Science.gov

Sample records for 24-h lethal concentration

  1. Effects of sleep fragmentation on appetite and related hormone concentrations over 24 h in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Gonnissen, Hanne K J; Hursel, Rick; Rutters, Femke; Martens, Eveline A P; Westerterp-Plantenga, Margriet S

    2013-02-28

    In addition to short sleep duration, reduced sleep quality is also associated with appetite control. The present study examined the effect of sleep fragmentation, independent of sleep duration, on appetite profiles and 24 h profiles of hormones involved in energy balance regulation. A total of twelve healthy male subjects (age 23 (sd 4) years, BMI 24·4 (sd 1·9) kg/m²) completed a 24 h randomised crossover study in which sleep (23.30-07.30 hours) was either fragmented or non-fragmented. Polysomnography was used to determine rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep, slow-wave sleep (SWS) and total sleep time (TST). Blood samples were taken at baseline and continued hourly for the 24 h period to measure glucose, insulin, ghrelin, leptin, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and melatonin concentrations. In addition, salivary cortisol levels were measured. Visual analogue scales were used to score appetite-related feelings. Sleep fragmentation resulted in reduced REM sleep (69·4 min compared with 83·5 min; P< 0·05) and preservation of SWS without changes in TST. In fragmented v. non-fragmented sleep, glucose concentrations did not change, while insulin secretion was decreased in the morning, and increased in the afternoon (P< 0·05), and GLP-1 concentrations and fullness scores were lower (P< 0·05). After dinner, desire-to-eat ratings were higher after fragmented sleep (P< 0·05). A single night of fragmented sleep, resulting in reduced REM sleep, induced a shift in insulin concentrations, from being lower in the morning and higher in the afternoon, while GLP-1 concentrations and fullness scores were decreased. These results may lead to increased food intake and snacking, thus contributing to a positive energy balance.

  2. High-fat meals reduce 24-h circulating leptin concentrations in women.

    PubMed

    Havel, P J; Townsend, R; Chaump, L; Teff, K

    1999-02-01

    Leptin induces weight loss in rodents via its effects on food intake and energy expenditure. High-fat diets induce weight gain, but the mechanism is not well understood. Previous studies have not found an effect of dietary fat content on fasting leptin. There is a nocturnal increase of leptin, however, which is related to insulin responses to meals. We have reported that adipocyte glucose utilization is involved in insulin-induced leptin secretion in vitro. Accordingly, high-fat, low-carbohydrate (HF/LC) meals, which induce smaller insulin and glucose responses, would produce lower leptin concentrations than low-fat, high-carbohydrate (LF/HC) meals. Blood samples were collected every 30-60 min for 24 h from 19 normal-weight (BMI, 24.2 +/- 0.7 kg/m2; percent body fat = 31 +/- 1%) women on 2 days (10 days apart) during which the subjects were randomized to consume three isocaloric 730-kcal meals containing either 60/20 or 20/60% of energy as fat/carbohydrate. Overall insulin and glycemic responses (24-h area under the curve [AUC]) were reduced by 55 and 61%, respectively, on the HF/LC day (P < 0.0001). During LF/HC feeding, there were larger increases of leptin 4-6 h after breakfast (38 +/- 7%, P < 0.001) and lunch (78 +/- 14%, P < 0.001) than after HF/LC meals (both P < 0.02). During LF/HC feeding, leptin increased from a morning baseline of 10.7 +/- 1.6 ng/ml to a nocturnal peak of 21.3 +/- 1.3 ng/ml (change, 10.6 +/- 1.3 ng/ml; percent change, 123 +/- 16%; P < 0.0001). The amplitudes of the nocturnal rise of leptin and the 24-h leptin AUC were 21 +/- 8% (P < 0.005) and 38 +/- 12% (P < 0.0025) larger, respectively, on the LF/HC day. In summary, consumption of HF/LC meals results in lowered 24-h circulating leptin concentrations. This result may be a consequence of decreased adipocyte glucose metabolism. Decreases of 24-h circulating leptin could contribute to the weight gain during consumption of high-fat diets.

  3. Apparent lethal concentrations of pyrolysis products of some polymeric materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Marcussen, W. H.; Furst, A.; Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    Thirty-nine samples of polymeric materials were evaluated to determine the apparent lethal concentrations of their pyrolysis products. The materials were compared on the basis of the apparent lethal concentration for 50 percent of the test animals. Relative toxicity rankings based o apparent lethal concentration values can differ significantly depending on whether they are based on weight of sample charged or weight of sample pyrolyzed. The ranking of polyphenylene sulfide is particularly sensitive to this difference.

  4. Isotope concentrations from 24-h urine and 3-h serum samples can be used to measure intestinal magnesium absorption in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Karen E; Nabak, Andrea C; Johnson, Rachael Erin; Marvdashti, Sheeva; Keuler, Nicholas S; Shafer, Martin M; Abrams, Steven A

    2014-04-01

    Studies suggest a link between magnesium status and osteoporosis. One barrier to more conclusive research on the potential relation is measuring intestinal magnesium absorption (MgA), which requires the use of stable isotopes and a ≥6-d stool or 3-d urine collection. We evaluated alternative methods of measuring MgA. We administered 2 stable magnesium isotopes to 15 postmenopausal women (cohort 1) aged 62 ± 8 y with a dietary magnesium intake of 345 ± 72 mg/d. Participants fasted from 1200 h to 0700 h and then consumed breakfast with ∼23 mg of oral ²⁶Mg and ∼11 mg of i.v. ²⁵Mg. We measured magnesium isotope concentrations in 72-h urine, spot urine (36, 48, 60, and 72 h), and spot serum (1, 3, and 5 h) samples collected after isotope dosing. We calculated MgA using the dose-corrected fraction of isotope concentrations from the 72-h urine collection. We validated new methods in 10 postmenopausal women (cohort 2) aged 59 ± 5 y with a dietary magnesium intake of 325 ± 122 mg/d. In cohort 1, MgA based on the 72-h urine collection was 0.28 ± 0.08. The 72-h MgA correlated most highly with 0-24 h urine MgA value alone (ρ = 0.95, P < 0.001) or the mean of the 0-24 h urine and the 3-h (ρ = 0.93, P < 0.001) or 5-h (ρ = 0.96, P < 0.001) serum MgA values. In cohort 2, Bland-Altman bias was lowest (-0.003, P = 0.82) using means of the 0-24 h urine and 3-h serum MgA values. We conclude that means of 0-24 h urine and 3-h serum MgA provide a reasonable estimate of 72-h MgA. However, if researchers seek to identify small changes in MgA, we recommend a 3-d urine or extended stool collection.

  5. Nanoscale probing of the lateral homogeneity of donors concentration in nitridated SiO2/4H-SiC interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorenza, Patrick; Di Franco, Salvatore; Giannazzo, Filippo; Roccaforte, Fabrizio

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, nanoscale resolution scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM) and local capacitance-voltage measurements were used to probe the interfacial donor concentration in SiO2/4H-SiC systems annealed in N2O. Such nitrogen-based annealings are commonly employed to passivate SiO2/SiC interface traps, and result both in the incorporation of N-related donors in SiC and in the increase of the mobility in the inversion layer in 4H-SiC MOS-devices. From our SCM measurements, a spatially inhomogeneous donor distribution was observed in the SiO2/4H-SiC system subjected to N2O annealing. Hence, the effect of a phosphorus implantation before the oxide deposition and N2O annealing was also evaluated. In this case, besides an increased average donor concentration, an improvement of the lateral homogeneity of the active doping was also detected. The possible implications of such a pre-implantation doping of the near-interface region on 4H-SiC MOS-devices are discussed.

  6. Nanoscale probing of the lateral homogeneity of donors concentration in nitridated SiO2/4H-SiC interfaces.

    PubMed

    Fiorenza, Patrick; Di Franco, Salvatore; Giannazzo, Filippo; Roccaforte, Fabrizio

    2016-08-05

    In this paper, nanoscale resolution scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM) and local capacitance-voltage measurements were used to probe the interfacial donor concentration in SiO2/4H-SiC systems annealed in N2O. Such nitrogen-based annealings are commonly employed to passivate SiO2/SiC interface traps, and result both in the incorporation of N-related donors in SiC and in the increase of the mobility in the inversion layer in 4H-SiC MOS-devices. From our SCM measurements, a spatially inhomogeneous donor distribution was observed in the SiO2/4H-SiC system subjected to N2O annealing. Hence, the effect of a phosphorus implantation before the oxide deposition and N2O annealing was also evaluated. In this case, besides an increased average donor concentration, an improvement of the lateral homogeneity of the active doping was also detected. The possible implications of such a pre-implantation doping of the near-interface region on 4H-SiC MOS-devices are discussed.

  7. Lethal and sub-lethal effects of elevated CO2 concentrations on marine benthic invertebrates and fish.

    PubMed

    Lee, Changkeun; Hong, Seongjin; Kwon, Bong-Oh; Lee, Jung-Ho; Ryu, Jongseong; Park, Young-Gyu; Kang, Seong-Gil; Khim, Jong Seong

    2016-08-01

    Concern about leakage of carbon dioxide (CO2) from deep-sea storage in geological reservoirs is increasing because of its possible adverse effects on marine organisms locally or at nearby coastal areas both in sediment and water column. In the present study, we examined how elevated CO2 affects various intertidal epibenthic (benthic copepod), intertidal endobenthic (Manila clam and Venus clam), sub-tidal benthic (brittle starfish), and free-living (marine medaka) organisms in areas expected to be impacted by leakage. Acute lethal and sub-lethal effects were detected in the adult stage of all test organisms exposed to varying concentrations of CO2, due to the associated decline in pH (8.3 to 5.2) during 96-h exposure. However, intertidal organisms (such as benthic copepods and clams) showed remarkable resistance to elevated CO2, with the Venus clam being the most tolerant (LpH50 = 5.45). Sub-tidal species (such as brittle starfish [LpH50 = 6.16] and marine medaka [LpH50 = 5.91]) were more sensitive to elevated CO2 compared to intertidal species, possibly because they have fewer defensive capabilities. Of note, the exposure duration might regulate the degree of acute sub-lethal effects, as evidenced by the Venus clam, which showed a time-dependent effect to elevated CO2. Finally, copper was chosen as a model toxic element to find out the synergistic or antagonistic effects between ocean acidification and metal pollution. Combination of CO2 and Cu exposure enhances the adverse effects to organisms, generally supporting a synergistic effect scenario. Overall, the significant variation in the degree to which CO2 adversely affected organisms (viz., working range and strength) was clearly observed, supporting the general concept of species-dependent effects of elevated CO2.

  8. The Spatial Concentration of Southern Whites and Argument-Based Lethal Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Matthew R.; Shihadeh, Edward S.

    2009-01-01

    This analysis examines how the spatial concentration of Southern whites is associated with white argument-based lethal violence. Using a well-known measure of spatial segregation (V, the adjusted P* index) among Southern-born whites in U.S. counties in 2000, the results reveal that the spatial concentration of Southern-born whites is only…

  9. Serum immunoreactive relaxin in women during a 24-h period.

    PubMed

    Seki, K; Kato, K; Tabei, T

    1987-03-01

    Serum relaxin concentrations were measured every 30 min during a 24-h period in nonpregnant and pregnant women. Relaxin was undetectable in all serum samples obtained from 3 nonpregnant women. Relaxin was detectable in all serum samples obtained from 2 pregnant women. However, neither episodic secretion of relaxin nor a 24-h rhythm in relaxin secretion was discernible in these women.

  10. Sub-lethal concentrations of activated complement increase rat lymphocyte glutamine utilization and oxidation while lethal concentrations cause death by a mechanism involving ATP depletion.

    PubMed

    Bacurau, R F P; O'Toole, C E; Newsholme, P; Costa Rosa, L F B P

    2002-09-01

    Nucleated cells are more resistant to complement-mediated cell death than anucleated cells such as erythrocytes. There are few reports concerning the metabolic response of nucleated cells subjected to sub-lethal complement attack. It is possible that the rate of utilization of specific metabolic fuels by the cell is increased to enhance cell defence. We have measured the maximum activity of hexokinase, citrate synthase, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutaminase in rat mesenteric lymphocytes exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of activated complement (present in zymosan-activated serum, ZAS). These enzymes were carefully selected as they indicate changes of flux in glycolysis, TCA cycle, pentose phosphate pathway and glutaminolysis, respectively. The only enzyme activity to change on exposure of lymphocytes to ZAS was glutaminase, which was enhanced approximately by two-fold. Although rates of both glutamine and glucose utilization were enhanced by exposure to ZAS, only the rate of oxidation of glutamine was increased. Complement kills anucleated cells by simple osmotic lysis. However, it is likely that some nucleated cells will display characteristics of an ordered death mechanism and we have demonstrated that the concentration of lymphocyte ATP is dramatically decreased by activated complement. Nevertheless, the extent of cell death could be significantly reduced by the addition of inhibitors of the nuclear enzyme poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). We conclude that glutamine metabolism is not only important for lymphocyte proliferative responses but is also important for cell defence from sub-lethal concentrations of activated complement. The rapid rate of complement-induced lymphocyte death reported here is suggested to be a consequence of over-activation of the nuclear enzyme PARP and ATP depletion.

  11. The natural antimicrobial carvacrol inhibits quorum sensing in Chromobacterium violaceum and reduces bacterial biofilm formation at sub-lethal concentrations.

    PubMed

    Burt, Sara A; Ojo-Fakunle, Victoria T A; Woertman, Jenifer; Veldhuizen, Edwin J A

    2014-01-01

    The formation of biofilm by bacteria confers resistance to biocides and presents problems in medical and veterinary clinical settings. Here we report the effect of carvacrol, one of the major antimicrobial components of oregano oil, on the formation of biofilms and its activity on existing biofilms. Assays were carried out in polystyrene microplates to observe (a) the effect of 0-0.8 mM carvacrol on the formation of biofilms by selected bacterial pathogens over 24 h and (b) the effect of 0-8 mM carvacrol on the stability of pre-formed biofilms. Carvacrol was able to inhibit the formation of biofilms of Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472, Salmonella enterica subsp. Typhimurium DT104, and Staphylococcus aureus 0074, while it showed no effect on formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (field isolate) biofilms. This inhibitory effect of carvacrol was observed at sub-lethal concentrations (<0.5 mM) where no effect was seen on total bacterial numbers, indicating that carvacrol's bactericidal effect was not causing the observed inhibition of biofilm formation. In contrast, carvacrol had (up to 8 mM) very little or no activity against existing biofilms of the bacteria described, showing that formation of the biofilm also confers protection against this compound. Since quorum sensing is an essential part of biofilm formation, the effect of carvacrol on quorum sensing of C. violaceum was also studied. Sub-MIC concentrations of carvacrol reduced expression of cviI (a gene coding for the N-acyl-L-homoserine lactone synthase), production of violacein (pigmentation) and chitinase activity (both regulated by quorum sensing) at concentrations coinciding with carvacrol's inhibiting effect on biofilm formation. These results indicate that carvacrol's activity in inhibition of biofilm formation may be related to the disruption of quorum sensing.

  12. Genetic determination of tolerance to lethal and sublethal copper concentrations in field populations of Daphnia longispina.

    PubMed

    Lopes, I; Baird, D J; Ribeiro, R

    2004-01-01

    In order to study the effects of environmental pollution on the genetic diversity of natural populations, two field populations of the cladoceran Daphnia longispina were sampled: one in a reference site (uncontaminated) and the other in a site historically stressed with acid mine drainage (AMD). Five hypotheses were formulated: (1) the stressed population presents a higher tolerance to lethal levels of copper than the reference population, (2) differences in tolerance to lethal levels, observed between the two populations, are due to the loss of sensitive lineages, (3) differences in tolerance to lethal levels of copper between the two populations are due to the appearance of new genotypes, (4) the acquisition of tolerance to lethal levels of copper involved changes in life-history patterns and fitness costs under optimal conditions, and (5) historical contamination by AMD resulted in tolerance differences to sublethal levels between populations, within categories similarly tolerant to lethality, specifically, lineages with similar tolerance to lethal levels from both populations show differences in tolerance to sublethal levels, the stressed population being more tolerant to sublethal levels of contamination than the reference population. Over 125 acclimated cloned lineages, from each population, were exposed to different copper concentrations for 24 hours. At the end of each assay, mortality and feeding inhibition were monitored. Life-cycle traits under optimal conditions were also monitored (time to first brood, number of neonates per brood, inter-brood time, body length, and ingested algae). At lethal levels of copper, significant differences were found in the frequency of sensitive lineages between the two populations. The stressed population did not include the most sensitive lineages, though the most tolerant ones were also present in the reference population. Thus, the hypothesis of presence of new genotypes in the stressed population resulting in an

  13. Survival from a lethal blood concentration of cyanide with associated alcohol intoxication.

    PubMed

    Kampe, S; Iffland, R; Korenkov, M; Diefenbach, C

    2000-12-01

    We present a patient with a lethal blood concentration of cyanide. Additionally, he was found to have an alcohol blood level of 270 mg. dl-1, but made a complete recovery following administration of the antidotes dimethylaminophenol and thiosulphate. It is postulated that the patient may have been able to detoxify himself as a result of metabolism of cyanide to the non-toxic form, thiocyanate.

  14. Effects of Glyphosate-Based Herbicide Sub-Lethal Concentrations on Fish Feeding Behavior.

    PubMed

    Giaquinto, Percilia Cardoso; de Sá, Marina Borges; Sugihara, Vanessa Seiko; Gonçalves, Bruno Bastos; Delício, Helton Carlos; Barki, Assaf

    2017-04-01

    Glyphosate-based herbicides are widely used in agricultural systems. Although the target organism are particularly plant organisms, there are numerous studies showing adverse effects in aquatic animals, such as inhibition of acetyl cholinesterase, effects on kidney, liver, and gill and stressors effects. This study analyzed the effects of commercial formulation of glyphosate on feeding behavior in Pacu (Piaractus mesopotamicus). Fish were exposed to three glyphosate concentrations (0.2, 0.6, and 1.8 ppm) for 15 days. At concentrations of 0.2 and 0.6 ppm, food intake decreased on day 13 and then returned to normal on day 15. At the highest glyphosate-based herbicide concentration, 1.8 ppm, food consumption decreased dramatically and did not recover on day 15. This study showed that glyphosate-based herbicide at sub-lethal concentrations can affect feed intake in pacu and consequently inhibits its growth.

  15. Effects of sub-lethal and chronic lead concentrations on blood and liver ALA-D activity and hematological parameters in Nile tilapia.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Carlucio Rocha; Cavalcante, Ana Luiza Michel; Hauser-Davis, Rachel Ann; Lopes, Renato Matos; Mattos, Rita De Cássia Oliveira Da Costa

    2016-07-01

    Liver and blood δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALA-D) inhibition by exposure to sub-lethal lead concentrations over time in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) were investigated. All three lead concentrations (1mgkg(-1), 10mgkg(-1) and 100mgkg(-1)) significantly inhibited ALA-D activity in blood (319±29.2; 180±14.6 and 172±19µmols(-1)h(-1)L(-1) respectively) and liver (302±5.84; 201±41.4 and 93±22.1µmols(-1)h(-1)L(-1)) 24h after injection relative to controls (blood: 597±37.0µmols(-1)h(-1)L(-1); liver: 376±23.1µmols(-1)h(-1)L(-1)). Blood ALA-D was greatly inhibited in all but the highest lead dose. Fish were then exposed to 1mgkg(-1) lead for 9 days, and presented short-term hyperglycemia, decreased hemoglobin and hematocrit values and time-dependent blood ALA-D activity inhibition, corroborating blood ALA-D activity as being more suitable for investigating lead effects, showing dose and time-dependent ALA-D inhibition after lead exposure. The results of the present study also demonstrated that fish size affects blood ALA-D activity, as fish from the 24-h assay, which were slightly smaller (approximately 200g), showed higher ALA-D inhibition in response to lead exposure when compared to the fish from the 9-day assay (approximately 500g). Thus, fish size should always be taken into account both in the field and in laboratory settings, and efforts should be made to obtain uniform fish size samples for biomarker studies.

  16. Distribution of nickel in the roach (Rutilus rutilus L. ) after exposure to lethal and sublethal concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Van Hoof, F.; Nauwelaers, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    In order to evaluate the eventual impact of nickel in fish kills occuring in the river Meuse in Belgium, a series of experiments were performed in which the uptake and distribution of nickel in Rutilus rutilus L., one of the dominant species in the river was studied after administration of nickel alone and in combination with other metals. In decreasing order the highest nickel concentrations were found in gill, opercle, kidney, liver, and muscle. After exposure to nickel in combination with copper or chromium nickel levels in gill tissue increased significantly compared to levels encountered when fish were exposed to the same concentration of nickel alone. When the pH of the test solution was lowered from 8.0 to 6.5, the lethal action and the accumulation of nickel in gill tissue increased. Control fish collected from a surface water storage reservoir and from the river Meuse had higher nickel levels in the opercle than in gill tissue.

  17. Discriminating lethal concentrations and efficacy of six pyrethroids for control of Aedes aegypti in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Juntarajumnong, Waraporn; Pimnon, Sunthorn; Bangs, Michael J; Thanispong, Kanutcharee; Chareonviriyaphap, Theeraphap

    2012-03-01

    Establishing baseline insecticide discriminating doses is crucial in accurately determining susceptibility status and changing temporal patterns of physiological response in mosquito populations. Pyrethroids are the predominant chemicals used for controlling adult Aedes aegypti and Ae. albopictus, both vectors of dengue viruses, in Thailand. Presently, only 2 pyrethroids, permethrin and lambda-cyhalothrin, have published diagnostic dose rates for monitoring Ae. aegypti. This study established the diagnostic lethal concentrations for 6 different pyrethroids available in Thailand for dengue vector control. United States Department of Agriculture insecticide-susceptible strain of Ae. aegypti was used to establish the baseline concentrations for subsequent susceptibility testing of field populations. Our findings showed lower discriminating concentrations for lambda-cyhalothrin and permethrin than those recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO), at 2.5- and 1.7-fold lower dosing, respectively. The susceptibility status of 3 different geographical populations of field-collected Ae. aegypti were tested using the standard WHO procedures. All 3 field strains demonstrated varying levels of physiological resistance to each compound. We conclude that establishing the baseline diagnostic concentration of an insecticide is of paramount importance in accurately determining the susceptibility status in field-collected mosquitoes. If possible, discriminating doses should be established for all insecticides and test assays run concurrently with a known susceptible strain for more accurate monitoring of resistance in mosquito populations in Thailand.

  18. Physiological changes in Biomphalaria glabrata Say, 1818 (Pulmonata: Planorbidae) caused by sub-lethal concentrations of the latex of Euphorbia splendens var. hislopii N.E.B (Euphorbiaceae).

    PubMed

    Mello-Silva, Clélia Christina; Vasconcellos, Maurício Carvalho de; Pinheiro, Jairo; Rodrigues, Maria de Lurdes de Azevedo

    2006-02-01

    Molluscides have been used as one of the strategies to control schistosomiasis. Many plant extracts with molluscidal effects have been tested, but the action of the latex of Euphorbia splendens var. hislopii is considered the most promising because it meets the recommendations of the World Health Organization (WHO). The objective of this study was to determine the lethal dose and identify the effects of the different doses of latex of E. splendens var. hislopii on the physiology of Biomphalaria glabrata submitted to treatment for 24 h. The concentrations of glucose, uric acid and total proteins in the hemolymph and of glycogen in the digestive gland and cephalopodal mass were determined. The LD50 value was 1 mg/l. The highest escape index was found to be at a concentration of 0.6 mg/l. The results showed that the latex of E. splendens var. hislopii caused a sharp reduction in the reserves of glycogen in the digestive gland and elevation of the protein content in the hemolymph of B. glabrata.

  19. Comparing median lethal concentration values using confidence interval overlap or ratio tests.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Matthew W; Park, Robert M; Bailer, A John

    2006-05-01

    Experimenters in toxicology often compare the concentration-response relationship between two distinct populations using the median lethal concentration (LC50). This comparison is sometimes done by calculating the 95% confidence interval for the LC50 for each population, concluding that no significant difference exists if the two confidence intervals overlap. A more appropriate test compares the ratio of the LC50s to 1 or the log(LC50 ratio) to 0. In this ratio test, we conclude that no difference exists in LC50s if the confidence interval for the ratio of the LC50s contains 1 or the confidence interval for the log(LC50 ratio) contains 0. A Monte Carlo simulation study was conducted to compare the confidence interval overlap test to the ratio test. The confidence interval overlap test performs substantially below the nominal alpha = 0.05 level, closer to p = 0.005; therefore, it has considerably less power for detecting true differences compared to the ratio test. The ratio-based method exhibited better type I error rates and superior power properties in comparison to the confidence interval overlap test. Thus, a ratio-based statistical procedure is preferred to using simple overlap of two independently derived confidence intervals.

  20. Effects of DDE on experimentally poisoned free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis): lethal brain concentrations.

    PubMed

    Clark, D R; Kroll, J C

    1977-12-01

    Adult female free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) were collected at Bracken Cave, Texas, and shipped to the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center. Treated mealworms (Tenebrio molitor) containing 107 ppm DDE were fed to 17 bats; five other bats were fed untreated mealworms. After 40 days on dosage, during which one dosed bat was killed accidentally, four dosed bats were frozen and the remaining 17 were starved to death. The objective was to elevate brain levels of DDE to lethality and measure these concentrations. After the feeding period, dosed bats weighed less than controls. After starvation, the body condition of dosed bats was poorer than that of controls even though there was no difference in the amounts of carcass fat. During starvation, dosed bats lost weight faster than controls. Also, four dosed bats exhibited the prolonged tremoring that characterizes DDE poisoning. DDE increased in brains of starving bats as fat was metabolized. The estimated mean brain concentration of DDE diagnostic of death was 519 ppm with a range of 458-564 ppm. These values resemble diagnostic levels known for two species of passerine birds, but they exceed published levels for two free-tailed bats from Carlsbad Caverns, New Mexico.

  1. Effects of DDE on experimentally poisoned free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis): Lethal brain concentrations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, D.R.; Kroll, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    Adult female free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) were collected at Bracken Cave, Texas, and shipped to the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center. Treated mealworms (Tenebrio molitor) containing 107 ppm DDE were fed to 17 bats; five other bats were fed untreated mealworms. After 40 days on dosage, during which one dosed bat was killed accidentally, four dosed bats were frozen and the remaining 17 were starved to death. The objective was to elevate brain levels of DDE to lethality and measure these concentrations. After the feeding period, dosed bats weighed less than controls. After starvation, the body condition of dosed bats was poorer than that of controls even though there was no difference in the amounts of carcass fat. During starvation, dosed bats lost weight faster than controls. Also, four dosed bats exhibited the prolonged tremoring that characterizes DDE poisoning. DDE increased in brains of starving bats as fat was metabolized. The estimated mean brain concentration of DDE diagnostic of death was 519 ppm with a range of 458-564 ppm. These values resemble diagnostic levels known for two species of passerine birds, but they exceed published levels for two free-tailed bats from Carlsbad Caverns, New Mexico.

  2. Histopathological changes in snail, Pomacea canaliculata, exposed to sub-lethal copper sulfate concentrations.

    PubMed

    Dummee, Vipawee; Tanhan, Phanwimol; Kruatrachue, Maleeya; Damrongphol, Praneet; Pokethitiyook, Prayad

    2015-12-01

    The acute toxicity test of Cu including range-finding and definitive test, was performed on golden apple snails, Pomacea canaliculata. The median lethal concentrations (LC50) of Cu at exposure times of 24, 48, 72 and 96 h were 330, 223, 177 and 146 µg/L, respectively. P. canaliculata were exposed to Cu at 146 µg/L for 96 h to study bioaccumulation and histopathological alterations in various organs. Snails accumulated elevated levels of Cu in gill, and lesser amounts in the digestive tract, muscle, and digestive gland. Histopathological investigation revealed several alterations in the epithelia of gill, digestive tract (esophagus, intestine, rectum), and digestive gland. The most striking changes were observed in the epithelium of the gill in which there was loss of cilia, an increase in number of mucus cells, and degeneration of columnar cells. Similar changes occurred in digestive tract epithelium. The digestive gland showed moderate alterations, vacuolization and degeneration of cells and an increase in the number of basophilic cells. We concluded that, P. canaliculata has a great potential as a bioindicator for Cu, and a biomarker for monitoring Cu contamination in aquatic environment.

  3. Contribution of QnrA, a Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance Peptide, to Survival of Escherichia coli Exposed to a Lethal Ciprofloxacin Concentration.

    PubMed

    Goto, Kensuke; Kawamura, Kumiko; Arakawa, Yoshichika

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of qnrA on survival of bacteria exposed to a lethal ciprofloxacin (CIP) concentration and development of quinolone resistance through the accumulation of amino acid substitutions in quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of GyrA and ParC, targets of quinolones, in Escherichia coli. CIP-susceptible E. coli strains of different O-serotypes (O1, O6, O18, O25b, O74, and O78) were transformed by a recombinant plasmid harboring qnrA, and the parent strains and their transformants were subjected to killing curve assays and adaptation tests. In the killing curve assay at 2 × the minimum inhibitory concentration of CIP, the viable bacterial cell numbers of strains O1, O6, and O25b were maintained at 10(5)-10(8) CFU/mL after 24-h incubation, while the remaining strains showed a 10(5)-fold reduction in viable cell numbers. In the adaptation test, a Ser83-Leu substitution in the QRDR of GyrA was identified earlier in the parent strains of O25b and O1 than in their transformants, suggesting that the acquisition of qnrA did not necessarily accelerate the rate of accumulation of amino acid substitutions in the QRDR. We confirmed that the presence of qnrA contributed to increased survival of the E. coli strains displaying certain O-serotypes. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the precise effects of qnrA on quinolone resistance acquisition by Enterobacteriaceae.

  4. Prediction of lethal/effective concentration/dose in the presence of multiple auxiliary covariates and components of variance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gutreuter, S.; Boogaard, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Predictors of the percentile lethal/effective concentration/dose are commonly used measures of efficacy and toxicity. Typically such quantal-response predictors (e.g., the exposure required to kill 50% of some population) are estimated from simple bioassays wherein organisms are exposed to a gradient of several concentrations of a single agent. The toxicity of an agent may be influenced by auxiliary covariates, however, and more complicated experimental designs may introduce multiple variance components. Prediction methods lag examples of those cases. A conventional two-stage approach consists of multiple bivariate predictions of, say, medial lethal concentration followed by regression of those predictions on the auxiliary covariates. We propose a more effective and parsimonious class of generalized nonlinear mixed-effects models for prediction of lethal/effective dose/concentration from auxiliary covariates. We demonstrate examples using data from a study regarding the effects of pH and additions of variable quantities 2???,5???-dichloro-4???- nitrosalicylanilide (niclosamide) on the toxicity of 3-trifluoromethyl-4- nitrophenol to larval sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus). The new models yielded unbiased predictions and root-mean-squared errors (RMSEs) of prediction for the exposure required to kill 50 and 99.9% of some population that were 29 to 82% smaller, respectively, than those from the conventional two-stage procedure. The model class is flexible and easily implemented using commonly available software. ?? 2007 SETAC.

  5. Long-term sub-lethal effects of low concentration commercial herbicide (glyphosate/pelargonic acid) formulation in Bryophyllum pinnatum.

    PubMed

    Pokhrel, Lok R; Karsai, Istvan

    2015-12-15

    Potential long-term (~7months) sub-lethal impacts of soil-applied low levels of Roundup herbicide formulation were investigated in a greenhouse environment using the vegetative clones of succulent non-crop plant model, Bryophyllum pinnatum (Lam.) Oken. An eleven day LC50 (concentration that killed 50% of the plants) was found to be 6.25% (~1.25mg glyphosate/mL and 1.25mg pelargonic acid/mL combined), and complete mortality occurred at 12.5%, of the field application rate (i.e., ~20mg glyphosate/mL and 20mg pelargonic acid/mL as active ingredients). While sub-lethal Roundup (1-5%) exposures led to hormesis-characterized by a significant increase in biomass and vegetative reproduction, higher concentrations (≥6.25%) were toxic. A significant interaction between Roundup concentrations and leaf biomass was found to influence the F1 plantlets' biomass. Biomass asymmetry generally increased with increasing Roundup concentrations, indicating that plants were more stressed at higher Roundup treatments but within the low-dose regime (≤5% of the as-supplied formulation). While leaf apex region demonstrated higher reproduction with lower biomass increase, leaf basal area showed lower reproduction with greater biomass increase, in plantlets. The results suggest long-term exposures to drifted low levels of Roundup in soil may promote biomass and reproduction in B. pinnatum.

  6. Effects of DDE and PCB (Aroclor 1260) on experimentally poisoned little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus): Lethal brain concentrations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, D.R.; Stafford, C.J.

    1981-01-01

    Adult female little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) were collected in a church attic in North East, Cecil County, Md. Mealworms (Tenebrio molitor) containing organochlorine pollutants were fed to the bats as follows: 5 bats were dosed at 480 ppm DDE, 12 at 150 ppm DDE, 5 at 1000 ppm polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB; Aroclor 1260), and 12 at 15 ppm PCB. Seven other bats were fed untreated mealworms. The objective was to elevate brain levels of DDE and PCB to lethality and measure these concentrations. During 40 d of dosage, one DDE-dosed bat and two PCB-dosed bats died after exhibiting the prolonged tremor that characterizes organochlorine poisoning. After dosage, surviving bats were starved to elevate brain levels of toxicants, and three additional DDE-dosed bats had tremors before dying. The mean brain concentration of DDE diagnostic of death was estimated as 603 ppm, range 540-670 ppm. This mean is 16-18% higher than means for Mexican free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) and common grackles (Quiscalus quiscula), and may indicate less sensitivity. Lethal brain concentrations of Aroclor 1260 were 1300 and 1500 ppm. Such values appear to be higher than values (Aroclor 1254) for brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater). During starvation, DDE-dosed bats lost weight about 24% faster than controls. If smaller amounts of stored DDE cause increases in metabolic rates of nonfeeding bats, as during hibernation or migration, the result could be premature energy depletion and increased mortality.

  7. Effects of lethal and sublethal concentrations of the herbicide, triclopyr butoxyethyl ester, in the diet of zebra finches.

    PubMed

    Holmes, S B; Thompson, D G; Wainio-Keizer, K L; Capell, S S; Staznik, B

    1994-07-01

    Lethal and sublethal effects of dietary triclopyr butoxyethyl ester (TBEE) on zebra finches (Poephila guttata Gould) were determined in laboratory experiments conducted between 8 January and 1 May 1991. The 8-day median lethal dietary concentration, LC50 (95% confidence interval), of TBEE to zebra finches was 1,923 (1,627 to 2,277) mg/kg. In the sublethal effects experiment, when birds were exposed to 500 mg/kg TBEE in the diet for 29 days, food consumption and body weight were significantly depressed (P < 0.05). Similar prolonged exposures to 50 and 150 mg/kg TBEE in the diet had no significant effect on food consumption or body weight (P > 0.05). Perch-hopping activity was depressed relative to controls in the 500 mg/kg group, and elevated in the 150 mg/kg group, but neither of these differences was significantly (P > 0.05). Disappearance of TBEE residues from treated seeds over the 29 day experimental period followed an exponential decay model, with half-lives in the order of 15 to 18 days. On the basis of our observation that TBEE had no significant adverse effects at a concentration greater than the maximum expected environmental concentration, we propose that forestry applications of triclopyr at registered dosage rates pose little risk to wild songbirds.

  8. Changes of prolactin regulatory mechanisms in aging: 24-h rhythms of serum prolactin and median eminence and adenohypophysial concentration of dopamine, serotonin, (gamma-aminobutyric acid, taurine and somatostatin in young and aged rats.

    PubMed

    Esquifino, A I; Cano, P; Jimenez, V; Reyes Toso, C F; Cardinali, D P

    2004-01-01

    Twenty-four hour rhythmicity of serum prolactin and median eminence and anterior pituitary content of dopamine (DA), serotonin (5HT), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), taurine and somatostatin were examined in 2 months-old and 18-20 months-old Wistar male rats. The concentration of prolactin was higher in aged rats, with peaks in both groups of rats at the early phase of the activity span. Median eminence DA content of young rats attained its maximum at the middle of rest span and decreased as prolactin levels augmented while the lowest values of adenohypophysial DA were observed at the time of prolactin peak. DA rhythmicity disappeared in aged rats. GABA content of median eminence and adenohypophysis was lower in aged rats, with maximal values of median eminence GABA at light-dark transition in young rats and at the second half of activity span in aged rats. Serum prolactin correlated positively with median eminence GABA in young rats and negatively with pituitary GABA in young and aged rats. Median eminence somatostatin peaked at the beginning of the activity phase (young rats) or at the end of the rest phase (aged rats). Prolactin levels and somatostatin content correlated significantly in young rats only. Median eminence and pituitary 5HT and taurine content did not change with age. The results indicate disruption of prolactin regulatory mechanisms with aging in rats.

  9. Cortisol response to acute stress in jundiá Rhamdia quelen acutely exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of agrichemicals.

    PubMed

    Cericato, Leonardo; Neto, Joaquim Gonçalves Machado; Fagundes, Michele; Kreutz, Luiz Carlos; Quevedo, Rosmari Mezzalira; Finco, Jovani; da Rosa, João Gabriel Santos; Koakoski, Gessi; Centenaro, Lucas; Pottker, Emanuele; Anziliero, Deniz; Barcellos, Leonardo José Gil

    2008-09-01

    Exposure to agrichemicals can have deleterious effects on fish, such as disruption of the hypothalamus-pituitary-inter-renal axis (HPI) that could impair the ability of fish to respond to stressors. In this study, fingerlings of the teleost jundiá (Rhamdia quelen) were used to investigate the effects of the commonly used agrichemicals on the fish response to stress. Five common agrichemicals were tested: the fungicide - tebuconazole, the insecticide - methyl-parathion, and the herbicides - atrazine, atrazine+simazine, and glyphosate. Control fishes were not exposed to agrichemicals and standard stressors. In treatments 2-4, the fishes were exposed to sub-lethal concentrations (16.6%, 33.3%, and 50% of the LC(50)) of each agrichemical for 96 h, and at the end of this period, were subjected to an acute stress-handling stimulus by chasing them with a pen net. In treatments 5-7 (16.6%, 33.3%, and 50% of the LC(50)), the fishes were exposed to the same concentrations of the agrichemicals without stress stimulus. Treatment 8 consisted of jundiás not exposed to agrichemicals, but was subjected to an acute stress-handling stimulus. Jundiás exposed to methyl-parathion, atrazine+simazine, and glyphosate presented a decreased capacity in exhibiting an adequate response to cope with stress and in maintaining the homeostasis, with cortisol level lower than that in the control fish (P<0.01). In conclusion, the results of this study clearly demonstrate that the acute exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of methyl-parathion, atrazine+simazine, and glyphosate exert a deleterious effect on the cortisol response to an additional acute stressor in the jundiá fingerlings.

  10. Vibrio cholerae Exploits Sub-Lethal Concentrations of a Competitor-Produced Antibiotic to Avoid Toxic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Graff, Jason R.; Forschner-Dancause, Stephanie R.; Menden-Deuer, Susanne; Long, Richard A.; Rowley, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a human pathogenic marine bacterium inhabiting coastal regions and is vectored into human food and water supplies via attachment to particles including detritus, phytoplankton, and zooplankton. Particle colonization by the pathogen is inhibited by an antagonistic interaction with the particle-associated Vibrionales bacterium SWAT3, a producer of the antibiotic andrimid. By analyzing the individual movement behaviors of V. cholerae exposed to a gradient of andrimid in a microfluidics device, we show that the pathogen has a concentration dependent avoidance response to sub-lethal concentrations of the pure antibiotic and to the metabolites produced by a growing colony of SWAT3-wild-type. This avoidance behavior includes a 25% increase in swimming speeds, 30% increase in run lengths, and a shift in the direction of the bacteria away from the andrimid source. Consequently, these behavioral shifts at low concentrations of andrimid would lead to higher diffusivity and result in the dispersion of bacteria away from the competitor and source of the antibiotic. Such alterations in motility were not elicited in response to a non-andrimid-producing SWAT3 mutant, suggesting andrimid may be a negative effector of chemotaxis for V. cholerae. The behavioral response of colonizing bacteria to sub-inhibitory concentrations of competitor-produced antibiotics is one mechanism that can influence microbial diversity and interspecific competition on particles, potentially affecting human health in coastal communities and element cycling in the ocean. PMID:23386845

  11. Residual control and lethal concentrations of GF-120 (spinosad) for Anastrepha spp. (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    PubMed

    Flores, Salvador; Gomez, Luis E; Montoya, Pablo

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between residual time of GF-120 (spinosad) treatment and mortality in three species of Anastrepha Schiner. Concentrations of 96, 72, 48, and 24 ppm were aged on mango leaves under field conditions for 0, 3, 7, 10, 14, 17, and 21 d after application. We found that Anastrepha ludens, A. obliqua, and A. serpentina were highly sensitive to spinosad. The effects of spinosad were not reduced over the 4 d after the initial application, even at a concentration of 24 ppm. Mortality at 14 d after the application of 72 and 96 ppm of spinosad was similar in each of the three fruit fly species. In addition, we found that 24 ppm of spinosad was consumed the most by each species even though no direct relationship between the rate of consumption per female and the dose of the product was observed, in this test, higher consumption of active ingredient was observed at a concentration of 72 ppm, for A. ludens, 48 ppm for A. obliqua, and 96 ppm for A. serpentina. Our results suggest that a spinosad concentration of 72 ppm may effectively control these pests for at least 10 d under field conditions.

  12. The sub-lethal effects and tissue concentration of the human pharmaceutical atenolol in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Steinbach, Christoph; Burkina, Viktoriia; Fedorova, Ganna; Grabicova, Katerina; Stara, Alzbeta; Velisek, Josef; Zlabek, Vladimir; Schmidt-Posthaus, Heike; Grabic, Roman; Kocour Kroupova, Hana

    2014-11-01

    Atenolol is a highly prescribed anti-hypertensive pharmaceutical and a member of the group of β-blockers. It has been detected at concentrations ranging from ng L(-1) to low μg L(-1) in waste and surface waters. The present study aimed to assess the sub-lethal effects of atenolol on rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and to determine its tissue-specific bioconcentration. Juvenile rainbow trout were exposed for 21 and 42 days to three concentration levels of atenolol (1 μg L(-1) - environmentally relevant concentration, 10 μg L(-1), and 1000 μg L(-1)). The fish exposed to 1 μg L(-1) atenolol exhibited a higher lactate content in the blood plasma and a reduced haemoglobin content compared with the control. The results show that exposure to atenolol at concentrations greater than or equal to 10 μg L(-1) significantly reduces both the haematocrit value and the glucose concentration in the blood plasma. The activities of the studied antioxidant enzymes (catalase and superoxide dismutase) were not significantly affected by atenolol exposure, and only the highest tested concentration of atenolol significantly reduced the activity of glutathione reductase. The activities of selected CYP450 enzymes were not affected by atenolol exposure. The histological changes indicate that atenolol has an effect on the vascular system, as evidenced by the observed liver congestion and changes in the pericardium and myocardium. Atenolol was found to have a very low bioconcentration factor (the highest value found was 0.27). The bioconcentration levels followed the order liver>kidney>muscle. The concentration of atenolol in the blood plasma was below the limit of quantification (2.0 ng g(-1)). The bioconcentration factors and the activities of selected CYP450 enzymes suggest that atenolol is not metabolised in the liver and may be excreted unchanged.

  13. Enhancing the Antibiotic Antibacterial Effect by Sub Lethal Tellurite Concentrations: Tellurite and Cefotaxime Act Synergistically in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Molina-Quiroz, Roberto C.; Muñoz-Villagrán, Claudia M.; de la Torre, Erick; Tantaleán, Juan C.; Vásquez, Claudio C.; Pérez-Donoso, José M.

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogenic bacteria during the last decades has become a public health concern worldwide. Aiming to explore new alternatives to treat antibiotic-resistant bacteria and given that the tellurium oxyanion tellurite is highly toxic for most microorganisms, we evaluated the ability of sub lethal tellurite concentrations to strengthen the effect of several antibiotics. Tellurite, at nM or µM concentrations, increased importantly the toxicity of defined antibacterials. This was observed with both Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria, irrespective of the antibiotic or tellurite tolerance of the particular microorganism. The tellurite-mediated antibiotic-potentiating effect occurs in laboratory and clinical, uropathogenic Escherichia coli, especially with antibiotics disturbing the cell wall (ampicillin, cefotaxime) or protein synthesis (tetracycline, chloramphenicol, gentamicin). In particular, the effect of tellurite on the activity of the clinically-relevant, third-generation cephalosporin (cefotaxime), was evaluated. Cell viability assays showed that tellurite and cefotaxime act synergistically against E. coli. In conclusion, using tellurite like an adjuvant could be of great help to cope with several multi-resistant pathogens. PMID:22536386

  14. Insecticides applied to a nursery colony of little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus): lethal concentrations in brain tissues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, D.R.; Kunz, T.H.; Kaiser, T.E.

    1978-01-01

    -Forty-six Myotis lucifugus were collected in May and June 1974 at a nursery colony in Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, that had been sprayed with DDT and chlordane in August and September 1973. When collected, 27 bats were alive, two were convulsing, and 17 were dead. Brains, carcasses, and milk and masticated insects from stomachs were analyzed for organochlorine insecticides and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB's). ...Concentrations of chemical residues in brains of surviving bats were compared with those of dead and convulsing bats. These comparisons indicated that DDT was the cause of death. Lethal brain concentrations of DDT in adult females averaged 24.52 parts per million (ppm) and suggested that adult M. lucifugus are approximately twice as sensitive to DDT as are adult laboratory rats and mice. Juvenile bats were about 1.5 times more sensitive than adult bats....Large chemical residues were present in milk. We found a statistically significant relationship between declines in carcass residues in lactating females and uterine regression for six of 10 toxicants. Among juveniles, there were corresponding, significant increases (for nine of 10 toxicants) in carcass levels of residues correlated with increasing age (growth of forearm).

  15. 24-h hydration status: parameters, epidemiology and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Manz, F; Wentz, A

    2003-12-01

    Hydration of individuals and groups is characterised by comparing actual urine osmolality (Uosm) with maximum Uosm. Data of actual, maximum and minimum Uosm in infants, children and adults and its major influencing factors are reviewed. There are remarkable ontogenetic, individual and cultural differences in Uosm. In the foetus and the breast-fed infant Uosm is much lower than plasma osmolality, whereas in children and adults it is usually much higher. Individuals and groups may show long-term differences in Uosm. In industrialised countries, the gender difference of Uosm is common. There are large intercultural differences of mean 24-h Uosm ranging from 860 mosm/kg in Germany, 649 mosm/kg in USA to 392 mosm/kg in Poland. A new physiologically based concept called 'free-water reserve' quantifies differences in 24-h euhydration. In 189 boys of the DONALD Study aged 4.0-6.9 y, median urine volume was 497 ml/24-h and median Uosm 809 mosm/kg. Considering mean-2 s.d. of actual maximum 24-h Uosm of 830 mosm/kg as upper level of euhydration and physiological criterion of adequate hydration in these boys, median free-water reserve was 11 ml/24-h. Based on median total water intake of 1310 ml/24-h and the third percentile of free-water volume of -156 ml/24-h, adequate total water intake was 1466 ml/24-h or 1.01 ml/kcal. Data of Uosm in 24-h urine samples and corresponding free-water reserve values of homogeneous groups of healthy subjects from all over the world might be useful parameters in epidemiology to investigate the health effects of different levels of 24-h euhydration.

  16. Is Low Non-Lethal Concentration of Methylmercury Really Safe? A Report on Genotoxicity with Delayed Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Crespo-Lopez, María Elena; Costa-Malaquias, Allan; Oliveira, Edivaldo H. C.; Miranda, Moysés S.; Arrifano, Gabriela P. F.; Souza-Monteiro, José R.; Sagica, Fernanda Espirito-Santo; Fontes-Junior, Enéas A.; Maia, Cristiane S. F.; Macchi, Barbarella M.; do Nascimento, José Luiz M.

    2016-01-01

    Human exposure to relatively low levels of methylmercury is worrying, especially in terms of its genotoxicity. It is currently unknown as to whether exposure to low levels of mercury (below established limits) is safe. Genotoxicity was already shown in lymphocytes, but studies with cells of the CNS (as the main target organ) are scarce. Moreover, disturbances in the cell cycle and cellular proliferation have previously been observed in neuronal cells, but no data are presently available for glial cells. Interestingly, cells of glial origin accumulate higher concentrations of methylmercury than those of neuronal origin. Thus, the aim of this work was to analyze the possible genotoxicity and alterations in the cell cycle and cell proliferation of a glioma cell line (C6) exposed to a low, non-lethal and non-apoptotic methylmercury concentration. Biochemical (mitochondrial activity) and morphological (integrity of the membrane) assessments confirmed the absence of cell death after exposure to 3 μM methylmercury for 24 hours. Even without promoting cell death, this treatment significantly increased genotoxicity markers (DNA fragmentation, micronuclei, nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear buds). Changes in the cell cycle profile (increased mitotic index and cell populations in the S and G2/M phases) were observed, suggesting arrest of the cycle. This delay in the cycle was followed, 24 hours after methylmercury withdrawal, by a decrease number of viable cells, reduced cellular confluence and increased doubling time of the culture. Our work demonstrates that exposure to a low sublethal concentration of MeHg considered relatively safe according to current limits promotes genotoxicity and disturbances in the proliferation of cells of glial origin with sustained consequences after methylmercury withdrawal. This fact becomes especially important, since this cellular type accumulates more methylmercury than neurons and displays a vital role protecting the CNS, especially in

  17. Is Low Non-Lethal Concentration of Methylmercury Really Safe? A Report on Genotoxicity with Delayed Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Crespo-Lopez, María Elena; Costa-Malaquias, Allan; Oliveira, Edivaldo H C; Miranda, Moysés S; Arrifano, Gabriela P F; Souza-Monteiro, José R; Sagica, Fernanda Espirito-Santo; Fontes-Junior, Enéas A; Maia, Cristiane S F; Macchi, Barbarella M; do Nascimento, José Luiz M

    2016-01-01

    Human exposure to relatively low levels of methylmercury is worrying, especially in terms of its genotoxicity. It is currently unknown as to whether exposure to low levels of mercury (below established limits) is safe. Genotoxicity was already shown in lymphocytes, but studies with cells of the CNS (as the main target organ) are scarce. Moreover, disturbances in the cell cycle and cellular proliferation have previously been observed in neuronal cells, but no data are presently available for glial cells. Interestingly, cells of glial origin accumulate higher concentrations of methylmercury than those of neuronal origin. Thus, the aim of this work was to analyze the possible genotoxicity and alterations in the cell cycle and cell proliferation of a glioma cell line (C6) exposed to a low, non-lethal and non-apoptotic methylmercury concentration. Biochemical (mitochondrial activity) and morphological (integrity of the membrane) assessments confirmed the absence of cell death after exposure to 3 μM methylmercury for 24 hours. Even without promoting cell death, this treatment significantly increased genotoxicity markers (DNA fragmentation, micronuclei, nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear buds). Changes in the cell cycle profile (increased mitotic index and cell populations in the S and G2/M phases) were observed, suggesting arrest of the cycle. This delay in the cycle was followed, 24 hours after methylmercury withdrawal, by a decrease number of viable cells, reduced cellular confluence and increased doubling time of the culture. Our work demonstrates that exposure to a low sublethal concentration of MeHg considered relatively safe according to current limits promotes genotoxicity and disturbances in the proliferation of cells of glial origin with sustained consequences after methylmercury withdrawal. This fact becomes especially important, since this cellular type accumulates more methylmercury than neurons and displays a vital role protecting the CNS, especially in

  18. Enhanced vagal baroreflex response during 24 h after acute exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Adams, W. C.

    1991-01-01

    We evaluated carotid-cardiac baroreflex responses in eight normotensive men (25-41 yr) on two different test days, each separated by at least 1 wk. On one day, baroreflex response was tested before and at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 h after graded supine cycle exercise to volitional exhaustion. On another day, this 24-h protocol was repeated with no exercise (control). Beat-to-beat R-R intervals were measured during external application of graded pressures to the carotid sinuses from 40 to -65 mmHg; changes of R-R intervals were plotted against carotid pressure (systolic pressure minus neck chamber pressure). The maximum slope of the response relationship increased (P less than 0.05) from preexercise to 12 h (3.7 +/- 0.4 to 7.1 +/- 0.7 ms/mmHg) and remained significantly elevated through 24 h. The range of the R-R response was also increased from 217 +/- 24 to 274 +/- 32 ms (P less than 0.05). No significant differences were observed during the control 24-h period. An acute bout of graded exercise designed to elicit exhaustion increases the sensitivity and range of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex response for 24 h and enhances its capacity to buffer against hypotension by increasing heart rate. These results may represent an underlying mechanism that contributes to blood pressure stability after intense exercise.

  19. Heat shock protein 27 expression in human proximal tubule cells exposed to lethal and sublethal concentrations of CdCl2.

    PubMed Central

    Somji, S; Sens, D A; Garrett, S H; Sens, M A; Todd, J H

    1999-01-01

    The expression of hsp 27 mRNA and protein was determined in cultured human proximal tubule (HPT) cells exposed to lethal and sublethal concentrations of Cd2+ under both acute and extended conditions. Initial procedures demonstrated that HPT cells display the classic stress response following physical and chemical stress. Heat stress (42.5 degrees C for 1 hr) caused an increase in both hsp 27 mRNA and protein as well as a shift in the protein to a more phosphorylated state. Results were similar when the cells were subjected to chemical stress (exposure to 100 microM sodium arsenite for 4 hr). Acute exposure to 53 microM CdCl2 for 4 hr also resulted in an increase in hsp 27 mRNA and protein and a shift to the more phosphorylated protein isoform. Extended Cd2+ exposure involved continuous treatment with Cd2+ at both lethal and sublethal levels over a 16-day time course. The results of this treatment showed that chronic exposure to Cd2+ failed to increase either hsp 27 mRNA or protein expression in HPT cells, even at lethal Cd2+ concentrations. In fact, hsp 27 protein levels decreased as compared to controls at both lethal and sub-lethal exposure to Cd2+. These findings imply that hsp 27 expression in human proximal tubule cells may have two distinct modes depending on the nature (acute vs. chronic) of the stress. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:10379001

  20. Identification of 24h Ixodes scapularis immunogenic tick saliva proteins.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Lauren A; Radulović, Željko M; Kim, Tae K; Porter, Lindsay M; Mulenga, Albert

    2015-04-01

    Ixodes scapularis is arguably the most medically important tick species in the United States. This tick transmits 5 of the 14 human tick-borne disease (TBD) agents in the USA: Borrelia burgdorferi, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, B. miyamotoi, Babesia microti, and Powassan virus disease. Except for the Powassan virus disease, I. scapularis-vectored TBD agents require more than 24h post attachment to be transmitted. This study describes identification of 24h immunogenic I. scapularis tick saliva proteins, which could provide opportunities to develop strategies to stop tick feeding before transmission of the majority of pathogens. A 24h fed female I. scapularis phage display cDNA expression library was biopanned using rabbit antibodies to 24h fed I. scapularis female tick saliva proteins, subjected to next generation sequencing, de novo assembly, and bioinformatic analyses. A total of 182 contigs were assembled, of which ∼19% (35/182) are novel and did not show identity to any known proteins in GenBank. The remaining ∼81% (147/182) of contigs were provisionally identified based on matches in GenBank including ∼18% (27/147) that matched protein sequences previously annotated as hypothetical and putative tick saliva proteins. Others include proteases and protease inhibitors (∼3%, 5/147), transporters and/or ligand binding proteins (∼6%, 9/147), immunogenic tick saliva housekeeping enzyme-like (17%, 25/147), ribosomal protein-like (∼31%, 46/147), and those classified as miscellaneous (∼24%, 35/147). Notable among the miscellaneous class include antimicrobial peptides (microplusin and ricinusin), myosin-like proteins that have been previously found in tick saliva, and heat shock tick saliva protein. Data in this study provides the foundation for in-depth analysis of I. scapularis feeding during the first 24h, before the majority of TBD agents can be transmitted.

  1. Identification of 24 h Ixodes scapularis immunogenic tick saliva proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Lauren A.; Radulović, Željko M.; Kim, Tae K.; Porter, Lindsay M.; Mulenga, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Ixodes scapularis is arguably the most medically important tick species in the United States. This tick transmits 5 of the 14 human tick-borne disease (TBD) agents in the USA: Borrelia burgdorferi, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, B. miyamotoi, Babesia microti, and Powassan virus disease. Except for the Powassan virus disease, I. scapularis-vectored TBD agents require more than 24 h post attachment to be transmitted. This study describes identification of 24 h immunogenic I. scapularis tick saliva proteins, which could provide opportunities to develop strategies to stop tick feeding before transmission of the majority of pathogens. A 24 h fed female I. scapularis phage display cDNA expression library was biopanned using rabbit antibodies to 24 h fed I. scapularis female tick saliva proteins, subjected to next generation sequencing, de novo assembly, and bioinformatic analyses. A total of 182 contigs were assembled, of which ~19% (35/182) are novel and did not show identity to any known proteins in GenBank. The remaining ~81% (147/182) of contigs were provisionally identified based on matches in GenBank including ~18% (27/147) that matched protein sequences previously annotated as hypothetical and putative tick saliva proteins. Others include proteases and protease inhibitors (~3%, 5/147), transporters and/or ligand binding proteins (~6%, 9/147), immunogenic tick saliva housekeeping enzyme-like (17%, 25/147), ribosomal protein-like (~31%, 46/147), and those classified as miscellaneous (~24%, 35/147). Notable among the miscellaneous class include antimicrobial peptides (microplusin and ricinusin), myosin-like proteins that have been previously found in tick saliva, and heat shock tick saliva protein. Data in this study provides the foundation for in-depth analysis of I. scapularis feeding during the first 24 h, before the majority of TBD agents can be transmitted. PMID:25825233

  2. Estimation of Median Lethal Concentration of Three Isolates of Beauveria bassiana for Control of Megacopta cribraria (Heteroptera: Plataspidae) Bioassayed on Solid Lygus spp. Diet

    PubMed Central

    Portilla, Maribel; Jones, Walker; Perera, Omaththage; Seiter, Nick; Greene, Jeremy; Luttrell, Randall

    2016-01-01

    The kudzu bug, Megacopta cribraria (F.), is an urban nuisance and significant agricultural pest. The median lethal concentrations of three strains of Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo), including the Mississippi Delta native strain (NI8) isolated from Lygus lineolaris (Palisot de Beauvois), the commercial strain BotaniGard® (GHA) (Victor, NY, USA), and the B. bassiana strain isolated from M. cribraria (KUDSC), were estimated on kudzu bug adults. A technique developed to evaluate B. bassiana against L. lineolaris was used. Younger adults (eight days after collection) were treated with NI8 and GHA and older adult (50 days after collection) were treated with NI8, GHA and KUDSC. Higher concentrations (n × 106, n × 107) of NI8 and GHA caused kudzu bug mortality two days after treatment in younger adults and similar concentrations of NI8, GHA, and KUDSC caused mortality one day after treatment in older adults. Lower concentrations (n × 104, n × 105) were not significantly different in mortality between strains. LS50 values of the KUDSC were significantly lower than NI8 and GHA values in older adults. This is the first available information on median lethal concentration of B. bassiana on kudzu bug adults bioassayed on artificial diet. It was determined that B. bassiana (KUDSC and NI8) are highly effective for young adults at very low doses (LC50 1.98–4.98 viable spores per mm2). PMID:27376335

  3. Estimation of Median Lethal Concentration of Three Isolates of Beauveria bassiana for Control of Megacopta cribraria (Heteroptera: Plataspidae) Bioassayed on Solid Lygus spp. Diet.

    PubMed

    Portilla, Maribel; Jones, Walker; Perera, Omaththage; Seiter, Nick; Greene, Jeremy; Luttrell, Randall

    2016-06-30

    The kudzu bug, Megacopta cribraria (F.), is an urban nuisance and significant agricultural pest. The median lethal concentrations of three strains of Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo), including the Mississippi Delta native strain (NI8) isolated from Lygus lineolaris (Palisot de Beauvois), the commercial strain BotaniGard(®) (GHA) (Victor, NY, USA), and the B. bassiana strain isolated from M. cribraria (KUDSC), were estimated on kudzu bug adults. A technique developed to evaluate B. bassiana against L. lineolaris was used. Younger adults (eight days after collection) were treated with NI8 and GHA and older adult (50 days after collection) were treated with NI8, GHA and KUDSC. Higher concentrations (n × 10⁶, n × 10⁷) of NI8 and GHA caused kudzu bug mortality two days after treatment in younger adults and similar concentrations of NI8, GHA, and KUDSC caused mortality one day after treatment in older adults. Lower concentrations (n × 10⁴, n × 10⁵) were not significantly different in mortality between strains. LS50 values of the KUDSC were significantly lower than NI8 and GHA values in older adults. This is the first available information on median lethal concentration of B. bassiana on kudzu bug adults bioassayed on artificial diet. It was determined that B. bassiana (KUDSC and NI8) are highly effective for young adults at very low doses (LC50 1.98-4.98 viable spores per mm²).

  4. A temporal proteome dynamics study reveals the molecular basis of induced phenotypic resistance in Mycobacterium smegmatis at sub-lethal rifampicin concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Giddey, Alexander D.; de Kock, Elise; Nakedi, Kehilwe C.; Garnett, Shaun; Nel, Andrew J. M.; Soares, Nelson C.; Blackburn, Jonathan M.

    2017-01-01

    In the last 40 years only one new antitubercular drug has been approved, whilst resistance to current drugs, including rifampicin, is spreading. Here, we used the model organism Mycobacterium smegmatis to study mechanisms of phenotypic mycobacterial resistance, employing quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics to investigate the temporal effects of sub-lethal concentrations of rifampicin on the mycobacterial proteome at time-points corresponding to early response, onset of bacteriostasis and early recovery. Across 18 samples, a total of 3,218 proteins were identified from 31,846 distinct peptides averaging 16,250 identified peptides per sample. We found evidence that two component signal transduction systems (e.g. MprA/MprB) play a major role during initial mycobacterial adaptive responses to sub-lethal rifampicin and that, after dampening an initial SOS response, the bacteria supress the DevR (DosR) regulon and also upregulate their transcriptional and translational machineries. Furthermore, we found a co-ordinated dysregulation in haeme and mycobactin synthesis. Finally, gradual upregulation of the M. smegmatis-specific rifampin ADP-ribosyl transferase was observed which, together with upregulation of transcriptional and translational machinery, likely explains recovery of normal growth. Overall, our data indicates that in mycobacteria, sub-lethal rifampicin triggers a concerted phenotypic response that contrasts significantly with that observed at higher antimicrobial doses. PMID:28262820

  5. Effects of sub-lethal neurite outgrowth inhibitory concentrations of chlorpyrifos oxon on cytoskeletal proteins and acetylcholinesterase in differentiating N2a cells.

    PubMed

    Flaskos, J; Nikolaidis, E; Harris, W; Sachana, M; Hargreaves, A J

    2011-11-01

    Previous work in our laboratory has shown that sub-lethal concentrations (1-10 μM) of chlorpyrifos (CPF), diazinon (DZ) and diazinon oxon (DZO) inhibit the outgrowth of axon-like neurites in differentiating mouse N2a neuroblastoma cells concomitant with altered levels and/or phosphorylation state of axonal cytoskeleton and growth-associated proteins. The aim of the present work was to determine whether chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO) was capable of inhibiting N2a cell differentiation in a similar manner. Using experimental conditions similar to our previous work, sub-lethal concentrations (1-10 μM) of CPO were found to inhibit N2a cell differentiation. However, unlike previous studies with DZ and DZO, there was a high level of sustained inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in CPO treated cells. Impairment of neurite outgrowth was also associated with reduced levels of growth associated protein-43 and neurofilament heavy chain (NFH), and the distribution of NFH in cells stained by indirect immunofluorescence was disrupted. However, in contrast to previous findings for DZO, the absolute level of phosphorylated NFH was unaffected by CPO exposure. Taken together, the findings suggest that sub-lethal concentrations of CPO inhibit axon outgrowth in differentiating N2a cells and that this effect involves reduced levels of two proteins that play key roles in axon outgrowth and maintenance. Although the inhibition of neurite outgrowth is unlikely to involve AChE inhibition directly, further work will help to determine whether the persistent inhibition of AChE by CPO can account for the different effects induced by CPO and DZO on the levels of total and phosphorylated NFH.

  6. Selenium concentrations in the razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus): Substitution of non-lethal muscle plugs for muscle tissue in contaminant assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waddell, B.; May, T.

    1995-01-01

    A single muscle plug was collected from each of 25 live razorback suckers inhabiting the Colorado River basin and analyzed for selenium by instrumental neutron activation. Eight fish from Ashley Creek and three from Razorback Bar exhibited selenium concentrations exceeding 8 μg/g, a level associated with reproductive failure in fish. Concentrations of selenium in eggs and milt were significantly correlated with selenium concentrations in muscle plugs and together indicate a possible explanation for the decline of this species in the Colorado River basin. Muscle plugs (<50mg) and muscle tissue (20 g) were collected from dorsal, anterior, and posterior areas of common carp, flannelmouth sucker, and an archived razorback sucker and analyzed for selenium. Concentrations of selenium in muscle plugs were significantly correlated with selenium concentrations in muscle tissue from the same location and fish (r=0.97). Coefficients of variation for selenium concentrations in each fish were <6.5% for muscle tissue, but ranged from 1.5 to 32.4% for muscle plugs. Increased variation in muscle plugs was attributed to lower selenium concentrations found in the anterior muscle plugs of flannelmouth suckers. Mean selenium concentrations in muscle plugs and tissue from dorsal and posterior areas and muscle tissue from the anterior area were not significantly different. The non-lethal collection of a muscle plug from dorsal and posterior areas of the razorback sucker and other fish species may provide an accurate assessment of selenium concentrations that exist in adjacent muscle tissue.

  7. Toxicity, feeding rate and growth rate response to sub-lethal concentrations of anthracene and benzo [a] pyrene in milkfish Chanos chanos (Forskkal).

    PubMed

    Palanikumar, L; Kumaraguru, A K; Ramakritinan, C M; Anand, M

    2013-01-01

    The feeding rate, growth rate and gross conversion efficiency were studied in milkfish Chanos chanos for 28 days of exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of anthracene (1.00, 2.00, 3.00, 6.00 and 12.0 μg l(-1)) and benzo [a] pyrene (0.30, 0.70, 1.40, 2.80 and 5.60 μg l(-1)) under continuous flow through bioassays. Based on survival and growth data, No Observed Effect Concentration; Lowest Observed Effect Concentration were estimated after 28 days, the values for anthracene were 2.03 and 3.09 μg l(-1), and the values for benzo [a] pyrene were 0.82 and 1.46 μg l(-1), respectively. Anthracene and benzo [a] pyrene exposure caused reduction in feeding and growth rate.

  8. Effects of sub-lethal neurite outgrowth inhibitory concentrations of chlorpyrifos oxon on cytoskeletal proteins and acetylcholinesterase in differentiating N2a cells

    SciTech Connect

    Flaskos, J.; Nikolaidis, E.; Harris, W.; Sachana, M.; Hargreaves, A.J.

    2011-11-15

    Previous work in our laboratory has shown that sub-lethal concentrations (1-10 {mu}M) of chlorpyrifos (CPF), diazinon (DZ) and diazinon oxon (DZO) inhibit the outgrowth of axon-like neurites in differentiating mouse N2a neuroblastoma cells concomitant with altered levels and/or phosphorylation state of axonal cytoskeleton and growth-associated proteins. The aim of the present work was to determine whether chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO) was capable of inhibiting N2a cell differentiation in a similar manner. Using experimental conditions similar to our previous work, sub-lethal concentrations (1-10 {mu}M) of CPO were found to inhibit N2a cell differentiation. However, unlike previous studies with DZ and DZO, there was a high level of sustained inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in CPO treated cells. Impairment of neurite outgrowth was also associated with reduced levels of growth associated protein-43 and neurofilament heavy chain (NFH), and the distribution of NFH in cells stained by indirect immunofluorescence was disrupted. However, in contrast to previous findings for DZO, the absolute level of phosphorylated NFH was unaffected by CPO exposure. Taken together, the findings suggest that sub-lethal concentrations of CPO inhibit axon outgrowth in differentiating N2a cells and that this effect involves reduced levels of two proteins that play key roles in axon outgrowth and maintenance. Although the inhibition of neurite outgrowth is unlikely to involve AChE inhibition directly, further work will help to determine whether the persistent inhibition of AChE by CPO can account for the different effects induced by CPO and DZO on the levels of total and phosphorylated NFH. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sub-lethal levels of chlorpyrifos oxon inhibit neurite outgrowth in N2a cells Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acetylcholinesterase exhibits sustained inhibition throughout exposure Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The levels of neurofilament heavy chain and GAP-43

  9. Acute effect of ephedrine on 24-h energy balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, J. R.; Gottesdiener, K.; Jordan, J.; Chen, K.; Flattery, S.; Larson, P. J.; Candelore, M. R.; Gertz, B.; Robertson, D.; Sun, M.

    1999-01-01

    Ephedrine is used to help achieve weight control. Data on its true efficacy and mechanisms in altering energy balance in human subjects are limited. We aimed to determine the acute effect of ephedrine on 24-h energy expenditure, mechanical work and urinary catecholamines in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, two-period crossover study. Ten healthy volunteers were given ephedrine (50 mg) or placebo thrice daily during each of two 24-h periods (ephedrine and placebo) in a whole-room indirect calorimeter, which accurately measures minute-by-minute energy expenditure and mechanical work. Measurements were taken of 24-h energy expenditure, mechanical work, urinary catecholamines and binding of (+/-)ephedrine in vitro to human beta1-, beta2- and beta3-adrenoreceptors. Twenty-four-hour energy expenditure was 3.6% greater (8965+/-1301 versus 8648+/-1347 kJ, P<0.05) with ephedrine than with placebo, but mechanical work was not different between the ephedrine and placebo periods. Noradrenaline excretion was lower with ephedrine (0.032+/-0.011 microg/mg creatinine) compared with placebo (0.044+/-0.012 microg/mg creatinine) (P<0.05). (+/-)Ephedrine is a relatively weak partial agonist of human beta1- and beta2-adrenoreceptors, and had no detectable activity at human beta3-adrenoreceptors. Ephedrine (50 mg thrice daily) modestly increases energy expenditure in normal human subjects. A lack of binding of ephedrine to beta3-adrenoreceptors and the observed decrease in urinary noradrenaline during ephedrine treatment suggest that the thermogenic effect of ephedrine results from direct beta1-/beta2-adrenoreceptor agonism. An indirect beta3-adrenergic effect through the release of noradrenaline seems unlikely as urinary noradrenaline decreased significantly with ephedrine.

  10. Quantitative structure-toxicity relationship study of lethal concentration to tadpole (Bufo vulgaris formosus) for organophosphorous pesticides.

    PubMed

    Yan, Dongyun; Jiang, Xin; Xu, Shaohui; Wang, Ligang; Bian, Yongrong; Yu, Guifen

    2008-05-01

    In the present study more than 1,000 structural parameters of 41 organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) were calculated using the software ChemOffice 8.03 and Dragon 2.1. Then, with multivariate linear regression and best subset regression analyses, different equations were derived to calculate the lethal toxicity, LC(50), for these 41 organophosphorous pesticides found in tadpoles (Bufo vulgaris formosus). An equation was developed for all selected OPs, especially those with relatively low toxicity levels (LC(50)>4.5mM) that accounted for 89.09% of the variability in the toxic effect. The equation indicated that the main contributions to OPs toxicity with tadpoles were the electrostatic contribution qH(+) (maximum net positive H atomic charge), spatial autocorrelation (MATS7 m) and hydrophobicity (lgK(ow)), with the two former being the most important parameters. For OPs with high toxicity, however, different structural parameters were introduced. The following equation was developed with LC(50)<4.5mM. These equations implied that with different levels of toxicity there could have different mechanisms in the tadpole. Furthermore, the results showed that molecular structural parameters had a particular value in modeling chemical reactivity within a homologous series of compounds.

  11. Estimate of dietary phosphorus intake using 24-h urine collection.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Yuuka; Sakuma, Masae; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Akitsu; Matsushita, Asami; Umeda, Minako; Ishikawa, Makoto; Taketani, Yutaka; Takeda, Eiji; Arai, Hidekazu

    2014-07-01

    Increases in serum phosphorus levels and dietary phosphorus intake induces vascular calcification, arterial sclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. Limiting phosphorus intake is advisable, however, no assessment methods are capable of estimating dietary phosphorus intake. We hypothesized that urinary phosphorus excretion can be translated into estimation of dietary phosphorus intake, and we evaluated whether a 24-h urine collection method could estimate dietary phosphorus intake. Thirty two healthy subjects were recruited for this study. Subjects collected urine samples over 24 h and weighed dietary records. We calculated dietary protein intake and phosphorus intake from dietary records and urine collection, and investigated associations between the two methods in estimating protein and phosphorus intake. Significant positive correlations were observed between dietary records and UC for protein and phosphorus intake. The average intakes determined from dietary records were significantly higher than from urine collection for both protein and phosphorus. There was a significant positive correlation between both the phosphorus and protein difference in dietary records and urine collection. The phosphorus-protein ratio in urine collection was significantly higher than in dietary records. Our data indicated that the 24-h urine collection method can estimate the amount of dietary phosphorus intake, and the results were superior to estimation by weighed dietary record.

  12. Biochemical response of the mussel Mytilus coruscus (Mytiloida: Mytilidae) exposed to in vivo sub-lethal copper concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yifeng; Gu, Zhongqi; Liu, Hong; Shen, Heding; Yang, Jinglong

    2012-09-01

    Many aquatic organisms are negatively affected by exposure to high copper concentrations. We investigated the biochemical response of the mussel Mytilus coruscus (Mytiloida: Mytilidae) to copper exposure. In vivo bioassays using M. coruscus and different copper concentrations were conducted. The activity of six biomarkers, namely superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), acid phosphatase (ACP), alkaline phosphatase (AKP), glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT) and glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (GPT) were measured. Survival rates decreased with increased copper concentrations and exposure times. The LC50 values at 48, 72, and 96 h exposure were 0.48, 0.37, and 0.32 mg/L, respectively. Within digestive glands, CAT activity increased with increasing Cu concentrations. The activity of AKP showed no significant change, while the remaining four enzymes showed decreasing activity with increasing Cu concentrations. Within the gills, AKP activity increased when the Cu concentration was 0.05 mg/L, but showed no significant changes at higher concentrations. Activity of CAT and ACP within gills tended to decrease with increasing Cu concentration. The activity of SOD and GPT decreased at an exposure concentration of 0.2 mg/L. GOT activity within gills decreased at 0.1 mg/L and increased at an exposure concentration of 0.2 mg/L. Within the adductor muscle, AKP activity increased at 0.05 mg/L but did not change at higher exposure concentrations. ACP activity within adductor muscle tissue showed no change, while activities of CAT, GOT and GPT decreased with increasing Cu concentrations. SOD activity within the adductor muscle tissue significantly decreased at the 0.02, 0.05 and 0.2 mg/L exposure concentrations. Our results show tissue specific differences for the six biomarkers in for M. coruscus. Our findings provide the basis for the establishment of reference activity levels against which biomarker changes can be estimated, and are essential preliminary steps in development

  13. Effects of sub-lethal glyphosate concentrations on growth and photosynthetic performance of non-target species Bolboschoenus maritimus.

    PubMed

    Mateos-Naranjo, E; Perez-Martin, A

    2013-11-01

    Glyphosate use has increased over the last decades for the control of invasive plant species in wetland ecosystems. Although glyphosate has been considered 'environmentally' safe, its repeated use could increase the toxicological risk derived from diffuse pollution of surface and groundwater on non-target vegetation. A glasshouse study was designed to determine the effect produced by the addition of different sub-lethal doses of glyphosate herbicides (5-30 mg L(-1)) to the nutrient solution on the growth and photosynthetic apparatus of Bolboschoenus maritimus. Although B. maritimus plants were able to grow and survive after 20 d of exposure to glyphosate, the presence of this herbicide affected their growth, through a direct interaction with the root system. Particularly, at 30 mg L(-1) glyphosate, B. maritimus showed ca. 30% of biomass decrease. The reduction in B. maritimus growth was due to a decrease in net photosynthetic rate (A), which ranged between values ca. 11.5 and 5.5 μmol m(-2)s(-1) CO2 for the control and the highest glyphosate treatment, respectively. The response of A to glyphosate could be largely accounted for by non-stomatal limitations, since stomatal conductance was similar in all glyphosate treatments. Thus, A decrease was prompted by the negative impact of herbicide on photochemical (PSII) apparatus, the reduction in the absorption of essential nutrients, the reduction of photosynthetic pigments and possibly the reduction in Rubisco carboxilation capacity. Moreover, glyphosate excess caused photoinhibitory damage. In conclusion, in this study we have shown that herbicide water pollution could be a source of indirect phytotoxicity for B. maritimus.

  14. Sub-lethal concentration of arsenic interferes with the proliferation of hepatocytes and induces in vivo apoptosis in Clarias batrachus L.

    PubMed

    Datta, Soma; Saha, Dhira Rani; Ghosh, Debabrata; Majumdar, Tanmay; Bhattacharya, Shelley; Mazumder, Shibnath

    2007-04-01

    We studied the hepatocellular alterations induced by sub-lethal concentrations (0.50 muM) of arsenic in Indian catfish Clarias batrachus L. Sub-lethal arsenic exposure altered serum aspartate aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase levels and brought about significant changes in different serum biochemical parameters. Arsenic exposure reduced total hepatocyte protein content and suppressed the proliferation of hepatocytes in a time-dependent manner. Routine histological studies on liver documented arsenic-induced changes characterized by dilated sinusoids, formation of intracellular edema, megalocytosis, vacuolation and appearance of hepatic cells with distorted nuclei. Transmission electron microscopy of hepatocytes further revealed hyperplasia and hypertrophy of mitochondria, development of dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum and changes in peroxisome size with duration of arsenic exposure. Degeneration of mitochondrial cristae and condensation of chromatin was also evident in arsenic-exposed hepatocytes. A significant number of hepatocytes isolated from arsenic-exposed fish stained with annexin V and demonstrated DNA ladder characteristic of apoptosis. Single-cell gel electrophoresis of exposed hepatocytes also revealed the development of comets usually seen in apoptotic cells. Using specific inhibitors it was determined that the arsenic-induced apoptosis of hepatocytes was caspase-mediated, involving the caspase 3 pathway.

  15. Judged Lethality

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    75 High Blood Pressure 535 89 17 538 76 Drug Abuse 1,020 1,371 19 95 80 Bronchitis 162 19 43 2,111 85 Pregnancy 67 24 13 787 250 Diabetes 487 101 52...Diseases 4 Mumps 3 Dental Problems 1 Always Overestimated High Blood Pressure 9 Alcoholism 6 Influenza 2 Note: Measles (8), tuberculosis (13), auto...statis- tical lethality rate and total number of people killed (cancer, strokes, heart attacks, emphysema, high blood pressure ) were rather accurately

  16. A PUFFERFISH (TETRADON NIGROVIRIDIS) AVAILABLE IN THE COMMON PET TRADE HARBORS LETHAL CONCENTRATIONS OF TETRODOTOXIN: A CASE STUDY OF POISONING IN A CUVIER'S DWARF CAIMAN (PALEOSUCHUS PALPEBROSUS).

    PubMed

    Williams, Becky L; Powers, Lauren V; Garner, Michael M

    2016-06-01

    Many pufferfish possess tetrodotoxin (TTX). Unaware of this fact, the owner of a 3-mo-old pet Cuvier's dwarf caiman ( Paleosuchus palpebrosus ) fed the caiman a green spotted pufferfish ( Tetraodon nigroviridis ), acquired from a local discount department store. The caiman was nonresponsive within an hour of consumption of the fish. The caiman was presented for veterinary evaluation but died despite intensive medical care. High-performance liquid chromatography and a competitive inhibition enzyme immunoassay were used to determine whether the pufferfish was tetrodotoxic and whether the deceased caiman had TTX in its system. Skin and liver of the pufferfish harbored high concentrations of TTX, and the caiman had TTX in the blood, liver, and kidney. The clinical signs and presence of TTX in the caiman suggest that the caiman succumbed to tetrodotoxicosis. The implication is that lethally poisonous species are available commercially and pose a danger to other pets and possibly small children.

  17. Concentrations of cis(Z)-clopenthixol and trans(E)-clopenthixol in a lethal case involving zuclopenthixol, diazepam, and cyamemazine.

    PubMed

    Rop, P P

    2001-01-01

    cis(Z)-Clopenthixol and trans(E)-clopenthixol were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography-diode-array detection in necropic samples from a postmortem case. The peripheral blood concentrations of cis(Z)-clopenthixol and trans(E)-clopenthixol were 278 and 177 ng/mL, respectively. The level of the active cis(Z)-isomer is within the toxic range. Other associated drugs' concentrations were within their therapeutic ranges. Postmortem redistribution of the drug and instability of the drug due to trans-isomerization were discussed.

  18. Assessment of Caudal Fin Clips as a Non-lethal Technique for Predicting Muscle Tissue Mercury Concentrations in Largeouth Bass

    EPA Science Inventory

    The statistical relationship between total mercury (Hg) concentration in clips from the caudal fin and muscle tissue of largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) from 26 freshwater sites in Rhode Island, USA was developed and evaluated to determine the utility of fin clip analysis ...

  19. Effect of sub-lethal concentrations of endosulfan on phagocytic and hematological parameters in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Girón-Pérez, M I; Montes-López, M; García-Ramírez, L A; Romero-Bañuelos, C A; Robledo-Marenco, M L

    2008-03-01

    The effect of endosulfan (6,7,8,9,10,10-hexachloro-1,5,5a,6,9,9a-hexahydro-6,9-methano-2,4,3-benzodioxathiepin-3-oxide), an organochlorine pesticide, was evaluated on phagocytic (phagocytic index and percentage of active cells) and hematological parameters in Nile tilapia. Experimental data showed that an acute exposure to endosulfan (4.0 and 7.0 microg/L) induces a significant decrease in the phagocytic index and the percentage of active cells in peripherical blood of Nile tilapia. However, hemoglobin concentration (Hb), hematocrit (Hto), red blood cell count (RBC), mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) were not significantly altered in fish exposed to endosulfan compared with control group.

  20. Evaluation of the cytotoxicity of 10 chemicals in human and rat hepatocytes and in cell lines: Correlation between in vitro data and human lethal concentration.

    PubMed

    Ponsoda, X; Jover, R; Núñez, C; Royo, M; Castell, J V; Gómez-Lechón, M J

    1995-12-01

    The cytotoxicity of 10 chemicals from the Multicentre Evaluation of In vitro Cytotoxicity (MEIC) list (nos 21-30) was evaluated in human and rat cultured hepatocytes and in two established cell lines (HepG2 and 3T3) according to the MEIC programme organized by the Scandinavian Society of Cell Toxicology. The MTT test was used as the endpoint of cytotoxicity after 24hr of exposure to the chemicals. Theophylline, phenobarbital and paraquat were the least cytotoxic compounds in the cellular systems (IC(50) = 450-17,000 mum) except for the 3T3 cells. The seven remaining chemicals (dextropropoxyphene, propranolol, arsenic trioxide, cupric sulfate, mercuric chloride, thioridazine and thallium sulfate) showed a similar relative cytotoxic ranking in the four in vitro systems in the lower range of concentrations (IC(50) = 2-350 mum). The data suggest that these 10 chemicals have a basal cytotoxic effect common to the four in vitro systems, and probably none of these compounds could be considered either hepatotoxic or species specific. The correlation between in vitro data and human lethal blood concentrations showed that the predictability of the in vitro systems was similar to that of in vivo rodent tests (LD(50)) only when low cytotoxic concentrations (IC(10)) were used for correlation.

  1. Cytotoxicity, haemolymphatic parameters, and oxidative stress following exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of quaternium-15 in Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Faggio, Caterina; Pagano, Maria; Alampi, Roberto; Vazzana, Irene; Felice, Maria Rosa

    2016-11-01

    The presence of a xenobiotic in the environment can often represent a risk for living organisms. Quaternium-15, a preservative, is one of the most used substances and is added to several cosmetics and other industrial products. For this reason,kwowing the bio-indicator of the marine environment, the toxicological effects potentially elicited by this preservative on the marine invertebrate Mytilus galloprovincialis were studied. The results of this work confirm that quaternium-15, used at 0.1 and 1mg/l concentrations, while metabolized in M. galloprovincialis, causes a decrease in cellular viability, and remarkable changes to the defense and antioxidant system. In fact, haemocyte viability is dramatically reduced, and haemolymphatic parameter measurements indicate a stress on the animal. Moreover, an increase in radical species production, in Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Species (TBARS) concentration, and in the Heat Shock Protein 70 amount, were observed in hepatopancreas. These changes suggest that the antioxidant systems are activated to overwhelm the oxidative damage induced by quaternium-15. Quaternium-15 jeopardizes both the defense and antioxidant systems. These results provide essential information with the biological fate of quaternium-15 in aquatic organisms, and confirm that biomarkers represent an important tool for modern environmental assessments as they can help with the prediction of pollutants involved in the monitoring program.

  2. Cadmium effects on 24h changes in glutamate, aspartate, glutamine, GABA and taurine content of rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pérez, B; Caride, A; Cabaleiro, T; Lafuente, A

    2010-07-01

    This work evaluates the possible changes in 24 h variations of striatal aspartate, glutamate, glutamine, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and taurine content after oral cadmium treatment. Male rats were submitted to cadmium exposure at two doses (25 and 50 mg/L of cadmium chloride (CdCl(2))) in the drinking water for 30 days. Control rats received cadmium-free water. After the treatment, rats were killed at six different time intervals throughout a 24 h cycle. Differential effects of cadmium on 24 h amino acid fluctuations were observed. Metal exposure modified the daily pattern of the amino acids concentration found in control animals, except for GABA and taurine with the lowest dose used. Exposure to 25 mg/L of CdCl(2) decreased mean content of aspartate, as well as GABA concentration. These results suggest that cadmium exposure affects 24 h changes of the studied amino acids concentration in the striatum, and those changes may be related to alterations in striatal function.

  3. Evaluation of resistance pattern to fenpyroximate and pyridaben in Tetranychus urticae collected from greenhouses and apple orchards using lethal concentration-slope relationship.

    PubMed

    Suh, Eunho; Koh, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Joon-Ho; Shin, Key-Il; Cho, Kijong

    2006-01-01

    This study aimed to monitor the present and future developments of the resistance of Tetranychus urticae Koch to fenpyroximate and pyridaben, using the relationship of the LC(50) and slope of the concentration-mortality line in a probit model, for the provision of reliable resistance management tactics. Tetranychus urticae populations were collected from 16 commercial greenhouses, where various crops were cultivated, as well as from 10 apple orchards throughout Korea. The resistance to fenpyroximate and pyridaben of each population was estimated by calculating the median lethal concentration (LC(50)), resistance ratio (RR) and slope of the concentration-mortality regression. Most of the greenhouse populations exhibited moderate levels of resistance, whereas the apple orchard populations showed only low levels, indicating that T. urticae populations in greenhouses were more strongly selected than those in apple orchards. Four population groups were established based on either the habitats (greenhouse and apple orchard) or acaricides (fenpyroximate and pyridaben). To test the hypothesis, "the slope is greatest at low and high levels of resistance," the slopes were regressed as a function of the LC(50), and fitted to a polynomial regression. The polynomial regression model explained this relationship well for the four population groups (p < 0.05), indicating that the development of resistance toward fenpyroximate or pyridaben was consistent with the gradient. A laboratory selection study agreed with the results from both acaricide field populations. These results suggest that the gradient was a good indicator of the susceptibility of T. urticae to genetic variations, which was related to the LC(50). The application of these findings is also discussed in relation to the resistance management of T. urticae.

  4. Four to seven random casual urine specimens are sufficient to estimate 24-h urinary sodium/potassium ratio in individuals with high blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Iwahori, T; Ueshima, H; Torii, S; Saito, Y; Fujiyoshi, A; Ohkubo, T; Miura, K

    2016-05-01

    This study was done to clarify the optimal number and type of casual urine specimens required to estimate urinary sodium/potassium (Na/K) ratio in individuals with high blood pressure. A total of 74 individuals with high blood pressure, 43 treated and 31 untreated, were recruited from the Japanese general population. Urinary sodium, potassium and Na/K ratio were measured in both casual urine samples and 7-day 24-h urine samples and then analyzed by correlation and Bland-Altman analyses. Mean Na/K ratio from random casual urine samples on four or more days strongly correlated with the Na/K ratio of 7-day 24-h urine (r=0.80-0.87), which was similar to the correlation between 1 and 2-day 24-h urine and 7-day 24-h urine (r=0.75-0.89). The agreement quality for Na/K ratio of seven random casual urine for estimating the Na/K ratio of 7-day 24-h urine was good (bias: -0.26, limits of agreements: -1.53-1.01), and it was similar to that of 2-day 24-h urine for estimating 7-day 24-h values (bias: 0.07, limits of agreement: -1.03 to 1.18). Stratified analyses comparing individuals using antihypertensive medication and individuals not using antihypertensive medication showed similar results. Correlations of the means of casual urine sodium or potassium concentrations with 7-day 24-h sodium or potassium excretions were relatively weaker than those for Na/K ratio. The mean Na/K ratio of 4-7 random casual urine specimens on different days provides a good substitute for 1-2-day 24-h urinary Na/K ratio for individuals with high blood pressure.

  5. Responses of bay anchovy (Anchoa mitchilli) larvae under lethal and sublethal scenarios of crude oil exposure.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Tara A; Childress, William; Portier, Ralph; Chesney, Edward J

    2016-12-01

    Bay anchovy (Anchoa mitchilli) is an ecologically important zooplanktivorous fish inhabiting estuaries of the Gulf of Mexico and eastern North America from Maine to Florida. Because they have a protracted spawning season (spring through fall) and are abundant at all life stages in coastal estuaries, their eggs and larvae likely encountered oil that reached the coast during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. We compared responses to oil exposure at different life stages and at lethal and sublethal conditions using acute, 24h exposures. In a series of experiments, bay anchovy larvae were exposed to high energy water accommodated fractions (HEWAF) and chemically-enhanced WAF (CEWAF) at two stages of larval development (5 and 21 days post hatch, dph). HEWAF oil exposures induced significantly greater life stage dependent sensitivity at 5 dph than at 21 dph but chemically dispersed (CEWAF) exposure mortality was more variable and LC50s were not significantly different between 5 and 21dph larvae. Acute exposure to two low-level concentrations of CEWAF did not result in significant mortality over 24h, but resulted in a 25-77% reduction in larval survival and a 12-34% reduction in weight specific growth after six days of post-exposure growth following the initial 24h exposure. These results show that younger (5 dph) bay anchovy larvae are more vulnerable to acute oil exposure than older (21 dph) larvae, and that acute responses do not accurately reflect potential population level mortality and impacts to growth and development.

  6. Differences in response of two model estuarine crustaceans after lethal and sublethal exposures to chlorpyrifos.

    PubMed

    Key, Peter B; Simonik, Elizabeth; Kish, Nicole; Chung, Katy W; Fulton, Michael H

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed the in vitro and in vivo effects of an acetylcholinesterase enzyme inhibitor (chlorpyrifos) in two estuarine crustaceans: grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio) and mysid (Americamysis bahia). The differences in response were quantified after lethal and sublethal exposures to chlorpyrifos and in vitro assays with chlorpyrifos-oxon. Results from the in vitro experiments indicated that the target enzyme, acetylcholinesterase (AChE), in the two species was similar in sensitivity to chlorpyrifos inhibition with IC50s of 0.98 nM and 0.89 nM for grass shrimp and mysids, respectively. In vivo experiments showed that mysids were significantly more sensitive to chlorpyrifos-induced AChE inhibition after 24 h of exposure. The in vivo EC50s for AChE inhibition were 1.23 μg L(-1) for grass shrimp and 0.027 μg L(-1) for mysids. Median lethal concentrations (24h LC50 values) were 1.06 μg L(-1) for grass shrimp and 0.068 μg L(-1) for mysids. The results suggest that differences in the response of these two crustaceans are likely related to differences in uptake and metabolism rather than target site sensitivity.

  7. Comparison of INTAKE24 (an Online 24-h Dietary Recall Tool) with Interviewer-Led 24-h Recall in 11–24 Year-Old

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Jennifer; Simpson, Emma; Poliakov, Ivan; Matthews, John N. S.; Olivier, Patrick; Adamson, Ashley J.; Foster, Emma

    2016-01-01

    Online dietary assessment tools offer a convenient, low cost alternative to traditional dietary assessment methods such as weighed records and face-to-face interviewer-led 24-h recalls. INTAKE24 is an online multiple pass 24-h recall tool developed for use with 11–24 year-old. The aim of the study was to undertake a comparison of INTAKE24 (the test method) with interviewer-led multiple pass 24-h recalls (the comparison method) in 180 people aged 11–24 years. Each participant completed both an INTAKE24 24-h recall and an interviewer-led 24-h recall on the same day on four occasions over a one-month period. The daily energy and nutrient intakes reported in INTAKE24 were compared to those reported in the interviewer-led recall. Mean intakes reported using INTAKE24 were similar to the intakes reported in the interviewer-led recall for energy and macronutrients. INTAKE24 was found to underestimate energy intake by 1% on average compared to the interviewer-led recall with the limits of agreement ranging from minus 49% to plus 93%. Mean intakes of all macronutrients and micronutrients (except non-milk extrinsic sugars) were within 4% of the interviewer-led recall. Dietary assessment that utilises technology may offer a viable alternative and be more engaging than paper based methods, particularly for children and young adults. PMID:27294952

  8. Comparison of INTAKE24 (an Online 24-h Dietary Recall Tool) with Interviewer-Led 24-h Recall in 11-24 Year-Old.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Jennifer; Simpson, Emma; Poliakov, Ivan; Matthews, John N S; Olivier, Patrick; Adamson, Ashley J; Foster, Emma

    2016-06-09

    Online dietary assessment tools offer a convenient, low cost alternative to traditional dietary assessment methods such as weighed records and face-to-face interviewer-led 24-h recalls. INTAKE24 is an online multiple pass 24-h recall tool developed for use with 11-24 year-old. The aim of the study was to undertake a comparison of INTAKE24 (the test method) with interviewer-led multiple pass 24-h recalls (the comparison method) in 180 people aged 11-24 years. Each participant completed both an INTAKE24 24-h recall and an interviewer-led 24-h recall on the same day on four occasions over a one-month period. The daily energy and nutrient intakes reported in INTAKE24 were compared to those reported in the interviewer-led recall. Mean intakes reported using INTAKE24 were similar to the intakes reported in the interviewer-led recall for energy and macronutrients. INTAKE24 was found to underestimate energy intake by 1% on average compared to the interviewer-led recall with the limits of agreement ranging from minus 49% to plus 93%. Mean intakes of all macronutrients and micronutrients (except non-milk extrinsic sugars) were within 4% of the interviewer-led recall. Dietary assessment that utilises technology may offer a viable alternative and be more engaging than paper based methods, particularly for children and young adults.

  9. Environmental impact on crew of armoured vehicles: effects of 24 h combat exercise in a hot desert.

    PubMed

    Singh, A P; Majumdar, D; Bhatia, M R; Srivastava, K K; Selvamurthy, W

    1995-11-01

    A field study was undertaken to investigate the effects of combined noise, vibration and heat stress on the physiological functions of the crew of armoured vehicles during prolonged combat exercise in a desert. The sound pressure level of noise was measured with a sound level meter and accelerations by vibration analyser. The thermal load on the crew was evaluated by calculating the wet bulb globe temperature index. The physiological responses of the subjects (n = 9), included significant increases in the heart rate, 24 h water intake and urinary catecholamine concentration. A significant decrease was recorded in body mass, peak expiratory flow rate and 24 h urinary output. The high heat load on the crew resulted in a hypohydration of 3% body mass and appeared to be the dominant factor in producing the physiological strain.

  10. Effects of sub-lethal concentrations of thyme and oregano essential oils, carvacrol, thymol, citral and trans-2-hexenal on membrane fatty acid composition and volatile molecule profile of Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis.

    PubMed

    Siroli, Lorenzo; Patrignani, Francesca; Gardini, Fausto; Lanciotti, Rosalba

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the modifications of cell membrane fatty acid composition and volatile molecule profiles of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella enteritidis, Escherichia coli, during growth in the presence of different sub-lethal concentrations of thyme and oregano essential oils as well as carvacrol, thymol, trans-2-hexenal and citral. The results evidenced that the tested molecules induced noticeable modifications of membrane fatty acid profiles and volatile compounds produced during the growth. Although specific differences in relation to the species considered were identified, the tested compounds induced a marked increase of some membrane associated fatty acids, particularly unsaturated fatty acids, trans-isomers, and specific released free fatty acids. These findings can contribute to the comprehension of the stress response mechanisms used by different pathogenic microorganisms often involved in food-borne diseases in relation to the exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of natural antimicrobials.

  11. The 24 h blood pressure-R-R interval relation in ambulatory monitoring.

    PubMed

    Recordati, Giorgio; Zanchetti, Alberto

    2008-05-30

    The present study was aimed at investigating whether the blood pressure-R-R interval relation obtained by ABPM may give useful information about autonomic control in the 24 h period. To this purpose ABPM was performed in 60 healthy young subjects (30 females and 30 males, mean age 21.8+/-1.0 years) and the collected variables were copied to a software program to convert heart rate into R-R interval values, for statistical analysis and graphic representation. The following data were calculated: 1) day and night means+/-SD; 2) difference and percent difference in mean night less mean day R-R interval (Delta y), diastolic and systolic blood pressures (Delta x) and their Delta y/Delta x ratios; 3) intercept (a_24 h), slope (b_24 h) and r coefficient (r_24 h) of the linear regressions of 24 h R-R interval over diastolic and systolic blood pressure values. In all subjects night, with respect to day, was characterized by R-R interval lengthening and blood pressure lowering. Despite this common pattern, day and night means and SDs, night and day differences, Delta y/Delta x ratios, a_24 h and b_24 h were different from individual to individual, but they were characteristic and reproducible in 20 out of the 21 subjects in which ABPM was repeated twice. Subjects could thus be classified according to their Delta y/Delta x ratios and slope (b_24 h). The 24 h blood pressure-R-R interval relation as calculated from ABPM yields individually characteristic indices of circadian sympatho-vagal reciprocity. This novel approach may be helpful in characterizing the 24 h autonomic control of several groups of patients.

  12. Critical analysis of the maximum non inhibitory concentration (MNIC) method in quantifying sub-lethal injury in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells exposed to either thermal or pulsed electric field treatments.

    PubMed

    Kethireddy, V; Oey, I; Jowett, Tim; Bremer, P

    2016-09-16

    Sub-lethal injury within a microbial population, due to processing treatments or environmental stress, is often assessed as the difference in the number of cells recovered on non-selective media compared to numbers recovered on a "selective media" containing a predetermined maximum non-inhibitory concentration (MNIC) of a selective agent. However, as knowledge of cell metabolic response to injury, population diversity and dynamics increased, the rationale behind the conventional approach of quantifying sub-lethal injury must be scrutinized further. This study reassessed the methodology used to quantify sub-lethal injury for Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells (≈ 4.75 Log CFU/mL) exposed to either a mild thermal (45°C for 0, 10 and 20min) or a mild pulsed electric field treatment (field strengths of 8.0-9.0kV/cm and energy levels of 8, 14 and 21kJ/kg). Treated cells were plated onto either Yeast Malt agar (YM) or YM containing NaCl, as a selective agent at 5-15% in 1% increments. The impact of sub-lethal stress due to initial processing, the stress due to selective agents in the plating media, and the subsequent variation of inhibition following the treatments was assessed based on the CFU count (cell numbers). ANOVA and a generalised least squares model indicated significant effects of media, treatments, and their interaction effects (P<0.05) on cell numbers. It was shown that the concentration of the selective agent used dictated the extent of sub-lethal injury recorded owing to the interaction effects of the selective component (NaCl) in the recovery media. Our findings highlight a potential common misunderstanding on how culture conditions impact on sub-lethal injury. Interestingly for S. cerevisiae cells the number of cells recovered at different NaCl concentrations in the media appears to provide valuable information about the mode of injury, the comparative efficacy of different processing regimes and the inherent degree of resistance within a population. This

  13. Effect of moderate cold exposure on 24-h energy expenditure: similar response in postobese and nonobese women.

    PubMed

    Buemann, B; Astrup, A; Christensen, N J; Madsen, J

    1992-12-01

    Twenty-four-hour energy expenditure (EE) and substrate oxidation rates were measured two times in eight postobese women and eight matched controls. On one occasion the subjects were exposed to a room temperature of 16 degrees C, on the other to 24 degrees C. Cold exposure elicited a 2% increment in 24-h EE (P < 0.05), with similar response in the two groups. The slight increase in EE was entirely covered by an enhanced carbohydrate oxidation rate. Fasting plasma norepinephrine (NE) increased from 0.74 +/- 0.08 to 1.29 +/- 0.21 nmol/l under cold exposure (P < 0.05), with no group difference. The cold-induced increase in 24-h EE was positively correlated to the increase in NE concentration (r2 = 0.41, P = 0.01). Sleeping EE was found to be 5% lower in the postobese women than in the controls (P = 0.04). The postobese group also had higher 24-h nonprotein respiratory quotient than the control group (P = 0.04), which was due to a 26% lower lipid-to-carbohydrate oxidation ratio. The study demonstrates that the thermogenic response to cold is normal in women susceptible to obesity, but it supports previous reports of a slightly lower basal EE and lower lipid-to-carbohydrate oxidation ratio in postobese subjects.

  14. Changes in the oral health-related quality of life 24 h following insertion of fixed orthodontic appliances

    PubMed Central

    Mansor, Noorhanizar; Saub, Roslan; Othman, Siti Adibah

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to assess changes in the oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) among patients wearing fixed orthodontic appliances 24 h after insertion. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients aged between 14 and 24 years (29 males and 31 females; mean age, 17.8 years; SD 3.1 years) were recruited from the Postgraduate Clinic, Department of Children's Dentistry and Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Malaya. The oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) was measured before treatment and 24 h after insertion of the orthodontic appliance. The instrument used to measure OHRQoL was a modified self-administered short version of Malaysian Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-16[M]) questionnaire. The higher the score, the poorer is the OHRQoL. Results: Overall score of OHRQoL increased significantly 24 h after insertion (mean 43.5±10.9) as compared to before insertion (mean 34.1±9.2) (P<0.001). Significant changes were found for the following items: Difficulties in chewing, bad breath, difficulties in pronunciation, discomfort in eating, ulcer, pain, avoidances of eating certain foods, difficulties in cleaning, embarrassment, avoid smiling, disturbed sleep, concentration affected, difficulty carrying out daily activities, and lack of self-confidence (P<0.05). Significant changes were also found in the mean difference of OHRQoL for gender (P<0.001). Conclusion: OHRQoL was found to deteriorate 24 h after insertion of fixed orthodontic appliances in almost all domains, with significant changes in gender. This information can be used as “informed consent”, which might increase patient's compliance as they are aware of what to expect from initial orthodontic treatment. PMID:24987635

  15. Ixodes scapularis Tick Saliva Proteins Sequentially Secreted Every 24 h during Blood Feeding

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Antônio F. M.; Moresco, James; Yates, John R.; da Silva Vaz, Itabajara; Mulenga, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Ixodes scapularis is the most medically important tick species and transmits five of the 14 reportable human tick borne disease (TBD) agents in the USA. This study describes LC-MS/MS identification of 582 tick- and 83 rabbit proteins in saliva of I. scapularis ticks that fed for 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 h, as well as engorged but not detached (BD), and spontaneously detached (SD). The 582 tick proteins include proteases (5.7%), protease inhibitors (7.4%), unknown function proteins (22%), immunity/antimicrobial (2.6%), lipocalin (3.1%), heme/iron binding (2.6%), extracellular matrix/ cell adhesion (2.2%), oxidant metabolism/ detoxification (6%), transporter/ receptor related (3.2%), cytoskeletal (5.5%), and housekeeping-like (39.7%). Notable observations include: (i) tick saliva proteins of unknown function accounting for >33% of total protein content, (ii) 79% of proteases are metalloproteases, (iii) 13% (76/582) of proteins in this study were found in saliva of other tick species and, (iv) ticks apparently selectively inject functionally similar but unique proteins every 24 h, which we speculate is the tick's antigenic variation equivalent strategy to protect important tick feeding functions from host immune system. The host immune responses to proteins present in 24 h I. scapularis saliva will not be effective at later feeding stages. Rabbit proteins identified in our study suggest the tick's strategic use of host proteins to modulate the feeding site. Notably fibrinogen, which is central to blood clotting and wound healing, was detected in high abundance in BD and SD saliva, when the tick is preparing to terminate feeding and detach from the host. A remarkable tick adaptation is that the feeding lesion is completely healed when the tick detaches from the host. Does the tick concentrate fibrinogen at the feeding site to aide in promoting healing of the feeding lesion? Overall, these data provide broad insight into molecular mechanisms regulating different tick

  16. Acute inhalation toxicity of carbon monoxide and hydrogen cyanide revisited: Comparison of models to disentangle the concentration × time conundrum of lethality and incapacitation.

    PubMed

    Pauluhn, Juergen

    2016-10-01

    Contemporary emergency response planning guidelines are stratified to consider the threshold for serious toxicity and/or impairment of escape, relative to the potentially lethal level above this threshold and the lower level at which individuals should not experience or develop effects more serious than mild irritation. While harmonized testing guidelines and risk assessment paradigms are available for the quantification of thresholds for lethality or establishing no adverse effect levels, the quantification of 'impairment of escape' appears to be a more elusive goal. Approaches were explored in context with CO and HCN in past experimental combustion toxicology studies to estimate the time available for escape. This point of departure (POD) was compared with the non-lethal threshold (LC01) and one third thereof from published recent acute inhalation studies in rats examining the Cxt-matrix of both CO and HCN. The findings from this analysis suggest that the rat delivers the most consistent data. However, it remains challenging yet to bridge the behavioral variables of human behavior typical of escape to any surrogate animal model. For the asphyxiant gases examined, the PODs characterizing 'impairment of escape' were difficult to distinguish from those indicative of impending death. No specific modeled carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) level could be linked to onset of incapacitation. In summary, the higher ventilation of rats (kg body weight adjusted) renders this species even more susceptible than heavy breathing humans. LCt01 × 1/3 values derived from the comprehensive Cxt matrix of rat inhalation studies are considered to be most suitable and robust to estimate the human equivalent threshold (POD) of 'impairment of escape'.

  17. Postmortem redistribution of the heroin metabolites morphine and morphine-3-glucuronide in rabbits over 24 h.

    PubMed

    Maskell, Peter D; Albeishy, Mohammed; De Paoli, Giorgia; Wilson, Nathan E; Seetohul, L Nitin

    2016-03-01

    The interpretation of postmortem drug levels is complicated by changes in drug blood levels in the postmortem period, a phenomena known as postmortem drug redistribution. We investigated the postmortem redistribution of the heroin metabolites morphine and morphine-3-glucuronide in a rabbit model. Heroin (1 mg/kg) was injected into anesthetised rabbit; after 1 h, an auricular vein blood sample was taken and the rabbit was euthanised. Following death rabbits were placed in a supine position at room temperature and divided into three groups namely (1) immediate autopsy, (2) autopsy after 30 minutes and (3) autopsy 24 h after death. Various samples which included femoral blood, cardiac blood, lung, liver, kidney, vitreous humour, subcutaneous and abdominal fat, liver, bone marrow and skeletal muscle were taken. The samples were analysed with a validated LC-MS/MS method. It was observed that within minutes there was a significant increase in free morphine postmortem femoral blood concentration compared to the antemortem sample (0.01 ± 0.01 to 0.05 ± 0.02 mg/L).Various other changes in free morphine and metabolite concentrations were observed during the course of the experiment in various tissues. Principal component analysis was used to investigate possible correlations between free morphine in the various samples. Some correlations were observed but gave poor predictions (>20 % error) when back calculating. The results suggest that rabbits are a good model for further studies of postmortem redistribution but that further study and understanding of the phenomena is required before accurate predictions of the blood concentration at the time of death are possible.

  18. Measurement of C{sub 24}H{sub 14} polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons associated with a size-segregated urban aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.O.; Dookeran, N.M.; Sarofim, A.F.; Smith, K.A.; Taghizadeh, K.; Plummer, E.F.; Lafleur, A.L.; Durant, J.L.

    1998-07-01

    Six-ring C{sub 24}H{sub 14} (MW 302) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), some of which are potent mutagens, are present in urban aerosols. Size-segregated atmospheric aerosol samples from Boston, MA, were analyzed for C{sub 24}H{sub 14} PAH by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Eleven peaks were found with mass to charge ratios of 302; of these, eight were identified using authentic standards. Five of the peaks were quantified. For each of these five, the distributions with respect to particle size were bimodal with the majority of the mass associated with accumulation mode particles and a smaller fraction of the mass associated with ultrafine mode particles. These distributions are similar to those observed for PAH of molecular weight 252--278 in the same sample but different from those of benzo[ghi]perylene and coronene which were associated to a greater degree with ultrafine particles. The data suggest that C{sub 24}H{sub 14} PAH repartition to larger particles by vaporization and sorption more rapidly than do benzo[ghi]perylene and coronene. The total concentration of C{sub 24}H{sub 14} PAH was comparable to that of benzo[a]pyrene in the same sample. Because of their mutagenicities, C{sub 24}H{sub 14} PAH may make a contribution to the genotoxicity of urban aerosols comparable to that of benzo[a]pyrene.

  19. Restructuring and redistribution of actinides in Am-MOX fuel during the first 24 h of irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kosuke; Miwa, Shuhei; Sekine, Shin-ichi; Yoshimochi, Hiroshi; Obayashi, Hiroshi; Koyama, Shin-ichi

    2013-09-01

    In order to confirm the effect of minor actinide additions on the irradiation behavior of MOX fuel pellets, 3 wt.% and 5 wt.% americium-containing MOX (Am-MOX) fuels were irradiated for 10 min at 43 kW/m and for 24 h at 45 kW/m in the experimental fast reactor Joyo. Two nominal values of the fuel pellet oxygen-to-metal ratio (O/M), 1.95 and 1.98, were used as a test parameter. Emphasis was placed on the behavior of restructuring and redistribution of actinides which directly affect the fuel performance and the fuel design for fast reactors. Microstructural evolutions in the fuels were observed by optical microscopy and the redistribution of constituent elements was determined by EPMA using false color X-ray mapping and quantitative point analyses. The ceramography results showed that structural changes occurred quickly in the initial stage of irradiation. Restructuring of the fuel from middle to upper axial positions developed and was almost completed after the 24-h irradiation. No sign of fuel melting was found in any of the specimens. The EPMA results revealed that Am as well as Pu migrated radially up the temperature gradient to the center of the fuel pellet. The increase in Am concentration on approaching the edge of the central void and its maximum value were higher than those of Pu after the 10-min irradiation and the difference was more pronounced after the 24-h irradiation. The increment of the Am and Pu concentrations due to redistribution increased with increasing central void size. In all of the specimens examined, the extent of redistribution of Am and Pu was higher in the fuel of O/M ratio of 1.98 than in that of 1.95.

  20. Parabens in 24 h urine samples of the German Environmental Specimen Bank from 1995 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Moos, Rebecca K; Koch, Holger M; Angerer, Jürgen; Apel, Petra; Schröter-Kermani, Christa; Brüning, Thomas; Kolossa-Gehring, Marike

    2015-10-01

    Parabens are widely used as antimicrobial preservatives in personal care and consumer products, food and pharmaceuticals. Due to their ubiquity, humans are constantly exposed to these chemicals. We assessed exposure to nine parabens (methyl-, ethyl-, n- and iso-propyl-, n- and iso-butyl-, benzyl-, pentyl- and heptyl paraben) in the German population from 1995 to 2012 based on 660 24h urine samples from the German Environmental Specimen Bank (ESB) using on-line HPLC coupled to isotope dilution tandem mass spectrometry. The limit of quantification (LOQ) was 0.5 μg/L for all parabens. We detected methyl-, ethyl- and n-propyl paraben in 79-99% of samples, followed by n-butyl paraben in 40% of samples. We infrequently detected iso-butyl-, iso-propyl- and benzyl paraben in 24%, 4% and 1.4% of samples, respectively. Urinary concentrations were highest for methyl paraben (median 39.8 μg/L; 95th percentile 319 μg/L) followed by n-propyl paraben (4.8 μg/L; 95th percentile 74.0 μg/L) and ethyl paraben (2.1 μg/L; 95th percentile 39.1 μg/L). Women had significantly higher urinary levels for all parabens than men, except for benzyl paraben. Samples from the ESB revealed that over the investigation period of nearly 20 years urinary paraben levels remained surprisingly constant; only methyl paraben had a significant increase, for both men and women. We found strong correlations between methyl- and n-propyl paraben and between n- and iso-butyl paraben. These results indicate that parabens are used in combination and arise from common sources of exposure. Urinary excretion factors are needed to extrapolate from individual urinary concentrations to actual doses.

  1. Detection of warfare agents in liquid foods using the brine shrimp lethality assay.

    PubMed

    Lumor, Stephen E; Diez-Gonzalez, Francisco; Labuza, Theodore P

    2011-01-01

    The brine shrimp lethality assay (BSLA) was used for rapid and non-specific detection of biological and chemical warfare agents at concentrations considerably below that which will cause harm to humans. Warfare agents detected include T-2 toxin, trimethylsilyl cyanide, and commercially available pesticides such as dichlorvos, diazinon, dursban, malathion, and parathion. The assay was performed by introducing 50 μL of milk or orange juice contaminated with each analyte into vials containing 10 freshly hatched brine shrimp nauplii in seawater. This was incubated at 28 °C for 24 h, after which mortality was determined. Mortality was converted to probits and the LC(50) was determined for each analyte by plotting probits of mortality against analyte concentration (log(10)). Our findings were the following: (1) the lethal effects of toxins dissolved in milk were observed, with T-2 toxin being the most lethal and malathion being the least, (2) except for parathion, the dosage (based on LC(50)) of analyte in a cup of milk (200 mL) consumed by a 6-y-old (20 kg) was less than the respective published rat LD(50) values, and (3) the BSLA was only suitable for detecting toxins dissolved in orange juice if incubation time was reduced to 6 h. Our results support the application of the BSLA for routine, rapid, and non-specific prescreening of liquid foods for possible sabotage by an employee or an intentional bioterrorist act. Practical Application: The findings of this study strongly indicate that the brine shrimp lethality assay can be adapted for nonspecific detection of warfare agents or toxins in food at any point during food production and distribution.

  2. Does an Adolescent’s Accuracy of Recall Improve with a Second 24-h Dietary Recall?

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Deborah A.; Wright, Janine L.; Dhaliwal, Satvinder S.; Boushey, Carol J.

    2015-01-01

    The multiple-pass 24-h dietary recall is used in most national dietary surveys. Our purpose was to assess if adolescents’ accuracy of recall improved when a 5-step multiple-pass 24-h recall was repeated. Participants (n = 24), were Chinese-American youths aged between 11 and 15 years and lived in a supervised environment as part of a metabolic feeding study. The 24-h recalls were conducted on two occasions during the first five days of the study. The four steps (quick list; forgotten foods; time and eating occasion; detailed description of the food/beverage) of the 24-h recall were assessed for matches by category. Differences were observed in the matching for the time and occasion step (p < 0.01), detailed description (p < 0.05) and portion size matching (p < 0.05). Omission rates were higher for the second recall (p < 0.05 quick list; p < 0.01 forgotten foods). The adolescents over-estimated energy intake on the first (11.3% ± 22.5%; p < 0.05) and second recall (10.1% ± 20.8%) compared with the known food and beverage items. These results suggest that the adolescents’ accuracy to recall food items declined with a second 24-h recall when repeated over two non-consecutive days. PMID:25984743

  3. Two cases of lethal nitrazepam poisoning.

    PubMed

    Brødsgaard, I; Hansen, A C; Vesterby, A

    1995-06-01

    This case report describes two cases of lethal poisoning caused by a combination of advanced chronic disease and an overdose of nitrazepam. In both cases, a relatively small blood concentration of nitrazepam was found postmortem.

  4. Toxicity of the pyrethroid pesticide fenvalerate to freshwater catfish Clarias gariepinus: lethality, biochemical effects and role of dietary ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Madhuban; Kaviraj, Anilava

    2009-08-01

    Static bioassays were made in the laboratory to determine lethal concentration of the pyrethroid pesticide fenvalerate [(RS)-alpha-cyano-3-phenoxybenzyl (RS)-2-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-methylbutyrate] for the freshwater catfish Clarias gariepinus and effects of sublethal concentrations of the pesticide on some biochemical parameters of the fish. For exposure periods of 24 to 96 h, LC(50) values of fenvalerate ranged from 5.83-4.76 micro g/L and 4.24-2.94 micro g/L, respectively for water and acetone soluble fenvalerate. Two sublethal concentrations of fenvalerate were used in the bioassays for biochemical parameters: 2.1 micro g/L for 24 h and 1.4 micro g/L for 96 h exposure, both concentrations representing 50% of LC(50) value of acetone soluble fenvalerate for the respective exposure period. Hepatosomatic index, liver glycogen, alkaline phosphatase of liver and ascorbic acid of blood, liver, and kidney decreased while haemoglobin (Hb) %, plasma glucose levels and acid phosphatase level of liver increased after 24 h exposure to 2.1 micro g/L fenvalerate. Longer exposure (96 h) to even a lower concentration (1.4 micro g/L) of fenvalerate resulted in reduction of all the parameters (except Hb %) tested as compared with control. Fish previously fed for 60 days with a diet supplemented by a high level of ascorbic acid (100 mg/100 g diet) could reverse most of the effects caused by 24 h exposure to 2.1 micro g/L fenvalerate. A lower level of ascorbic acid (50 mg/ 100 g diet) supplement could not influence these effects of fenvalerate. Even the higher dose of ascorbic acid supplementation (100 mg/100 g diet) could not relieve the stress parameters, except for Hb% and HSI, when the pesticide was applied at 1.4 micro g/L for a longer time period (96 h).

  5. Proteomic analysis of differentiating neuroblastoma cells treated with sub-lethal neurite inhibitory concentrations of diazinon: Identification of novel biomarkers of effect

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, W.; Sachana, M.; Flaskos, J.; Hargreaves, A.J.

    2009-10-15

    In previous work we showed that sub-lethal levels of diazinon inhibited neurite outgrowth in differentiating N2a neuroblastoma cells. Western blotting analysis targeted at proteins involved in axon growth and stress responses, revealed that such exposure led to a reduction in the levels of neurofilament heavy chain, microtubule associated protein 1 B (MAP 1B) and HSP-70. The aim of this study was to apply the approach of 2 dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry to identify novel biomarkers of effect. A number of proteins were found to be up-regulated compared to the control on silver-stained gels. These were classified in to 3 main groups of proteins: cytosolic factors, chaperones and the actin-binding protein cofilin, all of which are involved in cell differentiation, survival or metabolism. The changes observed for cofilin were further confirmed by quantitative Western blotting analysis with anti-actin and anti-cofilin antibodies. Indirect immunofluorescence staining with the same antibodies indicated that the microfilament network was disrupted in diazinon-treated cells. Our data suggest that microfilament organisation is disrupted by diazinon exposure, which may be related to increased cofilin expression.

  6. NQRS Data for C24H20BRb (Subst. No. 1578)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chihara, H.; Nakamura, N.

    This document is part of Subvolume B 'Substances Containing C10H16 … Zn' of Volume 48 'Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy Data' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains an extract of Section '3.2 Data tables' of the Chapter '3 Nuclear quadrupole resonance data' providing the NQRS data for C24H20BRb (Subst. No. 1578)

  7. NQRS Data for C24H24BN (Subst. No. 1583)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chihara, H.; Nakamura, N.

    This document is part of Subvolume B 'Substances Containing C10H16 … Zn' of Volume 48 'Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy Data' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains an extract of Section '3.2 Data tables' of the Chapter '3 Nuclear quadrupole resonance data' providing the NQRS data for C24H24BN (Subst. No. 1583)

  8. NQRS Data for C24H20BCs (Subst. No. 1575)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chihara, H.; Nakamura, N.

    This document is part of Subvolume B 'Substances Containing C10H16 … Zn' of Volume 48 'Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy Data' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains an extract of Section '3.2 Data tables' of the Chapter '3 Nuclear quadrupole resonance data' providing the NQRS data for C24H20BCs (Subst. No. 1575)

  9. NQRS Data for C24H20BK (Subst. No. 1576)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chihara, H.; Nakamura, N.

    This document is part of Subvolume B 'Substances Containing C10H16 … Zn' of Volume 48 'Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy Data' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains an extract of Section '3.2 Data tables' of the Chapter '3 Nuclear quadrupole resonance data' providing the NQRS data for C24H20BK (Subst. No. 1576)

  10. Probable maximum precipitation for 24 h duration over southeast Asian monsoon region—Selangor, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desa M, M. N.; Noriah, A. B.; Rakhecha, P. R.

    The probable maximum precipitation (PMP) for stations in Malaysia using Hershfield formula is routinely estimated as mean plus 15 standard deviations processed from yearly maximum rainfall values. The value of 15 as frequency factor is too high for a humid region such as Malaysia. In this paper, yearly maximum 1-day rainfall data of about 30-60 years for 33 stations in the region of Selangor, Malaysia, were analysed in an attempt to estimate PMP for 1-day duration based on an appropriate frequency factor for the first time. Based on the actual rainfall data of the stations, the highest value of this frequency factor was found to be 8.7. The frequency factor of 8.7 was subsequently used to estimate 24-h PMP values for the 33 stations. Using these PMP estimates, a generalised map was prepared showing the spatial distribution of 24-h PMP. It was found that 24-h PMP over Selangor, Malaysia, varied from 375 to 500 mm and the average ratio of the 24-h PMP to the highest observed 1-day rainfall was found to be about 2.0. The PMP map is considered as important to determine reliable and consistent PMP estimate for any location in Selangor, Malaysia, for designing costly and large hydraulic structures.

  11. Effect of ethanol on 24-h hormonal changes in prolactin release mechanisms in growing male rats.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Ortega, Vanesa; Cardinali, Daniel P; Cano, Pilar; Fernández-Mateos, Pilar; Reyes-Toso, Carlos; Esquifino, Ana I

    2006-12-01

    This study analyzes the effect of chronic ethanol feeding on 24-h variation of hypothalamic-pituitary mechanisms involved in prolactin regulation in growing male Wistar rats. Animals were maintained under a 12:12 h light/dark photoperiod (lights off at 2000 h), and they received a liquid diet for 4 wk, starting on d 35 of life. The ethanol-fed group received a similar diet to controls except that maltose was isocalorically replaced by ethanol. Ethanol replacement provided 36% of the total caloric content of the diet. Rats were killed at six time intervals every 4 h, beginning at 0900 h. Mean concentration of serum prolactin in ethanol-fed rats was 58.7% higher than in controls. Peak circulating prolactin levels occurred at the early phase of the activity span in both groups of rats, whereas a second peak was found late in the resting phase in ethanol-fed rats only. In control rats, median eminence dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and taurine levels exhibited two maxima, the major one preceding prolactin release and a second one during the first part of the resting phase. Median eminence DA and 5-HT turnover (as measured by 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, DOPAC/DA, and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, 5-HIAA/5-HT ratio) showed a single maximum preceding prolactin, at 0100 h. Ethanol treatment did not affect median eminence DA or 5-HT levels but it decreased significantly their turnover rate. The midday peak in DA and 5-HT levels (at 1300 h) was abolished and the night peak (at 0100 h) became spread and blunted in the ethanol-fed rats. This was accompanied with the disappearance of the 0100 h peak in DA and 5-HT turnover and the occurrence of a peak in 5-HT turnover at 1700 h. Ethanol intake suppressed the night peak in median eminence GABA and taurine (at 0100 h) as well as the midday peak of GABA. Ethanol augmented pituitary levels of DOPAC and 5-HIAA. The results indicate that chronic ethanol administration affects the mechanisms that

  12. At-sea trial of 24-h-based submarine watchstanding schedules with high and low correlated color temperature light sources.

    PubMed

    Young, Colin R; Jones, Geoffrey E; Figueiro, Mariana G; Soutière, Shawn E; Keller, Matthew W; Richardson, Annely M; Lehmann, Benjamin J; Rea, Mark S

    2015-04-01

    United States Navy submariners have historically lived with circadian disruption while at sea due to 18-h-based watchschedules. Previous research demonstrated that circadian entrainment improved with 24-h-based watchschedules. Twenty-nine male crew members participated in the study, which took place on an actual submarine patrol. The crew were exposed, first, to experimental high correlated color temperature (CCT = 13,500 K) fluorescent light sources and then to standard-issue fluorescent light sources (CCT = 4100 K). A variety of outcome measures were employed to determine if higher levels of circadian-effective light during on-watch times would further promote behavioral alignment to 24-h-based watchschedules. The high CCT light source produced significantly higher circadian light exposures than the low CCT light source, which was associated with significantly greater 24-h behavioral alignment with work schedules using phasor analysis, greater levels of sleep efficiency measured with wrist actigraphy, lower levels of subjective sleepiness measured with the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale, and higher nighttime melatonin concentrations measured by morning urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin/creatinine ratios. Unlike these diverse outcome measures, performance scores were significantly worse under the high CCT light source than under the low CCT light source, due to practice effects. As hypothesized, with the exception of the performance scores, all of the data converge to suggest that high CCT light sources, combined with 24-h watchschedules, promote better behavioral alignment with work schedules and greater sleep quality on submarines. Since the order and the type of light sources were confounded in this field study, the results should only be considered as consistent with our theoretical understanding of how regular, 24-h light-dark exposures combined with high circadian light exposures can promote greater behavioral alignment with work schedules and with sleep.

  13. High-intensity interval exercise induces 24-h energy expenditure similar to traditional endurance exercise despite reduced time commitment.

    PubMed

    Skelly, Lauren E; Andrews, Patricia C; Gillen, Jenna B; Martin, Brian J; Percival, Michael E; Gibala, Martin J

    2014-07-01

    Subjects performed high-intensity interval training (HIIT) and continuous moderate-intensity training (END) to evaluate 24-h oxygen consumption. Oxygen consumption during HIIT was lower versus END; however, total oxygen consumption over 24 h was similar. These data demonstrate that HIIT and END induce similar 24-h energy expenditure, which may explain the comparable changes in body composition reported despite lower total training volume and time commitment.

  14. Nqrs Data for C24H20MnO4P (Subst. No. 1581)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chihara, H.; Nakamura, N.

    This document is part of Subvolume B 'Substances Containing C10H16 … Zn' of Volume 48 'Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy Data' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains an extract of Section '3.2 Data tables' of the Chapter '3 Nuclear quadrupole resonance data' providing the NQRS data for C24H20MnO4P (Subst. No. 1581)

  15. Nqrs Data for C24H22Cl2Cu2N6 (Subst. No. 1582)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chihara, H.; Nakamura, N.

    This document is part of Subvolume B 'Substances Containing C10H16 … Zn' of Volume 48 'Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy Data' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains an extract of Section '3.2 Data tables' of the Chapter '3 Nuclear quadrupole resonance data' providing the NQRS data for C24H22Cl2Cu2N6 (Subst. No. 1582)

  16. Ambulant 24-h glucose rhythms mark calendar and biological age in apparently healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Wijsman, Carolien A; van Heemst, Diana; Hoogeveen, Evelien S; Slagboom, P Eline; Maier, Andrea B; de Craen, Anton J M; van der Ouderaa, Frans; Pijl, Hanno; Westendorp, Rudi G J; Mooijaart, Simon P

    2013-04-01

    Glucose metabolism marks health and disease and is causally inferred in the aging process. Ambulant continuous glucose monitoring provides 24-h glucose rhythms under daily life conditions. We aimed to describe ambulant 24-h glucose rhythms measured under daily life condition in relation to calendar and biological age in apparently healthy individuals. In the general population and families with propensity for longevity, we studied parameters from 24-h glucose rhythms; glucose levels; and its variability, obtained by continuous glucose monitoring. Participants were 21 young (aged 22-37 years), 37 middle-aged (aged 44-72 years) individuals from the general population, and 26 middle-aged (aged 52-74 years) individuals with propensity for longevity. All were free of diabetes. Compared with young individuals, middle-aged individuals from the general population had higher mean glucose levels (5.3 vs. 4.7 mmol L(-1) , P < 0.001), both diurnally (P < 0.001) and nocturnally (P = 0.002). Glucose variability was higher in the middle-aged compared with the young (standard deviation 0.70 vs. 0.57 mmol L(-1) , P = 0.025). Compared with middle-aged individuals from the general population, middle-aged individuals with propensity for longevity had lower overall mean glucose levels (5.2 vs. 5.4 mmol L(-1) , P = 0.047), which were more different nocturnally (4.8 vs. 5.2 mmol L(-1) , P = 0.003) than diurnally (5.3 vs. 5.5 mmol L(-1) , P = 0.14). There were no differences in glucose variability between these groups. Results were independent of body mass index. Among individuals without diabetes, we observed significantly different 24-h glucose rhythms depending on calendar and biological age.

  17. Exercise Increases 24-h Fat Oxidation Only When It Is Performed Before Breakfast

    PubMed Central

    Iwayama, Kaito; Kurihara, Reiko; Nabekura, Yoshiharu; Kawabuchi, Ryosuke; Park, Insung; Kobayashi, Masashi; Ogata, Hitomi; Kayaba, Momoko; Satoh, Makoto; Tokuyama, Kumpei

    2015-01-01

    Background As part of the growing lifestyle diversity in modern society, there is wide variation in the time of day individuals choose to exercise. Recent surveys in the US and Japan have reported that on weekdays, more people exercise in the evening, with fewer individuals exercising in the morning or afternoon. Exercise performed in the post-prandial state has little effect on accumulated fat oxidation over 24 h (24-h fat oxidation) when energy intake is matched to energy expenditure (energy-balanced condition). The present study explored the possibility that exercise increases 24-h fat oxidation only when performed in a post-absorptive state, i.e. before breakfast. Methods Indirect calorimetry using a metabolic chamber was performed in 10 young, non-obese men over 24 h. Subjects remained sedentary (control) or performed 60-min exercise before breakfast (morning), after lunch (afternoon), or after dinner (evening) at 50% of VO2max. All trials were designed to be energy balanced over 24 h. Time course of energy and substrate balance relative to the start of calorimetry were estimated from the differences between input (meal consumption) and output (oxidation). Findings Fat oxidation over 24 h was increased only when exercise was performed before breakfast (control, 456 ± 61; morning, 717 ± 64; afternoon, 446 ± 57; and evening, 432 ± 44 kcal/day). Fat oxidation over 24 h was negatively correlated with the magnitude of the transient deficit in energy and carbohydrate. Interpretation Under energy-balanced conditions, 24-h fat oxidation was increased by exercise only when performed before breakfast. Transient carbohydrate deficits, i.e., glycogen depletion, observed after morning exercise may have contributed to increased 24-h fat oxidation. PMID:26844280

  18. Nqrs Data for C24H42Li2N4 (Subst. No. 1587)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chihara, H.; Nakamura, N.

    This document is part of Subvolume B 'Substances Containing C10H16 … Zn' of Volume 48 'Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy Data' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains an extract of Section '3.2 Data tables' of the Chapter '3 Nuclear quadrupole resonance data' providing the NQRS data for C24H42Li2N4 (Subst. No. 1587)

  19. Development of a UK Online 24-h Dietary Assessment Tool: myfood24

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Michelle C.; Albar, Salwa A.; Morris, Michelle A.; Mulla, Umme Z.; Hancock, Neil; Evans, Charlotte E.; Alwan, Nisreen A.; Greenwood, Darren C.; Hardie, Laura J.; Frost, Gary S.; Wark, Petra A.; Cade, Janet E.

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of diet in large epidemiological studies can be costly and time consuming. An automated dietary assessment system could potentially reduce researcher burden by automatically coding food records. myfood24 (Measure Your Food on One Day) an online 24-h dietary assessment tool (with the flexibility to be used for multiple 24 h-dietary recalls or as a food diary), has been developed for use in the UK population. Development of myfood24 was a multi-stage process. Focus groups conducted with three age groups, adolescents (11–18 years) (n = 28), adults (19–64 years) (n = 24) and older adults (≥65 years) (n = 5) informed the development of the tool, and usability testing was conducted with beta (adolescents n = 14, adults n = 8, older adults n = 1) and live (adolescents n = 70, adults n = 20, older adults n = 4) versions. Median system usability scale (SUS) scores (measured on a scale of 0–100) in adolescents and adults were marginal for the beta version (adolescents median SUS = 66, interquartile range (IQR) = 20; adults median SUS = 68, IQR = 40) and good for the live version (adolescents median SUS = 73, IQR = 22; adults median SUS = 80, IQR = 25). Myfood24 is the first online 24-h dietary recall tool for use with different age groups in the UK. Usability testing indicates that myfood24 is suitable for use in UK adolescents and adults. PMID:26024292

  20. Transcriptomic response of Arabidopsis thaliana after 24 h incubation with the biocontrol fungus Trichoderma harzianum.

    PubMed

    Morán-Diez, Eugenia; Rubio, Belén; Domínguez, Sara; Hermosa, Rosa; Monte, Enrique; Nicolás, Carlos

    2012-04-15

    Trichoderma harzianum is a fungus used as biocontrol agent using its antagonistic abilities against phytopathogenic fungi, although it has also direct effects on plants, increasing or accelerating their growth and resistance to diseases and the tolerance to abiotic stresses. We analyzed Arabidopsis thaliana gene expression changes after 24 h of incubation in the presence of T. harzianum T34 using the Affymetrix GeneChip Arabidopsis ATH1. Because this microarray contains more than 22,500 probe sets representing approximately 24,000 genes, we were able to construct a global picture of the molecular physiology of the plant at 24 h of T. harzianum-Arabidopsis interaction. We identified several differentially expressed genes that are involved in plant responses to stress, regulation of transcription, signal transduction or plant metabolism. Our data support the hypothesis that salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid-related genes were down-regulated in A. thaliana after 24 h of incubation in the presence of T. harzianum T34, while several genes related to abiotic stress responses were up-regulated. These systemic changes elicited by T. harzianum in Arabidopsis are discussed.

  1. Availability of 24-h urine collection method on dietary phosphorus intake estimation

    PubMed Central

    Sakuma, Masae; Morimoto, Yuuka; Suzuki, Yukie; Suzuki, Akitsu; Noda, Saaya; Nishino, Kanaho; Ando, Sakiko; Ishikawa, Makoto; Arai, Hidekazu

    2017-01-01

    Accurate assessment of dietary phosphorus intake is necessary to prevent hyperphosphatemia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the 24-h urine collection method for estimation of phosphate intake in healthy males. Two experiments, a 1-day and a 5-day loading test, were performed. After an overnight fast, subjects consumed test meals, 24-h urine collection was performed, and blood samples were obtained. In the 5-day loading test, a phosphorus supplement was orally administered on day 3. The association between the phosphorus content of test meals and urinary excretion, anthropometric indices, and blood biomarkers was analyzed to develop a more precise formula for estimating phosphorus intake. In the 1-day loading test, the standard deviation of predictive phosphorus intake, based on multiple linear regression analysis, was less than that for the phosphorus absorption rate. In the 5-day loading test, urinary phosphorus excretion was similar on days 2, 4 and 5, but was significantly higher on day 3 after phosphorus supplementation. Our results indicate that estimation of dietary phosphorus intake with the 24-h urine collection method, using the amount of phosphorus and urea nitrogen excretion, may increase the precision of short-term monitoring. PMID:28366992

  2. Effect of octreotide on 24-h blood pressure profile in acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Fallo, F; Barzon, L; Boscaro, M; Casiglia, E; Sonino, N

    1998-05-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of octreotide, a somatostatin analog drug potentially able to inhibit growth hormone (GH), on the circadian blood pressure profile in a group of patients with acromegaly. Ten patients with GH-secreting pituitary adenoma were studied before and 6 months after treatment with subcutaneous octreotide 0.2 to 0.6 mg/day. Twenty-four hour blood pressure and heart rate were measured every 15 min at daytime (07:00 to 22:59) and every 30 min at nighttime (23:00 to 06:59) using a TM-2420 recorder. No correlation was found between GH levels and 24-h blood pressure in baseline conditions. Untreated patients had a significant nocturnal decrease of both systolic and diastolic blood pressure (P < .01), and all showed a circadian systolic or diastolic blood pressure rhythm. During octreotide treatment, 24 h as well as nighttime systolic and diastolic blood pressures significantly increased (P < .05), whereas daytime systolic and diastolic blood pressures did not change. Treated patients did not have a nocturnal decline in both systolic and diastolic blood pressures (P = NS), and eight lost their systolic or diastolic blood pressure rhythm. In conclusion, blood pressure circadian rhythm seems to be maintained in acromegaly. Octreotide treatment is associated with an increase of 24-h and nighttime blood pressure, and with loss of circadian blood pressure rhythm. Splanchnic vasoconstriction by this drug, shifting blood to peripheral vessels, may explain this phenomenon.

  3. Immune cell changes in response to a swimming training session during a 24-h recovery period.

    PubMed

    Morgado, José P; Monteiro, Cristina P; Teles, Júlia; Reis, Joana F; Matias, Catarina; Seixas, Maria T; Alvim, Marta G; Bourbon, Mafalda; Laires, Maria J; Alves, Francisco

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the impact of training sessions on the immune response is crucial for the adequate periodization of training, to prevent both a negative influence on health and a performance impairment of the athlete. This study evaluated acute systemic immune cell changes in response to an actual swimming session, during a 24-h recovery period, controlling for sex, menstrual cycle phases, maturity, and age group. Competitive swimmers (30 females, 15 ± 1.3 years old; and 35 males, 16.5 ± 2.1 years old) performed a high-intensity training session. Blood samples were collected before, immediately after, 2 h after, and 24 h after exercise. Standard procedures for the assessment of leukogram by automated counting (Coulter LH 750, Beckman) and lymphocytes subsets by flow cytometry (FACS Calibur BD, Biosciences) were used. Subjects were grouped according to competitive age groups and pubertal Tanner stages. Menstrual cycle phase was monitored. The training session induced neutrophilia, lymphopenia, and a low eosinophil count, lasting for at least 2 h, independent of sex and maturity. At 24 h postexercise, the acquired immunity of juniors (15-17 years old), expressed by total lymphocytes and total T lymphocytes (CD3(+)), was not fully recovered. This should be accounted for when planning a weekly training program. The observed lymphopenia suggests a lower immune surveillance at the end of the session that may depress the immunity of athletes, highlighting the need for extra care when athletes are exposed to aggressive environmental agents such as swimming pools.

  4. Sub-lethal concentrations of CdCl2 disrupt cell migration and cytoskeletal proteins in cultured mouse TM4 Sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    Egbowon, Biola F; Harris, Wayne; Arnott, Gordon; Mills, Chris Lloyd; Hargreaves, Alan J

    2016-04-01

    The aims of this study were to examine the effects of CdCl2 on the viability, migration and cytoskeleton of cultured mouse TM4 Sertoli cells. Time- and concentration-dependent changes were exhibited by the cells but 1 μM CdCl2 was sub-cytotoxic at all time-points. Exposure to 1 and 12 μM CdCl2 for 4 h resulted in disruption of the leading edge, as determined by chemical staining. Cell migration was inhibited by both 1 and 12 μM CdCl2 in a scratch assay monitored by live cell imaging, although exposure to the higher concentration was associated with cell death. Western blotting and immunofluorescence staining indicated that CdCl2 caused a concentration dependent reduction in actin and tubulin levels. Exposure to Cd(2+) also resulted in significant changes in the levels and/or phosphorylation status of the microtubule and microfilament destabilising proteins cofilin and stathmin, suggesting disruption of cytoskeletal dynamics. Given that 1-12 μM Cd(2+) is attainable in vivo, our findings are consistent with the possibility that Cd(2+) induced impairment of testicular development and reproductive health may involve a combination of reduced Sertoli cell migration and impaired Sertoli cell viability depending on the timing, level and duration of exposure.

  5. Food Intake Recording Software System, version 4 (FIRSSt4): A self-completed 24-h dietary recall for children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Food Intake Recording Software System, version 4 (FIRSSt4), is a web-based 24-h dietary recall (24 hdr) self-administered by children based on the Automated Self-Administered 24-h recall (ASA24) (a self-administered 24 hdr for adults). The food choices in FIRSSt4 are abbreviated to include only ...

  6. Entrainment of the human circadian pacemaker to longer-than-24-h days

    PubMed Central

    Gronfier, Claude; Wright, Kenneth P.; Kronauer, Richard E.; Czeisler, Charles A.

    2007-01-01

    Entrainment of the circadian pacemaker to the light:dark cycle is necessary for rhythmic physiological functions to be appropriately timed over the 24-h day. Nonentrainment results in sleep, endocrine, and neurobehavioral impairments. Exposures to intermittent bright light pulses have been reported to phase shift the circadian pacemaker with great efficacy. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that a modulated light exposure (MLE) with bright light pulses in the evening would entrain subjects to a light:dark cycle 1 h longer than their own circadian period (τ). Twelve subjects underwent a 65-day inpatient study. Individual subject's circadian period was determined in a forced desynchrony protocol. Subsequently, subjects were released into 30 longer-than-24-h days (daylength of τ + 1 h) in one of three light:dark conditions: (i) ≈25 lux; (ii) ≈100 lux; and (iii) MLE: ≈25 lux followed by ≈100 lux, plus two 45-min bright light pulses of ≈9,500 lux near the end of scheduled wakefulness. We found that lighting levels of ≈25 lux were insufficient to entrain all subjects tested. Exposure to ≈100 lux was sufficient to entrain subjects, although at a significantly wider phase angle compared with baseline. Exposure to MLE was able to entrain the subjects to the imposed sleep–wake cycles but at a phase angle comparable to baseline. These results suggest that MLE can be used to entrain the circadian pacemaker to non-24-h days. The implications of these findings are important because they could be used to treat circadian misalignment associated with space flight and circadian rhythm sleep disorders such as shift-work disorder. PMID:17502598

  7. Sediment toxicity and lethal body burdens of chlorophenols in an oligochaete worm, Lumbriculus variegatus

    SciTech Connect

    Kukkonen, J.; Halme, A.; Nikkilae, A.

    1995-12-31

    The toxicokinetics, acute toxicity and lethal body burden of 2,4,5-trichlorophenol (TCP) and pentachlorophenol (PCP) in Lumbriculus variegatus were measured in two different clean sediments. The sediments had an organic carbon content of 0.5% and 6.5%. The uptake rate coefficients (k{sub s}) of TCP at low TCP concentration (0.25 {micro}g g{sup {minus}1}) were 0.67 and 0.13 g dry sed. g{sup {minus}1} org. h{sup {minus}1} in low and high organic carbon content sediments, respectively. Organic carbon normalized uptake rate coefficient (k{sub oc}) was 0.0034 gOC g{sup {minus}1} org. h{sup {minus}1} for the low organic content sediment and 0.0085 gOC g{sup {minus}1} org. h{sup {minus}1} for the high organic content sediment showing that the organic carbon content does not explain all of the difference between the sediments. Similar to that, LC{sub 50} (24h) for the TCP was 37.4 and 121.5 {micro}g g{sup {minus}1} dw in low and high organic carbon content sediments, respectively. If organic carbon normalization is done the figures are 7,880 and 1,869 {micro}g g{sup {minus}1} OC. However, the lethal body burden of TCP in Lumbriculus variegatus is between 0.5--0.9 {micro}mol g{sup {minus}1} in both sediments. Similar type of results will be shown for PCP and the use of lethal body burden approach in sediment toxicology will be discussed.

  8. Lethal multiple pterygium syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Tulika; Noor, Nazia Nagori; Kural, Moolraj; Tripathi, Amita

    2016-01-01

    The multiple pterygium syndrome is consist of wide range of fetal malformations which have a genetic linkage. A defect in embryonic acetylcholine receptor which can be inherited as autosomal recessive, autosomal dominant, or X-linked fashion is the cause of this syndrome. We present a sporadic case of lethal multiple pterygium syndrome. PMID:27843868

  9. Monitoring hand flexor fatigue in a 24-h motorcycle endurance race.

    PubMed

    Marina, M; Porta, J; Vallejo, L; Angulo, R

    2011-04-01

    Motorcycle riders must endure high levels of muscle tension for long periods of time, especially in their arms and forearms, when steering and using handlebar controls. Because the right hand operates the gas handle and front brakes, the present research focuses on fatigue in the right hand flexors. Ten adult riders, aged 32.5±5.5years, volunteered to participate in this study. During the 24h race each rider, on completion of a relay stage, visited the assessment box to do the following handgrip test sequence: (1) 10s of EMG recording at rest, (2) one 3-s maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), (3) 1min rest interval and (4) 50% MVC maintained during 10s. EMG amplitude (MP: μV) and median and mean frequency (MF and MPF: Hz) over the superficial finger flexors were recorded during the whole handgrip test sequence with adhesive surface electrodes. MVC values were maintained during the first two relays (50-60min duration in total) and dropped gradually thereafter (p<0.01). During the monitoring of the 50% MVC, mean amplitude increased (p=0.024) while median and mean frequency tended to decrease. These results suggest fatigue is produced in motorcycle riders in a 24h race. However, the expected reduction of EMG frequency was not confirmed given to a potentially large variability.

  10. Effect of tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors on ambulatory 24-h blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Chagai; Bornstein, Gil; Leibowitz, Avshalom; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Grossman, Ehud

    2017-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) inhibitors are increasingly being used in inflammatory rheumatic diseases (IRD). The risk of cardiovascular disease is elevated in patients with IRD and TNF-α inhibitors reduce this risk. We assessed whether the beneficial effect of TNF-α inhibitors on cardiovascular risk is mediated by blood pressure reduction. We measured blood pressure levels with 24-h ambulatory blood pressure measurements device in patients with IRD before and 3 months after treatment with TNF-α inhibitors. The study population consisted of 15 subjects (6 men; mean age 45.9 ± 14.1 years). Most patients had either rheumatoid arthritis or psoriatic arthritis and adalimumab was the most common TNF-α inhibitor used. Mean 24-h systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels remained the same after treatment (121 ± 12/66 ± 7 before and 123 ± 11/67 ± 10 mm Hg after; p = 0.88 and 0.66, respectively). The study demonstrates that TNF-α inhibitors have no effect on blood pressure levels.

  11. BDNFval66met affects neural activation pattern during fear conditioning and 24 h delayed fear recall

    PubMed Central

    Golkar, Armita; Lindström, Kara M.; Haaker, Jan; Öhman, Arne; Schalling, Martin; Ingvar, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), the most abundant neutrophin in the mammalian central nervous system, is critically involved in synaptic plasticity. In both rodents and humans, BDNF has been implicated in hippocampus- and amygdala-dependent learning and memory and has more recently been linked to fear extinction processes. Fifty-nine healthy participants, genotyped for the functional BDNFval66met polymorphism, underwent a fear conditioning and 24h-delayed extinction protocol while skin conductance and blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) responses (functional magnetic resonance imaging) were acquired. We present the first report of neural activation pattern during fear acquisition ‘and’ extinction for the BDNFval66met polymorphism using a differential conditioned stimulus (CS)+ > CS− comparison. During conditioning, we observed heightened allele dose-dependent responses in the amygdala and reduced responses in the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex in BDNFval66met met-carriers. During early extinction, 24h later, we again observed heightened responses in several regions ascribed to the fear network in met-carriers as opposed to val-carriers (insula, amygdala, hippocampus), which likely reflects fear memory recall. No differences were observed during late extinction, which likely reflects learned extinction. Our data thus support previous associations of the BDNFval66met polymorphism with neural activation in the fear and extinction network, but speak against a specific association with fear extinction processes. PMID:25103087

  12. Lethal levels of selected water quality variables to larval and juvenile Lost River and shortnose suckers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saiki, M.K.; Monda, D.P.; Bellerud, B.L.

    1999-01-01

    Resource managers hypothesize that occasional fish kills during summer-early fall in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon, may be linked to unfavorable water quality conditions created by massive algal blooms. In a preliminary effort to address this concern, short-term (96-h-long) laboratory tests were conducted with larval and juvenile Lost River (Deltistes luxatus) and shortnose (Chasmistes brevirostris) suckers to determine the upper median lethal concentrations (LC50s; also referred to as median tolerance limits) for pH, un-ionized ammonia, and water temperature, and the lower LC50s for dissolved oxygen. The mean LC50s varied among species and life stages as follows: for pH, 10.30-10.39; for un-ionized ammonia, 0.48-1.06 mg litre-1; for temperature, 30.35-31.82??C; and for dissolved oxygen, 1.34-2.10 mg litre-1. Comparisons of 95% confidence limits indicated that, on average, the 96-h LC50s were not significantly different from those computed for shorter exposure times (i.e., 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h). According to two-way analysis of variance, LC50s for the four water quality variables did not vary significantly (p > 0.05) between fish species. However, LC50s for pH (exposure times of 24 h and 48 h) and dissolved oxygen (exposure times of 48 h, 72 h, and 96 h) differed significantly (p ??? 0.05) between life stages, whereas LC50s for un-ionized ammonia and water temperature did not exhibit significant differences. In general, larvae were more sensitive than juveniles to high pH and low dissolved oxygen concentrations. When compared to ambient water quality conditions in Upper Klamath Lake, our results strongly suggest that near-anoxic conditions associated with the senescence phase of algal blooms are most likely to cause high mortalities of larval and juvenile suckers.

  13. Gene expression responses over 24 h to lengthening and shortening contractions in human muscle: major changes in CSRP3, MUSTN1, SIX1, and FBXO32.

    PubMed

    Kostek, Matthew C; Chen, Yi-Wen; Cuthbertson, Daniel J; Shi, Rongye; Fedele, Mark J; Esser, Karyn A; Rennie, Michael J

    2007-09-19

    Resistance training using lengthening (eccentric) contractions induces greater increases in muscle size than shortening (concentric) contractions, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are not clear. Using temporal expression profiling, we compared changes in gene expression within 24 h of an acute bout of each type of contractions conducted simultaneously in the quadriceps of different legs. Five healthy young men performed shortening contractions with one leg while the contralateral leg performed lengthening contractions. Biopsies were taken from both legs before exercise and 3, 6, and 24 h afterwards, in the fed state. Expression profiling (n = 3) was performed using a custom-made Affymetrix MuscleChip containing probe sets of approximately 3,300 known genes and expressed sequence tags expressed in skeletal muscle. We identified 51 transcripts differentially regulated between the two exercise modes. Using unsupervised hierarchical clustering, we identified four distinct clusters, three of which corresponded to unique functional categories (protein synthesis, stress response/early growth, and sarcolemmal structure). Using quantitative RT-PCR (n = 5), we verified expression changes (lengthening/shortening) in SIX1 (3 h, -1.9-fold, P < 0.001), CSRP3 (6 h, 2.9-fold, P < 0.05), and MUSTN1 (24 h, 4.3-fold, P < 0.05). We examined whether FBXO32/atrogin-1/MAFbx, a known regulator of protein breakdown and of muscle atrophy was differentially expressed: the gene was downregulated after lengthening contractions (3 h, 2.7-fold, P < 0.05; 6 h, 3.3-fold, P < 0.05; 24 h, 2.3-fold, P < 0.05). The results suggested that lengthening and shortening contractions activated distinct molecular pathways as early as 3 h postexercise. The molecular differences might contribute to mechanisms underlying the physiological adaptations seen with training using the two modes of exercise.

  14. Boron uptake in tumors, cerebrum and blood from [10B]NA4B24H22S2

    DOEpatents

    Slatkin, Daniel N.; Micca, Peggy L.; Fairchild, Ralph G.

    1988-01-01

    A stable boronated (.sup.10 B-labeled) compound, sodium mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate is infused in the form of the disulfide dimer, [.sup.10 B]Na.sub.4 B.sub.24 H.sub.22 S.sub.2, at a dose of about 200 .mu.g .sup.10 B per gm body weight. The infusion is performed into the blood or peritoneal cavity of the patient slowly over a period of many days, perhaps one week or more, at the rate of roughly 1 .mu.g .sup.10 B per gm body weight per hour. Use of this particular boronated dimer in the manner or similarly to the manner so described permits radiotherapeutically effective amounts of boron to accumulate in tumors to be treated by boron neutron capture radiation therapy and also permits sufficient retention of boron in tumor after the cessation of the slow infusion, so as to allow the blood concentration of .sup.10 B to drop or to be reduced artificially to a radiotherapeutically effective level, less than one-half of the concentration of .sup.10 B in the tumor.

  15. Boron uptake in tumors, cerebrum and blood from [10B]NA4B24H22S2

    DOEpatents

    Slatkin, Daniel N.; Micca, Peggy L.; Fairchild, Ralph G.

    1988-08-02

    A stable boronated (.sup.10 B-labeled) compound, sodium mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate is infused in the form of the disulfide dimer, [.sup.10 B]Na.sub.4 B.sub.24 H.sub.22 S.sub.2, at a dose of about 200 .mu.g .sup.10 B per gm body weight. The infusion is performed into the blood or peritoneal cavity of the patient slowly over a period of many days, perhaps one week or more, at the rate of roughly 1 .mu.g .sup.10 B per gm body weight per hour. Use of this particular boronated dimer in the manner or similarly to the manner so described permits radiotherapeutically effective amounts of boron to accumulate in tumors to be treated by boron neutron capture radiation therapy and also permits sufficient retention of boron in tumor after the cessation of the slow infusion, so as to allow the blood concentration of .sup.10 B to drop or to be reduced artificially to a radiotherapeutically effective level, less than one-half of the concentration of .sup.10 B in the tumor.

  16. Validity and relative validity of a novel digital approach for 24-h dietary recall in athletes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We developed a digital dietary analysis tool for athletes (DATA) using a modified 24-h recall method and an integrated, customized nutrient database. The purpose of this study was to assess DATA’s validity and relative validity by measuring its agreement with registered dietitians’ (RDs) direct observations (OBSERVATION) and 24-h dietary recall interviews using the USDA 5-step multiple-pass method (INTERVIEW), respectively. Methods Fifty-six athletes (14–20 y) completed DATA and INTERVIEW in randomized counter-balanced order. OBSERVATION (n = 26) consisted of RDs recording participants’ food/drink intake in a 24-h period and were completed the day prior to DATA and INTERVIEW. Agreement among methods was estimated using a repeated measures t-test and Bland-Altman analysis. Results The paired differences (with 95% confidence intervals) between DATA and OBSERVATION were not significant for carbohydrate (10.1%, -1.2–22.7%) and protein (14.1%, -3.2–34.5%) but was significant for energy (14.4%, 1.2–29.3%). There were no differences between DATA and INTERVIEW for energy (-1.1%, -9.1–7.7%), carbohydrate (0.2%, -7.1–8.0%) or protein (-2.7%, -11.3–6.7%). Bland-Altman analysis indicated significant positive correlations between absolute values of the differences and the means for OBSERVATION vs. DATA (r = 0.40 and r = 0.47 for energy and carbohydrate, respectively) and INTERVIEW vs. DATA (r = 0.52, r = 0.29, and r = 0.61 for energy, carbohydrate, and protein, respectively). There were also wide 95% limits of agreement (LOA) for most method comparisons. The mean bias ratio (with 95% LOA) for OBSERVATION vs. DATA was 0.874 (0.551-1.385) for energy, 0.906 (0.522-1.575) for carbohydrate, and 0.895(0.395-2.031) for protein. The mean bias ratio (with 95% LOA) for INTERVIEW vs. DATA was 1.016 (0.538-1.919) for energy, 0.995 (0.563-1.757) for carbohydrate, and 1.031 (0.514-2.068) for protein. Conclusion DATA has good relative

  17. Master runners dominate 24-h ultramarathons worldwide—a retrospective data analysis from 1998 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aims of the present study were to examine (a) participation and performance trends and (b) the age of peak running performance in master athletes competing in 24-h ultra-marathons held worldwide between 1998 and 2011. Methods Changes in both running speed and the age of peak running speed in 24-h master ultra-marathoners (39,664 finishers, including 8,013 women and 31,651 men) were analyzed. Results The number of 24-h ultra-marathoners increased for both women and men across years (P < 0.01). The age of the annual fastest woman decreased from 48 years in 1998 to 35 years in 2011. The age of peaking running speed remained unchanged across time at 42.5 ± 5.2 years for the annual fastest men (P > 0.05). The age of the annual top ten women decreased from 42.6 ± 5.9 years (1998) to 40.1 ± 7.0 years (2011) (P < 0.01). For the annual top ten men, the age of peak running speed remained unchanged at 42 ± 2 years (P > 0.05). Running speed remained unchanged over time at 11.4 ± 0.4 km h-1 for the annual fastest men and 10.0 ± 0.2 km/h for the annual fastest women, respectively (P > 0.05). For the annual ten fastest women, running speed increased over time by 3.2% from 9.3 ± 0.3 to 9.6 ± 0.3 km/h (P < 0.01). Running speed of the annual top ten men remained unchanged at 10.8 ± 0.3 km/h (P > 0.05). Women in age groups 25–29 (r2 = 0.61, P < 0.01), 30–34 (r2 = 0.48, P < 0.01), 35–39 (r2 = 0.42, P = 0.01), 40–44 (r2 = 0.46, P < 0.01), 55–59 (r2 = 0.41, P = 0.03), and 60–64 (r2 = 0.57, P < 0.01) improved running speed; while women in age groups 45–49 and 50–54 maintained running speed (P > 0.05). Men improved running speed in age groups 25–29 (r2 = 0.48, P = 0.02), 45–49 (r2 = 0.34, P = 0.03), 50–54 (r2 = 0.50, P < 0.01), 55–59 (r2 = 0.70, P < 0.01), and 60–64 (r2 = 0.44, P = 0.03); while runners in age groups 30–34, 35–39, and 40–44 maintained running speed (P > 0.05). Conclusions Female and male age group runners improved

  18. Performance and sleepiness during a 24 h wake in constant conditions are affected by diet.

    PubMed

    Lowden, Arne; Holmbäck, Ulf; Akerstedt, Torbjörn; Forslund, Jeanette; Lennernäs, Maria; Forslund, Anders

    2004-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of high-carbohydrate (HC) and high-fat (HF) diet on cognitive performance, and subjective and objective sleepiness. Seven male participants were kept awake for 24 h in a metabolic ward. Meals were given every 4h and cognitive performance and sleepiness ratings were assessed hourly. The Karolinska Drowsiness Test (KDT, EEG derived) was performed twice after meal. Performance in simple reaction time showed a significant interaction of diet and the post-prandial period, a slower reaction time was observed for the HC-diet 3.5 h after meal intake. Diet did not affect EEG measures but a general post-prandial increase of objective sleepiness was observed 3.5h after meal servings. The HC-diet was significantly associated with an increase of subjective sleepiness. The study demonstrated that the HC-diet caused larger oscillation in performance and increased sleepiness as compared to HF-diet throughout day and night.

  19. Intrinsic near-24-h pacemaker period determines limits of circadian entrainment to a weak synchronizer in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, K. P. Jr; Hughes, R. J.; Kronauer, R. E.; Dijk, D. J.; Czeisler, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    Endogenous circadian clocks are robust regulators of physiology and behavior. Synchronization or entrainment of biological clocks to environmental time is adaptive and important for physiological homeostasis and for the proper timing of species-specific behaviors. We studied subjects in the laboratory for up to 55 days each to determine the ability to entrain the human clock to a weak circadian synchronizing stimulus [scheduled activity-rest cycle in very dim (approximately 1.5 lux in the angle of gaze) light-dark cycle] at three approximately 24-h periods: 23.5, 24.0, and 24.6 h. These studies allowed us to test two competing hypotheses as to whether the period of the human circadian pacemaker is near to or much longer than 24 h. We report here that imposition of a sleep-wake schedule with exposure to the equivalent of candle light during wakefulness and darkness during sleep is usually sufficient to maintain circadian entrainment to the 24-h day but not to a 23.5- or 24.6-h day. Our results demonstrate functionally that, in normally entrained sighted adults, the average intrinsic circadian period of the human biological clock is very close to 24 h. Either exposure to very dim light and/or the scheduled sleep-wake cycle itself can entrain this near-24-h intrinsic period of the human circadian pacemaker to the 24-h day.

  20. Histopathological effects of anthrax lethal factor on rat liver.

    PubMed

    Altunkaynak, Berrin Zuhal; Ozbek, Elvan

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, has become an increasingly important scientific topic due to its potential role in bioterrorism. The lethal toxin (LT) of B. anthracis consists of lethal factor (LF) and a protective antigen (PA). This study investigated whether only lethal factor was efficient as a hepatotoxin in the absence of the PA. To achieve this aim, LF (100 µg/kg body weight, dissolved in sterile distilled water) or distilled water vehicle were intraperitoneally injected once into adult rats. At 24 h post-injection, the hosts were euthanized and their livers removed and tissue samples examined under light and electron microscopes. As a result of LF application, hepatic injury - including cytoplasmic and nuclear damage in hepatocytes, sinusoidal dilatation, and hepatocellular lysis - became apparent. Further, light microscopic analyses of liver sections from the LF-injected rats revealed ballooning degeneration and cytoplasmic loss within hepatocytes, as well as peri-sinusoidal inflammation. Additionally, an increase in the numbers of Kupffer cells was evident. Common vascular injuries were also found in the liver samples; these injuries caused hypoxia and pathological changes. In addition, some cytoplasmic and nuclear changes were detected within the liver ultrastructure. The results of these studies allow one to suggest that LF could be an effective toxicant alone and that PA might act in situ to modify the effect of this agent (or the reverse situation wherein LF modifies effects of PA) such that lethality results.

  1. Expression of potentially lethal damage in Chinese hamster cells exposed to hematoporphyrin derivative photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Gomer, C J; Rucker, N; Ferrario, A; Murphree, A L

    1986-07-01

    Experiments were performed to determine whether the expression and/or repair of potentially lethal damage could be observed in mammalian cells exposed to hemataporphyrin derivative (HPD) photodynamic therapy (PDT). Photodynamic therapy was combined with posttreatment protocols known to inhibit the repair of potentially lethal damage in cells treated with X-rays, ultraviolet radiation, or alkylating agents. Potentiation of lethal damage from photodynamic therapy was induced by hypothermia (4 degrees C) following short (1 h) or extended (16 h) HPD incubation conditions. Caffeine potentiated the lethal effects of PDT only when cells were incubated with HPD for extended time periods. However, 3-aminobenzamide had no effect on the cytotoxic actions of PDT following either short or extended HPD incubations. Recovery from potentially lethal damage expressed by posttreatment hypothermia was complete within 1 h, while recovery from potentially lethal damage expressed by posttreatment caffeine required time periods of up to 24 h. The lack of effect of 3-aminobenzamide on expression of potentially lethal damage following photodynamic therapy may be related to direct inhibition of adenosine diphosphoribose transferase by photodynamic therapy. These results indicate that the expression and repair of potentially lethal damage can be observed in cells treated with PDT and will vary as a function of porphyrin incubation conditions.

  2. Comparative study of peritoneal macrophage functions in mice receiving lethal and non-lethal doses of LPS.

    PubMed

    Víctor, V M; De la Fuente, M

    2000-01-01

    In previous studies, we have observed changes in several functions of peritoneal macrophages from female BALB/c mice with lethal endotoxic shock caused by intraperitoneal injection of Escherichia coli O55:B5 lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 100 mg/kg), which were associated with a high production of superoxide anion and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). In the present work, both a lethal dose (250 mg/kg) and a non-lethal dose (100 mg/kg) of LPS were used in female Swiss mice. In peritoneal macrophages, the following functions were studied at 2, 4, 12 and 24 h after LPS injection: adherence to substrate, chemotaxis, ingestion of particles, and superoxide anion and TNF-alpha production. In both groups, the results showed a stimulation of adherence, ingestion and superoxide production as well as a decrease of chemotaxis, whereas TNF-alpha could not be detected in either of the two groups. These effects were more evident with the 250 mg/kg dose, especially as regards superoxide anion production, which was higher in the animals treated with a lethal dose of LPS.

  3. Baroreflex-mediated heart rate and vascular resistance responses 24 h after maximal exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, Victor A.

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Plasma volume, heart rate (HR) variability, and stimulus-response relationships for baroreflex control of forearm vascular resistance (FVR) and HR were studied in eight healthy men after and without performing a bout of maximal exercise to test the hypotheses that acute expansion of plasma volume is associated with 1) reduction in baroreflex-mediated HR response, and 2) altered operational range for central venous pressure (CVP). METHODS: The relationship between stimulus (DeltaCVP) and vasoconstrictive reflex response (DeltaFVR) during unloading of cardiopulmonary baroreceptors was assessed with lower-body negative pressure (LBNP, 0, -5, -10, -15, -20 mm Hg). The relationship between stimulus (Deltamean arterial pressure (MAP)) and cardiac reflex response (DeltaHR) during loading of arterial baroreceptors was assessed with steady-state infusion of phenylephrine (PE) designed to increase MAP by 15 mm Hg alone and during application of LBNP (PE+LBNP) and neck pressure (PE+LBNP+NP). Measurements of vascular volume and autonomic baroreflex responses were conducted on two different test days, each separated by at least 1 wk. On one day, baroreflex response was tested 24 h after graded cycle exercise to volitional exhaustion. On another day, measurement of baroreflex response was repeated with no exercise (control). The order of exercise and control treatments was counterbalanced. RESULTS: Baseline CVP was elevated (P = 0.04) from a control value of 10.5 +/- 0.4 to 12.3 +/- 0.4 mm Hg 24 h after exercise. Average DeltaFVR/DeltaCVP during LBNP was not different (P = 0.942) between the exercise (-1.35 +/- 0.32 pru x mm Hg-1) and control (-1.32 +/- 0.36 pru x mm Hg-1) conditions. However, maximal exercise caused a shift along the reflex response relationship to a higher CVP and lower FVR. HR baroreflex response (DeltaHR/DeltaMAP) to PE+LBNP+NP was lower (P = 0.015) after maximal exercise (-0.43 +/- 0.15 beats x min-1 x mm Hg-1) compared with the control

  4. The friction coefficient of shoulder joints remains remarkably low over 24 h of loading.

    PubMed

    Jones, Brian K; Durney, Krista M; Hung, Clark T; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2015-11-05

    The frictional response of whole human joints over durations spanning activities of daily living has not been reported previously. This study measured the friction of human glenohumeral joints during 24 h of reciprocal loading in a pendulum testing device, at moderate (0.2 mm/s, 4320 cycles) and low (0.02 mm/s, 432 cycles) sliding speeds, under a 200 N load. The effect of joint congruence was also investigated by testing human humeral heads against significantly larger mature bovine glenoids. Eight human joints and six bovine joints were tested in four combinations: human joints tested at moderate (hHCMS, n=6) and low speed (hHCLS, n=3), human humeral heads tested against bovine glenoids at moderate speed (LCMS, n=3), and bovine joints tested at moderate speed (bHCMS, n=3). In the first half hour the mean±standard deviation of the friction coefficient was hHCMS: 0.0016±0.0011, hHCLS: 0.0012±0.0002, LCMS: 0.0008±0.0002 and bHCMS: 0.0024±0.0008; in the last four hours it was hHCMS: 0.0057±0.0025, hHCLS: 0.0047±0.0017, LCMS: 0.0012±0.0003 and bHCMS: 0.0056±0.0016. The initial value was lower than the final value (p<0.0001). The value in LCMS was significantly lower than in hHCMS and bHCMS (p<0.01). No visual damage was observed in any of the specimens. These are the first results to demonstrate that the friction coefficient of natural human shoulders remains remarkably low (averaging as little as 0.0015 and no greater than 0.006) for up to 24 h of continuous loading. The sustained low friction coefficients observed in incongruent joints (~0.001) likely represent rolling rather than sliding friction.

  5. The lethality test system

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, W.M.; Sims, J.R.; Parker, J.V.

    1986-11-01

    The Lethality Test System (LTS), presently under construction at Los Alamos, is an electromagnetic launcher facility designed to perform impact experiments at velocities up to 15 km/s. The launcher is a 25 mm round bore, plasma armature railgun extending 22 m in length. Preinjection is accomplished with a two-stage light gas gun capable of 7 km/s. The railgun power supply utilized traction motors, vacuum interrupters, and pulse transformers. The design of these traction motors, vacuum interrupters and pulse transformers are detailed.

  6. Tuberculosis in hospitalized patients: clinical characteristics of patients receiving treatment within the first 24 h after admission*

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Denise Rossato; da Silva, Larissa Pozzebon; Dalcin, Paulo de Tarso Roth

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate clinical characteristics and outcomes in patients hospitalized for tuberculosis, comparing those in whom tuberculosis treatment was started within the first 24 h after admission with those who did not. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study involving new tuberculosis cases in patients aged ≥ 18 years who were hospitalized after seeking treatment in the emergency room. Results: We included 305 hospitalized patients, of whom 67 (22.0%) received tuberculosis treatment within the first 24 h after admission ( ≤24h group) and 238 (88.0%) did not (>24h group). Initiation of tuberculosis treatment within the first 24 h after admission was associated with being female (OR = 1.99; 95% CI: 1.06-3.74; p = 0.032) and with an AFB-positive spontaneous sputum smear (OR = 4.19; 95% CI: 1.94-9.00; p < 0.001). In the ≤24h and >24h groups, respectively, the ICU admission rate was 22.4% and 15.5% (p = 0.258); mechanical ventilation was used in 22.4% and 13.9% (p = 0.133); in-hospital mortality was 22.4% and 14.7% (p = 0.189); and a cure was achieved in 44.8% and 52.5% (p = 0.326). Conclusions: Although tuberculosis treatment was initiated promptly in a considerable proportion of the inpatients evaluated, the rates of in-hospital mortality, ICU admission, and mechanical ventilation use remained high. Strategies for the control of tuberculosis in primary care should consider that patients who seek medical attention at hospitals arrive too late and with advanced disease. It is therefore necessary to implement active surveillance measures in the community for earlier diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25029651

  7. 24 h electrocardiographic monitoring in morbidly obese patients during short-term zero calorie diet.

    PubMed

    Zuckerman, E; Yeshurun, D; Goldhammer, E; Shiran, A

    1993-06-01

    The medical literature of the previous decades has reported sudden unexpected death among cases of very low calorie dieters. Cardiac arrhythmias, possibly produced by a prolonged QT interval, were suspected to be the main cause of death in a considerable number of these cases. The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of significant cardiac arrhythmias and prolongation of the QT interval, during short-term zero calorie diet, in morbidly obese patients. A group of 11 such patients (BMI > 35 kg/m2) were treated with a short-term zero calorie diet, as in-patients for ten days, followed by an out-patient regime on an 800 kcal diet. Their ages ranged from 19-58 years (mean 43.6). None had diabetes mellitus, cardiac, liver or renal disease, or thyroid or pituitary abnormalities, and none took any medication except Allupurinol 300 mg/day. We used a 24h holter monitoring system to detect cardiac arrhythmias or prolonged QT interval. Recordings were performed on the day before starting the fast, while the patients were on their regular diet, and compared with similar recordings of the same patients taken on the 10th day of the fast. No significant cardiac arrhythmias or prolongation of the QT interval were recorded during the fasting period. Short-term zero calorie dieting provided the patients with physical and psychological encouragement and is a safe method for reducing weight if it is carried out under strict medical supervision.

  8. Radiative cooling to deep sub-freezing temperatures through a 24-h day–night cycle

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhen; Zhu, Linxiao; Raman, Aaswath; Fan, Shanhui

    2016-01-01

    Radiative cooling technology utilizes the atmospheric transparency window (8–13 μm) to passively dissipate heat from Earth into outer space (3 K). This technology has attracted broad interests from both fundamental sciences and real world applications, ranging from passive building cooling, renewable energy harvesting and passive refrigeration in arid regions. However, the temperature reduction experimentally demonstrated, thus far, has been relatively modest. Here we theoretically show that ultra-large temperature reduction for as much as 60 °C from ambient is achievable by using a selective thermal emitter and by eliminating parasitic thermal load, and experimentally demonstrate a temperature reduction that far exceeds previous works. In a populous area at sea level, we have achieved an average temperature reduction of 37 °C from the ambient air temperature through a 24-h day–night cycle, with a maximal reduction of 42 °C that occurs when the experimental set-up enclosing the emitter is exposed to peak solar irradiance. PMID:27959339

  9. Combined solar thermal and photovoltaic power plants - An approach to 24h solar electricity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platzer, Werner J.

    2016-05-01

    Solar thermal power plants have the advantage of being able to provide dispatchable renewable electricity even when the sun is not shining. Using thermal energy strorage (TES) they may increase the capacity factor (CF) considerably. However in order to increase the operating hours one has to increase both, thermal storage capacity and solar field size, because the additional solar field is needed to charge the storage. This increases investment cost, although levelised electricity cost (LEC) may decrease due to the higher generation. Photovoltaics as a fluctuating source on the other side has arrived at very low generation costs well below 10 ct/kWh even for Central Europe. Aiming at a capacity factor above 70% and at producing dispatchable power it is shown that by a suitable combination of CSP and PV we can arrive at lower costs than by increasing storage and solar field size in CSP plants alone. Although a complete baseload power plant with more than 90% full load hours may not be the most economic choice, power plants approaching a full 24h service in most days of the year seem to be possible at reasonably low tariffs.

  10. Radiative cooling to deep sub-freezing temperatures through a 24-h day-night cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhen; Zhu, Linxiao; Raman, Aaswath; Fan, Shanhui

    2016-12-01

    Radiative cooling technology utilizes the atmospheric transparency window (8-13 μm) to passively dissipate heat from Earth into outer space (3 K). This technology has attracted broad interests from both fundamental sciences and real world applications, ranging from passive building cooling, renewable energy harvesting and passive refrigeration in arid regions. However, the temperature reduction experimentally demonstrated, thus far, has been relatively modest. Here we theoretically show that ultra-large temperature reduction for as much as 60 °C from ambient is achievable by using a selective thermal emitter and by eliminating parasitic thermal load, and experimentally demonstrate a temperature reduction that far exceeds previous works. In a populous area at sea level, we have achieved an average temperature reduction of 37 °C from the ambient air temperature through a 24-h day-night cycle, with a maximal reduction of 42 °C that occurs when the experimental set-up enclosing the emitter is exposed to peak solar irradiance.

  11. Cerebral blood flow velocity in humans exposed to 24 h of head-down tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawai, Y.; Murthy, G.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Breit, G. A.; Deroshia, C. W.; Hargens, A. R.

    1993-01-01

    This study investigates cerebral blood flow (CBF) velocity in humans before, during, and after 24 h of 6 deg head-down tilt (HDT), which is a currently accepted experimental model to simulate microgravity. CBF velocity was measured by use of the transcranial Doppler technique in the right middle cerebral artery of eight healthy male subjects. Mean CBF velocity increased from the pre-HDT upright seated baseline value of 55.5 +/- 3.7 (SE) cm/s to 61.5 +/- 3.3 cm/s at 0.5 h of HDT, reached a peak value of 63.2 +/- 4.1 cm/s at 3 h of HDT, and remained significantly above the pre-HDT baseline for over 6 h of HDT. During upright seated recovery, mean CBF velocity decreased to 87 percent of the pre-HDT baseline value. Mean CBF velocity correlated well with calculated intracranial arterial pressure (IAP). As analyzed by linear regression, mean CBF velocity = 29.6 + 0.32IAP. These results suggest that HDT increases CBF velocity by increasing IAP during several hours after the onset of microgravity. Importantly, the decrease in CBF velocity after HDT may be responsible, in part, for the increased risk of syncope observed in subjects after prolonged bed rest and also in astronauts returning to Earth.

  12. Effects of 24-h and 36-h sleep deprivation on human postural control and adaptation.

    PubMed

    Patel, M; Gomez, S; Berg, S; Almbladh, P; Lindblad, J; Petersen, H; Magnusson, M; Johansson, R; Fransson, P A

    2008-02-01

    This study investigated whether human postural stability and adaptation were affected by sleep deprivation and the relationship between motor performance and subjective scores of sleepiness (visuo-anlogue sleepiness scores, VAS). Postural stability and subjective sleepiness were examined in 18 healthy subjects (mean age 23.8 years) following 24 and 36 h of continued wakefulness, ensured by portable EEG recordings, and compared to a control test where the assessments were made after a normal night of sleep. The responses were assessed using posturography with eyes open and closed, and vibratory proprioceptive stimulations were used to challenge postural control. Postural control was significantly affected after 24 h of sleep deprivation both in anteroposterior and in lateral directions, but less so after 36 h. Subjective VAS scores showed poor correlation with indicators of postural control performance. The clearest evidence that sleep deprivation decreased postural control was the reduction of adaptation. Also several near falls after 2-3 min during the posturographic tests showed that sleep deprivation might affect stability through momentary lapses of attention. Access to vision, somewhat, but not entirely reduced the effect of sleep deprivation. In conclusion, sleep deprivation can be a contributing factor to decreased postural control and falls.

  13. Radiative cooling to deep sub-freezing temperatures through a 24-h day-night cycle.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen; Zhu, Linxiao; Raman, Aaswath; Fan, Shanhui

    2016-12-13

    Radiative cooling technology utilizes the atmospheric transparency window (8-13 μm) to passively dissipate heat from Earth into outer space (3 K). This technology has attracted broad interests from both fundamental sciences and real world applications, ranging from passive building cooling, renewable energy harvesting and passive refrigeration in arid regions. However, the temperature reduction experimentally demonstrated, thus far, has been relatively modest. Here we theoretically show that ultra-large temperature reduction for as much as 60 °C from ambient is achievable by using a selective thermal emitter and by eliminating parasitic thermal load, and experimentally demonstrate a temperature reduction that far exceeds previous works. In a populous area at sea level, we have achieved an average temperature reduction of 37 °C from the ambient air temperature through a 24-h day-night cycle, with a maximal reduction of 42 °C that occurs when the experimental set-up enclosing the emitter is exposed to peak solar irradiance.

  14. Fasting for 24 h improves nasal chemosensory performance and food palatability in a related manner.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Jameason D; Goldfield, Gary S; Doucet, Éric

    2012-06-01

    Changes in smell function can modify feeding behaviour but there is little evidence of how acute negative energy balance may impact olfaction and palatability. In a within-subjects repeated measures design, 15 subjects (nine male; six female) aged 28.6±4.5 years with initial body weight (BW) 74.7±4.9 kg and body mass index (BMI) 25.3±1.4 kg/m(2) were randomized and tested at baseline (FED) and Post Deprivation (FASTED) for nasal chemosensory performance (Sniffin' Sticks) and food palatability (visual analogue scale). Significant main effects for time indicated improvements in the FASTED session for odor threshold, odor discrimination, and total odor scores (TDI), and for increased palatability. There were significant positive correlations between initial BW and the change in odor threshold (r=.52) and TDI scores (r=.53). Positive correlations were also noted between delta identification score and delta palatability (r=.68). When the sample was split by sex, only for females were there significant correlations between delta palatability and: delta BW (r=.88); delta odor identification (r=.94); and delta TDI score (r=.85). Fasting for 24h improved smell function and this was related to increased palatability ratings and initial BW. Further studies should confirm the role of BW and sex in the context of olfaction, energy deprivation and palatability.

  15. Lethality test system

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, W.M.; Sims, J.R.; Parker, J.V.

    1986-01-01

    The Lethality Test System (LTS), presently under construction at Los Alamos, is an electromagnetic launcher facility designed to perform impact experiments at velocities up to 15 km/s. The launcher is a 25 mm round bore, plasma armature railgun extending 22 m in length. Preinjection is accomplished with a two-stage gas gun capable of 7 km/s. The railgun power supply utilizes traction motors, vacuum interrupters, and pulse transformers. An assembly of 28 traction motors, equipped with flywheels, stores approximately 80 MJ at 92% of full speed and energizes the primary windings of three pulse transformers at a current of 50 kA. At peak current an array of vacuum interrupters disconnects the transformer primary windings and forces the current to flow in the secondary windings. The secondary windings are connected to the railgun, and by staging the vacuum interrupter openings, a 1 MA to 1.3 MA ramped current waveform will be delivered to the railgun.

  16. The Lethality Test System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, W. M.; Sims, J. R.; Parker, J. V.

    1986-11-01

    The Lethality Test System (LTS) under construction at Los Alamos is an electromagnetic launcher facility designed to perform impact experiments at velocities up to 15 km/sec. The launcher is a 25 mm round bore, plasma armature railgun 22 m in length. Preinjection is accomplished with a two-stage light gas gun capable of 7 km/sec. The railgun power supply utilizes traction motors, vacuum interrupters, and pulse transformers. An assembly of 28 traction motors, equipped with flywheels, stores approximately 80 MJ at 92 percent of full speed and energizes the primary windings of three pulse transformers at a current of 50 kA. At peak current an array of vacuum interrupters disconnects the transformer primary windings and forces the current to flow in the secondary windings. The secondary windings are connected to the railgun, and by staging the vacuum interrupter openings, a 1-1.3 MA ramped current waveform will be delivered to the railgun.

  17. Development of a Web-Based 24-h Dietary Recall for a French-Canadian Population

    PubMed Central

    Jacques, Simon; Lemieux, Simone; Lamarche, Benoît; Laramée, Catherine; Corneau, Louise; Lapointe, Annie; Tessier-Grenier, Maude; Robitaille, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Twenty-four-hour dietary recalls can provide high-quality dietary intake data, but are considered expensive, as they rely on trained professionals for both their administration and coding. The objective of this study was to develop an automated, self-administered web-based 24-h recall (R24W) for a French-Canadian population. The development of R24W was inspired by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Automated Multiple-Pass Method. Questions about the context of meals/snacks were included. Toppings, sauces and spices frequently added to each food/dish were suggested systematically. A list of frequently forgotten food was also suggested. An interactive summary allows the respondent to track the progress of the questionnaire and to modify or remove food as needed. The R24W prototype was pre-tested for usability and functionality in a convenience sample of 29 subjects between the ages of 23 and 65 years, who had to complete one recall, as well as a satisfaction questionnaire. R24W includes a list of 2865 food items, distributed into 16 categories and 98 subcategories. A total of 687 recipes were created for mixed dishes, including 336 ethnic recipes. Pictures of food items illustrate up to eight servings per food item. The pre-test demonstrated that R24W is easy to complete and to understand. This new dietary assessment tool is a simple and inexpensive tool that will facilitate diet assessment of individuals in large-scale studies, but validation studies are needed prior to the utilization of the R24W. PMID:27854276

  18. Differential Gene Expression Analysis in Polygonum minus Leaf upon 24 h of Methyl Jasmonate Elicitation

    PubMed Central

    Rahnamaie-Tajadod, Reyhaneh; Loke, Kok-Keong; Goh, Hoe-Han; Noor, Normah M.

    2017-01-01

    Polygonum minus is an herbal plant that grows in Southeast Asian countries and traditionally used as medicine. This plant produces diverse secondary metabolites such as phenolic compounds and their derivatives, which are known to have roles in plant abiotic and biotic stress responses. Methyl jasmonate (MeJA) is a plant signaling molecule that triggers transcriptional reprogramming in secondary metabolism and activation of defense responses against many biotic and abiotic stresses. However, the effect of MeJA elicitation on the genome-wide expression profile in the leaf tissue of P. minus has not been well-studied due to the limited genetic information. Hence, we performed Illumina paired-end RNA-seq for de novo reconstruction of P. minus leaf transcriptome to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in response to MeJA elicitation. A total of 182,111 unique transcripts (UTs) were obtained by de novo assembly of 191.57 million paired-end clean reads using Trinity analysis pipeline. A total of 2374 UTs were identified to be significantly up-/down-regulated 24 h after MeJA treatment. These UTs comprising many genes related to plant secondary metabolite biosynthesis, defense and stress responses. To validate our sequencing results, we analyzed the expression of 21 selected DEGs by quantitative real-time PCR and found a good correlation between the two analyses. The single time-point analysis in this work not only provides a useful genomic resource for P. minus but also gives insights on molecular mechanisms of stress responses in P. minus. PMID:28220135

  19. What are the approaches for evaluating antihypertensive treatment by 24 h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring?

    PubMed

    Neutel, J M; Smith, D H; Weber, M A

    1999-01-01

    Measurements of trough blood pressure in a clinic setting have been the traditional method of assessing the efficacy of antihypertensive agents. The duration of action of antihypertensive drugs has been assessed by calculation of a trough-to-peak ratio; drugs with a trough-to-peak ratio greater than 50% are typically given once-a-day indications. However, the use of clinical measurements to assess antihypertensive agents can be misleading. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is a simple technique that provides accurate and reproducible data on both the efficacy and duration of action of antihypertensive agents. Although several complicated techniques have been used for the analysis of ambulatory blood pressure data, studies have demonstrated that calculation of simple blood pressure means (24 h mean, day-time mean and night-time mean) will provide all the data required to assess the efficacy of a drug. Calculations of systolic and diastolic load also provide useful information, and the index correlates closely with target-organ damage. Assessing the reduction of blood pressure during the last 2-6 h of the dosing interval provides critical information on the duration of action of agents with once-a-day dosing. Trough-to-peak ratio can also be calculated from an ambulatory blood pressure monitor. Furthermore, a simple line graph constructed from hourly means makes available, at a simple glance, a large amount of information about a drug. The reproducibility of ambulatory monitoring, together with the absence of placebo effect and the ability to exclude patients with white-coat hypertension, make the technique an extremely powerful tool for the assessment of antihypertensive agents that clearly provides more data on the efficacy and duration of action of an antihypertensive agent than do traditional clinical measurements.

  20. Quality assurance of the international computerised 24 h dietary recall method (EPIC-Soft).

    PubMed

    Crispim, Sandra P; Nicolas, Genevieve; Casagrande, Corinne; Knaze, Viktoria; Illner, Anne-Kathrin; Huybrechts, Inge; Slimani, Nadia

    2014-02-01

    The interview-administered 24 h dietary recall (24-HDR) EPIC-Soft® has a series of controls to guarantee the quality of dietary data across countries. These comprise all steps that are part of fieldwork preparation, data collection and data management; however, a complete characterisation of these quality controls is still lacking. The present paper describes in detail the quality controls applied in EPIC-Soft, which are, to a large extent, built on the basis of the EPIC-Soft error model and are present in three phases: (1) before, (2) during and (3) after the 24-HDR interviews. Quality controls for consistency and harmonisation are implemented before the interviews while preparing the seventy databases constituting an EPIC-Soft version (e.g. pre-defined and coded foods and recipes). During the interviews, EPIC-Soft uses a cognitive approach by helping the respondent to recall the dietary intake information in a stepwise manner and includes controls for consistency (e.g. probing questions) as well as for completeness of the collected data (e.g. system calculation for some unknown amounts). After the interviews, a series of controls can be applied by dietitians and data managers to further guarantee data quality. For example, the interview-specific 'note files' that were created to track any problems or missing information during the interviews can be checked to clarify the information initially provided. Overall, the quality controls employed in the EPIC-Soft methodology are not always perceivable, but prove to be of assistance for its overall standardisation and possibly for the accuracy of the collected data.

  1. Acute metabolic responses to a 24-h ultra-marathon race in male amateur runners.

    PubMed

    Waśkiewicz, Zbigniew; Kłapcińska, Barbara; Sadowska-Krępa, Ewa; Czuba, Milosz; Kempa, Katarzyna; Kimsa, Elżbieta; Gerasimuk, Dagmara

    2012-05-01

    The study was conducted to evaluate the metabolic responses to a 24 h ultra-endurance race in male runners. Paired venous and capillary blood samples from 14 athletes (mean age 43.0 ± 10.8 years, body weight 64.3 ± 7.2 kg, VO(2max) 57.8 ± 6.1 ml kg(-1) min(-1)), taken 3 h before the run, after completing the marathon distance (42.195 km), after 12 h, and at the finish of the race, were analyzed for blood morphology, acid-base balance and electrolytes, lipid profile, interleukin-6 (IL-6), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), and serum enzyme activities. Mean distance covered during the race was 168.5 ± 23.1 km (range 125.2-218.5 km). Prolonged ultra-endurance exercise triggered immune and inflammatory responses, as evidenced by a twofold increase in total leukocyte count with neutrophils and monocytes as main contributors, nearly 30-fold increase in serum IL-6 and over 20-fold rise in hsCRP. A progressive exponential increase in mean creatine kinase activity up to the level 70-fold higher than the respective pre-race value, a several fold rise in serum activities of aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase, and a fairly stable serum γ-glutamyl transferase level, were indicative of muscle, but not of liver damage. With duration of exercise, there was a progressive development of hyperventilation-induced hypocapnic alkalosis, and a marked alteration in substrate utilization towards fat oxidation to maintain blood glucose homeostasis. The results of this study may imply that progressive decline in partial CO(2) pressure (hypocapnia) that develops during prolonged exercise may contribute to increased interleukin-6 production.

  2. [Validity of the 24-h previous day physical activity recall (PDPAR-24) in Spanish adolescents].

    PubMed

    Cancela, José María; Lago, Joaquín; Ouviña, Lara; Ayán, Carlos

    2015-04-01

    Introducción: El control del nivel de práctica de actividad física que realizan los adolescentes, de sus factores determinantes y susceptibilidad al cambio resulta indispensable para intervenir sobre la epidemia de obesidad que afecta a la sociedad española. Sin embargo, el número de cuestionarios validados para valorar la actividad física en adolescentes españoles es escaso. Objetivos: Evaluar la validez del cuestionario24hPrevious Day Physical Activity Recall (PDPAR-24) cuando es aplicado a la población de adolescentes españoles. Método: Participaron en este estudio estudiantes de 14-15 años de dos centros de educación secundaria del norte de Galicia. Como criterio objetivo de la actividad física realizada se utilizó el registro proporcionado por el acelerómetro Actigraph GT3X.Se monitorizó a los sujetos durante un día por medio del acelerómetro y al día siguiente se administró el cuestionario de auto-informe. Resultados: Un total de 79 alumnos (15.16 ± 0.81 años, 39% mujeres) finalizaron el estudio. Se observan correlaciones positivas estadísticamente significativas de tamaño medio a grande en ambos sexos (r=0.50-0.98), para la actividad física ligera y moderada. Las correlaciones observadas son más elevadas a medida que aumenta la intensidad de la actividad física realizada. Conclusiones: El cuestionario de auto-informe PDPAR-24 puede ser considerado como una herramienta válida a la hora de valorar el nivel de actividad física en adolescentes españoles.

  3. Heterogeneity of Lethals in a "Simple" Lethal Complementation Group

    PubMed Central

    Janca, Frank C.; Woloshyn, Effie P.; Nash, David

    1986-01-01

    Of 24 ethyl methanesulphonate-induced, recessive-lethal mutations in the region 9E1-9F13 of the X chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster , eight fall into a typically homogeneous lethal complementation group associated with the raspberry (ras) locus. Mutations in this group have previously been shown to be pleiotropic, affecting not only ras but also two other genetic entities, gua1 and pur1, which yield auxotrophic mutations.—The eight new mutations have been characterized phenotypically in double heterozygotes with gua1, pur1 and ras mutations. Despite their homogeneity in lethal complementation tests, the mutations prove quite diverse. For example, two mutations have little or no effect on eye color in double heterozygotes with ras2 . The differences between the lethals are allele-specific and cannot be explained as a trivial outcome of a hypomorphic series.—Taken alone, the lethal complementation studies mask the complexity of the locus and the diversity of its recessive lethal alleles. By extension, we argue that the general use of lethal saturation studies provides an unduly simplified image of genetic organization. We suggest that the reason why recessive lethal mutations rarely present complex complementation patterns is that complex loci tend to produce mutations that affect several subfunctions. PMID:3080355

  4. Functional characterization of left ventricular segmental responses during the initial 24 h and 1 wk after experimental canine myocardial infarction.

    PubMed Central

    Roan, P; Scales, F; Saffer, S; Buja, L M; Willerson, J T

    1979-01-01

    Characterization of the temporal evolution of resting segmental function and inotropic reserve after coronary occlusion may be important in evaluating attempts to salvage ischemic but non-necrotic myocardium. Accordingly, we chronically implanted up to six pairs of pulse-transit piezoelectric crystals in the left ventricular myocardium of dogs to measure segmental wall thickness. Segments were separated into groups according to the loss of net systolic thickening (NET) at 5 min postocclusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery in awake, unsedated dogs. Group 1 included segments with NET values of 67--100+ (percent control); group 2 between 67 and 0; and group 3 less than 0 (paradoxical motion). 5 min after coronary occlusion, group 1 NET was 92 +/- 5% (SEM) although significant decreases occurred in NET in group 2 (36 +/- 4%) and group 3 segments (-33 +/- 5%). Between 5 min and 24 h after coronary occlusion, no further significant changes occurred in NET in groups 1, 2, and 3 crystals. Some segments underwent further functional deterioration between 24 h and 1 wk after left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion, although no overall change occurred in segments with mild to moderate ischemic dysfunction. Segments with NET less than 0 at 24 h, on the other hand, exhibited a reduction in aneurysmal bulging between 24 h and 1 wk from -41 +/- 10 to -23 +/- 11% (n = 12, P = 0.02). Inotropic reserve was assessed with postextrasystolic potentiation (PESP) in 14 dogs, and with infusions of dopamine (11 dogs), and isoproterenol (13 dogs). PESP was the most potent intervention and produced a significant augmentation in NET in group 2 crystals at 1, 2, 4, 6,8, and 24 h after coronary occlusion but only at 1 and 2 h in NET in group 3 crystals. Thus, following experimental coronary occlusion, the evolution of ischemic segmental dysfunction is dynamic and variable. A significant degree of inotropic reserve, as assessed by PESP, dopamine, and isoproterenol

  5. Prophylaxis with human serum butyrylcholinesterase protects Göttingen minipigs exposed to a lethal high-dose of sarin vapor.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Ashima; Hastings, Nicholas B; Sun, Wei; Dabisch, Paul A; Hulet, Stanley W; Jakubowski, Edward M; Mioduszewski, Robert J; Doctor, Bhupendra P

    2015-08-05

    Serum-derived human butyrylcholinesterase (Hu BChE) is a stoichiometric bioscavenger that is being developed as a potential prophylactic nerve agent countermeasure. Previously, we reported the prophylactic efficacy of Hu BChE in Göttingen minipigs against a whole-body exposure to 4.1mg/m(3) of sarin (GB) vapor, which produced lethality over 60min. Since the toxicity of nerve agent is concentration-dependent, in the present study, we investigated the toxic effects of an almost 3-fold higher rate of GB vapor exposure and the ability of Hu BChE to protect minipigs against this exposure. Male minipigs were subjected to: (1) air exposure; (2) GB vapor exposure; or (3) pretreatment with 7.5mg/kg of Hu BChE by i.m. injection, 24h prior to whole-body exposure to 11.4mg/m(3) of GB vapor for 10min. Electrocardiogram, electroencephalogram, and pupil size were monitored throughout exposure. Blood drawn before and throughout exposure was analyzed for blood gases, electrolytes, metabolites, acetylcholinesterase and BChE activities, and amount of GB bound to red blood cells and plasma. A novel finding was that saline-treated animals exposed to GB vapor did not develop any seizures, but manifested a variety of cardiac and whole blood toxic signs and rapidly died due to respiratory failure. Strikingly, pre-treatment with 7.5mg/kg of Hu BChE not only prevented lethality, but also avoided all cardiac toxic signs manifested in the non-treated cohort. Thus, Hu BChE alone can serve as an effective prophylactic countermeasure versus a lethal high-dose exposure to GB vapor.

  6. Eplerenone restores 24-h blood pressure circadian rhythm and reduces advanced glycation end-products in rhesus macaques with spontaneous hypertensive metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Zheng, Wen; Liu, Yuli; Wang, Jue; Peng, Ying; Shang, Haibao; Hou, Ning; Hu, Xiaomin; Ding, Yi; Xiao, Yao; Wang, Can; Zeng, Fanxin; Mao, Jiaming; Zhang, Jun; Ma, Dongwei; Sun, Xueting; Li, Chuanyun; Xiao, Rui-Ping; Zhang, Xiuqin

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is often associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS), and serves as a risk factor of MetS and its complications. Blood pressure circadian rhythm in hypertensive patients has been suggested to contribute to cardiovascular consequences and organ damage of hypertension. But circadian changes of BP and their response to drugs have not been clearly investigated in non-human primates (NHPs) of MetS with hypertension. Here, we identified 16 elderly, hypertensive MetS rhesus monkeys from our in-house cohort. With implanted telemetry, we investigate BP changes and its circadian rhythm, together with the effect of antihypertensive drugs on BP and its diurnal fluctuation. MetS hypertensive monkeys displayed higher BP, obesity, glucose intolerance, and dyslipidemia. We also confirmed impaired 24-h BP circadian rhythm in MetS hypertensive monkeys. Importantly, Eplerenone, a mineralocorticoid receptor blocker, exerts multiple beneficial effects in MetS hypertensive monkeys, including BP reduction, 24-h BP circadian rhythm restoration, and decreased plasma concentration of inflammation factors and advanced glycation end-products. In summary, we identified a naturally-developed hypertensive MetS NHP model, which is of great value in the studies on pathogenesis of MetS-associated hypertension and development of novel therapeutic strategies. We also provided multiple novel mechanistic insights of the beneficial effect of Eplerenone on MetS with hypertension. PMID:27032687

  7. Eplerenone restores 24-h blood pressure circadian rhythm and reduces advanced glycation end-products in rhesus macaques with spontaneous hypertensive metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Zheng, Wen; Liu, Yuli; Wang, Jue; Peng, Ying; Shang, Haibao; Hou, Ning; Hu, Xiaomin; Ding, Yi; Xiao, Yao; Wang, Can; Zeng, Fanxin; Mao, Jiaming; Zhang, Jun; Ma, Dongwei; Sun, Xueting; Li, Chuanyun; Xiao, Rui-Ping; Zhang, Xiuqin

    2016-04-01

    Hypertension is often associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS), and serves as a risk factor of MetS and its complications. Blood pressure circadian rhythm in hypertensive patients has been suggested to contribute to cardiovascular consequences and organ damage of hypertension. But circadian changes of BP and their response to drugs have not been clearly investigated in non-human primates (NHPs) of MetS with hypertension. Here, we identified 16 elderly, hypertensive MetS rhesus monkeys from our in-house cohort. With implanted telemetry, we investigate BP changes and its circadian rhythm, together with the effect of antihypertensive drugs on BP and its diurnal fluctuation. MetS hypertensive monkeys displayed higher BP, obesity, glucose intolerance, and dyslipidemia. We also confirmed impaired 24-h BP circadian rhythm in MetS hypertensive monkeys. Importantly, Eplerenone, a mineralocorticoid receptor blocker, exerts multiple beneficial effects in MetS hypertensive monkeys, including BP reduction, 24-h BP circadian rhythm restoration, and decreased plasma concentration of inflammation factors and advanced glycation end-products. In summary, we identified a naturally-developed hypertensive MetS NHP model, which is of great value in the studies on pathogenesis of MetS-associated hypertension and development of novel therapeutic strategies. We also provided multiple novel mechanistic insights of the beneficial effect of Eplerenone on MetS with hypertension.

  8. 24-h ambulatory recording of aortic pulse wave velocity and central systolic augmentation: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Luzardo, Leonella; Lujambio, Inés; Sottolano, Mariana; da Rosa, Alicia; Thijs, Lutgarde; Noboa, Oscar; Staessen, Jan A; Boggia, José

    2012-10-01

    We assessed the feasibility of ambulatory pulse wave analysis by comparing this approach with an established tonometric technique. We investigated 35 volunteers (45.6 years; 51.0% women) exclusively at rest (R study) and 83 volunteers (49.9 years; 61.4% women) at rest and during daytime (1000-2000 h) ambulatory monitoring (R+A study). We recorded central systolic (cSP), diastolic (cDP) and pulse (cPP) pressures, augmentation index (cAI) and pulse wave velocity (PWV) by brachial oscillometry (Mobil-O-Graph 24h PWA Monitor) and radial tonometry (SphygmoCor). We applied the Bland and Altman's statistics. In the R study, tonometric and oscillometric estimates of cSP (105.6 vs. 106.9 mm Hg), cDP (74.6 vs. 74.7 mm Hg), cPP (31.0 vs. 32.1 mm Hg), cAI (21.1 vs. 20.6%) and PWV (7.3 vs. 7.0 m s(-1)) were similar (P0.11). In the R+A study, tonometric vs. oscillometric assessment yielded similar values for cSP (115.4 vs. 113.9 mm Hg; P=0.19) and cAI (26.5 vs. 25.3%; P=0.54), but lower cDP (77.8 vs. 81.9 mm Hg; P<0.0001), so that cPP was higher (37.6 vs. 32.1 mm Hg; P<0.0001). PWV (7.9 vs. 7.4 m s(-1)) was higher (P=0.0002) on tonometric assessment. The differences between tonometric and oscillometric estimates increased (P0.004) with cSP (r=0.37), cAI (r=0.39) and PWV (r=0.39), but not (P0.17) with cDP (r=0.15) or cPP (r=0.13). Irrespective of measurement conditions, brachial oscillometry compared with an established tonometric method provided similar estimates for cSP and systolic augmentation, but slightly underestimated PWV. Pending further validation, ambulatory assessment of central hemodynamic variables is feasible.

  9. [Use of customer relationship management to improve healthcare for citizens. The 24h Andalusian Health Service: Healthline].

    PubMed

    Quero, Manuel; Ramos, María Belén; López, Wilfredo; Cubillas, Juan José; González, José María; Castillo, José Luis

    2016-01-01

    Salud Responde (in English: Healthline) is a Health Service and Information Centre of the taxpayer-funded Andalusian Health System (AHS) that offers a Telephone Health Advisory Service called SA24h, among other services. The main objective of SA24h is to inform and advise citizens on health issues and the available health resources of the AHS. SA24h has a Customer Relationship Management information technology tool that organises information at various levels of specialization. Depending on the difficulty of the query, the citizen is attended by professionals with distinct profiles, providing a consensual response within the professionals working within Salud Responde or within other healthcare levels of the AHS. SA24h provided responses to 757,168 patient queries from late 2008 to the end of 01/12/2015. A total of 9.38% of the consultations were resolved by the non-health professionals working at Salud Responde. The remaining 84.07% were resolved by health staff. A total of 6.5% of users were referred to accident and emergency facilities while 88.77% did not need to attend their general practitioner within the next 24hours, thus avoiding unnecessary visits to health care facilities.

  10. Effects of the long-acting calcium channel blocker barnidipine hydrochloride on 24-h ambulatory blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Kuwajima, Iwao; Abe, Keishi

    2002-02-01

    The effect of the long acting calcium channel blocker, barnidipine hydrochloride (barnidipine) on 24-h ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) was evaluated in J-MUBA (Japanese Multicentre Study on Barnidipine with Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring). Following an observation period of two weeks, antihypertensive treatment with barnidipine was continued for at least six months. At the end of each period, ABP were measured. The patients were divided into high- and low-range groups based on ABP measurement. Throughout the 24 h, barnidipine exerted an excellent antihypertensive effect in the high-range group, but not in the low-range group. Barnidipine had comparable effects in the daytime and nighttime in inverted dippers and non-dippers, but it was more effective on daytime ABP than on nighttime ABP in dippers and in extreme dippers. Morning blood pressure before and after waking was evaluated before and after barnidipine administration in 233 patients. Barnidipine inhibited increases in blood pressure before and after waking, especially in surge-type patients whose blood pressure increased rapidly after waking. A positive correlation among 24-h ABP, daytime and night time ABP, morning blood pressure, and clinic blood pressure during the observation period and the antihypertensive effect of barnidipine was observed, with barnidipine exhibiting stronger antihypertensive effects in patients with persistently high blood pressure. It was concluded that the antihypertensive effects of barnidipine are maintained for 24 h but it has no excessive hypotensive effects on lower blood pressure and is thus a safe antihypertensive agent.

  11. Association between Parent and Child Dietary Sodium and Potassium Intakes as Assessed by 24-h Urinary Excretion.

    PubMed

    Service, Carrie; Grimes, Carley; Riddell, Lynn; He, Feng; Campbell, Karen; Nowson, Caryl

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the association between parent and child sodium (Na) and potassium (K) intake as assessed by 24-h urinary excretion (24hUE). Primary school children and their parent(s) provided one 24-h urine sample and information on cooking and children's discretionary salt use. Valid urine samples were provided by 108 mothers (mean age 41.8 (5.1) (SD) years, Na 120 (45) mmol/day) (7.0 g/day salt equivalent) and 40 fathers (44.4 (4.9) years, Na 152 (49) mmol/day (8.9 g/day salt), and 168 offspring (51.8% male, age 9.1 (2.0) years, Na 101 (47) mmol/day (5.9 g/day salt). When adjusted for parental age, child age and gender a 17 mmol/day Na (1 g/day salt) increase in mother's 24hUE was associated with a 3.4 mmol/day Na (0.2 g/day salt) increase in child's salt 24hUE (p = 0.04) with no association observed between father and child. Sixty-seven percent of parents added salt during cooking and 37% of children added salt at the table. Children who reported adding table salt had higher urinary excretion than those who did not (p = 0.01). The association between mother and child Na intake may relate to the consumption of similar foods and highlights the importance of the home environment in influencing total dietary sodium intake.

  12. Association between Parent and Child Dietary Sodium and Potassium Intakes as Assessed by 24-h Urinary Excretion

    PubMed Central

    Service, Carrie; Grimes, Carley; Riddell, Lynn; He, Feng; Campbell, Karen; Nowson, Caryl

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the association between parent and child sodium (Na) and potassium (K) intake as assessed by 24-h urinary excretion (24hUE). Primary school children and their parent(s) provided one 24-h urine sample and information on cooking and children’s discretionary salt use. Valid urine samples were provided by 108 mothers (mean age 41.8 (5.1) (SD) years, Na 120 (45) mmol/day) (7.0 g/day salt equivalent) and 40 fathers (44.4 (4.9) years, Na 152 (49) mmol/day (8.9 g/day salt), and 168 offspring (51.8% male, age 9.1 (2.0) years, Na 101 (47) mmol/day (5.9 g/day salt). When adjusted for parental age, child age and gender a 17 mmol/day Na (1 g/day salt) increase in mother’s 24hUE was associated with a 3.4 mmol/day Na (0.2 g/day salt) increase in child’s salt 24hUE (p = 0.04) with no association observed between father and child. Sixty-seven percent of parents added salt during cooking and 37% of children added salt at the table. Children who reported adding table salt had higher urinary excretion than those who did not (p = 0.01). The association between mother and child Na intake may relate to the consumption of similar foods and highlights the importance of the home environment in influencing total dietary sodium intake. PMID:27043620

  13. 24h Urinary Protein Levels and Urine Protein/Creatinine Ratios Could Probably Forecast the Pathological Classification of HSPN

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qing; Shang, Shi-qiang; Liu, Ai-min; Zhang, Ting; Shen, Hong-qiang; Chen, Xue-jun; Mao, Jian-hua

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the relevance of laboratory tests in Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis (HSPN) classification, and determine accurate classification factors. This prospective study included 694 HSPN patients who underwent ultrasound-guided percutaneous renal biopsy (PRB). Renal specimens were scored according to International Study of Kidney Disease in Children (ISKDC) classification. Meanwhile, blood samples were immediately collected for laboratory examination. The associations between laboratory parameters and HSPN classification were assessed. Significant differences in levels of serum Th1/Th2 cytokines, immunoglobulins, T-lymphocyte subsets, complement, and coagulation markers were obtained between HSPN patients and healthy children. Interestingly, 24h urinary protein (24h-UPRO) levels and urine protein/urine creatinine ratios could determine HPSN grade IIb, IIIa, and IIIb incidences, with areas under ROC curve of 0.767 and 0.731, respectively. At 24h-UPRO >580.35mg/L, prediction sensitivity and specificity were 75.2% and 70.0%, respectively. These values became 53.0% and 82.3%, respectively, with 24h-UPRO exceeding 1006.25mg/L. At urine protein/urine creatinine > 0.97, prediction sensitivity and specificity were 65.5% and 67.2%, respectively, values that became 57.4% and 80.0%, respectively, at ratios exceeding 1.2. Cell and humoral immunity, coagulation and fibrinolytic systems are all involved in the pathogenesis of HSPN, and type I hypersensitivity may be the disease trigger of HSPN. 24h-UPRO levels and urine protein/creatinine ratios could probably forecast the pathological classification of HSPN. PMID:25996387

  14. Glycolytic potential and activity of adenosine monophosphate kinase (AMPK), glycogen phosphorylase (GP) and glycogen debranching enzyme (GDE) in steer carcasses with normal (<5.8) or high (>5.9) 24h pH determined in M. longissimus dorsi.

    PubMed

    Apaoblaza, A; Galaz, A; Strobel, P; Ramírez-Reveco, A; Jeréz-Timaure, N; Gallo, C

    2015-03-01

    Muscle glycogen concentration (MGC) and lactate (LA), activity of glycogen debranching enzyme (GDE), glycogen phosphorylase (GP) and adenosine monophosphate kinase (AMPK) were determined at 0.5h (T0) and 24h (T24) post-mortem in Longissimus dorsi samples from 38 steers that produced high pH (>5.9) and normal pH (<5.8) carcasses at 24h postmortem. MGC, LA and glycolytic potential were higher (P<0.05) in normal pH carcasses. GDE activity was similar (P>0.05) in both pH categories. GP activity increased between T0 and T24 only in normal pH carcasses. AMPK activity was four times higher in normal pH v/s high pH carcasses, without changing its activity over time. Results reinforce the idea that differences in postmortem glycogenolytic/glycolytic flow in L. dorsi of steers showing normal v/s high muscle pH at 24h, could be explained not only by the higher initial MGC in normal pH carcasses, but also by a high and sustained activity of AMPK and an increased GP activity at 24h postmortem.

  15. Comparison of the lethal effects of chemical warfare nerve agents across multiple ages.

    PubMed

    Wright, Linnzi K M; Lee, Robyn B; Vincelli, Nicole M; Whalley, Christopher E; Lumley, Lucille A

    2016-01-22

    Children may be inherently more vulnerable than adults to the lethal effects associated with chemical warfare nerve agent (CWNA) exposure because of their closer proximity to the ground, smaller body mass, higher respiratory rate, increased skin permeability and immature metabolic systems. Unfortunately, there have only been a handful of studies on the effects of CWNA in pediatric animal models, and more research is needed to confirm this hypothesis. Using a stagewise, adaptive dose design, we estimated the 24h median lethal dose for subcutaneous exposure to seven CWNA in both male and female Sprague-Dawley rats at six different developmental times. Perinatal (postnatal day [PND] 7, 14 and 21) and adult (PND 70) rats were more susceptible than pubertal (PND 28 and 42) rats to the lethal effects associated with exposure to tabun, sarin, soman and cyclosarin. Age-related differences in susceptibility were not observed in rats exposed to VM, Russian VX or VX.

  16. Relationship between 24-h urine sodium/potassium ratio and central aortic systolic blood pressure in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Moo-Yong; Shin, Sung-Joon; Gu, Namyi; Nah, Deuk-Young; Kim, Byong-Kyu; Hong, Kyung-Soon; Cho, Eun-Joo; Sung, Ki-Chul; Lee, Sim-Yeol; Kim, Kwang-Il

    2016-11-24

    Studies evaluating the relationship between measured 24-h urine sodium (24HUNa), potassium (24HUK) and aortic blood pressure (BP) are rare, and no such study has been performed with an Asian population. We evaluated the relationship between 24HUNa, 24HUK, casual BP, 24-h ambulatory BP and aortic BP by analyzing data from 524 participants with valid 24-h urine collection, 24-h ambulatory BP and central BP measurements (mean age 48.1±9.8 years, 193 men). Hypertension was defined as a 24-h ambulatory BP ⩾130/80 mm Hg or current treatment for hypertension (n=219). The participants with hypertension and high 24HUNa (mean 210.5±52.0 mmol  per day, range 151.0-432.0) showed higher 24-h systolic (P=0.037) and diastolic BP (P=0.037) and aortic systolic BP (AoSBP, P=0.038) than the participants with hypertension and low 24HUNa (mean 115.7±25.0 mmol per day, range 45.6-150.0), adjusted for confounders. The participants with hypertension and a high ratio of 24HUNa and 24HUK (24HUNa/24HUK, mean 4.03±1.00, range 2.93-7.96) had higher AoSBP than the participants with hypertension and a low 24HUNa/24HUK ratio (mean 2.13±0.54, range 0.53-2.91), adjusted for confounders (P=0.026). The participants with hypertension demonstrated a significant linear relationship between AoSBP and 24HUNa/24HUK ratio that was independent of 24HUNa, according to the multiple regression analysis (P=0.047). In hypertensive patients, 24HUNa/24HUK was positively and more strongly related to AoSBP compared with 24HUNa alone. The result indicates that high sodium and low potassium intake may increase the subsequent risk of cardiovascular disease by elevating AoSBP.Hypertension Research advance online publication, 24 November 2016; doi:10.1038/hr.2016.161.

  17. Food Intake Recording Software System, version 4 (FIRSSt4): a self-completed 24-h dietary recall for children.

    PubMed

    Baranowski, T; Islam, N; Douglass, D; Dadabhoy, H; Beltran, A; Baranowski, J; Thompson, D; Cullen, K W; Subar, A F

    2014-01-01

    The Food Intake Recording Software System, version 4 (firsst4), is a web-based 24-h dietary recall (24 hdr) self-administered by children based on the Automated Self-Administered 24-h recall (ASA24) (a self-administered 24 hdr for adults). The food choices in firsst4 are abbreviated to include only those reported by children in US national surveys; and detailed food probe questions are simplified to exclude those that children could not be expected to answer (e.g. questions regarding food preparation and added fats). ASA24 and firsst4 incorporate 10 000+ food images, with up to eight images per food, to assist in portion size estimation. We review the formative research conducted during the development of firsst4. When completed, firsst4 will be hosted and maintained for investigator use on the National Cancer Institute's ASA24 website.

  18. Long-term blood pressure changes induced by the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake: assessment by 24 h ambulatory monitoring.

    PubMed

    Giorgini, Paolo; Striuli, Rinaldo; Petrarca, Marco; Petrazzi, Luisa; Pasqualetti, Paolo; Properzi, Giuliana; Desideri, Giovambattista; Omboni, Stefano; Parati, Gianfranco; Ferri, Claudio

    2013-09-01

    An increased rate of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events has been described during and immediately after earthquakes. In this regard, few data are available on long-term blood pressure control in hypertensive outpatients after an earthquake. We evaluated the long-term effects of the April 2009 L'Aquila earthquake on blood pressure levels, as detected by 24 h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Before/after (mean±s.d. 6.9±4.5/14.2±5.1 months, respectively) the earthquake, the available 24 h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring data for the same patients were extracted from our database. Quake-related daily life discomforts were evaluated through interviews. We enrolled 47 patients (25 female, age 52±14 years), divided into three groups according to antihypertensive therapy changes after versus before the earthquake: unchanged therapy (n=24), increased therapy (n=17) and reduced therapy (n=6). Compared with before the quake, in the unchanged therapy group marked increases in 24 h (P=0.004), daytime (P=0.01) and nighttime (P=0.02) systolic blood pressure were observed after the quake. Corresponding changes in 24 h (P=0.005), daytime (P=0.01) and nighttime (P=0.009) diastolic blood pressure were observed. Daily life discomforts were reported more frequently in the unchanged therapy and increased therapy groups than the reduced therapy group (P=0.025 and P=0.018, respectively). In conclusion, this study shows that patients with unchanged therapy display marked blood pressure increments up to more than 1 year after an earthquake, as well as long-term quake-related discomfort. Our data suggest that particular attention to blood pressure levels and adequate therapy modifications should be considered after an earthquake, not only early after the event but also months later.

  19. Nqrs Data for C24H76BLiN12O4P4 (Subst. No. 1593)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chihara, H.; Nakamura, N.

    This document is part of Subvolume B 'Substances Containing C10H16 … Zn' of Volume 48 'Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy Data' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains an extract of Section '3.2 Data tables' of the Chapter '3 Nuclear quadrupole resonance data' providing the NQRS data for C24H76BLiN12O4P4 (Subst. No. 1593)

  20. Shock in the first 24 h of intensive care unit stay: observational study of protocol-based fluid management.

    PubMed

    See, Kay Choong; Mukhopadhyay, Amartya; Lau, Samuel Chuan-Xian; Tan, Sandra Ming-Yien; Lim, Tow Keang; Phua, Jason

    2015-05-01

    Precision in fluid management for shock could lead to better clinical outcomes. We evaluated the association of protocol-based fluid management with intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital mortality. We performed an observational study of mechanically ventilated patients admitted directly from our emergency department to the ICU from August 2011 to December 2013, who had circulatory shock in the first 24 h of ICU stay (systolic blood pressure <90 mmHg at ICU admission or lactate >4 mmol/L). Patients with onset of shock beyond 24 h of ICU stay were excluded. Protocol-based fluid management required close physician-nurse cooperation and computerized documentation, checking for fluid response (≥10% arterial pulse pressure or stroke volume increase after two consecutive 250-mL crystalloid boluses), and fluid loading with repeated 500-mL boluses until fluid response became negative. Six hundred twelve mechanically ventilated patients with shock (mean [±SD] age, 63.0 years [16.5]; 252 or 41.2% females; mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, 30.2 [8.8]) were studied. The fluid management protocol was used 455 times for 242 patients (39.5% of 612 patients) within the first 24 h of ICU stay, with 244 (53.6% of 455) positive responses. Adjusted for age, sex, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, comorbidity, and admission year, protocol use was associated with reduced ICU mortality (odds ratio, 0.60; 95% confidence interval, 0.39-0.94; P = 0.025) but not hospital mortality (odds ratio, 0.82; 95% confidence interval, 0.54-1.23; P = 0.369). Among mechanically ventilated patients with shock within the first 24 h of ICU stay, about half had positive fluid responses. Adherence to protocol-based fluid management was associated with improved ICU survival.

  1. Nqrs Data for C24H46I2N6O2P2Sn (Subst. No. 1589)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chihara, H.; Nakamura, N.

    This document is part of Subvolume B 'Substances Containing C10H16 … Zn' of Volume 48 'Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy Data' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains an extract of Section '3.2 Data tables' of the Chapter '3 Nuclear quadrupole resonance data' providing the NQRS data for C24H46I2N6O2P2Sn (Subst. No. 1589)

  2. Tyramine pressor sensitivity during treatment with the selegiline transdermal system 6 mg/24 h in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Azzaro, Albert J; Vandenberg, Chad M; Blob, Lawrence F; Kemper, Eva M; Sharoky, Melvin; Oren, Dan A; Campbell, Bryan J

    2006-08-01

    The oral tyramine pressor test was administered to healthy males during treatment with a selegiline transdermal system (STS; 6 mg/24 h). The tyramine sensitivity factor (TSF) was calculated from the ratio of baseline and on-treatment tyramine pressor doses. The tyramine sensitivity factor value following 9 days of treatment with the selegiline transdermal system was 1.85 +/- 0.10. Extended treatment, 33 days, produced a small, clinically non-meaningful increase in this value. The tyramine sensitivity factor for the selegiline transdermal system was similar to that following treatment with 10 mg/d of oral selegiline capsules but more than 20 times less than observed during tranylcypromine treatment. A larger increase in the tyramine sensitivity factor was observed following extended selegiline transdermal system treatment at a higher dose (12 mg/24 h), which was significantly decreased following coadministration of tyramine capsules with a meal. These results suggest a wide tyramine safety margin for the selegiline transdermal system and provide evidence that the 6-mg/24-h selegiline transdermal system can be administered safely without dietary tyramine restrictions.

  3. The accuracy of the 24-h activity recall method for assessing sedentary behaviour: the physical activity measurement survey (PAMS) project.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngwon; Welk, Gregory J

    2017-02-01

    Sedentary behaviour (SB) has emerged as a modifiable risk factor, but little is known about measurement errors of SB. The purpose of this study was to determine the validity of 24-h Physical Activity Recall (24PAR) relative to SenseWear Armband (SWA) for assessing SB. Each participant (n = 1485) undertook a series of data collection procedures on two randomly selected days: wearing a SWA for full 24-h, and then completing the telephone-administered 24PAR the following day to recall the past 24-h activities. Estimates of total sedentary time (TST) were computed without the inclusion of reported or recorded sleep time. Equivalence testing was used to compare estimates of TST. Analyses from equivalence testing showed no significant equivalence of 24PAR for TST (90% CI: 443.0 and 457.6 min · day(-1)) relative to SWA (equivalence zone: 580.7 and 709.8 min · day(-1)). Bland-Altman plots indicated individuals that were extremely or minimally sedentary provided relatively comparable sedentary time between 24PAR and SWA. Overweight/obese and/or older individuals were more likely to under-estimate sedentary time than normal weight and/or younger individuals. Measurement errors of 24PAR varied by the level of sedentary time and demographic indicators. This evidence informs future work to develop measurement error models to correct for errors of self-reports.

  4. 'Life in the age of screens': parent perspectives on a 24-h no screen-time challenge.

    PubMed

    Peláez, Sandra; Alexander, Stephanie; Roberge, Jean-Baptiste; Henderson, Melanie; Bigras, Jean-Luc; Barnett, Tracie A

    2016-08-01

    Screens have become ubiquitous in modern society. Their use frequently underlies sedentary behaviour, a well-established determinant of obesity. As part of a family oriented clinic offering a 2-year lifestyle program for obese children and youth, we explored parents' experiences with a 24-h no screen-time challenge, an intervention designed to raise awareness of screen-time habits and to help families develop strategies to limit their use. In total, 15 parents representing 13 families participated. A focus group with nine parents and six phone interviews with those who could not join in person were conducted. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed qualitatively. Key elements to successful completion of the 24-h no screen-time challenge emerged, namely: clear rules about permitted activities during the 24-h period; togetherness, i.e. involving all family members in the challenge; and busyness, i.e. planning a full schedule in order to avoid idleness and preclude the temptation to use screens. Our findings suggest that practitioners aiming to increase awareness of screen-time or to limit their use may be more likely to succeed if they include all family members, offer concrete alternatives to screen-based activities and provide tailored strategies to manage discretionary time.

  5. 24 h Accelerometry: impact of sleep-screening methods on estimates of sedentary behaviour and physical activity while awake.

    PubMed

    Meredith-Jones, Kim; Williams, Sheila; Galland, Barbara; Kennedy, Gavin; Taylor, Rachael

    2016-01-01

    Although accelerometers can assess sleep and activity over 24 h, sleep data must be removed before physical activity and sedentary time can be examined appropriately. We compared the effect of 6 different sleep-scoring rules on physical activity and sedentary time. Activity and sleep were obtained by accelerometry (ActiGraph GT3X) over 7 days in 291 children (51.3% overweight or obese) aged 4-8.9 years. Three methods removed sleep using individualised time filters and two methods applied standard time filters to remove sleep each day (9 pm-6 am, 12 am-6 am). The final method did not remove sleep but simply defined non-wear as at least 60 min of consecutive zeros over the 24-h period. Different methods of removing sleep from 24-h data markedly affect estimates of sedentary time, yielding values ranging from 556 to 1145 min/day. Estimates of non-wear time (33-193 min), wear time (736-1337 min) and counts per minute (384-658) also showed considerable variation. By contrast, estimates of moderate-to-vigorous activity (MVPA) were similar, varying by less than 1 min/day. Different scoring methods to remove sleep from 24-h accelerometry data do not affect measures of MVPA, whereas estimates of counts per minute and sedentary time depend considerably on which technique is used.

  6. No evidence for genotoxic effects from 24 h exposure of human leukocytes to 1.9 GHz radiofrequency fields.

    PubMed

    McNamee, J P; Bellier, P V; Gajda, G B; Lavallée, B F; Marro, L; Lemay, E; Thansandote, A

    2003-05-01

    The current study extends our previous investigations of 2-h radiofrequency (RF)-field exposures on genotoxicity in human blood cell cultures by examining the effect of 24-h continuous-wave (CW) and pulsed-wave (PW) 1.9 GHz RF-field exposures on both primary DNA damage and micronucleus induction in human leukocyte cultures. Mean specific absorption rates (SARs) ranged from 0 to 10 W/kg, and the temperature within the cultures was maintained at 37.0 +/- 1.0 degrees C for the duration of the 24-h exposure period. No significant differences in primary DNA damage were observed between the sham-treated controls and any of the CW or PW 1.9 GHz RF-field-exposed cultures when processed immediately after the exposure period by the alkaline comet assay. Similarly, no significant differences were observed in the incidence of micronuclei, incidence of micronucleated binucleated cells, frequency of binucleated cells, or proliferation index between the sham-treated controls and any of the CW or PW 1.9 GHz RF-field-exposed cultures. In conclusion, the current study found no evidence of 1.9 GHz RF-field-induced genotoxicity in human blood cell cultures after a 24-h exposure period.

  7. Time course of the MAPK and PI3-kinase response within 24 h of skeletal muscle overload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, C. J.; Fan, Z.; Gordon, S. E.; Booth, F. W.

    2001-01-01

    Knowledge of the molecular mechanisms by which skeletal muscle hypertrophies in response to increased mechanical loading may lead to the discovery of novel treatment strategies for muscle wasting and frailty. To gain insight into potential early signaling mechanisms associated with skeletal muscle hypertrophy, the temporal pattern of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase) activity during the first 24 h of muscle overload was determined in the rat slow-twitch soleus and fast-twitch plantaris muscles after ablation of the gastrocnemius muscle. p38alpha MAPK phosphorylation was elevated for the entire 24-h overload period in both muscles. In contrast, Erk 2 and p54 JNK phosphorylation were transiently increased by overload, returning to the levels of sham-operated controls by 24 h. PI3-kinase activity was increased by muscle overload only at 12 h of overload and only in the plantaris muscle. In summary, sustained elevation of p38alpha MAPK phosphorylation occurred early in response to muscle overload, identifying this pathway as a potential candidate for mediating early hypertrophic signals in response to skeletal muscle overload.

  8. Sleep and cognitive function of crewmembers and mission controllers working 24-h shifts during a simulated 105-day spaceflight mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barger, Laura K.; Wright, Kenneth P.; Burke, Tina M.; Chinoy, Evan D.; Ronda, Joseph M.; Lockley, Steven W.; Czeisler, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    The success of long-duration space missions depends on the ability of crewmembers and mission support specialists to be alert and maintain high levels of cognitive function while operating complex, technical equipment. We examined sleep, nocturnal melatonin levels and cognitive function of crewmembers and the sleep and cognitive function of mission controllers who participated in a high-fidelity 105-day simulated spaceflight mission at the Institute of Biomedical Problems (Moscow). Crewmembers were required to perform daily mission duties and work one 24-h extended duration work shift every sixth day. Mission controllers nominally worked 24-h extended duration shifts. Supplemental lighting was provided to crewmembers and mission controllers. Participants' sleep was estimated by wrist-actigraphy recordings. Overall, results show that crewmembers and mission controllers obtained inadequate sleep and exhibited impaired cognitive function, despite countermeasure use, while working extended duration shifts. Crewmembers averaged 7.04±0.92 h (mean±SD) and 6.94±1.08 h (mean±SD) in the two workdays prior to the extended duration shifts, 1.88±0.40 h (mean±SD) during the 24-h work shift, and then slept 10.18±0.96 h (mean±SD) the day after the night shift. Although supplemental light was provided, crewmembers' average nocturnal melatonin levels remained elevated during extended 24-h work shifts. Naps and caffeine use were reported by crewmembers during ˜86% and 45% of extended night work shifts, respectively. Even with reported use of wake-promoting countermeasures, significant impairments in cognitive function were observed. Mission controllers slept 5.63±0.95 h (mean±SD) the night prior to their extended duration work shift. On an average, 89% of night shifts included naps with mission controllers sleeping an average of 3.4±1.0 h (mean±SD) during the 24-h extended duration work shift. Mission controllers also showed impaired cognitive function during extended

  9. Evaluating the effect of measurement error when using one or two 24 h dietary recalls to assess eating out: a study in the context of the HECTOR project.

    PubMed

    Orfanos, Philippos; Knüppel, Sven; Naska, Androniki; Haubrock, Jennifer; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Boeing, Heiner

    2013-09-28

    Eating out is often recorded through short-term measurements and the large within-person variability in intakes may not be adequately captured. The present study aimed to understand the effect of measurement error when using eating-out data from one or two 24 h dietary recalls (24hDR), in order to describe intakes and assess associations between eating out and personal characteristics. In a sample of 366 adults from Potsdam, Germany, two 24hDR and a FFQ were collected. Out-of-home intakes were estimated based on either one 24hDR or two 24hDR or the Multiple Source Method (MSM) combining the two 24hDR and the questionnaire. The distribution of out-of-home intakes of energy, macronutrients and selected foods was described. Multiple linear regression and partial correlation coefficients were estimated to assess associations between out-of-home energy intake and participants' characteristics. The mean daily out-of-home intakes estimated from the two 24hDR were similar to the usual intakes estimated through the MSM. The out-of-home energy intake, estimated through either one or two 24hDR, was positively associated with total energy intake, inversely with age and associations were stronger when using the two 24hDR. A marginally significant inverse association between out-of-home energy intake and physical activity at work was observed only on the basis of the two 24hDR. After applying the MSM, all significant associations remained and were more precise. Data on eating out collected through one or two 24hDR may not adequately describe intake distributions, but significant associations between eating out and participants' characteristics are highly unlikely to appear when in reality these do not exist.

  10. Lethal Amanita species in China.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qing; Cui, Yang-Yang; Yang, Zhu L

    2016-09-01

    Lethal amanitas (Amanita sect. Phalloideae) cause many casualties worldwide. Recent molecular phylogenetic studies revealed diverse lethal Amanita spp. in China. Here a 5-gene phylogeny (nuc rDNA region encompassing the internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2 with the 5.8S rDNA, the D1-D3 domains of nuc 28S rDNA, and partial RNA polymerase II second largest subunit, translation elongation factor 1-α and β-tubulin genes) is used to investigate the phylogenetic lineages and species delimitation in this section. Thirteen species are recognized, including four new species, namely A. griseorosea, A. molliuscula, A. parviexitialis, and A. subfuliginea They are documented with morphological, multigene phylogenetic, and ecological evidence, line drawings, and photographs and compared with similar species. A key to the Chinese lethal Amanita species is provided.

  11. Temporal variability in urinary excretion of bisphenol A and seven other phenols in spot, morning, and 24-h urine samples.

    PubMed

    Lassen, Tina Harmer; Frederiksen, Hanne; Jensen, Tina Kold; Petersen, Jørgen Holm; Main, Katharina M; Skakkebæk, Niels E; Jørgensen, Niels; Kranich, Selma Kløve; Andersson, Anna-Maria

    2013-10-01

    Human exposure to modern non-persistent chemicals is difficult to ascertain in epidemiological studies as exposure patterns and excretion rates may show temporal and diurnal variations. The aim of this study was to assess the temporal variability in repeated measurements of urinary excretion of bisphenol A (BPA) and seven other phenols. All analytes were determined using TurboFlow-LC-MS/MS. Two spot, three first morning and three 24-h urine samples were collected from 33 young Danish men over a three months period. Temporal variability was estimated by means of intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). More than 70% of the urine samples had detectable levels of BPA, triclosan (TCS), benzophenone-3 (BP-3) and sum of 2,4-dichlorophenol and 2,5-dichlorophenol (ΣDCP). We found low to moderate ICCs for BPA (0.10-0.42) and ΣDCP (0.39-0.72), whereas the ICCs for BP-3 (0.69-0.80) and TCS (0.55-0.90) were higher. The ICCs were highest for the two spot urine samples, which were collected approximately 4 days apart, compared with the 24-h urine samples and the first morning urine samples, which were collected approximately 40 days apart. A consequence of the considerable variability in urinary excretion of BPA may be misclassification of individual BPA exposure level in epidemiological studies, which may lead to attenuation of the association between BPA and outcomes. Our data do not support that collection of 24-h samples will improve individual exposure assessment for any of the analysed phenols.

  12. Evaluation of repolarization dynamics using the QT-RR regression line slope and intercept relationship during 24-h Holter ECG.

    PubMed

    Fujiki, Akira; Yoshioka, Ryozo; Sakabe, Masao

    2015-03-01

    QT-RR linear regression consists of two parameters, slope and intercept, and the aim of this study was to evaluate repolarization dynamics using the QT-RR linear regression slope and intercept relationship during 24-h Holter ECG. This study included 466 healthy subjects (54.6 ± 14.6 years; 200 men and 266 women) and 17 patients with ventricular arrhythmias, consisted of 10 patients with idiopathic ventricular fibrillation (IVF) and 7 patients with torsades de pointes (TDP). QT and RR intervals were measured from ECG waves based on a 15-s averaged ECG during 24-h Holter recording using an automatic QT analyzing system. The QT interval dependence on the RR interval was analyzed using a linear regression line for each subject ([QT] = A[RR] + B; where A is the slope and B is the y-intercept). The slope of the QT-RR regression line in healthy subjects was significantly greater in women than in men (0.185 ± 0.036 vs. 0.161 ± 0.033, p < 0.001) and the intercept was significantly smaller in women than in men (0.229 ± 0.028 vs. 0.240 ± 0.027, p < 0.001). A scatter diagram of the QT-RR regression line slope and intercept among healthy subjects demonstrated a statistically significant negative correlation (B = -0.62A + 0.34, r = -0.79). Distribution of both scatter diagrams of the slope and the intercept of the QT-RR regression line in patients with IVF and TDP was different from healthy subjects (left corner for IVF and upward shift for TDP). The slope and intercept relationship of the QT-RR linear regression line based on 24-h Holter ECG may become a simple useful marker for abnormality of ventricular repolarization dynamics.

  13. Neighbourhood food store availability in relation to 24 h urinary sodium and potassium excretion in young Japanese women.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Kentaro; Sasaki, Satoshi; Takahashi, Yoshiko; Uenishi, Kazuhiro

    2010-10-01

    Previous studies on the relationship of local food environment with residents' diets have relied exclusively on self-reported information on diet, producing inconsistent results. Evaluation of dietary intake using biomarkers may obviate the biases inherent to the use of self-reported dietary information. This cross-sectional study examined the association between neighbourhood food store availability and 24 h urinary Na and K excretion. The subjects were 904 female Japanese dietetic students aged 18-22 years. Neighbourhood food store availability was defined as the number of food stores within a 0.5-mile (0.8-km) radius of residence. Urinary Na and K excretion and the ratio of urinary Na to K were estimated from a single 24 h urine sample. After adjustment for potential confounding factors, neighbourhood availability of confectionery stores/bakeries was inversely associated with urinary K, and was positively associated with the ratio of Na to K (P for trend = 0.008 and 0.03, respectively). Neighbourhood availability of rice stores showed an independent inverse association with urinary K (P for trend = 0.03), whereas neighbourhood availability of supermarkets/grocery stores conversely showed an independent positive association with this variable (P for trend = 0.03). Furthermore, neighbourhood availability of fruit/vegetable stores showed an independent inverse association with the ratio of Na to K (P for trend = 0.049). In a group of young Japanese women, increasing neighbourhood availability of supermarkets/grocery stores and fruit/vegetable stores and decreasing availability of confectionery stores/bakeries and rice stores were associated with favourable profiles of 24 h urinary K (and Na) excretion.

  14. Metal element excretion in 24-h urine in patients with Wilson disease under treatment of D-penicillamine.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lisu; Yu, Xiaodan; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Yongjun; Jiao, Xianting; Yu, Xiaogang

    2012-05-01

    Wilson disease is an inherited autosomal recessive disorder causing copper accumulation and consequent toxicity. D-Penicillamine, a potent metal chelator, is an important therapy for Wilson disease. To investigate the changes of metal elements under the treatment of D-penicillamine, we determined the levels of Cu, Zn, Mg, Ca, Fe, Se, Mn, Pb, Hg, Cd, As, Tl, and Al by ICP-MS in 24-h urine of 115 Wilson disease patients who had received treatment with D: -penicillamine for 1 month to 22 years at maintenance doses, as well as 115 age-matched, healthy controls. The levels of Cu, Mg, Ca, Zn, Hg, Pb, Tl, Cd, and Mn in the 24-h urine of the cases were significantly higher than those of the controls (P < 0.05), and the observed increases in the levels of Mg, Ca, and Zn were directly correlated with the treatment duration with Pearson Correlation Coefficient (R) of 0.356 (Mg), 0.329 (Ca), and 0.313 (Zn), respectively (P < 0.05). On the other hand, the levels of Al and As in the 24-h urine were lower than those of the controls (P < 0.05) and were negatively correlated with the treatment time with R of -0.337 (Al) and -0.398 (As), respectively, (P < 0.05). Thus, this study indicates that the levels of metal elements may be altered in patients with Wilson disease under the treatment of D-penicillamine.

  15. Prediction of hypertensive crisis based on average, variability and approximate entropy of 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring.

    PubMed

    Schoenenberger, A W; Erne, P; Ammann, S; Perrig, M; Bürgi, U; Stuck, A E

    2008-01-01

    Approximate entropy (ApEn) of blood pressure (BP) can be easily measured based on software analysing 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM), but the clinical value of this measure is unknown. In a prospective study we investigated whether ApEn of BP predicts, in addition to average and variability of BP, the risk of hypertensive crisis. In 57 patients with known hypertension we measured ApEn, average and variability of systolic and diastolic BP based on 24-h ABPM. Eight of these fifty-seven patients developed hypertensive crisis during follow-up (mean follow-up duration 726 days). In bivariate regression analysis, ApEn of systolic BP (P<0.01), average of systolic BP (P=0.02) and average of diastolic BP (P=0.03) were significant predictors of hypertensive crisis. The incidence rate ratio of hypertensive crisis was 14.0 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.8, 631.5; P<0.01) for high ApEn of systolic BP as compared to low values. In multivariable regression analysis, ApEn of systolic (P=0.01) and average of diastolic BP (P<0.01) were independent predictors of hypertensive crisis. A combination of these two measures had a positive predictive value of 75%, and a negative predictive value of 91%, respectively. ApEn, combined with other measures of 24-h ABPM, is a potentially powerful predictor of hypertensive crisis. If confirmed in independent samples, these findings have major clinical implications since measures predicting the risk of hypertensive crisis define patients requiring intensive follow-up and intensified therapy.

  16. Melatonin, selective and non-selective MT1/MT2 receptors agonists: differential effects on the 24-h vigilance states.

    PubMed

    Ochoa-Sanchez, Rafael; Comai, Stefano; Spadoni, Gilberto; Bedini, Annalida; Tarzia, Giorgio; Gobbi, Gabriella

    2014-02-21

    Melatonin (MLT) is a neurohormone implicated in several physiological processes such as sleep. Contrasting results have been produced on whether or not it may act as a hypnotic agent, and the neurobiological mechanism through which it controls the vigilance states has not yet been elucidated. In this study we investigated the effect of MLT (40 mg/kg), a non-selective MT1/MT2 receptor agonist (UCM793, 40 mg/kg), and a selective MT2 partial agonist (UCM924, 40 mg/kg) on the 24-h vigilance states. EEG and EMG sleep-wake patterns were registered across the 24-h light-dark cycle in adult Sprague-Dawley male rats. MLT decreased (-37%) the latency to the first episode of non rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS), enhanced the power of NREMS delta band (+33%), but did not alter the duration of any of the three vigilance states. Differently, UCM793 increased the number of episodes (+52%) and decreased the length of the episodes (-38%) of wakefulness but did not alter the 24-h duration of wakefulness, NREMS and REMS. UCM924 instead reduced the latency (-56%) and increased (+31%) the duration of NREMS. Moreover, it raised the number of REMS episodes (+57%) but did not affect REMS duration. Taken together, these findings show that MLT and non-selective MT1/MT2 receptor agonists do not increase the quantity of sleep but differently influence the three vigilance states. In addition, they support the evidence that selective MT2 receptor agonists increase NREMS duration compared to MLT and non-selective MT1/MT2 agonists.

  17. Noncontact interface trap determination of SiO2-4H-SiC structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oborina, E. I.; Hoff, A. M.

    2010-01-01

    A sequence of noncontact corona-Kelvin metrology is introduced that enables the determination and monitoring of interface properties in dielectric/wide band gap semiconductor structures. The technique involves the incremental application of precise and measured quantities of corona charge, QC, onto the dielectric surface followed by determination of the contact potential difference, VCPD, as the material structure response. The V-Q characteristics obtained are used to extract the surface barrier, VSB, response related to the applied corona charge. The described approach differs from the common noncontact method applied in the case of dielectric/silicon structures where for each quanta of applied charge the value of surface barrier voltage, VSB, is obtained. Materials with wide band gaps and high concentrations of deep levels, as suggested for silicon carbide, do not permit quick determination of VSB by modulation of the band bending in the semiconductor with light. Light exposure in the case of SiC results in a long recovery time required to approach the nominal value of the preillumination VCPD value. The metrology approach presented determines an intersection of the VCPD-QC characteristic obtained in the dark with the Vox-QC characteristic representing the dielectric response. The specific VSB-QC dependence surrounding the reference VFB value is obtained from this approach and enables the noncontact determination of the dielectric interface trap density and its spectrum. Application of the modified metrology method to thermal oxide on n-type 4H-SiC demonstrates the modification of the Dit distribution by Fowler-Nordheim stress. In addition, an ability to quantify and separate trapped charge components is shown.

  18. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels as a therapeutic target for intervention of respiratory effects and lethality from phosgene.

    PubMed

    Andres, Devon; Keyser, Brian; Benton, Betty; Melber, Ashley; Olivera, Dorian; Holmes, Wesley; Paradiso, Danielle; Anderson, Dana; Ray, Radharaman

    2016-02-26

    Phosgene (CG), a toxic inhalation and industrial hazard, causes bronchoconstriction, vasoconstriction and associated pathological effects that could be life threatening. Ion channels of the transient receptor potential (TRP) family have been identified to act as specific chemosensory molecules in the respiratory tract in the detection, control of adaptive responses and initiation of detrimental signaling cascades upon exposure to various toxic inhalation hazards (TIH); their activation due to TIH exposure may result in broncho- and vasoconstriction. We studied changes in the regulation of intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in cultures of human bronchial smooth muscle cells (BSMC) and human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMEC) exposed to CG (16ppm, 8min), using an air/liquid interface exposure system. CG increased [Ca(2+)]i (p<0.05) in both cell types, The CG-induced [Ca(2+)]i was blocked (p<0.05) by two types of TRP channel blockers, SKF-96365, a general TRP channel blocker, and RR, a general TRPV (vanilloid type) blocker, in both BSMC and HPMEC. These effects correlate with the in vivo efficacies of these compounds to protect against lung injury and 24h lethality from whole body CG inhalation exposure in mice (8-10ppm×20min). Thus the TRP channel mechanism appears to be a potential target for intervention in CG toxicity.

  19. Histopathological biomarkers in juvenile silver catfish (Rhamdia quelen) exposed to a sublethal lead concentration.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Lautaro; Weber, Paula; Dressler, Valderi; Baldisserotto, Bernardo; Vigliano, Fabricio Andrés

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the 96-h lethal concentration (96-h LC50) of lead (Pb) in silver catfish, Rhamdia quelen, and to determine histopathological biomarkers in fish exposed for 96-h to a sublethal concentration at 25% of the LC50. The 96-h LC50 was 108 mgl(-1). In gills, the length and thickness of lamella and thickness of the filament epithelium were significantly higher in fish exposed to Pb for 48-h than in control fish whereas the interlamellar distance decreased. In the liver, the area occupied by lipid droplets and size of hepatocytes showed significantly higher values after 24-h of exposure. The percentage of abnormal renal tubules was higher in fish exposed to Pb, exhibiting a time-dependent increase. These variations in histopathological biomarkers permit the definition of the overall response of R. quelen to Pb and the potential usefulness in the monitoring of Pb contamination.

  20. Critical body-residues for lethal and sublethal effects of sediment-associated PAH on benthic copepods

    SciTech Connect

    Lotufo, G.R.

    1995-12-31

    Adult females of the meiobenthic copepod Schizopera knabeni were exposed to sediment-associated fluoranthene for 3, 6, 12, 24, 96, and 240 h. Sediment concentrations ranged from 25 to 1,661 nmol (5--336 {micro}g)/gdw and the TOC was 1.5%. Body burden increased to an apparent steady state after only 6 h. Elimination half-lives were 4.6 and 3.2 h in uncontaminated water and sediment, respectively. Toxic effects were only detected after 240 h as increased mortality and decreased offspring production. Significant mortality was observed only at the highest concentration; the LC50 was 1,011 nmol (204 {micro}g)/dgw. In contrast, offspring production was decreased at much lower concentrations, yielding an IC25 value of 148 nmol (30 {micro}g)/dgw. Lethal critical body residue (CBR) was determined as a 10-d LD50 of 15.5 {micro}mol/g dry tissue. By measuring PAH concentrations in the body and eggs of females, CBRs for reproductive output were determined as IC25 values of 2 and 3.1 {micro}mol/gdw, respectively. PAH sublethal effects on feeding rate were also investigated Adult copepods were exposed to {sup 14}C sediment-associated fluoranthene for 24 h were fed {sup 3}H-labeled algae for 3 h. Ingestion rate was significantly decreased at tissue concentrations as low as 1 {micro}mol/gdw and yielded an IC25 value of 0.6 {micro}mol/gdw. Similar findings were obtained using another species of estuarine copepod, Coullana sp. Non-polar narcotic compounds such as PAH cause a nonspecific disturbance of the functioning of cell membrane which results in decreased overall activity. Measurement of CBR associated with decreased feeding is proposed as a direct method to quantify sublethal narcotizing effects of organic compounds.

  1. Parallel assessment of nutrition and activity in athletes: validation against doubly labelled water, 24-h urea excretion, and indirect calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Karsten; Braun, Hans; De Marees, Markus; Fusch, Gerhard; Fusch, Christoph; Mester, Joachim; Schaenzer, Wilhelm

    2010-11-01

    The assessment of nutrition and activity in athletes requires accurate and precise methods. The aim of this study was to validate a protocol for parallel assessment of diet and exercise against doubly labelled water, 24-h urea excretion, and respiratory gas exchange. The participants were 14 male triathletes under normal training conditions. Energy intake and doubly labelled water were weakly associated with each other (r = 0.69, standard error of estimate [SEE] = 304 kcal x day(-1)). Protein intake was strongly correlated with 24-h urea (r = 0.89) but showed considerable individual variation (SEE = 0.34 g kg(-1) x day(-1)). Total energy expenditure based on recorded activities was highly correlated with doubly labelled water (r = 0.95, SEE = 195 kcal x day(-1)) but was proportionally biased. During running and cycling, estimated exercise energy expenditure was highly correlated with gas exchange (running: r = 0.89, SEE = 1.6 kcal x min(-1); cycling: r = 0.95, SEE = 1.4 kcal x min(-1)). High exercise energy expenditure was slightly underestimated during running. For nutrition data, variations appear too large for precise measurements in individual athletes, which is a common problem of dietary assessment methods. Despite the high correlations of total energy expenditure and exercise energy expenditure with reference methods, a correction for systematic errors is necessary for the valid estimation of energetic requirements in individual athletes.

  2. Ingestion of nutrition bars high in protein or carbohydrate does not impact 24-h energy intakes in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Trier, Catherine M; Johnston, Carol S

    2012-12-01

    Sales of nutrition bars increased almost 10-fold to $1.7billion over the past decade yet few studies have examined the impact of bar ingestion on dietary parameters. In this crossover trial, 24-h energy intakes were assessed in free-living college students ingesting a high-protein (HP, 280kcal) or a high-carbohydrate (HC, 260kcal) nutrition bar upon waking. Fifty-four students entered the trial, and 37 participants completed the three test days. Daily energy intakes ranged from 1752±99kcal for the non-intervention day to 1846±75 and 1891±110kcal for the days the HP and HC bars were consumed respectively (p=0.591). However, for individuals who reported high levels of physically activity (n=11), daily energy intakes increased significantly compared to the control day for the HC bar day (+45%; p=0.030) and HP bar day (+22%; p=0.038). Macro- and micro-nutrient intakes differed significantly across test days in the total sample mirroring the nutrient profile of the specific bars. These data suggest that young adults adjust caloric intakes appropriately following the ingestion of energy-dense nutrition bars over a 24-h period. Moreover, nutrition bars may represent a unique opportunity to favorably influence nutrient status of young adults.

  3. Schottky barrier height of Ni/TiO2/4H-SiC metal-insulator-semiconductor diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Ivan R.; Pereira, Marcelo B.; Boudinov, Henri I.

    2015-12-01

    Ni/TiO2/4H-SiC diodes were analysed through measurements of current-voltage curves varying the temperature. The Schottky Barrier Height (SBH) which increased with temperature was studied by simulation of the Thermionic Emission Model, considering Ni/SiC Schottky structures with an insulator layer between the metal and semiconductor. This model shows that a new method of calculation should be applied to diodes that have a metal-insulator-semiconductor structure. Misleading results for SBH are obtained if the thin insulator layer is not considered. When applying the suggested method to the Ni/TiO2/4H-SiC diodes it was necessary to consider not only the deposited TiO2 layer, but also a second dielectric layer of native SiCxOy at the surface of SiC. By measuring I-V-T curves for two samples with different thicknesses of TiO2, the suggested method allows one to estimate the thicknesses of both dielectric layers: TiO2 and SiOxCy.

  4. Effect of Androctonus bicolor scorpion venom on serum electrolytes in rats: A 24-h time-course study.

    PubMed

    Al-Asmari, A; Khan, H A; Manthiri, R A

    2016-03-01

    Black fat-tailed scorpion (Androctonus bicolor) belongs to the family Buthidae and is one of the most venomous scorpions in the world. The effects of A. bicolor venom on serum electrolytes were not known and therefore investigated in this study. Adult male Wistar rats were randomly divided into seven groups with five animals in each group. One of the groups served as control and received vehicle only. The animals in the remaining groups received a single subcutaneous injection of crude A. bicolor venom (200 μg/kg bodyweight) and were killed at different time intervals including 30 min, 1 h, 2 h, 4 h, 8 h, and 24 h after venom injection. The results showed that scorpion venom caused significant increase in serum sodium levels within 30 min after injection which slightly subsided after 1 h and then persisted over 24 h. Serum potassium levels continued to significantly increase until 4 h and then slightly subsided. There were significant decreases in serum magnesium (Mg(+)) levels following scorpion venom injection, at all the time points during the course of study. Serum calcium levels were significantly increased during the entire course of study, whereas serum chloride was significantly decreased. In conclusion, A. bicolor envenomation in rats caused severe and persistent hypomagnesemia with accompanied hypernatremia, hyperkalemia, and hypercalcemia. It is important to measure serum Mg(+) levels in victims of scorpion envenomation, and patients with severe Mg(+) deficiency should be treated accordingly.

  5. Microdialysis in the rat striatum: effects of 24 h dexamethasone retrodialysis on evoked dopamine release and penetration injury.

    PubMed

    Nesbitt, Kathryn M; Varner, Erika L; Jaquins-Gerstl, Andrea; Michael, Adrian C

    2015-01-21

    The power of microdialysis for in vivo neurochemical monitoring is a result of intense efforts to enhance microdialysis procedures, the probes themselves, and the analytical systems used for the analysis of dialysate samples. Our goal is to refine microdialysis further by focusing attention on what happens when the probes are implanted into brain tissue. It is broadly acknowledged that some tissue damage occurs, such that the tissue nearest the probes is disrupted from its normal state. We hypothesize that mitigating such disruption would refine microdialysis. Herein, we show that the addition of dexamethasone, an anti-inflammatory drug, to the perfusion fluid protects evoked dopamine responses as measured by fast-scan cyclic voltammetry next to the probes after 24 h. We also show that dexamethasone stabilizes evoked dopamine responses measured at the probe outlet over a 4-24 h postimplantation interval. The effects of dexamethasone are attributable to its anti-inflammatory actions, as dexamethasone had no significant effect on two histochemical markers for dopamine terminals, tyrosine hydroxylase and the dopamine transporter. Using histochemical assays, we confirmed that the actions of dexamethasone are tightly confined to the immediate, local vicinity of the probe.

  6. Sleep and 24-h activity rhythms in relation to cortisol change after a very low-dose of dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Luik, Annemarie I; Direk, Neşe; Zuurbier, Lisette A; Hofman, Albert; Van Someren, Eus J W; Tiemeier, Henning

    2015-03-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis plays an important role in sleep. Nevertheless, the association of sleep and its 24-h organization with negative feedback control of the HPA axis has received limited attention in population-based studies. We explored this association in 493 middle-aged persons of the Rotterdam Study, a large population-based study (mean age 56 years, standard deviation: 5.3 years; 57% female). The negative feedback of the HPA axis was measured as the change in morning saliva cortisol after the intake of 0.25mg dexamethasone the night before. Actigraphy allowed us to measure the stability and fragmentation of the activity rhythm and to estimate total sleep time, sleep onset latency and wake after sleep onset. A sleep diary kept during the week of actigraphy was used to assess self-reported total sleep time, sleep onset latency, number of awakenings and perceived sleep quality. In our study, enhanced negative feedback of the HPA axis was found in association with unstable activity rhythms (B=0.106, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.002; 0.210), total sleep time (B=0.108, 95%CI: 0.001; 0.215) and poor subjective sleep quality (B=0.107, 95%CI: 0.009; 0.206) after multivariate adjustment. These results indicated that the 24-h organization, duration and experience of sleep are all associated with the negative feedback control of the HPA axis.

  7. Microdialysis in the Rat Striatum: Effects of 24 h Dexamethasone Retrodialysis on Evoked Dopamine Release and Penetration Injury

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The power of microdialysis for in vivo neurochemical monitoring is a result of intense efforts to enhance microdialysis procedures, the probes themselves, and the analytical systems used for the analysis of dialysate samples. Our goal is to refine microdialysis further by focusing attention on what happens when the probes are implanted into brain tissue. It is broadly acknowledged that some tissue damage occurs, such that the tissue nearest the probes is disrupted from its normal state. We hypothesize that mitigating such disruption would refine microdialysis. Herein, we show that the addition of dexamethasone, an anti-inflammatory drug, to the perfusion fluid protects evoked dopamine responses as measured by fast-scan cyclic voltammetry next to the probes after 24 h. We also show that dexamethasone stabilizes evoked dopamine responses measured at the probe outlet over a 4–24 h postimplantation interval. The effects of dexamethasone are attributable to its anti-inflammatory actions, as dexamethasone had no significant effect on two histochemical markers for dopamine terminals, tyrosine hydroxylase and the dopamine transporter. Using histochemical assays, we confirmed that the actions of dexamethasone are tightly confined to the immediate, local vicinity of the probe. PMID:25491242

  8. Lethal and sub-lethal effects of spinosad on bumble bees (Bombus impatiens Cresson).

    PubMed

    Morandin, Lora A; Winston, Mark L; Franklin, Michelle T; Abbott, Virginia A

    2005-07-01

    Recent developments of new families of pesticides and growing awareness of the importance of wild pollinators for crop pollination have stimulated interest in potential effects of novel pesticides on wild bees. Yet pesticide toxicity studies on wild bees remain rare, and few studies have included long-term monitoring of bumble bee colonies or testing of foraging ability after pesticide exposure. Larval bees feeding on exogenous pollen and exposed to pesticides during development may result in lethal or sub-lethal effects during the adult stage. We tested the effects of a naturally derived biopesticide, spinosad, on bumble bee (Bombus impatiens Cresson) colony health, including adult mortality, brood development, weights of emerging bees and foraging efficiency of adults that underwent larval development during exposure to spinosad. We monitored colonies from an early stage, over a 10-week period, and fed spinosad to colonies in pollen at four levels: control, 0.2, 0.8 and 8.0 mg kg(-1), during weeks 2 through 5 of the experiment. At concentrations that bees would likely encounter in pollen in the wild (0.2-0.8 mg kg(-1)) we detected minimal negative effects to bumble bee colonies. Brood and adult mortality was high at 8.0 mg kg(-1) spinosad, about twice the level that bees would be exposed to in a 'worst case' field scenario, resulting in colony death two to four weeks after initial pesticide exposure. At more realistic concentrations there were potentially important sub-lethal effects. Adult worker bees exposed to spinosad during larval development at 0.8 mg kg(-1) were slower foragers on artificial complex flower arrays than bees from low or no spinosad treated colonies. Inclusion of similar sub-lethal assays to detect effects of pesticides on pollinators would aid in development of environmentally responsible pest management strategies.

  9. Boron uptake in tumors, cerebrum and blood from (/sup 10/B)Na/sub 4/B/sub 24/H/sub 22/S/sub 2/

    DOEpatents

    Slatkin, D.N.; Micca, P.L.; Fairchild, R.G.

    1986-03-11

    A stable boronated (/sup 10/B-labeled) compound, sodium mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate is infused in the form of the disulfide dimer, (/sup 10/B)Na/sub 4/B/sub 24/H/sub 22/S/sub 2/, at a dose of about 200 ..mu..g /sup 10/B per gm body weight. The infusion is preformed into the blood or peritoneal cavity of the patient slowly over a period of many days, perhaps one week or more, at the rate of roughly 1 ..mu..g /sup 10/B per gm body weight per hour. Use of this particular boronated dimer in the manner or similarly to the manner so described permits radiotherapeutically effective amounts of boron to accumulate in tumors to be treated by boron neutron capture radiation therapy and also permits sufficient retention of boron in tumor after the cessation of the slow infusion, so as to allow the blood concentration of /sup 10/B to drop or to be reduced artificially to a radiotherapeutically effective level, less than one-half of the concentration of /sup 10/B in the tumor. 1 tab.

  10. Holter monitor (24h)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the machine gets an accurate recording of the heart's activity. While wearing the device, avoid: Electric blankets High- ... Holter monitoring is used to determine how the heart responds to normal activity. The monitor may also be used: After a ...

  11. Hippuric acid in 24 h urine collections as a biomarker of fruits and vegetables intake in kidney stone formers.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Angela; Folesani, Giuseppina; Mena, Pedro; Ticinesi, Andrea; Allegri, Franca; Nouvenne, Antonio; Pinelli, Silvana; Del Rio, Daniele; Borghi, Loris; Meschi, Tiziana

    2014-12-01

    This work aimed to underline the prospects of hippuric acid, a product of the metabolism of polyphenols, as a new biomarker of fruits and vegetables intake associated with lithogenic risk. Biochemical parameters of lithogenic risk and hippuric acid were measured in the 24 h urine collections of a cohort of 696 Italian kidney stone formers divided into two subgroups according to their different dietary habits. The link between lithogenic risk parameters and hippuric acid was assessed and this compound was revealed as a valuable biomarker of fruits and vegetables intake in kidney stone formers. A cut-off value of urinary excretion of hippuric acid, 300 mg/24 h, was set as the threshold of discrimination between low and high intake of fruits and vegetables for these patients. These results highlight the importance of monitoring of the excretion hippuric acid in urine to address proper dietary guidelines for the management of stone former patients.

  12. Effect of boron incorporation on slow interface traps in SiO2/4H-SiC structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Dai; Sometani, Mitsuru; Harada, Shinsuke; Kosugi, Ryoji; Yonezawa, Yoshiyuki; Yano, Hiroshi

    2017-02-01

    The reason for the effective removal of interface traps in SiO2/4H-SiC (0001) structures by boron (B) incorporation was investigated by employing low-temperature electrical measurements. Low-temperature capacitance-voltage and thermal dielectric relaxation current measurements revealed that the density of electrons captured in slow interface traps in B-incorporated oxide is lower than that in dry and NO-annealed oxides. These results suggest that near-interface traps can be removed by B incorporation, which is considered to be an important reason for the increase in the field-effect mobility of 4H-SiC metal-oxide-semiconductor devices. A model for the passivation mechanism is proposed that takes account of stress relaxation during thermal oxidation.

  13. A review of the design and validation of web- and computer-based 24-h dietary recall tools.

    PubMed

    Timon, Claire M; van den Barg, Rinske; Blain, Richard J; Kehoe, Laura; Evans, Katie; Walton, Janette; Flynn, Albert; Gibney, Eileen R

    2016-12-01

    Technology-based dietary assessment offers solutions to many of the limitations of traditional dietary assessment methodologies including cost, participation rates and the accuracy of data collected. The 24-h dietary recall (24HDR) method is currently the most utilised method for the collection of dietary intake data at a national level. Recently there have been many developments using web-based platforms to collect food intake data using the principles of the 24HDR method. This review identifies web- and computer-based 24HDR tools that have been developed for both children and adult population groups, and examines common design features and the methods used to investigate the performance and validity of these tools. Overall, there is generally good to strong agreement between web-based 24HDR and respective reference measures for intakes of macro- and micronutrients.

  14. Airway hyper- or hyporeactivity to inhaled spasmogens 24 h after ovalbumin challenge of sensitized guinea-pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, C. A.; Broadley, K. J.

    1995-01-01

    1. The aim of this study was to determine whether an inhalation of ovalbumin (OA, 10 or 20 mg ml-1) by conscious OA-sensitized guinea-pigs leads to airway hyperreactivity to spasmogens 24 h later. In contrast to most previous studies, the spasmogens (5-HT, methacholine (MCh), U-46619 and adenosine) were administered by inhalation and airway function was measured in conscious guinea-pigs. 2. Guinea-pigs were sensitized by i.p. injection of 10 micrograms OA and 100 mg aluminium hydroxide in 1 ml normal saline; 14-21 days later they were exposed to an inhalation of 5-HT, MCh, U-46619 or adenosine. Specific airway conductance (sGaw) was measured in conscious animals by whole body plethysmography. The spasmogens caused bronchoconstriction, measured as a reduction in sGaw from the pre-inhalation basal values. Dose-related bronchoconstrictions were observed with 5-HT, MCh and U-46619. 3. The effect of an ovalbumin macroshock challenge upon the responses to each spasmogen were examined by giving an inhalation of aerosolized OA at 24 h (or 7 days in the cause of adenosine) after an initial spasmogen challenge. Eighteen to twenty-four hours after the OA macroshock, the same guinea-pigs were exposed to a repeated inhalation of 5-HT, MCh, U-46619 or adenosine. 4. U-46619 was the only spasmogen to demonstrate hyperresponsiveness, the peak change in sGaw being increased from -12.3 +/- 9.9 to -38.8 +/- 5.0% by 10 mg ml-1 OA challenge. In contrast, the ovalbumin challenge (20 mg ml-1) inhibited the bronchoconstrictions to 5-HT (50 micrograms ml-1) and MCh (100 micrograms ml-1). Adenosine demonstrated bronchoconstriction in sensitized guinea-pigs but no significant change in the response was observed after an OA challenge. 5. All results were compared with a control group of sensitized guinea-pigs receiving a NaCl challenge. The bronchoconstrictor responses to 5-HT, MCh, U-46619 or adenosine did not differ significantly before and after the saline challenge, indicating

  15. Derivation of Human Lethal Doses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-19

    emergency medicine, pharmacology, forensic medicine, and industrial chemical toxicology, in addition to a poison information center. The authors presented...Meditsinskaya Ekspeertiza. Forensic Medical Examination, 26(2), 48, 1983 (as cited in Sax’s). This reference is not available for review. Rat – LD50...mg/kg No LDLo, MLD, or lethal dose for humans Rat – LD50 (Bulletin of the Entomological Society of America, 1969) (as cited in Sax’s). This

  16. The 24-h recall instrument for home nursing to measure the activity profile of home nurses: development and psychometric testing.

    PubMed

    De Vliegher, Kristel; Aertgeerts, Bert; Declercq, Anja; Gosset, Christiane; Heyden, Isabelle; Van Geert, Michel; Moons, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Home health care today is challenged by a shift from an acute to a chronic health-care model, moving the focus of care from the hospital to home-care setting. This increased focus on care at home emphasizes the need for an efficient, effective, and transparent management of home health care. However, it is not precisely known what home-care nurses do; what kind of care is received by patients; what the performance of home nurses is; and what the impact of the increasing need for home nursing is on the current and future role of home nurses. In this respect, it is necessary to gain a clear insight into the activity profile of home nurses, but there is no gold standard to measure their activities. This study reports on the development and psychometric testing of the '24-hour recall instrument for home nursing' to measure the activity profile of home nurses. Five home nurses in Belgium, simultaneously with the researcher, registered the performed activities in a total of 69 patients, using the 24-h recall instrument for home nursing. The validity and the interrater reliability of this instrument were high: the proportions that observed agreement were very high; the strength of kappa agreement was substantial to almost perfect; the prevalence index showed great variety; and the bias index was low. The findings in this study support the validity evidence based on test content and the interrater reliability of the 24-h recall instrument. This instrument can help to shape practice and policy by making the home nursing profession more transparent: a clear insight into the kind of care that is provided by home nurses and is received by the patients in primary care contributes to the development of a clear definition of the role of home nurses in health care.

  17. Pulse Arrival Time Based Cuff-Less and 24-H Wearable Blood Pressure Monitoring and its Diagnostic Value in Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yali; Poon, Carmen C Y; Yan, Bryan P; Lau, James Y W

    2016-09-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) has become an essential tool in the diagnosis and management of hypertension. Current standard ABPM devices use an oscillometric cuff-based method which can cause physical discomfort to the patients with repeated inflations and deflations, especially during nighttime leading to sleep disturbance. The ability to measure ambulatory BP accurately and comfortably without a cuff would be attractive. This study validated the accuracy of a cuff-less approach for ABPM using pulse arrival time (PAT) measurements on both healthy and hypertensive subjects for potential use in hypertensive management, which is the first of its kind. The wearable cuff-less device was evaluated against a standard cuff-based device on 24 subjects of which 15 have known hypertension. BP measurements were taken from each subject over a 24-h period by the cuff-less and cuff-based devices every 15 to 30 minutes during daily activities. Mean BP of each subject during daytime, nighttime and over 24-h were calculated. Agreement between mean nighttime systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) measured by the two devices evaluated using Bland-Altman plot were -1.4 ± 6.6 and 0.4 ± 6.7 mmHg, respectively. Receiver operator characteristics (ROC) statistics was used to assess the diagnostic accuracy of the cuff-less approach in the detection of BP above the hypertension threshold during nighttime (>120/70 mmHg). The area under ROC curves were 0.975/0.79 for nighttime. The results suggest that PAT-based approach is accurate and promising for ABPM without the issue of sleep disturbances associated with cuff-based devices.

  18. RESP-24: a computer program for the investigation of 24-h breathing abnormalities in heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Maestri, R; Pinna, G D; Robbi, E; Varanini, M; Emdin, M; Raciti, M; La Rovere, M T

    2002-05-01

    In this paper, we describe a computer program (RESP-24) specifically devised to assess the prevalence and characteristics of breathing disorders in ambulant chronic heart failure patients during the overall 24 h period. The system works on a single channel respiratory signal (RS) recorded through a Holter-like portable device. In the pre-processing stage RESP-24 removes noise, baseline drift and motion artefacts from the RS using a non-linear filter, enhances respiratory frequency components through high-pass filtering and derives an instantaneous tidal volume (ITV) signal. The core processing is devoted to the identification and classification of the breathing pattern into periodic breathing (PB), normal breathing or non-classifiable breathing using a 60 s segmentation, and to the identification and estimation of apnea and hypopnea events. Sustained episodes of PB are detected by cross analysis of both the spectral content and time behavior of the ITV signal. User-friendly interactive facilities allow all the results of the automatic analysis procedure to be edited. The final report provides a set of standard and non-standard parameters quantifying breathing abnormalities during the 24 h period, the night-time and the day-time, including the apnea/hypopnea index, the apnea index, the total time spent in apnea or in hypopnea and the prevalence of non-apneic and apneic PB. The accuracy of these measurements was appraised on a data set of 14 recordings, by comparing them with those provided by a trained analyst. The mean and standard deviation of the error of the automatic procedure were below respectively 6 and 8% of the reference value for all parameters considered and the mean total classification accuracy was 92%. In most cases, the individual error was <12%. We conclude that measurements provided automatically by the RESP-24 software are suitable for screening purposes and clinical trials, although a preventive check of signal quality should be recommended.

  19. 24-h urinary sodium excretion is associated with obesity in a cross-sectional sample of Australian schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Grimes, Carley A; Riddell, Lynn J; Campbell, Karen J; He, Feng J; Nowson, Caryl A

    2016-03-28

    Emerging evidence indicates that dietary Na may be linked to obesity; however it is unclear whether this relationship is independent of energy intake (EI). The aim of this study was to assess the association between Na intake and measures of adiposity, including BMI z score, weight category and waist:height ratio (WHtR), in a sample of Australian schoolchildren. This was a cross-sectional study of schoolchildren aged 4-12 years. Na intake was assessed via one 24-h urine collection. BMI was converted to age- and sex-specific z scores, and WHtR was used to define abdominal obesity. In children aged ≥8 years, EI was determined via one 24-h dietary recall. Of the 666 children with valid urine samples 55 % were male (average age 9·3 (sd 1·8) years). In adjusted models an additional 17 mmol/d of Na was associated with a 0·10 higher BMI z score (95 % CI 0·07, 0·13), a 23 % (OR 1·23; 95 % CI 1·16, 1·31) greater risk of being overweight/obese and a 15 % (OR 1·15; 95 % CI 1·09, 1·23) greater risk of being centrally obese. In the subsample of 8-12-year-old children (n 458), adjustment for EI did not markedly alter the associations between Na and adiposity outcomes. Using a robust measure of daily Na intake we found a positive association between Na intake and obesity risk in Australian schoolchildren, which could not be explained by total energy consumption. To determine whether this is a causal relationship, longitudinal studies, with high-quality measures of Na and EI, are required.

  20. Pharmacological interventions in the newborn piglet in the first 24 h after hypoxia-ischemia. A hemodynamic and electrophysiological perspective.

    PubMed

    Peeters-Scholte, Cacha; van den Tweel, Evelyn; Ioroi, Tomoaki; Post, Ilka; Braun, Kees; Veldhuis, Wouter; Nicolay, Klaas; Groenendaal, Floris; van Bel, Frank

    2002-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether combined inhibition of neuronal and inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS) by 2-iminobiotin, free radical scavenging by allopurinol, and non-protein-bound iron chelation with deferoxamine improved cerebral oxygenation, electrocortical brain activity, and brain energy status during the first 24 h after hypoxia-ischemia (HI) in the newborn piglet. Forty-three newborn piglets were subjected to 1 h of severe HI by occluding both carotid arteries and phosphorous magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((31)P-MRS)-guided hypoxia, whereas five served as sham-operated controls. Upon reperfusion, piglets received vehicle (n=12), 2-iminobiotin (n=11), allopurinol (n=10), or deferoxamine (n=10). Cerebral oxygenation was recorded with near-infrared spectrophotometry (NIRS), electrocortical brain activity was assessed with amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG), and cerebral energy status with (31)P-MRS. The oxygenated hemoglobin (HbO(2)) and total hemoglobin (tHb) were significantly increased in vehicle-treated piglets compared with 2-iminobiotin-treated and deferoxamine-treated piglets. No change in deoxygenated Hb (HHb) was demonstrated over time. The aEEG was significantly preserved in 2-iminobiotin- and deferoxamine-treated piglets compared with vehicle-treated piglets. Allopurinol treatment was not as effective as 2-iminobiotin treatment after HI. Phosphocreatine/inorganic phosphate ratios (PCr/P(i)) were significantly decreased for vehicle-treated piglets at 24 h post-HI, whereas 2-iminobiotin, allopurinol, and deferoxamine prevented the development of secondary energy failure. We speculate that the beneficial effects, especially of 2-iminobiotin, but also of deferoxamine, are due to reduced peroxynitrite-mediated oxidation.

  1. Pre-treatment with low-dose endotoxin prolongs survival from experimental lethal endotoxic shock: Benefit for lethal peritonitis by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kopanakis, Konstantinos; Tzepi, Ira-Maria; Pistiki, Aikaterini; Carrer, Dionyssia-Pinelopi; Netea, Mihai G; Georgitsi, Marianna; Lymperi, Maria; Droggiti, Dionyssia-Irini; Liakakos, Theodoros; Machairas, Anastasios; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J

    2013-06-01

    Although LPS tolerance is well-characterized, it remains unknown if it is achieved even with single doses of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and if it offers protection against lethal bacterial infections. To this end, C57B6 mice were assigned to groups A (sham); B (saline i.p followed after 24h by i.p 30mg/kg LPS); and C (3mg/kg LPS i.p followed after 24h by i.p 30mg/kg LPS). Survival was monitored and animals were sacrificed early after lethal challenge for measurement of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) in serum; isolation of splenocytes and cytokine stimulation; and flow-cytometry for apoptosis and TREM-1. Experiments were repeated with mice infected i.p by Escherichia coli after challenging with saline or LPS. Mortality of group B was 72.2% compared with 38.9% of group C (p: 0.020). Serum TNFα of group C was lower than group B. Expression of TREM-1 of group C on monocytes/neutrophils was greater than group B. Release of TNFα, of IFNγ and of IL-17 from splenocytes of group C was lower than group B and the opposite happened for IL-10 showing evidence of cellular reprogramming. In parallel, apoptosis of circulating lymphocytes and of splenocytes of group C was greater compared with group B. Pre-treatment of mice challenged by E. coli with low dose LPS led to 0% mortality compared with 90% of saline pre-treated mice; in these mice, splenocytes improved over-time their capacity for release of IFNγ. It is concluded that single low doses of LPS lead to early reprogramming of the innate immune response and prolong survival after lethal E. coli challenge.

  2. A Mobile Phone Based Method to Assess Energy and Food Intake in Young Children: A Validation Study against the Doubly Labelled Water Method and 24 h Dietary Recalls.

    PubMed

    Delisle Nyström, Christine; Forsum, Elisabet; Henriksson, Hanna; Trolle-Lagerros, Ylva; Larsson, Christel; Maddison, Ralph; Timpka, Toomas; Löf, Marie

    2016-01-15

    Mobile phones are becoming important instruments for assessing diet and energy intake. We developed the Tool for Energy Balance in Children (TECH), which uses a mobile phone to assess energy and food intake in pre-school children. The aims of this study were: (a) to compare energy intake (EI) using TECH with total energy expenditure (TEE) measured via doubly labelled water (DLW); and (b) to compare intakes of fruits, vegetables, fruit juice, sweetened beverages, candy, ice cream, and bakery products using TECH with intakes acquired by 24 h dietary recalls. Participants were 39 healthy, Swedish children (5.5 ± 0.5 years) within the ongoing Mobile-based Intervention Intended to Stop Obesity in Preschoolers (MINISTOP) obesity prevention trial. Energy and food intakes were assessed during four days using TECH and 24 h telephone dietary recalls. Mean EI (TECH) was not statistically different from TEE (DLW) (5820 ± 820 kJ/24 h and 6040 ± 680 kJ/24 h, respectively). No significant differences in the average food intakes using TECH and 24 h dietary recalls were found. All food intakes were correlated between TECH and the 24 h dietary recalls (ρ = 0.665-0.896, p < 0.001). In conclusion, TECH accurately estimated the average intakes of energy and selected foods and thus has the potential to be a useful tool for dietary studies in pre-school children, for example obesity prevention trials.

  3. Comparative effects on rat primary astrocytes and C6 rat glioma cells cultures after 24-h exposure to silver nanoparticles (AgNPs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar-García, Samuel; Silva-Ramírez, Ana Sonia; Ramirez-Lee, Manuel A.; Rosas-Hernandez, Hector; Rangel-López, Edgar; Castillo, Claudia G.; Santamaría, Abel; Martinez-Castañon, Gabriel A.; Gonzalez, Carmen

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this work was to compare the effects of 24-h exposure of rat primary astrocytes and C6 rat glioma cells to 7.8 nm AgNPs. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive primary brain tumor and current treatments lead to diverse side-effects; for this reason, it is imperative to investigate new approaches, including those alternatives provided by nanotechnology, like nanomaterials (NMs) such as silver nanoparticles. Herein, we found that C6 rat glioma cells, but no primary astrocytes, decreased cell viability after AgNPs treatment; however, both cell types diminished their proliferation. The decrease of glioma C6 cells proliferation was related with necrosis, while in primary astrocytes, the decreased proliferation was associated with the induction of apoptosis. The ionic control (AgNO3) exerted a different profile than AgNPs; the bulk form did not modify the basal effect in each determination, whereas cisplatin, a well-known antitumoral drug used as a comparative control, promoted cytotoxicity in both cell types at specific concentrations. Our findings prompt the need to determine the fine molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the differential biological responses to AgNPs in order to develop new tools or alternatives based on nanotechnology that may contribute to the understanding, impact and use of NMs in specific targets, like glioblastoma cells.

  4. Treatment of Irradiated Mice with High-Dose Ascorbic Acid Reduced Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Tomohito; Kinoshita, Manabu; Yamamoto, Tetsuo; Ito, Masataka; Nishida, Takafumi; Takeuchi, Masaru; Saitoh, Daizoh; Seki, Shuhji; Mukai, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    Ascorbic acid is an effective antioxidant and free radical scavenger. Therefore, it is expected that ascorbic acid should act as a radioprotectant. We investigated the effects of post-radiation treatment with ascorbic acid on mouse survival. Mice received whole body irradiation (WBI) followed by intraperitoneal administration of ascorbic acid. Administration of 3 g/kg of ascorbic acid immediately after exposure significantly increased mouse survival after WBI at 7 to 8 Gy. However, administration of less than 3 g/kg of ascorbic acid was ineffective, and 4 or more g/kg was harmful to the mice. Post-exposure treatment with 3 g/kg of ascorbic acid reduced radiation-induced apoptosis in bone marrow cells and restored hematopoietic function. Treatment with ascorbic acid (3 g/kg) up to 24 h (1, 6, 12, or 24 h) after WBI at 7.5 Gy effectively improved mouse survival; however, treatments beyond 36 h were ineffective. Two treatments with ascorbic acid (1.5 g/kg × 2, immediately and 24 h after radiation, 3 g/kg in total) also improved mouse survival after WBI at 7.5 Gy, accompanied with suppression of radiation-induced free radical metabolites. In conclusion, administration of high-dose ascorbic acid might reduce radiation lethality in mice even after exposure. PMID:25651298

  5. A single prolonged milking interval of 24h compromises the well-being and health of dairy Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Kohler, P; Alsaaod, M; Dolf, G; O'Brien, R; Beer, G; Steiner, A

    2016-11-01

    Cows are often shown at dairy shows with overfilled udders to achieve a better show placing. However, it is unclear to what degree "over-bagging" affects the health and well-being of show cows. The goal of this study was to assess the effect of a single prolonged milking interval (PMI) of 24h on the measurable signs of health and well-being in dairy cows in early and mid-lactation and to assess the effect of a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) on well-being during a PMI. Fifteen Holstein cows were studied in early lactation (89.5±2.7d in milk) and were given an NSAID or physiological saline in a crossover design. Ten cows were studied again in mid-lactation (151.6±4.0d in milk). Data on clinical signs of cows' health, behavior, and well-being were collected at 1 or 2h intervals before and during a PMI of 24h. Data from the last 6h of a 12h milking interval were compared with the last 6h of the PMI. Compared with that of a cow in the last 6h of a 12-h milking interval, the behavior of cows in early lactation (saline group) changed during the last 6h of the PMI: we observed decreased eating time (22.4 vs. 16.2min/h), increased ruminating time (13.3 vs. 25.0min/h), and increased hind limb abduction while walking (score 41.7 vs. 62.6) and standing (31.2 vs. 38.9cm). Udder firmness was increased (2.9 vs. 4.5kg) during this period and more weight was placed on the hind limbs (46.4 vs. 47.0%). We also found pathological signs at the end of the PMI: all cows showed milk leaking, and 10 of 15 cows developed edema in the subcutaneous udder tissue. Somatic cell count was significantly increased from 12h to 72h after the PMI. Administration of an NSAID had no influence on measured variables, except that the occurrence of edema was not significantly increased during PMI in the flunixin group (10 of 15 and 6 of 15 cows for the saline and flunixin groups, respectively). In the cows in mid-lactation, different variables were not significantly changed in the PMI

  6. Effects of living at two ambient temperatures on 24-h blood pressure and neuroendocrine function among obese and non-obese humans: a pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanikowska, Dominika; Sato, Maki; Iwase, Satoshi; Shimizu, Yuuki; Nishimura, Naoki; Inukai, Yoko; Sugenoya, Junichi

    2013-05-01

    The effects of environmental temperature on blood pressure and hormones in obese subjects in Japan were compared in two seasons: summer vs winter. Five obese (BMI, 32 ± 5 kg/m2) and five non-obese (BMI, 23 ±3 kg/m2) men participated in this experiment at latitude 35°10' N and longitude 136°57.9' E. The average environmental temperature was 29 ± 1 °C in summer and 3 ± 1 °C in winter. Blood samples were analyzed for leptin, ghrelin, catecholamines, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), free thyroxine (fT4), free triiodothyronine (fT3), total cholesterol, triglycerides, insulin and glucose. Blood pressure was measured over the course of 24 h in summer and winter. A Japanese version of the Profile of Mood States (POMS) questionnaire was also administered each season. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures in obese men were significantly higher in winter (lower environmental temperatures) than in summer (higher environmental temperatures). Noradrenaline and dopamine concentrations were also significantly higher at lower environmental temperatures in obese subjects, but ghrelin, TSH, fT3, fT4, insulin and glucose were not significantly different in summer and winter between obese and non-obese subjects. Leptin, total cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations were significantly higher in winter in obese than non-obese men. Results from the POMS questionnaire showed a significant rise in Confusion at lower environmental temperatures (winter) in obese subjects. In this pilot study, increased blood pressure may have been due to increased secretion of noradrenaline in obese men in winter, and the results suggest that blood pressure control in obese men is particularly important in winter.

  7. Electroshock weapons can be lethal!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Marjorie

    2008-03-01

    Electroshock weapons (EWs)-stun guns, tasers, riot shields-are electroconductive devices designed to safely incapacitate healthy men neuromuscularly, so they are called nonlethal or less-lethal. EW firms seeking large nonmilitary markets targeted law enforcement and corrections personnel, who began using EWs in prisons/jails and on public patrol in 1980 in the USA. This shifted the EW-shocked population from healthy soldiers to a heterogeneous mix of both sexes, ages 6-92, in a wide variety of health conditions! An EW operates by disrupting normal physiological processes, producing transient effects in healthy people. But if a person's health is sufficiently compromised, the margin of safety can be lost, resulting in death or permanent health problems. 325 people have died after EW shock since 1980. Did the EW cause these deaths? Evidence indicates that EWs do play a causal role in most such deaths. EWs can be lethal for people in diabetic shock^1 (hypoglycemia), which may be why Robert Dziekanski-a Polish immigrant to Canada-died so quickly after he was tasered at Vancouver Airport: not having eaten for over 10 hours, he likely was severely hypoglycemic. The EW death rate in North America is 30 times higher than need be, because EW users have not been properly trained to use EWs on a heterogeneous population safely! ^1J. Clinical Engineering 30(3):111(2005).

  8. Ambulatory 24-h oesophageal impedance-pH recordings: reliability of automatic analysis for gastro-oesophageal reflux assessment.

    PubMed

    Roman, S; Bruley des Varannes, S; Pouderoux, P; Chaput, U; Mion, F; Galmiche, J-P; Zerbib, F

    2006-11-01

    Oesophageal pH-impedance monitoring allows detection of acid and non-acid gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) events. Visual analysis of impedance recording requires expertise. Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy of an automated analysis for GOR assessment. Seventy-three patients with suspected GORD underwent 24-h oesophageal pH-impedance monitoring. Recordings analysis was performed visually (V) and automatically using Autoscan function (AS) of Bioview software. A symptom index (SI) > or =50% was considered for a significant association between symptoms and reflux events. AS analysis detected more reflux events, especially non-acid, liquid, pure gas and proximal events. Detection of oesophageal acid exposure and acid reflux events was similar with both analyses. Agreement between V and AS analysis was good (Kendall's coefficient W > 0.750, P < 0.01) for all parameters. During pH-impedance studies, 65 patients reported symptoms. As compared to visual analysis, the sensitivity and specificity of a positive SI determined by AS were respectively 85.7% and 80% for all reflux events, 100% and 98% for acid reflux and 33% and 87.5% for non-acid reflux. Despite good agreement with visual analysis, automatic analysis overestimates the number of non-acid reflux events. Visual analysis remains the gold standard to detect an association between symptoms and non-acid reflux events.

  9. Comprehensive Mapping of Regional Expression of the Clock Protein PERIOD2 in Rat Forebrain across the 24-h Day

    PubMed Central

    Harbour, Valerie L.; Weigl, Yuval; Robinson, Barry; Amir, Shimon

    2013-01-01

    In mammals, a light-entrainable clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) regulates circadian rhythms by synchronizing oscillators throughout the brain and body. Notably, the nature of the relation between the SCN clock and subordinate oscillators in the rest of the brain is not well defined. We performed a high temporal resolution analysis of the expression of the circadian clock protein PERIOD2 (PER2) in the rat forebrain to characterize the distribution, amplitude and phase of PER2 rhythms across different regions. Eighty-four LEW/Crl male rats were entrained to a 12-h: 12-h light/dark cycle, and subsequently perfused every 30 min across the 24-h day for a total of 48 time-points. PER2 expression was assessed with immunohistochemistry and analyzed using automated cell counts. We report the presence of PER2 expression in 20 forebrain areas important for a wide range of motivated and appetitive behaviors including the SCN, bed nucleus, and several regions of the amygdala, hippocampus, striatum, and cortex. Eighteen areas displayed significant PER2 rhythms, which peaked at different times of day. Our data demonstrate a previously uncharacterized regional distribution of rhythms of a clock protein expression in the brain that provides a sound basis for future studies of circadian clock function in animal models of disease. PMID:24124556

  10. Time dependent effects of stress prior to encoding on event-related potentials and 24 h delayed retrieval.

    PubMed

    Quaedflieg, Conny W E M; Schwabe, Lars; Meyer, Thomas; Smeets, Tom

    2013-12-01

    Stress can exert profound effects on memory encoding. Here, we investigated whether (sub)cortical information processing during encoding and memory retrieval at a 24 h delayed test are affected by the temporal proximity between stress and memory encoding. Sixty-four participants engaged in the Maastricht Acute Stress Test (MAST) or a no-stress control condition either immediately before (i.e., proximate condition) or 30 min before (i.e., distant condition) a picture encoding task. In general, stress decreased the number of freely recalled and recognized pictures and increased the number of false alarms. However, timing of stress exposure did not differentially affect picture recall, recognition or selective attention processes (i.e., LPP). Nevertheless, stress-induced cortisol responses and correctly recognized neutral pictures were positively associated within the proximate stress condition but negatively associated within the distant stress condition. These findings suggest that the time at which a stressor is applied might differentially impact the association between stress-induced cortisol elevations and memory formation and indicate the need for a finer delineation of the time window during which glucocorticoids affect memory formation processes.

  11. Validation of an Online Food Frequency Questionnaire against Doubly Labelled Water and 24 h Dietary Recalls in Pre-School Children

    PubMed Central

    Delisle Nyström, Christine; Henriksson, Hanna; Alexandrou, Christina; Bergström, Anna; Bonn, Stephanie; Bälter, Katarina; Löf, Marie

    2017-01-01

    The development of easy-to-use and accurate methods to assess the intake of energy, foods and nutrients in pre-school children is needed. KidMeal-Q is an online food frequency questionnaire developed for the LifeGene prospective cohort study in Sweden. The aims of this study were to compare: (i) energy intake (EI) obtained using KidMeal-Q to total energy expenditure (TEE) measured via doubly labelled water and (ii) the intake of certain foods measured using KidMeal-Q to intakes acquired by means of 24 h dietary recalls in 38 children aged 5.5 years. The mean EI calculated using KidMeal-Q was statistically different (p < 0.001) from TEE (4670 ± 1430 kJ/24 h and 6070 ± 690 kJ/24 h, respectively). Significant correlations were observed for vegetables, fruit juice and candy between KidMeal-Q and 24 h dietary recalls. Only sweetened beverage consumption was significantly different in mean intake (p < 0.001), as measured by KidMeal-Q and 24 h dietary recalls. In conclusion, KidMeal-Q had a relatively short answering time and comparative validity to other food frequency questionnaires. However, its accuracy needs to be improved before it can be used in studies in pre-school children. PMID:28098765

  12. Acute and sub-lethal response to mercury in Arctic and boreal calanoid copepods.

    PubMed

    Overjordet, Ida Beathe; Altin, Dag; Berg, Torunn; Jenssen, Bjørn Munro; Gabrielsen, Geir Wing; Hansen, Bjørn Henrik

    2014-10-01

    Acute lethal toxicity, expressed as LC50 values, is a widely used parameter in risk assessment of chemicals, and has been proposed as a tool to assess differences in species sensitivities to chemicals between climatic regions. Arctic Calanus glacialis and boreal Calanus finmarchicus were exposed to mercury (Hg(2+)) under natural environmental conditions including sea temperatures of 2° and 10°C, respectively. Acute lethal toxicity (96 h LC50) and sub-lethal molecular response (GST expression; in this article gene expression is used as a synonym of gene transcription, although it is acknowledged that gene expression is also regulated, e.g., at translation and protein stability level) were studied. The acute lethal toxicity was monitored for 96 h using seven different Hg concentrations. The sub-lethal experiment was set up on the basis of nominal LC50 values for each species using concentrations equivalent to 50, 5 and 0.5% of their 96 h LC50 value. No significant differences were found in acute lethal toxicity between the two species. The sub-lethal molecular response revealed large differences both in response time and the fold induction of GST, where the Arctic species responded both faster and with higher mRNA levels of GST after 48 h exposure. Under the natural exposure conditions applied in the present study, the Arctic species C. glacialis may potentially be more susceptible to mercury exposure on the sub-lethal level.

  13. Development of synthetic lethality anticancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Fang, Bingliang

    2014-10-09

    The concept of synthetic lethality (the creation of a lethal phenotype from the combined effects of mutations in two or more genes) has recently been exploited in various efforts to develop new genotype-selective anticancer therapeutics. These efforts include screening for novel anticancer agents, identifying novel therapeutic targets, characterizing mechanisms of resistance to targeted therapy, and improving efficacies through the rational design of combination therapy. This review discusses recent developments in synthetic lethality anticancer therapeutics, including poly ADP-ribose polymerase inhibitors for BRCA1- and BRCA2-mutant cancers, checkpoint inhibitors for p53 mutant cancers, and small molecule agents targeting RAS gene mutant cancers. Because cancers are caused by mutations in multiple genes and abnormalities in multiple signaling pathways, synthetic lethality for a specific tumor suppressor gene or oncogene is likely cell context-dependent. Delineation of the mechanisms underlying synthetic lethality and identification of treatment response biomarkers will be critical for the success of synthetic lethality anticancer therapy.

  14. Pre-exposure to yeast protects larvae of Galleria mellonella from a subsequent lethal infection by Candida albicans and is mediated by the increased expression of antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Bergin, David; Murphy, Lisa; Keenan, Joanne; Clynes, Martin; Kavanagh, Kevin

    2006-07-01

    Pre-exposure of the larvae of Galleria mellonella to Candida albicans or Saccharomyces cerevisiae protects against a subsequent infection with 10(6) C. albicans cells. This protection can also be induced by exposing larvae to glucan or laminarin prior to the administration of the potentially lethal inoculum. Analysis of the genes coding for galiomicin, a defensin in G. mellonella, a cysteine-rich antifungal peptide gallerimycin, an iron-binding protein transferrin and an inducible metalloproteinase inhibitor (IMPI) from G. mellonella demonstrated increased expression, which is at its highest after 24 h of the initial inoculum. Examination of the expression of proteins in the insect haemolymph using 2D electrophoresis and MALDI TOF analysis revealed an increased expression of a number of proteins associated with the insect immune response to infection 24 h after the initial exposure. This study demonstrates that the larvae of G. mellonella can withstand a lethal inoculum of C. albicans if pre-exposed to a non-lethal dose of yeast or polysaccharide 24 h previously which is mediated by increased expression of a number of antimicrobial peptides and the appearance of a number of peptides in the challenged larvae.

  15. A decrease of intracellular ATP is compensated by increased respiration and acidification at sub-lethal parathion concentrations in murine embryonic neuronal cells: measurements in metabolic cell-culture chips.

    PubMed

    Buehler, S M; Stubbe, M; Gimsa, U; Baumann, W; Gimsa, J

    2011-11-30

    We present a label-free in vitro method for testing the toxic potentials of chemical substances using primary neuronal cells. The cells were prepared from 16-day-old NMRI mouse embryos and cultured on silicon chips (www.bionas.de) under the influence of different parathion concentrations with sensors for respiration (Clark-type oxygen electrodes), acidification (pH-ISFETs) and cell adhesion (interdigitated electrode structures, IDES). After 12 days in vitro, the sensor readouts were simultaneously recorded for 350 min in the presence of parathion applying a serial 1:3 dilution. The parathion-dependent data was fitted by logistic functions. IC(50) values of approximately 105 μM, 65 μM, and 54 μM were found for respiration, acidification, and adhesion, respectively. An IC(50) value of approximately 36 μM was determined from the intracellular ATP-levels of cells, which were detected by an ATP-luminescence assay using micro-well plates. While the intracellular ATP level and cell adhesion showed no deviation from a simple logistic decay, increases of approximately 29% in the respiration and 15% in the acidification rates above the control values were found at low parathion concentrations, indicating hormesis. These increases could be fitted by a modified logistic function. We believe that the label-free, continuous, multi-parametric monitoring of cell-metabolic processes may have applications in systems-biology and biomedical research, as well as in environmental monitoring. The parallel characterization of IC(50) values and hormetic effects may provide new insights into the metabolic mechanisms of toxic challenges to the cell.

  16. Risk factors for stillbirths and mortality during the first 24h of life on dairy farms in Hokkaido, Japan 2005-2009.

    PubMed

    Kayano, M; Kadohira, M; Stevenson, M A

    2016-05-01

    This was a retrospective cohort study using data from the insurance scheme provided by the Japanese Mutual Aid Association (NOSAI). The population of interest comprised all cattle born on NOSAI-client farms in the Japanese prefecture of Hokkaido, Japan for the period 1 April 2005-31 March 2009. The outcome of interest was whether or not at least one calf was stillborn, had died during delivery or died during the first 24 hours of life for a given calving event, termed first 24h mortality risk. A mixed-effects logistic regression model was developed to identify explanatory variables associated with first 24h mortality risk. The final data set comprised details of 1,281,737 calving events on a total of 5172 dairy herds from 19 NOSAI branches located throughout the prefecture of Hokkaido. Throughout the study period 7.68 (95% CI 7.64-7.73) of every 100 calving events had at least one calf that was either stillborn, dead at the time of delivery or dead during the first 24h of life. Factors that were positively associated with an increase in first 24h mortality risk included delivery during the colder months of the year (November-March), being of Wagyu breed, having a multipara dam, multiple (as opposed to single) birth deliveries, and delivery in larger herds. ​After adjusting for the fixed effects included in our multilevel model, 89% of the unexplained variation in first 24h mortality risk was at the calving event level. We propose that the data recording requirements of the NOSAI scheme are extended to include details of calving events (e.g. the presence or absence of dystocia) and details of the way in which calves are managed post delivery. This would allow more subtle risk factors for calf mortality to be identified which, in turn, will lead to refinement of recommendations for calf management during the first 24h of life in this area of Japan.

  17. Impact of a carbohydrate-electrolyte drink on ingestive behaviour, affect and self-selected intensity during recreational exercise after 24-h fluid restriction.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Oliver J; Thompson, Dylan; Stokes, Keith A

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a carbohydrate-electrolyte drink on voluntary fluid intake, affect and self-selected intensity during recreational exercise after fluid restriction. In a randomised counterbalanced design, ten physically active adults were dehydrated via a 24-h period of fluid restriction before completing two 20-min bouts of cardiovascular exercise, 20-min of resistance exercise and 20 min on a cycle ergometer at a self-selected intensity with ad libitum access to water (W) or a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution (CES). Fluid restriction induced hypohydration of ∼1.2% initial body mass. Fluid intake during exercise was greater with CES (2105 ± 363 vs. 1470 ± 429 mL; P<0.01) and resulted in more adequate hydration (-0.03 ± 0.65 vs. -1.26 ± 0.80%; P<0.01). Plasma glucose concentrations (4.48 ± 0.40 vs. 4.28 ± 0.32 mmol L(-1); P<0.01) and pleasure ratings (2.63 ± 1.17 vs. 1.81 ± 1.37; P<0.01) were greater with CES than W. Mean power output during exercise performed at a self-selected intensity was 5.6% greater with CES (171 ± 63 vs. 162 ± 60 W; P<0.05). In physically active adults performing a 'real-life' recreational exercise simulation, CES resulted in more adequate hydration and an enhanced affective experience that corresponded with an increase in self-selected exercise intensity.

  18. No effect of route of exposure (oral; subcutaneous injection) on plasma bisphenol A throughout 24h after administration in neonatal female mice.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Julia A; Welshons, Wade V; Vom Saal, Frederick S

    2008-02-01

    Route of administration of chemicals in adults is an important factor in pharmacokinetics of chemicals such as bisphenol A (BPA), the monomer with estrogenic activity used to make polycarbonate plastic products and to line food and beverage cans. Based on findings in adults it has been proposed (CERHR, 2007) that non-oral routes of administration in newborn rodents would also lead to high exposure relative to oral administration. However, in fetuses and neonates, the enzyme that conjugates BPA (UDP-glucuronosyltransferase) is expressed at low levels, suggesting that there may be no differences in pharmacokinetics between oral and non-oral dosing. We thus conducted an analysis of plasma concentrations of unconjugated 3H-BPA after HPLC separation in postnatal day 3 female mice throughout the 24h after administering 3H-BPA orally or via subcutaneous injection at doses above and below the current EPA reference dose. We found no significant difference in plasma BPA based on route of administration in neonatal mice at either dose. However, compared to data from other studies conducted with adults, there was a markedly higher plasma BPA level after oral administration of BPA in newborn mice. This finding sets aside the belief that non-oral administration of BPA renders data as not suitable for consideration of the hazard posed by low-dose exposure to BPA during neonatal life. Therefore the large numbers of BPA studies that used non-oral administration at very low doses during the neonatal period should not be dismissed by scientists or the regulatory community based on route of administration.

  19. Long-term invariant parameters obtained from 24-h Holter recordings: A comparison between different analysis techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerutti, Sergio; Esposti, Federico; Ferrario, Manuela; Sassi, Roberto; Signorini, Maria Gabriella

    2007-03-01

    Over the last two decades, a large number of different methods had been used to study the fractal-like behavior of the heart rate variability (HRV). In this paper some of the most used techniques were reviewed. In particular, the focus is set on those methods which characterize the long memory behavior of time series (in particular, periodogram, detrended fluctuation analysis, rescale range analysis, scaled window variance, Higuchi dimension, wavelet-transform modulus maxima, and generalized structure functions). The performances of the different techniques were tested on simulated self-similar noises (fBm and fGn) for values of α, the slope of the spectral density for very small frequency, ranging from -1 to 3 with a 0.05 step. The check was performed using the scaling relationships between the various indices. DFA and periodogram showed the smallest mean square error from the expected values in the range of interest for HRV. Building on the results obtained from these tests, the effective ability of the different methods in discriminating different populations of patients from RR series derived from Holter recordings, was assessed. To this extent, the Noltisalis database was used. It consists of a set of 30, 24-h Holter recordings collected from healthy subjects, patients suffering from congestive heart failure, and heart transplanted patients. All the methods, with the exception at most of rescale range analysis, were almost equivalent in distinguish between the three groups of patients. Finally, the scaling relationships, valid for fBm and fGn, when empirically used on HRV series, also approximately held.

  20. A 24 h investigation of the hydrogeochemistry of baseflow and stormwater in an urban area impacted by mining: Butte, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gammons, Christopher H.; Shope, Christopher L.; Duaime, Terence E.

    2005-01-01

    Changes in water quality during a storm event were continuously monitored over a 24 h period at a single location along an urban stormwater drain in Butte, Montana. The Butte Metro Storm Drain (MSD) collects groundwater baseflow and stormwater draining Butte Hill, a densely populated site that has been severely impacted by 130 years of mining, milling, and smelting of copper-rich, polymetallic mineral deposits. On the afternoon of 26 June 2002, a heavy thunderstorm caused streamflow in the MSD to increase 100-fold, from 0·2 ft3 s−1 to more than 20 ft3 s−1. Hourly discharge and water quality data were collected before, during, and following the storm. The most significant finding was that the calculated loads (grams per hour) of both dissolved and particulate copper passing down the MSD increased more than 100-fold in the first hour following the storm, and remained elevated over baseline conditions for the remainder of the study period. Other metals, such as zinc, cadmium, and manganese, showed a decrease in load from pre-storm to post-storm conditions. In addition to the large flush of copper, loads of soluble phosphorus increased during the storm, whereas dissolved oxygen dropped to low levels (<2 mg l−1). These results show that infrequent storm events in Butte have the potential to generate large volumes of runoff that exceed Montana water quality standards for acute exposure of aquatic life to copper, as well as depressed levels of dissolved oxygen. This study has important implications to ongoing reclamation activities in the upper Clark Fork Superfund site, particularly with respect to management of storm flow, and may be applicable to other watersheds impacted by mining activities.

  1. Adapting a standardised international 24 h dietary recall methodology (GloboDiet software) for research and dietary surveillance in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Kyung; Park, Jin Young; Nicolas, Geneviève; Paik, Hee Young; Kim, Jeongseon; Slimani, Nadia

    2015-06-14

    During the past decades, a rapid nutritional transition has been observed along with economic growth in the Republic of Korea. Since this dramatic change in diet has been frequently associated with cancer and other non-communicable diseases, dietary monitoring is essential to understand the association. Benefiting from pre-existing standardised dietary methodologies, the present study aimed to evaluate the feasibility and describe the development of a Korean version of the international computerised 24 h dietary recall method (GloboDiet software) and its complementary tools, developed at the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), WHO. Following established international Standard Operating Procedures and guidelines, about seventy common and country-specific databases on foods, recipes, dietary supplements, quantification methods and coefficients were customised and translated. The main results of the present study highlight the specific adaptations made to adapt the GloboDiet software for research and dietary surveillance in Korea. New (sub-) subgroups were added into the existing common food classification, and new descriptors were added to the facets to classify and describe specific Korean foods. Quantification methods were critically evaluated and adapted considering the foods and food packages available in the Korean market. Furthermore, a picture book of foods/dishes was prepared including new pictures and food portion sizes relevant to Korean diet. The development of the Korean version of GloboDiet demonstrated that it was possible to adapt the IARC-WHO international dietary tool to an Asian context without compromising its concept of standardisation and software structure. It, thus, confirms that this international dietary methodology, used so far only in Europe, is flexible and robust enough to be customised for other regions worldwide.

  2. Attenuated benzodiazepine-sensitive tonic GABAA currents of supraoptic magnocellular neuroendocrine cells in 24-h water-deprived rats.

    PubMed

    Pandit, S; Song, J G; Kim, Y J; Jeong, J A; Jo, J Y; Lee, G S; Kim, H-W; Jeon, B H; Lee, J U; Park, J B

    2014-01-01

    In supraoptic nucleus (SON) magnocellular neurosecretory cells (MNCs), γ-GABA, via activation of GABAA receptors (GABAA Rs), mediates persistent tonic inhibitory currents (Itonic ), as well as conventional inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs, Iphasic ). In the present study, we examined the functional significance of Itonic in SON MNCs challenged by 24-h water deprivation (24WD). Although the main characteristics of spontaneous IPSCs were similar in 24WD compared to euhydrated (EU) rats, Itonic , measured by bicuculline (BIC)-induced Iholding shifts, was significantly smaller in 24WD compared to EU rats (P < 0.05). Propofol and diazepam prolonged IPSC decay time to a similar extent in both groups but induced less Itonic in 24WD compared to EU rats, suggesting a selective decrease in GABAA receptors mediating Itonic over Iphasic in 24WD rats. THIP (4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol), a preferential δ subunit agonist, and L-655,708, a GABAA receptor α5 subunit selective imidazobenzodiazepine, caused a significantly smaller inward and outward shift in Iholding , respectively, in 24WD compared to EU rats (P < 0.05 in both cases), suggesting an overall decrease in the α5 subunit-containing GABAA Rs and the δ subunit-containing receptors mediating Itonic in 24WD animals. Consistent with a decrease in 24WD Itonic , bath application of GABA induced significantly less inhibition of the neuronal firing activity in 24WD compared to EU SON MNCs (P < 0.05). Taken together, the results of the present study indicate a selective decrease in GABAA Rs functions mediating Itonic as opposed to those mediating Iphasic in SON MNCs, demonstrating the functional significance of Itonic with respect to increasing neuronal excitability and hormone secretion in 24WD rats.

  3. Reproducibility of 24-h post-exercise changes in energy intake in overweight and obese women using current methodology.

    PubMed

    Brown, Gemma L; Lean, Michael E; Hankey, Catherine R

    2012-07-01

    Direct observation(s) of energy intake (EI) via buffet meals served in the laboratory are often carried out within short-term exercise intervention studies. The reproducibility of values obtained has not been assessed either under resting control conditions or post-exercise, in overweight and obese females. A total of fourteen sedentary, pre-menopausal females (BMI 30.0 (SD 5.1) kg/m²) completed four trials; two exercise and two control. Each trial lasted 24 h spanning over 2 d; conducted from afternoon on day 1 and morning on day 2. An exercise session to expend 1.65 MJ was completed on day 1 of exercise trials, and three buffet meals were served during each trial. Reproducibility of post-exercise changes in energy and macronutrient intakes was assessed at each individual buffet meal by intraclass correlation coefficient (r(i)). Only the r(i) values for post-exercise changes in energy (r(i) 0.44 (95 % CI - 0.03, 0.77), P = 0.03) and fat intake (r(i) 0.51 (95 % CI 0.04, 0.81), P = 0.02) at the lunch buffet meal achieved statistical significance; however, these r i values were weak and had large associated 95 % CI, which indicates a large degree of variability associated with these measurements. Energy and macronutrient intakes at the breakfast and evening buffet meals were not reproducible. This study concludes that the frequently used laboratory-based buffet meal method of assessing EI does not produce reliable, reproducible post-exercise changes in EI in overweight and obese women.

  4. Mortality in the first 24h of very low birth weight preterm infants in the Northeast of Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Castro, Eveline Campos Monteiro; Leite, Álvaro Jorge Madeiro; Guinsburg, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To evaluate factors associated with neonatal death within 24 hours after birth in very low birth weight preterm newborns. Methods: Prospective cohort of live births with gestational age of 230/7–316/7 weeks, birth weight of 500–1499g without malformations, in 19 public maternity hospitals in nine capitals in northeastern Brazil from July to December 2007. The 19 hospitals were assessed in relation to physical resources, equipment, human resources and aiming at quality in care initiatives. Hospital, maternal and neonatal characteristics, neonatal morbidity, neonatal procedures and interventions were compared between preterm newborns that died or survived up to 24 hours of life. The variables associated with death within 24 hours after birth were determined by logistic regression. Results: Of the 627 newborns enrolled in the study, 179 (29%) died within 168 hours after birth, of which 59 (33%) up to 24 hours and 97 (54%) up to 48 hours after birth. The variables associated with death <24h were: weight <1000g (2.94; 1.32–6.53), 5th minute Apgar <7 (7.17; 3.46–14.88), male gender (2.99; 1.39–6.47). A better hospital structure was a protective factor for early neonatal death (odds ratio: 0.34; 95% confidence interval: 0.17–0.71). Conclusions: The high neonatal mortality on the first day of life in capital cities of Northeast Brazil is associated with biological variables such as weight and gender of the newborn, as well as low vitality at birth and a worse infrastructure of the hospital where the birth occurred. PMID:26726002

  5. Sleep-like behavior and 24-h rhythm disruption in the Tc1 mouse model of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Heise, I; Fisher, S P; Banks, G T; Wells, S; Peirson, S N; Foster, R G; Nolan, P M

    2015-02-01

    Down syndrome is a common disorder associated with intellectual disability in humans. Among a variety of severe health problems, patients with Down syndrome exhibit disrupted sleep and abnormal 24-h rest/activity patterns. The transchromosomic mouse model of Down syndrome, Tc1, is a trans-species mouse model for Down syndrome, carrying most of human chromosome 21 in addition to the normal complement of mouse chromosomes and expresses many of the phenotypes characteristic of Down syndrome. To date, however, sleep and circadian rhythms have not been characterized in Tc1 mice. Using both circadian wheel-running analysis and video-based sleep scoring, we showed that these mice exhibited fragmented patterns of sleep-like behaviour during the light phase of a 12:12-h light/dark (LD) cycle with an extended period of continuous wakefulness at the beginning of the dark phase. Moreover, an acute light pulse during night-time was less effective in inducing sleep-like behaviour in Tc1 animals than in wild-type controls. In wheel-running analysis, free running in constant light (LL) or constant darkness (DD) showed no changes in the circadian period of Tc1 animals although they did express subtle behavioural differences including a reduction in total distance travelled on the wheel and differences in the acrophase of activity in LD and in DD. Our data confirm that Tc1 mice express sleep-related phenotypes that are comparable with those seen in Down syndrome patients with moderate disruptions in rest/activity patterns and hyperactive episodes, while circadian period under constant lighting conditions is essentially unaffected.

  6. Twice daily melatonin peaks in Siberian but not Syrian hamsters under 24 h light:dark:light:dark cycles.

    PubMed

    Raiewski, Evan E; Elliott, Jeffrey A; Evans, Jennifer A; Glickman, Gena L; Gorman, Michael R

    2012-11-01

    The daily pattern of blood-borne melatonin varies seasonally under the control of a multi-oscillator circadian pacemaker. Here we examine patterns of melatonin secretion and locomotor activity in Siberian and Syrian hamsters entrained to bimodal LDLD8:4:8:4 and LD20:4 lighting schedules that facilitate novel temporal arrangements of component circadian oscillators. Under LDLD, both species robustly bifurcated wheel-running activity in distinct day scotophase (DS) and night scotophase (NS) bouts. Siberian hamsters displayed significant melatonin increases during each scotophase in LDLD, and in the single daily scotophase of LD20:4. The bimodal melatonin secretion pattern persisted in acutely extended 16 h scotophases. Syrian hamsters, in contrast, showed no significant increases in plasma melatonin during either scotophase of LDLD8:4:8:4 or in LD20:4. In this species, detectable levels were observed only when the DS of LDLD was acutely extended to yield 16 h of darkness. Established species differences in the phase lag of nocturnal melatonin secretion relative to activity onset may underlie the above contrast: In non-bifurcated entrainment to 24 h LD cycles, Siberian hamsters show increased melatonin secretion within ≈ 2 h after activity onset, whereas in Syrian hamsters, detectable melatonin secretion phase lags activity onset and the L/D transition by at least 4 h. The present results provide new evidence indicating multi-oscillator regulation of the waveform of melatonin secretion, specifically, the circadian control of the onset, offset and duration of nocturnal secretion.

  7. Counterregulatory deficits occur within 24 h of a single hypoglycemic episode in conscious, unrestrained, chronically cannulated mice

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Lauren; Ansari, Tasneem; McGuinness, Owen P.

    2006-01-01

    Hypoglycemia-induced Counterregulatory failure is a dangerous complication of insulin use in diabetes mellitus. Controlled hypoglycemia studies in gene knockout models, which require the use of mice, would aid in identifying causes of defective counterregulation. Because stress can influence Counterregulatory hormones and glucose homeostasis, we developed glucose clamps with remote blood sampling in conscious, unrestrained mice. Male C57BL/6 mice implanted with indwelling carotid artery and jugular vein catheters were subjected to 2 h of hyperinsulinemic glucose clamps 24 h apart, with a 6-h fast before each clamp. On day 1,, blood glucose was maintained (euglycemia, 178 ± 4 mg/dl) or decreased to 62 ± 1 mg/dl (hypoglycemia) by insulin (20 mU·kg−1·min−1) and variable glucose infusion. Donor blood was continuously infused to replace blood sample volume. Baseline plasma epinephrine (32 ± 8 pg/ml), corticosterone (16.1 ± 1.8 μg/dl), and glucagon (35 ± 3 pg/ml) were unchanged during euglycemia but increased significantly during hypoglycemia, with a glycemic threshold of ~80 mg/dl. On day 2, all mice underwent a hypoglycemic clamp (blood glucose, 64 ± 1 mg/dl). Compared with mice that were euglycemic on day 1, previously hypoglycemic mice had significantly higher glucose requirements and significantly lower plasma glucagon and corticosterone (n = 6/group) on day 2. Epinephrine tended to decrease, although not significantly, in repeatedly hypoglycemic mice. Pre- and post-clamp insulin levels were similar between groups. We conclude that counterregulatory responses to acute and repeated hypoglycemia in unrestrained, chronically cannulated mice reproduce aspects of counterregulation in humans, and that repeated hypoglycemia in mice is a useful model of counterregulatory failure. PMID:16533951

  8. Identification of trends in rainfall, rainy days and 24 h maximum rainfall over subtropical Assam in Northeast India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jhajharia, Deepak; Yadav, Brijesh K.; Maske, Sunil; Chattopadhyay, Surajit; Kar, Anil K.

    2012-01-01

    Trends in rainfall, rainy days and 24 h maximum rainfall are investigated using the Mann-Kendall non-parametric test at twenty-four sites of subtropical Assam located in the northeastern region of India. The trends are statistically confirmed by both the parametric and non-parametric methods and the magnitudes of significant trends are obtained through the linear regression test. In Assam, the average monsoon rainfall (rainy days) during the monsoon months of June to September is about 1606 mm (70), which accounts for about 70% (64%) of the annual rainfall (rainy days). On monthly time scales, sixteen and seventeen sites (twenty-one sites each) witnessed decreasing trends in the total rainfall (rainy days), out of which one and three trends (seven trends each) were found to be statistically significant in June and July, respectively. On the other hand, seventeen sites witnessed increasing trends in rainfall in the month of September, but none were statistically significant. In December (February), eighteen (twenty-two) sites witnessed decreasing (increasing) trends in total rainfall, out of which five (three) trends were statistically significant. For the rainy days during the months of November to January, twenty-two or more sites witnessed decreasing trends in Assam, but for nine (November), twelve (January) and eighteen (December) sites, these trends were statistically significant. These observed changes in rainfall, although most time series are not convincing as they show predominantly no significance, along with the well-reported climatic warming in monsoon and post-monsoon seasons may have implications for human health and water resources management over bio-diversity rich Northeast India.

  9. Evaluating sub-lethal effects of orchard-applied pyrethroids using video-tracking software to quantify honey bee behaviors.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Erin M; Augustin, Julie; Ellis, Marion D; Siegfried, Blair D

    2015-09-01

    Managed honey bee, Apis mellifera L., colonies are contracted to pollinate fruit and nut orchards improving crop quality and yield. Colonies placed in orchards are potentially exposed to pyrethroid insecticides used for broad-spectrum pest control. Pyrethroids have been reported to pose minimal risk to bees due to their low application rates in the field and putative repellent properties. This repellency is believed to alter foraging behavior with the benefit of preventing bees from encountering a lethal dose in the field. However, sub-lethal exposure to pyrethroids may adversely impact bee behavior potentially resulting in social dysfunction or disruption of foraging. This study quantified behaviors associated with sub-lethal exposure to orchard-applied pyrethroids including, lambda-cyhalothrin, esfenvalerate, and permethrin, using video tracking software, Ethovision XT (Noldus Information Technologies). Bee locomotion, social interaction, and time spent near a food source were measured over a 24-h period. Bees treated with a pyrethroid traveled 30-71% less than control bees. Social interaction time decreased by 43% for bees treated with a high sub-lethal dose of esfenvalerate. Bees exposed to a high sub-lethal dose of permethrin spent 67% less time in social interaction and spent more than 5 times as long in the food zone compared to control bees.

  10. Evaluation of lethality estimates for combustion gases in military scenarios.

    PubMed

    Smith, S M; Stuhmiller, J H; Januszkiewicz, A J

    1996-12-31

    To meet the military objective of determining criteria for incapacitation and lethality from toxic gas exposures, a series of small animal tests and data analyses were conducted. Carbon monoxide (CO), a narcotic gas and nitrogen dioxide (NO2), an irritant gas, along with carbon dioxide (CO2) were tested individually and in the following mixtures: (CO + CO2), (NO2 + CO2) and (NO2 + CO + CO2). A group of six animals was exposed to each of the gases and their combinations, lethality and biophysical data were collected. We conclude that our observations of lethality from single toxic gases can be correlated with a fractional effective dose (FED) description, in which external concentrations are corrected for minute volume changes. Multiple gas exposures clearly demonstrate synergistic effects because lethality rates greatly exceed those expected from statistically independent causes. Simple addition of the FED values, however, overstates the effect and implies a competition between the narcotic and irritant gas effects. The N-Gas model, while being an additive FED model, does not appear to be in a form that could guide the setting of military exposure standards.

  11. Alcohol Consumption and Nearly Lethal Suicide Attempts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Kenneth E.; Kresnow, Marcie-jo; Mercy, James A.; Potter, Lloyd B.; Swann, Alan C.; Frankowski, Ralph F.; Lee, Roberta K.; Bayer, Timothy L.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a case-control study of the association between nearly lethal suicide attempts and facets of alcohol consumption; namely, drinking frequency, drinking quantity, binge drinking, alcoholism, drinking within 3 hours of suicide attempt, and age began drinking. In bivariate analyses, all measures were associated with nearly lethal suicide…

  12. Aging-induced changes in 24-h rhythms of mitogenic responses, lymphocyte subset populations and neurotransmitter and amino acid content in rat submaxillary lymph nodes during Freund's adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bonacho, M G; Cardinali, D P; Castrillón, P; Cutrera, R A; Esquifino, A I

    2001-02-01

    In young (two months) and aged (18 months) male rats injected s.c. with Freund's adjuvant or adjuvant's vehicle 18 days earlier, 24-h variations in mitogenic responses, lymphocyte subsets and monoamine and amino acid content were examined in submaxillary lymph nodes. Mitogenic responses to concanavalin A (Con A) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were higher during the light phase of daily photoperiod. Old rats exhibited a suppressed or impaired mitogenic response to Con A but not to LPS. Acrophases of 24-h rhythm in lymphocyte subset populations in submaxillary lymph nodes were: 18:37-19:44h (B cells), 09:00-10:08h (T and CD4(+) cells) and 12:19-15:58h (CD8(+) cells). Aging augmented B cells and decreased T, CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells. Significant correlations were found between Con A activity and T cells, between lymph node 5HT content and B, T and CD8(+) lymphocytes, and between lymph node 5HT and taurine and GABA content. Aging increased lymph node 5HT content but did not modify NE content. Lymph node concentration of aspartate, glutamate and taurine was higher at night while that of GABA attained peak values at late afternoon. Old rats injected with Freund's adjuvant showed a higher mean value (glutamate) and smaller amplitude (glutamate, taurine) than their respective young controls. The results further document the effects of aging on the chronobiology of the immune system.

  13. Preliminary nutritional assessment of the Ecuadorian diet based on a 24-h food recall survey in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Llaguno, S N; Neira-Mosquera, J A; Pérez-Rodríguez, F; Moreno Rojas, R

    2013-01-01

    Objetivos: Realizar una evaluación nutricional de la dieta ecuatoriana y determinar el porcentaje de contribución de la ingesta de diferentes nutrientes en función del tipo de comida (desayuno, almuerzo, comida, merienda, y cena) y de la Referencia de Ingesta Dietética (RID). Métodos: Se realizó una encuesta piloto basada en el método del recordatorio de alimentación de 24 h en tres regiones concretas de Ecuador y se procesó la información recogida, se analizó y se comparó con las RID establecidas para la población latinoamericana. Resultados: El estudio encontró diferencias significativas para energía y ciertas vitaminas en hombres y en mujeres, además de determinar que la mayor contribución energética se obtenía en la comida, seguida de la merienda y el desayuno. Las comidas intermedias (almuerzo, merienda y cena) contribuían de una manera significativamente menor en la dieta diaria en comparación con otros tipos de comidas. Además, se observó que las ingestas analizadas no alcanzaban las RID para hidratos de carbono, algunas vitaminas (tiamina, ácido pantoténico, biotina, folato, vitamina D y vitamina E) y minerales (Ca, K, Cu, Mn, I y Fe). La ingesta de NA estaba bastante por encima de las RID y el Límite Superior Tolerable proporcionado por la USDA, lo que indica un problema de salud pública en relación con este electrolito. Conclusiones: Esta encuesta piloto puede considerarse como un punto de partida para obtener una visión más profunda de la dieta ecuatoriana. Esto permitirá determinar los patrones de consumo que afectan al bienestar de la población y establecer efectos positivos y efectos adversos del patrón de consumo en Ecuador.

  14. Effects of encapsulated green tea and Guarana extracts containing a mixture of epigallocatechin-3-gallate and caffeine on 24 h energy expenditure and fat oxidation in men.

    PubMed

    Bérubé-Parent, Sonia; Pelletier, Catherine; Doré, Jean; Tremblay, Angelo

    2005-09-01

    It has been reported that green tea has a thermogenic effect, due to its caffeine content and probably also to the catechin, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). The main aim of the present study was to compare the effect of a mixture of green tea and Guarana extracts containing a fixed dose of caffeine and variable doses of EGCG on 24 h energy expenditure and fat oxidation. Fourteen subjects took part to this randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, cross-over study. Each subject was tested five times in a metabolic chamber to measure 24 h energy expenditure, substrate oxidation and blood pressure. During each stay, the subjects ingested a capsule of placebo or capsules containing 200 mg caffeine and a variable dose of EGCG (90, 200, 300 or 400 mg) three times daily, 30 min before standardized meals. Twenty-four hour energy expenditure increased significantly by about 750 kJ with all EGCG-caffeine mixtures compared with placebo. No effect of the EGCG-caffeine mixture was observed for lipid oxidation. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure increased by about 7 and 5 mmHg, respectively, with the EGCG-caffeine mixtures compared with placebo. This increase was significant only for 24 h diastolic blood pressure. The main finding of the study was the increase in 24 h energy expenditure with the EGCG-caffeine mixtures. However, this increase was similar with all doses of EGCG in the mixtures.

  15. Twelve weeks of moderate aerobic exercise without dietary intervention or weight loss does not affect 24-h energy expenditure in lean and obese adolescents.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exercise might have a persistent effect on energy expenditure and fat oxidation, resulting in increased fat loss. However, even without weight loss, exercise results in positive metabolic effects. The effect of an aerobic exercise program on 24-h total energy expenditure (TEE), and its components-ba...

  16. Three 15-min bouts of moderate postmeal walking significantly improves 24-h glycemic control in older people at risk for impaired glucose tolerance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of three 15-min bouts of postmeal walking with 45 min of sustained walking on 24-h glycemic control in older persons at risk for glucose intolerance. Inactive older (=60 years of age) participants (N = 10) were recruited from the community a...

  17. Myocardial infarction occurs with a similar 24 h pattern in the 4G/5G versions of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1.

    PubMed

    Bergheanu, Sandrin C; Pons, Douwe; Jukema, J Wouter; van der Hoeven, Bas L; Liem, Su-San; Vandenbroucke, Jan P; Rosendaal, Frits R; le Cessie, Saskia; Schalij, Martin J; van der Bom, Johanna G

    2009-05-01

    PAI-1 expression is regulated by a 4G/5G promoter polymorphism. The 4G allele is associated with greater circadian variation of PAI-1 levels. We hypothesized that the 24 h variation of cardiac risk is more pronounced among persons with the 4G4G genotype than among ones with 4G5G and 5G5G genotypes. We assessed the time of onset of symptoms in 623 consecutive patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) enrolled in the MISSION! Study between February 1, 2004, and October 29, 2006. All of the patients were genotyped for the PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism. We quantified the amplitude of the 24 h variation of AMI with a generalized linear model with Poisson distribution. A morning peak, between 06:00-11:59 h (n = 197; 32% of all cases), in the onset of symptoms of AMI was observed. The group composed of patients with the 4G4G genotype did not have a more pronounced morning peak than the groups composed of other genotypes; the 24 h variation was 38% (95% confidence interval 12-70%) in the group of 4G4G patients and 34% (14-58%) and 56% (20-100%) in the 4G5G and 5G5G groups of patients, respectively. Our findings show that 24 h variation of cardiac risk is not more pronounced among the 4G4G genotype of PAI-1.

  18. COMPARISON OF 24H AVERAGE VOC MONITORING RESULTS FOR RESIDENTIAL INDOOR AND OUTDOOR AIR USING CARBOPACK X-FILLED DIFFUSIVE SAMPLERS AND ACTIVE SAMPLING - A PILOT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analytical results obtained by thermal desorption GC/MS for 24h diffusive sampling of 11 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are compared with results of time-averaged active sampling at a known constant flow rate. Air samples were collected with co-located duplicate diffusive samp...

  19. Lethal entanglement in baleen whales.

    PubMed

    Cassoff, Rachel M; Moore, Kathleen M; McLellan, William A; Barco, Susan G; Rotsteins, David S; Moore, Michael J

    2011-10-06

    Understanding the scenarios whereby fishing gear entanglement of large whales induces mortality is important for the development of mitigation strategies. Here we present a series of 21 cases involving 4 species of baleen whales in the NW Atlantic, describing the available sighting history, necropsy observations, and subsequent data analyses that enabled the compilation of the manners in which entanglement can be lethal. The single acute cause of entanglement mortality identified was drowning from entanglement involving multiple body parts, with the animal's inability to surface. More protracted causes of death included impaired foraging during entanglement, resulting in starvation after many months; systemic infection arising from open, unresolved entanglement wounds; and hemorrhage or debilitation due to severe gear-related damage to tissues. Serious gear-induced injury can include laceration of large vessels, occlusion of the nares, embedding of line in growing bone, and massive periosteal proliferation of new bone in an attempt to wall off constricting, encircling lines. These data show that baleen whale entanglement is not only a major issue for the conservation of some baleen whale populations, but is also a major concern for the welfare of each affected individual.

  20. Lethal photosensitization of Helicobacter species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millson, Charles E.; Wilson, Michael; MacRobert, Alexander J.; Thurrell, Wendy; Mlkvy, Peter; Davies, Claire; Bown, Stephen G.

    1995-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is associated with a large number of gastroduodenal disorders. Clearance of the bacteria has been shown to benefit patients with duodenal ulcers, gastric ulcers, and certain rare types of gastric tumors. Broad-spectrum antibiotics are the mainstay of current treatment strategies but side-effects, poor compliance, and drug resistance limit their usefulness. We sensitized H. pylori with toluidine blue, haematoporphyrin derivative, aluminum disulphonated phthalocyanine, methylene blue or protoporphyrin IX prior to exposure to low-power laser light from either a gallium aluminum arsenide laser or a helium neon gas laser. All 5 sensitizers caused reductions of greater than 1000-fold in the number of viable bacteria. Light alone had no effect and only HpD caused a significant decrease in bacterial numbers without laser light. Next, we sensitized H. mustelae on explanted ferret gastric mucosa (ex vivo) with the same sensitizers and exposed them to light from a copper vapor pumped dye laser tuned appropriately. MB caused significant reductions in bacterial counts. Successful lethal photosensitization of Helicobacter pylori both in vitro and ex vivo raises the possibility of a local method for eradicating the bacteria, especially as the bacteria are only found in those parts of the upper gastrointestinal tract that are accessible to the endoscope.

  1. Influence of 8 and 24-h storage of whole blood at ambient temperature on prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, fibrinogen, thrombin time, antithrombin and D-dimer.

    PubMed

    Kemkes-Matthes, Bettina; Fischer, Ronald; Peetz, Dirk

    2011-04-01

    This study evaluates the effect of whole blood storage on common coagulation parameters in order to confirm or revise acceptable storage limits as defined by current guidelines and diverse study reports. Aliquots were taken from the citrated whole blood of inpatients and outpatients (n = 147) within 4 h after blood withdrawal and after extended storage of whole blood for 8 and 24 h at ambient temperature. Aliquots were centrifuged and analyzed for prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), fibrinogen (Fbg), antithrombin (AT), thrombin time (TT) and D-dimer. For each parameter, samples from 33-56 patients were investigated covering a wide range of normal and pathological values. Samples from patients receiving heparin were excluded from analyses of APTT and TT. All assays were performed using reagents and an analyzer from Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics Products GmbH. The mean percentage change after 8 and 24-h storage was below 10% for all parameters. Considering the changes in individual samples, all parameters can be reliably tested after 8-h storage, since less than 15% of the samples demonstrated individual changes of above 10%. The acceptable storage time can be extended to 24 h for PT, TT and D-dimer. Clinically relevant changes were detected after 24-h storage for APTT: 41% of the investigated samples demonstrated changes of above 10%. After 24-h storage, changes for Fbg and AT values were more than 15% in five out of 49 and in three out of 45 samples, respectively. This sporadic increase of values is clinically acceptable except for borderline samples.

  2. The effects of telmisartan alone or with hydrochlorothiazide on morning and 24-h ambulatory BP control: results from a practice-based study (SURGE 2).

    PubMed

    Parati, Gianfranco; Bilo, Grzegorz; Redon, Josep

    2013-04-01

    Observational studies have shown that 24-h and morning ambulatory blood pressure (BP) control is low. This large-scale, practice-based study evaluated the effects of telmisartan 40 or 80 mg alone or in combination with hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) 12.5 mg on these BP parameters over 8 weeks; treatment was adjusted if clinic BP remained ≥140/90 mm Hg. A total of 863 patients were evaluated (baseline mean clinic BP, morning and 24-h ambulatory BP: 155±15/93±10 mm Hg, 137±15/83±11 mm Hg, 133±14/79±10 mm Hg, respectively; 68% were previously treated at baseline). Telmisartan with/without HCTZ significantly reduced the mean morning ambulatory BP (-8.2/-4.9 mm Hg), daytime ambulatory BP (-8.0/-4.7 mm Hg), 24-h ambulatory BP (-7.9/-4.7 mm Hg) and clinic BP (-22.3/-13.2 mm Hg) (all P<0.001) in previously untreated and in treated patients who switched to telmisartan and telmisartan/HCTZ. After treatment with telmisartan with/without HCTZ, the morning ambulatory BP control increased from 36.5 to 64.4%; daytime ambulatory BP control increased from 40.8 to 67.6%; 53.0% of patients achieved 24-h ambulatory BP <125/80 mm Hg and 62% achieved <130/80 mm Hg targets. Only 0.8% (7/863) reported an adverse event. In summary, telmisartan and telmisartan/HCTZ increased smooth 24-h BP control in daily management of hypertension.

  3. Isotope concentrations from 24-h urine and 3-h serum samples can be used to measure intestinal magnesium absorption in postmenopausal women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies suggest a link between magnesium status and osteoporosis. One barrier to more conclusive research on the potential relation is measuring intestinal magnesium absorption (MgA), which requires the use of stable isotopes and a >/= 6-d stool or 3-d urine collection. We evaluated alternative meth...

  4. Differentiation factor/leukemia inhibitory factor protection against lethal endotoxemia in mice: synergistic effect with interleukin 1 and tumor necrosis factor

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Differentiation factor (D factor), also called leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), is a glycoprotein that has been increasingly recognized to possess a wide range of physiological activities. We examined the possibility that the administration of D factor may confer beneficial effects and enhance host resistance against lethal endotoxemia. A single intravenous dose of recombinant human D factor completely protected C57/Bl6 mice from the lethal effect of Escherichia coli endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]). The protective effects were dose dependent and observed when administered 2-24 h before LPS. Previous work has shown that interleukin 1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) also protect against a subsequent LPS challenge in a dose- dependent manner. When human D factor was combined with sub-protective doses of IL-1 beta or TNF-alpha, there was dramatic synergistic protection against a subsequent lethal LPS challenge. PMID:1552284

  5. Lethal methemoglobinemia and automobile exhaust inhalation.

    PubMed

    Vevelstad, Merete; Morild, Inge

    2009-05-30

    Inhalation of automobile exhaust gas often leads to death by CO intoxication. In some cases the measured carbon monoxide hemoglobin saturation level (COHb) is considerably below what is considered to be lethal. The death in such cases has been attributed to a combination of a high CO2 and a low O2 tension. In a recent case the deceased was found dead in a car equipped with a catalytic converter, with a hose leading exhaust from the engine to the interior of the car. Analysis revealed a moderately elevated COHb and a high methemoglobin saturation level (MetHb) in peripheral blood. No ethanol, narcotics or drugs were detected. Reports mentioning MetHb or methemoglobinemia in post-mortem cases are surprisingly scarce, and very few have related exhaust gas deaths to methemoglobinemia. High-degree methemoglobinemia causes serious tissue hypoxia leading to unconsciousness, arrhythmia and death. The existing literature in this field and the knowledge that exhaust fumes contain nitrogen oxide gases (NOx) that by inhalation and absorption can result in severe methemoglobinemia, led us to postulate that this death could possibly be attributed to a combination of methemoglobinemia and a moderately high COHb concentration.

  6. The 24 h pattern of arterial pressure in mice is determined mainly by heart rate‐driven variation in cardiac output

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, Theodore W.; Lujan, Heidi L.; DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Few studies have systematically investigated whether daily patterns of arterial blood pressure over 24 h are mediated by changes in cardiac output, peripheral resistance, or both. Understanding the hemodynamic mechanisms that determine the 24 h patterns of blood pressure may lead to a better understanding of how such patterns become disturbed in hypertension and influence risk for cardiovascular events. In conscious, unrestrained C57BL/6J mice, we investigated whether the 24 h pattern of arterial blood pressure is determined by variation in cardiac output, systemic vascular resistance, or both and also whether variations in cardiac output are mediated by variations in heart rate and or stroke volume. As expected, arterial pressure and locomotor activity were significantly (P < 0.05) higher during the nighttime period compared with the daytime period when mice are typically sleeping (+12.5 ± 1.0 mmHg, [13%] and +7.7 ± 1.3 activity counts, [254%], respectively). The higher arterial pressure during the nighttime period was mediated by higher cardiac output (+2.6 ± 0.3 mL/min, [26%], P < 0.05) in association with lower peripheral resistance (−1.5 ± 0.3 mmHg/mL/min, [−13%] P < 0.05). The increased cardiac output during the nighttime was mainly mediated by increased heart rate (+80.0 ± 16.5 beats/min, [18%] P < 0.05), as stroke volume increased minimally at night (+1.6 ± 0.5 μL per beat, [6%] P < 0.05). These results indicate that in C57BL/6J mice, the 24 h pattern of blood pressure is hemodynamically mediated primarily by the 24 h pattern of cardiac output which is almost entirely determined by the 24 h pattern of heart rate. These findings suggest that the differences in blood pressure between nighttime and daytime are mainly driven by differences in heart rate which are strongly correlated with differences in locomotor activity. PMID:25428952

  7. Modification over time of pulse wave velocity parallel to changes in aortic BP, as well as in 24-h ambulatory brachial BP.

    PubMed

    Oliveras, A; Segura, J; Suarez, C; García-Ortiz, L; Abad-Cardiel, M; Vigil, L; Gómez-Marcos, M A; Sans Atxer, L; Martell-Claros, N; Ruilope, L M; de la Sierra, A

    2016-03-01

    Arterial stiffness as assessed by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) is a marker of preclinical organ damage and a predictor of cardiovascular outcomes, independently of blood pressure (BP). However, limited evidence exists on the association between long-term variation (Δ) on aortic BP (aoBP) and ΔcfPWV. We aimed to evaluate the relationship of ΔBP with ΔcfPWV over time, as assessed by office and 24-h ambulatory peripheral BP, and aoBP. AoBP and cfPWV were evaluated in 209 hypertensive patients with either diabetes or metabolic syndrome by applanation tonometry (Sphygmocor) at baseline(b) and at 12 months of follow-up(fu). Peripheral BP was also determined by using validated oscillometric devices (office(o)-BP) and on an outpatient basis by using a validated (Spacelabs-90207) device (24-h ambulatory BP). ΔcfPWV over time was calculated as follows: ΔcfPWV=[(cfPWVfu-cfPWVb)/cfPWVb] × 100. ΔBP over time resulted from the same formula applied to BP values obtained with the three different measurement techniques. Correlations (Spearman 'Rho') between ΔBP and ΔcfPWV were calculated. Mean age was 62 years, 39% were female and 80% had type 2 diabetes. Baseline office brachial BP (mm Hg) was 143±20/82±12. Follow-up (12 months later) office brachial BP (mm Hg) was 136±20/79±12. ΔcfPWV correlated with ΔoSBP (Rho=0.212; P=0.002), Δ24-h SBP (Rho=0.254; P<0.001), Δdaytime SBP (Rho=0.232; P=0.001), Δnighttime SBP (Rho=0.320; P<0.001) and ΔaoSBP (Rho=0.320; P<0.001). A multiple linear regression analysis included the following independent variables: ΔoSBP, Δ24-h SBP, Δdaytime SBP, Δnighttime SBP and ΔaoSBP. ΔcfPWV was independently associated with Δ24-h SBP (β-coefficient=0.195; P=0.012) and ΔaoSBP (β-coefficient= 0.185; P=0.018). We conclude that changes in both 24-h SBP and aoSBP more accurately reflect changes in arterial stiffness than do office BP measurements.

  8. Lethality and Autonomous Robots: An Ethical Stance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Lethality and Autonomous Robots : An Ethical Stance Ronald C. Arkin and Lilia Moshkina College of Computing Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta... autonomous robots that maintain an ethical infrastructure to govern their behavior will be referred to as humane-oids. 2. Understanding the Ethical...2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Lethality and Autonomous Robots : An Ethical Stance 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER

  9. Non-Lethal Weapons (NLW) Reference Book

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    v Section A COUNTER-PERSONNEL (CP) FIELDED NLW Non-Lethal Capability Sets ( NLCS ) 1 Escalation of Force-Mission Modules (EoF-MM) 1...Weapons, 27 September 1999. Policy References Section A CP Fielded NLW 1 Non-Lethal Capability Sets ( NLCS ). A versatile package of commercial...and government off-the-shelf mission enhancing equipment and munitions. NLCS provide the warfighter with a variety of acoustic, optical distraction

  10. Identification of lethal cluster of genes in the yeast transcription network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, K.; Jeong, H.; Kahng, B.

    2006-05-01

    Identification of essential or lethal genes would be one of the ultimate goals in drug designs. Here we introduce an in silico method to select the cluster with a high population of lethal genes, called lethal cluster, through microarray assay. We construct a gene transcription network based on the microarray expression level. Links are added one by one in the descending order of the Pearson correlation coefficients between two genes. As the link density p increases, two meaningful link densities pm and ps are observed. At pm, which is smaller than the percolation threshold, the number of disconnected clusters is maximum, and the lethal genes are highly concentrated in a certain cluster that needs to be identified. Thus the deletion of all genes in that cluster could efficiently lead to a lethal inviable mutant. This lethal cluster can be identified by an in silico method. As p increases further beyond the percolation threshold, the power law behavior in the degree distribution of a giant cluster appears at ps. We measure the degree of each gene at ps. With the information pertaining to the degrees of each gene at ps, we return to the point pm and calculate the mean degree of genes of each cluster. We find that the lethal cluster has the largest mean degree.

  11. Utilization of potatoes for life support systems in space. III - Productivity at successive harvest dates under 12-h and 24-h photoperiods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Raymond M.; Tibbitts, Theodore W.

    1987-01-01

    Efficient crop production for controlled ecological life support systems requires near-optimal growing conditions with harvests taken when production per unit area per unit time is maximum. This maximum for potato was determined using data on Norland plants which were grown in walk-in growth rooms under 12-h and 24-h photoperiods at 16 C. Results show that high tuber production can be obtained from potatoes grown under a continuous light regime. The dry weights (dwt) of tuber and of the entire plants were found to increase under both photoperiods until the final harvest date (148 days), reaching 5732 g tuber dwt and 704 g total dwt under 12-h, and 791 g tuber dwt and 972 g total dwt under 24-h.

  12. Effect of X-ray and ethylnitrosourea exposures separated by 24 h on specific-locus mutation frequency in mouse stem-cell spermatogonia.

    PubMed

    Russell, W L; Carpenter, D A; Hitotsumachi, S

    1988-04-01

    Specific-locus mutation frequencies in mouse stem-cell spermatogonia were determined in 3 experiments in which mature male mice were exposed to 100,m 300, or 500 R of X-rays followed, 24 h later, by intraperitoneal injection of 100 mg/kg of ethylnitrosourea (ENU). The purpose was to find out if the mutation frequencies would be augmented over those expected on the basis of additivity of the effects of the separate treatments. Such augmentation had been observed in earlier work in which exposure to 100 or 500 R of X-rays was followed 24 h later by a second exposure of 500 R. No augmentation was observed for X-rays followed by ENU. The mutation frequencies in all 3 experiments actually fell below those expected on the basis of additivity, although the reductions were not statistically significant.

  13. Association Between Estimated 24-h Urinary Sodium Excretion and Metabolic Syndrome in Korean Adults: The 2009 to 2011 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    PubMed

    Won, Jong Chul; Hong, Jae Won; Noh, Jung Hyun; Kim, Dong-Jun

    2016-04-01

    High sodium intake is 1 of the modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease, but in Korea, daily sodium intake is estimated to be double the level recommended by World Health Organization. We investigated the association between the estimated 24-h urinary sodium excretion (24hUNaE) and metabolic syndrome using nationwide population data. In total, 17,541 individuals (weighted n = 33,200,054; weighted men, 52.5% [95% confidence interval, CI = 51.8-53.3]; weighted age, 45.2 years [44.7-45.7]) who participated in the Korean Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2009 to 2011 were investigated. NCEP-ATP III criteria for metabolic syndrome were used, and sodium intake was estimated by 24hUNaE using Tanaka equation with a spot urine sample. The weighted mean 24hUNaE values were 3964 mg/d (95% CI = 3885-4044) in men and 4736 mg/d (4654-4817) in women. The weighted age-adjusted prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 22.2% (21.4-23.0), and it increased with 24hUNaE quartile in both men and women (mean ± standard error of the mean; men: 22.5 ± 1.0%, 23.0 ± 1.0%, 26.0 ± 1.2%, and 26.0 ± 1.2%; P = 0.026; women: 19.4 ± 0.8%, 17.7 ± 0.8%, 19.8 ± 1.0%, and 23.0 ± 1.1%; P = 0.002, for quartiles 1-4, respectively). Even after adjustment for age, daily calorie intake, heavy alcohol drinking, regular exercise, college graduation, and antihypertensive medication, the weighted prevalence of metabolic syndrome increased with the increase in 24hUNaE in men and women. The weighted 24hUNaE was positively associated with the number of metabolic syndrome components after adjustment for confounding factors in men and women. In subjects without antihypertensive medication, the odds ratio for metabolic syndrome in quartile 4 of 24hUNaE compared with quartile 1 was 1.56 (1.33-1.84, P < 0.001) in the total population, 1.66 (1.34-2.06, P < 0.001) in men, and 1.94 (1.49-2.53, P < 0.001) in women. In this

  14. Oral Interleukin 11 as a Countermeasure to Lethal Total-Body Irradiation in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, Alexander F.; Biju, Prabath G.; Lui, Huanli; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Countermeasures against radiation are critically needed. Ideally, these measures would be easy to store, easy to administer and have minimal toxicity. We used oral delivery of interleukin 11 (IL11) in mice exposed to lethal doses of total-body irradiation (TBI). Animals were given IL11 by gavage at various daily doses beginning 24 h after TBI, which continued for 5 days. At a TBI of 9.0 Gy, mice treated with IL11 had a 70% survival at 30 days compared with control group survival of 25% (P = 0.035). At 10.0 Gy, treated animals had 50% survival at 30 days compared with no survivors in the control group. Treated animals had significant improvement in intestinal mucosal surface area and crypt survival. In addition bacterial translocation of coliform bacteria was significantly less in the treated animals. Systemic absorption of IL11 was low in treated animals and effects on the hematopoietic cells were not seen. Serum citrulline levels rebounded significantly faster after irradiation in the IL11 treated animals, indicating quicker recovery of small intestine health. These data suggest that IL11 given orally protects the intestinal mucosa from radiation damage and that this compound is beneficial as a mitigating agent even when started 24 h after radiation exposure. PMID:24219324

  15. Prolonged pretreatment of mice with cholera toxin, but not isoproterenol, alleviates acute lethal systemic inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingyang; Guo, Xiangrui; Cao, Junxia; Zhang, Xueying; Zhang, Jiyan; Sun, Dejun; Wang, Qingyang

    2014-11-01

    Isoproterenol, a synthetic non-selective β-adrenergic agonist, is often used during the immediate postoperative period after open heart surgery for its chronotropic and vasodilatory effects. It has been demonstrated that isoproterenol pretreatment followed by immediate LPS administration leads to reduced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) response in vivo. However, sepsis never happens immediately after the surgery, but rather severe immune dysfunction occurs at least 24h later. It remains elusive what effects isoproterenol might exert to innate immunity during the period. In this scenario, we investigated the effects of 24-h isoproterenol pretreatment on septic shock induced by experimental endotoxemia and bacterial peritonitis, with cholera toxin as another cAMP elevator. Unexpectedly, we found that isoproterenol and cholera toxin exhibited distinct effects in acute lethal systemic inflammatory response. Isoproterenol worsened liver injury without enhancing NK/NKT activity. Meanwhile, cholera toxin but not isoproterenol showed dramatically reduced TNF-α response in LPS induced septic shock. Our data provide a caution for the clinical use of isoproterenol and suggest that isoproterenol has cAMP-independent functions.

  16. The acceptability of repeat Internet-based hybrid diet assessment of previous 24-h dietary intake: administration of the Oxford WebQ in UK Biobank.

    PubMed

    Galante, Julieta; Adamska, Ligia; Young, Alan; Young, Heather; Littlejohns, Thomas J; Gallacher, John; Allen, Naomi

    2016-02-28

    Although dietary intake over a single 24-h period may be atypical of an individual's habitual pattern, multiple 24-h dietary assessments can be representative of habitual intake and help in assessing seasonal variation. Web-based questionnaires are convenient for the participant and result in automatic data capture for study investigators. This study reports on the acceptability of repeated web-based administration of the Oxford WebQ--a 24-h recall of frequency from a set food list suitable for self-completion from which energy and nutrient values can be automatically generated. As part of the UK Biobank study, four invitations to complete the Oxford WebQ were sent by email over a 16-month period. Overall, 176 012 (53% of those invited) participants completed the online version of the Oxford WebQ at least once and 66% completed it more than once, although only 16% completed it on all four occasions. The response rate for any one round of invitations varied between 34 and 26%. On most occasions, the Oxford WebQ was completed on the same day that they received the invitation, although this was less likely if sent on a weekend. Participants who completed the Oxford WebQ tended to be white, female, slightly older, less deprived and more educated, which is typical of health-conscious volunteer-based studies. These findings provide preliminary evidence to suggest that repeated 24-h dietary assessment via the Internet is acceptable to the public and a feasible strategy for large population-based studies.

  17. Evaluation of reduction of Fraser incubation by 24h in the EN ISO 11290-1 standard on detection and diversity of Listeria species.

    PubMed

    Gnanou Besse, Nathalie; Favret, Sandra; Desreumaux, Jennifer; Decourseulles Brasseur, Emilie; Kalmokoff, Martin

    2016-05-02

    The EN ISO 11290-1 method for the isolation of Listeria monocytogenes from food is carried out using a double enrichment in Fraser broths. While the method is effective it is also quite long requiring 4-7 days to process a contaminated food, and may be adversely affected by inter-strain and/or inter-species competition in samples containing mixed Listeria populations. Currently, we have little information on the impact of competition on food testing under routine conditions. Food samples (n=130) were analyzed using the standard method and the evolution of Listeria populations in 89 naturally contaminated samples followed over the entire enrichment process. In most instances, maximum increase in L. monocytogenes population occurred over the first 24h following sub-culture in Full Fraser broth and strain recovery was similar at both 24 and 48 h, indicating that the second enrichment step can be reduced by 24h without impacting the recovery of L. monocytogenes or affecting the sensitivity of the method. In approximately 6% of naturally contaminated samples the presence of competing Listeria species adversely impacted L. monocytogenes population levels. Moreover, these effects were more pronounced during the latter 24h of the Fraser enrichment, and potentially could affect or complicate the isolation of these strains.

  18. Is Atyaephyra desmarestii a useful candidate for lethal and sub-lethal toxicity tests on pharmaceutical compounds?

    PubMed

    Nieto, Elena; Blasco, Julián; González-Ortegón, Enrique; Drake, Pilar; Hampel, Miriam

    2013-12-15

    Single and mixture toxicity tests on three pharmaceutical compounds, Diclofenac (DF), Ibuprofen (IB) and Carbamazepine (CBZ), were carried out with the freshwater shrimp Atyaephyra desmarestii. Lethal and sublethal responses were analyzed for single compounds. Lethal concentrations (LC50) obtained for each individual compound, after 96 h of exposure, were 6.3 mg L(-1) for DF, 13.3 mg L(-1) for IB and 94.3 mg L(-1) for CBZ. The selected sublethal endpoints of food ingestion, osmoregulatory capacity and respiration rates were not affected by the exposures to environmentally-relevant concentrations. Based on mortality data obtained, the predictive no effect concentration (PNEC) was calculated for each of the compounds, and compared with predicted environmental concentrations (PEC) reported in surface waters. The environmental risk of each compound was estimated as the ratio between PEC/PNEC, and indicated that IB could represent a medium risk in freshwater environments. Additionally, binary and ternary mixture toxicity assays of the selected compounds were carried out. The data obtained was applied to two predictive toxicity models: Concentration Addition (CA) and Independent Action (IA). Finally, risk assessment was estimated using risk quotients (RQ) for the compound mixtures based on EC50 and LC50 values.

  19. Efficacy of 6-, 12-, and 24-h praziquantel bath treatments against Asian tapeworm Bothriocephalus acheilognathi in grass carp

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Praziquantel is an effective antihelmintic that has been used in dogs and cats as a de-wormer. It has also been used successfully against tapeworms and trematodes in fish. The current study tested the efficacy of praziquantel bath treatments at various concentrations (0.187, 0.375, 0.75, 1.5, 3.0,...

  20. Inactivation and sub-lethal injury of salmonella typhi, salmonella typhimurium and vibrio cholerae in copper water storage vessels

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This study provides information on the antibacterial effect of copper against the water-borne pathogens Salmonella Typhi, Salmonella Typhimurium and Vibrio cholerae. Methods Suspensions of each pathogen were kept in water within a traditional copper vessel at 30°C for 24 h. Samples were withdrawn, diluted and plated onto suitable growth media. Conventional enumeration of healthy (uninjured) bacteria was carried out using standard aerobic incubation conditions. Additionally, reactive oxygen species-neutralised (ROS-n) conditions were achieved by adding the peroxide scavenger sodium pyruvate to the medium with anaerobic incubation, to enumerate uninjured (ROS-insensitive) and injured (ROS-sensitive) bacteria. Differences between log-transformed means of conventional (aerobic) and ROS-n counts were statistically evaluated using t tests. Results Overall, all three pathogens were inactivated by storage in copper vessels for 24 h. However, for shorter-term incubation (4-12 h), higher counts were observed under ROS-n conditions than under aerobic conditions, which demonstrate the presence of substantial numbers of sub-lethally injured cells prior to their complete inactivation. Conclusions The present study has for the first time confirmed that these bacterial pathogens are inactivated by storage in a copper vessel within 24 h. However, it has also demonstrated that it is necessary to account for short-term sub-lethal injury, manifest as ROS-sensitivity, in order to more fully understand the process. This has important practical implications in terms of the time required to store water within a copper vessel to completely inactivate these bacteria and thereby remove the risk of water-borne disease transmission by this route. PMID:21794163

  1. Acute Low-Volume High-Intensity Interval Exercise and Continuous Moderate-Intensity Exercise Elicit a Similar Improvement in 24-h Glycemic Control in Overweight and Obese Adults.

    PubMed

    Parker, Lewan; Shaw, Christopher S; Banting, Lauren; Levinger, Itamar; Hill, Karen M; McAinch, Andrew J; Stepto, Nigel K

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acute exercise reduces postprandial oxidative stress and glycemia; however, the effects of exercise intensity are unclear. We investigated the effect of acute low-volume high-intensity interval-exercise (LV-HIIE) and continuous moderate-intensity exercise (CMIE) on glycemic control and oxidative stress in overweight and obese, inactive adults. Methods: Twenty-seven adults were randomly allocated to perform a single session of LV-HIIE (9 females, 5 males; age: 30 ± 1 years; BMI: 29 ± 1 kg·m(-2); mean ± SEM) or CMIE (8 females, 5 males; age: 30 ± 2.0; BMI: 30 ± 2.0) 1 h after consumption of a standard breakfast. Plasma redox status, glucose and insulin were measured. Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) was conducted during the 24-h period before (rest day) and after exercise (exercise day). Results: Plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS; 29 ±13%, p < 0.01; mean percent change ±90% confidence limit), hydrogen peroxide (44 ± 16%, p < 0.01), catalase activity (50 ± 16%, p < 0.01), and superoxide dismutase activity (21 ± 6%, p < 0.01) significantly increased 1 h after breakfast (prior to exercise) compared to baseline. Exercise significantly decreased postprandial glycaemia in whole blood (-6 ± 5%, p < 0.01), irrespective of the exercise protocol. Only CMIE significantly decreased postprandial TBARS (CMIE: -33 ± 8%, p < 0.01; LV-HIIE: 11 ± 22%, p = 0.34) and hydrogen peroxide (CMIE: -25 ± 15%, p = 0.04; LV-HIIE: 7 ± 26%; p = 0.37). Acute exercise provided a similar significant improvement in 24-h average glucose levels (-5 ± 2%, p < 0.01), hyperglycemic excursions (-37 ± 60%, p < 0.01), peak glucose concentrations (-8 ± 4%, p < 0.01), and the 2-h postprandial glucose response to dinner (-9 ± 4%, p < 0.01), irrespective of the exercise protocol. Conclusion: Despite elevated postprandial oxidative stress compared to CMIE, LV-HIIE is an equally effective exercise mode for improving 24-h glycemic control in overweight and obese

  2. Acute Low-Volume High-Intensity Interval Exercise and Continuous Moderate-Intensity Exercise Elicit a Similar Improvement in 24-h Glycemic Control in Overweight and Obese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Lewan; Shaw, Christopher S.; Banting, Lauren; Levinger, Itamar; Hill, Karen M.; McAinch, Andrew J.; Stepto, Nigel K.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Acute exercise reduces postprandial oxidative stress and glycemia; however, the effects of exercise intensity are unclear. We investigated the effect of acute low-volume high-intensity interval-exercise (LV-HIIE) and continuous moderate-intensity exercise (CMIE) on glycemic control and oxidative stress in overweight and obese, inactive adults. Methods: Twenty-seven adults were randomly allocated to perform a single session of LV-HIIE (9 females, 5 males; age: 30 ± 1 years; BMI: 29 ± 1 kg·m−2; mean ± SEM) or CMIE (8 females, 5 males; age: 30 ± 2.0; BMI: 30 ± 2.0) 1 h after consumption of a standard breakfast. Plasma redox status, glucose and insulin were measured. Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) was conducted during the 24-h period before (rest day) and after exercise (exercise day). Results: Plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS; 29 ±13%, p < 0.01; mean percent change ±90% confidence limit), hydrogen peroxide (44 ± 16%, p < 0.01), catalase activity (50 ± 16%, p < 0.01), and superoxide dismutase activity (21 ± 6%, p < 0.01) significantly increased 1 h after breakfast (prior to exercise) compared to baseline. Exercise significantly decreased postprandial glycaemia in whole blood (−6 ± 5%, p < 0.01), irrespective of the exercise protocol. Only CMIE significantly decreased postprandial TBARS (CMIE: −33 ± 8%, p < 0.01; LV-HIIE: 11 ± 22%, p = 0.34) and hydrogen peroxide (CMIE: −25 ± 15%, p = 0.04; LV-HIIE: 7 ± 26%; p = 0.37). Acute exercise provided a similar significant improvement in 24-h average glucose levels (−5 ± 2%, p < 0.01), hyperglycemic excursions (−37 ± 60%, p < 0.01), peak glucose concentrations (−8 ± 4%, p < 0.01), and the 2-h postprandial glucose response to dinner (−9 ± 4%, p < 0.01), irrespective of the exercise protocol. Conclusion: Despite elevated postprandial oxidative stress compared to CMIE, LV-HIIE is an equally effective exercise mode for improving 24-h glycemic control in

  3. What a Nostril Knows: Olfactory Nerve-Evoked AMPA Responses Increase while NMDA Responses Decrease at 24-h Post-Training for Lateralized Odor Preference Memory in Neonate Rat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, Qi; Harley, Carolyn W.

    2012-01-01

    Increased AMPA signaling is proposed to mediate long-term memory. Rat neonates acquire odor preferences in a single olfactory bulb if one nostril is occluded at training. Memory testing here confirmed that only trained bulbs support increased odor preference at 24 h. Olfactory nerve field potentials were tested at 24 h in slices from trained and…

  4. Lethal and sub-lethal effects on the Asian common toad Duttaphrynus melanostictus from exposure to hexavalent chromium.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Vindhya A K; Weerasena, Jagathpriya; Lakraj, G Pemantha; Perera, Inoka C; Dangalle, Chandima D; Handunnetti, Shiroma; Premawansa, Sunil; Wijesinghe, Mayuri R

    2016-08-01

    Chromium discharged in industrial effluents frequently occurs as an environmental pollutant, but the lethal and sub-lethal effects the heavy metal might cause in animals exposed to it have been insufficiently investigated. Selecting the amphibian Duttaphrynus melanostictus, we carried out laboratory tests to investigate the effects of short and long term exposure to hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in both tadpoles and adult toads. The concentrations used were 0.002, 0.02, 0.2, 1.0 and 2.0mg/L, the first three corresponding to field levels. In vitro exposures were also carried out using toad erythrocytes and Cr(VI) concentrations of 0.0015, 0.003, 0.015, 0.03, 0.15mg/L. Mortality, growth retardation, developmental delays and structural aberrations were noted in the metal-treated tadpoles, with increasing incidence corresponding to increase in Cr(VI) level and duration of exposure. Many of the sub-lethal effects were evident with long term exposure to environmentally relevant levels of the toxicant. Changes in selected blood parameters and erythrocyte morphometry were also detected in Cr(VI) exposed toads, indicating anaemic and leucopenic conditions. In the genotoxicity study, DNA damage indicated by comet assay and increased micronuclei frequency, occurred at the low Cr(VI) concentrations tested. The multiple deleterious effects of exposure to chromium signal the need for monitoring and controlling the discharge of chromium to the environment. The dose-dependency and genotoxic effects observed in this widely distributed Asian toad indicates its suitability for monitoring heavy metal pollution in aquatic systems.

  5. Effects of whole-body VX vapor exposure on lethality in rats.

    PubMed

    Benton, B J; McGuire, J M; Sommerville, D R; Dabisch, P A; Jakubowski, E M; Matson, K L; Mioduszewski, R J; Thomson, S A; Crouse, C L

    2006-12-01

    Male and female rats were whole-body exposed to VX vapor in a 1000-L single-pass exposure chamber. Estimated exposure dosages producing lethal (LCT50) effects in 50% of exposed male and female rats were established for 10, 60, and 240 min exposure durations. A potency comparison with GB and GF shows that VX becomes increasingly more potent than these G agents with increasing exposure duration. VX is approximately 4-30 times more potent than GB and 5-15 times more potent than GF. Gender differences in the estimated median dosages were not significant at the 10, 60, and 240 min exposure durations. An empirical toxic load model was developed and the toxic load exponent for lethality (n) in the equation Cn x T = k was determined to be n = 0.92. The VX-G regeneration assay was successfully used as a biomarker for the presence of VX in the blood plasma and RBC fractions of the blood 24 h postexposure.

  6. Nocturnal sleep-related variables from 24-h free-living waist-worn accelerometry: International Study of Childhood Obesity, Lifestyle and the Environment

    PubMed Central

    Tudor-Locke, C; Mire, E F; Barreira, T V; Schuna, J M; Chaput, J-P; Fogelholm, M; Hu, G; Kurpad, A; Kuriyan, R; Lambert, E V; Maher, C; Maia, J; Matsudo, V; Olds, T; Onywera, V; Sarmiento, O L; Standage, M; Tremblay, M S; Zhao, P; Church, T S; Katzmarzyk, P T

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: We describe the process of identifying and defining nocturnal sleep-related variables (for example, movement/non-movement indicators of sleep efficiency, waking episodes, midpoint and so on) using the unique 24-h waist-worn free-living accelerometer data collected in the International Study of Childhood Obesity, Lifestyle and the Environment (ISCOLE). Methods: Seven consecutive days of 24-h waist-worn accelerometer (GT3X+, ActiGraph LLC) data were collected from over 500 children at each site. An expert subgroup of the research team with accelerometry expertize, frontline data collectors and data managers met on several occasions to categorize and operationally define nocturnal accelerometer signal data patterns. The iterative process was informed by the raw data drawn from a sub set of the US data, and culminated in a refined and replicable delineated definition for each identified nocturnal sleep-related variable. Ultimately based on 6318 participants from all 12 ISCOLE sites with valid total sleep episode time (TSET), we report average clock times for nocturnal sleep onset, offset and midpoint in addition to sleep period time, TSET and restful sleep efficiency (among other derived variables). Results: Nocturnal sleep onset occurred at 2218 hours and nocturnal sleep offset at 0707 hours. The mean midpoint was 0243 hours. The sleep period time of 529.6 min (8.8 h) was typically accumulated in a single episode, making the average TSET very similar in duration (529.0 min). The mean restful sleep efficiency ranged from 86.8% (based on absolute non-movement of 0 counts per minute) to 96.0% (based on relative non-movement of <100 counts per minute). Conclusions: These variables extend the potential of field-based 24-h waist-worn accelerometry to distinguish and categorize the underlying robust patterns of movement/non-movement signals conveying magnitude, duration, frequency and periodicity during the nocturnal sleep period. PMID:27152185

  7. Cadmium-Induced Disruption in 24-h Expression of Clock and Redox Enzyme Genes in Rat Medial Basal Hypothalamus: Prevention by Melatonin

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Ortega, Vanesa; Cano-Barquilla, Pilar; Scacchi, Pablo A.; Cardinali, Daniel P.; Esquifino, Ana I.

    2011-01-01

    In a previous study we reported that a low daily p.o. dose of cadmium (Cd) disrupted the circadian expression of clock and redox enzyme genes in rat medial basal hypothalamus (MBH). To assess whether melatonin could counteract Cd activity, male Wistar rats (45 days of age) received CdCl2 (5 ppm) and melatonin (3 μg/mL) or vehicle (0.015% ethanol) in drinking water. Groups of animals receiving melatonin or vehicle alone were also included. After 1 month, MBH mRNA levels were measured by real-time PCR analysis at six time intervals in a 24-h cycle. In control MBH Bmal1 expression peaked at early scotophase, Per1 expression at late afternoon, and Per2 and Cry2 expression at mid-scotophase, whereas neither Clock nor Cry1 expression showed significant 24-h variations. This pattern was significantly disrupted (Clock, Bmal1) or changed in phase (Per1, Per2, Cry2) by CdCl2 while melatonin counteracted the changes brought about by Cd on Per1 expression only. In animals receiving melatonin alone the 24-h pattern of MBH Per2 and Cry2 expression was disrupted. CdCl2 disrupted the 24-h rhythmicity of Cu/Zn- and Mn-superoxide dismutase (SOD), nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-1, NOS-2, heme oxygenase (HO)-1, and HO-2 gene expression, most of the effects being counteracted by melatonin. In particular, the co-administration of melatonin and CdCl2 increased Cu/Zn-SOD gene expression and decreased that of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GSR), and HO-2. In animals receiving melatonin alone, significant increases in mean Cu/Zn and Mn-SOD gene expression, and decreases in that of GPx, GSR, NOS-1, NOS-2, HO-1, and HO-2, were found. The results indicate that the interfering effect of melatonin on the activity of a low dose of CdCl2 on MBH clock and redox enzyme genes is mainly exerted at the level of redox enzyme gene expression. PMID:21442002

  8. Effects of aerobic exercise intensity on 24-h ambulatory blood pressure in individuals with type 2 diabetes and prehypertension

    PubMed Central

    Karoline de Morais, Pâmella; Sales, Marcelo Magalhães; Alves de Almeida, Jeeser; Motta-Santos, Daisy; Victor de Sousa, Caio; Simões, Herbert Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To verify the effects of different intensities of aerobic exercise on 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure (BP) responses in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) and prehypertension. [Subjects and Methods] Ten individuals with T2D and prehypertension (55.8 ± 7.7 years old; blood glucose 133.0 ± 36.7 mg·dL−1 and awake BP 130.6 ± 1.6/ 80.5 ± 1.8 mmHg) completed three randomly assigned experiments: non-exercise control (CON) and exercise at moderate (MOD) and maximal (MAX) intensities. Heart rate (HR), BP, blood lactate concentrations ([Lac]), oxygen uptake (VO2), and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured at rest, during the experimental sessions, and during the 60 min recovery period. After this period, ambulatory blood pressure was monitored for 24 h. [Results] The results indicate that [Lac] (MAX: 6.7±2.0 vs. MOD: 3.8±1.2 mM), RPE (MAX: 19±1.3 vs. MOD: 11±2.3) and VO2peak (MAX: 20.2±4.1 vs. MOD: 14.0±3.0 mL·kg−1·min−1) were highest following the MAX session. Compared with CON, only MAX elicited post-exercise BP reduction that lasted for 8 h after exercise and during sleep. [Conclusion] A single session of aerobic exercise resulted in 24 h BP reductions in individuals with T2D, especially while sleeping, and this reduction seems to be dependent on the intensity of the exercise performed. PMID:25642036

  9. Sarcocystis species lethal for domestic pigeons.

    PubMed

    Olias, Philipp; Gruber, Achim D; Kohls, Andrea; Hafez, Hafez M; Heydorn, Alfred Otto; Mehlhorn, Heinz; Lierz, Michael

    2010-03-01

    A large number of Sarcocystis spp. infect birds as intermediate hosts, but pigeons are rarely affected. We identified a novel Sarcocystis sp. that causes lethal neurologic disease in domestic pigeons in Germany. Experimental infections indicated transmission by northern goshawks, and sequence analyses indicated transnational distribution. Worldwide spread is possible.

  10. Deadly Lessons: Understanding Lethal School Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Mark H., Ed.; Petrie, Carol V., Ed.; Braga, Anthony A., Ed.; McLaughlin, Brenda L., Ed.

    This collection of papers is the outcome of the National Academies' effort to glean information from six different case studies of student-perpetrated school shootings. Part 1, "Case Studies of Lethal School Violence," includes: "The Copycat Factor: Mental Illness, Guns, and the Shooting Incident at Heritage High School, Rockdale…

  11. The evolution of lethal intergroup violence.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Raymond C

    2005-10-25

    Recent findings and analyses in evolutionary biology, archaeology, and ethnology provide a favorable conjuncture for examining the evolution of lethal intergroup violence among hominids during the 2.9-million-year Paleolithic time span. Here, I seek to identify and investigate the main turning points in this evolutionary trajectory and to delineate the periodization that follows from this inquiry.

  12. Medical Conditions and Nearly Lethal Suicide Attempts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ikeda, Robin M.; Kresnow, Marcie-jo; Mercy, James A.; Powell, Kenneth E.; Simon, Thomas R.; Potter, Lloyd B.; Durant, Tonji M.; Swahn, Monica H.

    2002-01-01

    This population-based, case-control study examined physical illness as a risk factor for suicidal behavior. Case patients were more likely than controls to report having any serious medical conditions. Results suggest that young men with medical conditions are at increased risk for nearly lethal suicide attempts. (Contains 33 references and 3…

  13. Galantamine is a novel post-exposure therapeutic against lethal VX challenge.

    PubMed

    Hilmas, Corey J; Poole, Melissa J; Finneran, Kathryn; Clark, Matthew G; Williams, Patrick T

    2009-10-15

    The ability of galantamine hydrobromide (GAL HBr) treatment to antagonize O-ethyl-S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) methylphosphonothiolate (VX)-induced lethality, impairment of muscle tension, and electroencephalographic (EEG) changes was assessed in guinea pigs. Guinea pigs were challenged with 16.8 microg/kg VX (2LD50). One min after challenge, animals were administered 0.5 mg/kg atropine sulfate (ATR) and 25 mg/kg pyridine-2-aldoxime methochloride (2-PAM). In addition, guinea pigs were given 0, 1, 2, 4, 8 or 10 mg/kg GAL as a post-exposure treatment immediately prior to ATR and 2-PAM. Animals were either monitored for 24-h survival, scheduled for electroencephalography (EEG) recording, or euthanized 60 min later for measurement of indirectly-elicited muscle tension in the hemidiaphragm. Post-exposure GAL therapy produced a dose-dependent increase in survival from lethal VX challenge. Optimal clinical benefits were observed in the presence of 10 mg/kg GAL, which led to 100% survival of VX-challenged guinea pigs. Based on muscle physiology studies, GAL post-exposure treatment protected the guinea pig diaphragm, the major effector muscle of respiration, from fatigue, tetanic fade, and muscular paralysis. Protection against the paralyzing effects of VX was dose-dependent. In EEG studies, GAL did not alter seizure onset for all doses tested. At the highest dose tested (10 mg/kg), GAL decreased seizure duration when administered as a post-exposure treatment 1 min after VX. GAL also reduced the high correlation associated between seizure activity and lethality after 2LD50 VX challenge. GAL may have additional benefits both centrally and peripherally that are unrelated to its established mechanism as a reversible acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (AChEI).

  14. Galantamine is a novel post-exposure therapeutic against lethal VX challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Hilmas, Corey J. Poole, Melissa J.; Finneran, Kathryn; Clark, Matthew G.; Williams, Patrick T.

    2009-10-15

    The ability of galantamine hydrobromide (GAL HBr) treatment to antagonize O-ethyl-S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) methylphosphonothiolate (VX)-induced lethality, impairment of muscle tension, and electroencephalographic (EEG) changes was assessed in guinea pigs. Guinea pigs were challenged with 16.8 {mu}g/kg VX (2LD50). One min after challenge, animals were administered 0.5 mg/kg atropine sulfate (ATR) and 25 mg/kg pyridine-2-aldoxime methochloride (2-PAM). In addition, guinea pigs were given 0, 1, 2, 4, 8 or 10 mg/kg GAL as a post-exposure treatment immediately prior to ATR and 2-PAM. Animals were either monitored for 24-h survival, scheduled for electroencephalography (EEG) recording, or euthanized 60 min later for measurement of indirectly-elicited muscle tension in the hemidiaphragm. Post-exposure GAL therapy produced a dose-dependent increase in survival from lethal VX challenge. Optimal clinical benefits were observed in the presence of 10 mg/kg GAL, which led to 100% survival of VX-challenged guinea pigs. Based on muscle physiology studies, GAL post-exposure treatment protected the guinea pig diaphragm, the major effector muscle of respiration, from fatigue, tetanic fade, and muscular paralysis. Protection against the paralyzing effects of VX was dose-dependent. In EEG studies, GAL did not alter seizure onset for all doses tested. At the highest dose tested (10 mg/kg), GAL decreased seizure duration when administered as a post-exposure treatment 1 min after VX. GAL also reduced the high correlation associated between seizure activity and lethality after 2LD50 VX challenge. GAL may have additional benefits both centrally and peripherally that are unrelated to its established mechanism as a reversible acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (AChEI)

  15. Lethal exposure: An integrated approach to pathogen transmission via environmental reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Wendy C.; Kausrud, Kyrre L.; Beyer, Wolfgang; Easterday, W. Ryan; Barandongo, Zoë R.; Blaschke, Elisabeth; Cloete, Claudine C.; Lazak, Judith; Van Ert, Matthew N.; Ganz, Holly H.; Turnbull, Peter C. B.; Stenseth, Nils Chr.; Getz, Wayne M.

    2016-01-01

    To mitigate the effects of zoonotic diseases on human and animal populations, it is critical to understand what factors alter transmission dynamics. Here we assess the risk of exposure to lethal concentrations of the anthrax bacterium, Bacillus anthracis, for grazing animals in a natural system over time through different transmission mechanisms. We follow pathogen concentrations at anthrax carcass sites and waterholes for five years and estimate infection risk as a function of grass, soil or water intake, age of carcass sites, and the exposure required for a lethal infection. Grazing, not drinking, seems the dominant transmission route, and transmission is more probable from grazing at carcass sites 1–2 years of age. Unlike most studies of virulent pathogens that are conducted under controlled conditions for extrapolation to real situations, we evaluate exposure risk under field conditions to estimate the probability of a lethal dose, showing that not all reservoirs with detectable pathogens are significant transmission pathways. PMID:27265371

  16. Discrimination between patients with melancholic depression and healthy controls: comparison between 24-h cortisol profiles, the DST and the Dex/CRH test.

    PubMed

    Paslakis, Georgios; Krumm, Bertram; Gilles, Maria; Schweiger, Ulrich; Heuser, Isabella; Richter, Inga; Deuschle, Michael

    2011-06-01

    Diurnal (24-h) cortisol profiles were compared to DST and Dex/CRH test outcomes with regard to their discriminative power in depressive disorder. With regard to several statistical measures (effect sizes, area under the curve) we found 24-h cortisol profiles to better discriminate between healthy controls and inpatients with the melancholic subtype of depression compared to the DST and Dex/CRH test. In search of a shortened time interval we found the 2-h time window 1000-1200 h of the cortisol profile to be the one with the highest sensitivity (83.3%) and specificity (87.9%). The specificity of the DST was 93.3% and somewhat higher than that of the cortisol profiles and the Dex/CRH test (87.9% and 78.8.%, respectively). However, the sensitivity of the DST was very low (30.8%), in fact similar to that of the Dex/CRH test (30.8%), but much lower than that of the 1000-1200 h interval (83.3%). The assessment of cortisol in plasma is an easy to perform, cost-saving method for the evaluation of the HPA system activity, which may have a series of clinical and scientific implications for the depressive disorder.

  17. Lethal Mutagenesis of Hepatitis C Virus Induced by Favipiravir.

    PubMed

    de Ávila, Ana I; Gallego, Isabel; Soria, Maria Eugenia; Gregori, Josep; Quer, Josep; Esteban, Juan Ignacio; Rice, Charles M; Domingo, Esteban; Perales, Celia

    2016-01-01

    Lethal mutagenesis is an antiviral approach that consists in extinguishing a virus by an excess of mutations acquired during replication in the presence of a mutagen. Here we show that favipiravir (T-705) is a potent mutagenic agent for hepatitis C virus (HCV) during its replication in human hepatoma cells. T-705 leads to an excess of G → A and C → U transitions in the mutant spectrum of preextinction HCV populations. Infectivity decreased significantly in the presence of concentrations of T-705 which are 2- to 8-fold lower than its cytotoxic concentration 50 (CC50). Passaging the virus five times in the presence of 400 μM T-705 resulted in virus extinction. Since T-705 has undergone advanced clinical trials for approval for human use, the results open a new approach based on lethal mutagenesis to treat hepatitis C virus infections. If proven effective for HCV in vivo, this new anti-HCV agent may be useful in patient groups that fail current therapeutic regimens.

  18. Lethal Mutagenesis of Hepatitis C Virus Induced by Favipiravir

    PubMed Central

    de Ávila, Ana I.; Gallego, Isabel; Soria, Maria Eugenia; Gregori, Josep; Quer, Josep; Esteban, Juan Ignacio; Rice, Charles M.; Domingo, Esteban; Perales, Celia

    2016-01-01

    Lethal mutagenesis is an antiviral approach that consists in extinguishing a virus by an excess of mutations acquired during replication in the presence of a mutagen. Here we show that favipiravir (T-705) is a potent mutagenic agent for hepatitis C virus (HCV) during its replication in human hepatoma cells. T-705 leads to an excess of G → A and C → U transitions in the mutant spectrum of preextinction HCV populations. Infectivity decreased significantly in the presence of concentrations of T-705 which are 2- to 8-fold lower than its cytotoxic concentration 50 (CC50). Passaging the virus five times in the presence of 400 μM T-705 resulted in virus extinction. Since T-705 has undergone advanced clinical trials for approval for human use, the results open a new approach based on lethal mutagenesis to treat hepatitis C virus infections. If proven effective for HCV in vivo, this new anti-HCV agent may be useful in patient groups that fail current therapeutic regimens. PMID:27755573

  19. Improved accuracy in the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in air using 24 h sampling on a mixed bed followed by thermal desorption capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wauters, Eric; Van Caeter, Peter; Desmet, Gilbert; David, Frank; Devos, Christophe; Sandra, Pat

    2008-05-09

    A new sampling method for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in ambient air is described. The method is based on active sampling on sorption tubes consisting of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) foam, PDMS particles and a TENAX TA bed. After sampling, the solutes are quantitatively recovered by thermal desorption and analysed by capillary GC-MS. The new sampling method has been compared to the classical method using high-volume sampling on a glass fiber filter followed by polyurethane foam for 24h sampling of ambient air. Volumes enriched were 144 l on the mixed bed and 1296 m3 with the classical method. The concentrations measured using the new method were significantly higher that the values obtained using the classical method, i.e. a factor 1.2-3 for the high molecular weight PAHs and up to 35 times for naphthalene and 23 times for acenaphthene. The total toxicity equivalence value (TEQ) for PAHs was ca. two times higher compared to the conventional method, illustrating that the concentrations of PAHs in ambient air have been underestimated until now. Some figures of merit (mean value for 17 PAHs) of the method are repeatability 7.4%, detection limit 13 pg/m3, accuracy 105.6% and linearity 0.996. The method also opens interesting perspectives for the determination of other semi-volatile persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in air as illustrated with the analysis of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) at a workplace during removal of transformer oil.

  20. Lethality and synthetic lethality in the genome-wide metabolic network of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ghim, Cheol-Min; Goh, Kwang-Il; Kahng, Byungnam

    2005-12-21

    Recent genomic analyses on the cellular metabolic network show that reaction flux across enzymes are diverse and exhibit power-law behavior in its distribution. While intuition might suggest that the reactions with larger fluxes are more likely to be lethal under the blockade of its catalysing gene products or gene knockouts, we find, by in silico flux analysis, that the lethality rarely has correlations with the flux level owing to the widespread backup pathways innate in the genome-wide metabolism of Escherichia coli. Lethal reactions, of which the deletion generates cascading failure of following reactions up to the biomass reaction, are identified in terms of the Boolean network scheme as well as the flux balance analysis. The avalanche size of a reaction, defined as the number of subsequently blocked reactions after its removal, turns out to be a useful measure of lethality. As a means to elucidate phenotypic robustness to a single deletion, we investigate synthetic lethality in reaction level, where simultaneous deletion of a pair of nonlethal reactions leads to the failure of the biomass reaction. Synthetic lethals identified via flux balance and Boolean scheme are consistently shown to act in parallel pathways, working in such a way that the backup machinery is compromised.

  1. The effects of pasture availability for twin- and triplet-bearing ewes in mid and late pregnancy on ewe and lamb behaviour 12 to 24 h after birth.

    PubMed

    Corner, R A; Kenyon, P R; Stafford, K J; West, D M; Morris, S T; Oliver, M H

    2010-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of offering ewes two different feeding levels, during mid and late pregnancy, on ewe and lamb behaviour 12 to 24 h after birth. Romney ewes, bearing twin (n = 80) or triplet foetuses (n = 56), were allocated to a pasture sward height of 2 or 4 cm between 70 and 107 days of pregnancy. In late pregnancy (day 107 to 147), half of the ewes were reallocated the alternate sward height, which produced four treatments: 2-2, 2-4, 4-2 and 4-4. Ewes were weighed on days 65, 92, 107 and 130 of pregnancy and lamb live weights were recorded 12 to 24 h after birth. Twelve to 24 h after birth the maternal behaviour score (MBS) of the ewes were determined, whilst their lambs were tagged. After the lambs were released, the behaviour of each ewe and her lambs was observed for 5 min. Ewe treatment and litter size had no effect on ewe MBS. However, as MBS increased (ewes stayed closer to lambs during tagging), ewes bleated less in a high-pitch and were quicker to make contact with their lamb. During the observation period, ewes in the 4-4 treatment had a greater percentage of their bleats in a low pitch (P < 0.05) than ewes in the 2-2 and 4-2 treatment (61.3% v. 41.3% and 38.8% low bleats, respectively) and more lambs born to 4-4 ewes (95%) bleated than lambs born to 2-2 ewes (84%; P < 0.05). However, lambs born to ewes in the 2-2 treatment bleated earlier than lambs in all other treatments (P < 0.05). Lambs born to 4-4 ewes were less likely (P < 0.05) to move towards their dam in order to make contact than lambs born to 2-2 or 4-2 ewes (3.1% v. 16.9% and 16.7%, respectively). These findings suggest that under the conditions of the present study, ewe nutrition had little effect on maternal behaviour. However, lambs born to ewes offered 2 cm pasture sward heights during mid and/or late pregnancy (2-2, 2-4 and 4-2 treatments) displayed behaviour that demonstrated greater 'need' whereas lambs born to ewes offered 4 cm during mid and

  2. DETERMINATION OF LETHAL DISSOLVED OXYGEN LEVELS FOR SELECTED MARINE AND ESTUARINE FISHES, CRUSTACEANS AND A BIVALVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to provide a database of the incipient lethal concentrations for reduced dissolved oxygen (DO) for selected marine and estuarine species including 12 species of fish, 9 crustaceans, and 1 bivalve. All species occur in the Virginian Province, USA, w...

  3. Lethal arthrogryposis with anterior horn cell disease.

    PubMed

    Vuopala, K; Ignatius, J; Herva, R

    1995-01-01

    Fifteen infants (11 families) with lethal arthrogryposis and anterior horn motor neuron loss are described. The clinical presentation was the fetal akinesia deformation sequence (FADS) with multiple contractures and facial anomalies. At autopsy neurogenic muscular atrophy was present in all infants. The spinal cord showed a paucity of anterior horn motor neurons in the 12 infants studied. Both male and female infants were affected. Nine cases were sporadic, whereas in two families there were three affected cases. Consanguinity between the parents was reported in one family with one affected child. This and the recurrence of the condition speak for autosomal recessive inheritance. Detailed neuropathological examination and documentation of the clinical features are needed for a better delineation of and genetic counseling for perinatally lethal arthrogryposis.

  4. Henipaviruses-unanswered questions of lethal zoonoses.

    PubMed

    Field, Hume; Kung, Nina

    2011-12-01

    The highly lethal Hendra and Nipah viruses have been described for little more than a decade, yet within that time have been aetiologically associated with major livestock and human health impacts, albeit on a limited scale. Do these emerging pathogens pose a broader threat, or are they inconsequential 'viral chatter'. Given their lethality, and the evident multi-generational human-to-human transmission associated with Nipah virus in Bangladesh, it seems prudent to apply the precautionary principle. While much is known of their clinical, pathogenic and epidemiologic features in livestock species and humans, a number of fundamental questions regarding the relationship between the viruses, their natural fruit-bat host and the environment remain unanswered. In this paper, we pose and probe these questions in context, and offer perspectives based primarily on our experience with Hendra virus in Australia, augmented with Nipah virus parallels.

  5. PARP inhibitors: Synthetic lethality in the clinic.

    PubMed

    Lord, Christopher J; Ashworth, Alan

    2017-03-17

    PARP inhibitors (PARPi), a cancer therapy targeting poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, are the first clinically approved drugs designed to exploit synthetic lethality, a genetic concept proposed nearly a century ago. Tumors arising in patients who carry germline mutations in either BRCA1 or BRCA2 are sensitive to PARPi because they have a specific type of DNA repair defect. PARPi also show promising activity in more common cancers that share this repair defect. However, as with other targeted therapies, resistance to PARPi arises in advanced disease. In addition, determining the optimal use of PARPi within drug combination approaches has been challenging. Nevertheless, the preclinical discovery of PARPi synthetic lethality and the route to clinical approval provide interesting lessons for the development of other therapies. Here, we discuss current knowledge of PARP inhibitors and potential ways to maximize their clinical effectiveness.

  6. Lethality and entropy of protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Manke, Thomas; Demetrius, Lloyd; Vingron, Martin

    2005-01-01

    We characterize protein interaction networks in terms of network entropy. This approach suggests a ranking principle, which strongly correlates with elements of functional importance, such as lethal proteins. Our combined analysis of protein interaction networks and functional profiles in single cellular yeast and multi-cellular worm shows that proteins with large contribution to network entropy are preferentially lethal. While entropy is inherently a dynamical concept, the present analysis incorporates only structural information. Our result therefore highlights the importance of topological features, which appear as correlates of an underlying dynamical property, and which in turn determine functional traits. We argue that network entropy is a natural extension of previously studied observables, such as pathway multiplicity and centrality. It is also applicable to networks in which the processes can be quantified and therefore serves as a link to study questions of structural and dynamical robustness in a unified way.

  7. Lethality and Autonomous Systems: The Roboticist Demographic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    humanoid (22%), and other (23%); 9) Media Influence: only 18% said that media had a strong or very strong influence on their attitude to robots ...and whether certain emotions would be appropriate in a military robot . The Wars question was worded as follows: To what extent do you think ...Lethality and Autonomous Systems: The Roboticist Demographic Lilia V. Moshkina and Ronald C. Arkin Mobile Robot Laboratory, College of

  8. Lethality Rate Estimation and Testing Procedures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-11

    AUTHOR(S) Steven W. Rust, Paul I. Feder, Frederick R. Todt, Ronald L. Joiner Ila. TYPE OF REPORT 13b, IME .OVFRE 8 14. ATE OF PORT (VeerMontl.vay) 15...GD, and VX Administered Topically to Rabbits " (MREF Protocol 21, May 1985) to compare liquid or powder experimental decontaminants against the dual...chemical surety materick (CSM). The standardized screen is based on a lethality endpoint in laboratory albino rabbits . An essential aspect of this testing

  9. Characterization and Conductivity Behavior of Magnetic Activated Carbon (MAC) from FeCl2.4H2O-Containing Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aripin, Department Of Physics, Faculty Of Mathematics; Natural Science, Haluoleo University, Kampus Bumi Tridharma Anduonohu Kendari 93232 Indonesia

    2007-05-01

    Activated carbons (AC) and magnetic-containing activated carbons (MAC) have been synthesized using coconut shells as carbon sources and FeCl2.4H2O as magnetic precursor. The samples were characterized by nitrogen sorption, XRD, and FTIR. The BET surface area and total pore volume of MAC increase as the temperature increased. AC has XRD peaks, which evidences an amorphous carbon framework and MAC shows that this material consists of an organized carbon with the nanocrystalline magnetite embedded in its structure. The FTIR spectrum of MAC shows that carboxyl groups decreased as the temperature increased. Absorption bands of MAC shows the stretching and torsional vibration modes of the magnetite Fe-O bond in tetrahedral and octahedral sites, respectively. The electrical conductivity studies showed that conductivity of MAC is more than the AC due to structural properties of carbons exists on a framework containing metal structures.

  10. Cathodoluminescence study of radiative interface defects in thermally grown SiO{sub 2}/4H-SiC(0001) structures

    SciTech Connect

    Fukushima, Yuta; Chanthaphan, Atthawut; Hosoi, Takuji; Shimura, Takayoshi; Watanabe, Heiji

    2015-06-29

    Radiative defects in thermally grown SiO{sub 2}/4H-SiC(0001) structures and their location in depth were investigated by means of cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. It was found that while luminescence peaks ascribed to oxygen vacancy and nonbridging oxygen hole centers were observed both from thermal oxides grown on (0001) Si-face and C-face surfaces as with thermal oxides on Si, intense yellow luminescence at a wavelength of around 600 nm was identified only from the oxide interface on the Si-face substrate regardless of the oxide thickness and dopant type. Possible physical origins of the radiative centers localized near an oxide interface of a few nm thick are discussed on the basis of visible light emission from Si backbone structures.

  11. The effects of 24-h exposure to carbaryl or atrazine on the locomotor performance and overwinter growth and survival of juvenile spotted salamanders (Ambystoma maculatum).

    PubMed

    Mitchkash, Matthew G; McPeek, Tammy; Boone, Michelle D

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the effects of pesticide exposure on organisms throughout their life cycle is critical to predict population-level effects. For many taxa, including amphibians, juveniles are the main dispersal stage and are disproportionally important to population persistence when compared with other life stages. In the present study, we examined the effects of a single 24-h exposure to the insecticide carbaryl or the herbicide atrazine on locomotor performance (endurance, distance traveled, speed, and fatigue) in the laboratory and terrestrial growth and survival through overwintering in field enclosures using recent metamorphs of spotted salamanders (Ambystoma maculatum). We found that neither atrazine nor carbaryl impacted endurance, but fatigue increased with carbaryl exposure, which could leave salamanders less able to escape repeated attacks by predators. Terrestrial growth and overwinter survival were not affected by short-term exposure to carbaryl or atrazine, suggesting that when individuals can overcome acute effects, no long-term consequences result for the endpoints measured.

  12. Structure-Based Systematic Isolation of Conditional-Lethal Mutations in the Single Yeast Calmodulin Gene

    PubMed Central

    Ohya, Y.; Botstein, D.

    1994-01-01

    Conditional-lethal mutations of the single calmodulin gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been very difficult to isolate by random and systematic methods, despite the fact that deletions cause recessive lethality. We report here the isolation of numerous conditional-lethal mutants that were recovered by systematically altering phenylalanine residues. The phenylalanine residues of calmodulin were implicated in function both by structural studies of calmodulin bound to target peptides and by their extraordinary conservation in evolution. Seven single and 26 multiple Phe -> Ala mutations were constructed. Mutant phenotypes were examined in a haploid cmd1 disrupted strain under three conditions: single copy, low copy, and overexpressed. Whereas all but one of the single mutations caused no obvious phenotype, most of the multiple mutations caused obvious growth phenotypes. Five were lethal, 6 were lethal only in synthetic medium, 13 were temperature-sensitive lethal and 2 had no discernible phenotypic consequences. Overexpression of some of the mutant genes restored the phenotype to nearly wild type. Several temperature-sensitive calmodulin mutations were suppressed by elevated concentration of CaCl(2) in the medium. Mutant calmodulin protein was detected at normal levels in extracts of most of the lethal mutant cells, suggesting that the deleterious phenotypes were due to loss of the calmodulin function and not protein instability. Analysis of diploid strains heterozygous for all combinations of cmd1-ts alleles revealed four intragenic complementation groups. The contributions of individual phe->ala changes to mutant phenotypes support the idea of internal functional redundancy in the symmetrical calmodulin protein molecule. These results suggest that the several phenylalanine residues in calmodulin are required to different extents in different combinations in order to carry out each of the several essential tasks. PMID:7896089

  13. Complement component 5 promotes lethal thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Tomohiro; Yoshioka, Kengo; Mizuno, Masashi; Shimizu, Mie; Nagano, Fumihiko; Okuda, Tomoyuki; Tsuboi, Naotake; Maruyama, Shoichi; Nagamatsu, Tadashi; Imai, Masaki

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular histones promote platelet aggregation and thrombosis; this is followed by induction of coagulation disorder, which results in exhaustion of coagulation factors. Complement component 5 (C5) is known to be associated with platelet aggregation and coagulation system activation. To date, the pathological mechanism underlying liver injury has remained unclear. Here, we investigated whether C5 promotes liver injury associated with histone-induced lethal thrombosis. C5-sufficient and C5-deficient mice received single tail vein injections of purified, unfractionated histones obtained from calf thymus (45–75 μg/g). Subsequently, the mice were monitored for survival for up to 72 h. Based on the survival data, the 45 μg/g dose was used for analysis of blood cell count, liver function, blood coagulation ability, and promotion of platelet aggregation and platelet/leukocyte aggregate (PLA) production by extracellular histones. C5-deficient mice were protected from lethal thrombosis and had milder thrombocytopenia, consumptive coagulopathy, and liver injury with embolism and lower PLA production than C5-sufficient mice. These results indicate that C5 is associated with coagulation disorders, PLA production, and embolism-induced liver injury. In conclusion, C5 promotes liver injury associated with histone-induced lethal thrombosis. PMID:28205538

  14. Lethal interpersonal violence in the Middle Pleistocene.

    PubMed

    Sala, Nohemi; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Pantoja-Pérez, Ana; Pablos, Adrián; Martínez, Ignacio; Quam, Rolf M; Gómez-Olivencia, Asier; Bermúdez de Castro, José María; Carbonell, Eudald

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of interpersonal violence has been documented previously in Pleistocene members of the genus Homo, but only very rarely has this been posited as the possible manner of death. Here we report the earliest evidence of lethal interpersonal violence in the hominin fossil record. Cranium 17 recovered from the Sima de los Huesos Middle Pleistocene site shows two clear perimortem depression fractures on the frontal bone, interpreted as being produced by two episodes of localized blunt force trauma. The type of injuries, their location, the strong similarity of the fractures in shape and size, and the different orientations and implied trajectories of the two fractures suggest they were produced with the same object in face-to-face interpersonal conflict. Given that either of the two traumatic events was likely lethal, the presence of multiple blows implies an intention to kill. This finding shows that the lethal interpersonal violence is an ancient human behavior and has important implications for the accumulation of bodies at the site, supporting an anthropic origin.

  15. Lethal Interpersonal Violence in the Middle Pleistocene

    PubMed Central

    Sala, Nohemi; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Pantoja-Pérez, Ana; Pablos, Adrián; Martínez, Ignacio; Quam, Rolf M.; Gómez-Olivencia, Asier; Bermúdez de Castro, José María; Carbonell, Eudald

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of interpersonal violence has been documented previously in Pleistocene members of the genus Homo, but only very rarely has this been posited as the possible manner of death. Here we report the earliest evidence of lethal interpersonal violence in the hominin fossil record. Cranium 17 recovered from the Sima de los Huesos Middle Pleistocene site shows two clear perimortem depression fractures on the frontal bone, interpreted as being produced by two episodes of localized blunt force trauma. The type of injuries, their location, the strong similarity of the fractures in shape and size, and the different orientations and implied trajectories of the two fractures suggest they were produced with the same object in face-to-face interpersonal conflict. Given that either of the two traumatic events was likely lethal, the presence of multiple blows implies an intention to kill. This finding shows that the lethal interpersonal violence is an ancient human behavior and has important implications for the accumulation of bodies at the site, supporting an anthropic origin. PMID:26018668

  16. Stress-Related Signaling Pathways in Lethal and Non-Lethal Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Valdimarsdóttir, Unnur; Fang, Fang; Gerke, Travis; Tyekucheva, Svitlana; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Lambe, Mats; Sesso, Howard D.; Sweeney, Christopher J.; Wilson, Kathryn M.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Loda, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Recent data suggest that neuroendocrine signaling may influence progression in some cancers. We aimed to determine whether genes within the five major stress-related signaling pathways are differentially expressed in tumor tissue when comparing prostate cancer patients with lethal and non-lethal disease. Experimental Design We measured mRNA expression of 51 selected genes involved in predetermined stress-related signaling pathways (adrenergic, glucocorticoid, dopaminergic, serotoninergic, and muscarinic systems) in tumor tissue and normal prostate tissue collected from prostate cancer patients in the Physicians’ Health Study (n=150; n=82 with normal) and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (n=254; n=120 with normal). We assessed differences in pathway expression in relation to prostate cancer lethality as the primary outcome, and to biomarkers as secondary outcomes. Results Differential mRNA expression of genes within the adrenergic (p=0.001), glucocorticoid (p<0.0001), serotoninergic (p=0.0019), and muscarinic (p=0.0045) pathways in tumor tissue was associated with the risk of lethality. The adrenergic pathway was also statistically significant (p=0.001) when comparing against differential expression of genes not involved in the pathways. In adjacent normal prostate tissue, none of the pathways was clearly differentially expressed between lethal and non-lethal prostate cancer. The glucocorticoid and adrenergic pathways were associated with cell proliferation, while the glucocorticoid pathway was additionally associated with angiogenesis and perineural invasion. Conclusions Our study suggests that stress-related signaling pathways, particularly the adrenergic and glucocorticoid, may be dysregulated in the tumors of men whose prostate cancer proves to be lethal, and motivates further investigation of these pathways in functional studies. PMID:26490316

  17. Validation of web-based, multiple 24-h recalls combined with nutritional supplement intake questionnaires against nitrogen excretions to determine protein intake in Dutch elite athletes.

    PubMed

    Wardenaar, F C; Steennis, J; Ceelen, I J M; Mensink, M; Witkamp, R; de Vries, J H M

    2015-12-28

    Information on dietary composition is vitally important for elite athletes to optimise their performance and recovery, which requires valid tools. The aim of the present study was to investigate the validity of assessing protein intake using three web-based 24-h recalls and questionnaires, by comparing these with three urinary N excretions on the same day. A total of forty-seven Dutch elite top athletes, both disabled and non-disabled, aged between 18 and 35 years, with a BMI of 17·5-31 kg/m2, exercising >12 h/week were recruited. Estimated mean dietary protein intake was 109·6 (sd 33·0) g/d by recalls and questionnaires v. 141·3 (sd 38·2) g/d based on N excretions in urine; the difference was 25·5 (sd 21·3) % between the methods (P<0·05). We found a reasonably good association between methods for protein intake of 0·65 (95 % CI 0·45, 0·79). On an individual level, under-reporting was larger with higher protein intakes than with lower intakes. No significant differences were found in reporting absolute differences between subcategories (sex, under-reporting, BMI, collection of recalls within a certain amount of time and using protein supplements or not). In conclusion, combined, multiple, 24-h recalls and questionnaires underestimated protein intake in these young elite athletes more than that reported for non-athlete populations. The method proved to be suitable for ranking athletes according to their protein intake as needed in epidemiological studies. On an individual level, the magnitude of underestimation was about equal for all athletes except for those with very high protein intakes.

  18. Rhythmic 24 h Variation of Core Body Temperature and Locomotor Activity in a Subterranean Rodent (Ctenomys aff. knighti), the Tuco-Tuco

    PubMed Central

    Tachinardi, Patricia; Bicudo, José Eduardo Wilken; Oda, Gisele Akemi; Valentinuzzi, Verónica Sandra

    2014-01-01

    The tuco-tuco Ctenomys aff. knighti is a subterranean rodent which inhabits a semi-arid area in Northwestern Argentina. Although they live in underground burrows where environmental cycles are attenuated, they display robust, 24 h locomotor activity rhythms that are synchronized by light/dark cycles, both in laboratory and field conditions. The underground environment also poses energetic challenges (e.g. high-energy demands of digging, hypoxia, high humidity, low food availability) that have motivated thermoregulation studies in several subterranean rodent species. By using chronobiological protocols, the present work aims to contribute towards these studies by exploring day-night variations of thermoregulatory functions in tuco-tucos, starting with body temperature and its temporal relationship to locomotor activity. Animals showed daily, 24 h body temperature rhythms that persisted even in constant darkness and temperature, synchronizing to a daily light/dark cycle, with highest values occurring during darkness hours. The range of oscillation of body temperature was slightly lower than those reported for similar-sized and dark-active rodents. Most rhythmic parameters, such as period and phase, did not change upon removal of the running wheel. Body temperature and locomotor activity rhythms were robustly associated in time. The former persisted even after removal of the acute effects of intense activity on body temperature by a statistical method. Finally, regression gradients between body temperature and activity were higher in the beginning of the night, suggesting day-night variation in thermal conductance and heat production. Consideration of these day-night variations in thermoregulatory processes is beneficial for further studies on thermoregulation and energetics of subterranean rodents. PMID:24454916

  19. Dietary reporting errors on 24 h recalls and dietary questionnaires are associated with BMI across six European countries as evaluated with recovery biomarkers for protein and potassium intake.

    PubMed

    Freisling, Heinz; van Bakel, Marit M E; Biessy, Carine; May, Anne M; Byrnes, Graham; Norat, Teresa; Rinaldi, Sabina; Santucci de Magistris, Maria; Grioni, Sara; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Ocké, Marga C; Kaaks, Rudolf; Teucher, Birgit; Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Romaguera, Dora; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Palli, Domenico; Crowe, Francesca L; Tumino, Rosario; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas J; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Naska, Androniki; Orfanos, Philippos; Boeing, Heiner; Illner, Anne-Kathrin; Riboli, Elio; Peeters, Petra H; Slimani, Nadia

    2012-03-01

    Whether there are differences between countries in the validity of self-reported diet in relation to BMI, as evaluated using recovery biomarkers, is not well understood. We aimed to evaluate BMI-related reporting errors on 24 h dietary recalls (24-HDR) and on dietary questionnaires (DQ) using biomarkers for protein and K intake and whether the BMI effect differs between six European countries. Between 1995 and 1999, 1086 men and women participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition completed a single 24-HDR, a DQ and one 24 h urine collection. In regression analysis, controlling for age, sex, education and country, each unit (1 kg/m²) increase in BMI predicted an approximately 1·7 and 1·3 % increase in protein under-reporting on 24-HDR and DQ, respectively (both P < 0·0001). Exclusion of individuals who probably misreported energy intake attenuated BMI-related bias on both instruments. The BMI effect on protein under-reporting did not differ for men and women and neither between countries on both instruments as tested by interaction (all P>0·15). In women, but not in men, the DQ yielded higher mean intakes of protein that were closer to the biomarker-based measurements across BMI groups when compared with 24-HDR. Results for K were similar to those of protein, although BMI-related under-reporting of K was of a smaller magnitude, suggesting differential misreporting of foods. Under-reporting of protein and K appears to be predicted by BMI, but this effect may be driven by 'low-energy reporters'. The BMI effect on under-reporting seems to be the same across countries.

  20. The role of birth weight on litter size and mortality within 24h of life in purebred dogs: What aspects are involved?

    PubMed

    Groppetti, D; Ravasio, G; Bronzo, V; Pecile, A

    2015-12-01

    In humans, scientific evidence emphasizes the role of birth weight on neonatal welfare, morbidity and mortality. In canine species, defining normal ranges of birth weight is a harder issue due to a great morphological variability in size, body weight and breed. The aim of this study was to correlate birth weight with litter size and mortality within 24h of life in 789 pups from 140 litters of purebred dogs and to investigate the aspects that might affect these factors. Birth weight was influenced by maternal size, weight and age (P<0.001). The lightest pups were from toy sized or weighing up to 10 kg bitches. Conversely, bitches aged 2-8 years whelped heavier pups than younger and older mothers. Birth weight was also related both to litter size, with heavier pups in smaller rather than in larger litters from medium sized bitches, and breed (P<0.05). Unexpectedly, birth weight did not differ between live born and stillborn pups. However, birth weight was lower in pups dying within 24h of life (P<0.05). High mortality of pups was related both to short pregnancies (P<0.05), also showing lighter litters (P<0.001), and to dystocic parturitions (P<0.001). Litter size was associated with parity, type and number of mating, and length of pregnancy (P<0.001). Low birth weight appears to predispose to early neonatal mortality suggesting a predominant role of the breed rather than size and weight in determining birth weight in pups.

  1. Agreement between an online dietary assessment tool (myfood24) and an interviewer-administered 24-h dietary recall in British adolescents aged 11-18 years.

    PubMed

    Albar, Salwa A; Alwan, Nisreen A; Evans, Charlotte E L; Greenwood, Darren C; Cade, Janet E

    2016-05-01

    myfood24 Is an online 24-h dietary assessment tool developed for use among British adolescents and adults. Limited information is available regarding the validity of using new technology in assessing nutritional intake among adolescents. Thus, a relative validation of myfood24 against a face-to-face interviewer-administered 24-h multiple-pass recall (MPR) was conducted among seventy-five British adolescents aged 11-18 years. Participants were asked to complete myfood24 and an interviewer-administered MPR on the same day for 2 non-consecutive days at school. Total energy intake (EI) and nutrients recorded by the two methods were compared using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), Bland-Altman plots (using between and within-individual information) and weighted κ to assess the agreement. Energy, macronutrients and other reported nutrients from myfood24 demonstrated strong agreement with the interview MPR data, and ICC ranged from 0·46 for Na to 0·88 for EI. There was no significant bias between the two methods for EI, macronutrients and most reported nutrients. The mean difference between myfood24 and the interviewer-administered MPR for EI was -230 kJ (-55 kcal) (95 % CI -490, 30 kJ (-117, 7 kcal); P=0·4) with limits of agreement ranging between 39 % (3336 kJ (-797 kcal)) lower and 34 % (2874 kJ (687 kcal)) higher than the interviewer-administered MPR. There was good agreement in terms of classifying adolescents into tertiles of EI (κ w =0·64). The agreement between day 1 and day 2 was as good for myfood24 as for the interviewer-administered MPR, reflecting the reliability of myfood24. myfood24 Has the potential to collect dietary data of comparable quality with that of an interviewer-administered MPR.

  2. The Association of Knowledge and Behaviours Related to Salt with 24-h Urinary Salt Excretion in a Population from North and South India

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Claire; Mohan, Sailesh; Rogers, Kris; Shivashankar, Roopa; Thout, Sudhir Raj; Gupta, Priti; He, Feng J.; MacGregor, Graham A.; Webster, Jacqui; Krishnan, Anand; Maulik, Pallab K.; Reddy, K. Srinath; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Neal, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    Consumer knowledge is understood to play a role in managing risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease and may be influenced by level of education. The association between population knowledge, behaviours and actual salt consumption was explored overall, and for more-educated compared to less-educated individuals. A cross-sectional survey was done in an age-and sex-stratified random sample of 1395 participants from urban and rural areas of North and South India. A single 24-h urine sample, participants’ physical measurements and questionnaire data were collected. The mean age of participants was 40 years, 47% were women and mean 24-h urinary salt excretion was 9.27 (8.87–9.69) g/day. Many participants reported favourable knowledge and behaviours to minimise risks related to salt. Several of these behaviours were associated with reduced salt intake—less use of salt while cooking, avoidance of snacks, namkeens, and avoidance of pickles (all p < 0.003). Mean salt intake was comparable in more-educated (9.21, 8.55–9.87 g/day) versus less-educated (9.34, 8.57–10.12 g/day) individuals (p = 0.82). There was no substantively different pattern of knowledge and behaviours between more-versus less-educated groups and no clear evidence that level of education influenced salt intake. Several consumer behaviours related to use of salt during food preparation and consumption of salty products were related to actual salt consumption and therefore appear to offer an opportunity for intervention. These would be a reasonable focus for a government-led education campaign targeting salt. PMID:28212309

  3. A 24-h helpline for access to expert management advice for food allergy-related anaphylaxis in children: protocol for a pragmatic randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Kelleher, Maeve M; Hourihane, Jonathan O'B; DunnGalvin, Audrey; Cullinane, Claire; Fitzsimons, John; Sheikh, Aziz

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Anaphylaxis is an important, potentially life-threatening paediatric emergency. It is responsible for considerable morbidity and, in some cases, death. Poor outcomes may be associated with an inability to differentiate between milder and potentially more severe reactions and an associated reluctance to administer self-injectable adrenaline. This study aims to assess the effectiveness of a 24-h telephone access to specialist paediatric allergy expert advice in improving the quality of life of children and their families with potentially life-threatening food allergy (ie, anaphylaxis) compared with usual clinical care. Methods and analysis Children aged less than 16 years with food allergy and who carry an adrenaline autoinjector will be recruited from the Paediatric Allergy Clinic at Cork University Hospital, Ireland and baseline disease-specific quality of life will be ascertained using the validated Food Allergy Quality of Life Questionnaire (FAQLQ). Participants will be randomised for a period of 6 months to the 24-h telephone specialist support line or usual care. The primary outcome measure of interest is a change in FAQLQ scores, which will be assessed at 0, 1 and 6 months postrandomisation. Analysis will be on an intention-to-treat basis using a 2×3 repeated measures within-between analysis of variance. Although lacking power, we will in addition assess the impact of the intervention on a range of relevant process and clinical endpoints. Ethics and dissemination This trial protocol has been approved by the Clinical Research Ethics Committee of the Cork Teaching Hospitals. The findings will be presented at international scientific conferences and will be reported on in the peer-reviewed literature in early 2013. PMID:22893666

  4. Rhythmic 24 h variation of core body temperature and locomotor activity in a subterranean rodent (Ctenomys aff. knighti), the tuco-tuco.

    PubMed

    Tachinardi, Patricia; Bicudo, José Eduardo Wilken; Oda, Gisele Akemi; Valentinuzzi, Verónica Sandra

    2014-01-01

    The tuco-tuco Ctenomys aff. knighti is a subterranean rodent which inhabits a semi-arid area in Northwestern Argentina. Although they live in underground burrows where environmental cycles are attenuated, they display robust, 24 h locomotor activity rhythms that are synchronized by light/dark cycles, both in laboratory and field conditions. The underground environment also poses energetic challenges (e.g. high-energy demands of digging, hypoxia, high humidity, low food availability) that have motivated thermoregulation studies in several subterranean rodent species. By using chronobiological protocols, the present work aims to contribute towards these studies by exploring day-night variations of thermoregulatory functions in tuco-tucos, starting with body temperature and its temporal relationship to locomotor activity. Animals showed daily, 24 h body temperature rhythms that persisted even in constant darkness and temperature, synchronizing to a daily light/dark cycle, with highest values occurring during darkness hours. The range of oscillation of body temperature was slightly lower than those reported for similar-sized and dark-active rodents. Most rhythmic parameters, such as period and phase, did not change upon removal of the running wheel. Body temperature and locomotor activity rhythms were robustly associated in time. The former persisted even after removal of the acute effects of intense activity on body temperature by a statistical method. Finally, regression gradients between body temperature and activity were higher in the beginning of the night, suggesting day-night variation in thermal conductance and heat production. Consideration of these day-night variations in thermoregulatory processes is beneficial for further studies on thermoregulation and energetics of subterranean rodents.

  5. A 24-h forecast of solar irradiance using artificial neural network: Application for performance prediction of a grid-connected PV plant at Trieste, Italy

    SciTech Connect

    Mellit, Adel; Pavan, Alessandro Massi

    2010-05-15

    Forecasting of solar irradiance is in general significant for planning the operations of power plants which convert renewable energies into electricity. In particular, the possibility to predict the solar irradiance (up to 24 h or even more) can became - with reference to the Grid Connected Photovoltaic Plants (GCPV) - fundamental in making power dispatching plans and - with reference to stand alone and hybrid systems - also a useful reference for improving the control algorithms of charge controllers. In this paper, a practical method for solar irradiance forecast using artificial neural network (ANN) is presented. The proposed Multilayer Perceptron MLP-model makes it possible to forecast the solar irradiance on a base of 24 h using the present values of the mean daily solar irradiance and air temperature. An experimental database of solar irradiance and air temperature data (from July 1st 2008 to May 23rd 2009 and from November 23rd 2009 to January 24th 2010) has been used. The database has been collected in Trieste (latitude 45 40'N, longitude 13 46'E), Italy. In order to check the generalization capability of the MLP-forecaster, a K-fold cross-validation was carried out. The results indicate that the proposed model performs well, while the correlation coefficient is in the range 98-99% for sunny days and 94-96% for cloudy days. As an application, the comparison between the forecasted one and the energy produced by the GCPV plant installed on the rooftop of the municipality of Trieste shows the goodness of the proposed model. (author)

  6. Relative toxicity testing of spacecraft materials. 1: Spacecraft materials. [lethality of pyrolysates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, W. H.

    1980-01-01

    In chamber thermodegradation procedures were used to access the lethality to rats of the pyrolysis/combustion products of three foams, an adhesive backed metallic tape and RTV silicone rubber adhesive sealant used in spacecraft construction. The role of carbon monoxide in the overall pyrolysate toxicity was also investigated. Post exposure observation of the rats, histological evaluation of selected organs, carbon monoxide concentration in the chamber atmosphere during exposure and the percent carboxyhemoglobin in the animals expiring in the chamber are discussed. Thermogravimetric analysis and dosage response results are given. The lethal effect of the RTV silicon appears to be due to physical obstruction of the respiratory system by particulate matter from pyrolysis.

  7. Equation of state and fragmentation issues in computational lethality analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Trucano, T.G.

    1993-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize the status of computational analysis of hypervelocity impact lethality in relatively nontechnical terms from the perspective of the author. It is not intended to be a review of the technical literature on the problems of concern. The discussion is focused by concentrating on two phenomenology areas which are of particular concern in computational impact studies. First, the material`s equation of state, specifically the treatment of expanded states of metals undergoing shock vaporization, is discussed. Second, the process of dynamic fragmentation is addressed. In both cases, the context of the discussion deals with inaccuracies and difficulties associated with numerical hypervelocity impact simulations. Laboratory experimental capabilities in hypervelocity impact for impact velocities greater than 10.0 km/s are becoming increasingly viable. This paper also gives recommendations for experimental thrusts which utilize these capabilities that will help to resolve the uncertainties in the numerical lethality studies that are pointed out in the present report.

  8. The toxic and lethal effects of the trehalase inhibitor trehazolin in locusts are caused by hypoglycaemia.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Gerhard; Tschiedel, Volker; Schlöder, Paul; Ando, Osamu

    2003-04-01

    The main blood sugar of locusts is trehalose, which is hydrolysed to two glucose units by trehalase. Homogenates of locust flight muscles are rich in trehalase activity, which is bound to membranes. A minor fraction of trehalase is in an overt form while the remainder is latent, i.e. active only after impairing membrane integrity. Trehazolin, an antibiotic pseudosaccharide, inhibits locust flight muscle trehalase with apparent K(i)- and EC(50) values of 10(-8) mol l(-1) and 10(-7) mol l(-1), respectively. Trehazolin is insecticidal: 50 micro g injected into locusts completely and selectively blocked the overt form of muscle trehalase (with little effect on latent activity) and killed 50% of the insects within 24 h. Here, it is demonstrated for the first time that trehazolin causes dramatic hypoglycaemia. Injection of 10 micro g trehazolin caused glucose levels to fall by over 90% in 24 h, from 2.8 mmol l(-1) to 0.23 mmol l(-1), while trehalose increased from 61 mmol l(-1) to 111 mmol l(-1). Feeding glucose to the locusts fully neutralized the effects of a potentially lethal dose of trehazolin. This indicates that hypertrehalosaemia is not acutely toxic, whereas lack of glucose causes organ failure (presumably of the nervous system), and that sufficient haemolymph glucose can only be generated from trehalose by trehalase. The results also suggest that overt flight muscle trehalase is located in the plasma membrane with the active site accessible to the haemolymph. Trehalase inhibitors are valuable tools for studying the molecular physiology of trehalase function and sugar metabolism in insects.

  9. Lethal and sub-lethal effects of five pesticides used in rice farming on the earthworm Eisenia fetida.

    PubMed

    Rico, Andreu; Sabater, Consuelo; Castillo, María-Ángeles

    2016-05-01

    The toxicity of five pesticides typically used in rice farming (trichlorfon, dimethoate, carbendazim, tebuconazole and prochloraz) was evaluated on different lethal and sub-lethal endpoints of the earthworm Eisenia fetida. The evaluated endpoints included: avoidance behaviour after an exposure period of 2 days; and mortality, weight loss, enzymatic activities (cholinesterase, lactate dehydrogenase and alkaline phosphatase) and histopathological effects after an exposure period of 14 days. Carbendazim was found to be highly toxic to E. fetida (LC50=2mg/kg d.w.), significantly reducing earthworm weight and showing an avoidance response at soil concentrations that are close to those predicted in rice-fields and in surrounding ecosystems. The insecticide dimethoate showed a moderate acute toxicity (LC50=28mg/kg d.w.), whereas the rest of tested pesticides showed low toxicity potential (LC50 values above 100mg/kg d.w.). For these pesticides, however, weight loss was identified as a sensitive endpoint, with NOEC values approximately 2 times or lower than the calculated LC10 values. The investigated effects on the enzymatic activities of E. fetida and the observed histopathological alterations (longitudinal and circular muscle lesions, edematous tissues, endothelial degeneration and necrosis) proved to be sensitive biomarkers to monitor pesticide contamination and are proposed as alternative measures to evaluate pesticide risks on agro-ecosystems.

  10. Lethal and behavioural impacts of diesel and fuel oil on the Antarctic amphipod Paramoera walkeri.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kathryn E; King, Catherine K; Harrison, Peter L

    2017-03-03

    Toxicity testing with Antarctic species is required for risk assessment of fuel spills in Antarctic coastal waters. The lethal and sub-lethal (movement behaviour) sensitivity of adults and juveniles of the Antarctic amphipod Paramoera walkeri to the water accommodated fractions (WAF) of three fuels were estimated in extended duration tests at -1°C to 21 d. Response of P. walkeri for lethal hydrocarbon concentrations was slow, with LC50s first able to be estimated at 7 d for adults exposed to Special Antarctic Blend diesel (SAB), which had the highest hydrocarbon concentrations of the three fuel WAFs. Juveniles showed greater response to marine gas oil (MGO) and intermediate residual fuel oil (IFO 180) at longer exposure durations and were most sensitive at 21 d to IFO 180 (LC50 = 12 µg/L). Adults were initially more sensitive than juveniles; however, at 21 d juveniles were more than twice as sensitive as adults to SAB (LC50 = 153 µg/L and 377 µg/L respectively). Significant effects on movement behaviour were evident at earlier time points and lower concentrations than was mortality in all three fuel WAFs, and juveniles were highly sensitive to sub-lethal effects of MGO. These first estimates of Antarctic amphipod sensitivity to diesel and fuel oils in seawater contribute to development of ecologically relevant water quality guidelines for management of hydrocarbon contamination in the region. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Influence of nitrite and chloride concentrations on survival and hematological profiles of striped bass

    SciTech Connect

    Mazik, P.M.; Parker, N.C. ); Hinman, M.L.; Winkelmann, D.A.; Klaine, S.J.; Simco, B.A. )

    1991-03-01

    The 24-h median lethal concentration of nitrite (NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}) for striped bass Morone saxatilis was 163 mg/L in static toxicity tests. Exogenous chloride ions increased the tolerance of the fish for NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}; CaCl{sub 2} was more than twice as effective as NaCl. Plasma NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}, cortisol, and methemoglobin were correlated positively with environmental NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}. Plasma NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}} and methemoglobin were correlated negatively with environmental Cl{sup {minus}}, but cortisol was not reduced by the presence of environmental Cl{sup {minus}}. Striped bass maintained NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}} in the plasma (0-45 mg NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}/L) at concentrations below those in the environment (0-250 mg NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}/L). However, striped bass were sensitive to NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}} that entered the plasma; methemoglobin levels greater than 60% and plasma NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}} levels greater than 70 mg/L resulted in significant mortalities.

  12. Des-acyl-ghrelin (DAG) normalizes hyperlactacidemia and improves survival in a lethal rat model of burn trauma.

    PubMed

    Sheriff, Sulaiman; Kadeer, Nijiati; Friend, Lou Ann; James, J Howard; Alexander, J Wesley; Balasubramaniam, Ambikaipakan

    2014-10-01

    Critical illness, including burn injury, results in elevated plasma lactate levels. Dysregulation of PI3K/Akt signaling has been shown to play a predominant role in the inactivation of skeletal muscle PDC and, hence, in hyperlactacidemia in rat models of sepsis and endotoxemia. This observation, and our previous finding that DAG can reverse burn-induced skeletal muscle proteolysis through the activation of PI3K/Akt pathway, led us to hypothesize that DAG may also attenuate hyperlactacidemia in burn injury. Our investigations revealed that burn injury significantly elevated both skeletal muscle lactate production and plasma lactate levels. Moreover, this was accompanied in skeletal muscle by a 5-7 fold increase in mRNA expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDK) 2 and 4, and a ∼30% reduction in PDC activity. DAG treatment of burn rats completely normalized not only the mRNA expression of the PDKs and PDC activity, but also hyperlactacidemia within 24h of burn injury. DAG also normalized epinephrine-induced lactate production by isolated skeletal muscles from normal rats. Moreover, DAG also improved survival in a lethal rat model of burn trauma. These findings with DAG may have clinical implications because chances of survival for critically ill patients are greatly improved if plasma lactate levels are normalized within 24h of injury.

  13. Lethal and sublethal effects of thiamethoxam on the whitefly predator Serangium japonicum (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) through different exposure routes.

    PubMed

    Yao, Feng-Luan; Zheng, Yu; Zhao, Jian-Wei; Desneux, Nicolas; He, Yu-Xian; Weng, Qi-Yong

    2015-06-01

    Given expectations for a booming usage of thiamethoxam and increasing availability of the promising biological agent Serangium japonicum for the control of Bemisia tabaci in China, an evaluation of their compatibility is crucial for integrated pest management (IPM). This study examined the lethal and sublethal effects of thiamethoxam on S. japonicum through three exposure routes. An acute toxicity bioassay showed that LC50 values of thiamethoxam for S. japonicum through residue contact, egg-dip, and systemic treatment were 6.65, 4.37, and 2.43 mg AI L(-1), respectively. The prey consumption of S. japonicum given different densities of B. tabaci eggs under control, discontinuous, egg-dip and systemic exposure scenarios showed a good fit to a Type II functional response. Predation of S. japonicum was most affected under systemic exposure, followed by egg-dip, and discontinuous, which was only slightly affected. In all cases tested, however, predators recovered their predation capacity rapidly, either after 24h of exposure or 24h after the end of exposure. Thiamethoxam was highly toxic to S. japonicum regardless of exposure routes. Sublethal effects of thiamethoxam applied systemically or foliar both impaired the biological control of S. japonicum on B. tabaci. Therefore, thiamethoxam should be used with caution in IPM of B. tabaci.

  14. Lethal and sublethal toxicity of the industrial chemical epichlorohydrin on Rhinella arenarum (Anura, Bufonidae) embryos and larvae.

    PubMed

    Hutler Wolkowicz, Ianina R; Aronzon, Carolina M; Pérez Coll, Cristina S

    2013-12-15

    Lethal and sublethal toxicity of the major chemical used in epoxide compounds, epichlorohydrin (ECH) was evaluated on the early life cycle of the common South American toad, Rhinella arenarum (Anura, Bufonidae). The stages evaluated were (according to Del Conte and Sirlin): early blastula (S.3-S.4), gastrula (S.10-S.12), rotation (S.15), tail bud (S.17), muscular response (S.18), gill circulation (S.20), open mouth (S.21), opercular folds (S.23) and complete operculum (S.25). The LC50 and EC50 values for lethal and sublethal effects were calculated. The early blastula was the most sensitive stage to ECH both for continuously and pulse-exposures (LC50-24h=50.9 mg L(-1)), while S.20 was the most resistant (LC50-24h=104.9 mg L(-1)). Among sublethal effects, early blastula was also the most sensitive stage (LOEC-48 h=20 mg L(-1)) and it has a Teratogenic Index of 2.5, which indicates the teratogenic potential of the substance. The main abnormalities were persistent yolk plugs, cell dissociation, tumors, hydropsy, oral malformations, axial/tail flexures, delayed development and reduced body size. ECH also caused neurotoxicity including scarce response to stimuli, reduction in the food intake, general weakness, spasms and shortening, erratic or circular swimming. Industrial contamination is considered an important factor on the decline of amphibian populations. Considering the available information about ECH's toxicity and its potential hazard to the environment, this work shows the first results of its developmental toxicity on a native amphibian species, Rhinella arenarum.

  15. Lethal Forethought: Delayed Reward Discounting Differentiates High- and Low-Lethality Suicide Attempts in Old Age

    PubMed Central

    Dombrovski, Alexandre Y.; Szanto, Katalin; Siegle, Greg J.; Wallace, Meredith L.; Forman, Steven D.; Sahakian, Barbara; Reynolds, Charles F.; Clark, Luke

    2011-01-01

    Background The decision to commit suicide may be impulsive, but lethal suicidal acts often involve planning and forethought. People who attempt suicide make disadvantageous decisions in other contexts, but nothing is known about the way they decide about the future. Can the willingness to postpone future gratification differentiate between individuals prone to serious, premeditated and less serious, unplanned suicidal acts? Methods Four groups of depressed participants aged 60+ made choices between smaller immediate and larger delayed monetary rewards: 15 who made high-lethality suicide attempts, 14 who made low-lethality suicide attempts, 12 who seriously contemplated suicide, and 42 people with depression but no history of suicidal thoughts. The reference group was 31 psychiatrically healthy elders. Results Individuals who had made low-lethality attempts displayed an exaggerated preference for immediate rewards compared to non-suicidal depressed and healthy controls. Those who had carried out high-lethality suicide attempts were more willing to delay future rewards, compared to low-lethality attempters. Better planned suicide attempts were also associated with willingness to wait for larger rewards. These effects were unchanged after accounting for education, global cognitive function, substance use disorders, psychotropic medications, and possible brain injury from attempts. Discount rates were correlated with having debt but were not significantly associated with income, hopelessness, depressive severity, premorbid IQ, age at first attempt, or choice of violent means. Conclusions While clinicians often focus on impulsivity in patients at risk for suicide, these data suggest that identifying biological characteristics and treatments for non-impulsive suicidal older people may be even more important. PMID:21329911

  16. Lethal arthrogryposis multiplex congenital (fetal akinesia deformation sequence, FADS).

    PubMed

    Porter, H J

    1995-01-01

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenital (AMC) is the presence at birth of multiple congenital contractures in an intact skeleton. The severity of the condition is highly variable and the possible underlying causes are numerous. Fetal immobility and lesions of the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerves and muscle, along with mechanical restriction of the fetus in utero are the pathogenic mechanisms that need to be considered. Etiological factors that have been implicated in the development of AMC include genetic conditions, infections, drugs, toxins, maternal hyperthermia, and maternal illness. This review will concentrate on the severe end of the spectrum of AMC that results in disease that is lethal pre- or postnatally, and will discuss the pathology, pathogenesis, etiology, and practical approach to this diversely expressed condition.

  17. Clinical Effects and Lethal and Forensic Aspects of Propofol*

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    Propofol is a potent intravenous anesthetic agent that rapidly induces sedation and unconsciousness. The potential for propofol dependency, recreational use and abuse has only recently been recognized and several cases of accidental overdose and suicide have emerged. In addition, the first documented case of murder using propofol was reported a few months ago and a high profile case of suspected homicide with propofol is currently under investigation. A number of analytical methods have been employed to detect and quantify propofol concentrations in biological specimens. The reported propofol related deaths and post-mortem blood and tissue levels are reviewed. Importantly, limitations of propofol detection are discussed and future considerations are presented. Because propofol has the potential for diversion with lethal consequences, the forensic scientist must have a basic understanding of its clinical indications and uses, pharmacologic properties, and detection methods. In addition, medical institutions should develop systems to prevent and detect diversion of this potential drug of abuse. PMID:20950316

  18. Number of spermatozoa in the crypts of the sperm reservoir at about 24 h after a low-dose intrauterine and deep intrauterine insemination in sows.

    PubMed

    Tummaruk, P; Tienthai, P

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the number of spermatozoa in the crypts of the utero-tubal junction (UTJ) and the oviduct of sows approximately 24 h after intrauterine insemination (IUI) and deep intrauterine insemination (DIUI) and compared with that of conventional artificial insemination (AI). Fifteen crossbred Landrace x Yorkshire (LY) multiparous sows were used in the experiment. Transrectal ultrasonography was performed every 4 h to examine the time of ovulation in relation to oestrous behaviour. The sows were inseminated with a single dose of diluted fresh semen by the AI (n = 5), IUI (n = 5) and DIUI (n = 5) at approximately 6-8 h prior to the expected time of ovulation, during the second oestrus after weaning. The sperm dose contained 3000 x 10(6) spermatozoa in 100 ml for AI, 1,000 x 10(6) spermatozoa in 50 ml for IUI and 150 x 10(6) spermatozoa in 5 ml for DIUI. The sows were anaesthetized and ovario-hysterectomized approximately 24 h after insemination. The oviducts and the proximal part of the uterine horns (1 cm) on each side of the reproductive tracts were collected. The section was divided into four parts, i.e. UTJ, caudal isthmus, cranial isthmus and ampulla. The spermatozoa in the lumen in each part were flushed several times with phosphate buffer solution. After flushing, the UTJ and all parts of the oviducts were immersed in a 10% neutral buffered formalin solution. The UTJ and each part of the oviducts were cut into four equal parts and embedded in a paraffin block. The tissue sections were transversely sectioned to a thickness of 5 mum. Every fifth serial section was mounted and stained with haematoxylin and eosin. The total number of spermatozoa from 32 sections in each parts of the tissue (16 sections from the left side and 16 sections from the right side) was determined under light microscope. The results reveal that most of the spermatozoa in the histological section were located in groups in the epithelial crypts. The means of

  19. Testing of candidate non-lethal sampling methods for detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum in juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, Diane G.; McKibben, Constance L.; Conway, Carla M.; Purcell, Maureen K.; Chase, Dorothy M.; Applegate, Lynn M.

    2015-01-01

    Non-lethal pathogen testing can be a useful tool for fish disease research and management. Our research objectives were to determine if (1) fin clips, gill snips, surface mucus scrapings, blood draws, or kidney biopsies could be obtained non-lethally from 3 to 15 g Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, (2) non-lethal samples could accurately discriminate between fish exposed to the bacterial kidney disease agent Renibacterium salmoninarum and non-exposed fish, and (3) non-lethal samples could serve as proxies for lethal kidney samples to assess infection intensity. Blood draws and kidney biopsies caused ≥5% post-sampling mortality (Objective 1) and may be appropriate only for larger fish, but the other sample types were non-lethal. Sampling was performed over 21 wk following R. salmoninarum immersion challenge of fish from 2 stocks (Objectives 2 and 3), and nested PCR (nPCR) and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) results from candidate non-lethal samples were compared with kidney tissue analysis by nPCR, qPCR, bacteriological culture, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), fluorescent antibody test (FAT) and histopathology/immunohistochemistry. R. salmoninarum was detected by PCR in >50% of fin, gill, and mucus samples from challenged fish. Mucus qPCR was the only non-lethal assay exhibiting both diagnostic sensitivity and specificity estimates >90% for distinguishing between R. salmoninarum-exposed and non-exposed fish and was the best candidate for use as an alternative to lethal kidney sample testing. Mucus qPCR R. salmoninarum quantity estimates reflected changes in kidney bacterial load estimates, as evidenced by significant positive correlations with kidney R. salmoninaruminfection intensity scores at all sample times and in both fish stocks, and were not significantly impacted by environmentalR. salmoninarum concentrations.

  20. Sub-lethal ammonia toxicity in largemouth bass.

    PubMed

    Suski, C D; Kieffer, J D; Killen, S S; Tufts, B L

    2007-03-01

    Guidelines for ammonia toxicity in fish are often determined using static exposure tests with immature fish over a 96-h period. These results may not be relevant to aquaculture, hauling or angling tournament scenarios where mature fish can be exposed to ammonia for shorter durations, often following additional stressors such as handling. The current study sought to quantify (1) the impact of ambient ammonia on the ability of largemouth bass to recover from exercise, (2) the behavioural response of largemouth bass to elevated ambient ammonia and (3) the concentration of ammonia that can accumulate in a live-release vessel at an angling tournament. After approximately 3 h, total ammonia (T(amm)) concentrations in a live-release vessel at an angling tournament were almost 200 muM. Exposure of fish to 1000 microM T(amm) (a value approximately 80% below the criteria maximum concentration for largemouth bass) caused significant reductions in ventilation rates, and increases in erratic swimming and irregular ventilation. Exposure to 100 microM T(amm) impaired the ability of largemouth bass to recover from exercise relative to fish recovering in fresh water. Therefore, sub-lethal ambient ammonia concentrations cause physiological disturbances that can impair the recovery of largemouth bass from exercise.

  1. Continuous versus discontinuous drinking of an ethanol liquid diet in peripubertal rats: effect on 24-h variation of lymph node and splenic mitogenic responses and lymphocyte subset populations.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Ortega, Vanesa; Fernández-Mateos, María P; Barquilla, Pilar Cano; Cardinali, Daniel P; Esquifino, Ana I

    2011-03-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption continues to be a major public health problem, particularly in the adolescent and young adult populations. Generally, such a behavior tends to be confined to the weekends, to attain frequently binge drinking. This study in peripubertal male rats compares the effect of the discontinuous feeding of a liquid diet containing a moderate amount of ethanol (6.2% wt/vol) to that of continuous ethanol administration or a control diet, taking as end points the 24-h variations of plasma prolactin levels and mitogenic responses and lymphocyte subset populations in submaxillary lymph nodes and spleen. Animals received the ethanol liquid diet starting on day 35 of life, the diet being similar to that given to controls except for that maltose was isocalorically replaced by ethanol. Ethanol provided 36% of the total caloric content. Every week, the discontinuous ethanol group received the ethanol diet for 3 days and the control liquid diet for the remaining 4 days. After 4 weeks, rats were killed at six time intervals, beginning at 0900 h. A significant decrease of splenic cells' response to concanavalin A, and of lymph node and splenic cells' response to lipopolysaccharide was found in rats under the discontinuous ethanol regime, when compared with control- or ethanol-chronic rats. Under discontinuous ethanol feeding, mean values of lymph node and splenic CD8(+) and CD4(+)-CD8(+) cells decreased, whereas those of lymph node and splenic T cells, and splenic B cells, augmented. In rats chronically fed with ethanol, splenic mean levels of CD8(+) and CD4(+)-CD8(+) cells augmented. Both modalities of ethanol administration disrupted the 24 h variation in immune function seen in controls. Mean plasma prolactin levels increased by 3.6-fold and 8.5-fold in rats chronically or discontinuously fed with alcohol, respectively. The immune parameters examined in an additional group of rats fed regular chow and water ad libitum did not differ significantly from

  2. Administration of an immunomodulatory azaspirane, SK F 105685, or human recombinant interleukin 1 stimulates myelopoiesis and enhances survival from lethal irradiation in C57Bl/6 mice

    SciTech Connect

    King, A.G.; Badger, A.M. )

    1991-08-01

    The immunomodulatory azaspirane SK F 105685 has immunosuppressive activity in animal models of autoimmune disease such as adjuvant-induced arthritis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. The mechanism of SK F 105685 appears to be the induction of nonspecific suppressor cell (SC) activity. SC appear to be null cells, that is, cells that lack specific cell surface markers of mature B cells, T cells, natural killer (NK) cells, or macrophages. Because the authors hypothesized that the induction of SC was associated with enhanced hematopoiesis, they sought to determine the hematopoietic potential of SK F 105685. Recombinant interleukin 1 alpha (rIL-1) was included as a positive control for hematopoietic stimulation in their studies. They demonstrate here that administration of SK F 105685 increases the number of granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming units (CFU-GM) within the bone marrow 24 h after injection in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the percentage of CFU-GM in S-phase of the cell cycle was significantly increased, as was colony-stimulating activity (CSA) present in the serum of treated animals. In their experiments IL-1 did not increase marrow CFU-GM; however, splenic CFU-GM, the proportion of CFU-GM in S-phase of the cell cycle, and serum CSA were all increased 24 h after a single treatment. Administration of SK F 105685 24 h prior to lethal irradiation resulted in a dose-related increase in the number of surviving mice. These results demonstrate that SK F 105685 and rIL-1 stimulate myelopoiesis in vivo and suggest a mechanism by which prophylactic treatment with these agents protects mice from otherwise lethal irradiation.

  3. Issues surrounding lethal injection as a means of capital punishment.

    PubMed

    Romanelli, Frank; Whisman, Tyler; Fink, Joseph L

    2008-12-01

    Lethal injection as a method of state-sanctioned capital punishment was initially proposed in the United States in 1977 and used for the first time in 1982. Most lethal injection protocols use a sequential drug combination of sodium thiopental, pancuronium bromide, and potassium chloride. Lethal injection was originally introduced as a more humane form of execution compared with existing mechanical methods such as electrocution, toxic gassing, hanging, or firing squad. Lethal injection has not, however, been without controversy. Several states are considering whether lethal injection meets constitutional scrutiny forbidding cruel and unusual punishment. Recently in the case of Ralph Baze and Thomas C. Bowling, Petitioners, v John D. Rees, Commissioner, Kentucky Department of Corrections et al, the United States Supreme Court upheld the constitutionality of the lethal injection protocol as carried out in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. Most of the debate has surrounded the dosing and procedures used in lethal injection and whether the drug combinations and measures for administering the drugs truly produce a timely, pain-free, and fail-safe death. Many have also raised issues regarding the "medicalization" of execution and the ethics of health care professionals' participation in any part of the lethal injection process. As a result of all these issues, the future of lethal injection as a means of execution in the United States is under significant scrutiny. Outcomes of ongoing legislative and judicial reviews might result in cessation of lethal injection in totality or in alterations involving specific drug combinations or administration procedures.

  4. Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin reduces human alveolar epithelial barrier function.

    PubMed

    Langer, Marybeth; Duggan, Elizabeth Stewart; Booth, John Leland; Patel, Vineet Indrajit; Zander, Ryan A; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Ramani, Vijay; Veres, Tibor Zoltan; Prenzler, Frauke; Sewald, Katherina; Williams, Daniel M; Coggeshall, Kenneth Mark; Awasthi, Shanjana; Lupu, Florea; Burian, Dennis; Ballard, Jimmy Dale; Braun, Armin; Metcalf, Jordan Patrick

    2012-12-01

    The lung is the site of entry for Bacillus anthracis in inhalation anthrax, the deadliest form of the disease. Bacillus anthracis produces virulence toxins required for disease. Alveolar macrophages were considered the primary target of the Bacillus anthracis virulence factor lethal toxin because lethal toxin inhibits mouse macrophages through cleavage of MEK signaling pathway components, but we have reported that human alveolar macrophages are not a target of lethal toxin. Our current results suggest that, unlike human alveolar macrophages, the cells lining the respiratory units of the lung, alveolar epithelial cells, are a target of lethal toxin in humans. Alveolar epithelial cells expressed lethal toxin receptor protein, bound the protective antigen component of lethal toxin, and were subject to lethal-toxin-induced cleavage of multiple MEKs. These findings suggest that human alveolar epithelial cells are a target of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin. Further, no reduction in alveolar epithelial cell viability was observed, but lethal toxin caused actin rearrangement and impaired desmosome formation, consistent with impaired barrier function as well as reduced surfactant production. Therefore, by compromising epithelial barrier function, lethal toxin may play a role in the pathogenesis of inhalation anthrax by facilitating the dissemination of Bacillus anthracis from the lung in early disease and promoting edema in late stages of the illness.

  5. Bacillus anthracis Lethal Toxin Reduces Human Alveolar Epithelial Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Marybeth; Duggan, Elizabeth Stewart; Booth, John Leland; Patel, Vineet Indrajit; Zander, Ryan A.; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Ramani, Vijay; Veres, Tibor Zoltan; Prenzler, Frauke; Sewald, Katherina; Williams, Daniel M.; Coggeshall, Kenneth Mark; Awasthi, Shanjana; Lupu, Florea; Burian, Dennis; Ballard, Jimmy Dale; Braun, Armin

    2012-01-01

    The lung is the site of entry for Bacillus anthracis in inhalation anthrax, the deadliest form of the disease. Bacillus anthracis produces virulence toxins required for disease. Alveolar macrophages were considered the primary target of the Bacillus anthracis virulence factor lethal toxin because lethal toxin inhibits mouse macrophages through cleavage of MEK signaling pathway components, but we have reported that human alveolar macrophages are not a target of lethal toxin. Our current results suggest that, unlike human alveolar macrophages, the cells lining the respiratory units of the lung, alveolar epithelial cells, are a target of lethal toxin in humans. Alveolar epithelial cells expressed lethal toxin receptor protein, bound the protective antigen component of lethal toxin, and were subject to lethal-toxin-induced cleavage of multiple MEKs. These findings suggest that human alveolar epithelial cells are a target of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin. Further, no reduction in alveolar epithelial cell viability was observed, but lethal toxin caused actin rearrangement and impaired desmosome formation, consistent with impaired barrier function as well as reduced surfactant production. Therefore, by compromising epithelial barrier function, lethal toxin may play a role in the pathogenesis of inhalation anthrax by facilitating the dissemination of Bacillus anthracis from the lung in early disease and promoting edema in late stages of the illness. PMID:23027535

  6. OUP: lethal gene drive selects inbreeding

    PubMed Central

    Bull, James J.

    2017-01-01

    The use of ‘selfish’ gene drive systems to suppress or even extinguish populations has been proposed on theoretical grounds for almost half a century. Creating these genes has recently become possible with CRISPR technology. One seemingly feasible approach, originally proposed by Burt, is to create a homing endonuclease gene (HEG) that inserts into an essential gene, enabling heterozygote viability but causing homozygote lethality. With 100% segregation distortion in gametes, such genes can cause profound population suppression if resistance does not evolve. Here, population genetic models are used to consider the evolution of inbreeding (specifically selfing) as a possible response to a recessively lethal HEG with complete segregation distortion. Numerical analyses indicate a rich set of outcomes, but selfing often evolves in response to the HEG, with a corresponding partial restoration of mean fitness. Whether selfing does indeed evolve and its effect in restoring fitness depends heavily on the magnitude of inbreeding depression. Overall, these results point toward an underappreciated evolutionary response to block the harmful effects of a selfish gene. They raise the possibility that extreme population suppression may be resisted by mechanisms that are independent of the molecular basis of gene drive. At the same time, the evolution of inbreeding is not assured even if the genetic basis for inbreeding is present. As the models here strictly apply to hermaphrodites (plants), an important next step is to consider inbreeding in populations with separate sexes. PMID:28013241

  7. A lethal combination for cancer cells: synthetic lethality screenings for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Elisa; Lucca, Chiara; Foiani, Marco

    2010-11-01

    In recent years, cancer drug discovery has faced the challenging task of integrating the huge amount of information coming from the genomic studies with the need of developing highly selective target-based strategies within the context of tumour cells that experience massive genome instability. The combination between genetic and genomic technologies has been extremely useful and has contributed to efficiently transfer certain approaches typical of basic science to drug discover projects. An example comes from the synthetic lethal approaches, very powerful procedures that employ the rational used by geneticists working on model organisms. Applying the synthetic lethality (SL) screenings to anticancer therapy allows exploiting the typical features of tumour cells, such as genome instability, without changing them, as opposed to the conventional anticancer strategies that aim at counteracting the oncogenic signalling pathways. Recent and very encouraging clinical studies clearly show that certain promising anticancer compounds work through a synthetic lethal mechanism by targeting pathways that are specifically essential for the viability of cancer cells but not of normal cells. Herein we describe the rationale of the synthetic lethality approaches and the potential applications for anticancer therapy.

  8. Suicide Intent and Accurate Expectations of Lethality: Predictors of Medical Lethality of Suicide Attempts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Gregory K.; Henriques, Gregg R.; Sosdjan, Daniella; Beck, Aaron T.

    2004-01-01

    The degree of intent to commit suicide and the severity of self-injury were examined in individuals (N = 180) who had recently attempted suicide. Although a minimal association was found between the degree of suicide intent and the degree of lethality of the attempt, the accuracy of expectations about the likelihood of dying was found to moderate…

  9. Potential lethal and non-lethal effects of predators on dispersal of spider mites.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Hatsune; Yano, Shuichi

    2014-11-01

    Predators can affect prey dispersal lethally by direct consumption or non-lethally by making prey hesitate to disperse. These lethal and non-lethal effects are detectable only in systems where prey can disperse between multiple patches. However, most studies have drawn their conclusions concerning the ability of predatory mites to suppress spider mites based on observations of their interactions on a single patch or on heavily infested host plants where spider mites could hardly disperse toward intact patches. In these systems, specialist predatory mites that penetrate protective webs produced by spider mites quickly suppress the spider mites, whereas generalist predators that cannot penetrate the webs were ineffective. By using a connected patch system, we revealed that a generalist ant, Pristomyrmex punctatus Mayr (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), effectively prevented dispersal of spider mites, Tetranychus kanzawai Kishida (Acari: Tetranychidae), by directly consuming dispersing individuals. We also revealed that a generalist predatory mite, Euseius sojaensis Ehara (Acari: Phytoseiidae), prevented between-patch dispersal of T. kanzawai by making them hesitate to disperse. In contrast, a specialist phytoseiid predatory mite, Neoseiulus womersleyi Schicha, allowed spider mites to escape an initial patch, increasing the number of colonized patches within the system. Our results suggest that ants and generalist predatory mites can effectively suppress Tetranychus species under some conditions, and should receive more attention as agents for conservation biological control in agroecosystems.

  10. Gonadosomatic mosaicism for lethal mutations in Drosophila lethal mutations disturbing larval development

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, A.I.; Sakharova, N.Yu.

    1988-11-01

    Phenogenetic analysis of autonomous lethal mutations obtained by the method of gonadosomatic mosaicism which manifested during larval stages, established that the nuclei of hypodermal cells, salivary glands suprapharyngeal ganglion, pharynx, esophagus, gizzard, and hindgut are the derivatives of the same nucleus (from the first two nuclei of cleavage) as the nuclei of the cells of the imaginal-somatic tissues.

  11. Safety and Efficacy of 24-h Closed-Loop Insulin Delivery in Well-Controlled Pregnant Women With Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Helen R.; Kumareswaran, Kavita; Elleri, Daniela; Allen, Janet M.; Caldwell, Karen; Biagioni, Martina; Simmons, David; Dunger, David B.; Nodale, Marianna; Wilinska, Malgorzata E.; Amiel, Stephanie A.; Hovorka, Roman

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the safety and efficacy of closed-loop insulin delivery in well-controlled pregnant women with type 1 diabetes treated with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 12 women with type 1 diabetes (aged 32.9 years, diabetes duration 17.6 years, BMI 27.1 kg/m2, and HbA1c 6.4%) were randomly allocated to closed-loop or conventional CSII. They performed normal daily activities (standardized meals, snacks, and exercise) for 24 h on two occasions at 19 and 23 weeks’ gestation. Plasma glucose time in target (63–140 mg/dL) and time spent hypoglycemic were calculated. RESULTS Plasma glucose time in target was comparable for closed-loop and conventional CSII (median [interquartile range]: 81 [59–87] vs. 81% [54–90]; P = 0.75). Less time was spent hypoglycemic (<45 mg/dL [0.0 vs. 0.3%]; P = 0.04), with a lower low blood glucose index (2.4 [0.9–3.5] vs. 3.3 [1.9–5.1]; P = 0.03), during closed-loop insulin delivery. CONCLUSIONS Closed-loop insulin delivery was as effective as conventional CSII, with less time spent in extreme hypoglycemia. PMID:22011408

  12. An Open Framework Aluminophosphate with Unique 12-Membered Ring Channels: Al 9(PO 4) 12(C 24H 91N 16)·17H 2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yao-Hua; Zhang, Bing-Guang; Chen, Xiao-Feng; Liu, Shu-Hua; Duan, Chun-Ying; You, Xiao-Zeng

    1999-06-01

    By using the hydrothermal method, a new large-pore three dimensional aluminophosphate Al9(PO)12(C24H81N16)·17H2O has been synthesized. The compound crystallizes in the cubic space group I-43m with a=16.7963(13) Å, V=4738.5(6) Å3, and Z=2. The P/Al ratio of this compound is 4:3 and the structure consists of Al-centered and P-centered tetrahedra in which all the AlO4 tetrahedra vertices and three of PO4 tetrahedra corners are shared. The framework contains unique 12-membered ring channels, which intersect each other with 12-membered ring windows in three dimensions, and almost spherical cavities, in which water and amine ions are located. The window containing three P=O groups selectively interacts with 4-(2-aminoethyl)diethylenetriamine by the effect of recognition in the hydrothermal condition. The compound could exist up to 260°C. At higher temperature, the amine was decomposed and released, and the compound was transferred into amorphous phase. The component Al of the compound can be partly substituted with other elements, such as Sn, Zn, Mg, Co, Mn, and Cd, by which the charge of the framework can be adjusted.

  13. Insights into ultraviolet-induced electrical degradation of thermally grown SiO{sub 2}/4H-SiC(0001) interface

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeguchi, Daisuke; Hosoi, Takuji; Shimura, Takayoshi; Watanabe, Heiji; Nakano, Yuki; Nakamura, Takashi

    2014-01-06

    The harmful impact of ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation on thermally grown SiO{sub 2}/4H-SiC structures was investigated by means of electrical measurements of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors. Unlike Si-based MOS devices, significant electrical degradation, such as positive flatband voltage (V{sub FB}) shift and hysteresis in the capacitance-voltage (C-V) curves of SiC-MOS capacitors was induced by UV irradiation with a low-pressure mercury lamp. The interfacial fixed charge density increased with UV-irradiation (22.6 mW/cm{sup 2} for 16 h) to 1.7 × 10{sup 12} cm{sup −2}, which was an order of magnitude larger than that of the as-grown SiO{sub 2}/SiC interface. A detailed study based on single wavelength solid-state UV lasers revealed that there was a threshold photon energy at around 5 eV and a moderate dependence of UV-induced degradation on temperature. These experimental findings imply that pre-existing inactive defects accumulated at the thermally grown SiO{sub 2}/SiC interface were transformed to active carrier traps with high-energy UV irradiation through transparent SiO{sub 2} layers.

  14. Successful outcome after endovascular thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke with basis on perfusion-diffusion mismatch after 24 h of symptoms onset

    PubMed Central

    Mattei, Tobias A.; Rehman, Azeem A.; Goulart, Carlos R.; Sória, Marília G.; Rizelio, Vanessa; Meneses, Murilo S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although intravenous thrombolysis is the Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment for acute ischemic stroke (AIS) within 3 h, combined intravenous and intra-arterial thrombolysis with endovascular techniques may be able to extend this traditional time window. Case Description: We present the clinical evolution of a 45-year-old male presenting with acute left hemiparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a small diffusion restriction at the right basal ganglia with perfusion compromise in the entire right middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory. Angiography revealed a complete occlusion of MCA at its M1 segment. The patient underwent endovascular mechanical thrombectomy with additional intra-arterial thrombolysis more than 24 hours after the onset of the initial symptoms and experienced complete vessel recanalization. At 1 year, the patient had global independence with minor residual motor impairment in the left arm. Conclusions: We report the case of a successful thrombolytic therapy following AIS performed more than 24 h after the initial symptoms based on the presence of a perfusion-diffusion mismatch. This report is expected to stimulate the development of future prospective studies with special focus on the role of perfusion-diffusion mismatch in patient selection for treatment of AIS, especially in those presenting outside the traditional time window. PMID:27313971

  15. Synthesis of a novel layered double hydroxides [MgAl(4)(OH)(12)](Cl)(2)·2.4H(2)O and its anion-exchange properties.

    PubMed

    Chitrakar, Ramesh; Makita, Yoji; Sonoda, Akinari; Hirotsu, Takahiro

    2011-01-30

    A novel layered double hydroxide of Mg and Al with composition [Mg(0.96)Al(4.00)(OH)(12)]Cl(1.86)(CO(3))(0.03)·2.4H(2)O, designated as MgAl(4)-Cl, was synthesized by mixing crystalline gibbsite (γ-Al(OH)(3)) and solid MgCl(2)·6H(2)O with subsequent hydrothermal treatment at 160 °C for 72h. The MgAl(4)-Cl exhibited a crystalline material of a layered structure, as evidenced from X-ray diffraction. Anion uptake experiments with the MgAl(4)-Cl showed that Cl(-) in the interlayer space can be exchanged with anions such as Br(-), H(2)PO(4)(-), CO(3)(2-) or dodecyl sulfate (DS(-)) from aqueous solutions with preservation of the layered structure. Uptake of NO(3)(-), BrO(3)(-) or SO(4)(2-) on the MgAl(4)-Cl showed different behavior; these anions can be exchanged within 1h maintaining the layered structure, but a release of Mg(2+) cations from the sample was observed with increased reaction time, resulting in collapse of the layered structure and formation of the gibbsite phase, as determined from chemical analyses and X-ray diffraction.

  16. Effects of sodium ions on trapping and transport of electrons at the SiO{sub 2}/4H-SiC interface

    SciTech Connect

    Basile, A. F. Mooney, P. M.; Ahyi, A. C.; Williams, J. R.; Feldman, L. C.

    2014-01-21

    Capacitance-voltage (C-V) and Deep-Level-Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements were performed on Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (MOS) capacitors fabricated on 4H-SiC with the SiO{sub 2} layer grown by Sodium-Enhanced Oxidation. This technique has yielded 4H-SiC MOS transistors with record channel mobility, although with poor bias stability. The effects of the mobile positive charge on the C-V characteristics and DLTS spectra were investigated by applying a sequence of positive and negative bias-temperature stresses, which drifted the sodium ions toward and away from the SiO{sub 2}/4H-SiC interface, respectively. Analytical modeling of the C-V curves shows that the drift of sodium ions in the SiO{sub 2} layer during the voltage sweep can explain the temperature dependence of the C-V curves. The effects of lateral fluctuations of the surface potential (due to a non-uniform charge distribution) on the inversion layer mobility of MOS transistors are discussed within a two-dimensional percolation model.

  17. Structural and electronic properties of the transition layer at the SiO{sub 2}/4H-SiC interface

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wenbo; Wang, Dejun; Zhao, Jijun

    2015-01-15

    Using first-principles methods, we generate an amorphous SiO{sub 2}/4H-SiC interface with a transition layer. Based this interface model, we investigate the structural and electronic properties of the interfacial transition layer. The calculated Si 2p core-level shifts for this interface are comparable to the experimental data, indicating that various SiC{sub x}O{sub y} species should be present in this interface transition layer. The analysis of the electronic structures reveals that the tetrahedral SiC{sub x}O{sub y} structures cannot introduce any of the defect states at the interface. Interestingly, our transition layer also includes a C-C=C trimer and SiO{sub 5} configurations, which lead to the generation of interface states. The accurate positions of Kohn-Sham energy levels associated with these defects are further calculated within the hybrid functional scheme. The Kohn-Sham energy levels of the carbon trimer and SiO{sub 5} configurations are located near the conduction and valence band of bulk 4H-SiC, respectively. The result indicates that the carbon trimer occurred in the transition layer may be a possible origin of near interface traps. These findings provide novel insight into the structural and electronic properties of the realistic SiO{sub 2}/SiC interface.

  18. Serotonin turnover in different duration of sleep recovery in discrete regions of young rat brain after 24 h REM sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Senthilvelan, M; Ravindran, R; Samson, J; Devi, R Sheela

    2006-09-01

    Sleep plays an important role in restorative function and serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine: 5HT) equally plays important roles in sleep. Though various studies have revealed the roles of 5HT in sleep/wake cycle, the mechanism involved is yet unclear. In the present study we investigated alteration of the 5HT turnover in various regions of the young rat brains after 24 hours (h) REM sleep (sREM) deprivation to elucidate the roles of 5HT in sleep restoration function in the these regions. The 5HT turnover was evaluated by the ratio of 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid against 5HT. The sREM deprivation was performed by the inverted flowerpot technique. The 5HT turnover showed significant alteration in the all regions of the brain examined after 24h sREM deprivation, particular depending on the brain region. These results revealed that sREM modulates the 5HT turnover in the brain with region specificity and this may be one of the restorative functions of sleep indicating that sREM is regionally generated.

  19. Lethal and sublethal toxicity of didecyldimethylammonium chloride in early life stages of white sturgeon, Acipenser transmontanus.

    PubMed

    Teh, Swee Joo; Wong, Cecilia; Furtula, Vesna; Teh, Foo-Ching

    2003-09-01

    This study was conducted to describe the acute lethality and latent toxicity of didecyldimethylammonium chloride (DDAC) on early life stages of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus). Fish responses to 0, 10, 50, 100, 250, 500 microg/L concentrations of DDAC were determined using a 96-h standard static renewal method for acute toxicity testing, with three replicates per concentration. Twenty fish per replicate were tested for 3, 11, and 42-d-old larvae, and 7 fish per replicate were tested for 78-d-old juveniles. Following exposure, survival and growth were evaluated in exposed fish raised in clean water for 2 weeks. The 96-h median lethal concentration (LC50) values for DDAC were 10.0 to 50.0, 58.5, and 99.7 microg/L for 3, 11, and 42-d-old larvae and 100 to 250 microg/L for 78-d-old juveniles. Significant decreases in larval growth and survival were noted at all tested concentrations and in all sturgeon age groups. Results of this study reveal age- and concentration-dependent responses to DDAC. Among the age groups tested, the 3-d-old larvae were the most sensitive group. Results also revealed that 96-h lethality testing alone is not adequate for determining the toxicity of DDAC to white sturgeon.

  20. Pretreatment with ascorbic acid prevents lethal gastrointestinal syndrome in mice receiving a massive amount of radiation.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tetsuo; Kinoshita, Manabu; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi; Hiroi, Sadayuki; Sugasawa, Hidekazu; Matsushita, Yoshitaro; Majima, Takashi; Saitoh, Daizoh; Seki, Shuhji

    2010-01-01

    While bone marrow or stem cell transplantation can rescue bone marrow aplasia in patients accidentally exposed to a lethal radiation dose, radiation-induced irreversible gastrointestinal damage (GI syndrome) is fatal. We investigated the effects of ascorbic acid on radiation-induced GI syndrome in mice. Ascorbic acid (150 mg/kg/day) was orally administered to mice for 3 days, and then the mice underwent whole body irradiation (WBI). Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) 24 h after irradiation rescued mice receiving a WBI dose of less than 12 Gy. No mice receiving 14 Gy-WBI survived, because of radiation-induced GI syndrome, even if they received BMT. However, pretreatment with ascorbic acid significantly suppressed radiation-induced DNA damage in the crypt cells and prevented denudation of intestinal mucosa; therefore, ascorbic acid in combination with BMT rescued mice after 14 Gy-WBI. DNA microarray analysis demonstrated that irradiation up-regulated expressions of apoptosis-related genes in the small intestine, including those related to the caspase-9-mediated intrinsic pathway as well as the caspase-8-mediated extrinsic pathway, and down-regulated expressions of these genes in ascorbic acid-pretreated mice. Thus, pretreatment with ascorbic acid may effectively prevent radiation-induced GI syndrome.

  1. Lethal Dietary Toxicities of Environmental Contaminants and Pesticides to Coturnix

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, E.F.; Camardese, M.B.

    1986-01-01

    Five-day subacute dietary toxicity tests of 193 potential environmental contaminants, pesticides, organic solvents, and various adjuvants are presented for young coturnix (Japanese quail, Coturnix japonica Temminck and Schlegel). The report provides the most comprehensive data base available for avian subacute dietary toxicity tests and is primarily intended for use in ranking toxicities by a standard method that has a reasonable degree of environmental relevance. Findings are presented in two parts: Part I is a critique of selected drugs that includes discussion of subacute toxicity in relation to chemical class and structure, pesticide formulation, and age of animals; Part II is a summary of toxicologic findings for each test substance and provides a statistically basis for comparing toxicities. Data presented include the median lethal concentration (LC50), slope of the probit regression curve (dose-response curve), response chronology, and food consumption. We observed that: 1) fewer than 15% of the compounds were classed 'very' or 'highly' toxic (i.e, LC50 < 200 ppm) and all of these were either chlorinated hydrocarbons, organophosphates, or organometallics; 2) subacute toxicity may vary widely among structurally similar chemicals and between different formulations of the same chemical; therefore, conclusions about lethal hazard must be made cautiously until the actual formulation of inset has been tested: 3) inclusion of a general standard in each battery of tests is useful for detection of atypical trials and monitoring population changes but should not be used indiscriminantly for adjusting LC50's for intertest differences unless the chemicals of concern and the standard elicit their toxicities through the same action; 4) although other species have been tested effectively under the subacute protocol, coturnix were ideal for the stated purpose of this research because they are inexpensive, well-adapted to the laboratory environment, and yield good intertest

  2. Acute lethal and sublethal effects of neem leaf extract on the neotropical freshwater fish Prochilodus lineatus.

    PubMed

    Winkaler, Elissandra U; Santos, Thiago R M; Machado-Neto, Joaquim G; Martinez, Cláudia B R

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the toxicity of the aqueous extract of neem leaves, a product extensively used in fish-farms as alternative for the control of fish parasites and fish fry predators, for the neotropical fish Prochilodus lineatus. The 24 h LC(50) of neem leaf extract for juveniles P. lineatus was estimated as 4.8 g L(-1); the fish were then exposed for 24 h to 2.5, 5.0 and 7.5 g L(-1) or only clean water (control). Plasma glucose levels were higher in fish exposed to 2.5 g L(-1) and 5.0 g L(-1) neem extract, relative to control, indicating a typical stress response. Neem extract did not interfere with the osmoregulating capacity of the fish, as their plasma sodium, chloride, total protein and osmolarity did not change. The presence of the biopesticide interfered with the antioxidant defense system of P. lineatus, as there was a decrease in liver catalase activity at all neem concentrations and the detoxifying enzyme glutathione-S-transferase was activated in fish exposed to 5.0 g L(-1). Fish exposed to all neem extract concentrations exhibited damaged gill and kidney tissue. These results indicate that although neem extract is less toxic to P. lineatus than other synthetic insecticides used in fish-farming it does cause functional and morphological changes in this fish species.

  3. Ants defend aphids against lethal disease.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Charlotte; Agrawal, Anurag A; Hajek, Ann E

    2010-04-23

    Social insects defend their own colonies and some species also protect their mutualist partners. In mutualisms with aphids, ants typically feed on honeydew produced by aphids and, in turn guard and shelter aphid colonies from insect natural enemies. Here we report that Formica podzolica ants tending milkweed aphids, Aphis asclepiadis, protect aphid colonies from lethal fungal infections caused by an obligate aphid pathogen, Pandora neoaphidis. In field experiments, bodies of fungal-killed aphids were quickly removed from ant-tended aphid colonies. Ant workers were also able to detect infective conidia on the cuticle of living aphids and responded by either removing or grooming these aphids. Our results extend the long-standing view of ants as mutualists and protectors of aphids by demonstrating focused sanitizing and quarantining behaviour that may lead to reduced disease transmission in aphid colonies.

  4. Lethal Synergism between Influenza and Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, Jennifer M; Ashar, Harshini K; Chow, Vincent TK; Teluguakula, Narasaraju

    2016-01-01

    The devastating synergism of bacterial pneumonia with influenza viral infections left its mark on the world over the last century. Although the details of pathogenesis remain unclear, the synergism is related to a variety of factors including pulmonary epithelial barrier damage which exposes receptors that influence bacterial adherence and the triggering of an exaggerated innate immune response and cytokine storm, which further acts to worsen the injury. Several therapeutics and combination therapies of antibiotics, anti-inflammatories including corticosteroids and toll-like receptor modifiers, and anti-virals are being discussed. This mini review summarizes recent developments in unearthing the pathogenesis of the lethal synergism of pneumococcal co-infection following influenza, as well as addresses potential therapeutic options and combinations of therapies currently being evaluated. PMID:27981251

  5. Statistical tests for recessive lethal-carriers.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, M A; Haseman, J K

    1979-08-01

    This paper presents a statistical method for testing whether a male mouse is a recessive lethal-carrier. The analysis is based on a back-cross experiment in which the male mouse is mated with some of his daughters. The numbers of total implantations and intrauterine deaths in each litter are recorded. It is assumed that, conditional on the number of total implantations, the number of intrauterine deaths follows a binomial distribution. Using computer-simulated experimentation it is shown that the proposed statistical method, which is sensitive to the pattern of intrauterine death rates, is more powerful than a test based only on the total number of implant deaths. The proposed test requires relatively simple calculations and can be used for a wide range of values of total implantations and background implant mortality rates. For computer-simulated experiments, there was no practical difference between the empirical error rate and the nominal error rate.

  6. Infrared spectroscopy of [XFeC24H12]+ (X = C5H5, C5(CH3)5) complexes in the gas phase: experimental and computational studies of astrophysical interest.

    PubMed

    Simon, Aude; Joblin, Christine; Polfer, Nick; Oomens, Jos

    2008-09-18

    We report the first experimental mid-infrared (700-1600 cm (-1)) multiple-photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectra of [XFeC 24H 12] (+) (X = C 5H 5 or Cp, C 5(CH 3) 5 or Cp*) complexes in the gas phase obtained using the free electron laser for infrared experiments. The experimental results are complemented with theoretical infrared (IR) absorption spectra calculated with methods based on density functional theory. The isomers in which the XFe unit is coordinated to an outer ring of C 24H 12 (+) (Out isomers) were calculated to be the most stable ones. From the comparison between the experimental and calculated spectra, we could derive that, (i) for [CpFeC 24H 12] (+) complexes, the (1)A Out isomer appears to be the best candidate to be formed in the experiment but the presence of the (1)A In higher energy isomer in minor abundance is also plausible; and (ii) for [Cp*FeC 24H 12] (+) complexes, the three calculated Out isomers of similar energy are likely to be present simultaneously, in qualitative agreement with the observed dissociation patterns. This study also emphasizes the threshold effect in the IRMPD spectrum below which IR bands cannot be observed and evidence strong mode coupling effects in the [XFeC 24H 12] (+) species. The effect of the coordination of Fe in weakening the bands of C 24H 12 (+) in the 1000-1600 cm (-1) region is confirmed, which is of interest to search for such complexes in interstellar environments.

  7. Lethal and sublethal effects of a methomyl-based insecticide in Hoplobatrachus rugulosus

    PubMed Central

    Trachantong, Waret; Saenphet, Supap; Saenphet, Kanokporn; Chaiyapo, Monruedee

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the lethal and sublethal toxicity of a methomyl-based insecticide in Hoplobatrachus rugulosus, as methomyl-based insecticides are applied in massive amounts and agrochemicals have effects on the decline in amphibian populations. To evaluate the toxic effects of methomyl from agricultural application, a methomyl-based insecticide containing 40% methomyl was selected. The median lethal concentration of 96 hours of methomyl exposure was 8.69 ppm for H. rugulosus tadpoles. The lethal concentration also produced severe histological damage in the livers and kidneys of the exposed tadpoles. The sublethal concentration used for methomyl was 144 ppb during the metamorphosis period. It was found that the sublethal concentration of the methomyl compound could decrease growth, metamorphosis time, and size, disturb biochemical parameters, and produce histological damage. In livers, methomyl effects increased oxidative stress and dramatically decreased the glycogen level of the treated froglets. Mononuclear infiltration, blood congestion, amorphous substances, and hepatocytes vacuolization were observed throughout liver tissue. The methomyl-based insecticide also increased oxidative stress and decreased nitric oxide levels in the kidneys of the exposed froglets. Renal tissue damage including blood congestion, amorphous substances, and Bowman’s capsule spaces reduction were found in the methomyl exposure group. The methomyl compound also produced vacuoles in various stages of oocytes, but no histological damage was found in testicular tissue. Our results indicated strong toxic effects of the methomyl-based insecticide on H. rugulosus, a broadly tolerant anuran. PMID:28190921

  8. Lethal and sublethal effects of a methomyl-based insecticide in Hoplobatrachus rugulosus.

    PubMed

    Trachantong, Waret; Saenphet, Supap; Saenphet, Kanokporn; Chaiyapo, Monruedee

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the lethal and sublethal toxicity of a methomyl-based insecticide in Hoplobatrachus rugulosus, as methomyl-based insecticides are applied in massive amounts and agrochemicals have effects on the decline in amphibian populations. To evaluate the toxic effects of methomyl from agricultural application, a methomyl-based insecticide containing 40% methomyl was selected. The median lethal concentration of 96 hours of methomyl exposure was 8.69 ppm for H. rugulosus tadpoles. The lethal concentration also produced severe histological damage in the livers and kidneys of the exposed tadpoles. The sublethal concentration used for methomyl was 144 ppb during the metamorphosis period. It was found that the sublethal concentration of the methomyl compound could decrease growth, metamorphosis time, and size, disturb biochemical parameters, and produce histological damage. In livers, methomyl effects increased oxidative stress and dramatically decreased the glycogen level of the treated froglets. Mononuclear infiltration, blood congestion, amorphous substances, and hepatocytes vacuolization were observed throughout liver tissue. The methomyl-based insecticide also increased oxidative stress and decreased nitric oxide levels in the kidneys of the exposed froglets. Renal tissue damage including blood congestion, amorphous substances, and Bowman's capsule spaces reduction were found in the methomyl exposure group. The methomyl compound also produced vacuoles in various stages of oocytes, but no histological damage was found in testicular tissue. Our results indicated strong toxic effects of the methomyl-based insecticide on H. rugulosus, a broadly tolerant anuran.

  9. Exploring the physiologic role of human gastroesophageal reflux by analyzing time-series data from 24-h gastric and esophageal pH recordings.

    PubMed

    Lu, Luo; Mu, John C; Sloan, Sheldon; Miner, Philip B; Gardner, Jerry D

    2014-07-16

    Our previous finding of a fractal pattern for gastric pH and esophageal pH plus the statistical association of sequential pH values for up to 2 h led to our hypothesis that the fractal pattern encodes information regarding gastric acidity and that depending on the value of gastric acidity, the esophagus can signal the stomach to alter gastric acidity by influencing gastric secretion of acid or bicarbonate. Under our hypothesis values of gastric pH should provide information regarding values of esophageal pH and vice versa. We used vector autoregression, a theory-free set of inter-related linear regressions used to measure relationships that can change over time, to analyze data from 24-h recordings of gastric pH and esophageal pH. We found that in pH records from normal subjects, as well as from subjects with gastroesophageal reflux disease alone and after treatment with a proton pump inhibitor, gastric pH values provided important information regarding subsequent values of esophageal pH and values of esophageal pH provided important information regarding subsequent values of gastric pH. The ability of gastric pH and esophageal pH to provide information regarding subsequent values of each other was reduced in subjects with gastroesophageal reflux disease compared to normal subjects. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that depending on the value of gastric acidity, the esophagus can signal the stomach to alter gastric acidity, and that this ability is impaired in subjects with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

  10. UK dietary exposure to PCDD/Fs, PCBs, PBDD/Fs, PBBs and PBDEs: comparison of results from 24-h duplicate diets and total diet studies.

    PubMed

    Bramwell, Lindsay; Mortimer, David; Rose, Martin; Fernandes, Alwyn; Harrad, Stuart; Pless-Mulloli, Tanja

    2017-01-01

    Chemicals in food are monitored to check for compliance with regulatory limits and to evaluate trends in dietary exposures, among other reasons. This study compared two different methods for estimating human dietary exposure to lipophilic persistent organic pollutants (POPs) during 2011/12: (1) the 2012 Total Diet Study (TDS) conducted by the UK Food Standards Agency (FSA) and (2) a 24-h duplicate diet (DD) study of 20 adults from the North East of England. The equivalence of the two approaches was assessed; anything less than an order of magnitude could be considered reasonable and within three-fold (equivalent to 0.5 log) as good. Adult dietary exposure estimates derived from the DD study for both average and high-level (97.5th percentile) consumers compared well with those from the TDS. Estimates from the DD study when compared with those from the TDS were within 10% for P97.5 for total PCDD/F/PCB with divergence increasing to a factor of 3.4 for average BDE-209. Most estimates derived from the TDS were slightly higher than those derived from the DD. Comparison with earlier UK TDS data over the last 30 years or so confirmed a gradual decline in levels of PCDD/F/PCBs in food. Such comparisons also indicated peaks in dietary exposure to ∑PBDE (excluding BDE-209) between 2000 and 2005. Exposure estimates for all measured compounds using both TDS and DD data were found to be within recommended tolerable daily intakes where available or within acceptable margins of exposure.

  11. Nutrient Intake Is Insufficient among Senegalese Urban School Children and Adolescents: Results from Two 24 h Recalls in State Primary Schools in Dakar

    PubMed Central

    Fiorentino, Marion; Landais, Edwige; Bastard, Guillaume; Carriquiry, Alicia; Wieringa, Frank T.; Berger, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Due to rapid urbanization and high food prices and in the absence of nutrition programs, school children from urban areas in West Africa often have insufficient and inadequate diet leading to nutrient deficiencies that affect their health and schooling performance. Acute malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies are prevalent in children from primary state schools of Dakar (Senegal). The objectives of the present study were to assess the overall diet of these children, to report insufficient/excessive energy and nutrient intakes and to investigate association between insufficient nutrient intake and micronutrient deficiencies. Children attending urban state primary schools in the Dakar area were selected through a two-stage random cluster sampling (30 schools × 20 children). Dietary intake data were obtained from two 24 h recalls and blood samples were collected from 545 children (aged 5–17 years, 45% < 10 years, 53% girls) and adjusted for intra-individual variability to estimate nutrient usual intakes. Energy intake was insufficient and unbalanced with insufficient contribution of protein and excessive contribution of fat to global energy intake in one third of the children. Proportions of children with insufficient intake were: 100% for calcium, 100% for folic acid, 79% for vitamin A, 69% for zinc, 53% for vitamin C and 46% for iron. Insufficient iron and protein intake were risk factors for iron deficiency (odds ratio, OR 1.5, 2.2). Insufficient zinc intake and energy intake from protein were risk factors for zinc deficiency (OR 1.8, 3.0, 1.7, 2.9). Insufficient iron and vitamin C intake, and insufficient energy intake from protein were risk factors for marginal vitamin A status (OR 1.8, 1.8, 3.3). To address nutritional deficiencies associated with a diet deficient in energy, protein and micronutrients, nutrition education or school feeding programs are needed in urban primary schools of Senegal. PMID:27775598

  12. Nutrient Intake Is Insufficient among Senegalese Urban School Children and Adolescents: Results from Two 24 h Recalls in State Primary Schools in Dakar.

    PubMed

    Fiorentino, Marion; Landais, Edwige; Bastard, Guillaume; Carriquiry, Alicia; Wieringa, Frank T; Berger, Jacques

    2016-10-20

    Due to rapid urbanization and high food prices and in the absence of nutrition programs, school children from urban areas in West Africa often have insufficient and inadequate diet leading to nutrient deficiencies that affect their health and schooling performance. Acute malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies are prevalent in children from primary state schools of Dakar (Senegal). The objectives of the present study were to assess the overall diet of these children, to report insufficient/excessive energy and nutrient intakes and to investigate association between insufficient nutrient intake and micronutrient deficiencies. Children attending urban state primary schools in the Dakar area were selected through a two-stage random cluster sampling (30 schools × 20 children). Dietary intake data were obtained from two 24 h recalls and blood samples were collected from 545 children (aged 5-17 years, 45% < 10 years, 53% girls) and adjusted for intra-individual variability to estimate nutrient usual intakes. Energy intake was insufficient and unbalanced with insufficient contribution of protein and excessive contribution of fat to global energy intake in one third of the children. Proportions of children with insufficient intake were: 100% for calcium, 100% for folic acid, 79% for vitamin A, 69% for zinc, 53% for vitamin C and 46% for iron. Insufficient iron and protein intake were risk factors for iron deficiency (odds ratio, OR 1.5, 2.2). Insufficient zinc intake and energy intake from protein were risk factors for zinc deficiency (OR 1.8, 3.0, 1.7, 2.9). Insufficient iron and vitamin C intake, and insufficient energy intake from protein were risk factors for marginal vitamin A status (OR 1.8, 1.8, 3.3). To address nutritional deficiencies associated with a diet deficient in energy, protein and micronutrients, nutrition education or school feeding programs are needed in urban primary schools of Senegal.

  13. Toll-like receptor 2- and 6-mediated stimulation by macrophage-activating lipopeptide 2 induces lipopolysaccharide (LPS) cross tolerance in mice, which results in protection from tumor necrosis factor alpha but in only partial protection from lethal LPS doses.

    PubMed

    Deiters, Ursula; Gumenscheimer, Marina; Galanos, Chris; Mühlradt, Peter F

    2003-08-01

    Patients or experimental animals previously exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) become tolerant to further LPS challenge. We investigated the potential of the macrophage-activating lipopeptide 2 (MALP-2) to induce in vivo cross tolerance to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and LPS. MALP-2-induced tolerance could be of practical interest, as MALP-2 proved much less pyrogenic in rabbits than LPS. Whereas LPS signals via Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), MALP-2 uses TLR2 and TLR6. LPS-mediated cytokine release was studied in mice pretreated with intraperitoneal injections of MALP-2. No biologically active TNF-alpha could be detected in the serum of MALP-2-treated animals when challenged with LPS 24 or 72 h later, whereas suppression of LPS-dependent interleukin (IL)-6 lasted for only 24 h. Protection from lethal TNF-alpha shock was studied in galactosamine-treated mice. Dose dependently, MALP-2 prevented death from lethal TNF-alpha doses in TLR4(-/-) but not in TLR2(-/-) mice, with protection lasting from 5 to 24 h. To assay protection from LPS, mice were pretreated with MALP-2 doses of up to 10 micro g. Five and 24 h later, the animals were simultaneously sensitized and challenged by intravenous coinjection of galactosamine and a lethal dose of 50 ng of LPS. There was only limited protection (four of seven mice survived) when mice were challenged 5 h after MALP-2 pretreatment, and no protection when mice were challenged at later times. The high effectiveness of MALP-2 in suppressing TNF-alpha, the known ways of biological inactivation, and low pyrogenicity make MALP-2 a potential candidate for clinical use.

  14. Concentrated sodium chloride brine solutions as an additional treatment for preventing the introduction of nonindigenous species in the ballast tanks of ships declaring no ballast on board.

    PubMed

    Santagata, Scott; Bacela, Karolina; Reid, David F; Mclean, Kevin A; Cohen, Jill S; Cordell, Jeffery R; Brown, Christopher W; Johengen, Thomas H; Ruiz, Gregory M

    2009-02-01

    Currently, seawater flushing is the only management strategy for reducing the number of viable organisms in residual sediments and water of ballast tanks of vessels declaring no ballast on board (NOBOB) that traffic ports of the eastern United States. Previously, we identified several species of freshwater and brackish-water peracarid crustaceans able to survive the osmotic shock that occurs during open-ocean ballast water exchange and, potentially, to disperse over long distances via ballasted ships and NOBOB vessels. We tested the efficacy of concentrated sodium chloride brine solutions as an additional treatment for eradicating the halotolerant taxa often present in the ballast tanks of NOBOB ships. The lowest brine treatments (30 ppt for 1 h) caused 100% mortality in several species of cladocerans and copepods collected from oligohaline habitats. Several brackish-water peracarid crustaceans, however, including some that can survive in freshwater as well, required higher brine concentrations and longer exposure durations (45-60 ppt for 3-24 h). The most resilient animals were widely introduced peracarid crustaceans that generally prefer mesohaline habitats but do not tolerate freshwater (required brine treatments of 60-110 ppt for 3-24 h). Brine treatments (30 ppt) also required less time to cause 100% mortality for eight taxa compared with treatments using 34 ppt seawater. Based on these experiments and published data, we present treatment strategies for the ballast tank biota often associated with NOBOB vessels entering the Great Lakes region. We estimate the lethal dosage of brine for 95% of the species in our experiments to be 110 ppt (95% confidence interval, 85-192 ppt) when the exposure time is 1 h and 60 ppt (95% confidence interval, 48-98 ppt) when the exposure duration is 6 h or longer.

  15. Syn-Lethality: An Integrative Knowledge Base of Synthetic Lethality towards Discovery of Selective Anticancer Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue-juan; Mishra, Shital K.; Wu, Min; Zhang, Fan

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic lethality (SL) is a novel strategy for anticancer therapies, whereby mutations of two genes will kill a cell but mutation of a single gene will not. Therefore, a cancer-specific mutation combined with a drug-induced mutation, if they have SL interactions, will selectively kill cancer cells. While numerous SL interactions have been identified in yeast, only a few have been known in human. There is a pressing need to systematically discover and understand SL interactions specific to human cancer. In this paper, we present Syn-Lethality, the first integrative knowledge base of SL that is dedicated to human cancer. It integrates experimentally discovered and verified human SL gene pairs into a network, associated with annotations of gene function, pathway, and molecular mechanisms. It also includes yeast SL genes from high-throughput screenings which are mapped to orthologous human genes. Such an integrative knowledge base, organized as a relational database with user interface for searching and network visualization, will greatly expedite the discovery of novel anticancer drug targets based on synthetic lethality interactions. The database can be downloaded as a stand-alone Java application. PMID:24864230

  16. Chronic Exposure of Corals to Fine Sediments: Lethal and Sub-Lethal Impacts

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Florita; Hoogenboom, Mia O.; Smith, Luke D.; Cooper, Timothy F.; Abrego, David; Negri, Andrew P.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the sedimentation and turbidity thresholds for corals is critical in assessing the potential impacts of dredging projects in tropical marine systems. In this study, we exposed two species of coral sampled from offshore locations to six levels of total suspended solids (TSS) for 16 weeks in the laboratory, including a 4 week recovery period. Dose-response relationships were developed to quantify the lethal and sub-lethal thresholds of sedimentation and turbidity for the corals. The sediment treatments affected the horizontal foliaceous species (Montipora aequituberculata) more than the upright branching species (Acropora millepora). The lowest sediment treatments that caused full colony mortality were 30 mg l−1 TSS (25 mg cm−2 day−1) for M. aequituberculata and 100 mg l−1 TSS (83 mg cm−2 day−1) for A. millepora after 12 weeks. Coral mortality generally took longer than 4 weeks and was closely related to sediment accumulation on the surface of the corals. While measurements of damage to photosystem II in the symbionts and reductions in lipid content and growth indicated sub-lethal responses in surviving corals, the most reliable predictor of coral mortality in this experiment was long-term sediment accumulation on coral tissue. PMID:22662225

  17. Low salinity enhances NI-mediated oxidative stress and sub-lethal toxicity to the green shore crab (Carcinus maenas).

    PubMed

    Blewett, Tamzin A; Wood, Chris M

    2015-12-01

    Nickel (Ni) is a metal of environmental concern, known to cause toxicity to freshwater organisms by impairing ionoregulation and/or respiratory gas exchange, and by inducing oxidative stress. However, little is known regarding how nickel toxicity is influenced by salinity. In the current study we investigated the salinity-dependence and mechanisms of sub-lethal Ni toxicity in a euryhaline crab (Carcinus maenas). Crabs were acclimated to three experimental salinities--20, 60 and 100% seawater (SW)--and exposed to 3mg/L Ni for 24h or 96 h. Tissues were dissected for analysis of Ni accumulation, gills were taken for oxidative stress analysis (catalase activity and protein carbonyl content), haemolymph ions were analysed for ionoregulatory disturbance, and oxygen consumption was determined in exercised crabs after 96 h of Ni exposure. Total Ni accumulation was strongly dependant on salinity, with crabs from 20% SW displaying the highest tissue Ni burdens after both 24 and 96-h exposures. After 96 h of exposure, the highest accumulation of Ni occurred in the posterior (ionoregulatory) gills at the lowest salinity, 20% SW. Posterior gill 8 exhibited elevated protein carbonyl levels and decreased catalase activity after Ni exposure, but only in 20% SW. Similarly, decreased levels of haemolymph Mg and K and an increased level of Ca were recorded but only in crabs exposed to Ni for 96 h in 20% SW. Oxygen consumption after exercise was also inhibited in crabs exposed to Ni in 20% SW. These data show for the first time the simultaneous presence of all three modes of sub-lethal Ni toxicity in exposed animals, and indicate a strong salinity dependence of sub-lethal Ni toxicity to the euryhaline crab, C. maenas, a pattern that corresponded to tissue Ni accumulation.

  18. Non-Lethal Endotoxin Injection: A Rat Model of Hypercoagulability.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Marjory B; Turk, James R; Guerrero, Abraham; Narayanan, Padma K; Nolan, John P; Besteman, Elizabeth G; Wilson, Dennis W; Thomas, Roberta A; Fishman, Cindy E; Thompson, Karol L; Ellinger-Ziegelbauer, Heidrun; Pierson, Jennifer B; Paulman, April; Chiang, Alan Y; Schultze, Albert E

    2017-01-01

    Systemic inflammation co-activates coagulation, which unchecked culminates in a lethal syndrome of multi-organ microvascular thrombosis known as disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). We studied an endotoxin-induced inflammatory state in rats to identify biomarkers of hemostatic imbalance favoring hypercoagulability. Intraperitoneal injection of LPS at 15 mg/kg body weight resulted in peripheral leukopenia and widespread neutrophilic sequestration characteristic of an acute systemic inflammatory response. Early indicators of hemostatic pathway activation developed within 4 hours, including increased circulating concentrations of procoagulant extracellular vesicles (EVs), EVs expressing endothelial cell and platelet membrane markers, and high concentration of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), and D-dimers. Inflammation persisted throughout the 48-hour observation period; however, increases were found in a subset of serum microRNA (miRNA) that coincided with gradual resolution of hemostatic protein abnormalities and reduction in EV counts. Dose-adjusted LPS treatment in rats provides a time-course model to develop biomarker profiles reflecting procoagulant imbalance and rebalance under inflammatory conditions.

  19. Non-Lethal Endotoxin Injection: A Rat Model of Hypercoagulability

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Marjory B.; Turk, James R.; Guerrero, Abraham; Narayanan, Padma K.; Nolan, John P.; Besteman, Elizabeth G.; Wilson, Dennis W.; Thomas, Roberta A.; Fishman, Cindy E.; Thompson, Karol L.; Ellinger-Ziegelbauer, Heidrun; Pierson, Jennifer B.; Paulman, April; Chiang, Alan Y.; Schultze, Albert E.

    2017-01-01

    Systemic inflammation co-activates coagulation, which unchecked culminates in a lethal syndrome of multi-organ microvascular thrombosis known as disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). We studied an endotoxin-induced inflammatory state in rats to identify biomarkers of hemostatic imbalance favoring hypercoagulability. Intraperitoneal injection of LPS at 15 mg/kg body weight resulted in peripheral leukopenia and widespread neutrophilic sequestration characteristic of an acute systemic inflammatory response. Early indicators of hemostatic pathway activation developed within 4 hours, including increased circulating concentrations of procoagulant extracellular vesicles (EVs), EVs expressing endothelial cell and platelet membrane markers, and high concentration of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), and D-dimers. Inflammation persisted throughout the 48-hour observation period; however, increases were found in a subset of serum microRNA (miRNA) that coincided with gradual resolution of hemostatic protein abnormalities and reduction in EV counts. Dose-adjusted LPS treatment in rats provides a time-course model to develop biomarker profiles reflecting procoagulant imbalance and rebalance under inflammatory conditions. PMID:28081568

  20. The Influence of Geographic Mobility on Nearly Lethal Suicide Attempts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Lloyd B.; Kresnow, Marcie-jo; Powell, Kenneth E.; Simon, Thomas R.; Mercy, James A.; Lee, Roberta K.; Frankowski, Ralph F.; Swann, Alan C.; Bayer, Timothy; O'Carroll, Patrick W.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a population-based, case-control study of nearly lethal suicide attempts with 153 cases and 513 controls. Results indicate that moving in the past year is positively associated with a nearly lethal suicide attempt, as are specific characteristics of the move. Findings confirm and extend prior research by demonstrating a relationship…

  1. Lethal body burdens of chlorophenols and mixtures of chlorophenols in an oligochaete worm, Lumbriculus variegatus

    SciTech Connect

    Kukkonen, J.

    1995-12-31

    The lethal body burdens (LBB) of a few chlorophenol congeners were measured in the oligochaete worm, Lumbriculus variegatus. LBB is defined as the concentration of the compound in the organism on molar basis to cause a death. Groups of 40 organisms were exposed to different chlorophenol concentrations in artificial soft freshwater to achieve differential mortality. Exposure times were either 24 hours or 48 hours. Besides exposures with individual congener, mixtures of chlorophenols were also tested. After each exposure, the surviving organisms were collected and the body burden of chlorophenols were measured by GC with electron capture detection. Only the surviving organisms were analyzed, because dead worms started to decay rather quickly. The analyzed tissue concentrations were actually lower than in surviving organisms. The trichlorophenols and pentachlorophenol have a LBB of 0.4--0.7 {micro}mol/g wet weight. The 2,6-dichlorophenol has a slightly higher LBB of 1.0--1.6 {micro}mol/g wet weight. The LBB of chlorophenol mixtures (two congeners at a time) were of the same, on molar basis, as individual congeners demonstrating fully additive toxicity. The lethal body burdens of 2,4,5-trichlorophenol and pentachlorophenol in Lumbriculus variegatus were the same for these water-only exposures as previously reported for these compounds in two different sediments. The use of lethal body burden approach in sediment toxicology is further discussed.

  2. The metabolic fate of the amido-N group of glutamine in the tissues of the gastrointestinal tract in 24 h-fasted sheep.

    PubMed

    Gate, J J; Parker, D S; Lobley, G E

    1999-04-01

    Whole-body and gastrointestinal tract (GIT) metabolism of [5-(15)N]glutamine were monitored in lambs (33 kg live weight) fasted for 24 h. Animals were previously prepared with vascular catheters across the mesenteric-(MDV) and portal-drained viscera (PDV) to permit quantification of mass and isotopic transfers of metabolites by arterio-venous difference. Continuous infusions of [5-(15)N]glutamine into the jugular vein were conducted for 10 h and integrated blood samples withdrawn over 75 min intervals for the last 5 h of infusion. The lambs were then killed and portions from various tissues of the digestive tract and other body organs removed for determination of 15N enrichment in RNA, DNA and protein (the latter obtained by difference using total acid-precipitable N). Whole-body glutamine flux was 108 mumol/min of which 23 and 47% could be attributed to MDV and PDV metabolism (P < 0.001) respectively. There was a small net production of glutamine across the MDV. GIT blood-flows and NH3 production were partitioned 3:2 between MDV and non-MDV components. Less than 5% of the NH3 produced was derived from the amido-N of glutamine, while across the small intestine (MDV) 26% of the glutamine flux was converted to NH3, compared with 18% for non-MDV transfers. The 15N enrichments in protein were of the order jejunum > duodenum > ileum with mucosal cells more labelled than serosal (P < 0.001). Lesser enrichments were observed for other GIT tissues (abomasum > caecum > rumen) while liver and lymph were comparable with the abomasum; kidney, spleen and muscle were lower still (P < 0.05). Enrichments of RNA were similar to that of protein and followed the same pattern, except for higher relative values for liver, spleen and lymphoid tissue. The lowest enrichments were observed for DNA, but again the pattern order was similar except for increased label in lymph, caecum and the spleen. For the MDV there was reasonable agreement between 15N-disappearance as glutamine and

  3. The number of 24 h dietary recalls using the U.S. Department of Agriculture's automated multiple-pass method required to estimate nutrient intake in overweight and obese adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA’s Automated Multiple Pass Method (AMPM) is a five-step, multiple-pass, interviewer-administered, computerized, 24-h dietary recall. The objective of the study was to quantify sources of variation such as day of the week, season, sequence of the diet interviews (training effect), diet interv...

  4. Antidotes to anthrax lethal factor intoxication. Part 1: Discovery of potent lethal factor inhibitors with in vivo efficacy.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Guan-Sheng; Kim, Seongjin; Moayeri, Mahtab; Cregar-Hernandez, Lynne; McKasson, Linda; Margosiak, Stephen A; Leppla, Stephen H; Johnson, Alan T

    2010-11-15

    Sub-nanomolar small molecule inhibitors of anthrax lethal factor have been identified using SAR and Merck L915 (4) as a model compound. One of these compounds (16) provided 100% protection in a rat lethal toxin model of anthrax disease.

  5. Validation of soy protein estimates from a food-frequency questionnaire with repeated 24-h recalls and isoflavonoid excretion in overnight urine in a Western population with a wide range of soy intakes2

    PubMed Central

    Jaceldo-Siegl, Karen; Fraser, Gary E; Chan, Jacqueline; Franke, Adrian; Sabaté, Joan

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence of the benefits of soy on cancer risk in Western populations is inconsistent, in part because of the low intake of soy in these groups. Objective We assessed the validity of soy protein estimates from food-frequency questionnaires (FFQs) in a sample of Adventist Health Study-2 participants with a wide range of soy intakes. Design We obtained dietary intake data from 100 men and women (43 blacks and 57 nonblacks). Soy protein estimates from FFQs were compared against repeated 24-h recalls and urinary excretion of daidzein, genistein, total isoflavonoids (TIFLs), and equol (measured by HPLC/photodiode array/mass spectrometry) as reference criteria. We calculated Pearson and Spearman correlation coefficients (with 95% CIs) for FFQ–24-h recall, 24 h-recall–urinary excretion, and FFQ–urinary excretion pairs. Results Among soy users, mean (± SD) soy protein values were 12.12 ± 10.80 g/d from 24-h recalls and 9.43 ± 7.83 g/d from FFQs. The unattenuated correlation (95% CI) between soy protein estimates from 24-h recalls and FFQs was 0.57 (0.32, 0.75). Correlation coefficients between soy protein intake from 24-h recalls and urinary isoflavonoids were 0.72 (0.43, 0.96) for daidzein, 0.67 (0.43, 0.91) for genistein, and 0.72 (0.47, 0.98) for TIFLs. Between FFQs and urinary excretion, these were 0.50 (0.32, 0.65), 0.48 (0.29, 0.61), and 0.50 (0.32, 0.64) for daidzein, genistein, and TIFLs, respectively. Conclusions Soy protein estimates from questionnaire were significantly correlated with soy protein from 24-h recalls and urinary excretion of daidzein, genistein, and TIFLs. The Adventist Health Study-2 FFQ is a valid instrument for assessing soy protein in a population with a wide range of soy intakes. PMID:18469267

  6. Lethal body burdens of polar narcotics: Chlorophenols

    SciTech Connect

    Wezel, A.P. van; Punte, S.S.; Opperhuizen, A.

    1995-09-01

    The goal of the present study was to measure in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) the lethal body burden (LBB) of three chlorophenols that are known as polar narcotic chemicals. The LBBs of the chlorophenols were compared to LBBs of nonpolar narcotic chemicals to consider if the two classes of narcotic chemicals differ on a body burden level. The LBB of the most acidic chlorophenol was measured at two different levels of pH exposure to determine the influence of the degree of ionization on the magnitude of the LBB. Both n-octanol/water partition coefficients and n-hexane/water partition coefficients of the chlorophenols were determined at different pH levels to consider the influence of ionization on the partition coefficient and to determine the importance of a polar group in the organic phase on the partitioning behavior. Partitioning to n-octanol and n-hexane was used as input in a model to simulate the equilibrium partitioning between hydrophobic and nonhydrophobic and target and nontarget compartments in the fish.

  7. Inhibitors of the Metalloproteinase Anthrax Lethal Factor

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Allison B.; Turk, Benjamin E.

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, a rod shaped, spore forming, gram positive bacteria, is the etiological agent of anthrax. B. anthracis virulence is partly attributable to two secreted bipartite protein toxins, which act inside host cells to disrupt signaling pathways important for host defense against infection. These toxins may also directly contribute to mortality in late stage infection. The zinc-dependent metalloproteinase anthrax lethal factor (LF) is a critical component of one of these protein toxins and a prime target for inhibitor development to produce anthrax therapeutics. Here, we describe recent efforts to identify specific and potent LF inhibitors. Derivatization of peptide substrate analogs bearing zinc-binding groups has produced potent and specific LF inhibitors, and X-ray crystallography of LF-inhibitor complexes has provided insight into features required for high affinity binding. Novel inhibitor scaffolds have been identified through several approaches, including fragment-based drug discovery, virtual screening, and high-throughput screening of diverse compound libraries. Lastly, efforts to discover LF inhibitors have led to the development of new screening strategies, such as the use of full-length proteins as substrates, that may prove useful for other proteases as well. Overall, these efforts have led to a collection of chemically and mechanistically diverse molecules capable of inhibiting LF activity in vitro and in cells, as well as in animal models of anthrax infection. PMID:27072692

  8. Lethal Mutagenesis Failure May Augment Viral Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Paff, Matthew L.; Stolte, Steven P.; Bull, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Lethal mutagenesis, the attempt to extinguish a population by elevating its mutation rate, has been endorsed in the virology literature as a promising approach for treating viral infections. In support of the concept, in vitro studies have forced viral extinction with high doses of mutagenic drugs. However, the one known mutagenic drug used on patients commonly fails to cure infections, and in vitro studies typically find a wide range of mutagenic conditions permissive for viral growth. A key question becomes how subsequent evolution is affected if the viral population is mutated but avoids extinction—Is viral adaptation augmented rather than suppressed? Here we consider the evolution of highly mutated populations surviving mutagenesis, using the DNA phage T7. In assays using inhibitory hosts, whenever resistance mutants were observed, the mutagenized populations exhibited higher frequencies, but some inhibitors blocked plaque formation by even the mutagenized stock. Second, outgrowth of previously mutagenized populations led to rapid and potentially complete fitness recovery but polymorphism was slow to decay, and mutations exhibited inconsistent patterns of change. Third, the combination of population bottlenecks with mutagenesis did cause fitness declines, revealing a vulnerability that was not apparent from mutagenesis of large populations. The results show that a population surviving high mutagenesis may exhibit enhanced adaptation in some environments and experience little negative fitness consequences in many others. PMID:24092771

  9. Tumor clone dynamics in lethal prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Carreira, Suzanne; Romanel, Alessandro; Goodall, Jane; Grist, Emily; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Miranda, Susana; Prandi, Davide; Lorente, David; Frenel, Jean-Sebastien; Pezaro, Carmel; Omlin, Aurelius; Rodrigues, Daniel Nava; Flohr, Penelope; Tunariu, Nina; S de Bono, Johann; Demichelis, Francesca; Attard, Gerhardt

    2014-09-17

    It is unclear whether a single clone metastasizes and remains dominant over the course of lethal prostate cancer. We describe the clonal architectural heterogeneity at different stages of disease progression by sequencing serial plasma and tumor samples from 16 ERG-positive patients. By characterizing the clonality of commonly occurring deletions at 21q22, 8p21, and 10q23, we identified multiple independent clones in metastatic disease that are differentially represented in tissue and circulation. To exemplify the clinical utility of our studies, we then showed a temporal association between clinical progression and emergence of androgen receptor (AR) mutations activated by glucocorticoids in about 20% of patients progressing on abiraterone and prednisolone or dexamethasone. Resistant clones showed a complex dynamic with temporal and spatial heterogeneity, suggesting distinct mechanisms of resistance at different sites that emerged and regressed depending on treatment selection pressure. This introduces a management paradigm requiring sequential monitoring of advanced prostate cancer patients with plasma and tumor biopsies to ensure early discontinuation of agents when they become potential disease drivers.

  10. Tumor clone dynamics in lethal prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Suzanne; Romanel, Alessandro; Goodall, Jane; Grist, Emily; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Miranda, Susana; Prandi, Davide; Lorente, David; Frenel, Jean-Sebastien; Pezaro, Carmel; Omlin, Aurelius; Rodrigues, Daniel Nava; Flohr, Penelope; Tunariu, Nina; de Bono, Johann S.; Demichelis, Francesca; Attard, Gerhardt

    2015-01-01

    It is unclear whether a single clone metastasizes and remains dominant over the course of lethal prostate cancer. We describe the clonal architectural heterogeneity at different stages of disease progression by sequencing serial plasma and tumor samples from 16 ERG-positive patients. By characterizing the clonality of commonly occurring deletions at 21q22, 8p21, and 10q23, we identified multiple independent clones in metastatic disease that are differentially represented in tissue and circulation. To exemplify the clinical utility of our studies, we then showed a temporal association between clinical progression and emergence of androgen receptor (AR) mutations activated by glucocorticoids in about 20% of patients progressing on abiraterone and prednisolone or dexamethasone. Resistant clones showed a complex dynamic with temporal and spatial heterogeneity, suggesting distinct mechanisms of resistance at different sites that emerged and regressed depending on treatment selection pressure. This introduces a management paradigm requiring sequential monitoring of advanced prostate cancer patients with plasma and tumor biopsies to ensure early discontinuation of agents when they become potential disease drivers. PMID:25232177

  11. Establishing Genetic Interactions by a Synthetic Dosage Lethality Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Kroll, E. S.; Hyland, K. M.; Hieter, P.; Li, J. J.

    1996-01-01

    We have devised a genetic screen, termed synthetic dosage lethality, in which a cloned ``reference'' gene is inducibly overexpressed in a set of mutant strains carrying potential ``target'' mutations. To test the specificity of the method, two reference genes, CTF13, encoding a centromere binding protein, and ORC6, encoding a subunit of the origin of replication binding complex, were overexpressed in a large collection of mutants defective in either chromosome segregation or replication. CTF13 overexpression caused synthetic dosage lethality in combination with ctf14-42 (cbf2, ndc10), ctf17-61 (chl4), ctf19-58 and ctf19-26. ORC6 overexpression caused synthetic dosage lethality in combination with cdc2-1, cdc6-1, cdc14-1, cdc16-1 and cdc46-1. These relationships reflect specific interactions, as overexpression of CTF13 caused lethality in kinetochore mutants and overexpression of ORC6 caused lethality in replication mutants. In contrast, only one case of dosage suppression was observed. We suggest that synthetic dosage lethality identifies a broad spectrum of interacting mutations and is of general utility in detecting specific genetic interactions using a cloned wild-type gene as a starting point. Furthermore, synthetic dosage lethality is easily adapted to the study of cloned genes in other organisms. PMID:8722765

  12. Key tissue targets responsible for anthrax-toxin-induced lethality.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shihui; Zhang, Yi; Moayeri, Mahtab; Liu, Jie; Crown, Devorah; Fattah, Rasem J; Wein, Alexander N; Yu, Zu-Xi; Finkel, Toren; Leppla, Stephen H

    2013-09-05

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax disease, is lethal owing to the actions of two exotoxins: anthrax lethal toxin (LT) and oedema toxin (ET). The key tissue targets responsible for the lethal effects of these toxins are unknown. Here we generated cell-type-specific anthrax toxin receptor capillary morphogenesis protein-2 (CMG2)-null mice and cell-type-specific CMG2-expressing mice and challenged them with the toxins. Our results show that lethality induced by LT and ET occurs through damage to distinct cell types; whereas targeting cardiomyocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells is required for LT-induced mortality, ET-induced lethality occurs mainly through its action in hepatocytes. Notably, and in contradiction to what has been previously postulated, targeting of endothelial cells by either toxin does not seem to contribute significantly to lethality. Our findings demonstrate that B. anthracis has evolved to use LT and ET to induce host lethality by coordinately damaging two distinct vital systems.

  13. A COMPARISON OF THE LETHAL AND SUBLETHAL TOXICITY OF ORGANIC CHEMICAL MIXTURES TO THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The joint toxic effects of known binary and multiple organic chemical mixtures to the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) were defined at both the 96-h 50% lethal effect concentration (LC50) and sublethal (32-d growth) response levels for toxicants with a narcosis I, narcosis II...

  14. Thyroid follicular cell function after non-lethal complement membrane attack.

    PubMed Central

    Weetman, A P; Freeman, M; Morgan, B P

    1990-01-01

    Terminal complement complexes have been identified around thyroid follicles in Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and the concentrations of such complexes are increased in the sera of these patients, suggesting a role for complement activation and membrane attack complexes (MAC) in autoimmune thyroiditis. This has been investigated further using cultured human and rat thyroid cells. Thyrocytes were resistant to lysis by homologous complement, in contrast to the effects of heterologous (rabbit) complement. The formation of non-lethal amounts of MAC, using reactive lysis or classical pathway activation, significantly reduced cAMP production by these cells in response to thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) (P less than 0.01); similar effects were seen with thyroid-stimulating antibodies. Thyroid cells were able to recover rapidly from complement attack after washing and incubation for 30 min. Non-lethal MAC formation also resulted in reactive oxygen metabolite production, detected by luminol-dependent chemiluminescence in three out of five thyroid cell preparations tested. Ionomycin, but not TSH, also stimulated reactive oxygen metabolite production. These results suggest that repeated or continuous sub-lethal complement attack on thyroid cells may exacerbate hypothyroidism in Hashimoto's thyroiditis, or partially counter the effects of thyroid-stimulating antibodies in Graves' disease. Furthermore, the production of reactive oxygen metabolites in these circumstances could increase the intra-thyroidal inflammatory response; oxygen radical scavenging by anti-thyroid drugs (which are concentrated by thyrocytes) may account in part for the amelioration of thyroiditis observed with such treatment. PMID:2170066

  15. Anti-tumor necrosis factor VNAR single domains reduce lethality and regulate underlying inflammatory response in a murine model of endotoxic shock

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    was decreased at 24 h only in the anti-TNF VNAR group. Conclusions Anti-TNF VNAR single domains improved survival in a murine model of endotoxic shock. Protection was associated with regulation in the TNF/IL-10 balance, attenuation of IL-6 and iNOS gene expression in the liver as well as decreased serum IL-6 concentration. PMID:23548047

  16. Mitomycin C-induced synthesis of cloacin DF13 and lethality in cloacinogenic Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed Central

    van Tiel-Menkveld, G J; Veltkamp, E; De Graaf, F K

    1981-01-01

    Treatment of cloacinogenic cultures with increasing concentrations of mitomycin C induced an increasing synthesis of cloacin DF13 accompanied by a decreasing number of colony-forming cells. Cells grown in the presence of glucose required a 10-fold-higher concentration of mitomycin C for optimal induction of cloacin production than did cells grown with lactate. Release of the cloacin was hampered in glucose-grown cells. Experiments with various CloDF13 insertion and deletion mutants revealed that the transcription of CloDF13 deoxyribonucleic acid sequences adjacent to the cloacin structural gene was essential for mitomycin C-induced lethality. PMID:7012123

  17. Lethal and sub-lethal responses of native freshwater mussels exposed to granular Bayluscide®, a sea lamprey larvicide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newton, Teresa; Boogaard, Michael A.; Gray, Brian R.; Hubert, Terrance D.; Schloesser, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    The invasive sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) poses a substantial threat to fish communities in the Great Lakes. Efforts to control sea lamprey populations typically involve treating tributary streams with lampricides on a recurring cycle. The presence of a substantial population of larval sea lampreys in the aquatic corridor between Lakes Huron and Erie prompted managers to propose a treatment using the granular formulation of Bayluscide® that targets larval sea lampreys that reside in sediments. However, these treatments could cause adverse effects on native freshwater mussels—imperiled animals that also reside in sediments. We estimated the risk of mortality and sub-lethal effects among eight species of adult and sub-adult mussels exposed to Bayluscide® for durations up to 8 h to mimic field applications. Mortality was appreciable in some species, especially in sub-adults (range, 23–51%). The lethal and sub-lethal effects were positively associated with the duration of exposure in most species and life stage combinations. Estimates of the median time of exposure that resulted in lethal and sub-lethal effects suggest that sub-adults were often affected by Bayluscide® earlier than adults. Siphoning activity and burrowing position of mussels during exposure may have moderated the uptake of Bayluscide® and may have influenced lethal and sub-lethal responses. Given that the various species and life stages were differentially affected, it will be difficult to predict the effects of Bayluscide® treatments on mussels.

  18. Somatic Mosaicism for a Lethal TRPV4 Mutation Results in Non-Lethal Metatropic Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, Michael M.; Kang, Taekyu; Lachman, Ralph S.; Bamshad, Michael; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Krakow, Deborah; Cohn, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    Dominant mutations in TRPV4, which encodes the Transient Receptor Potential Cation Channel Subfamily V Member 4 calcium channel, result in a series of musculoskeletal disorders that include a set of peripheral neuropathies and a broad phenotypic spectrum of skeletal dysplasias. The skeletal pheno-types range from brachyolmia, in which there is scoliosis with mild short stature, through perinatal lethal metatropic dysplasia. We describe a case with phenotypic findings consistent with metatropic dysplasia, but in whom no TRPV4 mutation was detected by Sanger sequence analysis. Exome sequence analysis identified a known lethal metatropic dysplasia mutation, TRPV4L618P, which was present at lower frequency than would be expected for a heterozygous change. The affected individual was shown to be a somatic mosaic for the mutation, providing an explanation for the milder than expected phenotype. The data illustrate that high-throughput sequencing of genomic DNA can facilitate detection of mosaicism with higher sensitivity than Sanger sequence analysis and identify a new genetic mechanism for metatropic dysplasia. PMID:27530454

  19. Sub-lethal effects of Vip3A toxin on survival, development and fecundity of Heliothis virescens and Plutella xylostella.

    PubMed

    Gulzar, Asim; Wright, Denis J

    2015-11-01

    The assessment of sub-lethal effects is important to interpret the overall insecticide efficacy in controlling insect pest populations. In addition to the lethal effect, sub-lethal effects may also occur in exposed insects. Vegetative insecticidal proteins (Vips) have shown a broad spectrum of insecticidal activity against many insect pest species. In this study the sub-lethal effects of the Bacillus thuringiensis vegetative insecticidal toxin Vip3A on the development and reproduction of Heliothis virescens F. and Plutella xylostella L. were evaluated in the laboratory. The results indicated that the sub-lethal concentration of Vip3A increased the duration of the larval and pupal stages as compared with the control treatment for both species. The percent pupation and percent adult emergence were significantly lower for Vip3A-treated insects. The proportion of pairs that produced eggs and the longevity of adults were not significantly different between treatments. H. virescens and P. xylostella treated with Vip3A showed an 11 and 17 % decrease in their intrinsic rate of increase (rm) respectively compared with untreated insects. The results from this study will be helpful to develop the strategy to incorporate Vip 3A containing crops in an integrated pest management programme.

  20. Anthrax lethal factor inhibitors as potential countermeasure of the infection.

    PubMed

    Kumar, B V S Suneel; Malik, Siddharth; Grandhi, Pradeep; Dayam, Raveendra; Sarma, J A R P

    2014-01-01

    Anthrax Lethal Factor (LF) is a zinc-dependent metalloprotease, one of the virulence factor of anthrax infection. Three forms of the anthrax infection have been identified: cutaneous (through skin), gastrointestinal (through alimentary tract), and pulmonary (by inhalation of spores). Anthrax toxin is composed of protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF), and edema factor (EF). Protective antigen mediates the entry of Lethal Factor/Edema Factor into the cytosol of host cells. Lethal factor (LF) inactivates mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inducing cell death, and EF is an adenylyl cyclase impairing host defenses. In the past few years, extensive studies are undertaken to design inhibitors targeting LF. The current review focuses on the small molecule inhibitors targeting LF activity and its structure activity relationships (SAR).

  1. A lethal case of DEET toxicity due to intentional ingestion.

    PubMed

    Wiles, Devin; Yee, Justin; Castillo, Uvidelio; Russell, Jason; Spiller, Henry; Casavant, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    A 37-year-old male with prior medical history of profound developmental delay experienced seizure and cardiac arrest following ingestion of 6 ounces of a 40% N, N-diethyl-meta-toluamide (DEET) containing solution. The patient was unresponsive, acidemic, tachycardic and hypotensive on presentation. Over three hospital days, the patient's vitals recovered to baseline but he remained unresponsive and areflexic with fixed and dilated pupils. Non-contrast brain magnetic resonance imaging showed cerebral edema, transtentorial and tonsillar herniations. A rapid, simple and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was utilized for the analysis of postmortem plasma blood and urine samples of a lethal case of DEET intentional ingestion. The method combined the use of C18 SepPak cartridges for solid phase extraction and reversed-phase HPLC. One urine and five blood samples from this patient were analyzed for DEET concentration. Mixtures of serum/urine postcentrifuge were eluted and reduced to 1 mL using a solvent evaporator. Blood in ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), whole blood, serum, blood with heparin and urine DEET concentrations were 9.84, 9.21, 10.18, 8.66dl and 0.642 mg/dL, respectively. All samples were collected <1 h postingestion. Although seizures and cardiac toxicity have been described in other case reports, this case is atypical due to the exceptional dose ingested and the timing of the fluid test samples being drawn so soon following exposure. Although a widely used and extremely safe insect repellent, DEET can be highly toxic in large but easily obtainable doses.

  2. Hypericum perforatum Reduces Paracetamol-Induced Hepatotoxicity and Lethality in Mice by Modulating Inflammation and Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Hohmann, Miriam S N; Cardoso, Renato D R; Fattori, Victor; Arakawa, Nilton S; Tomaz, José C; Lopes, Norberto P; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A

    2015-07-01

    Hypericum perforatum is a medicinal plant with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, which is commercially available for therapeutic use in Brazil. Herein the effect of H. perforatum extract on paracetamol (acetaminophen)-induced hepatotoxicity, lethality, inflammation, and oxidative stress in male swiss mice were investigated. HPLC analysis demonstrated the presence of rutin, quercetin, hypericin, pseudohypericin, and hyperforin in H. perforatum extract. Paracetamol (0.15-3.0 g/kg, p.o.) induced dose-dependent mortality. The sub-maximal lethal dose of paracetamol (1.5 g/kg, p.o.) was chosen for the experiments in the study. H. perforatum (30-300 mg/kg, i.p.) dose-dependently reduced paracetamol-induced lethality. Paracetamol-induced increase in plasma aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) concentrations, and hepatic myeloperoxidase activity, IL-1β, TNF-α, and IFN-γ concentrations as well as decreased reduced glutathione (GSH) concentrations and capacity to reduce 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate radical cation; ABTS˙(+) ) were inhibited by H. perforatum (300 mg/kg, i.p.) treatment. Therefore, H. perforatum protects mice against paracetamol-induced lethality and liver damage. This effect seems to be related to the reduction of paracetamol-induced cytokine production, neutrophil recruitment, and oxidative stress.

  3. Perinatal-lethal Gaucher disease presenting as hydrops fetalis

    PubMed Central

    BenHamida, Emira; Ayadi, Imene; Ouertani, Ines; Chammem, Maroua; Bezzine, Ahlem; BenTmime, Riadh; Attia, Leila; Mrad, Ridha; Marrakchi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Perinatal-lethal Gaucher disease is very rare and is considered a variant of type 2 Gaucher disease that occurs in the neonatal period. The most distinct features of perinatal-lethal Gaucher disease are non-immune hydrops fetalis. Less common signs of the disease are hepatosplenomegaly, ichthyosis and arthrogryposis. We report a case of Gaucher's disease (type 2) diagnosed in a newborn who presented with Hydrops Fetalis. PMID:26327947

  4. Conflict Without Casualties: Non-Lethal Weapons in Irregular Warfare

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    Recognizing this, in 2006 the British Royal Marines reached out to the international community and, along with U.S. Marines, established a non-lethal...obstruction. But as the scenario intensified, they moved into the city alleys for a more authentic feel. British Royal Marine Capt. Rhys Hopkins stated...89 United States Federal News Service, “ Royal Marines Teach Non-Lethal Crowd Control for 2007

  5. Field Evaluation of Lethal Ovitrap against Dengue Vectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    AD Award Number: DAMD17-02-1-0217 TITLE: Field Evaluation of Lethal Ovitrap against Dengue Vectors PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Lane Foil CONTRACTING...2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Field Evaluation of Lethal Ovitrap against Dengue Vectors 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-02-1-0217 5c. PROGRAM...to effectively sample dengue mosquito vector populations, particularly Aedes aegypti for over a decade. Modifying a standard ovitrap by incorporating

  6. Ethylhexylglycerin Impairs Membrane Integrity and Enhances the Lethal Effect of Phenoxyethanol

    PubMed Central

    Langsrud, Solveig; Steinhauer, Katrin; Lüthje, Sonja; Weber, Klaus; Goroncy-Bermes, Peter; Holck, Askild L.

    2016-01-01

    Preservatives are added to cosmetics to protect the consumers from infections and prevent product spoilage. The concentration of preservatives should be kept as low as possible and this can be achieved by adding potentiating agents. The aim of the study was to investigate the mechanisms behind potentiation of the bactericidal effect of a commonly used preservative, 2-phenoxyethanol (PE), by the potentiating agent ethylhexylglycerin (EHG). Sub-lethal concentrations of EHG (0.075%) and PE (0.675%) in combination led to rapid killing of E. coli (> 5 log reduction of cfu after 30 min), leakage of cellular constituents, disruption of the energy metabolism, morphological deformities of cells and condensation of DNA. Used alone, EHG disrupted the membrane integrity even at low concentrations. In conclusion, sub-lethal concentrations of EHG potentiate the effect of PE through damage of the cell membrane integrity. Thus, adding EHG to PE in a 1:9 ratio has a similar effect on membrane damage and bacterial viability as doubling the concentration of PE. This study provides insight about the mechanism of action of a strong potentiating agent, EHG, which is commonly used in cosmetics together with PE. PMID:27783695

  7. Bleomycin: female-specific dominant lethal effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Sudman, P D; Rutledge, J C; Bishop, J B; Generoso, W M

    1992-12-01

    Limited comparative data in mice indicate that chemical mutagens that induce dominant lethal mutations in males are not necessarily effective in females, but those which are effective in females are generally equally or more effective in males. Recently, however, a few chemicals have been identified that are female-specific with respect to induction of dominant lethal mutations. The antitumor antibiotic adriamycin is among them. Another antitumor antibiotic, bleomycin was examined for its ability to induce dominant lethal mutations in the reproductive cells of male and female mice. No dominant lethal or cytotoxic effects were observed in males treated with bleomycin, even at a maximum tolerated dose. In females, on the other hand, a dose nearly 1/4 of that used in males induced not only a high level of dominant lethal mutations but also killed oocytes in certain stages of follicular development. The effectiveness of bleomycin in inducing dominant lethal mutations in mouse oocytes makes it a valuable tool for investigating whether gonadal transport, inherent differences in the configuration of chromatin in the germ cells of the two sexes or other factors are responsible for the differential susceptibility to bleomycin, which implies potential gender-specific genetic risk in cancer chemotherapy.

  8. Mechanism by which caffeine potentiates lethality of nitrogen mustard.

    PubMed Central

    Lau, C C; Pardee, A B

    1982-01-01

    Caffeine is synergistic with many DNA-damaging agents in increasing lethality to mammalian cells. The mechanism is not well understood. Our results show that caffeine potentiates the lethality of the nitrogen mustard 2-chloro-N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-methylethanamine (HN2) by inducing damaged cells to undergo mitosis before properly repairing lesions in their DNA. Treatment with low doses of HN2 (0.5 microM for 1 hr) caused little lethality in baby hamster kidney cells (90% survival). These cells were arrested in G2 shortly after treatment with HN2 as shown by flow microfluorimetry and autoradiography. After an arrest of 6 hr, HN2-treated cells began to move into mitosis and from then on behaved like normal cells. Repair synthesis was shown to continue during the G2 arrest by using synchronized cells pulse labeled with [3H]thymidine after HN2 treatment and autoradiography. Caffeine (2mM) increased the lethality of HN2 by 5- to 10-fold. It prevented the G2 arrest. Caffeine did not prevent these HN2-treated cells from entering or completing S phase but rather allowed them to divide without finishing the repair processes and as a consequence caused nuclear fragmentation after mitosis. Caffeine-induced nuclear fragmentation and enhanced lethality were proportional, as shown with dose--response curves and time dependence. In addition, both lethality and nuclear fragmentation were abolished by low doses of cycloheximide, an inhibitor of protein synthesis. Images PMID:6953438

  9. Near interface traps in SiO2/4H-SiC metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors monitored by temperature dependent gate current transient measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorenza, Patrick; La Magna, Antonino; Vivona, Marilena; Roccaforte, Fabrizio

    2016-07-01

    This letter reports on the impact of gate oxide trapping states on the conduction mechanisms in SiO2/4H-SiC metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs). The phenomena were studied by gate current transient measurements, performed on n-channel MOSFETs operated in "gate-controlled-diode" configuration. The measurements revealed an anomalous non-steady conduction under negative bias (VG > |20 V|) through the SiO2/4H-SiC interface. The phenomenon was explained by the coexistence of a electron variable range hopping and a hole Fowler-Nordheim (FN) tunnelling. A semi-empirical modified FN model with a time-depended electric field is used to estimate the near interface traps in the gate oxide (Ntrap ˜ 2 × 1011 cm-2).

  10. N-acetylcysteine protects mice from lethal endotoxemia by regulating the redox state of immune cells.

    PubMed

    Victor, Victor M; Rocha, Milagros; De la Fuente, Monica

    2003-09-01

    The excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) associated with inflammation leads to oxidative stress, which is involved with the high mortality from several diseases such as endotoxic shock and can be controlled to a certain degree by antioxidants. The immune cells use ROS in order to support their functions and, therefore, need adequate levels of antioxidant defenses in order to avoid the harmful effect of an excessive ROS production. In the present work, the effect of the administration of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on the redox state of peritoneal macrophages and lymphocytes from mice with lethal endotoxic shock (100 mg/kg i.p. of lipopolysaccharide, LPS), was studied. In both types of immune cells at 0, 2, 4, 12 and 24 h after LPS injection, an increase of ROS, of the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), the lipid peroxidation (malonaldehyde levels, MDA), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and the oxidized/reduced glutathione (GSSG/GSH) ratio, as well as a decrease of enzymatic antioxidant defenses, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activity, was observed. The injection of NAC (150 mg/kg i.p. at 30 min after LPS injection) decreased the ROS, the TNFalpha the MDA levels, iNOS expression and the GSSG/GSH ratio, and increased the antioxidant defenses in both macrophages and lymphocytes. Moreover, the NAC treatment prevented the activation of nuclear translocation of the nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB), which regulates ROS, inflammatory cytokines and antioxidant levels. Our present results provide evidence that both cell types have a relevant role in the pathogenesis of endotoxic shock, and that NAC, by improving the redox state of these immune cells, could increase mouse survival. Thus, antioxidants could offer an alternative treatment of human endotoxic shock.

  11. Lethal and Amanitin-Resistance Mutations in the Caenorhabditis Elegans Ama-1 and Ama-2 Genes

    PubMed Central

    Rogalski, T. M.; Bullerjahn, AME.; Riddle, D. L.

    1988-01-01

    Mutants of Caenorhabditis elegans resistant to α-amanitin have been isolated at a frequency of about 1.6 X 10(-6) after EMS mutagenesis of the wild-type strain, N2. Four new dominant resistance mutations have been studied genetically. Three are alleles of a previously identified gene, ama-1 IV, encoding the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. The fourth mutation defines a new gene, ama-2 V. Unlike the ama-1 alleles, the ama-2 mutation exhibits a recessive-lethal phenotype. Growth and reproduction of N2 was inhibited at a concentration of 10 μg/ml amanitin, whereas ama-2/+ animals were inhibited at 100 μg/ml, and 800 μg/ml was required to inhibit growth of ama-1/+ larvae. We have also determined that two reference strains used for genetic mapping, dpy-11(e224)V and sma-1(e30)V, are at least four-fold more sensitive to amanitin that the wild-type strain. Using an amanitin-resistant ama-1(m118) or ama-1(m322) strain as a parent, we have isolated amanitin-sensitive mutants that carry recessive-lethal ama-1 alleles. The frequency of EMS-induced lethal ama-1 mutations is approximately 1.7 X 10(-3), 1000-fold higher than the frequency of amanitin-resistance alleles. Nine of the lethal alleles are apparent null mutations, and they exhibit L1-lethal phenotypes at both 20° and 25°. Six alleles result in partial loss of RNA polymerase II function as determined by their sterile phenotypes at 20°. All but one of these latter mutations exhibit a more severe phenotype at 25°C. We have also selected seven EMS-induced revertants of three different ama-1 lethals. These revertants restore dominant resistance to amanitin. The selection for revertants also produced eight new dominant amanitin resistance alleles on the balancer chromosome, nT1. PMID:3197954

  12. Misregulation of Sex-Lethal and Disruption of Male-Specific Lethal Complex Localization in Drosophila Species Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Pal Bhadra, Manika; Bhadra, Utpal; Birchler, James A.

    2006-01-01

    A major model system for the study of evolutionary divergence between closely related species has been the unisexual lethality resulting from reciprocal crosses of Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans. Sex-lethal (Sxl), a critical gene for sex determination, is misregulated in these hybrids. In hybrid males from D. melanogaster mothers, there is an abnormal expression of Sxl and a failure of localization of the male-specific lethal (MSL) complex to the X chromosome, which causes changes in gene expression. Introduction of a Sxl mutation into this hybrid genotype will allow expression of the MSL complex but there is no sequestration to the X chromosome. Lethal hybrid rescue (Lhr), which allows hybrid males from this cross to survive, corrects the SXL and MSL defects. The reciprocal cross of D. simulans mothers by D. melanogaster males exhibits underexpression of Sxl in embryos. PMID:16951071

  13. Materials Applications for Non-Lethal: Aqueous Foams

    SciTech Connect

    GOOLSBY,TOMMY D.; SCOTT,STEVEN H.

    1999-09-15

    High expansion aqueous foam is an aggregation of bubbles that has the appearance of soap suds and is used to isolate individuals both visually and acoustically. It was developed in the 1920's in England to fight coal mine fires and has been widely used since for fire fighting and dust suppression. It was developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in the 1970's for nuclear safeguards and security applications. In the mid-1990s, the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), the research arm of the Department of Justice, began a project with SNL to determine the applicability of high expansion aqueous foam for correctional applications. NIJ funded the project as part of its search for new and better less-than-lethal weapons for responding to violent and dangerous individuals, where other means of force could lead to serious injuries. The phase one objectives of the project were to select a low-to-no toxicity foam concentrate (foaming agent) with physical characteristics suited for use in a single cell or large prison disturbances, and to determine if the selected foam concentrate could serve as a carrier for Oleoresin Capsicum (OC) irritant. The phase two objectives were to conduct an extensive toxicology review of the selected foam concentrate and OC irritant, and to conduct respiration simulation experiments in the selected high expansion aqueous foam. The phase three objectives were to build a prototype individual cell aqueous foam system and to study the feasibility of aqueous foams for large prison facility disturbances. The phase four and five objectives were to use the prototype system to do large scale foam physical characteristics testing of the selected foam concentrate, and to have the prototype single cell system further evaluated by correctional representatives. Prison rather than street scenarios were evaluated as the first and most likely place for using the aqueous foam since prisons have recurrent incidents where officers and inmates might be

  14. Extinction of Hepatitis C Virus by Ribavirin in Hepatoma Cells Involves Lethal Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Prieto, Ana M.; Sheldon, Julie; Grande-Pérez, Ana; Tejero, Héctor; Gregori, Josep; Quer, Josep; Esteban, Juan I.; Domingo, Esteban; Perales, Celia

    2013-01-01

    Lethal mutagenesis, or virus extinction produced by enhanced mutation rates, is under investigation as an antiviral strategy that aims at counteracting the adaptive capacity of viral quasispecies, and avoiding selection of antiviral-escape mutants. To explore lethal mutagenesis of hepatitis C virus (HCV), it is important to establish whether ribavirin, the purine nucleoside analogue used in anti-HCV therapy, acts as a mutagenic agent during virus replication in cell culture. Here we report the effect of ribavirin during serial passages of HCV in human hepatoma Huh-7.5 cells, regarding viral progeny production and complexity of mutant spectra. Ribavirin produced an increase of mutant spectrum complexity and of the transition types associated with ribavirin mutagenesis, resulting in HCV extinction. Ribavirin-mediated depletion of intracellular GTP was not the major contributory factor to mutagenesis since mycophenolic acid evoked a similar decrease in GTP without an increase in mutant spectrum complexity. The intracellular concentration of the other nucleoside-triphosphates was elevated as a result of ribavirin treatment. Mycophenolic acid extinguished HCV without an intervening mutagenic activity. Ribavirin-mediated, but not mycophenolic acid-mediated, extinction of HCV occurred via a decrease of specific infectivity, a feature typical of lethal mutagenesis. We discuss some possibilities to explain disparate results on ribavirin mutagenesis of HCV. PMID:23976977

  15. Case series of 226 γ-hydroxybutyrate-associated deaths: lethal toxicity and trauma.

    PubMed

    Zvosec, Deborah L; Smith, Stephen W; Porrata, Trinka; Strobl, A Quinn; Dyer, Jo Ellen

    2011-03-01

    γ-Hydroxybutyrate (GHB) and its prodrugs are drugs of abuse that were also sold as "dietary supplements." Users present to emergency departments with overdose, impaired driving, withdrawal, and associated trauma. We compiled a series of GHB-associated deaths to elucidate lethal risks, GHB concentrations, cointoxicants, products, uses, and medical interventions. Death records were reviewed for toxicology, autopsy findings, and history. Inclusion cutoffs were as follows: 5/10 mg/L of GHB (antemortem blood/urine) and 50/20/7 mg/L of GHB (postmortem blood/urine/vitreous). Of 226 deaths included, 213 had cardiorespiratory arrest and 13 had fatal accidents. Seventy-eight deaths (35%) had no cointoxicants. Sixteen deaths involved "supplements" and 1 involved pharmaceutical GHB (Xyrem, Jazz Pharmaceuticals, Palo Alto, CA). Postmortem blood GHB was 18 to 4400 mg/L (median, 347 mg/L) in deaths negative for cointoxicants. Cardiorespiratory arrest occurred prehospital in 100% of 184 cases with available history. Of 72 cases with antemortem adverse effects reported, medical assistance was delayed or absent in 66; of these, acute GHB ingestion was known in 51, including 40 left to "sleep off" adverse effects. Thirty others were left "sleeping" and found dead. γ-Hydroxybutyrate is lethal even without cointoxicants, directly and through fatal accidents. Medical interventions were frequently delayed or absent despite known GHB ingestion, and witnessed adverse events and cardiorespiratory arrest occurred prehospital. Education is needed about the lethality of GHB and the necessity for prompt medical intervention.

  16. Blocking anthrax lethal toxin at the protective antigen channel by using structure-inspired drug design.

    PubMed

    Karginov, Vladimir A; Nestorovich, Ekaterina M; Moayeri, Mahtab; Leppla, Stephen H; Bezrukov, Sergey M

    2005-10-18

    Bacillus anthracis secretes three polypeptides: protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF), and edema factor (EF), which interact at the surface of mammalian cells to form toxic complexes. LF and EF are enzymes that target substrates within the cytosol; PA provides a heptameric pore to facilitate LF and EF transport into the cytosol. Other than administration of antibiotics shortly after exposure, there is currently no approved effective treatment for inhalational anthrax. Here we demonstrate an approach to disabling the toxin: high-affinity blockage of the PA pore by a rationally designed low-molecular weight compound that prevents LF and EF entry into cells. Guided by the sevenfold symmetry and predominantly negative charge of the PA pore, we synthesized small cyclic molecules of sevenfold symmetry, beta-cyclodextrins chemically modified to add seven positive charges. By channel reconstitution and high-resolution conductance recording, we show that per-6-(3-aminopropylthio)-beta-cyclodextrin interacts strongly with the PA pore lumen, blocking PA-induced transport at subnanomolar concentrations (in 0.1 M KCl). The compound protected RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages from cytotoxicity of anthrax lethal toxin (= PA + LF). More importantly, it completely protected the highly susceptible Fischer F344 rats from lethal toxin. We anticipate that this approach will serve as the basis for a structure-directed drug discovery program to find new and effective treatments for anthrax.

  17. Ethylene oxide dose and dose-rate effects in the mouse dominant-lethal test

    SciTech Connect

    Generoso, W.M.; Cain, K.T.; Hughes, L.A.; Sega, G.A.; Braden, P.W.; Gosslee, D.G.; Shelby, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    In the dose-response study, male mice were exposed by inhalation to ethylene oxide (EtO) for 4 consecutive days. Mice were exposed for 6 hr per day to 300 ppm, 400 ppm, or 500 ppm EtO for a daily total of 1800, 2400, or 3000 ppm X hr (total exposures of 7200, 9600 and 12,000 ppm X hr), respectively. In the dose-rate study, mice were given a total exposure of 1800 ppm X hr per day, also for 4 consecutive days, delivered either at 300 ppm in 6 hr, 600 ppm in 3 hr, or 1200 ppm in 1.5 hr. Quantitation of dominant-lethal responses was made on matings involving sperm exposed as late spermatids and early spermatozoa, the most sensitive stages to EtO. In the dose-response study, a dose-related increase in dominant-lethal mutations was observed, the dose-response curve proved to be nonlinear. In the dose-rate study, increasing the exposure concentrations resulted in increased dominant-lethal responses.

  18. Lethal protein produced in response to competition between sibling bacterial colonies.

    PubMed

    Be'er, Avraham; Ariel, Gil; Kalisman, Oren; Helman, Yael; Sirota-Madi, Alexandra; Zhang, H P; Florin, E-L; Payne, Shelley M; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Swinney, Harry L

    2010-04-06

    Sibling Paenibacillus dendritiformis bacterial colonies grown on low-nutrient agar medium mutually inhibit growth through secretion of a lethal factor. Analysis of secretions reveals the presence of subtilisin (a protease) and a 12 kDa protein, termed sibling lethal factor (Slf). Purified subtilisin promotes the growth and expansion of P. dendritiformis colonies, whereas Slf is lethal and lyses P. dendritiformis cells in culture. Slf is encoded by a gene belonging to a large family of bacterial genes of unknown function, and the gene is predicted to encode a protein of approximately 20 kDa, termed dendritiformis sibling bacteriocin. The 20 kDa recombinant protein was produced and found to be inactive, but exposure to subtilisin resulted in cleavage to the active, 12 kDa form. The experimental results, combined with mathematical modeling, show that subtilisin serves to regulate growth of the colony. Below a threshold concentration, subtilisin promotes colony growth and expansion. However, once it exceeds a threshold, as occurs at the interface between competing colonies, Slf is then secreted into the medium to rapidly reduce cell density by lysis of the bacterial cells. The presence of genes encoding homologs of dendritiformis sibling bacteriocin in other bacterial species suggests that this mechanism for self-regulation of colony growth might not be limited to P. dendritiformis.

  19. Lipid nanocapsules for behavioural testing in aquatic toxicology: Time-response of Eurytemora affinis to environmental concentrations of PAHs and PCB.

    PubMed

    Michalec, François-Gaël; Holzner, Markus; Souissi, Anissa; Stancheva, Stefka; Barras, Alexandre; Boukherroub, Rabah; Souissi, Sami

    2016-01-01

    The increasing interest for behavioural investigations in aquatic toxicology has heightened the need for developing tools that allow realistic exposure conditions and provide robust quantitative data. Calanoid copepods dominate the zooplankton community in marine and brackish environments. These small organisms have emerged as attractive models because of the sensitivity of their behaviour to important environmental parameters and the significance of self-induced motion in their ecology. Estuarine copepods are particularly relevant in this context because of their incessant exposure to high levels of pollution. We used lipid nanocapsules to deliver sub-lethal concentrations of PAHs (pyrene, phenanthrene and fluoranthene) and PCB 153 into the digestive track of males and females Eurytemora affinis. This novel approach enabled us to achieve both contact and trophic exposure without using phytoplankton, and to expose copepods to small hydrophobic molecules without using organic solvent. We reconstructed the motion of many copepods swimming simultaneously by means of three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry. We quantified the combined effects of contact and trophic toxicity by comparing the kinematic and diffusive properties of their motion immediately and after 3h and 24h of exposure. Despite the lack of toxicity of their excipients, both empty and loaded capsules increased swimming activity and velocity immediately after exposure. Laser microscopy imaging shows adhesion of nanocapsules on the exoskeleton of the animals, suggesting contact toxicity. The behavioural response resembles an escape reaction allowing copepods to escape stressful conditions. The contact toxicity of empty capsules and pollutants appeared to be additive and nanocapsules loaded with PCB caused the greatest effects. We observed a progressive accumulation of capsules in the digestive track of the animals after 3h and 24h of exposure, which suggests an increasing contribution of systemic

  20. Anthrax Lethal Toxin Impairs Innate Immune Functions of Alveolar Macrophages and Facilitates Bacillus anthracis Survival

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-14

    germinate into vegetative bacteria (10, 23), which are capable of secreting anthrax lethal toxin (LT) and edema toxin . In the lymph nodes, bacteria ...inability of AM to completely eradicate bacteria suggests that intracellularly secreted lethal FIG. 5. Lethal toxin impairs bactericidal activity but...Microbiology. All Rights Reserved. Anthrax Lethal Toxin Impairs Innate Immune Functions of Alveolar Macrophages and Facilitates Bacillus anthracis

  1. (1)H NMR-based metabolomics of Daphnia magna responses after sub-lethal exposure to triclosan, carbamazepine and ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Kovacevic, Vera; Simpson, André J; Simpson, Myrna J

    2016-09-01

    Pharmaceuticals and personal care products are a class of emerging contaminants that are present in wastewater effluents, surface water, and groundwater around the world. There is a need to determine rapid and reliable bioindicators of exposure and the toxic mode of action of these contaminants to aquatic organisms. (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics in combination with multivariate statistical analysis was used to determine the metabolic profile of Daphnia magna after exposure to a range of sub-lethal concentrations of triclosan (6.25-100μg/L), carbamazepine (1.75-14mg/L) and ibuprofen (1.75-14mg/L) for 48h. Sub-lethal triclosan exposure suggested a general oxidative stress condition and the branched-chain amino acids, glutamine, glutamate, and methionine emerged as potential bioindicators. The aromatic amino acids, serine, glycine and alanine are potential bioindicators for sub-lethal carbamazepine exposure that may have altered energy metabolism. The potential bioindicators for sub-lethal ibuprofen exposure are serine, methionine, lysine, arginine and leucine, which showed a concentration-dependent response. The differences in the metabolic changes were related to the dissimilar modes of toxicity of triclosan, carbamazepine and ibuprofen. (1)H NMR-based metabolomics gave an improved understanding of how these emerging contaminants impact the keystone species D. magna.

  2. Effects of hypoxia on dopamine concentration and the immune response of White Shrimp ( Litopenaeus vannamei)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Fawen; Pan, Luqing; Jing, Futao

    2009-03-01

    Effects of hypoxia on the dopamine concentration and the immune response of White Shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei were studied. The results showed that hypoxia had significant effects on the concentration of dopamine (DA) in the haemolymph, haemocyte count, phenoloxidase activity, phagocytic activity of haemocytes and bacteriolytic and antibacterial activity in the haemolymph ( P<0.05). The concentration of the dopamine in haemolymph reached its maximum in the 3.0 and 1.5 mg L-1 DO groups at 12 h and 6 h, and then returned to normal after 24 h and 12 h, respectively. All immune parameters decreased with the reduction of dissolved oxygen. Total haemocyte count (THC), the hyaline cells and semi-granular cells in the 3.0 mg L-1 DO group became stable after 12 h, while granular cells did so after 24 h. The THC and different haemocyte count (DHC) in the 1.5 mg L-1 DO group became stable after 24 h. Phenoloxidase activity and bacteriolytic activity in the 3.0 and 1.5 mg L-1 DO groups reached their stable levels after 24 h and 12 h respectively, while phagocytic activity and antibacterial activity became stable after 24 and 12, and 36 and 24 h, respectively. It was also indicated that the changes of dopamine concentrations in haemolymph, haemocyte count and phenoloxidase activity were obviously related to the exposure time under hypoxic conditions.

  3. Detection and quantitation of infectious pancreatic necrosis virus by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction using lethal and non-lethal tissue sampling.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Robert M; Lapatra, Scott E; Dhar, Arun K

    2008-02-01

    Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) is a bisegmented double-stranded RNA virus belonging to the family Birnaviridae, genus Aquabirnavirus, which is a major viral pathogen of salmonid fish. The virus infects wild and cultured salmonids, causing high mortality in juvenile trout and salmon. A highly sensitive and specific real-time RT-PCR assay using the fluorogenic dye SYBR((R)) Green I was developed for the detection and quantitation of IPNV in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Rainbow trout were infected experimentally with IPNV in the laboratory by injection or immersion and then pectoral fin, spleen, and head kidney samples were collected for analysis. The corresponding cDNA was synthesized using DNase I-treated total RNA and then real-time RT-PCR was performed using primers based on the IPNV non-structural protein gene, designated as either NS or VP4. Rainbow trout beta-actin and elongation factor 1alpha (EF-1alpha) genes were used as internal controls. Using real-time RT-PCR, the virus was successfully detected in pectoral fin, spleen, and head kidney tissue samples. The dissociation curves for each amplicon showed a single melting peak at 83, 81.5, and 84 degrees C for IPNV NS, trout beta-actin, and EF-1alpha genes, respectively. The amplicon size and nucleotide sequence was used to confirm the specificity of the products. Using a dilution series of in vitro transcribed RNA, IPNV was reliably detected down to 10 RNA copies and had a dynamic range up to 10(7) RNA copies. A time course assay, using immersion challenged samples, revealed that the virus could be detected in pectoral fin, spleen, and head kidney as early as 24h post-challenge. The average viral load in all three tissues increased over time, reaching its highest level at 21 days post-challenge, which was followed by a slight decrease at 28 days post-challenge. IPNV load in pectoral fin tissue was comparable to the viral load in spleen and head kidney tissues, indicating that pectoral fin

  4. The Rorschach Suicide Constellation: assessing various degrees of lethality.

    PubMed

    Fowler, J C; Piers, C; Hilsenroth, M J; Holdwick, D J; Padawer, J R

    2001-04-01

    In this article we examine the relation between the Rorschach Comprehensive System's Suicide Constellation (S-CON; Exner, 1993; Exner & Wiley, 1977) and lethality of suicide attempts during the course of patients' hospitalization at the Austen Riggs Center (Stockbridge, MA). Patient records were rated as nonsuicidal (n = 37), parasuicidal (n = 37), or near-lethal (n = 30) based on the presence and lethality of self-destructive acts. Diagnostic efficiency statistics utilizing a cutoff score of 7 or more positive indicators successfully predicted which patients would engage in near-lethal suicidal activity relative to parasuicidal patients (overall correct classification rate [OCC] = .79), nonsuicidal inpatients (OCC = .79), and college students (OCC = .89). Although these predictions were influenced by relatively high base rates in the hospital population (14.5%), base rate estimates were calculated for other hypothetical populations revealing different prediction estimates that should be considered when judging the relative efficacy of the S-CON. Logistic regression analysis revealed that an S-CON score of 7 or more was the sole predictor of near-lethal suicide attempts among 9 psychiatric and demographic variables.

  5. Sub-lethal Effects of Chlorpyrifos on Big Brown Bats (Eptesicus fuscus).

    PubMed

    Eidels, Ronny R; Sparks, Daniel W; Whitaker, John O; Sprague, Charles A

    2016-10-01

    We determined dose-response curves for sublethal effects of the organophosphorus (OP) insecticide, chlorpyrifos, on bats. Big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus, n = 64) were given a single dose of chlorpyrifos (nominal concentrations) of 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, or 60 µg/g body weight and examined at 12 or 24 h after dosing. A second experiment dosed 32 bats with 0 or 60 µg/g body weight and examined 1, 3, 7, or 14 days after dosing. Skin temperature and behavioral changes were recorded, and brain and plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activity were measured. The benchmark dose (BMD10) of chlorpyrifos that altered brain and plasma ChE activity at 24 h was 3.7 and 10.1 µg/g, respectively. The 95 % lower confidence limit for the BMD10 (i.e., BMDL10) was 1.6 and 7.7 µg/g. The best of five models (as determined by AIC) for impaired flight, impaired movement, or presence of tremors provided a BMD10 of 6.2, 12.9, and 7.8 µg/g body weight of chlorpyrifos, respectively. BMDL10 for impaired flight, impaired movement, or presence of tremors was 3.5, 6.6, and 5.3 µg/g body weight, respectively. In the wild, impaired ability to fly or crawl could be life-threatening. Brain and plasma ChE activity remained low for 3 days after dosing. Gradual recovery of enzyme activity was observed by 7 days in survivors. Brain and plasma ChE activity were still significantly lower than that of the control group at 14 days after dosing.

  6. Evaluation of lethal and non-lethal sampling methods for the detection of white sturgeon iridovirus infection in white sturgeon, Acipenser transmontanus (Richardson).

    PubMed

    Drennan, J D; Lapatra, S E; Samson, C A; Ireland, S; Eversman, K F; Cain, K D

    2007-06-01

    Pectoral fin tissue of white sturgeon was investigated as a potential non-lethal sample source for the detection of white sturgeon iridovirus (WSIV) infection. Histopathology and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) results using fin tissue were compared with the standard lethal histopathology sampling method that utilizes head tissue. Tissues for each of the three sampling methods were collected weekly for 8 weeks from individual sturgeon undergoing an experimental cohabitation challenge with fish infected with the Abernathy isolate of WSIV. Non-lethal fin histopathological evaluation did not reveal infection during the first 3 weeks of sampling, while non-lethal PCR and the lethal method were variable. However, all three sampling methods were equally capable of identifying infection from 4 to 8 weeks post-exposure. Of the survivors tested, all were negative by PCR and the lethal method, and only one fish was identified as being positive by non-lethal fin histopathology. In another experiment, all three sampling methods were applied to asymptomatic WSIV carriers in a case study conducted at the Kootenai Tribal Sturgeon Conservation Hatchery. Results showed that both lethal and non-lethal fin histopathology were equally effective in detecting infection, but PCR was unable to identify this strain of WSIV. Depending on the virus isolate, these results suggest that non-lethal sampling of fin tissue (histopathology or PCR) is comparable with the lethal sampling method at identifying WSIV infection once infection is established, and under certain circumstances may provide an alternative to lethal sampling.

  7. Lethal effects of short-wavelength visible light on insects.

    PubMed

    Hori, Masatoshi; Shibuya, Kazuki; Sato, Mitsunari; Saito, Yoshino

    2014-12-09

    We investigated the lethal effects of visible light on insects by using light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The toxic effects of ultraviolet (UV) light, particularly shortwave (i.e., UVB and UVC) light, on organisms are well known. However, the effects of irradiation with visible light remain unclear, although shorter wavelengths are known to be more lethal. Irradiation with visible light is not thought to cause mortality in complex animals including insects. Here, however, we found that irradiation with short-wavelength visible (blue) light killed eggs, larvae, pupae, and adults of Drosophila melanogaster. Blue light was also lethal to mosquitoes and flour beetles, but the effective wavelength at which mortality occurred differed among the insect species. Our findings suggest that highly toxic wavelengths of visible light are species-specific in insects, and that shorter wavelengths are not always more toxic. For some animals, such as insects, blue light is more harmful than UV light.

  8. The effects of anthrax lethal toxin on host barrier function.

    PubMed

    Xie, Tao; Auth, Roger D; Frucht, David M

    2011-06-01

    The pathological actions of anthrax toxin require the activities of its edema factor (EF) and lethal factor (LF) enzyme components, which gain intracellular access via its receptor-binding component, protective antigen (PA). LF is a metalloproteinase with specificity for selected mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases (MKKs), but its activity is not directly lethal to many types of primary and transformed cells in vitro. Nevertheless, in vivo treatment of several animal species with the combination of LF and PA (termed lethal toxin or LT) leads to morbidity and mortality, suggesting that LT-dependent toxicity is mediated by cellular interactions between host cells. Decades of research have revealed that a central hallmark of this toxicity is the disruption of key cellular barriers required to maintain homeostasis. This review will focus on the current understanding of the effects of LT on barrier function, highlighting recent progress in establishing the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects.

  9. Crossover Suppressors and Balanced Recessive Lethals in CAENORHABDITIS ELEGANS

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Robert K.

    1978-01-01

    Two dominant suppressors of crossing over have been identified following X-ray treatment of the small nematode C. elegans. They suppress crossing over in linkage group II (LGII) about 100-fold and 50-fold and are both tightly linked to LGII markers. One, called C1, segregates independently of all other linkage groups and is homozygous fertile. The other is a translocation involving LGII and X. The translocation also suppresses crossing over along the right half of X and is homozygous lethal. C1 has been used as a balancer of LGII recessive lethal and sterile mutations induced by EMS. The frequencies of occurrence of lethals and steriles were approximately equal. Fourteen mutations were assigned to complementation groups and mapped. They tended to map in the same region where LGII visibles are clustered. PMID:631558

  10. Lethal effects of short-wavelength visible light on insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Masatoshi; Shibuya, Kazuki; Sato, Mitsunari; Saito, Yoshino

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the lethal effects of visible light on insects by using light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The toxic effects of ultraviolet (UV) light, particularly shortwave (i.e., UVB and UVC) light, on organisms are well known. However, the effects of irradiation with visible light remain unclear, although shorter wavelengths are known to be more lethal. Irradiation with visible light is not thought to cause mortality in complex animals including insects. Here, however, we found that irradiation with short-wavelength visible (blue) light killed eggs, larvae, pupae, and adults of Drosophila melanogaster. Blue light was also lethal to mosquitoes and flour beetles, but the effective wavelength at which mortality occurred differed among the insect species. Our findings suggest that highly toxic wavelengths of visible light are species-specific in insects, and that shorter wavelengths are not always more toxic. For some animals, such as insects, blue light is more harmful than UV light.

  11. Brief exposures of human body lice to sub-lethal amounts of ivermectin over transcribes detoxification genes involved in tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, K. S.; Strycharz, J. P.; Baek, J. H.; Sun, W.; Kim, J.H.; Kang, J.S.; Pittendrigh, B. R.; Lee, S. H.; Clark, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Transcriptional profiling results, using our non-invasive induction assay [short exposure intervals (2–5 h) to sub-lethal amounts of insecticides (24 h) administered by stress reducing means (contact vs. immersion screen) and with induction assessed in a time frame when tolerance is still present (~LC90 in 2–4 h)], show that ivermectin-induced detoxification genes from body lice are identified by quantitative real-time PCR analyses. Of the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase and ATP binding cassette transporter genes induced by ivermectin, CYP6CJ1, CYP9AG1, CYP9AG2 and PhABCC4 were respectively most significantly over-expressed, had high basal expression levels and were most closely related to genes from other organisms that metabolized insecticides, including ivermectin. Injection of dsRNAs against either CYP9AG2 or PhABCC4 into non-induced female lice reduced their respective transcript level and resulted in increase sensitivity to ivermectin, indicating that these two genes are involved in the xenobiotic metabolism of ivermectin and in the production of tolerance. PMID:21895817

  12. Prophylactic treatment with Bacopa monnieri leaf powder mitigates paraquat-induced oxidative perturbations and lethality in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Hosamani, Ravikumar; Muralidhara

    2010-04-01

    Environmental exposure to the oxidant-producing herbicide, paraquat (PQ) (1,1'-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyridinium dichloride) has long been implicated as a risk factor in Parkinson's disease (PD). PQ-induced oxidative stress has been exploited as a model to screen putative neuroprotective compounds employing Drosophila. In the present study, we investigated the prophylactic efficacy of Bacopa monnieri (BM) against PQ-induced oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunctions and lethality. Exposure of adult male flies (Oregon K) to PQ alone (40 mM in 5% sucrose) resulted in 50% mortality at 48 h. Prophylaxis (7 days) with BM extract (0.1%) offered significant protection (40%) against PQ-induced mortality. Further, oxidative impairments and mitochondrial dysfunctions were monitored among Drosophila exposed to PQ (20, 40 mM) for 24 h. Significant induction of oxidative stress was observed in terms of enhanced malondialdehyde and hydroperoxide levels, and elevated activities of antioxidant enzymes (catalase and SOD). Mitochondrial dysfunctions included of significant reduction in the activities of succinate dehydrogenase (23%), complex I-III (26%), and complex II-III (30%) enzymes. Interestingly, prophylaxis with BM extract prevented the oxidative stress induction by PQ and restored the activity of ETC complexes, suggesting clearly its specific effect on the mitochondria. While the precise mechanism of action of BM needs further investigations, it may be related to its ability to enhance antioxidant defences and thus mitigate PQ-induced oxidative stress in Drosophila.

  13. Curcumin and β-caryophellene attenuate cadmium quantum dots induced oxidative stress and lethality in Caenorhabditis elegans model system.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Swati; Pant, Aakanksha; Trivedi, Shalini; Pandey, Rakesh

    2016-03-01

    Curcumin (CUR) and β-caryophellene (BCP) are well known bioactive phytomolecules which are known to reduce oxidative stress in living organisms. Therefore, the present study was envisaged to explore the possible effects of CUR and BCP in suppression of cadmium quantum dots (CdTe QDs) induced toxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans. CdTe QD are luminescent nanoparticles extensively exploited for in vivo imaging, but long term bioaccumulation confer deleterious effects on living organisms. The 24-h LC50 and LC100 of CdTe QD were found to be 18.40 μg/ml and 100 μg/ml respectively. The CdTe QD exposure elevated HSP-16.2 expression mediating induction of the stress response. The CdTe QD lethality was due to increment in ROS and decline in SOD and GST expression. The present study demonstrates improved survival in BCP (50 μM) and CUR (20 μM) treated worms by over 60% (P<0.01) and 50% (P<0.029) in CdTe QD (100 μg/ml) exposed worms. Furthermore, BCP and CUR attenuate oxidative stress triggered by QD. The present study for the first time demonstrates CdTe QD toxicity remediation via BCP and CUR. The future investigations can unravel underlying protective effects of phytomolceules for remediating cyotoxicolgical effects of QDs.

  14. Using photopigment biomarkers to quantify sub-lethal effects of petroleum pollution on natural phytoplankton assemblages

    SciTech Connect

    Swistak, J.; Pinckney, J.; Piehler, M.; Paerl, H.

    1995-12-31

    Although much work has been undertaken to determine the toxicity of petroleum pollutants to phytoplankton, most studies have used pure cultures to monitor growth of selected phytoplankton species. Fewer have considered the net effect on entire microalgal communities. Using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to characterize diagnostic microalgal pigments, the authors were able to simultaneously assess sub-lethal pollutant effects on entire communities as well as on individual phytoplankton functional groups. Incubations of natural water samples with diesel fuel, an important contributor to coastal petroleum pollution, revealed significant changes in photopigments and relative abundance of taxonomic groups at sub-lethal concentrations. Differential rates of change of indicator pigment concentrations suggest a range of sensitivity among phytoplankton groups. In preliminary experiments, cyanobacteria exhibited the greatest overall tolerance to the diesel fuel concentrations tested, while cryptomonads displayed the most sensitivity. The authors are currently evaluating the responses of seasonal phytoplankton populations from 3 sites exposed to varied levels of petroleum pollution. HPLC will be used to characterize phytoplankton populations and to determine if the most abundant groups are also the most tolerant of diesel fuel. Preliminary experiments indicate that diesel fuel pollution may modify the structure and function of phytoplankton communities and subsequently alter the trophodynamics of impacted systems.

  15. Non-Lethal Weapons for Today’s Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Douglas J. Jerothe Lieutenant Colonel Paul L. Scholl Susan D. LeVine Kevin J. Swenson Kelley S. Hughes Alicia J. Owsiak Publication Management Bethel...Davel robert.davel@ conus.army.mil 573-563-7092 U.S. Air Force Sal Hernandez salvador.hernandez@ us.af.mil 210-925-5015 U.S. Marine Corps Scott H...Force Base, Nev. (DoD Photo by Alicia J. Owsiak) DoD Non-Lethal Weapons Program 2011 DoD Non-Lethal Weapons Program 2011 Colombian Marine

  16. Advantages of less-tech, less-than-lethal technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marts, Donna J.; Overlin, Trudy K.

    1995-05-01

    This paper illustrates the advantages of developing less-tech technologies by reporting on two less-tech, less-than-lethal prototype law enforcement tools developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The devices were developed for the National Institute of Justice, less- than-lethal weapons program: 1) an air bag restraint device for use in restraining suspects who become violent during transport in patrol vehicles, and 2) a retractable spiked barrier strip for stopping fleeing vehicles during high-speed pursuit. The success of both projects relied on developing design requirements in conjunction with the actual users of the devices.

  17. Crystal structure, magnetic, thermal behavior, and spectroscopic studies of two new bimetallic hydrogenselenites: [Cu2-xNix (HSeO3)2Cl2.4H2O], (x = 0.62; 0.91)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hentech, I.; Zehani, K.; Kabadou, A.; Ben Salah, A.; Loukil, M.; Bessais, L.

    2016-08-01

    Two new iso-structural bimetallic hydrogenselenites [Cu2-xNix(HSeO3)2Cl2.4H2O] (x = 0.62; 0.91) have been synthesized from solution and characterized by single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction. They crystallized in the orthorhombic Pnma space group with the following lattice parameters: for Cu1.09Ni0.91(HSeO3)2Cl2.4H2O: a = 9.0931 (2) Å, b = 17.7717 (4) Å, c = 7.1620 (2) Å, Z = 4, and for Cu1.38Ni0.62(HSeO3)2Cl2.4H2O: a = 9.0931 (4) Å, b = 17.7467 (7) Å, c = 7.1717 (3) Å; Z = 4. The crystal structure of this compound consists by a three-dimensional framework, but it may be described as a bi-dimensional structure consisting of layers, parallel to the (010) plane formed by two types of (Cu/Ni) octahedral and (HSeO3)- trigonal pyramids. The magnetic measurement, thermal and spectroscopic studies were performed for these compounds. The magnetic results reveal the appearance of a weak ferromagnetic behavior at low temperature (Tc = 16 K for x = 0.91 and 18.8 K for x = 0.62). The DSC analysis enabled us to locate two endothermic peaks. The first peak can be attributed to a completely dehydration of the material, in this transformation, the compounds undergo a structural phase transition which can favor a non-centrosymmetric phase at high temperature confirmed by the thermodiffractograms measurement. The second peak for these samples is due to the ferro-paraelectric phase transition which can be explained by an order- disorder transition.

  18. Nqrs Data for C24H48I12O42S12Tl12 [C12H24O6·12(CH2IO3STl)] (Subst. No. 1591)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chihara, H.; Nakamura, N.

    This document is part of Subvolume B 'Substances Containing C10H16 … Zn' of Volume 48 'Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy Data' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group III 'Condensed Matter'. It contains an extract of Section '3.2 Data tables' of the Chapter '3 Nuclear quadrupole resonance data' providing the NQRS data for C24H48I12O42S12Tl12 [C12H24O6·12(CH2IO3STl)] (Subst. No. 1591)

  19. Resistance of Trichomonas vaginalis to metronidazole: report of the first three cases from Finland and optimization of in vitro susceptibility testing under various oxygen concentrations.

    PubMed

    Meri, T; Jokiranta, T S; Suhonen, L; Meri, S

    2000-02-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a globally common sexually transmitted human parasite. Many strains of T. vaginalis from around the world have been described to be resistant to the current drug of choice, metronidazole. However, only a few cases of metronidazole resistance have been reported from Europe. The resistant strains cause prolonged infections which are difficult to treat. T. vaginalis infection also increases the risk for human immunodeficiency virus transmission. We present a practical method for determining the resistance of T. vaginalis to 5-nitroimidazoles. The suggested method was developed by determining the MICs and minimal lethal concentrations (MLCs) of metronidazole and ornidazole for T. vaginalis under various aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Using this assay we have found the first three metronidazole-resistant strains from Finland, although the origin of at least one of the strains seems to be Russia. Analysis of the patient-derived and previously characterized isolates showed that metronidazole-resistant strains were also resistant to ornidazole, and MLCs for all strains tested correlated well with the MICs. The suggested MICs of metronidazole for differentiation of sensitive and resistant isolates are >75 microg/ml in an aerobic 24-h assay and >15 microg/ml in an anaerobic 48-h assay.

  20. Sialic acid-binding protein Sp2CBMTD protects mice against lethal challenge with emerging influenza A (H7N9) virus.

    PubMed

    Govorkova, Elena A; Baranovich, Tatiana; Marathe, Bindumadhav M; Yang, Lei; Taylor, Margaret A; Webster, Robert G; Taylor, Garry L; Connaris, Helen

    2015-03-01

    Compounds that target the cellular factors essential for influenza virus replication represent an innovative approach to antiviral therapy. Sp2CBMTD is a genetically engineered multivalent protein that masks sialic acid-containing cellular receptors on the respiratory epithelium, which are recognized by influenza viruses. Here, we evaluated the antiviral potential of Sp2CBMTD against lethal infection in mice with an emerging A/Anhui/1/2013 (H7N9) influenza virus and addressed the mechanistic basis of its activity in vivo. Sp2CBMTD was administered to mice intranasally as a single or repeated dose (0.1, 1, 10, or 100 μg) before (day -7, -3, and/or -1) or after (6 or 24 h) H7N9 virus inoculation. A single Sp2CBMTD dose (10 or 100 μg) protected 80% to 100% of the mice when administered 7 days before the H7N9 lethal challenge. Repeated Sp2CBMTD administration conferred the highest protection, resulting in 100% survival of the mice even at the lowest dose tested (0.1 μg). When treatment began 24 h after exposure to the H7N9 virus, a single administration of 100 μg of Sp2CBMTD protected 40% of the mice from death. The administration of Sp2CBMTD induced the pulmonary expression of proinflammatory mediators (interleukin-6 [IL-6], IL-1β, RANTES, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 [MCP-1], macrophage inflammatory protein-1α [MIP-1α], and inducible protein [IP-10]) and recruited neutrophils to the respiratory tract before H7N9 virus infection, which resulted in less pronounced inflammation and rapid virus clearance from mouse lungs. Sp2CBMTD administration did not affect the virus-specific adaptive immune response, which was sufficient to protect against reinfection with a higher dose of homologous H7N9 virus or heterologous H5N1 virus. Thus, Sp2CBMTD was effective in preventing H7N9 infections in a lethal mouse model and holds promise as a prophylaxis option against zoonotic influenza viruses.

  1. Increased acylated plasma ghrelin, but improved lipid profiles 24-h after consumption of carob pulp preparation rich in dietary fibre and polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Gruendel, Sindy; Garcia, Ada L; Otto, Baerbel; Wagner, Karen; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Burget, Lukas; Weickert, Martin O; Dongowski, Gerhard; Speth, Maria; Katz, Norbert; Koebnick, Corinna

    2007-12-01

    We have recently shown that a polyphenol-rich insoluble dietary fibre preparation from carob pulp (Ceratonia siliqua L; carob fibre) decreased postprandial acylated ghrelin, TAG and NEFA during an acute liquid meal challenge test. However, delayed effects of carob fibre consumption are unknown. Therefore, a randomized controlled crossover study in nineteen healthy volunteers consuming foods with or without 50 g carob fibre was conducted. On the subsequent day (day 2), glucose, TAG, total and acylated ghrelin as well as insulin, NEFA and leptin were assessed at baseline and at timed intervals for 300 min after ingestion of standardized bread. Consumption of carob fibre-enriched foods did not affect fasting concentrations of glucose, TAG, total ghrelin, NEFA, insulin and leptin. Fasting acylated ghrelin was increased on the day subsequent to carob fibre consumption compared with control (P = 0.046). After consumption of the standard bread on day 2, glucose response (P = 0.029) was increased, and TAG (P = 0.033) and NEFA (P < 0.001) responses were decreased compared with control. Postprandial responses of total and acylated ghrelin, insulin and leptin on day 2 were unaffected by carob fibre consumption the previous day. In conclusion, an increase in total and acylated plasma ghrelin accompanied by enhanced lipid metabolism after carob fibre consumption suggests higher lipid utilization and suppressed lipolysis on the day subsequent to carob fibre consumption. However, elevated glucose levels after carob fibre consumption need to be addressed in future studies.

  2. Science or slaughter: need for lethal sampling of sharks.

    PubMed

    Heupel, M R; Simpfendorfer, C A

    2010-10-01

    General consensus among scientists, commercial interests, and the public regarding the status of shark populations is leading to an increasing need for the scientific community to provide information to help guide effective management and conservation actions. Experience from other marine vertebrate taxa suggests that public, political, and media pressures will play an increasingly important part in setting research, management, and conservation priorities. We examined the potential implications of nonscientific influences on shark research. In particular, we considered whether lethal research sampling of sharks is justified. Although lethal sampling comes at a cost to a population, especially for threatened species, the conservation benefits from well-designed studies provide essential data that cannot be collected currently in any other way. Methods that enable nonlethal collection of life-history data on sharks are being developed (e.g., use of blood samples to detect maturity), but in the near future they will not provide widespread or significant benefits. Development of these techniques needs to continue, as does the way in which scientists coordinate their use of material collected during lethal sampling. For almost half of the known shark species there are insufficient data to determine their population status; thus, there is an ongoing need for further collection of scientific data to ensure all shark populations have a future. Shark populations will benefit most when decisions about the use of lethal sampling are made on the basis of scientific evidence that is free from individual, political, public, and media pressures.

  3. 40 CFR 798.5450 - Rodent dominant lethal assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... dysfunction of the gamete, but which is lethal to the fertilized egg or developing embryo. (c) Reference... of the uteri are examined to determine the numbers of implants and live and dead embryos. The... determine the total number of implants and the number of live and dead embryos. (3) Animal...

  4. 40 CFR 798.5450 - Rodent dominant lethal assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... dysfunction of the gamete, but which is lethal to the fertilized egg or developing embryo. (c) Reference... of the uteri are examined to determine the numbers of implants and live and dead embryos. The... determine the total number of implants and the number of live and dead embryos. (3) Animal...

  5. 40 CFR 798.5450 - Rodent dominant lethal assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... dysfunction of the gamete, but which is lethal to the fertilized egg or developing embryo. (c) Reference... of the uteri are examined to determine the numbers of implants and live and dead embryos. The... determine the total number of implants and the number of live and dead embryos. (3) Animal...

  6. 40 CFR 798.5450 - Rodent dominant lethal assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... dysfunction of the gamete, but which is lethal to the fertilized egg or developing embryo. (c) Reference... of the uteri are examined to determine the numbers of implants and live and dead embryos. The... determine the total number of implants and the number of live and dead embryos. (3) Animal...

  7. 40 CFR 798.5450 - Rodent dominant lethal assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... dysfunction of the gamete, but which is lethal to the fertilized egg or developing embryo. (c) Reference... of the uteri are examined to determine the numbers of implants and live and dead embryos. The... determine the total number of implants and the number of live and dead embryos. (3) Animal...

  8. The "Lethal Chamber": Further Evidence of the Euthanasia Option.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elks, Martin A.

    1993-01-01

    Historical discussions of the euthanasia or "lethal chamber" option in relation to people with mental retardation are presented. The paper concludes that eugenic beliefs in the primacy of heredity over environment and the positive role of natural selection may have condoned the poor conditions characteristic of large, segregated institutions and…

  9. The Lethal "Femme Fatale" in the Noir Tradition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boozer, Jack

    2000-01-01

    Traces the lethal seductress through Hollywood's "noir" history from "Double Indemnity" (1944) to "The Last Seduction" (1996). Examines how this figure largely abjures traditional romance and passive domesticity, choosing instead to apply her sexuality to homicidal plots toward greed. Argues that her narrative…

  10. Conditional lethality strains for the biological control of Anastrepha species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pro-apoptotic cell death genes are promising candidates for biologically-based autocidal control of pest insects as demonstrated by tetracycline (tet)-suppressible systems for conditional embryonic lethality in Drosophila melanogaster (Dm) and the medfly, Ceratitis capitata (Cc). However, for medfly...

  11. Help-Seeking Behavior Prior to Nearly Lethal Suicide Attempts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Lauren Seymour; Ikeda, Robin M.; Kresnow, Marcie-jo

    2002-01-01

    The association between help-seeking and nearly lethal suicide attempts was evaluated using data from a population-based, case-control study. Measures of help-seeking included type of consultant contacted, and whether suicide was discussed. Findings suggest efforts to better understand the role of help-seeking in suicide prevention deserves…

  12. Dominant-lethal mutations and heritable translocations in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Generoso, W.M.

    1983-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations are a major component of radiation or chemically induced genetic damage in mammalian germ cells. The types of aberration produced are dependent upon the mutagen used and the germ-cell stage treated. For example, in male meiotic and postmeiotic germ cells certain alkylating chemicals induce both dominant-lethal mutations and heritable translocations while others induce primarily dominant-lethal mutations. Production of these two endpoints appears to be determined by the stability of alkylation products with the chromosomes. If the reaction products are intact in the male chromosomes at the time of sperm entry, they may be repaired in fertilized eggs. If repair is not effected and the alkylation products persist to the time of pronuclear chromosome replication, they lead to chromatid-type aberrations and eventually to dominant-lethality. The production of heritable translocations, on the other hand, requires a transformation of unstable alkylation products into suitable intermediate lesions. The process by which these lesions are converted into chromosome exchange within the male genome takes place after sperm enters the egg but prior to the time of pronuclear chromosome replication (i.e., chromosome-type). Thus, dominant-lethal mutations result from both chromatid- and chromosome-type aberrations while heritable translocations result primarily from the latter type. DNA target sites associated with the production of these two endpoints are discussed.

  13. Phenotypic characterization of spontaneously mutated rats showing lethal dwarfism and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hiroetsu; Takenaka, Motoo; Suzuki, Katsushi

    2007-08-01

    We have characterized the phenotype of spontaneously mutated rats, found during experimental inbreeding in a closed colony of Wistar Imamichi rats. Mutant rats showed severe dwarfism, short lifespan (early postnatal lethality), and high incidence of epileptic seizures. Mutant rats showed growth retardation after 3 d of age, and at 21 d their weight was about 56% that of normal rats. Most mutant rats died without reaching maturity, and 95% of the mutant rats had an ataxic gait. About 34% of the dwarf rats experienced epileptic seizures, most of which started as 'wild running' convulsions, progressing to generalized tonic-clonic convulsions. At age 28 d, the relative weight of the testes was significantly lower, and the relative weight of the brain was significantly higher, in mutant than in normal rats. Histologically, increased apoptotic germ cells, lack of spermatocytes, and immature Leydig cells were found in the mutant testes, and extracellular vacuoles of various sizes were present in the hippocampus and amygdala of the mutant brain. Mutant rats had significantly increased concentrations of plasma urea nitrogen, creatinine, and inorganic phosphate, as well as decreased concentrations of plasma growth hormone. Hereditary analysis showed that the defects were inherited as a single recessive trait. We have named the hypothetically mutated gene as lde (lethal dwarfism with epilepsy).

  14. Surface binding of contaminants by algae: Consequences for lethal toxicity and feeding to Daphnia magna straus

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G. |; Baird, D.J.; Soares, A.M.V.M.

    1998-03-01

    Freshwater algae, as with all suspended particulate matter in the water column, exhibit a net negative charge resulting in an affinity for positively charged species, such as toxic metal cations, which will readily adsorb to algal cell surfaces. In this study, the adsorption of a representative toxic metal cadmium cation (Cd{sup 2+}) to a freshwater algal species, Chlorella vulgaris, was investigated using environmentally realistic concentrations of both. A further study of the effects of this particulate adsorption of Cd{sup 2+} on lethal toxicity and feeding in Daphnia magna was conducted. Two apparently contrasting effects were observed. For the D. magna feeding study, cell ingestion was inhibited, leading to reduced growth and reproduction. Experiments comparing the effect of algal-bound cadmium and dissolved forms of cadmium demonstrate that this inhibition is almost entirely due to the surface-bound fraction of ions. However, at concentrations of dissolved cadmium that are lethal to Daphnia, algal cells were found to reduce toxicity. Such findings indicate the importance of food ration in laboratory-based toxicity tests as well as the difficulty in predicting the environmental fate and effect of contaminants using such tests.

  15. Association between 24 h urinary sodium and potassium excretion and the metabolic syndrome in Chinese adults: the Shandong and Ministry of Health Action on Salt and Hypertension (SMASH) study.

    PubMed

    Ge, Zeng; Guo, Xiaolei; Chen, Xiaorong; Tang, Junli; Yan, Liuxia; Ren, Jie; Zhang, Jiyu; Lu, Zilong; Dong, Jing; Xu, Jianwei; Cai, Xiaoning; Liang, Hao; Ma, Jixiang

    2015-03-28

    The association of 24 h urinary Na and potassium excretion with the risk of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) has not been studied in China. The aim of the present study was to examine this association by analysing the data from 1906 study participants living in north China. To this end, 24 h urine samples were collected. Of the 1906 participants, 471 (24·7 %) had the MetS. The mean urinary Na and K excretion was 228·7 and 40·8 mmol/d, respectively. After multivariate adjustment, the odds of the MetS significantly increased across the increasing tertiles of urinary Na excretion (1·00, 1·40 and 1·54, respectively). For the components of the MetS, the odds of central obesity, elevated blood pressure and elevated TAG, but not the odds of low HDL-cholesterol and elevated fasting glucose, significantly increased with the successive tertiles of urinary Na excretion. Furthermore, for every 100 mmol/d increase in urinary Na excretion, the odds of the MetS, central obesity, elevated blood pressure and elevated TAG was significantly increased by 29, 63, 22 and 21 %, respectively. However, urinary K excretion was not significantly associated with the risk of the MetS. These findings suggest that high Na intake might be an important risk factor for the MetS in Chinese adults.

  16. Effects of luseogliflozin, a sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor, on 24-h glucose variability assessed by continuous glucose monitoring in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, R; Osonoi, T; Kanada, S; Jinnouchi, H; Sugio, K; Omiya, H; Ubukata, M; Sakai, S; Samukawa, Y

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of luseogliflozin on 24-h glucose levels, assessed by continuous glucose monitoring, and on pharmacodynamic variables measured throughout the day. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study, 37 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus inadequately controlled with diet and exercise were randomized into two groups. Patients in each group first received luseogliflozin then placebo for 7 days each, or vice versa. After 7 days of treatment, the mean 24-h glucose level was significantly lower with luseogliflozin than with placebo [mean (95% confidence interval) 145.9 (134.4-157.5) mg/dl vs 168.5 (156.9-180.0) mg/dl; p < 0.001]. The proportion of time spent with glucose levels ≥70 to ≤180 mg/dl was significantly greater with luseogliflozin than with placebo [median (interquartile range) 83.2 (67.7-96.5)% vs 71.9 (46.9-83.3)%; p < 0.001] without inducing hypoglycaemia. The decrease in glucose levels was accompanied by reductions in serum insulin levels throughout the day.

  17. Empirical Complexities in the Genetic Foundations of Lethal Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bull, James J.; Joyce, Paul; Gladstone, Eric; Molineux, Ian J.

    2013-01-01

    From population genetics theory, elevating the mutation rate of a large population should progressively reduce average fitness. If the fitness decline is large enough, the population will go extinct in a process known as lethal mutagenesis. Lethal mutagenesis has been endorsed in the virology literature as a promising approach to viral treatment, and several in vitro studies have forced viral extinction with high doses of mutagenic drugs. Yet only one empirical study has tested the genetic models underlying lethal mutagenesis, and the theory failed on even a qualitative level. Here we provide a new level of analysis of lethal mutagenesis by developing and evaluating models specifically tailored to empirical systems that may be used to test the theory. We first quantify a bias in the estimation of a critical parameter and consider whether that bias underlies the previously observed lack of concordance between theory and experiment. We then consider a seemingly ideal protocol that avoids this bias—mutagenesis of virions—but find that it is hampered by other problems. Finally, results that reveal difficulties in the mere interpretation of mutations assayed from double-strand genomes are derived. Our analyses expose unanticipated complexities in testing the theory. Nevertheless, the previous failure of the theory to predict experimental outcomes appears to reside in evolutionary mechanisms neglected by the theory (e.g., beneficial mutations) rather than from a mismatch between the empirical setup and model assumptions. This interpretation raises the specter that naive attempts at lethal mutagenesis may augment adaptation rather than retard it. PMID:23934886

  18. A Multivariate Model of Stakeholder Preference for Lethal Cat Management

    PubMed Central

    Wald, Dara M.; Jacobson, Susan K.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying stakeholder beliefs and attitudes is critical for resolving management conflicts. Debate over outdoor cat management is often described as a conflict between two groups, environmental advocates and animal welfare advocates, but little is known about the variables predicting differences among these critical stakeholder groups. We administered a mail survey to randomly selected stakeholders representing both of these groups (n = 1,596) in Florida, where contention over the management of outdoor cats has been widespread. We used a structural equation model to evaluate stakeholder intention to support non-lethal management. The cognitive hierarchy model predicted that values influenced beliefs, which predicted general and specific attitudes, which in turn, influenced behavioral intentions. We posited that specific attitudes would mediate the effect of general attitudes, beliefs, and values on management support. Model fit statistics suggested that the final model fit the data well (CFI = 0.94, RMSEA = 0.062). The final model explained 74% of the variance in management support, and positive attitudes toward lethal management (humaneness) had the largest direct effect on management support. Specific attitudes toward lethal management and general attitudes toward outdoor cats mediated the relationship between positive (p<0.05) and negative cat-related impact beliefs (p<0.05) and support for management. These results supported the specificity hypothesis and the use of the cognitive hierarchy to assess stakeholder intention to support non-lethal cat management. Our findings suggest that stakeholders can simultaneously perceive both positive and negative beliefs about outdoor cats, which influence attitudes toward and support for non-lethal management. PMID:24736744

  19. The Chicxulub Impactites: What makes a crater lethal ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claeys, P.

    2004-12-01

    perturbation models based on the injection in the atmosphere of a high abundances of S-bearing gases (~ 300 Gt) should then be favored. However, modeling also shows that beyond a given concentration in S aerosols, the climate forcing reaches a saturation level. Chicxulub appears thus as a rather unique event; it is unclear if similar size impacts on other target or smaller impacts on volatile-rich targets would have the same lethal consequence for the biosphere ?

  20. An analysis of lethal and sublethal interactions among type I and type II pyrethroid pesticide mixtures using standard Hyalella azteca water column toxicity tests.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Krista Callinan; Deanovic, Linda; Werner, Inge; Stillway, Marie; Fong, Stephanie; Teh, Swee

    2016-10-01

    A novel 2-tiered analytical approach was used to characterize and quantify interactions between type I and type II pyrethroids in Hyalella azteca using standardized water column toxicity tests. Bifenthrin, permethrin, cyfluthrin, and lambda-cyhalothrin were tested in all possible binary combinations across 6 experiments. All mixtures were analyzed for 4-d lethality, and 2 of the 6 mixtures (permethrin-bifenthrin and permethrin-cyfluthrin) were tested for subchronic 10-d lethality and sublethal effects on swimming motility and growth. Mixtures were initially analyzed for interactions using regression analyses, and subsequently compared with the additive models of concentration addition and independent action to further characterize mixture responses. Negative interactions (antagonistic) were significant in 2 of the 6 mixtures tested, including cyfluthrin-bifenthrin and cyfluthrin-permethrin, but only on the acute 4-d lethality endpoint. In both cases mixture responses fell between the additive models of concentration addition and independent action. All other mixtures were additive across 4-d lethality, and bifenthrin-permethrin and cyfluthrin-permethrin were also additive in terms of subchronic 10-d lethality and sublethal responses. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2542-2549. © 2016 SETAC.

  1. Investigation into the potential of sub-lethal photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) to reduce susceptibility of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) to antibiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, C. M.; Donnelly, R. F.; Tunney, M. M.

    2009-06-01

    In PACT, a combination of a sensitising drug and visible light cause the selective destruction of microbial cells via singlet oxygen production. As singlet oxygen is a non-specific oxidizing agent and is only present during illumination, development of resistance to this treatment is thought to be unlikely. However, in response to oxidative stress, bacteria can up-regulate oxidative stress genes and associated antibiotic resistance genes. The up-regulation of these genes and potential transfer of genetic material may result in a resistant bacterial population. This study determined whether treatment of clinically isolated meticillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains with sub-lethal doses of methylene blue (MB) and meso-tetra (N-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphine tetra tosylate (TMP)-PACT resulted in reduced susceptibility to antibiotics and previously lethal PACT. Exposure of strains to sub-lethal doses of photosensitizer in combination with light had no effect on susceptibility to previously lethal photosensitization. Furthermore, exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of both photosensitizers caused no significant changes in the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for each strain tested. Any differences in susceptibility were not significant as they did not cross breakpoints between resistant and susceptible for any organism or antibiotic tested. Therefore, PACT remains an attractive alternative option for treatment of MRSA infections.

  2. Podophyllum hexandrum-Mediated Survival Protection and Restoration of Other Cellular Injuries in Lethally Irradiated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sankhwar, Sanghmitra; Gupta, Manju Lata; Gupta, Vanita; Verma, Savita; Suri, Krishna Avtar; Devi, Memita; Sharma, Punita; Khan, Ehsan Ahmed; Alam, M. Sarwar

    2011-01-01

    This study aims at the development of a safe and effective formulation to counter the effects of lethal irradiation. The sub-fraction (G-001M), prepared from Podophyllum hexandrum has rendered high degree of survival (>90%) at a dose of 6 mg kg−1 body weight (intramuscular) in lethally irradiated mice. Therapeutic dose of G-001M, at about 20 times lower concentration than its LD100, has revealed a DRF of 1.62. Comet assay studies in peripheral blood leukocytes have reflected that, treatment of G-001M before irradiation has significantly reduced DNA tail length (P < .001) and DNA damage score (P < .001), as compared to radiation-only group. Spleen cell counts in irradiated animals had declined drastically at the very first day of exposure, and the fall continued till the 5th day (P < .001). In the treated irradiated groups, there was a steep reduction in the counts initially, but this phase did not prolong. More than 60% decline in thymocytes of irradiated group animals was registered at 5 h of irradiation when compared with controls, and the fall progressed further downwards with the similar pace till 5th day of exposure (P < .001). At later intervals, thymus was found fully regressed. In G-001M pre-treated irradiated groups also, thymocytes decreased till the 5th day but thereafter rejuvenated and within 30 days of treatment the values were close to normal. Current studies have explicitly indicated that, G-001M in very small doses has not only rendered high survivability in lethally irradiated mice, but also protected their cellular DNA, besides supporting fast replenishment of the immune system. PMID:19553386

  3. Francisella philomiragia Infection and Lethality in Mammalian Tissue Culture Cell Models, Galleria mellonella, and BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Propst, Crystal N.; Pylypko, Stephanie L.; Blower, Ryan J.; Ahmad, Saira; Mansoor, Mohammad; van Hoek, Monique L.

    2016-01-01

    Francisella (F.) philomiragia is a Gram-negative bacterium with a preference for brackish environments that has been implicated in causing bacterial infections in near-drowning victims. The purpose of this study was to characterize the ability of F. philomiragia to infect cultured mammalian cells, a commonly used invertebrate model, and, finally, to characterize the ability of F. philomiragia to infect BALB/c mice via the pulmonary (intranasal) route of infection. This study shows that F. philomiragia infects J774A.1 murine macrophage cells, HepG2 cells and A549 human Type II alveolar epithelial cells. However, replication rates vary depending on strain at 24 h. F. philomiragia infection after 24 h was found to be cytotoxic in human U937 macrophage-like cells and J774A.1 cells. This is in contrast to the findings that F. philomiragia was non-cytotoxic to human hepatocellular carcinoma cells, HepG2 cells and A549 cells. Differential cytotoxicity is a point for further study. Here, it was demonstrated that F. philomiragia grown in host-adapted conditions (BHI, pH 6.8) is sensitive to levofloxacin but shows increased resistance to the human cathelicidin LL-37 and murine cathelicidin mCRAMP when compared to related the Francisella species, F. tularensis subsp. novicida and F. tularensis subsp. LVS. Previous findings that LL-37 is strongly upregulated in A549 cells following F. tularensis subsp. novicida infection suggest that the level of antimicrobial peptide expression is not sufficient in cells to eradicate the intracellular bacteria. Finally, this study demonstrates that F. philomiragia is lethal in two in vivo models; Galleria mellonella via hemocoel injection, with a LD50 of 1.8 × 103, and BALB/c mice by intranasal infection, with a LD50 of 3.45 × 103. In conclusion, F. philomiragia may be a useful model organism to study the genus Francisella, particularly for those researchers with interest in studying microbial ecology or environmental strains of Francisella

  4. Francisella philomiragia Infection and Lethality in Mammalian Tissue Culture Cell Models, Galleria mellonella, and BALB/c Mice.

    PubMed

    Propst, Crystal N; Pylypko, Stephanie L; Blower, Ryan J; Ahmad, Saira; Mansoor, Mohammad; van Hoek, Monique L

    2016-01-01

    Francisella (F.) philomiragia is a Gram-negative bacterium with a preference for brackish environments that has been implicated in causing bacterial infections in near-drowning victims. The purpose of this study was to characterize the ability of F. philomiragia to infect cultured mammalian cells, a commonly used invertebrate model, and, finally, to characterize the ability of F. philomiragia to infect BALB/c mice via the pulmonary (intranasal) route of infection. This study shows that F. philomiragia infects J774A.1 murine macrophage cells, HepG2 cells and A549 human Type II alveolar epithelial cells. However, replication rates vary depending on strain at 24 h. F. philomiragia infection after 24 h was found to be cytotoxic in human U937 macrophage-like cells and J774A.1 cells. This is in contrast to the findings that F. philomiragia was non-cytotoxic to human hepatocellular carcinoma cells, HepG2 cells and A549 cells. Differential cytotoxicity is a point for further study. Here, it was demonstrated that F. philomiragia grown in host-adapted conditions (BHI, pH 6.8) is sensitive to levofloxacin but shows increased resistance to the human cathelicidin LL-37 and murine cathelicidin mCRAMP when compared to related the Francisella species, F. tularensis subsp. novicida and F. tularensis subsp. LVS. Previous findings that LL-37 is strongly upregulated in A549 cells following F. tularensis subsp. novicida infection suggest that the level of antimicrobial peptide expression is not sufficient in cells to eradicate the intracellular bacteria. Finally, this study demonstrates that F. philomiragia is lethal in two in vivo models; Galleria mellonella via hemocoel injection, with a LD50 of 1.8 × 10(3), and BALB/c mice by intranasal infection, with a LD50 of 3.45 × 10(3). In conclusion, F. philomiragia may be a useful model organism to study the genus Francisella, particularly for those researchers with interest in studying microbial ecology or environmental strains of

  5. Strategy for enhanced transgenic strain development for embryonic conditionnal lethality in Anastrepha suspensa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here the first reproductive sterility system for the tephritid pest, Anastrepha suspensa, is presented, based on lethality primarily in embryos heterozygous for a lethal conditional transgene combination. The tetracycline-suppressible system uses the cellularization-specific A. suspensa serendipity...

  6. Role of cardiotrophin-1 in the regulation of metabolic circadian rhythms and adipose core clock genes in mice and characterization of 24-h circulating CT-1 profiles in normal-weight and overweight/obese subjects.

    PubMed

    López-Yoldi, Miguel; Stanhope, Kimber L; Garaulet, Marta; Chen, X Guoxia; Marcos-Gómez, Beatriz; Carrasco-Benso, María Paz; Santa Maria, Eva M; Escoté, Xavier; Lee, Vivien; Nunez, Marinelle V; Medici, Valentina; Martínez-Ansó, Eduardo; Sáinz, Neira; Huerta, Ana E; Laiglesia, Laura M; Prieto, Jesús; Martínez, J Alfredo; Bustos, Matilde; Havel, Peter J; Moreno-Aliaga, Maria J

    2017-04-01

    Cardiotrophin (CT)-1 is a regulator of glucose and lipid homeostasis. In the present study, we analyzed whether CT-1 also acts to peripherally regulate metabolic rhythms and adipose tissue core clock genes in mice. Moreover, the circadian pattern of plasma CT-1 levels was evaluated in normal-weight and overweight subjects. The circadian rhythmicity of oxygen consumption rate (Vo2) was disrupted in aged obese CT-1-deficient (CT-1(-/-)) mice (12 mo). Although circadian rhythms of Vo2 were conserved in young lean CT-1(-/-) mice (2 mo), CT-1 deficiency caused a phase shift of the acrophase. Most of the clock genes studied (Clock, Bmal1, and Per2) displayed a circadian rhythm in adipose tissue of both wild-type (WT) and CT-1(-/-) mice. However, the pattern was altered in CT-1(-/-) mice toward a lower percentage of the rhythm or lower amplitude, especially for Bmal1 and Clock. Moreover, CT-1 mRNA levels in adipose tissue showed significant circadian fluctuations in young WT mice. In humans, CT-1 plasma profile exhibited a 24-h circadian rhythm in normal-weight but not in overweight subjects. The 24-h pattern of CT-1 was characterized by a pronounced increase during the night (from 02:00 to 08:00). These observations suggest a potential role for CT-1 in the regulation of metabolic circadian rhythms.-López-Yoldi, M., Stanhope, K. L., Garaulet, M., Chen, X. G., Marcos-Gómez, B., Carrasco-Benso, M. P., Santa Maria, E. M., Escoté, X., Lee, V., Nunez, M. V., Medici, V., Martínez-Ansó, E., Sáinz, N., Huerta, A. E., Laiglesia, L. M., Prieto, J., Martínez, J. A., Bustos, M., Havel, P. J., Moreno-Aliaga, M. J. Role of cardiotrophin-1 in the regulation of metabolic circadian rhythms and adipose core clock genes in mice and characterization of 24-h circulating CT-1 profiles in normal-weight and overweight/obese subjects.

  7. Joint toxicity of chlorpyrifos, atrazine, and cadmium at lethal concentrations to the earthworm Eisenia fetida.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guiling; Chen, Chen; Wang, Yanhua; Cai, Leiming; Kong, Xiangzhen; Qian, Yongzhong; Wang, Qiang

    2015-06-01

    Contaminants in the environment often occur as complex mixtures, and their combined effect may exhibit toxicity to organisms. Risk assessments based on individual components tend to underestimate the effects associated with toxic action of mixtures. Toxicity studies on chemical mixtures are urgently required to assess their potential combined toxicities. The combination index (CI)-isobologram method was used to study chemical interactions to determine the nature of toxicological interactions of two pesticides chlorpyrifos and atrazine and a heavy metal cadmium toward earthworm Eisenia fetida by artificial soil and filter paper acute toxicity tests. The results showed that the binary mixture of chlorpyrifos and atrazine was antagonistic toward E. fetida at all f a levels in an artificial soil test. The combination of atrazine and Cd exhibited a slight degree of synergism throughout the exposure range, while chlorpyrifos plus Cd combination led to dual antagonistic/synergistic behavior. The nature of binary combinations in filter paper displayed opposite interaction to that in the artificial soil test, and the toxicity of ternary mixtures was not significantly synergistic than their binaries. The combination index (CI)-isobologram equation method could determine the interaction types for a series of effect levels of three chemicals in binary and ternary combinations in two types of acute earthworm tests. However, the nature of these interactions was not uniform along the f a level range in any of the two tests. Bioavailability, the nature of toxicological interaction, and the test organism need to be considered for understanding exposures and chemical measures. The synergistic effect for the particular binary combination suggests that a potential risk associated with the co-occurrence of these pollutants may still exist, which may have implications in risk assessment for the terrestrial environment. The combined effects between different contaminants might be influenced by the category of chemical, as well as the bioassay procedures. More studies of combined toxicities among these contaminants in the terrestrial environment should be conducted to identify the mixtures exhibiting synergistic pattern of interactions.

  8. Correlation of Lethal Concentrations of Heavy Metals with Tissue Levels of Earthworms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    14). ANALYSED REGRESSION CORRELAT. CORRELAT. LC 50 IN LC 5 IN PARAMETERS LINE COEFFIC. COEFFIC. PPM DRY PPM DRY TEST DATES EQUATION (r) TEST (t) WEIG...ANALYSED REGRESSION CORRELAT. CORRELAT. LC 50 IN LC 5 IN PARAMETERS LINE COEFFIC. COEFFIC. PPM DRY PPM DRY TEST DATES EQUATION (r) TEST (t) WEIG

  9. Changes in Tissue Cyclic AMP Concentrations following an Intravenous Lethal Dose of Cholera Enterotoxin in Rabbits,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-13

    systemically in an animal model. For the treatment of cholera in human patients, a continuous iv administration of water, electrolytes and bicarbonate...usually reverses the disease processes of severe dehydration [16-18). However, some cholera patients still die, despite the conventional fluid treatment ...correlations with acute tubular necrosis and hypokalemic nephropathy . Ann Intern Med 52:960-975, 1960. 3. Serebro, H. A., McGonagle, T., Iber, F. L., Royall

  10. A Systems Biology Approach to Link Nuclear Factor Kappa B Activation with Lethal Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    progression of prostate cancer to a lethal disease . We aim to identify patients with lethal prostate cancer using a systems biology approach focused on...activation which are associated with lethal disease . (Months 1 to 18) Task 1A: Perform gene profiling of tumors and determine whether a set of genes and...panel to be assessed for correlation with lethal disease . (Month 1 to 18) Accomplishments: In the first 12 months of the grant we have (i

  11. A Systems Biology Approach to Link Nuclear Factor Kappa B Activation with Lethal Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    independent data sets for association with lethal disease; ii) inform and increase power for identification of new SNPs in GWAS datasets associated with...for association with lethal disease; ii) inform and increase power for identification of new SNPs in GWAS datasets associated with lethal outcome...low risk/non-lethal prostate cancer cohort. We initially planned to use EDRN samples, but due to the samples being committed to a GWAS analysis, it

  12. Lethal, sublethal and transgenerational effects of the novel chiral neonicotinoid pesticide cycloxaprid on demographic and behavioral traits of Aphis gossypii (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hai-Bin; Li, Jin-Hua; Liu, Yong-Qiang; Cui, Li; Lu, Yan-Hui; Xu, Xiao-Yong; Li, Zhong; Wu, Kong-Ming; Desneux, Nicolas

    2016-05-11

    Aphis gossypii Glover (Hemiptera: Aphididae) is a key pest in cotton crops, notably owing to its increasing resistance to commonly used pesticides. Such resistance prompts for the development of integrated pest management (IPM) programs that include novel pesticides being effective against the aphid. In the present study, we assessed lethal and sublethal effects of cycloxaprid, a novel chiral neonicotinoid pesticide developed in China, on A. gossypii. The lethal concentration at 50% (LC50 ) value of cycloxaprid on A. gossypii was estimated, using the dipping method, at 7.73 mg/L. The impact of a sublethal concentration (LC10 ) and a lethal concentration (LC40 ) of cycloxaprid on A. gossypii population growth and feeding behavior (using electrical penetration graph technique [EPG]), and its transgenerational effect were further assessed. Adult longevity and fecundity significantly decreased after exposure to LC40 or LC10 of cycloxaprid. Cycloxaprid with sublethal concentrations (especially LC40 ) had negative effects on phloem ingestion by A. gossypii. Additionally, the offspring of the adults exposed to LC40 of cycloxaprid had shorter nymphal development duration and adult longevity than the control, and those from LC10 and LC40 treatments had lower adult fecundity and net productive rate. We demonstrated that cycloxaprid is a pesticide showing both lethal and sublethal activities, and transgenerational effects on A. gossypii; it may be useful for implementation in IPM programs against this aphid pest.

  13. Synthetic lethality between PAXX and XLF in mammalian development

    PubMed Central

    Balmus, Gabriel; Barros, Ana C.; Wijnhoven, Paul W.G.; Lescale, Chloé; Hasse, Hélène Lenden; Boroviak, Katharina; le Sage, Carlos; Doe, Brendan; Speak, Anneliese O.; Galli, Antonella; Jacobsen, Matt; Deriano, Ludovic; Adams, David J.; Jackson, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    PAXX was identified recently as a novel nonhomologous end-joining DNA repair factor in human cells. To characterize its physiological roles, we generated Paxx-deficient mice. Like Xlf−/− mice, Paxx−/− mice are viable, grow normally, and are fertile but show mild radiosensitivity. Strikingly, while Paxx loss is epistatic with Ku80, Lig4, and Atm deficiency, Paxx/Xlf double-knockout mice display embryonic lethality associated with genomic instability, cell death in the central nervous system, and an almost complete block in lymphogenesis, phenotypes that closely resemble those of Xrcc4−/− and Lig4−/− mice. Thus, combined loss of Paxx and Xlf is synthetic-lethal in mammals. PMID:27798842

  14. Lethal and sublethal effects of azadirachtin on the bumblebee Bombus terrestris (Hymenoptera: Apidae).

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Wagner Faria; De Meyer, Laurens; Guedes, Raul Narciso C; Smagghe, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Azadirachtin is a biorational insecticide commonly reported as selective to a range of beneficial insects. Nonetheless, only few studies have been carried out with pollinators, usually emphasizing the honeybee Apis mellifera and neglecting other important pollinator species such as the bumblebee Bombus terrestris. Here, lethal and sublethal effects of azadirachtin were studied on B. terrestris via oral exposure in the laboratory to bring out the potential risks of the compound to this important pollinator. The compound was tested at different concentrations above and below the maximum concentration that is used in the field (32 mg L(-1)). As most important results, azadirachtin repelled bumblebee workers in a concentration-dependent manner. The median repellence concentration (RC50) was estimated as 504 mg L(-1). Microcolonies chronically exposed to azadirachtin via treated sugar water during 11 weeks in the laboratory exhibited a high mortality ranging from 32 to 100 % with a range of concentrations between 3.2 and 320 mg L(-1). Moreover, no reproduction was scored when concentrations were higher than 3.2 mg L(-1). At 3.2 mg L(-1), azadirachtin significantly inhibited the egg-laying and, consequently, the production of drones during 6 weeks. Ovarian length decreased with the increase of the azadirachtin concentration. When azadirachtin was tested under an experimental setup in the laboratory where bumblebees need to forage for food, the sublethal effects were stronger as the numbers of drones were reduced already with a concentration of 0.64 mg L(-1). Besides, a negative correlation was found between the body mass of male offspring and azadirachtin concentration. In conclusion, our results as performed in the laboratory demonstrated that azadirachtin can affect B. terrestris with a range of sublethal effects. Taking into account that sublethal effects are as important as lethal effects for the development and survival of the colonies of B. terrestris

  15. Contribution of ammonium ions to the lethality and antimetamorphic effects of ammonium perchlorate.

    PubMed

    Goleman, Wanda L; Carr, James A

    2006-04-01

    Ammonium perchlorate (AP) is a widespread military waste product in the United States and is a potent thyroid function disruptor in all vertebrates tested thus far. To determine the relative contribution of ammonium ions to the toxicity of AP, we exposed embryonic and larval Xenopus laevis to various concentrations of sodium perchlorate (SP) or ammonium chloride (AC). Ammonium perchlorate was significantly more lethal than SP; 5-d LC50s were 83 and 2,780 mg/L, respectively. To determine whether ammonium ions contribute to the antithyroid effects of AP, we exposed embryonic and larval X. laevis to two sublethal, environmentally relevant concentrations of AP or identical concentrations of AC or SP. At the smaller concentration, only AP delayed metamorphosis and reduced hindlimb growth. Sodium perchlorate and AP, but not AC, prevented metamorphosis and reduced hindlimb growth at the greater concentration. Although AP was slightly more effective in reducing outward manifestations of thyroid disruption, both perchlorate salts, unlike AC, caused profound histopathologic changes in the thyroid. Exposure to the higher concentration of either perchlorate salt produced a feminizing effect, resulting in a skewed sex ratio. We conclude that ammonium ions contribute significantly to the toxicity of AP but not to the direct antithyroid effects of perchlorate.

  16. 76 FR 6054 - Use of Less-Than-Lethal Force: Delegation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-03

    ...-1146-F] RIN 1120-AB46 Use of Less-Than-Lethal Force: Delegation AGENCY: Bureau of Prisons, Justice... regulation on the use of chemical agents and other non-lethal (less-than-lethal) force to clarify that the... 39584), regarding the use of [[Page 6055

  17. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Use of less-than-lethal weapons... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  18. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Use of less-than-lethal weapons... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  19. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Use of less-than-lethal weapons... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  20. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Use of less-than-lethal weapons... Use of less-than-lethal weapons, including chemical agents. (a) The Warden may authorize the use of less-than-lethal weapons, including those containing chemical agents, only when the situation is...

  1. 28 CFR 552.25 - Use of chemical agents or non-lethal weapons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Use of chemical agents or non-lethal weapons. 552.25 Section 552.25 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE... agents or non-lethal weapons. The Warden may authorize the use of chemical agents or non-lethal...

  2. Developing Non-Lethal Weapons: The Human Effects Characterization Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    Review Board ( HERB ). The board provides Non-Lethal Weapons Program Managers and Milestone Decision Authorities with: • An assessment of the...quality and completeness of human effects information • Potential human effects risks • Recommendations to mitigate these risks The HERB consists of...and U.S. Coast Guard. The DoD Instruction states that “… the HERB review ensures human effects of NLWs are evaluated consistently.” In addition to

  3. Autopsy observations in lethal short-rib polydactyly syndromes.

    PubMed

    Okiro, Patricia; Wainwright, Helen; Spranger, Jürgen; Beighton, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The short rib-polydactyly syndromes are a heterogeneous group of lethal autosomal recessive disorders (SRP I-IV), which result from cellular ciliary dysfunction during embryogenesis. Diagnosis is conventionally based on radiographic imaging. Since 1976, postmortem investigations of 5 affected fetuses or stillbirths have been undertaken and the visceral abnormalities have been documented. These anomalies are discussed in the context of prenatal differential diagnosis and prognostication following imaging in pregnancy and at autopsy following miscarriage or stillbirth.

  4. Non-Lethal Weapons: Considerations for the Joint Force Commander

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-10

    a derivative of the opiate fentanyl, used by Russian military forces against Chechen terrorists in Moscow in October 2002. Unable to control the...populations. Instigators can organize and agitate a mob to engage in threatening behavior, and may attempt to employ lethal means from within that... mob . Combatants may seek shelter in homes, businesses, religious buildings, or medical facilities. It is in these scenarios that NLWs hold so much

  5. [Lethal achondrogenesis: a review of 56 cases (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Schulte, M J; Lenz, W; Vogel, M

    1978-07-01

    54 cases with lethal achondrogenesis from the literature as well as two own cases are reviewed and analyzed with regard to the following characteristics: sex, hydramnios, breech presentation, duration of pregnancy, length and weight at birth, head circumference, length of upper and lower extremities, clinical and radiological data, age of mother and father at time of birth, familial occurrence and consanguinity of parents, histological, histochemical and electronmicroscopic tissue examination.

  6. Institute for Non-Lethal Defense Technologies Report: Ballistic Gelatin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-02-01

    can be easily recovered, making this model ideal for forensics, and the wound profile visualization has proved to be a tool for wound treatment ...calibrated to reproduce measurements observed in living animal tissue. This allows prediction of wound characteristics for a given projectile without animal...must still interpret the data collected from wound profiles to determine projectile efficiency or lethality. In spite of difficulties with cost

  7. Molecular foundations of reproductive lethality in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Muralla, Rosanna; Lloyd, Johnny; Meinke, David

    2011-01-01

    The SeedGenes database (www.seedgenes.org) contains information on more than 400 genes required for embryo development in Arabidopsis. Many of these EMBRYO-DEFECTIVE (EMB) genes encode proteins with an essential function required throughout the life cycle. This raises a fundamental question. Why does elimination of an essential gene in Arabidopsis often result in embryo lethality rather than gametophyte lethality? In other words, how do mutant (emb) gametophytes survive and participate in fertilization when an essential cellular function is disrupted? Furthermore, why do some mutant embryos proceed further in development than others? To address these questions, we first established a curated dataset of genes required for gametophyte development in Arabidopsis based on information extracted from the literature. This provided a basis for comparison with EMB genes obtained from the SeedGenes dataset. We also identified genes that exhibited both embryo and gametophyte defects when disrupted by a loss-of-function mutation. We then evaluated the relationship between mutant phenotype, gene redundancy, mutant allele strength, gene expression pattern, protein function, and intracellular protein localization to determine what factors influence the phenotypes of lethal mutants in Arabidopsis. After removing cases where continued development potentially resulted from gene redundancy or residual function of a weak mutant allele, we identified numerous examples of viable mutant (emb) gametophytes that required further explanation. We propose that the presence of gene products derived from transcription in diploid (heterozygous) sporocytes often enables mutant gametophytes to survive the loss of an essential gene in Arabidopsis. Whether gene disruption results in embryo or gametophyte lethality therefore depends in part on the ability of residual, parental gene products to support gametophyte development. We also highlight here 70 preglobular embryo mutants with a zygotic pattern

  8. Infantile pulmonary capillary haemangiomatosis: a lethal form of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Eiméar; McNally, Paul; O'Sullivan, Maureen; Phelan, Ethna; Sumner, Kelli; Best, D Hunter; McMahon, Colin J

    2016-04-01

    We describe the cases of two children who both presented in infancy with recurrent severe pulmonary hypertensive crises. Exhaustive clinical work-up failed to identify an underlying aetiology. The patients had no clinical response to steroids, immunoglobulins, or pulmonary vasodilators. Post-mortem examination revealed extensive invasive pulmonary capillary haemangiomatosis. There was no evidence of pulmonary venous occlusive disease. Given the lethal nature of this condition, early consideration of referral to a lung transplant centre should be considered in selected patients.

  9. Stress-based aftershock forecasts made within 24 h postmain shock: Expected north San Francisco Bay area seismicity changes after the 2014 M = 6.0 West Napa earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Tom; Segou, Margaret; Sevilgen, Volkan; Milner, Kevin; Field, Edward; Toda, Shinji; Stein, Ross S.

    2014-12-01

    We calculate stress changes resulting from the M = 6.0 West Napa earthquake on north San Francisco Bay area faults. The earthquake ruptured within a series of long faults that pose significant hazard to the Bay area, and we are thus concerned with potential increases in the probability of a large earthquake through stress transfer. We conduct this exercise as a prospective test because the skill of stress-based aftershock forecasting methodology is inconclusive. We apply three methods: (1) generalized mapping of regional Coulomb stress change, (2) stress changes resolved on Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast faults, and (3) a mapped rate/state aftershock forecast. All calculations were completed within 24 h after the main shock and were made without benefit of known aftershocks, which will be used to evaluative the prospective forecast. All methods suggest that we should expect heightened seismicity on parts of the southern Rodgers Creek, northern Hayward, and Green Valley faults.

  10. Stress-based aftershock forecasts made within 24h post mainshock: Expected north San Francisco Bay area seismicity changes after the 2014M=6.0 West Napa earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, Thomas E.; Segou, Margaret; Sevilgen, Volkan; Milner, Kevin; Field, Ned; Toda, Shinji; Stein, Ross S.

    2014-01-01

    We calculate stress changes resulting from the M= 6.0 West Napa earthquake on north San Francisco Bay area faults. The earthquake ruptured within a series of long faults that pose significant hazard to the Bay area, and we are thus concerned with potential increases in the probability of a large earthquake through stress transfer. We conduct this exercise as a prospective test because the skill of stress-based aftershock forecasting methodology is inconclusive. We apply three methods: (1) generalized mapping of regional Coulomb stress change, (2) stress changes resolved on Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast faults, and (3) a mapped rate/state aftershock forecast. All calculations were completed within 24 h after the main shock and were made without benefit of known aftershocks, which will be used to evaluative the prospective forecast. All methods suggest that we should expect heightened seismicity on parts of the southern Rodgers Creek, northern Hayward, and Green Valley faults.

  11. Non-Lethal Weapons: Setting Our Phasers on Stun? Potential Stratetgic Blessings and Curses of Non-Lethal Weapons on the Battlefield

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-01

    Guided Munition (ERGM)54 and other long range delivery vehicles such as mortars , shoulder launched weapons, artillery, missiles, guided bombs , and...launchers, mortars , field artillery, and aircraft ordnance. 5. Malodorants Malodorous substances can be very useful operationally in counter...a Non-Lethal Mortar Munition, an 81 mm round designed to deliver and dispense non-lethal payloads up to 1.5 km. A sixth weapon is a non-lethal

  12. Crystallographic studies of the Anthrax lethal toxin. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick, C.A.

    1996-07-01

    The lethal form of Anthrax results from the inhalation of anthrax spores. Death is primarily due to the effects of the lethal toxin (Protective Antigen (PA) + Lethal Factor) from the causative agent, Bacillus anthracis. All the Anthrax vaccines currently in use or under development contain or produce PA, the major antigenic component of anthrax toxin, and there is a clear need for an improved vaccine for human use. In the previous report we described the first atomic resolution structure of PA, revealing that the molecule is composed largely of beta-sheets organized into four domains. This information can be used in the design. of recombinant PA vaccines. In this report we describe additional features of the full-length PA molecule derived from further crystallographic refinement and careful examination of the structure. We compare two crystal forms of PA grown at different pH values and discuss the functional implications. A complete definition of the function of each domain must await the crystal structure of the PA63 heptamer. We have grown crystals of the heptamer under both detergent and detergent-free conditions, and made substantial progress towards the crystal structure. The mechanism of anthrax intoxication in the light of our results is reviewed.

  13. Lethal injection, autonomy and the proper ends of medicine.

    PubMed

    Silver, David

    2003-04-01

    Gerald Dworkin has argued that it is inconsistent with the proper ends of medicine for a physician to participate in an execution by lethal injection. He does this by proposing a principle by which we are to judge whether an action is consistent with the proper ends of medicine. I argue: (a) that this principle, if valid, does not show that it is inconsistent with the proper ends of medicine for a physician to participate in an execution by lethal injection; and (b) that this principle is not valid, and this is because it mistakenly views the promotion of patient autonomy as one of the proper ends of medicine. Rather, I propose, we should view respect for a patient's autonomy as a constraint on the pursuit of the proper ends of medicine, rather than as one of the proper ends itself. With this revised understanding of the proper ends of medicine, we can conclude that it is inconsistent with the proper ends of medicine for a physician to participate in an execution by lethal injection.

  14. Skin penetration assessment of less lethal kinetic energy munitions.

    PubMed

    Bir, Cynthia A; Stewart, Shelby J; Wilhelm, Marianne

    2005-11-01

    The development of less-lethal technologies has provided law enforcement personnel with an alternative to lethal force. Although the less lethal projectile was produced to engender non-penetrating wounds, case studies show that there have been a number of reported penetrating injuries ranging from minor to significant in morbidity. The objective of this study was to determine the energy per unit area required to penetrate various regions of the body. Eight unembalmed postmortem human specimens were procured for this testing. Each specimen sustained a maximum of 25 impacts consisting of shots to the anterior and posterior thorax, abdomen, and legs. A 12-gauge, fin-stabilized, rubber rocket round was used as the impactor for all of the conducted tests. The energy density required for 50% risk of penetration varied from 23.99 J/cm2 for the location on the anterior rib (p = 0.000) to 52.74 J/cm2 for the location on the posterior rib (p = 0.001).

  15. Hydrometer test for estimation of immunoglobulin concentration in bovine colostrum.

    PubMed

    Fleenor, W A; Stott, G H

    1980-06-01

    A practical field method for measuring immunoglobulin concentration in bovine colostrum has been developed from the linear relationship between colostral specific gravity and immunoglobulin concentration. Fourteen colostrums were collected within 24 h postpartum from nursed and unnursed cows and were assayed for specific gravity and major colostral constituents. Additionally, 15 colostrums were collected immediately postpartum prior to suckling and assayed for specific gravity and immunoglobulin concentration. Regression analysis provided an equation to estimate colostral immunoglobulin concentration from the specific gravity of fresh whole colostrum. From this, a colostrometer was developed for practical field use.

  16. Tropospheric concentrations of the hydroxyl radical—a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitt, C. N.; Harrison, Roy M.

    The dominant role played by the hydroxyl radical in tropospheric photochemistry makes essential a better definition of its atmospheric abundance. The measurement techniques employed to date are critically evaluated and the reported concentrations of HO in ambient air are reviewed. Photochemica