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Sample records for 24-h glucose rhythms

  1. 24-h activity rhythm and sleep in depressed outpatients.

    PubMed

    Hori, Hiroaki; Koga, Norie; Hidese, Shinsuke; Nagashima, Anna; Kim, Yoshiharu; Higuchi, Teruhiko; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2016-06-01

    Disturbances in sleep and circadian rest-activity rhythms are key features of depression. Actigraphy, a non-invasive method for monitoring motor activity, can be used to objectively assess circadian rest-activity rhythms and sleep patterns. While recent studies have measured sleep and daytime activity of depressed patients using wrist-worn actigraphy, the actigraphic 24-h rest-activity rhythm in depression has not been well documented. We aimed to examine actigraphically measured sleep and circadian rest-activity rhythms in depressed outpatients. Twenty patients with DSM-IV major depressive episode and 20 age- and sex-matched healthy controls participated in this study. Participants completed 7 consecutive days of all-day actigraphic activity monitoring while engaging in usual activities. For sleep parameters, total sleep time, wake after sleep onset, and sleep fragmentation index were determined. Circadian rhythms were estimated by fitting individual actigraphy data to a cosine curve of a 24-h activity rhythm using the cosinor method, which generated three circadian activity rhythm parameters, i.e., MESOR (rhythm-adjusted mean), amplitude, and acrophase. Subjective sleep was also assessed using a sleep diary and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Patients showed significantly lower MESOR and more dampened amplitude along with significant sleep disturbances. Logistic regression analysis revealed that lower MESOR and more fragmented sleep emerged as the significant predictors of depression. Correlations between subjectively and actigraphically measured parameters demonstrated the validity of actigraphic measurements. These results indicate marked disturbances in sleep and circadian rest-activity rhythms of depression. By simultaneously measuring sleep and rest-activity rhythm parameters, actigraphy might serve as an objective diagnostic aid for depression. PMID:26978182

  2. Eplerenone restores 24-h blood pressure circadian rhythm and reduces advanced glycation end-products in rhesus macaques with spontaneous hypertensive metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Zheng, Wen; Liu, Yuli; Wang, Jue; Peng, Ying; Shang, Haibao; Hou, Ning; Hu, Xiaomin; Ding, Yi; Xiao, Yao; Wang, Can; Zeng, Fanxin; Mao, Jiaming; Zhang, Jun; Ma, Dongwei; Sun, Xueting; Li, Chuanyun; Xiao, Rui-Ping; Zhang, Xiuqin

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is often associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS), and serves as a risk factor of MetS and its complications. Blood pressure circadian rhythm in hypertensive patients has been suggested to contribute to cardiovascular consequences and organ damage of hypertension. But circadian changes of BP and their response to drugs have not been clearly investigated in non-human primates (NHPs) of MetS with hypertension. Here, we identified 16 elderly, hypertensive MetS rhesus monkeys from our in-house cohort. With implanted telemetry, we investigate BP changes and its circadian rhythm, together with the effect of antihypertensive drugs on BP and its diurnal fluctuation. MetS hypertensive monkeys displayed higher BP, obesity, glucose intolerance, and dyslipidemia. We also confirmed impaired 24-h BP circadian rhythm in MetS hypertensive monkeys. Importantly, Eplerenone, a mineralocorticoid receptor blocker, exerts multiple beneficial effects in MetS hypertensive monkeys, including BP reduction, 24-h BP circadian rhythm restoration, and decreased plasma concentration of inflammation factors and advanced glycation end-products. In summary, we identified a naturally-developed hypertensive MetS NHP model, which is of great value in the studies on pathogenesis of MetS-associated hypertension and development of novel therapeutic strategies. We also provided multiple novel mechanistic insights of the beneficial effect of Eplerenone on MetS with hypertension. PMID:27032687

  3. Sleep-like behavior and 24-h rhythm disruption in the Tc1 mouse model of Down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Heise, I; Fisher, S P; Banks, G T; Wells, S; Peirson, S N; Foster, R G; Nolan, P M

    2015-01-01

    Down syndrome is a common disorder associated with intellectual disability in humans. Among a variety of severe health problems, patients with Down syndrome exhibit disrupted sleep and abnormal 24-h rest/activity patterns. The transchromosomic mouse model of Down syndrome, Tc1, is a trans-species mouse model for Down syndrome, carrying most of human chromosome 21 in addition to the normal complement of mouse chromosomes and expresses many of the phenotypes characteristic of Down syndrome. To date, however, sleep and circadian rhythms have not been characterized in Tc1 mice. Using both circadian wheel-running analysis and video-based sleep scoring, we showed that these mice exhibited fragmented patterns of sleep-like behaviour during the light phase of a 12:12-h light/dark (LD) cycle with an extended period of continuous wakefulness at the beginning of the dark phase. Moreover, an acute light pulse during night-time was less effective in inducing sleep-like behaviour in Tc1 animals than in wild-type controls. In wheel-running analysis, free running in constant light (LL) or constant darkness (DD) showed no changes in the circadian period of Tc1 animals although they did express subtle behavioural differences including a reduction in total distance travelled on the wheel and differences in the acrophase of activity in LD and in DD. Our data confirm that Tc1 mice express sleep-related phenotypes that are comparable with those seen in Down syndrome patients with moderate disruptions in rest/activity patterns and hyperactive episodes, while circadian period under constant lighting conditions is essentially unaffected. PMID:25558895

  4. Effects of luseogliflozin, a sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor, on 24-h glucose variability assessed by continuous glucose monitoring in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, R; Osonoi, T; Kanada, S; Jinnouchi, H; Sugio, K; Omiya, H; Ubukata, M; Sakai, S; Samukawa, Y

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of luseogliflozin on 24-h glucose levels, assessed by continuous glucose monitoring, and on pharmacodynamic variables measured throughout the day. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study, 37 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus inadequately controlled with diet and exercise were randomized into two groups. Patients in each group first received luseogliflozin then placebo for 7 days each, or vice versa. After 7 days of treatment, the mean 24-h glucose level was significantly lower with luseogliflozin than with placebo [mean (95% confidence interval) 145.9 (134.4-157.5) mg/dl vs 168.5 (156.9-180.0) mg/dl; p < 0.001]. The proportion of time spent with glucose levels ≥70 to ≤180 mg/dl was significantly greater with luseogliflozin than with placebo [median (interquartile range) 83.2 (67.7-96.5)% vs 71.9 (46.9-83.3)%; p < 0.001] without inducing hypoglycaemia. The decrease in glucose levels was accompanied by reductions in serum insulin levels throughout the day. PMID:25930989

  5. Daily Fasting Blood Glucose Rhythm in Male Mice: A Role of the Circadian Clock in the Liver.

    PubMed

    Ando, Hitoshi; Ushijima, Kentaro; Shimba, Shigeki; Fujimura, Akio

    2016-02-01

    Fasting blood glucose (FBG) and hepatic glucose production are regulated according to a circadian rhythm. An early morning increase in FBG levels, which is pronounced among diabetic patients, is known as the dawn phenomenon. Although the intracellular circadian clock generates various molecular rhythms, whether the hepatic clock is involved in FBG rhythm remains unclear. To address this issue, we investigated the effects of phase shift and disruption of the hepatic clock on the FBG rhythm. In both C57BL/6J and diabetic ob/ob mice, FBG exhibited significant daily rhythms with a peak at the beginning of the dark phase. Light-phase restricted feeding altered the phase of FBG rhythm mildly in C57BL/6J mice and greatly in ob/ob mice, in concert with the phase shifts of mRNA expression rhythms of the clock and glucose production-related genes in the liver. Moreover, the rhythmicity of FBG and Glut2 expression was not detected in liver-specific Bmal1-deficient mice. Furthermore, treatment with octreotide suppressed the plasma growth hormone concentration but did not affect the hepatic mRNA expression of the clock genes or the rise in FBG during the latter half of the resting phase in C57BL/6J mice. These results suggest that the hepatic circadian clock plays a critical role in regulating the daily FBG rhythm, including the dawn phenomenon. PMID:26653333

  6. Circadian Control of the Daily Plasma Glucose Rhythm: An Interplay of GABA and Glutamate

    PubMed Central

    Kalsbeek, Andries; Foppen, Ewout; Schalij, Ingrid; Van Heijningen, Caroline; van der Vliet, Jan; Fliers, Eric; Buijs, Ruud M.

    2008-01-01

    The mammalian biological clock, located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), imposes its temporal structure on the organism via neural and endocrine outputs. To further investigate SCN control of the autonomic nervous system we focused in the present study on the daily rhythm in plasma glucose concentrations. The hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) is an important target area of biological clock output and harbors the pre-autonomic neurons that control peripheral sympathetic and parasympathetic activity. Using local administration of GABA and glutamate receptor (ant)agonists in the PVN at different times of the light/dark-cycle we investigated whether daily changes in the activity of autonomic nervous system contribute to the control of plasma glucose and plasma insulin concentrations. Activation of neuronal activity in the PVN of non-feeding animals, either by administering a glutamatergic agonist or a GABAergic antagonist, induced hyperglycemia. The effect of the GABA-antagonist was time dependent, causing increased plasma glucose concentrations only when administered during the light period. The absence of a hyperglycemic effect of the GABA-antagonist in SCN-ablated animals provided further evidence for a daily change in GABAergic input from the SCN to the PVN. On the other hand, feeding-induced plasma glucose and insulin responses were suppressed by inhibition of PVN neuronal activity only during the dark period. These results indicate that the pre-autonomic neurons in the PVN are controlled by an interplay of inhibitory and excitatory inputs. Liver-dedicated sympathetic pre-autonomic neurons (responsible for hepatic glucose production) and pancreas-dedicated pre-autonomic parasympathetic neurons (responsible for insulin release) are controlled by inhibitory GABAergic contacts that are mainly active during the light period. Both sympathetic and parasympathetic pre-autonomic PVN neurons also receive excitatory inputs, either from the

  7. A diurnal rhythm in glucose uptake in brown adipose tissue revealed by in vivo PET-FDG imaging

    PubMed Central

    van der Veen, Daan R; Shao, Jinping; Chapman, Sarah; Leevy, W Matthew; Duffield, Giles E

    2012-01-01

    Using a micro-PET/CT scanner, we have measured 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in interscapular brown adipose tissue (iBAT) in C57Bl/6 mice at intervals across a 24-hour light-dark cycle. Our data reveals a strong 24-hour profile of glucose uptake of iBAT, peaking at approximately 9 hours into the light phase of the 12 hour light, 12 hour dark day. BAT is increasingly gaining attention as being involved in metabolic phenotypes and obesity, where BAT, as observed by PET analysis, negatively correlates with obesity and age. Conversely, animals that show perturbations in circadian clocks, behavior and physiology show metabolic phenotypes. The observation of a 24-hour rhythm in glucose uptake in iBAT makes this tissue a candidate site of interaction between metabolic and circadian systems. PMID:22447290

  8. 24-h Efficacy of Glaucoma Treatment Options.

    PubMed

    Konstas, Anastasios G P; Quaranta, Luciano; Bozkurt, Banu; Katsanos, Andreas; Garcia-Feijoo, Julian; Rossetti, Luca; Shaarawy, Tarek; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Miglior, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    Current management of glaucoma entails the medical, laser, or surgical reduction of intraocular pressure (IOP) to a predetermined level of target IOP, which is commensurate with either stability or delayed progression of visual loss. In the published literature, the hypothesis is often made that IOP control implies a single IOP measurement over time. Although the follow-up of glaucoma patients with single IOP measurements is quick and convenient, such measurements often do not adequately reflect the untreated IOP characteristics, or indeed the quality of treated IOP control during the 24-h cycle. Since glaucoma is a 24-h disease and the damaging effect of elevated IOP is continuous, it is logical that we should aim to understand the efficacy of all treatment options throughout the 24-h period. This article first reviews the concept and value of diurnal and 24-h IOP monitoring. It then critically evaluates selected available evidence on the 24-h efficacy of medical, laser and surgical therapy options. During the past decade several controlled trials have significantly enhanced our understanding on the 24-h efficacy of all glaucoma therapy options. Nevertheless, more long-term evidence is needed to better evaluate the 24-h efficacy of glaucoma therapy and the precise impact of IOP characteristics on glaucomatous progression and visual prognosis. PMID:26909513

  9. A sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor empagliflozin prevents abnormality of circadian rhythm of blood pressure in salt-treated obese rats.

    PubMed

    Takeshige, Yui; Fujisawa, Yoshihide; Rahman, Asadur; Kittikulsuth, Wararat; Nakano, Daisuke; Mori, Hirohito; Masaki, Tsutomu; Ohmori, Koji; Kohno, Masakazu; Ogata, Hiroaki; Nishiyama, Akira

    2016-06-01

    Studies were performed to examine the effects of the selective sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor empagliflozin on urinary sodium excretion and circadian blood pressure in salt-treated obese Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats. Fifteen-week-old obese OLETF rats were treated with 1% NaCl (in drinking water), and vehicle (0.5% carboxymethylcellulose, n=10) or empagliflozin (10 mg kg(-1)per day, p.o., n=11) for 5 weeks. Blood pressure was continuously measured by telemetry system. Glucose metabolism and urinary sodium excretion were evaluated by oral glucose tolerance test and high salt challenge test, respectively. Vehicle-treated OLETF rats developed non-dipper type blood pressure elevation with glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. Compared with vehicle-treated animals, empagliflozin-treated OLETF rats showed an approximately 1000-fold increase in urinary glucose excretion and improved glucose metabolism and insulin resistance. Furthermore, empagliflozin prevented the development of blood pressure elevation with normalization of its circadian rhythm to a dipper profile, which was associated with increased urinary sodium excretion. These data suggest that empagliflozin elicits beneficial effects on both glucose homeostasis and hypertension in salt-replete obese states. PMID:26818652

  10. Circadian Rhythms

    MedlinePlus

    ... chronobiology. Are circadian rhythms the same thing as biological clocks? No, but they are related. Our biological clocks drive our circadian rhythms. What are biological clocks? The biological clocks that control circadian rhythms ...

  11. Circadian System and Glucose Metabolism: Implications for Physiology and Disease.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jingyi; Scheer, Frank A J L

    2016-05-01

    The circadian system serves one of the most fundamental properties present in nearly all organisms: it generates 24-h rhythms in behavioral and physiological processes and enables anticipating and adapting to daily environmental changes. Recent studies indicate that the circadian system is important in regulating the daily rhythm in glucose metabolism. Disturbance of this circadian control or of its coordination relative to the environmental/behavioral cycle, such as in shift work, eating late, or due to genetic changes, results in disturbed glucose control and increased type 2 diabetes risk. Therefore, an in-depth understanding of the mechanisms underlying glucose regulation by the circadian system and its disturbance may help in the development of therapeutic interventions against the deleterious health consequences of circadian disruption. PMID:27079518

  12. Health in a 24-h society.

    PubMed

    Rajaratnam, S M; Arendt, J

    2001-09-22

    With increasing economic and social demands, we are rapidly evolving into a 24-h society. In any urban economy, about 20% of the population are required to work outside the regular 0800-1700 h working day and this figure is likely to increase. Although the increase in shiftwork has led to greater flexibility in work schedules, the ability to provide goods and services throughout the day and night, and possibly greater employment opportunities, the negative effects of shiftwork and chronic sleep loss on health and productivity are now being appreciated. For example, sleepiness surpasses alcohol and drugs as the greatest identifiable and preventable cause of accidents in all modes of transport. Industrial accidents associated with night work are common, perhaps the most famous being Chernobyl, Three Mile Island, and Bhopal. PMID:11583769

  13. Circadian rhythms, the molecular clock, and skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Harfmann, Brianna D; Schroder, Elizabeth A; Esser, Karyn A

    2015-04-01

    Circadian rhythms are the approximate 24-h biological cycles that function to prepare an organism for daily environmental changes. They are driven by the molecular clock, a transcriptional:translational feedback mechanism that in mammals involves the core clock genes Bmal1, Clock, Per1/2, and Cry1/2. The molecular clock is present in virtually all cells of an organism. The central clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) has been well studied, but the clocks in the peripheral tissues, such as heart and skeletal muscle, have just begun to be investigated. Skeletal muscle is one of the largest organs in the body, comprising approximately 45% of total body mass. More than 2300 genes in skeletal muscle are expressed in a circadian pattern, and these genes participate in a wide range of functions, including myogenesis, transcription, and metabolism. The circadian rhythms of skeletal muscle can be entrained both indirectly through light input to the SCN and directly through time of feeding and activity. It is critical for the skeletal muscle molecular clock not only to be entrained to the environment but also to be in synchrony with rhythms of other tissues. When circadian rhythms are disrupted, the observed effects on skeletal muscle include fiber-type shifts, altered sarcomeric structure, reduced mitochondrial respiration, and impaired muscle function. Furthermore, there are detrimental effects on metabolic health, including impaired glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, which skeletal muscle likely contributes to considering it is a key metabolic tissue. These data indicate a critical role for skeletal muscle circadian rhythms for both muscle and systems health. Future research is needed to determine the mechanisms of molecular clock function in skeletal muscle, identify the means by which skeletal muscle entrainment occurs, and provide a stringent comparison of circadian gene expression across the diverse tissue system of skeletal muscle. PMID:25512305

  14. Circadian Rhythms, Metabolism, and Chrononutrition in Rodents and Humans.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Jonathan D; Ordovás, José M; Scheer, Frank A; Turek, Fred W

    2016-03-01

    Chrononutrition is an emerging discipline that builds on the intimate relation between endogenous circadian (24-h) rhythms and metabolism. Circadian regulation of metabolic function can be observed from the level of intracellular biochemistry to whole-organism physiology and even postprandial responses. Recent work has elucidated the metabolic roles of circadian clocks in key metabolic tissues, including liver, pancreas, white adipose, and skeletal muscle. For example, tissue-specific clock disruption in a single peripheral organ can cause obesity or disruption of whole-organism glucose homeostasis. This review explains mechanistic insights gained from transgenic animal studies and how these data are being translated into the study of human genetics and physiology. The principles of chrononutrition have already been demonstrated to improve human weight loss and are likely to benefit the health of individuals with metabolic disease, as well as of the general population. PMID:26980824

  15. Activity in the ferret: oestradiol effects and circadian rhythms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockman, E. R.; Albers, H. E.; Baum, M. J.; Wurtman, R. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1985-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine whether oestradiol increases activity in the European ferret (Mustela furo), whether this effect is sexually dimorphic, and whether a 24-h rhythm is present in the ferret's daily activity. The activity of male and female adult, postpubertally gonadectomized ferrets was monitored while they were maintained singly on a 13:11 light-dark cycle, before and after implantation with oestradiol-17 beta. Gonadectomized male and female ferrets exhibited equal levels of activity, and neither sex exhibited a significant change in activity following oestradiol implantation. None of the ferrets exhibited a strong circadian rhythm, although weak 24-h rhythms and shorter harmonic rhythms were present. Golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus), monitored in an identical manner, exhibited strong circadian rhythms. It was concluded that oestradiol administration may not cause an increase in activity in the ferret, and that this species lacks a strong circadian activity rhythm.

  16. Local 24-h hyperglycemia does not affect endothelium-dependent or -independent vasoreactivity in humans.

    PubMed

    Houben, A J; Schaper, N C; de Haan, C H; Huvers, F C; Slaaf, D W; de Leeuw, P W; Nieuwenhuijzen Kruseman, C

    1996-06-01

    Hyperglycemia induces regional hemodynamic changes, as suggested by animal studies. These hemodynamic changes may play an initiating role in the pathogenesis of diabetic microangiopathy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of acute local hyperglycemia for 24 h on basal human forearm muscle and skin blood flow and endothelium-dependent and -independent vasoreactivity. Local hyperglycemia (approximately 15 mM) was induced by infusion of 5% glucose into the brachial artery of the nondominant arm. In control experiments, the same individual amount of glucose was infused intravenously in the dominant arm to correct for possible systemic effects of the infused glucose. Vasoreactivity of the forearm vasculature was evaluated by local infusion of acetylcholine (ACh), sodium nitroprusside (SNP), NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), and norepinephrine (NE) into the brachial artery. Regional hemodynamic measurements were performed at baseline and after 6, 12, and 24 h of local hyperglycemia. Median (with interquartile range) basal forearm (muscle) blood flow (FBF) was not influenced by the 24-h local hyperglycemia [infused-to-contralateral arm FBF ratio for glucose 1.32 (1.16-1.64) vs. control 1.54 (1.34-1.69)]. Skin microcirculatory blood flow (laser Doppler flowmetry, LDF) was not influenced by the 24-h local hyperglycemia [LDF ratio for glucose 1.00 (0.62-1.56) vs control 0.80 (0.58-1.14)]. In addition, the vasoreactivity of both muscle and skin (not shown) vasculature to ACh [percent change in FBF ratio for glucose 167% (81-263) vs. control 148% (94-211)], SNP [for glucose 486% (178-586) vs. control 293% (196-454)], L-NMMA [for glucose -36% (-56 to -22) vs. control -41% (-51 to -24)], and NE [for glucose -48% (-72 to -41) vs. control -66% (-79 to -33)] was also not affected by the local hyperglycemia. Thus, in contrast to animal studies, our results suggest that a moderate-to-severe hyperglycemia does not affect the regulation of basal blood flow or

  17. Biological Rhythms in the Skin

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Mary S.; Pelle, Edward; Dong, Kelly; Pernodet, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms, ≈24 h oscillations in behavior and physiology, are reflected in all cells of the body and function to optimize cellular functions and meet environmental challenges associated with the solar day. This multi-oscillatory network is entrained by the master pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus, which directs an organism’s rhythmic expression of physiological functions and behavior via a hierarchical system. This system has been highly conserved throughout evolution and uses transcriptional–translational autoregulatory loops. This master clock, following environmental cues, regulates an organism’s sleep pattern, body temperature, cardiac activity and blood pressure, hormone secretion, oxygen consumption and metabolic rate. Mammalian peripheral clocks and clock gene expression have recently been discovered and are present in all nucleated cells in our body. Like other essential organ of the body, the skin also has cycles that are informed by this master regulator. In addition, skin cells have peripheral clocks that can function autonomously. First described in 2000 for skin, this review summarizes some important aspects of a rapidly growing body of research in circadian and ultradian (an oscillation that repeats multiple times during a 24 h period) cutaneous rhythms, including clock mechanisms, functional manifestations, and stimuli that entrain or disrupt normal cycling. Some specific relationships between disrupted clock signaling and consequences to skin health are discussed in more depth in the other invited articles in this IJMS issue on Sleep, Circadian Rhythm and Skin. PMID:27231897

  18. Biological Rhythms in the Skin.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Mary S; Pelle, Edward; Dong, Kelly; Pernodet, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms, ≈24 h oscillations in behavior and physiology, are reflected in all cells of the body and function to optimize cellular functions and meet environmental challenges associated with the solar day. This multi-oscillatory network is entrained by the master pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus, which directs an organism's rhythmic expression of physiological functions and behavior via a hierarchical system. This system has been highly conserved throughout evolution and uses transcriptional-translational autoregulatory loops. This master clock, following environmental cues, regulates an organism's sleep pattern, body temperature, cardiac activity and blood pressure, hormone secretion, oxygen consumption and metabolic rate. Mammalian peripheral clocks and clock gene expression have recently been discovered and are present in all nucleated cells in our body. Like other essential organ of the body, the skin also has cycles that are informed by this master regulator. In addition, skin cells have peripheral clocks that can function autonomously. First described in 2000 for skin, this review summarizes some important aspects of a rapidly growing body of research in circadian and ultradian (an oscillation that repeats multiple times during a 24 h period) cutaneous rhythms, including clock mechanisms, functional manifestations, and stimuli that entrain or disrupt normal cycling. Some specific relationships between disrupted clock signaling and consequences to skin health are discussed in more depth in the other invited articles in this IJMS issue on Sleep, Circadian Rhythm and Skin. PMID:27231897

  19. Biological rhythms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halberg, F.

    1975-01-01

    An overview is given of basic features of biological rhythms. The classification of periodic behavior of physical and psychological characteristics as circadian, circannual, diurnal, and ultradian is discussed, and the notion of relativistic time as it applies in biology is examined. Special attention is given to circadian rhythms which are dependent on the adrenocortical cycle. The need for adequate understanding of circadian variations in the basic physiological indicators of an individual (heart rate, body temperature, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, etc.) to ensure the effectiveness of prophylactic and therapeutic measures is stressed.

  20. Using multilevel path analysis in analyzing 24-h ambulatory physiological recordings applied to medically unexplained symptoms.

    PubMed

    Houtveen, Jan H; Hamaker, Ellen L; Van Doornen, Lorenz J P

    2010-05-01

    A non-clinical group high on heterogeneous medically unexplained symptoms (MUS; n=97) was compared with healthy controls (n=66) on the within-subject relationships between physiological measures using multilevel path analysis. Momentary experienced somatic complaints, mood (tension and depression), cardiac autonomic activity (inter-beat intervals, pre-ejection period (PEP), and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA)) and respiration (rate and partial pressure of CO(2) at the end of a normal expiration) were monitored for 24 h using electronic diary and ambulatory devices. Relationships between measures were controlled for diurnal variation and individual means. Only subtle group differences were found in the diurnal rhythm and in the within-subject relationships between physiological measures. For participants high on MUS, within-subject changes in bodily symptoms were related to changes in mood, but only marginally to the physiological measures. Results of the current path analysis confirm the subordinate role of cardiac autonomic and respiratory parameters in MUS. PMID:20030762

  1. Enhanced vagal baroreflex response during 24 h after acute exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Adams, W. C.

    1991-01-01

    We evaluated carotid-cardiac baroreflex responses in eight normotensive men (25-41 yr) on two different test days, each separated by at least 1 wk. On one day, baroreflex response was tested before and at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 h after graded supine cycle exercise to volitional exhaustion. On another day, this 24-h protocol was repeated with no exercise (control). Beat-to-beat R-R intervals were measured during external application of graded pressures to the carotid sinuses from 40 to -65 mmHg; changes of R-R intervals were plotted against carotid pressure (systolic pressure minus neck chamber pressure). The maximum slope of the response relationship increased (P less than 0.05) from preexercise to 12 h (3.7 +/- 0.4 to 7.1 +/- 0.7 ms/mmHg) and remained significantly elevated through 24 h. The range of the R-R response was also increased from 217 +/- 24 to 274 +/- 32 ms (P less than 0.05). No significant differences were observed during the control 24-h period. An acute bout of graded exercise designed to elicit exhaustion increases the sensitivity and range of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex response for 24 h and enhances its capacity to buffer against hypotension by increasing heart rate. These results may represent an underlying mechanism that contributes to blood pressure stability after intense exercise.

  2. Learning Rhythms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lippitt, Gordon L.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses factors which determine the quality of learning experiences. The author hypothesizes that there are learning rhythms which must be present in a balanced way for a Peak Learning Experience (PLE) to occur. Learner readiness can be stimulated by a teacher, increasing chances for a PLE. (JOW)

  3. Identification of 24 h Ixodes scapularis immunogenic tick saliva proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Lauren A.; Radulović, Željko M.; Kim, Tae K.; Porter, Lindsay M.; Mulenga, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Ixodes scapularis is arguably the most medically important tick species in the United States. This tick transmits 5 of the 14 human tick-borne disease (TBD) agents in the USA: Borrelia burgdorferi, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, B. miyamotoi, Babesia microti, and Powassan virus disease. Except for the Powassan virus disease, I. scapularis-vectored TBD agents require more than 24 h post attachment to be transmitted. This study describes identification of 24 h immunogenic I. scapularis tick saliva proteins, which could provide opportunities to develop strategies to stop tick feeding before transmission of the majority of pathogens. A 24 h fed female I. scapularis phage display cDNA expression library was biopanned using rabbit antibodies to 24 h fed I. scapularis female tick saliva proteins, subjected to next generation sequencing, de novo assembly, and bioinformatic analyses. A total of 182 contigs were assembled, of which ~19% (35/182) are novel and did not show identity to any known proteins in GenBank. The remaining ~81% (147/182) of contigs were provisionally identified based on matches in GenBank including ~18% (27/147) that matched protein sequences previously annotated as hypothetical and putative tick saliva proteins. Others include proteases and protease inhibitors (~3%, 5/147), transporters and/or ligand binding proteins (~6%, 9/147), immunogenic tick saliva housekeeping enzyme-like (17%, 25/147), ribosomal protein-like (~31%, 46/147), and those classified as miscellaneous (~24%, 35/147). Notable among the miscellaneous class include antimicrobial peptides (microplusin and ricinusin), myosin-like proteins that have been previously found in tick saliva, and heat shock tick saliva protein. Data in this study provides the foundation for in-depth analysis of I. scapularis feeding during the first 24 h, before the majority of TBD agents can be transmitted. PMID:25825233

  4. Circadian temperature rhythms of older people

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monk, T. H.; Buysse, D. J.; Reynolds, C. F. 3rd; Kupfer, D. J.; Houck, P. R.

    1995-01-01

    This collection of studies had the aim of exploring whether older (77+ years) men and women have circadian body temperature rhythms different from those of younger adults. A total of 20 older men and 28 older women were compared with either 22 young men or 14 middle-aged men in four protocols; all but the first protocol using a subset of the sample. The four protocols were: 1) 24 h, and 2) 72 h data collections on a normal laboratory routine (sleeping at night); 3) between 36 h and 153 h of field data collection at home; and 4) 36 h of a constant conditions routine (wakeful bedrest under temporal isolation) in the laboratory. There was some evidence for an age-related phase advance in temperature rhythm, especially for the older men on a normal routine, though this was not present in the constant conditions protocol, where 5 of the older subjects showed major delays in the timing of the body temperature trough (10:00 or later). There was no statistically significant evidence from any of the protocols that older subjects generally had lower temperature rhythm amplitudes than younger adults. Only when older men were compared with younger men in 24-h rhythm amplitude by simple t-test did any comparison involving amplitude achieve statistical significance (p < 0.05).

  5. Diurnal rhythms of visual accommodation and blink responses - Implication for flight-deck visual standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, M. R.; Randle, R. J.; Williams, B. A.

    1977-01-01

    Possible 24-h variations in accommodation responses were investigated. A recently developed servo-controlled optometer and focus stimulator were used to obtain monocular accommodation response data on four college-age subjects. No 24-h rhythm in accommodation was shown. Heart rate and blink rate also were measured and periodicity analysis showed a mean 24-h rhythm for both; however, blink rate periodograms were significant for only two of the four subjects. Thus, with the qualifications that college students were tested instead of pilots and that they performed monocular laboratory tasks instead of binocular flight-deck tasks, it is concluded that 24-h rhythms in accommodation responses need not be considered in setting visual standards for flight-deck tasks.

  6. Daily Rhythms in Mosquitoes and Their Consequences for Malaria Transmission.

    PubMed

    Rund, Samuel S C; O'Donnell, Aidan J; Gentile, James E; Reece, Sarah E

    2016-01-01

    The 24-h day involves cycles in environmental factors that impact organismal fitness. This is thought to select for organisms to regulate their temporal biology accordingly, through circadian and diel rhythms. In addition to rhythms in abiotic factors (such as light and temperature), biotic factors, including ecological interactions, also follow daily cycles. How daily rhythms shape, and are shaped by, interactions between organisms is poorly understood. Here, we review an emerging area, namely the causes and consequences of daily rhythms in the interactions between vectors, their hosts and the parasites they transmit. We focus on mosquitoes, malaria parasites and vertebrate hosts, because this system offers the opportunity to integrate from genetic and molecular mechanisms to population dynamics and because disrupting rhythms offers a novel avenue for disease control. PMID:27089370

  7. Daily Rhythms in Mosquitoes and Their Consequences for Malaria Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Rund, Samuel S. C.; O’Donnell, Aidan J.; Gentile, James E.; Reece, Sarah E.

    2016-01-01

    The 24-h day involves cycles in environmental factors that impact organismal fitness. This is thought to select for organisms to regulate their temporal biology accordingly, through circadian and diel rhythms. In addition to rhythms in abiotic factors (such as light and temperature), biotic factors, including ecological interactions, also follow daily cycles. How daily rhythms shape, and are shaped by, interactions between organisms is poorly understood. Here, we review an emerging area, namely the causes and consequences of daily rhythms in the interactions between vectors, their hosts and the parasites they transmit. We focus on mosquitoes, malaria parasites and vertebrate hosts, because this system offers the opportunity to integrate from genetic and molecular mechanisms to population dynamics and because disrupting rhythms offers a novel avenue for disease control. PMID:27089370

  8. Acute effect of ephedrine on 24-h energy balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, J. R.; Gottesdiener, K.; Jordan, J.; Chen, K.; Flattery, S.; Larson, P. J.; Candelore, M. R.; Gertz, B.; Robertson, D.; Sun, M.

    1999-01-01

    Ephedrine is used to help achieve weight control. Data on its true efficacy and mechanisms in altering energy balance in human subjects are limited. We aimed to determine the acute effect of ephedrine on 24-h energy expenditure, mechanical work and urinary catecholamines in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, two-period crossover study. Ten healthy volunteers were given ephedrine (50 mg) or placebo thrice daily during each of two 24-h periods (ephedrine and placebo) in a whole-room indirect calorimeter, which accurately measures minute-by-minute energy expenditure and mechanical work. Measurements were taken of 24-h energy expenditure, mechanical work, urinary catecholamines and binding of (+/-)ephedrine in vitro to human beta1-, beta2- and beta3-adrenoreceptors. Twenty-four-hour energy expenditure was 3.6% greater (8965+/-1301 versus 8648+/-1347 kJ, P<0.05) with ephedrine than with placebo, but mechanical work was not different between the ephedrine and placebo periods. Noradrenaline excretion was lower with ephedrine (0.032+/-0.011 microg/mg creatinine) compared with placebo (0.044+/-0.012 microg/mg creatinine) (P<0.05). (+/-)Ephedrine is a relatively weak partial agonist of human beta1- and beta2-adrenoreceptors, and had no detectable activity at human beta3-adrenoreceptors. Ephedrine (50 mg thrice daily) modestly increases energy expenditure in normal human subjects. A lack of binding of ephedrine to beta3-adrenoreceptors and the observed decrease in urinary noradrenaline during ephedrine treatment suggest that the thermogenic effect of ephedrine results from direct beta1-/beta2-adrenoreceptor agonism. An indirect beta3-adrenergic effect through the release of noradrenaline seems unlikely as urinary noradrenaline decreased significantly with ephedrine.

  9. Circadian rhythm of body temperature during prolonged undersea voyages.

    PubMed

    Colquhoun, W P; Paine, M W; Fort, A

    1978-05-01

    Circadian rhythms of oral temperature were assessed in 12 watchkeepers during a prolonged submarine voyage and compared with a "standard" rhythm obtained from nonwatchkeepers ashore. Initially, the parameters of the rhythms were similar to those of the standard; however, among eight ratings working 4-h watches in a rapidly rotating cycle, considerable changes in the rhythms occurred as the voyage progressed, and concurrent alterations in sleep patterning were observed. The most characteristic change in the rhythm was a marked decline in its amplitude. In most subjects, the rhythm also tended to depart from its original circadian pattern; in at least one case, it effectively disintegrated. One subject's rhythm appeared to "free-run" with a period greater than 24 h. A strong circadian rhythm was maintained in only one of these eight subjects. In four officers whose watch times were at fixed hours, adaptation of the rhythm to unusual times of sleep occurred in 2 of 3 cases where the schedule demanded it. The results are discussed in relation to the design of optimal watchkeeping systems for submariners. PMID:655989

  10. Metabolic circadian rhythms in embryonic turtles.

    PubMed

    Loudon, Fiona Kay; Spencer, Ricky-John; Strassmeyer, Alana; Harland, Karen

    2013-07-01

    Oviparous species are model organisms for investigating embryonic development of endogenous physiological circadian rhythms without the influence of maternal biorhythms. Recent studies have demonstrated that heart rates and metabolic rates of embryonic turtles are not constant or always maximal and can be altered in response to the presence of embryos at a more advanced stage of development within the nest. A first step in understanding the physiological mechanisms underpinning these responses in embryonic ectothermic organisms is to develop metabolic profiles (e.g., heart rate) at different temperatures throughout incubation. Heart beat and rhythmic patterns or changes in development may represent important signals or cues within a nest and may be vital to coordinate synchronous hatching well in advance of the final stages of incubation. We developed baseline embryonic heart-rate profiles of embryos of the short-necked Murray River turtle (Emydura macquarii) to determine the stage of embryogenesis that metabolic circadian rhythms become established, if at all. Eggs were incubated at constant temperatures (26°C and 30°C) and heart rates were monitored at 6-h intervals over 24 h every 7-11 days until hatching. Circadian heart rate rhythms were detected at the mid-gestation period and were maintained until hatching. Heart rates throughout the day varied by up to 20% over 24 h and were not related to time of day. This study demonstrated that endogenous metabolic circadian rhythms in developing embryos in turtle eggs establish earlier in embryogenesis than those documented in other vertebrate taxa during embryogenesis. Early establishment of circadian rhythms in heart rates may be critical for communication among embryos and synchrony in hatching and emergence from the nest. PMID:23652198

  11. Circadian rhythms and cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wood, P A; Hrushesky, W J

    1996-01-01

    Temporal coordination of biologic processes with an approximately 24-h cycle (circadian) is common throughout the animal and plant kingdom and even in some prokaryotic organisms. In all organisms studied, the capability to keep biologic time is an inherited characteristic located intracellularly. These biological clocks anticipate and get the organism ready for regular environmental changes. This indicates both the ubiquity and the weight of the selective environmental pressure to keep time accurately. Several molecular strategies for biologic time keeping have apparently arisen independently several times throughout evolution. The anatomic, biochemical, and molecular mechanisms of the clock are in the process of being defined. This temporal organization at the cellular, organ, and organismic levels results in predictable differences in the capacity of plants, animals, and human beings to respond to therapeutic interventions administered at different times throughout important biologic cycles (e.g., circadian timed therapy). In the treatment of the cancer bearing host, circadian timing of surgery, anticancer drugs, radiation therapy, and biologic agents can result in improved toxicity profiles, enhanced tumor control, and improved host survival. The routine clinical application of such principles is facilitated by the availability of programmable drug delivery devices. Rhythm frequency ranges other than 24-h (e.g., low frequency: menstrual; high frequency: 10 to 120 min) may also be important to understanding health and disease and to designing successful therapy in diseases as diverse as cancer, infertility, and diabetes. PMID:8959371

  12. Clocks within the Master Gland: Hypophyseal Rhythms and Their Physiological Significance.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xue-Wei; Blum, Ian David; Storch, Kai-Florian

    2015-08-01

    Various aspects of mammalian endocrine physiology show a time-of-day variation with a period of 24 h, which represents an adaptation to the daily environmental fluctuations resulting from the rotation of the earth. These 24-h rhythms in hormone abundance and consequently hormone function may rely on rhythmic signals produced by the master circadian clock, which resides in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and is thought to chiefly dictate the pattern of rest and activity in mammals in conjunction with the light/dark (LD) cycle. However, it is likely that clocks intrinsic to elements of the endocrine axes also contribute to the 24-h rhythms in hormone function. Here we review the evidence for rhythm generation in the endocrine master gland, the pituitary, and its physiological significance in the context of endocrine axes regulation and function. PMID:25926680

  13. Heart Rhythm Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search: Education & Meetings Scientific Sessions Certified Education Courses & Online Learning Heart Rhythm On Demand Co-Sponsored & Endorsed Events ... Education & Meetings less Scientific Sessions Certified Education Courses & Online Learning Heart Rhythm On Demand Co-Sponsored & Endorsed Events ...

  14. Circadian rhythm of gravitaxis in Euglena gracilis.

    PubMed

    Lebert, M; Porst, M; Hader, D P

    1999-09-01

    Euglena gracilis, a unicellular, photosynthetic flagellate is a model system for environmentally controlled behavioral reactions. One pronounced reaction is the orientation with respect to gravity. In synchronized cultures with no cell growth a distinct circadian rhythm of negative gravitactic orientation could be observed. The main maximum of sensitivity was detected 5 h after the beginning of the subjective day, the main minimum 5 h before the beginning of the subjective day. Transferring synchronized cultures to continuous light resulted in an almost instantaneous loss of rhythmicity. In contrast, after transfer to permanent darkness cells exhibited a circadian rhythm with a progressive shortening of the period for more than 5 days. These findings are in contrast to the circadian rhythm of phototaxis in Euglena, where a free-running period of 24 h was observed. Parallel measurements of negative gravitactic orientation, velocity, cell shape as well as cAMP concentration in synchronized cultures revealed a circadian rhythm of all reactions. The results are discussed with regard to the possible role of cell shape and cAMP in gravitactic orientation. PMID:11542916

  15. Nqrs Data for C24H44CuI2N [C24H44N·1/2(Cu2I4)] (Subst. No. 1588)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chihara, H.; Nakamura, N.

    This document is part of Subvolume B 'Substances Containing C10H16 … Zn' of Volume 48 'Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy Data' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains an extract of Section '3.2 Data tables' of the Chapter '3 Nuclear quadrupole resonance data' providing the NQRS data for C24H44CuI2N [C24H44N·1/2(Cu2I4)] (Subst. No. 1588)

  16. [Rhythms, depressions and light].

    PubMed

    Johnsson, Anders; Moan, Johan

    2006-04-01

    Many aspects of life in plants, animals and humans are controlled by light. Endogenous, so-called circadian rhythms in the body deviate from the exact 24-hour day and have typically a period of around 25.5 hours in man. Normally these rhythms adapt to the external 24-hour day-and night changes but under constant conditions the rhythms can free run. Many studies show how important the interplay between light and the circadian rhythms are for man as well as for other organisms. The control of these rhythms by light is mediated via the retina and the melatonin system in man. The adaptation of the rhythms is very important in shift work, in rapid jet lag travels over time zones, etc. Organisms often use the circadian rhythm to determine the length of day and of night, a feature that has given rise to the term biological clocks. A biological clock provides possibilities to determine the proper time for physiological processes to start in plants and animals (flowering, hibernation etc). The importance of light and circadian rhythms for seasonal affective disorders and manic-depressive disorders is also discussed. For several organisms one has now been able to specify genes that determine the period of the clocks. The rhythmic physiologic processes, the light reactions and the general importance of light for rhythms and for man are now studied at the molecular level. PMID:16619063

  17. Musical rhythms in heart period dynamics: a cross-cultural and interdisciplinary approach to cardiac rhythms.

    PubMed

    Bettermann, H; Amponsah, D; Cysarz, D; van Leeuwen, P

    1999-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to expand classic heart period analysis methods by techniques from ethnomusicology that explicitly take complex musical rhythm principles into consideration. The methods used are based on the theory of African music, the theory of symbolic dynamics, and combinatorial theory. Heart period tachograms from 192 24-h electrocardiograms of 96 healthy subjects were transformed into binary symbol sequences that were interpretable as elementary rhythmic (percussive) patterns, the time lines in African music. Using a hierarchical rhythm pattern scheme closely related to the Derler Rhythm Classification (from jazz theory), we calculated the predominance and stability of pattern classes. The results show that during sleep certain classes, specific to individuals, occurred in a cyclically recurrent manner and many times more often than expected. Simultaneously, other classes disappeared more or less completely. Moreover, the most frequent classes obviously originate from phase-locking processes in autonomic regulation (e.g., between respiratory and cardiac cycles). In conclusion, the new interdisciplinary method presented here demonstrates that heart period patterns, in particular those occurring during night sleep, can be interpreted as musical rhythms. This method may be of great potential use in music therapy research. PMID:10564129

  18. Transient energy deficit induced by exercise increases 24-h fat oxidation in young trained men.

    PubMed

    Iwayama, Kaito; Kawabuchi, Ryosuke; Park, Insung; Kurihara, Reiko; Kobayashi, Masashi; Hibi, Masanobu; Oishi, Sachiko; Yasunaga, Koichi; Ogata, Hitomi; Nabekura, Yoshiharu; Tokuyama, Kumpei

    2015-01-01

    Whole body fat oxidation increases during exercise. However, 24-h fat oxidation on a day with exercise often remains similar to that of sedentary day, when energy intake is increased to achieve an energy-balanced condition. The present study aimed to examine a possibility that time of the day when exercise is performed makes differences in 24-h fat oxidation. As a potential mechanism of exercise affecting 24-h fat oxidation, its relation to exercise-induced transient energy deficit was examined. Nine young male endurance athletes underwent three trials of indirect calorimetry using a metabolic chamber, in which they performed a session of 100 min of exercise before breakfast (AM), after lunch (PM), or two sessions of 50 min of exercise before breakfast and after lunch (AM/PM) at 65% of maximal oxygen uptake. Experimental meals were designed to achieve individual energy balance. Twenty-four-hour energy expenditure was similar among the trials, but 24-h fat oxidation was 1,142 ± 97, 809 ± 88, and 608 ± 46 kcal/24 h in descending order of its magnitude for AM, AM/PM, and PM, respectively (P < 0.05). Twenty-four-hour carbohydrate oxidation was 2,558 ± 110, 2,374 ± 114, and 2,062 ± 96 kcal/24 h for PM, AM/PM, and AM, respectively. In spite of energy-balanced condition over 24 h, exercise induced a transient energy deficit, the magnitude of which was negatively correlated with 24-h fat oxidation (r = -0.72, P < 0.01). Similarly, transient carbohydrate deficit after exercise was negatively correlated with 24-h fat oxidation (r = -0.40, P < 0.05). The time of the day when exercise is performed affects 24-h fat oxidation, and the transient energy/carbohydrate deficit after exercise is implied as a factor affecting 24-h fat oxidation. PMID:25554797

  19. Vitamin B12 affects non-photic entrainment of circadian locomotor activity rhythms in mice.

    PubMed

    Ebihara, S; Mano, N; Kurono, N; Komuro, G; Yoshimura, T

    1996-07-15

    Administration of vitamin B12 (VB12) has been reported to normalize human sleep-wake rhythm disorders such as non-24-h sleep-wake syndrome (HNS), delayed sleep phase syndrome (DSPS) or insomnia. However, the mechanisms of the action of VB12 on the rhythm disorders are unknown. In the present study, therefore, effects of VB12 on circadian rhythms of locomotor activity were examined in mice. In the first experiment, CBA/J mice were maintained under continuous light condition (LL) or blinded, and after free-running rhythms became stable, the mice were intraperitoneally injected with either VB12 or saline at a fixed time every day. In all the mice with tau > 24 h, saline injections resulted in entrainment of circadian rhythms, whereas not all the mice with tau < 24 h entrained to the injection. In contrast to saline injections, VB12 injections did not always induce entrainment and about half of the mice with tau > 24 h free-ran during the injection. In the second experiment, the amount of phase advances of circadian rhythms induced by a single injection of saline at circadian time (CT) 11 under LL was compared between the mice with and without VB12 silastic tubes. The results showed that the amplitude of phase advances was smaller in the mice with VB12 than those without VB12. In the third experiment, daily injections of saline were given to the mice with VB12 silastic tubes maintained under LL. In this chronic treatment of VB12 as well, attenuating effects of VB12 on saline-induced entrainment were observed. These results suggest that VB12 affects the mechanisms implicated in non-photic entrainment of circadian rhythms in mice. PMID:8842380

  20. Subjective alertness rhythms in elderly people

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monk, T. H.; Buysse, D. J.; Reynolds, C. F. 3rd; Kupfer, D. J.; Houck, P. R.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate age-related changes in the circadian rhythm of subjective alertness and to explore the circadian mechanisms underlying such changes. Using a visual analogue scale (VAS) instrument, 25 older men and women (71 y and older; 15 female, 10 male) rated their subjective alertness about 7 times per day during 5 baseline days of temporal isolation during which habitual bedtimes and waketimes were enforced. Comparisons were made with 13 middle-aged men (37-52 y) experiencing the same protocol. Advancing age (particularly in the men) resulted in less rhythmic alertness patterns, as indicated by lower amplitudes and less reliability of fitted 24-h sinusoids. This appeared in spite of the absence of any reliable age-related diminution in circadian temperature rhythm amplitude, thus suggesting the effect was not due to SCN weakness per se, but to weakened transduction of SCN output. In a further experiment, involving 36 h of constant wakeful bedrest, differences in the amplitude of the alertness rhythm were observed between 9 older men (79 y+), 7 older women (79 y+), and 17 young controls (9 males, 8 females, 19-28 y) suggesting that with advancing age (particularly in men) there is less rhythmic input into subjective alertness from the endogenous circadian pacemaker. These results may explain some of the nocturnal insomnia and daytime hypersomnia that afflict many elderly people.

  1. Auditory deprivation modifies biological rhythms in the golden hamster.

    PubMed

    Cutrera, R; Pedemonte, M; Vanini, G; Goldstein, N; Savorini, D; Cardinali, D P; Velluti, R A

    2000-11-01

    To assess to what extent auditory sensory deprivation affects biological rhythmicity, sleep/wakefulness cycle and 24 h rhythm in locomotor activity were examined in golden hamsters after bilateral cochlear lesion. An increase in total sleep time as well as a decrease in wakefulness (W) were associated to an augmented number of W episodes, as well as of slow wave sleep (SWS) and paradoxical sleep (PS) episodes in deaf hamsters. The number of episodes of the three behavioural states and the percent duration of W and SWS increased significantly during the light phase of daily photoperiod only. Lower amplitudes of locomotor activity rhythm and a different phase angle as far as light off were found in deaf hamsters kept either under light-dark photoperiod or in constant darkness. Period of locomotor activity remained unchanged after cochlear lesions. The results indicate that auditory deprivation disturbs photic synchronization of rhythms with little effect on the clock timing mechanism itself. PMID:11116570

  2. Understanding calendar rhythm.

    PubMed

    Reyes, D P

    1983-01-01

    Rhythm has been among the family planning methods endorsed since the start of the National Population Program in the Philippines, but it has not been given as much emphasis as the other methods such as oral contraception (OC), the IUD, and sterilization. For several years, no systematic effort was made to promote the effective use of rhythm. The 1978 Community Outreach Survey (COS) tried to determine the extent to which contraceptive methods were being used in the Outreach Project areas. The project covered 2,000 barangay service points (BSPs) with 1.76 million married couples of reproductive age (MCRA), representing 32% of the estimated total MCRA in the Philippines. The COS findings revealed that, of the total sexually active married women aged 15-49, 48% were using contraceptive methods. Of these, only 11.4% were using modern methods, 20% were using other program methods (rhythm, condom, and combination of rhythm and condom); and 16.7% were using nonprogram methods (withdrawal, abstinence, and others). When used in combination with other methods, rhythm had a monthly continuation rate of 96%; when used alone, 94%. The COS data showed that the rhythm method is practiced by a large number of Filipino couples. With the renewed interest in rhythm, it became imperative for the program to help rhythm acceptors use the method more effectively and thus reduce user failure. There continues to be need for data on the "product image" of rhythm. These include the emotions that come into play in the acceptance or rejection of rhythm, the perceived side effects as well as advantages of the method, the ways women communicate their "safe" and "unsafe" days to their husbands, the manner in which couples prevent sexual contact during "unsafe" days, and the attitude of couples toward abstinence. Among important study findings were the following: couples choose rhythm because it does not disturb the sexual act, has no side effects, and poses no religious objections; 1 of the

  3. Comparison of INTAKE24 (an Online 24-h Dietary Recall Tool) with Interviewer-Led 24-h Recall in 11-24 Year-Old.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Jennifer; Simpson, Emma; Poliakov, Ivan; Matthews, John N S; Olivier, Patrick; Adamson, Ashley J; Foster, Emma

    2016-01-01

    Online dietary assessment tools offer a convenient, low cost alternative to traditional dietary assessment methods such as weighed records and face-to-face interviewer-led 24-h recalls. INTAKE24 is an online multiple pass 24-h recall tool developed for use with 11-24 year-old. The aim of the study was to undertake a comparison of INTAKE24 (the test method) with interviewer-led multiple pass 24-h recalls (the comparison method) in 180 people aged 11-24 years. Each participant completed both an INTAKE24 24-h recall and an interviewer-led 24-h recall on the same day on four occasions over a one-month period. The daily energy and nutrient intakes reported in INTAKE24 were compared to those reported in the interviewer-led recall. Mean intakes reported using INTAKE24 were similar to the intakes reported in the interviewer-led recall for energy and macronutrients. INTAKE24 was found to underestimate energy intake by 1% on average compared to the interviewer-led recall with the limits of agreement ranging from minus 49% to plus 93%. Mean intakes of all macronutrients and micronutrients (except non-milk extrinsic sugars) were within 4% of the interviewer-led recall. Dietary assessment that utilises technology may offer a viable alternative and be more engaging than paper based methods, particularly for children and young adults. PMID:27294952

  4. Comparison of INTAKE24 (an Online 24-h Dietary Recall Tool) with Interviewer-Led 24-h Recall in 11–24 Year-Old

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Jennifer; Simpson, Emma; Poliakov, Ivan; Matthews, John N. S.; Olivier, Patrick; Adamson, Ashley J.; Foster, Emma

    2016-01-01

    Online dietary assessment tools offer a convenient, low cost alternative to traditional dietary assessment methods such as weighed records and face-to-face interviewer-led 24-h recalls. INTAKE24 is an online multiple pass 24-h recall tool developed for use with 11–24 year-old. The aim of the study was to undertake a comparison of INTAKE24 (the test method) with interviewer-led multiple pass 24-h recalls (the comparison method) in 180 people aged 11–24 years. Each participant completed both an INTAKE24 24-h recall and an interviewer-led 24-h recall on the same day on four occasions over a one-month period. The daily energy and nutrient intakes reported in INTAKE24 were compared to those reported in the interviewer-led recall. Mean intakes reported using INTAKE24 were similar to the intakes reported in the interviewer-led recall for energy and macronutrients. INTAKE24 was found to underestimate energy intake by 1% on average compared to the interviewer-led recall with the limits of agreement ranging from minus 49% to plus 93%. Mean intakes of all macronutrients and micronutrients (except non-milk extrinsic sugars) were within 4% of the interviewer-led recall. Dietary assessment that utilises technology may offer a viable alternative and be more engaging than paper based methods, particularly for children and young adults. PMID:27294952

  5. Modulation of glucose regulation and insulin secretion by circadian rhythmicity and sleep.

    PubMed Central

    Van Cauter, E; Blackman, J D; Roland, D; Spire, J P; Refetoff, S; Polonsky, K S

    1991-01-01

    To define the roles of circadian rhythmicity (intrinsic effects of time of day independent of the sleep or wake condition) and sleep (intrinsic effects of the sleep condition, irrespective of the time of day) on the 24-h variation in glucose tolerance, eight normal men were studied during constant glucose infusion for a total of 53 h. The period of study included 8 h of nocturnal sleep, 28 h of continuous wakefulness, and 8 h of daytime sleep. Blood samples for the measurement of glucose, insulin, C-peptide, cortisol, and growth hormone were collected at 20-min intervals throughout the entire study. Insulin secretion rates were derived from C-peptide levels by deconvolution. Sleep was polygraphically monitored. During nocturnal sleep, levels of glucose and insulin secretion increased by 31 +/- 5% and 60 +/- 11%, respectively, and returned to baseline in the morning. During sleep deprivation, glucose levels and insulin secretion rose again to reach a maximum at a time corresponding to the beginning of the habitual sleep period. The magnitude of the rise above morning levels averaged 17 +/- 5% for glucose and 49 +/- 8% for calculated insulin secretion. Serum insulin levels did not parallel the circadian variation in insulin secretion, indicating the existence of an approximate 40% increase in insulin clearance during the night. Daytime sleep was associated with a 16 +/- 3% rise in glucose levels, a 55 +/- 7% rise in insulin secretion, and a 39 +/- 5% rise in serum insulin. The diurnal variation in insulin secretion was inversely related to the cortisol rhythm, with a significant correlation of the magnitudes of their morning to evening excursions. Sleep-associated rises in glucose correlated with the amount of concomitant growth hormone secreted. These studies demonstrate previously underappreciated effects of circadian rhythmicity and sleep on glucose levels, insulin secretion, and insulin clearance, and suggest that these effects could be partially mediated by

  6. Rhythmic 24 h Variation of Core Body Temperature and Locomotor Activity in a Subterranean Rodent (Ctenomys aff. knighti), the Tuco-Tuco

    PubMed Central

    Tachinardi, Patricia; Bicudo, José Eduardo Wilken; Oda, Gisele Akemi; Valentinuzzi, Verónica Sandra

    2014-01-01

    The tuco-tuco Ctenomys aff. knighti is a subterranean rodent which inhabits a semi-arid area in Northwestern Argentina. Although they live in underground burrows where environmental cycles are attenuated, they display robust, 24 h locomotor activity rhythms that are synchronized by light/dark cycles, both in laboratory and field conditions. The underground environment also poses energetic challenges (e.g. high-energy demands of digging, hypoxia, high humidity, low food availability) that have motivated thermoregulation studies in several subterranean rodent species. By using chronobiological protocols, the present work aims to contribute towards these studies by exploring day-night variations of thermoregulatory functions in tuco-tucos, starting with body temperature and its temporal relationship to locomotor activity. Animals showed daily, 24 h body temperature rhythms that persisted even in constant darkness and temperature, synchronizing to a daily light/dark cycle, with highest values occurring during darkness hours. The range of oscillation of body temperature was slightly lower than those reported for similar-sized and dark-active rodents. Most rhythmic parameters, such as period and phase, did not change upon removal of the running wheel. Body temperature and locomotor activity rhythms were robustly associated in time. The former persisted even after removal of the acute effects of intense activity on body temperature by a statistical method. Finally, regression gradients between body temperature and activity were higher in the beginning of the night, suggesting day-night variation in thermal conductance and heat production. Consideration of these day-night variations in thermoregulatory processes is beneficial for further studies on thermoregulation and energetics of subterranean rodents. PMID:24454916

  7. Rhythmic 24 h variation of core body temperature and locomotor activity in a subterranean rodent (Ctenomys aff. knighti), the tuco-tuco.

    PubMed

    Tachinardi, Patricia; Bicudo, José Eduardo Wilken; Oda, Gisele Akemi; Valentinuzzi, Verónica Sandra

    2014-01-01

    The tuco-tuco Ctenomys aff. knighti is a subterranean rodent which inhabits a semi-arid area in Northwestern Argentina. Although they live in underground burrows where environmental cycles are attenuated, they display robust, 24 h locomotor activity rhythms that are synchronized by light/dark cycles, both in laboratory and field conditions. The underground environment also poses energetic challenges (e.g. high-energy demands of digging, hypoxia, high humidity, low food availability) that have motivated thermoregulation studies in several subterranean rodent species. By using chronobiological protocols, the present work aims to contribute towards these studies by exploring day-night variations of thermoregulatory functions in tuco-tucos, starting with body temperature and its temporal relationship to locomotor activity. Animals showed daily, 24 h body temperature rhythms that persisted even in constant darkness and temperature, synchronizing to a daily light/dark cycle, with highest values occurring during darkness hours. The range of oscillation of body temperature was slightly lower than those reported for similar-sized and dark-active rodents. Most rhythmic parameters, such as period and phase, did not change upon removal of the running wheel. Body temperature and locomotor activity rhythms were robustly associated in time. The former persisted even after removal of the acute effects of intense activity on body temperature by a statistical method. Finally, regression gradients between body temperature and activity were higher in the beginning of the night, suggesting day-night variation in thermal conductance and heat production. Consideration of these day-night variations in thermoregulatory processes is beneficial for further studies on thermoregulation and energetics of subterranean rodents. PMID:24454916

  8. Sleep and circadian rhythms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monk, Timothy H.

    1991-01-01

    Three interacting processes are involved in the preservation of circadian rhythms: (1) endogenous rhythm generation mechanisms, (2) entrainment mechanisms to keep these rhythms 'on track', and (3) exogenous masking processes stemming from changes in environment and bahavior. These processes, particularly the latter two, can be dramatically affected in individuals of advanced age and in space travelers, with a consequent disruption in sleep and daytime functioning. This paper presents results of a phase-shift experiment investigating the age-related effects of the exogeneous component of circadian rhythms in various physiological and psychological functions by comparing these functions in middle aged and old subjects. Dramatic differences were found between the two age groups in measures of sleep, mood, activation, and performance efficiency.

  9. Rain reverses diel activity rhythms in an estuarine teleost

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Nicholas L.; van der Meulen, Dylan E.; Gannon, Ruan; Semmens, Jayson M.; Suthers, Iain M.; Gray, Charles A.; Taylor, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    Activity rhythms are ubiquitous in nature, and generally synchronized with the day–night cycle. Several taxa have been shown to switch between nocturnal and diurnal activity in response to environmental variability, and these relatively uncommon switches provide a basis for greater understanding of the mechanisms and adaptive significance of circadian (approx. 24 h) rhythms. Plasticity of activity rhythms has been identified in association with a variety of factors, from changes in predation pressure to an altered nutritional or social status. Here, we report a switch in activity rhythm that is associated with rainfall. Outside periods of rain, the estuarine-associated teleost Acanthopagrus australis was most active and in shallower depths during the day, but this activity and depth pattern was reversed in the days following rain, with diurnality restored as estuarine conductivity and turbidity levels returned to pre-rain levels. Although representing the first example of a rain-induced reversal of activity rhythm in an aquatic animal of which we are aware, our results are consistent with established models on the trade-offs between predation risk and foraging efficiency. PMID:23173211

  10. Association of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction with 24-h aortic ambulatory blood pressure: the SAFAR study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Kollias, G; Argyris, A A; Papaioannou, T G; Tountas, C; Konstantonis, G D; Achimastos, A; Blacher, J; Safar, M E; Sfikakis, P P; Protogerou, A D

    2015-07-01

    Aortic blood pressure (BP) and 24-h ambulatory BP are both better associated with target organ damage than office brachial BP. However, it remains unclear whether a combination of these two techniques would be the optimal methodology to evaluate patients' BP in terms of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction (LVDD) prevention. In 230 participants, office brachial and aortic BPs were measured by a validated BP monitor and a tonometry-based device, respectively. 24-h ambulatory brachial and aortic BPs were measured by a validated ambulatory BP monitor (Mobil-O-Graph, Germany). Systematic assessment of patients' LVDD was performed. After adjustment for age, gender, hypertension and antihypertensive treatment, septum and lateral E/Ea were significantly associated with office aortic systolic BP (SBP) and pulse pressure (PP) and 24-h brachial and aortic SBP and PP (P ⩽ 0.04), but not with office brachial BP (P ⩾ 0.09). Similarly, 1 standard deviation in SBP was significantly associated with 97.8 ± 20.9, 86.4 ± 22.9, 74.1 ± 23.3 and 51.3 ± 22.6 in septum E/Ea and 68.6 ± 2 0.1, 54.2 ± 21.9, 37.9 ± 22.4 and 23.1 ± 21.4 in lateral E/Ea, for office and 24-h aortic and brachial SBP, respectively. In qualitative analysis, except for office brachial BP, office aortic and 24-h brachial and aortic BPs were all significantly associated with LVDD (P ⩽ 0.03), with the highest odds ratio in 24-h aortic SBP. Furthermore, aortic BP, no matter in the office or 24-h ambulatory setting, showed the largest area under receiver operating characteristic curves (P ⩽ 0.02). In conclusion, 24-h aortic BP is superior to other BPs in the association with LVDD. PMID:25391758

  11. Removal of glucose from the cardiopulmonary bypass prime: a prospective clinical audit.

    PubMed

    Newland, R F; Baker, R A; Mazzone, A L; Ottens, J; Sanderson, A J; Moubarak, J R

    2004-09-01

    To quantify our decision for the removal of glucose and the use of mannitol as a substitute osmotic agent in the cardiopulmonary bypass prime, we conducted a prospective clinical audit to evaluate the effects of this change on patient outcomes. Data were prospectively collected for 172 consecutive routine cardiac surgery patients. The first 85 patients (Surgeon A, 42 patients [Group 1], Surgeon B, 43 patients [Group 2]) received 1000 mL Plasmalyte 148 + 5% glucose as per institutional protocol. The remaining priming volume for each group consisted of 500 mL hemaccel or 4% albumin, 50 mL 8.4% sodium bicarbonate, 100 mL Hartmann's solution. The change to a glucose-free prime was then initiated, substituting Plasmalyte 148 (without 5% glucose) for the Plasmalyte 148 + 5% glucose, in addition 12.5 g mannitol was administered following delivery of cardioplegia to the patients operated on by Surgeon B. Surgeon A would not include mannitol at this time. Forty-one patients operated by Surgeon A (Group 3) subsequently received Plasmalyte 148, and 46 patients operated on by Surgeon B (Group 4) received Plasmalyte 148 plus mannitol. Analysis was performed stratified by surgeon to quantify the effects of removing glucose from the prime. Comparisons were made between groups 1 and 3, and 2 and 4. Net fluid changes were recorded from pre-CPB, up to 24-h postoperatively. Intraoperative data collection included serum glucose, hematocrit, osmolality, return to rhythm, arrhythmias, and blood transfusions. Post-operative variables, including cardiac enzymes, arrhythmias, intubation time, length of stay, and mortality were also collected. Removal of glucose from the CPB prime resulted in a lower serum glucose concentration (mmol/L) during CPB (Gp 1 [13.6] vs. Gp 3 [5.4]; Gp 2 [14.7] vs. Gp 4 [5.4], p < .05). The addition of 12.5 g of mannitol to the CPB prime resulted in a significantly lower net fluid gain (mL) 24 h postoperatively (Gp 2[2792] vs. Gp 4 [1970], p < .05) and greater CPB

  12. Temperature compensation and entrainment in circadian rhythms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenstein, C.; Heiland, I.; Schuster, S.

    2012-06-01

    To anticipate daily variations in the environment and coordinate biological activities into a daily cycle many organisms possess a circadian clock. In the absence of external time cues the circadian rhythm persists with a period of approximately 24 h. The clock phase can be shifted by single pulses of light, darkness, chemicals, or temperature and this allows entrainment of the clock to exactly 24 h by cycles of these zeitgebers. On the other hand, the period of the circadian rhythm is kept relatively constant within a physiological range of constant temperatures, which means that the oscillator is temperature compensated. The mechanisms behind temperature compensation and temperature entrainment are not fully understood, neither biochemically nor mathematically. Here, we theoretically investigate the interplay of temperature compensation and entrainment in general oscillatory systems. We first give an analytical treatment for small temperature shifts and derive that every temperature-compensated oscillator is entrainable to external small-amplitude temperature cycles. Temperature compensation ensures that this entrainment region is always centered at the endogenous period regardless of possible seasonal temperature differences. Moreover, for small temperature cycles the entrainment region of the oscillator is potentially larger for rectangular pulses. For large temperature shifts we numerically analyze different circadian clock models proposed in the literature with respect to these properties. We observe that for such large temperature shifts sinusoidal or gradual temperature cycles allow a larger entrainment region than rectangular cycles.

  13. Biological rhythms during residence in polar regions.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Josephine

    2012-05-01

    At Arctic and Antarctic latitudes, personnel are deprived of natural sunlight in winter and have continuous daylight in summer: light of sufficient intensity and suitable spectral composition is the main factor that maintains the 24-h period of human circadian rhythms. Thus, the status of the circadian system is of interest. Moreover, the relatively controlled artificial light conditions in winter are conducive to experimentation with different types of light treatment. The hormone melatonin and/or its metabolite 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (aMT6s) provide probably the best index of circadian (and seasonal) timing. A frequent observation has been a delay of the circadian system in winter. A skeleton photoperiod (2 × 1-h, bright white light, morning and evening) can restore summer timing. A single 1-h pulse of light in the morning may be sufficient. A few people desynchronize from the 24-h day (free-run) and show their intrinsic circadian period, usually >24 h. With regard to general health in polar regions, intermittent reports describe abnormalities in various physiological processes from the point of view of daily and seasonal rhythms, but positive health outcomes are also published. True winter depression (SAD) appears to be rare, although subsyndromal SAD is reported. Probably of most concern are the numerous reports of sleep problems. These have prompted investigations of the underlying mechanisms and treatment interventions. A delay of the circadian system with "normal" working hours implies sleep is attempted at a suboptimal phase. Decrements in sleep efficiency, latency, duration, and quality are also seen in winter. Increasing the intensity of ambient light exposure throughout the day advanced circadian phase and was associated with benefits for sleep: blue-enriched light was slightly more effective than standard white light. Effects on performance remain to be fully investigated. At 75°S, base personnel adapt the circadian system to night work within a week

  14. Does an Adolescent’s Accuracy of Recall Improve with a Second 24-h Dietary Recall?

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Deborah A.; Wright, Janine L.; Dhaliwal, Satvinder S.; Boushey, Carol J.

    2015-01-01

    The multiple-pass 24-h dietary recall is used in most national dietary surveys. Our purpose was to assess if adolescents’ accuracy of recall improved when a 5-step multiple-pass 24-h recall was repeated. Participants (n = 24), were Chinese-American youths aged between 11 and 15 years and lived in a supervised environment as part of a metabolic feeding study. The 24-h recalls were conducted on two occasions during the first five days of the study. The four steps (quick list; forgotten foods; time and eating occasion; detailed description of the food/beverage) of the 24-h recall were assessed for matches by category. Differences were observed in the matching for the time and occasion step (p < 0.01), detailed description (p < 0.05) and portion size matching (p < 0.05). Omission rates were higher for the second recall (p < 0.05 quick list; p < 0.01 forgotten foods). The adolescents over-estimated energy intake on the first (11.3% ± 22.5%; p < 0.05) and second recall (10.1% ± 20.8%) compared with the known food and beverage items. These results suggest that the adolescents’ accuracy to recall food items declined with a second 24-h recall when repeated over two non-consecutive days. PMID:25984743

  15. Does an Adolescent's Accuracy of Recall Improve with a Second 24-h Dietary Recall?

    PubMed

    Kerr, Deborah A; Wright, Janine L; Dhaliwal, Satvinder S; Boushey, Carol J

    2015-05-01

    The multiple-pass 24-h dietary recall is used in most national dietary surveys. Our purpose was to assess if adolescents' accuracy of recall improved when a 5-step multiple-pass 24-h recall was repeated. Participants (n = 24), were Chinese-American youths aged between 11 and 15 years and lived in a supervised environment as part of a metabolic feeding study. The 24-h recalls were conducted on two occasions during the first five days of the study. The four steps (quick list; forgotten foods; time and eating occasion; detailed description of the food/beverage) of the 24-h recall were assessed for matches by category. Differences were observed in the matching for the time and occasion step (p < 0.01), detailed description (p < 0.05) and portion size matching (p < 0.05). Omission rates were higher for the second recall (p < 0.05 quick list; p < 0.01 forgotten foods). The adolescents over-estimated energy intake on the first (11.3% ± 22.5%; p < 0.05) and second recall (10.1% ± 20.8%) compared with the known food and beverage items. These results suggest that the adolescents' accuracy to recall food items declined with a second 24-h recall when repeated over two non-consecutive days. PMID:25984743

  16. Circadian rhythms in healthy aging--effects downstream from the pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monk, T. H.; Kupfer, D. J.

    2000-01-01

    Using both previously published findings and entirely new data, we present evidence in support of the argument that the circadian dysfunction of advancing age in the healthy human is primarily one of failing to transduce the circadian signal from the circadian timing system (CTS) to rhythms "downstream" from the pacemaker rather than one of failing to generate the circadian signal itself. Two downstream rhythms are considered: subjective alertness and objective performance. For subjective alertness, we show that in both normal nychthemeral (24 h routine, sleeping at night) and unmasking (36 h of constant wakeful bed rest) conditions, advancing age, especially in men, leads to flattening of subjective alertness rhythms, even when circadian temperature rhythms are relatively robust. For objective performance, an unmasking experiment involving manual dexterity, visual search, and visual vigilance tasks was used to demonstrate that the relationship between temperature and performance is strong in the young, but not in older subjects (and especially not in older men).

  17. Find a Heart Rhythm Specialist

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search: Education & Meetings Scientific Sessions Certified Education Courses & Online Learning Heart Rhythm On Demand Co-Sponsored & Endorsed Events ... Education & Meetings less Scientific Sessions Certified Education Courses & Online Learning Heart Rhythm On Demand Co-Sponsored & Endorsed Events ...

  18. [Effect of diurnal distribution of food intake on 24-h profiles of plasma lipoproteins (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Schneider, J; Tauber, H

    1981-02-16

    The lipid infiltration theory of atherogenesis accepted, 24 h lipoprotein profiles may be more relevant than preprandial morning samples. Such profiles were performed in 12 metabolically healthy volunteers during two dietetic regimes identical in total food content but differing in the distribution over the day: form A meant an evening meal of 15% of total caloric intake, form B of 40%. After one week of each form, 24 h lipoprotein profiles differed significantly in the time course of triglyceride rich lipoproteins and in the mean values over 24 h in VLDL and LDL phospholipids and HDL cholesterol. These findings are cautiously interpreted as possible signs of differences in the catabolism of triglyceride rich lipoproteins, remnants and intermediate lipoproteins. The difference in HDL cholesterol which was higher in form A is discussed in the context of recent epidemiologic evidence. PMID:7194945

  19. Cardiovascular and thermoregulatory dysregulation over 24 h following acute heat stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Carrie M; Audet, Gerald N; Charkoudian, Nisha; Leon, Lisa R

    2015-08-15

    The influences of severe heat stroke (HS) on cardiovascular function during recovery are incompletely understood. We hypothesized that HS would elicit a heart rate (HR) increase persisting through 24 h of recovery due to hemodynamic, thermoregulatory, and inflammatory events, necessitating tachycardia to support mean arterial pressure (MAP). Core temperature (Tc), HR, and MAP were measured via radiotelemetry in conscious male Fischer 344 rats (n = 22; 282.4 ± 3.5 g) during exposure to 37°C ambient temperature until a maximum Tc of 42.0°C, and during recovery at 20°C ambient temperature through 24 h. Rats were divided into Mild, Moderate, and Severe groups based on pathophysiology. HS rats exhibited hysteresis relative to Tc with HR higher for a given Tc during recovery compared with heating (P < 0.0001). "Reverse" hysteresis occurred in MAP with pressure during cooling lower than heating per degree Tc (P < 0.0001). Mild HS rats showed tachycardia [P < 0.01 vs. control (Con)] through 8 h of recovery, elevated MAP (P < 0.05 vs. Con) for the initial 5 h of recovery, with sustained hyperthermia (P < 0.05 vs. Con) through 24 h. Moderate HS rats showed significant tachycardia (P < 0.01 vs. Con), normal MAP (P > 0.05 vs. Con), and rebound hyperthermia from 4 to 24 h post-HS (P < 0.05 vs. Con). Severe HS rats showed tachycardia (P < 0.05 vs. Con), hypotension (P < 0.01 vs. Con), and hypothermia for 24 h (P < 0.05 vs. Con). Severe HS rats showed 14- and 12-fold increase in heart and liver inducible nitric oxide synthase expression, respectively. Hypotension and hypothermia in Severe HS rats was consistent with inducible nitric oxide synthase-mediated systemic vasodilation. These findings provide mechanistic insight into hemodynamic and thermoregulatory impairments during 24 h of HS recovery. PMID:26071550

  20. Measuring Child Rhythm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Elinor; Post, Brechtje; Astruc, Lluisa; Prieto, Pilar; Vanrell, Maria del Mar

    2012-01-01

    Interval-based rhythm metrics were applied to the speech of English, Catalan and Spanish 2, 4 and 6 year-olds, and compared with the (adult-directed) speech of their mothers. Results reveal that child speech does not fall into a well-defined rhythmic class: for all three languages, it is more "vocalic" (higher %V) than adult speech and has a…

  1. Biological Clocks & Circadian Rhythms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Laura; Jones, M. Gail

    2009-01-01

    The study of biological clocks and circadian rhythms is an excellent way to address the inquiry strand in the National Science Education Standards (NSES) (NRC 1996). Students can study these everyday phenomena by designing experiments, gathering and analyzing data, and generating new experiments. As students explore biological clocks and circadian…

  2. Speech rhythm: a metaphor?

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Francis; Jeon, Hae-Sung

    2014-01-01

    Is speech rhythmic? In the absence of evidence for a traditional view that languages strive to coordinate either syllables or stress-feet with regular time intervals, we consider the alternative that languages exhibit contrastive rhythm subsisting merely in the alternation of stronger and weaker elements. This is initially plausible, particularly for languages with a steep ‘prominence gradient’, i.e. a large disparity between stronger and weaker elements; but we point out that alternation is poorly achieved even by a ‘stress-timed’ language such as English, and, historically, languages have conspicuously failed to adopt simple phonological remedies that would ensure alternation. Languages seem more concerned to allow ‘syntagmatic contrast’ between successive units and to use durational effects to support linguistic functions than to facilitate rhythm. Furthermore, some languages (e.g. Tamil, Korean) lack the lexical prominence which would most straightforwardly underpin prominence of alternation. We conclude that speech is not incontestibly rhythmic, and may even be antirhythmic. However, its linguistic structure and patterning allow the metaphorical extension of rhythm in varying degrees and in different ways depending on the language, and it is this analogical process which allows speech to be matched to external rhythms. PMID:25385774

  3. Rhythm Sticks without Music.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackin, Rosemary

    2000-01-01

    Provides 11 specific rhythm stick activities for preschoolers and kindergartners to increase children's awareness of basic music theory. Lessons incorporated in these activities include tempo, dynamics, intensity, laterality, and directionality. Lessons also address children's awareness of personal space and improved listening skills. Instructions…

  4. Speech rhythm: a metaphor?

    PubMed

    Nolan, Francis; Jeon, Hae-Sung

    2014-12-19

    Is speech rhythmic? In the absence of evidence for a traditional view that languages strive to coordinate either syllables or stress-feet with regular time intervals, we consider the alternative that languages exhibit contrastive rhythm subsisting merely in the alternation of stronger and weaker elements. This is initially plausible, particularly for languages with a steep 'prominence gradient', i.e. a large disparity between stronger and weaker elements; but we point out that alternation is poorly achieved even by a 'stress-timed' language such as English, and, historically, languages have conspicuously failed to adopt simple phonological remedies that would ensure alternation. Languages seem more concerned to allow 'syntagmatic contrast' between successive units and to use durational effects to support linguistic functions than to facilitate rhythm. Furthermore, some languages (e.g. Tamil, Korean) lack the lexical prominence which would most straightforwardly underpin prominence of alternation. We conclude that speech is not incontestibly rhythmic, and may even be antirhythmic. However, its linguistic structure and patterning allow the metaphorical extension of rhythm in varying degrees and in different ways depending on the language, and it is this analogical process which allows speech to be matched to external rhythms. PMID:25385774

  5. Synchronization of Biological Clock Neurons by Light and Peripheral Feedback Systems Promotes Circadian Rhythms and Health

    PubMed Central

    Ramkisoensing, Ashna; Meijer, Johanna H.

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) functions as a circadian clock that drives 24-h rhythms in both physiology and behavior. The SCN is a multicellular oscillator in which individual neurons function as cell-autonomous oscillators. The production of a coherent output rhythm is dependent upon mutual synchronization among single cells and requires both synaptic communication and gap junctions. Changes in phase-synchronization between individual cells have consequences on the amplitude of the SCN’s electrical activity rhythm, and these changes play a major role in the ability to adapt to seasonal changes. Both aging and sleep deprivation negatively affect the circadian amplitude of the SCN, whereas behavioral activity (i.e., exercise) has a positive effect on amplitude. Given that the amplitude of the SCN’s electrical activity rhythm is essential for achieving robust rhythmicity in physiology and behavior, the mechanisms that underlie neuronal synchronization warrant further study. A growing body of evidence suggests that the functional integrity of the SCN contributes to health, well-being, cognitive performance, and alertness; in contrast, deterioration of the 24-h rhythm is a risk factor for neurodegenerative disease, cancer, depression, and sleep disorders. PMID:26097465

  6. Synchronization of Biological Clock Neurons by Light and Peripheral Feedback Systems Promotes Circadian Rhythms and Health.

    PubMed

    Ramkisoensing, Ashna; Meijer, Johanna H

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) functions as a circadian clock that drives 24-h rhythms in both physiology and behavior. The SCN is a multicellular oscillator in which individual neurons function as cell-autonomous oscillators. The production of a coherent output rhythm is dependent upon mutual synchronization among single cells and requires both synaptic communication and gap junctions. Changes in phase-synchronization between individual cells have consequences on the amplitude of the SCN's electrical activity rhythm, and these changes play a major role in the ability to adapt to seasonal changes. Both aging and sleep deprivation negatively affect the circadian amplitude of the SCN, whereas behavioral activity (i.e., exercise) has a positive effect on amplitude. Given that the amplitude of the SCN's electrical activity rhythm is essential for achieving robust rhythmicity in physiology and behavior, the mechanisms that underlie neuronal synchronization warrant further study. A growing body of evidence suggests that the functional integrity of the SCN contributes to health, well-being, cognitive performance, and alertness; in contrast, deterioration of the 24-h rhythm is a risk factor for neurodegenerative disease, cancer, depression, and sleep disorders. PMID:26097465

  7. NQRS Data for C24H20BCs (Subst. No. 1575)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chihara, H.; Nakamura, N.

    This document is part of Subvolume B 'Substances Containing C10H16 … Zn' of Volume 48 'Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy Data' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains an extract of Section '3.2 Data tables' of the Chapter '3 Nuclear quadrupole resonance data' providing the NQRS data for C24H20BCs (Subst. No. 1575)

  8. NQRS Data for C24H20BRb (Subst. No. 1578)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chihara, H.; Nakamura, N.

    This document is part of Subvolume B 'Substances Containing C10H16 … Zn' of Volume 48 'Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy Data' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains an extract of Section '3.2 Data tables' of the Chapter '3 Nuclear quadrupole resonance data' providing the NQRS data for C24H20BRb (Subst. No. 1578)

  9. NQRS Data for C24H24BN (Subst. No. 1583)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chihara, H.; Nakamura, N.

    This document is part of Subvolume B 'Substances Containing C10H16 … Zn' of Volume 48 'Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy Data' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains an extract of Section '3.2 Data tables' of the Chapter '3 Nuclear quadrupole resonance data' providing the NQRS data for C24H24BN (Subst. No. 1583)

  10. A "second window of protection" occurs 24 h after ischemic preconditioning in the rat heart.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, N; Hoshida, S; Taniguchi, N; Kuzuya, T; Hori, M

    1998-06-01

    We and others found that cardioprotection is acquired not only soon after, but also 24 h after ischemic preconditioning in canine and rabbit myocardial infarction models (second window of protection). However, a second window phenomenon against myocardial infarction was dependent on species limitations and has not been observed in porcine hearts. In this study, we examined whether the "second window of protection" against myocardial infarction is observed in the rat heart. In the ischemic preconditioning (IP) group, the left main coronary artery (LCA) of rats was occluded four times for 3 min. each separated by reperfusion for 10 min. After 0, 3, and 24 h, the rats were subjected to a 20-min LCA occlusion followed by 48-h reperfusion. At 0 and 24 h after IP, infarct size and the incidence of ventricular fibrillation (VF) during ischemia were significantly reduced compared with corresponding sham-operated groups without preconditioning. After 3 h of IP, there were no differences either in the incidence of VF during ischemia or in infarct size. Manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) content in ischemic (LCA) region of myocardium significantly increased as compared with that of sham-operated rats 24 h after IP. Treatment with N-2-mercaptopropionyl glycine, an antioxidant and a hydroxyl radical scavenger, during IP abolished the early-phase (0 h after IP) and late-phase (24 h after IP) cardioprotection and the corresponding late increase in Mn-SOD content. These results indicate that a "second window of protection" against myocardial infarction also exists in rat hearts and the induction of an intrinsic scavenger, Mn-SOD, via free radical production during IP may be important in the second window of protection. PMID:9689592

  11. Circadian rhythms in the mating behavior of the cockroach, Leucophaea maderae.

    PubMed

    Rymer, Jennifer; Bauernfeind, Amy L; Brown, Scott; Page, Terry L

    2007-02-01

    Mating behavior of small populations of virgin males and females of the cockroach Leucophaea maderae were continuously monitored via time-lapse video recording in controlled laboratory conditions. The time of onset of copulation was found to be rhythmic in a light cycle of 12 h light alternated with 12 h of darkness, with the peak of mating behavior occurring near the light to dark transition. This rhythm persisted in constant dim red illumination and constant temperature. In constant conditions, the period of the rhythm was slightly less than 24 h, with a peak of copulation during the late subjective day. These data demonstrated that mating behavior is gated by a circadian clock. When males and females were taken from light cycles that were 12 h out of phase, a bimodal rhythm was observed with one peak in the males' late subjective day and a second peak of equal amplitude in the late subjective day of females. The results indicated that circadian systems in both males and females contribute to the circadian rhythm in copulation. Bilateral section of the optic tracts (OTX) of both males and females abolished the rhythm, but the rhythm persisted when OTX females were paired with intact males or when OTX males were paired with intact females. Furthermore, when OTX males or OTX females were paired with intact animals that were 12 h out of phase, a bimodal rhythm was still observed. These results suggested that the circadian pacemaker in the optic lobes of both male and female cockroaches participates in the control of mating, but that a pacemaker outside the optic lobes is also likely involved. Finally, it was shown that the female's olfactory response (measured by electroantennogram) to components of the male sex pheromone exhibited a circadian rhythm, but the data suggested the peripheral olfactory rhythm is not likely to be involved in the rhythm of mating behavior. PMID:17229924

  12. [Wenckebach and his rhythm].

    PubMed

    van Gijn, Jan; Gijselhart, Joost P

    2011-01-01

    Karel Frederik Wenckebach (1864-1940) showed an aptitude for research even as a medical student in Utrecht. After graduation and a thesis on the bursa of Fabricius he worked as an assistant in the physiological laboratory. Following a stint as general practitioner in a mining community (1891-1896) he returned to Utrecht, where he could combine his practice with physiological studies, especially disturbances of the heart rhythm. In 1899, with no other recording instruments than a sphygmomanometer for tracing the radial pulse and a tuning fork for chronometry, he described the 'rhythmic arrhythmia' phenomenon: a missed beat after a given number of regular beats (mostly between three and six), followed by an intermission shorter than the interval between two regular beats. The Wenckebach rhythm is now also known as type I second-degree atrioventricular block. Wenckebach subsequently became a professor of medicine in Groningen (1901), Strasbourg (1911) and Vienna (1914-1929). PMID:22085509

  13. Calculating activation energies for temperature compensation in circadian rhythms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenstein, C.; Heiland, I.; Schuster, S.

    2011-10-01

    Many biological species possess a circadian clock, which helps them anticipate daily variations in the environment. In the absence of external stimuli, the rhythm persists autonomously with a period of approximately 24 h. However, single pulses of light, nutrients, chemicals or temperature can shift the clock phase. In the case of light- and temperature-cycles, this allows entrainment of the clock to cycles of exactly 24 h. Circadian clocks have the remarkable property of temperature compensation, that is, the period of the circadian rhythm remains relatively constant within a physiological range of temperatures. For several organisms, temperature-regulated processes within the circadian clock have been identified in recent years. However, how these processes contribute to temperature compensation is not fully understood. Here, we theoretically investigate temperature compensation in general oscillatory systems. It is known that every oscillator can be locally temperature compensated around a reference temperature, if reactions are appropriately balanced. A balancing is always possible if the control coefficient with respect to the oscillation period of at least one reaction in the oscillator network is positive. However, for global temperature compensation, the whole physiological temperature range is relevant. Here, we use an approach which leads to an optimization problem subject to the local balancing principle. We use this approach to analyse different circadian clock models proposed in the literature and calculate activation energies that lead to temperature compensation.

  14. Sleep and Circadian Rhythms in Four Orbiting Astronauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monk, Timothy H.; Buysse, Daniel J.; Billy, Bart D.; Kennedy, Kathy S.; Willrich, Linda M.

    1999-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The study of human sleep and circadian rhythms in space has both operational and scientific significance. Operationally, U.S. Spaceflight is moving away from brief missions with durations of less than one week. Most space shuttle missions now last two weeks or more, and future plans involving space stations, lunar bases and interplanetary missions all presume that people will be living away from the gravity and time cues of earth for months at a time. Thus, missions are moving away from situations where astronauts can "tough it out" for comparatively brief durations, to situations where sleep and circadian disruptions are likely to become chronic, and thus resistant to short term pharmacological or behavioral manipulations. As well as the operational significance, there is a strong theoretical imperative for studying the sleep and circadian rhythms of people who are removed from the gravity and time cues of earth. Like other animals, in humans, the Circadian Timekeeping System (CTS) is entrained to the correct period (24h) and temporal orientation by various time cues ("zeitgebers"), the most powerful of which is the alternation of daylight and darkness. In leaving Earth, astronauts are removing themselves from the prime zeitgeber of their circadian system -- the 24h alternation of daylight and darkness.

  15. Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Ju; Lee, Jung Hie; Duffy, Jeanne F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review circadian rhythm sleep disorders, including underlying causes, diagnostic considerations, and typical treatments. Methods Literature review and discussion of specific cases. Results Survey studies 1,2 suggest that up to 3% of the adult population suffers from a circadian rhythm sleep disorder (CRSD). However, these sleep disorders are often confused with insomnia, and an estimated 10% of adult and 16% of adolescent sleep disorders patients may have a CRSD 3-6. While some CRSD (such as jet lag) can be self-limiting, others when untreated can lead to adverse medical, psychological, and social consequences. The International Classification of Sleep Disorders classifies CRSD as dyssomnias, with six subtypes: Advanced Sleep Phase Type, Delayed Sleep Phase Type, Irregular Sleep Wake Type, Free Running Type, Jet Lag Type, and Shift Work Type. The primary clinical characteristic of all CRSD is an inability to fall asleep and wake at the desired time. It is believed that CRSD arise from a problem with the internal biological clock (circadian timing system) and/or misalignment between the circadian timing system and the external 24-hour environment. This misalignment can be the result of biological and/or behavioral factors. CRSD can be confused with other sleep or medical disorders. Conclusions Circadian rhythm sleep disorders are a distinct class of sleep disorders characterized by a mismatch between the desired timing of sleep and the ability to fall asleep and remain asleep. If untreated, CRSD can lead to insomnia and excessive daytime sleepiness, with negative medical, psychological, and social consequences. It is important for physicians to recognize potential circadian rhythm sleep disorders so that appropriate diagnosis, treatment, and referral can be made. PMID:25368503

  16. The primate seahorse rhythm.

    PubMed

    Campos, L M G; Cruz-Rizzolo, Roelf J; Pinato, L

    2015-07-10

    The main Zeitgeber, the day-night cycle, synchronizes the central oscillator which determines behaviors rhythms as sleep-wake behavior, body temperature, the regulation of hormone secretion, and the acquisition and processing of memory. Thus, actions such as acquisition, consolidation, and retrieval performed in the hippocampus are modulated by the circadian system and show a varied dependence on light and dark. To investigate changes in the hippocampus' cellular mechanism invoked by the day and night in a diurnal primate, this study analyzed the expression of PER2 and the calcium binding proteins (CaBPs) calbindin, calretinin and parvalbumin in the hippocampus of Sapajus apella, a diurnal primate, at two different time points, one during the day and one during the dark phase. The PER2 protein expression peaked at night in the antiphase described for the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the same primate, indicating that hippocampal cells can present independent rhythmicity. This hippocampal rhythm was similar to that presented by diurnal but not nocturnal rodents. The CaBPs immunoreactivity also showed day/night variations in the cell number and in the cell morphology. Our findings provide evidence for the claim that the circadian regulation in the hippocampus may involve rhythms of PER2 and CaBPs expression that may contribute to the adaptation of this species in events and activities relevant to the respective periods. PMID:25862571

  17. Circadian Rhythms in Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Susan E; Golden, Susan S

    2015-12-01

    Life on earth is subject to daily and predictable fluctuations in light intensity, temperature, and humidity created by rotation of the earth. Circadian rhythms, generated by a circadian clock, control temporal programs of cellular physiology to facilitate adaptation to daily environmental changes. Circadian rhythms are nearly ubiquitous and are found in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Here we introduce the molecular mechanism of the circadian clock in the model cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. We review the current understanding of the cyanobacterial clock, emphasizing recent work that has generated a more comprehensive understanding of how the circadian oscillator becomes synchronized with the external environment and how information from the oscillator is transmitted to generate rhythms of biological activity. These results have changed how we think about the clock, shifting away from a linear model to one in which the clock is viewed as an interactive network of multifunctional components that are integrated into the context of the cell in order to pace and reset the oscillator. We conclude with a discussion of how this basic timekeeping mechanism differs in other cyanobacterial species and how information gleaned from work in cyanobacteria can be translated to understanding rhythmic phenomena in other prokaryotic systems. PMID:26335718

  18. High-intensity interval exercise induces 24-h energy expenditure similar to traditional endurance exercise despite reduced time commitment.

    PubMed

    Skelly, Lauren E; Andrews, Patricia C; Gillen, Jenna B; Martin, Brian J; Percival, Michael E; Gibala, Martin J

    2014-07-01

    Subjects performed high-intensity interval training (HIIT) and continuous moderate-intensity training (END) to evaluate 24-h oxygen consumption. Oxygen consumption during HIIT was lower versus END; however, total oxygen consumption over 24 h was similar. These data demonstrate that HIIT and END induce similar 24-h energy expenditure, which may explain the comparable changes in body composition reported despite lower total training volume and time commitment. PMID:24773393

  19. Association Between Estimated 24-h Urinary Sodium Excretion and Metabolic Syndrome in Korean Adults

    PubMed Central

    Won, Jong Chul; Hong, Jae Won; Noh, Jung Hyun; Kim, Dong-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract High sodium intake is 1 of the modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease, but in Korea, daily sodium intake is estimated to be double the level recommended by World Health Organization. We investigated the association between the estimated 24-h urinary sodium excretion (24hUNaE) and metabolic syndrome using nationwide population data. In total, 17,541 individuals (weighted n = 33,200,054; weighted men, 52.5% [95% confidence interval, CI = 51.8–53.3]; weighted age, 45.2 years [44.7–45.7]) who participated in the Korean Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2009 to 2011 were investigated. NCEP-ATP III criteria for metabolic syndrome were used, and sodium intake was estimated by 24hUNaE using Tanaka equation with a spot urine sample. The weighted mean 24hUNaE values were 3964 mg/d (95% CI = 3885–4044) in men and 4736 mg/d (4654–4817) in women. The weighted age-adjusted prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 22.2% (21.4–23.0), and it increased with 24hUNaE quartile in both men and women (mean ± standard error of the mean; men: 22.5 ± 1.0%, 23.0 ± 1.0%, 26.0 ± 1.2%, and 26.0 ± 1.2%; P = 0.026; women: 19.4 ± 0.8%, 17.7 ± 0.8%, 19.8 ± 1.0%, and 23.0 ± 1.1%; P = 0.002, for quartiles 1–4, respectively). Even after adjustment for age, daily calorie intake, heavy alcohol drinking, regular exercise, college graduation, and antihypertensive medication, the weighted prevalence of metabolic syndrome increased with the increase in 24hUNaE in men and women. The weighted 24hUNaE was positively associated with the number of metabolic syndrome components after adjustment for confounding factors in men and women. In subjects without antihypertensive medication, the odds ratio for metabolic syndrome in quartile 4 of 24hUNaE compared with quartile 1 was 1.56 (1.33–1.84, P < 0.001) in the total population, 1.66 (1.34–2.06, P < 0.001) in men, and 1.94 (1.49–2.53, P < 0

  20. Nqrs Data for C24H20MnO4P (Subst. No. 1581)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chihara, H.; Nakamura, N.

    This document is part of Subvolume B 'Substances Containing C10H16 … Zn' of Volume 48 'Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy Data' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains an extract of Section '3.2 Data tables' of the Chapter '3 Nuclear quadrupole resonance data' providing the NQRS data for C24H20MnO4P (Subst. No. 1581)

  1. Association of estimated glomerular filtration rate with 24-h urinalysis and stone composition.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Daniel M; Friedlander, Justin I; Hartman, Christopher; Gershman, Boris; Smith, Arthur D; Okeke, Zeph

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the association of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) with 24-h urine analysis and stone composition. We performed a retrospective review of 1060 stone formers with 24-h urinalysis, of which 499 had stone composition analysis available. Comparisons of baseline patient characteristics and urinary abnormalities across eGFR groups (<60, 60-89.9, ≥90 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) were performed using Fisher's exact test for categorical data and analysis of variance for continuous variables. Analyses of 24-h urinalysis and stone composition across eGFR groups were performed using linear regression with eGFR groups as a continuous variable to evaluate trends. Of the 1060 patients in the study, 595 (56 %) were males. The mean age was 53.8 years. A total of 38 (4 %), 77 (7 %), and 945 (89 %) patients had eGFR <60, 60-89.9, and ≥90 mL/min/1.73 m(2), respectively. Lower eGFR was associated with older age, lower body-mass index, and female gender (all P < 0.05). Lower eGFR was also associated with lower urinary volume, calcium, citrate, uric acid, sodium, magnesium, phosphorus, sulfate, and creatinine on both univariable and multivariable analyses, adjusted for demographics, comorbidities and medication use (all P < 0.05). The prevalence of hypocitraturia and hypomagnesuria was associated with decreased eGFR, while hypercalciuria, hyperoxaluria, hyperuricosuria and hyperphosphaturia were associated with higher eGFR (all P < 0.05). Stone composition was similar across eGFR groups (all P > 0.05). In conclusion, lower eGFR was associated with lower excretion of urinary elements in a routine 24-h urinalysis, but similar stone composition. PMID:26573808

  2. Ovine platelet function is unaffected by extracorporeal membrane oxygenation within the first 24 h.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Rylan A; Foley, Samuel; Shekar, Kiran; Diab, Sara; Dunster, Kimble R; McDonald, Charles; Fraser, John F

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated platelet dysfunction during short-term extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and secondarily to determine if hyperoxaemia contributes to this dysfunction. Healthy sheep were anaesthetized and maintained on ECMO for either 2 or 24 h, with or without induction of smoke inhalation acute lung injury. A specialized animal-operating theatre was used to conduct the experimentation. Forty-three healthy female sheep were randomized into either a test or a control group. Following anaesthesia, test groups received ECMO ± smoke inhalation acute lung injury (SALI), whereas control groups were maintained with ventilation only ± SALI. Physiological, biochemical and coagulation data were obtained throughout via continuous monitoring and blood sampling. Platelet function was quantified through whole blood impedance aggregometry using Multiplate. Ovine platelet activity induced by adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and collagen was unaffected during the first 24 h of ECMO. However, progressive divergence of ADP-induced platelet activity was noted at cessation of the experiment. PaO2 was inversely related to ADP-dependent platelet activity in the ECMO groups--a relationship not identified in the control groups. ADP and collagen-dependent platelet activity are not significantly affected within the first 24 h of ECMO in sheep. However, dysfunction in ADP-dependent platelet activity may have continued to develop if observed beyond 24 h. Hyperoxaemia during ECMO does appear to affect how platelets react to ADP and may contribute to this developing dysfunction. Long-term animal models and investigation in clinical animals are warranted to fully investigate platelet function during ECMO. PMID:26196193

  3. Dietary protein distribution positively influences 24-h muscle protein synthesis in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Mamerow, Madonna M; Mettler, Joni A; English, Kirk L; Casperson, Shanon L; Arentson-Lantz, Emily; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda; Layman, Donald K; Paddon-Jones, Douglas

    2014-06-01

    The RDA for protein describes the quantity that should be consumed daily to meet population needs and to prevent deficiency. Protein consumption in many countries exceeds the RDA; however, intake is often skewed toward the evening meal, whereas breakfast is typically carbohydrate rich and low in protein. We examined the effects of protein distribution on 24-h skeletal muscle protein synthesis in healthy adult men and women (n = 8; age: 36.9 ± 3.1 y; BMI: 25.7 ± 0.8 kg/m2). By using a 7-d crossover feeding design with a 30-d washout period, we measured changes in muscle protein synthesis in response to isoenergetic and isonitrogenous diets with protein at breakfast, lunch, and dinner distributed evenly (EVEN; 31.5 ± 1.3, 29.9 ± 1.6, and 32.7 ± 1.6 g protein, respectively) or skewed (SKEW; 10.7 ± 0.8, 16.0 ± 0.5, and 63.4 ± 3.7 g protein, respectively). Over 24-h periods on days 1 and 7, venous blood samples and vastus lateralis muscle biopsy samples were obtained during primed (2.0 μmol/kg) constant infusion [0.06 μmol/(kg⋅min)] of l-[ring-(13)C6]phenylalanine. The 24-h mixed muscle protein fractional synthesis rate was 25% higher in the EVEN (0.075 ± 0.006%/h) vs. the SKEW (0.056 ± 0.006%/h) protein distribution groups (P = 0.003). This pattern was maintained after 7 d of habituation to each diet (EVEN vs. SKEW: 0.077 ± 0.006 vs. 0.056 ± 0.006%/h; P = 0.001). The consumption of a moderate amount of protein at each meal stimulated 24-h muscle protein synthesis more effectively than skewing protein intake toward the evening meal. PMID:24477298

  4. Nqrs Data for C24H42Li2N4 (Subst. No. 1587)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chihara, H.; Nakamura, N.

    This document is part of Subvolume B 'Substances Containing C10H16 … Zn' of Volume 48 'Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy Data' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains an extract of Section '3.2 Data tables' of the Chapter '3 Nuclear quadrupole resonance data' providing the NQRS data for C24H42Li2N4 (Subst. No. 1587)

  5. Dysregulation of circadian rhythms following prolactin-secreting pituitary microadenoma.

    PubMed

    Borodkin, Katy; Ayalon, Liat; Kanety, Hanna; Dagan, Yaron

    2005-01-01

    A patient who developed an irregular sleep-wake pattern following prolactin-secreting pituitary microadenoma is described. The patient reported difficulties in sleep onset and awakening at the desired time, which caused major dysfunction in his daily life activities. Despite these difficulties, the sleep-related complaints of the patient remained unrecognized for as long as three yrs. Statistical analyses of the patient's rest-activity patterns revealed that the disruption of the sleep-wake circadian rhythm originated from a disharmony between ultradian (semicircadian) and circadian components. The circadian component displayed shorter than 24 h periodicity most of the time, but the semicircadian component fluctuated between longer and shorter than 12 h periods. Additionally, desynchrony in terms of period length was found in the tentative analyses of the rest-activity pattern, salivary melatonin, and oral temperature. While the salivary melatonin time series data could be characterized by a best-fit cosine curve of 24 h, the time series data of oral temperature was more compatible with 28 h best-fit curve. The rest-activity cycle during the simultaneous measurements, however, was best approximated by a best-fit curve of 21 h. The dysregulation of circadian rhythms occurred concomitantly, but not beforehand, with the onset of pituitary disease, thus suggesting an association between the two phenomena. This association may have interesting implications to the modeling of the circadian time-keeping system. This case also highlights the need to raise the awareness to circadian rhythm sleep disorders and to consider disruptions of sleep-wake cycle in patients with pituitary adenoma. PMID:15865328

  6. Development of a UK Online 24-h Dietary Assessment Tool: myfood24

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Michelle C.; Albar, Salwa A.; Morris, Michelle A.; Mulla, Umme Z.; Hancock, Neil; Evans, Charlotte E.; Alwan, Nisreen A.; Greenwood, Darren C.; Hardie, Laura J.; Frost, Gary S.; Wark, Petra A.; Cade, Janet E.

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of diet in large epidemiological studies can be costly and time consuming. An automated dietary assessment system could potentially reduce researcher burden by automatically coding food records. myfood24 (Measure Your Food on One Day) an online 24-h dietary assessment tool (with the flexibility to be used for multiple 24 h-dietary recalls or as a food diary), has been developed for use in the UK population. Development of myfood24 was a multi-stage process. Focus groups conducted with three age groups, adolescents (11–18 years) (n = 28), adults (19–64 years) (n = 24) and older adults (≥65 years) (n = 5) informed the development of the tool, and usability testing was conducted with beta (adolescents n = 14, adults n = 8, older adults n = 1) and live (adolescents n = 70, adults n = 20, older adults n = 4) versions. Median system usability scale (SUS) scores (measured on a scale of 0–100) in adolescents and adults were marginal for the beta version (adolescents median SUS = 66, interquartile range (IQR) = 20; adults median SUS = 68, IQR = 40) and good for the live version (adolescents median SUS = 73, IQR = 22; adults median SUS = 80, IQR = 25). Myfood24 is the first online 24-h dietary recall tool for use with different age groups in the UK. Usability testing indicates that myfood24 is suitable for use in UK adolescents and adults. PMID:26024292

  7. Immune cell changes in response to a swimming training session during a 24-h recovery period.

    PubMed

    Morgado, José P; Monteiro, Cristina P; Teles, Júlia; Reis, Joana F; Matias, Catarina; Seixas, Maria T; Alvim, Marta G; Bourbon, Mafalda; Laires, Maria J; Alves, Francisco

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the impact of training sessions on the immune response is crucial for the adequate periodization of training, to prevent both a negative influence on health and a performance impairment of the athlete. This study evaluated acute systemic immune cell changes in response to an actual swimming session, during a 24-h recovery period, controlling for sex, menstrual cycle phases, maturity, and age group. Competitive swimmers (30 females, 15 ± 1.3 years old; and 35 males, 16.5 ± 2.1 years old) performed a high-intensity training session. Blood samples were collected before, immediately after, 2 h after, and 24 h after exercise. Standard procedures for the assessment of leukogram by automated counting (Coulter LH 750, Beckman) and lymphocytes subsets by flow cytometry (FACS Calibur BD, Biosciences) were used. Subjects were grouped according to competitive age groups and pubertal Tanner stages. Menstrual cycle phase was monitored. The training session induced neutrophilia, lymphopenia, and a low eosinophil count, lasting for at least 2 h, independent of sex and maturity. At 24 h postexercise, the acquired immunity of juniors (15-17 years old), expressed by total lymphocytes and total T lymphocytes (CD3(+)), was not fully recovered. This should be accounted for when planning a weekly training program. The observed lymphopenia suggests a lower immune surveillance at the end of the session that may depress the immunity of athletes, highlighting the need for extra care when athletes are exposed to aggressive environmental agents such as swimming pools. PMID:27028294

  8. Monitoring circadian rhythms of individual honey bees in a social environment reveals social influences on postembryonic ontogeny of activity rhythms.

    PubMed

    Meshi, A; Bloch, G

    2007-08-01

    Social factors constitute an important component of the environment of many animals and have a profound influence on their physiology and behavior. Studies of social influences on circadian rhythms have been hampered by a methodological trade-off: automatic data acquisition systems obtain high-quality data but are effective only for individually isolated animals and therefore compromise by requiring a context that may not be sociobiologically relevant. Human observers can monitor animal activity in complex social environments but are limited in the resolution and quality of data that can be gathered. The authors developed and validated a method for prolonged, automatic, high-quality monitoring of focal honey bees in a relatively complex social environment and with minimal illumination. The method can be adapted for studies on other animals. The authors show that the system provides a reliable estimation of the actual path of a focal bee, only rarely misses its location for > 1 min, and removes most nonspecific signals from the background. Using this system, the authors provide the first evidence of social influence on the ontogeny of activity rhythms. Young bees that were housed with old foragers show ~24-h rhythms in locomotor activity at a younger age and with stronger rhythms than bees housed with a similar number of young bees. By contrast, the maturation of the hypopharyngeal glands was slower in bees housed with foragers, similar to findings in previous studies. The morphology and function of the hypopharyngeal glands vary along with age-based division of labor. Therefore, these findings indicate that social inhibition of task-related maturation was effective in the experimental setup. This study suggests that although the ontogeny of circadian rhythms is typically correlated with the age-based division of labor, their social regulation is different. PMID:17660451

  9. Clocks for sex: loss of circadian rhythms in ants after mating?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Vijay Kumar; Lone, Shahnaz Rahman; Goel, Anubhuthi

    This paper describes experiments on the locomotor activity rhythm of queens of the ant species Camponotus compressus, which were performed to investigate the consequences of mating on circadian clocks. Locomotor activity rhythm of virgin and mated queens was monitored individually under constant conditions of the laboratory. The locomotor activity rhythm of virgin queens entrained to a 24 h (12:12 h) laboratory light/dark (LD) cycle and free-ran under constant dim red light (RR) with a free-running period (τ) of approximately 24 h. The locomotor activity of the mated queens on the other hand was arrhythmic during the period when they were laying eggs, and robust rhythmicity appeared soon after the egg-laying phase was over. The τ of the locomotor activity rhythm of mated queens was significantly greater than that of virgin queens. These results are contrary to the commonly held belief that the role of circadian clocks in ant queens ceases after mating flights, thus suggesting that circadian clocks of ant queens are adaptively plastic and display activity patterns, perhaps depending on their physiological state and tasks in the colony.

  10. Sleep, performance, circadian rhythms, and light-dark cycles during two space shuttle flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dijk, D. J.; Neri, D. F.; Wyatt, J. K.; Ronda, J. M.; Riel, E.; Ritz-De Cecco, A.; Hughes, R. J.; Elliott, A. R.; Prisk, G. K.; West, J. B.; Czeisler, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    Sleep, circadian rhythm, and neurobehavioral performance measures were obtained in five astronauts before, during, and after 16-day or 10-day space missions. In space, scheduled rest-activity cycles were 20-35 min shorter than 24 h. Light-dark cycles were highly variable on the flight deck, and daytime illuminances in other compartments of the spacecraft were very low (5.0-79.4 lx). In space, the amplitude of the body temperature rhythm was reduced and the circadian rhythm of urinary cortisol appeared misaligned relative to the imposed non-24-h sleep-wake schedule. Neurobehavioral performance decrements were observed. Sleep duration, assessed by questionnaires and actigraphy, was only approximately 6.5 h/day. Subjective sleep quality diminished. Polysomnography revealed more wakefulness and less slow-wave sleep during the final third of sleep episodes. Administration of melatonin (0.3 mg) on alternate nights did not improve sleep. After return to earth, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep was markedly increased. Crewmembers on these flights experienced circadian rhythm disturbances, sleep loss, decrements in neurobehavioral performance, and postflight changes in REM sleep.

  11. A review of human physiological and performance changes associated with desynchronosis of biological rhythms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winget, C. M.; Deroshia, C. W.; Markley, C. L.; Holley, D. C.

    1984-01-01

    This review discusses the effects, in the aerospace environment, of alterations in approximately 24-h periodicities (circadian rhythms) upon physiological and psychological functions and possible therapies for desynchronosis induced by such alterations. The consequences of circadian rhythm alteration resulting from shift work, transmeridian flight, or altered day lengths are known as desynchronosis, dysrhythmia, dyschrony, jet lag, or jet syndrome. Considerable attention is focused on the ability to operate jet aircraft and manned space vehicles. The importance of environmental cues, such as light-dark cycles, which influence physiological and psychological rhythms is discussed. A section on mathematical models is presented to enable selection and verification of appropriate preventive and corrective measures and to better understand the problem of dysrhythmia.

  12. Food Intake Recording Software System, version 4 (FIRSSt4): A self-completed 24-h dietary recall for children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Food Intake Recording Software System, version 4 (FIRSSt4), is a web-based 24-h dietary recall (24 hdr) self-administered by children based on the Automated Self-Administered 24-h recall (ASA24) (a self-administered 24 hdr for adults). The food choices in FIRSSt4 are abbreviated to include only ...

  13. Strange musical rhythms.

    PubMed

    Valentinuzzi, Max E; Hortt, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Music, along with its attached rhythm, has been with man for centuries, developing and evolving along with him. Its influence on human behavior and mood can reach levels whose limits are still unknown, especially in everything related to perception, where the whole nervous system is involved. Thus, physiology and psychology become strongly connected areas, while technology, through, for example, the production of music by electronic means, appears as a new unexpected ingredient that traditional composers and musicians of older times could not imagine. Obviously, bioengineering and its multiple branches are not absent either [1]?[4]. The literature is enormous with several specialized journals. When one looks back in time at the evolution of this complex area, the appearance of some kind of sudden jump (as a step function), which took place within a relatively recent short interval, is evident: music is now much more than what it used to be, and rhythm has made a step forward as if resurrecting and renewing the ancient Indian or African drums. PMID:25437475

  14. Sleep, Memory & Brain Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Brendon O.; Buzsáki, György

    2015-01-01

    Sleep occupies roughly one-third of our lives, yet the scientific community is still not entirely clear on its purpose or function. Existing data point most strongly to its role in memory and homeostasis: that sleep helps maintain basic brain functioning via a homeostatic mechanism that loosens connections between overworked synapses, and that sleep helps consolidate and re-form important memories. In this review, we will summarize these theories, but also focus on substantial new information regarding the relation of electrical brain rhythms to sleep. In particular, while REM sleep may contribute to the homeostatic weakening of overactive synapses, a prominent and transient oscillatory rhythm called “sharp-wave ripple” seems to allow for consolidation of behaviorally relevant memories across many structures of the brain. We propose that a theory of sleep involving the division of labor between two states of sleep–REM and non-REM, the latter of which has an abundance of ripple electrical activity–might allow for a fusion of the two main sleep theories. This theory then postulates that sleep performs a combination of consolidation and homeostasis that promotes optimal knowledge retention as well as optimal waking brain function. PMID:26097242

  15. Substances and Heart Rhythm Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... in others. These rhythm problems are rarely serious. Substance Abuse: Drugs and Inhalants Abusing legal or illegal drugs ... people, alcohol can cause heart rhythm disturbances. Alcohol abuse is a major risk factor for High ... herbs and other substances used in over-the-counter remedies are believed ...

  16. Oxidative fuel selection and shivering thermogenesis during a 12- and 24-h cold-survival simulation.

    PubMed

    Haman, François; Mantha, Olivier L; Cheung, Stephen S; DuCharme, Michel B; Taber, Michael; Blondin, Denis P; McGarr, Gregory W; Hartley, Geoffrey L; Hynes, Zach; Basset, Fabien A

    2016-03-15

    Because the majority of cold exposure studies are constrained to short-term durations of several hours, the long-term metabolic demands of cold exposure, such as during survival situations, remain largely unknown. The present study provides the first estimates of thermogenic rate, oxidative fuel selection, and muscle recruitment during a 24-h cold-survival simulation. Using combined indirect calorimetry and electrophysiological and isotopic methods, changes in muscle glycogen, total carbohydrate, lipid, protein oxidation, muscle recruitment, and whole body thermogenic rate were determined in underfed and noncold-acclimatized men during a simulated accidental exposure to 7.5 °C for 12 to 24 h. In noncold-acclimatized healthy men, cold exposure induced a decrease of ∼0.8 °C in core temperature and a decrease of ∼6.1 °C in mean skin temperature (range, 5.4-6.9 °C). Results showed that total heat production increased by approximately 1.3- to 1.5-fold in the cold and remained constant throughout cold exposure. Interestingly, this constant rise in Ḣprod and shivering intensity was accompanied by a large modification in fuel selection that occurred between 6 and 12 h; total carbohydrate oxidation decreased by 2.4-fold, and lipid oxidation doubled progressively from baseline to 24 h. Clearly, such changes in fuel selection dramatically reduces the utilization of limited muscle glycogen reserves, thus extending the predicted time to muscle glycogen depletion to as much as 15 days rather than the previous estimates of approximately 30-40 h. Further research is needed to determine whether this would also be the case under different nutritional and/or colder conditions. PMID:26718783

  17. A new portable device for recording 24-h indirect blood pressure in hypertensive outpatients.

    PubMed

    Tochikubo, O; Kaneko, Y; Yokoi, H; Yukinari, Y

    1985-12-01

    To simplify 24-h blood pressure (BP) recording in hypertensive outpatients, we devised a new portable, automatic BP recorder and studied its accuracy and usefulness. The fully automatic recorder, measuring 5 x 16 x 18 cm with a cuff of usual size, weighs approximately 1 kg and is driven by a rechargeable battery. The cuff is inflated by a compact CO2 cartridge and two microphones are used to detect differentially the Korotkoff sounds in the upper arm. Systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and heart rate (HR) are automatically measured, displayed with the time of measurement, and recorded on a memory card at intervals of 15 min for 24 h. This equipment has high noise immunity and works very quietly. It predicts approximate BP during the period of increasing cuff pressure, and measures BP more quickly than the conventional method (the time required for each measurement was reduced by about half). Afterwards, mean values with standard deviations, trendgrams and histograms of BP and HR over a certain period of time can be displayed and recorded with an accessory analyser. The accuracy of the BP values recorded by this device were compared with those measured by the auscultatory method. The average differences were -0.6 +/- 2.1 (s.d.) mmHg for SBP and 0.2 +/- 3.0 mmHg for DBP (n = 152). The BP values by this method were also compared with those obtained directly from the brachial artery, the differences being -5.8 +/- 5.9/0.3 +/- 6.0 mmHg (n = 85). In 30 ambulatory hypertensive patients, 24-h BP was recorded using this recorder.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2856737

  18. 24h Urinary Sodium Excretion and Subsequent Change in Weight, Waist Circumference and Body Composition

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Sofus C.; Ängquist, Lars; Sørensen, Thorkild I. A.; Heitmann, Berit L.

    2013-01-01

    Background In the same period as the increasing obesity epidemic, there has been an increased consumption of highly processed foods with a high salt content, and a few studies have suggested that a diet with a high salt content may be associated with obesity. Objective To investigate the association between 24 h urinary sodium excretion and subsequent change in body weight (BW), waist circumference (WC), body fat (BF) and fat free mass (FFM) among adults. Design A longitudinal population study based on the Danish part of the MONICA project, with examinations in 1987–1988 and 1993–1994. Complete information on 24 h urinary sodium excretion along with repeated measures of obesity, as well as on potential confounders, was obtained from 215 subjects. Linear regression was used to examine the association between sodium excretion, as a measure of salt consumption, and subsequent changes in BW, WC, BF and FFM, and further evaluated by restricted cubic splines. Stepwise adjustments were made for selected covariates. Results Neither the crude nor the adjusted models showed any statistically significant associations between sodium excretion and change in BW or WC. Likewise, we found no significant association between sodium excretion and change in BF and FFM in the unadjusted models. However, after adjusting for potential baseline confounders and the concurrent BW change, we found a significant increase in BF of 0.24 kg (P = 0.015, CI: 0.05 to 0.43) per 100 mmol increase in 24 h urinary sodium excretion (equivalent to 6 g of salt), during the 6-year study period. Moreover, during the same period, we found a significant association with FFM of −0.21 kg (P = 0.041, CI: −0.40 to −0.01). Conclusions These results suggest that a diet with a high salt content may have a negative influence on development in body composition by expanding BF and reducing FFM. PMID:23936079

  19. Identifying waking time in 24-h accelerometry data in adults using an automated algorithm.

    PubMed

    van der Berg, Julianne D; Willems, Paul J B; van der Velde, Jeroen H P M; Savelberg, Hans H C M; Schaper, Nicolaas C; Schram, Miranda T; Sep, Simone J S; Dagnelie, Pieter C; Bosma, Hans; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Koster, Annemarie

    2016-10-01

    As accelerometers are commonly used for 24-h measurements of daily activity, methods for separating waking from sleeping time are necessary for correct estimations of total daily activity levels accumulated during the waking period. Therefore, an algorithm to determine wake and bed times in 24-h accelerometry data was developed and the agreement of this algorithm with self-report was examined. One hundred seventy-seven participants (aged 40-75 years) of The Maastricht Study who completed a diary and who wore the activPAL3™ 24 h/day, on average 6 consecutive days were included. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was calculated and the Bland-Altman method was used to examine associations between the self-reported and algorithm-calculated waking hours. Mean self-reported waking hours was 15.8 h/day, which was significantly correlated with the algorithm-calculated waking hours (15.8 h/day, ICC = 0.79, P = < 0.001). The Bland-Altman plot indicated good agreement in waking hours as the mean difference was 0.02 h (95% limits of agreement (LoA) = -1.1 to 1.2 h). The median of the absolute difference was 15.6 min (Q1-Q3 = 7.6-33.2 min), and 71% of absolute differences was less than 30 min. The newly developed automated algorithm to determine wake and bed times was highly associated with self-reported times, and can therefore be used to identify waking time in 24-h accelerometry data in large-scale epidemiological studies. PMID:26837855

  20. The relationship between serum albumin levels and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring recordings in non-diabetic essential hypertensive patients

    PubMed Central

    Ahbap, Elbis; Sakaci, Tamer; Kara, Ekrem; Sahutoglu, Tuncay; Koc, Yener; Basturk, Taner; Sevinc, Mustafa; Akgol, Cuneyt; Kayalar, Arzu O.; Ucar, Zuhal A.; Bayraktar, Feyza; Unsal, Abdulkadir

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The goal of this study was to evaluate the relationship between serum albumin levels and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (24-h ABPM) recordings in non-diabetic essential hypertensive patients. METHODS: A total of 354 patients (mean [SD] age: 55.5 [14.3] years, 50% females) with essential hypertension and 24-h ABPM recordings were included. Patient 24-h nighttime and daytime ABPM values, systolic and diastolic dipping status and average nocturnal dipping were recorded. The correlations between serum albumin levels and nocturnal systolic and diastolic dipping were evaluated, and correlates of average nocturnal systolic dipping were determined via a linear regression model. RESULTS: Overall, 73.2% of patients were determined to be non-dippers. The mean (SD) levels of serum albumin (4.2 [0.3] g/dL vs. 4.4 [0.4] g/dL, p<0.001) and the average nocturnal systolic (15.2 [4.8] mmHg vs. 0.3 [6.6] mmHg, p<0.001) and diastolic dipping (4.2 [8.6] mmHgvs. 18.9 [7.0] mmHg, p<0.001) were significantly lower in non-dippers than in dippers. A significant positive correlation was noted between serum albumin levels and both systolic (r=0.297, p<0.001) and diastolic dipping (r=0.265, p<0.001). The linear regression analysis revealed that for each one-unit increase in serum albumin, the average nocturnal dip in systolic BP increased by 0.17 mmHg (p=0.033). CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate an association between serum albumin levels and the deterioration of circadian BP rhythm among essential hypertensive patients along with the identification of a non-dipper pattern in more than two-thirds of patients. Our findings emphasize the importance of serum albumin levels, rather than urinary albumin excretion, as an independent predictor of nocturnal systolic dipping, at least in non-diabetic essential hypertensive patients with moderate proteinuria. PMID:27276394

  1. Breathing rhythms and emotions.

    PubMed

    Homma, Ikuo; Masaoka, Yuri

    2008-09-01

    Respiration is primarily regulated for metabolic and homeostatic purposes in the brainstem. However, breathing can also change in response to changes in emotions, such as sadness, happiness, anxiety or fear. Final respiratory output is influenced by a complex interaction between the brainstem and higher centres, including the limbic system and cortical structures. Respiration is important in maintaining physiological homeostasis and co-exists with emotions. In this review, we focus on the relationship between respiration and emotions by discussing previous animal and human studies, including studies of olfactory function in relation to respiration and the piriform-amygdala in relation to respiration. In particular, we discuss oscillations of piriform-amygdala complex activity and respiratory rhythm. PMID:18487316

  2. Influence of head-down bed rest on the circadian rhythms of hormones and electrolytes involved in hydroelectrolytic regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millet, C.; Custaud, M. A.; Allevard, A. M.; Zaouali-Ajina, M.; Monk, T. H.; Arnaud, S. B.; Claustrat, B.; Gharib, C.; Gauquelin-Koch, G.

    2001-01-01

    We investigated in six men the impact of a 17-day head-down bed rest (HDBR) on the circadian rhythms of the hormones and electrolytes involved in hydroelectrolytic regulation. This HDBR study was designed to mimic an actual spaceflight. Urine samples were collected at each voiding before, during and after HDBR. Urinary excretion of aldosterone, arginine vasopressin (AVP), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), cortisol, electrolytes (Na+ and K+) and creatinine were determined. HDBR resulted in a significant reduction of body mass (P < 0.01) and of caloric intake [mean (SEM) 2,778 (37) kcal.24 h(-1) to 2,450 (36) kcal.24 h(-1), where 1 kcal.h(-1) = 1.163 J.s(-1); P< 0.01]. There was a significant increase in diastolic blood pressure [71.8 (0.7) mmHg vs 75.6 (0.91) mmHg], with no significant changes in either systolic blood pressure or heart rate. The nocturnal hormonal decrease of aldosterone was clearly evident only before and after HDBR, but the day/night difference did not appear during HDBR. The rhythm of K+ excretion was unchanged during HDBR, whereas for Na+ excretion, a large decrease was shown during the night as compared to the day. The circadian rhythm of cortisol persisted. These data suggest that exposure to a 17-day HDBR could induce an exaggeration of the amplitude of the Na+ rhythm and abolition of the aldosterone rhythm.

  3. Circadian rhythms affect electroretinogram, compound eye color, striking behavior and locomotion of the praying mantis Hierodula patellifera.

    PubMed

    Schirmer, Aaron E; Prete, Frederick R; Mantes, Edgar S; Urdiales, Andrew F; Bogue, Wil

    2014-11-01

    Many behaviors and physiological processes oscillate with circadian rhythms that are synchronized to environmental cues (e.g. light onset), but persist with periods of ~24 h in the absence of such cues. We used a multilevel experimental approach to assess whether circadian rhythms modulate several aspects of the visual physiology and behavior of the praying mantis Hierodula patellifera. We used electroretinograms (ERGs) to assess compound eye sensitivity, colorimetric photographic analyses to assess compound eye color changes (screening pigment migration), behavioral assays of responsiveness to computer-generated prey-like visual stimuli and analyses of locomotor activity patterns on a modified treadmill apparatus. Our results indicate that circadian clocks control and/or modulate each of the target behaviors. Strong rhythms, persisting under constant conditions, with periods of ~24 h were evident in photoreceptor sensitivity to light, appetitive responsiveness to prey-like stimuli and gross locomotor activity. In the first two cases, responsiveness was highest during the subjective night and lowest during the subjective day. Locomotor activity was strongly clustered around the transition time from day to night. In addition, pigment migration and locomotor behavior responded strongly to light:dark cycles and anticipated the light-dark transition, suggesting that the circadian clocks modulating both were entrained to environmental light cues. Together, these data indicate that circadian rhythms operate at the cellular, cellular systems and organismal level in H. patellifera. Our results represent an intriguing first step in uncovering the complexities of circadian rhythms in the Mantodea. PMID:25214491

  4. Circadian Rhythms in Photosynthesis 1

    PubMed Central

    Hennessey, Timothy L.; Field, Christopher B.

    1991-01-01

    Net carbon assimilation and stomatal conductance to water vapor oscillated repeatedly in red kidney bean, Phaseolus vulgaris L., plants transferred from a natural photoperiod to constant light. In a gas exchange system with automatic regulation of selected environmental and physiological variables, assimilation and conductance oscillated with a free-running period of approximately 24.5 hours. The rhythms in carbon assimilation and stomatal conductance were closely coupled and persisted for more than a week under constant conditions. A rhythm in assimilation occurred when either ambient or intercellular CO2 partial pressure was held constant, demonstrating that the rhythm in assimilation was not entirely the result of stomatal effects on CO2 diffusion. Rhythms in assimilation and conductance were not expressed in plants grown under constant light at a constant temperature, demonstrating that the rhythms did not occur spontaneously but were induced by an external stimulus. In plants grown under constant light with a temperature cycle, a rhythm was entrained in stomatal conductance but not in carbon assimilation, indicating that the oscillators driving the rhythms differed in their sensitivity to environmental stimuli. PMID:16668261

  5. Circadian Rhythms, the Molecular Clock, and Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lefta, Mellani; Wolff, Gretchen; Esser, Karyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Almost all organisms ranging from single cell bacteria to humans exhibit a variety of behavioral, physiological, and biochemical rhythms. In mammals, circadian rhythms control the timing of many physiological processes over a 24-h period, including sleep-wake cycles, body temperature, feeding, and hormone production. This body of research has led to defined characteristics of circadian rhythms based on period length, phase, and amplitude. Underlying circadian behaviors is a molecular clock mechanism found in most, if not all, cell types including skeletal muscle. The mammalian molecular clock is a complex of multiple oscillating networks that are regulated through transcriptional mechanisms, timed protein turnover, and input from small molecules. At this time, very little is known about circadian aspects of skeletal muscle function/metabolism but some progress has been made on understanding the molecular clock in skeletal muscle. The goal of this chapter is to provide the basic terminology and concepts of circadian rhythms with a more detailed review of the current state of knowledge of the molecular clock, with reference to what is known in skeletal muscle. Research has demonstrated that the molecular clock is active in skeletal muscles and that the muscle-specific transcription factor, MyoD, is a direct target of the molecular clock. Skeletal muscle of clock-compromised mice, Bmal1−/− and ClockΔ19 mice, are weak and exhibit significant disruptions in expression of many genes required for adult muscle structure and metabolism. We suggest that the interaction between the molecular clock, MyoD, and metabolic factors, such as PGC-1, provide a potential system of feedback loops that may be critical for both maintenance and adaptation of skeletal muscle. PMID:21621073

  6. Validation and Assessment of Three Methods to Estimate 24-h Urinary Sodium Excretion from Spot Urine Samples in Chinese Adults.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yaguang; Li, Wei; Wang, Yang; Chen, Hui; Bo, Jian; Wang, Xingyu; Liu, Lisheng

    2016-01-01

    24-h urinary sodium excretion is the gold standard for evaluating dietary sodium intake, but it is often not feasible in large epidemiological studies due to high participant burden and cost. Three methods-Kawasaki, INTERSALT, and Tanaka-have been proposed to estimate 24-h urinary sodium excretion from a spot urine sample, but these methods have not been validated in the general Chinese population. This aim of this study was to assess the validity of three methods for estimating 24-h urinary sodium excretion using spot urine samples against measured 24-h urinary sodium excretion in a Chinese sample population. Data are from a substudy of the Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiology (PURE) study that enrolled 120 participants aged 35 to 70 years and collected their morning fasting urine and 24-h urine specimens. Bias calculations (estimated values minus measured values) and Bland-Altman plots were used to assess the validity of the three estimation methods. 116 participants were included in the final analysis. Mean bias for the Kawasaki method was -740 mg/day (95% CI: -1219, 262 mg/day), and was the lowest among the three methods. Mean bias for the Tanaka method was -2305 mg/day (95% CI: -2735, 1875 mg/day). Mean bias for the INTERSALT method was -2797 mg/day (95% CI: -3245, 2349 mg/day), and was the highest of the three methods. Bland-Altman plots indicated that all three methods underestimated 24-h urinary sodium excretion. The Kawasaki, INTERSALT and Tanaka methods for estimation of 24-h urinary sodium excretion using spot urines all underestimated true 24-h urinary sodium excretion in this sample of Chinese adults. Among the three methods, the Kawasaki method was least biased, but was still relatively inaccurate. A more accurate method is needed to estimate the 24-h urinary sodium excretion from spot urine for assessment of dietary sodium intake in China. PMID:26895296

  7. Validation and Assessment of Three Methods to Estimate 24-h Urinary Sodium Excretion from Spot Urine Samples in Chinese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yaguang; Li, Wei; Wang, Yang; Chen, Hui; Bo, Jian; Wang, Xingyu; Liu, Lisheng

    2016-01-01

    24-h urinary sodium excretion is the gold standard for evaluating dietary sodium intake, but it is often not feasible in large epidemiological studies due to high participant burden and cost. Three methods—Kawasaki, INTERSALT, and Tanaka—have been proposed to estimate 24-h urinary sodium excretion from a spot urine sample, but these methods have not been validated in the general Chinese population. This aim of this study was to assess the validity of three methods for estimating 24-h urinary sodium excretion using spot urine samples against measured 24-h urinary sodium excretion in a Chinese sample population. Data are from a substudy of the Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiology (PURE) study that enrolled 120 participants aged 35 to 70 years and collected their morning fasting urine and 24-h urine specimens. Bias calculations (estimated values minus measured values) and Bland-Altman plots were used to assess the validity of the three estimation methods. 116 participants were included in the final analysis. Mean bias for the Kawasaki method was -740 mg/day (95% CI: -1219, 262 mg/day), and was the lowest among the three methods. Mean bias for the Tanaka method was -2305 mg/day (95% CI: -2735, 1875 mg/day). Mean bias for the INTERSALT method was -2797 mg/day (95% CI: -3245, 2349 mg/day), and was the highest of the three methods. Bland-Altman plots indicated that all three methods underestimated 24-h urinary sodium excretion. The Kawasaki, INTERSALT and Tanaka methods for estimation of 24-h urinary sodium excretion using spot urines all underestimated true 24-h urinary sodium excretion in this sample of Chinese adults. Among the three methods, the Kawasaki method was least biased, but was still relatively inaccurate. A more accurate method is needed to estimate the 24-h urinary sodium excretion from spot urine for assessment of dietary sodium intake in China. PMID:26895296

  8. Preliminary Estimation of Deoxynivalenol Excretion through a 24 h Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Carrasco, Yelko; Mañes, Jordi; Berrada, Houda; Font, Guillermina

    2015-01-01

    A duplicate diet study was designed to explore the occurrence of 15 Fusarium mycotoxins in the 24 h-diet consumed by one volunteer as well as the levels of mycotoxins in his 24 h-collected urine. The employed methodology involved solvent extraction at high ionic strength followed by dispersive solid phase extraction and gas chromatography determination coupled to mass spectrometry in tandem. Satisfactory results in method performance were achieved. The method’s accuracy was in a range of 68%–108%, with intra-day relative standard deviation and inter-day relative standard deviation lower than 12% and 15%, respectively. The limits of quantitation ranged from 0.1 to 8 µg/Kg. The matrix effect was evaluated and matrix-matched calibrations were used for quantitation. Only deoxynivalenol (DON) was quantified in both food and urine samples. A total DON daily intake amounted to 49.2 ± 5.6 µg whereas DON daily excretion of 35.2 ± 4.3 µg was determined. DON daily intake represented 68.3% of the established DON provisional maximum tolerable daily intake (PMTDI). Valuable preliminary information was obtained as regards DON excretion and needs to be confirmed in large-scale monitoring studies. PMID:25723325

  9. BDNFval66met affects neural activation pattern during fear conditioning and 24 h delayed fear recall

    PubMed Central

    Golkar, Armita; Lindström, Kara M.; Haaker, Jan; Öhman, Arne; Schalling, Martin; Ingvar, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), the most abundant neutrophin in the mammalian central nervous system, is critically involved in synaptic plasticity. In both rodents and humans, BDNF has been implicated in hippocampus- and amygdala-dependent learning and memory and has more recently been linked to fear extinction processes. Fifty-nine healthy participants, genotyped for the functional BDNFval66met polymorphism, underwent a fear conditioning and 24h-delayed extinction protocol while skin conductance and blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) responses (functional magnetic resonance imaging) were acquired. We present the first report of neural activation pattern during fear acquisition ‘and’ extinction for the BDNFval66met polymorphism using a differential conditioned stimulus (CS)+ > CS− comparison. During conditioning, we observed heightened allele dose-dependent responses in the amygdala and reduced responses in the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex in BDNFval66met met-carriers. During early extinction, 24h later, we again observed heightened responses in several regions ascribed to the fear network in met-carriers as opposed to val-carriers (insula, amygdala, hippocampus), which likely reflects fear memory recall. No differences were observed during late extinction, which likely reflects learned extinction. Our data thus support previous associations of the BDNFval66met polymorphism with neural activation in the fear and extinction network, but speak against a specific association with fear extinction processes. PMID:25103087

  10. Creatinine measurements in 24 h urine by liquid chromatography--tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Kee; Watanabe, Takaho; Gee, Shirley J; Schenker, Marc B; Hammock, Bruce D

    2008-01-23

    A simple, sensitive, and specific liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for determining urinary creatinine was developed and used to evaluate 24 h urine samples collected during an exposure study. Urine (1 microL) was diluted with methanol and then directly applied to LC-MS/MS. Under electrospray ionization (ESI) conditions, the transition molecules of creatinine and creatinine- d3 were observed at m/ z 114 > 44 and m/ z 117 > 47, respectively. The retention time of creatinine was 0.59 min. The linear range was 1-2000 ng/mL, with a detection limit in urine of 1 ng/mL. LC-MS/MS and colorimetric end-point methods were significantly associated ( R2 = 0.8785, p < 0.0001). The LC-MS/MS method to determine creatinine in 24 h urine samples had shorter retention times, was more sensitive, reliable, reproducible, simple, selective, and used a smaller sample size than other LC-MS/MS or commercial methods. PMID:18092755

  11. The impact of a 24-h ultra-marathon on salivary antimicrobial protein responses.

    PubMed

    Gill, S K; Teixeira, A M; Rosado, F; Hankey, J; Wright, A; Marczak, S; Murray, A; Costa, R J S

    2014-10-01

    Depressed oral respiratory mucosal immunity and increased incidence of upper respiratory symptoms are commonly reported after bouts of prolonged exercise. The current study observed the impact of a 24-h continuous overnight ultra-marathon competition (distance range: 122-208 km; ambient temperature range: 0-20 °C) on salivary antimicrobial protein responses and incidence of upper respiratory symptoms. Body mass, unstimulated saliva and venous blood samples were taken from ultra-endurance runners (n=25) and controls (n=17), before and immediately after competition. Upper respiratory symptoms were assessed during and until 4-weeks after event completion. Samples were analyzed for salivary IgA, lysozyme, α-amylase and cortisol in addition to plasma osmolality. Decreased saliva flow rate (p<0.001), salivary IgA (p<0.001) and lysozyme (p=0.015) secretion rates, and increased salivary α-amylase secretion rate (p<0.001) and cortisol responses (p<0.001) were observed post-competition in runners, with no changes being observed in controls. No incidences of upper respiratory symptoms were reported by participants. A 24-h continuous overnight ultra-marathon resulted in the depression of some salivary antimicrobial protein responses, but no incidences of upper respiratory symptoms were evident during or following competition. Salivary antimicrobial protein synergism, effective management of non-infectious episodes, maintaining euhydration, and (or) favourable environmental influences could have accounted for the low prevalence of upper respiratory symptoms. PMID:24886918

  12. [Assessment of duodenogastric reflux 24h variability in subjects with functional dyspepsia].

    PubMed

    Romanowski, Marek; Chojnacki, Jan; Gil, Jerzy; Piotrowski, Wojciech

    2004-01-01

    Symptoms of functional dyspepsia demonstrate significant variability, among others dependently on the time of the day and on consumed meals. The aim of the study was to find out whether duodenogastric reflux is observed in subjects with nonulcer (NUD) and dysmotor dyspepsia (DD) and whether its intensification changes within 24 h. Investigations comprised 25 subjects with NUD and 25 with DD, aged 19-43 years after exclusion of other diseases and H. pylori infection. The gastric content of bilirubin was registered with Bilitec 2000 Synectics Medical. Duodenogastric reflux episodes were observed in both groups but their intensification and 24h dynamics were differentiated. In subjects with DD total reflux index was significantly higher than in those with NUD (mean=18.0+/-9.5% and mean=6.3+/-4.1%; p<0.05). These differences were particularly visible in after meal (mean=21.2+/-7.9% and mean=10.4+/-6.6%; p<0.01) and night time (mean=8.7+/-3.6% and mean=2.9+/-0.9%; p<0.01). The results of the study indicate that bilimetry may be useful in differentiation of the form of dyspepsia and in selection of rational therapy. PMID:15603369

  13. Preliminary estimation of deoxynivalenol excretion through a 24 h pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Carrasco, Yelko; Mañes, Jordi; Berrada, Houda; Font, Guillermina

    2015-03-01

    A duplicate diet study was designed to explore the occurrence of 15 Fusarium mycotoxins in the 24 h-diet consumed by one volunteer as well as the levels of mycotoxins in his 24 h-collected urine. The employed methodology involved solvent extraction at high ionic strength followed by dispersive solid phase extraction and gas chromatography determination coupled to mass spectrometry in tandem. Satisfactory results in method performance were achieved. The method's accuracy was in a range of 68%-108%, with intra-day relative standard deviation and inter-day relative standard deviation lower than 12% and 15%, respectively. The limits of quantitation ranged from 0.1 to 8 µg/Kg. The matrix effect was evaluated and matrix-matched calibrations were used for quantitation. Only deoxynivalenol (DON) was quantified in both food and urine samples. A total DON daily intake amounted to 49.2 ± 5.6 µg whereas DON daily excretion of 35.2 ± 4.3 µg was determined. DON daily intake represented 68.3% of the established DON provisional maximum tolerable daily intake (PMTDI). Valuable preliminary information was obtained as regards DON excretion and needs to be confirmed in large-scale monitoring studies. PMID:25723325

  14. Safety and Efficacy of 24-h Closed-Loop Insulin Delivery in Well-Controlled Pregnant Women With Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Helen R.; Kumareswaran, Kavita; Elleri, Daniela; Allen, Janet M.; Caldwell, Karen; Biagioni, Martina; Simmons, David; Dunger, David B.; Nodale, Marianna; Wilinska, Malgorzata E.; Amiel, Stephanie A.; Hovorka, Roman

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the safety and efficacy of closed-loop insulin delivery in well-controlled pregnant women with type 1 diabetes treated with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 12 women with type 1 diabetes (aged 32.9 years, diabetes duration 17.6 years, BMI 27.1 kg/m2, and HbA1c 6.4%) were randomly allocated to closed-loop or conventional CSII. They performed normal daily activities (standardized meals, snacks, and exercise) for 24 h on two occasions at 19 and 23 weeks’ gestation. Plasma glucose time in target (63–140 mg/dL) and time spent hypoglycemic were calculated. RESULTS Plasma glucose time in target was comparable for closed-loop and conventional CSII (median [interquartile range]: 81 [59–87] vs. 81% [54–90]; P = 0.75). Less time was spent hypoglycemic (<45 mg/dL [0.0 vs. 0.3%]; P = 0.04), with a lower low blood glucose index (2.4 [0.9–3.5] vs. 3.3 [1.9–5.1]; P = 0.03), during closed-loop insulin delivery. CONCLUSIONS Closed-loop insulin delivery was as effective as conventional CSII, with less time spent in extreme hypoglycemia. PMID:22011408

  15. Rhythms of the hippocampal network.

    PubMed

    Colgin, Laura Lee

    2016-04-01

    The hippocampal local field potential (LFP) shows three major types of rhythms: theta, sharp wave-ripples and gamma. These rhythms are defined by their frequencies, they have behavioural correlates in several species including rats and humans, and they have been proposed to carry out distinct functions in hippocampal memory processing. However, recent findings have challenged traditional views on these behavioural functions. In this Review, I discuss our current understanding of the origins and the mnemonic functions of hippocampal theta, sharp wave-ripples and gamma rhythms on the basis of findings from rodent studies. In addition, I present an updated synthesis of their roles and interactions within the hippocampal network. PMID:26961163

  16. Recognizing an Irregular Heart Rhythm

    MedlinePlus

    ... a workout, consider checking your rhythm as well. Atrial fibrillation, also referred to as AF, is a common ... upper chambers, or atria, of the heart. “While atrial fibrillation is not common among young people, it can ...

  17. Biological rhythms and vector insects

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Mirian David

    2013-01-01

    The adjustment of all species, animals and plants, to the Earth’s cyclic environments is ensured by their temporal organisation. The relationships between parasites, vectors and hosts rely greatly upon the synchronisation of their biological rhythms, especially circadian rhythms. In this short note, parasitic infections by Protozoa and by microfilariae have been chosen as examples of the dependence of successful transmission mechanisms on temporal components. PMID:24473803

  18. Reference Values for Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Chinese Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jian; Li, Hong; Ran, Xingwu; Yang, Wenying; Li, Qiang; Peng, Yongde; Li, Yanbing; Gao, Xin; Luan, Xiaojun; Wang, Weiqing; Jia, Weiping

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The widespread clinical application of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) is limited by the lack of generally accepted reference values. This multicenter study aims to establish preliminary normal reference values for CGM parameters in a sample of healthy Chinese subjects. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 434 healthy individuals with normal glucose regulation completed a 3-day period of glucose monitoring using a CGM system. The 24-h mean blood glucose (24-h MBG) and the percentage of time that subjects' blood glucose levels were ≥140 mg/dl (PT140) and ≤70 mg/dl (PT70) within 24 h were analyzed. RESULTS There was excellent compliance of finger stick blood glucose values with CGM measurements for subjects. Among the 434 subjects, the daily blood glucose varied from 76.9 ± 11.3 to 144.2 ± 23.2 mg/dl. The 24-h MBG, PT140, and PT70 were 104 ± 10 mg/dl, 4.1 ± 5.8%, and 2.4 ± 5.3%, respectively. As for these parameters, no significant differences were found between men and women. The 95th percentile values were adopted as the upper limits of CGM parameters, which revealed 119 mg/dl (6.6 mmol/l) for 24-h MBG, 17.1% for PT140, and 11.7% for PT70. CONCLUSIONS We recommend a 24-h MBG value <119 mg/dl, PT140 <17% (4 h), and PT70 <12% (3 h) as normal ranges for the Chinese population. PMID:19389816

  19. Cancer Clocks Out for Lunch: Disruption of Circadian Rhythm and Metabolic Oscillation in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Altman, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are 24-h oscillations present in most eukaryotes and many prokaryotes that synchronize activity to the day-night cycle. They are an essential feature of organismal and cell physiology that coordinate many of the metabolic, biosynthetic, and signal transduction pathways studied in biology. The molecular mechanism of circadian rhythm is controlled both by signal transduction and gene transcription as well as by metabolic feedback. The role of circadian rhythm in cancer cell development and survival is still not well understood, but as will be discussed in this Review, accumulated research suggests that circadian rhythm may be altered or disrupted in many human cancers downstream of common oncogenic alterations. Thus, a complete understanding of the genetic and metabolic alterations in cancer must take potential circadian rhythm perturbations into account, as this disruption itself will influence how gene expression and metabolism are altered in the cancer cell compared to its non-transformed neighbor. It will be important to better understand these circadian changes in both normal and cancer cell physiology to potentially design treatment modalities to exploit this insight. PMID:27500134

  20. Cancer Clocks Out for Lunch: Disruption of Circadian Rhythm and Metabolic Oscillation in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Altman, Brian J

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are 24-h oscillations present in most eukaryotes and many prokaryotes that synchronize activity to the day-night cycle. They are an essential feature of organismal and cell physiology that coordinate many of the metabolic, biosynthetic, and signal transduction pathways studied in biology. The molecular mechanism of circadian rhythm is controlled both by signal transduction and gene transcription as well as by metabolic feedback. The role of circadian rhythm in cancer cell development and survival is still not well understood, but as will be discussed in this Review, accumulated research suggests that circadian rhythm may be altered or disrupted in many human cancers downstream of common oncogenic alterations. Thus, a complete understanding of the genetic and metabolic alterations in cancer must take potential circadian rhythm perturbations into account, as this disruption itself will influence how gene expression and metabolism are altered in the cancer cell compared to its non-transformed neighbor. It will be important to better understand these circadian changes in both normal and cancer cell physiology to potentially design treatment modalities to exploit this insight. PMID:27500134

  1. Daily rhythms of physiological parameters in the dromedary camel under natural and laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Al-Haidary, Ahmed A; Abdoun, Khalid A; Samara, Emad M; Okab, Aly B; Sani, Mamane; Refinetti, Roberto

    2016-08-01

    Camels are well adapted to hot arid environments and can contribute significantly to the economy of developing countries in arid regions of the world. Full understanding of the physiology of camels requires understanding of the internal temporal order of the body, as reflected in daily or circadian rhythms. In the current study, we investigated the daily rhythmicity of 20 physiological variables in camels exposed to natural oscillations of ambient temperature in a desert environment and compared the daily temporal courses of the variables. We also studied the rhythm of core body temperature under experimental conditions with constant ambient temperature in the presence and absence of a light-dark cycle. The obtained results indicated that different physiological variables exhibit different degrees of daily rhythmicity and reach their daily peaks at different times of the day, starting with plasma cholesterol, which peaks 24min after midnight, and ending with plasma calcium, which peaks 3h before midnight. Furthermore, the rhythm of core body temperature persisted in the absence of environmental rhythmicity, thus confirming its endogenous nature. The observed delay in the acrophase of core body temperature rhythm under constant conditions suggests that the circadian period is longer than 24h. Further studies with more refined experimental manipulation of different variables are needed to fully elucidate the causal network of circadian rhythms in dromedary camels. PMID:27474007

  2. Behavioral rhythms of the Japanese newts, Cynops pyrrhogaster, under a semi-natural condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Kiyoko; Oishi, T.

    Locomotor activity rhythms of the Japanese newt, Cynops pyrrhogaster, were recorded under a semi-natural condition using phototransistor systems. The daily activity rhythm showed a seasonal change: the locomotor activity was mainly diurnal (active during the daytime) from spring to early summer; mainly nocturnal (active during the night-time) from summer to autumn; and showed either a diurnal or nocturnal pattern, depending on the ambient temperature, in winter. To analyze the daily activity in detail, we observed the behavior of a group of newts (three males, three females) throughout 24 h. Four types of behavior (respiration, feeding, mating, and resting on the land) were observed. Each behavior had daily rhythms and showed a seasonal change. The behavior on land showed mainly a nocturnal or bimodal pattern (activity rhythms with two peaks) throughout the year and was more frequently observed in summer. Mating behavior also showed a seasonal change: high activity in spring, with peaks in the early morning and evening, but no activity in summer. Except in winter, feeding and respiratory behavior showed no seasonal changes in either activity period or frequency. Coupling between behavior and the clock seems to be weak in the Japanese newt because of indistinct daily rhythms and frequent phase changes of locomotor activity in water. Physical factors such as humidity and temperature seem to affect strongly the daily activity of the newts.

  3. Effects of exercise on circadian rhythms and mobility in aging Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Rakshit, Kuntol; Wambua, Rebecca; Giebultowicz, Tomasz M; Giebultowicz, Jadwiga M

    2013-11-01

    Daily life functions such as sleep and feeding oscillate with circa 24 h period due to endogenous circadian rhythms generated by circadian clocks. Genetic or environmental disruption of circadian rhythms is associated with various aging-related phenotypes. Circadian rhythms decay during normal aging, and there is a need to explore strategies that could avert age-related changes in the circadian system. Exercise was reported to delay aging in mammals. Here, we investigated whether daily exercise via stimulation of upward climbing movement could improve circadian rest/activity rhythms in aging Drosophila melanogaster. We found that repeated exercise regimen did not strengthen circadian locomotor activity rhythms in aging flies and had no effect on their lifespan. We also tested the effects of exercise on mobility and determined that regular exercise lowered age-specific climbing ability in both wild type and clock mutant flies. Interestingly, the climbing ability was most significantly reduced in flies carrying a null mutation in the core clock gene period, while rescue of this gene significantly improved climbing to wild type levels. Our work highlights the importance of period in sustaining endurance in aging flies exposed to physical challenge. PMID:23916842

  4. A human calorimeter for the direct and indirect measurement of 24 h energy expenditure.

    PubMed

    Dauncey, M J; Murgatroyd, P R; Cole, T J

    1978-05-01

    1. A calorimeter for the continuous measurement of heat production and heat loss in the human subject, for at least 24 h, is described. The calorimeter operated on the heat-sink principle for direct calorimetry and an open-circuit system for indirect calorimetry. 2. Sensible heat loss was measured using a water-cooled heat exchanger, and the temperature of water entering the heat exchanger was controlled to maintain a mean temperature gradient of zero across the chamber walls. 3. Evaporative heat loss was determined from ingoing and outgoing wet-and-dry bulb temperatures and air flow-rates. 4. Problems associated with the calculation of evapoative heat loss and the estimation of the volume of incoming air in open-circuit systems are considered. 5. The calibration, limits of accuracy, sources of error and experiments with subjects are discussed. PMID:638125

  5. Master runners dominate 24-h ultramarathons worldwide—a retrospective data analysis from 1998 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aims of the present study were to examine (a) participation and performance trends and (b) the age of peak running performance in master athletes competing in 24-h ultra-marathons held worldwide between 1998 and 2011. Methods Changes in both running speed and the age of peak running speed in 24-h master ultra-marathoners (39,664 finishers, including 8,013 women and 31,651 men) were analyzed. Results The number of 24-h ultra-marathoners increased for both women and men across years (P < 0.01). The age of the annual fastest woman decreased from 48 years in 1998 to 35 years in 2011. The age of peaking running speed remained unchanged across time at 42.5 ± 5.2 years for the annual fastest men (P > 0.05). The age of the annual top ten women decreased from 42.6 ± 5.9 years (1998) to 40.1 ± 7.0 years (2011) (P < 0.01). For the annual top ten men, the age of peak running speed remained unchanged at 42 ± 2 years (P > 0.05). Running speed remained unchanged over time at 11.4 ± 0.4 km h-1 for the annual fastest men and 10.0 ± 0.2 km/h for the annual fastest women, respectively (P > 0.05). For the annual ten fastest women, running speed increased over time by 3.2% from 9.3 ± 0.3 to 9.6 ± 0.3 km/h (P < 0.01). Running speed of the annual top ten men remained unchanged at 10.8 ± 0.3 km/h (P > 0.05). Women in age groups 25–29 (r2 = 0.61, P < 0.01), 30–34 (r2 = 0.48, P < 0.01), 35–39 (r2 = 0.42, P = 0.01), 40–44 (r2 = 0.46, P < 0.01), 55–59 (r2 = 0.41, P = 0.03), and 60–64 (r2 = 0.57, P < 0.01) improved running speed; while women in age groups 45–49 and 50–54 maintained running speed (P > 0.05). Men improved running speed in age groups 25–29 (r2 = 0.48, P = 0.02), 45–49 (r2 = 0.34, P = 0.03), 50–54 (r2 = 0.50, P < 0.01), 55–59 (r2 = 0.70, P < 0.01), and 60–64 (r2 = 0.44, P = 0.03); while runners in age groups 30–34, 35–39, and 40–44 maintained running speed (P > 0.05). Conclusions Female and male age group runners improved

  6. Validity and relative validity of a novel digital approach for 24-h dietary recall in athletes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We developed a digital dietary analysis tool for athletes (DATA) using a modified 24-h recall method and an integrated, customized nutrient database. The purpose of this study was to assess DATA’s validity and relative validity by measuring its agreement with registered dietitians’ (RDs) direct observations (OBSERVATION) and 24-h dietary recall interviews using the USDA 5-step multiple-pass method (INTERVIEW), respectively. Methods Fifty-six athletes (14–20 y) completed DATA and INTERVIEW in randomized counter-balanced order. OBSERVATION (n = 26) consisted of RDs recording participants’ food/drink intake in a 24-h period and were completed the day prior to DATA and INTERVIEW. Agreement among methods was estimated using a repeated measures t-test and Bland-Altman analysis. Results The paired differences (with 95% confidence intervals) between DATA and OBSERVATION were not significant for carbohydrate (10.1%, -1.2–22.7%) and protein (14.1%, -3.2–34.5%) but was significant for energy (14.4%, 1.2–29.3%). There were no differences between DATA and INTERVIEW for energy (-1.1%, -9.1–7.7%), carbohydrate (0.2%, -7.1–8.0%) or protein (-2.7%, -11.3–6.7%). Bland-Altman analysis indicated significant positive correlations between absolute values of the differences and the means for OBSERVATION vs. DATA (r = 0.40 and r = 0.47 for energy and carbohydrate, respectively) and INTERVIEW vs. DATA (r = 0.52, r = 0.29, and r = 0.61 for energy, carbohydrate, and protein, respectively). There were also wide 95% limits of agreement (LOA) for most method comparisons. The mean bias ratio (with 95% LOA) for OBSERVATION vs. DATA was 0.874 (0.551-1.385) for energy, 0.906 (0.522-1.575) for carbohydrate, and 0.895(0.395-2.031) for protein. The mean bias ratio (with 95% LOA) for INTERVIEW vs. DATA was 1.016 (0.538-1.919) for energy, 0.995 (0.563-1.757) for carbohydrate, and 1.031 (0.514-2.068) for protein. Conclusion DATA has good relative

  7. Intrinsic near-24-h pacemaker period determines limits of circadian entrainment to a weak synchronizer in humans.

    PubMed

    Wright, K P; Hughes, R J; Kronauer, R E; Dijk, D J; Czeisler, C A

    2001-11-20

    Endogenous circadian clocks are robust regulators of physiology and behavior. Synchronization or entrainment of biological clocks to environmental time is adaptive and important for physiological homeostasis and for the proper timing of species-specific behaviors. We studied subjects in the laboratory for up to 55 days each to determine the ability to entrain the human clock to a weak circadian synchronizing stimulus [scheduled activity-rest cycle in very dim (approximately 1.5 lux in the angle of gaze) light-dark cycle] at three approximately 24-h periods: 23.5, 24.0, and 24.6 h. These studies allowed us to test two competing hypotheses as to whether the period of the human circadian pacemaker is near to or much longer than 24 h. We report here that imposition of a sleep-wake schedule with exposure to the equivalent of candle light during wakefulness and darkness during sleep is usually sufficient to maintain circadian entrainment to the 24-h day but not to a 23.5- or 24.6-h day. Our results demonstrate functionally that, in normally entrained sighted adults, the average intrinsic circadian period of the human biological clock is very close to 24 h. Either exposure to very dim light and/or the scheduled sleep-wake cycle itself can entrain this near-24-h intrinsic period of the human circadian pacemaker to the 24-h day. PMID:11717461

  8. Intrinsic near-24-h pacemaker period determines limits of circadian entrainment to a weak synchronizer in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, K. P. Jr; Hughes, R. J.; Kronauer, R. E.; Dijk, D. J.; Czeisler, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    Endogenous circadian clocks are robust regulators of physiology and behavior. Synchronization or entrainment of biological clocks to environmental time is adaptive and important for physiological homeostasis and for the proper timing of species-specific behaviors. We studied subjects in the laboratory for up to 55 days each to determine the ability to entrain the human clock to a weak circadian synchronizing stimulus [scheduled activity-rest cycle in very dim (approximately 1.5 lux in the angle of gaze) light-dark cycle] at three approximately 24-h periods: 23.5, 24.0, and 24.6 h. These studies allowed us to test two competing hypotheses as to whether the period of the human circadian pacemaker is near to or much longer than 24 h. We report here that imposition of a sleep-wake schedule with exposure to the equivalent of candle light during wakefulness and darkness during sleep is usually sufficient to maintain circadian entrainment to the 24-h day but not to a 23.5- or 24.6-h day. Our results demonstrate functionally that, in normally entrained sighted adults, the average intrinsic circadian period of the human biological clock is very close to 24 h. Either exposure to very dim light and/or the scheduled sleep-wake cycle itself can entrain this near-24-h intrinsic period of the human circadian pacemaker to the 24-h day.

  9. Circadian Melatonin and Temperature Taus in Delayed Sleep-wake Phase Disorder and Non-24-hour Sleep-wake Rhythm Disorder Patients: An Ultradian Constant Routine Study.

    PubMed

    Micic, Gorica; Lovato, Nicole; Gradisar, Michael; Burgess, Helen J; Ferguson, Sally A; Lack, Leon

    2016-08-01

    Our objectives were to investigate the period lengths (i.e., taus) of the endogenous core body temperature rhythm and melatonin rhythm in delayed sleep-wake phase disorder patients (DSWPD) and non-24-h sleep-wake rhythm disorder patients (N24SWD) compared with normally entrained individuals. Circadian rhythms were measured during an 80-h ultradian modified constant routine consisting of 80 ultrashort 1-h "days" in which participants had 20-min sleep opportunities alternating with 40 min of enforced wakefulness. We recruited a community-based sample of 26 DSWPD patients who met diagnostic criteria (17 males, 9 females; age, 21.85 ± 4.97 years) and 18 healthy controls (10 males, 8 females; age, 23.72 ± 5.10 years). Additionally, 4 full-sighted patients (3 males, 1 female; age, 25.75 ± 4.99 years) were diagnosed with N24SWD and included as a discrete study group. Ingestible core temperature capsules were used to record minute temperatures that were averaged to obtain 80 hourly data points. Salivary melatonin concentration was assessed every half-hour to determine time of dim light melatonin onset at the beginning and end of the 80-h protocol. DSWPD patients had significantly longer melatonin rhythm taus (24 h 34 min ± 17 min) than controls (24 h 22 min ± 15 min, p = 0.03, d = 0.70). These results were further supported by longer temperature rhythm taus in DSWPD patients (24 h 34 min ± 26 min) relative to controls (24 h 13 min ± 15 min, p = 0.01, d = 0.80). N24SWD patients had even longer melatonin (25 h ± 19 min) and temperature (24 h 52 min ± 17 min) taus than both DSWPD (p = 0.007, p = 0.06) and control participants (p < 0.001, p = 0.02, respectively). Between 12% and 19% of the variance in DSWPD patients' sleep timing could be explained by longer taus. This indicates that longer taus of circadian rhythms may contribute to the DSWPD patients' persistent tendency to delay, their frequent failure to respond to treatment, and their relapse following treatment

  10. Daily Rhythms of Hunger and Satiety in Healthy Men during One Week of Sleep Restriction and Circadian Misalignment

    PubMed Central

    Sargent, Charli; Zhou, Xuan; Matthews, Raymond W.; Darwent, David; Roach, Gregory D.

    2016-01-01

    The impact of sleep restriction on the endogenous circadian rhythms of hunger and satiety were examined in 28 healthy young men. Participants were scheduled to 2 × 24-h days of baseline followed by 8 × 28-h days of forced desynchrony during which sleep was either moderately restricted (equivalent to 6 h in bed/24 h; n = 14) or severely restricted (equivalent to 4 h in bed/24 h; n = 14). Self-reported hunger and satisfaction were assessed every 2.5 h during wake periods using visual analogue scales. Participants were served standardised meals and snacks at regular intervals and were not permitted to eat ad libitum. Core body temperature was continuously recorded with rectal thermistors to determine circadian phase. Both hunger and satiety exhibited a marked endogenous circadian rhythm. Hunger was highest, and satiety was lowest, in the biological evening (i.e., ~17:00–21:00 h) whereas hunger was lowest, and satiety was highest in the biological night (i.e., 01:00–05:00 h). The results are consistent with expectations based on previous reports and may explain in some part the decrease in appetite that is commonly reported by individuals who are required to work at night. Interestingly, the endogenous rhythms of hunger and satiety do not appear to be altered by severe—as compared to moderate—sleep restriction. PMID:26840322

  11. Dipper and non-dipper blood pressure 24-hour patterns: circadian rhythm-dependent physiologic and pathophysiologic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Fabbian, Fabio; Smolensky, Michael H; Tiseo, Ruana; Pala, Marco; Manfredini, Roberto; Portaluppi, Francesco

    2013-03-01

    Neuroendocrine mechanisms are major determinants of the normal 24-h blood pressure (BP) pattern. At the central level, integration of the major driving factors of this temporal variability is mediated by circadian rhythms of monoaminergic systems in conjunction with those of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal, hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid, opioid, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone, plus endothelial systems and specific vasoactive peptides. Humoral secretions are typically episodic, coupled either to sleep and/or the circadian endogenous (suprachiasmatic nucleus) central pacemaker clock, but exhibiting also weekly, monthly, seasonal, and annual periodicities. Sleep induction and arousal are influenced also by many hormones and chemical substances that exhibit 24-h variation, e.g., arginine vasopressin, vasoactive intestinal peptide, melatonin, somatotropin, insulin, steroids, serotonin, corticotropin-releasing factor, adrenocorticotropic hormone, thyrotropin-releasing hormone, endogenous opioids, and prostaglandin E2, all with established effects on the cardiovascular system. As a consequence, physical, mental, and pathologic stimuli that activate or inhibit neuroendocrine effectors of biological rhythmicity may also interfere with, or modify, the temporal BP structure. Moreover, immediate adjustment to exogenous components/environment demands by BP rhythms is modulated by the circadian-time-dependent responsiveness of biological oscillators and their neuroendocrine effectors. This knowledge contributes to a better understanding of the pathophysiology of abnormalities of the 24-h BP pattern and level and their correction through circadian rhythm-based chronotherapeutic strategies. PMID:23002916

  12. Circadian control of glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kalsbeek, Andries; la Fleur, Susanne; Fliers, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has risen to epidemic proportions. The pathophysiology of T2DM is complex and involves insulin resistance, pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and visceral adiposity. It has been known for decades that a disruption of biological rhythms (which happens the most profoundly with shift work) increases the risk of developing obesity and T2DM. Recent evidence from basal studies has further sparked interest in the involvement of daily rhythms (and their disruption) in the development of obesity and T2DM. Most living organisms have molecular clocks in almost every tissue, which govern rhythmicity in many domains of physiology, such as rest/activity rhythms, feeding/fasting rhythms, and hormonal secretion. Here we present the latest research describing the specific role played by the molecular clock mechanism in the control of glucose metabolism and speculate on how disruption of these tissue clocks may lead to the disturbances in glucose homeostasis. PMID:24944897

  13. Biological Rhythms During Residence in Polar Regions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    At Arctic and Antarctic latitudes, personnel are deprived of natural sunlight in winter and have continuous daylight in summer: light of sufficient intensity and suitable spectral composition is the main factor that maintains the 24-h period of human circadian rhythms. Thus, the status of the circadian system is of interest. Moreover, the relatively controlled artificial light conditions in winter are conducive to experimentation with different types of light treatment. The hormone melatonin and/or its metabolite 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (aMT6s) provide probably the best index of circadian (and seasonal) timing. A frequent observation has been a delay of the circadian system in winter. A skeleton photoperiod (2 × 1-h, bright white light, morning and evening) can restore summer timing. A single 1-h pulse of light in the morning may be sufficient. A few people desynchronize from the 24-h day (free-run) and show their intrinsic circadian period, usually >24 h. With regard to general health in polar regions, intermittent reports describe abnormalities in various physiological processes from the point of view of daily and seasonal rhythms, but positive health outcomes are also published. True winter depression (SAD) appears to be rare, although subsyndromal SAD is reported. Probably of most concern are the numerous reports of sleep problems. These have prompted investigations of the underlying mechanisms and treatment interventions. A delay of the circadian system with “normal” working hours implies sleep is attempted at a suboptimal phase. Decrements in sleep efficiency, latency, duration, and quality are also seen in winter. Increasing the intensity of ambient light exposure throughout the day advanced circadian phase and was associated with benefits for sleep: blue-enriched light was slightly more effective than standard white light. Effects on performance remain to be fully investigated. At 75°S, base personnel adapt the circadian system to night work within

  14. Tuberculosis in hospitalized patients: clinical characteristics of patients receiving treatment within the first 24 h after admission*

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Denise Rossato; da Silva, Larissa Pozzebon; Dalcin, Paulo de Tarso Roth

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate clinical characteristics and outcomes in patients hospitalized for tuberculosis, comparing those in whom tuberculosis treatment was started within the first 24 h after admission with those who did not. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study involving new tuberculosis cases in patients aged ≥ 18 years who were hospitalized after seeking treatment in the emergency room. Results: We included 305 hospitalized patients, of whom 67 (22.0%) received tuberculosis treatment within the first 24 h after admission ( ≤24h group) and 238 (88.0%) did not (>24h group). Initiation of tuberculosis treatment within the first 24 h after admission was associated with being female (OR = 1.99; 95% CI: 1.06-3.74; p = 0.032) and with an AFB-positive spontaneous sputum smear (OR = 4.19; 95% CI: 1.94-9.00; p < 0.001). In the ≤24h and >24h groups, respectively, the ICU admission rate was 22.4% and 15.5% (p = 0.258); mechanical ventilation was used in 22.4% and 13.9% (p = 0.133); in-hospital mortality was 22.4% and 14.7% (p = 0.189); and a cure was achieved in 44.8% and 52.5% (p = 0.326). Conclusions: Although tuberculosis treatment was initiated promptly in a considerable proportion of the inpatients evaluated, the rates of in-hospital mortality, ICU admission, and mechanical ventilation use remained high. Strategies for the control of tuberculosis in primary care should consider that patients who seek medical attention at hospitals arrive too late and with advanced disease. It is therefore necessary to implement active surveillance measures in the community for earlier diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25029651

  15. Endogenous rhythms influence interpersonal synchrony.

    PubMed

    Zamm, Anna; Wellman, Chelsea; Palmer, Caroline

    2016-05-01

    Interpersonal synchrony, the temporal coordination of actions between individuals, is fundamental to social behaviors from conversational speech to dance and music-making. Animal models indicate constraints on synchrony that arise from endogenous rhythms: Intrinsic periodic behaviors or processes that continue in the absence of change in external stimulus conditions. We report evidence for a direct causal link between endogenous rhythms and interpersonal synchrony in a music performance task, which places high demands on temporal coordination. We first establish that endogenous rhythms, measured by spontaneous rates of individual performance, are stable within individuals across stimulus materials, limb movements, and time points. We then test a causal link between endogenous rhythms and interpersonal synchrony by pairing each musician with a partner who is either matched or mismatched in spontaneous rate and by measuring their joint behavior up to 1 year later. Partners performed melodies together, using either the same or different hands. Partners who were matched for spontaneous rate showed greater interpersonal synchrony in joint performance than mismatched partners, regardless of hand used. Endogenous rhythms offer potential to predict optimal group membership in joint behaviors that require temporal coordination. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26820249

  16. Rhythm control in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Piccini, Jonathan P; Fauchier, Laurent

    2016-08-20

    Many patients with atrial fibrillation have substantial symptoms despite ventricular rate control and require restoration of sinus rhythm to improve their quality of life. Acute restoration (ie, cardioversion) and maintenance of sinus rhythm in patients with atrial fibrillation are referred to as rhythm control. The decision to pursue rhythm control is based on symptoms, the type of atrial fibrillation (paroxysmal, persistent, or long-standing persistent), patient comorbidities, general health status, and anticoagulation status. Many patients have recurrent atrial fibrillation and require further intervention to maintain long term sinus rhythm. Antiarrhythmic drug therapy is generally recommended as a first-line therapy and drug selection is on the basis of the presence or absence of structural heart disease or heart failure, electrocardiographical variables, renal function, and other comorbidities. In patients who continue to have recurrent atrial fibrillation despite medical therapy, catheter ablation has been shown to substantially reduce recurrent atrial fibrillation, decrease symptoms, and improve quality of life, although recurrence is common despite continued advancement in ablation techniques. PMID:27560278

  17. Baroreflex-mediated heart rate and vascular resistance responses 24 h after maximal exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, Victor A.

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Plasma volume, heart rate (HR) variability, and stimulus-response relationships for baroreflex control of forearm vascular resistance (FVR) and HR were studied in eight healthy men after and without performing a bout of maximal exercise to test the hypotheses that acute expansion of plasma volume is associated with 1) reduction in baroreflex-mediated HR response, and 2) altered operational range for central venous pressure (CVP). METHODS: The relationship between stimulus (DeltaCVP) and vasoconstrictive reflex response (DeltaFVR) during unloading of cardiopulmonary baroreceptors was assessed with lower-body negative pressure (LBNP, 0, -5, -10, -15, -20 mm Hg). The relationship between stimulus (Deltamean arterial pressure (MAP)) and cardiac reflex response (DeltaHR) during loading of arterial baroreceptors was assessed with steady-state infusion of phenylephrine (PE) designed to increase MAP by 15 mm Hg alone and during application of LBNP (PE+LBNP) and neck pressure (PE+LBNP+NP). Measurements of vascular volume and autonomic baroreflex responses were conducted on two different test days, each separated by at least 1 wk. On one day, baroreflex response was tested 24 h after graded cycle exercise to volitional exhaustion. On another day, measurement of baroreflex response was repeated with no exercise (control). The order of exercise and control treatments was counterbalanced. RESULTS: Baseline CVP was elevated (P = 0.04) from a control value of 10.5 +/- 0.4 to 12.3 +/- 0.4 mm Hg 24 h after exercise. Average DeltaFVR/DeltaCVP during LBNP was not different (P = 0.942) between the exercise (-1.35 +/- 0.32 pru x mm Hg-1) and control (-1.32 +/- 0.36 pru x mm Hg-1) conditions. However, maximal exercise caused a shift along the reflex response relationship to a higher CVP and lower FVR. HR baroreflex response (DeltaHR/DeltaMAP) to PE+LBNP+NP was lower (P = 0.015) after maximal exercise (-0.43 +/- 0.15 beats x min-1 x mm Hg-1) compared with the control

  18. The friction coefficient of shoulder joints remains remarkably low over 24 h of loading.

    PubMed

    Jones, Brian K; Durney, Krista M; Hung, Clark T; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2015-11-01

    The frictional response of whole human joints over durations spanning activities of daily living has not been reported previously. This study measured the friction of human glenohumeral joints during 24 h of reciprocal loading in a pendulum testing device, at moderate (0.2 mm/s, 4320 cycles) and low (0.02 mm/s, 432 cycles) sliding speeds, under a 200 N load. The effect of joint congruence was also investigated by testing human humeral heads against significantly larger mature bovine glenoids. Eight human joints and six bovine joints were tested in four combinations: human joints tested at moderate (hHCMS, n=6) and low speed (hHCLS, n=3), human humeral heads tested against bovine glenoids at moderate speed (LCMS, n=3), and bovine joints tested at moderate speed (bHCMS, n=3). In the first half hour the mean±standard deviation of the friction coefficient was hHCMS: 0.0016±0.0011, hHCLS: 0.0012±0.0002, LCMS: 0.0008±0.0002 and bHCMS: 0.0024±0.0008; in the last four hours it was hHCMS: 0.0057±0.0025, hHCLS: 0.0047±0.0017, LCMS: 0.0012±0.0003 and bHCMS: 0.0056±0.0016. The initial value was lower than the final value (p<0.0001). The value in LCMS was significantly lower than in hHCMS and bHCMS (p<0.01). No visual damage was observed in any of the specimens. These are the first results to demonstrate that the friction coefficient of natural human shoulders remains remarkably low (averaging as little as 0.0015 and no greater than 0.006) for up to 24 h of continuous loading. The sustained low friction coefficients observed in incongruent joints (~0.001) likely represent rolling rather than sliding friction. PMID:26472306

  19. Ixodes scapularis Tick Saliva Proteins Sequentially Secreted Every 24 h during Blood Feeding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Kwon; Tirloni, Lucas; Pinto, Antônio F M; Moresco, James; Yates, John R; da Silva Vaz, Itabajara; Mulenga, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Ixodes scapularis is the most medically important tick species and transmits five of the 14 reportable human tick borne disease (TBD) agents in the USA. This study describes LC-MS/MS identification of 582 tick- and 83 rabbit proteins in saliva of I. scapularis ticks that fed for 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 h, as well as engorged but not detached (BD), and spontaneously detached (SD). The 582 tick proteins include proteases (5.7%), protease inhibitors (7.4%), unknown function proteins (22%), immunity/antimicrobial (2.6%), lipocalin (3.1%), heme/iron binding (2.6%), extracellular matrix/ cell adhesion (2.2%), oxidant metabolism/ detoxification (6%), transporter/ receptor related (3.2%), cytoskeletal (5.5%), and housekeeping-like (39.7%). Notable observations include: (i) tick saliva proteins of unknown function accounting for >33% of total protein content, (ii) 79% of proteases are metalloproteases, (iii) 13% (76/582) of proteins in this study were found in saliva of other tick species and, (iv) ticks apparently selectively inject functionally similar but unique proteins every 24 h, which we speculate is the tick's antigenic variation equivalent strategy to protect important tick feeding functions from host immune system. The host immune responses to proteins present in 24 h I. scapularis saliva will not be effective at later feeding stages. Rabbit proteins identified in our study suggest the tick's strategic use of host proteins to modulate the feeding site. Notably fibrinogen, which is central to blood clotting and wound healing, was detected in high abundance in BD and SD saliva, when the tick is preparing to terminate feeding and detach from the host. A remarkable tick adaptation is that the feeding lesion is completely healed when the tick detaches from the host. Does the tick concentrate fibrinogen at the feeding site to aide in promoting healing of the feeding lesion? Overall, these data provide broad insight into molecular mechanisms regulating different tick

  20. Ixodes scapularis Tick Saliva Proteins Sequentially Secreted Every 24 h during Blood Feeding

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Antônio F. M.; Moresco, James; Yates, John R.; da Silva Vaz, Itabajara; Mulenga, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Ixodes scapularis is the most medically important tick species and transmits five of the 14 reportable human tick borne disease (TBD) agents in the USA. This study describes LC-MS/MS identification of 582 tick- and 83 rabbit proteins in saliva of I. scapularis ticks that fed for 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 h, as well as engorged but not detached (BD), and spontaneously detached (SD). The 582 tick proteins include proteases (5.7%), protease inhibitors (7.4%), unknown function proteins (22%), immunity/antimicrobial (2.6%), lipocalin (3.1%), heme/iron binding (2.6%), extracellular matrix/ cell adhesion (2.2%), oxidant metabolism/ detoxification (6%), transporter/ receptor related (3.2%), cytoskeletal (5.5%), and housekeeping-like (39.7%). Notable observations include: (i) tick saliva proteins of unknown function accounting for >33% of total protein content, (ii) 79% of proteases are metalloproteases, (iii) 13% (76/582) of proteins in this study were found in saliva of other tick species and, (iv) ticks apparently selectively inject functionally similar but unique proteins every 24 h, which we speculate is the tick's antigenic variation equivalent strategy to protect important tick feeding functions from host immune system. The host immune responses to proteins present in 24 h I. scapularis saliva will not be effective at later feeding stages. Rabbit proteins identified in our study suggest the tick's strategic use of host proteins to modulate the feeding site. Notably fibrinogen, which is central to blood clotting and wound healing, was detected in high abundance in BD and SD saliva, when the tick is preparing to terminate feeding and detach from the host. A remarkable tick adaptation is that the feeding lesion is completely healed when the tick detaches from the host. Does the tick concentrate fibrinogen at the feeding site to aide in promoting healing of the feeding lesion? Overall, these data provide broad insight into molecular mechanisms regulating different tick

  1. Redundancy of stomatal control for the circadian photosynthetic rhythm in Kalanchoë daigremontiana Hamet et Perrier.

    PubMed

    Wyka, T P; Duarte, H M; Lüttge, U E

    2005-03-01

    In continuous light, the Crassulacean acid metabolism plant Kalanchoe daigremontiana Hamet et Perrier has a circadian rhythm of gas exchange with peaks occurring during the subjective night. The rhythm of gas exchange is coupled to a weak, reverse phased rhythm of quantum yield of photosystem II (Phi (PSII)). To test if the rhythm of Phi (PSII) persists in the absence of stomatal control, leaves were coated with a thin layer of translucent silicone grease which prevented CO2 and H2O exchange. In spite of this treatment, the rhythm of Phi (PSII) occurred with close to normal phase timing and with a much larger amplitude than in uncoated leaves. The mechanism underlying the Phi (PSII) rhythm in coated leaves can be explained by a circadian activity of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC). At peaks of PEPC activity, the small amount of CO2 contained in the coated leaf could have become depleted, preventing the carboxylase activity of Rubisco and causing decreases in electron transport rates (observed as deep troughs of Phi (PSII) at 23-h in LL and at ca. 24-h intervals afterwards). Peaks of Phi (PSII) would be caused by a downregulation of PEPC leading to improved supply of CO2 to Rubisco. Substrate limitation of photochemistry at 23 h (trough of Phi (PSII)) was also suggested by the weak response of ETR in coated leaves to stepwise light enhancement. These results show that photosynthetic rhythmicity in K. daigremontiana is independent of stomatal regulation and may originate in the mesophyll. PMID:15822013

  2. Cerebral blood flow velocity in humans exposed to 24 h of head-down tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawai, Y.; Murthy, G.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Breit, G. A.; Deroshia, C. W.; Hargens, A. R.

    1993-01-01

    This study investigates cerebral blood flow (CBF) velocity in humans before, during, and after 24 h of 6 deg head-down tilt (HDT), which is a currently accepted experimental model to simulate microgravity. CBF velocity was measured by use of the transcranial Doppler technique in the right middle cerebral artery of eight healthy male subjects. Mean CBF velocity increased from the pre-HDT upright seated baseline value of 55.5 +/- 3.7 (SE) cm/s to 61.5 +/- 3.3 cm/s at 0.5 h of HDT, reached a peak value of 63.2 +/- 4.1 cm/s at 3 h of HDT, and remained significantly above the pre-HDT baseline for over 6 h of HDT. During upright seated recovery, mean CBF velocity decreased to 87 percent of the pre-HDT baseline value. Mean CBF velocity correlated well with calculated intracranial arterial pressure (IAP). As analyzed by linear regression, mean CBF velocity = 29.6 + 0.32IAP. These results suggest that HDT increases CBF velocity by increasing IAP during several hours after the onset of microgravity. Importantly, the decrease in CBF velocity after HDT may be responsible, in part, for the increased risk of syncope observed in subjects after prolonged bed rest and also in astronauts returning to Earth.

  3. Gender differences in the impact of daily sadness on 24-h heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Verkuil, Bart; Brosschot, Jos F; Marques, Andrea H; Kampschroer, Kevin; Sternberg, Esther M; Thayer, Julian F

    2015-12-01

    Reduced heart rate variability (HRV) is proposed to mediate the relation between depressive symptoms and cardiovascular health problems. Yet, several studies have found that in women depression is associated with higher HRV levels, whereas in men depression is associated with lower HRV levels. So far, these studies have only examined gender differences in HRV levels using a single assessment. This study aimed to test the interactive effects of gender and sadness on ambulatory-assessed HRV levels. A sample of 60 (41 women) employees participated in an ambulatory study. HRV levels (mean of successive differences; MSD) were continuously measured for 24 h. During the daytime, hourly assessments of sadness and other mood states were taken, while depressive symptoms were assessed with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale (CES-D). Gender differences were observed when examining the impact of average daily sadness on MSD. In women, but not in men, the total amount of sadness experienced during the day was associated with higher circadian MSD levels. These findings suggest that researchers need to take gender differences into account when examining the relation between sadness, HRV, and cardiovascular problems. PMID:26338472

  4. Combined solar thermal and photovoltaic power plants - An approach to 24h solar electricity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platzer, Werner J.

    2016-05-01

    Solar thermal power plants have the advantage of being able to provide dispatchable renewable electricity even when the sun is not shining. Using thermal energy strorage (TES) they may increase the capacity factor (CF) considerably. However in order to increase the operating hours one has to increase both, thermal storage capacity and solar field size, because the additional solar field is needed to charge the storage. This increases investment cost, although levelised electricity cost (LEC) may decrease due to the higher generation. Photovoltaics as a fluctuating source on the other side has arrived at very low generation costs well below 10 ct/kWh even for Central Europe. Aiming at a capacity factor above 70% and at producing dispatchable power it is shown that by a suitable combination of CSP and PV we can arrive at lower costs than by increasing storage and solar field size in CSP plants alone. Although a complete baseload power plant with more than 90% full load hours may not be the most economic choice, power plants approaching a full 24h service in most days of the year seem to be possible at reasonably low tariffs.

  5. Fasting for 24 h improves nasal chemosensory performance and food palatability in a related manner.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Jameason D; Goldfield, Gary S; Doucet, Éric

    2012-06-01

    Changes in smell function can modify feeding behaviour but there is little evidence of how acute negative energy balance may impact olfaction and palatability. In a within-subjects repeated measures design, 15 subjects (nine male; six female) aged 28.6±4.5 years with initial body weight (BW) 74.7±4.9 kg and body mass index (BMI) 25.3±1.4 kg/m(2) were randomized and tested at baseline (FED) and Post Deprivation (FASTED) for nasal chemosensory performance (Sniffin' Sticks) and food palatability (visual analogue scale). Significant main effects for time indicated improvements in the FASTED session for odor threshold, odor discrimination, and total odor scores (TDI), and for increased palatability. There were significant positive correlations between initial BW and the change in odor threshold (r=.52) and TDI scores (r=.53). Positive correlations were also noted between delta identification score and delta palatability (r=.68). When the sample was split by sex, only for females were there significant correlations between delta palatability and: delta BW (r=.88); delta odor identification (r=.94); and delta TDI score (r=.85). Fasting for 24h improved smell function and this was related to increased palatability ratings and initial BW. Further studies should confirm the role of BW and sex in the context of olfaction, energy deprivation and palatability. PMID:22387713

  6. Biological rhythms and mood disorders

    PubMed Central

    Salvatore, Paola; Indic, Premananda; Murray, Greg; Baldessarini, Ross J.

    2012-01-01

    Integration of several approaches concerning time and temporality can enhance the pathophysiological study of major mood disorders of unknown etiology. We propose that these conditions might be interpreted as disturbances of temporal profile of biological rhythms, as well as alterations of time-consciousness. Useful approaches to study time and temporality include philological suggestions, phenomenological and psychopathological conceptualizatíons, clinical descriptions, and research on circadian and ultradían rhythms, as well as nonlinear dynamics approaches to their analysis. PMID:23393414

  7. Control mechanisms in physiological rhythms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizell, S.

    1973-01-01

    A search was made for the factors involved in regulating rhythmic body functions. The basic premise was that at a particular point in time, any cell can normally act in one of two ways. It can either be engaged in dividing or carrying out its particular function. Experimental results indicate rhythmic functions are controlled by a lighting regime and that an inverse correlation exists between rhythms of cell division and cell function. Data also show rhythms are a function of animal sex and environment.

  8. 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in healthy young adult Anglo, Hispanic, and African-American subjects.

    PubMed

    Chase, H P; Garg, S K; Icaza, G; Carmain, J A; Walravens, C F; Marshall, G

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare office and 24-h ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) values for adolescent and young adult males and females of Anglo, Hispanic, and African-American descent. One hundred and eighteen healthy subjects (62 females, 56 males) participated, with an ethnic distribution of 50 Anglo, 32 Hispanic, and 36 African-American subjects. All subjects came to the clinic for height, weight, sitting blood pressure (BP), and to begin 24-h ABP monitoring using the SpaceLabs model 90207 automatic noninvasive monitor. The monitor recorded readings every 0.5 h from 06:00 to 22:00 and every hour at night from 22:00 to 06:00. Office systolic and diastolic BP values were higher for all males compared to all females. Mean 24-h, nighttime, and daytime systolic ABP values were also significantly higher for males compared to females. The 24-h mean and daytime systolic ABP values were significantly different by ethnic groups. The African-American subjects always had the highest readings. Mean 24-h diastolic ABP was also significantly different by ethnic groups, with the African-American subjects being higher than the Anglos or the Hispanics. Diastolic ABP (24-h mean, daytime, and nighttime) values (for all subjects combined) increased gradually and varied significantly with age. This study provides preliminary normative data about ABP in an understudied population (ie, teenagers and young adults of different ethnic backgrounds). It also shows that higher blood pressures are present among males and among subjects of African-American descent in the teenage and young adult population. PMID:9008244

  9. Measuring individual locomotor rhythms in honey bees, paper wasps and other similar-sized insects

    PubMed Central

    Giannoni-Guzmán, Manuel A.; Avalos, Arian; Perez, Jaime Marrero; Loperena, Eduardo J. Otero; Kayım, Mehmet; Medina, Jose Alejandro; Massey, Steve E.; Kence, Meral; Kence, Aykut; Giray, Tugrul; Agosto-Rivera, José L.

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms in social insects are highly plastic and are modulated by multiple factors. In addition, complex behaviors such as sun-compass orientation and time learning are clearly regulated by the circadian system in these organisms. Despite these unique features of social insect clocks, the mechanisms as well as the functional and evolutionary relevance of these traits remain largely unknown. Here we show a modification of the Drosophila activity monitoring (DAM) system that allowed us to measure locomotor rhythms of the honey bee, Apis mellifera (three variants; gAHB, carnica and caucasica), and two paper wasps (Polistes crinitus and Mischocyttarus phthisicus). A side-by-side comparison of the endogenous period under constant darkness (free-running period) led us to the realization that these social insects exhibit significant deviations from the Earth's 24 h rotational period as well as a large degree of inter-individual variation compared with Drosophila. Experiments at different temperatures, using honey bees as a model, revealed that testing the endogenous rhythm at 35°C, which is the hive's core temperature, results in average periods closer to 24 h compared with 25°C (23.8 h at 35°C versus 22.7 h at 25°C). This finding suggests that the degree of tuning of circadian temperature compensation varies among different organisms. We expect that the commercial availability, cost-effectiveness and integrated nature of this monitoring system will facilitate the growth of the circadian field in these social insects and catalyze our understanding of the mechanisms as well as the functional and evolutionary relevance of circadian rhythms. PMID:24436380

  10. Measuring individual locomotor rhythms in honey bees, paper wasps and other similar-sized insects.

    PubMed

    Giannoni-Guzmán, Manuel A; Avalos, Arian; Marrero Perez, Jaime; Otero Loperena, Eduardo J; Kayım, Mehmet; Medina, Jose Alejandro; Massey, Steve E; Kence, Meral; Kence, Aykut; Giray, Tugrul; Agosto-Rivera, José L

    2014-04-15

    Circadian rhythms in social insects are highly plastic and are modulated by multiple factors. In addition, complex behaviors such as sun-compass orientation and time learning are clearly regulated by the circadian system in these organisms. Despite these unique features of social insect clocks, the mechanisms as well as the functional and evolutionary relevance of these traits remain largely unknown. Here we show a modification of the Drosophila activity monitoring (DAM) system that allowed us to measure locomotor rhythms of the honey bee, Apis mellifera (three variants; gAHB, carnica and caucasica), and two paper wasps (Polistes crinitus and Mischocyttarus phthisicus). A side-by-side comparison of the endogenous period under constant darkness (free-running period) led us to the realization that these social insects exhibit significant deviations from the Earth's 24 h rotational period as well as a large degree of inter-individual variation compared with Drosophila. Experiments at different temperatures, using honey bees as a model, revealed that testing the endogenous rhythm at 35°C, which is the hive's core temperature, results in average periods closer to 24 h compared with 25°C (23.8 h at 35°C versus 22.7 h at 25°C). This finding suggests that the degree of tuning of circadian temperature compensation varies among different organisms. We expect that the commercial availability, cost-effectiveness and integrated nature of this monitoring system will facilitate the growth of the circadian field in these social insects and catalyze our understanding of the mechanisms as well as the functional and evolutionary relevance of circadian rhythms. PMID:24436380

  11. Daily and seasonal rhythms in immune responses of splenocytes in the freshwater snake, Natrix piscator.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Manish Kumar; Singh, Ramesh; Pati, Atanu Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Present study was designed to examine daily and seasonal variability in the innate immune responses of splenocytes in the fresh water snake, Natrix piscator. Animals were mildly anesthetized and spleen was aseptically isolated and processed for macrophage phagocytosis, NBT reduction, nitrite production, splenocyte proliferation and serum lysozyme activity. Samples were collected at seven time points, viz., 0000, 0400, 0800, 1200, 1600, 2000 and 0000 h during three different seasons, namely summer, winter and spring. Cosinor analysis revealed that percent phagocytosis had a significant 24-h rhythm during summer and spring seasons. The peaks of rhythms in NBT reduction and nitrite release occurred in the morning hours at 10.88 h and 8.31 h, respectively, in winter. A significant 24-h rhythm was also observed in lysozyme concentration and splenocyte proliferation (both Basal and Concanavalin A stimulated) in all three seasons. A significant phase shift in splenocyte proliferation was obtained with a trend of delayed phase shift from winter to spring and from spring to summer. Of the nine variables, significant annual (seasonal) rhythms were detected in almost all variables, excluding phagocytic and splenosomatic indices. All rhythmic variables, except spleen cellularity, exhibited tightly synchronized peaks coinciding with the progressive and recrudescence phases of annual reproductive cycle. It is concluded that the snake synchronizes its daily and seasonal immune activity with the corresponding external time cues. The enhancement of immune function coinciding with one of its crucial reproductive phases might be helping it to cope with the seasonal stressors, including abundance of pathogens, which would otherwise jeopardize the successful reproduction and eventual survival of the species. PMID:25723391

  12. The International Sweethearts of Rhythm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sher, Liz

    1987-01-01

    The International Sweethearts of Rhythm, a popular, long-lived, all-female jazz band of the 1940s, were the first racially integrated women's band in America. Their achievement has been largely neglected by music historians. A brief history of the band is presented, and their significance is discussed. (BJV)

  13. Biochemical Oscillations and Cellular Rhythms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldbeter, Albert; Berridge, Foreword by M. J.

    1997-04-01

    1. Introduction; Part I. Glycolytic Oscillations: 2. Oscillatory enzymes: simple periodic behaviour in an allosteric model for glycolytic oscillations; Part II. From Simple to Complex Oscillatory Behaviour; 3. Birhythmicity: coexistence between two stable rhythms; 4. From simple periodic behaviour to complex oscillations, including bursting and chaos; Part III. Oscillations Of Cyclic Amo In Dictyostelium Cells: 5. Models for the periodic synthesis and relay of camp signals in Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae; 6. Complex oscillations and chaos in the camp signalling system of Dictyostelium; 7. The onset of camp oscillations in Dictyostelium as a model for the ontogenesis of biological rhythms; Part IV. Pulsatile Signalling In Intercellular Communication: 8. Function of the rhythm of intercellular communication in Dictyostelium. Link with pulsatile hormone secretion; Part V. Calcium Oscillations: 9. Oscillations and waves of intracellular calcium; Part VI. The Mitotic Oscillator: 10. Modelling the mitotic oscillator driving the cell division cycle; Part VII. Circadian Rhythms: 11. Towards a model for circadian oscillations in the Drosophila period protein (PER); 12. Conclusions and perspectives; References.

  14. Rhythm Deficits in "Tone Deafness"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foxton, Jessica M.; Nandy, Rachel K.; Griffiths, Timothy D.

    2006-01-01

    It is commonly observed that "tone deaf" individuals are unable to hear the beat of a tune, yet deficits on simple timing tests have not been found. In this study, we investigated rhythm processing in nine individuals with congenital amusia ("tone deafness") and nine controls. Participants were presented with pairs of 5-note sequences, and were…

  15. Quality assurance of the international computerised 24 h dietary recall method (EPIC-Soft).

    PubMed

    Crispim, Sandra P; Nicolas, Genevieve; Casagrande, Corinne; Knaze, Viktoria; Illner, Anne-Kathrin; Huybrechts, Inge; Slimani, Nadia

    2014-02-01

    The interview-administered 24 h dietary recall (24-HDR) EPIC-Soft® has a series of controls to guarantee the quality of dietary data across countries. These comprise all steps that are part of fieldwork preparation, data collection and data management; however, a complete characterisation of these quality controls is still lacking. The present paper describes in detail the quality controls applied in EPIC-Soft, which are, to a large extent, built on the basis of the EPIC-Soft error model and are present in three phases: (1) before, (2) during and (3) after the 24-HDR interviews. Quality controls for consistency and harmonisation are implemented before the interviews while preparing the seventy databases constituting an EPIC-Soft version (e.g. pre-defined and coded foods and recipes). During the interviews, EPIC-Soft uses a cognitive approach by helping the respondent to recall the dietary intake information in a stepwise manner and includes controls for consistency (e.g. probing questions) as well as for completeness of the collected data (e.g. system calculation for some unknown amounts). After the interviews, a series of controls can be applied by dietitians and data managers to further guarantee data quality. For example, the interview-specific 'note files' that were created to track any problems or missing information during the interviews can be checked to clarify the information initially provided. Overall, the quality controls employed in the EPIC-Soft methodology are not always perceivable, but prove to be of assistance for its overall standardisation and possibly for the accuracy of the collected data. PMID:24001201

  16. Demographic, Dietary, and Urinary Factors and 24-h Urinary Calcium Excretion

    PubMed Central

    Curhan, Gary C.

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: Higher urinary calcium is a risk factor for nephrolithiasis. This study delineated associations between demographic, dietary, and urinary factors and 24-h urinary calcium. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: Cross-sectional studies were conducted of 2201 stone formers (SF) and 1167 nonstone formers (NSF) in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (men) and Nurses' Health Studies I and II (older and younger women). Results: Median urinary calcium was 182 mg/d in men, 182 mg/d in older women, and 192 mg/d in younger women. Compared with NSF, urinary calcium as a fraction of calcium intake was 33 to 38% higher in SF (P values ≤0.01). In regression analyses, participants were combined because associations with urinary calcium were similar in each cohort and in SF and NSF. After multivariate adjustment, participants in the highest quartile of calcium intake excreted 18 mg/d more urinary calcium than those in the lowest (P trend =0.01). Caffeine and family history of nephrolithiasis were positively associated, whereas urinary potassium, thiazides, gout, and age were inversely associated, with urinary calcium. After multivariate adjustment, participants in the highest quartiles of urinary magnesium, sodium, sulfate, citrate, phosphorus, and volume excreted 71 mg/d, 37 mg/d, 44 mg/d, 61 mg/d, 37 mg/d, and 24 mg/d more urinary calcium, respectively, than participants in the lowest (P values trend ≤0.01). Conclusions: Intestinal calcium absorption and/or negative calcium balance is greater in SF than NSF. Higher calcium intakes at levels typically observed in free-living individuals are associated with only small increases in urinary calcium. PMID:19820135

  17. Parabens in 24 h urine samples of the German Environmental Specimen Bank from 1995 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Moos, Rebecca K; Koch, Holger M; Angerer, Jürgen; Apel, Petra; Schröter-Kermani, Christa; Brüning, Thomas; Kolossa-Gehring, Marike

    2015-10-01

    Parabens are widely used as antimicrobial preservatives in personal care and consumer products, food and pharmaceuticals. Due to their ubiquity, humans are constantly exposed to these chemicals. We assessed exposure to nine parabens (methyl-, ethyl-, n- and iso-propyl-, n- and iso-butyl-, benzyl-, pentyl- and heptyl paraben) in the German population from 1995 to 2012 based on 660 24h urine samples from the German Environmental Specimen Bank (ESB) using on-line HPLC coupled to isotope dilution tandem mass spectrometry. The limit of quantification (LOQ) was 0.5 μg/L for all parabens. We detected methyl-, ethyl- and n-propyl paraben in 79-99% of samples, followed by n-butyl paraben in 40% of samples. We infrequently detected iso-butyl-, iso-propyl- and benzyl paraben in 24%, 4% and 1.4% of samples, respectively. Urinary concentrations were highest for methyl paraben (median 39.8 μg/L; 95th percentile 319 μg/L) followed by n-propyl paraben (4.8 μg/L; 95th percentile 74.0 μg/L) and ethyl paraben (2.1 μg/L; 95th percentile 39.1 μg/L). Women had significantly higher urinary levels for all parabens than men, except for benzyl paraben. Samples from the ESB revealed that over the investigation period of nearly 20 years urinary paraben levels remained surprisingly constant; only methyl paraben had a significant increase, for both men and women. We found strong correlations between methyl- and n-propyl paraben and between n- and iso-butyl paraben. These results indicate that parabens are used in combination and arise from common sources of exposure. Urinary excretion factors are needed to extrapolate from individual urinary concentrations to actual doses. PMID:26253560

  18. Postmortem redistribution of the heroin metabolites morphine and morphine-3-glucuronide in rabbits over 24 h.

    PubMed

    Maskell, Peter D; Albeishy, Mohammed; De Paoli, Giorgia; Wilson, Nathan E; Seetohul, L Nitin

    2016-03-01

    The interpretation of postmortem drug levels is complicated by changes in drug blood levels in the postmortem period, a phenomena known as postmortem drug redistribution. We investigated the postmortem redistribution of the heroin metabolites morphine and morphine-3-glucuronide in a rabbit model. Heroin (1 mg/kg) was injected into anesthetised rabbit; after 1 h, an auricular vein blood sample was taken and the rabbit was euthanised. Following death rabbits were placed in a supine position at room temperature and divided into three groups namely (1) immediate autopsy, (2) autopsy after 30 minutes and (3) autopsy 24 h after death. Various samples which included femoral blood, cardiac blood, lung, liver, kidney, vitreous humour, subcutaneous and abdominal fat, liver, bone marrow and skeletal muscle were taken. The samples were analysed with a validated LC-MS/MS method. It was observed that within minutes there was a significant increase in free morphine postmortem femoral blood concentration compared to the antemortem sample (0.01 ± 0.01 to 0.05 ± 0.02 mg/L).Various other changes in free morphine and metabolite concentrations were observed during the course of the experiment in various tissues. Principal component analysis was used to investigate possible correlations between free morphine in the various samples. Some correlations were observed but gave poor predictions (>20 % error) when back calculating. The results suggest that rabbits are a good model for further studies of postmortem redistribution but that further study and understanding of the phenomena is required before accurate predictions of the blood concentration at the time of death are possible. PMID:25863436

  19. Pinealectomy shortens resynchronisation times of house sparrow (Passer domesticus) circadian rhythms.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinod; Gwinner, Eberhard

    2005-09-01

    In many birds periodic melatonin secretion by the pineal organ is essential for the high-amplitude self-sustained output of the circadian pacemaker, and thus for the persistence of rhythmicity in 24 h oscillations controlled by it. The elimination of the pineal melatonin rhythm, or a reduction of its amplitude, renders the circadian pacemaker a less self-sustained, often highly damped, oscillatory system. A reduction in the degree of self-sustainment of a rhythm should not only increase its range of entrainment but also shorten the resynchronization times following phase-shifts of the zeitgeber. This hypothesis has not yet been directly tested. We therefore carried out the present study in which house sparrows (Passer domesticus) were subjected to both 6-h advance and 6-h delay phase-shifts of the light-dark cycle before and after the pinealectomy, and the rhythms in locomotion and feeding were recorded. The results indicate that following the delay, but not the advance, phase shift, resynchronization times were significantly shorter after pinealectomy. The dependence of resynchronization times on the presence or absence of the pineal organ is not only of theoretical interest but might also be of functional significance in the natural life of birds. A reduction or elimination of the amplitude of the melatonin secretion rhythm by the pineal organ might be responsible for faster adjustment to changes in zeitgeber conditions in nature. PMID:16151793

  20. An antennal circadian clock and circadian rhythms in peripheral pheromone reception in the moth Spodoptera littoralis.

    PubMed

    Merlin, Christine; Lucas, Philippe; Rochat, Didier; François, Marie-Christine; Maïbèche-Coisne, Martine; Jacquin-Joly, Emmanuelle

    2007-12-01

    Circadian rhythms are observed in mating behaviors in moths: females emit sex pheromones and males are attracted by these pheromones in rhythmic fashions. In the moth Spodoptera littoralis, we demonstrated the occurrence of a circadian oscillator in the antenna, the peripheral olfactory organ. We identified different clock genes, period (per), cryptochrome1 (cry1) and cryptochrome2 (cry2), in this organ. Using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), we found that their corresponding transcripts cycled circadianly in the antenna as well as in the brain. Electroantennogram (EAG) recordings over 24 h demonstrated for the first time a circadian rhythm in antennal responses of a moth to sex pheromone. qPCR showed that out of one pheromone-binding protein (PBP), one olfactory receptor (OR), and one odorant-degrading enzyme (ODE), all putatively involved in the pheromone reception, only the ODE transcript presented a circadian rhythm that may be related to rhythms in olfactory signal resolution. Peripheral or central circadian clock control of olfaction is then discussed in light of recent data. PMID:18057325

  1. Effect of maternal deprivation on N-acetyltransferase activity rhythm in blinded rat pups.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Y; Takeuchi, Y; Yamazaki, K; Takahashi, K

    1998-02-15

    It has been reported that the rhythms of infant rats synchronize with the mother's rhythm until the light-dark cycle comes and has strong effects on their endogenous clocks. We found that periodic maternal deprivation (PMD) was able to cause a phase shift of serotonin N-acetyltransferase (NAT) in neonatal blinded rat pups. PMD in which contact with the mother was allowed for only 4 h caused a phase shift of NAT rhythm, irrespective of the timing of contact with the mother in a day. Acute single mother deprivation caused an excess of NAT activity for more hours than usual and contact with the mother prevented such an excessive response. Mother deprivation may act as a cold stress, since artificial warming of pups gave the same results as contact with the mother. When the pups were artificially warmed by a heater during a 1-week deprivation period, a flat 24-h pattern of NAT was observed. The mechanism causing a phase shift of NAT activity rhythm of rat pups may be complicated. PMID:9523895

  2. Consequences of manganese intoxication on the circadian rest-activity rhythms in the rat.

    PubMed

    Bouabid, Safa; Fifel, Karim; Benazzouz, Abdelhamid; Lakhdar-Ghazal, Nouria

    2016-09-01

    Manganese (Mn) intoxication is associated with neurological dysfunctions collectively known as Parkinsonism or Manganism. Like in Parkinson's disease, Manganism is associated with motor disturbances, together with non-motor symptoms including cognitive and neuropsychiatric deficits. Although sleep dysfunctions are commonly reported among workers exposed to Mn, their underlying pathophysiology remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the rest-activity rhythms in rats treated daily with MnCl2 (10mg/kg, i.p) for 5weeks. Locomotor activity was assessed under a light-dark (LD) cycle, constant darkness (DD) and during adjustment to 6h shifts of the LD cycle. In LD conditions, Mn-treated rats exhibited a more fragmented and less stable rest-activity rhythm in addition to a reduction in the total 24-h amount of locomotor activity as well as in the activity confined to the active dark phase of the LD. Consequently, a significant decrease in the amplitude of the rest-activity rhythm was observed. These disturbances were displayed during and after Mn treatment. Furthermore, after the 6-h phase advance of the LD cycle, Mn-treated rats failed to re-adjust accurately their behavioral activity to the new shifted LD cycle. Upon release from LD into DD, Mn-treated rats expressed a normal and stable free-running period of their rest-activity rhythm (23.92±0.07h in Mn group vs. 24.01±0.04h in control rats). However, their rest-activity rhythm remained highly fragmented and less stable. Our results provide the first evidence that chronic Mn intoxication leads to impairment of rest-activity rhythms in addition to the motor and non-motor disturbances reported in Manganism. PMID:27316552

  3. On the Role of Histamine Receptors in the Regulation of Circadian Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Rozov, Stanislav V.; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; Panula, Pertti

    2015-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest a regulatory role of histamine in circadian rhythms, but little is known about signaling pathways that would be involved in such a putative role. The aim of this study was to examine whether histamine mediates its effects on the circadian system through Hrh1 or Hrh3 receptors. We assessed both diurnal and free-running locomotor activity rhythms of Hrh1-/- and Hrh3-/- mice. We also determined the expression of Per1, Per2 and Bmal1 genes in the suprachiasmatic nuclei, several areas of the cerebral cortex and striatum under symmetric 24 h light-dark cycle at zeitgeber times 14 and 6 by using radioactive in situ hybridization. We found no differences between Hrh1-/- and wild type mice in the length, amplitude and mesor of diurnal and free-running activity rhythms as well as in expression of Per1, Per2 and Bmal1 genes in any of the examined brain structures. The amplitude of free-running activity rhythm of the Hrh3-/- mice was significantly flattened, whereas the expression of the clock genes in Hrh3-/- mice was similar to the wild type animals in all of the assessed brain structures. Therefore, the knockout of Hrh1 receptor had no effects on the circadian rhythm of spontaneous locomotion, and a knockout of Hrh3 receptor caused a substantial reduction of free-running activity rhythm amplitude, but none of these knockout models affected the expression patterns of the core clock genes in any of the studied brain structures. PMID:26660098

  4. Chronic ethanol consumption disrupts diurnal rhythms of hepatic glycogen metabolism in mice

    PubMed Central

    Udoh, Uduak S.; Swain, Telisha M.; Filiano, Ashley N.; Gamble, Karen L.; Young, Martin E.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic ethanol consumption has been shown to significantly decrease hepatic glycogen content; however, the mechanisms responsible for this adverse metabolic effect are unknown. In this study, we examined the impact chronic ethanol consumption has on time-of-day-dependent oscillations (rhythms) in glycogen metabolism processes in the liver. For this, male C57BL/6J mice were fed either a control or ethanol-containing liquid diet for 5 wk, and livers were collected every 4 h for 24 h and analyzed for changes in various genes and proteins involved in hepatic glycogen metabolism. Glycogen displayed a robust diurnal rhythm in the livers of mice fed the control diet, with the peak occurring during the active (dark) period of the day. The diurnal glycogen rhythm was significantly altered in livers of ethanol-fed mice, with the glycogen peak shifted into the inactive (light) period and the overall content of glycogen decreased compared with controls. Chronic ethanol consumption further disrupted diurnal rhythms in gene expression (glycogen synthase 1 and 2, glycogenin, glucokinase, protein targeting to glycogen, and pyruvate kinase), total and phosphorylated glycogen synthase protein, and enzyme activities of glycogen synthase and glycogen phosphorylase, the rate-limiting enzymes of glycogen metabolism. In summary, these results show for the first time that chronic ethanol consumption disrupts diurnal rhythms in hepatic glycogen metabolism at the gene and protein level. Chronic ethanol-induced disruption in these daily rhythms likely contributes to glycogen depletion and disruption of hepatic energy homeostasis, a recognized risk factor in the etiology of alcoholic liver disease. PMID:25857999

  5. Concepts in human biological rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Reinberg, Alain; Ashkenazi, Israel

    2003-01-01

    Biological rhythms and their temporal organization are adaptive phenomena to periodic changes in environmental factors linked to the earth's rotation on its axis and around the sun. Experimental data from the plant and animal kingdoms have led to many models and concepts related to biological clocks that help describe and understand the mechanisms of these changes. Many of the prevailing concepts apply to all organisms, but most of the experimental data are insufficient to explain the dynamics of human biological clocks. This review presents phenomena thai are mainly characteristic ofand unique to - human chronobiology, and which cannot be fully explained by concepts and models drawn from laboratory experiments. We deal with the functional advantages of the human temporal organization and the problem of desynchronization, with special reference to the period (τ) of the circadian rhythm and its interindividual and intraindividual variability. We describe the differences between right- and left-hand rhythms suggesting the existence of different biological clocks in the right and left cortices, Desynchronization of rhythms is rather frequent (one example is night shift workers). In some individuals, desynchronization causes no clinical symptoms and we propose the concept of “allochronism” to designate a variant of the human temporal organization with no pathological implications. We restrict the term “dyschronism” to changes or alterations in temporal organization associated with a set of symptoms similar to those observed in subjects intolerant to shift work, eg, persisting fatigue and mood and sleep alterations. Many diseases involve chronic deprivation of sleep at night and constitute conditions mimicking thai of night shift workers who are intolerant to desynchronization. We also present a genetic model (the dian-circadian model) to explain interindividual differences in the period of biological rhythms in certain conditions. PMID:22033796

  6. Cognitive Efficacy (SIB) of 13.3 Versus 4.6 mg/24 h Rivastigmine Patch in Severe Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Isaacson, Richard S; Ferris, Steven; Velting, Drew M; Meng, Xiangyi

    2016-05-01

    Severe Impairment Battery (SIB) data from the 24-week, randomized, double-blind ACTivities of daily living and cognitION (ACTION) study suggest that patients with severe Alzheimer's disease (AD) benefit from treatment with 13.3 versus 4.6 mg/24 h rivastigmine patch. The objective of this retrospective analysis was to further examine the cognitive efficacy of 13.3 versus 4.6 mg/24 h rivastigmine patch on individual SIB items, and SIB domains derived using factor analysis of these items. Change from baseline at Week 24 on 9 new factor-defined domains and individual items was calculated and compared using effect sizes (Cohen's d). Numerically less decline was observed with 13.3 versus 4.6 mg/24 h patch on all domains and the majority of individual items. Largest least squares mean treatment differences were observed on "visuospatial reasoning," "object naming," "recognition," "design copying," "social agency," "ideational praxis," and "comprehension" domains. These findings suggest 13.3 mg/24 h rivastigmine patch demonstrates broad cognitive efficacy across a range of SIB items and domains in patients with severe AD. PMID:26371345

  7. [Use of customer relationship management to improve healthcare for citizens. The 24h Andalusian Health Service: Healthline].

    PubMed

    Quero, Manuel; Ramos, María Belén; López, Wilfredo; Cubillas, Juan José; González, José María; Castillo, José Luis

    2016-01-01

    Salud Responde (in English: Healthline) is a Health Service and Information Centre of the taxpayer-funded Andalusian Health System (AHS) that offers a Telephone Health Advisory Service called SA24h, among other services. The main objective of SA24h is to inform and advise citizens on health issues and the available health resources of the AHS. SA24h has a Customer Relationship Management information technology tool that organises information at various levels of specialization. Depending on the difficulty of the query, the citizen is attended by professionals with distinct profiles, providing a consensual response within the professionals working within Salud Responde or within other healthcare levels of the AHS. SA24h provided responses to 757,168 patient queries from late 2008 to the end of 01/12/2015. A total of 9.38% of the consultations were resolved by the non-health professionals working at Salud Responde. The remaining 84.07% were resolved by health staff. A total of 6.5% of users were referred to accident and emergency facilities while 88.77% did not need to attend their general practitioner within the next 24hours, thus avoiding unnecessary visits to health care facilities. PMID:26900101

  8. Association between Parent and Child Dietary Sodium and Potassium Intakes as Assessed by 24-h Urinary Excretion

    PubMed Central

    Service, Carrie; Grimes, Carley; Riddell, Lynn; He, Feng; Campbell, Karen; Nowson, Caryl

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the association between parent and child sodium (Na) and potassium (K) intake as assessed by 24-h urinary excretion (24hUE). Primary school children and their parent(s) provided one 24-h urine sample and information on cooking and children’s discretionary salt use. Valid urine samples were provided by 108 mothers (mean age 41.8 (5.1) (SD) years, Na 120 (45) mmol/day) (7.0 g/day salt equivalent) and 40 fathers (44.4 (4.9) years, Na 152 (49) mmol/day (8.9 g/day salt), and 168 offspring (51.8% male, age 9.1 (2.0) years, Na 101 (47) mmol/day (5.9 g/day salt). When adjusted for parental age, child age and gender a 17 mmol/day Na (1 g/day salt) increase in mother’s 24hUE was associated with a 3.4 mmol/day Na (0.2 g/day salt) increase in child’s salt 24hUE (p = 0.04) with no association observed between father and child. Sixty-seven percent of parents added salt during cooking and 37% of children added salt at the table. Children who reported adding table salt had higher urinary excretion than those who did not (p = 0.01). The association between mother and child Na intake may relate to the consumption of similar foods and highlights the importance of the home environment in influencing total dietary sodium intake. PMID:27043620

  9. Association between Parent and Child Dietary Sodium and Potassium Intakes as Assessed by 24-h Urinary Excretion.

    PubMed

    Service, Carrie; Grimes, Carley; Riddell, Lynn; He, Feng; Campbell, Karen; Nowson, Caryl

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the association between parent and child sodium (Na) and potassium (K) intake as assessed by 24-h urinary excretion (24hUE). Primary school children and their parent(s) provided one 24-h urine sample and information on cooking and children's discretionary salt use. Valid urine samples were provided by 108 mothers (mean age 41.8 (5.1) (SD) years, Na 120 (45) mmol/day) (7.0 g/day salt equivalent) and 40 fathers (44.4 (4.9) years, Na 152 (49) mmol/day (8.9 g/day salt), and 168 offspring (51.8% male, age 9.1 (2.0) years, Na 101 (47) mmol/day (5.9 g/day salt). When adjusted for parental age, child age and gender a 17 mmol/day Na (1 g/day salt) increase in mother's 24hUE was associated with a 3.4 mmol/day Na (0.2 g/day salt) increase in child's salt 24hUE (p = 0.04) with no association observed between father and child. Sixty-seven percent of parents added salt during cooking and 37% of children added salt at the table. Children who reported adding table salt had higher urinary excretion than those who did not (p = 0.01). The association between mother and child Na intake may relate to the consumption of similar foods and highlights the importance of the home environment in influencing total dietary sodium intake. PMID:27043620

  10. Prevalence and determinants of misreporting among European children in proxy-reported 24 h dietary recalls.

    PubMed

    Börnhorst, C; Huybrechts, I; Ahrens, W; Eiben, G; Michels, N; Pala, V; Molnár, D; Russo, P; Barba, G; Bel-Serrat, S; Moreno, L A; Papoutsou, S; Veidebaum, T; Loit, H-M; Lissner, L; Pigeot, I

    2013-04-14

    Dietary assessment is strongly affected by misreporting (both under- and over-reporting), which results in measurement error. Knowledge about misreporting is essential to correctly interpret potentially biased associations between diet and health outcomes. In young children, dietary data mainly rely on proxy respondents but little is known about determinants of misreporting here. The present analysis was conducted within the framework of the multi-centre IDEFICS (Identification and prevention of dietary- and lifestyle-induced health effects in children and infants) study and is based on 6101 children aged 2-9 years with 24 h dietary recall (24-HDR) and complete covariate information. Adapted Goldberg cut-offs were applied to classify the 24-HDR as 'over-report', 'plausible report' or 'under-report'. Backward elimination in the course of multi-level logistic regression analyses was conducted to identify factors significantly related to under- and over-reporting. Next to characteristics of the children and parents, social factors and parental concerns/perceptions concerning their child's weight status were considered. Further selective misreporting was addressed, investigating food group intakes commonly perceived as more or less socially desirable. Proportions of under-, plausible and over-reports were 8.0, 88.6 and 3.4 %, respectively. The risk of under-reporting increased with age (OR 1.19, 95 % CI 1.05, 1.83), BMI z-score of the child (OR 1.23, 95 % CI 1.10, 1.37) and household size (OR 1.12, 95 % CI 1.01, 1.25), and was higher in low/medium income groups (OR 1.45, 95 % CI 1.13, 1.86). Over-reporting was negatively associated with BMI z-scores of the child (OR 0.78, 95 % CI 0.69, 0.88) and higher in girls (OR 1.70, 95 % CI 1.27, 2.28). Further social desirability and parental concerns/perceptions seemed to influence the reporting behaviour. Future studies should involve these determinants of misreporting when investigating diet-disease relationships in children

  11. Pineal melatonin is a circadian time-giver for leptin rhythm in Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Chakir, Ibtissam; Dumont, Stéphanie; Pévet, Paul; Ouarour, Ali; Challet, Etienne; Vuillez, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Nocturnal secretion of melatonin from the pineal gland may affect central and peripheral timing, in addition to its well-known involvement in the control of seasonal physiology. The Syrian hamster is a photoperiodic species, which displays gonadal atrophy and increased adiposity when adapted to short (winter-like) photoperiods. Here we investigated whether pineal melatonin secreted at night can impact daily rhythmicity of metabolic hormones and glucose in that seasonal species. For that purpose, daily variations of plasma leptin, cortisol, insulin and glucose were analyzed in pinealectomized hamsters, as compared to sham-operated controls kept under very long (16 h light/08 h dark) or short photoperiods (08 h light/16 h dark). Daily rhythms of leptin under both long and short photoperiods were blunted by pinealectomy. Furthermore, the phase of cortisol rhythm under a short photoperiod was advanced by 5.6 h after pinealectomy. Neither plasma insulin, nor blood glucose displays robust daily rhythmicity, even in sham-operated hamsters. Pinealectomy, however, totally reversed the decreased levels of insulin under short days and the photoperiodic variations in mean levels of blood glucose (i.e., reduction and increase in long and short days, respectively). Together, these findings in Syrian hamsters show that circulating melatonin at night drives the daily rhythmicity of plasma leptin, participates in the phase control of cortisol rhythm and modulates glucose homeostasis according to photoperiod-dependent metabolic state. PMID:26074760

  12. Pineal melatonin is a circadian time-giver for leptin rhythm in Syrian hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Chakir, Ibtissam; Dumont, Stéphanie; Pévet, Paul; Ouarour, Ali; Challet, Etienne; Vuillez, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Nocturnal secretion of melatonin from the pineal gland may affect central and peripheral timing, in addition to its well-known involvement in the control of seasonal physiology. The Syrian hamster is a photoperiodic species, which displays gonadal atrophy and increased adiposity when adapted to short (winter-like) photoperiods. Here we investigated whether pineal melatonin secreted at night can impact daily rhythmicity of metabolic hormones and glucose in that seasonal species. For that purpose, daily variations of plasma leptin, cortisol, insulin and glucose were analyzed in pinealectomized hamsters, as compared to sham-operated controls kept under very long (16 h light/08 h dark) or short photoperiods (08 h light/16 h dark). Daily rhythms of leptin under both long and short photoperiods were blunted by pinealectomy. Furthermore, the phase of cortisol rhythm under a short photoperiod was advanced by 5.6 h after pinealectomy. Neither plasma insulin, nor blood glucose displays robust daily rhythmicity, even in sham-operated hamsters. Pinealectomy, however, totally reversed the decreased levels of insulin under short days and the photoperiodic variations in mean levels of blood glucose (i.e., reduction and increase in long and short days, respectively). Together, these findings in Syrian hamsters show that circulating melatonin at night drives the daily rhythmicity of plasma leptin, participates in the phase control of cortisol rhythm and modulates glucose homeostasis according to photoperiod-dependent metabolic state. PMID:26074760

  13. Glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis in muscles from immobilized limbs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholson, W. F.; Watson, P. A.; Booth, F. W.

    1984-01-01

    Defects in glucose metabolism in muscles of immobilized limbs of mice were related to alterations in insulin binding, insulin responsiveness, glucose supply, and insulin activation of glycogen synthase. These were tested by in vitro methodology. A significant lessening in the insulin-induced maximal response of 2-deoxyglucose uptake into the mouse soleus muscle occurred between the 3rd and 8th h of limb immobilization, suggesting a decreased insulin responsiveness. Lack of change in the specific binding of insulin to muscles of 24-h immobilized limbs indicates that a change in insulin receptor number did not play a role in the failure of insulin to stimulate glucose metabolism. Its inability to stimulate glycogen synthesis in muscle from immobilized limbs is due, in part, to a lack of glucose supply to glycogen synthesis and also to the ineffectiveness of insulin to increase the percentage of glycogen synthase in its active form in muscles from 24-h immobilized limbs.

  14. Renal Glucose Handling

    PubMed Central

    Ferrannini, Ele; Veltkamp, Stephan A.; Smulders, Ronald A.; Kadokura, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Ipragliflozin, a sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor, stimulates glycosuria and lowers glycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). The objective of this study was to assess the pharmacodynamics of ipragliflozin in T2DM patients with impaired renal function. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Glycosuria was measured before and after a single ipragliflozin dose in 8 nondiabetic subjects and 57 T2DM patients (age 62 ± 9 years, fasting glucose 133 ± 39 mg/dL, mean ± SD) with normal renal function (assessed as the estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR]) (eGFR1 ≥90 mL · min–1 · 1.73 m−2), mild (eGFR2 ≥60 to <90), moderate (eGFR3 ≥30 to <60), or severe reduction in eGFR (eGFR4 ≤15 to <30). RESULTS Ipragliflozin significantly increased urinary glucose excretion in each eGFR class (P < 0.0001). However, ipragliflozin-induced glycosuria declined (median [IQR]) across eGFR class (from 46 mg/min [33] in eGFR1 to 8 mg/min [7] in eGFR4, P < 0.001). Ipragliflozin-induced fractional glucose excretion (excretion/filtration) was 39% [27] in the T2DM patients (pooled data), similar to that of the nondiabetic subjects (37% [17], P = ns). In bivariate analysis of the pooled data, ipragliflozin-induced glycosuria was directly related to eGFR and fasting glucose (P < 0.0001 for both, r2 = 0.55), predicting a decrement in 24-h glycosuria of 15 g for each 20 mL/min decline in eGFR and an increase of 7 g for each 10 mg/dL increase in glucose above fasting normoglycemia. CONCLUSIONS In T2DM patients, ipragliflozin increases glycosuria in direct, linear proportion to GFR and degree of hyperglycemia, such that its amount can be reliably predicted in the individual patient. Although absolute glycosuria decreases with declining GFR, the efficiency of ipragliflozin action (fractional glucose excretion) is maintained in patients with severe renal impairment. PMID:23359360

  15. Temporal Interactions between Cortical Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Roopun, Anita K.; Kramer, Mark A.; Carracedo, Lucy M.; Kaiser, Marcus; Davies, Ceri H.; Traub, Roger D.; Kopell, Nancy J.; Whittington, Miles A.

    2008-01-01

    Multiple local neuronal circuits support different, discrete frequencies of network rhythm in neocortex. Relationships between different frequencies correspond to mechanisms designed to minimise interference, couple activity via stable phase interactions, and control the amplitude of one frequency relative to the phase of another. These mechanisms are proposed to form a framework for spectral information processing. Individual local circuits can also transform their frequency through changes in intrinsic neuronal properties and interactions with other oscillating microcircuits. Here we discuss a frequency transformation in which activity in two co-active local circuits may combine sequentially to generate a third frequency whose period is the concatenation sum of the original two. With such an interaction, the intrinsic periodicity in each component local circuit is preserved – alternate, single periods of each original rhythm form one period of a new frequency – suggesting a robust mechanism for combining information processed on multiple concurrent spatiotemporal scales. PMID:19225587

  16. Circadian Rhythm Control: Neurophysiological Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glotzbach, S. F.

    1985-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) was implicated as a primary component in central nervous system mechanisms governing circadian rhythms. Disruption of the normal synchronization of temperature, activity, and other rhythms is detrimental to health. Sleep wake disorders, decreases in vigilance and performance, and certain affective disorders may result from or be exacerbated by such desynchronization. To study the basic neurophysiological mechanisms involved in entrainment of circadian systems by the environment, Parylene-coated, etched microwire electrode bundles were used to record extracellular action potentials from the small somata of the SCN and neighboring hypothalamic nuclei in unanesthetized, behaving animals. Male Wistar rats were anesthetized and chronically prepared with EEG ane EMG electrodes in addition to a moveable microdrive assembly. The majority of cells had firing rates 10 Hz and distinct populations of cells which had either the highest firing rate or lowest firing rate during sleep were seen.

  17. Effects of living at two ambient temperatures on 24-h blood pressure and neuroendocrine function among obese and non-obese humans: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanikowska, Dominika; Sato, Maki; Iwase, Satoshi; Shimizu, Yuuki; Nishimura, Naoki; Inukai, Yoko; Sugenoya, Junichi

    2013-05-01

    The effects of environmental temperature on blood pressure and hormones in obese subjects in Japan were compared in two seasons: summer vs winter. Five obese (BMI, 32 ± 5 kg/m2) and five non-obese (BMI, 23 ±3 kg/m2) men participated in this experiment at latitude 35°10' N and longitude 136°57.9' E. The average environmental temperature was 29 ± 1 °C in summer and 3 ± 1 °C in winter. Blood samples were analyzed for leptin, ghrelin, catecholamines, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), free thyroxine (fT4), free triiodothyronine (fT3), total cholesterol, triglycerides, insulin and glucose. Blood pressure was measured over the course of 24 h in summer and winter. A Japanese version of the Profile of Mood States (POMS) questionnaire was also administered each season. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures in obese men were significantly higher in winter (lower environmental temperatures) than in summer (higher environmental temperatures). Noradrenaline and dopamine concentrations were also significantly higher at lower environmental temperatures in obese subjects, but ghrelin, TSH, fT3, fT4, insulin and glucose were not significantly different in summer and winter between obese and non-obese subjects. Leptin, total cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations were significantly higher in winter in obese than non-obese men. Results from the POMS questionnaire showed a significant rise in Confusion at lower environmental temperatures (winter) in obese subjects. In this pilot study, increased blood pressure may have been due to increased secretion of noradrenaline in obese men in winter, and the results suggest that blood pressure control in obese men is particularly important in winter.

  18. When the sun never sets: diverse activity rhythms under continuous daylight in free-living arctic-breeding birds

    PubMed Central

    Steiger, Silke S.; Valcu, Mihai; Spoelstra, Kamiel; Helm, Barbara; Wikelski, Martin; Kempenaers, Bart

    2013-01-01

    Circadian clocks are centrally involved in the regulation of daily behavioural and physiological processes. These clocks are synchronized to the 24 h day by external cues (Zeitgeber), the most important of which is the light–dark cycle. In polar environments, however, the strength of the Zeitgeber is greatly reduced around the summer and winter solstices (continuous daylight or continuous darkness). How animals time their behaviour under such conditions has rarely been studied in the wild. Using a radio-telemetry-based system, we investigated daily activity rhythms under continuous daylight in Barrow, Alaska, throughout the breeding season in four bird species that differ in mating system and parental behaviour. We found substantial diversity in daily activity rhythms depending on species, sex and breeding stage. Individuals exhibited either robust, entrained 24 h activity cycles, were continuously active (arrhythmic) or showed ‘free-running’ activity cycles. In semipalmated sandpipers, a shorebird with biparental incubation, we show that the free-running rhythm is synchronized between pair mates. The diversity of diel time-keeping under continuous daylight emphasizes the plasticity of the circadian system, and the importance of the social and life-history context. Our results support the idea that circadian behaviour can be adaptively modified to enable species-specific time-keeping under polar conditions. PMID:23782884

  19. Circadian rhythm of serum sulfate levels in man and acetaminophen pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, D A; Wallace, S M; Verbeeck, R K

    1990-01-01

    The circadian variation of serum inorganic sulfate levels was studied in healthy volunteers. The effect of subchronic acetaminophen administration (650 mg q.i.d. for 4 days) on serum inorganic sulfate levels was investigated and the possible role of fluctuating serum inorganic sulfate levels on the pharmacokinetics of acetaminophen was evaluated. During a 24 h cycle, serum inorganic sulfate levels were lowest in the morning (11.00 h) and typically increased in the afternoon to reach a maximum in the early evening (19.00 h). Average 24 h serum concentrations were 360 microM and the difference between minimum and maximum levels was on average 25.8%. Subchronic administration of acetaminophen (650 mg q.i.d. for 4 days) significantly reduced serum inorganic sulfate levels to a 24 h average of 253 microM. The circadian rhythm, however, was not affected and the difference between minimum (12.00 h) and maximum (18.50 h) serum concentrations was 31.3%. Subchronic acetaminophen administration lead to a significant decrease in the renal excretion (-51%) and renal clearance (-33%) of inorganic sulfate. No significant differences were found in the disposition kinetics of acetaminophen and its glucuronide and sulfate conjugates during two consecutive dosing intervals (08.00-14.00 h, 14.00-20.00 h) on Day 4 of the acetaminophen regimen. PMID:2253663

  20. Environmental impact on crew of armoured vehicles: Effects of 24 h combat exercise in a hot desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, A. P.; Majumdar, D.; Bhatia, M. R.; Srivastava, K. K.; Selvamurthy, W.

    1995-06-01

    A field study was undertaken to investigate the effects of combined noise, vibration and heat stress on the physiological functions of the crew of armoured vehicles during prolonged combat exercise in a desert. The sound pressure level of noise was measured with a sound level meter and accelerations by vibration analyser. The thermal load on the crew was evaluated by calculating the wet bulb globe temperature index. The physiological responses of the subjects ( n=9), included significant increases in the heart rate, 24 h water intake and urinary catecholamine concentration. A significant decrease was recorded in body mass, peak expiratory flow rate and 24 h urinary output. The high heat load on the crew resulted in a hypohydration of 3% body mass and appeared to be the dominant factor in producing the physiological strain.

  1. Circadian and ultradian extrasystole rhythms in healthy individuals at elevated versus lowland altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujanik, Stefan; Mikulecky, Miroslav

    2010-09-01

    We defined chronobiologic norms for supraventricular and ventricular single extrasystoles (SV and VE, respectively) in healthy older males in lowland areas. The study was extended to higher altitudes, where hypobaric hypoxia was expected to increase extrasystole frequency, while perhaps not changing rhythmicity. In healthy men (lowland n = 37, altitude n = 22), aged 49-72 years, mean numbers of SVs and VEs were counted over a 24-h period. Cosinor regression was used to test the 24-h rhythm and its 2nd-10th harmonics. The resulting approximating function for either extrasystole type includes its point, 95% confidence interval of the mean, and 95% tolerance for single measurement estimates. Separate hourly differences (delta) between altitude and lowland ( n = 59) were also analysed. Hourly means were significantly higher in the mountains versus lowland, by +0.8 beats/h on average for SVs, and by +0.9 beats/h for VEs. A relatively rich chronogram for VEs in mountains versus lowland exists. Delta VEs clearly display a 24-h component and its 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 7th harmonics. This results in significantly higher accumulation of VEs around 8.00 a.m., 11.00 a.m. and 3.00 p.m. in the mountains. The increase in extrasystole occurrence in the mountains is probably caused by higher hypobaric hypoxia and resulting sympathetic drive. Healthy men at elevated altitudes show circadian and several ultradian rhythms of single VEs dependent on the hypoxia level. This new methodological approach—evaluating the differences between two locations using delta values—promises to provide deeper insight into the occurrence of premature beats.

  2. Nqrs Data for C24H76BLiN12O4P4 (Subst. No. 1593)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chihara, H.; Nakamura, N.

    This document is part of Subvolume B 'Substances Containing C10H16 … Zn' of Volume 48 'Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy Data' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains an extract of Section '3.2 Data tables' of the Chapter '3 Nuclear quadrupole resonance data' providing the NQRS data for C24H76BLiN12O4P4 (Subst. No. 1593)

  3. Long-term blood pressure changes induced by the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake: assessment by 24 h ambulatory monitoring.

    PubMed

    Giorgini, Paolo; Striuli, Rinaldo; Petrarca, Marco; Petrazzi, Luisa; Pasqualetti, Paolo; Properzi, Giuliana; Desideri, Giovambattista; Omboni, Stefano; Parati, Gianfranco; Ferri, Claudio

    2013-09-01

    An increased rate of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events has been described during and immediately after earthquakes. In this regard, few data are available on long-term blood pressure control in hypertensive outpatients after an earthquake. We evaluated the long-term effects of the April 2009 L'Aquila earthquake on blood pressure levels, as detected by 24 h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Before/after (mean±s.d. 6.9±4.5/14.2±5.1 months, respectively) the earthquake, the available 24 h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring data for the same patients were extracted from our database. Quake-related daily life discomforts were evaluated through interviews. We enrolled 47 patients (25 female, age 52±14 years), divided into three groups according to antihypertensive therapy changes after versus before the earthquake: unchanged therapy (n=24), increased therapy (n=17) and reduced therapy (n=6). Compared with before the quake, in the unchanged therapy group marked increases in 24 h (P=0.004), daytime (P=0.01) and nighttime (P=0.02) systolic blood pressure were observed after the quake. Corresponding changes in 24 h (P=0.005), daytime (P=0.01) and nighttime (P=0.009) diastolic blood pressure were observed. Daily life discomforts were reported more frequently in the unchanged therapy and increased therapy groups than the reduced therapy group (P=0.025 and P=0.018, respectively). In conclusion, this study shows that patients with unchanged therapy display marked blood pressure increments up to more than 1 year after an earthquake, as well as long-term quake-related discomfort. Our data suggest that particular attention to blood pressure levels and adequate therapy modifications should be considered after an earthquake, not only early after the event but also months later. PMID:23595046

  4. Nqrs Data for C24H46I2N6O2P2Sn (Subst. No. 1589)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chihara, H.; Nakamura, N.

    This document is part of Subvolume B 'Substances Containing C10H16 … Zn' of Volume 48 'Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy Data' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains an extract of Section '3.2 Data tables' of the Chapter '3 Nuclear quadrupole resonance data' providing the NQRS data for C24H46I2N6O2P2Sn (Subst. No. 1589)

  5. 'Life in the age of screens': parent perspectives on a 24-h no screen-time challenge.

    PubMed

    Peláez, Sandra; Alexander, Stephanie; Roberge, Jean-Baptiste; Henderson, Melanie; Bigras, Jean-Luc; Barnett, Tracie A

    2016-08-01

    Screens have become ubiquitous in modern society. Their use frequently underlies sedentary behaviour, a well-established determinant of obesity. As part of a family oriented clinic offering a 2-year lifestyle program for obese children and youth, we explored parents' experiences with a 24-h no screen-time challenge, an intervention designed to raise awareness of screen-time habits and to help families develop strategies to limit their use. In total, 15 parents representing 13 families participated. A focus group with nine parents and six phone interviews with those who could not join in person were conducted. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed qualitatively. Key elements to successful completion of the 24-h no screen-time challenge emerged, namely: clear rules about permitted activities during the 24-h period; togetherness, i.e. involving all family members in the challenge; and busyness, i.e. planning a full schedule in order to avoid idleness and preclude the temptation to use screens. Our findings suggest that practitioners aiming to increase awareness of screen-time or to limit their use may be more likely to succeed if they include all family members, offer concrete alternatives to screen-based activities and provide tailored strategies to manage discretionary time. PMID:27242271

  6. Time course of the MAPK and PI3-kinase response within 24 h of skeletal muscle overload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, C. J.; Fan, Z.; Gordon, S. E.; Booth, F. W.

    2001-01-01

    Knowledge of the molecular mechanisms by which skeletal muscle hypertrophies in response to increased mechanical loading may lead to the discovery of novel treatment strategies for muscle wasting and frailty. To gain insight into potential early signaling mechanisms associated with skeletal muscle hypertrophy, the temporal pattern of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase) activity during the first 24 h of muscle overload was determined in the rat slow-twitch soleus and fast-twitch plantaris muscles after ablation of the gastrocnemius muscle. p38alpha MAPK phosphorylation was elevated for the entire 24-h overload period in both muscles. In contrast, Erk 2 and p54 JNK phosphorylation were transiently increased by overload, returning to the levels of sham-operated controls by 24 h. PI3-kinase activity was increased by muscle overload only at 12 h of overload and only in the plantaris muscle. In summary, sustained elevation of p38alpha MAPK phosphorylation occurred early in response to muscle overload, identifying this pathway as a potential candidate for mediating early hypertrophic signals in response to skeletal muscle overload.

  7. Twenty-four Hour Endocrine and Metabolic Profiles Following Consumption of High Fructose Corn Syrup-, Sucrose- Fructose-, and Glucose-Sweetened Beverages with Meals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have reported that compared with glucose-sweetened beverages, consuming fructose-sweetened beverages with meals results in lower 24-h circulating glucose, insulin and leptin concentrations, and elevated triacylglycerol (TG). However, pure fructose and glucose are not commonly used as sweeteners. ...

  8. Sleep and cognitive function of crewmembers and mission controllers working 24-h shifts during a simulated 105-day spaceflight mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barger, Laura K.; Wright, Kenneth P.; Burke, Tina M.; Chinoy, Evan D.; Ronda, Joseph M.; Lockley, Steven W.; Czeisler, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    The success of long-duration space missions depends on the ability of crewmembers and mission support specialists to be alert and maintain high levels of cognitive function while operating complex, technical equipment. We examined sleep, nocturnal melatonin levels and cognitive function of crewmembers and the sleep and cognitive function of mission controllers who participated in a high-fidelity 105-day simulated spaceflight mission at the Institute of Biomedical Problems (Moscow). Crewmembers were required to perform daily mission duties and work one 24-h extended duration work shift every sixth day. Mission controllers nominally worked 24-h extended duration shifts. Supplemental lighting was provided to crewmembers and mission controllers. Participants' sleep was estimated by wrist-actigraphy recordings. Overall, results show that crewmembers and mission controllers obtained inadequate sleep and exhibited impaired cognitive function, despite countermeasure use, while working extended duration shifts. Crewmembers averaged 7.04±0.92 h (mean±SD) and 6.94±1.08 h (mean±SD) in the two workdays prior to the extended duration shifts, 1.88±0.40 h (mean±SD) during the 24-h work shift, and then slept 10.18±0.96 h (mean±SD) the day after the night shift. Although supplemental light was provided, crewmembers' average nocturnal melatonin levels remained elevated during extended 24-h work shifts. Naps and caffeine use were reported by crewmembers during ˜86% and 45% of extended night work shifts, respectively. Even with reported use of wake-promoting countermeasures, significant impairments in cognitive function were observed. Mission controllers slept 5.63±0.95 h (mean±SD) the night prior to their extended duration work shift. On an average, 89% of night shifts included naps with mission controllers sleeping an average of 3.4±1.0 h (mean±SD) during the 24-h extended duration work shift. Mission controllers also showed impaired cognitive function during extended

  9. Modality effects in rhythm processing: Auditory encoding of visual rhythms is neither obligatory nor automatic.

    PubMed

    McAuley, J Devin; Henry, Molly J

    2010-07-01

    Modality effects in rhythm processing were examined using a tempo judgment paradigm, in which participants made speeding-up or slowing-down judgments for auditory and visual sequences. A key element of stimulus construction was that the expected pattern of tempo judgments for critical test stimuli depended on a beat-based encoding of the sequence. A model-based measure of degree of beat-based encoding computed from the pattern of tempo judgments revealed greater beat sensitivity for auditory rhythms than for visual rhythms. Visual rhythms with prior auditory exposure were more likely to show a pattern of tempo judgments similar to that for auditory rhythms than were visual rhythms without prior auditory exposure, but only for a beat period of 600 msec. Slowing down the rhythms eliminated the effect of prior auditory exposure on visual rhythm processing. Taken together, the findings in this study support the view that auditory rhythms demonstrate an advantage over visual rhythms in beat-based encoding and that the auditory encoding of visual rhythms can be facilitated with prior auditory exposure, but only within a limited temporal range. The broad conclusion from this research is that "hearing visual rhythms" is neither obligatory nor automatic, as was previously claimed by Guttman, Gilroy, and Blake (2005). PMID:20601718

  10. Gravitational considerations with animal rhythms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wunder, C. C.

    1974-01-01

    As established in the laboratory and largely confirmed by others, simulated high-g environments influence growth and development of animals as small as or smaller than baby turtles, sometimes accelerating and sometimes decelerating these processes. High-g environments result in many functional changes or adjustments in feeding, metabolism, circulation, fluid balances, and structures for support, and influence life expectancy. An assembly of equipment suitable for measuring oxygen consumption of small mammals as influenced by chronic centrifugation and/or by day-night rhythms is discussed.

  11. mir-276a strengthens Drosophila circadian rhythms by regulating timeless expression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao; Rosbash, Michael

    2016-05-24

    Circadian rhythms in metazoan eukaryotes are controlled by an endogenous molecular clock. It functions in many locations, including subsets of brain neurons (clock neurons) within the central nervous system. Although the molecular clock relies on transcription/translation feedback loops, posttranscriptional regulation also plays an important role. Here, we show that the abundant Drosophila melanogaster microRNA mir-276a regulates molecular and behavioral rhythms by inhibiting expression of the important clock gene timeless (tim). Misregulation of mir-276a in clock neurons alters tim expression and increases arrhythmicity under standard constant darkness (DD) conditions. mir-276a expression itself appears to be light-regulated because its levels oscillate under 24-h light-dark (LD) cycles but not in DD. mir-276a is regulated by the transcription activator Chorion factor 2 in flies and in tissue-culture cells. Evidence from flies mutated using the clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) tool shows that mir-276a inhibits tim expression: Deleting the mir-276a-binding site in the tim 3' UTR causes elevated levels of TIM and ∼50% arrhythmicity. We suggest that this pathway contributes to the more robust rhythms observed under light/dark LD conditions than under DD conditions. PMID:27162360

  12. Intrinsic, nondeterministic circadian rhythm generation in identified mammalian neurons

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Alexis B.; Angelo, Nikhil; Huettner, James E.; Herzog, Erik D.

    2009-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are modeled as reliable and self-sustained oscillations generated by single cells. The mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) keeps near 24-h time in vivo and in vitro, but the identity of the individual cellular pacemakers is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that circadian cycling is intrinsic to a unique class of SCN neurons by measuring firing rate or Period2 gene expression in single neurons. We found that fully isolated SCN neurons can sustain circadian cycling for at least 1 week. Plating SCN neurons at <100 cells/mm2 eliminated synaptic inputs and revealed circadian neurons that contained arginine vasopressin (AVP) or vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) or neither. Surprisingly, arrhythmic neurons (nearly 80% of recorded neurons) also expressed these neuropeptides. Furthermore, neurons were observed to lose or gain circadian rhythmicity in these dispersed cell cultures, both spontaneously and in response to forskolin stimulation. In SCN explants treated with tetrodotoxin to block spike-dependent signaling, neurons gained or lost circadian cycling over many days. The rate of PERIOD2 protein accumulation on the previous cycle reliably predicted the spontaneous onset of arrhythmicity. We conclude that individual SCN neurons can generate circadian oscillations; however, there is no evidence for a specialized or anatomically localized class of cell-autonomous pacemakers. Instead, these results indicate that AVP, VIP, and other SCN neurons are intrinsic but unstable circadian oscillators that rely on network interactions to stabilize their otherwise noisy cycling. PMID:19805326

  13. Burn trauma disrupts circadian rhythms in rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Rohit; Yang, Qian; Orman, Mehmet A; Berthiaume, Francois; Ierapetritou, Marianthi G; Androulakis, Ioannis P

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms play an important role in maintaining homeostasis and solid organ function. The purpose of this study is to assess the implications of burn injury in rats on the underlying circadian patterns of gene expression in liver. Circadian-regulated genes and burn-induced genes were identified by applying consensus clustering methodology to temporally differentially expressed probe sets obtained from burn and sham-burn data sets. Of the liver specific genes which we hypothesize that exhibit circadian rhythmicity, 88% are not differentially expressed following the burn injury. Specifically, the vast majority of the circadian regulated-genes representing central carbon and nitrogen metabolism are “up-regulated” after the burn injury, indicating the onset of hypermetabolism. In addition, cell-cell junction and membrane structure related genes showing rhythmic behavior in the control group were not differentially expressed across time in the burn group, which could be an indication of hepatic damage due to the burn. Finally, the suppression of the immune function related genes is observed in the postburn phase, implying the severe “immunosuppression”. Our results demonstrated that the short term response (24-h post injury) manifests a loss of circadian variability possibly compromising the host in terms of subsequent challenges. PMID:27335693

  14. Intrinsic, nondeterministic circadian rhythm generation in identified mammalian neurons.

    PubMed

    Webb, Alexis B; Angelo, Nikhil; Huettner, James E; Herzog, Erik D

    2009-09-22

    Circadian rhythms are modeled as reliable and self-sustained oscillations generated by single cells. The mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) keeps near 24-h time in vivo and in vitro, but the identity of the individual cellular pacemakers is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that circadian cycling is intrinsic to a unique class of SCN neurons by measuring firing rate or Period2 gene expression in single neurons. We found that fully isolated SCN neurons can sustain circadian cycling for at least 1 week. Plating SCN neurons at <100 cells/mm(2) eliminated synaptic inputs and revealed circadian neurons that contained arginine vasopressin (AVP) or vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) or neither. Surprisingly, arrhythmic neurons (nearly 80% of recorded neurons) also expressed these neuropeptides. Furthermore, neurons were observed to lose or gain circadian rhythmicity in these dispersed cell cultures, both spontaneously and in response to forskolin stimulation. In SCN explants treated with tetrodotoxin to block spike-dependent signaling, neurons gained or lost circadian cycling over many days. The rate of PERIOD2 protein accumulation on the previous cycle reliably predicted the spontaneous onset of arrhythmicity. We conclude that individual SCN neurons can generate circadian oscillations; however, there is no evidence for a specialized or anatomically localized class of cell-autonomous pacemakers. Instead, these results indicate that AVP, VIP, and other SCN neurons are intrinsic but unstable circadian oscillators that rely on network interactions to stabilize their otherwise noisy cycling. PMID:19805326

  15. Weather entrainment and multispectral diel activity rhythm of desert hamsters.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xinrong; Zhang, Xinjie; Huo, Yingjun; Wang, Guiming

    2013-10-01

    The circadian rhythm of animals is an adaptation to predictable variation in environmental conditions. Multiple internal oscillators may allow animals to cope with environmental oscillations in different frequencies. Heat stress and dramatic differences between night and day temperatures are the main selective pressures of the diel activity of desert mammals, particularly small-sized rodents. We tested the hypotheses that the diel activities of desert hamsters (Phodopus roborovskii) would be entrained by ambient humidity and temperature. We predicted that increases in night temperature and humidity would improve the propensity to perform activities of the hamster. We observed hourly activities of desert hamsters under semi natural conditions for 24 consecutive hours, with seven replicates in 7 different days. We fit generalized linear mixed models to observed proportions of active hamsters, temperatures, and relative humidity. Observed diel activities of desert hamsters consisted of three harmonic oscillations in the periodicities of 24 h, 12 h, and 6 h, respectively. Furthermore, probabilities to perform activities were positively related to night temperature and humidity. Therefore, the diel activities of desert hamsters are synchronized by atmospheric humidity, temperatures, and environmental cues of ultradian fluctuations. PMID:23810901

  16. Phenotyping Circadian Rhythms in Mice.

    PubMed

    Eckel-Mahan, Kristin; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms take place with a periodicity of 24 hr, temporally following the rotation of the earth around its axis. Examples of circadian rhythms are the sleep/wake cycle, feeding, and hormone secretion. Light powerfully entrains the mammalian clock and assists in keeping animals synchronized to the 24-hour cycle of the earth by activating specific neurons in the "central pacemaker" of the brain, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Absolute periodicity of an animal can deviate slightly from 24 hr as manifest when an animal is placed into constant dark or "free-running" conditions. Simple measurements of an organism's activity in free-running conditions reveal its intrinsic circadian period. Mice are a particularly useful model for studying circadian rhythmicity due to the ease of genetic manipulation, thus identifying molecular contributors to rhythmicity. Furthermore, their small size allows for monitoring locomotion or activity in their homecage environment with relative ease. Several tasks commonly used to analyze circadian periodicity and plasticity in mice are presented here including the process of entrainment, determination of tau (period length) in free-running conditions, determination of circadian periodicity in response to light disruption (e.g., jet lag studies), and evaluation of clock plasticity in non-24-hour conditions (T-cycles). Studying the properties of circadian periods such as their phase, amplitude, and length in response to photic perturbation, can be particularly useful in understanding how humans respond to jet lag, night shifts, rotating shifts, or other transient or chronic disruption of environmental surroundings. PMID:26331760

  17. Detecting and Correcting Speech Rhythm Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yurtbasi, Metin

    2015-01-01

    Every language has its own rhythm. Unlike many other languages in the world, English depends on the correct pronunciation of stressed and unstressed or weakened syllables recurring in the same phrase or sentence. Mastering the rhythm of English makes speaking more effective. Experiments have shown that we tend to hear speech as more rhythmical…

  18. The Incarnate Rhythm of Geometrical Knowing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bautista, Alfredo; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2012-01-01

    Rhythm is a fundamental dimension of human nature at both biological and social levels. However, existing research literature has not sufficiently investigated its role in mathematical cognition and behavior. The purpose of this article is to bring the concept of "incarnate rhythm" into current discourses in the field of mathematical learning and…

  19. Quantifying Speech Rhythm Abnormalities in the Dysarthrias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liss, Julie M.; White, Laurence; Mattys, Sven L.; Lansford, Kaitlin; Lotto, Andrew J.; Spitzer, Stephanie M.; Caviness, John N.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors examined whether rhythm metrics capable of distinguishing languages with high and low temporal stress contrast also can distinguish among control and dysarthric speakers of American English with perceptually distinct rhythm patterns. Methods: Acoustic measures of vocalic and consonantal segment durations were…

  20. Accelerated idioventricular rhythm during flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Borgeat, A.; Chiolero, R.; Mosimann, B.; Freeman, J.

    1987-03-01

    We report the case of a patient who developed severe hypoxemia and an unusual arrhythmia, accelerated idioventricular rhythm, during flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy. Coronary artery disease was subsequently suspected despite an unremarkable history and physical examination, and confirmed by a thallium 201 imaging. The appearance of accelerated idioventricular rhythm during fiberoptic bronchoscopy should raise the possibility of underlying coronary artery disease.

  1. Circadian rhythms in myocardial metabolism and function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Circadian rhythms in myocardial function and dysfunction are firmly established in both animal models and humans. For example, the incidence of arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death increases when organisms awaken. Such observations have classically been explained by circadian rhythms in neurohumoral...

  2. Circadian Rhythm Disruption Promotes Lung Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Papagiannakopoulos, Thales; Bauer, Matthew R; Davidson, Shawn M; Heimann, Megan; Subbaraj, Lakshmipriya; Bhutkar, Arjun; Bartlebaugh, Jordan; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Jacks, Tyler

    2016-08-01

    Circadian rhythms are 24-hr oscillations that control a variety of biological processes in living systems, including two hallmarks of cancer, cell division and metabolism. Circadian rhythm disruption by shift work is associated with greater risk for cancer development and poor prognosis, suggesting a putative tumor-suppressive role for circadian rhythm homeostasis. Using a genetically engineered mouse model of lung adenocarcinoma, we have characterized the effects of circadian rhythm disruption on lung tumorigenesis. We demonstrate that both physiologic perturbation (jet lag) and genetic mutation of the central circadian clock components decreased survival and promoted lung tumor growth and progression. The core circadian genes Per2 and Bmal1 were shown to have cell-autonomous tumor-suppressive roles in transformation and lung tumor progression. Loss of the central clock components led to increased c-Myc expression, enhanced proliferation, and metabolic dysregulation. Our findings demonstrate that both systemic and somatic disruption of circadian rhythms contribute to cancer progression. PMID:27476975

  3. Rhythms in cholesterol, cholesteryl esters, free fatty acids, and triglycerides in blood of lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Bitman, J; Wood, D L; Lefcourt, A M

    1990-04-01

    Blood samples from six lactating dairy cows were analyzed to determine whether circulating neutral lipids exhibit rhythmic variations. Plasma neutral lipids were measured by quantitative TLC on every fourth integrated 15-min blood sample taken over 48-h periods. Cows were housed in an environmental chamber at 20 degrees C with 16 h light:8 h dark (lights on at 0700 h), fed daily at 0900 h, and milked at 0830 and 2000 h. Other variables monitored included: body temperature, ammonia nitrogen, urea nitrogen, glucose, triiodothyronine, thyroxine, somatotropin, insulin, cortisol, and prolactin. Mean concentrations of cholesterol, cholesteryl esters, free fatty acids, and triglycerides were 21.4, 175.4, 3.1, and 6.3 mg/dl, respectively. Visual and power spectral analysis of the pulsatile fluctuations in lipids indicated rhythms with periods of 2 to 3 h. Amplitudes of rhythms for free fatty acids and triglycerides were 60% of mean concentrations and for cholesterol and cholesteryl esters were 20% of mean concentrations. The presence of these rhythms was conserved when data were averaged across time by cow. However, because of nonstationary conditions, rhythms identified by spectral analysis were not statistically significant. There was no evidence of circadian patterns in circulating neutral lipid components. All other metabolic and hormonal variables except cortisol exhibited distinct circadian rhythms. PMID:2345205

  4. Alterations in amino acid concentrations in the plasma and muscle in human subjects during 24 h of simulated adventure racing.

    PubMed

    Borgenvik, Marcus; Nordin, Marie; Mikael Mattsson, C; Enqvist, Jonas K; Blomstrand, Eva; Ekblom, Björn

    2012-10-01

    This investigation was designed to evaluate changes in plasma and muscle levels of free amino acids during an ultra-endurance exercise and following recovery. Nine male ultra-endurance trained athletes participated in a 24-h standardized endurance trial with controlled energy intake. The participants performed 12 sessions of running, kayaking and cycling (4 × each discipline). Blood samples were collected before, during and after exercise, as well as after 28 h of recovery. Muscle biopsies were taken before the test and after exercise, as well as after 28 h of recovery. During the 24-h exercise, plasma levels of branched-chain (BCAA), essential amino acids (EAA) and glutamine fell 13, 14 and 19% (P < 0.05), respectively, whereas their concentrations in muscle were unaltered. Simultaneously, tyrosine and phenylalanine levels rose 38 and 50% (P < 0.05) in the plasma and 66 and 46% (P < 0.05) in muscle, respectively. After the 24-h exercise, plasma levels of BCAA were positively correlated with muscle levels of glycogen (r (2) = 0.73, P < 0.05), as was the combined concentrations of muscle tyrosine and phenylalanine with plasma creatine kinase (R (2) = 0.55, P < 0.05). Following 28-h of recovery, plasma and muscle levels of amino acids had either returned to their initial levels or were elevated. In conclusion, ultra-endurance exercise caused significant changes elevations in plasma and muscle levels of tyrosine and phenylalanine, which suggest an increase in net muscle protein breakdown during exercise. There was a reduction in plasma concentrations of EAA and glutamine during exercise, whereas no changes were detected in their muscle concentration after exercise. PMID:22350359

  5. Variations in 7-day/24-h circadian pattern of ambulatory blood pressure and heart rate of type 2 diabetes patients

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Shipra; Verma, Narsingh; Anjum, Baby; Bhardwaj, Kshitij

    2014-01-01

    Aims/Introduction Diabetes has profound consequences on the cardiovascular system leading to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients. Blood pressure (BP) has a characteristic and reproducible circadian pattern, with high values during the day and low values at night. A 7-day timed analysis of BP through ambulatory blood pressure monitoring has been used not only to diagnose day and night dipping patterns of blood pressure, but also to measure day-to-day variability and the circadian hyper-amplitude-tension, a condition in which excessive circadian BP amplitude precedes the chronic established hypertension. Our objective was to assess the 7-day/24-h circadian pattern of BP and heart rate in diabetic patients, as it could be helpful in the diagnosis and prevention of cardiovascular morbidity. Materials and Methods A total of 50 diabetic patients with type 2 diabetes and 50 non-diabetic participants were recruited for the study. General health records were individually maintained, and 7-day/24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring using an ambulatory blood pressure monitor was carried out. Results The rhythmic parameters of systolic and diastolic BP, heart rate, double amplitude, acrophase and 3-h fractionated hyperbaric index were found to be significantly high in diabetic patients. A total of 12 participants were diagnosed with circadian hyper-amplitude-tension. These data suggest that diabetic patients have certain variations in the circadian pattern of blood pressure and heart rate, which can result in disturbed vascular events, and thus are at greater risk of cardiovascular morbidity. Conclusion Seven-day/24-h monitoring might be useful as an early predictive tool in assessing future cardiovascular risk, guiding treatment and management of these patients. PMID:25422775

  6. Restructuring and redistribution of actinides in Am-MOX fuel during the first 24 h of irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kosuke; Miwa, Shuhei; Sekine, Shin-ichi; Yoshimochi, Hiroshi; Obayashi, Hiroshi; Koyama, Shin-ichi

    2013-09-01

    In order to confirm the effect of minor actinide additions on the irradiation behavior of MOX fuel pellets, 3 wt.% and 5 wt.% americium-containing MOX (Am-MOX) fuels were irradiated for 10 min at 43 kW/m and for 24 h at 45 kW/m in the experimental fast reactor Joyo. Two nominal values of the fuel pellet oxygen-to-metal ratio (O/M), 1.95 and 1.98, were used as a test parameter. Emphasis was placed on the behavior of restructuring and redistribution of actinides which directly affect the fuel performance and the fuel design for fast reactors. Microstructural evolutions in the fuels were observed by optical microscopy and the redistribution of constituent elements was determined by EPMA using false color X-ray mapping and quantitative point analyses. The ceramography results showed that structural changes occurred quickly in the initial stage of irradiation. Restructuring of the fuel from middle to upper axial positions developed and was almost completed after the 24-h irradiation. No sign of fuel melting was found in any of the specimens. The EPMA results revealed that Am as well as Pu migrated radially up the temperature gradient to the center of the fuel pellet. The increase in Am concentration on approaching the edge of the central void and its maximum value were higher than those of Pu after the 10-min irradiation and the difference was more pronounced after the 24-h irradiation. The increment of the Am and Pu concentrations due to redistribution increased with increasing central void size. In all of the specimens examined, the extent of redistribution of Am and Pu was higher in the fuel of O/M ratio of 1.98 than in that of 1.95.

  7. Effects of dietary fatty acid composition on 24-h energy expenditure and chronic disease risk factors in men123

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Jamie A; Watras, Abigail C; Adams, Alexandra K; Schoeller, Dale A

    2009-01-01

    Background: A high-fat (HF) diet and sedentary lifestyle are implicated in the development of obesity. Controlled feeding studies and measures of short-term resting energy expenditure (REE) have suggested that the type of dietary fat may alter energy expenditure (EE). Objective: The objective was to examine the effects of an HF diet rich in either monounsaturated or saturated fatty acids (FAs) and of exercise on EE and chronic disease risk factors. Design: Eight healthy men [age: 18–45 y; body mass index (in kg/m2): 22 ± 3] were randomly assigned in a 2 × 2 crossover design to 1 of 4 treatments: HF diet (50% of energy) with a high amount of saturated fat (22% of energy) plus exercise (SE) or a sedentary (SS) condition or a diet high in monounsaturated fat (30% of energy) plus exercise (UE) or a sedentary (US) condition. The subjects spent 5 d in a metabolic chamber and cycled at 45% of maximal oxygen uptake for 2 h each day during the exercise visits. Respiratory gases and urinary nitrogen were measured to determine 24-h EE. Resting metabolic rate was measured on days 2, 4, and 6. Results: Average 24-h EE was not different with respect to dietary FA composition (3202 ± 146, 3208 ± 151, 2240 ± 82, and 2270 ± 104 for SE, UE, SS, and US, respectively). Total and LDL cholesterol and blood pressure were significantly greater after the SE and SS treatments than after the UE and US treatments. Conclusion: Resting metabolic rate and 24-h EE were not significantly different after short-term exposure to an HF diet rich in monounsaturated FAs or after exposure to a diet rich in saturated FAs in healthy, nonobese men. PMID:19321562

  8. Parsimonious model for blood glucose level monitoring in type 2 diabetes patients.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fang; Ma, Yan Fen; Wen, Jing Xiao; DU, Yan Fang; Li, Chun Lin; Li, Guang Wei

    2014-07-01

    To establish the parsimonious model for blood glucose monitoring in patients with type 2 diabetes receiving oral hypoglycemic agent treatment. One hundred and fifty-nine adult Chinese type 2 diabetes patients were randomized to receive rapid-acting or sustained-release gliclazide therapy for 12 weeks. Their blood glucose levels were measured at 10 time points in a 24 h period before and after treatment, and the 24 h mean blood glucose levels were measured. Contribution of blood glucose levels to the mean blood glucose level and HbA1c was assessed by multiple regression analysis. The correlation coefficients of blood glucose level measured at 10 time points to the daily MBG were 0.58-0.74 and 0.59-0.79, respectively, before and after treatment (P<0.0001). The multiple stepwise regression analysis showed that the blood glucose levels measured at 6 of the 10 time points could explain 95% and 97% of the changes in MBG before and after treatment. The three blood glucose levels, which were measured at fasting, 2 h after breakfast and before dinner, of the 10 time points could explain 84% and 86% of the changes in MBG before and after treatment, but could only explain 36% and 26% of the changes in HbA1c before and after treatment, and they had a poorer correlation with the HbA1c than with the 24 h MBG. The blood glucose levels measured at fasting, 2 h after breakfast and before dinner truly reflected the change 24 h blood glucose level, suggesting that they are appropriate for the self-monitoring of blood glucose levels in diabetes patients receiving oral anti-diabetes therapy. PMID:25073916

  9. Association between 24 h urinary sodium and potassium excretion and the metabolic syndrome in Chinese adults: the Shandong and Ministry of Health Action on Salt and Hypertension (SMASH) study.

    PubMed

    Ge, Zeng; Guo, Xiaolei; Chen, Xiaorong; Tang, Junli; Yan, Liuxia; Ren, Jie; Zhang, Jiyu; Lu, Zilong; Dong, Jing; Xu, Jianwei; Cai, Xiaoning; Liang, Hao; Ma, Jixiang

    2015-03-28

    The association of 24 h urinary Na and potassium excretion with the risk of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) has not been studied in China. The aim of the present study was to examine this association by analysing the data from 1906 study participants living in north China. To this end, 24 h urine samples were collected. Of the 1906 participants, 471 (24·7 %) had the MetS. The mean urinary Na and K excretion was 228·7 and 40·8 mmol/d, respectively. After multivariate adjustment, the odds of the MetS significantly increased across the increasing tertiles of urinary Na excretion (1·00, 1·40 and 1·54, respectively). For the components of the MetS, the odds of central obesity, elevated blood pressure and elevated TAG, but not the odds of low HDL-cholesterol and elevated fasting glucose, significantly increased with the successive tertiles of urinary Na excretion. Furthermore, for every 100 mmol/d increase in urinary Na excretion, the odds of the MetS, central obesity, elevated blood pressure and elevated TAG was significantly increased by 29, 63, 22 and 21 %, respectively. However, urinary K excretion was not significantly associated with the risk of the MetS. These findings suggest that high Na intake might be an important risk factor for the MetS in Chinese adults. PMID:25743698

  10. Absence of a serum melatonin rhythm under acutely extended darkness in the horse

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In contrast to studies showing gradual adaptation of melatonin (MT) rhythms to an advanced photoperiod in humans and rodents, we previously demonstrated that equine MT rhythms complete a 6-h light/dark (LD) phase advance on the first post-shift day. This suggested the possibility that melatonin secretion in the horse may be more strongly light-driven as opposed to endogenously rhythmic and light entrained. The present study investigates whether equine melatonin is endogenously rhythmic in extended darkness (DD). Methods Six healthy, young mares were maintained in a lightproof barn under an LD cycle that mimicked the ambient natural photoperiod outside. Blood samples were collected at 2-h intervals for 48 consecutive h: 24-h in LD, followed by 24-h in extended dark (DD). Serum was harvested and stored at -20°C until melatonin and cortisol were measured by commercial RIA kits. Results Two-way repeated measures ANOVA (n = 6/time point) revealed a significant circadian time (CT) x lighting condition interaction (p < .0001) for melatonin with levels non-rhythmic and consistently high during DD (CT 0-24). In contrast, cortisol displayed significant clock-time variation throughout LD and DD (p = .0009) with no CT x light treatment interaction (p = .4018). Cosinor analysis confirmed a significant 24-h temporal variation for melatonin in LD (p = .0002) that was absent in DD (p = .51), while there was an apparent circadian component in cortisol, which approached significance in LD (p = .076), and was highly significant in DD (p = .0059). Conclusions The present finding of no 24 h oscillation in melatonin in DD is the first evidence indicating that melatonin is not gated by a self-sustained circadian process in the horse. Melatonin is therefore not a suitable marker of circadian phase in this species. In conjunction with recent similar findings in reindeer, it appears that biosynthesis of melatonin in the pineal glands of some ungulates is strongly driven by the

  11. Four to seven random casual urine specimens are sufficient to estimate 24-h urinary sodium/potassium ratio in individuals with high blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Iwahori, T; Ueshima, H; Torii, S; Saito, Y; Fujiyoshi, A; Ohkubo, T; Miura, K

    2016-05-01

    This study was done to clarify the optimal number and type of casual urine specimens required to estimate urinary sodium/potassium (Na/K) ratio in individuals with high blood pressure. A total of 74 individuals with high blood pressure, 43 treated and 31 untreated, were recruited from the Japanese general population. Urinary sodium, potassium and Na/K ratio were measured in both casual urine samples and 7-day 24-h urine samples and then analyzed by correlation and Bland-Altman analyses. Mean Na/K ratio from random casual urine samples on four or more days strongly correlated with the Na/K ratio of 7-day 24-h urine (r=0.80-0.87), which was similar to the correlation between 1 and 2-day 24-h urine and 7-day 24-h urine (r=0.75-0.89). The agreement quality for Na/K ratio of seven random casual urine for estimating the Na/K ratio of 7-day 24-h urine was good (bias: -0.26, limits of agreements: -1.53-1.01), and it was similar to that of 2-day 24-h urine for estimating 7-day 24-h values (bias: 0.07, limits of agreement: -1.03 to 1.18). Stratified analyses comparing individuals using antihypertensive medication and individuals not using antihypertensive medication showed similar results. Correlations of the means of casual urine sodium or potassium concentrations with 7-day 24-h sodium or potassium excretions were relatively weaker than those for Na/K ratio. The mean Na/K ratio of 4-7 random casual urine specimens on different days provides a good substitute for 1-2-day 24-h urinary Na/K ratio for individuals with high blood pressure. PMID:26310187

  12. Circadian rhythms: glucocorticoids and arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Sulli, Alberto; Pizzorni, Carmen; Secchi, Maria Elena; Soldano, Stefano; Seriolo, Bruno; Straub, Rainer H; Otsa, Kati; Maestroni, Georges J

    2006-06-01

    Circadian rhythms are driven by biological clocks and are endogenous in origin. Therefore, circadian changes in the metabolism or secretion of endogenous glucocorticoids are certainly responsible in part for the time-dependent changes observed in the inflammatory response and arthritis. More recently, melatonin (MLT), another circadian hormone that is the secretory product of the pineal gland, has been found implicated in the time-dependent inflammatory reaction with effects opposite those of cortisol. Interestingly, cortisol and MLT show an opposite response to the light. The light conditions in the early morning have a strong impact on the morning cortisol peak, whereas MLT is synthesized in a strictly nocturnal pattern. Recently, a diurnal rhythmicity in healthy humans between cellular (Th1 type) or humoral (Th2 type) immune responses has been found and related to immunomodulatory actions of cortisol and MLT. The interferon (IFN)-gamma/interleukin (IL)-10 ratio peaked during the early morning and correlated negatively with plasma cortisol and positively with plasma MLT. Accordingly, the intensity of the arthritic pain varies consistently as a function of the hour of the day: pain is greater after waking up in the morning than in the afternoon or evening. The reduced cortisol and adrenal androgen secretion, observed during testing in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients not treated with glucocoticoids, should be clearly considered as a "relative adrenal insufficiency" in the presence of a sustained inflammatory process, and allows Th1 type cytokines to be produced in higher amounts during the late night. In conclusion, the right timing (early morning) for the glucocorticoid therapy in arthritis is fundamental and well justified by the circadian rhythms of the inflammatory mechanisms. PMID:16855156

  13. Phenotyping Circadian Rhythms in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Eckel-Mahan, Kristin; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms take place with a periodicity of twenty-four hours, temporally following the rotation of the earth around its axis. Examples of circadian rhythms are the sleep/wake cycle, feeding, and hormone secretion. Light powerfully entrains the mammalian clock and assists in keeping animals synchronized to the 24-hour cycle of the earth by activating specific neurons in the “central pacemaker” of the brain, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Absolute periodicity of an animal can deviate slightly from 24 hours as manifest when an animal is placed into constant dark- or “free running”- conditions. Simple measurements of an organism's activity in free running conditions reveal its intrinsic circadian period. Mice are a particularly useful model for studying circadian rhythmicity due to the ease of genetic manipulation, thus identifying molecular contributors to rhythmicity. Furthermore, their small size allows for monitoring locomotion or activity in their home cage environment with relative ease. Several tasks commonly used to analyze circadian periodicity and plasticity in mice are outlined here including the process of entrainment, determination of tau (period length) in free running conditions, determination of circadian periodicity in response to light disruption (i.e. jet lag studies), and evaluation of clock plasticity in non-twenty-four hour conditions (T-cycles). Studying the properties of circadian periods such as their phase, amplitude, and length in response to photic perturbation, can be particularly useful in understanding how humans respond to jet lag, night shifts, rotating shifts, or other transient or chronic disruption of one's environmental surroundings. PMID:26331760

  14. Parallel assessment of nutrition and activity in athletes: validation against doubly labelled water, 24-h urea excretion, and indirect calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Karsten; Braun, Hans; De Marees, Markus; Fusch, Gerhard; Fusch, Christoph; Mester, Joachim; Schaenzer, Wilhelm

    2010-11-01

    The assessment of nutrition and activity in athletes requires accurate and precise methods. The aim of this study was to validate a protocol for parallel assessment of diet and exercise against doubly labelled water, 24-h urea excretion, and respiratory gas exchange. The participants were 14 male triathletes under normal training conditions. Energy intake and doubly labelled water were weakly associated with each other (r = 0.69, standard error of estimate [SEE] = 304 kcal x day(-1)). Protein intake was strongly correlated with 24-h urea (r = 0.89) but showed considerable individual variation (SEE = 0.34 g kg(-1) x day(-1)). Total energy expenditure based on recorded activities was highly correlated with doubly labelled water (r = 0.95, SEE = 195 kcal x day(-1)) but was proportionally biased. During running and cycling, estimated exercise energy expenditure was highly correlated with gas exchange (running: r = 0.89, SEE = 1.6 kcal x min(-1); cycling: r = 0.95, SEE = 1.4 kcal x min(-1)). High exercise energy expenditure was slightly underestimated during running. For nutrition data, variations appear too large for precise measurements in individual athletes, which is a common problem of dietary assessment methods. Despite the high correlations of total energy expenditure and exercise energy expenditure with reference methods, a correction for systematic errors is necessary for the valid estimation of energetic requirements in individual athletes. PMID:20967672

  15. Effect of Androctonus bicolor scorpion venom on serum electrolytes in rats: A 24-h time-course study.

    PubMed

    Al-Asmari, A; Khan, H A; Manthiri, R A

    2016-03-01

    Black fat-tailed scorpion (Androctonus bicolor) belongs to the family Buthidae and is one of the most venomous scorpions in the world. The effects of A. bicolor venom on serum electrolytes were not known and therefore investigated in this study. Adult male Wistar rats were randomly divided into seven groups with five animals in each group. One of the groups served as control and received vehicle only. The animals in the remaining groups received a single subcutaneous injection of crude A. bicolor venom (200 μg/kg bodyweight) and were killed at different time intervals including 30 min, 1 h, 2 h, 4 h, 8 h, and 24 h after venom injection. The results showed that scorpion venom caused significant increase in serum sodium levels within 30 min after injection which slightly subsided after 1 h and then persisted over 24 h. Serum potassium levels continued to significantly increase until 4 h and then slightly subsided. There were significant decreases in serum magnesium (Mg(+)) levels following scorpion venom injection, at all the time points during the course of study. Serum calcium levels were significantly increased during the entire course of study, whereas serum chloride was significantly decreased. In conclusion, A. bicolor envenomation in rats caused severe and persistent hypomagnesemia with accompanied hypernatremia, hyperkalemia, and hypercalcemia. It is important to measure serum Mg(+) levels in victims of scorpion envenomation, and patients with severe Mg(+) deficiency should be treated accordingly. PMID:25964378

  16. Microdialysis in the Rat Striatum: Effects of 24 h Dexamethasone Retrodialysis on Evoked Dopamine Release and Penetration Injury

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The power of microdialysis for in vivo neurochemical monitoring is a result of intense efforts to enhance microdialysis procedures, the probes themselves, and the analytical systems used for the analysis of dialysate samples. Our goal is to refine microdialysis further by focusing attention on what happens when the probes are implanted into brain tissue. It is broadly acknowledged that some tissue damage occurs, such that the tissue nearest the probes is disrupted from its normal state. We hypothesize that mitigating such disruption would refine microdialysis. Herein, we show that the addition of dexamethasone, an anti-inflammatory drug, to the perfusion fluid protects evoked dopamine responses as measured by fast-scan cyclic voltammetry next to the probes after 24 h. We also show that dexamethasone stabilizes evoked dopamine responses measured at the probe outlet over a 4–24 h postimplantation interval. The effects of dexamethasone are attributable to its anti-inflammatory actions, as dexamethasone had no significant effect on two histochemical markers for dopamine terminals, tyrosine hydroxylase and the dopamine transporter. Using histochemical assays, we confirmed that the actions of dexamethasone are tightly confined to the immediate, local vicinity of the probe. PMID:25491242

  17. Schottky barrier height of Ni/TiO2/4H-SiC metal-insulator-semiconductor diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Ivan R.; Pereira, Marcelo B.; Boudinov, Henri I.

    2015-12-01

    Ni/TiO2/4H-SiC diodes were analysed through measurements of current-voltage curves varying the temperature. The Schottky Barrier Height (SBH) which increased with temperature was studied by simulation of the Thermionic Emission Model, considering Ni/SiC Schottky structures with an insulator layer between the metal and semiconductor. This model shows that a new method of calculation should be applied to diodes that have a metal-insulator-semiconductor structure. Misleading results for SBH are obtained if the thin insulator layer is not considered. When applying the suggested method to the Ni/TiO2/4H-SiC diodes it was necessary to consider not only the deposited TiO2 layer, but also a second dielectric layer of native SiCxOy at the surface of SiC. By measuring I-V-T curves for two samples with different thicknesses of TiO2, the suggested method allows one to estimate the thicknesses of both dielectric layers: TiO2 and SiOxCy.

  18. The classification of oesophageal 24 h pH measurements using a Kohonen self-organizing feature map.

    PubMed

    Haylett, K R; Vales, P; McCloy, R F

    2004-06-01

    Analysis of 24 h oesophageal pH studies can be problematic with many patients asymptomatic during the investigation, despite observations of reflux. The aim of this study was to carry out a cluster analysis of ambulatory pH studies to determine any underlying patterns and classes within the data. The results of 900 24 h pH studies were investigated using the Kohonen self-organizing feature map (SOFM), a neural network that can be used to identify clusters within multidimensional data. The clinical features were presented to the network and the main classes identified. The SOFM-based analysis showed that patients clinically assessed as having symptomatic reflux during the study could be described by four major classifications. The results also showed that the probability of identifying a correlation between symptoms and reflux during an investigation varies from 0.49 to 0.78 for the classes identified. The developed network may be a useful tool in the classification of pH data. The cluster-based technique may offer an alternative to standard statistical techniques for high-dimensional gastrointestinal data and form the basis of an expert system for the automated analysis of pH data. PMID:15253122

  19. Postprandial glucose and insulin profiles following a glucose-loaded meal in cats and dogs.

    PubMed

    Hewson-Hughes, Adrian K; Gilham, Matthew S; Upton, Sarah; Colyer, Alison; Butterwick, Richard; Miller, Andrew T

    2011-10-01

    Data from intravenous (i.v.) glucose tolerance tests suggest that glucose clearance from the blood is slower in cats than in dogs. Since different physiological pathways are activated following oral administration compared with i.v. administration, we investigated the profiles of plasma glucose and insulin in cats and dogs following ingestion of a test meal with or without glucose. Adult male and female cats and dogs were fed either a high-protein (HP) test meal (15 g/kg body weight; ten cats and eleven dogs) or a HP + glucose test meal (13 g/kg body-weight HP diet + 2 g/kg body-weight D-glucose; seven cats and thirteen dogs) following a 24 h fast. Marked differences in plasma glucose and insulin profiles were observed in cats and dogs following ingestion of the glucose-loaded meal. In cats, mean plasma glucose concentration reached a peak at 120 min (10.2, 95 % CI 9.7, 10.8 mmol/l) and returned to baseline by 240 min, but no statistically significant change in plasma insulin concentration was observed. In dogs, mean plasma glucose concentration reached a peak at 60 min (6.3, 95 % CI 5.9, 6.7 mmol/l) and returned to baseline by 90 min, while plasma insulin concentration was significantly higher than pre-meal values from 30 to 120 min following the glucose-loaded meal. These results indicate that cats are not as efficient as dogs at rapidly decreasing high blood glucose levels and are consistent with a known metabolic adaptation of cats, namely a lack of glucokinase, which is important for both insulin secretion and glucose uptake from the blood. PMID:22005400

  20. Phase-shifting human circadian rhythms: influence of sleep timing, social contact and light exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, J. F.; Kronauer, R. E.; Czeisler, C. A.

    1996-01-01

    1. Both the timing of behavioural events (activity, sleep and social interactions) and the environmental light-dark cycle have been reported to contribute to entrainment of human circadian rhythms to the 24 h day. Yet, the relative contribution of those putative behavioural synchronizers to that of light exposure remains unclear. 2. To investigate this, we inverted the schedule of rest, sedentary activity and social contact of thirty-two young men either with or without exposure to bright light. 3. On this inverted schedule, the endogenous component of the core temperature rhythm of subjects who were exposed to bright light showed a significant phase shift, demonstrating that they were adapting to the new schedule. In contrast, the core temperature rhythm of subjects who were not exposed to bright light moved on average 0.2 h later per day and after 10 days had not significantly adapted to the new schedule. 4. The direction of phase shift in the groups exposed to bright light was dependent on the time of bright light exposure, while control subjects drifted to a later hour regardless of the timing of their schedule of sleep timing, social contact and meals. 5. These results support the concept that the light-dark cycle is the most important synchronizer of the human circadian system. They suggest that inversion of the sleep-wake, rest-activity and social contact cycles provides relatively minimal drive for resetting the human circadian pacemaker. 6. These data indicate that interventions designed to phase shift human circadian rhythms for adjustment to time zone changes or altered work schedules should focus on properly timed light exposure.

  1. Irregular Sleep-Wake Rhythm Disorder.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Sabra M; Zee, Phyllis C

    2015-12-01

    Irregular sleep-wake rhythm disorder is a circadian rhythm disorder characterized by multiple bouts of sleep within a 24-hour period. Patients present with symptoms of insomnia, including difficulty either falling or staying asleep, and daytime excessive sleepiness. The disorder is seen in a variety of individuals, ranging from children with neurodevelopmental disorders, to patients with psychiatric disorders, and most commonly in older adults with neurodegenerative disorders. Treatment of irregular sleep-wake rhythm disorder requires a multimodal approach aimed at strengthening circadian synchronizing agents, such as daytime exposure to bright light, and structured social and physical activities. In addition, melatonin may be useful in some patients. PMID:26568126

  2. Musical alexia for rhythm notation: a discrepancy between pitch and rhythm.

    PubMed

    Midorikawa, Akira; Kawamura, Mitsuru; Kezuka, Machiko

    2003-06-01

    In the process of reading music, the reading of rhythm and pitch might be differentiated, although there is no evidence of this to date. There have been cases of disorders restricted to the reading of pitch, but none in which the disorder has been restricted to the reading of rhythm. We present a case of musical alexia and agraphia with Wernicke's aphasia. An in-depth assessment of the subject's musical reading ability showed that her musical alexia was restricted to unfamiliar melodies. When a melody was divided into rhythm elements and pitch elements, pitch reading was preserved, but rhythm reading was severely disturbed. This is the first case reported of a disorder restricted to rhythm reading, and suggests the independence of rhythm reading and pitch reading. PMID:12925929

  3. Effects of long-term microgravity exposure in space on circadian rhythms of heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Naomune; Otsuka, Kuniaki; Kubo, Yutaka; Hayashi, Mitsutoshi; Mizuno, Koh; Ohshima, Hiroshi; Mukai, Chiaki

    2015-04-01

    We evaluated their circadian rhythms using data from electrocardiographic records and examined the change in circadian period related to normal RR intervals for astronauts who completed a long-term (≥6-month) mission in space. The examinees were seven astronauts, five men and two women, from 2009 to 2010. Their mean ± SD age was 52.0 ± 4.2 years (47-59 yr). Each stayed in space for more than 160 days; their average length of stay was 172.6 ± 14.6 days (163-199 days). We conducted a 24-h Holter electrocardiography before launch (Pre), at one month after launch (DF1), at two months after launch (DF2), at two weeks before return (DF3), and at three months after landing (Post), comparing each index of frequency-domain analysis and 24-h biological rhythms of the NN intervals (normal RR intervals). Results show that the mean period of Normal Sinus (NN) intervals was within 24 ± 4 h at each examination. Inter-individual variability differed among the stages, being significantly smaller at DF3 (Pre versus DF1 versus DF3 versus Post = 22.36 ± 2.50 versus 25.46 ± 4.37 versus 22.46 ± 1.75 versus 26.16 ± 7.18 h, p < 0.0001). The HF component increased in 2 of 7 astronauts, whereas it decreased in 3 of 7 astronauts and 1 was remained almost unchanged at DF1. During DF3, about 6 months after their stay in space, the HF component of 5 of 7 astronauts recovered from the decrease after launch, with prominent improvement to over 20% in 3 astronauts. Although autonomic nervous functions and circadian rhythms were disturbed until one month had passed in space, well-scheduled sleep and wake rhythms and meal times served as synchronizers. PMID:25392280

  4. Non-invasive measurement of glucose uptake of skeletal muscle tissue models using a glucose nanobiosensor.

    PubMed

    Obregón, Raquel; Ahadian, Samad; Ramón-Azcón, Javier; Chen, Luyang; Fujita, Takeshi; Shiku, Hitoshi; Chen, Mingwei; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2013-12-15

    Skeletal muscle tissues play a significant role to maintain the glucose level of whole body and any dysfunction of this tissue leads to the diabetes disease. A culture medium was created in which the muscle cells could survive for a long time and meanwhile it did not interfere with the glucose sensing. We fabricated a model of skeletal muscle tissues in vitro to monitor its glucose uptake. A nanoporous gold as a high sensitive nanobiosensor was then successfully developed and employed to detect the glucose uptake of the tissue models in this medium upon applying the electrical stimulation in a rapid, and non-invasive approach. The response of the glucose sensor was linear in a wide concentration range of 1-50 mM, with a detection limit of 3 μM at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3.0. The skeletal muscle tissue was electrically stimulated during 24 h and glucose uptake was monitored during this period. During the first 3 h of stimulation, electrically stimulated muscle tissue consumed almost twice the amount of glucose than counterpart non-stimulated sample. In total, the glucose consumption of muscle tissues was higher for the electrically stimulated tissues compared to those without applying the electrical field. PMID:23856563

  5. CIRCADIAN RHYTHM REPROGRAMMING DURING LUNG INFLAMMATION

    PubMed Central

    Haspel, Jeffrey A.; Chettimada, Sukrutha; Shaik, Rahamthulla S.; Chu, Jen-Hwa; Raby, Benjamin A.; Cernadas, Manuela; Carey, Vincent; Process, Vanessa; Hunninghake, G. Matthew; Ifedigbo, Emeka; Lederer, James A.; Englert, Joshua; Pelton, Ashley; Coronata, Anna; Fredenburgh, Laura E.; Choi, Augustine M. K.

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are known to regulate immune responses in healthy animals, but it is unclear whether they persist during acute illnesses where clock gene expression is disrupted by systemic inflammation. Here, we use a genome-wide approach to investigate circadian gene and metabolite expression in the lungs of endotoxemic mice and find that novel cellular and molecular circadian rhythms are elicited in this setting. The endotoxin-specific circadian program exhibits unique features, including a divergent group of rhythmic genes and metabolites compared to the basal state and a distinct periodicity and phase distribution. At the cellular level endotoxin treatment also alters circadian rhythms of leukocyte counts within the lung in a bmal1-dependent manner, such that granulocytes rather than lymphocytes become the dominant oscillating cell type. Our results show that inflammation produces a complex reorganization of cellular and molecular circadian rhythms that are relevant to early events in lung injury. PMID:25208554

  6. Metrical perception of trisyllabic speech rhythms.

    PubMed

    Benadon, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The perception of duration-based syllabic rhythm was examined within a metrical framework. Participants assessed the duration patterns of four-syllable phrases set within the stress structure XxxX (an Abercrombian trisyllabic foot). Using on-screen sliders, participants created percussive sequences that imitated speech rhythms and analogous non-speech monotone rhythms. There was a tendency to equalize the interval durations for speech stimuli but not for non-speech. Despite the perceptual regularization of syllable durations, different speech phrases were conceived in various rhythmic configurations, pointing to a diversity of perceived meters in speech. In addition, imitations of speech stimuli showed more variability than those of non-speech. Rhythmically skilled listeners exhibited lower variability and were more consistent with vowel-centric estimates when assessing speech stimuli. These findings enable new connections between meter- and duration-based models of speech rhythm perception. PMID:23417710

  7. Diel rhythms of feeding activity in the European catfish, Silurus glanis.

    PubMed

    Boujard, T

    1995-10-01

    The diel rhythms of feeding activity of S. glanis held singly or in groups, and with free or time-restricted access to self-feeders is described. It was found that this this species has a strongly nocturnal feeding activity. European catfish can be trained to feed itself by day, but in such case its voluntary feed intake is reduced. When trained to feed by day, they resume their nocturnal behavior in less than 24 h when they have again free access to feed. It is also clearly evidenced that this fish species does not behave the same way when it is isolated from its congeneres rather than when it is maintained in groups, with a tendency to become arhythmic. PMID:8559771

  8. Circadian rhythm in adenosine A1 receptor of mouse cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Florio, C.; Rosati, A.M.; Traversa, U.; Vertua, R. )

    1991-01-01

    In order to investigate diurnal variation in adenosine A1 receptors binding parameters, Bmax and Kd values of specifically bound N6-cyclohexyl-({sup 3}H)adenosine were determined in the cerebral cortex of mice that had been housed under controlled light-dark cycles for 4 weeks. Significant differences were found for Bmax values measured at 3-hr intervals across a 24-h period, with low Bmax values during the light period and high Bmax values during the dark period. The amplitude between 03.00 and 18.00 hr was 33%. No substantial rhythm was found in the Kd values. It is suggested that the changes in the density of A1 receptors could reflect a physiologically-relevant mechanism by which adenosine exerts its modulatory role in the central nervous system.

  9. Sleep and circadian rhythms in long duration space flight - Antarctica as an analogue environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gander, Philippa H.

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility of using Antarctica as an environment for studying the impact of unusual 24 h environmental cycles (zeitgebers) on the circadian system is discussed. Adaptation of circadian rhythms and sleep of three scientists travelling from New Zealand to Antarctica during summer (which is analogous to arrival at a lunar base during the lunar day) has been studied. Data obtained indicate that sleep occurred at the same clock time, but sleep quality was poorer in Antarctica, which can be explained by the fact that the circadian system delayed by about 2 h in Antarctica, as would be expected in a weaker zeitgeber environment. It is suggested that sleep could be improved by altering patterns of exposure to the available zeitgebers to increase their effective strength.

  10. Hippuric acid in 24 h urine collections as a biomarker of fruits and vegetables intake in kidney stone formers.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Angela; Folesani, Giuseppina; Mena, Pedro; Ticinesi, Andrea; Allegri, Franca; Nouvenne, Antonio; Pinelli, Silvana; Del Rio, Daniele; Borghi, Loris; Meschi, Tiziana

    2014-12-01

    This work aimed to underline the prospects of hippuric acid, a product of the metabolism of polyphenols, as a new biomarker of fruits and vegetables intake associated with lithogenic risk. Biochemical parameters of lithogenic risk and hippuric acid were measured in the 24 h urine collections of a cohort of 696 Italian kidney stone formers divided into two subgroups according to their different dietary habits. The link between lithogenic risk parameters and hippuric acid was assessed and this compound was revealed as a valuable biomarker of fruits and vegetables intake in kidney stone formers. A cut-off value of urinary excretion of hippuric acid, 300 mg/24 h, was set as the threshold of discrimination between low and high intake of fruits and vegetables for these patients. These results highlight the importance of monitoring of the excretion hippuric acid in urine to address proper dietary guidelines for the management of stone former patients. PMID:25198158

  11. Nintendo® Wii Fit based sleepiness tester detects impairment of postural steadiness due to 24 h of wakefulness.

    PubMed

    Tietäväinen, Aino; Gates, Fred K; Meriläinen, Antti; Mandel, Jeff E; Hæggström, Edward

    2013-12-01

    A field-usable sleepiness tester could reduce sleepiness related accidents. 15 subjects' postural steadiness was measured with a Nintendo(®) Wii Fit balance board every hour for 24 h. Body sway was quantified with complexity index, CI, and the correlation between CI and alertness predicted by a three-process model of sleepiness was calculated. The CI group average was 8.9 ± 1.3 for alert and 7.9 ± 1.4 for sleep deprived subjects (p < 0.001, ρ = 0.94). The Wii Fit board detects the impairment of postural steadiness. This may allow large scale sleepiness testing outside the laboratory setting. PMID:24054980

  12. A Mobile Phone Based Method to Assess Energy and Food Intake in Young Children: A Validation Study against the Doubly Labelled Water Method and 24 h Dietary Recalls.

    PubMed

    Delisle Nyström, Christine; Forsum, Elisabet; Henriksson, Hanna; Trolle-Lagerros, Ylva; Larsson, Christel; Maddison, Ralph; Timpka, Toomas; Löf, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Mobile phones are becoming important instruments for assessing diet and energy intake. We developed the Tool for Energy Balance in Children (TECH), which uses a mobile phone to assess energy and food intake in pre-school children. The aims of this study were: (a) to compare energy intake (EI) using TECH with total energy expenditure (TEE) measured via doubly labelled water (DLW); and (b) to compare intakes of fruits, vegetables, fruit juice, sweetened beverages, candy, ice cream, and bakery products using TECH with intakes acquired by 24 h dietary recalls. Participants were 39 healthy, Swedish children (5.5 ± 0.5 years) within the ongoing Mobile-based Intervention Intended to Stop Obesity in Preschoolers (MINISTOP) obesity prevention trial. Energy and food intakes were assessed during four days using TECH and 24 h telephone dietary recalls. Mean EI (TECH) was not statistically different from TEE (DLW) (5820 ± 820 kJ/24 h and 6040 ± 680 kJ/24 h, respectively). No significant differences in the average food intakes using TECH and 24 h dietary recalls were found. All food intakes were correlated between TECH and the 24 h dietary recalls (ρ = 0.665-0.896, p < 0.001). In conclusion, TECH accurately estimated the average intakes of energy and selected foods and thus has the potential to be a useful tool for dietary studies in pre-school children, for example obesity prevention trials. PMID:26784226

  13. A Mobile Phone Based Method to Assess Energy and Food Intake in Young Children: A Validation Study against the Doubly Labelled Water Method and 24 h Dietary Recalls

    PubMed Central

    Delisle Nyström, Christine; Forsum, Elisabet; Henriksson, Hanna; Trolle-Lagerros, Ylva; Larsson, Christel; Maddison, Ralph; Timpka, Toomas; Löf, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Mobile phones are becoming important instruments for assessing diet and energy intake. We developed the Tool for Energy Balance in Children (TECH), which uses a mobile phone to assess energy and food intake in pre-school children. The aims of this study were: (a) to compare energy intake (EI) using TECH with total energy expenditure (TEE) measured via doubly labelled water (DLW); and (b) to compare intakes of fruits, vegetables, fruit juice, sweetened beverages, candy, ice cream, and bakery products using TECH with intakes acquired by 24 h dietary recalls. Participants were 39 healthy, Swedish children (5.5 ± 0.5 years) within the ongoing Mobile-based Intervention Intended to Stop Obesity in Preschoolers (MINISTOP) obesity prevention trial. Energy and food intakes were assessed during four days using TECH and 24 h telephone dietary recalls. Mean EI (TECH) was not statistically different from TEE (DLW) (5820 ± 820 kJ/24 h and 6040 ± 680kJ/24 h, respectively). No significant differences in the average food intakes using TECH and 24 h dietary recalls were found. All food intakes were correlated between TECH and the 24 h dietary recalls (ρ = 0.665–0.896, p < 0.001). In conclusion, TECH accurately estimated the average intakes of energy and selected foods and thus has the potential to be a useful tool for dietary studies in pre-school children, for example obesity prevention trials. PMID:26784226

  14. 24-h fluid kinetics and perception of sweat losses following a 1-h run in a temperate environment.

    PubMed

    O'Neal, Eric K; Caufield, Christina R; Lowe, Jordan B; Stevenson, Mary C; Davis, Brett A; Thigpen, Lauren K

    2014-01-01

    This study examined 24-h post-run hydration status and sweat loss estimation accuracy in college age runners (men=12, women=8) after completing a 1-h self-paced outdoor run (wet bulb globe temperature=19.9±3.0 °C). Sweat losses (1353±422 mL; 1.9%±0.5% of body mass) were significantly greater (p<0.001) than perceived losses (686±586 mL). Cumulative fluid consumption equaled 3876±1133 mL (218±178 mL during) with 37% of fluid ingested lost through urine voids (1450±678 mL). Fluid balance based on intake and urine production equaled +554±669 mL at 12 h and +1186±735 mL at 24 h. Most runners reported euhydrated (pre-run urine specific gravity (USG)=1.018±0.008) with no changes (p=0.33) at hours 12 or 24 when both genders were included. However, USG was higher (p=0.004) at 12 h post-run for men (1.025±0.0070 vs. 1.014±0.007), who consumed 171%±40% of sweat losses at 12 h vs. 268%±88% for women. Most runners do not need intervention concerning between bout hydration needs in temperate environments. However, repeated USG measurements were able to identify runners who greatly under or over consumed fluid during recovery. Practitioners can use multiple USG assessments as cheap method to detect runners who need to modify their hydration strategies and should promote assessment of sweat losses by change in body mass, as runners had poor perception of sweat losses. PMID:24451307

  15. The 24-h recall instrument for home nursing to measure the activity profile of home nurses: development and psychometric testing.

    PubMed

    De Vliegher, Kristel; Aertgeerts, Bert; Declercq, Anja; Gosset, Christiane; Heyden, Isabelle; Van Geert, Michel; Moons, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Home health care today is challenged by a shift from an acute to a chronic health-care model, moving the focus of care from the hospital to home-care setting. This increased focus on care at home emphasizes the need for an efficient, effective, and transparent management of home health care. However, it is not precisely known what home-care nurses do; what kind of care is received by patients; what the performance of home nurses is; and what the impact of the increasing need for home nursing is on the current and future role of home nurses. In this respect, it is necessary to gain a clear insight into the activity profile of home nurses, but there is no gold standard to measure their activities. This study reports on the development and psychometric testing of the '24-hour recall instrument for home nursing' to measure the activity profile of home nurses. Five home nurses in Belgium, simultaneously with the researcher, registered the performed activities in a total of 69 patients, using the 24-h recall instrument for home nursing. The validity and the interrater reliability of this instrument were high: the proportions that observed agreement were very high; the strength of kappa agreement was substantial to almost perfect; the prevalence index showed great variety; and the bias index was low. The findings in this study support the validity evidence based on test content and the interrater reliability of the 24-h recall instrument. This instrument can help to shape practice and policy by making the home nursing profession more transparent: a clear insight into the kind of care that is provided by home nurses and is received by the patients in primary care contributes to the development of a clear definition of the role of home nurses in health care. PMID:24479985

  16. Clinical and Laboratory Responses of Cross-Country Skiing for a 24-H World Record: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Niemelä, Markus; Juvonen, Jukka; Kangastupa, Päivikki; Niemelä, Onni; Juvonen, Tatu

    2015-01-01

    The physiological consequences of ultra-endurance cross-country skiing in cold conditions are poorly known. We report here clinical, echocardiographic and laboratory findings from a 41-y old male elite skier in a world record trial for 24-h skiing. The athlete completed a total of 406.8 km outdoors with the temperature ranging between -24°C and –5°C during the 24-h period. Post exercise, notable increases from baseline values were observed in myoglobin (50-fold), creatinine kinase (30-fold) and proBNP (6-fold), whereas troponin T or troponin I levels remained unchanged. At baseline, echocardiographic findings showed cardiac hypertrophy and after skiing, a 5% reduction of left-ventricular end-diastolic dimension. Increases in markers of kidney (creatinine) and liver function (alanine aminotransferase), serum uric acid, C-reactive protein and white blood cell counts were also noted. In addition, electrolyte disturbances including hyponatremia, hypophosphatemia and hypocalcaemia were noted during the follow-up. The data indicates that a prolonged period of high-intensity skiing leads to muscle, heart and kidney affection and activation of inflammation even in an experienced elite skier. The observed health effects underscore the need for strict medical surveillance of participants in extreme sports with long duration. Key points An elite athlete was able to ski over 400 km during 24 hours with an outdoor temperature ranging between –5 °C and –24 °C. Several postrace abnormalities occurred in biomarkers of muscle, heart, kidney, liver and inflammation status. Serum troponins, specific markers of myocardial cell damage, remained stable. The report supports careful medical surveillance of participants in extreme sports with long duration. PMID:26664265

  17. Pulse Arrival Time Based Cuff-Less and 24-H Wearable Blood Pressure Monitoring and its Diagnostic Value in Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yali; Poon, Carmen C Y; Yan, Bryan P; Lau, James Y W

    2016-09-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) has become an essential tool in the diagnosis and management of hypertension. Current standard ABPM devices use an oscillometric cuff-based method which can cause physical discomfort to the patients with repeated inflations and deflations, especially during nighttime leading to sleep disturbance. The ability to measure ambulatory BP accurately and comfortably without a cuff would be attractive. This study validated the accuracy of a cuff-less approach for ABPM using pulse arrival time (PAT) measurements on both healthy and hypertensive subjects for potential use in hypertensive management, which is the first of its kind. The wearable cuff-less device was evaluated against a standard cuff-based device on 24 subjects of which 15 have known hypertension. BP measurements were taken from each subject over a 24-h period by the cuff-less and cuff-based devices every 15 to 30 minutes during daily activities. Mean BP of each subject during daytime, nighttime and over 24-h were calculated. Agreement between mean nighttime systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) measured by the two devices evaluated using Bland-Altman plot were -1.4 ± 6.6 and 0.4 ± 6.7 mmHg, respectively. Receiver operator characteristics (ROC) statistics was used to assess the diagnostic accuracy of the cuff-less approach in the detection of BP above the hypertension threshold during nighttime (>120/70 mmHg). The area under ROC curves were 0.975/0.79 for nighttime. The results suggest that PAT-based approach is accurate and promising for ABPM without the issue of sleep disturbances associated with cuff-based devices. PMID:27447469

  18. Intracranial Pressure Elevation 24 h after Ischemic Stroke in Aged Rats Is Prevented by Early, Short Hypothermia Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Murtha, Lucy A.; Beard, Daniel J.; Bourke, Julia T.; Pepperall, Debbie; McLeod, Damian D.; Spratt, Neil J.

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is predominantly a senescent disease, yet most preclinical studies investigate treatment in young animals. We recently demonstrated that short-duration hypothermia-treatment completely prevented the dramatic intracranial pressure (ICP) rise seen post-stroke in young rats. Here, our aim was to investigate whether a similar ICP rise occurs in aged rats and to determine whether short-duration hypothermia is an effective treatment in aged animals. Experimental middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo-3 h occlusion) was performed on male Wistar rats aged 19–20 months. At 1 h after stroke-onset, rats were randomized to 2.5 h hypothermia-treatment (32.5°C) or normothermia (37°C). ICP was monitored at baseline, for 3.5 h post-occlusion, and at 24 h post-stroke. Infarct and edema volumes were calculated from histology. Baseline pre-stroke ICP was 11.2 ± 3.3 mmHg across all animals. Twenty-four hours post-stroke, ICP was significantly higher in normothermic animals compared to hypothermia-treated animals (27.4 ± 18.2 mmHg vs. 8.0 ± 5.0 mmHg, p = 0.03). Infarct and edema volumes were not significantly different between groups. These data demonstrate ICP may also increase 24 h post-stroke in aged rats, and that short-duration hypothermia treatment has a profound and sustained preventative effect. These findings may have important implications for the use of hypothermia in clinical trials of aged stroke patients. PMID:27303291

  19. 24-h urinary sodium excretion is associated with obesity in a cross-sectional sample of Australian schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Grimes, Carley A; Riddell, Lynn J; Campbell, Karen J; He, Feng J; Nowson, Caryl A

    2016-03-28

    Emerging evidence indicates that dietary Na may be linked to obesity; however it is unclear whether this relationship is independent of energy intake (EI). The aim of this study was to assess the association between Na intake and measures of adiposity, including BMI z score, weight category and waist:height ratio (WHtR), in a sample of Australian schoolchildren. This was a cross-sectional study of schoolchildren aged 4-12 years. Na intake was assessed via one 24-h urine collection. BMI was converted to age- and sex-specific z scores, and WHtR was used to define abdominal obesity. In children aged ≥8 years, EI was determined via one 24-h dietary recall. Of the 666 children with valid urine samples 55 % were male (average age 9·3 (sd 1·8) years). In adjusted models an additional 17 mmol/d of Na was associated with a 0·10 higher BMI z score (95 % CI 0·07, 0·13), a 23 % (OR 1·23; 95 % CI 1·16, 1·31) greater risk of being overweight/obese and a 15 % (OR 1·15; 95 % CI 1·09, 1·23) greater risk of being centrally obese. In the subsample of 8-12-year-old children (n 458), adjustment for EI did not markedly alter the associations between Na and adiposity outcomes. Using a robust measure of daily Na intake we found a positive association between Na intake and obesity risk in Australian schoolchildren, which could not be explained by total energy consumption. To determine whether this is a causal relationship, longitudinal studies, with high-quality measures of Na and EI, are required. PMID:26810972

  20. 24-h Fluid Kinetics and Perception of Sweat Losses Following a 1-h Run in a Temperate Environment

    PubMed Central

    O’Neal, Eric K.; Caufield, Christina R.; Lowe, Jordan B.; Stevenson, Mary C.; Davis, Brett A.; Thigpen, Lauren K.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined 24-h post-run hydration status and sweat loss estimation accuracy in college age runners (men = 12, women = 8) after completing a 1-h self-paced outdoor run (wet bulb globe temperature = 19.9 ± 3.0 °C). Sweat losses (1353 ± 422 mL; 1.9% ± 0.5% of body mass) were significantly greater (p < 0.001) than perceived losses (686 ± 586 mL). Cumulative fluid consumption equaled 3876 ± 1133 mL (218 ± 178 mL during) with 37% of fluid ingested lost through urine voids (1450 ± 678 mL). Fluid balance based on intake and urine production equaled +554 ± 669 mL at 12 h and +1186 ± 735 mL at 24 h. Most runners reported euhydrated (pre-run urine specific gravity (USG) = 1.018 ± 0.008) with no changes (p = 0.33) at hours 12 or 24 when both genders were included. However, USG was higher (p = 0.004) at 12 h post-run for men (1.025 ± 0.0070 vs. 1.014 ± 0.007), who consumed 171% ± 40% of sweat losses at 12 h vs. 268% ± 88% for women. Most runners do not need intervention concerning between bout hydration needs in temperate environments. However, repeated USG measurements were able to identify runners who greatly under or over consumed fluid during recovery. Practitioners can use multiple USG assessments as cheap method to detect runners who need to modify their hydration strategies and should promote assessment of sweat losses by change in body mass, as runners had poor perception of sweat losses. PMID:24451307

  1. Neuroanatomy of the Extended Circadian Rhythm System

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Lawrence P

    2012-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), site of the primary clock in the circadian rhythm system, has three major afferent connections. The most important consists of a retinohypothalamic projection through which photic information, received by classical rod/cone photoreceptors and intrinsically photoreceptive retinal ganglion cells, gains access to the clock. This information influences phase and period of circadian rhythms. The two other robust afferent projections are the median raphe serotonergic pathway and the geniculohypothalamic (GHT), NPY-containing pathway from the thalamic intergeniculate leaflet (IGL). Beyond this simple framework, the number of anatomical routes that could theoretically be involved in rhythm regulation is enormous, with the SCN projecting to 15 regions and being directly innervated by about 35. If multisynaptic afferents to the SCN are included, the number expands to approximately brain 85 areas providing input to the SCN. The IGL, a known contributor to circadian rhythm regulation, has a still greater level of complexity. This nucleus connects abundantly throughout the brain (to approximately 100 regions) by pathways that are largely bilateral and reciprocal. Few of these sites have been evaluated for their contributions to circadian rhythm regulation, although most have a theoretical possibility of doing so via the GHT. The anatomy of IGL connections suggests that one of its functions may be regulation of eye movements during sleep. Together, neural circuits of the SCN and IGL are complex and interconnected. As yet, few have been tested with respect to their involvement in rhythm regulation. PMID:22766204

  2. The role of feeding rhythm, adrenal hormones and neuronal inputs in synchronizing daily clock gene rhythms in the liver.

    PubMed

    Su, Yan; Cailotto, Cathy; Foppen, Ewout; Jansen, Remi; Zhang, Zhi; Buijs, Ruud; Fliers, Eric; Kalsbeek, Andries

    2016-02-15

    The master clock in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is assumed to distribute rhythmic information to the periphery via neural, humoral and/or behavioral connections. Until now, feeding, corticosterone and neural inputs are considered important signals for synchronizing daily rhythms in the liver. In this study, we investigated the necessity of neural inputs as well as of the feeding and adrenal hormone rhythms for maintaining daily hepatic clock gene rhythms. Clock genes kept their daily rhythm when only one of these three signals was disrupted, or when we disrupted hepatic neuronal inputs together with the adrenal hormone rhythm or with the daily feeding rhythm. However, all clock genes studied lost their daily expression rhythm after simultaneous disruption of the feeding and adrenal hormone rhythm. These data indicate that either a daily rhythm of feeding or adrenal hormones should be present to synchronize clock gene rhythms in the liver with the SCN. PMID:26704081

  3. Holter monitor (24h)

    MedlinePlus

    ... be firmly attached to the chest so the machine gets an accurate recording of the heart's activity. While wearing the device, avoid: Electric blankets High-voltage areas Magnets Metal detectors Continue ...

  4. Holter monitor (24h)

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart medicine It may be used to diagnose: Atrial fibrillation or flutter Multifocal atrial tachycardia Palpitations Paroxysmal supraventricular ... Saunders Elsevier; 2011:chap 62. Read More Arrhythmias Atrial fibrillation or flutter Chest pain Electrocardiogram Fainting Heart attack ...

  5. Glucose control.

    PubMed

    Preiser, Jean-Charles

    2013-01-01

    Stress-related hyperglycemia is a common finding in acutely ill patients, and is related to the severity and outcome of the critical illness. The pathophysiology of stress hyperglycemia includes hormonal and neural signals, leading to increased production of glucose by the liver and peripheral insulin resistance mediated by the translocation of transmembrane glucose transporters. In one pioneering study, tight glycemic control by intensive insulin therapy in critically ill patients was associated with improved survival. However, this major finding was not confirmed in several other prospective randomized controlled trials. The reasons underlying the discrepancy between the first and the subsequent studies could include nutritional strategy (amount of calories provided, use of parenteral nutrition), case-mix, potential differences in the optimal blood glucose level (BG) in different types of patients, hypoglycemia and its correction, and the magnitude of glucose variability. Therefore, an improved understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology of glycemic regulation during acute illness is needed. Safe and effective glucose control will need improvement in the definition of optimal BG and in the measurement techniques, perhaps including continuous monitoring of insulin algorithms and closed-loop systems. PMID:23075589

  6. Effects of L-Dopa on circadian rhythms of 6-OHDA striatal lesioned rats: a radiotelemetric study.

    PubMed

    Boulamery, Audrey; Simon, Nicolas; Vidal, Johanna; Bruguerolle, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    -Dopa treatment improved or accelerated recovery of the circadian rhythms, the effect being more pronounced for the HR rhythm. When circadian rhythms were not abolished but perturbed, L-Dopa treatment did not improve the 6-OHDA-induced changes in the T and A mesor (24 h mean level), while a significant effect was observed for HR. It appears that constant-rate L-Dopa infusion is unable to totally balance dopamine depletion; taking into account the circadian pattern of many structures implicated in drug effect, a sinusoidal delivery of L-Dopa must be evaluated in future experiments. PMID:20370468

  7. Rapid phase adjustment of melatonin and core body temperature rhythms following a 6-h advance of the light/dark cycle in the horse

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Barbara A; Elliott, Jeffrey A; Sessions, Dawn R; Vick, Mandi M; Kennedy, Erin L; Fitzgerald, Barry P

    2007-01-01

    Background Rapid displacement across multiple time zones results in a conflict between the new cycle of light and dark and the previously entrained program of the internal circadian clock, a phenomenon known as jet lag. In humans, jet lag is often characterized by malaise, appetite loss, fatigue, disturbed sleep and performance deficit, the consequences of which are of particular concern to athletes hoping to perform optimally at an international destination. As a species renowned for its capacity for athletic performance, the consequences of jet lag are also relevant for the horse. However, the duration and severity of jet lag related circadian disruption is presently unknown in this species. We investigated the rates of re-entrainment of serum melatonin and core body temperature (BT) rhythms following an abrupt 6-h phase advance of the LD cycle in the horse. Methods Six healthy, 2 yr old mares entrained to a 12 h light/12 h dark (LD 12:12) natural photoperiod were housed in a light-proofed barn under a lighting schedule that mimicked the external LD cycle. Following baseline sampling on Day 0, an advance shift of the LD cycle was accomplished by ending the subsequent dark period 6 h early. Blood sampling for serum melatonin analysis and BT readings were taken at 3-h intervals for 24 h on alternate days for 11 days. Disturbances to the subsequent melatonin and BT 24-h rhythms were assessed using repeated measures ANOVA and analysis of Cosine curve fitting parameters. Results We demonstrate that the equine melatonin rhythm re-entrains rapidly to a 6-h phase advance of an LD12:12 photocycle. The phase shift in melatonin was fully complete on the first day of the new schedule and rhythm phase and waveform were stable thereafter. In comparison, the advance in the BT rhythm was achieved by the third day, however BT rhythm waveform, especially its mesor, was altered for many days following the LD shift. Conclusion Aside from the temperature rhythm disruption, rapid

  8. Association of food form with self-reported 24-h energy intake and meal patterns in US adults: NHANES 2003–2008123

    PubMed Central

    Kant, Ashima K; Graubard, Barry I; Mattes, Richard D

    2012-01-01

    Background: Laboratory studies suggest that food form (beverages compared with solid foods) evokes behavioral and physiologic responses that modify short-term appetite and food intake. Beverage energy may be less satiating and poorly compensated, which leads to higher energy intake. Objective: We examined associations between 24-h energy consumed in beverages and a variety of meal and dietary attributes to quantify the contribution of beverage consumption to the energy content of diets in free-living individuals consuming their self-selected diets. Design: We used dietary recall data for adults (n = 13,704) in NHANES 2003–2008 to examine the multiple covariate-adjusted associations between 24-h energy from beverages and nonbeverages and associations between beverage intake, eating behaviors, and the energy density of beverage and nonbeverage foods. Results: In the highest tertile of 24-h beverage energy intake, beverages provided >30% of energy. Total 24-h energy and nonbeverage energy consumption and energy density (kcal/g) of both beverage and nonbeverage foods increased with increasing energy from beverages (P < 0.0001). With increasing 24-h beverage energy consumption, the reported frequency of all, snack, and beverage-only ingestive episodes and length of the ingestive period increased, whereas the percentage of energy from main meals decreased (P < 0.0001). Conclusions: Higher 24-h beverage energy intake was related to higher energy intake from nonbeverage foods, quality of food selections, and distribution of 24-h energy into main meal and snack episodes. Moderation of beverage-only ingestive episodes and curtailing the length of the ingestion period may hold potential to lower uncompensated beverage energy consumption in the US population. PMID:23097271

  9. Convergent Rhythm Generation from Divergent Cellular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Jason C.; Blitz, Dawn M.

    2013-01-01

    Different modulatory inputs commonly elicit distinct rhythmic motor patterns from a central pattern generator (CPG), but they can instead elicit the same pattern. We are determining the rhythm-generating mechanisms in this latter situation, using the gastric mill (chewing) CPG in the crab (Cancer borealis) stomatogastric ganglion, where stimulating the projection neuron MCN1 (modulatory commissural neuron 1) or bath applying CabPK (C. borealis pyrokinin) peptide elicits the same gastric mill motor pattern, despite configuring different gastric mill circuits. In both cases, the core rhythm generator includes the same reciprocally inhibitory neurons LG (lateral gastric) and Int1 (interneuron 1), but the pyloric (food-filtering) circuit pacemaker neuron AB (anterior burster) is additionally necessary only for CabPK rhythm generation. MCN1 drives this rhythm generator by activating in the LG neuron the modulator-activated inward current (IMI), which waxes and wanes periodically due to phasic feedback inhibition of MCN1 transmitter release. Each buildup of IMI enables the LG neuron to generate a self-terminating burst and thereby alternate with Int1 activity. Here we establish that CabPK drives gastric mill rhythm generation by activating in the LG neuron IMI plus a slowly activating transient, low-threshold inward current (ITrans-LTS) that is voltage, time, and Ca2+ dependent. Unlike MCN1, CabPK maintains a steady IMI activation, causing a subthreshold depolarization in LG that facilitates a periodic postinhibitory rebound burst caused by the regular buildup and decay of the availability of ITrans-LTS. Thus, different modulatory inputs can use different rhythm-generating mechanisms to drive the same neuronal rhythm. Additionally, the same ionic current (IMI) can play different roles under these different conditions, while different currents (IMI, ITrans-LTS) can play the same role. PMID:24227716

  10. Glucose Variability

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The proposed contribution of glucose variability to the development of the complications of diabetes beyond that of glycemic exposure is supported by reports that oxidative stress, the putative mediator of such complications, is greater for intermittent as opposed to sustained hyperglycemia. Variability of glycemia in ambulatory conditions defined as the deviation from steady state is a phenomenon of normal physiology. Comprehensive recording of glycemia is required for the generation of any measurement of glucose variability. To avoid distortion of variability to that of glycemic exposure, its calculation should be devoid of a time component. PMID:23613565

  11. Alpha-amylase circadian rhythm of young rat parotid gland: an endogenous rhythm with maternal coordination.

    PubMed

    Bellavía, S L; Sanz, E G; Sereno, R; Vermouth, N T

    1992-01-01

    The circadian rhythm of alpha-amylase, E.C. 3.2.1.1. alpha-1,4-glucan-4-glucanohydrolase) in the parotid glands of 25-day-old rats were studied under different experimental designs (fasting, reversed photoperiod, constant lighting conditions and treatment with reserpine and alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine). The rhythm of fasted rats did not change. There were modifications in the rhythm of rats submitted to a reversed photoperiod or treated with reserpine or alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine. The rhythm was present, with changes in the acrophase, in parotids of rats kept during their gestation and postnatal life in constant light or dark. Results suggest that the circadian rhythm of alpha-amylase in parotid gland of young rats is endogenous, synchronized by the photoperiod, and with maternal coordination. PMID:1610312

  12. Temporal variability of pyrethroid metabolite levels in bedtime, morning, and 24-h urine samples for 50 adults in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Marsha K; Sobus, Jon R; Barr, Dana Boyd; Croghan, Carry W; Chen, Fu-Lin; Walker, Richard; Alston, Lillian; Andersen, Erik; Clifton, Matthew S

    2016-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides are widely used to control insects in both agricultural and residential settings worldwide. Few data are available on the temporal variability of pyrethroid metabolites in the urine of non-occupationally exposed adults. In this work, we describe the study design and sampling methodology for the Pilot Study to Estimate Human Exposures to Pyrethroids using an Exposure Reconstruction Approach (Ex-R study). Two major objectives were to quantify the concentrations of several pyrethroid metabolites in bedtime, first morning void (FMV), and 24-h urine samples as concentration (wet weight), specific-gravity (SG) corrected, creatinine (CR) corrected, and excretion rate values for 50 Ex-R adults over a six-week monitoring period and to determine if these correction approaches for urine dilution reduced the variability of the biomarker levels. The Ex-R study was conducted at the United States Environmental Protection Agency's Human Studies Facility in Chapel Hill, North Carolina USA and at participants' homes within a 40-mile radius of this facility. Recruitment of participants and field activities occurred between October 2009 and May 2011. Participants, ages 19-50 years old, provided daily food, activity, and pesticide-use diaries and collected their own urine samples (bedtime, FMV, and 24-h) during weeks 1, 2, and 6 of a six-week monitoring period. A total of 2503 urine samples were collected from the study participants. These samples were analyzed for the pyrethroid metabolites 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA), cis/trans-3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethyl-cyclopropane carboxylic acid (cis/trans-DCCA), and 2-methyl-3-phenylbenzoic acid (MPA) using high performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Only 3-PBA was frequently detected (>50%) in the adult urine samples. Median urinary 3-PBA levels were 0.88 ng/mL, 0.96 ng/mL-SG, 1.04 ng/mg, and 1.04 ng/min for concentration, SG-corrected, CR-corrected, and excretion rate values, respectively

  13. Endocrine and metabolic effects of consuming fructose- and glucose-sweetened beverages with meals in obese men and women: Influence of insulin resistance on plasma triglyceride responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Context: Compared with glucose-sweetened beverages, consumption of fructose-sweetened beverages with meals elevates postprandial plasma triglycerides and lowers 24-h insulin and leptin profiles in normal weight women. The effects of fructose, compared with glucose, ingestion on metabolic profiles in...

  14. The full moon as a synchronizer of circa-monthly biological rhythms: Chronobiologic perspectives based on multidisciplinary naturalistic research.

    PubMed

    Reinberg, Alain; Smolensky, Michael H; Touitou, Yvan

    2016-01-01

    Biological rhythmicity is presumed to be an advantageous genetic adaptation of fitness and survival value resulting from evolution of life forms in an environment that varies predictably-in-time during the 24 h, month, and year. The 24 h light/dark cycle is the prime synchronizer of circadian periodicities, and its modulation over the course of the year, in terms of daytime photoperiod length, is a prime synchronizer of circannual periodicities. Circadian and circannual rhythms have been the major research focus of most scientists. Circa-monthly rhythms triggered or synchronized by the 29.5 day lunar cycle of nighttime light intensity, or specifically the light of the full moon, although explored in waterborne and certain other species, have received far less study, perhaps because of associations with ancient mythology and/or an attitude naturalistic studies are of lesser merit than ones that entail molecular mechanisms. In this editorial, we cite our recent discovery through multidisciplinary naturalistic investigation of a highly integrated circadian, circa-monthly, and circannual time structure, synchronized by the natural ambient nyctohemeral, lunar, and annual light cycles, of the Peruvian apple cactus (C. peruvianus) flowering and reproductive processes that occur in close temporal coordination with like rhythms of the honey bee as its pollinator. This finding led us to explore the preservation of this integrated biological time structure, synchronized and/or triggered by environmental light cues and cycles, in the reproduction of other species, including Homo sapiens, and how the artificial light environment of today in which humans reside may be negatively affecting human reproduction efficiency. PMID:27019304

  15. Sleep Control, GPCRs, and Glucose Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tsuneki, Hiroshi; Sasaoka, Toshiyasu; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2016-09-01

    Modern lifestyles prolong daily activities into the nighttime, disrupting circadian rhythms, which may cause sleep disturbances. Sleep disturbances have been implicated in the dysregulation of blood glucose levels and reported to increase the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and diabetic complications. Sleep disorders are treated using anti-insomnia drugs that target ionotropic and G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), including γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonists, melatonin agonists, and orexin receptor antagonists. A deeper understanding of the effects of these medications on glucose metabolism and their underlying mechanisms of action is crucial for the treatment of diabetic patients with sleep disorders. In this review we focus on the beneficial impact of sleep on glucose metabolism and suggest a possible strategy for therapeutic intervention against sleep-related metabolic disorders. PMID:27461005

  16. Impact of dispersed coupling strength on the free running periods of circadian rhythms.

    PubMed

    Gu, Changgui; Rohling, Jos H T; Liang, Xiaoming; Yang, Huijie

    2016-03-01

    The dominant endogenous clock, named the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), regulates circadian rhythms of behavioral and physiological activity in mammals. One of the main characteristics of the SCN is that the animal maintains a circadian rhythm with a period close to 24 h in the absence of a daily light-dark cycle (called the free running period). The free running period varies among species due to heterogeneity of the SCN network. Previous studies have shown that the heterogeneity in cellular coupling as well as in intrinsic neuronal periods shortens the free running period. Furthermore, as derived from experiments, one neuron's coupling strength is negatively associated with its period. It is unknown what the effects of this association between coupling strength and period are on the free running period and how the heterogeneity in coupling strength influences this free running period. In the present study we found that in the presence of a negative relationship between one neuron's coupling strength and its period, surprisingly, the dispersion of coupling strengths increases the free running period. Our present finding may shed new light on the understanding of the heterogeneous SCN network and provides an alternative explanation for the diversity of free running periods between species. PMID:27078397

  17. Impact of dispersed coupling strength on the free running periods of circadian rhythms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Changgui; Rohling, Jos H. T.; Liang, Xiaoming; Yang, Huijie

    2016-03-01

    The dominant endogenous clock, named the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), regulates circadian rhythms of behavioral and physiological activity in mammals. One of the main characteristics of the SCN is that the animal maintains a circadian rhythm with a period close to 24 h in the absence of a daily light-dark cycle (called the free running period). The free running period varies among species due to heterogeneity of the SCN network. Previous studies have shown that the heterogeneity in cellular coupling as well as in intrinsic neuronal periods shortens the free running period. Furthermore, as derived from experiments, one neuron's coupling strength is negatively associated with its period. It is unknown what the effects of this association between coupling strength and period are on the free running period and how the heterogeneity in coupling strength influences this free running period. In the present study we found that in the presence of a negative relationship between one neuron's coupling strength and its period, surprisingly, the dispersion of coupling strengths increases the free running period. Our present finding may shed new light on the understanding of the heterogeneous SCN network and provides an alternative explanation for the diversity of free running periods between species.

  18. Plant resistance mechanisms to air pollutants: rhythms in ascorbic acid production during growth under ozone stress

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.H. )

    1991-01-01

    Relationships between ozone (O3) tolerance and leaf ascorbic acid concentrations in O3-susceptible (O3-S) 'Hark' and O3-resistant (O3-R) 'Hood' soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merr., cultivars were examined with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Leaf samples were analyzed at 4 intervals during a 24 h period. Soybean cultivars grown in the greenhouse with charcoal filtered (CF) and nonfiltered (NF) air showed daily oscillations in ascorbic acid production. Highest ascorbic acid levels in leaves during light coincided with highest concentrations of photochemical oxidants in the atmosphere at 2:00 p.m. The resistant genotype produced more ascorbic acid in its trifoliate leaves than did the corresponding susceptible genotype. Under CF air (an O3-reduced environment) O3-S and O3-R cultivars showed rhythms in ascorbic acid production. In NF air (an O3 stress environment) the O3-R cultivar alone showed rhythms in ascorbic acid production. Results indicated that superior O3 tolerance in the Hood soybean cultivar (compared with Hark) was associated with a greater increase in endogenous levels of ascorbic acid. Ascorbic acid may scavenge free radicals and thereby protect cells from injury by O3 or other oxyradical products. Plants defend themselves against photochemical oxidant stress, such as O3, by several mechanisms. Experimental evidence indicates that antioxidant defense systems existing in plant tissues may function to protect cellular components from deleterious effects of photochemical oxidants through endogenous and exogenous controls.

  19. Nondestructive and intuitive determination of circadian chlorophyll rhythms in soybean leaves using multispectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Wen-Juan; Wang, Xia; Deng, Yong-Ren; Li, Jia-Hang; Chen, Wei; Chiang, John Y.; Yang, Jian-Bo; Zheng, Lei

    2015-06-01

    The circadian clock, synchronized by daily cyclic environmental cues, regulates diverse aspects of plant growth and development and increases plant fitness. Even though much is known regarding the molecular mechanism of circadian clock, it remains challenging to quantify the temporal variation of major photosynthesis products as well as their metabolic output in higher plants in a real-time, nondestructive and intuitive manner. In order to reveal the spatial-temporal scenarios of photosynthesis and yield formation regulated by circadian clock, multispectral imaging technique has been employed for nondestructive determination of circadian chlorophyll rhythms in soybean leaves. By utilizing partial least square regression analysis, the determination coefficients R2, 0.9483 for chlorophyll a and 0.8906 for chlorophyll b, were reached, respectively. The predicted chlorophyll contents extracted from multispectral data showed an approximately 24-h rhythm which could be entrained by external light conditions, consistent with the chlorophyll contents measured by chemical analyses. Visualization of chlorophyll map in each pixel offers an effective way to analyse spatial-temporal distribution of chlorophyll. Our results revealed the potentiality of multispectral imaging as a feasible nondestructive universal assay for examining clock function and robustness, as well as monitoring chlorophyll a and b and other biochemical components in plants.

  20. Biological Rhythms Modelisation of Vigilance and Sleep in Microgravity State with COSINOR and Volterra's Kernels Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudeua de Gerlicz, C.; Golding, J. G.; Bobola, Ph.; Moutarde, C.; Naji, S.

    2008-06-01

    The spaceflight under microgravity cause basically biological and physiological imbalance in human being. Lot of study has been yet release on this topic especially about sleep disturbances and on the circadian rhythms (alternation vigilance-sleep, body, temperature...). Factors like space motion sickness, noise, or excitement can cause severe sleep disturbances. For a stay of longer than four months in space, gradual increases in the planned duration of sleep were reported. [1] The average sleep in orbit was more than 1.5 hours shorter than the during control periods on earth, where sleep averaged 7.9 hours. [2] Alertness and calmness were unregistered yield clear circadian pattern of 24h but with a phase delay of 4h.The calmness showed a biphasic component (12h) mean sleep duration was 6.4 structured by 3-5 non REM/REM cycles. Modelisations of neurophysiologic mechanisms of stress and interactions between various physiological and psychological variables of rhythms have can be yet release with the COSINOR method. [3

  1. Circadian rhythms (temperature, heart rate, vigilance, mood) of short and long sleepers: effects of sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Benoit, O; Foret, J; Merle, B; Reinberg, A

    1981-01-01

    Seven long sleepers (LS) (sleep greater than or equal to 9 h) and seven short sleepers (SS) (sleep less than or equal to 7 h), aged 20 to 23 years, were selected among medical students. They measured their axillary temperature (T), heart rate (HR) and self-estimated their vigilance (V) and mood (M) every 4 h from awakening to bed time during a ten-day control span and during the two sleep deprived nights. Polygraphic sleep recordings were performed on 3 control days and recovery from 24 h (day sleep) or 36 h (night sleep) sleep deprivations. For the 4 variables (T, HR, V and M), group circadian patterns were analyzed by means of the cosinor method for the control span and after both types of sleep deprivation. The acrophases of the 4 variables clustered more in LS than in SS. The acrophases of V and M were found to be more closely related to the sleep/wake rhythm than those of T and HR. Sleep deprivation resulted in a large change of the circadian rhythms in LS but had little effect in SS as indicated by the non detection of most acrophases in LS and the persistence of such acrophases in SS. This difference might be explained by the large interindividual variability of changes induced by the sleep deprivation in LS. Moreover, day sleep recovery was more disturbed in LS than in SS. PMID:7327054

  2. Nondestructive and intuitive determination of circadian chlorophyll rhythms in soybean leaves using multispectral imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Wen-Juan; Wang, Xia; Deng, Yong-Ren; Li, Jia-Hang; Chen, Wei; Chiang, John Y.; Yang, Jian-Bo; Zheng, Lei

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock, synchronized by daily cyclic environmental cues, regulates diverse aspects of plant growth and development and increases plant fitness. Even though much is known regarding the molecular mechanism of circadian clock, it remains challenging to quantify the temporal variation of major photosynthesis products as well as their metabolic output in higher plants in a real-time, nondestructive and intuitive manner. In order to reveal the spatial-temporal scenarios of photosynthesis and yield formation regulated by circadian clock, multispectral imaging technique has been employed for nondestructive determination of circadian chlorophyll rhythms in soybean leaves. By utilizing partial least square regression analysis, the determination coefficients R2, 0.9483 for chlorophyll a and 0.8906 for chlorophyll b, were reached, respectively. The predicted chlorophyll contents extracted from multispectral data showed an approximately 24-h rhythm which could be entrained by external light conditions, consistent with the chlorophyll contents measured by chemical analyses. Visualization of chlorophyll map in each pixel offers an effective way to analyse spatial-temporal distribution of chlorophyll. Our results revealed the potentiality of multispectral imaging as a feasible nondestructive universal assay for examining clock function and robustness, as well as monitoring chlorophyll a and b and other biochemical components in plants. PMID:26059057

  3. Microglia modulate respiratory rhythm generation and autoresuscitation.

    PubMed

    Lorea-Hernández, Jonathan-Julio; Morales, Teresa; Rivera-Angulo, Ana-Julia; Alcantara-Gonzalez, David; Peña-Ortega, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Inflammation has been linked to the induction of apneas and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, whereas proinflammatory mediators inhibit breathing when applied peripherally or directly into the CNS. Considering that peripheral inflammation can activate microglia in the CNS and that this cell type can directly release all proinflammatory mediators that modulate breathing, it is likely that microglia can modulate breathing generation. It might do so also in hypoxia, since microglia are sensitive to hypoxia, and peripheral proinflammatory conditions affect gasping generation and autoresuscitation. Here, we tested whether microglial activation or inhibition affected respiratory rhythm generation. By measuring breathing as well as the activity of the respiratory rhythm generator (the preBötzinger complex), we found that several microglial activators or inhibitors, applied intracisternally in vivo or in the recording bath in vitro, affect the generation of the respiratory rhythms both in normoxia and hypoxia. Furthermore, microglial activation with lipopolysaccharide affected the ability of the animals to autoresuscitate after hypoxic conditions, an effect that is blocked when lipopolysaccharide is co-applied with the microglial inhibitor minocycline. Moreover, we found that the modulation of respiratory rhythm generation induced in vitro by microglial inhibitors was reproduced by microglial depletion. In conclusion, our data show that microglia can modulate respiratory rhythm generation and autoresuscitation. PMID:26678570

  4. Daily Rhythms in Mobile Telephone Communication.

    PubMed

    Aledavood, Talayeh; López, Eduardo; Roberts, Sam G B; Reed-Tsochas, Felix; Moro, Esteban; Dunbar, Robin I M; Saramäki, Jari

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are known to be important drivers of human activity and the recent availability of electronic records of human behaviour has provided fine-grained data of temporal patterns of activity on a large scale. Further, questionnaire studies have identified important individual differences in circadian rhythms, with people broadly categorised into morning-like or evening-like individuals. However, little is known about the social aspects of these circadian rhythms, or how they vary across individuals. In this study we use a unique 18-month dataset that combines mobile phone calls and questionnaire data to examine individual differences in the daily rhythms of mobile phone activity. We demonstrate clear individual differences in daily patterns of phone calls, and show that these individual differences are persistent despite a high degree of turnover in the individuals' social networks. Further, women's calls were longer than men's calls, especially during the evening and at night, and these calls were typically focused on a small number of emotionally intense relationships. These results demonstrate that individual differences in circadian rhythms are not just related to broad patterns of morningness and eveningness, but have a strong social component, in directing phone calls to specific individuals at specific times of day. PMID:26390215

  5. [Medicinal rhythm control in atrial fibrillation].

    PubMed

    Nowak, Bernd; Fürnkranz, Alexander

    2014-03-01

    Medicinal antiarrhythmic therapy is either used in the acute setting to convert atrial fibrillation to sinus rhythm or as chronic medication to preserve sinus rhythm if a rhythm control strategy is followed. The choice of the antiarrhythmic agent is based on the presence or absence of structural heart disease. In addition, oral anticoagulation should be established according to current guidelines. In the acute setting the armamentarium comprises flecainide, propafenone, vernakalant and amiodarone. Usually, combination therapy with an atrioventricular (AV) node slowing drug (a beta blocker or verapamil) is used. For chronic rhythm control a class IC drug, such as sotalol, dronedarone and amiodarone is given depending on the comorbidities. In the absence of structural heart disease, rare episodes of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation can be treated by a pill-in-the-pocket strategy, i.e. self-administered pharmacological cardioversion with flecainide or propafenone. Despite recent advances in catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation, medical rhythm control continues to play an important role due to its ubiquitous availability and relatively easy use. The risk for proarrhythmia has to be evaluated in all patients. PMID:24549989

  6. Daily Rhythms in Mobile Telephone Communication

    PubMed Central

    Aledavood, Talayeh; López, Eduardo; Roberts, Sam G. B.; Reed-Tsochas, Felix; Moro, Esteban; Dunbar, Robin I. M.; Saramäki, Jari

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are known to be important drivers of human activity and the recent availability of electronic records of human behaviour has provided fine-grained data of temporal patterns of activity on a large scale. Further, questionnaire studies have identified important individual differences in circadian rhythms, with people broadly categorised into morning-like or evening-like individuals. However, little is known about the social aspects of these circadian rhythms, or how they vary across individuals. In this study we use a unique 18-month dataset that combines mobile phone calls and questionnaire data to examine individual differences in the daily rhythms of mobile phone activity. We demonstrate clear individual differences in daily patterns of phone calls, and show that these individual differences are persistent despite a high degree of turnover in the individuals’ social networks. Further, women’s calls were longer than men’s calls, especially during the evening and at night, and these calls were typically focused on a small number of emotionally intense relationships. These results demonstrate that individual differences in circadian rhythms are not just related to broad patterns of morningness and eveningness, but have a strong social component, in directing phone calls to specific individuals at specific times of day. PMID:26390215

  7. Mu rhythm desynchronization by tongue thrust observation

    PubMed Central

    Sakihara, Kotoe; Inagaki, Masumi

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the mu rhythm in the sensorimotor area during tongue thrust observation and to obtain an answer to the question as to how subtle non-verbal orofacial movement observation activates the sensorimotor area. Ten healthy volunteers performed finger tap execution, tongue thrust execution, and tongue thrust observation. The electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded from 128 electrodes placed on the scalp, and regions of interest were set at sensorimotor areas. The event-related desynchronization (ERD) and event-related synchronization (ERS) for the mu rhythm (8–13 Hz) and beta (13−25 Hz) bands were measured. Tongue thrust observation induced mu rhythm ERD, and the ERD was detected at the left hemisphere regardless whether the observed tongue thrust was toward the left or right. Mu rhythm ERD was also recorded during tongue thrust execution. However, temporal analysis revealed that the ERD associated with tongue thrust observation preceded that associated with execution by approximately 2 s. Tongue thrust observation induces mu rhythm ERD in sensorimotor cortex with left hemispheric dominance. PMID:26441599

  8. Refined multiscale entropy: application to 24-h Holter recordings of heart period variability in healthy and aortic stenosis subjects.

    PubMed

    Valencia, José Fernando; Porta, Alberto; Vallverdú, Montserrat; Clarià, Francesc; Baranowski, Rafal; Orłowska-Baranowska, Ewa; Caminal, Pere

    2009-09-01

    Multiscale entropy (MSE) was proposed to characterize complexity as a function of the time-scale factor tau. Despite its broad use, this technique suffers from two limitations: 1) the artificial MSE reduction due to the coarse graining procedure and 2) the introduction of spurious MSE oscillations due to the suboptimal procedure for the elimination of the fast temporal scales. We propose a refined MSE (RMSE), and we apply it to simulations and to 24-h Holter recordings of heart rate variability (HRV) obtained from healthy and aortic stenosis (AS) groups. The study showed that the refinement relevant to the elimination of the fast temporal scales was more helpful at short scales (spanning the range of short-term HRV oscillations), while that relevant to the procedure of coarse graining was more useful at large scales. In healthy subjects, during daytime, RMSE was smaller at short scales (i.e., tau = 1-2) and larger at longer scales (i.e., tau = 4-20) than during nighttime. In AS population, RMSE was smaller during daytime both at short and long time scales (i.e., tau = 1 -11) than during nighttime. RMSE was larger in healthy group than in AS population during both daytime (i.e., tau = 2 -9) and nighttime (i.e., tau = 2). RMSE overcomes two limitations of MSE and confirms the complementary information that can be derived by observing complexity as a function of the temporal scale. PMID:19457745

  9. Time dependent effects of stress prior to encoding on event-related potentials and 24 h delayed retrieval.

    PubMed

    Quaedflieg, Conny W E M; Schwabe, Lars; Meyer, Thomas; Smeets, Tom

    2013-12-01

    Stress can exert profound effects on memory encoding. Here, we investigated whether (sub)cortical information processing during encoding and memory retrieval at a 24 h delayed test are affected by the temporal proximity between stress and memory encoding. Sixty-four participants engaged in the Maastricht Acute Stress Test (MAST) or a no-stress control condition either immediately before (i.e., proximate condition) or 30 min before (i.e., distant condition) a picture encoding task. In general, stress decreased the number of freely recalled and recognized pictures and increased the number of false alarms. However, timing of stress exposure did not differentially affect picture recall, recognition or selective attention processes (i.e., LPP). Nevertheless, stress-induced cortisol responses and correctly recognized neutral pictures were positively associated within the proximate stress condition but negatively associated within the distant stress condition. These findings suggest that the time at which a stressor is applied might differentially impact the association between stress-induced cortisol elevations and memory formation and indicate the need for a finer delineation of the time window during which glucocorticoids affect memory formation processes. PMID:24074803

  10. Boron uptake in tumors, cerebrum and blood from [10B]NA4B24H22S2

    DOEpatents

    Slatkin, Daniel N.; Micca, Peggy L.; Fairchild, Ralph G.

    1988-08-02

    A stable boronated (.sup.10 B-labeled) compound, sodium mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate is infused in the form of the disulfide dimer, [.sup.10 B]Na.sub.4 B.sub.24 H.sub.22 S.sub.2, at a dose of about 200 .mu.g .sup.10 B per gm body weight. The infusion is performed into the blood or peritoneal cavity of the patient slowly over a period of many days, perhaps one week or more, at the rate of roughly 1 .mu.g .sup.10 B per gm body weight per hour. Use of this particular boronated dimer in the manner or similarly to the manner so described permits radiotherapeutically effective amounts of boron to accumulate in tumors to be treated by boron neutron capture radiation therapy and also permits sufficient retention of boron in tumor after the cessation of the slow infusion, so as to allow the blood concentration of .sup.10 B to drop or to be reduced artificially to a radiotherapeutically effective level, less than one-half of the concentration of .sup.10 B in the tumor.

  11. Boron uptake in tumors, cerebrum and blood from [10B]NA4B24H22S2

    DOEpatents

    Slatkin, Daniel N.; Micca, Peggy L.; Fairchild, Ralph G.

    1988-01-01

    A stable boronated (.sup.10 B-labeled) compound, sodium mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate is infused in the form of the disulfide dimer, [.sup.10 B]Na.sub.4 B.sub.24 H.sub.22 S.sub.2, at a dose of about 200 .mu.g .sup.10 B per gm body weight. The infusion is performed into the blood or peritoneal cavity of the patient slowly over a period of many days, perhaps one week or more, at the rate of roughly 1 .mu.g .sup.10 B per gm body weight per hour. Use of this particular boronated dimer in the manner or similarly to the manner so described permits radiotherapeutically effective amounts of boron to accumulate in tumors to be treated by boron neutron capture radiation therapy and also permits sufficient retention of boron in tumor after the cessation of the slow infusion, so as to allow the blood concentration of .sup.10 B to drop or to be reduced artificially to a radiotherapeutically effective level, less than one-half of the concentration of .sup.10 B in the tumor.

  12. Oral contraceptives alter circadian rhythm parameters of cortisol, melatonin, blood pressure, heart rate, skin blood flow, transepidermal water loss, and skin amino acids of healthy young women.

    PubMed

    Reinberg, A E; Touitou, Y; Soudant, E; Bernard, D; Bazin, R; Mechkouri, M

    1996-08-01

    Sixteen healthy women users and nonusers of oral contraceptives (OC) volunteered to document a set of circadian rhythms. Nine were taking OC providing ethynyl estradiol (0.03-0.05 mg/24h, 21 days/month) combined with DL- or L-norgestrel or norethisterone. There was no group difference (p > 0.05) in median age (22 years), weight (57 kg), and height (162) cm). Data were obtained at fixed hours, 5 times/24h, during a 48-h span, in November. (Day activity from approximately 08:00 to approximately 23:00 h and night rest). Environmental conditions were controlled, using air-conditioned rooms of constant temperature (26 degrees +/- 0.5) and relative humidity 45% +/- 1. Both cosinor and ANOVA were used for statistical analyses. All circadian rhythms were validated with one exception: that of salivary melatonin was not detected in OC users. The 24h mean (M) exhibited group differences for certain variables: M was greater in OC than non-OC users for systolic blood pressure (p < 0.0001), heart rate (p < 0.01), skin blood flow (p < 0.04), and transepidermal water loss (p < 0.02). M was lower in OC than non-OC users in salivary cortisol (p < 0.04) and skin amino acids (p < 0.003). No group difference was detected in any other documented rhythms: diastolic blood pressure, grip strength of both hands, oral temperature, self-rated fatigue, and the skin variables of urea, lactate, triglycerides, and acid phosphatase activity. PMID:8874983

  13. Effects of a quercetin-rich onion skin extract on 24 h ambulatory blood pressure and endothelial function in overweight-to-obese patients with (pre-)hypertension: a randomised double-blinded placebo-controlled cross-over trial.

    PubMed

    Brüll, Verena; Burak, Constanze; Stoffel-Wagner, Birgit; Wolffram, Siegfried; Nickenig, Georg; Müller, Cornelius; Langguth, Peter; Alteheld, Birgit; Fimmers, Rolf; Naaf, Stefanie; Zimmermann, Benno F; Stehle, Peter; Egert, Sarah

    2015-10-28

    The polyphenol quercetin may prevent CVD due to its antihypertensive and vasorelaxant properties. We investigated the effects of quercetin after regular intake on blood pressure (BP) in overweight-to-obese patients with pre-hypertension and stage I hypertension. In addition, the potential mechanisms responsible for the hypothesised effect of quercetin on BP were explored. Subjects (n 70) were randomised to receive 162 mg/d quercetin from onion skin extract powder or placebo in a double-blinded, placebo-controlled cross-over trial with 6-week treatment periods separated by a 6-week washout period. Before and after the intervention, ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) and office BP were measured; urine and blood samples were collected; and endothelial function was measured by EndoPAT technology. In the total group, quercetin did not significantly affect 24 h ABP parameters and office BP. In the subgroup of hypertensives, quercetin decreased 24 h systolic BP by -3·6 mmHg (P=0·022) when compared with placebo (mean treatment difference, -3·9 mmHg; P=0·049). In addition, quercetin significantly decreased day-time and night-time systolic BP in hypertensives, but without a significant effect in inter-group comparison. In the total group and also in the subgroup of hypertensives, vasoactive biomarkers including endothelin-1, soluble endothelial-derived adhesion molecules, asymmetric dimethylarginine, angiotensin-converting enzyme activity, endothelial function, parameters of oxidation, inflammation, lipid and glucose metabolism were not affected by quercetin. In conclusion, supplementation with 162 mg/d quercetin from onion skin extract lowers ABP in patients with hypertension, suggesting a cardioprotective effect of quercetin. The mechanisms responsible for the BP-lowering effect remain unclear. PMID:26328470

  14. Relationship between HbA1c and Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Chinese Population: A Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Ran, Xingwu; Yang, Wenying; Li, Qiang; Peng, Yongde; Li, Yanbing; Gao, Xin; Luan, Xiaojun; Wang, Weiqing; Xie, Yun; Jia, Weiping

    2013-01-01

    Objective Since there is a paucity of reference data in the literature to indicate the relationship between HbA1c, and 24 h mean blood glucose (MBG) from continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) in Chinese populations, we described the above relationship in adult Chinese subjects with different glucose tolerance status. Methods Seven-hundred-and-forty-two individuals without history of diabetes were included to the study at 11 hospitals in urban areas across China from 2007–2009 and data of 673 subjects were included into the final analysis. Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) classified the participants as nondiabetic subjects, including those with normal glucose regulation (NGR; n = 121) and impaired glucose regulation (IGR; n = 209), or newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes (n = 343). All participants completed testing for HbA1c levels and wore a CGM system for three consecutive days. The 24 h MBG levels were calculated. Spearman correlations and linear regression analyses were applied to quantify the relationship between glucose markers. Results The levels of HbA1c and 24 h MBG significantly increased with presence of glucose intolerance (NGR24 h MBG (r = 0.735). The correlation was also found to be significant for the subgroup of participants with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes (r = 0.694, P<0.001). Linear regression analysis of the total study population yielded the following equation: 24 h MBG mmol/L = 1.198×HbA1c–0.582 (24 h MBG mg/dL = 21.564×HbA1c–10.476) (R2 = 0.670, P<0.001). The model fit was not improved by application of exponential or quadratic modeling. When HbA1c was 6.5%, the calculated 24 h MBG was 7.2 (6.4–8.1) mmol/L (130 (115–146) mg/dL); and when HbA1c was 7.0%, the 24 h MBG was 7.8 (6.9–8.7) mmol/L (140 (124–157) mg/dL). Conclusions Our study provided the reference data of the

  15. Genetic Basis of Human Circadian Rhythm Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christopher R.; Huang, Angela L.; Ptáček, Louis J.; Fu, Ying-Hui

    2012-01-01

    Circadian rhythm disorders constitute a group of phenotypes that usually present as altered sleep-wake schedules. Until a human genetics approach was applied to investigate these traits, the genetic components regulating human circadian rhythm and sleep behaviors remained mysterious. Steady advances in the last decade have dramatically improved our understanding of the genes involved in circadian rhythmicity and sleep regulation. Finding these genes presents new opportunities to use a wide range of approaches, including in vitro molecular studies and in vivo animal modeling, to elevate our understanding of how sleep and circadian rhythms are regulated and maintained. Ultimately, this knowledge will reveal how circadian and sleep disruption contribute to various ailments and shed light on how best to maintain and recover good health. PMID:22849821

  16. Aerobic and Combined Exercise Sessions Reduce Glucose Variability in Type 2 Diabetes: Crossover Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Figueira, Franciele R.; Umpierre, Daniel; Casali, Karina R.; Tetelbom, Pedro S.; Henn, Nicoli T.; Schaan, Beatriz D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effects of aerobic (AER) or aerobic plus resistance exercise (COMB) sessions on glucose levels and glucose variability in patients with type 2 diabetes. Additionally, we assessed conventional and non-conventional methods to analyze glucose variability derived from multiple measurements performed with continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS). Methods Fourteen patients with type 2 diabetes (56±2 years) wore a CGMS during 3 days. Participants randomly performed AER and COMB sessions, both in the morning (24 h after CGMS placement), and at least 7 days apart. Glucose variability was evaluated by glucose standard deviation, glucose variance, mean amplitude of glycemic excursions (MAGE), and glucose coefficient of variation (conventional methods) as well as by spectral and symbolic analysis (non-conventional methods). Results Baseline fasting glycemia was 139±05 mg/dL and HbA1c 7.9±0.7%. Glucose levels decreased immediately after AER and COMB protocols by ∼16%, which was sustained for approximately 3 hours. Comparing the two exercise modalities, responses over a 24-h period after the sessions were similar for glucose levels, glucose variance and glucose coefficient of variation. In the symbolic analysis, increases in 0 V pattern (COMB, 67.0±7.1 vs. 76.0±6.3, P = 0.003) and decreases in 1 V pattern (COMB, 29.1±5.3 vs. 21.5±5.1, P = 0.004) were observed only after the COMB session. Conclusions Both AER and COMB exercise modalities reduce glucose levels similarly for a short period of time. The use of non-conventional analysis indicates reduction of glucose variability after a single session of combined exercises. Trial Registration Aerobic training, aerobic-resistance training and glucose profile (CGMS) in type 2 diabetes (CGMS exercise). ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT00887094. PMID:23536769

  17. Thoracic surface temperature rhythms as circadian biomarkers for cancer chronotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Véronique Pasquale; Mohamad-Djafari, Ali; Innominato, Pasquale Fabio; Karaboué, Abdoulaye; Gorbach, Alexander; Lévi, Francis Albert

    2014-01-01

    The disruption of the temperature circadian rhythm has been associated with cancer progression, while its amplification resulted in cancer inhibition in experimental tumor models. The current study investigated the relevance of skin surface temperature rhythms as biomarkers of the Circadian Timing System (CTS) in order to optimize chronotherapy timing in individual cancer patients. Baseline skin surface temperature at four sites and wrist accelerations were measured every minute for 4 days in 16 patients with metastatic gastro-intestinal cancer before chronotherapy administration. Temperature and rest-activity were recorded, respectively, with wireless skin surface temperature patches (Respironics, Phillips) and an actigraph (Ambulatory Monitoring). Both variables were further monitored in 10 of these patients during and after a 4-day course of a fixed chronotherapy protocol. Collected at baseline, during and after therapy longitudinal data sets were processed using Fast Fourier Transform Cosinor and Linear Discriminant Analyses methods. A circadian rhythm was statistically validated with a period of 24 h (p<0.05) for 49/61 temperature time series (80.3%), and 15/16 rest-activity patterns (93.7%) at baseline. However, individual circadian amplitudes varied from 0.04 °C to 2.86 °C for skin surface temperature (median, 0.72 °C), and from 16.6 to 146.1 acc/min for rest-activity (median, 88.9 acc/min). Thirty-nine pairs of baseline temperature and rest-activity time series (75%) were correlated (r>|0.7|; p<0.05). Individual circadian acrophases at baseline were scattered from 15:18 to 6:05 for skin surface temperature, and from 12:19 to 15:18 for rest-activity, with respective median values of 01:10 (25–75% quartiles, 22:35–3:07) and 14:12 (13:14–14:31). The circadian patterns in skin surface temperature and rest-activity persisted or were amplified during and after fixed chronotherapy delivery for 5/10 patients. In contrast, transient or sustained disruption

  18. Stochastic models of cellular circadian rhythms in plants help to understand the impact of noise on robustness and clock structure.

    PubMed

    Guerriero, Maria L; Akman, Ozgur E; van Ooijen, Gerben

    2014-01-01

    Rhythmic behavior is essential for plants; for example, daily (circadian) rhythms control photosynthesis and seasonal rhythms regulate their life cycle. The core of the circadian clock is a genetic network that coordinates the expression of specific clock genes in a circadian rhythm reflecting the 24-h day/night cycle. Circadian clocks exhibit stochastic noise due to the low copy numbers of clock genes and the consequent cell-to-cell variation: this intrinsic noise plays a major role in circadian clocks by inducing more robust oscillatory behavior. Another source of noise is the environment, which causes variation in temperature and light intensity: this extrinsic noise is part of the requirement for the structural complexity of clock networks. Advances in experimental techniques now permit single-cell measurements and the development of single-cell models. Here we present some modeling studies showing the importance of considering both types of noise in understanding how plants adapt to regular and irregular light variations. Stochastic models have proven useful for understanding the effect of regular variations. By contrast, the impact of irregular variations and the interaction of different noise sources are less well studied. PMID:25374576

  19. Current practice for diagnosis and management of silent atrial fibrillation: results of the European Heart Rhythm Association survey.

    PubMed

    Dobreanu, Dan; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Lewalter, Thorsten; Hernández-Madrid, Antonio; Lip, Gregory Y H; Blomström-Lundqvist, Carina

    2013-08-01

    Although it is well known that silent atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with morbidity and mortality rates similar to those of symptomatic AF, no specific strategy for screening and management of this form of AF has been advocated. The purpose of this survey was to identify current practices for the diagnosis and management of silent AF. This survey is based on an electronic questionnaire sent to the European Heart Rhythm Association Research Network partners. Responses were received from 33 centres in 16 countries. The preferred screening methods for silent AF in patients with rhythm control by pharmacological therapy was 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) at outpatient visits (31.3%) and periodical 24 h Holter ECG recordings (34.4%), while after pulmonary vein isolation the corresponding figures were 6.3 and 65.6%, respectively. No consensus has been reached concerning the therapeutic approach for such patients. Most responders preferred rate control over rhythm control in patients with silent AF, although some favoured pulmonary vein isolation in young patients. However, oral anticoagulant therapy in patients at high thromboembolic risk was considered mandatory by most, provided that at least one episode of silent AF was documented, without recommending further investigations. The results of this survey have confirmed that there is currently no consensus regarding the screening and management of patients with silent AF and that clinical practice is not always consistent with the few existing evidence-based recommendations. PMID:23878150

  20. Axillary and thoracic skin temperatures poorly comparable to core body temperature circadian rhythm: results from 2 adult populations.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Karen A; Burr, Robert; Wang, Shu-Yuann; Lentz, Martha J; Shaver, Joan

    2004-01-01

    Data from 2 separate studies were used to examine the relationships of axillary or thoracic skin temperature to rectal temperature and to determine the phase relationships of the circadian rhythms of these temperatures. In study 1, axillary skin and rectal temperatures were recorded in 19 healthy women, 21 to 36 years of age. In study 2, thoracic skin and rectal temperatures were recorded in 74 healthy women, 39 to 59 years of age. In both studies, temperatures were recorded continuously for 24 h while subjects carried out normal activities. Axillary and thoracic probes were insulated purposely to prevent ambient effects. Cosinor analysis was employed to estimate circadian rhythm mesor, amplitude, and acrophase. In addition, correlations between temperatures at various measurement sites were calculated and agreement determined. The circadian timing of axillary and skin temperature did not closely approximate that of rectal temperature: the mean acrophase (clock time) for study 1 was 18:57 h for axillary temperature and 16:12 h for rectal; for study 2, it was 03:05 h for thoracic and 15:05 h for rectal. Across individual subjects, the correlations of axillary or thoracic temperatures with rectal temperatures were variable. Results do not support the use of either axillary or skin temperature as a substitute for rectal temperature in circadian rhythm research related to adult women. PMID:14737919

  1. The 24-h Energy Intake of Obese Adolescents Is Spontaneously Reduced after Intensive Exercise: A Randomized Controlled Trial in Calorimetric Chambers

    PubMed Central

    Thivel, David; Isacco, Laurie; Montaurier, Christophe; Boirie, Yves

    2012-01-01

    Background Physical exercise can modify subsequent energy intake and appetite and may thus be of particular interest in terms of obesity treatment. However, it is still unclear whether an intensive bout of exercise can affect the energy consumption of obese children and adolescents. Objective To compare the impact of high vs. moderate intensity exercises on subsequent 24-h energy intake, macronutrient preferences, appetite sensations, energy expenditure and balance in obese adolescent. Design This randomized cross-over trial involves 15 obese adolescent boys who were asked to randomly complete three 24-h sessions in a metabolic chamber, each separated by at least 7 days: (1) sedentary (SED); (2) Low-Intensity Exercise (LIE) (40% maximal oxygen uptake, VO2max); (3) High-Intensity Exercise (HIE) (75%VO2max). Results Despite unchanged appetite sensations, 24-h total energy intake following HIE was 6–11% lower compared to LIE and SED (p<0.05), whereas no differences appeared between SED and LIE. Energy intake at lunch was 9.4% and 8.4% lower after HIE compared to SED and LIE, respectively (p<0.05). At dinner time, it was 20.5% and 19.7% lower after HIE compared to SED and LIE, respectively (p<0.01). 24-h energy expenditure was not significantly altered. Thus, the 24-h energy balance was significantly reduced during HIE compared to SED and LIE (p<0.01), whereas those of SED and LIE did not differ. Conclusions In obese adolescent boys, HIE has a beneficial impact on 24-h energy balance, mainly due to the spontaneous decrease in energy intake during lunch and dinner following the exercise bout. Prescribing high-intensity exercises to promote weight loss may therefore provide effective results without affecting appetite sensations and, as a result, food frustrations. Trial Registration ClinicalTrial.gov NCT01036360 PMID:22272251

  2. Circadian rhythm asynchrony in man during hypokinesis.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winget, C. M.; Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Cronin, S. E.; Leach, C. S.; Rambaut, P. C.; Mack, P. B.

    1972-01-01

    Posture and exercise were investigated as synchronizers of certain physiologic rhythms in eight healthy male subjects in a defined environment. Four subjects exercised during bed rest. Body temperature (BT), heart rate, plasma thyroid hormone, and plasma steroid data were obtained from the subjects for a 6-day ambulatory equilibration period before bed rest, 56 days of bed rest, and a 10-day recovery period after bed rest. The results indicate that the mechanism regulating the circadian rhythmicity of the cardiovascular system is rigorously controlled and independent of the endocrine system, while the BT rhythm is more closely aligned to the endocrine system.

  3. Role of diabetes in heart rhythm disorders

    PubMed Central

    Koektuerk, Buelent; Aksoy, Murat; Horlitz, Marc; Bozdag-Turan, Ilkay; Turan, Ramazan Goekmen

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of diabetes mellitus (DM) is increasing rapidly. DM is the leading cause of cardiovascular diseases, which can lead to varied cardiovascular complications by aggravated atherosclerosis in large arteries and coronary atherosclerosis, thereby grows the risk for macro and microangiopathy such as myocardial infarction, stroke, limb loss and retinopathy. Moreover diabetes is one of the strongest and independent risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, which is associated frequently with rhythm disorders such as atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular arrhythmias (VA). The present article provides a concise overview of the association between DM and rhythm disorders such as AF and VA with underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. PMID:26862372

  4. Food intake during the previous 24 h as a percentage of usual intake: a marker of hypoxia in infants with bronchiolitis: an observational, prospective, multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hypoxia associated with bronchiolitis is not always easy to assess on clinical grounds alone. The aim of this study was to determine the value of food intake during the previous 24 hours (bottle and spoon feeding), as a percentage of usual intake (24h FI), as a marker of hypoxia, and to compare its diagnostic value with that of usual clinical signs. Methods In this observational, prospective, multicenter study, 18 community pediatricians, enrolled 171 infants, aged from 0 to 6 months, with bronchiolitis (rhinorrhea + dyspnea + cough + expiratory sounds). Infants with risk factors (history of prematurity, chronic heart or lung disorders), breast-fed infants, and infants having previously been treated for bronchial disorders were excluded. The 24h FI, subcostal, intercostal, supracostal retractions, nasal flaring, respiratory rate, pauses, cyanosis, rectal temperature and respiratory syncytial virus test results were noted. The highest stable value of transcutaneous oxygen saturation (SpO2) was recorded. Hypoxia was noted if SpO2 was below 95% and verified. Results 24h FI ≥ 50% was associated with a 96% likelihood of SpO2 ≥ 95% [95% CI, 91–99]. In univariate analysis, 24h FI < 50% had the highest odds ratio (13.8) for SpO2 < 95%, compared to other 24h FI values and other clinical signs, as well as providing one of the best compromises between specificity (90%) and sensitivity (60%) for identifying infants with hypoxia. In multivariate analysis with adjustment for age, SpO2 < 95% was related to the presence of intercostal retractions (OR = 9.1 [95% CI, 2.4-33.8%]) and 24h FI < 50% (OR = 10.9 [95% CI, 3.0-39.1%]). Hospitalization (17 infants) was strongly related to younger age, 24h FI and intercostal retractions. Conclusion In practice, the measure of 24 h FI may be useful in identifying hypoxia and deserves further study. PMID:23311899

  5. Normal fasting plasma glucose levels in some birds of prey.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, J A; Garbett, R; Morzenti, A

    1978-10-01

    Blood samples taken from five great horned owls (Bubo virginianus), eight red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), four marsh hawks (Circus cyaneus), two prairie falcons (Falco mexicanus), five golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos), and five white leghorn chickens (Gallus domesticus) that had been fasted for 24 h were used to determine plasma levels of glucose by the glucose oxidase method. The mean plasma glucose levels were: great horned owls 374.6 mg/100 ml, red-tailed hawks 346.5 mg/00 ml, marsh hawks 369.3 mg/100 ml, prairie falcons 414.5 mg/100 ml, golden eagles 368.4 mg/100 ml, and white Leghorn chickens 218.2 mg/100 ml. The plasma glucose levels obtained for the raptorial birds in this study were considerably higher than those found for the chickens. These values are discussed in relation to the carnivorous food habits of raptors. PMID:739587

  6. Adapting a standardised international 24 h dietary recall methodology (GloboDiet software) for research and dietary surveillance in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Kyung; Park, Jin Young; Nicolas, Geneviève; Paik, Hee Young; Kim, Jeongseon; Slimani, Nadia

    2015-06-14

    During the past decades, a rapid nutritional transition has been observed along with economic growth in the Republic of Korea. Since this dramatic change in diet has been frequently associated with cancer and other non-communicable diseases, dietary monitoring is essential to understand the association. Benefiting from pre-existing standardised dietary methodologies, the present study aimed to evaluate the feasibility and describe the development of a Korean version of the international computerised 24 h dietary recall method (GloboDiet software) and its complementary tools, developed at the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), WHO. Following established international Standard Operating Procedures and guidelines, about seventy common and country-specific databases on foods, recipes, dietary supplements, quantification methods and coefficients were customised and translated. The main results of the present study highlight the specific adaptations made to adapt the GloboDiet software for research and dietary surveillance in Korea. New (sub-) subgroups were added into the existing common food classification, and new descriptors were added to the facets to classify and describe specific Korean foods. Quantification methods were critically evaluated and adapted considering the foods and food packages available in the Korean market. Furthermore, a picture book of foods/dishes was prepared including new pictures and food portion sizes relevant to Korean diet. The development of the Korean version of GloboDiet demonstrated that it was possible to adapt the IARC-WHO international dietary tool to an Asian context without compromising its concept of standardisation and software structure. It, thus, confirms that this international dietary methodology, used so far only in Europe, is flexible and robust enough to be customised for other regions worldwide. PMID:25899045

  7. Dose-finding and 24-h monitoring for efficacy and safety of aerosolized Nacystelyn in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    App, E M; Baran, D; Dab, I; Malfroot, A; Coffiner, M; Vanderbist, F; King, M

    2002-02-01

    The aim of the present studies was to investigate the tolerability and activity of a novel mucolytic drug, Nacystelyn (NAL), for the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. In study 1, involving 10 CF patients, the main objective was to determine the tolerability and potential efficacy of a range of single doses of NAL in comparison to a placebo, in order to establish an optimal dose for further testing. On five consecutive scheduled treatment days, patients inhaled either from two (4 mg) to eight puffs (16 mg) of a single dose of NAL from the range, administered in an open-label fashion, or 12 puffs of active NAL (24 mg) versus 12 puffs of placebo, administered in a randomized double-blind fashion. Pulmonary function data were unaffected and clinically-adverse effects were limited to wheezing in some patients that inhaled 12 puffs of either placebo or active drug. Subsequent rheological analysis of their sputum showed a dose-dependent decrease in sputum viscoelasticity, accompanied by a decrease in sputum solids content and an increase in chloride and sodium concentrations. In study 2, involving 12 CF patients, the clinical safety and mucolytic activity of a single dose of NAL was monitored over 24 h. On different scheduled treatment days, 7 days apart, patients inhaled a single dose of 12 puffs of active NAL (24 mg) or 12 puffs of placebo drug in a randomized, double-blind sequence, with sputum samples taken at intervals before and after inhalation. Mucus rigidity decreased following NAL inhalation, with the maximum effect observed at 4 h; the 1-, 2- and 4-h NAL rheology results were significantly different from placebo. No adverse effects were observed. The drug was well tolerated in both studies. Sputum results were predictive of improved clearability by ciliary and cough transport mechanisms. PMID:11866009

  8. A 24 h investigation of the hydrogeochemistry of baseflow and stormwater in an urban area impacted by mining: Butte, Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammons, Christopher H.; Shope, Christopher L.; Duaime, Terence E.

    2005-09-01

    Changes in water quality during a storm event were continuously monitored over a 24 h period at a single location along an urban stormwater drain in Butte, Montana. The Butte Metro Storm Drain (MSD) collects groundwater baseflow and stormwater draining Butte Hill, a densely populated site that has been severely impacted by 130 years of mining, milling, and smelting of copper-rich, polymetallic mineral deposits. On the afternoon of 26 June 2002, a heavy thunderstorm caused streamflow in the MSD to increase 100-fold, from 0.2 ft3 s-1 to more than 20 ft3 s-1. Hourly discharge and water quality data were collected before, during, and following the storm. The most significant finding was that the calculated loads (grams per hour) of both dissolved and particulate copper passing down the MSD increased more than 100-fold in the first hour following the storm, and remained elevated over baseline conditions for the remainder of the study period. Other metals, such as zinc, cadmium, and manganese, showed a decrease in load from pre-storm to post-storm conditions. In addition to the large flush of copper, loads of soluble phosphorus increased during the storm, whereas dissolved oxygen dropped to low levels (<2 mg l-1). These results show that infrequent storm events in Butte have the potential to generate large volumes of runoff that exceed Montana water quality standards for acute exposure of aquatic life to copper, as well as depressed levels of dissolved oxygen. This study has important implications to ongoing reclamation activities in the upper Clark Fork Superfund site, particularly with respect to management of storm flow, and may be applicable to other watersheds impacted by mining activities.

  9. Mortality in the first 24h of very low birth weight preterm infants in the Northeast of Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Castro, Eveline Campos Monteiro; Leite, Álvaro Jorge Madeiro; Guinsburg, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To evaluate factors associated with neonatal death within 24 hours after birth in very low birth weight preterm newborns. Methods: Prospective cohort of live births with gestational age of 230/7–316/7 weeks, birth weight of 500–1499g without malformations, in 19 public maternity hospitals in nine capitals in northeastern Brazil from July to December 2007. The 19 hospitals were assessed in relation to physical resources, equipment, human resources and aiming at quality in care initiatives. Hospital, maternal and neonatal characteristics, neonatal morbidity, neonatal procedures and interventions were compared between preterm newborns that died or survived up to 24 hours of life. The variables associated with death within 24 hours after birth were determined by logistic regression. Results: Of the 627 newborns enrolled in the study, 179 (29%) died within 168 hours after birth, of which 59 (33%) up to 24 hours and 97 (54%) up to 48 hours after birth. The variables associated with death <24h were: weight <1000g (2.94; 1.32–6.53), 5th minute Apgar <7 (7.17; 3.46–14.88), male gender (2.99; 1.39–6.47). A better hospital structure was a protective factor for early neonatal death (odds ratio: 0.34; 95% confidence interval: 0.17–0.71). Conclusions: The high neonatal mortality on the first day of life in capital cities of Northeast Brazil is associated with biological variables such as weight and gender of the newborn, as well as low vitality at birth and a worse infrastructure of the hospital where the birth occurred. PMID:26726002

  10. Short-term blood pressure variability over 24 h and target organ damage in middle-aged men and women.

    PubMed

    Madden, J M; O'Flynn, A M; Dolan, E; Fitzgerald, A P; Kearney, P M

    2015-12-01

    Blood pressure variability (BPV) has been associated with cardiovascular events; however, the prognostic significance of short-term BPV remains uncertain. As uncertainty also remains as to which measure of variability most accurately describes short-term BPV, this study explores different indices and investigates their relationship with subclinical target organ damage (TOD). We used data from the Mitchelstown Study, a cross-sectional study of Irish adults aged 47-73 years (n=2047). A subsample (1207) underwent 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM). As measures of short-term BPV, we estimated the s.d., weighted s.d. (wSD), coefficient of variation (CV) and average real variability (ARV). TOD was documented by microalbuminuria and electrocardiogram (ECG) left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). There was no association found between any measure of BPV and LVH in both unadjusted and fully adjusted logistic regression models. Similar analysis found that ARV (24 h, day and night), s.d. (day and night) and wSD were all univariately associated with microalbuminuria and remained associated after adjustment for age, gender, smoking, body mass index (BMI), diabetes and antihypertensive treatment. However, when the models were further adjusted for the mean BP the association did not persist for all indices. Our findings illustrate choosing the appropriate summary measure, which accurately captures that short-term BPV is difficult. Despite discrepancies in values between the different measures, there was no association between any indexes of variability with TOD measures after adjustment for the mean BP. PMID:25787777

  11. The importance of bioimpedance (BIA) analysis and Cardio Tens (24-h ABPM and ECG) monitoring in the dialysis programme.

    PubMed

    Löcsey, L; Szlanka, B; Ménes, I; Kövér, A; Vitai, E; Malkócs, Z; Keresztes, P; Paragh, G

    1999-01-01

    The authors performed bioimpedance analysis and Cardio Tens (24-h ABPM and ECG) monitoring in 66 patients (28 males, 38 females) treated in the chronic haemodialysis programme. They investigated the correlations between the body weights before, during and after dialysis, the changes of the water compartments and fat body weight, and the recorded values of blood pressure and ECG alterations. On the basis of the measurements by this non-invasive method it is concluded that, as a result of dialysis and ultrafiltration, the total body weight and total body water are decreasing in a greater extent in men than in women. By gradually decreasing the body weight, the optimal dry weight could be attained, which resulted in the reduction of blood pressure or even normotension. In the course of dialysis the values of bioimpedance and bioreactance increase. The intradialytic hypotensive indispositions were accompanied by a significant reduction of bioreactance (n = 16). The BMI, total body weight and total body water hyperlipidaemic, hypalbuminic patients with treatment-resistant hypertension are considerably larger than those of the patients with normal blood pressure (p<0.01). During Cardio Tens monitoring 53% of the patients proved to be dippers, 47% of whom had ST depression, while in 73% of the non-dippers ischaemic alterations were encountered together with high hyperbaric impact values. The total body weights and total water compartments of patients returning to dialysis with an excess body weight of more than 3.5 kg were significantly larger than of patients who were cooperative and had no oedemas. In the last hour of dialysis and during the following few hours, arrhythmias and ST depressions of the cardiovascularly instable patients appeared more frequently. The total water compartments of these patients are significantly larger than normotensive, normolipaemic patients with appropriate serum albumin concentrations. The importance of the BIA and Cardio Tens monitoring

  12. Long-term invariant parameters obtained from 24-h Holter recordings: A comparison between different analysis techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerutti, Sergio; Esposti, Federico; Ferrario, Manuela; Sassi, Roberto; Signorini, Maria Gabriella

    2007-03-01

    Over the last two decades, a large number of different methods had been used to study the fractal-like behavior of the heart rate variability (HRV). In this paper some of the most used techniques were reviewed. In particular, the focus is set on those methods which characterize the long memory behavior of time series (in particular, periodogram, detrended fluctuation analysis, rescale range analysis, scaled window variance, Higuchi dimension, wavelet-transform modulus maxima, and generalized structure functions). The performances of the different techniques were tested on simulated self-similar noises (fBm and fGn) for values of α, the slope of the spectral density for very small frequency, ranging from -1 to 3 with a 0.05 step. The check was performed using the scaling relationships between the various indices. DFA and periodogram showed the smallest mean square error from the expected values in the range of interest for HRV. Building on the results obtained from these tests, the effective ability of the different methods in discriminating different populations of patients from RR series derived from Holter recordings, was assessed. To this extent, the Noltisalis database was used. It consists of a set of 30, 24-h Holter recordings collected from healthy subjects, patients suffering from congestive heart failure, and heart transplanted patients. All the methods, with the exception at most of rescale range analysis, were almost equivalent in distinguish between the three groups of patients. Finally, the scaling relationships, valid for fBm and fGn, when empirically used on HRV series, also approximately held.

  13. Twice Daily Melatonin Peaks in Siberian but not Syrian Hamsters under 24 h Light:Dark:Light:Dark Cycles

    PubMed Central

    Raiewski, Evan E.; Elliott, Jeffrey A.; Evans, Jennifer A.; Glickman, Gena L.; Gorman, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    The daily pattern of blood borne melatonin varies seasonally under the control of a multi-oscillator circadian pacemaker. Here we examine patterns of melatonin secretion and locomotor activity in Siberian and Syrian hamsters entrained to bimodal LDLD8:4:8:4 and LD20:4 lighting schedules that facilitate novel temporal arrangements of component circadian oscillators. Under LDLD, both species robustly bifurcated wheel-running activity in distinct day scotophase (DS) and night scotophase (NS) bouts. Siberian hamsters displayed significant melatonin increases during each scotophase in LDLD, and in the single daily scotophase of LD20:4. The bimodal melatonin secretion pattern persisted in acutely extended 16 h scotophases. Syrian hamsters, in contrast, showed no significant increases in plasma melatonin during either scotophase of LDLD8:4:8:4 or in LD20:4. In this species, detectable levels were observed only when the day scotophase of LDLD was acutely extended to yield 16 h of darkness. Established species differences in the phase lag of nocturnal melatonin secretion relative to activity onset may underlie the above contrast: In non-bifurcated entrainment to 24 h LD cycles, Siberian hamsters show increased melatonin secretion within ~ 2 h after activity onset, whereas in Syrian hamsters, detectable melatonin secretion phase lags activity onset and the L/D transition by at least 4 h. The present results provide new evidence indicating multi-oscillator regulation of the waveform of melatonin secretion, specifically, the circadian control of the onset, offset, and duration of nocturnal secretion. PMID:23003567

  14. Circadian rhythms in Macaca mulatta monkeys during Bion 11 flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alpatov, A. M.; Hoban-Higgins, T. M.; Klimovitsky, V. Y.; Tumurova, E. G.; Fuller, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    Circadian rhythms of primate brain temperature, head and ankle skin temperature, motor activity, and heart rate were studied during spaceflight and on the ground. In space, the circadian rhythms of all the parameters were synchronized with diurnal Zeitgebers. However, in space the brain temperature rhythm showed a significantly more delayed phase angle, which may be ascribed to an increase of the endogenous circadian period.

  15. Monkey Lipsmacking Develops Like the Human Speech Rhythm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrill, Ryan J.; Paukner, Annika; Ferrari, Pier F.; Ghazanfar, Asif A.

    2012-01-01

    Across all languages studied to date, audiovisual speech exhibits a consistent rhythmic structure. This rhythm is critical to speech perception. Some have suggested that the speech rhythm evolved "de novo" in humans. An alternative account--the one we explored here--is that the rhythm of speech evolved through the modification of rhythmic facial…

  16. Perceptual Tests of Rhythmic Similarity: I. Mora Rhythm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murty, Lalita; Otake, Takashi; Cutler, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Listeners rely on native-language rhythm in segmenting speech; in different languages, stress-, syllable- or mora-based rhythm is exploited. The rhythmic similarity hypothesis holds that where two languages have similar rhythm, listeners of each language should segment their own and the other language similarly. Such similarity in listening was…

  17. The Features and Training of English Stress and Rhythm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cai, Cui-yun

    2008-01-01

    In second language learning, to possess a perfect pronunciation, the importance of stress and rhythm should not be ignored. This articles explores the nature of sentence and word stress as well as rhythm, thus putting forward some feasible ways of training and acquiring a good English stress and rhythm in EFLT (English as Foreign Language…

  18. Does Melody Assist in the Reproduction of Novel Rhythm Patterns?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinney, Daryl W.; Forsythe, Jere L.

    2013-01-01

    We examined music education majors' ability to reproduce rhythmic stimuli presented in melody and rhythm only conditions. Participants reproduced rhythms of two-measure music examples by immediately echo-performing through a method of their choosing (e.g., clapping, tapping, vocalizing). Forty examples were presented in melody and rhythm only…

  19. The Rhythm of Perception: Entrainment to Acoustic Rhythms Induces Subsequent Perceptual Oscillation.

    PubMed

    Hickok, Gregory; Farahbod, Haleh; Saberi, Kourosh

    2015-07-01

    Acoustic rhythms are pervasive in speech, music, and environmental sounds. Recent evidence for neural codes representing periodic information suggests that they may be a neural basis for the ability to detect rhythm. Further, rhythmic information has been found to modulate auditory-system excitability, which provides a potential mechanism for parsing the acoustic stream. Here, we explored the effects of a rhythmic stimulus on subsequent auditory perception. We found that a low-frequency (3 Hz), amplitude-modulated signal induces a subsequent oscillation of the perceptual detectability of a brief nonperiodic acoustic stimulus (1-kHz tone); the frequency but not the phase of the perceptual oscillation matches the entrained stimulus-driven rhythmic oscillation. This provides evidence that rhythmic contexts have a direct influence on subsequent auditory perception of discrete acoustic events. Rhythm coding is likely a fundamental feature of auditory-system design that predates the development of explicit human enjoyment of rhythm in music or poetry. PMID:25968248

  20. The rhythm of retinoids in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Ransom, Jemma; Morgan, Peter J; McCaffery, Peter J; Stoney, Patrick N

    2014-01-01

    The retinoids are a family of compounds that in nature are derived from vitamin A or pro-vitamin A carotenoids. An essential part of the diet for mammals, vitamin A has long been known to be essential for many organ systems in the adult. More recently, however, they have been shown to be necessary for function of the brain and new discoveries point to a central role in processes ranging from neuroplasticity to neurogenesis. Acting in several regions of the central nervous system including the eye, hippocampus and hypothalamus, one common factor in its action is control of biological rhythms. This review summarizes the role of vitamin A in the brain; its action through the metabolite retinoic acid via specific nuclear receptors, and the regulation of its concentration through controlled synthesis and catabolism. The action of retinoic acid to regulate several rhythms in the brain and body, from circadian to seasonal, is then discussed to finish with the importance of retinoic acid in the regular pattern of sleep. We review the role of vitamin A and retinoic acid (RA) as mediators of rhythm in the brain. In the suprachiasmatic nucleus and hippocampus they control expression of circadian clock genes while in the cortex retinoic acid is required for delta oscillations of sleep. Retinoic acid is also central to a second rhythm that keeps pace with the seasons, regulating function in the hypothalamus and pineal gland. PMID:24266881

  1. Characterization of neurospora circadian rhythms in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferraro, James S.

    1987-01-01

    To determine whether the circadian rhythm of conidiation in neurospora crassa is endogenously derived or is driven by some geophysical time cue, an experiment was conducted on space shuttle flight STS-9, where inoculated race tubes were exposed to the microgravity environment of space. The results demonstated that the rhythm can persist in space. However, there were several minor alterations noted; an increase in the period of the oscillation and the variability of the growth rate and a diminished rhythm amplitude, which eventually damped out in 25% of the flight tubes. On day seven of the flight, the tubes were exposed to light while their growth fronts were marked. It appears that some aspects of this marking process reinstated a robust rhythm in all the tubes which continued throughout the remainder of the flight. It was hypothesized that the damping found prior to the marking procedure on STS-9 may have been a result of the hypergravity pulse of launch and not due to the microgravity of the orbital lab; furthermore, that the marking procedure, by exposing the samples to light, had reinstated rhythmicity. To test this, an investigation was conducted into the effects of acute and chronic exposure to hypergravity.

  2. Neuroscience: A Sleep Rhythm with Multiple Facets.

    PubMed

    Koo, Ping Chai; Marshall, Lisa

    2016-09-12

    Sleep spindles were one of the first rhythms associated with learning and memory consolidation. Current research shows spindles can reflect features of trait and time-varying properties of neuroplasticity. A new study has now used feedback-controlled spindle frequency stimulation to show that sleep spindles modulate endogenous brain electric activity and behavior. PMID:27623266

  3. Environmental synchronizers of squirrel monkey circadian rhythms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulzman, F. M.; Fuller, C. A.; Moore-Ede, M. C.

    1977-01-01

    Various temporal signals in the environment were tested to determine if they could synchronize the circadian timing system of the squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus). The influence of cycles of light and dark, eating and fasting, water availability and deprivation, warm and cool temperature, sound and quiet, and social interaction and isolation on the drinking and activity rhythms of unrestrained monkeys was examined. In the absence of other time cues, 24-hr cycles of each of these potential synchronizers were applied for up to 3 wk, and the periods of the monkey's circadian rhythms were examined. Only light-dark cycles and cycles of food availability were shown to be entraining agents, since they were effective in determining the period and phase of the rhythmic variables. In the presence of each of the other environmental cycles, the monkey's circadian rhythms exhibited free-running periods which were significantly different from 24 hr with all possible phase relationships between the rhythms and the environmental cycles being examined.

  4. Procedures for numerical analysis of circadian rhythms

    PubMed Central

    REFINETTI, ROBERTO; LISSEN, GERMAINE CORNÉ; HALBERG, FRANZ

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews various procedures used in the analysis of circadian rhythms at the populational, organismal, cellular and molecular levels. The procedures range from visual inspection of time plots and actograms to several mathematical methods of time series analysis. Computational steps are described in some detail, and additional bibliographic resources and computer programs are listed. PMID:23710111

  5. Emotion and Rhythm in Critical Learning Incidents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soini, Hannu; Flynn, Mark

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we analyzed the descriptions of learning provided by 234 College of Education students from Finland and Canada and compared them with Whitehead's (1932/1962) epistemological theory of the rhythm of mental growth. The students were asked to "Give a concrete example of a situation in which you really learned something." The…

  6. [Circadian rhythm sleep disorders in psychiatric diseases].

    PubMed

    Bromundt, Vivien

    2014-11-01

    Circadian rhythm sleep disorders are prevalent among psychiatric patients. This is most probable due to a close relationship between functional disturbances of the internal clock, sleep regulation and mental health. Mechanisms on molecular level of the circadian clock and neurotransmitter signalling are involved in the development of both disorders. Moreover, circadian disorders and psychiatric diseases favour each other by accessory symptoms such as stress or social isolation. Actimetry to objectively quantify the rest-activity cycle and salivary melatonin profiles as marker for the circadian phase help to diagnose circadian rhythm sleep disorders in psychiatric patients. Chronotherapeutics such as bright light therapy, dark therapy, melatonin administration, and wake therapy are used to synchronise and consolidate circadian rhythms and help in the treatment of depression and other psychiatric disorders, but are still neglected in medicine. More molecular to behavioural research is needed for the understanding of the development of circadian disorders and their relationship to psychiatric illnesses. This will help to boost the awareness and treatment of circadian rhythm sleep disorders in psychiatry. PMID:25377290

  7. NEUROSENSORY LINKS BETWEEN BRONCHOCONSTRICTION AND CARDIAC RHYTHM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reports in the literature have attributed altered heart rate, heart rate variability, and rhythm to inhaled particulate matter (PM) in humans. Whereas the changes in heart rate are very small, analysis of ECG tracings indicate changes in HRV suggesting altered autonomic balance. ...

  8. From Biological Rhythms to Social Rhythms: Physiological Precursors of Mother-Infant Synchrony

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Ruth

    2006-01-01

    Links between neonatal biological rhythms and the emergence of interaction rhythms were examined in 3 groups (N=71): high-risk preterms (HR; birth weight less than 1,000 g), low-risk preterms (LR; birth weight=1,700-1,850 g), and full-term (FT) infants. Once a week for premature infants and on the 2nd day for FT infants, sleep-wake cyclicity was…

  9. Circadian rhythms in circulating T lymphocyte subtypes and plasma testosterone, total and free cortisol in five healthy men

    PubMed Central

    Lévi, F. A.; Canon, Chantal; Touitou, Y.; Sulon, J.; Mechkouri, M.; Ponsart, Emilie Demey; Touboul, J. P.; Vannetzel, J. M.; Mowzowicz, Irène; Reinberg, A.; Mathe, G.

    1988-01-01

    Circadian variations of circulating T lymphocyte subtypes and their possible relations with those of endogenous cortisol or testosterone were investigated in five healthy young men. Venous blood (40 ml) was obtained every 4 h for 24 h from each subject in January, March, June, August and November. Leucocyte and differential counts were measured. Mononuclear cells were isolated on Ficoll-Paque gradient, and samples were incubated with OKT3, OKT4 or OKT8 monoclonal antibodies for characterizing all T, T helper and T suppressor-cytotoxic lymphocytes respectively. The proportion of labelled lymphocytes was determined under an epifluorescence microscope and the counts of circulating lymphocyte subsets (cells/mm3) computed. Total and free cortisol and testosterone were also determined in the corresponding plasma samples. Results from analysis of variance and cosinor indicated statistically significant differences (P<0·001) as a function of both individual subject and circadian sampling time for all variables. Circadian rhythms (with a period, τ≡24 h) were validated for total, T and T helper lymphocytes and for the T helper: T suppressor-cytotoxic ratio (P<0·001), with double amplitudes (2A, total extent of variation accounted for by the fitted cosine function) ranging from 25% up to 50% of the 24 h mean (M), and acrophases (Φ, time of maximum) localized near 0100 h. A rhythm with τ≡12 h characterized circulating T suppressor-cytotoxic lymphocytes (P<0·001; 2A=36% of M; Φ=0830 and 2030 h). Circadian rhythms were also found for plasma cortisol (either total or free) and testosterone (P<0·001). No correlation was found however between time-qualified data of these hormones and the immunological variables herein investigated (162 pairs of data) whether or not a 4 h or an 8 h lag time was considered to allow for hormonal actions to operate. This suggests that neither the circadian organization of the adrenal cortex nor that of the testis play a prominent role in

  10. Blooming rhythms of cactus Cereus peruvianus with nocturnal peak at full moon during seasons of prolonged daytime photoperiod.

    PubMed

    Ben-Attia, Mossadok; Reinberg, Alain; Smolensky, Michael H; Gadacha, Wafa; Khedaier, Achraf; Sani, Mamane; Touitou, Yvan; Boughamni, Néziha Ghanem

    2016-01-01

    Cereus peruvianus (Peruvian apple cactus) is a large erect and thorny succulent cactus characterized by column-like (cereus [L]: column), that is, candle-shaped, appendages. For three successive years (1100 days), between early April and late November, we studied the flowering patterns of eight cacti growing in public gardens and rural areas of north and central Tunisia, far from nighttime artificial illumination, in relation to natural environmental light, temperature, relative humidity and precipitation parameters. Flower blooming was assessed nightly between 23:00 h and until at least 02:00 h, and additionally around-the-clock at ~1 h intervals for 30 consecutive days during the late summer of each year of study to quantify both nyctohemeral (day-night) and lunar patterns. During the summer months of prolonged daytime photoperiod, flower blooming of C. peruvianus exhibited predictable-in-time variation as "waves" with average period of 29.5 days synchronized by the light of the full moon. The large-sized flower (~16 cm diameter) opens almost exclusively at night, between sunset and sunrise, as a 24 h rhythm during a specific 3-4-day span of the lunar cycle (full moon), with a strong correlation between moon phase and number and proportion of flowers in bloom (ranging from r = +0.59 to +0.91). Black, blue and red cotton sheets were used to filter specific spectral bands of nighttime moonlight from illuminating randomly selected plant appendages as a means to test the hypothesis of a "gating" 24 h rhythm phenomenon of photoreceptors at the bud level. Relative to control conditions (no light filtering), black sheet covering inhibited flower bud induction by 87.5%, red sheet covering by 46.6% and blue sheet covering by 34%, and the respective inhibiting effects on number of flowers in bloom were essentially 100%, ~81% and ~44%. C. peruvianus is a unique example of a terrestrial plant that exhibits a circadian flowering rhythm (peak ~00:00 h) "gated" by 24 h, lunar

  11. Circadian rhythms in crassulacean acid metabolism: phase relationships between gas exchange, leaf water relations and malate metabolism in Kalanchoë daigremontiana.

    PubMed

    Buchanan-Bollig, I C; Smith, J A

    1984-06-01

    Gas exchange, leaf water relations, malate content and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase activity in crude extracts were examined for circadian rhythmicity in the crassulacean acid metabolism plant Kalanchoë daigremontiana. At low irradiance (20 W m(-2)) the rhythm in CO2 uptake continued for several days with a period length of approx. 22 h, whereas the transpiration rhythm was no longer apparent after 24 h. This shows that the CO2 rhythm in continuous light (LL) is not under stomatal control. Circadian oscillations in malate content were detectable for up to 72 h in LL but were of much reduced amplitude. This was reflected in the changes in leaf water relations, which quickly damped after transfer to LL. The activity of PEP carboxylase assayed immediately after extraction showed a rhythmicity for at least 18 h, but after 36 h, values from different plants were scattered. We suggest that the CO2-uptake rhythm is primarily the result of endogenous changes in the activity of PEP carboxylase, which competes to varying degrees with ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase for CO2. PMID:24253720

  12. A non-invasive method for detecting the metabolic stress response in rodents: characterization and disruption of the circadian corticosterone rhythm.

    PubMed

    Thanos, P K; Cavigelli, S A; Michaelides, M; Olvet, D M; Patel, U; Diep, M N; Volkow, N D

    2009-01-01

    Plasma corticosterone (CORT) measures are a common procedure to detect stress responses in rodents. However, the procedure is invasive and can influence CORT levels, making it less than ideal for monitoring CORT circadian rhythms. In the current paper, we examined the applicability of a non-invasive fecal CORT metabolite measure to assess the circadian rhythm. We compared fecal CORT metabolite levels to circulating CORT levels, and analyzed change in the fecal circadian rhythm following an acute stressor (i.e. blood sampling by tail veil catheter). Fecal and blood samples were collected from male adolescent rats and analyzed for CORT metabolites and circulating CORT respectively. Fecal samples were collected hourly for 24 h before and after blood draw. On average, peak fecal CORT metabolite values occurred 7-9 h after the plasma CORT peak and time-matched fecal CORT values were well correlated with plasma CORT. As a result of the rapid blood draw, fecal production and CORT levels were altered the next day. These results indicate fecal CORT metabolite measures can be used to assess conditions that disrupt the circadian CORT rhythm, and provide a method to measure long-term changes in CORT production. This can benefit research that requires long-term glucocorticoid assessment (e.g. stress mechanisms underlying health). PMID:18380537

  13. Circadian regulation gene polymorphisms are associated with sleep disruption and duration, and circadian phase and rhythm in adults with HIV.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kathryn A; Gay, Caryl; Byun, Eeeseung; Lerdal, Anners; Pullinger, Clive R; Aouizerat, Bradley E

    2015-01-01

    Genes involved in circadian regulation, such as circadian locomotor output cycles kaput [CLOCK], cryptochrome [CRY1] and period [PER], have been associated with sleep outcomes in prior animal and human research. However, it is unclear whether polymorphisms in these genes are associated with the sleep disturbances commonly experienced by adults living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). Thus, the purpose of this study was to describe polymorphisms in selected circadian genes that are associated with sleep duration or disruption as well as the sleep-wake rhythm strength and phase timing among adults living with HIV/AIDS. A convenience sample of 289 adults with HIV/AIDS was recruited from HIV clinics and community sites in the San Francisco Bay Area. A wrist actigraph was worn for 72 h on weekdays to estimate sleep duration or total sleep time (TST), sleep disruption or percentage of wake after sleep onset (WASO) and several circadian rhythm parameters: mesor, amplitude, the ratio of mesor to amplitude (circadian quotient), and 24-h autocorrelation. Circadian phase measures included clock time for peak activity (acrophase) from actigraphy movement data, and bed time and final wake time from actigraphy and self-report. Genotyping was conducted for polymorphisms in five candidate genes involved in circadian regulation: CLOCK, CRY1, PER1, PER2 and PER3. Demographic and clinical variables were evaluated as potential covariates. Interactions between genotype and HIV variables (i.e. viral load, years since HIV diagnosis) were also evaluated. Controlling for potentially confounding variables (e.g. race, gender, CD4+ T-cell count, waist circumference, medication use, smoking and depressive symptoms), CLOCK was associated with WASO, 24-h autocorrelation and objectively-measured bed time; CRY1 was associated with circadian quotient; PER1 was associated with mesor and self-reported habitual wake time; PER2 was associated with TST

  14. Twelve weeks of moderate aerobic exercise without dietary intervention or weight loss does not affect 24-h energy expenditure in lean and obese adolescents.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exercise might have a persistent effect on energy expenditure and fat oxidation, resulting in increased fat loss. However, even without weight loss, exercise results in positive metabolic effects. The effect of an aerobic exercise program on 24-h total energy expenditure (TEE), and its components-ba...

  15. COMPARISON OF 24H AVERAGE VOC MONITORING RESULTS FOR RESIDENTIAL INDOOR AND OUTDOOR AIR USING CARBOPACK X-FILLED DIFFUSIVE SAMPLERS AND ACTIVE SAMPLING - A PILOT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analytical results obtained by thermal desorption GC/MS for 24h diffusive sampling of 11 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are compared with results of time-averaged active sampling at a known constant flow rate. Air samples were collected with co-located duplicate diffusive samp...

  16. Characterisation of circadian rhythms of various duckweeds.

    PubMed

    Muranaka, T; Okada, M; Yomo, J; Kubota, S; Oyama, T

    2015-01-01

    The plant circadian clock controls various physiological phenomena that are important for adaptation to natural day-night cycles. Many components of the circadian clock have been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana, the model plant for molecular genetic studies. Recent studies revealed evolutionary conservation of clock components in green plants. Homologues of clock-related genes have been isolated from Lemna gibba and Lemna aequinoctialis, and it has been demonstrated that these homologues function in the clock system in a manner similar to their functioning in Arabidopsis. While clock components are widely conserved, circadian phenomena display diversity even within the Lemna genus. In order to survey the full extent of diversity in circadian rhythms among duckweed plants, we characterised the circadian rhythms of duckweed by employing a semi-transient bioluminescent reporter system. Using a particle bombardment method, circadian bioluminescent reporters were introduced into nine strains representing five duckweed species: Spirodela polyrhiza, Landoltia punctata, Lemna gibba, L. aequinoctialis and Wolffia columbiana. We then monitored luciferase (luc+) reporter activities driven by AtCCA1, ZmUBQ1 or CaMV35S promoters under entrainment and free-running conditions. Under entrainment, AtCCA1::luc+ showed similar diurnal rhythms in all strains. This suggests that the mechanism of biological timing under day-night cycles is conserved throughout the evolution of duckweeds. Under free-running conditions, we observed circadian rhythms of AtCCA1::luc+, ZmUBQ1::luc+ and CaMV35S::luc+. These circadian rhythms showed diversity in period length and sustainability, suggesting that circadian clock mechanisms are somewhat diversified among duckweeds. PMID:24942699

  17. Biologic rhythms derived from Siberian mammoths' hairs.

    PubMed

    Spilde, Mike; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Qualls, Clifford; Phillips, Genevieve; Ali, Abdul-Mehdi; Agenbroad, Larry; Appenzeller, Otto

    2011-01-01

    Hair is preserved for millennia in permafrost; it enshrines a record of biologic rhythms and offers a glimpse at chronobiology as it was in extinct animals. Here we compare biologic rhythms gleaned from mammoth's hairs with those of modern human hair. Four mammoths' hairs came from varying locations in Siberia 4600 km, four time zones, apart ranging in age between 18,000 and 20,000 years before present. We used two contemporaneous human hairs for comparison. Power spectra derived from hydrogen isotope ratios along the length of the hairs gave insight into biologic rhythms, which were different in the mammoths depending on location and differed from humans. Hair growth for mammoths was ∼31 cms/year and ∼16 cms/year for humans. Recurrent annual rhythms of slow and fast growth varying from 3.4 weeks/cycles to 8.7 weeks/cycles for slow periods and 1.2 weeks/cycles to 2.2 weeks/cycles for fast periods were identified in mammoth's hairs. The mineral content of mammoth's hairs was measured by electron microprobe analysis (k-ratios), which showed no differences in sulfur amongst the mammoth hairs but significantly more iron then in human hair. The fractal nature of the data derived from the hairs became evident in Mandelbrot sets derived from hydrogen isotope ratios, mineral content and geographic location. Confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed varied degrees of preservation of the cuticle largely independent of age but not location of the specimens. X-ray fluorescence microprobe and fluorescence computed micro-tomography analyses allowed evaluation of metal distribution and visualization of hollow tubes in the mammoth's hairs. Seasonal variations in iron and copper content combined with spectral analyses gave insights into variation in food intake of the animals. Biologic rhythms gleaned from power spectral plots obtained by modern methods revealed life style and behavior of extinct mega-fauna. PMID:21747920

  18. Biologic Rhythms Derived from Siberian Mammoths' Hairs

    PubMed Central

    Spilde, Mike; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Qualls, Clifford; Phillips, Genevieve; Ali, Abdul-Mehdi; Agenbroad, Larry; Appenzeller, Otto

    2011-01-01

    Hair is preserved for millennia in permafrost; it enshrines a record of biologic rhythms and offers a glimpse at chronobiology as it was in extinct animals. Here we compare biologic rhythms gleaned from mammoth's hairs with those of modern human hair. Four mammoths' hairs came from varying locations in Siberia 4600 km, four time zones, apart ranging in age between 18,000 and 20,000 years before present. We used two contemporaneous human hairs for comparison. Power spectra derived from hydrogen isotope ratios along the length of the hairs gave insight into biologic rhythms, which were different in the mammoths depending on location and differed from humans. Hair growth for mammoths was ∼31 cms/year and ∼16 cms/year for humans. Recurrent annual rhythms of slow and fast growth varying from 3.4 weeks/cycles to 8.7 weeks/cycles for slow periods and 1.2 weeks/cycles to 2.2 weeks/cycles for fast periods were identified in mammoth's hairs. The mineral content of mammoth's hairs was measured by electron microprobe analysis (k-ratios), which showed no differences in sulfur amongst the mammoth hairs but significantly more iron then in human hair. The fractal nature of the data derived from the hairs became evident in Mandelbrot sets derived from hydrogen isotope ratios, mineral content and geographic location. Confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed varied degrees of preservation of the cuticle largely independent of age but not location of the specimens. X-ray fluorescence microprobe and fluorescence computed micro-tomography analyses allowed evaluation of metal distribution and visualization of hollow tubes in the mammoth's hairs. Seasonal variations in iron and copper content combined with spectral analyses gave insights into variation in food intake of the animals. Biologic rhythms gleaned from power spectral plots obtained by modern methods revealed life style and behavior of extinct mega-fauna. PMID:21747920

  19. Biologic Rhythms Derived from Siberian Mammoths Hairs

    SciTech Connect

    M Spilde; A Lanzirotti; C Qualls; G Phillips; A Ali; L Agenbroad; O Appenzeller

    2011-12-31

    Hair is preserved for millennia in permafrost; it enshrines a record of biologic rhythms and offers a glimpse at chronobiology as it was in extinct animals. Here we compare biologic rhythms gleaned from mammoth's hairs with those of modern human hair. Four mammoths' hairs came from varying locations in Siberia 4600 km, four time zones, apart ranging in age between 18,000 and 20,000 years before present. We used two contemporaneous human hairs for comparison. Power spectra derived from hydrogen isotope ratios along the length of the hairs gave insight into biologic rhythms, which were different in the mammoths depending on location and differed from humans. Hair growth for mammoths was {approx}31 cms/year and {approx}16 cms/year for humans. Recurrent annual rhythms of slow and fast growth varying from 3.4 weeks/cycles to 8.7 weeks/cycles for slow periods and 1.2 weeks/cycles to 2.2 weeks/cycles for fast periods were identified in mammoth's hairs. The mineral content of mammoth's hairs was measured by electron microprobe analysis (k-ratios), which showed no differences in sulfur amongst the mammoth hairs but significantly more iron then in human hair. The fractal nature of the data derived from the hairs became evident in Mandelbrot sets derived from hydrogen isotope ratios, mineral content and geographic location. Confocal microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed varied degrees of preservation of the cuticle largely independent of age but not location of the specimens. X-ray fluorescence microprobe and fluorescence computed micro-tomography analyses allowed evaluation of metal distribution and visualization of hollow tubes in the mammoth's hairs. Seasonal variations in iron and copper content combined with spectral analyses gave insights into variation in food intake of the animals. Biologic rhythms gleaned from power spectral plots obtained by modern methods revealed life style and behavior of extinct mega-fauna.

  20. The Validity and Reliability of Rhythm Measurements in Automatically Scoring the English Rhythm Proficiency of Chinese EFL Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Jin; Lin, Jianghao; Li, Xinguang

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to find out the validity of rhythm measurements to capture the rhythmic features of Chinese English. Besides, the reliability of the valid rhythm measurements applied in automatically scoring the English rhythm proficiency of Chinese EFL learners is also explored. Thus, two experiments were carried out. First, thirty students of…

  1. Retinoic Acid-Related Orphan Receptors (RORs): Regulatory Functions in Immunity, Development, Circadian Rhythm, and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Donald N.; Kang, Hong Soon; Jetten, Anton M.

    2015-01-01

    In this overview, we provide an update on recent progress made in understanding the mechanisms of action, physiological functions, and roles in disease of retinoic acid related orphan receptors (RORs). We are particularly focusing on their roles in the regulation of adaptive and innate immunity, brain function, retinal development, cancer, glucose and lipid metabolism, circadian rhythm, metabolic and inflammatory diseases and neuropsychiatric disorders. We also summarize the current status of ROR agonists and inverse agonists, including their regulation of ROR activity and their therapeutic potential for management of various diseases in which RORs have been implicated. PMID:26878025

  2. Changes in glucose, insulin, and growth hormone levels associated with bedrest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Leach, C. S.; Winget, C. M.; Goodwin, A. L.; Rambaut, P. C.

    1976-01-01

    Changes in plasma glucose, insulin, and growth hormone (HGH) resulting from exposure to 56 d of bedrest were determined in five healthy young male subjects. Changes in the daily levels of these factors for each subject were expressed as the mean of six blood samples per 24-h period. The level of HGH dropped after 10 d of bedrest, then showed a 1.5-fold increase at 20 d and subsequently decreased gradually reaching levels of 2.5 mg/ml/24 h, well below pre-bedrest controls of 4.2 mg/ml/24 h, by the 54th d. In spite of a marked increase in the daily plasma insulin levels during the first 30 d of bedrest, glucose levels remained unchanged. Beyond 30 d of bedrest, insulin began decreasing toward pre-bedrest levels and glucose followed with a similar reduction to below the control levels of 75 mg/100 ml/24 h on day 54. The daily mean changes reflect a change in the amplitude of the diurnal variation. The daily peak in plasma insulin shifted progressively to the late evening during the bedrest period.

  3. Hyperinsulinaemia reduces the 24-h virological response to PEG-interferon therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis C and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Bortoletto, G; Scribano, L; Realdon, S; Marcolongo, M; Mirandola, S; Franceschini, L; Bonisegna, S; Noventa, F; Plebani, M; Martines, D; Alberti, A

    2010-07-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) reduces response to pegylated-interferon (PEG-IFN)/ribavirin in chronic hepatitis C (CHC), but the mechanisms are still undefined. We examined the relationship between baseline insulin levels, the main component affecting homeostasis model of assessment - insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) for assessment of IR in non-diabetic patients, and the 'acute' virological response to PEG-IFN measured 24 h after the first injection and taken as correlate of intracellular interferon signalling. In 62 patients treated with PEG-IFN/Ribavirin, serum insulin and HOMA-IR were assessed at baseline, while hepatitis C virus (HCV)-RNA was measured at baseline and 24 h, 1, 2, 4 and 12 weeks after treatment initiation. Sustained virological response was examined 24 weeks after therapy discontinuation. Mean baseline insulin was 11.52 +/- 8.51 U/L and mean HOMA-IR was 2.65 +/- 2.01 both being significantly higher with advanced liver fibrosis. Hepatitis C virus-RNA decay observed 24 h after the first injection of PEG-IFN was significantly lower (0.7 +/- 0.8 log) in patients with HOMA > or =3 compared with those with HOMA <3 (1.7 +/- 0.8, P = 0.001). A highly significant (r = -0.42) inverse correlation was observed between baseline insulin levels and the 24-h HCV-RNA decay. The difference in early viral kinetics between patients with HOMA > or =3 or <3 resulted in a significant difference in the percentage of patients achieving rapid (week 4) and sustained virological response. Multivariate analysis, inclusive of patient age, HCV genotype and fibrosis stage, identified baseline insulin levels as the main independent variable affecting the 24-h response to PEG-IFN. Hyperinsulinaemia reduces the cellular response to Pegylated-interferon in CHC with IR. Strategies to reduce insulin levels before initiation of treatment should be pursued to improve efficacy of anti-viral treatment. PMID:19878535

  4. Ultra-early microsurgical treatment within 24 h of SAH improves prognosis of poor-grade aneurysm combined with intracerebral hematoma

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, JUNHUI; ZHU, JUN; HE, JIANQING; WANG, YUHAI; CHEN, LEI; ZHANG, CHUNLEI; ZHOU, JINGXU; YANG, LIKUN

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is the most common cerebrovascular disease. The conventional treatment for SAH is usually associated with high mortality. The present study aims to assess the prognosis of microsurgical treatment for patients with poor-grade aneurysm (Hunt and Hess grades IV–V) associated with intracerebral hematoma. A total of 18 consecutive patients who were diagnosed with poor-grade aneurysm accompanied with intracerebral hematoma were retrospectively recruited. All patients underwent microsurgical treatment between April 2010 and June 2013 at The 101st Hospital of Chinese People's Liberation Army (Wuxi, China). Among them, 15 cases underwent microsurgery within 24 h of SAH, and 3 cases underwent microsurgery 24 h following SAH. All 18 cases were examined by computed tomography angiography (CTA). The outcome was assessed during a follow-up time of 6–36 months. According to the Glasgow Outcome Scale, 4 patients experienced a good recovery, 6 were dissatisfied with the outcome, 4 were in vegetative state and 4 succumbed to disease. Poor outcome occurred in patients with an aneurysm diameter >10 mm, exhibited >50 ml volume of intracerebral hematoma or presented cerebral hernia prior to the surgical operation. The outcome of ultra-early surgery (within 24 h of SAH) was improved, compared with that of surgery following 24 h of SAH (P=0.005). Among 7 patients who accepted extraventricular drainage, good outcomes were achieved in 4 of them, whereas dissatisfaction and mortality occurred in 2 and 1 patients, respectively. Therefore, ultra-early microsurgery (within 24 h of SAH) combined with extraventricular drainage may improve the prognosis of patients with poor-grade aneurysm. PMID:27123084

  5. Perturbed energy balance and hydration status in ultra-endurance runners during a 24 h ultra-marathon.

    PubMed

    Costa, Ricardo J S; Gill, Samantha K; Hankey, Joanne; Wright, Alice; Marczak, Slawomir

    2014-08-14

    The present study aimed to assess the adequacy of energy, macronutrients and water intakes of ultra-endurance runners (UER) competing in a 24 h ultra-marathon (distance range: 122-208 km). The ad libitum food and fluid intakes of the UER (n 25) were recorded throughout the competition and analysed using dietary analysis software. Body mass (BM), urinary ketone presence, plasma osmolality (POsmol) and volume change were determined at pre- and post-competition time points. Data were analysed using appropriate t tests, with significance set at P <0·05. The total energy intake and expenditure of the UER were 20 (sd 12) and 55 (sd 11) MJ, respectively (control (CON) (n 17): 12 (sd 1) and 14 (sd 5) MJ, respectively). The protein, carbohydrate and fat intakes of the UER were 1·1 (sd 0·4), 11·3 (sd 7·0) and 1·5 (sd 0·7) g/kg BM, respectively. The rate of carbohydrate intake during the competition was 37 (sd 24) g/h. The total water intake of the UER was 9·1 (sd 4·0) litres (CON: 2·1 (sd 1·0) litres), while the rate of water intake was 378 (sd 164) ml/h. Significant BM loss occurred at pre- to post-competition time points (P =0·001) in the UER (1·6 (sd 2·0) %). No significant changes in POsmol values were observed at pre- (285 (sd 11) mOsmol/kg) to post-competition (287 (sd 10) mOsmol/kg) time points in the UER and were lower than those recorded in the CON group (P <0·05). However, plasma volume (PV) increased at post-competition time points in the UER (10·2 (sd 9·7) %; P <0·001). Urinary ketones were evident in the post-competition samples of 90 % of the UER. Energy deficit was observed in all the UER, with only one UER achieving the benchmark recommendations for carbohydrate intake during endurance exercise. Despite the relatively low water intake rates recorded in the UER, hypohydration does not appear to be an issue, considering increases in PV values observed in the majority (80 %) of the UER. Population-specific dietary recommendations may be

  6. A prototype-based resonance model of rhythm categorization

    PubMed Central

    Bååth, Rasmus; Lagerstedt, Erik; Gärdenfors, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Categorization of rhythmic patterns is prevalent in musical practice, an example of this being the transcription of (possibly not strictly metrical) music into musical notation. In this article we implement a dynamical systems' model of rhythm categorization based on the resonance theory of rhythm perception developed by Large (2010). This model is used to simulate the categorical choices of participants in two experiments of Desain and Honing (2003). The model accurately replicates the experimental data. Our results support resonance theory as a viable model of rhythm perception and show that by viewing rhythm perception as a dynamical system it is possible to model central properties of rhythm categorization. PMID:26034564

  7. Albuminuria, renal dysfunction and circadian blood pressure rhythm in older men: a population-based longitudinal cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hong; Huang, Xiaoyan; Risérus, Ulf; Cederholm, Tommy; Sjögren, Per; Lindholm, Bengt; Ärnlöv, Johan; Carrero, Juan Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Background Both albuminuria and kidney dysfunction may affect circadian blood pressure (BP) rhythm, while exacerbating each other's effects. We investigated associations and interactions of these two risk factors with circadian BP rhythm variation and non-dipper pattern progression in community-dwelling older men. Methods This was a cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses in the third and fourth cycles of the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men, including 1051 men (age 71 years) with assessments on urinary albumin excretion rate (UAER), 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) and cystatin-C-estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Of these, 574 men attended re-examination after 6 years. Study outcomes were ABMP changes and non-dipping BP pattern (prevalence and progression). Results UAER associated with circadian BP rhythm both cross-sectionally and longitudinally. Longitudinally, significant interactions were observed between UAER and kidney dysfunction (eGFR < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2) in its association with the changes of both night-time systolic BP (SBP) and night–day SBP ratio. After stratification, UAER strongly predicted night–day SBP ratio change only in those with concurrent kidney dysfunction. At re-examination, 221 new cases of non-dipper were identified. In multivariable logistic models, high UAER associated with increased likelihood of non-dipper progression, but more strongly so among individuals with concurrent kidney dysfunction. These associations were evident also in the subpopulation of non-diabetics and in participants with normal range UAER. Conclusions UAER associates with circadian BP rhythm variation and non-dipper progression in elderly men. Concurrent renal dysfunction modifies and exacerbates these associations. PMID:26413281

  8. A Novel Quantitative Trait Locus on Mouse Chromosome 18, “era1,” Modifies the Entrainment of Circadian Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Wisor, Jonathan P.; Striz, Martin; DeVoss, Jason; Murphy, Greer M.; Edgar, Dale M.; O'Hara, Bruce F.

    2007-01-01

    Study Objectives: The mammalian circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the hypothalamus conveys 24-h rhythmicity to sleep-wake cycles, locomotor activity, and other behavioral and physiological processes. The timing of rhythms relative to the light/dark (LD12:12) cycle is influenced in part by the endogenous circadian period and the time of day specific sensitivity of the clock to light. We now describe a novel circadian rhythm phenotype, and a locus influencing that phenotype, in a segregating population of mice. Methods: By crossbreeding 2 genetically distinct nocturnal strains of mice (Cast/Ei and C57BL/6J) and backcrossing the resulting progeny to Cast/Ei, we have produced a novel circadian phenotype, called early runner mice. Results: Early runner mice entrain to a light/dark cycle at an advanced phase, up to 9 hours before dark onset. This phenotype is not significantly correlated with circadian period in constant darkness and is not associated with disruption of molecular circadian rhythms in the SCN, as assessed by analysis of period gene expression. We have identified a genomic region that regulates this phenotype—a major quantitative trait locus on chromosome 18 (near D18Mit184) that we have named era1 for Early Runner Activity locus one. Phase delays caused by light exposure early in the subjective night were of smaller magnitude in backcross offspring that were homozygous Cast/Ei at D18Mit184 than in those that were heterozygous at this locus. Conclusion: Genetic variability in the circadian response to light may, in part, explain the variance in phase angle of entrainment in this segregating mouse population. Citation: Wisor JP; Striz M; DeVoss J; Murphy GM; Edgar DM; O'Hara BF. A novel quantitative trait locus on mouse chromosome 18, “era1,” modifies the entrainment of circadian rhythms. SLEEP 2007;30(10):1255-1263. PMID:17969459

  9. Rhythm measures and dimensions of durational variation in speech.

    PubMed

    Loukina, Anastassia; Kochanski, Greg; Rosner, Burton; Keane, Elinor; Shih, Chilin

    2011-05-01

    Patterns of durational variation were examined by applying 15 previously published rhythm measures to a large corpus of speech from five languages. In order to achieve consistent segmentation across all languages, an automatic speech recognition system was developed to divide the waveforms into consonantal and vocalic regions. The resulting duration measurements rest strictly on acoustic criteria. Machine classification showed that rhythm measures could separate languages at rates above chance. Within-language variability in rhythm measures, however, was large and comparable to that between languages. Therefore, different languages could not be identified reliably from single paragraphs. In experiments separating pairs of languages, a rhythm measure that was relatively successful at separating one pair often performed very poorly on another pair: there was no broadly successful rhythm measure. Separation of all five languages at once required a combination of three rhythm measures. Many triplets were about equally effective, but the confusion patterns between languages varied with the choice of rhythm measures. PMID:21568427

  10. [Interpersonal and social rhythm therapy (IPSRT)].

    PubMed

    Bottai, T; Biloa-Tang, M; Christophe, S; Dupuy, C; Jacquesy, L; Kochman, F; Meynard, J-A; Papeta, D; Rahioui, H; Adida, M; Fakra, E; Kaladjian, A; Pringuey, D; Azorin, J-M

    2010-12-01

    Bipolar disorder is common, recurrent, often severe and debiliting disorder. All types of bipolar disorder have a common determinant: depressive episode. It is justify to propose a psychotherapy which shown efficacy in depression. Howewer, perturbations in circadian rhythms have been implicated in the genesis of each episode of the illness. Biological circadian dysregulation can be encouraged by alteration of time-givers (Zeitgebers) or occurrence of time-disturbers (Zeitstörers). Addition of social rhythm therapy to interpersonal psychotherapy leads to create a new psychotherapy adaptated to bipolar disorders: InterPersonal and Social Rhythm Therapy (IPSRT). IPSRT, in combinaison with medication, has demonstrated efficacy as a treatment for bipolar disorders. IPSRT combines psychoeducation, behavioral strategy to regularize daily routines and interpersonal psychotherapy which help patients cope better with the multiple psychosocial and relationship problems associated with this chronic disorder. The main issues of this psychotherapy are: to take the history of the patient's illness and review of medication, to help patient for "grief for the lost healthy self" translated in the french version in "acceptance of a long-term medical condition", to give the sick role, to examinate the current relationships and changes proximal to the emergence of mood symptoms in the four problem areas (unresolved grief, interpersonal disputes, role transitions, role déficits), to examinate and increase daily routines and social rhythms. French version of IPSRT called TIPARS (with few differences), a time-limited psychotherapy, in 24 sessions during approximatively 6 months, is conducted in three phases. In the initial phase, the therapist takes a thorough history of previous episodes and their interpersonal context and a review of previous medication, provides psychoeducation, evaluates social rhythms, introduces the Social Rhythm Metric, identifies the patient's main interpersonal

  11. Impairment of beat-based rhythm discrimination in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Grahn, Jessica A; Brett, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Humans often synchronize movements to the beat, indicating that motor areas may be involved in detecting or generating a beat. The basal ganglia have been shown to be preferentially activated by perception of rhythms with a regular beat (Grahn and Brett, 2007), but their necessity for beat-based rhythm processing has not been proven. Previous research has shown that Parkinson's disease (PD) patients are impaired in timing of isochronous intervals (Harrington et al., 1998a; O'Boyle et al., 1996), but little work has tested more complex rhythms. In healthy volunteers, behavioural performance is better for rhythms with a beat than without a beat (Essens, 1986). We tested PD patients and controls on a rhythm discrimination task to determine if basal ganglia dysfunction results in an impairment of processing rhythms that have a beat. Unlike rhythm reproduction, discrimination has no motor requirements that are problematic for patients. Half the rhythms had a beat-based structure, and half did not. Subjects heard a rhythm twice and then indicated if a third presentation of the rhythm was the same or different. We predicted that PD patients would benefit less from beat structure than controls, resulting in a group by rhythm-type interaction, with reduced relative performance for the beat-based sequences in the PD group. Indeed this was the pattern of the results. In the control group, a significant advantage was observed for discrimination of rhythms with a beat compared to those without a beat. This advantage was greatly reduced in the PD group. Discrimination of beat-based rhythms was significantly impaired in PD patients compared to controls, whereas discrimination of non-beat-based rhythms did not differ significantly. This suggests that the basal ganglia are part of a system involved in detecting or generating an internal beat, and that this system is compromised in patients with Parkinson's disease. PMID:19027895

  12. Risk factors for stillbirths and mortality during the first 24h of life on dairy farms in Hokkaido, Japan 2005-2009.

    PubMed

    Kayano, M; Kadohira, M; Stevenson, M A

    2016-05-01

    This was a retrospective cohort study using data from the insurance scheme provided by the Japanese Mutual Aid Association (NOSAI). The population of interest comprised all cattle born on NOSAI-client farms in the Japanese prefecture of Hokkaido, Japan for the period 1 April 2005-31 March 2009. The outcome of interest was whether or not at least one calf was stillborn, had died during delivery or died during the first 24 hours of life for a given calving event, termed first 24h mortality risk. A mixed-effects logistic regression model was developed to identify explanatory variables associated with first 24h mortality risk. The final data set comprised details of 1,281,737 calving events on a total of 5172 dairy herds from 19 NOSAI branches located throughout the prefecture of Hokkaido. Throughout the study period 7.68 (95% CI 7.64-7.73) of every 100 calving events had at least one calf that was either stillborn, dead at the time of delivery or dead during the first 24h of life. Factors that were positively associated with an increase in first 24h mortality risk included delivery during the colder months of the year (November-March), being of Wagyu breed, having a multipara dam, multiple (as opposed to single) birth deliveries, and delivery in larger herds. ​After adjusting for the fixed effects included in our multilevel model, 89% of the unexplained variation in first 24h mortality risk was at the calving event level. We propose that the data recording requirements of the NOSAI scheme are extended to include details of calving events (e.g. the presence or absence of dystocia) and details of the way in which calves are managed post delivery. This would allow more subtle risk factors for calf mortality to be identified which, in turn, will lead to refinement of recommendations for calf management during the first 24h of life in this area of Japan. PMID:27094140

  13. Sleep, Circadian Rhythms, and Anxious Traits.

    PubMed

    Coles, Meredith E; Schubert, Jessica R; Nota, Jacob A

    2015-09-01

    Anxiety is adaptive and plays an important role in keeping us safe. However, when anxiety becomes too extreme, it can cause significant disruptions and distress. Understanding the mechanisms underlying excessive anxiety and how to best treat it is a priority for researchers and clinicians. There is increasing recognition that disruptions in the amount and timing of sleep are associated with anxiety symptoms and characteristics. In the current paper, we explore the intersections between sleep, circadian rhythms, and anxiety. First, we review accumulating evidence that anxiety is associated with disruptions in sleep and circadian rhythms in both clinical and nonclinical samples and across ages. Next, we discuss the data linking sleep disruptions with anxiety-related traits (anxiety sensitivity, neuroticism, and perfectionism) and patterns of cognition and emotion. Finally, potential treatment implications are highlighted. Overall, these data suggest that delineating the role of disruptions in the amount and timing of sleep holds promise for improving the lives of individuals with heightened anxiety. PMID:26216591

  14. Circadian rhythms: basic neurobiology and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Moore, R Y

    1997-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are major features of adaptation to our environment. In mammals, circadian rhythms are generated and regulated by a circadian timing system. This system consists of entertainment pathways, pacemakers, and pace-maker output to effector systems that are under circadian control. The primary entertainment pathway is the retinohypothalamic tract, which terminates in the circadian pacemakers, the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus. The output of the suprachiasmatic nuclei is principally to the hypothalamus, the midline thalamus, and the basal forebrain. This provides a temporal organization to the sleep-wake cycle, to many physiological and endocrine functions, and to psychomotor performance functions. Disorders of circadian timing primarily affect entertainment and pacemaker functions. The pineal hormone, melatonin, appears to be promising agent for therapy of some circadian timing disorders. PMID:9046960

  15. [Molecular oscillatory machinery of circadian rhythms].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Yoshiaki; Okamura, Hitoshi

    2012-07-01

    Many metabolic and physiological processes display daily rhythms oscillated by the internal circadian clock system. This rhythm is generated by interlocked transcription-(post) translation feedback loops of clock genes: the core oscillatory loop, being composed of CLOCK/BMAL1 heterodimer activating the expressions of PER and CRY that directly repress CLOCK/BMAL1, is accompanied by accessory loops consisted with REV-ERB nuclear receptor repressing Bmal1 or with DBP competing with E4BP4 on D-box site. These clock proteins are regulated by phosphorylation and ubiquitination (PER/CRY), and acetylation (CLOCK/BMAL1). Recently, a deacetylating protein SIRT1 mediated metabolic pathway is discovered to be interlocked with core oscillatory loop via Nampt expression, a late-limiting enzyme in NAD+ salvage pathway. Since many key-step enzymes of metabolisms are regulated by the circadian clock, circadian clock system may intimately link to cellular metabolism. PMID:22844791

  16. Circadian rhythms in liver physiology and liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xin; Yin, Lei

    2013-04-01

    In mammals, circadian rhythms function to coordinate a diverse panel of physiological processes with environmental conditions such as food and light. As the driving force for circadian rhythmicity, the molecular clock is a self-sustained transcription-translational feedback loop system consisting of transcription factors, epigenetic modulators, kinases/phosphatases, and ubiquitin E3 ligases. The molecular clock exists not only in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus but also in the peripheral tissues to regulate cellular and physiological function in a tissue-specific manner. The circadian clock system in the liver plays important roles in regulating metabolism and energy homeostasis. Clock gene mutant animals display impaired glucose and lipid metabolism and are susceptible to diet-induced obesity and metabolic dysfunction, providing strong evidence for the connection between the circadian clock and metabolic homeostasis. Circadian-controlled hepatic metabolism is partially achieved by controlling the expression and/or activity of key metabolic enzymes, transcription factors, signaling molecules, and transporters. Reciprocally, intracellular metabolites modulate the molecular clock activity in response to the energy status. Although still at the early stage, circadian clock dysfunction has been implicated in common chronic liver diseases. Circadian dysregulation of lipid metabolism, detoxification, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and cell-cycle control might contribute to the onset and progression of liver steatosis, fibrosis, and even carcinogenesis. In summary, these findings call for a comprehensive study of the function and mechanisms of hepatic circadian clock to gain better understanding of liver physiology and diseases. PMID:23720334

  17. Circadian rhythms of performance: new trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrier, J.; Monk, T. H.

    2000-01-01

    This brief review is concerned with how human performance efficiency changes as a function of time of day. It presents an overview of some of the research paradigms and conceptual models that have been used to investigate circadian performance rhythms. The influence of homeostatic and circadian processes on performance regulation is discussed. The review also briefly presents recent mathematical models of alertness that have been used to predict cognitive performance. Related topics such as interindividual differences and the postlunch dip are presented.

  18. Circadian rhythms of women with fibromyalgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klerman, E. B.; Goldenberg, D. L.; Brown, E. N.; Maliszewski, A. M.; Adler, G. K.

    2001-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome is a chronic and debilitating disorder characterized by widespread nonarticular musculoskeletal pain whose etiology is unknown. Many of the symptoms of this syndrome, including difficulty sleeping, fatigue, malaise, myalgias, gastrointestinal complaints, and decreased cognitive function, are similar to those observed in individuals whose circadian pacemaker is abnormally aligned with their sleep-wake schedule or with local environmental time. Abnormalities in melatonin and cortisol, two hormones whose secretion is strongly influenced by the circadian pacemaker, have been reported in women with fibromyalgia. We studied the circadian rhythms of 10 women with fibromyalgia and 12 control healthy women. The protocol controlled factors known to affect markers of the circadian system, including light levels, posture, sleep-wake state, meals, and activity. The timing of the events in the protocol were calculated relative to the habitual sleep-wake schedule of each individual subject. Under these conditions, we found no significant difference between the women with fibromyalgia and control women in the circadian amplitude or phase of rhythms of melatonin, cortisol, and core body temperature. The average circadian phases expressed in hours posthabitual bedtime for women with and without fibromyalgia were 3:43 +/- 0:19 and 3:46 +/- 0:13, respectively, for melatonin; 10:13 +/- 0:23 and 10:32 +/- 0:20, respectively for cortisol; and 5:19 +/- 0:19 and 4:57 +/- 0:33, respectively, for core body temperature phases. Both groups of women had similar circadian rhythms in self-reported alertness. Although pain and stiffness were significantly increased in women with fibromyalgia compared with healthy women, there were no circadian rhythms in either parameter. We suggest that abnormalities in circadian rhythmicity are not a primary cause of fibromyalgia or its symptoms.

  19. Heart rhythm during permanent cardiac pacing.

    PubMed Central

    Edhag, O; Rosenqvist, M

    1979-01-01

    Heart rhythm was analysed with regard to spontaneous or pacemaker-induced heart activity, in a consecutive series of 282 patients paced for at least 1 year. The mean duration of pacing was 59 (13 to 180) months. The mean age of the patients was 76 (39 to 93) years. Spontaneous heart activity at all routine examinations was found in 33 (12%) of the patients. Pacemaker-induced rhythm only was recorded in 42 per cent of the patients whereas the remaining 46 per cent had varying electrocardiographic patterns. Of the patients with spontaneous rhythm at each visit, 10 had had complete heart block before pacing. Regular sinus activity was recorded at every routine examination in 74 per cent of the patients paced for reasons other than the sick sinus syndrome. This indicated that a substantial number of paced patients might be candidates for atrial triggered pacing. Patients treated with digitalis more often had asystole at the time of replacement of the pacemaker (32%) than those not so treated (19). This suggests an increased risk of sudden death in paced patients on digitalis if the pacemaker fails. PMID:486279

  20. Respiratory modulation of human autonomic rhythms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badra, L. J.; Cooke, W. H.; Hoag, J. B.; Crossman, A. A.; Kuusela, T. A.; Tahvanainen, K. U.; Eckberg, D. L.

    2001-01-01

    We studied the influence of three types of breathing [spontaneous, frequency controlled (0.25 Hz), and hyperventilation with 100% oxygen] and apnea on R-R interval, photoplethysmographic arterial pressure, and muscle sympathetic rhythms in nine healthy young adults. We integrated fast Fourier transform power spectra over low (0.05-0.15 Hz) and respiratory (0.15-0.3 Hz) frequencies; estimated vagal baroreceptor-cardiac reflex gain at low frequencies with cross-spectral techniques; and used partial coherence analysis to remove the influence of breathing from the R-R interval, systolic pressure, and muscle sympathetic nerve spectra. Coherence among signals varied as functions of both frequency and time. Partialization abolished the coherence among these signals at respiratory but not at low frequencies. The mode of breathing did not influence low-frequency oscillations, and they persisted during apnea. Our study documents the independence of low-frequency rhythms from respiratory activity and suggests that the close correlations that may exist among arterial pressures, R-R intervals, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity at respiratory frequencies result from the influence of respiration on these measures rather than from arterial baroreflex physiology. Most importantly, our results indicate that correlations among autonomic and hemodynamic rhythms vary over time and frequency, and, thus, are facultative rather than fixed.

  1. Detecting Rhythms in Time Series with RAIN

    PubMed Central

    Thaben, Paul F.; Westermark, Pål O.

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental problem in research on biological rhythms is that of detecting and assessing the significance of rhythms in large sets of data. Classic methods based on Fourier theory are often hampered by the complex and unpredictable characteristics of experimental and biological noise. Robust nonparametric methods are available but are limited to specific wave forms. We present RAIN, a robust nonparametric method for the detection of rhythms of prespecified periods in biological data that can detect arbitrary wave forms. When applied to measurements of the circadian transcriptome and proteome of mouse liver, the sets of transcripts and proteins with rhythmic abundances were significantly expanded due to the increased detection power, when we controlled for false discovery. Validation against independent data confirmed the quality of these results. The large expansion of the circadian mouse liver transcriptomes and proteomes reflected the prevalence of nonsymmetric wave forms and led to new conclusions about function. RAIN was implemented as a freely available software package for R/Bioconductor and is presently also available as a web interface. PMID:25326247

  2. Chronotypes and rhythm stability in mice.

    PubMed

    Wicht, Helmut; Korf, Horst-Werner; Ackermann, Hanns; Ekhart, Daniel; Fischer, Claudia; Pfeffer, Martina

    2014-02-01

    Humans come in different chronotypes: The phase of their sleep-wake cycle with respect to the phase of the external, sidereal cycle of night and day differs. Colloquially, the early chronotypes are addressed as "larks," the late ones as "owls." The human chronotype can be quantified in hours and minutes of local time by determining the median of the sleep phase. Demographically, early and late human chronotypes differ with respect to the stability of their rhythms and the prevalence of several widespread diseases and risk factors, such as depression, nicotine abuse, and others. Inbred mice are widely used in chronobiological research as model organisms, but up to now there was no way to chronotype them. We have developed a method to chronotype mice in hours and fractions of hours by measuring the median of activity (MoA) and have shown that different mouse strains have significantly different MoAs and, thus, chronotypes. We have further developed methods to estimate the stability of the behavioral rhythms and found that "late" mice have relatively instable rhythms. Our methods permit the use of inbred mice for investigations into the molecular and genetic background of the chronotype and the prevalence of risks and diseases that are associated with it. PMID:24079808

  3. The effect of retrograde and anterograde glucose administration on memory performance in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Sünram-Lea, Sandra I; Foster, Jonathan K; Durlach, Paula; Perez, Catalina

    2002-08-21

    Memory for a list of 20 words can be enhanced by preceding learning by consumption of 25 g of glucose, compared with consumption of an equally sweet aspartame solution (Psychopharmacology 137 (1998) 259; Psychopharmacology 157 (2001) 46). However, using this anterograde administration procedure, it is impossible to separate whether glucose affects encoding, consolidation, or retrieval. The present placebo-controlled, double-blind study investigated the effect of anterograde and retrograde administration on memory performance in healthy young participants. In order to evaluate whether post-acquisition administration of glucose can improve memory performance and to compare possible differences in the size of the effect, participants were administered 25 g of glucose immediately before or immediately after presentation of a word list. Moreover, in order to investigate whether the effect of glucose administration on memory performance is time-dependent, a third group received 25 g of glucose 15 min before learning the word list. Word- list recall was tested 30 min and 24 h after word list presentation. Measures of spatial memory performance and working memory were also evaluated. The results of this study showed that both pre- and post-acquisition oral glucose administration (25 g) can improve memory performance. However, as the time interval between anterograde glucose administration and memory encoding increased, the glucose memory facilitation effect decreased. This study provides evidence that glucose enhances memory performance in healthy young people even when it is given after learning has taken place, and that this effect is observed at least up to 24 h after glucose administration. Moreover, it provides evidence that the effect of glucose on memory performance may be time-dependent, as the enhancement of retention was decreased when the administration-learning interval was increased. PMID:12191837

  4. Differential short-term memorisation for vocal and instrumental rhythms.

    PubMed

    Klyn, Niall A M; Will, Udo; Cheong, Yong-Jeon; Allen, Erin T

    2016-07-01

    This study explores differential processing of vocal and instrumental rhythms in short-term memory with three decision (same/different judgments) and one reproduction experiment. In the first experiment, memory performance declined for delayed versus immediate recall, with accuracy for the two rhythms being affected differently: Musicians performed better than non-musicians on clapstick but not on vocal rhythms, and musicians were better on vocal rhythms in the same than in the different condition. Results for the second experiment showed that concurrent sub-vocal articulation and finger-tapping differentially affected the two rhythms and same/different decisions, but produced no evidence for articulatory loop involvement in delayed decision tasks. In a third experiment, which tested rhythm reproduction, concurrent sub-vocal articulation decreased memory performance, with a stronger deleterious effect on the reproduction of vocal than of clapstick rhythms. This suggests that the articulatory loop may only be involved in delayed reproduction not in decision tasks. The fourth experiment tested whether differences between filled and empty rhythms (continuous vs. discontinuous sounds) can explain the different memorisation of vocal and clapstick rhythms. Though significant differences were found for empty and filled instrumental rhythms, the differences between vocal and clapstick can only be explained by considering additional voice specific features. PMID:26274938

  5. Phase shift in the 24-hour rhythm of hippocampal EEG spiking activity in a rat model of temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, David A.; Talathi, Sachin S.; Parekh, Mansi B.; Cordiner, Daniel J.; Zhou, Junli; Mareci, Thomas H.; Ditto, William L.

    2013-01-01

    For over a century epileptic seizures have been known to cluster at specific times of the day. Recent studies have suggested that the circadian regulatory system may become permanently altered in epilepsy, but little is known about how this affects neural activity and the daily pattern of seizures. To investigate, we tracked long-term changes in the rate of spontaneous hippocampal EEG spikes (SPKs) in a rat model of temporal lobe epilepsy. In healthy animals, SPKs oscillated with near 24-h period; however, after injury by status epilepticus, a persistent phase shift of ∼12 h emerged in animals that later went on to develop chronic spontaneous seizures. Additional measurements showed that global 24-h rhythms, including core body temperature and theta state transitions, did not phase shift. Instead, we hypothesized that locally impaired circadian input to the hippocampus might be responsible for the SPK phase shift. This was investigated with a biophysical computer model in which we showed that subtle changes in the relative strengths of circadian input could produce a phase shift in hippocampal neural activity. MRI provided evidence that the medial septum, a putative circadian relay center for the hippocampus, exhibits signs of damage and therefore could contribute to local circadian impairment. Our results suggest that balanced circadian input is critical to maintaining natural circadian phase in the hippocampus and that damage to circadian relay centers, such as the medial septum, may disrupt this balance. We conclude by discussing how abnormal circadian regulation may contribute to the daily rhythms of epileptic seizures and related cognitive dysfunction. PMID:23678009

  6. Glucose test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... person with diabetes constantly manages their blood's sugar (glucose) levels. After a blood sample is taken and tested, it is determined whether the glucose levels are low or high. If glucose levels ...

  7. Low Blood Glucose (Hypoglycemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other Dental Problems Diabetic Eye Disease Low Blood Glucose (Hypoglycemia) What is hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia, also called low ... actions can also help prevent hypoglycemia: Check blood glucose levels Knowing your blood glucose level can help ...

  8. Utilization of potatoes for life support systems in space. III - Productivity at successive harvest dates under 12-h and 24-h photoperiods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Raymond M.; Tibbitts, Theodore W.

    1987-01-01

    Efficient crop production for controlled ecological life support systems requires near-optimal growing conditions with harvests taken when production per unit area per unit time is maximum. This maximum for potato was determined using data on Norland plants which were grown in walk-in growth rooms under 12-h and 24-h photoperiods at 16 C. Results show that high tuber production can be obtained from potatoes grown under a continuous light regime. The dry weights (dwt) of tuber and of the entire plants were found to increase under both photoperiods until the final harvest date (148 days), reaching 5732 g tuber dwt and 704 g total dwt under 12-h, and 791 g tuber dwt and 972 g total dwt under 24-h.

  9. Association Between Estimated 24-h Urinary Sodium Excretion and Metabolic Syndrome in Korean Adults: The 2009 to 2011 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    PubMed

    Won, Jong Chul; Hong, Jae Won; Noh, Jung Hyun; Kim, Dong-Jun

    2016-04-01

    High sodium intake is 1 of the modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease, but in Korea, daily sodium intake is estimated to be double the level recommended by World Health Organization. We investigated the association between the estimated 24-h urinary sodium excretion (24hUNaE) and metabolic syndrome using nationwide population data.In total, 17,541 individuals (weighted n = 33,200,054; weighted men, 52.5% [95% confidence interval, CI = 51.8-53.3]; weighted age, 45.2 years [44.7-45.7]) who participated in the Korean Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2009 to 2011 were investigated. NCEP-ATP III criteria for metabolic syndrome were used, and sodium intake was estimated by 24hUNaE using Tanaka equation with a spot urine sample.The weighted mean 24hUNaE values were 3964 mg/d (95% CI = 3885-4044) in men and 4736 mg/d (4654-4817) in women. The weighted age-adjusted prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 22.2% (21.4-23.0), and it increased with 24hUNaE quartile in both men and women (mean ± standard error of the mean; men: 22.5 ± 1.0%, 23.0 ± 1.0%, 26.0 ± 1.2%, and 26.0 ± 1.2%; P = 0.026; women: 19.4 ± 0.8%, 17.7 ± 0.8%, 19.8 ± 1.0%, and 23.0 ± 1.1%; P = 0.002, for quartiles 1-4, respectively). Even after adjustment for age, daily calorie intake, heavy alcohol drinking, regular exercise, college graduation, and antihypertensive medication, the weighted prevalence of metabolic syndrome increased with the increase in 24hUNaE in men and women. The weighted 24hUNaE was positively associated with the number of metabolic syndrome components after adjustment for confounding factors in men and women. In subjects without antihypertensive medication, the odds ratio for metabolic syndrome in quartile 4 of 24hUNaE compared with quartile 1 was 1.56 (1.33-1.84, P < 0.001) in the total population, 1.66 (1.34-2.06, P < 0.001) in men, and 1.94 (1.49-2.53, P < 0.001) in women.In this nationwide

  10. The acceptability of repeat Internet-based hybrid diet assessment of previous 24-h dietary intake: administration of the Oxford WebQ in UK Biobank.

    PubMed

    Galante, Julieta; Adamska, Ligia; Young, Alan; Young, Heather; Littlejohns, Thomas J; Gallacher, John; Allen, Naomi

    2016-02-28

    Although dietary intake over a single 24-h period may be atypical of an individual's habitual pattern, multiple 24-h dietary assessments can be representative of habitual intake and help in assessing seasonal variation. Web-based questionnaires are convenient for the participant and result in automatic data capture for study investigators. This study reports on the acceptability of repeated web-based administration of the Oxford WebQ--a 24-h recall of frequency from a set food list suitable for self-completion from which energy and nutrient values can be automatically generated. As part of the UK Biobank study, four invitations to complete the Oxford WebQ were sent by email over a 16-month period. Overall, 176 012 (53% of those invited) participants completed the online version of the Oxford WebQ at least once and 66% completed it more than once, although only 16% completed it on all four occasions. The response rate for any one round of invitations varied between 34 and 26%. On most occasions, the Oxford WebQ was completed on the same day that they received the invitation, although this was less likely if sent on a weekend. Participants who completed the Oxford WebQ tended to be white, female, slightly older, less deprived and more educated, which is typical of health-conscious volunteer-based studies. These findings provide preliminary evidence to suggest that repeated 24-h dietary assessment via the Internet is acceptable to the public and a feasible strategy for large population-based studies. PMID:26652593

  11. Evaluation of reduction of Fraser incubation by 24h in the EN ISO 11290-1 standard on detection and diversity of Listeria species.

    PubMed

    Gnanou Besse, Nathalie; Favret, Sandra; Desreumaux, Jennifer; Decourseulles Brasseur, Emilie; Kalmokoff, Martin

    2016-05-01

    The EN ISO 11290-1 method for the isolation of Listeria monocytogenes from food is carried out using a double enrichment in Fraser broths. While the method is effective it is also quite long requiring 4-7 days to process a contaminated food, and may be adversely affected by inter-strain and/or inter-species competition in samples containing mixed Listeria populations. Currently, we have little information on the impact of competition on food testing under routine conditions. Food samples (n=130) were analyzed using the standard method and the evolution of Listeria populations in 89 naturally contaminated samples followed over the entire enrichment process. In most instances, maximum increase in L. monocytogenes population occurred over the first 24h following sub-culture in Full Fraser broth and strain recovery was similar at both 24 and 48 h, indicating that the second enrichment step can be reduced by 24h without impacting the recovery of L. monocytogenes or affecting the sensitivity of the method. In approximately 6% of naturally contaminated samples the presence of competing Listeria species adversely impacted L. monocytogenes population levels. Moreover, these effects were more pronounced during the latter 24h of the Fraser enrichment, and potentially could affect or complicate the isolation of these strains. PMID:26913375

  12. Predictors of reported consumption of low-nutrient-density foods in a 24-h recall by 8-16 year old US children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kant, Ashima K; Graubard, Barry I

    2003-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an explanatory model to predict the number of low-nutrient-density (LND) foods reported in a 24-h recall by US children and adolescents using data from the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The reported number of LND foods was estimated from 24-h dietary recall data for 8-16 year old respondents (n=4137; 2024 males and 2113 females). The LND foods included--baked and dairy desserts, sweeteners, salty snacks, visible/discretionary fat, and miscellaneous. The predictive ability of socio-demographic, family, weight/dieting related, life-style or food consumption related subject characteristics was determined using multiple linear regression analyses. The strongest independent negative predictor of the reported number of LND foods was the amount of nutrient-dense foods from the five major food groups. In addition, number of eating occasions reported was a significant independent positive predictor, and the weekly frequency of consuming a complete school lunch was a significant independent negative predictor of the reported number of LND foods. These models explained approximately 55% of the variance in LND food reporting in both males and females. Socio-demographic, family, body weight, or lifestyle characteristics contributed little to predicting the number of LND foods reported in a 24-h recall. PMID:14550315

  13. Efficacy of i.v. amiodarone in converting rapid atrial fibrillation and flutter to sinus rhythm in intensive care patients.

    PubMed

    Faniel, R; Schoenfeld, P

    1983-03-01

    Twenty-six consecutive patients (14 males, 12 females--mean age 66.6) were admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) because of a rapid ventricular response to atrial fibrillation (RAF). Fourteen of them had been unsuccessfully treated by drugs (other than amiodarone) and/or DC shock before admission. A loading dose of i.v. amiodarone was administered (repeated boluses of 3 mg/kg in 3 min, or 30 min-infusions of 5 to 7.5 mg/kg), followed by continuous infusion, in order to reach a maximal total dosage of 1500 mg in 24 h. This treatment was considered efficacious if a reversion to stable sinus rhythm (SSR) occurred within 24 h and was maintained for more than 48 h. This was achieved in 21 out of 26 patients (80.8%). The mean time between the administration of therapy and the occurrence of SSR was 171 min. The total dose of amiodarone delivered to effect SSR was 6.9 +/- 2.3 mg/kg. No adverse reactions were encountered during the bolus injection but we recommend that continuous infusion be carried out through a central venous catheter to avoid phlebitis. The administration of 7 mg/kg of intravenous amiodarone delivered in 30 min proved a safe and successful first choice of management in atrial fibrillation with a rapid ventricular response. PMID:6861767

  14. [Central EEG rhythm associated with movement and EEG rhythm associated with spatial reasoning: are they homologous?].

    PubMed

    Tarotin, I V; Ivanitsky, G A

    2014-01-01

    EEG rhythmical picture of subject's movement suppression and spatial-figurative task solving was examined and analyzed. Rhythms appearing during spatial reasoning and suppressed movements with the frequency of about 11 Hz were isolated. It was hypothesized that a functional link exists between these rhythms in the considered behavioral tests. To test the hypothesis and to reveal this connection, experiments were developed and carried out. Then the analysis of recorded EEG signals was conducted by applying Fourier transform, independent component analysis (ICA) and equivalent dipole source localization. Unexpected conclusion about the existence of a general mechanism of movement suppression was drawn. PMID:25975138

  15. Conventional rhythms enhance infants' and adults' perception of musical patterns.

    PubMed

    Trehub, Sandra E; Hannon, Erin E

    2009-01-01

    Listeners may favour particular rhythms because of their degree of conformity to culture-specific expectations or because of perceptual constraints that are apparent early in development. In two experiments we examined adults' and 6-month-old infants' detection of subtle rhythmic and melodic changes to two sequences of tones, a conventional rhythm that musically untrained adults rated as rhythmically good and an unconventional rhythm that was rated as poor. Detection of the changes was above chance in all conditions, but adults and infants performed more accurately in the context of the conventional rhythm. Unlike adults, who benefited from rhythmic conventionality only when detecting rhythmic changes, infants benefited when detecting melodic as well as rhythmic changes. The findings point to infant and adult parallels for some aspects of rhythm processing and to integrated perception of rhythm and melody early in life. PMID:19058799

  16. Sleep Restriction Enhances the Daily Rhythm of Circulating Levels of Endocannabinoid 2-Arachidonoylglycerol

    PubMed Central

    Hanlon, Erin C.; Tasali, Esra; Leproult, Rachel; Stuhr, Kara L.; Doncheck, Elizabeth; de Wit, Harriet; Hillard, Cecilia J.; Van Cauter, Eve

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Increasing evidence from laboratory and epidemiologic studies indicates that insufficient sleep may be a risk factor for obesity. Sleep curtailment results in stimulation of hunger and food intake that exceeds the energy cost of extended wakefulness, suggesting the involvement of reward mechanisms. The current study tested the hypothesis that sleep restriction is associated with activation of the endocannabinoid (eCB) system, a key component of hedonic pathways involved in modulating appetite and food intake. Methods: In a randomized crossover study comparing 4 nights of normal (8.5 h) versus restricted sleep (4.5 h) in healthy young adults, we examined the 24-h profiles of circulating concentrations of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and its structural analog 2-oleoylglycerol (2-OG). We concomitantly assessed hunger, appetite, and food intake under controlled conditions. Results: A robust daily variation of 2-AG concentrations with a nadir around the middle of the sleep/overnight fast, followed by a continuous increase culminating in the early afternoon, was evident under both sleep conditions but sleep restriction resulted in an amplification of this rhythm with delayed and extended maximum values. Concentrations of 2-OG followed a similar pattern, but with a lesser amplitude. When sleep deprived, participants reported increases in hunger and appetite concomitant with the afternoon elevation of 2-AG concentrations, and were less able to inhibit intake of palatable snacks. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that activation of the eCB system may be involved in excessive food intake in a state of sleep debt and contribute to the increased risk of obesity associated with insufficient sleep. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 495. Citation: Hanlon EC, Tasali E, Leproult R, Stuhr KL, Doncheck E, de Wit H, Hillard CJ, Van Cauter E. Sleep restriction enhances the daily rhythm of circulating levels of

  17. No endogenous circadian rhythm in resting plasma Hsp72 concentration in humans

    PubMed Central

    Fortes, Matthew B.

    2008-01-01

    Extra-cellular (e) heat shock protein (Hsp)72 has been shown to be elevated in a number of clinical conditions and has been proposed as a potential diagnostic marker. From a methodological and diagnostic perspective, it is important to investigate if concentrations of eHsp72 fluctuate throughout the day; hence, the purpose of the study was to measure resting concentrations of plasma eHsp72 throughout a 24-h period. Blood samples were taken every hour from 1200–2100 hours and from 0700–1200 hours the following day from seven healthy recreationally active males. Participants remained in the laboratory throughout the trial, performed light sedentary activities and were provided with standardised meals and fluids. Physical activity was quantified throughout by the use of an accelerometer. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid blood samples were analysed for eHsp72 concentration using a commercially available high-sensitivity enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (intra-assay coefficient of variation = 1.4%). One-way repeated measures analysis of variance revealed that measures of physiological stress such as heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure remained stable throughout the trial and subjects remained sedentary throughout (mean activity energy expenditure above resting metabolic rate—35.7 ± 10.0 kcal∙h−1). Plasma Hsp72 concentration did not fluctuate significantly throughout the day and showed no apparent endogenous circadian rhythm in absolute (P = 0.367) or plasma volume change corrected data (P = 0.380). Individual coefficients of variation ranged from 3.8–7.7% (mean 5.4%). Mean Hsp72 concentration across all subjects and time points was 1.49 ± 0.08 ng∙ml−1. These data show that in a rested state, plasma eHsp72 concentration shows no apparent endogenous circadian rhythm. PMID:18839337

  18. Daily Rhythms in the Cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus Probed by High-resolution Mass Spectrometry–based Proteomics Reveals a Small Defined Set of Cyclic Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Guerreiro, Ana C. L.; Benevento, Marco; Lehmann, Robert; van Breukelen, Bas; Post, Harm; Giansanti, Piero; Maarten Altelaar, A. F.; Axmann, Ilka M.; Heck, Albert J. R.

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are self-sustained and adjustable cycles, typically entrained with light/dark and/or temperature cycles. These rhythms are present in animals, plants, fungi, and several bacteria. The central mechanism behind these “pacemakers” and the connection to the circadian regulated pathways are still poorly understood. The circadian rhythm of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 (S. elongatus) is highly robust and controlled by only three proteins, KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC. This central clock system has been extensively studied functionally and structurally and can be reconstituted in vitro. These characteristics, together with a relatively small genome (2.7 Mbp), make S. elongatus an ideal model system for the study of circadian rhythms. Different approaches have been used to reveal the influence of the central S. elongatus clock on rhythmic gene expression, rhythmic mRNA abundance, rhythmic DNA topology changes, and cell division. However, a global analysis of its proteome dynamics has not been reported yet. To uncover the variation in protein abundances during 48 h under light and dark cycles (12:12 h), we used quantitative proteomics, with TMT 6-plex isobaric labeling. We queried the S. elongatus proteome at 10 different time points spanning a single 24-h period, leading to 20 time points over the full 48-h period. Employing multidimensional separation and high-resolution mass spectrometry, we were able to find evidence for a total of 82% of the S. elongatus proteome. Of the 1537 proteins quantified over the time course of the experiment, only 77 underwent significant cyclic variations. Interestingly, our data provide evidence for in- and out-of-phase correlation between mRNA and protein levels for a set of specific genes and proteins. As a range of cyclic proteins are functionally not well annotated, this work provides a resource for further studies to explore the role of these proteins in the cyanobacterial circadian rhythm. PMID

  19. Evaluation of regression-based 3-D shoulder rhythms.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xu; Dickerson, Clark R; Lin, Jia-Hua; McGorry, Raymond W

    2016-08-01

    The movements of the humerus, the clavicle, and the scapula are not completely independent. The coupled pattern of movement of these bones is called the shoulder rhythm. To date, multiple studies have focused on providing regression-based 3-D shoulder rhythms, in which the orientations of the clavicle and the scapula are estimated by the orientation of the humerus. In this study, six existing regression-based shoulder rhythms were evaluated by an independent dataset in terms of their predictability. The datasets include the measured orientations of the humerus, the clavicle, and the scapula of 14 participants over 118 different upper arm postures. The predicted orientations of the clavicle and the scapula were derived from applying those regression-based shoulder rhythms to the humerus orientation. The results indicated that none of those regression-based shoulder rhythms provides consistently more accurate results than the others. For all the joint angles and all the shoulder rhythms, the RMSE are all greater than 5°. Among those shoulder rhythms, the scapula lateral/medial rotation has the strongest correlation between the predicted and the measured angles, while the other thoracoclavicular and thoracoscapular bone orientation angles only showed a weak to moderate correlation. Since the regression-based shoulder rhythm has been adopted for shoulder biomechanical models to estimate shoulder muscle activities and structure loads, there needs to be further investigation on how the predicted error from the shoulder rhythm affects the output of the biomechanical model. PMID:26253991

  20. Evidence of Circadian Rhythm, Oxygen Regulation Capacity, Metabolic Repeatability and Positive Correlations between Forced and Spontaneous Maximal Metabolic Rates in Lake Sturgeon Acipenser fulvescens

    PubMed Central

    Svendsen, Jon C.; Genz, Janet; Anderson, W. Gary; Stol, Jennifer A.; Watkinson, Douglas A.; Enders, Eva C.

    2014-01-01

    Animal metabolic rate is variable and may be affected by endogenous and exogenous factors, but such relationships remain poorly understood in many primitive fishes, including members of the family Acipenseridae (sturgeons). Using juvenile lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens), the objective of this study was to test four hypotheses: 1) A. fulvescens exhibits a circadian rhythm influencing metabolic rate and behaviour; 2) A. fulvescens has the capacity to regulate metabolic rate when exposed to environmental hypoxia; 3) measurements of forced maximum metabolic rate (MMRF) are repeatable in individual fish; and 4) MMRF correlates positively with spontaneous maximum metabolic rate (MMRS). Metabolic rates were measured using intermittent flow respirometry, and a standard chase protocol was employed to elicit MMRF. Trials lasting 24 h were used to measure standard metabolic rate (SMR) and MMRS. Repeatability and correlations between MMRF and MMRS were analyzed using residual body mass corrected values. Results revealed that A. fulvescens exhibit a circadian rhythm in metabolic rate, with metabolism peaking at dawn. SMR was unaffected by hypoxia (30% air saturation (O2sat)), demonstrating oxygen regulation. In contrast, MMRF was affected by hypoxia and decreased across the range from 100% O2sat to 70% O2sat. MMRF was repeatable in individual fish, and MMRF correlated positively with MMRS, but the relationships between MMRF and MMRS were only revealed in fish exposed to hypoxia or 24 h constant light (i.e. environmental stressor). Our study provides evidence that the physiology of A. fulvescens is influenced by a circadian rhythm and suggests that A. fulvescens is an oxygen regulator, like most teleost fish. Finally, metabolic repeatability and positive correlations between MMRF and MMRS support the conjecture that MMRF represents a measure of organism performance that could be a target of natural selection. PMID:24718688

  1. What a Nostril Knows: Olfactory Nerve-Evoked AMPA Responses Increase while NMDA Responses Decrease at 24-h Post-Training for Lateralized Odor Preference Memory in Neonate Rat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, Qi; Harley, Carolyn W.

    2012-01-01

    Increased AMPA signaling is proposed to mediate long-term memory. Rat neonates acquire odor preferences in a single olfactory bulb if one nostril is occluded at training. Memory testing here confirmed that only trained bulbs support increased odor preference at 24 h. Olfactory nerve field potentials were tested at 24 h in slices from trained and…

  2. Effects of menstrual cycle phase and oral contraceptives on alertness, cognitive performance, and circadian rhythms during sleep deprivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, K. P. Jr; Badia, P.; Czeisler, C. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The influence of menstrual cycle phase and oral contraceptive use on neurobehavioral function and circadian rhythms were studied in healthy young women (n = 25) using a modified constant routine procedure during 24 h of sleep deprivation. Alertness and performance worsened across sleep deprivation and also varied with circadian phase. Entrained circadian rhythms of melatonin and body temperature were evident in women regardless of menstrual phase or oral contraceptive use. No significant difference in melatonin levels, duration, or phase was observed between women in the luteal and follicular phases, whereas oral contraceptives appeared to increase melatonin levels. Temperature levels were higher in the luteal phase and in oral contraceptive users compared to women in the follicular phase. Alertness on the maintenance of wakefulness test and some tests of cognitive performance were poorest for women in the follicular phase especially near the circadian trough of body temperature. These observations suggest that hormonal changes associated with the menstrual cycle and the use of oral contraceptives contribute to changes in nighttime waking neurobehavioral function and temperature level whereas these factors do not appear to affect circadian phase.

  3. Identification of Light-Sensitive Phosphorylation Sites on PERIOD That Regulate the Pace of Circadian Rhythms in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Evrim; Chiu, Joanna C; Edery, Isaac

    2016-03-01

    The main components regulating the pace of circadian (≅24 h) clocks in animals are PERIOD (PER) proteins, transcriptional regulators that undergo daily changes in levels and nuclear accumulation by means of complex multisite phosphorylation programs. In the present study, we investigated the function of two phosphorylation sites, at Ser826 and Ser828, located in a putative nuclear localization signal (NLS) on the Drosophila melanogaster PER protein. These sites are phosphorylated by DOUBLETIME (DBT; Drosophila homolog of CK1δ/ε), the key circadian kinase regulating the daily changes in PER stability and phosphorylation. Mutant flies in which phosphorylation at Ser826/Ser828 is blocked manifest behavioral rhythms with periods slightly longer than 1 h and with altered temperature compensation properties. Intriguingly, although phosphorylation at these sites does not influence PER stability, timing of nuclear entry, or transcriptional autoinhibition, the phospho-occupancy at Ser826/Ser828 is rapidly stimulated by light and blocked by TIMELESS (TIM), the major photosensitive clock component in Drosophila and a crucial binding partner of PER. Our findings identify the first phosphorylation sites on core clock proteins that are acutely regulated by photic cues and suggest that some phosphosites on PER proteins can modulate the pace of downstream behavioral rhythms without altering central aspects of the clock mechanism. PMID:26711257

  4. Blood Test: Glucose

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Blood Test: Glucose KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood Test: Glucose Print A A A Text Size What's in ... de sangre: glucosa What It Is A blood glucose test measures the amount of glucose (the main ...

  5. Heart rate dynamics distinguish among atrial fibrillation, normal sinus rhythm and sinus rhythm with frequent ectopy.

    PubMed

    Carrara, Marta; Carozzi, Luca; Moss, Travis J; de Pasquale, Marco; Cerutti, Sergio; Ferrario, Manuela; Lake, Douglas E; Moorman, J Randall

    2015-09-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is usually detected by inspection of the electrocardiogram waveform, a task made difficult when the signal is distorted by noise. The RR interval time series is more frequently available and accurate, yet linear and nonlinear time series analyses that detect highly varying and irregular AF are vulnerable to the common finding of frequent ectopy. We hypothesized that different nonlinear measures might capture characteristic features of AF, normal sinus rhythm (NSR), and sinus rhythm (SR) with frequent ectopy in ways that linear measures might not. To test this, we studied 2722 patients with 24 h ECG recordings in the University of Virginia Holter database. We found dynamical phenotypes for the three rhythm classifications. As expected, AF records had the highest variability and entropy, and NSR the lowest. SR with ectopy could be distinguished from AF, which had higher entropy, and from NSR, which had different fractal scaling, measured as higher detrended fluctuation analysis slope. With these dynamical phenotypes, we developed successful classification strategies, and the nonlinear measures improved on the use of mean and variability alone, even after adjusting for age. Final models using all variables had excellent performance, with positive predictive values for AF, NSR and SR with ectopy as high as 97, 98 and 90%, respectively. Since these classifiers can reliably detect rhythm changes utilizing segments as short as 10 min, we envision their application in noisy settings and in personal monitoring devices where only RR interval time series may be available. PMID:26246162

  6. Standing down Straight: Jump Rhythm Technique's Rhythm-Driven, Community-Directed Approach to Dance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegenfeld, Billy

    2009-01-01

    "Standing down straight" means to stand on two feet with both stability and relaxation. Using standing down straight as the foundation of class work, Jump Rhythm Technique offers a fresh alternative to conventional systems of dance study. It bases its pedagogy on three behaviors: grounding the body so that it can move with power and efficiency,…

  7. In vitro circadian rhythms: imaging and electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Beaulé, Christian; Granados-Fuentes, Daniel; Marpegan, Luciano; Herzog, Erik D

    2011-06-30

    In vitro assays have localized circadian pacemakers to individual cells, revealed genetic determinants of rhythm generation, identified molecular players in cell-cell synchronization and determined physiological events regulated by circadian clocks. Although they allow strict control of experimental conditions and reduce the number of variables compared with in vivo studies, they also lack many of the conditions in which cellular circadian oscillators normally function. The present review highlights methods to study circadian timing in cultured mammalian cells and how they have shaped the hypothesis that all cells are capable of circadian rhythmicity. PMID:21819387

  8. In vitro circadian rhythms: imaging and electrophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Beaulé, Christian; Granados-Fuentes, Daniel; Marpegan, Luciano; Herzog, Erik D.

    2013-01-01

    In vitro assays have localized circadian pacemakers to individual cells, revealed genetic determinants of rhythm generation, identified molecular players in cell-cell synchronization and determined physiological events regulated by circadian clocks. Although they allow strict control of experimental conditions and reduce the number of variables compared with in vivo studies, they also lack many of the conditions in which cellular circadian oscillators normally function. The present review highlights methods to study circadian timing in cultured mammalian cells and how they have shaped the hypothesis that all cells are capable of circadian rhythmicity. PMID:21819387

  9. Scapulothoracic rhythm in normal male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Talkhani, I S; Kelly, C P

    1997-01-01

    Dynamic pattern of Scapulothoracic rhythm during arm abduction in scapular plane is studied using computer-imaging technique. Aim of the study is to produce a reproducible and reliable way of calculating the scapular movement and glenohumeral movement using least possible roentgenographic exposure. Moving X-ray screening picture of the shoulder joint is analysed using video capture computer programme and the images at different degrees of abduction are then analysed for scapular movement using computer aided designer and drafting software. Results were comparable to the authoritative shoulder analysis carried out in the past, the difference of radiation exposure, approximately 10 times less. PMID:9603061

  10. How does the brain create rhythms?

    PubMed

    Szirmai, Imre

    2010-01-30

    Connection was found between rhythmic cortical activity and motor control. The 10 Hz micro-rhythm and the 20-30 Hz bursts represent two functional states of the somatomotor system. A correspondence of the central micro-rhythm of the motor cortex and the physiological hand tremor (8-12 Hz) is presumed. The precise tuning of the motor system can be estimated by the frequency of repetitive finger movements. In complex tapping exercise, the index finger is the most skillful, the 3rd, 4th and 5th fingers keep rhythm with less precision. It was found that the organization of mirror movements depends on the cortical representation of fingers. Mirror finger movements are more regular if the subject begins the motor action with the 5th (small) finger. Concerning cortical regulation of finger movements, it was suggested that there are two time-keeping systems in the brain; one with a sensitivity above and another with a sensitivity below the critical frequency of 3 Hz. The preferred meter which helps to maintain synchronous finger movements is the cadence of 4/4 and 8/8. We observed that the unlearned inward-outward sequential finger movement was equally impaired in nonmusician controls and patients with Parkinson-disease. In movement disorders, the ability of movement and the "clock-mechanism" are equally involved. The polyrhythmic finger movement is not our inborn ability, it has to be learned. The "timer" function, which regulates the rhythmic movement, is presumably localised in the basal ganglia or in the cerebellum. The meter of the music is built on the reciprocal values of 2 raised to the second to fifth power (1/1(2), 1/2(2), 1/2(3), 1/2(4), 1/2(5)). The EEG frequencies that we consider important in the regulation of conscious motor actions are approximately in the same domain (4, 8, 16, 32, 64 Hz). During music performance, an important neural process is the coupling of distant brain areas. Concerning melody, the musical taste of Europeans is octave-based. Musical

  11. Synthesis of the coenzymes adenosine diphosphate glucose, guanosine diphosphate glucose, and cytidine diphosphoethanolamine under primitive Earth conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mar, A.; Oro, J.

    1991-01-01

    The nonenzymatic synthesis of the coenzymes adenosine diphosphate glucose (ADPG), guanosine diphosphate glucose (GDPG), and cytidine diphosphoethanolamine (CDP-ethanolamine) has been carried out under conditions considered to have been prevalent on the early Earth. The production of these compounds was performed by allowing simple precursor molecules to react under aqueous solutions, at moderate temperatures and short periods of time, with mediation by cyanamide or urea. These two condensing agents are considered to have been present in significant amounts on the primitive Earth and have been previously used in the nonenzymatic synthesis of several other important biochemical compounds. In our experiments, ADPG was obtained by heating glucose-1-phosphate (G1P) and ATP in the presence of cyanamide for 24 h at 70 degrees C. The reaction of G1P and GTP under the same conditions yielded GDPG. The cyanamide-mediated production of CDP-ethanolamine was carried out by reacting a mixture of ethanolamine phosphate and CTP for 24 h at 70 degrees C. The separation and identification of the reaction products was carried out by paper chromatography, thin-layer chromatography, high performance thin-layer chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography, both normal and reverse-phase, UV spectroscopy, enzymatic assays, and acid hydrolysis. Due to the mild conditions employed, and to the relative ease of these reactions, these studies offer a simple attractive system for the nonenzymatic synthesis of phosphorylated high-energy metabolic intermediates under conditions considered to have been prevalent on the ancient Earth.

  12. Circadian rhythms of embryonic development and hatching in fish: a comparative study of zebrafish (diurnal), Senegalese sole (nocturnal), and Somalian cavefish (blind).

    PubMed

    Villamizar, Natalia; Blanco-Vives, Borja; Oliveira, Catarina; Dinis, Maria Teresa; Di Rosa, Viviana; Negrini, Pietro; Bertolucci, Cristiano; Sánchez-Vázquez, Francisco Javier

    2013-08-01

    During early development, most organisms display rhythmic physiological processes that are shaped by daily changes in their surrounding environment (i.e., light and temperature cycles). In fish, the effects of daily photocycles and their interaction with temperature during early developmental stages remain largely unexplored. We investigated the existence of circadian rhythms in embryonic development and hatching of three teleost species with different daily patterns of behavior: diurnal (zebrafish), nocturnal (Senegalese sole), and blind, not entrained by light (Somalian cavefish). To this end, fertilized eggs were exposed to three light regimes: 12 h of light: 12 h of darkness cycle (LD), continuous light (LL), or continuous darkness (DD); and three species-appropriate temperature treatments: 24°C, 28°C, or 32°C for zebrafish and cavefish and 18°C, 21°C, or 24°C for sole. The results pointed to the existence of daily rhythms of embryonic development and hatching synchronized to the LD cycle, with different acrophases, depending on the species: zebrafish embryos advanced their developmental stage during the light phase, whereas sole did so during the dark phase. In cavefish, embryogenesis occurred within 24 h post fertilization (hpf) at the same pace during day or night. The hatching rhythms appeared to be controlled by a clock mechanism that restricted or "gated" hatching to a particular time of day/night (window), so that embryos that reached a certain developmental state by that time hatch, whereas those that have not wait until the next available window. Under LL and DD conditions, hatching rhythms and the gating phenomenon persisted in cavefish, in zebrafish they split into ultradian bouts of hatching occurring at 12-18-h intervals, whereas in sole DD and LL produced a 24-h delay and advance, respectively. Hatching rates were best under the LD cycle and the reported optimal temperature for each species (95.2±2.7% of the zebrafish and 83.3±0.1% of the

  13. Renal proximal tubular cell fibronectin accumulation in response to glucose is polyol pathway dependent

    PubMed

    Morrisey; Steadman; Williams; Phillips

    1999-06-01

    Thickening and reduplication of the tubular basement membrane has been reported as an early event in diabetic nephropathy. In the current study we have examined the polar requirements of proximal tubular cells for the D-glucose stimulated accumulation of fibronectin. We also examined the mechanism by which glucose led to accumulation of fibronectin, with particular emphasis on the polyol pathway. Incubation of confluent monolayers of LLC-PK1 cells grown on tissue culture inserts with 25 mM D-glucose on either their apical or basolateral aspect, led to fibronectin accumulation in the basolateral compartment. This reached statistical significance 24 h following apical addition of glucose (2.7 fold increase compared to 5 mM D-glucose, p = 0.007, n = 6), and 12 h after the basolateral addition of glucose (2.54 fold increase compared to 5 mM D-glucose, p = 0.02, n = 6). The increase in fibronectin concentration in response to glucose was inhibited by the aldose reductase inhibitor sorbinil. At a dose of 100&mgr;M sorbinil there was 59% inhibition of fibronectin accumulation in response to glucose, 48 h after the addition of the inhibitor (4.76 +/- 1.4 vs 11.53 +/- 1.41, mean +/- SD, p = 0.01, n = 3). Exposure of cells to glucose at either their apical or basolateral aspect lead to accumulation of intracellular glucose and polyol pathway activation, as assessed by sorbitol accumulation. Accumulation of intracellular glucose and hence subsequent polyol pathway activation occurred independently of transport of glucose by either apical sodium linked glucose transporter (SLGT) or basolateral GLUT 1. The data demonstrate that fibronectin generation in response to glucose was non-polar in terms application of glucose, but polar in terms of fibronectin accumulation. Furthermore modulation of fibronectin was mediated by polyol pathway activation, and more specifically related to the metabolism of sorbitol to fructose. PMID:10354307

  14. Impact of Daily Thermocycles on Hatching Rhythms, Larval Performance and Sex Differentiation of Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Villamizar, Natalia; Ribas, Laia; Piferrer, Francesc; Vera, Luisa M.; Sánchez-Vázquez, Francisco Javier

    2012-01-01

    In the wild, water temperature cycles daily: it warms up after sunrise, and cools rapidly after sunset. Surprisingly, the impact of such daily thermocycles during the early development of fish remains neglected. We investigated the influence of constant vs daily thermocycles in zebrafish, from embryo development to sexual differentiation, by applying four temperature regimens: two constant (24°C and 28°C) and two daily thermocycles: 28:24°C, TC (thermophase coinciding with daytime, and cryophase coinciding with night-time) and 24:28°C, CT (opposite to TC) in a 12:12 h light:dark cycle (LD). Embryo development was temperature-dependent but enhanced at 28°C and TC. Hatching rhythms were diurnal (around 4 h after lights on), but temperature- and cycle-sensitive, since hatching occurred sooner at 28°C (48 hours post fertilization; hpf) while it was delayed at 24°C (96 hpf). Under TC, hatching occurred at 72 hpf, while under CT hatching displayed two peaks (at 70 hpf and 94 hpf). In constant light (LL) or darkness (DD), hatching rhythms persisted with tau close to 24 h, suggesting a clock-controlled “gating” mechanism. Under 28°C or TC, larvae showed the best performance (high growth and survival, and low malformations). The sex ratio was strongly influenced by temperature, as the proportion of females was higher in CT and TC (79 and 83% respectively), contrasting with 28°C and 24°C, which led to more males (83 and 76%). Ovarian aromatase (cyp19a) expression in females was highest in TC and CT (6.5 and 4.6 fold higher than at 28°C, respectively); while anti-müllerian hormone (amh) expression in males increased in testis at 24°C (3.6 fold higher compared to TC) and particularly at 28°C (14.3 fold increase). Taken together, these findings highlight the key role of environmental cycles during early development, which shaped the daily rhythms in fish embryo and larvae, and ultimately influenced sex differentiation. PMID:23284912

  15. Genetic deletion of MT1 melatonin receptors alters spontaneous behavioral rhythms in male and female C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Adamah-Biassi, E B; Hudson, R L; Dubocovich, M L

    2014-09-01

    Behaviors vary over the 24h light/dark cycle and these temporal patterns reflect in part modulation by circadian neural circuits and hormones, such as melatonin. The goal of this study was to investigate the involvement of MT1 melatonin receptors in behavioral regulation by comparing male and female C57 wild type (WT) mice with C57 mice with genetic deletion of the MT1 receptor (MT1KO). A comprehensive array of fifteen distinct spontaneous behaviors was recorded continuously in the homecage over multiple days using the HomeCageScan system. Behaviors assessed were activity-like (i.e. come down, hang, jump, walk), exploration-like (i.e. dig, groom, rear up, sniff, stretch), resting-like (i.e. awake, remain low, rest, twitch) and ingestion-like (i.e. drink, eat). Phenotypic array and temporal distribution analysis revealed distinct behavioral rhythms that differed between WT and MT1KO mice. The rhythms were consistent from day to day in males and varied with the estrous cycle in females. We also studied the role of MT1 receptors on depressive and anxiety-like behaviors. Genetic deletion of MT1 receptors increased immobility time in the forced swim test and decreased the number of marbles buried in the marble burying test in both male and female C57 mice. We conclude that MT1 melatonin receptors are involved in neural pathways modulating diurnal rhythms of spontaneous behavior in the homecage as well as pathways regulating depressive and anxiolytic-like behaviors. PMID:25200199

  16. The Clock gene clone and its circadian rhythms in Pelteobagrus vachelli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Chuanjie; Shao, Ting

    2015-05-01

    The Clock gene, a key molecule in circadian systems, is widely distributed in the animal kingdom. We isolated a 936-bp partial cDNA sequence of the Clock gene ( Pva-clock) from the darkbarbel catfish Pelteobagrus vachelli that exhibited high identity with Clock genes of other species of fish and animals (65%-88%). The putative domains included a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) domain and two period-ARNT-single-minded (PAS) domains, which were also similar to those in other species of fish and animals. Pva-Clock was primarily expressed in the brain, and was detected in all of the peripheral tissues sampled. Additionally, the pattern of Pva-Clock expression over a 24-h period exhibited a circadian rhythm in the brain, liver and intestine, with the acrophase at zeitgeber time 21:35, 23:00, and 23:23, respectively. Our results provide insight into the function of the molecular Clock of P. vachelli.

  17. A statistical model of the human core-temperature circadian rhythm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, E. N.; Choe, Y.; Luithardt, H.; Czeisler, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    We formulate a statistical model of the human core-temperature circadian rhythm in which the circadian signal is modeled as a van der Pol oscillator, the thermoregulatory response is represented as a first-order autoregressive process, and the evoked effect of activity is modeled with a function specific for each circadian protocol. The new model directly links differential equation-based simulation models and harmonic regression analysis methods and permits statistical analysis of both static and dynamical properties of the circadian pacemaker from experimental data. We estimate the model parameters by using numerically efficient maximum likelihood algorithms and analyze human core-temperature data from forced desynchrony, free-run, and constant-routine protocols. By representing explicitly the dynamical effects of ambient light input to the human circadian pacemaker, the new model can estimate with high precision the correct intrinsic period of this oscillator ( approximately 24 h) from both free-run and forced desynchrony studies. Although the van der Pol model approximates well the dynamical features of the circadian pacemaker, the optimal dynamical model of the human biological clock may have a harmonic structure different from that of the van der Pol oscillator.

  18. Light-sampling behavior in photoentrainment of a rodent circadian rhythm.

    PubMed

    DeCoursey, P J

    1986-08-01

    Behavioral aspects of photoentrainment of circadian locomotor activity rhythms were recorded for a nocturnal den-dwelling rodent, the flying squirrel, Glaucomys volans. Methods included both telemetric monitoring and infrared observations of animals under constant dark (DD) or light-dark (LD) schedules in either standard wheel cages or in newly developed simulated den cages. By means of the den cages, several aspects of a circadian activity cycle could be simultaneously measured emphasizing the arousal from rest, the light-sampling behavior by which a squirrel assessed the environmental photoregimen, and the phase-shifting by which photoentrainment was achieved. Each animal in a den cage remained for 12 or more hours of its rest period almost exclusively in the darkened nest box, then at an abrupt arousal time moved to the light-sampling porthole. In darkness each animal initiated wheel activity immediately after arousal; light at arousal time, however, induced a return to the nest box for a nap and a delay phase-shift in onset of activity of approximately 40 min. On subsequent days, each animal appeared to be free-running (tau FR less than 24 h) until onset again advanced into the light period. A squirrel usually viewed only a few minutes light per day, and on free-running days occasionally saw none of the 12-h light period. The significance of these data for theories of circadian photoentrainment is discussed. PMID:3761222

  19. Melatonin rhythms in Pony mares and foals.

    PubMed

    Kilmer, D M; Sharp, D C; Berglund, L A; Grubaugh, W; McDowell, K J; Peck, L S

    1982-01-01

    Melatonin concentrations in intact (N = 3) and sham-operated (N = 3) mares during March were greater (P less than 0 . 05) during the night than during the day, but this pattern was not seen in 3 mares from which the superior cervical ganglia had been removed bilaterally. When 4 Pony mares were exposed to a photoperiod of 10L:14D for 3 weeks and then to continuous darkness (0L:24D) for another 3 weeks, melatonin levels were greater (P less than 0 . 05) at the end of the 0L:24D period than during the earlier period and still displayed rhythmic fluctuations but were no longer co-ordinated with equivalent day/night rhythms or among mares. When melatonin rhythms were monitored in 3 mares and their foals housed in open pens exposed to natural lighting, significant time trends in melatonin concentrations were observed in mares when the foals were aged 1-3, 4-6 and 7-11 weeks, but foals did not display significant times trends in melatonin until they were 7-11 weeks old. PMID:6962864

  20. Circadian Rhythms, Sleep Deprivation, and Human Performance

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Namni; Basner, Mathias; Rao, Hengyi; Dinges, David F.

    2014-01-01

    Much of the current science on, and mathematical modeling of, dynamic changes in human performance within and between days is dominated by the two-process model of sleep–wake regulation, which posits a neurobiological drive for sleep that varies homeostatically (increasing as a saturating exponential during wakefulness and decreasing in a like manner during sleep), and a circadian process that neurobiologically modulates both the homeostatic drive for sleep and waking alertness and performance. Endogenous circadian rhythms in neurobehavioral functions, including physiological alertness and cognitive performance, have been demonstrated using special laboratory protocols that reveal the interaction of the biological clock with the sleep homeostatic drive. Individual differences in circadian rhythms and genetic and other components underlying such differences also influence waking neurobehavioral functions. Both acute total sleep deprivation and chronic sleep restriction increase homeostatic sleep drive and degrade waking neurobehavioral functions as reflected in sleepiness, attention, cognitive speed, and memory. Recent evidence indicating a high degree of stability in neurobehavioral responses to sleep loss suggests that these trait-like individual differences are phenotypic and likely involve genetic components, including circadian genes. Recent experiments have revealed both sleep homeostatic and circadian effects on brain metabolism and neural activation. Investigation of the neural and genetic mechanisms underlying the dynamically complex interaction between sleep homeostasis and circadian systems is beginning. A key goal of this work is to identify biomarkers that accurately predict human performance in situations in which the circadian and sleep homeostatic systems are perturbed. PMID:23899598

  1. The effect of stress on circadian rhythms.

    PubMed

    Brodan, V; Kuhn, E; Veselková, A; Kaucká, J

    1982-01-01

    The authors chose four types of intensive stress in man and show their effect on the circadian rhythms of selected parameters. Sleep deprivation reduces mean sideraemia and oscilation amplitudes. The morning rhythm maximum shifts to early morning hours. Acute fasting does not change the biorhythm of serum iron despite that mean sideraemia increases. On the other hand, realimentation is associated with a marked drop of iron level and a shift of the morning maximum to early afternoon hours. Stress induced by isolation in humid warm environment initiates a decrease of systolic blood pressure. While biorhythm amplitude remains unchanged peak systolic pressure moves from the usual 18 to 20 hours up to 23 to 24 hours. Stress caused by diagnostic cardiac catheterization results in biorhythm inversion of the urinary excretion of catecholamines and 17-OH-corticoids. On the day of catheterization, performed in all cases in the morning hours, the usual morning peak values of adrenaline shifted to afternoon hours and those of noradrenaline and 17-OH-corticoids even to late night hours. For practical purposes, biorhythm changes can be used as indicators of the effect and intensity of stress. PMID:7075389

  2. Rhythms for Cognition: Communication through Coherence.

    PubMed

    Fries, Pascal

    2015-10-01

    I propose that synchronization affects communication between neuronal groups. Gamma-band (30-90 Hz) synchronization modulates excitation rapidly enough that it escapes the following inhibition and activates postsynaptic neurons effectively. Synchronization also ensures that a presynaptic activation pattern arrives at postsynaptic neurons in a temporally coordinated manner. At a postsynaptic neuron, multiple presynaptic groups converge, e.g., representing different stimuli. If a stimulus is selected by attention, its neuronal representation shows stronger and higher-frequency gamma-band synchronization. Thereby, the attended stimulus representation selectively entrains postsynaptic neurons. The entrainment creates sequences of short excitation and longer inhibition that are coordinated between pre- and postsynaptic groups to transmit the attended representation and shut out competing inputs. The predominantly bottom-up-directed gamma-band influences are controlled by predominantly top-down-directed alpha-beta-band (8-20 Hz) influences. Attention itself samples stimuli at a 7-8 Hz theta rhythm. Thus, several rhythms and their interplay render neuronal communication effective, precise, and selective. PMID:26447583

  3. Circadian rhythm and its role in malignancy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are daily oscillations of multiple biological processes directed by endogenous clocks. The circadian timing system comprises peripheral oscillators located in most tissues of the body and a central pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. Circadian genes and the proteins produced by these genes constitute the molecular components of the circadian oscillator which form positive/negative feedback loops and generate circadian rhythms. The circadian regulation extends beyond clock genes to involve various clock-controlled genes (CCGs) including various cell cycle genes. Aberrant expression of circadian clock genes could have important consequences on the transactivation of downstream targets that control the cell cycle and on the ability of cells to undergo apoptosis. This may lead to genomic instability and accelerated cellular proliferation potentially promoting carcinogenesis. Different lines of evidence in mice and humans suggest that cancer may be a circadian-related disorder. The genetic or functional disruption of the molecular circadian clock has been found in various cancers including breast, ovarian, endometrial, prostate and hematological cancers. The acquisition of current data in circadian clock mechanism may help chronotherapy, which takes into consideration the biological time to improve treatments by devising new therapeutic approaches for treating circadian-related disorders, especially cancer. PMID:20353609

  4. Subjective pain perception mediated by alpha rhythms.

    PubMed

    Peng, Weiwei; Babiloni, Claudio; Mao, Yanhui; Hu, Yong

    2015-07-01

    Suppression of spontaneous alpha oscillatory activities, interpreted as cortical excitability, was observed in response to both transient and tonic painful stimuli. The changes of alpha rhythms induced by pain could be modulated by painful sensory inputs, experimental tasks, and top-down cognitive regulations such as attention. The temporal and spatial characteristics, as well as neural functions of pain induced alpha responses, depend much on how these factors contribute to the observed alpha event-related desynchronization/synchronization (ERD/ERS). How sensory-, task-, and cognitive-related changes of alpha oscillatory activities interact in pain perception process is reviewed in the current study, and the following conclusions are made: (1) the functional inhibition hypothesis that has been proposed in auditory and visual modalities could be applied also in pain modality; (2) the neural functions of pain induced alpha ERD/ERS were highly dependent on the cortical regions where it is observed, e.g., somatosensory cortex alpha ERD/ERS in pain perception for painful stimulus processing; (3) the attention modulation of pain perception, i.e., influences on the sensory and affective dimensions of pain experience, could be mediated by changes of alpha rhythms. Finally, we propose a model regarding the determinants of pain related alpha oscillatory activity, i.e., sensory-discriminative, affective-motivational, and cognitive-modulative aspects of pain experience, would affect and determine pain related alpha oscillatory activities in an integrated way within the distributed alpha system. PMID:26026894

  5. Cardiovascular autonomic function analysis using approximate entropy from 24-h heart rate variability and its frequency components in patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xia; Yu, Shuo; Chen, Hui; Lu, Cheng; Zhang, Kuan; Li, Fangjie

    2015-01-01

    Aims/Introduction The principal aim of the present study was to investigate the cardiovascular autonomic system status of diabetes patients using approximate entropy (ApEn) extracted from 24-h heart rate variability (HRV) and its frequency components. Materials and Methods A total of 29 healthy controls and 63 type 2 diabetes patients were included. Participants’ 24-h HRV signals were recorded, and decomposed and reconstructed into four frequency components: high, low, very low and ultra low. The total 24-h HRV and its four components were divided into 24 1-h segments. ApEn values were extracted and statistically analyzed. Four traditional HRV indices, namely standard deviation of the RR intervals, root mean square of successive differences, coefficient of variance of RR intervals and ratio of low to high power of HRV, were also calculated. Results The low-frequency component contained the most abundant non-linear information, so was potentially most suitable for studying the cardiovascular system status with non-linear methods. ApEn values extracted from low- and high-frequency components of healthy controls were higher than those of diabetes patients. Except for root mean square of successive differences, standard deviation of the RR intervals, low to high power of HRV and coefficient of variance of RR intervals of healthy controls were all higher than those of diabetes patients. Conclusions The results showed that ApEn contained information on disorders of autonomic system function of diabetes patients as traditional HRV indices in time and frequency domains. ApEn and three traditional indices showed accordance to some degree. Non-linear information in subcomponents of HRV was shown, which is potentially more effective for distinguishing healthy individuals and diabetes patients than that extracted from the total HRV. Compared with diabetes patients, the cardiovascular system of healthy controls showed information of higher complexity, and better regulation

  6. Spatial learning and memory deficits following exposure to 24 h of sleep fragmentation or intermittent hypoxia in a rat model of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Ward, Christopher P; McCoy, John G; McKenna, James T; Connolly, Nina P; McCarley, Robert W; Strecker, Robert E

    2009-10-19

    Obstructive sleep apnea is primarily characterized by hypoxemia due to frequent apneic episodes and fragmentation of sleep due to the brief arousals that terminate the apneic episodes. Though neurobehavioral deficits frequently accompany sleep apnea, the relative roles of hypoxia versus sleep fragmentation are difficult to separate in apneic patients. Here, we assessed cognitive function as measured by water maze in the Fischer/Brown Norway (FBN) rat, comparing 24 h of sleep interruption (SI) to 24 h of intermittent hypoxia (IH), in order to dissociate their relative contributions to cognitive impairment. For SI, automated treadmills were used to induce brief ambulation in rats every 2 min, either prior to, or after, initial water maze acquisition training. IH was simulated by cycling environmental oxygen levels between 6% and 19% every 2 min, again either prior to, or after, acquisition. Twenty-four hours of IH exposure had no significant effect on either acquisition or retention, irrespective of whether IH occurred prior to, or after, acquisition. To replicate previous work, another group of rats, exposed to 3 days of IH (10 h/day) prior to acquisition, had impaired performance during acquisition. A comparison of the 24 h IH and 3 day IH findings suggests that a minimum amount of IH exposure is necessary to produce detectable spatial memory impairments. Although SI before acquisition had no effect on acquisition or later retention of the hidden platform location, SI after acquisition robustly impaired retention, indicating that spatial memory consolidation is more susceptible to the effects of sleep disruption than is the acquisition (learning) of spatial information. PMID:19643093

  7. Nocturnal sleep-related variables from 24-h free-living waist-worn accelerometry: International Study of Childhood Obesity, Lifestyle and the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Tudor-Locke, C; Mire, E F; Barreira, T V; Schuna, J M; Chaput, J-P; Fogelholm, M; Hu, G; Kurpad, A; Kuriyan, R; Lambert, E V; Maher, C; Maia, J; Matsudo, V; Olds, T; Onywera, V; Sarmiento, O L; Standage, M; Tremblay, M S; Zhao, P; Church, T S; Katzmarzyk, P T

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: We describe the process of identifying and defining nocturnal sleep-related variables (for example, movement/non-movement indicators of sleep efficiency, waking episodes, midpoint and so on) using the unique 24-h waist-worn free-living accelerometer data collected in the International Study of Childhood Obesity, Lifestyle and the Environment (ISCOLE). Methods: Seven consecutive days of 24-h waist-worn accelerometer (GT3X+, ActiGraph LLC) data were collected from over 500 children at each site. An expert subgroup of the research team with accelerometry expertize, frontline data collectors and data managers met on several occasions to categorize and operationally define nocturnal accelerometer signal data patterns. The iterative process was informed by the raw data drawn from a sub set of the US data, and culminated in a refined and replicable delineated definition for each identified nocturnal sleep-related variable. Ultimately based on 6318 participants from all 12 ISCOLE sites with valid total sleep episode time (TSET), we report average clock times for nocturnal sleep onset, offset and midpoint in addition to sleep period time, TSET and restful sleep efficiency (among other derived variables). Results: Nocturnal sleep onset occurred at 2218 hours and nocturnal sleep offset at 0707 hours. The mean midpoint was 0243 hours. The sleep period time of 529.6 min (8.8 h) was typically accumulated in a single episode, making the average TSET very similar in duration (529.0 min). The mean restful sleep efficiency ranged from 86.8% (based on absolute non-movement of 0 counts per minute) to 96.0% (based on relative non-movement of <100 counts per minute). Conclusions: These variables extend the potential of field-based 24-h waist-worn accelerometry to distinguish and categorize the underlying robust patterns of movement/non-movement signals conveying magnitude, duration, frequency and periodicity during the nocturnal sleep period. PMID:27152185

  8. Variable day/night bias in 24-h non-invasive finger pressure against intrabrachial artery pressure is removed by waveform filtering and level correction.

    PubMed

    Westerhof, Berend E; Guelen, Ilja; Parati, Gianfranco; Groppelli, Antonella; van Montfrans, Gert A; Wieling, Wouter; Wesseling, Karel H; Bos, Willem Jan W

    2002-10-01

    BACKGROUND Twenty-four-hour finger arterial pressure (FAP) recordings show a negative bias against intrabrachial artery pressure (BAP) and the bias is greater during the night, thereby overestimating the nocturnal blood pressure dip. We have available a methodology with which to reconstruct BAP from FAP by waveform filtering (transfer function) and generalized level (bias) correction that reduces the bias for short-term blood pressure records. OBJECTIVE To investigate if this methodology also decreases the extra bias during the night, thereby yielding a better estimate of the nocturnal dip. METHODS Twenty-four-hour FAP and BAP blood pressure recordings were simultaneously obtained in eight healthy normotensive volunteers and 14 patients with hypertension (ages 19-60 years), during standardized scheduled activities. The data were analysed off-line, applying the brachial reconstruction technique (reBAP) consisting of a waveform filter and level correction. Simultaneous beats yielded systolic, diastolic and mean pressures that were averaged per 30 min, per day, per night, per activity, over the 24-h period, and for volunteers and patients separately. RESULTS Over the full 24 h, FAP systolic, diastolic and mean values for the total group differed from BAP by +1 +/- 10, -8 +/- 7 and -10 +/- 8 mmHg (mean +/- SD), respectively. Similarly, reBAPs differed by +1 +/- 11, -2 +/- 7 and -2 +/- 7 mmHg. BAPs dipped by 20 +/- 8, 13 +/- 6 and 15 +/- 6 mmHg, respectively, during the night. These dips were overestimated by +8, +4 and +4 mmHg by FAP, but not by reBAP: -1, +1 and +1 mmHg. The volunteer and the patient groups showed slight differences in results, but these were not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS The generalized reconstruction technique to obtain near-brachial pressure from non-invasive FAP almost completely removed bias over the full 24-h day-night period and improved tracking of diurnal changes for all three blood pressure values. PMID:12359976

  9. Experimental sleep curtailment causes wake-dependent increases in 24-h energy expenditure as measured by whole-room indirect calorimetry1234

    PubMed Central

    Shechter, Ari; Rising, Russell; Albu, Jeanine B

    2013-01-01

    Background: Epidemiologic evidence has shown a link between short sleep and obesity. Clinical studies suggest a role of increased energy intake in this relation, whereas the contributions of energy expenditure (EE) and substrate utilization are less clearly defined. Objective: Our aim was to investigate the effects of sleep curtailment on 24-h EE and respiratory quotient (RQ) by using whole-room indirect calorimetry under fixed-meal conditions. Design: Ten females aged 22–43 y with a BMI (in kg/m2) of 23.4–27.5 completed a randomized, crossover study. Participants were studied under short- (4 h/night) and habitual- (8 h/night) sleep conditions for 3 d, with a 4-wk washout period between visits. Standardized weight-maintenance meals were served at 0800, 1200, and 1900 with a snack at 1600. Measures included EE and RQ during the sleep episode on day 2 and continuously over 23 h on day 3. Results: Short compared with habitual sleep resulted in significantly higher (±SEM) 24-h EE (1914.0 ± 62.4 compared with 1822.1 ± 43.8 kcal; P = 0.012). EE during the scheduled sleep episode (0100–0500 and 2300–0700 in short- and habitual-sleep conditions, respectively) and across the waking episode (0800–2300) were unaffected by sleep restriction. RQ was unaffected by sleep restriction. Conclusions: Short compared with habitual sleep is associated with an increased 24-h EE of ∼92 kcal (∼5%)—lower than the increased energy intake observed in prior sleep-curtailment studies. This finding supports the hypothesis that short sleep may predispose to weight gain as a result of an increase in energy intake that is beyond the modest energy costs associated with prolonged nocturnal wakefulness. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01751581. PMID:24088722

  10. Utilization of potatoes for life support systems in space: III. Productivity at successive harvest dates under 12-h and 24-h photoperiods.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, R M; Tibbitts, T W

    1987-01-01

    Potatoes are among several crops under consideration for use in controlled ecological life support systems (CELSS) being proposed for space colonies. Efficient crop production for such life support systems will require near-optimal growing conditions with harvests taken when production per unit area per unit time is maximum. To determine this maximum for potato, cv. Norland plants were grown in walk-in growth rooms under 12-h and 24-h photoperiods at 16 C and harvested at 42, 63, 84, 105, 126 and 148 days from planting. At 42 days, plants were encaged in wire fence cylinders with a cross-sectional area of 0.2 m2. The dry weights (dwt) of tubers and of the entire plants increased under both photoperiods until the final harvest date (148 days), reaching 572 g tuber dwt and 704 g total dwt under 12-h, and 791 g tuber dwt and 972 g total dwt under 24-h. At a spacing of 0.2 m2 per plant, the 148-day tuber production from plants under continuous light would equate to nearly 40 t ha-1 dry matter (200 t fresh weight), approximately twice that of exceptionally high field yields. Tuber productivity (g m-2 day-1) under the 24-h photoperiod reached a maximum of 29.4 g dwt m-2 day-1 at 126 days, but continued to rise throughout the experiment under the 12-h photoperiod, reaching 19.5 g dwt m-2 day-1 at 14 days, approximately 25 m2 would continuously provide the daily dietary energy requirements for one human. PMID:11539685

  11. Employing FAD-dependent glucose dehydrogenase within a glucose/oxygen enzymatic fuel cell operating in human serum.

    PubMed

    Milton, Ross D; Lim, Koun; Hickey, David P; Minteer, Shelley D

    2015-12-01

    Flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent glucose dehydrogenase (FAD-GDH) is emerging as an oxygen-insensitive alternative to glucose oxidase (GOx) as the biocatalyst for bioelectrodes and bioanodes in glucose sensing and glucose enzymatic fuel cells (EFCs). Glucose EFCs, which utilize oxygen as the oxidant and final electron acceptor, have the added benefit of being able to be implanted within living hosts. These can then produce electrical energy from physiological glucose concentrations and power internal or external devices. EFCs were prepared with FAD-GDH and bilirubin oxidase (BOx) to evaluate the suitability of FAD-GDH within an implantable setting. Maximum current and power densities of 186.6±7.1 μA cm(-2) and 39.5±1.3 μW cm(-2) were observed when operating in human serum at 21 °C, which increased to 285.7±31.3 μA cm(-2) and 57.5±5.4 μW cm(-2) at 37 °C. Although good stability was observed with continual near-optimal operation of the EFCs in human serum at 21 °C for 24 h, device failure was observed between 13-14 h when continually operated at 37 °C. PMID:25890695

  12. Isotope concentrations from 24-h urine and 3-h serum samples can be used to measure intestinal magnesium absorption in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Karen E; Nabak, Andrea C; Johnson, Rachael Erin; Marvdashti, Sheeva; Keuler, Nicholas S; Shafer, Martin M; Abrams, Steven A

    2014-04-01

    Studies suggest a link between magnesium status and osteoporosis. One barrier to more conclusive research on the potential relation is measuring intestinal magnesium absorption (MgA), which requires the use of stable isotopes and a ≥6-d stool or 3-d urine collection. We evaluated alternative methods of measuring MgA. We administered 2 stable magnesium isotopes to 15 postmenopausal women (cohort 1) aged 62 ± 8 y with a dietary magnesium intake of 345 ± 72 mg/d. Participants fasted from 1200 h to 0700 h and then consumed breakfast with ∼23 mg of oral ²⁶Mg and ∼11 mg of i.v. ²⁵Mg. We measured magnesium isotope concentrations in 72-h urine, spot urine (36, 48, 60, and 72 h), and spot serum (1, 3, and 5 h) samples collected after isotope dosing. We calculated MgA using the dose-corrected fraction of isotope concentrations from the 72-h urine collection. We validated new methods in 10 postmenopausal women (cohort 2) aged 59 ± 5 y with a dietary magnesium intake of 325 ± 122 mg/d. In cohort 1, MgA based on the 72-h urine collection was 0.28 ± 0.08. The 72-h MgA correlated most highly with 0-24 h urine MgA value alone (ρ = 0.95, P < 0.001) or the mean of the 0-24 h urine and the 3-h (ρ = 0.93, P < 0.001) or 5-h (ρ = 0.96, P < 0.001) serum MgA values. In cohort 2, Bland-Altman bias was lowest (-0.003, P = 0.82) using means of the 0-24 h urine and 3-h serum MgA values. We conclude that means of 0-24 h urine and 3-h serum MgA provide a reasonable estimate of 72-h MgA. However, if researchers seek to identify small changes in MgA, we recommend a 3-d urine or extended stool collection. PMID:24500940

  13. Isotope Concentrations from 24-h Urine and 3-h Serum Samples Can Be Used to Measure Intestinal Magnesium Absorption in Postmenopausal Women123

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Karen E.; Nabak, Andrea C.; Johnson, Rachael Erin; Marvdashti, Sheeva; Keuler, Nicholas S.; Shafer, Martin M.; Abrams, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    Studies suggest a link between magnesium status and osteoporosis. One barrier to more conclusive research on the potential relation is measuring intestinal magnesium absorption (MgA), which requires the use of stable isotopes and a ≥6-d stool or 3-d urine collection. We evaluated alternative methods of measuring MgA. We administered 2 stable magnesium isotopes to 15 postmenopausal women (cohort 1) aged 62 ± 8 y with a dietary magnesium intake of 345 ± 72 mg/d. Participants fasted from 1200 h to 0700 h and then consumed breakfast with ∼23 mg of oral 26Mg and ∼11 mg of i.v. 25Mg. We measured magnesium isotope concentrations in 72-h urine, spot urine (36, 48, 60, and 72 h), and spot serum (1, 3, and 5 h) samples collected after isotope dosing. We calculated MgA using the dose-corrected fraction of isotope concentrations from the 72-h urine collection. We validated new methods in 10 postmenopausal women (cohort 2) aged 59 ± 5 y with a dietary magnesium intake of 325 ± 122 mg/d. In cohort 1, MgA based on the 72-h urine collection was 0.28 ± 0.08. The 72-h MgA correlated most highly with 0–24 h urine MgA value alone (ρ = 0.95, P < 0.001) or the mean of the 0–24 h urine and the 3-h (ρ = 0.93, P < 0.001) or 5-h (ρ = 0.96, P < 0.001) serum MgA values. In cohort 2, Bland-Altman bias was lowest (−0.003, P = 0.82) using means of the 0–24 h urine and 3-h serum MgA values. We conclude that means of 0–24 h urine and 3-h serum MgA provide a reasonable estimate of 72-h MgA. However, if researchers seek to identify small changes in MgA, we recommend a 3-d urine or extended stool collection. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01593501. PMID:24500940

  14. Circadian Activity Rhythms, Time Urgency, and Achievement Concerns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Barbara L.

    Many physiological and psychological processes fluctuate throughout the day in fairly stable, rhythmic patterns. The relationship between individual differences in circadian activity rhythms and a sense of time urgency were explored as well as a number of achievement-related variables. Undergraduates (N=308), whose circadian activity rhythms were…

  15. Neglect of Biological Rhythms in High School Biology Texts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahlgren, Andrew; Nelson, Julie Ann

    1979-01-01

    This article developed from a survey of the five most popular biology texts which promote the theory of invariant homeostasis rather than biological rhythms. The popular fad of "birthdate biorhythms" is discussed in relation to providing education on biological rhythms and its legitimacy to the public. (SA)

  16. A novel animal model linking adiposity to altered circadian rhythms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Researchers have provided evidence for a link between obesity and altered circadian rhythms (e.g., shift work, disrupted sleep), but the mechanism for this association is still unknown. Adipocytes possess an intrinsic circadian clock, and circadian rhythms in adipocytokines and adipose tissue metab...

  17. Rhythm's Gonna Get You: Regular Meter Facilitates Semantic Sentence Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothermich, Kathrin; Schmidt-Kassow, Maren; Kotz, Sonja A.

    2012-01-01

    Rhythm is a phenomenon that fundamentally affects the perception of events unfolding in time. In language, we define "rhythm" as the temporal structure that underlies the perception and production of utterances, whereas "meter" is defined as the regular occurrence of beats (i.e. stressed syllables). In stress-timed languages such as German, this…

  18. Yes, circadian rhythms actually do affect almost everything.

    PubMed

    Dunlap, Jay C; Loros, Jennifer J

    2016-07-01

    Circadian rhythms in the level of intracellular Mg appear to be widely conserved phylogenetically, and have the potential to impact nearly all aspects of metabolism. Moreover, the clock regulates the ion channels that generate the rhythm, demonstrating that the whole cell operates as a circadian system. PMID:27241553

  19. A Rhythm Recognition Computer Program to Advocate Interactivist Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buisson, Jean-Christophe

    2004-01-01

    This paper advocates the main ideas of the interactive model of representation of Mark Bickhard and the assimilation/accommodation framework of Jean Piaget, through a rhythm recognition demonstration program. Although completely unsupervised, the program progressively learns to recognize more and more complex rhythms struck on the user's keyboard.…

  20. Effects of Some Aspects of Rhythm on Tempo Perception.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Cecilia Chu

    1984-01-01

    Results indicated that significantly more time is needed to perceive tempo increase than tempo decrease, uneven rhythm then even rhythm, and melody alone than melody with accompaniment. Furthermore, significant interaction effects involving beat locations of tempo change suggest that differential groupings may be a factor in tempo discrimination.…

  1. Perceptual Tests of Rhythmic Similarity: II. Syllable Rhythm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jeesun; Davis, Chris; Cutler, Anne

    2008-01-01

    To segment continuous speech into its component words, listeners make use of language rhythm; because rhythm differs across languages, so do the segmentation procedures which listeners use. For each of stress-, syllable-and mora-based rhythmic structure, perceptual experiments have led to the discovery of corresponding segmentation procedures. In…

  2. Dissociable systems of working memory for rhythm and melody.

    PubMed

    Jerde, Trenton A; Childs, Stephanie K; Handy, Sarah T; Nagode, Jennifer C; Pardo, José V

    2011-08-15

    Specialized neural systems are engaged by the rhythmic and melodic components of music. Here, we used PET to measure regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in a working memory task for sequences of rhythms and melodies, which were presented in separate blocks. Healthy subjects, without musical training, judged whether a target rhythm or melody was identical to a series of subsequently presented rhythms or melodies. When contrasted with passive listening to rhythms, working memory for rhythm activated the cerebellar hemispheres and vermis, right anterior insular cortex, and left anterior cingulate gyrus. These areas were not activated in a contrast between passive listening to rhythms and a non-auditory control, indicating their role in the temporal processing that was specific to working memory for rhythm. The contrast between working memory for melody and passive listening to melodies activated mainly a right-hemisphere network of frontal, parietal, and temporal cortices: areas involved in pitch processing and auditory working memory. Overall, these results demonstrate that rhythm and melody have unique neural signatures not only in the early stages of auditory processing, but also at the higher cognitive level of working memory. PMID:21645625

  3. Correlation between glycemic trends assessed by 24 h continuous monitoring and autonomic activity in patients with recent onset type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Borgognoni, Laura; Picciarella, Alice; Di Stefano, Angelo; Fontana, Vincenzo; Russo, Alessandro; Pascucci, Matteo; Paris, Alberto; Tubani, Luigi; Fiorentini, Alessandra

    2013-04-01

    We observe, in patients with type 2 diabetes of recent onset, the activity of the autonomic nervous system and glucose metabolic impairment. The data indicate the hyperactivity of the sympathetic and minimal changes in glucose values. The role played by glycemia appeared to be less important than that represented by insulin resistance. PMID:23497980

  4. The role of circadian rhythm in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shujing; Ao, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    The circadian rhythm is an endogenous time keeping system shared by most organisms. The circadian clock is comprised of both peripheral oscillators in most organ tissues of the body and a central pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the central nervous system. The circadian rhythm is crucial in maintaining the normal physiology of the organism including, but not limited to, cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, and cellular metabolism; whereas disruption of the circadian rhythm is closely related to multi-tumorigenesis. In the past several years, studies from different fields have revealed that the genetic or functional disruption of the molecular circadian rhythm has been found in various cancers, such as breast, prostate, and ovarian. In this review, we will investigate and present an overview of the current research on the influence of circadian rhythm regulating proteins on breast cancer. PMID:23997531

  5. Renal electrolyte circadian rhythms - Independence from feeding and activity patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore-Ede, M. C.; Herd, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on six unanesthetized chair-acclimatized adult male squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) weighing 600-900 g to determine whether internal synchronization is the result of simple passive dependence of renal excretory rhythms on endogenous rhythms of those variable that influence electrolyte excretion such as dietary intake and muscular activity. Independence of the urinary rhythms from diurnal variations in feeding, drinking, and activity was secured by depriving the animals of food, water, and training them to perform a two-hourly schedule of feeding, drinking, and activity throughout day and night. Results indicate that the internal synchronization which is normally observed between the behavioral and urinary rhythms cannot be explained by any direct dependence of renal function on behavioral patterns. The most probable mechanism for circadian internal synchronization is that the various behavioral and renal rhythms are controlled by potentially independent separate oscillators which are normally kept in synchrony with one another.

  6. Circadian rhythms in the short-tailed shrew, Blarina brevicauda.

    PubMed

    Antipas, A J; Madison, D M; Ferraro, J S

    1990-08-01

    Circadian rhythms of wheel running and feeding were measured in the short-tailed shrew. Shrews were strongly nocturnal, and their activity rhythms entrained to both long-day (LD 16:8) and short-day (LD 6:18) photocycles. Under conditions of continuous light (LL) or darkness (DD), the activity rhythms free-ran with average periodicities of 25.1 hours and 24.1 hours, respectively. In LL the level of activity was depressed, and in some cases wheel running was completely inhibited. No significant sex differences were observed in the period or amplitude of the monitored circadian rhythms. All shrews fed throughout the day and night; however, unlike in previous reports, ultradian periods of feeding behavior were not found. The results are related to Aschoff's four observations for the effect of light on activity rhythms in nocturnal rodents. PMID:2255728

  7. Daily rhythms in the somatotropic axis of Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis): The time of day influences the response to GH administration.

    PubMed

    López-Olmeda, J F; Pujante, I M; Costa, L S; Galal-Khallaf, A; Mancera, J M; Sánchez-Vázquez, F J

    2016-01-01

    Growth factors in vertebrates display daily rhythms, which, while widely described in mammals, are still poorly understood in teleost fish. Here, we investigated the existence of daily rhythms in the somatotropic axis of the flatfish Solea senegalensis. In a first experiment, daily rhythms of the expression of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (pacap), growth hormone (gh), insulin-like growth factor 1 (igf1) and its receptor (igf1r) were analyzed under a 12:12 h light:dark cycle. All genes displayed daily rhythms with the acrophases of pacap, gh and igf1 located in the second half of the dark phase (ZT 20:28-0:04 h), whereas the acrophase of igf1r was located around mid-light (ZT 5:33 h). In a second experiment, the influence of the time of day (mid-light, ML, versus mid-darkness, MD) of GH administration on the expression of these factors and on plasma glucose levels was tested. The response observed depended on the time of injection: the strongest effects were observed at MD, when GH administration significantly reduced pituitary gh and enhanced liver igf1 expression. These results provide the first evidence of daily rhythms and differential day/night effects in growth factors in S. senegalensis, suggesting new insights for investigating the physiology of growth and possible applications to improve fish aquaculture. PMID:26930129

  8. Effects of aeration on the synthesis of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) from glycerol and glucose in recombinant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Alejandra; Giordano, Andrea M; Nikel, Pablo I; Pettinari, M Julia

    2010-03-01

    Bioreactor cultures of Escherichia coli recombinants carrying phaBAC and phaP of Azotobacter sp. FA8 grown on glycerol under low-agitation conditions accumulated more poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) and ethanol than at high agitation, while in glucose cultures, low agitation led to a decrease in PHB formation. Cells produced smaller amounts of acids from glycerol than from glucose. Glycerol batch cultures stirred at 125 rpm accumulated, in 24 h, 30.1% (wt/wt) PHB with a relative molecular mass of 1.9 MDa, close to that of PHB obtained using glucose. PMID:20080998

  9. Chronotype predicts positive affect rhythms measured by ecological momentary assessment.

    PubMed

    Miller, Megan A; Rothenberger, Scott D; Hasler, Brant P; Donofry, Shannon D; Wong, Patricia M; Manuck, Stephen B; Kamarck, Thomas W; Roecklein, Kathryn A

    2015-04-01

    Evening chronotype, a correlate of delayed circadian rhythms, is associated with depression. Altered positive affect (PA) rhythms may mediate the association between evening chronotype and depression severity. Consequently, a better understanding of the relationship between chronotype and PA may aid in understanding the etiology of depression. Recent studies have found that individuals with evening chronotype show delayed and blunted PA rhythms, although these studies are relatively limited in sample size, representativeness and number of daily affect measures. Further, published studies have not included how sleep timing changes on workday and non-workdays, or social jet lag (SJL) may contribute to the chronotype-PA rhythm link. Healthy non-depressed adults (n = 408) completed self-report affect and chronotype questionnaires. Subsequently, positive and negative affects were measured hourly while awake for at least two workdays and one non-workday by ecological momentary assessment (EMA). Sleep variables were collected via actigraphy and compared across chronotype groups. A cosinor variant of multilevel modeling was used to model individual and chronotype group rhythms and to calculate two variables: (1) amplitude of PA, or the absolute amount of daily variation from peak to trough during one period of the rhythm and (2) acrophase, or the time at which the peak amplitude of affect rhythms occurred. On workdays, individuals with evening chronotype had significantly lower PA amplitudes and later workday acrophase times than their morning type counterparts. In contrast to predictions, SJL was not found to be a mediator in the relationship between chronotype and PA rhythms. The association of chronotype and PA rhythms in healthy adults may suggest the importance of daily measurement of PA in depressed individuals and would be consistent with the hypothesis that evening chronotype may create vulnerability to depression via delayed and blunted PA rhythms. PMID

  10. Cross-cultural influences on rhythm processing: reproduction, discrimination, and beat tapping

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Daniel J.; Bentley, Jocelyn; Grahn, Jessica A.

    2015-01-01

    The structures of musical rhythm differ between cultures, despite the fact that the ability to entrain movement to musical rhythm occurs in virtually all individuals across cultures. To measure the influence of culture on rhythm processing, we tested East African and North American adults on perception, production, and beat tapping for rhythms derived from East African and Western music. To assess rhythm perception, participants identified whether pairs of rhythms were the same or different. To assess rhythm production, participants reproduced rhythms after hearing them. To assess beat tapping, participants tapped the beat along with repeated rhythms. We expected that performance in all three tasks would be influenced by the culture of the participant and the culture of the rhythm. Specifically, we predicted that a participant’s ability to discriminate, reproduce, and accurately tap the beat would be better for rhythms from their own culture than for rhythms from another culture. In the rhythm discrimination task, there were no differences in discriminating culturally familiar and unfamiliar rhythms. In the rhythm reproduction task, both groups reproduced East African rhythms more accurately than Western rhythms, but East African participants also showed an effect of cultural familiarity, leading to a significant interaction. In the beat tapping task, participants in both groups tapped the beat more accurately for culturally familiar than for unfamiliar rhythms. Moreover, there were differences between the two participant groups, and between the two types of rhythms, in the metrical level selected for beat tapping. The results demonstrate that culture does influence the processing of musical rhythm. In terms of the function of musical rhythm, our results are consistent with theories that musical rhythm enables synchronization. Musical rhythm may foster musical cultural identity by enabling within-group synchronization to music, perhaps supporting social cohesion

  11. Nanoscale probing of the lateral homogeneity of donors concentration in nitridated SiO2/4H-SiC interfaces.

    PubMed

    Fiorenza, Patrick; Di Franco, Salvatore; Giannazzo, Filippo; Roccaforte, Fabrizio

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, nanoscale resolution scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM) and local capacitance-voltage measurements were used to probe the interfacial donor concentration in SiO2/4H-SiC systems annealed in N2O. Such nitrogen-based annealings are commonly employed to passivate SiO2/SiC interface traps, and result both in the incorporation of N-related donors in SiC and in the increase of the mobility in the inversion layer in 4H-SiC MOS-devices. From our SCM measurements, a spatially inhomogeneous donor distribution was observed in the SiO2/4H-SiC system subjected to N2O annealing. Hence, the effect of a phosphorus implantation before the oxide deposition and N2O annealing was also evaluated. In this case, besides an increased average donor concentration, an improvement of the lateral homogeneity of the active doping was also detected. The possible implications of such a pre-implantation doping of the near-interface region on 4H-SiC MOS-devices are discussed. PMID:27324844

  12. Interpersonal and social rhythm therapy: an intervention addressing rhythm dysregulation in bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Ellen; Swartz, Holly A.; Boland, Elaine

    2007-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is characterized by frequent recurrences, often related to noncompliance with drug treatment, stressful life events, and disruptions in social rhythms. Interpersonal and social rhythm therapy (IPSRT) was designed to directly address these problem areas. This article discusses the circadian basis of IPSRT and the importance of stable daily routines in the maintenance of the euthymic state, as well as the two large controlled trials which empirically support this intervention. The authors discuss the advantages of IPSRT as an acute intervention, as well as a prophylactic treatment for both bipolar I and II disorder. Using a case example, the authors describe how IPSRT is implemented in a clinical setting, detailing the therapeutic methods and processes involved. PMID:17969869

  13. Role of Circadian Rhythms in Potassium Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Gumz, Michelle L.; Rabinowitz, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    It has been known for decades that urinary potassium excretion varies with a circadian pattern. In this review, we consider the historical evidence for this phenomenon and present an overview of recent developments in the field. Extensive evidence from the latter part of the last century clearly demonstrates that circadian potassium excretion does not depend on endogenous aldosterone. Of note is the recent discovery that the expression of several renal potassium transporters varies with a circadian pattern that appears to be consistent with substantial clinical data regarding daily fluctuations in urinary potassium levels. We propose the circadian clock mechanism as a key regulator of renal potassium transporters, and consequently renal potassium excretion. Further investigation into the mechanism of regulation of renal potassium transport by the circadian clock is warranted in order to increase our understanding of the clinical relevance of circadian rhythms to potassium homeostasis. PMID:23953800

  14. Copula-based analysis of rhythm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, J. E.; González-López, V. A.; Viola, M. L. Lanfredi

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we establish stochastic profiles of the rhythm for three languages: English, Japanese and Spanish. We model the increase or decrease of the acoustical energy, collected into three bands coming from the acoustic signal. The number of parameters needed to specify a discrete multivariate Markov chain grows exponentially with the order and dimension of the chain. In this case the size of the database is not large enough for a consistent estimation of the model. We apply a strategy to estimate a multivariate process with an order greater than the order achieved using standard procedures. The new strategy consist on obtaining a partition of the state space which is constructed from a combination of the partitions corresponding to the three marginal processes, one for each band of energy, and the partition coming from to the multivariate Markov chain. Then, all the partitions are linked using a copula, in order to estimate the transition probabilities.

  15. Sensorimotor Rhythm Neurofeedback Enhances Golf Putting Performance.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ming Yang; Huang, Chung Ju; Chang, Yu Kai; Koester, Dirk; Schack, Thomas; Hung, Tsung Min

    2015-12-01

    Sensorimotor rhythm (SMR) activity has been related to automaticity during skilled action execution. However, few studies have bridged the causal link between SMR activity and sports performance. This study investigated the effect of SMR neurofeedback training (SMR NFT) on golf putting performance. We hypothesized that preelite golfers would exhibit enhanced putting performance after SMR NFT. Sixteen preelite golfers were recruited and randomly assigned into either an SMR or a control group. Participants were asked to perform putting while electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded, both before and after intervention. Our results showed that the SMR group performed more accurately when putting and exhibited greater SMR power than the control group after 8 intervention sessions. This study concludes that SMR NFT is effective for increasing SMR during action preparation and for enhancing golf putting performance. Moreover, greater SMR activity might be an EEG signature of improved attention processing, which induces superior putting performance. PMID:26866770

  16. Unstable periodic orbits in human cardiac rhythms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, K.; Govindan, R. B.; Gopinathan, M. S.

    1998-04-01

    Unstable periodic orbits (UPOs) extracted from experimental electrocardiograph signals are reported for normal and pathological human cardiac rhythms. The periodicity and distribution of the orbits on the chaotic attractor are found to be indicative of the state of health of the cardiac system. The normal cardiac system is characterized by three to four UPOs with typical periodicities and intensities. However, pathological conditions such as premature ventricular contraction, atrio ventricular block, ventricular tachy arrhythmia, and ventricular fibrillation have UPOs whose periodicity and intensity distribution are quite distinct from those of the healthy cases and are characteristic of the pathological conditions. Eigenvalues and the largest positive Lyapunov exponent value for the UPOs are also reported. The UPOs are shown to be insensitive to the embedding dimension and the present UPO analysis is demonstrated to be reliable by the method of surrogate analysis.

  17. Nonlinear properties of cardiac rhythm abnormalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebovitch, Larry S.; Todorov, Angelo T.; Zochowski, Michal; Scheurle, Daniela; Colgin, Laura; Wood, Mark A.; Ellenbogen, Kenneth A.; Herre, John M.; Bernstein, Robert C.

    1999-03-01

    Many physical processes have distributions of times between events that have non-normalizable, power law probability density functions (PDF's). The moments of such distributions are not defined. We found that the PDF's of the times between events of ventricular tachyarrhythmia (rapid heart rate) and premature ventricular contractions have a power law form indicative of a non-normalizable distribution, and that the timing between these events cannot be meaningfully characterized by the mean frequency of such events. The Hurst analysis showed that there were self-similar correlations in the data. These results indicate that the physical processes that disrupt the normal rhythm of the heart produce a fractal pattern in the timing between these events. It also suggests that the mean and the variance of the frequency of these events may not be good measures to assess the status of patients with these arrhythmias and determine the effectiveness of therapeutic procedures.

  18. The timing of the human circadian clock is accurately represented by the core body temperature rhythm following phase shifts to a three-cycle light stimulus near the critical zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewett, M. E.; Duffy, J. F.; Czeisler, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    A double-stimulus experiment was conducted to evaluate the phase of the underlying circadian clock following light-induced phase shifts of the human circadian system. Circadian phase was assayed by constant routine from the rhythm in core body temperature before and after a three-cycle bright-light stimulus applied near the estimated minimum of the core body temperature rhythm. An identical, consecutive three-cycle light stimulus was then applied, and phase was reassessed. Phase shifts to these consecutive stimuli were no different from those obtained in a previous study following light stimuli applied under steady-state conditions over a range of circadian phases similar to those at which the consecutive stimuli were applied. These data suggest that circadian phase shifts of the core body temperature rhythm in response to a three-cycle stimulus occur within 24 h following the end of the 3-day light stimulus and that this poststimulus temperature rhythm accurately reflects the timing of the underlying circadian clock.

  19. Circadian rhythms, sleep, and performance in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallis, M. M.; DeRoshia, C. W.

    2005-01-01

    Maintaining optimal alertness and neurobehavioral functioning during space operations is critical to enable the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) vision "to extend humanity's reach to the Moon, Mars and beyond" to become a reality. Field data have demonstrated that sleep times and performance of crewmembers can be compromised by extended duty days, irregular work schedules, high workload, and varying environmental factors. This paper documents evidence of significant sleep loss and disruption of circadian rhythms in astronauts and associated performance decrements during several space missions, which demonstrates the need to develop effective countermeasures. Both sleep and circadian disruptions have been identified in the Behavioral Health and Performance (BH&P) area and the Advanced Human Support Technology (AHST) area of NASA's Bioastronautics Critical Path Roadmap. Such disruptions could have serious consequences on the effectiveness, health, and safety of astronaut crews, thus reducing the safety margin and increasing the chances of an accident or incident. These decrements oftentimes can be difficult to detect and counter effectively in restrictive operational environments. NASA is focusing research on the development of optimal sleep/wake schedules and countermeasure timing and application to help mitigate the cumulative effects of sleep and circadian disruption and enhance operational performance. Investing research in humans is one of NASA's building blocks that will allow for both short- and long-duration space missions and help NASA in developing approaches to manage and overcome the human limitations of space travel. In addition to reviewing the current state of knowledge concerning sleep and circadian disruptions during space operations, this paper provides an overview of NASA's broad research goals. Also, NASA-funded research, designed to evaluate the relationships between sleep quality, circadian rhythm stability, and

  20. Circadian rhythms, alcohol and gut interactions

    PubMed Central

    Forsyth, Christopher B.; Voigt, Rbin M.; Burgess, Helen J.; Swanson, Garth R.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock establishes rhythms throughout the body with an approximately 24 hour period that affect expression of hundreds of genes. Epidemiological data reveal chronic circadian misalignment, common in our society, significantly increases the risk for a myriad of diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, infertility and gastrointestinal disease. Disruption of intestinal barrier function, also known as gut leakiness, is especially important in alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Several studies have shown that alcohol causes ALD in only a 20–30% subset of alcoholics. Thus, a better understanding is needed of why only a subset of alcoholics develops ALD. Compelling evidence shows that increased gut leakiness to microbial products and especially LPS play a critical role in the pathogenesis of ALD. Clock and other circadian clock genes have been shown to regulate lipid transport, motility and other gut functions. We hypothesized that one possible mechanism for alcohol-induced intestinal hyper-permeability is through disruption of central or peripheral (intestinal) circadian regulation. In support of this hypothesis, our recent data shows that disruption of circadian rhythms makes the gut more susceptible to injury. Our in vitro data show that alcohol stimulates increased Clock and Per2 circadian clock proteins and that siRNA knockdown of these proteins prevents alcohol-induced permeability. We also show that intestinal Cyp2e1-mediated oxidative stress is required for alcohol-induced upregulation of Clock and Per2 and intestinal hyperpermeability. Our mouse model of chronic alcohol feeding shows that circadian disruption through genetics (in ClockΔ19 mice) or environmental disruption by weekly 12h phase shifting results in gut leakiness alone and exacerbates alcohol-induced gut leakiness and liver pathology. Our data in human alcoholics show they exhibit abnormal melatonin profiles characteristic of circadian disruption. Taken together our

  1. Circadian rhythms, sleep, and performance in space.

    PubMed

    Mallis, M M; DeRoshia, C W

    2005-06-01

    Maintaining optimal alertness and neurobehavioral functioning during space operations is critical to enable the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) vision "to extend humanity's reach to the Moon, Mars and beyond" to become a reality. Field data have demonstrated that sleep times and performance of crewmembers can be compromised by extended duty days, irregular work schedules, high workload, and varying environmental factors. This paper documents evidence of significant sleep loss and disruption of circadian rhythms in astronauts and associated performance decrements during several space missions, which demonstrates the need to develop effective countermeasures. Both sleep and circadian disruptions have been identified in the Behavioral Health and Performance (BH&P) area and the Advanced Human Support Technology (AHST) area of NASA's Bioastronautics Critical Path Roadmap. Such disruptions could have serious consequences on the effectiveness, health, and safety of astronaut crews, thus reducing the safety margin and increasing the chances of an accident or incident. These decrements oftentimes can be difficult to detect and counter effectively in restrictive operational environments. NASA is focusing research on the development of optimal sleep/wake schedules and countermeasure timing and application to help mitigate the cumulative effects of sleep and circadian disruption and enhance operational performance. Investing research in humans is one of NASA's building blocks that will allow for both short- and long-duration space missions and help NASA in developing approaches to manage and overcome the human limitations of space travel. In addition to reviewing the current state of knowledge concerning sleep and circadian disruptions during space operations, this paper provides an overview of NASA's broad research goals. Also, NASA-funded research, designed to evaluate the relationships between sleep quality, circadian rhythm stability, and

  2. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003671.htm Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is a type of ...

  3. Your Glucose Meter

    MedlinePlus

    ... by Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Your Glucose Meter Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... Español Basic Facts 7 Tips for Testing Your Blood Sugar and Caring for Your Meter Glucose meters test ...

  4. Continuous Glucose Monitoring

    MedlinePlus

    ... catalog. Additional Links ​ Alternative Devices for Taking Insulin Children and Diabetes Glucose Meters Juvenile Diabetes (Teens and Diabetes ) Know Your Blood Glucose Numbers Your Guide to Diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2 Contact Us Health Information Center ...

  5. Influence of circadian rhythms on rat muscle glycogen metabolism during and after exercise.

    PubMed

    Garetto, L P; Armstrong, R B

    1983-01-01

    Marked circadian fluctuations in skeletal muscle glycogen concentrations have previously been reported. The purpose of the present study was to estimate the influence of these rhythms on muscle glycogen metabolism during and after high-intensity treadmill exercise. Male Sprague-Dawley rats ran five 1-min sprints at 75 m min-1 interspersed by 1-3 min rest intervals either at 08.00 h (morning) or at 20.00 h (night). All muscles sampled lost significant amounts of glycogen during exercise at both time periods. There were no differences in rates of loss between morning and night, even though glycogen levels in several muscles (high-oxidative muscles) were significantly higher before exercise in the morning. Following exercise, glycogen restoration in muscle samples primarily composed of fast-twitch fibres was more rapid in the morning than at night. There was no difference in glycogen restoration rates between the two time periods in the muscle primarily composed of slow-twitch fibres. Although liver glycogen was lower after exercise at night than in the morning, there were no differences in post-exercise blood glucose levels between the two time periods. In conclusion, circadian rhythms do not appear to influence rates of glycogen loss during high-speed running. However, since glycogen loss is the same at all times of day, one would predict that circadian changes in pre-exercise muscle glycogen concentrations would affect muscular endurance. Muscle glycogen restoration after exercise does appear to be affected by circadian rhythms, although interpretation of these data is complicated by possible changes in patterns of muscle fibre contraction at different times of the day. These circadian influences should be considered in the design of exercise studies using laboratory rodents. PMID:6833943

  6. [The kidney and circadian rhythms: a whole new world?].

    PubMed

    Manfredini, Roberto; Sasso, Ferdinando Carlo; Pala, Marco; De Giorgi, Alfredo; Fabbian, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    Chronobiology is a branch of biomedical sciences devoted to the study of biological rhythms. Biological rhythms exist at any level of living organisms and, according to their cycle length, may be divided into three main types: circadian, ultradian, and infradian rhythms. Circadian rhythms are the most commonly and widely studied. The principal circadian clock is located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, and is supposed to regulate peripheral clocks via neurohumoral modulation. Circadian clocks have been identified within almost all mammalian cell types, and circadian clock genes seem to be essential for cardiovascular health. Disturbance of the renal circadian rhythms is increasingly recognized as a risk factor for hypertension, polyuria, and other diseases and may contribute to renal fibrosis. The origin of these rhythms has been attributed to the reactive response of the kidney to circadian changes in volume and/or in the composition of extracellular fluids regulated by rest/activity and feeding/fasting cycles. However, most of the renal excretory rhythms persist for long periods of time, even in the absence of periodic environmental cues. These observations led to the hypothesis of the existence of a self-sustained mechanism, enabling the kidney to anticipate various predictable circadian challenges to homeostasis. The molecular basis of this mechanism remained unknown until the recent discovery of the mammalian circadian clock, comprising a system of autoregulatory transcriptional/translational feedback loops, which have also been found in the kidney. PMID:24403200

  7. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide entrains circadian rhythms in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Marpegan, Luciano; Krall, Thomas J; Herzog, Erik D

    2009-04-01

    Many mammalian cell types show daily rhythms in gene expression driven by a circadian pacemaker. For example, cultured astrocytes display circadian rhythms in Period1 and Period2 expression. It is not known, however, how or which intercellular factors synchronize and sustain rhythmicity in astrocytes. Because astrocytes are highly sensitive to vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), a neuropeptide released by neurons and important for the coordination of daily cycling, the authors hypothesized that VIP entrains circadian rhythms in astrocytes. They used astrocyte cultures derived from knock-in mice containing a bioluminescent reporter of PERIOD2 (PER2) protein, to assess the effects of VIP on the rhythmic properties of astrocytes. VIP induced a dose-dependent increase in the peak-to-trough amplitude of the ensemble rhythms of PER2 expression with maximal effects near 100 nM VIP and threshold values between 0.1 and 1 nM. VIP also induced dose- and phase-dependent shifts in PER2 rhythms and daily VIP administration entrained bioluminescence rhythms of astrocytes to a predicted phase angle. This is the first demonstration that a neuropeptide can entrain glial cells to a phase predicted by a phase-response curve. The authors conclude that VIP potently entrains astrocytes in vitro and is a candidate for coordinating daily rhythms among glia in the brain. PMID:19346450

  8. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide entrains circadian rhythms in astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Marpegan, Luciano; Krall, Thomas J.; Herzog, Erik D.

    2009-01-01

    Many mammalian cell types show daily rhythms in gene expression driven by a circadian pacemaker. For example, cultured astrocytes display circadian rhythms in Period1 and Period2 expression. It is not known, however, how or which intercellular factors synchronize and sustain rhythmicity in astrocytes. Because astrocytes are highly sensitive to vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), a neuropeptide released by neurons and important for the coordination of daily cycling, we hypothesized that VIP entrains circadian rhythms in astrocytes. We used astrocyte cultures derived from knock-in mice containing a bioluminescent reporter of PERIOD2 (PER2) protein, to assess the effects of VIP on the rhythmic properties of astrocytes. VIP induced a dose-dependent increase in the peak-to-trough amplitude of the ensemble rhythms of PER2 expression with maximal effects near 100nM VIP and threshold values between 0.1 and 1 nM. VIP also induced dose- and phase-dependent shifts in PER2 rhythms and daily VIP administration entrained bioluminescence rhythms of astrocytes to a predicted phase angle. This is the first demonstration that a neuropeptide can entrain glial cells to a phase predicted by a phase response curve. We conclude that VIP potently entrains astrocytes in vitro and is a candidate for coordinating daily rhythms among glia in the brain. PMID:19346450

  9. Neural Networks for Beat Perception in Musical Rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Large, Edward W.; Herrera, Jorge A.; Velasco, Marc J.

    2015-01-01

    Entrainment of cortical rhythms to acoustic rhythms has been hypothesized to be the neural correlate of pulse and meter perception in music. Dynamic attending theory first proposed synchronization of endogenous perceptual rhythms nearly 40 years ago, but only recently has the pivotal role of neural synchrony been demonstrated. Significant progress has since been made in understanding the role of neural oscillations and the neural structures that support synchronized responses to musical rhythm. Synchronized neural activity has been observed in auditory and motor networks, and has been linked with attentional allocation and movement coordination. Here we describe a neurodynamic model that shows how self-organization of oscillations in interacting sensory and motor networks could be responsible for the formation of the pulse percept in complex rhythms. In a pulse synchronization study, we test the model's key prediction that pulse can be perceived at a frequency for which no spectral energy is present in the amplitude envelope of the acoustic rhythm. The result shows that participants perceive the pulse at the theoretically predicted frequency. This model is one of the few consistent with neurophysiological evidence on the role of neural oscillation, and it explains a phenomenon that other computational models fail to explain. Because it is based on a canonical model, the predictions hold for an entire family of dynamical systems, not only a specific one. Thus, this model provides a theoretical link between oscillatory neurodynamics and the induction of pulse and meter in musical rhythm. PMID:26635549

  10. Heterogeneity induces rhythms of weakly coupled circadian neurons.

    PubMed

    Gu, Changgui; Liang, Xiaoming; Yang, Huijie; Rohling, Jos H T

    2016-01-01

    The main clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) regulates circadian rhythms in mammals. The SCN is composed of approximately twenty thousand heterogeneous self-oscillating neurons, that have intrinsic periods varying from 22 h to 28 h. They are coupled through neurotransmitters and neuropeptides to form a network and output a uniform periodic rhythm. Previous studies found that the heterogeneity of the neurons leads to attenuation of the circadian rhythm with strong cellular coupling. In the present study, we investigate the heterogeneity of the neurons and of the network in the condition of constant darkness. Interestingly, we found that the heterogeneity of weakly coupled neurons enables them to oscillate and strengthen the circadian rhythm. In addition, we found that the period of the SCN network increases with the increase of the degree of heterogeneity. As the network heterogeneity does not change the dynamics of the rhythm, our study shows that the heterogeneity of the neurons is vitally important for rhythm generation in weakly coupled systems, such as the SCN, and it provides a new method to strengthen the circadian rhythm, as well as an alternative explanation for differences in free running periods between species in the absence of the daily cycle. PMID:26898574

  11. Heterogeneity induces rhythms of weakly coupled circadian neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Changgui; Liang, Xiaoming; Yang, Huijie; Rohling, Jos H. T.

    2016-01-01

    The main clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) regulates circadian rhythms in mammals. The SCN is composed of approximately twenty thousand heterogeneous self-oscillating neurons, that have intrinsic periods varying from 22 h to 28 h. They are coupled through neurotransmitters and neuropeptides to form a network and output a uniform periodic rhythm. Previous studies found that the heterogeneity of the neurons leads to attenuation of the circadian rhythm with strong cellular coupling. In the present study, we investigate the heterogeneity of the neurons and of the network in the condition of constant darkness. Interestingly, we found that the heterogeneity of weakly coupled neurons enables them to oscillate and strengthen the circadian rhythm. In addition, we found that the period of the SCN network increases with the increase of the degree of heterogeneity. As the network heterogeneity does not change the dynamics of the rhythm, our study shows that the heterogeneity of the neurons is vitally important for rhythm generation in weakly coupled systems, such as the SCN, and it provides a new method to strengthen the circadian rhythm, as well as an alternative explanation for differences in free running periods between species in the absence of the daily cycle. PMID:26898574

  12. Neural Responses to Complex Auditory Rhythms: The Role of Attending

    PubMed Central

    Chapin, Heather L.; Zanto, Theodore; Jantzen, Kelly J.; Kelso, Scott J. A.; Steinberg, Fred; Large, Edward W.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the role of attention in pulse and meter perception using complex rhythms. We used a selective attention paradigm in which participants attended to either a complex auditory rhythm or a visually presented word list. Performance on a reproduction task was used to gauge whether participants were attending to the appropriate stimulus. We hypothesized that attention to complex rhythms – which contain no energy at the pulse frequency – would lead to activations in motor areas involved in pulse perception. Moreover, because multiple repetitions of a complex rhythm are needed to perceive a pulse, activations in pulse-related areas would be seen only after sufficient time had elapsed for pulse perception to develop. Selective attention was also expected to modulate activity in sensory areas specific to the modality. We found that selective attention to rhythms led to increased BOLD responses in basal ganglia, and basal ganglia activity was observed only after the rhythms had cycled enough times for a stable pulse percept to develop. These observations suggest that attention is needed to recruit motor activations associated with the perception of pulse in complex rhythms. Moreover, attention to the auditory stimulus enhanced activity in an attentional sensory network including primary auditory cortex, insula, anterior cingulate, and prefrontal cortex, and suppressed activity in sensory areas associated with attending to the visual stimulus. PMID:21833279

  13. Neural Networks for Beat Perception in Musical Rhythm.

    PubMed

    Large, Edward W; Herrera, Jorge A; Velasco, Marc J

    2015-01-01

    Entrainment of cortical rhythms to acoustic rhythms has been hypothesized to be the neural correlate of pulse and meter perception in music. Dynamic attending theory first proposed synchronization of endogenous perceptual rhythms nearly 40 years ago, but only recently has the pivotal role of neural synchrony been demonstrated. Significant progress has since been made in understanding the role of neural oscillations and the neural structures that support synchronized responses to musical rhythm. Synchronized neural activity has been observed in auditory and motor networks, and has been linked with attentional allocation and movement coordination. Here we describe a neurodynamic model that shows how self-organization of oscillations in interacting sensory and motor networks could be responsible for the formation of the pulse percept in complex rhythms. In a pulse synchronization study, we test the model's key prediction that pulse can be perceived at a frequency for which no spectral energy is present in the amplitude envelope of the acoustic rhythm. The result shows that participants perceive the pulse at the theoretically predicted frequency. This model is one of the few consistent with neurophysiological evidence on the role of neural oscillation, and it explains a phenomenon that other computational models fail to explain. Because it is based on a canonical model, the predictions hold for an entire family of dynamical systems, not only a specific one. Thus, this model provides a theoretical link between oscillatory neurodynamics and the induction of pulse and meter in musical rhythm. PMID:26635549

  14. Endogenous thermoregulatory rhythms of squirrel monkeys in thermoneutrality and cold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, E. L.; Fuller, C. A.

    1999-01-01

    Whole body heat production (HP) and heat loss (HL) were examined to determine if the free-running circadian rhythm in body temperature (Tb) results from coordinated changes in HP and HL rhythms in thermoneutrality (27 degrees C) as well as mild cold (17 degrees C). Squirrel monkey metabolism (n = 6) was monitored by both indirect and direct calorimetry, with telemetered measurement of Tb and activity. Feeding was also measured. Rhythms of HP, HL, and conductance were tightly coupled with the circadian Tb rhythm at both ambient temperatures (TA). At 17 degrees C, increased HP compensated for higher HL at all phases of the Tb rhythm, resulting in only minor changes to Tb. Parallel compensatory changes of HP and HL were seen at all rhythm phases at both TA. Similar time courses of Tb, HP, and HL in their respective rhythms and the relative stability of Tb during both active and rest periods suggest action of the circadian timing system on Tb set point.

  15. Experimental study on apoptosis of TNFR1 receptor pro-endothelial progenitor cells activated by high glucose induced oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong; Xei, Fei; Xu, Xiong-Fei; Zeng, Hong; He, Hu-Qiang; Zhang, Lei; Zheng, Ying-Qiang; He, Yan-Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether high glucose in vitro activating TNFR1 and further promote rat marrow endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) apoptosis. Methods: Rat morrow endothelial progenitor cells were cultured and identified by Confocal Microscopy; then were treated with high glucose (5.5, 15, 30, 60 mmol/L), mannitol (15, 30, 60, 90 mmol/L), high glucose + Tempol and high glucose+ MAB430. Apoptosis rate of the above cells were detected by flow cytometry. ROS and MDA level and anti-O2- were detected by colorimetric technique; the expression level of TNFR1 induced signal pathway related proteins were detected by Western blotting. Results: High glucose can induce endothelial progenitor cells apoptosis, which is mostly in the later stage (72 h-96 h) instead of the earlier stage (24 h-48 h); high glucose can also induce oxidative stress reaction and the produces ROS and MDA increase significantly in the later stage (after 72 h), but anti-O2- decrease significantly. TNF apoptosis signal pathway related protein expression level not increase in the earlier stage (before 24 h) but increase significantly in the later stage (after 72 h). Tempol and MAB430 down-regulate TNF apoptosis signal pathway related protein expression and reduce EPCs apoptosis. Conclusion: High glucose activates the TNFR1 of TPCs through oxidative stress reaction and further induces cell apoptosis. PMID:26884909

  16. Effects of environmental stress on the depression-like behaviors and the diurnal rhythm of corticosterone and melatonin in male rats.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ming; Liu, Li-Jing; Xu, Ling-Zhi; Guo, Tian-You; Yue, Xiao-Dong; Li, Su-Xia

    2016-06-25

    Environmental stress (ES) is commonly used in producing chronic unpredictable mild stress to study pathogenesis of depression, including the regulatory role of circadian system on depression. However, the direct effect of ES on the circadian system has been rarely explored. The present study was aimed to investigate the effect of ES on depression-like behaviors and diurnal rhythm of plasma hormone/peptide levels in male rats. Rats were allocated into control group (CON group), low frequency ES group (LF group) and high frequency ES group (HF group). Sucrose preference test (SPT), open field test (OFT), weight gain, food and water intake were conducted to assess depression- and anxiety-like behaviors. A total of 7 times of the tail venous blood was collected with an interval of 4 h during 24 h from other rats who subjected to the same procedures of ES but not the behavioral tests. The alterations of diurnal rhythm of peripheral plasma corticosterone (CORT) and melatonin, and changes of the cholecystokinin (CCK), neuropeptide Y and leptin levels at zeitgeber time (ZT) 0 were detected by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We found that ES led to a disturbance of diurnal rhythm of CORT and melatonin in the plasma. Besides, it also increased plasma leptin level and decreased body weight gain, but it did not produce depression- and anxiety-like behaviors compared with those rats in the control group. In short, our findings indicated that the ES could induce a disturbance of diurnal rhythm of plasma CORT and melatonin in male rats. PMID:27350193

  17. CSF glucose test

    MedlinePlus

    Glucose test - CSF; Cerebrospinal fluid glucose test ... The glucose level in the CSF should be 50 to 80 mg/100 mL (or greater than 2/3 of the blood sugar level). Note: Normal value ranges may vary slightly ...

  18. Circadian rhythms in human performance and mood under constant conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monk, T. H.; Buysse, D. J.; Reynolds, C. F. 3rd; Berga, S. L.; Jarrett, D. B.; Begley, A. E.; Kupfer, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between circadian performance rhythms and rhythms in rectal temperature, plasma cortisol, plasma melatonin, subjective alertness and well-being. Seventeen healthy young adults were studied under 36 h of 'unmasking' conditions (constant wakeful bedrest, temporal isolation, homogenized 'meals') during which rectal temperatures were measured every minute, and plasma cortisol and plasma melatonin measured every 20 min. Hourly subjective ratings of global vigour (alertness) and affect (well-being) were obtained followed by one of two performance batteries. On odd-numbered hours performance (speed and accuracy) of serial search, verbal reasoning and manual dexterity tasks was assessed. On even-numbered hours, performance (% hits, response speed) was measured at a 25-30 min visual vigilance task. Performance of all tasks (except search accuracy) showed a significant time of day variation usually with a nocturnal trough close to the trough in rectal temperature. Performance rhythms appeared not to reliably differ with working memory load. Within subjects, predominantly positive correlations emerged between good performance and higher temperatures and better subjective alertness; predominantly negative correlations between good performance and higher plasma levels of cortisol and melatonin. Temperature and cortisol rhythms correlated with slightly more performance measures (5/7) than did melatonin rhythms (4/7). Global vigour correlated about as well with performance (5/7) as did temperature, and considerably better than global affect (1/7). In conclusion: (1) between-task heterogeneity in circadian performance rhythms appeared to be absent when the sleep/wake cycle was suspended; (2) temperature (positively), cortisol and melatonin (negatively) appeared equally good as circadian correlates of performance, and (3) subjective alertness correlated with performance rhythms as well as (but not better than) body temperature, suggesting that

  19. A pilot study on the effect of telmisartan & ramipril on 24 h blood pressure profile & dipping pattern in type 1 diabetes patients with nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Anantharaman, R.; Bhansali, Anil; Bhadada, Sanjay K.; Kohli, Harbir S.; Walia, Rama; Shanmugasundar, G.; Jayaprakash, P.

    2011-01-01

    Background & objectives: Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) have been used to normalize the blood pressure and the dipping pattern in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and nephropathy. However, there are no data on the effect of the dual blockade on the dipping pattern in these subjects. We therefore, carried out this study to evaluate the effect of administrating an ACEI followed by ARB in the optimum doses in T1DM patients with nephropathy on 24 h blood pressure (BP) profile and nocturnal dipping pattern. Methods: An open label interventional pilot study was done during a one year period involving 30 consecutive patients who were treated with telmisartan 80 mg (0800-1000 h) for eight weeks followed by addition of ramipril 10 mg (1200-1400 h) for the next eight weeks. Ambulatory BP, dipping pattern and albumin excretion rate were studied after each phase. Twenty patients were hypertensive and 10 patients had macro- and 20 patients had microalbuminuria. Results: Telmisartan produced a fall in the clinic BP by 4/1.3 mm Hg (P<0.05 and P<0.362, respectively), 2/1.9 mm Hg in the mean 24 h BP, 1.4/1.1 mm Hg in the day BP and 3.7/3 mm Hg in the trough BP. Addition of ramipril to telmisartan produced a further reduction of 6.3/5.9 mm Hg in the clinic BP (P<0.001 for both), 4.3/4.2 mm Hg in the mean 24 h BP (P<0.01 and P<0.0001, respectively), 5.8/3.9 mm Hg in the day BP (P<0.01 for both), 4.2/2.5 mm Hg in the trough BP, with a reduction of clinic SBP and DBP of 10.3/7.2 mm Hg from the baseline. Telmisartan restored normal systolic dipping pattern in 33.3 per cent of the nondippers (P<0.01) but addition of ramipril was not complimentary. Hyperkalamia (>5.5 mmol/l) was observed only in 2 patients towards the end of the study. Interpretation & conclusions: The dual blockade with telmisartan and ramipril had complimentary effect on lowering of the BP, however, similar beneficial effect on the nocturnal dipping

  20. Circadian rhythms from multiple oscillators: lessons from diverse organisms.

    PubMed

    Bell-Pedersen, Deborah; Cassone, Vincent M; Earnest, David J; Golden, Susan S; Hardin, Paul E; Thomas, Terry L; Zoran, Mark J

    2005-07-01

    The organization of biological activities into daily cycles is universal in organisms as diverse as cyanobacteria, fungi, algae, plants, flies, birds and man. Comparisons of circadian clocks in unicellular and multicellular organisms using molecular genetics and genomics have provided new insights into the mechanisms and complexity of clock systems. Whereas unicellular organisms require stand-alone clocks that can generate 24-hour rhythms for diverse processes, organisms with differentiated tissues can partition clock function to generate and coordinate different rhythms. In both cases, the temporal coordination of a multi-oscillator system is essential for producing robust circadian rhythms of gene expression and biological activity. PMID:15951747

  1. Circadian rhythms of visual accommodation responses and physiological correlations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, M. R.; Randle, R. J.; Williams, B. A.

    1972-01-01

    Use of a recently developed servocontrolled infrared optometer to continuously record the state of monocular focus while subjects viewed a visual target for which the stimulus to focus was systematically varied. Calculated parameters form recorded data - e.g., speeds of accommodation to approaching and receding targets, magnitude of accommodation to step changes in target distance, and amplitude and phase lag of response to sinusoidally varying stimuli were submitted to periodicity analyses. Ear canal temperature (ECT) and heart rate (HR) rhythms were also recorded for physiological correlation with accommodation rhythms. HR demonstrated a 24-hr rhythm, but ECT data did not.

  2. Attraction and social coordination: mutual entrainment of vocal activity rhythms.

    PubMed

    McGarva, Andrew R; Warner, Rebecca M

    2003-05-01

    To investigate factors that affect the mutual entrainment of vocal activity rhythms, female general psychology students paired according to attitude similarity questionnaires engaged in 40-minute introductory conversations. Fourier analyses performed on speakers' on-off vocal activity demonstrated periodic oscillations in talkativeness. Although some dyads coordinated their vocal activity rhythms, speech accommodation was not predicted by attitude similarity or attraction and did not affect ratings of conversation quality. These rhythms of dialogue appear resistant to change, their behavioral momentum rooted perhaps in an underlying chronobiology. PMID:12845943

  3. Altered Circadian Rhythm and Metabolic Gene Profile in Rats Subjected to Advanced Light Phase Shifts

    PubMed Central

    Herrero, Laura; Valcarcel, Lorea; da Silva, Crhistiane Andressa; Albert, Nerea; Diez-Noguera, Antoni; Cambras, Trinitat; Serra, Dolors

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock regulates metabolic homeostasis and its disruption predisposes to obesity and other metabolic diseases. However, the effect of phase shifts on metabolism is not completely understood. We examined whether alterations in the circadian rhythm caused by phase shifts induce metabolic changes in crucial genes that would predispose to obesity. Three-month-old rats were maintained on a standard diet under lighting conditions with chronic phase shifts consisting of advances, delays or advances plus delays. Serum leptin, insulin and glucose levels decreased only in rats subjected to advances. The expression of the clock gene Bmal 1 increased in the hypothalamus, white adipose tissue (WAT), brown adipose tissue (BAT) and liver of the advanced group compared to control rats. The advanced group showed an increase in hypothalamic AgRP and NPY mRNA, and their lipid metabolism gene profile was altered in liver, WAT and BAT. WAT showed an increase in inflammation and ER stress and brown adipocytes suffered a brown-to-white transformation and decreased UCP-1 expression. Our results indicate that chronic phase advances lead to significant changes in neuropeptides, lipid metabolism, inflammation and ER stress gene profile in metabolically relevant tissues such as the hypothalamus, liver, WAT and BAT. This highlights a link between alteration of the circadian rhythm and metabolism at the transcriptional level. PMID:25837425

  4. Brief light exposure at night disrupts the circadian rhythms in eye growth and choroidal thickness in chicks.

    PubMed

    Nickla, Debora L; Totonelly, Kristen

    2016-05-01

    Changes in ocular growth that lead to myopia or hyperopia are associated with alterations in the circadian rhythms in eye growth, choroidal thickness and intraocular pressure in animal models of emmetropization. Recent studies have shown that light at night has deleterious effects on human health, acting via "circadian disruptions" of various diurnal rhythms, including changes in phase or amplitude. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of brief, 2-h episodes of light in the middle of the night on the rhythms in axial length and choroidal thickness, and whether these alter eye growth and refractive error in the chick model of myopia. Starting at 2 weeks of age, birds received 2 h of light between 12:00 am and 2:00 am for 7 days (n = 12; total hours of light: 14 h). Age-matched controls had a continuous dark night (n = 14; 14L/10D). Ocular dimensions were measured using high-frequency A-scan ultrasonography on the first day of the experiment, and again on day 7, at 6-h intervals, starting at noon (12 pm, 6 pm, 12 am, 6 am, 12 pm). Measurements during the night were done under a photographic safe-light. These data were used to determine rhythm parameters of phase and amplitude. 2 groups of birds, both experimental (light at night) and control, were measured with ultrasound at various intervals over the course of 4 weeks to determine growth rates. Refractive errors were measured in 6 experimental and 6 control birds at the end of 2 weeks. Eyes of birds in a normal L/D cycle showed sinusoidal 24-h period diurnal rhythms in axial length and choroid thickness. Light in the middle of the night caused changes in both the rhythms in axial length and choroidal thickness, such that neither could be fit to a sine function having a period of 24 h. Light caused an acute, transient stimulation in ocular growth rate in the subsequent 6-h period (12 am-6 am), that may be responsible for the increased growth rate seen 4 weeks later, and the more

  5. Daily rhythms of lipid metabolic gene expression in zebra fish liver: Response to light/dark and feeding cycles.

    PubMed

    Paredes, J F; López-Olmeda, J F; Martínez, F J; Sánchez-Vázquez, F J

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous studies about fish nutrition and lipid metabolism, very little is known about the daily rhythm expression of lipogenesis and lipolysis genes. This research aimed to investigate the existence of daily rhythm expressions of the genes involved in lipid metabolism and their synchronization to different light/dark (LD) and feeding cycles in zebra fish liver. For this purpose, three groups of zebra fish were submitted to a 12:12 h LD cycle. A single daily meal was provided to each group at various times: in the middle of the light phase (ML); in the middle of the dark phase (MD); at random times. After 20 days of acclimation to these experimental conditions, liver samples were collected every 4 h in one 24-h cycle. The results revealed that most genes displayed a significant daily rhythm with an acrophase of expression in the dark phase. The acrophase of lipolytic genes (lipoprotein lipase - lpl, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor - pparα and hydroxyacil CoA dehydrogenase - hadh) was displayed between ZT 02:17 h and ZT 18:31 h. That of lipogenic genes (leptin-a - lepa, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor - pparγ, liver X receptor - lxr, insulin-like growth factor - igf1, sterol regulatory element-binding protein - srebp and fatty acid synthase - fas) was displayed between ZT 15:25 h and 20:06 h (dark phase). Feeding time barely influenced daily expression rhythms, except for lxr in the MD group, whose acrophase shifted by about 14 h compared with the ML group (ZT 04:31 h versus ZT 18:29 h, respectively). These results evidence a strong synchronization to the LD cycle, but not to feeding time, and most genes showed a nocturnal acrophase. These findings highlight the importance of considering light and feeding time to optimize lipid metabolism and feeding protocols in fish farming. PMID:26595085

  6. Fabrication of SiO{sub 2}/4H-SiC (0001) interface with nearly ideal capacitance-voltage characteristics by thermal oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, Richard Heihachiro; Kita, Koji

    2014-07-21

    We fabricated SiO{sub 2}/4H-SiC (0001) metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors with nearly ideal capacitance-voltage characteristics, simply by the control of thermal oxidation conditions which were selected based on thermodynamic and kinetic considerations of SiC oxidation. The interface with low interface defect state density <10{sup 11 }cm{sup −2} eV{sup −1} for the energy range of 0.1–0.4 eV below the conduction band of SiC was obtained by thermal oxidation at 1300 °C in a ramp-heating furnace with a short rise/fall time, followed by low temperature O{sub 2} anneal at 800 °C.

  7. Characterization and Conductivity Behavior of Magnetic Activated Carbon (MAC) from FeCl2.4H2O-Containing Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aripin, Department Of Physics, Faculty Of Mathematics; Natural Science, Haluoleo University, Kampus Bumi Tridharma Anduonohu Kendari 93232 Indonesia

    2007-05-01

    Activated carbons (AC) and magnetic-containing activated carbons (MAC) have been synthesized using coconut shells as carbon sources and FeCl2.4H2O as magnetic precursor. The samples were characterized by nitrogen sorption, XRD, and FTIR. The BET surface area and total pore volume of MAC increase as the temperature increased. AC has XRD peaks, which evidences an amorphous carbon framework and MAC shows that this material consists of an organized carbon with the nanocrystalline magnetite embedded in its structure. The FTIR spectrum of MAC shows that carboxyl groups decreased as the temperature increased. Absorption bands of MAC shows the stretching and torsional vibration modes of the magnetite Fe-O bond in tetrahedral and octahedral sites, respectively. The electrical conductivity studies showed that conductivity of MAC is more than the AC due to structural properties of carbons exists on a framework containing metal structures.

  8. Entropy, pattern entropy, and related methods for the analysis of data on the time intervals between heartbeats from 24-h electrocardiograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żebrowski, J. J.; Popławska, W.; Baranowski, R.

    1994-11-01

    Sequences of the time intervals between heartbeats-medically termed RR intervals-extracted from 24-h electrocardiogram recordings are examined as three-dimensional return map images. The recordings were made in humans by means of the medically widely used portable electrocardiograph (Holter system). A time window measured in the number of heartbeats is used and different types of behavior are classified. Bifurcations between the types of dynamics of the heart are noted and a form of intermittency is found. An alternative quantitative measure-a form pattern entropy of the return map image-is defined that characterizes the dynamics of the RR interval sequence. It is shown that this is a measure of the degree of ordering of the RR interval sequence and as such it is a good novel medical diagnostic tool for analyzing heart rate variability which distinguishes between illness and health where other diagnostics fail.

  9. Cathodoluminescence study of radiative interface defects in thermally grown SiO{sub 2}/4H-SiC(0001) structures

    SciTech Connect

    Fukushima, Yuta; Chanthaphan, Atthawut; Hosoi, Takuji; Shimura, Takayoshi; Watanabe, Heiji

    2015-06-29

    Radiative defects in thermally grown SiO{sub 2}/4H-SiC(0001) structures and their location in depth were investigated by means of cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. It was found that while luminescence peaks ascribed to oxygen vacancy and nonbridging oxygen hole centers were observed both from thermal oxides grown on (0001) Si-face and C-face surfaces as with thermal oxides on Si, intense yellow luminescence at a wavelength of around 600 nm was identified only from the oxide interface on the Si-face substrate regardless of the oxide thickness and dopant type. Possible physical origins of the radiative centers localized near an oxide interface of a few nm thick are discussed on the basis of visible light emission from Si backbone structures.

  10. New high proper motion stars with declinations between -5(deg) and -30(deg) , and right ascensions between 13h 30m and 24h

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wroblewski, H.; Costa, E.

    1999-10-01

    Proper motions, positions, finding charts and magnitudes are given for 293 newly discovered stars with proper motions larger than 0.15 arcsec/year. They are located between -5(deg) and -30(deg) in declination, and 13h 30m and 24h in right ascension. Their blue photographic magnitudes range from approximately 13.0 to 18.5. Six stars of the above sample have proper motions larger than 0.4 (0.401 to 0.534) arcsec/year. An estimated precision level between 7 and 13 mas/year was achieved for the proper motions. Table~2 is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp 130.79.128.5 or http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/Abstract.html and figures~2 are available in the on-line edition of the journal at http://www.edpsciences.com

  11. Impact of hypobaric hypoxia in pressurized cabins of simulated long-distance flights on the 24 h patterns of biological variables, fatigue, and clinical status.

    PubMed

    Coste, Olivier; Van Beers, Pascal; Touitou, Yvan

    2007-01-01

    Long-distance flights can cause a number of clinical problems in both passengers and crewmembers. Jet lag as well as mild hypoxia resulting from incomplete cabin pressurization could contribute to these problems. The objective of this study was to assess, using a chronobiological approach, the clinical impact of diurnal hypobaric, hypoxic exposure on fatigue and other common symptoms encountered during high-altitude exposure and to measure changes in blood chemistry (i.e., plasma creatinine, urea, uric acid, sodium, calcium, phosphorus, glycemia, and lipids). Fourteen healthy, diurnally active (from 07:00 to 23:00 h) male volunteers, aged 23 to 39 yrs, spent 8.5 h in a hypobaric chamber (08:00 to 16:30 h), at a simulated altitude of 8,000 ft (2,438 m). This was followed by an additional 8.5 h of study four weeks later at a simulated altitude of 12,000 ft (3,658 m). Clinical data were collected every 2 h between 08:00 and 18:00 h, and biological variables were assayed every 2 h over two (control and hypoxic-exposure) 24 h cycles. Clinical symptoms were more frequent with the 12,000 ft exposure. Wide interindividual variability was observed in the clinical tolerance to prolonged hypobaric hypoxia. The 24 h profiles of most biochemical variables were significantly altered at each altitude, with changes in mean plasma levels and a tendency toward phase delay, except for uric acid, which showed a phase advance. Changes in appetite mainly occurred with the simulated 12,000 ft exposure and may have been associated with changes in the postprandial glycemia profile. Finally, though the observed biochemical changes were significant, their clinical relevance must be clarified in studies involving actual long-distance flights. PMID:18075804

  12. Validation of web-based, multiple 24-h recalls combined with nutritional supplement intake questionnaires against nitrogen excretions to determine protein intake in Dutch elite athletes.

    PubMed

    Wardenaar, F C; Steennis, J; Ceelen, I J M; Mensink, M; Witkamp, R; de Vries, J H M

    2015-12-28

    Information on dietary composition is vitally important for elite athletes to optimise their performance and recovery, which requires valid tools. The aim of the present study was to investigate the validity of assessing protein intake using three web-based 24-h recalls and questionnaires, by comparing these with three urinary N excretions on the same day. A total of forty-seven Dutch elite top athletes, both disabled and non-disabled, aged between 18 and 35 years, with a BMI of 17·5-31 kg/m2, exercising >12 h/week were recruited. Estimated mean dietary protein intake was 109·6 (sd 33·0) g/d by recalls and questionnaires v. 141·3 (sd 38·2) g/d based on N excretions in urine; the difference was 25·5 (sd 21·3) % between the methods (P<0·05). We found a reasonably good association between methods for protein intake of 0·65 (95 % CI 0·45, 0·79). On an individual level, under-reporting was larger with higher protein intakes than with lower intakes. No significant differences were found in reporting absolute differences between subcategories (sex, under-reporting, BMI, collection of recalls within a certain amount of time and using protein supplements or not). In conclusion, combined, multiple, 24-h recalls and questionnaires underestimated protein intake in these young elite athletes more than that reported for non-athlete populations. The method proved to be suitable for ranking athletes according to their protein intake as needed in epidemiological studies. On an individual level, the magnitude of underestimation was about equal for all athletes except for those with very high protein intakes. PMID:26435534

  13. Agreement between an online dietary assessment tool (myfood24) and an interviewer-administered 24-h dietary recall in British adolescents aged 11-18 years.

    PubMed

    Albar, Salwa A; Alwan, Nisreen A; Evans, Charlotte E L; Greenwood, Darren C; Cade, Janet E

    2016-05-01

    myfood24 Is an online 24-h dietary assessment tool developed for use among British adolescents and adults. Limited information is available regarding the validity of using new technology in assessing nutritional intake among adolescents. Thus, a relative validation of myfood24 against a face-to-face interviewer-administered 24-h multiple-pass recall (MPR) was conducted among seventy-five British adolescents aged 11-18 years. Participants were asked to complete myfood24 and an interviewer-administered MPR on the same day for 2 non-consecutive days at school. Total energy intake (EI) and nutrients recorded by the two methods were compared using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), Bland-Altman plots (using between and within-individual information) and weighted κ to assess the agreement. Energy, macronutrients and other reported nutrients from myfood24 demonstrated strong agreement with the interview MPR data, and ICC ranged from 0·46 for Na to 0·88 for EI. There was no significant bias between the two methods for EI, macronutrients and most reported nutrients. The mean difference between myfood24 and the interviewer-administered MPR for EI was -230 kJ (-55 kcal) (95 % CI -490, 30 kJ (-117, 7 kcal); P=0·4) with limits of agreement ranging between 39 % (3336 kJ (-797 kcal)) lower and 34 % (2874 kJ (687 kcal)) higher than the interviewer-administered MPR. There was good agreement in terms of classifying adolescents into tertiles of EI (κ w =0·64). The agreement between day 1 and day 2 was as good for myfood24 as for the interviewer-administered MPR, reflecting the reliability of myfood24. myfood24 Has the potential to collect dietary data of comparable quality with that of an interviewer-administered MPR. PMID:26975650

  14. Mitomycin C with weekly 24-h infusion of high-dose 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin in patients with biliary tract and periampullar carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Chen, J S; Lin, Y C; Jan, Y Y; Liau, C T

    2001-04-01

    We have reported a 33% partial response rate with acceptable toxicity using weekly 24-h infusion of high-dose 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and leucovorin (LV) in patients with far advanced biliary tract cancers (BTC). In this study, we added mitomycin (MMC) to 5-FU and LV in an attempt to improve the response rate and survival. From July 1997 to September 1999, 25 chemotherapy-naive patients with pathology-proven far advanced BTC and periampullar cancers were enrolled. The regimen consisted of MMC 10 mg/m(2) every 8 weeks combined with 5-FU 2600 mg/m(2) and LV 150 mg at a schedule of 24-h infusion weekly for 6 weeks followed by a 2 week break. There were 10 males and 15 females with a median age of 57 years (range 40-76). The sites of primary tumor were 15 intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas (CC), one perihilar CCs, three distal BTC, three gallbladder cancers (GB) and three periampullar cancers. A total of 148 sessions of chemotherapy were given with a mean of 8 (range 2-18). Nineteen patients were evaluable for response. The response rate was: 26% (five of 19) partial response, 42% (eight of 19) stable disease and 32% (six of 19) progressive disease. All of the patients were evaluable for toxicity. Toxicities more than grade III-IV were thrombocytopenia 16% (four of 25), leukopenia 12% (three of 25) and vomiting 4% (one of 25). There were four treatment-related deaths. The median time to disease progression was 3 months. The median survival was 6 months. A combination of MMC with weekly high-dose 5-FU and LV in patients with BTC did not improve the response rate, but produced more toxicity than weekly high-dose 5-FU and LV alone. PMID:11335790

  15. Distribution and variability of the 24-h average air exchange rates and interzonal flow rates in 26 Japanese residences in 5 seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, Naohide; Kataoka, Toshiyuki; Takamine, Koichi; Gamo, Masashi

    2011-07-01

    In this study, to evaluate the distribution of air exchange rates in Japan, daily, seasonal, and inter-residence variabilities were determined as well as the air exchange rate itself. In addition, airflows among multiple zones were also evaluated. For this purpose, the 24 h average air exchange rates and interzonal air flow rates were measured using a passive perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) method with three kinds of tracer gases for 1 week in three rooms of 26 Japanese residences over five seasons: summer and autumn of 2005, and winter, spring, and summer of 2006. During these seasons, the weekly average air exchange rates were found to be 1.6 ± 1.7, 0.58 ± 0.94, 0.61 ± 0.93, 1.2 ± 2.5, and 1.7 ± 1.8 h -1, respectively. Two-way repeated measure analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed that the air exchange rates differed significantly with respect to the seasons, residences, and interaction of seasons and residences ( p < 0.01). In addition, the air exchange rates in both summers and spring were statistically higher than those in autumn and winter (Sheffe test, p < 0.01). According to the ANOVA, the percentage contribution of inter-residence variability, seasonal variability, interaction of seasonal and inter-residence variabilities, and daily variability to the total variability of the 24 h average air exchange rates in the present survey was 51%, 44%, 3.7%, and 1.0%, respectively.

  16. [Semi-automatic defibrillators does not always interpret heart rhythms correctly. Five patients were defibrillated despite non-shockable rhythms].

    PubMed

    Wangenheim, Burkard; Israelsson, Johan; Lindstaedt, Michael; Carlsson, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Automated external defibrillators (AED) have become an important part of the »the chain of survival« in case of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA), where early defibrillation is lifesaving. The American Heart Association demands that AEDs have a specificity of >99 % to recognize normal sinus rhythm and >95 % for the other non-shockable rhythms. Reports on their performance in the field are scarce. We present five cases in which AED recommended shock for apparently non-shockable rhythms. This indicates the necessity to systematically reevaluate AED performance. PMID:26241809

  17. Menstrual changes in sleep, rectal temperature and melatonin rhythms in a subject with premenstrual syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, K; Uchiyama, M; Okawa, M; Saito, K; Kawaguchi, M; Funabashi, T; Kimura, F

    2000-03-10

    We studied a sighted woman with premenstrual syndrome who showed menstrual changes in circadian rhythms. She showed alternative phase shifts in the sleep rhythm in the menstrual cycle: progressive phase advances in the follicular phase and phase delays in the luteal phase. Rectal temperature rhythm also showed similar menstrual changes, but the phase advance and delay started a few days earlier than changes in sleep-wake rhythm so that the two rhythms were dissociated around ovulation and menstruation. These results suggest that her circadian rhythms in sleep and temperature are under the control of ovarian steroid hormones and that these two rhythms have different sensitivity to the hormones. PMID:10704767

  18. [Glucose Metabolism: Stress Hyperglycemia and Glucose Control].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Katsuya; Tsutsumi, Yasuo M

    2016-05-01

    It is important for the anesthesiologists to understand pathophysiology of perioperative stress hyperglycemia, because it offers strategies for treatment of stress hyperglycemia. The effect of glucose tolerance is different in the choice of the anesthetic agent used in daily clinical setting. Specifically, the volatile anesthetics inhibit insulin secretion after glucose load and affects glucose tolerance. During minor surgery by the remifentanil anesthesia, the stress reaction is hard to be induced, suggesting that we should consider low-dose glucose load. Finally it is necessary to perform the glycemic control of the patients who fell into stress hyperglycemia depending on the individual patient. However, there are a lot of questions to be answered in the future. The prognosis of the perioperative patients is more likely to be greatly improved if we can control stress hyperglycemia. PMID:27319094

  19. Effects of sleep disruption and high fat intake on glucose metabolism in mice.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jacqueline M; Barf, R Paulien; Opp, Mark R

    2016-06-01

    Poor sleep quality or quantity impairs glycemic control and increases risk of disease under chronic conditions. Recovery sleep may offset adverse metabolic outcomes of accumulated sleep debt, but the extent to which this occurs is unclear. We examined whether recovery sleep improves glucose metabolism in mice subjected to prolonged sleep disruption, and whether high fat intake during sleep disruption exacerbates glycemic control. Adult male C57BL/6J mice were subjected to 18-h sleep fragmentation daily for 9 days, followed by 1 day of recovery. During sleep disruption, one group of mice was fed a high-fat diet (HFD) while another group was fed standard laboratory chow. Insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance were assessed by insulin and glucose tolerance testing at baseline, after 3 and 7 days of sleep disruption, and at the end of the protocol after 24h of undisturbed sleep opportunity (recovery). To characterize changes in sleep architecture that are associated with sleep debt and recovery, we quantified electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings during sleep fragmentation and recovery periods from an additional group of mice. We now report that 9 days of 18-h daily sleep fragmentation significantly reduces rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) and non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS). Mice respond with increases in REMS, but not NREMS, during the daily 6-h undisturbed sleep opportunity. However, both REMS and NREMS increase significantly during the 24-h recovery period. Although sleep disruption alone has no effect in this protocol, high fat feeding in combination with sleep disruption impairs glucose tolerance, effects that are reversed by recovery sleep. Insulin sensitivity modestly improves after 3 days of sleep fragmentation and after 24h of recovery, with significantly greater improvements in mice exposed to HFD during sleep disruption. Improvements in both glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity are associated with NREMS rebound, raising the possibility that this

  20. Speech rhythm sensitivity and musical aptitude: ERPs and individual differences.

    PubMed

    Magne, Cyrille; Jordan, Deanna K; Gordon, Reyna L

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the electrophysiological markers of rhythmic expectancy during speech perception. In addition, given the large literature showing overlaps between cognitive and neural resources recruited for language and music, we considered a relation between musical aptitude and individual differences in speech rhythm sensitivity. Twenty adults were administered a standardized assessment of musical aptitude, and EEG was recorded as participants listened to sequences of four bisyllabic words for which the stress pattern of the final word either matched or mismatched the stress pattern of the preceding words. Words with unexpected stress patterns elicited an increased fronto-central mid-latency negativity. In addition, rhythm aptitude significantly correlated with the size of the negative effect elicited by unexpected iambic words, the least common type of stress pattern in English. The present results suggest shared neurocognitive resources for speech rhythm and musical rhythm. PMID:26828758

  1. Rhythm: A Psycho-Philosophical Perspective on Black Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toldson, Ivory L.; Pasteur, Alfred B.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses rhythm as a fundamental element in human behavior. Suggests that the unity of cognitive, affective, and psychomotor functioning, most vividly seen in Black expressive forms, must be studied to more fully understand Black behavior and learning styles. (RC)

  2. Social Rhythm Therapies for Mood Disorders: an Update.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Patricia L; Gengler, Devan; Kelly, Monica

    2016-08-01

    Social rhythms are patterns of habitual daily behaviors that may impact the timing of the circadian system directly or indirectly through light exposure. According to the social rhythm hypothesis of depression, depressed individuals possess a vulnerability in the circadian timing system that inhibits natural recovery after disrupting life events. Social rhythm therapies (SRTs) support the implementation of regular, daily patterns of activity in order to facilitate recovery of circadian biological processes and also to improve mood. The majority of SRT research has examined interpersonal and social rhythm therapy (IPSRT) for bipolar disorder. Recent studies have examined IPSRT in inpatient settings, using alternative modes of delivery (group, combined individual and group, internet-based applications) and with brief timeframes. New forms of SRTs are developing that target mood in individuals who have experienced specific types of stressful life events. This manuscript reviews the theoretical and biological bases of SRTs and current literature on SRT outcomes. PMID:27338753

  3. [Atrial fibrillation-pharmacological therapy for rate and rhythm control].

    PubMed

    Müller-Burri, Stephan Andreas

    2014-02-01

    The therapeutic management of patients with atrial fibrillation is based on the three pillars (1) prevention of thromboembolism, (2) rate control, and (3) rhythm control. Patients with one or more risk factors should be treated with an oral anticoagulants in order to prevent stroke and to reduce mortality. The goals of rate control, prevention of heart failure and alleviation of atrial fibrillation related symptoms, normally can be achieved by pharmacological agents slowing the conduction in the AV node (e. g. β-blockers, calcium channel blockers, digoxin). For patients remaining symptomatic despite sufficient rate control adding a rhythm control strategy may be considered. The currently available antiarrhythmic drugs (e. g. flecainide, propafenone, sotalol, dronedarone, amiodarone) are characterized by a rather low efficacy in maintaining sinus rhythm and various possibly life threatening side effects. Therefore, invasive therapies as catheter ablation are frequently needed to achieve rhythm control in symptomatic patients with atrial fibrillation. PMID:24463376

  4. Preliminary characterization of persisting circadian rhythms during space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sultzman, F. M.

    1984-01-01

    In order to evaluate the function of the circadian timing system in space, the circadian rhythm of conidiation of the fungus Neurospora crassa was monitored in constant darkness on the STS 9 flight of the Space Shuttle Columbia. During the first 7 days of spaceflight many tubes showed a marked reduction in the apparent amplitude of the conidiation rhythm, and some cultures appeared arrhythmic. There was more variability in the growth rate and circadian rhythms of individual cultures in space than is usually seen on earth. The results of this experiment indicate that while the circadian rhythm of Neurospora conidiation can persist outside of the earth's environment, either the timekeeping process or its expression is altered in space.

  5. Death of Loved One May Trigger Heart Rhythm Trouble

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158176.html Death of Loved One May Trigger Heart Rhythm Trouble ... likely to develop an irregular heartbeat following the death of their spouse or life partner, particularly if ...

  6. Age, circadian rhythms, and sleep loss in flight crews

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gander, Philippa H.; Nguyen, DE; Rosekind, Mark R.; Connell, Linda J.

    1993-01-01

    Age-related changes in trip-induced sleep loss, personality, and the preduty temperature rhythm were analyzed in crews from various flight operations. Eveningness decreased with age. The minimum of the baseline temperature rhythm occurred earlier with age. The amplitude of the baseline temperature rhythm declined with age. Average daily percentage sleep loss during trips increased with age. Among crewmembers flying longhaul flight operations, subjects aged 50-60 averaged 3.5 times more sleep loss per day than subjects aged 20-30. These studies support previous findings that evening types and subjects with later peaking temperature rhythms adapt better to shift work and time zone changes. Age and circadian type may be important considerations for duty schedules and fatigue countermeasures.

  7. Language familiarity, expectation, and novice musical rhythm production.

    PubMed

    Neuhoff, John G; Lidji, Pascale

    2014-12-01

    The music of expert musicians reflects the speech rhythm of their native language. Here, we examine this effect in amateur and novice musicians. English- and French-speaking participants were both instructed to produce simple "English" and "French" tunes using only two keys on a keyboard. All participants later rated the rhythmic variability of English and French speech samples. The rhythmic variability of the "English" and "French" tunes that were produced reflected the perceived rhythmic variability in English and French speech samples. Yet, the pattern was different for English and French participants and did not correspond to the actual measured speech rhythm variability of the speech samples. Surprise recognition tests two weeks later confirmed that the music-speech relationship remained over time. The results show that the relationship between music and speech rhythm is more widespread than previously thought and that musical rhythm production by amateurs and novices is concordant with their rhythmic expectations in the perception of speech. PMID:25536848

  8. Lipogenesis in Huh7 cells is promoted by increasing the fructose: Glucose molar ratio

    PubMed Central

    Windemuller, Fernando; Xu, Jiliu; Rabinowitz, Simon S; Hussain, M Mahmood; Schwarz, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether hepatocyte lipogenesis, in an in vitro cell culture model, is modulated by adjusting culture media monosaccharide content and concentration. METHODS: Hepatocytes (Huh7), demonstrating glucose and fructose uptake and lipid biosynthesis, were incubated in culture media containing either glucose alone (0.65-0.72 mmol/L) or isosmolar monosaccharide (0.72 mmol/L) comprising fructose:glucose (F:G) molar ratios ranging from 0.58-0.67. Following a 24-h incubation, cells were harvested and analyzed for total protein, triglyceride (TG) and cholesterol (C) content. Significant differences (P < 0.05) among groups were determined using analysis of variance followed by Dunnett’s test for multiple comparisons. RESULTS: After a 24 h incubation period, Huh7 cell mass and viability among all experimental groups were not different. Hepatocytes cultured with increasing concentrations of glucose alone did not demonstrate a significant change either in C or in TG content. However, when the culture media contained increasing F:G molar ratios, at a constant total monosaccharide concentration, synthesis both of C and of TG increased significantly [F:G ratio = 0.58, C/protein (μg/μg) = 0.13; F:G = 0.67, C/protein = 0.18, P < 0.01; F:G ratio = 0.58, TG/protein (μg/μg) = 0.06; F:G ratio = 0.67, TG/protein = 0.11, P < 0.01]. CONCLUSION: In an in vitro hepatocyte model, glucose or fructose plus glucose support total cell mass and lipogenic activity. Increasing the fructose:glucose molar ratio (but not glucose alone) enhances triglyceride and cholesterol synthesis. These investigations demonstrate fructose promotes hepatocellular lipogenesis, and they provide evidence supporting future, in vivo studies of fructose’s role in the development of hepatic steatosis and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:27458503

  9. Postexercise glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis in skeletal muscle from GLUT4-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Ryder, J W; Kawano, Y; Galuska, D; Fahlman, R; Wallberg-Henriksson, H; Charron, M J; Zierath, J R

    1999-12-01

    To determine the role of GLUT4 on postexercise glucose transport and glycogen resynthesis in skeletal muscle, GLUT4-deficient and wild-type mice were studied after a 3 h swim exercise. In wild-type mice, insulin and swimming each increased 2-deoxyglucose uptake by twofold in extensor digitorum longus muscle. In contrast, insulin did not increase 2-deoxyglucose glucose uptake in muscle from GLUT4-null mice. Swimming increased glucose transport twofold in muscle from fed GLUT4-null mice, with no effect noted in fasted GLUT4-null mice. This exercise-associated 2-deoxyglucose glucose uptake was not accompanied by increased cell surface GLUT1 content. Glucose transport in GLUT4-null muscle was increased 1.6-fold over basal levels after electrical stimulation. Contraction-induced glucose transport activity was fourfold greater in wild-type vs. GLUT4-null muscle. Glycogen content in gastrocnemius muscle was similar between wild-type and GLUT4-null mice and was reduced approximately 50% after exercise. After 5 h carbohydrate refeeding, muscle glycogen content was fully restored in wild-type, with no change in GLUT4-null mice. After 24 h carbohydrate refeeding, muscle glycogen in GLUT4-null mice was restored to fed levels. In conclusion, GLUT4 is the major transporter responsible for exercise-induced glucose transport. Also, postexercise glycogen resynthesis in muscle was greatly delayed; unlike wild-type mice, glycogen supercompensation was not found. GLUT4 it is not essential for glycogen repletion since muscle glycogen levels in previously exercised GLUT4-null mice were totally restored after 24 h carbohydrate refeeding.-Ryder, J. W., Kawano, Y., Galuska, D., Fahlman, R., Wallberg-Henriksson, H., Charron, M. J., Zierath, J. R. Postexercise glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis in skeletal muscle from GLUT4-deficient mice. PMID:10593872

  10. Methods to Record Circadian Rhythm Wheel Running Activity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Siepka, Sandra M.; Takahashi, Joseph S.

    2013-01-01

    Forward genetic approaches (phenotype to gene) are powerful methods to identify mouse circadian clock components. The success of these approaches, however, is highly dependent on the quality of the phenotype— specifically, the ability to measure circadian rhythms in individual mice. This article outlines the factors necessary to measure mouse circadian rhythms, including choice of mouse strain, facilities and equipment design and construction, experimental design, high-throughput methods, and finally methods for data analysis. PMID:15817291

  11. Looking for inspiration: new perspectives on respiratory rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Jack L.; Del Negro, Christopher A.

    2010-01-01

    Recent experiments in vivo and in vitro have advanced our understanding of the sites and mechanisms involved in mammalian respiratory rhythm generation. Here we evaluate and interpret the new evidence for two separate brainstem respiratory oscillators and for the essential role of emergent network properties in rhythm generation. Lesion studies suggest that respiratory cell death might explain morbidity and mortality associated with neurodegenerative disorders and ageing. PMID:16495944

  12. Circadian Rhythms in Stomatal Responsiveness to Red and Blue Light.

    PubMed Central

    Gorton, H. L.; Williams, W. E.; Assmann, S. M.

    1993-01-01

    Stomata of many plants have circadian rhythms in responsiveness to environmental cues as well as circadian rhythms in aperture. Stomatal responses to red light and blue light are mediated by photosynthetic photoreceptors; responses to blue light are additionally controlled by a specific blue-light photoreceptor. This paper describes circadian rhythmic aspects of stomatal responsiveness to red and blue light in Vicia faba. Plants were exposed to a repeated light:dark regime of 1.5:2.5 h for a total of 48 h, and because the plants could not entrain to this short light:dark cycle, circadian rhythms were able to "free run" as if in continuous light. The rhythm in the stomatal conductance established during the 1.5-h light periods was caused both by a rhythm in sensitivity to light and by a rhythm in the stomatal conductance established during the preceding 2.5-h dark periods. Both rhythms peaked during the middle of the subjective day. Although the stomatal response to blue light is greater than the response to red light at all times of day, there was no discernible difference in period, phase, or amplitude of the rhythm in sensitivity to the two light qualities. We observed no circadian rhythmicity in net carbon assimilation with the 1.5:2.5 h light regime for either red or blue light. In continuous white light, small rhythmic changes in photosynthetic assimilation were observed, but at relatively high light levels, and these appeared to be attributable largely to changes in internal CO2 availability governed by stomatal conductance. PMID:12231947

  13. Circannual rhythms of physical fitness and tolerance of hypoxic hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Kwarecki, K; Golec, L; Kłossowski, M; Zuzewicz, K

    1981-01-01

    Presence of a circannual rhythm of physical fitness and tolerance of hypoxia was demonstrated. The rhythm of physical fitness had two peaks, in April and September. Using cosinor analysis the acrophase of the circannual rhythm was found to be on Aug. 10 with a 95% confidence limit (May 30-October 16), and the amplitude of the rhythm was 1.6 ml O2/kg/min with a 95% confidence limit (0.22-2.96 ml/kg/min). The circannual rhythm of hypoxia tolerance showed a similar pattern of changes. The maximum value of this rhythm was observed also in April and in autumn, its acrophase was calculated to occur on Aug. 26 with a 95% confidence limit (May 10-October 2), and its amplitude was 33.4 sec with a 95% confidence limit (10.4-56.4 sec.). An analysis of the results of physical fitness tests carried out in training camps confirmed these circannual fluctuations of physical fitness. PMID:7348519

  14. Dynamical Analysis of bantam-Regulated Drosophila Circadian Rhythm Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Liu, Zengrong

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) interact with 3‧untranslated region (UTR) elements of target genes to regulate mRNA stability or translation, and play a crucial role in regulating many different biological processes. bantam, a conserved miRNA, is involved in several functions, such as regulating Drosophila growth and circadian rhythm. Recently, it has been discovered that bantam plays a crucial role in the core circadian pacemaker. In this paper, based on experimental observations, a detailed dynamical model of bantam-regulated circadian clock system is developed to show the post-transcriptional behaviors in the modulation of Drosophila circadian rhythm, in which the regulation of bantam is incorporated into a classical model. The dynamical behaviors of the model are consistent with the experimental observations, which shows that bantam is an important regulator of Drosophila circadian rhythm. The sensitivity analysis of parameters demonstrates that with the regulation of bantam the system is more sensitive to perturbations, indicating that bantam regulation makes it easier for the organism to modulate its period against the environmental perturbations. The effectiveness in rescuing locomotor activity rhythms of mutated flies shows that bantam is necessary for strong and sustained rhythms. In addition, the biological mechanisms of bantam regulation are analyzed, which may help us more clearly understand Drosophila circadian rhythm regulated by other miRNAs.

  15. Rhythm perception, production, and synchronization during the perinatal period

    PubMed Central

    Provasi, Joëlle; Anderson, David I.; Barbu-Roth, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Sensori-motor synchronization (SMS) is the coordination of rhythmic movement with an external rhythm. It plays a central role in motor, cognitive, and social behavior. SMS is commonly studied in adults and in children from four years of age onward. Prior to this age, the ability has rarely been investigated due to a lack of available methods. The present paper reviews what is known about SMS in young children, infants, newborns, and fetuses. The review highlights fetal and infant perception of rhythm and cross modal perception of rhythm, fetal, and infant production of rhythm and cross modal production of rhythm, and the contexts in which production of rhythm can be observed in infants. A primary question is whether infants, even newborns, can modify their spontaneous rhythmical motor behavior in response to external rhythmical stimulation. Spontaneous sucking, crying, and leg movements have been studied in the presence or absence of rhythmical auditory stimulation. Findings suggest that the interaction between movement and sound is present at birth and that SMS can be observed in special conditions and within a narrow range of tempi, particularly near the infant’s own spontaneous motor tempo. The discussion centers on the fundamental role of SMS in interaction and communication at the beginning of life. PMID:25278929

  16. Circadian rhythm of alpha-amylase in rat parotid gland.

    PubMed

    Bellavía, S L; Sanz, E G; Chiarenza, A P; Sereno, R; Vermouth, N T

    1990-01-01

    The circadian rhythm of alpha-amylase, E.C. 3.2.1.1. (alpha-1,4-glucan-4-glucanohydrolase) in parotid gland of 25 day old rats was studied under different experimental conditions (fast, reversed photoperiod, constant light or darkness and treatment with reserpine and alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine). The rhythm of rats fasted or exposed for 7 days to constant darkness did not change. There were modifications in the rhythm of rats submitted to a reversed photoperiod and it disappeared in animals submitted to constant light or darkness for 15 days or treated with reserpine or alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine. The rhythm persisted, with minor changes in the acrophase, in parotids of rats kept during their gestation and post-natal life in constant light or darkness. Results suggest that the circadian rhythm of alpha-amylase in parotid gland of young rats is endogenous, synchronized by the photoperiod, under autonomous nervous system control and maternal coordination. This model appears to be useful in the study of sympathetic nervous system control of target organs and circadian rhythms in general. PMID:2076161

  17. The phonetic rhythm/syntax headedness connection: Evidence from Tagalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, Sonya; Fais, Laurel; Werker, Janet

    2005-04-01

    Ramus, Nespor, and Mehler [Cognition (1999)] show that the rhythm of a language (broadly: stress- versus syllable- versus mora-timing) results from the proportion of vocalic material in an utterance (%V) and the standard deviation of consonantal intervals (delta-C). Based on 14 languages, Shukla, Nespor, and Mehler [submitted] further argue that rhythm is correlated with syntactic headedness: low %V is correlated with head-first languages (e.g., English); high %V is correlated with head-final languages (e.g., Japanese). Together, these proposals have important implications for language acquisition: infants can discriminate across rhythm classes [Nazzi, Bertoncini, and Mehler, J. Exp. Psych: Human Perception and Performance (1998)]. If rhythm, as defined by %V and delta-C, can predict headedness, then infants can potentially use rhythm information to bootstrap into their languages syntactic structure. This paper reports on a study analyzing rhythm in a language not yet considered: Tagalog. Results support the Shukla et al. proposal in an interesting way: based on its %V and delta-C, Tagalog falls between head-first and head-last languages, slighty closer to the head-first group. This placement correlates well with the fact that, although Tagalog is said to be primarily head-first syntactically, head-last phrases are permitted and common in the language.

  18. Neural mechanisms of rhythm perception: current findings and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Grahn, Jessica A

    2012-10-01

    Perception of temporal patterns is fundamental to normal hearing, speech, motor control, and music. Certain types of pattern understanding are unique to humans, such as musical rhythm. Although human responses to musical rhythm are universal, there is much we do not understand about how rhythm is processed in the brain. Here, I consider findings from research into basic timing mechanisms and models through to the neuroscience of rhythm and meter. A network of neural areas, including motor regions, is regularly implicated in basic timing as well as processing of musical rhythm. However, fractionating the specific roles of individual areas in this network has remained a challenge. Distinctions in activity patterns appear between "automatic" and "cognitively controlled" timing processes, but the perception of musical rhythm requires features of both automatic and controlled processes. In addition, many experimental manipulations rely on participants directing their attention toward or away from certain stimulus features, and measuring corresponding differences in neural activity. Many temporal features, however, are implicitly processed whether attended to or not, making it difficult to create controlled baseline conditions for experimental comparisons. The variety of stimuli, paradigms, and definitions can further complicate comparisons across domains or methodologies. Despite these challenges, the high level of interest and multitude of methodological approaches from different cognitive domains (including music, language, and motor learning) have yielded new insights and hold promise for future progress. PMID:22811317

  19. European Heart Rhythm Association Summit report 2014.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Richard; Leclercq, Christophe; Kuck, Karl-Heinz

    2016-05-01

    Across Europe, the role of the welfare state is constantly being questioned and even eroded. At the same time, funding sources for post-graduate medical education and training are under attack as regulators review the working relationships between physicians and industry. Both of these issues have profound consequences for cardiologists and their patients, and were, therefore, chosen as the themes of the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) 2014 Spring Summit held at Heart House, Sophia Antipolis, 25-26 March 2014. The meeting noted that some of the changes are already affecting patient care standards and that this is exacerbated by a reduction in research and education programmes. The principle conclusion was that EHRA must find better means of engagement with the authorities across Europe to ensure that its views are considered and that ethical patient care is preserved. Participants were particularly alarmed by the example from Sweden in which future healthcare planning appears to exclude the views of physicians, although this is not yet the case in other countries. The demand for greater transparency in relationships between physicians and industry was also discussed. Although intended to eliminate corruption, concern was expressed that such moves would cause long-term damage to education and research, threatening the future of congresses, whose role in these areas appears underestimated by the authorities. PMID:26467405

  20. Biological rhythms as organization and information.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, D; Rossi, E L

    1993-11-01

    While it is generally acknowledged that modern science began with the quantification of time in the measurement of linear physical processes in space by Galileo and Newton, the biological sciences have only recently developed appropriate experimental and mathematical methods for the description of living systems in terms of processes of non-linear, recursive dynamics. We now recognize that living organisms have patterns of exquisitely timed processes that are as intricate as their spatial structure and organization. Self-similarities of life processes in time and space have evolved to generate an ensemble of oscillators within which analogous functions may be discerned on many different time scales. The increasing complexity of periodic relationships on and between the many levels of biological organization are uncovered by current research. Recent efforts to reformulate the foundation of physics from the quantum to the cosmological level by using the concept of information as the common denominator integrating time, structure and energy remind us of an apparently analogous suggestion in the chronobiological literature which also describes the periodic dynamics of living systems as information processing. In this paper we review the periodic processes of living systems on all levels from the molecular, genetic and cellular to the neuroendocrinological, behavioural and social domains. Biological rhythms may be conceptualized as the evolution of ever more complex dynamics of information transduction that optimize the temporal integrity, development, and survival of the organism. PMID:8130327

  1. Synchrony in silicon: the gamma rhythm.

    PubMed

    Arthur, John V; Boahen, Kwabena A

    2007-11-01

    In this paper, we present a network of silicon interneurons that synchronize in the gamma frequency range (20-80 Hz). The gamma rhythm strongly influences neuronal spike timing within many brain regions, potentially playing a crucial role in computation. Yet it has largely been ignored in neuromorphic systems, which use mixed analog and digital circuits to model neurobiology in silicon. Our neurons synchronize by using shunting inhibition (conductance based) with a synaptic rise time. Synaptic rise time promotes synchrony by delaying the effect of inhibition, providing an opportune period for interneurons to spike together. Shunting inhibition, through its voltage dependence, inhibits interneurons that spike out of phase more strongly (delaying the spike further), pushing them into phase (in the next cycle). We characterize the interneuron, which consists of soma (cell body) and synapse circuits, fabricated in a 0.25-microm complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS). Further, we show that synchronized interneurons (population of 256) spike with a period that is proportional to the synaptic rise time. We use these interneurons to entrain model excitatory principal neurons and to implement a form of object binding. PMID:18051195

  2. Music and speech prosody: a common rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Hausen, Maija; Torppa, Ritva; Salmela, Viljami R.; Vainio, Martti; Särkämö, Teppo

    2013-01-01

    Disorders of music and speech perception, known as amusia and aphasia, have traditionally been regarded as dissociated deficits based on studies of brain damaged patients. This has been taken as evidence that music and speech are perceived by largely separate and independent networks in the brain. However, recent studies of congenital amusia have broadened this view by showing that the deficit is associated with problems in perceiving speech prosody, especially intonation and emotional prosody. In the present study the association between the perception of music and speech prosody was investigated with healthy Finnish adults (n = 61) using an on-line music perception test including the Scale subtest of Montreal Battery of Evaluation of Amusia (MBEA) and Off-Beat and Out-of-key tasks as well as a prosodic verbal task that measures the perception of word stress. Regression analyses showed that there was a clear association between prosody perception and music perception, especially in the domain of rhythm perception. This association was evident after controlling for music education, age, pitch perception, visuospatial perception, and working memory. Pitch perception was significantly associated with music perception but not with prosody perception. The association between music perception and visuospatial perception (measured using analogous tasks) was less clear. Overall, the pattern of results indicates that there is a robust link between music and speech perception and that this link can be mediated by rhythmic cues (time and stress). PMID:24032022

  3. Music and speech prosody: a common rhythm.

    PubMed

    Hausen, Maija; Torppa, Ritva; Salmela, Viljami R; Vainio, Martti; Särkämö, Teppo

    2013-01-01

    Disorders of music and speech perception, known as amusia and aphasia, have traditionally been regarded as dissociated deficits based on studies of brain damaged patients. This has been taken as evidence that music and speech are perceived by largely separate and independent networks in the brain. However, recent studies of congenital amusia have broadened this view by showing that the deficit is associated with problems in perceiving speech prosody, especially intonation and emotional prosody. In the present study the association between the perception of music and speech prosody was investigated with healthy Finnish adults (n = 61) using an on-line music perception test including the Scale subtest of Montreal Battery of Evaluation of Amusia (MBEA) and Off-Beat and Out-of-key tasks as well as a prosodic verbal task that measures the perception of word stress. Regression analyses showed that there was a clear association between prosody perception and music perception, especially in the domain of rhythm perception. This association was evident after controlling for music education, age, pitch perception, visuospatial perception, and working memory. Pitch perception was significantly associated with music perception but not with prosody perception. The association between music perception and visuospatial perception (measured using analogous tasks) was less clear. Overall, the pattern of results indicates that there is a robust link between music and speech perception and that this link can be mediated by rhythmic cues (time and stress). PMID:24032022

  4. Circadian Rhythms: Hijacking the Cyanobacterial Clock

    PubMed Central

    Hoyle, Nathaniel P.; O’Neill, John S

    2016-01-01

    The production of limitless carbon-free energy is a long-sought dream of scientists and politicians alike. One strategy for achieving this aim is the production of hydrogen by photosynthetic microorganisms – harnessing the effectively limitless power of the sun to power our cars, toasters and PCR machines. It may be tempting to think of host expression systems as miniature factories given over entirely to the production our molecule of interest. However, the biological nature of the host must be taken into account if we are to maximize productivity. The circadian rhythm, an organism’s entrainable oscillation of biological processes with a period of around 24 hours, is one such aspect that has received scant attention but is likely to be of particular importance to photosynthetic host systems. In this issue of current biology Xu et al. describe how our knowledge of the Synechococcus elongatus circadian clock can be leveraged to improve the production of exogeneous proteins, including those involved in the production of hydrogen [1]. PMID:24309283

  5. Modeling activity rhythms in fiddler crabs.

    PubMed

    Dugaw, Christopher J; Honeyfield, Rebecca; Taylor, Caz M; Verzi, Diana W

    2009-10-01

    Burrowing crabs of the genus Uca inhabit tidal mudflats and beaches. They feed actively during low tide and remain in their burrows when the tide is high. The timing of this activity has been shown to persist in the absence of external light and tidal cues, indicating the presence of an internal timing mechanism. Researchers report the persistence of several variations in locomotor activity under laboratory conditions that cannot be explained by a single circatidal clock. Previous studies supported two alternative hypotheses: the presence of either two circalunidian clocks, or a circadian and circatidal clock to regulate these activity rhythms. In this paper, we formulate mathematical models to describe and test these hypotheses. The models suggested by the literature contain some important differences beyond the frequency of proposed clocks, and these are reflected in the mathematical formulations and simulation results. One hypothesis suggests independent phase oscillators, while the other hypothesis suggests that they are coupled in anti-phase. Neither model is able to recover all of the variations in locomotor acitivity observed under laboratory conditions. However, we propose a new model that incorporates aspects of both existing hypotheses and is able to reproduce all laboratory observations. PMID:19916836

  6. Glucose intolerance induced by a high-fat/low-carbohydrate diet in rats effects of nonesterified fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Miura, Yoshikazu; Kaneko, Takashi; Li, Jue; Qin, Li-Qiang; Wang, Pei-Yu; Matsui, Hisao; Sato, Akio

    2002-04-01

    We examined the time course of effects of a high-fat/low-carbohydrate (HF/LC) diet on the impairment of glucose tolerance in rats, clarified whether insulin secretion and sensitivity were impaired by the HF/LC diet, and investigated the relationship between the increased nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) after HF/LC diet feeding and insulin secretion and sensitivity. We found that glucose tolerance and the postglucose-loading insulin secretion were impaired after 3 and 7 d on the HF/LC diet. The glucose intolerance was accompanied by a rise in the fasting plasma NEFA level. When stimulated with 15 mmol/L of glucose, the insulin secretion was impaired in pancreatic islets from rats fed the HF/LC diet. Rats fed the HF/LC diet showed insulin resistance in vivo. The glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was inhibited in the islets following 24-h culture with palmitic acid. The 24-h infusion of palmitic acid decreased whole-body insulin sensitivity. In summary, at least 3 d on a HF/LC diet is needed to induce glucose intolerance in rats, and the impairment may be induced by decreased insulin secretion and sensitivity, which is related to the increase in the plasma NEFA level. PMID:12108518

  7. Glucose uptake in rat soleus - Effect of acute unloading and subsequent reloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, Eric J.; Tischler, Marc E.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of acutely reduced weight bearing (unloading) on the in vitro uptake of 2-1,2-H-3-deoxy-D-glucose was studied in the soleus muscle by tail casting and suspending rats. After just 4 h, the uptake of 2-deoxy-D-glucose fell (-19 percent) and declined further after an additional 20 h of unloading. This diminution at 24 h was associated with slower oxidation of C-14-glucose and incorporation of C-14-glucose into glycogen. At 3 days of unloading, basal uptake of 2-deoxy-D-glucose did not differ from control. Reloading of the soleus after 1 or 3 days of unloading increased uptake of 2-deoxy-D-glucose above control and returned it to normal within 6 h and 4 days, respectively. These effects of unloading and recovery were caused by local changes in the soleus, because the extensor digitorum longus from the same hindlimbs did not display any alterations in uptake of 2-deoxy-D-glucose or metabolism of glucose.

  8. Altered glucose kinetics in diabetic rats during Gram-negative infection

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, C.H.; Dobrescu, C.; Bagby, G.J.; Spitzer, J.J. )

    1987-08-01

    The present study examined the purported exacerbating effect of sepsis on glucose metabolism in diabetes. Diabetes was induced in rats by an intravenous injection of 70 or 45 mg/kg streptozotocin. The higher dose produced severe diabetes, whereas the lower dose of streptozotocin produced a miler, latent diabetes. After a chronic diabetic state had developed for 4 wk, rats had catheters implanted and sepsis induced by intraperitoneal injections of live Escherichia coli. After 24 h of sepsis the blood glucose concentration was unchanged in nondiabetics and latent diabetics, but glucose decreased from 15 to 8 mM in the septic severe diabetic group. This decrease in blood glucose was not accompanied by alterations in the plasma insulin concentration. Glucose turnover, assessed by the constant intravenous infusion of (6-{sup 3}H)- and (U-{sup 14}C)glucose, was elevated in the severe diabetic group, compared with either latent diabetics or nondiabetics. Sepsis increased the rate of glucose disappearance in nondiabetic rats but had no effect in either group of diabetic animals. Sepsis also failed to alter the insulinogenic index, used to estimate the insulin secretory capacity, in diabetic rats. Thus the present study sugges