antiterminated, i.e. slow, RNAPs completely abolishes its effect. This result suggests that rho-dependent termination may selectively terminate slow RNAPs.

  2. An RNA trapping mechanism in Alphavirus mRNA promotes ribosome stalling and translation initiation

    PubMed Central

    Toribio, René; Díaz-López, Irene; Boskovic, Jasminka; Ventoso, Iván

    2016-01-01

    During translation initiation, eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2) delivers the Met-tRNA to the 40S ribosomal subunit to locate the initiation codon (AUGi) of mRNA during the scanning process. Stress-induced eIF2 phosphorylation leads to a general blockade of translation initiation and represents a key antiviral pathway in mammals. However, some viral mRNAs can initiate translation in the presence of phosphorylated eIF2 via stable RNA stem-loop structures (DLP; Downstream LooP) located in their coding sequence (CDS), which promote 43S preinitiation complex stalling on the initiation codon. We show here that during the scanning process, DLPs of Alphavirus mRNA become trapped in ES6S region (680–914 nt) of 18S rRNA that are projected from the solvent side of 40S subunit. This trapping can lock the progress of the 40S subunit on the mRNA in a way that places the upstream initiator AUGi on the P site of 40S subunit, obviating the participation of eIF2. Notably, the DLP structure is released from 18S rRNA upon 60S ribosomal subunit joining, suggesting conformational changes in ES6Ss during the initiation process. These novel findings illustrate how viral mRNA is threaded into the 40S subunit during the scanning process, exploiting the topology of the 40S subunit solvent side to enhance its translation in vertebrate hosts. PMID:26984530

  3. Depurination of ribosomal RNA and inhibition of viral RNA translation by an antiviral protein of Celosia cristata.

    PubMed

    Baranwal, V K; Tumer, Nilgun E; Kapoor, H C

    2002-10-01

    An antiviral protein (25 kD) isolated from leaves of Celosia cristata (CCP 25) was tested for depurination study on ribosomal RNA from yeast. Ribosomal RNA yielded 360 nucleotide base fragment after treatment with CCP 25 indicating that CCP 25 was a ribosome inactivating protein. CCP 25 also inhibited translation of brome mosaic virus (BMV) and pokeweed mosaic virus (PMV) RNAs in rabbit reticulocyte translation system. The radioactive assay showed that incorporation of [35S]-methionine was less in translation proteins of BMV nucleic acid when CCP 25 was added to translation system. This indicated that antiviral protein from Celosia cristata not only depurinated ribosomal RNA but also inhibited translation of viral RNA in vitro.

  4. Modeling of ribosome dynamics on a ds-mRNA under an external load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakiba, Bahareh; Dayeri, Maryam; Mohammad-Rafiee, Farshid

    2016-07-01

    Protein molecules in cells are synthesized by macromolecular machines called ribosomes. According to the recent experimental data, we reduce the complexity of the ribosome and propose a model to express its activity in six main states. Using our model, we study the translation rate in different biological relevant situations in the presence of external force and the translation through the RNA double stranded region in the absence or presence of the external force. In the present study, we give a quantitative theory for translation rate and show that the ribosome behaves more like a Brownian Ratchet motor. Our findings could shed some light on understanding behaviors of the ribosome in biological conditions.

  5. Transfer RNA-mediated regulation of ribosome dynamics during protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Jingyi; Richard, Arianne C.; Bronson, Jonathan E.; Gonzalez, & Ruben L.

    2011-01-01

    Translocation of transfer RNAs (tRNAs) through the ribosome during protein synthesis involves large-scale structural rearrangements of the ribosome and the ribosome-bound tRNAs that are accompanied by extensive and dynamic remodeling of tRNA-ribosome interactions. The contributions that rearranging individual tRNA-ribosome interactions make to directing tRNA movements during translocation, however, remain largely unknown. To address this question, we have used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer to characterize the dynamics of ribosomal pre-translocation (PRE) complex analogs carrying either wild-type or systematically mutagenized tRNAs. Our data reveal how specific tRNA-ribosome interactions regulate the rate with which the PRE complex rearranges into a critical, on-pathway translocation intermediate and how these interactions control the stability of the resulting configuration. More interestingly, our results suggest that the conformational flexibility of the tRNA molecule itself plays a crucial role in directing the structural dynamics of the PRE complex during translocation. PMID:21857664

  6. Recognition of the 70S ribosome and polysome by the RNA degradosome in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Chun; Du, Dijun; Domínguez-Malfavón, Lilianha; Dimastrogiovanni, Daniela; Cross, Jonathan; Callaghan, Anastasia J; García-Mena, Jaime; Luisi, Ben F

    2012-11-01

    The RNA degradosome is a multi-enzyme assembly that contributes to key processes of RNA metabolism, and it engages numerous partners in serving its varied functional roles. Small domains within the assembly recognize collectively a diverse range of macromolecules, including the core protein components, the cytoplasmic lipid membrane, mRNAs, non-coding regulatory RNAs and precursors of structured RNAs. We present evidence that the degradosome can form a stable complex with the 70S ribosome and polysomes, and we demonstrate the proximity in vivo of ribosomal proteins and the scaffold of the degradosome, RNase E. The principal interactions are mapped to two, independent, RNA-binding domains from RNase E. RhlB, the RNA helicase component of the degradosome, also contributes to ribosome binding, and this is favoured through an activating interaction with RNase E. The catalytic activity of RNase E for processing 9S RNA (the ribosomal 5S RNA precursor) is repressed in the presence of the ribosome, whereas there is little affect on the cleavage of single-stranded substrates mediated by non-coding RNA, suggestings that the enzyme retains capacity to cleave unstructured substrates when associated with the ribosome. We propose that polysomes may act as antennae that enhance the rates of capture of the limited number of degradosomes, so that they become recruited to sites of active translation to act on mRNAs as they become exposed or tagged for degradation.

  7. Nucleolin provides a link between RNA polymerase I transcription and pre-ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Roger, Benoit; Moisand, André; Amalric, François; Bouvet, Philippe

    2003-03-01

    Despite the identification of numerous factors involved in ribosomal RNA synthesis and maturation, the molecular mechanisms of ribosome biogenesis, and in particular the relationship between the different steps, are still largely unknown. We have investigated the consequences of an increased amount of a major nucleolar non-ribosomal protein, nucleolin, in Xenopus laevisstage VI oocytes on the production of ribosomal subunits. We show that a threefold increase in nucleolin leads to the complete absence of pre-rRNA maturation in addition to significant repression of RNA polymerase I transcription. Observation of "Christmas trees" by electron microscopy and analysis of the sedimentation properties of 40S pre-ribosomal particles suggest that an increased amount of nucleolin leads to incorrect packaging of the 40S particle. Interestingly, nucleolin affects the maturation of the 40S particle only when it is present at the time of transcription. These results indicate that nucleolin participates in the co-transcriptional packaging of the pre-rRNA, and that the quality of this packaging will determine whether the 40S precursor undergoes maturation or is degraded. The interaction of nucleolin with nascent pre-rRNA could help the co-transcriptional assembly on pre-rRNA of factors necessary for the subsequent maturation of the pre-ribosomal particle containing the 40S pre-rRNA.

  8. YaeJ is a novel ribosome-associated protein in Escherichia coli that can hydrolyze peptidyl-tRNA on stalled ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Handa, Yoshihiro; Inaho, Noriyuki; Nameki, Nobukazu

    2011-03-01

    In bacteria, ribosomes often become stalled and are released by a trans-translation process mediated by transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA). In the absence of tmRNA, however, there is evidence that stalled ribosomes are released from non-stop mRNAs. Here, we show a novel ribosome rescue system mediated by a small basic protein, YaeJ, from Escherichia coli, which is similar in sequence and structure to the catalytic domain 3 of polypeptide chain release factor (RF). In vitro translation experiments using the E. coli-based reconstituted cell-free protein synthesis system revealed that YaeJ can hydrolyze peptidyl-tRNA on ribosomes stalled by both non-stop mRNAs and mRNAs containing rare codon clusters that extend downstream from the P-site and prevent Ala-tmRNA•SmpB from entering the empty A-site. In addition, YaeJ had no effect on translation of a normal mRNA with a stop codon. These results suggested a novel tmRNA-independent rescue system for stalled ribosomes in E. coli. YaeJ was almost exclusively found in the 70S ribosome and polysome fractions after sucrose density gradient sedimentation, but was virtually undetectable in soluble fractions. The C-terminal basic residue-rich extension was also found to be required for ribosome binding. These findings suggest that YaeJ functions as a ribosome-attached rescue device for stalled ribosomes.

  9. Ribosomal protein L2 is involved in the association of the ribosomal subunits, tRNA binding to A and P sites and peptidyl transfer

    PubMed Central

    Diedrich, Gundo; Spahn, Christian M.T.; Stelzl, Ulrich; Schäfer, Markus A.; Wooten, Tammy; Bochkariov, Dmitry E.; Cooperman, Barry S.; Traut, Robert R.; Nierhaus, Knud H.

    2000-01-01

    Ribosomal proteins L2, L3 and L4, together with the 23S RNA, are the main candidates for catalyzing peptide bond formation on the 50S subunit. That L2 is evolutionarily highly conserved led us to perform a thorough functional analysis with reconstituted 50S particles either lacking L2 or harboring a mutated L2. L2 does not play a dominant role in the assembly of the 50S subunit or in the fixation of the 3′-ends of the tRNAs at the peptidyl-transferase center. However, it is absolutely required for the association of 30S and 50S subunits and is strongly involved in tRNA binding to both A and P sites, possibly at the elbow region of the tRNAs. Furthermore, while the conserved histidyl residue 229 is extremely important for peptidyl-transferase activity, it is apparently not involved in other measured functions. None of the other mutagenized amino acids (H14, D83, S177, D228, H231) showed this strong and exclusive participation in peptide bond formation. These results are used to examine critically the proposed direct involvement of His229 in catalysis of peptide synthesis. PMID:11013226

  10. Identification of previously unrecognized common elements in eukaryotic promoters. A ribosomal RNA gene initiator element for RNA polymerase I.

    PubMed

    Radebaugh, C A; Gong, X; Bartholomew, B; Paule, M R

    1997-02-07

    A new ribosomal RNA promoter element with a functional role similar to the RNA polymerase II initiator (Inr) was identified. This sequence, which we dub the ribosomal Inr (rInr) is unusually conserved, even in normally divergent RNA polymerase I promoters. It functions in the recruitment of the fundamental, TATA-binding protein (TBP)-containing transcription factor, TIF-IB. All upstream elements of the exceptionally strong Acanthamoeba castellanii ribosomal RNA core promoter, to within 6 base pairs of the transcription initiation site (tis), can be deleted without loss of specific transcription initiation. Thus, the A. castellanii promoter can function in a manner similar to RNA polymerase II TATA-less promoters. Sequence-specific photo-cross-linking localizes a 96-kDa subunit of TIF-IB and the second largest RNA polymerase I subunit (A133) to the rInr sequence. A185 also photo-cross-links when polymerase is stalled at +7.

  11. Potential key bases of ribosomal RNA to kingdom-specific spectra of antibiotic susceptibility and the possible archaeal origin of eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qiang; Wang, Yanhui; Lin, Jinzhong; Qin, Yan; Wang, Ying; Bu, Wenjun

    2012-01-01

    In support of the hypothesis of the endosymbiotic origin of eukaryotes, much evidence has been found to support the idea that some organelles of eukaryotic cells originated from bacterial ancestors. Less attention has been paid to the identity of the host cell, although some biochemical and molecular genetic properties shared by archaea and eukaryotes have been documented. Through comparing 507 taxa of 16S-18S rDNA and 347 taxa of 23S-28S rDNA, we found that archaea and eukaryotes share twenty-six nucleotides signatures in ribosomal DNA. These signatures exist in all living eukaryotic organisms, whether protist, green plant, fungus, or animal. This evidence explicitly supports the archaeal origin of eukaryotes. In the ribosomal RNA, besides A2058 in Escherichia coli vs. G2400 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, there still exist other twenties of sites, in which the bases are kingdom-specific. Some of these sites concentrate in the peptidyl transferase centre (PTC) of the 23S-28S rRNA. The results suggest potential key sites to explain the kingdom-specific spectra of drug resistance of ribosomes.

  12. Specific detection and identification of [Actinobacillus] muris by PCR using primers targeting the 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer regions.

    PubMed

    Benga, Laurentiu; Benten, W Peter M; Engelhardt, Eva; Gougoula, Christina; Sager, Martin

    2013-08-01

    [Actinobacillus] muris represents along with [Pasteurella] pneumotropica the most prevalent Pasteurellaceae species isolated from the laboratory mouse. Despite the biological and economic importance of Pasteurellaceae in relation to experimental animals, no molecular based methods for the identification of [A.] muris are available. The aim of the present investigation was to develop a PCR method allowing detection and identification of [A.] muris. In this assay, a Pasteurellaceae common forward primer based on a conserved region of the 16S rRNA gene was used in conjunction with two different reverse primers specific for [A.] muris, targeting the 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer sequences. The specificity of the assay was tested against 78 reference and clinical isolates of Pasteurellaceae, including 37 strains of [A.] muris. In addition, eight other mice associated bacterial species which could pose a diagnostic problem were included. The assay showed 100% sensitivity and 97.95% specificity. Identification of the clinical isolates was validated by ITS profiling and when necessary by 16S rRNA sequencing. This multiplex PCR represents the first molecular tool able to detect [A.] muris and may become a reliable alternative to the present diagnostic methods. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Eukaryote-specific rRNA expansion segments function in ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Madhumitha; Woolford, John L

    2016-08-01

    The secondary structure of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is largely conserved across all kingdoms of life. However, eukaryotes have evolved extra blocks of rRNA sequences, relative to those of prokaryotes, called expansion segments (ES). A thorough characterization of the potential roles of ES remains to be done, possibly because of limitations in the availability of robust systems to study rRNA mutants. We sought to systematically investigate the potential functions, if any, of the ES in 25S rRNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by deletion mutagenesis. We deleted 14 of the 16 different eukaryote-specific ES in yeast 25S rRNA individually and assayed their phenotypes. Our results show that all but two of the ES tested are necessary for optimal growth and are required for production of 25S rRNA, suggesting that ES play roles in ribosome biogenesis. Further, we classified expansion segments into groups that participate in early nucleolar, middle, and late nucleoplasmic steps of ribosome biogenesis, by assaying their pre-rRNA processing phenotypes. This study is the first of its kind to systematically identify the functions of eukaryote-specific expansion segments by showing that they play roles in specific steps of ribosome biogenesis. The catalog of phenotypes we identified, combined with previous investigations of the roles ribosomal proteins in large subunit biogenesis, leads us to infer that assembling ribosomes are composed of distinct RNA and protein structural neighborhood clusters that participate in specific steps of ribosome biogenesis. © 2016 Ramesh and Woolford; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  14. Organization and nucleotide sequence analysis of a ribosomal RNA gene cluster from Streptomyces ambofaciens.

    PubMed

    Pernodet, J L; Boccard, F; Alegre, M T; Gagnat, J; Guérineau, M

    1989-06-30

    The Streptomyces ambofaciens genome contains four rRNA gene clusters. These copies are called rrnA, B, C and D. The complete nucleotide (nt) sequence of rrnD has been determined. These genes possess striking similarity with other eubacterial rRNA genes. Comparison with other rRNA sequences allowed the putative localization of the sequences encoding mature rRNAs. The structural genes are arranged in the order 16S-23S-5S and are tightly linked. The mature rRNAs are predicted to contain 1528, 3120 and 120 nt, for the 16S, 23S and 5S rRNAs, respectively. The 23S rRNA is, to our knowledge, the longest of all sequenced prokaryotic 23S rRNAs. When compared to other large rRNAs it shows insertions at positions where they are also present in archaebacterial and in eukaryotic large rRNAs. Secondary structure models of S. ambofaciens rRNAs are proposed, based upon those existing for other bacterial rRNAs. Positions of putative transcription start points and of a termination signal are suggested. The corresponding putative primary transcript, containing the 16S, 23S and 5S rRNAs plus flanking regions, was folded into a secondary structure, and sequences possibly involved in rRNA maturation are described. The G + C content of the rRNA gene cluster is low (57%) compared with the overall G + C content of Streptomyces DNA (73%).

  15. Complex RNA maturation pathway for a chloroplast ribosomal protein operon with an internal tRNA cistron.

    PubMed Central

    Christopher, D A; Hallick, R B

    1990-01-01

    We have studied the expression of a large chloroplast ribosomal protein operon from Euglena gracilis that resembles the Escherichia coli S10 and spc ribosomal protein operons. We present evidence that 11 ribosomal protein genes, a tRNA gene, and a new locus, orf214/orf302, are expressed as a single transcription unit. The primary transcript also contains at least 15 group II and group III introns. Gene-specific probes for each ribosomal protein gene, orf214/orf302, and for trnl hybridized to a common pre-mRNA of an estimated size of 8.3 kilobases. This is the RNA size predicted for a full-length transcript of the entire operon after splicing of all 15 introns. Polycistronic ribosomal protein mRNAs accumulated primarily as spliced hepta-, hexa-, penta-, tetra-, tri-, and dicistronic mRNAs, which were presumed to arise by stepwise processing of the 8.3-kilobase pre-mRNA. A novel finding was the cotranscription of the trnl gene as an internal cistron within the ribosomal protein operon. Several combined mRNA/tRNA molecules, such as the pentacistronic rpl5-rps8-rpl36-trnl-rps14, were characterized. The occurrence of the orf214/orf302 is a unique feature of the Euglena operon, distinguishing it from all chloroplast and prokaryotic ribosomal protein operons characterized to date. The orf214/orf302 are not similar to any known genes but are cotranscribed with the ribosomal protein loci and encode stable RNA species of 2.4, 1.8, and 1.4 kilobases. PMID:2136640

  16. Amicoumacin a inhibits translation by stabilizing mRNA interaction with the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Polikanov, Yury S; Osterman, Ilya A; Szal, Teresa; Tashlitsky, Vadim N; Serebryakova, Marina V; Kusochek, Pavel; Bulkley, David; Malanicheva, Irina A; Efimenko, Tatyana A; Efremenkova, Olga V; Konevega, Andrey L; Shaw, Karen J; Bogdanov, Alexey A; Rodnina, Marina V; Dontsova, Olga A; Mankin, Alexander S; Steitz, Thomas A; Sergiev, Petr V

    2014-11-20

    We demonstrate that the antibiotic amicoumacin A (AMI) is a potent inhibitor of protein synthesis. Resistance mutations in helix 24 of the 16S rRNA mapped the AMI binding site to the small ribosomal subunit. The crystal structure of bacterial ribosome in complex with AMI solved at 2.4 Å resolution revealed that the antibiotic makes contacts with universally conserved nucleotides of 16S rRNA in the E site and the mRNA backbone. Simultaneous interactions of AMI with 16S rRNA and mRNA and the in vivo experimental evidence suggest that it may inhibit the progression of the ribosome along mRNA. Consistent with this proposal, binding of AMI interferes with translocation in vitro. The inhibitory action of AMI can be partly compensated by mutations in the translation elongation factor G. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Ribosome release factor RF4 and termination factor RF3 are involved in dissociation of peptidyl-tRNA from the ribosome.

    PubMed Central

    Heurgué-Hamard, V; Karimi, R; Mora, L; MacDougall, J; Leboeuf, C; Grentzmann, G; Ehrenberg, M; Buckingham, R H

    1998-01-01

    Peptidyl-tRNA dissociation from ribosomes is an energetically costly but apparently inevitable process that accompanies normal protein synthesis. The drop-off products of these events are hydrolysed by peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase. Mutant selections have been made to identify genes involved in the drop-off of peptidyl-tRNA, using a thermosensitive peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase mutant in Escherichia coli. Transposon insertions upstream of the frr gene, which encodes RF4 (ribosome release or recycling factor), restored growth to this mutant. The insertions impaired expression of the frr gene. Mutations inactivating prfC, encoding RF3 (release factor 3), displayed a similar phenotype. Conversely, production of RF4 from a plasmid increased the thermosensitivity of the peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase mutant. In vitro measurements of peptidyl-tRNA release from ribosomes paused at stop signals or sense codons confirmed that RF3 and RF4 were able to stimulate peptidyl-tRNA release from ribosomes, and showed that this action of RF4 required the presence of translocation factor EF2, known to be needed for the function of RF4 in ribosome recycling. When present together, the three factors were able to stimulate release up to 12-fold. It is suggested that RF4 may displace peptidyl-tRNA from the ribosome in a manner related to its proposed function in removing deacylated tRNA during ribosome recycling. PMID:9451005

  18. An unusual mechanism for EF-Tu activation during tmRNA-mediated ribosome rescue

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mickey R.; Buskirk, Allen R.

    2014-01-01

    In bacteria, ribosomes stalled on truncated mRNAs are rescued by transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) and its protein partner SmpB. Acting like tRNA, the aminoacyl-tmRNA/SmpB complex is delivered to the ribosomal A site by EF-Tu and accepts the transfer of the nascent polypeptide. Although SmpB binding within the decoding center is clearly critical for licensing tmRNA entry into the ribosome, it is not known how activation of EF-Tu occurs in the absence of a codon–anticodon interaction. A recent crystal structure revealed that SmpB residue His136 stacks on 16S rRNA nucleotide G530, a critical player in the canonical decoding mechanism. Here we use pre-steady-state kinetic methods to probe the role of this interaction in ribosome rescue. We find that although mutation of His136 does not reduce SmpB's affinity for the ribosomal A-site, it dramatically reduces the rate of GTP hydrolysis by EF-Tu. Surprisingly, the same mutation has little effect on the apparent rate of peptide-bond formation, suggesting that release of EF-Tu from the tmRNA/SmpB complex on the ribosome may occur prior to GTP hydrolysis. Consistent with this idea, we find that peptidyl transfer to tmRNA is relatively insensitive to the antibiotic kirromycin. Taken together, our studies provide a model for the initial stages of ribosomal rescue by tmRNA. PMID:24345396

  19. An unusual mechanism for EF-Tu activation during tmRNA-mediated ribosome rescue.

    PubMed

    Miller, Mickey R; Buskirk, Allen R

    2014-02-01

    In bacteria, ribosomes stalled on truncated mRNAs are rescued by transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) and its protein partner SmpB. Acting like tRNA, the aminoacyl-tmRNA/SmpB complex is delivered to the ribosomal A site by EF-Tu and accepts the transfer of the nascent polypeptide. Although SmpB binding within the decoding center is clearly critical for licensing tmRNA entry into the ribosome, it is not known how activation of EF-Tu occurs in the absence of a codon-anticodon interaction. A recent crystal structure revealed that SmpB residue His136 stacks on 16S rRNA nucleotide G530, a critical player in the canonical decoding mechanism. Here we use pre-steady-state kinetic methods to probe the role of this interaction in ribosome rescue. We find that although mutation of His136 does not reduce SmpB's affinity for the ribosomal A-site, it dramatically reduces the rate of GTP hydrolysis by EF-Tu. Surprisingly, the same mutation has little effect on the apparent rate of peptide-bond formation, suggesting that release of EF-Tu from the tmRNA/SmpB complex on the ribosome may occur prior to GTP hydrolysis. Consistent with this idea, we find that peptidyl transfer to tmRNA is relatively insensitive to the antibiotic kirromycin. Taken together, our studies provide a model for the initial stages of ribosomal rescue by tmRNA.

  20. Ribosomal protein S1 unwinds double-stranded RNA in multiple steps

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Xiaohui; Lancaster, Laura; Noller, Harry F.; Bustamante, Carlos; Tinoco, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    The sequence and secondary structure of the 5′-end of mRNAs regulate translation by controlling ribosome initiation on the mRNA. Ribosomal protein S1 is crucial for ribosome initiation on many natural mRNAs, particularly for those with structured 5′-ends, or with no or weak Shine-Dalgarno sequences. Besides a critical role in translation, S1 has been implicated in several other cellular processes, such as transcription recycling, and the rescuing of stalled ribosomes by tmRNA. The mechanisms of S1 functions are still elusive but have been widely considered to be linked to the affinity of S1 for single-stranded RNA and its corresponding destabilization of mRNA secondary structures. Here, using optical tweezers techniques, we demonstrate that S1 promotes RNA unwinding by binding to the single-stranded RNA formed transiently during the thermal breathing of the RNA base pairs and that S1 dissociation results in RNA rezipping. We measured the dependence of the RNA unwinding and rezipping rates on S1 concentration, and the force applied to the ends of the RNA. We found that each S1 binds 10 nucleotides of RNA in a multistep fashion implying that S1 can facilitate ribosome initiation on structured mRNA by first binding to the single strand next to an RNA duplex structure (“stand-by site”) before subsequent binding leads to RNA unwinding. Unwinding by multiple small substeps is much less rate limited by thermal breathing than unwinding in a single step. Thus, a multistep scheme greatly expedites S1 unwinding of an RNA structure compared to a single-step mode. PMID:22908248

  1. Determining RNA quality for NextGen sequencing: some exceptions to the gold standard rule of 23S to 16S rRNA ratio

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Using next-generation-sequencing technology to assess entire transcriptomes requires high quality starting RNA. Currently, RNA quality is routinely judged using automated microfluidic gel electrophoresis platforms and associated algorithms. Here we report that such automated methods generate false-n...

  2. Development of a multiplex PCR assay based on the 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer for the detection and identification of rodent Pasteurellaceae.

    PubMed

    Benga, Laurentiu; Benten, W Peter M; Engelhardt, Eva; Bleich, André; Gougoula, Christina; Sager, Martin

    2013-11-01

    The rodents Pasteurellaceae have to be excluded from the specified pathogen free experimental animal facilities. Despite the biological and economic importance of Pasteurellaceae in relation to experimental animals just a few molecular based methods are available for their detection and identification. The aim of the present investigation was to develop a multiplex PCR assay allowing detection of all rodent Pasteurellaceae and identification of [Pasteurella] pneumotropica biotype Jawetz, [P.] pneumotropica biotype Heyl and [Actinobacillus] muris, as the most prevalent members of the group. For this, a Pasteurellaceae common forward primer located on the 16S rRNA gene was used in conjunction with four different reverse primers specific for [P.] pneumotropica biotype Jawetz, [P.] pneumotropica biotype Heyl, [A.] muris and a common reverse primer for all rodent Pasteurellaceae, all targeting the 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer sequences. The performance characteristics of the assay were tested against 125 Pasteurellaceae isolates belonging to eleven different species and including 34 strains of [P.] pneumotropica biotype Jawetz, 44 strains of [P.] pneumotropica biotype Heyl and 37 strains of [A.] muris. Additionally, eight other mouse associated bacterial species which could pose a diagnostic problem were included. The assay showed 100% sensitivity and specificity. Identification of the clinical isolates was validated by ITS profiling and when necessary by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. This multiplex PCR represents the first molecular tool able to detect and differentiate in a single assay among the Pasteurellaceae found in laboratory mouse and may become a reliable alternative to the present diagnostic methods. © 2013.

  3. Stimulation of vasculogenesis and leukopoiesis of embryonic stem cells by extracellular transfer RNA and ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed

    Sharifpanah, Fatemeh; De Silva, Sepali; Bekhite, Mohamed M; Hurtado-Oliveros, Jorge; Preissner, Klaus T; Wartenberg, Maria; Sauer, Heinrich

    2015-12-01

    Cell injury releases nucleic acids supporting inflammation and stem cell activation. Here, the impact of extracellular ribonucleic acid, especially transfer RNA (ex-tRNA), on vasculogenesis and leukopoiesis of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells was investigated. ex-tRNA, whole cell RNA and ribosomal RNA (ex-rRNA) but not DNA increased CD31-positive vascular structures in embryoid bodies. Ex-tRNA and ex-rRNA increased numbers of VEGFR2(+), CD31(+) and VE-cadherin(+) vascular cells as well as CD18(+), CD45(+) and CD68(+) cells, indicating leukocyte/macrophage differentiation. This was paralleled by mRNA and protein expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), vascular endothelial growth factor-165 (VEGF165) and neuropilin 1 (NRP1), phosphorylation of phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) as well as mRNA expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). ex-tRNA was taken up by endosomes, increased expression of the pro-angiogenic semaphorin B4 receptor plexin B1 as well as the ephrin-type B receptor 4 (EphB4) and ephrinB2 ligand and enhanced cell migration, which was inhibited by the VEGFR2 antagonist SU5614 and the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. This likewise abolished the effects of ex-tRNA on vasculogenesis and leukopoiesis of ES cells. Ex-tRNA increased NOX1, NOX2, NOX4 and DUOX2 mRNA and boosted the generation of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide which was inhibited by radical scavengers, the NADPH oxidase inhibitors apocynin, VAS2870, ML171, and plumbagin as well as shRNA silencing of NOX1 and NOX4. Our findings indicate that ex-tRNA treatment induces vasculogenesis and leukopoiesis of ES cells via superoxide/hydrogen peroxide generated by NADPH oxidase and activation of VEGFR2 and PI3K. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The influence of base identity and base pairing on the function of the alpha-sarcin loop of 23S rRNA.

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, M; Dahlberg, A E

    1996-01-01

    The alpha-sarcin loop of large subunit rRNAs is one of the sites of interaction of elongation factors with the ribosome, and the target of the cytotoxins alpha-sarcin and ricin. Using a genetic selection for increased frameshifting in a reporter gene, we have isolated a C --> U mutation at position 2666 in the alpha-sarcin loop. In the NMR-derived structure of the loop, bases equivalent to 2666 and 2654 are paired via a non-canonical base pairing interaction. Each of the three base substitutions at C2666 and A2654 was constructed by site-directed mutagenesis of a plasmid borne copy of the rrnB operon of Escherichia coli. Only the C2666 --> U and A2654 --> G mutations that resulted in the formation of canonical A-U and C-G base pairs respectively, increased the levels of stop codon readthrough and frameshifting. The effects of different base pair combinations at positions 2666 and 2654 on ribosome function were then tested by constructing and analyzing all possible base combinations at these sites. All A --> G base substitution mutations at position 2654 and C --> U substitutions at position 2666 increased the levels of translational errors. However, these effects were greatest when G2654 and U2666 had the potential to engage in standard Watson-Crick base pairing interactions. These data indicate that base identity as well as base pairing interactions are important for the function of this essential component of the large subunit rRNA. PMID:8758999

  5. A pre-ribosomal RNA interaction network involving snoRNAs and the Rok1 helicase.

    PubMed

    Martin, Roman; Hackert, Philipp; Ruprecht, Maike; Simm, Stefan; Brüning, Lukas; Mirus, Oliver; Sloan, Katherine E; Kudla, Grzegorz; Schleiff, Enrico; Bohnsack, Markus T

    2014-08-01

    Ribosome biogenesis in yeast requires 75 small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) and a myriad of cofactors for processing, modification, and folding of the ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs). For the 19 RNA helicases implicated in ribosome synthesis, their sites of action and molecular functions have largely remained unknown. Here, we have used UV cross-linking and analysis of cDNA (CRAC) to reveal the pre-rRNA binding sites of the RNA helicase Rok1, which is involved in early small subunit biogenesis. Several contact sites were identified in the 18S rRNA sequence, which interestingly all cluster in the "foot" region of the small ribosomal subunit. These include a major binding site in the eukaryotic expansion segment ES6, where Rok1 is required for release of the snR30 snoRNA. Rok1 directly contacts snR30 and other snoRNAs required for pre-rRNA processing. Using cross-linking, ligation and sequencing of hybrids (CLASH) we identified several novel pre-rRNA base-pairing sites for the snoRNAs snR30, snR10, U3, and U14, which cluster in the expansion segments of the 18S rRNA. Our data suggest that these snoRNAs bridge interactions between the expansion segments, thereby forming an extensive interaction network that likely promotes pre-rRNA maturation and folding in early pre-ribosomal complexes and establishes long-range rRNA interactions during ribosome synthesis. © 2014 Martin et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  6. Ribosome excursions during mRNA translocation mediate broad branching of frameshift pathways.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shannon; Wen, Jin-Der; Bustamante, Carlos; Tinoco, Ignacio

    2015-02-26

    Programmed ribosomal frameshifting produces alternative proteins from a single transcript. -1 frameshifting occurs on Escherichia coli's dnaX mRNA containing a slippery sequence AAAAAAG and peripheral mRNA structural barriers. Here, we reveal hidden aspects of the frameshifting process, including its exact location on the mRNA and its timing within the translation cycle. Mass spectrometry of translated products shows that ribosomes enter the -1 frame from not one specific codon but various codons along the slippery sequence and slip by not just -1 but also -4 or +2 nucleotides. Single-ribosome translation trajectories detect distinctive codon-scale fluctuations in ribosome-mRNA displacement across the slippery sequence, representing multiple ribosomal translocation attempts during frameshifting. Flanking mRNA structural barriers mechanically stimulate the ribosome to undergo back-and-forth translocation excursions, broadly exploring reading frames. Both experiments reveal aborted translation around mutant slippery sequences, indicating that subsequent fidelity checks on newly adopted codon position base pairings lead to either resumed translation or early termination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Dynamics of translation by single ribosomes through mRNA secondary structures

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chunlai; Zhang, Haibo; Broitman, Steven L.; Reiche, Michael; Farrell, Ian; Cooperman, Barry S.; Goldman, Yale E.

    2013-01-01

    During protein synthesis, the ribosome translates nucleotide triplets in single-stranded mRNA into polypeptide sequences. Strong downstream mRNA secondary (2°) structures, which must be unfolded for translation, can slow or even halt protein synthesis. Here we employ single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer to determine reaction rates for specific steps within the elongation cycle as the Escherichia coli ribosome encounters stem loop or pseudoknot mRNA 2° structures. Downstream stem-loops containing 100% G-C base pairs decrease the rates of both tRNA translocation within the ribosome and deacylated tRNA dissociation from the ribosomal exit (E) site. Downstream stem-loops or pseudoknots containing both G-C and A-U pairs also decrease the rate of tRNA dissociation, but they have little effect on tRNA translocation rate. Thus, somewhat surprisingly, unfolding of mRNA 2° structures is more closely coupled to E-site tRNA dissociation than to tRNA translocation. PMID:23542154

  8. Dynamics of translation by single ribosomes through mRNA secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunlai; Zhang, Haibo; Broitman, Steven L; Reiche, Michael; Farrell, Ian; Cooperman, Barry S; Goldman, Yale E

    2013-05-01

    During protein synthesis, the ribosome translates nucleotide triplets in single-stranded mRNA into polypeptide sequences. Strong downstream mRNA secondary structures, which must be unfolded for translation, can slow or even halt protein synthesis. Here we used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer to determine reaction rates for specific steps within the elongation cycle as the Escherichia coli ribosome encounters stem-loop or pseudoknot mRNA secondary structures. Downstream stem-loops containing 100% GC base pairs decrease the rates of both tRNA translocation within the ribosome and deacylated tRNA dissociation from the ribosomal exit site (E site). Downstream stem-loops or pseudoknots containing both GC and AU pairs also decrease the rate of tRNA dissociation, but they have little effect on tRNA translocation rate. Thus, somewhat unexpectedly, unfolding of mRNA secondary structures is more closely coupled to E-site tRNA dissociation than to tRNA translocation.

  9. Blasticidin S inhibits translation by trapping deformed tRNA on the ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Svidritskiy, Egor; Ling, Clarence; Ermolenko, Dmitri N.; Korostelev, Andrei A.

    2013-01-01

    The antibiotic blasticidin S (BlaS) is a potent inhibitor of protein synthesis in bacteria and eukaryotes. We have determined a 3.4-Å crystal structure of BlaS bound to a 70S⋅tRNA ribosome complex and performed biochemical and single-molecule FRET experiments to determine the mechanism of action of the antibiotic. We find that BlaS enhances tRNA binding to the P site of the large ribosomal subunit and slows down spontaneous intersubunit rotation in pretranslocation ribosomes. However, the antibiotic has negligible effect on elongation factor G catalyzed translocation of tRNA and mRNA. The crystal structure of the antibiotic–ribosome complex reveals that BlaS impedes protein synthesis through a unique mechanism by bending the 3′ terminus of the P-site tRNA toward the A site of the large ribosomal subunit. Biochemical experiments demonstrate that stabilization of the deformed conformation of the P-site tRNA by BlaS strongly inhibits peptidyl-tRNA hydrolysis by release factors and, to a lesser extent, peptide bond formation. PMID:23824292

  10. Translation by Ribosomes with mRNA Degradation: Exclusion Processes on Aging Tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagar, Apoorva; Valleriani, Angelo; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2011-12-01

    We investigate the role of degradation of mRNA on protein synthesis using the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP) as the underlying model for ribosome dynamics. mRNA degradation has a strong effect on the lifetime distribution of the mRNA, which in turn affects polysome statistics such as the number of ribosomes present on an mRNA strand of a given size. An average over mRNA of all ages is equivalent to an average over possible configurations of the corresponding TASEP—both before steady state and in steady state. To evaluate the relevant quantities for the translation problem, we first study the approach towards steady state of the TASEP, starting with an empty lattice representing an unloaded mRNA. When approaching the high density phase, the system shows two distinct phases with the entry and exit boundaries taking control of the density at their respective ends in the second phase. The approach towards the maximal current phase exhibits the surprising property that the ribosome entry flux can exceed the maximum possible steady state value. In all phases, the averaging over the mRNA age distribution shows a decrease in the average ribosome density profile as a function of distance from the entry boundary. For entry/exit parameters corresponding to the high density phase of TASEP, the average ribosome density profile also has a maximum near the exit end.

  11. The Ribosome Uses Two Active Mechanisms to Unwind mRNA During Translation

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Xiaohui; Wen, Jin-Der; Lancaster, Laura; Noller, Harry F.; Bustamante, Carlos; Tinoco, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    The ribosome translates the genetic information encoded in messenger RNA into protein. Folded structures in the coding region of an mRNA represent a kinetic barrier that slows the peptide elongation rate, as the ribosome must disrupt structures it encounters in the mRNA at its entry site to enable translocation to the next codon. Such structures are exploited by the cell to create diverse strategies for translation regulation, such as programmed frameshifting1,2, protein expression levels3,4, ribosome localization5, and cotranslational protein folding6. Although strand separation activity is inherent to the ribosome, requiring no exogenous helicases7, its mechanism is still unknown. Here, using a single-molecule optical tweezers assay on mRNA hairpins, we find that the translation rate of identical codons at the decoding center is greatly influenced by the G•C content of folded structures at the mRNA entry site. Furthermore, force applied to the ends of the hairpin to favor its unfolding significantly speeds translation. Quantitative analysis of the force dependence of its helicase activity reveals that the ribosome, unlike previously studied helicases, uses two distinct active mechanisms to unwind mRNA structure: (i) it destabilizes the helical junction at the mRNA entry site by biasing its thermal fluctuations toward the open state, increasing the probability for the ribosome to translocate unhindered; and (ii) it also mechanically pulls apart the mRNA single-strands of the closed junction during the conformational changes that accompany ribosome translocation. Our results establish a quantitative mechanical basis for understanding the mechanism of regulation of the elongation rate of translation by structured mRNAs. PMID:21734708

  12. The ribosome profiling strategy for monitoring translation in vivo by deep sequencing of ribosome-protected mRNA fragments

    PubMed Central

    Ingolia, Nicholas T.; Brar, Gloria A.; Rouskin, Silvia; McGeachy, Anna M.; Weissman, Jonathan S.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies highlight the importance of translational control in determining protein abundance, underscoring the value of measuring gene expression at the level of translation. We present a protocol for genome-wide, quantitative analysis of in vivo translation by deep sequencing. This ribosome profiling approach maps the exact positions of ribosomes on transcripts by nuclease footprinting. The nuclease-protected mRNA fragments are converted into a DNA library suitable for deep sequencing using a strategy that minimizes bias. The abundance of different footprint fragments in deep sequencing data reports on the amount of translation of a gene. Additionally, footprints reveal the exact regions of the transcriptome that are translated. To better define translated reading frames, we describe an adaptation that reveals the sites of translation initiation by pre-treating cells with harringtonine to immobilize initiating ribosomes. The protocol we describe requires 5–7 days to generate a completed ribosome profiling sequencing library. Sequencing and data analysis requires a further 4 – 5 days. PMID:22836135

  13. The RNA-binding protein Gemin5 binds directly to the ribosome and regulates global translation

    PubMed Central

    Francisco-Velilla, Rosario; Fernandez-Chamorro, Javier; Ramajo, Jorge; Martinez-Salas, Encarnación

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play crucial roles in all organisms. The protein Gemin5 harbors two functional domains. The N-terminal domain binds to snRNAs targeting them for snRNPs assembly, while the C-terminal domain binds to IRES elements through a non-canonical RNA-binding site. Here we report a comprehensive view of the Gemin5 interactome; most partners copurified with the N-terminal domain via RNA bridges. Notably, Gemin5 sediments with the subcellular ribosome fraction, and His-Gemin5 binds to ribosome particles via its N-terminal domain. The interaction with the ribosome was lost in F381A and Y474A Gemin5 mutants, but not in W14A and Y15A. Moreover, the ribosomal proteins L3 and L4 bind directly with Gemin5, and conversely, Gemin5 mutants impairing the binding to the ribosome are defective in the interaction with L3 and L4. The overall polysome profile was affected by Gemin5 depletion or overexpression, concomitant to an increase or a decrease, respectively, of global protein synthesis. Gemin5, and G5-Nter as well, were detected on the polysome fractions. These results reveal the ribosome-binding capacity of the N-ter moiety, enabling Gemin5 to control global protein synthesis. Our study uncovers a crosstalk between this protein and the ribosome, and provides support for the view that Gemin5 may control translation elongation. PMID:27507887

  14. Cap-dependent translation is mediated by 'RNA looping' rather than 'ribosome scanning'.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sung Key; Paek, Ki Young

    2016-01-01

    The 40S ribosomal subunit cannot directly recognize the start codon of eukaryotic mRNAs. Instead, it recognizes the start codon after its association with the 5'-cap structure via translation initiation factors. Base-by-base inspection of the 5'UTR by a scanning ribosome is the generally accepted hypothesis of start codon selection. As part of an effort to confirm the underlying mechanism of start codon selection by the 40S ribosome, we investigated the role of eIF4G, which participates in the recruitment of 40S ribosomes to various translation enhancers, such as 5'-cap structure, poly(A) tail, and several internal ribosome entry sites. We found that an artificial translation factor composed of recombinant eIF4G fused with MS2 greatly enhanced translation of an upstream reporter gene when it was tethered to the 3'UTR. These data suggest that the 40S ribosome recruited to a translation enhancer can find the start codon by looping of the intervening RNA segment. The 'RNA-looping' hypothesis of translation start codon recognition was further supported by an analysis of the effect of 5'UTR length on translation efficiency and the mathematically predicted probability of RNA-loop-mediated interactions between the start codon and the 40S ribosome associated at the 5'-end.

  15. The ribosome structure controls and directs mRNA entry, translocation and exit dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurkcuoglu, Ozge; Doruker, Pemra; Sen, Taner Z.; Kloczkowski, Andrzej; Jernigan, Robert L.

    2008-12-01

    The protein-synthesizing ribosome undergoes large motions to effect the translocation of tRNAs and mRNA; here, the domain motions of this system are explored with a coarse-grained elastic network model using normal mode analysis. Crystal structures are used to construct various model systems of the 70S complex with/without tRNA, elongation factor Tu and the ribosomal proteins. Computed motions reveal the well-known ratchet-like rotational motion of the large subunits, as well as the head rotation of the small subunit and the high flexibility of the L1 and L7/L12 stalks, even in the absence of ribosomal proteins. This result indicates that these experimentally observed motions during translocation are inherently controlled by the ribosomal shape and only partially dependent upon GTP hydrolysis. Normal mode analysis further reveals the mobility of A- and P-tRNAs to increase in the absence of the E-tRNA. In addition, the dynamics of the E-tRNA is affected by the absence of the ribosomal protein L1. The mRNA in the entrance tunnel interacts directly with helicase proteins S3 and S4, which constrain the mRNA in a clamp-like fashion, as well as with protein S5, which likely orients the mRNA to ensure correct translation. The ribosomal proteins S7, S11 and S18 may also be involved in assuring translation fidelity by constraining the mRNA at the exit site of the channel. The mRNA also interacts with the 16S 3' end forming the Shine-Dalgarno complex at the initiation step; the 3' end may act as a 'hook' to reel in the mRNA to facilitate its exit.

  16. A pre-ribosomal RNA interaction network involving snoRNAs and the Rok1 helicase

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Roman; Hackert, Philipp; Ruprecht, Maike; Simm, Stefan; Brüning, Lukas; Mirus, Oliver; Sloan, Katherine E.; Kudla, Grzegorz; Schleiff, Enrico; Bohnsack, Markus T.

    2014-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis in yeast requires 75 small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) and a myriad of cofactors for processing, modification, and folding of the ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs). For the 19 RNA helicases implicated in ribosome synthesis, their sites of action and molecular functions have largely remained unknown. Here, we have used UV cross-linking and analysis of cDNA (CRAC) to reveal the pre-rRNA binding sites of the RNA helicase Rok1, which is involved in early small subunit biogenesis. Several contact sites were identified in the 18S rRNA sequence, which interestingly all cluster in the “foot” region of the small ribosomal subunit. These include a major binding site in the eukaryotic expansion segment ES6, where Rok1 is required for release of the snR30 snoRNA. Rok1 directly contacts snR30 and other snoRNAs required for pre-rRNA processing. Using cross-linking, ligation and sequencing of hybrids (CLASH) we identified several novel pre-rRNA base-pairing sites for the snoRNAs snR30, snR10, U3, and U14, which cluster in the expansion segments of the 18S rRNA. Our data suggest that these snoRNAs bridge interactions between the expansion segments, thereby forming an extensive interaction network that likely promotes pre-rRNA maturation and folding in early pre-ribosomal complexes and establishes long-range rRNA interactions during ribosome synthesis. PMID:24947498

  17. The ribosome structure controls and directs mRNA entry, translocation and exit dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kurkcuoglu, Ozge; Doruker, Pemra; Sen, Taner Z.; Kloczkowski, Andrzej; Jernigan, Robert L.

    2009-01-01

    The protein-synthesizing ribosome undergoes large motions to effect the translocation of tRNAs and mRNA; here the domain motions of this system are explored with a coarse-grained elastic network model using normal mode analysis. Crystal structures are used to construct various model systems of the 70S complex with/without tRNA, elongation factor Tu and the ribosomal proteins. Computed motions reveal the well-known ratchet-like rotational motion of the large subunits, as well as the head rotation of the small subunit and the high flexibility of the L1 and L7/L12 stalks, even in the absence of ribosomal proteins. This result indicates that these experimentally observed motions during translocation are inherently controlled by the ribosomal shape and only partially dependent upon GTP hydrolysis. Normal mode analysis further reveals the mobility of A- and P-tRNAs to increase in the absence of the E-tRNA. In addition, the dynamics of the E-tRNA is affected by the absence of the ribosomal protein L1. The mRNA in the entrance tunnel interacts directly with helicase proteins S3 and S4, which constrain the mRNA in a clamp-like fashion, as well as with protein S5, which likely orients the mRNA to ensure correct translation. The ribosomal proteins S7, S11 and S18 may also be involved in assuring translation fidelity by constraining the mRNA at the exit site of the channel. The mRNA also interacts with the 16S 3’ end forming the Shine-Dalgarno complex at the initiation step; the 3’ end may act as a ‘hook’ to reel in the mRNA to facilitate its exit. PACS: 87.10.Pq; 87.15.bk; 87.15.kj; 87.16.dj; 87.16.dr PMID:19029596

  18. Identification of the gene encoding the 5S ribosomal RNA maturase in Bacillus subtilis: mature 5S rRNA is dispensable for ribosome function.

    PubMed Central

    Condon, C; Brechemier-Baey, D; Beltchev, B; Grunberg-Manago, M; Putzer, H

    2001-01-01

    Over 25 years ago, Pace and coworkers described an activity called RNase M5 in Bacillus subtilis cell extracts responsible for 5S ribosomal RNA maturation (Sogin & Pace, Nature, 1974, 252:598-600). Here we show that RNase M5 is encoded by a gene of previously unknown function that is highly conserved among the low G + C gram-positive bacteria. We propose that the gene be named rnmV. The rnmV gene is nonessential. B. subtilis strains lacking RNase M5 do not make mature 5S rRNA, indicating that this process is not necessary for ribosome function. 5S rRNA precursors can, however, be found in both free and translating ribosomes. In contrast to RNase E, which cleaves the Escherichia coli 5S precursor in a single-stranded region, which is then trimmed to yield mature 5S RNA, RNase M5 cleaves the B. subtilis equivalent in a double-stranded region to yield mature 5S rRNA in one step. For the most part, eubacteria contain one or the other system for 5S rRNA production, with an imperfect division along gram-negative and gram-positive lines. A potential correlation between the presence of RNase E or RNase M5 and the single- or double-stranded nature of the predicted cleavage sites is explored. PMID:11233981

  19. Intrageneric structure of the genus Gluconobacter analyzed by the 16S rRNA gene and 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer sequences.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Mai; Yukphan, Pattaraporn; Yamada, Yuzo; Suzuki, Ken-ichiro; Sakane, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Yasuyoshi

    2006-06-01

    Forty-nine strains belonging to the genus Gluconobacter were re-examined with respect to their species identification based on the sequences of the 16S rDNA and 16S-23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS). A phylogenetic tree constructed from the 16S rDNA sequences indicated the presence of five clusters corresponding, respectively, to the major five species of the genus Gluconobacter, namely G. albidus, G. cerinus, G. frateurii, G. oxydans (type species), and G. thailandicus. The type strain of G. asaii, NBRC 3276T (T=type strain) was included in the G. cerinus cluster, which is consistent with the report that G. asaii is a junior subjective synonym of G. cerinus. Existence of the G. albidus, G. cerinus, G. frateurii, G. oxydans, and G. thailandicus clusters was also recognized by the ITS sequence analysis. Both sequence analyses revealed that the G. cerinus and G. frateurii clusters were heterogeneous. The G. cerinus cluster comprised three strains of G. cerinus and one strain of G. frateurii, while the G. frateurii cluster included ten strains of G. frateurii, three of G. cerinus, and eleven of G. oxydans. These results suggest that phenotypic differences among Gluconobacter species are ambiguous and the species definition must be re-evaluated. The 16S rDNA and ITS sequences determined in this study are valuable for the identification and phylogenetic analysis of Gluconobacter species.

  20. Direct detection of Brucella spp. in raw milk by PCR and reverse hybridization with 16S-23S rRNA spacer probes.

    PubMed Central

    Rijpens, N P; Jannes, G; Van Asbroeck, M; Rossau, R; Herman, L M

    1996-01-01

    The 16S-23S rRNA spacer regions of Brucella abortus, B. melitensis, and B. suis were cloned and subcloned after PCR amplification. Sequence analysis of the inserts revealed a spacer of about 800 bp with very high ( > 99%) homology among the three species examined. Two genus-specific primer pairs, BRU-P5-BRU-P8 and BRU-P6-BRU-P7, that could be used in a nested PCR format and three genus-specific DNA probes, BRU-ICG2, BRU-ICG3, and BRU-ICG4, were deduced from this spacer. The specificity and sensitivity of both primer sets and probes were examined by testing them against a collection of 18 Brucella strains and 56 strains from other relevant taxa by using PCR and the Line Probe Assay (LiPA), respectively. A method for direct detection of Brucella spp. in 1 ml of raw milk was developed on the basis of enzymatic treatment of the milk components and subsequent PCR and LiPA hybridization. After a single PCR, sensitivities of 2.8 x 10(5) and 2.8 x 10(4) CFU/ml were obtained for detection by agarose gel electrophoresis and LiPA, respectively. Nested PCR yielded a sensitivity of 2.8 x 10(2) CFU/ml for both methods. PMID:8633866

  1. Genetic modulation of RNA metabolism in Drosophilia. I. Increased rate of ribosomal RNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Clark, S H; Strausbaugh, L D; Kiefer, B I

    1977-08-01

    It has been suggested that a particular Y chromosome which is rDNA-deficient (YbbSuVar-5) may be associated with an increased utilization of rDNA template in adult testes (Shermoen and Kiefer 1975). To extend the observations on this chromosome, experiments were designed to determine if the chromosome has an effect on rRNA synthesis in bobbed adults and on classic bobbed phenotypes (shortened and thinner scutellar bristles and delayed development). Specific activity measurements were made on rRNA extracted from adult males of the genotypes car bb/YbbSuVar-5, which are rDNA-deficient to the same extent, and from Samarkand+ isogenic (Sam+ iso), which is a wild-type stock. The resulting data demonstrated that the presence of the YbbSuVar-5 chromosome increases the rate of ribosomal RNA synthesis in adult flies. In addition, it was found that the presence of this particular Y chromosome restores wild-type bristle phenotype and development time. Appropriate genetic crosses indicate that the observed effects (increased rRNA synthesis, restoration of wild-type phenotype) are a function of this particular Y chromosome, and are not due to autosomal factors. The results of these experiments suggest that the rate of rRNA accumulation is under genetic control.

  2. Identification of virulence factors in 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer genotyped Staphylococcus aureus isolated from water buffaloes and small ruminants.

    PubMed

    Cremonesi, P; Zottola, T; Locatelli, C; Pollera, C; Castiglioni, B; Scaccabarozzi, L; Moroni, P

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important human and animal pathogen, and is regarded as an important cause of intramammary infection (IMI) in ruminants. Staphylococcus aureus genetic variability and virulence factors have been well studied in veterinary medicine, especially in cows as support for control and management of IMI. The aim of the present study was to genotype 71 Staph. aureus isolates from the bulk tank and foremilk of water buffaloes (n=40) and from udder tissue (n=7) and foremilk (n=24) from small ruminants. The method used was previously applied to bovine Staph. aureus and is based on the amplification of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region. The technique applied was able to identify different Staph. aureus genotypes isolated from dairy species other than the bovine species, and cluster the genotypes according to species and herds. Virulence gene distribution was consistent with genotype differentiation. The isolates were also characterized through determination of the presence of 19 virulence-associated genes by specific PCR. Enterotoxins A, C, D, G, I, J, and L were associated with Staph. aureus isolates from buffaloes, whereas enterotoxins C and L were linked to small ruminants. Genes coding for methicillin resistance, Panton-Valentine leukocidin, exfoliative toxins A and B, and enterotoxins B, E, and H were undetected. These findings indicate that RNA template-specific PCR is a valid technique for typing Staph. aureus from buffaloes and small ruminants and is a useful tool for understanding udder infection epidemiology. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Update of the All-Species Living Tree Project based on 16S and 23S rRNA sequence analyses.

    PubMed

    Yarza, Pablo; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Euzéby, Jean; Amann, Rudolf; Schleifer, Karl-Heinz; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Rosselló-Móra, Ramon

    2010-10-01

    The "All-Species Living Tree Project" (LTP) provides the scientific community with a useful taxonomic tool consisting of a curated database of type strain sequences, a universal and optimized alignment and a single phylogenetic tree harboring all the type strains of the hitherto classified species. On the website http://www.arb-silva.de/projects/living-tree an update has been regularly maintained by including the 1301 new descriptions that have appeared in the validation and notification lists of the IJSEM journal. The topology of the 16S rRNA-based tree was validated with a detailed comparison against a collection of taxa-specific and broad-range trees made using different approaches, subsets of sequences and alignments. Seven percent of the classified species is still missing, as their type strains do not have a good quality SSU sequence. In addition, a new database of type strains for which adequate 23S rRNA entries existed in public repositories was built. Among the 8602 species with validly published names until February 2010, we were able to find good quality LSU representatives for 792 type strains, whereas around 91% of the complete catalogue still remains unsequenced. Despite the scarce representation of some groups in LSU databases, we have devised a highly optimized alignment and a reliable LSU tree in order to set up a stable phylogenetic starting point for taxonomic purposes. The current release corresponds to the fourth update of the project (LTPs102), and contains additional features which increase usability and compatibility. Use the contact address living-tree@arb-silva.de to provide additional input for the development of this taxonomic tool. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Disruption of ribosome assembly in yeast blocks cotranscriptional pre-rRNA processing and affects the global hierarchy of ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Talkish, Jason; Biedka, Stephanie; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Zhang, Jingyu; Tang, Lan; Strahler, John R; Andrews, Philip C; Maddock, Janine R; Woolford, John L

    2016-06-01

    In higher eukaryotes, pre-rRNA processing occurs almost exclusively post-transcriptionally. This is not the case in rapidly dividing yeast, as the majority of nascent pre-rRNAs are processed cotranscriptionally, with cleavage at the A2 site first releasing a pre-40S ribosomal subunit followed by release of a pre-60S ribosomal subunit upon transcription termination. Ribosome assembly is driven in part by hierarchical association of assembly factors and r-proteins. Groups of proteins are thought to associate with pre-ribosomes cotranscriptionally during early assembly steps, whereas others associate later, after transcription is completed. Here we describe a previously uncharacterized phenotype observed upon disruption of ribosome assembly, in which normally late-binding proteins associate earlier, with pre-ribosomes containing 35S pre-rRNA. As previously observed by many other groups, we show that disruption of 60S subunit biogenesis results in increased amounts of 35S pre-rRNA, suggesting that a greater fraction of pre-rRNAs are processed post-transcriptionally. Surprisingly, we found that early pre-ribosomes containing 35S pre-rRNA also contain proteins previously thought to only associate with pre-ribosomes after early pre-rRNA processing steps have separated maturation of the two subunits. We believe the shift to post-transcriptional processing is ultimately due to decreased cellular division upon disruption of ribosome assembly. When cells are grown under stress or to high density, a greater fraction of pre-rRNAs are processed post-transcriptionally and follow an alternative processing pathway. Together, these results affirm the principle that ribosome assembly occurs through different, parallel assembly pathways and suggest that there is a kinetic foot-race between the formation of protein binding sites and pre-rRNA processing events. © 2016 Talkish et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  5. Delayed rRNA Processing Results in Significant Ribosome Biogenesis and Functional Defects

    PubMed Central

    Meskauskas, Arturas; Baxter, Jennifer L.; Carr, Edward A.; Yasenchak, Jason; Gallagher, Jennifer E. G.; Baserga, Susan J.; Dinman, Jonathan D.

    2003-01-01

    mof6-1 was originally isolated as a recessive mutation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae which promoted increased efficiencies of programmed −1 ribosomal frameshifting and rendered cells unable to maintain the killer virus. Here, we demonstrate that mof6-1 is a unique allele of the histone deacetylase RPD3, that the deacetylase function of Rpd3p is required for controlling wild-type levels of frameshifting and virus maintenance, and that the closest human homolog can fully complement these defects. Loss of the Rpd3p-associated histone deacetylase function, either by mutants of rpd3 or loss of the associated gene product Sin3p or Sap30p, results in a delay in rRNA processing rather than in an rRNA transcriptional defect. This results in production of ribosomes having lower affinities for aminoacyl-tRNA and diminished peptidyltransferase activities. We hypothesize that decreased rates of peptidyl transfer allow ribosomes with both A and P sites occupied by tRNAs to pause for longer periods of time at −1 frameshift signals, promoting increased programmed −1 ribosomal frameshifting efficiencies and subsequent loss of the killer virus. The frameshifting defect is accentuated when the demand for ribosomes is highest, suggesting that rRNA posttranscriptional modification is the bottleneck in ribosome biogenesis. PMID:12588980

  6. Use of 16S Ribosomal RNA Sequences to Infer Relationships among Archaebacteria.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-16

    FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP Archaebacteria; Eubacteria ; Eukaryotes; 16S Ribosomal RNA; 08 I Phylogeny; rRNA; RNA Sequencing; Molecular Clock; Urkingdoms; r...16S rRNA data were used to infer the relat onships among the archaebacteria, and of the archaebacteria to the eubacteria and eukaryotes. ur programs for...been published (1, 2, 16, 18). The analyses render untenable the suggestions of Lake and colleagues (Lake et al., 1985) that the eubacteria derive from

  7. The complex of tmRNA-SmpB and EF-G on translocating ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Ramrath, David J F; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Rother, Kristian; Wittek, Daniela; Pech, Markus; Mielke, Thorsten; Loerke, Justus; Scheerer, Patrick; Ivanov, Pavel; Teraoka, Yoshika; Shpanchenko, Olga; Nierhaus, Knud H; Spahn, Christian M T

    2012-05-06

    Bacterial ribosomes stalled at the 3' end of malfunctioning messenger RNAs can be rescued by transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA)-mediated trans-translation. The SmpB protein forms a complex with the tmRNA, and the transfer-RNA-like domain (TLD) of the tmRNA then enters the A site of the ribosome. Subsequently, the TLD-SmpB module is translocated to the P site, a process that is facilitated by the elongation factor EF-G, and translation is switched to the mRNA-like domain (MLD) of the tmRNA. Accurate loading of the MLD into the mRNA path is an unusual initiation mechanism. Despite various snapshots of different ribosome-tmRNA complexes at low to intermediate resolution, it is unclear how the large, highly structured tmRNA is translocated and how the MLD is loaded. Here we present a cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of a fusidic-acid-stalled ribosomal 70S-tmRNA-SmpB-EF-G complex (carrying both of the large ligands, that is, EF-G and tmRNA) at 8.3 Å resolution. This post-translocational intermediate (TI(POST)) presents the TLD-SmpB module in an intrasubunit ap/P hybrid site and a tRNA(fMet) in an intrasubunit pe/E hybrid site. Conformational changes in the ribosome and tmRNA occur in the intersubunit space and on the solvent side. The key underlying event is a unique extra-large swivel movement of the 30S head, which is crucial for both tmRNA-SmpB translocation and MLD loading, thereby coupling translocation to MLD loading. This mechanism exemplifies the versatile, dynamic nature of the ribosome, and it shows that the conformational modes of the ribosome that normally drive canonical translation can also be used in a modified form to facilitate more complex tasks in specialized non-canonical pathways.

  8. The structure of the 80S ribosome from Trypanosoma cruzi reveals unique rRNA components

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Haixiao; Ayub, Maximiliano Juri; Levin, Mariano J.; Frank, Joachim

    2005-01-01

    We present analysis, by cryo-electron microscopy and single-particle reconstruction, of the structure of the 80S ribosome from Trypanosoma cruzi, the kinetoplastid protozoan pathogen that causes Chagas disease. The density map of the T. cruzi 80S ribosome shows the phylogenetically conserved eukaryotic rRNA core structure, together with distinctive structural features in both the small and large subunits. Remarkably, a previously undescribed helical structure appears in the small subunit in the vicinity of the mRNA exit channel. We propose that this rRNA structure likely participates in the recruitment of ribosome onto the 5′ end of mRNA, in facilitating and modulating the initiation of translation that is unique to the trypanosomes. PMID:16014419

  9. Reduced expression of the mouse ribosomal protein Rpl17 alters the diversity of mature ribosomes by enhancing production of shortened 5.8S rRNA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Minshi; Parshin, Andrey V.; Shcherbik, Natalia; Pestov, Dimitri G.

    2015-01-01

    Processing of rRNA during ribosome assembly can proceed through alternative pathways but it is unclear whether this could affect the structure of the ribosome. Here, we demonstrate that shortage of a ribosomal protein can change pre-rRNA processing in a way that over time alters ribosome diversity in the cell. Reducing the amount of Rpl17 in mouse cells led to stalled 60S subunit maturation, causing degradation of most of the synthesized precursors. A fraction of pre-60S subunits, however, were able to complete maturation, but with a 5′-truncated 5.8S rRNA, which we named 5.8SC. The 5′ exoribonuclease Xrn2 is involved in the generation of both 5.8SC and the canonical long form of 5.8S rRNA. Ribosomes containing 5.8SC rRNA are present in various mouse and human cells and engage in translation. These findings uncover a previously undescribed form of mammalian 5.8S rRNA and demonstrate that perturbations in ribosome assembly can be a source of heterogeneity in mature ribosomes. PMID:25995445

  10. Reduced expression of the mouse ribosomal protein Rpl17 alters the diversity of mature ribosomes by enhancing production of shortened 5.8S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Minshi; Parshin, Andrey V; Shcherbik, Natalia; Pestov, Dimitri G

    2015-07-01

    Processing of rRNA during ribosome assembly can proceed through alternative pathways but it is unclear whether this could affect the structure of the ribosome. Here, we demonstrate that shortage of a ribosomal protein can change pre-rRNA processing in a way that over time alters ribosome diversity in the cell. Reducing the amount of Rpl17 in mouse cells led to stalled 60S subunit maturation, causing degradation of most of the synthesized precursors. A fraction of pre-60S subunits, however, were able to complete maturation, but with a 5'-truncated 5.8S rRNA, which we named 5.8SC. The 5' exoribonuclease Xrn2 is involved in the generation of both 5.8S(C) and the canonical long form of 5.8S rRNA. Ribosomes containing 5.8S(C) rRNA are present in various mouse and human cells and engage in translation. These findings uncover a previously undescribed form of mammalian 5.8S rRNA and demonstrate that perturbations in ribosome assembly can be a source of heterogeneity in mature ribosomes.

  11. Depletion of ribosomal protein S19 causes a reduction of rRNA synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Juli, Giada; Gismondi, Angelo; Monteleone, Valentina; Caldarola, Sara; Iadevaia, Valentina; Aspesi, Anna; Dianzani, Irma; Proud, Christopher G.; Loreni, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis plays key roles in cell growth by providing increased capacity for protein synthesis. It requires coordinated production of ribosomal proteins (RP) and ribosomal RNA (rRNA), including the processing of the latter. Here, we show that, the depletion of RPS19 causes a reduction of rRNA synthesis in cell lines of both erythroid and non-erythroid origin. A similar effect is observed upon depletion of RPS6 or RPL11. The deficiency of RPS19 does not alter the stability of rRNA, but instead leads to an inhibition of RNA Polymerase I (Pol I) activity. In fact, results of nuclear run-on assays and ChIP experiments show that association of Pol I with the rRNA gene is reduced in RPS19-depleted cells. The phosphorylation of three known regulators of Pol I, CDK2, AKT and AMPK, is altered during ribosomal stress and could be involved in the observed downregulation. Finally, RNA from patients with Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA), shows, on average, a lower level of 47S precursor. This indicates that inhibition of rRNA synthesis could be one of the molecular alterations at the basis of DBA. PMID:27734913

  12. Disruption of ribosome assembly in yeast blocks cotranscriptional pre-rRNA processing and affects the global hierarchy of ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Talkish, Jason; Biedka, Stephanie; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Zhang, Jingyu; Tang, Lan; Strahler, John R.; Andrews, Philip C.; Maddock, Janine R.; Woolford, John L.

    2016-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, pre-rRNA processing occurs almost exclusively post-transcriptionally. This is not the case in rapidly dividing yeast, as the majority of nascent pre-rRNAs are processed cotranscriptionally, with cleavage at the A2 site first releasing a pre-40S ribosomal subunit followed by release of a pre-60S ribosomal subunit upon transcription termination. Ribosome assembly is driven in part by hierarchical association of assembly factors and r-proteins. Groups of proteins are thought to associate with pre-ribosomes cotranscriptionally during early assembly steps, whereas others associate later, after transcription is completed. Here we describe a previously uncharacterized phenotype observed upon disruption of ribosome assembly, in which normally late-binding proteins associate earlier, with pre-ribosomes containing 35S pre-rRNA. As previously observed by many other groups, we show that disruption of 60S subunit biogenesis results in increased amounts of 35S pre-rRNA, suggesting that a greater fraction of pre-rRNAs are processed post-transcriptionally. Surprisingly, we found that early pre-ribosomes containing 35S pre-rRNA also contain proteins previously thought to only associate with pre-ribosomes after early pre-rRNA processing steps have separated maturation of the two subunits. We believe the shift to post-transcriptional processing is ultimately due to decreased cellular division upon disruption of ribosome assembly. When cells are grown under stress or to high density, a greater fraction of pre-rRNAs are processed post-transcriptionally and follow an alternative processing pathway. Together, these results affirm the principle that ribosome assembly occurs through different, parallel assembly pathways and suggest that there is a kinetic foot-race between the formation of protein binding sites and pre-rRNA processing events. PMID:27036125

  13. Ribosome-associated Asc1/RACK1 is required for endonucleolytic cleavage induced by stalled ribosome at the 3' end of nonstop mRNA.

    PubMed

    Ikeuchi, Ken; Inada, Toshifumi

    2016-06-17

    Dom34-Hbs1 stimulates degradation of aberrant mRNAs lacking termination codons by dissociating ribosomes stalled at the 3' ends, and plays crucial roles in Nonstop Decay (NSD) and No-Go Decay (NGD). In the dom34Δ mutant, nonstop mRNA is degraded by sequential endonucleolytic cleavages induced by a stalled ribosome at the 3' end. Here, we report that ribosome-associated Asc1/RACK1 is required for the endonucleolytic cleavage of nonstop mRNA by stalled ribosome at the 3' end of mRNA in dom34Δ mutant cells. Asc1/RACK1 facilitates degradation of truncated GFP-Rz mRNA in the absence of Dom34 and exosome-dependent decay. Asc1/RACK1 is required for the sequential endonucleolytic cleavages by the stalled ribosome in the dom34Δ mutant, depending on its ribosome-binding activity. The levels of peptidyl-tRNA derived from nonstop mRNA were elevated in dom34Δasc1Δ mutant cells, and overproduction of nonstop mRNA inhibited growth of mutant cells. E3 ubiquitin ligase Ltn1 degrades the arrest products from truncated GFP-Rz mRNA in dom34Δ and dom34Δasc1Δ mutant cells, and Asc1/RACK1 represses the levels of substrates for Ltn1-dependent degradation. These indicate that ribosome-associated Asc1/RACK1 facilitates endonucleolytic cleavage of nonstop mRNA by stalled ribosomes and represses the levels of aberrant products even in the absence of Dom34. We propose that Asc1/RACK1 acts as a fail-safe in quality control for nonstop mRNA.

  14. Ribosome-associated Asc1/RACK1 is required for endonucleolytic cleavage induced by stalled ribosome at the 3′ end of nonstop mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Ikeuchi, Ken; Inada, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Dom34-Hbs1 stimulates degradation of aberrant mRNAs lacking termination codons by dissociating ribosomes stalled at the 3′ ends, and plays crucial roles in Nonstop Decay (NSD) and No-Go Decay (NGD). In the dom34Δ mutant, nonstop mRNA is degraded by sequential endonucleolytic cleavages induced by a stalled ribosome at the 3′ end. Here, we report that ribosome-associated Asc1/RACK1 is required for the endonucleolytic cleavage of nonstop mRNA by stalled ribosome at the 3′ end of mRNA in dom34Δ mutant cells. Asc1/RACK1 facilitates degradation of truncated GFP-Rz mRNA in the absence of Dom34 and exosome-dependent decay. Asc1/RACK1 is required for the sequential endonucleolytic cleavages by the stalled ribosome in the dom34Δ mutant, depending on its ribosome-binding activity. The levels of peptidyl-tRNA derived from nonstop mRNA were elevated in dom34Δasc1Δ mutant cells, and overproduction of nonstop mRNA inhibited growth of mutant cells. E3 ubiquitin ligase Ltn1 degrades the arrest products from truncated GFP-Rz mRNA in dom34Δ and dom34Δasc1Δ mutant cells, and Asc1/RACK1 represses the levels of substrates for Ltn1-dependent degradation. These indicate that ribosome-associated Asc1/RACK1 facilitates endonucleolytic cleavage of nonstop mRNA by stalled ribosomes and represses the levels of aberrant products even in the absence of Dom34. We propose that Asc1/RACK1 acts as a fail-safe in quality control for nonstop mRNA. PMID:27312062

  15. Both endonucleolytic and exonucleolytic cleavage mediate ITS1 removal during human ribosomal RNA processing.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Katherine E; Mattijssen, Sandy; Lebaron, Simon; Tollervey, David; Pruijn, Ger J M; Watkins, Nicholas J

    2013-03-04

    Human ribosome production is up-regulated during tumorogenesis and is defective in many genetic diseases (ribosomopathies). We have undertaken a detailed analysis of human precursor ribosomal RNA (pre-rRNA) processing because surprisingly little is known about this important pathway. Processing in internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) is a key step that separates the rRNA components of the large and small ribosomal subunits. We report that this was initiated by endonuclease cleavage, which required large subunit biogenesis factors. This was followed by 3' to 5' exonucleolytic processing by RRP6 and the exosome, an enzyme complex not previously linked to ITS1 removal. In contrast, RNA interference-mediated knockdown of the endoribonuclease MRP did not result in a clear defect in ITS1 processing. Despite the apparently high evolutionary conservation of the pre-rRNA processing pathway and ribosome synthesis factors, each of these features of human ITS1 processing is distinct from those in budding yeast. These results also provide significant insight into the links between ribosomopathies and ribosome production in human cells.

  16. Structural signatures of thermal adaptation of bacterial ribosomal RNA, transfer RNA, and messenger RNA.

    PubMed

    Jegousse, Clara; Yang, Yuedong; Zhan, Jian; Wang, Jihua; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2017-01-01

    Temperature adaptation of bacterial RNAs is a subject of both fundamental and practical interest because it will allow a better understanding of molecular mechanism of RNA folding with potential industrial application of functional thermophilic or psychrophilic RNAs. Here, we performed a comprehensive study of rRNA, tRNA, and mRNA of more than 200 bacterial species with optimal growth temperatures (OGT) ranging from 4°C to 95°C. We investigated temperature adaptation at primary, secondary and tertiary structure levels. We showed that unlike mRNA, tRNA and rRNA were optimized for their structures at compositional levels with significant tertiary structural features even for their corresponding randomly permutated sequences. tRNA and rRNA are more exposed to solvent but remain structured for hyperthermophiles with nearly OGT-independent fluctuation of solvent accessible surface area within a single RNA chain. mRNA in hyperthermophiles is essentially the same as random sequences without tertiary structures although many mRNA in mesophiles and psychrophiles have well-defined tertiary structures based on their low overall solvent exposure with clear separation of deeply buried from partly exposed bases as in tRNA and rRNA. These results provide new insight into temperature adaptation of different RNAs.

  17. Group II intron-ribosome association protects intron RNA from degradation.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Lydia M; Huang, Tao; Piazza, Carol Lyn; Smith, Dorie; Qu, Guosheng; Gelderman, Grant; Potratz, Jeffrey P; Russell, Rick; Belfort, Marlene

    2013-11-01

    The influence of the cellular environment on the structures and properties of catalytic RNAs is not well understood, despite great interest in ribozyme function. Here we report on ribosome association of group II introns, which are ribozymes that are important because of their putative ancestry to spliceosomal introns and retrotransposons, their retromobility via an RNA intermediate, and their application as gene delivery agents. We show that group II intron RNA, in complex with the intron-encoded protein from the native Lactoccocus lactis host, associates strongly with ribosomes in vivo. Ribosomes have little effect on intron ribozyme activities; rather, the association with host ribosomes protects the intron RNA against degradation by RNase E, an enzyme previously shown to be a silencer of retromobility in Escherichia coli. The ribosome interacts strongly with the intron, exerting protective effects in vivo and in vitro, as demonstrated by genetic and biochemical experiments. These results are consistent with the ribosome influencing the integrity of catalytic RNAs in bacteria in the face of degradative nucleases that regulate intron mobility.

  18. Protein-RNA Dynamics in the Central Junction Control 30S Ribosome Assembly.

    PubMed

    Baker, Kris Ann; Lamichhane, Rajan; Lamichhane, Tek; Rueda, David; Cunningham, Philip R

    2016-09-11

    Interactions between ribosomal proteins (rproteins) and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) facilitate the formation of functional ribosomes. S15 is a central domain primary binding protein that has been shown to trigger a cascade of conformational changes in 16S rRNA, forming the functional structure of the central domain. Previous biochemical and structural studies in vitro have revealed that S15 binds a three-way junction of helices 20, 21, and 22, including nucleotides 652-654 and 752-754. All junction nucleotides except 653 are highly conserved among the Bacteria. To identify functionally important motifs within the junction, we subjected nucleotides 652-654 and 752-754 to saturation mutagenesis and selected and analyzed functional mutants. Only 64 mutants with greater than 10% ribosome function in vivo were isolated. S15 overexpression complemented mutations in the junction loop in each of the partially active mutants, although mutations that produced inactive ribosomes were not complemented by overexpression of S15. Single-molecule Förster or fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) was used to study the Mg(2+)- and S15-induced conformational dynamics of selected junction mutants. Comparison of the structural dynamics of these mutants with the wild type in the presence and absence of S15 revealed specific sequence and structural motifs in the central junction that are important in ribosome function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Group II intron–ribosome association protects intron RNA from degradation

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Lydia M.; Huang, Tao; Piazza, Carol Lyn; Smith, Dorie; Qu, Guosheng; Gelderman, Grant; Potratz, Jeffrey P.; Russell, Rick; Belfort, Marlene

    2013-01-01

    The influence of the cellular environment on the structures and properties of catalytic RNAs is not well understood, despite great interest in ribozyme function. Here we report on ribosome association of group II introns, which are ribozymes that are important because of their putative ancestry to spliceosomal introns and retrotransposons, their retromobility via an RNA intermediate, and their application as gene delivery agents. We show that group II intron RNA, in complex with the intron-encoded protein from the native Lactoccocus lactis host, associates strongly with ribosomes in vivo. Ribosomes have little effect on intron ribozyme activities; rather, the association with host ribosomes protects the intron RNA against degradation by RNase E, an enzyme previously shown to be a silencer of retromobility in Escherichia coli. The ribosome interacts strongly with the intron, exerting protective effects in vivo and in vitro, as demonstrated by genetic and biochemical experiments. These results are consistent with the ribosome influencing the integrity of catalytic RNAs in bacteria in the face of degradative nucleases that regulate intron mobility. PMID:24046482

  20. Flipping of the ribosomal A-site adenines provides a basis for tRNA selection

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xiancheng; Chugh, Jeetender; Casiano-Negroni, Anette; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.; Brooks, Charles L.

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomes control the missense error rate of ~10−4 during translation though quantitative contributions of individual mechanistic steps of the conformational changes yet to be fully determined. Biochemical and biophysical studies led to a qualitative tRNA selection model in which ribosomal A-site residues A1492 and A1493 (A1492/3) flip out in response to cognate tRNA binding, promoting the subsequent reactions, but not in the case of near cognate or non-cognate tRNA. However, this model was recently questioned by X-ray structures revealing conformations of extrahelical A1492/3 and domain closure of the decoding center in both cognate and near-cognate tRNA bound ribosome complexes, suggesting that the non-specific flipping of A1492/3 has no active role in tRNA selection. We explore this question by carrying out molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, aided with fluorescence and NMR experiments, to probe the free energy cost of extrahelical flipping of 1492/3 and the strain energy associated with domain conformational change. Our rigorous calculations demonstrate that the A1492/3 flipping is indeed a specific response to the binding of cognate tRNA, contributing 3 kcal/mol to the specificity of tRNA selection. Furthermore, the different A-minor interactions in cognate and near-cognate complexes propagate into the conformational strain and contribute another 4 kcal/mol in domain closure. The recent structure of ribosome with features of extrahelical A1492/3 and closed domain in near-cognate complex is reconciled by possible tautomerization of the wobble base pair in mRNA-tRNA. These results quantitatively rationalize other independent experimental observations and explain the ribosomal discrimination mechanism of selecting cognate versus near-cognate tRNA. PMID:24813122

  1. Assembly factors Rpf2 and Rrs1 recruit 5S rRNA and ribosomal proteins rpL5 and rpL11 into nascent ribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingyu; Harnpicharnchai, Piyanun; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Tang, Lan; Guo, Yurong; Oeffinger, Marlene; Rout, Michael P.; Hiley, Shawna L.; Hughes, Timothy; Woolford, John L.

    2007-01-01

    More than 170 proteins are necessary for assembly of ribosomes in eukaryotes. However, cofactors that function with each of these proteins, substrates on which they act, and the precise functions of assembly factors—e.g., recruiting other molecules into preribosomes or triggering structural rearrangements of pre-rRNPs—remain mostly unknown. Here we investigated the recruitment of two ribosomal proteins and 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) into nascent ribosomes. We identified a ribonucleoprotein neighborhood in preribosomes that contains two yeast ribosome assembly factors, Rpf2 and Rrs1, two ribosomal proteins, rpL5 and rpL11, and 5S rRNA. Interactions between each of these four proteins have been confirmed by binding assays in vitro. These molecules assemble into 90S preribosomal particles containing 35S rRNA precursor (pre-rRNA). Rpf2 and Rrs1 are required for recruiting rpL5, rpL11, and 5S rRNA into preribosomes. In the absence of association of these molecules with pre-rRNPs, processing of 27SB pre-rRNA is blocked. Consequently, the abortive 66S pre-rRNPs are prematurely released from the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm, and cannot be exported to the cytoplasm. PMID:17938242

  2. Assembly factors Rpf2 and Rrs1 recruit 5S rRNA and ribosomal proteins rpL5 and rpL11 into nascent ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingyu; Harnpicharnchai, Piyanun; Jakovljevic, Jelena; Tang, Lan; Guo, Yurong; Oeffinger, Marlene; Rout, Michael P; Hiley, Shawna L; Hughes, Timothy; Woolford, John L

    2007-10-15

    More than 170 proteins are necessary for assembly of ribosomes in eukaryotes. However, cofactors that function with each of these proteins, substrates on which they act, and the precise functions of assembly factors--e.g., recruiting other molecules into preribosomes or triggering structural rearrangements of pre-rRNPs--remain mostly unknown. Here we investigated the recruitment of two ribosomal proteins and 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) into nascent ribosomes. We identified a ribonucleoprotein neighborhood in preribosomes that contains two yeast ribosome assembly factors, Rpf2 and Rrs1, two ribosomal proteins, rpL5 and rpL11, and 5S rRNA. Interactions between each of these four proteins have been confirmed by binding assays in vitro. These molecules assemble into 90S preribosomal particles containing 35S rRNA precursor (pre-rRNA). Rpf2 and Rrs1 are required for recruiting rpL5, rpL11, and 5S rRNA into preribosomes. In the absence of association of these molecules with pre-rRNPs, processing of 27SB pre-rRNA is blocked. Consequently, the abortive 66S pre-rRNPs are prematurely released from the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm, and cannot be exported to the cytoplasm.

  3. Relationships between 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer DNA and genomic DNA similarities in the taxonomy of phototrophic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamura, K.; Hisada, T.; Takata, K.; Hiraishi, A.

    2013-04-01

    Rapid and accurate identification of microbial species is essential task in microbiology and biotechnology. In prokaryotic systematics, genomic DNA-DNA hybridization is the ultimate tool to determine genetic relationships among bacterial strains at the species level. However, a practical problem in this assay is that the experimental procedure is laborious and time-consuming. In recent years, information on the 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region has been used to classify bacterial strains at the species and intraspecies levels. It is unclear how much information on the ITS region can reflect the genome that contain it. In this study, therefore, we evaluate the quantitative relationship between ITS DNA and entire genomic DNA similarities. For this, we determined ITS sequences of several species of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria belonging to the order Rhizobiales, and compared with DNA-DNA relatedness among these species. There was a high correlation between the two genetic markers. Based on the regression analysis of this relationship, 70% DNA-DNA relatedness corresponded to 92% ITS sequence similarity. This suggests the usefulness of the ITS sequence similarity as a criterion for determining the genospecies of the phototrophic bacteria. To avoid the effects of polymorphism bias of ITS on similarities, PCR products from all loci of ITS were used directly as genetic probes for comparison. The results of ITS DNA-DNA hybridization coincided well with those of genomic DNA-DNA relatedness. These collective data indicate that the whole ITS DNA-DNA similarity can be used as an alternative to genomic DNA-DNA similarity.

  4. Initiation factor 2, tRNA, and 50S subunits cooperatively stabilize mRNAs on the ribosome during initiation

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Tomoaki; Petrov, Alexey N.; Iizuka, Ryo; Funatsu, Takashi; Puglisi, Joseph D.; Uemura, Sotaro

    2012-01-01

    Initiation factor 2 (IF2) is a key factor in initiation of bacterial protein synthesis. It recruits initiator tRNA to the small ribosomal subunit and facilitates joining of the large ribosomal subunit. Using reconstituted translation system of Escherichia coli and optical tweezers, we directly measure the rupture force between single ribosomal complexes and mRNAs for initiation complexes in the presence and the absence of IF2. We demonstrate that IF2 together with codon recognition by initiator tRNA increases the force required to dislocate mRNA from the ribosome complexes; mRNA stabilization by IF2 required the presence of a joined 50S subunit, and was independent of bound guanine nucleotide. IF2 thus helps lock the 70S ribosome over the start codon during initiation, thus maintaining reading frame. Our results show how mRNA is progressively stabilized on the ribosome through distinct steps of initiation. PMID:22411833

  5. Piecemeal Buildup of the Genetic Code, Ribosomes, and Genomes from Primordial tRNA Building Blocks

    PubMed Central

    Caetano-Anollés, Derek; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    The origin of biomolecular machinery likely centered around an ancient and central molecule capable of interacting with emergent macromolecular complexity. tRNA is the oldest and most central nucleic acid molecule of the cell. Its co-evolutionary interactions with aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase protein enzymes define the specificities of the genetic code and those with the ribosome their accurate biosynthetic interpretation. Phylogenetic approaches that focus on molecular structure allow reconstruction of evolutionary timelines that describe the history of RNA and protein structural domains. Here we review phylogenomic analyses that reconstruct the early history of the synthetase enzymes and the ribosome, their interactions with RNA, and the inception of amino acid charging and codon specificities in tRNA that are responsible for the genetic code. We also trace the age of domains and tRNA onto ancient tRNA homologies that were recently identified in rRNA. Our findings reveal a timeline of recruitment of tRNA building blocks for the formation of a functional ribosome, which holds both the biocatalytic functions of protein biosynthesis and the ability to store genetic memory in primordial RNA genomic templates. PMID:27918435

  6. Counterselection of prokaryotic ribosomal RNA during reverse transcription using non-random hexameric oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, J M; Robb, F T

    2007-12-01

    Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is the major component in total RNA extracts, interfering with the synthesis of cDNA corresponding to messenger RNA (mRNA). In this study, we present a novel strategy for selectively discriminating against rRNA and favoring mRNA from prokaryotes during synthesis of cDNA by reverse transcriptase. Our technique is based on the fact that rRNA sequences, in many species, are G+C rich relative to the genome at large, and highly conserved among prokaryotes. The sequence TTTT is therefore rarely found in rRNA sequences. However, TTTT priming sites are found at a much higher frequency in protein-encoding gene sequences. We designed specific hexamers (HD/DHTTTT) to prime reverse transcription reactions resulting in a selective synthesis of cDNA corresponding to mRNA from prokaryotic total RNA extractions.

  7. Research Techniques Made Simple: Bacterial 16S Ribosomal RNA Gene Sequencing in Cutaneous Research.

    PubMed

    Jo, Jay-Hyun; Kennedy, Elizabeth A; Kong, Heidi H

    2016-03-01

    Skin serves as a protective barrier and also harbors numerous microorganisms collectively comprising the skin microbiome. As a result of recent advances in sequencing (next-generation sequencing), our understanding of microbial communities on skin has advanced substantially. In particular, the 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing technique has played an important role in efforts to identify the global communities of bacteria in healthy individuals and patients with various disorders in multiple topographical regions over the skin surface. Here, we describe basic principles, study design, and a workflow of 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing methodology, primarily for investigators who are not familiar with this approach. This article will also discuss some applications and challenges of 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing as well as directions for future development.

  8. Ribosomal RNA and protein transcripts persist in the cysts of Entamoeba invadens.

    PubMed

    Ojha, Sandeep; Ahamad, Jamaluddin; Bhattacharya, Alok; Bhattacharya, Sudha

    2014-06-01

    In most organisms rDNA transcription ceases under conditions of growth stress. However, we have earlier shown that pre-rRNA accumulates during encystation in Entamoeba invadens. We labeled newly-synthesized rRNA during encystation, with [methyl-(3)H] methionine in the presence of chitinase to enable uptake of isotope. Incorporation rate reduced after 24h, and then increased to reach levels comparable with normal cells. The label was rapidly chased to the ribosomal pellet in dividing cells, while at late stages of encystation the ratio of counts going to the pellet dropped 3-fold. The transcript levels of selected ribosomal protein genes also went down initially but went up again at later stages of encystation. This suggested that rRNA and ribosomal protein transcription may be coordinately regulated. Our data shows that encysting E. invadens cells accumulate transcripts of both the RNA and protein components of the ribosome, which may ensure rapid synthesis of new ribosomes when growth resumes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Archaeal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases interact with the ribosome to recycle tRNAs.

    PubMed

    Godinic-Mikulcic, Vlatka; Jaric, Jelena; Greber, Basil J; Franke, Vedran; Hodnik, Vesna; Anderluh, Gregor; Ban, Nenad; Weygand-Durasevic, Ivana

    2014-04-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS) are essential enzymes catalyzing the formation of aminoacyl-tRNAs, the immediate precursors for encoded peptides in ribosomal protein synthesis. Previous studies have suggested a link between tRNA aminoacylation and high-molecular-weight cellular complexes such as the cytoskeleton or ribosomes. However, the structural basis of these interactions and potential mechanistic implications are not well understood. To biochemically characterize these interactions we have used a system of two interacting archaeal aaRSs: an atypical methanogenic-type seryl-tRNA synthetase and an archaeal ArgRS. More specifically, we have shown by thermophoresis and surface plasmon resonance that these two aaRSs bind to the large ribosomal subunit with micromolar affinities. We have identified the L7/L12 stalk and the proteins located near the stalk base as the main sites for aaRS binding. Finally, we have performed a bioinformatics analysis of synonymous codons in the Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus genome that supports a mechanism in which the deacylated tRNAs may be recharged by aaRSs bound to the ribosome and reused at the next occurrence of a codon encoding the same amino acid. These results suggest a mechanism of tRNA recycling in which aaRSs associate with the L7/L12 stalk region to recapture the tRNAs released from the preceding ribosome in polysomes.

  10. Basic Mechanisms in RNA Polymerase I Transcription of the Ribosomal RNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Goodfellow, Sarah J.; Zomerdijk, Joost C. B. M.

    2013-01-01

    RNA Polymerase (Pol) I produces ribosomal (r)RNA, an essential component of the cellular protein synthetic machinery that drives cell growth, underlying many fundamental cellular processes. Extensive research into the mechanisms governing transcription by Pol I has revealed an intricate set of control mechanisms impinging upon rRNA production. Pol I-specific transcription factors guide Pol I to the rDNA promoter and contribute to multiple rounds of transcription initiation, promoter escape, elongation and termination. In addition, many accessory factors are now known to assist at each stage of this transcription cycle, some of which allow the integration of transcriptional activity with metabolic demands. The organisation and accessibility of rDNA chromatin also impinge upon Pol I output, and complex mechanisms ensure the appropriate maintenance of the epigenetic state of the nucleolar genome and its effective transcription by Pol I. The following review presents our current understanding of the components of the Pol I transcription machinery, their functions and regulation by associated factors, and the mechanisms operating to ensure the proper transcription of rDNA chromatin. The importance of such stringent control is demonstrated by the fact that deregulated Pol I transcription is a feature of cancer and other disorders characterised by abnormal translational capacity. PMID:23150253

  11. RBF1, a Plant Homolog of the Bacterial Ribosome-Binding Factor RbfA, Acts in Processing of the Chloroplast 16S Ribosomal RNA1[W

    PubMed Central

    Fristedt, Rikard; Scharff, Lars B.; Clarke, Cornelia A.; Wang, Qin; Lin, Chentao; Merchant, Sabeeha S.; Bock, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Plastids (chloroplasts) possess 70S ribosomes that are very similar in structure and function to the ribosomes of their bacterial ancestors. While most components of the bacterial ribosome (ribosomal RNAs [rRNAs] and ribosomal proteins) are well conserved in the plastid ribosome, little is known about the factors mediating the biogenesis of plastid ribosomes. Here, we have investigated a putative homolog of the bacterial RbfA (for ribosome-binding factor A) protein that was identified as a cold-shock protein and an auxiliary factor acting in the 5′ maturation of the 16S rRNA. The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and the vascular plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) both encode a single RbfA-like protein in their nuclear genomes. By generating specific antibodies against this protein, we show that the plant RbfA-like protein functions exclusively in the plastid, where it is associated with thylakoid membranes. Analysis of mutants for the corresponding gene (termed RBF1) reveals that the gene function is essential for photoautotrophic growth. Weak mutant alleles display reduced levels of plastid ribosomes, a specific depletion in 30S ribosomal subunits, and reduced activity of plastid protein biosynthesis. Our data suggest that, while the function in ribosome maturation and 16S rRNA 5′ end processing is conserved, the RBF1 protein has assumed an additional role in 3′ end processing. Together with the apparent absence of a homologous protein from plant mitochondria, our findings illustrate that the assembly process of the 70S ribosome is not strictly conserved and has undergone some modifications during organelle evolution. PMID:24214533

  12. Oligonucleotide directed mutagenesis of Escherichia coli 5S ribosomal RNA: construction of mutant and structural analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Göringer, H U; Wagner, R; Jacob, W F; Dahlberg, A E; Zwieb, C

    1984-01-01

    The ribosomal 5S RNA gene from the rrnB operon of E. coli was mutagenised in vitro using a synthetic oligonucleotide hybridised to M13 ssDNA containing that gene. The oligonucleotide corresponded to the 5S RNA sequence positions 34 to 51 and changed the guanosine at position 41 to a cytidine. The DNA containing the desired mutation was identified by dot blot hybridisation and introduced back into the plasmid pKK 3535 which contains the total rrnB operon in pBR 322. Plasmid coded 5S rRNA was selectively labeled with 32p using a modified maxi-cell system, and the replacement of guanosine G41 by cytidine was confirmed by RNA sequencing. The growth of cells containing mutant 5S rRNA was not altered by the base change, and the 5S rRNA was processed and incorporated into 50S ribosomal subunits and 70S ribosomes. The structure of wildtype and mutant 5S rRNA was compared by chemical modification of accessible guanosines with kethoxal and limited enzymatic digestion using RNase T1 and nuclease S1. These results showed that the wildtype and mutant 5S rRNA do not differ significantly in their structure. Furthermore, the formation, interconversion and stability of the two 5S rRNA A- and B-conformers are unchanged. Images PMID:6091046

  13. Reformation of functional liver polyribosomes from ribosome monomers in the absence of RNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Stewart, G A; Farber, E

    1967-07-07

    The administration to rats of the ethyl analog of methionine, ethionine, results in the rapid decrease in the hepatic concentration of adenosine triphosphate followed by an extensive disaggregation of polysomes to ribosome monomers and a concomitant inhibition of protein synthesis. These effects are readily reversed by the injection of methionine or precursors of adenine nucleotides such as adenine. The reformation of liver polyribosomes in such animals following the administration of adenine plus methionine was found to occur under conditions in which new RNA synthesis was markedly inhibited. Free messenger RNA without attached ribosomes must be capable of remaining functionally active in the liver cytoplasm for many hours.

  14. Use of Eukaryotic Native Small Ribosomal Subunits for the Translation of Globin Messenger RNA

    PubMed Central

    Freienstein, Christoph; Blobel, Günter

    1974-01-01

    A highly active in vitro system for the translation of globin mRNA, resulting in more than 10 rounds of translation, is described. The reconstituted system consists of native small ribosomal subunits of rabbit reticulocytes (as a source of initiation factors as well as small ribosomal subunits), large subunits derived from rat liver polysomes by the puromycin-KCl procedure, and a pH 5 fraction obtained from a Krebs ascites cell high speed supernatant. In this system no differences were found between globin messenger ribonucleoprotein and globin mRNA. Images PMID:4530315

  15. Ribosomal protein L16 binds to the 3'-end of transfer RNA.

    PubMed

    Maimets, T; Remme, J; Villems, R

    1984-01-23

    Escherichia coli 50 S ribosomal subunits were reconstituted with and without protein L16 present. The latter particles, although active in puromycin reaction, were unable to use CACCA-Phe as an acceptor substrate. We also found that L16 interacts directly with this oligonucleotide and, in the complex with tRNA, protects its 3'-end from pancreatic ribonuclease digestion. We suggest that the role of L16 is in the fixation of the aminoacyl stem of tRNA to the ribosome at its A-site.

  16. A GTPase reaction accompanying the rejection of Leu-tRNA2 by UUU-programmed ribosomes. Proofreading of the codon-anticodon interaction by ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Thompson, R C; Dix, D B; Gerson, R B; Karim, A M

    1981-01-10

    The characteristics of a GTPase reaction between poly(U)-programmed ribosomes, EFTu . GTP, and the near-cognate aminoacyl (aa)-tRNA, Leu-tRNA Leu 2, have been studied to assess the role of this reaction in proofreading of the codon-anticodon interaction. The reaction resembles the GTPase reaction with cognate aa-tRNAs and EFTu . GTP in its substrate requirements, in its involving EFTu . GTP . aa-tRNA ternary complexes, and in its requiring a free ribosomal A-site. The noncognate reaction differs from the cognate one in that aa-tRNA becomes stably bound to the ribosomes only 5% of the time; it therefore seems best characterized as an abortive enzymatic binding reaction. The rate of reaction is a significant fraction (4%) of that of the cognate aa-tRNA, indicating that recognition of ternary complexes by ribosomes involves a level of error greater than that of translation as a whole. The rejection of the noncognate aa-tRNA following GTP hydrolysis is therefore a vital step in the translation process and fulfills the criteria set for a proofreading reaction. Leu-tRNA Leu 2 which escapes rejection through proofreading, forms a stable complex with the ribosomal A-site, so it appears that the Leu-tRNA2 which was rejected never reached the A-site and that proofreading precedes full A-site binding.

  17. Co-evolution of Bacterial Ribosomal Protein S15 with Diverse mRNA Regulatory Structures.

    PubMed

    Slinger, Betty L; Newman, Hunter; Lee, Younghan; Pei, Shermin; Meyer, Michelle M

    2015-12-01

    RNA-protein interactions are critical in many biological processes, yet how such interactions affect the evolution of both partners is still unknown. RNA and protein structures are impacted very differently by mechanisms of genomic change. While most protein families are identifiable at the nucleotide level across large phylogenetic distances, RNA families display far less nucleotide similarity and are often only shared by closely related bacterial species. Ribosomal protein S15 has two RNA binding functions. First, it is a ribosomal protein responsible for organizing the rRNA during ribosome assembly. Second, in many bacterial species S15 also interacts with a structured portion of its own transcript to negatively regulate gene expression. While the first interaction is conserved in most bacteria, the second is not. Four distinct mRNA structures interact with S15 to enable regulation, each of which appears to be independently derived in different groups of bacteria. With the goal of understanding how protein-binding specificity may influence the evolution of such RNA regulatory structures, we examine whether examples of these mRNA structures are able to interact with, and regulate in response to, S15 homologs from organisms containing distinct mRNA structures. We find that despite their shared RNA binding function in the rRNA, S15 homologs have distinct RNA recognition profiles. We present a model to explain the specificity patterns observed, and support this model by with further mutagenesis. After analyzing the patterns of conservation for the S15 protein coding sequences, we also identified amino acid changes that alter the binding specificity of an S15 homolog. In this work we demonstrate that homologous RNA-binding proteins have different specificity profiles, and minor changes to amino acid sequences, or to RNA structural motifs, can have large impacts on RNA-protein recognition.

  18. Co-evolution of Bacterial Ribosomal Protein S15 with Diverse mRNA Regulatory Structures

    PubMed Central

    Slinger, Betty L.; Newman, Hunter; Lee, Younghan; Pei, Shermin; Meyer, Michelle M.

    2015-01-01

    RNA-protein interactions are critical in many biological processes, yet how such interactions affect the evolution of both partners is still unknown. RNA and protein structures are impacted very differently by mechanisms of genomic change. While most protein families are identifiable at the nucleotide level across large phylogenetic distances, RNA families display far less nucleotide similarity and are often only shared by closely related bacterial species. Ribosomal protein S15 has two RNA binding functions. First, it is a ribosomal protein responsible for organizing the rRNA during ribosome assembly. Second, in many bacterial species S15 also interacts with a structured portion of its own transcript to negatively regulate gene expression. While the first interaction is conserved in most bacteria, the second is not. Four distinct mRNA structures interact with S15 to enable regulation, each of which appears to be independently derived in different groups of bacteria. With the goal of understanding how protein-binding specificity may influence the evolution of such RNA regulatory structures, we examine whether examples of these mRNA structures are able to interact with, and regulate in response to, S15 homologs from organisms containing distinct mRNA structures. We find that despite their shared RNA binding function in the rRNA, S15 homologs have distinct RNA recognition profiles. We present a model to explain the specificity patterns observed, and support this model by with further mutagenesis. After analyzing the patterns of conservation for the S15 protein coding sequences, we also identified amino acid changes that alter the binding specificity of an S15 homolog. In this work we demonstrate that homologous RNA-binding proteins have different specificity profiles, and minor changes to amino acid sequences, or to RNA structural motifs, can have large impacts on RNA-protein recognition. PMID:26675164

  19. Simulating movement of tRNA through the ribosome during hybrid-state formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitford, Paul C.; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y.

    2013-09-01

    Biomolecular simulations provide a means for exploring the relationship between flexibility, energetics, structure, and function. With the availability of atomic models from X-ray crystallography and cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM), and rapid increases in computing capacity, it is now possible to apply molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to large biomolecular machines, and systematically partition the factors that contribute to function. A large biomolecular complex for which atomic models are available is the ribosome. In the cell, the ribosome reads messenger RNA (mRNA) in order to synthesize proteins. During this essential process, the ribosome undergoes a wide range of conformational rearrangements. One of the most poorly understood transitions is translocation: the process by which transfer RNA (tRNA) molecules move between binding sites inside of the ribosome. The first step of translocation is the adoption of a "hybrid" configuration by the tRNAs, which is accompanied by large-scale rotations in the ribosomal subunits. To illuminate the relationship between these rearrangements, we apply MD simulations using a multi-basin structure-based (SMOG) model, together with targeted molecular dynamics protocols. From 120 simulated transitions, we demonstrate the viability of a particular route during P/E hybrid-state formation, where there is asynchronous movement along rotation and tRNA coordinates. These simulations not only suggest an ordering of events, but they highlight atomic interactions that may influence the kinetics of hybrid-state formation. From these simulations, we also identify steric features (H74 and surrounding residues) encountered during the hybrid transition, and observe that flexibility of the single-stranded 3'-CCA tail is essential for it to reach the endpoint. Together, these simulations provide a set of structural and energetic signatures that suggest strategies for modulating the physical-chemical properties of protein synthesis by the

  20. PTRF/Cavin-1 promotes efficient ribosomal RNA transcription in response to metabolic challenges

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Libin; Pilch, Paul F

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA transcription mediated by RNA polymerase I represents the rate-limiting step in ribosome biogenesis. In eukaryotic cells, nutrients and growth factors regulate ribosomal RNA transcription through various key factors coupled to cell growth. We show here in mature adipocytes, ribosomal transcription can be acutely regulated in response to metabolic challenges. This acute response is mediated by PTRF (polymerase I transcription and release factor, also known as cavin-1), which has previously been shown to play a critical role in caveolae formation. The caveolae–independent rDNA transcriptional role of PTRF not only explains the lipodystrophy phenotype observed in PTRF deficient mice and humans, but also highlights its crucial physiological role in maintaining adipocyte allostasis. Multiple post-translational modifications of PTRF provide mechanistic bases for its regulation. The role of PTRF in ribosomal transcriptional efficiency is likely relevant to many additional physiological situations of cell growth and organismal metabolism. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17508.001 PMID:27528195

  1. Computational and Experimental Characterization of Ribosomal DNA and RNA G-Quadruplexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Samuel

    DNA G-quadruplexes in human telomeres and gene promoters are being extensively studied for their role in controlling the growth of cancer cells. Recent studies strongly suggest that guanine (G)-rich genes encoding pre-ribosomal RNA (pre-rRNA) are a potential anticancer target through the inhibition of RNA polymerase I (Pol I) in ribosome biogenesis. However, the structures of ribosomal G-quadruplexes at atomic resolution are unknown, and very little biophysical characterization has been performed on them to date. Here, we have modeled two putative rDNA G-quadruplex structures, NUC 19P and NUC 23P, which we observe via circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy to adopt a predominantly parallel topology, and their counterpart rRNA. To validate and refine the putative ribosomal G-quadruplex structures, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using the CHARMM36 force field in the presence and absence of stabilizing K + or Na + ions. We optimized the CHARMM36 force field K + parameters to be more consistent with quantum mechanical calculations (and the polarizable Drude model force field) so that the K + ion is predominantly in the G-quadruplex channel. Our MD simulations show that the rDNA G-quadruplex have more well-defined, predominantly parallel-topology structures than rRNA and NUC 19P is more structured than NUC 23P, which features extended loops. Our study demonstrates that they are both potential targets for the design of novel chemotherapeutics.

  2. Molecular characterization of 5S ribosomal RNA genes and transcripts in the protozoan parasite Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Campos, Rodrigo; Florencio-Martínez, Luis E; Nepomuceno-Mejía, Tomás; Rojas-Sánchez, Saúl; Vélez-Ramírez, Daniel E; Padilla-Mejía, Norma E; Figueroa-Angulo, Elisa; Manning-Cela, Rebeca; Martínez-Calvillo, Santiago

    2016-12-01

    Eukaryotic 5S rRNA, synthesized by RNA polymerase III (Pol III), is an essential component of the large ribosomal subunit. Most organisms contain hundreds of 5S rRNA genes organized into tandem arrays. However, the genome of the protozoan parasite Leishmania major contains only 11 copies of the 5S rRNA gene, which are interspersed and associated with other Pol III-transcribed genes. Here we report that, in general, the number and order of the 5S rRNA genes is conserved between different species of Leishmania. While in most organisms 5S rRNA genes are normally associated with the nucleolus, combined fluorescent in situ hybridization and indirect immunofluorescence experiments showed that 5S rRNA genes are mainly located at the nuclear periphery in L. major. Similarly, the tandemly repeated 5S rRNA genes in Trypanosoma cruzi are dispersed throughout the nucleus. In contrast, 5S rRNA transcripts in L. major were localized within the nucleolus, and scattered throughout the cytoplasm, where mature ribosomes are located. Unlike other rRNA species, stable antisense RNA complementary to 5S rRNA is not detected in L. major.

  3. Protein synthesis factors (RF1, RF2, RF3, RRF, and tmRNA) and peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase rescue stalled ribosomes at sense codons.

    PubMed

    Vivanco-Domínguez, Serafín; Bueno-Martínez, José; León-Avila, Gloria; Iwakura, Nobuhiro; Kaji, Akira; Kaji, Hideko; Guarneros, Gabriel

    2012-04-13

    During translation, ribosomes stall on mRNA when the aminoacyl-tRNA to be read is not readily available. The stalled ribosomes are deleterious to the cell and should be rescued to maintain its viability. To investigate the contribution of some of the cellular translation factors on ribosome rescuing, we provoked stalling at AGA codons in mutants that affected the factors and then analyzed the accumulation of oligopeptidyl (peptides of up to 6 amino acid residues, oligopep-)-tRNA or polypeptidyl (peptides of more than 300 amino acids in length, polypep-)-tRNA associated with ribosomes. Stalling was achieved by starvation for aminoacyl-tRNA(Arg4) upon induced expression of engineered lacZ (β-galactosidase) reporter gene harboring contiguous AGA codons close to the initiation codon or at internal codon positions together with minigene ATGAGATAA accompanied by reduced peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase (Pth). Our results showed accumulations of peptidyl-tRNA associated with ribosomes in mutants for release factors (RF1, RF2, and RF3), ribosome recycling factor (RRF), Pth, and transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA), implying that each of these factors cooperate in rescuing stalled ribosomes. The role of these factors in ribosome releasing from the stalled complex may vary depending on the length of the peptide in the peptidyl-tRNA. RF3 and RRF rescue stalled ribosomes by "drop-off" of peptidyl-tRNA, while RF1, RF2 (in the absence of termination codon), or Pth may rescue by hydrolyzing the associated peptidyl-tRNA. This is followed by the disassembly of the ribosomal complex of tRNA and mRNA by RRF and elongation factor G.

  4. Metabolic stability of the extrachromosomal ribosomal RNA genes in the slime mould Physarum polycephalum.

    PubMed

    Hall, L; Gubler, U; Braun, R

    1978-05-01

    The rRNA genes of the slime mould Physarum polycephalum are located on free, linear DNA molecules of a discrete size, Mr=38X10(6). Using an isotope dilution technique we have examined the metabolic stability of these extrachromosomal genes during active, balanced growth. Microplasmodia, prelabelled with [3H]thymidine, were used to prepare synchronous surface plasmodial cultures which were subsequently grown on unlabelled medium. The gross synthesis of ribosomal DNA was then determined over three consecutive mitotic divisions from the ratio of 3H to 14C in a hybrid formed between the extracted ribosomal [3H]DNA and a [14C]rRNA probe. It was found that ribosomal DNA, like chromosomal DNA, is completely stable during active growth.

  5. Adaptive evolution of an artificial RNA genome to a reduced ribosome environment.

    PubMed

    Mizuuchi, Ryo; Ichihashi, Norikazu; Usui, Kimihito; Kazuta, Yasuaki; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2015-03-20

    The reconstitution of an artificial system that has the same evolutionary ability as a living thing is a major challenge in the in vitro synthetic biology. In this study, we tested the adaptive evolutionary ability of an artificial RNA genome replication system, termed the translation-coupled RNA replication (TcRR) system. In a previous work, we performed a study of the long-term evolution of the genome with an excess amount of ribosome. In this study, we continued the evolution experiment in a reduced-ribosome environment and observed that the mutant genome compensated for the reduced ribosome concentration. This result demonstrated the ability of the TcRR system to adapt and may be a step toward generating living things with evolutionary ability.

  6. High-Resolution Analysis of Coronavirus Gene Expression by RNA Sequencing and Ribosome Profiling.

    PubMed

    Irigoyen, Nerea; Firth, Andrew E; Jones, Joshua D; Chung, Betty Y-W; Siddell, Stuart G; Brierley, Ian

    2016-02-01

    Members of the family Coronaviridae have the largest genomes of all RNA viruses, typically in the region of 30 kilobases. Several coronaviruses, such as Severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Middle East respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus (MERS-CoV), are of medical importance, with high mortality rates and, in the case of SARS-CoV, significant pandemic potential. Other coronaviruses, such as Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus and Avian coronavirus, are important livestock pathogens. Ribosome profiling is a technique which exploits the capacity of the translating ribosome to protect around 30 nucleotides of mRNA from ribonuclease digestion. Ribosome-protected mRNA fragments are purified, subjected to deep sequencing and mapped back to the transcriptome to give a global "snap-shot" of translation. Parallel RNA sequencing allows normalization by transcript abundance. Here we apply ribosome profiling to cells infected with Murine coronavirus, mouse hepatitis virus, strain A59 (MHV-A59), a model coronavirus in the same genus as SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. The data obtained allowed us to study the kinetics of virus transcription and translation with exquisite precision. We studied the timecourse of positive and negative-sense genomic and subgenomic viral RNA production and the relative translation efficiencies of the different virus ORFs. Virus mRNAs were not found to be translated more efficiently than host mRNAs; rather, virus translation dominates host translation at later time points due to high levels of virus transcripts. Triplet phasing of the profiling data allowed precise determination of translated reading frames and revealed several translated short open reading frames upstream of, or embedded within, known virus protein-coding regions. Ribosome pause sites were identified in the virus replicase polyprotein pp1a ORF and investigated experimentally. Contrary to expectations, ribosomes were not found to pause at the ribosomal

  7. High-Resolution Analysis of Coronavirus Gene Expression by RNA Sequencing and Ribosome Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Joshua D.; Chung, Betty Y.-W.; Siddell, Stuart G.; Brierley, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Members of the family Coronaviridae have the largest genomes of all RNA viruses, typically in the region of 30 kilobases. Several coronaviruses, such as Severe acute respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Middle East respiratory syndrome-related coronavirus (MERS-CoV), are of medical importance, with high mortality rates and, in the case of SARS-CoV, significant pandemic potential. Other coronaviruses, such as Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus and Avian coronavirus, are important livestock pathogens. Ribosome profiling is a technique which exploits the capacity of the translating ribosome to protect around 30 nucleotides of mRNA from ribonuclease digestion. Ribosome-protected mRNA fragments are purified, subjected to deep sequencing and mapped back to the transcriptome to give a global “snap-shot” of translation. Parallel RNA sequencing allows normalization by transcript abundance. Here we apply ribosome profiling to cells infected with Murine coronavirus, mouse hepatitis virus, strain A59 (MHV-A59), a model coronavirus in the same genus as SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. The data obtained allowed us to study the kinetics of virus transcription and translation with exquisite precision. We studied the timecourse of positive and negative-sense genomic and subgenomic viral RNA production and the relative translation efficiencies of the different virus ORFs. Virus mRNAs were not found to be translated more efficiently than host mRNAs; rather, virus translation dominates host translation at later time points due to high levels of virus transcripts. Triplet phasing of the profiling data allowed precise determination of translated reading frames and revealed several translated short open reading frames upstream of, or embedded within, known virus protein-coding regions. Ribosome pause sites were identified in the virus replicase polyprotein pp1a ORF and investigated experimentally. Contrary to expectations, ribosomes were not found to pause at the ribosomal

  8. Exploring human 40S ribosomal proteins binding to the 18S rRNA fragment containing major 3'-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Gopanenko, Alexander V; Malygin, Alexey A; Karpova, Galina G

    2015-02-01

    Association of ribosomal proteins with rRNA during assembly of ribosomal subunits is an intricate process, which is strictly regulated in vivo. As for the assembly in vitro, it was reported so far only for prokaryotic subunits. Bacterial ribosomal proteins are capable of selective binding to 16S rRNA as well as to its separate morphological domains. In this work, we explored binding of total protein of human 40S ribosomal subunit to the RNA transcript corresponding to the major 3'-domain of 18S rRNA. We showed that the resulting ribonucleoprotein particles contained almost all of the expected ribosomal proteins, whose binding sites are located in this 18S rRNA domain in the 40S subunit, together with several nonspecific proteins. The binding in solution was accompanied with aggregation of the RNA-protein complexes. Ribosomal proteins bound to the RNA transcript protected from chemical modification mostly those 18S rRNA nucleotides that are known to be involved in binding with the proteins in the 40S subunit and thereby demonstrated their ability to selectively bind to the rRNA in vitro. The possible implication of unstructured extensions of eukaryotic ribosomal proteins in their nonspecific binding with rRNA and in subsequent aggregation of the resulting complexes is discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Assessing the 5S ribosomal RNA heterogeneity in Arabidopsis thaliana using short RNA next generation sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Szymanski, Maciej; Karlowski, Wojciech M

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotes, ribosomal 5S rRNAs are products of multigene families organized within clusters of tandemly repeated units. Accumulation of genomic data obtained from a variety of organisms demonstrated that the potential 5S rRNA coding sequences show a large number of variants, often incompatible with folding into a correct secondary structure. Here, we present results of an analysis of a large set of short RNA sequences generated by the next generation sequencing techniques, to address the problem of heterogeneity of the 5S rRNA transcripts in Arabidopsis and identification of potentially functional rRNA-derived fragments.

  10. Ribosomal RNA genes in the amoebal and plasmodial forms of the slime mould Physarum polycephalum.

    PubMed

    Hall, L; Turnock, G; Cox, B J

    1975-02-21

    1. The degree of homology between ribosomal RNA isolated from microplasmodia and amoebae of the slime mould Physarum polycephalum has been determined by competive hybridisation of the RNA from the two sources to homologous DNA in solution. The extent of competition was measured both by hybridisation to saturation and by following the kinetics of hybrid formation. In each case competition was found to be 100%, indicating that the ribosomal RNAs from the two, quite different vegetative forms of the organism exhibit a high degree of homology and are probably transcribed from the same genes. 2. The relationship between the amount of nuclear DNA that codes for ribosomal RNA (rDNA) and ploidy has been investigated in three strains of P. polycephalum which exhibit a 1:2:5 variation in the amount of DNA per nucleus. Ribosomal RNA saturation values were determined by hybridisation to DNA isolated from prophase nuclei of plasmodia. The proportion of rDNA was found to be constant at 0.16--0.18% of the total genome in the three strains.

  11. The Ribosome Shape Directs mRNA Translocation through Entrance and Exit Dynamics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The protein-synthesizing ribosome undergoes large motions to effect the translocation of tRNAs (transfer ribonucleic acids) and mRNA (messenger ribonucleic acid); here the domain motions of this system are explored with a coarse-grained elastic network model using normal mode analysis. Crystal struc...

  12. Yeast ribosomal protein L10 helps coordinate tRNA movement through the large subunit

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Alexey N.; Meskauskas, Arturas; Roshwalb, Sara C.; Dinman, Jonathan D.

    2008-01-01

    Yeast ribosomal protein L10 (E. coli L16) is located at the center of a topological nexus that connects many functional regions of the large subunit. This essential protein has previously been implicated in processes as diverse as ribosome biogenesis, translational fidelity and mRNA stability. Here, the inability to maintain the yeast Killer virus was used as a proxy for large subunit defects to identify a series of L10 mutants. These mapped to roughly four discrete regions of the protein. A detailed analysis of mutants located in the N-terminal ‘hook’ of L10, which inserts into the bulge of 25S rRNA helix 89, revealed strong effects on rRNA structure corresponding to the entire path taken by the tRNA 3′ end as it moves through the large subunit during the elongation cycle. The mutant-induced structural changes are wide-ranging, affecting ribosome biogenesis, elongation factor binding, drug resistance/hypersensitivity, translational fidelity and virus maintenance. The importance of L10 as a potential transducer of information through the ribosome, and of a possible role of its N-terminal domain in switching between the pre- and post-translocational states are discussed. PMID:18824477

  13. Role of messenger RNA-ribosome complex in complementary DNA display.

    PubMed

    Naimuddin, Mohammed; Ohtsuka, Isao; Kitamura, Koichiro; Kudou, Motonori; Kimura, Shinnosuke

    2013-07-15

    In vitro display technologies such as ribosome display and messenger RNA (mRNA)/complementary DNA (cDNA) display are powerful methods that can generate library diversities on the order of 10(10-14). However, in mRNA and cDNA display methods, the end use diversity is two orders of magnitude lower than initial diversity and is dependent on the downstream processes that act as limiting factors. We found that in our previous cDNA display protocol, the purification of protein fusions by the use of streptavidin matrices from cell-free translation mixtures had poor efficiency (∼10-15%) that seriously affected the diversity of the purified library. Here, we have investigated and optimized the protocols that provided remarkable purification efficiencies. The stalled ribosome in the mRNA-ribosome complex was found to impede this purification efficiency. Among the various conditions tested, destabilization of ribosomes by appropriate concentration of metal chelating agents in combination with an optimal temperature of 30°C were found to be crucial and effective for nearly complete isolation of protein fusions from the cell-free translation system. Thus, this protocol provided 8- to 10-fold increased efficiency of purification over the previous method and results in retaining the diversity of the library by approximately an order of magnitude-important for directed evolution. We also discuss the possible effects in the fabrication of protein chips. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. mRNA translocation occurs during the second step of ribosomal intersubunit rotation.

    PubMed

    Ermolenko, Dmitri N; Noller, Harry F

    2011-04-01

    During protein synthesis, mRNA and tRNA undergo coupled translocation through the ribosome in a process that is catalyzed by elongation factor G (EF-G). On the basis of cryo-EM reconstructions, counterclockwise and clockwise rotational movements between the large and small ribosomal subunits have been implicated in a proposed ratcheting mechanism to drive the unidirectional movement of translocation. We used a combination of two fluorescence-based approaches to study the timing of these events, intersubunit fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements to observe relative rotational movement of the subunits, and a fluorescence quenching assay to monitor translocation of mRNA. Binding of EF-G-GTP first induces rapid counterclockwise intersubunit rotation, followed by a slower, clockwise reversal of the rotational movement. We compared the rates of these movements and found that mRNA translocation occurs during the second, clockwise rotation event, corresponding to the transition from the hybrid state to the classical state.

  15. Is wheat mitochondrial 5S ribosomal RNA prokaryotic in nature?

    PubMed Central

    Gray, M W; Spencer, D F

    1981-01-01

    Küntzel et al. (1981) (Nucleic Acids Res. 9, 1451-1461) recently concluded that the sequence of wheat mitochondrial 5S rRNA is significantly more related to prokaryotic than to eukaryotic 5S rRNA sequences, and displays an especially high affinity to that of the thermophilic Gram-negative bacterium, Thermus aquaticus. However, the sequence on which this conclusion was based, although attributed to us, differs in several places from the one determined by us. We show here that the correct sequence (Spencer, D.F., Bonen, L. and Gray, M.W. (1981) Biochemistry, in press) does not support the conclusions of Küntzel et al. about potential secondary structure in wheat mitochondrial 5S rRNA and its phylogenetic significance. We further show that when the wheat mitochondrial 5S rRNA sequence is matched against published alignments for E. coli, T. aquaticus, and wheat cytosol 5S rRNAs, the mitochondrial sequence shows no greater homology to the T. aquaticus sequence than to the E. coli sequence, and only slightly more homology to these two sequences than to wheat cytosol 5S rRNA. This analysis confirms our original view (Biochemistry, in press) that wheat mitochondrial 5S rRNA is neither obviously prokaryotic nor eukaryotic in nature, but shows characteristics of both classes of 5S rRNA, as well as some unique features. PMID:7024917

  16. Analysis of Pteridium ribosomal RNA sequences by rapid direct sequencing.

    PubMed

    Tan, M K

    1991-08-01

    A total of 864 bases from 5 regions interspersed in the 18S and 26S rRNA molecules from various clones of Pteridium covering the general geographical distribution of the genus was analysed using a rapid rRNA sequencing technique. No base difference has been detected amongst the three major lineages, two of which apparently separated before the breakup of the ancient supercontinent, Pangaea. These regions of the rRNA sequences have thus been conserved for at least 160 million years and are here compared with other eukaryotic, especially plant rRNAs.

  17. Identification and sequence of the initiation site for rat 45S ribosomal RNA synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, C A; Chikaraishi, D M

    1983-01-01

    The transcription initiation site for rat 45S precursor ribosomal RNA synthesis was determined by nuclease protection mapping with two single-strand endonucleases. S1 and mung bean, and one single-strand exonuclease, ExoVII. These experiments were performed with end-labeled ribosomal DNA from double-stranded pBR322 recombinants and from single-stranded M13 recombinants. Results from experiments using both kinds of DNA and all three enzymes showed that the 5' end of 45S RNA mapped to a unique site 125 bases upstream from the Hind III site in the ribosomal DNA gene. The DNA surrounding this site (designated +1) was sequenced from -281 to +641. The entire sequence of this region shows extensive homology to the comparable region of mouse. This includes three stretches of T residues in the non-coding strand between +300 and +630. Two sets of direct repeats adjacent to these T-rich regions are observed. Comparison of the mouse and human ribosomal DNA transcription initiation sites with the rat sequence reported in this paper demonstrates a conserved sequence at +2 to +16, CTGACACGCTGTCCT. This suggests that this region may be important for the initiation of transcription on mammalian ribosomal DNAs. Images PMID:6304628

  18. Protein Folding Activity of Ribosomal RNA Is a Selective Target of Two Unrelated Antiprion Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Tribouillard-Tanvier, Déborah; Dos Reis, Suzana; Gug, Fabienne; Voisset, Cécile; Béringue, Vincent; Sabate, Raimon; Kikovska, Ema; Talarek, Nicolas; Bach, Stéphane; Huang, Chenhui; Desban, Nathalie; Saupe, Sven J.; Supattapone, Surachai; Thuret, Jean-Yves; Chédin, Stéphane; Vilette, Didier; Galons, Hervé; Sanyal, Suparna; Blondel, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Background 6-Aminophenanthridine (6AP) and Guanabenz (GA, a drug currently in use for the treatment of hypertension) were isolated as antiprion drugs using a yeast-based assay. These structurally unrelated molecules are also active against mammalian prion in several cell-based assays and in vivo in a mouse model for prion-based diseases. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we report the identification of cellular targets of these drugs. Using affinity chromatography matrices for both drugs, we demonstrate an RNA-dependent interaction of 6AP and GA with the ribosome. These specific interactions have no effect on the peptidyl transferase activity of the ribosome or on global translation. In contrast, 6AP and GA specifically inhibit the ribosomal RNA-mediated protein folding activity of the ribosome. Conclusion/Significance 6AP and GA are therefore the first compounds to selectively inhibit the protein folding activity of the ribosome. They thus constitute precious tools to study the yet largely unexplored biological role of this protein folding activity. PMID:18478094

  19. Fluctuations in protein synthesis from a single RNA template: Stochastic kinetics of ribosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garai, Ashok; Chowdhury, Debashish; Ramakrishnan, T. V.

    2009-01-01

    Proteins are polymerized by cyclic machines called ribosomes, which use their messenger RNA (mRNA) track also as the corresponding template, and the process is called translation. We explore, in depth and detail, the stochastic nature of the translation. We compute various distributions associated with the translation process; one of them—namely, the dwell time distribution—has been measured in recent single-ribosome experiments. The form of the distribution, which fits best with our simulation data, is consistent with that extracted from the experimental data. For our computations, we use a model that captures both the mechanochemistry of each individual ribosome and their steric interactions. We also demonstrate the effects of the sequence inhomogeneities of real genes on the fluctuations and noise in translation. Finally, inspired by recent advances in the experimental techniques of manipulating single ribosomes, we make theoretical predictions on the force-velocity relation for individual ribosomes. In principle, all our predictions can be tested by carrying out in vitro experiments.

  20. The nucleotide sequence of 5S ribosomal RNA from slime mold Physarum polycephalum.

    PubMed

    Komiya, H; Takemura, S

    1981-12-01

    The nucleotide sequence of 5S ribosomal RNA from plasmodia of the slime mold Physarum polycephalum was determined as pppGGAUGCGGC CAUACUAAGG 20 AGAAAGCACC 30 UCAUCCCGUC 40 CGAUCUGAGA 50 AGUUAAGCUC 60 CUUCAGGCGU 70 GGUUAGUACU 80 GGGGUGGGGG 90 ACCACCUGGG 100 AAUCCCACGU 110 GCUGCAUUCU 120 Uoh by chemical and enzymatic gel sequencing technics using 3' and 5' end-labeled RNA. This RNA is very different from 5S rRNA of the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum (36 nucleotides are different), and shows greater similarity to 5S rRNAs from Protozoa and Metazoa than to those from fungi.

  1. Identification and structural analysis of a ribosomal RNA gene promoter from Thiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    PubMed

    Takamiya, M; Salazar, O; Vargas, D; Jedlicki, E; Orellana, O

    1990-10-15

    The 5'-terminus of a rRNA operon (rrnT2) from Thiobacillus ferrooxidans was characterized. The rRNA promoters from this microorganism were identified by means of a functional assay in Escherichia coli. DNA sequencing of the promoter region, upstream the 16 S rRNA gene, showed the presence of a consensus sequence for bacterial ribosomal promoters. Other features such as a 'discriminator' sequence, antiterminator elements and an upstream hexanucleotide common to several rRNA operons were also found. Two other putative transcription promoters were also identified.

  2. Cloning and determination of the transcription termination site of ribosomal RNA gene of the mouse.

    PubMed Central

    Kominami, R; Mishima, Y; Urano, Y; Sakai, M; Muramatsu, M

    1982-01-01

    A Eco RI 6.6 kb DNA fragment containing the 3'-end of 28S ribosomal RNA gene of the mouse was detected by Southern blot hybridization, and cloned in a lambda-phage vector. The site of transcription termination and the processed 3'-end of 28S RNA were determined on the cloned fragment and the surrounding nucleotide sequence determined. The 3'-terminal nucleotides of mouse 28S RNA are similar to those of yeast, Drosophila and Xenopus although the homology was lost drastically beyond the 3'-end of 28S RNA. 45S precursor RNA terminated at 30 nucleotides downstream from the 3'-end of 28S RNA gene. A structure of a dyad symmetry with a loop was found immediately prior to the termination site of 45S RNA. The rDNA termination site thus shares some common features with termination sites recognized by other RNA polymerases. Images PMID:6281727

  3. Characterization of nitrogen-fixing Paenibacillus species by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of part of genes encoding 16S rRNA and 23S rRNA and by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Marcia Reed Rodrigues; von der Weid, Irene; Zahner, Viviane; Seldin, Lucy

    2003-05-28

    Forty-two strains representing the eight recognized nitrogen-fixing Paenibacillus species and 12 non-identified strains were examined by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of part of 16S and 23S rRNA genes amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Eleven different 16S rDNA genotypes were obtained from the combined data of RFLP analysis with four endonucleases and they were in agreement with the established taxonomic classification. Only one group of unclassified strains (Group I) was assigned in a separate genotype, suggesting they belong to a new species. Using the 23S PCR-RFLP method only six genotypes were detected, showing that this method is less discriminative than the 16S PCR-RFLP. Using the multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE) assay, the 48 strains tested could be classified into 35 zymovars. The seven enzymatic loci tested were polymorphic and the different profiles obtained among strains allowed the grouping of strains into 10 clusters. The PCR-RFLP methods together with the MLEE assay provide a rapid tool for the characterization and the establishment of the taxonomic position of isolates belonging to this nitrogen-fixing group, which shows a great potentiality in promoting plant growth.

  4. Can we estimate bacterial growth rates from ribosomal RNA content?

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, P.F.

    1995-12-31

    Several studies have demonstrated a strong relationship between the quantity of RNA in bacterial cells and their growth rate under laboratory conditions. It may be possible to use this relationship to provide information on the activity of natural bacterial communities, and in particular on growth rate. However, if this approach is to provide reliably interpretable information, the relationship between RNA content and growth rate must be well-understood. In particular, a requisite of such applications is that the relationship must be universal among bacteria, or alternately that the relationship can be determined and measured for specific bacterial taxa. The RNA-growth rate relationship has not been used to evaluate bacterial growth in field studies, although RNA content has been measured in single cells and in bulk extracts of field samples taken from coastal environments. These measurements have been treated as probable indicators of bacterial activity, but have not yet been interpreted as estimators of growth rate. The primary obstacle to such interpretations is a lack of information on biological and environmental factors that affect the RNA-growth rate relationship. In this paper, the available data on the RNA-growth rate relationship in bacteria will be reviewed, including hypotheses regarding the regulation of RNA synthesis and degradation as a function of growth rate and environmental factors; i.e. the basic mechanisms for maintaining RNA content in proportion to growth rate. An assessment of the published laboratory and field data, the current status of this research area, and some of the remaining questions will be presented.

  5. Tetrahymena ORC contains a ribosomal RNA fragment that participates in rDNA origin recognition.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Mohammad M; Donti, Taraka R; Sebastian Yakisich, J; Smith, Aaron G; Kapler, Geoffrey M

    2007-12-12

    The Tetrahymena thermophila ribosomal DNA (rDNA) replicon contains dispersed cis-acting replication determinants, including reiterated type I elements that associate with sequence-specific, single-stranded binding factors, TIF1 through TIF4. Here, we show that TIF4, previously implicated in cell cycle-controlled DNA replication and rDNA gene amplification, is the T. thermophila origin recognition complex (TtORC). We further demonstrate that TtORC contains an integral RNA subunit that participates in rDNA origin recognition. Remarkably, this RNA, designated 26T, spans the terminal 282 nts of 26S ribosomal RNA. 26T RNA exhibits extensive complementarity to the type I element T-rich strand and binds the rDNA origin in vivo. Mutations that disrupt predicted interactions between 26T RNA and its complementary rDNA target change the in vitro binding specificity of ORC and diminish in vivo rDNA origin utilization. These findings reveal a role for ribosomal RNA in chromosome biology and define a new mechanism for targeting ORC to replication initiation sites.

  6. The CRM domain: an RNA binding module derived from an ancient ribosome-associated protein.

    PubMed

    Barkan, Alice; Klipcan, Larik; Ostersetzer, Oren; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Asakura, Yukari; Watkins, Kenneth P

    2007-01-01

    The CRS1-YhbY domain (also called the CRM domain) is represented as a stand-alone protein in Archaea and Bacteria, and in a family of single- and multidomain proteins in plants. The function of this domain is unknown, but structural data and the presence of the domain in several proteins known to interact with RNA have led to the proposal that it binds RNA. Here we describe a phylogenetic analysis of the domain, its incorporation into diverse proteins in plants, and biochemical properties of a prokaryotic and eukaryotic representative of the domain family. We show that a bacterial member of the family, Escherichia coli YhbY, is associated with pre-50S ribosomal subunits, suggesting that YhbY functions in ribosome assembly. GFP fused to a single-domain CRM protein from maize localizes to the nucleolus, suggesting that an analogous activity may have been retained in plants. We show further that an isolated maize CRM domain has RNA binding activity in vitro, and that a small motif shared with KH RNA binding domains, a conserved "GxxG" loop, contributes to its RNA binding activity. These and other results suggest that the CRM domain evolved in the context of ribosome function prior to the divergence of Archaea and Bacteria, that this function has been maintained in extant prokaryotes, and that the domain was recruited to serve as an RNA binding module during the evolution of plant genomes.

  7. Characterization of recombinant bacteriophages containing mosquito ribosomal RNA genes

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y.J.

    1988-01-01

    A family of nine recombinant bacteriophages containing rRNA genes from cultured cells of the mosquito, Aedes albopictus, has been isolated by screening two different genomic DNA libraries - Charon 30 and EMBL 3 using {sup 32}P-labeled 18S and 28S rRNA as probes. These nine recombinant bacteriophages were characterized by restriction mapping, Southern blotting, and S1 nuclease analysis. The 18S rRNA coding region contains an evolutionarily conserved EcoRI site near the 3{prime}-end, and measures 1800 bp. The 28S rRNA genes were divided into {alpha} and {beta} coding regions measuring 1750 bp and 2000 bp, respectively. The gap between these two regions measures about 340 bp. No insertion sequences were found in the rRNA coding regions. The entire rDNA repeat unit had a minimum length of 15.6 kb, including a nontranscribed spacer region. The non-transcribed spacer region of cloned A. albopictus rDNA contained a common series of seven PvuI sites within a 1250 bp region upstream of the 18S rRNA coding region, and a proportion of this region also showed heterogeneity both in the length and in the restriction sites.

  8. Preparation of biologically active Arabidopsis ribosomes and comparison with yeast ribosomes for binding to a tRNA-mimic that enhances translation of plant plus-strand RNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Stupina, Vera A.; Simon, Anne E.

    2013-01-01

    Isolation of biologically active cell components from multicellular eukaryotic organisms often poses difficult challenges such as low yields and inability to retain the integrity and functionality of the purified compound. We previously identified a cap-independent translation enhancer (3′CITE) in the 3′UTR of Turnip crinkle virus (TCV) that structurally mimics a tRNA and binds to yeast 80S ribosomes and 60S subunits in the P-site. Yeast ribosomes were used for these studies due to the lack of methods for isolation of plant ribosomes with high yields and integrity. To carry out studies with more natural components, a simple and efficient procedure has been developed for the isolation of large quantities of high quality ribosomes and ribosomal subunits from Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts prepared from seed-derived callus tissue. Attempts to isolate high quality ribosomes from wheat germ, bean sprouts, and evacuolated protoplasts were unsuccessful. Addition of purified Arabidopsis 80S plant ribosomes to ribosome-depleted wheat germ lysates resulted in a greater than 1200-fold enhancement in in vitro translation of a luciferase reporter construct. The TCV 3′CITE bound to ribosomes with a three to sevenfold higher efficiency when using plant 80S ribosomes compared with yeast ribosomes, indicating that this viral translational enhancer is adapted to interact more efficiently with host plant ribosomes. PMID:23885260

  9. Secondary structure features of ribosomal RNA species within intact ribosomal subunits and efficiency of RNA-protein interactions in thermoacidophilic (Caldariella acidophila, Bacillus acidocaldarius) and mesophilic (Escherichia coli) bacteria.

    PubMed

    Cammarano, P; Mazzei, F; Londei, P; Teichner, A; de Rosa, M; Gambacorta, A

    1983-08-02

    Ribosomal subunits of Caldariella acidophila (max.growth temp., 90 degrees C) have been compared to subunits of Bacillus acidocaldarius (max. growth temp., 70 degrees C) and Escherichia coli (max. growth temp., 47 degrees C) with respect to (a) bihelical content of rRNA; (b) G . C content of bihelical domains and (c) tightness of rRNA-protein interactions. The principal results are as follows. Subunits of C. acidophilia ribosomes (Tm = 90-93 degrees C) exhibit considerable thermal tolerance over their B. acidocaldarius (Tm = 77 degrees C) and E. coli counterparts (Tm = 72 degrees C). Based on the "melting' hyperchromicities of the intact ribosomal subunits a 51-55% fraction of the nucleotides appears to participate in hydrogen-bonded base pairing regardless of ribosome source, whereas a larger fraction, 67-70%, appears to be involved in hydrogen bonding in the naked rRNA species. The G . C content of bihelical domains of both free and ribosome-bound rRNA increases with increasing thermophily; based on hyperchromicity dispersion spectra of intact subunits and free rRNA, the bihelical parts of C. acidophila rRNA are estimated to contain 63-64% G . C, compared to 58.5% G . C for B. acidocaldarius and 55% G . C for E. coli. The increment of ribosome Tm values with increasing thermophily is greater than the increase in Tm for the free rRNA, indicating that within ribosomes bihelical domains of the thermophile rRNA species are stabilized more efficiently than their mesophile counterparts by proteins or/ and other component(s). The efficiency of the rRNA-protein interactions in the mesophile and thermophile ribosomes has been probed by comparing the releases, with LiCl-urea, of the rRNA species from the corresponding ribosomal subunits stuck to a Celite column through their protein moiety; it has been established that the release of C. acidophila rRNA from the Celite-bound ribosomes occurs at salt-urea concentrations about 4-fold higher than those required to release rRNA

  10. Transcription of a yeast ribosomal RNA minigene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Quincey, R V; Arnold, R E

    1984-01-01

    A transcription system using intact yeast has been developed for investigating which sequences are implicated in the initiation of transcription of yeast rRNA genes. The system employs an rRNA minigene that consists of the initiation and termination sites for rRNA biosynthesis separated by approx. 700 base pairs of vector DNA in the Escherichia coli-yeast shuttle vector, pJDB207. Two recombinants containing this minigene were constructed; one retained all of the nontranscribed spacer DNA upstream from the initiation site, the other retained 208 base pairs of this DNA. Transcripts of this structurally unique minigene in RNA from yeast transformed with these recombinants were readily detected by nuclease S1 mapping. These transcripts were initiated at the site used by the host rRNA genes, were approx. 3-fold more abundant in the recombinant retaining all of the nontranscribed spacer and were less abundant when the yeast was not growing. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:6097222

  11. Steric interactions lead to collective tilting motion in the ribosome during mRNA-tRNA translocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Kien; Whitford, Paul C.

    2016-02-01

    Translocation of mRNA and tRNA through the ribosome is associated with large-scale rearrangements of the head domain in the 30S ribosomal subunit. To elucidate the relationship between 30S head dynamics and mRNA-tRNA displacement, we apply molecular dynamics simulations using an all-atom structure-based model. Here we provide a statistical analysis of 250 spontaneous transitions between the A/P-P/E and P/P-E/E ensembles. Consistent with structural studies, the ribosome samples a chimeric ap/P-pe/E intermediate, where the 30S head is rotated ~18°. It then transiently populates a previously unreported intermediate ensemble, which is characterized by a ~10° tilt of the head. To identify the origins of head tilting, we analyse 781 additional simulations in which specific steric features are perturbed. These calculations show that head tilting may be attributed to specific steric interactions between tRNA and the 30S subunit (PE loop and protein S13). Taken together, this study demonstrates how molecular structure can give rise to large-scale collective rearrangements.

  12. RNA editing in six mitochondrial ribosomal protein genes of Didymium iridis.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, Peter G; Silliker, Margaret E

    2010-06-01

    Similarity searches with Didymium iridis mitochondrial genomic DNA identified six possible ribosomal protein-coding regions, however, each region contained stop codons that would need to be removed by RNA editing to produce functional transcripts. RT-PCR was used to amplify these regions from total RNA for cloning and sequencing. Six functional transcripts were verified for the following ribosomal protein genes: rpS12, rpS7, rpL2, rpS19, rpS3, and rpL16. The editing events observed, such as single C and U nucleotide insertions and a dinucleotide insertion, were consistent with previously observed editing patterns seen in D. iridis. Additionally, a new form of insertional editing, a single A insertion, was observed in a conserved region of the rpL16 gene. While the majority of codons created by editing specify hydrophobic amino acids, a greater proportion of the codons created in these hydrophilic ribosomal proteins called for positively charged amino acids in comparison to the previously characterized hydrophobic respiratory protein genes. This first report of edited soluble mitochondrial ribosomal proteins in myxomycetes expands upon the RNA editing patterns previously seen; there was: a greater proportion of created codons specifying positively charged amino acids, a shift in the codon position edited, and the insertion of single A nucleotides.

  13. Identification of nucleotides in E. coli 16S rRNA essential for ribosome subunit association

    PubMed Central

    Pulk, Arto; Maiväli, Ülo; Remme, Jaanus

    2006-01-01

    The ribosome consists of two unequal subunits, which associate via numerous intersubunit contacts. Medium-resolution structural studies have led to grouping of the intersubunit contacts into 12 directly visualizable intersubunit bridges. Most of the intersubunit interactions involve RNA. We have used an RNA modification interference approach to determine Escherichia coli 16S rRNA positions that are essential for the association of functionally active 70S ribosomes. Modification of the N1 position of A702, A1418, and A1483 with DMS, and of the N3 position of U793, U1414, and U1495 with CMCT in 30S subunits strongly interferes with 70S ribosome formation. Five of these positions localize into previously recognized intersubunit bridges, namely, B2a (U1495), B2b (U793), B3 (A1483), B5 (A1418), and B7a (A702). The remaining position displaying interference, U1414, forms a base pair with G1486, which is a part of bridge B3. We contend that these five intersubunit bridges are essential for reassociation of the 70S ribosome, thus forming the functional core of the intersubunit contacts. PMID:16556933

  14. Identification of nucleotides in E. coli 16S rRNA essential for ribosome subunit association.

    PubMed

    Pulk, Arto; Maiväli, Ulo; Remme, Jaanus

    2006-05-01

    The ribosome consists of two unequal subunits, which associate via numerous intersubunit contacts. Medium-resolution structural studies have led to grouping of the intersubunit contacts into 12 directly visualizable intersubunit bridges. Most of the intersubunit interactions involve RNA. We have used an RNA modification interference approach to determine Escherichia coli 16S rRNA positions that are essential for the association of functionally active 70S ribosomes. Modification of the N1 position of A702, A1418, and A1483 with DMS, and of the N3 position of U793, U1414, and U1495 with CMCT in 30S subunits strongly interferes with 70S ribosome formation. Five of these positions localize into previously recognized intersubunit bridges, namely, B2a (U1495), B2b (U793), B3 (A1483), B5 (A1418), and B7a (A702). The remaining position displaying interference, U1414, forms a base pair with G1486, which is a part of bridge B3. We contend that these five intersubunit bridges are essential for reassociation of the 70S ribosome, thus forming the functional core of the intersubunit contacts.

  15. TIF-IA: An oncogenic target of pre-ribosomal RNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Rui; Zhou, Wei

    2016-12-01

    Cancer cells devote the majority of their energy consumption to ribosome biogenesis, and pre-ribosomal RNA transcription accounts for 30-50% of all transcriptional activity. This aberrantly elevated biological activity is an attractive target for cancer therapeutic intervention if approaches can be developed to circumvent the development of side effects in normal cells. TIF-IA is a transcription factor that connects RNA polymerase I with the UBF/SL-1 complex to initiate the transcription of pre-ribosomal RNA. Its function is conserved in eukaryotes from yeast to mammals, and its activity is promoted by the phosphorylation of various oncogenic kinases in cancer cells. The depletion of TIF-IA induces cell death in lung cancer cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts but not in several other normal tissue types evaluated in knock-out studies. Furthermore, the nuclear accumulation of TIF-IA under UTP down-regulated conditions requires the activity of LKB1 kinase, and LKB1-inactivated cancer cells are susceptible to cell death under such stress conditions. Therefore, TIF-IA may be a unique target to suppress ribosome biogenesis without significantly impacting the survival of normal tissues.

  16. Validation of two ribosomal RNA removal methods for microbial metatranscriptomics

    SciTech Connect

    He, Shaomei; Wurtzel, Omri; Singh, Kanwar; Froula, Jeff L; Yilmaz, Suzan; Tringe, Susannah G; Wang, Zhong; Chen, Feng; Lindquist, Erika A; Sorek, Rotem; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2010-10-01

    The predominance of rRNAs in the transcriptome is a major technical challenge in sequence-based analysis of cDNAs from microbial isolates and communities. Several approaches have been applied to deplete rRNAs from (meta)transcriptomes, but no systematic investigation of potential biases introduced by any of these approaches has been reported. Here we validated the effectiveness and fidelity of the two most commonly used approaches, subtractive hybridization and exonuclease digestion, as well as combinations of these treatments, on two synthetic five-microorganism metatranscriptomes using massively parallel sequencing. We found that the effectiveness of rRNA removal was a function of community composition and RNA integrity for these treatments. Subtractive hybridization alone introduced the least bias in relative transcript abundance, whereas exonuclease and in particular combined treatments greatly compromised mRNA abundance fidelity. Illumina sequencing itself also can compromise quantitative data analysis by introducing a G+C bias between runs.

  17. Structure of the Ribosomal RNA Decoding Site Containing a Selenium-Modified Responsive Fluorescent Ribonucleoside Probe.

    PubMed

    Nuthanakanti, Ashok; Boerneke, Mark A; Hermann, Thomas; Srivatsan, Seergazhi G

    2017-03-01

    Comprehensive understanding of the structure-function relationship of RNA both in real time and at atomic level will have a profound impact in advancing our understanding of RNA functions in biology. Here, we describe the first example of a multifunctional nucleoside probe, containing a conformation-sensitive fluorophore and an anomalous X-ray diffraction label (5-selenophene uracil), which enables the correlation of RNA conformation and recognition under equilibrium and in 3D. The probe incorporated into the bacterial ribosomal RNA decoding site, fluorescently reports antibiotic binding and provides diffraction information in determining the structure without distorting native RNA fold. Further, by comparing solution binding data and crystal structure, we gained insight on how the probe senses ligand-induced conformational change in RNA. Taken together, our nucleoside probe represents a new class of biophysical tool that would complement available tools for functional RNA investigations.

  18. Functional conformations of the L11–ribosomal RNA complex revealed by correlative analysis of cryo-EM and molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen; Sengupta, Jayati; Rath, Bimal K.; Frank, Joachim

    2006-01-01

    The interaction between the GTPase-associated center (GAC) and the aminoacyl-tRNA·EF-Tu·GTP ternary complex is of crucial importance in the dynamic process of decoding and tRNA accommodation. The GAC includes protein L11 and helices 43–44 of 23S rRNA (referred to as L11–rRNA complex). In this study, a method of fitting based on a systematic comparison between cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) density maps and structures obtained by molecular dynamics simulations has been developed. This method has led to the finding of atomic models of the GAC that fit the EM maps with much improved cross-correlation coefficients compared with the fitting of the X-ray structure. Two types of conformations of the L11–rRNA complex, produced by the simulations, match the cryo-EM maps representing the states either bound or unbound to the aa-tRNA·EF-Tu·GTP ternary complex. In the bound state, the N-terminal domain of L11 is extended from its position in the crystal structure, and the base of nucleotide A1067 in the 23S ribosomal RNA is flipped out. This position of the base allows the RNA to reach the elbow region of the aminoacyl-tRNA when the latter is bound in the A/T site. In the unbound state, the N-terminal domain of L11 is rotated only slightly, and A1067 of the RNA is flipped back into the less-solvent-exposed position, as in the crystal structure. By matching our experimental cryo-EM maps with much improved cross-correlation coefficients compared to the crystal structure, these two conformations prove to be strong candidates of the two functional states. PMID:16682558

  19. The NBS1-Treacle complex controls ribosomal RNA transcription in response to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Dorthe H; Hari, Flurina; Clapperton, Julie A; Gwerder, Myriam; Gutsche, Katrin; Altmeyer, Matthias; Jungmichel, Stephanie; Toledo, Luis I; Fink, Daniel; Rask, Maj-Britt; Grøfte, Merete; Lukas, Claudia; Nielsen, Michael L; Smerdon, Stephen J; Lukas, Jiri; Stucki, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome breakage elicits transient silencing of ribosomal RNA synthesis, but the mechanisms involved remained elusive. Here we discover an in-trans signaling mechanism that triggers pan-nuclear silencing of rRNA transcription in response to DNA damage. This is associated with transient recruitment of the Nijmegen breakage syndrome protein 1 (NBS1), a central regulator of DNA damage responses, into the nucleoli. We further identified TCOF1-Treacle, a nucleolar factor implicated in ribosome biogenesis and mutated in Treacher Collins syndrome, as an interaction partner of NBS1, and demonstrate that NBS1 translocation and accumulation in the nucleoli is Treacle-dependent. Finally, we provide evidence that Treacle-mediated NBS1 recruitment into the nucleoli regulates rRNA silencing in-trans in the presence of distant chromosome breaks. PMID:25064736

  20. Biological significance of 5S rRNA import into human mitochondria: role of ribosomal protein MRP-L18.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Alexandre; Entelis, Nina; Martin, Robert P; Tarassov, Ivan

    2011-06-15

    5S rRNA is an essential component of ribosomes of all living organisms, the only known exceptions being mitochondrial ribosomes of fungi, animals, and some protists. An intriguing situation distinguishes mammalian cells: Although the mitochondrial genome contains no 5S rRNA genes, abundant import of the nuclear DNA-encoded 5S rRNA into mitochondria was reported. Neither the detailed mechanism of this pathway nor its rationale was clarified to date. In this study, we describe an elegant molecular conveyor composed of a previously identified human 5S rRNA import factor, rhodanese, and mitochondrial ribosomal protein L18, thanks to which 5S rRNA molecules can be specifically withdrawn from the cytosolic pool and redirected to mitochondria, bypassing the classic nucleolar reimport pathway. Inside mitochondria, the cytosolic 5S rRNA is shown to be associated with mitochondrial ribosomes.

  1. Biological significance of 5S rRNA import into human mitochondria: role of ribosomal protein MRP-L18

    PubMed Central

    Smirnov, Alexandre; Entelis, Nina; Martin, Robert P.; Tarassov, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    5S rRNA is an essential component of ribosomes of all living organisms, the only known exceptions being mitochondrial ribosomes of fungi, animals, and some protists. An intriguing situation distinguishes mammalian cells: Although the mitochondrial genome contains no 5S rRNA genes, abundant import of the nuclear DNA-encoded 5S rRNA into mitochondria was reported. Neither the detailed mechanism of this pathway nor its rationale was clarified to date. In this study, we describe an elegant molecular conveyor composed of a previously identified human 5S rRNA import factor, rhodanese, and mitochondrial ribosomal protein L18, thanks to which 5S rRNA molecules can be specifically withdrawn from the cytosolic pool and redirected to mitochondria, bypassing the classic nucleolar reimport pathway. Inside mitochondria, the cytosolic 5S rRNA is shown to be associated with mitochondrial ribosomes. PMID:21685364

  2. The human RNA-binding protein RBFA promotes the maturation of the mitochondrial ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Rozanska, Agata; Richter-Dennerlein, Ricarda; Rorbach, Joanna; Gao, Fei; Lewis, Richard J.

    2017-01-01

    Accurate assembly and maturation of human mitochondrial ribosomes is essential for synthesis of the 13 polypeptides encoded by the mitochondrial genome. This process requires the correct integration of 80 proteins, 1 mt (mitochondrial)-tRNA and 2 mt-rRNA species, the latter being post-transcriptionally modified at many sites. Here, we report that human ribosome-binding factor A (RBFA) is a mitochondrial RNA-binding protein that exerts crucial roles in mitoribosome biogenesis. Unlike its bacterial orthologue, RBFA associates mainly with helices 44 and 45 of the 12S rRNA in the mitoribosomal small subunit to promote dimethylation of two highly conserved consecutive adenines. Characterization of RBFA-depleted cells indicates that this dimethylation is not a prerequisite for assembly of the small ribosomal subunit. However, the RBFA-facilitated modification is necessary for completing mt-rRNA maturation and regulating association of the small and large subunits to form a functional monosome implicating RBFA in the quality control of mitoribosome formation. PMID:28512204

  3. Head swivel on the ribosome facilitates translocation via intra-subunit tRNA hybrid sites

    PubMed Central

    Ratje, Andreas H.; Loerke, Justus; Mikolajka, Aleksandra; Brünner, Matthias; Hildebrand, Peter W.; Starosta, Agata L.; Dönhöfer, Alexandra; Connell, Sean R.; Fucini, Paola; Mielke, Thorsten; Whitford, Paul C.; Onuchic, Jose’ N; Yu, Yanan; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y.; Hartmann, Roland K.; Penczek, Pawel A.; Wilson, Daniel N.; Spahn, Christian M.T.

    2011-01-01

    The elongation cycle of protein synthesis involves the delivery of aminoacyl-tRNAs to the A-site of the ribosome, followed by peptide-bond formation and translocation of the tRNAs through the ribosome to reopen the A-site1,2. The translocation reaction is catalyzed by elongation factor G (EF-G) in a GTP-dependent fashion3. Despite the availability of structures of various EF-G-ribosome complexes, the precise mechanism by which tRNAs move through the ribosome still remains unclear. Here we use multiparticle cryo-EM analysis to resolve two previously unseen subpopulations within EF-G-ribosome complexes at sub-nanometer resolution, one of them with a partially translocated tRNA. Comparison of these sub-states reveals that translocation of tRNA on the 30S subunit parallels the swiveling of the 30S-head and is coupled to un-ratcheting of the 30S-body. Since the tRNA maintains contact with the P-site on the 30S-head and simultaneously establishes interaction with the E-site on the 30S-platform, a novel intra-subunit pe/E hybrid state is formed. This state is stabilized by domain IV of EF-G, which interacts with the swiveled 30S-head conformation. These findings provide direct structural and mechanistic insight into the “missing link” in terms of tRNA intermediates involved in the universally conserved translocation process. PMID:21124459

  4. Targets and Intracellular Signaling Mechanisms for Deoxynivalenol-Induced Ribosomal RNA Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    He, Kaiyu; Zhou, Hui-Ren; Pestka, James J.

    2012-01-01

    The trichothecene mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON), a known translational inhibitor, induces ribosomal RNA (rRNA) cleavage. Here, we characterized this process relative to (1) specific 18S and 28S ribosomal RNA cleavage sites and (2) identity of specific upstream signaling elements in this pathway. Capillary electrophoresis indicated that DON at concentrations as low as 200 ng/ml evoked selective rRNA cleavage after 6 h and that 1000 ng/ml caused cleavage within 2 h. Northern blot analysis revealed that DON exposure induced six rRNA cleavage fragments from 28S rRNA and five fragments from 18S rRNA. When selective kinase inhibitors were used to identify potential upstream signals, RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR), hematopoietic cell kinase (Hck), and p38 were found to be required for rRNA cleavage, whereas c-Jun N-terminal kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase were not. Furthermore, rRNA fragmentation was suppressed by the p53 inhibitors pifithrin-α and pifithrin-μ as well as the pan caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK. Concurrent apoptosis was confirmed by acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining and flow cytometry. DON activated caspases 3, 8, and 9, thus suggesting the possible coinvolvement of both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways in rRNA cleavage. Satratoxin G (SG), anisomycin, and ricin also induced specific rRNA cleavage profiles identical to those of DON, suggesting that ribotoxins might share a conserved rRNA cleavage mechanism. Taken together, DON-induced rRNA cleavage is likely to be closely linked to apoptosis activation and appears to involve the sequential activation of PKR/Hck →p38→p53→caspase 8/9→caspase 3. PMID:22491426

  5. Targets and intracellular signaling mechanisms for deoxynivalenol-induced ribosomal RNA cleavage.

    PubMed

    He, Kaiyu; Zhou, Hui-Ren; Pestka, James J

    2012-06-01

    The trichothecene mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON), a known translational inhibitor, induces ribosomal RNA (rRNA) cleavage. Here, we characterized this process relative to (1) specific 18S and 28S ribosomal RNA cleavage sites and (2) identity of specific upstream signaling elements in this pathway. Capillary electrophoresis indicated that DON at concentrations as low as 200 ng/ml evoked selective rRNA cleavage after 6 h and that 1000 ng/ml caused cleavage within 2 h. Northern blot analysis revealed that DON exposure induced six rRNA cleavage fragments from 28S rRNA and five fragments from 18S rRNA. When selective kinase inhibitors were used to identify potential upstream signals, RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR), hematopoietic cell kinase (Hck), and p38 were found to be required for rRNA cleavage, whereas c-Jun N-terminal kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase were not. Furthermore, rRNA fragmentation was suppressed by the p53 inhibitors pifithrin-α and pifithrin-μ as well as the pan caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK. Concurrent apoptosis was confirmed by acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining and flow cytometry. DON activated caspases 3, 8, and 9, thus suggesting the possible coinvolvement of both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways in rRNA cleavage. Satratoxin G (SG), anisomycin, and ricin also induced specific rRNA cleavage profiles identical to those of DON, suggesting that ribotoxins might share a conserved rRNA cleavage mechanism. Taken together, DON-induced rRNA cleavage is likely to be closely linked to apoptosis activation and appears to involve the sequential activation of PKR/Hck →p38→p53→caspase 8/9→caspase 3.

  6. The Unusual 23S rRNA Gene of Coxiella burnetii: Two Self-Splicing Group I Introns Flank a 34-Base-Pair Exon, and One Element Lacks the Canonical ΩG▿

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Rahul; Miller, Scott R.; Hicks, Linda D.; Minnick, Michael F.

    2007-01-01

    We describe the presence and characteristics of two self-splicing group I introns in the sole 23S rRNA gene of Coxiella burnetii. The two group I introns, Cbu.L1917 and Cbu.L1951, are inserted at sites 1917 and 1951 (Escherichia coli numbering), respectively, in the 23S rRNA gene of C. burnetii. Both introns were found to be self-splicing in vivo and in vitro even though the terminal nucleotide of Cbu.L1917 is adenine and not the canonical conserved guanine, termed ΩG, found in Cbu.L1951 and all other group I introns described to date. Predicted secondary structures for both introns were constructed and revealed that Cbu.L1917 and Cbu.L1951 were group IB2 and group IA3 introns, respectively. We analyzed strains belonging to eight genomic groups of C. burnetii to determine sequence variation and the presence or absence of the elements and found both introns to be highly conserved (≥99%) among them. Although phylogenetic analysis did not identify the specific identities of donors, it indicates that the introns were likely acquired independently; Cbu.L1917 was acquired from other bacteria like Thermotoga subterranea and Cbu.L1951 from lower eukaryotes like Acanthamoeba castellanii. We also confirmed the fragmented nature of mature 23S rRNA in C. burnetii due to the presence of an intervening sequence. The presence of three selfish elements in C. burnetii's 23S rRNA gene is very unusual for an obligate intracellular bacterium and suggests a recent shift to its current lifestyle from a previous niche with greater opportunities for lateral gene transfer. PMID:17644584

  7. Mechanical insights into ribosomal progression overcoming RNA G-quadruplex from periodical translation suppression in cells.

    PubMed

    Endoh, Tamaki; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2016-03-07

    G-quadruplexes formed on DNA and RNA can be roadblocks to movement of polymerases and ribosome on template nucleotides. Although folding and unfolding processes of the G-quadruplexes are deliberately studied in vitro, how the mechanical and physical properties of the G-quadruplexes affect intracellular biological systems is still unclear. In this study, mRNAs with G-quadruplex forming sequences located either in the 5' untranslated region (UTR) or in the open reading frame (ORF) were constructed to evaluate positional effects of the G-quadruplex on translation suppression in cells. Periodic fluctuation of translation suppression was observed at every three nucleotides within the ORF but not within the 5' UTR. The results suggested that difference in motion of ribosome at the 5' UTR and the ORF determined the ability of the G-quadruplex structure to act as a roadblock to translation in cells and provided mechanical insights into ribosomal progression to overcome the roadblock.

  8. Comparative survey of the relative impact of mRNA features on local ribosome profiling read density

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Patrick B. F.; Andreev, Dmitry E.; Baranov, Pavel V.

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome profiling (Ribo-seq), a promising technology for exploring ribosome decoding rates, is characterized by the presence of infrequent high peaks in ribosome footprint density and by long alignment gaps. Here, to reduce the impact of data heterogeneity we introduce a simple normalization method, Ribo-seq Unit Step Transformation (RUST). RUST is robust and outperforms other normalization techniques in the presence of heterogeneous noise. We illustrate how RUST can be used for identifying mRNA sequence features that affect ribosome footprint densities globally. We show that a few parameters extracted with RUST are sufficient for predicting experimental densities with high accuracy. Importantly the application of RUST to 30 publicly available Ribo-seq data sets revealed a substantial variation in sequence determinants of ribosome footprint frequencies, questioning the reliability of Ribo-seq as an accurate representation of local ribosome densities without prior quality control. This emphasizes our incomplete understanding of how protocol parameters affect ribosome footprint densities. PMID:27698342

  9. Probing the secondary structure of expansion segment ES6 in 18S ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed

    Alkemar, Gunnar; Nygård, Odd

    2006-07-04

    Expansion segment ES6 in 18S ribosomal RNA is, unlike many other expansion segments, present in all eukaryotes. The available data suggest that ES6 is located on the surface of the small ribosomal subunit. Here we have analyzed the secondary structure of the complete ES6 sequence in intact ribosomes from three eukaryotes, wheat, yeast, and mouse, representing different eukaryotic kingdoms. The availability of the ES6 sequence for modification and cleavage by structure sensitive chemicals and enzymatic reagents was analyzed by primer extension and gel electrophoresis on an ABI 377 automated DNA sequencer. The experimental results were used to restrict the number of possible secondary structure models of ES6 generated by the folding software MFOLD. The modification data obtained from the three experimental organisms were very similar despite the sequence variation. Consequently, similar secondary structure models were obtained for the ES6 sequence in wheat, yeast, and mouse ribosomes. A comparison of sequence data from more than 6000 eukaryotes showed that similar structural elements could also be formed in other organisms. The comparative analysis also showed that the extent of compensatory base changes in the suggested helices was low. The in situ structure analysis was complemented by a secondary structure analysis of wheat ES6 transcribed and folded in vitro. The obtained modification data indicate that the secondary structure of the in vitro transcribed sequence differs from that observed in the intact ribosome. These results suggest that chaperones, ribosomal proteins, and/or tertiary rRNA interactions could be involved in the in vivo folding of ES6.

  10. Development of an endpoint genotyping assay to detect the Mycoplasma pneumoniae 23S rRNA gene and distinguish the existence of macrolide resistance-associated mutations at position 2063.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yu; Seto, Junji; Shimotai, Yoshitaka; Ikeda, Tatsuya; Yahagi, Kazue; Mizuta, Katsumi; Matsuzaki, Yoko; Hongo, Seiji

    2016-12-01

    The prevalence of macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae harboring a mutation in the 23S rRNA gene is increasing, and rapid detection assays are needed for clinical management. We developed an endpoint genotyping assay to detect the M. pneumoniae 23S rRNA gene and determine the existence of macrolide resistance-associated mutations at position 2063 (A2063G, A2063T and A2063C mutations). This A2063B genotyping assay detected more than 50 copies/reaction of the M. pneumoniae gene in every nucleotide mutation at position 2063. Of 42 clinical specimens, 3 were positive without mutation, 6 were positive with the A2063G mutation, and 33 were negative. The results were confirmed using nested PCR with the sequencing of the M. pneumoniae 23S rRNA gene, and a high sensitivity (90%), specificity (100%), and coincidence ratio (kappa coefficient=0.93) were obtained. Therefore, the A2063B genotyping assay is useful for the rapid discrimination of macrolide resistance mutations at position 2063.

  11. The Circadian Clock Modulates Global Daily Cycles of mRNA Ribosome Loading[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Missra, Anamika; Ernest, Ben; Jia, Qidong; Ke, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Circadian control of gene expression is well characterized at the transcriptional level, but little is known about diel or circadian control of translation. Genome-wide translation state profiling of mRNAs in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings grown in long day was performed to estimate ribosome loading per mRNA. The experiments revealed extensive translational regulation of key biological processes. Notably, translation of mRNAs for ribosomal proteins and mitochondrial respiration peaked at night. Central clock mRNAs are among those subject to fluctuations in ribosome loading. There was no consistent phase relationship between peak translation states and peak transcript levels. The overlay of distinct transcriptional and translational cycles can be expected to alter the waveform of the protein synthesis rate. Plants that constitutively overexpress the clock gene CCA1 showed phase shifts in peak translation, with a 6-h delay from midnight to dawn or from noon to evening being particularly common. Moreover, cycles of ribosome loading that were detected under continuous light in the wild type collapsed in the CCA1 overexpressor. Finally, at the transcript level, the CCA1-ox strain adopted a global pattern of transcript abundance that was broadly correlated with the light-dark environment. Altogether, these data demonstrate that gene-specific diel cycles of ribosome loading are controlled in part by the circadian clock. PMID:26392078

  12. The Circadian Clock Modulates Global Daily Cycles of mRNA Ribosome Loading.

    PubMed

    Missra, Anamika; Ernest, Ben; Lohoff, Tim; Jia, Qidong; Satterlee, James; Ke, Kenneth; von Arnim, Albrecht G

    2015-09-01

    Circadian control of gene expression is well characterized at the transcriptional level, but little is known about diel or circadian control of translation. Genome-wide translation state profiling of mRNAs in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings grown in long day was performed to estimate ribosome loading per mRNA. The experiments revealed extensive translational regulation of key biological processes. Notably, translation of mRNAs for ribosomal proteins and mitochondrial respiration peaked at night. Central clock mRNAs are among those subject to fluctuations in ribosome loading. There was no consistent phase relationship between peak translation states and peak transcript levels. The overlay of distinct transcriptional and translational cycles can be expected to alter the waveform of the protein synthesis rate. Plants that constitutively overexpress the clock gene CCA1 showed phase shifts in peak translation, with a 6-h delay from midnight to dawn or from noon to evening being particularly common. Moreover, cycles of ribosome loading that were detected under continuous light in the wild type collapsed in the CCA1 overexpressor. Finally, at the transcript level, the CCA1-ox strain adopted a global pattern of transcript abundance that was broadly correlated with the light-dark environment. Altogether, these data demonstrate that gene-specific diel cycles of ribosome loading are controlled in part by the circadian clock. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  13. Dwell-Time Distribution, Long Pausing and Arrest of Single-Ribosome Translation through the mRNA Duplex.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ping

    2015-10-09

    Proteins in the cell are synthesized by a ribosome translating the genetic information encoded on the single-stranded messenger RNA (mRNA). It has been shown that the ribosome can also translate through the duplex region of the mRNA by unwinding the duplex. Here, based on our proposed model of the ribosome translation through the mRNA duplex we study theoretically the distribution of dwell times of the ribosome translation through the mRNA duplex under the effect of a pulling force externally applied to the ends of the mRNA to unzip the duplex. We provide quantitative explanations of the available single molecule experimental data on the distribution of dwell times with both short and long durations, on rescuing of the long paused ribosomes by raising the pulling force to unzip the duplex, on translational arrests induced by the mRNA duplex and Shine-Dalgarno(SD)-like sequence in the mRNA. The functional consequences of the pauses or arrests caused by the mRNA duplex and the SD sequence are discussed and compared with those obtained from other types of pausing, such as those induced by "hungry" codons or interactions of specific sequences in the nascent chain with the ribosomal exit tunnel.

  14. An intron within the 16S ribosomal RNA gene of the archaeon Pyrobaculum aerophilum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burggraf, S.; Larsen, N.; Woese, C. R.; Stetter, K. O.

    1993-01-01

    The 16S rRNA genes of Pyrobaculum aerophilum and Pyrobaculum islandicum were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction, and the resulting products were sequenced directly. The two organisms are closely related by this measure (over 98% similar). However, they differ in that the (lone) 16S rRNA gene of Pyrobaculum aerophilum contains a 713-bp intron not seen in the corresponding gene of Pyrobaculum islandicum. To our knowledge, this is the only intron so far reported in the small subunit rRNA gene of a prokaryote. Upon excision the intron is circularized. A secondary structure model of the intron-containing rRNA suggests a splicing mechanism of the same type as that invoked for the tRNA introns of the Archaea and Eucarya and 23S rRNAs of the Archaea. The intron contains an open reading frame whose protein translation shows no certain homology with any known protein sequence.

  15. An intron within the 16S ribosomal RNA gene of the archaeon Pyrobaculum aerophilum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burggraf, S.; Larsen, N.; Woese, C. R.; Stetter, K. O.

    1993-01-01

    The 16S rRNA genes of Pyrobaculum aerophilum and Pyrobaculum islandicum were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction, and the resulting products were sequenced directly. The two organisms are closely related by this measure (over 98% similar). However, they differ in that the (lone) 16S rRNA gene of Pyrobaculum aerophilum contains a 713-bp intron not seen in the corresponding gene of Pyrobaculum islandicum. To our knowledge, this is the only intron so far reported in the small subunit rRNA gene of a prokaryote. Upon excision the intron is circularized. A secondary structure model of the intron-containing rRNA suggests a splicing mechanism of the same type as that invoked for the tRNA introns of the Archaea and Eucarya and 23S rRNAs of the Archaea. The intron contains an open reading frame whose protein translation shows no certain homology with any known protein sequence.

  16. An intron within the 16S ribosomal RNA gene of the archaeon Pyrobaculum aerophilum.

    PubMed

    Burggraf, S; Larsen, N; Woese, C R; Stetter, K O

    1993-03-15

    The 16S rRNA genes of Pyrobaculum aerophilum and Pyrobaculum islandicum were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction, and the resulting products were sequenced directly. The two organisms are closely related by this measure (over 98% similar). However, they differ in that the (lone) 16S rRNA gene of Pyrobaculum aerophilum contains a 713-bp intron not seen in the corresponding gene of Pyrobaculum islandicum. To our knowledge, this is the only intron so far reported in the small subunit rRNA gene of a prokaryote. Upon excision the intron is circularized. A secondary structure model of the intron-containing rRNA suggests a splicing mechanism of the same type as that invoked for the tRNA introns of the Archaea and Eucarya and 23S rRNAs of the Archaea. The intron contains an open reading frame whose protein translation shows no certain homology with any known protein sequence.

  17. Recognition of Cognate Transfer RNA by the 30S Ribosomal Subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Ogle, James M.; Brodersen, Ditlev E.; Clemons, William M.; Tarry, Michael J.; Carter, Andrew P.; Ramakrishnan, V.

    2009-10-07

    Crystal structures of the 30S ribosomal subunit in complex with messenger RNA and cognate transfer RNA in the A site, both in the presence and absence of the antibiotic paromomycin, have been solved at between 3.1 and 3.3 angstroms resolution. Cognate transfer RNA (tRNA) binding induces global domain movements of the 30S subunit and changes in the conformation of the universally conserved and essential bases A1492, A1493, and G530 of 16S RNA. These bases interact intimately with the minor groove of the first two base pairs between the codon and anticodon, thus sensing Watson-Crick base-pairing geometry and discriminating against near-cognate tRNA. The third, or 'wobble,' position of the codon is free to accommodate certain noncanonical base pairs. By partially inducing these structural changes, paromomycin facilitates binding of near-cognate tRNAs.

  18. Structure and Function of the Ribosomal Frameshifting Pseudoknot RNA from Beet Western Yellow Virus

    SciTech Connect

    Egli, M.; Sarkhel, S.; Minasov, G.; Rich, A.

    2010-03-05

    Many viruses reprogram ribosomes to produce two different proteins from two different reading frames. So-called -1 frameshifting often involves pairwise alignment of two adjacent tRNAs at a 'slippery' sequence in the ribosomal A and P sites such that an overlapping codon is shifted upstream by one base relative to the zero frame. In the majority of cases, an RNA pseudoknot located downstream stimulates this type of frameshift. Crystal structures of the frameshifting RNA pseudoknot from Beet Western Yellow Virus (BWYV) have provided a detailed picture of the tertiary interactions stabilizing this folding motif, including a minor-groove triplex and quadruple-base interactions. The structure determined at atomic resolution revealed the locations of several magnesium ions and provided insights into the role of structured water stabilizing the RNA. Systematic in vitro and in vivo mutational analyses based on the structural results revealed specific tertiary interactions and regions in the pseudoknot that drastically change frameshifting efficiency. Here, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of pseudoknot-mediated ribosomal frameshifting on the basis of the insights gained from structural and functional studies of the RNA pseudoknot from BWYV.

  19. S1 ribosomal protein and the interplay between translation and mRNA decay

    PubMed Central

    Delvillani, Francesco; Papiani, Giulia; Dehò, Gianni; Briani, Federica

    2011-01-01

    S1 is an ‘atypical’ ribosomal protein weakly associated with the 30S subunit that has been implicated in translation, transcription and control of RNA stability. S1 is thought to participate in translation initiation complex formation by assisting 30S positioning in the translation initiation region, but little is known about its role in other RNA transactions. In this work, we have analysed in vivo the effects of different intracellular S1 concentrations, from depletion to overexpression, on translation, decay and intracellular distribution of leadered and leaderless messenger RNAs (mRNAs). We show that the cspE mRNA, like the rpsO transcript, may be cleaved by RNase E at multiple sites, whereas the leaderless cspE transcript may also be degraded via an alternative pathway by an unknown endonuclease. Upon S1 overexpression, RNase E-dependent decay of both cspE and rpsO mRNAs is suppressed and these transcripts are stabilized, whereas cleavage of leaderless cspE mRNA by the unidentified endonuclease is not affected. Overall, our data suggest that ribosome-unbound S1 may inhibit translation and that part of the Escherichia coli ribosomes may actually lack S1. PMID:21685451

  20. DksA Guards Elongating RNA Polymerase Against Ribosome-Stalling-Induced Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Mooney, Rachel A.; Grass, Jeffrey A.; Sivaramakrishnan, Priya; Herman, Christophe; Landick, Robert; Wang, Jue D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary In bacteria, translation-transcription coupling inhibits RNA polymerase (RNAP) stalling. We present evidence suggesting that, upon amino acid starvation, inactive ribosomes promote rather than inhibit RNAP stalling. We developed an algorithm to evaluate genome-wide polymerase progression independently of local noise, and used it to reveal that the transcription factor DksA inhibits promoter-proximal pausing and increases RNAP elongation when uncoupled from translation by depletion of charged tRNAs. DksA has minimal effect on RNAP elongation in vitro and on untranslated RNAs in vivo. In these cases, transcripts can form RNA structures that prevent backtracking. Thus, the effect of DksA on transcript elongation may occur primarily upon ribosome slowing/stalling or at promoter-proximal locations that limit the potential for RNA structure. We propose that inactive ribosomes prevent formation of backtrack-blocking mRNA structures and that, in this circumstance, DksA acts as a transcription elongation factor in vivo. PMID:24606919

  1. Ribosomes lacking protein S20 are defective in mRNA binding and subunit association.

    PubMed

    Tobin, Christina; Mandava, Chandra Sekhar; Ehrenberg, Måns; Andersson, Dan I; Sanyal, Suparna

    2010-04-02

    The functional significance of ribosomal proteins is still relatively unclear. Here, we examined the role of small subunit protein S20 in translation using both in vivo and in vitro techniques. By means of lambda red recombineering, the rpsT gene, encoding S20, was removed from the chromosome of Salmonella enterica var. Typhimurium LT2 to produce a DeltaS20 strain that grew markedly slower than the wild type while maintaining a wild-type rate of peptide elongation. Removal of S20 conferred a significant reduction in growth rate that was eliminated upon expression of the rpsT gene on a high-copy-number plasmid. The in vitro phenotype of mutant ribosomes was investigated using a translation system composed of highly active, purified components from Escherichia coli. Deletion of S20 conferred two types of initiation defects to the 30S subunit: (i) a significant reduction in the rate of mRNA binding and (ii) a drastic decrease in the yield of 70S complexes caused by an impairment in association with the 50S subunit. Both of these impairments were partially relieved by an extended incubation time with mRNA, fMet-tRNA(fMet), and initiation factors, indicating that absence of S20 disturbs the structural integrity of 30S subunits. Considering the topographical location of S20 in complete 30S subunits, the molecular mechanism by which it affects mRNA binding and subunit docking is not entirely obvious. We speculate that its interaction with helix 44 of the 16S ribosomal RNA is crucial for optimal ribosome function. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. RiboDiff: detecting changes of mRNA translation efficiency from ribosome footprints

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yi; Karaletsos, Theofanis; Drewe, Philipp; Sreedharan, Vipin T.; Kuo, David; Singh, Kamini; Wendel, Hans-Guido; Rätsch, Gunnar

    2017-01-01

    Motivation: Deep sequencing based ribosome footprint profiling can provide novel insights into the regulatory mechanisms of protein translation. However, the observed ribosome profile is fundamentally confounded by transcriptional activity. In order to decipher principles of translation regulation, tools that can reliably detect changes in translation efficiency in case–control studies are needed. Results: We present a statistical framework and an analysis tool, RiboDiff, to detect genes with changes in translation efficiency across experimental treatments. RiboDiff uses generalized linear models to estimate the over-dispersion of RNA-Seq and ribosome profiling measurements separately, and performs a statistical test for differential translation efficiency using both mRNA abundance and ribosome occupancy. Availability and Implementation: RiboDiff webpage http://bioweb.me/ribodiff. Source code including scripts for preprocessing the FASTQ data are available at http://github.com/ratschlab/ribodiff. Contacts: zhongy@cbio.mskcc.org or raetsch@inf.ethz.ch Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27634950

  3. Autogenous Control of 5′TOP mRNA Stability by 40S Ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Gentilella, Antonio; Morón-Duran, Francisco D; Fuentes, Pedro; Zweig-Rocha, Guilherme; Riaño-Canalias, Ferran; Pelletier, Joffrey; Ruiz, Marta; Turón, Gemma; Castaño, Julio; Tauler, Albert; Bueno, Clara; Menéndez, Pablo; Kozma, Sara C; Thomas, George

    2017-07-06

    Ribosomal protein (RP) expression in higher eukaryotes is regulated translationally through the 5′TOP sequence. This mechanism evolved to more rapidly produce RPs on demand in different tissues. Here we show that 40S ribosomes, in a complex with the mRNA binding protein LARP1, selectively stabilize 5′TOP mRNAs, with disruption of this complex leading to induction of the impaired ribosome biogenesis checkpoint (IRBC) and p53 stabilization. The importance of this mechanism is underscored in 5q− syndrome, a macrocytic anemia caused by a large monoallelic deletion, which we found to also encompass the LARP1 gene. Critically, depletion of LARP1 alone in human adult CD34+ bone marrow precursor cells leads to a reduction in 5′TOP mRNAs and the induction of p53. These studies identify a 40S ribosome function independent of those in translation that, with LARP1, mediates the autogenous control of 5′TOP mRNA stability, whose disruption is implicated in the pathophysiology of 5q− syndrome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A proton wire to couple aminoacyl-tRNA accommodation and peptide-bond formation on the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Polikanov, Yury S; Steitz, Thomas A; Innis, C Axel

    2014-09-01

    During peptide-bond formation on the ribosome, the α-amine of an aminoacyl-tRNA attacks the ester carbonyl carbon of a peptidyl-tRNA to yield a peptide lengthened by one amino acid. Although the ribosome's contribution to catalysis is predominantly entropic, the lack of high-resolution structural data for the complete active site in complex with full-length ligands has made it difficult to assess how the ribosome might influence the pathway of the reaction. Here, we present crystal structures of preattack and postcatalysis complexes of the Thermus thermophilus 70S ribosome at ~2.6-Å resolution. These structures reveal a network of hydrogen bonds along which proton transfer could take place to ensure the concerted, rate-limiting formation of a tetrahedral intermediate. We propose that, unlike earlier models, the ribosome and the A-site tRNA facilitate the deprotonation of the nucleophile through the activation of a water molecule.

  5. Novel mRNA-specific effects of ribosome drop-off on translation rate and polysome profile

    PubMed Central

    Bonnin, Pierre; Kern, Norbert; Young, Neil T.; Stansfield, Ian

    2017-01-01

    The well established phenomenon of ribosome drop-off plays crucial roles in translational accuracy and nutrient starvation responses during protein translation. When cells are under stress conditions, such as amino acid starvation or aminoacyl-tRNA depletion due to a high level of recombinant protein expression, ribosome drop-off can substantially affect the efficiency of protein expression. Here we introduce a mathematical model that describes the effects of ribosome drop-off on the ribosome density along the mRNA and on the concomitant protein synthesis rate. Our results show that ribosome premature termination may lead to non-intuitive ribosome density profiles, such as a ribosome density which increases from the 5’ to the 3’ end. Importantly, the model predicts that the effects of ribosome drop-off on the translation rate are mRNA-specific, and we quantify their resilience to drop-off, showing that the mRNAs which present ribosome queues are much less affected by ribosome drop-off than those which do not. Moreover, among those mRNAs that do not present ribosome queues, resilience to drop-off correlates positively with the elongation rate, so that sequences using fast codons are expected to be less affected by ribosome drop-off. This result is consistent with a genome-wide analysis of S. cerevisiae, which reveals that under favourable growth conditions mRNAs coding for proteins involved in the translation machinery, known to be highly codon biased and using preferentially fast codons, are highly resilient to ribosome drop-off. Moreover, in physiological conditions, the translation rate of mRNAs coding for regulatory, stress-related proteins, is less resilient to ribosome drop-off. This model therefore allows analysis of variations in the translational efficiency of individual mRNAs by accounting for the full range of known ribosome behaviours, as well as explaining mRNA-specific variations in ribosome density emerging from ribosome profiling studies. PMID

  6. Nuclear Export of Pre-Ribosomal Subunits Requires Dbp5, but Not as an RNA-Helicase as for mRNA Export.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Bettina; Wu, Haijia; Hackmann, Alexandra; Krebber, Heike

    2016-01-01

    The DEAD-box RNA-helicase Dbp5/Rat8 is known for its function in nuclear mRNA export, where it displaces the export receptor Mex67 from the mRNA at the cytoplasmic side of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Here we show that Dbp5 is also required for the nuclear export of both pre-ribosomal subunits. Yeast temperature-sensitive dbp5 mutants accumulate both ribosomal particles in their nuclei. Furthermore, Dbp5 genetically and physically interacts with known ribosomal transport factors such as Nmd3. Similar to mRNA export we show that also for ribosomal transport Dbp5 is required at the cytoplasmic side of the NPC. However, unlike its role in mRNA export, Dbp5 does not seem to undergo its ATPase cycle for this function, as ATPase-deficient dbp5 mutants that selectively inhibit mRNA export do not affect ribosomal transport. Furthermore, mutants of GLE1, the ATPase stimulating factor of Dbp5, show no major ribosomal export defects. Consequently, while Dbp5 uses its ATPase cycle to displace the export receptor Mex67 from the translocated mRNAs, Mex67 remains bound to ribosomal subunits upon transit to the cytoplasm, where it is detectable on translating ribosomes. Therefore, we propose a model, in which Dbp5 supports ribosomal transport by capturing ribosomal subunits upon their cytoplasmic appearance at the NPC, possibly by binding export factors such as Mex67. Thus, our findings reveal that although different ribonucleoparticles, mRNAs and pre-ribosomal subunits, use shared export factors, they utilize different transport mechanisms.

  7. Nuclear Export of Pre-Ribosomal Subunits Requires Dbp5, but Not as an RNA-Helicase as for mRNA Export

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Bettina; Wu, Haijia; Hackmann, Alexandra; Krebber, Heike

    2016-01-01

    The DEAD-box RNA-helicase Dbp5/Rat8 is known for its function in nuclear mRNA export, where it displaces the export receptor Mex67 from the mRNA at the cytoplasmic side of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Here we show that Dbp5 is also required for the nuclear export of both pre-ribosomal subunits. Yeast temperature-sensitive dbp5 mutants accumulate both ribosomal particles in their nuclei. Furthermore, Dbp5 genetically and physically interacts with known ribosomal transport factors such as Nmd3. Similar to mRNA export we show that also for ribosomal transport Dbp5 is required at the cytoplasmic side of the NPC. However, unlike its role in mRNA export, Dbp5 does not seem to undergo its ATPase cycle for this function, as ATPase-deficient dbp5 mutants that selectively inhibit mRNA export do not affect ribosomal transport. Furthermore, mutants of GLE1, the ATPase stimulating factor of Dbp5, show no major ribosomal export defects. Consequently, while Dbp5 uses its ATPase cycle to displace the export receptor Mex67 from the translocated mRNAs, Mex67 remains bound to ribosomal subunits upon transit to the cytoplasm, where it is detectable on translating ribosomes. Therefore, we propose a model, in which Dbp5 supports ribosomal transport by capturing ribosomal subunits upon their cytoplasmic appearance at the NPC, possibly by binding export factors such as Mex67. Thus, our findings reveal that although different ribonucleoparticles, mRNAs and pre-ribosomal subunits, use shared export factors, they utilize different transport mechanisms. PMID:26872259

  8. Kinetoplastid Specific RNA-Protein Interactions in Trypanosoma cruzi Ribosome Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Umaer, Khan; Williams, Noreen

    2015-01-01

    RNA binding proteins (RBP) play essential roles in the highly conserved and coordinated process of ribosome biogenesis. Our laboratory has previously characterized two essential and abundant RBPs, P34 and P37, in Trypanosoma brucei which are required for several critical steps in ribosome biogenesis. The genes for these proteins have only been identified in kinetoplastid organisms but not in the host genome. We have identified a homolog of the TbP34 and TbP37 in a T. cruzi strain (termed TcP37/NRBD). Although the N-terminal APK-rich domain and RNA recognition motifs are conserved, the C-terminal region which contains putative nuclear and nucleolar localization signals in TbP34 and TbP37 is almost entirely missing from TcP37/NRBD. We have shown that TcP37/NRBD is expressed in T. cruzi epimastigotes at the level of mature mRNA and protein. Despite the loss of the C-terminal domain, TcP37/NRBD is present in the nucleus, including the nucleolus, and the cytoplasm. TcP37/NRBD interacts directly with Tc 5S rRNA, but does not associate with polyadenylated RNA. TcP37/NRBD also associates in vivo and in vitro with large ribosomal protein TcL5 and, unlike the case of T. brucei, this association is strongly enhanced by the presence of 5S rRNA, suggesting that the loss of the C-terminal domain of TcP37/NRBD may alter the interactions within the complex. These results indicate that the unique preribosomal complex comprised of L5, 5S rRNA, and the trypanosome-specific TcP37/NRBD or TbP34 and TbP37 is functionally conserved in trypanosomes despite the differences in the C-termini of the trypanosome-specific protein components. PMID:26121669

  9. Kinetoplastid Specific RNA-Protein Interactions in Trypanosoma cruzi Ribosome Biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Umaer, Khan; Williams, Noreen

    2015-01-01

    RNA binding proteins (RBP) play essential roles in the highly conserved and coordinated process of ribosome biogenesis. Our laboratory has previously characterized two essential and abundant RBPs, P34 and P37, in Trypanosoma brucei which are required for several critical steps in ribosome biogenesis. The genes for these proteins have only been identified in kinetoplastid organisms but not in the host genome. We have identified a homolog of the TbP34 and TbP37 in a T. cruzi strain (termed TcP37/NRBD). Although the N-terminal APK-rich domain and RNA recognition motifs are conserved, the C-terminal region which contains putative nuclear and nucleolar localization signals in TbP34 and TbP37 is almost entirely missing from TcP37/NRBD. We have shown that TcP37/NRBD is expressed in T. cruzi epimastigotes at the level of mature mRNA and protein. Despite the loss of the C-terminal domain, TcP37/NRBD is present in the nucleus, including the nucleolus, and the cytoplasm. TcP37/NRBD interacts directly with Tc 5S rRNA, but does not associate with polyadenylated RNA. TcP37/NRBD also associates in vivo and in vitro with large ribosomal protein TcL5 and, unlike the case of T. brucei, this association is strongly enhanced by the presence of 5S rRNA, suggesting that the loss of the C-terminal domain of TcP37/NRBD may alter the interactions within the complex. These results indicate that the unique preribosomal complex comprised of L5, 5S rRNA, and the trypanosome-specific TcP37/NRBD or TbP34 and TbP37 is functionally conserved in trypanosomes despite the differences in the C-termini of the trypanosome-specific protein components.

  10. Quantitative studies of mRNA recruitment to the eukaryotic ribosome

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    The process of peptide bond synthesis by ribosomes is conserved between species, but the initiation step differs greatly between the three kingdoms of life. This is illustrated by the evolution of roughly an order of magnitude more initiation factor mass found in humans compared with bacteria. Eukaryotic initiation of translation is comprised of a number of sub-steps: (i) recruitment of an mRNA and initiator methionyl-tRNA to the 40S ribosomal subunit; (ii) migration of the 40S subunit along the 5′ UTR to locate the initiation codon; and (iii) recruitment of the 60S subunit to form the 80S initiation complex. Although the mechanism and regulation of initiation has been studied for decades, many aspects of the pathway remain unclear. In this review, I will focus discussion on what is known about the mechanism of mRNA selection and its recruitment to the 40S subunit. I will summarize how the 43S preinitiation complex (PIC) is formed and stabilized by interactions between its components. I will discuss what is known about the mechanism of mRNA selection by the eukaryotic initiation factor 4F (eIF4F) complex and how the selected mRNA is recruited to the 43S PIC. The regulation of this process by secondary structure located in the 5′ UTR of an mRNA will also be discussed. Finally, I present a possible kinetic model with which to explain the process of mRNA selection and recruitment to the eukaryotic ribosome. PMID:25742741

  11. Minor groove RNA triplex in the crystal structure of a ribosomal frameshifting viral pseudoknot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, L.; Chen, L.; Egli, M.; Berger, J. M.; Rich, A.

    1999-01-01

    Many viruses regulate translation of polycistronic mRNA using a -1 ribosomal frameshift induced by an RNA pseudoknot. A pseudoknot has two stems that form a quasi-continuous helix and two connecting loops. A 1.6 A crystal structure of the beet western yellow virus (BWYV) pseudoknot reveals rotation and a bend at the junction of the two stems. A loop base is inserted in the major groove of one stem with quadruple-base interactions. The second loop forms a new minor-groove triplex motif with the other stem, involving 2'-OH and triple-base interactions, as well as sodium ion coordination. Overall, the number of hydrogen bonds stabilizing the tertiary interactions exceeds the number involved in Watson-Crick base pairs. This structure will aid mechanistic analyses of ribosomal frameshifting.

  12. Minor groove RNA triplex in the crystal structure of a ribosomal frameshifting viral pseudoknot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, L.; Chen, L.; Egli, M.; Berger, J. M.; Rich, A.

    1999-01-01

    Many viruses regulate translation of polycistronic mRNA using a -1 ribosomal frameshift induced by an RNA pseudoknot. A pseudoknot has two stems that form a quasi-continuous helix and two connecting loops. A 1.6 A crystal structure of the beet western yellow virus (BWYV) pseudoknot reveals rotation and a bend at the junction of the two stems. A loop base is inserted in the major groove of one stem with quadruple-base interactions. The second loop forms a new minor-groove triplex motif with the other stem, involving 2'-OH and triple-base interactions, as well as sodium ion coordination. Overall, the number of hydrogen bonds stabilizing the tertiary interactions exceeds the number involved in Watson-Crick base pairs. This structure will aid mechanistic analyses of ribosomal frameshifting.

  13. Multicolor fluorescence detection of ribosomal RNA in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balberg, Michal; Hristova, Krassimira; Mau, Margit; Frigon, Dominic; Zeringue, Henry C.; Brady, David J.; Beebe, David J.; Raskin, Lutgarde

    2000-03-01

    A micro fluidic device capable of detecting the abundance of bacteria in an environmental solution is described. The micro channels are made of poly(dimethylsioxane) (PDMS) elastomer integrated with fused silica capillaries coated with Aluminum. The detection of specific bacteria is based on molecular probes (beacons) that emit a fluorescent signal only when hybridized to the target. This method allows hybridization in solution, without immobilization, and avoids washing of the unbound probes. By marking 16S rDNA oligonucleotide probes (different genetic sequences) with different color dyes, and detecting the spectral intensity of light in the micro- channel, different micro-organisms can be detected in one sample. Miniaturization of the analytic device allows the use of small quantities of RNA molecules, as target molecules, and improves the detection limits. Future devices should incorporate a parallel array of micro-channels, and enable fast and parallel processing of the molecular signals.

  14. Antibacterial discovery in actinomycetes strains with mutations in RNA polymerase or ribosomal protein S12.

    PubMed

    Hosaka, Takeshi; Ohnishi-Kameyama, Mayumi; Muramatsu, Hideyuki; Murakami, Kana; Tsurumi, Yasuhisa; Kodani, Shinya; Yoshida, Mitsuru; Fujie, Akihiko; Ochi, Kozo

    2009-05-01

    We show that selection of drug-resistant bacterial mutants allows the discovery of antibacterial compounds. Mutant strains of a soil-isolated Streptomyces species that does not produce antibacterials synthesize a previously unknown class of antibacterial, which we name piperidamycin. Overall, 6% of non-Streptomyces actinomycetes species and 43% of Streptomyces species that do not produce antibacterials are activated to produce them. The antibacterial-producing mutants all carried mutations in RNA polymerase and/or the ribosomal protein S12.

  15. RPFdb: a database for genome wide information of translated mRNA generated from ribosome profiling.

    PubMed

    Xie, Shang-Qian; Nie, Peng; Wang, Yan; Wang, Hongwei; Li, Hongyu; Yang, Zhilong; Liu, Yizhi; Ren, Jian; Xie, Zhi

    2016-01-04

    Translational control is crucial in the regulation of gene expression and deregulation of translation is associated with a wide range of cancers and human diseases. Ribosome profiling is a technique that provides genome wide information of mRNA in translation based on deep sequencing of ribosome protected mRNA fragments (RPF). RPFdb is a comprehensive resource for hosting, analyzing and visualizing RPF data, available at www.rpfdb.org or http://sysbio.sysu.edu.cn/rpfdb/index.html. The current version of database contains 777 samples from 82 studies in 8 species, processed and reanalyzed by a unified pipeline. There are two ways to query the database: by keywords of studies or by genes. The outputs are presented in three levels. (i) Study level: including meta information of studies and reprocessed data for gene expression of translated mRNAs; (ii) Sample level: including global perspective of translated mRNA and a list of the most translated mRNA of each sample from a study; (iii) Gene level: including normalized sequence counts of translated mRNA on different genomic location of a gene from multiple samples and studies. To explore rich information provided by RPF, RPFdb also provides a genome browser to query and visualize context-specific translated mRNA. Overall our database provides a simple way to search, analyze, compare, visualize and download RPF data sets. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. A-kinase anchoring protein AKAP95 is a novel regulator of ribosomal RNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Marstad, Anne; Landsverk, Ole Jørgen B; Strømme, Olaf; Otterlei, Marit; Collas, Philippe; Sundan, Anders; Brede, Gaute

    2016-02-01

    The RNA polymerase I transcription apparatus acquires and integrates the combined information from multiple cellular signalling cascades to regulate ribosome production essential for cell growth and proliferation. In the present study, we show that a subpopulation of A-kinase anchoring protein 95 (AKAP95) targets the nucleolus during interphase and is involved in regulating rRNA production. We show that AKAP95 co-localizes with the nucleolar upstream binding factor, an essential rRNA transcription factor. Similar to other members of the C2 H2 -zinc finger family, we show, using systematic selection and evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment and in vitro binding analysis, that AKAP95 has a preference for GC-rich DNA in vitro, whereas fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis reveals AKAP95 to be a highly mobile protein that exhibits RNA polymerase I and II dependent nucleolar trafficking. In line with its GC-binding features, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed AKAP95 to be associated with ribosomal chromatin in vivo. Manipulation of AKAP95-expression in U2OS cells revealed a reciprocal relationship between the expression of AKAP95 and 47S rRNA. Taken together, our data indicate that AKAP95 is a novel nucleolus-associated protein with a regulatory role on rRNA production. © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  17. The mitochondrial genome of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana: analysis of the ribosomal RNA region.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, T A; Hegedus, D D; Khachatourians, G G

    1993-01-01

    The 28.5-kbp mitochondrial (mt) genome from the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana was studied using restriction enzyme analysis, gene probe hybridization, and DNA sequence comparisons. A detailed restriction enzyme map allowed cloning of the entire genome into a number of segments. Hybridization of heterologous gene probes to the mtDNA resulted in the identification of the large ribosomal RNA (lrRNA) and small ribosomal RNA (srRNA) genes. Gene probes derived from several yeasts and fungi failed to identify any additional genes. However, partial DNA sequence analysis revealed the lrRNA and srRNA genes as well as four protein-encoding genes: the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (NAD1), NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 (NAD6), cytochrome oxidase subunit 3 (CO3), and ATPase subunit 6 (ATP6) genes. The ATPase subunit 9 (ATP9) gene was not identified by hybridization to mtDNA, but could be detected by hybridization to total cellular DNA. The portions of the genes sequenced were homologous to the equivalent genes from yeast and other filamentous fungi, most notably Aspergillus nidulans. No introns were identified in these regions. The organization of the sequenced region of the B. bassiana mt genome more closely resembled that of A. nidulans than that of Podospora anserina or Neurospora crassa.

  18. Sequence of the 16S ribosomal RNA from Halobacterium volcanii, an archaebacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, R.; Lanter, J. M.; Woese, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    The sequence of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) from the archaebacterium Halobacterium volcanii has been determined by DNA sequencing methods. The archaebacterial rRNA is similar to its eubacterial counterpart in secondary structure. Although it is closer in sequence to the eubacterial 16S rRNA than to the eukaryotic 16S-like rRNA, the H. volcanii sequence also shows certain points of specific similarity to its eukaryotic counterpart. Since the H. volcanii sequence is closer to both the eubacterial and the eukaryotic sequences than these two are to one another, it follows that the archaebacterial sequence resembles their common ancestral sequence more closely than does either of the other two versions.

  19. Sequence of the 16S ribosomal RNA from Halobacterium volcanii, an archaebacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, R.; Lanter, J. M.; Woese, C. R.