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Sample records for 24-hour blood pressure

  1. Relationship between 24-hour blood pressure pattern and left ventricular structure and function in hypertensive Nigerians.

    PubMed

    Nwafor, Chibuike E; Adebiyi, Adewole A; Ogah, Okechukwu S; Falase, Ayodele O

    2013-01-01

    Blood pressure variation throughout the day is known to have cardiovascular consequences. Left ventricular (LV) mass is more closely related to 24-hour blood pressure than casual blood pressure. Daytime blood pressure expectedly is higher than that of nighttime under normal circumstances. The effect of 24-hour blood pressure pattern on the left ventricular structure and function has not been examined in hypertensive Nigerians. The aim of our study was to assess the 24-hour blood pressure pattern and its relationship to the LV structure and function in newly diagnosed hypertensives in Nigeria. We hypothesized that 24-hour blood pressure was more related to left ventricular structure than casual blood pressure in hypertensive Nigerians. Cross-sectional study. The study was carried out at the Cardiology Unit of the Department of Medicine, University College Hospital, Ibadan, South West Nigeria. Three casual blood pressure measurements were taken, while the participants were resting, using standardized digital blood pressure machine. Mean of the 3 measurements was used to categorize the participants as hypertensives or normotensives (controls). A calibrated Schiller BR-102 ABPM machine was used to measure the 24-hour blood pressure in 210 hypertensives and 202 normotensives (controls). Daytime and nighttime systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressures (DBP) were acquired every 20 minutes. Left ventricular mass was indexed by the allometric power of height (height 2.7) and left ventricular hypertrophy was considered present if LVM was > or = 49.2 g/m2.7 in males or > or = 46.7 g/m2.7 in females. The hypertensives and the controls were comparable in their demographic characteristics. Among the hypertensives, mean casual blood pressure and mean 24-hour blood pressure (SD) were 165(16)/96(8) mm Hg and 132(22)/84(15) mm Hg, respectively (P < .0001). 24-hour, day- and nighttime blood pressure were statistically related to left ventricular mass and indexed left ventricular

  2. Assessment of patients with office hypertension by 24-hour noninvasive ambulatory blood pressure monitoring.

    PubMed

    White, W B

    1986-11-01

    To assess the discrepancy between casual (office) and home blood pressure readings in patients performing home blood pressure monitoring, we analyzed office, home, and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure and heart rates in 19 patients in a prospective four-week study. After the month of study, the average difference between mean office and manual home blood pressures in this office hypertensive group was 30 +/- 17/20 +/- 6 mm Hg. The blood pressures taken in the office were substantially greater than the 24-hour average blood pressures and ambulatory blood pressures during work or while at home (awake). An analysis of the automatic monitor readings while in the doctor's office and at 15-minute intervals after leaving the office showed a progressive reduction in blood pressure and heart rate during the first hour after leaving the office. A mean 24-hour blood pressure of less than 130/80 mm Hg was found in 13 (68%) patients. These data suggest that patients with office hypertension are usually normotensive but may have a persistent and recurrent pressor response in a medical care setting. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring provides confirmation of not only the office-home disparity, but also suggests that stress other than office visits fails to elicit a hypertensive response.

  3. [Salt taste threshold, 24 hour natriuresis and blood pressure variation in normotensive individuals].

    PubMed

    Antonello, Vicente Sperb; Antonello, Ivan Carlos Ferreira; Santos, Carlos Abaeté de Los

    2007-01-01

    The study evaluates salt taste sensibility, urinary sodium excretion and blood pressure (BP) in normotensive persons. The hypothesis was that a higher salt taste threshold (STT) can be associated to a higher 24 hour natriuresis and increased BP levels. Twenty four not hypertensive volunteers were selected. To evaluate STT, different concentrations of sodium chloride were used. Individuals were submitted to 24 hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) and the 24 hour urine was collected for sodium dosage. Patients were divided in two groups related to higher or normal STT. Both groups did not differ regarding age or body mass index (BMI). There was no difference between the groups regarding demographic variables, alcohol or tobacco use, and ABPM. Twenty-four hour natriuresis was significantly higher in the group with increased STT. Using Pearson's correlation coefficient, with the significance determined by Student-t test, there was a strong correlation between 24 hour Systolic BP and BMI, Diastolic BP and BMI, and a regular correlation between STT with 24 hour natriuresis and Systolic BP with 24 hour natriuresis. Twenty four hour natriuresis was significantly higher in individuals with higher STT, suggesting that this avidity for salt is followed by higher ingestion of sodium. There was strong association between BP and BMI. The association between STT and BP levels was not confirmed. Increasing the number of persons, the age bracket, and of hypertensive patients may lead to a better understanding of the relations between STT, natriuresis and BP variation.

  4. Comparisons of Office and 24-Hour Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring in Children with Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kun-Tai; Chiu, Shuenn-Nan; Weng, Wen-Chin; Lee, Pei-Lin; Hsu, Wei-Chung

    2017-03-01

    To compare office blood pressure (BP) and 24-hour ambulatory BP (ABP) monitoring to facilitate the diagnosis and management of hypertension in children with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Children aged 4-16 years with OSA-related symptoms were recruited from a tertiary referral medical center. All children underwent overnight polysomnography, office BP, and 24-hour ABP studies. Multiple linear regression analyses were applied to elucidate the association between the apnea-hypopnea index and BP. Correlation and consistency between office BP and 24-hour ABP were measured by Pearson correlation, intraclass correlation, and Bland-Altman analyses. In the 163 children enrolled (mean age, 8.2 ± 3.3 years; 67% male). The prevalence of systolic hypertension at night was significantly higher in children with moderate-to-severe OSA than in those with primary snoring (44.9% vs 16.1%, P = .006). Pearson correlation and intraclass correlation analyses revealed associations between office BP and 24-hour BP, and Bland-Altman analysis indicated an agreement between office and 24-hour BP measurements. However, multiple linear regression analyses demonstrated that 24-hour BP (nighttime systolic BP and mean arterial pressure), unlike office BP, was independently associated with the apnea-hypopnea index, after adjustment for adiposity variables. Twenty-four-hour ABP is more strongly correlated with OSA in children, compared with office BP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in children with familial dysautonomia.

    PubMed

    Nussinovitch, Naomi; Nussinovitch, Moshe; Peleg, Edna; Rosenthal, Talma

    2005-04-01

    Familial dysautonomia (Riley Day syndrome) is a genetic disease. The present study of 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in children with familial dysautonomia was carried out to investigate the pattern of blood pressure in this syndrome. To the best of our knowledge, this is the only description of patients with 24-hour blood pressure monitoring. Vasomotor instability reflected in extreme hypertension and hypotension was recorded by 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in three patients with familial dysautonomia: a 16-year old girl, a 14-year old boy and a 3-year old boy. Recordings were taken on a routine school day in the first two patients and during hospitalization in the third. Patients 1 and 2 displayed circadian rhythm but with significantly higher than normal blood pressure and heart rate. Patient 3 exhibited these fluctuations to a lesser degree. Postural hypotension without compensatory tachycardia was frequently seen in all three patients. Unusual variability in blood pressure was recorded during routine activities in patients 1 and 2 and during an acute attack in patient 3. Close monitoring of antihypertensive therapy should be considered in familial dysautonomia patients in whom blood pressure reaches excessive levels.

  6. [Assessment of arterial wall stiffness by 24-hour blood pressure monitoring].

    PubMed

    Korneva, V A; Kuznetsova, T Yu

    2016-01-01

    Arterial wall stiffness is an early marker of cardiovascular diseases. The gold standard for assessment of the stiffness of large vessels is presently pulse wave velocity (PWV). Work is in progress on the study of the reference values of PWV in people of different genders and ages. 24-hour blood pressure (BP) monitoring is not only a procedure that can estimate diurnal BP variability, but also monitor the indicators of vascular wall stiffness in a number of cases over a 24-hour period. The given review highlights the pathophysiology of arterial stiffness, methods for its assessment, and the aspects of use in therapeutic practice.

  7. Heterogeneity of Prognostic Studies of 24-Hour Blood Pressure Variability: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Kathryn S.; Heneghan, Carl J.; Stevens, Richard J.; Adams, Emily C.; Nunan, David; Ward, Alison

    2015-01-01

    In addition to mean blood pressure, blood pressure variability is hypothesized to have important prognostic value in evaluating cardiovascular risk. We aimed to assess the prognostic value of blood pressure variability within 24 hours. Using MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library to April 2013, we conducted a systematic review of prospective studies of adults, with at least one year follow-up and any day, night or 24-hour blood pressure variability measure as a predictor of one or more of the following outcomes: all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, all cardiovascular events, stroke and coronary heart disease. We examined how blood pressure variability is defined and how its prognostic use is reported. We analysed relative risks adjusted for covariates including the appropriate mean blood pressure and considered the potential for meta-analysis. Our analysis of methods included 24 studies and analysis of predictions included 16 studies. There were 36 different measures of blood pressure variability and 13 definitions of night- and day-time periods. Median follow-up was 5.5 years (interquartile range 4.2–7.0). Comparing measures of dispersion, coefficient of variation was less well researched than standard deviation. Night dipping based on percentage change was the most researched measure and the only measure for which data could be meaningfully pooled. Night dipping or lower night-time blood pressure was associated with lower risk of cardiovascular events. The interpretation and use in clinical practice of 24-hour blood pressure variability, as an important prognostic indicator of cardiovascular events, is hampered by insufficient evidence and divergent methodologies. We recommend greater standardisation of methods. PMID:25984791

  8. Heterogeneity of prognostic studies of 24-hour blood pressure variability: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Kathryn S; Heneghan, Carl J; Stevens, Richard J; Adams, Emily C; Nunan, David; Ward, Alison

    2015-01-01

    In addition to mean blood pressure, blood pressure variability is hypothesized to have important prognostic value in evaluating cardiovascular risk. We aimed to assess the prognostic value of blood pressure variability within 24 hours. Using MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library to April 2013, we conducted a systematic review of prospective studies of adults, with at least one year follow-up and any day, night or 24-hour blood pressure variability measure as a predictor of one or more of the following outcomes: all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, all cardiovascular events, stroke and coronary heart disease. We examined how blood pressure variability is defined and how its prognostic use is reported. We analysed relative risks adjusted for covariates including the appropriate mean blood pressure and considered the potential for meta-analysis. Our analysis of methods included 24 studies and analysis of predictions included 16 studies. There were 36 different measures of blood pressure variability and 13 definitions of night- and day-time periods. Median follow-up was 5.5 years (interquartile range 4.2-7.0). Comparing measures of dispersion, coefficient of variation was less well researched than standard deviation. Night dipping based on percentage change was the most researched measure and the only measure for which data could be meaningfully pooled. Night dipping or lower night-time blood pressure was associated with lower risk of cardiovascular events. The interpretation and use in clinical practice of 24-hour blood pressure variability, as an important prognostic indicator of cardiovascular events, is hampered by insufficient evidence and divergent methodologies. We recommend greater standardisation of methods.

  9. The relationship between 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure load and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio.

    PubMed

    Çimen, Tolga; Sunman, Hamza; Efe, Tolga Han; Erat, Mehmet; Şahan, Haluk Furkan; Algül, Engin; Guliyev, İlkin; Akyel, Ahmet; Doğan, Mehmet; Açıkel, Sadık; Yeter, Ekrem

    2017-02-01

    The neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) is established as a reliable marker of systemic inflammation. Low-grade inflammation has a key role in the pathogenesis and progression of hypertension (HTN). Blood pressure (BP) load, defined as the percentage of abnormally elevated BP readings, is a good marker of HTN severity. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between HTN severity and NLR using averaged ambulatory BP readings and BP load. A total of 300 patients with untreated essential HTN were included in this cross-sectional study. Patients were divided into quartiles according to NLR values (first: <1.55; second: 1.55-1.92; third: 1.92-2.48; and fourth: >2.48). Averaged ambulatory BP values and BP load were assessed for each quartile. In the interquartile evaluation there were no differences between quartiles in terms of baseline demographic, clinical and echocardiographic characteristics (p>0.05). Daytime systolic BP (SBP), 24-hour diastolic BP (DBP), daytime DBP, daytime SBP load, 24-hour DBP load and daytime DBP load were found to be significantly higher in the upper two quartiles (p<0.05 for all). In correlation analysis, log NLR values were found to be positively correlated with 24-hour SBP, DBP, SBP load and DBP load (Pearson coefficients of 0.194, 0.197, 0.157 and 0.181, respectively; p<0.01 for all). In multivariate analysis, log NLR had an independent association with 24-hour SBP and DBP and 24-hour SBP and DBP load. This study showed for the first time that increased NLR is independently associated with HTN severity in untreated essential HTN patients. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. The 24-hour pulse wave velocity, aortic augmentation index, and central blood pressure in normotensive volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Tatyana Y; Korneva, Viktoria A; Bryantseva, Evgeniya N; Barkan, Vitaliy S; Orlov, Artemy V; Posokhov, Igor N; Rogoza, Anatoly N

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the pulse wave velocity, aortic augmentation index corrected for heart rate 75 (AIx@75), and central systolic and diastolic blood pressure during 24-hour monitoring in normotensive volunteers. Overall, 467 subjects (206 men and 261 women) were recruited in this study. Participants were excluded from the study if they were less than 19 years of age, had blood test abnormalities, had a body mass index greater than 2 7.5 kg/m(2), had impaired glucose tolerance, or had hypotension or hypertension. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) with the BPLab(®) device was performed in each subject. ABPM waveforms were analyzed using the special automatic Vasotens(®) algorithm, which allows the calculation of pulse wave velocity, AIx@75, central systolic and diastolic blood pressure for "24-hour", "awake", and "asleep" periods. Circadian rhythms and sex differences in these indexes were identified. Pending further validation in prospective outcome-based studies, our data may be used as preliminary diagnostic values for the BPLab ABPM additional index in adult subjects.

  11. Activity-adjusted 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure and cardiac remodeling in children with sleep disordered breathing.

    PubMed

    Amin, Raouf; Somers, Virend K; McConnell, Keith; Willging, Paul; Myer, Charles; Sherman, Marc; McPhail, Gary; Morgenthal, Ashley; Fenchel, Matthew; Bean, Judy; Kimball, Thomas; Daniels, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Questions remain as to whether pediatric sleep disordered breathing increases the risk for elevated blood pressure and blood pressure-dependent cardiac remodeling. We tested the hypothesis that activity-adjusted morning blood pressure surge, blood pressure load, and diurnal and nocturnal blood pressure are significantly higher in children with sleep disordered breathing than in healthy controls and that these blood pressure parameters relate to left ventricular remodeling. 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure parameters were compared between groups. The associations between blood pressure and left ventricular relative wall thickness and mass were measured. 140 children met the inclusion criteria. In children with apnea hypopnea index <5 per hour, a significant difference from controls was the morning blood surge. Significant increases in blood pressure surge, blood pressure load, and in 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure were evident in those whom the apnea hypopnea index exceeded 5 per hour. Sleep disordered breathing and body mass index had similar effect on blood pressure parameters except for nocturnal diastolic blood pressure, where sleep disordered breathing had a significantly greater effect than body mass index. Diurnal and nocturnal systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and mean arterial blood pressure predicted the changes in left ventricular relative wall thickness. Therefore, sleep disordered breathing in children who are otherwise healthy is independently associated with an increase in morning blood pressure surge, blood pressure load, and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure. The association between left ventricular remodeling and 24-hour blood pressure highlights the role of sleep disordered breathing in increasing cardiovascular morbidity.

  12. Pharmacist-physician co-management of hypertension reduces 24-hour ambulatory blood pressures

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Cynthia A.; Ernst, Michael E.; Sezate, Genesis S.; Zheng, Shimin; Carter, Barry L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Pharmacist-physician co-management of hypertension has been shown to improve office blood pressures (BP). We sought to describe the effect of such a model on 24-hour ambulatory BPs. Methods We performed a prospective, cluster-randomised controlled clinical trial in 179 patients with uncontrolled hypertension from five primary care clinics in Iowa City, Iowa. Patients were randomized by clinic to receive pharmacist-physician collaborative management of hypertension (intervention) or usual care (control) for a 9-month period. In the intervention group, pharmacists helped patients identify barriers to BP control, counselled on lifestyle and dietary modifications, and adjusted antihypertensive therapy in collaboration with the patient’s primary care provider. Patients were seen by pharmacists a minimum every 2 months. Ambulatory BP was obtained at baseline and study end. Results Baseline and end of study ambulatory BP profiles were evaluated for 175 patients. Ambulatory BPs were reduced to a greater extent in the intervention compared to control group (daytime ΔSBP [SD] 15.2[11.5] vs 5.5[13.5], p<0.001; nighttime ΔSBP [SD] 12.2[14.8] vs 3.4[13.3], p<0.001; 24-hour ΔSBP [SD] 14.1[11.3] vs 5.5[12.5], p<0.001). More patients in the intervention group had BP controlled at the end of the study (75% vs 50.7%, p<0.001) as defined by overall 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring. Conclusions Pharmacist-physician collaborative management of hypertension achieved consistent and significantly greater reduction in 24-hour BP and a high rate of BP control. PMID:20937921

  13. Low correlation between visit-to-visit variability and 24-hour variability of blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Muntner, Paul; Shimbo, Daichi; Diaz, Keith M.; Newman, Jonathan; Sloan, Richard P.; Schwartz, Joseph E.

    2013-01-01

    Visit-to-visit variability (VVV) of clinic systolic blood pressure (SBP) has been associated with cardiovascular disease risk. Given the need for obtaining blood pressure (BP) at multiple visits to calculate VVV, substituting BP variability from ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) may be a practical alternative. We assessed the correlation between VVV of BP and BP variability from ABPM using data from 146 untreated, mostly normotensive participants (mean age 47.9 years) in a substudy of the ongoing Masked Hypertension Study. VVV of SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) was estimated by the standard deviation (SDvvv) and average real variability (ARVvvv) from 6 study visits over a median of 216 days. ABPM data were used to calculate the day-night SD (SDdn) and the ARV of SBP and DBP over 24 hours (ARV24). For SBP, the mean SDvvv and SDdn were 6.3 (SD=2.5) and 8.8 (SD=1.8) mmHg, respectively, and mean ARVvvv and ARV24 were 7.2 (SD=3.2) and 8.4 (SD=2.1) mmHg, respectively. The Spearman correlation coefficient between SDvvv and SDdn of SBP was rs=0.25 and between ARVvvv and ARV24 was rs=0.17. Participants in the highest quartile of SDdn of SBP were 1.66 (95% CI: 0.93 – 2.75) times more likely to be in the highest quartile of SDvvv of SBP. The observed-to-expected ratio between the highest quartiles of ARVvvv and ARV24 of SBP was 0.89 (95% CI: 0.41 – 1.69). The correlations for SDvvv and SDdn and ARVvvv and ARV24 of DBP were minimal. These data suggest VVV and 24-hour variability are weakly correlated and not interchangeable. PMID:23784506

  14. Ambulatory arterial stiffness index derived from 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Wang, Ji-Guang; Dolan, Eamon; Gao, Ping-Jin; Guo, Hui-Feng; Nawrot, Tim; Stanton, Alice V; Zhu, Ding-Liang; O'Brien, Eoin; Staessen, Jan A

    2006-03-01

    We hypothesized that 1 minus the slope of diastolic on systolic pressure during 24-hour ambulatory monitoring (ambulatory arterial stiffness index [AASI]) might reflect arterial stiffness. We compared AASI with established measures of arterial stiffness and studied its distribution in Chinese and European populations. We used 90207 SpaceLabs monitors and the SphygmoCor device to measure AASI, central and peripheral pulse pressures, the central (CAIx) and peripheral (PAIx) systolic augmentation indexes, and aortic pulse wave velocity. In 166 volunteers, the correlation coefficient between AASI and pulse wave velocity was 0.51 (P<0.0001). In 348 randomly recruited Chinese subjects, AASI correlated (P<0.0001) with CAIx (r=0.48), PAIx (r=0.50), and central pulse pressure (r=0.50). AASI increased with age and mean arterial pressure but decreased with body height. Both before and after adjustment for arterial wave reflections by considering height and heart rate as covariates, AASI correlated more (P<0.0001) closely with CAIx and PAIx than 24-hour pulse pressure. Among normotensive subjects, the 95th percentile of AASI was 0.55 in Chinese and 0.57 in 1617 Europeans enrolled in the International Database on Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring. The upper boundary of the 95% prediction interval of AASI in relation to age ranged from 0.53 at 20 years to 0.72 at 80 years. In conclusion, AASI is a new index of arterial stiffness that can be easily measured under ambulatory conditions. Pending additional validation in outcome studies, normal values of AASI are probably <0.50 and 0.70 in young and older subjects, respectively.

  15. Physician-pharmacist co-management and 24-hour blood pressure control.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ziqian; Ernst, Michael E; Ardery, Gail; Xu, Yinghui; Carter, Barry L

    2013-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare indices of 24-hour blood pressure (BP) following a physician-pharmacist collaborative intervention and to describe the associated changes in antihypertensive medications. This was a secondary analysis of a prospective, cluster-randomized clinical trial conducted in 6 family medicine clinics randomized to co-managed (n=3 clinics, 176 patients) or control (n=3 clinics, 198 patients) groups. Mean ambulatory systolic BP (SBP) was significantly lower in the co-managed vs the control group: daytime BP 122.8 mm Hg vs 134.4 mm Hg (P<.001); nighttime SBP 114.8 mm Hg vs 123.7 mm Hg (P<.001); and 24-hour SBP 120.4 mm Hg vs 131.8 mm Hg (P<.001), respectively. Significantly more drug changes were made in the co-managed than in the control group (2.7 vs 1.1 changes per patient, P<.001), and there was greater diuretic use in co-managed patients (79.6% vs 62.6%, P<.001). Ambulatory BPs were significantly lower for the patients who had a diuretic added during the first month compared with those who never had a diuretic added (P<.01). Physician-pharmacist co-management significantly improved ambulatory BP compared with the control group. Antihypertensive drug therapy was intensified much more for patients in the co-managed group.

  16. The 24-hour pulse wave velocity, aortic augmentation index, and central blood pressure in normotensive volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsova, Tatyana Y; Korneva, Viktoria A; Bryantseva, Evgeniya N; Barkan, Vitaliy S; Orlov, Artemy V; Posokhov, Igor N; Rogoza, Anatoly N

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the pulse wave velocity, aortic augmentation index corrected for heart rate 75 (AIx@75), and central systolic and diastolic blood pressure during 24-hour monitoring in normotensive volunteers. Overall, 467 subjects (206 men and 261 women) were recruited in this study. Participants were excluded from the study if they were less than 19 years of age, had blood test abnormalities, had a body mass index greater than 2 7.5 kg/m2, had impaired glucose tolerance, or had hypotension or hypertension. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) with the BPLab® device was performed in each subject. ABPM waveforms were analyzed using the special automatic Vasotens® algorithm, which allows the calculation of pulse wave velocity, AIx@75, central systolic and diastolic blood pressure for “24-hour”, “awake”, and “asleep” periods. Circadian rhythms and sex differences in these indexes were identified. Pending further validation in prospective outcome-based studies, our data may be used as preliminary diagnostic values for the BPLab ABPM additional index in adult subjects. PMID:24812515

  17. Effect of nasal continuous positive airway pressure during sleep on 24-hour blood pressure in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, I; Grunstein, R R; Hedner, J A; Doyle, J; Collins, F L; Fletcher, P J; Kelly, D T; Sullivan, C E

    1993-09-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure (BP) was measured noninvasively (Oxford Medilog ABP) at 15-minute intervals for 24 hours before and after 8 weeks of treatment with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) in 19 men with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We included both normotensive and hypertensive patients, but hypertensives were studied after withdrawal of antihypertensive drugs. Ambulatory BP before and after treatment was compared using patients as their own controls. Treatment with nCPAP was successfully established in 14 of the 19 patients (74%). Blood pressure fell significantly in patients who were successfully treated: 24-hour mean BP (systolic/diastolic) decreased from 141 +/- 18/89 +/- 11 mm Hg to 134 +/- 19/85 +/- 13 mm Hg (p < 0.05). The reduction in 24-hour mean systolic BP occurred during both day and night, but a significant fall in mean diastolic BP was only observed during the day. The mean blood pressure fell in both normotensive and hypertensive patients. Patients who were inadequately treated with nCPAP had no reduction in mean 24-hour BP. Effective treatment of sleep apnea with nCPAP was associated with a significant fall in both systolic and diastolic BP independent of changes in body weight or alcohol consumption, suggesting that sleep apnea was an independent factor contributing to elevated nighttime and daytime BP in these patients.

  18. Cardiovascular Outcomes in Patients with Normal and Abnormal 24-Hour Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, P.; Stevenson, Louise

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) plays an important role in assessing cardiovascular prognosis, through presence or absence of ABPM-related prognostic features. Objectives. To study relationship between 24-hour ABPM and cardiovascular outcomes in patients from Chesterfield Royal Hospital. Material and Methods. Over 12 months from the 1st of August 2002, 1187 individuals had 24-hour ABPM performed. Cardiovascular outcomes were studied in a subset (297) of the original cohort, made up by every 4th consecutive subject. The following ABPM-related prognostic features were studied—high day time systolic and diastolic BP (≥135, ≥85 mmHg), high night time systolic and diastolic BP (≥120 mmHg, ≥75 mmHg), absence of nocturnal dip (≤10% fall in night time SBP), high early morning SBP (≥140 mmHg), and morning surge (≥20/15 mmHg). The cardiovascular outcomes studied in the fourth table included fatal and nonfatal MI, new diagnosis of angina, acute coronary syndrome, sudden cardiac death, cardiac arrhythmias, acute LVF, cerbrovascular events, peripheral vascular disease, abdominal aortic aneurysm, and CKD stage 3 or above. Results. Over a followup period of 2015 ± 116 days (1720–2305 days) 82 cardiovascular events occurred in 61 subjects. Cardiac arrhythmias were the most common CV outcome (34 events) followed by cerebrovascular events (15). Statistically significant associations found were between cerebrovascular events and absent nocturnal dip ≤ 10% (P = .05) and high day time DBP (P = .029), peripheral vascular disease and morning surge ≥ 20/15 mmHg (P = .014), cardiac arrhythmias and high day time and night time DBP (P = .009 and .033, resp.). Conclusion. Significant associations were found between cerebrovascular events and absent nocturnal dip ≤ 10% and high day time DBP, peripheral vascular disease and morning surge ≥ 20/15 mmHg, cardiac arrhythmias and high day time and night time DBP. PMID

  19. Relationship of 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure and heart rate with markers of hepatic function in cirrhotic patients.

    PubMed

    Tzamouranis, Dimitris G; Alexopoulou, Alexandra; Dourakis, Spyros P; Stergiou, George S

    2010-12-12

    There is evidence that in cirrhotic patients, certain hemodynamic parameters, such as blood pressure and heart rate, are related to the severity of liver disease. This study investigated whether non-invasive 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure and heart rate are more closely associated with markers of liver disease severity than conventional office measurements. Ambulatory patients with cirrhosis underwent office blood pressure and heart rate measurements, 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and blood laboratory tests. Fifty-one patients (32 men, mean age 57.4 ± 11.3 years) completed the study. Twenty six patients had compensated liver cirrhosis (group A) and 25 patients had more advanced liver disease (group B). Group A and B patients differed significantly both in ambulatory asleep diastolic blood pressure (p < 0.05) and office diastolic blood pressure (p < 0.01), which were lower in more advanced liver disease. Office blood pressure and heart rate correlations were similar to or even stronger than ambulatory ones. Ambulatory blood pressure and heart rate awake-asleep variation (dipping) showed a relatively flat pattern as markers of liver dysfunction were deteriorating. The strongest correlations were found with both ambulatory and office heart rate, which increased as indicators of severity of liver disease were worsening. Heart rate seems to be a more reliable marker of ongoing liver dysfunction than blood pressure. Evaluation of blood pressure and heart rate with 24-hour ambulatory measurement does not seem to offer more information than conventional office measurements.

  20. [Definition of 24 hour ambulatory blood pressure values corresponding to office blood pressure values of 130/80 mm Hg].

    PubMed

    Rihácek, I; Soucek, M; Frána, P; Plachý, M; Vasků, A; Znojil, V

    2008-02-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) provides a profile of blood pressure (BP) away from the medical environment and has been shown to be a stronger predictor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality than office BP measurement. There are known the normal BP values for ABPM in general population with office BP value 140/90 mm Hg, but don't are known normal values for ABPM of patients with high risk hypertension which needs to have office BP below 130/80 mm Hg. Definition of normal BP value of ABPM in patients with office BP130 and/or 80 mm Hg. BP measurement in 241 healthy subjects by ABPM and mercury sphygmomanometer according to European Hypertension Society criteria. Subject selection with following criteria: mean office systolic blood pressure 128-132 mm Hg or diastolic blood pressure 78-82 mm Hg. Exclusion ABPM curves with white-coat hypertension and masked hypertension. All office and ABPM inclusion criteria fulfill 37 subjects for systolic blood pressure, mean age 44 years and 48 subjects for diastolic blood pressure, mean age 45 years. Mean office systolic BP 129.9 +/- 1.6 mm Hg, diastolic BP 80.2 +/- 1.5 mm Hg. Mean 24hour systolic BP 119.1 +/- 12.3 (95% CI, 119.0-119.3) mm Hg, diastolic BP 71.4 +/- 10.2 (95% CI, 71.3-71.5) mm Hg, day time systolic BP 123.7 +/- 9.0 (95% CI, 123.6-123.8) mm Hg, diastolic BP 75.4 +/- 7.0 (95% CI, 75.3-75.5) mm Hg, night time systolic BP 105.8 +/- 10.4 (95% CI, 105.7-105.9) mm Hg and diastolic BP 59.8 +/- 9.0 (95% CI, 59.7-59.8) mm Hg. The normal BP value ofABPM in patients with office BP 130/80 mm Hg is for 24hour BP 119/71 mm Hg, day time BP 124/75 mm Hg and night time BP 106/60 mm Hg.

  1. Analysis of 24-Hour Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring in Children With Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Kun-Tai; Chiu, Shuenn-Nan; Weng, Wen-Chin; Lee, Pei-Lin; Hsu, Wei-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In the present study, we aimed to verify associations between ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) and pediatric obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in a hospital-based population. This was a cross-sectional observational study on children aged 4 to 16 years with OSA-related symptoms from a tertiary referral medical center. All children received overnight polysomnography and 24-hour recording of ABP. Severity of the disease was classified as primary snoring (apnea-hypopnea index, AHI <1), mild OSA (AHI 1–5), and moderate-to-severe OSA (AHI >5). For 195 children enrolled in this study (mean age, 7.8 ± 3.4 years; 69% boy), ABP increased as severity of OSA increased. During daytime, children with moderate-to-severe OSA had significantly higher systolic blood pressure (BP) (117.0 ± 12.7 vs 110.5 ± 9.3 mmHg), mean arterial pressure (MAP) (85.6 ± 8.1 vs 81.6 ± 6.8 mmHg), and diastolic BP load (12.0 ± 9.6 vs 8.4 ± 10.9 mmHg) compared with children with primary snoring. During nighttime, children with moderate-to-severe OSA had significantly higher systolic BP (108.6 ± 15.0 vs 100.0 ± 9.4 mmHg), MAP (75.9 ± 9.6 vs 71.1 ± 7.0 mmHg), systolic BP load (44.0 ± 32.6 vs 26.8 ± 24.5 mmHg), systolic BP index (0.5 ± 13.1 vs −6.8 ± 8.5 mmHg), and higher prevalence of systolic hypertension (47.6% vs 14.7 %) compared with children with primary snoring. Multiple linear regression analyses revealed an independent association between AHI and nighttime systolic BP and MAP after adjusting for adiposity variables. This large hospital-based study showed that children with moderate-to-severe OSA had a higher ABP compared with children who were primary snorers. As elevated BP in childhood predicts future cardiovascular risks, children with severe OSA should be treated properly to prevent further adverse cardiovascular outcomes. PMID:26448004

  2. The BpTRU automatic blood pressure monitor compared to 24 hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in the assessment of blood pressure in patients with hypertension.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Linda; Godwin, Marshall

    2005-06-28

    Increasing evidence suggests that ABPM more closely predicts target organ damage than does clinic measurement. Future guidelines may suggest ABPM as routine in the diagnosis and monitoring of hypertension. This would create difficulties as this test is expensive and often difficult to obtain. The purpose of this study is to determine the degree to which the BpTRU automatic blood pressure monitor predicts results on 24 hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM). A quantitative analysis comparing blood pressure measured by the BpTRU device with the mean daytime blood pressure on 24 hour ABPM. The study was conducted by the Centre for Studies in Primary Care, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada on adult primary care patients who are enrolled in two randomized controlled trials on hypertension. The main outcomes were the mean of the blood pressures measured at the three most recent office visits, the initial measurement on the BpTRU-100, the mean of the five measurements on the BpTRU monitor, and the daytime average on 24 hour ABPM. The group mean of the three charted clinic measured blood pressures (150.8 (SD10.26) / 82.9 (SD 8.44)) was not statistically different from the group mean of the initial reading on BpTRU (150.0 (SD21.33) / 83.3 (SD12.00)). The group mean of the average of five BpTRU readings (140.0 (SD17.71) / 79.8 (SD 10.46)) was not statistically different from the 24 hour daytime mean on ABPM (141.5 (SD 13.25) / 79.7 (SD 7.79)). Within patients, BpTRU average correlated significantly better with daytime ambulatory pressure than did clinic averages (BpTRU r = 0.571, clinic r = 0.145). Based on assessment of sensitivity and specificity at different cut-points, it is suggested that the initial treatment target using the BpTRU be set at <135/85 mmHG, but achievement of target should be confirmed using 24 hour ABPM. The BpTRU average better predicts ABPM than does the average of the blood pressures recorded on the patient chart from the three

  3. A Fall in Systolic Blood Pressure 24 Hours after Thrombolysis for Acute Ischemic Stroke Is Associated with Early Neurological Recovery.

    PubMed

    Gill, Dipender; Cox, Thomas; Aravind, Adarsh; Wilding, Peter; Korompoki, Eleni; Veltkamp, Roland; Kar, Arindam

    2016-06-01

    Outcomes are worse in patients who underwent thrombolysis for acute ischemic stroke (AIS) with persistent hypertension. The objective of this study is to investigate whether fall in systolic blood pressure (SBP) has any relationship with neurological outcome 24 hours after thrombolysis, after adjusting for potentially confounding factors. Retrospective analysis of a single-center database of consecutive thrombolysis cases for AIS. Multivariate regression analysis was used to explore the relationship between fall in SBP and reduction in National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score 24 hours after thrombolysis. Other potentially confounding predictor variables used in the model were SBP on thrombolysis, blood glucose level on thrombolysis, NIHSS score on thrombolysis, administration of antihypertensive medications, and the time to thrombolysis after symptom onset. A fall in SBP 24 hours after thrombolysis is independently associated with greater improvement in NIHSS score 24 hours after thrombolysis (coefficient .051, 95% confidence interval .023-.078, P < .001). Thus, a reduction of 10 mmHg in SBP after 24 hours is associated with a .51 point reduction in the NIHSS score. Restoration of SBP toward normal limits after thrombolysis for AIS is associated with greater early neurological improvement. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Relationship of 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure and rennin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in children with primary nephrotic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhi-Quan; Yi, Zhu-Wen; Dang, Xi-Qiang; Wu, Xiao-Chuan; He, Xiao-Jie

    2010-10-01

    To investigate the changes of blood pressure by 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) monitoring in children with primary nephrotic syndrome (PNS) and explore the relationship of the changes in blood pressure with rennin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) in these children. ABP and casual blood pressure (CBP) monitoring were performed in 114 children with PNS. Plasma levels of rennin activity (PRA), angiotensin II (AngII) and aldosterone (ALD) were measured. The correlation of plasma levels of PRA, AngII and ALD with ABP was evaluated. Of the 114 children with PNS, 101 (88.6%) presented elevated blood pressure. Mild or severe masked hypertension was found in 45 children (39.5%). Eighty (70.2%) children showed non-dipper blood pressure. The index and load of systolic blood pressure were higher than those of diastolic blood pressure. The blood pressure index and blood pressure load during sleep were higher than those during wakefulness. The boy presented higher diastolic blood pressure index and load than girls. Decubitus blood PRA, AngII and ALD levels in children with PNS were significantly higher than normal controls. The group with elevated blood pressure presented significantly higher decubitus blood PRA, AngII and ALD levels than the group with normal blood pressure. AngII level was significantly positively correlated with the index and load of both systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure. The children with PNS present a high incidence of hypertension, with a large percentage of masked hypertension and non-dipper blood pressure. Systolic blood pressure increases more significantly than diastolic blood pressure. Blood pressure during sleep increases more significantly than that during wakefulness. Diastolic blood pressure increases more significantly in boys than in girls. RAAS activity is elevated and the elevated RAAS activity might increase the blood pressure mainly by AngII in children with PNS.

  5. Reciprocal Interaction of 24-Hour Blood Pressure Variability and Systolic Blood Pressure on Outcome in Stroke Thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Kellert, Lars; Hametner, Christian; Ahmed, Niaz; Rauch, Geraldine; MacLeod, Mary J; Perini, Francesco; Lees, Kennedy R; Ringleb, Peter A

    2017-07-01

    Significance and management of blood pressure (BP) changes in acute stroke care are unclear. Here, we aimed to investigate the impact of 24-hour BP variability (BPV) on outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke treated with intravenous thrombolysis. From the Safe Implementation of Treatment in Stroke International Stroke Thrombolysis registry, 28 976 patients with documented pre-treatment systolic BP at 2 and 24 hours were analyzed. The primary measure of BP variability was successive variability. Data were preprocessed using coarsened exact matching. We assessed early neurological improvement, symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (SICH), and long-term functional outcome (modified Rankin Scale [mRS] at 90 days) by binary and ordinal regression analyses. Attempts to explain successive variation for analysis of BPV with patients characteristics at admission found systolic BP (5.5% variance) to be most influential, yet 92% of BPV variance remained unexplained. Independently from systolic BP, successive variation for analysis of BPV was associated with poor functional outcome mRS score of 0 to 2 (odds ratio [OR], 0.94; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.90-0.98), disadvantage across the shift of mRS (OR, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.01-1.08), mortality (OR, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.01-1.08), SICHSITS (OR, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.06-1.23), and SICHECASS (OR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.10-1.40; ECASS [European Cooperative Acute Stroke Study 2]). Analyzing successive variation for analysis of BPV as a function of pre-treatment, systolic BP significantly improved the prediction of functional outcome (mRS score of 0-1, mRS score of 0-2, neurological improvement, mRS-shift: all Pinteraction<0.01). Excluding patients with atrial fibrillation in a sensitivity analysis gave consistent results overall. This study suggests the need for a more individual BP management accounting for pre-treatment BP and the acute BP course (ie, BPV) to achieve best possible outcome for the patient. © 2017 American Heart Association

  6. Experience with noninvasive ambulatory 24-hour blood pressure recording in a community hospital.

    PubMed

    van de Weijgert, E J; Braun, J J

    1992-04-01

    In 40 subjects (23 treated with antihypertensive medication), 24-h ambulatory blood pressure was measured with an oscillometric blood pressure monitor (Spacelabs model 90202). We studied applicability in the out-patient department with regard to patient tolerance, correlation with mercury manometer measurements, 24-h blood pressure variability and the use in detecting "white-coat" hypertension. The measurements were tolerated quite well except for complaints of sleep disturbance and local irritation from the cuff. The average percentage of missed measuring points was 9.2%. Correlation between blood pressure with the mercury manometer and the Spacelabs monitor (averages of three consecutive readings) was: systolic 0.87 and diastolic 0.73 (P less than 0.001). No evidence for systematic error between the two methods was found. Diurnal blood pressure variation was significant with an average night-time drop of 12 +/- 15 mmHg systolic and 12 +/- 11 mmHg diastolic. "Office" blood pressure measured with the Spacelabs monitor was in the hypertensive range for 28 patients (systolic greater than or equal to 160 and/or diastolic greater than or equal to 95 mmHg). Only 15 of these subjects still met the hypertension criteria on the basis of mean daytime ambulatory blood pressure values. When ambulatory blood pressures during arbitrary 3-h periods of the daytime were studied, the number of patients with established hypertension did not change. The patients with this "office" or "white-coat" hypertensive response could not be distinguished on the basis of variability in daytime blood pressure.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Relationship of wall-to-lumen ratio of retinal arterioles with clinic and 24-hour blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Salvetti, Massimo; Agabiti Rosei, Claudia; Paini, Anna; Aggiusti, Carlo; Cancarini, Anna; Duse, Sarah; Semeraro, Francesco; Rizzoni, Damiano; Agabiti Rosei, Enrico; Muiesan, Maria Lorenza

    2014-05-01

    Wall-to-lumen ratio of retinal arterioles might serve as an in vivo parameter of vascular damage. We analyzed the impact of brachial clinic blood pressure (BP), of central BP, and of 24-hour BP on wall-to-lumen ratio (WLR) of retinal arterioles. In 295 subjects (147 men; age range, 22-72 years; mean age, 54±7 years), WLR of retinal arterioles was assessed in vivo using scanning laser Doppler flowmetry. In addition, clinic and 24-hour BP values were measured. Central hemodynamics was assessed by pulse wave analysis. In treated patients with essential hypertension (n=100), a higher WLR (0.29±0.18 versus 0.23±0.13; P=0.009) was observed in comparison with normotensive individuals (n=119); no significant differences were observed between treated and untreated hypertensive patients (0.29±0.18 versus 0.28±0.18; P=0.7). WLR of retinal arterioles was significantly related to clinic systolic (r=0.18; P=0.002) and pulse pressure (r=0.20; P=0.001), to 24-hour systolic (r=0.25; P=0.0001) and pulse pressure (r=0.17; P=0.005), and to central systolic (r=0.16; P=0.006) and pulse pressure (r=0.18; P=0.002). Multiple regression analysis revealed that only mean systolic 24-hour BP was independently associated with an increased WLR of retinal arterioles. In this large group of hypertensive patients and normotensive individuals, 24-hour systolic BP seems to be the strongest determinant of increased WLR of retinal arterioles.

  8. Does Aerobic Exercise Increase 24-Hour Ambulatory Blood Pressure Among Workers With High Occupational Physical Activity?-A RCT.

    PubMed

    Korshøj, Mette; Krause, Niklas; Clays, Els; Søgaard, Karen; Krustrup, Peter; Holtermann, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    High occupational physical activity (OPA) increases cardiovascular risk and aerobic exercise has been recommended for reducing this risk. This paper investigates the effects of an aerobic exercise intervention on 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) among cleaners with high OPA. Hundred and sixteen cleaners between 18 and 65 years were randomized. During the 4-month intervention period, the aerobic exercise group (AE) (n = 57) performed worksite aerobic exercise (2 × 30 minutes/week), while the reference group (REF) (n = 59) attended lectures. Between-group differences in 4-month ABP changes were evaluated by intention-to-treat analysis using a repeated-measure 2 × 2 multiadjusted mixed-models design. Relative to REF, 24-hour ABP significantly increased in AE: systolic 3.6 mm Hg (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6-5.7) and diastolic 2.3 mm Hg (95% CI 0.9-3.8). Cleaners with high aerobic workload exhibited particularly high 24-hour ABP increases: systolic 6.0 mm Hg (95% CI 2.4-9.6), and diastolic 3.8 mm Hg (95% CI 1.3-6.4). Aerobic exercise increased 24-hour ABP among cleaners. This adverse effect raises questions about the safety and intended benefits of aerobic exercise, especially among workers with high OPA and a demanding aerobic workload. http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN86682076. Unique identifier ISRCTN86682076. Trial Number ISRCTN86682076.

  9. Association of target organ damage with 24-hour systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels and hypertension subtypes in untreated Chinese.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fang-Fei; Li, Yan; Zhang, Lu; Xu, Ting-Yan; Ding, Feng-Hua; Staessen, Jan A; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2014-02-01

    The association of target organ damage with 24-hour systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels and ambulatory hypertension subtypes has not yet been examined in untreated Chinese patients. We measured left ventricular mass index by echocardiography (n=619), the urinary albumin:creatinine ratio (n=1047), and aortic pulse wave velocity by tonometry (n=1013) in 1047 untreated subjects (mean age, 50.6 years; 48.9% women). Normotension was a 24-hour systolic/diastolic blood pressure <130/<80 mm Hg. Hypertension subtypes were isolated diastolic hypertension and mixed systolic plus diastolic hypertension. We assessed associations of interest by multivariable-adjusted linear models. Using normotension as reference, mixed hypertension was associated with higher (P≤0.003) left ventricular mass index (+4.31 g/m(2)), urinary albumin:creatinine ratio (+1.63 mg/mmol), and pulse wave velocity (+0.76 m/s); and isolated diastolic hypertension was associated with similar left ventricular mass index and pulse wave velocity (P≥0.39), but higher urinary albumin:creatinine ratio (+1.24 mg/mmol; P=0.002). In younger participants (<55 years), the mutually independent effect sizes associated with 1 SD increases in 24-hour systolic/diastolic blood pressure were +3.31/-0.36 g/m(2) (P=0.009/0.79) for left ventricular mass index, +1.15/+1.14 mg/mmol (P=0.02/0.04) for the urinary albumin:creatinine ratio, and +0.54/-0.05 m/s (P<0.001/0.54) for pulse wave velocity. In older participants, these estimates were +3.58/+0.30 g/m(2) (P=0.045/0.88), +1.23/+1.05 mg/mmol (P=0.002/0.54), and +0.76/-0.49 m/s (P<0.001/<0.001), respectively. In conclusion, 24-hour systolic blood pressure and mixed hypertension are major determinants of target organ damage irrespective of age and target organ, whereas 24-hour diastolic blood pressure and isolated diastolic hypertension only relate to the urinary albumin:creatinine ratio below middle age.

  10. The Effects of Rilmenidine and Perindopril on Arousal Blood Pressure during 24 Hour Recordings in SHR

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Kyungjoon; Jackson, Kristy L.; Burke, Sandra L.; Head, Geoffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    The surge in arterial pressure during arousal in the waking period is thought to be largely due to activation of the sympathetic nervous system. In this study we compared in SHR the effects of chronic administration of the centrally acting sympatholytic agent rilmenidine with an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor perindopril on the rate of rise and power of the surge in mean arterial pressure (MAP) that occurs with arousal associated with the onset of night. Recordings were made using radiotelemetry in 17 adult SHR before and after treatment with rilmenidine (2mg/kg/day), perindopril (1mg/kg/day) or vehicle in the drinking water for 2 weeks. Rilmenidine reduced MAP by 7.2 ± 1.7mmHg while perindopril reduced MAP by 19 ± 3mmHg. Double logistic curve fit analysis showed that the rate and power of increase in systolic pressure during the transition from light to dark was reduced by 50% and 65%, respectively, but had no effect on diastolic pressure. Rilmenidine also reduced blood pressure variability in the autonomic frequency in the active period as assessed by spectral analysis which is consistent with reduction in sympathetic nervous system activity. Perindopril had no effect on the rate or power of the arousal surge in either systolic or diastolic pressure. These results suggest that the arousal induced surge in blood pressure can largely be reduced by an antihypertensive agent that inhibits the sympathetic nervous system and that angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition, while effective in reducing blood pressure, does not alter the rate or power of the surge associated with arousal. PMID:28002478

  11. Gender differences in the relationship between resting heart rate variability and 24-hour blood pressure variability.

    PubMed

    Thayer, Julian F; Sollers, John J; Friedman, Bruce H; Koenig, Julian

    2016-01-01

    The study explored the relationship between time- and frequency-domain indices of cardiac autonomic control and 24 h blood pressure variability (BPV) in a sample of healthy men and women. Vagally mediated cardiac control was inversely related to 24 h BPV, and measures of cardiac autonomic control were better predictors of systolic BPV in men and better predictors of diastolic BPV in women. These findings may help researchers to understand the disparity in cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality between men and women.

  12. The comparison of QT dispersion and 24 hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring amongst diabetic patients with and without microalbuminuria.

    PubMed

    Yeo, C K; Hapizah, M N; Khalid, B A K; Wan Nazainimoon, W M; Khalid, Y

    2004-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus is an important coronary artery disease risk factor. The presence of microalbuminuria, which indicates renal involvement in diabetic patients, is associated with an increased cardiovascular risk. There are suggestions that diabetic patients with microalbuminuria have more adverse risk profile such as higher ambulatory blood pressure and total cholesterol levels to account for the increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. QT dispersion is increasingly being recognized as a prognostic factor for coronary artery disease and sudden death. Some studies have suggested that QT dispersion is an important predictor of mortality in Type II diabetic patients. Our cross sectional study was to compare the QT dispersion and 24 hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring between diabetic patients with microalbuminuria and those without microalbuminuria. Diabetic patients with overt coronary artery disease were excluded from the study. A total of 108 patients were recruited of which 57 patients had microalbuminuria and 51 were without microalbuminuria. The mean value of QT dispersion was significantly higher in patients with microalbuminuria than in patients without microalbuminuria (58.9 +/- 27.9 ms vs. 47.1 +/- 25.0 ms, p < 0.05). The mean 24 hour systolic and diastolic blood pressures were significantly higher in patients with microalbuminuria than in patients without microalbuminuria (129.5 +/- 12.3 mm Hg vs 122.3 +/- 10.2 mm Hg, p < 0.05 and 78.4 +/- 6.9 mm Hg vs 75.3 +/- 6.8 mm Hg, p < 0.05, respectively). Our study suggests that QT dispersion prolongation, related perhaps to some autonomic dysfunction, is an early manifestation of cardiovascular aberration in diabetic patients with microalbuminuria. The higher blood pressure levels recorded during a 24-hour period min diabetics with microalbuminuria could also possibly account for the worse cardiovascular outcome in this group of patients.

  13. Evaluation of nocturnal blood pressure by the Multi-P Analysis of 24-hour ambulatory monitoring.

    PubMed

    Lusardi, P; Vanasia, A; Mugellini, A; Zoppi, A; Preti, P; Fogari, R

    1996-01-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) is utilized to identify "dippers" and "non dippers" among hypertensives. Such a classification has either prognostic or therapeutical implications. Rigid definitions of nocturnal time period (e.g., from 10 p.m. to 7 a.m.) may not correspond to actual sleep patterns, and thus may lead to faulty interpretations. In our study, we analyzed 32 ABPM; diurnal and nocturnal blood pressure (BP) were assessed by three different ways: the patients' diary method; fixed intervals utilized by Spacelabs software; Multi-P Analysis (MPA) of the data. MPA method proved to be effective to evaluate nocturnal BP values. In comparison with Spacelabs program, it seems to define more precisely nocturnal BP, which differs less from the real sleep-time values. This modifies the percentage of dippers, which is greater than that obtained by Spacelabs program and equal to that calculated by the patients reported nocturnal sleep intervals. These results suggest that MPA method may be a contribution to a better definition of nocturnal BP.

  14. Association of depressive and anxiety symptoms with 24-hour urinary catecholamines in individuals with untreated high blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Paine, Nicola J; Watkins, Lana L; Blumenthal, James A; Kuhn, Cynthia M; Sherwood, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Depression and anxiety are considered risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). The explanatory mechanisms, however, are still to be characterized. One proposed pathophysiological pathway is dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system, including heightened sympathetic nervous system activity. This study examined the relationship between symptoms of depression, anxiety, and sympathetic nervous system activity in individuals with untreated high blood pressure. A total of 140 participants with untreated high blood pressure (55% white, 38.5% female, mean [standard deviation] age = 45.5 [8.55] years) collected urine over a 24-hour period on 3 separate occasions. Urine samples were assayed for mean 24-hour epinephrine (EPI24) and norepinephrine excretion. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory, with anxiety symptoms assessed using the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Depression and anxiety scores were intercorrelated (r = 0.76, p < .001). EPI24 was positively correlated with anxiety (r = 0.20, p = .02) but not depression (r = 0.02, p = .77), whereas 24-hour urinary norepinephrine excretion was not correlated with anxiety (r = 0.10, p = .21) or with depression (r = 0.07, p = .39). Regression models, accounting for sex, age, body mass index, race, mean systolic ambulatory blood pressure, tobacco use, alcohol use, physical activity, and sleep efficiency confirmed that anxiety was associated with EPI24 excretion (p = .023) and that depressive symptoms were not (p = .54). Anxiety was associated with heightened sympathoadrenal activity, suggesting a biological pathway through which anxiety could increase CVD risk. Anxiety and depression may confer increased CVD risk via different mechanisms.

  15. Associations of Depressive and Anxiety Symptoms with 24-hour Urinary Catecholamines in individuals with untreated high blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Paine, Nicola J.; Watkins, Lana L.; Blumenthal, James A.; Kuhn, Cynthia M.; Sherwood, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Objective Depression and anxiety are considered risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD); however, the explanatory mechanisms are still to be characterized. One proposed pathophysiological pathway is dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system, including heightened sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity. This study examined the relationship between symptoms of depression, anxiety and SNS activity in individuals with untreated high blood pressure. Methods 140 participants with untreated high blood pressure (55% White, 38.5% Female, mean age ± SD: 45.5±8.55 years) collected urine over a 24-hour period on 3 separate occasions. Urine samples were assayed for mean 24-hour epinephrine (EPI24) and norepinephrine (NE24) excretion. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory, with anxiety symptoms assessed by the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Results Depression and anxiety scores were inter-correlated (r = .76, p < .001). EPI24 was positively correlated with anxiety (r = .20, p = .02) but not depression (r = .02, p = .77), while NE24 was not correlated with anxiety (r = .10, p = .21) or with depression (r = .07, p = .39). Regression models, accounting for gender, Age, BMI, race, mean systolic ambulatory blood pressure, tobacco use, alcohol use, physical activity, and sleep efficacy confirmed that anxiety was associated with EPI24 excretion (p = .023), and that depressive symptoms were not (p = .54). Conclusions Anxiety was associated with heightened sympathoadrenal activity, suggesting a biological pathway through which anxiety could increase CVD risk. Anxiety and depression may confer increased CVD risk via different mechanisms. PMID:25647750

  16. Association between albumin:creatinine ratio and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure in essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Boulatov, V A; Stenehjem, A; Os, I

    2001-04-01

    Microalbuminuria (MAU) is often found in essential hypertension (EH) and represents a sign of renal and cardiovascular damage. In the present study, we aimed to look at the association between ambulatory blood pressure (BP) and urinary albumin excretion (UAE). We studied 140 patients aged 50.1 +/- 11.6 years referred for 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) and, separately, 46 untreated subjects with newly diagnosed EH. Urinary albumin excretion was evaluated by determination of the albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) in the first voided morning urine sample taken the same day as the ABPM was started. According to the ACR, patients were categorized as having normoalbuminuria (ACR < 1.5 mg/mmol), borderline MAU (1.5 < or = ACR < 3.0 mg/mmol), and overt MAU (ACR > or = 3.0 mg/mmol). Mean ACR was significantly higher in hypertensive than normotensive individuals (2.17 +/- 2.67 mg/mmol and 1.72 +/- 2.97 mg/mmol, respectively, P = .012). Average 24-h, daytime and nighttime systolic BP and diastolic BP were lower in patients with normoalbuminuria than in the other two groups and did not differ among the two microalbuminuric groups. Univariate regression analysis showed a close relationship between ACR and ambulatory BP. Strong correlation between BP and ACR in the normoalbuminuric and borderline microalbuminuric range was also obtained in the group of 46 newly diagnosed hypertensive patients. In conclusion, the threshold level of ACR > or = 3.0 mg/mmol currently used to define microalbuminuria may be not applicable to EH. Instead, a threshold level of ACR > or = 1. 5 mg/mmol may be more appropriate.

  17. Mediterranean diet reduces 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure, blood glucose, and lipids: one-year randomized, clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Doménech, Mónica; Roman, Pilar; Lapetra, José; García de la Corte, Francisco J; Sala-Vila, Aleix; de la Torre, Rafael; Corella, Dolores; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Valentina; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa-María; Toledo, Estefania; Estruch, Ramón; Coca, Antonio; Ros, Emilio

    2014-07-01

    The PREvención con DIeta MEDiterránea (PREDIMED) trial showed that Mediterranean diets (MedDiets) supplemented with either extravirgin olive oil or nuts reduced cardiovascular events, particularly stroke, compared with a control, lower fat diet. The mechanisms of cardiovascular protection remain unclear. We evaluated the 1-year effects of supplemented MedDiets on 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure (BP), blood glucose, and lipids. Randomized, parallel-design, controlled trial was conducted in 2 PREDIMED sites. Diets were ad libitum, and no advice on increasing physical activity or reducing sodium intake was given. Participants were 235 subjects (56.5% women; mean age, 66.5 years) at high cardiovascular risk (85.4% with hypertension). Adjusted changes from baseline in mean systolic BP were -2.3 (95% confidence interval [CI], -4.0 to -0.5) mm Hg and -2.6 (95% CI, -4.3 to -0.9) mm Hg in the MedDiets with olive oil and the MedDiets with nuts, respectively, and 1.7 (95% CI, -0.1 to 3.5) mm Hg in the control group (P<0.001). Respective changes in mean diastolic BP were -1.2 (95% CI, -2.2 to -0.2), -1.2 (95% CI, -2.2 to -0.2), and 0.7 (95% CI, -0.4 to 1.7) mm Hg (P=0.017). Daytime and nighttime BP followed similar patterns. Mean changes from baseline in fasting blood glucose were -6.1, -4.6, and 3.5 mg/dL (P=0.016) in the MedDiets with olive oil, MedDiets with nuts, and control diet, respectively; those of total cholesterol were -11.3, -13.6, and -4.4 mg/dL (P=0.043), respectively. In high-risk individuals, most with treated hypertension, MedDiets supplemented with extravirgin olive oil or nuts reduced 24-hour ambulatory BP, total cholesterol, and fasting glucose. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: ISRCTN35739639. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Depressive Symptoms and 24-Hour Ambulatory Blood Pressure in Africans: The SABPA Study

    PubMed Central

    Hamer, Mark; Frasure-Smith, Nancy; Lespérance, François; Harvey, Brian H.; Malan, Nico T.; Malan, Leoné

    2012-01-01

    Disturbances in circadian rhythm might play a central role in the neurobiology of depression. We examined the association between depressive symptoms and 24-hour ambulatory BP in a sample of 405 (197 black and 208 Caucasian) urbanized African teachers aged 25 to 60 yrs (mean 44.6 ± 9.6 yrs). Depressive symptoms were assessed using the self-administered 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). After adjusting for age, sex, and ethnicity, participants with severe depressive symptoms (PHQ-9 ≥ 15) had higher odds of hypertension defined from ambulatory BP and/or use of antihypertensive medication (odds ratio = 2.19, 95% CI, 1.00–4.90) in comparison to participants with no symptoms. Compared to Caucasians with no depressive symptoms, those with severe symptoms had blunted nocturnal systolic BP drop of 4.7 mmHg (95% CI, −0.5 to 10.0, P = 0.07). In summary, depressive symptoms were associated with the circadian BP profile in black and Caucasian Africans. PMID:22028954

  19. Resistance training decreases 24-hour blood pressure in women with metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to verify the effects of eight weeks of resistance training (RT) on 24 hour blood pressure (BP) in patients with and without metabolic syndrome (MetS). Methods Seventeen women volunteered to participate in this study, 9 with MetS (37.0 ± 8.7 yrs; body mass 77.3 ± 9.7 kg; body mass index 30.3 ± 4.2 kg · m-2) and 8 without MetS (35.1 ± 7.2 yrs; body mass 61.3 ± 8.1 kg; body mass index 24.2 ± 2.5 kg · m-2). Individuals were subjected to eight weeks (3 times/week) of whole body RT comprised of one exercise for each main muscle group with three sets of 8–12 repetitions of each subject’s maximal load . A rest interval of one minute was allowed between sets and exercises. Twenty-four hour BP was measured by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Results Mean and diastolic night-time BP decreased (−3.9 mmHg, p = 0.04; -5.5 mmHg, p = 0.03, respectively) after eight weeks of training in MetS patients. This decrease was observed at 11:00 pm, 02:00 am (only diastolic), 07:00 am, and 6:00 pm. There was no training effect on BP in women without MetS. Conclusions Considering the elevation of BP as a contributor to the pathogenesis of MetS, and also to the increase of cardiovascular risk, this study supports RT as a non-pharmacological therapy in the management of BP control for MetS. PMID:23711286

  20. Disproportional decrease in office blood pressure compared with 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure with antihypertensive treatment: dependency on pretreatment blood pressure levels.

    PubMed

    Schmieder, Roland E; Schmidt, Stephanie T; Riemer, Thomas; Dechend, Ralf; Hagedorn, Ina; Senges, Jochen; Messerli, Franz H; Zeymer, Uwe

    2014-11-01

    The long-term relationship between 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) and office BP in patients on therapy is not well documented. From a registry we included all patients in whom antihypertensive therapy needed to be uptitrated. Drug treatment included the direct renin inhibitor aliskiren or an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker or drugs not blocking the renin-angiotensin system, alone or on top of an existing drug regimen. In all patients, office BP and 24-hour ABP were obtained at baseline and after 1 year with validated devices. In the study population of 2722 patients, there was a good correlation between the change in office BP and 24-hour ABP (systolic: r=0.39; P<0.001; diastolic: r=0.34; P<0.001). However, the numeric decrease in office BP did not correspond to the decrease in ABP in a 1:1 fashion, for example, a decrease of 10, 20, and 30 mm Hg corresponded to a decrease of ≈7.2, 10.5, and 13.9 mm Hg in systolic ABP, respectively. The disproportionally greater decrease in systolic office BP compared with ABP was dependent on the level of the pretreatment BP, which was consistently higher for office BP than ABP. The white coat effect (difference between office BP and ABP) was on average 10/5 mm Hg lower 1 year after intensifying treatment and the magnitude of that was also dependent on pretreatment BP. There was a disproportionally greater decrease in systolic office BP than in ABP, which for both office BP and ABP seemed to depend on the pretreatment BP level. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Comparison of the effects of energy drink versus caffeine supplementation on indices of 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Franks, Amy M; Schmidt, Julia M; McCain, Keith R; Fraer, Mony

    2012-02-01

    Cardiovascular events associated with energy drink consumption have been reported, but few data exist to delineate the hemodynamic effects of energy drinks. To compare the effects of an energy drink versus caffeine supplementation on blood pressure (BP) indices as measured by 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM). Healthy, nonsmoking, normotensive volunteers (aged 18-45 years) taking no medications were enrolled in a single-center, open-label, 2-period crossover pilot study. During each study period, subjects received either an energy drink (Red Bull Energy Drink, each dose containing 80 mg of caffeine and 1000 mg of taurine in an 8.3-oz serving) or a control (compounded caffeine solution, each dose containing 80 mg of caffeine solution in 8 oz of bottled water) at 0800, 1100, 1500, and 1900 hours and underwent 24-hour ABPM. The study periods were separated by a washout period (4-30 days). Mean 24-hour, daytime, and nighttime systolic (SBP), diastolic (DBP), and mean arterial (MAP) BP; BP load; and percent nocturnal dipping were compared between study periods. Nine subjects (5 females, mean [SD] age 27.7 [5.0] years) completed the study. Mean 24-hour SBP (123.2 vs 117.4 mm Hg, p = 0.04), DBP (73.6 vs 68.2 mm Hg, p = 0.02), and MAP (90.1 vs 84.8 mm Hg, p = 0.03) were significantly higher during energy drink supplementation versus caffeine supplementation. Daytime DBP (77.0 vs 72.0 mm Hg, p = 0.04) also was significantly higher with the energy drink versus caffeine supplementation. Trends in higher daytime SBP (127.0 vs 121.9 mm Hg, p = 0.05) and MAP (93.6 vs 88.6 mm Hg, p = 0.05) were recorded with energy drink supplementation versus caffeine supplementation. Nighttime SBP and DBP loads were significantly higher with the energy drink, but nocturnal dipping did not differ significantly between study periods. Single-day energy drink supplementation increased mean 24-hour and daytime BP compared to caffeine control in this pilot study. Additional research is

  2. Relating cardiovascular risk to out-of-office blood pressure and the importance of controlling blood pressure 24 hours a day.

    PubMed

    White, William B

    2008-08-01

    Blood pressure exhibits a natural circadian rhythm characterized by a decrease during sleep, then a steep increase in the early morning period followed by higher values throughout the active waking period. Because an excessive early morning surge in blood pressure is associated with an elevated risk for cardiovascular events, it represents a potential therapeutic target in patients with hypertension, especially those already at high risk for such events. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) is an out-of-office technique that allows assessment of blood pressure control during a 24-hour period, including the morning surge. It is known that 24-hour control based on ABPM is a better predictor of hypertensive target-organ involvement and cardiovascular events than conventional in-office blood pressure measurement. ABPM also reveals that many antihypertensive drugs do not adequately control early morning blood pressure, particularly when given once daily in the morning. There are several effective ways to improve morning blood pressure control. These include using agents with a long pharmacologic half-life; prescribing drug formulations specifically designed to target the morning blood pressure surge when given at bedtime; or increasing dosages to twice daily that of conventional shorter-acting agents.

  3. Improved 24-hour blood pressure control with sirolimus versus calcineurin inhibitor based immunosuppression in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Steigerwalt, S P; Brar, N; Dhungel, A; Butcher, D; Steigerwalt, S; El-Ghouroury, M; Provenzano, R

    2009-12-01

    Calcineurin inhibitors (CNI) have brought dramatic improvements in early renal allograft survival. However, CNI are associated with posttransplant hypertension (PTHTN), a risk factor for mortality from cardiovascular disease and graft failure. Sirolimus (SRL) is emerging as an alternative to CNI. SRL effects on blood pressure (BP) in humans are unclear. We compared the prevalence of PTHTN among patients receiving SRL as maintenance immunosuppression with a group receiving CNI by using 24-hour ambulatory BP (AMBP). AMBP has been shown to predict cardiovascular events and progression of kidney disease better than casual office BP measurements in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Renal transplant recipients with office hypertension (defined as BP > 130/80 or on antihypertensive medications), receiving stable immunosuppression and displaying consistent serum creatinine values for > or =6 months were eligible. We enrolled the first 40 patients to consent. Office BP was measured twice using a BP-Tru machine. AMBP was then analyzed for systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), and nocturnal blood pressure fall (NF; "dipping"). Patients were placed in the SRL group (n = 18) and the CNI group (n = 20) based on their maintenance immunosuppressive protocol. Two patients were excluded because of incomplete data. All patients received mycophenolate mofetil, and 14/38, maintenance steroids. We collected, demographics as well as type and date of renal allograft, medications, comorbidities, CKD stage, proteinuria, and plasma creatinine at the time of study enrollment. Patients in the SRL group displayed lower 24-hour SBP than the CNI group (128.0 +/- 10.8 vs 137.7 +/- 14; P = .029). Nightime MAP, nightime SBP, and nighttime DBP were all lower in the SRL group. NF did not reach significance between the SRL and CNI groups (44% vs 15%; P = .074). Patient demographics and number of antihypertensive medications did not differ. The lower 24-hour SBP seen in the SRL group by AMBP may

  4. An Analysis of 24-Hour Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring Data using Orthonormal Polynomials in the Linear Mixed Model

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Lloyd J.; Simpson, Sean L.

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) in clinical practice and observational epidemiological studies has grown considerably in the past 25 years. ABPM is a very effective technique for assessing biological, environmental, and drug effects on blood pressure. Objectives In order to enhance the effectiveness of ABPM for clinical and observational research studies via analytical and graphical results, developing alternative data analysis approaches using modern statistical techniques are important. Methods The linear mixed model for the analysis of longitudinal data is particularly well-suited for the estimation of, inference about, and interpretation of both population (mean) and subject-specific trajectories for ABPM data. We propose using a linear mixed model with orthonormal polynomials across time in both the fixed and random effects to analyze ABPM data. Results We demonstrate the proposed analysis technique using data from the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) study, a multicenter, randomized, parallel arm feeding study that tested the effects of dietary patterns on blood pressure. Conclusions The linear mixed model is relatively easy to implement (given the complexity of the technique) using available software, allows for straight-forward testing of multiple hypotheses, and the results can be presented to research clinicians using both graphical and tabular displays. Using orthonormal polynomials provides the ability to model the nonlinear trajectories of each subject with the same complexity as the mean model (fixed effects). PMID:24667908

  5. Correlation of blood pressure readings from 6-hour intervals with the daytime period of 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    King-Schultz, Leslie; Weaver, Amy L; Cramer, Carl H

    2012-06-01

    Shorter-interval (6-hour) ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) has been shown to correlate well with 24-hour ABPM in adults, but this has not been studied in children. The authors selected 131 patients aged 9 to 18 who underwent 24-ABPM from 2000-2008. Six-hour intervals beginning at different start times were compared with the daytime and 24-hour period, with subset analysis for normotensive and hypertensive patients. Concordance correlation coefficients (CCCs) were used to assess for agreement. Among normotensive patients, the mean difference between daytime and 6-hour intervals ranged from -0.1 mm Hg to 0.0 mm Hg for diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and -1.1 mm Hg to 0.6 mm Hg for systolic blood pressure (SBP) with CCCs of 0.88 to 0.93 for DBP and 0.93 to 0.96 for SBP. For hypertensive patients, mean difference ranged from -0.6 to 1.3 mm Hg for DBP and -0.8 to 1.1 mm Hg for SBP with CCCs of 0.89 to 0.98 for DBP and 0.86 to 0.95 for SBP. Shorter-interval monitoring correlates significantly with full daytime monitoring in children, allowing for assessment of blood pressure with improved convenience. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Impact of Age and Target-Organ Damage on Prognostic Value of 24-Hour Ambulatory Blood Pressure.

    PubMed

    Olesen, Thomas B; Stidsen, Jacob V; Blicher, Marie K; Pareek, Manan; Rasmussen, Susanne; Vishram-Nielsen, Julie K K; Olsen, Michael H

    2017-09-11

    Markers of target-organ damage and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure (BP) measurement improve cardiovascular risk stratification. The prevalence of target-organ damage and raised BP increases with aging. The study aim was to evaluate the impact of age and target-organ damage on the prognostic value of ambulatory BP. Markers of target-organ damage and ambulatory BP were measured in 1408 healthy people aged 41 or 51 (middle-aged group), and 61 or 71 (older group) years. The primary outcome was cardiovascular events after 16 years of follow-up, with data obtained from national registries. The prognostic value of BP was evaluated with Cox regression models, adjusted for traditional risk factors and target-organ damage, including left ventricular mass, pulse wave velocity, carotid plaques, and urine albumin/creatinine ratio. A total of 323 events were observed. In comparison with traditional risk factors, adding systolic BP and presence of target-organ damage improved risk stratification by increasing concordance index from 0.711 to 0.728 (P=0.01). In middle-aged subjects with target-organ damage, increment in pulse pressure (hazard ratio, 1.70; 95% confidence interval, 1.31-2.21; P<0.01) and increment in average real variability (hazard ratio, 1.29; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.59; P=0.02) were associated with a greater risk of cardiovascular disease compared with subjects without target-organ damage: hazard ratio, 1.04 (95% confidence interval, 0.74-1.46; P=0.81); P for interaction, 0.02; and hazard ratio, 0.89 (95% confidence interval, 0.69-1.14; P=0.36); P for interaction, 0.01. Target-organ damage may be a marker of individual susceptibility to the harmful effects of pulse pressure and BP variability on the cardiovascular system in middle-aged individuals. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Effect of an L- and T-Type Calcium Channel Blocker on 24-Hour Systolic Blood Pressure and Heart Rate in Hypertensive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsumi, Takeshi; Ebado, Mio; Takeyama, Youichi

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of an L- and T-type calcium channel blocker (CCB) on 24-hour systolic blood pressure (24-hour SBP) and heart rate (24-hour HR) profiles in essential hypertensive patients. Subjects and Methods Thirty-seven consecutive patients were enrolled in this study. The 24-hour SBP and HR were recorded before and after treatment with efonidipine (L- and T-type CCB, 40 mg), after waking. Changes in 24-hour SBP and HR and the diurnal to nocturnal SBP ratio were measured. The best-fit curves of changes in SBP and HR were depicted using a periodic function. Results The mean 24-hour SBP and HR decreased significantly after treatment. The diurnal to nocturnal SBP ratio in dipper-type hypertension cases decreased from 16.7±6.1% to 8.3±9.8% (p<0.05), whereas in non-dipper hypertension cases, it increased from 2.3±2.9% to 7.7±5.1% (p<0.01). The antihypertensive effect was minimal at 5.0 hours after drug administration and it slowly recovered at a constant rate (2.1 mm Hg/h) over 12 hours in dipper cases. The median 24-hour changes in HR in the dipper and non-dipper cases were -2.3/min and -5.4/min, respectively. A continuous reduction in the change in HR was seen from 3.5 to 23 hours after drug administration. Conclusion The antihypertensive action of efonidipine was characterized by a slow recovery of the SBP decrease at a constant rate (2.1 mm Hg/h) and a non-administration time dependent reduction in 24-hour HR. PMID:22563335

  8. Abnormal Pulsatile Hemodynamics in Hypertensive Patients With Normalized 24-Hour Ambulatory Blood Pressure by Combination Therapy of Three or More Antihypertensive Agents.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dai-Yin; You, Li-Kai; Sung, Shih-Hsien; Cheng, Hao-Min; Lin, Shing-Jong; Chiang, Fu-Tien; Chen, Chen-Huan; Yu, Wen-Chung

    2016-04-01

    It remains uncertain whether intensive antihypertensive therapy can normalize pulsatile hemodynamics resulting in minimized residual cardiovascular risks. In this study, office and 24-hour ambulatory systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), pulse pressure, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV), and forward (Pf) and reflected (Pb) pressure wave from a decomposed carotid pressure wave were measured in hypertensive participants. Among them, 57 patients whose 24-hour SBP and DBP were normalized by three or more classes of antihypertensive medications were included. Another 57 age- and sex-matched normotensive participants were randomly selected from a community survey. The well-treated hypertensive patients had similar 24-hour SBP, lower DBP, and higher PP values. The treated patients had higher PWV (11.7±0.3 vs 8.3±0.2 m/s, P<.001), Pf, Pb, Pb/Pf, and left ventricular mass index values. After adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, and office SBP, the differences for PWV, Pb, and Pb/Pf remained significant. Hypertensive patients whose 24-hour SBP and DBP are normalized may still have markedly increased arterial stiffness and wave reflection. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Acute effects of nasal continuous positive airway pressure on 24-hour blood pressure and catecholamines in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Minemura, H; Akashiba, T; Yamamoto, H; Akahoshi, T; Kosaka, N; Horie, T

    1998-12-01

    To assess the acute effects of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on the 24-hour blood pressure and the secretion of catecholamines in urine and plasma, we investigated the changes in the 24-hour blood pressure and urinary and plasma concentrations of epinephrine (E) and norepinephrine (NE) in 26 men with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) with and without nasal CPAP. Nasal CPAP resulted in significant decreases in the daytime diastolic pressure (from 86 +/-16 mmHg to 83+/-12 mmHg), the nighttime diastolic pressure (from 81+/-12 mmHg to 77+/-9 mmHg) and the nighttime systolic pressures (from 125+/-15 mmHg to 120+/-10 mmHg). There was no significant difference between patients with and without CPAP in the daytime or nighttime urinary E level, but patients who received CPAP showed a significant decrease in daytime urinary NE level (from 156+/-112 microg/14h to 119+/-101 microg/14h) and nighttime urinary NE level (from 143+/-91 microg/10h to 112+/-65 microg/10h). The morning plasma level of NE also decreased (from 371+/-181 pg/ml to 273 +/-148 pg/ml) in patients who received nasal CPAP (p<0.02), but the plasma level of E remained unchanged. There were no correlations between PSG parameters and the reductions in blood pressure and the catecholamine levels induced by nasal CPAP. These findings suggest that OSA contributes, at least in part, to the development of systemic hypertension by increasing sympathetic nervous activity.

  10. Ambulatory 24-hour cardiac oxygen consumption and blood pressure-heart rate variability: effects of nebivolol and valsartan alone and in combination.

    PubMed

    Izzo, Joseph L; Khan, Safi U; Saleem, Osman; Osmond, Peter J

    2015-07-01

    We compared an angiotensin receptor blocker (valsartan; VAL), a beta-blocker (nebivolol; NEB) and the combination of NEB/VAL with respect to 24-hour myocardial oxygen consumption (determined by 24-hour ambulatory heart rate-central systolic pressure product [ACRPP]) and its components. Subjects with hypertension (systolic blood pressure >140 or diastolic blood pressure >90; n = 26) were studied in a double-blinded, double-dummy, forced-titration, crossover design with 3 random-order experimental periods: VAL 320 mg, NEB 40 mg, and NEB/VAL 320/40 mg daily. After 4 weeks of each drug, ambulatory pulse wave analysis (MobilOGraph) was performed every 20 minutes for 24 hours. All three treatments resulted in nearly identical brachial and central systolic blood pressures. NEB alone or in combination with VAL resulted in lower ACRPP (by 11%-14%; P < .001 each) and heart rate (by 18%-20%; P < .001 each) compared with VAL, but stroke work (ACRPP per beat) was lower with VAL. Relative and adjusted variability (standard deviation and coefficient of variation) of heart rate were also lower with NEB and NEB/VAL than VAL. Results in African Americans, the majority subpopulation, were similar to those of the entire treatment group. We conclude that the rate-slowing effects of NEB cause ambulatory cardiac myocardial oxygen consumption to be lower with NEB monotherapy or NEB/VAL combination therapy than with VAL monotherapy. NEB/VAL is not superior to NEB alone in controlling heart rate, blood pressure, or ACRPP. Heart rate variability but not ACRPP variability is reduced by NEB or the combination NEB/VAL. There is no attenuation of beta-blocker-induced rate-slowing effects of in African Americans. Copyright © 2015 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The effects of perceived discrimination on ambulatory blood pressure and affective responses to interpersonal stress modeled over 24 hours.

    PubMed

    Smart Richman, Laura; Pek, Jolynn; Pascoe, Elizabeth; Bauer, Daniel J

    2010-07-01

    This research examined the impact of perceived discrimination on ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) and daily level affect during social interaction. For 24 hrs, adult Black and White participants wore an ABP monitor and completed palm pilot diary entries about their social interactions. Mean level and time-trend trajectories of blood pressure and heart rate were examined as well as mean level measures of positive and negative affect after stressful and nonstressful social interactions. Analyses showed that, after controlling for important covariates, perceived discrimination predicted the slopes of both wake and nocturnal ABP responses, with those who reported more discrimination having steeper daytime trajectories for systolic and diastolic blood pressure and less nighttime dipping in heart rate over time as compared to those who had reported relatively infrequent discrimination. High levels of perceived discrimination were also related to positive and negative affective responses after stressful encounters. These results suggest that, regardless of race, perceived discrimination is related to cardiovascular and affective responses that may increase vulnerability to pathogenic processes. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved

  12. [Indices of static and dynamic components of pressure load (assessed by 24-hour blood pressure monitoring) and the state of renal function in patients with essential hypertension].

    PubMed

    Zelveian, P A; Buniatian, M S; Oshchepkova, E V; Lazareva, N V; Rogoza, A N

    2011-01-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate possible relationship between parameters of blood pressure (BP) profile and glomerular filtration rate in patients (pts) with I-II stage essential hypertension (EH). Material and methods. We studied 120 pts (97 men), aged 23-65 (50,2+/-0,6) years with I (n=98) and II (n=22) stage EH. In BP profile (SL-90207) we calculated 24-hour, daytime, nighttime values of systolic, diastolic, pulse pressures (SBP, DBP, PP), time load (TL), variability and nocturnal fall (NF) of BP. The state of renal function was assessed by measurement of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) calculated by the Cockcroft formula. Results. After nonlinear statistical analysis by Gauss-Newton all patients were divided into three groups according to GFR tertiles. Significant differences were found between these groups by 24-hour, nighttime and daytime values of SBP and DBP. Values of SBP were the lowest in group II. In group II lowest values of PP were also observed, but statistically significant differences were found only in nocturnal PP values between groups II and III. There were no significant differences between groups by TL and NF of BP. In group Ill (high GFR) variability of daytime values of SBP and DBF were significantly higher. Univariate correlation analysis showed statistically significant negative relationship between GFR and nocturnal PP in patients with lowest level of GFR. Positive correlations between nocturnal values of PP and GFR in groups II and III were also observed. Conclusion. These results indicated the presence of strong relationship between high values of nocturnal PP and decreasing of glomerular filtration rate in patients with EH and thus confirmed significance of "constant" and "dynamic" components of pressure load as a marker of impairment of renal function.

  13. Reductions in Mean 24-Hour Ambulatory Blood Pressure After 6-Week Treatment With Canagliflozin in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Raymond R; Machin, Israel; Ren, Jimmy; Trujillo, Angelina; Kawaguchi, Masato; Vijapurkar, Ujjwala; Damaraju, Chandrasekharrao V; Pfeifer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study evaluated the early effects of canagliflozin on blood pressure (BP) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and hypertension. Patients were randomized to canagliflozin 300 mg, canagliflozin 100 mg, or placebo for 6 weeks and underwent 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring before randomization, on day 1 of treatment, and after 6 weeks. The primary endpoint was change in mean 24-hour systolic BP (SBP) from baseline to week 6. Overall, 169 patients were included (mean age, 58.6 years; glycated hemoglobin, 8.1%; seated BP 138.5/82.7 mm Hg). At week 6, canagliflozin 300 mg provided greater reductions in mean 24-hour SBP than placebo (least squares mean -6.2 vs -1.2 mm Hg, respectively; P=.006). Numerical reductions in SBP were observed with canagliflozin 100 mg. Canagliflozin was generally well tolerated, with side effects similar to those reported in previous studies. These results suggest that canagliflozin rapidly reduces BP in patients with T2DM and hypertension. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Dipper and non-dipper blood pressure 24-hour patterns: circadian rhythm-dependent physiologic and pathophysiologic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Fabbian, Fabio; Smolensky, Michael H; Tiseo, Ruana; Pala, Marco; Manfredini, Roberto; Portaluppi, Francesco

    2013-03-01

    Neuroendocrine mechanisms are major determinants of the normal 24-h blood pressure (BP) pattern. At the central level, integration of the major driving factors of this temporal variability is mediated by circadian rhythms of monoaminergic systems in conjunction with those of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal, hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid, opioid, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone, plus endothelial systems and specific vasoactive peptides. Humoral secretions are typically episodic, coupled either to sleep and/or the circadian endogenous (suprachiasmatic nucleus) central pacemaker clock, but exhibiting also weekly, monthly, seasonal, and annual periodicities. Sleep induction and arousal are influenced also by many hormones and chemical substances that exhibit 24-h variation, e.g., arginine vasopressin, vasoactive intestinal peptide, melatonin, somatotropin, insulin, steroids, serotonin, corticotropin-releasing factor, adrenocorticotropic hormone, thyrotropin-releasing hormone, endogenous opioids, and prostaglandin E2, all with established effects on the cardiovascular system. As a consequence, physical, mental, and pathologic stimuli that activate or inhibit neuroendocrine effectors of biological rhythmicity may also interfere with, or modify, the temporal BP structure. Moreover, immediate adjustment to exogenous components/environment demands by BP rhythms is modulated by the circadian-time-dependent responsiveness of biological oscillators and their neuroendocrine effectors. This knowledge contributes to a better understanding of the pathophysiology of abnormalities of the 24-h BP pattern and level and their correction through circadian rhythm-based chronotherapeutic strategies.

  15. Effects of Blood Pressure and Blood Pressure-Lowering Treatment During the First 24 Hours Among Patients in the Third International Stroke Trial of Thrombolytic Treatment for Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Berge, Eivind; Cohen, Geoffrey; Lindley, Richard I; Sandercock, Peter; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Sandset, Else C; Whiteley, William

    2015-12-01

    In patients with acute ischemic stroke, a high blood pressure or a highly variable blood pressure is a common reason for withholding thrombolytic treatment, but guidelines recommend a conservative approach to active blood pressure lowering in this setting. We have performed exploratory analyses to study the clinical effects of blood pressure and early blood pressure-lowering treatment in patients included in a randomized-controlled trial of thrombolytic treatment for acute ischemic stroke. The Third International Stroke Trial (IST-3) randomized 3035 patients with ischemic stroke to recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator 0.9 mg/kg or open control within 6 hours of symptom onset. Blood pressure was measured at randomization, at start of treatment, and at 30 minutes and 1 and 24 hours after start of treatment, and the use of blood pressure-lowering treatment during the first 24 hours was recorded. We have characterized blood pressure by mean systolic blood pressure at baseline, by variability of systolic blood pressure (expressed by the standard deviation and the range between the lowest and the highest pressure), and by the change in systolic blood pressure from baseline to 24 hours. We used logistic regression analysis to explore the associations of blood pressure characteristics or blood pressure-lowering treatment with early adverse events, early death, and functional outcome at 6 months, after adjustment for key prognostic variables. High baseline blood pressure and high blood pressure variability during the first 24 hours were associated with higher numbers of early adverse events and early deaths, and for several analyses, the differences were statistically significant. A larger decline in blood pressure and the use of blood pressure-lowering treatment during the first 24 hours were associated with a reduced risk of poor outcome at 6 months (odds ratio, 0.93; 95% confidence interval, 0.89-0.97; P=0.001 and odds ratio, 0.78; 95% confidence interval, 0

  16. [A validation of the data obtained with the simultaneous recording of blood pressure and the 24-hour electrocardiogram].

    PubMed

    Germanò, G; Caparra, A; Valentino, S; Coia, F; Federico, L; Santucci, A

    1993-06-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate the blood pressure (BP) measurement reliability of a light weight ambulatory BP and ECG recorder. Micro AM is a new 300 g portable apparatus that combines in one device both the ambulatory BP and solid state ECG recording. The dimensions of the Micro AM are 75 x 140 x 29 mm. The monitor measures BP using Korotkoff phase 1 for systolic and phase 5 for diastolic BP, and concurrently measures oscillometric BP, one method validating the other. In addition, the manual and programmed BP measurement modes can be supplemented by an "intelligent" mode in which the ECG triggers an ambulatory BP reading during an abnormal ST segment change. A standard mercury manometer was connected with the cuff of the Micro AM with a Y-shaped part, and 12 BP measurements were simultaneously taken at 5 min intervals by the automatic device in auscultatory mode and by a trained technician in 86 normotensive volunteers (aged from 18 to 44 years, 37 males and 49 females). The algebraic differences, the frequency distribution and the difference distribution of systolic and diastolic data between the 2 methods were calculated. The results show that the automatic method gives values for systolic BP that are lower than conventional ones (average differences -0.643 mmHg), whereas for diastolic BP, the values are higher (average differences +0.229 mmHg). Then, Student's paired t-test was used to evaluate statistically significant differences. The test relative to systolic BP was significant to the critical level of 0.1%, but the differences being 3 times smaller than the instrumental tolerance. On the contrary, diastolic BP differences were non significant. In conclusion, we found a good agreement between BP recorded automatically and by sphygmomanometer.

  17. Correlation of 24-Hour Blood Pressure and Heart Rate Variability to Renal Function Parameters in Hypertensive Patients. The Effect of Smoking.

    PubMed

    Liakos, Charalampos I; Karpanou, Eva A; Markou, Maria I; Grassos, Charalampos A; Vyssoulis, Gregory P

    2015-12-01

    Intrarenal hemodynamics depend on blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), and smoking. Although BP levels have been associated with kidney function, the effect of HR levels, BP, and HR variability on renal function are less well clarified. This cross-sectional study sought to determine the association of 24-hour BP and HR variability with kidney function in hypertensive patients, stratified by smoking. The study comprised 9600 nondiabetic, never-treated hypertensive individuals without evident renal impairment examined from 1985 to 2014 (aged 53.3±13.4 years, 55.3% males). The 24-hour systolic BP (SBP) and HR variability were estimated via their coefficient of variation (CV =standard deviation×100/mean value) derived from ambulatory recording. The CV SBP-to-CV HR ratio (CV R) was used as a marker of the interplay between 24-hour SBP and HR variability. Renal function was estimated via 24-hour urine creatinine clearance (CrCl), estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR), and 24-hour urine α1 -microglobulin. After adjustment for age, sex, and smoking, CV SBP was found to be weakly correlated to eGFR (r=-0.017, P=.1) and somewhat more strongly to CrCl, ACR, and α1 -microglobulin (r=-0.032, 0.072, and 0.065; P=.002, <.001 and <.001, respectively). CV HR was much better related to renal function, with stronger adjusted correlations to CrCl, eGFR, ACR, and α1 -microglobulin (r=0.185, 0.134, -0.306, -0.247; all P<.001, respectively). CV R also showed equally good adjusted correlations (r=-0.175, -0.125, 0.336, 0.262; all P<.001, respectively). Most adjusted correlations for CV HR and CV R were even better in smokers (r=0.213, 0.158, -0.332, -0.272 and -0.183, -0.118, 0.351, 0.275, respectively; all P<.001). CV HR and CV R emerge as better related to kidney function than CV SBP, especially in smokers. The correlation of CV HR and CV SBP to renal function is inverse to each other. ACR and α1 -microglobulin are better related to

  18. [Association between the office, visit-to-visit and 24-hour ambulatory systolic blood pressure and vascular damages in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Zheng, X M; Li, C H; Wu, Y T; Zhao, H Y; Jin, C; Song, L; Zhao, H L; Liu, J; Zhang, R Y; Li, W; Chen, S H; Wu, S L

    2016-07-24

    To investigate the association between different kinds of systolic blood pressure (SBP, including office, visit-to-visit, 24-hour ambulatory) and vascular damages (represented by carotid intima-media thickness, CIMT; brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity, baPWV) in the elderly. A total of 2 814 participants aged of ≥60 years old and retired employees were selected with random sampling method from the individuals who took part in 2006-2007, 2008-2009, 2010-2011 health examination in Tangshan Kailuan Hospital, Kailuan Linxi Hospital, Kailuan Zhaogezhuang Hospital and with 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring data, CIMT and baPWV.Finally, 2 146 participants (1 438 males, average age (67.3±6.0) years old) were included to the analysis.Multivariable regression analysis was used to analyze association between the office, visit-to-visit, 24-hour, day-time, night-time SBP and CIMT and baPWV, respectively. (1) The average SBP, DBP, CIMT and baPWV were (137.0±20.4) mmHg(1 mmHg=0.133 kPa), (83.5±11.0) mmHg, (0.92±0.18)mm and (1 781.7±353.2)cm/s.(2) The participants were divided into high and low level groups according to the median of different SBPs, respectively.The results indicated that CIMT and baPWV were significantly higher in high level groups than in low level groups (all P<0.01). (3) After adjusting for gender and age, the partial correlate analysis showed that the office, visit-to-visit, 24-hour, day-time, night-time SBP positively associated with CIMT and baPWV (all P<0.01). (4) After adjusting for confounding factors, multivariable regression analysis showed that the office, visit-to-visit, 24-hour, day-time, night-time SBP were positively and linearly associated with CIMT and baPWV in total cohort, and standard regression coefficients were 0.157, 0.208, 0.175, 0.169, 0.163, 0.479, 0.420, 0.401, 0.389 and 0.354, respectively.In addition, similar results were observed in male and female participants but there was no significance between night-time SBP

  19. Ambulatory Hypertension Subtypes and 24-Hour Systolic and Diastolic Blood Pressure as Distinct Outcome Predictors in 8341 Untreated People Recruited From 12 Populations

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Wei, Fang-Fei; Thijs, Lutgarde; Boggia, José; Asayama, Kei; Hansen, Tine W.; Kikuya, Masahiro; Björklund-Bodegård, Kristina; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Gu, Yu-Mei; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Dolan, Eamon; Liu, Yan-Ping; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Stolarz-Skrzypek, Katarzyna; Tikhonoff, Valérie; Malyutina, Sofia; Casiglia, Edoardo; Nikitin, Yuri; Lind, Lars; Sandoya, Edgardo; Kawecka-Jaszcz, Kalina; Mena, Luis; Maestre, Gladys E.; Filipovský, Jan; Imai, Yutaka; O’Brien, Eoin; Wang, Ji-Guang; Staessen, Jan A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Data on risk associated with 24-hour ambulatory diastolic (DBP24) versus systolic (SBP24) blood pressure are scarce. Methods and Results We recorded 24-hour blood pressure and health outcomes in 8341 untreated people (mean age, 50.8 years; 46.6% women) randomly recruited from 12 populations. We computed hazard ratios (HRs) using multivariable-adjusted Cox regression. Over 11.2 years (median), 927 (11.1%) participants died, 356 (4.3%) from cardiovascular causes, and 744 (8.9%) experienced a fatal or nonfatal cardiovascular event. Isolated diastolic hypertension (DBP24≥80 mm Hg) did not increase the risk of total mortality, cardiovascular mortality, or stroke (HRs≤1.54; P≥0.18), but was associated with a higher risk of fatal combined with nonfatal cardiovascular, cardiac, or coronary events (HRs≥1.75; P≤0.0054). Isolated systolic hypertension (SBP24≥130 mm Hg) and mixed diastolic plus systolic hypertension were associated with increased risks of all aforementioned end points (P≤0.0012). Below age 50, DBP24 was the main driver of risk, reaching significance for total (HR for 1-SD increase, 2.05; P=0.0039) and cardiovascular mortality (HR, 4.07; P=0.0032) and for all cardiovascular end points combined (HR, 1.74; P=0.039) with a nonsignificant contribution of SBP24 (HR≤0.92; P≥0.068); above age 50, SBP24 predicted all end points (HR≥1.19; P≤0.0002) with a nonsignificant contribution of DBP24 (0.96≤HR≤1.14; P≥0.10). The interactions of age with SBP24 and DBP24 were significant for all cardiovascular and coronary events (P≤0.043). Conclusions The risks conferred by DBP24 and SBP24 are age dependent. DBP24 and isolated diastolic hypertension drive coronary complications below age 50, whereas above age 50 SBP24 and isolated systolic and mixed hypertension are the predominant risk factors. PMID:24906822

  20. Acute and chronic effects of a hypocaloric diet on 24-hour blood pressure, heart rate and heart-rate variability in mildly-to-moderately obese patients with essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Minami, J; Kawano, Y; Ishimitsu, T; Matsuoka, H; Takishita, S

    1999-11-01

    We examined the acute and chronic effects of a nutritionally balanced, moderately hypocaloric diet on 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure, heart rate and heart-rate variability in mildly-to-moderately obese patients with essential hypertension. We enrolled 16 obese patients with essential hypertension [age: 51-76 years, body mass index (BMI): 26-32 kg/m2]. For the initial week, a standard diet of 2,000 kcal/day was given, followed by a 3-week of a hypocaloric diet of 850 kcal/day. In the last period of the standard diet and in the first and the last periods of the hypocaloric diet, each subject's 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure, heart rate and R-R intervals of the electrocardiogram were recorded, and electrolytes and catecholamines in 24-hour urine samples were also measured. A power spectral analysis of the heart-rate variability was performed over a 24-hour period based on the autoregressive method. The subjects lost 3.7+/-0.3 kg (mean +/- s.e.m.) of body weight during the 3-week hypocaloric diet period. The 24-hour blood pressure did not differ between the last period of the standard diet and the first period of the hypocaloric diet; however, it showed a significant reduction after 3 weeks of the hypocaloric diet. The decrease in the 24-hour blood pressure during the study period was 10.5+/-1.5 mm Hg systole and 4.3+/-1.8 mm Hg diastole. In contrast, the 24-hour heart rate was significantly reduced in the first period of the hypocaloric diet, although the body weight and blood pressure did not change, and the rate was maintained even in the last period of the hypocaloric diet. The decrease in the 24-hour heart rate during the study period was 2.8+/-0.9 beats per minute. The hypocaloric diet did not change any autonomic indices obtained from a power spectral analysis of the heart-rate variability. In conclusion, different responses to a hypocaloric diet were observed between the blood pressure and the heart rate in obese hypertensive patients. The changes in

  1. Is 24-hour Intraocular Pressure Monitoring Necessary in Glaucoma?

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri, Kaweh; Weinreb, Robert N.; Medeiros, Felipe A.

    2013-01-01

    Although intraocular pressure (IOP) is the only treatable risk factor for glaucoma, its 24-hour behavior is poorly understood. Conflicting information is available in the literature with regard to the importance and predictive value of IOP peaks and fluctuations on the risk of glaucoma development and progression. This may be secondary to lack of prospective studies designed to address this issue. This article critically reviews the current evidence for the importance of 24-h IOP measurements in glaucoma and discusses shortcomings of current methods to assess 24-h IOP data, drawing attention to new developments in this field. PMID:23697618

  2. The optimal control of blood glucose is associated with normal blood pressure 24 hours profile and prevention of the left ventricular remodeling in the patients with gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Zakovicova, Eva; Charvat, Jiri; Mokra, Dana; Svab, Premysl; Kvapil, Milan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the optimal diabetes control on the left ventricular parameters and ambulatory blood pressure in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). The patients with GDM were followed up according to predetermined protocol in order to optimize blood glucose and optimal weight gain. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) and transthoracal and tissue echocardiography were examined in 36th week of pregnancy. The age of 35 women with GDM was 33.1±3 and 30.5±4.4 years in 31 healthy control subjects (p=0.2). Fasting plasma glucose (FPG) in the patients with GDM was 5.0±0.5 mmol/L compared to 4.6±0.3 mmol/L in control subjects (p=0.002). Average weight gain during pregnancy was significantly lower in women with GDM; 10±7.6 kg vs. 13.1±3.7 kg in healthy pregnant women (p=0.05). No significant differences were recorded in 24 hours mean heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure and number of nondippers between both groups. The significant correlation was detected between FPG and blood pressure dipping in subjects with GDM. Interventricular septal, posterior wall and relative wall thickness of the left ventricle were significantly higher in patients with GDM comparing to healthy pregnant women but no significant differences of the left ventricular functions were recorded. The optimal control of diabetes in GDM is associated with normal 24 hours blood pressure profile and prevention of the left ventricular function changes in GDM patients. The differences in the left ventricular walls thicknesses may be explained by metabolic changes in GDM.

  3. Estimated 24-hour urine sodium excretion is correlated with blood pressure in Korean population: 2009-2011 Korean National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jieun; Lee, Jeonghwan; Koo, Ho Seok; Kim, Suhnggwon; Chin, Ho Jun

    2014-09-01

    No large-scale studies have investigated the association between salt intake and hypertension in Korean population. To investigate the relationship of blood pressure to salt consumption, we analyzed data from 19,476 participants in the 2009-2011 Korean National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (KNHANES). Urinary sodium excretion over 24-hr (24HUNa) was estimated from spot urine tests using Tanaka's equation. The study subjects were stratified into hypertensive and normotensive groups. Hypertensive participants (n=6,552, 33.6%) had higher estimated 24HUNa, 150.4±38.8 mEq/day, than normotensive participants, 140.5±34.6 mEq/day (P<0.001). The association between 24HUNa and blood pressure outcomes was not affected by adjustment for other risk factors for hypertension (odds ratio 0.001; 95% confidence interval 0.001-0.003; P<0.001). Increases in 24HUNa of 100 mEq/day were associated with a 6.1±0.3/2.9±0.2 mmHg increase in systolic/diastolic blood pressure in all participants. This effect was stronger in hypertensive participants (increase of 8.1±0.5/3.4±0.3 mmHg per 100 mEq/day) and smaller in normotensive participants (2.9±0.3/1.3±0.2 mmHg). These results support recommendations for low salt intake in Korean population to prevent and control adverse blood pressure levels.

  4. Preliminary report: the effect of a 6-month dietary glycemic index manipulation in addition to healthy eating advice and weight loss on arterial compliance and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure in men: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Philippou, Elena; Bovill-Taylor, Candace; Rajkumar, Chakravarthi; Vampa, Maria Luisa; Ntatsaki, Eleana; Brynes, Audrey E; Hickson, Mary; Frost, Gary S

    2009-12-01

    We aimed to determine whether altering dietary glycemic index (GI) in addition to healthy eating and weight loss advice affects arterial compliance and 24-hour blood pressure (BP), both coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors. Middle-aged men with at least 1 CHD risk were randomized to a 6-month low-GI (LGI) or high-GI (HGI) diet. All were advised on healthy eating and weight loss. They were seen monthly to assess dietary compliance and anthropometrics. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV), fasting blood lipid profile, and glucose and insulin concentrations were measured at baseline and at months 3 and 6. Six-hour postprandial glucose and insulin responses and 24-hour ambulatory BP were also assessed at baseline and month 6. Thirty-eight subjects (HGI group, n = 16; LGI group, n = 22) completed the study. At month 6, groups differed in dietary GI, glycemic load, and carbohydrate intake (P < .001). Fasting insulin concentration and insulin resistance (calculated by homeostatic model assessment) were lower in the LGI than the HGI group (P < .01). The reduction in total cholesterol and 24-hour BP was bigger in the LGI than the HGI group (P < .05); and only the LGI group had significant reductions (P < .05) in PWV, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triacylglycerol concentration. There were no differences in postprandial glucose or insulin responses between the groups. The results suggest that an LGI diet may be more beneficial in reducing CHD risk, including PWV and 24-hour BP, even in the setting of healthy eating and weight loss; and thus, further study is warranted.

  5. Remifentanil patient-controlled analgesia for labor – monitoring of newborn heart rate, blood pressure and oxygen saturation during the first 24 hours after delivery

    PubMed Central

    Konefał, Halina; Jaskot, Brygida; Pastuszka, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    Introduction There is no available information about the effects of remifentanil labor analgesia on newborns’ vital signs in the first hours after delivery. The aim of the study was to assess changes in the heart rate, blood pressure and oxygen saturation during the first 24 h of neonatal life after using remifentanil patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) for labor analgesia. Material and methods Forty-four full-term neonates, 23 from intravenous PCA remifentanil labor anesthesia 0.2 µg/kg, repeated not more frequently than every 2 min, and 21 born to mothers without any pharmacological forms of analgesia, were studied. Heart rate, oxygen saturation, and systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were monitored using a Nellcor Oxi Max monitor N5500 (Tyco Healthcare), and recorded at 1 h, 6 h, 12 h and 24 h. Results No significant differences in heart rate (p = 0.54; p = 0.26; p = 0.60; p = 0.83), oxygen saturation (p = 0.21; p = 0.27; p = 0.61; p = 0.9) and DBP (p = 0.98; p = 0.31; p = 0.83; p = 0.58) between the groups at 1 h, 6 h, 12 h and 24 h. Newborns from the remifentanil group had lower SBP at 1 h of life (59 mm Hg vs. 68.5 mm Hg) but the difference was just on the borderline of statistical significance (p > 0.06). There were no significant differences in SBP between the groups at 6 h (p = 0.65), 12 h (p = 0.11), and 24 h (p = 0.89) of life. Conclusions Remifentanil PCA analgesia during labor does not significantly modify the oxygen saturation, heart rate and blood pressure in infants during the first day of their life. Therefore, further studies are needed to explain the observed trend for arterial hypotension in the first hour of life in infants born to mothers treated with remifentanil. PMID:24049531

  6. Changes in biomarkers and 24 hours blood pressure in hypertensive African Americans with the metabolic syndrome: comparison of amlodipine/olmesartan versus hydrochlorothiazide/losartan.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Nadya; Rahman, Syed T; Ahmad, Mushtaq; Parrott, Janice M; Johnson, Julie; Ferdinand, Keith C; Khan, Bobby V

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of amlodipine and olmesartan (A/O; Azor) versus losartan and hydrochlorothiazide (L/H; Hyzaar), on changes in serum and urine biomarkers of inflammation and oxidation, neutrophil reactive oxygen species generation, and changes in systolic blood pressure (BP), diastolic BP, and heart rate as measured with 24 hours ambulatory BP monitoring in a high-risk, hypertensive African-American population with the metabolic syndrome. Sixty-six African-American subjects with Stage 1 and 2 hypertension and characteristics of the metabolic syndrome were treated in open-label, active comparator fashion for 20 weeks. After 14 weeks of therapy, treatment with A/O had a significant effect on reducing the production of reactive oxygen series, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, F2 isoprostane, myeloperoxidase, and homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance while L/H treatment only significantly lowered levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance. Treatment with A/O showed a trend of a more immediate and sustained systolic and diastolic BP-lowering, as well as night time BP reduction. In addition to a trend toward lower blood pressure, treatment with A/O in comparison with L/H has superior efficacy in reducing reactive oxygen species generation and production of inflammatory and oxidative biomarkers in a hypertensive African-American population with features of the metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2013 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Vasomotor hot flushes and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure in normotensive women: A placebo-controlled trial on post-menopausal hormone therapy.

    PubMed

    Tuomikoski, Pauliina; Haapalahti, Petri; Sarna, Seppo; Ylikorkala, Olavi; Mikkola, Tomi S

    2010-07-01

    Blood pressure (BP) is one of the most powerful determinants of cardiovascular risk in women. This risk may differ between post-menopausal women with and without vasomotor hot flushes, possibly indicating different vascular responses to hormone therapy (HT). Thus, we compared in a clinical trial the effect of HT on ambulatory BP in normotensive, recently post-menopausal women with or without severe hot flushes. A total of 147 women recorded prospectively their hot flushes for 2 weeks; 70 women were symptomatic (>or=7 moderate/severe hot flush episodes/day), whereas 77 women were defined as asymptomatic (

  8. [Clinical study of 38 cases of pheochromocytoma --correlation between the instability of intraoperative blood pressure and 24-hour urinary vanillylmandelic acid].

    PubMed

    Onuki, Tatsuaki; Yamagishi, Takuya; Teranishi, Jun-ichi; Suzuki, Koutaro; Kondo, Keiichi; Nakaigawa, Noboru; Saito, Kazuo; Noguchi, Kazumi; Kubota, Yoshinobu

    2007-07-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a rare tumor of chromaffin tissues most commonly arising from the adrenal medulla. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 38 patients with pheochromocytoma who underwent surgical treatment between 1977 and 2004 at our Yokohama City University Medical Center and Yokohama City University Hospital. Twenty two patients (57.9%) were females and 16 (42.1%) were males. The most frequent symptoms were headache (58%). One patient had bilateral adrenal tumors and pathological examination revealed malignant pheochromocytoma. Six patients had an extra-adrenal tumor and in 2 patients the tumor occurred in the urinary bladder. Twelve patients (31.6%) had sustained hypertension, 21 patients (55.3%) had paroxysmal hypertension and 5 patients (13.1%) remained normotensive. The 24-h urinary total metanephrines and vanillylmandelic acid (VMA) were the most sensitive biochemical tests for the diagnosis of pheochromocytoma. The sensitivity of urinary total metanephrines was 92.0% for all the patients and was 92.3% for the patients without paroxysmal hypertension. Fifteen patients had intraoperative hypertensive reactions in the surgical manipulation or hypotension after tumor resection. This group had more urinary excretion of VMA before surgery, compared with that with stable intraoperative blood pressure (p < 0.005).

  9. [24-hour pulse pressure in children with chronic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Zaniew, Marcin; Drozdz, Dorota; Mroziński, Bartłomiej; Rudziński, Andrzej; Blumczyński, Andrzej; Pietrzyk, Jacek A; Zachwieja, Jacek

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess 24-h pulse pressure (PP) and to determine relationships between PP and echocardiographic parameters of left ventricle in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The study population included 47 children (mean age: 13.11 yrs) with CKD treated conservatively (n=14), with hemodialysis (HD) (n=13) and automated peritoneal dialysis (APD) (n=20). Retrospectively, antropometrical data, office blood pressure, ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) variables and LV parameters in echocardiogaphy were analyzed. In study subjects, hypertension (HTN) was present in 25 (53.19%) and in 29 (61.7%) when based on office blood pressure and ABPM respectively. The prevalence of HTN was the highest in predialysis patients. 21 (44.6%) of children had left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), which was the most frequently found in HD group. The mean PP value was 45.26 +/- 7.56 mmHg and was similar in all groups. Positive correlations were found between PP and weight (p < 0.001), height (p < 0.05), body surface area (p < 0.01) and LV measures (LV mass, LV posterior wall thickness and diastolic diameter of LV, all p < 0.05). Children with PP above median had tendency for greater LV mass (p = 0.06). There was no difference in severity of blood pressure and PP in children with/without LVH. However, in 45% of patients LVH was noted in whom the value of PP was greater than calculated normative value of PP (95 centile). HTN and LVH is common in children with CKD. A mean PP in children with CKD is lower when compared to adult population with CKD. The results confirm that PP increases with the age and an increasing PP has an influence on the changes of LV geometry. Assessment of PP in ABPM might help in identifying those with abnormal LV geometry.

  10. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring: importance of sampling rate and duration--48 versus 24 hours--on the accurate assessment of cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Hermida, Ramón C; Ayala, Diana E; Fontao, María J; Mojón, Artemio; Fernández, José R

    2013-03-01

    Independent prospective studies have found that ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring (ABPM) is more closely correlated with target organ damage and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk than clinic BP measurement. This is based on studies in which BP was sampled every 15-30 min for ≤24 h, without taking into account that reproducibility of any estimated parameter from a time series to be potentially used for CVD risk assessment might depend more on monitoring duration than on sampling rate. Herein, we evaluated the influence of duration (48 vs. 24 h) and sampling rate of BP measurements (form every 20-30 min up to every 2 h) on the prognostic value of ABPM-derived parameters. We prospectively studied 3344 subjects (1718 men/1626 women), 52.6 ± 14.5 yrs of age, during a median follow-up of 5.6 yrs. Those with hypertension at baseline were randomized to ingest all their prescribed hypertension medications upon awakening or ≥1 of them at bedtime. At baseline, BP was measured at 20-min intervals from 07:00 to 23:00 h and at 30-min intervals at night for 48 h, and physical activity was simultaneously monitored every min by wrist actigraphy to accurately derive the awake and asleep BP means. Identical assessment was scheduled annually and more frequently (quarterly) if treatment adjustment was required. ABPM profiles were modified to generate time series of identical 48-h duration but with data sampled at 1- or 2-h intervals, or shorter, i.e., first 24 h, time series with data sampled at the original rate (daytime 20-min intervals/nighttime 30-min intervals). Bland-Altman plots indicated that the range of individual differences in the estimated awake and asleep systolic (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) means between the original and modified ABPM profiles was up to 3-fold smaller for data sampled every 1 h for 48 h than for data sampled every 20-30 min for the first 24 h. Reduction of ABPM duration to just 24 h resulted in error of the

  11. Seasonal changes of 24-hour intraocular pressure rhythm in healthy Shanghai population

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jingyi; Xiao, Ming; Xu, Huan; Fang, Shaobin; Chen, Xu; Kong, Xiangmei; Sun, Xinghuai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the present study was to investigate and compare the 24-hour intraocular pressure (IOP) rhythms in winter and summer in the healthy population of Shanghai, China. This is a cross-sectional study in which 24-hour IOP measurements were taken for all eligible healthy volunteers in winter and summer, respectively, and the temperature, hours of sunlight (sunlight time), and circulatory parameters, including heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure, were also recorded. The 24-hour IOP curves and IOP parameters (mean, peak, trough, and fluctuation of IOP together with the diurnal-to-nocturnal IOP change) in winter and summer were obtained and compared. The magnitude of IOP changes from summer to winter was also calculated. A total of 29 participants (58 eyes), 14 (48.28%) male and 15 (51.72%) female, aged 43.66 ± 12.20 (19–61) years, were considered eligible for this study. Generally, IOP decreased progressively before noon, increased notably in the nocturnal period, and peaked at 12:00 am in winter and at 2:00 am in summer. The pattern of 24-hour IOP in winter and summer was significantly different (P = 0.002). The average IOPs from 4:00 pm to 8:00 am, except for 6:00 am, were significantly higher in winter (P < 0.05). However, no significant differences were shown after adjusting for temperature and/or sunlight time. From summer to winter, the extent of IOP increase was mostly around 0 to 3 mm Hg, and the IOPs increased more significantly in the nocturnal period than in the diurnal period (P = 0.05). The 24-hour IOP rhythms were different in winter and summer, with higher IOP level in winter. Temperature and sunlight time, which are independent of heart rate and blood pressure, affected the 24-hour IOP rhythms in healthy people in Shanghai, China. Further investigations are expected for the rhythm of some endogenous substance secretion and the inner mechanism of regulation of IOP. PMID:27495076

  12. Effects of verapamil SR and atenolol on 24-hour blood pressure and heart rate in hypertension patients with coronary artery disease: an international verapamil SR-trandolapril ambulatory monitoring substudy.

    PubMed

    Denardo, Scott J; Gong, Yan; Cooper-DeHoff, Rhonda M; Farsang, Csaba; Keltai, Matyas; Szirmai, László; Messerli, Franz H; Bavry, Anthony A; Handberg, Eileen M; Mancia, Giuseppe; Pepine, Carl J

    2015-01-01

    Elevated nighttime blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR), increased BP and HR variability, and altered diurnal variations of BP and HR (nighttime dipping and morning surge) in patients with systemic hypertension are each associated with increased adverse cardiovascular events. However, there are no reports on the effect of hypertension treatment on these important hemodynamic parameters in the growing population of hypertensive patients with atherosclerotic coronary artery disease (CAD). This was a pre-specified subgroup analysis of the INternational VErapamil SR-Trandolapril STudy (INVEST), which involved 22,576 clinically stable patients aged ≥ 50 years with hypertension and CAD randomized to either verapamil SR- or atenolol-based hypertension treatment strategies. The subgroup consisted of 117 patients undergoing 24-hour ambulatory monitoring at baseline and after 1 year of treatment. Hourly systolic and diastolic BP (SBP and DBP) decreased after 1 year for both verapamil SR- and atenolol-based treatment strategies compared with baseline (P<0.0001). Atenolol also decreased hourly HR (P<0.0001). Both treatment strategies decreased SBP variability (weighted standard deviation: P = 0.012 and 0.021, respectively). Compared with verapamil SR, atenolol also increased the prevalence of BP and HR nighttime dipping among prior non-dippers (BP: OR = 3.37; 95% CI: 1.26-8.97 P = 0.015; HR: OR = 4.06; 95% CI: 1.35-12.17; P = 0.012) and blunted HR morning surge (+2.8 vs. +4.5 beats/min/hr; P = 0.019). Both verapamil SR- and especially atenolol-based strategies resulted in favorable changes in ambulatory monitoring parameters that have been previously associated with increased adverse cardiovascular events.

  13. [Reproducibility of arterial pressure measured in the ELSA-Brasil with 24-hour pressure monitoring].

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Larissa Rangel; Molina, Maria del Carmen Bisi; Faria, Carolina Perim; Cunha, Roberto de Sá; Mill, José Geraldo

    2013-06-01

    To determine the reproducibility of casual arterial pressure measurement and to confirm pressure diagnosis by monitoring of participants in the ELSA-Brasil (Estudo Longitudinal de Saúde do Adulto - Brazilian Longitudinal Study for Adult Health). Casual blood pressure was measured with an oscilometric device. A sub-sample of participants (N = 255) from Espírito Santo state (Southeastern Brazil) was reevaluated using the same methodology following one to ten weeks and, in addition, underwent arterial blood pressure monitoring. Diagnosis of hypertension used cut off points of 140/90 mmHg for casual pressure and 130/80 mmHg for arterial blood pressure monitoring. White coat hypertension was defined as the presence of hypertension in casual blood pressure and normal arterial blood pressure monitoring, and converse findings characterized masked hypertension. Data are from 230 participants that on the two occasions were free from antihypertensive medication (N1 = 153) or under the same antihypertensive regimen (N2 = 77). Normotension was confirmed by arterial blood pressure monitoring in 120 out of 134 participants of the N1 group. In N2, blood pressure control was confirmed by arterial blood pressure monitoring in 43 of 54 participants with controlled hypertension per casual blood pressure. Overall diagnostic concordance between casual blood pressure and arterial blood pressure monitoring was 78% (kappa = 0.44). In the N1 group, six subjects (4%) presented white coat hypertension, and 23 subjects (25%) presented with masked hypertension. Diagnostic concordance between casual blood pressure and arterial blood pressure monitoring was moderate. The rigorous standardization of casual blood pressure measurement adopted in the ELSA-Brasil study was able to reduce white coat hypertension. The high frequency of masked hypertension may suggest that pressure values obtained by arterial blood pressure monitoring indicate an elevated degree of stress at work.

  14. [Evaluation of a delayed-action beta blocker by 24-hour ambulatory recording of the arterial pressure].

    PubMed

    Campanini, C; Adamec, R; Barthélémy, J C; Mérier, G

    1984-01-07

    Twelve students aged 21 to 39 years (mean age 26) with borderline hypertension underwent three 24 hours ambulatory recordings of blood pressure using an Avionics Pressurometer II device: the first recording under basic conditions, the second after taking placebo and the third after being treated for 3 days with a betablocker of long acting effect (oxprenolol R 160 mg) in a randomized study. The blood pressure mean profile showed a double peak during daily activity with a progressive lowering of the blood pressure during sleep. The effect on the blood pressure of long acting oxprenolol begins four hours later, remains for about ten hours and may be still present next day. The shape of the circadian blood pressure profile is not modified. No significant difference between the pressure profiles on the basic conditions and placebo is noticed.

  15. Variation of 24-hour intraocular pressure in healthy individuals: right eye versus left eye.

    PubMed

    Liu, John H K; Sit, Arthur J; Weinreb, Robert N

    2005-10-01

    An assumption for the one-eye therapeutic trial of ocular hypotensive drugs is the symmetrical variation of intraocular pressure (IOP) between the two eyes. We evaluated whether or not 24-hour variations of IOP in the two eyes are similar in healthy individuals. Experimental study with human subjects. Ninety-one healthy individuals. We reviewed bilateral IOP data collected from 38 younger (18-25 years) and 53 older (40-74 years) experimental subjects housed for 24 hours in a sleep laboratory. Intraocular pressure was measured every 2 hours using a pneumatonometer in the sitting and supine positions during the 16-hour diurnal/wake period and in the supine position during the 8-hour nocturnal/sleep period. Measurements were always taken first in the right eye. For each age group, the two eyes' means, peaks, troughs, and ranges of IOP during office hours, the diurnal period, the nocturnal period, and the 24-hour period were compared. The coefficient of determination was used to examine the strength of association between the right and left IOPs. Bilateral IOP. For each age group, the profiles of IOP variations were similar in the two eyes with either the habitual body positions (diurnal sitting and nocturnal supine) or the 24-hour supine position. Mean, peak, and trough IOPs in the right eye were slightly higher than those in the left eye during the defined periods. There was no difference in the IOP range, except for the supine IOP in the younger group during the diurnal period. Cosine fits of the 24-hour supine IOP indicate no difference in the estimated phase timing or the 24-hour variation between the two eyes. Coefficients of determination for single pairs of right and left IOPs were in the range of 0.311 to 0.741. Variations of 24-hour IOP in the right and left eyes are similar. However, because the strength of association between the two eyes is only moderate, it may be difficult to perform a one-eye therapeutic trial using single pairs of right and left eye

  16. [Fluctuation of intraocular pressure in 24-hour telemonitoring compared to tonometry during normal office hours].

    PubMed

    Jürgens, C; Antal, S; Henrici, K; Grossjohann, R; Tost, F H

    2009-01-01

    Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is a clinically relevant factor in glaucoma progression. As a dynamic parameter the IOP depends on various internal and exogenic influencing factors. Therefore, we analysed intraindividual IOD variations between ambulant care and 24-h home-monitoring using self-tonometry. This study is based on paper-based glaucoma cards of 25 patients with primary open angle glaucoma. Additionally, all patients participated in a telemedical home-monitoring study with self-measurements of IOP and blood pressure stored in an electronic patient record. The glaucoma cards contained a total number of 409 IOP values with documentation periods from 0.5 to 10 years. In the teletonometry project all 25 patients were observed for 6 months with 1490 recorded IOP values. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS software. Average IOP values for all 25 glaucoma patients were 16.3 +/- 2.9 mmHg for both eyes in glaucoma card documentation, whereas the electronic patient records showed IOP averages of 18.9 +/- 4.7 mmHg for right eyes and 18.2 +/- 4.4 mmHg for left eyes. Corresponding to the practice opening hours the glaucoma cards contained no IOP records from 12:00 pm to 01:30 pm as well as between 06:00 pm and 07:15 am. In these time periods 17 % of all IOP values recorded in 24-hour teletonometry were higher than 20 mmHg. However, statistical analysis and clinical evaluation of device parameters and measurement characteristics revealed sporadic measuring errors. The additional involvement of self-tonometry in telemedical 24-h home-monitoring is a feasible method to record and detect intraday IOP fluctuations. Compared to single IOP measurements documented in common paper-based glaucoma cards, the 24-h electronic patient record showed more frequent circadian IOP variations. As a result, self-tonometry and home-monitoring can be a useful link to fill the gap between singular ambulant IOP measurement and hospitalisation with 24-hour IOP profiles.

  17. The possible advantages of cryoprecipitate prepared from fresh frozen plasma from blood stored for 24 hours.

    PubMed

    Philip, Joseph; Kumarage, Samantha; Chatterjee, Tathagata; Kumar, Sudeep; Mallhi, Rajeev

    2014-01-01

    To compare the coagulation-factor profile of cryoprecipitate produced from fresh frozen plasma from whole blood (WB) stored for 24 hours at room temperature (24CP) with that of standard cryoprecipitate (CP). We collected 80 units of WB from healthy volunteers, of which 20 units were of each blood group. Each unit of blood was divided into 2 parts. One part was used for preparation and quality-control evaluation of CP within 8 hours of collection; the other part was stored at room temperature for 24 hours and then subjected to CP preparation. Coagulation studies were carried out on each batch of CP after production. Fibrinogen, Factor VIII (FVII), and von Willibrand factor (vWF) were measured, and the blood groups were determined. We used the Student's t-test to perform comparisons and considered results to be significant at P < .005. Overall, all 3 clotting factors were increased in 24CP compared with CP, with a statistically significant increase in the level of FVIII. Blood group AB had significantly increased levels of fibrinogen and vWF in 24CP compared with CP. Our study showed that 24CP has equal or greater levels of coagulation factors compared with CP. His indicates that our alternate approach for preparation of CP may enable more efficient use of blood collected in satellite blood collection centers and during blood drives.

  18. Continuous 24-hour intraocular pressure monitoring for glaucoma--time for a paradigm change.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, K; Weinreb, R

    2012-03-28

    Glaucoma is the main cause of irreversible blindness and intraocular pressure (IOP) is its only modifiable risk factor. The importance of robust lowering of IOP for prevention of glaucoma onset and progression is well established. Although IOP is a dynamic parameter with individual circadian rhythms, current management usually relies on single IOP measurements during regular clinic hours performed a few times a year. Recent technological advances have provided clinicians with tools for continuous IOP monitoring during a 24 hour period in an ambulatory setting. There are two approaches being investigated. The first is permanent IOP monitoring through an implantable sensor and the other is temporary monitoring through a contact lens sensor. In this article, we discuss the shortcomings of the current gold standard for tonometry (Goldmann Applanation Tonometry) and the current experience with the first commercially available continuous 24 hour IOP monitoring technology (SENSIMED Triggerfish®); a telemetric contact lens sensor produced by a Swiss start-up company (Sensimed AG, Lausanne, Switzerland). Recent studies suggest that 24 hour continuous monitoring of IOP can be integrated into clinical practice and have the potential to contribute to the reduction of glaucoma-related vision loss.

  19. Intraocular Pressure Fluctuations and 24-Hour Continuous Monitoring for Glaucoma Risk in Wind Instrument Players.

    PubMed

    de Crom, Ronald M P C; Webers, Carroll A B; van Kooten-Noordzij, Marina A W; Michiels, Agnes C; Schouten, Jan S A G; Berendschot, Tos T J M; Beckers, Henny J M

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of playing a wind instrument on intraocular pressure (IOP) and to monitor 24-hour (IOP) fluctuations in wind musicians of symphony and wind orchestras to compare IOP levels during normal daily activities with IOP levels during playing. Professional and amateur musicians of symphony and wind orchestras were invited to participate. A total of 42 participants, 9 with glaucoma, underwent a routine ophthalmologic examination. IOP measurements were taken before and immediately after 20 minutes of playing wind instruments. In addition, 6 participants underwent 24-hour IOP monitoring with the Triggerfish (Sensimed AG, Switzerland) sensing contact lens, during which they kept an activity logbook. Eleven professionals and 31 amateur musicians participated in the study. A total of 7 eyes of 6 patients underwent additional 24-hour IOP monitoring. Mean IOP before playing was 13.6±2.6 mm Hg, IOP change after playing was +1.5±2.2 mm Hg with a significant difference between professionals (2.5±1.5 mm Hg) and amateurs (1.1±2.3 mm Hg). There were no significant differences in IOP change between subjects with or without glaucoma. During 24-hour IOP monitoring there were slight increases in IOP while playing an instrument, but also during other activities and overnight. These latter IOP levels were similar or even higher than the IOP rise caused by playing a wind instrument. IOP often rises after playing wind instruments, but similar or even higher IOP levels seem to occur during common other daily activities or at night. These peaks may be relevant for glaucomatous field progression and treatment of glaucoma patients.

  20. The Application of a Contact Lens Sensor in Detecting 24-Hour Intraocular Pressure-Related Patterns

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of blindness worldwide. Recent studies suggest that intraocular pressure (IOP) fluctuations, peaks, and rhythm are important factors in disease advancement. Yet, current glaucoma management remains hinged on single IOP measurements during clinic hours. To overcome this limitation, 24-hour IOP monitoring devices have been employed and include self-tonometry, permanent IOP, and temporary IOP monitoring. This review discusses each IOP measuring strategy and focuses on the recently FDA-approved contact lens sensor (CLS). The CLS records IOP-related ocular patterns for 24 hours continuously. Using the CLS, IOP-related parameters have been found to be associated with the rate of visual field progression in primary open-angle glaucoma, disease progression in primary angle-closure glaucoma, and various clinical variables in ocular hypertension. The CLS has been used to quantify blink rate and limbal strain and measure the circadian rhythm in a variety of disease states including normal-tension glaucoma and thyroid eye disease. The effects of various IOP-lowering interventions were also characterized using the CLS. CLS provides a unique, safe, and well-tolerated way to study IOP-related patterns in a wide range of disease states. IOP-related patterns may help identify patients most at risk for disease progression and assist with the development of tailored treatments. PMID:27525110

  1. Personalizing Intraocular Pressure: Target Intraocular Pressure in the Setting of 24-Hour Intraocular Pressure Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Sit, Arthur J; Pruet, Christopher M

    2016-01-01

    Determining target intraocular pressure (IOP) in glaucoma patients is multifaceted, requiring attention to many different factors such as glaucoma type, severity of disease, age, race, family history, corneal thickness and hysteresis, and initial IOP. Even with all these variables accounted for, there are still patients who have progression of the disease despite achieving target IOP. Intraocular pressure variability has been identified as a potential independent risk factor for glaucoma progression but is currently difficult to quantify in individual patients. New technologies enabling measurement of both diurnal and nocturnal IOP may necessitate modifying our concept of target pressure.

  2. Ambulatory arterial stiffness index and 24-hour ambulatory pulse pressure as predictors of mortality in Ohasama, Japan.

    PubMed

    Kikuya, Masahiro; Staessen, Jan A; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Thijs, Lutgarde; Metoki, Hirohito; Asayama, Kei; Obara, Taku; Inoue, Ryusuke; Li, Yan; Dolan, Eamon; Hoshi, Haruhisa; Hashimoto, Junichiro; Totsune, Kazuhito; Satoh, Hiroshi; Wang, Ji-Guang; O'Brien, Eoin; Imai, Yutaka

    2007-04-01

    Ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI) and pulse pressure (PP) are indexes of arterial stiffness and can be computed from 24-hour blood pressure recordings. We investigated the prognostic value of AASI and PP in relation to fatal outcomes. In 1542 Ohasama residents (baseline age, 40 to 93 years; 63.4% women), we applied Cox regression to relate mortality to AASI and PP while adjusting for sex, age, BMI, 24-hour MAP, smoking and drinking habits, diabetes mellitus, and a history of cardiovascular disease. During 13.3 years (median), 126 cardiovascular and 63 stroke deaths occurred. The sex- and age-standardized incidence rates of cardiovascular and stroke mortality across quartiles were U-shaped for AASI and J-shaped for PP. Across quartiles, the multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios for cardiovascular and stroke death significantly deviated from those in the whole population in a U-shaped fashion for AASI, whereas for PP, none of the HRs departed from the overall risk. The hazard ratios for cardiovascular mortality across ascending AASI quartiles were 1.40 (P=0.04), 0.82 (P=0.25), 0.64 (P=0.01), and 1.35 (P=0.03). Additional adjustment of AASI for PP and sensitivity analyses by sex, excluding patients on antihypertensive treatment or with a history of cardiovascular disease, or censoring deaths occurring within 2 years of enrollment, produced confirmatory results. In a Japanese population, AASI predicted cardiovascular and stroke mortality over and beyond PP and other risk factors, whereas in adjusted analyses, PP did not carry any prognostic information.

  3. 24-hour intraocular pressure rhythm in young healthy subjects evaluated with continuous monitoring using a contact lens sensor.

    PubMed

    Mottet, Benjamin; Aptel, Florent; Romanet, Jean-Paul; Hubanova, Ralitsa; Pépin, Jean-Louis; Chiquet, Christophe

    2013-12-01

    This study evaluates a new device that has been proposed to continuously monitor intraocular pressure (IOP) over 24 hours. To evaluate 24-hour IOP rhythm reproducibility during repeated continuous 24-hour IOP monitoring with noncontact tonometry (NCT) and a contact lens sensor (CLS) in healthy participants. Cross-sectional study of 12 young healthy volunteers at a referral center of chronobiology. Participants were housed in a sleep laboratory and underwent four 24-hour sessions of IOP measurements over a 6-month period. After initial randomized attribution, the IOP of the first eye was continuously monitored using a CLS and the IOP of the fellow eye was measured hourly using NCT. Two sessions with NCT measurements in 1 eye and CLS measurements in the fellow eye, 1 session with CLS measurements in only 1 eye, and 1 session with NCT measurements in both eyes were performed. A nonlinear least squares, dual-harmonic regression analysis was used to model the 24-hour IOP rhythm. Comparison of acrophase, bathyphase, amplitude, midline estimating statistic of rhythm, IOP values, IOP changes, and agreement were evaluated in the 3 tonometry methods. A significant nyctohemeral IOP rhythm was found in 31 of 36 sessions (86%) using NCT and in all sessions (100%) using CLS. Hourly awakening during NCT IOP measurements did not significantly change the mean phases of the 24-hour IOP pattern evaluated using CLS in the contralateral eye. Throughout the sessions, intraclass correlation coefficients of the CLS acrophase (0.6 [95% CI, 0.0 to 0.9]; P = .03), CLS bathyphase (0.7 [95% CI, 0.1 to 0.9]; P = .01), NCT amplitude (0.7 [95% CI, 0.1 to 0.9]; P = .01), and NCT midline estimating statistic of rhythm (0.9 [95% CI, 0.9 to 1.0]; P < .01) were significant. When performing NCT measurements in 1 eye and CLS measurements in the contralateral eye, the IOP change at each point normalized from the first measurement (9 am) was not symmetric individually or within the population. The CLS is

  4. Successful in vitro antigen-dependent activation of 24-hour-old peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Owen, J A; Muirhead, K; Jensen, C; Jonak, Z L

    1996-03-28

    We describe a simple, rapid and reproducible in vitro culture system in which human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs), donated 24 h prior to initiation of culture can be stimulated to produce antigen-specific antibodies. Peripheral blood lymphocytes purified by Ficoll-Hypaque centrifugation were passed over a G10 Sephadex column and then activated in vitro in the presence of 0.003% staphylococcus Cowan A, 2.8 x 10(-6) M indomethacin and appropriate concentrations of tetanus toxoid antigen. After the first 24 h in culture, a five-fold concentrated supernatant from an allogeneic mixed lymphocyte culture was added. The cell surface phenotypes of the PBLs were analyzed by flow cytometry at the initiation and termination of culture, in order to provide a comprehensive characterization of the cellular composition of a successful in vitro stimulation system. Our results clearly show that the majority of peripheral blood B cells can be induced to an activated stage (blast transformation) and interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptor expression, following very simple manipulations of the lymphoid population. Tetanus toxoid-specific antibody production can be readily generated in this cell population. In contrast, T cells were not activated to express IL-2 receptors and reach blast transformation, and did not show appreciable proliferation. Our system provides a population of B cells producing antibodies of desired specificity which could be utilized for the generation of human hybridomas or could serve as a donor population for antibody engineering via the combinatorial library approach. Careful light scattering and cell surface phenotypic analyses of the cells entering, proliferating and differentiating in these cultures enabled several novel observations to be made.

  5. Platelet concentrates prepared after a 20- to 24-hour hold of the whole blood at 22°C.

    PubMed

    Slichter, Sherrill J; Corson, Jill; Jones, Mary Kay; Christoffel, Todd; Pellham, Esther; Bolgiano, Doug

    2012-09-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requires that red blood cells must be refrigerated within 8 hours of whole blood collection. Longer storage of whole blood at 22°C before component preparation would have many advantages. Two methods of holding whole blood for 20 to 24 hours at room temperature were evaluated, refrigerated plates or a 23°C incubator. After extended whole blood storage, platelet (PLT) concentrates were prepared from PLT-rich plasma on Day 1 postdonation, and the PLTs were stored for 6 more days. On Day 7 of PLT storage, blood was drawn from each subject to prepare fresh PLTs. The stored and fresh PLTs were radiolabeled and transfused into their donor. Eleven subjects' whole blood was stored using refrigerated butanediol plates (Compocool, Fresenius), and 10 using an incubator. Poststorage PLT recoveries averaged 47 ± 13% versus 53 ± 11% and survivals averaged 4.6 ± 1.7 days versus 4.7 ± 0.9 days for Compocool versus incubator storage, respectively (p = NS). With all results, poststorage PLT recoveries averaged 75 ± 10% of fresh and survivals 57 ± 13% of fresh; PLT recoveries met FDA guidelines for poststorage PLT viability but not survivals. Seven-day poststorage PLT viability is comparable when whole blood is stored for 22 ± 2 hours at 22°C using either refrigerated plates or an incubator to maintain temperature before preparing PLT concentrates. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  6. Urine 24-hour volume

    MedlinePlus

    ... insipidus - renal Diabetes insipidus - central Diabetes High fluid intake Some forms of kidney disease Use of diuretic medicines Alternative Names Urine volume; 24-hour urine collection; Urine protein - 24 hour Images Urine sample Female urinary tract ...

  7. PLATELET CONCENTRATES PREPARED AFTER A 20 TO 24 HOUR HOLD OF THE WHOLE BLOOD AT 22°C

    PubMed Central

    Slichter, Sherrill J.; Corson, Jill; Jones, Mary Kay; Christoffel, Todd; Pellham, Esther; Bolgiano, Doug

    2012-01-01

    Background The FDA requires that red cells must be refrigerated within 8 hours of whole blood collection. Longer storage of whole blood at 22°C before component preparation would have many advantages. Study Design And Methods Two methods of holding whole blood for 20 to 24 hours at room temperature were evaluated; i.e., refrigerated plates or a 23°C incubator. After extended whole blood storage, platelet concentrates were prepared from platelet-rich-plasma on day 1 post-donation, and the platelets were stored for 6 more days. On day 7 of platelet storage, blood was drawn from each subject to prepare fresh platelets. The stored and fresh platelets were radiolabeled and transfused into their donor. Results Eleven subjects’ whole blood was stored using refrigerated Compocool plates and 10 using an incubator. Post-storage platelet recoveries averaged 47 ± 13% versus 53 ± 11% and survivals averaged 4.6 ± 1.7 days versus 4.7 ± 0.9 days for Compocool versus incubator storage, respectively (p=N.S.). Using all results, post-storage platelet recoveries averaged 75 ± 10% of fresh and survivals 57 ± 13% of fresh; platelet recoveries met FDA guidelines for post-storage platelet viability but not survivals. Conclusion Seven-day post-storage platelet viability is comparable when whole blood is stored for 22 ± 2 hour at 22°C using either refrigerated plates or an incubator to maintain temperature prior to preparing platelet concentrates. PMID:22320682

  8. Effect of additive solutions on red blood cell (RBC) membrane properties of stored RBCs prepared from whole blood held for 24 hours at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Veale, Margaret F; Healey, Gerry; Sparrow, Rosemary L

    2011-01-01

    The quality of RBC components is influenced by collection, processing and storage conditions. Regulations require that whole blood (WB) units be refrigerated within 8 hours and processed into RBCs within 24 hours of collection. Overnight room temperature hold of WB has logistical advantages, but the effect on RBC quality has not been fully investigated. RBC additive solutions were compared for their ability to provide improved quality of RBCs prepared from WB held at room temperature for 24 hours. Leukocyte-reduced RBCs were prepared from WB held at 20°C on cooling plates for 24 hours prior to processing. RBCs were stored in additive solutions, SAG-M (control), Erythrosol-4, and PAGGSM, under standard blood banking conditions and sampled during 49 days of storage. Stored RBCs were evaluated for RBC shape and microparticle (MP) accumulation using flow cytometry. Osmotic fragility, adhesion of RBCs to endothelium under shear stress conditions (0.5 dyne/cm(2) ), and routine RBC quality parameters were assessed. RBCs stored in Erythrosol-4 and PAGGSM had decreased cell size, reduced osmotic fragility, and decreased accumulation of glycophorin A-positive MPs and annexin V-binding MPs compared with RBCs stored in SAG-M. RBCs stored in erythrosol-4 had increased adherence to endothelium at days 42 and 49 compared with RBCs stored in SAG-M or PAGGSM. RBCs stored in PAGGSM or Erythrosol-4 had improved retention of RBC membrane and osmotic resilience. The development of new additive solutions may offer improved quality of RBC components prepared from WB held overnight at room temperature. © 2010 American Association of Blood Banks.

  9. [The normalisation of blood sugar using a non-miniaturised artifical pancreas. Application for 24 hours in 7 insulin-dependent diabetics (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Slama, G; Klein, J C; Tardieu, M C; Tchobroutsky, G

    1977-06-25

    Seven insulin-dependent diabetic were treated for 24 to 36 hours by intravenous injections of insulin adapted to variations in blood glucose using a fairly voluminous automatic regulation device. This artificial pancreas consists of a modified Technicon blood sugar apparatus which provides continuous estimation of blood glucose using non-haemolysed whole blood by a glucose oxidase method with an inertia time of 6 minutes, a table calculator and a newly developed interpretation and command electronic unit (GlucostatR). Normalisation of blood glucose was obtained for at least 24 hours, during and between meals, during a period following an oral glucose load and throughout the night.

  10. [THE INFLUENCE OF CYTOFLAVIN AND CARDIOXIPIN ON THE PARAMETERS OF 24-HOUR ARTERIAL PRESSURE MONITORING IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC CEREBRAL CIRCULATION INSUFFICIENCY, ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION AND HYPERCHOLESTEROLEMIA].

    PubMed

    Vodop'ianova, O A; Moiseeva, I Ia; Rodina, O P; Kustikova, I N; Antropova, N V

    2015-01-01

    This comparative study of the influence of cytoflavin and cardioxipin on the parameters of 24-hour arterial pressure monitoring in 56 patients with chronic cerebral circulation insufficiency, arterial hypertension and hypercholesterolemia included 32 women and 24 men aged 42-72 years divided into 3 groups matchedfor the stage of diseases, age, sex, severity of AH, total cholesterol level, and antihypertensive therapy. Patients of group 1 were treated without cytoflavin and cardioxipin. Those in group 2 received daily i/v droplet infusion of 10 mg/kg cardioxipin (20-30 droplets/min). Patients of group 3 were given daily i/v droplet infusion of 10 ml cytoflavin in 200 ml 0.9% sodium chloride solution for 10 days. 24-hour arterial pressure monitoring was used to estimate the influence of the two drugs on systolic and diastolic pressure, its daily rhythm, AP variability and frequency of elevation. The study showed that both therapeutic modalities improved daily AP rhythm as manifested in a significant increase of the number of patients with the dipper rhythm and a decrease in the number of systolic/diastolic non-dipper patients. Moreover cytoflavin significantly decreased the number of systolic over-dippers compared with control group.

  11. 24-hour urine protein

    MedlinePlus

    ... a blockage of blood vessels, or other causes Multiple myeloma Healthy people may have higher than normal urine ... team. Kidney Tests Read more Lymphoma Read more Multiple Myeloma Read more A.D.A.M., Inc. is ...

  12. [Effect of incremental cycling exercise performed before and 24 hours after blood withdrawal on the concentration of morphologic elements of blood in young health men].

    PubMed

    Duda, Krzysztof; Majerczak, Joanna; Zoładz, Jerzy A; Duda, Janina P; Kołodziejski, Leszek; Rychlik, Urszula; Kulpa, Jan

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of incremental cycling exercise test performed before and 24 hours after blood donation (withdrawal of 450 ml of blood) on the plasma volume and concentration of morphologic elements of blood. Thirteen subjects (mean +/- SD), age 23 +/- 3 years; body mass 75 +/- 10 kg; BMI 23.4 +/- 2 kg x m(-2); VO2max 2903 +/- 334 ml x min(-1), volunteered for this study. The exercise test started at the power output of 20 W with an increase by 20 W every 3 minutes--until exhaustion. This test was performed once in the control study (7-12 days before blood donation) and repeated 24 hrs after blood donation. The blood samples were taken from the antecubital vein, in a sitting position (1) at rest, (2) at the stage of 100 W power output, (3) at the end of the test (the stage of exhaustion) and (4) at 2 hours after the end of the test. The changes in plasma volume were evaluated according to changes in hemoglobin and hematocrit concentrations. The significance of differences in the studied variables were tested using Wilcoxon test. At the end of the exercise test a significant (p<0.05) decrease in plasma volume was found in both study. It amounted to--11.1 +/- 2.9% in the control study, and to--13.0 +/- 3.9% after blood donation. Within 2 hours after the end of the exercise test plasma volume returned to the pre-exercise value in the control study and exceeded the pre-exercise value by 3.9 +/- 6.7% (p<0.05) in the study performed after blood donation. The MCV, MCH, and MCHC values were not affected by the exercise performed before and after blood donation. In the control study, at the end of the incremental exercise test a significant increase in the leukocyte, lymphocyte and thrombocyte count was found. At 2 hours after exercise thrombocytes count returned to the pre-exercise level, whereas the exercise-induced leucocytosis remained at the end-exercise level. The lymphocyte count decreased to lymphopenic level. During the incremental

  13. Improved Oxygenation 24 Hours After Transition to Airway Pressure Release Ventilation or High-Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation Accurately Discriminates Survival in Immunocompromised Pediatric Patients With Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome*

    PubMed Central

    Yehya, Nadir; Topjian, Alexis A.; Thomas, Neal J.; Friess, Stuart H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Children with an immunocompromised condition and requiring invasive mechanical ventilation have high risk of death. Such patients are commonly transitioned to rescue modes of non-conventional ventilation, including airway pressure release ventilation and high-frequency oscillatory ventilation, for acute respiratory distress syndrome refractory to conventional ventilation. Our aim was to describe our experience with airway pressure release ventilation and high-frequency oscillatory ventilation in children with an immunocompromised condition and acute respiratory distress syndrome refractory to conventional ventilation and to identify factors associated with survival. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Tertiary care, university-affiliated PICU. Patients Sixty pediatric patients with an immunocompromised condition and acute respiratory distress syndrome refractory to conventional ventilation transitioned to either airway pressure release ventilation or high-frequency oscillatory ventilation. Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results Demographic data, ventilator settings, arterial blood gases, oxygenation index, and Pao2/Fio2 were recorded before transition to either mode of nonconventional ventilation and at predetermined intervals after transition for up to 5 days. Mortality in the entire cohort was 63% and did not differ between patients transitioned to airway pressure release ventilation and high-frequency oscillatory ventilation. For both airway pressure release ventilation and high-frequency oscillatory ventilation, improvements in oxygenation index and Pao2/Fio2 at 24 hours expressed as a fraction of pretransition values (oxygenation index24/oxygenation indexpre and Pao2/Fio224/Pao2/FIO2pre) reliably discriminated nonsurvivors from survivors, with receiver operating characteristic areas under the curves between 0.89 and 0.95 (p for all curves < 0.001). Sensitivity-specificity analysis suggested that less than 15% reduction in

  14. Blood pressure

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Normal blood pressure is important for proper blood flow to the body's organs and tissues. The force of the blood on the walls of the arteries is called blood pressure. Blood pressure is measured both as the heart ...

  15. The effect of exercise performed before and 24 hours after blood withdrawal on serum erythropoietin and growth hormone concentrations in humans.

    PubMed

    Duda, K; Zoladz, J A; Majerczak, J; Kolodziejski, L; Konturek, S J

    2003-07-01

    blood donation. No effect of blood withdrawal on pre-exercise level of plasma lactate concentration, end-tidal O2 and end-tidal CO2 was found. We concluded that withdrawal of 450 ml of blood, within 24 hours significantly increased serum erythropoietin concentration and caused non-lactic acidosis. A single bout of maximal incremental exercise, performed before and 24 hours after blood withdrawal, had no effect on serum erythropoietin concentration in humans but the exercise-induced increase in serum GH concentration performed after blood withdrawal tended to be lower than in the control study.

  16. Microparticle profile and procoagulant activity of fresh-frozen plasma is affected by whole blood leukoreduction rather than 24-hour room temperature hold.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kasey Sze-Kei; Sparrow, Rosemary L

    2014-08-01

    Microparticles (MPs) are small phospholipid-containing vesicles that have procoagulant properties. MPs are thought to contribute to the hemostatic potential of plasma. This study investigated the effects of whole blood (WB) hold time and leukoreduction (LR) on the MP profile and hemostatic potential of fresh-frozen plasma (FFP). WB units (n=12) from healthy donors were divided into two pairs and each pair was held at 20 to 24°C for 6 or 24 hours. At the designated hold time, 1 unit from the pair was LR while the other unit was not LR. FFP was prepared by standard procedures, aliquoted, and frozen. The MP content was determined by flow cytometry using an absolute count assay and specific labels for red blood cells (CD235a), platelets (CD41), and phosphatidylserine (PS). The hemostatic potential was determined by thrombelastography (TEG) and coagulation factor assays. Compared to non-LR-FFP, LR-FFP had significantly lower numbers of MPs, particularly CD41+ MPs and PS-positive MPs (p<0.03). LR-FFP, compared to non-LR-FFP, had a slower clot formation time (p=0.002); lower clot strength (p<0.001); and lower Factor (F)VIII, FXII, and fibrinogen levels (p<0.01). With longer WB hold time, the TEG profile was unchanged, although FVIII levels were decreased as expected (p<0.01). On average FFP units met quality requirements. LR of WB resulted in lower hemostatic potential of FFP in conjunction with depletion of MPs and coagulation factors. Longer WB hold time did not significantly affect the hemostatic potential of FFP as measured by TEG. Acceptable hemostatic quality was maintained for all FFP processing conditions studied. © 2014 Australian Red Cross Blood Service. Transfusion © 2014 AABB.

  17. Estimating 24-Hour Urinary Sodium Excretion From Casual Urinary Sodium Concentrations in Western Populations

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Ian J.; Dyer, Alan R.; Chan, Queenie; Cogswell, Mary E.; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Stamler, Jeremiah; Elliott, Paul

    2013-01-01

    High intakes of dietary sodium are associated with elevated blood pressure levels and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. National and international guidelines recommend reduced sodium intake in the general population, which necessitates population-wide surveillance. We assessed the utility of casual (spot) urine specimens in estimating 24-hour urinary sodium excretion as a marker of sodium intake in the International Cooperative Study on Salt, Other Factors, and Blood Pressure. There were 5,693 participants recruited in 1984–1987 at the ages of 20–59 years from 29 North American and European samples. Participants were randomly assigned to test or validation data sets. Equations derived from casual urinary sodium concentration and other variables in the test data were applied to the validation data set. Correlations between observed and estimated 24-hour sodium excretion were 0.50 for individual men and 0.51 for individual women; the values were 0.79 and 0.71, respectively, for population samples. Bias in mean values (observed minus estimated) was small; for men and women, the values were −1.6 mmol per 24 hours and 2.3 mmol per 24 hours, respectively, at the individual level and −1.8 mmol per 24 hours and 2.2 mmol per 24 hours, respectively, at the population level. Proportions of individuals with urinary 24-hour sodium excretion above the recommended levels were slightly overestimated by the models. Casual urine specimens may be a useful, low-burden, low-cost alternative to 24-hour urine collections for estimation of population sodium intakes; ongoing calibration with study-specific 24-hour urinary collections is recommended to increase validity. PMID:23673246

  18. 24-Hour Relativistic Bit Commitment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbanis, Ephanielle; Martin, Anthony; Houlmann, Raphaël; Boso, Gianluca; Bussières, Félix; Zbinden, Hugo

    2016-09-01

    Bit commitment is a fundamental cryptographic primitive in which a party wishes to commit a secret bit to another party. Perfect security between mistrustful parties is unfortunately impossible to achieve through the asynchronous exchange of classical and quantum messages. Perfect security can nonetheless be achieved if each party splits into two agents exchanging classical information at times and locations satisfying strict relativistic constraints. A relativistic multiround protocol to achieve this was previously proposed and used to implement a 2-millisecond commitment time. Much longer durations were initially thought to be insecure, but recent theoretical progress showed that this is not so. In this Letter, we report on the implementation of a 24-hour bit commitment solely based on timed high-speed optical communication and fast data processing, with all agents located within the city of Geneva. This duration is more than 6 orders of magnitude longer than before, and we argue that it could be extended to one year and allow much more flexibility on the locations of the agents. Our implementation offers a practical and viable solution for use in applications such as digital signatures, secure voting and honesty-preserving auctions.

  19. Microparticle Profile and Procoagulant Activity of Fresh Frozen Plasma is Affected by Whole Blood-Leukocyte Depletion Rather Than 24-Hour Room Temperature-Hold

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kasey Sze-Kei; Sparrow, Rosemary L

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Microparticles (MPs) are small phospholipid-containing vesicles that have pro-coagulant properties. MPs are thought to contribute to the hemostatic potential of plasma. This study investigated the effects of WB-hold time and leukodepletion (LD) on the MP profile and hemostatic potential of fresh-frozen plasma (FFP). STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS WB units (n=12) from healthy donors were divided into two pairs and each pair was held at 20–24°C for 6 or 24 hours. At the designated hold-time, one unit from the pair was leukodepleted while the other unit was not leukodepleted. FFP was prepared by standard procedures, aliquoted and frozen. The MP content was determined by flow cytometry using an absolute count assay and specific labels for red cells (CD235a), platelets (CD41) and phosphatidylserine. The hemostatic potential was determined by thrombelastography (TEG) and coagulation factor assays. RESULTS Compared to non-LD FFP, LD-FFP had significantly lower numbers of MPs, particularly CD41+ MPs and phosphatidylserine-positive MPs (p<0.03). LD-FFP, compared to non-LD FFP, had a slower clot formation time (p=0.002), lower clot strength (p<0.001) and lower FVIII, FXII and fibrinogen levels (p<0.01). With longer WB hold-time, the TEG profile was unchanged, although FVIII levels were decreased as expected (p<0.01). On average FFP units met quality requirements. CONCLUSION LD of WB resulted in lower hemostatic potential of FFP in conjunction with depletion of MPs and coagulation factors. Longer WB hold-time did not significantly affect the hemostatic potential of FFP as measured by TEG. Acceptable hemostatic quality was maintained for all FFP processing conditions studied. PMID:24635475

  20. Index Blood Tests and National Early Warning Scores within 24 Hours of Emergency Admission Can Predict the Risk of In-Hospital Mortality: A Model Development and Validation Study

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Mohammed A.; Rudge, Gavin; Watson, Duncan; Wood, Gordon; Smith, Gary B.; Prytherch, David R.; Girling, Alan; Stevens, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Background We explored the use of routine blood tests and national early warning scores (NEWS) reported within ±24 hours of admission to predict in-hospital mortality in emergency admissions, using empirical decision Tree models because they are intuitive and may ultimately be used to support clinical decision making. Methodology A retrospective analysis of adult emergency admissions to a large acute hospital during April 2009 to March 2010 in the West Midlands, England, with a full set of index blood tests results (albumin, creatinine, haemoglobin, potassium, sodium, urea, white cell count and an index NEWS undertaken within ±24 hours of admission). We developed a Tree model by randomly splitting the admissions into a training (50%) and validation dataset (50%) and assessed its accuracy using the concordance (c-) statistic. Emergency admissions (about 30%) did not have a full set of index blood tests and/or NEWS and so were not included in our analysis. Results There were 23248 emergency admissions with a full set of blood tests and NEWS with an in-hospital mortality of 5.69%. The Tree model identified age, NEWS, albumin, sodium, white cell count and urea as significant (p<0.001) predictors of death, which described 17 homogeneous subgroups of admissions with mortality ranging from 0.2% to 60%. The c-statistic for the training model was 0.864 (95%CI 0.852 to 0.87) and when applied to the testing data set this was 0.853 (95%CI 0.840 to 0.866). Conclusions An easy to interpret validated risk adjustment Tree model using blood test and NEWS taken within ±24 hours of admission provides good discrimination and offers a novel approach to risk adjustment which may potentially support clinical decision making. Given the nature of the clinical data, the results are likely to be generalisable but further research is required to investigate this promising approach. PMID:23734195

  1. Index blood tests and national early warning scores within 24 hours of emergency admission can predict the risk of in-hospital mortality: a model development and validation study.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Mohammed A; Rudge, Gavin; Watson, Duncan; Wood, Gordon; Smith, Gary B; Prytherch, David R; Girling, Alan; Stevens, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    We explored the use of routine blood tests and national early warning scores (NEWS) reported within ±24 hours of admission to predict in-hospital mortality in emergency admissions, using empirical decision Tree models because they are intuitive and may ultimately be used to support clinical decision making. A retrospective analysis of adult emergency admissions to a large acute hospital during April 2009 to March 2010 in the West Midlands, England, with a full set of index blood tests results (albumin, creatinine, haemoglobin, potassium, sodium, urea, white cell count and an index NEWS undertaken within ±24 hours of admission). We developed a Tree model by randomly splitting the admissions into a training (50%) and validation dataset (50%) and assessed its accuracy using the concordance (c-) statistic. Emergency admissions (about 30%) did not have a full set of index blood tests and/or NEWS and so were not included in our analysis. There were 23248 emergency admissions with a full set of blood tests and NEWS with an in-hospital mortality of 5.69%. The Tree model identified age, NEWS, albumin, sodium, white cell count and urea as significant (p<0.001) predictors of death, which described 17 homogeneous subgroups of admissions with mortality ranging from 0.2% to 60%. The c-statistic for the training model was 0.864 (95%CI 0.852 to 0.87) and when applied to the testing data set this was 0.853 (95%CI 0.840 to 0.866). An easy to interpret validated risk adjustment Tree model using blood test and NEWS taken within ±24 hours of admission provides good discrimination and offers a novel approach to risk adjustment which may potentially support clinical decision making. Given the nature of the clinical data, the results are likely to be generalisable but further research is required to investigate this promising approach.

  2. A study of the quantity of some stable and labile coagulation factors in fresh-frozen plasma produced from whole blood stored for 24 hours in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Naghadeh, Hossin Timori; Roudkenar, Mehryar Habibi

    2009-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess whether the quantities of some coagulation factors in fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) produced from whole blood stored at 4°C for 24 h are adequate for their intended purpose. Materials and methods The amounts of some coagulation factors (fibrinogen, FV, FVII, FVIII, FX and FXI) in FFP separated from whole blood after storage at 4°C for 24 h were compared with the amounts of the corresponding coagulation factors in FFP separated from whole blood within 8 h of donation. Results In 98% of the FFP units prepared after 24 h of storage, the levels of fibrinogen, FV, FVII, FX and FXI were greater than 0.5 IU/mL. The concentration of FVIII in the 24 h plasma units was 82% of that found in the FFP units prepared within 8 h of blood collection. In FFP, FVIII, FVII and FX were reduced by 38%, 8% and 3%, respectively, but FV, FXI and fibrinogen were not reduced. Conclusion These data suggest that there is good retention of coagulation factor activity in plasma produced from whole blood stored at 4ºC for 24 h and that such plasma would be an acceptable product for most patients requiring FFP. PMID:19290079

  3. A study of the quantity of some stable and labile coagulation factors in fresh-frozen plasma produced from whole blood stored for 24 hours in Iran.

    PubMed

    Naghadeh, Hossin Timori; Roudkenar, Mehryar Habibi

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether the quantities of some coagulation factors in fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) produced from whole blood stored at 4 degrees C for 24 h are adequate for their intended purpose. The amounts of some coagulation factors (fibrinogen, FV, FVII, FVIII, FX and FXI) in FFP separated from whole blood after storage at 4 degrees C for 24 h were compared with the amounts of the corresponding coagulation factors in FFP separated from whole blood within 8 h of donation. In 98% of the FFP units prepared after 24 h of storage, the levels of fibrinogen, FV, FVII, FX and FXI were greater than 0.5 IU/mL. The concentration of FVIII in the 24 h plasma units was 82% of that found in the FFP units prepared within 8 h of blood collection. In FFP, FVIII, FVII and FX were reduced by 38%, 8% and 3%, respectively, but FV, FXI and fibrinogen were not reduced. These data suggest that there is good retention of coagulation factor activity in plasma produced from whole blood stored at 4 masculineC for 24 h and that such plasma would be an acceptable product for most patients requiring FFP.

  4. 24-Hour Academic Libraries: Adjusting to Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Adam C.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the adaptive measures that academic libraries perform when implementing and operating a 24-hour schedule. Five in-depth interviews were conducted with current managerial-level librarians at 24-hour academic libraries. The exploratory interviews revealed similar measures for security, budgeting, employee…

  5. 24-Hour Academic Libraries: Adjusting to Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Adam C.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the adaptive measures that academic libraries perform when implementing and operating a 24-hour schedule. Five in-depth interviews were conducted with current managerial-level librarians at 24-hour academic libraries. The exploratory interviews revealed similar measures for security, budgeting, employee…

  6. High serum lactate level may predict death within 24 hours

    PubMed Central

    Zoubi, Abd Almajid; Kuria, Shiran; Blum, Nava

    2015-01-01

    Background Unexpected death within 24 hours of admission is a real challenge for the clinician in the emergency room. How to diagnose these patients and the right approach to prevent sudden death with 24 hours is still an enigma. The aims of our study were to find the independent factors that may affect the clinical outcome in the first 24 hours of admission to the hospital. Methods We performed a retrospective study defining unexpected death within 24 hours of admission in our Department of Medicine in the last 6 years. We found 43 patients who died within 24 hours of admission, and compared their clinical and biochemical characteristics to 6055 consecutive patients who were admitted in that period of time and did not die within the first 24 hours of admission. The parameters that were used include gender, age, temperature, clinical and laboratory criteria for SIRS, arterial blood lactate, and arterial blood pH. Results Most of the patients who died within 24 hours had sepsis with SIRS. These patients were older (78.6±14.7 vs. 65.2±20.2 years [p<.0001]), had higher lactate levels (8.0±4.8 vs. 2.1±1.8mmol/L [p<.0001]), and lower pH (7.2±0.2 vs. 7.4±0.1 [p<.0001]). Logistic regression analysis found that lactate was the strongest independent parameter to predict death within 24 hours of admission (OR 1.366 [95% CI 1.235–1.512]), followed by old age (OR 1.048 [95% CI 1.048–1.075] and low arterial blood pH (OR 0.007 [CI <0.001–0.147]). When gender was analyzed, pH was not an independent variable in females (only in males). Conclusions The significant independent variable that predicted death within 24 hours of admission was arterial blood lactate level on admission. Older age was also an independent variable; low pH affected only males, but was a less dominant variable. We suggest use of arterial blood lactate level on admission as a bio-marker in patients with suspected sepsis admitted to the hospital for risk assessment and prediction of death within 24

  7. Estimating 24-hour urinary sodium excretion from casual urinary sodium concentrations in Western populations: the INTERSALT study.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ian J; Dyer, Alan R; Chan, Queenie; Cogswell, Mary E; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Stamler, Jeremiah; Elliott, Paul

    2013-06-01

    High intakes of dietary sodium are associated with elevated blood pressure levels and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. National and international guidelines recommend reduced sodium intake in the general population, which necessitates population-wide surveillance. We assessed the utility of casual (spot) urine specimens in estimating 24-hour urinary sodium excretion as a marker of sodium intake in the International Cooperative Study on Salt, Other Factors, and Blood Pressure. There were 5,693 participants recruited in 1984-1987 at the ages of 20-59 years from 29 North American and European samples. Participants were randomly assigned to test or validation data sets. Equations derived from casual urinary sodium concentration and other variables in the test data were applied to the validation data set. Correlations between observed and estimated 24-hour sodium excretion were 0.50 for individual men and 0.51 for individual women; the values were 0.79 and 0.71, respectively, for population samples. Bias in mean values (observed minus estimated) was small; for men and women, the values were -1.6 mmol per 24 hours and 2.3 mmol per 24 hours, respectively, at the individual level and -1.8 mmol per 24 hours and 2.2 mmol per 24 hours, respectively, at the population level. Proportions of individuals with urinary 24-hour sodium excretion above the recommended levels were slightly overestimated by the models. Casual urine specimens may be a useful, low-burden, low-cost alternative to 24-hour urine collections for estimation of population sodium intakes; ongoing calibration with study-specific 24-hour urinary collections is recommended to increase validity.

  8. Relationship of sodium and magnesium intakes to hypertension proven by 24-hour urianalysis in a South Indian population.

    PubMed

    Chidambaram, Natesan; Sethupathy, Subramaniyam; Saravanan, Nadanam; Mori, Mari; Yamori, Yukio; Garg, Arun Kumar; Chockalingam, Arun

    2014-08-01

    The Healthy Eating Asians Remain Together (HEART) study was carried out to investigate the relationship between 24-hour urine nutritional biomarkers and cardiometabolic risks in India. A total of 168 participants underwent health examination to assess body mass index, blood pressure, and 24-hour urine samples. The participants were divided into normotensive and hypertensive. The average blood pressure, weight, and body mass index were significantly high in patients considered to be hypertensive, and 24-hour urine biomarkers showed significant differences in sodium and magnesium/creatinine ratios in patients aged 40 and older. High sodium intake and reduction in magnesium consumption are associated with increased blood pressure in patients from India. ©2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Spot urine tests in predicting 24-hour urine sodium excretion in Asian patients.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Srinivas; Teo, Boon Wee; Toh, Qi Chun; Koh, Yun Yin; Li, Jialiang; Sethi, Sunil; Lee, Evan J C

    2013-11-01

    The control of hypertension is often suboptimal, and it is frequently due to excessive sodium intake. Monitoring sodium intake is cumbersome and involves 24-hour collection of urine. We hypothesize that a spot urine test can accurately predict 24-hour urine sodium excretion in an Asian population. This is a prospective, observational study. We used stored urine specimens (n = 333) from the Asian Kidney Disease Study and Singapore Kidney Function Study Phase I. We measured spot urine tests and correlated these variables to the previously measured 24-hour urine sodium measurements. Age, gender, ethnicity, diastolic blood pressure, height, weight, body mass index, serum creatinine, spot urine sodium, spot urine chloride, and spot urine osmolality were associated with 24-hour urine sodium excretion. The final model for predicting 24-hour urine sodium less than 100 mmol included age, gender, ethnicity, weight, and spot urine sodium. Spot urine sodium can help monitor a patient's sodium intake when used in the derived 5-variable equation. Copyright © 2013 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The effect of storing whole blood at 22 degrees C for up to 24 hours with and without rapid cooling on the quality of red cell concentrates and fresh-frozen plasma.

    PubMed

    Wilsher, Claire; Garwood, Margaret; Sutherland, Janet; Turner, Craig; Cardigan, Rebecca

    2008-11-01

    Storage of whole blood (WB) for less than 24 hours at ambient temperature is permitted in Europe, but data directly comparing storage with and without active cooling are lacking, which was investigated and compared to current standard methods. WB was stored in one of four different ways for 24 hours after donation before processing on Day 1 to red cell concentrates (RCCs) in saline-adenine-glucose-mannitol and fresh-frozen plasma (FFP; n = 20 each): 1) at 22 degrees C in plastic trays, 2) in cooling devices (Compocool II, NPBI), 3) at 4 degrees C, or 4) processed from WB without storage less than 8 hours from donation (Day 0). 2,3-Diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) in RCCs were lower after ambient storage compared with those processed on Day 0 or after 4 degrees C storage. Rapid cooling slowed the loss of 2,3-DPG but levels were undetectable by Day 21 with any method. On Day 42 of RCC storage, there was no significant difference between storage methods in levels of adenosine triphosphate or hemolysis. Potassium levels were lower in RCCs from WB stored at ambient compared with those produced on Day 0, regardless of the use of cooling plates. FFP produced from WB on Day 0 or after storage at ambient with or without active cooling met UK specifications (>75% of units >0.70 IU/mL Factor VIII). These data suggest that RCCs and FFP produced from WB that has been stored at ambient temperature with or without active cooling are of acceptable quality compared with those produced using current standard methods in the United Kingdom.

  11. Continuous Blood Pressure Monitoring in Daily Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Guillaume; Shuzo, Masaki; Ushida, Hiroyuki; Hidaka, Keita; Yanagimoto, Shintaro; Imai, Yasushi; Kosaka, Akio; Delaunay, Jean-Jacques; Yamada, Ichiro

    Continuous monitoring of blood pressure in daily life could improve early detection of cardiovascular disorders, as well as promoting healthcare. Conventional ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) equipment can measure blood pressure at regular intervals for 24 hours, but is limited by long measuring time, low sampling rate, and constrained measuring posture. In this paper, we demonstrate a new method for continuous real-time measurement of blood pressure during daily activities. Our method is based on blood pressure estimation from pulse wave velocity (PWV) calculation, which formula we improved to take into account changes in the inner diameter of blood vessels. Blood pressure estimation results using our new method showed a greater precision of measured data during exercise, and a better accuracy than the conventional PWV method.

  12. Low Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... a problem. Sometimes blood pressure that is too low can also cause problems. Blood pressure is the ... reading is 90/60 or lower, you have low blood pressure. Some people have low blood pressure ...

  13. Blood Pressure Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood pressure readings at home. Tracking your blood pressure readings It can be helpful in diagnosing or ... options might work best for you. Low blood pressure Low blood pressure that either doesn't cause ...

  14. [24 hours at Johannesburg Hospital Trauma Unit].

    PubMed

    Østerballe, Lene; Asbury, Sarah; Boffard, Kenneth D

    2011-05-02

    This paper describes the hectic work as a doctor at the Trauma Unit of Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital, a highly regarded and well-visited trauma unit worldwide. A trauma junior doctor is followed on a 24-hour-call through a full casualty to urgent operations and complicated postoperative management of the trauma patient. In a diary fashion the paper describes the evidence-based guidelines of management of certain trauma cases brought into the trauma unit during the 24-hour-shift.

  15. The 24-Hour Mathematical Modeling Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galluzzo, Benjamin J.; Wendt, Theodore J.

    2015-01-01

    Across the mathematics curriculum there is a renewed emphasis on applications of mathematics and on mathematical modeling. Providing students with modeling experiences beyond the ordinary classroom setting remains a challenge, however. In this article, we describe the 24-hour Mathematical Modeling Challenge, an extracurricular event that exposes…

  16. The 24-Hour Mathematical Modeling Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galluzzo, Benjamin J.; Wendt, Theodore J.

    2015-01-01

    Across the mathematics curriculum there is a renewed emphasis on applications of mathematics and on mathematical modeling. Providing students with modeling experiences beyond the ordinary classroom setting remains a challenge, however. In this article, we describe the 24-hour Mathematical Modeling Challenge, an extracurricular event that exposes…

  17. High blood pressure medicines

    MedlinePlus

    Hypertension - medicines ... blood vessel diseases. You may need to take medicines to lower your blood pressure if lifestyle changes ... blood pressure to the target level. WHEN ARE MEDICINES FOR HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE USED Most of the ...

  18. Blood Pressure and Physical Function

    PubMed Central

    Forbang, Nketi; Ix, Joachim; Criqui, Michael; Rifkin, Dena

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hypertension in older adults is a dynamic process, with significant diurnal fluctuation. Little research has been done on the associations between increased short-term blood pressure variability and blunted night-time dipping in respect to decreased physical function in the elderly. Our aim is to use a cross-sectional analysis to illuminate any associations. Methods: A cross-sectional sub-study (mean age: 72, 67.5% female) was performed on selected participants from the San Diego Population Study (Criqui, et al, 2003). Blood pressure was measured both in the office (3 independent blood pressure readings) and using a 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring cuff. Blood pressure variability was measured using average real variability (ARV). Physical function was measured using the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) test. Statistical analysis was performed on IBM SPSS Statistics (1911) software. Results: An unadjusted univariate analysis adjusted for age and gender showed associations between 24-hr ARV of SBP (P = .001), 24-hr ARV pulse pressure (P < .001), and percent systolic dipping (P = .011) and SPPB score. After multivariate analysis adjusted for age and gender was performed, the results were substantially attenuated. However, the association of ARV of SBP was not significant with a P-value of .052 and the ARV of pulse pressure remained significant with a P-value of .022. Multivariate hierarchical linear regression models revealed insignificant trends. Conclusions: Increased short-term variability and blunted night-time dipping were associated physical function but were not independent of age and body mass index (BMI). Further research can be done as to the biology of how both age and BMI influence blood pressure patterns. The trends observed in this study may warrant the investigation of abnormal blood pressure patterns in those who are either elderly or have increased BMI.

  19. [24-hour heart rate profile in assessment of target organs in women with arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Shipilova, T; Pshenichnikov, I; Karaĭ, D; Ripul'k, E; Kaĭk, Iu

    2013-01-01

    To study relationships of 24-hour heart rate (HR) profile with involvement of the heart and kidney in women with arterial hypertension (AH). We examined women (n=273) aged 40-70 years with essential 2-3 degree AH. Blood pressure (BP) measurements (8 times in a week), electrocardiography, echocardiography, ambulatory BP monitoring, complex laboratory diagnostics. Less than 10% HR lowering was registered in 22.7% of patients. Compared with the group with normal HR profile this group was characterized by high levels of clinical systolic and diastolic BP (SBP, DBP), mean 24-hour BP, nocturnal BP, SBP time index, as well as low levels of 24-hour SBP, HR, and HR variability. Same group had also significantly greater left atrial dimensions, and higher values of NT-proBNP and total risk according to SCORE (Systematic Coronary Risk Estimation). Correlation analysis revealed significant reverse association between 24-hour HR index which reflected circadian character of cardiac rhythm, left atrial dimension (r=-0.212) and NT-proBNP (r=-0.346). Flat HR profile was not statistically significant for detection of cardiac pathology (odds ratio 1.19; 95% confidence interval from 0.67 to 2.14). Insufficient nocturnal HR lowering in women with AH was not associated with significant changes of the myocardium and kidney and clear cat links with dyslipidemia, obesity, and smoking.

  20. [Clinical significance of nocturnal blood pressure and blood pressure variability: analysis of 522 cases].

    PubMed

    Palatini, P; Mormino, P; Martina, S; Businaro, R; Penzo, M; Racioppa, A; Guzzardi, G; Anaclerio, M; Pessina, A C

    1990-03-01

    Purpose of the study was to investigate whether and to what extent blood pressure variability and average night-time blood pressure are related to cardiovascular complications in hypertension. To this aim 60 normotensive and 462 hypertensive subjects were studied by means of non-invasive 24 hour blood pressure monitoring, using either the Avionics, or the ICR Spacelabs, or the Takeda system. Each subject was attributed a target organ damage score on the basis of 12-lead electrocardiogram, chest X-ray and fundoscopy, starting from 0 (no damage) up to 5 (maximum degree of damage). The 522 subjects were subsequently subdivided into 5 classes of increasing average daytime diastolic blood pressure. In each class a higher degree of cardiovascular complications was present in the subjects with the higher blood pressure variability and the higher average night-time blood pressure. From these results it may be inferred that both blood pressure variability and night-time blood pressure are related to the degree of target organ damage in hypertension. This stresses the importance of recording blood pressure throughout the 24 hours.

  1. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... normal blood pressure 140/90 or higher is high blood pressure Between 120 and 139 for the top number, ... prehypertension. Prehypertension means you may end up with high blood pressure, unless you take steps to prevent it. High ...

  2. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Print Page Text Size: A A A Listen High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Nearly 1 in 3 American adults has ... weight. How Will I Know if I Have High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is a silent problem — you ...

  3. High blood pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000468.htm High blood pressure To use the sharing features on this page, ... body. Hypertension is the term used to describe high blood pressure. Blood pressure readings are given as two numbers. ...

  4. [24-hour systolic wave increment index monitoring in patients with low-renin arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Valieva, Z S; Chikhladze, N M; Rogoza, A N; Iarovaia, E B; Bosykh, E G; Chazova, I E

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the circadian rhythm of blood pressure (BP) and daily reflected wave values in patients with low-renin hypertension with normal and elevated aldosterone production. The investigation included 66 patients. 24-hour BP monitoring was carried out and arterial wall rigidity and reflected wave values were assessed in all the patients. The patients with hyperaldosteronemia were found to have not only statistically significant severer hypertension, impaired circadian rhythms of BP, but also impaired augmentation index (Aix)--mainly its nocturnal increase. A positive correlation was found between nocturnal Aix and resting plasma aldosterone concentrations (r = -0.31; p = 0.002). The findings suggest the expediency of 24-hour systolic wave increment index monitoring in hypertensive patients ofthis category.

  5. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. High Blood Pressure What Is High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is a common disease in ... the heart, kidneys, brain, and eyes. Types of High Blood Pressure There are two main types of high blood ...

  6. Impact of Different Normality Thresholds for 24-hour ABPM at the Primary Health Care Level

    PubMed Central

    Grezzana, Guilherme Brasil; Moraes, David William; Stein, Airton Tetelbon; Pellanda, Lucia Campos

    2017-01-01

    Background Hypertension is an important risk factor for cardiovascular outcomes. Primary health care (PHC) physicians should be prepared to act appropriately in the prevention of cardiovascular risk factors. However, the rates of patients with control of blood pressure (BP) remain low. The impact of the reclassification of high BP by 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) can lead to different medical decisions in PHC. Objective To evaluate the agreement between the BP measured by a conventional method by PHC physicians and by 24-hour ABPM, considering different BP normal thresholds for the 24-hour ABPM according to the V Brazilian ABPM Guidelines and the European Society of Hypertension Guidelines. Methods A cross-sectional study including 569 hypertensive patients. The BP was initially measured by the PHC physicians and, later, by 24-hour ABPM. The BP measurements were obtained independently between the two methods. The therapeutic targets for the conventional BP followed the guidelines by the Eighth Joint National Committee (JNC 8), the V ABPM Brazilian Guidelines, and the 2013 European Hypertension Guidelines. Results There was an accuracy of 54.8% (95% confidence interval [95%CI] 0.51 - 0.58%) for the BP measured with the conventional method when compared with the 24-hour ABPM, with a sensitivity of 85% (95%CI 80.8 - 88.6%), specificity of 31.9% (95%CI 28.7 - 34.7%), and kappa value of 0.155, when considering the European Hypertension Guidelines. When using more stringent thresholds to characterize the BP as "normal" by ABPM, the accuracy was 45% (95%CI 0.41 - 0.47%) for conventional measurement when compared with 24-hour ABPM, with a sensitivity of 86.7% (95%CI 0.81 - 0.91%), specificity of 29% (95%CI 0.26 - 0.30%), and kappa value of 0.103. Conclusion The BP measurements obtained by PHC physicians showed low accuracy when compared with those obtained by 24-hour ABPM, regardless of the threshold set by the different guidelines. PMID:28099585

  7. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) KidsHealth > For Teens > Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) A ... rest temperature diet emotions posture medicines Why Is High Blood Pressure Bad? High blood pressure means a person's heart ...

  8. Comparison of 24-hour cardiovascular and autonomic function in paraplegia, tetraplegia, and control groups: implications for cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Rosado-Rivera, Dwindally; Radulovic, M; Handrakis, John P; Cirnigliaro, Christopher M; Jensen, A Marley; Kirshblum, Steve; Bauman, William A; Wecht, Jill Maria

    2011-01-01

    Fluctuations in 24-hour cardiovascular hemodynamics, specifically heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP), are thought to reflect autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity. Persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) represent a model of ANS dysfunction, which may affect 24-hour hemodynamics and predispose these individuals to increased cardiovascular disease risk. To determine 24-hour cardiovascular and ANS function among individuals with tetraplegia (n=20; TETRA: C4-C8), high paraplegia (n=10; HP: T2-T5), low paraplegia (n=9; LP: T7-T12), and non-SCI controls (n=10). Twenty-four-hour ANS function was assessed by time domain parameters of heart rate variability (HRV); the standard deviation of the 5-minute average R-R intervals (SDANN; milliseconds/ms), and the root-mean square of the standard deviation of the R-R intervals (rMSSD; ms). Subjects wore 24-hour ambulatory monitors to record HR, HRV, and BP. Mixed analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed significantly lower 24-hour BP in the tetraplegic group; however, BP did not differ between the HP, LP, and control groups. Mixed ANOVA suggested significantly elevated 24-hour HR in the HP and LP groups compared to the TETRA and control groups (P<0.05); daytime HR was higher in both paraplegic groups compared to the TETRA and control groups (P<0.01) and nighttime HR was significantly elevated in the LP group compared to the TETRA and control groups (P<0.01). Twenty-four-hour SDANN was significantly increased in the HP group compared to the LP and TETRA groups (P<0.05) and rMSSD was significantly lower in the LP compared to the other three groups (P<0.05). Elevated 24-hour HR in persons with paraplegia, in concert with altered HRV dynamics, may impart significant adverse cardiovascular consequences, which are currently unappreciated.

  9. High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... The Health Information Center High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy What Is High Blood Pressure? Blood pressure is ... Are the Effects of High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy? Although many pregnant women with high blood pressure ...

  10. Beneficial Effects of Paeoniflorin Enriched Extract on Blood Pressure Variability and Target Organ Damage in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zheng-Biao; Lei, Shan-Shan; Chen, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Blood pressure variability (BPV) is associated with the development and progression of severe target organ damage (TOD). This study aims to evaluate the protective effect of paeoniflorin enriched extract from Radix Paeoniae Alba (PG) on BPV and TOD in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). All SHR were orally treated with distilled water, metoprolol (MP, 20 mg/kg), and PG (PG-H, 90 mg/kg or PG-L, 30 mg/kg) for a single time or daily for 7 weeks. The 24-hour dynamic blood pressure was monitored and then calculated BPV including long- and short-term systolic blood pressure variability (SBPV), diastolic blood pressure variability (DBPV), mean blood pressure variability (MBPV), and heart rate variability (HRV) as well as the 24-hour-SBP, 24-hour-DBP, and 24-hour-MBP. The protective effects of PG on TOD were observed by histopathologic and biochemical detection. The results indicated that long- and short-term SBPV, DBPV, MBPV, and HRV as well as 24-hour-SBP, 24-hour-DBP, and 24-hour-MBP showed no significant changes after single-dose administration of PG and significantly decreased after administration with PG for 7 weeks. PG could also markedly improve the damage of aorta, heart, kidney, and brain. This study suggested that PG could notably reduce BPV, stabilize blood pressure, and mitigate TOD in SHR. PMID:28243310

  11. Blood pressure measurement

    MedlinePlus

    ... have this problem. High blood pressure is often discovered during a visit to the provider for another ... to develop high blood pressure. If you have diabetes, heart disease, or kidney problems, or if you ...

  12. Low blood pressure

    MedlinePlus

    Hypotension; Blood pressure - low; Postprandial hypotension; Orthostatic hypotension; Neurally mediated hypotension; NMH ... Blood pressure varies from one person to another. A drop as little as 20 mmHg, can cause problems for ...

  13. Blood Pressure Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... high blood pressure can lead to… stroke. kidney failure. heart attack and heart failure. all of the above. ... high blood pressure can lead to stroke, kidney failure, heart attack and heart failure A is the correct ...

  14. High blood pressure - infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007329.htm High blood pressure - infants To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. High blood pressure (hypertension) is an increase in the force of ...

  15. High Blood Pressure Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. High Blood Pressure Prevention Steps You Can Take You can take steps to prevent high blood pressure by adopting these healthy lifestyle habits. Follow a ...

  16. Blood Pressure Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    High blood pressure, also called hypertension, usually has no symptoms. But it can cause serious problems such as stroke, ... and kidney failure. If you cannot control your high blood pressure through lifestyle changes such as losing weight and ...

  17. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Visitor Information RePORT NIH Fact Sheets Home > Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) Small Text Medium Text Large Text Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) YESTERDAY Hypertension is a silent killer because it ...

  18. Understanding Blood Pressure Readings

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Understanding Blood Pressure Readings Updated:Mar 22,2017 What do your ... it’s too high for blood pressure High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP • Know Your ...

  19. Low Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Low Blood Pressure - When Blood Pressure Is Too Low Updated:Dec 13,2016 How ... content was last reviewed October 2016 High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP Introduction What ...

  20. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... En Español Who is at risk? How is high blood pressure treated? Understanding your blood pressure: What do the ...

  1. Relation of Urinary Calcium and Magnesium Excretion to Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Kesteloot†, Hugo; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Brown, Ian J.; Chan, Queenie; Wijeyesekera, Anisha; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Zhao, Liancheng; Dyer, Alan R.; Unwin, Robert J.; Stamler, Jeremiah; Elliott, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Data indicate an inverse association between dietary calcium and magnesium intakes and blood pressure (BP); however, much less is known about associations between urinary calcium and magnesium excretion and BP in general populations. The authors assessed the relation of BP to 24-hour excretion of calcium and magnesium in 2 cross-sectional studies. The International Study of Macro- and Micro-Nutrients and Blood Pressure (INTERMAP) comprised 4,679 persons aged 40–59 years from 17 population samples in China, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States, and the International Cooperative Study on Salt, Other Factors, and Blood Pressure (INTERSALT) comprised 10,067 persons aged 20–59 years from 52 samples around the world. Timed 24-hour urine collections, BP measurements, and nutrient data from four 24-hour dietary recalls (INTERMAP) were collected. In multiple linear regression analyses, urinary calcium excretion was directly associated with BP. After adjustment for multiple confounders (including weight, height, alcohol intake, calcium intake, urinary sodium level, and urinary potassium intake), systolic BP was 1.9 mm Hg higher per each 4.1 mmol per 24 hours (2 standard deviations) of higher urinary calcium excretion (associations were smaller for diastolic BP) in INTERMAP. Qualitatively similar associations were observed in INTERSALT analyses. Associations between magnesium excretion and BP were small and nonsignificant for most of the models examined. The present data suggest that altered calcium homoeostasis, as exhibited by increased calcium excretion, is associated with higher BP levels. PMID:21624957

  2. Ex Situ Perfusion of Human Limb Allografts for 24 Hours.

    PubMed

    Werner, Nicole L; Alghanem, Fares; Rakestraw, Stephanie L; Sarver, Dylan C; Nicely, Bruce; Pietroski, Richard E; Lange, Paul; Rudich, Steven M; Mendias, Christopher L; Rojas-Pena, Alvaro; Magee, John C; Bartlett, Robert H; Ozer, Kagan

    2017-03-01

    Vascularized composite allografts, particularly hand and forearm, have limited ischemic tolerance after procurement. In bilateral hand transplantations, this demands a 2 team approach and expedited transfer of the allograft, limiting the recovery to a small geographic area. Ex situ perfusion may be an alternative allograft preservation method to extend allograft survival time. This is a short report of 5 human limbs maintained for 24 hours with ex situ perfusion. Upper limbs were procured from brain-dead organ donors. Following recovery, the brachial artery was cannulated and flushed with 10 000 U of heparin. The limb was then attached to a custom-made, near-normothermic (30-33°C) ex situ perfusion system composed of a pump, reservoir, and oxygenator. Perfusate was plasma-based with a hemoglobin concentration of 4 to 6 g/dL. Average warm ischemia time was 76 minutes. Perfusion was maintained at an average systolic pressure of 93 ± 2 mm Hg, flow 310 ± 20 mL/min, and vascular resistance 153 ± 16 mm Hg/L per minute. Average oxygen consumption was 1.1 ± 0.2 mL/kg per minute. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation continually displayed contraction until the end of perfusion, and histology showed no myocyte injury. Human limb allografts appeared viable after 24 hours of near-normothermic ex situ perfusion. Although these results are early and need validation with transplantation, this technology has promise for extending allograft storage times.

  3. Low Blood Pressure (Hypotension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and fatigue. Fever, vomiting, severe diarrhea, overuse of diuretics and strenuous exercise can lead to dehydration. Blood ... can cause low blood pressure, including: Water pills (diuretics), such as furosemide (Lasix) and hydrochlorothiazide (Maxzide, Microzide, ...

  4. Blood Pressure Measurement: Clinic, Home, Ambulatory, and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Drawz, Paul E.; Abdalla, Mohamed; Rahman, Mahboob

    2014-01-01

    Blood pressure has traditionally been measured in the clinic setting using the auscultory method and a mercury sphygmomanometer. Technological advances have led to improvements in measuring clinic blood pressure and allowed for measuring blood pressures outside the clinic. This review outlines various methods for evaluating blood pressure and the clinical utility of each type of measurement. Home blood pressures and 24 hour ambulatory blood pressures have improved our ability to evaluate risk for target organ damage and hypertension related morbidity and mortality. Measuring home blood pressures may lead to more active participation in health care by patients and has the potential to improve blood pressure control. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring enables the measuring nighttime blood pressures and diurnal changes, which may be the most accurate predictors of risk associated with elevated blood pressure. Additionally, reducing nighttime blood pressure is feasible and may be an important component of effective antihypertensive therapy. Finally, estimating central aortic pressures and pulse wave velocity are two of the newer methods for assessing blood pressure and hypertension related target organ damage. PMID:22521624

  5. Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring in Clinical Practice: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Viera, Anthony J.; Shimbo, Daichi

    2016-01-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring offers the ability to collect blood pressure readings several times an hour across a 24-hour period. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring facilitates the identification of white-coat hypertension, the phenomenon whereby certain individuals who are not on antihypertensive medication show elevated blood pressure in a clinical setting but show non-elevated blood pressure averages when assessed by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Additionally, readings can be segmented into time windows of particular interest, e.g., mean daytime and nighttime values. During sleep, blood pressure typically decreases, or dips, such that mean sleep blood pressure is lower than mean awake blood pressure. A non-dipping pattern and nocturnal hypertension are strongly associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Approximately 70% of individuals dip ≥10% at night, while 30% have non-dipping patterns, when blood pressure remains similar to daytime average, or occasionally rises above daytime average. The various blood pressure categorizations afforded by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring are valuable for clinical management of high blood pressure since they increase accuracy for diagnosis and the prediction of cardiovascular risk. PMID:25107387

  6. Blood Pressure Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Engineering Development Laboratory developed a system for the cardiovascular study of weightless astronauts. This was designed to aid people with congestive heart failure and diabetes. While in space, astronauts' blood pressure rises, heart rate becomes unstable, and there are sometimes postflight lightheadedness or blackouts. The Baro-Cuff studies the resetting of blood pressure. When a silicone rubber chamber is strapped to the neck, the Baro-Cuff stimulates the carotid arteries by electronically controlled pressure application. Blood pressure controls in patients may be studied.

  7. Nighttime blood pressure in cluster headache.

    PubMed

    Santos Lasaosa, Sonia; Navarro Calzada, Jorge; Velázquez Benito, Alba; Pérez Lázaro, Cristina

    2011-10-01

    It has been proposed that desaturation of oxygen during an apnea event is the trigger for cluster headache. Obstructive sleep apnea has been associated with a higher than normal cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Some obstructive sleep apnea syndrome patients lack the sleep-related, nocturnal decrease, or "dip" in blood pressure, which is seen in normal individuals. The aim of this study is to assess whether this non-dipper pattern is present in cluster headache patients. A total of 30 normotensive cluster headache patients underwent an ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. "Non dippers" were defined as patients with a nighttime mean blood pressure fall <10%. Fifteen cluster headache patients (50%) were non-dippers, a frequency higher than expected. The pattern of nocturnal non-dipping is associated with a higher body mass index. Non-dipper patients displayed higher mean nighttime systolic and diastolic blood pressure. No significant difference was observed in the mean 24-hour and daytime blood pressure. The high incidence (50%) of non-dipper pattern in both processes, cluster headache and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, provides support for the hypothesis of a relationship between theses 2 disorders. © 2011 American Headache Society.

  8. Comparison of 24-hour cardiovascular and autonomic function in paraplegia, tetraplegia, and control groups: Implications for cardiovascular risk

    PubMed Central

    Rosado-Rivera, Dwindally; Radulovic, M.; Handrakis, John P.; Cirnigliaro, Christopher M.; Jensen, A. Marley; Kirshblum, Steve; Bauman, William A.; Wecht, Jill Maria

    2011-01-01

    Background Fluctuations in 24-hour cardiovascular hemodynamics, specifically heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP), are thought to reflect autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity. Persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) represent a model of ANS dysfunction, which may affect 24-hour hemodynamics and predispose these individuals to increased cardiovascular disease risk. Objective To determine 24-hour cardiovascular and ANS function among individuals with tetraplegia (n = 20; TETRA: C4–C8), high paraplegia (n = 10; HP: T2–T5), low paraplegia (n = 9; LP: T7–T12), and non-SCI controls (n = 10). Twenty-four-hour ANS function was assessed by time domain parameters of heart rate variability (HRV); the standard deviation of the 5-minute average R–R intervals (SDANN; milliseconds/ms), and the root-mean square of the standard deviation of the R–R intervals (rMSSD; ms). Subjects wore 24-hour ambulatory monitors to record HR, HRV, and BP. Mixed analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed significantly lower 24-hour BP in the tetraplegic group; however, BP did not differ between the HP, LP, and control groups. Mixed ANOVA suggested significantly elevated 24-hour HR in the HP and LP groups compared to the TETRA and control groups (P < 0.05); daytime HR was higher in both paraplegic groups compared to the TETRA and control groups (P < 0.01) and nighttime HR was significantly elevated in the LP group compared to the TETRA and control groups (P < 0.01). Twenty-four-hour SDANN was significantly increased in the HP group compared to the LP and TETRA groups (P < 0.05) and rMSSD was significantly lower in the LP compared to the other three groups (P < 0.05). Elevated 24-hour HR in persons with paraplegia, in concert with altered HRV dynamics, may impart significant adverse cardiovascular consequences, which are currently unappreciated. PMID:21903013

  9. Human prolactin - 24-hour pattern with increased release during sleep.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassin, J. F.; Weitzman, E. D.; Kapen, S.; Frantz, A. G.

    1972-01-01

    Human prolactin was measured in plasma by radioimmunoassay at 20-minute intervals for a 24-hour period in each of six normal adults, whose sleep-wake cycles were monitored polygraphically. A marked diurnal variation in plasma concentrations was demonstrated, with highest values during sleep. Periods of episodic release occurred throughout the 24 hours.

  10. Human prolactin - 24-hour pattern with increased release during sleep.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassin, J. F.; Weitzman, E. D.; Kapen, S.; Frantz, A. G.

    1972-01-01

    Human prolactin was measured in plasma by radioimmunoassay at 20-minute intervals for a 24-hour period in each of six normal adults, whose sleep-wake cycles were monitored polygraphically. A marked diurnal variation in plasma concentrations was demonstrated, with highest values during sleep. Periods of episodic release occurred throughout the 24 hours.

  11. Blood Pressure Checker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    An estimated 30 million people in the United States have high blood pressure, or hypertension. But a great many of them are unaware of it because hypertension, in its initial stages, displays no symptoms. Thus, the simply-operated blood pressure checking devices now widely located in public places are useful health aids. The one pictured above, called -Medimax 30, is a direct spinoff from NASA technology developed to monitor astronauts in space. For manned space flights, NASA wanted a compact, highly-reliable, extremely accurate method of checking astronauts' blood pressure without the need for a physician's interpretive skill. NASA's Johnson Space Center and Technology, Inc., a contractor, developed an electronic sound processor that automatically analyzes blood flow sounds to get both systolic (contracting arteries) and diastolic (expanding arteries) blood pressure measurements. NASA granted a patent license for this technology to Advanced Life Sciences, Inc., New York City, manufacturers of Medimax 30.

  12. Pulse Blood Pressure Correlates with Late Outcome in Acute Ischemic Stroke without Significant Culprit Artery Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Tien, Yi-Ting; Chang, Ming-Hong; Lee, Yu-Shan; Liaw, Yeng-Fung; Chen, Po-Lin

    2016-05-01

    This study was conducted to test the hypothesis that elevated blood pressure at the early stage is associated with unfavorable outcome in acute ischemic stroke patients with stenosis of less than 50% of the culprit artery. Patients with acute ischemic stroke onset within 48 hours and stenosis of less than 50% of the culprit artery from a prospective stroke registry were analyzed. A modified Rankin Scale score of 1 or lower at 3 months was defined as a favorable late outcome. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to analyze the association between hemodynamic parameters and outcome. One hundred thirty-six patients fulfilled the selection criteria. Patients with favorable outcome had lower pulse pressure at emergency department (ED) triage, lower systolic blood pressure (SBP) at 24 hours, lower pulse pressure at 24 hours, and lower heart rate (HR) at 24 hours. The univariate logistic regression analysis showed that history of stroke, elevated SBP at 24 hours, elevated HR at 24 hours, elevated pulse pressure at 24 hours, and higher National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score at ED triage were associated with a less favorable late outcome. Two separate models of multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that pulse pressure at ED triage and pulse pressure at 24 hours, respectively, were significantly associated with less favorable outcome. Elevated pulse pressure at the early stage is independently associated with unfavorable late outcome in acute ischemic stroke patients with culprit artery stenosis less than 50%. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Measuring blood pressure].

    PubMed

    Estrada Reventos, Dolors; Pujol Navarro, Ester

    2008-09-01

    High blood pressure is one of the main factors which lead to cardiovascular cerebral-vascular and kidney diseases; therefore, nursing professionals should have enough basic knowledge to enable them to carry out a precocious diagnosis and correct follow-up procedures. Although students in nursing schools are taught how to correctly measure blood pressure, often this teaching does not meet the recommendations provided by different national and international guidelines. Thus it is important to know how to use the correct methodology to measure blood pressure.

  14. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... is at rest between beats Health care workers write blood pressure numbers with the systolic number above ... available to discuss recent findings and ongoing research projects about health conditions and social determinants that disproportionately ...

  15. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Practice healthy coping techniques, such as muscle relaxation, deep breathing or meditation. Getting regular physical activity and ... blood pressure at home. Practice relaxation or slow, deep breathing. Practice taking deep, slow breaths to help ...

  16. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... can improve your health in other ways. Mastering stress management techniques can lead to other behavior changes — including those that reduce your blood pressure. When looking for ways to manage stress, remember that you have many options. For example: ...

  17. The effects of calcium supplementation on ambulatory blood pressure in African-American adolescents.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, I. J.; Grim, C.; Dwyer, K.; Nicholson, L.; Dwyer, J.

    1996-01-01

    This longitudinal trial investigated the effects of calcium supplementation on the mean 24-hour blood pressure in African-American adolescents. Subjects were self-identified African-American adolescents from a high school in a suburb of Los Angeles, California. The subjects were randomly placed in a placebo or treatment group (placebo versus 1.5 g of calcium/day x 4 weeks). Follow-up mean 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) for both the treatment and control groups was lower than the baseline mean 24-hour ABP. In the treatment group, there was a decrease of 2.2 mm Hg in the mean systolic blood pressure and 0.7 mm Hg in the diastolic blood pressure. Relative to the placebo group, the net change in ABP was -1.7 mm Hg for systolic blood pressure and -0.5 mm Hg for the diastolic blood pressure. There was no statistically significant effect of calcium supplementation on the 24-hour mean ABP. The net effect of supplementation on ABP during waking and sleeping hours also was not significant. PMID:8990802

  18. The association of knowledge, attitudes and behaviours related to salt with 24-hour urinary sodium excretion.

    PubMed

    Land, Mary-Anne; Webster, Jacqui; Christoforou, Anthea; Johnson, Claire; Trevena, Helen; Hodgins, Frances; Chalmers, John; Woodward, Mark; Barzi, Federica; Smith, Wayne; Flood, Victoria; Jeffery, Paul; Nowson, Caryl; Neal, Bruce

    2014-04-04

    Salt reduction efforts usually have a strong focus on consumer education. Understanding the association between salt consumption levels and knowledge, attitudes and behaviours towards salt should provide insight into the likely effectiveness of education-based programs. A single 24-hour urine sample and a questionnaire describing knowledge, attitudes and behaviours was obtained from 306 randomly selected participants and 113 volunteers from a regional town in Australia. Mean age of all participants was 55 years (range 20-88), 55% were women and mean 24-hour urinary salt excretion was 8.8(3.6) g/d. There was no difference in salt excretion between the randomly selected and volunteer sample. Virtually all participants (95%) identified that a diet high in salt can cause serious health problems with the majority of participants (81%) linking a high salt diet to raised blood pressure. There was no difference in salt excretion between those who did 8.7(2.1) g/d and did not 7.5(3.3) g/d identify that a diet high in salt causes high blood pressure (p=0.1). Nor was there a difference between individuals who believed they consumed "too much" 8.9(3.3) g/d "just the right amount" 8.4(2.6) g/d or "too little salt" 9.1(3.7) g/d (p=0.2). Likewise, individuals who indicated that lowering their salt intake was important 8.5(2.9) g/d vs. not important 8.8(2.4) g/d did not have different consumption levels (p=0.4). The absence of a clear association between knowledge, attitudes and behaviours towards salt and actual salt consumption suggests that interventions focused on knowledge, attitudes and behaviours alone may be of limited efficacy.

  19. Health associations with meeting new 24-hour movement guidelines for Canadian children and youth.

    PubMed

    Carson, Valerie; Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Janssen, Ian; Tremblay, Mark S

    2017-02-01

    The study objective was to examine whether meeting the new Canadian 24-hour movement guidelines was associated with health indicators in a representative sample of Canadian children and youth. Cross-sectional findings are based on 4157 (1239 fasting subsample) children and youth aged 6-17years from cycles 1-3 of the Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS). Sleep and screen time were subjectively measured while moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA) was accelerometer-determined. Health indicators in the full sample (body mass index (BMI) z-scores, waist circumference, blood pressure, behavioral strengths and difficulties score (lower=better), and aerobic fitness) and fasting subsample (triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, C-reactive protein, and insulin) were measured. Meeting the overall guidelines was defined as: 9-11 hour/night (5-13years) or 8-10 hour/day (14-17years) of sleep, ≤2 hour/day of screen time, and ≥60 minute/day of MVPA. Compared to meeting all three recommendations, meeting none, one, and two recommendations were associated with a higher BMI z-score, waist circumference, and behavioral strengths and difficulties score and lower aerobic fitness in a gradient pattern (Ptrend<0.05). Additionally, compared to meeting all three recommendations, meeting none and one recommendation were associated with higher systolic blood pressure and insulin (Ptrend<0.05). Finally, compared to meeting all three recommendations, meeting no recommendations was associated with higher triglycerides and lower HDL-cholesterol (Ptrend<0.05). Collectively, meeting more recommendations within the 24-hour movement guidelines was associated with better overall health. Since a small proportion (17%) of this representative sample was meeting the overall guidelines, efforts to promote adoption are needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The association of knowledge, attitudes and behaviours related to salt with 24-hour urinary sodium excretion

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aim Salt reduction efforts usually have a strong focus on consumer education. Understanding the association between salt consumption levels and knowledge, attitudes and behaviours towards salt should provide insight into the likely effectiveness of education-based programs. Methods A single 24-hour urine sample and a questionnaire describing knowledge, attitudes and behaviours was obtained from 306 randomly selected participants and 113 volunteers from a regional town in Australia. Results Mean age of all participants was 55 years (range 20–88), 55% were women and mean 24-hour urinary salt excretion was 8.8(3.6) g/d. There was no difference in salt excretion between the randomly selected and volunteer sample. Virtually all participants (95%) identified that a diet high in salt can cause serious health problems with the majority of participants (81%) linking a high salt diet to raised blood pressure. There was no difference in salt excretion between those who did 8.7(2.1) g/d and did not 7.5(3.3) g/d identify that a diet high in salt causes high blood pressure (p = 0.1). Nor was there a difference between individuals who believed they consumed “too much” 8.9(3.3) g/d “just the right amount” 8.4(2.6) g/d or “too little salt” 9.1(3.7) g/d (p = 0.2). Likewise, individuals who indicated that lowering their salt intake was important 8.5(2.9) g/d vs. not important 8.8(2.4) g/d did not have different consumption levels (p = 0.4). Conclusion The absence of a clear association between knowledge, attitudes and behaviours towards salt and actual salt consumption suggests that interventions focused on knowledge, attitudes and behaviours alone may be of limited efficacy. PMID:24708561

  1. Dietary phosphorus and blood pressure: international study of macro- and micro-nutrients and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Paul; Kesteloot, Hugo; Appel, Lawrence J; Dyer, Alan R; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Chan, Queenie; Brown, Ian J; Zhao, Liancheng; Stamler, Jeremiah

    2008-03-01

    Raised blood pressure is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide; improved nutritional approaches to population-wide prevention are required. Few data are available on dietary phosphorus and blood pressure and none are available on possible combined effects of phosphorus, magnesium, and calcium on blood pressure. The International Study of Macro- and Micro-Nutrients and Blood Pressure is a cross-sectional epidemiologic study of 4680 men and women ages 40 to 59 from 17 population samples in Japan, China, United Kingdom, and United States. Blood pressure was measured 8 times at 4 visits. Dietary intakes were obtained from four 24-hour recalls plus data on supplement use. Dietary phosphorus was inversely associated with blood pressure in a series of predefined multiple regression models, with the successive addition of potential confounders, both nondietary and dietary. Estimated blood pressure differences per 232 mg/1000 kcal (2 SD) of higher dietary phosphorus were -1.1 to -2.3 mm Hg systolic/-0.6 to -1.5 mm Hg diastolic (n=4680) and -1.6 to -3.5 mm Hg systolic/-0.8 to -1.8 mm Hg diastolic for 2238 "nonintervened" individuals, ie, those without special diet/nutritional supplements or diagnosis/treatment for cardiovascular disease or diabetes. Dietary calcium and magnesium, correlated with phosphorus (partial r=0.71 and r=0.68), were inversely associated with blood pressure. Blood pressures were lower by 1.9 to 4.2 mm Hg systolic/1.2 to 2.4 mm Hg diastolic for people with intakes above versus below country-specific medians for all 3 of the minerals. These results indicate the potential for increased phosphorus/mineral intake to lower blood pressure as part of the recommendations for healthier eating patterns for the prevention and control of prehypertension and hypertension.

  2. Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring: Five Decades of More Light and Less Shadows

    PubMed Central

    Nobre, Fernando; Mion Junior, Décio

    2016-01-01

    Casual blood pressure measurements have been extensively questioned over the last five decades. A significant percentage of patients have different blood pressure readings when examined in the office or outside it. For this reason, a change in the paradigm of the best manner to assess blood pressure has been observed. The method that has been most widely used is the Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring - ABPM. The method allows recording blood pressure measures in 24 hours and evaluating various parameters such as mean BP, pressure loads, areas under the curve, variations between daytime and nighttime, pulse pressure variability etc. Blood pressure measurements obtained by ABPM are better correlated, for example, with the risks of hypertension. The main indications for ABPM are: suspected white coat hypertension and masked hypertension, evaluation of the efficacy of the antihypertensive therapy in 24 hours, and evaluation of symptoms. There is increasing evidence that the use of ABPM has contributed to the assessment of blood pressure behaviors, establishment of diagnoses, prognosis and the efficacy of antihypertensive therapy. There is no doubt that the study of 24-hour blood pressure behavior and its variations by ABPM has brought more light and less darkness to the field, which justifies the title of this review. PMID:27168473

  3. Utility of home blood pressure monitoring to evaluate postprandial blood pressure in treated hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Alfie, José

    2015-08-01

    Postprandial hypotension, defined as a fall in systolic blood pressure (SBP) of 20 mmHg or greater within 2 hours after a meal, is a risk factor for stroke, coronary events and mortality. The clinical suspicion is typically raised by episodes of postprandial syncope or falls, whereas asymptomatic postprandial hypotension is mostly neglected. The magnitude of the postprandial fall in SBP, as detected by 24-hour recording in apparently healthy middle-aged to elderly subjects, was proportional to the severity of the silent cerebrovascular damage. Postprandial hypotension can also be detected by self-measured blood pressure before and within 2 hours after meals using automatic devices. The review highlights the value of home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM) as a screening test for asymptomatic postprandial hypotension in hypertensive patients. Using a HBPM protocol that included duplicated blood pressure measurements before and after three consecutive lunches, we detected unsuspected postprandial hypotension in 27.4% of the 230 hypertensive patients screened. The prevalence of postprandial hypotension was 13.2% in controlled and 42.2% in uncontrolled hypertensive patients (p < 0.001), raising the dilemma of further lowering blood pressure in the setting of postprandial hypotension. The inclusion of preprandial and postprandial measurements in the protocol of HBPM is useful to identify hypertensive patients with postprandial hypotension and may guide adjustments in antihypertensive treatment according to postprandial blood pressure. © The Author(s), 2015.

  4. Prevention of High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Prevention of High Blood Pressure Healthy lifestyle habits, proper use of medicines, and ... prevent high blood pressure or its complications. Preventing High Blood Pressure Onset Healthy lifestyle habits can help prevent high ...

  5. Blood pressure monitors for home

    MedlinePlus

    ... type of blood pressure monitor for home use. DIGITAL BLOOD PRESSURE MONITORS A digital device will also have a cuff that wraps ... on its own. The screen will show a digital readout of your systolic and diastolic blood pressure. ...

  6. Automated Blood Pressure Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The Vital-2 unit pictured is a semi-automatic device that permits highly accurate blood pressure measurement, even by untrained personnel. Developed by Meditron Instrument Corporation, Milford, New Hampshire, it is based in part on NASA technology found in a similar system designed for automatic monitoring of astronauts' blood pressure. Vital-2 is an advancement over the familiar arm cuff, dial and bulb apparatus customarily used for blood pressure checks. In that method, the physician squeezes the bulb to inflate the arm cuff, which restricts the flow of blood through the arteries. As he eases the pressure on the arm, he listens, through a stethoscope, to the sounds of resumed blood flow as the arteries expand and contract. Taking dial readings related to sound changes, he gets the systolic (contracting) and diastolic (expanding) blood pressure measurements. The accuracy of the method depends on the physician's skill in interpreting the sounds. Hospitals sometimes employ a more accurate procedure, but it is "invasive," involving insertion of a catheter in the artery.

  7. 29 CFR 785.21 - Less than 24-hour duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... be on duty for less than 24 hours is working even though he is permitted to sleep or engage in other... specified hours is working even though she is permitted to sleep when not busy answering calls. It makes no...

  8. 29 CFR 785.21 - Less than 24-hour duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... be on duty for less than 24 hours is working even though he is permitted to sleep or engage in other... specified hours is working even though she is permitted to sleep when not busy answering calls. It makes no...

  9. 29 CFR 785.21 - Less than 24-hour duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... be on duty for less than 24 hours is working even though he is permitted to sleep or engage in other... specified hours is working even though she is permitted to sleep when not busy answering calls. It makes no...

  10. 29 CFR 785.21 - Less than 24-hour duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... be on duty for less than 24 hours is working even though he is permitted to sleep or engage in other... specified hours is working even though she is permitted to sleep when not busy answering calls. It makes no...

  11. 29 CFR 785.21 - Less than 24-hour duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... be on duty for less than 24 hours is working even though he is permitted to sleep or engage in other... specified hours is working even though she is permitted to sleep when not busy answering calls. It makes no...

  12. William B. White Explains the Changes In the Way We Look at Blood Pressure: Which Numbers Matter Most-and Why Can They Be Deceptive?

    PubMed

    McCain, Jack

    2016-09-01

    Dr. White, known worldwide as an expert in the use of 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM), discusses hypertension, the importance of accurate measurement, and the utility of ABPM for effective diagnoses and treatment.

  13. Urinary {alpha}{sub 1}-microglobulin, {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin, and retinol-binding protein levels in general populations in Japan with references to cadmium in urine, blood, and 24-hour food duplicates

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Masayuki; Moon, Chan-Seok; Zhang, Zuo-Wen

    1995-07-01

    Possible cadmium (Cd) exposure-associated changes in urinary levels of low-molecular-weight proteins were studied in nonsmoking and nondrinking female members of the general Japanese population (378 subjects with no known occupational heavy metal exposure) who lived at 19 study sites (all without any known environmental heavy metal pollution) in 13 prefectures throughout Japan. The external Cd dose was evaluated in terms of daily Cd intake via food (Cd-F), whereas Cd levels in blood (Cd-B) and urine (Cd-U) were taken as internal dose indicators. When the subjects were classified according to Cd-F into three groups with {open_quotes}low{close_quotes} (20.4 {mu}g/day as a geometric mean of 97 women), {open_quotes}middle{close_quotes} (35.0 {mu}g/day, 120 women) and {open_quotes}high{close_quotes} (67.0 {mu}g/day, 66 women) exposure, both Cd-B and Cd-U increased in parallel with the changes in Cd-F. However, there were no dose-dependent changes in {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin or retinol-binding protein levels in urine. {alpha}{sub 1}-Microglobulin levels appeared to increase, but the distribution of the cases above the two cutoff levels of 9.6 and 15.8 {mu}g/mg creatinine among the three Cd-F groups did not show any bias. Overall, it was concluded that there was no apparent Cd exposure-associated elevation in urinary low-molecular-weight protein levels in the study population. 41 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  14. Comparison of propranolol and propranolol LA in hypertension using 24-hr noninvasive blood pressure monitoring.

    PubMed Central

    Rustin, M. H.; Coomes, E. N.

    1983-01-01

    The technique of non-invasive blood pressure monitoring was used to compare the 24-hr control of blood pressure in 10 patients with essential hypertension taking either twice daily propranolol or a once daily long-acting formulation of propranolol (propranolol LA). Both drug regimes produced smooth control of blood pressure and heart rate through the 24 hours and significantly reduced blood pressure and heart rate on bicycle ergometry tests. There was no significant difference between the two treatments. The non-invasive oscillometric method of measuring 24-hr control of blood pressure provides an alternative to ambulatory intra-arterial monitoring. PMID:6686326

  15. Routine 24-Hour Computed Tomography Brain Scan is not useful in stable patients Post Intravenous Tissue Plasminogen Activator.

    PubMed

    Guhwe, Mary; Utley-Smith, Queen; Blessing, Robert; Goldstein, Larry B

    2016-03-01

    Obtaining a routine computed tomography (CT) brain scan 24 hours after treatment with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV-tPA) is included in the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association acute stroke guidelines. The usefulness of the test in stable patients is not known. We hypothesized that the results of routine, 24-hour post-treatment neuroimaging (CT or magnetic resonance imaging [MRI] brain scans) would not alter the management of clinically stable patients. Patients treated with IV-tPA between January 2011 and December 2013 were identified from a single hospital's stroke registry. All patients were closely monitored for changes in stroke severity. Demographics, changes in neurological status, neuroimaging results, and changes in therapy were abstracted from the patients' medical records. Patients having a neuroimaging study because of neurological deterioration were excluded. Of 136 patients treated with IV-tPA, 131 met criteria for inclusion. Of these, 86.7% had moderate to severe neurological deficits (i.e., initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score > 5 points; median 8 points). All patients had routine imaging ~24 hours after treatment (CT brain 62.6%, MRI brain 12.4%, both CT and MRI brain 25%). Asymptomatic hemorrhagic transformation occurred in 6.7% and potentially changed management in a single patient (target systolic blood pressure was lowered from 185 to 180 mmHg). Over a 3-year period, routine neuroimaging ~24-hours after IV-tPA in clinically stable patients was associated with a change in therapy in only 1 (.95%) patient. If confirmed in other cohorts, these results suggest that routine neuroimaging after IV-tPA may be safely avoided in clinically stable patients, eliminating unnecessary radiation exposure in those having CT brain and reducing costs. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Principles and techniques of blood pressure measurement.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Thomas G

    2002-05-01

    The gold standard for clinical blood pressure measurement continues to be readings taken by a physician using a mercury sphygmomanometer, but this is changing as mercury is gradually being phased out. The oscillometric technique, which primarily detects mean arterial pressure, is increasingly popular for use in electronic devices. Other methods include ultrasound (used mainly to detect systolic pressure) and the finger cuff method of Penaz, which can record beat-to-beat pressure noninvasively from the finger. The preferred location of measurement is the upper arm, but errors may occur because of changes in the position of the arm. Other technical sources of error include inappropriate cuff size and too rapid deflation of the cuff. Clinic readings may be unrepresentative of the patient's true blood pressure because of the white coat effect, which is defined as the difference between the clinic readings and the average daytime blood pressure. Patients with elevated clinic pressure and normal daytime pressure are said to have white coat hypertension. There are three commonly used methods for measuring blood pressure for clinical purposes: clinic readings, self-monitoring by the patient at home, and 24-hour ambulatory readings. Self-monitoring is growing rapidly in popularity and is generally carried out using electronic devices that work on the oscillometric technique. Although standard validation protocols exist, many devices on the market have not been tested for accuracy. Such devices can record blood pressure from the upper arm, wrist, or finger, but the arm is preferred. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory monitoring has been found to be the best predictor of cardiovascular risk in the individual patient and is the only technique that can describe the diurnal rhythm of blood pressure accurately. Ambulatory monitoring is mainly used for diagnosing hypertension, whereas self-monitoring is used for following the response to treatment. Different techniques of blood pressure

  17. Test Your Blood Pressure IQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... How High Blood Pressure is Diagnosed BP vs. Heart Rate Low Blood Pressure Resistant Hypertension Pulmonary Hypertension High Blood Pressure Myths ... Healthy 6 What are the Symptoms of High Blood Pressure? 7 All About Heart Rate (Pulse) 8 Tachycardia | Fast Heart Rate 9 Warning ...

  18. Living with High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With High Blood Pressure If you have high blood pressure, the best thing to do is to talk ... help you track your blood pressure. Pregnancy Planning High blood pressure can cause problems for mother and baby. High ...

  19. GENETIC ARCHITECTURE OF AMBULATORY BLOOD PRESSURE IN THE GENERAL POPULATION – INSIGHTS FROM CARDIOVASCULAR GENE-CENTRIC ARRAY

    PubMed Central

    Tomaszewski, Maciej; Debiec, Radoslaw; Braund, Peter S; Nelson, Christopher P; Hardwick, Robert; Christofidou, Paraskevi; Denniff, Matthew; Codd, Veryan; Rafelt, Suzanne; van der Harst, Pim; Waterworth, Dawn; Song, Kijoung; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Zukowska-Szczechowska, Ewa; Burton, Paul R; Mooser, Vincent; Charchar, Fadi J; Thompson, John R; Tobin, Martin D; Samani, Nilesh J

    2010-01-01

    Genetic determinants of blood pressure are poorly defined. We undertook a large-scale gene-centric analysis to identify loci and pathways associated with ambulatory systolic and diastolic blood pressure. We measured 24-hour ambulatory BP in 2020 individuals from 520 white European nuclear families (the GRAPHIC Study) and genotyped their DNA using the Illumina HumanCVD BeadChip array which contains approximately 50000 single nucleotide polymorphisms in >2000 cardiovascular candidate loci. We found a strong association between rs13306560 polymorphism in the promoter region of MTHFR and CLCN6 and mean 24-hour diastolic blood pressure - each minor allele copy of rs13306560 was associated with 2.6 mmHg lower mean 24-hour diastolic blood pressure (P=1.2×10−8). rs13306560 was also associated with clinic diastolic blood pressure in a combined analysis of 8129 subjects from the GRAPHIC Study, the CoLaus Study and the Silesian Cardiovascular Study (P=5.4×10−6). Additional analysis of associations between variants in Gene Ontology-defined pathways and mean 24-hour blood pressure in the GRAPHIC Study showed that cell survival control signalling cascades could play a role in blood pressure regulation. There was also a significant over-representation of rare variants (minor allele frequency <0.05) amongst polymorphisms showing at least nominal association with mean 24-hour blood pressure indicating that a considerable proportion of its heritability may be explained by uncommon alleles. Through a large scale gene-centric analysis of ambulatory blood pressure, we identified an association of a novel variant at the MTHFR/CLNC6 locus with diastolic blood pressure and provided new insights into the genetic architecture of blood pressure. PMID:21060006

  20. What Causes High Blood Pressure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... can cause high blood pressure. Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system makes angiotensin and ... blood volumes and high blood pressure. Sympathetic Nervous System Activity The sympathetic nervous system has important functions ...

  1. Assessment of Dietary Sodium and Potassium in Canadians Using 24-Hour Urinary Collection.

    PubMed

    Mente, Andrew; Dagenais, Gilles; Wielgosz, Andreas; Lear, Scott A; McQueen, Matthew J; Zeidler, Johannes; Fu, Lily; DeJesus, Jane; Rangarajan, Sumathy; Bourlaud, Anne-Sophie; De Bluts, Anne Leblanc; Corber, Erica; de Jong, Veronica; Boomgaardt, Jacob; Shane, Alexandra; Jiang, Ying; de Groh, Margaret; O'Donnell, Martin J; Yusuf, Salim; Teo, Koon

    2016-03-01

    Although salt intake derived from data on urinary sodium excretion in free-living populations has been used in public policy, a population study on urinary sodium excretion has not been done in Canada. We assessed dietary sodium and potassium intake using a 24-hour urine collection in a large survey of urban and rural communities from 4 Canadian cities and determined the association of these electrolytes with blood pressure (BP). One thousand seven hundred consecutive individuals, aged 37-72 years, attending their annual follow-up visits of the ongoing Prospective and Urban Rural Epidemiology (PURE) study in Vancouver, Hamilton, Ottawa, and Quebec City, Canada, collected a 24-hour urine sample using standardized procedures. Mean sodium excretion was 3325 mg/d and mean potassium excretion was 2935 mg/d. Sodium excretion ranged from 3093 mg/d in Vancouver to 3642 mg/d in Quebec City, after adjusting for covariates. Potassium excretion ranged from 2844 mg/d in Ottawa to 3082 mg/d in Quebec City. Both electrolytes were higher in men than in women and in rural populations than in urban settings (P < 0.001 for all). Sodium excretion was between 3000 and 6000 mg/d in 48.3% of the participants, < 3000 mg/d in 46.7%, and > 6000 mg/d in only 5%. No significant association between sodium or potassium excretion and BP was found. Sodium consumption in these Canadians is within a range comparable to other Western countries, and intake in most individuals is < 6000 mg/d, with only 5% at higher levels. Within this range, sodium or potassium levels were not associated with BP. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Preparation and results of a 24-hour orbital flight.

    PubMed

    Titov, G S

    1963-01-01

    The space age presents man with unprecedented opportunities for discovery and for cooperative endeavors to benefit all mankind. My flight of August 6-7, 1961 was conducted for the purpose of determining whether man can stay and work effectively and whether all systems of the spaceship can operate successfully during a period of 24 hours in space. The flight of Vostok II represents an experimental step in a logical sequence which included the first earth orbiting flight of USSR citizen Yuri A. Gagarin. Preparation for the flight included the study of theoretical and applied subjects, testing in various kinds of apparatus which provide acceleration, heat and isolation experience, brief airborne weightless flights and parachute landings, in addition to extensive training in a real spacecraft having simulators for normal and emergency contingencies of space flight. The actual flight was therefore carried out with a sense of confidence and familiarity and with continuous close radio contact with ground centers from whom my fellow cosmonauts served as spokesmen. Sequential boosters totaling 600 000 kg thrust placed the 4731 kg spaceship into a perfect orbit varying in altitude from 178-246 km in a plane 64 degrees 58' inclined to the equator. The spaceship made 17 orbits around the earth landing 25 hours, 18 minutes after take-off. The cabin had full atmospheric pressure and a comfortable habitability which could be extended for 10 days. I was able to maneuver the spaceship and perform many other control functions, make observations and take pictures of the earth and its cloud cover, eat meals and sleep all with good efficiency. I experienced mild symptoms suggestive of seasickness which were aggravated by head turning, ameliorated by sleep and entirely relieved by resumption of g-loading during descent. Altogether analyses of the physical and structural performance of the spaceship and the continuously monitored physiological responses of the pilot indicate that all

  3. Relationship of office, home, and ambulatory blood pressure to blood glucose and lipid variables in the PAMELA population.

    PubMed

    Mancia, Giuseppe; Facchetti, Rita; Bombelli, Michele; Polo Friz, Hernan; Grassi, Guido; Giannattasio, Cristina; Sega, Roberto

    2005-06-01

    Alterations in blood glucose and cholesterol are more frequently detectable in hypertensive than in normotensive conditions. However, no information exists as to whether this phenomenon involves only office or also home and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure (ie, when values are representative of daily life). In 2045 subjects enrolled in the Pressioni Arteriose Monitorate E Loro Associazioni (PAMELA) study, we measured home, 24-hour, and office blood pressure. Measurements also included fasting blood glucose and serum total and HDL cholesterol values. Prevalence of diabetes (> or =126 mg/dL or use of antidiabetic drugs), impaired fasting blood glucose (> or =110 to <126 mg/dL), and hypercholesterolemia (serum total cholesterol > or =240 mg/dL or 200 mg/dL) increased progressively from "optimal" to "normal," "high-normal," and "elevated" office systolic or diastolic blood pressure. Fasting blood glucose and total serum cholesterol also increased progressively from the first to the fourth group, with HDL cholesterol values showing a concomitant progressive decrease. This was also the case for quartiles of office, home, and 24-hour blood pressure. In the whole population, there was a positive correlation between serum cholesterol or blood glucose and all blood pressure values (P always <0.0001), with a much smaller and less consistent relationship with heart rate. In a multivariate analysis that included gender, body mass index, age, and antihypertensive treatment, all blood pressure values remained highly significantly related to values of either metabolic variables. Thus, in the PAMELA population, glucose and lipid values are independently related to blood pressure. This is also the case when daily life blood pressure values are considered.

  4. Overtime in Relation to Blood Pressure and Mood during Work, Leisure, and Night Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rau, Renate; Triemer, Antje

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the association between characteristics of the workplace and overtime. A sample of 117 women and 126 men were assessed over 24 hours of a working day by means of a computerized diary and ambulant monitoring of blood pressure. Of the total sample, 178 participants had a contractual weekly working time of 40 hours. Of these, 106…

  5. Impact of Stress Reduction Interventions on Hostility and Ambulatory Systolic Blood Pressure in African American Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Lynda Brown; Gregoski, Mathew J.; Tingen, Martha S.; Barnes, Vernon A.; Treiber, Frank A.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the impact of breathing awareness meditation (BAM), life skills (LS) training, and health education (HE) interventions on self-reported hostility and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) in 121 African American (AA) ninth graders at increased risk for development of essential hypertension. They were randomly assigned to BAM,…

  6. Overtime in Relation to Blood Pressure and Mood during Work, Leisure, and Night Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rau, Renate; Triemer, Antje

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the association between characteristics of the workplace and overtime. A sample of 117 women and 126 men were assessed over 24 hours of a working day by means of a computerized diary and ambulant monitoring of blood pressure. Of the total sample, 178 participants had a contractual weekly working time of 40 hours. Of these, 106…

  7. Impact of Stress Reduction Interventions on Hostility and Ambulatory Systolic Blood Pressure in African American Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Lynda Brown; Gregoski, Mathew J.; Tingen, Martha S.; Barnes, Vernon A.; Treiber, Frank A.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the impact of breathing awareness meditation (BAM), life skills (LS) training, and health education (HE) interventions on self-reported hostility and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) in 121 African American (AA) ninth graders at increased risk for development of essential hypertension. They were randomly assigned to BAM,…

  8. Association Between Neurologic Improvement With Decline in Blood Pressure and Recanalization in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraja, Nandakumar; Warach, Steven; Hsia, Amie W.; Adams, Harold P.; Auh, Sungyoung; Latour, Lawrence L.; Merino, José G.

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Patients with stroke often have a decline in blood pressure after thrombolysis. Neurologic improvement could result from recanalization or better collateral flow despite persistent occlusion. We hypothesized that neurologic improvement with concurrent decline in blood pressure may be a clinical sign of recanalization after intravenous tissue plasminogen activator. OBSERVATIONS Patients treated with intravenous tissue plasminogen activator at Suburban Hospital, Bethesda, Maryland, and MedStar Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC, from 1999 to 2009 were included in the study if they had pretreatment and 24-hour magnetic resonance angiographic scans, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores at those times, and proximal middle cerebral artery occlusion demonstrated prior to treatment. The recanalization status on 24-hour magnetic resonance angiography was classified as none, partial, or complete. Seventeen patients met study criteria. On 24-hour magnetic resonance angiography, 3 patients had no recanalization, 8 had partial recanalization, and 6 had complete recanalization. At 24 hours after thrombolysis, neurologic improvement with concurrent decline in systolic blood pressure of 20 mm Hg or greater was seen in 4 patients with partial recanalization, 4 patients with complete recanalization, and none of the patients with no recanalization. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Neurologic improvement with concurrent decline in systolic blood pressure of 20 mm Hg or greater after intravenous tissue plasminogen activator may be a clinical sign of recanalization. This observation needs confirmation in a larger cohort. PMID:25330362

  9. Blood vessels, circulation and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Hendry, Charles; Farley, Alistair; McLafferty, Ella

    This article, which forms part of the life sciences series, describes the vessels of the body's blood and lymphatic circulatory systems. Blood pressure and its regulatory systems are examined. The causes and management of hypertension are also explored. It is important that nurses and other healthcare professionals understand the various mechanisms involved in the regulation of blood pressure to prevent high blood pressure or ameliorate its damaging consequences.

  10. Blood Pressure Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Engineering Development Lab., Inc.'s E-2000 Neck Baro Reflex System was developed for cardiovascular studies of astronauts. It is regularly used on Space Shuttle Missions, and a parallel version has been developed as a research tool to facilitate studies of blood pressure reflex controls in patients with congestive heart failure, diabetes, etc. An advanced version, the PPC-1000, was developed in 1991, and the technology has been refined substantially. The PPC provides an accurate means of generating pressure for a broad array of laboratory applications. An improved version, the E2010 Barosystem, is anticipated.

  11. Impact of Stress Reduction Interventions on Hostility and Ambulatory Systolic Blood Pressure in African American Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Lynda Brown; Gregoski, Mathew J.; Tingen, Martha S.; Barnes, Vernon A.; Treiber, Frank A.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the impact of breathing awareness meditation (BAM), life skills (LS) training, and health education (HE) interventions on self-reported hostility and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) in 121 African American (AA) ninth graders at increased risk for development of essential hypertension. They were randomly assigned to BAM, LS, or HE and engaged in intervention sessions during health class for 3 months. Before, after, and 3 months following intervention cessation, self-reported hostility and 24-hour ABP were measured. Results indicated that between pre- and postintervention, BAM participants displayed significant reductions in self-reported hostility and 24-hour systolic ABP. Reductions in hostility were significantly related to reductions in 24-hour systolic ABP. Between postintervention and follow-up, participants receiving LS showed a significant reduction in hostility but not in 24-hour ABP. Significant changes were not found for the HE group in 24-hour ABP or self-reported hostility, but these change scores were significantly correlated. The implications of the findings are discussed with regard to behavioral stress reduction programs for the physical and emotional health of AAs. PMID:22485058

  12. The 24 Hours before Hospitalization: Factors Related to Suicide Attempting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiles, John A.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Psychiatric inpatients (N=59) were interviewd concerning psychological and environmental events that occurred in the 24 hours prior to their hospitalization. Suicide attempters were more likely to have used alcohol or marijuana and less likely to have contacted a health care professional than suicide ideators, even when past history of suicide…

  13. Chapter 4: 24-hour recall and diet record methods

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The two methods described in this chapter, the 24-hour dietary recall (24hdr) and the food record (FR) method, are the currently preferred methods of dietary intake assessment, and are based on foods and amounts actually consumed by an individual on one or more specific days. This minimizes some sou...

  14. [A 24-hour solid state Holter recording and analyzing system].

    PubMed

    Jia, C; Duan, H; Yan, X; Lu, W

    1998-01-01

    The design and functions of a new type of multi-channel solid-state Holter system were introduced in this paper. The flash memory card based recorder can record 24 hours or more of data from up to all 12 leads. The full function scanner software can analysis automatically and archive with complete editing capabilities.

  15. Associations of ambulatory blood pressure with urinary caffeine and caffeine metabolite excretions.

    PubMed

    Guessous, Idris; Pruijm, Menno; Ponte, Belén; Ackermann, Daniel; Ehret, Georg; Ansermot, Nicolas; Vuistiner, Philippe; Staessen, Jan; Gu, Yumei; Paccaud, Fred; Mohaupt, Markus; Vogt, Bruno; Pechère-Bertschi, Antoinette; Pechère-Berstchi, Antoinette; Martin, Pierre-Yves; Burnier, Michel; Eap, Chin B; Bochud, Murielle

    2015-03-01

    Intake of caffeinated beverages might be associated with reduced cardiovascular mortality possibly via the lowering of blood pressure. We estimated the association of ambulatory blood pressure with urinary caffeine and caffeine metabolites in a population-based sample. Families were randomly selected from the general population of Swiss cities. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was conducted using validated devices. Urinary caffeine, paraxanthine, theophylline, and theobromine excretions were measured in 24 hours urine using ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. We used mixed models to explore the associations of urinary excretions with blood pressure although adjusting for major confounders. The 836 participants (48.9% men) included in this analysis had mean age of 47.8 and mean 24-hour systolic and diastolic blood pressure of 120.1 and 78.0 mm Hg. For each doubling of caffeine excretion, 24-hour and night-time systolic blood pressure decreased by 0.642 and 1.107 mm Hg (both P values <0.040). Similar inverse associations were observed for paraxanthine and theophylline. Adjusted night-time systolic blood pressure in the first (lowest), second, third, and fourth (highest) quartile of paraxanthine urinary excretions were 110.3, 107.3, 107.3, and 105.1 mm Hg, respectively (P trend <0.05). No associations of urinary excretions with diastolic blood pressure were generally found, and theobromine excretion was not associated with blood pressure. Anti-hypertensive therapy, diabetes mellitus, and alcohol consumption modify the association of caffeine urinary excretion with systolic blood pressure. Ambulatory systolic blood pressure was inversely associated with urinary excretions of caffeine and other caffeine metabolites. Our results are compatible with a potential protective effect of caffeine on blood pressure.

  16. Aldosterone-to-Renin Ratio Is Associated With Reduced 24-Hour Heart Rate Variability and QTc Prolongation in Hypertensive Patients.

    PubMed

    Grübler, Martin R; Kienreich, Katharina; Gaksch, Martin; Verheyen, Nicolas; Hartaigh, Bríain Ó; Fahrleitner-Pammer, Astrid; März, Winfried; Schmid, Johannes; Oberreither, Eva-Maria; Wetzel, Julia; Catena, Cristiana; Sechi, Leonardo A; Pieske, Burkert; Tomaschitz, Andreas; Pilz, Stefan

    2016-02-01

    Aldosterone is considered to exert direct effects on the myocardium and the sympathetic nervous system. Both QT time and heart rate (HR) variability (HRV) are considered to be markers of arrhythmic risk and autonomous dysregulation. In this study, we investigated the associations between aldosterone, QT time, and HRV in patients with arterial hypertension.We recruited 477 hypertensive patients (age: 60.2 ± 10.2 years; 52.3% females) with a mean systolic/diastolic 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) value of 128 ± 12.8/77.1 ± 9.2 mmHg and with a median of 2 (IQR: 1-3) antihypertensive agents. Patients were recruited from the outpatient clinic at the Department of Internal Medicine of the Medical University of Graz, Austria. Blood samples, 24-hour HRV derived from 24-hour blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) and ECG's were obtained. Plasma aldosterone and plasma renin concentrations were measured by means of a radioimmunoassay. Twenty-four-hour urine specimens were collected in parallel with ABPM.Mean QTc was 423.3 ± 42.0 milliseconds for males and 434.7 ± 38.3 milliseconds for females. Mean 24H-HR and 24H-HRV was 71.9 ± 9.8 and 10.0 ± 3.6 bpm, respectively. In linear regression analyses adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, ABPM, and current medication, aldosterone to active renin ratio (AARR) was significantly associated with the QTc interval, a marker for cardiac repolarization abnormalities (mean = 426 ± 42.4 milliseconds; β-coefficient = 0.121; P = 0.03) as well as with the 24-hour heart rate variability a surrogate for autonomic dysfunction (median = 9.67 [IQR = 7.38-12.22 bpm]; β-coefficient = -0.133; P = 0.01).In hypertensive patients, AARR is significantly related to QTc prolongation as well as HRV. Further studies investigating the effects of mineralocorticoid receptor blocker and aldosterone synthase inhibitors on QTc and HRV are warranted.

  17. 24-hour rhythmicity of seizures in refractory focal epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Nzwalo, Hipólito; Menezes Cordeiro, Inês; Santos, Ana Catarina; Peralta, Rita; Paiva, Teresa; Bentes, Carla

    2016-02-01

    The occurrence of seizures in specific types of epilepsies can follow a 24-hour nonuniform or nonrandom pattern. We described the 24-hour pattern of clinical seizures in patients with focal refractory epilepsy who underwent video-electroencephalography monitoring. Only patients who were candidates for epilepsy surgery with an unequivocal seizure focus were included in the study. A total of 544 seizures from 123 consecutive patients were analyzed. Specific time of seizures were distributed along 3- or 4-hour time blocks or bins throughout the 24-hour period. The mean age of the subjects was 37.7 years, with standard deviation of 11.5 years, median of 37. The majority were females (70/56%). The majority of patients had a seizure focus located in the mesial temporal lobe (102/83%) and in the neocortical temporal lobe (13/11%). The remaining patients had a seizure focus located in the extratemporal lobe (8/6%). The most common etiology was mesial temporal sclerosis (86/69.9%). Nonuniform seizure distribution was observed in seizures arising from the temporal lobe (mesial temporal lobe and neocortical temporal lobe), with two peaks found in both 3- and 4-hour bins: 10:00-13:00/16:00-19:00 and 08:00-12:00/16:00-20:00 respectively (p=0.004). No specific 24-hour pattern was identified in seizures from extratemporal location. The 24-hour rhythmicity of seizure distribution is recognized in certain types of epilepsy, but studies on the topic are scarce. Their replication and validation is therefore needed. Our study confirms the bimodal pattern of temporal lobe epilepsy independently of the nature of the lesion. However, peak times differ between different studies, suggesting that the ambient, rhythmic exogenous factors or environmental/social zeitgebers, may modulate the 24-hour rhythmicity of seizures. Characterization of these 24-hour patterns of seizure occurrence can influence diagnosis and treatment in selected types of epilepsy, such as the case of temporal lobe

  18. Impact of Different Normality Thresholds for 24-hour ABPM at the Primary Health Care Level.

    PubMed

    Grezzana, Guilherme Brasil; Moraes, David William; Stein, Airton Tetelbon; Pellanda, Lucia Campos

    2017-02-01

    Hypertension is an important risk factor for cardiovascular outcomes. Primary health care (PHC) physicians should be prepared to act appropriately in the prevention of cardiovascular risk factors. However, the rates of patients with control of blood pressure (BP) remain low. The impact of the reclassification of high BP by 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) can lead to different medical decisions in PHC. To evaluate the agreement between the BP measured by a conventional method by PHC physicians and by 24-hour ABPM, considering different BP normal thresholds for the 24-hour ABPM according to the V Brazilian ABPM Guidelines and the European Society of Hypertension Guidelines. A cross-sectional study including 569 hypertensive patients. The BP was initially measured by the PHC physicians and, later, by 24-hour ABPM. The BP measurements were obtained independently between the two methods. The therapeutic targets for the conventional BP followed the guidelines by the Eighth Joint National Committee (JNC 8), the V ABPM Brazilian Guidelines, and the 2013 European Hypertension Guidelines. There was an accuracy of 54.8% (95% confidence interval [95%CI] 0.51 - 0.58%) for the BP measured with the conventional method when compared with the 24-hour ABPM, with a sensitivity of 85% (95%CI 80.8 - 88.6%), specificity of 31.9% (95%CI 28.7 - 34.7%), and kappa value of 0.155, when considering the European Hypertension Guidelines. When using more stringent thresholds to characterize the BP as "normal" by ABPM, the accuracy was 45% (95%CI 0.41 - 0.47%) for conventional measurement when compared with 24-hour ABPM, with a sensitivity of 86.7% (95%CI 0.81 - 0.91%), specificity of 29% (95%CI 0.26 - 0.30%), and kappa value of 0.103. The BP measurements obtained by PHC physicians showed low accuracy when compared with those obtained by 24-hour ABPM, regardless of the threshold set by the different guidelines. A hipertensão arterial sistêmica é um fator de risco importante para

  19. High Blood Pressure Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... Prevent and Control Chronic Diseases Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Web Sites with More Information About High Blood Pressure ...

  20. Blood Pressure vs. Heart Rate

    MedlinePlus

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Blood Pressure vs. Heart Rate (Pulse) Updated:Jan 18,2017 ... content was last reviewed October 2016. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP Introduction What ...

  1. High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the baby. Controlling your blood pressure during pregnancy and getting regular prenatal care are important for ... your baby. Treatments for high blood pressure in pregnancy may include close monitoring of the baby, lifestyle ...

  2. High blood pressure and diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007483.htm High blood pressure and diet To use the sharing features on ... diet is a proven way to help control high blood pressure . These changes can also help you lose weight ...

  3. Extended duration orbiter medical project variability of blood pressure and heart rate (STS-50/USML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritsch-Yelle, Janice M.; Charles, John B.; Boettcher, Sheila W.

    1994-01-01

    Decreases in arterial baroreflex function after space flight may be related to changes in blood pressure and heart rate patterns during flight. Ambulatory blood pressure and heart rate were measured for 24 hours, in fourteen astronauts on two occasions before flight, two to three occasions in flight, and 2 days after landing on Shuttle missions lasting 4 to 14 days. Blood pressure and heart rate were recorded every 20minutes during awake periods and every 30 minutes during sleep. In pre- and postflight studies, the 24-hour ambulatory measurements were followed by studies of carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex responses. Carotid baroreceptors were stimulated using a sequence of neck pressure and suction from +40 to -65 mmHg.

  4. High Blood Pressure - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Well-Being 8 - High Blood Pressure - العربية (Arabic) MP3 Siloam Family Health Center High Blood Pressure - العربية ( ... Being 8 - High Blood Pressure - myanma bhasa (Burmese) MP3 Siloam Family Health Center Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect) ( ...

  5. Controlling your high blood pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000101.htm Controlling your high blood pressure To use the sharing features on this page, ... JavaScript. Hypertension is another term used to describe high blood pressure. High blood pressure can lead to: Stroke Heart ...

  6. Enhanced carotid-cardiac baroreflex response and elimination of orthostatic hypotension 24 hours after acute exercise in paraplegics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelke, K. A.; Shea, J. D.; Doerr, D. F.; Convertino, V. A.

    1992-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that an acute bout of maximal exercise can ameliorate orthostatic hypotension consequent to prolonged wheelchair confinement, we evaluated heart rate (HR), systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure responses during 15 minutes of 70 degrees head-up tilt (HUT) in 10 paraplegic subjects 24 hours after arm crank exercise designed to elicit maximal effort, and during a control (no exercise) conditions. Additionally, the carotid baroreceptor stimulus-cardiac response relationship was determined by measurement of R-R interval during external application of graded pressures to the carotid sinuses. One week separated the treatment conditions. The maximum slope of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex response was increased (p = 0.049) by exercise (6.2 +/- 1.7 msec/mmHg) compared to control (3.3 +/- 0.6). During control HUT, HR increased from 61 +/- 1 to 90 +/- 7 bpm (p = 0.001) while SBP decreased from 118 +/- 5 to 106 +/- 9 mmHg (p = 0.025). During HUT 24 hours after exercise, HR increased from 60 +/- 2 to 90 +/- 4 bpm (p = 0.001), but the reduction in SBP was essentially eliminated (116 +/- 5 to 113 +/- 5 mmHg).

  7. Enhanced carotid-cardiac baroreflex response and elimination of orthostatic hypotension 24 hours after acute exercise in paraplegics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelke, K. A.; Shea, J. D.; Doerr, D. F.; Convertino, V. A.

    1992-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that an acute bout of maximal exercise can ameliorate orthostatic hypotension consequent to prolonged wheelchair confinement, we evaluated heart rate (HR), systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure responses during 15 minutes of 70 degrees head-up tilt (HUT) in 10 paraplegic subjects 24 hours after arm crank exercise designed to elicit maximal effort, and during a control (no exercise) conditions. Additionally, the carotid baroreceptor stimulus-cardiac response relationship was determined by measurement of R-R interval during external application of graded pressures to the carotid sinuses. One week separated the treatment conditions. The maximum slope of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex response was increased (p = 0.049) by exercise (6.2 +/- 1.7 msec/mmHg) compared to control (3.3 +/- 0.6). During control HUT, HR increased from 61 +/- 1 to 90 +/- 7 bpm (p = 0.001) while SBP decreased from 118 +/- 5 to 106 +/- 9 mmHg (p = 0.025). During HUT 24 hours after exercise, HR increased from 60 +/- 2 to 90 +/- 4 bpm (p = 0.001), but the reduction in SBP was essentially eliminated (116 +/- 5 to 113 +/- 5 mmHg).

  8. Polymyxin B-immobilized fiber column hemoperfusion removes endotoxin throughout a 24-hour treatment period.

    PubMed

    Mitaka, Chieko; Fujiwara, Naoto; Yamamoto, Mamoru; Toyofuku, Takahiro; Haraguchi, Go; Tomita, Makoto

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the extent of endotoxin adsorption by polymyxin B-immobilized fiber column hemoperfusion (PMX) performed for a 24-hour treatment period in patients with septic shock. Nineteen patients with septic shock were retrospectively studied. The plasma endotoxin concentrations of blood drawn from the radial artery and from the outlet circuit of the PMX column were measured by kinetic turbidimetric limulus assay using an MT-358 Toxinometer (Wako Pure Chemical Industries, Ltd, Osaka, Japan) after 24 hours of PMX treatment. The endotoxin removal rate was defined by the following equation: ([radial artery endotoxin concentration - outlet circuit of PMX column endotoxin concentration]/radial artery endotoxin concentration) × 100%. The patients had a median Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score of 29 at intensive care unit admission and a 28-day mortality of 47%. Before the start of the PMX treatment, the median radial arterial plasma endotoxin concentration was 16.48 pg/mL. After 24 hours of PMX treatment, the median radial plasma endotoxin concentration had decreased to 1.857 pg/mL, and the concentration at the outlet circuit of the PMX column was further decreased to 0.779 pg/mL. The median endotoxin removal rate was 74.4%. These findings suggest that 24-hour PMX treatment was effective in removing endotoxin continuously throughout the entire treatment period. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Blood pressure rhythmicity and visceral fat in children with hypertension.

    PubMed

    Niemirska, Anna; Litwin, Mieczysław; Feber, Janusz; Jurkiewicz, Elżbieta

    2013-10-01

    Primary hypertension is associated with disturbed activity of the sympathetic nervous system and altered blood pressure rhythmicity. We analyzed changes in cardiovascular rhythmicity and its relation with target organ damage during 12 months of antihypertensive treatment in 50 boys with hypertension (median, 15.0 years). The following parameters were obtained before and after 12 months of antihypertensive treatment: 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure, left ventricular mass, carotid intima-media thickness, and MRI for visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue. Amplitudes and acrophases of mean arterial pressure and heart rate rhythms were obtained for 24-, 12-, and 8-hour periods. After 1 year of treatment, 68% of patients were normotensive, and left ventricular mass and carotid intima-media thickness decreased in 60% and 62% of patients, respectively. Blood pressure and heart rate rhythmicity patterns did not change. Changes in blood pressure amplitude correlated with the decrease of waist circumference (P=0.035). Moreover, the decrease of visceral fat correlated with the decrease of 24-hour mean arterial pressure and heart rate acrophases (both P<0.05). There were no differences in changes of blood pressure and heart rate rhythms between patients who achieved or did not achieve normotension and regression of left ventricular mass and carotid intima-media thickness. It was concluded that abnormal cardiovascular rhythmicity persists in children with primary hypertension despite effective antihypertensive treatment, which suggests that it may be the primary abnormality. The correlation between changes in cardiovascular rhythmicity and visceral obesity may indicate that the visceral fat plays an important role in the sympathetic activity of adolescents with hypertension.

  10. Aerobic exercise reduces blood pressure in resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Dimeo, Fernando; Pagonas, Nikolaos; Seibert, Felix; Arndt, Robert; Zidek, Walter; Westhoff, Timm H

    2012-09-01

    Regular physical exercise is broadly recommended by current European and American hypertension guidelines. It remains elusive, however, whether exercise leads to a reduction of blood pressure in resistant hypertension as well. The present randomized controlled trial examines the cardiovascular effects of aerobic exercise on resistant hypertension. Resistant hypertension was defined as a blood pressure ≥140/90 mm Hg in spite of 3 antihypertensive agents or a blood pressure controlled by ≥4 antihypertensive agents. Fifty subjects with resistant hypertension were randomly assigned to participate or not to participate in an 8- to 12-week treadmill exercise program (target lactate, 2.0±0.5 mmol/L). Blood pressure was assessed by 24-hour monitoring. Arterial compliance and cardiac index were measured by pulse wave analysis. The training program was well tolerated by all of the patients. Exercise significantly decreased systolic and diastolic daytime ambulatory blood pressure by 6±12 and 3±7 mm Hg, respectively (P=0.03 each). Regular exercise reduced blood pressure on exertion and increased physical performance as assessed by maximal oxygen uptake and lactate curves. Arterial compliance and cardiac index remained unchanged. Physical exercise is able to decrease blood pressure even in subjects with low responsiveness to medical treatment. It should be included in the therapeutic approach to resistant hypertension.

  11. The Effect of Job Strain on Nighttime Blood Pressure Dipping among Men and Women with High Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Lin-bo; Blumenthal, James A.; Hinderliter, Alan L.; Sherwood, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Blunted nighttime blood pressure dipping is an established cardiovascular risk factor. This study examined the effect of job strain on nighttime blood pressure dipping among men and women with high blood pressure. Methods The sample consisted of 122 blue collar and white collar workers (men=72, women=50). Job psychological demands, job control and social support were measured by the Job Content Questionnaire. Job strain was assessed by the ratio of job demands/job control. Nighttime blood pressure dipping was evaluated from 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring performed on three workdays. Results Men with high job strain had a 5.4 mm Hg higher sleep systolic blood pressure (P=0.03) and 3.5 mm Hg higher sleep pulse pressure (P=0.02) compared to men with low job strain. Men with high job strain had a smaller fall in systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure from awake to sleep than those with low job strain (P<0.05). Hierarchical analyses showed that job strain was an independent determinant of systolic blood pressure dipping (P=0.03) among men after adjusting for ethnicity, body mass index, anxiety and depression symptoms, current smoking status, and alcohol consumption. Further exploratory analyses indicated that job control was the salient component of job strain associated with blood pressure dipping (p=.03). Conclusions High job strain is associated with a blunting of the normal diurnal variation in blood pressure and pulse pressure, which may contribute to the relationship between job strain and cardiovascular disease. PMID:22460541

  12. The effect of job strain on nighttime blood pressure dipping among men and women with high blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lin-Bo; Blumenthal, James A; Hinderliter, Alan L; Sherwood, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Blunted nighttime blood pressure dipping is an established cardiovascular risk factor. This study examined the effect of job strain on nighttime blood pressure dipping among men and women with high blood pressure. The sample consisted of 122 blue- and white collar workers (men=72, women=50). The Job Content Questionnaire was used to measure job psychological demands, job control, and social support. The ratio of job demands to job control was used to assess job strain. Nighttime blood pressure dipping was evaluated from 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring performed on three workdays. Men with high job strain had a 5.4 mm Hg higher sleep systolic blood pressure (P=0.03) and 3.5 mm Hg higher sleep pulse pressure (P=0.02) compared to men with low job strain. Men with high job strain had a smaller fall in systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure from awake to sleep state than those with low job strain (P<0.05). Hierarchical analyses showed that job strain was an independent determinant of systolic blood pressure dipping (P=0.03) among men after adjusting for ethnicity, body mass index, anxiety and depression symptoms, current smoking status, and alcohol consumption. Further exploratory analyses indicated that job control was the salient component of job strain associated with blood pressure dipping (P=0.03). High job strain is associated with a blunting of the normal diurnal variation in blood pressure and pulse pressure, which may contribute to the relationship between job strain and cardiovascular disease.

  13. Estimated daily salt intake in relation to blood pressure and blood lipids: the role of obesity.

    PubMed

    Thuesen, Betina H; Toft, Ulla; Buhelt, Lone P; Linneberg, Allan; Friedrich, Nele; Nauck, Matthias; Wallaschofski, Henri; Jørgensen, Torben

    2015-12-01

    Excessive salt intake causes increased blood pressure which is considered the leading risk for premature death. One major challenge when evaluating associations between daily salt intake and markers of non-communicable diseases is that a high daily salt intake correlates with obesity, which is also a well described risk factor for poor cardiometabolic outcome. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship of estimated daily salt intake with blood pressure and blood lipids and to investigate the effect of taking different measures of obesity into account. We included 3294 men and women aged 18-69 years from a general population based study in Copenhagen, Denmark. Estimated 24-hour sodium excretion was calculated by measurements of creatinine and sodium concentration in spot urine in combination with information of sex, age, height and weight. The relations of estimated 24-hour sodium excretion with blood pressure and blood lipids were evaluated by linear regression models. The daily mean estimated intake of salt was 10.80 g and 7.52 g among men and women, respectively. Daily salt intake was significantly associated with blood pressure (β-estimates 1.18 mm Hg/g salt (systolic) and 0.74 mm Hg/g salt (diastolic), p < 0.0001) - however this association was markedly affected by adjustment for obesity (β-estimates around 0.60 mm Hg/g salt (systolic) and around 0.25 mm Hg/g salt (diastolic), p < 0.05). Also associations between daily salt intake and blood lipids were highly affected by adjustment for obesity. Associations of estimated daily salt intake with blood pressure and blood lipids were highly affected by adjustment for obesity. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  14. Effect of nimesulide-a preferential COX-2 inhibitor on arterial blood pressure, compared to ketoprofen.

    PubMed

    Saran, Tomasz; Sodolski, Wojciech; Sodolska, Katarzyna; Danilkiewicz, Wit Cezary; Schabowski, Janusz

    2004-01-01

    Clinical and experimental studies have shown that renal and cardiovascular effects of most selective COX-2 inhibitors (rofecoxib, celecoxib) are similar to other traditional NSAIDs (dual COX inhibitors). In these study the effect of nimesulide--preferential COX-2 inhibitor, administration on 24-hour blood pressure profile was investigated in 40 adult individuals on antihypertensive therapy with pain states caused by osteoartritis. Nimesulide was administered orally, twice a day at the conventional dose of 0.1 g for five days. In the next (or previous) 5 days the same patients were administered with ketoprofen at the dose of 0.05 g three times a day. On the last day of the NSAID administration period, 24-hour blood pressure monitoring was performed. Our results indicate no difference between nimesulide and ketoprofen effects on mean blood pressure values during antihypertensive therapy.

  15. Office and 24-hour heart rate and target organ damage in hypertensive patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We investigated the association between heart rate and its variability with the parameters that assess vascular, renal and cardiac target organ damage. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed including a consecutive sample of 360 hypertensive patients without heart rate lowering drugs (aged 56 ± 11 years, 64.2% male). Heart rate (HR) and its standard deviation (HRV) in clinical and 24-hour ambulatory monitoring were evaluated. Renal damage was assessed by glomerular filtration rate and albumin/creatinine ratio; vascular damage by carotid intima-media thickness and ankle/brachial index; and cardiac damage by the Cornell voltage-duration product and left ventricular mass index. Results There was a positive correlation between ambulatory, but not clinical, heart rate and its standard deviation with glomerular filtration rate, and a negative correlation with carotid intima-media thickness, and night/day ratio of systolic and diastolic blood pressure. There was no correlation with albumin/creatinine ratio, ankle/brachial index, Cornell voltage-duration product or left ventricular mass index. In the multiple linear regression analysis, after adjusting for age, the association of glomerular filtration rate and intima-media thickness with ambulatory heart rate and its standard deviation was lost. According to the logistic regression analysis, the predictors of any target organ damage were age (OR = 1.034 and 1.033) and night/day systolic blood pressure ratio (OR = 1.425 and 1.512). Neither 24 HR nor 24 HRV reached statistical significance. Conclusions High ambulatory heart rate and its variability, but not clinical HR, are associated with decreased carotid intima-media thickness and a higher glomerular filtration rate, although this is lost after adjusting for age. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01325064 PMID:22439900

  16. Exaggerated blood pressure response to exercise is not associated with masked hypertension in patients with high normal blood pressure levels.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Alon; Cohen, Noa; Shemesh, Joseph; Koren-Morag, Nira; Leibowitz, Avshalom; Grossman, Ehud

    2014-04-01

    The association between exaggerated blood pressure (BP) response to exercise (ExBPR) and "masked hypertension" is unclear. Medical records of patients with high-normal BP who were evaluated in the Chaim Sheba Screening Institute Ramat Gan, Israel, during the years 2002-2007 and referred for 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) and exercise test were reviewed. Data on exercise tests performed in the preceding 5 years were retrieved. Reproducible ExBPR was defined when it was recorded at least twice. BP levels on 24-hour ABPM were compared between patients with a normal BP response and those with an ExBPR (systolic BP ≥200 mm Hg). Sixty-nine normotensive patients with high normal BP levels were identified. ExBPR was recorded in 43 patients and was reproducible in 28. BP levels on 24-hour ABPM were similar in patients with and without ExBPR. In patients with high-normal BP levels, ExBPR is not associated with masked hypertension.

  17. Dysglycemia induces abnormal circadian blood pressure variability

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Prediabetes (PreDM) in asymptomatic adults is associated with abnormal circadian blood pressure variability (abnormal CBPV). Hypothesis Systemic inflammation and glycemia influence circadian blood pressure variability. Methods Dahl salt-sensitive (S) rats (n = 19) after weaning were fed either an American (AD) or a standard (SD) diet. The AD (high-glycemic-index, high-fat) simulated customary human diet, provided daily overabundant calories which over time lead to body weight gain. The SD (low-glycemic-index, low-fat) mirrored desirable balanced human diet for maintaining body weight. Body weight and serum concentrations for fasting glucose (FG), adipokines (leptin and adiponectin), and proinflammatory cytokines [monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)] were measured. Rats were surgically implanted with C40 transmitters and blood pressure (BP-both systolic; SBP and diastolic; DBP) and heart rate (HR) were recorded by telemetry every 5 minutes during both sleep (day) and active (night) periods. Pulse pressure (PP) was calculated (PP = SBP-DBP). Results [mean(SEM)]: The AD fed group displayed significant increase in body weight (after 90 days; p < 0.01). Fasting glucose, adipokine (leptin and adiponectin) concentrations significantly increased (at 90 and 172 days; all p < 0.05), along with a trend for increased concentrations of systemic pro-inflammatory cytokines (MCP-1 and TNF-α) on day 90. The AD fed group, with significantly higher FG, also exhibited significantly elevated circadian (24-hour) overall mean SBP, DBP, PP and HR (all p < 0.05). Conclusion These data validate our stated hypothesis that systemic inflammation and glycemia influence circadian blood pressure variability. This study, for the first time, demonstrates a cause and effect relationship between caloric excess, enhanced systemic inflammation, dysglycemia, loss of blood pressure control and abnormal CBPV. Our results provide the fundamental

  18. Setting Thresholds to Varying Blood Pressure Monitoring Intervals Differentially Affects Risk Estimates Associated With White-Coat and Masked Hypertension in the Population

    PubMed Central

    Asayama, Kei; Thijs, Lutgarde; Li, Yan; Gu, Yu-Mei; Hara, Azusa; Liu, Yan-Ping; Zhang, Zhenyu; Wei, Fang-Fei; Lujambio, Inés; Mena, Luis J.; Boggia, José; Hansen, Tine W.; Björklund-Bodegård, Kristina; Nomura, Kyoko; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Dolan, Eamon; Stolarz-Skrzypek, Katarzyna; Malyutina, Sofia; Casiglia, Edoardo; Nikitin, Yuri; Lind, Lars; Luzardo, Leonella; Kawecka-Jaszcz, Kalina; Sandoya, Edgardo; Filipovský, Jan; Maestre, Gladys E.; Wang, Jiguang; Imai, Yutaka; Franklin, Stanley S.; O’Brien, Eoin; Staessen, Jan A.

    2015-01-01

    Outcome-driven recommendations about time intervals during which ambulatory blood pressure should be measured to diagnose white-coat or masked hypertension are lacking. We cross-classified 8237 untreated participants (mean age, 50.7 years; 48.4% women) enrolled in 12 population studies, using ≥140/≥90, ≥130/≥80, ≥135/≥85, and ≥120/≥70 mm Hg as hypertension thresholds for conventional, 24-hour, daytime, and nighttime blood pressure. White-coat hypertension was hypertension on conventional measurement with ambulatory normotension, the opposite condition being masked hypertension. Intervals used for classification of participants were daytime, nighttime, and 24 hours, first considered separately, and next combined as 24 hours plus daytime or plus nighttime, or plus both. Depending on time intervals chosen, white-coat and masked hypertension frequencies ranged from 6.3% to 12.5% and from 9.7% to 19.6%, respectively. During 91 046 person-years, 729 participants experienced a cardiovascular event. In multivariable analyses with normotension during all intervals of the day as reference, hazard ratios associated with white-coat hypertension progressively weakened considering daytime only (1.38; P=0.033), nighttime only (1.43; P=0.0074), 24 hours only (1.21; P=0.20), 24 hours plus daytime (1.24; P=0.18), 24 hours plus nighttime (1.15; P=0.39), and 24 hours plus daytime and nighttime (1.16; P=0.41). The hazard ratios comparing masked hypertension with normotension were all significant (P<0.0001), ranging from 1.76 to 2.03. In conclusion, identification of truly low-risk white-coat hypertension requires setting thresholds simultaneously to 24 hours, daytime, and nighttime blood pressure. Although any time interval suffices to diagnose masked hypertension, as proposed in current guidelines, full 24-hour recordings remain standard in clinical practice. PMID:25135185

  19. Setting thresholds to varying blood pressure monitoring intervals differentially affects risk estimates associated with white-coat and masked hypertension in the population.

    PubMed

    Asayama, Kei; Thijs, Lutgarde; Li, Yan; Gu, Yu-Mei; Hara, Azusa; Liu, Yan-Ping; Zhang, Zhenyu; Wei, Fang-Fei; Lujambio, Inés; Mena, Luis J; Boggia, José; Hansen, Tine W; Björklund-Bodegård, Kristina; Nomura, Kyoko; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Dolan, Eamon; Stolarz-Skrzypek, Katarzyna; Malyutina, Sofia; Casiglia, Edoardo; Nikitin, Yuri; Lind, Lars; Luzardo, Leonella; Kawecka-Jaszcz, Kalina; Sandoya, Edgardo; Filipovský, Jan; Maestre, Gladys E; Wang, Jiguang; Imai, Yutaka; Franklin, Stanley S; O'Brien, Eoin; Staessen, Jan A

    2014-11-01

    Outcome-driven recommendations about time intervals during which ambulatory blood pressure should be measured to diagnose white-coat or masked hypertension are lacking. We cross-classified 8237 untreated participants (mean age, 50.7 years; 48.4% women) enrolled in 12 population studies, using ≥140/≥90, ≥130/≥80, ≥135/≥85, and ≥120/≥70 mm Hg as hypertension thresholds for conventional, 24-hour, daytime, and nighttime blood pressure. White-coat hypertension was hypertension on conventional measurement with ambulatory normotension, the opposite condition being masked hypertension. Intervals used for classification of participants were daytime, nighttime, and 24 hours, first considered separately, and next combined as 24 hours plus daytime or plus nighttime, or plus both. Depending on time intervals chosen, white-coat and masked hypertension frequencies ranged from 6.3% to 12.5% and from 9.7% to 19.6%, respectively. During 91 046 person-years, 729 participants experienced a cardiovascular event. In multivariable analyses with normotension during all intervals of the day as reference, hazard ratios associated with white-coat hypertension progressively weakened considering daytime only (1.38; P=0.033), nighttime only (1.43; P=0.0074), 24 hours only (1.21; P=0.20), 24 hours plus daytime (1.24; P=0.18), 24 hours plus nighttime (1.15; P=0.39), and 24 hours plus daytime and nighttime (1.16; P=0.41). The hazard ratios comparing masked hypertension with normotension were all significant (P<0.0001), ranging from 1.76 to 2.03. In conclusion, identification of truly low-risk white-coat hypertension requires setting thresholds simultaneously to 24 hours, daytime, and nighttime blood pressure. Although any time interval suffices to diagnose masked hypertension, as proposed in current guidelines, full 24-hour recordings remain standard in clinical practice. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Exercising in the Fasted State Reduced 24-Hour Energy Intake in Active Male Adults

    PubMed Central

    Deitrick, Ronald W.; Hillman, Angela R.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of fasting prior to morning exercise on 24-hour energy intake was examined using a randomized, counterbalanced design. Participants (12 active, white males, 20.8 ± 3.0 years old, VO2max: 59.1 ± 5.7 mL/kg/min) fasted (NoBK) or received breakfast (BK) and then ran for 60 minutes at 60%  VO2max. All food was weighed and measured for 24 hours. Measures of blood glucose and hunger were collected at 5 time points. Respiratory quotient (RQ) was measured during exercise. Generalized linear mixed models and paired sample t-tests examined differences between the conditions. Total 24-hour (BK: 19172 ± 4542 kJ versus NoBK: 15312 ± 4513 kJ; p < 0.001) and evening (BK: 12265 ± 4278 kJ versus NoBK: 10833 ± 4065; p = 0.039) energy intake and RQ (BK: 0.90 ± 0.03 versus NoBK: 0.86 ± 0.03; p < 0.001) were significantly higher in BK than NoBK. Blood glucose was significantly higher in BK than NoBK before exercise (5.2 ± 0.7 versus 4.5 ± 0.6 mmol/L; p = 0.025). Hunger was significantly lower for BK than NoBK before exercise, after exercise, and before lunch. Blood glucose and hunger were not associated with energy intake. Fasting before morning exercise decreased 24-hour energy intake and increased fat oxidation during exercise. Completing exercise in the morning in the fasted state may have implications for weight management. PMID:27738523

  1. Electrocardiographic left ventricular hypertrophy criteria and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring parameters in adults.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Marcos, Manuel A; Recio-Rodríguez, Jose I; Patino-Alonso, María C; Agudo-Conde, Cristina; Fernandez-Alonso, Carmen; Martinez Vizcaino, Vicente; Cantera, Carlos Martin; Guenaga-Saenz, Nahia; González-Viejo, Natividad; García-Ortiz, Luis

    2014-03-01

    To examine the relationship between ambulatory blood pressure monitoring parameters (ABPM) and electrocardiographic criteria for left-ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in adults. This study analyzed 1,544 subjects from the EVIDENT study (mean age = 55 ± 14 years; 61% women). A standard electrocardiograph (ECG) and 10 criteria were used to detect LVH. Office and ABPM were performed, and we analyzed 24-hour systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), percentage of time awake with SBP ≥135 mm Hg, percentage of time asleep with SBP ≥120 mm Hg, and central aortic blood pressure. LVH according to some electrocardiographic criteria was found in 11.30% of the patients (16.60% of men and 7.70% of women). The patients with LVH were older; had higher values for office, 24-hour and, central aortic blood pressure; were more likely to be men; and had a higher prevalence of obesity, diabetes, and antihypertensive or lipid-lowering drug use. In the logistic regression analysis, the association between the parameters of ABPM and LVH, after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, and heart rate, remained statistically significant. Twenty-four hour blood pressure, the percentage of time with elevated awake and asleep SBPs, and the central systolic blood pressure are related to the presence of LVH as determined by ECG in adults. These results indicate the potential importance of the monitoring and control of different 24-hour parameters of blood pressure in addition to the standard clinic blood pressure with respect to the development of LVH. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01325064.

  2. [Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (CABPM): clinical characteristics of 31,530 patients].

    PubMed

    Sierra, Cristina; De la Sierra, Alejandro; Sobrino, Javier; Segura, Julián; Banegas, José Ramón; Gorostidi, Manuel; Ruilope, Luis Miguel

    2007-06-02

    Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) is a useful diagnostic and therapeutic tool in hypertensive patients. This study reports the clinical characteristics of 31,530 patients included in the Spanish Registry of ABPM. A total number of 767 investigators recruited patients with suspected or confirmed hypertension to whom an ABPM was indicated with a validated device and included them in the study. Mean blood pressures from daytime, nighttime, and the whole 24-hour period were all measured. Circadian patterns were defined depending on nocturnal systolic blood pressure fall: extreme dipper (> 20%), dipper (10%-20%), non-dipper (< 10%) and riser (nocturnal blood pressure increase). 24-hour, daytime, and nighttime blood pressure values were lower than those obtained at the office. Twenty percent of patients exhibited elevated office blood pressure with normal values on ABPM ( hypertensives or false resistant) whereas 9% showed increased values on ABPM, but normal at the office (masked hypertension). The non-dipper or riser circadian patterns were present in more than half of the patients (40.2% and 13.4%, respectively) and were associated with an increased cardiovascular risk. Almost one third of hypertensive patients exhibit blood pressure values that are not concordant between office and ABPM. More than a half of patients, especially those at higher risk, present a circadian pattern with an inadequate nocturnal blood pressure fall.

  3. What Is High Blood Pressure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... consistently too high. How your blood pressure and circulatory system work In order to survive and function properly, ... and organs need the oxygenated blood that your circulatory system carries throughout the body. When the heart beats, ...

  4. Association of ambulatory blood pressure and heart rate with advanced white matter lesions in ischemic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyuk Sung; Lim, Young-Hyo; Kim, Hyun Young; Kim, Hee-Tae; Kwon, Hyung-Min; Lim, Jae-Sung; Lee, Young-Jun; Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Young Seo

    2014-02-01

    White matter lesions (WMLs) are a common finding in stroke patients, and the most important risk factors are old age and hypertension. Although many studies have described the association between WMLs and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) parameters in healthy subjects and hypertensive patients, little is known about the association in hypertensive ischemic stroke patients. From July 2009 to June 2012, 169 consecutive hypertensive noncardioembolic ischemic stroke patients were recruited within 1 week of suffering a stroke, and ABPM was applied 1 or 2 weeks after stroke onset. The subjects were classified into 2 groups according to the presence of advanced WMLs, and their ABPM parameters were compared. Finally, multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to investigate the independent relationships between WMLs and ABPM parameters. Seventy (41%) patients had advanced WMLs. In univariable analysis, higher 24-hour, awake, and asleep systolic blood pressure (SBP)/diastolic blood pressure levels and 24-hour pulse pressure were associated with advanced WMLs. However, circadian blood pressure parameters such as 24-hour BP variability, morning surge, and nocturnal dipping pattern were not associated with advanced WMLs. After adjustments, old age (odds ratio (OR) = 1.063; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.024-1.104; P = 0.002), high 24-hour SBP levels (OR = 1.055; 95% CI = 1.028-1.082; P < 0.001), and high 24-hour heart rate (OR = 1.041; 95% CI = 1.006-1.078; P = 0.023) were independently associated with advanced WMLs. In addition to old age and elevated 24-hour SBP, increased heart rate is associated with advanced WMLs in ischemic stroke patients. Heart rate deserves more attention in predicting advanced WMLs in those patients.

  5. Low-Glycemic-Index Foods Can Decrease Systolic and Diastolic Blood Pressure in the Short Term

    PubMed Central

    Hosseininasab, Mina; Norouzy, Abdolreza; Nematy, Mohsen; Bonakdaran, Shokoufeh

    2015-01-01

    Background. We aimed to compare the effects of low- and high-GI foods on 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure. Methods. This longitudinal study was performed on 30 women, aged 18 to 40 years, during 24 hours. In the first leg of study all recruited subjects were assigned to LGI period for 24 hours and, after a 2-week washout period, all subjects were assigned to HGI period. BP was measured every hour during the 24-hour monitoring. Results. After the intervention, there were significant decreases in SBP and DBP in the LGI period (102.26 ± 14.18 mmHg versus 112.86 ± 9.33 mmHg for SBP and 66.96 ± 10.39 mmHg versus 74.46 ± 7.61 mmHg for DBP) (P = 0.00 and P = 0.002, resp.). However, in the HGI period, there was no significant change in SBP or DBP (110.66 ± 9.85 versus 111.80 ± 9.57 for SBP and 71.16 ± 9.16 versus 74.26 ± 10.09 for DBP) (P = 0.6 and P = 0.06, resp.). Conclusion. The results suggest that LGI foods may be beneficial in reducing 24-hour BP. PMID:26509082

  6. Automated office blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Myers, Martin G; Godwin, Marshall

    2012-05-01

    Manual blood pressure (BP) is gradually disappearing from clinical practice with the mercury sphygmomanometer now considered to be an environmental hazard. Manual BP is also subject to measurement error on the part of the physician/nurse and patient-related anxiety which can result in poor quality BP measurements and office-induced (white coat) hypertension. Automated office (AO) BP with devices such as the BpTRU (BpTRU Medical Devices, Coquitlam, BC) has already replaced conventional manual BP in many primary care practices in Canada and has also attracted interest in other countries where research studies using AOBP have been undertaken. The basic principles of AOBP include multiple readings taken with a fully automated recorder with the patient resting alone in a quiet room. When these principles are followed, office-induced hypertension is eliminated and AOBP exhibits a much stronger correlation with the awake ambulatory BP as compared with routine manual BP measurements. Unlike routine manual BP, AOBP correlates as well with left ventricular mass as does the awake ambulatory BP. AOBP also simplifies the definition of hypertension in that the cut point for a normal AOBP (< 135/85 mm Hg) is the same as for the awake ambulatory BP and home BP. This article summarizes the currently available evidence supporting the use of AOBP in routine clinical practice and proposes an algorithm in which AOBP replaces manual BP for the diagnosis and management of hypertension.

  7. Prognostic Effect of the Nocturnal Blood Pressure Fall in Hypertensive Patients: The Ambulatory Blood Pressure Collaboration in Patients With Hypertension (ABC-H) Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Salles, Gil F; Reboldi, Gianpaolo; Fagard, Robert H; Cardoso, Claudia R L; Pierdomenico, Sante D; Verdecchia, Paolo; Eguchi, Kazuo; Kario, Kazuomi; Hoshide, Satoshi; Polonia, Jorge; de la Sierra, Alejandro; Hermida, Ramon C; Dolan, Eamon; O'Brien, Eoin; Roush, George C

    2016-04-01

    The prognostic importance of the nocturnal systolic blood pressure (SBP) fall, adjusted for average 24-hour SBP levels, is unclear. The Ambulatory Blood Pressure Collaboration in Patients With Hypertension (ABC-H) examined this issue in a meta-analysis of 17 312 hypertensives from 3 continents. Risks were computed for the systolic night-to-day ratio and for different dipping patterns (extreme, reduced, and reverse dippers) relative to normal dippers. ABC-H investigators provided multivariate adjusted hazard ratios (HRs), with and without adjustment for 24-hour SBP, for total cardiovascular events (CVEs), coronary events, strokes, cardiovascular mortality, and total mortality. Average 24-hour SBP varied from 131 to 140 mm Hg and systolic night-to-day ratio from 0.88 to 0.93. There were 1769 total CVEs, 916 coronary events, 698 strokes, 450 cardiovascular deaths, and 903 total deaths. After adjustment for 24-hour SBP, the systolic night-to-day ratio predicted all outcomes: from a 1-SD increase, summary HRs were 1.12 to 1.23. Reverse dipping also predicted all end points: HRs were 1.57 to 1.89. Reduced dippers, relative to normal dippers, had a significant 27% higher risk for total CVEs. Risks for extreme dippers were significantly influenced by antihypertensive treatment (P<0.001): untreated patients had increased risk of total CVEs (HR, 1.92), whereas treated patients had borderline lower risk (HR, 0.72) than normal dippers. For CVEs, heterogeneity was low for systolic night-to-day ratio and reverse/reduced dipping and moderate for extreme dippers. Quality of included studies was moderate to high, and publication bias was undetectable. In conclusion, in this largest meta-analysis of hypertensive patients, the nocturnal BP fall provided substantial prognostic information, independent of 24-hour SBP levels.

  8. Effects of dietary sodium reduction on blood pressure in subjects with resistant hypertension: results from a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Eduardo; Gaddam, Krishna K; Oparil, Suzanne; Aban, Inmaculada; Husain, Saima; Dell'Italia, Louis J; Calhoun, David A

    2009-09-01

    Observational studies indicate a significant relation between dietary sodium and level of blood pressure. However, the role of salt sensitivity in the development of resistant hypertension is unknown. The present study examined the effects of dietary salt restriction on office and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure in subjects with resistant hypertension. Twelve subjects with resistant hypertension entered into a randomized crossover evaluation of low (50 mmol/24 hours x 7 days) and high sodium diets (250 mmol/24 hours x 7 days) separated by a 2-week washout period. Brain natriuretic peptide; plasma renin activity; 24-hour urinary aldosterone, sodium, and potassium; 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring; aortic pulse wave velocity; and augmentation index were compared between dietary treatment periods. At baseline, subjects were on an average of 3.4+/-0.5 antihypertensive medications with a mean office BP of 145.8+/-10.8/83.9+/-11.2 mm Hg. Mean urinary sodium excretion was 46.1+/-26.8 versus 252.2+/-64.6 mmol/24 hours during low- versus high-salt intake. Low- compared to high-salt diet decreased office systolic and diastolic blood pressure by 22.7 and 9.1 mm Hg, respectively. Plasma renin activity increased whereas brain natriuretic peptide and creatinine clearance decreased during low-salt intake, indicative of intravascular volume reduction. These results indicate that excessive dietary sodium ingestion contributes importantly to resistance to antihypertensive treatment. Strategies to substantially reduce dietary salt intake should be part of the overall treatment of resistant hypertension.

  9. Impact of 24-hour helpline service for people with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Farrukh; Asim-Bin-Zafar; Riaz, Musarrat; Ghafoor, Erum; Rehman, Rabia Abdul; Uddin, Qutub

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the impact and effectiveness of 24-hour helpline service in providing information and educating patients about self-management of diabetes. Method: The study was conducted at Baqai Institute of Diabetology & Endocrinology (BIDE), a tertiary diabetes care center, Karachi, Pakistan. People with diabetes attending the outpatient department from November 2012 to October 2014 were included in this study. After providing diabetes education, a helpline number was provided for emergency situations. Calls of registered patients were received by diabetes educators stationed at the BIDE around the clock. Data was collected through specially designed interface of HMS (health management system) in which the current complaint of caller and the advice of educator was recorded. Result: A total of 4842 calls were received. Out of those, 4268 (88%) were made by Type-2 diabetics and 526 calls (10%) were made by Type-1 diabetics. The average age of patients was 47.6 years. Three seventy-four calls (7.7%) were received with complaint of Hypoglycemia (72-80mg/dl). Six hundred and ninety-eight calls (14.4%) were received with complaint of hyperglycemia (>200mg/dl). Insulin dose was adjusted on 935 calls (19.3%). Calls regarding other special situations such as (insulin handling, technique, medicine information) 2014 (41.6%) were received. Conclusion: Station based 24-hour telephonic helpline service is an effective tool for providing continuous support to people with diabetes and their families, for the self-management of diabetes. It can help in the management of various acute complication of diabetes, thereby preventing unnecessary hospital visits and admission. PMID:28811807

  10. Variation in Sodium Intake and Intra-individual Change in Blood Pressure in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Chetna M; Ix, Joachim H; Anderson, Cheryl A M; Woodell, Tyler B; Smits, Gerard; Persky, Martha S; Block, Geoffrey A; Rifkin, Dena E

    2017-08-30

    In the kidney disease clinic setting, higher-than-usual blood pressure is often ascribed to recent dietary sodium indiscretion. While clinical trials demonstrate a clear relationship between salt intake and blood pressure on the population level, it is uncertain whether real-world variation in sodium intake within individual chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients is associated with fluctuations in blood pressure. We analyzed data from the Phosphorus Normalization Trial, in which participants with CKD eating their usual diets completed at least three 24-hour urine collections over 9 months, from which we measured sodium. Blood pressure was measured at the time of 24-hour urine collections. For each individual participant, we assessed the slope of the relationship between sodium intake and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP). Among 119 participants (mean age 67 years and mean estimated glomerular filtration rate 31 mL/minute/1.73 m(2)), there was substantial variation in sodium intake as measured by 24-hour urine collections (mean intake 3,903 mg/day, standard deviation 1037 mg/day). Individual participants had highly variable associations between their sodium intake and their MAP; 47% (n = 56) had inverse associations between sodium and MAP, whereas the remainder had positive (salt-sensitive) associations. Among CKD patients, there is substantial variation in sodium intake but no predictable relationship between dietary sodium and blood pressure in individuals. The frequent dismissal of elevated blood pressure readings as related to recent sodium intake in clinic may be a misapplication of large-scale population data to explain individual variability and may contribute to clinical inertia regarding high blood pressure treatment. Copyright © 2017 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Ambulatory blood pressure reduction following high-intensity interval exercise performed in water or dryland condition.

    PubMed

    Sosner, Philippe; Gayda, Mathieu; Dupuy, Olivier; Garzon, Mauricio; Lemasson, Christopher; Gremeaux, Vincent; Lalongé, Julie; Gonzales, Mariel; Hayami, Douglas; Juneau, Martin; Nigam, Anil; Bosquet, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    We aimed to compare blood pressure (BP) responses following moderate-intensity continuous exercise (MICE), high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) in dry land or HIIE in immersed condition, using 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring. Forty-two individuals (65 ± 7 years, 52% men) with a baseline BP ≥ 130/85 mm Hg (systolic/diastolic blood pressures [SBP/DBP]) were randomly assigned to perform one of the three following exercises on a stationary cycle: MICE (24 minutes at 50% peak power output) or HIIE in dry land (two sets of 10 minutes with phases of 15 seconds 100% peak power output interspersed by 15 seconds of passive recovery) or HIIE in up-to-the-chest immersed condition. While MICE modified none of the 24-hour average hemodynamic variables, dryland HIIE induced a 24-hour BP decrease (SBP: -3.6 ± 5.7/DBP: -2.8 ± 3.0 mm Hg, P < .05) and, to a much greater extent, immersed HIIE (SBP: -6.8 ± 9.5/DBP: -3.0 ± 4.5 mm Hg, P < .05). The one condition that modified 24-hour pulse-wave velocity was immersed HIIE (-0.21 ± 0.30 m/s, P < .05).

  12. Low Blood Pressure (Hypotension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... if you stand up after lying down. Ordinarily, gravity causes blood to pool in your legs whenever ... eating. It affects mostly older adults. Just as gravity pulls blood to your feet when you stand, ...

  13. Diabetes and blood pressure (image)

    MedlinePlus

    People with diabetes have a higher risk for heart attacks and strokes. Your doctor or nurse should check your blood pressure ... People with diabetes have a higher risk for heart attacks and strokes. Your doctor or nurse should check your blood pressure ...

  14. Stroke and High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More How High Blood Pressure Can Lead to Stroke Updated:May 3,2017 ... This content was last reviewed October 2016. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP • Know Your ...

  15. Drinking pattern and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Seppä, K; Laippala, P; Sillanaukee, P

    1994-03-01

    Large amounts of alcohol are known to increase blood pressure. There is little evidence about the effect of binge drinking of alcohol on blood pressure, although this is the dominant style of alcohol drinking in several countries. The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship between binge drinking and blood pressure using daily heavy drinkers as a reference group. We examined 260 consecutive nonalcoholic 40- and 45-year-old men participating in a health screening. There were 37 teetotalers, 147 social drinkers, 62 weekend heavy drinkers attending the health screening 2 to 7 days after binge drinking, and 14 men who drank heavily every day. Group division was made using self-reported alcohol consumption and a structured alcohol questionnaire. Blood pressure was measured manually by a mercury manometer. BMDP statistical software was used in the statistical analysis of the material. The diastolic blood pressure of weekend heavy drinkers (mean intake during the weekend, 289 g) did not differ from that found in teetotalers but systolic blood pressure was slightly higher (5 mm Hg, P = .04). In contrast, daily heavy drinkers (mean intake during the weekend [Friday to Saturday], 151 g) had significantly higher systolic (8 mm Hg, P = .04) and diastolic (6 mm Hg, P = .05) blood pressure values than teetotalers. We conclude that different drinking habits seem to have different effects on blood pressure, those of daily heavy drinking being more prominent than those of weekend heavy drinking.

  16. Managing High Blood Pressure Medications

    MedlinePlus

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Managing High Blood Pressure Medications Updated:Jan 3,2017 When your doctor ... health. This content was last reviewed October 2016. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP • Know Your ...

  17. High Blood Pressure and Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More High Blood Pressure and Women Updated:Dec 14,2016 Pregnancy and ... Women . This content was last reviewed October 2016. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP • Know Your ...

  18. High Blood Pressure Increasing Worldwide

    MedlinePlus

    ... other ways to control blood pressure, including healthy lifestyle choices and maintaining a normal weight, Roth said. Murray said some of the factors responsible for the worldwide increase in high blood pressure are unhealthy diets and obesity. In addition, in developing countries, more people are ...

  19. Serotonin and Blood Pressure Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Shaun F.; Davis, Robert Patrick; Barman, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin) was discovered more than 60 years ago as a substance isolated from blood. The neural effects of 5-HT have been well investigated and understood, thanks in part to the pharmacological tools available to dissect the serotonergic system and the development of the frequently prescribed selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors. By contrast, our understanding of the role of 5-HT in the control and modification of blood pressure pales in comparison. Here we focus on the role of 5-HT in systemic blood pressure control. This review provides an in-depth study of the function and pharmacology of 5-HT in those tissues that can modify blood pressure (blood, vasculature, heart, adrenal gland, kidney, brain), with a focus on the autonomic nervous system that includes mechanisms of action and pharmacology of 5-HT within each system. We compare the change in blood pressure produced in different species by short- and long-term administration of 5-HT or selective serotonin receptor agonists. To further our understanding of the mechanisms through which 5-HT modifies blood pressure, we also describe the blood pressure effects of commonly used drugs that modify the actions of 5-HT. The pharmacology and physiological actions of 5-HT in modifying blood pressure are important, given its involvement in circulatory shock, orthostatic hypotension, serotonin syndrome and hypertension. PMID:22407614

  20. [Ambulatory blood pressure: methods, equipment, technical problems, validations].

    PubMed

    Carré, A; Petetin, N; Fouquoire, B; Mounier-Vehier, C; Poncelet, P

    1991-09-01

    The measurement of ambulatory blood pressure provides a discontinuous recording which reflects the pressure load over a 24 hour period. The latest recorders allow the patient a relative autonomy due to discontinuous but programmable recording and the miniaturisation of the recorder and relative silence during inflation of the cuff. The main disadvantage of the technique is the necessity of interruption of the patient's physical activity at the moment of recording indicated by an audible "beep". The concept of "active pressure load" is therefore illusory. The traditional controversy between supporters of the auscultatory versus those for the oscillometric method is far from being settled and these discussions do not resolve the problem. The use of finger plethysmographic techniques (Finapress-Ohmeda) is an interesting approach but limited for the time being by the necessity of confinement to a laboratory and recordings of short durations requiring strict conditions of ambient temperature. Future developments using ultrasonic techniques may provide a solution to these problems.

  1. Quantitation of 24-Hour Moisturization by Electrical Measurements of Skin Hydration.

    PubMed

    Wickett, R Randall; Damjanovic, Bronson

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the effects of several moisturizers on hydration of the stratum corneum by measuring their effect on electrical conductance over a 24-hour period. Double-blind, randomized controlled trial. Twenty-five healthy female volunteers aged 18 to 65 years with dry skin on the lower legs and no other known dermatologic pathology participated in the study. Additional exclusion criteria were pregnant or taking anti-inflammatory steroids. The study was carried out in a clinical research facility in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. Subjects underwent a 3-day conditioning period using a natural soap bar on the lower legs and no application of moisturizer to the skin. Participants then came to the test site and equilibrated for at least 30 minutes under controlled conditions of temperature and humidity. After baseline hydration measurements on test sites on the lower legs of each subject, a single application of each of 5 test products at a dose of 2 mg/cm was made. Skin hydration was assessed by electrical conductance measurements with a specialized probe. The probe was briefly placed on the skin surface with light pressure, and the measurement recorded in units of microsiemens (μS). Conductance was measured at 2, 4, 6, 8, and 24 hours after product applications. Although all but 1 of the test products increased conductance at 2 hours, only 2 moisturizers containing high levels of glycerin (products C and E) maintained increased conductance relative to baseline at 24 hours, +37.8 (P < .001) and +103.5 (P < .001), respectively. Moisturizers containing high levels of glycerin can provide a measurable moisturization benefit as determined by skin conductance for at least 24 hours after a single application.

  2. Caffeine Consumption and Heart Rate and Blood Pressure Response to Regadenoson.

    PubMed

    Bitar, Abbas; Mastouri, Ronald; Kreutz, Rolf P

    2015-01-01

    Current guidelines recommend that caffeinated products should be avoided for at least 12 hours prior to regadenoson administration. We intended to examine the effect of caffeine consumption and of timing of last dose on hemodynamic effects after regadenoson administration for cardiac stress testing. 332 subjects undergoing regadenoson stress testing were enrolled. Baseline characteristics, habits of coffee/caffeine exposure, baseline vital signs and change in heart rate, blood pressure, percent of maximal predicted heart rate, and percent change in heart rate were prospectively collected. Non-coffee drinkers (group 1) (73 subjects) and subjects who last drank coffee >24 hours (group 3) (139 subjects) prior to regadenoson did not demonstrate any difference in systolic blood pressure, heart rate change, maximal predicted heart rate and percent change in heart rate. Systolic blood pressure change (15.2±17.1 vs. 7.2±10.2 mmHg, p = 0.001), heart rate change (32.2±14 vs. 27.3±9.6 bpm, p = 0.038) and maximal predicted heart rate (65.5±15.6 vs. 60.7±8.6%, p = 0.038) were significantly higher in non-coffee drinkers (group 1) compared to those who drank coffee 12-24 hours prior (group 2) (108 subjects). Subjects who drank coffee >24 hours prior (group 3) exhibited higher systolic blood pressure change (13±15.8 vs. 7±10.2, p = 0.007), and heart rate change (32.1±15.3 vs. 27.3±9.6, p = 0.017) as compared to those who drank coffee 12-24 hours prior to testing (group 2). Caffeine exposure 12-24 hours prior to regadenoson administration attenuates the vasoactive effects of regadenoson, as evidenced by a blunted rise in heart rate and systolic blood pressure. These results suggest that caffeine exposure within 24 hours may reduce the effects of regadenoson administered for vasodilatory cardiac stress testing.

  3. Caffeine Consumption and Heart Rate and Blood Pressure Response to Regadenoson

    PubMed Central

    Bitar, Abbas; Mastouri, Ronald; Kreutz, Rolf P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Current guidelines recommend that caffeinated products should be avoided for at least 12 hours prior to regadenoson administration. We intended to examine the effect of caffeine consumption and of timing of last dose on hemodynamic effects after regadenoson administration for cardiac stress testing. Methods 332 subjects undergoing regadenoson stress testing were enrolled. Baseline characteristics, habits of coffee/caffeine exposure, baseline vital signs and change in heart rate, blood pressure, percent of maximal predicted heart rate, and percent change in heart rate were prospectively collected. Results Non-coffee drinkers (group 1) (73 subjects) and subjects who last drank coffee >24 hours (group 3) (139 subjects) prior to regadenoson did not demonstrate any difference in systolic blood pressure, heart rate change, maximal predicted heart rate and percent change in heart rate. Systolic blood pressure change (15.2±17.1 vs. 7.2±10.2 mmHg, p = 0.001), heart rate change (32.2±14 vs. 27.3±9.6 bpm, p = 0.038) and maximal predicted heart rate (65.5±15.6 vs. 60.7±8.6%, p = 0.038) were significantly higher in non-coffee drinkers (group 1) compared to those who drank coffee 12–24 hours prior (group 2) (108 subjects). Subjects who drank coffee >24 hours prior (group 3) exhibited higher systolic blood pressure change (13±15.8 vs. 7±10.2, p = 0.007), and heart rate change (32.1±15.3 vs. 27.3±9.6, p = 0.017) as compared to those who drank coffee 12–24 hours prior to testing (group 2). Conclusions Caffeine exposure 12–24 hours prior to regadenoson administration attenuates the vasoactive effects of regadenoson, as evidenced by a blunted rise in heart rate and systolic blood pressure. These results suggest that caffeine exposure within 24 hours may reduce the effects of regadenoson administered for vasodilatory cardiac stress testing. PMID:26098883

  4. Estimation of salt intake by 24-hour urinary sodium excretion: a cross-sectional study in Yantai, China

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background High levels of dietary sodium are associated with raised blood pressure and adverse cardiovascular health. To determine baseline salt intake, we investigated the average dietary salt intake from 24-hour urinary sodium excretion with a small sample of Yantai adults in the Shandong province of China. Methods One hundred ninety one adults aged 18–69 years were randomly selected from the Yantai adult population. Blood pressure, anthropometric indices and sodium excretion in a 24-hour urine collection were measured. Consumption of condiments was derived from 3-day weighted records. Completeness of urine collections was verified using creatinine excretion in relation to weight. Results The mean Na and K outputs over 24 hours were 201.5 ± 77.7 mmol/day and 46.8 ± 23.2 mmol/day, respectively (corresponding to 11.8 g NaCl and 1.8 g K). Overall, 92.1% of the subjects (96.9% of men and 87.1% of women) had intakes of over 6 g salt (NaCl)/d. The main sources of salt intake from weighed condiments records were from home cooking salt (74.7%) followed by soy sauce (15.0%). Salt intake from condiments and salt excretion were weakly correlated((r = 0.20, p = 0.005).A positive linear correlation between salt intake was associated with systolic blood pressure in all adjusted and unadjusted model (r = 0.16, p = 0.01). Each 100 mmol/day increase in sodium intake was associated with a 4.0 mmHg increase in systolic blood pressure. Conclusion Dietary salt intake in Yantai adults was high. Reducing the intake of table salt and soy sauce used in cooking will be an important strategy to reduce sodium intake among Yantai adults. PMID:24507470

  5. Ambulatory versus conventional methods for monitoring blood pressure during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bergel, E; Carroli, G; Althabe, F

    2002-01-01

    Hypertensive disorders are among the most common medical complications of pregnancy and a leading cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality world-wide. Blood pressure measurement plays a central role in the screening and management of hypertension during pregnancy. In recent years the validity of conventional (clinic) blood pressure measurement has been questioned and efforts have been made to improve the technique with ambulatory automated devices that provide a large number of measurements over a period of time, usually a 24-hour period. To assess whether the use of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring during pregnancy improves subsequent maternal and feto-neonatal outcomes, women-newborn quality of life or use of health service resources, compared with conventional (clinic) blood pressure measurements. These effects will be assessed for the following subgroups: (1) Women at low or average risk of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (unselected). (2) Women defined as high risk of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. (3) Women with hypertension without other signs of pre-eclampsia. (4) Women with established pre-eclampsia. The Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group trials register, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, MEDLINE, LILACS and EMBASE were searched. Date of last search: July 2001. All randomised trials comparing ambulatory blood pressure monitoring versus conventional (clinic) blood pressure monitoring in pregnancy. Quasi-random designs will be excluded. Two reviewers evaluated all potentially relevant articles, examined each study for possible inclusion and assessed the methodological quality using the Cochrane guidelines. No trials included. There is no randomised controlled trial evidence to support the use of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring during pregnancy. Randomized trials with adequate design and sample sizes are needed to evaluate the possible advantages and risks of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring during pregnancy

  6. Effect of CPAP on blood pressure in patients with obstructive sleep apnea and resistant hypertension: the HIPARCO randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Martínez-García, Miguel-Angel; Capote, Francisco; Campos-Rodríguez, Francisco; Lloberes, Patricia; Díaz de Atauri, María Josefa; Somoza, María; Masa, Juan F; González, Mónica; Sacristán, Lirios; Barbé, Ferrán; Durán-Cantolla, Joaquín; Aizpuru, Felipe; Mañas, Eva; Barreiro, Bienvenido; Mosteiro, Mar; Cebrián, Juan J; de la Peña, Mónica; García-Río, Francisco; Maimó, Andrés; Zapater, Jordi; Hernández, Concepción; Grau SanMarti, Nuria; Montserrat, Josep María

    2013-12-11

    More than 70% of patients with resistant hypertension have obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, there is little evidence about the effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment on blood pressure in patients with resistant hypertension. To assess the effect of CPAP treatment on blood pressure values and nocturnal blood pressure patterns in patients with resistant hypertension and OSA. Open-label, randomized, multicenter clinical trial of parallel groups with blinded end point design conducted in 24 teaching hospitals in Spain involving 194 patients with resistant hypertension and an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of 15 or higher. Data were collected from June 2009 to October 2011. CPAP or no therapy while maintaining usual blood pressure control medication. The primary end point was the change in 24-hour mean blood pressure after 12 weeks. Secondary end points included changes in other blood pressure values and changes in nocturnal blood pressure patterns. Both intention-to-treat (ITT) and per-protocol analyses were performed. A total of 194 patients were randomly assigned to receive CPAP (n = 98) or no CPAP (control; n = 96). The mean AHI was 40.4 (SD, 18.9) and an average of 3.8 antihypertensive drugs were taken per patient. Baseline 24-hour mean blood pressure was 103.4 mm Hg; systolic blood pressure (SBP), 144.2 mm Hg; and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), 83 mm Hg. At baseline, 25.8% of patients displayed a dipper pattern (a decrease of at least 10% in the average nighttime blood pressure compared with the average daytime blood pressure). The percentage of patients using CPAP for 4 or more hours per day was 72.4%. When the changes in blood pressure over the study period were compared between groups by ITT, the CPAP group achieved a greater decrease in 24-hour mean blood pressure (3.1 mm Hg [95% CI, 0.6 to 5.6]; P = .02) and 24-hour DBP (3.2 mm Hg [95% CI, 1.0 to 5.4]; P = .005), but not in 24-hour SBP (3.1 mm Hg [95% CI, -0.6 to 6

  7. High blood pressure in women.

    PubMed

    Calhoun, D A; Oparil, S

    1997-01-01

    There is a sexual dimorphism in blood pressure of humans and experimental animals: males tend to have higher blood pressure than females with functional ovaries, while ovariectomy or menopause tends to abolish the sexual dimorphism and cause females to develop a "male" pattern of blood pressure. Hypertensive male laboratory animals tend to have NaCl-sensitive blood pressure, while females are NaCl resistant unless their ovaries are removed, in which case NaCl sensitivity appears. The hormonal basis of NaCl sensitivity of blood pressure and of the sexual dimorphism of hypertension remains to be defined. Synthetic estrogens and progestins, as found in oral contraceptives, tend to elevate blood pressure, while naturally occurring estrogens lower it, or have no effect. Hypertension increases cardiovascular risk in women, as well as men, although the benefits of antihypertensive treatment have been more difficult to demonstrate in women. In the population of the United States, women are more aware of their hypertension, more likely to be treated medically, and more likely to have their blood pressure controlled.

  8. Chaos in blood pressure control.

    PubMed

    Wagner, C D; Nafz, B; Persson, P B

    1996-03-01

    A number of control mechanisms are comprised within blood pressure regulation, ranging from events on the cellular level up to circulating hormones. Despite their vast number, blood pressure fluctuations occur preferably within a certain range (under physiological conditions). A specific class of dynamic systems has been extensively studied over the past several years: nonlinear coupled systems, which often reveal a characteristic form of motion termed "chaos". The system is restricted to a certain range in phase space, but the motion is never periodic. The attractor the system moves on has a non-integer dimension. What all chaotic systems have in common is their sensitive dependence on initial conditions. The question arises as to whether blood pressure regulation can be explained by such models. Many efforts have been made to characterise heart rate variability and EEG dynamics by parameters of chaos theory (e.g., fractal dimensions and Lyapunov exponents). These method were successfully applied to dynamics observed in single organs, but very few studies have dealt with blood pressure dynamics. This mini-review first gives an overview on the history of blood pressure dynamics and the methods suitable to characterise the dynamics by means of tools derived from the field of nonlinear dynamics. Then applications to systemic blood pressure are discussed. After a short survey on heart rate variability, which is indirectly reflected in blood pressure variability, some dynamic aspects of resistance vessels are given. Intriguingly, systemic blood pressure reveals a change in fractal dimensions and Lyapunov exponents, when the major short-term control mechanism--the arterial baroreflex--is disrupted. Indeed it seems that cardiovascular time series can be described by tools from nonlinear dynamics [66]. These methods allow a novel description of some important aspects of biological systems. Both the linear and the nonlinear tools complement each other and can be useful in

  9. Managing sleep and wakefulness in a 24-hour world

    PubMed Central

    Coveney, Catherine M

    2014-01-01

    This article contributes to literature on the sociology of sleep by exploring the sleeping practices and subjective sleep experiences of two social groups: shift workers and students. It draws on data, collected in the UK from 25 semi-structured interviews, to discuss the complex ways in which working patterns and social activities impact upon experiences and expectations of sleep in our wired awake world. The data show that, typically, sleep is valued and considered to be important for health, general wellbeing, appearance and physical and cognitive functioning. However, sleep time is often cut back on in favour of work demands and social activities. While shift workers described their efforts to fit in an adequate amount of sleep per 24-hour period, for students, the adoption of a flexible sleep routine was thought to be favourable for maintaining a work–social life balance. Collectively, respondents reported using a wide range of strategies, techniques, technologies and practices to encourage, overcome or delay sleep(iness) and boost, promote or enhance wakefulness/alertness at socially desirable times. The analysis demonstrates how social context impacts not only on how we come to think about sleep and understand it, but also how we manage or self-regulate our sleeping patterns. PMID:23957268

  10. Cognitive Performance during a 24-Hour Cold Exposure Survival Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Geoffrey L.; Zaharieva, Dessi; Basset, Fabien A.; Hynes, Zach

    2016-01-01

    Survivor of a ship ground in polar regions may have to wait more than five days before being rescued. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore cognitive performance during prolonged cold exposure. Core temperature (Tc) and cognitive test battery (CTB) performance data were collected from eight participants during 24 hours of cold exposure (7.5°C ambient air temperature). Participants (recruited from those who have regular occupational exposure to cold) were instructed that they could freely engage in minimal exercise that was perceived to maintaining a tolerable level of thermal comfort. Despite the active engagement, test conditions were sufficient to significantly decrease Tc after exposure and to eliminate the typical 0.5–1.0°C circadian rise and drop in core temperature throughout a 24 h cycle. Results showed minimal changes in CTB performance regardless of exposure time. Based on the results, it is recommended that survivors who are waiting for rescue should be encouraged to engage in mild physical activity, which could have the benefit of maintaining metabolic heat production, improve motivation, and act as a distractor from cold discomfort. This recommendation should be taken into consideration during future research and when considering guidelines for mandatory survival equipment regarding cognitive performance. PMID:27478839

  11. Flexibility of working hours in the 24-hour society.

    PubMed

    Costa, G

    2006-01-01

    The 24-hour Society undergoes an ineluctable process towards a social organisation where time constraints are no more restricting human life. The borders between working and social times are no more fixed and rigidly determined, and the value of working time changes according to the different economic and social effects you may consider. Shift and night work, irregular and flexible working hours, together with new technologies, are the milestone of this epochal passage. What are the advantages and disadvantages for the individual, the companies, and the society? What is the cost/benefit ratio in terms of health and social well-being? Coping properly with this process means avoiding a passive acceptance of it with consequent maladjustments at both individual and social level, but adopting effective preventive and compensative strategies aimed at building up a more sustainable society. Flexible working times now appear to be one of the best ways to cope with the demands of the modern life, but there are different points of view about labour and temporal 'flexibility" between employers and employees. For the former it means a prompt adaptation to market demands and technological innovations; for the latter it is a way to improve working and social life, by decreasing work constraints and increasing control and autonomy. Although it can be easily speculated that individual-based 'flexibility" should improve health and well-being, and especially satisfaction, whereas company-based flexibility" might interfere negatively, the effective consequences on health and well-being have still to be analysed properly.

  12. Managing sleep and wakefulness in a 24-hour world.

    PubMed

    Coveney, Catherine M

    2014-01-01

    This article contributes to literature on the sociology of sleep by exploring the sleeping practices and subjective sleep experiences of two social groups: shift workers and students. It draws on data, collected in the UK from 25 semi-structured interviews, to discuss the complex ways in which working patterns and social activities impact upon experiences and expectations of sleep in our wired awake world. The data show that, typically, sleep is valued and considered to be important for health, general wellbeing, appearance and physical and cognitive functioning. However, sleep time is often cut back on in favour of work demands and social activities. While shift workers described their efforts to fit in an adequate amount of sleep per 24-hour period, for students, the adoption of a flexible sleep routine was thought to be favourable for maintaining a work-social life balance. Collectively, respondents reported using a wide range of strategies, techniques, technologies and practices to encourage, overcome or delay sleep(iness) and boost, promote or enhance wakefulness/alertness at socially desirable times. The analysis demonstrates how social context impacts not only on how we come to think about sleep and understand it, but also how we manage or self-regulate our sleeping patterns.

  13. Serial Alberta Stroke Program early CT score from baseline to 24 hours in Solitaire Flow Restoration with the Intention for Thrombectomy study: a novel surrogate end point for revascularization in acute stroke.

    PubMed

    Liebeskind, David S; Jahan, Reza; Nogueira, Raul G; Jovin, Tudor G; Lutsep, Helmi L; Saver, Jeffrey L

    2014-03-01

    The Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) on baseline imaging is an established predictor of acute ischemic stroke outcomes. We analyzed change on serial ASPECTS at baseline and 24-hour imaging in the Solitaire Flow Restoration with the Intention for Thrombectomy (SWIFT) study to determine prognostic value and to identify subgroups with extensive injury after intervention. ASPECTS at baseline and 24 hours was independently scored in all anterior circulation SWIFT cases, blinded to all other trial data. ASPECTS at baseline, at 24 hours, and serial changes were analyzed with univariate and multivariate approaches. One hundred thirty-nine patients (mean age, 67 [SD, 12] years; 52% women; median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, 18 [interquartile range, 8-28]) with complete data at both time points were studied. Multivariate analyses showed that higher 24-hour ASPECTS predicted good clinical outcome (day 90 modified Rankin Scale, 0-2; odds ratio, 1.67; P<0.001). Among patients with high baseline ASPECTS (8-10; n=109), dramatic infarct progression (decrease in ASPECTS ≥6 points at 24 hours) was noted in 31 of 109 (28%). Such serial ASPECTS change was predicted by higher baseline systolic blood pressure (P=0.019), higher baseline blood glucose (P=0.133), and failure to achieve Thrombolysis in Cerebral Infarction score of 2b/3 reperfusion (P<0.001), culminating in worse day 90 modified Rankin Scale outcomes (mean modified Rankin Scale, 4.4 versus 2.7; P<0.001). Twenty-four-hour ASPECTS provides better prognostic information compared with baseline ASPECTS. Predictors of dramatic infarct progression on ASPECTS are hyperglycemia, hypertension, and nonreperfusion. Serial ASPECTS change from baseline to 24 hours predicts clinical outcome, providing an early surrogate end point for thrombectomy trials. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01054560.

  14. [Relationship between sleep architecture and blood pressure dynamic change in patients with sleep apnea syndrome].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y Q; Long, Q; Wang, C; Shuai, X J; Chen, B; Kong, J; Wei, Y L

    2016-07-26

    To investigate sleep architecture and blood pressure dynamic change in patients with Sleep apnea syndrome by electrocardiogram-based cardiopulmonary coupling analysis system. Seventy-nine sleep disorder participants (PSQI≥8) were enrolled. Electrocardiogram-based cardiopulmonary coupling analysis device and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring were synchronously used to evaluate sleep architecture and blood pressure circadian rhythm. The patients were divided into SAS group (47 participants) and non-SAS group (32 participants) according to the Apnea Hypopnea Index (AHI) that calculated by CPC device. The data of sleep architecture and blood pressure variability were compared between two groups. Compared with non-SAS group, SAS group have less proportion of deep sleep, more proportion of light sleep, higher mean blood pressure in 24 hours and daytime, lower nocturnal blood pressure dipping, faster mean heart rate in night time (P<0.05). AHI has moderate inverse correlation with deep sleep time, wake/dream time (-0.6≤r<-0.3), moderate positive correlation with light sleep time (0.3blood pressure dipping (r=-0.785, P=0.000), moderate positive correlation with mean diastolic blood pressure (r=0.425, P=0.019). Our study shows that less proportion of deep sleep, more proportion of light sleep, 24 hours mean blood pressure and nocturnal blood pressure increase in the patients with Sleep Apnea Syndrome. The severity of Sleep Apnea Syndrome has a positive correlation with the severity of abnormal sleep architecture and the degree of blood pressure elevation.

  15. Lack of effect of a 24-hour infusion of iloprost in intermittent claudication.

    PubMed

    Hay, C R; Waller, P C; Carter, C; Cameron, H A; Parnell, L; Ramsay, L E; Preston, F E; Greaves, M

    1987-04-15

    24 hour infusion of iloprost was compared with placebo infusion in 19 patients with stable intermittent claudication using a double blind, balanced crossover design. Despite significant inhibition of platelet aggregation to ADP and collagen (p less than 0.001) and the typical cardiovascular and gastrointestinal side effects, there was no significant effect on treadmill exercise times at any time up to 6 weeks after infusion. The 95% confidence limits indicated that an improvement of more than 25% was unlikely to occur. No significant changes in B thromboglobulin, platelet aggregate ratio, bleeding time, whole blood viscosity and euglobulin clot lysis time were demonstrated.

  16. Are Retinal Vessels Calibers Influenced by Blood Pressure Measured at the Time of Retinography Acquisition?

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Sandra C; Pakter, Helena M; Maestri, Marcelo K; Beltrami-Moreira, Marina; Gus, Miguel; Moreira, Leila B; Oliveira, Manuel M; Fuchs, Flavio D

    2015-01-01

    Retinal arterial narrowing is associated with higher office blood pressure (BP) and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, and increased incidence of cardiovascular disease, but it is still unknown if the vessel caliber is associated with BP measured at the time of retinography acquisition. Retinal arteriolar and venular calibers were measured by the microdensitometric method in 448 patients with hypertension. Participants underwent 24-hours ambulatory blood pressure (24-h ABP) monitoring simultaneously with the retinography acquisition. Association between arteriolar and venular calibers with increase of 10 mmHg in the mean 24-hours, daily, and nightly BP, and with BP measured at the time of retinography, was evaluated by ANOVA and multivariate analyses. Mean 24-hours, daytime and nighttime systolic and diastolic BP were inversely associated with the arteriolar caliber, but not with the venular caliber. Arteriolar caliber decreased -0.8 (95% CI -1.4 to -0.2) μm per 10-mmHg increase in 24-hours mean systolic BP, adjusted for age, gender, fellow vessel, and duration of hypertension (P = 0.01). The corresponding decreasing in arteriolar caliber by 10 mmHg of increasing in mean diastolic BP was -1.1 μm (-2.0 to -0.2, P = 0.02). The decrease of arteriolar caliber by the same increasing of BP measured at the time of retinography was lower and not statistically significant, particularly for mean diastolic BP and outer arterioles calibers: -1.0 (-1.8 to -0.2) μm in the daytime BP average versus -0.3 (-0.9 to 0.3) at the moment of retinography acquisition. These findings suggest that the caliber of arteriolar retinal vessels in patients with uncontrolled hypertension are not significantly influenced by blood pressure measured at the time of retinography acquisition.

  17. Metabolic syndrome in the Pressioni Arteriose Monitorate E Loro Associazioni (PAMELA) study: daily life blood pressure, cardiac damage, and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Mancia, Giuseppe; Bombelli, Michele; Corrao, Giovanni; Facchetti, Rita; Madotto, Fabiana; Giannattasio, Cristina; Trevano, Fosca Quarti; Grassi, Guido; Zanchetti, Alberto; Sega, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome (National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria) and its relationships with daily life blood pressures, cardiac damage, and prognosis were determined in 2013 subjects from a Northern Italian population aged 25 to 74 years. Home blood pressure, 24-hour blood pressure, and left ventricular mass index (echocardiography) were also measured. Cardiovascular and noncardiovascular deaths were registered over 148 months. Metabolic syndrome was found in 16.2% of the sample, an office blood pressure elevation being the most frequent (95.4%) and the blood glucose abnormality the least frequent (31.5%) component. There was in metabolic syndrome a frequent elevation in home and/or 24-hour average blood pressure, as well as a greater left ventricular mass index and prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy, which was manifest even when data were adjusted for between-group differences, including blood pressure. The adjusted risk of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality was greater in metabolic syndrome subjects (+71.0% and +37.0%; P<0.05), a further marked increase being observed with left ventricular hypertrophy or "in-office" and "out-of-office" blood pressure elevations. The increased risk was related to the blood pressure and the blood glucose component of metabolic syndrome, with no contribution of the remaining components. Thus, metabolic syndrome is common in a Mediterranean population in which it significantly increases the long-term risk of death. Cardiac abnormalities and increases in home and 24-hour blood pressure are common in metabolic syndrome, and their occurrence further enhances the risk. The contribution of metabolic syndrome components to the risk, however, is unbalanced and mainly related to blood pressure and glucose abnormalities.

  18. Serial ASPECTS from Baseline to 24 Hours in SWIFT: A Novel Surrogate Endpoint for Revascularization in Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Liebeskind, David S; Jahan, Reza; Nogueira, Raul G; Jovin, Tudor G; Lutsep, Helmi L; Saver, Jeffrey L

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose ASPECTS on baseline imaging is an established predictor of acute ischemic stroke outcomes. We analyzed change on serial ASPECTS at baseline and 24-hour imaging in the SOLITAIRE™ FR With the Intention For Thrombectomy (SWIFT) Study to determine prognostic value and to identify subgroups with extensive injury after intervention. Methods ASPECTS at baseline and 24 hours was independently scored in all anterior circulation SWIFT cases, blind to all other trial data. ASPECTS at baseline, at 24 hours, and serial changes were analyzed with univariate and multivariate approaches. Results 139 patients (mean age 67 years (SD 12), 52% female, median NIHSS 18 (IQR 8–28)) with complete data at both time points were studied. Multivariate analyses showed higher 24-hour ASPECTS predicted good clinical outcome (Day 90 mRS 0–2): OR 1.67, p<0.001. Among patients with high baseline ASPECTS (8–10; n=109), dramatic infarct progression (decrease in ASPECTS ≥ 6 points at 24 hours) was noted in 31/109 (28%). Such serial ASPECTS change was predicted by higher baseline SBP (p=0.019), higher baseline blood glucose (p=0.133), and failure to achieve TICI 2b/3 reperfusion (p<0.001), culminating in worse Day 90 mRS outcomes (mean mRS 4.4 vs. 2.7, p<0.001). Conclusions 24-hour ASPECTS provides better prognostic information than baseline ASPECTS. Predictors of dramatic infarct progression on ASPECTS are hyperglycemia, hypertension and non-reperfusion. Serial ASPECTS change from baseline to 24 hours predicts clinical outcome, providing an early surrogate endpoint for thrombectomy trials. Clinical Trial Registration-URL http://clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01054560. PMID:24525954

  19. Relationship Between Urinary Nitrate Excretion and Blood Pressure in the InChianti Cohort.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, Miranda J; Ble, Alessandro; Melzer, David; Winyard, Paul G; Benjamin, Nigel; Shore, Angela C; Gilchrist, Mark

    2017-07-01

    Inorganic nitrate from the oxidation of endogenously synthesized nitric oxide (NO) or consumed in the diet can be reduced to NO via a complex enterosalivary circulation pathway. The relationship between total nitrate exposure by measured urinary nitrate excretion and blood pressure in a large population sample has not been assessed previously. For this cross-sectional study, 24-hour urinary nitrate excretion was measured by spectrophotometry in the 919 participants from the InChianti cohort at baseline and blood pressure measured with a mercury sphygmomanometer. After adjusting for age and sex only, diastolic blood pressure was 1.9 mm Hg lower in subjects with ≥2 mmol urinary nitrate excretion compared with those excreting <1 mmol nitrate in 24 hours: systolic blood pressure was 3.4 mm Hg (95% confidence interval (CI): -3.5 to -0.4) lower in subjects for the same comparison. Effect sizes in fully adjusted models (for age, sex, potassium intake, use of antihypertensive medications, diabetes, HS-CRP, or current smoking status) were marginally larger: systolic blood pressure in the ≥2 mmol urinary nitrate excretion group was 3.9 (CI: -7.1 to -0.7) mm Hg lower than in the comparison <1 mmol excretion group. Modest differences in total nitrate exposure are associated with lower blood pressure. These differences are at least equivalent to those seen from substantial (100 mmol) reductions in sodium intake.

  20. High Blood Pressure and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... damage. Some women with gestational hypertension eventually develop preeclampsia. Chronic hypertension. Chronic hypertension is high blood pressure ... determine when it began. Chronic hypertension with superimposed preeclampsia. This condition occurs in women with chronic hypertension ...

  1. Medications for High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Products For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Medications for High Blood Pressure Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... all their lives. back to top Types of Medications FDA has approved many medications to treat high ...

  2. TURN Score Predicts 24-Hour Cerebral Edema After IV Thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Asuzu, David; Nyström, Karin; Sreekrishnan, Anirudh; Schindler, Joseph; Wira, Charles; Greer, David; Halliday, Janet; Kimberly, W Taylor; Sheth, Kevin N

    2016-06-01

    Cerebral edema is associated with poor outcome after IV thrombolysis. We recently described the TURN score (Thrombolysis risk Using mRS and NIHSS), a predictor of severe outcome after IV thrombolysis. Our purpose was to evaluate its ability to predict 24-h cerebral edema. We retrospectively analyzed data from 303 patients who received IV rt-PA during the NINDS rt-PA trial. Measures of brain swelling included edema, mass effect and midline shift assessed at baseline, at 24 h and new onset at 24 h. Outcome was assessed using intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH), 90-day severe outcome, and 90-day mortality. Statistical associations were assessed by logistic regression reporting odds ratios (OR) and by areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUROC). Baseline brain swelling did not predict poor outcome; however, 24-h brain swelling predicted ICH (OR 5.69, P < 0.001), sICH (OR 9.50, P = 0.01), 90-day severe outcome (OR 7.10, P < 0.001), and 90-day mortality (OR 5.65, P = 0.01). Similar results were seen for new brain swelling at 24 h. TURN predicted 24-hour brain swelling (OR 2.5, P < 0.001; AUROC 0.69, 95 % CI 0.63-0.75) and new brain swelling at 24 h (OR 2.1, P < 0.001; AUROC 0.67, 95 % CI 0.61-0.73). Cerebral edema at 24 h is associated with poor outcome and 90-day mortality. TURN predicts ischemic stroke patients who will develop 24-h cerebral edema after IV thrombolysis.

  3. 24-Hour Urine Phosphorus Excretion and Mortality and Cardiovascular Events

    PubMed Central

    Palomino, Heather L.; Rifkin, Dena E.; Anderson, Cheryl; Criqui, Michael H.; Whooley, Mary A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Higher morning serum phosphorus has been associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with or without CKD. In patients with CKD and a phosphorous level >4.6 mg/dl, the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes guidelines recommend dietary phosphorus restriction. However, whether phosphorus restriction influences serum phosphorus concentrations and whether dietary phosphorus is itself associated with CVD or death are uncertain. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Among 880 patients with stable CVD and normal kidney function to moderate CKD, 24-hour urine phosphorus excretion (UPE) and serum phosphorus were measured at baseline. Participants were followed for a median of 7.4 years for CVD events and all-cause mortality. Results Mean ± SD age was 67±11 years, estimated GFR (eGFR) was 71±22 ml/min per 1.73 m2, and serum phosphorus was 3.7±0.6 mg/dl. Median UPE was 632 (interquartile range, 439, 853) mg/d. In models adjusted for demographic characteristics and eGFR, UPE was weakly and nonsignificantly associated with serum phosphorus (0.03 mg/dl higher phosphorus per 300 mg higher UPE; P=0.07). When adjusted for demographics, eGFR, and CVD risk factors, each 300-mg higher UPE was associated with 17% lower risk of CVD events. The association of UPE with all-cause mortality was not statistically significant (hazard ratio, 0.93; 95% confidence interval, 0.82 to 1.05). Results were similar irrespective of CKD status (P interactions > 0.87). Conclusions Among outpatients with stable CVD, the magnitude of the association of UPE with morning serum phosphorus is modest. Greater UPE is associated with lower risk for CVD events. The association was similar for all-cause mortality but was not statistically significant. PMID:23539231

  4. [Daily and nightly fluctuation of intraocular pressure and blood pressure in glaucoma and non-glaucoma patients].

    PubMed

    Chiseliţă, D; Moţoc, Irina; Danielescu, C

    2008-01-01

    To determine and compare 24-hour fluctuations of intraocular pressure (IOP) and systemic blood pressure (BP) in patients with ocular hypertension (OHT) and primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) versus non-glaucoma patients. Applanation IOP and BP were measured every 2 hours by one observer for 24 hours in 102 patients. The patients were classified: group 1 - 21 patients with OHT and POAG without treatment, group 2 - 40 patients with OHT and POAG with a satisfactory diurnal therapeutic control of IOP (daytime IOP ? 21 mmHg), group 3 - 13 patients with POAG with unsatisfactory control of IOP under maximal tolerated medication (daytime IOP > 21 mmHg), and group 0-28 non-glaucoma patients (control group). In all glaucoma patients groups 24-hour IOP fluctuations were greater than in the control group (group 0 - 3.62 +/- 0.82 mmHg, ANOVA p < 0.001). Untreated OHT/POAG had 24-hour IOP fluctuations significantly greater than those with good therapeutic control (group 1 - 5.66 +/- 1.66 mmHg versus group 2 - 4.27 +/- 1.86 mmHg, p = 0.0001). POAG with uncontrolled IOP under maximal tolerated medication had the 24-hour IOP fluctuations significantly greater than the other groups (group 3 - 8.38 +/- 3.78 mmHg, p?0.0001). In these patients there was an evident nocturnal mean IOP peak between 0-2 am which temporally correlates with nocturnal systemic BP "dip". Nocturnal IOP peaks (between 11 pm-7 am) were found more frequently in treated glaucoma patients (45.28% - groups 2 and 3 versus 10.2% - groups 0 and 1, p < 0.0001). Circadian lOP fluctuations in glaucoma patients, even with a satisfactory diurnal therapeutic control, are greater than in the age-matched control subjects. Patients with uncontrolled lOP under topical maximal tolerated medication had the greatest 24-hour lOP fluctuations. Nocturnal lOP peaks occur more often in medically treated patients and 24-hour monitoring of lOP may be useful in this patients.

  5. Indirect Blood Pressure Measuring Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hum, L.; Cole, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    Design and performance of a blood pressure recording device for pediatric use are reported. A strain gage transducer with a copper-beryllium strip as force sensing element is used to monitor skin movements and to convert them into electrical signals proportional to those displacements. Experimental tests with this device in recording of force developed above the left femoral artery of a dog accurately produced a blood pressure curve.

  6. Indirect Blood Pressure Measuring Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hum, L.; Cole, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    Design and performance of a blood pressure recording device for pediatric use are reported. A strain gage transducer with a copper-beryllium strip as force sensing element is used to monitor skin movements and to convert them into electrical signals proportional to those displacements. Experimental tests with this device in recording of force developed above the left femoral artery of a dog accurately produced a blood pressure curve.

  7. Nutritional effects on blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Myers, Valerie H; Champagne, Catherine M

    2007-02-01

    There has not been a thorough recent evaluation of the nutritional effects on blood pressure. Apart from outstanding clinical trials like Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, there have been controversial papers on a number of factors influencing blood pressure. This paper is a systematic review of the current literature as it relates to hypertension. Results from many meta-analyses and well controlled clinical trials on the effects of a variety of nutritional factors are presented in this review. Evidence suggests that dietary sodium intake needs reduction. There is a seemingly inverse relationship between protein intake and blood pressure, but data are inconclusive. High monounsaturated fat and fish oil appear to be beneficial. Several studies on dietary fiber indicate that the strongest evidence for blood pressure lowering effects is in hypertensive as opposed to normotensive participants. Vegetarians seem to have lower levels of hypertension and cardiovascular disease risk. Low carbohydrate diets show short-term beneficial effects but are not sustained. High levels of potassium, magnesium, calcium and soy seem to have some benefit, but results remain inconclusive. Weight reduction positively impacts blood pressure. More compelling research defining specific factors is needed to inform the public as to steps needed to reduce blood pressure and improve cardiovascular risk.

  8. Effect of Intensive Versus Standard Clinic-Based Hypertension Management on Ambulatory Blood Pressure: Results From the SPRINT (Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial) Ambulatory Blood Pressure Study.

    PubMed

    Drawz, Paul E; Pajewski, Nicholas M; Bates, Jeffrey T; Bello, Natalie A; Cushman, William C; Dwyer, Jamie P; Fine, Lawrence J; Goff, David C; Haley, William E; Krousel-Wood, Marie; McWilliams, Andrew; Rifkin, Dena E; Slinin, Yelena; Taylor, Addison; Townsend, Raymond; Wall, Barry; Wright, Jackson T; Rahman, Mahboob

    2017-01-01

    The effect of clinic-based intensive hypertension treatment on ambulatory blood pressure (BP) is unknown. The goal of the SPRINT (Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial) ambulatory BP ancillary study was to evaluate the effect of intensive versus standard clinic-based BP targets on ambulatory BP. Ambulatory BP was obtained within 3 weeks of the 27-month study visit in 897 SPRINT participants. Intensive treatment resulted in lower clinic systolic BP (mean difference between groups=16.0 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 14.1-17.8 mm Hg), nighttime systolic BP (mean difference=9.6 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 7.7-11.5 mm Hg), daytime systolic BP (mean difference=12.3 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 10.6-13.9 mm Hg), and 24-hour systolic BP (mean difference=11.2 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 9.7-12.8 mm Hg). The night/day systolic BP ratio was similar between the intensive (0.92±0.09) and standard-treatment groups (0.91±0.09). There was considerable lack of agreement within participants between clinic systolic BP and daytime ambulatory systolic BP with wide limits of agreement on Bland-Altman plots. In conclusion, targeting a systolic BP of <120 mm Hg, when compared with <140 mm Hg, resulted in lower nighttime, daytime, and 24-hour systolic BP, but did not change the night/day systolic BP ratio. Ambulatory BP monitoring may be required to assess the effect of targeted hypertension therapy on out of office BP. Further studies are needed to assess whether targeting hypertension therapy based on ambulatory BP improves clinical outcomes.

  9. Relationship Between Ambulatory Blood Pressure and Aortic Arch Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Shinichi; Jin, Zhezhen; Schwartz, Joseph E; Homma, Shunichi; Elkind, Mitchell S.V.; Rundek, Tatjana; Sacco, Ralph L.; Di Tullio, Marco R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Atherosclerotic plaque in the aortic arch is an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke. Although high blood pressure (BP) measured at the doctor’s office is known to be associated with aortic atherosclerosis, little is known on the association between 24-hour ambulatory BP and aortic arch plaque presence and severity. Our objective was to clarify the association between ambulatory BP variables and aortic arch atherosclerosis in a community-based cohort. Methods The study population consisted of 795 patients (mean age 71±9 years) participating in the Cardiovascular Abnormalities and Brain Lesions (CABL) study who underwent 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM). Arch plaque was evaluated by 2D transthoracic echocardiography from a suprasternal window. Results All systolic ABPM variables (24-hour/daytime/nighttime mean systolic BP, daytime/nighttime systolic BP variability) were associated with the presence of any plaque and large (≥4mm) plaque, whereas diastolic BP variables were not associated with aortic atherosclerosis. Multiple regression analysis indicated that nighttime systolic BP variability (expressed as the standard deviation of nighttime systolic BP) remained independently associated with large plaque after adjustment for age, sex, cigarette smoking, history of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, anti-hypertensive medication and nighttime mean systolic BP (odds ratio 1.39 per 1 standard deviation increase, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.93, P<0.05). Conclusion Systolic ABPM variables are significantly associated with the presence of arch plaque. Nighttime systolic BP variability is independently associated with large arch plaque. These findings may have important implications in gaining further insights into the mechanism of arch plaque formation and progression. PMID:22296886

  10. Anxiety: A Cause of High Blood Pressure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions High blood pressure (hypertension) Can anxiety cause high blood pressure? Answers from Sheldon G. Sheps, M.D. Anxiety doesn't cause long-term high blood pressure (hypertension). But episodes of anxiety can cause dramatic, ...

  11. High Blood Pressure: Medicines to Help You

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women High Blood Pressure--Medicines to Help You Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... Click here for the Color Version (PDF 533KB) High blood pressure is a serious illness. High blood pressure is ...

  12. Wrist Blood Pressure Monitors: Are They Accurate?

    MedlinePlus

    ... be at heart level. Even then, blood pressure measurements taken at the wrist are usually higher and ... a very large arm or find blood pressure measurements painful. In these cases, measuring blood pressure at ...

  13. Night time blood pressure dip

    PubMed Central

    Bloomfield, Dennis; Park, Alex

    2015-01-01

    The advent of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring permitted examination of blood pressures during sleep and recognition of the associated circadian fall in pressure during this period. The fall in pressure, called the “dip”, is defined as the difference between daytime mean systolic pressure and nighttime mean systolic pressure expressed as a percentage of the day value. Ten percent to 20% is considered normal. Dips less than 10%, referred to as blunted or absent, have been considered as predicting an adverse cardiovascular event. This view and the broader concept that white coat hypertension itself is a forerunner of essential hypertension is disputable. This editorial questions whether mean arterial pressures over many hours accurately represent the systolic load, whether nighttime dipping varies from measure to measure or is a fixed phenomenon, whether the abrupt morning pressure rise is a risk factor or whether none of these issues are as important as the actual night time systolic blood pressure itself. The paper discusses the difference between medicated and nonmedicated white coat hypertensives in regard to the cardiovascular risk and suggests that further work is necessary to consider whether the quality and duration of sleep are important factors. PMID:26225196

  14. Night time blood pressure dip.

    PubMed

    Bloomfield, Dennis; Park, Alex

    2015-07-26

    The advent of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring permitted examination of blood pressures during sleep and recognition of the associated circadian fall in pressure during this period. The fall in pressure, called the "dip", is defined as the difference between daytime mean systolic pressure and nighttime mean systolic pressure expressed as a percentage of the day value. Ten percent to 20% is considered normal. Dips less than 10%, referred to as blunted or absent, have been considered as predicting an adverse cardiovascular event. This view and the broader concept that white coat hypertension itself is a forerunner of essential hypertension is disputable. This editorial questions whether mean arterial pressures over many hours accurately represent the systolic load, whether nighttime dipping varies from measure to measure or is a fixed phenomenon, whether the abrupt morning pressure rise is a risk factor or whether none of these issues are as important as the actual night time systolic blood pressure itself. The paper discusses the difference between medicated and nonmedicated white coat hypertensives in regard to the cardiovascular risk and suggests that further work is necessary to consider whether the quality and duration of sleep are important factors.

  15. Vegetarian diet and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Beilin, L J; Armstrong, B K; Margetts, B M; Rouse, I L; Vandongen, R

    1987-01-01

    There is now convincing evidence from epidemiological studies and randomized controlled trials that adoption of an ovo-lacto vegetarian diet leads to blood pressure reduction in both normotensive and hypertensive subjects. This effect appears to be independent of both dietary sodium and weight loss but additive to effects of weight reduction. Long-term adherence to a vegetarian diet is associated with less of a rise of blood pressure with age and a decreased prevalence of hypertension. The nutrients responsible for these effects have not been clearly identified and the mechanisms involved are unknown. Resolution of these questions is needed to enable more widespread adoption of dietary changes which may reduce the prevalence of hypertension, reduce antihypertensive drug dependence and by effects on blood pressure and blood lipids ameliorate the natural history of hypertensive cardiovascular disease.

  16. Implanted Blood-Pressure-Measuring Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischell, Robert E.

    1988-01-01

    Arterial pressure compared with ambient bodily-fluid pressure. Implanted apparatus, capable of measuring blood pressure of patient, includes differential-pressure transducer connected to pressure sensor positioned in major artery. Electrical signal is function of differential pressure between blood-pressure sensor and reference-pressure sensor transmitted through skin of patient to recorder or indicator.

  17. Kidney volume and ambulatory blood pressure in children.

    PubMed

    Gurusinghe, Shari; Palvanov, Arkadiy; Bittman, Mark E; Singer, Pamela; Frank, Rachel; Chorny, Nataliya; Infante, Lulette; Sethna, Christine B

    2016-12-16

    Low nephron number has been shown to be a risk factor for hypertension (HTN) in adulthood. Kidney volume may serve as a surrogate marker for nephron mass. The relationship between kidney volume and ambulatory blood pressure (BP) in the pediatric population is not known. A retrospective chart review of children younger than 21 years who were evaluated for HTN was performed. Twenty-four-hour BP and ultrasonography data were obtained. Multiple regression was used to examine associations between BP and kidney volume. Of 84 children (mean age 13.87 years, 72.6% males), 54 had HTN. Systolic BP index during the awake, sleep, and 24-hour periods (all P≤.05) was found to be positively correlated with total kidney volume. Greater total kidney volume was found to be a positive predictor of 24-hour and sleep systolic index (P≤.05). It failed to serve as a predictor of HTN, pre-HTN, or white-coat HTN. Contrary to expectation, total kidney volume was positively associated with systolic BP indices.

  18. Blood pressure regulation: basic concepts.

    PubMed

    Guyton, A C; Hall, J E; Lohmeier, T E; Jackson, T E; Kastner, P R

    1981-06-01

    In this paper we have attempted to explain the difference between proportional pressure control systems and the renal-blood volume-pressure control mechanism, which is an infinite gain pressure control system. Because of this infinite gain of the kidney mechanism, this mechanism has the capability of returning arterial pressure all the way back to the control leve. Furthermore, this mechanism can override the other pressure control mechanisms because of its extreme control capability. On the other hand, the renal-blood volume mechanism for pressure control itself be controlled by many other factors. These other factors are said to change the pressure "set-point" level of the renal system, and then the renal system automatically brings the pressure to the set-point level. It is especially noteworthy, however, that some of the factors that play extreme roles in short-term pressure control-such as heart strength, vascular capacity, and total peripheral resistance-will not alter the long-term arterial pressure level (unless they in some way concurrently alter the set-point of the kidney mechanism).

  19. Comparison of observation level versus 24-hour average atmospheric loading corrections in VLBI analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMillan, D. S.; van Dam, T. M.

    2009-04-01

    Variations in the horizontal distribution of atmospheric mass induce displacements of the Earth's surface. Theoretical estimates of the amplitude of the surface displacement indicate that the predicted surface displacement is often large enough to be detected by current geodetic techniques. In fact, the effects of atmospheric pressure loading have been detected in Global Positioning System (GPS) coordinate time series [van Dam et al., 1994; Dong et al., 2002; Scherneck et al., 2003; Zerbini et al., 2004] and very long baseline interferometery (VLBI) coordinates [Rabble and Schuh, 1986; Manabe et al., 1991; van Dam and Herring, 1994; Schuh et al., 2003; MacMillan and Gipson, 1994; and Petrov and Boy, 2004]. Some of these studies applied the atmospheric displacement at the observation level and in other studies, the predicted atmospheric and observed geodetic surface displacements have been averaged over 24 hours. A direct comparison of observation level and 24 hour corrections has not been carried out for VLBI to determine if one or the other approach is superior. In this presentation, we address the following questions: 1) Is it better to correct geodetic data at the observation level rather than applying corrections averaged over 24 hours to estimated geodetic coordinates a posteriori? 2) At the sub-daily periods, the atmospheric mass signal is composed of two components: a tidal component and a non-tidal component. If observation level corrections reduce the scatter of VLBI data more than a posteriori correction, is it sufficient to only model the atmospheric tides or must the entire atmospheric load signal be incorporated into the corrections? 3) When solutions from different geodetic techniques (or analysis centers within a technique) are combined (e.g., for ITRF2008), not all solutions may have applied atmospheric loading corrections. Are any systematic effects on the estimated TRF introduced when atmospheric loading is applied?

  20. Evaluation of Intradermal and Subcutaneous Infusion Set Performance Under 24-Hour Basal and Bolus Conditions

    PubMed Central

    McVey, Elaine; Keith, Steven; Herr, Joshua K.; Sutter, Diane; Pettis, Ronald J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study sought to assess the function and delivery reliability of intradermal (ID) infusion sets used with commercial insulin pumps. Method: Healthy subjects (n = 43) were randomized to either ID or subcutaneous (SC) arms, and received basal/bolus placebo delivery for 24 hours. Subjects received 4 of 8 infusion set combinations (ID: microneedle design A or B, with 2 pump brands [Animas or MiniMed]; SC: Teflon Quickset or steel Rapid-D, Animas pump only, with or without overtaping) and were evaluated for pump occlusion alarms, fluid leakage, pain, and tissue tolerability. A novel algorithm was developed to determine flow consistency based on fluid pressure, and the duration and occurrence rate for periods of unalarmed but interrupted flow (“silent occlusions’”) were compared. Results: ID delivery was successfully maintained over the 24-hour infusion period. The number of silent occlusions was lower for ID microneedle cannula design B than A (P < .01) and lower for Rapid-D SC device compared to Quick-set (P = .03). There was no significant difference in the number of occlusion alarms between the ID and SC devices with the Animas pump. However, the pumps tested with ID devices had significantly different alarm rates (MiniMed 29.5%, Animas 0%, P < .001). Leakage and tissue tolerability were comparable across devices. Conclusion: The ID infusion set reliably delivered diluent for an extended 24-hour period in healthy subjects and was well tolerated. Silent occlusion flow interruptions could be detected in both ID and SC infusion sets using a proprietary algorithm. This algorithm is a promising method for quantitatively evaluating infusion set flow performance. PMID:26319228

  1. Specific Genetic Influences on Nighttime Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaojing; Su, Shaoyong; Treiber, Frank A.; Vlietinck, Robert; Fagard, Robert; Derom, Catherine; Gielen, Marij; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Snieder, Harold

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Nighttime blood pressure (BP) has been shown to be superior to daytime BP in predicting hypertension related target organ damage and cardiac mortality. In our Georgia Cardiovascular Twin Study, we showed that apart from the genes that also influence daytime BP, specific genetic determinants explained 44% and 67% of the nighttime systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) heritabilities, respectively. Here, we determined whether these results could be confirmed in a much larger twin cohort of young adults with 24-hour ambulatory BP measurements. METHODS Ambulatory BP was available in 703 white twins (308 pairs and 87 singletons, aged 18–34 years, 50% males) from the Prenatal Programming Twin Study. A bivariate quantitative genetic twin model was used to analyze daytime and nighttime BP. We conducted a meta-analysis to compare and integrate results from the 2 twin cohorts. RESULTS Model fitting showed no sex differences for any of the measures. Heritabilities were 0.60 and 0.51 for SBP and 0.54 and 0.46 for DBP at daytime and nighttime. The specific heritability due to novel genetic effects emerging during the nighttime was 0.21 for SBP and 0.26 for DBP, which comprised 41% and 57% of the total nighttime heritability for SBP and DBP, respectively. Meta-analysis confirmed absence of cohort differences with very similar combined results. CONCLUSIONS In addition to genes that influence both daytime and nighttime BP, a large part of the heritability is explained by genes that specifically influence BP at night. PMID:25205800

  2. Effects of exenatide and liraglutide on 24-hour glucose fluctuations in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Nagakura, Jo; Yamakawa, Tadashi; Taguri, Masataka; Tsuchiya, Hirohisa; Shigematsu, Erina; Suzuki, Jun; Morita, Satoshi; Kadonosono, Kazuaki; Terauchi, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the influence of short-term treatment with exenatide twice daily or liraglutide once daily on daily blood glucose fluctuations in 40 patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled by sulfonylureas. The patients in a multicenter, open-label trial were randomly assigned to receive add-on exenatide (10 μg/day, n = 21) or add-on liraglutide (0.3-0.9 mg/day, n = 19), and underwent 24-hour continuous subcutaneous glucose monitoring. There was no significant between-group difference in glucose fluctuations during the day, as assessed by calculating mean amplitude of glycemic excursion (MAGE) and standard deviation (SD). However, the mean blood glucose levels at 3 hours after breakfast and dinner were significantly lower in the exenatide group than the liraglutide group (breakfast: 127.3 ± 24.1 vs. 153.4 ± 28.7 mg/dL; p = 0.006, dinner: 108.7 ± 17.3 vs. 141.9 ± 24.2 mg/dL; p < 0.001). In contrast, mean blood glucose levels and their SD were significantly lower between 0000 h and 0600 h in the liraglutide group than the exenatide group (average glucose: 126.9 ± 27.1 vs. 107.1 ± 24.0 mg/dL; p = 0.029, SD: 15.2 ± 10.5 vs. 8.7 ± 3.8; p = 0.020). Both groups had similar glucose fluctuations despite differences in 24-hour blood glucose profiles. Therefore, each of these agents may have advantages or disadvantages and should be selected according to the blood glucose profile of the patient.

  3. SLEEP DURATION AND AMBULATORY BLOOD PRESSURE IN BLACK AND WHITE ADOLESCENTS

    PubMed Central

    Mezick, Elizabeth J; Hall, Martica; Matthews, Karen A

    2012-01-01

    Self-reported short sleep duration is linked to higher blood pressure and incident hypertension in adults. Few studies have examined sleep and blood pressure in younger samples. We evaluated the associations between actigraphy-assessed time spent asleep and ambulatory blood pressure in adolescents. Participants were 246 black and white adolescents (mean age = 15.7) who were free from cardiovascular or kidney disease and were not taking sleep, cardiovascular, or psychiatric medications. Sleep duration and efficiency were assessed with in-home wrist actigraphy and sleep diaries across one week; ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was used to obtain 24-hour, sleep, wake blood pressure, and sleep-wake blood pressure ratios across two full days and nights. Results showed that shorter actigraphy-assessed sleep across one week was related to higher 48-hour blood pressure and higher nighttime blood pressure. Shorter sleep was also related to a higher systolic blood pressure sleep-wake ratio. These results were independent of age, race, sex, and body mass index. Follow-up analyses by race revealed that associations between sleep duration and blood pressure were largely present in white, but not black, adolescents. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that the cardiovascular consequences of short sleep may begin as early as adolescence. PMID:22275538

  4. Blood pressure morning surge, exercise blood pressure response and autonomic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Tanindi, Asli; Ugurlu, Murat; Tore, Hasan Fehmi

    2015-08-01

    We investigated blood pressure (BP) response to exercise with respect to BP morning surge (MS), and the association between MS, exercise treadmill test (ETT) and heart rate variability (HRV) indices. Eighty-four healthy subjects without hypertension were enrolled. Ambulatory BP monitoring and 24-hour Holter recordings were obtained for sleep-trough MS and HRV indices: low-frequency (LF) component, high-frequency (HF) component and LF/HF ratio. ETT was performed, and BPs were obtained at rest, end of each stage, and recovery. Third-minute heart rate recovery (HRR) and BP recovery ratio (BPRR) were calculated. When analysed in quartiles of MS, systolic BP at low workloads was higher in the highest than in the lowest quartile, although maximum BPs at maximum exercise were not significantly different. BPRR was highest in the highest quartile in contrast to HRR, which was lowest in the highest quartile. LF/HF was highest during both at daytime and night-time in the highest quartile. BPRR and LF/HF were positively, and HRR was inversely associated with MS. Subjects with a high MS have higher BP at low workloads, at which most daily activities are performed, and impairment in some indices, which indirectly reflect the autonomic nervous system.

  5. Blood Pressure Self-Measurement.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Blood pressure self-measurement has been used extensively as part of several clinical processes including in the home monitoring setting for mitigating white coat effect and gaining more detailed insights into the blood pressure variability of patients over time. Self-measurement of BP is also being used as part of telemonitoring and telemedicine processes, as well as in the waiting rooms and self-measurement rooms of general practice clinics, specialized hospital department's outpatient clinics, and in other types of care facilitates and institutions.The aim of this review is to provide an overview of where, when, and how blood pressure self-measurement is being used, which official clinical guidelines and procedures are available for its implementation, as well as the opportunities and challenges that are related to its use.

  6. Vitamin D therapy to reduce blood pressure and left ventricular hypertrophy in resistant hypertension: randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Witham, Miles D; Ireland, Sheila; Houston, J Graeme; Gandy, Stephen J; Waugh, Shelley; Macdonald, Thomas M; Mackenzie, Isla S; Struthers, Allan D

    2014-04-01

    Low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels are associated with higher prevalent blood pressure. We tested whether high-dose intermittent oral vitamin D therapy could reduce blood pressure and left ventricular mass in patients with hypertension resistant to conventional treatment. We conducted a parallel-group, double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial. Patients with supine office blood pressure >140/90 mm Hg on ≥3 antihypertensive agents received 100 000 U oral vitamin D3 or matching placebo every 2 months. Office and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure, glucose, and cholesterol were measured at baseline, 2, 4, and 6 months; left ventricular mass index was measured by cardiac MRI on a subgroup at baseline and 6 months. The primary outcome was mean 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure at 6 months. A total of 68 participants were randomized, 34 in each group. Mean age was 63 (SD 11) years, mean baseline office blood pressure was 154/84 (13/10) mm Hg, and mean baseline 25-hydroxyvitamin D level was 42 (16) nmol/L. Treatment with vitamin D did not reduce 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure (adjusted treatment effects: systolic, +3 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, -4 to +11; P=0.33; diastolic, -2 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, -6 to +2; P=0.29); similar results were seen for office blood pressure. Left ventricular mass index was measured in a subgroup (n=25); no reduction was seen with vitamin D treatment (adjusted treatment effect, +4 g/m(2); 95% confidence interval, 0 to +7; P=0.04). There was no significant change in cholesterol or glucose levels. Thus, 6 months of intermittent, high-dose oral vitamin D3 did not reduce blood pressure or left ventricular mass in patients with resistant hypertension.

  7. The relationship between ambulatory blood pressure variability and enlarged perivascular spaces: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuna; Qin, Wei; Yang, Lei; Fan, Huimin; Li, Yue; Yin, Jiangmei; Hu, Wenli

    2017-08-21

    Recent studies reported that 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure variability (ABPV) was associated with lacunar infarction and white matter hyperintensities (WMH). However, the relationship between ABPV and enlarged perivascular spaces (EPVS) has not been investigated. Thus, our study aimed to investigate whether ABPV is associated with EPVS by 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM). We conducted this study as a cross-sectional study. The study was based on patients who presented for physical examinations in our hospital from May 2013 to June 2016. Patients with both brain MRI scans and 24-hour ABPM were included and patients with acute stroke, a history of severe stroke and some other severe diseases were excluded. A total of 573 Chinese patients were prospectively enrolled in this study. EPVS in basal ganglia (BG) and white matter (WM) were identified on MRI and classified into three categories by the severity. WMH were scored by the Fazekas scale. Coefficient of variation (CV) and SD were considered as metrics of ABPV. Spearman correlation analysis and ordinal logistic regression analysis were used to assess the relationship between ABPV and EPVS. There were statistical differences among the subgroups stratified by the severity of EPVS in BG in the following ABPV metrics: SD and CV of systolic blood pressure (SBP), CV of diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in 24 hours, daytime and nighttime and SD of DBP in nighttime. The above ABPV metrics were positively associated with the degree of EPVS. The association was unchanged after adjusting for confounders. Spearman correlation analysis showed ABPV was not related to the degree of EPVS in the WM. ABPV was independently associated with EPVS in BG after controlling for blood pressure, but not in the WM. Pathogenesis of EPVS in BG and WM might be different. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted

  8. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) KidsHealth > For Parents > High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) A ... posture, and medications. continue Long-Term Effects of High Blood Pressure When someone has high blood pressure, the heart ...

  9. Individual blood pressure responses to walking and resistance exercise in peripheral artery disease patients: Are the mean values describing what is happening?

    PubMed

    Lima, Aluísio H R A; Miranda, Alessandra S; Correia, Marilia A; Soares, Antônio H G; Cucato, Gabriel G; Sobral Filho, Dario C; Gomes, Silvana L; Ritti-Dias, Raphael M

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the average and individual blood pressure responses to walking and resistance exercise in patients with peripheral artery disease. Thirteen patients underwent three experimental sessions: walking exercise, resistance exercise, and control. Ambulatory blood pressure, heart rate, and rate pressure product were obtained before and until 24 hours after sessions. The mean cardiovascular values during 24 hours, awake, and sleep periods were similar (P > 0.05) after the three experimental sessions. The analysis of individual data revealed that during 24 hours, eight of 13 patients reduced systolic or diastolic blood pressure in ≥4.0 mm Hg in at least one of the exercise session; furthermore, most of these patients presented greater responses after resistance exercise. The clinical characteristics of patients seem to influence the blood pressure responses after exercises. Individual data showed that part of patients presented clinically significant decreases in blood pressure, showing that these patients have acute cardiovascular benefits after performing an acute bout of exercise. Although, in average, a bout of walking or resistance exercise did not decrease ambulatory blood pressure in peripheral artery disease patients, the individual data revealed that most patients presented clinically relevant blood pressure reductions, especially after resistance exercise. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Nursing, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. High blood pressure and eye disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000999.htm High blood pressure and eye disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. High blood pressure can damage blood vessels in the retina . The ...

  11. Effect of Body Mass Index on Postoperative Transfusions and 24-Hour Chest-Tube Output

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Heather R.; Ramaiah, Chandrashekhar

    2011-01-01

    An increasing obese population in the United States focuses attention on the effect of obesity on surgical outcomes. Our objective was to see if obesity, determined by body mass index (BMI), contributed to bleeding in coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery as measured by intraoperative and postoperative packed red blood cell transfusion frequency and amount and 24-hour chest-tube output. A retrospective chart review examined 150 subjects undergoing single-surgeon off-pump or on-pump CABG surgery between September 2006 and April 2009. BMI groups included normal-weight (BMI <25), overweight (BMI 25 to 29), and obese (BMI ≥30). Analyses used a chi-square test to determine variances in number of transfusions, and ANOVA for transfusion amount and 24-hour chest-tube amount. The percentage of subjects receiving intraoperative transfusions varied significantly by BMI group (p = 0.022). The percentage of subjects receiving transfusions in the 72-hour postoperative period showed a decreasing linear trend based on BMI group (p = 0.054). The percentage of subjects receiving transfusions in the combined intraoperative or 72-hour postoperative period showed a decreasing linear trend based on BMI group (p = 0.054). The transfusion amount during the 72-hour postoperative period varied significantly between BMI groups (p = 0.021), and the test for a linear decrease across groups was significant (p = 0.020). Twenty-four hour chest-tube output showed variation across all three BMI categories (p = 0.018) with chest-tube output decreasing with increasing obesity in a linear fashion (p = 0.006). Transfusion rate and amount indicate total blood loss is decreased in the obese, and chest-tube output findings give a direct measurable indicator of blood loss from the surgical site indicating increasing BMI is linearly correlated with decreasing postoperative bleeding. PMID:22654469

  12. Alcohol: Does It Affect Blood Pressure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... pressure (hypertension) Does drinking alcohol affect your blood pressure? Answers from Sheldon G. Sheps, M.D. Drinking too much alcohol can raise blood pressure to unhealthy levels. Having more than three drinks ...

  13. Automatic blood pressure measuring system (M092)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolte, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    The Blood Pressure Measuring System is described. It measures blood pressure by the noninvasive Korotkoff sound technique on a continual basis as physical stress is imposed during experiment M092, Lower Body Negative Pressure, and experiment M171, Metabolic Activity.

  14. Automatic blood pressure measuring system (M092)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolte, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    The Blood Pressure Measuring System is described. It measures blood pressure by the noninvasive Korotkoff sound technique on a continual basis as physical stress is imposed during experiment M092, Lower Body Negative Pressure, and experiment M171, Metabolic Activity.

  15. Clinical characteristics of resistant hypertension evaluated by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kansui, Yasuo; Matsumura, Kiyoshi; Kida, Haruko; Sakata, Satoko; Ohtsubo, Toshio; Ibaraki, Ai; Kitazono, Takanari

    2014-01-01

    Strict control of blood pressure is important to prevent cardiovascular disease, although it is sometimes difficult to decrease blood pressure to target levels. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical characteristics of resistant hypertension evaluated by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. One hundred in-hospital patients, whose 24-hour average blood pressure was higher than 130/80 mmHg even after treatment with more than three antihypertensive drugs, were included in the present analysis. Circadian variation of blood pressure was evaluated by nocturnal fall in systolic blood pressure. Average blood pressures of all patients were high in both daytime and nighttime, 150.0/82.9 and 143.8/78.2 mmHg, respectively. Twenty patients had been treated with hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. In 63 patients out of the other 80 patients (79%), estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was also decreased (<60 mL/min/1.73 m²). The patients classified into dipper, non-dipper, riser and extreme-dipper were 20%, 43%, 34% and 3%, respectively. In addition, in 17 patients whose eGFR was preserved, 12 patients showed a non-dipper or riser pattern, suggesting that it was difficult to account for this altered circadian blood pressure variation only by renal dysfunction. These results show that a large number of the patients with resistant hypertension suffered from renal dysfunction, although it was difficult to explain altered circadian blood pressure variation based on renal dysfunction alone.

  16. How Many Measurements Are Needed to Estimate Blood Pressure Variability Without Loss of Prognostic Information?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Average real variability (ARV) is a recently proposed index for short-term blood pressure (BP) variability. We aimed to determine the minimum number of BP readings required to compute ARV without loss of prognostic information. METHODS ARV was calculated from a discovery dataset that included 24-hour ambulatory BP measurements for 1,254 residents (mean age = 56.6 years; 43.5% women) of Copenhagen, Denmark. Concordance between ARV from full (≥80 BP readings) and randomly reduced 24-hour BP recordings was examined, as was prognostic accuracy. A test dataset that included 5,353 subjects (mean age = 54.0 years; 45.6% women) with at least 48 BP measurements from 11 randomly recruited population cohorts was used to validate the results. RESULTS In the discovery dataset, a minimum of 48 BP readings allowed an accurate assessment of the association between cardiovascular risk and ARV. In the test dataset, over 10.2 years (median), 806 participants died (335 cardiovascular deaths, 206 cardiac deaths) and 696 experienced a major fatal or nonfatal cardiovascular event. Standardized multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were computed for associations between outcome and BP variability. Higher diastolic ARV in 24-hour ambulatory BP recordings predicted (P < 0.01) total (HR = 1.12), cardiovascular (HR = 1.19), and cardiac (HR = 1.19) mortality and fatal combined with nonfatal cerebrovascular events (HR = 1.16). Higher systolic ARV in 24-hour ambulatory BP recordings predicted (P < 0.01) total (HR = 1.12), cardiovascular (HR = 1.17), and cardiac (HR = 1.24) mortality. CONCLUSIONS Forty-eight BP readings over 24 hours were observed to be adequate to compute ARV without meaningful loss of prognostic information. PMID:23955605

  17. Recanalization Modulates Association Between Blood Pressure and Functional Outcome in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Martins, Ana Inês; Sargento-Freitas, João; Silva, Fernando; Jesus-Ribeiro, Joana; Correia, Inês; Gomes, João Pedro; Aguiar-Gonçalves, Mariana; Cardoso, Leila; Machado, Cristina; Rodrigues, Bruno; Santo, Gustavo C; Cunha, Luís

    2016-06-01

    Historical stroke cohorts reported a U- or J-shaped relationship between blood pressure (BP) and clinical outcome. However, these studies predated current revascularization strategies, disregarding the recanalization state of the affected arterial territory. We aimed to investigate the relationship between BP in the first 24 hours after ischemic stroke and clinical outcome in patients submitted to intravenous or intra-arterial recanalization treatments. Consecutive patients with acute stroke treated with intravenous thrombolysis or intra-arterial therapies were enrolled in a retrospective cohort study. BP was measured on regular intervals throughout day and night during the first 24 hours after stroke onset. The mean systolic BP and diastolic BP during the first 24 hours post stroke were calculated. Recanalization was assessed at 6 hours by transcranial color-coded Doppler, angiography, or angio-computed tomography. Functional outcome was assessed at 3 months by modified Rankin Scale. Linear and quadratic multivariate regression models were performed to determine associations between BP and functional outcome for the whole population and recanalyzed and nonrecanalyzed patients. We included 674 patients; mean age was 73.28 (SD, 11.50) years. Arterial recanalization was documented in 355 (52.70%) patients. In multivariate analyses, systolic BP and diastolic BP in the first 24 hours post stroke show a J-shaped relationship with functional outcome in the total population and in the nonrecanalyzed patients. Recanalyzed patients show a linear association with functional outcome (systolic BP: odds ratio, 1.015; 95% confidence interval, 1.007-1.024; P=0.001; R(2) change=0.001; P=0.412 and diastolic BP: odds ratio, 1.019; 95% confidence interval, 1.004-1.033; P=0.012; R(2) change<0.001; P=0.635). Systemic BP in the first 24 hours after ischemic stroke influences 3-month clinical outcome. This association is dependent on the revascularization status. © 2016 American Heart

  18. 24-Hour IOP Telemetry in the Nonhuman Primate: Implant System Performance and Initial Characterization of IOP at Multiple Timescales

    PubMed Central

    Burgoyne, Claude F.; Seigfreid, William P.; Reynaud, Juan F.; Strouthidis, Nicholas G.; Sallee, Verney

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. IOP is the most common independent risk factor for development and progression of glaucoma, but very little is known about IOP dynamics. Continuous IOP telemetry was used in three nonhuman primates to characterize IOP dynamics at multiple time scales for multiple 24-hour periods. Methods. An existing implantable telemetric pressure transducer system was adapted to monitoring anterior chamber IOP. The system records 500 IOP, ECG, and body temperature measurements per second and compensates for barometric pressure in real time. The continuous IOP signal was digitally filtered for noise and dropout and reported using time-window averaging for 19, 18, and 4 24-hour periods in three animals, respectively. Those data were analyzed for a nycthemeral pattern within each animal. Results. Ten-minute time-window averaging for multiple 24-hour periods showed that IOP fluctuated from 7 to 14 mm Hg during the day, and those changes occurred frequently and quickly. Two-hour time-window averages of IOP for multiple 24-hour periods in three animals showed a weak nycthemeral trend, but IOP was not repeatable from day-to-day within animals. Conclusions. The measured IOP was successfully measured continuously by using a new, fully implantable IOP telemetry system. IOP fluctuates as much as 10 mm Hg from day to day and hour to hour in unrestrained nonhuman primates, which indicates that snapshot IOP measurements may be inadequate to capture the true dynamic character of IOP. The distributions, magnitudes, and patterns of IOP are not reproducible from day to day within animals, but IOP tends to be slightly higher at night when IOP data are averaged across multiple 24-hour periods within animals. PMID:21791586

  19. Attenuated sympathetic nerve responses after 24 hours of bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, Mazhar H.; Kunselman, Allen R.; Leuenberger, Urs A.; Davidson, William R Jr; Ray, Chester A.; Gray, Kristen S.; Hogeman, Cynthia S.; Sinoway, Lawrence I.

    2002-01-01

    Bed rest reduces orthostatic tolerance. Despite decades of study, the cause of this phenomenon remains unclear. In this report we examined hemodynamic and sympathetic nerve responses to graded lower body negative pressure (LBNP) before and after 24 h of bed rest. LBNP allows for baroreceptor disengagement in a graded fashion. We measured heart rate (HR), cardiac output (HR x stroke volume obtained by echo Doppler), and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during a progressive and graded LBNP paradigm. Negative pressure was increased by 10 mmHg every 3 min until presyncope or completion of -60 mmHg. After bed rest, LBNP tolerance was reduced in 11 of 13 subjects (P <.023), HR was greater (P <.002), cardiac output was unchanged, and the ability to augment MSNA at high levels of LBNP was reduced (rate of rise for 30- to 60-mmHg LBNP before bed rest 0.073 bursts x min(-1) x mmHg(-1); after bed rest 0.035 bursts x min(-1) x mmHg(-1); P < 0.016). These findings suggest that 24 h of bed rest reduces sympathetic nerve responses to LBNP.

  20. The clinical significance of platelet counts in the first 24 hours after severe injury.

    PubMed

    Stansbury, Lynn G; Hess, Aaron S; Thompson, Kwaku; Kramer, Betsy; Scalea, Thomas M; Hess, John R

    2013-04-01

    Admission platelet (PLT) counts are known to be associated with all-cause mortality for seriously injured patients admitted to a trauma center. The course of subsequent PLT counts, their implications, and the effects of PLT therapy are less well known. Trauma center patients who were directly admitted from the scene of injury, received 1 or more units of uncrossmatched red blood cells in the first hour of care, survived for at least 15 minutes, and had a PLT count measured in the first hour were analyzed for the association of their admission and subsequent PLT counts in the first 24 hours with injury severity and hemorrhagic and central nervous system (CNS) causes of in-hospital mortality. Over an 8.25-year period, 1292 of 45,849 direct trauma admissions met entry criteria. Admission PLT counts averaged 228×10(9) ±90×10(9) /L and decreased by 104×10(9) /L by the second hour and 1×10(9) /L each hour thereafter. The admission count was not related to time to admission. Each 1-point increase in the injury severity score was associated with a 1×10(9) /L decrease in the PLT count at all times in the first 24 hours of care. Admission PLT counts were strongly associated with hemorrhagic and CNS injury mortality and subsequent PLT counts. Effects of PLT therapy could not be ascertained. Admission PLT counts in critically injured trauma patients are usually normal, decreasing after admission. Low PLT counts at admission and during the course of trauma care are strongly associated with mortality. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  1. Overexpression of Renin in the collecting duct causes elevated blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Ramkumar, Nirupama; Ying, Jian; Stuart, Deborah; Kohan, Donald E

    2013-08-01

    Renin is synthesized in the collecting duct and is regulated differently than renin in the juxtaglomerular apparatus. However, the physiological relevance of collecting duct renin remains unknown, particularly with regard to its ability to regulate blood pressure. We used gene targeting to generate mice with overexpression of renin in the collecting duct. A conditional mutant mouse line was created with the mouse renin transcript distal to a "transcriptional stop sequence" such that gene expression only occurred when the stop sequence was excised. These mice were bred with mice transgenic for the aquaporin-2 promoter driving Cre recombinase in order to achieve collecting duct-specific overexpression of renin. RNA analysis confirmed kidney-specific recombination, and medullary renin mRNA levels were increased 5-fold in collecting duct renin mice. Blood pressure was recorded by telemetry and plasma and urine was collected in 24-hour metabolic cages on normal, high-, and low-Na+ diets. Although no significant differences in 24-hour urinary Na+ excretion between targeted and control mice were detected, renin overexpresser mice had elevated blood pressure compared with controls on a high-Na+ diet. Urinary renin excretion was 2-fold higher in targeted mice as compared with controls on normal and low-Na+ diets. Plasma renin concentration was significantly suppressed in targeted mice as compared with controls on normal and high-Na+ diets. Taken together, these results suggest that collecting duct-derived renin has the potential to modulate blood pressure independent of the systemic renin-angiotensin system.

  2. Continuous antihypertensive therapy throughout the initial 24 hours of intracerebral hemorrhage: the stroke acute management with urgent risk-factor assessment and improvement-intracerebral hemorrhage study.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Junpei; Koga, Masatoshi; Tanaka, Eijirou; Okada, Yasushi; Kimura, Kazumi; Yamagami, Hiroshi; Okuda, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Shiokawa, Yoshiaki; Furui, Eisuke; Nakagawara, Jyoji; Kario, Kazuomi; Okata, Takuya; Arihiro, Shoji; Sato, Shoichiro; Nagatsuka, Kazuyuki; Minematsu, Kazuo; Toyoda, Kazunori

    2014-03-01

    A short duration (<24 hours) of antihypertensive therapy (AHT) after acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) may be sufficient because active bleeding generally ceases within several hours. We aimed to determine the association between sequential systolic blood pressure (SBP) levels during AHT and outcomes in ICH patients. In 211 hyperacute ICH patients who underwent AHT based on predefined protocol, the mean of hourly SBP (mSBP) measurements was calculated over 1 to 8 hours (first mSBP), 9 to 16 hours (second mSBP), and 17 to 24 hours (third mSBP) after the initiation of AHT. Outcomes included neurological deterioration (72-hour Glasgow Coma Scale decrease ≥2 or National Instititutes of Health Stroke Scale increase ≥4), hematoma expansion (>33%), and unfavorable outcome (3-month modified Rankin Scale score 4-6). The median first, second, and third mSBPs were 132, 131, and 137 mm Hg, respectively. A higher first mSBP (odds ratio [OR], 2.41; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.34-4.69 per 10 mm Hg) or second mSBP (OR, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.20-3.80) was independently associated with neurological deterioration, and a higher second mSBP (OR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.02-2.00) or third mSBP (OR, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.05-2.05) was associated with unfavorable outcome. None of the mSBPs was associated with hematoma expansion. The continuation of AHT throughout the initial 24 hours after ICH may improve outcomes.

  3. CHRONOBIOLOGY OF HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE

    PubMed Central

    Cornélissen, G.; Halberg, F.; Bakken, E. E.; Wang, Z.; Tarquini, R.; Perfetto, F.; Laffi, G.; Maggioni, C.; Kumagai, Y.; Homolka, P.; Havelková, A.; Dušek, J.; Svačinová, H.; Siegelová, J.; Fišer, B.

    2008-01-01

    BIOCOS, the project aimed at studying BIOlogical systems in their COSmos, has obtained a great deal of expertise in the fields of blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) monitoring and of marker rhythmometry for the purposes of screening, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. Prolonging the monitoring reduces the uncertainty in the estimation of circadian parameters; the current recommendation of BIOCOS requires monitoring for at least 7 days. The BIOCOS approach consists of a parametric and a non-parametric analysis of the data, in which the results from the individual subject are being compared with gender- and age-specified reference values in health. Chronobiological designs can offer important new information regarding the optimization of treatment by timing its administration as a function of circadian and other rhythms. New technological developments are needed to close the loop between the monitoring of blood pressure and the administration of antihypertensive drugs. PMID:19122770

  4. The Environment and Blood Pressure.

    PubMed

    Brook, Robert D

    2017-05-01

    A host of environmental factors can significantly increase arterial blood pressure (BP) including cold temperature, high altitude, loud noises, and ambient air pollutants. Although brief exposures acutely elevate BP, over the long term, chronic exposures may be capable of promoting the development of sustained hypertension. Given their omnipresent nature, environmental factors may play a role in worsening BP control and heightening overall cardiovascular risk at the global public health level. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. High Blood Pressure and Kidney Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kidney disease is diagnosed with urine and blood tests. Health care providers measure blood pressure with a blood pressure ... the sample to a lab for analysis. A health care provider may order a blood test to estimate how much blood the kidneys filter ...

  6. An evaluation of excision with application of autografts or porcine xenografts within 24 hours of burn injury.

    PubMed

    Still, J M; Law, E J; Craft-Coffman, B

    1996-02-01

    An evaluation of feasibility and safety of excising burn wounds within 24 hours of injury was carried out. Over a 2-year period, 124 patients were admitted and taken to the operating room within 24 hours of initial burn injury. All cases were from one surgeon's practice. There were 99 males and 28 females. Age ranged from 8 months to 93 years. Burn size ranged from 0.5% to 70%, with a mean of 17.59%. Time from injury to surgery varied from 2 hours 10 minutes to 23 hours 40 minutes, with a mean of 14.42 hours. All patients admitted within 24 hours of injury were considered for immediate excision. Patients admitted too late in their course to receive excision within 24 hours were not included in the evaluation. Second-degree burns were treated with tangential debridement and porcine xenografts. If third-degree burns were obviously present, electrocautery excision was carried out followed by cadaver grafting or autografting as appropriate. Blood loss ranged from 0 to 2000 cc (mean, 215.08 cc) for the first surgery. The mean number of operations per patient was 1.72. Very large burns underwent staged procedures. There were five deaths (4.0%) in the group. There were no operative deaths. Twenty-three patients required readmission for further treatment, usually including surgery. It appears that excision within 24 hours of injury is safe. There is the obvious benefit of a reduced hospital stay by decreasing the time to surgery and the theoretical advantage obtained by early removal of sources of infection.

  7. Strict blood-pressure control and progression of renal failure in children.

    PubMed

    Wühl, Elke; Trivelli, Antonella; Picca, Stefano; Litwin, Mieczyslaw; Peco-Antic, Amira; Zurowska, Aleksandra; Testa, Sara; Jankauskiene, Augustina; Emre, Sevinc; Caldas-Afonso, Alberto; Anarat, Ali; Niaudet, Patrick; Mir, Sevgi; Bakkaloglu, Aysin; Enke, Barbara; Montini, Giovanni; Wingen, Ann-Margret; Sallay, Peter; Jeck, Nikola; Berg, Ulla; Caliskan, Salim; Wygoda, Simone; Hohbach-Hohenfellner, Katharina; Dusek, Jiri; Urasinski, Tomasz; Arbeiter, Klaus; Neuhaus, Thomas; Gellermann, Jutta; Drozdz, Dorota; Fischbach, Michel; Möller, Kristina; Wigger, Marianne; Peruzzi, Licia; Mehls, Otto; Schaefer, Franz

    2009-10-22

    Although inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system delays the progression of renal failure in adults with chronic kidney disease, the blood-pressure target for optimal renal protection is controversial. We assessed the long-term renoprotective effect of intensified blood-pressure control among children who were receiving a fixed high dose of an angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitor. After a 6-month run-in period, 385 children, 3 to 18 years of age, with chronic kidney disease (glomerular filtration rate of 15 to 80 ml per minute per 1.73 m(2) of body-surface area) received ramipril at a dose of 6 mg per square meter of body-surface area per day. Patients were randomly assigned to intensified blood-pressure control (with a target 24-hour mean arterial pressure below the 50th percentile) or conventional blood-pressure control (mean arterial pressure in the 50th to 95th percentile), achieved by the addition of antihypertensive therapy that does not target the renin-angiotensin system; patients were followed for 5 years. The primary end point was the time to a decline of 50% in the glomerular filtration rate or progression to end-stage renal disease. Secondary end points included changes in blood pressure, glomerular filtration rate, and urinary protein excretion. A total of 29.9% of the patients in the group that received intensified blood-pressure control reached the primary end point, as assessed by means of a Kaplan-Meier analysis, as compared with 41.7% in the group that received conventional blood-pressure control (hazard ratio, 0.65; confidence interval, 0.44 to 0.94; P=0.02). The two groups did not differ significantly with respect to the type or incidence of adverse events or the cumulative rates of withdrawal from the study (28.0% vs. 26.5%). Proteinuria gradually rebounded during ongoing ACE inhibition after an initial 50% decrease, despite persistently good blood-pressure control. Achievement of blood-pressure targets and a decrease in proteinuria

  8. The relationship between caffeine and blood pressure in preadolescent African American girls.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Jagadeshwar G; Ebbert, Jon O; Klesges, Lisa M; Enders, Felicity T B; Klesges, Robert C; Lanctot, Jennifer Q; McClanahan, Barbara S

    2008-01-01

    While high caffeine consumption has been shown to be associated with increased blood pressure in controlled experiments, the relationship between caffeine consumption and blood pressure in preadolescent (ages 6-11 years) and adolescent (ages 12-19 years) children has not been well studied. The primary objective of this study was to assess the cross-sectional relationship between caffeine intake and blood pressure in 8- to 10-year-old African American girls who eat an unrestricted diet. Demographic, 24-hour dietary recall, and blood pressure data collected at baseline from 303 African American girls aged 8-10 years in the Girls health Enrichment Multisite Studies (GEMS) cohort were analyzed by using linear and multiple regression models. Dietary caffeine intake was not associated with either systolic or diastolic blood pressure (P=.33 and P=.36, respectively). However, consistent with the literature, height and body mass index were each positively and independently associated with systolic blood pressure (both P<.0001). Height and amount of sodium intake were positively associated with diastolic blood pressure (P=.01 and P=.02, respectively). Dietary caffeine intake in low amounts is not associated with elevated blood pressure in 8- to 10-year-old African American girls who eat an unrestricted diet.

  9. Masked hypertension defined by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is associated with an increased serum glucose level and urinary albumin-creatinine ratio.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Joji; Hoshide, Satoshi; Eguchi, Kazuo; Schwartz, Joseph E; Pickering, Thomas G; Shimada, Kazuyuki; Kario, Kazuomi

    2010-08-01

    The authors evaluated the relationship of hypertensive target organ damage to masked hypertension assessed by ambulatory blood pressure (BP) and home blood pressure (HBP) monitoring in 129 participants without taking antihypertensive medication. Masked hypertension was defined as office BP < or =140/90 mm Hg and 24-hour ambulatory BP > or =130/80 mm Hg. The masked hypertensive participants defined by 24-hour ambulatory BP (n=13) had a higher serum glucose level (126 vs 96 mg/dL, P=.001) and urinary albumin-creatinine ratio (38.0 vs 7.5 mg/gCr, P<.001) than the normotensive participants (n=74); however, these relationships were not observed when the authors defined groups using HBP (> or =135/85 mm Hg). Masked hypertension by both 24-hour ambulatory BP and HBP had a higher urinary albumin-creatinine ratio than normotension by both 24-hour ambulatory BP and HBP (62.1 vs 7.4 mg/gCr, P=.001), and than masked hypertension by HBP alone (9.3 mg/gCr, P=.009). Masked hypertension defined by 24-hour ambulatory BP is associated with an increased serum glucose level and urinary albumin-creatinine ratio, but these relationships are not observed in masked hypertension defined by HBP.

  10. Masked Hypertension Defined by Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring Is Associated With an Increased Serum Glucose Level and Urinary Albumin-Creatinine Ratio

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Joji; Hoshide, Satoshi; Eguchi, Kazuo; Schwartz, Joseph E.; Pickering, Thomas G.; Shimada, Kazuyuki; Kario, Kazuomi

    2017-01-01

    The authors evaluated the relationship of hypertensive target organ damage to masked hypertension assessed by ambulatory blood pressure (BP) and home blood pressure (HBP) monitoring in 129 participants without taking antihypertensive medication. Masked hypertension was defined as office BP ≤140/90 mm Hg and 24-hour ambulatory BP ≥130/80 mm Hg. The masked hypertensive participants defined by 24-hour ambulatory BP (n=13) had a higher serum glucose level (126 vs 96 mg/dL, P=.001) and urinary albumin-creatinine ratio (38.0 vs 7.5 mg/gCr, P<.001) than the normotensive participants (n=74); however, these relationships were not observed when the authors defined groups using HBP (≥135/85 mm Hg). Masked hypertension by both 24-hour ambulatory BP and HBP had a higher urinary albumin-creatinine ratio than normotension by both 24-hour ambulatory BP and HBP (62.1 vs 7.4 mg/gCr, P=.001), and than masked hypertension by HBP alone (9.3 mg/gCr, P=.009). Masked hypertension defined by 24-hour ambulatory BP is associated with an increased serum glucose level and urinary albumin-creatinine ratio, but these relationships are not observed in masked hypertension defined by HBP. PMID:20695934

  11. Effects of para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) form and administration mode on PABA recovery in 24-hour urine collections.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rashmi S; Joy, Raechel C; Boushey, Carol J; Ferruzzi, Mario G; Leonov, Alexei P; McCrory, Megan A

    2014-03-01

    Para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) has long been used as an objective measure to assess completeness of 24-hour urine collections. However, pharmaceutical-grade PABA for human ingestion is not available in the United States. An alternative, the potassium salt of PABA, aminobenzoate potassium, can be obtained for clinical use, although it has not yet been validated in this role. Both PABA and aminobenzoate potassium can be directly ingested in their tablet or capsule forms or added to food before consumption. Our aim was to investigate the effect of form (PABA vs aminobenzoate potassium) and administration mode (directly ingested as a tablet/capsule vs added to food) on urinary PABA recovery levels. Twenty healthy participants underwent 3 test days separated by two 24-hour wash-out periods. Three test conditions, one on each test day, were investigated in randomized order: PABA tablet, aminobenzoate potassium capsule, and PABA or aminobenzoate potassium in food. Ingestion of each dose was supervised and participants performed the 24-hour urine collections while free-living. The 24-hour urine collections were analyzed for PABA recovery (%R) levels using a colorimetric assay. Recoveries 85% to 110% were deemed complete and those >110% were reanalyzed by high pressure liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Only complete collections (>85%R) were included in analyses. The recovery for the PABA tablet, aminobenzoate potassium capsule, and PABA/aminobenzoate potassium in food were similar at 98.8%R±2.0%R, 95.1%R±2.3%R, and 93.2%R±2.1%R, respectively, and did not differ significantly. These results suggest that aminobenzoate potassium may be used as an alternative to PABA for assessing the completeness of 24-hour urine collections and to track compliance with consuming provided diets in community-dwelling studies.

  12. Association between postexercise hypotension and long-term training-induced blood pressure reduction: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hecksteden, Anne; Grütters, Teresa; Meyer, Tim

    2013-01-01

    The interindividual variability in the efficacy of regular endurance exercise to lower blood pressure is high. Therefore, to optimize training prescriptions, predictors would be desirable. The main hypothesis of the present study was an association between postexercise hypotension after an exhaustive exercise test and chronic blood pressure reductions in response to an endurance training program. Uncontrolled prospective training study. University department. Healthy untrained subjects were recruited by flyers. Inclusion criteria were age 30 to 60 years, body mass index 25 to 35 kg/m(2), untrained status (<1 hour/week regular activity; V[Combining Dot Above]O(2max) < 45 mL·min(-1)·kg(-1)), blood pressure 150/95 mm Hg, nonsmoker; 14 subjects were included, 12 could be analyzed. Walking/running 4 times per week at 60% heart rate reserve for 4 weeks. Difference in blood pressure from the initial resting value to 1 and 24 hours after the initial test (acute) and the resting value before the final test (chronic), respectively. Initial resting systolic blood pressure was 134 ± 18 mm Hg. Values were significantly reduced at all time points thereafter (1 hour: 125 ± 13 mm Hg; 24 hours: 128 ± 12 mm Hg; final: 125 ± 18 mm Hg). Acute and chronic changes correlated significantly (1 hour: P = 0.003; r = 0.77; 24 hours: P = 0.017; r = 0.67). Results for diastolic blood pressure were comparable yet less pronounced. The magnitude of postexercise hypotension is a promising candidate for the prediction of individual blood pressure-related training efficacy. Easily determined, it might be used to improve training prescriptions. However, further studies are needed to assess predictive accuracy.

  13. Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring in Lean, Obese and Diabetic Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Shikha, Deep; Singla, Montish; Walia, Rachna; Potter, Natia; Umpaichitra, Vatcharapan; Mercado, Arlene; Winer, Nathaniel

    2015-01-01

    Aim To determine if children and adolescents who have obesity (Ob) or type 2 diabetes (T2DM) of relatively short duration have impaired cardiovascular function compared with lean subjects using 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure as a surrogate measure of evaluation. Methods We enrolled 100 African-Caribbean subjects (45 males/55 females), mean ages 14.4-15.2 years (range 11.8-18.5 years) and Tanner stage 4.2-4.8. Mean BMI for the Ob (n = 40), T2DM (n = 39) and lean (n = 21) groups were 40.3, 34.2 and 20.8, respectively (p < 0.01, Ob and T2DM vs. lean). Mean hemoglobin A1c in lean and Ob was 5.4 and 5.5% compared to 8.8% in T2DM (p < 0.001, T2DM vs. lean and Ob). Ambulatory blood pressure was recorded every 20 min over 24 h using Spacelabs 70207. Results Mean 24-hour, daytime and nighttime systolic blood pressure was significantly higher in Ob and T2DM compared with lean subjects (mean 24-hour 117 and 120 vs. 109 mm Hg; daytime 121 and 123 vs. 113 mm Hg; and nighttime 109 and 115 vs. 101 mm Hg; p < 0.01 for all time periods). The nocturnal systolic dip in Ob and T2DM did not differ from that of lean, whereas nocturnal diastolic dip decreased significantly in Ob and T2DM compared to lean (11.5 and 10.4 vs. 20.6 mm Hg; p < 0.01). Mean pulse pressure was significantly increased in the Ob and T2DM groups compared to lean subjects (51 and 54 vs. 45 mm Hg; p < 0.01). Conclusion Adolescent Ob and T2DM groups share adverse risk factors, which may be harbingers of adult cardiovascular events. PMID:26195970

  14. Mean 24-hours sympathetic nervous system activity decreases during head-down tilted bed rest but not during microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Nj; Heer, M.; Ivanova, K.; Norsk, P.

    Sympathetic nervous system activity is closely related to gravitational stress in ground based experiments. Thus a high activity is present in the standing-up position and a very low activity is observed during acute head-out water immersion. Adjustments in sympathetic activity are necessary to maintain a constant blood pressure during variations in venous return. Head-down tilted bed rest is applied as a model to simulate changes observed during microgravity. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that mean 24-hours sympathetic activity was low and similar during space flight and in ground based observation obtained during long-term head-down tilted bed rest. Forearm venous plasma noradrenaline was measured by a radioenzymatic technique as an index of muscle sympathetic activity and thrombocyte noradrenaline and adrenaline were measured as indices of mean 24-hours sympathoadrenal activity. Previous results have indicated that thrombocyte noradrenaline level has a half-time of 2 days. Thus to reflect sympathetic activity during a specific experiment the study period must last for at least 6 days and a sample must be obtained within 12 hours after the experiment has ended. Ten normal healthy subjects were studied before and during a 14 days head-down tilted bed rest as well as during an ambulatory study period of a similar length. The whole experiment was repeated while the subjects were on a low calorie diet. Thrombocyte noradrenaline levels were studied in 4 cosmonauts before and within 12 hours after landing after more than 7 days in flight. Thrombocyte noradrenaline decreased markedly during the head-down tilted bed rest (p<0.001), whereas there were no significant changes in the ambulatory study. Plasma noradrenaline decreased in the adaptation period but not during the intervention. During microgravity thrombocyte noradrenaline increased in four cosmonauts and the percentage changes were significantly different in cosmonauts and in subjects

  15. Risk Factors for High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... to achieve target blood pressure goals with treatment. Overweight You are more likely to develop prehypertension or high blood pressure if you’re overweight or obese . The terms “overweight” and “obese” refer ...

  16. Control Blood Pressure, Protect Your Kidneys

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Health Lines Control Blood Pressure, Protect Your Kidneys Past Issues / Fall ... Not Alone / Keep Weight Off / Facts About Fat / Control Blood Pressure, Protect Your Kidneys Fall 2008 Issue: ...

  17. Taking your blood pressure at home (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... sure you are taking your blood pressure correctly. Compare your home machine with the one at your ... sure you are taking your blood pressure correctly. Compare your home machine with the one at your ...

  18. Avoid the Consequences of High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aneurysm More Avoid the Consequences of High Blood Pressure Infographic Updated:Oct 31,2016 View a downloadable version of this infographic High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP • Know Your ...

  19. A comparison of overnight and 24 hour collection to measure urinary catecholamines.

    PubMed

    White, I R; Brunner, E J; Barron, J L

    1995-02-01

    The period of urine collection used to measure excretion of catecholamines varies in epidemiological practice. We set out to compare overnight with 24 hour collection. Twenty-four subjects each collected urine for 24 hours, with the overnight urine being separately collected. The correlation of overnight and 24 hour catecholamines was highest when both measures were standardised for creatinine excretion and when creatinine excretion was adjusted for urine flow rate. The observed correlations were 0.74 for dopamine, 0.81 for noradrenaline and 0.54 for adrenaline. The use of overnight collections may therefore require a sample size up to 1.5 times as large (for noradrenaline) or 3.4 times as large (for adrenaline) to achieve the same power as with 24 hour collections. However, the figures given exaggerate the advantage of 24 hour collections if these incorporate measurement errors that are not present in overnight collections.

  20. [Why and how should the patient perform a correct home blood pressure measurement?].

    PubMed

    Krzesinski, F; Krzesinski, J M

    2009-04-01

    Home blood pressure (BP) measurement is a medical prescription. The interpretation of the results must be left to the physician. This method is complementary to the classical office BP measurement and the 24 hour ambulatory blood pressure measurement. It must be proposed to some selected patients on the basis of their capacity of learning and understanding the place of the technique for the diagnosis and the treatment compliance. It allows a more active contribution of the patient to the management of her chronic disease and, this, may improve the prevention of cardiovascular complication. A normal blood pressure during self BP measurement is equal or lower to 135/85 mmHg or even lower in high cardiovascular risk patients. This new technique, already largely used by patients, needs adequate education and good advice for buying a validated device.

  1. Cuff for Blood-Vessel Pressure Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimizu, M.

    1982-01-01

    Pressure within blood vessel is measured by new cufflike device without penetration of vessel. Device continuously monitors blood pressure for up to 6 months or longer without harming vessel. Is especially useful for vessels smaller than 4 or 5 millimeters in diameter. Invasive methods damage vessel wall, disturb blood flow, and cause clotting. They do not always give reliable pressure measurements over prolonged periods.

  2. Cuff for Blood-Vessel Pressure Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimizu, M.

    1982-01-01

    Pressure within blood vessel is measured by new cufflike device without penetration of vessel. Device continuously monitors blood pressure for up to 6 months or longer without harming vessel. Is especially useful for vessels smaller than 4 or 5 millimeters in diameter. Invasive methods damage vessel wall, disturb blood flow, and cause clotting. They do not always give reliable pressure measurements over prolonged periods.

  3. Reliability of nocturnal blood pressure dipping.

    PubMed

    Dimsdale, J E; von Känel, R; Profant, J; Nelesen, R; Ancoli-Israel, S; Ziegler, M

    2000-08-01

    Increasing evidence documents the fact that individuals whose blood pressure drops or 'dips' relatively little at night have a higher risk of numerous cardiovascular illnesses. To examine the reliability of various measures of nocturnal blood pressure dipping. This study examined 17 individuals with ambulatory blood pressure monitoring on three 24 h recordings while they pursued a schedule similar to that of in-patients on a clinical research unit. Nocturnal dipping of blood pressure was scored three ways: as the drop in blood pressure between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. ('clocktime'), as the drop in blood pressure tailored to each individual's reported bedtime ('bedtime'), and as the drop in blood pressure accompanying polysomnographically verified sleep ('sleeptime'). Adequate reliability was obtained for all three measures of dipping. There was, in general, a significant correlation across testing occasions (P<0.05). The correlation coefficient ranged from 0.5 to 0.8, depending on which criterion of dipping was selected and whether the endpoint was systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, or mean arterial blood pressure. The reliability of systolic blood pressure dipping was somewhat lower than that of diastolic or mean arterial blood pressure dipping. Dipping appears to be a reliable construct. While no one definition of dipping was demonstrably better than another, the most sensible definition of dipping would allow some adjustment for defining 'night' on the basis of each individual's idiosyncratic bed time.

  4. Blood pressure and associated factors in a rural Kenyan community.

    PubMed

    Poulter, N; Khaw, K T; Hopwood, B E; Mugambi, M; Peart, W S; Rose, G; Sever, P S

    1984-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) and associated factors were determined in 1737 men in a remote Kenyan agricultural community. Systolic BP showed no significant rise with age until after 54 years; diastolic BP showed a small rise with age. Both systolic and diastolic BP correlated with weight independent of age. Systolic and diastolic BP correlated positively with casual urinary sodium/potassium and negatively with potassium/creatinine ratios. Both systolic and diastolic BP correlated significantly with the number of years of education, as did urinary sodium/potassium and sodium/creatinine ratios. Potassium/creatinine ratios were negatively correlated with the number of years of education. Blood pressure and urinary sodium/creatinine ratios were significantly lower in subsistence farmers compared with those in other occupations, and potassium/creatinine ratios were significantly higher. Two pilot studies of Luo tribesmen showed a strong correlation between casual urinary electrolyte ratios and those derived from 24-hour urine samples and a greater variance of sodium excretion between these people than that found within individuals. These results suggest that a relationship between BP and casual urine electrolyte estimations may be identifiable in communities where there is less day-to-day dietary variation. They also suggest that some of the changes in BP associated with urbanization could be mediated by changes in dietary electrolytes.

  5. Why use automated office blood pressure measurements in clinical practice?

    PubMed

    Andreadis, Emmanuel A; Angelopoulos, Epameinondas T; Agaliotis, Gerasimos D; Tsakanikas, Athanasios P; Mousoulis, George P

    2011-09-01

    Automated office blood pressure (AOBP) measurement with the patient resting alone in a quiet examining room can eliminate the white-coat effect associated with conventional readings taken by manual sphygmomanometer. The key to reducing the white-coat response appears to be multiple blood pressure (BP) readings taken in a non-observer office setting, thus eliminating any interaction that could provoke an office-induced increase in BP. Furthermore, AOBP readings have shown a higher correlation with the mean awake ambulatory BP compared with BP readings recorded in routine clinical practice. Although there is a paucity of studies connecting AOBP with organ damage, AOBP values were recently found to be equally associated with left ventricular mass index as those of ambulatory BP. This concludes that in contrast to routine manual office BP, AOBP readings compare favourably with 24-hour ambulatory BP measurements in the appraisal of cardiac remodelling and, as such, could be complementary to ambulatory readings in a way similar to home BP measurements.

  6. [Ambulatory measurement of blood pressure].

    PubMed

    Mallion, J M; Tremel, F; Siché, J P; Azzouzi, L; Baguet, J P

    1995-12-09

    The advent of new techniques has greatly contributed to the development of ambulatory measurement as a noninvasive method for evaluating blood pressure. The technique implies use of a validated and reliable standardized apparatus. The operator must strictly comply with operating procedures, which must also be explained to the patient. Ambulatory measurement can be meaningful only if the results are compatible with reference values, which have now been established, and if the causes of possible error can be recognized and interpreted. Ambulatory blood pressure measurement has greatly improved our knowledge of physiological and pathological variations over the circadian cycle including day/night variability and the effects of psychosensorial stimulation. Diagnostic indications are clearly identified and include borderline hypertension suspected but not identified after about 3 months, the white coat effect, severe hypertension when modifications in the circadian cycle are suspected, paroxysmal hypertension, suspected pheochromocytoma, and gravid hypertension or an inversion of the circadian cycle possibly preceding an episode of eclampsia. There are also a certain number of particular indications in patients with degenerative or primary conditions affecting their autonomy. The true prognostic value of these recordings was recognized several years ago and has been confirmed by clinical trials. For example, the white blouse effect has no significant implication in terms or predicting less favourable morbidity or mortality. Finally, ambulatory blood pressure measurement has been definitively shown to be a valid method for evaluating the therapeutic effect of an anti-hypertensive drug in a given patient, especially when resting levels are questioned. For therapeutic trials, ambulatory measurements serve as a reference to evaluate the effect of treatment on the circadian cycle. Peak/dip levels can thus be determined in comparison with the residual effect of the drug. A

  7. Cutaneous control of blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Randall S; Titze, Jens; Weller, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Textbook theory holds that blood pressure (BP) is regulated by the brain, by blood vessels, or by the kidney. Recent evidence suggests that BP could be regulated in the skin. The skin holds a complex capillary counter current system, which controls body temperature, skin perfusion, and apparently systemic BP. Epidemiological data suggest that sunlight exposure plays a role in controlling BP. Ultraviolet A radiation produces vasodilation and a fall in BP. Keratinocytes and immune cells control blood flow in the extensive countercurrent loop system of the skin by producing nitric oxide, a key regulator of vascular tone. The balance between hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and hypoxia-inducible factor-2α activity in keratinocytes controls skin perfusion, systemic thermoregulation, and systemic BP by nitric oxide-dependent mechanisms. Furthermore, the skin accumulates Na which generates a barrier to promote immunological host defense. Immune cells control skin Na metabolism and the clearance of Na via the lymphatic system. Reduced lymphatic clearance increases BP. Apart from the well-known role of the brain, blood vessels, and the kidney, the skin is important for systemic BP control in humans and in experimental animals.

  8. Relationship between IL-17 serum level and ambulatory blood pressure in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Foroozanfard, Fatemeh; Soleimani, Alireza; Arbab, Elham; Samimi, Mansooreh; Tamadon, Mohammad Reza

    2017-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrine disorders with an inflammatory basis. It is associated with hyperandrogenism in women and can be also associated with increased activity of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Approximately 5% to 10% of women of reproductive age are affected by this disease. This syndrome is the main cause of infertility. Blood pressure may be one of the complications of the syndrome. In this study, we sought to assess the role of the IL-17 inflammatory cytokine in increasing blood pressure in patients with PCOS. In this cross-sectional study, after obtaining informed consent, we evaluated 85 patients with PCOS. IL-17 serum level was measured after separating the serum via ELISA method. The results obtained for the two groups of patients with high blood pressure and normal blood pressure were compared with each other. The daytime blood pressure was abnormal in eight patients, while it was normal in 72 patients. The blood pressure during the day had a direct correlation with the IL-17serum level; as a result, the mean IL-17 serum level in patients with high blood pressure was 77.10 ± 17.94 ρ g/ml while in those with normal blood pressure it was 55.20 ± 13.71 ρ g/ml (P = 0.001). High blood pressure during the night also showed a direct relation with theIL-17 serum level (P = 0.001). In addition, increasing of ambulatory 24-hourblood pressure was significantly related with IL-17 serum level, in such a way that the IL-17 serum level of people with high blood pressure rose by almost 22 ρg/ml during 24 hours (P = 0.001). Our results showed an association between PCO syndrome and inflammatory factors. The IL-17 serum level was directly associated with the increase in blood pressure.

  9. Relationship between IL-17 serum level and ambulatory blood pressure in women with polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Foroozanfard, Fatemeh; Soleimani, Alireza; Arbab, Elham; Samimi, Mansooreh; Tamadon, Mohammad Reza

    2017-01-01

    Background Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrine disorders with an inflammatory basis. It is associated with hyperandrogenism in women and can be also associated with increased activity of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Approximately 5% to 10% of women of reproductive age are affected by this disease. This syndrome is the main cause of infertility. Blood pressure may be one of the complications of the syndrome. Objectives In this study, we sought to assess the role of the IL-17 inflammatory cytokine in increasing blood pressure in patients with PCOS. Patients and Methods In this cross-sectional study, after obtaining informed consent, we evaluated 85 patients with PCOS. IL-17 serum level was measured after separating the serum via ELISA method. The results obtained for the two groups of patients with high blood pressure and normal blood pressure were compared with each other. Results The daytime blood pressure was abnormal in eight patients, while it was normal in 72 patients. The blood pressure during the day had a direct correlation with the IL-17serum level; as a result, the mean IL-17 serum level in patients with high blood pressure was 77.10 ± 17.94 ρ g/ml while in those with normal blood pressure it was 55.20 ± 13.71 ρ g/ml (P = 0.001). High blood pressure during the night also showed a direct relation with theIL-17 serum level (P = 0.001). In addition, increasing of ambulatory 24-hourblood pressure was significantly related with IL-17 serum level, in such a way that the IL-17 serum level of people with high blood pressure rose by almost 22 ρg/ml during 24 hours (P = 0.001). Conclusions Our results showed an association between PCO syndrome and inflammatory factors. The IL-17 serum level was directly associated with the increase in blood pressure. PMID:28042549

  10. Healthy Lifestyle and Blood Pressure Variability in Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Maseli, Anna; Aeschbacher, Stefanie; Schoen, Tobias; Fischer, Andreas; Jung, Manuel; Risch, Martin; Risch, Lorenz; Conen, David

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the relationships between healthy lifestyle metrics and blood pressure variability (BPV) in young and healthy adults. A population-based sample of 1,999 individuals aged 25-41 years was investigated. A lifestyle-score from 0 (most unhealthy) to 7 (most healthy) was calculated by giving one point for each of the following components: never smoking cigarettes, adhering to a healthy diet, performing moderate or intense physical activity, having a body mass index <25 kg/m2, a total cholesterol <200 mg/dl, a glycated hemoglobin <5.7%, or a conventional BP <120/80 mm Hg. Standardized ambulatory 24-hour BP measurements were obtained in all individuals. BPV was defined as the SD of all individual ambulatory BP recordings. We constructed multivariable linear regression models to assess the relationships between the lifestyle-score and BPV. None of the results were adjusted for multiple testing. Median age was 37 years and 46.8% were men. With increasing lifestyle-score, systolic and diastolic BPV is decreasing linearly (P for trend <0.0001), even after multivariable adjustment. Per 1-point increase in lifestyle-score, the β-coefficient (95% confidence interval) for systolic and diastolic 24-hour BPV was -0.03 (-0.03; -0.02) and -0.04 (-0.05; -0.03), respectively, both P for trend <0.0001. These relationships were attenuated but remained statistically significant after additional adjustment for mean individual BP. In this study of young and healthy adults, adopting a healthy lifestyle was associated with a lower BPV. These associations were independent of mean BP levels.

  11. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and structural changes in carotid arteries in normotensive workers occupationally exposed to lead.

    PubMed

    Poreba, Rafał; Poreba, Małgorzata; Gać, Paweł; Andrzejak, Ryszard

    2011-09-01

    Occupational exposure to lead may cause an increase in blood pressure. The aim of the study was to estimate the effect of occupational exposure to lead on selected parameters of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) and structural changes in carotid arteries. The study included 33 normotensive men occupationally exposed to lead and 39 unexposed men employed in administration of the foundry. All of the men underwent 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and high-resolution B-mode ultrasonography to determine intima-media thickness (IMT). The group of men occupationally exposed to lead manifested significantly higher mean systolic blood pressure (MSBP), mean diastolic blood pressure (MDBP), mean blood pressure (MBP), pulse pressure (PP), variability of diastolic blood pressure (VDBP), and IMT than the unexposed group. The studied groups did not differ in mean values of variability of systolic blood pressure (VSBP). As compared to the unexposed group, in men exposed to lead, atherosclerotic plaques were significantly more common. In the group of persons exposed to lead the Pearson's correlation coefficient analysis revealed significant linear positive correlations between MSBP and IMT, between lead level and the number of atherosclerotic plaques, and between lead level and PP. Multivariate stepwise regression analysis demonstrated that higher lead level in blood and higher triglyceride concentration in blood represent independent risk factors of an increased pulse pressure in the group of individuals occupationally exposed to lead. Occupational exposure to lead can be associated with increased blood pressure and accelerated progression of atherosclerosis.

  12. Blood pressure reprogramming adapter assists signal recording

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vick, H. A.

    1967-01-01

    Blood pressure reprogramming adapter separates the two components of a blood pressure signal, a dc pressure signal and an ac Korotkoff sounds signal, so that the Korotkoff sounds are recorded on one channel as received while the dc pressure signal is converted to FM and recorded on a second channel.

  13. Searching for baseline blood pressure: A comparison of blood pressure at three different care points.

    PubMed

    Ard, John L; Kendale, Samir

    2016-12-01

    A common approach to blood pressure management in the operating room is to keep the intraoperative, pressures within 20% of baseline blood pressure. One question that arises from this recommendation is; what is a patient's true baseline blood pressure? In order to get a more precise definition of baseline blood pressure, a comparison of the first operating room blood pressure was made with the blood pressure taken in a preoperative holding area before surgery, and the blood pressure taken in pre-surgical testing. (before day of surgery). A database of 2087 adult general anesthesia cases was generated, which contained the blood pressure (BP) in the pre-surgical testing clinic, the first BP in preoperative holding on the day of surgery, and the first BP in the operating room. Comparisons were made between the blood pressures taken at each phase of care. All components of BP taken in the OR were statistically significantly higher (p<0.001 for all comparisons) than in either PST or the holding area, while the BP in the latter locations were not significantly different. This blood pressure difference persists whether or not the patient is taking antihypertensive medications. The higher blood pressure measured in the operating rooms precludes using this measurement to determine baseline blood pressure. Blood pressures taken prior to arrival in the operating room are similar to blood pressures taken before the day of surgery. Blood pressure measurements taken prior to entrance in the operating room can be used to determine baseline blood pressure.

  14. Azilsartan in Patients With Mild to Moderate Hypertension Using Clinic and Ambulatory Blood Pressure Measurements.

    PubMed

    Perez, Alfonso; Cao, Charlie

    2017-01-01

    This was a phase 2, multicenter, randomized, parallel-group, double-blind dose-ranging study. Hypertensive adults (n=555) received one of five doses of azilsartan (AZL; 2.5, 5, 10, 20, 40 mg), olmesartan medoxomil (OLM) 20 mg, or placebo once daily. The primary endpoint was change in trough clinic diastolic blood pressure (DBP) at week 8. Compared with placebo, all AZL doses (except 2.5 mg) provided statistically and clinically significant reductions in DBP and systolic blood pressure (SBP) based on both clinic blood pressure (BP) and 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM). AZL 40 mg was statistically superior vs OLM. Clinic BP was associated with a pronounced placebo effect (-6 mm Hg), whereas this was negligible with ABPM (±0.5 mm Hg). Adverse event frequency was similar in the AZL and placebo groups. Based on these and other findings, subsequent trials investigated the commercial AZL medoxomil tablet at doses 20 to 80 mg/d using 24-hour ABPM. ©2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Fish meal supplementation and ambulatory blood pressure in patients with hypertension: relevance of baseline membrane fatty acid composition.

    PubMed

    Colussi, GianLuca; Catena, Cristiana; Dialti, Valeria; Pezzutto, Francesca; Mos, Lucio; Sechi, Leonardo A

    2014-03-01

    Studies on fish oil effects on ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) are inconclusive. We evaluated fish effects on fatty acid composition of red blood cell (RBC) membrane and ABP values and tested the hypothesis that the starting membrane fatty acid composition affects the ability to incorporate additional polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and decrease blood pressure. In 55 hypertensive patients, we measured RBC membrane fatty acid by gas chromatography and performed ABP monitoring. Patients received nutritional counseling and 3 weekly meals of trout rich in PUFA. In 42 patients, RBC membrane fatty acid and ABP were reassessed after 6 months. At baseline, the PUFA/saturated fatty acid (SFA) ratio of RBC membrane (PUFA/SFA) was inversely related to 24-hour, daytime, and nighttime systolic and pulse pressure, a relationship that was independent of covariables. At follow-up, the PUFA/SFA ratio increased in 20 (48%) of 42 patients. Patients with increased PUFA/SFA ratio at follow-up had lower baseline PUFA/SFA ratio than patients without such increase. Fish meal supplementation decreased 24-hour systolic and diastolic pressure only in patients who had increased PUFA/SFA ratio, a change that was more prominent during the nighttime. The change in PUFA/SFA was inversely and independently related to the change in 24-hour systolic and pulse pressure, and a logistic regression analysis indicated low baseline PUFA/SFA ratio as the only independent predictor of PUFA/SFA increase and blood pressure decrease. The ability of fish meals to increase membrane PUFA content and decrease blood pressure in hypertensive patients depends upon the starting membrane fatty acid composition.

  16. Central blood pressure and chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Yoichi; Kanno, Yoshihiko; Takenaka, Tsuneo

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we focused on the relationship between central blood pressure and chronic kidney diseases (CKD). Wave reflection is a major mechanism that determines central blood pressure in patients with CKD. Recent medical technology advances have enabled non-invasive central blood pressure measurements. Clinical trials have demonstrated that compared with brachial blood pressure, central blood pressure is a stronger risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) and renal diseases. CKD is characterized by a diminished renal autoregulatory ability, an augmented direct transmission of systemic blood pressure to glomeruli, and an increase in proteinuria. Any elevation in central blood pressure accelerates CKD progression. In the kidney, interstitial inflammation induces oxidative stress to handle proteinuria. Oxidative stress facilitates atherogenesis, increases arterial stiffness and central blood pressure, and worsens the CV prognosis in patients with CKD. A vicious cycle exists between CKD and central blood pressure. To stop this cycle, vasodilator antihypertensive drugs and statins can reduce central blood pressure and oxidative stress. Even in early-stage CKD, mineral and bone disorders (MBD) may develop. MBD promotes oxidative stress, arteriosclerosis, and elevated central blood pressure in patients with CKD. Early intervention or prevention seems necessary to maintain vascular health in patients with CKD. PMID:26788468

  17. Estimating salt intake in a Caucasian population: can spot urine substitute 24-hour urine samples?

    PubMed

    Toft, Ulla; Cerqueira, Charlotte; Andreasen, Anne Helms; Thuesen, Betina Heinsbæk; Laurberg, Peter; Ovesen, Lars; Perrild, Hans; Jørgensen, Torben

    2014-10-01

    A simple and valid alternative for 24-hour urine collection to estimate populational 24-hour urinary sodium excretion would be desirable for monitoring sodium intake in populations. To assess the validity of the predicted 24-hour urinary sodium excretion using spot urine and two different prediction methods in a Danish population. Overall, 473 Danish individuals provided a para-aminobenzoic acid-validated complete 24-hour urine collection and a spot urine sample. Data were collected in the DanThyr study (248 women aged 25-30 years and 60-65 years) and the Inter99 study (102 men and 113 women aged 30-60 years), respectively. The measured 24-hour urine sodium excretion was compared with the predicted 24-hour sodium excretion from a causal urine specimen, using both the Tanaka prediction method and a prediction model developed in a Danish population. The measured 24-hour sodium excretion (median, 5th to 95th percentile) was men 195 (110 to 360) and women 139 (61 to 258), whereas the predicted 24-hour sodium excretion for the Tanaka model was men 171 (117 to 222) and women 153 (92 to 228) and for the Danish model was men 207 (146 to 258); women 134 (103 to 163). The Spearman correlation between predicted and measured 24-hour sodium excretion was 0.39 and 0.49 for the Tanaka and the Danish model, respectively. For both prediction models, the proportion of individuals classified in the same or adjacent quintile was 74% for men and 64% for women. Both prediction models gave a reasonable classification of individuals according to their sodium excretion. However, the median daily sodium intake was estimated more precisely by the Danish model, especially among men. © Authors 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  18. Self-measurement of blood pressure at home reduces the need for antihypertensive drugs: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Verberk, Willem J; Kroon, Abraham A; Lenders, Jacques W M; Kessels, Alfons G H; van Montfrans, Gert A; Smit, Andries J; van der Kuy, Paul-Hugo M; Nelemans, Patricia J; Rennenberg, Roger J M W; Grobbee, Diederick E; Beltman, Frank W; Joore, Manuela A; Brunenberg, Daniëlle E M; Dirksen, Carmen; Thien, Theo; de Leeuw, Peter W

    2007-12-01

    It is still uncertain whether one can safely base treatment decisions on self-measurement of blood pressure. In the present study, we investigated whether antihypertensive treatment based on self-measurement of blood pressure leads to the use of less medication without the loss of blood pressure control. We randomly assigned 430 hypertensive patients to receive treatment either on the basis of self-measured pressures (n=216) or office pressures (OPs; n=214). During 1-year follow-up, blood pressure was measured by office measurement (10 visits), ambulatory monitoring (start and end), and self-measurement (8 times, self-pressure group only). In addition, drug use, associated costs, and degree of target organ damage (echocardiography and microalbuminuria) were assessed. The self-pressure group used less medication than the OP group (1.47 versus 2.48 drug steps; P<0.001) with lower costs ($3222 versus $4420 per 100 patients per month; P<0.001) but without significant differences in systolic and diastolic OP values (1.6/1.0 mm Hg; P=0.25/0.20), in changes in left ventricular mass index (-6.5 g/m(2) versus -5.6 g/m(2); P=0.72), or in median urinary microalbumin concentration (-1.7 versus -1.5 mg per 24 hours; P=0.87). Nevertheless, 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure values at the end of the trial were higher in the self-pressure than in the OP group: 125.9 versus 123.8 mm Hg (P<0.05) for systolic and 77.2 versus 76.1 mm Hg (P<0.05) for diastolic blood pressure. These data show that self-measurement leads to less medication use than office blood pressure measurement without leading to significant differences in OP values or target organ damage. Ambulatory values, however, remain slightly elevated for the self-pressure group.

  19. Reliability of indirect blood pressure monitoring for the evaluation of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Palatini, P; Sperti, G; Cordone, L; Mormino, P; Di Marco, A; Bastanzetti, M; Pessina, A C

    1985-01-01

    To assess the reliability of the Del Mar Avionics indirect blood pressure (BP) monitoring system 15 hypertensive patients were concomitantly studied with the intraarterial Oxford system. During daytime a statistically significant correlation was found between the BP values obtained with the two systems. On the contrary during the night this correlation in most cases was not significant. However the histograms of the between-method differences were similar during the day and the night, showing that the Del Mar Avionics Pressurometer (P) performs equally well throughout the 24 hours. It is concluded that the P is reliable for continuous indirect BP monitoring and suitable for the evaluation of the efficacy of antihypertensive treatments.

  20. Cardiac and Arterial Contribution to Blood Pressure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    heart to the blood pressure . We conclude that when the heart hypertrophies, as a result of the hypertension , the changed cardiac behavior, in turn...Plenary Talks Cardiac and Arterial Contribution to Blood Pressure N.Westerhof, Lab. for Physiology, Institute for Cardiovascular Research...Vrije Universiteit of Amsterdam Blood pressure and blood flow result from the interaction of the heart, the pump, and the arterial system, the load

  1. Relation of blood volume and blood pressure in orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, G.; Biaggioni, I.; Mosqueda-Garcia, R.; Robertson, R. M.; Robertson, D.

    1998-01-01

    A complex but crucial relationship exists between blood volume and blood pressure in human subjects; it has been recognized that in essential hypertension, renovascular hypertension, and pheochromocytoma, the relationship between plasma volume and diastolic blood pressure is an inverse one. This phenomenon has not been studied in individuals with low normal and reduced blood pressures. Orthostatic intolerance is a commonly encountered abnormality in blood pressure regulation often associated with tachycardia in the standing position. Most of these patients have varying degrees of reduced blood volume. We tested the hypothesis that the relationship previously found between plasma volume and diastolic blood pressure in pressor states would also hold in orthostatic intolerance. We studied 16 patients with a history of symptomatic orthostatic intolerance associated with an elevation in plasma norepinephrine in the upright posture and hypovolemia in 9 patients and normovolemia in 7 patients. Our studies demonstrate an inverse relationship between plasma volume and diastolic blood pressure in patients with orthostatic intolerance. This finding also holds for the change in diastolic blood pressure in response to upright posture. In this relationship, patients with orthostatic intolerance with high plasma norepinephrine resemble those with essential hypertension, renovascular hypertension, and pheochromocytoma. We conclude that in a variety of conditions at both ends of the blood pressure spectrum, the seemingly paradoxical association of hypovolemia and diastolic blood pressure is preserved.

  2. Relation of blood volume and blood pressure in orthostatic intolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, G.; Biaggioni, I.; Mosqueda-Garcia, R.; Robertson, R. M.; Robertson, D.

    1998-01-01

    A complex but crucial relationship exists between blood volume and blood pressure in human subjects; it has been recognized that in essential hypertension, renovascular hypertension, and pheochromocytoma, the relationship between plasma volume and diastolic blood pressure is an inverse one. This phenomenon has not been studied in individuals with low normal and reduced blood pressures. Orthostatic intolerance is a commonly encountered abnormality in blood pressure regulation often associated with tachycardia in the standing position. Most of these patients have varying degrees of reduced blood volume. We tested the hypothesis that the relationship previously found between plasma volume and diastolic blood pressure in pressor states would also hold in orthostatic intolerance. We studied 16 patients with a history of symptomatic orthostatic intolerance associated with an elevation in plasma norepinephrine in the upright posture and hypovolemia in 9 patients and normovolemia in 7 patients. Our studies demonstrate an inverse relationship between plasma volume and diastolic blood pressure in patients with orthostatic intolerance. This finding also holds for the change in diastolic blood pressure in response to upright posture. In this relationship, patients with orthostatic intolerance with high plasma norepinephrine resemble those with essential hypertension, renovascular hypertension, and pheochromocytoma. We conclude that in a variety of conditions at both ends of the blood pressure spectrum, the seemingly paradoxical association of hypovolemia and diastolic blood pressure is preserved.

  3. Effects of cigarette smoking on ambulatory blood pressure, heart rate, and heart rate variability in treated hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Yuko; Kawano, Yuhei; Hayashi, Shinichiro; Iwashima, Yoshio; Yoshihara, Fumiki; Nakamura, Satoko

    We investigated the influence of cigarette smoking on the levels and circadian patterns of blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), and HR variability (HRV) in hypertensive patients. Sixteen hypertensive smokers (57 ± 2 years old) receiving antihypertensive treatments participated in this study. Ambulatory monitoring of BP, HR, and electrocardiograms was performed every 30 min for 24 hours on a smoking day and nonsmoking day in a randomized crossover manner. Average 24-hour BP and daytime BP were significantly higher in the smoking period than in the nonsmoking period. No significant differences were observed in nighttime BP between the two periods. Average 24-hour and daytime HR, but not nighttime HR, were also higher in the smoking period than in the nonsmoking period. The daytime high frequency (HF) component of HRV was attenuated more in the smoking period than in the nonsmoking period. No significant differences were observed in the low frequency (LF) components of HRV or LF/HF ratio between the two periods. These results demonstrated that cigarette smoking increased the daytime and average 24-hour BP and HR, and the increases observed in daytime BP and HR were associated with the attenuation of parasympathetic nerve activity.

  4. Pioglitazone reduces blood pressure in non-dipping diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Negro, R; Dazzi, D; Hassan, H; Pezzarossa, A

    2004-03-01

    The association between insulin resistance and hypertension is firmly established and has been extensively investigated. Thiazolidinediones (TZD), a class of oral hypoglycemic agents that act as insulin sensitizers have been demonstrated, in many in vivo and in vitro studies, to possess antihypertensive properties. Whether the ability of TZD to lower blood pressure (BP) should be ascribed to a reduction of insulin resistance, or to a direct vasodilating effect, is matter of debate. Since blunted BP nocturnal dipping precedes overt hypertension and is associated with an increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events, we evaluated the pioglitazone effects on BP in non-dipper type 2 diabetic patients. Forty non-dipper diabetic patients were randomly assigned to metformin + placebo (M) or metformin + pioglitazone 30 mg (MP) and submitted to 24 hours blood pressure monitoring at the beginning and after 8 weeks. After 8 weeks of treatment in subjects on metformin + pioglitazone 30 mg (group MP1), we found a reduction of nocturnal blood pressure values (mean nocturnal systolic BP 128.05+/- 1.23 vs 122.8+/-2.3 mmHg; p<0.02; mean nocturnal diastolic BP 81.2+/-0.99 vs 75.65+/-0.93 mmHg; p<0.005). The observed improvements in BP were independent from changes in metabolic parameters. The obtained data show that pioglitazone was effective in reducing BP values in non-dipping diabetic patients. The reduction of BP values was independent from amelioration of the metabolic picture: that suggest the hypothesis that these ameliorations may be also due to a direct antihypertensive action exerted by pioglitazone.

  5. Noninvasive continuous blood pressure monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poghosyan, Armen; Mouradian, Vahram; Hovhannisyan, Levon

    2015-03-01

    We are presenting a novel photoplethysmographic (PPG) optical sensor and device with ambient optical, electrical and electromagnetic noises cancellation, thus allowing only the useful optical signals to be received by the health monitoring device. We are also presenting a new processing technique for canceling the ambient noises contributed by optical, electrical and electromagnetic artifacts in the measured PPG signals. Such a device and method allow the enhancement of the performance of the PPG sensors compared to conventional apparatus and methods. The presented sensor and methodology have been integrated into a prototype standalone device for noninvasive, continuous, wearable, remote and mobile monitoring of blood pressure and other human vital signs, such as heart rate, oxygen saturation, respiration rate, etc This small device allows the user to read, store, process and transmit all the measurements made using the PPG optical sensor and the electronic unit to a remote location.

  6. Cocoa reduces blood pressure and insulin resistance and improves endothelium-dependent vasodilation in hypertensives.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Davide; Necozione, Stefano; Lippi, Cristina; Croce, Giuseppe; Valeri, Letizia; Pasqualetti, Paolo; Desideri, Giovambattista; Blumberg, Jeffrey B; Ferri, Claudio

    2005-08-01

    Consumption of flavanol-rich dark chocolate (DC) has been shown to decrease blood pressure (BP) and insulin resistance in healthy subjects, suggesting similar benefits in patients with essential hypertension (EH). Therefore, we tested the effect of DC on 24-hour ambulatory BP, flow-mediated dilation (FMD), and oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) in patients with EH. After a 7-day chocolate-free run-in phase, 20 never-treated, grade I patients with EH (10 males; 43.7+/-7.8 years) were randomized to receive either 100 g per day DC (containing 88 mg flavanols) or 90 g per day flavanol-free white chocolate (WC) in an isocaloric manner for 15 days. After a second 7-day chocolate-free period, patients were crossed over to the other treatment. Noninvasive 24-hour ambulatory BP, FMD, OGTT, serum cholesterol, and markers of vascular inflammation were evaluated at the end of each treatment. The homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI), and insulin sensitivity index (ISI) were calculated from OGTT values. Ambulatory BP decreased after DC (24-hour systolic BP -11.9+/-7.7 mm Hg, P<0.0001; 24-hour diastolic BP -8.5+/-5.0 mm Hg, P<0.0001) but not WC. DC but not WC decreased HOMA-IR (P<0.0001), but it improved QUICKI, ISI, and FMD. DC also decreased serum LDL cholesterol (from 3.4+/-0.5 to 3.0+/-0.6 mmol/L; P<0.05). In summary, DC decreased BP and serum LDL cholesterol, improved FMD, and ameliorated insulin sensitivity in hypertensives. These results suggest that, while balancing total calorie intake, flavanols from cocoa products may provide some cardiovascular benefit if included as part of a healthy diet for patients with EH.

  7. Ambulatory monitoring detects sorafenib-induced blood pressure elevations on the first day of treatment

    PubMed Central

    Maitland, Michael L.; Kasza, Kristen E.; Karrison, Theodore; Moshier, Kristin; Sit, Laura; Black, Henry R.; Undevia, Samir D.; Stadler, Walter M.; Elliott, William J.; Ratain, Mark J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Hypertension is a mechanism-based toxicity of sorafenib and other cancer therapeutics that inhibit the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling pathway (VSP). This prospective, single center, cohort study characterized ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring (ABPM) as an early pharmacodynamic biomarker of VSP inhibition by sorafenib. Experimental Design Fifty-four normotensive advanced cancer patients underwent 24-hour ABPM prior to and between days 6 and 10 of sorafenib therapy. After BP changes were detected among the first cohort within 10 days, ABPM was performed during the first 24 hours of treatment for the second cohort. Results For the entire patient population the BP increase (mean systolic +10.8 mmHg [95% CI, 8.6 to 13.0], range −5.2 to +28.7 mmHg; mean diastolic +8.0 mmHg [95% CI, 6.3 to 9.7], range −4.4 to +27.1mmHg) was detected between days 6 and 10 (P <0.0001 for both) and plateaued thereafter. Variability in BP change did not associate with: age, body size, sex, self-reported race, baseline BP, or steady state sorafenib plasma concentrations. In the second cohort the BP elevation was detected during the first 24 hours (mean systolic +8.2 mmHg [95% CI, 5.0 to 11.3]; mean diastolic +6.5 mmHg [95% CI, 4.7 to 8.3] P <0.0001 for both). Conclusions ABPM detects the BP response to VSP inhibition by sorafenib during the first 24 hours of treatment. The magnitude of BP elevation is highly variable and unpredictable, but could be important in optimizing the therapeutic index of VSP inhibitor therapy. PMID:19773379

  8. Optimal dose of oral omeprazole for maximal 24 hour decrease of intragastric acidity.

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, B K; Walt, R P; Pounder, R E; Gomes, M D; Wood, E C; Logan, L H

    1984-01-01

    In a series of 59 experiments in nine duodenal ulcer patients, 24 hour intragastric acidity was measured before, during, and after treatment with daily oral omeprazole. Omeprazole 10, 20, and 30 mg/day for one week caused a 37, 90, and 97% decrease of 24 hour intragastric acidity, respectively. No further decrease of acidity was observed when the dose of omeprazole was doubled to 60 mg/day, or after a second week of treatment with 30 mg/day. One week after stopping treatment with omeprazole (14 doses) there was a significant 26% decrease of 24 hour intragastric acidity, with full recovery seven weeks later. Fasting plasma gastrin concentration was significantly raised during treatment with all doses of omeprazole. Omeprazole 30 mg/day is the optimal dose for a maximal decrease of 24 hour intragastric acidity in duodenal ulcer patients. PMID:6469081

  9. Wearable and low-stress ambulatory blood pressure monitoring technology for hypertension diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Altintas, Ersin; Takoh, Kimiyasu; Ohno, Yuji; Abe, Katsumi; Akagawa, Takeshi; Ariyama, Tetsuri; Kubo, Masahiro; Tsuda, Kenichiro; Tochikubo, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    We propose a highly wearable, upper-arm type, oscillometric-based blood pressure monitoring technology with low-stress. The low-stress is realized by new developments in the hardware and software design. In the hardware design, conventional armband; cuff, is almost halved in volume thanks to a flexible plastic core and a liquid bag which enhances the fitness and pressure uniformity over the arm. Reduced air bag volume enables smaller motor pump size and battery leading to a thinner, more compact and more wearable unified device. In the software design, a new prediction algorithm enabled to apply less stress (and less pain) on arm of the patient. Proof-of-concept experiments on volunteers show a high accuracy on both technologies. This paper mainly introduces hardware developments. The system is promising for less-painful and less-stressful 24-hour blood pressure monitoring in hypertension managements and related healthcare solutions.

  10. Comparison of anthropometric and training characteristics between recreational male marathoners and 24-hour ultramarathoners

    PubMed Central

    Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rosemann, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Background Of the anthropometry and training variables used to predict race performance in a 24-hour ultrarun, the personal best marathon time is the strongest predictor in recreational male 24-hour ultramarathoners. This finding raises the question of whether similarities exist between male recreational 24-hour ultramarathoners and male recreational marathoners. Methods The association between age, anthropometric variables (ie, body mass, body height, body mass index, percent body fat, skeletal muscle mass, limb circumference, and skinfold thickness at the pectoral, mid axillary, triceps, subscapular, abdominal, suprailiac, front thigh, and medial calf sites), previous experience and training characteristics (ie, volume, speed, and personal best time), and race time for 79 male recreational 24-hour ultramarathoners and 126 male recreational marathoners was investigated using bivariate and multivariate analysis. Results The 24-hour ultramarathoners were older (P < 0.05), had a lower circumference at both the upper arm (P < 0.05) and thigh (P < 0.01), and a lower skinfold thickness at the pectoral, axillary, and suprailiac sites (P < 0.05) compared with the marathoners. During training, the 24-hour ultramarathoners were running for more hours per week (P < 0.001) and completed more kilometers (P < 0.001), but were running slower (P < 0.01) compared with the marathoners. In the 24-hour ultramarathoners, neither anthropometric nor training variables were associated with kilometers completed in the race (P > 0.05). In the marathoners, percent body fat (P < 0.001) and running speed during training (P < 0.0001) were related to marathon race times. Conclusion In summary, differences in anthropometric and training predictor variables do exist between male recreational 24-hour ultramarathoners and male recreational marathoners for race performance. PMID:24198595

  11. Assessing response to stroke thrombolysis: validation of 24-hour multimodal magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Bruce C V; Tu, Hans T H; Christensen, Søren; Desmond, Patricia M; Levi, Christopher R; Bladin, Christopher F; Hjort, Niels; Ashkanian, Mahmoud; Sølling, Christine; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Davis, Stephen M; Ostergaard, Leif; Parsons, Mark W

    2012-01-01

    Imaging is used as a surrogate for clinical outcome in early-phase stroke trials. Assessment of infarct growth earlier than the standard 90 days used for clinical end points may be equally accurate and more practical. To compare assessment of the effect of reperfusion therapies using 24-hour vs day 90 magnetic resonance imaging. Infarct volume was assessed on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) at baseline and 24 hours after stroke onset and on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images at day 90. The DWI and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery lesions were manually outlined by 2 independent raters, and the volumes were averaged. Interrater consistency was assessed using the median difference in lesion volume between raters. Referral center. Patients  Imaging data were available for 83 patients; 77 of these patients received thrombolysis. Infarct volume at 24 hours and 90 days. The 24-hour DWI infarct volume had a strong linear correlation with day 90 fluid-attenuated inversion recovery infarct volume (r = 0.98, 95% confidence interval, 0.97-0.99). Recanalization had a significant effect on infarct evolution between baseline and 24 hours but not between 24 hours and day 90. Infarct growth from baseline was significantly reduced by recanalization, whether assessed at 24 hours or day 90. Infarct volume at either time point predicted functional outcome independent of age and baseline stroke severity. Interrater agreement was better for DWI than fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (1.4 mL [8%] vs 1.8 mL [17%]; P = .002). Assessment of final infarct volume using DWI at 24 hours captures the effect of reperfusion therapies on infarct growth and predicts functional outcome similarly to imaging at day 90. This has the potential to reduce loss to follow-up in trials and may add early prognostic information in clinical practice.

  12. BLOOD PRESSURE DIPPING: ETHNICITY, SLEEP QUALITY AND SYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM ACTIVITY

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Andrew; Routledge, Faye S.; Wohlgemuth, William K.; Hinderliter, Alan L.; Kuhn, Cynthia M.; Blumenthal, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Blunted blood pressure dipping is an established predictor of adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Although blunted blood pressure dipping is more common in African Americans than whites, the factors contributing to this ethnic difference are not well understood. This study examined the relationships of blood pressure dipping to ethnicity, body mass index, sleep quality, and fall in sympathetic nervous system activity during the sleep-period. Methods On 3 occasions, 128 participants with untreated high clinic blood pressure (130–159/85–99 mmHg) underwent assessments of 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure, sleep quality (evaluated by sleep interview, self-report, actigraphy) and sleep-period fall in sympathetic activity (measured by waking/sleep urinary catecholamine excretion). Results Compared to whites (n=72), African Americans (n=56) exhibited higher sleep-period systolic (p=.01) and diastolic blood pressure (p<.001), blunted systolic blood pressure dipping (p=.01), greater body mass index (p=.049) and poorer sleep quality (p=.02). Systolic blood pressure dipping was correlated with body mass index (r=−0.32, p<.001), sleep quality (r=0.30, p<.001), and sleep-period fall in sympathetic activity (r=0.30, p<.001). Multiple regression analyses indicated that these 3 factors were independent determinants of sleep-period systolic blood pressure dipping; ethnic differences in dipping were attenuated when controlling for these factors. Conclusions Blunted blood pressure dipping was related to higher body mass index, poorer sleep quality, and a lesser decline in sleep-period sympathetic nervous system activity. Although African American ethnicity also was associated with blunted dipping compared to whites in unadjusted analyses, this ethnic difference was diminished when body mass index, sleep quality and sympathetic activity were taken into account. PMID:21633397

  13. Effect of nocturnal blood pressure measurement on sleep and blood pressure during sleep.

    PubMed

    Middeke, M

    1996-01-01

    Nocturnal hypertension is of diagnostic interest and has important prognostic and therapeutic implications. Nighttime blood pressure can easily be measured using ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM). However, during nocturnal ambulatory blood pressure measurement pump noise, tactile stimuli and pressure produced by cuff inflation may alter the quality of sleep and subsequently influence the physiological fall of night time blood pressure. Eight studies were performed to determine whether non-invasive automated blood pressure monitoring during day and/or night provokes alert reaction, arousal, sleep disturbances and changes in blood pressure and/or heart rate. From these studies it can be concluded: 1) Nighttime blood pressure can be evaluated properly using ABPM. 2) Nocturnal blood pressure is not overestimated by ABPM. 3) ABPM does not induce an alarm reaction and a blood pressure rise when monitored with a silently operating recorder. 4) Sleep is often disturbed by blood pressure measurement without provoking a blood pressure increase. 5) In older patients blood pressure measurement and age-related alterations in sleep quality may influence each other. A patient's protocol has to be carried out and sleep quality should be recorded to provide a proper interpretation of nocturnal blood pressure behavior. ABPM is an important and valuable method to record nocturnal blood pressure for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.

  14. Pressure natriuresis and the renal control of arterial blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Ivy, Jessica R; Bailey, Matthew A

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of extracellular fluid volume by renal sodium excretion lies at the centre of blood pressure homeostasis. Renal perfusion pressure can directly regulate sodium reabsorption in the proximal tubule. This acute pressure natriuresis response is a uniquely powerful means of stabilizing long-term blood pressure around a set point. By logical extension, deviation from the set point can only be sustained if the pressure natriuresis mechanism is impaired, suggesting that hypertension is caused or sustained by a defect in the relationship between renal perfusion pressure and sodium excretion. Here we describe the role of pressure natriuresis in blood pressure control and outline the cascade of biophysical and paracrine events in the renal medulla that integrate the vascular and tubular response to altered perfusion pressure. Pressure natriuresis is impaired in hypertension and mechanistic insight into dysfunction comes from genetic analysis of blood pressure disorders. Transplantation studies in rats show that blood pressure is determined by the genotype of the kidney and Mendelian hypertension indicates that the distal nephron influences the overall natriuretic efficiency. These approaches and the outcomes of genome-wide-association studies broaden our view of blood pressure control, suggesting that renal sympathetic nerve activity and local inflammation can impair pressure natriuresis to cause hypertension. Understanding how these systems interact is necessary to tackle the global burden of hypertension. PMID:25107929

  15. Pressure natriuresis and the renal control of arterial blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Ivy, Jessica R; Bailey, Matthew A

    2014-09-15

    The regulation of extracellular fluid volume by renal sodium excretion lies at the centre of blood pressure homeostasis. Renal perfusion pressure can directly regulate sodium reabsorption in the proximal tubule. This acute pressure natriuresis response is a uniquely powerful means of stabilizing long-term blood pressure around a set point. By logical extension, deviation from the set point can only be sustained if the pressure natriuresis mechanism is impaired, suggesting that hypertension is caused or sustained by a defect in the relationship between renal perfusion pressure and sodium excretion. Here we describe the role of pressure natriuresis in blood pressure control and outline the cascade of biophysical and paracrine events in the renal medulla that integrate the vascular and tubular response to altered perfusion pressure. Pressure natriuresis is impaired in hypertension and mechanistic insight into dysfunction comes from genetic analysis of blood pressure disorders. Transplantation studies in rats show that blood pressure is determined by the genotype of the kidney and Mendelian hypertension indicates that the distal nephron influences the overall natriuretic efficiency. These approaches and the outcomes of genome-wide-association studies broaden our view of blood pressure control, suggesting that renal sympathetic nerve activity and local inflammation can impair pressure natriuresis to cause hypertension. Understanding how these systems interact is necessary to tackle the global burden of hypertension.

  16. Measuring Time-Averaged Blood Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothman, Neil S.

    1988-01-01

    Device measures time-averaged component of absolute blood pressure in artery. Includes compliant cuff around artery and external monitoring unit. Ceramic construction in monitoring unit suppresses ebb and flow of pressure-transmitting fluid in sensor chamber. Transducer measures only static component of blood pressure.

  17. Measuring Time-Averaged Blood Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothman, Neil S.

    1988-01-01

    Device measures time-averaged component of absolute blood pressure in artery. Includes compliant cuff around artery and external monitoring unit. Ceramic construction in monitoring unit suppresses ebb and flow of pressure-transmitting fluid in sensor chamber. Transducer measures only static component of blood pressure.

  18. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory blood pressure in children with sleep-disordered breathing.

    PubMed

    Amin, Raouf S; Carroll, John L; Jeffries, Jenny L; Grone, Charles; Bean, Judy A; Chini, Barbara; Bokulic, Ronald; Daniels, Stephen R

    2004-04-15

    Obstructive sleep apnea causes intermittent elevation of systemic blood pressure (BP) during sleep. To determine whether obstructive apnea in children has a tonic effect on diurnal BP, 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure was obtained from 60 children with mean age of 10.8 +/- 3.5 years. Thirty-nine children had obstructive apnea and 21 had primary snoring. Children with obstructive apnea had significantly greater mean BP variability during wakefulness and sleep, a higher night-to-day systolic BP, and a smaller nocturnal dipping of mean BP. Variability of mean arterial pressure during wakefulness was predicted by the desaturation, body mass, and arousal indices, whereas variability during sleep was predicted by apnea-hypopnea and body mass indices. Nocturnal BP dipping was predicted by the desaturation index. There were no significant differences in systolic, diastolic, or mean arterial BP during sleep between the groups. Diastolic BP during wakefulness was significantly different between the groups and correlated negatively with apnea-hypopnea index. We conclude that obstructive apnea in children is associated with 24-hour BP dysregulation and that, independent of obesity, the frequency of obstructive apnea, oxygen desaturation, and arousal contributes to abnormal BP control.

  19. Abnormal diurnal rhythm of urine output following renal transplantation: the impact of blood pressure and diuretics.

    PubMed

    Alstrup, K; Graugaard-Jensen, C; Rittig, S; Jørgensen, K A

    2010-11-01

    Nocturnal polyuria is the excretion at night of an excessive volume of urine. A major problem following renal transplantation is an abnormal diurnal rhythmicity in urine output. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the prevalence of nocturnal polyuria among renal transplant recipients in the early period after transplantation as well as at least 1 year after transplantation. We aimed to explore possible pathophysiological mechanisms behind nocturnal polyuria in this group of patients, focusing on the impact of blood pressure and medication. Seventeen recently transplanted patients 17 late transplant recipients, and 17 healthy controls were included in the study. Voiding habits were assessed by completion of a frequency-volume chart recording all fluid intakes and voiding. A concomitant 24-hour blood pressure profile was obtained in all. Renal transplant recipients had a high prevalence of nocturnal polyuria (74%) and a disturbed blood pressure profile with a lack of appropriate nocturnal dipping (P < .0001) compared to controls. We found a positive correlation between increased nocturnal blood pressure and urine output at night (r = .368, P = .008). Patients taking diuretics had a circadian diurnal rhythm of urine output and a blood pressure profile similar to controls. Nocturnal polyuria was very common among both recent and late transplant recipients. A high fluid intake during daytime and hypervolemia were suggested as causes of a disturbed blood pressure profile, which partly seemed to explain the high urine output at night. Daytime diuretics may be an effective treatment of this inconvenient complication. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Blood Pressure Out of the Office: Its Time Has Finally Come.

    PubMed

    Krakoff, Lawrence R

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of hypertension includes measurement of blood pressure out of the office by either 24-hour ambulatory monitoring or home blood pressure monitoring. These methods have led to recognition of "white coat hypertension" (WCH) and "masked hypertension" (MH). Research in the 1930s first demonstrated that blood pressures in the office were often far different from those out of the office, at a time when there was no effective treatment. International attention was focused on another imminent world war and a highly controversial election in the United States. Hypertension was not a priority for concern. From the 1950s onward: (i) epidemiology linked hypertension to risk of cardiovascular disease, (ii) effective and safe drugs for treatment of hypertension appeared, (iii) randomized clinical trials demonstrated that drug treatment of hypertension is highly effective for prevention of cardiovascular disease, and (iv) advances in technology led to development of small, portable devices for recording blood pressure noninvasively at home or during usual activities. Accurate measurement of blood pressure in "real life" is now necessary and feasible for appropriate diagnosis and assessment of treatment. Out-of-office blood pressure measurement is emerging as the standard of care for hypertension.

  1. Impact of ATLS guidelines, trauma team introduction, and 24-hour mortality due to severe trauma in a busy, metropolitan Italian hospital: A case control study.

    PubMed

    Magnone, Stefano; Allegri, Andrea; Belotti, Eugenia; Castelli, Claudio Carlo; Ceresoli, Marco; Coccolini, Federico; Manfredi, Roberto; Merli, Cecilia; Palamara, Fabrizio; Piazzalunga, Dario; Valetti, Tino Martino; Ansaloni, Luca

    2016-05-01

    Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) guidelines are widely accepted for use in initial management of trauma patients. The application of ATLS guidelines and introduction of management by means of trauma team (TT) both took place in April 2011. The aim of the present study was to evaluate related effects on mortality in the shock room (SR) and at 24 hours after admission. Data were retrieved by administrative software based on patient admission for trauma of at least 48 hours. Study period was from April 2011 to December 2012, and control period was from January 2007 to March 2011. All admitted patients were identified by first diagnosis (ICD 9-CM), excluding traumatic brain injuries, and only patients admitted to the general intensive care, general surgery, and orthopedics units were included. The control group (CG) included 198 patients; the study group (SG) included 141. Differences were determined in patient age, which was mean 45.2 years (SD: 19.2) in the CG and mean 49.3 years (SD±18.3) in the SG (p=0.03). Differences were not found regarding gender, length of hospital stay, or Injury Severity Score (ISS). Among the patients who died, no differences were found in terms of systolic blood pressure, metabolic acidosis, or packed red blood cell consumption. Mortality was significantly higher in the CG, compared to the SG (14.1% vs 7.1%, respectively; p=0.033; confidence interval [CI]: 0.21-0.95). Mortality in the shock room was significantly lower in the SG, compared to the CG (0.7% vs 7.1%, respectively; p=0.002; CI: 0.004-0.592). The introduction of ATLS guidelines and TT had a positive impact on mortality in the first 24 hours, both in the SR and after admission.

  2. Effects of the once-weekly glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist dulaglutide on ambulatory blood pressure and heart rate in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ferdinand, Keith C; White, William B; Calhoun, David A; Lonn, Eva M; Sager, Philip T; Brunelle, Rocco; Jiang, Honghua H; Threlkeld, Rebecca J; Robertson, Kenneth E; Geiger, Mary Jane

    2014-10-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists, used to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus, are associated with small reductions in systolic blood pressure (SBP) and increases in heart rate. However, findings based on clinic measurements do not adequately assess a drug's 24-hour pharmacodynamic profile. The effects of dulaglutide, a once-weekly glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, on BP and heart rate were investigated using ambulatory BP monitoring. Patients (n=755; 56±10 years; 81% white; 48% women), with type 2 diabetes mellitus, taking ≥1 oral antihyperglycemic medication, with a clinic BP between 90/60 and 140/90 mm Hg were randomized to dulaglutide (1.5 or 0.75 mg) or placebo subcutaneously for 26 weeks. Ambulatory BP monitoring was performed at baseline and at 4, 16, and 26 weeks. The primary end point was change from baseline to week 16 in mean 24-hour SBP, a tree gatekeeping strategy compared the effects of dulaglutide to placebo. Both doses of dulaglutide were noninferior to placebo for changes in 24-hour SBP and diastolic blood pressure, and dulaglutide 1.5 mg significantly reduced SBP (least squares mean difference [95% confidence interval]), -2.8 mm Hg [-4.6, -1.0]; P≤0.001). Dulaglutide 0.75 mg was noninferior to placebo (1.6 bpm; [0.3, 2.9]; P≤0.02) for 24-hour heart rate (least squares mean difference [95% confidence interval]), but dulaglutide 1.5 mg was not (2.8 bpm [1.5, 4.2]). Dulaglutide 1.5 mg was associated with a reduction in 24-hour SBP and an increase in 24-hour heart rate. The mechanisms responsible for the observed effects remain to be clarified. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Blood pressure behaviour during physical activity.

    PubMed

    Palatini, P

    1988-06-01

    Aerobic exercise is currently being recommended in addition to pharmacological therapy for lowering blood pressure levels in hypertensive patients, i.e. in subjects whose resting blood pressure levels exceed 145/90 mm Hg. On the other hand competitive sports are generally contraindicated in hypertensives, who are thought to be at increased risk of morbidity or mortality from their blood pressure levels. The present knowledge of blood pressure behaviour during isotonic physical activity is almost wholly based on the results obtained by means of the ergometric tests. Several maximal and submaximal exercise protocols have been introduced, but none has proved to be superior for diagnostic purposes. There is general agreement that the systolic blood pressure increase determined by isotonic exercise usually ranges from 50 to 70 mm Hg in both normotensive or hypertensive subjects. Diastolic blood pressure shows only minor changes in the normotensives, while in the hypertensives it tends to substantially increase because of their inability to adequately reduce their peripheral resistance. This mechanism may also explain the delay shown by the hypertensives in reaching pre-exercise blood pressure values during the recovery. On average diastolic blood pressure increases to a greater extent during bicycle ergometry than during treadmill, while no differences in exertional systolic blood pressure have been observed between the 2 tests. The results of several studies indicate that the blood pressure response to isotonic exercise is a marker for detection of hypertension earlier in the course of the disease, while resting blood pressure is still normal. According to some authors it is also of value in predicting future hypertension in individuals with borderline pressure levels. There are no conclusive data on the effect of training on blood pressure response to exercise. The majority of the published studies report small exertional pressure reductions after conditioning, which

  4. Sodium intake and blood pressure among US children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Yang, Quanhe; Zhang, Zefeng; Kuklina, Elena V; Fang, Jing; Ayala, Carma; Hong, Yuling; Loustalot, Fleetwood; Dai, Shifan; Gunn, Janelle P; Tian, Niu; Cogswell, Mary E; Merritt, Robert

    2012-10-01

    To assess the association between usual dietary sodium intake and blood pressure among US children and adolescents, overall and by weight status. Children and adolescents aged 8 to 18 years (n = 6235) who participated in NHANES 2003-2008 comprised the sample. Subjects' usual sodium intake was estimated by using multiple 24-hour dietary recalls. Linear or logistic regression was used to examine association between sodium intake and blood pressure or risk for pre-high blood pressure and high blood pressure (pre-HBP/HPB). Study subjects consumed an average of 3387 mg/day of sodium, and 37% were overweight/obese. Each 1000 mg per day sodium intake was associated with an increased SD score of 0.097 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.006-0.188, ∼1.0 mm Hg) in systolic blood pressure (SBP) among all subjects and 0.141 (95% CI: -0.010 to 0.298, ∼1.5 mm Hg) increase among overweight/obese subjects. Mean adjusted SBP increased progressively with sodium intake quartile, from 106.2 mm Hg (95% CI: 105.1-107.3) to 108.8 mm Hg (95% CI: 107.5-110.1) overall (P = .010) and from 109.0 mm Hg (95% CI: 107.2-110.8) to 112.8 mm Hg (95% CI: 110.7-114.9; P = .037) among those overweight/obese. Adjusted odds ratios comparing risk for pre-HBP/HPB among subjects in the highest versus lowest sodium intake quartile were 2.0 (95% CI: 0.95-4.1, P = .062) overall and 3.5 (95% CI: 1.3-9.2, P = .013) among those overweight/obese. Sodium intake and weight status appeared to have synergistic effects on risk for pre-HBP/HPB (relative excess risk for interaction = 0.29 (95% CI: 0.01-0.90, P < .05). Sodium intake is positively associated with SBP and risk for pre-HBP/HPB among US children and adolescents, and this association may be stronger among those who are overweight/obese.

  5. Derivation of a measure of systolic blood pressure mutability: a novel information theory-based metric from ambulatory blood pressure tests.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Danitza J; Vogel, Eugenio E; Saravia, Gonzalo; Stockins, Benjamin

    2016-03-01

    We provide ambulatory blood pressure (BP) exams with tools based on information theory to quantify fluctuations thus increasing the capture of dynamic test components. Data from 515 ambulatory 24-hour BP exams were considered. Average age was 54 years, 54% were women, and 53% were under BP treatment. The average systolic pressure (SP) was 127 ± 8 mm Hg. A data compressor (wlzip) designed to recognize meaningful information is invoked to measure mutability which is a form of dynamical variability. For patients with the same average SP, different mutability values are obtained which reflects the differences in dynamical variability. In unadjusted linear regression models, mutability had low association with the mean systolic BP (R(2) = 0.056; P < .000001) but larger association with the SP deviation (R(2) = 0.761; P < .001). Wlzip allows detecting levels of variability in SP that could be hazardous. This new indicator can be easily added to the 24-hour BP monitors improving information toward diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in hypertensive adolescents.

    PubMed

    Fixler, D E; Wallace, J M; Thornton, W E; Dimmitt, P

    1990-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring to identify youths with chronic blood pressure elevation. Nineteen adolescent boys were studied, ten had 5-year average systolic or diastolic pressures above the 95th percentile, nine had normal pressure. A Del Mar Avionics Pressurometer III system recorded an average of 121 readings on each subject. The coefficients of variation for pressure were similar for hypertensive and normotensive individuals. During classes, eight of the ten hypertensive youths had elevated pressures in over half of the measurements. Also during these classes eight of ten hypertensive boys had average systolic or diastolic pressure above the 95th percentile, whereas only one of nine normotensive boys had average pressures above this level. We suggest that schooltime ambulatory pressures may be most useful in classifying the blood pressure trend in a youth.

  7. Preeclampsia and High Blood Pressure During Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... thrombophilia , or lupus • are obese •had in vitro fertilization What are the risks for my baby if ... blood cells. Hypertension: High blood pressure. In Vitro Fertilization: A procedure in which an egg is removed ...

  8. Effects of age on blood pressure (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... become less elastic with age. The average blood pressure increases from 120/70 to 150/90 and may persist slightly high, even if treated. The blood vessels respond more slowly to a change in body ...

  9. Preeclampsia and High Blood Pressure During Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... mellitus , thrombophilia , or lupus • are obese •had in vitro fertilization What are the risks for my baby if ... red blood cells. Hypertension: High blood pressure. In Vitro Fertilization: A procedure in which an egg is removed ...

  10. Sustained Blood Pressure Responding during Synthetic Work.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-15

    split-half reliabilities of both heart rate and mean * blood pressure were high during task performance. Significant correlations were observed between... blood pressure responses elicited by :1 16 an anagram task showed a high test-retest reliability, even over an interval of 13 months. Examination of the...8217AD-AI5 733 JOHNS HOPKINS UNIV BALTIMORE MO DEPT OF PSYCHIATRY F/6 6/5 SUSTAINED BLOOD PRESSURE RESPONDING DURING SYNTHETIC WORK.(U) JUN A2 R L RAY

  11. Biofeedback With Implanted Blood-Pressure Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rischell, Robert E.

    1988-01-01

    Additional uses found for equipment described in "Implanted Blood-Pressure-Measuring Device" (GSC-13042). Implanted with device electronic circuitry that measures, interprets, and transmits data via inductive link through patient's skin to external receiver. Receiver includes audible alarm generator activated when patient's blood pressure exceeds predetermined threshold. Also included in receiver a blood-pressure display, recorder, or both, for use by patient or physician.

  12. High blood pressure tests (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... factors. These lab tests include urinalysis, blood cell count, blood chemistry (potassium, sodium, creatinine, fasting glucose, total cholesterol and HDL cholesterol), and an ECG (electrocardiogram). ...

  13. How to Prevent High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider will use a gauge, a stethoscope or electronic sensor, and a blood pressure cuff. For most ... pressure. Stress management techniques include exercising, listening to music, focusing on something calm or peaceful, and meditating. ...

  14. Blood pressure measurement--an overview.

    PubMed

    Dieterle, Thomas

    2012-01-27

    Arterial hypertension continues to represent the leading cause of morbidity and mortality world-wide. Diagnosis and therapy of arterial hypertension require adequate blood pressure measurements. Blood pressure is affected by constitutional and environmental factors as well as the measurement procedure itself, inducing substantial uncertainty with regard to adequate diagnosis and control of arterial hypertension. Therefore, current guidelines recommend that the diagnosis of arterial hypertension should not be solely based on conventional blood pressure measurements in the physician's office or in the hospital, but also on out-of-office ambulatory or home blood pressure measurements using clinically validated semi-automated or automated blood pressure measurement devices. Despite the enormous progress in the field of arterial hypertension, many aspects of blood pressure measurement require further intensive investigation, for example blood pressure measurement in special populations and distinct clinical situations, as well as the applicability and validation of novel measurement approaches and devices. This article provides an overview of current methods and trends in the field of non-invasive blood pressure measurement, an update on current clinical guidelines and an overview of blood pressure measurement in special populations.

  15. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in children.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rajiv; Dionne, Janis

    2011-02-01

    Recently there have been great advances in the use of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) in children. A major boost has been the publication of normative data for blood pressure in children. ABPM has been able to detect significant differences in blood pressure in many disease states including chronic renal failure, polycystic kidney disease and post renal transplantation and has helped in identifying both white coat hypertension and masked hypertension. Current evidence does suggest that sole reliance on clinic blood pressure might not be always appropriate and ABPM has a definite role in pediatric hypertension.

  16. Biomechanical evaluation of three fixation modalities for preperitoneal inguinal hernia repair: a 24-hour postoperative study in pigs.

    PubMed

    Guérin, Gaëtan; Bourges, Xavier; Turquier, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Tacks and sutures ensure a strong fixation of meshes, but they can be associated with pain and discomfort. Less invasive methods are now available. Three fixation modalities were compared: the ProGrip™ laparoscopic self-fixating mesh; the fibrin glue Tisseel™ with Bard™ Soft Mesh; and the SorbaFix™ absorbable fixation system with Bard™ Soft Mesh. Meshes (6 cm ×6 cm) were implanted in the preperitoneal space of swine. Samples were explanted 24 hours after surgery. Centered defects were created, and samples (either ten or eleven per fixation type) were loaded in a pressure chamber. For each sample, the pressure, the mesh displacement through the defect, and the measurements of the contact area were recorded. At all pressures tested, the ProGrip™ laparoscopic self-fixating mesh both exhibited a significantly lower displacement through the defect and retained a significantly higher percentage of its initial contact area than either the Bard™ Soft Mesh with Tisseel™ system or the Bard™ Soft Mesh with SorbaFix™ absorbable fixation system. Dislocations occurred with the Bard™ Soft Mesh with Tisseel™ system and with the Bard™ Soft Mesh with SorbaFix™ absorbable fixation system at physiological pressure (,225 mmHg). No dislocation was recorded for the ProGrip™ laparoscopic self-fixating mesh. At 24 hours after implantation, the mechanical fixation of the ProGrip™ laparoscopic self-fixating mesh was found to be significantly better than the fixation of the Tisseel™ system or the SorbaFix™ absorbable fixation system.

  17. Embedded programmable blood pressure monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Md. Mahmud-Ul; Islam, Md. Kafiul; Shawon, Mehedi Azad; Nowrin, Tasnuva Faruk

    2010-02-01

    A more efficient newer algorithm of detecting systolic and diastolic pressure of human body along with a complete package of an effective user-friendly embedded programmable blood pressure monitoring system has been proposed in this paper to reduce the overall workload of medical personals as well as to monitor patient's condition more conveniently and accurately. Available devices for measuring blood pressure have some problems and limitations in case of both analog and digital devices. The sphygmomanometer, being analog device, is still being used widely because of its reliability and accuracy over digital ones. But it requires a skilled person to measure the blood pressure and obviously not being automated as well as time consuming. Our proposed system being a microcontroller based embedded system has the advantages of the available digital blood pressure machines along with a much improved form and has higher accuracy at the same time. This system can also be interfaced with computer through serial port/USB to publish the measured blood pressure data on the LAN or internet. The device can be programmed to determine the patient's blood pressure after each certain interval of time in a graphical form. To sense the pressure of human body, a pressure to voltage transducer is used along with a cuff in our system. During the blood pressure measurement cycle, the output voltage of the transducer is taken by the built-in ADC of microcontroller after an amplifier stage. The recorded data are then processed and analyzed using the effective software routine to determine the blood pressure of the person under test. Our proposed system is thus expected to certainly enhance the existing blood pressure monitoring system by providing accuracy, time efficiency, user-friendliness and at last but not the least the 'better way of monitoring patient's blood pressure under critical care' all together at the same time.

  18. Lifetime racial/ethnic discrimination and ambulatory blood pressure: The moderating effect of age

    PubMed Central

    Moody, Danielle L. Beatty; Waldstein, Shari R.; Tobin, Jonathan; Cassels, Andrea; Schwartz, Joseph C.; Brondolo, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine if the relationships of lifetime discrimination to ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) varied as a function of age in a sample of Black and Latino(a) adults ages 19 – 65. Methods Participants were 607 Black (n = 318) and Latino(a) (n = 289) adults (49% female) who completed the Perceived Ethnic Discrimination Questionnaire-Community Version (PEDQ-CV), which assesses lifetime exposure to racism/ethnic discrimination. They were outfitted with an ABP monitor to assess systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP, DBP) across a 24-hour period. Mixed-level modeling was conducted to examine potential interactive effects of lifetime discrimination and age to 24-hour, daytime, and nighttime ABP after adjustment for demographic, socioeconomic, personality and life stress characteristics, and substance consumption covariates (e.g., smoking, alcohol). Results There were significant interactions of Age × Lifetime Discrimination on 24-hour and daytime DBP (ps ≤ .04), and in particular significant interactions for the Social Exclusion component of Lifetime Discrimination. Post-hoc probing of the interactions revealed the effects of Lifetime Discrimination on DBP were seen for older, but not younger participants. Lifetime discrimination was significantly positively associated with nocturnal SBP, and these effects were not moderated by age. All associations of Lifetime Discrimination to ABP remained significant controlling for recent exposure to discrimination as well as all other covariates. Conclusions Exposure to racial/ethnic discrimination across the life course is associated with elevated ABP in middle to older aged Black and Latino(a) adults. Further research is needed to understand the mechanisms linking discrimination to ABP over the life course. PMID:27018724

  19. Beetroot supplementation lowers daily systolic blood pressure in older, overweight subjects.

    PubMed

    Jajja, A; Sutyarjoko, A; Lara, J; Rennie, K; Brandt, K; Qadir, O; Siervo, M

    2014-10-01

    Although inorganic nitrate and beetroot juice supplementation are associated with decreased systolic blood pressure (BP), these results have primarily been obtained from short-term trials that focused on healthy young adults. Therefore, we hypothesized that oral supplementation of beetroot juice concentrate would decrease systolic BP in overweight older participants but that the decline in BP would not be sustained after a 1-week interruption of the beetroot juice supplementation. For 3 weeks, 24 participants were randomized to either the beetroot juice concentrate or blackcurrant juice group, with a 1-week postsupplementation phase (week 4). Changes in systolic and diastolic BP were assessed during the supplementation and postsupplementation phases. Blood pressure was measured using 3 different methods: (1) resting clinic BP, (2) 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring, and (3) home monitoring of daily resting BP. The first 2 methods were applied at baseline and after weeks 3 and 4. Daily measurements were conducted throughout the study, with 21 subjects completing the study (beetroot/blackcurrant = 10/11; male/female = 12/9; age = 62.0 ± 1.4 years; body mass index = 30.1 ± 1.2 kg/m(2)). After 3 weeks, beetroot juice supplementation was not associated with significant changes in resting clinic BP or 24-hour ABPM. Conversely, beetroot juice concentrate reduced daily systolic BP after 3 weeks (-7.3 ± 5.9 mm Hg, P = .02); however, the effect was not maintained after the interruption of the supplementation (week 4, 2.8 ± 6.1 mm Hg, P = .09). In overweight older subjects, beetroot juice concentrate supplementation was associated with beneficial effects on daily systolic BP, although the effects were not significant when measured by 24-hour ABPM or resting clinic BP.

  20. Renal Denervation in a Real Life Setting: A Gradual Decrease in Home Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Beeftink, Martine M. A.; Spiering, Wilko; Bots, Michiel L.; Verloop, Willemien L.; De Jager, Rosa L.; Sanders, Margreet F.; Vonken, Evert-jan; Blankestijn, Peter J.; Voskuil, Michiel

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the blood pressure dynamics after renal denervation through monthly home blood pressure measurements throughout the first 12 months. Methods A cohort of 70 patients performed highly standardized monthly home blood pressure monitoring during the first year after denervation according to the European Society of Hypertension guidelines. At baseline and 12 months follow-up, office and ambulatory blood pressure as well as routine physical and laboratory assessment was performed. Results Home blood pressure decreased with a rate of 0.53 mmHg/month (95% CI 0.20 to 0.86) systolic and 0.26 mmHg/month (95% CI 0.08 to 0.44) diastolic throughout 12 months of follow-up, while the use of antihypertensive medication remained stable (+0.03 daily defined doses/month, 95% CI -0.01 to 0.08). On average, a 12 month reduction of 8.1 mmHg (95% CI 4.2 to 12.0) was achieved in home systolic blood pressure, 9.3 mmHg (95% CI -14.2 to -4.4) as measured by 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and 15.9 mmHg (95% CI -23.8 to -7.9) on office measurements. Conclusion Blood pressure reduction after renal denervation occurs as a gradual decrease that extends to at least one-year follow-up. Home monitoring seems a suitable alternative for ambulatory blood pressure monitoring after renal denervation. PMID:27631608

  1. Nutraceuticals for blood pressure control.

    PubMed

    Sirtori, Cesare R; Arnoldi, Anna; Cicero, Arrigo F G

    2015-01-01

    Significant effects on blood pressure (BP) have been reported from large nutritional interventions, particularly the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) and the Mediterranean diet. In more recent years, numerous studies have investigated the possible BP-lowering effect of different nutraceuticals; these range from specific foods to minerals, lipids, whole proteins, peptides, amino acids, probiotics, and vitamins. While a very large body of evidence supports the use of potassium, L-arginine, vitamins C and D, cocoa flavonoids, beetroot juice, some probiotics, coenzyme Q10, controlled-release melatonin, aged garlic extract, and coffee, the use of other nutraceuticals, such as green tea, flaxseed, and resveratrol, has not as yet been supported by adequate evidence. In some cases, e.g. proteins/peptides, the responsible component needs also to be fully uncovered. Finally, while for most of the products only short-term studies are available, with no specific end-points, an ongoing very large prospective study on chocolate flavanols will answer the question whether this may reduce cardiovascular risk. Thus, in addition to data on long-term safety, further clinical research is advisable in order to identify, among active nutraceuticals, those with the best cost-effectiveness and risk-benefit ratio for a wide use in the general population with a raised cardiovascular risk consequent to uncomplicated hypertension.

  2. The DASH diet and blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Craddick, Shirley R; Elmer, Patricia J; Obarzanek, Eva; Vollmer, William M; Svetkey, Laura P; Swain, Martha C

    2003-11-01

    High blood pressure (also called hypertension) is one of the most important and common risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) and other chronic diseases. National guidelines recommend that all individuals with blood pressure readings of 120/80 mm Hg or higher adopt healthy lifestyle habits, including the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet, to manage their blood pressure. The DASH diet, which is high in fruits, vegetables, and low-fat dairy products and reduced in fat, has been shown in large, randomized, controlled trials to reduce blood pressure significantly. The DASH diet also has been shown to reduce blood cholesterol and homocysteine levels and to enhance the benefits of antihypertensive drug therapy. The DASH diet should be promoted, along with maintaining healthy weight, reducing sodium intake, increasing regular physical activity, and limiting alcohol intake, for lowering blood pressure and reducing the risk of CVD.

  3. Determinants of blood pressure in Navajo adolescents.

    PubMed

    Coulehan, J L; Topper, M D; Arena, V C; Welty, T K

    1990-01-01

    Hypertension is becoming more common among Navajo people, especially among young men. In a group of 580 Navajo adolescents, we looked for factors associated with variations in blood pressure level. Using our criteria, 11.1% of adolescent males and 1.6% of females had an elevated screening blood pressure. In males, blood pressure was a function of age only, and not significantly related either to obesity (body mass index) or measures of acculturation and personal adjustment. In females, blood pressure was not related to age, but was associated with body mass index. Systolic pressure in females was also associated with poor personal adjustment. Level of acculturation (by our index) had no bearing on blood pressure level in this population.

  4. Perioperative Blood Pressure Control and Management.

    PubMed

    Duke-Novakovski, Tanya; Carr, Anthony

    2015-09-01

    Blood pressure monitoring and management is a vital part of the perianesthetic period. Disturbances in blood pressure, especially hypotension, can have significant impacts on the well-being of small animal patients. There are a variety of mechanisms present to control blood pressure, including ultra-short-, short-, and long-term mechanisms. Several conditions can contribute to decreased blood pressure, including anesthetics, tension pneumothorax, intermittent positive pressure ventilation, hypoxemia, hypercapnia, surgical positioning, and abdominal distension. If hypotension is encountered, the initial response is to provide appropriate fluid therapy. If this is inadequate, other interventions can be used to increase blood pressure and thereby increase perfusion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Palpatory Method of Measuring Diastolic Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Dinesh; Bhaskaran, M

    2010-01-01

    Background: Most common method for measuring blood pressure is palpatory but only systolic pressure can be measured with this method. In this study we are describing palpatory method of measuring diastolic blood pressure as well. Patients & Methods: We have studied in 200 patients and compared systolic as well as diastolic blood pressures with two methods, auscutatory and palpatory. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure were measured by one of the authors with new palpatory method and noted down. Then an independent observer, who was blinded to the palpatory method's values, measured blood pressure by auscultatory method and noted down. The values were compared in term of range and percentage. Results: The difference were analysed and found that 102 (51%) patients had systolic and diastolic blood pressure measured by palpatory method, within ± 2 mmHg of auscutatory method, 37 (19%) patients had within ± 4 mmHg, 52 (25%) patients had same readings as with auscutatory method, and in 9 (0.5%) patients it could not be measured. Conclusion: The palpatory method would be very useful where frequent blood pressure measurement are being done manually like in wards, in busy OPD, patient on treadmill and also whenever stethoscope is not available. The blood pressure can be measured in noisy environment too. PMID:21547184

  6. Blood pressure and blood lead concentration in bus drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, D.S.; Osterloh, J.; Becker, C.E.; Bernard, B.; Smith, A.H.; Fisher, J.M.; Syme, S.L.; Holman, B.L.; Johnston, T.

    1988-06-01

    San Francisco bus drivers have an increased prevalence of hypertension. This study examined relationships between blood lead concentration and blood pressure in 342 drivers. The analysis reported in this study was limited to subjects not on treatment for hypertension (n = 288). Systolic and diastolic pressure varied from 102 to 173 mm Hg and from 61 to 105 mm Hg, respectively. The blood lead concentration varied from 2 to 15 ..mu..g/dL. The relationship between blood pressure and the logarithm of blood lead concentration was examined using multiple regression analysis. Covariates included age, body mass index, sex, race, and caffeine intake. The largest regression coefficient relating systolic blood pressure and blood lead concentration was 1.8 mm Hg/ln (..mu..g/dL). The coefficient for diastolic blood pressure was 2.5 mm Hg/ln (..mu..g/dL). These findings suggest effects of lead exposure at lower blood lead concentrations than those concentrations that have previously been linked with increases in blood pressure.

  7. Correlation of 2 Hours and 24 Hours Creatinine Clearance in Renal Donors After Unilateral Nephrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Devanand, Viji; Chithrapavai, S.U.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The kidney performs numerous specialised functions in an effort to maintain constancy of the internal composition of body fluids. Aim: This study was done to ascertain the feasibility of estimating creatinine clearance as an outpatient procedure over a 2 hours period instead of doing the study over a 24 hours period. Material and Methods: Eighteen renal donors, Twelve females and Six males, who were closely related to recipients, were chosen. This study was done on renal donors who attended the Nephrology Department of Rajiv Gandhi Government General Hospital, Madras Medical College, Chennai–03 India. To estimate creatinine clearance in 24 hours urine, 24 hours urine sample was collected from 9 am on the first day to 9 am on the next day, after first emptying the bladder. Then, creatinine clearance was calculated by using standard formula, CC=UV/ Pt X 1.73m2/BSA of the individual. Results: There was no significant differences in mean creatinine clearance values by collecting 2 hours and 24 hours urine samples from renal donors in different stages of post nephrectomy period. It has been shown that 2 hours collection of urine sample is as good as 24 hours urine sample for estimating creatinine clearance. Conclusion: Hence it was proved that measurement of creatinine clearance could be done as an outpatient procedure, as the patient needed only 2 hours of hospital stay. PMID:24298453

  8. Effect of variable energy served on 24-hour energy intake in 16 preschools, Chicago, Illinois, 2007.

    PubMed

    Lown, Debbie A; Fitzgibbon, Marian L; Dyer, Alan; Schiffer, Linda; Gomez, Sandra; Braunschweig, Carol L

    2011-05-01

    The effect of varying portion size in a natural environment on the self-regulation of 24-hour energy intake has not been evaluated. We studied students at 16 preschools in Chicago to determine the effect of meals with variable energy and macronutrients on the amount consumed over a 24-hour period (ie, at preschool and outside of preschool). The food items and portion sizes served at 16 preschools in the Chicago Public Schools early childhood education programs were observed for 3 to 8 days. Children were assessed for total energy and selected macronutrients consumed at preschool and outside of preschool for a 24-hour period; their data were pooled and reported by school. The students were predominantly African American (96%); on average, 32 students (range, 21-38) participated at each of the 16 preschools, and the age range of students was 4.0 to 4.5 years. The energy served at preschools ranged from 48% to 90% of the daily recommended energy allowance (REA). The mean energy intake at school was significantly higher (39% of REA) at 2 preschools, including 1 that served 90% of the REA. Mean energy consumption outside of preschool and total 24-hour energy consumption did not differ by preschool, adjusting for body mass index z score and sex. The preschools served meals that widely varied by portion size and energy; however, this variation did not result in differences in mean 24-hour nutrient intakes for the students attending these schools.

  9. Insights about serum sodium behavior after 24 hours of continuous renal replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Thiago Gomes; Martins, Cassia Pimenta Barufi; Mendes, Pedro Vitale; Besen, Bruno Adler Maccagnan Pinheiro; Zampieri, Fernando Godinho; Park, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical and laboratorial factors associated with serum sodium variation during continuous renal replacement therapy and to assess whether the perfect admixture formula could predict 24-hour sodium variation. Methods Thirty-six continuous renal replacement therapy sessions of 33 patients, in which the affluent prescription was unchanged during the first 24 hours, were retrieved from a prospective collected database and then analyzed. A mixed linear model was performed to investigate the factors associated with large serum sodium variations (≥ 8mEq/L), and a Bland-Altman plot was generated to assess the agreement between the predicted and observed variations. Results In continuous renal replacement therapy 24-hour sessions, SAPS 3 (p = 0.022) and baseline hypernatremia (p = 0.023) were statistically significant predictors of serum sodium variations ≥ 8mEq/L in univariate analysis, but only hypernatremia demonstrated an independent association (β = 0.429, p < 0.001). The perfect admixture formula for sodium prediction at 24 hours demonstrated poor agreement with the observed values. Conclusions Hypernatremia at the time of continuous renal replacement therapy initiation is an important factor associated with clinically significant serum sodium variation. The use of 4% citrate or acid citrate dextrose - formula A 2.2% as anticoagulants was not associated with higher serum sodium variations. A mathematical prediction for the serum sodium concentration after 24 hours was not feasible. PMID:27410407

  10. The Effect of Ex Situ Perfusion in a Swine Limb Vascularized Composite Tissue Allograft on Survival up to 24 Hours.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Kagan; Rojas-Pena, Alvaro; Mendias, Christopher L; Bryner, Benjamin S; Toomasian, Cory; Bartlett, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    To test the potential for the ex situ limb perfusion system to prolong limb allograft survival up to 24 hours. We used 20 swine for the study. In group 1 (control), 4 limbs were perfused with heparin solution and preserved at 4°C for 6 hours. In group 2, 4 limbs were perfused with autologous blood at 27°C to 32°C for 24 hours. In both groups, limbs were transplanted orthotopically to recipients and monitored for 12 hours. In addition to perfusion parameters, we recorded perfusate gases and electrolytes (pH, pCO2, pO2, O2 saturation, Na, K, Cl, Ca, HCO3, glucose, and lactate) and obtained functional electrostimulation hourly throughout the experiment. Histology samples were obtained for TUNEL staining and single-muscle fiber contractility testing. In both groups, hemodynamic variables of circulation remained stable throughout the experiment. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation remained intact until the end of reperfusion in group 2 vs no response in group 1. In group 2, a gradual increase in lactate levels during pump perfusion returned to normal after transplantation. Compared with the contralateral limb in group 2, single-muscle fiber contractility testing showed no significant difference at the end of the experiment. We demonstrated extended limb survival up to 24 hours using normothermic pulsatile perfusion and autologous blood. Successful prolongation of limb survival using ex situ perfusion methods provides with more time for revascularization of an extremity. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Twenty-Four-Hour Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring in Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this health technology assessment was to determine the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) for hypertension. Clinical Need: Condition and Target Population Hypertension occurs when either systolic blood pressure, the pressure in the artery when the heart contracts, or diastolic blood pressure, the pressure in the artery when the heart relaxes between beats, are consistently high. Blood pressure (BP) that is consistently more than 140/90 mmHg (systolic/diastolic) is considered high. A lower threshold, greater than 130/80 mmHg (systolic/diastolic), is set for individuals with diabetes or chronic kidney disease. In 2006 and 2007, the age-standardized incidence rate of diagnosed hypertension in Canada was 25.8 per 1,000 (450,000 individuals were newly diagnosed). During the same time period, 22.7% of adult Canadians were living with diagnosed hypertension. A smaller proportion of Canadians are unaware they have hypertension; therefore, the estimated number of Canadians affected by this disease may be higher. Diagnosis and management of hypertension are important, since elevated BP levels are related to the risk of cardiovascular disease, including stroke. In Canada in 2003, the costs to the health care system related to the diagnosis, treatment, and management of hypertension were over $2.3 billion (Cdn). Technology The 24-hour ABPM device consists of a standard inflatable cuff attached to a small computer weighing about 500 grams, which is worn over the shoulder or on a belt. The technology is noninvasive and fully automated. The device takes BP measurements every 15 to 30 minutes over a 24-to 28-hour time period, thus providing extended, continuous BP recordings even during a patient’s normal daily activities. Information on the multiple BP measurements can be downloaded to a computer. The main detection methods used by the device are auscultation and

  12. How Is High Blood Pressure Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... secondary high blood pressure, he or she will work to treat the other condition or change the medicine suspected of causing your ... when the medications they are taking do not work well for them or another medical condition is leading to uncontrolled blood pressure. Health care ...

  13. The importance of prompt blood pressure control.

    PubMed

    Basile, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Hypertension affects almost one-third of adults in the United States, but blood pressure is adequately controlled in only about 50% to 60% of persons with treated hypertension. Abundant clinical trial evidence has shown that antihypertensive therapy significantly reduces the risk of vascular events, and meta-analyses of observational and clinical trials have shown that greater reductions in blood pressure are associated with greater reductions in risk. Recent trials have also suggested that prompt control of blood pressure is beneficial in high-risk patients with hypertension. A post hoc analysis of a trial comparing an angiotensin II receptor blocker-based program with a calcium channel blocker-based treatment regimen found that the blood pressure response after 1 month (regardless of the drug used) predicted the risk of vascular events and survival. Therapy with > or =2 medications given separately or as a fixed combination is more likely than monotherapy to lower blood pressure to goal in part because drugs from different classes target different mechanisms that regulate blood pressure. Moreover, the likelihood of achieving blood pressure goals is greater if the time to achieve control is shortened, and prompt control of blood pressure is more likely with multiple-drug therapy than with monotherapy.

  14. Dietary sodium intake and arterial blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Dumler, Francis

    2009-01-01

    We sought to summarize major recent studies in the field of dietary sodium intake and arterial blood pressure, and discuss the following trials. INTERSALT: Sodium intake correlates with the rise in blood pressure with age, but not with the prevalence of hypertension. The population study identified a minimal impact of sodium intake on blood pressure (0.9 mm Hg/10 mmol difference in salt intake). DASH: This diet induced significant reductions in blood pressure compared with the control diet. Further decreases were observed with DASH and a 50 mmol/day sodium intake. VANGUARD: Blood pressure was inversely related to urinary potassium, calcium and magnesium but not to sodium excretion. TONE: Cardiovascular events were highest in the usual care group (83%) and lowest in the sodium reduction-plus-weight loss group (56%). META-ANALYSIS: A systematic review of 11 long-term controlled randomized trials reported a small decrease (1.1 mm Hg) in median systolic but not diastolic blood pressure with a reduced dietary sodium intake. In conclusion, (1) sodium restriction in hypertensive patients reduces blood pressure, and (2) the long-term impact of reduced salt intake on blood pressure, mortality, and morbidity remains to be defined.

  15. Blood Pressure. Instructor's Packet. Learning Activity Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hime, Kirsten

    This instructor's packet accompanies the learning activity package (LAP) on blood pressure. Contents included in the packet are a time sheet, suggested uses for the LAP, an instruction sheet, final LAP reviews, a final LAP review answer key, a pupil performance checklist, a handout on blood pressure, and student completion cards to issue to…

  16. High Blood Pressure Often Undiagnosed, Untreated

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. More Health News on: Heart Attack High Blood Pressure Stroke Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Heart Attack High Blood Pressure Stroke ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated ...

  17. Determinants of Blood Pressure in Navajo Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coulehan, John L.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Among 580 Navajo adolescents, 11.1 percent of males and 1.6 percent of females had high blood pressure. Blood pressure was related to age in males and to body mass index in females but was not related to level of acculturation or traditionality. Contains 17 references. (SV)

  18. Determinants of Blood Pressure in Navajo Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coulehan, John L.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Among 580 Navajo adolescents, 11.1 percent of males and 1.6 percent of females had high blood pressure. Blood pressure was related to age in males and to body mass index in females but was not related to level of acculturation or traditionality. Contains 17 references. (SV)

  19. Non-24-Hour Sleep-Wake Rhythm Disorder in Sighted and Blind Patients.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Makoto; Lockley, Steven W

    2015-12-01

    Non-24-hour sleep-wake rhythm disorder (N24SWD) is a cyclic debilitating circadian rhythm sleep disorder characterized by an inability to sleep on a 24-hour schedule. Individuals isolated from a 24-hour light-dark cycle exhibit sleep-wake cycles different from 24 hours. Relatively rare in sighted patients, it may be associated with delayed sleep-wake rhythm disorder or psychiatric disorders. It is more common in totally blind individuals owing to the lack of light information reaching the circadian pacemaker in the hypothalamus. We review the clinical characteristics of patients with N24SWD, discuss the biological mechanisms that may underlie its development, and describe treatment strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Raised intracranial pressure and cerebral blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, I. H.; Rowan, J. O.; Harper, A. M.; Jennett, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    Changes in cerebral blood flow during incremental increases of intracranial pressure produced by infusion of fluid into the cisterna magna were studied in anaesthetized baboons. Cerebral blood flow remained constant at intracranial pressure levels up to approximately 50 mm Hg. At intracranial pressure levels between 50-96 mm Hg a marked increase in cerebral blood flow occurred, associated with the development of systemic hypertension and changes in cerebrovascular resistance. Further increases of intracranial pressure led to a progressive fall in cerebral blood flow. Prior section of the cervical cord prevented both the increase in cerebral blood flow and the systemic hypertension. Alteration of cerebral perfusion pressure by bleeding during the hyperaemia in a further group of animals suggested that autoregulation was at least partially preserved during this phase. After maximum hyperaemia had occurred, however, autoregulation appeared to be lost. The clinical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:4624687

  1. Ambulatory blood pressure in untreated and treated hypertensive patients at high altitude: the High Altitude Cardiovascular Research-Andes study.

    PubMed

    Bilo, Grzegorz; Villafuerte, Francisco C; Faini, Andrea; Anza-Ramírez, Cecilia; Revera, Miriam; Giuliano, Andrea; Caravita, Sergio; Gregorini, Francesca; Lombardi, Carolina; Salvioni, Elisabetta; Macarlupu, Jose Luis; Ossoli, Deborah; Landaveri, Leah; Lang, Morin; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe; Sosa, José Manuel; Mancia, Giuseppe; Parati, Gianfranco

    2015-06-01

    Blood pressure increases during acute exposure to high altitude in healthy humans. However, little is known on altitude effects in hypertensive subjects or on the treatment efficacy in this condition. Objectives of High Altitude Cardiovascular Research (HIGHCARE)-Andes Lowlanders Study were to investigate the effects of acute high-altitude exposure on 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure in hypertensive subjects and to assess antihypertensive treatment efficacy in this setting. One hundred untreated subjects with mild hypertension (screening blood pressure, 144.1±9.8 mm Hg systolic, 92.0±7.5 mm Hg diastolic) were randomized to double-blind placebo or to telmisartan 80 mg+modified release nifedipine 30 mg combination. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was performed off-treatment, after 6 weeks of treatment at sea level, on treatment during acute exposure to high altitude (3260 m) and immediately after return to sea level. Eighty-nine patients completed the study (age, 56.4±17.6 years; 52 men/37 women; body mass index, 28.2±3.5 kg/m(2)). Twenty-four-hour systolic blood pressure increased at high altitude in both groups (placebo, 11.0±9 mm Hg; P<0.001 and active treatment, 8.1±10.4 mm Hg; P<0.001). Active treatment reduced 24-hour systolic blood pressure both at sea level and at high altitude (147.9±11.1 versus 132.6±12.4 mm Hg for placebo versus treated; P<0.001; 95% confidence interval of the difference 10.9-19.9 mm Hg) and was well tolerated. Similar results were obtained for diastolic, for daytime blood pressure, and for nighttime blood pressure. Treatment was well tolerated in all conditions. Our study demonstrates that (1) 24-hour blood pressure increases significantly during acute high-altitude exposure in hypertensive subjects and (2) treatment with angiotensin receptor blocker-calcium channel blocker combination is effective and safe in this condition. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01830530. © 2015

  2. Vascular Health Assessment of The Hypertensive Patients (VASOTENS) Registry: Study Protocol of an International, Web-Based Telemonitoring Registry for Ambulatory Blood Pressure and Arterial Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Parati, Gianfranco; Avolio, Alberto; Rogoza, Anatoly N; Kotovskaya, Yulia V; Mulè, Giuseppe; Muiesan, Maria Lorenza; Orlova, Iana A; Grigoricheva, Elena A; Cardona Muñoz, Ernesto; Zelveian, Parounak H; Pereira, Telmo; Peixoto Maldonado, João Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypertension guidelines recommend ambulatory blood pressure (ABP), central aortic pressure (CAP), and pulse wave velocity (PWV) as parameters for estimating blood pressure (BP) control and vascular impairment. Recent advances in technology have enabled devices to combine non-invasive estimation of these parameters over the 24-hour ABP monitoring. However, currently there is limited evidence on the usefulness of such an approach for routine hypertension management. Objective We recently launched an investigator-initiated, international, multicenter, observational, prospective study, the Vascular health Assessment Of The Hypertensive patients (VASOTENS) Registry, aimed at (1) evaluating non-invasive 24-hour ABP and arterial stiffness estimates (through 24-hour pulse wave analysis, PWA) in hypertensive subjects undergoing ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) for clinical reasons; (2) assessing the changes in estimates following treatment; (3) weighing the impact of 24-hour PWA on target organ damage and cardiovascular prognosis; (4) assessing the relationship between arterial stiffness, BP absolute mean level and variability, and prognosis; and (5) validating the use of a 24-hour PWA electronic health (e-health) solution for hypertension screening. Methods Approximately 2000 subjects, referred to 20 hypertension clinics for routine diagnostic evaluation and follow-up of hypertension of any severity or stage, will be recruited. Data collection will include ABPM, performed with a device allowing simultaneous non-invasive assessment of 24-hour CAP and arterial stiffness (BPLab), and clinical data (including cardiovascular outcomes). As recommended by current guidelines, each patient will be followed-up with visits occurring at regular intervals (ideally every 6 months, and not less than once a year depending on disease severity). A Web-based telemedicine platform (THOLOMEUS) will be used for data collection. The use of the telemedicine system will allow

  3. Raised intracranial pressure and cerebral blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, I. H.; Rowan, J. O.

    1974-01-01

    Pressure changes within the venous outflow tract from the brain were studied in anaesthetized baboons. Segmental vascular resistance changes were also calculated and the results correlated with the changes in cerebral blood flow, measured by the 133Xenon clearance method. Three different methods were used to raise intracranial pressure: cisterna magna infusion, a supratentorial subdural balloon, and an infratentorial subdural balloon. A close correlation was found between the cortical vein pressure and intracranial pressure with all methods of raising intracranial pressure: the overall correlation coefficient was 0·98. In the majority of animals sagittal sinus pressure showed little change through a wide range of intracranial pressure. In three of the six animals in the cisterna magna infusion group, however, sagittal sinus pressure increased to levels approaching the intracranial pressure during the later stages of intracranial hypertension. Jugular venous pressure showed little change with increasing intracranial pressure. The relationship between cerebral prefusion pressure and cerebral blood flow differed according to the method of increasing intracranial pressure. This was due to differing patterns of change in prevenous vascular resistance as venous resistance increased progressively with increasing pressure in all three groups. The present results confirm, therefore, the validity of the current definition of cerebral perfusion pressure—that is, cerebral perfusion pressure is equal to mean arterial pressure minus mean intracranial pressure—by demonstrating that intracranial pressure does represent the effective cerebral venous outflow pressure. Images PMID:4209160

  4. Agreement between 24-hour salt ingestion and sodium excretion in a controlled environment.

    PubMed

    Lerchl, Kathrin; Rakova, Natalia; Dahlmann, Anke; Rauh, Manfred; Goller, Ulrike; Basner, Mathias; Dinges, David F; Beck, Luis; Agureev, Alexander; Larina, Irina; Baranov, Victor; Morukov, Boris; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Vassilieva, Galina; Wabel, Peter; Vienken, Jörg; Kirsch, Karl; Johannes, Bernd; Krannich, Alexander; Luft, Friedrich C; Titze, Jens

    2015-10-01

    Accurately collected 24-hour urine collections are presumed to be valid for estimating salt intake in individuals. We performed 2 independent ultralong-term salt balance studies lasting 105 (4 men) and 205 (6 men) days in 10 men simulating a flight to Mars. We controlled dietary intake of all constituents for months at salt intakes of 12, 9, and 6 g/d and collected all urine. The subjects' daily menus consisted of 27 279 individual servings, of which 83.0% were completely consumed, 16.5% completely rejected, and 0.5% incompletely consumed. Urinary recovery of dietary salt was 92% of recorded intake, indicating long-term steady-state sodium balance in both studies. Even at fixed salt intake, 24-hour urine collection for sodium excretion (UNaV) showed infradian rhythmicity. We defined a ±25 mmol deviation from the average difference between recorded sodium intake and UNaV as the prediction interval to accurately classify a 3-g difference in salt intake. Because of the biological variability in UNaV, only every other daily urine sample correctly classified a 3-g difference in salt intake (49%). By increasing the observations to 3 consecutive 24-hour collections and sodium intakes, classification accuracy improved to 75%. Collecting seven 24-hour urines and sodium intake samples improved classification accuracy to 92%. We conclude that single 24-hour urine collections at intakes ranging from 6 to 12 g salt per day were not suitable to detect a 3-g difference in individual salt intake. Repeated measurements of 24-hour UNaV improve precision. This knowledge could be relevant to patient care and the conduct of intervention trials.

  5. Asymptomatic rhythm and conduction abnormalities in children with acute rheumatic fever: 24-hour electrocardiography study.

    PubMed

    Karacan, Mehmet; Işıkay, Sedat; Olgun, Haşim; Ceviz, Naci

    2010-12-01

    Some rhythm and conduction abnormalities can occur in children with acute rheumatic fever. These abnormalities have been defined based on standard electrocardiography; however, the real prevalence of these abnormalities has not been investigated previously by the evaluation of long-term electrocardiographic recordings. In this study, we evaluated the asymptomatic rhythm and conduction abnormalities in children with acute rheumatic fever by evaluating the 24-hour electrocardiography. We evaluated the standard electrocardiography and the 24-hour electrocardiography of 64 children with acute rheumatic fever. On standard electrocardiography, the frequency of the first-degree atrioventricular block was found to be 21.9%. Electrocardiography at 24 hours detected three additional and separate patients with a long PR interval. Mobitz type I block and atypical Wenckebach periodicity were determined in one patient (1.56%) on 24-hour electrocardiography. While accelerated junctional rhythm was detected in three patients on standard electrocardiography, it was present in nine patients according to 24-hour electrocardiography. Premature contractions were present in 1.7% of standard electrocardiography, but in 29.7% of 24-hour electrocardiography. Absence of carditis was found to be related to the presence of accelerated junctional rhythm (p > 0.05), and the presence of carditis was found to be related to the presence of premature contractions (p = 0.000). In conclusion, our results suggest that in children with acute rheumatic fever, the prevalence of rhythm and conduction abnormalities may be much higher than determined on standard electrocardiography. Further studies are needed to clarify whether or not these abnormalities are specific to acute rheumatic fever.

  6. Effect of measuring ambulatory blood pressure on sleep and on blood pressure during sleep.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, R. J.; Jenkins, N. E.; Stradling, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess whether recording of ambulatory blood pressure at night causes arousal from sleep and a change in the continuous blood pressure recorded simultaneously. DESIGN--Repeated measurement of blood pressure with two ambulatory blood pressure machines (Oxford Medical ABP and A&D TM2420) during continuous measurement of beat to beat blood pressure and continuous electroencephalography. SETTING--Sleep research laboratory. SUBJECTS--Six normal subjects. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--The duration of electroencephalographic arousal and the beat to beat changes in blood pressure produced by the measurement of ambulatory blood pressure; the size of any changes that this arousal and change in blood pressure produced in the blood pressure recorded by the ambulatory machine. RESULTS--Both ambulatory blood pressure machines caused arousal from sleep: the mean duration of arousal was 16 seconds (95% range 0-202) with the ABP and 8 seconds (0-73) with the TM2420. Both also caused a rise in beat to beat blood pressure. During non-rapid eye movement sleep, this rise led to the ABP machine overestimating the true systolic blood pressure during sleep by a mean of 10 (SD 14.8) mm Hg and the TM2420 by a mean of 6.3 (8.2) mm Hg. On average, diastolic pressure was not changed, but measurements in individual subjects changed by up to 23 mm Hg. These changes varied in size among subjects and stages of sleep and were seen after measurements that did not cause any electroencephalographic arousal. CONCLUSIONS--Ambulatory blood pressure machines cause appreciable arousal from sleep and therefore alter the blood pressure that they are trying to record. This effect should be taken into account when recordings of blood pressure at night are interpreted in clinical work and epidemiological research. PMID:8167489

  7. Continual 24-hour observations of thermospheric winds made with the SOFDI instrument from Huancayo, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerrard, Andrew; Meriwether, John W.

    The Second generation Optimized Fabry-Perot Doppler Imager (SOFDI), a state-of-the-art triple-etalon Fabry-Perot interferometer, has been sucessfully relocated to Huancayo, Peru and is making continual 24-hour observations. The 630-nm data, originating from layer-integrated OI emission with centroid heights of 250 km at night and 220 km during the day, are analyzed so as to obtain measurements of horizontal winds in the thermosphere. In this paper we report the most recent results from continuous 24-hour observations of these thermospheric parameters.

  8. Nocturnal Blood Pressure Non-Dipping, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, and Sleep Quality in Women

    PubMed Central

    Ulmer, C. S.; Calhoun, P. S.; Bosworth, H. B.; Dennis, M. F.; Beckham, J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Women with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have poor sleep quality and increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Non-dipping of nocturnal blood pressure may be an explanatory factor for the relationship between sleep and CVD found in previous research. Purpose The current study was designed to determine if non-dipping nocturnal blood pressure was associated with trauma exposure, PTSD diagnosis, PTSD symptoms, and sleep quality in a sample of women. Methods Participants completed 24 hours of ABPM and self-report questionnaires. Non-dipping was defined as less than 10% reduction in blood pressure during sleep. Results The frequency of non-dippers did not differ by diagnostic status (d=.15). However, non-dippers endorsed more traumatic event categories (d=.53), more PTSD hyperarousal symptoms (d=.53), poorer overall sleep quality (d=.59), more frequent use of sleep medication (d=.62), greater sleep-related daytime dysfunction (d=.58), and longer sleep onset latencies (d=.55) than dippers. Conclusions Increased attention to nocturnal blood pressure variation may be needed to improve blood pressure control in trauma-exposed women. PMID:24236808

  9. The relationship between terazosin dose and blood pressure response in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Achari, R; Hosmane, B; Bonacci, E; O'Dea, R

    2000-10-01

    A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, multicenter study was conducted to describe the dose-response curve for terazosin on blood pressure. A total of 128 patients with mild to moderate essential hypertension (supine diastolic blood pressure, 100 to 114 mmHg) participated in the study. The study consisted of a 4-week single-blind placebo lead-in period and a 14-week double-blind treatment period. Patients were randomized in equal numbers to four parallel treatment groups: terazosin 1, 2, and 5 mg; terazosin 2, 5, and 10 mg; terazosin 20, 40, and 80 mg; and placebo. The 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure measurements were performed at the end of the placebo lead-in period and at the end of each 4-week fixed-dose period. The nonlinear, mixed-effect model computer program was used to analyze the dose-response relationship. There was a strong dose-response relationship between fall in blood pressure and the 1 to 10 mg terazosin dose, as well as a plateauing of response for terazosin doses above 10 mg. The maximum antihypertensive response (Emax) to terazosin was 10.7 mmHg for systolic blood pressure and 8.0 mmHg for diastolic blood pressure. The daily dose of terazosin, which produced 50% of the maximum response (ED50), was 3.0 mg for systolic blood pressure and 1.5 mg for diastolic blood pressure. The results of this study suggest that although some patients may benefit from terazosin doses of greater than 10 mg, doses up to 10 mg will maximize therapeutic benefit for most patients, with acceptable side effects.

  10. Mutations in the Na-Cl cotransporter reduce blood pressure in humans.

    PubMed

    Cruz, D N; Simon, D B; Nelson-Williams, C; Farhi, A; Finberg, K; Burleson, L; Gill, J R; Lifton, R P

    2001-06-01

    The relationship between salt homeostasis and blood pressure has remained difficult to establish from epidemiological studies of the general population. Recently, mendelian forms of hypertension have demonstrated that mutations that increase renal salt balance lead to higher blood pressure, suggesting that mutations that decrease the net salt balance might have the converse effect. Gitelman's syndrome, caused by loss of function mutations in the Na-Cl cotransporter of the distal convoluted tubule (NCCT), features inherited hypokalemic alkalosis with so-called "normal" blood pressure. We hypothesized that the mild salt wasting of Gitelman's syndrome results in reduced blood pressure and protection from hypertension. We have formally addressed this question through the study of 199 members of a large Amish kindred with Gitelman's syndrome. Through genetic testing, family members were identified as inheriting 0 (n=60), 1 (n=113), or 2 (n=26) mutations in NCCT, permitting an unbiased assessment of the clinical consequences of inheriting these mutations by comparison of the phenotypes of relatives with contrasting genotypes. The results demonstrate high penetrance of hypokalemic alkalosis, hypomagnesemia, and hypocalciuria in patients inheriting 2 mutant NCCT alleles. In addition, the NCCT genotype was a significant predictor of blood pressure, with homozygous mutant family members having significantly lower age- and gender-adjusted systolic and diastolic blood pressures than those of their wild-type relatives. Moreover, both homozygote and heterozygote subjects had significantly higher 24-hour urinary Na(+) than did wild-type subjects, reflecting a self-selected higher salt intake. Finally, heterozygous children, but not adults, had significantly lower blood pressures than those of the wild-type relatives. These findings provide formal demonstration that inherited mutations that impair renal salt handling lower blood pressure in humans.

  11. Characteristics of Blood Pressure Profiles After Endovascular Coiling as Predictors of Clinical Outcome in Poor-Grade Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Cai, Kefu; Zhang, Yunfeng; Shen, Lihua; Ji, Qiuhong; Xu, Tian; Cao, Maohong

    2017-08-01

    Accurate identification of patients who will achieve a favorable outcome is almost impossible preoperatively or postoperatively in poor-grade (Hunt and Hess Grade IV and V) aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Whether characteristics of blood pressure profiles during the first 24 hours after endovascular coiling could predict prognosis in poor grade patients was explored. Data were obtained retrospectively on all patients undergoing endovascular treatment with poor-grade SAH from November 2011 to June 2016. Blood pressure during the initial 24 hours was measured at 2-hour intervals after coil embolization. Studied features of mean systolic blood pressure (MSBP) and systolic blood pressure variability (SBPV) as well as demographics, medical history, clinical characteristics, and neurologic outcomes were documented. SBPV was determined as standard deviation and successive variation of systolic blood pressure. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify predictors of favorable outcome assessed on modified Rankin Scale score of 0 to 2. The patients with favorable and unfavorable outcome were comparable with respect to systolic blood pressure on admission and MSBP after coiling. However, MSBP between 120 and 140 mm Hg was one of independent predictors of good outcomes at discharge (odds ratio 7.1; P = 0.002). SBPV-successive variation after embolization was associated with functional recovery (odds ratio 0.87; P = 0.011) in multivariate logistic analysis and mortality by Cox proportional hazard regression (hazard ratio, 1.10; P = 0.001) at 6-month follow-up. Characteristics of blood pressure profiles after coiling appeared to be simple and convenient indexes for the prognosis of patients with poor-grade SAH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The relationship between dipping-non-dipping arterial blood pressure pattern and frequency of restless leg syndrome with related factors.

    PubMed

    Ulu, Sena Memnune; Ahsen, Ahmet; Akcı, Önder; Yaman, Fatima; Demir, Kasım; Yaman, Gökhan; Yüksel, Şeref; Acartürk, Gürsel

    2015-04-01

    The lack of nocturnal decline in blood pressure (BP) is associated with an increase in cardiovascular events. Restless leg syndrome (RLS) is an uncomfortable feeling in which the patient wants to budge the legs with ache in the legs. RLS also increases the hypertension and cardiovascular risk. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the relationship between dipping and non-dipping blood pressure patterns with RLS and its severity. Two hundred patients who had 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) were enrolled into this cross-sectional study. They were classified by blood pressure pattern as dipping and non-dipping. Then, 100 patients with the dipper pattern and 100 patients with the non-dipper pattern were chosen. A questionnaire for RLS diagnosis that was prepared by the International RLS Study Group was given performed to the patients. RLS symptom score was higher in patients with non-dipping blood pressure patterns (NDBPP), and patients with NDBPP had more severe RLS. Beside this, there were no differences in terms of RLS frequency in dipping and non-dipping blood pressure patterns. As a conclusion, dipping and non-dipping blood pressure patterns do not increase RLS risk. But, if patients with NDBPP have RLS, they have more severe RLS. So, we suggest that evaluating a patient with a non-dipping blood pressure pattern, considering RLS, would be helpful to ameliorate the quality of life of the patient.

  13. Changes in platelet morphology and function during 24 hours of storage.

    PubMed

    Braune, S; Walter, M; Schulze, F; Lendlein, A; Jung, F

    2014-01-01

    aggregates could be visualized microscopically. After four hours, first debris and very small aggregates occurred. After 24 hours, platelet aggregates and also debris progressively increased. In accordance to this, the CASY system revealed an increase of platelet aggregates (up to 90 μm diameter) with increasing storage time. The percentage of CD62P positive platelets and PF4 increased significantly with storage time in resting PRP. When soluble ADP was added to stored PRP samples, the number of activatable platelets decreased significantly over storage time. The present study reveals the importance of a consequent standardization in the preparation of WB and PRP. Platelet morphology and function, particularly platelet reactivity to adherent or soluble agonists in their surrounding milieu, changed rapidly outside the vascular system. This knowledge is of crucial interest, particularly in the field of biomaterial development for cardiovascular applications, and may help to define common standards in the in vitro hemocompatibility testing of biomaterials.

  14. Accurate, reproducible measurement of blood pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, N R; Chockalingam, A; Fodor, J G; McKay, D W

    1990-01-01

    The diagnosis of mild hypertension and the treatment of hypertension require accurate measurement of blood pressure. Blood pressure readings are altered by various factors that influence the patient, the techniques used and the accuracy of the sphygmomanometer. The variability of readings can be reduced if informed patients prepare in advance by emptying their bladder and bowel, by avoiding over-the-counter vasoactive drugs the day of measurement and by avoiding exposure to cold, caffeine consumption, smoking and physical exertion within half an hour before measurement. The use of standardized techniques to measure blood pressure will help to avoid large systematic errors. Poor technique can account for differences in readings of more than 15 mm Hg and ultimately misdiagnosis. Most of the recommended procedures are simple and, when routinely incorporated into clinical practice, require little additional time. The equipment must be appropriate and in good condition. Physicians should have a suitable selection of cuff sizes readily available; the use of the correct cuff size is essential to minimize systematic errors in blood pressure measurement. Semiannual calibration of aneroid sphygmomanometers and annual inspection of mercury sphygmomanometers and blood pressure cuffs are recommended. We review the methods recommended for measuring blood pressure and discuss the factors known to produce large differences in blood pressure readings. PMID:2192791

  15. Salt, blood pressure, and human health.

    PubMed

    Alderman, M H

    2000-11-01

    The positive relation of sodium intake and blood pressure, first recognized a century ago, has been well established in ecological, epidemiological, and experimental human studies. Equally well established is the association of increasing blood pressure and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Indeed, the pharmacological capacity to reduce blood pressure has produced one of the great public health accomplishments of the 20th century. These two facts-the positive relation of blood pressure to strokes and heat attacks and the positive association of sodium intake to blood pressure-underlie the hypothesis that a reduction in sodium intake, by virtue of its hypotensive effect, might prevent strokes and heart attacks. Moreover, even if the effect on blood pressure were in the range of a 1- to 2-mm Hg decline in blood pressure for every 75- to 100-mmol difference in sodium intake, the impact of such a change, applied to the whole population, would be enormous. The problem with this appealing possibility is that a reduction in salt consumption of this magnitude has other-and sometimes adverse-health consequences. The question, therefore, is whether the beneficial hypotensive effects of sodium restriction will outweigh its hazards. Unfortunately, few data link sodium intake to health outcomes, and that which is available is inconsistent. Without knowledge of the sum of the multiple effects of a reduced sodium diet, no single universal prescription for sodium intake can be scientifically justified.

  16. Reproductive hormones and blood pressure during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kristiansson, P; Wang, J X

    2001-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in cardiovasular changes during human pregnancy and the complicated aetiology of gestational hypertension are unclear. Reproductive hormones have known effects on the cardiovascular system in the non-pregnant state and in animal systems, but their effects in human pregnancy are uncertain. In this study of pregnant women, the effects of serum concentrations of relaxin, progesterone and oestradiol on arterial blood pressure were studied. Higher serum concentrations of progesterone and relaxin, but not oestradiol, in early pregnancy were related to lower mean systolic blood pressures in the second and third trimesters. No relationship was found between hormonal concentrations and diastolic blood pressures. However, women with a diastolic blood pressure of >90 mmHg in late pregnancy showed statistically significant lower relaxin concentrations in early pregnancy in comparison with women whose diastolic blood pressure was blood pressure (P: < 0.0001) and serum relaxin (P: < 0.01) in early pregnancy, but not progesterone, were independently related to systolic blood pressure in late pregnancy. The results support previous experimental and clinical studies. The effect of relaxin may be explained by a possible vasodilatatory action seen in animal studies and appears to be moderate.

  17. Blood Pressure in Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    McManus, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is present in up to 84% of patients presenting with acute stroke, and a smaller proportion of patients have blood pressures that are below typical values in the context of cerebral ischemia. Outcomes are generally worse in those who present with either low or severely elevated blood pressure. Several studies have provided valuable information about malignant trends in blood pressure during the transition from the acute to the subacute phase of stroke. It is not uncommon for practitioners in clinical practice to identify what appear to be pressure-dependent neurologic deficits. Despite physiologic and clinical data suggesting the importance of blood pressure modulation to support cerebral blood flow to ischemic tissue, randomized controlled trials have not yielded robust evidence for this in acute ischemic stroke. We highlight previous studies involving acute-stroke patients that have defined trends in blood pressure and that have evaluated the safety and efficacy of blood-pressure modulation in acute ischemic stroke. This overview reports the current status of this topic from the perspective of a stroke neurologist and provides a framework for future research. PMID:26833984

  18. Ambulatory monitoring in the evaluation of blood pressure in patients with borderline hypertension and the role of the defense reflex.

    PubMed

    Pickering, T G; Harshfield, G A; Kleinert, H D; Laragh, J H

    1982-01-01

    The differences between blood pressure (BP) readings taken in the clinic and during normal daily activities were assessed in two studies using a noninvasive ambulatory BP monitor (Avionics). In the first study 30 untreated hypertensive patients (17 with borderline pressures, average diastolic less than or equal to 95, and 13 established hypertensives, diastolics above 95) and 5 normotensive subjects had 30 readings taken in the physician's office and 30 while at home. Conventional sphygmomanometer BPs were also recorded in the office. In the borderline group home BPs were significantly lower than clinic BPs, whereas this difference was less marked for the established and normotensive group. In the second study BP was measured every 15 minutes for 24 hours in 25 normal subjects, 25 borderline and 25 established hypertensives, and readings categorized according to four recording situations: physician's office, work, at home, and sleep. BPs in all groups were highest at work and lowest asleep, and directional changes were similar. Both hypertensive groups showed higher BPs in the physician's office than at home, while normal subjects showed no difference. BPs recorded in the physician's office were good predictors of 24 hour average BP in normal and established hypertensive subjects, but not in the borderline group: in such patients 24 hour monitoring may be of particular value in evaluating the need for treatment.

  19. Validation of a dietary questionnaire assessed with multiple weighed dietary records or 24-hour recalls

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The authors evaluated the validity of a 152-item semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire (SFFQ) by comparing it with two 7-day dietary records (7DDRs) or up to 4 automated self-administered 24-hour recalls (ASA24s) over a 1-year period in the women's Lifestyle Validation Study (2010-2012), con...

  20. A step towards using urinary nitrogen as a tool for validating 24-hour dietary recall interviews.

    PubMed

    Kahn, H A

    1987-09-01

    In an active population, can urinary nitrogen output provide a satisfactory basis for estimating protein intake without preliminary screening to rule out metabolic disease? A successful demonstration would justify comparing average protein intake for active groups derived from 24-hour recall interviews with that obtained from 24-hour urine specimens. This could then be a practical test of the hypothesis that 24-hour recall data provide valid estimates for groups. Volunteers (45) from a university population limited their diet for four days to a commercially prepared liquid diet and provided a 24-hour urine specimen beginning on the morning of the fourth day. For men, average daily intake of protein was 112.8 grams and the estimated intake based on urinary nitrogen was 114.5. Corresponding data for women were 84.6 and 83.9. Screening for metabolic disease seems unnecessary but persons restricting their intake to less than their caloric needs will have their protein intake overestimated on the basis of urinary nitrogen measurement.

  1. Mood-Dependent Cognitive Change in a Man with Bipolar Disorder Who Cycles Every 24 Hours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Dominic; Mansell, Warren

    2008-01-01

    A case study of a bipolar patient whose mood changes every 24 hours is described to illustrate the changes in cognitive processing and content during different phases of bipolar disorder. The participant completed a battery of questionnaires and tasks on 4 separate occasions: twice when depressed and twice when manic. Depression tended to be…

  2. The Three-Continent, 24-Hour Help Desk: An Academic First?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sykes, Jean

    2002-01-01

    Describes Follow the Sun, a computer help-desk service that takes advantage of time differences around the world to permit four universities (University of Colorado Boulder, Australia's Macquarie and Newcastle universities, and the London School of Economics) to share services and provide 24-hour support to users. (EV)

  3. Assessing dietary intake in childhood cancer survivors: Food frequency questionnaire versus 24-hour diet recalls

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cancer diagnosis and treatment may influence dietary intake. The validity of using self-reported methods to quantify dietary intake has not been evaluated in childhood cancer survivors. We validated total energy intake (EI) reported from Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) and repeated 24-hour diet r...

  4. Mood-Dependent Cognitive Change in a Man with Bipolar Disorder Who Cycles Every 24 Hours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Dominic; Mansell, Warren

    2008-01-01

    A case study of a bipolar patient whose mood changes every 24 hours is described to illustrate the changes in cognitive processing and content during different phases of bipolar disorder. The participant completed a battery of questionnaires and tasks on 4 separate occasions: twice when depressed and twice when manic. Depression tended to be…

  5. Raised intracranial pressure and cerebral blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, I. H.; Rowan, J. O.

    1974-01-01

    Intracranial pressure was raised by expansion of a supratentorial subdural ballon in anaesthetized baboons. Pressures were measured at several sites, both supratentorial and infratentorial, and cerebral blood flow was measured in each cerebral hemisphere separately. Pressures recorded from the right and left lateral ventricles corresponded closely throughout. Highly significant correlations were also obtained between the pressures in the right and left subdural spaces and the mean intraventricular pressure. There was, thus, no evidence of intracompartmental pressure gradients within the supratentorial space. Pressure gradients did, however, develop between the supratentorial and infratentorial compartments in the majority of experiments, although the level of supratentorial pressure at which this occurred, varied. Despite the presence of a large mass lesion over the right cerebral hemisphere, no significant differences developed between levels of cerebral blood flow in the two hemispheres, although flow in the right hemisphere remained consistently slightly lower than that in the left after the ballon was inserted. PMID:4836754

  6. Beat-to-Beat Blood Pressure Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Yong Jin

    2012-01-01

    This device provides non-invasive beat-to-beat blood pressure measurements and can be worn over the upper arm for prolonged durations. Phase and waveform analyses are performed on filtered proximal and distal photoplethysmographic (PPG) waveforms obtained from the brachial artery. The phase analysis is used primarily for the computation of the mean arterial pressure, while the waveform analysis is used primarily to obtain the pulse pressure. Real-time compliance estimate is used to refine both the mean arterial and pulse pressures to provide the beat-to-beat blood pressure measurement. This wearable physiological monitor can be used to continuously observe the beat-to-beat blood pressure (B3P). It can be used to monitor the effect of prolonged exposures to reduced gravitational environments and the effectiveness of various countermeasures. A number of researchers have used pulse wave velocity (PWV) of blood in the arteries to infer the beat-to-beat blood pressure. There has been documentation of relative success, but a device that is able to provide the required accuracy and repeatability has not yet been developed. It has been demonstrated that an accurate and repeatable blood pressure measurement can be obtained by measuring the phase change (e.g., phase velocity), amplitude change, and distortion of the PPG waveforms along the brachial artery. The approach is based on comparing the full PPG waveform between two points along the artery rather than measuring the time-of-flight. Minimizing the measurement separation and confining the measurement area to a single, well-defined artery allows the waveform to retain the general shape between the two measurement points. This allows signal processing of waveforms to determine the phase and amplitude changes. Photoplethysmography, which measures changes in arterial blood volume, is commonly used to obtain heart rate and blood oxygen saturation. The digitized PPG signals are used as inputs into the beat-to-beat blood

  7. The Birmingham blood pressure school study.

    PubMed Central

    De Giovanni, J. V.; Pentecost, B. L.; Beevers, D. G.; Beevers, M.; Jackson, S. H.; Bannan, L. T.; Osbourne, V. L.; Mathews, K.

    1983-01-01

    Four-hundred and twenty-eight school leavers of 3 ethnic groups (white, black and Asian) were screened for blood pressure, resting pulse rate and general anthropometric characteristics. Asian pupils were both shorter and lighter than the other two groups whilst black males were heavier and taller. There was no significant difference in the mean systolic or diastolic blood pressure between the 3 groups, although the black pupils had a stronger family history of hypertension, particularly on the mother's side. These observations differ in some respects from other ethnic blood pressure studies and establish values for the local population. PMID:6647172

  8. MEASUREMENT ERROR CORRECTED SODIUM AND POTASSIUM INTAKE ESTIMATION USING 24-HOUR URINARY EXCRETION

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying; Van Horn, Linda; Tinker, Lesley F.; Neuhouser, Marian L.; Carbone, Laura; Mossavar-Rahmani, Yasmin; Thomas, Fridtjof; Prentice, Ross L.

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies of the association of sodium and potassium intake with cardiovascular disease risk have almost exclusively relied on self-reported dietary data. Here, 24-hour urinary excretion assessments are used to correct the dietary self-report data for measurement error, under the assumption that 24-hour urine recovery provides a biomarker that differs from usual intake according to a ‘classical’ measurement model. Under this assumption, dietary self-reports underestimate sodium by 0–15%, overestimate potassium by 8–15%, and underestimates the sodium-to-potassium ratio by about 20% using food frequency questionnaires, 4-day food records, or three 24-hour dietary recalls, in Women’s Health Initiative studies. ‘Calibration’ equations are developed by linear regression of log-transformed 24-hour urine assessments on corresponding log-transformed self-report assessments, and several study subject characteristics. For each self-report method the calibration equations turned out to depend on race and age, and strongly on body mass index. Following adjustment for temporal variation, calibration equations using food records or recalls explained 45–50% of the variation in (log-transformed) 24-hour urine assessments for sodium, 60–70% of the variation for potassium, and 55–60% of the variation for the sodium-to-potassium ratio. These equations may be suitable for use in epidemiologic disease association studies among postmenopausal women. The corresponding ‘signals’ from food frequency questionnaire data were weak, but calibration equations for the ratios of sodium and potassium to total energy explained about 35%, 50%, and 45% of log-biomarker variation for sodium, potassium, and their ratio, respectively, following adjustment for temporal biomarker variation, and may be suitable for cautious use in epidemiologic studies. PMID:24277763

  9. A 24-hour dental plaque prevention study with a stannous fluoride dentifrice containing hexametaphosphate.

    PubMed

    White, Donald J; Kozak, Kathy M; Gibb, Roger; Dunavent, John; Klukowska, Malgorzata; Sagel, Paul A

    2006-07-01

    Recently, a novel antibacterial fluoride dentifrice containing stannous fluoride and sodium hexametaphosphate (CrestPRO-HEALTH) was introduced. A digital plaque image analysis (DPIA) technique was used to quantify in situ plaque formation in a population carrying out a phased intervention protocol that included: (1) an initial treatment regimen including toothbrushing with standard sodium fluoride dentifrice in conventional bid brushing, (2) a second treatment regimen where a modified hygiene regimen was applied using standard sodium fluoride dentifrice including a period of 24 hours of non-brushing, and (3) a third treatment regimen where the 24-hour non-brushing regimen was continued using the antimicrobial stannous fluoride/sodium hexametaphosphate dentifrice. The quantitative evaluation of plaque formation was assessed in morning measurements following either standard evening hygiene (treatment period 1) or 24 hours since brushing (treatment periods 2 and 3). Post-brushing plaque measurements were also taken in each treatment regimen. Sixteen subjects completed all three treatment regimens with no side effects or oral complaints. Morning plaque coverage in treatment period 1 was 13.3%. Plaque coverage significantly increased in treatment period 2 when pre-bedtime brushing was discontinued, with 24-hour growth covering 18.4% of the dentition. Intervention of the antimicrobial stannous fluoride/hexametaphosphate dentifrice in treatment period 3 provided significant inhibition of plaque regrowth over 24 hours (15.2% coverage, a 17% reduction vs. sodium fluoride dentifrice control). These results support the strong retention and lasting antimicrobial efficacy of high stabilized stannous fluoride/sodium hexametaphosphate dentifrices.

  10. Assessing Child Nutrient Intakes Using a Tablet-Based 24-Hour Recall Tool in Rural Zambia.

    PubMed

    Caswell, Bess L; Talegawkar, Sameera A; Dyer, Brian; Siamusantu, Ward; Klemm, Rolf D W; Palmer, Amanda C

    2015-12-01

    Detailed dietary intake data in low-income populations are needed for research and program evaluation. However, collection of such data by paper-based 24-hour recall imposes substantial demands for staff time and expertise, training, materials, and data entry. To describe our development and use of a tablet-based 24-hour recall tool for conducting dietary intake surveys in remote settings. We designed a 24-hour recall tool using Open Data Kit software on an Android tablet platform. The tool contains a list of local foods, questions on portion size, cooking method, ingredients, and food source and prompts to guide interviewers. We used this tool to interview caregivers on dietary intakes of children participating in an efficacy trial of provitamin A-biofortified maize conducted in Mkushi, a rural district in central Zambia. Participants were children aged 4 to 8 years not yet enrolled in school (n = 938). Dietary intake data were converted to nutrient intakes using local food composition and recipe tables. We developed a tablet-based 24-hour recall tool and used it to collect dietary data among 928 children. The majority of foods consumed were maize, leafy vegetable, or small fish dishes. Median daily energy intake was 6416 kJ (1469 kcal). Food and nutrient intakes assessed using the tablet-based tool were consistent with those reported in prior research. The tool was easily used by interviewers without prior nutrition training or computing experience. Challenges remain to improve programming, but the tool is an innovation that enables efficient collection of 24-hour recall data in remote settings. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. 24 Hours of Sleep, Sedentary Behavior, and Physical Activity with Nine Wearable Devices

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberger, Mary E.; Buman, Matthew P.; Haskell, William L.; McConnell, Michael V.; Carstensen, Laura L.

    2015-01-01

    Getting enough sleep, exercising and limiting sedentary activities can greatly contribute to disease prevention and overall health and longevity. Measuring the full 24-hour activity cycle - sleep, sedentary behavior (SED), light intensity physical activity (LPA) and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) - may now be feasible using small wearable devices. PURPOSE This study compares nine devices for accuracy in 24-hour activity measurement. METHODS Adults (N=40, 47% male) wore nine devices for 24-hours: Actigraph GT3X+, activPAL, Fitbit One, GENEactiv, Jawbone Up, LUMOback, Nike Fuelband, Omron pedometer, and Z-Machine. Comparisons (to standards) were made for total sleep time (Z-machine), time spent in SED (activPAL), LPA (GT3x+), MVPA (GT3x+), and steps (Omron). Analysis included mean absolute percent error, equivalence testing, and Bland-Altman plots. RESULTS Error rates ranged from 8.1–16.9% for sleep; 9.5–65.8% for SED; 19.7–28.0% for LPA; 51.8–92% for MVPA; and 14.1–29.9% for steps. Equivalence testing indicated only two comparisons were significantly equivalent to standards: the LUMOback for sedentary behavior and the GT3X+ for sleep. Bland-Altman plots indicated GT3X+ had the closest measurement for sleep, LUMOback for sedentary behavior, GENEactiv for LPA, Fitbit for MVPA and GT3X+ for steps. CONCLUSIONS Currently, no device accurately captures activity data across the entire 24-hour day, but the future of activity measurement should aim for accurate 24-hour measurement as a goal. Researchers should continue to select measurement devices based on their primary outcomes of interest. PMID:26484953

  12. Evaluation of plasma and buffy coat ascorbic acid concentrations in dogs before and after a 24-hour fast.

    PubMed

    Lee, A H; Spano, J S; Swaim, S F; McGuire, J A; Hughes, K S

    1986-09-01

    Samples of blood were taken from 15 female and 15 male research laboratory Beagles before and after they were fasted for 24 hours. The mean buffy coat ascorbic acid concentration was significantly higher in dogs after they were fasted than that before they were fasted. In contrast, the mean plasma ascorbic acid concentration was significantly lower in dogs after they were fasted than that before they were fasted. The mean buffy coat ascorbic acid concentrations in blood samples of both fasted and nonfasted female Beagles was significantly greater than those of male Beagles, whereas the mean plasma concentrations of both fasted and nonfasted female Beagles was significantly lower than those of male Beagles. It was observed that whenever there was a decrease in plasma ascorbic acid concentration, there was an increase in buffy coat ascorbic acid concentration, regardless of fasting stress or sex difference.

  13. Non-dipping blood pressure in the metabolic syndrome among Arabs of the Oman family study.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mohammed O; Jaju, Deepali; Albarwani, Sulayma; Al-Yahyaee, Saeed; Al-Hadabi, Saleh; Lopez-Alvarenga, Juan C; Rizvi, Syed G; Comuzzie, Antony G; Bayoumi, Riad A

    2007-10-01

    The objective was to examine the circadian changes in blood pressure and their relation to the metabolic syndrome and its components in Omani Arabs. Ambulatory blood pressure (ABPM) was recorded in 1124 subjects from 5 large, extended, consanguineous, and young Arab pedigrees. According to the International Diabetes Federation's definition, 264 subjects had the metabolic syndrome, a prevalence of 23%. Subjects were defined as non-dippers when their nocturnal systolic blood pressure (SBP) fell by <10% from daytime SBP. Non-dippers with the metabolic syndrome were 131 of 264 (50%), compared with 265 of 860 (31%) without the metabolic syndrome. Of the non-dippers, 99 of 131 (76%) were females and 32 of 131 (24%) were males. Daytime and nighttime SBP and DBP and nighttime pulse pressure were significantly higher in non-dipper subjects with the metabolic syndrome. The important determinants of a non-dipping BP in this cohort were high BMI and high serum triglycerides. We hypothesize that obesity and nocturnal volume-dependent hypertension may be involved in the pathophysiology of non-dipping in the metabolic syndrome. This study showed that non-dipping BP was common in subjects with the metabolic syndrome. Higher 24-hour blood pressure load may add to the indices of the overall cardiovascular burden already associated with the metabolic syndrome.

  14. Raised intracranial pressure and cerebral blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, I. H.; Rowan, J. O.; Harper, A. M.; Jennett, W. B.

    1973-01-01

    Changes in cerebral blood flow with increasing intracranial pressure were studied in anaesthetized baboons during expansion of a subdural balloon in one of two different sites. With an infratentorial balloon, cerebral blood flow bore no clear relation to intracranial pressure, but was linearly related to cerebral perfusion pressure. Apart from an initial change in some animals, cerebrovascular resistance remained constant with increasing intracranial pressure, and autoregulation appeared to be lost from the outset. With a supratentorial balloon, cerebral blood flow remained constant as intracranial pressure was increased to levels around 60 mm Hg, corresponding to a cerebral perfusion pressure range of approximately 100 to 40 mmHg. Cerebrovascular resistance fell progressively, and autoregulation appeared to be effective during this phase. At higher intracranial pressure levels (lower cerebral perfusion pressure levels), autoregulation was lost and cerebral blood flow became directly dependent on cerebral perfusion pressure. The importance of the cause of the increase in intracranial pressure on the response of the cerebral circulation and the relevance of these findings to the clinical situation are discussed. PMID:4196632

  15. Blood pressure and industrial lead exposure.

    PubMed

    Maheswaran, R; Gill, J S; Beevers, D G

    1993-03-15

    The association between environmental lead exposure and raised blood pressure remains controversial. This association was examined in a cross-sectional study in 1981 on 809 male workers who were occupationally exposed to lead in a factory manufacturing car lead accumulator batteries in Birmingham, United Kingdom. Lead exposure was assessed by blood lead levels, blood zinc protoporphyrin levels, and years of industrial exposure to lead. The geometric mean blood lead level was 31.6 micrograms/dl with minimum and maximum values of 0 microgram/dl and 98 micrograms/dl, respectively. Unadjusted systolic blood pressure rose with increasing blood lead levels (analysis of variance, F = 3.3, p < 0.05) from 127 mmHg (95% confidence interval (CI) 123.5-130.5) in men with blood lead levels less than 21 micrograms/dl to 133 mmHg (95% CI 128.7-137.3) in men with levels exceeding 50 micrograms/dl. Following adjustment for the confounding effects of age, body mass index, and alcohol consumption, however, the effect of blood lead on systolic pressure was diminished (analysis of variance, F = 1.3, not significant) to 129 mmHg and 132 mmHg in the respective categories. There was no association between diastolic blood pressure and blood lead. Zinc protoporphyrin levels and years of industrial lead exposure did not raise adjusted systolic or diastolic pressure. In conclusion, subject to the limitations inherent in a cross-sectional survey, the findings are consistent with a weak effect of industrial lead exposure on systolic blood pressure, within the range of exposures observed in this study.

  16. Working meeting on blood pressure measurement: suggestions for measuring blood pressure to use in populations surveys.

    PubMed

    2003-11-01

    As part of the Pan American Hypertension Initiative (PAHI), the Pan American Health Organization and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health of the United States of America conducted a working meeting to discuss blood pressure (BP) measurement methods used in various hypertension prevalence surveys and clinical trials, with the objective of developing a BP measurement protocol for use in hypertension prevalence surveys in the Americas. No such common protocol has existed in the Americas, so it has been difficult to compare hypertension prevention and intervention strategies. This piece describes a proposed standard method for measuring blood pressure for use in population surveys in the Region of the Americas. The piece covers: considerations for developing a common blood pressure measurement protocol, critical issues in measuring blood pressure in national surveys, minimum procedures for blood pressure measurement during surveillance, and quality assessment of blood pressure.

  17. What Is High Blood Pressure Medicine?

    MedlinePlus

    ... make the other lifestyle changes that will help reduce blood pressure, including: reaching and maintaining a healthy weight, lowering sodium (salt) intake, eating a heart-healthy diet, being more regularly physically active, and limiting alcohol ...

  18. Dietary fiber and blood pressure control.

    PubMed

    Aleixandre, A; Miguel, M

    2016-04-01

    In the past few years, new strategies to control blood pressure levels are emerging by developing new bioactive components of foods. Fiber has been linked to the prevention of a number of cardiovascular diseases and disorders. β-Glucan, the main soluble fiber component in oat grains, was initially linked to a reduction in plasma cholesterol. Several studies have shown afterward that dietary fiber may also improve glycaemia, insulin resistance and weight loss. The effect of dietary fiber on arterial blood pressure has been the subject of far fewer studies than its effect on the above-mentioned variables, but research has already shown that fiber intake can decrease arterial blood pressure in hypertensive rats. Moreover, certain fibers can improve arterial blood pressure when administered to hypertensive and pre-hypertensive subjects. The present review summarizes all those studies which attempt to establish the antihypertensive effects of dietary fiber, as well as its effect on other cardiovascular risk factors.

  19. Caffeine: How Does It Affect Blood Pressure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... M.D. References Zhang Z, et al. Habitual coffee consumption and risk of hypertension: A systematic review and ... 1212. Steffen M, et al. The effect of coffee consumption on blood pressure and the development of hypertension: ...

  20. Principles and techniques of blood pressure measurement

    PubMed Central

    Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Pickering, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Although the mercury sphygmomanometer is widely regarded as the “gold standard” for office blood pressure measurement, the ban on use of mercury devices continues to diminish their role in office and hospital settings. To date, mercury devices have largely been phased out in US hospitals. This has led to the proliferation of non-mercury devices and has changed (probably for ever) the preferable modality of blood pressure measurement in clinic and hospital settings. In this article, the basic techniques of blood pressure measurement and the technical issues associated with measurements in clinical practice are discussed. The devices currently available for hospital and clinic measurements and their important sources of error are presented. Practical advice is given on how the different devices and measurement techniques should be used. Blood pressure measurements in different circumstances and in special populations such as infants, children, pregnant women, elderly persons, and obese subjects are discussed. PMID:20937442

  1. Automatic blood pressure measuring system (M091)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The Leg Volume Measuring System is used to measure leg calf girth changes that occur during exposure to lower body negative pressure as a result of pooling of blood and other fluids in the lower extremities.

  2. Alcohol drinking and blood pressure among adolescents.

    PubMed

    Jerez, S J; Coviello, A

    1998-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate alcohol consumption among adolescents from Tucuman, Argentina, and to determine its possible relationship with increased levels of blood pressure. Three hundred fifty-six students aged 13-18 included in the study were asked to answer questionnaires anonymously. Two blood pressures measures were then taken. Differences between both sexes were found in quantity and frequency of alcohol consumption. Enjoyment was determined to be the main reason for drinking. There was an association between frequency and alcohol-related problems, and smoking habits. There were also differences in blood pressure among males and females. A weak, but significant, relationship between quantity/frequency index and diastolic blood pressure was found. A greater prevalence of hypertension in male heavy drinkers was noted as well. Because this addiction implies multiple social problems and it also accounts for a hypertension risk factor, the importance of aiming at developing prevention strategies for alcohol abuse among adolescents is stressed.

  3. Blood pressure and migration in children.

    PubMed

    Beaglehole, R; Eyles, E; Prior, I

    1979-03-01

    The effect of migration on childhood blood pressure levels has been studied by comparing children before and after migration to New Zealand with children who stayed at home on the Pacific atolls of Tokelau. Data were collected in 1971 on 502 children (97% response rate) aged 5--14 years resident in Tokelau and follow-up data were collected in New Zealand and in Tokelau in 1975--1977 (respknse rate 91%). No selection factors were detected before migration. After migration, the younger migrants had significantly higher blood pressures and were heavier, but not taller, than the non-migrants. Weight differences explained some but not all of the blood pressure differences. There were no differences in body size between the 2 groups of older children although the older non migrant girls had higher blood pressure than the migrant girls.

  4. Correlates of Blood Pressure in Elementary Schoolchildren.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melby, Christopher L.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    This cross-sectional study determined which anthropometric, dietary, and physical fitness variables were the best predictors of blood pressure in 323 white elementary school children. Results are discussed. (Author/MT)

  5. Automatic blood pressure measuring system (M091)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The Leg Volume Measuring System is used to measure leg calf girth changes that occur during exposure to lower body negative pressure as a result of pooling of blood and other fluids in the lower extremities.

  6. Birth weight and childhood blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Edvardsson, Vidar O; Steinthorsdottir, Sandra D; Eliasdottir, Sigridur B; Indridason, Olafur S; Palsson, Runolfur

    2012-12-01

    A large body of literature suggests an inverse relationship between birth weight and blood pressure in children, adolescents and adults. The most persistent findings have been observed in children with a history of low birth weight or intrauterine growth restriction, while a large number of studies carried out in populations with normally distributed birth weight have shown conflicting results. A recently reported strong direct association between high birth weight and blood pressure, and the significant positive effect of postnatal growth on blood pressure suggests that the fetal origins of adult disease hypothesis should be expanded to include the role of excessive fetal and postnatal growth. In this paper, we review recent studies on the relationship between birth weight and blood pressure in childhood, with a focus on confounding variables that may explain the conflicting results of published work in this field.

  7. Weightlifting: Bad for Your Blood Pressure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Circulation. 2007;116:572. Cornelissen VA, et al. Impact of resistance training on blood pressure and other cardiovascular risk factors: A meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials. Hypertension. ...

  8. Biomechanical evaluation of three fixation modalities for preperitoneal inguinal hernia repair: a 24-hour postoperative study in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Guérin, Gaëtan; Bourges, Xavier; Turquier, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Tacks and sutures ensure a strong fixation of meshes, but they can be associated with pain and discomfort. Less invasive methods are now available. Three fixation modalities were compared: the ProGrip™ laparoscopic self-fixating mesh; the fibrin glue Tisseel™ with Bard™ Soft Mesh; and the SorbaFix™ absorbable fixation system with Bard™ Soft Mesh. Materials and methods Meshes (6 cm ×6 cm) were implanted in the preperitoneal space of swine. Samples were explanted 24 hours after surgery. Centered defects were created, and samples (either ten or eleven per fixation type) were loaded in a pressure chamber. For each sample, the pressure, the mesh displacement through the defect, and the measurements of the contact area were recorded. Results At all pressures tested, the ProGrip™ laparoscopic self-fixating mesh both exhibited a significantly lower displacement through the defect and retained a significantly higher percentage of its initial contact area than either the Bard™ Soft Mesh with Tisseel™ system or the Bard™ Soft Mesh with SorbaFix™ absorbable fixation system. Dislocations occurred with the Bard™ Soft Mesh with Tisseel™ system and with the Bard™ Soft Mesh with SorbaFix™ absorbable fixation system at physiological pressure (,225 mmHg). No dislocation was recorded for the ProGrip™ laparoscopic self-fixating mesh. Conclusion At 24 hours after implantation, the mechanical fixation of the ProGrip™ laparoscopic self-fixating mesh was found to be significantly better than the fixation of the Tisseel™ system or the SorbaFix™ absorbable fixation system. PMID:25525396

  9. Carotid Stenosis and Ocular Blood Pressure Modelling

    PubMed Central

    Jullian, M.; Kinsner, W.

    1984-01-01

    A model of the human carotid vascular system was developed to study the effects of carotid stenosis on ocular blood pressure and ocular pulse waveform. The model incorporates a non-linear element representing a stenosis. A state variable representation of a reduced model is used in a computer simulation. Results show that carotid stenosis as low as 20% are detectable in the ocular blood pressure waveform.

  10. Reproducibility of blood pressure responses to dietary sodium and potassium interventions: the GenSalt study.

    PubMed

    Gu, Dongfeng; Zhao, Qi; Chen, Jing; Chen, Ji-Chun; Huang, Jianfeng; Bazzano, Lydia A; Lu, Fanghong; Mu, Jianjun; Li, Jianxin; Cao, Jie; Mills, Katherine; Chen, Chung-Shiuan; Rice, Treva; Hamm, L Lee; He, Jiang

    2013-09-01

    Blood pressure responses to dietary sodium and potassium interventions vary among individuals. We studied the long-term reproducibility of blood pressure responses to dietary sodium and potassium intake. We repeated the dietary sodium and potassium interventions among 487 Chinese adults 4.5 years after the original dietary intervention. The identical dietary intervention protocol, which included a 7-day low-sodium feeding (51.3 mmol/d), a 7-day high-sodium feeding (307.8 mmol/d), and a 7-day high-sodium feeding with oral potassium supplementation (60.0 mmol/d), was applied in both the initial and repeated studies. Three blood pressure measurements were obtained during each of the 3 days of baseline observation and on days 5, 6, and 7 of each intervention period. The results from the 24-hour urinary excretion of sodium and potassium showed excellent compliance with the study diet. Blood pressure responses to dietary intervention in the original and repeated studies were highly correlated. For example, the correlation coefficients (95% confidence interval) for systolic blood pressure levels were 0.77 (0.73-0.80) at baseline, 0.79 (0.75-0.82) during low sodium, 0.80 (0.77-0.83) during high sodium, and 0.82 (0.79-0.85) during high sodium and potassium supplementation interventions (all P<0.0001). The correlation coefficients for systolic blood pressure changes were 0.37 (0.29-0.44) from baseline to low sodium, 0.37 (0.29-0.44) from low to high sodium, and 0.28 (0.20-0.36) from high sodium to high sodium plus potassium supplementation (all P<0.0001). These data indicate that blood pressure responses to dietary sodium and potassium interventions have long-term reproducibility and stable characteristics in the general population.

  11. Reduced effect of percutaneous renal denervation on blood pressure in patients with isolated systolic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ewen, Sebastian; Ukena, Christian; Linz, Dominik; Kindermann, Ingrid; Cremers, Bodo; Laufs, Ulrich; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Schmieder, Roland E; Böhm, Michael; Mahfoud, Felix

    2015-01-01

    Renal denervation can reduce blood pressure in certain patients with resistant hypertension. The effect in patients with isolated systolic hypertension (ISH, ≥140/<90 mm Hg) is unknown. This study investigated the effects of renal denervation in 126 patients divided into 63 patients with ISH and 63 patients with combined hypertension (CH, ≥140/≥90 mm Hg) defined as baseline office systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≥140 mm Hg despite treatment with ≥3 antihypertensive agents. Renal denervation significantly reduced office SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) at 3, 6, and 12 months by 17/18/17 and 5/4/4 mm Hg in ISH and by 28/27/30 and 13/16/18 mm Hg in CH, respectively. The reduction in SBP and DBP in ISH was lower compared with patients with CH at all observed time points (P<0.05 for SBP/DBP intergroup comparison). The nonresponder rate (change in office SBP <10 mm Hg) after 6 months was 37% in ISH and 21% in CH (P<0.001). Mean 24-hour ambulatory SBP and DBP after 3, 6, and 12 months were significantly reduced by 10/13/15 and 6/6/9 mm Hg in CH, respectively. In patients with ISH the reduction in systolic ambulatory blood pressure was 4/8/7 mm Hg (P=0.032/P<0.001/P=0.009) and 3/4/2 mm Hg (P=0.08/P<0.001/P=0.130) in diastolic ambulatory blood pressure after 3, 6, and 12 months, respectively. The ambulatory blood pressure reduction was significantly lower after 3 and 12 months in SBP and after 12 months in ambulatory DBP, respectively. In conclusion, renal denervation reduces office and ambulatory blood pressure in patients with ISH. However, this reduction is less pronounced compared with patients with CH.

  12. Telemedicine Home Blood Pressure Measurements Predict Progression of Albuminuria in Elderly People with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Palmas, Walter; Pickering, Thomas G.; Teresi, Jeanne; Schwartz, Joseph E.; Field, Lesley; Weinstock, Ruth S.; Shea, Steven

    2013-01-01

    We assessed whether home blood pressure monitoring improved the prediction of progression of albuminuria when added to office measurements, and compared it to ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in a multiethnic cohort of older people (n=392) with diabetes mellitus, without macroalbuminuria, participating in the telemedicine arm of the Informatics for Diabetes Education and Telemedicine (IDEATel) study. Albuminuria was assessed by measuring the spot urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio at baseline and annually for three years. Ambulatory sleep/wake systolic blood pressure ratio was categorized as dipping (ratio≤0.9), non-dipping (ratio>0.9 -1), and nocturnal rise (ratio>1). In a repeated measures mixed linear model, after adjustment that included office pulse pressure, home pulse pressure was independently associated with higher follow-up albumin-to-creatinine ratio (p=0.001). That association persisted (p=0.01) after adjusting for 24-hour pulse pressure, and nocturnal rise, which were also independent predictors (p=0.02 and p=0.03, respectively). Cox proportional hazards models examined progression of albuminuria (n=74) as defined by cutoff values used by clinicians. After adjustment for office pulse pressure the hazards ratio (95% CI) per 10 mmHg increment of home pulse pressure was 1.34 (1.1-1.7), p=0.01. Home pulse pressure was not an independent predictor in the model including ambulatory monitoring data—a nocturnal rise was the only independent predictor (p=0.035). However, Cox models built separately for home pulse pressure and ambulatory monitoring exhibited similar calibration and discrimination. In conclusion, home blood pressure adds to office measurements and may substitute for ambulatory monitoring to predict worsening of albuminuria in elderly people with diabetes. PMID:18378859

  13. Effect of a novel calcium channel blocker on abnormal nocturnal blood pressure in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Kario, Kazuomi; Nariyama, Jin; Kido, Hidenori; Ando, Shin-ichi; Takiuchi, Shin; Eguchi, Kazuo; Niijima, Yawara; Ando, Toshiaki; Noda, Makoto

    2013-07-01

    The authors examined the effect of cilnidipine, a unique L/N-type calcium channel blocker, on abnormal nocturnal blood pressure (BP) dipping in Japanese hypertensive patients in the real world. The Ambulatory Blood Pressure Control and Home Blood Pressure (Morning and Evening) Lowering by N-Channel Blocker Cilnidipine (ACHIEVE-ONE), a large-scale clinical study, was designed to evaluate the effects of cilnidipine in daily medical practice. Among the study, 24-hour ambulatory BP data were obtained from 615 patients and classified according to their nocturnal dipping status as extreme dippers, dippers, nondippers, or risers. A 12-week treatment with cilnidipine significantly reduced 24-hour BP in all groups (P<.001). Changes in nocturnal systolic BP (SBP) from baseline were -17.9 mm Hg from 154.6 mm Hg in risers and -11.9 mm Hg from 142.1 mm Hg, -6.6 mm Hg from 128.5 mm Hg, and 0.1 mm Hg from 115.8 mm Hg in nondippers, dippers, and extreme dippers, respectively. Changes from baseline in nocturnal SBP reduction rate were 8.2% in risers (P<.001) but -7.0% in extreme dippers (P<.001), while no change was observed in the nighttime SBP reduction rate for the total patients (-0.2%±9.6%, P=.617). Cilnidipine partially, but significantly, restored abnormal nocturnal dipping status toward a normal dipping pattern in hypertensive patients.

  14. Blood pressure, the prevalence of cardiovascular diseases, and exposure to cadmium: A population study

    SciTech Connect

    Staessen, J.; Amery, A.; Bernard, A.; Bruaux, P.; Buchet, J.P.; Bulpitt, C.J.; Claeys, F.; De Plaen, P.; Ducoffre, G.; Fagard, R. )

    1991-08-01

    In a population study conducted from 1985 to 1989 in Belgium, the authors investigated whether exposure to cadmium is associated with blood pressure elevation and with an increased prevalence of cardiovascular diseases. The participants, aged 20-88 years, constituted a random sample of the households living in two low exposure areas (n = 803) and two high exposure areas (n = 1,283). For each exposure level, a rural and an urban district were selected. The cadmium levels in blood (8.5 vs. 11.0 n