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Sample records for 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiography

  1. Asymptomatic rhythm and conduction abnormalities in children with acute rheumatic fever: 24-hour electrocardiography study.

    PubMed

    Karacan, Mehmet; Işıkay, Sedat; Olgun, Haşim; Ceviz, Naci

    2010-12-01

    Some rhythm and conduction abnormalities can occur in children with acute rheumatic fever. These abnormalities have been defined based on standard electrocardiography; however, the real prevalence of these abnormalities has not been investigated previously by the evaluation of long-term electrocardiographic recordings. In this study, we evaluated the asymptomatic rhythm and conduction abnormalities in children with acute rheumatic fever by evaluating the 24-hour electrocardiography. We evaluated the standard electrocardiography and the 24-hour electrocardiography of 64 children with acute rheumatic fever. On standard electrocardiography, the frequency of the first-degree atrioventricular block was found to be 21.9%. Electrocardiography at 24 hours detected three additional and separate patients with a long PR interval. Mobitz type I block and atypical Wenckebach periodicity were determined in one patient (1.56%) on 24-hour electrocardiography. While accelerated junctional rhythm was detected in three patients on standard electrocardiography, it was present in nine patients according to 24-hour electrocardiography. Premature contractions were present in 1.7% of standard electrocardiography, but in 29.7% of 24-hour electrocardiography. Absence of carditis was found to be related to the presence of accelerated junctional rhythm (p > 0.05), and the presence of carditis was found to be related to the presence of premature contractions (p = 0.000). In conclusion, our results suggest that in children with acute rheumatic fever, the prevalence of rhythm and conduction abnormalities may be much higher than determined on standard electrocardiography. Further studies are needed to clarify whether or not these abnormalities are specific to acute rheumatic fever.

  2. Pharmacist-physician co-management of hypertension reduces 24-hour ambulatory blood pressures

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Cynthia A.; Ernst, Michael E.; Sezate, Genesis S.; Zheng, Shimin; Carter, Barry L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Pharmacist-physician co-management of hypertension has been shown to improve office blood pressures (BP). We sought to describe the effect of such a model on 24-hour ambulatory BPs. Methods We performed a prospective, cluster-randomised controlled clinical trial in 179 patients with uncontrolled hypertension from five primary care clinics in Iowa City, Iowa. Patients were randomized by clinic to receive pharmacist-physician collaborative management of hypertension (intervention) or usual care (control) for a 9-month period. In the intervention group, pharmacists helped patients identify barriers to BP control, counselled on lifestyle and dietary modifications, and adjusted antihypertensive therapy in collaboration with the patient’s primary care provider. Patients were seen by pharmacists a minimum every 2 months. Ambulatory BP was obtained at baseline and study end. Results Baseline and end of study ambulatory BP profiles were evaluated for 175 patients. Ambulatory BPs were reduced to a greater extent in the intervention compared to control group (daytime ΔSBP [SD] 15.2[11.5] vs 5.5[13.5], p<0.001; nighttime ΔSBP [SD] 12.2[14.8] vs 3.4[13.3], p<0.001; 24-hour ΔSBP [SD] 14.1[11.3] vs 5.5[12.5], p<0.001). More patients in the intervention group had BP controlled at the end of the study (75% vs 50.7%, p<0.001) as defined by overall 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring. Conclusions Pharmacist-physician collaborative management of hypertension achieved consistent and significantly greater reduction in 24-hour BP and a high rate of BP control. PMID:20937921

  3. Depressive Symptoms and 24-Hour Ambulatory Blood Pressure in Africans: The SABPA Study

    PubMed Central

    Hamer, Mark; Frasure-Smith, Nancy; Lespérance, François; Harvey, Brian H.; Malan, Nico T.; Malan, Leoné

    2012-01-01

    Disturbances in circadian rhythm might play a central role in the neurobiology of depression. We examined the association between depressive symptoms and 24-hour ambulatory BP in a sample of 405 (197 black and 208 Caucasian) urbanized African teachers aged 25 to 60 yrs (mean 44.6 ± 9.6 yrs). Depressive symptoms were assessed using the self-administered 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). After adjusting for age, sex, and ethnicity, participants with severe depressive symptoms (PHQ-9 ≥ 15) had higher odds of hypertension defined from ambulatory BP and/or use of antihypertensive medication (odds ratio = 2.19, 95% CI, 1.00–4.90) in comparison to participants with no symptoms. Compared to Caucasians with no depressive symptoms, those with severe symptoms had blunted nocturnal systolic BP drop of 4.7 mmHg (95% CI, −0.5 to 10.0, P = 0.07). In summary, depressive symptoms were associated with the circadian BP profile in black and Caucasian Africans. PMID:22028954

  4. Cardiovascular Outcomes in Patients with Normal and Abnormal 24-Hour Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, P.; Stevenson, Louise

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) plays an important role in assessing cardiovascular prognosis, through presence or absence of ABPM-related prognostic features. Objectives. To study relationship between 24-hour ABPM and cardiovascular outcomes in patients from Chesterfield Royal Hospital. Material and Methods. Over 12 months from the 1st of August 2002, 1187 individuals had 24-hour ABPM performed. Cardiovascular outcomes were studied in a subset (297) of the original cohort, made up by every 4th consecutive subject. The following ABPM-related prognostic features were studied—high day time systolic and diastolic BP (≥135, ≥85 mmHg), high night time systolic and diastolic BP (≥120 mmHg, ≥75 mmHg), absence of nocturnal dip (≤10% fall in night time SBP), high early morning SBP (≥140 mmHg), and morning surge (≥20/15 mmHg). The cardiovascular outcomes studied in the fourth table included fatal and nonfatal MI, new diagnosis of angina, acute coronary syndrome, sudden cardiac death, cardiac arrhythmias, acute LVF, cerbrovascular events, peripheral vascular disease, abdominal aortic aneurysm, and CKD stage 3 or above. Results. Over a followup period of 2015 ± 116 days (1720–2305 days) 82 cardiovascular events occurred in 61 subjects. Cardiac arrhythmias were the most common CV outcome (34 events) followed by cerebrovascular events (15). Statistically significant associations found were between cerebrovascular events and absent nocturnal dip ≤ 10% (P = .05) and high day time DBP (P = .029), peripheral vascular disease and morning surge ≥ 20/15 mmHg (P = .014), cardiac arrhythmias and high day time and night time DBP (P = .009 and .033, resp.). Conclusion. Significant associations were found between cerebrovascular events and absent nocturnal dip ≤ 10% and high day time DBP, peripheral vascular disease and morning surge ≥ 20/15 mmHg, cardiac arrhythmias and high day time and night time DBP. PMID

  5. Activity-adjusted 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure and cardiac remodeling in children with sleep disordered breathing.

    PubMed

    Amin, Raouf; Somers, Virend K; McConnell, Keith; Willging, Paul; Myer, Charles; Sherman, Marc; McPhail, Gary; Morgenthal, Ashley; Fenchel, Matthew; Bean, Judy; Kimball, Thomas; Daniels, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Questions remain as to whether pediatric sleep disordered breathing increases the risk for elevated blood pressure and blood pressure-dependent cardiac remodeling. We tested the hypothesis that activity-adjusted morning blood pressure surge, blood pressure load, and diurnal and nocturnal blood pressure are significantly higher in children with sleep disordered breathing than in healthy controls and that these blood pressure parameters relate to left ventricular remodeling. 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure parameters were compared between groups. The associations between blood pressure and left ventricular relative wall thickness and mass were measured. 140 children met the inclusion criteria. In children with apnea hypopnea index <5 per hour, a significant difference from controls was the morning blood surge. Significant increases in blood pressure surge, blood pressure load, and in 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure were evident in those whom the apnea hypopnea index exceeded 5 per hour. Sleep disordered breathing and body mass index had similar effect on blood pressure parameters except for nocturnal diastolic blood pressure, where sleep disordered breathing had a significantly greater effect than body mass index. Diurnal and nocturnal systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and mean arterial blood pressure predicted the changes in left ventricular relative wall thickness. Therefore, sleep disordered breathing in children who are otherwise healthy is independently associated with an increase in morning blood pressure surge, blood pressure load, and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure. The association between left ventricular remodeling and 24-hour blood pressure highlights the role of sleep disordered breathing in increasing cardiovascular morbidity.

  6. Experience with noninvasive ambulatory 24-hour blood pressure recording in a community hospital.

    PubMed

    van de Weijgert, E J; Braun, J J

    1992-04-01

    In 40 subjects (23 treated with antihypertensive medication), 24-h ambulatory blood pressure was measured with an oscillometric blood pressure monitor (Spacelabs model 90202). We studied applicability in the out-patient department with regard to patient tolerance, correlation with mercury manometer measurements, 24-h blood pressure variability and the use in detecting "white-coat" hypertension. The measurements were tolerated quite well except for complaints of sleep disturbance and local irritation from the cuff. The average percentage of missed measuring points was 9.2%. Correlation between blood pressure with the mercury manometer and the Spacelabs monitor (averages of three consecutive readings) was: systolic 0.87 and diastolic 0.73 (P less than 0.001). No evidence for systematic error between the two methods was found. Diurnal blood pressure variation was significant with an average night-time drop of 12 +/- 15 mmHg systolic and 12 +/- 11 mmHg diastolic. "Office" blood pressure measured with the Spacelabs monitor was in the hypertensive range for 28 patients (systolic greater than or equal to 160 and/or diastolic greater than or equal to 95 mmHg). Only 15 of these subjects still met the hypertension criteria on the basis of mean daytime ambulatory blood pressure values. When ambulatory blood pressures during arbitrary 3-h periods of the daytime were studied, the number of patients with established hypertension did not change. The patients with this "office" or "white-coat" hypertensive response could not be distinguished on the basis of variability in daytime blood pressure.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Prevalence of Masked Hypertension: a Population-Based Survey in a Large City by Using 24-Hour Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun-Woong; Choi, Eun-Hee; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Nah, Deuk-Young; Shin, Sung-Joon; Gu, Namyi

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives We estimated the prevalence of hypertension and hypertension subtypes in a large semi-urban city in Korea, using 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) in a randomly selected sample population. Subjects and Methods A random sample (aged 20-65 years) from a city with an adult population of approximately 600000 was selected by using a list-assisted random digit dialing method. The 24-hour ABPM and conventional blood pressure measurement (CBPM) of these individuals were obtained. Results Among the 496 participants, valid 24-hour ABPM and CBPM were obtained from 462 (93%) individuals. The estimated prevalence of hypertension in Goyang was 17.54% by CBPM and 32.70% by 24-hour ABPM (p<0.01). In the age stratified analysis, both CBPM and 24-hour ABPM showed increased prevalence of hypertension with age. The estimated prevalence of masked hypertension was 16.22% and that of white-coat hypertension was 1.08%. Men had a higher prevalence of masked hypertension than women (20.79% vs. 11.86%, p=0.0295). The estimated prevalence of masked hypertension was 17.5%, 20.58%, 24.34%, and 13.29% in the age categories of 30s, 40s, 50s, and 60s, respectively. The estimated prevalence of masked uncontrolled hypertension was 26.79% in patients with hypertension who were taking antihypertensive medications. Conclusion The estimated prevalence of hypertension by 24-hour ABPM was higher than that by CBPM, revealing high prevalence of masked hypertension. The high prevalence of masked hypertension supports the adoption of ABPM in the national population survey and clinical practice to improve public health and reduce health care costs. PMID:27721860

  8. Ambulatory 24-hour cardiac oxygen consumption and blood pressure-heart rate variability: effects of nebivolol and valsartan alone and in combination.

    PubMed

    Izzo, Joseph L; Khan, Safi U; Saleem, Osman; Osmond, Peter J

    2015-07-01

    We compared an angiotensin receptor blocker (valsartan; VAL), a beta-blocker (nebivolol; NEB) and the combination of NEB/VAL with respect to 24-hour myocardial oxygen consumption (determined by 24-hour ambulatory heart rate-central systolic pressure product [ACRPP]) and its components. Subjects with hypertension (systolic blood pressure >140 or diastolic blood pressure >90; n = 26) were studied in a double-blinded, double-dummy, forced-titration, crossover design with 3 random-order experimental periods: VAL 320 mg, NEB 40 mg, and NEB/VAL 320/40 mg daily. After 4 weeks of each drug, ambulatory pulse wave analysis (MobilOGraph) was performed every 20 minutes for 24 hours. All three treatments resulted in nearly identical brachial and central systolic blood pressures. NEB alone or in combination with VAL resulted in lower ACRPP (by 11%-14%; P < .001 each) and heart rate (by 18%-20%; P < .001 each) compared with VAL, but stroke work (ACRPP per beat) was lower with VAL. Relative and adjusted variability (standard deviation and coefficient of variation) of heart rate were also lower with NEB and NEB/VAL than VAL. Results in African Americans, the majority subpopulation, were similar to those of the entire treatment group. We conclude that the rate-slowing effects of NEB cause ambulatory cardiac myocardial oxygen consumption to be lower with NEB monotherapy or NEB/VAL combination therapy than with VAL monotherapy. NEB/VAL is not superior to NEB alone in controlling heart rate, blood pressure, or ACRPP. Heart rate variability but not ACRPP variability is reduced by NEB or the combination NEB/VAL. There is no attenuation of beta-blocker-induced rate-slowing effects of in African Americans.

  9. Reductions in Mean 24-Hour Ambulatory Blood Pressure After 6-Week Treatment With Canagliflozin in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Raymond R; Machin, Israel; Ren, Jimmy; Trujillo, Angelina; Kawaguchi, Masato; Vijapurkar, Ujjwala; Damaraju, Chandrasekharrao V; Pfeifer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study evaluated the early effects of canagliflozin on blood pressure (BP) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and hypertension. Patients were randomized to canagliflozin 300 mg, canagliflozin 100 mg, or placebo for 6 weeks and underwent 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring before randomization, on day 1 of treatment, and after 6 weeks. The primary endpoint was change in mean 24-hour systolic BP (SBP) from baseline to week 6. Overall, 169 patients were included (mean age, 58.6 years; glycated hemoglobin, 8.1%; seated BP 138.5/82.7 mm Hg). At week 6, canagliflozin 300 mg provided greater reductions in mean 24-hour SBP than placebo (least squares mean -6.2 vs -1.2 mm Hg, respectively; P=.006). Numerical reductions in SBP were observed with canagliflozin 100 mg. Canagliflozin was generally well tolerated, with side effects similar to those reported in previous studies. These results suggest that canagliflozin rapidly reduces BP in patients with T2DM and hypertension.

  10. Prognostic indices among hypertensive heart failure patients in Nigeria: the roles of 24-hour Holter electrocardiography and 6-minute walk test

    PubMed Central

    Mene-Afejuku, Tuoyo O; Balogun, Michael O; Akintomide, Anthony O; Adebayo, Rasaaq A

    2017-01-01

    Background Hypertensive heart failure (HHF) is associated with a poor prognosis. There is paucity of data in Nigeria on prognosis among HHF patients elucidating the role of 24-hour Holter electrocardiogram (ECG) in concert with other risk factors. Objective The aim of this study was to determine the prognostic utility of 24-hour Holter ECG, the 6-minute walk test (6-MWT), echocardiography, clinical and laboratory parameters among HHF patients. Methods A total of 113 HHF patients were recruited and followed up for 6 months. Thirteen of these patients were lost to follow-up, and as a result only 100 HHF patients were analyzed. All the patients underwent baseline laboratory tests, echocardiography, 24-hour Holter ECG and the 6-MWT. HHF patients were analyzed as “mortality vs alive” and as “events vs no-events” based on the outcome at the end of 6 months. Events was defined as HHF patients who were rehospitalized for heart failure (HF), had prolonged hospital stay or died. No-events group was defined as HHF patients who did not meet the criteria for the events group. Results HHF patients in the mortality group (n = 7) had significantly higher serum urea (5.71 ± 2.07 mmol/L vs 3.93 ± 1.45 mmol/L, p = 0.003) than that in those alive. After logistic regression, high serum urea conferred increased mortality risk (p = 0.035). Significant premature ventricular complexes (PVCs) on 24-hour Holter ECG following logistic regression were also significantly higher (p = 0.015) in the mortality group than in the “alive” group (n = 93) at the end of the 6-month follow-up period. The 6-minute walk distance (6-MWD) was least among the HHF patients who died (167.26 m ± 85.24 m). However, following logistic regression, the 6-MWT was not significant (p = 0.777) for predicting adverse outcomes among HHF patients. Patients in the events group (n = 41) had significantly higher New York Heart Association (NYHA) class (p = 0.001), Holter-detected ventricular tachycardia (VT; p

  11. Relative prognostic value of rest thallium-201 imaging, radionuclide ventriculography and 24 hour ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring after acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Hakki, A.H.; Nestico, P.F.; Heo, J.; Unwala, A.A.; Iskandrian, A.S.

    1987-07-01

    Rest thallium-201 scintigraphy, radionuclide ventriculography and 24 hour Holter monitoring are acceptable methods to assess myocardial necrosis, performance and electrical instability. This study examined the relative value of the three tests, when obtained a mean of 7 days after acute myocardial infarction, in predicting 1 year mortality in 93 patients. Planar thallium-201 images were obtained in three projections and were scored on a scale of 0 to 4 in 15 segments (normal score = 60). Patients were classified as having high risk test results as follows: thallium score less than or equal to 45 (33 patients), left ventricular ejection fraction less than or equal to 40% (51 patients) and complex ventricular arrhythmias on Holter monitoring (36 patients). During the follow-up of 6.4 +/- 3.4 months (mean +/- SD), 15 patients died of cardiac causes. All three tests were important predictors of survival by univariate Cox survival analysis; the thallium score, however, was the only important predictor by multivariate analysis. The predictive power of the thallium score was comparable with that of combined ejection fraction and Holter monitoring (chi-square = 21 versus chi-square = 22). Thus, rest thallium-201 imaging performed before hospital discharge provides important prognostic information in survivors of acute myocardial infarction which is comparable with that provided by left ventricular ejection fraction and Holter monitoring. Patients with a lower thallium score (large perfusion defects) are at high risk of cardiac death during the first year after infarction.

  12. Disproportional decrease in office blood pressure compared with 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure with antihypertensive treatment: dependency on pretreatment blood pressure levels.

    PubMed

    Schmieder, Roland E; Schmidt, Stephanie T; Riemer, Thomas; Dechend, Ralf; Hagedorn, Ina; Senges, Jochen; Messerli, Franz H; Zeymer, Uwe

    2014-11-01

    The long-term relationship between 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) and office BP in patients on therapy is not well documented. From a registry we included all patients in whom antihypertensive therapy needed to be uptitrated. Drug treatment included the direct renin inhibitor aliskiren or an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker or drugs not blocking the renin-angiotensin system, alone or on top of an existing drug regimen. In all patients, office BP and 24-hour ABP were obtained at baseline and after 1 year with validated devices. In the study population of 2722 patients, there was a good correlation between the change in office BP and 24-hour ABP (systolic: r=0.39; P<0.001; diastolic: r=0.34; P<0.001). However, the numeric decrease in office BP did not correspond to the decrease in ABP in a 1:1 fashion, for example, a decrease of 10, 20, and 30 mm Hg corresponded to a decrease of ≈7.2, 10.5, and 13.9 mm Hg in systolic ABP, respectively. The disproportionally greater decrease in systolic office BP compared with ABP was dependent on the level of the pretreatment BP, which was consistently higher for office BP than ABP. The white coat effect (difference between office BP and ABP) was on average 10/5 mm Hg lower 1 year after intensifying treatment and the magnitude of that was also dependent on pretreatment BP. There was a disproportionally greater decrease in systolic office BP than in ABP, which for both office BP and ABP seemed to depend on the pretreatment BP level.

  13. Electrocardiographic and chronobiological features of paroxysmal AV block recorded by ambulatory electrocardiography.

    PubMed

    Saito, Ken; Takeda, Shiho; Saito, Yuko; Kawamura, Mami; Yoshikawa, Yoko; Yano, Hayato; Sata, Masataka

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the electrocardiographic and chronobio-logical features of paroxysmal atrioventricular (AV) block (PAVB) using data from ambulatory electrocardiography (AECG). The study population consisted of five men and six women aged from 47 to 82 years of age. Main presenting symptoms were pre-syncope in five patients (45.5%) and syncope in three patients (27.3%). Organic cardiovascular diseases were seen in eight patients (72.7%), and AV conduction disturbances were seen in six patients (54.5%), such as right bundle branch block, first to second degree AV block on standard 12-lead electrocardiography. Incidence of PAVB events were 1-329 (37.9 ± 98.0) episodes/patient/day, and the maximum pause during Holter recordings was 3.3-12.4 (6.39 ± 3.09) seconds. This maximum pause caused by intrinsic AV block was longer than that of vagally mediated AV block (8.4 ± 3.2 sec vs 4.7 ± 1.0 sec, p<0.05). In chronobiological analysis, episodes of PAVB exhibited a circadian rhythm characterized by a peak between 2:00 am and 4:00 am and a trough between 0:00 pm and 2:00 pm. AECG is a useful tool to detect the maximum pause occurring during sleep and provides critical data necessary to prevent the sudden cardiac death caused by PAVB.

  14. Utility of ambulatory 24-hour esophageal pH and motility monitoring in noncardiac chest pain: report of 90 patients and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lacima, Gloria; Grande, Luis; Pera, Manuel; Francino, Antonio; Ros, Emilio

    2003-05-01

    It is unclear whether prolonged motility monitoring improves the diagnostic yield of standard esophageal tests in patients with noncardiac chest pain. Our aim was to assess the diagnostic value of ambulatory 24-hr pH and pressure monitoring in patients with noncardiac chest pain. Stationary manometry, edrophonium testing, and ambulatory pH and motility studies were performed in 90 consecutive patients with recurrent chest pain and normal coronary angiograms. Normality limits of ambulatory 24-hr motility were established in 30 healthy controls. The diagnoses of specific esophageal motility disorders (nutcracker esophagus and diffuse esophageal spasm) by stationary and ambulatory manometry were discordant in 48% of the patients. Edrophonium testing was positive in 9 patients, but correlated poorly with esophageal diagnoses. During ambulatory studies, 144 chest pain events occurred in 42 patients, and 72 (50%) were related to esophageal dysfunction. Strict temporal associations of events with esophageal dysfunction in relation to ambulatory 24-hr pH/motility scores permitted four patient categorizations: true positives (event-related and abnormal tests), N = 15; true negatives (event-unrelated and abnormal tests), N = 10; reduced esophageal pain threshold (event-related and normal tests), N = 4; and indeterminate origin (event-unrelated and normal tests), N = 13. Overall, 19 patients (21%) had a probable esophageal cause for chest pain (14 esophageal motility disorder, 4 acid reflux, 1 both). In conclusion, ambulatory manometry increases the diagnostic yield of standard esophageal testing in noncardiac chest pain, but the gain is small. Causes of chest pain other than high esophageal pressures and acid reflux must still be sought in most patients with chest pain of unknown origin after a negative cardiac work-up.

  15. Preliminary report: the effect of a 6-month dietary glycemic index manipulation in addition to healthy eating advice and weight loss on arterial compliance and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure in men: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Philippou, Elena; Bovill-Taylor, Candace; Rajkumar, Chakravarthi; Vampa, Maria Luisa; Ntatsaki, Eleana; Brynes, Audrey E; Hickson, Mary; Frost, Gary S

    2009-12-01

    We aimed to determine whether altering dietary glycemic index (GI) in addition to healthy eating and weight loss advice affects arterial compliance and 24-hour blood pressure (BP), both coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors. Middle-aged men with at least 1 CHD risk were randomized to a 6-month low-GI (LGI) or high-GI (HGI) diet. All were advised on healthy eating and weight loss. They were seen monthly to assess dietary compliance and anthropometrics. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV), fasting blood lipid profile, and glucose and insulin concentrations were measured at baseline and at months 3 and 6. Six-hour postprandial glucose and insulin responses and 24-hour ambulatory BP were also assessed at baseline and month 6. Thirty-eight subjects (HGI group, n = 16; LGI group, n = 22) completed the study. At month 6, groups differed in dietary GI, glycemic load, and carbohydrate intake (P < .001). Fasting insulin concentration and insulin resistance (calculated by homeostatic model assessment) were lower in the LGI than the HGI group (P < .01). The reduction in total cholesterol and 24-hour BP was bigger in the LGI than the HGI group (P < .05); and only the LGI group had significant reductions (P < .05) in PWV, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triacylglycerol concentration. There were no differences in postprandial glucose or insulin responses between the groups. The results suggest that an LGI diet may be more beneficial in reducing CHD risk, including PWV and 24-hour BP, even in the setting of healthy eating and weight loss; and thus, further study is warranted.

  16. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring: importance of sampling rate and duration--48 versus 24 hours--on the accurate assessment of cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Hermida, Ramón C; Ayala, Diana E; Fontao, María J; Mojón, Artemio; Fernández, José R

    2013-03-01

    Independent prospective studies have found that ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring (ABPM) is more closely correlated with target organ damage and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk than clinic BP measurement. This is based on studies in which BP was sampled every 15-30 min for ≤24 h, without taking into account that reproducibility of any estimated parameter from a time series to be potentially used for CVD risk assessment might depend more on monitoring duration than on sampling rate. Herein, we evaluated the influence of duration (48 vs. 24 h) and sampling rate of BP measurements (form every 20-30 min up to every 2 h) on the prognostic value of ABPM-derived parameters. We prospectively studied 3344 subjects (1718 men/1626 women), 52.6 ± 14.5 yrs of age, during a median follow-up of 5.6 yrs. Those with hypertension at baseline were randomized to ingest all their prescribed hypertension medications upon awakening or ≥1 of them at bedtime. At baseline, BP was measured at 20-min intervals from 07:00 to 23:00 h and at 30-min intervals at night for 48 h, and physical activity was simultaneously monitored every min by wrist actigraphy to accurately derive the awake and asleep BP means. Identical assessment was scheduled annually and more frequently (quarterly) if treatment adjustment was required. ABPM profiles were modified to generate time series of identical 48-h duration but with data sampled at 1- or 2-h intervals, or shorter, i.e., first 24 h, time series with data sampled at the original rate (daytime 20-min intervals/nighttime 30-min intervals). Bland-Altman plots indicated that the range of individual differences in the estimated awake and asleep systolic (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) means between the original and modified ABPM profiles was up to 3-fold smaller for data sampled every 1 h for 48 h than for data sampled every 20-30 min for the first 24 h. Reduction of ABPM duration to just 24 h resulted in error of the

  17. Effects of verapamil SR and atenolol on 24-hour blood pressure and heart rate in hypertension patients with coronary artery disease: an international verapamil SR-trandolapril ambulatory monitoring substudy.

    PubMed

    Denardo, Scott J; Gong, Yan; Cooper-DeHoff, Rhonda M; Farsang, Csaba; Keltai, Matyas; Szirmai, László; Messerli, Franz H; Bavry, Anthony A; Handberg, Eileen M; Mancia, Giuseppe; Pepine, Carl J

    2015-01-01

    Elevated nighttime blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR), increased BP and HR variability, and altered diurnal variations of BP and HR (nighttime dipping and morning surge) in patients with systemic hypertension are each associated with increased adverse cardiovascular events. However, there are no reports on the effect of hypertension treatment on these important hemodynamic parameters in the growing population of hypertensive patients with atherosclerotic coronary artery disease (CAD). This was a pre-specified subgroup analysis of the INternational VErapamil SR-Trandolapril STudy (INVEST), which involved 22,576 clinically stable patients aged ≥ 50 years with hypertension and CAD randomized to either verapamil SR- or atenolol-based hypertension treatment strategies. The subgroup consisted of 117 patients undergoing 24-hour ambulatory monitoring at baseline and after 1 year of treatment. Hourly systolic and diastolic BP (SBP and DBP) decreased after 1 year for both verapamil SR- and atenolol-based treatment strategies compared with baseline (P<0.0001). Atenolol also decreased hourly HR (P<0.0001). Both treatment strategies decreased SBP variability (weighted standard deviation: P = 0.012 and 0.021, respectively). Compared with verapamil SR, atenolol also increased the prevalence of BP and HR nighttime dipping among prior non-dippers (BP: OR = 3.37; 95% CI: 1.26-8.97 P = 0.015; HR: OR = 4.06; 95% CI: 1.35-12.17; P = 0.012) and blunted HR morning surge (+2.8 vs. +4.5 beats/min/hr; P = 0.019). Both verapamil SR- and especially atenolol-based strategies resulted in favorable changes in ambulatory monitoring parameters that have been previously associated with increased adverse cardiovascular events.

  18. [Analysis of the market and future trends of the instrumentation for ambulatory electrocardiography].

    PubMed

    Varanini, M; Taddei, A; Marchesi, C

    1987-12-01

    An inquiry has been made among most manufacturers of ambulatory ECG instrumentation. Both playback and real time systems have been considered. The inquiry, based on a questionnaire, was mainly aimed at identifying possible standard technical solutions emerging from the analysis of various implementations, and at verifying whether techniques for performance evaluation are in common use. Main conclusions of this study include: playback systems are still in competition with real time systems; automatic analysis has not yet reached adequate accuracy; analysis of ST-T interval, while performed by most systems, is not evaluated because common standard of quality is lacking.

  19. 24-Hour Relativistic Bit Commitment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbanis, Ephanielle; Martin, Anthony; Houlmann, Raphaël; Boso, Gianluca; Bussières, Félix; Zbinden, Hugo

    2016-09-01

    Bit commitment is a fundamental cryptographic primitive in which a party wishes to commit a secret bit to another party. Perfect security between mistrustful parties is unfortunately impossible to achieve through the asynchronous exchange of classical and quantum messages. Perfect security can nonetheless be achieved if each party splits into two agents exchanging classical information at times and locations satisfying strict relativistic constraints. A relativistic multiround protocol to achieve this was previously proposed and used to implement a 2-millisecond commitment time. Much longer durations were initially thought to be insecure, but recent theoretical progress showed that this is not so. In this Letter, we report on the implementation of a 24-hour bit commitment solely based on timed high-speed optical communication and fast data processing, with all agents located within the city of Geneva. This duration is more than 6 orders of magnitude longer than before, and we argue that it could be extended to one year and allow much more flexibility on the locations of the agents. Our implementation offers a practical and viable solution for use in applications such as digital signatures, secure voting and honesty-preserving auctions.

  20. 24-Hour Academic Libraries: Adjusting to Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Adam C.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the adaptive measures that academic libraries perform when implementing and operating a 24-hour schedule. Five in-depth interviews were conducted with current managerial-level librarians at 24-hour academic libraries. The exploratory interviews revealed similar measures for security, budgeting, employee…

  1. The 24-Hour Mathematical Modeling Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galluzzo, Benjamin J.; Wendt, Theodore J.

    2015-01-01

    Across the mathematics curriculum there is a renewed emphasis on applications of mathematics and on mathematical modeling. Providing students with modeling experiences beyond the ordinary classroom setting remains a challenge, however. In this article, we describe the 24-hour Mathematical Modeling Challenge, an extracurricular event that exposes…

  2. Human prolactin - 24-hour pattern with increased release during sleep.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassin, J. F.; Weitzman, E. D.; Kapen, S.; Frantz, A. G.

    1972-01-01

    Human prolactin was measured in plasma by radioimmunoassay at 20-minute intervals for a 24-hour period in each of six normal adults, whose sleep-wake cycles were monitored polygraphically. A marked diurnal variation in plasma concentrations was demonstrated, with highest values during sleep. Periods of episodic release occurred throughout the 24 hours.

  3. Physician-pharmacist co-management and 24-hour blood pressure control.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ziqian; Ernst, Michael E; Ardery, Gail; Xu, Yinghui; Carter, Barry L

    2013-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare indices of 24-hour blood pressure (BP) following a physician-pharmacist collaborative intervention and to describe the associated changes in antihypertensive medications. This was a secondary analysis of a prospective, cluster-randomized clinical trial conducted in 6 family medicine clinics randomized to co-managed (n=3 clinics, 176 patients) or control (n=3 clinics, 198 patients) groups. Mean ambulatory systolic BP (SBP) was significantly lower in the co-managed vs the control group: daytime BP 122.8 mm Hg vs 134.4 mm Hg (P<.001); nighttime SBP 114.8 mm Hg vs 123.7 mm Hg (P<.001); and 24-hour SBP 120.4 mm Hg vs 131.8 mm Hg (P<.001), respectively. Significantly more drug changes were made in the co-managed than in the control group (2.7 vs 1.1 changes per patient, P<.001), and there was greater diuretic use in co-managed patients (79.6% vs 62.6%, P<.001). Ambulatory BPs were significantly lower for the patients who had a diuretic added during the first month compared with those who never had a diuretic added (P<.01). Physician-pharmacist co-management significantly improved ambulatory BP compared with the control group. Antihypertensive drug therapy was intensified much more for patients in the co-managed group.

  4. 29 CFR 785.21 - Less than 24-hour duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Sleeping Time and Certain Other Activities § 785.21 Less than 24-hour duty. An employee who is required to... difference that she is furnished facilities for sleeping. Her time is given to her employer. She is...

  5. 29 CFR 785.21 - Less than 24-hour duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Sleeping Time and Certain Other Activities § 785.21 Less than 24-hour duty. An employee who is required to... difference that she is furnished facilities for sleeping. Her time is given to her employer. She is...

  6. 29 CFR 785.21 - Less than 24-hour duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Sleeping Time and Certain Other Activities § 785.21 Less than 24-hour duty. An employee who is required to... difference that she is furnished facilities for sleeping. Her time is given to her employer. She is...

  7. 29 CFR 785.21 - Less than 24-hour duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Sleeping Time and Certain Other Activities § 785.21 Less than 24-hour duty. An employee who is required to... difference that she is furnished facilities for sleeping. Her time is given to her employer. She is...

  8. 29 CFR 785.21 - Less than 24-hour duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Sleeping Time and Certain Other Activities § 785.21 Less than 24-hour duty. An employee who is required to... difference that she is furnished facilities for sleeping. Her time is given to her employer. She is...

  9. High serum lactate level may predict death within 24 hours

    PubMed Central

    Zoubi, Abd Almajid; Kuria, Shiran; Blum, Nava

    2015-01-01

    Background Unexpected death within 24 hours of admission is a real challenge for the clinician in the emergency room. How to diagnose these patients and the right approach to prevent sudden death with 24 hours is still an enigma. The aims of our study were to find the independent factors that may affect the clinical outcome in the first 24 hours of admission to the hospital. Methods We performed a retrospective study defining unexpected death within 24 hours of admission in our Department of Medicine in the last 6 years. We found 43 patients who died within 24 hours of admission, and compared their clinical and biochemical characteristics to 6055 consecutive patients who were admitted in that period of time and did not die within the first 24 hours of admission. The parameters that were used include gender, age, temperature, clinical and laboratory criteria for SIRS, arterial blood lactate, and arterial blood pH. Results Most of the patients who died within 24 hours had sepsis with SIRS. These patients were older (78.6±14.7 vs. 65.2±20.2 years [p<.0001]), had higher lactate levels (8.0±4.8 vs. 2.1±1.8mmol/L [p<.0001]), and lower pH (7.2±0.2 vs. 7.4±0.1 [p<.0001]). Logistic regression analysis found that lactate was the strongest independent parameter to predict death within 24 hours of admission (OR 1.366 [95% CI 1.235–1.512]), followed by old age (OR 1.048 [95% CI 1.048–1.075] and low arterial blood pH (OR 0.007 [CI <0.001–0.147]). When gender was analyzed, pH was not an independent variable in females (only in males). Conclusions The significant independent variable that predicted death within 24 hours of admission was arterial blood lactate level on admission. Older age was also an independent variable; low pH affected only males, but was a less dominant variable. We suggest use of arterial blood lactate level on admission as a bio-marker in patients with suspected sepsis admitted to the hospital for risk assessment and prediction of death within 24

  10. Impact of Different Normality Thresholds for 24-hour ABPM at the Primary Health Care Level

    PubMed Central

    Grezzana, Guilherme Brasil; Moraes, David William; Stein, Airton Tetelbon; Pellanda, Lucia Campos

    2017-01-01

    Background Hypertension is an important risk factor for cardiovascular outcomes. Primary health care (PHC) physicians should be prepared to act appropriately in the prevention of cardiovascular risk factors. However, the rates of patients with control of blood pressure (BP) remain low. The impact of the reclassification of high BP by 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) can lead to different medical decisions in PHC. Objective To evaluate the agreement between the BP measured by a conventional method by PHC physicians and by 24-hour ABPM, considering different BP normal thresholds for the 24-hour ABPM according to the V Brazilian ABPM Guidelines and the European Society of Hypertension Guidelines. Methods A cross-sectional study including 569 hypertensive patients. The BP was initially measured by the PHC physicians and, later, by 24-hour ABPM. The BP measurements were obtained independently between the two methods. The therapeutic targets for the conventional BP followed the guidelines by the Eighth Joint National Committee (JNC 8), the V ABPM Brazilian Guidelines, and the 2013 European Hypertension Guidelines. Results There was an accuracy of 54.8% (95% confidence interval [95%CI] 0.51 - 0.58%) for the BP measured with the conventional method when compared with the 24-hour ABPM, with a sensitivity of 85% (95%CI 80.8 - 88.6%), specificity of 31.9% (95%CI 28.7 - 34.7%), and kappa value of 0.155, when considering the European Hypertension Guidelines. When using more stringent thresholds to characterize the BP as "normal" by ABPM, the accuracy was 45% (95%CI 0.41 - 0.47%) for conventional measurement when compared with 24-hour ABPM, with a sensitivity of 86.7% (95%CI 0.81 - 0.91%), specificity of 29% (95%CI 0.26 - 0.30%), and kappa value of 0.103. Conclusion The BP measurements obtained by PHC physicians showed low accuracy when compared with those obtained by 24-hour ABPM, regardless of the threshold set by the different guidelines. PMID:28099585

  11. Effect of nasal continuous positive airway pressure during sleep on 24-hour blood pressure in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, I; Grunstein, R R; Hedner, J A; Doyle, J; Collins, F L; Fletcher, P J; Kelly, D T; Sullivan, C E

    1993-09-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure (BP) was measured noninvasively (Oxford Medilog ABP) at 15-minute intervals for 24 hours before and after 8 weeks of treatment with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) in 19 men with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We included both normotensive and hypertensive patients, but hypertensives were studied after withdrawal of antihypertensive drugs. Ambulatory BP before and after treatment was compared using patients as their own controls. Treatment with nCPAP was successfully established in 14 of the 19 patients (74%). Blood pressure fell significantly in patients who were successfully treated: 24-hour mean BP (systolic/diastolic) decreased from 141 +/- 18/89 +/- 11 mm Hg to 134 +/- 19/85 +/- 13 mm Hg (p < 0.05). The reduction in 24-hour mean systolic BP occurred during both day and night, but a significant fall in mean diastolic BP was only observed during the day. The mean blood pressure fell in both normotensive and hypertensive patients. Patients who were inadequately treated with nCPAP had no reduction in mean 24-hour BP. Effective treatment of sleep apnea with nCPAP was associated with a significant fall in both systolic and diastolic BP independent of changes in body weight or alcohol consumption, suggesting that sleep apnea was an independent factor contributing to elevated nighttime and daytime BP in these patients.

  12. The 24 Hours before Hospitalization: Factors Related to Suicide Attempting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiles, John A.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Psychiatric inpatients (N=59) were interviewd concerning psychological and environmental events that occurred in the 24 hours prior to their hospitalization. Suicide attempters were more likely to have used alcohol or marijuana and less likely to have contacted a health care professional than suicide ideators, even when past history of suicide…

  13. 24-hour rhythmicity of seizures in refractory focal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Nzwalo, Hipólito; Menezes Cordeiro, Inês; Santos, Ana Catarina; Peralta, Rita; Paiva, Teresa; Bentes, Carla

    2016-02-01

    The occurrence of seizures in specific types of epilepsies can follow a 24-hour nonuniform or nonrandom pattern. We described the 24-hour pattern of clinical seizures in patients with focal refractory epilepsy who underwent video-electroencephalography monitoring. Only patients who were candidates for epilepsy surgery with an unequivocal seizure focus were included in the study. A total of 544 seizures from 123 consecutive patients were analyzed. Specific time of seizures were distributed along 3- or 4-hour time blocks or bins throughout the 24-hour period. The mean age of the subjects was 37.7 years, with standard deviation of 11.5 years, median of 37. The majority were females (70/56%). The majority of patients had a seizure focus located in the mesial temporal lobe (102/83%) and in the neocortical temporal lobe (13/11%). The remaining patients had a seizure focus located in the extratemporal lobe (8/6%). The most common etiology was mesial temporal sclerosis (86/69.9%). Nonuniform seizure distribution was observed in seizures arising from the temporal lobe (mesial temporal lobe and neocortical temporal lobe), with two peaks found in both 3- and 4-hour bins: 10:00-13:00/16:00-19:00 and 08:00-12:00/16:00-20:00 respectively (p=0.004). No specific 24-hour pattern was identified in seizures from extratemporal location. The 24-hour rhythmicity of seizure distribution is recognized in certain types of epilepsy, but studies on the topic are scarce. Their replication and validation is therefore needed. Our study confirms the bimodal pattern of temporal lobe epilepsy independently of the nature of the lesion. However, peak times differ between different studies, suggesting that the ambient, rhythmic exogenous factors or environmental/social zeitgebers, may modulate the 24-hour rhythmicity of seizures. Characterization of these 24-hour patterns of seizure occurrence can influence diagnosis and treatment in selected types of epilepsy, such as the case of temporal lobe

  14. The 24-hour pulse wave velocity, aortic augmentation index, and central blood pressure in normotensive volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Tatyana Y; Korneva, Viktoria A; Bryantseva, Evgeniya N; Barkan, Vitaliy S; Orlov, Artemy V; Posokhov, Igor N; Rogoza, Anatoly N

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the pulse wave velocity, aortic augmentation index corrected for heart rate 75 (AIx@75), and central systolic and diastolic blood pressure during 24-hour monitoring in normotensive volunteers. Overall, 467 subjects (206 men and 261 women) were recruited in this study. Participants were excluded from the study if they were less than 19 years of age, had blood test abnormalities, had a body mass index greater than 2 7.5 kg/m(2), had impaired glucose tolerance, or had hypotension or hypertension. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) with the BPLab(®) device was performed in each subject. ABPM waveforms were analyzed using the special automatic Vasotens(®) algorithm, which allows the calculation of pulse wave velocity, AIx@75, central systolic and diastolic blood pressure for "24-hour", "awake", and "asleep" periods. Circadian rhythms and sex differences in these indexes were identified. Pending further validation in prospective outcome-based studies, our data may be used as preliminary diagnostic values for the BPLab ABPM additional index in adult subjects.

  15. Is 24-hour Intraocular Pressure Monitoring Necessary in Glaucoma?

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri, Kaweh; Weinreb, Robert N.; Medeiros, Felipe A.

    2013-01-01

    Although intraocular pressure (IOP) is the only treatable risk factor for glaucoma, its 24-hour behavior is poorly understood. Conflicting information is available in the literature with regard to the importance and predictive value of IOP peaks and fluctuations on the risk of glaucoma development and progression. This may be secondary to lack of prospective studies designed to address this issue. This article critically reviews the current evidence for the importance of 24-h IOP measurements in glaucoma and discusses shortcomings of current methods to assess 24-h IOP data, drawing attention to new developments in this field. PMID:23697618

  16. The ST segment of the ambulatory electrocardiogram in a normal population.

    PubMed Central

    Kohli, R S; Cashman, P M; Lahiri, A; Raftery, E B

    1988-01-01

    The behaviour of the ST segment in everyday life was studied by ambulatory electrocardiography in 111 normal volunteers. Fifteen were excluded because of abnormal exercise responses (10 subjects) and significant postural ST segment shifts (five subjects). This left 62 men and 34 women, mean (SD) age 40.5 (12.6) years (range 20-67 years). Ambulatory monitoring of leads CM5 and CC5 for 24 hours was followed by a maximal treadmill exercise test. The tapes of the ambulatory monitoring were analysed by a computer aided system. The computer printed trend plots of the ST segment (measured both at the J point and at J + 60 ms) to detect episodes of ST segment elevation and depression, which were confirmed by visual analysis of real time printouts. Twelve subjects showed "ischaemic" ST segment depression and nine subjects showed ST segment elevation. Eight people with ambulatory ST segment changes were studied during exercise by radionuclide ventriculography and thallium-201 imaging scans. Although seven of the eight thallium studies were normal, radionuclide ventriculography showed functional impairment in five cases. Seven of the 10 subjects with abnormal exercise tests were similarly investigated and their results followed the same pattern, with normal thallium images in six and functional impairment in four. Ambulatory electrocardiography was repeated in 20 people after a median of 20 days. The ST segment changes were reproducible. ST segment changes of an apparently ischaemic nature occur even in a carefully defined normal population but they do not necessarily represent latent clinically significant coronary artery disease. This indicates that ST segment changes seen in patients with known obstructive coronary artery disease should be interpreted with caution. PMID:3408617

  17. Low correlation between visit-to-visit variability and 24-hour variability of blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Muntner, Paul; Shimbo, Daichi; Diaz, Keith M.; Newman, Jonathan; Sloan, Richard P.; Schwartz, Joseph E.

    2013-01-01

    Visit-to-visit variability (VVV) of clinic systolic blood pressure (SBP) has been associated with cardiovascular disease risk. Given the need for obtaining blood pressure (BP) at multiple visits to calculate VVV, substituting BP variability from ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) may be a practical alternative. We assessed the correlation between VVV of BP and BP variability from ABPM using data from 146 untreated, mostly normotensive participants (mean age 47.9 years) in a substudy of the ongoing Masked Hypertension Study. VVV of SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) was estimated by the standard deviation (SDvvv) and average real variability (ARVvvv) from 6 study visits over a median of 216 days. ABPM data were used to calculate the day-night SD (SDdn) and the ARV of SBP and DBP over 24 hours (ARV24). For SBP, the mean SDvvv and SDdn were 6.3 (SD=2.5) and 8.8 (SD=1.8) mmHg, respectively, and mean ARVvvv and ARV24 were 7.2 (SD=3.2) and 8.4 (SD=2.1) mmHg, respectively. The Spearman correlation coefficient between SDvvv and SDdn of SBP was rs=0.25 and between ARVvvv and ARV24 was rs=0.17. Participants in the highest quartile of SDdn of SBP were 1.66 (95% CI: 0.93 – 2.75) times more likely to be in the highest quartile of SDvvv of SBP. The observed-to-expected ratio between the highest quartiles of ARVvvv and ARV24 of SBP was 0.89 (95% CI: 0.41 – 1.69). The correlations for SDvvv and SDdn and ARVvvv and ARV24 of DBP were minimal. These data suggest VVV and 24-hour variability are weakly correlated and not interchangeable. PMID:23784506

  18. Managing sleep and wakefulness in a 24-hour world.

    PubMed

    Coveney, Catherine M

    2014-01-01

    This article contributes to literature on the sociology of sleep by exploring the sleeping practices and subjective sleep experiences of two social groups: shift workers and students. It draws on data, collected in the UK from 25 semi-structured interviews, to discuss the complex ways in which working patterns and social activities impact upon experiences and expectations of sleep in our wired awake world. The data show that, typically, sleep is valued and considered to be important for health, general wellbeing, appearance and physical and cognitive functioning. However, sleep time is often cut back on in favour of work demands and social activities. While shift workers described their efforts to fit in an adequate amount of sleep per 24-hour period, for students, the adoption of a flexible sleep routine was thought to be favourable for maintaining a work-social life balance. Collectively, respondents reported using a wide range of strategies, techniques, technologies and practices to encourage, overcome or delay sleep(iness) and boost, promote or enhance wakefulness/alertness at socially desirable times. The analysis demonstrates how social context impacts not only on how we come to think about sleep and understand it, but also how we manage or self-regulate our sleeping patterns.

  19. Managing sleep and wakefulness in a 24-hour world

    PubMed Central

    Coveney, Catherine M

    2014-01-01

    This article contributes to literature on the sociology of sleep by exploring the sleeping practices and subjective sleep experiences of two social groups: shift workers and students. It draws on data, collected in the UK from 25 semi-structured interviews, to discuss the complex ways in which working patterns and social activities impact upon experiences and expectations of sleep in our wired awake world. The data show that, typically, sleep is valued and considered to be important for health, general wellbeing, appearance and physical and cognitive functioning. However, sleep time is often cut back on in favour of work demands and social activities. While shift workers described their efforts to fit in an adequate amount of sleep per 24-hour period, for students, the adoption of a flexible sleep routine was thought to be favourable for maintaining a work–social life balance. Collectively, respondents reported using a wide range of strategies, techniques, technologies and practices to encourage, overcome or delay sleep(iness) and boost, promote or enhance wakefulness/alertness at socially desirable times. The analysis demonstrates how social context impacts not only on how we come to think about sleep and understand it, but also how we manage or self-regulate our sleeping patterns. PMID:23957268

  20. Cognitive Performance during a 24-Hour Cold Exposure Survival Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Geoffrey L.; Zaharieva, Dessi; Basset, Fabien A.; Hynes, Zach

    2016-01-01

    Survivor of a ship ground in polar regions may have to wait more than five days before being rescued. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore cognitive performance during prolonged cold exposure. Core temperature (Tc) and cognitive test battery (CTB) performance data were collected from eight participants during 24 hours of cold exposure (7.5°C ambient air temperature). Participants (recruited from those who have regular occupational exposure to cold) were instructed that they could freely engage in minimal exercise that was perceived to maintaining a tolerable level of thermal comfort. Despite the active engagement, test conditions were sufficient to significantly decrease Tc after exposure and to eliminate the typical 0.5–1.0°C circadian rise and drop in core temperature throughout a 24 h cycle. Results showed minimal changes in CTB performance regardless of exposure time. Based on the results, it is recommended that survivors who are waiting for rescue should be encouraged to engage in mild physical activity, which could have the benefit of maintaining metabolic heat production, improve motivation, and act as a distractor from cold discomfort. This recommendation should be taken into consideration during future research and when considering guidelines for mandatory survival equipment regarding cognitive performance. PMID:27478839

  1. Preparation and results of a 24-hour orbital flight.

    PubMed

    Titov, G S

    1963-01-01

    The space age presents man with unprecedented opportunities for discovery and for cooperative endeavors to benefit all mankind. My flight of August 6-7, 1961 was conducted for the purpose of determining whether man can stay and work effectively and whether all systems of the spaceship can operate successfully during a period of 24 hours in space. The flight of Vostok II represents an experimental step in a logical sequence which included the first earth orbiting flight of USSR citizen Yuri A. Gagarin. Preparation for the flight included the study of theoretical and applied subjects, testing in various kinds of apparatus which provide acceleration, heat and isolation experience, brief airborne weightless flights and parachute landings, in addition to extensive training in a real spacecraft having simulators for normal and emergency contingencies of space flight. The actual flight was therefore carried out with a sense of confidence and familiarity and with continuous close radio contact with ground centers from whom my fellow cosmonauts served as spokesmen. Sequential boosters totaling 600 000 kg thrust placed the 4731 kg spaceship into a perfect orbit varying in altitude from 178-246 km in a plane 64 degrees 58' inclined to the equator. The spaceship made 17 orbits around the earth landing 25 hours, 18 minutes after take-off. The cabin had full atmospheric pressure and a comfortable habitability which could be extended for 10 days. I was able to maneuver the spaceship and perform many other control functions, make observations and take pictures of the earth and its cloud cover, eat meals and sleep all with good efficiency. I experienced mild symptoms suggestive of seasickness which were aggravated by head turning, ameliorated by sleep and entirely relieved by resumption of g-loading during descent. Altogether analyses of the physical and structural performance of the spaceship and the continuously monitored physiological responses of the pilot indicate that all

  2. Association of target organ damage with 24-hour systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels and hypertension subtypes in untreated Chinese.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fang-Fei; Li, Yan; Zhang, Lu; Xu, Ting-Yan; Ding, Feng-Hua; Staessen, Jan A; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2014-02-01

    The association of target organ damage with 24-hour systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels and ambulatory hypertension subtypes has not yet been examined in untreated Chinese patients. We measured left ventricular mass index by echocardiography (n=619), the urinary albumin:creatinine ratio (n=1047), and aortic pulse wave velocity by tonometry (n=1013) in 1047 untreated subjects (mean age, 50.6 years; 48.9% women). Normotension was a 24-hour systolic/diastolic blood pressure <130/<80 mm Hg. Hypertension subtypes were isolated diastolic hypertension and mixed systolic plus diastolic hypertension. We assessed associations of interest by multivariable-adjusted linear models. Using normotension as reference, mixed hypertension was associated with higher (P≤0.003) left ventricular mass index (+4.31 g/m(2)), urinary albumin:creatinine ratio (+1.63 mg/mmol), and pulse wave velocity (+0.76 m/s); and isolated diastolic hypertension was associated with similar left ventricular mass index and pulse wave velocity (P≥0.39), but higher urinary albumin:creatinine ratio (+1.24 mg/mmol; P=0.002). In younger participants (<55 years), the mutually independent effect sizes associated with 1 SD increases in 24-hour systolic/diastolic blood pressure were +3.31/-0.36 g/m(2) (P=0.009/0.79) for left ventricular mass index, +1.15/+1.14 mg/mmol (P=0.02/0.04) for the urinary albumin:creatinine ratio, and +0.54/-0.05 m/s (P<0.001/0.54) for pulse wave velocity. In older participants, these estimates were +3.58/+0.30 g/m(2) (P=0.045/0.88), +1.23/+1.05 mg/mmol (P=0.002/0.54), and +0.76/-0.49 m/s (P<0.001/<0.001), respectively. In conclusion, 24-hour systolic blood pressure and mixed hypertension are major determinants of target organ damage irrespective of age and target organ, whereas 24-hour diastolic blood pressure and isolated diastolic hypertension only relate to the urinary albumin:creatinine ratio below middle age.

  3. A comparison of overnight and 24 hour collection to measure urinary catecholamines.

    PubMed

    White, I R; Brunner, E J; Barron, J L

    1995-02-01

    The period of urine collection used to measure excretion of catecholamines varies in epidemiological practice. We set out to compare overnight with 24 hour collection. Twenty-four subjects each collected urine for 24 hours, with the overnight urine being separately collected. The correlation of overnight and 24 hour catecholamines was highest when both measures were standardised for creatinine excretion and when creatinine excretion was adjusted for urine flow rate. The observed correlations were 0.74 for dopamine, 0.81 for noradrenaline and 0.54 for adrenaline. The use of overnight collections may therefore require a sample size up to 1.5 times as large (for noradrenaline) or 3.4 times as large (for adrenaline) to achieve the same power as with 24 hour collections. However, the figures given exaggerate the advantage of 24 hour collections if these incorporate measurement errors that are not present in overnight collections.

  4. Aldosterone-to-Renin Ratio Is Associated With Reduced 24-Hour Heart Rate Variability and QTc Prolongation in Hypertensive Patients.

    PubMed

    Grübler, Martin R; Kienreich, Katharina; Gaksch, Martin; Verheyen, Nicolas; Hartaigh, Bríain Ó; Fahrleitner-Pammer, Astrid; März, Winfried; Schmid, Johannes; Oberreither, Eva-Maria; Wetzel, Julia; Catena, Cristiana; Sechi, Leonardo A; Pieske, Burkert; Tomaschitz, Andreas; Pilz, Stefan

    2016-02-01

    Aldosterone is considered to exert direct effects on the myocardium and the sympathetic nervous system. Both QT time and heart rate (HR) variability (HRV) are considered to be markers of arrhythmic risk and autonomous dysregulation. In this study, we investigated the associations between aldosterone, QT time, and HRV in patients with arterial hypertension.We recruited 477 hypertensive patients (age: 60.2 ± 10.2 years; 52.3% females) with a mean systolic/diastolic 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) value of 128 ± 12.8/77.1 ± 9.2 mmHg and with a median of 2 (IQR: 1-3) antihypertensive agents. Patients were recruited from the outpatient clinic at the Department of Internal Medicine of the Medical University of Graz, Austria. Blood samples, 24-hour HRV derived from 24-hour blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) and ECG's were obtained. Plasma aldosterone and plasma renin concentrations were measured by means of a radioimmunoassay. Twenty-four-hour urine specimens were collected in parallel with ABPM.Mean QTc was 423.3 ± 42.0 milliseconds for males and 434.7 ± 38.3 milliseconds for females. Mean 24H-HR and 24H-HRV was 71.9 ± 9.8 and 10.0 ± 3.6 bpm, respectively. In linear regression analyses adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, ABPM, and current medication, aldosterone to active renin ratio (AARR) was significantly associated with the QTc interval, a marker for cardiac repolarization abnormalities (mean = 426 ± 42.4 milliseconds; β-coefficient = 0.121; P = 0.03) as well as with the 24-hour heart rate variability a surrogate for autonomic dysfunction (median = 9.67 [IQR = 7.38-12.22 bpm]; β-coefficient = -0.133; P = 0.01).In hypertensive patients, AARR is significantly related to QTc prolongation as well as HRV. Further studies investigating the effects of mineralocorticoid receptor blocker and aldosterone synthase inhibitors on QTc and HRV are warranted.

  5. Optimal dose of oral omeprazole for maximal 24 hour decrease of intragastric acidity.

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, B K; Walt, R P; Pounder, R E; Gomes, M D; Wood, E C; Logan, L H

    1984-01-01

    In a series of 59 experiments in nine duodenal ulcer patients, 24 hour intragastric acidity was measured before, during, and after treatment with daily oral omeprazole. Omeprazole 10, 20, and 30 mg/day for one week caused a 37, 90, and 97% decrease of 24 hour intragastric acidity, respectively. No further decrease of acidity was observed when the dose of omeprazole was doubled to 60 mg/day, or after a second week of treatment with 30 mg/day. One week after stopping treatment with omeprazole (14 doses) there was a significant 26% decrease of 24 hour intragastric acidity, with full recovery seven weeks later. Fasting plasma gastrin concentration was significantly raised during treatment with all doses of omeprazole. Omeprazole 30 mg/day is the optimal dose for a maximal decrease of 24 hour intragastric acidity in duodenal ulcer patients. PMID:6469081

  6. Comparison of anthropometric and training characteristics between recreational male marathoners and 24-hour ultramarathoners

    PubMed Central

    Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rosemann, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Background Of the anthropometry and training variables used to predict race performance in a 24-hour ultrarun, the personal best marathon time is the strongest predictor in recreational male 24-hour ultramarathoners. This finding raises the question of whether similarities exist between male recreational 24-hour ultramarathoners and male recreational marathoners. Methods The association between age, anthropometric variables (ie, body mass, body height, body mass index, percent body fat, skeletal muscle mass, limb circumference, and skinfold thickness at the pectoral, mid axillary, triceps, subscapular, abdominal, suprailiac, front thigh, and medial calf sites), previous experience and training characteristics (ie, volume, speed, and personal best time), and race time for 79 male recreational 24-hour ultramarathoners and 126 male recreational marathoners was investigated using bivariate and multivariate analysis. Results The 24-hour ultramarathoners were older (P < 0.05), had a lower circumference at both the upper arm (P < 0.05) and thigh (P < 0.01), and a lower skinfold thickness at the pectoral, axillary, and suprailiac sites (P < 0.05) compared with the marathoners. During training, the 24-hour ultramarathoners were running for more hours per week (P < 0.001) and completed more kilometers (P < 0.001), but were running slower (P < 0.01) compared with the marathoners. In the 24-hour ultramarathoners, neither anthropometric nor training variables were associated with kilometers completed in the race (P > 0.05). In the marathoners, percent body fat (P < 0.001) and running speed during training (P < 0.0001) were related to marathon race times. Conclusion In summary, differences in anthropometric and training predictor variables do exist between male recreational 24-hour ultramarathoners and male recreational marathoners for race performance. PMID:24198595

  7. Mean 24-hours sympathetic nervous system activity decreases during head-down tilted bed rest but not during microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Nj; Heer, M.; Ivanova, K.; Norsk, P.

    Sympathetic nervous system activity is closely related to gravitational stress in ground based experiments. Thus a high activity is present in the standing-up position and a very low activity is observed during acute head-out water immersion. Adjustments in sympathetic activity are necessary to maintain a constant blood pressure during variations in venous return. Head-down tilted bed rest is applied as a model to simulate changes observed during microgravity. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that mean 24-hours sympathetic activity was low and similar during space flight and in ground based observation obtained during long-term head-down tilted bed rest. Forearm venous plasma noradrenaline was measured by a radioenzymatic technique as an index of muscle sympathetic activity and thrombocyte noradrenaline and adrenaline were measured as indices of mean 24-hours sympathoadrenal activity. Previous results have indicated that thrombocyte noradrenaline level has a half-time of 2 days. Thus to reflect sympathetic activity during a specific experiment the study period must last for at least 6 days and a sample must be obtained within 12 hours after the experiment has ended. Ten normal healthy subjects were studied before and during a 14 days head-down tilted bed rest as well as during an ambulatory study period of a similar length. The whole experiment was repeated while the subjects were on a low calorie diet. Thrombocyte noradrenaline levels were studied in 4 cosmonauts before and within 12 hours after landing after more than 7 days in flight. Thrombocyte noradrenaline decreased markedly during the head-down tilted bed rest (p<0.001), whereas there were no significant changes in the ambulatory study. Plasma noradrenaline decreased in the adaptation period but not during the intervention. During microgravity thrombocyte noradrenaline increased in four cosmonauts and the percentage changes were significantly different in cosmonauts and in subjects

  8. Insights about serum sodium behavior after 24 hours of continuous renal replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Thiago Gomes; Martins, Cassia Pimenta Barufi; Mendes, Pedro Vitale; Besen, Bruno Adler Maccagnan Pinheiro; Zampieri, Fernando Godinho; Park, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical and laboratorial factors associated with serum sodium variation during continuous renal replacement therapy and to assess whether the perfect admixture formula could predict 24-hour sodium variation. Methods Thirty-six continuous renal replacement therapy sessions of 33 patients, in which the affluent prescription was unchanged during the first 24 hours, were retrieved from a prospective collected database and then analyzed. A mixed linear model was performed to investigate the factors associated with large serum sodium variations (≥ 8mEq/L), and a Bland-Altman plot was generated to assess the agreement between the predicted and observed variations. Results In continuous renal replacement therapy 24-hour sessions, SAPS 3 (p = 0.022) and baseline hypernatremia (p = 0.023) were statistically significant predictors of serum sodium variations ≥ 8mEq/L in univariate analysis, but only hypernatremia demonstrated an independent association (β = 0.429, p < 0.001). The perfect admixture formula for sodium prediction at 24 hours demonstrated poor agreement with the observed values. Conclusions Hypernatremia at the time of continuous renal replacement therapy initiation is an important factor associated with clinically significant serum sodium variation. The use of 4% citrate or acid citrate dextrose - formula A 2.2% as anticoagulants was not associated with higher serum sodium variations. A mathematical prediction for the serum sodium concentration after 24 hours was not feasible. PMID:27410407

  9. Agreement between 24-hour salt ingestion and sodium excretion in a controlled environment.

    PubMed

    Lerchl, Kathrin; Rakova, Natalia; Dahlmann, Anke; Rauh, Manfred; Goller, Ulrike; Basner, Mathias; Dinges, David F; Beck, Luis; Agureev, Alexander; Larina, Irina; Baranov, Victor; Morukov, Boris; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Vassilieva, Galina; Wabel, Peter; Vienken, Jörg; Kirsch, Karl; Johannes, Bernd; Krannich, Alexander; Luft, Friedrich C; Titze, Jens

    2015-10-01

    Accurately collected 24-hour urine collections are presumed to be valid for estimating salt intake in individuals. We performed 2 independent ultralong-term salt balance studies lasting 105 (4 men) and 205 (6 men) days in 10 men simulating a flight to Mars. We controlled dietary intake of all constituents for months at salt intakes of 12, 9, and 6 g/d and collected all urine. The subjects' daily menus consisted of 27 279 individual servings, of which 83.0% were completely consumed, 16.5% completely rejected, and 0.5% incompletely consumed. Urinary recovery of dietary salt was 92% of recorded intake, indicating long-term steady-state sodium balance in both studies. Even at fixed salt intake, 24-hour urine collection for sodium excretion (UNaV) showed infradian rhythmicity. We defined a ±25 mmol deviation from the average difference between recorded sodium intake and UNaV as the prediction interval to accurately classify a 3-g difference in salt intake. Because of the biological variability in UNaV, only every other daily urine sample correctly classified a 3-g difference in salt intake (49%). By increasing the observations to 3 consecutive 24-hour collections and sodium intakes, classification accuracy improved to 75%. Collecting seven 24-hour urines and sodium intake samples improved classification accuracy to 92%. We conclude that single 24-hour urine collections at intakes ranging from 6 to 12 g salt per day were not suitable to detect a 3-g difference in individual salt intake. Repeated measurements of 24-hour UNaV improve precision. This knowledge could be relevant to patient care and the conduct of intervention trials.

  10. Screening for Coronary Heart Disease with Electrocardiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... Force Recommendations Screening for Coronary Heart Disease with Electrocardiography The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) ... recommendations on Screening for Coronary Heart Disease with Electrocardiography . These recommendations are for adult men and women ...

  11. Continual 24-hour observations of thermospheric winds made with the SOFDI instrument from Huancayo, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerrard, Andrew; Meriwether, John W.

    The Second generation Optimized Fabry-Perot Doppler Imager (SOFDI), a state-of-the-art triple-etalon Fabry-Perot interferometer, has been sucessfully relocated to Huancayo, Peru and is making continual 24-hour observations. The 630-nm data, originating from layer-integrated OI emission with centroid heights of 250 km at night and 220 km during the day, are analyzed so as to obtain measurements of horizontal winds in the thermosphere. In this paper we report the most recent results from continuous 24-hour observations of these thermospheric parameters.

  12. 29 CFR 785.22 - Duty of 24 hours or more.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Sleeping Time and Certain Other Activities § 785.22 Duty of 24 hours or more. (a) General. Where an... bona fide meal periods and a bona fide regularly scheduled sleeping period of not more than 8 hours from hours worked, provided adequate sleeping facilities are furnished by the employer and the...

  13. 29 CFR 785.22 - Duty of 24 hours or more.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Sleeping Time and Certain Other Activities § 785.22 Duty of 24 hours or more. (a) General. Where an... bona fide meal periods and a bona fide regularly scheduled sleeping period of not more than 8 hours from hours worked, provided adequate sleeping facilities are furnished by the employer and the...

  14. 24-Hour Access: Responding to Students' Need for Late Library Hours at the University of Denver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sewell, Bethany B.

    2013-01-01

    The University of Denver's Penrose Library saw a substantial increase in use as a result of several new and enhanced services over a six-year period. In turn, longer operating hours and increased staffing for a 24-hours-a-day, five-days-a-week (24 x 5) operating schedule was funded. This case study analyzes student need for longer library hours…

  15. Assessing dietary intake in childhood cancer survivors: Food frequency questionnaire versus 24-hour diet recalls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cancer diagnosis and treatment may influence dietary intake. The validity of using self-reported methods to quantify dietary intake has not been evaluated in childhood cancer survivors. We validated total energy intake (EI) reported from Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) and repeated 24-hour diet r...

  16. Mood-Dependent Cognitive Change in a Man with Bipolar Disorder Who Cycles Every 24 Hours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Dominic; Mansell, Warren

    2008-01-01

    A case study of a bipolar patient whose mood changes every 24 hours is described to illustrate the changes in cognitive processing and content during different phases of bipolar disorder. The participant completed a battery of questionnaires and tasks on 4 separate occasions: twice when depressed and twice when manic. Depression tended to be…

  17. The Three-Continent, 24-Hour Help Desk: An Academic First?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sykes, Jean

    2002-01-01

    Describes Follow the Sun, a computer help-desk service that takes advantage of time differences around the world to permit four universities (University of Colorado Boulder, Australia's Macquarie and Newcastle universities, and the London School of Economics) to share services and provide 24-hour support to users. (EV)

  18. 29 CFR 785.22 - Duty of 24 hours or more.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Sleeping Time and Certain Other Activities § 785.22 Duty of 24 hours or more. (a) General. Where an... bona fide meal periods and a bona fide regularly scheduled sleeping period of not more than 8 hours from hours worked, provided adequate sleeping facilities are furnished by the employer and the...

  19. 29 CFR 785.22 - Duty of 24 hours or more.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Sleeping Time and Certain Other Activities § 785.22 Duty of 24 hours or more. (a) General. Where an... bona fide meal periods and a bona fide regularly scheduled sleeping period of not more than 8 hours from hours worked, provided adequate sleeping facilities are furnished by the employer and the...

  20. 29 CFR 785.22 - Duty of 24 hours or more.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Sleeping Time and Certain Other Activities § 785.22 Duty of 24 hours or more. (a) General. Where an... bona fide meal periods and a bona fide regularly scheduled sleeping period of not more than 8 hours from hours worked, provided adequate sleeping facilities are furnished by the employer and the...

  1. 24 Hours of Sleep, Sedentary Behavior, and Physical Activity with Nine Wearable Devices

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberger, Mary E.; Buman, Matthew P.; Haskell, William L.; McConnell, Michael V.; Carstensen, Laura L.

    2015-01-01

    Getting enough sleep, exercising and limiting sedentary activities can greatly contribute to disease prevention and overall health and longevity. Measuring the full 24-hour activity cycle - sleep, sedentary behavior (SED), light intensity physical activity (LPA) and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) - may now be feasible using small wearable devices. PURPOSE This study compares nine devices for accuracy in 24-hour activity measurement. METHODS Adults (N=40, 47% male) wore nine devices for 24-hours: Actigraph GT3X+, activPAL, Fitbit One, GENEactiv, Jawbone Up, LUMOback, Nike Fuelband, Omron pedometer, and Z-Machine. Comparisons (to standards) were made for total sleep time (Z-machine), time spent in SED (activPAL), LPA (GT3x+), MVPA (GT3x+), and steps (Omron). Analysis included mean absolute percent error, equivalence testing, and Bland-Altman plots. RESULTS Error rates ranged from 8.1–16.9% for sleep; 9.5–65.8% for SED; 19.7–28.0% for LPA; 51.8–92% for MVPA; and 14.1–29.9% for steps. Equivalence testing indicated only two comparisons were significantly equivalent to standards: the LUMOback for sedentary behavior and the GT3X+ for sleep. Bland-Altman plots indicated GT3X+ had the closest measurement for sleep, LUMOback for sedentary behavior, GENEactiv for LPA, Fitbit for MVPA and GT3X+ for steps. CONCLUSIONS Currently, no device accurately captures activity data across the entire 24-hour day, but the future of activity measurement should aim for accurate 24-hour measurement as a goal. Researchers should continue to select measurement devices based on their primary outcomes of interest. PMID:26484953

  2. Seasonal changes of 24-hour intraocular pressure rhythm in healthy Shanghai population

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jingyi; Xiao, Ming; Xu, Huan; Fang, Shaobin; Chen, Xu; Kong, Xiangmei; Sun, Xinghuai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the present study was to investigate and compare the 24-hour intraocular pressure (IOP) rhythms in winter and summer in the healthy population of Shanghai, China. This is a cross-sectional study in which 24-hour IOP measurements were taken for all eligible healthy volunteers in winter and summer, respectively, and the temperature, hours of sunlight (sunlight time), and circulatory parameters, including heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure, were also recorded. The 24-hour IOP curves and IOP parameters (mean, peak, trough, and fluctuation of IOP together with the diurnal-to-nocturnal IOP change) in winter and summer were obtained and compared. The magnitude of IOP changes from summer to winter was also calculated. A total of 29 participants (58 eyes), 14 (48.28%) male and 15 (51.72%) female, aged 43.66 ± 12.20 (19–61) years, were considered eligible for this study. Generally, IOP decreased progressively before noon, increased notably in the nocturnal period, and peaked at 12:00 am in winter and at 2:00 am in summer. The pattern of 24-hour IOP in winter and summer was significantly different (P = 0.002). The average IOPs from 4:00 pm to 8:00 am, except for 6:00 am, were significantly higher in winter (P < 0.05). However, no significant differences were shown after adjusting for temperature and/or sunlight time. From summer to winter, the extent of IOP increase was mostly around 0 to 3 mm Hg, and the IOPs increased more significantly in the nocturnal period than in the diurnal period (P = 0.05). The 24-hour IOP rhythms were different in winter and summer, with higher IOP level in winter. Temperature and sunlight time, which are independent of heart rate and blood pressure, affected the 24-hour IOP rhythms in healthy people in Shanghai, China. Further investigations are expected for the rhythm of some endogenous substance secretion and the inner mechanism of regulation of IOP. PMID:27495076

  3. Experiences of 24-hour advice line services: a framework for good practice and meeting NICE guidelines.

    PubMed

    Yardley, Sarah J; Codling, Jan; Roberts, Dai; O Donnell, Valerie; Taylor, Sue

    2009-06-01

    This article presents a framework for the practical implementation of a 24-hour specialist palliative care advice line, illustrated by two case examples from the authors' experience. In the UK, National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guidance requires provision of 24-hour access to specialist palliative care advice for healthcare professionals and carers regardless of a patient's location. Effective implementation of a telephone advice line for specialist advice is one approach to addressing the current variability in palliative care service provision, both in the UK and elsewhere. The authors were unable to identify a model with documentation for ensuring adequate clinical governance of an advice line in the literature and so present their own. The accompanying case examples demonstrate the difference between 'evolution of services by demand' and taking a systemic approach to service design. Key recommendations for practice are outlined for an effective advice line service which incorporates training and education into the clinical governance structures of the host organization.

  4. Correlation of 24-Hour Blood Pressure and Heart Rate Variability to Renal Function Parameters in Hypertensive Patients. The Effect of Smoking.

    PubMed

    Liakos, Charalampos I; Karpanou, Eva A; Markou, Maria I; Grassos, Charalampos A; Vyssoulis, Gregory P

    2015-12-01

    Intrarenal hemodynamics depend on blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), and smoking. Although BP levels have been associated with kidney function, the effect of HR levels, BP, and HR variability on renal function are less well clarified. This cross-sectional study sought to determine the association of 24-hour BP and HR variability with kidney function in hypertensive patients, stratified by smoking. The study comprised 9600 nondiabetic, never-treated hypertensive individuals without evident renal impairment examined from 1985 to 2014 (aged 53.3±13.4 years, 55.3% males). The 24-hour systolic BP (SBP) and HR variability were estimated via their coefficient of variation (CV =standard deviation×100/mean value) derived from ambulatory recording. The CV SBP-to-CV HR ratio (CV R) was used as a marker of the interplay between 24-hour SBP and HR variability. Renal function was estimated via 24-hour urine creatinine clearance (CrCl), estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR), and 24-hour urine α1 -microglobulin. After adjustment for age, sex, and smoking, CV SBP was found to be weakly correlated to eGFR (r=-0.017, P=.1) and somewhat more strongly to CrCl, ACR, and α1 -microglobulin (r=-0.032, 0.072, and 0.065; P=.002, <.001 and <.001, respectively). CV HR was much better related to renal function, with stronger adjusted correlations to CrCl, eGFR, ACR, and α1 -microglobulin (r=0.185, 0.134, -0.306, -0.247; all P<.001, respectively). CV R also showed equally good adjusted correlations (r=-0.175, -0.125, 0.336, 0.262; all P<.001, respectively). Most adjusted correlations for CV HR and CV R were even better in smokers (r=0.213, 0.158, -0.332, -0.272 and -0.183, -0.118, 0.351, 0.275, respectively; all P<.001). CV HR and CV R emerge as better related to kidney function than CV SBP, especially in smokers. The correlation of CV HR and CV SBP to renal function is inverse to each other. ACR and α1 -microglobulin are better related to

  5. Acute and chronic effects of a hypocaloric diet on 24-hour blood pressure, heart rate and heart-rate variability in mildly-to-moderately obese patients with essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Minami, J; Kawano, Y; Ishimitsu, T; Matsuoka, H; Takishita, S

    1999-11-01

    We examined the acute and chronic effects of a nutritionally balanced, moderately hypocaloric diet on 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure, heart rate and heart-rate variability in mildly-to-moderately obese patients with essential hypertension. We enrolled 16 obese patients with essential hypertension [age: 51-76 years, body mass index (BMI): 26-32 kg/m2]. For the initial week, a standard diet of 2,000 kcal/day was given, followed by a 3-week of a hypocaloric diet of 850 kcal/day. In the last period of the standard diet and in the first and the last periods of the hypocaloric diet, each subject's 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure, heart rate and R-R intervals of the electrocardiogram were recorded, and electrolytes and catecholamines in 24-hour urine samples were also measured. A power spectral analysis of the heart-rate variability was performed over a 24-hour period based on the autoregressive method. The subjects lost 3.7+/-0.3 kg (mean +/- s.e.m.) of body weight during the 3-week hypocaloric diet period. The 24-hour blood pressure did not differ between the last period of the standard diet and the first period of the hypocaloric diet; however, it showed a significant reduction after 3 weeks of the hypocaloric diet. The decrease in the 24-hour blood pressure during the study period was 10.5+/-1.5 mm Hg systole and 4.3+/-1.8 mm Hg diastole. In contrast, the 24-hour heart rate was significantly reduced in the first period of the hypocaloric diet, although the body weight and blood pressure did not change, and the rate was maintained even in the last period of the hypocaloric diet. The decrease in the 24-hour heart rate during the study period was 2.8+/-0.9 beats per minute. The hypocaloric diet did not change any autonomic indices obtained from a power spectral analysis of the heart-rate variability. In conclusion, different responses to a hypocaloric diet were observed between the blood pressure and the heart rate in obese hypertensive patients. The changes in

  6. Exercising in the Fasted State Reduced 24-Hour Energy Intake in Active Male Adults

    PubMed Central

    Deitrick, Ronald W.; Hillman, Angela R.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of fasting prior to morning exercise on 24-hour energy intake was examined using a randomized, counterbalanced design. Participants (12 active, white males, 20.8 ± 3.0 years old, VO2max: 59.1 ± 5.7 mL/kg/min) fasted (NoBK) or received breakfast (BK) and then ran for 60 minutes at 60%  VO2max. All food was weighed and measured for 24 hours. Measures of blood glucose and hunger were collected at 5 time points. Respiratory quotient (RQ) was measured during exercise. Generalized linear mixed models and paired sample t-tests examined differences between the conditions. Total 24-hour (BK: 19172 ± 4542 kJ versus NoBK: 15312 ± 4513 kJ; p < 0.001) and evening (BK: 12265 ± 4278 kJ versus NoBK: 10833 ± 4065; p = 0.039) energy intake and RQ (BK: 0.90 ± 0.03 versus NoBK: 0.86 ± 0.03; p < 0.001) were significantly higher in BK than NoBK. Blood glucose was significantly higher in BK than NoBK before exercise (5.2 ± 0.7 versus 4.5 ± 0.6 mmol/L; p = 0.025). Hunger was significantly lower for BK than NoBK before exercise, after exercise, and before lunch. Blood glucose and hunger were not associated with energy intake. Fasting before morning exercise decreased 24-hour energy intake and increased fat oxidation during exercise. Completing exercise in the morning in the fasted state may have implications for weight management. PMID:27738523

  7. Circadian polymorphisms in night owls, in bipolars, and in non-24-hour sleep cycles.

    PubMed

    Kripke, Daniel F; Klimecki, Walter T; Nievergelt, Caroline M; Rex, Katharine M; Murray, Sarah S; Shekhtman, Tatyana; Tranah, Gregory J; Loving, Richard T; Lee, Heon-Jeong; Rhee, Min Kyu; Shadan, Farhad F; Poceta, J Steven; Jamil, Shazia M; Kline, Lawrence E; Kelsoe, John R

    2014-10-01

    People called night owls habitually have late bedtimes and late times of arising, sometimes suffering a heritable circadian disturbance called delayed sleep phase syndrome (DSPS). Those with DSPS, those with more severe progressively-late non-24-hour sleep-wake cycles, and those with bipolar disorder may share genetic tendencies for slowed or delayed circadian cycles. We searched for polymorphisms associated with DSPS in a case-control study of DSPS research participants and a separate study of Sleep Center patients undergoing polysomnography. In 45 participants, we resequenced portions of 15 circadian genes to identify unknown polymorphisms that might be associated with DSPS, non-24-hour rhythms, or bipolar comorbidities. We then genotyped single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in both larger samples, using Illumina Golden Gate assays. Associations of SNPs with the DSPS phenotype and with the morningness-eveningness parametric phenotype were computed for both samples, then combined for meta-analyses. Delayed sleep and "eveningness" were inversely associated with loci in circadian genes NFIL3 (rs2482705) and RORC (rs3828057). A group of haplotypes overlapping BHLHE40 was associated with non-24-hour sleep-wake cycles, and less robustly, with delayed sleep and bipolar disorder (e.g., rs34883305, rs34870629, rs74439275, and rs3750275 were associated with n=37, p=4.58E-09, Bonferroni p=2.95E-06). Bright light and melatonin can palliate circadian disorders, and genetics may clarify the underlying circadian photoperiodic mechanisms. After further replication and identification of the causal polymorphisms, these findings may point to future treatments for DSPS, non-24-hour rhythms, and possibly bipolar disorder or depression.

  8. Iodine Excretion in 24-hour Urine Collection and Its Dietary Determinants in Healthy Japanese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Katagiri, Ryoko; Asakura, Keiko; Uechi, Ken; Masayasu, Shizuko; Sasaki, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Background Since seaweed is a common component of the Japanese diet, iodine intake in Japanese is expected to be high. However, urinary iodine excretion, measured using 24-hour urine samples, and its dietary determinants are not known. Methods Apparently healthy adults aged 20 to 69 years living in 20 areas throughout Japan were recruited in February and March, 2013. Urinary iodine excretion was evaluated using 24-hour urine collected from 713 subjects (362 men and 351 women), and the difference among age groups was assessed. The association between dietary intake of food groups and urinary iodine excretion was assessed among 358 subjects who completed a semi-weighed 4-day diet record (DR) and urine collection. The correlations between iodine intake and iodine excretion were also evaluated, and correlation coefficients were calculated for iodine intake in the DR of the overlapping day or the DR 1 day before and after urine collection. Results Median iodine excretion in 24-hour urine was 365 µg, and excretion was significantly higher in older subjects. Iodine intake estimated by the DRs was significantly correlated with urinary iodine excretion when DRs and urine collection were obtained on the same day (r = 0.37). After adjustment for confounding factors, iodine excretion was significantly associated with intakes of kelp and soup stock from kelp and fish. Conclusions Although multiple measurements for urinary iodine are required to confirm our results, this study showed the current iodine status of healthy Japanese adults. The results suggest that kelp and fish are the main contributors to Japanese iodine status measured by 24-hour urine. PMID:27374137

  9. 24-hour-restraint stress induces long-term depressive-like phenotypes in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ying; Hu, Zhiqiang; Lou, Jingyu; Song, Wei; Li, Jing; Liang, Xiao; Chen, Chen; Wang, Shuai; Yang, Beimeng; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Xu; Song, Jinjing; Dong, Yujie; Chen, Shiqing; He, Lin; Xie, Qingguo; Chen, Xiaoping; Li, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing risk of mental disorders, such as acute stress disorder (ASD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression among survivors who were trapped in rubble during earthquake. Such long-term impaction of a single acute restraint stress has not been extensively explored. In this study, we subjected mice to 24-hour-restraint to simulate the trapping episode, and investigated the acute (2 days after the restraint) and long-term (35 days after the restraint) impacts. Surprisingly, we found that the mice displayed depression-like behaviors, decreased glucose uptake in brain and reduced adult hippocampal neurogenesis 35 days after the restraint. Differential expression profiling based on microarrays suggested that genes and pathways related to depression and other mental disorders were differentially expressed in both PFC and hippocampus. Furthermore, the depression-like phenotypes induced by 24-hour-restraint could be reversed by fluoxetine, a type of antidepressant drug. These findings demonstrated that a single severe stressful event could produce long-term depressive-like phenotypes. Moreover, the 24-hour-restraint stress mice could also be used for further studies on mood disorders. PMID:27609090

  10. [24-hour energy metabolism in the human: circadian rhythm, relation to body weight and nutrition].

    PubMed

    Steiniger, J

    1985-04-15

    In 7 men with normal weight and 9 man with overweight and healthy metabolism the resting and fasting energy expenditure was indirectly calorimetrically pursued in the open system over 24 hours. The total energy expenditure over 24 hours revealed an ascertained dependence on body-weight and nutrition. The persons with overweight had a higher absolute energy expenditure, however, the activity of the energy metabolism of the body mass free from fat and the active body mass, respectively, decreased with increasing overweight. The resting and fasting energy expenditure showed in all measured parameters (oxygen consumption, respiratory quotient and nitrogen excretion in the urine) an ascertained daily periodicity (circadian rhythm), which was widely independent of body weight. Only the average daily level C0 (rhythm adjusted level) of the resting and fasting energy expenditure was positively correlated with the body weight and the food energy intake. A negative energy balance (reduction 1.2 MJ/d over 28 days) influenced only the total energy and substrate balance over 24 hours and the daily average level, respectively. The circadian conditions remained unchanged (Chossat's phenomenon). The variability in daily rhythm of the energy expenditure of nearly 25% of the daily average should be taken into consideration in the judgment of exogenically stimulated changes in the energy metabolism.

  11. Validation of triple pass 24-hour dietary recall in Ugandan children by simultaneous weighed food assessment

    PubMed Central

    Olupot-Olupot, Peter; Engoru, Charles; Ssenyondo, Tonny; Nteziyaremye, Julius; Amorut, Denis; Nakuya, Margaret; Arimi, Margaret; Frost, Gary; Maitland, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    Background Undernutrition remains highly prevalent in African children, highlighting the need for accurately assessing dietary intake. In order to do so, the assessment method must be validated in the target population. A triple pass 24 hour dietary recall with volumetric portion size estimation has been described but not previously validated in African children. This study aimed to establish the relative validity of 24-hour dietary recalls of daily food consumption in healthy African children living in Mbale and Soroti, eastern Uganda compared to simultaneous weighed food records. Methods Quantitative assessment of daily food consumption by weighed food records followed by two independent assessments using triple pass 24-hour dietary recall on the following day. In conjunction with household measures and standard food sizes, volumes of liquid, dry rice, or play dough were used to aid portion size estimation. Inter-assessor agreement, and agreement with weighed food records was conducted primarily by Bland-Altman analysis and secondly by intraclass correlation coefficients and quartile cross-classification. Results 19 healthy children aged 6 months to 12 years were included in the study. Bland-Altman analysis showed 24-hour recall only marginally under-estimated energy (mean difference of 149kJ or 2.8%; limits of agreement -1618 to 1321kJ), protein (2.9g or 9.4%; -12.6 to 6.7g), and iron (0.43mg or 8.3%; -3.1 to 2.3mg). Quartile cross-classification was correct in 79% of cases for energy intake, and 89% for both protein and iron. The intraclass correlation coefficient between the separate dietary recalls for energy was 0.801 (95% CI, 0.429-0.933), indicating acceptable inter-observer agreement. Conclusions Dietary assessment using 24-hour dietary recall with volumetric portion size estimation resulted in similar and acceptable estimates of dietary intake compared with weighed food records and thus is considered a valid method for daily dietary intake assessment of

  12. Static stretching can impair explosive performance for at least 24 hours.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Monoem; Dridi, Amir; Chtara, Moktar; Chaouachi, Anis; Wong, Del P; Behm, David; Chamari, Karim

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of static vs. dynamic stretching (DS) on explosive performances and repeated sprint ability (RSA) after a 24-hour delay. Sixteen young male soccer players performed 15 minutes of static stretching (SS), DS, or a no-stretch control condition (CC) 24 hours before performing explosive performances and RSA tests. This was a within-subject repeated measures study with SS, DS, and CC being counterbalanced. Stretching protocols included 2 sets of 7 minutes 30 seconds (2 repetitions of 30 seconds with a 15-second passive recovery) for 5 muscle groups (quadriceps, hamstring, calves, adductors, and hip flexors). Twenty-four hours later (without any kind of stretching in warm-up), the players were tested for the 30-m sprint test (with 10- and 20-m lap times), 5 jump test (5JT), and RSA test. Significant differences were observed between CC, SS, and DS with 5JT (F = 9.99, p < 0.00, effect size [ES] = 0.40), 10-m sprint time (F = 46.52, p < 0.00, ES = 0.76), 20-m sprint time (F = 18.44, p < 0.000, ES = 0.55), and 30-m sprint time (F = 34.25, p < 0.000, ES = 0.70). The significantly better performance (p < 0.05) was observed after DS as compared with that after CC and SS in 5JT, and sprint times for 10, 20, and 30 m. In contrast, significantly worse performance (p < 0.05) was observed after SS as compared with that after CC in 5JT, and sprint times for 10, 20, and 30 m. With RSA, no significant difference was observed between different stretching protocols in the total time (F = 1.55, p > 0.05), average time (F = 1.53, p > 0.05), and fastest time (F = 2.30, p > 0.05), except for the decline index (F = 3.54, p < 0.04, ES = 0.19). Therefore, the SS of the lower limbs and hip muscles had a negative effect on explosive performances up to 24 hours poststretching with no major effects on the RSA. Conversely, the DS of the same muscle groups are highly recommended 24 hours before performing sprint and long-jump performances. In

  13. Ambulatory Phlebectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stretch Marks Sun-damaged Skin Unwanted Hair Unwanted Tattoos Varicose Veins Vitiligo Wrinkles Treatments and Procedures Ambulatory ... Stretch Marks Sun-damaged Skin Unwanted Hair Unwanted Tattoos Varicose Veins Vitiligo Wrinkles Treatments and Procedures Ambulatory ...

  14. Treating allergic conjunctivitis: A once-daily medication that provides 24-hour symptom relief

    PubMed Central

    Schaeffer, Jack; Donnenfeld, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background: Allergic conjunctivitis (AC) is a common ocular inflammatory manifestation of allergen exposure in sensitized individuals. Signs and symptoms of AC can decrease quality of life, interfere with productivity, and lead to considerable economic burden. Consistent suppression of conjunctival inflammation is necessary for managing AC, but currently available medications require frequent administration and exhibit limited duration of action. Methods: In this review, we summarized AC pathogenesis, diagnosis, and current treatment options as well as their limitations. Findings from the literature were discussed in the context of the unmet need for a once-daily medication with sustained 24-hour effectiveness. Results: Topical pharmacologic treatments are the most common approach for managing extant AC; however, most available medications require multiple daily instillations. Dual-acting antihistamine-mast cell stabilizing agents are currently considered first-line therapeutics for AC because they provide acute relief of signs and symptoms and block persistent inflammation to promote regression of AC. Recent studies of a newly-developed, higher-concentration formulation of a dual-acting antihistamine-mast cell stabilizer have demonstrated that this formulation provides a 24-hour duration of action with once-daily dosing. Conclusions: Dual-acting AC medications exhibit a high degree of overall effectiveness and are well tolerated for chronic use. A newly available once-daily medication that manages signs and symptoms of AC for a full 24 hours may be considered a treatment of choice for patients experiencing seasonal or perennial AC. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01743027 and NCT01479374 PMID:27466061

  15. Bioenergetical and Cardiac Adaptations of Pilots to a 24-Hour Team Kart Race.

    PubMed

    Durand, Sylvain; Ripamonti, Michael; Rahmani, Abderrahmane; Beaune, Bruno

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate energy expenditure (EE) and heart rate (HR) response in kart pilots to successive driving bouts during a 24-hour team race. Eight adult male pilots (22.8 ± 4.1 years) participated to a team 24-hour speedway kart race in Le Mans (France). They alternatively piloted a 390 cm kart. Each relay was 45 minutes long and each pilot performed 4 relays. For each pilot, mean speeds were calculated from lap-to-lap duration recordings using a telemetric infrared timing device. Heart rate values were recorded continuously on 5-second intervals using a portable cardiometric device. Total energy expenditure (EET) and physical activity ratio (PAR) were determined by accelerometry. To pilot a kart during 45 minutes at a mean speed around 62 km·h induces a 300-kcal EET, corresponding to a 5.6-Mets PAR. This effort is responsive for a 73 b·min increase in HR, from 84.1 ± 7.6 to 157.4 ± 11.0 b·min (82% maximal heart rate intensity). However, during this relay period, HR values seemed independent to mean speed performance and bioenergetical values. Thus, in the context of the 24-hour team race, the variability in effort made during each relay and relay succession did not alter bioenergetical adaptation of pilots to kart driving. The high EE and HR values would be better explained by both emotional stress and environmental constraints such as speedway configuration and vibrations. The way how these factors specifically influence bioenergetical demand, and their relative importance, has to be specified to optimize training procedure and recommendations.

  16. Heterogeneity of Prognostic Studies of 24-Hour Blood Pressure Variability: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Kathryn S.; Heneghan, Carl J.; Stevens, Richard J.; Adams, Emily C.; Nunan, David; Ward, Alison

    2015-01-01

    In addition to mean blood pressure, blood pressure variability is hypothesized to have important prognostic value in evaluating cardiovascular risk. We aimed to assess the prognostic value of blood pressure variability within 24 hours. Using MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library to April 2013, we conducted a systematic review of prospective studies of adults, with at least one year follow-up and any day, night or 24-hour blood pressure variability measure as a predictor of one or more of the following outcomes: all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, all cardiovascular events, stroke and coronary heart disease. We examined how blood pressure variability is defined and how its prognostic use is reported. We analysed relative risks adjusted for covariates including the appropriate mean blood pressure and considered the potential for meta-analysis. Our analysis of methods included 24 studies and analysis of predictions included 16 studies. There were 36 different measures of blood pressure variability and 13 definitions of night- and day-time periods. Median follow-up was 5.5 years (interquartile range 4.2–7.0). Comparing measures of dispersion, coefficient of variation was less well researched than standard deviation. Night dipping based on percentage change was the most researched measure and the only measure for which data could be meaningfully pooled. Night dipping or lower night-time blood pressure was associated with lower risk of cardiovascular events. The interpretation and use in clinical practice of 24-hour blood pressure variability, as an important prognostic indicator of cardiovascular events, is hampered by insufficient evidence and divergent methodologies. We recommend greater standardisation of methods. PMID:25984791

  17. Heterogeneity of prognostic studies of 24-hour blood pressure variability: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Kathryn S; Heneghan, Carl J; Stevens, Richard J; Adams, Emily C; Nunan, David; Ward, Alison

    2015-01-01

    In addition to mean blood pressure, blood pressure variability is hypothesized to have important prognostic value in evaluating cardiovascular risk. We aimed to assess the prognostic value of blood pressure variability within 24 hours. Using MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library to April 2013, we conducted a systematic review of prospective studies of adults, with at least one year follow-up and any day, night or 24-hour blood pressure variability measure as a predictor of one or more of the following outcomes: all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, all cardiovascular events, stroke and coronary heart disease. We examined how blood pressure variability is defined and how its prognostic use is reported. We analysed relative risks adjusted for covariates including the appropriate mean blood pressure and considered the potential for meta-analysis. Our analysis of methods included 24 studies and analysis of predictions included 16 studies. There were 36 different measures of blood pressure variability and 13 definitions of night- and day-time periods. Median follow-up was 5.5 years (interquartile range 4.2-7.0). Comparing measures of dispersion, coefficient of variation was less well researched than standard deviation. Night dipping based on percentage change was the most researched measure and the only measure for which data could be meaningfully pooled. Night dipping or lower night-time blood pressure was associated with lower risk of cardiovascular events. The interpretation and use in clinical practice of 24-hour blood pressure variability, as an important prognostic indicator of cardiovascular events, is hampered by insufficient evidence and divergent methodologies. We recommend greater standardisation of methods.

  18. Lack of effect of a 24-hour infusion of iloprost in intermittent claudication.

    PubMed

    Hay, C R; Waller, P C; Carter, C; Cameron, H A; Parnell, L; Ramsay, L E; Preston, F E; Greaves, M

    1987-04-15

    24 hour infusion of iloprost was compared with placebo infusion in 19 patients with stable intermittent claudication using a double blind, balanced crossover design. Despite significant inhibition of platelet aggregation to ADP and collagen (p less than 0.001) and the typical cardiovascular and gastrointestinal side effects, there was no significant effect on treadmill exercise times at any time up to 6 weeks after infusion. The 95% confidence limits indicated that an improvement of more than 25% was unlikely to occur. No significant changes in B thromboglobulin, platelet aggregate ratio, bleeding time, whole blood viscosity and euglobulin clot lysis time were demonstrated.

  19. [The changes in mental working capacity of operators during 24-hour shift work conditions].

    PubMed

    Kal'nysh, V V; Shvets', A V; Ieshchenko, O I

    2011-01-01

    Psychophysiological peculiarities of influence of a 24-hour shift work on the efficiency of operators have been discussed. It was shown that servicemen operators develop significant fatigue as a result of 24 hrs duty services. The informative psychophysiological characteristics which can be reliable indicators of fatigue level are highlighted. Individual psychophysiological indicators of fatigue level, according to different mechanisms of its development, have been proposed. The hypothesis about the existence of several compensatory mechanisms for maintenance of long duty operators' working capacity has been formulated.

  20. Assessing Dietary Intake in Childhood Cancer Survivors: Food Frequency Questionnaire Versus 24-Hour Diet Recalls.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang Fang; Roberts, Susan B; Must, Aviva; Wong, William W; Gilhooly, Cheryl H; Kelly, Michael J; Parsons, Susan K; Saltzman, Edward

    2015-10-01

    Cancer diagnosis and treatment may influence dietary intake. The validity of using self-reported methods to quantify dietary intake has not been evaluated in childhood cancer survivors. We validated total energy intake (EI) reported from Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) and repeated 24-hour diet recalls (24HRs) against total energy expenditure (TEE) measured using the doubly labeled water method in 16 childhood cancer survivors. Dietary underreporting, assessed by (EI-TEE)/TEE × 100%, was 22% for FFQ and 1% for repeated 24HRs. FFQ significantly underestimates dietary intake and should not be used to assess the absolute intake of foods and nutrients in childhood cancer survivors.

  1. The Application of a Contact Lens Sensor in Detecting 24-Hour Intraocular Pressure-Related Patterns

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of blindness worldwide. Recent studies suggest that intraocular pressure (IOP) fluctuations, peaks, and rhythm are important factors in disease advancement. Yet, current glaucoma management remains hinged on single IOP measurements during clinic hours. To overcome this limitation, 24-hour IOP monitoring devices have been employed and include self-tonometry, permanent IOP, and temporary IOP monitoring. This review discusses each IOP measuring strategy and focuses on the recently FDA-approved contact lens sensor (CLS). The CLS records IOP-related ocular patterns for 24 hours continuously. Using the CLS, IOP-related parameters have been found to be associated with the rate of visual field progression in primary open-angle glaucoma, disease progression in primary angle-closure glaucoma, and various clinical variables in ocular hypertension. The CLS has been used to quantify blink rate and limbal strain and measure the circadian rhythm in a variety of disease states including normal-tension glaucoma and thyroid eye disease. The effects of various IOP-lowering interventions were also characterized using the CLS. CLS provides a unique, safe, and well-tolerated way to study IOP-related patterns in a wide range of disease states. IOP-related patterns may help identify patients most at risk for disease progression and assist with the development of tailored treatments. PMID:27525110

  2. Deviation of innate circadian period from 24 hours reduces longevity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Libert, Sergiy; Bonkowski, Michael S.; Pointer, Kelli; Pletcher, Scott D.; Guarente, Leonard

    2012-01-01

    Summary The variation of individual lifespans, even in highly inbred cohorts of animals and under strictly controlled environmental conditions, is substantial and not well understood. This variation in part could be due to epigenetic variation, which later affects the animal’s physiology and ultimately longevity. Identification of the physiological properties that impact health and lifespan is crucial for longevity research and the development of anti-aging therapies. Here we measured individual circadian and metabolic characteristics in a cohort of inbred F1 hybrid mice and correlated these parameters to their lifespans. We found that mice with innate circadian periods close to 24 hours (revealed during 30 days of housing in total darkness) enjoyed nearly 20% longer lifespans than their littermates, which had shorter or longer innate circadian periods. These findings show that maintenance of a 24 hour intrinsic circadian period is a positive predictor of longevity. Our data suggest that circadian period may be used to predict individual longevity and that processes that control innate circadian period affect aging. PMID:22702406

  3. Validity of 24-hour dietary recall interviews conducted among volunteers in an adult working community.

    PubMed

    Kahn, H A; Whelton, P K; Appel, L J; Kumanyika, S K; Meneses, J L; Hebert, P R; Woods, M

    1995-11-01

    There is considerable uncertainty regarding the validity of dietary data collected from free-living populations. Nevertheless, few attempts have been made to validate dietary assessment instruments. To address this issue, we compared average daily protein intake estimated from 24-hour dietary recall interviews to protein intake estimated from urinary nitrogen excretion in 24-hour samples. Among 244 community-dwelling adults who volunteered for a hypertension study, men (n = 139) overreported dietary protein intake by 12 to 19%. In contrast, women (n = 105) reported a dietary protein intake almost exactly in agreement with estimates based on urinary nitrogen levels. Thin men reported about one-third more protein intake than was reflected in their urinary nitrogen measurements. Our results suggest that the accuracy of dietary recall estimates may vary across subgroups of the population. Additional information from sufficiently large validation studies would be helpful in determining the role of dietary assessment instruments which are already in wide use in epidemiologic research. Until such information is obtained, doubts will remain regarding the validity of inferences drawn from nutritional epidemiologic studies.

  4. Comparison of 24-hour intragastric pH using four liquid formulations of lansoprazole and omeprazole.

    PubMed

    Sharma, V K

    1999-12-01

    The results of previous studies evaluating the effect of four liquid formulations of proton-pump inhibitors on 24-hour intragastric pH are described. Patients with a gastrostomy who were resident in a Veterans Affairs medical center or its affiliated nursing home were eligible for enrollment in one of four open-label studies in which each patient served as his own control. Patients underwent 24-hour intragastric pH studies before and after receiving seven consecutive days of one of the following liquid formulations of a proton-pump inhibitor administered once daily: omeprazole granules 20 mg in orange juice, lansoprazole granules 30 mg in orange juice, simplified omeprazole suspension 20 mg, and simplified lansoprazole suspension 30 mg. The suspensions were prepared with 10 mL of 8.4% sodium bicarbonate solution. Mean intragastric pH was measured, as was the time pH stayed above 3.0 and 4.0 during the 24-hour period. Six to 14 patients participated in each study. The mean posttreatment pH was 4.9+/-0.8, 4.7+/-0.6, 4.1+/-1.5, and 5.1+/-1.1 for omeprazole granules in orange juice, lansoprazole granules in orange juice, simplified omeprazole suspension, and simplified lansoprazole suspension, respectively. Both drugs in orange juice maintained pH above 4.0 longer than 14 hours and above 3.0 for close to 20 hours, which are the levels deemed optimal for healing erosive esophagitis and duodenal ulcers, respectively. Simplified lansoprazole suspension maintained pH above those thresholds for the optimal times, but simplified omeprazole suspension did not (20 and 15 hr above 3.0, 17 and 12 hr above 4.0 for lansoprazole and omeprazole, respectively). Further development of liquid formulations of proton-pump inhibitors may have important implications for the treatment of acid-related diseases in patients, including children, who are unable to swallow capsules.

  5. Estimating 24-hour urinary sodium excretion from casual urinary sodium concentrations in Western populations: the INTERSALT study.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ian J; Dyer, Alan R; Chan, Queenie; Cogswell, Mary E; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Stamler, Jeremiah; Elliott, Paul

    2013-06-01

    High intakes of dietary sodium are associated with elevated blood pressure levels and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. National and international guidelines recommend reduced sodium intake in the general population, which necessitates population-wide surveillance. We assessed the utility of casual (spot) urine specimens in estimating 24-hour urinary sodium excretion as a marker of sodium intake in the International Cooperative Study on Salt, Other Factors, and Blood Pressure. There were 5,693 participants recruited in 1984-1987 at the ages of 20-59 years from 29 North American and European samples. Participants were randomly assigned to test or validation data sets. Equations derived from casual urinary sodium concentration and other variables in the test data were applied to the validation data set. Correlations between observed and estimated 24-hour sodium excretion were 0.50 for individual men and 0.51 for individual women; the values were 0.79 and 0.71, respectively, for population samples. Bias in mean values (observed minus estimated) was small; for men and women, the values were -1.6 mmol per 24 hours and 2.3 mmol per 24 hours, respectively, at the individual level and -1.8 mmol per 24 hours and 2.2 mmol per 24 hours, respectively, at the population level. Proportions of individuals with urinary 24-hour sodium excretion above the recommended levels were slightly overestimated by the models. Casual urine specimens may be a useful, low-burden, low-cost alternative to 24-hour urine collections for estimation of population sodium intakes; ongoing calibration with study-specific 24-hour urinary collections is recommended to increase validity.

  6. Setting Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for 1 hour or 24 hour contingency exposures to airborne chemicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Hector D.; Limero, Thomas F.; James, John T.

    1992-01-01

    Since the early years of the manned space program, NASA has developed and used exposure limits called Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations (SMACs) to help protect astronauts from airborne toxicants. Most of these SMACS are based on an exposure duration of 7 days, since this is the duration of a 'typical' mission. A set of 'contingency SMACs' is also being developed for scenarios involving brief (1-hour or 24- hour) exposures to relatively high levels of airborne toxicants from event-related 'contingency' releases of contaminants. The emergency nature of contingency exposures dictates the use of different criteria for setting exposure limits. The NASA JSC Toxicology Group recently began a program to document the rationales used to set new SMACs and plans to review the older, 7-day SMACs. In cooperation with the National Research Council's Committee on Toxicology, a standard procedure has been developed for researching, setting, and documenting SMAC values.

  7. New method for assessing cardiac parasympathetic activity using 24 hour electrocardiograms.

    PubMed Central

    Ewing, D J; Neilson, J M; Travis, P

    1984-01-01

    Cardiac parasympathetic activity was assessed using 24 hour electrocardiographic recordings by measuring the incidence of larger changes in successive RR intervals, which in normal subjects occur frequently but irregularly. In 25 normal subjects the mean number of times per hour in which the change in successive RR interval was greater than 50 ms was 150-250 during waking and 350-450 during sleeping. By contrast, 30 diabetics with medically denervated hearts (12 with cardiovascular reflex evidence of parasympathetic damage and 18 with additional sympathetic damage) and six cardiac transplant patients with surgically denervated hearts had extremely low counts. Additionally, of 20 diabetics with normal cardiovascular reflexes, about half had abnormally low counts, suggesting that this method is better than currently available reflex tests in detecting early cardiac parasympathetic damage. This technique provides a valid and sensitive way of monitoring cardiac parasympathetic activity over prolonged periods. PMID:6383446

  8. After 24-hour scrub, another tower rollback for the Boeing Delta II rocket carrying Stardust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    As tower rollback begins, the Boeing Delta II rocket carrying the Stardust spacecraft waits on Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, for the second launch attempt at 4:04 p.m. EST. The original launch was scrubbed on Feb. 6 for 24 hours. Stardust is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006.

  9. Mice increased target biting behaviors 24 hours after co-administration of alcohol and fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Mamiya, Ping Chao; Matray-Devoti, Judith; Fisher, Hans; Wagner, George C

    2017-02-10

    Increased alcohol consumption has been linked to social isolation. Individuals showed heightened aggression following social isolation. Animals treated with alcohol following social separation showed higher aggression and lower serotonin transmission. Although reduced serotonin transmission in the brain may be related to alcohol induced heightened aggression, it remains unclear whether there are specific brain regions where changes in serotonin transmission are critical for animal aggression following alcohol treatment. In the present study, we isolated mice for 4 - 6 weeks and injected them with alcohol, fluoxetine and alcohol with fluoxetine. We studied their aggression by using two types of behavioral paradigms: isolation-induced attack behavior towards a naïve mouse in a neutral cage, or shock-induced target biting aggression. We observed that alcohol administered at 500 mg/kg significantly increased animal attack behaviors towards naïve mice 30 minutes after injections. This dose of alcohol co-administered with a low dose of fluoxetine (2 mg/kg) further increased the attack behaviors, but with higher doses of fluoxetine decreased the attack behaviors. Alcohol administered at a dose of 1,000 mg/kg significantly decreased the shock-induced target biting rates 24 hours after injections. Interestingly, we observed a significant increase in target biting rates when alcohol was co-administered with fluoxetine at a dose of 16 mg/kg 24 hours after injections. We also observed the same heightened target biting rates when animals were injected with fluoxetine alone. This heightened biting attack engendered by the fluoxetine (alone or in combination with the alcohol) occurred at a time when brain serotonin activity was reduced by these drugs in the frontal lobe and hypothalamus. These observations indicate that heightened biting attack behavior may be associated with reduced serotonergic activity in brain regions regulating aggression.

  10. Effects of exenatide and liraglutide on 24-hour glucose fluctuations in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Nagakura, Jo; Yamakawa, Tadashi; Taguri, Masataka; Tsuchiya, Hirohisa; Shigematsu, Erina; Suzuki, Jun; Morita, Satoshi; Kadonosono, Kazuaki; Terauchi, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the influence of short-term treatment with exenatide twice daily or liraglutide once daily on daily blood glucose fluctuations in 40 patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled by sulfonylureas. The patients in a multicenter, open-label trial were randomly assigned to receive add-on exenatide (10 μg/day, n = 21) or add-on liraglutide (0.3-0.9 mg/day, n = 19), and underwent 24-hour continuous subcutaneous glucose monitoring. There was no significant between-group difference in glucose fluctuations during the day, as assessed by calculating mean amplitude of glycemic excursion (MAGE) and standard deviation (SD). However, the mean blood glucose levels at 3 hours after breakfast and dinner were significantly lower in the exenatide group than the liraglutide group (breakfast: 127.3 ± 24.1 vs. 153.4 ± 28.7 mg/dL; p = 0.006, dinner: 108.7 ± 17.3 vs. 141.9 ± 24.2 mg/dL; p < 0.001). In contrast, mean blood glucose levels and their SD were significantly lower between 0000 h and 0600 h in the liraglutide group than the exenatide group (average glucose: 126.9 ± 27.1 vs. 107.1 ± 24.0 mg/dL; p = 0.029, SD: 15.2 ± 10.5 vs. 8.7 ± 3.8; p = 0.020). Both groups had similar glucose fluctuations despite differences in 24-hour blood glucose profiles. Therefore, each of these agents may have advantages or disadvantages and should be selected according to the blood glucose profile of the patient.

  11. The effect of Operation 24 Hours on reducing collision in the City of Edmonton.

    PubMed

    Halim, Siana; Jiang, Heming

    2013-09-01

    In the City of Edmonton, in order to reduce the prevalence of collisions, the Operation 24 Hours program (OPS24) was developed by using existing police and transportation services resources. The program uses traditional manned police speed enforcement method, which are supplemented by traffic safety messages displayed on permanent and mobile dynamic messaging signs (DMS). In this paper, collision data analysis was performed by looking at the daily number of collisions from 2008 to 2011 that covers 28 Operation 24 Hours (OPS24) events. The objective of the collision data analysis is to analyze if there is a reduction in collision frequencies after OPS24 was held and examined how long the collision reduction effect last. Weather factors such as temperature, thickness of snow, and wind gust have been considered by many as a great influence on collision occurrences, especially in a city with long and cold winter such as Edmonton. Therefore, collision modeling was performed by considering these external weather factors. To analyze the linear and periodic trend of different collision types (injury, fatal, and property damage only (PDO)) and examine the influence of weather factors on collisions, negative binomial time series model that accounts for seasonality and weather factors was used to model daily collision data. The modeling also considered collision proportion to account for missing traffic volume data; the Gaussian time series model that accounts for seasonality and weather factors was used to model collision proportion. To estimate the collision trend and test for changes in collision levels before/after OPS24, interrupted time series model with segmented regression was used. While for estimating how long the effect of the OPS24 last, change point method was applied.

  12. Estimation of 24-hour urinary sodium excretion using spot urine samples.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Moo-Yong; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Shin, Sung-Joon; Gu, Namyi; Nah, Deuk-Young; Hong, Kyung-Soon; Cho, Eun-Joo; Sung, Ki-Chul

    2014-06-20

    The present study evaluated the reliability of equations using spot urine (SU) samples in the estimation of 24-hour urine sodium excretion (24-HUNa). Equations estimating 24-HUNa from SU samples were derived from first-morning SU of 101 participants (52.4 ± 11.1 years, range 24-70 years). Equations developed by us and other investigators were validated with SU samples from a separate group of participants (n = 224, 51.0 ± 10.9 years, range 24-70 years). Linear, quadratic, and cubic equations were derived from first-morning SU samples because these samples had a sodium/creatinine ratio having the highest correlation coefficient for 24-HUNa/creatinine ratio (r = 0.728, p < 0.001). In the validation group, the estimated 24-HUNa showed significant correlations with measured 24-HUNa values. The estimated 24-HUNa by the linear, quadratic, and cubic equations developed from our study were not significantly different from measured 24-HUNa, while estimated 24-HUNa by previously developed equations were significantly different from measured 24-HUNa values. The limits of agreement between measured and estimated 24-HUNa by six equations exceeded 100 mmol/24-hour in the Bland-Altman analysis. All equations showed a tendency of under- or over-estimation of 24-HUNa, depending on the level of measured 24-HUNa. Estimation of 24-HUNa from single SU by equations as tested in the present study was found to be inadequate for the estimation of an individual's 24-HUNa.

  13. Dietary restraint and disinhibition do not affect accuracy of 24-hour recall in a multiethnic population.

    PubMed

    Ard, Jamy D; Desmond, Renee Ann; Allison, David B; Conway, Joan Marie

    2006-03-01

    Some psychological predictors of eating behaviors have been shown to affect usefulness of methods for dietary assessment. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the association of dietary restraint and disinhibition with dietary recall accuracy for total energy, fat, carbohydrate, and protein. In a cross-sectional study, data were obtained from 79 male and 71 female non-Hispanic whites and African-American volunteers. Participants selected and consumed all foods for a 1-day period under observation and actual intake was determined. The following day, each participant completed a telephone 24-hour recall using the US Department of Agriculture Multiple-Pass method to obtain recalled intake. The Eating Inventory, which measures dietary restraint and disinhibition, was administered prior to eating any food in the study. Repeated measures analyses of variance were used to determine if dietary restraint or disinhibition were independent predictors of recall accuracy. The mean (+/-standard deviation) age and body mass index of the participants was 43+/-12 years and 29+/-5.5 (calculated as kg/m2), respectively. On average, men overreported intake of energy by 265 kcal and women by 250 kcal; both groups also overreported intake of protein, carbohydrate, and fat. When controlling for body mass index, sex, and race, restraint was a significant independent predictor of energy intake (P=0.004) and negatively correlated with energy intake (r=-0.23, P<0.001). Unlike intake of carbohydrate or protein, fat intake was significantly and negatively associated with dietary restraint (P<0.001; r=-0.3). Dietary restraint did not affect accuracy of recall of intake of energy, fat, carbohydrate, or protein, but was significantly associated with intake of energy and fat. Disinhibition was not related to intake or accuracy. Dietetics professionals should consider dietary restraint a possible reason for a lower than expected estimate of energy intake when using 24-hour recalls.

  14. Attempt Quit Smoking 24+ Hours Maps and Data of Model-Based Small Area Estimates - Small Area Estimates

    Cancer.gov

    Attempt Quit Smoking 24+ Hours is defined as a person 18 years of age or older who must have reported smoking at least 100 cigarettes in his/her life, and now does not smoke at all but it has been less than 365 days since completely stopped smoking cigarettes, or now smoke everyday or some days but reported that have made attempt of quitting for more than 24 hours in the past 12 months.

  15. Time-Based Measurement of Personal Mite Allergen Bioaerosol Exposure over 24 Hour Periods

    PubMed Central

    Tovey, Euan R.; Liu-Brennan, Damien; Garden, Frances L.; Oliver, Brian G.; Perzanowski, Matthew S.; Marks, Guy B.

    2016-01-01

    Allergic diseases such as asthma and rhinitis are common in many countries. Globally the most common allergen associated with symptoms is produced by house dust mites. Although the bed has often been cited as the main site of exposure to mite allergens, surprisingly this has not yet been directly established by measurement due to a lack of suitable methods. Here we report on the development of novel methods to determine the pattern of personal exposure to mite allergen bioaerosols over 24-hour periods and applied this in a small field study using 10 normal adults. Air was sampled using a miniature time-based air-sampler of in-house design located close to the breathing zone of the participants, co-located with a miniature time-lapse camera. Airborne particles, drawn into the sampler at 2L/min via a narrow slot, were impacted onto the peripheral surface of a disk mounted on the hour-hand of either a 12 or 24 hour clock motor. The impaction surface was either an electret cloth, or an adhesive film; both novel for these purposes. Following a review of the time-lapse images, disks were post-hoc cut into subsamples corresponding to eight predetermined categories of indoor or outdoor location, extracted and analysed for mite allergen Der p 1 by an amplified ELISA. Allergen was detected in 57.2% of the total of 353 subsamples collected during 20 days of sampling. Exposure patterns varied over time. Higher concentrations of airborne mite allergen were typically measured in samples collected from domestic locations in the day and evening. Indoor domestic Der p 1 exposures accounted for 59.5% of total exposure, whereas total in-bed-asleep exposure, which varied 80 fold between individuals, accounted overall for 9.85% of total exposure, suggesting beds are not often the main site of exposure. This study establishes the feasibility of novel methods for determining the time-geography of personal exposure to many bioaerosols and identifies new areas for future technical

  16. Non-24-Hour Sleep-Wake Disorder Revisited – A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Garbazza, Corrado; Bromundt, Vivien; Eckert, Anne; Brunner, Daniel P.; Meier, Fides; Hackethal, Sandra; Cajochen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The human sleep-wake cycle is governed by two major factors: a homeostatic hourglass process (process S), which rises linearly during the day, and a circadian process C, which determines the timing of sleep in a ~24-h rhythm in accordance to the external light–dark (LD) cycle. While both individual processes are fairly well characterized, the exact nature of their interaction remains unclear. The circadian rhythm is generated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (“master clock”) of the anterior hypothalamus, through cell-autonomous feedback loops of DNA transcription and translation. While the phase length (tau) of the cycle is relatively stable and genetically determined, the phase of the clock is reset by external stimuli (“zeitgebers”), the most important being the LD cycle. Misalignments of the internal rhythm with the LD cycle can lead to various somatic complaints and to the development of circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSD). Non-24-hour sleep-wake disorders (N24HSWD) is a CRSD affecting up to 50% of totally blind patients and characterized by the inability to maintain a stable entrainment of the typically long circadian rhythm (tau > 24.5 h) to the LD cycle. The disease is rare in sighted individuals and the pathophysiology less well understood. Here, we present the case of a 40-year-old sighted male, who developed a misalignment of the internal clock with the external LD cycle following the treatment for Hodgkin’s lymphoma (ABVD regimen, four cycles and AVD regimen, four cycles). A thorough clinical assessment, including actigraphy, melatonin profiles and polysomnography led to the diagnosis of non-24-hour sleep-wake disorders (N24HSWD) with a free-running rhythm of tau = 25.27 h. A therapeutic intervention with bright light therapy (30 min, 10,000 lux) in the morning and melatonin administration (0.5–0.75 mg) in the evening failed to entrain the free-running rhythm, although a longer treatment duration and more intense therapy

  17. Low mean impedance in 24-hour tracings and esophagitis in children: a strong connection.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, S; Salvatoni, A; Ummarino, D; Ghanma, A; Van der Pol, R; Rongen, A; Fuoti, M; Meneghin, F; Benninga, M Alexander; Vandenplas, Y

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal multiple intraluminal impedance baseline is an additional impedance parameter that was recently related to esophageal integrity. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between mean esophageal impedance value and endoscopic findings in a large group of children. Children with symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux submitted to both endoscopy and impedance were included. Esophagitis was graded according to the Los Angeles classification. Mean impedance value was automatically calculated over 24-hour tracings. Data were adjusted for age through z-score transformation using percentiles normalized by the LMS (Lambda for the skew, Mu for the median, and Sigma for the generalized coefficient of variation) method. Nonparametric Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests, multiple, and stepwise regression were used. P-value <0.05 was considered as statistically significant. A total of 298 impedance tracings were analyzed. Endoscopic and histological esophagitis were detected in 30 and 29% patients, respectively. Median baseline z-score was significantly decreased both in proximal (P = 0.02) and distal (P = 0.01) esophagus in patients with endoscopic (but not histological) esophagitis. Patients with more severe esophagitis showed the lowest z-score. Bolus exposure index and the number of reflux episodes were the variables that were significantly associated with the baseline z-score. Impedance z-score is significantly decreased in infants and children with endoscopic esophagitis. Severity of esophagitis, bolus exposure index, and number of reflux episodes are factors influencing mean esophageal impedance.

  18. Deep venous thrombophlebitis: detection with 4-hour versus 24-hour platelet scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Seabold, J.E.; Conrad, G.R.; Ponto, J.A.; Kimball, D.A.; Frey, E.E.; Ahmed, F.; Coughlan, J.D.; Jensen, K.C.

    1987-11-01

    Thirty-one nonheparinized patients with suspected deep venous thrombophlebitis (DVT) underwent contrast venography and indium-111 platelet scintigraphy (In-111 PS). Venography permitted identification of acute DVT in 12 of 31 cases (39%). One additional patient was considered to have acute DVT despite nonconclusive venography results. In-111 PS results were positive at 4 hours in nine of 13 cases (69%) and at 24 hours in 12 of 13 cases (92%). Two of four patients with false-negative 4-hour In-111 PS studies had received warfarin. Thus, the sensitivity of 4-hour In-111 PS in patients not receiving anticoagulants was 82%. Venography results were negative for acute DVT in 18 cases, and 4-hour In-111 PS studies were negative or equivocal in each. In-111 PS is an alternative to contrast venography for detecting acute DVT. If 4-hour In-111 PS results are positive, anticoagulation can be initiated. Delayed images are necessary if the 4-hour images are negative or equivocal.

  19. Neonatal family care for 24 hours per day: effects on maternal confidence and breast-feeding.

    PubMed

    Wataker, Heidi; Meberg, Alf; Nestaas, Eirik

    2012-01-01

    In family care (FC) program for neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), parents are encouraged to reside together with their infant for 24 hours a day to actively be involved in the care. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of FC on maternal confidence and breast-feeding. Maternal confidence and rate of breast-feeding were assessed in 31 mothers offered FC that included special family rooms in the NICU, and in 30 mothers from a comparable NICU providing traditional care without such facilities. One week prior to hospital discharge, mothers in the FC group felt better informed regarding nursing issues and had more confidence in interpretation of the infants regarding feeding issues and in caregiving without staff attendance (P < .05). They also reported a higher level of empowerment (P < .05). Three months after discharge, the mothers in the FC group had a higher self-reported skill level for interpretation of the infant's signals and knowledge about breast-feeding (P < .05). Despite similar rate of breast-feeding at discharge, more infants in the FC group were breastfed 3 months after discharge (P < .05). An FC program in the NICU promoted better maternal confidence during the hospital stay and 3 months after discharge compared with traditional care.

  20. The Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Children and Youth: Implications for practitioners, professionals, and organizations.

    PubMed

    Latimer-Cheung, Amy E; Copeland, Jennifer L; Fowles, Jonathon; Zehr, Lori; Duggan, Mary; Tremblay, Mark S

    2016-06-01

    The new Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Children and Youth emphasize the integration of all movement behaviours that occur over a whole day (i.e., light, moderate, and vigorous physical activity, sedentary behaviour, and sleep). These guidelines shift the paradigm away from considering each behaviour in isolation. This concept of the "whole day matters" not only calls for a change in thinking about movement but also for redevelopment of dissemination and implementation practice. Past guideline launch activities largely have aimed to create awareness through passive dissemination strategies (e.g., Website posts, distribution of print resources). For the integrated guidelines to have public health impact, we must move beyond dissemination and raising of awareness to implementation and behaviour change. Shifting this focus requires new, innovative approaches to intervention, including interdisciplinary collaboration, policy change, and refocused service provision. The purpose of this paper is to identify practitioners, professionals, and organizations with potential to disseminate and/or implement the guidelines, discuss possible implementation strategies for each of these groups, and describe the few resources being developed and those needed to support dissemination and implementation efforts. This discussion makes readily apparent the need for a well-funded, comprehensive, long-term dissemination, implementation, and evaluation plan to ensure uptake and activation of the guidelines.

  1. After 24-hour scrub, the Boeing Delta II rocket carrying Stardust waits for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the late morning light at Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Cananveral Air Station, the fixed utility tower (right) casts a long shadow across the base of the Boeing Delta II rocket (left) waiting to launch the Stardust spacecraft. After a 24-hour scrub, the new targeted launch time is 4:04 p.m. EST. Stardust is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006.

  2. Obtaining liver tridimensional scaffold through the decellularization of rabbit whole liver in 24 hours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federico, Schliamser; Ayelen, Rinaldi; Romina, Comin; Alba Nelly, Borchert; Adrian, Nari Gustavo; Alicia, Salvatierra Nancy; Mariana Paula, Cid

    2016-04-01

    In the present work, we development a new protocol for liver decellularization in which the hole decellularization was reached over 24 h. Introduction: the availability of transplantable livers is not sufficient to fulfill the current demand for grafts, with the search for therapeutic alternatives having generated different lines of research, one of which is the use of decellularized three-dimensional biological matrices and subsequent cell seeding to obtain a functional organ. Objective: to produce a decellularization protocol from rabbit liver to generate a three-dimensional matrixin which the time period involved didn't pass 24 h. Methods: The decellularization is obtained through the use of water and SDS (0,1-0,3 %), after freezing at -80 degrees, is the best alternative of different physical and/or chemical mechanisms to break down organ cells and leave only the extracellular matriz. After 24 h of retrograde perfusion, a decellularized translucent matrix was generated. To evaluate if the decellularization protocol was successful, with the extracellular matrix being preserved, we carried out histological (light microscopy) and biochemical (DNA quantification) studies. Results: the decellularization process was verified by macroscopic observation of the organ using microscopic observation corroborated the macroscopic results, with the hematoxylin-eosin and Masson staining showing no cells or nuclear material. In addition, the DNA quantification was less than 10% in the decellularized liver compared to control. Finally,the time taken to develop the decellularization protocol was less than 24 hours.

  3. Comparison of effects of amphotericin B deoxycholate infused over 4 or 24 hours: randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Urs; Seifert, Burkhard; Schaffner, Andreas

    2001-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that amphotericin B deoxycholate is less toxic when given by continuous infusion than by conventional rapid infusion. Design Randomised, controlled, non-blinded, single centre study. Setting University hospital providing tertiary clinical care. Patients 80 mostly neutropenic patients with refractory fever and suspected or proved invasive fungal infections. Intervention Patients were randomised to receive 0.97 mg/kg amphotericin B by continuous infusion over 24 hours or 0.95 mg/kg by rapid infusion over four hours. Main outcome measures Patients were evaluated for side effects related to infusion, nephrotoxicity, and mortality up to three months after treatment. Analysis was on an intention to treat basis. Results Patients in the continuous infusion group had fewer side effects and significantly reduced nephrotoxicity than those in the rapid infusion group. Overall mortality was higher during treatment and after three months' follow up in the rapid infusion than in the continuous infusion group. Conclusion Continuous infusions of amphotericin B reduce nephrotoxicity and side effects related to infusion without increasing mortality. PMID:11238151

  4. What and how much do we eat? 24-hour dietary recall method.

    PubMed

    Salvador Castell, Gemma; Serra-Majem, Lluis; Ribas-Barba, Lourdes

    2015-02-26

    Diet, along with lifestyle factors, is an important determinant of the health status of an individual and of a community. Dietary assessment at the population level provides us with key information on the frequency and distribution of possible inadequate diets and/or nutritional status. It is also useful as input into the elaboration of food and nutrition policies aiming to improve dietary habits and the health status of a community. This article reviews the characteristics, advantages and limitations of the 24-hour dietary recall method (24hDR), which is one of the most widely used tools in nutrition epidemiology to identify food, energy and nutrient intake in national nutrition surveys, cross-sectional studies, clinical trials and cohort studies as well as in the evaluation of individual dietary intake and Total Diet assessment. To reduce the key factors associated with bias, the importance of previously trained interviewers is highlighted, as well as the role of support materials and the contribution of novel technologies.

  5. After 24-hour scrub, the Boeing Delta II rocket carrying Stardust waits for launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    After a 24-hour postponement, the Boeing Delta II rocket carrying the Stardust spacecraft waits on Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, for its scheduled launch at 4:04 p.m. EST. Umbilical lines (at top) still attached to the fixed utility tower (at right) feed electricity, air conditioning and coolants for the Stardust spacecraft inside the fairing (enclosing the upper stage) before launch. Stardust is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006.

  6. After 24-hour scrub, the Boeing Delta II rocket carrying Stardust launches on time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Flames sear the pristine blue sky behind the Boeing Delta II rocket carrying the Stardust spacecraft after the 4:04:15 p.m. launch from Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station. A 24- hour scrub postponed the launch from the originally scheduled date of Feb. 6. Stardust is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006.

  7. A 24-hour study to investigate persistent chemical exposures associated with clandestine methamphetamine laboratories.

    PubMed

    VanDyke, Mike; Erb, Nicola; Arbuckle, Shawn; Martyny, John

    2009-02-01

    The clandestine manufacture of methamphetamine continues to be a concern across the United States. Although the exposures associated with the actual production process have been evaluated, the persistence of those exposures in a residential setting have not been investigated. This study was designed to document the contamination associated with two red phosphorous methamphetamine "cooks" conducted in a residence and the associated exposures up to 24 hours after the cook. The two cooks were conducted on the first day of the study, and exposures associated with different occupant activity levels were measured the following day. Airborne methamphetamine levels during the cook ranged from 520 microg/m(3) to 760 microg/m(3). On Day 2, airborne levels of methamphetamine ranged from 70 microg/m(3) to 210 microg/m(3) and increased with moderate to high activity levels within the residence. The majority of the methamphetamine measured during both days had a particle size of less than 1 mum, suggesting that the methamphetamine is formed as a condensation aerosol and is readily resuspended from contaminated surfaces. Significant methamphetamine contamination was found in the carpeting and likely was associated with the elevated levels of methamphetamine during activity. Levels of hydrogen chloride and iodine were also detected on Day 2 of the project although at very low levels. The study concluded that exposures may still present a significant inhalation exposure well after the actual cook.

  8. Long-Term Continuous Ambulatory ECG Monitors and External Cardiac Loop Recorders for Cardiac Arrhythmia: A Health Technology Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Kabali, Conrad; Xie, Xuanqian; Higgins, Caroline

    2017-01-01

    Background Ambulatory electrocardiography (ECG) monitors are often used to detect cardiac arrhythmia. For patients with symptoms, an external cardiac loop recorder will often be recommended. The improved recording capacity of newer Holter monitors and similar devices, collectively known as longterm continuous ambulatory ECG monitors, suggests that they will perform just as well as, or better than, external loop recorders. This health technology assessment aimed to evaluate the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and budget impact of longterm continuous ECG monitors compared with external loop recorders in detecting symptoms of cardiac arrhythmia. Methods Based on our systematic search for studies published up to January 15, 2016, we did not identify any studies directly comparing the clinical effectiveness of longterm continuous ECG monitors and external loop recorders. Therefore, we conducted an indirect comparison, using a 24-hour Holter monitor as a common comparator. We used a meta-regression model to control for bias due to variation in device-wearing time and baseline syncope rate across studies. We conducted a similar systematic search for cost-utility and cost-effectiveness studies comparing the two types of devices; none were found. Finally, we used historical claims data (2006–2014) to estimate the future 5-year budget impact in Ontario, Canada, of continued public funding for both types of longterm ambulatory ECG monitors. Results Our clinical literature search yielded 7,815 non-duplicate citations, of which 12 cohort studies were eligible for indirect comparison. Seven studies assessed the effectiveness of longterm continuous monitors and five assessed external loop recorders. Both types of devices were more effective than a 24-hour Holter monitor, and we found no substantial difference between them in their ability to detect symptoms (risk difference 0.01; 95% confidence interval −0.18, 0.20). Using GRADE for network meta-analysis, we evaluated the

  9. No Enhancement of 24-Hour Visuomotor Skill Retention by Post-Practice Caffeine Administration

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Sara J.; Cole, Kelly J.

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine is widely consumed throughout the world and appears to indirectly facilitate learning and memory through effects on attention and motivation. Animal work indicates that post-training caffeine administration augments inhibitory avoidance memory, spatial memory, and object memory. In humans, post-training caffeine administration enhances the ability to discern between familiar images and new, similar images. However, the effect of post-training caffeine administration on motor memory has not been examined. Therefore, we tested two groups of low caffeine consumers (average weekly consumption ≤500 mg) in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study involving acquisition of a continuous isometric visuomotor tracking skill. On Day 1, subjects completed 5 blocks (150 repetitions) of training on the continuous isometric visuomotor skill and subsequently ingested either 200 mg of caffeine or placebo. On day 2, subjects completed an additional 5 blocks of training. Day 1 mean performance and performance variability were both similar between groups, suggesting that both groups acquired the motor skill similarly. For mean performance on Day 2, patterns of re-learning, mean performance learning magnitudes, mean performance learning rates, and mean performance retention magnitudes were all similar between groups. For performance variability on Day 2, there was a small trend towards increased variability in the caffeine group during re-learning, but performance variability learning magnitudes and performance variability retention magnitudes did not differ between groups. Because motor skill acquisition can also be conceptualized as a reduction in performance variability, these results suggest that there may be a small negative effect of post-practice caffeine administration on memory of a newly-learned visuomotor skill. Overall, we found no evidence to suggest that post-training caffeine administration enhances 24-hour retention of a newly-learned continuous visuomotor

  10. No Enhancement of 24-Hour Visuomotor Skill Retention by Post-Practice Caffeine Administration.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Sara J; Cole, Kelly J

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine is widely consumed throughout the world and appears to indirectly facilitate learning and memory through effects on attention and motivation. Animal work indicates that post-training caffeine administration augments inhibitory avoidance memory, spatial memory, and object memory. In humans, post-training caffeine administration enhances the ability to discern between familiar images and new, similar images. However, the effect of post-training caffeine administration on motor memory has not been examined. Therefore, we tested two groups of low caffeine consumers (average weekly consumption ≤500 mg) in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study involving acquisition of a continuous isometric visuomotor tracking skill. On Day 1, subjects completed 5 blocks (150 repetitions) of training on the continuous isometric visuomotor skill and subsequently ingested either 200 mg of caffeine or placebo. On day 2, subjects completed an additional 5 blocks of training. Day 1 mean performance and performance variability were both similar between groups, suggesting that both groups acquired the motor skill similarly. For mean performance on Day 2, patterns of re-learning, mean performance learning magnitudes, mean performance learning rates, and mean performance retention magnitudes were all similar between groups. For performance variability on Day 2, there was a small trend towards increased variability in the caffeine group during re-learning, but performance variability learning magnitudes and performance variability retention magnitudes did not differ between groups. Because motor skill acquisition can also be conceptualized as a reduction in performance variability, these results suggest that there may be a small negative effect of post-practice caffeine administration on memory of a newly-learned visuomotor skill. Overall, we found no evidence to suggest that post-training caffeine administration enhances 24-hour retention of a newly-learned continuous visuomotor

  11. The Impact of Using Different Methods to Assess Completeness of 24-Hour Urine Collection on Estimating Dietary Sodium.

    PubMed

    Wielgosz, Andreas; Robinson, Christopher; Mao, Yang; Jiang, Ying; Campbell, Norm R C; Muthuri, Stella; Morrison, Howard

    2016-06-01

    The standard for population-based surveillance of dietary sodium intake is 24-hour urine testing; however, this may be affected by incomplete urine collection. The impact of different indirect methods of assessing completeness of collection on estimated sodium ingestion has not been established. The authors enlisted 507 participants from an existing community study in 2009 to collect 24-hour urine samples. Several methods of assessing completeness of urine collection were tested. Mean sodium intake varied between 3648 mg/24 h and 7210 mg/24 h depending on the method used. Excluding urine samples collected for longer or shorter than 24 hours increased the estimated urine sodium excretion, even when corrections for the variation in timed collections were applied. Until an accurate method of indirectly assessing completeness of urine collection is identified, the gold standard of administering para-aminobenzoic acid is recommended. Efforts to ensure participants collect complete urine samples are also warranted.

  12. Non-24-hour sleep–wake syndrome improved by low-dose valproic acid: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kurita, Masatake; Moriya, Takahiro; Nishino, Satoshi; Hirata, Eishin; Hirasawa, Noriyasu; Okubo, Yoshiro; Sato, Tadahiro

    2016-01-01

    A woman was diagnosed with non-24-hour sleep–wake syndrome and depressive symptoms. Her depressive symptoms did not respond to standard doses of several antidepressants or mood stabilizers. Furthermore, her sleep–wake cycle remained non-entrained despite treatment with a melatonin-related drug, vitamin B12, and phototherapy. Ultimately, her sleep–wake rhythm was restored to a 24-hour pattern with a low dose of valproic acid, and her depressive symptoms tended to improve as a result of synchronization without antidepressants. Low-dose valproic acid appears to be one of the effective means of entraining circadian rhythms in patients with non-24-hour sleep–wake syndrome, which in turn likely improves associated depressive symptoms. PMID:28008257

  13. To Compare the Microleakage Among Experimental Adhesives Containing Nanoclay Fillers after the Storages of 24 Hours and 6 Months

    PubMed Central

    Mousavinasab, Seyed Mostafa; Atai, Mohammad; Alavi, Bagher

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the microleakage among experimental adhesives containing nanoclay fillers after the storages of 24 hours and 6 months. Materials and Methods: Class V cavities were prepared on extracted human molars with the occlusal margins located in enamel and the cervical margins in cementum. Phosphoric acid was applied to the enamel and dentin margins.Subsequently, the cavities were treated using four groups of experimental adhesive systems and restored with a resin composite. Adper Single Bond® was used as control group. After 24- hour and 6- month storages, the samples were subjected to thermocycling shocks and then immersed in silver nitrate as well as developer solution and finally evaluated for leakage. The data were analyzed using SPSS software. Results: Based on Kruskal –Wallis test, significant differences were found between groups regarding microleakage. The Mann- Whitney test showed that Leakage was significantly lower in Adper Single Bond® compared to the other groups in dentinal margins after 24 hours and 6 months and in enamel margins after 6 months. The Wilcoxon Signed Ranks test showed that the enamel leakage in experimental adhesives was significantly lower than dentinal leakage after 24 hours as well as enamel leakage in Adper Single Bond and adhesive with 0.5% PMAA-g-nanoclay was significantly lower than dentinal margins after storage period of 6 months. Conclusion: All the experimental adhesives were effective in reducing enamel leakage after 24 hours, but were not effective in reducing dentinal leakage after 24 hours as well as in enamel and dentinal leakage after a 6-month storage. No improvement was observed in the microleakage in dentin in both short (24 hrs) and long times (6 months). The high microleakage in the adhesives is probably attributed to the high concentration of HEMA in the recipe of the bonding agent. PMID:21566692

  14. Executive Functions are not Affected by 24 Hours of Sleep Deprivation: A Color-Word Stroop Task Study

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Abhinav; Mittal, Tushar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sleep is an important factor affecting cognitive performance. Sleep deprivation results in fatigue, lack of concentration, confusion and sleepiness along with anxiety, depression and irritability. Sleep deprivation can have serious consequences in professions like armed forces and medicine where quick decisions and actions need to be taken. Color-Word Stroop task is one of the reliable tests to assess attention and it analyzes the processing of information in two dimensions i.e., reading of words and naming of colour. The evidence regarding the effect of sleep deprivation on Stroop interference is conflicting. The present study evaluated the effect of 24 hours of sleep deprivation on reaction time and interference in Stroop task. Materials and Methods: The present study was done on 30 healthy male medical student volunteers in the age group of 18-25 years after taking their consent and clearance from Institute Ethics Committee. Recordings of Stroop task were at three times: baseline (between 7-9 am), after 12 hours (7-9 pm) and after 24 hours (7-9 am, next day). The subjects were allowed to perform normal daily activities. Results: The study revealed a significant increase in reaction time after 24 hours of sleep deprivation in comparison to baseline and after 12 hours of sleep deprivation. There was no significant change in interference and facilitation after sleep deprivation in comparison to baseline. The number of errors also did not show any significant change after sleep deprivation. Conclusion: The study indicated that there was slowing of responses without change in executive functions after 24 hours of sleep deprivation. It is probable that 24 hours of sleep deprivation does not bring about change in areas of brain affecting executive functions in healthy individuals who have normal sleep cycle. The present study indicated that in professions like armed forces and medicine working 24 hours at a stretch can lead to decrease in motor responses

  15. Interchangeability between 24-hour collection and single spot urines for vanillylmandelic and homovanillic acid levels in the diagnosis of neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Cangemi, Giuliana; Barco, Sebastiano; Reggiardo, Giorgio; Viscardi, Elisabetta; Di Cataldo, Andrea; Garaventa, Alberto; Melioli, Giovanni; Conte, Massimo

    2013-12-01

    The determination of the two urinary catecholamine metabolites homovanillic acid (HVA) and vanillylmandelic acid (VMA) is of crucial importance for the diagnosis and follow-up of neuroblastoma (NB). The standard practice for their measurement requires the use of 24-hour collections that are time consuming and difficult to obtain. In this article, we directly demonstrate that 24-hour collections and single spot urines are interchangeable for the determination of HVA and VMA expressed as ratio on creatinine concentration. This study can be useful for a faster management of NB at onset.

  16. 77 FR 65310 - Additional Air Quality Designations for the 2006 24-Hour Fine Particle National Ambient Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-26

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 81 Additional Air Quality Designations for the 2006 24-Hour Fine Particle National Ambient Air Quality Standards AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Supplemental... particle (PM 2.5 ) national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS) air quality designations for the...

  17. Accuracy and Usefulness of Select Methods for Assessing Complete Collection of 24-Hour Urine: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    John, Katherine A; Cogswell, Mary E; Campbell, Norm R; Nowson, Caryl A; Legetic, Branka; Hennis, Anselm J M; Patel, Sheena M

    2016-05-01

    Twenty-four-hour urine collection is the recommended method for estimating sodium intake. To investigate the strengths and limitations of methods used to assess completion of 24-hour urine collection, the authors systematically reviewed the literature on the accuracy and usefulness of methods vs para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) recovery (referent). The percentage of incomplete collections, based on PABA, was 6% to 47% (n=8 studies). The sensitivity and specificity for identifying incomplete collection using creatinine criteria (n=4 studies) was 6% to 63% and 57% to 99.7%, respectively. The most sensitive method for removing incomplete collections was a creatinine index <0.7. In pooled analysis (≥2 studies), mean urine creatinine excretion and volume were higher among participants with complete collection (P<.05); whereas, self-reported collection time did not differ by completion status. Compared with participants with incomplete collection, mean 24-hour sodium excretion was 19.6 mmol higher (n=1781 specimens, 5 studies) in patients with complete collection. Sodium excretion may be underestimated by inclusion of incomplete 24-hour urine collections. None of the current approaches reliably assess completion of 24-hour urine collection.

  18. Population Pharmacokinetic Model Characterizing 24-Hour Variation in the Pharmacokinetics of Oral and Intravenous Midazolam in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    van Rongen, A; Kervezee, L; Brill, MJE; van Meir, H; den Hartigh, J; Guchelaar, H-J; Meijer, JH; Burggraaf, J; van Oosterhout, F

    2015-01-01

    Daily rhythms in physiology may affect the pharmacokinetics of a drug. The aim of this study was to evaluate 24-hour variation in the pharmacokinetics of the CYP3A substrate midazolam. Oral (2 mg) and intravenous (1 mg) midazolam was administered at six timepoints throughout the 24-hour period in 12 healthy volunteers. Oral bioavailability (population mean value [RSE%] of 0.28 (7.1%)) showed 24-hour variation that was best parameterized as a cosine function with an amplitude of 0.04 (17.3%) and a peak at 12:14 in the afternoon. The absorption rate constant was 1.41 (4.7%) times increased after drug administration at 14:00. Clearance (0.38 L/min (4.8%)) showed a minor 24-hour variation with an amplitude of 0.03 (14.8%) L/min and a peak at 18:50. Simulations show that dosing time minimally affects the concentration time profiles after intravenous administration, while concentrations are higher during the day compared to the night after oral dosing, reflecting considerable variation in intestinal processes. PMID:26380154

  19. Correlations of beta-aminoisobutyric acid in 8 hour and 24 hour urinary samples determined by dual column gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Sjölin, K E; Nyholm, K K

    1980-05-01

    The correlations of beta-aminoisobutyric acid values in 8 hour and 24 hour urinary samples from 23 healthy persons were determined. beta-AIB in the 8 hour urinary samples was measured by gas chromatography and the 24 hour excretion was calculated from the results of three 8 hour determinations. Simultaneous determinations of urinary creatinine were performed by Jaffe's reaction. Based on the 8 hour values of urinary beta-AIB the results demonstrated a constant excretion of beta-aminoisobutyric acid within the 24 hour periods in both low and high excretors. The precision in distinguishing low and high 24 hour excretors of beta-AIB by using 8 hour values was 91%. If 8 hour values of beta-AIB were related to creatinine the same precision for this calculated ratio was 96.5%. However, for high excretors of beta-AIB, failures were 24.5% by using the 8 hour excretion of beta-AIB as indicator, but only 6.5% by using the ratio.

  20. Urinary saturation and risk factors for calcium oxalate stone disease based on spot and 24-hour urine specimens.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Yoshihide; Yonou, Hiroyuki; Hokama, Sanehiro; Oda, Masami; Morozumi, Makoto; Sugaya, Kimio

    2003-09-01

    In 222 random spot urine specimens, the calcium concentration and calcium oxalate saturation [DG(CaOx)] were significantly higher among stone formers than among non-stone formers, while the citrate and creatinine-corrected citrate concentrations were lower. In 188 24-hour urine specimens, magnesium excretion was lower among stone formers than non-stone formers, while the creatinine-corrected calcium concentration and DG(CaOx) were higher. Among stone formers, there was no gender difference in the urinary concentrations of calcium, oxalate, citrate, magnesium, and DG(CaOx), but the creatinine-corrected calcium, citrate, and magnesium concentrations were higher in women, as well as 24-hour citrate excretion. The levels of calcium and oxalate have a major influence on DG(CaOx), while citrate and magnesium levels have a minor influence. DG(CaOx) was correlated with calcium and oxalate excretion, as well as with the creatinine-corrected calcium and oxalate concentrations. Approximately 5% of 24-hour urine specimens showed critical supersaturation, 80% showed metastable supersaturation, and 15% were unsaturated. Hypercalciuria or hyperoxaluria was fairly common (30% and 40%) in critically supersaturated urine, while it was less common (22.4% and 8.6%) in metastably supersaturated urine and was not detected in unsaturated urine. Hypocitraturia and/or hypomagnesiuria was more common (63.8-80%) at any saturation. The urinary calcium, oxalate, and citrate concentrations, as well as the creatinine-corrected calcium, oxalate, citrate, and magnesium concentrations and DG(CaOx), showed a significant correlation between 57 paired early morning spot urine and 24-hour urine specimens. The creatinine-corrected calcium and citrate concentrations of the early morning urine specimens were significantly correlated with the levels of calcium and citrate excretion in the paired 24-hour urine specimens. In conclusion, no parameter other than urinary saturation gives more than a vague

  1. Irregular 24-hour Activity Rhythms and the Metabolic Syndrome in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Sohail, Shahmir; Yu, Lei; Bennett, David A.; Buchman, Aron S.; Lim, Andrew S.P.

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms – near 24-hour intrinsic biological rhythms – modulate many aspects of human physiology and hence disruption of circadian rhythms may have an important impact on human health. Experimental work supports a potential link between irregular circadian rhythms and several key risk factors for cardiovascular disease including hypertension, obesity, diabetes, and dyslipidemia, collectively termed the metabolic syndrome. While several epidemiological studies have demonstrated an association between shift-work and the components of the metabolic syndrome in working-age adults, there is a relative paucity of data concerning the impact of non-occupational circadian irregularity in older women and men. To address this question, we studied 7 days of actigraphic data from 1137 older woman and men participating in the Rush Memory and Aging Project, a community-based cohort study of the chronic conditions of aging. The regularity of activity rhythms was quantified using the nonparametric interdaily stability metric, and was related to the metabolic syndrome and its components obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. More regular activity rhythms were associated with a lower odds of having the metabolic syndrome (OR=0.69, 95%CI=0.60–0.80, p=5.8×10−7), being obese (OR=0.73, 95%CI=0.63–0.85, p=2.5×10−5), diabetic (OR=0.76, 95%CI=0.65–0.90, p=9.3×10−4), hypertensive (OR=0.78, 95%CI=0.66–0.91, p=2.0×10−3), or dyslipidemic (OR=0.82, 95%CI=0.72–0.92, p=1.2×10−3). These associations were independent of differences in objectively measured total daily physical activity or rest, and were not accounted for by prevalent coronary artery disease, stroke, or peripheral artery disease. Moreover, more regular activity rhythms were associated with lower odds of having cardiovascular disease (OR=0.83; 95%CI=0.73–0.95, p=5.7×10−3), an effect that was statistically mediated by the metabolic syndrome. We conclude that irregular activity

  2. Changes in platelet morphology and function during 24 hours of storage.

    PubMed

    Braune, S; Walter, M; Schulze, F; Lendlein, A; Jung, F

    2014-01-01

    aggregates could be visualized microscopically. After four hours, first debris and very small aggregates occurred. After 24 hours, platelet aggregates and also debris progressively increased. In accordance to this, the CASY system revealed an increase of platelet aggregates (up to 90 μm diameter) with increasing storage time. The percentage of CD62P positive platelets and PF4 increased significantly with storage time in resting PRP. When soluble ADP was added to stored PRP samples, the number of activatable platelets decreased significantly over storage time. The present study reveals the importance of a consequent standardization in the preparation of WB and PRP. Platelet morphology and function, particularly platelet reactivity to adherent or soluble agonists in their surrounding milieu, changed rapidly outside the vascular system. This knowledge is of crucial interest, particularly in the field of biomaterial development for cardiovascular applications, and may help to define common standards in the in vitro hemocompatibility testing of biomaterials.

  3. Neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage is associated with higher ratio of 24-hour urinary sodium to potassium in young Japanese women.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Kentaro; Sasaki, Satoshi; Takahashi, Yoshiko; Uenishi, Kazuhiro

    2009-09-01

    Information on the relationship of neighborhood characteristics to objective indicators of dietary intake is extremely limited. The aim of this observational cross-sectional study was to examine the association between neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES) and 24-hour urinary excretion of sodium and potassium in a population with a high ratio of urinary sodium to potassium. Subjects were 1,032 female Japanese dietetics students aged 18 to 22 years, residing in 293 municipalities in Japan. Neighborhood SES index was defined by seven municipal-level variables, namely unemployment, household overcrowding, poverty, education, income, home ownership, and vulnerable groups, with an increasing index signifying increasing neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage. Urinary excretion of sodium and potassium was estimated from a single 24-hour urine sample. Neighborhood SES index was not significantly associated with 24-hour urinary excretion of sodium (mean value for each quartile of neighborhood SES: 133.5, 135.2, 126.5, and 141.7 mmol/day, respectively; P for trend 0.10) or potassium (mean value for each quartile: 43.5, 42.2, 38.4, and 42.5 mmol/day, respectively; P for trend 0.44). However, neighborhood SES index was significantly positively associated with the ratio of 24-hour urinary sodium to potassium (mean value for each quartile: 3.14, 3.28, 3.37, and 3.41, respectively; P for trend 0.03). This significant association remained after adjustment for household SES variables (mean value for each quartile: 3.15, 3.35, 3.29, and 3.41, respectively; P for trend 0.04). Neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage was associated with higher ratio of 24-hour urinary sodium to potassium in young Japanese women.

  4. Microleakage of Two Self-Adhesive Cements in the Enamel and Dentin After 24 Hours and Two Months

    PubMed Central

    Jaberi Ansari, Zahra; Kalantar Motamedi, Mojdeh

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Microleakage is a main cause of restorative treatment failure. In this study, we compared occlusal and cervical microleakage of two self-adhesive cements after 24 hours and two months. Materials and Methods: In this in-vitro experimental study, class II inlay cavities were prepared on 60 sound human third molars. Composite inlays were fabricated with Z100 composite resin. The teeth were randomly assigned to six groups. RelyX-Arc (control), RelyX-Unicem and Maxcem were used for the first three groups and specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours. The same cements were used for the remaining three groups, but the specimens were stored for 2 months. The teeth were subjected to 500 thermal cycles (5°C and 55°C) and immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsin for 24 hours and then sectioned mesiodistally and dye penetration was evaluated in a class II cavity with occlusal and cervical margins using X20 magnification stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using Kruskal Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. Results: After 24 hours, cements had significant differences only in cervical margin microleakage (P=0.0001) and microleakage of RelyX-Unicem and Maxcem was significantly more than that of RelyX-Arc (both P=0.0001). Cervical microleakage in RelyX-Unicem and Maxcem was greater than occlusal (P=0.0001 and P=0.001, respectively). Microleakage was not significantly different between the occlusal and cervical margins after 2 months. Conclusion: Cervical microleakage was greater than occlusal in RelyX-Unicem and Maxcem after 24h. The greatest microleakage was reported for the cervical margin of RelyX-Unicem after 24 hours. PMID:25584053

  5. Effects of para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) form and administration mode on PABA recovery in 24-hour urine collections.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rashmi S; Joy, Raechel C; Boushey, Carol J; Ferruzzi, Mario G; Leonov, Alexei P; McCrory, Megan A

    2014-03-01

    Para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) has long been used as an objective measure to assess completeness of 24-hour urine collections. However, pharmaceutical-grade PABA for human ingestion is not available in the United States. An alternative, the potassium salt of PABA, aminobenzoate potassium, can be obtained for clinical use, although it has not yet been validated in this role. Both PABA and aminobenzoate potassium can be directly ingested in their tablet or capsule forms or added to food before consumption. Our aim was to investigate the effect of form (PABA vs aminobenzoate potassium) and administration mode (directly ingested as a tablet/capsule vs added to food) on urinary PABA recovery levels. Twenty healthy participants underwent 3 test days separated by two 24-hour wash-out periods. Three test conditions, one on each test day, were investigated in randomized order: PABA tablet, aminobenzoate potassium capsule, and PABA or aminobenzoate potassium in food. Ingestion of each dose was supervised and participants performed the 24-hour urine collections while free-living. The 24-hour urine collections were analyzed for PABA recovery (%R) levels using a colorimetric assay. Recoveries 85% to 110% were deemed complete and those >110% were reanalyzed by high pressure liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Only complete collections (>85%R) were included in analyses. The recovery for the PABA tablet, aminobenzoate potassium capsule, and PABA/aminobenzoate potassium in food were similar at 98.8%R±2.0%R, 95.1%R±2.3%R, and 93.2%R±2.1%R, respectively, and did not differ significantly. These results suggest that aminobenzoate potassium may be used as an alternative to PABA for assessing the completeness of 24-hour urine collections and to track compliance with consuming provided diets in community-dwelling studies.

  6. Resistance training decreases 24-hour blood pressure in women with metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to verify the effects of eight weeks of resistance training (RT) on 24 hour blood pressure (BP) in patients with and without metabolic syndrome (MetS). Methods Seventeen women volunteered to participate in this study, 9 with MetS (37.0 ± 8.7 yrs; body mass 77.3 ± 9.7 kg; body mass index 30.3 ± 4.2 kg · m-2) and 8 without MetS (35.1 ± 7.2 yrs; body mass 61.3 ± 8.1 kg; body mass index 24.2 ± 2.5 kg · m-2). Individuals were subjected to eight weeks (3 times/week) of whole body RT comprised of one exercise for each main muscle group with three sets of 8–12 repetitions of each subject’s maximal load . A rest interval of one minute was allowed between sets and exercises. Twenty-four hour BP was measured by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Results Mean and diastolic night-time BP decreased (−3.9 mmHg, p = 0.04; -5.5 mmHg, p = 0.03, respectively) after eight weeks of training in MetS patients. This decrease was observed at 11:00 pm, 02:00 am (only diastolic), 07:00 am, and 6:00 pm. There was no training effect on BP in women without MetS. Conclusions Considering the elevation of BP as a contributor to the pathogenesis of MetS, and also to the increase of cardiovascular risk, this study supports RT as a non-pharmacological therapy in the management of BP control for MetS. PMID:23711286

  7. Changes in foot volume, body composition, and hydration status in male and female 24-hour ultra-mountain bikers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The effects of running and cycling on changes in hydration status and body composition during a 24-hour race have been described previously, but data for 24-hour ultra-mountain bikers are missing. The present study investigated changes in foot volume, body composition, and hydration status in male and female 24-hour ultra-mountain bikers. Methods We compared in 49 (37 men and 12 women) 24-hour ultra-mountain bikers (ultra-MTBers) changes (Δ) in body mass (BM). Fat mass (FM), percent body fat (%BF) and skeletal muscle mass (SM) were estimated using anthropometric methods. Changes in total body water (TBW), extracellular fluid (ECF) and intracellular fluid (ICF) were determined using bioelectrical impedance and changes in foot volume using plethysmography. Haematocrit, plasma [Na+], plasma urea, plasma osmolality, urine urea, urine specific gravity and urine osmolality were measured in a subgroup of 25 ultra-MTBers (16 men and 9 women). Results In male 24-hour ultra-MTBers, BM (P < 0.001), FM (P < 0.001), %BF (P < 0.001) and ECF (P < 0.05) decreased whereas SM and TBW did not change (P > 0.05). A significant correlation was found between post-race BM and post-race FM (r = 0.63, P < 0.001). In female ultra-MTBers, BM (P < 0.05), %BF (P < 0.05) and FM (P < 0.001) decreased, whereas SM, ECF and TBW remained stable (P > 0.05). Absolute ranking in the race was related to Δ%BM (P < 0.001) and Δ%FM in men (P < 0.001) and to Δ%BM (P < 0.05) in women. In male ultra-MTBers, increased post-race plasma urea (P < 0.001) was negatively related to absolute ranking in the race, Δ%BM, post-race FM and Δ%ECF (P < 0.05). Foot volume remained stable in both sexes (P > 0.05). Conclusions Male and female 24-hour ultra-MTBers experienced a significant loss in BM and FM, whereas SM remained stable. Body weight changes and increases in plasma urea do not reflect a change in body hydration status. No oedema

  8. Study on Operation Optimization of Pumping Station's 24 Hours Operation under Influences of Tides and Peak-Valley Electricity Prices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Gong; Jilin, Cheng; Lihua, Zhang; Rentian, Zhang

    2010-06-01

    According to different processes of tides and peak-valley electricity prices, this paper determines the optimal start up time in pumping station's 24 hours operation between the rating state and adjusting blade angle state respectively based on the optimization objective function and optimization model for single-unit pump's 24 hours operation taking JiangDu No.4 Pumping Station for example. In the meantime, this paper proposes the following regularities between optimal start up time of pumping station and the process of tides and peak-valley electricity prices each day within a month: (1) In the rating and adjusting blade angle state, the optimal start up time in pumping station's 24 hours operation which depends on the tide generation at the same day varies with the process of tides. There are mainly two kinds of optimal start up time which include the time at tide generation and 12 hours after it. (2) In the rating state, the optimal start up time on each day in a month exhibits a rule of symmetry from 29 to 28 of next month in the lunar calendar. The time of tide generation usually exists in the period of peak electricity price or the valley one. The higher electricity price corresponds to the higher minimum cost of water pumping at unit, which means that the minimum cost of water pumping at unit depends on the peak-valley electricity price at the time of tide generation on the same day. (3) In the adjusting blade angle state, the minimum cost of water pumping at unit in pumping station's 24 hour operation depends on the process of peak-valley electricity prices. And in the adjusting blade angle state, 4.85%˜5.37% of the minimum cost of water pumping at unit will be saved than that of in the rating state.

  9. Dipstick Spot urine pH does not accurately represent 24 hour urine PH measured by an electrode

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Mohamed; Sarkissian, Carl; Jianbo, Li; Calle, Juan; Monga, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To determine whether spot urine pH measured by dipstick is an accurate representation of 24 hours urine pH measured by an electrode. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed urine pH results of patients who presented to the urology stone clinic. For each patient we recorded the most recent pH result measured by dipstick from a spot urine sample that preceded the result of a 24-hour urine pH measured by the use of a pH electrode. Patients were excluded if there was a change in medications or dietary recommendations or if the two samples were more than 4 months apart. A difference of more than 0.5 pH was considered an inaccurate result. Results A total 600 patients were retrospectively reviewed for the pH results. The mean difference in pH between spot urine value and the 24 hours collection values was 0.52±0.45 pH. Higher pH was associated with lower accuracy (p<0.001). The accuracy of spot urine samples to predict 24-hour pH values of <5.5 was 68.9%, 68.2% for 5.5 to 6.5 and 35% for >6.5. Samples taken more than 75 days apart had only 49% the accuracy of more recent samples (p<0.002). The overall accuracy is lower than 80% (p<0.001). Influence of diurnal variation was not significant (p=0.588). Conclusions Spot urine pH by dipstick is not an accurate method for evaluation of the patients with urolithiasis. Patients with alkaline urine are more prone to error with reliance on spot urine pH. PMID:27286119

  10. Antimicrobial Prophylaxis in Instrumented Spinal Fusion Surgery: A Comparative Analysis of 24-Hour and 72-Hour Dosages

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Vineet Thomas; Ravichandran, Mirunalini; Achimuthu, Rajamani

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Prospective study. Purpose To compare the efficacy of 24-hour and 72-hour antibiotic prophylaxis in preventing surgical site infections (SSIs). Overview of Literature Antimicrobial prophylaxis in surgical practice has become a universally accepted protocol for minimizing postoperative complications related to infections. Although prophylaxis is an accepted practice, a debate exists with regard to the antibiotic type and its administration duration for various surgical procedures. Methods Our institute is a tertiary care hospital with more than 100 spinal surgeries per year for various spine disorders in the department of orthopedics. We conducted this prospective study in our department from June 2012 to January 2015. A total of 326 patients were enrolled in this study, with 156 patients in the 72-hour antibiotic prophylaxis group (group A) and 170 patients in the 24-hour group (group B). Cefazolin was the antibiotic used in both groups. Two surgeons were involved in conducting all the spinal procedures. Our study compared SSIs among patients undergoing instrumented spinal fusion. Results The overall rate of SSIs was 1.8% with no statistical difference between the two groups. Conclusions The 24-hour antimicrobial prophylaxis is as effective as the 72-hour dosage in instrumented spinal fusion surgery. PMID:27994776

  11. Vanilmandelic acid and homovanillic acid levels in patients with neural crest tumor: 24-hour urine collection versus random sample.

    PubMed

    Gregianin, L J; McGill, A C; Pinheiro, C M; Brunetto, A L

    1997-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common solid tumor in childhood and is the most frequent neural crest tumor (NCT). More than 90% of the patients excrete high levels of vanilmandelic acid (VMA) and homovanillic acid (HVA) in the urine. Original biochemical methods for measuring these two metabolites of catecholamines employed a collection of urine for 24 hours to avoid errors related to circadian cycle variations. More recently, attempts have been made to replace the 24-hour collections by random samples (RSs). This has practical advantages particularly for young children. The objective of this study is to assess whether urinary VMA related to urinary creatinine levels can be determined reliably by the method of Pisano et al. from RSs in patients with NCT. The determination of the consumption of VMA in urine stored for prolonged periods of time was also studied. We found a good correlation between the values of metabolites of catecholamines in RSs compared with 24-hour urine collections. There was consumption of VMA in urine samples after storage. We conclude that determination of VMA in RSs of urine by Pisano's method may identify NCT production of catecholamines and that the consumption of these catecholamines is an important factor to consider in the interpretation of values obtained with stored urine specimens.

  12. Assessment of 24-hours Aldosterone Administration on Protein Abundances in Fluorescence-Sorted Mouse Distal Renal Tubules by Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Thomas B; Pisitkun, Trairak; Hoffert, Jason D; Jensen, Uffe B; Fenton, Robert A; Praetorius, Helle A; Knepper, Mark A; Praetorius, Jeppe

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Aldosterone exerts multiple long-term effects in the distal renal tubules. The aim of this study was to establish a method for identifying proteins in these tubules that change in abundance by only 24-hours aldosterone administration. Methods Mice endogenously expressing green fluorescent protein (eGFP) in the connecting tubule and cortical collecting ducts were treated with a subcutaneous injection of 2.0 mg/kg aldosterone or vehicle (n=5), and sacrificed 24 hours later. Suspensions of single cells were obtained enzymatically, and eGFP positive cells were isolated by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). Samples of 100 μg proteins were digested with trypsin and labeled with 8-plex iTRAQ reagents and processed for liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Results FACS yielded 1.4 million cells per mouse. The LC-MS/MS spectra were matched to peptides by the SEQUEST search algorithm, which identified 3002 peptides corresponding to 506 unique proteins of which 20 significantly changed abundance 24-hours after aldosterone injection. Conclusion We find the method suitable and useful for studying hormonal effects on protein abundance in distal tubular segments. PMID:23428628

  13. Ambulatory glucose profile: Flash glucose monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sanjay; Gupta, Yashdeep

    2015-12-01

    Ambulatory glucose profile (AGP) is a novel way of assessing glycaemic levels on a 24 hour basis, through a minimally invasive method, known as flash glucose monitoring. This review describes the unique features of AGP, differentiates it from existing methods of glucose monitoring, and explains how it helps pursue the glycaemic pentad. The review suggests pragmatic usage of this technology, including pre-test, intra-test, and post-test counselling, and lists specific clinical scenarios where the investigation seems to be of immense benefit.

  14. The origins of electrocardiography in Poland.

    PubMed

    Gryglewski, Ryszard W

    2015-06-01

    The progress of science and technology in the 19(th) century enabled better understanding of the electrical activity that occurs during a heartbeat. However, it was only the construction and introduction of the galvanometer that cleared the way for appropriate experimental and clinical studies. Marey, Waller, Wenckebach, Einthoven, and Pardee are just examples of the world's pioneers of electrocardiography. Polish researchers, including Cybulski, Eiger, Rzętkowski, Surzycki, and Latkowski, also contributed to the development of this area of study. The following article is a review aiming to reconstruct the origins of electrocardiography in Poland, both as a measurement method used in experiments and as a diagnostic tool in clinical studies conducted in the years preceding the outbreak of World War I.

  15. The origins of electrocardiography in Poland

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The progress of science and technology in the 19th century enabled better understanding of the electrical activity that occurs during a heartbeat. However, it was only the construction and introduction of the galvanometer that cleared the way for appropriate experimental and clinical studies. Marey, Waller, Wenckebach, Einthoven, and Pardee are just examples of the world's pioneers of electrocardiography. Polish researchers, including Cybulski, Eiger, Rzętkowski, Surzycki, and Latkowski, also contributed to the development of this area of study. The following article is a review aiming to reconstruct the origins of electrocardiography in Poland, both as a measurement method used in experiments and as a diagnostic tool in clinical studies conducted in the years preceding the outbreak of World War I. PMID:26336508

  16. Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia

    MedlinePlus

    ... We Represent Ambulatory and Office-Based Anesthesia The Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia provides educational opportunities, encourages research ... 6620 | E-mail: info@sambahq.org Copyright | 2017 Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia Home | Search | Terms | Privacy Policy | ...

  17. Caffeine does not entrain the circadian clock but improves daytime alertness in blind patients with non-24-hour rhythms

    PubMed Central

    St. Hilaire, Melissa A.; Lockley, Steven W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective/Background Totally blind individuals are highly likely to suffer from Non-24-Hour Sleep-Wake Disorder due to a failure of light to reset the circadian pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nuclei. In this outpatient case series, we investigated whether daily caffeine administration could entrain the circadian pacemaker in non-entrained blind patients to alleviate symptoms of non-24-hour sleep–wake disorder. Patients/Methods Three totally blind males (63.0 ± 7.5 years old) were studied at home over ~4 months. Urinary 6-sulphatoxymelatonin (aMT6s) rhythms were measured for 48 h every 1–2 weeks. Participants completed daily sleep–wake logs, and rated their alertness and mood using nine-point scales every ~2–4 h while awake on urine sampling days. Caffeine capsules (150 mg per os) were self-administered daily at 10 a.m. for approximately one circadian beat cycle based on each participant's endogenous circadian period τ and compared to placebo (n = 2) or no treatment (n = 1) in a single-masked manner. Results Non-24-h aMT6s rhythms were confirmed in all three participants (τ range = 24.32–24.57 h). Daily administration of 150 mg caffeine did not entrain the circadian clock. Caffeine treatment significantly improved daytime alertness at adverse circadian phases (p < 0.0001) but did not decrease the occurrence of daytime naps compared with placebo. Conclusions Although caffeine was able to improve daytime alertness acutely and may therefore provide temporary symptomatic relief, the inability of caffeine to correct the underlying circadian disorder means that an entraining agent is required to treat Non-24-Hour Sleep–Wake Disorder in the blind appropriately. PMID:25891543

  18. Effects of Fibrinogen Concentrate on Thrombin Generation, Thromboelastometry Parameters, and Laboratory Coagulation Testing in a 24-Hour Porcine Trauma Model

    PubMed Central

    Zentai, Christian; Solomon, Cristina; van der Meijden, Paola E. J.; Spronk, Henri M. H.; Schnabel, Jonas; Rossaint, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In a 24-hour porcine model of liver injury, we showed that fibrinogen supplementation does not downregulate endogenous fibrinogen synthesis. Here we report data from the same study showing the impact of fibrinogen on coagulation variables. Materials and Methods: Coagulopathy was induced in 20 German land race pigs by hemodilution and blunt liver injury. Animals randomly received fibrinogen concentrate (100 mg/kg) or saline. Coagulation parameters were assessed and thromboelastometry (ROTEM) was performed. Results: Fibrinogen concentrate significantly reduced the prolongations of EXTEM clotting time, EXTEM clot formation time, and prothrombin time induced by hemodilution and liver injury. A decrease in clot strength was also ameliorated. Endogenous thrombin potential was significantly higher in the fibrinogen group than in the control group, 20 minutes (353 ± 24 vs 289 ± 22 nmol/L·min; P < .05) and 100 minutes (315 ± 40 vs 263 ± 38 nmol/L·min; P < .05) after the start of infusion. However, no significant between-group differences were seen in other thrombin generation parameters or in d-dimer or thrombin–antithrombin levels. Fibrinogen–platelet binding was reduced following liver injury, with no significant differences between groups. No significant between-group differences were observed in any parameter at ∼12 and ∼24 hours. Conclusion: This study suggests that, in trauma, fibrinogen supplementation may shorten some measurements of the speed of coagulation initiation and produce a short-lived increase in endogenous thrombin potential, potentially through increased clotting substrate availability. Approximately 12 and 24 hours after starting fibrinogen concentrate/saline infusion, all parameters measured in this study were comparable in the 2 study groups. PMID:25948634

  19. Reliability and predictive validity of energy intake measures from the 24-hour dietary recalls of homebound older adults.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yanhui; Roth, David L; Ritchie, Christine S; Burgio, Kathryn L; Locher, Julie L

    2010-05-01

    Twenty-four-hour dietary recalls are used frequently to study homebound older adults' eating behaviors. However, the reliability and predictive validity of this method have not been established in this population. The purpose of this study was to examine whether homebound older adults provide reliable and valid measures of total energy intake in 24-hour dietary recalls. Two hundred thirty homebound older adults were interviewed in their homes using a questionnaire to assess eating behaviors and factors that could affect those behaviors. Participants completed three 24-hour dietary recalls at baseline and again at 6-month follow-up. Two subsamples were identified for analyses. For participants who were not hospitalized during the 6-month interval and had their weight measured at both assessments (n=52), sufficient test-retest reliability of energy intake was observed (r=0.59), but energy intake deficiencies relative to estimated energy requirements did not predict actual weight loss (r=0.08). When this sample was supplemented with 91 participants who experienced any adverse event (weight loss of 2.5% or more, hospitalization, institutionalization, or mortality) in the 6-month period (n=143), adverse events were more likely to occur for those with insufficient energy intake (odds ratio 3.49, P=0.009), and in white participants compared to African-American participants (odds ratio 3.13, P=0.016). Adequate test-retest reliability of the 24-hour dietary recall was demonstrated, but additional research with larger samples and longer follow-up intervals is needed to better evaluate the predictive validity of energy intake measures for this population.

  20. Extent and Determinants of Thermogenic Responses to 24 Hours of Fasting, Energy Balance, and Five Different Overfeeding Diets in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Pannacciulli, Nicola; Bonfiglio, Susan; Pacak, Karel; Krakoff, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Context: Individual variation in the ability to convert excess calories to heat and the effects of dietary macronutrient composition are unclear. Objective: Stability and determinants of the energy expenditure (EE) response to overconsumption were assessed. Design, Setting, and Participants: Twenty subjects (75% male) with normal glucose regulation were evaluated during 24 hours each of energy balance, fasting, and 5 different diets with 200% energy requirements in a clinical research unit. Interventions: Five 1-day overfeeding diets were given in random order: high carbohydrate (75%) and low protein (3%); high carbohydrate and normal protein (20%); high fat (46%) and low protein; high fat (60%) and normal protein; and balanced (50% carbohydrates, 20% protein). Main Outcome Measures: The 24-hour EE, sleeping EE, and thermic effect of food (TEF) during each diet were measured with a metabolic chamber. Appetitive hormones were measured before and after the diets. Results: The EE response to overfeeding exhibited good intraindividual reproducibility. Similar increases above eucaloric feeding in 24-hour EE (mean 10.7 ± 5.7%, P < .001; range 2.9–18.8%) and sleeping EE (14.4 ± 11.3%, P < .001; range 1.0–45.1%) occurred when overfeeding diets containing 20% protein, despite differences in fat and carbohydrate content, but the EE response during overfeeding diets containing 3% protein was attenuated. The percent body fat negatively correlated with TEF during normal protein overfeeding (r = −0.53, P < .01). Fasting peptide YY negatively correlated with TEF (r = −0.56, P < .01) and the increase in sleeping EE (r = −0.54, P < .01) during overfeeding. Conclusions: There is an intrinsic EE response to overfeeding that negatively associates with adiposity, although it represents a small percentage of consumed calories. PMID:23666976

  1. The Automated Self-Administered 24-Hour Dietary Recall for Children, 2012 version, for youth aged 9 to 11 Years: A validation study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our objective was to validate the 2012 version of the Automated Self-Administered 24-Hour Dietary Recall for Children (ASA24-Kids-2012), a self-administered web-based 24-hour dietary recall (24hDR) instrument, among children aged 9 to 11 years, in two sites using a quasiexperimental design. In one s...

  2. A Hot-Line Emergency Service for the Ambulatory Frail Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf-Klein, Gisele P.; Silverstone, Felix A.

    1987-01-01

    Surveyed patients and families who used hotline emergency service in ambulatory day treatment center for frail elderly. Results revealed appropriate use of service: Most calls required medical intervention, including hospitalization in 31 percent of cases. Findings suggest that 24-hour medical coverage is necessary and cost efficient. (Author/NB)

  3. Impact of Stress Reduction Interventions on Hostility and Ambulatory Systolic Blood Pressure in African American Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Lynda Brown; Gregoski, Mathew J.; Tingen, Martha S.; Barnes, Vernon A.; Treiber, Frank A.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the impact of breathing awareness meditation (BAM), life skills (LS) training, and health education (HE) interventions on self-reported hostility and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) in 121 African American (AA) ninth graders at increased risk for development of essential hypertension. They were randomly assigned to BAM,…

  4. Determination of and correlation between urine protein excretion and urine protein-to-creatinine ratio values during a 24-hour period in healthy horses and ponies.

    PubMed

    Uberti, Benjamin; Eberle, D Bernard; Pressler, Barrak M; Moore, George E; Sojka, Janice E

    2009-12-01

    OBJECTIVE-To determine whether urine protein-to-creatinine (UP:C) ratio assessment provides an estimate of urine protein excretion (UPE) over a 24-hour period in horses and ponies, establish a preliminary UP:C ratio reference range, and determine UP:C ratio variation over time in healthy equids. ANIMALS-11 female horses and 6 female ponies. PROCEDURES-Urine was collected from all equids at 4-hour intervals for 24 hours. Total 24-hour UPE (mg of protein/kg of body weight) and UP:C ratio were determined; these variables were also assessed in aliquots of urine collected at 4-hour intervals. On 2 additional days, urine samples were also obtained from 6 horses (1 sample/horse/d) to determine day-to-day variation in UP:C ratio. Correlation between 4-hour or 24-hour UPE and UP:C ratio values was assessed. Reference ranges for 24-hour UPE, 24-hour UP:C ratio, and 4-hour UP:C ratios were calculated as central 95th percentiles of observed values. RESULTS-Mean 24-hour UPE (4.28 +/- 2.99 mg/kg) and 24-hour UP:C ratio (0.0 to 0.37) had excellent correlation (R = 0.826; P < 0.001) in both horses and ponies; analysis of 4-hour data also revealed good correlation (R = 0.782; P < 0.001) with these variables. Calculated UPE and UP:C ratio reference ranges were similar to established ranges in other species. Day-to-day variability in UP:C ratio was minimal, and all results were within the reference range calculated by use of the 24-hour urine samples. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE-Assessment of the UP:C ratio appears to be a reliable method for estimating 24-hour UPE in horses and ponies.

  5. Enhanced carotid-cardiac baroreflex response and elimination of orthostatic hypotension 24 hours after acute exercise in paraplegics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelke, K. A.; Shea, J. D.; Doerr, D. F.; Convertino, V. A.

    1992-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that an acute bout of maximal exercise can ameliorate orthostatic hypotension consequent to prolonged wheelchair confinement, we evaluated heart rate (HR), systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure responses during 15 minutes of 70 degrees head-up tilt (HUT) in 10 paraplegic subjects 24 hours after arm crank exercise designed to elicit maximal effort, and during a control (no exercise) conditions. Additionally, the carotid baroreceptor stimulus-cardiac response relationship was determined by measurement of R-R interval during external application of graded pressures to the carotid sinuses. One week separated the treatment conditions. The maximum slope of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex response was increased (p = 0.049) by exercise (6.2 +/- 1.7 msec/mmHg) compared to control (3.3 +/- 0.6). During control HUT, HR increased from 61 +/- 1 to 90 +/- 7 bpm (p = 0.001) while SBP decreased from 118 +/- 5 to 106 +/- 9 mmHg (p = 0.025). During HUT 24 hours after exercise, HR increased from 60 +/- 2 to 90 +/- 4 bpm (p = 0.001), but the reduction in SBP was essentially eliminated (116 +/- 5 to 113 +/- 5 mmHg).

  6. Urine 24-hour volume

    MedlinePlus

    ... in a day, such as: Creatinine Sodium Potassium Nitrogen Protein This test may also be done if ... disease Potassium urine test Sodium urine test Urea nitrogen urine test Urination - excessive amount Urine output - decreased ...

  7. 24-hour urine protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... your doctor may be able to order a test that is done on just one urine sample (protein-to-creatinine ratio). Normal Results The normal value is less than 100 milligrams per day or less than 10 milligrams per deciliter ... of these tests. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different ...

  8. Ambulatory Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Trull, Timothy J.; Ebner-Priemer, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Ambulatory assessment (AA) covers a wide range of assessment methods to study people in their natural environment, including self-report, observational, and biological/physiological/behavioral. AA methods minimize retrospective biases while gathering ecologically valid data from patients’ everyday life in real time or near real time. Here, we report on the major characteristics of AA, and we provide examples of applications of AA in clinical psychology (a) to investigate mechanisms and dynamics of symptoms, (b) to predict the future recurrence or onset of symptoms, (c) to monitor treatment effects, (d) to predict treatment success, (e) to prevent relapse, and (f) as interventions. In addition, we present and discuss the most pressing and compelling future AA applications: technological developments (the smartphone), improved ecological validity of laboratory results by combined lab-field studies, and investigating gene-environment interactions. We conclude with a discussion of acceptability, compliance, privacy, and ethical issues. PMID:23157450

  9. Ultra-Rapid dUT1 Measurements on Japan-Fennoscandian Baselines - Application to 24-hour Sessions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsuzaka, Shigeru; Kurihara, Shinobu; Sekido, Mamoru; Hobiger, Thomas; Haas, Rudiger; Ritakari, Jouko; Wagner, Jan

    2010-01-01

    GSI, NICT, OSO, and MRO have been engaged in Ultra-rapid dUT1 experiments since 2007 aiming at the technological possibility of real-time dUT1 results using the e-VLBI technique. We have already successfully determined dUT1 in less than four minutes after the end of an experimental Intensive session in 2008, and at present we routinely get the results within 30 minutes for regular Intensives. In 2009 we applied the technique to 24-hour sessions and continuously obtained dUT1 values by processing and analyzing Tsukuba Onsala data in near real-time. It showed a detailed behavior of UT1 variations, which could be very valuable for scientific study as well as for precise prediction of UT1-UTC.

  10. 24-hour energy expenditure and substrate oxidation rates are unaffected by body fat distribution in obese women.

    PubMed

    Buemann, B; Astrup, A; Quaade, F; Madsen, J

    1994-01-01

    Twenty-four-hour energy expenditure (EE) and nonprotein respiratory quotient (RQnp) were measured by indirect calorimetry in 19 upper-body-obese (UBO) and 15 lower-body-obese (LBO) women with similar body mass index (BMI) and body fat percent. The measurements were performed in a respiration chamber on a predetermined physical activity program and a controlled diet. No differences between the UBO and LBO groups were found in 24-hour, daytime, and sleeping EE after adjustment for differences in fat-free mass (FFM). Furthermore, no group effect was observed in RQnp, but a positive correlation was found between RQnp and age. Despite the fact that an increased free fatty acid (FFA) turnover has been found in UBO subjects, the present study does not support the contention that upper-body obesity is accompanied by an increased lipid oxidation.

  11. Prognostic Significance of Initial Serum Albumin and 24 Hour Daily Protein Excretion before Treatment in Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia-Hong; Hsu, Shun-Neng; Huang, Tzu-Chuan; Wu, Yi-Ying; Lin, Chin; Chang, Ping-Ying; Chen, Yeu-Chin; Ho, Ching-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Renal failure is a common morbidity in multiple myeloma (MM). Although proteinuria has been increasingly reported in malignancies, it is not routinely used to refine risk estimates of survival outcomes in patients with MM. Here we aimed to investigate initial serum albumin and 24-hour daily protein excretion (24-h DPE) before treatment as prognostic factors in patients with MM. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 102 patients with myeloma who were ineligible for haematopoietic stem cell transplantation between October 2000 and December 2012. Initial proteinuria was assessed before treatment by quantitative analysis of 24-hour urine samples. The demographic and laboratory characteristics, survival outcome, and significance of pre-treatment 24-h DPE and albumin in the new staging system of MM were analyzed. Pre-treatment proteinuria (>300 mg/day) was present in 66 patients (64.7%). The optimal cut-off value of 24-h DPE before treatment was 500 mg/day. Analysis of the time-dependent area under the curve showed that the serum albumin and 24-h DPE before treatment were better than 24-h creatinine clearance rate and β2-microglobulin. A subgroup analysis showed that an initial excess proteinuria (24-h DPE ≥ 500 mg) was associated with poor survival status (17.51 vs. 34.24 months, p = 0.002). Furthermore, initial serum albumin was an independent risk factor on multivariate analysis (<2.8 vs. ≥ 2.8, hazard ratio = 0.486, p = 0.029). Using the A-DPE staging system, there was a significant survival difference among patients with stage I, II, and III MM (p < 0.001). Initial serum albumin and 24-h DPE before treatment showed significant prognostic factors in patients with MM, and the new A-DPE staging system may be utilized instead of the International Staging System. Its efficacy should be evaluated by further large prospective studies.

  12. Biomechanical evaluation of three fixation modalities for preperitoneal inguinal hernia repair: a 24-hour postoperative study in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Guérin, Gaëtan; Bourges, Xavier; Turquier, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Tacks and sutures ensure a strong fixation of meshes, but they can be associated with pain and discomfort. Less invasive methods are now available. Three fixation modalities were compared: the ProGrip™ laparoscopic self-fixating mesh; the fibrin glue Tisseel™ with Bard™ Soft Mesh; and the SorbaFix™ absorbable fixation system with Bard™ Soft Mesh. Materials and methods Meshes (6 cm ×6 cm) were implanted in the preperitoneal space of swine. Samples were explanted 24 hours after surgery. Centered defects were created, and samples (either ten or eleven per fixation type) were loaded in a pressure chamber. For each sample, the pressure, the mesh displacement through the defect, and the measurements of the contact area were recorded. Results At all pressures tested, the ProGrip™ laparoscopic self-fixating mesh both exhibited a significantly lower displacement through the defect and retained a significantly higher percentage of its initial contact area than either the Bard™ Soft Mesh with Tisseel™ system or the Bard™ Soft Mesh with SorbaFix™ absorbable fixation system. Dislocations occurred with the Bard™ Soft Mesh with Tisseel™ system and with the Bard™ Soft Mesh with SorbaFix™ absorbable fixation system at physiological pressure (,225 mmHg). No dislocation was recorded for the ProGrip™ laparoscopic self-fixating mesh. Conclusion At 24 hours after implantation, the mechanical fixation of the ProGrip™ laparoscopic self-fixating mesh was found to be significantly better than the fixation of the Tisseel™ system or the SorbaFix™ absorbable fixation system. PMID:25525396

  13. The prevalence of exercise-associated hyponatremia in 24-hour ultra-mountain bikers, 24-hour ultra-runners and multi-stage ultra-mountain bikers in the Czech Republic

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To assess the prevalence of exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) in two 24-hour mountain bike (MTB) (R1,R2), one 24-hour running (R3) and one multi-stage MTB (R4) races held in the Czech Republic in a cluster of four cross-sectional studies. Methods In 27 ultra-mountain bikers (ultra-MTBers), 12 ultra-runners, and 14 multi-stage MTBers, fluid intake, changes (Δ) in body mass, hematocrit, plasma volume, plasma [Na+], plasma [K+], plasma osmolality, urine [Na+], urine [K+], urine specific gravity, urine osmolality, K+/Na+ ratio in urine, transtubular potassium gradient and glomerular filtration rate were measured and calculated. The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and symptoms of EAH were recorded using post-race questionnaires. Results Of the 53 finishers, three (5.7%) developed post-race EAH, thereof one (3.7%) ultra-MTBer, one (8.3%) ultra-runner and one (7.1%) multi-stage MTBer. Plasma [Na+] decreased significantly (p < 0.001) only in R4. Urine osmolality (R1, R3, R4 p < 0.001; R2 p < 0.05) and glomerular filtration rate (p < 0.001) increased, and body mass decreased in all races (p < 0.05). Δ body mass was inversely related to the number of kilometers achieved (p < 0.001) in R2 where better ultra-MTBers tended to lose more weight. Δ body mass (p < 0.001) and %Δ body mass (p = 0.05) were positively related to lower post-race plasma [Na+] in R3 that was associated with increased loss in body mass. Fluid intake was positively related to race performance in R1 and R2 (R1: p = 0.04; R2: p = 0.01) where ultra-MTBers in R1 and R2 who drank more finished ahead of those who drank less. Post-race plasma [Na+] was negatively associated with race performance in ultra-MTBers in R2 (p < 0.05), similarly ultra-runners in R3 (p < 0.05) where finishers with more kilometres had lower post-race plasma [Na+]. Conclusions The prevalence of EAH in the Czech Republic was no higher compared to existing reports on ultra-endurance athletes in other countries

  14. Effect of an L- and T-Type Calcium Channel Blocker on 24-Hour Systolic Blood Pressure and Heart Rate in Hypertensive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsumi, Takeshi; Ebado, Mio; Takeyama, Youichi

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of an L- and T-type calcium channel blocker (CCB) on 24-hour systolic blood pressure (24-hour SBP) and heart rate (24-hour HR) profiles in essential hypertensive patients. Subjects and Methods Thirty-seven consecutive patients were enrolled in this study. The 24-hour SBP and HR were recorded before and after treatment with efonidipine (L- and T-type CCB, 40 mg), after waking. Changes in 24-hour SBP and HR and the diurnal to nocturnal SBP ratio were measured. The best-fit curves of changes in SBP and HR were depicted using a periodic function. Results The mean 24-hour SBP and HR decreased significantly after treatment. The diurnal to nocturnal SBP ratio in dipper-type hypertension cases decreased from 16.7±6.1% to 8.3±9.8% (p<0.05), whereas in non-dipper hypertension cases, it increased from 2.3±2.9% to 7.7±5.1% (p<0.01). The antihypertensive effect was minimal at 5.0 hours after drug administration and it slowly recovered at a constant rate (2.1 mm Hg/h) over 12 hours in dipper cases. The median 24-hour changes in HR in the dipper and non-dipper cases were -2.3/min and -5.4/min, respectively. A continuous reduction in the change in HR was seen from 3.5 to 23 hours after drug administration. Conclusion The antihypertensive action of efonidipine was characterized by a slow recovery of the SBP decrease at a constant rate (2.1 mm Hg/h) and a non-administration time dependent reduction in 24-hour HR. PMID:22563335

  15. [A validation of the data obtained with the simultaneous recording of blood pressure and the 24-hour electrocardiogram].

    PubMed

    Germanò, G; Caparra, A; Valentino, S; Coia, F; Federico, L; Santucci, A

    1993-06-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate the blood pressure (BP) measurement reliability of a light weight ambulatory BP and ECG recorder. Micro AM is a new 300 g portable apparatus that combines in one device both the ambulatory BP and solid state ECG recording. The dimensions of the Micro AM are 75 x 140 x 29 mm. The monitor measures BP using Korotkoff phase 1 for systolic and phase 5 for diastolic BP, and concurrently measures oscillometric BP, one method validating the other. In addition, the manual and programmed BP measurement modes can be supplemented by an "intelligent" mode in which the ECG triggers an ambulatory BP reading during an abnormal ST segment change. A standard mercury manometer was connected with the cuff of the Micro AM with a Y-shaped part, and 12 BP measurements were simultaneously taken at 5 min intervals by the automatic device in auscultatory mode and by a trained technician in 86 normotensive volunteers (aged from 18 to 44 years, 37 males and 49 females). The algebraic differences, the frequency distribution and the difference distribution of systolic and diastolic data between the 2 methods were calculated. The results show that the automatic method gives values for systolic BP that are lower than conventional ones (average differences -0.643 mmHg), whereas for diastolic BP, the values are higher (average differences +0.229 mmHg). Then, Student's paired t-test was used to evaluate statistically significant differences. The test relative to systolic BP was significant to the critical level of 0.1%, but the differences being 3 times smaller than the instrumental tolerance. On the contrary, diastolic BP differences were non significant. In conclusion, we found a good agreement between BP recorded automatically and by sphygmomanometer.

  16. Heart Rate and Electrocardiography Monitoring in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ho, David; Zhao, Xin; Gao, Shumin; Hong, Chull; Vatner, Dorothy E.; Vatner, Stephen F.

    2011-01-01

    The majority of current cardiovascular research involves studies in genetically engineered mouse models. The measurement of heart rate is central to understanding cardiovascular control under normal conditions, with altered autonomic tone, superimposed stress or disease states, both in wild type mice as well as those with altered genes. Electrocardiography (ECG) is the “gold standard” using either hard wire or telemetry transmission. In addition, heart rate is measured or monitored from the frequency of the arterial pressure pulse or cardiac contraction, or by pulse oximetry. For each of these techniques, discussions of materials and methods, as well as advantages and limitations are covered. However, only the direct ECG monitoring will determine not only the precise heart rates but also whether the cardiac rhythm is normal or not. PMID:21743842

  17. The heart and tuberous sclerosis. An echocardiographic and electrocardiographic study.

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, J L

    1985-01-01

    Cross sectional echocardiography, 12 lead electrocardiography, and 24 hour ambulatory electrocardiography were performed in eleven patients with tuberous sclerosis. Echocardiography showed single or multiple intramyocardial masses, most commonly in the ventricular septum, suggestive of rhabdomyomata in seven of the eleven cases. One patient with a normal echocardiogram showed ventricular pre-excitation on electrocardiography, with tachycardias of 180 beats per minute on ambulatory monitoring. Sinus bradycardia, sinus tachycardia, and supraventricular tachycardia were also seen, but their importance is uncertain. Echocardiography and electrocardiography should be routinely performed in the assessment of patients with tuberous sclerosis and ambulatory electrocardiography should be considered in those with seizures that respond poorly to anticonvulsants. Images PMID:4074592

  18. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation improves survival in a novel 24-hour pig model of severe acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Araos, Joaquín; Alegría, Leyla; García, Patricio; Damiani, Felipe; Tapia, Pablo; Soto, Dagoberto; Salomon, Tatiana; Rodriguez, Felipe; Amthauer, Macarena; Erranz, Benjamín; Castro, Gabriel; Carreño, Pamela; Medina, Tania; Retamal, Jaime; Cruces, Pablo; Bugedo, Guillermo; Bruhn, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is increasingly being used to treat severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, there is limited clinical evidence about how to optimize the technique. Experimental research can provide an alternative to fill the actual knowledge gap. The purpose of the present study was to develop and validate an animal model of acute lung injury (ALI) which resembled severe ARDS, and which could be successfully supported with ECMO. Eighteen pigs were randomly allocated into three groups: sham, ALI, and ALI + ECMO. ALI was induced by a double-hit consisting in repeated saline lavage followed by a 2-hour period of injurious ventilation. All animals were followed up to 24 hours while being ventilated with conventional ventilation (tidal volume 10 ml/kg). The lung injury model resulted in severe hypoxemia, increased airway pressures, pulmonary hypertension, and altered alveolar membrane barrier function, as indicated by an increased protein concentration in bronchoalveolar fluid, and increased wet/dry lung weight ratio. Histologic examination revealed severe diffuse alveolar damage, characteristic of ARDS. Veno-venous ECMO was started at the end of lung injury induction with a flow > 60 ml/kg/min resulting in rapid reversal of hypoxemia and pulmonary hypertension. Mortality was 0, 66.6 and 16.6% in the SHAM, ALI and ALI + ECMO groups, respectively (p < 0.05). This is a novel clinically relevant animal model that can be used to optimize the approach to ECMO and foster translational research in extracorporeal lung support. PMID:27398166

  19. Dietary quality varies according to data collection instrument: a comparison between a food frequency questionnaire and 24-hour recall.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Paulo Rogério Melo; de Souza, Rita Adriana Gomes; De Cnop, Mara Lima; Monteiro, Luana Silva; Coura, Camila Pinheiro; Brito, Alessandra Page; Pereira, Rosangela Alves

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the agreement between the Brazilian Healthy Eating Index - Revised (BHEI-R), estimated by a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and multiple 24-hour recalls (24h-R). The Wilcoxon paired test, partial correlations (PC), intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), and Bland-Altman method were used. The total BHEI-R scores and its components ("total fruits", "whole fruits", "total vegetables", "integral cereals", "saturated fat", "sodium", and "energy intake derived from solid fat, added sugar, and alcoholic beverages") were statistically different, with the ICC and PC indicating poor concordance and correlation. The mean concordance estimated for the total BHEI-R and its components varied from 68% for "integral cereals" to 147% for "whole fruits". The suitable concordance limits were violated for most of the components of the BHEI-R. Poor concordance was observed between the BHEI-R estimated by the FFQ and by multiple 24h-R, which indicated a strong reliability of the BHEI-R on the instrument used to collect information on food consumption.

  20. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation improves survival in a novel 24-hour pig model of severe acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Araos, Joaquín; Alegría, Leyla; García, Patricio; Damiani, Felipe; Tapia, Pablo; Soto, Dagoberto; Salomon, Tatiana; Rodriguez, Felipe; Amthauer, Macarena; Erranz, Benjamín; Castro, Gabriel; Carreño, Pamela; Medina, Tania; Retamal, Jaime; Cruces, Pablo; Bugedo, Guillermo; Bruhn, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is increasingly being used to treat severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, there is limited clinical evidence about how to optimize the technique. Experimental research can provide an alternative to fill the actual knowledge gap. The purpose of the present study was to develop and validate an animal model of acute lung injury (ALI) which resembled severe ARDS, and which could be successfully supported with ECMO. Eighteen pigs were randomly allocated into three groups: sham, ALI, and ALI + ECMO. ALI was induced by a double-hit consisting in repeated saline lavage followed by a 2-hour period of injurious ventilation. All animals were followed up to 24 hours while being ventilated with conventional ventilation (tidal volume 10 ml/kg). The lung injury model resulted in severe hypoxemia, increased airway pressures, pulmonary hypertension, and altered alveolar membrane barrier function, as indicated by an increased protein concentration in bronchoalveolar fluid, and increased wet/dry lung weight ratio. Histologic examination revealed severe diffuse alveolar damage, characteristic of ARDS. Veno-venous ECMO was started at the end of lung injury induction with a flow > 60 ml/kg/min resulting in rapid reversal of hypoxemia and pulmonary hypertension. Mortality was 0, 66.6 and 16.6% in the SHAM, ALI and ALI + ECMO groups, respectively (p < 0.05). This is a novel clinically relevant animal model that can be used to optimize the approach to ECMO and foster translational research in extracorporeal lung support.

  1. Lessons from Studies to Evaluate an Online 24-Hour Recall for Use with Children and Adults in Canada.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Sharon I; Gilsing, Anne M; Hobin, Erin; Solbak, Nathan M; Wallace, Angela; Haines, Jess; Mayhew, Alexandra J; Orr, Sarah K; Raina, Parminder; Robson, Paula J; Sacco, Jocelyn E; Whelan, Heather K

    2017-01-31

    With technological innovation, comprehensive dietary intake data can be collected in a wide range of studies and settings. The Automated Self-Administered 24-hour (ASA24) Dietary Assessment Tool is a web-based system that guides respondents through 24-h recalls. The purpose of this paper is to describe lessons learned from five studies that assessed the feasibility and validity of ASA24 for capturing recall data among several population subgroups in Canada. These studies were conducted within a childcare setting (preschool children with reporting by parents), in public schools (children in grades 5-8; aged 10-13 years), and with community-based samples drawn from existing cohorts of adults and older adults. Themes emerged across studies regarding receptivity to completing ASA24, user experiences with the interface, and practical considerations for different populations. Overall, we found high acceptance of ASA24 among these diverse samples. However, the ASA24 interface was not intuitive for some participants, particularly young children and older adults. As well, technological challenges were encountered. These observations underscore the importance of piloting protocols using online tools, as well as consideration of the potential need for tailored resources to support study participants. Lessons gleaned can inform the effective use of technology-enabled dietary assessment tools in research.

  2. Global empirical model of TEC response to geomagnetic activity: Short-term (24 hours ahead) prediction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andonov, Borislav

    2013-04-01

    A global empirical model of the rTEC=(TECobs-TECmed)/TECmed depending on the geomagnetic activity (described by the Kp-index) and at a given moment is built by using global TEC data for full 13 years between 1999 and 2011.The data are downloaded from the CODE (Center for Orbit Determination in Europe) database in the Astronomical Institute, University of Bern. By using a 2D cross-correlation analysis it is found that the ionospheric response to the geomagnetic activity revealed both positive and negative phases of the response. The both phases of the ionospheric response have different duration and time delay with respect to the geomagnetic storm. It was found that these two parameters of the ionospheric response depend on the season, geographical/geomagnetic coordinates and local time. The rTEC response is represented by 2D (longitude-time) sine waves with different zonal wavenumbers and periods being harmonics of the diurnal period. The input data for the current and predicted geomagnetic activity are obtained from the MAK model developed in NIGGG-BAS, which uses the solar wind measurements from the ACE satellite. The background condition is defined by the recent CODE TEC maps. For each current hour the model provides predicted global TEC maps in geographic frame for the next 24 hours.

  3. Office and ambulatory blood pressure control in hypertensive patients treated with different two-drug and three-drug combinations.

    PubMed

    de la Sierra, Alejandro; Banegas, José R; Vinyoles, Ernest; Gorostidi, Manuel; Segura, Julián; de la Cruz, Juan J; Ruilope, Luis M

    There is scarce information regarding ambulatory blood pressure (BP) achieved in daily practice with a wide range of antihypertensive drug combinations. We looked for differences in office and ambulatory BP among major drug combinations of two and three antihypertensive agents from a different drugs class. A total of 17187 patients treated with six types of two-drug combinations and 9724 treated with six types of three-drug combinations from the Spanish ABPM Registry were analyzed. We compared achieved office and ambulatory BP, as well as office (< 140/90 mmHg) and ambulatory (24-hour BP < 130/80; day BP < 135/85, and night BP < 120/70 mmHg) BP control among groups. The combination of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) blockers with diuretics and the triple combination of RAS blockers with diuretics and calcium channel blockers (CCB) were associated with lower values of 24-hour, daytime and nighttime BP, as well as more pronounced nocturnal BP dip. Compared with such combinations (reference), other double combinations had lower rates of ambulatory BP control. Moreover, triple combinations containing alpha blockers also had lower rates of ambulatory BP control. We conclude that even with similar office BP control, differences exist among antihypertensive two-drug and three-drug combinations with respect to ambulatory BP control achieved during treatment, with RAS blockers/diuretics and RAS blockers/CCBs/diuretics obtaining better control rates. This can help physicians choose among drug combinations in order to obtain further ambulatory BP reductions.

  4. Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Children and Youth: An Integration of Physical Activity, Sedentary Behaviour, and Sleep.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Mark S; Carson, Valerie; Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Connor Gorber, Sarah; Dinh, Thy; Duggan, Mary; Faulkner, Guy; Gray, Casey E; Gruber, Reut; Janson, Katherine; Janssen, Ian; Katzmarzyk, Peter T; Kho, Michelle E; Latimer-Cheung, Amy E; LeBlanc, Claire; Okely, Anthony D; Olds, Timothy; Pate, Russell R; Phillips, Andrea; Poitras, Veronica J; Rodenburg, Sophie; Sampson, Margaret; Saunders, Travis J; Stone, James A; Stratton, Gareth; Weiss, Shelly K; Zehr, Lori

    2016-06-01

    Leaders from the Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology convened representatives of national organizations, content experts, methodologists, stakeholders, and end-users who followed rigorous and transparent guideline development procedures to create the Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Children and Youth: An Integration of Physical Activity, Sedentary Behaviour, and Sleep. These novel guidelines for children and youth aged 5-17 years respect the natural and intuitive integration of movement behaviours across the whole day (24-h period). The development process was guided by the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research Evaluation (AGREE) II instrument and systematic reviews of evidence informing the guidelines were assessed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. Four systematic reviews (physical activity, sedentary behaviour, sleep, integrated behaviours) examining the relationships between and among movement behaviours and several health indicators were completed and interpreted by expert consensus. Complementary compositional analyses were performed using Canadian Health Measures Survey data to examine the relationships between movement behaviours and health indicators. A stakeholder survey was employed (n = 590) and 28 focus groups/stakeholder interviews (n = 104) were completed to gather feedback on draft guidelines. Following an introductory preamble, the guidelines provide evidence-informed recommendations for a healthy day (24 h), comprising a combination of sleep, sedentary behaviours, light-, moderate-, and vigorous-intensity physical activity. Proactive dissemination, promotion, implementation, and evaluation plans have been prepared in an effort to optimize uptake and activation of the new guidelines. Future research should consider the integrated relationships among movement behaviours, and similar integrated guidelines for other age groups should be developed.

  5. Implementation of integrated heterogeneous electronic electrocardiography data into Maharaj Nakorn Chiang Mai Hospital Information System.

    PubMed

    Khumrin, Piyapong; Chumpoo, Pitupoom

    2016-03-01

    Electrocardiography is one of the most important non-invasive diagnostic tools for diagnosing coronary heart disease. The electrocardiography information system in Maharaj Nakorn Chiang Mai Hospital required a massive manual labor effort. In this article, we propose an approach toward the integration of heterogeneous electrocardiography data and the implementation of an integrated electrocardiography information system into the existing Hospital Information System. The system integrates different electrocardiography formats into a consistent electrocardiography rendering by using Java software. The interface acts as middleware to seamlessly integrate different electrocardiography formats. Instead of using a common electrocardiography protocol, we applied a central format based on Java classes for mapping different electrocardiography formats which contains a specific parser for each electrocardiography format to acquire the same information. Our observations showed that the new system improved the effectiveness of data management, work flow, and data quality; increased the availability of information; and finally improved quality of care.

  6. The 24-hour shelf-life of cytapheresis platelet concentrates stored in polyvinyl chloride containers should be extended only with caution.

    PubMed

    Strauss, R G; Snyder, E L; Eckermann, I; Stewart, L

    1987-01-01

    A recent publication suggested that the 24-hour allowable shelf-life of apheresis platelet concentrates collected by open-system techniques be extended to 48 hours because platelets collected in this fashion usually remain sterile for that length of time. The current studies, however, show that the quality of platelet concentrates deteriorates rapidly after storage for more than 24 hours in the relatively small-volume, polyvinyl chloride containers of currently marketed, open-system software, as evidenced by the falling pH, the disintegration of platelets, and the inability of platelets to recover from hypotonic shock. Platelets were markedly defective within 48 hours. Thus, it seems unwise to extend the shelf-life of such platelet concentrates beyond 24 hours solely because they are likely to remain sterile. Collection techniques and software must also be modified to ensure satisfactory platelet quality before the period of storage should be extended.

  7. Effect of aging on 24-hour changes in dopamine and serotonin turnover and amino acid and somatostatin contents of rat corpus striatum.

    PubMed

    Esquifino, Ana I; Cano, Pilar; Chacon, Fernando; Reyes Toso, Carlos F; Cardinali, Daniel P

    2002-01-01

    This study examined the 24-hour changes in a number of transmitters in the corpus striatum of young and middle-aged male Wistar rats. The contents of excitatory amino acids (glutamate, aspartate) and inhibitory amino acids (gamma-aminobutyric acid, GABA; taurine, glycine) and of somatostatin were measured in 2-month- and 18- to 20-month-old rats killed at six different time points along the 24-hour cycle. The striatal serotonin and dopamine turnover was also measured. Both young and middle-aged rats showed significant 24-hour variations in striatal glutamate and aspartate contents; only in young rats these variations fitted a cosine function, with acrophase during the first part of rest span. Mesor values of striatal excitatory amino acid contents were lowest in middle-aged rats. Significant 24-hour variations in striatal contents of GABA, taurine, and glycine occurred in young rats, while only striatal GABA exhibited 24-hour changes in middle- aged rats (acrophases during the first part of rest span). For every inhibitory transmitter, the mesor values in middle-aged rats were significantly lower than in young rats. The 24-hour variation of the striatal somatostatin content showed acrophase during the first part of rest span, mesor values and amplitude being lowest in middle-aged rats. Aging rats exhibited significantly higher mesor values of striatal serotonin turnover (34% increase) and lower mesor values of dopamine turnover (69% decrease) than their younger counterparts. Some of the circadian modifications of motor function seen in aging rats could be related to the striatal transmitter changes reported herein.

  8. The relatively poor correlation between random and 24-hour urine protein excretion in patients with biopsy-proven glomerular diseases.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Marie C; Reich, Heather N; Nelson, Peter J; Adler, Sharon G; Cattran, Daniel C; Appel, Gerald B; Gipson, Debbie S; Kretzler, Matthias; Troost, Jonathan P; Lieske, John C

    2016-11-01

    Random urine protein creatinine ratios are used to estimate 24-hour urine protein excretion, which is considered a diagnostic gold standard. However, few studies are available of the sensitivity and specificity of this estimation in patients with glomerular proteinuria. To clarify this, we measured the urine protein and creatinine centrally in random and 24-hour urine collections at biopsy and longitudinally every 6 months in individuals participating in the Nephrotic Syndrome Study Network (NEPTUNE) cohort with glomerular disease. In the initial developmental cohort, 302 patients had same day random and 24-hour samples with a total of 827 paired measurements across all visits. The protein excretion (g/day) was higher in adult than pediatric patients. The correlation between the random urine protein creatinine ratio and 24-hour urine protein excretion was moderate in both groups (r of 0.60 and 0.67, respectively). However, the log10 transformation of values strengthened correlations in both groups (r of 0.85 and 0.82, respectively). Associations were moderately stronger among obese patients. Prediction equations were developed and validated in 232 unique cases from NEPTUNE (R(2) of 0.65). Thus, in patients with glomerular disease and proteinuria, the urine protein creatinine ratio correlates only moderately with 24-hour urine protein excretion. However an estimating equation was developed to derive 24-hour urine protein excretion from random urine protein creatinine ratio values with improved precision. The long-term prognostic value of log10-transformed random protein creatinine ratios values requires future study.

  9. Jack Healy Remembers - Anecdotal Evidence for the Origin of the Approximate 24-hour Urine Sampling Protocol Used for Worker Bioassay Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Carbaugh, Eugene H.

    2008-10-01

    The origin of the approximate 24-hour urine sampling protocol used at Hanford for routine bioassay is attributed to an informal study done in the mid-1940s. While the actual data were never published and have been lost, anecdotal recollections by staff involved in the initial bioassay program design and administration suggest that the sampling protocol had a solid scientific basis. Numerous alternate methods for normalizing partial day samples to represent a total 24-hour collection have since been proposed and used, but no one method is obviously preferred.

  10. Investigations into the source of two fungicides measured in the air for 24 hours following application to a cereal crop.

    PubMed

    Ellis, M C Butler; Lane, A G; O'Sullivan, C M; Miller, P C H

    2009-01-01

    Airborne pesticides can be detected near to recently-treated arable fields for a period of days following the application. Identifying the source of such pesticides is important in developing predictive models for use in exposure and risk assessments. Previous work showed levels of pesticide in the air that were higher than expected for a low-vapour-pressure active ingredient, epoxiconazole, and comparable with an active ingredient of a significantly higher vapour pressure, fenpropidin. It was possible that the measured concentrations could be attributed to 'dust' particles emitted from the crop, either biological material contaminated with pesticide or solid dried deposits of active ingredient and other formulation components. A second experiment was therefore undertaken to measure airborne concentrations of the same active ingredients and to determine whether some or all of the measured airborne pesticide could be attributed to particles, using a Marple personal cascade impactor, which collects particles in the range 0.3 - 50 microm. Such samplers are not optimised to give good sampling efficiencies under the proposed field conditions, so some initial tests were undertaken in the Silsoe wind tunnel to assess its ability to sample particles in an air flow. In the subsequent field trial, a 192 m square plot in a commercially established winter cereal crop was sprayed with a tank mix of commercial formulations of epoxiconazole and fenpropidin. Measurements of airborne pesticides were made for 24 hours following the application with suction samplers attached to tenax tubes to evaluate vapour concentrations and with the cascade impactor to determine whether contaminated airborne particles were present. The concentrations of pesticide measured with the tenax tubes were significantly higher than the particulate component detected on the cascade impactor plates and it is therefore it was very unlikely that there was a significant contribution from pesticide

  11. Perfusion-CT - Can We Predict Acute Pancreatitis Outcome within the First 24 Hours from the Onset of Symptoms?

    PubMed Central

    Pieńkowska, Joanna; Gwoździewicz, Katarzyna; Skrobisz-Balandowska, Katarzyna; Marek, Iwona; Kostro, Justyna; Szurowska, Edyta; Studniarek, Michał

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Severe acute pancreatitis (AP) is still a significant clinical problem which is associated with a highly mortality. The aim of this study was the evaluation of prognostic value of CT regional perfusion measurement performed on the first day of onset of symptoms of AP, in assessing the risk of developing severe form of acute pancreatitis. Material and Methods 79 patients with clinical symptoms and biochemical criteria indicative of acute pancreatitis (acute upper abdominal pain, elevated levels of serum amylase and lipase) underwent perfusion CT within 24 hours after onset of symptoms. The follow-up examinations were performed after 4–6 days to detect progression of the disease. Perfusion parameters were compared in 41 people who developed severe form of AP (pancreatic and/or peripancreatic tissue necrosis) with parameters in 38 consecutive patients in whom course of AP was mild. Blood flow, blood volume, mean transit time and permeability surface area product were calculated in the three anatomic pancreatic subdivisions (head, body and tail). At the same time the patient's clinical status was assessed by APACHE II score and laboratory parameters such as CRP, serum lipase and amylase, AST, ALT, GGT, ALP and bilirubin were compared. Results Statistical differences in the perfusion parameters between the group of patients with mild and severe AP were shown. Blood flow, blood volume and mean transit time were significantly lower and permeability surface area product was significantly higher in patients who develop severe acute pancreatitis and presence of pancreatic and/or peripancreatic necrosis due to pancreatic ischemia. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups in terms of evaluated on admission severity of pancreatitis assessed using APACHE II score and laboratory tests. Conclusions CT perfusion is a very useful indicator for prediction and selection patients in early stages of acute pancreatitis who are at risk of

  12. History of precordial leads in electrocardiography.

    PubMed

    Burch, G E

    1978-09-01

    Precordial leads were first used by Waller, whose capillary electroscope was too insensitive to detect the electric forces emanating from the human heart unless the electrode was placed over the precordium as near to the heart as possible. When Einthoven developed the elegant, reliable and sensitive string galvanometer, he could record the electric forces of the heart from the hands and feet of the subject without even undressing him. When Einthoven's great galvanometer became available, only the three standard limb leads were used. Thomas Lewis and others experimented with precordial direct leads and made many important discoveries in electrocardiography and cardiology. Wolferth and Wood, in 1932, introduced the first precordial lead in clinical, diagnostic cardiology. The recordings were 'upside-down', i.e. positive deflections were down and negative ones up. They called this the 4th lead (lead IV). The precordial electrode was placed on the chest over the apex of the heart, regardless of where the apex was located. This immediately opened new avenues of study in infarction, ventricular hypertrophy, bundle branch block, and all other cardiac states. Then CL, CR, CF, CB and V leads were introduced. The points considered best for placing the 'exploring' or precordial electrode became an issue, and much confusion prevailed until Wilson and his associates developed the central or isopotential terminal and until the American Heart Association and the Heart Society of Britain and Ireland met in London and published the standards for recording precordial leads in 1938. There followed, for obvious reasons, a slow settling of the confusion until the V1 through V6 precordial leads became standard procedure all over the world, as exists today. Goldberger introduced the augmented unipolar limb leads (aVR, aVL and aVF) which have resulted in the standard 12-lead electrocardiogram of routine use today. No one would consider an electrocardiographic evaluation adequate in a

  13. Bath water contamination with Legionella and nontuberculous mycobacteria in 24-hour home baths, hot springs, and public bathhouses of Nagano Prefecture, Japan.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Michiko; Oana, Kozue; Kawakami, Yoshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Bath water samples were collected from 116 hot springs, 197 public bathhouses, and 38 24-hour home baths in Nagano Prefecture, Japan, during the period of April 2009 to November 2011, for determining the presence and extent of contamination with Legionella and nontuberculous mycobacteria. Cultures positive for Legionella were observed in 123 of the 3,314 bath water samples examined. The distribution and abundance of Legionella and/or combined contamination with Legionella and nontuberculous mycobacteria were investigated to clarify the contamination levels. The abundance of Legionella was demonstrated to correlate considerably with the levels of combined contamination with Legionella and nontuberculous mycobacteria. Legionella spp. were obtained from 61% of the water samples from 24-hour home baths, but only from 3% of the samples from public bathhouses and hot springs. This is despite the fact that a few outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease in Nagano Prefecture as well as other regions of Japan have been traced to bath water contamination. The comparatively higher rate of contamination of the 24-hour home baths is a matter of concern. It is therefore advisable to routinely implement good maintenance of the water basins, particularly of the 24-hour home baths.

  14. 49 CFR 375.607 - What must I do if I am able to tender a shipment for final delivery more than 24 hours before a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What must I do if I am able to tender a shipment for final delivery more than 24 hours before a specified date? 375.607 Section 375.607 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL...

  15. Effect of one week of CPAP treatment of obstructive sleep apnoea on 24-hour profiles of glucose, insulin and counter-regulatory hormones in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mokhlesi, Babak; Grimaldi, Daniela; Beccuti, Guglielmo; Van Cauter, Eve

    2017-03-01

    Studies examining the impact of CPAP treatment on glycaemic control have yielded conflicting results, partly because of insufficient nightly CPAP use. We examined the 24-hour profiles of glucose, insulin and counter-regulatory hormones in 12 subjects with type 2 diabetes and OSA before and after 1 week of effective in-laboratory CPAP therapy over an entire 8-hour night thus ensuring optimal CPAP compliance. Blood samples were collected every 15 to 30 minutes for 24 hours under controlled conditions. The 24-hour mean glucose decreased from 153.2 ± 33.0 to 139.7 ± 24.2 mg/dL with CPAP (-13.5 ± 13.5 mg/dL; P = .005) without change in insulin levels. Morning fasting glucose levels decreased by 14.6 ± 3 mg/dL (P = .001) and the dawn phenomenon decreased by 7.8 ± 9.8 mg/dL (P = .019). CPAP treatment decreased norepinephrine levels while the 24-hour profiles of growth hormone and cortisol remained unchanged. In conclusion, 1 week of effective treatment of OSA over an entire 8-hour night results in a clinically significant improvement in glycaemic control via an amelioration of evening fasting glucose metabolism and a reduction in the dawn phenomenon, a late-night glucose increase that is not adequately treated by oral medications. Clinical Trials Information: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01136785.

  16. The effect of low level radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation on the excretion rates of stress hormones in operators during 24-hour shifts.

    PubMed

    Vangelova, K; Israel, M; Mihaylov, S

    2002-06-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of long term exposure to low level radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic (EM) radiation on the excretion rates of stress hormones in satellite station operators during 24-hour shifts. Twelve male operators at a satellite station for TV communications and space research were studied during 24-hour shifts. Dosimetric evaluation of the exposure was carried out and showed low level exposure with specific absorption of 0.1127 J.kg-1. A control group of 12 unexposed male operators with similar job task and the same shift system were studied, too. The 11-oxycorticosteroids (11-OCS), adrenaline and noradrenaline were followed by spectrofluorimetric methods on 3-hour intervals during the 24-hour shifts. The data were analyzed by tests for interindividual analysis, Cosinor analysis and analysis of variance (ANOVA). Significant increase in the 24-hour excretion of 11-OCS and disorders in its circadian rhythm, manifested by increase in the mesor, decrease in the amplitude and shift in the acrophase were found in the exposed operators. The changes in the excretion rates of the catecholamines were significant and showed greater variability of both variables. The long term effect of the exposure to low-level RF EM radiation evoked pronounced stress reaction with changes in the circadian rhythm of 11-OCS and increased variability of catecholamines secretion. The possible health hazards associated with observed alteration in the stress system need to be clarified by identification of their significance and prognostic relevance.

  17. Validation of the automated self-administered 24-hour dietary recall for children (ASA24-Kids) among 9- to 11-year-old youth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our purpose was to validate ASA24-Kids-2012, a self-administered web-based 24-hour dietary recall (24hDR) among 9- to 11-year-old children. Sixty-nine children in two sites participated in the study. In one site, trained staff observed and recorded types and portions of foods and drinks consumed by ...

  18. Characterization of pulmonary protein profiles in response to zinc oxide nanoparticles in mice: a 24-hour and 28-day follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Chih-Hong; Chuang, Kai-Jen; Chen, Jen-Kun; Hsiao, Ta-Chih; Lai, Ching-Huang; Jones, Tim P; BéruBé, Kelly A; Hong, Gui-Bing; Ho, Kin-Fai; Chuang, Hsiao-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Although zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONPs) are recognized to cause systemic disorders, little is known about the mechanisms that underlie the time-dependent differences that occur after exposure. The objective of this study was to investigate the mechanistic differences at 24 hours and 28 days after the exposure of BALB/c mice to ZnONPs via intratracheal instillation. An isobaric tag for the relative and absolute quantitation coupled with liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry was used to identify the differential protein expression, biological processes, molecular functions, and pathways. A total of 18 and 14 proteins displayed significant changes in the lung tissues at 24 hours and 28 days after exposure, respectively, with the most striking changes being observed for S100-A9 protein. Metabolic processes and catalytic activity were the main biological processes and molecular functions, respectively, in the responses at the 24-hour and 28-day follow-up times. The glycolysis/gluconeogenesis pathway was continuously downregulated from 24 hours to 28 days, whereas detoxification pathways were activated at the 28-day time-point after exposure. A comprehensive understanding of the potential time-dependent effects of exposure to ZnONPs was provided, which highlights the metabolic mechanisms that may be important in the responses to ZnONP. PMID:26251593

  19. Identifying nutrients that are under-reported by an automated 24-hour dietary recall method in overweight and obese women after weight loss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Underreporting of energy intake by 15-50% is a common problem in dietary assessment. Evidence suggests overweight/obese respondents are more likely to under-report than normal weight. This study compared Automated Self-Administered 24-hour recall (ASA24)-reported dietary intake to true intake in ove...

  20. 24-HOUR DIFFUSIVE SAMPLING OF 1,3-BUTADIENE IN AIR ONTO CARBONPAK X SOLID ADSORBENT WITH THEMAL DESORPTION/GC/MS ANALYSIS - FEASIBILITY STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diffusive sampling of 1,3-butadiene for 24 hours onto the graphitic adsorbent Carbopack X contained in a stainless steel tube badge (6.3 mm OD, 5 mm ID, and 90 mm in length) with analysis by thermal desorption/GC/MS has been evaluated in controlled tests. A test matrix of 42 tr...

  1. Characterization of pulmonary protein profiles in response to zinc oxide nanoparticles in mice: a 24-hour and 28-day follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chih-Hong; Chuang, Kai-Jen; Chen, Jen-Kun; Hsiao, Ta-Chih; Lai, Ching-Huang; Jones, Tim P; BéruBé, Kelly A; Hong, Gui-Bing; Ho, Kin-Fai; Chuang, Hsiao-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Although zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONPs) are recognized to cause systemic disorders, little is known about the mechanisms that underlie the time-dependent differences that occur after exposure. The objective of this study was to investigate the mechanistic differences at 24 hours and 28 days after the exposure of BALB/c mice to ZnONPs via intratracheal instillation. An isobaric tag for the relative and absolute quantitation coupled with liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry was used to identify the differential protein expression, biological processes, molecular functions, and pathways. A total of 18 and 14 proteins displayed significant changes in the lung tissues at 24 hours and 28 days after exposure, respectively, with the most striking changes being observed for S100-A9 protein. Metabolic processes and catalytic activity were the main biological processes and molecular functions, respectively, in the responses at the 24-hour and 28-day follow-up times. The glycolysis/gluconeogenesis pathway was continuously downregulated from 24 hours to 28 days, whereas detoxification pathways were activated at the 28-day time-point after exposure. A comprehensive understanding of the potential time-dependent effects of exposure to ZnONPs was provided, which highlights the metabolic mechanisms that may be important in the responses to ZnONP.

  2. Effect of Intensive Versus Standard Clinic-Based Hypertension Management on Ambulatory Blood Pressure: Results From the SPRINT (Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial) Ambulatory Blood Pressure Study.

    PubMed

    Drawz, Paul E; Pajewski, Nicholas M; Bates, Jeffrey T; Bello, Natalie A; Cushman, William C; Dwyer, Jamie P; Fine, Lawrence J; Goff, David C; Haley, William E; Krousel-Wood, Marie; McWilliams, Andrew; Rifkin, Dena E; Slinin, Yelena; Taylor, Addison; Townsend, Raymond; Wall, Barry; Wright, Jackson T; Rahman, Mahboob

    2017-01-01

    The effect of clinic-based intensive hypertension treatment on ambulatory blood pressure (BP) is unknown. The goal of the SPRINT (Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial) ambulatory BP ancillary study was to evaluate the effect of intensive versus standard clinic-based BP targets on ambulatory BP. Ambulatory BP was obtained within 3 weeks of the 27-month study visit in 897 SPRINT participants. Intensive treatment resulted in lower clinic systolic BP (mean difference between groups=16.0 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 14.1-17.8 mm Hg), nighttime systolic BP (mean difference=9.6 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 7.7-11.5 mm Hg), daytime systolic BP (mean difference=12.3 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 10.6-13.9 mm Hg), and 24-hour systolic BP (mean difference=11.2 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 9.7-12.8 mm Hg). The night/day systolic BP ratio was similar between the intensive (0.92±0.09) and standard-treatment groups (0.91±0.09). There was considerable lack of agreement within participants between clinic systolic BP and daytime ambulatory systolic BP with wide limits of agreement on Bland-Altman plots. In conclusion, targeting a systolic BP of <120 mm Hg, when compared with <140 mm Hg, resulted in lower nighttime, daytime, and 24-hour systolic BP, but did not change the night/day systolic BP ratio. Ambulatory BP monitoring may be required to assess the effect of targeted hypertension therapy on out of office BP. Further studies are needed to assess whether targeting hypertension therapy based on ambulatory BP improves clinical outcomes.

  3. Electrodes for long-term esophageal electrocardiography.

    PubMed

    Niederhauser, Thomas; Haeberlin, Andreas; Marisa, Thanks; Jungo, Michael; Goette, Josef; Jacomet, Marcel; Abacherli, Roger; Vogel, Rolf

    2013-09-01

    The emerging application of long-term and high-quality ECG recording requires alternative electrodes to improve the signal quality and recording capability of surface skin electrodes. The esophageal ECG has the potential to overcome these limitations but necessitates novel recorder and lead designs. The electrode material is of particular interest, since the material has to ensure conflicting requirements like excellent biopotential recording properties and inertness. To this end, novel electrode materials like PEDOT and silver-PDMS as well as established electrode materials such as stainless steel, platinum, gold, iridium oxide, titanium nitride, and glassy carbon were investigated by long-term electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and model-based signal analysis using the derived in vitro interfacial properties in conjunction with a dedicated ECG amplifier. The results of this novel approach show that titanium nitride and iridium oxide featuring microstructured surfaces did not degrade when exposed to artificial acidic saliva. These materials provide low electrode potential drifts and insignificant signal distortion superior to surface skin electrodes making them compatible with accepted standards for ambulatory ECG. They are superior to the noble and polarizable metals such as platinum, silver, and gold that induced more signal distortions and are superior to esophageal stainless steel electrodes that corrode in artificial saliva. The study provides rigorous criteria for the selection of electrode materials for prolonged ECG recording by combining long-term in vitro electrode material properties with ECG signal quality assessment.

  4. [Adaptation of Einthoven's string galvanometer for electrocardiography in the Netherlands].

    PubMed

    Wyers, P J

    2001-12-22

    After the Dutch physiologist Willem Einthoven (1860-1927) published the construction of his string galvanometer in 1901, the development of electrocardiography in the Netherlands was slow. During the next twenty years only a few string galvanometers were in use in the Netherlands, mostly in physiology laboratories. Publications concerning electrocardiographic tests on patients were scarce. In 1924, Einthoven was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physiology and Medicine for discovering the mechanism of the electrocardiogram. From that moment onwards, electrocardiography developed rapidly in the Netherlands and during the following 30 years particular use was made of the French string galvanometer designed by Boulitte.

  5. Ambulatory arterial stiffness index is not associated with magnetic resonance imaging markers of cerebral small vessel disease in lacunar stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Klarenbeek, Pim; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J; Staals, Julie

    2015-05-01

    Ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI) is associated with microvascular damage in other organs, but the association with microvascular brain damage is unknown. The association of AASI with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) markers of cerebral small vessel disease in 143 patients with lacunar stroke was investigated. We performed 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and scored the presence of lacunes, white matter hyperintensities, perivascular spaces, and cerebral microbleeds on brain MRI. In logistic regression analyses, AASI was associated with white matter hyperintensities, but, after adjustment for age and sex, this association lost significance. AASI was not associated with lacunes, microbleeds, or perivascular spaces. Systolic and diastolic 24-hour blood pressure values were associated with lacunes, perivascular spaces, and microbleeds independent of age and sex. Despite its significance and growing interest as a possible prognostic and therapeutic target in (micro)vascular diseases, AASI seems to have no added value over standard 24-hour blood pressure in cerebral small vessel disease.

  6. [Comparison of the data of 24-hour ECG monitoring and the condition of the coronary bed in patients with the variants of the course of unstable stenocardia].

    PubMed

    Karpov, Iu A; Pomerantsev, E V; Shibleva, V V; Merkulova, I N; Khakimov, A G; Podinovskaia, Ia A; Setin, V F

    1992-03-01

    A total of 232 patients with various clinical types of unstable angina pectoris were examined. All the patients underwent coronary angiographic studies, 24-hour ECG monitoring. In 40.5% of the patients, 24-hour monitoring revealed transient ST segment changes which were not accompanied by pain in 47% of the cases. ST segment changes were equally encountered in patients with one-, two-, and three-vessel disease in the presence or absence of pain. Ischemic ST segment changes generally occurred with an anginal episode in patients with crescendo unstable angina, whereas in those with more prolonged and intensified pain and angina at rest in particular, silent myocardial ischemic episodes were significantly more frequently recorded, which were more common in these patients with multivessel disease.

  7. Value of random urinary homovanillic acid and vanillylmandelic acid levels in the diagnosis and management of patients with neuroblastoma: comparison with 24-hour urine collections.

    PubMed

    Tuchman, M; Morris, C L; Ramnaraine, M L; Bowers, L D; Krivit, W

    1985-02-01

    Urinary homovanillic acid (HVA) and vanillylmandelic acid (VMA) levels were determined in random samples and in 24-hour collections from 13 patients with neuroblastoma and 22 patients without neuroblastoma. Random sample levels were compared with levels in 24-hour collections and showed a positive correlation of 95% for HVA (N = 59) and 93% for VMA (N = 52). No false positives or false negatives occurred using random samples for diagnosis. Nonneuroblastoma (normal) HVA (N = 126) and VMA (N = 119) levels are reported for different age groups. Sequential random HVA and VMA determinations in patients with neuroblastoma during and after therapy are shown. Random urinary HVA and VMA levels are shown to be adequate for utilization in the diagnosis of neuroblastoma and sequential determinations of random HVA and VMA are shown to be helpful in the follow-up of those patients.

  8. In vitro study of 24-hour and 30-day shear bond strengths of three resin-glass ionomer cements used to bond orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Lippitz, S J; Staley, R N; Jakobsen, J R

    1998-06-01

    Interest in using composite resin-glass ionomer hybrid cements as orthodontic bracket adhesives has grown because of their potential for fluoride release. The purpose of this pilot study was to compare shear bond strengths of three resin-glass ionomer cements (Advance, Fuji Duet, Fuji Ortho LC) used as bracket adhesives with a composite resin 24 hours and 30 days after bonding. The amount of adhesive remaining on the debonded enamel surface was scored for each adhesive. Mesh-backed stainless-steel brackets were bonded to 100 extracted human premolars, which were stored in artificial saliva at 37 degrees C until being tested to failure in a testing machine. The hybrid cements, with one exception, had bond strengths similar to those of the composite resin at 24 hours and 30 days. Fuji Ortho LC had significantly lower bond strengths (ANOVA p < or = 0.05) than the other adhesives at 24 hours and 30 days when it was bonded to unetched, water-moistened enamel. Adhesive-remnant scores were similar for all cements, except for cement Fuji Ortho LC when it was bonded to unetched enamel. The resin-glass ionomer cements we tested appear to have bond strengths suitable for routine use as orthodontic bracket-bonding adhesives.

  9. Deconvolution of insulin secretion, insulin hepatic extraction post-hepatic delivery rates and sensitivity during 24-hour standardized meals: time course of glucose homeostasis in leptin replacement treatment.

    PubMed

    Andreev, V P; Paz-Filho, G; Wong, M-L; Licinio, J

    2009-02-01

    Minimally invasive methodology, mathematical model, and software for analysis of glucose homeostasis by deconvolution of insulin secretion, hepatic extraction, post-hepatic delivery, and sensitivity from 24-hour standardized meals test have been developed and illustrated by the study of glucose homeostasis of a genetically based leptin-deficient patient before and after leptin replacement treatment. The only genetically leptin-deficient adult man identified in the world was treated for 24 months with recombinant methionyl human leptin. Blood was collected every 7 minutes for 24 hours, with standardized meals consumed during the 4 visits: at baseline, one-week, 18-months, and 24-months after initiation of the treatment. Concentrations of insulin, C-peptide, and plasma glucose were measured. Insulin secretion was obtained by deconvolution of C-peptide data. Hepatic insulin extraction was determined based on our modifications of the insulin kinetics model . Insulin sensitivity for each of the four meals was calculated by using the minimal glucose model approach. Hepatic extraction of insulin was the first element of glucose homeostasis to respond to leptin replacement treatment and increased 2-fold after one week of treatment. Insulin secretion and delivery rates decreased more than 2-fold and insulin sensitivity increased 10-fold after 24 months of treatment. Computer programs for analysis of 24-hour insulin secretion, extraction, delivery, and action are available upon request.

  10. Effects of transdermal scopolamine, alone or in combination with cimetidine, on total 24 hour gastric acid secretion in patients with duodenal ulcer.

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, C T; Feldman, M

    1986-01-01

    Transdermal scopolamine is an antimuscarinic preparation approved for use in the United States for prevention of motion sickness. A recent study using this drug (0.5 mg/patch) suggested that enough scopolamine was absorbed through the skin to reduce basal gastric acid secretion in patients with duodenal ulcer. We have compared the effect of transdermal scopolamine and oral cimetidine (400 mg twice daily) in seven men with chronic duodenal ulcer, both alone and in combination, on acid secretion throughout an entire 24 hour period in a placebo-controlled, randomised, double blinded cross over study. The effect of these drugs on basal, interprandial, and nocturnal gastric juice volume and hydrogen ion concentration also was measured. Transdermal scopolamine had no significant effect on mean 24 hour acid secretion (placebo, 409.4 mmol/day; scopolamine, 364.0 mmol/day) nor did it have a significant effect on gastric juice volume or hydrogen ion concentration. The combination of transdermal scopolamine plus cimetidine was not more effective than cimetidine alone in reducing total 24 hour acid secretion (mean, 231.8 versus 235.3 mmol/day) nor in reducing gastric juice volume or hydrogen ion concentration. PMID:3804025

  11. Factors Associated With High Sodium Intake Based on Estimated 24-Hour Urinary Sodium Excretion: The 2009-2011 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jae Won; Noh, Jung Hyun; Kim, Dong-Jun

    2016-03-01

    Although reducing dietary salt consumption is the most cost-effective strategy for preventing progression of cardiovascular and renal disease, policy-based approaches to monitor sodium intake accurately and the understanding factors associated with excessive sodium intake for the improvement of public health are lacking. We investigated factors associated with high sodium intake based on the estimated 24-hour urinary sodium excretion, using data from the 2009 to 2011 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES). Among 21,199 adults (≥19 years of age) who participated in the 2009 to 2011 KNHANES, 18,000 participants (weighted n = 33,969,783) who completed urinary sodium and creatinine evaluations were analyzed in this study. The 24-hour urinary sodium excretion was estimated using Tanaka equation. The mean estimated 24-hour urinary sodium excretion level was 4349 (4286-4413) mg per day. Only 18.5% (weighted n = 6,298,481/3,396,973, unweighted n = 2898/18,000) of the study participants consumed less the 2000 mg sodium per day. Female gender (P < 0.001), older age (P < 0.001), total energy intake ≥50 percentile (P < 0.005), and obesity (P < 0.001) were associated with high sodium intake, even after adjusting for potential confounders. Senior high school/college graduation in education and managers/professionals in occupation were associated with lower sodium intake (P < 0.001). According to hypertension management status, those who had hypertension without medication consumed more sodium than those who were normotensive. However, those who receiving treatment for hypertension consumed less sodium than those who were normotensive (P < 0.001). The number of family members, household income, and alcohol drinking did not affect 24-hour urinary sodium excretion. The logistic regression analysis for the highest estimated 24-hour urinary sodium excretion quartile (>6033 mg/day) using the abovementioned variables

  12. 24 Hours to Save the NHS - The Chief Executive's Account of Reform 2000 to 2006 Crisp Nigel 24 Hours to Save the NHS - The Chief Executive's Account of Reform 2000 to 2006 248pp Oxford University Press 9780199639953 0199639957 [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    2012-02-22

    The title of this book comes from Tony Blair's political slogan on the eve of the 1997 election when he told voters they had '24 hours to save the NHS' by voting for a Labour government. The new millennium, however, still found the NHS in decline.

  13. Development and validity of a 3-day smartphone assisted 24-hour recall to assess beverage consumption in a Chinese population: a randomized cross-over study.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lindsey P; Hua, Jenna; Seto, Edmund; Du, Shufa; Zang, Jiajie; Zou, Shurong; Popkin, Barry M; Mendez, Michelle A

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the need for diet assessment methods that capture the rapidly changing beverage consumption patterns in China. The objective of this study was to develop a 3-day smartphone-assisted 24-hour recall to improve the quantification of beverage intake amongst young Chinese adults (n=110) and validate, in a small subset (n=34), the extent to which the written record and smartphone-assisted recalls adequately estimated total fluid intake, using 24-hour urine samples. The smartphone-assisted method showed improved validity compared with the written record-assisted method, when comparing reported total fluid intake to total urine volume. However, participants reported consuming fewer beverages on the smartphone-assisted method compared with the written record-assisted method, primarily due to decreased consumption of traditional zero-energy beverages (i.e. water, tea) in the smartphone-assisted method. It is unclear why participants reported fewer beverages in the smartphone-assisted method than the written record -assisted method. One possibility is that participants found the smartphone method too cumbersome, and responded by decreasing beverage intake. These results suggest that smartphone-assisted 24-hour recalls perform comparably but do not appear to substantially improve beverage quantification compared with the current written record-based approach. In addition, we piloted a beverage screener to identify consumers of episodically consumed SSBs. As expected, a substantially higher proportion of consumers reported consuming SSBs on the beverage screener compared with either recall type, suggesting that a beverage screener may be useful in characterizing consumption of episodically consumed beverages in China's dynamic food and beverage landscape.

  14. Differences in the Slope of the QT-RR Relation Based on 24-Hour Holter ECG Recordings between Cardioembolic and Atherosclerotic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Fujiki, Akira; Sakabe, Masao

    2016-01-01

    Objective Detecting paroxysmal atrial fibrillation in patients with ischemic stroke presenting in sinus rhythm is difficult because such episodes are often short, and they are also frequently asymptomatic. It is possible that the ventricular repolarization dynamics may reflect atrial vulnerability and cardioembolic stroke. Hence, we compared the QT-RR relation between cardioembolic stroke and atherosclerotic stroke during sinus rhythm. Methods The subjects comprised 62 consecutive ischemic stroke patients including 31 with cardioembolic strokes (71.8±12.7 years, 17 men) and 31 with atherosclerotic strokes (74.8±10.8 years, 23 men). The QT and RR intervals were measured from ECG waves based on a 15-sec averaged ECG during 24-hour Holter recording using an automatic QT analyzing system. The QT interval dependence on the RR interval was analyzed using a linear regression line for each subject ([QT]=A[RR]+B; where A is the slope and B is the y-intercept). Results The mean slope of the QT-RR relation was significantly greater in cardioembolic stroke than in atherosclerotic stroke (0.187±0.044 vs. 0.142±0.045, p<0.001). The mean QT, RR, or QTc during 24-hour Holter recordings did not differ between them. An increased slope (≥0.14) of the QT-RR regression line could predict cardioembolic stroke with 97% sensitivity, 55% specificity and a positive predictive value of 64%. Conclusion The increased slope of the QT-RR linear regression line based on 24-hour Holter ECG in patients with ischemic stroke presenting in sinus rhythm may therefore be a simple and useful marker for cardioembolic stroke. PMID:27746427

  15. Correlation of random urine protein creatinine (P-C) ratio with 24-hour urine protein and P-C ratio, based on physical activity: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sadjadi, Seyed-Ali; Jaipaul, Navin

    2010-09-07

    Quantification of proteinuria is usually predicated upon 24-hour urine collection. Multiple factors influence urine collection and the rate of protein and creatinine excretion. Urine collection is often incomplete, and therefore creatinine and protein excretion rates are underestimated. A random urine protein-creatinine (P-C) ratio has been shown over the years to be a reliable alternative to the 24-hour collection for detection and follow up of proteinuria. However, urine protein excretion may be influenced by physical activity. We studied 48 patients with proteinuria and varying levels of physical activity to determine the correlation between the measures of urine protein excretion. The correlation coefficient (r) between 24-hour urine total protein and random urine P-C ratio was 0.75 (P < 0.01) in the overall study population, but varied according to the level of proteinuria and physical activity in a stratified analysis: r = 0.99 (P < 0.001) and r = 0.95 (P < 0.01) in bedridden patients; r = 0.44 (P = not significant [NS]) and r = 0.54 (P = NS) in semiactive patients; and r = 0.44 (P = NS) and r = 0.58 (P < 0.05) in active patients with nephrotic- (>3500 mg/day) and non-nephrotic (<3500 mg/day) range proteinuria, respectively. The correlation appeared to be stronger between random urine and 24-hour urine P-C ratio for the overall study population (r = 0.84; P < 0.001), and when stratified according to the level of proteinuria and physical activity: r = 0.99 (P < 0.001) and r = 0.92 (P < 0.01) in bedridden patients; r = 0.61 (P = NS) and r = 0.54 (P = NS) in semiactive patients; and r = 0.64 (P < 0.02) and r = 0.52 (P < 0.05) in active patients with nephrotic and non-nephrotic range proteinuria, respectively. We conclude that the random urine P-C ratio is a reliable and practical way of estimating and following proteinuria, but its precision and accuracy may be affected by the level of patient physical activity.

  16. Variability of Urinary Concentrations of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Metabolite in General Population and Comparison of Spot, First-Morning, and 24-Hour Void Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zheng; Romanoff, Lovisa C.; Lewin, Michael D; Porter, Erin N; Trinidad, Debra A; Needham, Larry L; Patterson, Donald G; Sjödin, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Urinary hydroxy polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (OH-PAHs) are commonly used in biomonitoring to assess exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Similar to other biologically non-persistent chemicals, OH-PAHs have relatively short biological half-lives (4.4–35 hours). Little information is available on their variability in urinary concentrations over time in non- occupationally exposed subjects. This study was designed to (i) study the variability of 9 urinary OH-PAH metabolite concentrations over time and (ii) calculate sample size requirements for future epidemiological studies based on spot urine, first morning void and 24-hour void sampling. Individual urine samples (n = 427) were collected during one week from 8 non-occupationally exposed adults. We recorded the time and volume of each urine excretion, dietary details, and the driving activities of the participants. Within subjects, the coefficients of variation (CV) for the wet-weight concentration of OH-PAHs in all samples ranged from 45% to 297%; creatinine adjustment reduced the CV to 19–288% (p < 0.001; paired t-test). The simulated 24-hour void concentrations were the least variable measure, with CVs ranging 13–182% for the 9 OH-PAHs. Within-day variability contributed on average 84%, and between-day variability accounted for 16% of the total variance of 1-hydroxypyrene (1-PYR). Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) of 1-PYR levels were 0.55 for spot urine samples, 0.60 for first-morning voids, and 0.76 for 24-hour voids, indicating a high degree of correlation between urine measurements collected from the same subject over time. Sample size calculations were performed to estimate the number of subjects needed for detecting differences in geometric mean at a statistical power of 80% for spot urine, first-morning, and 24-hour void sampling. These data will aid in the design of future studies of PAHs and possibly other biologically non-persistent chemicals and the interpretation of

  17. Low adherence to exclusive breastfeeding in Eastern Uganda: A community-based cross-sectional study comparing dietary recall since birth with 24-hour recall

    PubMed Central

    Engebretsen, Ingunn Marie S; Wamani, Henry; Karamagi, Charles; Semiyaga, Nulu; Tumwine, James; Tylleskär, Thorkild

    2007-01-01

    Background Exclusive breastfeeding is recommended as the best feeding alternative for infants up to six months and has a protective effect against mortality and morbidity. It also seems to lower HIV-1 transmission compared to mixed feeding. We studied infant feeding practices comparing dietary recall since birth with 24-hour dietary recall. Methods A cross-sectional survey on infant feeding practices was performed in Mbale District, Eastern Uganda in 2003 and 727 mother-infant (0–11 months) pairs were analysed. Four feeding categories were made based on WHO's definitions: 1) exclusive breastfeeding, 2) predominant breastfeeding, 3) complementary feeding and 4) replacement feeding. We analyzed when the infant fell into another feeding category for the first time. This was based on the recall since birth. Life-table analysis was made for the different feeding categories and Cox regression analysis was done to control for potential associated factors with the different practices. Prelacteal feeding practices were also addressed. Results Breastfeeding was practiced by 99% of the mothers. Dietary recall since birth showed that 7% and 0% practiced exclusive breastfeeding by 3 and 6 months, respectively, while 30% and 3% practiced predominant breastfeeding and had not started complementary feeding at the same points in time. The difference between the 24-hour recall and the recall since birth for the introduction of complementary feeds was 46 percentage points at two months and 59 percentage points at four months. Prelacteal feeding was given to 57% of the children. High education and formal marriage were protective factors against prelacteal feeding (adjusted OR 0.5, 0.2 – 1.0 and 0.5, 0.3 – 0.8, respectively). Conclusion Even if breastfeeding is practiced at a very high rate, the use of prelacteal feeding and early introduction of other food items is the norm. The 24-hour recall gives a higher estimate of exclusive breastfeeding and predominant breastfeeding than

  18. Treatment of burns in the first 24 hours: simple and practical guide by answering 10 questions in a step-by-step form

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Residents in training, medical students and other staff in surgical sector, emergency room (ER) and intensive care unit (ICU) or Burn Unit face a multitude of questions regarding burn care. Treatment of burns is not always straightforward. Furthermore, National and International guidelines differ from one region to another. On one hand, it is important to understand pathophysiology, classification of burns, surgical treatment, and the latest updates in burn science. On the other hand, the clinical situation for treating these cases needs clear guidelines to cover every single aspect during the treatment procedure. Thus, 10 questions have been organised and discussed in a step-by-step form in order to achieve the excellence of education and the optimal treatment of burn injuries in the first 24 hours. These 10 questions will clearly discuss referral criteria to the burn unit, primary and secondary survey, estimation of the total burned surface area (%TBSA) and the degree of burns as well as resuscitation process, routine interventions, laboratory tests, indications of Bronchoscopy and special considerations for Inhalation trauma, immediate consultations and referrals, emergency surgery and admission orders. Understanding and answering the 10 questions will not only cover the management process of Burns during the first 24 hours but also seems to be an interactive clear guide for education purpose. PMID:22583548

  19. [THE INFLUENCE OF CYTOFLAVIN AND CARDIOXIPIN ON THE PARAMETERS OF 24-HOUR ARTERIAL PRESSURE MONITORING IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC CEREBRAL CIRCULATION INSUFFICIENCY, ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION AND HYPERCHOLESTEROLEMIA].

    PubMed

    Vodop'ianova, O A; Moiseeva, I Ia; Rodina, O P; Kustikova, I N; Antropova, N V

    2015-01-01

    This comparative study of the influence of cytoflavin and cardioxipin on the parameters of 24-hour arterial pressure monitoring in 56 patients with chronic cerebral circulation insufficiency, arterial hypertension and hypercholesterolemia included 32 women and 24 men aged 42-72 years divided into 3 groups matchedfor the stage of diseases, age, sex, severity of AH, total cholesterol level, and antihypertensive therapy. Patients of group 1 were treated without cytoflavin and cardioxipin. Those in group 2 received daily i/v droplet infusion of 10 mg/kg cardioxipin (20-30 droplets/min). Patients of group 3 were given daily i/v droplet infusion of 10 ml cytoflavin in 200 ml 0.9% sodium chloride solution for 10 days. 24-hour arterial pressure monitoring was used to estimate the influence of the two drugs on systolic and diastolic pressure, its daily rhythm, AP variability and frequency of elevation. The study showed that both therapeutic modalities improved daily AP rhythm as manifested in a significant increase of the number of patients with the dipper rhythm and a decrease in the number of systolic/diastolic non-dipper patients. Moreover cytoflavin significantly decreased the number of systolic over-dippers compared with control group.

  20. Sodium and potassium intake in South Africa: an evaluation of 24-hour urine collections in a white, black, and Indian population.

    PubMed

    Swanepoel, Bianca; Schutte, Aletta E; Cockeran, Marike; Steyn, Krisela; Wentzel-Viljoen, Edelweiss

    2016-11-01

    Limited number of studies on salt intake has been conducted in the South Africa. The present study established the sodium and potassium excretion (24-hour urine collection) of three different South African populations. In total, 692 successful 24-hour urine collections were analyzed for sodium, potassium, and iodine levels. The median sodium and potassium excretion was 122.9 and 33.5 mmol/d, respectively, and the median salt intake was 7.2 g/d. The majority (92.8%) of the population did not meet the recommended potassium intake/d, and 65.6% consumed more than 6 g of salt/d. Potassium excretion showed a linear relationship with salt intake (P-trend ≤ .001). The median sodium-to-potassium ratio was 3.5. These findings support the South African government's sodium reduction legislation, as well as global initiatives. More consideration should be given to promoting the intake of potassium-rich foods, as this may have a greater public health impact than focusing only on dietary sodium reduction.

  1. Treatment of burns in the first 24 hours: simple and practical guide by answering 10 questions in a step-by-step form.

    PubMed

    Alharbi, Ziyad; Piatkowski, Andrzej; Dembinski, Rolf; Reckort, Sven; Grieb, Gerrit; Kauczok, Jens; Pallua, Norbert

    2012-05-14

    Residents in training, medical students and other staff in surgical sector, emergency room (ER) and intensive care unit (ICU) or Burn Unit face a multitude of questions regarding burn care. Treatment of burns is not always straightforward. Furthermore, National and International guidelines differ from one region to another. On one hand, it is important to understand pathophysiology, classification of burns, surgical treatment, and the latest updates in burn science. On the other hand, the clinical situation for treating these cases needs clear guidelines to cover every single aspect during the treatment procedure. Thus, 10 questions have been organised and discussed in a step-by-step form in order to achieve the excellence of education and the optimal treatment of burn injuries in the first 24 hours. These 10 questions will clearly discuss referral criteria to the burn unit, primary and secondary survey, estimation of the total burned surface area (%TBSA) and the degree of burns as well as resuscitation process, routine interventions, laboratory tests, indications of Bronchoscopy and special considerations for Inhalation trauma, immediate consultations and referrals, emergency surgery and admission orders. Understanding and answering the 10 questions will not only cover the management process of Burns during the first 24 hours but also seems to be an interactive clear guide for education purpose.

  2. Comparison between two standardized cultural methods and 24 hour duplex SYBR green real-time PCR assay for Salmonella detectionin meat samples.

    PubMed

    Delibato, Elisabetta; Fiore, Alfonsina; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Auricchio, Bruna; Filetici, Emma; Orefice, Leucio; Losio, Marina Nadia; De Medici, Dario

    2011-07-01

    Food-borne diseases caused by Salmonella represent a worldwide public health problem. Salmonella must be absent in an established amount depending on the kind of the product and usually cultural methods have to be applied to evaluate the compliance of the products. ISO 6579:2002 in Europe and FSIS MLG 4.04.:2008 in the USA have usually been employed to detect Salmonella in meat, poultry and egg products. A Real Time PCR method using probes has recently been validated against the NMKL (Nordic Committee on Food Analysis) standard method. This method has been modified using the less expensive Sybr Green Real Time PCR approach and applied directly in the 18 hours preenrichment broth for the purpose of detecting Salmonella in meat products in less than 24 hours. The purpose of this study was to: - compare the effectiveness of ISO and FSIS cultural methods; - develop a new 24 hour duplex Sybr Green Real Time PCR-melting curve analysis; - evaluate the performance of Salmonella, Standard Method, Rapid Method, SYBR Green Real Time PCR. The equivalence between ISO and FSIS methods was demonstrated and the use of SYBR Green Real Time PCR as a screening tool for negative results seems appealing especially to evaluate compliance with the HACCP systems.

  3. A Case Report on Dyskinesia Following Rivastigmine Patch 13.3 mg/24 hours for Alzheimer's Disease: Perspective in the Movement Disorders Spectrum Following Use of Cholinesterase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Maria Cristina B; Rosales, Raymond L

    2015-08-01

    Current reports on movement disorder adverse effects of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors only include extrapyramidal symptoms and myoclonus.Here is a case of an 81-year-old female Filipino with dementia who presented with first-onset generalized choreiform movements.The etiology of the clinical finding of dyskinesia was investigated through laboratories, neuroimaging, and electroencephalogram, all of which yielded negative results. Review of her medications included the rivastigmine (Exelon) patch, which had just been increased to 13.3 mg/24-hour-dose 3 months prior. With all other possible causes excluded, a trial discontinuation of rivastigmine, showed decreased frequency of the dyskinesia 48 hours after, with complete resolution after 6 days, and no recurrence since then.This case thus presents a probable association or causality between the choreiform movement and rivastigmine at 13.3 mg/24-hour-dose patch because of clear temporal proximity, lack of alternative explanations, and a reversal of the dyskinesia upon medicament discontinuation.

  4. Effect of current and lifetime posttraumatic stress disorder on 24-hour urinary catecholamines and cortisol: results from the Mind Your Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Wingenfeld, Katja; Whooley, Mary A.; Neylan, Thomas C.; Otte, Christian; Cohen, Beth E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and several other chronic illnesses. Alterations in the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in PTSD might contribute to these associations but findings regarding SNS and HPA activity in PTSD are heterogeneous. We measured 24-hour urinary catecholamines and cortisol in a large cohort of adult outpatients recruited from 2 Veterans Affairs medical centers. 24-hour urinary norepinephrine, epinephrine, dopamine and cortisol were measured by tandem mass spectrometry. Lifetime and current PTSD were assessed with the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale using DSM-IV-TR criteria. Out of 613 participants, 199 (32.5%) had current PTSD, 100 (16.3%) had lifetime but not current PTSD, and 314 (51.2%) never had PTSD. Patients with current PTSD had significantly higher norepinephrine secretion compared to those without PTSD. Patients in the lifetime PTSD group exhibited lower cortisol values compared to those without PTSD. Participants who never had PTSD showed the lowest norepinephrine and the highest cortisol values. All results remained stable when controlling for potentially confounding variables. This study provides evidence for increased norepinephrine secretion and decreased cortisol in PTSD. Future longitudinal studies are needed to determine whether these changes contribute to adverse health outcomes in patients with PTSD. PMID:25459895

  5. Discussion of "Computational Electrocardiography: Revisiting Holter ECG Monitoring".

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Christian; Caiani, Enrico G; Dickhaus, Hartmut; Kulikowski, Casimir A; Schiecke, Karin; van Bemmel, Jan H; Witte, Herbert

    2016-08-05

    This article is part of a For-Discussion-Section of Methods of Information in Medicine about the paper "Computational Electrocardiography: Revisiting Holter ECG Monitoring" written by Thomas M. Deserno and Nikolaus Marx. It is introduced by an editorial. This article contains the combined commentaries invited to independently comment on the paper of Deserno and Marx. In subsequent issues the discussion can continue through letters to the editor.

  6. 24-hour urine copper test

    MedlinePlus

    ... associated with providing a urine sample. Alternative Names Quantitative urinary copper Images Copper urine test References McPherson ... for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis ...

  7. Ambulatory blood pressure reduction following high-intensity interval exercise performed in water or dryland condition.

    PubMed

    Sosner, Philippe; Gayda, Mathieu; Dupuy, Olivier; Garzon, Mauricio; Lemasson, Christopher; Gremeaux, Vincent; Lalongé, Julie; Gonzales, Mariel; Hayami, Douglas; Juneau, Martin; Nigam, Anil; Bosquet, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    We aimed to compare blood pressure (BP) responses following moderate-intensity continuous exercise (MICE), high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) in dry land or HIIE in immersed condition, using 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring. Forty-two individuals (65 ± 7 years, 52% men) with a baseline BP ≥ 130/85 mm Hg (systolic/diastolic blood pressures [SBP/DBP]) were randomly assigned to perform one of the three following exercises on a stationary cycle: MICE (24 minutes at 50% peak power output) or HIIE in dry land (two sets of 10 minutes with phases of 15 seconds 100% peak power output interspersed by 15 seconds of passive recovery) or HIIE in up-to-the-chest immersed condition. While MICE modified none of the 24-hour average hemodynamic variables, dryland HIIE induced a 24-hour BP decrease (SBP: -3.6 ± 5.7/DBP: -2.8 ± 3.0 mm Hg, P < .05) and, to a much greater extent, immersed HIIE (SBP: -6.8 ± 9.5/DBP: -3.0 ± 4.5 mm Hg, P < .05). The one condition that modified 24-hour pulse-wave velocity was immersed HIIE (-0.21 ± 0.30 m/s, P < .05).

  8. The effects of calcium supplementation on ambulatory blood pressure in African-American adolescents.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, I. J.; Grim, C.; Dwyer, K.; Nicholson, L.; Dwyer, J.

    1996-01-01

    This longitudinal trial investigated the effects of calcium supplementation on the mean 24-hour blood pressure in African-American adolescents. Subjects were self-identified African-American adolescents from a high school in a suburb of Los Angeles, California. The subjects were randomly placed in a placebo or treatment group (placebo versus 1.5 g of calcium/day x 4 weeks). Follow-up mean 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) for both the treatment and control groups was lower than the baseline mean 24-hour ABP. In the treatment group, there was a decrease of 2.2 mm Hg in the mean systolic blood pressure and 0.7 mm Hg in the diastolic blood pressure. Relative to the placebo group, the net change in ABP was -1.7 mm Hg for systolic blood pressure and -0.5 mm Hg for the diastolic blood pressure. There was no statistically significant effect of calcium supplementation on the 24-hour mean ABP. The net effect of supplementation on ABP during waking and sleeping hours also was not significant. PMID:8990802

  9. Antiplatelet Effect Durability of a Novel, 24-Hour, Extended-Release Prescription Formulation of Acetylsalicylic Acid in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Gurbel, Paul A; Bliden, Kevin P; Chaudhary, Rahul; Patrick, Jeff; Liu, Fang; Chen, Gailing; McLeod, Christopher; Tantry, Udaya S

    2016-12-15

    High platelet reactivity and high platelet turnover have been implicated in incomplete platelet inhibition during immediate-release acetylsalicylic acid therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). An extended-release acetylsalicylic acid (ER-ASA; Durlaza) formulation was developed to provide 24-hour antithrombotic effects with once-daily dosing. The objective of the study was to evaluate the antiplatelet effects of ER-ASA in patients with DM. In this open-label, single-center study, patients with DM (n = 40) and multiple cardiovascular risk factors received ER-ASA 162.5 mg/day for 14 ± 4 days. Multiple platelet function tests, serum and urinary thromboxane B2 metabolites, prostacyclin metabolite, and high-sensitive C-reactive protein levels were assessed at 1, 12, 16, and 24 hours post-dose. Patients with high platelet turnover and/or high platelet reactivity were treated with ER-ASA 325 mg/day for 14 ± 4 days, and laboratory analyses were repeated. All patients responded to ER-ASA 162.5 mg/day as measured by arachidonic acid-induced aggregation, and there was no loss of the platelet inhibitory effect of ER-ASA 162.5 mg/day over 24 hours post-dose (p = not significant). The antiplatelet effect was sustained over 24 hours for all platelet function measurements. Mean 1- to 24-hour serum thromboxane B2 levels were low with both doses and were lower with ER-ASA 325 mg/day compared with 162.5 mg/day therapy (p = 0.002). In conclusion, ER-ASA 162.5 mg daily dose provided sustained antiplatelet effects over 24 hours in patients with type 2 DM and multiple cardiovascular risk factors and had a favorable tolerability profile.

  10. Validity of a multipass, web-based, 24-hour self-administered recall for assessment of total energy intake in blacks and whites.

    PubMed

    Arab, Lenore; Tseng, Chi-Hong; Ang, Alfonso; Jardack, Patricia

    2011-12-01

    To date, Web-based 24-hour recalls have not been validated using objective biomarkers. From 2006 to 2009, the validity of 6 Web-based DietDay 24-hour recalls was tested among 115 black and 118 white healthy adults from Los Angeles, California, by using the doubly labeled water method, and the results were compared with the results of the Diet History Questionnaire, a food frequency questionnaire developed by the National Cancer Institute. The authors performed repeated measurements in a subset of 53 subjects approximately 6 months later to estimate the stability of the doubly labeled water measurement. The attenuation factors for the DietDay recall were 0.30 for blacks and 0.26 for whites. For the Diet History Questionnaire, the attenuation factors were 0.15 and 0.17 for blacks and whites, respectively. Adjusted correlations between true energy intake and the recalls were 0.50 and 0.47 for blacks and whites, respectively, for the DietDay recall. For the Diet History Questionnaire, they were 0.34 and 0.36 for blacks and whites, respectively. The rate of underreporting of more than 30% of calories was lower with the recalls than with the questionnaire (25% and 41% vs. 34% and 52% for blacks and whites, respectively). These findings suggest that Web-based DietDay dietary recalls offer an inexpensive and widely accessible dietary assessment alternative, the validity of which is equally strong among black and white adults. The validity of the Web-administered recall was superior to that of the paper food frequency questionnaire.

  11. Acute effects of nasal continuous positive airway pressure on 24-hour blood pressure and catecholamines in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Minemura, H; Akashiba, T; Yamamoto, H; Akahoshi, T; Kosaka, N; Horie, T

    1998-12-01

    To assess the acute effects of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on the 24-hour blood pressure and the secretion of catecholamines in urine and plasma, we investigated the changes in the 24-hour blood pressure and urinary and plasma concentrations of epinephrine (E) and norepinephrine (NE) in 26 men with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) with and without nasal CPAP. Nasal CPAP resulted in significant decreases in the daytime diastolic pressure (from 86 +/-16 mmHg to 83+/-12 mmHg), the nighttime diastolic pressure (from 81+/-12 mmHg to 77+/-9 mmHg) and the nighttime systolic pressures (from 125+/-15 mmHg to 120+/-10 mmHg). There was no significant difference between patients with and without CPAP in the daytime or nighttime urinary E level, but patients who received CPAP showed a significant decrease in daytime urinary NE level (from 156+/-112 microg/14h to 119+/-101 microg/14h) and nighttime urinary NE level (from 143+/-91 microg/10h to 112+/-65 microg/10h). The morning plasma level of NE also decreased (from 371+/-181 pg/ml to 273 +/-148 pg/ml) in patients who received nasal CPAP (p<0.02), but the plasma level of E remained unchanged. There were no correlations between PSG parameters and the reductions in blood pressure and the catecholamine levels induced by nasal CPAP. These findings suggest that OSA contributes, at least in part, to the development of systemic hypertension by increasing sympathetic nervous activity.

  12. [Indices of static and dynamic components of pressure load (assessed by 24-hour blood pressure monitoring) and the state of renal function in patients with essential hypertension].

    PubMed

    Zelveian, P A; Buniatian, M S; Oshchepkova, E V; Lazareva, N V; Rogoza, A N

    2011-01-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate possible relationship between parameters of blood pressure (BP) profile and glomerular filtration rate in patients (pts) with I-II stage essential hypertension (EH). Material and methods. We studied 120 pts (97 men), aged 23-65 (50,2+/-0,6) years with I (n=98) and II (n=22) stage EH. In BP profile (SL-90207) we calculated 24-hour, daytime, nighttime values of systolic, diastolic, pulse pressures (SBP, DBP, PP), time load (TL), variability and nocturnal fall (NF) of BP. The state of renal function was assessed by measurement of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) calculated by the Cockcroft formula. Results. After nonlinear statistical analysis by Gauss-Newton all patients were divided into three groups according to GFR tertiles. Significant differences were found between these groups by 24-hour, nighttime and daytime values of SBP and DBP. Values of SBP were the lowest in group II. In group II lowest values of PP were also observed, but statistically significant differences were found only in nocturnal PP values between groups II and III. There were no significant differences between groups by TL and NF of BP. In group Ill (high GFR) variability of daytime values of SBP and DBF were significantly higher. Univariate correlation analysis showed statistically significant negative relationship between GFR and nocturnal PP in patients with lowest level of GFR. Positive correlations between nocturnal values of PP and GFR in groups II and III were also observed. Conclusion. These results indicated the presence of strong relationship between high values of nocturnal PP and decreasing of glomerular filtration rate in patients with EH and thus confirmed significance of "constant" and "dynamic" components of pressure load as a marker of impairment of renal function.

  13. Electronic Dietary Intake Assessment (e-DIA): Comparison of a Mobile Phone Digital Entry App for Dietary Data Collection With 24-Hour Dietary Recalls

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Sarah; Giannelli, Valentina; Yap, Megan LH; Tang, Lie Ming; Roy, Rajshri; Louie, Jimmy Chun Yu; Hebden, Lana; Kay, Judy; Allman-Farinelli, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Background The electronic Dietary Intake Assessment (e-DIA), a digital entry food record mobile phone app, was developed to measure energy and nutrient intake prospectively. This can be used in monitoring population intakes or intervention studies in young adults. Objective The objective was to assess the relative validity of e-DIA as a dietary assessment tool for energy and nutrient intakes using the 24-hour dietary recall as a reference method. Methods University students aged 19 to 24 years recorded their food and drink intake on the e-DIA for five days consecutively and completed 24-hour dietary recalls on three random days during this 5-day study period. Mean differences in energy, macro-, and micronutrient intakes were evaluated between the methods using paired t tests or Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, and correlation coefficients were calculated on unadjusted, energy-adjusted, and deattenuated values. Bland-Altman plots and cross-classification into quartiles were used to assess agreement between the two methods. Results Eighty participants completed the study (38% male). No significant differences were found between the two methods for mean intakes of energy or nutrients. Deattenuated correlation coefficients ranged from 0.55 to 0.79 (mean 0.68). Bland-Altman plots showed wide limits of agreement between the methods but without obvious bias. Cross-classification into same or adjacent quartiles ranged from 75% to 93% (mean 85%). Conclusions The e-DIA shows potential as a dietary intake assessment tool at a group level with good ranking agreement for energy and all nutrients. PMID:26508282

  14. Correlation of Occupational Stress Index with 24-hour Urine Cortisol and Serum DHEA Sulfate among City Bus Drivers: A Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Mia Chihya; Lu, Luo; Tai, John Jen

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The questionnaire of occupational stress index (OSI) has been popular in the workplace, and it has been tailored for bus drivers in Taiwan. Nevertheless, its outcomes for participants are based on self-evaluations, thus validation by their physiological stress biomarker is warranted and this is the main goal of this study. Methods A cross-sectional study of sixty-three city bus drivers and fifty-four supporting staffs for comparison was conducted. Questionnaire surveys, 24-hour urine cortisol testing, and blood draws for dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEA-S) testing were performed. The measured concentrations of these biological measures were logarithmically transformed before the statistical analysis where various scores of stressor factors, moderators, and stress effects of each OSI domain were analyzed by applying multiple linear regression models. Results For drivers, the elevated 24-hour urine cortisol level was associated with a worker's relationship with their supervisor and any life change events in the most recent 3 months. The DHEA-S level was higher in drivers of younger age as well as drivers with more concerns relating to their salary and bonuses. Non-drivers showed no association between any stressor or satisfaction and urine cortisol and blood DHEA-S levels. Conclusion Measurements of biomarkers may offer additional stress evaluations with OSI questionnaires for bus drivers. Increased DHEA-S and cortisol levels may result from stressors like income security. Prevention efforts towards occupational stress and life events and health promotional efforts for aged driver were important anti-stress remedies. PMID:22953199

  15. Peripheral Augmentation Index is Associated With the Ambulatory Arterial Stiffness Index in Patients With Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Heffernan, Kevin S.; Patvardhan, Eshan A.; Karas, Richard H.; Kuvin, Jeffrey T.

    2011-01-01

    Background Vascular dysfunction is highly prevalent if not ubiquitous in patients with hypertension. We compared two different measures of vascular function obtained from digital volume waveforms with measures of ventricular-vascular load derived from 24-hour blood pressure (BP) recordings in patients with hypertension. Methods Digital pulsatile volume waveforms were captured via plethysmography (peripheral arterial tone, PAT) and used to derive augmentation index (a measure of ventricular-vascular coupling) and the pulse wave amplitude-reactive hyperemia index (a measure of microvascular reactivity). Ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI) and the BP variability ratio (BPVR) were derived from 24-hour ambulatory BP recordings. Results There was a positive association between PAT-AIx and AASI (r = 0.52, P < 0.05). There was also a positive association between PAT-AIx and BPVR (r = 0.37, P < 0.05). PAT-AIx was not associated with PWA-RHI (r = -0.14, P > 0.05). PWA-RHI was not associated with AASI or BPVR (P > 0.05). Conclusions PAT-AIx is associated with ambulatory measures of vascular function and may offer clinical insight into vascular burden and cardiovascular disease risk in patients with hypertension independent of information obtained from PWA-RHI.

  16. Electrocardiography series. Narrow QRS-complex tachycardia: part 2.

    PubMed

    Singh, Devinder; Teo, Swee-Guan; Omar, Abdul Razakjr Bin; Poh, Kian Keong

    2014-09-01

    We discuss two cases of incessant atrial tachycardia (AT), including the presentation and clinical course. It is important to differentiate AT from other causes of supraventricular tachycardia, such as atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia (AVNRT) and atrioventricular reentrant tachycardia (AVRT), as it would have implications on clinical management. Electrocardiographic features of AT, especially the presence of an AV Wenckebach phenomenon with 'grouped beating', are critical for differentiating AT from AVRT and AVNRT. It is also vital to identify the P waves and their relations to QRS on electrocardiography, as this would aid in the differentiation of various supraventricular tachycardias.

  17. Kidney volume and ambulatory blood pressure in children.

    PubMed

    Gurusinghe, Shari; Palvanov, Arkadiy; Bittman, Mark E; Singer, Pamela; Frank, Rachel; Chorny, Nataliya; Infante, Lulette; Sethna, Christine B

    2016-12-16

    Low nephron number has been shown to be a risk factor for hypertension (HTN) in adulthood. Kidney volume may serve as a surrogate marker for nephron mass. The relationship between kidney volume and ambulatory blood pressure (BP) in the pediatric population is not known. A retrospective chart review of children younger than 21 years who were evaluated for HTN was performed. Twenty-four-hour BP and ultrasonography data were obtained. Multiple regression was used to examine associations between BP and kidney volume. Of 84 children (mean age 13.87 years, 72.6% males), 54 had HTN. Systolic BP index during the awake, sleep, and 24-hour periods (all P≤.05) was found to be positively correlated with total kidney volume. Greater total kidney volume was found to be a positive predictor of 24-hour and sleep systolic index (P≤.05). It failed to serve as a predictor of HTN, pre-HTN, or white-coat HTN. Contrary to expectation, total kidney volume was positively associated with systolic BP indices.

  18. Associations of ambulatory blood pressure with urinary caffeine and caffeine metabolite excretions.

    PubMed

    Guessous, Idris; Pruijm, Menno; Ponte, Belén; Ackermann, Daniel; Ehret, Georg; Ansermot, Nicolas; Vuistiner, Philippe; Staessen, Jan; Gu, Yumei; Paccaud, Fred; Mohaupt, Markus; Vogt, Bruno; Pechère-Bertschi, Antoinette; Pechère-Berstchi, Antoinette; Martin, Pierre-Yves; Burnier, Michel; Eap, Chin B; Bochud, Murielle

    2015-03-01

    Intake of caffeinated beverages might be associated with reduced cardiovascular mortality possibly via the lowering of blood pressure. We estimated the association of ambulatory blood pressure with urinary caffeine and caffeine metabolites in a population-based sample. Families were randomly selected from the general population of Swiss cities. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was conducted using validated devices. Urinary caffeine, paraxanthine, theophylline, and theobromine excretions were measured in 24 hours urine using ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. We used mixed models to explore the associations of urinary excretions with blood pressure although adjusting for major confounders. The 836 participants (48.9% men) included in this analysis had mean age of 47.8 and mean 24-hour systolic and diastolic blood pressure of 120.1 and 78.0 mm Hg. For each doubling of caffeine excretion, 24-hour and night-time systolic blood pressure decreased by 0.642 and 1.107 mm Hg (both P values <0.040). Similar inverse associations were observed for paraxanthine and theophylline. Adjusted night-time systolic blood pressure in the first (lowest), second, third, and fourth (highest) quartile of paraxanthine urinary excretions were 110.3, 107.3, 107.3, and 105.1 mm Hg, respectively (P trend <0.05). No associations of urinary excretions with diastolic blood pressure were generally found, and theobromine excretion was not associated with blood pressure. Anti-hypertensive therapy, diabetes mellitus, and alcohol consumption modify the association of caffeine urinary excretion with systolic blood pressure. Ambulatory systolic blood pressure was inversely associated with urinary excretions of caffeine and other caffeine metabolites. Our results are compatible with a potential protective effect of caffeine on blood pressure.

  19. A Pre-Screening Questionnaire to Predict Non-24-Hour Sleep-Wake Rhythm Disorder (N24HSWD) among the Blind

    PubMed Central

    Flynn-Evans, Erin E.; Lockley, Steven W.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: There is currently no questionnaire-based pre-screening tool available to detect non-24-hour sleep-wake rhythm disorder (N24HSWD) among blind patients. Our goal was to develop such a tool, derived from gold standard, objective hormonal measures of circadian entrainment status, for the detection of N24HSWD among those with visual impairment. Methods: We evaluated the contribution of 40 variables in their ability to predict N24HSWD among 127 blind women, classified using urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin period, an objective marker of circadian entrainment status in this population. We subjected the 40 candidate predictors to 1,000 bootstrapped iterations of a logistic regression forward selection model to predict N24HSWD, with model inclusion set at the p < 0.05 level. We removed any predictors that were not selected at least 1% of the time in the 1,000 bootstrapped models and applied a second round of 1,000 bootstrapped logistic regression forward selection models to the remaining 23 candidate predictors. We included all questions that were selected at least 10% of the time in the final model. We subjected the selected predictors to a final logistic regression model to predict N24SWD over 1,000 bootstrapped models to calculate the concordance statistic and adjusted optimism of the final model. We used this information to generate a predictive model and determined the sensitivity and specificity of the model. Finally, we applied the model to a cohort of 1,262 blind women who completed the survey, but did not collect urine samples. Results: The final model consisted of eight questions. The concordance statistic, adjusted for bootstrapping, was 0.85. The positive predictive value was 88%, the negative predictive value was 79%. Applying this model to our larger dataset of women, we found that 61% of those without light perception, and 27% with some degree of light perception, would be referred for further screening for N24HSWD. Conclusions: Our model has

  20. Metabolic Engineering of Light and Dark Biochemical Pathways in Wild-Type and Mutant Strains of Synechocystis PCC 6803 for Maximal, 24-Hour Production of Hydrogen Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Ely, Roger L.; Chaplen, Frank W.R.

    2014-03-11

    This project used the cyanobacterial species Synechocystis PCC 6803 to pursue two lines of inquiry, with each line addressing one of the two main factors affecting hydrogen (H2) production in Synechocystis PCC 6803: NADPH availability and O2 sensitivity. H2 production in Synechocystis PCC 6803 requires a very high NADPH:NADP+ ratio, that is, the NADP pool must be highly reduced, which can be problematic because several metabolic pathways potentially can act to raise or lower NADPH levels. Also, though the [NiFe]-hydrogenase in PCC 6803 is constitutively expressed, it is reversibly inactivated at very low O2 concentrations. Largely because of this O2 sensitivity and the requirement for high NADPH levels, a major portion of overall H2 production occurs under anoxic conditions in the dark, supported by breakdown of glycogen or other organic substrates accumulated during photosynthesis. Also, other factors, such as N or S limitation, pH changes, presence of other substances, or deletion of particular respiratory components, can affect light or dark H2 production. Therefore, in the first line of inquiry, under a number of culture conditions with wild type (WT) Synechocystis PCC 6803 cells and a mutant with impaired type I NADPH-dehydrogenase (NDH-1) function, we used H2 production profiling and metabolic flux analysis, with and without specific inhibitors, to examine systematically the pathways involved in light and dark H2 production. Results from this work provided rational bases for metabolic engineering to maximize photobiological H2 production on a 24-hour basis. In the second line of inquiry, we used site-directed mutagenesis to create mutants with hydrogenase enzymes exhibiting greater O2 tolerance. The research addressed the following four tasks: 1. Evaluate the effects of various culture conditions (N, S, or P limitation; light/dark; pH; exogenous organic carbon) on H2 production profiles of WT cells and an NDH-1 mutant; 2. Conduct metabolic flux analyses for

  1. Ambulatory Feedback System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finger, Herbert; Weeks, Bill

    1985-01-01

    This presentation discusses instrumentation that will be used for a specific event, which we hope will carry on to future events within the Space Shuttle program. The experiment is the Autogenic Feedback Training Experiment (AFTE) scheduled for Spacelab 3, currently scheduled to be launched in November, 1984. The objectives of the AFTE are to determine the effectiveness of autogenic feedback in preventing or reducing space adaptation syndrome (SAS), to monitor and record in-flight data from the crew, to determine if prediction criteria for SAS can be established, and, finally, to develop an ambulatory instrument package to mount the crew throughout the mission. The purpose of the Ambulatory Feedback System (AFS) is to record the responses of the subject during a provocative event in space and provide a real-time feedback display to reinforce the training.

  2. EXTRAPOLATION TECHNIQUES EVALUATING 24 HOURS OF AVERAGE ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELD EMITTED BY RADIO BASE STATION INSTALLATIONS: SPECTRUM ANALYZER MEASUREMENTS OF LTE AND UMTS SIGNALS.

    PubMed

    Mossetti, Stefano; de Bartolo, Daniela; Veronese, Ivan; Cantone, Marie Claire; Cosenza, Cristina; Nava, Elisa

    2016-12-01

    International and national organizations have formulated guidelines establishing limits for occupational and residential electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure at high-frequency fields. Italian legislation fixed 20 V/m as a limit for public protection from exposure to EMFs in the frequency range 0.1 MHz-3 GHz and 6 V/m as a reference level. Recently, the law was changed and the reference level must now be evaluated as the 24-hour average value, instead of the previous highest 6 minutes in a day. The law refers to a technical guide (CEI 211-7/E published in 2013) for the extrapolation techniques that public authorities have to use when assessing exposure for compliance with limits. In this work, we present measurements carried out with a vectorial spectrum analyzer to identify technical critical aspects in these extrapolation techniques, when applied to UMTS and LTE signals. We focused also on finding a good balance between statistically significant values and logistic managements in control activity, as the signal trend in situ is not known. Measurements were repeated several times over several months and for different mobile companies. The outcome presented in this article allowed us to evaluate the reliability of the extrapolation results obtained and to have a starting point for defining operating procedures.

  3. Control of bleeding by silk ligation and diathermy coagulation during tonsillectomy: A comparison of efficacy of the two techniques in the first 24 hours after surgery

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, Khurshid; Ahmad, Rafiq; Khan, Muneeb

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess and compare the relative efficacy of silk ligation and diathermy coagulation techniques in controlling bleeding during tonsillectomy in the first 24 hours. Methods: This prospective study was conducted at the Department of ENT, Khalifa Gul Nawaz Teaching Hospital, Bannu and this department related consultants’ private clinics from January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2014. The study included 180 cases. All patients included were having history of recurrent, acute tonsillitis, with more than 6–7 episodes in one year, five episodes per year for two years, or three episodes per year for three years. All the surgeries were performed by dissection method. Haemostasis during the procedure was secured by either ligation with silk 1 or using diathermy. The results were analyzed using SPSS 16.0 for windows. Results: A total of180 cases were included in the study. The ages of the patients ranged from 5 to 40 years with the mean age of 15.56 years and a std.deviation of +/- 8.24. The male to female ratio was 1.25:1. The number of hemorrhages occurring was greater in the ‘diathermy coagulation’ group as compared to the ‘silk ligation’ group. However, the observed difference was statistically insignificant (p >.05). Conclusion: Primary haemorrhage occurring during tonsillectomy is a serious threat and control of bleeding during the procedure should therefore be meticulous. Both suture ligation and coagulation diathermy for control of bleeders during the procedure by dissection method are equally effective. PMID:26430438

  4. Computer simulation of the effect of dDAVP with saline loading on fluid balance after 24-hour head-down tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R. S.; Simanonok, K. E.; Charles, J. B.

    1994-01-01

    Fluid loading (FL) before Shuttle reentry is a countermeasure currently in use by NASA to improve the orthostatic tolerance of astronauts during reentry and postflight. The fluid load consists of water and salt tablets equivalent to 32 oz (946 ml) of isotonic saline. However, the effectiveness of this countermeasure has been observed to decrease with the duration of spaceflight. The countermeasure's effectiveness may be improved by enhancing fluid retention using analogs of vasopressin such as lypressin (LVP) and desmopressin (dDAVP). In a computer simulation study reported previously, we attempted to assess the improvement in fluid retention obtained by the use of LVP administered before FL. The present study is concerned with the use of dDAVP. In a recent 24-hour, 6 degree head-down tilt (HDT) study involving seven men, dDAVP was found to improve orthostatic tolerance as assessed by both lower body negative pressure (LBNP) and stand tests. The treatment restored Luft's cumulative stress index (cumulative product of magnitude and duration of LBNP) to nearly pre-bedrest level. The heart rate was lower and stroke volume was marginally higher at the same LBNP levels with administration of dDAVP compared to placebo. Lower heart rates were also observed with dDAVP during stand test, despite the lower level of cardiovascular stress. These improvements were seen with only a small but significant increase in plasma volume of approximately 3 percent. This paper presents a computer simulation analysis of some of the results of this HDT study.

  5. Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines for Children and Youth: Exploring the perceptions of stakeholders regarding their acceptability, barriers to uptake, and dissemination.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, Guy; White, Lauren; Riazi, Negin; Latimer-Cheung, Amy E; Tremblay, Mark S

    2016-06-01

    Engaging stakeholders in the development of guidelines and plans for implementation is vital. The purpose of this study was to examine stakeholders' (parents, teachers, exercise professionals, paediatricians, and youth) perceptions of the Canadian 24-Hour Movement Behaviour Guidelines for Children and Youth ("Movement Guidelines"). Stakeholders (n = 104) engaged in semi-structured focus groups or interviews to discuss the perceived acceptability of the guidelines, potential barriers to implementation, and preferred methods and messengers of dissemination. A thematic analysis was conducted. Overall, there was consistent support across all stakeholder groups, with the exception of youth participants, for the Movement Guidelines. Stakeholders identified a range of barriers to the uptake of the guidelines including concerns with accurately defining key terms such as "recreational" screen time; everyday challenges such as financial and time constraints; and the possibility of the Movement Guidelines becoming just another source of stress and guilt for already busy and overwhelmed parents. Participants identified a range of recommended methods and messengers for future dissemination. School and medical settings were the most commonly recommended settings through which dissemination efforts should be delivered. Overall, participants representing a range of stakeholder groups were receptive to the new Movement Guidelines and endorsed their value. In complementing the Movement Guidelines, messaging and resources will need to be developed that address common concerns participants had regarding their dissemination and implementation.

  6. Donor-reactive CD8 Memory T Cells Infiltrate Cardiac Allografts Within 24 Hours Post-Transplant in Naïve Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Schenk, A.D.; Nozaki, T.; Rabant, M.; Valujskikh, A.; Fairchild, R.L.

    2008-01-01

    Normal immune responses stimulated by pathogenic and environmental antigens generate memory T cells that react with donor antigens and no currently used immunosuppressive drug completely inhibits memory T cell function. While donor-reactive memory T cells clearly compromise graft outcomes, mechanisms utilized by memory T cells to promote rejection are largely unknown. In the current study we investigated how early endogenous memory cells infiltrate and express effector function in cardiac allografts. Endogenous CD8 memory T cells in non-sensitized recipients distinguish syngeneic vs. allogeneic cardiac allografts within 24 hours of reperfusion. CD8-dependent production of IFN-γ and CXCL9/Mig was observed 24–72 hours post-transplant in allografts but not isografts. CXCL9 was produced by donor cells in response to IFN-γ made by recipient CD8 T cells reactive to donor class I MHC molecules. Activated CD8 T cells were detected in allografts at least three days before donor-specific effector T cells producing IFN-γ were detected in the recipient spleen. Early inflammation mediated by donor-reactive CD8 memory T cells greatly enhanced primed effector T cell infiltration into allografts. These results suggest that strategies for optimal inhibition of alloimmunity should include neutralization of infiltrating CD8 memory T cells within a very narrow window after transplantation. PMID:18557725

  7. Influence of irrigation protocols on the bond strength of fiber posts cemented with a self-adhesive luting agent 24 hours after endodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Lima, Jessica Ferraz Carvalho; Lima, Adriano Fonseca; Humel, Maria Malerba Colombi; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre Maffei Sartini; Marchi, Giselle Maria; Ferraz, Caio Cezar Randi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of different irrigation protocols on the bond strength, at different root depths, of fiber posts cemented with a self-adhesive cement 24 hours after endodontic treatment. Fifty-six bovine incisor roots were endodontically prepared and separated into 7 groups (n = 8) according to irrigation protocols: group 1, sterile saline (control); group 2, chlorhexidine (CHX) gel 2% and saline; group 3, sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) 5.25% and saline; group 4, CHX and saline (final irrigation with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid [EDTA] 17%); group 5, NaOCl and saline (final irrigation with EDTA); group 6, CHX and saline (final irrigation with NaOCl and EDTA); and group 7, NaOCl (final irrigation with CHX and EDTA). No statistically significant difference was found among the groups. Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that the different irrigation protocols did not influence the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement, which presented similar behaviors at the 3 root depths studied.

  8. Gastroesophageal and pharyngeal reflux detection using impedance and 24-hour pH monitoring in asymptomatic subjects: defining the normal environment.

    PubMed

    Oelschlager, Brant K; Quiroga, Elina; Isch, John A; Cuenca-Abente, Federico

    2006-01-01

    Airway symptoms are often caused by aspiration of refluxed materials into the larynx. In this study we sought to define the frequency, character, and proximal extent of refluxed contents - including nonacid reflux-in normal subjects using intraluminal impedance to improve our understanding of the relationship between reflux and aspiration. Ten subjects, who had no symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease or airway disease, underwent impedance/pH monitoring with a catheter that allowed simultaneous esophageal and pharyngeal monitoring. Impedance detected 496 gastroesophageal reflux episodes in the 10 subjects during 240 hours of study. The majority, 399 (81% of the total) were acid reflux episodes (pH < 4). Ninety-seven were nonacid (pH > 4). Most reflux episodes (348 of 496) reached the mid esophagus (9 cm above lower esophageal sphincter). There were 51 reflux episodes that reached the pharynx (PR). Only 13 (25%) of PR were acidic (pH < 4), while 38 were nonacid. Twenty-six PR episodes were liquid and 25 were mixed (liquid and gas). The median number of PR episodes measured with impedance was 5 (0-10). In asymptomatic subjects, most episodes of gastroesophageal reflux are acidic and reach the midesophagus. Reflux into the PR appears to be more common than previously believed, and most of these episodes are not acidic. Thus, traditional 24-hour pH monitoring may underestimate the presence of pharyngeal reflux. The combination of impedance with pH monitoring markedly enhances our ability to accurately detect potential microaspiration.

  9. Derivation of a measure of systolic blood pressure mutability: a novel information theory-based metric from ambulatory blood pressure tests.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Danitza J; Vogel, Eugenio E; Saravia, Gonzalo; Stockins, Benjamin

    2016-03-01

    We provide ambulatory blood pressure (BP) exams with tools based on information theory to quantify fluctuations thus increasing the capture of dynamic test components. Data from 515 ambulatory 24-hour BP exams were considered. Average age was 54 years, 54% were women, and 53% were under BP treatment. The average systolic pressure (SP) was 127 ± 8 mm Hg. A data compressor (wlzip) designed to recognize meaningful information is invoked to measure mutability which is a form of dynamical variability. For patients with the same average SP, different mutability values are obtained which reflects the differences in dynamical variability. In unadjusted linear regression models, mutability had low association with the mean systolic BP (R(2) = 0.056; P < .000001) but larger association with the SP deviation (R(2) = 0.761; P < .001). Wlzip allows detecting levels of variability in SP that could be hazardous. This new indicator can be easily added to the 24-hour BP monitors improving information toward diagnosis.

  10. Effects of the once-weekly glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist dulaglutide on ambulatory blood pressure and heart rate in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ferdinand, Keith C; White, William B; Calhoun, David A; Lonn, Eva M; Sager, Philip T; Brunelle, Rocco; Jiang, Honghua H; Threlkeld, Rebecca J; Robertson, Kenneth E; Geiger, Mary Jane

    2014-10-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists, used to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus, are associated with small reductions in systolic blood pressure (SBP) and increases in heart rate. However, findings based on clinic measurements do not adequately assess a drug's 24-hour pharmacodynamic profile. The effects of dulaglutide, a once-weekly glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, on BP and heart rate were investigated using ambulatory BP monitoring. Patients (n=755; 56±10 years; 81% white; 48% women), with type 2 diabetes mellitus, taking ≥1 oral antihyperglycemic medication, with a clinic BP between 90/60 and 140/90 mm Hg were randomized to dulaglutide (1.5 or 0.75 mg) or placebo subcutaneously for 26 weeks. Ambulatory BP monitoring was performed at baseline and at 4, 16, and 26 weeks. The primary end point was change from baseline to week 16 in mean 24-hour SBP, a tree gatekeeping strategy compared the effects of dulaglutide to placebo. Both doses of dulaglutide were noninferior to placebo for changes in 24-hour SBP and diastolic blood pressure, and dulaglutide 1.5 mg significantly reduced SBP (least squares mean difference [95% confidence interval]), -2.8 mm Hg [-4.6, -1.0]; P≤0.001). Dulaglutide 0.75 mg was noninferior to placebo (1.6 bpm; [0.3, 2.9]; P≤0.02) for 24-hour heart rate (least squares mean difference [95% confidence interval]), but dulaglutide 1.5 mg was not (2.8 bpm [1.5, 4.2]). Dulaglutide 1.5 mg was associated with a reduction in 24-hour SBP and an increase in 24-hour heart rate. The mechanisms responsible for the observed effects remain to be clarified.

  11. Ambulatory diffuse optical tomography and multimodality physiological monitoring system for muscle and exercise applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Gang; Zhang, Quan; Ivkovic, Vladimir; Strangman, Gary E.

    2016-09-01

    Ambulatory diffuse optical tomography (aDOT) is based on near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and enables three-dimensional imaging of regional hemodynamics and oxygen consumption during a person's normal activities. Although NIRS has been previously used for muscle assessment, it has been notably limited in terms of the number of channels measured, the extent to which subjects can be ambulatory, and/or the ability to simultaneously acquire synchronized auxiliary data such as electromyography (EMG) or electrocardiography (ECG). We describe the development of a prototype aDOT system, called NINscan-M, capable of ambulatory tomographic imaging as well as simultaneous auxiliary multimodal physiological monitoring. Powered by four AA size batteries and weighing 577 g, the NINscan-M prototype can synchronously record 64-channel NIRS imaging data, eight channels of EMG, ECG, or other analog signals, plus force, acceleration, rotation, and temperature for 24+ h at up to 250 Hz. We describe the system's design, characterization, and performance characteristics. We also describe examples of isometric, cycle ergometer, and free-running ambulatory exercise to demonstrate tomographic imaging at 25 Hz. NINscan-M represents a multiuse tool for muscle physiology studies as well as clinical muscle assessment.

  12. 2001: A Space Odyssey Revisited: The Feasibility of 24 Hour Commuter Flights to the Moon Using NTR Propulsion with LUNOX Afterburners. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borowski, Stanley; Dudzinski, Leonard A.

    2003-01-01

    The prospects for 24 hour commuter flights to the Moon, similar to that portrayed in 2001: A Space Odyssey but on a more Spartan scale, are examined using two near term, high leverage technologies: liquid oxygen (LOX)-augmented nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) propulsion and lunar-derived oxygen (LUNOX) production. Iron-rich volcanic glass, or orange soil, discovered during the Apollo 17 mission to Taurus-Littrow, has produced a 4 percent oxygen yield in recent NASA experiments using hydrogen reduction. LUNOX development and utilization would eliminate the need to transport oxygen supplies from Earth and is expected to dramatically reduce the size, cost and complexity of space transportation systems. The LOX-augmented NTR concept (LANTR) exploits the high performance capability of the conventional liquid hydrogen (LH2)-cooled NTR and the mission leverage provided by LUNOX in a unique way. LANTR utilizes the large divergent section of its nozzle as an afterburner into which oxygen is injected and supersonically combusted with nuclear preheated hydrogen emerging from the engine's choked sonic throat, essentially scramjet propulsion in reverse. By varying the oxygen-to-hydrogen mixture ratio, the LANTR engine can operate over a wide range of thrust and specific impulse (Isp) values while the reactor core power level remains relatively constant. The thrust augmentation feature of LANTR means that big engine performance can be obtained using smaller, more affordable, easier to test NTR engines. The use of high-density LOX in place of low density LH2 also reduces hydrogen mass and tank volume resulting in smaller space vehicles. An implementation strategy and evolutionary lunar mission architecture is outlined which requires only Shuttle C or in-line Shuttle-derived launch vehicles, and utilizes conventional NTR-powered lunar transfer vehicles (LTVs), operating in an expendable mode initially, to maximize delivered surface payload on each mission. The increased payload is

  13. "2001: A Space Odyssey" Revisited: The Feasibility of 24 Hour Commuter Flights to the Moon Using NTR Propulsion with LUNOX Afterburners. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borowski, Stanley K.; Dudzinski, Leonard A.

    2001-01-01

    The prospects for "24 hour" commuter flights to the Moon. similar to that portrayed in 2001: A Space Odyssey but on a more Spartan scale. are examined using two near term. "high leverage" technologies-liquid oxygen (LOX)-augmented nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) propulsion and "lunar-derived" oxygen (LUNOX) production. Iron-rich volcanic glass. or "orange soil," discovered during the Apollo 17 mission to Taurus-Littrow. has produced a 4% oxygen yield in recent NASA experiments using hydrogen reduction. LUNOX development and utilization would eliminate the need to transport oxygen supplies from Earth and is expected to dramatically reduce the size, cost and complexity of space transportation systems. The LOX-augmented NTR concept (LANTR) exploits the high performance capability of the conventional liquid hydrogen (LH2)-cooled NTR and the mission leverage provided by LUNOX in a unique way. LANTR utilizes the large divergent section of its nozzle as an "afterburner" into which oxygen is injected and supersonically combusted with nuclear preheated hydrogen emerging from the engine's choked sonic throat-essentially "scramjet propulsion in reverse." By varying the oxygen-to-hydrogen mixture ratio, the LANTR engine can operate over a wide range of thrust and specific impulse (Isp) values while the reactor core power level remains relatively constant. The thrust augmentation feature of LANTR means that "big engine" performance can be obtained using smaller. more affordable. easier to test NTR engines. The use of high-density LOX in place of low-density LH2 also reduces hydrogen mass and tank volume resulting in smaller space vehicles. An implementation strategy and evolutionary lunar mission architecture is outlined which requires only Shuttle C or "in-line" Shuttle-derived launch vehicles, and utilizes conventional NTR-powered lunar transfer vehicles (LTVs), operating in an "expendable mode" initially, to maximize delivered surface payload on each mission. The increased

  14. "2001: A Space Odyssey" Revisited--The Feasibility of 24 Hour Commuter Flights to the Moon Using NTR Propulsion with LUNOX Afterburners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borowski, Stanley K.; Dudzinski, Leonard A.

    1998-01-01

    The prospects for "24 hour" commuter flights to the Moon, similar to that portrayed in 2001: A Space Odyssey but on a more Spartan scale, are examined using two near term, "high leverage" technologies--liquid oxygen (LOX)-augmented nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) propulsion and "lunar-derived" oxygen (LUNOX) production. Ironrich volcanic glass, or "orange soil," discovered during the Apollo 17 mission to Taurus-Littrow, has produced a 4% oxygen yield in recent NASA experiments using hydrogen reduction. LUNOX development and utilization would eliminate the need to transport oxygen supplies from Earth and is expected to dramatically reduce the size, cost and complexity of space transportation systems. The LOX-augmented NTR concept (LANTR) exploits the high performance capability of the conventional liquid hydrogen (LH2)-cooled NTR and the mission leverage provided by LUNOX in a unique way, LANTR utilizes the large divergent section of its nozzle as an "afterburner" into which oxygen is injected and supersonically combusted with nuclear preheated hydrogen emerging front the engine's choked sonic throat--essentially "scramjet propulsion in reverse." By varying the oxygen-to-hydrogen mixture ratio, the LANTR engine can operate over a wide range of thrust and specific impulse (Isp) values while the reactor core power level remains relatively constant. The thrust augmentation feature of LANTR means that "big engine" performance can be obtained using smaller, more affordable, easier to test NTR engines. The use of high-density LOX in place of low-density LH2 also reduces hydrogen mass and tank volume resulting in smaller space vehicles. An implementation strategy and evolutionary lunar mission architecture is outlined which requires only Shuttle C or "in-line" Shuttle-derived launch vehicles, and utilizes conventional NTR-powered lunar transfer vehicles (LTVs), operating in an "expendable mode" initially, to maximize delivered surface payload on each mission. The increased

  15. Epidemiology of Urban Traffic Accident Victims Hospitalized More Than 24 Hours in a Level III Trauma Center, Kashan County, Iran, During 2012-2013

    PubMed Central

    Mahdian, Mehrdad; Sehat, Mojtaba; Fazel, Mohammad Reza; Moraveji, Alireza; Mohammadzadeh, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Urban traffic accidents are an extensively significant problem in small and busy towns in Iran. This study tried to explore the epidemiological pattern of urban traffic accidents in Kashan and Aran-Bidgol cities, Iran. Objectives: This study aimed to assess various epidemiological factors affecting victims of trauma admitted to a main trauma center in Iran. Patients and Methods: During a retrospective study, data including age, sex, injury type and pattern, outcome, hospital stay and treatment expenditures regarding urban Road Traffic Accidents (RTAs) for one year (March 2012-March 2013) were obtained from the registry of trauma research center, emergency medical services and deputy of health of Kashan University of Medical Sciences. One-way ANOVA and chi-square tests were used to analyze data using SPSS version 16.0. P value < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: A total of 1723 victims (82.6% male, sex ratio of almost 5:1) were considered in this study. Mortality rate in trauma cases hospitalized more than 24 hours during our study was 0.8%. Young motorcyclist men with the rate of more than 103 per 10000 were the most vulnerable group. The most common injury was head injury (73.6%) followed by lower limb injury (33.2%). A significant association was found between mechanism of injury and head, lower limb, multiple injuries and high risk age group. Conclusions: Urban RTAs are one of the most important problems in Kashan and Aran-Bidgol cities, which impose a great economic burden on health system. Motorcyclists are the most vulnerable victims and multiple trauma and head injury are seen among them extensively. PMID:26101765

  16. Spatial characteristics of extreme rainfall over China with hourly through 24-hour accumulation periods based on national-level hourly rain gauge data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yongguang; Xue, Ming; Li, Bo; Chen, Jiong; Tao, Zuyu

    2016-11-01

    Hourly rainfall measurements of 1919 national-level meteorological stations from 1981 through 2012 are used to document, for the first time, the climatology of extreme rainfall in hourly through 24-h accumulation periods in China. Rainfall amounts for 3-, 6-, 12- and 24-h periods at each station are constructed through running accumulation from hourly rainfall data that have been screened by proper quality control procedures. For each station and for each accumulation period, the historical maximum is found, and the corresponding 50-year return values are estimated using generalized extreme value theory. Based on the percentiles of the two types of extreme rainfall values among all the stations, standard thresholds separating Grade I, Grade II and Grade III extreme rainfall are established, which roughly correspond to the 70th and 90th percentiles for each of the accumulation periods. The spatial characteristics of the two types of extreme rainfall are then examined for different accumulation periods. The spatial distributions of extreme rainfall in hourly through 6-h periods are more similar than those of 12- and 24-h periods. Grade III rainfall is mostly found over South China, the western Sichuan Basin, along the southern and eastern coastlines, and in the large river basins and plains. There are similar numbers of stations with Grade III extreme hourly rainfall north and south of 30°N, but the percentage increases to about 70% south of 30°N as the accumulation period increases to 24 hours, reflecting richer moisture and more prolonged rain events in southern China. Potential applications of the extreme rainfall climatology and classification standards are suggested at the end.

  17. Establishing normal plasma and 24-hour urinary biochemistry ranges in C3H, BALB/c and C57BL/6J mice following acclimatization in metabolic cages.

    PubMed

    Stechman, Michael J; Ahmad, Bushra N; Loh, Nellie Y; Reed, Anita A C; Stewart, Michelle; Wells, Sara; Hough, Tertius; Bentley, Liz; Cox, Roger D; Brown, Steve D M; Thakker, Rajesh V

    2010-07-01

    Physiological studies of mice are facilitated by normal plasma and 24-hour urinary reference ranges, but variability of these parameters may increase due to stress that is induced by housing in metabolic cages. We assessed daily weight, food and water intake, urine volume and final day measurements of the following: plasma sodium, potassium, chloride, urea, creatinine, calcium, phosphate, alkaline phosphatase, albumin, cholesterol and glucose; and urinary sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphate, glucose and protein in 24- to 30-week-old C3H/HeH, BALB/cAnNCrl and C57BL/6J mice. Between 15 and 20 mice of each sex from all three strains were individually housed in metabolic cages with ad libitum feeding for up to seven days. Acclimatization was evaluated using general linear modelling for repeated measures and comparison of biochemical data was by unpaired t-test and analysis of variance (SPSS version 12.0.1). Following an initial 5-10% fall in body weight, daily dietary intake, urinary output and weight in all three strains reached stable values after 3-4 days of confinement. Significant differences in plasma glucose, cholesterol, urea, chloride, calcium and albumin, and urinary glucose, sodium, phosphate, calcium and protein were observed between strains and genders. Thus, these results provide normal reference values for plasma and urinary biochemistry in three strains housed in metabolic cages and demonstrate that 3-4 days are required to reach equilibrium in metabolic cage studies. These variations due to strain and gender have significant implications for selecting the appropriate strain upon which to breed genetically-altered models of metabolic and renal disease.

  18. External Beam Radiotherapy Plus 24-Hour Continuous Infusion of Gemcitabine in Unresectable Pancreatic Carcinoma: Long-Term Results of a Phase II Study

    SciTech Connect

    Mattiucci, Gian C.; Morganti, Alessio G.; Valentini, Vincenzo; Ippolito, Edy; Alfieri, Sergio; Antinori, Armando; Crucitti, Antonio; D'Agostino, Giuseppe R.; Di Lullo, Liberato; Luzi, Stefano; Mantini, Giovanna; Smaniotto, Daniela; Doglietto, Gian B.; Cellini, Numa

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of gemcitabine-based chemoradiation (CT-RT) in treating patients (pts) affected by locally advanced pancreatic cancers (LAPC). Methods and Materials: Weekly gemcitabine (100 mg/m{sup 2}) was given as a 24-hour infusion during the course of three-dimensional radiotherapy (50.4 Gy to the tumor, 39.6 Gy to the nodes). After CT-RT, pts received five cycles of sequential chemotherapy with gemcitabine (1000 mg/m{sup 2}; 1, 8, q21). Response rate was assessed according to World Health Organization criteria 6 weeks after the end of CT-RT. Local control (LC), time to progression (TTP), metastases-free survival (MFS), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed by the Kaplan Meier method. Results: Forty pts (male/female 22/18; median age 62 years, range, 36-76) were treated from 2000 to 2005. The majority had T4 tumour (n = 34, 85%), six pts (15%) had T3 tumour. Sixteen pts (40%) were node positive at diagnosis. Grade 3-4 acute toxicity was observed in 21 pts (52.5%). Thirty pts (75%) completed the treatment schedule. A clinical response was achieved in 12 pts (30%). With a median follow-up of 76 months (range, 32-98), 2-year LC was 39.6% (median, 12 months), 2-year TTP was 18.4% (median, 10 months), and 2-year MFS was 29.7% (median, 10 months). Two-year OS (25%; median, 15.5 months) compared with our previous study on 5-fluorouracil-based CT-RT (2.8%) was significantly improved (p <0.001). Conclusions: Gemcitabine CT-RT seems correlated with improved outcomes. Healthier patients who are likely to complete the treatment schedule may benefit most from this therapy.

  19. Effects of cigarette smoking on ambulatory blood pressure, heart rate, and heart rate variability in treated hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Yuko; Kawano, Yuhei; Hayashi, Shinichiro; Iwashima, Yoshio; Yoshihara, Fumiki; Nakamura, Satoko

    We investigated the influence of cigarette smoking on the levels and circadian patterns of blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), and HR variability (HRV) in hypertensive patients. Sixteen hypertensive smokers (57 ± 2 years old) receiving antihypertensive treatments participated in this study. Ambulatory monitoring of BP, HR, and electrocardiograms was performed every 30 min for 24 hours on a smoking day and nonsmoking day in a randomized crossover manner. Average 24-hour BP and daytime BP were significantly higher in the smoking period than in the nonsmoking period. No significant differences were observed in nighttime BP between the two periods. Average 24-hour and daytime HR, but not nighttime HR, were also higher in the smoking period than in the nonsmoking period. The daytime high frequency (HF) component of HRV was attenuated more in the smoking period than in the nonsmoking period. No significant differences were observed in the low frequency (LF) components of HRV or LF/HF ratio between the two periods. These results demonstrated that cigarette smoking increased the daytime and average 24-hour BP and HR, and the increases observed in daytime BP and HR were associated with the attenuation of parasympathetic nerve activity.

  20. [White coat hypertension under outpatient conditions: indications for ambulatory monitoring of arterial pressure].

    PubMed

    Calderón Montero, A; Palma Gámiz, J L

    1997-01-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) is to be considered an excellent diagnostic tool, progressively used by the clinicians in their routine medical practice, in order to assess both medical diagnosis and antihypertensive treatment efficacy. ABPM permits to distinguish with a high level of accuracy the true hypertensives, from the false hypertensives or from subjects with isolated clinical hypertension, the old so-called "white coat hypertension". Prognostic implications of hypertension and target organ involvement can be assessed more accurately with ABPM than with basal blood pressure measurement. ABPM also permits an excellent approach to 24-hour blood pressure load, establishing different categories of circadian curves. In the same way, the 24-hour monitoring observation period during a normal daily life, helps to identify the hot moments of circadian period, correlating them, with changes in blood pressure, and subsequently with cardiovascular events, particularly in the early morning hours, during the so-called circadian vulnerable period, in which a significant increase in both cardiovascular events and stroke are usually observed. Nevertheless, some limitations are still linked to ABPM systems and equipments; on the one hand, the lack of a cut-off point, to establish the limits of true normally, and on the other one; the today intermittent character of ABPM measurements, do not permit an exact assessment of 24-hour blood pressure profile, containing all the hemodynamic changes. Several ongoing studies, will bring in the near future the very necessary answers to all these interrogants.

  1. Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring: Five Decades of More Light and Less Shadows

    PubMed Central

    Nobre, Fernando; Mion Junior, Décio

    2016-01-01

    Casual blood pressure measurements have been extensively questioned over the last five decades. A significant percentage of patients have different blood pressure readings when examined in the office or outside it. For this reason, a change in the paradigm of the best manner to assess blood pressure has been observed. The method that has been most widely used is the Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring - ABPM. The method allows recording blood pressure measures in 24 hours and evaluating various parameters such as mean BP, pressure loads, areas under the curve, variations between daytime and nighttime, pulse pressure variability etc. Blood pressure measurements obtained by ABPM are better correlated, for example, with the risks of hypertension. The main indications for ABPM are: suspected white coat hypertension and masked hypertension, evaluation of the efficacy of the antihypertensive therapy in 24 hours, and evaluation of symptoms. There is increasing evidence that the use of ABPM has contributed to the assessment of blood pressure behaviors, establishment of diagnoses, prognosis and the efficacy of antihypertensive therapy. There is no doubt that the study of 24-hour blood pressure behavior and its variations by ABPM has brought more light and less darkness to the field, which justifies the title of this review. PMID:27168473

  2. Performance of the Automated Self-Administered 24-hour Recall relative to a measure of true intakes and to an interviewer-administered 24-h recall123

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, Sharon I; Subar, Amy F; Douglass, Deirdre; Zimmerman, Thea P; Thompson, Frances E; Kahle, Lisa L; George, Stephanie M; Dodd, Kevin W; Potischman, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Automated Self-Administered 24-hour Recall (ASA24), a freely available Web-based tool, was developed to enhance the feasibility of collecting high-quality dietary intake data from large samples. Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the criterion validity of ASA24 through a feeding study in which the true intake for 3 meals was known. Design: True intake and plate waste from 3 meals were ascertained for 81 adults by inconspicuously weighing foods and beverages offered at a buffet before and after each participant served him- or herself. Participants were randomly assigned to complete an ASA24 or an interviewer-administered Automated Multiple-Pass Method (AMPM) recall the following day. With the use of linear and Poisson regression analysis, we examined the associations between recall mode and 1) the proportions of items consumed for which a match was reported and that were excluded, 2) the number of intrusions (items reported but not consumed), and 3) differences between energy, nutrient, food group, and portion size estimates based on true and reported intakes. Results: Respondents completing ASA24 reported 80% of items truly consumed compared with 83% in AMPM (P = 0.07). For both ASA24 and AMPM, additions to or ingredients in multicomponent foods and drinks were more frequently omitted than were main foods or drinks. The number of intrusions was higher in ASA24 (P < 0.01). Little evidence of differences by recall mode was found in the gap between true and reported energy, nutrient, and food group intakes or portion sizes. Conclusions: Although the interviewer-administered AMPM performed somewhat better relative to true intakes for matches, exclusions, and intrusions, ASA24 performed well. Given the substantial cost savings that ASA24 offers, it has the potential to make important contributions to research aimed at describing the diets of populations, assessing the effect of interventions on diet, and elucidating diet and health

  3. Sex and age-related differences in performance in a 24-hour ultra-cycling draft-legal event – a cross-sectional data analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to examine the sex and age-related differences in performance in a draft-legal ultra-cycling event. Methods Age-related changes in performance across years were investigated in the 24-hour draft-legal cycling event held in Schötz, Switzerland, between 2000 and 2011 using multi-level regression analyses including age, repeated participation and environmental temperatures as co-variables. Results For all finishers, the age of peak cycling performance decreased significantly (β = −0.273, p = 0.036) from 38 ± 10 to 35 ± 6 years in females but remained unchanged (β = −0.035, p = 0.906) at 41.0 ± 10.3 years in males. For the annual fastest females and males, the age of peak cycling performance remained unchanged at 37.3 ± 8.5 and 38.3 ± 5.4 years, respectively. For all female and male finishers, males improved significantly (β = 7.010, p = 0.006) the cycling distance from 497.8 ± 219.6 km to 546.7 ± 205.0 km whereas females (β = −0.085, p = 0.987) showed an unchanged performance of 593.7 ± 132.3 km. The mean cycling distance achieved by the male winners of 960.5 ± 51.9 km was significantly (p < 0.001) greater than the distance covered by the female winners with 769.7 ± 65.7 km but was not different between the sexes (p > 0.05). The sex difference in performance for the annual winners of 19.7 ± 7.8% remained unchanged across years (p > 0.05). The achieved cycling distance decreased in a curvilinear manner with advancing age. There was a significant age effect (F = 28.4, p < 0.0001) for cycling performance where the fastest cyclists were in age group 35–39 years. Conclusion In this 24-h cycling draft-legal event, performance in females remained unchanged while their age of peak cycling performance decreased and performance in males improved while their age of peak cycling performance remained unchanged. The annual fastest females and males were 37.3 ± 8.5 and 38.3 ± 5.4 years old, respectively. The sex

  4. Review of systems, physical examination, and routine tests for case-finding in ambulatory patients.

    PubMed

    Boland, B J; Wollan, P C; Silverstein, M D

    1995-04-01

    The screening value of the comprehensive review of systems and the complete physical examination in detecting unsuspected diseases for which therapeutic interventions are initiated has not been formally studied in ambulatory patients. The medical records of 100 randomly selected adult patients who had an ambulatory general medical evaluation at the Mayo Clinic in 1990-1991 were surveyed to compare review of systems and physical examination with routine laboratory tests, chest radiography, and electrocardiography as case-finding maneuvers. The main outcome measure was the therapeutic yield of each case-finding maneuver, defined as the proportion of maneuvers leading to a new therapy for a new clinically important diagnosis. The utilization rate of routine tests in the 100 patients (mean age: 59 +/- 16 years; 58% women) was high, ranging from 77 to 98%. Overall, the case-finding maneuvers led to 36 unsuspected clinically important diagnoses and resulted in 25 new therapeutic interventions. Higher therapeutic yield was observed for review of systems (7%), physical examination (5%), and lipid screening (9.2%) than for chemistry group (2.2%), complete blood count (1.8%), thyroid tests (1.5%), urinalysis (1.1%), electrocardiography (0%), or chest radiography (0%). The number of therapeutic interventions was not associated with patient's age (P = 0.55), sex (P = 0.88), comorbidity (P = 0.30) or with the time interval since the last general medical evaluation (P = 0.12). Based on therapeutic yield, these data suggest that review of systems and physical examination are valuable case-finding maneuvers in the periodic medical evaluation of ambulatory patients.

  5. High-Frequency Electrocardiography: Optimizing the Diagnosis of the Acute Myocardial Infarct with ST-Elevation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naydenov, S.; Donova, T.; Matveev, M.; Gegova, A.; Popdimitrova, N.; Zlateva, G.; Vladimirova, D.

    2007-04-01

    The analysis of the received digital signal by computer microprocessor in high-frequency electrocardiography, used in our research, makes possible synthesis of vectorcardiographic images and loops, allowing improved qualitative and quantitative diagnosing of the myocardial injury.

  6. Comparison of an in-pharmacy automated blood pressure kiosk to daytime ambulatory blood pressure in hypertensive subjects.

    PubMed

    Padwal, Raj S; Townsend, Raymond R; Trudeau, Luc; Hamilton, Peter G; Gelfer, Mark

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to compare serial readings from an in-pharmacy automated blood pressure (BP) kiosk to mean daytime ambulatory BP. A total of 100 community-dwelling adults with hypertension underwent (1) three baseline automated office readings; (2) three in-pharmacy readings on each of four visits (12 total) using the PharmaSmart PS-2000 kiosk; and (3) 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring between in-pharmacy visits two and three. Paired t-tests, Bland-Altman plots, and Pearson correlation coefficients were used for analysis. Mean BPs were 137.8 ± 13.7/81.9 ± 12.2 mm Hg for in-pharmacy and 135.5 ± 11.7/79.7 ± 10.0 mm Hg for daytime ambulatory (difference of 2.3 ± 9.5/2.2 ± 6.9 mm Hg [P ≤ .05]). Bland-Altman plots depicted a high degree of BP variability but did not show clinically important systematic BP differences. With ambulatory BP as the reference standard, in-pharmacy device results were similar to automated office results. The PharmaSmart PS-2000 closely approximated mean daytime ambulatory BP, supporting the use of serial readings from this device in the assessment of BP.

  7. Eyewitness to history: Landmarks in the development of computerized electrocardiography.

    PubMed

    Rautaharju, Pentti M

    2016-01-01

    The use of digital computers for ECG processing was pioneered in the early 1960s by two immigrants to the US, Hubert Pipberger, who initiated a collaborative VA project to collect an ECG-independent Frank lead data base, and Cesar Caceres at NIH who selected for his ECAN program standard 12-lead ECGs processed as single leads. Ray Bonner in the early 1970s placed his IBM 5880 program in a cart to print ECGs with interpretation, and computer-ECG programs were developed by Telemed, Marquette, HP-Philips and Mortara. The "Common Standards for quantitative Electrocardiography (CSE)" directed by Jos Willems evaluated nine ECG programs and eight cardiologists in clinically-defined categories. The total accuracy by a representative "average" cardiologist (75.5%) was 5.8% higher than that of the average program (69.7, p<0.001). Future comparisons of computer-based and expert reader performance are likely to show evolving results with continuing improvement of computer-ECG algorithms and changing expertise of ECG interpreters.

  8. A brief review: history to understand fundamentals of electrocardiography.

    PubMed

    AlGhatrif, Majd; Lindsay, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    The last decade of the 19th century witnessed the rise of a new era in which physicians used technology along with classical history taking and physical examination for the diagnosis of heart disease. The introduction of chest x-rays and the electrocardiograph (electrocardiogram) provided objective information about the structure and function of the heart. In the first half of the 20th century, a number of innovative individuals set in motion a fascinating sequence of discoveries and inventions that led to the 12-lead electrocardiogram, as we know it now. Electrocardiography, nowadays, is an essential part of the initial evaluation for patients presenting with cardiac complaints. As a first line diagnostic tool, health care providers at different levels of training and expertise frequently find it imperative to interpret electrocardiograms. It is likely that an understanding of the electrical basis of electrocardiograms would reduce the likelihood of error. An understanding of the disorders behind electrocardiographic phenomena could reduce the need for memorizing what may seem to be an endless list of patterns. In this article, we will review the important steps in the evolution of electrocardiogram. As is the case in most human endeavors, an understanding of history enables one to deal effectively with the present.

  9. A brief review: history to understand fundamentals of electrocardiography

    PubMed Central

    AlGhatrif, Majd; Lindsay, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    The last decade of the 19th century witnessed the rise of a new era in which physicians used technology along with classical history taking and physical examination for the diagnosis of heart disease. The introduction of chest x-rays and the electrocardiograph (electrocardiogram) provided objective information about the structure and function of the heart. In the first half of the 20th century, a number of innovative individuals set in motion a fascinating sequence of discoveries and inventions that led to the 12-lead electrocardiogram, as we know it now. Electrocardiography, nowadays, is an essential part of the initial evaluation for patients presenting with cardiac complaints. As a first line diagnostic tool, health care providers at different levels of training and expertise frequently find it imperative to interpret electrocardiograms. It is likely that an understanding of the electrical basis of electrocardiograms would reduce the likelihood of error. An understanding of the disorders behind electrocardiographic phenomena could reduce the need for memorizing what may seem to be an endless list of patterns. In this article, we will review the important steps in the evolution of electrocardiogram. As is the case in most human endeavors, an understanding of history enables one to deal effectively with the present. PMID:23882360

  10. Polyphonic sonification of electrocardiography signals for diagnosis of cardiac pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Kather, Jakob Nikolas; Hermann, Thomas; Bukschat, Yannick; Kramer, Tilmann; Schad, Lothar R.; Zöllner, Frank Gerrit

    2017-01-01

    Electrocardiography (ECG) data are multidimensional temporal data with ubiquitous applications in the clinic. Conventionally, these data are presented visually. It is presently unclear to what degree data sonification (auditory display), can enable the detection of clinically relevant cardiac pathologies in ECG data. In this study, we introduce a method for polyphonic sonification of ECG data, whereby different ECG channels are simultaneously represented by sound of different pitch. We retrospectively applied this method to 12 samples from a publicly available ECG database. We and colleagues from our professional environment then analyzed these data in a blinded way. Based on these analyses, we found that the sonification technique can be intuitively understood after a short training session. On average, the correct classification rate for observers trained in cardiology was 78%, compared to 68% and 50% for observers not trained in cardiology or not trained in medicine at all, respectively. These values compare to an expected random guessing performance of 25%. Strikingly, 27% of all observers had a classification accuracy over 90%, indicating that sonification can be very successfully used by talented individuals. These findings can serve as a baseline for potential clinical applications of ECG sonification. PMID:28317848

  11. Polyphonic sonification of electrocardiography signals for diagnosis of cardiac pathologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kather, Jakob Nikolas; Hermann, Thomas; Bukschat, Yannick; Kramer, Tilmann; Schad, Lothar R.; Zöllner, Frank Gerrit

    2017-03-01

    Electrocardiography (ECG) data are multidimensional temporal data with ubiquitous applications in the clinic. Conventionally, these data are presented visually. It is presently unclear to what degree data sonification (auditory display), can enable the detection of clinically relevant cardiac pathologies in ECG data. In this study, we introduce a method for polyphonic sonification of ECG data, whereby different ECG channels are simultaneously represented by sound of different pitch. We retrospectively applied this method to 12 samples from a publicly available ECG database. We and colleagues from our professional environment then analyzed these data in a blinded way. Based on these analyses, we found that the sonification technique can be intuitively understood after a short training session. On average, the correct classification rate for observers trained in cardiology was 78%, compared to 68% and 50% for observers not trained in cardiology or not trained in medicine at all, respectively. These values compare to an expected random guessing performance of 25%. Strikingly, 27% of all observers had a classification accuracy over 90%, indicating that sonification can be very successfully used by talented individuals. These findings can serve as a baseline for potential clinical applications of ECG sonification.

  12. Advanced Electrocardiography Can Identify Occult Cardiomyopathy in Doberman Pinschers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiljak, M.; Petric, A. Domanjko; Wilberg, M.; Olsen, L. H.; Stepancic, A.; Schlegel, T. T.; Starc, V.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, multiple advanced resting electrocardiographic (A-ECG) techniques have improved the diagnostic value of short-duration ECG in detection of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in humans. This study investigated whether 12-lead A-ECG recordings could accurately identify the occult phase of DCM in dogs. Short-duration (3-5 min) high-fidelity 12-lead ECG recordings were obtained from 31 privately-owned, clinically healthy Doberman Pinschers (5.4 +/- 1.7 years, 11/20 males/females). Dogs were divided into 2 groups: 1) 19 healthy dogs with normal echocardiographic M-mode measurements: left ventricular internal diameter in diastole (LVIDd . 47mm) and in systole (LVIDs . 38mm) and normal 24-hour ECG recordings (<50 ventricular premature complexes, VPCs); and 2) 12 dogs with occult DCM: 11/12 dogs had increased M-mode measurements (LVIDd . 49mm and/or LVIDs . 40mm) and 5/11 dogs had also >100 VPCs/24h; 1/12 dogs had only abnormal 24-hour ECG recordings (>100 VPCs/24h). ECG recordings were evaluated via custom software programs to calculate multiple parameters of high-frequency (HF) QRS ECG, heart rate variability, QT variability, waveform complexity and 3-D ECG. Student's t-tests determined 19 ECG parameters that were significantly different (P < 0.05) between groups. Principal component factor analysis identified a 5-factor model with 81.4% explained variance. QRS dipolar and non-dipolar voltages, Cornell voltage criteria and QRS waveform residuum were increased significantly (P < 0.05), whereas mean HF QRS amplitude was decreased significantly (P < 0.05) in dogs with occult DCM. For the 5 selected parameters the prediction of occult DCM was performed using a binary logistic regression model with Chi-square tested significance (P < 0.01). ROC analyses showed that the five selected ECG parameters could identify occult ECG with sensitivity 89% and specificity 83%. Results suggest that 12-lead A-ECG might improve diagnostic value of short-duration ECG in earlier detection

  13. Ambulatory monitoring detects sorafenib-induced blood pressure elevations on the first day of treatment

    PubMed Central

    Maitland, Michael L.; Kasza, Kristen E.; Karrison, Theodore; Moshier, Kristin; Sit, Laura; Black, Henry R.; Undevia, Samir D.; Stadler, Walter M.; Elliott, William J.; Ratain, Mark J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Hypertension is a mechanism-based toxicity of sorafenib and other cancer therapeutics that inhibit the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling pathway (VSP). This prospective, single center, cohort study characterized ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring (ABPM) as an early pharmacodynamic biomarker of VSP inhibition by sorafenib. Experimental Design Fifty-four normotensive advanced cancer patients underwent 24-hour ABPM prior to and between days 6 and 10 of sorafenib therapy. After BP changes were detected among the first cohort within 10 days, ABPM was performed during the first 24 hours of treatment for the second cohort. Results For the entire patient population the BP increase (mean systolic +10.8 mmHg [95% CI, 8.6 to 13.0], range −5.2 to +28.7 mmHg; mean diastolic +8.0 mmHg [95% CI, 6.3 to 9.7], range −4.4 to +27.1mmHg) was detected between days 6 and 10 (P <0.0001 for both) and plateaued thereafter. Variability in BP change did not associate with: age, body size, sex, self-reported race, baseline BP, or steady state sorafenib plasma concentrations. In the second cohort the BP elevation was detected during the first 24 hours (mean systolic +8.2 mmHg [95% CI, 5.0 to 11.3]; mean diastolic +6.5 mmHg [95% CI, 4.7 to 8.3] P <0.0001 for both). Conclusions ABPM detects the BP response to VSP inhibition by sorafenib during the first 24 hours of treatment. The magnitude of BP elevation is highly variable and unpredictable, but could be important in optimizing the therapeutic index of VSP inhibitor therapy. PMID:19773379

  14. Effects of Baroreflex Activation Therapy on Ambulatory Blood Pressure in Patients With Resistant Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wallbach, Manuel; Lehnig, Luca-Yves; Schroer, Charlotte; Lüders, Stephan; Böhning, Enrico; Müller, Gerhard A; Wachter, Rolf; Koziolek, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    Baroreflex activation therapy (BAT) has been demonstrated to decrease office blood pressure (BP) in the randomized, double-blind Rheos trial. There are limited data on 24-hour BP changes measured by ambulatory BP measurements (ABPMs) using the first generation rheos BAT system suggesting a significant reduction but there are no information about the effect of the currently used, unilateral BAT neo device on ABPM. Patients treated with the BAT neo device for uncontrolled resistant hypertension were prospectively included into this study. ABPM was performed before BAT implantation and 6 months after initiation of BAT. A total of 51 patients were included into this study, 7 dropped out from analysis because of missing or insufficient follow-up. After 6 months, 24-hour ambulatory systolic (from 148 ± 17 mm Hg to 140 ± 23 mm Hg, P<0.01), diastolic (from 82 ± 13 mm Hg to 77 ± 15 mm Hg, P<0.01), day- and night-time systolic and diastolic BP (all P ≤ 0.01) significantly decreased while the number of prescribed antihypertensive classes could be reduced from 6.5 ± 1.5 to 6.0 ± 1.8 (P=0.03). Heart rate and pulse pressure remained unchanged. BAT was equally effective in reducing ambulatory BP in all subgroups of patients. This is the first study demonstrating a significant BP reduction in ABPM in patients undergoing chronically stimulation of the carotid sinus using the BAT neo device. About that BAT-reduced office BP and improved relevant aspects of ABPM, BAT might be considered as a new therapeutic option to reduce cardiovascular risk in patients with resistant hypertension. Randomized controlled trials are needed to evaluate BAT effects on ABPM in patients with resistant hypertension accurately.

  15. History of research in Japan on electrocardiography in the racehorse

    PubMed Central

    HIRAGA, Atsushi; SUGANO, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Since the first recording of electrocardiograms (ECGs) of a horse in Japan was carried out in 1944, studies on ECGs have been performed intensively. During the early stages of research from the 1950s to 1960s, leads to use for ECG recording were evaluated using several different approaches including unipolar leads, bipolar limb leads, and bipolar chest leads. Based on these studies, the AB lead, which is oriented along the long axis of the heart, became the standard reference method in Japan. Electrodes of the AB lead are placed on the upper 1/4th point along a straight line between the withers and the left shoulder blade (base: B), and 10 cm posterior to the left olecranon (apex: A). The incidence of equine arrhythmias among racehorses has been surveyed, and details of the electrocardiographic characteristics of several arrhythmias have been investigated. In particular, atrial fibrillation (AF) has been extensively studied, and papers have reported findings such as that paroxysmal AF occurs during racing and described electrocardiographic changes that occur at the onset of AF during exercise. Development of a radiotelemetry system for ECG recording enabled the first recording of equine ECGs during galloping in 1964, the detection of arrhythmias, and calculation of heart rate during exercise. Studies on comparative and developmental changes of ECGs have described characteristics of the equine ECGs. Future research on changes in cardiac function, including autonomic function, that occur with aging may lead to new developments in equine electrocardiography and contribute to improving the health and welfare of the horse. PMID:25829865

  16. Effects of continuous positive airway pressure treatment on clinic and ambulatory blood pressures in patients with obstructive sleep apnea and resistant hypertension: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Muxfeldt, Elizabeth S; Margallo, Victor; Costa, Leonardo M S; Guimarães, Gleison; Cavalcante, Aline H; Azevedo, João C M; de Souza, Fabio; Cardoso, Claudia R L; Salles, Gil F

    2015-04-01

    The effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on blood pressures (BPs) in patients with resistant hypertension and obstructive sleep apnea is not established. We aimed to evaluate it in a randomized controlled clinical trial, with blinded assessment of outcomes. Four hundred thirty-four resistant hypertensive patients were screened and 117 patients with moderate/severe obstructive sleep apnea, defined by an apnea-hypopnea index ≥15 per hour, were randomized to 6-month CPAP treatment (57 patients) or no therapy (60 patients), while maintaining antihypertensive treatment. Clinic and 24-hour ambulatory BPs were obtained before and after 6-month treatment. Primary outcomes were changes in clinic and ambulatory BPs and in nocturnal BP fall patterns. Intention-to-treat and per-protocol (limited to those with uncontrolled ambulatory BPs) analyses were performed. Patients had mean (SD) 24-hour BP of 129(16)/75(12) mm Hg, and 59% had uncontrolled ambulatory BPs. Mean apnea-hypopnea index was 41 per hour and 58.5% had severe obstructive sleep apnea. On intention-to-treat analysis, there was no significant difference in any BP change, neither in nocturnal BP fall, between CPAP and control groups. The best effect of CPAP was on night-time systolic blood pressure in per-protocol analysis, with greater reduction of 4.7 mm Hg (95% confidence interval, -11.3 to +3.1 mm Hg; P=0.24) and an increase in nocturnal BP fall of 2.2% (95% confidence interval, -1.6% to +5.8%; P=0.25), in comparison with control group. In conclusion, CPAP treatment had no significant effect on clinic and ambulatory BPs in patients with resistant hypertension and moderate/severe obstructive sleep apnea, although a beneficial effect on night-time systolic blood pressure and on nocturnal BP fall might exist in patients with uncontrolled ambulatory BP levels.

  17. [Ambulatory blood pressure profiles of patients with permanent or occasional hypertension. Correlation with clinical data].

    PubMed

    Herpin, D; Amiel, A; Boutaud, P; Ciber, M A; Demange, J

    1987-06-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure (BP) recording was performed in 57 untreated hypertensive patients by means of the "Spacelabs" non-invasive apparatus. Patients were divided into two groups according to BP measurements previously made during medical consultation. Group I comprised 25 "permanently hypertensive" patients (diastolic BP always above 95 mmHg) and group II, 32 "occasionally hypertensive" patients (diastolic BP sometimes normal, sometimes above 95 mmHg). The same circadian rhythm was observed in both groups. The mean ambulatory BP level was significantly higher (p less than 0.001) in group I patients than in group II patients, either over the whole of the 24-hour period (142.0/88.0 versus 122.7/75.3 mmHg), or in day time (149.0/92.5 versus 128.2/78.9 mmHg) or at night (128.0/80.1 versus 111.5/68.0 mmHg). In contrast, there did not seem to be any significant difference between the two groups in relative long-term variability of BP, expressed as the standard deviation/mean BP values ratio. Comparison with clinical data showed that BP values measured during consultation (160/103 mmHg in group I, 143/94 mmHg in group II) were higher than ambulatory values and, chiefly, that there was very poor correlation between the two measurement methods, precluding any extrapolation. Automatic ambulatory BP recording provides for more accurate evaluation of hypertensive patients, enabling emotional "artefacts" to be excluded and patients "reactivity" to their socio-professional environment to be assessed. However, in the absence of sufficient epidemiological data, doctors should not feel authorized to base their therapeutic decisions on the sole data supplied by ambulatory BP recordings.

  18. Ambulatory respiratory rate detection using ECG and a triaxial accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Chan, Alexander M; Ferdosi, Nima; Narasimhan, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    Continuous monitoring of respiratory rate in ambulatory conditions has widespread applications for screening of respiratory diseases and remote patient monitoring. Unfortunately, minimally obtrusive techniques often suffer from low accuracy. In this paper, we describe an algorithm with low computational complexity for combining multiple respiratory measurements to estimate breathing rate from an unobtrusive chest patch sensor. Respiratory rates derived from the respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and modulation of the QRS amplitude of electrocardiography (ECG) are combined with a respiratory rate derived from tri-axial accelerometer data. The three respiration rates are combined by a weighted average using weights based on quality metrics for each signal. The algorithm was evaluated on 15 elderly subjects who performed spontaneous and metronome breathing as well as a variety of activities of daily living (ADLs). When compared to a reference device, the mean absolute error was 1.02 breaths per minute (BrPM) during metronome breathing, 1.67 BrPM during spontaneous breathing, and 2.03 BrPM during ADLs.

  19. High daytime and nighttime ambulatory pulse pressure predict poor cognitive function and mild cognitive impairment in hypertensive individuals

    PubMed Central

    Riba-Llena, Iolanda; Nafría, Cristina; Filomena, Josefina; Tovar, José L; Vinyoles, Ernest; Mundet, Xavier; Jarca, Carmen I; Vilar-Bergua, Andrea; Montaner, Joan

    2016-01-01

    High blood pressure accelerates normal aging stiffness process. Arterial stiffness (AS) has been previously associated with impaired cognitive function and dementia. Our aims are to study how cognitive function and status (mild cognitive impairment, MCI and normal cognitive aging, NCA) relate to AS in a community-based population of hypertensive participants assessed with office and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure measurements. Six hundred ninety-nine participants were studied, 71 had MCI and the rest had NCA. Office pulse pressure (PP), carotid–femoral pulse wave velocity, and 24-hour ambulatory PP monitoring were collected. Also, participants underwent a brain magnetic resonance to study cerebral small–vessel disease (cSVD) lesions. Multivariate analysis–related cognitive function and cognitive status to AS measurements after adjusting for demographic, vascular risk factors, and cSVD. Carotid–femoral pulse wave velocity and PP at different periods were inversely correlated with several cognitive domains, but only awake PP measurements were associated with attention after correcting for confounders (beta = −0.22, 95% confidence interval (CI) −0.41, −0.03). All ambulatory PP measurements were related to MCI, which was independently associated with nocturnal PP (odds ratio (OR) = 2.552, 95% CI 1.137, 5.728) and also related to the presence of deep white matter hyperintensities (OR = 1.903, 1.096, 3.306). Therefore, higher day and night ambulatory PP measurements are associated with poor cognitive outcomes. PMID:25966945

  20. Vascular Health Assessment of The Hypertensive Patients (VASOTENS) Registry: Study Protocol of an International, Web-Based Telemonitoring Registry for Ambulatory Blood Pressure and Arterial Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Parati, Gianfranco; Avolio, Alberto; Rogoza, Anatoly N; Kotovskaya, Yulia V; Mulè, Giuseppe; Muiesan, Maria Lorenza; Orlova, Iana A; Grigoricheva, Elena A; Cardona Muñoz, Ernesto; Zelveian, Parounak H; Pereira, Telmo; Peixoto Maldonado, João Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypertension guidelines recommend ambulatory blood pressure (ABP), central aortic pressure (CAP), and pulse wave velocity (PWV) as parameters for estimating blood pressure (BP) control and vascular impairment. Recent advances in technology have enabled devices to combine non-invasive estimation of these parameters over the 24-hour ABP monitoring. However, currently there is limited evidence on the usefulness of such an approach for routine hypertension management. Objective We recently launched an investigator-initiated, international, multicenter, observational, prospective study, the Vascular health Assessment Of The Hypertensive patients (VASOTENS) Registry, aimed at (1) evaluating non-invasive 24-hour ABP and arterial stiffness estimates (through 24-hour pulse wave analysis, PWA) in hypertensive subjects undergoing ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) for clinical reasons; (2) assessing the changes in estimates following treatment; (3) weighing the impact of 24-hour PWA on target organ damage and cardiovascular prognosis; (4) assessing the relationship between arterial stiffness, BP absolute mean level and variability, and prognosis; and (5) validating the use of a 24-hour PWA electronic health (e-health) solution for hypertension screening. Methods Approximately 2000 subjects, referred to 20 hypertension clinics for routine diagnostic evaluation and follow-up of hypertension of any severity or stage, will be recruited. Data collection will include ABPM, performed with a device allowing simultaneous non-invasive assessment of 24-hour CAP and arterial stiffness (BPLab), and clinical data (including cardiovascular outcomes). As recommended by current guidelines, each patient will be followed-up with visits occurring at regular intervals (ideally every 6 months, and not less than once a year depending on disease severity). A Web-based telemedicine platform (THOLOMEUS) will be used for data collection. The use of the telemedicine system will allow

  1. Biomedical Wireless Ambulatory Crew Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chmiel, Alan; Humphreys, Brad

    2009-01-01

    A compact, ambulatory biometric data acquisition system has been developed for space and commercial terrestrial use. BioWATCH (Bio medical Wireless and Ambulatory Telemetry for Crew Health) acquires signals from biomedical sensors using acquisition modules attached to a common data and power bus. Several slots allow the user to configure the unit by inserting sensor-specific modules. The data are then sent real-time from the unit over any commercially implemented wireless network including 802.11b/g, WCDMA, 3G. This system has a distributed computing hierarchy and has a common data controller on each sensor module. This allows for the modularity of the device along with the tailored ability to control the cards using a relatively small master processor. The distributed nature of this system affords the modularity, size, and power consumption that betters the current state of the art in medical ambulatory data acquisition. A new company was created to market this technology.

  2. Real-time ECG emulation: a multiple dipole model for electrocardiography simulation.

    PubMed

    Abkai, Ciamak; Hesser, Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    A new model for describing electrocardiography (ECG) is presented, which is based on multiple dipoles compared to standard single dipole approaches in vector electrocardiography. The multiple dipole parameters are derived from real data (e.g. four dipoles from 12-channel ECG) by solving the backward problem of ECG numerically. Results are transformed to a waveform description based on Gaussian mixture for every dimension of each dipole. These compact parameterized descriptors are used for a very realistic real-time simulation applying the forward solution of the proposed model.

  3. Cross sectional longitudinal study of spot morning urine protein:creatinine ratio, 24 hour urine protein excretion rate, glomerular filtration rate, and end stage renal failure in chronic renal disease in patients without diabetes.

    PubMed Central

    Ruggenenti, P.; Gaspari, F.; Perna, A.; Remuzzi, G.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether the protein:creatinine ratio in spot morning urine samples is a reliable indicator of 24 hour urinary protein excretion and predicts the rate of decline of glomerular filtration rate and progression to end stage renal failure in non-diabetic patients with chronic nephropathy. DESIGN: Cross sectional correlation between the ratio and urinary protein excretion rate. Univariate and multivariate analysis of baseline predictors, including the ratio and 24 hour urinary protein, of decline in glomerular filtration rate and end stage renal failure in the long term. SETTING: Research centre in Italy. SUBJECTS: 177 non-diabetic outpatients with chronic renal disease screened for participation in the ramipril efficacy in nephropathy study. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Rate of decline in filtration rate evaluated by repeated measurements of unlabelled iohexol plasma clearance and rate of progression to renal failure. RESULTS: Protein:creatinine ratio was significantly correlated with absolute and log transformed 24 hour urinary protein values (P = 0.0001 and P < 0.0001, respectively.) Ratios also had high predictive value for rate of decline of the glomerular filtration rate (univariate P = 0.0003, multivariate P = 0.004) and end stage renal failure (P = 0.002 and P = 0.04). Baseline protein:creatinine ratios and rate of decline of the glomerular filtration rate were also significantly correlated (P < 0.0005). In the lowest third of the protein:creatinine ratio (< 1.7) there was 3% renal failure compared with 21.2% in the highest third (> 2.7) (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Protein:creatinine ratio in spot morning urine samples is a precise indicator of proteinuria and a reliable predictor of progression of disease in non-diabetic patients with chronic nephropathies and represents a simple and inexpensive procedure in establishing severity of renal disease and prognosis. PMID:9501711

  4. Index Blood Tests and National Early Warning Scores within 24 Hours of Emergency Admission Can Predict the Risk of In-Hospital Mortality: A Model Development and Validation Study

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Mohammed A.; Rudge, Gavin; Watson, Duncan; Wood, Gordon; Smith, Gary B.; Prytherch, David R.; Girling, Alan; Stevens, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Background We explored the use of routine blood tests and national early warning scores (NEWS) reported within ±24 hours of admission to predict in-hospital mortality in emergency admissions, using empirical decision Tree models because they are intuitive and may ultimately be used to support clinical decision making. Methodology A retrospective analysis of adult emergency admissions to a large acute hospital during April 2009 to March 2010 in the West Midlands, England, with a full set of index blood tests results (albumin, creatinine, haemoglobin, potassium, sodium, urea, white cell count and an index NEWS undertaken within ±24 hours of admission). We developed a Tree model by randomly splitting the admissions into a training (50%) and validation dataset (50%) and assessed its accuracy using the concordance (c-) statistic. Emergency admissions (about 30%) did not have a full set of index blood tests and/or NEWS and so were not included in our analysis. Results There were 23248 emergency admissions with a full set of blood tests and NEWS with an in-hospital mortality of 5.69%. The Tree model identified age, NEWS, albumin, sodium, white cell count and urea as significant (p<0.001) predictors of death, which described 17 homogeneous subgroups of admissions with mortality ranging from 0.2% to 60%. The c-statistic for the training model was 0.864 (95%CI 0.852 to 0.87) and when applied to the testing data set this was 0.853 (95%CI 0.840 to 0.866). Conclusions An easy to interpret validated risk adjustment Tree model using blood test and NEWS taken within ±24 hours of admission provides good discrimination and offers a novel approach to risk adjustment which may potentially support clinical decision making. Given the nature of the clinical data, the results are likely to be generalisable but further research is required to investigate this promising approach. PMID:23734195

  5. Effects of dietary fish and weight reduction on ambulatory blood pressure in overweight hypertensives.

    PubMed

    Bao, D Q; Mori, T A; Burke, V; Puddey, I B; Beilin, L J

    1998-10-01

    Obesity is a major factor contributing to hypertension and increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Regular consumption of dietary fish and omega3 fatty acids of marine origin can lower blood pressure (BP) levels and reduce cardiovascular risk. This study examined the potential effects of combining dietary fish rich in omega3 fatty acids with a weight loss regimen in overweight hypertensive subjects, with ambulatory BP levels as the primary end point. Using a factorial design, 69 overweight medication-treated hypertensives were randomized to a daily fish meal (3.65 g omega3 fatty acids), weight reduction, the 2 regimens combined, or a control regimen for 16 weeks. Sixty-three subjects with a mean+/-SEM body mass index of 31.6+/-0.5 kg/m2 completed the study. Weight fell by 5.6+/-0.8 kg with energy restriction. Dietary fish and weight loss had significant independent and additive effects on 24-hour ambulatory BP. Effects were greatest on awake systolic and diastolic BP (P<0.01); relative to control, awake pressures fell 6.0/3.0 mm Hg with dietary fish alone, 5.5/2.2 mm Hg with weight reduction alone, and 13.0/9.3 mm Hg with fish and weight loss combined. These results also remained significant after further adjustment for changes in urinary sodium, potassium, or the sodium/potassium ratio, as well as dietary macronutrients. Dietary fish also significantly reduced 24-hour (-3.1+/-1.4 bpm, P=0.036) and awake (-4.2+/-1.6 bpm, P=0. 013) ambulatory heart rates. Weight reduction had a significant effect on sleeping heart rate only (-3.2+/-1.7 bpm, P=0.037). Combining a daily fish meal with a weight-reducing regimen led to additive effects on ambulatory BP and decreased heart rate. The effects were large, suggesting that cardiovascular risk and antihypertensive drug requirements are likely to be reduced substantially by combining dietary fish meals rich in omega3 fatty acids with weight-loss regimens in overweight medication-treated hypertensives. The reduction in heart

  6. Daily Energy Expenditure and Its Relation to Health Care Costs in Patients Undergoing Ambulatory Electrocardiographic Monitoring.

    PubMed

    George, Jason; Abdulla, Rami Khoury; Yeow, Raymond; Aggarwal, Anshul; Boura, Judith; Wegner, James; Franklin, Barry A

    2017-02-15

    Our increasingly sedentary lifestyle is associated with a heightened risk of obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and cardiovascular mortality. Using the recently developed heart rate index formula in 843 patients (mean ± SD age 62.3 ± 15.7 years) who underwent 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiographic (ECG) monitoring, we estimated average and peak daily energy expenditure, expressed as metabolic equivalents (METs), and related these data to subsequent hospital encounters and health care costs. In this cohort, estimated daily average and peak METs were 1.7 ± 0.7 and 5.5 ± 2.1, respectively. Patients who achieved daily bouts of peak energy expenditure ≥5 METs had fewer hospital encounters (p = 0.006) and median health care costs that were nearly 50% lower (p <0.001) than their counterparts who attained <5 METs. In patients whose body mass index was ≥30 kg/m(2), there were significant differences in health care costs depending on whether they achieved <5 or ≥5 METs estimated by ambulatory ECG monitoring (p = 0.005). Interestingly, patients who achieved ≥5 METs had lower and no significant difference in their health care costs, regardless of their body mass index (p = 0.46). Patients with previous percutaneous coronary intervention who achieved ≥5 METs had lower health care costs (p = 0.044) and fewer hospital encounters (p = 0.004) than those who achieved <5 METs. In conclusion, average and peak daily energy expenditures estimated from ambulatory ECG monitoring may provide useful information regarding health care utilization in patients with and without previous percutaneous coronary intervention, irrespective of body habitus. Our findings are the first to link lower intensities of peak daily energy expenditure, estimated from ambulatory ECG monitoring, with increased health care utilization.

  7. Improved Oxygenation 24 Hours After Transition to Airway Pressure Release Ventilation or High-Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation Accurately Discriminates Survival in Immunocompromised Pediatric Patients With Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome*

    PubMed Central

    Yehya, Nadir; Topjian, Alexis A.; Thomas, Neal J.; Friess, Stuart H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Children with an immunocompromised condition and requiring invasive mechanical ventilation have high risk of death. Such patients are commonly transitioned to rescue modes of non-conventional ventilation, including airway pressure release ventilation and high-frequency oscillatory ventilation, for acute respiratory distress syndrome refractory to conventional ventilation. Our aim was to describe our experience with airway pressure release ventilation and high-frequency oscillatory ventilation in children with an immunocompromised condition and acute respiratory distress syndrome refractory to conventional ventilation and to identify factors associated with survival. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Tertiary care, university-affiliated PICU. Patients Sixty pediatric patients with an immunocompromised condition and acute respiratory distress syndrome refractory to conventional ventilation transitioned to either airway pressure release ventilation or high-frequency oscillatory ventilation. Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results Demographic data, ventilator settings, arterial blood gases, oxygenation index, and Pao2/Fio2 were recorded before transition to either mode of nonconventional ventilation and at predetermined intervals after transition for up to 5 days. Mortality in the entire cohort was 63% and did not differ between patients transitioned to airway pressure release ventilation and high-frequency oscillatory ventilation. For both airway pressure release ventilation and high-frequency oscillatory ventilation, improvements in oxygenation index and Pao2/Fio2 at 24 hours expressed as a fraction of pretransition values (oxygenation index24/oxygenation indexpre and Pao2/Fio224/Pao2/FIO2pre) reliably discriminated nonsurvivors from survivors, with receiver operating characteristic areas under the curves between 0.89 and 0.95 (p for all curves < 0.001). Sensitivity-specificity analysis suggested that less than 15% reduction in

  8. Differential Gene Expression in Explanted Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells 24-Hours Post-Exposure to 532 nm, 3.0 ns Pulsed Laser Light and 1064 nm, 170 ps Pulsed Laser Light 12-Hours Post-Exposure: Results Compendium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    Laser Light and 1064 nm, 170 ps Pulsed Laser Light 12-hours Post-Exposure: Results Compendium John W. Obringer Martin D. Johnson Laser and Optics...Explanted Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells 12-hours Post-Exposure to 532 nm, 3.0 ns Pulsed Laser Light and 1064 nm, 170 ps Pulsed Laser Lightl2-hours...Explanted Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial USAFA F05611-02-P-0471 Cells 24-Hours Post-Exposure to 532 nm, 3.0 ns Pulsed Laser-Light and 1064nm, 170 ps Pulsed

  9. Myocardial perfusion imaging with thallium-201: correlation with coronary arteriography and electrocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Sternberg, Leonard; Wald, Robert W.; Feiglin, David H.I.; Morch, John E.

    1978-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging with thallium-201 and electrocardiography with the subject at rest and undergoing submaximal treadmill exercise were performed in 19 men and 3 women. Selective coronary arteriography and left ventriculography showed that 7 had normal coronary arteries and 15 had coronary artery disease. The 11 persons with electrocardiographic evidence of an old myocardial infarct (q waves) had a perfusion defect at rest in the area of the infarct and a segmental abnormality of wall motion apparent on the left ventriculogram corresponding to the perfusion defect. Myocardial perfusion imaging and electrocardiography were equally sensitive in detecting coronary artery disease in exercising individuals: perfusion defects were noted in 7 of the 15 persons with coronary artery disease, and diagnostic ST-segment depression was present in 8 of the 15. Combination of the results of the two tests with exercise permitted the identification of 11 of the 15 persons and improved the sensitivity. Combination of the results of rest and exercise imaging and electrocardiography permitted the identification of 94% of the patients with coronary artery disease. Myocardial perfusion imaging with 201TI in the subject at rest is a sensitive indicator of previous myocardial infarction. Imaging after the subject has exercised is a useful adjunct to conventional exercise electrocardiography, especially in those whose exercise electrocardiogram is non-interpretable. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5 PMID:630487

  10. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory blood pressure in children with sleep-disordered breathing.

    PubMed

    Amin, Raouf S; Carroll, John L; Jeffries, Jenny L; Grone, Charles; Bean, Judy A; Chini, Barbara; Bokulic, Ronald; Daniels, Stephen R

    2004-04-15

    Obstructive sleep apnea causes intermittent elevation of systemic blood pressure (BP) during sleep. To determine whether obstructive apnea in children has a tonic effect on diurnal BP, 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure was obtained from 60 children with mean age of 10.8 +/- 3.5 years. Thirty-nine children had obstructive apnea and 21 had primary snoring. Children with obstructive apnea had significantly greater mean BP variability during wakefulness and sleep, a higher night-to-day systolic BP, and a smaller nocturnal dipping of mean BP. Variability of mean arterial pressure during wakefulness was predicted by the desaturation, body mass, and arousal indices, whereas variability during sleep was predicted by apnea-hypopnea and body mass indices. Nocturnal BP dipping was predicted by the desaturation index. There were no significant differences in systolic, diastolic, or mean arterial BP during sleep between the groups. Diastolic BP during wakefulness was significantly different between the groups and correlated negatively with apnea-hypopnea index. We conclude that obstructive apnea in children is associated with 24-hour BP dysregulation and that, independent of obesity, the frequency of obstructive apnea, oxygen desaturation, and arousal contributes to abnormal BP control.

  11. Association of uremic pruritus in hemodialysis patients with the number of days of high mean 24-hour particulate matter with a diameter of <2.5 μm

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming-Hui; Chan, Ming-Jen; Hsu, Ching-Wei; Weng, Cheng-Hao; Yen, Tzung-Hai; Huang, Wen-Hung

    2017-01-01

    Uremic pruritus (UP) is a common and incapacitating symptom in patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD). The pathogenesis of UP is multifactorial and complex. Particulate matter (PM), a major air pollutant, is a mixture of particles with various chemical compositions. PM is associated with several allergic diseases, including dermatitis. To assess the role of PM (PM with a diameter of <10 μm [PM10] and PM with a diameter of <2.5 μm [PM2.5]) and other clinical variables in UP in patients on HD, we recruited 866 patients on maintenance HD (MHD). We analyzed the number of days of mean 24-hour PM10 ≥125 μg/m3/12 months (NDPM10) or the number of days of mean 24-hour PM2.5 ≥35 μg/m3/12 months (NDPM2.5) exceeding the standard level in the past 12 months respectively to determine the association with UP. In a multivariate logistic regression, HD duration, serum ferritin levels, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels, and NDPM2.5 ≥116 days/12 months were positively associated with UP. This cross-sectional study showed that the number of days on which the environmental PM2.5 exceeds the standard level might be associated with UP in patients on MHD. PMID:28260912

  12. Communication in acute ambulatory care.

    PubMed

    Dean, Marleah; Oetzel, John; Sklar, David P

    2014-12-01

    Effective communication has been linked to better health outcomes, higher patient satisfaction, and treatment adherence. Communication in ambulatory care contexts is even more crucial, as providers typically do not know patients' medical histories or have established relationships, conversations are time constrained, interruptions are frequent, and the seriousness of patients' medical conditions may create additional tension during interactions. Yet, health communication often unduly emphasizes information exchange-the transmission and receipt of messages leading to a mutual understanding of a patient's condition, needs, and treatments. This approach does not take into account the importance of rapport building and contextual issues, and may ultimately limit the amount of information exchanged.The authors share the perspective of communication scientists to enrich the current approach to medical communication in ambulatory health care contexts, broadening the under standing of medical communication beyond information exchange to a more holistic, multilayered viewpoint, which includes rapport and contextual issues. The authors propose a socio-ecological model for understanding communication in acute ambulatory care. This model recognizes the relationship of individuals to their environment and emphasizes the importance of individual and contextual factors that influence patient-provider interactions. Its key elements include message exchange and individual, organizational, societal, and cultural factors. Using this model, and following the authors' recommendations, providers and medical educators can treat communication as a holistic process shaped by multiple layers. This is a step toward being able to negotiate conflicting demands, resolve tensions, and create encounters that lead to positive health outcomes.

  13. Prognostic Effect of the Nocturnal Blood Pressure Fall in Hypertensive Patients: The Ambulatory Blood Pressure Collaboration in Patients With Hypertension (ABC-H) Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Salles, Gil F; Reboldi, Gianpaolo; Fagard, Robert H; Cardoso, Claudia R L; Pierdomenico, Sante D; Verdecchia, Paolo; Eguchi, Kazuo; Kario, Kazuomi; Hoshide, Satoshi; Polonia, Jorge; de la Sierra, Alejandro; Hermida, Ramon C; Dolan, Eamon; O'Brien, Eoin; Roush, George C

    2016-04-01

    The prognostic importance of the nocturnal systolic blood pressure (SBP) fall, adjusted for average 24-hour SBP levels, is unclear. The Ambulatory Blood Pressure Collaboration in Patients With Hypertension (ABC-H) examined this issue in a meta-analysis of 17 312 hypertensives from 3 continents. Risks were computed for the systolic night-to-day ratio and for different dipping patterns (extreme, reduced, and reverse dippers) relative to normal dippers. ABC-H investigators provided multivariate adjusted hazard ratios (HRs), with and without adjustment for 24-hour SBP, for total cardiovascular events (CVEs), coronary events, strokes, cardiovascular mortality, and total mortality. Average 24-hour SBP varied from 131 to 140 mm Hg and systolic night-to-day ratio from 0.88 to 0.93. There were 1769 total CVEs, 916 coronary events, 698 strokes, 450 cardiovascular deaths, and 903 total deaths. After adjustment for 24-hour SBP, the systolic night-to-day ratio predicted all outcomes: from a 1-SD increase, summary HRs were 1.12 to 1.23. Reverse dipping also predicted all end points: HRs were 1.57 to 1.89. Reduced dippers, relative to normal dippers, had a significant 27% higher risk for total CVEs. Risks for extreme dippers were significantly influenced by antihypertensive treatment (P<0.001): untreated patients had increased risk of total CVEs (HR, 1.92), whereas treated patients had borderline lower risk (HR, 0.72) than normal dippers. For CVEs, heterogeneity was low for systolic night-to-day ratio and reverse/reduced dipping and moderate for extreme dippers. Quality of included studies was moderate to high, and publication bias was undetectable. In conclusion, in this largest meta-analysis of hypertensive patients, the nocturnal BP fall provided substantial prognostic information, independent of 24-hour SBP levels.

  14. Learning From Errors in Ambulatory Pediatrics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    355 Learning from Errors in Ambulatory Pediatrics Julie J. Mohr, Carole M. Lannon, Kathleen A. Thoma, Donna Woods, Eric J. Slora, Richard C...Wasserman, Lynne Uhring Abstract Background: Approximately 70 percent of pediatric care occurs in ambulatory settings, yet there has been little...research on errors and harm in these settings. Given the importance of understanding harm in ambulatory pediatrics , this study was funded by the Agency

  15. 24-hour urinary aldosterone excretion test

    MedlinePlus

    ... sodium is in your diet Whether your kidneys work properly The condition being diagnosed Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or test different samples. Talk to your doctor ...

  16. Long-term EEG in adults: sleep-deprived EEG (SDE), ambulatory EEG (Amb-EEG) and long-term video-EEG recording (LTVER).

    PubMed

    Michel, V; Mazzola, L; Lemesle, M; Vercueil, L

    2015-03-01

    Long-term EEG in adults includes three modalities: sleep deprived-EEG lasting 1 to 3 hours, 24 hours ambulatory-EEG and continuous prolonged video-EEG lasting from several hours to several days. The main indications of long-term EEG are: syndromic classification of epilepsy; search for interictal discharges when epilepsy is suspected or for the purpose of therapeutic evaluation; positive diagnosis of paroxysmal clinical events; and pre-surgical evaluation of drug-resistant epilepsy. Sleep deprived-EEG and ambulatory-EEG are indicated to detect interictal discharges in order to validate a syndromic classification of epilepsy when standard EEG is negative. These exams can help in evaluating treatment efficacy, especially when clinical evaluation is difficult. Long-term video EEG is indicated for drug-resistant epilepsy, to analyze electro-clinical correlations in a pre-surgical evaluation context, and to refine a positive diagnosis when paroxysmal clinical events are frequent.

  17. Cross-Sectional Study of 24-Hour Urinary Electrolyte Excretion and Associated Health Outcomes in a Convenience Sample of Australian Primary Schoolchildren: The Salt and Other Nutrients in Children (SONIC) Study Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Janet R; Campbell, Karen J; Riddell, Lynn J; Rigo, Manuela; Liem, Djin Gie; Keast, Russell S; He, Feng J; Nowson, Caryl A

    2015-01-01

    Background Dietary sodium and potassium are involved in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Data exploring the cardiovascular outcomes associated with these electrolytes within Australian children is sparse. Furthermore, an objective measure of sodium and potassium intake within this group is lacking. Objective The primary aim of the Salt and Other Nutrient Intakes in Children (“SONIC”) study was to measure sodium and potassium intakes in a sample of primary schoolchildren located in Victoria, Australia, using 24-hour urine collections. Secondary aims were to identify the dietary sources of sodium and potassium, examine the association between these electrolytes and cardiovascular risk factors, and assess children’s taste preferences and saltiness perception of manufactured foods. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in a convenience sample of schoolchildren attending primary schools in Victoria, Australia. Participants completed one 24-hour urine collection, which was analyzed for sodium, potassium, and creatinine. Completeness of collections was assessed using collection time, total volume, and urinary creatinine. One 24-hour dietary recall was completed to assess dietary intake. Other data collected included blood pressure, body weight, height, waist and hip circumference. Children were also presented with high and low sodium variants of food products and asked to discriminate salt level and choose their preferred variant. Parents provided demographic information and information on use of discretionary salt. Descriptive statistics will be used to describe sodium and potassium intakes. Linear and logistic regression models with clustered robust standard errors will be used to assess the association between electrolyte intake and health outcomes (blood pressure and body mass index/BMI z-score and waist circumference) and to assess differences in taste preference and discrimination between high and low sodium foods, and correlations between

  18. Metadata - National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) is designed to collect information on the services provided in hospital emergency and outpatient departments and in ambulatory surgery centers.

  19. SLEEP DURATION AND AMBULATORY BLOOD PRESSURE IN BLACK AND WHITE ADOLESCENTS

    PubMed Central

    Mezick, Elizabeth J; Hall, Martica; Matthews, Karen A

    2012-01-01

    Self-reported short sleep duration is linked to higher blood pressure and incident hypertension in adults. Few studies have examined sleep and blood pressure in younger samples. We evaluated the associations between actigraphy-assessed time spent asleep and ambulatory blood pressure in adolescents. Participants were 246 black and white adolescents (mean age = 15.7) who were free from cardiovascular or kidney disease and were not taking sleep, cardiovascular, or psychiatric medications. Sleep duration and efficiency were assessed with in-home wrist actigraphy and sleep diaries across one week; ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was used to obtain 24-hour, sleep, wake blood pressure, and sleep-wake blood pressure ratios across two full days and nights. Results showed that shorter actigraphy-assessed sleep across one week was related to higher 48-hour blood pressure and higher nighttime blood pressure. Shorter sleep was also related to a higher systolic blood pressure sleep-wake ratio. These results were independent of age, race, sex, and body mass index. Follow-up analyses by race revealed that associations between sleep duration and blood pressure were largely present in white, but not black, adolescents. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that the cardiovascular consequences of short sleep may begin as early as adolescence. PMID:22275538

  20. Ambulatory Arterial Stiffness Index Is Higher in Hypertensive Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg; Neves, Mario Fritsch; Oigman, Wille; Bregman, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI) is a parameter obtained from ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) that correlates with clinical endpoints. The aim of this study was to compare AASI in nondiabetic hypertensive patients with and without chronic kidney disease (CKD). Subjects with systemic arterial hypertension (SAH, n = 30) with normal renal function, aged 40 to 75 years, were compared to hypertensive patients with CKD (n = 30) presenting estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 mL/min by MDRD formula. ABPM was carried out in all patients. In CKD group, eGFR was 35.3 ± 2.8 ml/min. The mean 24-hour systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) was similar in both groups. AASI was significantly higher in CKD group (0.45 ± 0.03 versus 0.37 ± 0.02, P < 0.05), positively correlated to age (r = 0.38, P < 0.01) and pulse pressure (r = 0.43, P < 0.01) and negatively correlated to nocturnal BP fall (r = -0.28, P = 0.03). These findings indicate the presence of stiffer vessels in CKD hypertensive patients. PMID:22675608

  1. The Relation between Hot Flashes and Ambulatory Blood Pressure: The Hilo Women’s Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Daniel E.; Sievert, Lynnette L.; Morrison, Lynn A.; Rahberg, Nichole; Reza, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Hot flashes (HFs) have been associated with elevated blood pressure, but studies have not examined the relationship between objectively measured HFs and blood pressure during normal daily activities. The objectives of this study are to examine ambulatory blood pressure (BP) differences between women who report HFs and those who do not, and to observe whether an objectively measured HF is associated with transient changes in BP. Methods A sample of 202 women in Hilo, Hawaii aged 45–55 years were asked to fill out a questionnaire that included demographic information and an inventory of symptoms. The women underwent simultaneous 24-hour monitoring of ambulatory BP and HFs, while keeping a diary that included mood and HF reports. Results No significant difference was present in mean BP between women who reported having a HF during the past 2 weeks and those who did not. When measurements controlled for negative mood reports and posture, there was a highly significant elevation in Z scores of systolic BP when a measured, objective HF occurred within 10 minutes preceding a BP reading, and a significant elevation of Z scores of diastolic BP when a subjectively reported HF occurred within 10 minutes after a BP reading. Conclusions These results suggest that objectively measured HFs precede transient elevations of systolic BP, but it is unclear if there is a causal relationship. These results also suggest that women experience subjective HFs within 10 minutes after a transient increase in diastolic BP. Again, the causal relationship is not understood. PMID:21183716

  2. [Left ventricular relaxation and ambulatory blood pressure in mild, untreated arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Herpin, D; Raynier, P; Ciber, M; Amiel, A; Boutaud, P; Demange, J

    1989-03-01

    Twenty patients with mild, untreated arterial hypertension had ambulatory blood pressure recordings and a digitized echocardiographic study of the left ventricle with measurement of its mass (LVM) and of relaxation parameters. A significant correlation was found between LVM and ambulatory systolic pressure during daytime (r = 0.64; p less than 0.01; n = 20) and during 24 hours (r = 0.79; p less than 0.001; n = 16). One of the relaxation parameters studied, the time taken to reach maximal speed of left ventricular enlargement, was closely related to the diurnal diastolic blood pressure (r = 0.58; p less than 0.01; n = 20), whereas in this population with mild arterial blood pressure none of the parameters was related to the amount of increase of LVM. One may therefore consider the abnormalities of left ventricular relaxation as likely to appear at an early stage of arterial hypertension; their discovery may antedate that of LVM and confirm that the hypertensive disease is real. However, the methodological problems encountered with type of exploration ought to be stressed: left ventricular relaxation is a multifactorial phenomenon, and its echocardiographic approach is subject to many hazards.

  3. Big Data and Ambulatory Care

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, Jane Hyatt; Gray, Elizabeth Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Big data is heralded as having the potential to revolutionize health care by making large amounts of data available to support care delivery, population health, and patient engagement. Critics argue that big data's transformative potential is inhibited by privacy requirements that restrict health information exchange. However, there are a variety of permissible activities involving use and disclosure of patient information that support care delivery and management. This article presents an overview of the legal framework governing health information, dispels misconceptions about privacy regulations, and highlights how ambulatory care providers in particular can maximize the utility of big data to improve care. PMID:25401945

  4. Hypotension based on office and ambulatory monitoring blood pressure. Prevalence and clinical profile among a cohort of 70,997 treated hypertensives.

    PubMed

    Divisón-Garrote, Juan A; Banegas, José R; De la Cruz, Juan J; Escobar-Cervantes, Carlos; De la Sierra, Alejandro; Gorostidi, Manuel; Vinyoles, Ernest; Abellán-Aleman, José; Segura, Julián; Ruilope, Luis M

    2016-09-01

    We aimed to determine the prevalence of hypotension and factors associated with the presence of this condition in treated hypertensive patients undergoing ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM). Data were taken from the Spanish ABPM Registry. Office blood pressure (BP) and ABPM were determined using validated devices under standardized conditions. Based on previous studies, hypotension was defined as office systolic/diastolic BP <110 and/or 70 mm Hg, daytime ABPM <105 and/or 65 mm Hg, nighttime ABPM <90 and/or 50 mm Hg, and 24-hour ABPM <100 and/or 60 mm Hg. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to determine the variables associated with the presence of hypotension. A total of 70,997 hypertensive patients on treatment (mean age 61.8 years, 52.5% men) were included in the study. The prevalence of hypotension was 8.2% with office BP, 12.2% with daytime ABPM, 3.9% with nighttime ABPM, and 6.8% with 24-hour ABPM. Low diastolic BP values were responsible for the majority of cases of hypotension. Some 68% of the hypotension cases detected by daytime ABPM did not correspond to hypotension according to office BP. The variables independently and consistently associated with higher likelihood of office, daytime, and 24 hour-based hypotension were age, female gender, history of ischemic heart disease, and body mass index <30 kg/m(2) (P < .05). In conclusion, in this large cohort of patients in usual daily practice, one in eight treated hypertensive patients are at risk of hypotension according to daytime BP. Two-thirds of them are not adequately identified with office BP. ABPM could be especially helpful for identifying ambulatory hypotension, in particular in patients who are older, women, or with previous ischemic heart disease where antihypertensive treatment should be especially individualized and cautious.

  5. Fasting in paediatric ambulatory surgery.

    PubMed

    Klemetti, Seija; Suominen, Tarja

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study was to examine how preoperative fasting and postoperative termination of the fast was experienced in ambulatory surgery by child patients and their mothers. The target group consisted of children (n = 12, age 2-10 years) who had undergone tonsillectomy/adenoidectomy, and their mothers. In the interviews, the mothers were asked to describe the problems connected with their child's preoperative fast and postoperative termination of the fast, as well as the things that went well in the process. Content analysis was carried out inductively. Preoperatively, the children were thirsty and anxious, but understood the fasting situation well. In some cases, there were conflicts between the child and his/her parent if fasting was prolonged. Parents also had doubts about their ability to implement the child's fast. Postoperatively, children had pains in their throats and stomachs, suffered from nausea, and had difficulty taking in nutrition and medication. Parents had worries about their child's home care, such as food intake and administration of pain medication. The possibility of postoperative bleeding and exacerbation of the child's condition was also worrying for the parents. The most evident result of the study was that parents need more information before their child's operation. Preparing the child for the operation by giving him/her nutrition as long as permitted enhances postoperative recovery and improves parents' control over the ambulatory surgical experience. Nurses should take a more active part in children's perioperative fasting and preoperative preparation of children and their parents. In further research, experimental studies should be designed in order to receive more evidence-based information for clinical practice.

  6. Relationship of office, home, and ambulatory blood pressure to blood glucose and lipid variables in the PAMELA population.

    PubMed

    Mancia, Giuseppe; Facchetti, Rita; Bombelli, Michele; Polo Friz, Hernan; Grassi, Guido; Giannattasio, Cristina; Sega, Roberto

    2005-06-01

    Alterations in blood glucose and cholesterol are more frequently detectable in hypertensive than in normotensive conditions. However, no information exists as to whether this phenomenon involves only office or also home and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure (ie, when values are representative of daily life). In 2045 subjects enrolled in the Pressioni Arteriose Monitorate E Loro Associazioni (PAMELA) study, we measured home, 24-hour, and office blood pressure. Measurements also included fasting blood glucose and serum total and HDL cholesterol values. Prevalence of diabetes (> or =126 mg/dL or use of antidiabetic drugs), impaired fasting blood glucose (> or =110 to <126 mg/dL), and hypercholesterolemia (serum total cholesterol > or =240 mg/dL or 200 mg/dL) increased progressively from "optimal" to "normal," "high-normal," and "elevated" office systolic or diastolic blood pressure. Fasting blood glucose and total serum cholesterol also increased progressively from the first to the fourth group, with HDL cholesterol values showing a concomitant progressive decrease. This was also the case for quartiles of office, home, and 24-hour blood pressure. In the whole population, there was a positive correlation between serum cholesterol or blood glucose and all blood pressure values (P always <0.0001), with a much smaller and less consistent relationship with heart rate. In a multivariate analysis that included gender, body mass index, age, and antihypertensive treatment, all blood pressure values remained highly significantly related to values of either metabolic variables. Thus, in the PAMELA population, glucose and lipid values are independently related to blood pressure. This is also the case when daily life blood pressure values are considered.

  7. Helping You Choose Quality Ambulatory Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Quality Check ® at www. qualitycheck. org to find Joint Commission accredited ambulatory care centers. • Can you get a ... Helping Your Choose series is published by The Joint Commission, the largest health care accrediting body in the ...

  8. Ambulatory cleft lip surgery: A value analysis

    PubMed Central

    Arneja, Jugpal S; Mitton, Craig

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Socialized health systems face fiscal constraints due to a limited supply of resources and few reliable ways to control patient demand. Some form of prioritization must occur as to what services to offer and which programs to fund. A data-driven approach to decision making that incorporates outcomes, including safety and quality, in the setting of fiscal prudence is required. A value model championed by Michael Porter encompasses these parameters, in which value is defined as outcomes divided by cost. OBJECTIVES: To assess ambulatory cleft lip surgery from a quality and safety perspective, and to assess the costs associated with ambulatory cleft lip surgery in North America. Conclusions will be drawn as to how the overall value of cleft lip surgery may be enhanced. METHODS: A value analysis of published articles related to ambulatory cleft lip repair over the past 30 years was performed to determine what percentage of patients would be candidates for ambulatory cleft lip repair from a quality and safety perspective. An economic model was constructed based on costs associated with the inpatient stay related to cleft lip repair. RESULTS: On analysis of the published reports in the literature, a minority (28%) of patients are currently discharged in an ambulatory fashion following cleft lip repair. Further analysis suggests that 88.9% of patients would be safe candidates for same-day discharge. From an economic perspective, the mean cost per patient for the overnight admission component of ambulatory cleft surgery to the health care system in the United States was USD$2,390 and $1,800 in Canada. CONCLUSIONS: The present analysis reviewed germane publications over a 30-year period, ultimately suggesting that ambulatory cleft lip surgery results in preservation of quality and safety metrics for most patients. The financial model illustrates a potential cost saving through the adoption of such a practice change. For appropriately selected patients, ambulatory

  9. Methodological Considerations in Ambulatory Skin Conductance Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Doberenz, Sigrun; Roth, Walton T.; Maslowski, Nina I.; Wollburg, Eileen; Kim, Sunyoung

    2011-01-01

    Little is known how much skin conductance (SC) recordings from the fingers are affected by factors such as electrode site deterioration, ambient temperature (TMP), or physical activity (ACT), or by age, sex, race, or body mass index. We recorded SC, TMP, and ACT in 48 healthy control subjects for a 24-hour period, and calculated SC level (SCL), its standard deviation, the coefficient of SC variation, and frequency and amplitude of non-specific SC fluctuations. One method of assessing electrode site deterioration showed an average decline of 20 %, while a second method found no significant change. All SC measures were higher during waking than sleep. Other factors influenced different measures in different ways. Thus, 24-hour SC recording outside the laboratory is feasible, but some measures need to be corrected for the influence of confounding variables. PMID:21320551

  10. Comparison of thrombolysis in myocardial infarction, Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II risk scores in patients with acute myocardial infarction who require mechanical ventilation for more than 24 hours.

    PubMed

    Eran, Oren; Novack, Victor; Gilutz, Harel; Zahger, Doron

    2011-02-01

    The ability to provide an accurate prognosis in an intensive care unit is of major importance. Numerous risk scores have been developed to predict hospital mortality based on demographic, physiologic, and clinical data. These scores were universally developed in general medical or surgical intensive care units. Patients admitted to a cardiac care unit differ in many aspects from those admitted to general medical intensive care units. Few patients require mechanical ventilation and prolonged intensive care. Performance of risk scores developed for patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in this subgroup is unknown. We prospectively studied 51 consecutive patients who were admitted to a cardiac care unit from September 2006 to March 2008 for AMI and received mechanical ventilation for >24 hours. Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II), Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction, and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events risk scores were calculated for each patient. Mortality rates were extrapolated based on these 3 risk scores. Twenty-two of 51 patients (43%) died in hospital. Age, mean arterial pressure, urea, albumin, hemoglobin, need for vasopressors, and estimated glomerular filtration rate were predictive of mortality. APACHE II and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events scores were higher in nonsurvivors but Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction risk score was not predictive of mortality. APACHE II score had the highest value for area under receiver operator characteristics curve for mortality prediction. In conclusion, patients with AMI requiring mechanical ventilation have a high mortality rate. This risk is predicted by co-morbidities better than by direct cardiac parameters. Consequently, conventional AMI risk scores do not perform well in this very sick population and the APACHE II score better predicts their short-term outcome.

  11. Cardiac Autonomic Alteration and Metabolic Syndrome: An Ambulatory ECG-based Study in A General Population

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yan; Tseng, Ping-Huei; Ahn, Andrew; Wu, Ming-Shiang; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Chen, Ming-Fong; Peng, Chung-Kang

    2017-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been associated with chronic damage to the cardiovascular system. This study aimed to evaluate early stage cardiac autonomic dysfunction with electrocardiography (ECG)-based measures in MetS subjects. During 2012–2013, 175 subjects with MetS and 226 healthy controls underwent ECG recordings of at least 4 hours starting in the morning with ambulatory one-lead ECG monitors. MetS was diagnosed using the criteria defined in the Adult Treatment Panel III, with a modification of waist circumference for Asians. Conventional heart rate variability (HRV) analysis, and complexity index (CI1–20) calculated from 20 scales of entropy (multiscale entropy, MSE), were compared between subjects with MetS and controls. Compared with the healthy controls, subjects with MetS had significantly reduced HRV, including SDNN and pNN20 in time domain, VLF, LF and HF in frequency domain, as well as SD2 in Poincaré analysis. MetS subjects have significantly lower complexity index (CI1–20) than healthy subjects (1.69 ± 0.18 vs. 1.77 ± 0.12, p < 0.001). MetS severity was inversely associated with the CI1–20 (r = −0.27, p < 0.001). MetS is associated with significant alterations in heart rate dynamics, including HRV and complexity. PMID:28290487

  12. Temporal Differential Gene Expression in Explanted Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells at 0.5, 1.0, 3.0, 6.0, 12 and 24 Hours Post-Exposure to 1064 nm, 3.6 ns Pulsed Laser Light

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    USAFA TR 2005-05 Temporal Differential Gene Expression in Explanted Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells at 0.5, 1.0, 3.0, 6.0, 12 and 24 Hours...AIR FORCE ACADEMY COLORADO 80840 20050630 417 USAFA TR 2005-05 This article, "Temporal Differential Gene Expression in Explanted Human Retinal ...Differential Gene Expression in Explanted Human Retinal Pigment USAFA F05611-02-P-0471 Epithelial Cells at 0.5, 1.0, 3.0, 6.0, 12 and 24-Hours Post-Exposure

  13. New horizons in ambulatory electroencephalography.

    PubMed

    Waterhouse, Elizabeth

    2003-01-01

    Since its inception 30 years ago, AEEG has continued to evolve--from four-channel tape recorders to 32-channel digital recorders with sophisticated automatic spike and seizure detection algorithms. AEEG remains an important tool in epilepsy evaluation. In the near future, smaller, faster, and more sophisticated AEEGs will be developed. Seizure detection/anticipation systems will allow the wearer to be forewarned of a seizure so that appropriate safety measures can be taken. With further refinement in our understanding of nonlinear dynamic analysis to define the pre-ictal state, AEEG will be coupled with an accurate seizure anticipation device in a closed-loop system, providing a time window during which therapeutic intervention can occur, to prevent a seizure. The therapeutic intervention will most likely involve vagus nerve or deep brain stimulation. An alternative is that the patient may learn to recognize early symptoms of the pre-ictal state and use behavioral biofeedback interventions to avoid a clinical seizure. In order to achieve convenient ambulatory recording and seizure detection that could realistically improve the lives of patients with refractory epilepsy, the process of miniaturization of such a device to a convenient size must be accomplished. One of the aspects of epilepsy that patients find most frustrating, and that most limits activities, is the vulnerability to sudden unexpected incapacitation due to the occurrence of a seizure. With miniaturization of AEEG and seizure anticipation technology, and advancements in our ability to identify the transition from pre-ictal to ictal state, there is realistic hope that patients with refractory epilepsy may gain control over their seizures and enjoy significantly improved quality of life.

  14. Preventing Misdiagnosis of Ambulatory Hypertension: Algorithm Using Office and Home Blood Pressures

    PubMed Central

    Shimbo, Daichi; Kuruvilla, Sujith; Haas, Donald; Pickering, Thomas G.; Schwartz, Joseph E.; Gerin, William

    2009-01-01

    Objectives An algorithm for making a differential diagnosis between sustained and white coat hypertension (SH and WCH) has been proposed–patients with office hypertension undergo home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM) and those with normal HBP levels undergo ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM). We tested whether incorporating an upper office blood pressure (OBP) cutoff in the algorithm, higher than the traditional 140/90 mmHg, reduces the need for HBPM and ABPM. Methods 229 normotensive and untreated mildly hypertensive participants (mean age 52.5 ± 14.6, 54% female) underwent OBP measurements, HBPM, and 24-hour ABPM. Using the algorithm, sensitivity (SN), specificity (SP), and positive and negative predictive values (PPV, NPV) for SH and WCH were assessed. We then modified the algorithm utilizing a systolic and diastolic OBP cutoff at a SP of 95% for ambulatory hypertension –those with office hypertension but OBP levels below the upper cutoff undergo HBPM and subsequent ABPM if appropriate. Results Using the original algorithm, SN and PPV for SH were 100% and 93.8%. Despite a SP of 44.4%, NPV was 100%. These values correspond to SP, NPV, SN, and PPV for WCH respectively. Using the modified algorithm, the diagnostic accuracy for SH and WCH did not change. However, far fewer participants needed HBPM (29 vs. 84) and ABPM (8 vs. 15). Conclusions In this sample, the original and modified algorithms are excellent at diagnosing SH and WCH. However, the latter requires far fewer subjects to undergo HBPM and ABPM. These findings have important implications for the cost-effective diagnosis of SH and WCH. PMID:19491703

  15. Increased salt sensitivity of ambulatory blood pressure in women with a history of severe preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Martillotti, Gabriella; Ditisheim, Agnès; Burnier, Michel; Wagner, Ghislaine; Boulvain, Michel; Irion, Olivier; Pechère-Bertschi, Antoinette

    2013-10-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the principal cause of death in women in developed countries and are importantly promoted by hypertension. The salt sensitivity of blood pressure (BP) is considered as an important cardiovascular risk factor at any BP level. Preeclampsia is a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy that arises as a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. This study measured the salt sensitivity of BP in women with a severe preeclampsia compared with women with no pregnancy hypertensive complications. Forty premenopausal women were recruited 10 years after delivery in a case-control study. Salt sensitivity was defined as an increase of >4 mm Hg in 24-hour ambulatory BP on a high-sodium diet. The ambulatory BP response to salt was significantly increased in women with a history of preeclampsia compared with that of controls. The mean (95% confidence interval) daytime systolic/diastolic BP increased significantly from 115 (109-118)/79 (76-82) mm Hg on low-salt diet to 123 (116-130)/80 (76-84) on a high-salt diet in women with preeclampsia, but not in the control group (from 111 [104-119]/77 [72-82] to 111 [106-116]/75 [72-79], respectively, P<0.05). The sodium sensitivity index (SSI=Δmean arterial pressure/Δurinary Na excretion×1000) was 51.2 (19.1-66.2) in women with preeclampsia and 6.6 (5.8-18.1) mm Hg/mol per day in controls (P=0.015). The nocturnal dip was blunted on a high-salt diet in women with preeclampsia. Our study shows that women who have developed preeclampsia are salt sensitive before their menopause, a finding that may contribute to their increased cardiovascular risk. Women with a history of severe preeclampsia should be targeted at an early stage for preventive measures of cardiovascular diseases.

  16. Diagnostic Errors in Ambulatory Care: Dimensions and Preventive Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Hardeep; Weingart, Saul N.

    2009-01-01

    Despite an increasing focus on patient safety in ambulatory care, progress in understanding and reducing diagnostic errors in this setting lag behind many other safety concerns such as medication errors. To explore the extent and nature of diagnostic errors in ambulatory care, we identified five dimensions of ambulatory care from which errors may…

  17. Assessing ethical and social issues of transtelephonic electrocardiography (TTEGG) in Chile.

    PubMed

    Lamas, Eugenia; Miguel, Silvia; Muehlan, Holger; Schmidt, Silke; Salinas, Rodrigo A

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to focus on the ethical and social issues derived from the implementation of transtelephonic electrocardiography (TTECG) in the public healthcare sector in Chile, studying patients and healthcare providers' acceptance and expectations concerning: (a) TTECG effectiveness and safety; and (b) data protection issues, such as confidentiality, privacy and security. For this purpose, we developed two psychosocial surveys; the first was addressed to patients receiving transtelephonic electrocardiogram (either in the emergency services of hospitals or in distant primary care services) and the second one aimed at healthcare providers involved in either administering and/or interpreting it. Results included: (a) major acceptability of TTECG in terms of safety and security; (b) privacy and confidentiality of the patients were considered to be well protected; and (c) the patient-doctor relationship was not affected by this device.

  18. Secure chaotic transmission of electrocardiography signals with acousto-optic modulation under profiled beam propagation.

    PubMed

    Almehmadi, Fares S; Chatterjee, Monish R

    2015-01-10

    Electrocardiography (ECG) signals are used for both medical purposes and identifying individuals. It is often necessary to encrypt this highly sensitive information before it is transmitted over any channel. A closed-loop acousto-optic hybrid device acting as a chaotic modulator is applied to ECG signals to achieve this encryption. Recently improved modeling of this approach using profiled optical beams has shown it to be very sensitive to key parameters that characterize the encryption and decryption process, exhibiting its potential for secure transmission of analog and digital signals. Here the encryption and decryption is demonstrated for ECG signals, both analog and digital versions, illustrating strong encryption without significant distortion. Performance analysis pertinent to both analog and digital transmission of the ECG waveform is also carried out using output signal-to-noise, signal-to-distortion, and bit-error-rate measures relative to the key parameters and presence of channel noise in the system.

  19. Development and clinical study of mobile 12-lead electrocardiography based on cloud computing for cardiac emergency.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Hideo; Uchimura, Yuji; Waki, Kayo; Omae, Koji; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Ohe, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    To improve emergency services for accurate diagnosis of cardiac emergency, we developed a low-cost new mobile electrocardiography system "Cloud Cardiology®" based upon cloud computing for prehospital diagnosis. This comprises a compact 12-lead ECG unit equipped with Bluetooth and Android Smartphone with an application for transmission. Cloud server enables us to share ECG simultaneously inside and outside the hospital. We evaluated the clinical effectiveness by conducting a clinical trial with historical comparison to evaluate this system in a rapid response car in the real emergency service settings. We found that this system has an ability to shorten the onset to balloon time of patients with acute myocardial infarction, resulting in better clinical outcome. Here we propose that cloud-computing based simultaneous data sharing could be powerful solution for emergency service for cardiology, along with its significant clinical outcome.

  20. Coordinator Traffic Diffusion for Data-Intensive Zigbee Transmission in Real-time Electrocardiography Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chinyang Henry

    2013-12-01

    Zigbee is expected to have an explosive growth in wireless medical monitoring systems because it possesses the advantages of low cost, safe power strength, and easy deployment. However, limited work focuses on solving the bottleneck issue at the Zigbee coordinator in a data-intensive system to guarantee transmission reliability of life-critical data. This paper proposes coordinator traffic diffusion (CTD) method to redirect excessive traffic from coordinator to the sink in electrocardiography (ECG) medical application. CTD router, which implements CTD design, automatically redirects ECG data traffic to the sink node without involving the coordinator, and thus reliable real-time ECG monitoring service can be delivered precisely. CTD design is tested in both TI CC2530 Zigbee platform and NS2 simulation. Experimental result demonstrates that a CTD design can assist routers in successfully delivering real-time ECG data samples reliably with the best transmission rate, 24 kb/s. This performance cannot be achieved by the original Zigbee design.

  1. Solving the inverse problem of electrocardiography using a Duncan and Horn formulation of the Kalman filter.

    PubMed

    Berrier, Keith L; Sorensen, Danny C; Khoury, Dirar S

    2004-03-01

    Numeric regularization methods most often used to solve the ill-posed inverse problem of electrocardiography are spatial and ignore the temporal nature of the problem. In this paper, a Kalman filter reformulation incorporated temporal information to regularize the inverse problem, and was applied to reconstruct left ventricular endocardial electrograms based on cavitary electrograms measured by a noncontact, multielectrode probe. These results were validated against in situ electrograms measured with an integrated, multielectrode basket-catheter. A three-dimensional, probe-endocardium model was determined from multiplane fluoroscopic images. The boundary element method was applied to solve the boundary value problem and determine a linear relationship between endocardial and probe potentials. The Duncan and Horn formulation of the Kalman filter was employed and was compared to the commonly used zero- and first-order Tikhonov spatial regularization as well as the Twomey temporal regularization method. Endocardial electrograms were reconstructed during both sinus and paced rhythms. The Paige and Saunders solution of the Duncan and Horn formulation reconstructed endocardial electrograms at an amplitude relative error of 13% (potential amplitude) which was superior to solutions obtained with zero-order Tikhonov (relative error, 31%), first-order Tikhonov (relative error, 19%), and Twomey regularization (relative error, 44%). Likewise, activation time error in the inverse solution using the Duncan and Horn formulation (2.9 ms) was smaller than that of zero-order Tikhonov (4.8 ms), first-order Tikhonov (5.4 ms), and Twomey regularization (5.8 ms). Therefore, temporal regularization based on the Duncan and Horn formulation of the Kalman filter improves the solution of the inverse problem of electrocardiography.

  2. Clinical characteristics of resistant hypertension evaluated by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kansui, Yasuo; Matsumura, Kiyoshi; Kida, Haruko; Sakata, Satoko; Ohtsubo, Toshio; Ibaraki, Ai; Kitazono, Takanari

    2014-01-01

    Strict control of blood pressure is important to prevent cardiovascular disease, although it is sometimes difficult to decrease blood pressure to target levels. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical characteristics of resistant hypertension evaluated by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. One hundred in-hospital patients, whose 24-hour average blood pressure was higher than 130/80 mmHg even after treatment with more than three antihypertensive drugs, were included in the present analysis. Circadian variation of blood pressure was evaluated by nocturnal fall in systolic blood pressure. Average blood pressures of all patients were high in both daytime and nighttime, 150.0/82.9 and 143.8/78.2 mmHg, respectively. Twenty patients had been treated with hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. In 63 patients out of the other 80 patients (79%), estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was also decreased (<60 mL/min/1.73 m²). The patients classified into dipper, non-dipper, riser and extreme-dipper were 20%, 43%, 34% and 3%, respectively. In addition, in 17 patients whose eGFR was preserved, 12 patients showed a non-dipper or riser pattern, suggesting that it was difficult to account for this altered circadian blood pressure variation only by renal dysfunction. These results show that a large number of the patients with resistant hypertension suffered from renal dysfunction, although it was difficult to explain altered circadian blood pressure variation based on renal dysfunction alone.

  3. Business planning for ambulatory surgical services.

    PubMed

    Burns, L A

    1987-08-01

    Successful responses to the rapid expansion of ambulatory surgical services in the United States require careful planning on the part of current and potential providers. The recommended approach to business' planning includes development of a detailed business concept, assessment of market and competitive characteristics, and analysis of current and projected financial performance.

  4. Clinical Assessment Applications of Ambulatory Biosensors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynes, Stephen N.; Yoshioka, Dawn T.

    2007-01-01

    Ambulatory biosensor assessment includes a diverse set of rapidly developing and increasingly technologically sophisticated strategies to acquire minimally disruptive measures of physiological and motor variables of persons in their natural environments. Numerous studies have measured cardiovascular variables, physical activity, and biochemicals…

  5. Memo to: Ambulatory Health Care Planners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Facilities Labs., Inc., New York, NY.

    Planning for changing types of health professions and a changing clientele necessitates designing flexible facilities. Findings from a recently completed analysis of ambulatory care facilities are directed to planners in the form of 16 memos. Approaches to planning and design considerations are made that attempt to humanize these facilities.…

  6. Ambulatory care: a decade of evolution.

    PubMed

    Welch, Leslie

    2009-01-01

    Leslie Welch, a director at HLM Architects, explains how new generation, well-equipped ambulatory and emergency care centres, a relatively new development in the UK, are offering local day care patients a holistic healthcare service in a high quality setting, while reducing pressure on general hospitals and cutting waiting times.

  7. Predicting recovery at home after Ambulatory Surgery

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The correct implementation of Ambulatory Surgery must be accompanied by an accurate monitoring of the patient post-discharge state. We fit different statistical models to predict the first hours postoperative status of a discharged patient. We will also be able to predict, for any discharged patient, the probability of needing a closer follow-up, or of having a normal progress at home. Background The status of a discharged patient is predicted during the first 48 hours after discharge by using variables routinely used in Ambulatory Surgery. The models fitted will provide the physician with an insight into the post-discharge progress. These models will provide valuable information to assist in educating the patient and their carers about what to expect after discharge as well as to improve their overall level of satisfaction. Methods A total of 922 patients from the Ambulatory Surgery Unit of the Dr. Peset University Hospital (Valencia, Spain) were selected for this study. Their post-discharge status was evaluated through a phone questionnaire. We pretend to predict four variables which were self-reported via phone interviews with the discharged patient: sleep, pain, oral tolerance of fluid/food and bleeding status. A fifth variable called phone score will be built as the sum of these four ordinal variables. The number of phone interviews varies between patients, depending on the evolution. The proportional odds model was used. The predictors were age, sex, ASA status, surgical time, discharge time, type of anaesthesia, surgical specialty and ambulatory surgical incapacity (ASI). This last variable reflects, before the operation, the state of incapacity and severity of symptoms in the discharged patient. Results Age, ambulatory surgical incapacity and the surgical specialty are significant to explain the level of pain at the first call. For the first two phone calls, ambulatory surgical incapacity is significant as a predictor for all responses except for sleep at

  8. Use of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring to compare antihypertensive efficacy and safety of two angiotensin II receptor antagonists, losartan and valsartan. Losartan Trial Investigators.

    PubMed

    Monterroso, V H; Rodriguez Chavez, V; Carbajal, E T; Vogel, D R; Aroca Martinez, G J; Garcia, L H; Cuevas, J H; Lara Teran, J; Hitzenberger, G; Leao Neves, P; Middlemost, S J; Dumortier, T; Bunt, A M; Smith, R D

    2000-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of losartan and valsartan were evaluated in a multicenter, double-blind, randomized trial in patients with mild to moderate essential hypertension. Blood pressure responses to once-daily treatment with either losartan 50 mg (n = 93) or valsartan 80 mg (n = 94) for 6 weeks were assessed through measurements taken in the clinic and by 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM). Both drugs significantly reduced clinic sitting systolic (SiSBP) and diastolic blood pressure (SiDBP) at 2, 4, and 6 weeks. Maximum reductions from baseline in SiSBP and SiDBP on 24-hour ABPM were also significant with the two treatments. The reduction in blood pressure was more consistent across patients in the losartan group, as indicated by a numerically smaller variability in change from baseline on all ABPM measures, which achieved significance at peak (P = .017) and during the day (P = .002). In addition, the numerically larger smoothness index with losartan suggested a more homogeneous antihypertensive effect throughout the 24-hour dosing interval. The antihypertensive response rate was 54% with losartan and 46% with valsartan. Three days after discontinuation of therapy, SiDBP remained below baseline in 73% of losartan and 63% of valsartan patients. Both agents were generally well tolerated. Losartan, but not valsartan, significantly decreased serum uric acid an average 0.4 mg/dL at week 6. In conclusion, once-daily losartan 50 mg and valsartan 80 mg had similar antihypertensive effects in patients with mild to moderate essential hypertension. Losartan produced a more consistent blood pressure-lowering response and significantly lowered uric acid, suggesting potentially meaningful differences between these two A II receptor antagonists.

  9. Agreement Between a Smartphone Pulse Sensor Application and Electrocardiography for Determining lnRMSSD.

    PubMed

    Esco, Michael R; Flatt, Andrew A; Nakamura, Fábio Y

    2017-02-01

    Esco, MR, Flatt, AA, and Nakamura, FY. Agreement between a smartphone pulse sensor application and electrocardiography for determining lnRMSSD. J Strength Cond Res 31(2): 380-385, 2017-The purpose of this study was to determine the agreement between a smartphone pulse finger sensor (SPFS) and electrocardiography (ECG) for determining ultra-short-term heart rate variability in 3 different positions. Thirty college-aged men (n = 15) and women (n = 15) volunteered to participate in this study. Sixty-second heart rate measures were simultaneously taken with the SPFS and ECG in supine, seated, and standing positions. The log transformed root mean square of successive R-R interval differences (lnRMSSD) was calculated from the SPFS and ECG. The lnRMSSD values were 81.5 ± 11.7 using ECG and 81.6 ± 11.3 using SPFS (p = 0.63, Cohen's d = 0.01) in the supine position, 76.5 ± 8.2 using ECG and 77.5 ± 8.2 using SPFS (p = 0.007, Cohen's d = 0.11) in the seated position, and 66.5 ± 9.2 using ECG and 67.8 ± 9.1 using SPFS (p < 0.001, Cohen's d = 0.15) in the standing position. The SPFS showed a possibly strong correlation to the ECG in all 3 positions (r values from 0.98 to 0.99). In addition, the limits of agreement (constant error ± 1.98 SD) were -0.13 ± 2.83 for the supine values, -0.94 ± 3.47 for the seated values, and -1.37 ± 3.56 for the standing values. The results of the study suggest good agreement between the SPFS and ECG for measuring lnRMSSD in supine, seated, and standing positions. Although significant differences were noted between the 2 methods in the seated and standing positions, the effect sizes were trivial.

  10. A randomized controlled trial comparing the effects of yoga with an active control on ambulatory blood pressure in individuals with prehypertension and stage 1 hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hagins, Marshall; Rundle, Andrew; Consedine, Nathan S; Khalsa, Sat Bir S

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of yoga with an active control (nonaerobic exercise) in individuals with prehypertension and stage 1 hypertension. A randomized clinical trial was performed using two arms: (1) yoga and (2) active control. Primary outcomes were 24-hour day and night ambulatory systolic and diastolic blood pressures. Within-group and between-group analyses were performed using paired t tests and repeated-measures analysis of variance (time × group), respectively. Eighty-four participants enrolled, with 68 participants completing the trial. Within-group analyses found 24-hour diastolic, night diastolic, and mean arterial pressure all significantly reduced in the yoga group (-3.93, -4.7, -4.23 mm Hg, respectively) but no significant within-group changes in the active control group. Direct comparisons of the yoga intervention with the control group found a single blood pressure variable (diastolic night) to be significantly different (P=.038). This study has demonstrated that a yoga intervention can lower blood pressure in patients with mild hypertension. Although this study was not adequately powered to show between-group differences, the size of the yoga-induced blood pressure reduction appears to justify performing a definitive trial of this intervention to test whether it can provide meaningful therapeutic value for the management of hypertension.

  11. A randomized controlled trial comparing the effects of yoga to an active control on ambulatory blood pressure in individuals with Pre- and Stage 1 Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hagins, Marshall; Rundle, Andrew; Consedine, Nathan S.; Khalsa, Sat Bir S.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of yoga to an active control (non-aerobic exercise) in individuals with pre- and Stage 1 hypertension. A randomized clinical trial was performed using two arms: 1) yoga and 2) active control. Primary outcomes were 24-hour, day and night ambulatory systolic and diastolic blood pressures. Within-group and between-group analyses were performed using paired t-tests and repeated measures ANOVAs (time x group), respectively. Eighty-four participants enrolled with 68 participants completing the trial. Within-group analyses found 24-hour diastolic, night diastolic, and mean arterial pressure all significantly reduced in the yoga group (−3.93, −4.7, −4.23 mmHg, respectively) but no significant within-group changes in the active control group. Direct comparisons of the yoga intervention to the control group found a single blood pressure variable (diastolic night) to be significantly different (p =.038). This study has demonstrated that a yoga intervention can lower blood pressure in patients with mild hypertension. Although this study was not adequately powered to show between-group differences, the size of the yoga-induced blood pressure reduction we observed appears to justify performing a definitive trial of this intervention to test whether it can provide meaningful therapeutic value for the management of hypertension. PMID:24387700

  12. Bio-telemetric device for measurement of left ventricular pressure-volume loops using the admittance technique in conscious, ambulatory rats

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Karthik; Feldman, Marc D; Porterfield, John E; Larson, Erik R; Jenkins, J Travis; Escobedo, Daniel; Pearce, John A

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the design, construction and testing of a device to measure pressure volume loops in the left ventricle of conscious, ambulatory rats. Pressure is measured with a standard sensor, but volume is derived from data collected from a tetrapolar electrode catheter using a novel admittance technique. There are two main advantages of the admittance technique to measure volume. First, the contribution from the adjacent muscle can be instantaneously removed. Second, the admittance technique incorporates the nonlinear relationship between the electric field generated by the catheter and the blood volume. A low power instrument weighing 27 g was designed, which takes pressure-volume loops every 2 minutes and runs for 24 hours. Pressure-volume data are transmitted wirelessly to a base station. The device was first validated in thirteen rats with an acute preparation with 2-D echocardiography used to measure true volume. From an accuracy standpoint, the admittance technique is superior to both the conductance technique calibrated with hypertonic saline injections, and calibrated with cuvettes. The device was then tested in six rats with a 24-hour chronic preparation. Stability of the animal preparation and careful calibration are important factors affecting the success of the device. PMID:21606560

  13. Expert system designed to assist in the interpretation and evaluation of thoracic surface maps produced by high-resolution electrocardiography

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.K.

    1988-01-01

    An expert system is an artificial intelligence program that relies on a knowledge base composed of information derived from an expert and is designed to perform a difficult task. The system is usually domain specific and provides an interactive consultation with the user in problem solving. High-resolution electrocardiography is a technique for acquiring information about the heart's electrical activity with the use of multilead electrodes. Thoracic surface maps are presented at precise intervals during the depolarization/repolarization stages of a heartbeat. Cardiologists have determined methods for relating the thoracic maps to the actual tissue condition of the heart giving a basis for diagnoses. This work shows the anatomy of the heart, techniques for measuring that activity, and in detail, the techniques used with High Resolution Electrocardiography. The field of artificial intelligence is explored with an emphasis on expert systems. An expert system developed to diagnose the HRE record is presented.

  14. Higher ambulatory blood pressure is associated with aortic valve calcification in the elderly: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Shinichi; Russo, Cesare; Jin, Zhezhen; Schwartz, Joseph E; Homma, Shunichi; Elkind, Mitchell S V; Rundek, Tatjana; Sacco, Ralph L; Di Tullio, Marco R

    2013-01-01

    Aortic valve calcification (AVC) without outflow obstruction (stenosis) is common in the elderly and increases the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Although high blood pressure (BP) measured at the doctor's office is known to be associated with AVC, little is known about the association between 24-hour ambulatory BP (ABP) and AVC. Our objective was to clarify the association between ABP variables and AVC. The study population consisted of 737 patients (mean age, 71±9 years) participating in the Cardiovascular Abnormalities and Brain Lesions study who underwent 24-hour ABP monitoring. Each aortic valve leaflet was graded on a scale of 0 (normal) to 3 (severe calcification). A total valve score (values 0-9) was calculated as the sum of all leaflet scores. Advanced AVC (score ≥4) was present in 77 subjects (10.4%). All of the systolic ABP variables (except systolic BP nocturnal decline) and mean asleep diastolic BP were positively associated with advanced calcification, whereas normal dipping status and diastolic BP nocturnal decline were negatively associated. Multiple regression analysis indicated that mean awake diastolic BP (odds ratio, 1.31 [95% CI, 1.01-1.71]) and asleep diastolic BP (odds ratio, 1.34 [95% CI, 1.04-1.72]) remained independently associated with advanced calcification after adjustment for age, sex, cigarette smoking, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, serum creatinine, and any degree of aortic insufficiency. Diastolic ABP is independently associated with advanced calcification. This finding may have important implications in gaining further insight into the mechanism of AVC.

  15. Anticoagulation management in the ambulatory surgical setting.

    PubMed

    Eisenstein, Diana Hill

    2012-04-01

    Many people receiving maintenance anticoagulation therapy require surgery each year in ambulatory surgery centers. National safety organizations focus attention toward improving anticoagulation management, and the American College of Chest Physicians has established guidelines for appropriate anticoagulation management to balance the risk of thromboembolism when warfarin is discontinued with the risk of bleeding when anticoagulation therapy is maintained. The guidelines recommend that patients at high or moderate risk for thromboembolism should be bridged with subcutaneous low-molecular-weight heparin or IV unfractionated heparin with the interruption of warfarin, and low-risk patients may require subcutaneous low-molecular-weight heparin or no bridging with the interruption of warfarin. The guidelines recommend the continuation of warfarin for patients who are undergoing minor dermatologic or dental procedures or cataract removal. The literature reveals, however, that there is not adequate adherence to these recommendations and guidelines. Management of anticoagulation therapy by a nurse practitioner may improve compliance and safety in ambulatory surgery centers.

  16. Measuring and improving ambulatory surgery patients' satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Farber, Janice

    2010-09-01

    The pressure on perioperative services to improve quality for health care consumers creates both challenges and opportunities. To make positive changes, many health care organizations contract with Press Ganey (PG), which processes an extensive database of more than 9.5 million surveys annually and provides benchmark reports to same-type organizations. To measure and improve ambulatory surgery patient satisfaction at one health care network in northeastern Pennsylvania, the nursing leaders in the ambulatory surgery center and OR undertook a quality improvement project focused on educating perioperative nurses on the use of PG reports. After we reviewed the PG reports and implemented changes with nursing staff members in perioperative areas, PG patient satisfaction scores improved regarding information about delays (4.1%) and center attractiveness (0.2%).

  17. Identification of weakly coupled multiphysics problems. Application to the inverse problem of electrocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrado, Cesare; Gerbeau, Jean-Frédéric; Moireau, Philippe

    2015-02-01

    This work addresses the inverse problem of electrocardiography from a new perspective, by combining electrical and mechanical measurements. Our strategy relies on the definition of a model of the electromechanical contraction which is registered on ECG data but also on measured mechanical displacements of the heart tissue typically extracted from medical images. In this respect, we establish in this work the convergence of a sequential estimator which combines for such coupled problems various state of the art sequential data assimilation methods in a unified consistent and efficient framework. Indeed, we aggregate a Luenberger observer for the mechanical state and a Reduced-Order Unscented Kalman Filter applied on the parameters to be identified and a POD projection of the electrical state. Then using synthetic data we show the benefits of our approach for the estimation of the electrical state of the ventricles along the heart beat compared with more classical strategies which only consider an electrophysiological model with ECG measurements. Our numerical results actually show that the mechanical measurements improve the identifiability of the electrical problem allowing to reconstruct the electrical state of the coupled system more precisely. Therefore, this work is intended to be a first proof of concept, with theoretical justifications and numerical investigations, of the advantage of using available multi-modal observations for the estimation and identification of an electromechanical model of the heart.

  18. Effects of electrocardiography contamination and comparison of ECG removal methods on upper trapezius electromyography recordings.

    PubMed

    Marker, Ryan J; Maluf, Katrina S

    2014-12-01

    Electromyography (EMG) recordings from the trapezius are often contaminated by the electrocardiography (ECG) signal, making it difficult to distinguish low-level muscle activity from muscular rest. This study investigates the influence of ECG contamination on EMG amplitude and frequency estimations in the upper trapezius during muscular rest and low-level contractions. A new method of ECG contamination removal, filtered template subtraction (FTS), is described and compared to 30 Hz high-pass filter (HPF) and averaged template subtraction (ATS) methods. FTS creates a unique template of each ECG artifact using a low-pass filtered copy of the contaminated signal, which is subtracted from contaminated periods in the original signal. ECG contamination results in an over-estimation of EMG amplitude during rest in the upper trapezius, with negligible effects on amplitude and frequency estimations during low-intensity isometric contractions. FTS and HPF successfully removed ECG contamination from periods of muscular rest, yet introduced errors during muscle contraction. Conversely, ATS failed to fully remove ECG contamination during muscular rest, yet did not introduce errors during muscle contraction. The relative advantages and disadvantages of different ECG contamination removal methods should be considered in the context of the specific motor tasks that require analysis.

  19. A novel method of fabricating carbon nanotubes-polydimethylsiloxane composite electrodes for electrocardiography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Benyan; Chen, Yingmin; Luo, Zhangyuan; Zhang, Wenzan; Tu, Quan; Jin, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Polymer-based flexible electrodes are receiving much attention in medical applications due to their good wearing comfort. The current fabrication methods of such electrodes are not widely applied. In this study, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and conductive additives of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were employed to fabricate composite electrodes for electrocardiography (ECG). A three-step dispersion process consisting of ultrasonication, stirring, and in situ polymerization was developed to yield homogenous CNTs-PDMS mixtures. The CNTs-PDMS mixtures were used to fabricate CNTs-PDMS composite electrodes by replica technology. The influence of ultrasonication time and CNT concentration on polymer electrode performance was evaluated by impedance and ECG measurements. The signal amplitude of the electrodes prepared using an ultrasonication time of 12 h and CNT content of 5 wt% was comparable to that of commercial Ag/AgCl electrodes. The polymer electrodes were easily fabricated by conventional manufacturing techniques, indicating a potential advantage of reduced cost for mass production.

  20. Ambulance 12-lead electrocardiography transmission via cell phone technology to cardiologists.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Jui-Chien; Lin, Bo-Xuan; Wu, Feng-Ren; Chang, Pei-Chann; Tsuei, Yi-Wei; Yang, Chung-Chi

    2010-10-01

    This study demonstrates transmission of 12-lead electrocardiography (ECG) in an ambulance to the cell phone of the attendant emergency medical technician and then to the hospital and to cell phones of off-site cardiologists. The emergency medical technician cell phone receives Extensible Markup Language files generated by a Phillips Extensible Markup Language ECG instrument via Wi-Fi-based wireless network and then sends them to an ECG-processing server at the hospital over the mobile telephone network. After reducing ECG noises and artifacts, the server converts files to Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine-based ECG reports stored in Picture Archiving and Communication System. These reports are sent to the cell phones of off-site cardiologists. Consequently, on-site Emergency Department physicians and off-site cardiologists can discuss ECG reports via Picture Archiving and Communication System on their computers or cell phones to prepare for the most appropriate treatment while the patient is on the way to the hospital. In conclusion, this 12-lead ECG transmission e-technology expands the functions of a 12-lead ECG instrument and facilitates more efficient prehospital cardiac care.

  1. Effects of a Web-based teaching method on undergraduate nursing students' learning of electrocardiography.

    PubMed

    Jang, Keum S; Hwang, Seon Y; Park, Soon J; Kim, Yoon M; Kim, Mi J

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a Web-based teaching method (versus a traditional lecture method) on undergraduate nursing students' learning of electrocardiography (ECG). The Web-based learning program was developed by the authors and implemented for 4 weeks. The study used a pretest-posttest experimental design. A total of 105 senior nursing students were recruited at a university in Korea. Fifty-four students were assigned to an experimental group in 2002, and 51 were assigned to a control group in 2003. Knowledge about ECG among students in the Web-based group was significantly lower than that of students in the control group (p < .01). Conversely, the ability to interpret ECG recordings was significantly higher among students in the Web-based group (p < .05). No significant differences were found between the two groups in level of motivation or satisfaction with learning. The self-directed, Web-based ECG learning program appears to be effective in helping nursing students to interpret ECG recordings.

  2. Interoperability in digital electrocardiography: harmonization of ISO/IEEE x73-PHD and SCP-ECG.

    PubMed

    Trigo, Jesús D; Chiarugi, Franco; Alesanco, Alvaro; Martínez-Espronceda, Miguel; Serrano, Luis; Chronaki, Catherine E; Escayola, Javier; Martínez, Ignacio; García, José

    2010-11-01

    The ISO/IEEE 11073 (x73) family of standards is a reference frame for medical device interoperability. A draft for an ECG device specialization (ISO/IEEE 11073-10406-d02) has already been presented to the Personal Health Device (PHD) Working Group, and the Standard Communications Protocol for Computer-Assisted ElectroCardioGraphy (SCP-ECG) Standard for short-term diagnostic ECGs (EN1064:2005+A1:2007) has recently been approved as part of the x73 family (ISO 11073-91064:2009). These factors suggest the coordinated use of these two standards in foreseeable telecardiology environments, and hence the need to harmonize them. Such harmonization is the subject of this paper. Thus, a mapping of the mandatory attributes defined in the second draft of the ISO/IEEE 11073-10406-d02 and the minimum SCP-ECG fields is presented, and various other capabilities of the SCP-ECG Standard (such as the messaging part) are also analyzed from an x73-PHD point of view. As a result, this paper addresses and analyzes the implications of some inconsistencies in the coordinated use of these two standards. Finally, a proof-of-concept implementation of the draft x73-PHD ECG device specialization is presented, along with the conversion from x73-PHD to SCP-ECG. This paper, therefore, provides recommendations for future implementations of telecardiology systems that are compliant with both x73-PHD and SCP-ECG.

  3. Exercise thallium-201 scintigraphy and prognosis in typical angina pectoris and negative exercise electrocardiography

    SciTech Connect

    Bairey, C.N.; Rozanski, A.; Maddahi, J.; Resser, K.J.; Berman, D.S. )

    1989-08-01

    Patients with a history of typical angina but negative exercise electrocardiography represent a subgroup with an intermediate likelihood of having coronary artery disease and future cardiac events. A retrospective study of the prognostic utility of stress-redistribution thallium-201 scintigraphy was performed in 190 such patients. A second group of 203 patients with typical angina and a positive exercise electrocardiogram were analyzed for comparative scintigraphic purposes. The cardiac event rate for the 144 negative exercise electrocardiogram patients with normal thallium results was 5 vs 15% in the 46 patients with abnormal thallium results (p = 0.01). These patients were further stratified into high (14 to 18%), intermediate (9%) and low (less than 2%) risk groups for future cardiac events based on combining the thallium results with the percentage of maximal predicted heart rate achieved. A multivariate analysis revealed that an abnormal thallium result was the only significant correlate of future cardiac events. Mechanisms responsible for the discordant finding of a negative exercise electrocardiogram in patients with typical angina include (1) false-positive angina symptomatology in low prevalence coronary artery disease groups in whom the thallium test is negative, and (2) electrocardiographically silent ischemia in patients in whom the thallium test is positive. These findings reveal that thallium stress-redistribution scintigraphy can be used to stratify 1-year prognosis in this subgroup of patients with typical angina and negative exercise electrocardiograms.

  4. The evolution of ambulatory ECG monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Harold L

    2013-01-01

    Ambulatory Holter electrocardiographic (ECG) monitoring has undergone continuous technological evolution since its invention and development in the 1950s era. With commercial introduction in 1963, there has been an evolution of Holter recorders from 1 channel to 12 channel recorders with increasingly smaller storage media, and there has evolved Holter analysis systems employing increasingly technologically advanced electronics providing a myriad of data displays. This evolution of smaller physical instruments with increasing technological capacity has characterized the development of electronics over the past 50 years. Currently the technology has been focused upon the conventional continuous 24 to 48 hour ambulatory ECG examination, and conventional extended ambulatory monitoring strategies for infrequent to rare arrhythmic events. However, the emergence of the Internet, Wi-Fi, cellular networks, and broad-band transmission has positioned these modalities at the doorway of the digital world. This has led to an adoption of more cost-effective strategies to these conventional methods of performing the examination. As a result, the emergence of the mobile smartphone coupled with this digital capacity is leading to the recent development of Holter smartphone applications. The potential of point-of-care applications utilizing the Holter smartphone and a vast array of new non-invasive sensors is evident in the not too distant future. The Holter smartphone is anticipated to contribute significantly in the future to the field of global health.

  5. Data logging technology in ambulatory medical instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Anderson, R; Lyons, G M

    2001-05-01

    This paper reviews the advancements made in ambulatory data logging used in the study of human subjects since the inception of the analogue tape based data logger in the 1960s. Research into the area of ambulatory monitoring has been rejuvenated due to the development of novel storage technologies during the 1990s. Data logging systems that were previously impractical due to lack of processing power, practical size and cost are now available to the practitioner. An overview of the requirements of present day ambulatory data logging is presented and analogue tape, solid-state memory and disk drive storage recording systems that have been described in the literature are investigated in detail. It is proposed that digital based technology offers the best solution to the problems encountered during human based data logging. The appearance of novel digital storage media will continue the trend of increased recording durations, signal resolution and number of parameters thus allowing the momentum gained throughout the last several decades to continue.

  6. Perioperative Management of the Ambulatory Anorectal Surgery Patient

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Darcy; Ternent, Charles A.

    2016-01-01

    Ambulatory surgery is appropriate for most anorectal pathology. Ambulatory anorectal surgery can be performed at reduced cost compared with inpatient procedures with excellent safety, improved efficiency, and high levels of patient satisfaction. Several perioperative strategies are employed to control pain and avoid urinary retention, including the use of a multimodal pain regimen and restriction of intravenous fluids. Ambulatory anorectal surgery often utilizes standardized order sets and discharge instructions. PMID:26929746

  7. 76 FR 66929 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; The American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ... Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities for Approval of Deeming Authority for Rural... American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities (AAAASF) for recognition as a... of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities (AAAASF's) request for deeming authority for RHCs. This notice...

  8. Chronobiologically Interpreted Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cornélissen, Germaine; Hillman, Dewayne; Beaty, Larry A.; Hong, Shiyu; Schwartzkopff, Othild; Watanabe, Yoshihiko; Otsuka, Kuniaki; Siegelova, Jarmila

    2012-01-01

    To detect vascular variability anomalies (VVAs), a blood pressure and heart rate profile around the clock for at least 7 days is a start. As a minimum, measurement every 60 or preferably 30 minutes for a week is needed, to be continued if abnormality is found, to assess the about 24-hour (circadian) variability that exists in all individuals. As a first dividend, one then also obtains a glimpse of 2 of the very many longer-than-circadian periodicities, the biological half-week and week. Certainly if we can have sensors and computer chips in our cars that continuously monitor the pressure over a tire's life, we should be able to do the same job for ourselves for diagnostic and therapeutic decisions. Healthcare today emphasizes wellness with recommendations for exercise and a proper diet, yet these evaluations may not be adequate. BP may be measured at a visit to the doctor or before an exercise session, along with measuring body weight and performing a physical exam. The seeds of disease are planted long before they are visible, and what appears to be normal from a conventional point of view may in fact be abnormal. Hidden alterations of physiological function, masked by the body's remarkable adaptive capabilities, may become visible through a new diagnostic and therapeutic realm—chronobiology—that reveals hitherto unseen abnormalities. The tools of chronobiology may yield additional dividends, such as the detection of physiological “loads” related to stress and stress relief and the undesirable effects of space weather upon personal events such as sudden cardiac death, societal events like terrorism and war, and natural disasters. Chronobiologically interpreted automatic ambulatory BP and heart rate (HR) monitoring (C-ABPM) may detect the antecedents of these types of events. C-ABPM is of interest in preventive cardiology, since it reveals new diagnoses as vascular variability anomalies (VVAs) and renders previous conventional diagnoses more reliable, such

  9. Chronobiologically Interpreted Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring in Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Halberg, Franz; Mult, Hc; Cornélissen, Germaine; Hillman, Dewayne; Beaty, Larry A; Hong, Shiyu; Schwartzkopff, Othild; Watanabe, Yoshihiko; Otsuka, Kuniaki; Siegelova, Jarmila

    2012-05-01

    To detect vascular variability anomalies (VVAs), a blood pressure and heart rate profile around the clock for at least 7 days is a start. As a minimum, measurement every 60 or preferably 30 minutes for a week is needed, to be continued if abnormality is found, to assess the about 24-hour (circadian) variability that exists in all individuals. As a first dividend, one then also obtains a glimpse of 2 of the very many longer-than-circadian periodicities, the biological half-week and week. Certainly if we can have sensors and computer chips in our cars that continuously monitor the pressure over a tire's life, we should be able to do the same job for ourselves for diagnostic and therapeutic decisions. Healthcare today emphasizes wellness with recommendations for exercise and a proper diet, yet these evaluations may not be adequate. BP may be measured at a visit to the doctor or before an exercise session, along with measuring body weight and performing a physical exam. The seeds of disease are planted long before they are visible, and what appears to be normal from a conventional point of view may in fact actually be abnormal. Hidden alterations of physiological function, masked by the body's remarkable adaptive capabilities, may become visible through a new diagnostic and therapeutic realm-chronobiology-that reveals hitherto unseen abnormalities. The tools of chronobiology may yield additional dividends, such as the detection of physiological "loads" related to stress and stress relief and the undesirable effcts of space weather upon personal events such as sudden cardiac death, societal events like terrorism and war, and natural disasters. Chronobiologi cally interpreted automatic ambulatory BP and heart rate (HR) monitoring (C-ABPM) may detect the antecedents of these types of events. C-ABPM is of interest in preventive cardiology, since it reveals new diagnoses as vascular variability anomalies (VVAs) and renders previous conventional diagnoses more reliable, such

  10. Electrocardiography in conscious releasable Andean condors (Vultur gryphus): reference panel and unusual findings.

    PubMed

    Wiemeyer, Guillermo M; Lambertucci, Sergio A; Bianchini, Laura Torres; Belerenian, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    Electrocardiography is a useful tool when included in healthcare protocols and is increasingly utilized for monitoring wild birds. However, the lack of reference data for many species is limiting the clinical value of this technique. In this study 26 Andean condors (Vultur gryphus) coming from rehabilitation and captive breeding programs were examined to determine electrocardiographic references prior to being released. Standard bipolar (I, II, and III) and augmented unipolar limb (aVR, aVL, and aVF) leads were recorded with birds under physical restraint. Five beats were analyzed on Lead II at 50 mm/sec and 1 cm = 1 mV to determine QRS complex morphology, cardiac rhythm, heart rate, P, PR, R, S, QRS, T, QT, and ST amplitude and/or duration. P and T wave configuration was determined for all leads, and Mean Electrical Axis (MEA) in the frontal plane was determined using leads I and III. Cardiac rhythm corresponded to regular sinus rhythm in 42% of the birds, with a relevant rate of sinus arrhythmia in 58%, and rS as the most common pattern (42%) for QRS complex in lead II. We found an influence of age and heart rate but not of sex on several ECG waves and intervals. Relevant ECG findings for studied Andean condors include a high rate of T(a), R', and U wave detection. Waves T(a) and R' were considered non-pathological, while the significance of U waves remains unclear. Our results provide a useful reference to improve clinical interpretation of full electrocardiographic examination in Andean condors.

  11. Utility of Electrocardiography (ECG)-Gated Computed Tomography (CT) for Preoperative Evaluations of Thymic Epithelial Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Yoshiyuki; Hara, Masaki; Nakagawa, Motoo; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Preoperative evaluation of invasion to the adjacent organs is important for the thymic epithelial tumors on CT. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the utility of electrocardiography (ECG)-gated CT for assessing thymic epithelial tumors with regard to the motion artifacts produced and the preoperative diagnostic accuracy of the technique. Material/Methods Forty thymic epithelial tumors (36 thymomas and 4 thymic carcinomas) were examined with ECG-gated contrast-enhanced CT using a dual source scanner. The scan delay after the contrast media injection was 30 s for the non-ECG-gated CT and 100 s for the ECG-gated CT. Two radiologists blindly evaluated both the non-ECG-gated and ECG-gated CT images for motion artifacts and determined whether the tumors had invaded adjacent structures (mediastinal fat, superior vena cava, brachiocephalic veins, aorta, pulmonary artery, pericardium, or lungs) on each image. Motion artifacts were evaluated using a 3-grade scale. Surgical and pathological findings were used as a reference standard for tumor invasion. Results Motion artifacts were significantly reduced for all structures by ECG gating (p=0.0089 for the lungs and p<0.0001 for the other structures). Non-ECG-gated CT and ECG-gated CT demonstrated 79% and 95% accuracy, respectively, during assessments of pericardial invasion (p=0.03). Conclusions ECG-gated CT reduced the severity of motion artifacts and might be useful for preoperative assessment whether thymic epithelial tumors have invaded adjacent structures. PMID:27920842

  12. Personal black carbon exposure influences ambulatory blood pressure: air pollution and cardiometabolic disease (AIRCMD-China) study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoyi; Sun, Zhichao; Ruan, Yanping; Yan, Jianhua; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Yang, Fumo; Duan, Fengkui; Sun, Lixian; Liang, Ruijuan; Lian, Hui; Zhang, Shuyang; Fang, Quan; Gu, Dongfeng; Brook, Jeffrey R; Sun, Qinghua; Brook, Robert D; Rajagopalan, Sanjay; Fan, Zhongjie

    2014-04-01

    Few prospective studies have assessed the blood pressure effect of extremely high air pollution encountered in Asia's megacities. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between combustion-related air pollution with ambulatory blood pressure and autonomic function. During February to July 2012, personal black carbon was determined for 5 consecutive days using microaethalometers in patients with metabolic syndrome in Beijing, China. Simultaneous ambient fine particulate matter concentration was obtained from the Beijing Municipal Environmental Monitoring Center and the US Embassy. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory blood pressure and heart rate variability were measured from day 4. Arterial stiffness and endothelial function were obtained at the end of day 5. For statistical analysis, we used generalized additive mixed models for repeated outcomes and generalized linear models for single/summary outcomes. Mean (SD) of personal black carbon and fine particulate matter during 24 hours was 4.66 (2.89) and 64.2 (36.9) μg/m(3). Exposure to high levels of black carbon in the preceding hours was associated significantly with adverse cardiovascular responses. A unit increase in personal black carbon during the previous 10 hours was associated with an increase in systolic blood pressure of 0.53 mm Hg and diastolic blood pressure of 0.37 mm Hg (95% confidence interval, 0.17-0.89 and 0.10-0.65 mm Hg, respectively), a percentage change in low frequency to high frequency ratio of 5.11 and mean interbeat interval of -0.06 (95% confidence interval, 0.62-9.60 and -0.11 to -0.01, respectively). These findings highlight the public health effect of air pollution and the importance of reducing air pollution.

  13. Ambulatory and Challenge-Associated Heart Rate Variability Measures Predict Cardiac Responses to “Real-World” Acute Emotional Stress

    PubMed Central

    Dikecligil, GN; Mujica-Parodi, LR

    2010-01-01

    Background Heart rate variability (HRV) measures homeostatic regulation of the autonomic nervous system in response to perturbation, and has been previously shown to quantify risk for cardiac events. In spite of known interactions between stress vulnerability, psychiatric illness, and cardiac health, however, to our knowledge this is the first study to directly compare the value of laboratory HRV in predicting autonomic modulation of “real-world” emotional stress. Methods We recorded ECG on 56 subjects: first, within the laboratory, and then during an acute emotional stressor: a first-time skydive. Laboratory sessions included two five-minute ECG recordings separated by one ambulatory 24-hour recording. To test the efficacy of introducing a mild emotional challenge, during each of the five-minute laboratory recordings subjects viewed either aversive or benign images. Following the laboratory session, subjects participated in the acute stressor wearing a holter ECG. Artifact-free ECGs (N=33) were analyzed for HRV, then statistically compared across laboratory and acute stress sessions. Results There were robust correlations (r=0.7-0.8) between the laboratory and acute stress HRV, indicating that the two most useful paradigms (long-term wake, followed by short-term challenge) also were most sensitive to distinct components of the acute stressor: the former correlated with the fine-tuned regulatory modulation occurring immediately prior and following the acute stressor, while the latter correlated with gross amplitude and recovery. Conclusions Our results confirmed the efficacy of laboratory-acquired HRV in predicting autonomic response to acute emotional stress, and suggest that ambulatory and challenge protocols enhance predictive value. PMID:20299007

  14. Effects of aerobic exercise intensity on 24-h ambulatory blood pressure in individuals with type 2 diabetes and prehypertension

    PubMed Central

    Karoline de Morais, Pâmella; Sales, Marcelo Magalhães; Alves de Almeida, Jeeser; Motta-Santos, Daisy; Victor de Sousa, Caio; Simões, Herbert Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To verify the effects of different intensities of aerobic exercise on 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure (BP) responses in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) and prehypertension. [Subjects and Methods] Ten individuals with T2D and prehypertension (55.8 ± 7.7 years old; blood glucose 133.0 ± 36.7 mg·dL−1 and awake BP 130.6 ± 1.6/ 80.5 ± 1.8 mmHg) completed three randomly assigned experiments: non-exercise control (CON) and exercise at moderate (MOD) and maximal (MAX) intensities. Heart rate (HR), BP, blood lactate concentrations ([Lac]), oxygen uptake (VO2), and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured at rest, during the experimental sessions, and during the 60 min recovery period. After this period, ambulatory blood pressure was monitored for 24 h. [Results] The results indicate that [Lac] (MAX: 6.7±2.0 vs. MOD: 3.8±1.2 mM), RPE (MAX: 19±1.3 vs. MOD: 11±2.3) and VO2peak (MAX: 20.2±4.1 vs. MOD: 14.0±3.0 mL·kg−1·min−1) were highest following the MAX session. Compared with CON, only MAX elicited post-exercise BP reduction that lasted for 8 h after exercise and during sleep. [Conclusion] A single session of aerobic exercise resulted in 24 h BP reductions in individuals with T2D, especially while sleeping, and this reduction seems to be dependent on the intensity of the exercise performed. PMID:25642036

  15. Renal disease in pregnancy ambulatory issues.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Sharon T

    2012-09-01

    Acute and chronic renal disease will complicate prenatal care. Normal physiological changes during pregnancy make the urinary tract system more vulnerable to infectious complications or worsening of preexisting disease. Much of the focus of prenatal care includes screening for these concerns both at the onset of prenatal care and through the pregnancy and postpartum course. With careful and attentive care, the pregnancy outcome for women with significant renal disease has improved and the occurrence of renal injury or obstetric complications due to infectious insults has decreased. This manuscript reviews the current ambulatory prenatal care as it relates to the urinary tract in pregnancy.

  16. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in children.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rajiv; Dionne, Janis

    2011-02-01

    Recently there have been great advances in the use of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) in children. A major boost has been the publication of normative data for blood pressure in children. ABPM has been able to detect significant differences in blood pressure in many disease states including chronic renal failure, polycystic kidney disease and post renal transplantation and has helped in identifying both white coat hypertension and masked hypertension. Current evidence does suggest that sole reliance on clinic blood pressure might not be always appropriate and ABPM has a definite role in pediatric hypertension.

  17. An Ambulatory Program for Surgical Residents and Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Margaret

    1988-01-01

    A pilot program based in a freestanding ambulatory surgery center at the Chicago Medical School Department of Surgery is described, its curriculum outlined, and the daily activities of the residents and medical students are detailed. A brief history of ambulatory surgery is given. (Author/MLW)

  18. Gastrointestinal transit and prolonged ambulatory colonic motility in health and faecal incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, F; Kamm, M; Morris, G; Britton, K; Woloszko, J; Nicholls, R

    1997-01-01

    Background—Colonic motor function has not been studied in the ambulatory setting over a prolonged period in the unprepared state. Furthermore, the disturbance of this function in patients with faecal incontinence is unknown. 
Aim—To study colonic function over two to three days in the ambulatory, unprepared state in health and in patients with idiopathic faecal incontinence. 
Methods—Six healthy women and six women with faecal incontinence and a structurally intact anal sphincter ingested a dual radioisotope meal, and had a six sensor, solid state manometric probe colonoscopically inserted into the left colon. Scanning was performed until radioisotope left the gut and pressure was recorded for a median of 44hours. 
Results—Three of six patients showed abnormal gastric emptying. Patients showed no disturbance of colonic radioisotope transit. Controls had a median of 12, whereas patients had a median of 16, high amplitude propagated waves per 24 hours. In three patients urge incontinence was associated with high amplitude (up to 500 cm water) propagated waves which often reached the rectum. These high pressure waves were identical to those occuring in healthy subjects, the only difference being the lack of adequate sphincter response. Passive incontinence was not associated with colonic motor activity. Defaecation in all subjects was associated with identical propagated waves, and distal movement of 13% (median) of right colonic content and excretion of 32% from the left colon and rectum. The urge to defaecate was associated with either propagated waves (45%) or non-propagated contractions (55%). Rectal motor complexes were recorded in both groups of subjects, but similar rhythmic activity was also recorded in the sigmoid and descending colon. 
Conclusions—Normal colonic function consists of frequent high pressure propagated waves. Rhythmic activity occurs both proximal to and in the rectum. Defaecation is characterised by high pressure propagated

  19. Self-esteem and the acute effect of anxiety on ambulatory blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Edmondson, Donald; Arndt, Jamie; Alcántara, Carmela; Chaplin, William; Schwartz, Joseph E

    2015-01-01

    Objective Recent research suggests that self-esteem may be associated with improved parasympathetic nervous system functioning. This study tested whether high self-esteem is associated with decreased ambulatory systolic blood pressure (ASBP) reactivity to anxiety in healthy adults during the waking hours of a normal day. Methods Each of 858 participants completed a short version of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and then wore an ABP monitor which took two blood pressure readings per hour for 24 hours. Immediately after each blood pressure reading, participants completed an electronic diary report that included an anxiety rating on a 100-point visual analog scale (VAS). Using multilevel models, we assessed the association of momentary anxiety, high trait self-esteem, and their interaction on momentary ASBP, with adjustment for age, sex, race, ethnicity, and body mass index. Sensitivity analyses were conducted examining psychological factors associated with self-esteem: sense of mastery, optimism, social support, and depressive symptoms. Results On average, a 1-point increase in cube root-transformed anxiety was associated with a 0.80 mmHg (SE=0.09, p<0.001) increase in ASBP, and the interaction of high self-esteem and momentary anxiety was significant, such that this effect was 0.48 (SE=0.20, p=0.015) less in individuals with high self-esteem compared to all others. Results for self-esteem remained significant when adjusting for sex and psychological factors. Conclusions Momentary increases in anxiety are associated with acute increases in ASBP, and high self-esteem buffers the effect of momentary anxiety on blood pressure. Thus, high self-esteem may confer cardiovascular benefit by reducing the acute effects of anxiety on systolic blood pressure. PMID:26230481

  20. Relationship between IL-17 serum level and ambulatory blood pressure in women with polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Foroozanfard, Fatemeh; Soleimani, Alireza; Arbab, Elham; Samimi, Mansooreh; Tamadon, Mohammad Reza

    2017-01-01

    Background Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrine disorders with an inflammatory basis. It is associated with hyperandrogenism in women and can be also associated with increased activity of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Approximately 5% to 10% of women of reproductive age are affected by this disease. This syndrome is the main cause of infertility. Blood pressure may be one of the complications of the syndrome. Objectives In this study, we sought to assess the role of the IL-17 inflammatory cytokine in increasing blood pressure in patients with PCOS. Patients and Methods In this cross-sectional study, after obtaining informed consent, we evaluated 85 patients with PCOS. IL-17 serum level was measured after separating the serum via ELISA method. The results obtained for the two groups of patients with high blood pressure and normal blood pressure were compared with each other. Results The daytime blood pressure was abnormal in eight patients, while it was normal in 72 patients. The blood pressure during the day had a direct correlation with the IL-17serum level; as a result, the mean IL-17 serum level in patients with high blood pressure was 77.10 ± 17.94 ρ g/ml while in those with normal blood pressure it was 55.20 ± 13.71 ρ g/ml (P = 0.001). High blood pressure during the night also showed a direct relation with theIL-17 serum level (P = 0.001). In addition, increasing of ambulatory 24-hourblood pressure was significantly related with IL-17 serum level, in such a way that the IL-17 serum level of people with high blood pressure rose by almost 22 ρg/ml during 24 hours (P = 0.001). Conclusions Our results showed an association between PCO syndrome and inflammatory factors. The IL-17 serum level was directly associated with the increase in blood pressure. PMID:28042549

  1. Relationship between Ambulatory BP and Clinical Outcomes in Patients with Hypertensive CKD

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Mahboob; Hu, Bo; Appel, Lawrence J.; Charleston, Jeanne; Contreras, Gabriel; Faulkner, Marquetta L.; Hiremath, Leena; Jamerson, Kenneth A.; Lea, Janice P.; Lipkowitz, Michael S.; Pogue, Velvie A.; Rostand, Stephen G.; Smogorzewski, Miroslaw J.; Wright, Jackson T.; Greene, Tom; Gassman, Jennifer; Wang, Xuelei; Phillips, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Abnormal ambulatory BP (ABP) profiles are commonplace in CKD, yet the prognostic value of ABP for renal and cardiovascular outcomes is uncertain. This study assessed the relationship of baseline ABP profiles with CKD progression and subsequent cardiovascular outcomes to determine the prognostic value of ABP beyond that of clinic BP measurements. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Between 2002 and 2003, 617 African Americans with hypertensive CKD treated to a clinic BP goal of <130/80 mmHg were enrolled in this prospective, observational study. Participants were followed for a median of 5 years. Primary renal outcome was a composite of doubling of serum creatinine, ESRD, or death. The primary cardiovascular outcome was a composite of myocardial infarction, hospitalized congestive heart failure, stroke, revascularization procedures, cardiovascular death, and ESRD. Results Multivariable Cox proportional hazard analysis showed that higher 24-hour systolic BP (SBP), daytime, night-time, and clinic SBP were each associated with subsequent renal (hazard ratio, 1.17–1.28; P<0.001) and cardiovascular outcomes (hazard ratio, 1.22–1.32; P<0.001). After controlling for clinic SBP, ABP measures were predictive of renal outcomes in participants with clinic SBP <130 mmHg (P<0.05 for interaction). ABP predicted cardiovascular outcomes with no interaction based on clinic BP control. Conclusions ABP provides additional information beyond that of multiple clinic BP measures in predicting renal and cardiovascular outcomes in African Americans with hypertensive CKD. The primary utility of ABP in these CKD patients was to identify high-risk individuals among those patients with controlled clinic BP. PMID:22935847

  2. Willem Einthoven and the birth of clinical electrocardiography a hundred years ago.

    PubMed

    Barold, S Serge

    2003-01-01

    The first electrocardiogram (ECG) from the intact human heart was recorded with a mercury capillary electrometer by Augustus Waller in May 1887 at St. Mary's Hospital, London. The tracings were poor and exhibited only 2 distorted deflections. Willem Einthoven (1860-1927) who was professor of physiology at the University of Leiden, The Netherlands, began his studies of the ECG with the mercury capillary electrometer, and improved its distortion mathematically so that he was finally able to register a good representation of the ECG before the beginning of the twentieth century. He later further improved ECG recordings with the introduction of a string galvanometer of his design. Einthoven published his first article about the string galvanometer in 1901, followed by a more detailed description in 1903 which included a report of ECGs taken with the new instrument. The year 2002 marks the centennial of Willem Einthoven's first recording of the ECG in a clinically applicable fashion with the string galvanometer. The clinical use of Einthoven's immobile equipment required transtelephonic transmission of the ECG from the physiology laboratory to the clinic at the Academic Hospital about a mile away as documented in the 1906 paper on the "télécardiogramme". This report contained a wealth of ECG patterns and arrhythmias. Einthoven developed a system of electrocardiographic standardization that continues to be used all over the world and introduced the triaxial bipolar system with 3 limb leads and thus established uniformity of the recording process. Einthoven also conceived the famous equilateral triangle with leads I, II, and III at its sides and the calculation of the electrical axis (in the frontal plane) depicted as a single vector with an arrow at the center of the triangle. Einthoven recognized the great potential importance of the ECG as a diagnostic and investigative tool and his achievements made him the founder of modern electrocardiography. He was awarded the

  3. The inverse problem in electrocardiography: solutions in terms of epicardial potentials.

    PubMed

    Rudy, Y; Messinger-Rapport, B J

    1988-01-01

    The objective of the inverse problem in electrocardiography is to recover noninvasively regional information about intracardiac electrical events from electrical measurements on the body surface. The choice of epicardial potentials as the solution to the inverse problem is motivated by the availability of a unique epicardial potential solution for each body surface potential distribution, by the ability to verify experimentally the inverse-recovered epicardial potentials, by the proven relationship between epicardial potentials and the details of intracardiac regional events, and by the possibility of using the inverse solution as a supplement or possible replacement to clinical epicardial potential mapping prior to surgical intervention. Although, in principle, the epicardial potential distribution can be recovered from the body surface potential distribution, the inverse problem in terms of potentials is ill-posed, and naive attempts to reconstruct the epicardial potentials result in incorrect solutions which are highly oscillatory. Large deviations from the actual solution may result from inaccuracy of the data measurement, incomplete knowledge of the potential data over the entire torso, and inaccurate description of the inhomogeneous torso volume conductor. This review begins with a mathematical and qualitative description of the inverse problem in terms of epicardial potentials. The ill-posed nature of the problem is demonstrated using a theoretical boundary value problem. Effects of inaccuracies in the body surface potential data (stability estimates) are introduced, and a sensitivity analysis of geometrical and inhomogeneity parameters is presented using an analytical eccentric spheres model. Various computational methods for relating epicardial to body surface potentials, i.e., the computation of the forward transfer matrix, are described and compared. The need for regularization of the inverse recovery of epicardial potentials, resulting from the need to

  4. Predictors of exercise participation in ambulatory and non-ambulatory older people with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Chelsea; Wallack, Elizabeth M.; Drodge, Olivia; Beaulieu, Serge; Mayo, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Background. Exercise at moderate intensity may confer neuroprotective benefits in multiple sclerosis (MS), however it has been reported that people with MS (PwMS) exercise less than national guideline recommendations. We aimed to determine predictors of moderate to vigorous exercise among a sample of older Canadians with MS who were divided into ambulatory (less disabled) and non-ambulatory (more disabled) groups. Methods. We analysed data collected as part of a national survey of health, lifestyle and aging with MS. Participants (n = 743) were Canadians over 55 years of age with MS for 20 or more years. We identified ‘a priori’ variables (demographic, personal, socioeconomic, physical health, exercise history and health care support) that may predict exercise at moderate to vigorous intensity (>6.75 metabolic equivalent hours/week). Predictive variables were entered into stepwise logistic regression until best fit was achieved. Results. There was no difference in explanatory models between ambulatory and non-ambulatory groups. The model predicting exercise included the ability to walk independently (OR 1.90, 95% CI [1.24–2.91]); low disability (OR 1.50, 95% CI [1.34–1.68] for each 10 point difference in Barthel Index score), perseverance (OR 1.17, 95% CI [1.08–1.26] for each additional point on the scale of 0–14), less fatigue (OR 2.01, 95% CI [1.32–3.07] for those in the lowest quartile), fewer years since MS diagnosis (OR 1.58, 95% CI [1.11–2.23] below the median of 23 years) and fewer cardiovascular comorbidities (OR 1.55 95% CI [1.02–2.35] one or no comorbidities). It was also notable that the factors, age, gender, social support, health care support and financial status were not predictive of exercise. Conclusions. This is the first examination of exercise and exercise predictors among older, more disabled PwMS. Disability is a major predictor of exercise participation (at moderate to vigorous levels) in both ambulatory and non-ambulatory

  5. The effect of abnormal birth history on ambulatory blood pressure and disease progression in children with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Joseph T; Ng, Derek K; Chan, Grace J; Samuels, Joshua; Furth, Susan; Warady, Bradley; Greenbaum, Larry A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the associations between abnormal birth history (birth weight [BW] <2500 grams, gestational age <36 weeks, or small for gestational age), BP, and renal function among 332 participants (97 with abnormal and 235 with normal birth history) in the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children (CKiD) Study, a cohort of children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Study design Casual and 24-hour ambulatory BP were obtained. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was determined by iohexol disappearance. Confounders (birth and maternal characteristics, socioeconomic status) were used to generate predicted probabilities of abnormal birth history for propensity score matching. Weighted linear and logistic regression models with adjustment for quintiles of propensity scores and CKD diagnosis were used to assess the impact of birth history on BP and GFR. Results Age at enrollment, percent with glomerular disease, and baseline GFR were similar between the groups. Those with abnormal birth history were more likely to be female, of Black race or Hispanic ethnicity, to have low household income, or part of a multiple birth. Unadjusted BP measurements, baseline GFR and change in GFR did not differ significantly between the groups; no differences were seen after adjusting for confounders by propensity score matching. Conclusions Abnormal birth history does not appear to have exerted a significant influence on BP or GFR in this cohort of children with CKD. The absence of an observed association is likely secondary to the dominant effects of underlying CKD and its treatment. PMID:24698454

  6. 77 FR 37680 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Application From the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-22

    ... the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care for Continued Approval of Its Ambulatory... Association for Ambulatory Health Care for continued recognition as a national accrediting organization for... 6 years or as determined by CMS. The Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care...

  7. Growing ambulatory care nurse leaders in a multigenerational workforce.

    PubMed

    Moye, Janet P; Swan, Beth Ann

    2009-01-01

    Ambulatory care faces challenges in sustaining a nursing workforce in the future as newly licensed nurses are heavily recruited to inpatient settings and retirements will impact ambulatory care sooner than other areas. Building a diverse team by recruiting nurses of different ages (generations) and skills may result in a more successful and robust organization. Knowledge about generational characteristics and preferences will aid nurse leaders and recruiters in attracting high-quality, talented nurses. Nurses of Generations X and Y can increase their likelihood of success in ambulatory care by better understanding intergenerational issues.

  8. Implementing university hospital ambulatory care evaluation.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, G A

    1975-05-01

    The clinics of a single university hospital center were observed to determine a practical rationale for and impediments to implementing a medical care evaluation program. A quality assurance mechanism is especially important in the ambulatory care setting because of problems with patient compliance, lack of policy continuity, lack of intercommunication among care providers, no counterpart for most inpatient quality-oriented activities, structural defects in many clinics, and general emphasis on the inpatient medicine. Impediments to implementing quality assurance programs include the condition of clinic records and individual charts, lack of established criteria for care, problems of care provider intercommunication during the evaluation process, manpower availability, choice of evaluation method, and method of implementing resulting plans for corrective action.

  9. Resource requirements for evaluating ambulatory health care.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, M S; Palmer, R H; Rothrock, J K; Strain, R; Brachman, L H; Wright, E A

    1984-01-01

    We implemented the most frequently used form of quality assurance activity: abstracting information on the quality of patient care from medical records and communicating findings to providers in 16 ambulatory care groups. Site providers accepted the evaluation criteria, agreed that deficiencies in care were detected, and, for some medical tasks, effected improvements in care. Direct costs in 1980 dollars for the quality assurance cycle including data system development were $46 per evaluated case. Per-case costs varied considerably among tasks, decreased with larger numbers of cases and as experience grew, and were reduced through computerization. Measured costs were high due to: a demanding research design; our extended accounting of direct, indirect, and induced costs; and the substantial resource requirements of rigorously performed evaluations. PMID:6496817

  10. Ambulatory setting for peritoneal dialysis catheter placement.

    PubMed

    Maya, Ivan D

    2008-01-01

    A modified fluoroscopic technique by adding ultrasound-assistance ensuring entry into the abdominal cavity and avoiding the risk of epigastric artery injury under direct ultrasound visualization was recently published. This study demonstrated that the technique was minimally invasive and allowed for accurate assessment of entry into the abdominal cavity and avoidance of vascular injury. In the current analysis, we report the impact of this technique on hospital stay during a peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheter insertion. Twenty-six PD catheters have been placed on an outpatient basis using this technique. All catheter insertions were successful. Patients were discharge on the same day of the procedure. There were no procedure-related complication or related to short hospital stay. An ambulatory setting allows for a short hospital stay without compromising patient care. This brief paper explains in detail the pre, peri and postoperative period and follow-up.

  11. Antibiotic stewardship: a focus on ambulatory care.

    PubMed

    Gangat, M Azhar; Hsu, Jennifer L

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is one of the major health threats facing modern medicine. While there are many tactics to address this issue, antibiotic stewardship has been shown effective in reducing antimicrobial resistance, adverse drug effects, mortality and health care cost. Most antibiotic stewardship programs have evolved within acute care settings where the bulk of resistant infections are identified. Unfortunately, hospitals are just the tip of the iceberg in terms of overall antibiotic use. The vast majority of the antibiotic prescriptions are dispensed in ambulatory care settings, making this a critical target for stewardship programs. This article discusses the global need for antibiotic stewardship, highlights the importance of outpatient stewardship, and discusses strategies and challenges for implementation of stewardship in community settings.

  12. Development of Quality Metrics in Ambulatory Pediatric Cardiology.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Devyani; Gurvitz, Michelle; Marelli, Ariane; Anderson, Jeffrey; Baker-Smith, Carissa; Diab, Karim A; Edwards, Thomas C; Hougen, Tom; Jedeikin, Roy; Johnson, Jonathan N; Karpawich, Peter; Lai, Wyman; Lu, Jimmy C; Mitchell, Stephanie; Newburger, Jane W; Penny, Daniel J; Portman, Michael A; Satou, Gary; Teitel, David; Villafane, Juan; Williams, Roberta; Jenkins, Kathy

    2017-02-07

    The American College of Cardiology Adult Congenital and Pediatric Cardiology (ACPC) Section had attempted to create quality metrics (QM) for ambulatory pediatric practice, but limited evidence made the process difficult. The ACPC sought to develop QMs for ambulatory pediatric cardiology practice. Five areas of interest were identified, and QMs were developed in a 2-step review process. In the first step, an expert panel, using the modified RAND-UCLA methodology, rated each QM for feasibility and validity. The second step sought input from ACPC Section members; final approval was by a vote of the ACPC Council. Work groups proposed a total of 44 QMs. Thirty-one metrics passed the RAND process and, after the open comment period, the ACPC council approved 18 metrics. The project resulted in successful development of QMs in ambulatory pediatric cardiology for a range of ambulatory domains.

  13. Sun Blasts 6 CMEs in 24 Hour Period

    NASA Video Gallery

    This movie from the chronograph on board the SOlar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), shows the sun's atmosphere – the corona – from September 17 to September 20. The sun let loose with at ...

  14. Rethinking the Youth Weight Debate: The 24 Hour Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodd, Graham; Biggs, Sarah; Agley, Daniel; Dollman, James; Lushington, Kurt

    2008-01-01

    Approaches to weight management have traditionally focussed on caloric intake versus caloric expenditure. Despite a range of interventions based on these approaches, the proportion of overweight children and adolescents continues to rise. There are increasing indications that other factors, such as sleep duration, may be at play. This commentary…

  15. Newborn Infants' Memory for Speech Sounds Retained over 24 Hours.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swain, Irina U.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Neonates who were exposed to the same or different words on two consecutive days habituated to the sound on day one and recovered head turning on day two. Infants who heard the same word again on day two responded less well than infants exposed to the word for the first time on day two. (BC)

  16. Knighthelm 24-hour HMD: from development to production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, John; Cameron, Alexander A.

    2001-08-01

    The BAE SYSTEMS Knighthelm HMD is a unique two-part helmet design, using a form fitted inner helmet with an outer display module. It has been refined and enhanced, as part of an extensive development program, for the German Army Tiger helicopter, and is optimized for the attack helicopter application. The design optically mixes the output of an Image Intensifier Tube with Cathode Ray Tube imagery. This provides a flexible display of symbology overlaid on NVG imagery or symbology overlaid on FLIR video viewed as a collimated image in the see through combiner eyepiece in front of the users eyes.

  17. Perceptually relevant remapping of human somatotopy in 24 hours

    PubMed Central

    Kolasinski, James; Makin, Tamar R; Logan, John P; Jbabdi, Saad; Clare, Stuart; Stagg, Charlotte J; Johansen-Berg, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    Experience-dependent reorganisation of functional maps in the cerebral cortex is well described in the primary sensory cortices. However, there is relatively little evidence for such cortical reorganisation over the short-term. Using human somatosensory cortex as a model, we investigated the effects of a 24 hr gluing manipulation in which the right index and right middle fingers (digits 2 and 3) were adjoined with surgical glue. Somatotopic representations, assessed with two 7 tesla fMRI protocols, revealed rapid off-target reorganisation in the non-manipulated fingers following gluing, with the representation of the ring finger (digit 4) shifted towards the little finger (digit 5) and away from the middle finger (digit 3). These shifts were also evident in two behavioural tasks conducted in an independent cohort, showing reduced sensitivity for discriminating the temporal order of stimuli to the ring and little fingers, and increased substitution errors across this pair on a speeded reaction time task. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17280.001 PMID:28035900

  18. A 24-hour remote surveillance system for terrestrial wildlife studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sykes, P.W.; Ryman, W.E.; Kepler, C.B.; Hardy, J.W.

    1995-01-01

    The configuration, components, specifications and costs of a state-of-the-art closed-circuit television system with wide application for wildlife research and management are described. The principal system components consist of color CCTV camera with zoom lens, pan/tilt system, infrared illuminator, heavy duty tripod, coaxial cable, coaxitron system, half-duplex equalizing video/control amplifier, timelapse video cassette recorder, color video monitor, VHS video cassettes, portable generator, fuel tank and power cable. This system was developed and used in a study of Mississippi sandhiIl Crane (Grus canadensis pratensis) behaviors during incubation, hatching and fledging. The main advantages of the system are minimal downtime where a complete record of every event, its time of occurrence and duration, are permanently recorded and can be replayed as many times as necessary thereafter to retrieve the data. The system is particularly applicable for studies of behavior and predation, for counting individuals, or recording difficult to observe activities. The system can be run continuously for several weeks by two people, reducing personnel costs. This paper is intended to provide biologists who have litte knowledge of electronics with a system that might be useful to their specific needs. The disadvantages of this system are the initial costs (about $9800 basic, 1990-1991 U.S. dollars) and the time required to playback video cassette tapes for data retrieval, but the playback can be sped up when litte or no activity of interest is taking place. In our study, the positive aspects of the system far outweighed the negative.

  19. Pros and cons of the ambulatory surgery center joint venture.

    PubMed

    Giannini, Deborah

    2008-01-01

    If a physician group has determined that it has a realistic patient base to establish an ambulatory surgery center, it may be beneficial to consider a partner to share the costs and risks of this new joint venture. Joint ventures can be a benefit or liability in the establishment of an ambulatory surgery center. This article discusses the advantages and disadvantages of a hospital physician-group joint venture.

  20. Factors influencing validation of ambulatory blood pressure measuring devices.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, E; Atkins, N; Staessen, J

    1995-11-01

    With the introduction of 24 h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring into clinical practice a vast market for ambulatory blood pressure monitoring devices has been created. To satisfy this market manufacturers are producing an array of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring devices. There is no obligation on manufacturers to have such devices validated independently, even though two national protocols, one from the British Hypertension Society (BHS) and the other from the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI), call for independent validation and state the means of doing so. However, many factors can influence the validation procedure. They include compliance to the protocol being employed; the accuracy of the standard; establishing precisely the model being validated; the influences of blood pressure level, age and exercise on device accuracy; the provisions necessary for special populations, such as pregnant women, the elderly and children; the influence of oscillometric versus Korotkoff sound detection and electrocardiographic gating on comparative measurements; the assessment of performance as distinct from accuracy; and the relevance of general factors, such as the algorithm being employed and computer compatibility. Forty-three ambulatory blood pressure monitoring devices have been marketed for ambulatory blood pressure measurement and of those only 18 have been validated according to either the BHS or the AAMI protocol. The influence of the factors listed above on the validation studies of those devices will be considered and the relevance of validation procedures to the clinical use of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring devices will be discussed.

  1. The impact of fertilization on the chicken egg yolk plasma and granule proteome 24 hours post-lay at room temperature: capitalizing on high-pH/low-pH reverse phase chromatography in conjunction with tandem mass tag (TMT) technology.

    PubMed

    Padliya, Neerav D; Qian, Meiqian; Mimi Roy, Sushmita; Chu, Patrick; Zheng, Haiyan; Tess, Alex; Dariani, Maghsoud; Hariri, Robert J

    2015-07-01

    Chicken egg yolk is a rich source of nutrients providing high quality proteins, vitamins, minerals, carotenoids and antioxidants. Chicken egg yolk, recovered from whole egg within 24 hours post-lay has been utilized as a starting material in the preparation of a dietary supplement that has been demonstrated to lead to gains in muscle mass in a human clinical study. Further, an oil derived from chicken egg yolk has been utilized as a topical agent to treat third degree burn injury. The molecular changes that take place in fertilized, chicken egg yolk during the first 24 hours post-lay are not well understood. By studying how the protein composition of egg yolk varies with fertility status, one can utilize this knowledge to develop egg yolk-based products that have been optimized for specific applications. In this study, a direct quantitative comparison was made between the proteome of fertilized chicken egg yolk and the proteome of unfertilized chicken egg yolk, both maintained at 20 °C and analyzed within 24 hours post-lay. Egg yolk proteins from each fertility state were digested with trypsin, labeled with distinct chemical labels (tandem mass tag reagents) and then combined in a 1 : 1 ratio. A TMT-labeled tryptic digest derived from chicken egg yolk proteins (fertilized and unfertilized) was separated using high-pH/low-pH reverse-phase chromatography and analyzed using mass spectrometry. 225 protein identifications were made from this TMT-labeled tryptic digest based on a minimum of 2 unique peptides observed per protein. 9 proteins increased in abundance in fertilized egg yolk relative to unfertilized egg yolk and 9 proteins decreased in abundance in fertilized egg yolk relative to unfertilized egg yolk. Some proteins that increased in abundance in fertilized egg yolk play an important role in angiogenesis (pleiotrophin, histidine rich glycoprotein) and defense against pathogens (mannose-binding lectin, β-defensin 11, serum amyloid P-component, ovostatin

  2. [Diagnostic accuracy of NT-proBNP compared with electrocardiography in detecting left ventricular hypertrophy of hypertensive origin].

    PubMed

    Andrade, Helder; Morillas, Pedro; Castillo, Jesús; Roldán, Julián; Mateo, Irene; Agudo, Pilar; Quiles, Juan; Bertomeu-Martínez, Vicente

    2011-10-01

    Electrocardiography (ECG) is the most widely used method for diagnosing left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in hypertensive patients. We assessed the value of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) determination compared with ECG for detecting LVH in 336 consecutive hypertensive patients with preserved systolic function. We found a significant correlation between NT-proBNP levels and left ventricular mass adjusted for body surface area (r=.41; P<.001). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.75 (95% CI, 0.7-0.8). A cut-off of 74.2 pg/mL had a greater sensitivity than ECG (76.6% vs 25.5%; P<.001) and a higher negative predictive value (87.8% vs 76.6%; P<.001) in the identification of LVH. NT-proBNP determination may be a useful tool for LVH screening in hypertensive patients.

  3. Salary survey of ambulatory care clinical pharmacists.

    PubMed

    Anastasio, G D; Shaughnessy, A F

    1997-01-01

    To determine salary and selected fringe benefits of members of the Ambulatory Care Practice and Research Network of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy, we developed a self-administered questionnaire that surveyed demographic information, schooling and training, academic appointments, yearly salary (as of February 1, 1995), source of salary, outside income, annual raise, vacation time, financial support for continuing education, and board certification. Ninety-nine surveys were returned (return rate 46%). Respondents were mostly women (58%), their average age was 34 years (range 25-51 yrs), and they had a median of 5 years in the work force. Most respondents (67%) had residency training, whereas only 21% had fellowship experience. Board certification was reported by 46%. The median salary was $53,500 (average $55,861, range $35-90 k), with progression for academic rank. The last salary increase averaged 3.7%. Most (93%) respondents received an average of $1509 for travel. The survey represents a young work force. The salaries vary but show progression for accomplishment.

  4. Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis: no longer experimental.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, G.; Khanna, R.; Vas, S. I.; Digenis, G.; Oreopoulos, D. G.

    1984-01-01

    Many patients with end-stage renal disease have now been maintained for 5 years or more with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). Viewed initially as an experimental alternative to be used only when hemodialysis was not feasible, CAPD is now seen as the treatment of choice in an increasing number of situations. CAPD is suitable for self-care. The main concern in the early years--peritonitis--is now less frightening and less frequent (one episode occurring every 18 patient-months as compared with every 8 initially), and this has allowed chronic complications of CAPD, such as malnutrition and loss of the peritoneum's capacity for ultrafiltration, to come to light. As would be expected, among patients of advanced age and those who have heart disease or diabetes, survival rates tend to be lower than among other CAPD patients. However, hypertension seems to be more easily controlled, pre-existing anemia can be significantly ameliorated, and young children grow more normally than they do with hemodialysis. Diabetes-related changes in vision stabilize in most CAPD patients, and control of the blood glucose level is good; insulin is administered intraperitoneally. CAPD is thus showing itself to be a feasible form of long-term treatment for end-stage renal disease. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6697277

  5. Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis: Indian scenario.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Georgi; Mathew, Milli; Hinduja, Anish; Padma, G

    2002-03-01

    Chronic peritoneal dialysis (CPD) has been initiated as a treatment modality for chronic renal failure patients in the Indian subcontinent since 1990. Over a period of 9 years both continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) and continuous cyclic peritoneal dialysis (CCPD) have emerged as accepted forms of renal replacement therapy in our country. Although there were government restrictions on import of dialysis fluid until 1993, the availability of locally manufactured fluid in collapsible bags had facilitated the expansion of the programme to the far corners of the country and in neighbouring countries. Initially majority (78%) of the patients who were started on this programme were diabetics with other comorbid conditions who were drop-outs from haemodialysis and unfit for transplantation. Both CAPD and CCPD have been used for all age groups and for men and women. Majority of the patients do 3 x 2 l exchanges a day on CAPD; 8-10 l using a cycler at night those who are onCCPD. Peritonitis rate was 1 episode every 18 patient months. With the introduction of new connection and disposable sets the incidence of peritonitis is dropping down. The major cause of drop-out is cardiovascular death followed by peritonitis. Malnutrition is a major problem in both CAPD and haemodialysis patients. The programme has been expanded and there are over one thousand patients on this treatment in the country. The introduction of CPD had a major impact on the treatment of renal failure in India.

  6. [Ambulatory surgery in urology: first numbers of a successful program].

    PubMed

    Espiridião, P; Amorim, R; Costa, L; Oliveira, V; Xambre, L; Pereira, M; Amaral, L; Ferraz, L

    2009-01-01

    The ambulatory surgery includes those surgical procedures that require a small period of post-operative recovery so that the patients will be discharged from the hospital in the same day of the surgical intervention. In Urology, the vast amount of pathology that allows the cure with medium and low complexity surgical procedures makes this specialty a privileged one in which ambulatory surgery is concerned. In this paper the authors propose to describe how their Urology group works in the ambulatory field. 472 patients where reviewed in an evaluation period from January 2006 to April 2008. The medical appointment protocol is summarized as well as the most common surgical procedures and complications. Annually we operate an average of 200 ambulatory patients and this represents about 22% of the hole surgical activity of the Urology group. The majority of the surgeries are circumcisions and vasectomies (always associated with other small procedures). There is a 5 hours weakly period where a total of 5 to 6 patients are operated. Surgical complications represented 1.6% of total procedures, all of them late ones. With this specific ambulatory program our service managed to reduce drastically the waiting time for this kind of procedures (now-a-days is about 3-4 weeks), with a satisfaction rate of about 95%. According to the great outcomes, low complications rate and great acceptance of the patients, the development of this unit is without doubt a winning project in patients care.

  7. Understanding the Diffusion of Ambulatory Surgery Centers

    PubMed Central

    Suskind, Anne M.; Zhang, Yun; Dunn, Rodney L.; Hollingsworth, John M.; Strope, Seth A.; Hollenbeck, Brent K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Outpatient surgery is increasingly delivered at freestanding ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs), which are thought to deliver quality care at lower costs per episode. The objective of this study was to understand potential facilitators and/or barriers to the introduction of freestanding ASCs in the United States. Methods This is an observational study conducted from 2008–2010 using a 20% sample of Medicare claims. Potential determinants of ASC dissemination, including population, system, and legal factors, were compared between markets that always had ASCs, never had ASCs, and those that had new ASCs open during the study. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine characteristics of markets associated with the opening of a new facility in a previously naïve market. Results New ASCs opened in 67 previously naïve markets between 2008 and 2010. ASCs were more likely to open in HSAs that were urban (adjusted OR 4.10; 95% CI 1.51–10.96), had higher per capita income (adjusted OR 3.83; 95% CI 1.43–10.45), and had less competition for outpatient surgery (adjusted OR 2.13; 95% CI 1.02–4.45). Legal considerations and latent need, as measured by case volumes of hospital-based outpatient surgery in 2007, were not associated with the opening of a new ASC. Conclusions Freestanding ASCs opened in advantageous socioeconomic environments with the least amount of competition. Because of their associated efficiency advantages, policymakers might consider strategies to promote ASC diffusion in disadvantaged markets to potentially improve access and reduce costs. PMID:25143440

  8. The fraud and abuse statute and investor-owned ambulatory surgery centers.

    PubMed

    Becker, Scott; Harned, Nicholas

    2002-04-01

    The growth in the number of ambulatory surgery centers, coupled with the unique guidance provided by the OIG in this area, provide a fascinating legal and regulatory environment for ambulatory surgery centers.

  9. Designing appointment scheduling systems for ambulatory care services.

    PubMed

    Cayirli, Tugba; Veral, Emre; Rosen, Harry

    2006-02-01

    The current climate in the health care industry demands efficiency and patient satisfaction in medical care delivery. These two demands intersect in scheduling of ambulatory care visits. This paper uses patient and doctor-related measures to assess ambulatory care performance and investigates the interactions among appointment system elements and patient panel characteristics. Analysis methodology involves simulation modeling of clinic sessions where empirical data forms the basis of model design and assumptions. Results indicate that patient sequencing has a greater effect on ambulatory care performance than the choice of an appointment rule, and that panel characteristics such as walk-ins, no-shows, punctuality and overall session volume, influence the effectiveness of appointment systems.

  10. Ambulatory surgery centers best practices for the 90s.

    PubMed

    Hoover, J A

    1994-05-01

    Outpatient surgery will be the driving force in the continued growth of ambulatory care in the 1990s. Providing efficient, high-quality ambulatory surgical services should therefore be a priority among healthcare providers. Arthur Andersen conducted a survey to discover best practices in ambulatory surgical service. General success characteristics of best performers were business-focused relationships with physicians, the use of clinical protocols, patient convenience, cost management, strong leadership, teamwork, streamlined processes and efficient design. Other important factors included scheduling to maximize OR room use; achieving surgical efficiencies through reduced case pack assembly errors and equipment availability; a focus on cost capture rather than charge capture; sound materiel management practices, such as standardization and vendor teaming; and the appropriate use of automated systems. It is important to evaluate whether the best practices are applicable to your environment and what specific changes to your current processes would be necessary to adopt them.

  11. Ambulatory measurement of the ECG T-wave amplitude.

    PubMed

    van Lien, René; Neijts, Melanie; Willemsen, Gonneke; de Geus, Eco J C

    2015-02-01

    Ambulatory recording of the preejection period (PEP) can be used to measure changes in cardiac sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity under naturalistic conditions. Here, we test the ECG T-wave amplitude (TWA) as an alternative measure, using 24-h ambulatory monitoring of PEP and TWA in a sample of 564 healthy adults. The TWA showed a decrease in response to mental stress and a monotonic decrease from nighttime sleep to daytime sitting and more physically active behaviors. Within-participant changes in TWA were correlated with changes in the PEP across the standardized stressors (r = .42) and the unstandardized naturalistic conditions (mean r = .35). Partialling out changes in heart rate and vagal effects attenuated these correlations, but they remained significant. Ambulatory TWA cannot replace PEP, but simultaneous recording of TWA and PEP provides a more comprehensive picture of changes in cardiac SNS activity in real-life settings.

  12. A Twelve-Year Experience in Ambulatory Surgery within Urology

    PubMed Central

    Navalón, Pedro; Pallás, Yoni; Navalón, Victor; Ordoño, Felipe; Monllor, Elisa

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study is to show you the results we obtained through the integration of the Urology Department into the Ambulatory Surgery Unit for the very first twelve years. Scope. We will explain both the criteria we followed for patients to join in and the surgical and anesthetic procedures we used with those 1544 patients who were ambulatory subjected to urological diseases. After those patients were treated, they reached up to 95% of reasonable results. Conclusions. Most of urological patients liable to have surgical treatment are bound to be included in an ambulatory surgery program, which implies neither a worse healthcare service standard nor a worse satisfaction in patients. PMID:22530152

  13. Pediatric ambulatory blood pressure monitoring: indications and interpretations.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Joseph T; Urbina, Elaine M

    2012-06-01

    The prevalence of hypertension in children and adolescents is increasing, especially in obese and ethnic children. The adverse long-term effects of hypertension beginning in youth are known; therefore, it is important to identify young patients who need intervention. Unfortunately, measuring blood pressure (BP) is difficult due to the variety of techniques available and innate biologic variation in BP levels. Ambulatory BP monitoring may overcome some of the challenges clinicians face when attempting to categorize a young patient's BP levels. In this article, the authors review the use of ambulatory BP monitoring in pediatrics, discuss interpretation of ambulatory BP monitoring, and discuss gaps in knowledge in usage of this technique in the management of pediatric hypertension.

  14. 77 FR 70783 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Approval of the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-27

    ... Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC) Application for Continuing CMS Approval of Its... Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC) for continued recognition as a national accrediting... by CMS. The Ambulatory Health Care's (AAAHC) current term of approval for their ASC...

  15. Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring Phenotypes among Individuals With and Without Diabetes Taking Antihypertensive Medication: The Jackson Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Bromfield, Samantha G.; Shimbo, Daichi; Bertoni, Alain G.; Sims, Mario; Carson, April P.; Muntner, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) can detect phenotypes associated with increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Diabetes is associated with increased CVD risk but few data are available documenting whether blood pressure (BP) phenotypes, detected by ABPM, differ between individuals with versus without diabetes. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 567 participants in the Jackson Heart Study, a population-based study of African Americans, taking antihypertensive medication to evaluate the association between diabetes and ABPM phenotypes. Two clinic BP measurements were taken at baseline following a standardized protocol. ABPM was performed for 24 hours following the clinic visit. ABPM phenotypes included daytime, sustained, nocturnal, and isolated nocturnal hypertension, a non-dipping BP pattern, and white coat, masked, and masked isolated nocturnal hypertension. Diabetes was defined as fasting glucose ≥126 mg/dL, hemoglobin A1c ≥6.5% (48 mmol/mol), or use of insulin or oral hypoglycemic medications. Of the included participants (mean age 62.3 years, 71.8% female), 196 (34.6%) had diabetes. After multivariable adjustment, participants with diabetes were more likely to have daytime hypertension (prevalence ratio [PR]: 1.32; 95% CI: 1.09–1.60), masked hypertension (PR: 1.46; 95% CI: 1.11–1.93), and masked isolated nocturnal hypertension (PR: 1.39; 95% CI: 1.02–1.89). Although nocturnal hypertension was more common among participants with versus without diabetes, this association was not present after adjustment for daytime systolic BP. Diabetes was not associated with the other ABPM phenotypes investigated. This study highlights the high prevalence of ABPM phenotypes among individuals with diabetes taking antihypertensive medication. PMID:27169827

  16. The Ambulatory Semi-Poikilothermic Dog (Poikilothermic Against Cold)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1952-06-10

    aK 12 pp a ii Abstract; Report No. 84 From Project No. 5-6/i-12-C2^ THE AMBULATORY SEt-H-POIKILOq^’jIRrac ..- DOG ; (Poikilothermic Against 13625...evaluating partial impairment of thermo-regulatory functions. _-; ’’•••, Ambulatory semi-poikilothermic dogs \\ xe pre.pared.’.i3r’selec-; tive...SEMI-POIKILOTHERMIC DOG * (Poikilothermic Against Cold) Dy Allen D. Keller, Physiologist and Henry Batsel, Physiologist with the technical

  17. A System for Coding the Presenting Requests of Ambulatory Patients

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, Philip; Gordon, Michael J.; Gilson, John S.

    1977-01-01

    Effective methods developed to review and study the care of patients in hospital have not been applicable to ambulatory care, in which definitive diagnosis is the exception rather than the rule. A reasonable alternative to using diagnosis as the basis for assessing ambulatory care is to use the problems or requests presented by the patients themselves. A system has been developed for classifying and coding this information for flexible computer retrieval. Testing indicates that the system is simple in design, easily mastered by nonphysicians and provides reliable, useful data at a low cost. PMID:855324

  18. An ambulatory care classification system: design, development and evaluation.

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, D

    1979-01-01

    A medical classification system for coding a patient's reason for visit has been developed for use in the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and for ambulatory care settings. The code is developed in a modular structure and includes modules for Symptoms; Diseases; Diagnostic, Screening and Preventive Procedures; Therapeutic Procedures, Process Problems and Counseling; Injuries and Adverse Effects; Follow-ups for Test Results; and Administrative Reasons for Visits. The system was evaluated in coding tests, through review by medical societies representing the major specialties, and by other health care providers. An extensive coding index is available. PMID:468555

  19. Equine wellness care in ambulatory practice.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Claudia; True, Claudia

    2012-04-01

    Clients want dependable veterinary care and to understand how the services will benefit and meet their horse’s needs. Wellness visits provide ambulatory practitioners with great opportunities to strengthen the doctor-client-patient bond; effective communication with clients during wellness visits, where new literature or facts can be presented, can offer opportunities for demonstrating the value of having the veterinarian maintain a primary role in disease control. The criteria for selecting vaccines, interpreting FECs, and diagnosing dental pathology require the continued need for veterinary involvement. When providing wellness services, veterinarians should discuss those services, the reasons for them, as well as the possibility of adverse reactions. In so doing, the veterinarian is able to clearly distinguish himself or herself from a technician who is merely giving a "shot." Although some of these services can be performed by clients and lay professionals, the knowledge and training that veterinarians bring to these tasks add benefits to the horse beyond the services provided. For example, by targeting treatment and conveying the goals and limitations of FECs and deworming to clients, the speed at which anthelmintic resistance occurs will be diminished, and veterinarians will regain control over equine parasite management. Additional client education, such as demonstrating dental pathology to clients and how veterinary treatment benefits their horse, will not only improve the health of the horse further but also solidify the veterinarian’s role in preventative medicine. While all components of a wellness program were not detailed here, services such as nutritional consultation, blood work, and lameness evaluation should be offered based on the practice’s equine population. With the increasing population of geriatric horses, dentistry, nutrition, blood work, and lameness should be assessed annually or biannually. Each practice has its own set of criteria

  20. The non-contact measure of the heart rate variability by laser Doppler vibrometry: comparison with electrocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosoli, G.; Casacanditella, L.; Tomasini, E. P.; Scalise, L.

    2016-06-01

    The assessment of the heart rate variability (HRV) is of utmost importance, being one of the most promising markers of the activity of the autonomic nervous system and associated to cardiovascular mortality. Different signals can be used to perform HRV, primarily electrocardiography (ECG), photoplethysmography (PPG), phonocardiography (PCG) or vibrocardiography (VCG), since the fundamental aspect is the individuation of a periodic feature strictly correlated with cardiac activity (i.e. R-peak in ECG or the first sound in PCG). In this work, the authors demonstrate that the VCG performances in HRV analysis are sufficiently accurate if compared to the ones measured by ECG (i.e. standard methodology); moreover, the authors want to prove the feasibility of such measurement in correspondence of different measurement points (i.e. carotid artery—which is the typical VCG measurement point—and the radial artery on the wrist)1. Results show that VCG has a mean deviation of  <1 bpm with respect to ECG in heart rate (HR) measurement; carotid artery is the most accurate site for the assessment, but also the radial artery is a valid site, even if with a reduced SNR. With regards to HRV parameters, the mean percentage deviation is  <10% in correspondence of carotid artery, and  ≈16% for the radial artery. So, VCG allows for non-contact monitoring of the cardiac activity.

  1. High-risk angina patient: identification by clinical features, hospital course, electrocardiography, and technetium-99m stannous pyrophosphate scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, H.G.; Lyons, K.P.; Aronow, W.S.; Stinson, P.J.; Kuperus, J.; Waters, H.J.

    1981-10-01

    We evaluated 193 consecutive unstable angina patients by clinical features, hospital course and electrocardiography. All patients were managed medically. Of the 193 patients, 150 (78%) had a technetium-99m pyrophosphate (Tc-PYP) myocardial scintigram after hospitalization. Of these, 49 (33%) had positive scintigrams. At a follow-up of 24.9 +- 10.8 months after hospitalization, 16 of 49 patients (33%) with positive scintigrams died from cardiac causes, compared with six of 101 patients (6%) with negative scintigrams (p < 0.001). Of 49 patients with positive scintigrams, 11 (22%) had had nonfatal myocardial infarction at follow-up, compared with seven of 101 patients (7%) with negative scintigrams (p < 0.01). Age, duration of clinical coronary artery disease, continuing angina during hospitalization, ischemic ECG, cardiomegaly and a history of heart failure also correlated with cardiac death at follow-up. Ischemic ECG and a history of angina with a crescendo pattern also correlated with nonfatal infarction at follow-up. Patients with continuing angina, an ischemic ECG and a positive scintigram constituted a high-risk unstable angina subgroup, with a survival rate of 58% at 6 months, 47% at 12 months and 42% at 24 and 36 months. We conclude that the assessment of clinical features, hospital course, ECG and Tc-PYP scintigraphy may be useful in identifying high-risk unstable angina patients.

  2. High-risk angina patient. Identification by clinical features, hospital course, electrocardiography and technetium-99m stannous pyrophosphate scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, H.G.; Lyons, K.P.; Aronow, W.S.; Stinson, P.J.; Kuperus, J.; Waters, H.J.

    1981-10-01

    We evaluated 193 consecutive unstable angina patients by clinical features, hospital course and electrocardiography. All patients were managed medically. Of the 193 patients, 150 (78%) had a technetium-99m pyrophosphate (Tc-PYP) myocardial scintigram after hospitalization. Of these, 49 (33%) had positive scintigrams. At a follow-up of 24.9 +/- 10.8 months after hospitalization, 16 of 49 patients (33%) with positive scintigrams died from cardiac causes, compared with six of 101 patients (6%) with negative scintigrams (p less than 0.001). Of 49 patients with positive scintigrams, 11 (22%) had had nonfatal myocardial infarction at follow-up, compared with seven of 101 patients (7%) with negative scintigrams (p less than 0.01). Age, duration of clinical coronary artery disease, continuing angina during hospitalization, ischemic ECG, cardiomegaly and a history of heart failure also correlated with cardiac death at follow-up. Ischemic ECG and a history of angina with a crescendo pattern also correlated with nonfatal infarction at follow-up. Patients with continuing angina, an ischemic ECG and a positive scintigram constituted a high-risk unstable angina subgroup with a survival rate of 58% at 6 months, 47% at 12 months and 42% at 24 and 36 months. We conclude that the assessment of clinical features, hospital course, ECG and Tc-PYP scintigraphy may be useful in identifying high-risk unstable angina patients.

  3. Myocardial infarction size and location: a comparative study of epicardial isopotential mapping, thallium-201 scintigraphy, electrocardiography and vectorcardiography

    SciTech Connect

    Toyama, S.; Suzuki, K.; Takahashi, T.; Yamashita, Y.

    1987-07-01

    Based on epicardial isopotential mapping (the Ep Map), which was calculated from body surface isopotential mapping (the Body Map) with Yamashita's method, using the finite element technique, we predicted the location and size of the abnormal depolarized area (the infarcted area) in 19 clinical cases of anterior and 18 cases of inferoposterior infarction. The prediction was done using Toyama's diagnostic method, previously reported. The accuracy of the prediction by the Ep Map was assessed by comparing it with findings from thallium-201 scintigraphy (SCG), electrocardiography (ECG) and vectorcardiography (VCG). In all cases of anterior infarction, the location of the abnormal depolarized areas determined on the Ep Map, which was localized at the anterior wall along the anterior intraventricular septum, agreed with the location of the abnormal findings obtained by SCG, ECG and VCG. For all inferoposterior infarction cases, the abnormal depolarized areas were localized at the posterior wall and the location also coincided with that of the abnormal findings obtained by SCG, ECG and VCG. Furthermore, we ranked and ordered the size of the abnormal depolarized areas, which were predicted by the Ep Map for both anterior and inferoposterior infarction cases. In the cases of anterior infarction, the order of the size of the abnormal depolarized area by the Ep Map was correlated to the size of the abnormal findings by SCG, as well as to the results from Selvester's QRS scoring system in ECG and to the angle of the maximum QRS vector in the horizontal plane in VCG.

  4. [Current aspects of ambulatory long-term oxygen therapy].

    PubMed

    Russi, W

    1988-03-19

    Longterm O2-therapy increases life expectancy in hypoxemic patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and may improve their quality of life as well. The efficiency of this treatment modality depends upon the duration of oxygen administration within 24 hours. Measures which prolong mobility through a long-lasting oxygen source improve patient compliance. Transtracheal oxygen delivery is a genuine advance in longterm O2-therapy. Other oxygen-conserving methods are of interest, but experience is lacking to assess their efficiency in longterm practice.

  5. Clinical Practice Guideline for the Treatment of Intrinsic Circadian Rhythm Sleep-Wake Disorders: Advanced Sleep-Wake Phase Disorder (ASWPD), Delayed Sleep-Wake Phase Disorder (DSWPD), Non-24-Hour Sleep-Wake Rhythm Disorder (N24SWD), and Irregular Sleep-Wake Rhythm Disorder (ISWRD). An Update for 2015

    PubMed Central

    Auger, R. Robert; Burgess, Helen J.; Emens, Jonathan S.; Deriy, Ludmila V.; Thomas, Sherene M.; Sharkey, Katherine M.

    2015-01-01

    A systematic literature review and meta-analyses (where appropriate) were performed and the GRADE approach was used to update the previous American Academy of Sleep Medicine Practice Parameters on the treatment of intrinsic circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders. Available data allowed for positive endorsement (at a second-tier degree of confidence) of strategically timed melatonin (for the treatment of DSWPD, blind adults with N24SWD, and children/ adolescents with ISWRD and comorbid neurological disorders), and light therapy with or without accompanying behavioral interventions (adults with ASWPD, children/adolescents with DSWPD, and elderly with dementia). Recommendations against the use of melatonin and discrete sleep-promoting medications are provided for demented elderly patients, at a second- and first-tier degree of confidence, respectively. No recommendations were provided for remaining treatments/ populations, due to either insufficient or absent data. Areas where further research is needed are discussed. Citation: Auger RR, Burgess HJ, Emens JS, Deriy LV, Thomas SM, Sharkey KM. Clinical practice guideline for the treatment of intrinsic circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders: advanced sleep-wake phase disorder (ASWPD), delayed sleep-wake phase disorder (DSWPD), non-24-hour sleep-wake rhythm disorder (N24SWD), and irregular sleep-wake rhythm disorder (ISWRD). An update for 2015. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(10):1199–1236. PMID:26414986

  6. [The shift towards ambulatory care, from wishful thinking to practice].

    PubMed

    Pierru, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    For several years, there has been a distinct political will for the development of home care. However, this shift to ambulatory care, a source of financial savings for the health system and comfort for the patient, requires sociological debate. Notable issues for discussion are the social inequalities caused by this evolution and the role of the family in the care.

  7. Teaching Interdisciplinary Geriatrics Ambulatory Care: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Brent C.; Remington, Tami L.; Foulk, Mariko A.; Whall, Ann L.

    2006-01-01

    Interdisciplinary health care training is advocated by numerous government and philanthropic organizations. Educators in the health professions are increasingly offering training in interdisciplinary health care in a variety of contexts, including ambulatory settings. This paper describes a three-year program to teach skills in interdisciplinary…

  8. Ambulatory care centers: structure, services, and marketing techniques.

    PubMed

    Phillips, J H; Reeder, C E

    1987-12-01

    A generic definition for an ambulatory care center (ACC) is not apparent. ACCs differ in ownership, primary function, and services offered. ACCs are attempting to expand their patient base by providing nonemergency care, contracting with provider organizations (e.g., HMOs and PPOs), and using aggressive marketing techniques.

  9. Planning for ambulatory care: simple methods for improving patient flow.

    PubMed

    Schuh, S E; Tolins, I; Westphal, M C; Miller, M C

    1977-06-01

    A combined patient flow and work sampling study was done at the Ambulatory Pediatric Service of the Medical University of South Carolina. The biggest problem was that almost two thirds of the patient's time was spent waiting to see the doctor. Reasons for delay included too few examining rooms, the single block appointment system, and design of the facility.

  10. The ten successful elements of an ambulatory care center.

    PubMed

    Watkins, G

    1997-01-01

    Experts in healthcare predict that in the future, over 80% of all care will be provided either in the home or ambulatory care centers. How radiology facilities position themselves for this shifting market is critical to their long-term success, even though it appears there are endless opportunities for providing care in this atmosphere. The ten most critical elements that healthcare providers must address to ensure their preparedness are discussed. Location is critical, particularly since patients no longer want to travel to regional medical centers. The most aggressive providers are building local care centers to serve specific populations. Ambulatory care centers should project a high tech, high touch atmosphere. Patient comfort and the appeal of the overall environment must be considered. Centers need to focus on their customers' needs in multiple areas of care. A quick and easy registration process, providing dressing gowns in patient areas, clear billing functions--these are all important areas that centers should develop. Physicians practicing in the ambulatory care center are key to its overall success and can set the tone for all staff members. Staff members must be friendly and professional in their work with patients. The hours offered by the center must meet the needs of its client base, perhaps by offering evening and weekend appointments. Keeping appointments on schedule is critical if a center wants satisfied customers. It's important to identify the target before developing your marketing plan. Where do your referrals come from? Look to such sources as referring physicians, managed care plans and patients themselves. Careful billing is critical for survival in the ambulatory care world. Costs are important and systems that can track cost per exam are useful. Know your bottom line. Service remains the central focus of all successful ambulatory care center functions.

  11. Detection of peripartum myocardial burden by vector-projected 187 channel electrocardiography and serum NT-proBNP.

    PubMed

    Terata, Miyuki; Nakai, Kenji; Fukushima, Akimune; Itoh, Manabu; Kikuchi, Akihiko; Sugiyama, Toru

    2013-01-01

    There is no reliable method of screening for pregnant women at high risk of developing severe myocardial disorders. In this study, we used vector-projected 187 channel electrocardiography (DREAM-ECG) and serum biochemical markers to evaluate peripartum myocardial burden in pregnant women. Forty-one pregnant women were examined at 36-37 weeks gestation (GW36), 7 days postpartum (PPD7), and 1 month postpartum (PPM1). Ten non-pregnant control women were assessed at a single time point. Heart rate, sympathetic index, and repolarization index (RTc dispersion) were quantified using the DREAM-ECG system, and serum levels of NT-proBNP, cardiac troponin T, estrogen, and progesterone were determined. Heart rate and the sympathetic index decreased from GW36 to PPM1 (P = 0.0031). The repolarization index decreased over time and was greater than in non-pregnant controls (31 ± 13 ms). Estrogen and progesterone at PPD7 and PPM1 were significantly lower than those at GW36 (P < 0.0001, P < 0.001). NT-proBNP at PPD7 was greater than at GW36 (median 29 pg/mL at GW36, 86 pg/mL at PPD7), and decreased at PPM1 in comparison to PPD7 (median 18.5 pg/mL). Troponin T was in the normal range during the whole period (< 0.003 ng/mL). In conclusion, these results indicate that the peripartum myocardial burden in pregnant women does not return to normal nonpregnant levels by PPM1. We propose that both repolarization indexes such as RTc dispersion by DREAM-ECG and serum biochemical markers may identify pregnant women at high risk of developing severe myocardial damage in the peripartum period.

  12. Non-contact detection of myocardium's mechanical activity by ultrawideband RF-radar and interpretation applying electrocardiography.

    PubMed

    Thiel, F; Kreiseler, D; Seifert, F

    2009-11-01

    can potentially be used to support standard electrocardiography (ECG) analysis by complementary information where sole ECG analysis fails, e.g., electromechanical dissociation.

  13. Non-contact detection of myocardium's mechanical activity by ultrawideband RF-radar and interpretation applying electrocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiel, F.; Kreiseler, D.; Seifert, F.

    2009-11-01

    can potentially be used to support standard electrocardiography (ECG) analysis by complementary information where sole ECG analysis fails, e.g., electromechanical dissociation.

  14. Prevalence and prognostic significance of exercise-induced silent myocardial ischemia detected by thallium scintigraphy and electrocardiography in asymptomatic volunteers

    SciTech Connect

    Fleg, J.L.; Gerstenblith, G.; Zonderman, A.B.; Becker, L.C.; Weisfeldt, M.L.; Costa, P.T. Jr.; Lakatta, E.G. )

    1990-02-01

    Although a silent ischemic electrocardiographic response to treadmill exercise in clinically healthy populations is associated with an increased likelihood of future coronary events (i.e., angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, or cardiac death), such a response has a low predictive value for future events because of the low prevalence of disease in asymptomatic populations. To examine whether detection of reduced regional perfusion by thallium scintigraphy improved the predictive value of exercise-induced ST segment depression, we performed maximal treadmill exercise electrocardiography (ECG) and thallium scintigraphy (201Tl) in 407 asymptomatic volunteers 40-96 years of age (mean = 60) from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study on Aging. The prevalence of exercise-induced silent ischemia, defined by concordant ST segment depression and a thallium perfusion defect, increased more than sevenfold from 2% in the fifth and sixth decades to 15% in the ninth decade. Over a mean follow-up period of 4.6 years, cardiac events developed in 9.8% of subjects and consisted of 20 cases of new angina pectoris, 13 myocardial infarctions, and seven deaths. Events occurred in 7% of individuals with both negative 201Tl and ECG, 8% of those with either test positive, and 48% of those in whom both tests were positive (p less than 0.001). By proportional hazards analysis, age, hypertension, exercise duration, and a concordant positive ECG and 201Tl result were independent predictors of coronary events. Furthermore, those with positive ECG and 201Tl had a 3.6-fold relative risk for subsequent coronary events, independent of conventional risk factors.

  15. Ambulatory assessment in panic disorder and specific phobia.

    PubMed

    Alpers, Georg W

    2009-12-01

    Anxiety disorders are among the most prevalent mental disorders. In panic disorder, panic attacks often occur at unpredictable times, making it difficult to study these episodes in the laboratory. In specific phobias, symptoms occur in very circumscribed situations and specific triggers are sometimes difficult to reproduce in the laboratory. Ambulatory assessment, or ecological momentary assessment, can further the understanding of the natural course and scope of symptoms under ecologically valid circumstances. Because bodily symptoms are integral to the diagnosis of anxiety disorders, the objective assessment of physiological responses in the patients' natural environment is particularly important. On the one hand, research has highlighted intriguing discrepancies between the experience of symptoms and physiology during panic attacks. On the other hand, it has validated symptom reporting during therapeutic exposure to phobic situations. Therefore, ambulatory assessment can yield useful information about the psychopathology of anxiety disorders, and it can be used to monitor change during clinical interventions.

  16. Ambulatory oesophageal bile reflux monitoring in Barrett's oesophagus.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, M T; Lawlor, P; Byrne, P J; Walsh, T N; Hennessy, T P

    1995-05-01

    Bile reflux has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Barrett's oesophagus but evaluation remains difficult. Bilitec 2000 is an ambulatory system that detects bilirubin based on its spectrophotometric properties. Oesophageal bile exposure was evaluated in three groups of patients. Group 1 (n = 11) were normal controls, group 2 (n = 13) were patients with uncomplicated gastro-oesophageal reflux and group 3 (n = 12) were patients with Barrett's oesophagus. Bile reflux was greater in patients with Barrett's mucosa than in controls or those with uncomplicated reflux. This difference was seen in the supine and interdigestive periods. The percentage of time at which gastric pH was greater than 4 and oesophageal pH was above 7 did not differ between the groups. Bilitec 2000 detects greater bile reflux in patients with Barrett's oesophagus. No corresponding gastric or oesophageal alkaline shift is found. This ambulatory bile reflux monitoring system may be a useful tool in clinical practice.

  17. LED power reduction trade-offs for ambulatory pulse oximetry.

    PubMed

    Peláez, Eduardo Aguilar; Villegas, Esther Rodríguez

    2007-01-01

    The development of ambulatory arterial pulse oximetry is key to longer term monitoring and treatment of cardiovascular and respiratory conditions. The investigation presented in this paper will assist the designer of an ambulatory pulse oximetry monitor in minimizing the overall LED power consumption (P LED,TOT) levels by analyzing the lowest achievable limit as constrained by the optical components, circuitry implementation and final SpO2 reading accuracy required. LED duty cycle (D LED) reduction and light power (P LED,ON) minimization are proposed as methods to reduce P LED,TOT. Bandwidth and signal quality calculations are carried out in order to determine the required P LED,TOT as a function of the different noise sources.

  18. Interdisciplinary Shared Governance in Ambulatory Care: One Health System's Journey.

    PubMed

    Powers, Sharon; Bacon, Cynthia Thornton

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of shared governance structures in acute care has illustrated the positive relationship between shared decision making and nurse empowerment and positive nurse and patient outcomes. Little is known, however, about interdisciplinary shared governance, and even less is known about shared governance in ambulatory care. This article details one health system's experience with the implementation of an interdisciplinary shared governance structure in ambulatory care over a 4-year period. The authors report lessons learned, positive health system outcomes that resulted including improved communication, better preparedness for accreditation visits, improved assessment of fall risk, and a streamlined documentation system. Also discussed are mechanisms to enhance sustainability of the structure and discussion of future opportunities and challenges.

  19. Improving adherence to the Epic Beacon ambulatory workflow.

    PubMed

    Chackunkal, Ellen; Dhanapal Vogel, Vishnuprabha; Grycki, Meredith; Kostoff, Diana

    2016-03-16

    Computerized physician order entry has been shown to significantly improve chemotherapy safety by reducing the number of prescribing errors. Epic's Beacon Oncology Information System of computerized physician order entry and electronic medication administration was implemented in Henry Ford Health System's ambulatory oncology infusion centers on 9 November 2013. Since that time, compliance to the infusion workflow had not been assessed. The objective of this study was to optimize the current workflow and improve the compliance to this workflow in the ambulatory oncology setting. This study was a retrospective, quasi-experimental study which analyzed the composite workflow compliance rate of patient encounters from 9 to 23 November 2014. Based on this analysis, an intervention was identified and implemented in February 2015 to improve workflow compliance. The primary endpoint was to compare the composite compliance rate to the Beacon workflow before and after a pharmacy-initiated intervention. The intervention, which was education of infusion center staff, was initiated by ambulatory-based, oncology pharmacists and implemented by a multi-disciplinary team of pharmacists and nurses. The composite compliance rate was then reassessed for patient encounters from 2 to 13 March 2015 in order to analyze the effects of the determined intervention on compliance. The initial analysis in November 2014 revealed a composite compliance rate of 38%, and data analysis after the intervention revealed a statistically significant increase in the composite compliance rate to 83% (p < 0.001). This study supports a pharmacist-initiated educational intervention can improve compliance to an ambulatory, oncology infusion workflow.

  20. Hospitalization of older adults due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Aline Pinto; Montilla, Dalia Elena Romero; de Almeida, Wanessa da Silva; de Andrade, Carla Lourenço Tavares

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the temporal evolution of the hospitalization of older adults due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions according to their structure, magnitude and causes. METHODS Cross-sectional study based on data from the Hospital Information System of the Brazilian Unified Health System and from the Primary Care Information System, referring to people aged 60 to 74 years living in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Souhteastern Brazil. The proportion and rate of hospitalizations due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions were calculated, both the global rate and, according to diagnoses, the most prevalent ones. The coverage of the Family Health Strategy and the number of medical consultations attended by older adults in primary care were estimated. To analyze the indicators’ impact on hospitalizations, a linear correlation test was used. RESULTS We found an intense reduction in hospitalizations due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions for all causes and age groups. Heart failure, cerebrovascular diseases and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases concentrated 50.0% of the hospitalizations. Adults older than 69 years had a higher risk of hospitalization due to one of these causes. We observed a higher risk of hospitalization among men. A negative correlation was found between the hospitalizations and the indicators of access to primary care. CONCLUSIONS Primary healthcare in the state of Rio de Janeiro has been significantly impacting the hospital morbidity of the older population. Studies of hospitalizations due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions can aid the identification of the main causes that are sensitive to the intervention of the health services, in order to indicate which actions are more effective to reduce hospitalizations and to increase the population’s quality of life. PMID:25372173

  1. The Perioperative Experience of the Ambulatory Surgery Patient

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    Preparation of Patients 10 Non-Pharmacological Preparation of Patients 10 Contemporary Health Care Delivery 12 Summary 16 CHAPTER III: METHOD OF...the challenges posed by the Triservice Nursing Research Program Advisory Council who have identified health care delivery systems and ambulatory...White, 1997). This normal expected response is often viewed as a problem, thus health care personnel make efforts to reduce anxiety. Anxiety is an

  2. Redesigning ambulatory care business processes supporting clinical care delivery.

    PubMed

    Patterson, C; Sinkewich, M; Short, J; Callas, E

    1997-04-01

    The first step in redesigning the health care delivery process for ambulatory care begins with the patient and the business processes that support the patient. Patient-related business processes include patient access, service documentation, billing, follow-up, collection, and payment. Access is the portal to the clinical delivery and care management process. Service documentation, charge capture, and payment and collection are supporting processes to care delivery. Realigned provider networks now demand realigned patient business services to provide their members/customers/patients with improved service delivery at less cost. Purchaser mandates for cost containment, health maintenance, and enhanced quality of care have created an environment where every aspect of the delivery system, especially ambulatory care, is being judged. Business processes supporting the outpatient are therefore being reexamined for better efficiency and customer satisfaction. Many health care systems have made major investments in their ambulatory care environment, but have pursued traditional supporting business practices--such as multiple access points, lack of integrated patient appointment scheduling and registration, and multiple patient bills. These are areas that are appropriate for redesign efforts--all with the customer's needs and convenience in mind. Similarly, setting unrealistic expectations, underestimating the effort required, and ignoring the human elements of a patient-focused business service redesign effort can sabotage the very sound reasons for executing such an endeavor. Pitfalls can be avoided if a structured methodology, coupled with a change management process, are employed. Deloitte & Touche Consulting Group has been involved in several major efforts, all with ambulatory care settings to assist with the redesign of their business practices to consider the patient as the driver, instead of the institution providing the care.

  3. [Current clinical aspects of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring].

    PubMed

    Sauza-Sosa, Julio César; Cuéllar-Álvarez, José; Villegas-Herrera, Karla Montserrat; Sierra-Galán, Lilia Mercedes

    2016-01-01

    Systemic arterial hypertension is the prevalentest disease worldwide that significantly increases cardiovascular risk. An early diagnosis together to achieve goals decreases the risk of complications significatly. Recently have been updated the diagnostic criteria for hypertension and the introduction of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. The introduction into clinical practice of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was to assist the diagnosis of «white coat hypertension» and «masked hypertension». Today has also shown that ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is better than the traditional method of recording blood pressure in the office, to the diagnosis and to adequate control and adjustment of drug treatment. Also there have been introduced important new concepts such as isloted nocturnal hypertension, morning blood pressure elevation altered and altered patterns of nocturnal dip in blood pressure; which have been associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Several studies have shown significant prognostic value in some stocks. There are still other concepts on which further study is needed to properly establish their introduction to clinical practice as hypertensive load variability, pulse pressure and arterial stiffness. In addition to setting values according to further clinical studies in populations such as elderly and children.

  4. Pathway to Best Practice in Spirometry in the Ambulatory Setting.

    PubMed

    Peracchio, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Spirometry performed in the ambulatory setting is an invaluable tool for diagnosis, monitoring, and evaluation of respiratory health in patients with chronic lung disease. If spirometry is not performed according to American Thoracic Society (ATS) guidelines, unnecessary repeated testing, increased expenditure of time and money, and increased patient and family anxiety may result. Two respiratory therapists at Mission Health System in Asheville, NC, identified an increase in patients arriving at the pulmonary function testing (PFT) laboratories with abnormal spirometry results obtained in the ambulatory setting. These abnormal results were due to incorrect testing procedure, not chronic lung disease. Three training methods were developed to increase knowledge of correct spirometry testing procedure in the ambulatory setting. The therapists also created a plan to educate offices that do not perform spirometry on the importance and availability of PFT services at our hospital for the population of patients with chronic lung disease. Notable improvements in posttraining test results were demonstrated. The education process was evaluated by a leading respiratory expert, with improvements suggested and implemented. Next steps are listed.

  5. Predictors of static balance in ambulatory persons with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Fry, Donna K; Huang, Min H; Rodda, Becky J

    2016-03-01

    People with multiple sclerosis (MS) experience a high rate of falls and have decreased static and dynamic balance. The purpose of this study was to determine best predictors of static standing balance, as measured by a single limb stance (SLS) timed test, in ambulatory persons with MS (PwMS) from among commonly used medical and rehabilitation clinical tests. Ambulatory PwMS participated in a single test session. Medical exam data gathered included the Function System (FS) neurologic exam and Expanded Disability Status Score (EDSS). A variety of commonly administered rehabilitation clinical tests addressing static balance, dynamic balance, gait endurance, functional lower extremity strength, abdominal and respiratory muscle strength were completed. Descriptive statistics, Pearson product moment correlations, and forward step-wise linear regressions were calculated. Twenty-eight ambulatory PwMS completed this study. Mean age was 54.74 years. Mean SLS score was 14.6 s. Pyramidal, sensory, bowel/bladder, and visual FS scores and the EDSS were significantly correlated with SLS. Maximal step length scores were significantly correlated with SLS at P less than 0.05 and the Functional Stair Test (FST) and 6-min walk test were correlated with SLS at P less than 0.10. Medical exam data EDSS and FS sensory explain 72.1% of the variance in SLS scores. Rehabilitation exam data FS sensory and FST explain 68.8% of the variance. The FS sensory, EDSS, and FST together explain 73.3% of the variance.

  6. Role of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Guido; Bombelli, Michele; Seravalle, Gino; Brambilla, Gianmaria; Dell'oro, Raffaella; Mancia, Giuseppe

    2013-06-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring has gained growing popularity in the diagnosis and treatment of essential hypertension for several reasons, such as the lack of the so-called white-coat effect, the greater reproducibility as compared with clinic blood pressure, the ability to provide information on blood pressure phenomena of prognostic value and the closer relationship with the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. All the above-mentioned main features of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring are also true for resistant hypertension. In addition, however, in resistant hypertension, blood pressure monitoring allows one to precisely define the diagnosis of this clinical condition, by excluding the presence of white-coat hypertension, which is responsible for a consistent number of "false" resistant hypertensive cases. The approach also allows one to define the patterns of blood pressure variability in this clinical condition, as well as its relationships with target organ damage. Finally, it allows one to assess the effects of therapeutic interventions, such as renal nerves ablation, aimed at improving blood pressure control in this hypertensive state. The present paper will critically review the main features of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in resistant hypertension, with particular emphasis on the diagnosis and treatment of this high-risk hypertensive state.

  7. Annotated Bibliography: Understanding Ambulatory Care Practices in the Context of Patient Safety and Quality Improvement.

    PubMed

    Montano, Maria F; Mehdi, Harshal; Nash, David B

    2016-11-01

    The ambulatory care setting is an increasingly important component of the patient safety conversation. Inpatient safety is the primary focus of the vast majority of safety research and interventions, but the ambulatory setting is actually where most medical care is administered. Recent attention has shifted toward examining ambulatory care in order to implement better health care quality and safety practices. This annotated bibliography was created to analyze and augment the current literature on ambulatory care practices with regard to patient safety and quality improvement. By providing a thorough examination of current practices, potential improvement strategies in ambulatory care health care settings can be suggested. A better understanding of the myriad factors that influence delivery of patient care will catalyze future health care system development and implementation in the ambulatory setting.

  8. Evaluation of Ambulatory Care Classification Systems for the Military Health Care System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    reports will be directed to the following: U.S. Department of Commerce C) eu urNational Tecnical Information Services (NTIS) (peD ntu5285 Port RoyalRoad p s...of those examined for possible evaluation. Subzequent phases will focus on PACs with an ambulatory surgery component included called Products of...Ambulatory Surgery (PAS), Ambulatory Patient Groups (APGs) which are based on AVGs, Emergency Department Groups (EDGs) (Cameron, Baraff, and Sekhon, 1990

  9. Visualization of cardiac dipole using a current density map: detection of cardiac current undetectable by electrocardiography using magnetocardiography.

    PubMed

    Ikefuji, Hiroyuki; Nomura, Masahiro; Nakaya, Yutaka; Mori, Toshifumi; Kondo, Noriyasu; Ieishi, Kiyoshi; Fujimoto, Sayuri; Ito, Susumu

    2007-02-01

    A close relationship exists between electric current and the magnetic field. However, electricity and magnetism have different physical characteristics, and magnetocardiography (MCG) may provide information on cardiac current that is difficult to obtain by electrocardiography (ECG). In the present study, we investigated the issue of whether the current density map method, in which cardiac current is estimated from the magnetic gradient, facilitates the visualization of cardiac current undetectable by ECG. The subjects were 50 healthy adults (N group), 40 patients with left ventricular overloading (LVO group), 15 patients with right ventricular overloading (RVO group), 10 patients with an old inferior myocardial infarction (OMI group), and 30 patients with diabetes mellitus (DM group). MCGs were recorded with a second derivative superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) gradiometer using liquid helium. Isopotential maps and current density maps from unipolar precordial ECG leads and MCGs, respectively, were prepared, and the cardiac electric current was examined. The current density map at the ventricular depolarization phase showed one peak of current density in the N group. However, in the OMI group, the current density map showed multiple peaks of current density areas. In the RVO group, two peaks of current densities were detected at the right superior region and left thoracic region and these two diploles appeared to be from the right and left ventricular derived cardiac currents, respectively. Moreover, there was a significant correlation between the magnitude of the current density from the right ventricle and the systolic pulmonary arterial pressure. The current density map at the ventricular repolarization phase in the N group showed only a single current source. However, abnormal current sources in the current density maps were frequently detected even in patients showing no abnormalities on isopotential maps in the LVO, DM, and OMI groups. The

  10. Clinical Application of Electrocardiography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brammell, H. L.; Orr, William

    The scalar electrocardiogram (ECG) is one of the most important and commonly used clinical tools in medicine. A detailed description of the recordings of cardiac electrical activity made by the ECG is presented, and the vast numbers of uses made with the data provided by this diagnostic tool are cited. Clinical applications of the ECG are listed.…

  11. Noninvasive diagnostic test choices for the evaluation of coronary artery disease in women: a multivariate comparison of cardiac fluoroscopy, exercise electrocardiography and exercise thallium myocardial perfusion scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, J.; Chaitman, B.R.; Lam, J.; Lesperance, J.; Dupras, G.; Fines, P.; Bourassa, M.G.

    1984-07-01

    Several diagnostic noninvasive tests to detect coronary and multivessel coronary disease are available for women. However, all are imperfect and it is not yet clear whether one particular test provides substantially more information than others. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical findings, exercise electrocardiography, exercise thallium myocardial scintigraphy and cardiac fluoroscopy in 92 symptomatic women without previous infarction and determine which tests were most useful in determining the presence of coronary disease and its severity. Univariate analysis revealed two clinical, eight exercise electrocardiographic, seven myocardial scintigraphic and seven fluoroscopic variables predictive of coronary or multivessel disease with 70% or greater stenosis. The multivariate discriminant function analysis selected a reversible thallium defect, coronary calcification and character of chest pain syndrome as the variables most predictive of presence or absence of coronary disease. The ranked order of variables most predictive of multivessel disease were cardiac fluoroscopy score, thallium score and extent of ST segment depression in 14 electrocardiographic leads. Each provided statistically significant information to the model. The estimate of predictive accuracy was 89% for coronary disease and 97% for multivessel coronary disease. The results suggest that cardiac fluoroscopy or thallium scintigraphy provide significantly more diagnostic information than exercise electrocardiography in women over a wide range of clinical patient subsets.

  12. Adiposity is increased among High-Functioning, Non-Ambulatory Patients with Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sproule, Douglas M.; Montes, Jacqueline; Dunaway, Sally; Montgomery, Megan; Battista, Vanessa; Koenigsberger, Dorcas; Martens, Bill; Shen, Wei; Punyanitya, Mark; Benton, Maryjane; Butler, Hailly; Caracciolo, Jayson; Mercuri, Eugenio; Finkel, Richard; Darras, Basil; De Vivo, Darryl C.; Kaufmann, Petra

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between body composition and function in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is poorly understood. 53 subjects with SMA were stratified by type and Hammersmith Functional Motor Scale, Expanded score into three cohorts: Low-Functioning Non-Ambulatory (type 2 with Hammersmith score <12, n=19), High-Functioning Non-Ambulatory (type 2 with Hammersmith Score ≥ 12 or non-ambulatory type 3, n=17), and Ambulatory (n=17). Lean and fat mass was estimated using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Anthropometric data was incorporated to measure fat-free (lean mass in kg /stature in m2) and fat (fat mass in kg /stature in m2) mass indices, the latter compared to published age and sex norms. Feeding dysfunction among type 2 subjects was assessed by questionnaire. Fat mass index was increased in the High-Functioning Non-Ambulatory cohort (10.4 ± 4.5) compared with both the ambulatory (7.2 ± 2.1, p = 0.013) and Low-Functioning Non-Ambulatory (7.6 ± 3.1, p = 0.040) cohorts. 12 of 17 subjects (71%) in the High-Functioning Non-Ambulatory cohort had fat mass index >85th percentile for age and gender (connoting “at risk of overweight”) versus 9 of 19 subjects (47%) in the Low-Functioning Non-Ambulatory cohort and 8 of 17 ambulatory subjects (47%). Despite differences in clinical function, a similar proportion of low functioning (7/18, 39%) and high functioning (2/7, 29%) type 2 subjects reported swallowing or feeding dysfunction. Non-ambulatory patients with relatively high clinical function may be at particular risk of excess adiposity, perhaps reflecting access to excess calories despite relative immobility, emphasizing the importance of individualized nutritional management in SMA. PMID:20610154

  13. Regional variations in ambulatory care and incidence of cardiovascular events

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Jack V.; Chu, Anna; Maclagan, Laura; Austin, Peter C.; Johnston, Sharon; Ko, Dennis T.; Cheung, Ingrid; Atzema, Clare L.; Booth, Gillian L.; Bhatia, R. Sacha; Lee, Douglas S.; Jackevicius, Cynthia A.; Kapral, Moira K.; Tu, Karen; Wijeysundera, Harindra C.; Alter, David A.; Udell, Jacob A.; Manuel, Douglas G.; Mondal, Prosanta; Hogg, William

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Variations in the prevalence of traditional cardiac risk factors only partially account for geographic variations in the incidence of cardiovascular disease. We examined the extent to which preventive ambulatory health care services contribute to geographic variations in cardiovascular event rates. METHODS: We conducted a cohort study involving 5.5 million patients aged 40 to 79 years in Ontario, Canada, with no hospital stays for cardiovascular disease as of January 2008, through linkage of multiple population-based health databases. The primary outcome was the occurrence of a major cardiovascular event (myocardial infarction, stroke or cardiovascular-related death) over the following 5 years. We compared patient demographics, cardiac risk factors and ambulatory health care services across the province’s 14 health service regions, known as Local Health Integration Networks (LHINs), and evaluated the contribution of these variables to regional variations in cardiovascular event rates. RESULTS: Cardiovascular event rates across LHINs varied from 3.2 to 5.7 events per 1000 person-years. Compared with residents of high-rate LHINs, those of low-rate health regions received physician services more often (e.g., 4.2 v. 3.5 mean annual family physician visits, p value for LHIN-level trend = 0.01) and were screened for risk factors more often. Low-rate LHINs were also more likely to achieve treatment targets for hypercholes-terolemia (51.8% v. 49.6% of patients, p = 0.03) and controlled hypertension (67.4% v. 53.3%, p = 0.04). Differences in patient and health system factors accounted for 74.5% of the variation in events between LHINs, of which 15.5% was attributable to health system factors alone. INTERPRETATION: Preventive ambulatory health care services were provided more frequently in health regions with lower cardiovascular event rates. Health system interventions to improve equitable access to preventive care might improve cardiovascular outcomes. PMID

  14. Educating Asthmatic Children in European Ambulatory Pediatrics: Facts and Insights.

    PubMed

    Robberecht, Marie Noëlle; Beghin, Laurent; Deschildre, Antoine; Hue, Valérie; Reali, Laura; Plevnik-Vodušek, Vesna; Moretto, Marilena; Agustsson, Sigurlaug; Tockert, Emile; Jäger-Roman, Elke; Deplanque, Dominique; Najaf-Zadeh, Abolfazl; Martinot, Alain

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the role of European ambulatory pediatricians in caring for asthmatic children, especially in terms of their therapeutic education. We developed a survey that was observational, declarative, retrospective and anonymous in nature. 436 ambulatory pediatricians in Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Luxembourg and Slovenia were asked to participate in the survey providing information on three children over 6 years old suffering from persistent asthma, who had been followed for at least 6 months. We considered the pediatricians' profile, and their role in the therapeutic education of children. 277 pediatricians (64%) responded: 81% were primary care pediatricians; 46% participated in networks; 4% had specific training in Therapeutic Patient Education; 69% followed more than 5 asthmatic children per month, and over long periods (7 ± 4 years). The profiles of 684 children were assessed. Answers diverged concerning the provision of a Personalized Action Plan (60-88%), training the child to measure and interpret his Peak Expiratory Flow (31-99%), and the prescription of pulmonary function tests during the follow-up programme of consultations (62-97%). Answers converged on pediatricians' perception of their role in teaching children about their condition and its treatment (99%), about inhalation techniques (96%), and in improving the children's ability to take preventive measures when faced with risk situations (97%). This study highlights the role of European pediatricians in caring for asthmatic children, and their lack of training in Therapeutic Patient Education. Programmes and tools are required in order to train ambulatory pediatricians in Therapeutic Patient Education, and such resources should be integrated into primary health care, and harmonized at the European level.

  15. Educating Asthmatic Children in European Ambulatory Pediatrics: Facts and Insights

    PubMed Central

    Robberecht, Marie Noëlle; Beghin, Laurent; Deschildre, Antoine; Hue, Valérie; Reali, Laura; Plevnik-Vodušek, Vesna; Moretto, Marilena; Agustsson, Sigurlaug; Tockert, Emile; Jäger-Roman, Elke; Deplanque, Dominique; Najaf-Zadeh, Abolfazl; Martinot, Alain

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the role of European ambulatory pediatricians in caring for asthmatic children, especially in terms of their therapeutic education. We developed a survey that was observational, declarative, retrospective and anonymous in nature. 436 ambulatory pediatricians in Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Luxembourg and Slovenia were asked to participate in the survey providing information on three children over 6 years old suffering from persistent asthma, who had been followed for at least 6 months. We considered the pediatricians’ profile, and their role in the therapeutic education of children. 277 pediatricians (64%) responded: 81% were primary care pediatricians; 46% participated in networks; 4% had specific training in Therapeutic Patient Education; 69% followed more than 5 asthmatic children per month, and over long periods (7 ± 4 years). The profiles of 684 children were assessed. Answers diverged concerning the provision of a Personalized Action Plan (60–88%), training the child to measure and interpret his Peak Expiratory Flow (31–99%), and the prescription of pulmonary function tests during the follow-up programme of consultations (62–97%). Answers converged on pediatricians’ perception of their role in teaching children about their condition and its treatment (99%), about inhalation techniques (96%), and in improving the children’s ability to take preventive measures when faced with risk situations (97%). This study highlights the role of European pediatricians in caring for asthmatic children, and their lack of training in Therapeutic Patient Education. Programmes and tools are required in order to train ambulatory pediatricians in Therapeutic Patient Education, and such resources should be integrated into primary health care, and harmonized at the European level. PMID:26061153

  16. Flexible capacitive electrodes for minimizing motion artifacts in ambulatory electrocardiograms.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Su; Heo, Jeong; Lee, Won Kyu; Lim, Yong Gyu; Kim, Youn Ho; Park, Kwang Suk

    2014-08-12

    This study proposes the use of flexible capacitive electrodes for reducing motion artifacts in a wearable electrocardiogram (ECG) device. The capacitive electrodes have conductive foam on their surface, a shield, an optimal input bias resistor, and guarding feedback. The electrodes are integrated in a chest belt, and the acquired signals are transmitted wirelessly for ambulatory heart rate monitoring. We experimentally validated the electrode performance with subjects standing and walking on a treadmill at speeds of up to 7 km/h. The results confirmed the highly accurate heart rate detection capacity of the developed system and its feasibility for daily-life ECG monitoring.

  17. Pilgrims satisfaction with ambulatory health services in Makkah, 2008

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hoqail, Ibrahim A.; Abdalla, Abdelshakour M.; Saeed, Abdalla A.; Al-Hamdan, Nasir A.; Bahnassy, Ahmed A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The main objective of this study was to assess the level and correlates of patients’ satisfaction with ambulatory health services provided for pilgrims during Hajj period in 2008. Materials and Methods: This was a facility-based, cross-sectional study conducted in the Makkah region during the Hajj season in December 2008. A two-stage technique was used to select 500 patients from those who attended the ambulatory health services. One hundred subjects were selected by systematic random sampling (every fifth) from each of the five hospitals included in the study and asked to fill in a pilot-tested self-administered questionnaire. A total of 487 questionnaires were analyzed. Descriptive statistics and t-test, Mann Whitney test and ANOVA, or Kruskal-Wallis test was used as appropriate after checking for normality. Level of significance level was set to be <0.05 throughout the study. Results: From 478 subjects analyzed, 390 (81.6%) were man, 345 (72.2%) were married, 28.9% had either intermediate or high secondary school education, and 2.4% were skilled laborers. The total satisfaction score for health facilities was 20.45 ± 4.03 of 25. The satisfaction scores were 20.15 ± 4.7 of 25 for patient satisfaction with physicians and 21.35 ± 4.5 for patient satisfaction with paramedical personnel. The overall satisfaction score was 61.5 ± 4.5 of 75 points. There were significant relations between total satisfaction of health facilities with education level and with occupation (P = 0.012, 0.001, respectively). The total satisfaction of patients with physicians was significant only with education level. The overall satisfaction score had a significant relation with occupation (P = 0.03), but a borderline relation with the education level (P = 0.056). Conclusion: Satisfaction with ambulatory Hajj health services is acceptable. Some physicians and waiting area services need special attention to improve satisfaction levels with ambulatory health in the subsequent

  18. The effects of electronic documentation in the ambulatory surgery setting.

    PubMed

    O'Meara, Estela

    2007-12-01

    Electronic documentation can improve organizational processes in health care settings and may be of particular benefit to ambulatory surgery centers. A decision support system (DSS) can be integrated with an electronic documentation system. A DSS can identify potential errors and deviations from best practices and provide electronic alerts for health care clinicians to support patient screening and care. Barriers to implementation of a DSS include practitioner noncompliance with alerts and limitations in system design. Nurses can be instrumental in overcoming the barriers that prevent some clinicians from adopting these useful information systems.

  19. A Portable Computer System for Auditing Quality of Ambulatory Care

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, J. Michael; Dunn, Earl V.; Borgiel, Alexander E.

    1987-01-01

    Prior efforts to effectively and efficiently audit quality of ambulatory care based on comprehensive process criteria have been limited largely by the complexity and cost of data abstraction and management. Over the years, several demonstration projects have generated large sets of process criteria and mapping systems for evaluating quality of care, but these paper-based approaches have been impractical to implement on a routine basis. Recognizing that portable microcomputers could solve many of the technical problems in abstracting data from medical records, we built upon previously described criteria and developed a microcomputer-based abstracting system that facilitates reliable and cost-effective data abstraction.

  20. [Molecular diagnostics of infectious diseases for the ambulatory practice].

    PubMed

    Dumoulin, A

    2014-10-08

    Molecular diagnostics methods are not limited to specialized centers anymore. They play an important role for the diagnostic of infections commonly encountered in the clinical practice. Especially the detection of pathogens difficult to cultivate, such as viruses, has been greatly improved by these methods. Often, PCR has become the gold standard for the diagnostics of these pathogens. However, PCR cannot be used in any case, and it is not fail proof. Therefore, it is important to know when to use molecular methods and what are their strengths and weaknesses, in order to prescribe them rationally. This article reviews the characteristics of molecular tests and their main indications in the ambulatory setting.

  1. [Assessment of nutritional status in pediatric ambulatory research].

    PubMed

    Vanhelst, J; Béghin, L

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional status, an important measure in health promotion and certain childhood and adolescent pathologies, includes anthropometric, diet and physical activity evaluation. Choosing the best assessment of nutritional status for your research must consider objectives of clinician, study design, number of subjects, frequency of measurement, and cost. The purpose of this paper is to present reliable and valid field techniques available for pediatric ambulatory clinical research. These techniques do not interfere with free living conditions and represent a good alternative compared to reference assessment. The techniques are compatible with the quality assurance and ethics in clinical and epidemiological research requirements.

  2. Mycobacterium fortuitum infection in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Hod, T; Kushnir, R; Paitan, Y; Korzets, Z

    2008-12-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum group species is an atypical rapidly growing nontuberculous mycobacterium. It has been increasingly recognized as a potential pathogen mostly encountered in skin and soft tissue infections. Rarely, however, it has been associated with catheter-related infections, either central venous lines or peritoneal dialysis catheters. In this report we describe 2 patients maintained on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis who developed Mycobacterium fortuitum peritonitis and a catheter tunnel abscess, respectively. Molecular biology identification of the isolates was performed in both cases. The literature is reviewed regarding all similar cases.

  3. [Preoperative tests recommendations in adult patients for ambulatory surgery].

    PubMed

    Zaballos, M; López-Álvarez, S; Argente, P; López, A

    2015-01-01

    Anesthetic assessment traditionally included a series of laboratory tests intended to detect undiagnosed diseases, and to ensure that the patient undergoes surgery following safety criteria. These tests, without a specific clinical indication, are expensive, of questionable diagnostic value and often useless. In the context of outpatient surgery, recent evidence suggests that patients of any age without significant comorbidity, ASA physical status gradei and grade ii, do not need additional preoperative tests routinely. The aim of the present recommendations is to determine the general indications in which these tests should be performed in ASA gradei and grade ii patients undergoing ambulatory surgery.

  4. International accreditation of ambulatory surgical centers and medical tourism.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Michael F

    2013-07-01

    The two forces that have driven the increase in accreditation of outpatient ambulatory surgery centers (ASC's) in the United States are reimbursement of facility fees by Medicare and commercial insurance companies, which requires either accreditation, Medicare certification, or state licensure, and state laws which mandate one of these three options. Accreditation of ASC's internationally has been driven by national requirements and by the competitive forces of "medical tourism." The three American accrediting organizations have all developed international programs to meet this increasing demand outside of the United States.

  5. 78 FR 56711 - Health Insurance Exchanges; Application by the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-13

    ... Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care To Be a Recognized Accrediting Entity for the Accreditation... Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC) to be a recognized accrediting entity for the purposes of fulfilling the... Exchange. \\3\\ Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Standards Related to Essential Health...

  6. Adopting ambulatory breast cancer surgery as the standard of care in an asian population.

    PubMed

    Ng, Yvonne Ying Ru; Chan, Patrick Mun Yew; Chen, Juliana Jia Chuan; Seah, Melanie Dee Wern; Teo, Christine; Tan, Ern Yu

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Ambulatory surgery is not commonly practiced in Asia. A 23-hour ambulatory (AS23) service was implemented at our institute in March 2004 to allow more surgeries to be performed as ambulatory procedures. In this study, we reviewed the impact of the AS23 service on breast cancer surgeries and reviewed surgical outcomes, including postoperative complications, length of stay, and 30-day readmission. Methods. Retrospective review was performed of 1742 patients who underwent definitive breast cancer surgery from 1 March 2004 to 31 December 2010. Results. By 2010, more than 70% of surgeries were being performed as ambulatory procedures. Younger women (P < 0.01), those undergoing wide local excision (P < 0.01) and those with ductal carcinoma-in situ or early stage breast cancer (P < 0.01), were more likely to undergo ambulatory surgery. Six percent of patients initially scheduled for ambulatory surgery were eventually managed as inpatients; a third of these were because of perioperative complications. Wound complications, 30-day readmission and reoperation rates were not more frequent with ambulatory surgery. Conclusion. Ambulatory breast cancer surgery is now the standard of care at our institute. An integrated workflow facilitating proper patient selection and structured postoperativee outpatient care have ensured minimal complications and high patient acceptance.

  7. Successful long-term ambulatory norepinephrine infusions in a patient with pure autonomic failure.

    PubMed

    Zekeridou, A; Michel, P; Medlin, F; Hayoz, D; Lalive, P H; Kuntzer, T

    2015-08-01

    We present a case study of a patient with pure autonomic failure who was successfully treated with ambulatory norepinephrine (NE) infusions over a 9-year-period of time before death occurred unexpectedly. Given this patient's response to the NE infusion treatment, we discuss the option of ambulatory NE infusions as a treatment for severe orthostatic hypotension that is refractory to common treatments.

  8. Delineating the Ambulatory Care Nursing Activities in the Navy Medical Department. Phase 1. Workload Management System for Nursing Ambulatory Care Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-01

    between the levels of intensity of nursing care found in the emergency department compared to the leve’s found in outpatient clinics. CONCLUSION: The...requirements for nursing care personnel. The planned methodology of Phases II and III are discussed further in Appendix B. An extensive review of the...be generalizable across a variety of ambulatory settings (Verran, 1986, p. 250). The ACCCI quantifies the complexity of nursing care in the ambulatory

  9. Diagnostic value and cost-benefit analysis of 24 hours ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in primary care in Portugal

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hypertensive patients (HTs) are usually attended in primary care (PC). We aimed to assess the diagnostic accuracy and cost-benefit ratio of 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) in all newly diagnosed hypertensive patients (HTs) attended in PC. Methods In a cross-sectional study ABPM was recorded in all 336 never treated HTs (Office BP ≥140 and/or ≥ 90 mm Hg) that were admitted during 16 months. Since benefits from drug treatment in white-coat hypertension (WCH) remain unproven, a cost benefit estimation of a general use of ABPM (vs absence of ABPM) in HTs was calculated comparing the cost of usual medical assistance of HTs only diagnosed in office with that based both on refraining from drug treatment all subjects identified as WCH and on the reduction by half of the frequency of biochemical exams and doctor visits. Results Women were 56%, age 51 ± 14 years and BMI 27 ± 4 Kg/m2. Out of these, 206 were considered as true HTs, daytime ABPM ≥ 135 and/or ≥85 mm Hg and 130 (38,7%) were identified as having white coat hypertension (WCH), daytime ABPM <135/85 mm Hg. Versus HTs, WCH group showed higher percentage of women (68% vs 51%) and lower values of an index composed by the association of cardiovascular risk factors. We estimated that with ABPM total medical expenses can be reduced by 23% (157.500 euros) with a strategy based on ABPM for 1000 patients followed for 2 years. Conclusions In PC, the widespread use of ABPM in newly diagnosed HTs increases diagnostic accuracy of hypertension, improves cardiovascular risk stratification, reduces health expenses showing a highly favourable benefit-cost ratio vs a strategy without ABPM. PMID:23937261

  10. Prediction of Ambulatory Status After Hip Fracture Surgery in Patients Over 60 Years Old

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To predict ambulatory capacity, 1 month after physical therapy following hip fracture surgery. Methods A retrospective chart review was carried out. Patients more than 60 years old, who underwent hip fracture surgery and received physical therapies, were selected (n=548). Age, gender, presence of cognitive dysfunction, combined medical diseases, combined fractures, previous history of hip surgery, prefracture ambulatory capacity, days from the fracture to surgery, type of fracture, type of surgery, presence of postoperative complications, days from the surgery to physical therapy, and total admission period, were collected. Prefracture ambulatory capacity and postoperative ambulatory capacity were classified into non-ambulatory status (NA), ambulation with assistive device (AA), and independent-ambulation without any assistive device (IA). Multiple-logistic regression analysis was performed for the prediction of postoperative ambulatory capacity. Results Age (odds ratio [OR]=0.94 for IA and 0.96 for IA or AA), gender (OR=1.64 for IA and 0.98 for IA or AA), prefracture ambulatory capacity (OR of IA=19.17 for IA; OR of IA=16.72 for IA or AA; OR of AA=1.26 for IA, OR of AA=9.46 for IA or AA), and combined medical disease (OR=2.02) were found to be the factors related to postoperative ambulatory capacity and the prediction model was set up using these four factors. Conclusion Using this model, we can predict the ambulatory capacity following hip fracture surgery. Further prospective studies should be constructed to improve postoperative ambulatory capacity. PMID:27606273

  11. Strategies to reduce medication errors in ambulatory practice.

    PubMed Central

    Adubofour, Kwabena O. M.; Keenan, Craig R.; Daftary, Ashok; Mensah-Adubofour, Josepha; Dachman, William D.

    2004-01-01

    Medication errors generally refer to mistakes made in the processes of ordering, transcribing, dispensing, administering or monitoring of pharmaceutical agents used in clinical practice. The Institute of Medicine report, To Err Is Human: Building a Safer Health System, has helped raise public awareness surrounding the issue of patient safety within our hospitals. A number of legislative and regulatory steps have resulted in hospital authorities putting in place various systems to allow for error reporting and prevention. Medication errors are being closely scrutinized as part of these hospital-based efforts. Most Americans, however, receive their healthcare in the ambulatory primary care setting. Primary care physicians are involved in the writing of several million prescriptions annually. The steps underway in our hospitals to reduce medication errors should occur concurrently with steps to increase awareness of this problem in the out-patient setting. This article provides an overview of strategies that can be adopted by primary care physicians to decrease medication errors in ambulatory practice. PMID:15622685

  12. Wearable and superhydrophobic hardware for ambulatory biopotential acquisition.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Tabares, F J; Delgado-Trejos, E; Castellanos-Dominguez, G

    2013-01-01

    Wearable monitoring devices are a promising trend for ambulatory and real time biosignal processing, because they improve access and coverage by means of comfortable sensors, with real-time communication via mobile networks. In this paper, we present a garment for ambulatory electrocardiogram monitoring, a smart t-shirt with a textile electrode that conducts electricity and has a coating designed to preserve the user's hygiene, allowing long-term mobile measurements. Silicon dioxide nanoparticles were applied on the surface of the textile electrodes to preserve conductivity and impart superhydrophobic properties. A model to explain these results is proposed. The best result of this study is obtained when the contact angles between the fluid and the fabric exceeded 150°, while the electrical resistivity remained below 5 Ω·cm, allowing an acquisition of high quality electrocardiograms in moving patients. Thus, this tool represents an interesting alternative for medium and long-term measurements, preserving the textile feeling of clothing and working under motion conditions.

  13. Ambulatory blood pressure status in children: comparing alternate limit sources.

    PubMed

    Bell, Cynthia S; Poffenbarger, Tim S; Samuels, Joshua A

    2011-12-01

    The American Heart Association has included alternate ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) limits for children published by Wühl in 2002. These updated limits employ the same pediatric cohort data as the previous ABP limits published by Soergel in 1997 but differ in analysis technique. The implications of changing ABP limit source on the diagnosis of hypertension has yet to be examined in a large pediatric cohort. We reviewed 741 ABP monitorings performed in children referred to our hypertension clinic between 1991-2007. Hypertension was defined as 24-h mean blood pressure ≥ 95 th percentile or 24-h blood pressure load ≥ 25%, by Soergel and Wühl limits separately. Six hundred seventy-three (91%) children were classified the same by both limit sources. Wühl limits were more likely than Soergel to classify a child as hypertensive (443 vs. 409, respectively). There was an increased classification of prehypertension and decreased white-coat hypertension by the Wühl method, whereas ambulatory and severe hypertension counts remained relatively the same by both limits sources. The use of either limit source will not significantly affect most clinical outcomes but should remain consistent over long-term research projects. Collection of new normative data from a larger, multiethnic population is needed for better measurement of ABP in children.

  14. The costs of a family practice residency ambulatory care program.

    PubMed

    Pawlson, L G; Watkins, R

    1979-12-01

    The cost of patient care service and education occurring in a family practice residency unit of a community based prepaid health program was determined from accounting records. The cost of producing the same number of patient visits in comparable family practice units which did not have residents on-site was determined in a similar manner. The cost per visit in the residency unit was $15.53 while that in the nonresidency unit was $13.92. There was an excess cost of $1.61 per visit in the residency, or, based on the number of residents present, a net cost of $7 per resident per day. None of the costs of central residency program administration or of ambulatory based subspecialty rotations were included. While a small increase (ten percent) in productivity or efficiency would result in the residency patient care unit itself being self-sustaining, this study casts considerable doubt on the ability of the model family practice residency unit to offset the full costs of the ambulatory care portion of family practice residency training.

  15. Pain Management in Ambulatory Surgery—A Review

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsson, Jan G.

    2014-01-01

    Day surgery, coming to and leaving the hospital on the same day as surgery as well as ambulatory surgery, leaving hospital within twenty-three hours is increasingly being adopted. There are several potential benefits associated with the avoidance of in-hospital care. Early discharge demands a rapid recovery and low incidence and intensity of surgery and anaesthesia related side-effects; such as pain, nausea and fatigue. Patients must be fit enough and symptom intensity so low that self-care is feasible in order to secure quality of care. Preventive multi-modal analgesia has become the gold standard. Administering paracetamol, NSIADs prior to start of surgery and decreasing the noxious influx by the use of local anaesthetics by peripheral block or infiltration in surgical field prior to incision and at wound closure in combination with intra-operative fast acting opioid analgesics, e.g., remifentanil, have become standard of care. Single preoperative 0.1 mg/kg dose dexamethasone has a combined action, anti-emetic and provides enhanced analgesia. Additional α-2-agonists and/or gabapentin or pregabalin may be used in addition to facilitate the pain management if patients are at risk for more pronounced pain. Paracetamol, NSAIDs and rescue oral opioid is the basic concept for self-care during the first 3–5 days after common day/ambulatory surgical procedures. PMID:25061796

  16. Developments in ambulatory surgery in orthopedics in France in 2016.

    PubMed

    Hulet, C; Rochcongar, G; Court, C

    2017-02-01

    Under the new categorization introduced by the Health Authorities, ambulatory surgery (AS) in France now accounts for 50% of procedures, taking all surgical specialties together. The replacement of full hospital admission by AS is now well established and recognized. Health-care centers have learned, in coordination with the medico-surgical and paramedical teams, how to set up AS units and the corresponding clinical pathways. There is no single model handed down from above. The authorities have encouraged these developments, partly by regulations but also by means of financial incentives. Patient eligibility and psychosocial criteria are crucial determining factors for the success of the AS strategy. The surgeons involved are strongly committed. Feedback from many orthopedic subspecialties (shoulder, foot, knee, spine, hand, large joints, emergency and pediatric surgery) testify to the rise of AS, which now accounts for 41% of all orthopedic procedures. Questions remain, however, concerning the role of the GP in the continuity of care, the role of innovation and teaching, the creation of new jobs, and the attractiveness of AS for surgeons. More than ever, it is the patient who is "ambulatory", within an organized structure in which surgical technique and pain management are well controlled. Not all patients can be eligible, but the AS concept is becoming standard, and overnight stay will become a matter for medical and surgical prescription.

  17. Recommendations for the standardization and interpretation of the electrocardiogram: part II: Electrocardiography diagnostic statement list: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association Electrocardiography and Arrhythmias Committee, Council on Clinical Cardiology; the American College of Cardiology Foundation; and the Heart Rhythm Society: endorsed by the International Society for Computerized Electrocardiology.

    PubMed

    Mason, Jay W; Hancock, E William; Gettes, Leonard S; Bailey, James J; Childers, Rory; Deal, Barbara J; Josephson, Mark; Kligfield, Paul; Kors, Jan A; Macfarlane, Peter; Pahlm, Olle; Mirvis, David M; Okin, Peter; Rautaharju, Pentti; Surawicz, Borys; van Herpen, Gerard; Wagner, Galen S; Wellens, Hein

    2007-03-13

    This statement provides a concise list of diagnostic terms for ECG interpretation that can be shared by students, teachers, and readers of electrocardiography. This effort was motivated by the existence of multiple automated diagnostic code sets containing imprecise and overlapping terms. An intended outcome of this statement list is greater uniformity of ECG diagnosis and a resultant improvement in patient care. The lexicon includes primary diagnostic statements, secondary diagnostic statements, modifiers, and statements for the comparison of ECGs. This diagnostic lexicon should be reviewed and updated periodically.

  18. Recommendations for the standardization and interpretation of the electrocardiogram. Part II: Electrocardiography diagnostic statement list. A scientific statement from the American Heart Association Electrocardiography and Arrhythmias Committee, Council on Clinical Cardiology; the American College of Cardiology Foundation; and the Heart Rhythm Society.

    PubMed

    Mason, Jay W; Hancock, E William; Gettes, Leonard S

    2007-03-01

    This statement provides a concise list of diagnostic terms for ECG interpretation that can be shared by students, teachers, and readers of electrocardiography. This effort was motivated by the existence of multiple automated diagnostic code sets containing imprecise and overlapping terms. An intended outcome of this statement list is greater uniformity of ECG diagnosis and a resultant improvement in patient care. The lexicon includes primary diagnostic statements, secondary diagnostic statements, modifiers, and statements for the comparison of ECGs. This diagnostic lexicon should be reviewed and updated periodically.

  19. Recommendations for the standardization and interpretation of the electrocardiogram: part II: electrocardiography diagnostic statement list a scientific statement from the American Heart Association Electrocardiography and Arrhythmias Committee, Council on Clinical Cardiology; the American College of Cardiology Foundation; and the Heart Rhythm Society Endorsed by the International Society for Computerized Electrocardiology.

    PubMed

    Mason, Jay W; Hancock, E William; Gettes, Leonard S; Bailey, James J; Childers, Rory; Deal, Barbara J; Josephson, Mark; Kligfield, Paul; Kors, Jan A; Macfarlane, Peter; Pahlm, Olle; Mirvis, David M; Okin, Peter; Rautaharju, Pentti; Surawicz, Borys; van Herpen, Gerard; Wagner, Galen S; Wellens, Hein

    2007-03-13

    This statement provides a concise list of diagnostic terms for ECG interpretation that can be shared by students, teachers, and readers of electrocardiography. This effort was motivated by the existence of multiple automated diagnostic code sets containing imprecise and overlapping terms. An intended outcome of this statement list is greater uniformity of ECG diagnosis and a resultant improvement in patient care. The lexicon includes primary diagnostic statements, secondary diagnostic statements, modifiers, and statements for the comparison of ECGs. This diagnostic lexicon should be reviewed and updated periodically.

  20. Application of neural classifier to risk recognition of sustained ventricular tachycardia and flicker in patients after myocardial infarction based on high-resolution electrocardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wydrzyński, Jacek; Jankowski, Stanisław; Piątkowska-Janko, Ewa

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the application of neural networks to the risk recognition of sustained ventricular tachycardia and flicker in patients after myocardial infarction based on high-resolution electrocardiography. This work is based on dataset obtained from the Medical University of Warsaw. The studies were performed on one multiclass classifier and on binary classifiers. For each case the optimal number of hidden neurons was found. The effect of data preparation: normalization and the proper selection of parameters was considered, as well as the influence of applied filters. The best neural classifier contains 5 hidden neurons, the input ECG signal is represented by 8 parameters. The neural network classifier had high rate of successful recognitions up to 90% performed on the test data set.

  1. Challenges of pain control and the role of the ambulatory pain specialist in the outpatient surgery setting

    PubMed Central

    Vadivelu, Nalini; Kai, Alice M; Kodumudi, Vijay; Berger, Jack M

    2016-01-01

    Ambulatory surgery is on the rise, with an unmet need for optimum pain control in ambulatory surgery centers worldwide. It is important that there is a proportionate increase in the availability of acute pain-management services to match the rapid rise of clinical patient load with pain issues in the ambulatory surgery setting. Focus on ambulatory pain control with its special challenges is vital to achieve optimum pain control and prevent morbidity and mortality. Management of perioperative pain in the ambulatory surgery setting is becoming increasingly complex, and requires the employment of a multimodal approach and interventions facilitated by ambulatory surgery pain specialists, which is a new concept. A focused ambulatory pain specialist on site at each ambulatory surgery center, in addition to providing safe anesthesia, could intervene early once problematic pain issues are recognized, thus preventing emergency room visits, as well as readmissions for uncontrolled pain. This paper reviews methods of acute-pain management in the ambulatory setting with risk stratification, the utilization of multimodal interventions, including pharmacological and nonpharmacological options, opioids, nonopioids, and various routes with the goal of preventing delayed discharge and unexpected hospital admissions after ambulatory surgery. Continued research and investigation in the area of pain management with outcome studies in acute surgically inflicted pain in patients with underlying chronic pain treated with opioids and the pattern and predictive factors for pain in the ambulatory surgical setting is needed. PMID:27382329

  2. Challenges of pain control and the role of the ambulatory pain specialist in the outpatient surgery setting.

    PubMed

    Vadivelu, Nalini; Kai, Alice M; Kodumudi, Vijay; Berger, Jack M

    2016-01-01

    Ambulatory surgery is on the rise, with an unmet need for optimum pain control in ambulatory surgery centers worldwide. It is important that there is a proportionate increase in the availability of acute pain-management services to match the rapid rise of clinical patient load with pain issues in the ambulatory surgery setting. Focus on ambulatory pain control with its special challenges is vital to achieve optimum pain control and prevent morbidity and mortality. Management of perioperative pain in the ambulatory surgery setting is becoming increasingly complex, and requires the employment of a multimodal approach and interventions facilitated by ambulatory surgery pain specialists, which is a new concept. A focused ambulatory pain specialist on site at each ambulatory surgery center, in addition to providing safe anesthesia, could intervene early once problematic pain issues are recognized, thus preventing emergency room visits, as well as readmissions for uncontrolled pain. This paper reviews methods of acute-pain management in the ambulatory setting with risk stratification, the utilization of multimodal interventions, including pharmacological and nonpharmacological options, opioids, nonopioids, and various routes with the goal of preventing delayed discharge and unexpected hospital admissions after ambulatory surgery. Continued research and investigation in the area of pain management with outcome studies in acute surgically inflicted pain in patients with underlying chronic pain treated with opioids and the pattern and predictive factors for pain in the ambulatory surgical setting is needed.

  3. Active ambulatory care management supported by short message services and mobile phone technology in patients with arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kiselev, Anton R; Gridnev, Vladimir I; Shvartz, Vladimir A; Posnenkova, Olga M; Dovgalevsky, Pavel Ya

    2012-01-01

    The use of short message services and mobile phone technology for ambulatory care management is the most accessible and most inexpensive way to transition from traditional ambulatory care management to active ambulatory care management in patients with arterial hypertension (AH). The aim of this study was to compare the clinical efficacy of active ambulatory care management supported by short message services and mobile phone technology with traditional ambulatory care management in AH patients. The study included 97 hypertensive patients under active ambulatory care management and 102 patients under traditional ambulatory care management. Blood pressure levels, body mass, and smoking history of patients were analyzed in the study. The duration of study was 1 year. In the active ambulatory care management group, 36% of patients were withdrawn from the study within a year. At the end of the year, 77% of patients from the active care management group had achieved the goal blood pressure level. That was more than 5 times higher than that in the traditional ambulatory care management group (P < .001). The risk ratio of achieving and maintaining the goal blood pressure in patients of active care management group was 5.44, CI (3.2-9.9; P = .005). Implementation of active ambulatory care management supported by short message services and mobile phone improves the quality of ambulatory care of hypertensive patients.

  4. Use of ambulatory physician group clinical information by hospital-based users within an integrated delivery network.

    PubMed

    Bowes, Watson A

    2007-10-11

    At Intermountain Healthcare, as part of a broad information system transition plan, a proposal was made to replace the integrated ambulatory EHR, used by 550 physicians, with a new stand alone EHR. The notion leading to the proposal was that ambulatory data was infrequently accessed outside of the ambulatory setting. To test this notion, retrospective analysis was done to determine the number of ambulatory patient events accessed by hospital based users. 399 Departments from the Hospital-based group accessed 1, 984, 785 patient events that originated from within the ambulatory group in a 90 day period. This study showed that a significant number of ambulatory patient records were viewed by a wide range of hospital-based users. The decision to replace the legacy ambulatory system with a new, stand alone system was postponed. This analysis was critical in planning the road map for a new integrated clinical information system.

  5. Cost-effectiveness of nurse practitioners in primary and specialised ambulatory care: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Misener, Ruth; Harbman, Patricia; Donald, Faith; Reid, Kim; Kilpatrick, Kelley; Carter, Nancy; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Kaasalainen, Sharon; Marshall, Deborah A; Charbonneau-Smith, Renee; DiCenso, Alba

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the cost-effectiveness of nurse practitioners delivering primary and specialised ambulatory care. Design A systematic review of randomised controlled trials reported since 1980. Data sources 10 electronic bibliographic databases, handsearches, contact with authors, bibliographies and websites. Included studies Randomised controlled trials that evaluated nurse practitioners in alternative and complementary ambulatory care roles and reported health system outcomes. Results 11 trials were included. In four trials of alternative provider ambulatory primary care roles, nurse practitioners were equivalent to physicians in all but seven patient outcomes favouring nurse practitioner care and in all but four health system outcomes, one favouring nurse practitioner care and three favouring physician care. In a meta-analysis of two studies (2689 patients) with minimal heterogeneity and high-quality evidence, nurse practitioner care resulted in lower mean health services costs per consultation (mean difference: −€6.41; 95% CI −€9.28 to −€3.55; p<0.0001) (2006 euros). In two trials of alternative provider specialised ambulatory care roles, nurse practitioners were equivalent to physicians in all but three patient outcomes and one health system outcome favouring nurse practitioner care. In five trials of complementary provider specialised ambulatory care roles, 16 patient/provider outcomes favouring nurse practitioner plus usual care, and 16 were equivalent. Two health system outcomes favoured nurse practitioner plus usual care, four favoured usual care and 14 were equivalent. Four studies of complementary specialised ambulatory care compared costs, but only one assessed costs and outcomes jointly. Conclusions Nurse practitioners in alternative provider ambulatory primary care roles have equivalent or better patient outcomes than comparators and are potentially cost-saving. Evidence for their cost-effectiveness in alternative provider

  6. Organization of ambulatory care provision: a critical determinant of health system performance in developing countries.

    PubMed Central

    Berman, P.

    2000-01-01

    Success in the provision of ambulatory personal health services, i.e. providing individuals with treatment for acute illness and preventive health care on an ambulatory basis, is the most significant contributor to the health care system's performance in most developing countries. Ambulatory personal health care has the potential to contribute the largest immediate gains in health status in populations, especially for the poor. At present, such health care accounts for the largest share of the total health expenditure in most lower income countries. It frequently comprises the largest share of the financial burden on households associated with health care consumption, which is typically regressively distributed. The "organization" of ambulatory personal health services is a critical determinant of the health system's performance which, at present, is poorly understood and insufficiently considered in policies and programmes for reforming health care systems. This article begins with a brief analysis of the importance of ambulatory care in the overall health system performance and this is followed by a summary of the inadequate global data on ambulatory care organization. It then defines the concept of "macro organization of health care" at a system level. Outlined also is a framework for analysing the organization of health care services and the major pathways through which the organization of ambulatory personal health care services can affect system performance. Examples of recent policy interventions to influence primary care organization--both government and nongovernmental providers and market structure--are reviewed. It is argued that the characteristics of health care markets in developing countries and of most primary care goods result in relatively diverse and competitive environments for ambulatory care services, compared with other types of health care. Therefore, governments will be required to use a variety of approaches beyond direct public provision

  7. Commentary on the required skills for ambulatory cardiac care in the young: is training necessary?

    PubMed

    Boris, Jeffrey R

    2015-12-01

    Extensive supplemental training exists for many subspecialty disciplines within fellowship training for paediatric cardiology in the United States of America. These disciplines, or domains, such as echocardiography, cardiac intensive care, interventional cardiology, and electrophysiology, allow for initial exposure and training during the basic 3 years of fellowship, plus mandate a 4th year of advanced training; however, ambulatory cardiology has no in-depth or additional training beyond the basic clinical exposure during fellowship training. Ambulatory cardiology is not included in the recommended scheduling of the various domains of cardiology training. This document reviews the reasons to consider augmenting the depth and breadth of training in ambulatory paediatric cardiology.

  8. Ambulatory pH Monitoring: New Advances and Indications

    PubMed Central

    Lutsi, Brant

    2006-01-01

    Ambulatory pH monitoring is currently used to objectively demonstrate abnormal degrees of esophageal acid exposure in patients with suspected gastroesophageal reflux disease. The development of wireless pH capsule recording has improved the tolerability and increased the duration of pH recording. Use of symptom-reflux correlation measures and pH testing, combining periods off and on PPI therapy, serves to optimize the performance of conventional pH testing. On the other hand, devices that measure bile reflux as well as nonacid reflux (esophageal impedance testing) have broadened the definition of gastroesophageal reflux and present potential explanations for patients with continued symptoms despite high-dose PPI therapy. These advances and their current and future clinical applications are reviewed

  9. Modifications to the postanesthesia score for use in ambulatory surgery.

    PubMed

    Aldrete, J A

    1998-06-01

    The Aldrete Score has withstood the changes in anesthesia and surgical care that have developed in the past three decades. Nevertheless, it is imperative that (1) a modification is made to incorporate the most effective monitor of the respiratory and hemodynamic functions, e.g., pulse oximetry; and (2) the five indices previously used be expanded by incorporating five more indices including dressing, pain, ambulation, fasting/feeding, and urine output to evaluate patients undergoing ambulatory surgery and anesthesia. A patient's recovery from anesthesia and surgery, using 10 indices graded 0, 1, or 2, would provide criteria for street fitness and discharge to home when the patient reaches a postanesthesia recovery score of 18 or higher.

  10. Fatigue in the acute care and ambulatory setting.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Margaret; Patricia, Branowicki

    2014-01-01

    Nurses commonly assess their patients for symptoms and intervene to ease any patient distress, yet children are seldom asked about feeling fatigued. The existing pediatric literature suggests that fatigue goes unrecognized and therefore untreated in children, particularly children experiencing stressful events, such as illness and/or hospitalization. In an effort to better understand the presence of the symptom in our environment we conducted a program specific point prevalence survey. Data were collected on nine inpatient and 11 outpatient units of a university affiliated tertiary care children's hospital. Overall, this sample reported higher levels of fatigue than published data from their healthy and chronically ill peers by total fatigue score and sub scores. This brief description of the symptom in our inpatient and ambulatory settings has provided information that will inform our nursing practice and drive future research.

  11. The ambulatory treatment of noncompulsive users of psychoactive substances.

    PubMed

    Perez-Gomez, A

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the experience of "La Casa" Programme, a center of the University of Los Andes (Bogotá, Colombia) aimed at prevention, treatment, and research in the fields of drug addiction and AIDS. The multimodal strategy at "La Casa", ambulatory and almost free of charge, has constituted a unique approach in Colombia. The country has a heavy and specific drug consumption problem: in the last ten years the number of regular consumers of a mixture of alcohol, coca paste ("basuco")/cocaine and marihuana has increased to almost 500,000 people; state facilities and human resources are scarce, thus the importance of an appropriate use of them and search for alternatives.

  12. Peritoneal mucormycosis in a patient receiving continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Polo, J R; Luño, J; Menarguez, C; Gallego, E; Robles, R; Hernandez, P

    1989-03-01

    A 48-year-old man receiving maintenance hemodialysis for 3 years and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis for 1 year developed a clinical picture compatible with peritonitis. Three successive fluid cultures were negative, and only after filtration of a large volume of peritoneal fluid a fungus identified as a Rhizopus sp was isolated in cultures of the filtering devices. The same fungus was also isolated from the peritoneal catheter cuff. Intravenous amphotericin B was administered and both the abdominal and general conditions of the patient improved transiently. Twenty days after initiation of antifungal treatment, a clinical suspicion of intestinal perforation arose and an exploratory laparotomy was scheduled, but the patient died during the anesthetic induction. The patient never received deferoxamine; any conditions predisposing to mucormycosis, such as diabetes or immunosuppression, were also absent.

  13. [Low-power Wireless Micro Ambulatory Electrocardiogram Node].

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhipeng; Luo, Kan; Li, Jianqing

    2016-02-01

    Ambulatory electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring can effectively reduce the risk and death rate of patients with cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). The Body Sensor Network (BSN) based ECG monitoring is a new and efficien method to protect the CVDs patients. To meet the challenges of miniaturization, low power and high signal quality of the node, we proposed a novel 50 mmX 50 mmX 10 mm, 30 g wireless ECG node, which includes the single-chip an alog front-end AD8232, ultra-low power microprocessor MSP430F1611 and Bluetooth module HM-11. The ECG signal quality is guaranteed by the on-line digital filtering. The difference threshold algorithm results in accuracy of R-wave detection and heart rate. Experiments were carried out to test the node and the results showed that the pro posed node reached the design target, and it has great potential in application of wireless ECG monitoring.

  14. Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis: nurses' experiences of teaching patients.

    PubMed

    Shubayra, Amnah

    2015-03-01

    Nine nurses were interviewed to determine nurses' experiences of teaching patients to use continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). The material was analyzed using content analysis. Data were sorted into four themes and ten subthemes. The themes were presented as follows: Importance of language, individualized teaching, teaching needs and structure of care in teaching. The findings highlighted important insights into how nurses experience teaching patients to perform CAPD. The study revealed some barriers for the nurses during teaching. The major barrier was shortage of Arabic speaking nursing staff. Incidental findings involved two factors that played an important role in teaching, retraining and a special team to perform pre-assessments, including home visits. In conclusion, the findings of this study showed several factors that are considered as barriers for the nurses during teaching the CAPD patients and the need to improve the communication and teaching in the peritoneal dialysis units, including the importance of individualized teaching.

  15. Impact of clinical preventive services in the ambulatory setting

    PubMed Central

    Ogola, Gerald; Mercer, Quay; Fong, Jaclyn; DeVol, Edward; Couch, Carl E.; Ballard, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Indicators of the performance of clinical preventive services (CPS) have been adopted in the ambulatory setting to improve quality of care. The impact of CPS was evaluated in a network of 49 primary care practices providing care to an estimated 245,000 adults in the Dallas–Fort Worth area through a sample chart review to determine delivery of recommended evidence-based CPS combined with medical literature estimates of the effectiveness of CPS. In this population in 2005, CPS were estimated to have prevented 36 deaths and 97 incident cases of cancer; 420 coronary heart disease events (including 66 sudden deaths) and 118 strokes; 816 cases of influenza and pneumonia (including 24 hospital admissions); and 87 osteoporosis-related fractures. Thus, CPS have substantial benefits in preventing deaths and illness episodes. PMID:18628969

  16. Tuberculous peritonitis in a child undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Tsai, T C; Hsu, J C; Chou, L H; Lee, M L

    1994-01-01

    We present a 13-year-old girl with Arnold-Chiari syndrome and uremia secondary to neurogenic bladder. She had been treated with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) for 13 months prior to the development of peritonitis. The patient demonstrated no improvement with a 3-day therapy of intraperitoneal vancomycin and netilmicin. Meanwhile, smear of centrifuged dialysate revealed acid fast bacilli on two occasions. We, then, started anti-TB therapy with oral isoniazid (INAH), rifampin and ethambutal. The symptoms subsided within three days. In the first week, the patient lost her peritoneal ultrafiltration and needed daytime automatic peritoneal dialysis. At the last follow-up examination, 12 months after treatment, she remained well on standard CAPD.

  17. Pharmacokinetics of ceftizoxime in patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, E D; Blair, A D

    1983-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of ceftizoxime were studied in 12 patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. After a 3-g intravenous dose, the steady-state volume of distribution was 0.23 +/- 0.05 liter kg-1, with an elimination half-life of 9.7 +/- 5.1 h. The peritoneal clearance of ceftizoxime (2.8 +/- 0.7 ml min-1) contributed modestly to the overall serum clearance of the drug (17.1 +/- 7.4 ml min-1) and was greater than the renal clearance (0.8 +/- 0.8 ml min-1). The peritoneal concentration rose to 91 +/- 29 micrograms ml-1 at 6 h, which was 0.61 +/- 0.17 of the serum concentration. A 3-g intravenous dose of ceftizoxime given every 48 h would result in adequate activity against most susceptible organisms, but more frequent dosing may be necessary for less susceptible organisms. PMID:6314887

  18. Using cadence to study free-living ambulatory behaviour.

    PubMed

    Tudor-Locke, Catrine; Rowe, David A

    2012-05-01

    The health benefits of a physically active lifestyle across a person's lifespan have been established. If there is any single physical activity behaviour that we should measure well and promote effectively, it is ambulatory activity and, more specifically, walking. Since public health physical activity guidelines include statements related to intensity of activity, it follows that we need to measure and promote free-living patterns of ambulatory activity that are congruent with this intent. The purpose of this review article is to present and summarize the potential for using cadence (steps/minute) to represent such behavioural patterns of ambulatory activity in free-living. Cadence is one of the spatio-temporal parameters of gait or walking speed. It is typically assessed using short-distance walks in clinical research and practice, but free-living cadence can be captured with a number of commercially available accelerometers that possess time-stamping technology. This presents a unique opportunity to use the same metric to communicate both ambulatory performance (assessed under testing conditions) and behaviour (assessed in the real world). Ranges for normal walking cadence assessed under laboratory conditions are 96-138 steps/minute for women and 81-135 steps/minute for men across their lifespan. The correlation between mean cadence and intensity (assessed with indirect calorimetry and expressed as metabolic equivalents [METs]) based on five treadmill/overground walking studies, is r = 0.93 and 100 steps/minute is considered to be a reasonable heuristic value indicative of walking at least at absolutely-defined moderate intensity (i.e. minimally, 3 METs) in adults. The weighted mean cadence derived from eight studies that have observed pedestrian cadence under natural conditions was 115.2 steps/minute, demonstrating that achieving 100 steps/minute is realistic in specific settings that occur in real life. However, accelerometer data collected in a large

  19. Design and construction of an ambulatory surgery center.

    PubMed

    Lindeman, William E

    2008-09-01

    The regulatory climate in which an ambulatory surgery center (ASC) must operate is complex. Seemingly contradictory regulations at the federal, state, and local levels can be resolved by using the "greatest requirement" approach to facilitate flexibility in the long-term use of an ASC. A well-designed ASC should be profitable, flexible, and attractive to both surgeons and patients. The development team must keep the ultimate goal in mind: a high-performance facility with maximum efficiency, high patient satisfaction, and minimal staff turnover, resulting in lower operating costs and correspondingly higher profit potential. Planning a new facility can be accomplished most effectively through a series of ordered steps for decision making. The ultimate success of an ASC will lie in its ability to meet both initial expectations and longer-term demands for operational flexibility and financial integrity.

  20. Eliminating lateral violence in the ambulatory setting: one center's strategies.

    PubMed

    Dimarino, Tina J

    2011-05-01

    Lateral violence (eg, disruptive, disparaging, or uncivil behavior inflicted by one peer on another) creates an unpleasant work environment that can have harmful effects on individual nurses, team members, patients, and the bottom line of the health care organization. Educating nurses about the most common forms of lateral violence and strategies for handling inappropriate behavior can be the first step toward eliminating this behavior. Effective nursing leaders develop and maintain a "zero-tolerance" culture that includes clear and concise behavioral expectations and consequences for employees who exhibit unprofessional behavior. Use of a code of conduct, open communication, and quick resolution of issues that arise are strategies that one ambulatory surgery center has used to successfully combat lateral violence in the workplace.

  1. The complex relationship between CKD and ambulatory blood pressure patterns.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Arjun D; Agarwal, Rajiv

    2015-03-01

    Hypertension and CKD frequently coexist, and both are risk factors for cardiovascular events and mortality. Among people with hypertension, the loss of the normal fall in night-time BP, called nondipping, can only be diagnosed by ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) and is a risk factor for cardiovascular events. The pathophysiology of nondipping is complex, and CKD is an independent risk factor for nondipping. In fact, nondipping can be seen in as many as 80% of people with CKD. However, the evidence for nondipping as an independent risk factor or causal agent for adverse outcomes in CKD remains mixed. ABPM has been shown to be superior to clinical BP measurement for correlating with end-organ damage and prognosis in CKD. This review covers the evidence for the use of ABPM in CKD, the evidence linking ABPM patterns to outcome in CKD and the evidence for treatment of nondipping in CKD.

  2. Ambulatory Seizure Monitoring: From Concept to Prototype Device

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Mark H.; Threatt, Madeline; Solies, Karsten M.; McFerrin, Brent M.; Hopf, Lindsey B.; Birdwell, J. Douglas; Sillay, Karl A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The brain, made up of billions of neurons and synapses, is the marvelous core of human thought, action and memory. However, if neuronal activity manifests into abnormal electrical activity across the brain, neural behavior may exhibit synchronous neural firings known as seizures. If unprovoked seizures occur repeatedly, a patient may be diagnosed with epilepsy. Purpose The scope of this project is to develop an ambulatory seizure monitoring system that can be used away from a hospital, making it possible for the user to stay at home, and primary care personnel to monitor a patient's seizure activity in order to provide deeper analysis of the patient's condition and apply personalized intervention techniques. Methods The ambulatory seizure monitoring device is a research device that has been developed with the objective of acquiring a portable, clean electroencephalography (EEG) signal and transmitting it wirelessly to a handheld device for processing and notification. Result This device is comprised of 4 phases: acquisition, transmission, processing and notification. During the acquisition stage, the EEG signal is detected using EEG electrodes; these signals are filtered and amplified before being transmitted in the second stage. The processing stage encompasses the signal processing and seizure prediction. A notification is sent to the patient and designated contacts, given an impending seizure. Each of these phases is comprised of various design components, hardware and software. The experimental findings illustrate that there may be a triggering mechanism through the phase lock value method that enables seizure prediction. Conclusion The device addresses the need for long-term monitoring of the patient's seizure condition in order to provide the clinician a better understanding of the seizure's duration and frequency and ultimately provide the best remedy for the patient. PMID:27647960

  3. Microbiological aspects of peritonitis associated with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed Central

    von Graevenitz, A; Amsterdam, D

    1992-01-01

    The process of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis has provided a useful, relatively inexpensive, and safe alternative for patients with end-stage renal disease. Infectious peritonitis, however, has limited a more widespread acceptance of this technique. The definition of peritonitis in this patient population is not universally accepted and does not always include the laboratory support of a positive culture (or Gram stain). In part, the omission of clinical microbiological findings stems from the lack of sensitivity of earlier microbiological efforts. Peritonitis results from decreased host phagocytic efficiency with depressed phagocytosis and bactericidal capacity of peritoneal macrophages. During episodes of peritonitis, fluid movement is reversed, away from the lymphatics and peritoneal membrane and toward the cavity. As a result, bloodstream infections are rare. Most peritonitis episodes are caused by bacteria. Coagulase-negative staphylococci are the most frequently isolated organisms, usually originating from the skin flora, but a wide array of microbial species have been documented as agents of peritonitis. Clinical microbiology laboratories need to be cognizant of the diverse agents so that appropriate primary media can be used. The quantity of dialysate fluid that is prepared for culture is critical and should constitute at least 10 ml. The sensitivity of the cultural approach depends on the volume of dialysate, its pretreatment (lysis or centrifugation), the media used, and the mode of incubation. The low concentration of microorganisms in dialysate fluids accounts for negative Gram stain results. Prevention of infection in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients is associated with the socioeconomic status of the patient, advances in equipment (catheter) technology, and, probably least important, the application of prophylactic antimicrobial agents. PMID:1735094

  4. Latissimus dorsi free flap for coverage of sacral radiodermatitis in the ambulatory patient

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, D.; Tofield, J.J.; Terranova, W.; Hurley, D.; Kenney, J.

    1987-07-01

    Ambulatory patients with large sacral ulcers can represent extremely challenging coverage problems. Technical options become fewer when sacral ulcers are coupled with radiation dermatitis. Latissimus dorsi free flap transfer, with direct anastomoses to sacral vessels, is described in 2 patients.

  5. Estimating Treatment and Treatment Times for Special and Nonspecial Patients in Hospital Ambulatory Dental Clinics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Dara J.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A study compared the treatments and the amount of time needed for treatment of the dental needs of developmentally disabled, severely compromised, and moderately compromised patients with those of nondisabled patients in a hospital ambulatory dental clinic. (MSE)

  6. A Case Report of Neisseria Mucosa Peritonitis in a Chronic Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis Patient

    PubMed Central

    Awdisho, Alan; Bermudez, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Peritonitis is a leading complication of chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. However, very rarely does Neisseria mucosa cause peritonitis. We describe an unusual case of N. mucosa peritonitis in a chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patient. A 28-year-old Hispanic male presents with diffuse abdominal pain exacerbated during draining of the peritoneal fluid. Peritoneal fluid examination was remarkable for leukocytosis and gramnegative diplococci. Bacterial cultures were positive for N. mucosa growth. The patient was treated with ciprofloxacin with preservation of the dialysis catheter. This case highlights the rarity and importance of Neisseria mucosa causing peritonitis in chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients’. There seems to be a unique association between N. mucosa peritonitis and chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients’. The patient was successfully managed with ciprofloxacin along with salvaging of the dialysis catheter. PMID:28191300

  7. Validating hyperbilirubinemia and gut mucosal atrophy with a novel ultramobile ambulatory total parenteral nutrition piglet model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) provides all nutrition intravenously. Although TPN therapy has grown enormously, it causes significant complications, including gut and hepatic dysfunction. Current models use animal tethering which is unlike ambulatory human TPN delivery and is cost prohibitive. We ...

  8. Treating Intractable Post-Amputation Phantom Limb Pain with Ambulatory Continuous Peripheral Nerve Blocks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-13-2-0009 TITLE: Treating Intractable Post-Amputation Phantom Limb Pain with Ambulatory Continuous...Annual 3. DATES COVERED 26 Dec 2014- 25 Dec 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Treating Intractable Post-Amputation Phantom Limb Pain with Ambulatory...effective treatment for intractable phantom limb pain following a traumatic limb amputation. There is currently no reliable treatment for phantom limb pain

  9. Treating Intractable Post-Amputation Phantom Limb Pain With Ambulatory Continuous Peripheral Nerve Blocks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-13-2-0009 TITLE: Treating Intractable Post-Amputation Phantom Limb Pain With Ambulatory Continuous...TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 26 Dec 2013 – 25 Dec 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Treating Intractable Post-Amputation Phantom Limb Pain With Ambulatory...AKAs, and phantom pain in multiple locations • Approval received by National Amputee Coalition research committee to advertise in their website, e

  10. Ambulatory care training during core internal medicine residency training: the Canadian experience.

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, P J; Meagher, T W

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the status of ambulatory care training of core internal medicine residents in Canada. DESIGN: Mail survey. PARTICIPANTS: All 16 program directors of internal medicine residency training programs in Canada. OUTCOME MEASURES: The nature and amount of ambulatory care training experienced by residents, information about the faculty tutors, and the sources and types of patients seen by the residents. As well, the program directors were asked for their opinions on the ideal ambulatory care program and the kinds of teaching skills required of tutors. RESULTS: All of the directors responded. Fifteen stated that the ambulatory care program is mandatory, and the other stated that it is an elective. Block rotations are more common than continuity-of-care assignments. In 12 of the programs 10% or less of the overall training time is spent in ambulatory care. In 11 the faculty tutors comprise a mixture of generalists and subspecialists. The tutors simultaneously care for patients and teach residents in the ambulatory care setting in 14 of the schools. Most are paid through fee-for-service billing. The respondents felt that the ideal program should contain a mix of general and subspecialty ambulatory care training. There was no consensus on whether it should be a block or continuity-of-care experience, but the directors felt that consultation and communication skills should be emphasized regardless of which type of experience prevails. CONCLUSIONS: Although there is a widespread commitment to provide core internal medicine residents with experience in ambulatory care, there is little uniformity in how this is achieved in Canadian training programs. PMID:8324688

  11. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in children and adolescents: coming of age?

    PubMed

    Lurbe, Empar; Torró, María Isabel; Alvarez, Julio

    2013-06-01

    Over the last years, ambulatory blood pressure monitoring has been introduced into the pediatric population, contributing to a significant increase in the bulk of knowledge of crucial clinically relevant issues. Guidelines have established the currently known conditions where ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is useful and where it will provide additional information in children and adolescents. How common and important the intra-individual differences are within clinical and ambulatory blood pressure is the keystone to the use of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring as a diagnostic tool. By using not only office, but also ambulatory blood pressure, four possible situations arise. Two of these have values in agreement for normotension or hypertension. Two have values that are discrepant. The latter two are known as white coat and masked hypertension. The relationship with hypertension-induced organ damage, the prognostic value and the assessment of treatment goals are key issues of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. In children, the accurate identification of hypertension at the earliest possible age would, therefore, give health-care providers the opportunity to initiate preventive measures, thereby reducing the chance of developing end-organ damage and its attendant morbidity and mortality.

  12. Comparative study of thallium-201 single-photon emission computed tomography and electrocardiography in Duchenne and other types of muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, S.; Matsushima, H.; Suzuki, A.; Sotobata, I.; Indo, T.; Matsuoka, Y.

    1988-04-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using thallium-201 was compared with 12-lead electrocardiography (ECG) in patients with Duchenne (29), facioscapulohumeral (7), limb-girdle (6) and myotonic (5) dystrophies, by dividing the left ventricular (LV) wall into 5 segments. SPECT showed thallium defects (37 patients, mostly in the posteroapical wall), malrotation (23), apical aneurysm (5) and dilatation (7). ECG showed abnormal QRS (36 patients), particularly as a posterolateral pattern (13). Both methods of assessment were normal in only 7 patients. The Duchenne type frequently showed both a thallium defect (particularly in the posteroapical wall) and an abnormal QRS (predominantly in the posterolateral wall); the 3 other types showed abnormalities over the 5 LV wall segments in both tests. The percent of agreement between the 2 tests was 64, 66, 70, 72 and 72 for the lateral, apical, anteroseptal, posterior and inferior walls, respectively. The 2 tests were discordant in 31% of the LV wall, with SPECT (+) but ECG (-) in 21% (mostly in the apicoinferior wall) and SPECT (-) but ECG (+) in 10% (mostly in the lateral wall). Some patients showed large SPECT hypoperfusion despite minimal electrocardiographic changes. ECG thus appeared to underestimate LV fibrosis and to reflect posteroapical rather than posterolateral dystrophy in its posterolateral QRS pattern. In this disease, extensive SPECT hypoperfusion was also shown, irrespective of clinical subtype and skeletal involvement.

  13. Dynamics of ambulatory surgery centers and hospitals market entry.

    PubMed

    Housman, Michael; Al-Amin, Mona

    2013-08-01

    In this article, we investigate the diversity of healthcare delivery organizations by comparing the market determinants of hospitals entry rates with those of ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs). Unlike hospitals, ASCs is one of the growing populations of specialized healthcare delivery organizations. There are reasons to believe that firm entry patterns differ within growing organizational populations since these markets are characterized by different levels of organizational legitimacy, technological uncertainty, and information asymmetry. We compare the entry patterns of firms in a mature population of hospitals to those of firms within a growing population of ASCs. By using patient-level datasets from the state of Florida, we break down our explanatory variables by facility type (ASC vs. hospital) and utilize negative binomial regression models to evaluate the impact of niche density on ASC and hospital entry. Our results indicate that ASCs entry rates is higher in markets with overlapping ASCs while hospitals entry rates are less in markets with overlapping hospitals and ASCs. These results are consistent with the notion that firms in growing populations tend to seek out crowded markets as they compete to occupy the most desirable market segments while firms in mature populations such as general hospitals avoid direct competition.

  14. Mobile Personal Health System for Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Felix, Vanessa G.; Ostos, Rodolfo; Gonzalez, Jesus A.; Cervantes, Armando; Ochoa, Armando; Ruiz, Carlos; Ramos, Roberto; Maestre, Gladys E.

    2013-01-01

    The ARVmobile v1.0 is a multiplatform mobile personal health monitor (PHM) application for ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) monitoring that has the potential to aid in the acquisition and analysis of detailed profile of ABP and heart rate (HR), improve the early detection and intervention of hypertension, and detect potential abnormal BP and HR levels for timely medical feedback. The PHM system consisted of ABP sensor to detect BP and HR signals and smartphone as receiver to collect the transmitted digital data and process them to provide immediate personalized information to the user. Android and Blackberry platforms were developed to detect and alert of potential abnormal values, offer friendly graphical user interface for elderly people, and provide feedback to professional healthcare providers via e-mail. ABP data were obtained from twenty-one healthy individuals (>51 years) to test the utility of the PHM application. The ARVmobile v1.0 was able to reliably receive and process the ABP readings from the volunteers. The preliminary results demonstrate that the ARVmobile 1.0 application could be used to perform a detailed profile of ABP and HR in an ordinary daily life environment, bedsides of estimating potential diagnostic thresholds of abnormal BP variability measured as average real variability. PMID:23762189

  15. Utilization of lean management principles in the ambulatory clinic setting.

    PubMed

    Casey, Jessica T; Brinton, Thomas S; Gonzalez, Chris M

    2009-03-01

    The principles of 'lean management' have permeated many sectors of today's business world, secondary to the success of the Toyota Production System. This management method enables workers to eliminate mistakes, reduce delays, lower costs, and improve the overall quality of the product or service they deliver. These lean management principles can be applied to health care. Their implementation within the ambulatory care setting is predicated on the continuous identification and elimination of waste within the process. The key concepts of flow time, inventory and throughput are utilized to improve the flow of patients through the clinic, and to identify points that slow this process -- so-called bottlenecks. Nonessential activities are shifted away from bottlenecks (i.e. the physician), and extra work capacity is generated from existing resources, rather than being added. The additional work capacity facilitates a more efficient response to variability, which in turn results in cost savings, more time for the physician to interact with patients, and faster completion of patient visits. Finally, application of the lean management principle of 'just-in-time' management can eliminate excess clinic inventory, better synchronize office supply with patient demand, and reduce costs.

  16. Ambulatory pulmonary artery pressure monitoring in advanced heart failure patients

    PubMed Central

    Yandrapalli, Srikanth; Raza, Anoshia; Tariq, Sohaib; Aronow, Wilbert S

    2017-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is an emerging epidemic associate with significant morbidity, mortality, and health care expenditure. Although there were major advances in pharmacologic and device based therapies for the management of HF, mortality of this condition remains high. Accurate monitoring of HF patients for exacerbations is very important to reduce recurrent hospitalizations and its associated complications. With the failure of clinical signs, tele-monitoring, and laboratory bio-markers to function as early markers of HF exacerbations, more sophisticated techniques were sought to accurately predict the circulatory status in HF patients in order to execute timely pharmacological intervention to reduce frequent hospitalizations. CardioMEMSTM (St. Jude Medical, Inc., Saint Paul, Minnesota) is an implantable, wireless pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) monitoring system which transmits the patient’s continuous PAPs to the treating health care provider in the ambulatory setting. PAP-guided medical therapy modification has been shown to significantly reduce HF-related hospitalization and overall mortality. In advanced stages of HF, wireless access to hemodynamic information correlated with earlier left ventricular assist device implantation and shorter time to heart transplantation. PMID:28163833

  17. The efficacy and adequacy of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, George; Kim, Donald; Oreopoulos, Dimitrios G

    1985-01-01

    Since it was introduced in 1976, continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) has won acceptance in many centres and it is now regarded as an important alternative to haemodialysis. CAPD patients have comparable and, in some circumstances, better survival than those on chronic haemodialysis. It is indicated particularly in patients with diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular instability and at the extremes of life. The success of kidney transplantation is similar in those maintained on CAPD and on haemodialysis. CAPD also achieves satisfactory physical and psychological rehabilitation, and the quality of life, including the level of sexual function, is similar during CAPD and haemodialysis. Women on CAPD menstruate more often than those on haemodialysis. CAPD provides adequate clearance of metabolic wastes, maintains fluid balance and ameliorates neurotoxic cognitive dysfunction. CAPD gives control of hypertension and anaemia which is superior to that on haemodialysis. Neuropathy remains stable but osteitis fibrosa seems to progress. CAPD is the most economical of the various forms of dialysis. We conclude that CAPD is an adequate form of replacement and should be made available in every nephrology centre providing treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease. PMID:3909582

  18. Marginal ambulatory teaching cost under varying levels of service utilization.

    PubMed

    Panton, D M; Mushlin, A I; Gavett, J W

    1980-06-01

    The ambulatory component of residency training jointly produces two products, namely, training and patient services. In costing educational programs of this type, two approaches are frequently taken. The first considers the total costs of the educational program, including training and patient services. These costs are usually constructed from historical accounting records. The second approach attempts to cost the joint products separately, based upon estimates of future changes in program costs, if the product in question is added to or removed from the program. The second approach relates to typical decisions facing the managers of medical centers and practices used for teaching purposes. This article reports such a study of costs in a primary-care residency training program in a hospital outpatient setting. The costs of the product, i.e., on-the-job training, are evaluated using a replacement-cost concept under different levels of patient services. The results show that the cost of the product, training, is small at full clinical utilization and is sensitive to changes in the volume of services provided.

  19. Method of evaluating and improving ambulatory medical care.

    PubMed Central

    Payne, B C; Lyons, T F; Neuhaus, E; Kolton, M; Dwarshius, L

    1984-01-01

    The usefulness of an action-research model is demonstrated in the evaluation and improvement of ambulatory medical care in a variety of settings: solo office practice, prepaid capitation multiple-specialty group practice, and medical school hospital-based outpatient clinic practice. Improvements in the process of medical care are found to relate directly to the intensity and duration of planned interventions by the study group and are demonstrated to follow organizational changes in the participating sites--primarily managerial and support services initiated by policy decisions in each study site. Improvement in performance approaching one standard deviation results from the most intense intervention, about one-half standard deviation at the next level of intervention, and virtually no change from a simple feedback of performance measures. On the basis of these findings and other operational and research efforts to improve physician performance, it is unlikely that simple feedback of performance measures will elicit a change in behavior. However, noncoercive methods involving health care providers in problem identification, problem solving, and solution implementation are demonstrated to be effective. PMID:6735736

  20. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in spinal cord injury: clinical practicability.

    PubMed

    Hubli, Michèle; Krassioukov, Andrei V

    2014-05-01

    Trauma to the spinal cord often results not only in sensorimotor but also autonomic impairments. The loss of autonomic control over the cardiovascular system can cause profound blood pressure (BP) derangements in subjects with spinal cord injury (SCI) and may therefore lead to increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in this population. The use of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) allows insights into circadian BP profiles, which have been shown to be of good prognostic value for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in able-bodied subjects. Past studies in SCI subjects using ABPM have shown that alterations in circadian BP patterns are dependent on the spinal lesion level. Tetraplegic subjects with sensorimotor complete lesions have a decreased daytime arterial BP, loss of the physiological nocturnal BP dip, and higher circadian BP variability, including potentially life-threatening hypertensive episodes known as autonomic dysreflexia (AD), compared with paraplegic and able-bodied subjects. The proposed underlying mechanisms of these adverse BP alterations mainly are attributed to a lost or decreased central drive to sympathetic spinal preganglionic neurons controlling the heart and blood vessels. In addition, several maladaptive anatomical changes within the spinal cord and the periphery, as well as the general decrease of physical daily activity in SCI subjects, account for adverse BP changes. ABPM enables the identification of adverse BP profiles and the associated increased risk for CVD in SCI subjects. Concurrently, it also might provide a useful clinical tool to monitor improvements of AD and lost nocturnal dip after appropriate treatments in the SCI population.

  1. Utility of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Graves, John W; Althaf, Mohammed Mahdi

    2006-11-01

    Diagnosis of hypertension is critically dependent on accurate blood pressure measurement. "Accurate" refers to carefully following the guidelines for blood pressure measurement laid out for children and adults to minimize observer and subject errors that commonly occur in clinical blood pressure measurement. Accurate blood pressure measurement is more important in children and adolescents as the misdiagnosis of hypertension may have a life-long adverse impact on insurability and employment. Automated blood pressure measurement offers multiple advantages in achieving high-quality blood pressure determinations by reducing observer errors. The most commonly used form of automated blood pressure measurement is 24-h ambulatory blood pressure measurement (ABPM). Information on ABPM in children has grown exponentially over the last decade. Normative data exists for diagnosis of hypertension in children using ABPM including a novel method for determining normal values with the LMS method. There is further information about the utility of different determinants of 24-h blood pressure such as dipping status, morning surge and blood pressure load. ABPM has been able to detect significant differences in blood pressure in many disease states in children including chronic renal failure, polycystic kidney disease, solitary functioning kidney, and after renal transplantation. Increasingly nonambulatory automated blood pressure determinations have been used in management of hypertension in children. Although nonambulatory automated readings lack information about nocturnal blood pressure or blood pressure during daily activity, studies have suggested that home automated blood pressure measurements are a helpful adjunct to the usual office blood pressure reading.

  2. The content of hope in ambulatory patients with colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Beckman, Emily S; Helft, Paul R; Torke, Alexia M

    2013-01-01

    Although hope is a pervasive concept in cancer treatment, we know little about how ambulatory patients with cancer define or experience hope. We explored hope through semistructured interviews with ten patients with advanced (some curable, some incurable) colon cancer at one Midwestern, university-based cancer center. We conducted a thematic analysis to identify key concepts related to patient perceptions of hope. Although we did ask specifically about hope, patients also often revealed their hopes in response to indirect questions or by telling stories about their cancer experience. We identified four major themes related to hope: 1) hope is essential, 2) a change in perspective, 3) the content of hope, and 4) communicating about hope. The third theme, the content of hope, included three subthemes: a) the desire for normalcy, b) future plans, and c) hope for a cure. We conclude that hope is an essential concept for patients undergoing treatment for cancer as it pertains to their psychological well-being and quality of life, and hope for a cure is not and should not be the only consideration. In a clinical context, the exploration of patients' hopes and aspirations in light of their cancer diagnosis is important because it provides a frame for understanding their goals for treatment. Exploration of the content of patients' hope can not only help to illuminate misunderstandings but also clarify how potential treatments may or may not contribute to achieving patients' goals.

  3. Ibuprofen timing for hand surgery in ambulatory care

    PubMed Central

    Giuliani, Enrico; Bianchi, Anna; Marcuzzi, Augusto; Landi, Antonio; Barbieri, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of pre-operative administration of ibuprofen on post-operative pain control vs. early post-operative administration for hand surgery procedures performed under local anaesthesia in ambulatory care. METHODS: Candidates to trigger finger release by De Quervain tenosynovitis and carpal tunnel operation under local anesthesia were enrolled in the study. Group A received 400 mg ibuprofen before the operation and placebo after the procedure; group B received placebo before the operation and ibuprofen 400 mg at the end of the procedure; both groups received ibuprofen 400 mg every 6h thereafter. Visual analogue scale (VAS) was measured at fixed times before and every 6h after surgery, for a total follow-up of 18h. RESULTS: Groups were similar according to age, gender and type of surgery. Median VAS values did not produce any statistical significance, while there was a statistically significant difference on pre-operative and early post-operative VAS values between groups (A -8.53 mm vs. B 3.36 mm, p=0.0085). CONCLUSION: Average pain levels were well controlled by local anesthesia and post-operati