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Sample records for 24-hour home care

  1. Neonatal family care for 24 hours per day: effects on maternal confidence and breast-feeding.

    PubMed

    Wataker, Heidi; Meberg, Alf; Nestaas, Eirik

    2012-01-01

    In family care (FC) program for neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), parents are encouraged to reside together with their infant for 24 hours a day to actively be involved in the care. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of FC on maternal confidence and breast-feeding. Maternal confidence and rate of breast-feeding were assessed in 31 mothers offered FC that included special family rooms in the NICU, and in 30 mothers from a comparable NICU providing traditional care without such facilities. One week prior to hospital discharge, mothers in the FC group felt better informed regarding nursing issues and had more confidence in interpretation of the infants regarding feeding issues and in caregiving without staff attendance (P < .05). They also reported a higher level of empowerment (P < .05). Three months after discharge, the mothers in the FC group had a higher self-reported skill level for interpretation of the infant's signals and knowledge about breast-feeding (P < .05). Despite similar rate of breast-feeding at discharge, more infants in the FC group were breastfed 3 months after discharge (P < .05). An FC program in the NICU promoted better maternal confidence during the hospital stay and 3 months after discharge compared with traditional care.

  2. Characterisation of sleep in intensive care using 24-hour polysomnography: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Many intensive care patients experience sleep disruption potentially related to noise, light and treatment interventions. The purpose of this study was to characterise, in terms of quantity and quality, the sleep of intensive care patients, taking into account the impact of environmental factors. Methods This observational study was conducted in the adult ICU of a tertiary referral hospital in Australia, enrolling 57 patients. Polysomnography (PSG) was performed over a 24-hour period to assess the quantity (total sleep time: hh:mm) and quality (percentage per stage, duration of sleep episode) of patients' sleep while in ICU. Rechtschaffen and Kales criteria were used to categorise sleep. Interrater checks were performed. Sound pressure and illuminance levels and care events were simultaneously recorded. Patients reported on their sleep quality in ICU using the Richards Campbell Sleep Questionnaire and the Sleep in Intensive Care Questionnaire. Data were summarised using frequencies and proportions or measures of central tendency and dispersion as appropriate and Cohen's Kappa statistic was used for interrater reliability of the sleep data analysis. Results Patients' median total sleep time was 05:00 (IQR: 02:52 to 07:14). The majority of sleep was stage 1 and 2 (medians: 19 and 73%) with scant slow wave and REM sleep. The median duration of sleep without waking was 00:03. Sound levels were high (mean Leq 53.95 dB(A) during the day and 50.20 dB(A) at night) and illuminance levels were appropriate at night (median <2 lux) but low during the day (median: 74.20 lux). There was a median 1.7 care events/h. Patients' mean self-reported sleep quality was poor. Interrater reliability of sleep staging was highest for slow wave sleep and lowest for stage 1 sleep. Conclusions The quantity and quality of sleep in intensive care patients are poor and may be related to noise, critical illness itself and treatment events that disturb sleep. The study highlights the

  3. Increased energy density of the home-delivered lunch meal improves 24-hour nutrient intakes in older adults.

    PubMed

    Silver, Heidi J; Dietrich, Mary S; Castellanos, Victoria H

    2008-12-01

    As food intake declines with aging, older adults develop energy and nutrient inadequacies. It is important to design practical approaches to combat insufficient dietary intakes to decrease risk for acute and chronic diseases, illness, and injury. Manipulating the energy density of meals has improved energy intakes in institutional settings, but the effects on community-residing older adults who are at nutrition risk have not been investigated. The aim of this study was to determine whether enhancing the energy density of food items regularly served in a home-delivered meals program would increase lunch and 24-hour energy and nutrient intakes. In a randomized crossover counterbalanced design, 45 older adult Older American Act Nutrition Program participants received a regular and enhanced version of a lunch meal on alternate weeks. The types of foods, portion sizes (gram weight), and appearance of the lunch meal was held constant. Consumption of the enhanced meal increased average lunch energy intakes by 86% (P<0.001) and 24-hour energy intakes by 453 kcal (from 1,423.1+/-62.2 to 1,876.2+/-78.3 kcal, P<0.001). The 24-hour intakes of several key macronutrients and micronutrients also improved. These data suggest that altering the energy density of regularly served menu items is an effective strategy to improve dietary intakes of free-living older adults.

  4. Bath water contamination with Legionella and nontuberculous mycobacteria in 24-hour home baths, hot springs, and public bathhouses of Nagano Prefecture, Japan.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Michiko; Oana, Kozue; Kawakami, Yoshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Bath water samples were collected from 116 hot springs, 197 public bathhouses, and 38 24-hour home baths in Nagano Prefecture, Japan, during the period of April 2009 to November 2011, for determining the presence and extent of contamination with Legionella and nontuberculous mycobacteria. Cultures positive for Legionella were observed in 123 of the 3,314 bath water samples examined. The distribution and abundance of Legionella and/or combined contamination with Legionella and nontuberculous mycobacteria were investigated to clarify the contamination levels. The abundance of Legionella was demonstrated to correlate considerably with the levels of combined contamination with Legionella and nontuberculous mycobacteria. Legionella spp. were obtained from 61% of the water samples from 24-hour home baths, but only from 3% of the samples from public bathhouses and hot springs. This is despite the fact that a few outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease in Nagano Prefecture as well as other regions of Japan have been traced to bath water contamination. The comparatively higher rate of contamination of the 24-hour home baths is a matter of concern. It is therefore advisable to routinely implement good maintenance of the water basins, particularly of the 24-hour home baths.

  5. Italian society of hypertension guidelines for conventional and automated blood pressure measurement in the office, at home and over 24 hours.

    PubMed

    Parati, Gianfranco; Omboni, Stefano; Palatini, Paolo; Rizzoni, Damiano; Bilo, Grzegorz; Valentini, Mariaconsuelo; Rosei, Enrico Agabiti; Mancia, Giuseppe

    2008-10-01

    This article offers instructions and recommendations on how to perform blood pressure measurements in the doctor's office, in the patient's home and in ambulatory conditions over 24 hours. Great attention is paid to some of the general aspects of blood pressure measurement, including the accuracy of blood pressure measuring devices, the importance of a 'white-coat effect', and the need for patient education. This article also deals with a number of practical details, such as the importance of patient's relaxation and position, arm position and support, arm selection and cuff selection and application. Recommendations are provided on the observer's position and performance, and on the need to pay attention to specific factors affecting the blood pressure measurement in different patient populations, namely in children, elderly and obese people, pregnant women, patients with arrhythmias and patients on treatment. This article then separately focuses on the characteristics of auscultatory and automated measurements, the latter performed either in the office, at home or over 24 hours in ambulatory settings. Home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM) is becoming increasingly important in the diagnosis and management of arterial hypertension. The importance of HBPM in cardiovascular prevention, related to a deeper involvement of patients in their long-term management, and the wide diffusion of this approach in populations, is not always accompanied by adequate knowledge of how to make proper use of this technique, which emphasizes the need for more precise recommendations. This article summarizes the available evidence and provides recommendations on the use of home blood pressure monitoring in clinical practice and in research. It updates the previous recommendations on the same topic issued in 2000. The main topics addressed include the methodology of HBPM, focusing on measurement conditions and procedures, ranging from patient/subject position, to arm selection, arm

  6. Home Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help Related Topics Assisted Living Community-Based Care Nursing Homes Related Video Join our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Home Care Basic Facts & Information Role of Health Care Professionals in Home Care Your physician is the leader ...

  7. Demand and characteristics of a psychiatric 24-hour emergency service performed by mandatory rotation of licensed psychiatrists in Swiss primary care

    PubMed Central

    Chmiel, Corinne; Rosemann, Thomas; Senn, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Background To investigate characteristics of and satisfaction with psychiatric 24-hour emergency primary care performed by mandatory rotation of licensed psychiatrists as a viable baseline for possible reorganizational measures. Methods This was a questionnaire-based cross-sectional study (November 2010–April 2011). The number of patient–psychiatrist encounters, modes of contact, and patient and psychiatrist characteristics were assessed. Diagnoses were coded with ICD-10 (International Classification of Diseases, version 10). Results From 167 duty episodes, 74 (44%) were recorded. Of the psychiatrists (n=44), 52% were female, and mean age (standard deviation) was 49.9 (5.2) years. The median number of encounters per episode was 4 (interquartile range 0–8), mainly in the evenings. Demand for “face-to-face” (direct) patient visits was significantly more common (64.0%) than practice (1.3%) or telephone consultations (34.7%). In 83.8%, psychiatrists judged the encounter as adequate at the patient’s location. A total of 43 different diagnoses were recorded: mainly schizophrenic disorders (23.9%), suicidal behavior (15.2%), and acute stress reactions (10.3%). Psychiatrists felt burdened by services (62.5%): in 39.2%, they felt threatened; and in 6.8%, violence occurred. In 32.4%, bills were not paid for. If services were optional, 45.2% would participate. Conclusion Our findings indicate justified demand for direct mobile patient visits, suggesting that emergency care should be multifaceted, and sole provision of psychiatric care at stationed emergency facilities may not always be appropriate. Reorganization of 24-hour emergency services should carefully evaluate patient and provider’s needs before changing established structures. PMID:24707172

  8. Home Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page Resize Text Printer Friendly Online Chat Home Health Care Home health care helps older adults live independently for as long ... need for long-term nursing home care. Home health care may include occupational and physical therapy, speech therapy, ...

  9. Home health care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skilled nursing - home care; Physical therapy - at home; Occupational therapy - at home; Discharge - home health care ... medicines that you may be taking. Physical and occupational therapists can make sure your home is set ...

  10. Home Care Services

    MedlinePlus

    Home care is care that allows a person with special needs stay in their home. It might be for people who are getting ... chronically ill, recovering from surgery, or disabled. Home care services include Personal care, such as help with ...

  11. Respiratory Home Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthy Living > Living With Lung Disease > Respiratory Home Health Care Font: Aerosol Delivery Oxygen Resources Immunizations Pollution Nutrition ... Disease Articles written by Respiratory Experts Respiratory Home Health Care Respiratory care at home can contribute to improved ...

  12. Laparoscopic Colon Resections With Discharge Less Than 24 Hours

    PubMed Central

    Ganji, Maedeh; Alam, Shaan E.; Kar, Pran M.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: A short hospital stay is one of the main advantages of laparoscopic surgery. Previous studies have shown that after a multimodal fast-track process, the hospital length of stay can be shortened to between 2 and 5 days. The objective of this review is to show that the hospital length of stay can, in some cases, be reduced to <24 hours. Methods: This study retrospectively reviews a surgeon's experience with laparoscopic surgery over a 12-month period. Seven patients were discharged home within 24 hours after minimally invasive laparoscopic surgical treatment, following a modified fast-track protocol that was adopted for perioperative care. Results: Of the 7 patients, 4 received laparoscopic right hemicolectomy for malignant disease and 3 underwent sigmoid colectomies for recurrent diverticulitis. The mean hospital stay was 21 hours, 47 minutes; the mean volume of intraoperative fluid (lactated Ringer) was 1850 mL; the mean surgical blood loss was only 74.3 mL; the mean duration of surgery was 118 minutes; and the patients were ambulated and fed a liquid diet after recovery from anesthesia. The reviewed patients had functional gastrointestinal tracts and were agreeable to the timing of discharge. On the follow-up visit, they showed no adverse consequences such as bleeding, infection, or anastomotic leak. Conclusion: Laparoscopic colon surgery that incorporated multimodal perioperative care allowed patients to be discharged within the first 24 hours. Careful postoperative outpatient follow-up is important in monitoring complications such as anastomotic leak, which may not present until postoperative day 5. PMID:23925012

  13. 24-Hour Relativistic Bit Commitment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbanis, Ephanielle; Martin, Anthony; Houlmann, Raphaël; Boso, Gianluca; Bussières, Félix; Zbinden, Hugo

    2016-09-01

    Bit commitment is a fundamental cryptographic primitive in which a party wishes to commit a secret bit to another party. Perfect security between mistrustful parties is unfortunately impossible to achieve through the asynchronous exchange of classical and quantum messages. Perfect security can nonetheless be achieved if each party splits into two agents exchanging classical information at times and locations satisfying strict relativistic constraints. A relativistic multiround protocol to achieve this was previously proposed and used to implement a 2-millisecond commitment time. Much longer durations were initially thought to be insecure, but recent theoretical progress showed that this is not so. In this Letter, we report on the implementation of a 24-hour bit commitment solely based on timed high-speed optical communication and fast data processing, with all agents located within the city of Geneva. This duration is more than 6 orders of magnitude longer than before, and we argue that it could be extended to one year and allow much more flexibility on the locations of the agents. Our implementation offers a practical and viable solution for use in applications such as digital signatures, secure voting and honesty-preserving auctions.

  14. [Identification of paroxysmal, transient arrhythmias: Intermittent registration more efficient than the 24-hour Holter monitoring].

    PubMed

    Hendrikx, Tijn; Rosenqvist, Mårten; Sandström, Herbert; Persson, Mats; Hörnsten, Rolf

    2015-01-06

    Many patients suffer from palpitations or dizziness/presyncope. These patients are often referred for Holter ECG (24 hour), although the sensitivity for detecting arrhythmias is low. A new method, short intermittent regular and symptomatic ECG registrations at home, might be a convenient and more sensitive alternative also suitable for primary health care. In this case report we present a patient who had contacted health care several times during a seven year period for paroxysmal palpitations. Routine examination with 24 hour Holter ECG and event recorder did not result in a diagnosis. Using intermittent handheld ECG registration at home, a paroxysmal supraventricular arrhythmia was diagnosed. Further investigation revealed that the patient had a concealed Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome.

  15. 24-Hour Academic Libraries: Adjusting to Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Adam C.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the adaptive measures that academic libraries perform when implementing and operating a 24-hour schedule. Five in-depth interviews were conducted with current managerial-level librarians at 24-hour academic libraries. The exploratory interviews revealed similar measures for security, budgeting, employee…

  16. The 24 Hours before Hospitalization: Factors Related to Suicide Attempting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiles, John A.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Psychiatric inpatients (N=59) were interviewd concerning psychological and environmental events that occurred in the 24 hours prior to their hospitalization. Suicide attempters were more likely to have used alcohol or marijuana and less likely to have contacted a health care professional than suicide ideators, even when past history of suicide…

  17. The 24-Hour Mathematical Modeling Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galluzzo, Benjamin J.; Wendt, Theodore J.

    2015-01-01

    Across the mathematics curriculum there is a renewed emphasis on applications of mathematics and on mathematical modeling. Providing students with modeling experiences beyond the ordinary classroom setting remains a challenge, however. In this article, we describe the 24-hour Mathematical Modeling Challenge, an extracurricular event that exposes…

  18. Home care goes corporate.

    PubMed

    Meyer, H

    1997-05-01

    Some 18,000 home health agencies dot today's landscape--one of health care's last cottage industries. But the spread of managed care, plus long-promised Medicare payment reform, will change all that. Waves of consolidation and cost-cutting won't be far behind.

  19. American Academy of Home Care Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Newsletter Certification/Training Donate Featured Members Home Care Medicine in America The American Academy of Home Care ... Resources with the American Academy of Home Care Medicine. The American Academy of Home Care Medicine understands ...

  20. Enhancing family physician capacity to deliver quality palliative home care

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Denise; Howell, Doris; Brazil, Kevin; Howard, Michelle; Taniguchi, Alan

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT PROBLEM BEING ADDRESSED Family physicians face innumerable challenges to delivering quality palliative home care to meet the complex needs of end-of-life patients and their families. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM To implement a model of shared care to enhance family physicians’ ability to deliver quality palliative home care, particularly in a community-based setting. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Family physicians in 3 group practices (N = 21) in Ontario’s Niagara West region collaborated with an interprofessional palliative care team (including a palliative care advanced practice nurse, a palliative medicine physician, a bereavement counselor, a psychosocial-spiritual advisor, and a case manager) in a shared-care partnership to provide comprehensive palliative home care. Key features of the program included systematic and timely identification of end-of-life patients, needs assessments, symptom and psychosocial support interventions, regular communication between team members, and coordinated care guided by outcome-based assessment in the home. In addition, educational initiatives were provided to enhance family physicians’ knowledge and skills. CONCLUSION Because of the program, participants reported improved communication, effective interprofessional collaboration, and the capacity to deliver palliative home care, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, to end-of-life patients in the community. PMID:19074714

  1. "Uberizing" home care in Ontario.

    PubMed

    Wojtak, Anne; Stark, Linda

    2016-07-01

    This article looks at home care in Ontario and its role as a foundation for a sustainable healthcare system in the future. Beginning with the history and evolution of the service delivery model, it examines current challenges and opportunities to unleash the potential of home care within a more integrated model for patient-centred care for the future. An in-depth look at how to better coordinate, integrate, and fund care for patients is highlighted.

  2. "Uberizing" home care in Ontario.

    PubMed

    Wojtak, Anne; Stark, Linda

    2016-07-01

    This article looks at home care in Ontario and its role as a foundation for a sustainable healthcare system in the future. Beginning with the history and evolution of the service delivery model, it examines current challenges and opportunities to unleash the potential of home care within a more integrated model for patient-centred care for the future. An in-depth look at how to better coordinate, integrate, and fund care for patients is highlighted. PMID:27269814

  3. Coordinated Home Care Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor. Home Care Training Center.

    This manual is intended as a source of information and assistance in the planning, organization, implementation, and evaluation of home care programs. There are ten major sections: (1) Introduction (review of the history of home care and definition of pertinent terms), (2) Program Planning, (3) Organizational Structure, (4) Coordination and…

  4. Human prolactin - 24-hour pattern with increased release during sleep.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassin, J. F.; Weitzman, E. D.; Kapen, S.; Frantz, A. G.

    1972-01-01

    Human prolactin was measured in plasma by radioimmunoassay at 20-minute intervals for a 24-hour period in each of six normal adults, whose sleep-wake cycles were monitored polygraphically. A marked diurnal variation in plasma concentrations was demonstrated, with highest values during sleep. Periods of episodic release occurred throughout the 24 hours.

  5. Patterns in Home Care Use in Manitoba

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Lori; Roos, Noralou, P.; Shapiro, Evelyn

    2005-01-01

    Administrative home care data from the Manitoba Support Services Payroll (MSSP) system for fiscal years 1995/1996 to 1998/1999 were utilized to study home care client characteristics and changes in home care use over time. Patterns in home care access and use after hospitalization, before admission to a nursing home, and before death were…

  6. Perspectives on Home Care Quality

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Rosalie A.; Kane, Robert L.; Illston, Laurel H.; Eustis, Nancy N.

    1994-01-01

    Home care quality assurance (QA) must consider features inherent in home care, including: multiple goals, limited provider control, and unique family roles. Successive panels of stakeholders were asked to rate the importance of selected home care outcomes. Most highly rated outcomes were freedom from exploitation, satisfaction with care, physical safety, affordability, and physical functioning. Panelists preferred outcome indicators to process and structure, and all groups emphasized “enabling” criteria. Themes highlighted included: interpersonal components of care; normalizing life for clientele; balancing quality of life with safety; developing flexible, negotiated care plans; mechanisms for accountability and case management. These themes were formulated differently according to the stakeholders' role. Providers preferred intermediate outcomes, akin to process. PMID:10140158

  7. 29 CFR 785.21 - Less than 24-hour duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... be on duty for less than 24 hours is working even though he is permitted to sleep or engage in other... specified hours is working even though she is permitted to sleep when not busy answering calls. It makes...

  8. 29 CFR 785.21 - Less than 24-hour duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... be on duty for less than 24 hours is working even though he is permitted to sleep or engage in other... specified hours is working even though she is permitted to sleep when not busy answering calls. It makes...

  9. 29 CFR 785.21 - Less than 24-hour duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... be on duty for less than 24 hours is working even though he is permitted to sleep or engage in other... specified hours is working even though she is permitted to sleep when not busy answering calls. It makes...

  10. 29 CFR 785.21 - Less than 24-hour duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... be on duty for less than 24 hours is working even though he is permitted to sleep or engage in other... specified hours is working even though she is permitted to sleep when not busy answering calls. It makes...

  11. 29 CFR 785.21 - Less than 24-hour duty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... be on duty for less than 24 hours is working even though he is permitted to sleep or engage in other... specified hours is working even though she is permitted to sleep when not busy answering calls. It makes...

  12. [Necessity of a 24-hour system of blood transfusion testing].

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Yuji

    2003-01-01

    The preventive effects of a 24-hour system of blood transfusion testing on mistyping of transfused blood was examined. Blood transfusion tests have been performed by blood transfusion technologists during working hours and by physicians at other times. In March 2000, we introduced a system in which technologists perform blood transfusion tests after working hours. Technologists of the Blood Transfusion Unit and Central Clinical Laboratory perform the test jointly, and column agglutination technology was introduced as the test method. A computer system setup exclusively for the testing was also introduced to perform computer cross-matching. Since transfusion error is likely to occur during emergency blood transfusion, a manual was established to prioritize safety. After introduction of the system, mistyping that may have been caused by inaccurate blood test results markedly decreased, confirming the usefulness of this system for prevention of mistyping. In addition, transfusion errors also decreased in wards and the improved system increased the safety of the entire medical care system. The frequency of mistyping was about 1% when physicians performed blood typing, showing the importance of clinical technologists for blood transfusion tests. PMID:12652691

  13. [Social inequality in home care].

    PubMed

    Möller, A; Osterfeld, A; Büscher, A

    2013-06-01

    Social inequality in Germany is discussed primarily with regard to educational or social welfare issues. There is a political consensus that more action should be taken to ensure equality of chances and fulfillment of basic needs for everyone. In long-term care these considerations have not yet taken place and there are hardly any research studies in this field. However, the startling rise of the need for long-term care will definitely require a discussion of social inequality in various care arrangements. To learn more about social inequality in home care, a qualitative approach was used and 16 home care nurses were interviewed. Our study shows that many care recipients face numerous problems they cannot handle on their own, which may even worsen their situation. In addition, the results reveal that facing social inequalities place a burden on nurses and influence their work performance.

  14. Preceptorship in home care.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, Kelly

    2008-10-01

    Central to the orientation process is the role of the preceptor. The following is a methodological survey of clinical and administrative nursing staffs' current perceptions concerning the preceptorship process existing within a small New England home health agency. Recommendations are made for improvement using evidenced-based strategies found in the current literature.

  15. Giving home care nurses a hand.

    PubMed

    Dannenfeldt, D

    1994-05-01

    Parkview Episcopal Medical Center in Pueblo, Colo., joined forces with Patient Care Technologies of Atlanta to automate the hospital's home care department--traditionally one of the least automated areas of health care. Home care nurses using hand-held computers now make more home visits in the time previously devoted to paperwork. These extra visits generate $876,000 in additional annual revenues. What's more, automation has improved the quality of the home care division's record-keeping and patient care.

  16. Patterns in home care use in Manitoba.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Lori; Roos, Noralou P; Shapiro, Evelyn

    2005-01-01

    Administrative home care data from the Manitoba Support Services Payroll (MSSP) system for fiscal years 1995/1996 to 1998/1999 were utilized to study home care client characteristics and changes in home care use over time. Patterns in home care access and use after hospitalization, before admission to a nursing home, and before death were examined. The study found that the majority of home care clients were female, aged 65 and over, and not married. The proportion of Manitobans using home care increased slowly, but significantly, over the 4 years. The greatest increases were found among the older age groups. The average number of days that clients received home care before death or before admission to a nursing home was stable over time, while a significant increase over time in home care use after hospitalization was experienced. These findings can be useful to regional health authorities for planning and budgeting. PMID:16080138

  17. Guidebook for Licensed Child Care Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Jeanie

    This guidebook is a reference for family child care homes and family child care group homes licensed by the State of Alaska. It outlines licensing standards and procedures and serves as a simplified abstract of Alaska child care regulations. The first part is an overview that introduces home child care and licensing. Topics covered include…

  18. Agreement between 24-hour salt ingestion and sodium excretion in a controlled environment.

    PubMed

    Lerchl, Kathrin; Rakova, Natalia; Dahlmann, Anke; Rauh, Manfred; Goller, Ulrike; Basner, Mathias; Dinges, David F; Beck, Luis; Agureev, Alexander; Larina, Irina; Baranov, Victor; Morukov, Boris; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Vassilieva, Galina; Wabel, Peter; Vienken, Jörg; Kirsch, Karl; Johannes, Bernd; Krannich, Alexander; Luft, Friedrich C; Titze, Jens

    2015-10-01

    Accurately collected 24-hour urine collections are presumed to be valid for estimating salt intake in individuals. We performed 2 independent ultralong-term salt balance studies lasting 105 (4 men) and 205 (6 men) days in 10 men simulating a flight to Mars. We controlled dietary intake of all constituents for months at salt intakes of 12, 9, and 6 g/d and collected all urine. The subjects' daily menus consisted of 27 279 individual servings, of which 83.0% were completely consumed, 16.5% completely rejected, and 0.5% incompletely consumed. Urinary recovery of dietary salt was 92% of recorded intake, indicating long-term steady-state sodium balance in both studies. Even at fixed salt intake, 24-hour urine collection for sodium excretion (UNaV) showed infradian rhythmicity. We defined a ±25 mmol deviation from the average difference between recorded sodium intake and UNaV as the prediction interval to accurately classify a 3-g difference in salt intake. Because of the biological variability in UNaV, only every other daily urine sample correctly classified a 3-g difference in salt intake (49%). By increasing the observations to 3 consecutive 24-hour collections and sodium intakes, classification accuracy improved to 75%. Collecting seven 24-hour urines and sodium intake samples improved classification accuracy to 92%. We conclude that single 24-hour urine collections at intakes ranging from 6 to 12 g salt per day were not suitable to detect a 3-g difference in individual salt intake. Repeated measurements of 24-hour UNaV improve precision. This knowledge could be relevant to patient care and the conduct of intervention trials.

  19. Help is just a phone call away: after-hours support for palliative care patients wishing to die at home.

    PubMed

    Baird-Bower, Debbie; Roach, Julie; Andrews, Morven; Onslow, Fiona; Curnin, Emma

    2016-06-01

    The 24-hour support for palliative patients is the gold standard of health care in Australia. However, in the state of Tasmania after-hours telephone support was spatially fragmented and inequitable. In 2014, hospice@HOME, a pilot programme introduced in Tasmania in that year, implemented a state-wide after-hours palliative care support service--1800HOSPICE--offering 24-hour support, 7 days a week for palliative patients, caregivers and the public. Six months of after-hours call logs in combination with additional patient data, were analysed to evaluate the use and wider implications of a state-wide after-hours palliative care support number. Family and caregivers mainly used the after-hours support to request changes to support services (25.1%), report changes in patients' overall condition (23.6%) and request acute medical assistance (16.2%). Through the use of the after-hours services by all individuals involved in the care, end-of-life patients were able to reduce ambulance contact and emergency department admission, and thereby increase their likelihood of dying at home (for patients whose preference was to die at home). Overall, 24-hour palliative care telephone support was found to be a valuable tool for all individuals involved in the care of end-of-life patients.

  20. Help is just a phone call away: after-hours support for palliative care patients wishing to die at home.

    PubMed

    Baird-Bower, Debbie; Roach, Julie; Andrews, Morven; Onslow, Fiona; Curnin, Emma

    2016-06-01

    The 24-hour support for palliative patients is the gold standard of health care in Australia. However, in the state of Tasmania after-hours telephone support was spatially fragmented and inequitable. In 2014, hospice@HOME, a pilot programme introduced in Tasmania in that year, implemented a state-wide after-hours palliative care support service--1800HOSPICE--offering 24-hour support, 7 days a week for palliative patients, caregivers and the public. Six months of after-hours call logs in combination with additional patient data, were analysed to evaluate the use and wider implications of a state-wide after-hours palliative care support number. Family and caregivers mainly used the after-hours support to request changes to support services (25.1%), report changes in patients' overall condition (23.6%) and request acute medical assistance (16.2%). Through the use of the after-hours services by all individuals involved in the care, end-of-life patients were able to reduce ambulance contact and emergency department admission, and thereby increase their likelihood of dying at home (for patients whose preference was to die at home). Overall, 24-hour palliative care telephone support was found to be a valuable tool for all individuals involved in the care of end-of-life patients. PMID:27349847

  1. Allowing Family to be Family: End-of-Life Care in Veterans Affairs Medical Foster Homes.

    PubMed

    Manheim, Chelsea E; Haverhals, Leah M; Jones, Jacqueline; Levy, Cari R

    2016-01-01

    The Medical Foster Home program is a unique long-term care program coordinated by the Veterans Health Administration. The program pairs Veterans with private, 24-hour a day community-based caregivers who often care for Veterans until the end of life. This qualitative study explored the experiences of care coordination for Medical Foster Home Veterans at the end of life with eight Veterans' family members, five Medical Foster Home caregivers, and seven Veterans Health Administration Home-Based Primary Care team members. A case study, qualitative content analysis identified these themes addressing care coordination and impact of the Medical Foster Home model on those involved: (a) Medical Foster Home program supports Veterans' families; (b) Medical Foster Home program supports the caregiver as family; (c) Veterans' needs are met socially and culturally at the end of life; and (d) the changing needs of Veterans, families, and caregivers at Veterans' end of life are addressed. Insights into how to best support Medical Foster Home caregivers caring for Veterans at the end of life were gained including the need for more and better respite options and how caregivers are compensated in the month of the Veteran's death, as well as suggestions to navigate end-of-life care coordination with multiple stakeholders involved.

  2. Effect of daily oral omeprazole on 24 hour intragastric acidity.

    PubMed Central

    Walt, R P; Gomes, M D; Wood, E C; Logan, L H; Pounder, R E

    1983-01-01

    Twenty four hour intragastric acidity was measured in nine patients with duodenal ulcer before and after one week of treatment with oral omeprazole 30 mg daily, a drug that inhibits gastric secretion by inhibition of parietal cell H+K+ adenosinetriphosphatase (ATPase). Omeprazole virtually eliminated intragastric acidity in all patients: the median 24 hour intragastric pH rose from 1.4 to 5.3 and the mean hourly hydrogen ion activity fell from 38.50 to 1.95 mmol(mEq)/1 (p less than 0.001). This inhibition of 24 hour intragastric acidity is more profound than that previously reported with either cimetidine 1 g daily or ranitidine 300 mg daily. PMID:6407676

  3. [Gastroesophageal reflux during pregnancy: 24-hour esophageal ph monitoring].

    PubMed

    Anton, C; Anton, E; Drug, V; Stanciu, C

    2001-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) occurs in 30-50% of all pregnancies. The progressive rise in plasma progesterone has been suggested as a possible mediator of GER during pregnancy. Recent advances in technology have made it possible to detect GER through monitoring of esophageal pH for prolonged periods, including sleep. 24-hour pH monitoring is the proper method for diagnosing GER in pregnant women. If 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring is to be a useful diagnostic tool, it must reliably discriminate GER patients despite daily variations in distal esophageal acid exposure. To address this issue, we studied 62 women (30 healthy non-pregnant women without GER symptoms and 32 pregnant women with GER symptoms-heartburn, acid regurgitation) with 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring. Intrasubject reproducibility of three pH parameters to discriminate the presence of abnormal acid reflux was determined (DeMeester score, Kaye score, circadian one hour diagram for pH < 4). Each patient was interviewed, using a reliable questionnaire detailing individual habits, life style characteristics and symptoms, at four time points during the first, second, third trimesters of pregnancy and post-partum period. Symptoms of GER are common in pregnancy and although GER rarely endangers maternal or fetal health, it can significantly affect patient comfort and quality of life. We conclude: 1. GER is almost constantly present during pregnancy, increasing with gestational age. 2. The most important pH--parameter is DeMcester score. 3. Heartburn disappear after delivery. 4. 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring is the gold standard for measuring acid exposure and is a reproducible test for the diagnosis of GER in pregnancy.

  4. A web-based care-requiring client and Home Helper mutual support system.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Hidekuni; Yonezawa, Yoshiharu; Maki, Hiromichi; Hahn, Allen W; Caldwell, W Morton

    2005-01-01

    For the improved efficiency of home care of the elderly, a web-based system has been developed to enable faster communications between care-requiring clients, their Home Helper and the care manager. Changes to care items, such as cooking, bathing, washing, cleaning and shopping are usually requested by the elderly client over the telephone. However, the care central office often requires 24 hours to process and respond to such spoken requests. The system we have developed consists of Internet client computers with liquid crystal input tablets, wireless Internet Java enabled mobile phones and a central office server that yields almost instant communication. The care clients enter requests on the liquid crystal tablet at their home and then their computer sends these requests to the server at the Home Helper central office. The server automatically creates a new file of the requested items, and then immediately transfers them to the care manager and Home Helper's mobile phone. With this non-vocal and paperless system, the care-requiring clients, who can easily operate the liquid crystal tablet, can very quickly communicate their needed care change requests to their Home Helper.

  5. Home care leadership of the future.

    PubMed

    King, Nancy Koury

    2002-09-01

    Home care leaders have been given an important responsibility--to assure the delivery of quality care to patients in need. And yet we accomplish this important goal only through the work of others. As leaders in home care we must work to continually assess and refine our leadership skills. There are several key themes that can assist and benefit you as a home care leader.

  6. FastStats: Home Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Home Health Care Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are ... Data Alzheimer’s disease Characteristics and Use of Home Health Care by Men and Women Aged 65 and Over [ ...

  7. Telemedicine in Neonatal Home Care: Identifying Parental Needs Through Participatory Design

    PubMed Central

    Brødsgaard, Anne; Zachariassen, Gitte; Clemensen, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Background For the majority of preterm infants, the last weeks of hospital admission mainly concerns tube feeding and establishment of breastfeeding. Neonatal home care (NH) was developed to allow infants to remain at home for tube feeding and establishment of breastfeeding with regular home visits from neonatal nurses. For hospitals covering large regions, home visits may be challenging, time consuming, and expensive and alternative approaches must be explored. Objective To identify parental needs when wanting to provide neonatal home care supported by telemedicine. Methods The study used participatory design and qualitative methods. Data were collected from observational studies, individual interviews, and focus group interviews. Two neonatal units participated. One unit was experienced in providing neonatal home care with home visits, and the other planned to offer neonatal home care with telemedicine support. A total of 9 parents with preterm infants assigned to a neonatal home care program and 10 parents with preterm infants admitted to a neonatal unit participated in individual interviews and focus group interviews, respectively. Results Three overall themes were identified: being a family, parent self-efficacy, and nurse-provided security. Parents expressed desire for the following: (1) a telemedicine device to serve as a “bell cord” to the neonatal unit, giving 24-hour access to nurses, (2) video-conferencing to provide security at home, (3) timely written email communication with the neonatal unit, and (4) an online knowledge base on preterm infant care, breastfeeding, and nutrition. Conclusions Our findings highlight the importance of neonatal home care. NH provides parents with a feeling of being a family, supports their self-efficacy, and gives them a feeling of security when combined with nursing guidance. Parents did not request hands-on support for infant care, but instead expressed a need for communication and guidance, which could be met using

  8. The Future of Home Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Landers, Steven; Madigan, Elizabeth; Leff, Bruce; Rosati, Robert J.; McCann, Barbara A.; Hornbake, Rodney; MacMillan, Richard; Jones, Kate; Bowles, Kathryn; Dowding, Dawn; Lee, Teresa; Moorhead, Tracey; Rodriguez, Sally; Breese, Erica

    2016-01-01

    The Future of Home Health project sought to support transformation of home health and home-based care to meet the needs of patients in the evolving U.S. health care system. Interviews with key thought leaders and stakeholders resulted in key themes about the future of home health care. By synthesizing this qualitative research, a literature review, case studies, and the themes from a 2014 Institute of Medicine and National Research Council workshop on “The Future of Home Health Care,” the authors articulate a vision for home-based care and recommend a bold framework for the Medicare-certified home health agency of the future. The authors also identify challenges and recommendations for achievement of this framework. PMID:27746670

  9. Enabling research in care homes: an evaluation of a national network of research ready care homes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In the UK care homes are one of the main providers of long term care for older people with dementia. Despite the recent increase in care home research, residents with dementia are often excluded from studies. Care home research networks have been recommended by the Ministerial Advisory Group on Dementia Research (MAGDR) as a way of increasing research opportunities for residents with dementia. This paper reports on an evaluation of the feasibility and early impact of an initiative to increase care home participation in research. Methods A two phase, mixed methods approach was used; phase 1 established a baseline of current and recent studies including the National Institute for Health Research portfolio. To explore the experiences of recruiting care homes and research participation, interviews were conducted with researchers working for the Dementia and Neurodegenerative Diseases Research Network (DeNDRoN) and care home managers. In phase 2, four DeNDRoN area offices recruited care homes to a care home network for their region. The care home networks were separate from the DeNDRoN research network. Diaries were used to document and cost recruitment; DeNDRoN staff were interviewed to understand the barriers, facilitators and impact of the care home networks. Results Thirty three current or recent studies were identified as involving care homes as care home specific studies or those which included residents. Further details of care home recruitment were obtained on 20 studies by contacting study teams. Care home managers were keen to be involved in research that provided staff support, benefits for residents and with minimal disruption. In phase 2, 141 care homes were recruited to the care home research networks, through corporate engagement and individual invitation. Pre-existing relationships with care homes facilitated recruitment. Sites with minimal experience of working with care homes identified the need for care home training for researchers

  10. Home care safety markers: a scoping review.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Marilyn; Lang, Ariella; Storch, Jan; Stevenson, Lynn; Donaldson, Susan; Barber, Tanya; Iaboni, Kristine

    2013-01-01

    Safety in home care is a new research frontier, and one in which demand for services continues to rise. A scoping review of the home care literature on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and congestive heart failure was thus completed to identify safety markers that could serve to develop our understanding of safety in this sector. Results generated seven safety markers: (a) Home alone; (b) A fixed agenda in a foreign language; (c) Strangers in the home; (d) The butcher, the baker, the candlestick maker; (e) Medication mania; (f) Out of pocket: The cost of caring at home; and (g) My health for yours: Declining caregiver health. PMID:23679662

  11. Better jobs, better care: building the home care work force.

    PubMed

    Surpin, R; Haslanger, K; Dawson, S

    1994-08-01

    This paper focuses on providing quality care in the paraprofessional home care industry. Despite government policies that have encouraged home-based care for 20 years, home health care still remains relegated to second-class status by the rest of the health care industry. Home care is unique because it relies primarily on paraprofessional care delivered by a home care aide working alone, essentially as a guest in the client's home. The resulting interpersonal dynamic between patient and caregiver--which develops far from the eyes of the primary physician, regulators, and third-party payers--is one unlike any other patient-caregiver relationship in the health care system. The quality of care received by the client is linked directly to the quality of the paraprofessional's job: "good jobs" are prerequisite for "good service." Good jobs, however, are not enough. They must be supported by paraprofessional agencies that add real value to the home care service. Part I We define quality home care as meeting the client's needs. Unfortunately, since home care is provided in dispersed, minimally supervised settings, measuring quality of service is very difficult. For this reason, we suggest that it is the front-line employee--the home care aide who is present for hours every visit--who can best determine if the client's needs are being met, and who is best positioned to respond accordingly. Part II To best meet client needs, paraprofessional home care must be built around the home care aide. This requires that home care aides (1) be carefully selected during the hiring process, (2) be well trained, and (3) be empowered with considerable responsibility and capacity to respond to the daily needs of the clients. This Model, one that emphasizes the front-line employee, is in full keeping with the "total quality management" innovations that are currently reorganizing America's service industries. Unfortunately this model is not typically reflected in current paraprofessional

  12. An Electronic System for Home Care Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Saba, Virginia K.; Irwin, Ruth Galten

    2001-01-01

    This is demonstration of an Electronic Tracking System being implemented in several Home Health Agencies in the US. It uses the Home Health Care Classification (HHCC) System, a standardized terminology designed and developed to document patient care. The goal it to take the coded data to design the Electronic Tracking System as a method for predicting resource requirements, tracking care needs, and measuring the outcomes of the care.

  13. Neonatal intensive care in the home.

    PubMed

    Sudia-Robinson, T M

    1998-12-01

    As the trend toward early discharge and home care of medically fragile neonates continues, parents find themselves thrust into a lifestyle for which they are unprepared. They must quickly adjust to a new daily routine and new home environment. They watch as part of their home is transformed into a mini intensive care unit with the kind of high-tech equipment and supplies once exclusively reserved for hospital settings. Parents also must learn to live with limited privacy because home care nurses and other providers become a visible presence and a daily reminder that their lives have been forever altered. PMID:10030204

  14. Integrated working between residential care homes and primary care: a survey of care homes in England

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Older people living in care homes in England have complex health needs due to a range of medical conditions, mental health needs and frailty. Despite an increasing policy expectation that professionals should operate in an integrated way across organisational boundaries, there is a lack of understanding between care homes and the National Health Service (NHS) about how the two sectors should work together, meaning that residents can experience a poor "fit" between their needs, and services they can access. This paper describes a survey to establish the current extent of integrated working that exists between care homes and primary and community health and social services. Methods A self-completion, online questionnaire was designed by the research team. Items on the different dimensions of integration (funding, administrative, organisational, service delivery, clinical care) were included. The survey was sent to a random sample of residential care homes with more than 25 beds (n = 621) in England in 2009. Responses were analysed using quantitative and qualitative methods. Results The survey achieved an overall response rate of 15.8%. Most care homes (78.7%) worked with more than one general practice. Respondents indicated that a mean of 14.1 professionals/ services (other than GPs) had visited the care homes in the last six months (SD 5.11, median 14); a mean of .39 (SD.163) professionals/services per bed. The most frequent services visiting were district nursing, chiropody and community psychiatric nurses. Many (60%) managers considered that they worked with the NHS in an integrated way, including sharing documents, engaging in integrated care planning and joint learning and training. However, some care home managers cited working practices dictated by NHS methods of service delivery and priorities for care, rather than those of the care home or residents, a lack of willingness by NHS professionals to share information, and low levels of respect for

  15. Medication Information Flow in Home Care.

    PubMed

    Norri-Sederholm, Teija; Saranto, Kaija; Paakkonen, Heikki

    2016-01-01

    Critical success factors in medication care involve communication and information sharing. Knowing the information needs of each actor in medication process in home care, is the first step to ensure that the right type of information is available, when needed. The aim of the study was to describe the needed and delivered information in home care in order to perform medication care successfully. A total of 15 nurses from primary home care participated a workshop focusing on medication treatment. The qualitative data was collected by focus group technique. Data was analyzed according to content analysis. Three medication information themes were formulated: Client-related information, medication, and medication error. The critical medication information were generic drug information, validity of the list of medication and client's clinical status. As a conclusion findings, show the diversity of the medication information in home care. PMID:27332222

  16. Hospital at home: home-based end of life care

    PubMed Central

    Shepperd, Sasha; Wee, Bee; Straus, Sharon E

    2014-01-01

    Background The policy in a number of countries is to provide people with a terminal illness the choice of dying at home. This policy is supported by surveys indicating that the general public and patients with a terminal illness would prefer to receive end of life care at home. Objectives To determine if providing home-based end of life care reduces the likelihood of dying in hospital and what effect this has on patients’ symptoms, quality of life, health service costs and care givers compared with inpatient hospital or hospice care. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library) to October 2009, Ovid MED-LINE(R) 1950 to March 2011, EMBASE 1980 to October 2009, CINAHL 1982 to October 2009 and EconLit to October 2009. We checked the reference lists of articles identified for potentially relevant articles. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials, interrupted time series or controlled before and after studies evaluating the effectiveness of home-based end of life care with inpatient hospital or hospice care for people aged 18 years and older. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently extracted data and assessed study quality. We combined the published data for dichotomous outcomes using fixed-effect Mantel-Haenszel meta-analysis. When combining outcome data was not possible we presented the data in narrative summary tables. Main results We included four trials in this review. Those receiving home-based end of life care were statistically significantly more likely to die at home compared with those receiving usual care (RR 1.33, 95% CI 1.14 to 1.55, P = 0.0002; Chi 2 = 1.72, df = 2, P = 0.42, I2 = 0% (three trials; N=652)). We detected no statistically significant differences for functional status (measured by the Barthel Index), psychological well-being or cognitive status, between patients receiving home-based end of life care compared with those receiving standard care (which

  17. Home Health Care: What It Is and What to Expect

    MedlinePlus

    ... care + Share widget - Select to show What’s home health care & what should I expect? What's home health care? Home health care is a wide range of ... listed. What should I expect from my home health care? Doctor’s orders are needed to start care. Once ...

  18. Managing sleep and wakefulness in a 24-hour world

    PubMed Central

    Coveney, Catherine M

    2014-01-01

    This article contributes to literature on the sociology of sleep by exploring the sleeping practices and subjective sleep experiences of two social groups: shift workers and students. It draws on data, collected in the UK from 25 semi-structured interviews, to discuss the complex ways in which working patterns and social activities impact upon experiences and expectations of sleep in our wired awake world. The data show that, typically, sleep is valued and considered to be important for health, general wellbeing, appearance and physical and cognitive functioning. However, sleep time is often cut back on in favour of work demands and social activities. While shift workers described their efforts to fit in an adequate amount of sleep per 24-hour period, for students, the adoption of a flexible sleep routine was thought to be favourable for maintaining a work–social life balance. Collectively, respondents reported using a wide range of strategies, techniques, technologies and practices to encourage, overcome or delay sleep(iness) and boost, promote or enhance wakefulness/alertness at socially desirable times. The analysis demonstrates how social context impacts not only on how we come to think about sleep and understand it, but also how we manage or self-regulate our sleeping patterns. PMID:23957268

  19. Cognitive Performance during a 24-Hour Cold Exposure Survival Simulation.

    PubMed

    Taber, Michael J; Hartley, Geoffrey L; McGarr, Gregory W; Zaharieva, Dessi; Basset, Fabien A; Hynes, Zach; Haman, Francois; Pinet, Bernard M; DuCharme, Michel B; Cheung, Stephen S

    2016-01-01

    Survivor of a ship ground in polar regions may have to wait more than five days before being rescued. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore cognitive performance during prolonged cold exposure. Core temperature (T c) and cognitive test battery (CTB) performance data were collected from eight participants during 24 hours of cold exposure (7.5°C ambient air temperature). Participants (recruited from those who have regular occupational exposure to cold) were instructed that they could freely engage in minimal exercise that was perceived to maintaining a tolerable level of thermal comfort. Despite the active engagement, test conditions were sufficient to significantly decrease T c after exposure and to eliminate the typical 0.5-1.0°C circadian rise and drop in core temperature throughout a 24 h cycle. Results showed minimal changes in CTB performance regardless of exposure time. Based on the results, it is recommended that survivors who are waiting for rescue should be encouraged to engage in mild physical activity, which could have the benefit of maintaining metabolic heat production, improve motivation, and act as a distractor from cold discomfort. This recommendation should be taken into consideration during future research and when considering guidelines for mandatory survival equipment regarding cognitive performance. PMID:27478839

  20. Cognitive Performance during a 24-Hour Cold Exposure Survival Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Geoffrey L.; Zaharieva, Dessi; Basset, Fabien A.; Hynes, Zach

    2016-01-01

    Survivor of a ship ground in polar regions may have to wait more than five days before being rescued. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore cognitive performance during prolonged cold exposure. Core temperature (Tc) and cognitive test battery (CTB) performance data were collected from eight participants during 24 hours of cold exposure (7.5°C ambient air temperature). Participants (recruited from those who have regular occupational exposure to cold) were instructed that they could freely engage in minimal exercise that was perceived to maintaining a tolerable level of thermal comfort. Despite the active engagement, test conditions were sufficient to significantly decrease Tc after exposure and to eliminate the typical 0.5–1.0°C circadian rise and drop in core temperature throughout a 24 h cycle. Results showed minimal changes in CTB performance regardless of exposure time. Based on the results, it is recommended that survivors who are waiting for rescue should be encouraged to engage in mild physical activity, which could have the benefit of maintaining metabolic heat production, improve motivation, and act as a distractor from cold discomfort. This recommendation should be taken into consideration during future research and when considering guidelines for mandatory survival equipment regarding cognitive performance. PMID:27478839

  1. Managing sleep and wakefulness in a 24-hour world.

    PubMed

    Coveney, Catherine M

    2014-01-01

    This article contributes to literature on the sociology of sleep by exploring the sleeping practices and subjective sleep experiences of two social groups: shift workers and students. It draws on data, collected in the UK from 25 semi-structured interviews, to discuss the complex ways in which working patterns and social activities impact upon experiences and expectations of sleep in our wired awake world. The data show that, typically, sleep is valued and considered to be important for health, general wellbeing, appearance and physical and cognitive functioning. However, sleep time is often cut back on in favour of work demands and social activities. While shift workers described their efforts to fit in an adequate amount of sleep per 24-hour period, for students, the adoption of a flexible sleep routine was thought to be favourable for maintaining a work-social life balance. Collectively, respondents reported using a wide range of strategies, techniques, technologies and practices to encourage, overcome or delay sleep(iness) and boost, promote or enhance wakefulness/alertness at socially desirable times. The analysis demonstrates how social context impacts not only on how we come to think about sleep and understand it, but also how we manage or self-regulate our sleeping patterns.

  2. Is home health care a substitute for hospital care?

    PubMed

    Lichtenberg, Frank R

    2012-01-01

    A previous study used aggregate (region-level) data to investigate whether home health care serves as a substitute for inpatient hospital care and concluded that "there is no evidence that services provided at home replace hospital services." However, that study was based on a cross-section of regions observed at a single point of time and did not control for unobserved regional heterogeneity. In this article, state-level employment data are used to reexamine whether home health care serves as a substitute for inpatient hospital care. This analysis is based on longitudinal (panel) data--observations on states in two time periods--which enable the reduction or elimination of biases that arise from use of cross-sectional data. This study finds that states that had higher home health care employment growth during the period 1998-2008 tended to have lower hospital employment growth, controlling for changes in population. Moreover, states that had higher home health care payroll growth tended to have lower hospital payroll growth. The estimates indicate that the reduction in hospital payroll associated with a $1,000 increase in home health payroll is not less than $1,542, and may be as high as $2,315. This study does not find a significant relationship between growth in utilization of home health care and growth in utilization of nursing and residential care facilities. An important reason why home health care may serve as a substitute for hospital care is that the availability of home health care may allow patients to be discharged from the hospital earlier. Hospital discharge data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project are used to test the hypothesis that use of home health care reduces the length of hospital stays. Major Diagnostic Categories with larger increases in the fraction of patients discharged to home health care tended to have larger declines in mean length of stay (LOS). Between 1998 and 2008, mean LOS declined by 4.1%, from 4.78 to 4.59 days

  3. Is home health care a substitute for hospital care?

    PubMed

    Lichtenberg, Frank R

    2012-01-01

    A previous study used aggregate (region-level) data to investigate whether home health care serves as a substitute for inpatient hospital care and concluded that "there is no evidence that services provided at home replace hospital services." However, that study was based on a cross-section of regions observed at a single point of time and did not control for unobserved regional heterogeneity. In this article, state-level employment data are used to reexamine whether home health care serves as a substitute for inpatient hospital care. This analysis is based on longitudinal (panel) data--observations on states in two time periods--which enable the reduction or elimination of biases that arise from use of cross-sectional data. This study finds that states that had higher home health care employment growth during the period 1998-2008 tended to have lower hospital employment growth, controlling for changes in population. Moreover, states that had higher home health care payroll growth tended to have lower hospital payroll growth. The estimates indicate that the reduction in hospital payroll associated with a $1,000 increase in home health payroll is not less than $1,542, and may be as high as $2,315. This study does not find a significant relationship between growth in utilization of home health care and growth in utilization of nursing and residential care facilities. An important reason why home health care may serve as a substitute for hospital care is that the availability of home health care may allow patients to be discharged from the hospital earlier. Hospital discharge data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project are used to test the hypothesis that use of home health care reduces the length of hospital stays. Major Diagnostic Categories with larger increases in the fraction of patients discharged to home health care tended to have larger declines in mean length of stay (LOS). Between 1998 and 2008, mean LOS declined by 4.1%, from 4.78 to 4.59 days

  4. Moving Parkinson care to the home.

    PubMed

    Dorsey, E Ray; Vlaanderen, Floris P; Engelen, Lucien Jlpg; Kieburtz, Karl; Zhu, William; Biglan, Kevin M; Faber, Marjan J; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2016-09-01

    In many ways, the care of individuals with Parkinson disease does not meet their needs. Despite the documented benefits of receiving care from clinicians with Parkinson disease expertise, many patients (if not most) do not. Moreover, current care models frequently require older individuals with impaired mobility, cognition, and driving ability to be driven by overburdened caregivers to large, complex urban medical centers. Moving care to the patient's home would make Parkinson disease care more patient-centered. Demographic factors, including aging populations, and social factors, such as the splintering of the extended family, will increase the need for home-based care. Technological advances, especially the ability to assess and deliver care remotely, will enable the transition of care back to the home. However, despite its promise, this next generation of home-based care will have to overcome barriers, including outdated insurance models and a technological divide. Once these barriers are addressed, home-based care will increase access to high quality care for the growing number of individuals with Parkinson disease. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. PMID:27501323

  5. Moving Parkinson care to the home.

    PubMed

    Dorsey, E Ray; Vlaanderen, Floris P; Engelen, Lucien Jlpg; Kieburtz, Karl; Zhu, William; Biglan, Kevin M; Faber, Marjan J; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2016-09-01

    In many ways, the care of individuals with Parkinson disease does not meet their needs. Despite the documented benefits of receiving care from clinicians with Parkinson disease expertise, many patients (if not most) do not. Moreover, current care models frequently require older individuals with impaired mobility, cognition, and driving ability to be driven by overburdened caregivers to large, complex urban medical centers. Moving care to the patient's home would make Parkinson disease care more patient-centered. Demographic factors, including aging populations, and social factors, such as the splintering of the extended family, will increase the need for home-based care. Technological advances, especially the ability to assess and deliver care remotely, will enable the transition of care back to the home. However, despite its promise, this next generation of home-based care will have to overcome barriers, including outdated insurance models and a technological divide. Once these barriers are addressed, home-based care will increase access to high quality care for the growing number of individuals with Parkinson disease. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  6. Comparison of Population Iodine Estimates from 24-Hour Urine and Timed-Spot Urine Samples

    PubMed Central

    Cogswell, Mary E.; Swanson, Christine A.; Sullivan, Kevin M.; Chen, Te-Ching; Carriquiry, Alicia L.; Dodd, Kevin W.; Caldwell, Kathleen L.; Wang, Chia-Yih

    2014-01-01

    Background: Median urine iodine concentration (UIC; μg/L) in spot urine samples is recommended for monitoring population iodine status. Other common measures are iodine:creatinine ratio (I/Cr; μg/g) and estimated 24-hour urine iodine excretion (UIE; I/Cr×predicted 24-hour Cr; μg/day). Despite different units, these measures are often used interchangeably, and it is unclear how they compare with the reference standard 24-hour UIE. Methods: Volunteers aged 18–39 years collected all their urine samples for 24 hours (n=400). Voids from morning, afternoon, evening, overnight, and a composite 24-hour sample were analyzed for iodine. We calculated median observed 24-hour UIE and 24-hour UIC, and spot UIC, I/Cr, and two measures of estimated UIE calculated using predicted 24-hour Cr from published estimates by Kesteloot and Joosens (varies by age and sex) and published equations by Mage et al. (varies by age, sex, race, and anthropometric measures). We examined mean differences and relative difference across iodine excretion levels using Bland–Altman plots. Results: Median 24-hour UIE was 173.6 μg/day and 24-hour UIC was 144.8 μg/L. From timed-spot urine samples, estimates were: UIC 147.3–156.2 μg/L; I/Cr 103.6–114.3 μg/g, estimated 24-hour UIE (Kesteloot and Joosens) 145.7–163.3 μg/day; and estimated 24-hour UIE (Mage) 176.5–187.7 μg/day. Iodine measures did not vary consistently by timing of spot urine collection. Compared with observed 24-hour UIE, on average, estimated (Mage) 24-hour UIE was not significantly different, while estimated 24-hour UIE (Kesteloot and Joosens) was significantly different for some ethnicity/sex groups. Compared with 24-hour UIC, on average, spot UIC did not differ. Conclusions: Estimates of UIC, I/Cr, and estimated 24-hour UIE (I/Cr×predicted 24-hour Cr) from spot urine samples should not be used interchangeably. Estimated 24-hour UIE, where predicted 24-hour Cr varies by age, sex, ethnicity, and

  7. Preparation and results of a 24-hour orbital flight.

    PubMed

    Titov, G S

    1963-01-01

    The space age presents man with unprecedented opportunities for discovery and for cooperative endeavors to benefit all mankind. My flight of August 6-7, 1961 was conducted for the purpose of determining whether man can stay and work effectively and whether all systems of the spaceship can operate successfully during a period of 24 hours in space. The flight of Vostok II represents an experimental step in a logical sequence which included the first earth orbiting flight of USSR citizen Yuri A. Gagarin. Preparation for the flight included the study of theoretical and applied subjects, testing in various kinds of apparatus which provide acceleration, heat and isolation experience, brief airborne weightless flights and parachute landings, in addition to extensive training in a real spacecraft having simulators for normal and emergency contingencies of space flight. The actual flight was therefore carried out with a sense of confidence and familiarity and with continuous close radio contact with ground centers from whom my fellow cosmonauts served as spokesmen. Sequential boosters totaling 600 000 kg thrust placed the 4731 kg spaceship into a perfect orbit varying in altitude from 178-246 km in a plane 64 degrees 58' inclined to the equator. The spaceship made 17 orbits around the earth landing 25 hours, 18 minutes after take-off. The cabin had full atmospheric pressure and a comfortable habitability which could be extended for 10 days. I was able to maneuver the spaceship and perform many other control functions, make observations and take pictures of the earth and its cloud cover, eat meals and sleep all with good efficiency. I experienced mild symptoms suggestive of seasickness which were aggravated by head turning, ameliorated by sleep and entirely relieved by resumption of g-loading during descent. Altogether analyses of the physical and structural performance of the spaceship and the continuously monitored physiological responses of the pilot indicate that all

  8. Flexibility of working hours in the 24-hour society.

    PubMed

    Costa, G

    2006-01-01

    The 24-hour Society undergoes an ineluctable process towards a social organisation where time constraints are no more restricting human life. The borders between working and social times are no more fixed and rigidly determined, and the value of working time changes according to the different economic and social effects you may consider. Shift and night work, irregular and flexible working hours, together with new technologies, are the milestone of this epochal passage. What are the advantages and disadvantages for the individual, the companies, and the society? What is the cost/benefit ratio in terms of health and social well-being? Coping properly with this process means avoiding a passive acceptance of it with consequent maladjustments at both individual and social level, but adopting effective preventive and compensative strategies aimed at building up a more sustainable society. Flexible working times now appear to be one of the best ways to cope with the demands of the modern life, but there are different points of view about labour and temporal 'flexibility" between employers and employees. For the former it means a prompt adaptation to market demands and technological innovations; for the latter it is a way to improve working and social life, by decreasing work constraints and increasing control and autonomy. Although it can be easily speculated that individual-based 'flexibility" should improve health and well-being, and especially satisfaction, whereas company-based flexibility" might interfere negatively, the effective consequences on health and well-being have still to be analysed properly. PMID:17017360

  9. Intermittent short ECG recording is more effective than 24-hour Holter ECG in detection of arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many patients report symptoms of palpitations or dizziness/presyncope. These patients are often referred for 24-hour Holter ECG, although the sensitivity for detecting relevant arrhythmias is comparatively low. Intermittent short ECG recording over a longer time period might be a convenient and more sensitive alternative. The objective of this study is to compare the efficacy of 24-hour Holter ECG with intermittent short ECG recording over four weeks to detect relevant arrhythmias in patients with palpitations or dizziness/presyncope. Methods Design: prospective, observational, cross-sectional study. Setting: Clinical Physiology, University Hospital. Patients: 108 consecutive patients referred for ambiguous palpitations or dizziness/presyncope. Interventions: All individuals underwent a 24-hour Holter ECG and additionally registered 30-second handheld ECG (Zenicor EKG® thumb) recordings at home, twice daily and when having cardiac symptoms, during 28 days. Main outcome measures: Significant arrhythmias: atrial fibrillation (AF), paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT), atrioventricular (AV) block II–III, sinus arrest (SA), wide complex tachycardia (WCT). Results 95 patients, 42 men and 53 women with a mean age of 54.1 years, completed registrations. Analysis of Holter registrations showed atrial fibrillation (AF) in two patients and atrioventricular (AV) block II in one patient (= 3.2% relevant arrhythmias [95% CI 1.1–8.9]). Intermittent handheld ECG detected nine patients with AF, three with paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT) and one with AV-block-II (= 13.7% relevant arrhythmias [95% CI 8.2–22.0]). There was a significant difference between the two methods in favour of intermittent ECG with regard to the ability to detect relevant arrhythmias (P = 0.0094). With Holter ECG, no symptoms were registered during any of the detected arrhythmias. With intermittent ECG, symptoms were registered during half of the arrhythmia

  10. Hospital information technology in home care

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Pei-Ying

    2016-01-01

    The utilization of hospital information technology (HIT) as a tool for home care is a recent trend in health science. Subjects gaining benefits from this new endeavor include middle-aged individuals with serious chronic illness living at home. Published data on the utilization of health care information technology especially for home care in chronic illness patients have increased enormously in recent past. The common chronic illnesses reported in these studies were primarily on heart and lung diseases. Furthermore, health professionals have confirmed in these studies that HIT was beneficial in gaining better access to information regarding their patients and they were also able to save that information easily for future use. On the other hand, some health professional also observed that the use of HIT in home care is not suitable for everyone and that individuals cannot be replaced by HIT. On the whole it is clear that the use of HIT could complement communication in home care. The present review aims to shed light on these latest aspects of the health care information technology in home care. PMID:27698741

  11. Hospital information technology in home care

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Pei-Ying

    2016-01-01

    The utilization of hospital information technology (HIT) as a tool for home care is a recent trend in health science. Subjects gaining benefits from this new endeavor include middle-aged individuals with serious chronic illness living at home. Published data on the utilization of health care information technology especially for home care in chronic illness patients have increased enormously in recent past. The common chronic illnesses reported in these studies were primarily on heart and lung diseases. Furthermore, health professionals have confirmed in these studies that HIT was beneficial in gaining better access to information regarding their patients and they were also able to save that information easily for future use. On the other hand, some health professional also observed that the use of HIT in home care is not suitable for everyone and that individuals cannot be replaced by HIT. On the whole it is clear that the use of HIT could complement communication in home care. The present review aims to shed light on these latest aspects of the health care information technology in home care.

  12. Psychological Issues in Pediatric Home Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohrman, Arthur F.

    The popularity of home care for chronically ill or technology-dependent children has moved professionals into unfamiliar settings. Factors responsible for the relatively sudden surge of effort to place children with complex needs at home include costs, individualism and autonomy, changing views of medicine and its institutions, limits of medical…

  13. Home Care Nursing Improves Cancer Symptom Management

    Cancer.gov

    Home care nursing (HCN) improves the management of symptoms in breast and colorectal cancer patients who take the oral chemotherapy drug capecitabine, according to a study published online November 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

  14. The Determinants of Care Home Closure

    PubMed Central

    Allan, Stephen; Forder, Julien

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the causes of full closure of care homes in the English care home/nursing home market. We develop theoretical arguments about two causes for closure that are triggered by errors or external shocks: poor economic sustainability and regulatory action. Homes aiming to operate with lower quality in the market are argued for a number of reasons to be more susceptible to errors/shocks in setting quality, especially negative errors, leading to an empirical hypothesis that observed quality should negatively affect closure chance. In addition, given quality, homes facing relatively high levels of local competition should also have an increased chance of closure. We use a panel of care homes from 2008 and 2010 to examine factors affecting their closure status in subsequent years. We allow for the potential endogeneity of home quality and use multiple imputation to replace missing data. Results suggest that homes with comparatively higher quality and/or lower levels of competition have less chance of closure than other homes. We discuss that the results provide some support for the policy of regulators providing quality information to potential purchasers in the market. © 2015 The Authors. Health Economics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:25760588

  15. 24 hour blood pressure monitoring in healthy and hypertensive children.

    PubMed Central

    Reusz, G S; Hóbor, M; Tulassay, T; Sallay, P; Miltényi, M

    1994-01-01

    24 Hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) was performed to provide data on the normal daily blood pressure of healthy schoolchildren and on patients with hypertension. The subjects studied were 123 healthy schoolchildren with a mean (SD) age of 12.5 (1.6) years (range 9.5-14.5 years), 24 children with borderline or mild hypertension, 17 with renal hypertension and normal renal function, 10 with chronic renal failure, and six with a renal allograft. In eight children with definite renal disease a second measurement was performed after treatment modification. The monitor used for ABPM was validated with a mercury column manometer. The mean (SD) of the signed differences of the blood pressure measured by the two methods was -0.19 (1.75) mmHg for the systolic and -0.21 (2.11) mmHg for the diastolic blood pressure (n = 60). Normal values for daytime and night time blood pressure were determined for those aged 10-14 years. The mean (SD) blood pressure of the 123 children was 109 (7)/66 (8) mmHg (systolic/diastolic) for the daytime and 96 (8)/52 (7) mmHg at night time. Of the 24 children with borderline or mild hypertension 14 had a raised blood pressure on ABPM. The circadian rhythm was disturbed in three children of this group. Even children with normal daytime blood pressure had significantly higher systolic blood pressure in the night when compared with the controls. The incidence of disturbed circadian rhythm was higher in the groups with renal hypertension (4/17 in the subgroup with normal renal function, 5/16 in the group with renal failure and/or transplantation). All children undergoing a second ABPM measurement had a lower average blood pressure after treatment adjustment. ABPM measurements were reproducible and accurate. The method provided new data on the physiological circadian variation of blood pressure in healthy children. It proved to be a helpful tool in the diagnosis of hypertension, particularly in the detection of cases of disturbance of the

  16. Nutritional behavior of cyclists during a 24-hour team relay race: a field study report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Information about behavior of energy intake in ultra-endurance cyclists during a 24-hour team relay race is scarce. The nutritional strategy during such an event is an important factor which athletes should plan carefully before the race. The purpose of this study was to examine and compare the nutritional intake of ultra-endurance cyclists during a 24-hour team relay race with the current nutritional guidelines for endurance events. Additionally, we analyzed the relationship among the nutritional and performance variables. Methods Using a observational design, nutritional intake of eight males (mean ± SD: 36.7 ± 4.7 years; 71.6 ± 4.9 kg; 174.6 ± 7.3 cm; BMI 23.5 ± 0.5 kg/m2) participating in a 24-hour team relay cycling race was assessed. All food and fluid intake by athletes were weighed and recorded. Additionally, distance and speed performed by each rider were also recorded. Furthermore, before to the race, all subjects carried out an incremental exercise test to determine two heart rate-VO2 regression equations which were used to estimate the energy expenditure. Results The mean ingestion of macronutrients during the event was 943 ± 245 g (13.1 ± 4.0 g/kg) of carbohydrates, 174 ± 146 g (2.4 ± 1.9 g/kg) of proteins and 107 ± 56 g (1.5 ± 0.7 g/kg) of lipids, respectively. This amount of nutrients reported an average nutrient intake of 22.8 ± 8.9 MJ which were significantly lower compared with energy expenditure 42.9 ± 6.8 MJ (P = 0.012). Average fluid consumption corresponded to 10497 ± 2654 mL. Mean caffeine ingestion was 142 ± 76 mg. Additionally, there was no relationship between the main nutritional variables (i.e. energy intake, carbohydrates, proteins, fluids and caffeine ingestion) and the main performance variables (i.e. distance and speed). Conclusions A 24-hour hours cycling competition in a team relay format elicited high energy demands which were not compensated by energy intake of the athletes despite that dietary

  17. High-tech, high-touch perinatal home care.

    PubMed

    Dahlberg, N L; Blazek, D; Wikoff, B; Tuckwell, B L; Koloroutis, M

    1995-05-01

    Perinatal home care for women experiencing a high-risk pregnancy often requires the use of technologies for safe home management. Home care professionals need to integrate high technology with high touch to ensure the best results.

  18. Kansas Adult Care Home Aide Curriculum. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fornelli, Linda K.; Bartel, Myrna J.

    This curriculum guide is designed for use by instructors whose responsibility it is to prepare persons to provide basic direct care for residents living in adult care homes. Addressed in the individual units of part I (which contains information to be covered in the first 40 hours of training) are the following topics: working in an adult care…

  19. They Are Called Nursing Homes for a Reason: RN Staffing in Long-Term Care Facilities.

    PubMed

    Harden, J Taylor; Burger, Sarah Greene

    2015-12-01

    According to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), the Consolidated Medicare and Medicaid regulations have not been systematically reviewed and updated since 1991. Existing regulations require that, with certain exceptions, an RN provide services in a facility for 8 consecutive hours per day, 7 days per week; licensed practical nurses (LPNs) 24 hours per day; and sufficient staff to meet residents' needs. The requirements to determine "sufficient" staff remain undefined by CMS. Several national organizations support RN staffing 24 hours per day each day of the week (24/7). These organizations provided evidence refuting CMS' position that it does not have sufficient information at this time to require a specific number of staff or hours of nursing care per resident. Consideration should be given to the Institute of Medicine recommendation affrming the need for and requiring the presence of at least one RN within every nursing home facility at all times. Currently, there is a bill in the House of Representatives that supports 24/7 RN coverage in nursing homes, which must become both bipartisan and bicameral to be passed. PMID:26594951

  20. [Specialized palliative home care: An interprofessional network].

    PubMed

    Alt-Epping, Bernd; Nauck, F

    2015-04-01

    Specialized palliative home care ("Spezialisierte Ambulante Palliativversorgung", SAPV) denotes an intensified, multi-professional support system at home for patients suffering from complex symptoms and needs associated with severe and advanced illness. In 2007, a change in legislation guaranteed SAPV to any patient (covered by public health insurance) in need of specialized palliative care. Despite further specifications by federal institutions, SAPV has been transferred into German clinical practice in a very regionally diverse manner. This contribution describes the legislative and conceptual framework of SAPV, the financial and clinical aspects, and its future perspectives for the comprehensive palliative care of patients with complex demands.

  1. Speak Up: Help Prevent Errors in Your Care: Home Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... to see if they meet The Joint Commission’s quality standards. • Ask if the home care organization has taken ... rules that make sure that patient safety and quality standards are followed. P articipate in all decisions about ...

  2. Misalignment between Medicare Policies and Depression Care in Home Health Care: Home health provider perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Yuhua; Eggman, Ashley; Richardson, Joshua; Bruce, Martha

    2013-01-01

    Objective Depression affects one in four older adults receiving home health care. Medicare policies are influential in shaping home health practice. This study aims to identify Medicare policy areas that are aligned or misaligned with depression care quality improvement in home health care. Methods Qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews with nurses and administrators from five home health agencies in five states (n=20). Digitally recorded interviews were transcribed and analyzed using the grounded theory method. A multi-disciplinary team iteratively developed a codebook from interview data to identify themes. Results Several important Medicare policies are largely misaligned with depression care quality improvement in home health care: Medicare eligibility requirements for patients to remain homebound and to demonstrate a need for skilled care restrict nurses’ abilities to follow up with depressed patients for sufficient length of time; the lack of explicit recognition of nursing time and quality of care in the home health Prospective Payment System (PPS) provides misaligned incentives for depression care; incorporation of a two-item depression screening tool in Medicare-mandated comprehensive patient assessment raised clinician awareness of depression; however, inclusion of the tool at Start-of-Care only but not any other follow-up points limits its potential in assisting nurses with depression care management; under-development of clinical decision support for depression care in vendor-developed electronic health records constitutes an important barrier to depression quality improvement in home health care. Conclusions Several influential Medicare policies and regulations for home health practice may be misaligned with evidence-based depression care for home health patients. PMID:24632686

  3. Home care for demented subjects: new models of care and home-care allowance.

    PubMed

    Fabris, F; Molaschi, M; Aimonino, N; Ponzetto, M; Maero, B; Tibaldi, V; Nicola, E; Varetto, O; Barresi, O; Cavallero, M L; Boschis, D; Plastino, V; Vitale, R

    2004-01-01

    This study on home care for demented patients is one of the finalized research projects sponsored by the Ministry of Health. The teams involved are: the Home Hospitalization Service (HHS) of S. Giovanni Battista Hospital of Torino, the "Azienda Sanitaria Locale n 20" (ASL 20) of Alessandria and Tortona and the "Presidio Ospedaliero Riabilitativo Fatebenefratelli" of San Maurizio Canavese (Torino). Aim of the study is to assess the feasibility and usefulness of taking care of elderly demented patients at home and to improve the quality of life of patients and their relatives, involving training experiences and economic help. The Geriatric Department of San Giovanni Battista Hospital started a randomized controlled study on 109 severely demented subjects admitted to the emergency room of the hospital. Fifty-three patients were transferred to the traditional geriatric ward and 56 to the HHS. The team of ASL 20 of Alessandria and Tortona selected and evaluated 45 elderly demented patients living at home. These subjects, stratified for their cognitive and functional impairment, were randomly allocated to two different groups: a group receiving an economic help for one year and a control group. In the first setting of research the degree of dementia was severe, mini mental state examination (MMSE) score was 10.0 +/- 5.2 for patients at home, and 10.5 +/- 6 for the second group. The majority of patients followed at home (78.6 %) were discharged, while only 47.2 % of the in-patients returned home (p < 0.001). Seventeen out of 53 patients (32.1 %) admitted to the traditional ward and only two of home-hospitalization patients had to be sent to nursing home (p <0.001). The 45 subjects evaluated by the team of ASL 20 were divided into two groups.Twenty-four subjects were allocated to receive a home care allowance. Their functional status was impaired. Their MMSE score was 12.6 +/- 5.4 and clinical dementia rating scale(CDR) score 2.7 +/- 0.9. A control group of 21 subjects (17

  4. Home Inotropes and Other Palliative Care.

    PubMed

    Ginwalla, Mahazarin

    2016-07-01

    Heart failure is a leading case of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and patients with advanced heart failure have limited options without any available cure. These options mainly include cardiac transplantation or mechanical circulatory support device implantation. Chronic home inotropes are an option in these patients for a variety of indications. This report discusses the use of chronic home inotropes in palliated heart failure patients and reviews the role of palliative care management in end-stage heart failure. PMID:27371519

  5. Political Perspectives on Uncertified Home Care Agencies

    PubMed Central

    Silberberg, Mina; Estes, Carroll L.; Harrington, Charlene

    1994-01-01

    This article examines the political agendas of public sector and organized private sector interests concerned with policies affecting uncertified home care agencies in three metropolitan areas. Using a telephone survey, the study found substantial differences across these groups in both the frequency with which they work on given issues and in some key attitudes. Overall, respondents were most likely to work on policies related to home care quality, and had particularly diverse—and at times conflicting—concerns in this area. Policymakers need to actively solicit the diverse attitudes of key interest groups towards controversial issues in order to understand less dominant perspectives, keep in mind the interconnection of policy issues, and arrive at politically viable solutions to home care policy problems. PMID:10140155

  6. Introducing reflective narratives into palliative care home care education.

    PubMed

    Wessel, Elizabeth M; Garon, Maryanne

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of the research project was to determine the impact of palliative care education and the writing of a reflective narrative on nurses' self-awareness of their attitudes toward death and care of the dying. Findings support integration of narrative reflection into palliative care education as an effective teaching strategy.Only qualitative findings of a larger study are presented; quantitative results have been published in the Journal of Hospice & Palliative Nursing (Home care and hospice nurses' attitudes toward death and caring for the dying: effects of palliative care education. 2005;7[4], 212-218).

  7. Comparative Costs of Home Care and Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappell, Neena L.; Havens, Betty; Honorary, Dlitt; Hollander, Marcus J.; Miller, Jo Ann; McWilliam, Carol

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: This paper reports on Canadian research that examined the cost effectiveness of home care for seniors as a substitute for long-term institutional services. Design and Methods: Two Canadian cities were included in the research: Victoria, British Columbia, and Winnipeg, Manitoba. The research computes the costs of formal care and informal…

  8. Introducing handheld computers into home care.

    PubMed

    Tapper, Lloyd; Quinn, Holly; Kerry, June; Brown, Katherine Grant

    2012-01-01

    In the fall of 2009, Bayshore Home Health (BHH) provided tablet computers to 75 home care nurses working in Barrie, Ont. The devices were equipped with an embedded evidence-based documentation system and loaded with decision-making supports such as drug reference databases. The technology was designed to facilitate client assessment, care planning and evaluation at the point of care. This article documents the experience of implementing handheld computers in a home care setting and presents the lessons learned from the perspectives of the BHH executive team and front-line nurses. These groups were asked to complete online surveys, developed by the BHH research and evaluation steering committee, to assess the impact of the implementation on the organization, its nurses and its clients. An analysis of the feedback indicated support for the implementation. However, both groups had concerns about the capability of the hardware and software to meet the needs of decentralized home care nurses working in both urban and rural areas. Front-line nurses also identified the impact of handheld computers on the time required for charting and on the nurse-client relationship as areas of concern.

  9. Home Medical Care for Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Yumino, Dai

    2016-01-01

    As heart failure progresses to the end stage, it becomes more difficult to maintain the same level of quality of life using the established therapy for the heart failure patients. We believe that an innovative home medical care for heart failure therapy that focuses on the individual's quality of daily living and early intervention is necessary. The roles of home medical care include: early discharge to home as opposed to long hospitalization; the prevention of re-hospitalization; the provision of good care; treatment of any exacerbations; and options available at the end of the patient's life at home. Being able to provide all of the above will allow heart failure patients to live at their home. Home medical care for heart failure requires collaborative teamwork among multiple institutions and medical professionals. Among this collaborative group, the role of pharmacists is critical. Since many of the elderly with heart failure are taking multiple medications, it is important to evaluate the compliance and to intervene for improvement. Pharmacists visiting the patient's home will be able to check the patient's living environment, to evaluate medication compliance, to reconsider the necessary medications for the specific patient, and to consult physicians. Pharmacists can also explain clearly to patients and their family members any changes in medical therapy, as the conditions for an end-stage heart failure patient may change drastically in a short time. By achieving all of the above, it may be possible to prevent re-hospitalization and to help maintain the quality of life for heart failure patients. PMID:27477731

  10. 77 FR 72738 - Contracts and Provider Agreements for State Home Nursing Home Care

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-06

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 51 RIN 2900-AO57 Contracts and Provider Agreements for State Home Nursing Home Care... agreements with State homes for the nursing home care of certain disabled veterans. This rulemaking is required to implement a change in law that revises how VA will pay for care provided to these veterans...

  11. Perinatal home care: one entrepreneur's experience.

    PubMed

    Eaton, D G

    1994-10-01

    Nurses have responded to the entrepreneurial movement by entering into various nontraditional roles and starting their own businesses. This article describes the author's experience in establishing a perinatal home-care business. The characteristics of women and nurse entrepreneurs are discussed, as are the components of a business plan and how to manage a business.

  12. [Nursing care at home and secularism].

    PubMed

    Lecointre, Brigitte

    2015-12-01

    The question of secularism, long-time confined to schools and the relationships between the Church and State, is today being raised in the field of public health. Nurses are directly affected and are integrating this dimension of secularism into their care practices. A private practice nurse describes the effect these changes are having on her practice in patients' homes. PMID:26654502

  13. Home Care Service Diversification: A Pilot Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jette, Alan M.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes a diversified approach to delivering home care to vulnerable older people. This pilot program, funded by the Massachusetts Department of Elder Affairs, attempted to reduce the demand for scarce homemaker services. Results suggest homecare diversification did not alter consumer satisfaction but increased manager time. (Author/JAC)

  14. Lessons Learned from Home Visiting with Home-Based Child Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, Lisa A.; Peterson, Shira M.; Baker, Amy C.; Dumka, Marsha; Brach, Mary Jo; Webb, Diana

    2011-01-01

    Caring for Quality and Partners in Family Child Care are home visiting programs designed to improve the quality of home-based child care. This article describes the experiences of two different home visitors to demonstrate how programs such as these can help providers improve the overall quality of care, increase children's development, and lead…

  15. Untangling home care's Gordion knot. The Home Care Information Management and Technology Forum.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Lawrence

    2003-03-01

    As home care and hospice technological tools have evolved over the past six years, there have been no efforts to standardize the collection, storage, and reporting of data among different systems. The rapid pace of technological change, increased use of wireless and remote technology, a greater reliance on tools for collaboration and networking, and the ever-increasing regulatory burden on home care and hospice providers have resulted in the need for polices and procedures for the standardization of data across the industry. Agency administrators, already strapped for cash and time, need to know what technology investments they need to make now in order to remain competitive in the future. The National Association for Home Care & Hospice has created a forum to address these concerns and to develop a blueprint for the future development of home care and hospice technology.

  16. 38 CFR 59.140 - Nursing home care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Nursing home care... (CONTINUED) GRANTS TO STATES FOR CONSTRUCTION OR ACQUISITION OF STATE HOMES § 59.140 Nursing home care requirements. As a condition for receiving a grant and grant funds for a nursing home facility under this...

  17. 38 CFR 59.140 - Nursing home care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Nursing home care... (CONTINUED) GRANTS TO STATES FOR CONSTRUCTION OR ACQUISITION OF STATE HOMES § 59.140 Nursing home care requirements. As a condition for receiving a grant and grant funds for a nursing home facility under this...

  18. 38 CFR 59.140 - Nursing home care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Nursing home care... (CONTINUED) GRANTS TO STATES FOR CONSTRUCTION OR ACQUISITION OF STATE HOMES § 59.140 Nursing home care requirements. As a condition for receiving a grant and grant funds for a nursing home facility under this...

  19. 38 CFR 59.140 - Nursing home care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Nursing home care... (CONTINUED) GRANTS TO STATES FOR CONSTRUCTION OR ACQUISITION OF STATE HOMES § 59.140 Nursing home care requirements. As a condition for receiving a grant and grant funds for a nursing home facility under this...

  20. 38 CFR 59.140 - Nursing home care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nursing home care... (CONTINUED) GRANTS TO STATES FOR CONSTRUCTION OR ACQUISITION OF STATE HOMES § 59.140 Nursing home care requirements. As a condition for receiving a grant and grant funds for a nursing home facility under this...

  1. A New Typology of Home-Care Helpers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Eileen J.; Ganong, Lawrence H.; Drew, Nancy; Lanes, Tracy I.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The formal-informal dichotomy of home care, which has been a theoretical framework in quantitative and qualitative research, might not be descriptive of older persons' views about their home-care providers. This qualitative study explores the perspectives of older women about the characteristics of their home-care providers. Design and…

  2. Nursing home closures and quality of care.

    PubMed

    Castle, Nicholas G

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the relationship between quality of care in nursing homes and their likelihood of closure. We hypothesize that lower-quality facilities will be more likely to close than higher-quality facilities. Using the rates of physical restraint use, urethral catheterization, contractures, pressure ulcers, and psychotropic medication use as quality measures from approximately 12,000 facilities from 1992 to 1998, the author examine cross-sectional and change score relationships between these measures and a nursing home's likelihood of closure. The descriptive analysis shows that 621 nursing homes closed in this time period, and the results for physical restraint use were robust in their positive association with closures in most analyses lending some support for this study's hypothesis. However, overall, the author concludes that nursing facility closures are relatively rare events. And the likelihood of closure, even for poor-quality facilities, is low. PMID:15643031

  3. Severe community-acquired pneumonia: timely management measures in the first 24 hours.

    PubMed

    Phua, Jason; Dean, Nathan C; Guo, Qi; Kuan, Win Sen; Lim, Hui Fang; Lim, Tow Keang

    2016-01-01

    Mortality rates for severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) range from 17 to 48 % in published studies.In this review, we searched PubMed for relevant papers published between 1981 and June 2016 and relevant files. We explored how early and aggressive management measures, implemented within 24 hours of recognition of severe CAP and carried out both in the emergency department and in the ICU, decrease mortality in severe CAP.These measures begin with the use of severity assessment tools and the application of care bundles via clinical decision support tools. The bundles include early guideline-concordant antibiotics including macrolides, early haemodynamic support (lactate measurement, intravenous fluids, and vasopressors), and early respiratory support (high-flow nasal cannulae, lung-protective ventilation, prone positioning, and neuromuscular blockade for acute respiratory distress syndrome).While the proposed interventions appear straightforward, multiple barriers to their implementation exist. To successfully decrease mortality for severe CAP, early and close collaboration between emergency medicine and respiratory and critical care medicine teams is required. We propose a workflow incorporating these interventions. PMID:27567896

  4. Home care in Europe: a systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Health and social services provided at home are becoming increasingly important. Hence, there is a need for information on home care in Europe. The objective of this literature review was to respond to this need by systematically describing what has been reported on home care in Europe in the scientific literature over the past decade. Methods A systematic literature search was performed for papers on home care published in English, using the following data bases: Cinahl, the Cochrane Library, Embase, Medline, PsycINFO, Sociological Abstracts, Social Services Abstracts, and Social Care Online. Studies were only included if they complied with the definition of home care, were published between January 1998 and October 2009, and dealt with at least one of the 31 specified countries. Clinical interventions, instrument developments, local projects and reviews were excluded. The data extracted included: the characteristics of the study and aspects of home care 'policy & regulation', 'financing', 'organisation & service delivery', and 'clients & informal carers'. Results Seventy-four out of 5,133 potentially relevant studies met the inclusion criteria, providing information on 18 countries. Many focused on the characteristics of home care recipients and on the organisation of home care. Geographical inequalities, market forces, quality and integration of services were also among the issues frequently discussed. Conclusions Home care systems appeared to differ both between and within countries. The papers included, however, provided only a limited picture of home care. Many studies only focused on one aspect of the home care system and international comparative studies were rare. Furthermore, little information emerged on home care financing and on home care in general in Eastern Europe. This review clearly shows the need for more scientific publications on home care, especially studies comparing countries. A comprehensive and more complete insight into the

  5. Estimation of 24-Hour Intraocular Pressure Peak Timing and Variation Using a Contact Lens Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Liu, John H. K.; Mansouri, Kaweh; Weinreb, Robert N.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare estimates of 24-hour intraocular pressure (IOP) peak timing and variation obtained using a contact lens sensor (CLS) and using a pneumatonometer. Methods Laboratory data collected from 30 healthy volunteers (ages, 20-66 years) in a randomized, controlled clinical trial were analyzed. Participants were housed for 24 hours in a sleep laboratory. One randomly selected right or left eye was fitted with a CLS that monitored circumferential curvature in the corneoscleral region related to the change of IOP. Electronic output signals of 30 seconds were averaged and recorded every 5 minutes. In the contralateral eye, habitual IOP measurements were taken using a pneumatonometer once every two hours. Simulated 24-hour rhythms in both eyes were determined by cosinor fitting. Simulated peak timings (acrophases) and simulated data variations (amplitudes) were compared between the paired eyes. Results Bilateral change patterns of average 24-hour data for the group were in parallel. The simulated peak timing in the CLS fitted eye occurred at 4:44 AM ± 210 min (mean ± SD) and the IOP peak timing in the contralateral eye at 4:11 AM ± 120 min (P=0.256, Wilcoxon signed-rank test). There was no significant correlation between the simulated data variations in the paired eyes (P=0.820, linear regression). Conclusions The 24-hour CLS data showed a simulated peak timing close to the 24-hour IOP peak timing obtained using the pneumatonometer. However, the simulated variations of 24-hour data in the paired eyes were not correlated. Estimated 24-hour IOP rhythms using the two devices should not be considered interchangeable. PMID:26076472

  6. Transitions in men's caring identities: experiences from home-based care to nursing home placement.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Henrik; Sandberg, Jonas

    2008-06-01

    Objectives.  The aim of this study is to describe, from a gender identity perspective, the experiences of older men involved in the process of caring for a partner at home and the placement into a nursing home. Background.  Few studies have paid attention to the importance of gender when considering the social experiences of older men providing care for an ill spouse and finally placing a partner in a nursing home. Further understanding is much needed of how older men experience the process of caring for a spouse from a gender identity perspective. Design.  A qualitative constructivist approach was adopted for this study. Participants.  Data consists of interviews with seven men that have been informal carers and experienced the placement of their wife in a nursing home. Methods.  Interviews were analysed with a constructivist approach. Results.  The results indicate that men go through two transitions in their gender identity during the caregiving process and placement. From the mutual loving relationship of being a loving husband, the social responsibility of daily care of their wives changes the situation into that of being a caring husband, and finally with the move to a nursing home there is a transition from intimate care to a relationship based on friendship. Conclusions.  The results show that older caregiving men undergo a process involving a reconstruction of gender identity. To formally recognize men's caring activities and to make them sustainable, we believe that men in an informal caring relationship need support. Relevance to clinical practice.  Nurses need to recognize the identity struggles resulting in sadness and suffering that are related to changes in men's lives during the caregiving process. Understanding the dynamics and changes that occur when men take on a caring task is important for the development of their role as carers.

  7. Expanded Medical Home Model Works for Children in Foster Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaudes, Paula Kienberger; Champagne, Vince; Harden, Allen; Masterson, James; Bilaver, Lucy A.

    2012-01-01

    The Illinois Child Welfare Department implemented a statewide health care system to ensure that children in foster care obtain quality health care by providing each child with a medical home. This study demonstrates that the Medical Home model works for children in foster care providing better health outcomes in higher immunization rates. These…

  8. 24-Hour ICH Score Is a Better Predictor of Outcome than Admission ICH Score

    PubMed Central

    Aysenne, Aimee M.; Albright, Karen C.; Mathias, Tiffany; Chang, Tiffany R.; Boehme, Amelia K.; Beasley, T. Mark; Martin-Schild, Sheryl

    2016-01-01

    Background The ICH score is a validated tool for predicting 30-day morbidity and mortality in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. Aims and/or Hypothesis The aim of this study is to determine if the ICH score calculated 24 hours after admission is a better predictor of mortality than the ICH score calculated on admission. Methods Patients presenting to our center with ICH from 7/08-12/10 were retrospectively identified from our prospective stroke registry. ICH scores were calculated based on initial Glasgow coma scale (GCS) and emergent head computed tomography (CT) on initial presentation and were recalculated after 24 hours. Results A total of 91 patients out of 121 had complete data for admission and 24-hour ICH score. The ICH score changed in 38% from baseline to 24 hours. After adjusting for age, NIHSS on admission, and glucose, ICH score at 24 hours was a significant, independent predictor of mortality (OR = 2.71, 95% CI 1–19–6.20, and P = 0.018), but ICH score on admission was not (OR = 2.14, 95% CI 0.88-5.24, and P = 0.095). Conclusion Early determination of the ICH score may incorrectly estimate the severity and expected outcome after ICH. Calculations of the ICH score 24 hours after admission will better predict early outcomes.

  9. Dissociated 24-hour patterns of somatotropin and prolactin in fatal familial insomnia.

    PubMed

    Portaluppi, F; Cortelli, P; Avoni, P; Vergnani, L; Maltoni, P; Pavani, A; Sforza, E; Manfredini, R; Montagna, P; Roiter, I

    1995-06-01

    To assess the changes in the 24-hour profiles of serum somatotropin and prolactin levels during total disruption of the sleep/wake cycle sustained over several months, we studied 2 subjects affected by fatal familial insomnia, a rare disease characterized by selective thalamic degeneration that causes chronic sleep loss. Under standardized conditions and polysomnographic control, the patients underwent repeated 24-hour study sessions covering the entire clinical course of the disease. Hormones were assayed at 30-min intervals. Four healthy volunteers were used as controls. A sleep/wake cycle was always absent in fatal familial insomnia. Serum somatotropin and prolactin concentrations never exceeded the normal range of variation. The nocturnal elevation of somatotropin disappeared simultaneously with sleep loss, whereas a significant 24-hour component of variations in serum prolactin levels was present for months after total disruption of the sleep/wake cycle, with normally placed nocturnal acrophases. Complete obliteration of the 24-hour component was achieved for prolactin only in the advanced stages, through a progressive decrease in 24-hour amplitude of variation. Selective and progressive degeneration of the mediodorsal and anterior ventral nuclei of the thalamus causes an early obliteration of the 24-hour rhythm of somatotropin and a later disappearance of circadian prolactin rhythmicity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Home and community care sector accountability.

    PubMed

    Steele Gray, Carolyn; Berta, Whitney; Deber, Raisa B; Lum, Janet

    2014-09-01

    This paper focuses on accountability for the home and community care (HCC) sector in Ontario. The many different service delivery approaches, funding methods and types of organizations delivering HCC services make this sector highly heterogeneous. Findings from a document analysis and environmental scan suggest that organizations delivering HCC services face multiple accountability requirements from a wide array of stakeholders. Government stakeholders tend to rely on regulatory and expenditure instruments to hold organizations to account for service delivery. Semi-structured key informant interview respondents reported that the expenditure-based accountability tools being used carried a number of unintended consequences, both positive and negative. These include an increased organizational focus on quality, shifting care time away from clients (particularly problematic for small agencies), dissuading innovation, and reliance on performance indicators that do not adequately support the delivery of high-quality care. PMID:25305389

  11. Home and community care sector accountability.

    PubMed

    Steele Gray, Carolyn; Berta, Whitney; Deber, Raisa B; Lum, Janet

    2014-09-01

    This paper focuses on accountability for the home and community care (HCC) sector in Ontario. The many different service delivery approaches, funding methods and types of organizations delivering HCC services make this sector highly heterogeneous. Findings from a document analysis and environmental scan suggest that organizations delivering HCC services face multiple accountability requirements from a wide array of stakeholders. Government stakeholders tend to rely on regulatory and expenditure instruments to hold organizations to account for service delivery. Semi-structured key informant interview respondents reported that the expenditure-based accountability tools being used carried a number of unintended consequences, both positive and negative. These include an increased organizational focus on quality, shifting care time away from clients (particularly problematic for small agencies), dissuading innovation, and reliance on performance indicators that do not adequately support the delivery of high-quality care.

  12. Long-term home care research.

    PubMed

    Green, J H

    1989-11-01

    The population of seniors is growing and health service reimbursement is shrinking. Long-term home health care services were developed with an assumption that the services would decrease costs. This assumption has not been validated. What has been recognized is that long-term home health care targets a new and growing population of frail seniors who need services but are probably not at risk for institutionalization. The impact of long-term home care services on the health status and quality of life of seniors and caregivers has been limited by outcome measurement problems. There are indications that the services improved life satisfaction and reduced services needs, but further evaluations need to replicate the outcomes. In effect, long-term outcomes have not been sufficiently explored. Further research also needs to assist us in identifying outcomes for certain services with precise target populations. Public policy questions are ahead. Should a program that can increase costs, has demonstrated some but not dramatic impacts on quality of life and health status, and has the possibility of expansion, be funded? The question is obviously debatable. From a nursing perspective of health promotion and prevention, the answer is "yes." Funding should be continued in conjunction with increased research on the program impacts. In Kane's (1988) analysis of the Channeling experiments, she summarized the situation effectively: Knowing these facts, we are now in a position to reformulate public policies to design a system of long-term care that satisfies the preferences of consumers and protects them from catastrophic long-term expenses, while promoting the triple virtues of acceptable, quality, equitable access, and defensible costs. . . Nothing in the Channeling results should prevent us from going ahead and trying to develop both community based and institutionally based long-term services in which this country can take pride.

  13. Integrating care coordination home telehealth and home based primary care in rural Oklahoma: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sorocco, Kristen H; Bratkovich, Kristi L; Wingo, Rita; Qureshi, Saleem M; Mason, Patrick J

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this program was to evaluate the benefits of integrating VA Care Coordination Home Telehealth and Telemental health within HBPC. A case study design was used to determine quality assurance and quality improvement of incorporating additional home telehealth equipment within Home Based Primary Care (HBPC). Veterans with complex medical conditions and their caregivers living in rural Oklahoma were enrolled. Veterans received the same care other HBPC patients received with the addition of home telehealth equipment. Members from the interdisciplinary treatment team were certified to use the telehealth equipment. Veterans and their caregivers were trained on use of the equipment in their homes. Standard HBPC program measures were used to assess the program success. Assessments from all disciplines on the HBPC team were at baseline, 3, and 6 months, and participants provided satisfaction and interview data to assess the benefits of integrating technology into standard care delivery within an HBPC program. Six veterans were enrolled (mean age = 72 yrs) with a range of physical health conditions including: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cerebrovascular accident, spinal cord injury, diabetes, hypertension, and syncope. Primary mental health conditions included depression, dementia, anxiety, and PTSD. Scores on the Mini-Mental State Examination ranged from 18 to 30. Over a 6-month period, case studies indicated improvements in strength, social functioning, decreased caregiver burden, and compliance with treatment plan. This integration of CCHT and HBPC served previously underserved rural veterans having complex medical conditions and appears both feasible and clinically beneficial to veterans and their caregivers.

  14. 42 CFR 494.100 - Condition: Care at home.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... hemodialysis patient, and if necessary, arrange for backup dialysis until the problem is corrected if— (1... Patient Care § 494.100 Condition: Care at home. A dialysis facility that is certified to provide services to home patients must ensure through its interdisciplinary team, that home dialysis services are...

  15. Social Workers in Home Care: The Israeli Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayalon, Liat; Baum, Nehami

    2010-01-01

    In Israel, the government partially supports personal home care services (grooming, feeding, assistance with transfers) as a means to maintain frail individuals in their home environment for as long as possible. Social workers capture a prominent position in these arrangements as initiators and supervisors of personal home care services. This…

  16. Home Based Care: Direction for the 80s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryce, Marvin E.

    Home based family centered (HBFC) service programs have been developed as alternatives to out-of-home placement. These programs have reported relatively high service success rates at costs signficantly lower than foster home and institutional care while, at the same time, avoiding the social and psychological risks of out-of-home placement.…

  17. Economies of scale in home care.

    PubMed

    Joffe, J

    1989-01-01

    Home care (HC) demonstration projects have assessed the results of an existing decentralized system rather than evaluate the consequences of changing the system. This paper examines the potential for improving HC cost performance through economies of scale and how these economies can be introduced into HC operations with expansion and consolidation of the market. Theoretical, empirical and policy issues discussed include: (a) specification of the elements of structural redesign of HC service programs focusing on the creation of joint services; (b) a critique of the current method of estimating the size of the market for long term care; (c) empirical measures of uneven HC market size and density with implications for the opportunity to apply economies of scale; (d) the major institutional obstacles to creating the requisite coordination for joint HC services and policy recommendations to overcome these obstacles; (e) housing settings for joint services; (f) HC practices embodying economies of scale in Sweden. Joint services are especially applicable in older northern cities with a high density and a large number of elderly persons. This delivery mode provides a cost savings logic for expanding and consolidating home care services.

  18. Eligibility for publicly financed home care.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, M E; Burwell, B; Clark, R F; Harahan, M

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. Proposals for publicly financed home care for the elderly now tend to include cognitive impairment criteria as well as activities of daily living (ADL) criteria. The numbers of elderly deemed eligible for services will depend on the definitions of ADL and cognitive impairment used. METHODS. Data from the 1984 National Long-Term Care Survey were used to generate a series of estimates of the community-dwelling elderly with ADL disabilities and cognitive impairment. RESULTS. When only ADL criteria are used, estimates of disability range from 472,000 to over 3 million (1.6% to 12.5% of the community-dwelling elderly). These estimates increase to approximately 1 million to 4.2 million (3.5% to 14.0% of the community-dwelling elderly) when cognitive impairment criteria are added. CONCLUSIONS. The use of more stringent or more liberal eligibility criteria will have dramatic effects on the number of elders who qualify for services. The nature of the eligibility criteria employed in any expansion of federally financed home care benefits will be a major factor in determining the costs of such a program. PMID:1533996

  19. Data sharing between home care professionals: a feasibility study using the RAI Home Care instrument

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Across Ontario, home care professionals collect standardized information on each client using the Resident Assessment for Home Care (RAI-HC). However, this information is not consistently shared with those professionals who provide services in the client’s home. In this pilot study, we examined the feasibility of sharing data, from the RAI-HC, between care coordinators and service providers. Methods All participants were involved in a one-day training session on the RAI-HC. The care coordinators shared specific outputs from the RAI-HC, including the embedded health index scales, with their contracted physiotherapy and occupational therapy service providers. Two focus groups were held, one with care coordinators (n = 4) and one with contracted service providers (n = 6). They were asked for their opinions on the positive aspects of the project and areas for improvement. Results The focus groups revealed a number of positive outcomes related to the project including the use of a falls prevention brochure and an increased level of communication between professionals. The participants also cited multiple areas for improvement related to data sharing (e.g., time constraints, data being sent in a timely fashion) and to their standard practices in the community (e.g., busy workloads, difficulties in data sharing, duplication of assessments between professionals). Conclusions Home care professionals were able to share select pieces of information generated from the RAI-HC system and this project enhanced the level of communication between the two groups of professionals. However, a single information session was not adequate training for the rehabilitation professionals, who do not use the RAI-HC as part of normal practice. Better education, ongoing support and timely access to the RAI-HC data are some ways to improve the usefulness of this information for busy home care providers. PMID:24975375

  20. 24-hour central blood pressure and intermediate cardiovascular phenotypes in untreated subjects

    PubMed Central

    Bednarek, Agnieszka; Jankowski, Piotr; Olszanecka, Agnieszka; Windak, Adam; Kawecka-Jaszcz, Kalina; Czarnecka, Danuta

    2014-01-01

    Background: Recently, 24-hour monitoring of central systolic blood pressure (SBP) has become available. However, the relation between end-organ damage and the 24-hour central SBP profile and variability has not so far been analyzed. Therefore, the aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the relation between 24-hour central SBP, 24-hour central SBP profile as well as central SBP short-term variability and parameters of cardiac and vascular intermediate phenotypes. Methods: The study group consisted of 50 patients with newly diagnosed, untreated hypertension (age 40.4 ± 11.5 years, 35 men) and 50 normotensive subjects (age 38.3 ± 12.0 years, 35 men). Applanation tonometry of the radial artery and the “n-point forward moving average” method were used to determine 24-hour central SBP. Each study participant underwent echocardiography and carotid ultrasonography. Results: 24-hour, daytime, and nighttime central SBP was related to left ventricle end-diastole diameter (p < 0.05), left ventricular mass index (p < 0.001), relative wall thickness (p < 0.05), E/E’ ratio (p < 0.01), and left atrium volume (p < 0.01). The nocturnal central SBP fall was not related to any of the mentioned parameters, whereas parameters of short-term variability were related to IMT in hypertensives only (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The present study showed that 24-hour central SBP is related to intermediate cardiac phenotypes as assessed by echocardiography whereas short-term central SBP variability is mainly related to vascular phenotype as determined by IMT. PMID:25628959

  1. Digital skills training in care homes: achievement.

    PubMed

    Wild, Deidre; Kydd, Angela

    2016-05-27

    This article describes digital skills training (DST) for staff and later, residents, as part of a programme of culture change in a large care home with nursing in Glasgow. It presents the successes and challenges arising from DST from the perspectives of the two volunteer information technology (IT) champions (Thomas Sloan and John Thomson), who were also staff members. Using their written reports, questionnaires and subsequent conversations, the IT champions recall the challenges and gains for staff and residents as a result of their initial training. This is supplemented by a follow-up on IT activities in the 18 months after the introduction period. PMID:27231084

  2. Digital skills training in care homes: achievement.

    PubMed

    Wild, Deidre; Kydd, Angela

    2016-05-27

    This article describes digital skills training (DST) for staff and later, residents, as part of a programme of culture change in a large care home with nursing in Glasgow. It presents the successes and challenges arising from DST from the perspectives of the two volunteer information technology (IT) champions (Thomas Sloan and John Thomson), who were also staff members. Using their written reports, questionnaires and subsequent conversations, the IT champions recall the challenges and gains for staff and residents as a result of their initial training. This is supplemented by a follow-up on IT activities in the 18 months after the introduction period.

  3. Home Care Nursing via Computer Networks: Justification and Design Specifications

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Patricia Flatley

    1988-01-01

    High-tech home care includes the use of information technologies, such as computer networks, to provide direct care to patients in the home. This paper presents the justification and design of a project using a free, public access computer network to deliver home care nursing. The intervention attempts to reduce isolation and improve problem solving among home care patients and their informal caregivers. Three modules comprise the intervention: a decision module, a communications module, and an information data base. This paper describes the experimental evaluation of the project, and discusses issues in the delivery of nursing care via computers.

  4. Palliative Home Care: A Designer’s Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bhatnagar, Tigmanshu

    2015-01-01

    The purpose for this observational research was to understand how Can Support provides palliative care at home and analyze its strengths and weaknesses in various socioeconomic scenarios for future development. In the period of 2 weeks, patients and their caregivers were silently observed in their natural surroundings during home care visits in order to listen their problems, identify the pattern of questions for the home care team, their natural way of storytelling, organizational techniques for medicines and medical reports, care givers lives, patient journey, etc. Such observations have enabled the understanding of the phenomena of home palliative care and have led to the identification of certain influential variables of the practice. PMID:26009683

  5. When the caregiver has HIV: early intervention through home care.

    PubMed

    D'Arrigo, T

    1994-05-01

    Many informal caregivers of AIDS patients, by virtue of being or having been their sexual partners, are infected with HIV but are not yet sick. Home care providers have an excellent opportunity to educate these caregivers during home visits.

  6. The Relationship Between 24-Hour Symptoms and COPD Exacerbations and Healthcare Resource Use: Results from an Observational Study (ASSESS).

    PubMed

    Miravitlles, Marc; Worth, Heinrich; Soler-Cataluña, Juan José; Price, David; De Benedetto, Fernando; Roche, Nicolas; Godtfredsen, Nina S; van der Molen, Thys; Löfdahl, Claes-Göran; Padullés, Laura; Ribera, Anna

    2016-10-01

    This observational study assessed the relationship between nighttime, early-morning and daytime chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) symptoms and exacerbations and healthcare resource use. COPD symptoms were assessed at baseline in patients with stable COPD using a standardised questionnaire during routine clinical visits. Information was recorded on exacerbations and healthcare resource use during the year before baseline and during a 6-month follow-up period. The main objective of the analysis was to determine the predictive nature of current symptoms for future exacerbations and healthcare resource use. 727 patients were eligible (65.8% male, mean age: 67.2 years, % predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second: 52.8%); 698 patients (96.0%) provided information after 6 months. Symptoms in any part of the day were associated with a prior history of exacerbations (all p < 0.05) and nighttime and early-morning symptoms were associated with the frequency of primary care visits in the year before baseline (both p < 0.01). During follow-up, patients with baseline symptoms during any part of the 24-hour day had more exacerbations than patients with no symptoms in each period (all p < 0.05); there was also an association between 24-hour symptoms and the frequency of primary care visits (all p ≤ 0.01). Although there was a significant association between early-morning and daytime symptoms and exacerbations during follow-up (both p < 0.01), significance was not maintained when adjusted for potential confounders. Prior exacerbations were most strongly associated with future risk of exacerbation. The results suggest 24-hour COPD symptoms do not independently predict future exacerbation risk.

  7. Financing of pediatric home health care. Committee on Child Health Financing, Section on Home Care, American Academy of Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    2006-08-01

    In certain situations, home health care has been shown to be a cost-effective alternative to inpatient hospital care. National health expenditures reveal that pediatric home health costs totaled $5.3 billion in 2000. Medicaid is the major payer for pediatric home health care (77%), followed by other public sources (22%). Private health insurance and families each paid less than 1% of pediatric home health expenses. The most important factors affecting access to home health care are the inadequate supply of clinicians and ancillary personnel, shortages of home health nurses with pediatric expertise, inadequate payment, and restrictive insurance and managed care policies. Many children must stay in the NICU, PICU, and other pediatric wards and intermediate care areas at a much higher cost because of inadequate pediatric home health care services. The main financing problem pertaining to Medicaid is low payment to home health agencies at rates that are insufficient to provide beneficiaries access to home health services. Although home care services may be a covered benefit under private health plans, most do not cover private-duty nursing (83%), home health aides (45%), or home physical, occupational, or speech therapy (33%) and/or impose visit or monetary limits or caps. To advocate for improvements in financing of pediatric home health care, the American Academy of Pediatrics has developed several recommendations for public policy makers, federal and state Medicaid offices, private insurers, managed care plans, Title V officials, and home health care professionals. These recommendations will improve licensing, payment, coverage, and research related to pediatric home health services.

  8. Insights about serum sodium behavior after 24 hours of continuous renal replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Thiago Gomes; Martins, Cassia Pimenta Barufi; Mendes, Pedro Vitale; Besen, Bruno Adler Maccagnan Pinheiro; Zampieri, Fernando Godinho; Park, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical and laboratorial factors associated with serum sodium variation during continuous renal replacement therapy and to assess whether the perfect admixture formula could predict 24-hour sodium variation. Methods Thirty-six continuous renal replacement therapy sessions of 33 patients, in which the affluent prescription was unchanged during the first 24 hours, were retrieved from a prospective collected database and then analyzed. A mixed linear model was performed to investigate the factors associated with large serum sodium variations (≥ 8mEq/L), and a Bland-Altman plot was generated to assess the agreement between the predicted and observed variations. Results In continuous renal replacement therapy 24-hour sessions, SAPS 3 (p = 0.022) and baseline hypernatremia (p = 0.023) were statistically significant predictors of serum sodium variations ≥ 8mEq/L in univariate analysis, but only hypernatremia demonstrated an independent association (β = 0.429, p < 0.001). The perfect admixture formula for sodium prediction at 24 hours demonstrated poor agreement with the observed values. Conclusions Hypernatremia at the time of continuous renal replacement therapy initiation is an important factor associated with clinically significant serum sodium variation. The use of 4% citrate or acid citrate dextrose - formula A 2.2% as anticoagulants was not associated with higher serum sodium variations. A mathematical prediction for the serum sodium concentration after 24 hours was not feasible. PMID:27410407

  9. A global perspective: technology in home care. Discussion.

    PubMed

    Bowman, A; Gordon, A S; Grice, W; Hart, J; Schmidt, A; Tjassing, H; al Watban, H

    1997-07-01

    Technological advances are changing the way the world shares information and conducts daily business, CARING asked home care colleagues around the world to respond to a question about technology's role in home care delivery. Although the degree of technology's involvement differs from country to country, each country is aware of the possibilities and is looking toward the future. PMID:10169878

  10. Home health care quality conferences: promoting change through dialogue.

    PubMed

    Rudin, Danylle

    2006-01-01

    The following brief is based on the results of two conferences on home care quality hosted by the Center for Home Care Policy and Research of the Visiting Nurse Service of New York. For more information about the conference outcomes and proceedings please see: Feldman, P.H.,Peterson, L.E., Reische, L., Bruno, L., & Clark, A. (2004). Charting the course for home healthcare quality: Action steps for achieving sustainable improvement. Conference proceedings. Home Healthcare Nurse, 22(12): 841-850; and Feldman, P.H., Clark, A., & Bruno, L. (2006). Advancing the agenda for home healthcare quality: Conference proceedings and findings. Home Healthcare Nurse, 24(5): 282-290.

  11. Unmet patient need in home care under managed care.

    PubMed

    Kadushin, Goldie; Egan, Marcia

    2006-01-01

    Social workers in home care agencies obtained through a national random sample responded to a mail questionnaire that examined the relationship between the frequency of discharge with unmet patient need and patient/family characteristics, agency auspice, and practice activities when social workers' assessment of patient needs and managed care payment limits conflict. Regression analysis found that the importance of social work financial planning with clients and intra-agency advocacy were significant negative contributors, and patient cognitive impairment, inadequate family care, and agency auspice were significant positive contributors to a regression model explaining 31 percent of the variance in the frequency of discharge with unmet need. Implications for practice, education, and research are discussed. PMID:17062525

  12. [Nursing home care on the move; a stock-taking overview of 5 substitution projects nursing home care].

    PubMed

    Schols, J M; Theunissen, N J; Borst, V; Sinnema, M E

    1995-02-01

    An inventory was made of 5 substitute care projects in old people's homes, performed by the nursing home in Geertruidenberg. Data were gathered by semi-structured interviews and enquiries. The general goal of substitution of nursing home care for outdoor patients is to provide complementary outreaching nursing home services, by which real nursing home admittance can be postponed or avoided. In fact, in many cases substitution care appears to avoid nursing home admittance. In 1991-1993 there were 144 participants in these projects, from which only 11 at least were admitted to the nursing home. In the near future however, the quality of these outreaching nursing home projects has to be improved, especially on aspects as: continuity and methodology of care and with respect to the multidisciplinary approach. At last the financial support of these projects appears to be complicated and uncertain. A structural solution for this problem is urgent too.

  13. The assessment and management of skin tears in care homes.

    PubMed

    Stephen-Haynes, Jackie; Callaghan, Rosie; Bethell, Elaine; Greenwood, Michelle

    This article discusses a project conducted in Worcestershire nursing homes to review current practices in the management of skin tears and the subsequent development and implementation of guidelines resulting in a standardised client care package. An initial audit in five care homes was followed by an in-depth audit in 52 homes over a 12-week period. This led to the development of resources and the 'STAR box' to assist with implementation of timely and appropriate care delivery.

  14. Microtensile bond strength of resin-resin interfaces after 24-hour and 2-month soaking.

    PubMed

    Leavitt, Curry; Boberick, Kenneth G; Winkler, Sheldon

    2007-01-01

    Evaluate the bond strengths of denture base-repair materials to minimize recurrent failure rate. Use microtensile bond strength (muTBS) testing to evaluate the interfacial bonding strength of 6 commercial denture repair materials after 24-hour and 12-month soaking. Blocks of poly(methyl metacrylate) (PMMA) and Triad were fabricated, fractured, and repaired. Twenty bars (1 x 1 x 30 mm) per group were sectioned from each block parallel to the long axis and approximately 90 degrees to the resin-resin repair interface and stored before muTBS testing in a servo-hydraulic tensile-testing machine. Intact PMMA and Triad bars that had been soaked for 24 hours and 12 months were tested for reference. The 24-hour repair strengths for PMMA ranged from 52% to 84% of original strength. Soaking for 12 months resulted in a 20% decrease in strength for the PMMA control. The 12-month repair strengths for PMMA ranged from 43% to 74% of the 12-month soaked material strength. Triad repair tested 35% of original strength after soaking for 24 hours. Permabond (cyanoacrylate) to PMMA tested 47% of original strength after 24 hours of soaking and 26% of the 12-month soaked material strength. Permabond to Triad tested 30% of original strength after 24 hours of soaking. Permabond and Triad showed a 100% adhesive mode of failure. All other materials tested exhibited either an adhesive mode of failure at the denture base-repair-material interface or a complex cohesive failure within the repair-material interface. The muTBS approach can be used to analyze the resin-resin interface of repaired acrylics. The relatively small standard deviations make the muTBS approach attractive. In this study, muTBS was used to evaluate the repair strength of 6 denture repair materials enabling clinicians to make clinical judgments regarding the strongest repair bond available. PMID:17987865

  15. Improving care transitions from hospital to home: standardized orders for home health nursing with remote telemonitoring.

    PubMed

    Heeke, Sheila; Wood, Felecia; Schuck, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    A task force at a multihospital health care system partnered with home health agencies to improve gaps during the discharge transition process. A standardized order template for home health nursing and remote telemonitoring was developed to decrease discrepancies in communication between hospital health care providers and home health nurses caring for patients with heart failure. Pilot results showed significantly improved communication with no readmissions, using the order template. PMID:23938358

  16. Culture change in care homes: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Wild, Deirdre; Kydd, Angela

    2016-08-01

    This article is the first of a two-part series that explores a programme of culture change in care homes. A UK care home company sought the authors' expertise to design and facilitate an independent programme of learning to encourage and support staff in two of its homes to become the architects of their own quality improvement. The article reviews the literature that was an essential information base for the authors in their dual roles as designers of the learning programme and facilitators of its delivery to participant staff. The literature is necessarily broad in reflecting the nature and context of care homes, residents' needs and wants from care, and the particular challenges that might be faced by care home staff and managers when making quality improvements. In the second article, the reality of running the programme in the two homes is described. PMID:27573965

  17. Prevalence of Masked Hypertension: a Population-Based Survey in a Large City by Using 24-Hour Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun-Woong; Choi, Eun-Hee; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Nah, Deuk-Young; Shin, Sung-Joon; Gu, Namyi

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives We estimated the prevalence of hypertension and hypertension subtypes in a large semi-urban city in Korea, using 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) in a randomly selected sample population. Subjects and Methods A random sample (aged 20-65 years) from a city with an adult population of approximately 600000 was selected by using a list-assisted random digit dialing method. The 24-hour ABPM and conventional blood pressure measurement (CBPM) of these individuals were obtained. Results Among the 496 participants, valid 24-hour ABPM and CBPM were obtained from 462 (93%) individuals. The estimated prevalence of hypertension in Goyang was 17.54% by CBPM and 32.70% by 24-hour ABPM (p<0.01). In the age stratified analysis, both CBPM and 24-hour ABPM showed increased prevalence of hypertension with age. The estimated prevalence of masked hypertension was 16.22% and that of white-coat hypertension was 1.08%. Men had a higher prevalence of masked hypertension than women (20.79% vs. 11.86%, p=0.0295). The estimated prevalence of masked hypertension was 17.5%, 20.58%, 24.34%, and 13.29% in the age categories of 30s, 40s, 50s, and 60s, respectively. The estimated prevalence of masked uncontrolled hypertension was 26.79% in patients with hypertension who were taking antihypertensive medications. Conclusion The estimated prevalence of hypertension by 24-hour ABPM was higher than that by CBPM, revealing high prevalence of masked hypertension. The high prevalence of masked hypertension supports the adoption of ABPM in the national population survey and clinical practice to improve public health and reduce health care costs. PMID:27721860

  18. Marketing considerations in home health care.

    PubMed

    Tanner, D J

    1985-12-01

    Methods for conducting a comprehensive analysis of the potential for strategic entry or expansion in the home health-care (HHC) market are discussed. By conducting a comprehensive analysis of the HHC market, hospital pharmacists can evaluate the feasibility of developing and implementing a hospital-based HHC service. A comprehensive market analysis should include an initial assessment of potential product-line offerings, development of strengths-and-weaknesses and opportunities-and-threats profiles, evaluations of competing providers of HHC and regulatory issues, and formulation of a business plan. The potential impact of program structure, operations management, product pricing, advertising and promotion, and marketing controls should also be considered. The hospital pharmacist has a unique opportunity to further the organizational objectives of the hospital by participating in the provision of HHC; a comprehensive market analysis represents a useful method of assessing the benefits and costs associated with providing integrated HHC services.

  19. Experiences of Technology Integration in Home Care Nursing

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, KA; Valdez, RS; Casper, GR; Kossman, SP; Carayon, P; Or, CKL; Burke, LJ; Brennan, PF

    2008-01-01

    The infusion of health care technologies into the home leads to substantial changes in the nature of work for home care nurses and their patients. Nurses and nursing practice must change to capitalize on these innovations. As part of a randomized field experiment evaluating web-based support for home care of patients with chronic heart disease, we engaged nine nurses in a dialogue about their experience integrating this modification of care delivery into their practice. They shared their perceptions of the work they needed to do and their perceptions and expectations for patients and themselves in using technologies to promote and manage self-care. We document three overarching themes that identify preexisting factors that influenced integration or represent the consequences of technology integration into home care: doing tasks differently, making accommodations in the home for devices and computers, and being mindful of existing expectations and skills of both nurses and patients. PMID:18999245

  20. Mood-Dependent Cognitive Change in a Man with Bipolar Disorder Who Cycles Every 24 Hours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Dominic; Mansell, Warren

    2008-01-01

    A case study of a bipolar patient whose mood changes every 24 hours is described to illustrate the changes in cognitive processing and content during different phases of bipolar disorder. The participant completed a battery of questionnaires and tasks on 4 separate occasions: twice when depressed and twice when manic. Depression tended to be…

  1. Leg skinfold thicknesses and race performance in male 24-hour ultra-marathoners.

    PubMed

    Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Rosemann, Thomas

    2011-04-01

    The association of skinfold thicknesses with race performance has been investigated in runners competing over distances of ≤50 km. This study investigated a potential relation between skinfold thicknesses and race performance in male ultra-marathoners completing >50 km in 24 hours. Variables of anthropometry, training, and previous performance were related to race performance in 63 male ultra-marathoners aged 46.9 (standard deviation [SD] 10.3) years, standing 1.78 (SD 0.07) m in height, and weighing 73.3 (SD 7.6) kg. The runners clocked 146.1 (SD 43.1) km during the 24 hours. In the bivariate analysis, several variables were associated with race performance: body mass (r = -0.25); skinfold thickness at axilla (r = -0.37), subscapula (r = -0.28), abdomen (r = -0.31), and suprailiaca (r = -0.30); the sum of skinfold thicknesses (r = -0.32); percentage body fat (r = -0.32); weekly kilometers run (r = 0.31); personal best time in a marathon (r = -0.58); personal best time in a 100-km ultra-run (r = -0.31); and personal best performance in a 24-hour run (r = 0.46). In the multivariate analysis, no anthropometric or training variable was related to race performance. In conclusion, in contrast to runners up to distances of 50 km, skinfold thicknesses of the lower limbs were not related to race performance in 24-hour ultra-marathoners.

  2. The Three-Continent, 24-Hour Help Desk: An Academic First?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sykes, Jean

    2002-01-01

    Describes Follow the Sun, a computer help-desk service that takes advantage of time differences around the world to permit four universities (University of Colorado Boulder, Australia's Macquarie and Newcastle universities, and the London School of Economics) to share services and provide 24-hour support to users. (EV)

  3. Assessing dietary intake in childhood cancer survivors: Food frequency questionnaire versus 24-hour diet recalls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cancer diagnosis and treatment may influence dietary intake. The validity of using self-reported methods to quantify dietary intake has not been evaluated in childhood cancer survivors. We validated total energy intake (EI) reported from Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) and repeated 24-hour diet r...

  4. Oropharyngeal 24-Hour pH Monitoring in Children With Airway-Related Problems

    PubMed Central

    Mesallam, Tamer A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Diagnosis and clinical presentation of pediatric laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) is still controversial. The aims of this work were to study the possibility of performing 24-hour oropharyngeal pH monitoring for children in the outpatient clinic setup and to explore the results of this test in correlation to airway-related problems. Methods In this descriptive qualitative study, 26 children suffering from airway-related problems were included. Oropharyngeal 24-hour pH monitoring was performed for all subjects in the outpatient clinic setting. The distribution of airway diagnoses among the study group was studied versus the results of the pH monitoring. Results There were 16 males and 10 females participated in the study with a mean age of 6.88 (SD, ±5.77) years. Thirty-five percent of the patients were under the age of 3 years (range, 11 months to 3 years). Eight-five percent of the patients tolerated the pH probe insertion and completed 24-hour of pH recording. Laryngomalacia and subglottic stenosis (SGS) were more frequently reported in the positive LPR patients (77%). Conclusion Oropharyngeal 24-hour pH monitoring can be conducted for children in the outpatient setup even in young age children below 3 years old. Among the positive LPR group, SGS and laryngomalacia were the most commonly reported airway findings. PMID:27090271

  5. Webcasting in home and hospice care services: virtual communication in home care.

    PubMed

    Smith-Stoner, Marilyn

    2011-06-01

    The access to free live webcasting over home computers was much more available in 2007, when three military leaders from West Point, with the purpose of helping military personnel stay connected with their families when deployed, developed Ustream.tv. There are many types of Web-based video streaming applications. This article describes Ustream, a free and effective communication tool to virtually connect staff. There are many features in Ustream, but the most useful for home care and hospice service providers is its ability to broadcast sound and video to anyone with a broadband Internet connection, a chat room for users to interact during a presentation, and the ability to have a "co-host" or second person also broadcast simultaneously. Agencies that provide community-based services in the home will benefit from integration of Web-based video streaming into their communication strategy.

  6. Family Perceptions of Geriatric Foster Family and Nursing Home Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Kathryn L.; Rose, Charles L.

    1987-01-01

    Relatives (N=62) of matched pairs of patients in geriatric foster homes and nursing homes rated care provided to their relatives. Significantly more foster family patients had positive pre-placement attitudes than did nursing home patients. Upon follow-up, relatives of foster patients reported seeing more patient improvement, satisfaction,…

  7. The care home activity project: does introducing an occupational therapy programme reduce depression in care homes?

    PubMed

    Mozley, C G; Schneider, J; Cordingley, L; Molineux, M; Duggan, S; Hart, C; Stoker, B; Williamson, R; Lovegrove, R; Cruickshank, A

    2007-01-01

    The primary aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that depression severity in care homes for older people would be reduced by an occupational therapy programme. This was a feasibility study for a cluster randomised controlled trial and involved four intervention and four control homes in northern England. In each intervention home a registered occupational therapist worked full-time for one year delivering an individualised programme to participants. Pre- and post-intervention data for the Geriatric Mental State-Depression Scale (primary outcome measure) were obtained for 143 participants. Secondary outcomes included dependency and quality of life. No significant intervention effects were found in any of the quantitative outcome measures, though qualitative interviews showed the intervention was valued by many participants, staff and relatives. Therapist ratings and qualitative interviews suggested that the intervention was beneficial to some participants but no distinctive characteristics were found that might enable prediction of likely benefit on initial assessment. This exploratory study provides no evidence that this intervention produced benefits in terms of depression, dependency or quality of life. Lack of prior power calculations means these are not definitive findings; but numbers were sufficient to perform the required analyses and data did not suggest effects that would have reached statistical significance with a larger sample. This study highlights issues for consideration in providing such services in care homes.

  8. Measurement error corrected sodium and potassium intake estimation using 24-hour urinary excretion.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying; Van Horn, Linda; Tinker, Lesley F; Neuhouser, Marian L; Carbone, Laura; Mossavar-Rahmani, Yasmin; Thomas, Fridtjof; Prentice, Ross L

    2014-02-01

    Epidemiological studies of the association of sodium and potassium intake with cardiovascular disease risk have almost exclusively relied on self-reported dietary data. Here, 24-hour urinary excretion assessments are used to correct the dietary self-report data for measurement error under the assumption that 24-hour urine recovery provides a biomarker that differs from usual intake according to a classical measurement model. Under this assumption, dietary self-reports underestimate sodium by 0% to 15%, overestimate potassium by 8% to 15%, and underestimate sodium/potassium ratio by ≈20% using food frequency questionnaires, 4-day food records, or three 24-hour dietary recalls in Women's Health Initiative studies. Calibration equations are developed by linear regression of log-transformed 24-hour urine assessments on corresponding log-transformed self-report assessments and several study subject characteristics. For each self-report method, the calibration equations turned out to depend on race and age and strongly on body mass index. After adjustment for temporal variation, calibration equations using food records or recalls explained 45% to 50% of the variation in (log-transformed) 24-hour urine assessments for sodium, 60% to 70% of the variation for potassium, and 55% to 60% of the variation for sodium/potassium ratio. These equations may be suitable for use in epidemiological disease association studies among postmenopausal women. The corresponding signals from food frequency questionnaire data were weak, but calibration equations for the ratios of sodium and potassium/total energy explained ≈35%, 50%, and 45% of log-biomarker variation for sodium, potassium, and their ratio, respectively, after the adjustment for temporal biomarker variation and may be suitable for cautious use in epidemiological studies. Clinical Trial Registration- URL: www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00000611.

  9. Caring for elderly people at home: the consequences to caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Grunfeld, E; Glossop, R; McDowell, I; Danbrook, C

    1997-01-01

    The emphasis on home-based care is one important aspect of health services restructuring initiatives in Canada. Fundamental to the preference for home-based care over institutional care is the expectation that family caregivers will be available in the home to support patients who would otherwise be in an institution. The authors explore the potential impact of this devolution of services from institutions to the home in 2 vulnerable patient populations--elderly patients with dementia and elderly patients with terminal illnesses. Community-based surveillance strategies are needed to determine the true health, quality-of-life and economic outcomes of these restructuring initiatives. PMID:9347781

  10. OBRA 1987 and the quality of nursing home care.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Virender; Norton, Edward C; Encinosa, William E

    2006-03-01

    Because minimum government standards for quality regulate only part of the market failure, they may have unintended effects. We present a general theory of how government regulation of quality of care may affect different market segments, and test the hypotheses for the nursing home market. OBRA 1987 was a sweeping government reform to improve the quality of nursing home care. We study how the effect of OBRA on the quality of nursing home care, measured by resident outcomes, varied with nursing home profitability. Using a semi-parametric method to control for the endogenous effects of regulation, we found that this landmark legislation had a negative effect on the quality of care in less profitable nursing homes, but improved the quality in more profitable nursing homes during the initial period after OBRA. But, this legislation had no statistically significant effect in the later period when the regulation was weakly enforced.

  11. [Technological advances and hospital-at-home care].

    PubMed

    Tibaldi, Vittoria; Aimonino Ricauda, Nicoletta; Rocco, Maurizio; Bertone, Paola; Fanton, Giordano; Isaia, Giancarlo

    2013-05-01

    Advances in the miniaturization and portability of diagnostic technologies, information technologies, remote monitoring, and long-distance care have increased the viability of home-based care, even for patients with serious conditions. Telemedicine and teleradiology projects are active at the Hospital at Home Service of Torino. PMID:23748683

  12. [Technological advances and hospital-at-home care].

    PubMed

    Tibaldi, Vittoria; Aimonino Ricauda, Nicoletta; Rocco, Maurizio; Bertone, Paola; Fanton, Giordano; Isaia, Giancarlo

    2013-05-01

    Advances in the miniaturization and portability of diagnostic technologies, information technologies, remote monitoring, and long-distance care have increased the viability of home-based care, even for patients with serious conditions. Telemedicine and teleradiology projects are active at the Hospital at Home Service of Torino.

  13. Learning Opportunities for Nurses Working within Home Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundgren, Solveig

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore home care nurses' experience of learning in a multicultural environment. Design/methodology/approach: The study was based on qualitative research design. Data were collected through repeated interviews with registered home care nurses working in a multicultural area. The data were analyzed through a…

  14. Minimum Standards Required for Licensing of Day Care Family Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Dept. of Human Services, Little Rock. Div. of Social Services.

    State licensing requirements for day care family homes in Arkansas are collected in this publication. Contents focus on the licensing authority, definition of a family day care home and application requirements, administration, personnel, program and activities, discipline and guidance, records, food service and nutrition, building and grounds,…

  15. Computer information systems in Ohio home care agencies.

    PubMed

    Nickle, J T

    1998-06-01

    Computerized information management is increasingly critical for home care agencies. Yet little is known of computer capabilities currently available in home care agencies. Findings from one study indicate that computer support for clinical services is considerably less developed than for administrative services and that agencies plan major expansions of computerized clinical support.

  16. The emergence of Medicare hospice care in US nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Miller, S C; Mor, V

    2001-11-01

    Although Medicare-financed hospice care has been provided in nursing homes in the USA for over 10 years, very little is known regarding the use of this government health care benefit in nursing homes. Using resident assessment data and hospice and inpatient Medicare claim data from five US states, we were able to identify and describe nursing home residents receiving hospice care between 1992 and 1996, and their hospice utilization patterns. Six per cent of all dying nursing home residents received hospice care at some point in time and, in 1996, an estimated 24% of all Medicare hospice patients in the five study states received hospice while in a nursing home. Of those residents beginning hospice care after nursing home admission, 48% were 85 years or older, 70% were female, 94% were white, 76% were unmarried and 62% had a non-cancer principal diagnosis. The average length of stay in the hospice programme for residents receiving hospice care while in the nursing home was 90.6 days, the median 35 and the mode 2. Hospice care in US nursing homes is a prevalent model of care that appears further to extend the Medicare hospice benefit to older adults who are female and to those with non-cancer diagnoses. Lengths of stay in the programme are similar to those observed in the community and the average length of stay is substantially shorter than previously estimated by an influential government study.

  17. Marketing home health care to health maintenance organizations.

    PubMed

    Shalowitz, J

    1987-01-01

    Home health care is a rapidly growing industry whose continued success depends upon expansion into new markets. One target market a successful company will need to reach is health maintenance organizations. The following article summarizes basic marketing strategies a home care company needs to follow in order to access such contracts.

  18. [Home care of children with chronic diseases: cooperation between hospital and home care workers].

    PubMed

    Cologna, M; Zeni, F; Bobbi, C

    1996-01-01

    Newborns with chronic problems needing continuous and special care even after discharge are not very frequent but represent a challenge for the caring team. The discharge program of the Neonatal Care ward of Trento hospital includes several steps: discharge meetings of teh neonatologist and the nurse responsible for the child, the head nurse, the psychologist and, when possible, the social worker; a training program for the parents; the coordination of communications and interventions of the home-care nurses and a detailed post-discharge planning. From 1995 a home-hospital program, as an alternative to the hospital admission was started. To describe how the team functions and stress the need of a close integration among the team members, the case of Ahmed is presented. This case faced the team with several challenges, because of the lack of parent's knowledge of the italian language and of the severity of the child's problems. Every care plan is developed building on newborn's needs and patients' resources. Data on the patients-problems dealt with from 1991 to 1995 and the interventions and resources needed are presented.

  19. Home care for the dying child.

    PubMed

    Gyulay, J E

    1989-01-01

    The death of a child suffering from a terminal illness or congenital anomalies incompatible with life is the most painful life experience a family has to face. We, as health-care providers, cannot always prevent the death or cure the disease process. However, we can allow the family appropriate decision-making processes, such as allowing the child to die at home. We cannot take the death away, but we can walk the child's and family's journey toward his transition. Few persons in life are as privileged to share such a depth of intimacy in life as we in health care do when living the life experience of death. Death can be likened to shedding or releasing of our physical earth coats toward physical death and individual family beliefs of transition. This journey is a sacred, private, individual, and painful experience. Fear and anxiety can be decreased with appropriate education, and providing an environment of excellent clinical expertise, support, compassion, trust, and love.

  20. The innovative use of Six Sigma in home care.

    PubMed

    Elberfeld, Adrienne; Bennis, Sandra; Ritzius, Jeannie; Yhlen, David

    2007-01-01

    The Prospective Payment System had significant impact on home healthcare agencies throughout the nation. Virtua Home Care, located in Southern New Jersey, realized the need for process improvement in order to remain viable. Six Sigma was introduced to the agency and the Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, and Control processes were initiated to achieve sustainable results, and within 9 months, Virtua Home Care improved regulatory compliance, experienced a deficiency-free survey, and recognized a 1.2 million dollars financial gain.

  1. Relationship between home care service use and changes in the care needs level of Japanese elderly

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background With the introduction of long-term care insurance (LTCI) in Japan, more home care services are available for the community-dwelling elderly. To deliver effective home care services, it is important to know the effects of service use. In this study, as the first step to determine this, we sought to describe different home service use in the sustained/improved group and deteriorated group in their care needs levels, and to report the relationship between the use of home care services and changes in care needs levels. Methods The participants included 624 of a total of 1,474 users of LTCI services in one city in Japan. Home care service users were stratified into a 'lower care needs level subgroup' and a 'higher care needs level subgroup' based on the baseline care needs level. Simple statistical comparison and multiple logistic regression analyses in which the change in care needs level was set as a dependent variable were performed. Gender, age, and baseline care needs level were designated as control variables. Home based services were treated as independent variables. In this study, home care services consisted of home help, home bathing services, a visiting nurse, home rehabilitation, nursing home daycare, health daycare, loan of medical devices, respite stay in a nursing home, respite stay in a health care facility, respite stay in a sanatorium-type medical care facility, and medical management by a physician. Results In the lower care needs level subgroup, age (OR = 1.04, CI, 1.01-1.08), use of respite stay in a nursing home (OR = 2.55; CI, 1.43-4.56), and the number of types of long-term care services (OR = 1.33; CI, 1.02-1.74) used during an 11 month period were significantly related to a deterioration of the user's care needs level. In the higher care needs level subgroup, use of medical management by a physician (OR = 6.99; CI, 1.42-41.25) was significantly related to a deterioration of the user's care needs level. There were no home based

  2. Client involvement in home care practice: a relational sociological perspective.

    PubMed

    Glasdam, Stinne; Henriksen, Nina; Kjær, Lone; Praestegaard, Jeanette

    2013-12-01

    'Client involvement' has been a mantra within health policies, education curricula and healthcare institutions over many years, yet very little is known about how 'client involvement' is practised in home-care services. The aim of this article is to analyse 'client involvement' in practise seen from the positions of healthcare professionals, an elderly person and his relative in a home-care setting. A sociologically inspired single case study was conducted, consisting of three weeks of observations and interviews. The study has a focus on the relational aspects of home care and the structural, political and administrative frames that rule home- care practice. Client involvement is shown within four constructed analytical categories: 'Structural conditions of providing and receiving home care'; 'Client involvement inside the home: performing a professional task and living an everyday life'; 'Client involvement outside the home: liberal business and mutual goal setting'; and 'Converting a home to a working place: refurnishing a life'. The meaning of involvement is depending on which position it is viewed from. On the basis of this analysis, we raise the question of the extent to which involvement of the client in public home-care practice remains limited. PMID:23217061

  3. Client involvement in home care practice: a relational sociological perspective.

    PubMed

    Glasdam, Stinne; Henriksen, Nina; Kjær, Lone; Praestegaard, Jeanette

    2013-12-01

    'Client involvement' has been a mantra within health policies, education curricula and healthcare institutions over many years, yet very little is known about how 'client involvement' is practised in home-care services. The aim of this article is to analyse 'client involvement' in practise seen from the positions of healthcare professionals, an elderly person and his relative in a home-care setting. A sociologically inspired single case study was conducted, consisting of three weeks of observations and interviews. The study has a focus on the relational aspects of home care and the structural, political and administrative frames that rule home- care practice. Client involvement is shown within four constructed analytical categories: 'Structural conditions of providing and receiving home care'; 'Client involvement inside the home: performing a professional task and living an everyday life'; 'Client involvement outside the home: liberal business and mutual goal setting'; and 'Converting a home to a working place: refurnishing a life'. The meaning of involvement is depending on which position it is viewed from. On the basis of this analysis, we raise the question of the extent to which involvement of the client in public home-care practice remains limited.

  4. Trajectories of At-Homeness and Health in Usual Care and Small House Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molony, Sheila L.; Evans, Lois K.; Jeon, Sangchoon; Rabig, Judith; Straka, Leslie A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Long-term care providers across the United States are building innovative environments called "Green House" or small-house nursing homes that weave humanistic person-centered philosophies into clinical care, organizational policies, and built environments. Purpose: To compare and contrast trajectories of at-homeness and health over…

  5. Older Women Doing Home Care: Exploitation or Ideal Job?

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Sandra S.

    2013-01-01

    The increased need for both personal assistance workers and meaningful employment opportunities for older workers results in growing numbers of older home care aides. This study examined lifetime financial security and perceived advantages of older age in this field through interviews with 31 older home care aides. Study participants experienced high levels of financial insecurity and perceived older workers as particularly well suited to the home care job. The consequences of this low-wage, low-status work are explored along with implications for social workers to advocate for improved conditions for these workers providing essential care to frail elders. PMID:23600600

  6. Role of environmental cleanliness and decontamination in care homes.

    PubMed

    Cousins, Gary

    2016-01-01

    While it is widely accepted that the environment has an important role in transmission of healthcare-associated infections, there has been a paucity of empirical investigation in this area to date, and the majority of published literature relates to acute settings. People living in care homes come into contact with a communally used environment and communally used equipment daily. Equipment may include hoists, hoist slings, clinical monitoring equipment, commodes and shower chairs. In care homes, primary responsibility for decontamination lies with the healthcare team, most of whom are not nurses. The challenge for nurses working in care homes is their accountability for the provision of safe and effective care. PMID:26938419

  7. Seasonal changes of 24-hour intraocular pressure rhythm in healthy Shanghai population

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jingyi; Xiao, Ming; Xu, Huan; Fang, Shaobin; Chen, Xu; Kong, Xiangmei; Sun, Xinghuai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the present study was to investigate and compare the 24-hour intraocular pressure (IOP) rhythms in winter and summer in the healthy population of Shanghai, China. This is a cross-sectional study in which 24-hour IOP measurements were taken for all eligible healthy volunteers in winter and summer, respectively, and the temperature, hours of sunlight (sunlight time), and circulatory parameters, including heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure, were also recorded. The 24-hour IOP curves and IOP parameters (mean, peak, trough, and fluctuation of IOP together with the diurnal-to-nocturnal IOP change) in winter and summer were obtained and compared. The magnitude of IOP changes from summer to winter was also calculated. A total of 29 participants (58 eyes), 14 (48.28%) male and 15 (51.72%) female, aged 43.66 ± 12.20 (19–61) years, were considered eligible for this study. Generally, IOP decreased progressively before noon, increased notably in the nocturnal period, and peaked at 12:00 am in winter and at 2:00 am in summer. The pattern of 24-hour IOP in winter and summer was significantly different (P = 0.002). The average IOPs from 4:00 pm to 8:00 am, except for 6:00 am, were significantly higher in winter (P < 0.05). However, no significant differences were shown after adjusting for temperature and/or sunlight time. From summer to winter, the extent of IOP increase was mostly around 0 to 3 mm Hg, and the IOPs increased more significantly in the nocturnal period than in the diurnal period (P = 0.05). The 24-hour IOP rhythms were different in winter and summer, with higher IOP level in winter. Temperature and sunlight time, which are independent of heart rate and blood pressure, affected the 24-hour IOP rhythms in healthy people in Shanghai, China. Further investigations are expected for the rhythm of some endogenous substance secretion and the inner mechanism of regulation of IOP. PMID:27495076

  8. Can family caregiving substitute for nursing home care?

    PubMed

    Charles, Kerwin Kofi; Sevak, Purvi

    2005-11-01

    Informal care should be a substitute for nursing homes but empirical evidence often suggests the opposite. This may be because informal care receipt is positively correlated with unobserved negative health characteristics. We exploit variation in children's characteristics as instruments for informal care to provide Two-Stage Least Squares (TSLS) estimates of nursing home use among a sample of 6855 individuals from the 1993-2000 waves of the AHEAD survey. While OLS results suggest informal care is associated with greater future nursing home risk, TSLS estimates show that receipt of informal care statistically and substantially reduces the risk of nursing home entry. This finding has implications for Medicaid and private long-term care insurance markets.

  9. Implementing digital skills training in care homes: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Wild, Deidre; Kydd, Angela; Szczepura, Ala

    2016-05-01

    This article is the first of a two-part series that informs and describes digital skills training using a dedicated console computer provided for staff and residents in a care home setting. This was part of a programme of culture change in a large care home with nursing in Glasgow, Scotland. The literature review shows that over the past decade there has been a gradual increase in the use of digital technology by staff and older people in community settings including care homes. Policy from the European Commission presents a persuasive argument for the advancement of technology-enabled care to counter the future impact of an increased number of people of advanced age on finite health and social care resources. The psychosocial and environmental issues that inhibit or enhance the acquisition of digital skills in care homes are considered and include the identification of exemplar schemes and the support involved. PMID:27125940

  10. Implementing digital skills training in care homes: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Wild, Deidre; Kydd, Angela; Szczepura, Ala

    2016-05-01

    This article is the first of a two-part series that informs and describes digital skills training using a dedicated console computer provided for staff and residents in a care home setting. This was part of a programme of culture change in a large care home with nursing in Glasgow, Scotland. The literature review shows that over the past decade there has been a gradual increase in the use of digital technology by staff and older people in community settings including care homes. Policy from the European Commission presents a persuasive argument for the advancement of technology-enabled care to counter the future impact of an increased number of people of advanced age on finite health and social care resources. The psychosocial and environmental issues that inhibit or enhance the acquisition of digital skills in care homes are considered and include the identification of exemplar schemes and the support involved.

  11. Unpacking the impact of older adults' home death on family care-givers' experiences of home.

    PubMed

    Milligan, Christine; Turner, Mary; Blake, Susan; Brearley, Sarah; Seamark, David; Thomas, Carol; Wang, Xu; Payne, Sheila

    2016-03-01

    Public Health England (2013) survey data indicates that while the place of death is geographically uneven across England, given a choice, many older people nearing end of life would prefer to die at home. There is, however, a growing critique that policies designed to support home death fail to understand the needs and preferences of older people and the impact on family carers. Such policies also make assumption about within whose home the home death takes place. Hence, there are major gaps in our understanding of firstly, where and how care work undertaken by family members within domestic settings takes place; and secondly, how it can create tensions between home and care that fundamentally disrupt the physical and socio-emotional meaning of home for family carers, impacting on their sense of home post-death. This can have consequences for their own well-being. In this paper we draw on interview data from our 'Unpacking the Home' study to elicit an in-depth understanding of how facilitating a home death can create an ambiguity of place for family carers, where the issues faced by them in caring for a dying older person at home, and the home death itself, can fundamentally reshape the meaning and sense of home. PMID:26916987

  12. [Behavior profile of psychogeriatric patients in substitute care projects: nursing home care and home for the aged].

    PubMed

    Boom-Poels, P G

    1994-03-01

    This article describes behaviour profiles of psychogeriatric patients participating in some substitute care projects. The behaviour of 55 patients from five residential homes participating in these projects were rated on the Behaviour Rating Scale for Psychogeriatric Inpatients (GIP). These data were compared with GIP-data of two reference groups: elderly people in residential homes and patients in psychogeriatric nursing homes (supervision, intensive care and nursing care requiring patients). Patients in the projects have, compared to the other people in residential homes, more cognitive and social disabilities. Compared to the patients in nursing homes, the patients in the projects have less social, cognitive and psychomotor disabilities, but more emotional problems, like suspicious, melancholic and dependent behaviour. These results show that patients in substitute care projects have a specific behaviour profile. The profile can be used for careful selection of patients in these projects.

  13. Complexity and contradiction: home care in a multicultural area.

    PubMed

    Skott, Carola; Lundgren, Solveig M

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the meaning of experience for home-care nurses in a multicultural area of Sweden. Interviews and group discussions with a team of five home-care nurses were interpreted in accordance with a hermeneutical perspective. The meaning was expressed in connection with the complexities of place, and space for care. Contradictions developed from diversities of perspectives incorporated in this particular multicultural area. Nurses saw themselves as mediators and allowed complexity to be considered in order to manage care. They took on responsibility of creating a 'space of care', while the organizational structures of home care were perceived as something outside the care praxis. Making contradictions evident renders an intermediary caring strategy feasible.

  14. Contracts and provider agreements for State home nursing home care. Interim final rule.

    PubMed

    2012-12-01

    This interim final rule amends Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) regulations to allow VA to enter into contracts or provider agreements with State homes for the nursing home care of certain disabled veterans. This rulemaking is required to implement a change in law that revises how VA will pay for care provided to these veterans and authorizes VA to use provider agreements to pay for such care. The change made by this law applies to all care provided to these veterans in State homes on and after February 2, 2013.

  15. Pulmonary function in mechanically-ventilated patients during 24-hour use of a hygroscopic condensor humidifier.

    PubMed

    MacIntyre, N R; Anderson, H R; Silver, R M; Schuler, F R; Coleman, R E

    1983-11-01

    Hygroscopic condensor humidifiers (HCH) are reportedly capable of humidifying even the driest of ventilator source gases with at least 30 mg H2O/liter of ventilation. To assess the adequacy of the HCH during mechanical ventilation, we studied 26 patients over a 72-hour period (alternating 24-hour periods of humidification by a conventional cascade and the HCH). In these patients, we found no significant difference in static lung compliance, airway resistance, PaO2, and PaCO2 on either system. Additionally, estimates of sputum volume (over a four-hour collection period) and clearance of aerosolized 99mTc labelled DTPA (in five of these patients) also showed no significant differences between the two systems. We conclude that the HCH is capable of supplying necessary heat and moisture to most mechanically-ventilated patients for at least a period of 24 hours.

  16. Demonstration that thiazole-orange-positive platelets in the dog are less than 24 hours old.

    PubMed

    Dale, G L; Friese, P; Hynes, L A; Burstein, S A

    1995-04-01

    Approximately 6% of dog platelets are positive for staining with thiazole orange, a dye frequently used to stain ribonucleic acid. In this report, thiazole-orange positivity is shown to mark platelets that are less than 24 hours old. Dog platelets were derivatized in vivo with N-hydroxysuccinimido biotin such that greater than 95% of all platelets were biotinylated. Newly synthesized, nonbiotinylated platelets were then monitored by flow cytometry for their ability to bind thiazole orange. After biotinylation, the percentage of biotin-negative, thiazole-orange-positive platelets increased gradually from 0.72% at 30 minutes to 5.44% at 24 hours. These data indicate that thiazole-orange staining does label newly synthesized platelets.

  17. [Contraceptive effect of spermicide on cervical mucus in vivo after 24 hours (authors transl)].

    PubMed

    Batallan, L; Brissi, J; Commerot, J

    1980-10-01

    Efficacy of Alpagelle, a vaginal contraceptive jelly containing benzalkonium chlorohydrate, was tested on 34 women who had been using it for some. The testing was conducted using fresh human spermatozoa, and measuring the penetration into the cervical mucus 24 hours after instillation of 2 ml. of Alpagelle. Maximum penetration of spermatozoa before immobilization and death was 2/10 mm., while it is 2mm. a minute under normal conditions. Alpagelle has no contraindications, and only 1 application every 24 hours will provide contraceptive protection; such method could be ideal for women presenting temporary or permanent contraindications to the IUD, or to the pill, or to those who wish to opt for a method free of side effects. PMID:12262152

  18. Circadian Polymorphisms in Night Owls, in Bipolars, and in Non-24-Hour Sleep Cycles

    PubMed Central

    Klimecki, Walter T.; Nievergelt, Caroline M.; Rex, Katharine M.; Murray, Sarah S.; Shekhtman, Tatyana; Tranah, Gregory J.; Loving, Richard T.; Lee, Heon-Jeong; Rhee, Min Kyu; Shadan, Farhad F.; Poceta, J. Steven; Jamil, Shazia M.; Kline, Lawrence E.; Kelsoe, John R.

    2014-01-01

    People called night owls habitually have late bedtimes and late times of arising, sometimes suffering a heritable circadian disturbance called delayed sleep phase syndrome (DSPS). Those with DSPS, those with more severe progressively-late non-24-hour sleep-wake cycles, and those with bipolar disorder may share genetic tendencies for slowed or delayed circadian cycles. We searched for polymorphisms associated with DSPS in a case-control study of DSPS research participants and a separate study of Sleep Center patients undergoing polysomnography. In 45 participants, we resequenced portions of 15 circadian genes to identify unknown polymorphisms that might be associated with DSPS, non-24-hour rhythms, or bipolar comorbidities. We then genotyped single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in both larger samples, using Illumina Golden Gate assays. Associations of SNPs with the DSPS phenotype and with the morningness-eveningness parametric phenotype were computed for both samples, then combined for meta-analyses. Delayed sleep and "eveningness" were inversely associated with loci in circadian genes NFIL3 (rs2482705) and RORC (rs3828057). A group of haplotypes overlapping BHLHE40 was associated with non-24-hour sleep-wake cycles, and less robustly, with delayed sleep and bipolar disorder (e.g., rs34883305, rs34870629, rs74439275, and rs3750275 were associated with n=37, p=4.58E-09, Bonferroni p=2.95E-06). Bright light and melatonin can palliate circadian disorders, and genetics may clarify the underlying circadian photoperiodic mechanisms. After further replication and identification of the causal polymorphisms, these findings may point to future treatments for DSPS, non-24-hour rhythms, and possibly bipolar disorder or depression. PMID:25395965

  19. Exercising in the Fasted State Reduced 24-Hour Energy Intake in Active Male Adults

    PubMed Central

    Deitrick, Ronald W.; Hillman, Angela R.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of fasting prior to morning exercise on 24-hour energy intake was examined using a randomized, counterbalanced design. Participants (12 active, white males, 20.8 ± 3.0 years old, VO2max: 59.1 ± 5.7 mL/kg/min) fasted (NoBK) or received breakfast (BK) and then ran for 60 minutes at 60%  VO2max. All food was weighed and measured for 24 hours. Measures of blood glucose and hunger were collected at 5 time points. Respiratory quotient (RQ) was measured during exercise. Generalized linear mixed models and paired sample t-tests examined differences between the conditions. Total 24-hour (BK: 19172 ± 4542 kJ versus NoBK: 15312 ± 4513 kJ; p < 0.001) and evening (BK: 12265 ± 4278 kJ versus NoBK: 10833 ± 4065; p = 0.039) energy intake and RQ (BK: 0.90 ± 0.03 versus NoBK: 0.86 ± 0.03; p < 0.001) were significantly higher in BK than NoBK. Blood glucose was significantly higher in BK than NoBK before exercise (5.2 ± 0.7 versus 4.5 ± 0.6 mmol/L; p = 0.025). Hunger was significantly lower for BK than NoBK before exercise, after exercise, and before lunch. Blood glucose and hunger were not associated with energy intake. Fasting before morning exercise decreased 24-hour energy intake and increased fat oxidation during exercise. Completing exercise in the morning in the fasted state may have implications for weight management. PMID:27738523

  20. Assessing variability of the 24-hour pad weight test in men with post-prostatectomy incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Rena D.; Cohn, Joshua A.; Fedunok, Pauline A.; Chung, Doreen E.; Bales, Gregory T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: Decision-making regarding surgery for post-prostatectomy incontinence (PPI) is challenging. The 24-hour pad weight test is commonly used to objectively quantify PPI. However, pad weight may vary based upon activity level. We aimed to quantify variability in pad weights based upon patient-reported activity. Materials and Methods: 25 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy were prospectively enrolled. All patients demonstrated clinical stress urinary incontinence without clinical urgency urinary incontinence. On three consecutive alternating days, patients submitted 24-hour pad weights along with a short survey documenting activity level and number of pads used. Results: Pad weights collected across the three days were well correlated to the individual (ICC 0.85 (95% CI 0.74–0.93), p<0.001). The mean difference between the minimum pad weight leakage and maximum leakage per patient was 133.4g (95% CI 80.4–186.5). The mean increase in 24-hour leakage for a one-point increase in self-reported activity level was 118.0g (95% CI 74.3–161.7, p<0.001). Pad weights also varied significantly when self-reported activity levels did not differ (mean difference 51.2g (95% CI 30.3–72.1), p<0.001). Conclusions: 24-hour pad weight leakage may vary significantly on different days of collection. This variation is more pronounced with changes in activity level. Taking into account patient activity level may enhance the predictive value of pad weight testing. PMID:27256187

  1. Circadian polymorphisms in night owls, in bipolars, and in non-24-hour sleep cycles.

    PubMed

    Kripke, Daniel F; Klimecki, Walter T; Nievergelt, Caroline M; Rex, Katharine M; Murray, Sarah S; Shekhtman, Tatyana; Tranah, Gregory J; Loving, Richard T; Lee, Heon-Jeong; Rhee, Min Kyu; Shadan, Farhad F; Poceta, J Steven; Jamil, Shazia M; Kline, Lawrence E; Kelsoe, John R

    2014-10-01

    People called night owls habitually have late bedtimes and late times of arising, sometimes suffering a heritable circadian disturbance called delayed sleep phase syndrome (DSPS). Those with DSPS, those with more severe progressively-late non-24-hour sleep-wake cycles, and those with bipolar disorder may share genetic tendencies for slowed or delayed circadian cycles. We searched for polymorphisms associated with DSPS in a case-control study of DSPS research participants and a separate study of Sleep Center patients undergoing polysomnography. In 45 participants, we resequenced portions of 15 circadian genes to identify unknown polymorphisms that might be associated with DSPS, non-24-hour rhythms, or bipolar comorbidities. We then genotyped single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in both larger samples, using Illumina Golden Gate assays. Associations of SNPs with the DSPS phenotype and with the morningness-eveningness parametric phenotype were computed for both samples, then combined for meta-analyses. Delayed sleep and "eveningness" were inversely associated with loci in circadian genes NFIL3 (rs2482705) and RORC (rs3828057). A group of haplotypes overlapping BHLHE40 was associated with non-24-hour sleep-wake cycles, and less robustly, with delayed sleep and bipolar disorder (e.g., rs34883305, rs34870629, rs74439275, and rs3750275 were associated with n=37, p=4.58E-09, Bonferroni p=2.95E-06). Bright light and melatonin can palliate circadian disorders, and genetics may clarify the underlying circadian photoperiodic mechanisms. After further replication and identification of the causal polymorphisms, these findings may point to future treatments for DSPS, non-24-hour rhythms, and possibly bipolar disorder or depression. PMID:25395965

  2. Impedance and electrically evoked compound action potential (ECAP) drop within 24 hours after cochlear implantation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Joshua Kuang-Chao; Chuang, Ann Yi-Chiun; Sprinzl, Georg Mathias; Tung, Tao-Hsin; Li, Lieber Po-Hung

    2013-01-01

    Previous animal study revealed that post-implantation electrical detection levels significantly declined within days. The impact of cochlear implant (CI) insertion on human auditory pathway in terms of impedance and electrically evoked compound action potential (ECAP) variation within hours after surgery remains unclear, since at this time frequency mapping can only commence weeks after implantation due to factors associated with wound conditions. The study presented our experiences with regards to initial switch-on within 24 hours, and thus the findings about the milieus inside cochlea within the first few hours after cochlear implantation in terms of impedance/ECAP fluctuations. The charts of fifty-four subjects with profound hearing impairment were studied. A minimal invasive approach was used for cochlear implantation, characterized by a small skin incision (≈ 2.5 cm) and soft techniques for cochleostomy. Impedance/ECAP was measured intro-operatively and within 24 hours post-operatively. Initial mapping within 24 hours post-operatively was performed in all patients without major complications. Impedance/ECAP became significantly lower measured within 24 hours post-operatively as compared with intra-operatively (p<0.001). There were no differences between pre-operative and post-operative threshold for air-conduction hearing. A significant drop of impedance/ECAP in one day after cochlear implantation was revealed for the first time in human beings. Mechanisms could be related to the restoration of neuronal sensitivity to the electrical stimulation, and/or the interaction between the matrix enveloping the electrodes and the electrical stimulation of the initial switch-on. Less wound pain/swelling and soft techniques both contributed to the success of immediate initial mapping, which implied a stable micro-environment inside the cochlea despite electrodes insertion. Our research invites further studies to correlate initial impedance/ECAP changes with long

  3. Impedance and Electrically Evoked Compound Action Potential (ECAP) Drop within 24 Hours after Cochlear Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Joshua Kuang-Chao; Chuang, Ann Yi-Chiun; Sprinzl, Georg Mathias; Tung, Tao-Hsin; Li, Lieber Po-Hung

    2013-01-01

    Previous animal study revealed that post-implantation electrical detection levels significantly declined within days. The impact of cochlear implant (CI) insertion on human auditory pathway in terms of impedance and electrically evoked compound action potential (ECAP) variation within hours after surgery remains unclear, since at this time frequency mapping can only commence weeks after implantation due to factors associated with wound conditions. The study presented our experiences with regards to initial switch-on within 24 hours, and thus the findings about the milieus inside cochlea within the first few hours after cochlear implantation in terms of impedance/ECAP fluctuations. The charts of fifty-four subjects with profound hearing impairment were studied. A minimal invasive approach was used for cochlear implantation, characterized by a small skin incision (≈2.5 cm) and soft techniques for cochleostomy. Impedance/ECAP was measured intro-operatively and within 24 hours post-operatively. Initial mapping within 24 hours post-operatively was performed in all patients without major complications. Impedance/ECAP became significantly lower measured within 24 hours post-operatively as compared with intra-operatively (p<0.001). There were no differences between pre-operative and post-operative threshold for air-conduction hearing. A significant drop of impedance/ECAP in one day after cochlear implantation was revealed for the first time in human beings. Mechanisms could be related to the restoration of neuronal sensitivity to the electrical stimulation, and/or the interaction between the matrix enveloping the electrodes and the electrical stimulation of the initial switch-on. Less wound pain/swelling and soft techniques both contributed to the success of immediate initial mapping, which implied a stable micro-environment inside the cochlea despite electrodes insertion. Our research invites further studies to correlate initial impedance/ECAP changes with long

  4. 24-hour-restraint stress induces long-term depressive-like phenotypes in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ying; Hu, Zhiqiang; Lou, Jingyu; Song, Wei; Li, Jing; Liang, Xiao; Chen, Chen; Wang, Shuai; Yang, Beimeng; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Xu; Song, Jinjing; Dong, Yujie; Chen, Shiqing; He, Lin; Xie, Qingguo; Chen, Xiaoping; Li, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing risk of mental disorders, such as acute stress disorder (ASD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression among survivors who were trapped in rubble during earthquake. Such long-term impaction of a single acute restraint stress has not been extensively explored. In this study, we subjected mice to 24-hour-restraint to simulate the trapping episode, and investigated the acute (2 days after the restraint) and long-term (35 days after the restraint) impacts. Surprisingly, we found that the mice displayed depression-like behaviors, decreased glucose uptake in brain and reduced adult hippocampal neurogenesis 35 days after the restraint. Differential expression profiling based on microarrays suggested that genes and pathways related to depression and other mental disorders were differentially expressed in both PFC and hippocampus. Furthermore, the depression-like phenotypes induced by 24-hour-restraint could be reversed by fluoxetine, a type of antidepressant drug. These findings demonstrated that a single severe stressful event could produce long-term depressive-like phenotypes. Moreover, the 24-hour-restraint stress mice could also be used for further studies on mood disorders. PMID:27609090

  5. 24-hour-restraint stress induces long-term depressive-like phenotypes in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Xixia; Zhou, Ying; Hu, Zhiqiang; Lou, Jingyu; Song, Wei; Li, Jing; Liang, Xiao; Chen, Chen; Wang, Shuai; Yang, Beimeng; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Xu; Song, Jinjing; Dong, Yujie; Chen, Shiqing; He, Lin; Xie, Qingguo; Chen, Xiaoping; Li, Weidong

    2016-09-01

    There is an increasing risk of mental disorders, such as acute stress disorder (ASD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression among survivors who were trapped in rubble during earthquake. Such long-term impaction of a single acute restraint stress has not been extensively explored. In this study, we subjected mice to 24-hour-restraint to simulate the trapping episode, and investigated the acute (2 days after the restraint) and long-term (35 days after the restraint) impacts. Surprisingly, we found that the mice displayed depression-like behaviors, decreased glucose uptake in brain and reduced adult hippocampal neurogenesis 35 days after the restraint. Differential expression profiling based on microarrays suggested that genes and pathways related to depression and other mental disorders were differentially expressed in both PFC and hippocampus. Furthermore, the depression-like phenotypes induced by 24-hour-restraint could be reversed by fluoxetine, a type of antidepressant drug. These findings demonstrated that a single severe stressful event could produce long-term depressive-like phenotypes. Moreover, the 24-hour-restraint stress mice could also be used for further studies on mood disorders.

  6. 24-hour-restraint stress induces long-term depressive-like phenotypes in mice.

    PubMed

    Chu, Xixia; Zhou, Ying; Hu, Zhiqiang; Lou, Jingyu; Song, Wei; Li, Jing; Liang, Xiao; Chen, Chen; Wang, Shuai; Yang, Beimeng; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Xu; Song, Jinjing; Dong, Yujie; Chen, Shiqing; He, Lin; Xie, Qingguo; Chen, Xiaoping; Li, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing risk of mental disorders, such as acute stress disorder (ASD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression among survivors who were trapped in rubble during earthquake. Such long-term impaction of a single acute restraint stress has not been extensively explored. In this study, we subjected mice to 24-hour-restraint to simulate the trapping episode, and investigated the acute (2 days after the restraint) and long-term (35 days after the restraint) impacts. Surprisingly, we found that the mice displayed depression-like behaviors, decreased glucose uptake in brain and reduced adult hippocampal neurogenesis 35 days after the restraint. Differential expression profiling based on microarrays suggested that genes and pathways related to depression and other mental disorders were differentially expressed in both PFC and hippocampus. Furthermore, the depression-like phenotypes induced by 24-hour-restraint could be reversed by fluoxetine, a type of antidepressant drug. These findings demonstrated that a single severe stressful event could produce long-term depressive-like phenotypes. Moreover, the 24-hour-restraint stress mice could also be used for further studies on mood disorders. PMID:27609090

  7. Continuous 24-hour intraocular pressure monitoring for glaucoma--time for a paradigm change.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, K; Weinreb, R

    2012-01-01

    Glaucoma is the main cause of irreversible blindness and intraocular pressure (IOP) is its only modifiable risk factor. The importance of robust lowering of IOP for prevention of glaucoma onset and progression is well established. Although IOP is a dynamic parameter with individual circadian rhythms, current management usually relies on single IOP measurements during regular clinic hours performed a few times a year. Recent technological advances have provided clinicians with tools for continuous IOP monitoring during a 24 hour period in an ambulatory setting. There are two approaches being investigated. The first is permanent IOP monitoring through an implantable sensor and the other is temporary monitoring through a contact lens sensor. In this article, we discuss the shortcomings of the current gold standard for tonometry (Goldmann Applanation Tonometry) and the current experience with the first commercially available continuous 24 hour IOP monitoring technology (SENSIMED Triggerfish®); a telemetric contact lens sensor produced by a Swiss start-up company (Sensimed AG, Lausanne, Switzerland). Recent studies suggest that 24 hour continuous monitoring of IOP can be integrated into clinical practice and have the potential to contribute to the reduction of glaucoma-related vision loss.

  8. [Home care for the chronically ill: a self-care health system].

    PubMed

    Silva, Leticia Robles

    2004-01-01

    This article focuses on home care for chronically ill adults and seniors. According to our thesis, home care should be understood as a self-care system, and its aim is to guarantee the individual's social and bodily survival. Home care consists of three areas, related to illness, the home, and to life history. Caregiving, usually under women's responsibility, is present throughout the history of the illness and the health-seeking process. The article analyzes these issues in light of the ageing process, the epidemiological changes occurring worldwide, and the urgency to incorporate this analysis into the heath care research agenda. PMID:15073644

  9. Leadership and quality of working life in home health care.

    PubMed

    Smith, H L; Hood, J N; Piland, N F

    1994-01-01

    Home health care has undergone startling changes in the past decade and, in the process, become a strategically important ingredient of health care delivery. However, the question remains whether home health care organizations can deliver the benefits anticipated for integrated care delivery systems. The answer to this question depends to a great extent on whether home health care organizations build vibrant, visionary leadership capable of transforming organizations and motivating staff to deliver high quality and low cost services. This paper examines a case study of transformational leadership as it relates to the quality of working life for nurses, homemakers, and staff. The findings indicate that leader behaviour is strongly associated with homemakers', and to a lesser extent staff members', job satisfaction, job involvement, and propensity to remain with the organization. These job attitudes have been shown to be related to higher job performance. The implications for leadership in home health agencies are discussed. PMID:10134028

  10. Factors Associated With High Sodium Intake Based on Estimated 24-Hour Urinary Sodium Excretion

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jae Won; Noh, Jung Hyun; Kim, Dong-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although reducing dietary salt consumption is the most cost-effective strategy for preventing progression of cardiovascular and renal disease, policy-based approaches to monitor sodium intake accurately and the understanding factors associated with excessive sodium intake for the improvement of public health are lacking. We investigated factors associated with high sodium intake based on the estimated 24-hour urinary sodium excretion, using data from the 2009 to 2011 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES). Among 21,199 adults (≥19 years of age) who participated in the 2009 to 2011 KNHANES, 18,000 participants (weighted n = 33,969,783) who completed urinary sodium and creatinine evaluations were analyzed in this study. The 24-hour urinary sodium excretion was estimated using Tanaka equation. The mean estimated 24-hour urinary sodium excretion level was 4349 (4286–4413) mg per day. Only 18.5% (weighted n = 6,298,481/3,396,973, unweighted n = 2898/18,000) of the study participants consumed less the 2000 mg sodium per day. Female gender (P < 0.001), older age (P < 0.001), total energy intake ≥50 percentile (P < 0.005), and obesity (P < 0.001) were associated with high sodium intake, even after adjusting for potential confounders. Senior high school/college graduation in education and managers/professionals in occupation were associated with lower sodium intake (P < 0.001). According to hypertension management status, those who had hypertension without medication consumed more sodium than those who were normotensive. However, those who receiving treatment for hypertension consumed less sodium than those who were normotensive (P < 0.001). The number of family members, household income, and alcohol drinking did not affect 24-hour urinary sodium excretion. The logistic regression analysis for the highest estimated 24-hour urinary sodium excretion quartile (>6033 mg/day) using the

  11. Validation of triple pass 24-hour dietary recall in Ugandan children by simultaneous weighed food assessment

    PubMed Central

    Olupot-Olupot, Peter; Engoru, Charles; Ssenyondo, Tonny; Nteziyaremye, Julius; Amorut, Denis; Nakuya, Margaret; Arimi, Margaret; Frost, Gary; Maitland, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    Background Undernutrition remains highly prevalent in African children, highlighting the need for accurately assessing dietary intake. In order to do so, the assessment method must be validated in the target population. A triple pass 24 hour dietary recall with volumetric portion size estimation has been described but not previously validated in African children. This study aimed to establish the relative validity of 24-hour dietary recalls of daily food consumption in healthy African children living in Mbale and Soroti, eastern Uganda compared to simultaneous weighed food records. Methods Quantitative assessment of daily food consumption by weighed food records followed by two independent assessments using triple pass 24-hour dietary recall on the following day. In conjunction with household measures and standard food sizes, volumes of liquid, dry rice, or play dough were used to aid portion size estimation. Inter-assessor agreement, and agreement with weighed food records was conducted primarily by Bland-Altman analysis and secondly by intraclass correlation coefficients and quartile cross-classification. Results 19 healthy children aged 6 months to 12 years were included in the study. Bland-Altman analysis showed 24-hour recall only marginally under-estimated energy (mean difference of 149kJ or 2.8%; limits of agreement -1618 to 1321kJ), protein (2.9g or 9.4%; -12.6 to 6.7g), and iron (0.43mg or 8.3%; -3.1 to 2.3mg). Quartile cross-classification was correct in 79% of cases for energy intake, and 89% for both protein and iron. The intraclass correlation coefficient between the separate dietary recalls for energy was 0.801 (95% CI, 0.429-0.933), indicating acceptable inter-observer agreement. Conclusions Dietary assessment using 24-hour dietary recall with volumetric portion size estimation resulted in similar and acceptable estimates of dietary intake compared with weighed food records and thus is considered a valid method for daily dietary intake assessment of

  12. Static stretching can impair explosive performance for at least 24 hours.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Monoem; Dridi, Amir; Chtara, Moktar; Chaouachi, Anis; Wong, Del P; Behm, David; Chamari, Karim

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of static vs. dynamic stretching (DS) on explosive performances and repeated sprint ability (RSA) after a 24-hour delay. Sixteen young male soccer players performed 15 minutes of static stretching (SS), DS, or a no-stretch control condition (CC) 24 hours before performing explosive performances and RSA tests. This was a within-subject repeated measures study with SS, DS, and CC being counterbalanced. Stretching protocols included 2 sets of 7 minutes 30 seconds (2 repetitions of 30 seconds with a 15-second passive recovery) for 5 muscle groups (quadriceps, hamstring, calves, adductors, and hip flexors). Twenty-four hours later (without any kind of stretching in warm-up), the players were tested for the 30-m sprint test (with 10- and 20-m lap times), 5 jump test (5JT), and RSA test. Significant differences were observed between CC, SS, and DS with 5JT (F = 9.99, p < 0.00, effect size [ES] = 0.40), 10-m sprint time (F = 46.52, p < 0.00, ES = 0.76), 20-m sprint time (F = 18.44, p < 0.000, ES = 0.55), and 30-m sprint time (F = 34.25, p < 0.000, ES = 0.70). The significantly better performance (p < 0.05) was observed after DS as compared with that after CC and SS in 5JT, and sprint times for 10, 20, and 30 m. In contrast, significantly worse performance (p < 0.05) was observed after SS as compared with that after CC in 5JT, and sprint times for 10, 20, and 30 m. With RSA, no significant difference was observed between different stretching protocols in the total time (F = 1.55, p > 0.05), average time (F = 1.53, p > 0.05), and fastest time (F = 2.30, p > 0.05), except for the decline index (F = 3.54, p < 0.04, ES = 0.19). Therefore, the SS of the lower limbs and hip muscles had a negative effect on explosive performances up to 24 hours poststretching with no major effects on the RSA. Conversely, the DS of the same muscle groups are highly recommended 24 hours before performing sprint and long-jump performances. In

  13. [Utility of Smartphone in Home Care Medicine - First Trial].

    PubMed

    Takeshige, Toshiyuki; Hirano, Chiho; Nakagawa, Midori; Yoshioka, Rentaro

    2015-12-01

    The use of video calls for home care can reduce anxiety and offer patients peace of mind. The most suitable terminals at facilities to support home care have been iPad Air and iPhone with FaceTime software. However, usage has been limited to specific terminals. In order to eliminate the need for special terminals and software, we have developed a program that has been customized to meet the needs of facilities using Web Real Time Communication(WebRTC)in cooperation with the University of Aizu. With this software, video calls can accommodate the large number of home care patients. PMID:26809398

  14. [Utility of Smartphone in Home Care Medicine - First Trial].

    PubMed

    Takeshige, Toshiyuki; Hirano, Chiho; Nakagawa, Midori; Yoshioka, Rentaro

    2015-12-01

    The use of video calls for home care can reduce anxiety and offer patients peace of mind. The most suitable terminals at facilities to support home care have been iPad Air and iPhone with FaceTime software. However, usage has been limited to specific terminals. In order to eliminate the need for special terminals and software, we have developed a program that has been customized to meet the needs of facilities using Web Real Time Communication(WebRTC)in cooperation with the University of Aizu. With this software, video calls can accommodate the large number of home care patients.

  15. Paediatric palliative home care in areas of Germany with low population density and long distances: a questionnaire survey with general paediatricians

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In 2007, the patient’s right to specialised palliative home care became law in Germany. However, childhood palliative care in territorial states with low patient numbers and long distances requires adapted models to ensure an area-wide maintenance. Actually, general paediatricians are the basic care providers for children and adolescents. They also provide home care. The aim of this study was to improve the knowledge about general paediatrician’s involvement in and contribution to palliative care in children. Findings To evaluate the current status of palliative home care provided by general paediatricians and their cooperation with other paediatric palliative care providers, a questionnaire survey was disseminated to general paediatricians in Lower Saxony, a German federal state with nearly eight million inhabitants and a predominantly rural infrastructure. Data analysis was descriptive. One hundred forty one of 157 included general paediatricians completed the questionnaire (response rate: 89.8%). A total of 792 children and adolescents suffering from life-limiting conditions were cared for by these general paediatricians in 2008. Severe cerebral palsy was the most prevalent diagnosis. Eighty-nine per cent of the general paediatricians stated that they had professional experience with paediatric palliative care. Collaboration of general paediatricians and other palliative care providers was stated as not well developed. The support by a specialised team including 24-hour on-call duty and the intensification of educational programs were emphasised. Conclusions The current regional infrastructure of palliative home care in Lower Saxony can benefit from the establishment of a coordinated network of palliative home care providers. PMID:22967691

  16. The Future of Home Health project: developing the framework for health care at home.

    PubMed

    Lee, Teresa; Schiller, Jennifer

    2015-02-01

    In addition to providing high-quality care to vulnerable patient populations, home healthcare offers the least costly option for patients and the healthcare system, particularly in postacute care. As the baby boom generation ages, policymakers are expressing concerns about rising costs, variation in home healthcare service use, and program integrity. The Alliance for Home Health Quality and Innovation seeks to develop a research-based strategic framework for the future of home healthcare for older Americans and those with disabilities. This article describes the initiative and invites readers to provide comments and suggestions. PMID:25654456

  17. Pain Assessment Strategies in Home Care and Nursing Homes in Mid-Norway: A Cross-sectional Survey.

    PubMed

    Torvik, Karin; Nordtug, Bente; Brenne, Inger Karin; Rognstad, May-Karin

    2015-08-01

    The prevalence of pain ranges from 27.8% to 86.5% in nursing homes and 42% to 50% in home care. Pain assessment is the first step toward effective pain management. The aim of this study was to explore the use of pain assessment strategies (verbal, numeric, and observation rating scales and standardized questions) in home care and nursing homes. The study was a descriptive cross-sectional survey. Health care providers who were responsible for the patients' medications replied to a questionnaire. In-home care and nursing homes in 11 randomly selected municipalities in Mid-Norway were included. Three hundred ninety-two individuals were included in this study (70% response rate): 271 (69%) from nursing homes and 121 (31%) from home care. The respondents working in home care had a higher educational level than those in working in nursing homes. Pain assessment instruments were not used frequently in nursing homes and home care. Verbal and numeric rating scales were used significantly more frequently in home care than in nursing homes. Registered nurses (RNs) in nursing homes used standardized questions significantly more often than did RNs in home care. RNs and social educators in home care self-reported less competence in treating the patients' total pain experience than did those in nursing homes. Workplace (working in home care) and regular training in the use of pain assessment tools explained more than 20% of the variation in the use of pain assessment tools. Regular training in the use of pain assessment tools is needed for health care workers in home care and nursing homes.

  18. Medicaid Home Care Services and Survival in New York City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albert, Steven M.; Simone, Bridget; Brassard, Andrea; Stern, Yaakov; Mayeux, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: New York City's Medicaid Home Care Services Program provides an integrated program of housekeeping and personal assistance care along with regular nursing assessments. We sought to determine if this program of supportive care offers a survival benefit to older adults. Design and Methods: Administrative data from New York City's Medicaid…

  19. Child Care: Volume II. Vocational Home Economics Education. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Ann; Kates, Donna

    Intended for use in a four-semester occupational child care program for 11th- or 12th-grade and adult students, this curriculum guide provides instructional materials covering basic information and skills for operating a child care center or a family day care home. It includes 4 sections and 23 instructional units. Each unit of instruction…

  20. Non-Technical Medical Care: An In-Home Care Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Human Services, Oklahoma City.

    This document describes the Non-Technical Medical Care (NTMC) program, a personal care service offered by the Oklahoma Department of Human Services to eligible persons in their own homes. These NTMC program goals are listed: to provide personal care services to frail elderly and disabled persons, allowing them to remain in their homes; and to…

  1. Home care technology through an ability expectation lens.

    PubMed

    Wolbring, Gregor; Lashewicz, Bonnie

    2014-01-01

    Home care is on the rise, and its delivery is increasingly reliant on an expanding variety of health technologies ranging from computers to telephone "health apps" to social robots. These technologies are most often predicated on expectations that people in their homes (1) can actively interact with these technologies and (2) are willing to submit to the action of the technology in their home. Our purpose is to use an "ability expectations" lens to bring together, and provide some synthesis of, the types of utility and disadvantages that can arise for people with disabilities in relation to home care technology development and use. We searched the academic databases Scopus, Web of Science, EBSCO ALL, IEEE Xplore, and Compendex to collect articles that had the term "home care technology" in the abstract or as a topic (in the case of Web of Science). We also used our background knowledge and related academic literature pertaining to self-diagnosis, health monitoring, companionship, health information gathering, and care. We examined background articles and articles collected through our home care technology search in terms of ability expectations assumed in the presentation of home care technologies, or discussed in relation to home care technologies. While advances in health care support are made possible through emerging technologies, we urge critical examination of such technologies in terms of implications for the rights and dignity of people with diverse abilities. Specifically, we see potential for technologies to result in new forms of exclusion and powerlessness. Ableism influences choices made by funders, policy makers, and the public in the development and use of home health technologies and impacts how people with disabilities are served and how useful health support technologies will be for them. We urge continued critical examination of technology development and use according to ability expectations, and we recommend increasing incorporation of

  2. Home Care Technology Through an Ability Expectation Lens

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Home care is on the rise, and its delivery is increasingly reliant on an expanding variety of health technologies ranging from computers to telephone “health apps” to social robots. These technologies are most often predicated on expectations that people in their homes (1) can actively interact with these technologies and (2) are willing to submit to the action of the technology in their home. Our purpose is to use an “ability expectations” lens to bring together, and provide some synthesis of, the types of utility and disadvantages that can arise for people with disabilities in relation to home care technology development and use. We searched the academic databases Scopus, Web of Science, EBSCO ALL, IEEE Xplore, and Compendex to collect articles that had the term “home care technology” in the abstract or as a topic (in the case of Web of Science). We also used our background knowledge and related academic literature pertaining to self-diagnosis, health monitoring, companionship, health information gathering, and care. We examined background articles and articles collected through our home care technology search in terms of ability expectations assumed in the presentation of home care technologies, or discussed in relation to home care technologies. While advances in health care support are made possible through emerging technologies, we urge critical examination of such technologies in terms of implications for the rights and dignity of people with diverse abilities. Specifically, we see potential for technologies to result in new forms of exclusion and powerlessness. Ableism influences choices made by funders, policy makers, and the public in the development and use of home health technologies and impacts how people with disabilities are served and how useful health support technologies will be for them. We urge continued critical examination of technology development and use according to ability expectations, and we recommend increasing incorporation

  3. Home care technology through an ability expectation lens.

    PubMed

    Wolbring, Gregor; Lashewicz, Bonnie

    2014-06-20

    Home care is on the rise, and its delivery is increasingly reliant on an expanding variety of health technologies ranging from computers to telephone "health apps" to social robots. These technologies are most often predicated on expectations that people in their homes (1) can actively interact with these technologies and (2) are willing to submit to the action of the technology in their home. Our purpose is to use an "ability expectations" lens to bring together, and provide some synthesis of, the types of utility and disadvantages that can arise for people with disabilities in relation to home care technology development and use. We searched the academic databases Scopus, Web of Science, EBSCO ALL, IEEE Xplore, and Compendex to collect articles that had the term "home care technology" in the abstract or as a topic (in the case of Web of Science). We also used our background knowledge and related academic literature pertaining to self-diagnosis, health monitoring, companionship, health information gathering, and care. We examined background articles and articles collected through our home care technology search in terms of ability expectations assumed in the presentation of home care technologies, or discussed in relation to home care technologies. While advances in health care support are made possible through emerging technologies, we urge critical examination of such technologies in terms of implications for the rights and dignity of people with diverse abilities. Specifically, we see potential for technologies to result in new forms of exclusion and powerlessness. Ableism influences choices made by funders, policy makers, and the public in the development and use of home health technologies and impacts how people with disabilities are served and how useful health support technologies will be for them. We urge continued critical examination of technology development and use according to ability expectations, and we recommend increasing incorporation of

  4. The economies of scale for nursing home care.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Wu; Shea, Dennis G

    2004-03-01

    Using a modified hybrid short-term operating cost function and a national sample of nursing homes in 1994, the authors examined the scale economies of nursing home care. The results show that scale economies exist for Medicare postacute care, with an elasticity of -0.15 and an optimal scale of around 4,000 patient days annually. However, more than 68 percent of nursing homes in the analytic sample produced Medicare days at a level below the optimal scale. The financial pressures resulting from the implementation of a prospective payment system for Medicare skilled nursing facilities may further reduce the quantity of Medicare days served by nursing homes. In addition, the results show that chain-owned nursing homes do not have lower short-term operating costs than do independent facilities. This indicates that the rationale behind recent increasing horizontal integration among nursing homes may not be seeking greater cost efficiency but some other consideration.

  5. [Relations with emergency medical care and primary care doctor, home health care].

    PubMed

    Azuma, Kazunari; Ohta, Shoichi

    2016-02-01

    Medical care for an ultra-aging society has been shifted from hospital-centered to local community-based. This shift has yielded the so-called Integrated Community Care System. In the system, emergency medical care is considered important, as primary care doctors and home health care providers play a crucial role in coordinating with the department of emergency medicine. Since the patients move depending on their physical condition, a hospital and a community should collaborate in providing a circulating service. The revision of the medical payment system in 2014 clearly states the importance of "functional differentiation and strengthen and coordination of medical institutions, improvement of home health care". As part of the revision, the subacute care unit has been integrated into the community care unit, which is expected to have more than one role in community coordination. The medical fee has been set for the purpose of promoting the home medical care visit, and enhancing the capability of family doctors. In the section of end-of-life care for the elderly, there have been many issues such as reduction of the readmission rate and endorsement of a patient's decision-making, and judgment for active emergency medical care for patient admission. The concept of frailty as an indicator of prognosis has been introduced, which might be applied to the future of emergency medicine. As described above, the importance of a primary doctor and a family doctor should be identified more in the future; thereby it becomes essential for doctors to closely work with the hospital. Advancing the cooperation between a hospital and a community for seamless patient-centered care, the emergency medicine as an integrated community care will further develop by adapting to an ultra-aging society. PMID:26915240

  6. Using videotelephony to support paediatric oncology-related palliative care in the home: from abandoned RCT to acceptability study.

    PubMed

    Bensink, M E; Armfield, N R; Pinkerton, R; Irving, H; Hallahan, A R; Theodoros, D G; Russell, T; Barnett, A G; Scuffham, P A; Wootton, R

    2009-04-01

    Videotelephony (real-time audio-visual communication) has been used successfully in adult palliative home care. This paper describes two attempts to complete an RCT (both of which were abandoned following difficulties with family recruitment), designed to investigate the use of videotelephony with families receiving palliative care from a tertiary paediatric oncology service in Brisbane, Australia. To investigate whether providing videotelephone-based support was acceptable to these families, a 12-month non-randomised acceptability trial was completed. Seventeen palliative care families were offered access to a videotelephone support service in addition to the 24 hours 'on-call' service already offered. A 92% participation rate in this study provided some reassurance that the use of videotelephones themselves was not a factor in poor RCT participation rates. The next phase of research is to investigate the integration of videotelephone-based support from the time of diagnosis, through outpatient care and support, and for palliative care rather than for palliative care in isolation. Trial registration ACTRN 12606000311550.

  7. 38 CFR 59.40 - Maximum number of nursing home care and domiciliary care beds for veterans by State.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... home care and domiciliary care beds for veterans by State. 59.40 Section 59.40 Pensions, Bonuses, and... ACQUISITION OF STATE HOMES § 59.40 Maximum number of nursing home care and domiciliary care beds for veterans... for a project to construct or acquire a new state home facility, to increase the number of...

  8. Information Persistence Services Designed to Support Home Care

    PubMed Central

    Queirós, Alexandra; Augusto, Filipe; Rodríguez, Yosvany Llerena; Cardoso, Carlos; Grade, José Miguel; Quintas, João

    2015-01-01

    Background Due to the challenges faced by health and social care systems, in particular those related to actual demographic trends, home care emerges as a potentially cost-effective solution to answer the needs of citizens, and to allow the reallocation of resources to alternatives to hospitalization or institutionalization. Objective Home care services require cooperation between different actors, including health and social caregivers, care receivers, and their informal caregivers (eg, relatives or friends), across time, space, and organizational boundaries. Therefore, it is foreseeable that eHealth services can contribute to their improvement. The aim of this study is to evaluate information persistence services based on the Reference Information Model (RIM) of the Health Level Seven (HL7) version 3 to support formal caregivers, both health and social care providers, and informal caregivers in the context of home care services. Methods A pilot study was set up involving two Portuguese institutions that provide home care services for the elderly. Defining of information requirements was performed according to a comprehensive process. This included a review of the literature, observations of work activities, interviews with caregivers, care receivers and their relatives, analysis of paper documentation related to care receivers’ histories, health conditions and care plans, and brainstorming groups involving specialized professionals. Following this, information objects were implemented and validated. Results The methodological approach, as well as the information persistence services, proved to be robust and adequate to specify, implement, and validate different types of information objects related to home care services for the elderly. This study also reinforces the application of the RIM of the HL7 version 3 beyond the strict scope of health care, allowing the persistence of not only health care information, but also information related to social assistance

  9. Evaluation of Home Health Care Devices: Remote Usability Assessment

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background An increasing amount of health care is now performed in a home setting, away from the hospital. While there is growing anecdotal evidence about the difficulty patients and caregivers have using increasingly complex health care devices in the home, there has been little systematic scientific study to quantify the global nature of home health care device usability in the field. Research has tended to focus on a handful of devices, making it difficult to gain a broad view of the usability of home-care devices in general. Objective The objective of this paper is to describe a remote usability assessment method using the System Usability Scale (SUS), and to report on the usability of a broad range of health care devices using this metric. Methods A total of 271 participants selected and rated up to 10 home health care devices of their choice using the SUS, which scores usability from 0 (unusable) to 100 (highly usable). Participants rated a total of 455 devices in their own home without an experimenter present. Results Usability scores ranged from 98 (oxygen masks) to 59 (home hormone test kits). An analysis conducted on devices that had at least 10 ratings showed that the effect of device on SUS scores was significant (P<.001), and that the usability of these devices was on the low end when compared with other commonly used items in the home, such as microwave ovens and telephones. Conclusions A large database of usability scores for home health care devices collected using this remote methodology would be beneficial for physicians, patients, and their caregivers. PMID:27025664

  10. Measuring End-of-Life Care Processes in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temkin-Greener, Helena; Zheng, Nan; Norton, Sally A.; Quill, Timothy; Ladwig, Susan; Veazie, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The objectives of this study were to develop measures of end-of-life (EOL) care processes in nursing homes and to validate the instrument for measuring them. Design and Methods: A survey of directors of nursing was conducted in 608 eligible nursing homes in New York State. Responses were obtained from 313 (51.5% response rate) facilities.…

  11. 7 CFR 226.18 - Day care home provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... children enrolled in the day care home, through collection of free and reduced price applications and/or... home, to collect applications and determine the eligibility of enrolled children for free or reduced..., lunch, supper, and snack. Reimbursement may not be claimed for more than two meals and one snack, or...

  12. 7 CFR 226.18 - Day care home provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... children enrolled in the day care home, through collection of free and reduced price applications and/or... home, to collect applications and determine the eligibility of enrolled children for free or reduced..., lunch, supper, and snack. Reimbursement may not be claimed for more than two meals and one snack, or...

  13. 7 CFR 226.18 - Day care home provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... children enrolled in the day care home, through collection of free and reduced price applications and/or... home, to collect applications and determine the eligibility of enrolled children for free or reduced..., lunch, supper, and snack. Reimbursement may not be claimed for more than two meals and one snack, or...

  14. 7 CFR 226.18 - Day care home provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... children enrolled in the day care home, through collection of free and reduced price applications and/or... home, to collect applications and determine the eligibility of enrolled children for free or reduced..., lunch, supper, and snack. Reimbursement may not be claimed for more than two meals and one snack, or...

  15. 7 CFR 226.18 - Day care home provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... children enrolled in the day care home, through collection of free and reduced price applications and/or... home, to collect applications and determine the eligibility of enrolled children for free or reduced..., lunch, supper, and snack. Reimbursement may not be claimed for more than two meals and one snack, or...

  16. Patients' Anticipation of Stress in Nursing Home Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Shayna; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Examined anticipation of stresses in 223 patients recently admitted to nursing homes, who completed the stresses in Institutional Care Scale (SIC). Factor analysis revealed five factors significantly related to psychological and physical variables. Suggests using SIC for admission screening in nursing homes. Appendix contains the SIC. (NRB)

  17. Federal Home Visiting under the Affordable Care Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strader, Kathleen; Counts, Jacqueline; Filene, Jill

    2013-01-01

    The Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) Program is part of The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and provides $1.5 billion over 5 years to states, territories, and tribes with the goal of delivering evidence-based home visiting services as part of a high-quality, comprehensive early childhood system that promotes…

  18. Quality of life for chronic psychiatric illnesses and home care

    PubMed Central

    Molu, Nesibe Gunay; Ozkan, Birgul; Icel, Sema

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, mental illnesses are gradually increasing and so does chronic psychiatric patients. As a result of this increase, chronic psychiatric disorders lead the burden of patients and their families. To reduce the burden of mental illnesses on individuals and their families, treatment and care are given including psychosocial, physiological and medical support and social services. To begin with, home care enables both the patient and his or her family to stay at their own houses and not to be bothered with residents or long-term, institutional-based nursing homes. In addition, the home care providers deliver services to the patient’s at their own house. The other advantages of taking care at home is that it eases financial issues in terms of reducing the cost, reduces the patient’s symptoms and improve the individual’s quality of life (QoL). In addition to these, home care also minimizes the burden on outpatient services and provides help for the patient and the family in order to solve their problems and give support. Home care services help patients to get their freedom back and enhance the quality of their lives. Thus, it is necessary to procure and implement these services and supply both the patient and his or her family a high-quality life. Sources of data/ study selection: Literature review was done by using the keywords “home care, patient with chronic mental illness, quality of life, home care nursing” from the sources including PsychINFO, PsychARTICLES, MEDLINE, PubMED, EBSCOHOST and The COCHRANE LIBRARY in the time period of 2005- 2015. PMID:27182272

  19. [Travel and cultural activities in care homes for the elderly].

    PubMed

    Andriot, Hervé; Roumilhac, Vanessa

    2010-01-01

    Travel and cultural activities are still accessible for elderly people, in particular those living in care homes. With some precautions and adequate professional supervision, it is possible to carry out such activities, elderly people's limits being psychological rather than physical. Elderly people can thereby open up to the adventure of travelling whether it is an actual, physical trip or a virtual journey, through cultural activities. A report on the Residence Orpea des Noues care home's experience of such initiatives.

  20. [Precarity, vulnerability, anticipating end-of-life care at home].

    PubMed

    Bonneval, Camille

    2016-02-01

    Many patients want to end their life at home. Care teams adapt to these wishes and organise a form of treatment which blends safety of care and the respect of the expectations of the patients and family members. When factors of precarity increase the vulnerability inherent to the end of life, caregivers anticipate and support as best as they can the difficulties encountered as testified by a hospital at home team in Dax. PMID:26861082

  1. Influence of Overweight on 24-Hour Urine Chemistry Studies and Recurrent Urolithiasis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jae Dong; Kim, Tae-Hyoung; Myung, Soon Chul; Moon, Young Tae; Kim, Kyung Do

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the influence of overweight on 24-hour urine chemistry studies and recurrent urolithiasis (UL) in children. Materials and Methods A retrospective cohort study was designed to assess children who presented with UL at a pediatric institution between 1985 and 2010. We calculated body mass index percentile (BMIp) adjusted for gender and age according to the 2007 Korean Children and Adolescents Growth Chart and stratified the children into 3 BMI categories: lower body weight (LBW, BMIp≤10), normal BW (NBW, 1024-hour urine chemistry studies did not differ significantly between the three groups. Mean urine citrate levels were lower (0.273±0.218 mg/mg/d vs. 0.429±0.299 mg/mg/d, p<0.05) and the incidence of hypocitraturia was higher (81.5% vs. 45.7%, p<0.05)) in the recurrent stone former group. In the univariate analysis, hypocitraturia and acidic urinary pH were risk factors, but in the multivariate analysis, only hypocitraturia was a risk factor for stone recurrence (hazard ratio, 3.647; 95% confidence interval, 1.047 to 12.703). In the Kaplan-Meier curve, the hypocitraturia group showed higher recurrence than did the normocitraturia group (p<0.05). Conclusions Unlike in adults, in children, overweight adjusted for gender and age was not associated with 24-hour urine chemistry studies and was not a risk factor for recurrent UL. Hypocitraturia was the only risk factor for UL in children. PMID:22536471

  2. [Electrocardiographic recording of long duration (Holter) of 24 hours during idiopathic cardiomyopathy of the peripartum].

    PubMed

    Diao, M; Diop, I B; Kane, A; Camara, S; Kane, Ad; Sarr, M; Ba, S A; Diouf, S M

    2004-01-01

    The idiopathic myocardiopathy of the peripartum (IMPP) is a frequent disease in the Soudano-Sahelian zone of Africa whose evolution is loaded with many complications hemodynamic, thrombo-embolic and rhythmic. The prevalence and the meaning of the rhythm disorders are unknown. The aims of this prospective study are to measure and to describe the prevalence of the anomalies observed in Holter ECG of 24 hours. It's about a description cross-sectional study realized at the Cardiology Department (CHU Dakar) and 19 patients with IMPP were included, from October 2000 to July 2002. A recording ECG of 24 hours (Holter) was realized on all the patients. The average age was 29.4+/-6.9 years with a low socio-economic level (100%). The diagnosis of IMPP done before childbirth in 4 cases (21%) and the post partum on 15 patients (78.9%). The dyspnea was constant, the chest pain in 12 cases (63.1%) and palpitations in 8 cases (42%). The average rate of hemoglobin was of 10.85+/-2.05 g/dL. The standard electrocardiogram recorded a sinusal tachycardia (68.4%), a cavitary hypertrophy (78.8%), and disorders of the repolarization (47.3%). The cardiac echo-Doppler noted a cavitary dilatation (84.2%), a constant alteration of the left ventricular systolic function with a fraction of average ejection of 29.7+/-10.3%. The anatomy of the valves was normal. The recording Holter ECG of 24 hours recorded a sinusal tachycardia in 17 cases (89.4%), ventricular extrasystoles on 7 patients (36.8%), 4 cases of ventricular tachycardia non-sustained and double ventricular extrasystole on 1 patient, auricular extrasystoles in 4 cases (21%) and 1 case of auriculo-ventricular block of the first degree. The study of heart rate variability founded a mean value of 106 ms.

  3. Development of an artificial placenta IV: 24 hour venovenous extracorporeal life support in premature lambs.

    PubMed

    Gray, Brian W; El-Sabbagh, Ahmed; Rojas-Pena, Alvaro; Kim, Anne C; Gadepali, Samir; Koch, Kely L; Capizzani, Tony R; Bartlet, Robert H; Mychaliska, George B

    2012-01-01

    An extracorporeal artificial placenta would change the paradigm of treating extremely premature infants. We hypothesized that a venovenous extracorporeal life support (VV-ECLS) artificial placenta would maintain fetal circulation, hemodynamic stability, and adequate gas exchange for 24 hours. A near-term neonatal lamb model (130 days; term = 145 days) was used (n = 9). The right jugular vein was cannulated for VV-ECLS outflow, and an umbilical vein was used for inflow. The circuit included a peristaltic roller pump and a 0.5 m(2) hollow fiber oxygenator. Lambs were maintained on VV-ECLS in an "amniotic bath" for up to 24 hours. Five of nine fetuses survived for 24 hours. In the survivors, average mean arterial pressure was 69 ± 10 mm Hg for the first 4 hours and 36 ± 8 mm Hg for the remaining 20 hours. The mean fetal heart rate was 202 ± 30. Mean VV-ECLS flow was 94 ± 20 ml/kg/min. Using a gas mixture of 50% O(2)/3% CO(2) and sweep flow of 1-2 L/min, the mean pH was 7.27 ± 0.09, with Po(2) of 35 ± 12 mm Hg and Pco(2) of 48 ± 12 mm Hg. Necropsy revealed a patent ductus arteriosus in all cases, and there was no gross or microscopic intracranial hemorrhage. Complications in failed attempts included technically difficult cannulation and multisystem organ failure. Future studies will enhance stability and address the factors necessary for long-term support.

  4. Treating allergic conjunctivitis: A once-daily medication that provides 24-hour symptom relief

    PubMed Central

    Schaeffer, Jack; Donnenfeld, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background: Allergic conjunctivitis (AC) is a common ocular inflammatory manifestation of allergen exposure in sensitized individuals. Signs and symptoms of AC can decrease quality of life, interfere with productivity, and lead to considerable economic burden. Consistent suppression of conjunctival inflammation is necessary for managing AC, but currently available medications require frequent administration and exhibit limited duration of action. Methods: In this review, we summarized AC pathogenesis, diagnosis, and current treatment options as well as their limitations. Findings from the literature were discussed in the context of the unmet need for a once-daily medication with sustained 24-hour effectiveness. Results: Topical pharmacologic treatments are the most common approach for managing extant AC; however, most available medications require multiple daily instillations. Dual-acting antihistamine-mast cell stabilizing agents are currently considered first-line therapeutics for AC because they provide acute relief of signs and symptoms and block persistent inflammation to promote regression of AC. Recent studies of a newly-developed, higher-concentration formulation of a dual-acting antihistamine-mast cell stabilizer have demonstrated that this formulation provides a 24-hour duration of action with once-daily dosing. Conclusions: Dual-acting AC medications exhibit a high degree of overall effectiveness and are well tolerated for chronic use. A newly available once-daily medication that manages signs and symptoms of AC for a full 24 hours may be considered a treatment of choice for patients experiencing seasonal or perennial AC. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01743027 and NCT01479374 PMID:27466061

  5. Evaluation of Intradermal and Subcutaneous Infusion Set Performance Under 24-Hour Basal and Bolus Conditions

    PubMed Central

    McVey, Elaine; Keith, Steven; Herr, Joshua K.; Sutter, Diane; Pettis, Ronald J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study sought to assess the function and delivery reliability of intradermal (ID) infusion sets used with commercial insulin pumps. Method: Healthy subjects (n = 43) were randomized to either ID or subcutaneous (SC) arms, and received basal/bolus placebo delivery for 24 hours. Subjects received 4 of 8 infusion set combinations (ID: microneedle design A or B, with 2 pump brands [Animas or MiniMed]; SC: Teflon Quickset or steel Rapid-D, Animas pump only, with or without overtaping) and were evaluated for pump occlusion alarms, fluid leakage, pain, and tissue tolerability. A novel algorithm was developed to determine flow consistency based on fluid pressure, and the duration and occurrence rate for periods of unalarmed but interrupted flow (“silent occlusions’”) were compared. Results: ID delivery was successfully maintained over the 24-hour infusion period. The number of silent occlusions was lower for ID microneedle cannula design B than A (P < .01) and lower for Rapid-D SC device compared to Quick-set (P = .03). There was no significant difference in the number of occlusion alarms between the ID and SC devices with the Animas pump. However, the pumps tested with ID devices had significantly different alarm rates (MiniMed 29.5%, Animas 0%, P < .001). Leakage and tissue tolerability were comparable across devices. Conclusion: The ID infusion set reliably delivered diluent for an extended 24-hour period in healthy subjects and was well tolerated. Silent occlusion flow interruptions could be detected in both ID and SC infusion sets using a proprietary algorithm. This algorithm is a promising method for quantitatively evaluating infusion set flow performance. PMID:26319228

  6. 77 FR 65310 - Additional Air Quality Designations for the 2006 24-Hour Fine Particle National Ambient Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-26

    ... the 2006 24-hour Fine Particle (PM 2.5 ) National Ambient Air Quality Standards,'' 74 FR 58688... Federal Regulations DC District of Columbia EO Executive Order EPA Environmental Protection Agency FR... EPA finalized designations for the 2006 24-hour PM 2.5 NAAQS (74 FR 58688, November 13, 2009), the...

  7. Home-based care, technology, and the maintenance of selves.

    PubMed

    Parks, Jennifer A

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, I will argue that there is a deep connection between home-based care, technology, and the self. Providing the means for persons (especially older persons) to receive care at home is not merely a kindness that respects their preference to be at home: it is an important means of extending their selfhood and respecting the unique selves that they are. Home-based technologies like telemedicine and robotic care may certainly be useful tools in providing care for persons at home, but they also have important implications for sustaining selfhood in ways that are of value to individuals and those who care for them. I will argue, by appealing to Hilde Lindemann's notion of "holding" persons' identities in place, that technological interventions are not only useful tools for improving and sustaining health and good care at home, but that they may also help to extend our personal identities and relational capacities in ways that are practically and ethically good. Because of these important goods, I will claim that there is a prima facie moral duty to do this "holding" work and that it is best done by family members and loved ones who are well suited to the job because of their history and relationship with the individual that needs to be "held" in place.

  8. Home-based care, technology, and the maintenance of selves.

    PubMed

    Parks, Jennifer A

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, I will argue that there is a deep connection between home-based care, technology, and the self. Providing the means for persons (especially older persons) to receive care at home is not merely a kindness that respects their preference to be at home: it is an important means of extending their selfhood and respecting the unique selves that they are. Home-based technologies like telemedicine and robotic care may certainly be useful tools in providing care for persons at home, but they also have important implications for sustaining selfhood in ways that are of value to individuals and those who care for them. I will argue, by appealing to Hilde Lindemann's notion of "holding" persons' identities in place, that technological interventions are not only useful tools for improving and sustaining health and good care at home, but that they may also help to extend our personal identities and relational capacities in ways that are practically and ethically good. Because of these important goods, I will claim that there is a prima facie moral duty to do this "holding" work and that it is best done by family members and loved ones who are well suited to the job because of their history and relationship with the individual that needs to be "held" in place. PMID:25787720

  9. Assessing Dietary Intake in Childhood Cancer Survivors: Food Frequency Questionnaire Versus 24-Hour Diet Recalls.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang Fang; Roberts, Susan B; Must, Aviva; Wong, William W; Gilhooly, Cheryl H; Kelly, Michael J; Parsons, Susan K; Saltzman, Edward

    2015-10-01

    Cancer diagnosis and treatment may influence dietary intake. The validity of using self-reported methods to quantify dietary intake has not been evaluated in childhood cancer survivors. We validated total energy intake (EI) reported from Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) and repeated 24-hour diet recalls (24HRs) against total energy expenditure (TEE) measured using the doubly labeled water method in 16 childhood cancer survivors. Dietary underreporting, assessed by (EI-TEE)/TEE × 100%, was 22% for FFQ and 1% for repeated 24HRs. FFQ significantly underestimates dietary intake and should not be used to assess the absolute intake of foods and nutrients in childhood cancer survivors.

  10. Assessing Dietary Intake in Childhood Cancer Survivors: Food Frequency Questionnaire versus 24-Hour Diet Recalls

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fang Fang; Roberts, Susan B.; Must, Aviva; Wong, William W.; Gilhooly, Cheryl H.; Kelly, Michael J.; Parsons, lkSusan K.; Saltzman, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Cancer diagnosis and treatment may influence dietary intake. The validity of using self-reported methods to quantify dietary intake has not been evaluated in childhood cancer survivors. We validated total energy intake (EI) reported from food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and repeated 24-hour diet recalls (24HRs) against total energy expenditure (TEE) measured using the doubly labeled water method in 16 childhood cancer survivors. Dietary underreporting, assessed by (EI-TEE)/TEE ×100%, was 22% for FFQ and 1% for repeated 24HRs. FFQ significantly underestimates dietary intake and should not be used to assess the absolute intake of foods and nutrients in childhood cancer survivors. PMID:25883059

  11. 77 FR 45719 - Proposed Information Collection (Per Diem for Nursing Home Care of Veterans in State Homes; Per...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-01

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Per Diem for Nursing Home Care of Veterans in State Homes; Per... the notice. This notice solicits comments on information needed to ensure that nursing home and adult day health care facilities are providing high quality services to Veterans in State homes....

  12. 78 FR 46421 - Proposed Information Collection (Per Diem for Nursing Home Care of Veterans in State Homes; Per...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-31

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Per Diem for Nursing Home Care of Veterans in State Homes; Per... the notice. This notice solicits comments on information needed to ensure that nursing home and adult day health care facilities are providing high quality services to Veterans in State homes....

  13. Raising the standard: palliative care in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Meier, Diane E; Lim, Betty; Carlson, Melissa D A

    2010-01-01

    More than two-thirds of long-stay nursing home residents suffer from dementia. This illness has a variable and unpredictable course that renders it a poor fit for the six-month life-expectancy requirement of the Medicare hospice benefit. Palliative care-a form of treatment that strives to match care to patient goals, relieve pain, and improve quality of life for people with chronic or life-threatening illnesses-should be the standard of practice for all elderly dementia patients in nursing homes, regardless of prognosis. Similar principles could apply to other long-term residents with underlying chronic diseases who would benefit from palliative care. Indeed, we would argue that the growing acceptance of the culture-change movement centered on elder-directed goals in nursing homes is promising evidence of the goodness-of-fit of palliative care principles in the long-term care setting.

  14. Regional Neurodegeneration and Gliosis Are Amplified by Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Repeated at 24-Hour Intervals

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Amanda Nicholle; Saatman, Kathryn Eileen

    2014-01-01

    Most traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) that occur every year are classified as ‘mild’. Individuals involved in high-risk activities may sustain multiple mild TBIs. We evaluated the acute physiological and histopathological consequences of mild TBI in a mouse model, comparing sham injury, single impact, or 5 impacts at a 24- or 48-hour inter-injury interval. A single closed skull impact resulted in bilateral gliosis in the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex that was proportional to impact depth. Midline impact, at a depth just above the threshold to induce transient unconsciousness, produced occasional axonal injury and degenerating neurons accompanied by astrogliosis in the entorhinal cortex and cerebellum. Mild TBI repeated every 24 hours resulted in bilateral hemorrhagic lesions in the entorhinal cortex along with significantly increased neurodegeneration and microglial activation despite diminished durations of apnea and unconsciousness with subsequent impacts. Astrogliosis and diffusely distributed axonal injury were also observed bilaterally in the cerebellum and the brainstem. When the interval between mild TBIs was increased to 48 hours, the pathological consequences were comparable to a single TBI. Together, these data suggest that in mice the brain remains at increased risk for damage for 24 hours after mild TBI despite reduced acute physiological responses to subsequent mild impacts. PMID:25232942

  15. The Application of a Contact Lens Sensor in Detecting 24-Hour Intraocular Pressure-Related Patterns

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of blindness worldwide. Recent studies suggest that intraocular pressure (IOP) fluctuations, peaks, and rhythm are important factors in disease advancement. Yet, current glaucoma management remains hinged on single IOP measurements during clinic hours. To overcome this limitation, 24-hour IOP monitoring devices have been employed and include self-tonometry, permanent IOP, and temporary IOP monitoring. This review discusses each IOP measuring strategy and focuses on the recently FDA-approved contact lens sensor (CLS). The CLS records IOP-related ocular patterns for 24 hours continuously. Using the CLS, IOP-related parameters have been found to be associated with the rate of visual field progression in primary open-angle glaucoma, disease progression in primary angle-closure glaucoma, and various clinical variables in ocular hypertension. The CLS has been used to quantify blink rate and limbal strain and measure the circadian rhythm in a variety of disease states including normal-tension glaucoma and thyroid eye disease. The effects of various IOP-lowering interventions were also characterized using the CLS. CLS provides a unique, safe, and well-tolerated way to study IOP-related patterns in a wide range of disease states. IOP-related patterns may help identify patients most at risk for disease progression and assist with the development of tailored treatments. PMID:27525110

  16. The 24-hour pulse wave velocity, aortic augmentation index, and central blood pressure in normotensive volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Tatyana Y; Korneva, Viktoria A; Bryantseva, Evgeniya N; Barkan, Vitaliy S; Orlov, Artemy V; Posokhov, Igor N; Rogoza, Anatoly N

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the pulse wave velocity, aortic augmentation index corrected for heart rate 75 (AIx@75), and central systolic and diastolic blood pressure during 24-hour monitoring in normotensive volunteers. Overall, 467 subjects (206 men and 261 women) were recruited in this study. Participants were excluded from the study if they were less than 19 years of age, had blood test abnormalities, had a body mass index greater than 2 7.5 kg/m(2), had impaired glucose tolerance, or had hypotension or hypertension. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) with the BPLab(®) device was performed in each subject. ABPM waveforms were analyzed using the special automatic Vasotens(®) algorithm, which allows the calculation of pulse wave velocity, AIx@75, central systolic and diastolic blood pressure for "24-hour", "awake", and "asleep" periods. Circadian rhythms and sex differences in these indexes were identified. Pending further validation in prospective outcome-based studies, our data may be used as preliminary diagnostic values for the BPLab ABPM additional index in adult subjects.

  17. A Compute Perspective: Delivering Decision Support Products in 24 Hours from the Airborne Snow Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, P.; Mattmann, C. A.; Painter, T. H.; Seidel, F. C.; Trangsrud, A.; Hart, A. F.; Goodale, C. E.; Boardman, J. W.; Heneghan, C.; Verma, R.; Khudikyan, S.; Boustani, M.; Zimdars, P. A.; Horn, J.; Neely, S.

    2013-12-01

    The JPL Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO) must process 100s of GB of raw data to 100s of Terabytes of derived data in 24 hour Near Real Time (NRT) latency in a geographically distributed mobile compute and data-intensive processing setting. ASO provides meaningful information to water resource managers in the Western US letting them know how much water to maintain; or release, and what the prospectus of the current snow season is in the Sierra Nevadas. Providing decision support products processed from airborne data in a 24 hour timeframe is an emergent field and required the team to develop a novel solution as this process is typically done over months. We've constructed a system that combines Apache OODT; with Apache Tika; with the Interactive Data Analysis (IDL)/ENVI programming environment to rapidly and unobtrusively generate, distribute and archive ASO data as soon as the plane lands near Mammoth Lakes, CA. Our system is flexible, underwent several redeployments and reconfigurations, and delivered this critical information to stakeholders during the recent "Snow On" campaign March 2013 - June 2013. This talk will take you through a day in the life of the compute team from data acquisition, delivery, processing, and dissemination. Within this context, we will discuss the architecture of ASO; the open source software we used; the data we stored; and how it was delivered to its users. Moreover we will discuss the logistics, system engineering, and staffing that went into the developing, deployment, and operation of the mobile compute system.

  18. Coagulation abnormalities in diabetic coma before and 24 hours after treatment.

    PubMed

    McLaren, E H; Cullen, D R; Brown, M J

    1979-12-01

    A coagulation screen consisting of measurement of the prothrombin time, thrombin time, kaolin caphalin clotting time, platelet count, plasma fibrinogen level, fibrin degradation products and ethanol gelation test was performed on 24 patients with impairment of consciousness due to acute diabetic metabolic decompensation at the start of treatment and 24 hours later. 22 out of 24 patients showed at least one coagulation abnormality on admission of which the commonest were a prolonged prothrombin time, shortened kaolin cephalin clotting.time and raised plasma fibrinogen level. After 24 hours of treatment these values were more normal but 20 out of 22 patients still displayed some abnormality. 15 patients had two or more coagulation abnormalities on admission including 3 patients with haematological abnormalities suggestive of disseminated intravascular coagulation. This group was older and had higher blood ureas than those with fewer abnormalities, but plasma glucose, sodium, potassium and bicarbonate levels were similar in both groups of patients. All 5 patients with hyperosmolar non-ketotic coma and all 3 patients who died without recovering consciousness had two or more coagulation abnormalities on admission.

  19. Deviation of innate circadian period from 24 hours reduces longevity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Libert, Sergiy; Bonkowski, Michael S.; Pointer, Kelli; Pletcher, Scott D.; Guarente, Leonard

    2012-01-01

    Summary The variation of individual lifespans, even in highly inbred cohorts of animals and under strictly controlled environmental conditions, is substantial and not well understood. This variation in part could be due to epigenetic variation, which later affects the animal’s physiology and ultimately longevity. Identification of the physiological properties that impact health and lifespan is crucial for longevity research and the development of anti-aging therapies. Here we measured individual circadian and metabolic characteristics in a cohort of inbred F1 hybrid mice and correlated these parameters to their lifespans. We found that mice with innate circadian periods close to 24 hours (revealed during 30 days of housing in total darkness) enjoyed nearly 20% longer lifespans than their littermates, which had shorter or longer innate circadian periods. These findings show that maintenance of a 24 hour intrinsic circadian period is a positive predictor of longevity. Our data suggest that circadian period may be used to predict individual longevity and that processes that control innate circadian period affect aging. PMID:22702406

  20. Sleep in healthy elderly subjects: a 24-hour ambulatory polysomnographic study.

    PubMed

    Gigli, G L; Placidi, F; Diomedi, M; Maschio, M; Silvestri, G; Scalise, A; Marciani, M G

    1996-04-01

    It is still debated whether the deterioration of the sleep pattern, frequently reported by elderly subjects, is due only to aging per se. Other factors associated with aging or modifications of biological rhythms could also be involved. Elderly subjects frequently complain of daytime sleepiness, but it is not clear whether this actually represents a return to a polyphasic structure of sleep, or only a consequence of a disturbed night sleep. Ten healthy, independent and active elderly subjects (age > 72 years) were elevated by means of 24-hour ambulatory polysomnography. Findings of nocturnal sleep were compared with sleep of the same group in the 24-hour period and with sleep of young healthy controls. We observed a fragmentation of nocturnal sleep, but a fairly good representation of stages and a preservation of cyclicity. Except for three cases, with early or late times of sleep onset and wake-up, sleep disruption did not seem to be related to modification of circadian rhythms. Only three subjects presented undesired daytime naps, whereas the others either did not show daytime sleep at all, or were used to having their siesta after lunch since their young adulthood. In normal aging, daytime sleep does not constitute a social problem. Ambulatory polysomnography is a valid alternative to laboratory recordings in the identification of daytime sleep. PMID:8734563

  1. The Application of a Contact Lens Sensor in Detecting 24-Hour Intraocular Pressure-Related Patterns.

    PubMed

    Xu, Sarah C; Gauthier, Angela C; Liu, Ji

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of blindness worldwide. Recent studies suggest that intraocular pressure (IOP) fluctuations, peaks, and rhythm are important factors in disease advancement. Yet, current glaucoma management remains hinged on single IOP measurements during clinic hours. To overcome this limitation, 24-hour IOP monitoring devices have been employed and include self-tonometry, permanent IOP, and temporary IOP monitoring. This review discusses each IOP measuring strategy and focuses on the recently FDA-approved contact lens sensor (CLS). The CLS records IOP-related ocular patterns for 24 hours continuously. Using the CLS, IOP-related parameters have been found to be associated with the rate of visual field progression in primary open-angle glaucoma, disease progression in primary angle-closure glaucoma, and various clinical variables in ocular hypertension. The CLS has been used to quantify blink rate and limbal strain and measure the circadian rhythm in a variety of disease states including normal-tension glaucoma and thyroid eye disease. The effects of various IOP-lowering interventions were also characterized using the CLS. CLS provides a unique, safe, and well-tolerated way to study IOP-related patterns in a wide range of disease states. IOP-related patterns may help identify patients most at risk for disease progression and assist with the development of tailored treatments. PMID:27525110

  2. PHYSICIAN-PHARMACIST CO-MANAGEMENT AND 24-HOUR BLOOD PRESSURE CONTROL

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ziqian; Ernst, Michael E.; Ardery, Gail; Xu, Yinghui; Carter, Barry L.

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were: to compare indices of 24-hour BP following a physician-pharmacist collaborative intervention and to describe the associated changes in antihypertensive medications. This was a secondary analysis of a prospective, cluster-randomized clinical trial conducted in 6 family medicine clinics randomized to co-managed (n=3 clinics, 176 subjects) or control (n=3 clinics, 198 subjects) groups. Mean ambulatory systolic BP was significantly lower in the co-managed versus the control group: daytime SBP 122.8 mm Hg versus 134.4 mm Hg (p<0.001); nighttime SBP 114.8 mm Hg versus 123.7 mm Hg (p<0.001); and 24-hour SBP 120.4 mm Hg versus 131.8 mm Hg (p<0.001), respectively. Significantly more drug changes were made in the co-managed than in the control group (2.7 versus 1.1 changes/subject, p<0.001), and there was greater diuretic use in co-managed subjects (79.6% versus 62.6%, p<0.001). Ambulatory BPs were significantly lower for the subjects who had a diuretic added during the first month compared with those who never had a diuretic added (p<0.01). Physician-pharmacist co-management significantly improved ambulatory BP compared with a control group. Anti-hypertensive drug therapy was intensified much more for subjects in the co-managed group. PMID:23614849

  3. The 24-hour pulse wave velocity, aortic augmentation index, and central blood pressure in normotensive volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Tatyana Y; Korneva, Viktoria A; Bryantseva, Evgeniya N; Barkan, Vitaliy S; Orlov, Artemy V; Posokhov, Igor N; Rogoza, Anatoly N

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the pulse wave velocity, aortic augmentation index corrected for heart rate 75 (AIx@75), and central systolic and diastolic blood pressure during 24-hour monitoring in normotensive volunteers. Overall, 467 subjects (206 men and 261 women) were recruited in this study. Participants were excluded from the study if they were less than 19 years of age, had blood test abnormalities, had a body mass index greater than 2 7.5 kg/m(2), had impaired glucose tolerance, or had hypotension or hypertension. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) with the BPLab(®) device was performed in each subject. ABPM waveforms were analyzed using the special automatic Vasotens(®) algorithm, which allows the calculation of pulse wave velocity, AIx@75, central systolic and diastolic blood pressure for "24-hour", "awake", and "asleep" periods. Circadian rhythms and sex differences in these indexes were identified. Pending further validation in prospective outcome-based studies, our data may be used as preliminary diagnostic values for the BPLab ABPM additional index in adult subjects. PMID:24812515

  4. Preliminary Data on a Care Coordination Program for Home Care Recipients.

    PubMed

    Dean, Katie M; Hatfield, Laura A; Jena, Anupam B; Cristman, David; Flair, Michael; Kator, Kylie; Nudd, Geoffrey; Grabowski, David C

    2016-09-01

    Home care recipients are often hospitalized for potentially avoidable reasons. A pilot program (Intervention in Home Care to Improve Health Outcomes (In-Home)) was designed to help home care providers identify acute clinical changes in condition and then manage the condition in the home and thereby avoid a costly hospitalization. Caregivers answer simple questions about the care recipient's condition during a telephone-based "clock-out" at the end of each shift. Responses are electronically captured in the agency management software that caregivers use to "clock-in," manage care, and "clock-out" on every shift. These are transmitted to the agency's care manager, who follows up on the change in condition and escalates appropriately. A description of the In-Home model is presented, and pilot data from 22 home care offices are reported. In the pilot, caregivers reported a change in condition after 2% of all shifts, representing an average of 1.9 changes per care recipient in a 6-month period. Changes in behavior and skin condition were the most frequently recorded domains. Interviews with participating caregivers and care managers suggested positive attitudes regarding the intervention; challenges included resistance to change on the part of home care staff and difficulties in applying a uniform intervention to individuals with varying needs in home care offices with varying capacities. In an ongoing randomized trial, the success of the overall program will be measured primarily according to the potential reduction in avoidable hospitalizations of home care recipients and the effect this potential reduction has on spending and healthcare outcomes. PMID:27506164

  5. Component analysis of productivity in home care RNs.

    PubMed

    Benefield, L E

    1996-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a productivity measurement method applicable to home health care registered nurses (RNs) by identifying and quantifying the areas of knowledge and ability that define productive nursing practice in home health care. A descriptive, correlational design using qualitative and quantitative methods of data collection and analysis identified 35 knowledge and ability variables that grouped into seven dimensions: Client/Family Management, Practice Management, Knowledge/Skill Maintenance, Communication, Nursing Process, Written Documentation, and Home Health Care Knowledge. There were no significant differences in productivity variables among four major types of agencies. Among agencies considered preeminent, intellectual skills appeared to be of greater importance to productive practice than direct-care skills. The seven productivity dimensions that emerged from this study show promise in providing 1) a theoretical basis for understanding the knowledge and abilities associated with RN productivity in the home health setting, 2) a description of nurse inputs in a home health services productivity model, and 3) a reality-based measurement tool that has utility in managing RN productivity in home health care. PMID:8828384

  6. 78 FR 76193 - Agency Information Collection (Care Coordination Home Telehealth (CCHT) Patient Satisfaction...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Care Coordination Home Telehealth (CCHT) Patient Satisfaction... Retaining Nurses at State Homes).'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Care Coordination Home...

  7. Understanding Nursing Home Worker Conceptualizations about Good Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Gawon

    2013-01-01

    This study explored how direct care workers in nursing homes conceptualize good care and how their conceptualizations are influenced by external factors surrounding their work environment and the relational dynamics between them and residents. Study participants were drawn from a local service employees' union, and in-depth interviews were…

  8. The Coach Is in: Improving Nutritional Care in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahman, Anna N.; Simmons, Sandra F.; Applebaum, Robert; Lindabury, Kate; Schnelle, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This article describes and evaluates a long distance coaching course aimed at improving nutritional care in nursing homes (NHs). The course was structured to provide more support than traditional training programs offer. Methods: In a series of 6 monthly teleconferences led by an expert in NH nutritional care, participating NH staff…

  9. Correlates of Home Health Care Services Use among the Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starrett, Richard A.; And Others

    The use of health and social services is influenced by economic, community, geographic, organizational, societal, and environmental factors. A study was conducted to examine predisposing, enabling, and need-for-care factors related to the use of home health care services by a stratified random sample of 400 older adults. Predisposing factors…

  10. Home Economics Education Guide for Occupational Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewald, Margaret R.

    Designed to assist home economics teachers in providing a training program to prepare high school students for jobs in the child care field, this curriculum guide contains a two-year course of study in occupational child care. In the first year, the following nine topics are outlined: (1) an orientation to the philosophies and overview of careers…

  11. Issues and opportunities in the regulation of home health care.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, A D; Hyman, H H; Gary, L R

    1980-10-01

    Recent federal legislation established a Certificate of Need (CON) process by which health care providers must receive state approval before building or renovating a facility, or adding a new service. Certainly, strict regulation of cost and quality of home health care is needed, but it is asserted that CON is an ineffective way of organizing the delivery of services and limiting costs, and furthermore, that CON is biased in favor of institutionally-based providers and maintenance of the status quo. The authors feel that vested interests have a history of trying to use earlier state CON regulations to control their turf, limit competition, and consequently stifle innovation. Home health care should be incorporated into national health planning goals and integrated into state and regional health plans. Such planning must precede CON regulations and should not be confused with it. Alternatives to CON can achieve quality service and moderate costs and include licensing of personnel, standards for provider accreditation, and utilization review. Planning for these alternatives should begin now to avoid fragmented expansion of home health care. Evidence suggests a comprehensive use of home health care as a cost-effective alternative for many levels of care given in hospitals and nursing homes.

  12. Who's the boss? Ethical conflicts in home care.

    PubMed

    Young, A; Pignatello, C H; Taylor, M B

    1988-12-01

    In 1987 a committee of the Home Health Assembly of New Jersey began a study of ethical issues in home care situations where the autonomy of the elderly patient is at risk. The study was based on four case histories describing actual situations of elderly patients, their families, and the professional practice of nursing and social work in the home. To determine concerns of home health agency administrators and their staffs, the committee did surveys, held round-table discussions, and conducted telephone interviews. As a result, it identified four key ethical concerns: 1. Maintaining agency solvency without denying care to patients who lack adequate financial resources. 2. Responding to the conflicting needs of patients and families. 3. Practicing healthcare in situations where patients may be abused or neglected. 4. Addressing decisions about candor and treatment in the care of the terminally ill. The committee identified five characteristics unique to the home care setting that create challenging situations which are rare in other healthcare settings: 1. Strongly asserted autonomy. 2. Limited definition of communal values. 3. Patient isolation. 4. Patient dependency on family care givers. 5. Inadequate long-term care policies. PMID:10290837

  13. The causal effects of home care use on institutional long-term care utilization and expenditures.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing; Konetzka, R Tamara; Manning, Willard G

    2015-03-01

    Limited evidence exists on whether expanding home care saves money overall or how much institutional long-term care can be reduced. This paper estimates the causal effect of Medicaid-financed home care services on the costs and utilization of institutional long-term care using Medicaid claims data. A unique instrumental variable was applied to address the potential bias caused by omitted variables or reverse effect of institutional care use. We find that the use of Medicaid-financed home care services significantly reduced but only partially offset utilization and Medicaid expenditures on nursing facility services. A $1000 increase in Medicaid home care expenditures avoided 2.75 days in nursing facilities and reduced annual Medicaid nursing facility costs by $351 among people over age 65 when selection bias is addressed. Failure to address selection biases would misestimate the substitution and offset effects.

  14. Personal resources supporting living at home as described by older home care clients.

    PubMed

    Eloranta, Sini; Routasalo, Pirkko; Arve, Seija

    2008-08-01

    This study describes the personal resources of older (> or = 75 years) home care clients in Finland and their perceptions of factors that enhance and constrain their ability to live independently at home. The data were collected by unstructured interviews with 21 older home care clients. Inductive content analysis were used to analyse the data. The resources of older people consisted of a sense of control over one's life and a determination to remain active. Factors enhancing older people's resources were their involvement in leisure activities and social networks, factors undermining their resources were conditions on living imposed by outsiders, declining health and loneliness. The results show that home care professionals do not yet have sufficient skills and abilities to identify and support older people's existing resources. As well as having access to necessary resources, it is also crucial that older people know how to use them.

  15. Care Instability in Nursing Homes; A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Majid; Fadayevatan, Reza; Abedi, Heidar Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: The use of long-term care services has risen and this trend is expected to continue as the population reaches old age. Objectives: This study was performed to assess the caring conditions in nursing homes. Patients and Methods: This study was conducted with a qualitative approach using conventional qualitative content analysis. The study was conducted on 23 Iranian participants including 14 elders and 9 caregivers. Data was collected with unstructured interviews and continued to the point of data saturation. Analysis of data was performed continually and concurrently with data collection through a comparative method. Results: Three themes emerged from 595 open codes including care as unpleasant task, sustained care and insufficient resources. Ten subthemes indicated participants’ experiences and understanding of caring conditions in a nursing home. Conclusions: The prevailing given care was the routine one with a focus on physical aspects, although there was some psychological care given to the older people. The findings of this research are guidelines for managers and care planners in nursing homes who should pay attention to physical and psychological care needs of older people. In addition, it is important to pay close attention to the needs of caregivers and provision of instructions for treatment, supervision and education of caregivers and medical students to provide a better care. PMID:27186382

  16. Battling AIDS through home care in Uganda and Zambia.

    PubMed

    1992-10-01

    Innovative home care programs, providing a variety of services to persons with HIV infection and their families and reflecting different health, political, cultural, social, and philosophical concepts, have been developed in Africa, starting in 1987. In 1989 the World Health Organization (WHO) Global Programme on AIDS conducted a descriptive study of some of these programs. It is hoped that these experiences will assist planners and health care providers in their decision making and thereby benefit persons with HIV infection and their families. The lessons learned about the context, backgrounds, structure, process, and outcome of the six selected home care programs can be used and adapted by policymakers and program planners in their own settings when deciding on "their" model of home care.

  17. Nurse Delegation in Home Care: Research Guiding Policy Change.

    PubMed

    Young, Heather M; Farnham, Jennifer; Reinhard, Susan C

    2016-09-01

    The current study evaluated nurse delegation in home care, a pilot program introduced in 2007 in New Jersey to promote home care options for consumers needing assistance with medical/nursing tasks. Findings on readiness for the program, barriers and facilitating factors, experience with the program, and recommendations are summarized and presented. Methods included surveys and interviews with participants in nurse delegation, observations of planning and implementation meetings, and review meeting minutes. Major findings were no negative outcomes for consumers, improvements in quality of life and quality of care for consumers, high readiness and increasing satisfaction with experience in delegation, perception of nurse delegation in home care as a valued option, and the challenges of ensuring adequate staffing. Subsequent changes in regulation in New Jersey are underway, translating this research into policy. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 42(9), 7-15.]. PMID:27571400

  18. [eLearning service for home palliative care].

    PubMed

    Sakuyama, Toshikazu; Komatsu, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Daisuke; Fukushima, Osamu

    2008-12-01

    In order to support the home palliative care learning, we made the eLearning service for home palliative care (beta version) and tried to teach the palliative care to the medical staffs in the community. The various learners (such as nurses, pharmacists and the like) accessed to the online learning and used this eLearning service. After the learners finished eLearning for home palliative care, some questionnaires were distributed to the learners and analyzed by us. The analysis of questionnaires revealed that almost all were satisfied with our eLearning services. Especially the learners were not only interested in using the skills of opioids and the management of pain control, but they had a good cognition for the usage of opioids. PMID:20443298

  19. HoCaMA: Home Care Hybrid Multiagent Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraile, Juan A.; Bajo, Javier; Abraham, Ajith; Corchado, Juan M.

    Home Care is one of the main objectives of Ambient Intelligence. Nowadays, the disabled and elderly population, which represents a significant part of our society, requires novel solutions for providing home care in an effective way. In this chapter, we present HoCaMA, a hybrid multiagent architecture that facilitates remote monitoring and care services for disabled patients at their homes. HoCaMA combines multiagent systems and Web services to facilitate the communication and integration with multiple health care systems. In addition, HoCaMA focuses on the design of reactive agents capable of interacting with different sensors present in the environment, and incorporates a system of alerts through SMS and MMS mobile technologies. Finally, it uses Radio Frequency IDentification and JavaCard technologies to provide advanced location and identification systems, as well as automatic access control facilities. HoCaMA has been implemented in a real environment and the results obtained are presented within this chapter.

  20. Interdisciplinary Care Planning and the Written Care Plan in Nursing Homes: A Critical Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dellefield, Mary Ellen

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This article is a critical review of the history, research evidence, and state-of-the-art technology in interdisciplinary care planning and the written plan of care in American nursing homes. Design and Methods: We reviewed educational and empirical literature. Results: Interdisciplinary care planning and the written care plan are…

  1. Association between Sleep Duration and 24-Hour Urine Free Cortisol in the MrOS Sleep Study

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Madhu N.; Blackwell, Terri; Redline, Susan; Punjabi, Naresh M.; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Neylan, Thomas C.; Stone, Katie L.

    2013-01-01

    Context Short sleep duration is associated with adverse health outcomes, but the mechanisms involved are unknown. It has been postulated that short sleep duration may elevate cortisol levels, but studies have had conflicting results. It is unclear whether these differing findings may be due to methodological issues, such as assessment of sleep duration. Specifically, objective versus subjective methods of measuring habitual sleep duration may account for the conflicting results found in epidemiological studies. Objective Our goal was to determine whether habitual sleep duration, measured objectively (by actigraphy) and subjectively (by self-report), was associated with 24-hour urine free cortisol (UFC), a measure of integrated cortisol secretion. Our secondary goal was to determine whether slow wave sleep (SWS, determined by polysomnography) was associated with 24-hour UFC. Design/Setting Cross sectional study of community dwelling older men. Patients/Participants 325 men (mean age = 76.6 years, SD = 5.5) from the Portland site of the MrOS Sleep Study, who underwent 24-hour urine collection, polysomnography, actigraphy and sleep questionnaire. Primary Outcome 24-hour UFC. Results In this study of community dwelling older men, self-reported sleep duration was inversely related to 24-hour UFC levels. Participants reporting <5 hours of habitual sleep had an adjusted mean 24-hour UFC of 29.8 ug, compared to 28.0 ug in participants reporting >5 to <8 hours of sleep 25.5 ug in those reporting >8 hours of habitual sleep. However, sleep duration determined by actigraphy was not associated with 24-hour UFC in either univariable or multivariable regression models. SWS was not associated with 24-hour UFC. Conclusion Objectively measured (i.e., actigraphic) sleep duration is not associated with 24-hour UFC in these community dwelling older men. This finding, together with prior studies, suggests that elevated levels of integrated cortisol secretion is not the

  2. Introducing Psychiatric Care into Nursing Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sakauye, Kenneth M.; Camp, Cameron J.

    1992-01-01

    Consultation-liaison psychiatry program in teaching nursing home helped implement six guiding principles, including make patient human to the staff; assume no behavior is random; look for depression or psychosis as source of problems; reduce medications and medication doses; create more homelike environment; and use conditions in which learning…

  3. Older nurses embrace hospice & home care.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, N Jean

    2004-05-01

    Older nurses who have "done their time" in hospital wards sometimes find home health or hospice nursing a welcome and rewarding change of pace. While their maturity often gives them the empathy and compassion that can bring comfort to their patients, their extensive experience supplies them with the knowledge they need to work confidently in an independent setting. PMID:15168577

  4. Home Care and Health Reform: Changes in Home Care Utilization in One Canadian Province, 1990-2000

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penning, Margaret J.; Brackley, Moyra E.; Allan, Diane E.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines population-based trends in home care service utilization, alone and in conjunction with hospitalizations, during a period of health reform in Canada. It focuses on the extent to which observed trends suggest enhanced community-based care relative to three competing hypotheses: cost-cutting, medicalization, and…

  5. Turbulent diffusion on the solar photosphere through 24-hour continuous observations of magnetic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannattasio, F.; Berrilli, F.; Del Moro, D.; Bellot Rubio, L.; Orozco Suarez, D.; Gosic, M.

    2012-12-01

    Solar atmosphere is a unique laboratory for the study of turbulent flows under extreme conditions (e.g. very high Reynolds numbers). The turbulent nature of the flow may be approached by determining how magnetic flux elements are transported on the solar surface, and measuring the spatio-temporal scales on which these small magnetic structures are organized. The process involved is diffusion. Several works explored this topic, both by simulations and observations, and the results are often contradictory, ranging from fully-developed turbulent scenarios to normal-diffusive motions. We analyze 24-hour continuous Hinode SOT observations of a supergranular region (for the first time these long scales are explored), studying the evolution of the mutual distance between magnetic element pairs and its scaling laws, in order to investigate the diffusion process. We find a super-diffusive behavior, with a gamma index depending on the spatial scale selected.

  6. After 24-hour scrub, another tower rollback for the Boeing Delta II rocket carrying Stardust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    As tower rollback begins, the Boeing Delta II rocket carrying the Stardust spacecraft waits on Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, for the second launch attempt at 4:04 p.m. EST. The original launch was scrubbed on Feb. 6 for 24 hours. Stardust is destined for a close encounter with the comet Wild 2 in January 2004. Using a silicon-based substance called aerogel, Stardust will capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of the comet. The spacecraft also will bring back samples of interstellar dust. These materials consist of ancient pre-solar interstellar grains and other remnants left over from the formation of the solar system. Scientists expect their analysis to provide important insights into the evolution of the sun and planets and possibly into the origin of life itself. The collected samples will return to Earth in a sample return capsule to be jettisoned as Stardust swings by Earth in January 2006.

  7. Chest physiotherapy in preterm infants with RDS in the first 24 hours of life.

    PubMed

    Raval, D; Yeh, T F; Mora, A; Cuevas, D; Pyati, S; Pildes, R S

    1987-01-01

    To evaluate if chest physiotherapy is beneficial to premature infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) during the first 24 hours of life, 20 infants were randomly assigned to two groups; 10 infants in Group I received routine chest physiotherapy and suction, and 10 infants in Group II received suction only. The birth weight, gestational age, postnatal age, Apgar scores, blood gases, acid-base status, and ventilatory requirements prior to study were comparable between the two groups. There were no significant differences between the groups in the amount of endotracheal secretions removed, the PO2/FIO2 ratio, blood gases, and pH during the study. The incidence of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), Grade I and II intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), and mortality was comparable. However, five of 10 Group I and zero of 10 Group II infants developed Grade III or IV IVH (P less than 0.05).

  8. [Development of direct and indirect ambulatory 24-hour blood pressure monitoring].

    PubMed

    Krönig, B

    1991-01-01

    The direct ambulatory 24-hour blood-pressure monitoring has been applied in two ways. With the so called "Oxford-system", blood pressure is recorded via a cannula in the brachial artery which is connected to a perfusion unit that is worn around the neck, on the front of the chest, with a tape recorder carried in a pouch on the patient's belt. Using the micro-catheter blood-pressure telemetry recording is done in the same way, but transmission of the data to a stationary-receiving unit is managed by telemetry. The usage of the latter method is limited by the weight and complexity of the patient-sited equipment. Compared to the Oxford-system there is the advantage of continuously observing the patients blood-pressure "on-line" during the recording. The invasive character of both methods limits the application to special, scientific investigations. In recent years the indirect recording machines for 24-hour blood-pressure monitoring has been developed further. They are now accurate, easy to apply and simple to work out. Beside the auscultatory way of recording, with or without ECG-gating, the oscillometry recording machines have been improved. There should be automatically-operated intervals with recordings in day-time every 15-20 minutes and during the night every 30 minutes. The recorded data should be analysed by computer, calculating mean values with standard deviations in day-time and night-time separately. Further more, there should be a listing of reading-errors and probably corrected measurements.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Ambulatory arterial stiffness index derived from 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Wang, Ji-Guang; Dolan, Eamon; Gao, Ping-Jin; Guo, Hui-Feng; Nawrot, Tim; Stanton, Alice V; Zhu, Ding-Liang; O'Brien, Eoin; Staessen, Jan A

    2006-03-01

    We hypothesized that 1 minus the slope of diastolic on systolic pressure during 24-hour ambulatory monitoring (ambulatory arterial stiffness index [AASI]) might reflect arterial stiffness. We compared AASI with established measures of arterial stiffness and studied its distribution in Chinese and European populations. We used 90207 SpaceLabs monitors and the SphygmoCor device to measure AASI, central and peripheral pulse pressures, the central (CAIx) and peripheral (PAIx) systolic augmentation indexes, and aortic pulse wave velocity. In 166 volunteers, the correlation coefficient between AASI and pulse wave velocity was 0.51 (P<0.0001). In 348 randomly recruited Chinese subjects, AASI correlated (P<0.0001) with CAIx (r=0.48), PAIx (r=0.50), and central pulse pressure (r=0.50). AASI increased with age and mean arterial pressure but decreased with body height. Both before and after adjustment for arterial wave reflections by considering height and heart rate as covariates, AASI correlated more (P<0.0001) closely with CAIx and PAIx than 24-hour pulse pressure. Among normotensive subjects, the 95th percentile of AASI was 0.55 in Chinese and 0.57 in 1617 Europeans enrolled in the International Database on Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring. The upper boundary of the 95% prediction interval of AASI in relation to age ranged from 0.53 at 20 years to 0.72 at 80 years. In conclusion, AASI is a new index of arterial stiffness that can be easily measured under ambulatory conditions. Pending additional validation in outcome studies, normal values of AASI are probably <0.50 and 0.70 in young and older subjects, respectively. PMID:16432048

  10. A 24-Hour Study of the Hypothalamo-Pituitary Axes in Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nambron, Rajasree; Costelloe, Seán J.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Hill, Nathan R.; Frost, Chris; Watt, Hilary C.; Hindmarsh, Peter; Björkqvist, Maria; Warner, Thomas T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Huntington’s disease is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder characterised by motor, cognitive and psychiatric disturbances. Patients exhibit other symptoms including sleep and mood disturbances, muscle atrophy and weight loss which may be linked to hypothalamic pathology and dysfunction of hypothalamo-pituitary axes. Methods We studied neuroendocrine profiles of corticotropic, somatotropic and gonadotropic hypothalamo-pituitary axes hormones over a 24-hour period in controlled environment in 15 healthy controls, 14 premanifest and 13 stage II/III Huntington’s disease subjects. We also quantified fasting levels of vasopressin, oestradiol, testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate, thyroid stimulating hormone, free triiodothyronine, free total thyroxine, prolactin, adrenaline and noradrenaline. Somatotropic axis hormones, growth hormone releasing hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1 and insulin-like factor binding protein-3 were quantified at 06:00 (fasting), 15:00 and 23:00. A battery of clinical tests, including neurological rating and function scales were performed. Results 24-hour concentrations of adrenocorticotropic hormone, cortisol, luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone did not differ significantly between the Huntington’s disease group and controls. Daytime growth hormone secretion was similar in control and Huntington’s disease subjects. Stage II/III Huntington’s disease subjects had lower concentration of post-sleep growth hormone pulse and higher insulin-like growth factor-1:growth hormone ratio which did not reach significance. In Huntington’s disease subjects, baseline levels of hypothalamo-pituitary axis hormones measured did not significantly differ from those of healthy controls. Conclusions The relatively small subject group means that the study may not detect subtle perturbations in hormone concentrations. A targeted study of the somatotropic axis in larger cohorts may be warranted. However, the lack

  11. Low correlation between visit-to-visit variability and 24-hour variability of blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Muntner, Paul; Shimbo, Daichi; Diaz, Keith M.; Newman, Jonathan; Sloan, Richard P.; Schwartz, Joseph E.

    2013-01-01

    Visit-to-visit variability (VVV) of clinic systolic blood pressure (SBP) has been associated with cardiovascular disease risk. Given the need for obtaining blood pressure (BP) at multiple visits to calculate VVV, substituting BP variability from ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) may be a practical alternative. We assessed the correlation between VVV of BP and BP variability from ABPM using data from 146 untreated, mostly normotensive participants (mean age 47.9 years) in a substudy of the ongoing Masked Hypertension Study. VVV of SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) was estimated by the standard deviation (SDvvv) and average real variability (ARVvvv) from 6 study visits over a median of 216 days. ABPM data were used to calculate the day-night SD (SDdn) and the ARV of SBP and DBP over 24 hours (ARV24). For SBP, the mean SDvvv and SDdn were 6.3 (SD=2.5) and 8.8 (SD=1.8) mmHg, respectively, and mean ARVvvv and ARV24 were 7.2 (SD=3.2) and 8.4 (SD=2.1) mmHg, respectively. The Spearman correlation coefficient between SDvvv and SDdn of SBP was rs=0.25 and between ARVvvv and ARV24 was rs=0.17. Participants in the highest quartile of SDdn of SBP were 1.66 (95% CI: 0.93 – 2.75) times more likely to be in the highest quartile of SDvvv of SBP. The observed-to-expected ratio between the highest quartiles of ARVvvv and ARV24 of SBP was 0.89 (95% CI: 0.41 – 1.69). The correlations for SDvvv and SDdn and ARVvvv and ARV24 of DBP were minimal. These data suggest VVV and 24-hour variability are weakly correlated and not interchangeable. PMID:23784506

  12. Roles of Nurses in Home Medical Care.

    PubMed

    Tomiyama, Miyuki

    2016-01-01

    Some patients of advanced age with heart failure (HF) require repeated hospital care. In an aging society, the importance of medical and social care support systems for patients with HF further increases. In Onomichi-city, a comprehensive community care system has been in place since its introduction in 1997. The system is called "Onomichi Type". This is an interprofessional care system in which a variety of healthcare professionals, with common basic knowledge of disease prevention, treatment and welfare, collaborate with other care professionals. These professionals gain shared knowledge in regard to care management, and fulfill their respective roles at Care Conferences held during a patient's hospital stay. Elderly patients also often have multiple comorbidities and take a lot of medicines. Some patients might forget to take their medicine, whereas others might take an overdose. Thus, sharing a patient's complete medical information with pharmacists is also necessary. We began to collaborate with pharmacists in hospitals and at pharmacies in 2014. The pharmacist plays a great role in providing comprehensive community medical care. PMID:27477730

  13. Wound care dressings and choices for care of wounds in the home.

    PubMed

    Adkins, Carrie L

    2013-05-01

    Statistics from various resources report that many patients in home healthcare settings have wounds. These vary from surgical, pressure, neuropathic, trauma, stasis, and venous wounds. These require the assessment, knowledge, and expertise of a clinician to assist them with wound care management. The purpose of this article is to identify and categorize types of wound care products appropriate for the various types of wounds that clinicians care for and manage in the home.

  14. Prediction of Advisability of Returning Home Using the Home Care Score.

    PubMed

    Matsugi, Akiyoshi; Tani, Keisuke; Tamaru, Yoshiki; Yoshioka, Nami; Yamashita, Akira; Mori, Nobuhiko; Oku, Kosuke; Ikeda, Masashi; Nagano, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to assess whether the home care score (HCS), which was developed by the Ministry of Health and Welfare in Japan in 1992, is useful for the prediction of advisability of home care. Methods. Subjects living at home and in assisted-living facilities were analyzed. Binominal logistic regression analyses, using age, sex, the functional independence measure score, and the HCS, along with receiver operating characteristic curve analyses, were conducted. Findings/Conclusions. Only HCS was selected for the regression equation. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that the area under the curve (0.9), sensitivity (0.82), specificity (0.83), and positive predictive value (0.84) for HCS were higher than those for the functional independence measure, indicating that the HCS is a powerful predictor for advisability of home care. Clinical Relevance. Comprehensive measurements of the condition of provided care and the activities of daily living of the subjects, which are included in the HCS, are required for the prediction of advisability of home care. PMID:26491568

  15. Prediction of Advisability of Returning Home Using the Home Care Score

    PubMed Central

    Matsugi, Akiyoshi; Tani, Keisuke; Tamaru, Yoshiki; Yoshioka, Nami; Yamashita, Akira; Mori, Nobuhiko; Oku, Kosuke; Ikeda, Masashi; Nagano, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to assess whether the home care score (HCS), which was developed by the Ministry of Health and Welfare in Japan in 1992, is useful for the prediction of advisability of home care. Methods. Subjects living at home and in assisted-living facilities were analyzed. Binominal logistic regression analyses, using age, sex, the functional independence measure score, and the HCS, along with receiver operating characteristic curve analyses, were conducted. Findings/Conclusions. Only HCS was selected for the regression equation. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that the area under the curve (0.9), sensitivity (0.82), specificity (0.83), and positive predictive value (0.84) for HCS were higher than those for the functional independence measure, indicating that the HCS is a powerful predictor for advisability of home care. Clinical Relevance. Comprehensive measurements of the condition of provided care and the activities of daily living of the subjects, which are included in the HCS, are required for the prediction of advisability of home care. PMID:26491568

  16. [Home care to the elderly who had stroke].

    PubMed

    Pedreira, Larissa Chaves; Lopes, Regina Lúcia Mendonça

    2010-01-01

    The purpose was to Identify the knowledge production about the stroke in elderly under home care. Bibliographic research whose data were collected though the abstracts from 1997 to 2007, contained in LILACS and SciELO databases. The following key words were used: home assistance, aged people and cerebrovascular accident. Fifty-two references were found in the LILACS database, nine in the SciELO Brazil, and three in the SciELO Cuba. Most of the researches were carried out in 2000. Regarding the method, qualitative method predominance were observed, and central theme is related to the care giver, as well as to the clinical and epidemiologic aspects of the disease. It was observed that this knowledge is still established in Brazil, and the themes related to the person submitted to home care and violence to the aged are still little explored.

  17. Administration of care to older patients in transition from hospital to home care services: home nursing leaders’ experiences

    PubMed Central

    Dale, Bjørg; Hvalvik, Sigrun

    2013-01-01

    Background Older persons in transition between hospital and home care services are in a particularly vulnerable situation and risk unfortunate consequences caused by organizational inefficiency. The purpose of the study reported here was to elucidate how home nursing leaders experience the administration of care to older people in transition from hospital to their own homes. Methods A qualitative study design was used. Ten home nursing leaders in two municipalities in southern Norway participated in individual interviews. The interview texts were audio taped, transcribed verbatim and analyzed by use of a phenomenological-hermeneutic approach. Results Three main themes and seven subthemes were deduced from the data. The first main theme was that the home nursing leaders felt challenged by the organization of home care services. Two subthemes were identified related to this. The first was that the leaders lacked involvement in the transitional process, and the second was that they were challenged by administration of care being decided at another level in the municipality. The second main theme found was that the leaders felt that they were acting in a shifting and unsettled context. Related to this, they had to adjust internal resources to external demands and expectations, and experienced lack of communication with significant others. The third main theme identified was that the leaders endeavored to deliver care in accordance with professional values. The two related subthemes were, first, that they provided for appropriate internal systems and routines, and, second, that they prioritized available professional competence, and made an effort to promote a professional culture. Conclusion To meet the complex needs of the patients in a professional way, the home nursing leaders needed to be flexible and pragmatic in their administration of care. This involved utilizing available professional competence appropriately. The coordination and communication between the

  18. Home is not where the heart is: looming problems of the home care industry.

    PubMed

    Ford, D E

    1994-01-01

    This analysis shows a definite trend of fiscal and social retrenchment policy by the government concerning in-home care service delivery (Tables 1 and 2). Ruggie (1990:164) notes that such shifts and changes in Medicare reimbursement patterns may be efforts of the government to realign itself to become the pivotal force in the provision or delivery of in-home care. Cost-containment pressures, although most needed in the health care industry, are the primary driving force behind retrenchment and the subsequent realignment of government. Such forces tend to impede the development of a comprehensive system for the provision of long-term care services. As noted, the movements and shifts in reimbursement patterns documented by this analysis can lead one to conclude that the same old features will continue to prevail instead of new and innovative delivery structures or public-private partnerships. In other words, the in-home care industry will become more like the nursing home industry--highly regulated and perpetually plagued by questions concerning quality of care. Although government is attempting to diminish its task as the prime provider of health services (i.e., through fiscal retrenchment) and the public's role as the dominant delivery system (i.e., social retrenchment), nevertheless the government has been unable to retrench politically in spite of its present direction of cost containment and fiscal restraint. Consequently, Ruggie (1990:147) notes that "the social welfare functions may continue to be performed" in spite of cost restraint policies. As a result, another "no care zone" is created and policy-makers will continue to develop "crisis policy" such as intense demands to hold unit costs low. The home care system has expanded many of the long-term care options and has emerged as a salient segment of our health and social service system (Applebaum and Phillips, 1990). Yet, policy-makers have not developed a comprehensive long-term care system, particularly

  19. [Evaluation of a home care program for children with cancer].

    PubMed

    Fernández Navarro, J M; Pozuelo Muñoz, B; Ortí Martínez, P; López Ferrer, L; Cañete Nieto, A; Verdeguer Miralles, V; Castel Sánchez, V

    2000-01-01

    The home care team dependent from the pediatric oncology unit in our institution started working in April, 1997. We evaluate in this paper the medical activities accomplished in seventeen month experience. The team is constituted by a pediatric oncologist, two pediatric nurses and a clinical assistant with experience in the specialty. The geographic area we cover is la Communidad Valenciana. We directly attend children living in Valencia city and its metropolitan area. For the rest of patients, we coordinate the interventions of the local primary care teams and local hospitals. 127 patients have been admitted in the home care unit in 433 occasions. The immediate reasons for the admission were: early discharge from the hospital (61%), followed by the administration of antibiotics (18%) and chemotherapy (12%) at home. We attended 17 children in the terminal phase of their diseases. Five of them required opioid treatment for pain control. Six out of eight patients living in the area of direct intervention of the home care team died at home. The most common cause of discharge (73%) was the achievement of the goals planned when the patient was included in the program. Only in two cases (0.5%) we did not found enough cooperation from the parents and the treatment was completed in the hospital. This program has been well accepted by our patients and their parents and permits to shorten the stay in the hospital.

  20. Attempt Quit Smoking 24+ Hours Maps and Data of Model-Based Small Area Estimates - Small Area Estimates

    Cancer.gov

    Attempt Quit Smoking 24+ Hours is defined as a person 18 years of age or older who must have reported smoking at least 100 cigarettes in his/her life, and now does not smoke at all but it has been less than 365 days since completely stopped smoking cigarettes, or now smoke everyday or some days but reported that have made attempt of quitting for more than 24 hours in the past 12 months.

  1. Funding a Health Disparities Research Agenda: The Case of Medicare Home Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davitt, Joan K.

    2014-01-01

    Medicare home health care provides critical skilled nursing and therapy services to patients in their homes, generally after a period in an inpatient facility or nursing home. Disparities in access to, or outcomes of, home health care can result in patient deterioration and increased cost to the Medicare program if patient care needs intensify.…

  2. Troubling Gifts of Care: Vulnerable Persons and Threatening Exchanges in Chicago’s Home Care Industry

    PubMed Central

    Buch, Elana

    2015-01-01

    By tracing the transformations of troubling exchanges in paid home care, this article examines how differently positioned individuals strive to build caring relations within potentially restrictive regimes of care. In paid home care in Chicago, older adults and their workers regularly participate in exchanges of money, time, and material goods. These gifts play a crucial role in building good care relationships that sustain participants’ moral personhood. Amid widespread concern about vulnerable elders, home care agencies compete in a crowded marketplace by prohibiting these exchanges, even as they depend on them to strengthen relationships. Supervisors thus exercise discretion, sometimes reclassifying gift exchanges as punishable thefts. In this context, the commodification of care did not lead to the actual elimination of gift relations, but rather transformed gift relations into a suspicious and troublesome source of value. PMID:25331658

  3. Formal care providers' perceptions of home- and community-based services: informing dementia care quality.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Lynn; Forbes, Dorothy A; Markle-Reid, Maureen; Hawranik, Pamela; Kingston, Dawn; Peacock, Shellie; Henderson, Sandra; Leipert, Beverly

    2009-01-01

    Little attention has been given to the perceptions of formal care providers on the nature and quality of home- and community-based dementia care. The purpose of this descriptive interpretive research was to explore formal care providers' perceptions of their experiences with Canadian home- and community-based dementia care. Participants within three personal interviews and six focus groups (n = 41) included nurses, social workers, therapists, home care aides, and Alzheimer Society personnel (front line/management) in rural and urban areas of Saskatchewan (n = 16), Manitoba (n = 20), and Ontario (n = 8). Two overarching thematic categories, Service Availability and Service Acceptability, emerged from the data analysis. Subthemes of availability were identified as: (a) challenges of service availability, including service wait lists, lack of home care provider training, lack of community-based dementia care infrastructure, and sociocultural and geographic barriers to accessing dementia services; and (b) essential facilitators of availability, including service infrastructure, service bridging, and agency partnerships to form coordinated care systems. Subthemes of acceptability were revealed as: (a) essential components of dementia care, including provision of comprehensive personal care and the use of dementia care professional practice knowledge within a home care setting; and (b) service challenges, including inadequate service time for the physical care and socioemotional support of the client and family caregiver, caregiver and formal provider difficulty with navigation of a fragmented care system, lack of system coordination, and financial costs of services. Essential, integrated dementia care could be established by listening to the "voices of formal care providers," thereby decreasing dementia care costs and increasing the quality of life for those with dementia, and their family caregivers.

  4. Occupational health of home care aides: results of the safe home care survey

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Margaret M; Markkanen, Pia K; Galligan, Catherine J; Sama, Susan R; Kriebel, David; Gore, Rebecca J; Brouillette, Natalie M; Okyere, Daniel; Sun, Chuan; Punnett, Laura; Laramie, Angela K; Davis, Letitia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In countries with ageing populations, home care (HC) aides are among the fastest growing jobs. There are few quantitative studies of HC occupational safety and health (OSH) conditions. The objectives of this study were to: (1) assess quantitatively the OSH hazards and benefits for a wide range of HC working conditions, and (2) compare OSH experiences of HC aides who are employed via different medical and social services systems in Massachusetts, USA. Methods HC aides were recruited for a survey via agencies that employ aides and schedule their visits with clients, and through a labour union of aides employed directly by clients or their families. The questionnaire included detailed questions about the most recent HC visits, as well as about individual aides’ OSH experiences. Results The study population included 1249 HC aides (634 agency-employed, 615 client-employed) contributing information on 3484 HC visits. Hazards occurring most frequently related to musculoskeletal strain, exposure to potentially infectious agents and cleaning chemicals for infection prevention and experience of violence. Client-hired and agency-hired aides had similar OSH experiences with a few exceptions, including use of sharps and experience of verbal violence. Conclusions The OSH experience of HC aides is similar to that of aides in institutional healthcare settings. Despite OSH challenges, HC aides enjoy caring for others and the benefits of HC work should be enhanced. Quantification of HC hazards and benefits is useful to prioritise resources for the development of preventive interventions and to provide an evidence base for policy-setting. PMID:26209318

  5. Merging home and health via contemporary care delivery: program management insights on a home telehealth project.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Chon; Rosenthal, David A

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses a home telehealth program that uses innovative informatics and telemedicine technologies to meet the needs of a Veterans Affairs Medical Center. We provide background information for the program inclusive of descriptions for the decision support system, patient selection process, and selected home telehealth technologies. Lessons learned based on interview data collected from the project team highlight issues regarding implementation and management of the program. Our goal is to provide useful information to other healthcare systems considering home telehealth as a contemporary option for care delivery. PMID:18769182

  6. At-home options. Enhancing care for AIDS patients.

    PubMed

    Sibley, M R

    1993-05-01

    Mark is a 45-year-old man with advanced AIDS. His care partner, Gary, has a full-time job in the design industry. A home care aide visits Mark five days a week for 10 hours at a time to provide personal care while Gary is at work. A visiting nurse sees Mark weekly and has taught Gary how to prepare Mark's ganciclovir infusion. Every six weeks Mark meets with a nutritionist, who evaluates his dietary status and advises Gary on purchasing high-calorie foods for Mark. In May Gary must attend a conference out of town and he is worried:who will care for Mark for those three days? Gary calls the At Home Options (AHOP) nurse and explains the situation. She arranges for nighttime nursing coverage for those three days, and ensures that Mark's home care aide can stay for the weekend. Gary is able to attend his conference and concentrate on his work, secure in the knowledge that Mark will be well cared for and that scheduled respite care, although not a benefit with traditional insurance, is covered through the AHOP program. PMID:10125243

  7. Encounters in Home-Based Nursing Care - Registered Nurses’ Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Wälivaara, Britt-Marie; Sävenstedt, Stefan; Axelsson, Karin

    2013-01-01

    The encounter between registered nurses and persons in need of healthcare has been described as fundamental in nursing care. This encounter can take place face-to-face in physical meetings and through meetings via distance-spanning technology. A strong view expressed in the literature is that the face-to-face encounter is important and cannot entirely be replaced by remote encounters. The encounter has been studied in various healthcare contexts but there is a lack of studies with specific focus on the encounter in home-based nursing care. The aim of this study was to explore the encounter in home-based nursing care based on registered nurses’ experiences. Individual interviews were performed with 24 nurses working in home-based nursing care. The transcribed interviews were analyzed using thematic content analysis and six themes were identified: Follows special rules, Needs some doing, Provides unique information and understanding, Facilitates by being known, Brings energy and relieves anxiety, and Can reach a spirit of community. The encounter includes dimensions of being private, being personal and being professional. A good encounter contains dimensions of being personal and being professional and that there is a good balance between these. This is an encounter between two human beings, where the nurse faces the person with herself and the profession steadily and securely in the back. Being personal and professional at the same time could encourage nurses to focus on doing and being during the encounter in home-based nursing care. PMID:23847697

  8. Longitudinal Changes in the Amount of Informal Care among Publicly Paid Home Care Recipients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Lydia W.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined how the amount of informal care received by disabled elders changes when they are receiving publicly paid home care, and whether formal service use, disability, caregiving arrangements, and demographic characteristics of older adults predict changes in the amount of informal care. Design and Methods: Hierarchical…

  9. Designing the future: care closer to home.

    PubMed

    2014-03-01

    According to its architects, Maber, the Corby Urgent Care Centre is "the first of its kind, providing a combination of primary and emergency care facilities in a community-focused building that patients and staff agree is friendly, welcoming, and 'unlike a hospital'." Since it opened in February 2013, the Centre has almost doubled its visitor targets, and helped take NHS Corby CCG into the top 10 per cent of performers in England for (lower) A&E attendance. The architects report. PMID:24697092

  10. [Conceptualizations on care for persons with dementia in nursing homes].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Martín, Beatriz; Martínez-Andrés, María; Notario-Pacheco, Blanca; Martínez-Vizcaíno, Vicente

    2016-03-01

    Despite the importance of family perceptions when analyzing care for the elderly in nursing homes, little is said about this aspect. This study aims to identify preferences and areas for improvement in care for persons with dementia, as perceived by families. A qualitative study was performed, based on Grounded Theory, combining two data collection techniques (participant observation and in-depth interviews) in a theoretical sample of institutionalized persons with dementia. The ideal model of care for persons with dementia, as perceived by participants, was based on specialized and individualized care and family participation in the care provided. Areas for improvement included aspects pertaining to specialized training in geriatrics, human relations, and the culture of institutional work. Faced with the current trend towards technification of care, families are now demanding personalized, small-scale care in which they form an active part of the team.

  11. 38 CFR 59.40 - Maximum number of nursing home care and domiciliary care beds for veterans by State.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Maximum number of nursing... ACQUISITION OF STATE HOMES § 59.40 Maximum number of nursing home care and domiciliary care beds for veterans... increase the total number of state home nursing home and domiciliary beds in that state beyond the...

  12. 38 CFR 59.40 - Maximum number of nursing home care and domiciliary care beds for veterans by State.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Maximum number of nursing... ACQUISITION OF STATE HOMES § 59.40 Maximum number of nursing home care and domiciliary care beds for veterans... increase the total number of state home nursing home and domiciliary beds in that state beyond the...

  13. 38 CFR 59.40 - Maximum number of nursing home care and domiciliary care beds for veterans by State.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Maximum number of nursing... ACQUISITION OF STATE HOMES § 59.40 Maximum number of nursing home care and domiciliary care beds for veterans... increase the total number of state home nursing home and domiciliary beds in that state beyond the...

  14. 38 CFR 59.40 - Maximum number of nursing home care and domiciliary care beds for veterans by State.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Maximum number of nursing... ACQUISITION OF STATE HOMES § 59.40 Maximum number of nursing home care and domiciliary care beds for veterans... increase the total number of state home nursing home and domiciliary beds in that state beyond the...

  15. Time-Based Measurement of Personal Mite Allergen Bioaerosol Exposure over 24 Hour Periods.

    PubMed

    Tovey, Euan R; Liu-Brennan, Damien; Garden, Frances L; Oliver, Brian G; Perzanowski, Matthew S; Marks, Guy B

    2016-01-01

    Allergic diseases such as asthma and rhinitis are common in many countries. Globally the most common allergen associated with symptoms is produced by house dust mites. Although the bed has often been cited as the main site of exposure to mite allergens, surprisingly this has not yet been directly established by measurement due to a lack of suitable methods. Here we report on the development of novel methods to determine the pattern of personal exposure to mite allergen bioaerosols over 24-hour periods and applied this in a small field study using 10 normal adults. Air was sampled using a miniature time-based air-sampler of in-house design located close to the breathing zone of the participants, co-located with a miniature time-lapse camera. Airborne particles, drawn into the sampler at 2L/min via a narrow slot, were impacted onto the peripheral surface of a disk mounted on the hour-hand of either a 12 or 24 hour clock motor. The impaction surface was either an electret cloth, or an adhesive film; both novel for these purposes. Following a review of the time-lapse images, disks were post-hoc cut into subsamples corresponding to eight predetermined categories of indoor or outdoor location, extracted and analysed for mite allergen Der p 1 by an amplified ELISA. Allergen was detected in 57.2% of the total of 353 subsamples collected during 20 days of sampling. Exposure patterns varied over time. Higher concentrations of airborne mite allergen were typically measured in samples collected from domestic locations in the day and evening. Indoor domestic Der p 1 exposures accounted for 59.5% of total exposure, whereas total in-bed-asleep exposure, which varied 80 fold between individuals, accounted overall for 9.85% of total exposure, suggesting beds are not often the main site of exposure. This study establishes the feasibility of novel methods for determining the time-geography of personal exposure to many bioaerosols and identifies new areas for future technical

  16. Non-24-Hour Sleep-Wake Disorder Revisited - A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Garbazza, Corrado; Bromundt, Vivien; Eckert, Anne; Brunner, Daniel P; Meier, Fides; Hackethal, Sandra; Cajochen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The human sleep-wake cycle is governed by two major factors: a homeostatic hourglass process (process S), which rises linearly during the day, and a circadian process C, which determines the timing of sleep in a ~24-h rhythm in accordance to the external light-dark (LD) cycle. While both individual processes are fairly well characterized, the exact nature of their interaction remains unclear. The circadian rhythm is generated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus ("master clock") of the anterior hypothalamus, through cell-autonomous feedback loops of DNA transcription and translation. While the phase length (tau) of the cycle is relatively stable and genetically determined, the phase of the clock is reset by external stimuli ("zeitgebers"), the most important being the LD cycle. Misalignments of the internal rhythm with the LD cycle can lead to various somatic complaints and to the development of circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSD). Non-24-hour sleep-wake disorders (N24HSWD) is a CRSD affecting up to 50% of totally blind patients and characterized by the inability to maintain a stable entrainment of the typically long circadian rhythm (tau > 24.5 h) to the LD cycle. The disease is rare in sighted individuals and the pathophysiology less well understood. Here, we present the case of a 40-year-old sighted male, who developed a misalignment of the internal clock with the external LD cycle following the treatment for Hodgkin's lymphoma (ABVD regimen, four cycles and AVD regimen, four cycles). A thorough clinical assessment, including actigraphy, melatonin profiles and polysomnography led to the diagnosis of non-24-hour sleep-wake disorders (N24HSWD) with a free-running rhythm of tau = 25.27 h. A therapeutic intervention with bright light therapy (30 min, 10,000 lux) in the morning and melatonin administration (0.5-0.75 mg) in the evening failed to entrain the free-running rhythm, although a longer treatment duration and more intense therapy might have

  17. Time-Based Measurement of Personal Mite Allergen Bioaerosol Exposure over 24 Hour Periods

    PubMed Central

    Tovey, Euan R.; Liu-Brennan, Damien; Garden, Frances L.; Oliver, Brian G.; Perzanowski, Matthew S.; Marks, Guy B.

    2016-01-01

    Allergic diseases such as asthma and rhinitis are common in many countries. Globally the most common allergen associated with symptoms is produced by house dust mites. Although the bed has often been cited as the main site of exposure to mite allergens, surprisingly this has not yet been directly established by measurement due to a lack of suitable methods. Here we report on the development of novel methods to determine the pattern of personal exposure to mite allergen bioaerosols over 24-hour periods and applied this in a small field study using 10 normal adults. Air was sampled using a miniature time-based air-sampler of in-house design located close to the breathing zone of the participants, co-located with a miniature time-lapse camera. Airborne particles, drawn into the sampler at 2L/min via a narrow slot, were impacted onto the peripheral surface of a disk mounted on the hour-hand of either a 12 or 24 hour clock motor. The impaction surface was either an electret cloth, or an adhesive film; both novel for these purposes. Following a review of the time-lapse images, disks were post-hoc cut into subsamples corresponding to eight predetermined categories of indoor or outdoor location, extracted and analysed for mite allergen Der p 1 by an amplified ELISA. Allergen was detected in 57.2% of the total of 353 subsamples collected during 20 days of sampling. Exposure patterns varied over time. Higher concentrations of airborne mite allergen were typically measured in samples collected from domestic locations in the day and evening. Indoor domestic Der p 1 exposures accounted for 59.5% of total exposure, whereas total in-bed-asleep exposure, which varied 80 fold between individuals, accounted overall for 9.85% of total exposure, suggesting beds are not often the main site of exposure. This study establishes the feasibility of novel methods for determining the time-geography of personal exposure to many bioaerosols and identifies new areas for future technical

  18. Non-24-Hour Sleep-Wake Disorder Revisited – A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Garbazza, Corrado; Bromundt, Vivien; Eckert, Anne; Brunner, Daniel P.; Meier, Fides; Hackethal, Sandra; Cajochen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The human sleep-wake cycle is governed by two major factors: a homeostatic hourglass process (process S), which rises linearly during the day, and a circadian process C, which determines the timing of sleep in a ~24-h rhythm in accordance to the external light–dark (LD) cycle. While both individual processes are fairly well characterized, the exact nature of their interaction remains unclear. The circadian rhythm is generated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (“master clock”) of the anterior hypothalamus, through cell-autonomous feedback loops of DNA transcription and translation. While the phase length (tau) of the cycle is relatively stable and genetically determined, the phase of the clock is reset by external stimuli (“zeitgebers”), the most important being the LD cycle. Misalignments of the internal rhythm with the LD cycle can lead to various somatic complaints and to the development of circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSD). Non-24-hour sleep-wake disorders (N24HSWD) is a CRSD affecting up to 50% of totally blind patients and characterized by the inability to maintain a stable entrainment of the typically long circadian rhythm (tau > 24.5 h) to the LD cycle. The disease is rare in sighted individuals and the pathophysiology less well understood. Here, we present the case of a 40-year-old sighted male, who developed a misalignment of the internal clock with the external LD cycle following the treatment for Hodgkin’s lymphoma (ABVD regimen, four cycles and AVD regimen, four cycles). A thorough clinical assessment, including actigraphy, melatonin profiles and polysomnography led to the diagnosis of non-24-hour sleep-wake disorders (N24HSWD) with a free-running rhythm of tau = 25.27 h. A therapeutic intervention with bright light therapy (30 min, 10,000 lux) in the morning and melatonin administration (0.5–0.75 mg) in the evening failed to entrain the free-running rhythm, although a longer treatment duration and more intense therapy

  19. Medically Complex Home Care and Caregiver Strain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moorman, Sara M.; Macdonald, Cameron

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of the study: To examine (a) whether the content of caregiving tasks (i.e., nursing vs. personal care) contributes to variation in caregivers' strain and (b) whether the level of complexity of nursing tasks contributes to variation in strain among caregivers providing help with such tasks. Design and methods: The data came from the Cash…

  20. Home care of children and youth with complex health care needs and technology dependencies.

    PubMed

    Elias, Ellen Roy; Murphy, Nancy A

    2012-05-01

    Children and youth with complex medical issues, especially those with technology dependencies, experience frequent and often lengthy hospitalizations. Hospital discharges for these children can be a complicated process that requires a deliberate, multistep approach. In addition to successful discharges to home, it is essential that pediatric providers develop and implement an interdisciplinary and coordinated plan of care that addresses the child's ongoing health care needs. The goal is to ensure that each child remains healthy, thrives, and obtains optimal medical home and developmental supports that promote ongoing care at home and minimize recurrent hospitalizations. This clinical report presents an approach to discharging the child with complex medical needs with technology dependencies from hospital to home and then continually addressing the needs of the child and family in the home environment. PMID:22547780

  1. A system for intelligent home care ECG upload and priorisation.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Lorenzo T; Tarita, Eugeniu; Zywietz, Tosja K; Lueth, Tim C

    2010-01-01

    In this contribution, a system for internet based, automated home care ECG upload and priorisation is presented for the first time. It unifies the advantages of existing telemonitoring ECG systems adding functionalities such as automated priorisation and usability for home care. Chronic cardiac diseases are a big group in the geriatric field. Most of them can be easily diagnosed with help of an electrocardiogram. A frequent or long-term ECG analysis allows early diagnosis of e.g. a cardiac infarction. Nevertheless, patients often aren't willing to visit a doctor for prophylactic purposes. Possible solutions of this problem are home care devices, which are used to investigate patients at home without the presence of a doctor on site. As the diffusion of such systems leads to a huge amount of data which has to be managed and evaluated, the presented approach focuses on an easy to use software for ECG upload from home, a web based management application and an algorithm for ECG preanalysis and priorisation.

  2. Problems of care in a private nursing home.

    PubMed

    Pearson, J; Challis, L; Bowman, C E

    To assess problems of care in a private nursing home an observational study was carried out over two months, during which a research nurse worked as a member of the staff in a home caring for 25 patients aged 62-90. During the second month a consultant physician visited the home weekly to hold case conferences and assess each patient's functional ability and drug regimen. Various problems in medical, nursing, and bureaucratic matters were identified--for example, staff failed to understand the appropriate response to various medical symptoms; no clear policy existed for managing pressure sores; and one patient's anticoagulant state could not be assessed when industrial action meant that transport to take him to hospital was not available--and several changes in drug treatments were recommended. The problems that were identified were mainly due to poor communication between the home and general practitioners and hospitals and to the lack of guidance policy on common issues that arise in long term care. Such a policy could be produced by health authority staff, general practitioners, and representatives of nursing homes.

  3. Leadership, staffing and quality of care in nursing homes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Leadership and staffing are recognised as important factors for quality of care. This study examines the effects of ward leaders' task- and relationship-oriented leadership styles, staffing levels, ratio of registered nurses and ratio of unlicensed staff on three independent measures of quality of care. Methods A cross-sectional survey of forty nursing home wards throughout Norway was used to collect the data. Five sources of data were utilised: self-report questionnaires to 444 employees, interviews with and questionnaires to 13 nursing home directors and 40 ward managers, telephone interviews with 378 relatives and 900 hours of field observations. Separate multi-level analyses were conducted for quality of care assessed by relatives, staff and field observations respectively. Results Task-oriented leadership style had a significant positive relationship with two of the three quality of care indexes. In contrast, relationship-oriented leadership style was not significantly related to any of the indexes. The lack of significant effect for relationship-oriented leadership style was due to a strong correlation between the two leadership styles (r = 0.78). Staffing levels and ratio of registered nurses were not significantly related to any of the quality of care indexes. The ratio of unlicensed staff, however, showed a significant negative relationship to quality as assessed by relatives and field observations, but not to quality as assessed by staff. Conclusions Leaders in nursing homes should focus on active leadership and particularly task-oriented behaviour like structure, coordination, clarifying of staff roles and monitoring of operations to increase quality of care. Furthermore, nursing homes should minimize use of unlicensed staff and address factors related to high ratios of unlicensed staff, like low staff stability. The study indicates, however, that the relationship between staffing levels, ratio of registered nurses and quality of care is

  4. Training in care homes to reduce avoidable harm.

    PubMed

    Brownhill, Kai

    This article demonstrates the effectiveness of using workshop-based education and service-improvement models in care homes. The models were designed around both threshold and predictive modelling and were intended to raise awareness of the symptoms that may result from a fall, pressure ulcers or urinary tract infections. The project exceeded our targets. Preventive assessments, care planning and timely referrals resulted in a reduction in avoidable hospital admissions and district nurse and GP visits.

  5. A Home Health Care System for Family Doctor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamabe, Ryuji; Taketa, Norihiro

    We propose a constitution technique of small-scale Home Health Care system for family doctor that has been developed by applying various API of JAVA. One function is vital data transmission which allows a family doctor to check the data of elderly persons with ease via Internet. Vital data is encrypted and transmitted for the purpose of security. The other function is telecommunication with voice and face image for care consulting.

  6. Hepatitis C therapy at home: a hospital and home care partnership.

    PubMed

    Jack, Kate; Barnett, Jenn; Holiday, Amanda; Heard, Greeba; Thomson, Brian

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a significant public health threat in the UK, and is both underdiagnosed and undertreated. The treatment episode takes between 12 and 48 weeks. In the UK, HCV management is undertaken in secondary and tertiary centres. This does not meet the needs of all patients; they may have to travel long distances, incur travel costs, wait a long time to be seen and negotiate time off work while not divulging their illness. Providing care at home can increase patients' access to and acceptability of treatment, especially in areas remote from specialist centres. This paper describes the feasibility, safety and efficacy of treating HCV infected patients at home by a partnership between secondary care and an clinical home care company. The home care model had a significantly higher attendance rate than the clinic model. It allowed the trust to improve care at no extra cost. This model can optimise specialist nurses' time, allowing them to focus on patients with more complex needs. PMID:23752623

  7. 38 CFR 17.60 - Extensions of community nursing home care beyond six months.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... nursing home care beyond six months. 17.60 Section 17.60 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Use of Community Nursing Home Care Facilities § 17.60 Extensions of community nursing home care beyond six months. Directors of health care facilities may authorize, for...

  8. 38 CFR 17.60 - Extensions of community nursing home care beyond six months.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... nursing home care beyond six months. 17.60 Section 17.60 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Use of Community Nursing Home Care Facilities § 17.60 Extensions of community nursing home care beyond six months. Directors of health care facilities may authorize, for...

  9. 38 CFR 17.60 - Extensions of community nursing home care beyond six months.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... nursing home care beyond six months. 17.60 Section 17.60 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Use of Community Nursing Home Care Facilities § 17.60 Extensions of community nursing home care beyond six months. Directors of health care facilities may authorize, for...

  10. 38 CFR 17.60 - Extensions of community nursing home care beyond six months.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... nursing home care beyond six months. 17.60 Section 17.60 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Use of Community Nursing Home Care Facilities § 17.60 Extensions of community nursing home care beyond six months. Directors of health care facilities may authorize, for...

  11. 38 CFR 17.60 - Extensions of community nursing home care beyond six months.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... nursing home care beyond six months. 17.60 Section 17.60 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Use of Community Nursing Home Care Facilities § 17.60 Extensions of community nursing home care beyond six months. Directors of health care facilities may authorize, for...

  12. Developing Initiatives for Home-Based Child Care: Current Research and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Toni; Paulsell, Diane

    2011-01-01

    Home-based child care accounts for a significant share of the child care supply in the United States, especially for infants and toddlers. A synthesis of the home-based care research literature and information about recent home-based care quality initiatives points to a critical need for more systematic efforts to develop and test quality…

  13. Residents' choice of and control over food in care homes.

    PubMed

    Winterburn, Susan

    2009-04-01

    This study aimed to map food pathways in care homes to identify how residents exercised choice and control over their food intake and any associated or influencing factors. Four homes were visited, interviews were conducted with chefs and nursing staff and the dining facilities were noted. It was found that residents were dependent on the care home for the provision of food. There was almost no direct contact between residents and external food retailers. A food map was constructed, which identified three routes for potential improvements in practice: supply and delivery of food; serving of food; and consumption of food. Residents' choice and control over food could be improved through the design of new products for serving and consumption of food and eating aids, access to local food retailers and nutritional training. PMID:19363950

  14. Staffing Subsidies and the Quality of Care in Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Andrew D.; Lee, Yong Suk

    2015-01-01

    Concerns about the quality of state-financed nursing home care has led to the wide-scale adoption by states of pass-through subsidies, in which Medicaid reimbursement rates are directly tied to staffing expenditure. We examine the effects of Medicaid pass-through on nursing home staffing and quality of care by adapting a two-step FGLS method that addresses clustering and state-level temporal autocorrelation. We find that pass-through subsidies increases staffing by about 1% on average and 2.7% in nursing homes with a low share of Medicaid patients. Furthermore, pass-through subsidies reduce the incidences of pressure ulcer worsening by about 0.9%. PMID:25814437

  15. [The challenge of home care for respiratory failure].

    PubMed

    Huchon, G

    2001-05-31

    In France, 65,000 patients with chronic respiratory failure are managed at home. This is made possible by the collaboration between prescribing physicians and other medical and social agents in the community. It consists in various medical, technical and social interventions, all aimed at improving both survival and quality of life. Patient and family education is a key-factor to increase the success of the various therapeutic interventions that are rehabilitation, long term oxygen therapy and home mechanical ventilation. Rehabilitation programmes include optimisation of pharmacological treatments, help in smoking cessation, social and psychological support, and exercise training. National alert procedure for medical devices, and evaluation of medical devices is part of the management of respiratory failure at home. Care networks facilitate the various interventions necessary to maintain the patient with chronic respiratory failure at home. PMID:11468910

  16. Assisted Living Expansion and the Market for Nursing Home Care

    PubMed Central

    Grabowski, David C; Stevenson, David G; Cornell, Portia Y

    2012-01-01

    Objective To analyze the effect of market-level changes in assisted living supply on nursing home utilization and resident acuity. Data Sources Primary data on the supply of assisted living over time were collected from 13 states from 1993 through 2007 and merged with nursing home-level data from the Online Survey Certification and Reporting System and market-level information from the Area Resource File. Study Design Least squares regression specification incorporating market and time-fixed effects. Principal Findings A 10 percent increase in assisted living capacity led to a 1.4 percent decline in private-pay nursing home occupancy and a 0.2–0.6 percent increase in patient acuity. Conclusions Assisted living serves as a potential substitute for nursing home care for some healthier individuals with greater financial resources, suggesting implications for policy makers, providers, and consumers. PMID:22578039

  17. What and how much do we eat? 24-hour dietary recall method.

    PubMed

    Salvador Castell, Gemma; Serra-Majem, Lluis; Ribas-Barba, Lourdes

    2015-02-26

    Diet, along with lifestyle factors, is an important determinant of the health status of an individual and of a community. Dietary assessment at the population level provides us with key information on the frequency and distribution of possible inadequate diets and/or nutritional status. It is also useful as input into the elaboration of food and nutrition policies aiming to improve dietary habits and the health status of a community. This article reviews the characteristics, advantages and limitations of the 24-hour dietary recall method (24hDR), which is one of the most widely used tools in nutrition epidemiology to identify food, energy and nutrient intake in national nutrition surveys, cross-sectional studies, clinical trials and cohort studies as well as in the evaluation of individual dietary intake and Total Diet assessment. To reduce the key factors associated with bias, the importance of previously trained interviewers is highlighted, as well as the role of support materials and the contribution of novel technologies.

  18. Sudden cardiac arrest risk stratification based on 24-hour Holter ECG statistics.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Keisuke; Shiobara, Masahito; Nakamura, Saya; Yamashiro, Koichiro; Yana, Kazuo; Ono, Takuya

    2015-08-01

    This study examined the feasibility of using indices obtained from a long term Holter ECG record for sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) risk stratification. The ndices tested were the QT-RR interval co-variability and the alternans ratio percentile (ARP(θ)) which is defined as the θ(th) percentile of alternans ratios over a 24 hour period. The QT-RR interval co-variabilities are evaluated by the serial correlation coefficient between QT and RR trend sequences (QTRC). Previously reported Kalman filter technique and a simple smoothing spline method for the trend estimation are compared. Parameter θ in the alternans ratio percentile index was optimized to achieve the best classification accuracy. These indices were estimated from 26 cardiovascular outpatients for Holter ECG record. Patients were classified into high and low risk groups according to their clinical diagnosis, and the obtained indices were compared with those of 25 control subjects. A risk stratification using the two indices QTRC and ARP(θ) yielded an average sensitivity of 0.812 and a specificity of 0.925. The sensitivities and specificities of all three categories exceeded 0.8 except for the sensitivity to detect the high-risk patient group. Other short-term ECG parameters may need to be incorporated in order to improve the sensitivity.

  19. 24 Hours in the Life of HIV-1 in a T Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Pejman; Desfarges, Sébastien; Bartha, István; Joos, Beda; Zangger, Nadine; Muñoz, Miguel; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Beerenwinkel, Niko; Telenti, Amalio; Ciuffi, Angela

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 infects CD4+ T cells and completes its replication cycle in approximately 24 hours. We employed repeated measurements in a standardized cell system and rigorous mathematical modeling to characterize the emergence of the viral replication intermediates and their impact on the cellular transcriptional response with high temporal resolution. We observed 7,991 (73%) of the 10,958 expressed genes to be modulated in concordance with key steps of viral replication. Fifty-two percent of the overall variability in the host transcriptome was explained by linear regression on the viral life cycle. This profound perturbation of cellular physiology was investigated in the light of several regulatory mechanisms, including transcription factors, miRNAs, host-pathogen interaction, and proviral integration. Key features were validated in primary CD4+ T cells, and with viral constructs using alternative entry strategies. We propose a model of early massive cellular shutdown and progressive upregulation of the cellular machinery to complete the viral life cycle. PMID:23382686

  20. Age and individual sleep characteristics affect cognitive performance in anesthesiology residents after a 24-hour shift.

    PubMed

    Tadinac, Meri; Sekulić, Ante; Hromatko, Ivana; Mazul-Sunko, Branka; Ivancić, Romina

    2014-03-01

    Previous research has shown that both shift work and sleep deprivation have an adverse influence on various aspects of human cognitive performance. The aim of this study was to explore changes in cognitive functioning and subjective sleepiness of anesthesiology residents after a 24-hour shift. Twenty-six anesthesiology residents completed a set of psychological instruments at the beginning and at the end of the shift, as well as a questionnaire regarding information about the shift, Stanford Sleepiness Scale, and Circadian Type Questionnaire. There was a significant decline in cognitive performance measured by the Auditory Verbal Learning Test after the shift. The effect was stronger in older participants and in those with high scores on rigidity of sleep scale and low scores on the ability to overcome sleepiness scale. There were no differences in the digits forward test (a measure of concentration), while digits backward test (a measure of working memory) even showed an improved performance after the shift. Although participants reported being significantly sleepier after the shift, the subjective sleepiness did not correlate with any of the objective measures of cognitive performance. In conclusion, the performance in short tasks involving concentration and working memory was not impaired, while performance in long-term and monotone tasks declined after sleep deprivation, and the magnitude of this decline depended on the specific individual characteristics of sleep and on age Surprisingly, age seemed to have an important impact on cognitive functions after shift work even in the relatively age-homogeneous population of young anesthesiology residents.

  1. High energy deficit in an ultraendurance athlete in a 24-hour ultracycling race

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Ferran A.; Iglesias, Xavier; Benítez, Adolfo; Marina, Míchel; Padullés, Josep M.; Torrado, Priscila; Vázquez, Jairo; Knechtle, Beat

    2012-01-01

    This case study examined the nutritional behavior and energy balance in an official finisher of a 24-hour ultracycling race. The food and beverages consumed by the cyclist were continuously weighed and recorded to estimate intake of energy, macronutrients, sodium, and caffeine. In addition, during the race, heart rate was continuously monitored. Energy expenditure was assessed using a heart rate–oxygen uptake regression equation obtained previously from a laboratory test. The athlete (39 years, 175.6 cm, 84.2 kg, maximum oxygen uptake, 64 mL/kg/min) cycled during 22 h 22 min, in which he completed 557.3 km with 8760 m of altitude at an average speed of 25.1 km/h. The average heart rate was 131 beats/min. Carbohydrates were the main macronutrient intake (1102 g, 13.1 g/kg); however, intake was below current recommendations. The consumption of protein and fat was 86 g and 91 g, respectively. He ingested 20.7 L (862 mL/h) of fluids, with sport drinks the main fluid used for hydration. Sodium concentration in relation to total fluid intake was 34.0 mmol/L. Caffeine consumption over the race was 231 mg (2.7 mg/kg). During the race, he expended 15,533 kcal. Total energy intake was 5571 kcal, with 4058 (73%) and 1513 (27%) kcal derived from solids and fluids, respectively. The energy balance resulted in an energy deficit of 9915 kcal. PMID:22481841

  2. Obtaining liver tridimensional scaffold through the decellularization of rabbit whole liver in 24 hours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federico, Schliamser; Ayelen, Rinaldi; Romina, Comin; Alba Nelly, Borchert; Adrian, Nari Gustavo; Alicia, Salvatierra Nancy; Mariana Paula, Cid

    2016-04-01

    In the present work, we development a new protocol for liver decellularization in which the hole decellularization was reached over 24 h. Introduction: the availability of transplantable livers is not sufficient to fulfill the current demand for grafts, with the search for therapeutic alternatives having generated different lines of research, one of which is the use of decellularized three-dimensional biological matrices and subsequent cell seeding to obtain a functional organ. Objective: to produce a decellularization protocol from rabbit liver to generate a three-dimensional matrixin which the time period involved didn't pass 24 h. Methods: The decellularization is obtained through the use of water and SDS (0,1-0,3 %), after freezing at -80 degrees, is the best alternative of different physical and/or chemical mechanisms to break down organ cells and leave only the extracellular matriz. After 24 h of retrograde perfusion, a decellularized translucent matrix was generated. To evaluate if the decellularization protocol was successful, with the extracellular matrix being preserved, we carried out histological (light microscopy) and biochemical (DNA quantification) studies. Results: the decellularization process was verified by macroscopic observation of the organ using microscopic observation corroborated the macroscopic results, with the hematoxylin-eosin and Masson staining showing no cells or nuclear material. In addition, the DNA quantification was less than 10% in the decellularized liver compared to control. Finally,the time taken to develop the decellularization protocol was less than 24 hours.

  3. Electrodes for 24 hours pH monitoring--a comparative study.

    PubMed Central

    McLauchlan, G; Rawlings, J M; Lucas, M L; McCloy, R F; Crean, G P; McColl, K E

    1987-01-01

    Three pH electrodes in clinical use were examined--(1) antimony electrode with remote reference electrode (Synectics 0011), (2) glass electrode with remote reference electrode (Microelectrodes Inc. MI 506) and (3) combined glass electrode with integral reference electrode (Radiometer GK2801C). In vitro studies showed that both glass electrodes were similar and superior to the antimony electrode with respect to response time, drift, and sensitivity. The effect of the siting of the reference electrode on the recorded pH was examined in five human volunteers. The pH reading using a remote skin reference electrode was higher by a mean of 0.3 pH units (range 0.0-0.6) in the stomach, lower by 0.65 pH units (0.5-0.8) in the duodenum and lower by 0.3 pH units (0.0-0.6) in the oesophagus than that simultaneously obtained with an intraluminal reference electrode. Buccal reference electrodes gave similar readings to skin. Combined reference and glass pH electrodes are recommended for 24-hour ambulatory pH monitoring. Images Fig. 1 PMID:3666560

  4. Depressive Symptoms and 24-Hour Ambulatory Blood Pressure in Africans: The SABPA Study

    PubMed Central

    Hamer, Mark; Frasure-Smith, Nancy; Lespérance, François; Harvey, Brian H.; Malan, Nico T.; Malan, Leoné

    2012-01-01

    Disturbances in circadian rhythm might play a central role in the neurobiology of depression. We examined the association between depressive symptoms and 24-hour ambulatory BP in a sample of 405 (197 black and 208 Caucasian) urbanized African teachers aged 25 to 60 yrs (mean 44.6 ± 9.6 yrs). Depressive symptoms were assessed using the self-administered 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). After adjusting for age, sex, and ethnicity, participants with severe depressive symptoms (PHQ-9 ≥ 15) had higher odds of hypertension defined from ambulatory BP and/or use of antihypertensive medication (odds ratio = 2.19, 95% CI, 1.00–4.90) in comparison to participants with no symptoms. Compared to Caucasians with no depressive symptoms, those with severe symptoms had blunted nocturnal systolic BP drop of 4.7 mmHg (95% CI, −0.5 to 10.0, P = 0.07). In summary, depressive symptoms were associated with the circadian BP profile in black and Caucasian Africans. PMID:22028954

  5. Importance of all movement behaviors in a 24 hour period for overall health.

    PubMed

    Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Carson, Valerie; Gray, Casey E; Tremblay, Mark S

    2014-12-01

    Physical inactivity and childhood obesity are well-recognized public health concerns that are associated with a range of adverse health outcomes. Historically, the benefits of physical activity (e.g., moderate-to-vigorous physical activity-MVPA) to overall health have dominated discussions and emerging evidence indicates that a broader, more integrated approach is needed to better understand and address current public health crises. Existing guidelines for children and youth around the world only focus on MVPA, and recently sedentary behavior, despite an accumulating body of evidence showing that light-intensity physical activity (LPA) such as walking can provide important health benefits. Furthermore, there is accumulating support for the importance of adequate sleep and that these behaviors moderate the health impact of each other. Ignoring the other components of the movement continuum (i.e., sleep, sedentary time, LPA) while focusing efforts exclusively on MVPA (accounting for <5% of the time in a 24 h period) limits the potential to optimize the health benefits of movement behaviors. In order to address this limitation, experts in Canada are currently developing the world's first Integrated 24 Hour Movement Behaviour Guidelines for Children and Youth to help advance an integrated healthy active living agenda that has the potential to significantly improve the overall health and well-being of children and youth. PMID:25485978

  6. Predictors of mortality among elderly dependent home care patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to identify which variables –among those commonly available and used in the primary care setting– best predict mortality in a cohort of elderly dependent patients living at home (EDPLH) that were included in a home care program provided by Primary Care Teams (PCT). Additionally, we explored the risk of death among a sub-group of these patients that were admitted to hospital the year before they entered the home care program. Methods A one-year longitudinal cohort study of a sample of EDPLH patients included in a home care programme provided by 72 PCTs. Variables collected from each individual patient included health and social status, carer’s characteristics, carer’s burden of care, health and social services received. Results 1,001 patients completed the study (91.5%), 226 were admitted to hospital the year before inclusion. 290 (28.9%) died during the one-year follow-up period. In the logistic regression analysis women show a lower risk of death [OR= 0.67 (0.50-0.91)]. The risk of death increases with comorbidity [Charlson index OR= 1.14 (1,06-1.23)], the number of previous hospital admissions [OR= 1,16 (1.03-1.33)], and with the degree of pressure ulcers [ulcers degree 1–2 OR = 2.94 (1.92-4.52); ulcers degree 3–4 OR = 4.45 (1.90-10.92)]. The logistic predictive model of mortality for patients previously admitted to hospital identified male sex, comorbidity, degree of pressure ulcers, and having received home care rehabilitation as independent variables that predict death. Conclusions Comorbidity, hospital admissions and pressure ulcers predict mortality in the following year in EDPLH patients. The subgroup of patients that entered home care programs with a previous record of hospital admission and a high score in our predictive model might be considered as candidates for palliative care. PMID:23947599

  7. Virtual Visits in Home Health Care for Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Husebø, Anne Marie Lunde

    2014-01-01

    Background. This review identifies the content of virtual visits in community nursing services to older adults and explores the manner in which service users and the nurses use virtual visits. Design. An integrative literature review. Method. Data collection comprised a literature search in three databases: Cinahl, Medline, and PubMed. In addition, a manual search of reference lists and expert consultation were performed. A total of 12 articles met the inclusion criteria. The articles were reviewed in terms of study characteristics, service content and utilization, and patient and health care provider experience. Results. Our review shows that in most studies the service is delivered on a daily basis and in combination with in-person visits. The findings suggest that older home-dwelling patients can benefit from virtual visits in terms of enhanced social inclusion and medication compliance. Service users and their nurses found virtual visits satisfactory and suitable for care delivery in home care to the elderly. Evidence for cost-saving benefits of virtual visits was not found. Conclusions. The findings can inform the planning of virtual visits in home health care as a complementary service to in-person visits, in order to meet the increasingly complex needs of older adults living at home. PMID:25506616

  8. Feds come knocking in search of home-care fraud.

    PubMed

    Burns, J

    1995-06-01

    Home care has become a target for federal investigators looking for ways to reduce the amount of money Medicare doles out to fraudulent providers. Companies and executives in the multibillion-dollar industry are facing charges ranging from filing bogus claims to money laundering. PMID:10142723

  9. Methodological challenges of researching in the care home sector.

    PubMed

    Mold, Freda; Roberts, Julia; Fitzpatrick, Joanne; Barriball, Louise

    2008-01-01

    Freda Mold, Julia Roberts, Joanne Fitzpatrick and Louise Barriball address the challenges encountered while undertaking a feasibility study to elicit the views of care home nurse managers on the needs of minority ethnic older residents. It includes advice for those who plan to conduct empirical work in this sector.

  10. Social Support and the Receipt of Home Care Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappell, Neena L.

    1985-01-01

    Compares differences between elderly who use formal home care services and those who do not. Data revealed users as less healthy and less active and as receiving more assistance from both formal and informal sources. Suggests that formal and informal services complement rather than substitute for one another. (NRB)

  11. Use of Informal In-Home Care by Rural Elders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newhouse, Janette K.; McAuley, William J.

    1987-01-01

    Examined use of in-home services by older rural people who received assistance exclusively from informal sources. Results suggest that informal caregiver is essential in community-based care for rural elderly. Having a car, distance to friend, economic resources, physical health, and performance in daily living activities related to use of more…

  12. Family Day Care: How to Provide it in Your Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squibb, Betsy

    Tips, recommendations, ideas, and background information are offered to providers of family day care. After a brief discussion of licensing and registration and a listing of learning activities for young children at home, additional learning activities and materials are described that are considered appropriate for infants, toddlers, preschool…

  13. Predictors of Home Based Long-Term Care Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luppens, Jean; And Others

    An attempt was made to determine predictors of service need, use, and outcome among chronically impaired adults and aged who were living in the community and using the home-based, long term care services of the Chronic Illness Center (CIC) of the Cuyahoga County Hospitals (Ohio). Randomly selected consumer service records (N=200) were coded for…

  14. Educating Home Healthcare Nurses About Heart Failure Self-Care.

    PubMed

    Ekong, Joyce; Radovich, Patti; Brown, Gina

    2016-10-01

    The ability of home healthcare nurses to effectively educate patients with heart failure (HF) on appropriate self-care is key to lowering the hospital readmission rates and other adverse outcomes. Evidence indicates, however, that nurses often lack current knowledge about HF self-care. Furthermore, patient education often fails to produce health literacy. Thus, this educational intervention for home healthcare nurses included content about key aspects of managing HF (e.g., diet, medications), as well as how to use the teach-back method during patient education. Pre- and posttesting (using the Nurses' Knowledge of HF Education Principles Questionnaire) and role-playing were used to evaluate the intervention delivered to 33 home care nurses. Findings exposed knowledge deficits regarding high-sodium foods, symptoms indicating deterioration, problematic weight gain, fluid management, as well as other topics related to HF. The education was partially effective in addressing these nurses' knowledge gaps. The evidence-based education for home healthcare nurses suggests that not only may nurses lack knowledge essential to teaching HF self-care; they may also lack effective patient education skills such as using the teach-back method. PMID:27677064

  15. A joint venture in providing home care and community service.

    PubMed

    Reifsteck, S

    1987-01-01

    General discussion of a joint venture providing home care and community service including future possibilities, business and financial aspects and demand is presented. The author then provides a group practice joint venture model including descriptions of operating structure, contract arrangements and management.

  16. Nursing Home Care Quality: Insights from a Bayesian Network Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodson, Justin; Jang, Wooseung; Rantz, Marilyn

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is twofold. The first purpose is to utilize a new methodology (Bayesian networks) for aggregating various quality indicators to measure the overall quality of care in nursing homes. The second is to provide new insight into the relationships that exist among various measures of quality and how such measures…

  17. [Family competence, an ally in patient home care].

    PubMed

    Siboni Amsellem, Johana

    2016-01-01

    Systemic therapy allows collective awareness with respect to a designated individual problematic. This approach, which can take place at the family home, allows everyone to exploit possible areas of expression and speak freely. Account of a mobile unit care in Paris. PMID:27157195

  18. Income Tax Deductions for Family Day Care Homes. Southeastern Day Care Bulletin No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galambos, Eva C.

    Women who provide day care in their own homes augment their modest earnings in some cases if they take afvantage of deductions permitted under the Internal Revenue regulations concerning use of private homes for business purposes. Where combined family income is at a level where income tax is payable, it may be profitable to calculate all…

  19. Institutional and Home-Based Long-Term Care Alternatives: The 1965-85 Swedish Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Stig; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the Swedish experience in which the official old-age care policy has been to substitute home care for institutional care. Found some substitution of the two forms of long-term care which took place from 1965-75, but thereafter the use of long-term care institutions and home care remained stable or contracted. (Author/ABL)

  20. Time providing care outside visits in a home-based primary care program

    PubMed Central

    Pedowitz, Elizabeth J.; Ornstein, Katherine A.; Farber, Jeffrey; DeCherrie, Linda V.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives Homebound elderly patients with chronic medical illnesses face multiple barriers to care. Primary care physicians (PCPs) devote a significant amount of time to care apart from actual office visits, but there is little quantification of such time by physicians who provide primary care in the home. This article assesses exactly how much time physicians in a large home based primary care (HBPC) program spend providing care outside of home visits. Unreimbursed time, as well as patient and provider-related factors that may contribute to that increased time, are considered. Design Mount Sinai Visiting Doctors (MSVD) providers filled out research forms for every interaction involving care provision outside of home visits. Data collected included: length of interaction, mode, nature, and whom the interaction was with for 3 weeks. Setting/Participants MSVD is an academic home-visit program in Manhattan, NY. All PCPs in MSVD (n=14) agreed to participate. Measurements Time data were analyzed using a comprehensive estimate and conservative estimates to quantify unbillable time. Results Data on 1151 interactions for 537 patients were collected. An average 8.2 hours/week were spent providing non-home visit care for a full-time provider. Using the most conservative estimates, 3.6 hours/week was estimated to be unreimbursed per full-time provider. No significant differences in interaction times were found among dementia vs. non-dementia patients, new vs. non-new patients, and primary-panel vs. covered patients. Conclusion Findings suggest that HBPC providers spend substantial time providing care outside home visits, much of which goes unrecognized in the current reimbursement system. These findings may help guide practice development and creation of new payment systems for HBPC and similar models of care. PMID:24802078

  1. Behavioral Health and Health Care Reform Models: Patient-Centered Medical Home, Health Home, and Accountable Care Organization

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Yuhua; Casalino, Lawrence P.; Pincus, Harold Alan

    2012-01-01

    Discussions of health care delivery and payment reforms have largely been silent about how behavioral health could be incorporated into reform initiatives. This paper draws attention to four patient populations defined by the severity of their behavioral health conditions and insurance status. It discusses the potentials and limitations of three prominent models promoted by the Affordable Care Act to serve populations with behavioral health conditions: the Patient Centered Medical Home, the Health Home initiative within Medicaid, and the Accountable Care Organization. To incorporate behavioral health into health reform, policymakers and practitioners may consider embedding in the reform efforts explicit tools – accountability measures and payment designs – to improve access to and quality of care for patients with behavioral health needs. PMID:23188486

  2. Caring relationships in home-based nursing care - registered nurses' experiences.

    PubMed

    Wälivaara, Britt-Marie; Sävenstedt, Stefan; Axelsson, Karin

    2013-01-01

    The caring relationship between the nurse and the person in need of nursing care has been described as a key concept in nursing and could facilitate health and healing by involving the person's genuine needs. The aim of this study was to explore registered nurses' experiences of their relationships with persons in need of home-based nursing care. Individual interviews with nurses (n=13 registered nurses and 11 district nurses) working in home-based nursing care were performed. A thematic content analysis was used to analyze the transcribed interviews and resulted in the main theme Good nursing care is built on trusting relationship and five sub-themes, Establishing the relationship in home-based nursing care, Conscious efforts maintains the relationship, Reciprocity is a requirement in the relationship, Working in different levels of relationships and Limitations and boundaries in the relationship. A trusting relationship between the nurse and the person in need of healthcare is a prerequisite for good home-based nursing care whether it is based on face-to-face encounters or remote encounters through distance-spanning technology. A trusting relationship could reduce the asymmetry of the caring relationship which could strengthen the person's position. The relationship requires conscious efforts from the nurse and a choice of level of the relationship. The trusting relationship was reciprocal and meant that the nurse had to communicate something about themself as the person needs to know who is entering the home and who is communicating through distance-spanning technology.

  3. Nursing Home Levels of Care: Problems and Alternatives

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Christine E.; Plough, Alonzo L.; Willemain, Thomas R.

    1980-01-01

    Providers and recipients of nursing home care under Medicaid are currently classified into two levels of care to facilitate appropriate placement, care, and reimbursement. The inherent imprecision of the two level system leads to problems of increased cost to Medicaid, lowered quality of care, and inadequate access to care for Medicaid recipients. However, a more refined system is likely to encounter difficulties in carrying out the functions performed by the broad two-level system, including assessment of residents, prescription of needed services, and implementation of service plans. The service type-service intensity classification proposed here can work in combination with a three-part reimbursement rate to encourage more accurate matching of resident needs, services, and Medicaid payment, while avoiding disruption of care. PMID:10309329

  4. A 24-HOUR AMBULATORY ECG MONITORING IN ASSESSMENT OF QT INTERVAL DURATION AND DISPERSION IN ROWERS WITH PHYSIOLOGICAL MYOCARDIAL HYPERTROPHY

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Z.F.; Bilalova, R.R.; Tsibulkin, N.A.; Almetova, R.R.; Mudarisova, R.R.; Ahmetov, I.I.

    2013-01-01

    Myocardial hypertrophy (MH) due to cardiac pathology is characterized by an increase in QT interval duration and dispersion, while the findings for exercise-induced myocardial hypertrophy are contradictory. The majority of published research findings have not explored this relationship, but there have only been a few conducted studies using 24-hour ECG monitoring. The aim of the study was to determine the QT interval duration and dispersion in short-term and 24-hour ECG in endurance athletes with myocardial hypertrophy and without it. Methods: A total of 26 well-trained rowers underwent a resting 12-lead ECG, 24-hour ECG monitoring and echocardiography. Results: Athletes with MH (n = 7) at rest did not show any increase in QTc interval duration and dispersion, or mean and maximal QTc duration in Holter monitoring compared to athletes without MH (n = 19). Left ventricular mass was not significantly correlated with any QTc characteristics. Furthermore, athletes with MH had significantly longer mean QT (P = 0.01) and maximal QT (P = 0.018) intervals in Holter monitoring and higher 24-hour heart rate variability indexes due to stronger vagal effects. Conclusions: The present study demonstrated that athlete's heart syndrome with myocardial hypertrophy as a benign phenomenon does not lead to an increase in QT interval duration, or increases in maximal and mean duration in a 24-hour ECG. An increase in QT interval duration in athletes may have an autonomic nature. PMID:24744494

  5. Caring for Children 24/7, 365--Supporting Families Who Work Non-Traditional Hours.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acord, Phil

    2003-01-01

    Describes the Children's Home Extended Child Care Program in Tennessee, a year-round child-care program operating 24 hours a day. Presents considerations for programs contemplating extending their hours, including operation hours, ages of children served, staffing schedule, serving meals, cleaning the facility, facility security, and funding.…

  6. Case management insider. Home health care--a key component of discharge planning.

    PubMed

    Cesta, Toni

    2014-11-01

    Home care is an important intervention to consider for virtually every patient you discharge to home. By using the strategies discussed above, you can increase your percentage of patients going home with this important service. Remember to assess every patient on admission and to reassess every patient daily. Standardize your assessment questions using a tool that includes social work and home care referral criteria. Finally, consider home care as one of the most important tools in your readmission reduction toolbox!

  7. Case management insider. Home health care--a key component of discharge planning.

    PubMed

    Cesta, Toni

    2014-11-01

    Home care is an important intervention to consider for virtually every patient you discharge to home. By using the strategies discussed above, you can increase your percentage of patients going home with this important service. Remember to assess every patient on admission and to reassess every patient daily. Standardize your assessment questions using a tool that includes social work and home care referral criteria. Finally, consider home care as one of the most important tools in your readmission reduction toolbox! PMID:25330706

  8. Metabolic and renal changes in two athletes during a world 24 hour relay record performance.

    PubMed Central

    Irving, R A; Noakes, T D; van Zyl Smit, R

    1989-01-01

    Metabolic parameters and renal function were studied in two subjects before, during and after they established a world two-man 24 hour relay record. During the race, the athletes expended an estimated 37.747 and 42.880 kJ running at 54 and 61 per cent of maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max). Rectal temperatures reached maxima of 38.6 and 39.2 degrees C respectively during the race. Serum free fatty acid levels peaked at 2108 and 1875 mumol ml-1 after 24 hours; blood glucose levels varied from 4.3-6.5 and 4.9-8.5 mmol.l-1 respectively. Plasma insulin levels fell from 42.9 and 22.7 microU.ml-1 to 11.5 microU.ml-1. Plasma urea, creatinine, beta 2-microglobulin and C-reactive protein concentrations were elevated at the end of the race (to 9.0 and 8.0 mmol.l-1, 119 and 102 mumol.l-1, 3.508 and 3203 micrograms.l-1 and 2.7 and 3.9 mg per cent respectively). Plasma osmolality was altered from 293 and 304 to 302 and 280 mosmol.Kg-1 during the race but increased to 312 and 318 mosmol.Kg-1 the following day probably due to intercompartmental fluid shifts. Plasma creatinine concentration was increased by 38 and 26 per cent due to reduced urinary excretion. Urine flow rate increased 40 and 123 per cent respectively during the race, but creatinine clearance decreased by 38 and 40 per cent. Urine osmolality decreased by 38 and 65 per cent and osmolal clearance decreased by 15 and 16 per cent respectively. Urine sodium excretion was greatly reduced (85 and 90 per cent) on the post-race days (by 88 and 92 per cent on day 2). Both urine total protein and beta2-microglobulin excretion increased during the race (by 89 and 35 per cent and by 334 and 136 per cent respectively), but owing to the increased beta2-microglobulin production renal clearance was unaltered. The changes in renal function were temporary and some aspects of renal tubular function were enhanced during the post-race days. We conclude that, although C-reactive protein concentrations increased sooner and were higher

  9. Setting a new standard of care in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Klaasen, Kathleen; Lamont, Lori; Krishnan, Preetha

    2009-11-01

    The Winnipeg Regional Health Authority's introduction of a full-time nurse practitioner in a 116-bed non-profit nursing home provided an opportunity to explore a collaborative relationship between an NP acting as the primary care provider and a single physician serving as the consultant for complex care and after-hours care. The outcomes were measured in terms of resident and family satisfaction, quality of care indicators and cost effectiveness. Data were collected from pre-existing quality indicators, including a resident/family satisfaction survey, transfers to acute care, and medication use statistics. Unstructured interviews were also conducted with nursing staff and members of the interdisciplinary team. Dramatic improvements in medication use were observed, including a 17 per cent reduction in overall drug costs, a 55 per cent decrease in polypharmacy rates and a 63 per cent reduction in antipsychotic drug use. Transfers to emergency decreased by 20 per cent. Family satisfaction with the quality of health care provided to residents increased by 24 per cent. The collaborative practice of an NP with physician consultation is an effective way of delivering quality care to nursing home residents.

  10. Comparison of 24-hour Holter Monitoring with 14-day Novel Adhesive Patch Electrocardiographic Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Paddy M.; Komatireddy, Ravi; Haaser, Sharon; Topol, Sarah; Sheard, Judith; Encinas, Jackie; Fought, Angela J.; Topol, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cardiac arrhythmias are remarkably common and routinely go undiagnosed because they are often transient and asymptomatic. Effective diagnosis and treatment can substantially reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with cardiac arrhythmias. The Zio Patch (iRhythm Technologies, Inc, San Francisco, Calif) is a novel, single-lead electrocardiographic (ECG), lightweight, Food and Drug Administration–cleared, continuously recording ambulatory adhesive patch monitor suitable for detecting cardiac arrhythmias in patients referred for ambulatory ECG monitoring. METHODS A total of 146 patients referred for evaluation of cardiac arrhythmia underwent simultaneous ambulatory ECG recording with a conventional 24-hour Holter monitor and a 14-day adhesive patch monitor. The primary outcome of the study was to compare the detection arrhythmia events over total wear time for both devices. Arrhythmia events were defined as detection of any 1 of 6 arrhythmias, including supraventricular tachycardia, atrial fibrillation/flutter, pause greater than 3 seconds, atrioventricular block, ventricular tachycardia, or polymorphic ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation. McNemar’s tests were used to compare the matched pairs of data from the Holter and the adhesive patch monitor. RESULTS Over the total wear time of both devices, the adhesive patch monitor detected 96 arrhythmia events compared with 61 arrhythmia events by the Holter monitor (P < .001). CONCLUSIONS Over the total wear time of both devices, the adhesive patch monitor detected more events than the Holter monitor. Prolonged duration monitoring for detection of arrhythmia events using single-lead, less-obtrusive, adhesive-patch monitoring platforms could replace conventional Holter monitoring in patients referred for ambulatory ECG monitoring. PMID:24384108

  11. Sleep-Disordered Breathing and 24-Hour Blood Pressure Pattern Among Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    White, William B.; Kutner, Michael; Ouslander, Joseph G.; Bliwise, Donald L.

    2009-01-01

    Background To examine the association between sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) and 24-hour blood pressure (BP) pattern among community-dwelling older adults. Methods A convenience sample of 70 community-dwelling older adults, recruited from senior housing, community centers, and learning centers, were admitted to General Clinical Research Center, Emory University Hospital, Atlanta, Ga. Information regarding demographic and clinical history was obtained using questionnaires. Twenty-four–hour BP monitoring in supine position was performed using Spacelabs model 20207. Breathing during sleep was monitored with the use of a modified sleep recording system (Embletta, PDS), which monitors nasal and oral airflow, chest and abdominal movements, and pulse oximetry. Night time–daytime (night-day) BP ratio (average night-time BP divided by daytime BP) was calculated both for systolic and diastolic BPs. Results Sixty-nine participants, mean age 74.9 ± 6.4 years (41 [57%] women), completed the study. The mean apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was 13 ± 13 per hour of sleep, and 20 participants (29%) had AHI ≥15 per hour of sleep, indicating moderate to severe SDB. Moderate to severe SDB (AHI ≥15 per hour of sleep) was significantly associated with nocturnal hypertension, whereas there was no statistically significant difference in wake-time BP between those with and without moderate to severe SDB. Stepwise multiple regressions showed that AHI independently predicted increased night-day systolic and night-day diastolic BP ratio, even after controlling for nocturia frequency. Conclusions The results indicate increased BP load associated with increased AHI in this group of older adults. This increased BP load may contribute to increased hypertension-related morbidity and disease burden. PMID:19196901

  12. Methodology for adding glycemic index and glycemic load values to 24-hour dietary recall database

    PubMed Central

    Olendzki, Barbara C.; Ma, Yunsheng; Culver, Annie L.; Ockene, Ira S.; Griffith, Jennifer A.; Hafner, Andrea R.; Hebert, James R.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives We describe a method of adding the glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) values to the nutrient database of the 24-hour dietary recall interview (24HR), a widely used dietary assessment. We also calculated daily GI and GL values from the 24HR. Methods Subjects were 641 healthy adults from central Massachusetts who completed 9067 24HRs. The 24HR-derived food data were matched to the International Table of Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load Values. The GI values for specific foods not in the table were estimated against similar foods according to physical and chemical factors that determine GI. Mixed foods were disaggregated into individual ingredients. Results Of 1261 carbohydrate-containing foods in the database, GI values of 602 foods were obtained from a direct match (47.7%), accounting for 22.36% of dietary carbohydrate. GI values from 656 foods (52.1%) were estimated, contributing to 77.64% of dietary carbohydrate. The GI values from three unknown foods (0.2%) could not be assigned. The average daily GI was 84 (SD 5.1, white bread as referent) and the average GL was 196 (SD 63). Conclusion Using this methodology for adding GI and GL values to nutrient databases, it is possible to assess associations between GI and/or GL and body weight and chronic disease outcomes (diabetes, cancer, heart disease). This method can be used in clinical and survey research settings where 24HRs are a practical means for assessing diet. The implications for using this methodology compel a broader evaluation of diet with disease outcomes. PMID:17029903

  13. Usability of a smartphone food picture app for assisting 24-hour dietary recall: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Benjamin T.; Bilgiç, Pelin; Orr, Barron J.; Suzuki, Asuka; Kim, Angela Sarah; Merchant, Nirav C.; Roe, Denise J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES The Recaller app was developed to help individuals record their food intakes. This pilot study evaluated the usability of this new food picture application (app), which operates on a smartphone with an embedded camera and Internet capability. SUBJECTS/METHODS Adults aged 19 to 28 years (23 males and 22 females) were assigned to use the Recaller app on six designated, nonconsecutive days in order to capture an image of each meal and snack before and after eating. The images were automatically time-stamped and uploaded by the app to the Recaller website. A trained nutritionist administered a 24-hour dietary recall interview 1 day after food images were taken. Participants' opinions of the Recaller app and its usability were determined by a follow-up survey. As an evaluation indicator of usability, the number of images taken was analyzed and multivariate Poisson regression used to model the factors determining the number of images sent. RESULTS A total of 3,315 food images were uploaded throughout the study period. The median number of images taken per day was nine for males and 13 for females. The survey showed that the Recaller app was easy to use, and 50% of the participants would consider using the app daily. Predictors of a higher number of images were as follows: greater interval (hours) between the first and last food images sent, weekend, and female. CONCLUSIONS The results of this pilot study provide valuable information for understanding the usability of the Recaller smartphone food picture app as well as other similarly designed apps. This study provides a model for assisting nutrition educators in their collection of food intake information by using tools available on smartphones. This innovative approach has the potential to improve recall of foods eaten and monitoring of dietary intake in nutritional studies. PMID:25861429

  14. Implementing a quality improvement programme in palliative care in care homes: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background An increasing number of older people reach the end of life in care homes. The aim of this study is to explore the perceived benefits of, and barriers to, implementation of the Gold Standards Framework for Care Homes (GSFCH), a quality improvement programme in palliative care. Methods Nine care homes involved in the GSFCH took part. We conducted semi-structured interviews with nine care home managers, eight nurses, nine care assistants, eleven residents and seven of their family members. We used the Framework approach to qualitative analysis. The analysis was deductive based on the key tasks of the GSFCH, the 7Cs: communication, coordination, control of symptoms, continuity, continued learning, carer support, and care of the dying. This enabled us to consider benefits of, and barriers to, individual components of the programme, as well as of the programme as a whole. Results Perceived benefits of the GSFCH included: improved symptom control and team communication; finding helpful external support and expertise; increasing staff confidence; fostering residents' choice; and boosting the reputation of the home. Perceived barriers included: increased paperwork; lack of knowledge and understanding of end of life care; costs; and gaining the cooperation of GPs. Many of the tools and tasks in the GSFCH focus on improving communication. Participants described effective communication within the homes, and with external providers such as general practitioners and specialists in palliative care. However, many had experienced problems with general practitioners. Although staff described the benefits of supportive care registers, coding predicted stage of illness and advance care planning, which included improved communication, some felt the need for more experience of using these, and there were concerns about discussing death. Conclusions Most of the barriers described by participants are relevant to other interventions to improve end of life care in care homes

  15. Day Care Homes: A Pennsylvania Profile. Center for Human Services Development Report No. 18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Donald L.

    This report presents a preliminary profile of home day care in Pennsylvania. Information was gathered through extensive questionnaires and home observations which occurred during site visits to a geographically-representative sample of 162 licensed or approved day care homes. In the profile, comparisons are made between 146 homes which are…

  16. VNA of Boston addresses cultural barriers in home-based care.

    PubMed

    Cuthbert-Allman, C; Conti, P A

    1995-12-01

    Home care professionals know that communication is the key to successful treatment. But what if the patient speaks a different language? One home care agency addresses this problem with a culturally diverse staff and access to interpretation services. PMID:10153855

  17. 75 FR 15496 - Agency Information Collection (Care Coordination Home Telehealth (CCHT)) Activity Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Care Coordination Home Telehealth (CCHT)) Activity Under OMB Review...).'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Care Coordination Home Telehealth (CCHT) Patient Satisfaction Survey, VA...

  18. 78 FR 53506 - Proposed Information Collection (Care Coordination Home Telehealth (CCHT) Patient Satisfaction...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Care Coordination Home Telehealth (CCHT) Patient Satisfaction... forms of information technology. Titles: Care Coordination Home Telehealth (CCHT) Patient...

  19. 75 FR 2595 - Proposed Information Collection (Care Coordination Home Telehealth (CCHT) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Care Coordination Home Telehealth (CCHT) Activity: Comment... use of other forms of information technology. Title: Care Coordination Home Telehealth (CCHT)...

  20. Home Health Care With Telemonitoring Improves Health Status for Older Adults with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Madigan, Elizabeth; Schmotzer, Brian J.; Struk, Cynthia J.; DiCarlo, Christina M.; Kikano, George; Piña, Ileana L.; Boxer, Rebecca S.

    2014-01-01

    Home telemonitoring can augment home health care services during a patient's transition from hospital to home. Home health care agencies commonly use telemonitors for patients with heart failure although studies have shown mixed results in the use of telemonitors to reduce rehospitalizations. This randomized trial investigated if older patients with heart failure admitted to home health care following a hospitalization would have a reduction in rehospitalizations and improved health status if they received telemonitoring. Patients were followed up to 180 days post-discharge from home health care services. Results showed no difference in the time to rehospitalizations or emergency visits between those who received a telemonitoring vs. usual care. Older heart failure patients who received telemonitoring had better health status by home health care discharge than those who received usual care. Therefore for older adults with heart failure telemonitoring may be important adjunct to home health care services to improve health status. PMID:23438509

  1. Lack of ear care knowledge in nursing homes

    PubMed Central

    Solheim, Jorunn; Shiryaeva, Olga; Kvaerner, Kari J

    2016-01-01

    Background Rising life expectancy means an increase in the number of elderly people with hearing loss in the population. Many elderly people live in nursing homes, with varying care needs. A substantial proportion of these people will need help with their hearing aids and other hearing devices. Objective The objective of the study has been to assess the knowledge, experience, skills, competence, and need for information of staff at nursing homes in relation to residents’ hearing loss and hearing aids. Materials and methods One hundred and ninety-five employees at seven nursing homes participated in the study. The main approach was a descriptive study, using questionnaires. Results The main findings are that 73% of informants found that many residents need help with their hearing aids. Only one-tenth report that they know enough about the residents’ hearing aids. Almost four out of five informants find that the residents become socially isolated as a result of hearing loss. Seventy-eight percent agree to some extent that more residents would benefit from hearing aids. Conclusion Staff at nursing homes have insufficient knowledge about hearing loss and hearing aids. Increased focus on the elderly with hearing impairment in nursing homes is needed. Contact between nursing homes and audiological specialists should be improved to best followup hearing loss and hearing aids. PMID:27757038

  2. Caring for veterans returning home from Middle Eastern wars.

    PubMed

    Wands, Lisa Marie

    2011-04-01

    After serving at war, veterans work to resume a normal life at home. For some, the difficulties of reintegration are compounded by significant physical injury or psychological trauma, such as traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder. It is equally important to attend to the all-encompassing experience of reintegration for any veteran. The transition is deeply embedded in the context of relationships and, as such, nurses can provide support. Nurses can find guidance on how to better connect with veterans returning home from war in Swanson's work on caring.

  3. A new model for home care for COPD.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Albert

    2004-01-01

    A new model for home care of COPD patients is investigated, as a part of a coordinated provision model across levels of care. In the Spanish pilot of the e-Vital project, relevant vital signs for COPD are closely monitored and used for early detection of deterioration in the state of the patient and all prompt treatment. This can also reduce the need for in-person check-ups and re-admission to hospital. Later analysis aims to determine whether the system has significant economic impact, and whether it will provide more convenience for patients and healthcare professionals. The present trial focuses on the impact of community based nurses visiting each patient in the home as a part of this shared care. The visits are part of the regular follow-up for patients with chronic conditions who belong to any of the home care programs currently available in our institution. In each one of these visits, the nurse performs a number of tasks in order to assess patient status. Vital signs are collected and may be transmitted to the data monitor centre automatically using 2.5-3G technology. Sensors communicate through a Body Area Network (BAN) with a PDA configured to display the data and transfer it to the server using GPRS. Patients can be trained to use the equipment on their own. Results so far are encouraging. In the previous phase, a similar set-up without monitoring facilities at the patient's home showed improvements in several clinical indicators (ER visits, SGRQ, Quality of life, LOS and costs) for a home hospitalisation program and in a prevention of exacerbation program. The current set-up aims at increasing such benefits and further extending the target population. PMID:15747942

  4. Home Visiting Programs: What the Primary Care Clinician Should Know.

    PubMed

    Finello, Karen Moran; Terteryan, Araksi; Riewerts, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    Responsibilities for primary care clinicians are rapidly expanding ascomplexities in families' lives create increased disparities in health and developmental outcomes for young children. Despite the demands on primary care clinicians to promote health in the context of complex family and community factors, most primary care clinicians are operating in an environment of limited training and a shortage of resources for supporting families. Partnerships with evidence-based home visiting programs for very young children and their families can provide a resource that will help to reduce the impact of adverse early childhood experiences and facilitate health equity. Home visiting programs in the United States are typically voluntary and designed to be preventative in nature, although families are usually offered services based on significant risk criteria since the costs associated with universal approaches have been considered prohibitive. Programs may be funded within the health (physical orbehavioral/mental health), child welfare, early education, or early intervention systems or by private foundation dollars focused primarily on oneof the above systems (e.g., health), with a wide range of outcomes targeted by the programs and funders. Services may be primarily focused on the child, the parent, or parent-child interactions. Services include the development of targeted and individualized intervention strategies, better coaching of parents, and improved modeling of interactions that may assist struggling families. This paper provides a broad overview ofthe history of home visiting, theoretical bases of home visiting programs, key components of evidence-based models, outcomes typically targeted, research on effectiveness, cost information, challenges and benefits of home visiting, and funding/sustainability concerns. Significance for primary care clinicians isdescribed specifically and information relevant for clinicians is emphasized throughout the paper. PMID:26872870

  5. Deficiencies In Care At Nursing Homes And Racial & Ethnic Disparities Across Homes Declined, 2006–11

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yue; Harrington, Charlene; Temkin-Greener, Helena; Kai, You; Cai, Xueya; Cen, Xi; Mukamel, Dana B.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the increased use of nursing homes by minority residents, nursing home care remains highly segregated. Compared to whites, racial/ethnic minorities tend to be cared for in facilities with limited clinical and financial resources, low nurse staffing levels, and a relatively high number of care deficiency citations. We assessed the trends from 2006 to 2011 in those citations and in disparities across facilities with four different concentrations of racial/ethnic minority residents. We found that the number of health care–related deficiencies and the percentage of facilities with serious deficiencies decreased over time for all four facility groups. From 2006 to 2011, the average annual number of health care–related deficiencies declined from 7.4 to 6.8 for facilities with low minority concentrations (< 5 percent) and from 10.6 to 9.4 for facilities with high minority concentrations (≥ 35 percent). In multivariable analyses, across-site disparities in health care-related deficiencies and in life-safety deficiencies narrowed over time. We also found that increasing the Medicaid payment rate might help improve both overall quality and disparities, but state case-mix payment approaches might worsen both. These results suggest the need to reevaluate quality improvement and cost containment efforts to better foster quality and equity of nursing home care. PMID:26153308

  6. The Impact of Using Different Methods to Assess Completeness of 24-Hour Urine Collection on Estimating Dietary Sodium.

    PubMed

    Wielgosz, Andreas; Robinson, Christopher; Mao, Yang; Jiang, Ying; Campbell, Norm R C; Muthuri, Stella; Morrison, Howard

    2016-06-01

    The standard for population-based surveillance of dietary sodium intake is 24-hour urine testing; however, this may be affected by incomplete urine collection. The impact of different indirect methods of assessing completeness of collection on estimated sodium ingestion has not been established. The authors enlisted 507 participants from an existing community study in 2009 to collect 24-hour urine samples. Several methods of assessing completeness of urine collection were tested. Mean sodium intake varied between 3648 mg/24 h and 7210 mg/24 h depending on the method used. Excluding urine samples collected for longer or shorter than 24 hours increased the estimated urine sodium excretion, even when corrections for the variation in timed collections were applied. Until an accurate method of indirectly assessing completeness of urine collection is identified, the gold standard of administering para-aminobenzoic acid is recommended. Efforts to ensure participants collect complete urine samples are also warranted.

  7. When children cannot remain home: foster family care and kinship care.

    PubMed

    Berrick, J D

    1998-01-01

    Despite the best efforts of child welfare agencies, community agencies, and individuals, some children are not safe in their homes and must be placed in substitute care settings by child welfare authorities. Increasingly, as this article points out, child welfare agencies are placing children in the homes of their relatives rather than in traditional foster family homes (31% of all children in out-of-home care in the early 1990s were living with kin). This article discusses how such factors as the availability of foster homes, the demand for foster care, attitudes toward the extended families of troubled parents, and policies regarding payment for the costs of care have contributed to the rapid growth in kinship foster care. It discusses differences in the personal characteristics of kin and traditional foster parents and in the supports provided to the caregivers by child welfare agencies. Research findings suggest that kinship homes can promote the child welfare goals of protecting children and supporting families, but they are less likely to facilitate the prompt achievement of legal permanence for children. To forge a coherent policy toward kinship caregivers, officials must balance the natural strengths of informal, private exchanges among family members with the power of government agencies to provide both resources and oversight.

  8. Psychiatric home care: a new tool for crisis intervention.

    PubMed

    Spiro, A H

    1994-03-01

    The cost of psychiatric care has been rapidly increasing in recent years. Between 1984 and 1987, there was a 46 percent increase in psychiatric hospitals beds and a 60 percent increase in psychiatric units in general hospitals. This reflected a recognition by many health care systems that psychiatric patients were a good source of revenue. With this push toward more and more inpatient programs, crucial aspects of psychiatric care were left behind. Specifically, the limitations of inpatient therapy have not been recognized. Within the past five years, a new program has been developed and pioneered to use home care to prevent psychiatric hospitalizations and to also prevent the difficult transitions for psychiatric patients. Over a two-year period, this program was studied for its impact on the quality and cost of psychiatric care.

  9. Psychiatric home care: a new tool for crisis intervention.

    PubMed

    Spiro, A H

    1994-03-01

    The cost of psychiatric care has been rapidly increasing in recent years. Between 1984 and 1987, there was a 46 percent increase in psychiatric hospitals beds and a 60 percent increase in psychiatric units in general hospitals. This reflected a recognition by many health care systems that psychiatric patients were a good source of revenue. With this push toward more and more inpatient programs, crucial aspects of psychiatric care were left behind. Specifically, the limitations of inpatient therapy have not been recognized. Within the past five years, a new program has been developed and pioneered to use home care to prevent psychiatric hospitalizations and to also prevent the difficult transitions for psychiatric patients. Over a two-year period, this program was studied for its impact on the quality and cost of psychiatric care. PMID:10132548

  10. Executive Functions are not Affected by 24 Hours of Sleep Deprivation: A Color-Word Stroop Task Study

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Abhinav; Mittal, Tushar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sleep is an important factor affecting cognitive performance. Sleep deprivation results in fatigue, lack of concentration, confusion and sleepiness along with anxiety, depression and irritability. Sleep deprivation can have serious consequences in professions like armed forces and medicine where quick decisions and actions need to be taken. Color-Word Stroop task is one of the reliable tests to assess attention and it analyzes the processing of information in two dimensions i.e., reading of words and naming of colour. The evidence regarding the effect of sleep deprivation on Stroop interference is conflicting. The present study evaluated the effect of 24 hours of sleep deprivation on reaction time and interference in Stroop task. Materials and Methods: The present study was done on 30 healthy male medical student volunteers in the age group of 18-25 years after taking their consent and clearance from Institute Ethics Committee. Recordings of Stroop task were at three times: baseline (between 7-9 am), after 12 hours (7-9 pm) and after 24 hours (7-9 am, next day). The subjects were allowed to perform normal daily activities. Results: The study revealed a significant increase in reaction time after 24 hours of sleep deprivation in comparison to baseline and after 12 hours of sleep deprivation. There was no significant change in interference and facilitation after sleep deprivation in comparison to baseline. The number of errors also did not show any significant change after sleep deprivation. Conclusion: The study indicated that there was slowing of responses without change in executive functions after 24 hours of sleep deprivation. It is probable that 24 hours of sleep deprivation does not bring about change in areas of brain affecting executive functions in healthy individuals who have normal sleep cycle. The present study indicated that in professions like armed forces and medicine working 24 hours at a stretch can lead to decrease in motor responses

  11. Sex differences in 24-hour ultra-marathon performance - A retrospective data analysis from 1977 to 2012

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Laura; Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Knechtle, Beat; Rosemann, Thomas; Lepers, Romuald

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined the changes in running performance and the sex differences between women and men in 24-hour ultra-marathons held worldwide from 1977 to 2012. METHOD: Changes in running speed and ages of the fastest 24-hour ultra-marathoners were determined using single- and multi-level regression analyses. RESULTS: From 1977 to 2012, the sex differences in 24-hour ultra-marathon performance were 4.6±0.5% for all women and men, 13.3% for the annual fastest finishers, 12.9±0.8% for the top 10 and 12.2±0.4% for the top 100 finishers. Over time, the sex differences decreased for the annual fastest finishers to 17%, for the annual 10 fastest finishers to 11.3±2.2% and for the annual 100 fastest finishers to 14.2±1.8%. For the annual fastest men, the age of peak running speed increased from 23 years (1977) to 53 years (2012). For the annual 10 and 100 fastest men, the ages of peak running speed were unchanged at 40.9±2.5 and 44.4±1.1 years, respectively. For women, the ages of the annual fastest, the annual 10 fastest and the annual 100 fastest remained unchanged at 43.0±6.1, 43.2±2.6 and 43.8±0.8 years, respectively. CONCLUSION: The gap between the annual top, annual top 10 and annual top 100 female and male 24-hour ultra-marathoners decreased over the last 35 years; however, it seems unlikely that women will outrun men in 24-hour ultra-marathons in the near future. The fastest 24-hour ultra-marathoners worldwide achieved their peak performance at the age of master athletes (>35 years). PMID:24473558

  12. Treatment of burns in the first 24 hours: simple and practical guide by answering 10 questions in a step-by-step form

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Residents in training, medical students and other staff in surgical sector, emergency room (ER) and intensive care unit (ICU) or Burn Unit face a multitude of questions regarding burn care. Treatment of burns is not always straightforward. Furthermore, National and International guidelines differ from one region to another. On one hand, it is important to understand pathophysiology, classification of burns, surgical treatment, and the latest updates in burn science. On the other hand, the clinical situation for treating these cases needs clear guidelines to cover every single aspect during the treatment procedure. Thus, 10 questions have been organised and discussed in a step-by-step form in order to achieve the excellence of education and the optimal treatment of burn injuries in the first 24 hours. These 10 questions will clearly discuss referral criteria to the burn unit, primary and secondary survey, estimation of the total burned surface area (%TBSA) and the degree of burns as well as resuscitation process, routine interventions, laboratory tests, indications of Bronchoscopy and special considerations for Inhalation trauma, immediate consultations and referrals, emergency surgery and admission orders. Understanding and answering the 10 questions will not only cover the management process of Burns during the first 24 hours but also seems to be an interactive clear guide for education purpose. PMID:22583548

  13. Caring from Home: Addressing Barriers to Family Child Care Expansion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Citizens' Committee for Children of New York, NY.

    This study involved focus groups with New York City family day care providers to determine difficulties they experienced in three areas: economic barriers, payment and regulatory barriers, and barriers to workforce development. Overall, providers had difficulty making wages that allowed them to provide for themselves and their families. They…

  14. Winning at Child Caring: Easier Ways with Young Children in Child Care Centers, Homes and Malls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simons, Bette

    This booklet is a compilation of articles from a column in the "Warner Center News" written by an experienced early childhood educator on various topics related to child care. The brief articles describe the problems and pleasures that preschool children bring to child care centers, homes, markets, and malls. The articles are grouped into four…

  15. Diarrhea & Child Care: Controlling Diarrhea in Out-of-Home Child Care. NCEDL Spotlights, No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churchill, Robin B.; Pickering, Larry K.

    This report, the fourth in the National Center for Early Development and Learning's (NCEDL) "Spotlights" series, is based on excerpts from a paper presented during a "Research into Practice in Infant/Toddler Care" synthesis conference in fall 1997. The report addresses controlling diarrhea in out-of-home child care. The report notes that the rate…

  16. Who Will Deliver the Care? A Study of the Availability of Home Care Professionals in Ohio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Aging, Columbus.

    A shortage of home care paraprofessionals in Ohio is causing concern about the quality and continuity of care. Worker turnover is high, ranging from 30-70 percent. Most paraprofessionals share several traits: middle-aged women; single, with dependents; sole breadwinners in their households; wage earners of less than $11,000 per year; part-time…

  17. A Comprehensive, Multidisciplinary Approach to Providing Health Care for Children in Out-of-Home Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blatt, Steven D.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Describes ENHANCE (Excellence in Health Care for Abused and Neglected Children) of Onondaga County, New York, a comprehensive, multidisciplinary clinic for children in out-of-home care involving pediatrics, child psychology, nursing, child development, and child welfare components. Also presents profiles of the health, mental health, and…

  18. Home Health Care and Patterns of Subsequent VA and Medicare Health Care Utilization for Veterans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Houtven, Courtney Harold; Jeffreys, Amy S.; Coffman, Cynthia J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The Veterans Affairs or VA health care system is in the process of significantly expanding home health care (HOC) nationwide. We describe VA HHC use in 2003 for all VA HHC users from 2002; we examine whether VA utilization across a broad spectrum of services differed for a sample of VA HHC users and their propensity-score-matched…

  19. Correlates of Suicide among Home Health Care Utilizers Who Died by Suicide and Community Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Jennifer L.; Bruce, Martha L.; Conwell, Yeates

    2006-01-01

    Home health care patients often have several late-life risk factors for suicide and constitute a high risk group for suicidal behaviors. In this study, we examined the characteristics of 14 older adult home health care utilizers who died by suicide and four community controls who used similar services. Both groups of home health care utilizers had…

  20. Home Care Quality Indicators (HCQIS) Based on the MDS-HC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirdes, John P.; Fries, Brant E.; Morris, John N.; Ikegami, Naoki; Zimmerman, David; Dalby, Dawn M.; Aliaga, Pablo; Hammer, Suzanne; Jones, Richard

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to develop home care quality indicators (HCQIs) to be used by a variety of audiences including consumers, agencies, regulators, and policy makers to support evidence-based decision making related to the quality of home care services. Design and Methods: Data from 3,041 Canadian and 11,252 U.S. home care clients assessed…

  1. Back disorders and lumbar load in nursing staff in geriatric care: a comparison of home-based care and nursing homes

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Back pain is one of the most frequent complaints in the nursing profession. Thus, the 12-month prevalence of pain in the lumbar spine in nursing staff is as high as 76%. Only a few representative studies have assessed the prevalence rates of back pain and its risk factors among nursing staff in nursing homes in comparison to staff in home-based care facilities. The present study accordingly investigates the prevalence in the lumbar and cervical spine and determines the physical workload to lifting and caring in geriatric care. Methods 1390 health care workers in nursing homes and home care participated in this cross sectional survey. The nursing staff members were examined by occupational physicians according to the principals of the multistep diagnosis of musculoskeletal disorders. Occupational exposure to daily care activities with patient transfers was measured by a standardised questionnaire. The lumbar load was calculated with the Mainz-Dortmund dose model. Information on ergonomic conditions were recorded from the management of the nursing homes. Comparisons of all outcome variables were made between both care settings. Results Complete documentation, including the findings from the occupational physicians and the questionnaire, was available for 41%. Staff in nursing homes had more often positive orthopaedic findings than staff in home care. At the same time the values calculated for lumbar load were found to be significant higher in staff in nursing homes than in home-based care: 45% vs. 6% were above the reference value. Nursing homes were well equipped with technical lifting aids, though their provision with assistive advices is unsatisfactory. Situation in home care seems worse, especially as the staff often has to get by without assistance. Conclusions Future interventions should focus on counteracting work-related lumbar load among staff in nursing homes. Equipment and training in handling of assistive devices should be improved especially

  2. Circadian (about 24-hour) variation in malondialdehyde content and catalase activity of mouse erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Sani, Mamane; Sebai, Hichem; Ghanem-Boughanmi, Néziha; Boughattas, Naceur A; Ben-Attia, Mossadok

    2015-01-01

    Lipid peroxidation is a part of normal metabolism that may cause biological molecule damage leading to the formation of several specific metabolites that include aldehydes of variable chains, such as malondialdehyde (MDA). These biological effects are controlled in vivo by a wide spectrum of enzymatic and non-enzymatic defense mechanisms among which catalase (CAT) is considered as an important regulator of oxidative stress. The present study aimed to investigate the possible relationship between the temporal patterns of the formation of MDA and the activity of CAT in the erythrocytes of mice. Twenty-four-hour studies were performed on male Swiss albino mice, 12 weeks old, synchronized to a 12:12 light: dark cycle for 3 weeks. Different and comparable groups of animals (n = 10) were sacrificed at an interval of 4 hours (1, 5, 9, 13, 17, and 21 hours after light onset (HALO)). The levels of erythrocyte MDA concentration and CAT activity both significantly (analysis of variance: F = 6.4, P < 0.002) varied according to the time of sampling under non-stressed conditions. The characteristics of the waveform describing the temporal patterns differed between the two studied variables, e.g. MDA content showing one peak (≅21 HALO) and CAT activity showing three peaks (≅9, 17, and 21 HALO). Cosinor analysis revealed a significant (adjusted Cosinor: P ≤ 0.018) circadian (τ ≅ 24 hours) rhythm in MDA level and no statistically significant rhythmicity in CAT activity. The differences and the absence of correlation between the curve patterns of erythrocyte MDA content and CAT activity under physiological conditions are hypothesized to explain that variation in lipid peroxidation may depend on several factors. Moreover, the identification of peak/trough levels of MDA accumulation in erythrocytes may reflect the degree of oxidative stress in these blood cells. In addition, the observed significant time-of-day effect suggests that, in both clinical and scientific

  3. Analysis of 24-Hour Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring in Children With Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Kun-Tai; Chiu, Shuenn-Nan; Weng, Wen-Chin; Lee, Pei-Lin; Hsu, Wei-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In the present study, we aimed to verify associations between ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) and pediatric obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in a hospital-based population. This was a cross-sectional observational study on children aged 4 to 16 years with OSA-related symptoms from a tertiary referral medical center. All children received overnight polysomnography and 24-hour recording of ABP. Severity of the disease was classified as primary snoring (apnea-hypopnea index, AHI <1), mild OSA (AHI 1–5), and moderate-to-severe OSA (AHI >5). For 195 children enrolled in this study (mean age, 7.8 ± 3.4 years; 69% boy), ABP increased as severity of OSA increased. During daytime, children with moderate-to-severe OSA had significantly higher systolic blood pressure (BP) (117.0 ± 12.7 vs 110.5 ± 9.3 mmHg), mean arterial pressure (MAP) (85.6 ± 8.1 vs 81.6 ± 6.8 mmHg), and diastolic BP load (12.0 ± 9.6 vs 8.4 ± 10.9 mmHg) compared with children with primary snoring. During nighttime, children with moderate-to-severe OSA had significantly higher systolic BP (108.6 ± 15.0 vs 100.0 ± 9.4 mmHg), MAP (75.9 ± 9.6 vs 71.1 ± 7.0 mmHg), systolic BP load (44.0 ± 32.6 vs 26.8 ± 24.5 mmHg), systolic BP index (0.5 ± 13.1 vs −6.8 ± 8.5 mmHg), and higher prevalence of systolic hypertension (47.6% vs 14.7 %) compared with children with primary snoring. Multiple linear regression analyses revealed an independent association between AHI and nighttime systolic BP and MAP after adjusting for adiposity variables. This large hospital-based study showed that children with moderate-to-severe OSA had a higher ABP compared with children who were primary snorers. As elevated BP in childhood predicts future cardiovascular risks, children with severe OSA should be treated properly to prevent further adverse cardiovascular outcomes. PMID:26448004

  4. Palliative and end of life care for people living with dementia in care homes: part 1.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Gary; Agnelli, Joanne; McGreevy, Jessie; Diamond, Monica; Roble, Herlindina; McShane, Elaine; Strain, Joanne

    2016-06-22

    The terms palliative and end of life care are often used interchangeably and healthcare practitioners may perceive that palliative care is only appropriate during the terminal stages of an illness. This article, the first of two parts, provides healthcare practitioners with an overview of the concept of palliative care. It explains how this can be differentiated from end of life care and how it should be commenced in a timely manner, so that people who are living with dementia can contribute to the planning of their future care and death. The policies and tools used in the provision of palliative and end of life care are discussed, including advance care planning and The Gold Standards Framework. The article is framed in a care home context; there is little research about how to optimise palliative care for people living with dementia in care homes. The second part of this article will discuss end of life care and the best practices for providing end of life care, including nutrition and hydration, oral hygiene, pain management and spiritual care. PMID:27332611

  5. Competition and quality in home health care markets.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyoungrae; Polsky, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    Market-based solutions are often proposed to improve health care quality; yet evidence on the role of competition in quality in non-hospital settings is sparse. We examine the relationship between competition and quality in home health care. This market is different from other markets in that service delivery takes place in patients' homes, which implies low costs of market entry and exit for agencies. We use 6 years of panel data for Medicare beneficiaries during the early 2000s. We identify the competition effect from within-market variation in competition over time. We analyze three quality measures: functional improvements, the number of home health visits, and discharges without hospitalization. We find that the relationship between competition and home health quality is nonlinear and its pattern differs by quality measure. Competition has positive effects on functional improvements and the number of visits in most ranges, but in the most competitive markets, functional outcomes and the number of visits slightly drop. Competition has a negative effect on discharges without hospitalization that is strongest in the most competitive markets. This finding is different from prior research on hospital markets and suggests that market-specific environments should be considered in developing polices to promote competition.

  6. Regulation and mindful resident care in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S; Plowman, Donde; Bailey, Donald; Corazzini, Kirsten; Utley-Smith, Queen; Ammarell, Natalie; Toles, Mark; Anderson, Ruth

    2010-09-01

    Regulatory oversight is intended to improve the health outcomes of nursing home residents, yet evidence suggests that regulations can inhibit mindful staff behaviors that are associated with effective care. We explored the influence of regulations on mindful staff behavior as it relates to resident health outcomes, and offer a theoretical explanation of why regulations sometimes enhance mindfulness and other times inhibit it. We analyzed data from an in-depth, multiple-case study including field notes, interviews, and documents collected in eight nursing homes. We completed a conceptual/thematic description using the concept of mindfulness to reframe the observations. Shared facility mission strongly impacted staff perceptions of the purpose and utility of regulations. In facilities with a resident-centered culture, regulations increased mindful behavior, whereas in facilities with a cost-focused culture, regulations reduced mindful care practices. When managers emphasized the punitive aspects of regulation we observed a decrease in mindful practices in all facilities. PMID:20479137

  7. Quality improvement for feeding assistance care in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Sandra F

    2007-03-01

    Unintentional weight loss is a common problem among nursing home residents and one that can lead to adverse and costly clinical outcomes. Observational studies have shown that residents often receive inadequate and poor-quality feeding assistance during meals, and residents consume few calories between meals from oral liquid nutritional supplements or other food and fluid items. Improvements in the adequacy and quality of feeding assistance either during or between meals have been shown to improve residents' daily oral food and fluid consumption and promote weight gain. However, these feeding assistance interventions require significantly more time than nursing home staff currently spend on feeding assistance care activities. Alternative staffing models are explored through the recent federal "paid feeding assistant" regulation and an observational tool is described for use in practice to improve feeding assistance care.

  8. Supporting patient autonomy: decision making in home care.

    PubMed

    Davitt, J K; Kaye, L W

    1996-01-01

    This study examines the policies and procedures that home health care agencies have developed to handle the incapacitated patient and life-sustaining treatment decisions. Data collected from a survey of 154 home health care agency directors and interviews with 92 local agency staff (including nurses and social workers) and 67 patients confirmed that directors, staff, and patients agree that patients are informed about their legal rights. When asked about specific rights, fewer patients were aware of their right to execute an advance directive, and even fewer patients had actually executed one. Only 67 percent of agencies reported having existing policies on advance directives and life-sustaining treatment decisions, whereas 41.5 percent had policies on how to handle the patient with questionable decision-making capacity. Consistent policies are needed for social workers, nurses, and other staff to handle such difficult ethical dilemmas. A review of specific agency policies is presented with recommendations for future policy changes and development.

  9. Improving nursing documentation for private-duty home health care.

    PubMed

    Borchers, E L

    1999-06-01

    Private-duty, home health care agencies have struggled in assuring compliance with accurate and complete nursing documentation. In this descriptive study, the author reports on an improvement and innovation project in a private-duty, home health care agency aimed at improving nursing documentation, as measured in chart review audits. Initial strategies were directed toward revising the documentation system, with implementation of a flow record, and conducting group nurse education. These efforts had a minimal effect on improving documentation compliance. A major, multifocus strategy was then implemented. The educational component stressed pre- and posttest. The chart audit tool was revised to track individual nurse behaviors. Nurses were mentored when documentation did not meet standards. Lastly, the nurse job description and corresponding performance appraisal document were revised to clarify nurse responsibility and strengthen nurse accountability; progressive discipline was initiated when warranted. Significant and sustained improvement was subsequently realized.

  10. The characteristics of residents in extra care housing and care homes in England.

    PubMed

    Darton, Robin; Bäumker, Theresia; Callaghan, Lisa; Holder, Jacquetta; Netten, Ann; Towers, Ann-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Extra care housing aims to meet the housing, care and support needs of older people, while helping them to maintain their independence in their own private accommodation. It has been viewed as a possible alternative, or even a replacement for residential care. In 2003, the Department of Health announced capital funding to support the development of extra care housing and made the receipt of funding conditional on participating in an evaluative study. This paper presents findings on the characteristics of the residents at the time of moving in, drawing on information collected from the 19 schemes in the evaluation, and a recent comparable study of residents who moved into care homes providing personal care. Overall, the people who moved into extra care were younger and much less physically and cognitively impaired than those who moved into care homes. However, the prevalence of the medical conditions examined was more similar for the two groups, and several of the schemes had a significant minority of residents with high levels of dependence on the Barthel Index of Activities of Daily Living. In contrast, levels of severe cognitive impairment were much lower in all schemes than the overall figure for residents of care homes, even among schemes designed specifically to provide for residents with dementia. The results suggest that, although extra care housing may be operating as an alternative to care homes for some individuals, it is providing for a wider population, who may be making a planned move rather than reacting to a crisis. While extra care supports residents with problems of cognitive functioning, most schemes appear to prefer residents to move in when they can become familiar with their new accommodation before the development of more severe cognitive impairment.

  11. Resist the call to install cameras in care homes.

    PubMed

    Scott, Graham

    2014-05-13

    Last week's BBC Panorama documentary depicting the abuse of older people in a south London care home reignited the debate about whether CCTV should be installed in such settings. Those in favour argue that abuse would be prevented if the perpetrators feared being caught on camera. However, there is a long list of reasons why the introduction of such surveillance systems on a routine basis should be resisted.

  12. Resist the call to install cameras in care homes.

    PubMed

    Scott, Graham

    2014-05-13

    Last week's BBC Panorama documentary depicting the abuse of older people in a south London care home reignited the debate about whether CCTV should be installed in such settings. Those in favour argue that abuse would be prevented if the perpetrators feared being caught on camera. However, there is a long list of reasons why the introduction of such surveillance systems on a routine basis should be resisted. PMID:24802418

  13. Rural home care of a technology-dependent infant.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, J. E.

    1995-01-01

    A multidisciplinary approach is necessary to prepare for home care of technology-dependent infants. The environment must protect, support, and promote the physical, cognitive, and social growth and development of these infants. Parents and caregivers of technology-dependent infants should be taught cardiopulmonary resuscitation and should be helped to develop a plan for obtaining emergency medical assistance. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7780317

  14. Arbitration agreements in health care nursing home contracts.

    PubMed

    Infante, Marie C; Lovitch, Karen S

    2003-11-01

    Increasingly, long-term care facilities are adopting alternative dispute resolution measures, such as arbitration, in admission contracts. Whereas avoiding the onus of civil lawsuits is understandable, nursing homes must ensure that the arbitration wording in the contract is precise, enforceable, and most importantly, pursuant to state and federal laws, regulations, and guidelines. Otherwise, the contract itself may be the subject of a court action. PMID:14650372

  15. Infectious medical waste management. A home care responsibility.

    PubMed

    Ralph, I G

    1993-01-01

    With the proliferation of bloodborne diseases in the United States, more attention is being focused on the issues of infectious medical waste and its disposal. Home care organizations must be aware of the potential risks involved in handling infectious wastes, and adhere to industry standards of disposal and transport. Education of staff, patients, and community about the management of infectious waste is crucial in today's healthcare arena.

  16. [Specifics of Analgesia in Palliative Care Patients at Home].

    PubMed

    Pautex, Sophie

    2015-02-25

    Pain management at home for a patient, suffering from one or more advanced progressive diseases, goes beyond the prescription of an opioid. Apart from the importance of finding the most suitable analgesic drug (controlled pain with least possible adverse effects), three important dimensions will be addressed: interprofessionnal care (shared care goals, evaluation, monitoring of pain and other symptoms; physiotherapy, etc.) information, education and support for patients and relatives in particular on the use of opioids, and finally the importance of anticipation. This includes for example the requirement of breakthrough pain treatment in case of pain exacerbation or the definition of the place of hospitalization in case of worsening general condition or of death.

  17. The Aging Brain Care Medical Home: Preliminary Data.

    PubMed

    LaMantia, Michael A; Alder, Catherine A; Callahan, Christopher M; Gao, Sujuan; French, Dustin D; Austrom, Mary G; Boustany, Karim; Livin, Lee; Bynagari, Bharath; Boustani, Malaz A

    2015-06-01

    The Aging Brain Care (ABC) Medical Home aims to improve the care, health outcomes, and medical costs of Medicare beneficiaries with dementia or depression across central Indiana. This population health management program, funded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Innovation Center, expanded an existing collaborative dementia and depression care program to serve 1,650 older adults in a local safety-net hospital system. During the first year, 20 full-time clinical staff were hired, trained, and deployed to deliver a collaborative care intervention. In the first 18 months, an average of 13 visits was provided per person. Thirty percent of the sample had a diagnosis of dementia, and 77% had a diagnosis of depression. Sixty-six percent of participants with high depression scores (Patient Health Questionnaire-9 score ≥14) had at least a 50% reduction in their depressive symptoms. Fifty-one percent of caregivers of individuals with dementia had at least a 50% reduction in caregiver stress symptoms (measured by the Healthy Aging Brain Care Monitor-Caregiver Version). After 18 months, the ABC Medical Home has demonstrated progress toward improving the health of older adults with dementia and depression. Scalable and practical models like this show initial promise for answering the challenges posed by the nation's rapidly aging population. PMID:26096394

  18. Is health care use changing? A comparison between physician, hospital, nursing-home, and home-care use of two elderly cohorts.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, E; Tate, R B

    1989-11-01

    This study used log-linear survival analysis, and log-rank tests to compare 1) the characteristics of two elderly cohorts; 2) their use of physician, hospital, nursing-home and home-care services over 8.5 years; and 3) physician and bed supplies during the two periods. Both cohorts were similar in health status and in their use of hospital, nursing-home, and home-care resources despite a steady decrease in hospital beds during both periods and a shrinking supply of nursing-home beds for the later cohort. Although physician supply increased more rapidly for the first (1971) than for the second (1976) cohort, the later cohort used significantly more ambulatory care than the earlier cohort. Home care appears to substitute for year-to-year variations in nursing-home admissions but not for variations in hospital lengths of stay.

  19. Home telehealth for children with special health-care needs.

    PubMed

    Cady, Rhonda; Kelly, Anne; Finkelstein, Stanley

    2008-01-01

    The U Special Kids (USK) programme at the University of Minnesota provides intensive care coordination and case management services to children with complex special health-care needs. We conducted a one-year pilot study to evaluate the feasibility of videoconferencing between the USK office and family homes. To ensure easy installation, families were provided with prepackaged equipment and software. However, the families had different Internet providers, different modems and/or routers and different firewall software, which required case-by-case resolution during home visits by the project coordinator. Five families participated in 3-5 videoconferencing sessions with a USK nurse. All connections with urban families had clear audio and video, whereas connections with rural families had clear audio, but unclear video. All of the scheduled virtual visits were rated by nurses as providing information that was similar to a telephone call. However, the unscheduled virtual visits were rated by the nurses as providing more information than a telephone call, suggesting that home-based videoconferencing may be useful in the management of children with complex special health-care needs. PMID:18534949

  20. Providing end-of-life care in care homes for older people: a qualitative study of the views of care home staff and community nurses.

    PubMed

    Goddard, Cassie; Stewart, Frances; Thompson, Genevieve; Hall, Sue

    2013-02-01

    The study aimed to explore the views of care home staff (CHS) and community nurses (CNs) on providing end-of-life care (EOLC) in care homes. Participants were randomly selected and qualitative interviews conducted with 80 CHS and 10 CNs. Themes emerging from the data included the following: The meaning of EOLC; starting EOLC; dying in the care home; stress of providing EOLC; improving EOLC; and the role of the CN. CHS felt that planning for the end of life was important before residents reached the dying phase, which some found difficult to determine. Although CHS wished to avoid residents being transferred to hospital to die, they acknowledged that improvements in their skills and the resources available to them were needed to manage EOLC effectively. CNs were critical of the EOLC provided in some care homes, reporting tensions over their relationship with CHS. As the number of older people who die in care homes increases, there is a need to overcome these barriers to provide good EOLC. PMID:25473926

  1. Navigating the field of temporally framed care in the Danish home care sector.

    PubMed

    Tufte, Pernille; Dahl, Hanne Marlene

    2016-01-01

    The organisational and temporal framing of elderly care in Europe has changed in the wake of new public management reforms and standardised care services, the strict measurement of time and work schedules have become central aspects of care work. The article investigates the crafting of care in this framing: how care workers approach the services specified in their rotas and navigate between needs, demands and opportunities in the daily performance of duties. Applying feminist theory on time and anthropological theory on social navigation, it examines the practice of home care work in two Danish municipalities. Data are derived predominantly from participant observation. The article identifies two overarching temporal dilemmas in different home care situations: one where process time prevails over clock time and another where the care workers balance the two. Focusing on how care workers respond to these dilemmas in practice, the article identifies various navigation tactics, including leaving time outside, individualised routinisation, working on different paths simultaneously and postponing tasks. By assessing care workers' performance in the temporal framing of work and focusing on care workers' mediation between different time logics, this study provides an in-depth perspective on the broader feminist literature on the dilemmas of care. PMID:26474802

  2. Navigating the field of temporally framed care in the Danish home care sector.

    PubMed

    Tufte, Pernille; Dahl, Hanne Marlene

    2016-01-01

    The organisational and temporal framing of elderly care in Europe has changed in the wake of new public management reforms and standardised care services, the strict measurement of time and work schedules have become central aspects of care work. The article investigates the crafting of care in this framing: how care workers approach the services specified in their rotas and navigate between needs, demands and opportunities in the daily performance of duties. Applying feminist theory on time and anthropological theory on social navigation, it examines the practice of home care work in two Danish municipalities. Data are derived predominantly from participant observation. The article identifies two overarching temporal dilemmas in different home care situations: one where process time prevails over clock time and another where the care workers balance the two. Focusing on how care workers respond to these dilemmas in practice, the article identifies various navigation tactics, including leaving time outside, individualised routinisation, working on different paths simultaneously and postponing tasks. By assessing care workers' performance in the temporal framing of work and focusing on care workers' mediation between different time logics, this study provides an in-depth perspective on the broader feminist literature on the dilemmas of care.

  3. Effects of dietary interventions on 24-hour urine parameters in patients with idiopathic recurrent calcium oxalate stones.

    PubMed

    Kıraç, Mustafa; Küpeli, Bora; Irkilata, Lokman; Gülbahar, Ozlem; Aksakal, Nur; Karaoğlan, Ustünol; Bozkırlı, Ibrahim

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of dietary factors on 24-hour urine parameters in patients with idiopathic recurrent calcium oxalate stones. A total of 108 of idiopathic recurrent calcium oxalate stones were included in the study. A 24-hour urinalysis was performed and metabolic abnormalities were measured for all of the patients. All of the patients were given specialized diets for their 24-hour urine abnormalities. At the end of first month, the same parameters were examined in another 24-hour urinalysis. Hyperoxaluria, hypernatruria, and hypercalciuria were found in 84 (77%), 43 (39.8%), and 38 (35.5%) of the patients, respectively. The differences between the oxalate, sodium, volume, uric acid, and citrate parameters before and after the dietary intervention were significant (p < 0.05). The calcium parameters were not significantly different before and after the intervention. We found that oxalate, sodium, volume, uric acid, and citrate-but not calcium-abnormalities in patients with recurrent calcium oxalate stones can be corrected by diet. The metabolic profiles of idiopathic calcium oxalate stone patients should be evaluated and the appropriate dietary interventions should be implemented to decrease stone recurrence.

  4. Self-Renewal and Differentiation Capacity of Urine-Derived Stem Cells after Urine Preservation for 24 Hours

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yingai; Bharadwaj, Shantaram; Leng, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Xiaobo; Liu, Hong; Atala, Anthony; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2013-01-01

    Despite successful approaches to preserve organs, tissues, and isolated cells, the maintenance of stem cell viability and function in body fluids during storage for cell distribution and transportation remains unexplored. The aim of this study was to characterize urine-derived stem cells (USCs) after optimal preservation of urine specimens for up to 24 hours. A total of 415 urine specimens were collected from 12 healthy men (age range 20–54 years old). About 6×104 cells shed off from the urinary tract system in 24 hours. At least 100 USC clones were obtained from the stored urine specimens after 24 hours and maintained similar biological features to fresh USCs. The stored USCs had a “rice grain” shape in primary culture, and expressed mesenchymal stem cell surface markers, high telomerase activity, and normal karyotypes. Importantly, the preserved cells retained bipotent differentiation capacity. Differentiated USCs expressed myogenic specific proteins and contractile function when exposed to myogenic differentiation medium, and they expressed urothelial cell-specific markers and barrier function when exposed to urothelial differentiation medium. These data demonstrated that up to 75% of fresh USCs can be safely persevered in urine for 24 hours and that these cells stored in urine retain their original stem cell properties, indicating that preserved USCs could be available for potential use in cell-based therapy or clinical diagnosis. PMID:23349776

  5. Relationships, Expertise, Incentives, and Governance: Supporting Care Home Residents' Access to Health Care. An Interview Study From England

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Claire; Davies, Sue L.; Gordon, Adam L.; Meyer, Julienne; Dening, Tom; Gladman, John R.F.; Iliffe, Steve; Zubair, Maria; Bowman, Clive; Victor, Christina; Martin, Finbarr C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore what commissioners of care, regulators, providers, and care home residents in England identify as the key mechanisms or components of different service delivery models that support the provision of National Health Service (NHS) provision to independent care homes. Methods Qualitative, semistructured interviews with a purposive sample of people with direct experience of commissioning, providing, and regulating health care provision in care homes and care home residents. Data from interviews were augmented by a secondary analysis of previous interviews with care home residents on their personal experience of and priorities for access to health care. Analysis was framed by the assumptions of realist evaluation and drew on the constant comparative method to identify key themes about what is required to achieve quality health care provision to care homes and resident health. Results Participants identified 3 overlapping approaches to the provision of NHS that they believed supported access to health care for older people in care homes: (1) Investment in relational working that fostered continuity and shared learning between visiting NHS staff and care home staff, (2) the provision of age-appropriate clinical services, and (3) governance arrangements that used contractual and financial incentives to specify a minimum service that care homes should receive. Conclusion The 3 approaches, and how they were typified as working, provide a rich picture of the stakeholder perspectives and the underlying assumptions about how service delivery models should work with care homes. The findings inform how evidence on effective working in care homes will be interrogated to identify how different approaches, or specifically key elements of those approaches, achieve different health-related outcomes in different situations for residents and associated health and social care organizations. PMID:25687930

  6. Estimation of Daily Sodium and Potassium Excretion Using Spot Urine and 24-Hour Urine Samples in a Black Population (Benin).

    PubMed

    Mizéhoun-Adissoda, Carmelle; Houehanou, Corine; Chianéa, Thierry; Dalmay, François; Bigot, André; Preux, Pierre-Marie; Bovet, Pascal; Houinato, Dismand; Desport, Jean-Claude

    2016-07-01

    The 24-hour urine collection method is considered the gold standard for the estimation of ingested potassium and sodium. Because of the impracticalities of collecting all urine over a 24-hour period, spot urine is often used for epidemiological investigations. This study aims to assess the agreement between spot urine and 24-hour urine measurements to determine sodium and potassium intake. A total of 402 participants aged 25 to 64 years were randomly selected in South Benin. Spot urine was taken during the second urination of the day. Twenty-four-hour urine was also collected. Samples (2-mL) were taken and then stored at -20°C. The analysis was carried out using potentiometric dosage. The agreement between spot urine and 24-hour urine measurements was established using Bland-Altman plots. A total of 354 results were analyzed. Daily sodium chloride and potassium chloride urinary excretion means were 10.2±4.9 g/24 h and 2.9±1.4 g/24 h, respectively. Estimated daily sodium chloride and potassium chloride means from the spot urine were 10.7±7.0 g/24 h and 3.9±2.1 g/24 h, respectively. Concordance coefficients were 0.61 at d=-0.5 g, (d±2SD=-11 g and 10.1 g) for sodium chloride and 0.61 at d=-1 g, (d±2SD=-3.8 g and 1.8 g) for potassium chloride. Spot urine method is acceptable for estimating 24-hour urinary sodium and potassium excretion to assess sodium and potassium intake in a black population. However, the confidence interval for the mean difference, which is too large, makes the sodium chloride results inadmissible at a clinical level.

  7. Value of 24-hour Delayed Film of Barium Enema for Evaluation of Colon Transit Function in Young Children with Constipation

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ha Yeong; Son, Jae Sung; Park, Hye Won; Kwak, Byung Ok; Kim, Hyeong Su; Bae, Sun Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims A colon transit time test using radio-opaque markers (CTTRM) is considered the gold standard for evaluating colon transit function. A 24-hour delayed film of barium enema (BE) has been used as a supplementary method in structural evaluations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of a 24-hour delayed BE film for assessing colon transit function in young children with constipation. Methods In total, 93 children with constipation who performed both single-contrast BE and CTTRM were enrolled in this study. Of these, the data from 70 children were analyzed (males 33, females 37; mean age [range], 5.63 ± 2.94 [2–14] years). The basic principle of the study is “velocity = distance/time”. Time values were identified in both studies, and the colon length and distance of barium movement were measured on the 24-hour delayed BE film. Thus, colon transit velocity values could be calculated using both methods. The correlation between colon transit velocity using a 24-hour delayed BE film versus CTTRM was analyzed statistically. Results Median value (interquartile range) of colon transit velocity using CTTRM was 1.57 (1.07–2.89) cm/hr, and that using BE of that was 1.58 (0.94–2.07) cm/hr. The Spearman correlation coefficient was 0.438 (P < 0.001) for the overall group. The correlation was strongest in children younger than 4 years (r = 0.537, P = 0.032). Conclusions Although the correlation between BE and CTTRM was not very strong, the 24-hour delayed BE film could provide broad information about colon transit function in young children, especially those under 4 years who usually cannot undergo CTTRM. PMID:26979249

  8. Microleakage of Two Self-Adhesive Cements in the Enamel and Dentin After 24 Hours and Two Months

    PubMed Central

    Jaberi Ansari, Zahra; Kalantar Motamedi, Mojdeh

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Microleakage is a main cause of restorative treatment failure. In this study, we compared occlusal and cervical microleakage of two self-adhesive cements after 24 hours and two months. Materials and Methods: In this in-vitro experimental study, class II inlay cavities were prepared on 60 sound human third molars. Composite inlays were fabricated with Z100 composite resin. The teeth were randomly assigned to six groups. RelyX-Arc (control), RelyX-Unicem and Maxcem were used for the first three groups and specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours. The same cements were used for the remaining three groups, but the specimens were stored for 2 months. The teeth were subjected to 500 thermal cycles (5°C and 55°C) and immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsin for 24 hours and then sectioned mesiodistally and dye penetration was evaluated in a class II cavity with occlusal and cervical margins using X20 magnification stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed using Kruskal Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. Results: After 24 hours, cements had significant differences only in cervical margin microleakage (P=0.0001) and microleakage of RelyX-Unicem and Maxcem was significantly more than that of RelyX-Arc (both P=0.0001). Cervical microleakage in RelyX-Unicem and Maxcem was greater than occlusal (P=0.0001 and P=0.001, respectively). Microleakage was not significantly different between the occlusal and cervical margins after 2 months. Conclusion: Cervical microleakage was greater than occlusal in RelyX-Unicem and Maxcem after 24h. The greatest microleakage was reported for the cervical margin of RelyX-Unicem after 24 hours. PMID:25584053

  9. Changes in platelet morphology and function during 24 hours of storage.

    PubMed

    Braune, S; Walter, M; Schulze, F; Lendlein, A; Jung, F

    2014-01-01

    aggregates could be visualized microscopically. After four hours, first debris and very small aggregates occurred. After 24 hours, platelet aggregates and also debris progressively increased. In accordance to this, the CASY system revealed an increase of platelet aggregates (up to 90 μm diameter) with increasing storage time. The percentage of CD62P positive platelets and PF4 increased significantly with storage time in resting PRP. When soluble ADP was added to stored PRP samples, the number of activatable platelets decreased significantly over storage time. The present study reveals the importance of a consequent standardization in the preparation of WB and PRP. Platelet morphology and function, particularly platelet reactivity to adherent or soluble agonists in their surrounding milieu, changed rapidly outside the vascular system. This knowledge is of crucial interest, particularly in the field of biomaterial development for cardiovascular applications, and may help to define common standards in the in vitro hemocompatibility testing of biomaterials.

  10. [A Study on problems associated with a patient's death during home care, based on the duration of home care and patient's age-why terminal home care is difficult for a patient's family].

    PubMed

    Ohara, Hiroo; Okabe, Hiromi; Tsuchiya, Kumiko; Kikuchi, Kana

    2012-12-01

    When a patient receives home care, an important factor is how the family accepts the patient's death. In this study, we observed that the number of long-term in-home terminal care cases increased, as well as the number of short-term in-home care cases. Moreover, the number of cancer cases among the young population is also increasing. Consequently, how to acceptance of a patient's death varies among their family. When tending to patients, suitable support from the medical staff is required. Additionally, various options need to be provided for terminal care. PMID:23268913

  11. 45 CFR 156.245 - Treatment of direct primary care medical homes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS HEALTH INSURANCE ISSUER STANDARDS UNDER THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT, INCLUDING... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Treatment of direct primary care medical homes... direct primary care medical homes. A QHP issuer may provide coverage through a direct primary...

  12. Preventing crises in palliative care in the home. Role of family physicians and nurses.

    PubMed Central

    Howarth, G.; Willison, K. B.

    1995-01-01

    With the current shift to community care, the need for palliative care in the home involving the family physician has increased. Potential causes of crises in the home care of the dying are identified. Strategies to prevent crises are suggested that rely on a team's providing comprehensive and anticipatory care. PMID:7539653

  13. The Geriatrics in Primary Care Demonstration: Integrating Comprehensive Geriatric Care into the Medical Home: Preliminary Data.

    PubMed

    Engel, Peter A; Spencer, Jacqueline; Paul, Todd; Boardman, Judith B

    2016-04-01

    Three thousand nine hundred thirty-one veterans aged 75 and older receive primary care (PC) in two large practices of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Boston Healthcare System. Cognitive and functional disabilities are endemic in this group, creating needs that predictably exceed available or appropriate resources. To address this problem, Geriatrics in Primary Care (GPC) embeds geriatric services directly into primary care. An on-site consulting geriatrician and geriatric nurse care manager work directly with PC colleagues in medicine, nursing, social work, pharmacy, and mental health within the VA medical home. This design delivers interdisciplinary geriatric care within PC that emphasizes comprehensive evaluations, care management, planned transitions, informed resource use, and a shift in care focus from multiple subspecialties to PC. Four hundred thirty-five veterans enrolled during the project's 4-year course. Complex, fragmented care was evident in a series of 50 individuals (aged 82 ± 7) enrolled during Months 1 to 6. The year before, these individuals made 372 medical or surgical subspecialty clinic visits (7.4 ± 9.8); 34% attended five or more subspecialty clinics, 48% had dementia, and 18% lacked family caregivers. During the first year after enrollment the mean number of subspecialty clinic visits declined significantly (4.7 ± 5.0, P = .01), whereas the number of PC-based visits remained stable (3.1 ± 1.5 and 3.3 ± 1.5, respectively, P = .50). Telephone contact by GPC (2.3 ± 2.0) and collaboration with PC clinicians replaced routine follow-up geriatric care. GPC facilitated planned transitions to rehabilitation centers (n = 5), home hospice (n = 2), dementia units (n = 3), and home care (n = 37). GPC provides efficient, comprehensive geriatric care and case management while preserving established relationships between patients and the PC team. Preliminary results suggest "care defragmentation," as reflected by a significant reduction in

  14. Mothers With Physical Disability: Child Care Adaptations at Home

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Diane L.; Iezzoni, Lisa I.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study describes how women with physical disability experience caregiving for a new infant and how they adapt their home environment and care tasks. METHOD. In 2013, we conducted 2-hr telephone interviews with 22 women with significant physical disability who had delivered babies within the previous 10 yr. The semistructured, open-ended interview protocol addressed wide-ranging pregnancy-related topics. NVivo was used to sort the texts for content analysis. RESULTS. Night care, bathing, and carrying the baby were identified as the biggest challenges. Typical adaptations (with and without occupational therapy consultation) included use of a wrap for carrying the infant, furniture adaptations for mothers using wheelchairs, and assistance from caregivers. CONCLUSION. Women with physical disability can be fully capable of caring for an infant and can find ways to adapt their environment. Further research may determine the role of occupation therapy. PMID:27767945

  15. Job Stress and Job Satisfaction: Home Care Workers in a Consumer-Directed Model of Care

    PubMed Central

    Delp, Linda; Wallace, Steven P; Geiger-Brown, Jeanne; Muntaner, Carles

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate determinants of job satisfaction among home care workers in a consumer-directed model. Data Sources/Setting Analysis of data collected from telephone interviews with 1,614 Los Angeles home care workers on the state payroll in 2003. Data Collection and Analysis Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to determine the odds of job satisfaction using job stress model domains of demands, control, and support. Principal Findings Abuse from consumers, unpaid overtime hours, and caring for more than one consumer as well as work-health demands predict less satisfaction. Some physical and emotional demands of the dyadic care relationship are unexpectedly associated with greater job satisfaction. Social support and control, indicated by job security and union involvement, have a direct positive effect on job satisfaction. Conclusions Policies that enhance the relational component of care may improve workers' ability to transform the demands of their job into dignified and satisfying labor. Adequate benefits and sufficient authorized hours of care can minimize the stress of unpaid overtime work, caring for multiple consumers, job insecurity, and the financial constraints to seeking health care. Results have implications for the structure of consumer-directed models of care and efforts to retain long-term care workers. PMID:20403063

  16. [Development of a specialised paediatric palliative home care service].

    PubMed

    Kuhlen, M; Balzer, S; Richter, U; Fritsche-Kansy, M; Friedland, C; Borkhardt, A; Janssen, G

    2009-01-01

    In Germany annually 1,500-3,000 children die from life-limiting diseases. Symptoms and course of disease differ considerably depending on the character of the underlying disease. Due to the desire of the children and their families to spend the end of life at home a paediatric palliative home care service was founded at the university children's hospital of Duesseldorf. In the last 20 years a specialised paediatric palliative team evolved from an unstructured voluntary activity. Prospective aims are an area-wide professional supply of all paediatric palliative patients and the improvement of the cooperation with the resident paediatrician and paediatric palliative nursing services. Furthermore the establishment of networks as well as a proper communication among the professionals is inalienable.

  17. Factors affecting prevention and control of viral gastroenteritis outbreaks in care homes.

    PubMed

    Vivancos, R; Trainor, E; Oyinloye, A; Keenan, A

    2012-10-01

    We assess the effect of key care quality indicators on viral gastroenteritis outbreaks and control in care homes using mandatory inspection data collected by a non-departmental public body. Outbreak occurrence was associated with care home size but not with overall quality or individual environmental standards. Care home size, hygiene and infection control standard scores were inversely associated with attack rate in residents, whereas delayed reporting to the local public health agency was associated with higher attack rates.

  18. Americans Needing Home Care, United States. Data from the National Health Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feller, Barbara A.

    1986-01-01

    This report presents information from the Home Care Supplement to the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) on the types of help needed by adults with chronic health problems who live outside of institutions. Home care items discussed include: (1) assistance in basic physical activities; (2) assistance in home management activities; (3) adults…

  19. Home Health Care Utilization: A Review of the Research for Social Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kadushin, Goldie

    2004-01-01

    The author reviewed the literature to identify the variables associated with home health care utilization using the Andersen-Newman model as a framework for analysis. Sixty-four studies published between 1985 and 2000 were identified through PUBMED, Sociofile, and PsycINFO databases. Home health care was defined as in-home skilled nursing,…

  20. Ineffective Staff, Ineffective Supervision, or Ineffective Administration? Why Some Nursing Homes Fail to Provide Adequate Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheridan, John E.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This study involved 530 nursing staff working in 25 for-profit and nonprofit nursing homes, 2 of which failed to meet residential care standards. Nursing home climate in failed homes was perceived as being significantly lower in human relations and higher in laissez-faire and status orientation dimensions that the climate in the successful homes.…

  1. Can district nurses and care home staff improve bowel care for older people using a clinical benchmarking tool?

    PubMed

    Goodman, Claire; L Davies, Sue; Norton, Christine; Fader, Mandy; Morris, Jackie; Wells, Mandy; Gage, Heather

    2013-12-01

    A quasi-experimental study tested a clinical benchmarking tool (Essence of Care) to improve bowel-related care for older people living in six care homes. In the intervention care homes, district nurses and care home staff used the clinical benchmarking tool to discuss and plan how to improve bowel care for residents. In the control care homes, staff were provided with detailed information about the residents and continence services contact details. The intervention was acceptable to care home and district nursing staff, and possible to incorporate into existing working patterns. The study did not demonstrate a significant reduction in bowel-related problems, although there was evidence in one care home of reduction in episodes of avoidable faecal incontinence. At an individual level of care, there were observable benefits, and examples of person-centred care were prompted through participating in the intervention and improved staff awareness. Clinical benchmarking tools can be used to structure discussion between district nurses and care home staff to review and plan care for residents. However, it takes time to achieve change and embedding this kind of approach requires either robust pre-existing working relationships or the involvement of a facilitator.

  2. Home iv antibiotic therapy through a medical day care unit.

    PubMed

    Gourdeau, M; Deschênes, L; Caron, M; Desmarais, M

    1993-05-01

    An out-patient parenteral antibiotic therapy program provided through a medical day care unit was evaluated in a tertiary care hospital. From July 11, 1988 to December 31, 1990, 122 patients were treated either on site at the unit or at home with self-administered intravenous antibiotics. In all, 142 courses of parenteral antibiotics (mostly cephalosporins and clindamycin) were given for a total of 124 infections, mostly bone and soft tissue infections (67 of 124, 54%). The duration of out-patient therapy ranged from two to 62 days with a mean duration of 9.4 days if treated at the unit, or 13.2 days in the home care model (1476 patient-days). Vein access was peripheral and catheters remained functional for an average of 4.9 days (range 0.5 to 22 days). Only two patients experienced adverse drug reactions that necessitated modification of treatment. One other case was readmitted to the hospital for surgical debridement. The average cost per patient-day was $66 compared with $375 for in-hospital therapy. This program proved to be safe, efficient, and cost-effective.

  3. Home iv antibiotic therapy through a medical day care unit

    PubMed Central

    Gourdeau, Marie; Deschênes, Louise; Caron, Martine; Desmarais, Marc

    1993-01-01

    An out-patient parenteral antibiotic therapy program provided through a medical day care unit was evaluated in a tertiary care hospital. From July 11, 1988 to December 31, 1990, 122 patients were treated either on site at the unit or at home with self-administered intravenous antibiotics. In all, 142 courses of parenteral antibiotics (mostly cephalosporins and clindamycin) were given for a total of 124 infections, mostly bone and soft tissue infections (67 of 124, 54%). The duration of out-patient therapy ranged from two to 62 days with a mean duration of 9.4 days if treated at the unit, or 13.2 days in the home care model (1476 patient-days). Vein access was peripheral and catheters remained functional for an average of 4.9 days (range 0.5 to 22 days). Only two patients experienced adverse drug reactions that necessitated modification of treatment. One other case was readmitted to the hospital for surgical debridement. The average cost per patient-day was $66 compared with $375 for in-hospital therapy. This program proved to be safe, efficient, and cost-effective. PMID:22346440

  4. The Falls In Care Home study: a feasibility randomized controlled trial of the use of a risk assessment and decision support tool to prevent falls in care homes

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Gemma M; Armstrong, Sarah; Gordon, Adam L; Gladman, John; Robertson, Kate; Ward, Marie; Conroy, Simon; Arnold, Gail; Darby, Janet; Frowd, Nadia; Williams, Wynne; Knowles, Sue; Logan, Pip A

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the feasibility of implementing and evaluating the Guide to Action Care Home fall prevention intervention. Design: Two-centre, cluster feasibility randomized controlled trial and process evaluation. Setting: Purposive sample of six diverse old age/learning disability, long stay care homes in Nottinghamshire, UK. Subjects: Residents aged over 50 years, who had fallen at least once in the past year, not bed-bound, hoist-dependent or terminally ill. Interventions: Intervention homes (n = 3) received Guide to Action Care Home fall prevention intervention training and support. Control homes (n = 3) received usual care. Outcomes: Recruitment, attrition, baseline and six-month outcome completion, contamination and intervention fidelity, compliance, tolerability, acceptance and impact. Results: A total of 81 of 145 (56%) care homes expressed participatory interest. Six of 22 letter respondent homes (27%) participated. The expected resident recruitment target was achieved by 76% (52/68). Ten (19%) residents did not complete follow-up (seven died, three moved). In intervention homes 36/114 (32%) staff attended training. Two of three (75%) care homes received protocol compliant training. Staff valued the training, but advised greater management involvement to improve intervention implementation. Fall risks were assessed, actioned and recorded in care records. Of 115 recorded falls, 533/570 (93%) of details were complete. Six-month resident fall rates were 1.9 and 4.0 per year for intervention and control homes, respectively. Conclusions: The Guide to Action Care Home is implementable under trial conditions. Recruitment and follow-up rates indicate that a definitive trial can be completed. Falls (primary outcome) can be ascertained reliably from care records. PMID:26385358

  5. 48 CFR 852.222-70 - Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act-nursing home care contract supplement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Safety Standards Act-nursing home care contract supplement. 852.222-70 Section 852.222-70 Federal...—nursing home care contract supplement. As prescribed in 822.305, for nursing home care requirements, insert the following clause: Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act—Nursing Home Care...

  6. 48 CFR 852.222-70 - Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act-nursing home care contract supplement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Safety Standards Act-nursing home care contract supplement. 852.222-70 Section 852.222-70 Federal...—nursing home care contract supplement. As prescribed in 822.305, for nursing home care requirements, insert the following clause: Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act—Nursing Home Care...

  7. 48 CFR 852.222-70 - Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act-nursing home care contract supplement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Safety Standards Act-nursing home care contract supplement. 852.222-70 Section 852.222-70 Federal...—nursing home care contract supplement. As prescribed in 822.305, for nursing home care requirements, insert the following clause: Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act—Nursing Home Care...

  8. 48 CFR 852.222-70 - Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act-nursing home care contract supplement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Safety Standards Act-nursing home care contract supplement. 852.222-70 Section 852.222-70 Federal...—nursing home care contract supplement. As prescribed in 822.305, for nursing home care requirements, insert the following clause: Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act—Nursing Home Care...

  9. 48 CFR 852.222-70 - Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act-nursing home care contract supplement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Safety Standards Act-nursing home care contract supplement. 852.222-70 Section 852.222-70 Federal...—nursing home care contract supplement. As prescribed in 822.305, for nursing home care requirements, insert the following clause: Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act—Nursing Home Care...

  10. Cancer patient-centered home care: a new model for health care in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Tralongo, Paolo; Ferraù, Francesco; Borsellino, Nicolò; Verderame, Francesco; Caruso, Michele; Giuffrida, Dario; Butera, Alfredo; Gebbia, Vittorio

    2011-01-01

    Patient-centered home care is a new model of assistance, which may be integrated with more traditional hospital-centered care especially in selected groups of informed and trained patients. Patient-centered care is based on patients’ needs rather than on prognosis, and takes into account the emotional and psychosocial aspects of the disease. This model may be applied to elderly patients, who present comorbid diseases, but it also fits with the needs of younger fit patients. A specialized multidisciplinary team coordinated by experienced medical oncologists and including pharmacists, psychologists, nurses, and social assistance providers should carry out home care. Other professional figures may be required depending on patients’ needs. Every effort should be made to achieve optimal coordination between the health professionals and the reference hospital and to employ shared evidence-based guidelines, which in turn guarantee safety and efficacy. Comprehensive care has to be easily accessible and requires a high level of education and knowledge of the disease for both the patients and their caregivers. Patient-centered home care represents an important tool to improve quality of life and help cancer patients while also being cost effective. PMID:21941445

  11. 75 FR 41793 - Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care Home Food Service...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-19

    ... Food and Nutrition Service Child and Adult Care Food Program: National Average Payment Rates, Day Care... Day Care Homes for the Period July 1, 2010 Through June 30, 2011 AGENCY: Food and Nutrition Service...-risk afterschool care centers, and adult day care centers; the food service payment rates for meals...

  12. Twelve Home Cleaning Recipes

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Safe and Effective Disinfection Twelve Home Cleaning Recipes Safer alternatives to hazardous cleaning products exist for ... 24 hours at room temperature. All Purpose Cleaner recipes for use on counters, floors and other hard ...

  13. Day Care in Caracas: A Day Care Homes Program Evaluation Report. Volume I: Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Ruesta, Maria Carlota; de Vidal, Amalia Barrios

    This document provides a summary of a formative evaluation research project concerning the neighborhood day care homes program in Caracas, Venezuela. The evaluation included nine lines of study: (1) an assessment of sociodemographic conditions of Venezuelan preschool age children, legal and employment status of Venezuelan women, and general social…

  14. HOW RELIABLE IS 24 HOUR SERUM LITHIUM LEVEL AFTER A TEST DOSE OF LITHIUM IN PREDICTING OPTIMAL LITHIUM DOSE?

    PubMed Central

    Kuruvilla, K.; Shaji, K.S.

    1989-01-01

    SUMMARY 57% of a group of 35 patients treated with Lithium Carbonate at dosages predicted by the nomogram suggested by Cooper et al (1973) failed to reach therapeutic levels of serum lithium. This finding casts serious doubts on the usefulness of the claim by Cooper et al (1973 & 1976) that 24 hour serum lithium level after a test dose of 600 mg. lithium can predict the daily lithium dose. PMID:21927360

  15. Dipstick Spot urine pH does not accurately represent 24 hour urine PH measured by an electrode

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Mohamed; Sarkissian, Carl; Jianbo, Li; Calle, Juan; Monga, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To determine whether spot urine pH measured by dipstick is an accurate representation of 24 hours urine pH measured by an electrode. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed urine pH results of patients who presented to the urology stone clinic. For each patient we recorded the most recent pH result measured by dipstick from a spot urine sample that preceded the result of a 24-hour urine pH measured by the use of a pH electrode. Patients were excluded if there was a change in medications or dietary recommendations or if the two samples were more than 4 months apart. A difference of more than 0.5 pH was considered an inaccurate result. Results A total 600 patients were retrospectively reviewed for the pH results. The mean difference in pH between spot urine value and the 24 hours collection values was 0.52±0.45 pH. Higher pH was associated with lower accuracy (p<0.001). The accuracy of spot urine samples to predict 24-hour pH values of <5.5 was 68.9%, 68.2% for 5.5 to 6.5 and 35% for >6.5. Samples taken more than 75 days apart had only 49% the accuracy of more recent samples (p<0.002). The overall accuracy is lower than 80% (p<0.001). Influence of diurnal variation was not significant (p=0.588). Conclusions Spot urine pH by dipstick is not an accurate method for evaluation of the patients with urolithiasis. Patients with alkaline urine are more prone to error with reliance on spot urine pH. PMID:27286119

  16. Prognostic factors for death and survival with or without complications in cardiac arrest patients receiving CPR within 24 hours of anesthesia for emergency surgery

    PubMed Central

    Siriphuwanun, Visith; Punjasawadwong, Yodying; Lapisatepun, Worawut; Charuluxananan, Somrat; Uerpairojkit, Ketchada

    2014-01-01

    than or equal to 65 years of age (OR =4.30, 95% CI =1.13–16.42), upper abdominal site of surgery (OR =10.86, 95% CI =1.99–59.13), shock prior to cardiac arrest (OR =3.62, 95% CI =1.30–10.12), arrhythmia prior to cardiac arrest (OR =4.61, 95% CI =1.01–21.13), and cardiac arrest occurring in the postoperative period (OR =3.63, 95% CI =1.31–10.02). Conclusion The mortality and morbidity in patients who received anesthesia for emergency surgery within 24 hours of their first CPR were high, and were associated with identifiable patient comorbidity, age, shock, anatomic site of operation, the timing of cardiac arrest, EKG rhythm, and the duration of CPR. EKG monitoring helps to identify cardiac arrest quickly and diagnose the EKG rhythm as a shockable or nonshockable rhythm, with CPR being performed as per the American Heart Association (AHA) CPR Guidelines 2010. The use of the fast track system in combination with an interdisciplinary team for surgery, CPR, and postoperative care helps to rescue patients in a short time. PMID:25378961

  17. From risky to safer home care: health care assistants striving to overcome a lack of training, supervision, and support.

    PubMed

    Swedberg, Lena; Chiriac, Eva Hammar; Törnkvist, Lena; Hylander, Ingrid

    2013-05-23

    Patients receiving home care are becoming increasingly dependent upon competent caregivers' 24-h availability due to their substantial care needs, often with advanced care and home care technology included. In Sweden, care is often carried out by municipality-employed paraprofessionals such as health care assistants (HC assistants) with limited or no health care training, performing advanced care without formal training or support. The aim of this study was to investigate the work experience of the HC assistants and to explore how they manage when delivering 24-h home care to patients with substantial care needs. Grounded theory methodology involving multiple data sources comprising interviews with HC assistants (n=19) and field observations in patients' homes was used to collect data and constant comparative analysis was used for analysis. The initial analysis revealed a number of barriers, competence gap; trapped in the home setting; poor supervision and unconnected to the patient care system, describing the risks associated with the situations of HC assistants working in home care, thus affecting their working conditions as well as the patient care. The core process identified was the HC assistants' strivings to combine safe home care with good working conditions by using compensatory processes. The four identified compensatory processes were: day-by-day learning; balancing relations with the patient; self-managing; and navigating the patient care system. By actively employing the compensatory processes, the HC assistants could be said to adopt an inclusive approach, by compensating for their own barriers as well as those of their colleagues' and taking overall responsibility for their workplace. In conclusion, the importance of supporting HC assistants in relation to their needs for training, supervision,and support from health care professionals must be addressed when organising 24-h home care to patients with substantial care needs in the future.

  18. [Home care workers' oral health awareness and practice for disabled elderly].

    PubMed

    Atsushi, Ohyama; Yoshinori, Toriyama; Yoshiyuki, Sasaki; Izumi, Koyama; Chie, Shimizu; Norimasa, Kurosaki; Shiro, Mataki

    2003-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the level of oral health awareness, and to explore the needs for home care workers to provide oral health care for disabled elderly. We conducted a questionnaire survey at two home-help service centers and a social welfare council. Subjects for this investigation were 63 home care workers. The results were as follows: 1. Ninety-six percent of home care workers thought it was necessary to provide oral health care for disabled elderly, but only 11 percent of them put oral care into practice on a daily basis. 2. From the results of a cause and effect diagram, necessities of oral care were summarized as six major causes: 1) Disabled elderly are often unable to brush their teeth, 2) The oral hygiene level may affect physical condition, 3) Disabled elderly should be protected from oral diseases, 4) Disabled elderly should have their mouths kept clean, 5) Eating and swallowing may become increasingly difficult, 6) Disabled elderly should take in adequate nutrition. 3. Sixty-eight percent of home care workers took part in a training course of nursing care including oral care. 4. Home care workers, dentists, dental hygienists, and nurses taught oral health care to home care workers. 5. From the results of a cause and effect diagram, there were three major items that home care workers want to know: 1) denture management, 2) the routine of oral care, 3) infection control. 6. Home care workers recognized that oral care should be provided by family members of disabled elderly or home care workers. PMID:12708030

  19. Supporting home care aides: what employers can do to assist their workers.

    PubMed

    Butler, Sandra S; Rowan, Noell

    2013-01-01

    The demand for personal care workers in home-based care is expected to double with the aging of the baby boomer population at the same time that home care agencies struggle with high rates of turnover. This article examines the job experience of 171 home care aides who remained on the job over 18 months of data collection in the longitudinal home care worker retention study. The three groups of themes that emerged from the analysis of telephone interviews with study participants-challenges of the job, compensating strategies, and potential employer interventions-provide insight on how to offer support to these valuable workers. PMID:24189019

  20. Assessment of 24-hours Aldosterone Administration on Protein Abundances in Fluorescence-Sorted Mouse Distal Renal Tubules by Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Thomas B; Pisitkun, Trairak; Hoffert, Jason D; Jensen, Uffe B; Fenton, Robert A; Praetorius, Helle A; Knepper, Mark A; Praetorius, Jeppe

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Aldosterone exerts multiple long-term effects in the distal renal tubules. The aim of this study was to establish a method for identifying proteins in these tubules that change in abundance by only 24-hours aldosterone administration. Methods Mice endogenously expressing green fluorescent protein (eGFP) in the connecting tubule and cortical collecting ducts were treated with a subcutaneous injection of 2.0 mg/kg aldosterone or vehicle (n=5), and sacrificed 24 hours later. Suspensions of single cells were obtained enzymatically, and eGFP positive cells were isolated by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). Samples of 100 μg proteins were digested with trypsin and labeled with 8-plex iTRAQ reagents and processed for liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Results FACS yielded 1.4 million cells per mouse. The LC-MS/MS spectra were matched to peptides by the SEQUEST search algorithm, which identified 3002 peptides corresponding to 506 unique proteins of which 20 significantly changed abundance 24-hours after aldosterone injection. Conclusion We find the method suitable and useful for studying hormonal effects on protein abundance in distal tubular segments. PMID:23428628

  1. Teaching home care electronic documentation skills to undergraduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Nokes, Kathleen M; Aponte, Judith; Nickitas, Donna M; Mahon, Pamela Y; Rodgers, Betsy; Reyes, Nancy; Chaya, Joan; Dornbaum, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Although there is general consensus that nursing students need knowledge and significant skill to document clinical findings electronically, nursing faculty face many barriers in ensuring that undergraduate students can practice on electronic health record systems (EHRS). External funding supported the development of an educational innovation through a partnership between a home care agency staff and nursing faculty. Modules were developed to teach EHRS skills using a case study of a homebound person requiring wound care and the Medicare-required OASIS documentation system. This article describes the development and implementation of the module for an upper-level baccalaureate nursing program located in New York City. Nursing faculty are being challenged to develop creative and economical solutions to expose nursing students to EHRSs in nonclinical settings.

  2. Exploring the medical home in Ryan White HIV care settings: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Beane, Stephanie N; Culyba, Rebecca J; DeMayo, Michael; Armstrong, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    Amid increased attention to the cost of health care, health information technology, and specialization and fragmentation in medicine, the medical home has achieved recognition as a model for more effective and efficient health care. Little data are available on recently funded HIV medical home demonstration projects, and no research richly describes existing medical home characteristics, implementation challenges, and impact on outcomes in longstanding HIV outpatient settings. The Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program (RWP) provides federal funding for primary and specialty care for people living with HIV. Although RWP clinics developed independently of the medical home model, existing data indirectly support that, with emphasis on primary, comprehensive, and patient-centered care, RWP clinics operate as medical homes. This study explores the development, definition, and implementation of medical home characteristics by RWP-funded providers in order to better understand how it fits with broader debates about medical homes and health care reform.

  3. Exploring the Medical Home in Ryan White HIV Care Settings: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Beane, Stephanie N.; Culyba, Rebecca J.; DeMayo, Michael; Armstrong, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    Amid increased attention to the cost of health care, health information technology, and specialization and fragmentation in medicine, the medical home has achieved recognition as a model for more effective and efficient health care. Little data are available on recently funded HIV medical home demonstration projects, and no research richly describes existing medical home characteristics, implementation challenges, and impact on outcomes in longstanding HIV outpatient settings. The Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program (RWP) provides federal funding for primary and specialty care for people living with HIV. Although RWP clinics developed independently of the medical home model, existing data indirectly support that, with emphasis on primary, comprehensive, and patient-centered care, RWP clinics operate as medical homes. This study explores the development, definition, and implementation of medical home characteristics by RWP-funded providers in order to better understand how it fits with broader debates about medical homes and health care reform. PMID:24560357

  4. Sensor network infrastructure for a home care monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, Filippo; Ullberg, Jonas; Stimec, Ales; Furfari, Francesco; Karlsson, Lars; Coradeschi, Silvia

    2014-02-25

    This paper presents the sensor network infrastructure for a home care system that allows long-term monitoring of physiological data and everyday activities. The aim of the proposed system is to allow the elderly to live longer in their home without compromising safety and ensuring the detection of health problems. The system offers the possibility of a virtual visit via a teleoperated robot. During the visit, physiological data and activities occurring during a period of time can be discussed. These data are collected from physiological sensors (e.g., temperature, blood pressure, glucose) and environmental sensors (e.g., motion, bed/chair occupancy, electrical usage). The system can also give alarms if sudden problems occur, like a fall, and warnings based on more long-term trends, such as the deterioration of health being detected. It has been implemented and tested in a test environment and has been deployed in six real homes for a year-long evaluation. The key contribution of the paper is the presentation of an implemented system for ambient assisted living (AAL) tested in a real environment, combining the acquisition of sensor data, a flexible and adaptable middleware compliant with the OSGistandard and a context recognition application. The system has been developed in a European project called GiraffPlus.

  5. Sensor Network Infrastructure for a Home Care Monitoring System

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Filippo; Ullberg, Jonas; Štimec, Ales; Furfari, Francesco; Karlsson, Lars; Coradeschi, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the sensor network infrastructure for a home care system that allows long-term monitoring of physiological data and everyday activities. The aim of the proposed system is to allow the elderly to live longer in their home without compromising safety and ensuring the detection of health problems. The system offers the possibility of a virtual visit via a teleoperated robot. During the visit, physiological data and activities occurring during a period of time can be discussed. These data are collected from physiological sensors (e.g., temperature, blood pressure, glucose) and environmental sensors (e.g., motion, bed/chair occupancy, electrical usage). The system can also give alarms if sudden problems occur, like a fall, and warnings based on more long-term trends, such as the deterioration of health being detected. It has been implemented and tested in a test environment and has been deployed in six real homes for a year-long evaluation. The key contribution of the paper is the presentation of an implemented system for ambient assisted living (AAL) tested in a real environment, combining the acquisition of sensor data, a flexible and adaptable middleware compliant with the OSGistandard and a context recognition application. The system has been developed in a European project called GiraffPlus. PMID:24573309

  6. Designing an Awareness Display for Senior Home Care Professionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vastenburg, Martijn H.; Vroegindeweij, Robbert J.

    Home care professionals play a central role in supporting elderly people when they need help to continue living in their own homes. Using awareness systems, caregivers might better be able to consider the actual and changing needs of individual clients, and better be prepared for the home visits. In the present situation, the functional requirements on a awareness systems for professional caregivers are unknown, and caregivers tend to be unaware of the potential use of these sensor-based systems. This paper presents a case study in which the user needs are studied using a working prototype; the prototype is used to make target users experience an awareness system in their everyday work practice, and thereby enable them to better reflect upon the user needs and the potential use of these systemsWhereas caregivers were skeptical at first, they did value the prototype in the evaluation phase. In the exit interviews, the caregivers came up with an interesting list of requirements and design directions for a future awareness display.

  7. Home care patients in four Nordic capitals - predictors of nursing home admission during one-year followup.

    PubMed

    Sørbye, Liv W; Hamran, Torunn; Henriksen, Nils; Norberg, Astrid

    2010-03-24

    The aim was to predict nursing home admission (NHA) for home care patients after a 12-month follow-up study. This Nordic study is derived from the aged in home care (AdHOC) project conducted in 2001-2003 with patients at 11 sites in Europe. The participants in the cohort study were randomly selected individuals, aged 65 years or older, receiving homecare in Oslo, Stockholm, Copenhagen, and Reykjavik. The Resident Assessment Instrument for Home Care (version 2.0) was used. Epidemiological and medical characteristics of patients and service utilization were recorded for 1508 home care patients (participation rate 74%). In this sample 75% were female. The mean age was 82.1 (6.9) years for men and 84.0 (6.6) for women. The most consistent predictor of NHA was receiving skilled nursing procedures at baseline (help with medication and injections, administration or help with oxygen, intravenous, catheter and stoma care, wounds and skin care) (adjusted odds ratio = 3.7, 95% confidence interval: 1.7-7.8; P < 0.001). In this Nordic material, stronger emphasizing on higher qualified nurses in a home care setting could prevent or delay NHA.

  8. Association of target organ damage with 24-hour systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels and hypertension subtypes in untreated Chinese.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fang-Fei; Li, Yan; Zhang, Lu; Xu, Ting-Yan; Ding, Feng-Hua; Staessen, Jan A; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2014-02-01

    The association of target organ damage with 24-hour systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels and ambulatory hypertension subtypes has not yet been examined in untreated Chinese patients. We measured left ventricular mass index by echocardiography (n=619), the urinary albumin:creatinine ratio (n=1047), and aortic pulse wave velocity by tonometry (n=1013) in 1047 untreated subjects (mean age, 50.6 years; 48.9% women). Normotension was a 24-hour systolic/diastolic blood pressure <130/<80 mm Hg. Hypertension subtypes were isolated diastolic hypertension and mixed systolic plus diastolic hypertension. We assessed associations of interest by multivariable-adjusted linear models. Using normotension as reference, mixed hypertension was associated with higher (P≤0.003) left ventricular mass index (+4.31 g/m(2)), urinary albumin:creatinine ratio (+1.63 mg/mmol), and pulse wave velocity (+0.76 m/s); and isolated diastolic hypertension was associated with similar left ventricular mass index and pulse wave velocity (P≥0.39), but higher urinary albumin:creatinine ratio (+1.24 mg/mmol; P=0.002). In younger participants (<55 years), the mutually independent effect sizes associated with 1 SD increases in 24-hour systolic/diastolic blood pressure were +3.31/-0.36 g/m(2) (P=0.009/0.79) for left ventricular mass index, +1.15/+1.14 mg/mmol (P=0.02/0.04) for the urinary albumin:creatinine ratio, and +0.54/-0.05 m/s (P<0.001/0.54) for pulse wave velocity. In older participants, these estimates were +3.58/+0.30 g/m(2) (P=0.045/0.88), +1.23/+1.05 mg/mmol (P=0.002/0.54), and +0.76/-0.49 m/s (P<0.001/<0.001), respectively. In conclusion, 24-hour systolic blood pressure and mixed hypertension are major determinants of target organ damage irrespective of age and target organ, whereas 24-hour diastolic blood pressure and isolated diastolic hypertension only relate to the urinary albumin:creatinine ratio below middle age.

  9. Why are some care homes better than others? An empirical study of the factors associated with quality of care for older people in residential homes in Surrey, England.

    PubMed

    Gage, Heather; Knibb, Wendy; Evans, Joanne; Williams, Peter; Rickman, Neil; Bryan, Karen

    2009-11-01

    This paper reports an empirical study that investigated associations between the quality of care received by older people in residential settings and features of the care homes in which they live. Data were gathered from the first announced inspection reports (2002-2003) of all 258 care homes for older people in one county of England (Surrey). The number of inspected standards failed in each home was used as the main indicator of quality of care. Independent variables (for each home) were: size, type, specialist registration, on-site nursing, ownership, year registered, location, maximum fee, vacancies, resident dependency, whether the home took publicly funded residents, care staff qualifications and managerial quality. Quality of care was modelled using a Poisson count maximum likelihood method based on 245 (91%) of the inspected homes for which relevant data were available. The results showed that quality of care (as defined by failures on national standards) was statistically associated with features of care homes and their residents. A higher probability of failing a standard was significantly associated with being a home that: was a for-profit small business (adjusted risk ratio (RR) = 1.17); was registered before 2000 (adj. RR = 1.22), accommodated publicly funded residents (adj. RR = 1.12); was registered to provide nursing care (adj. RR = 1.12). Fewer failures were associated with homes that were corporate for-profit (adj. RR = 0.82); held a specialist registration (adj. RR = 0.91); charged higher maximum fees (adj. RR = 0.98 per 100 pound sterling unit). A secondary analysis revealed a stronger model: higher scores on managerial standards correlated with fewer failures on other standards (r = 0.65, P < 0.001). The results of this study may help inform future policy. They are discussed in the context of alternative approaches to measuring quality of residential care, and in terms of their generalisability.

  10. Associations of Special Care Units and Outcomes of Residents with Dementia: 2004 National Nursing Home Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Huabin; Fang, Xiangming; Liao, Youlian; Elliott, Amanda; Zhang, Xinzhi

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: We compared the rates of specialized care for residents with Alzheimer's disease or dementia in special care units (SCUs) and other nursing home (NH) units and examined the associations of SCU residence with process of care and resident outcomes. Design and Methods: Data came from the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey. The indicators of…

  11. Advance Care Planning in Nursing Homes: Correlates of Capacity and Possession of Advance Directives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Rebecca S.; DeLaine, Shermetra R.; Chaplin, William F.; Marson, Daniel C.; Bourgeois, Michelle S.; Dijkstra, Katinka; Burgio, Louis D.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The identification of nursing home residents who can continue to participate in advance care planning about end-of-life care is a critical clinical and bioethical issue. This study uses high quality observational research to identify correlates of advance care planning in nursing homes, including objective measurement of capacity. Design…

  12. Transforming Data into Practical Information: Using Consumer Input to Improve Home-Care Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applebaum, Robert; Kunkel, Suzanne; Wilson, Ken

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: As funds have increased for the provision of in-home care, so too have concerns about the quality of services. In response, care management agencies and home-care providers have developed an array of monitoring activities designed to ensure the quality of services. In this article, we show how an area agency on aging both collected and…

  13. 76 FR 71920 - Payment for Home Health Services and Hospice Care by Non-VA Providers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-21

    ... medical charges associated with non-VA outpatient care, provided under 38 CFR 17.52 or 17.120. 75 FR 78901.... See 75 FR 78901. We explained: Home Health Care and Hospice Care he pricing methodology adopted by...-day period was $2,537.40 in FY 2010. The average Medicare reimbursement level for skilled home...

  14. An Evaluation of Health and Safety Hazards in Family Based Day Care Homes in Philadelphia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Hernando; Haynes, Sonia; Michael, Karen; Burstyn, Igor; Jandhyala, Malica; Palermo, Peter

    2011-01-01

    In Pennsylvania, Family Day Care Homes (FDCH) are private residences used to care for up to six children in a 24 h period. These homes are often times the most affordable alternative to day care centers parents have in low-income communities. The aims of this study were to evaluate FDCH providers' knowledge of hazards and their understanding of…

  15. Rethinking Teaching Nursing Homes: Potential for Improving Long-Term Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mezey, Mathy D.; Mitty, Ethel L.; Burger, Sarah Green

    2008-01-01

    To meet the special needs of and provide quality health care to nursing home residents, the health care workforce must be knowledgeable about the aging process. Health professionals are minimally prepared in their academic programs to care for older adults, and few programs have required rotations in geriatrics. Teaching nursing homes (TNHs) have…

  16. Children Can't Wait: Reducing Delays in Out-of-Home Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahn, Katharine, Ed.; Johnson, Paul, Ed.

    It is estimated that the average child entering out-of-home care will remain for 3 years. This book provides a collection of essays based on the need for permanent homes for children in foster care. The essays support the concept of shortening a child's time spent in temporary foster care. The six articles in the book are: (1) "Critical Issues in…

  17. Family Members Providing Home-Based Palliative Care to Older Adults: The Enactment of Multiple Roles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemmer, Sarah J.; Ward-Griffin, Catherine; Forbes, Dorothy

    2008-01-01

    Canadians are experiencing increased life expectancy and chronic illness requiring end-of-life care. There is limited research on the multiple roles for family members providing home-based palliative care. Based on a larger ethnographic study of client-family-provider relationships in home-based palliative care, this qualitative secondary analysis…

  18. Mapping a Research Agenda for Home Care Safety: Perspectives from Researchers, Providers, and Decision Makers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macdonald, Marilyn; Lang, Ariella; MacDonald, Jo-Anne

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative interpretive design was to explore the perspectives of researchers, health care providers, policy makers, and decision makers on key risks, concerns, and emerging issues related to home care safety that would inform a line of research inquiry. Defining safety specifically in this home care context has yet to be…

  19. The Effect of Entry Regulation in the Health Care Sector: the Case of Home Health.

    PubMed

    Polsky, Daniel; David, Guy; Yang, Jianing; Kinosian, Bruce; Werner, Rachel

    2014-02-01

    The consequences of government regulation in the post-acute care sector are not well understood. We examine the effect of entry regulation on quality of care in home health care by analyzing the universe of hospital discharges during 2006 for publicly insured beneficiaries (about 4.5 million) and subsequent home health admissions to determine whether there is a significant difference in home health utilization, hospital readmission rates, and health care expenditures in states with and without Certificate of Need laws (CON) regulating entry. We identify these effects by looking across regulated and nonregulated states within Hospital Referral Regions, which characterize well-defined health care markets and frequently cross state boundaries. We find that CON states use home health less frequently, but system-wide rehospitalization rates, overall Medicare expenditures, and home health practice patterns are similar. Removing CON for home health would have negligible system-wide effects on health care costs and quality.

  20. The Effect of Entry Regulation in the Health Care Sector: the Case of Home Health

    PubMed Central

    Polsky, Daniel; David, Guy; Yang, Jianing; Kinosian, Bruce; Werner, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    The consequences of government regulation in the post-acute care sector are not well understood. We examine the effect of entry regulation on quality of care in home health care by analyzing the universe of hospital discharges during 2006 for publicly insured beneficiaries (about 4.5 million) and subsequent home health admissions to determine whether there is a significant difference in home health utilization, hospital readmission rates, and health care expenditures in states with and without Certificate of Need laws (CON) regulating entry. We identify these effects by looking across regulated and nonregulated states within Hospital Referral Regions, which characterize well-defined health care markets and frequently cross state boundaries. We find that CON states use home health less frequently, but system-wide rehospitalization rates, overall Medicare expenditures, and home health practice patterns are similar. Removing CON for home health would have negligible system-wide effects on health care costs and quality. PMID:24497648

  1. Co-learning with home care aides and their clients: collaboratively increasing individual and organizational capacities.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Naoko; Madrigal, Jessica; Berbaum, Michael L; Henderson, Vida A; Jurivich, Donald A; Zanoni, Joseph; Marquez, David X; Cruz Madrid, Katya

    2015-01-01

    Changes in health care provide unprecedented opportunities for collaboration across research, education, and practice for the common goal of enhancing the well-being of older adults and their caregivers. This article describes how a pilot project, Promoting Seniors' Health with Home Care Aides, has synergistic education, research, and practice effects that enhance individual and organizational capacities. This pilot is an innovative partnership with home care aides to deliver a safe physical activity program appropriate for frail seniors in a real-life public home care program. The intervention and research occur in older adults' homes and thus provide rare opportunities for the research team and partners to learn from each other about dynamics of home care in older adults' life contexts. Co-learning is essential for continuous quality improvement in education, research and practice. The authors propose to establish "teaching home care" to ensure ongoing co-learning in gerontology and geriatrics. PMID:25671492

  2. Care coordination in long-term home- and community-based care.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Barbara; Harkey, Jane

    2014-09-01

    This article examines the role of care coordination, when fulfilled by a professional board-certified case manager, in successful long-term home- and community-based care (HCBC). A facet of care coordination, as also discussed, is a robust assessment of the individual by the professional case manager, who devises and implements a comprehensive care plan to address the clinical, psychosocial, and environmental needs of the individual as part of a person-centered, evidenced-based approach. To be successful, long-term HCBC starts with a robust assessment of the individual by a professional board-certified case manager. The case manager uses specific tools that incorporate qualitative measurements to address factors such as medical/clinical needs, (e.g., diagnoses, chronic conditions, and/or health risks); mental/behavioral health (e.g., geriatric depression screening); medication/pharmacology (e.g., review and reconciliation of prescribed and over the counter medications and supplements) and the individual's ability to self-administer; home safety; and presence of a family/support system and their ability and willingness to provide care. Based on these findings, the case manager puts in place a comprehensive care plan, working with a well-coordinated multidisciplinary team, including informal supports, physicians, registered nurses, occupational therapists, pharmacists, social workers, nutritionists, and other allied health professionals. From the beginning, the rigor of care coordination is essential to the how successfully individuals and their families/support systems realize their goal of long-term HCBC.

  3. Stability, precision, and near-24-hour period of the human circadian pacemaker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czeisler, C. A.; Duffy, J. F.; Shanahan, T. L.; Brown, E. N.; Mitchell, J. F.; Rimmer, D. W.; Ronda, J. M.; Silva, E. J.; Allan, J. S.; Emens, J. S.; Dijk, D. J.; Kronauer, R. E.

    1999-01-01

    Regulation of circadian period in humans was thought to differ from that of other species, with the period of the activity rhythm reported to range from 13 to 65 hours (median 25.2 hours) and the period of the body temperature rhythm reported to average 25 hours in adulthood, and to shorten with age. However, those observations were based on studies of humans exposed to light levels sufficient to confound circadian period estimation. Precise estimation of the periods of the endogenous circadian rhythms of melatonin, core body temperature, and cortisol in healthy young and older individuals living in carefully controlled lighting conditions has now revealed that the intrinsic period of the human circadian pacemaker averages 24.18 hours in both age groups, with a tight distribution consistent with other species. These findings have important implications for understanding the pathophysiology of disrupted sleep in older people.

  4. Primary care in nursing homes revisited: survey of the experiences of primary care physicians.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, L E; Jennings, S; Gavin, R; McConaghy, D; Collins, D R

    2014-09-01

    The Irish Health Information and Quality Authority (HIQA) published National Quality Standards for Residential Care Settings for Older People in 2009. We reported on experiences of general practitioners (GPs) in Dublin caring for nursing home patients (NHPs) in 2006. We revisit these experiences following publication of HIQA's standards. 400 GPs received an anonymous postal survey. Of 204 respondents, 145 (71%) felt NHPs required more contact time and 124 (61%) reported more complex consultations compared to other patients. Only 131 (64%) felt adequately trained in gerontology. 143 (70%) reported access to specialist advice, but only 6 (3%) reported a change in this following HIOA standards. 65 (32%) had witnessed substandard care in a NH, of which 16 (25%) made no report, similar figures to 2006. There remains similar levels of concern regarding patient complexity, substandard care, access to specialist support and training in the care of NHPs. Many GPs expressed uncertainty regarding their role in implementing HIQA standards.

  5. Re-Imagining the Care Home: A Spatially Responsive Approach to Arts Practice with Older People in Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatton, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers some of the spatial challenges of doing arts projects with older people in care homes, including those living with dementia. It reflects on the author's own experience of running a performance project with residents with at a care home in North London. Drawing on Lefebvre's concept of socially produced space, it argues that…

  6. Bringing Central Line–Associated Bloodstream Infection Prevention Home: CLABSI Definitions and Prevention Policies in Home Health Care Agencies

    PubMed Central

    Rinke, Michael L.; Bundy, David G.; Milstone, Aaron M.; Deuber, Kristin; Chen, Allen R.; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Miller, Marlene R.

    2015-01-01

    Background A study was conducted to investigate home health care agency central line–associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) definitions and prevention policies and compare them to the Joint Commission National Patient Safety Goal (NPSG.07.04.01), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) CLABSI prevention recommendations, and a best-practice central line care bundle for inpatients. Methods A telephone-based survey was conducted in 2011 of a convenience sample of home health care agencies associated with children’s hematology/oncology centers. Results Of the 97 eligible home health care agencies, 57 (59%) completed the survey. No agency reported using all five aspects of the National Healthcare and Safety Network/Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology CLABSI definition and adjudication process, and of the 50 agencies that reported tracking CLABSI rates, 20 (40%) reported using none. Only 10 agencies (18%) had policies consistent with all elements of the inpatient-focused NPSG.07.04.01, 10 agencies (18%) were consistent with all elements of the home care targeted CDC CLABSI prevention recommendations, and no agencies were consistent with all elements of the central line care bundle. Only 14 agencies (25%) knew their overall CLABSI rate: mean 0.40 CLABSIs per 1,000 central line days (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.18 to 0.61). Six agencies (11%) knew their agency’s pediatric CLABSI rate: mean 0.54 CLABSIs per 1,000 central line days (95% CI, 0.06 to 1.01). Conclusions The policies of a national sample of home health care agencies varied significantly from national inpatient and home health care agency targeted standards for CLABSI definitions and prevention. Future research should assess strategies for standardizing home health care practices consistent with evidence-based recommendations. PMID:23991509

  7. Health information use in home care: brainstorming barriers, facilitators, and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Stolee, Paul; Steeves, Brandie; Manderson, Brooke L; Toscan, Justine L; Glenny, Christine; Berg, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    There is growing recognition of the importance of sharing health information in home care; however, limited research exists to identify appropriate strategies, especially with home care providers. We engaged home care stakeholders from three locations in Ontario to determine facilitators, barriers, and recommendations for using health information in home care. The results suggest that health professionals recognize the potential of these systems to enhance communication through several emergent themes; however, there was a lack of agreement on the current facilitators, barriers, and recommendations for future interventions. More research is needed to achieve consensus before strategies for improvement can be initiated.

  8. Nutrition and Physical Activity Policies and Practices in Family Child Care Homes in Oregon: Baseline Findings from the Healthy Home Child Care Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunter, Katherine B.; Rice, Kelly R.; Trost, Stewart G.

    2012-01-01

    Baseline findings from the Healthy Home Child Care Project include data from Family Child Care Providers (FCCPs) in Oregon (n=53) who completed assessments of nutrition and physical activity policies and practices and BMI data for children in the care of FCCPs (n=205). Results show that a significant percentage of FCCPs failed to meet child care…

  9. Regulation, Subsidy Receipt and Provider Characteristics: What Predicts Quality in Child Care Homes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raikes, H.A.; Raikes, H.H.; Wilcox, B.

    2005-01-01

    Far less is known about predictors of quality for family child care homes than for child care centers. The current study of 120 randomly-selected family child care providers in four Midwestern states examined distal, state policy-level variables (family child care regulations and the concentration of children cared for who received public child…

  10. The 24-h recall instrument for home nursing to measure the activity profile of home nurses: development and psychometric testing.

    PubMed

    De Vliegher, Kristel; Aertgeerts, Bert; Declercq, Anja; Gosset, Christiane; Heyden, Isabelle; Van Geert, Michel; Moons, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Home health care today is challenged by a shift from an acute to a chronic health-care model, moving the focus of care from the hospital to home-care setting. This increased focus on care at home emphasizes the need for an efficient, effective, and transparent management of home health care. However, it is not precisely known what home-care nurses do; what kind of care is received by patients; what the performance of home nurses is; and what the impact of the increasing need for home nursing is on the current and future role of home nurses. In this respect, it is necessary to gain a clear insight into the activity profile of home nurses, but there is no gold standard to measure their activities. This study reports on the development and psychometric testing of the '24-hour recall instrument for home nursing' to measure the activity profile of home nurses. Five home nurses in Belgium, simultaneously with the researcher, registered the performed activities in a total of 69 patients, using the 24-h recall instrument for home nursing. The validity and the interrater reliability of this instrument were high: the proportions that observed agreement were very high; the strength of kappa agreement was substantial to almost perfect; the prevalence index showed great variety; and the bias index was low. The findings in this study support the validity evidence based on test content and the interrater reliability of the 24-h recall instrument. This instrument can help to shape practice and policy by making the home nursing profession more transparent: a clear insight into the kind of care that is provided by home nurses and is received by the patients in primary care contributes to the development of a clear definition of the role of home nurses in health care.

  11. The 24-h recall instrument for home nursing to measure the activity profile of home nurses: development and psychometric testing.

    PubMed

    De Vliegher, Kristel; Aertgeerts, Bert; Declercq, Anja; Gosset, Christiane; Heyden, Isabelle; Van Geert, Michel; Moons, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Home health care today is challenged by a shift from an acute to a chronic health-care model, moving the focus of care from the hospital to home-care setting. This increased focus on care at home emphasizes the need for an efficient, effective, and transparent management of home health care. However, it is not precisely known what home-care nurses do; what kind of care is received by patients; what the performance of home nurses is; and what the impact of the increasing need for home nursing is on the current and future role of home nurses. In this respect, it is necessary to gain a clear insight into the activity profile of home nurses, but there is no gold standard to measure their activities. This study reports on the development and psychometric testing of the '24-hour recall instrument for home nursing' to measure the activity profile of home nurses. Five home nurses in Belgium, simultaneously with the researcher, registered the performed activities in a total of 69 patients, using the 24-h recall instrument for home nursing. The validity and the interrater reliability of this instrument were high: the proportions that observed agreement were very high; the strength of kappa agreement was substantial to almost perfect; the prevalence index showed great variety; and the bias index was low. The findings in this study support the validity evidence based on test content and the interrater reliability of the 24-h recall instrument. This instrument can help to shape practice and policy by making the home nursing profession more transparent: a clear insight into the kind of care that is provided by home nurses and is received by the patients in primary care contributes to the development of a clear definition of the role of home nurses in health care. PMID:24479985

  12. A desire to be seen: family caregivers' experiences of their caring role in palliative home care.

    PubMed

    Linderholm, Märit; Friedrichsen, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Primary health care is the base of Swedish healthcare, and many terminally ill patients are cared for at home. A dying relative has a profound impact on his/her family members' situation, including negative effects on roles, well-being, and health. The aim of this study was to explore how the informal carers of a dying relative in palliative home care experienced their caring role and support during the patient's final illness and after death. Fourteen family members were selected in 4 primary health care areas in Sweden. Data were collected using open, tape-recorded interviews. A hermeneutic approach was used to analyze the data. The findings revealed that being an informal carer was natural when a relative became seriously ill. More or less voluntarily, the family member took on a caring role of control and responsibility. The informal carers felt left out and had feelings of powerlessness when they did not manage to establish a relationship with the healthcare professionals. For the informal carers to feel seen, it was necessary for them to narrate about their own supporting role.

  13. What Makes Migrant Live-in Home Care Workers in Elder Care Be Satisfied with Their Job?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iecovich, Esther

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The study aims to examine job satisfaction of migrant live-in home care workers who provide care to frail older adults and to examine the extent to which quality of relationships between the care provider and care recipient and workplace characteristics is associated with job satisfaction. Design and Methods: A convenience sample that…

  14. Protecting care home residents from mistreatment and abuse: on the need for policy.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    With a rising older person population with increasing life expectancies, the demand for care homes will increase in the future. Older people in care homes are particularly vulnerable due to their dependencies related to cognitive and/or functional self-care challenges. Although many care homes provide good care, maltreatment and abuse of older people can and does occur. One major step in preventing and addressing maltreatment in care homes is having comprehensive and responsive policy, which delineates national expectations that are locally implemented. This paper examines the literature related to maltreatment in care homes and argues for policy based on a multisystems approach. Policy needs to firstly acknowledge and address general societal issues which tacitly impact on older person care delivery, underpin how care homes and related systems should be operationalized, and finally delineate expected standards and outcomes for individual experience of care. Such a policy demands attention at every level of the health care and societal system. Furthermore, contemporary issues central to policy evolution in care homes are discussed, such as safeguarding education and training and fostering organization whistle-blowing protection. PMID:26640391

  15. Effects of Home Exercise on Physical Function and Activity in Home Care Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nakae, Hideyuki; Tsushima, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of guidance in home exercise on physical function and the amount of activity in home care patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). [Subjects and Methods] A 2-month home exercise intervention consisting of self-administered exercise by patients (self-exercise) and home visit exercise therapy guided by a physical therapist (home visit exercise) was conducted in 10 home care patients with PD to compare changes in physical function, activities of daily living, and postural status between before and after the intervention. [Results] A decreased number of chief complaints and alleviation of fear of falling were observed after the intervention. In terms of physical function, a significant increase in flexibility and muscle strength were observed, although no significant changes were found in activities of daily living, gait, and balance. Although there was no significant change in the total amount of daily physical activity, the analysis of daily posture changes revealed a significant reduction in the percentage of time spent lying down and a significant increase in the percentage of time spent sitting after the intervention. [Conclusion] Guidance in home exercise in home care patients with PD can be effective in making self-exercise a habit, improving range of motion and muscle strength, and reducing the time spent in a supine position. PMID:25435681

  16. House Calls: The Impact of Home-Based Care for Older Adults With Alzheimer's and Dementia.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kasey; Bachman, Sara S

    2015-01-01

    Older adults with Alzheimer's/dementia have high health care costs; they may benefit from home-based care, but few have home visits. This article describes a home-based care program for frail elders, including those with Alzheimer's/dementia. Descriptive statistics are provided for Medicare-enrolled program participants and matched controls with Alzheimer's/dementia on expenditures along six services: skilled nursing facility, inpatient acute, physician, home health, hospice, and social services. Cases with dementia were significantly more likely to have home health and hospice expenditures than controls, suggesting potential for the program to improve end-of-life care. Very few cases or controls had any social service expenditures. Social workers should advocate for the expanded role of home-based care for older adults with dementia and for increased Medicare reimbursement of social work services. PMID:26186425

  17. Co-Learning With Home Care Aides and Their Clients: Collaboratively Increasing Individual and Organizational Capacities

    PubMed Central

    MURAMATSU, NAOKO; MADRIGAL, JESSICA; BERBAUM, MICHAEL L.; HENDERSON, VIDA A.; JURIVICH, DONALD A.; ZANONI, JOSEPH; MARQUEZ, DAVID X.; MADRID, KATYA CRUZ

    2015-01-01

    Changes in health care provide unprecedented opportunities for collaboration across research, education, and practice for the common goal of enhancing the well-being of older adults and their caregivers. This article describes how a pilot project, “Promoting Seniors’ Health with Home Care Aides,” has synergistic education, research and practice effects that enhance individual and organizational capacities. This pilot is an innovative partnership with home care aides to deliver a safe physical activity program appropriate for frail seniors in a real-life public home care program. The intervention and research occur in older adults’ homes and thus provide rare opportunities for the research team and partners to learn from each other about dynamics of home care in older adults’ life contexts. Co-learning is essential for continuous quality improvement in education, research and practice. We propose to establish “Teaching Home Care” to ensure ongoing co-learning in gerontology and geriatrics. PMID:25671492

  18. House Calls: The Impact of Home-Based Care for Older Adults With Alzheimer's and Dementia.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kasey; Bachman, Sara S

    2015-01-01

    Older adults with Alzheimer's/dementia have high health care costs; they may benefit from home-based care, but few have home visits. This article describes a home-based care program for frail elders, including those with Alzheimer's/dementia. Descriptive statistics are provided for Medicare-enrolled program participants and matched controls with Alzheimer's/dementia on expenditures along six services: skilled nursing facility, inpatient acute, physician, home health, hospice, and social services. Cases with dementia were significantly more likely to have home health and hospice expenditures than controls, suggesting potential for the program to improve end-of-life care. Very few cases or controls had any social service expenditures. Social workers should advocate for the expanded role of home-based care for older adults with dementia and for increased Medicare reimbursement of social work services.

  19. Cross-validation of a composite pain scale for preschool children within 24 hours of surgery.

    PubMed

    Suraseranivongse, S; Santawat, U; Kraiprasit, K; Petcharatana, S; Prakkamodom, S; Muntraporn, N

    2001-09-01

    This study was designed to cross-validate a composite measure of the pain scales CHEOPS (Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Pain Scale), OPS (Objective Pain Scale, simplified for parent use by replacing blood pressure measurement with observation of body language or posture), TPPPS (Toddler Preschool Postoperative Pain Scale) and FLACC (Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability) in 167 Thai children aged 1-5.5 yr. The pain scales were translated and tested for content, construct and concurrent validity, including inter-rater and intra-rater reliabilities. Discriminative validity in immediate and persistent pain for the age groups < or =3 and >3 yr were also studied. The children's behaviour was videotaped before and after surgery, before analgesia had been given in the post-anaesthesia care unit (PACU), and on the ward. Four observers then rated pain behaviour from rearranged videotapes. The decision to treat pain was based on routine practice and was made by a researcher unaware of the rating procedure. All tools had acceptable content validity and excellent inter-rater and intra-rater reliabilities (intraclass correlation >0.9 and >0.8 respectively). Construct validity was determined by the ability to differentiate the group with no pain before surgery and a high pain level after surgery, before analgesia (P<0.001). The positive correlations among all scales in the PACU and on the ward (r=0.621-0.827, P<0.0001) supported concurrent validity. Use of the kappa statistic indicated that CHEOPS yielded the best agreement with the routine decision to treat pain. The younger and older age groups both yielded very good agreement in the PACU but only moderate agreement on the ward. On the basis of data from this study, we recommend CHEOPS as a valid, reliable and practical tool. PMID:11517123

  20. Meal-induced 24-hour profile of circulating glycated insulin in type 2 diabetic subjects measured by a novel radioimmunoassay.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, John R; McKillop, Aine M; Mooney, Mark H; Flatt, Peter R; Bell, Patrick M; O'harte, Finbarr P M

    2003-05-01

    Increasing evidence supports a role for glycated insulin in the insulin-resistant state of type 2 diabetes. We measured 24-hour profiles of plasma glycated insulin, using a novel radioimmunoassay (RIA), to evaluate the effects of meal stimulation and intermittent fasting on circulating concentrations of plasma glycated insulin in type 2 diabetes. Patients (n = 6; hemoglobin A(1c) [HbA(1c)], 7.2% +/- 0.6%; fasting plasma glucose, 7.4 +/- 0.7 mmol/L; body mass index [BMI], 35.7 +/- 3.5 kg/m(2); age, 56.3 +/- 4.4 years) were admitted for 24 hours and received a standardized meal regimen. Half-hourly venous samples were taken for plasma glycated insulin, glucose, insulin, and C-peptide concentrations between 8 am and midnight and 2-hourly overnight. The mean plasma glycated insulin concentration over 24 hours was 27.8 +/- 1.2 pmol/L with a mean ratio of insulin:glycated insulin of 11:1. Circulating glucose, insulin, C-peptide, and glycated insulin followed a basal and meal-related pattern with most prominent increments following breakfast, lunch, and evening meal, respectively. The mean concentrations of glycated insulin during the morning, afternoon, evening, and night-time periods were 24.4 +/- 2.5, 28.7 +/- 2.3, 31.1 +/- 2.1, and 26.2 +/- 1.5 pmol/L, respectively, giving significantly higher molar ratios of insulin:glycated insulin of 18.0:1, 14.2:1, and 12.7:1 compared with 7.0:1 at night (P <.01 to P <.001). These data demonstrate that glycated insulin circulates at relatively high concentrations in type 2 diabetes with a diurnal pattern of basal and meal-stimulated release. A higher proportion of glycated insulin circulates at night suggestive of differences in metabolic clearance compared with native insulin.

  1. Effects of Fibrinogen Concentrate on Thrombin Generation, Thromboelastometry Parameters, and Laboratory Coagulation Testing in a 24-Hour Porcine Trauma Model

    PubMed Central

    Zentai, Christian; Solomon, Cristina; van der Meijden, Paola E. J.; Spronk, Henri M. H.; Schnabel, Jonas; Rossaint, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In a 24-hour porcine model of liver injury, we showed that fibrinogen supplementation does not downregulate endogenous fibrinogen synthesis. Here we report data from the same study showing the impact of fibrinogen on coagulation variables. Materials and Methods: Coagulopathy was induced in 20 German land race pigs by hemodilution and blunt liver injury. Animals randomly received fibrinogen concentrate (100 mg/kg) or saline. Coagulation parameters were assessed and thromboelastometry (ROTEM) was performed. Results: Fibrinogen concentrate significantly reduced the prolongations of EXTEM clotting time, EXTEM clot formation time, and prothrombin time induced by hemodilution and liver injury. A decrease in clot strength was also ameliorated. Endogenous thrombin potential was significantly higher in the fibrinogen group than in the control group, 20 minutes (353 ± 24 vs 289 ± 22 nmol/L·min; P < .05) and 100 minutes (315 ± 40 vs 263 ± 38 nmol/L·min; P < .05) after the start of infusion. However, no significant between-group differences were seen in other thrombin generation parameters or in d-dimer or thrombin–antithrombin levels. Fibrinogen–platelet binding was reduced following liver injury, with no significant differences between groups. No significant between-group differences were observed in any parameter at ∼12 and ∼24 hours. Conclusion: This study suggests that, in trauma, fibrinogen supplementation may shorten some measurements of the speed of coagulation initiation and produce a short-lived increase in endogenous thrombin potential, potentially through increased clotting substrate availability. Approximately 12 and 24 hours after starting fibrinogen concentrate/saline infusion, all parameters measured in this study were comparable in the 2 study groups. PMID:25948634

  2. Developing a Method to Test the Validity of 24 Hour Time Use Diaries Using Wearable Cameras: A Feasibility Pilot

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Paul; Thomas, Emma; Doherty, Aiden; Harms, Teresa; Burke, Órlaith; Gershuny, Jonathan; Foster, Charlie

    2015-01-01

    Self-report time use diaries collect a continuous sequenced record of daily activities but the validity of the data they produce is uncertain. This study tests the feasibility of using wearable cameras to generate, through image prompted interview, reconstructed 'near-objective' data to assess their validity. 16 volunteers completed the Harmonised European Time Use Survey (HETUS) diary and used an Autographer wearable camera (recording images at approximately 15 second intervals) for the waking hours of the same 24-hour period. Participants then completed an interview in which visual images were used as prompts to reconstruct a record of activities for comparison with the diary record. 14 participants complied with the full collection protocol. We compared time use and number of discrete activities from the diary and camera records (using 10 classifications of activity). In terms of aggregate totals of daily time use we found no significant difference between the diary and camera data. In terms of number of discrete activities, participants reported a mean of 19.2 activities per day in the diaries, while image prompted interviews revealed 41.1 activities per day. The visualisations of the individual activity sequences reveal some potentially important differences between the two record types, which will be explored at the next project stage. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using wearable cameras to reconstruct time use through image prompted interview in order to test the concurrent validity of 24-hour activity time-use budgets. In future we need a suitably powered study to assess the validity and reliability of 24-hour time use diaries. PMID:26633807

  3. The Automated Self-Administered 24-Hour Dietary Recall for Children, 2012 version, for youth aged 9 to 11 Years: A validation study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our objective was to validate the 2012 version of the Automated Self-Administered 24-Hour Dietary Recall for Children (ASA24-Kids-2012), a self-administered web-based 24-hour dietary recall (24hDR) instrument, among children aged 9 to 11 years, in two sites using a quasiexperimental design. In one s...

  4. Aldosterone-to-Renin Ratio Is Associated With Reduced 24-Hour Heart Rate Variability and QTc Prolongation in Hypertensive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Grübler, Martin R.; Kienreich, Katharina; Gaksch, Martin; Verheyen, Nicolas; Hartaigh, Bríain Ó.; Fahrleitner-Pammer, Astrid; März, Winfried; Schmid, Johannes; Oberreither, Eva-Maria; Wetzel, Julia; Catena, Cristiana; Sechi, Leonardo A.; Pieske, Burkert; Tomaschitz, Andreas; Pilz, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aldosterone is considered to exert direct effects on the myocardium and the sympathetic nervous system. Both QT time and heart rate (HR) variability (HRV) are considered to be markers of arrhythmic risk and autonomous dysregulation. In this study, we investigated the associations between aldosterone, QT time, and HRV in patients with arterial hypertension. We recruited 477 hypertensive patients (age: 60.2 ± 10.2 years; 52.3% females) with a mean systolic/diastolic 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) value of 128 ± 12.8/77.1 ± 9.2 mmHg and with a median of 2 (IQR: 1–3) antihypertensive agents. Patients were recruited from the outpatient clinic at the Department of Internal Medicine of the Medical University of Graz, Austria. Blood samples, 24-hour HRV derived from 24-hour blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) and ECG's were obtained. Plasma aldosterone and plasma renin concentrations were measured by means of a radioimmunoassay. Twenty-four-hour urine specimens were collected in parallel with ABPM. Mean QTc was 423.3 ± 42.0 milliseconds for males and 434.7 ± 38.3 milliseconds for females. Mean 24H-HR and 24H-HRV was 71.9 ± 9.8 and 10.0 ± 3.6 bpm, respectively. In linear regression analyses adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, ABPM, and current medication, aldosterone to active renin ratio (AARR) was significantly associated with the QTc interval, a marker for cardiac repolarization abnormalities (mean = 426 ± 42.4 milliseconds; β-coefficient = 0.121; P = 0.03) as well as with the 24-hour heart rate variability a surrogate for autonomic dysfunction (median = 9.67 [IQR = 7.38–12.22 bpm]; β-coefficient = −0.133; P = 0.01). In hypertensive patients, AARR is significantly related to QTc prolongation as well as HRV. Further studies investigating the effects of mineralocorticoid receptor blocker and aldosterone synthase inhibitors on QTc and HRV are warranted

  5. A Plaque Disruption Index Identifies Patients with Non-STE-Type 1 Myocardial Infarction within 24 Hours of Troponin Positivity

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mohaissen, Maha A.; Carere, Ronald G.; Mancini, G. B. John; Humphries, Karin H.; Whalen, Beth A.; Lee, Terry; Scheuermeyer, Frank X.; Ignaszewski, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Markers of plaque destabilization and disruption may have a role in identifying non-STE- type 1 Myocardial Infarction in patients presenting with troponin elevation. We hypothesized that a plaque disruption index (PDI) derived from multiple biomarkers and measured within 24 hours from the first detectable troponin in patients with acute non-STE- type 1 MI (NSTEMI-A) will confirm the diagnosis and identify these patients with higher specificity when compared to individual markers and coronary angiography. Methods We examined 4 biomarkers of plaque destabilization and disruption: myeloperoxidase (MPO), high-sensitivity interleukin-6, myeloid-related protein 8/14 (MRP8/14) and pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) in 83 consecutive patients in 4 groups: stable non-obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD), stable obstructive CAD, NSTEMI-A (enrolled within 24 hours of troponin positivity), and NSTEMI-L (Late presentation NSTEMI, enrolled beyond the 24 hour limit). The PDI was calculated and the patients’ coronary angiograms were reviewed for evidence of plaque disruption. The diagnostic performance of the PDI and angiography were compared. Results Compared to other biomarkers, MPO had the highest specificity (83%) for NSTEMI-A diagnosis (P<0.05). The PDI computed from PAPP-A, MRP8/14 and MPO was higher in NSTEMI-A patients compared to the other three groups (p<0.001) and had the highest diagnostic specificity (87%) with 79% sensitivity and 86% accuracy, which were higher compared to those obtained with MPO, but did not reach statistical significance (P>0.05 for all comparisons). The PDI had higher specificity and accuracy for NSTEMI-A diagnosis compared to coronary angiography (P<0.05). Conclusions A PDI measured within 24 hour of troponin positivity has potential to identify subjects with acute Non-ST-elevation type 1 MI. Additional evidence using other marker combinations and investigation in a sufficiently large non-selected cohort is warranted

  6. Characteristics and Use of Home Health Care by Men and Women Aged 65 and Over

    MedlinePlus

    ... April 18, 2012 Characteristics and Use of Home Health Care by Men and Women Aged 65 and Over ... and Roberto Valverde, M.P.H., Division of Health Care Statistics Abstract Objective —This report presents national estimates ...

  7. [Quality of care among older adults with diabetes mellitus: comparison between community-dwelling adults attended to by home care services and nursing home residents in Dresden].

    PubMed

    Coll-Planas, Laura; Bergmann, Antje; Schwarz, Peter; Guillén-Grima, Francisco; Schulze, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Due to changes in the age structure of the population the number of frail elderly diabetics is rising. This change is accompanied by an increase in nursing care efforts and requirements in both home care services and nursing homes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of care in the home care and nursing home setting concerning the structure, the process and the outcome quality at the institutional and patient level. This is an observational transversal study. At the institutional level a standardised questionnaire of the German Diabetes Research Institute was sent to all nursing homes (37) and home care services (88) in Dresden. At the patient level 37 homebound patients and 46 residents were recruited. A Geriatric assessment and a clinical examination were performed and a blood sample was analysed. Patients with moderate or severe cognitive impairment were excluded. The prevalence of diabetes in home care services was 27.2% and in nursing homes 36.1%. The participation rate among the institutions was 21.6% (n = 27). In 14% (n = 12) of the diabetic patients the HbA1c was above 8% (poor metabolic control) and in 24% (20) it was between 7% and 8% (regular metabolic control). 56.6% (n = 21) of the homebound elderly diabetics and 46.7% (n = 21) of the nursing home residents with diabetes were hospitalized at least once during the last 12 months. Our study showed a high prevalence of diabetes in both types of institutions in Dresden and a high hospitalisation rate of the elderly diabetics, although 62% of the patients had an optimum metabolic control. These facts indicate that the quality of care of frail elderly diabetics concerning the multimorbidity might be further improved. PMID:18269054

  8. Testing the bed-blocking hypothesis: does nursing and care home supply reduce delayed hospital discharges?

    PubMed

    Gaughan, James; Gravelle, Hugh; Siciliani, Luigi

    2015-03-01

    Hospital bed-blocking occurs when hospital patients are ready to be discharged to a nursing home, but no place is available, so that hospital care acts as a more costly substitute for long-term care. We investigate the extent to which greater supply of nursing home beds or lower prices can reduce hospital bed-blocking using a new Local Authority (LA) level administrative data from England on hospital delayed discharges in 2009-2013. The results suggest that delayed discharges respond to the availability of care home beds, but the effect is modest: an increase in care home beds by 10% (250 additional beds per LA) would reduce social care delayed discharges by about 6-9%. We also find strong evidence of spillover effects across LAs: more care home beds or fewer patients aged over 65 years in nearby LAs are associated with fewer delayed discharges.

  9. Operating environment and USA nursing homes' participation in the subacute care market: a longitudinal analysis.

    PubMed

    Weech-Maldonado, Robert; Qaseem, Amir; Mkanta, William

    2009-02-01

    We examined the impact of environmental factors on USA nursing homes' participation in the subacute care market. Findings suggest that the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 did not have a significant impact in the participation of nursing homes in the subacute care market from 1998 to 2000. However, there was a declining trend in the participation of nursing homes in the subacute care market after the implementation of Medicare prospective payment system (PPS). Furthermore, nursing homes with a higher proportion of Medicare residents were more likely to exit the subacute care market after PPS. Results also suggest that nursing homes have responded strategically to the environmental demand for subacute care services. Nursing homes located in markets with higher Medicare managed care penetration were more likely to offer subacute care services. Environmental munificence was also an important predictor of nursing home innovation into subacute care. Nursing homes in states with higher Medicaid reimbursement and those in less competitive markets were more likely to participate in the subacute care market.

  10. Registered Nurse Staffing Mix and Quality of Care in Nursing Homes: A Longitudinal Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hongsoo; Harrington, Charlene; Greene, William H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the relationship between registered nurse (RN) staffing mix and quality of nursing home care measured by regulatory violations. Design and Methods: A retrospective panel data study (1999-2003) of 2 groups of California freestanding nursing homes. One group was 201 nursing homes that consistently met the state's minimum standard…

  11. Work experience, work environment, and blood exposure among home care and hospice nurses.

    PubMed

    Leiss, Jack K

    2012-01-01

    Blood exposure rates among home care and hospice nurses (RNs) in the United States are markedly lower for nurses with more home care/hospice experience, whether or not they have more total years of nursing experience (i.e., in other work environments). This study examined whether the protective effect of home care/hospice experience was greater for nurses who worked under three types of circumstances that are typical of the home care/hospice work environment and conducive to blood exposure. A mail survey was conducted in 2006 among home care/hospice nurses in North Carolina, a largely rural state in the southeastern U.S. The adjusted response rate was 69% (n=833). Blood exposure rates were higher among nurses with ≤5 years' experience in home care/hospice. Contrary to expectations, the protective effect of more experience was greater among nurses who did not have limited access to safety devices/personal protective equipment, did not have to rush during home visits, and did not often visit homes with unrestrained pets, unruly children, poor lighting, or extreme clutter. These results suggest that characteristics of the home care/hospice work environment limit nurses' ability to use their experience to prevent blood exposure.

  12. The impact of kidney transplantation on 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure in end-stage renal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myung Hyun; Ko, Kyung Min; Ahn, Seung Won; Bae, Myoung Nam; Choi, Bum Soon; Park, Cheol Whee; Kim, Yong-Soo; Yang, Chul Woo; Chung, Byung Ha

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we prospectively investigated the impact of kidney transplantation (KT) on the status of hypertension, including circadian rhythm in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. We performed 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring and office BP measurement in 48 patients before and 1 year after KT. According to the nocturnal reduction in systolic BP (ΔSBP), the patients were divided into dippers, non-dippers, and reverse dippers. After KT, the mean BP value in office BP and 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring did not change, but the proportion of patients taking anti-hypertensive drugs and the pill number significantly decreased. In contrast, the mean ΔSBP significantly decreased, and the proportion of non-dippers and reverse dippers did not decrease. Decrease in ΔSBP after KT was associated with inferior allograft function during follow-up. Our study suggests that KT improved the overall BP level, but it did not affect abnormal circadian rhythm in ESRD patients. PMID:26051924

  13. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Augments Perceptual Sensitivity and 24-Hour Retention in a Complex Threat Detection Task

    PubMed Central

    Falcone, Brian; Coffman, Brian A.; Clark, Vincent P.; Parasuraman, Raja

    2012-01-01

    We have previously shown that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) improved performance of a complex visual perceptual learning task (Clark et al. 2012). However, it is not known whether tDCS can enhance perceptual sensitivity independently of non-specific, arousal-linked changes in response bias, nor whether any such sensitivity benefit can be retained over time. We examined the influence of stimulation of the right inferior frontal cortex using tDCS on perceptual learning and retention in 37 healthy participants, using signal detection theory to distinguish effects on perceptual sensitivity (d′) from response bias (ß). Anodal stimulation with 2 mA increased d′, compared to a 0.1 mA sham stimulation control, with no effect on ß. On completion of training, participants in the active stimulation group had more than double the perceptual sensitivity of the control group. Furthermore, the performance enhancement was maintained for 24 hours. The results show that tDCS augments both skill acquisition and retention in a complex detection task and that the benefits are rooted in an improvement in sensitivity (d′), rather than changes in response bias (ß). Stimulation-driven acceleration of learning and its retention over 24 hours may result from increased activation of prefrontal cortical regions that provide top-down attentional control signals to object recognition areas. PMID:22511978

  14. Enhanced carotid-cardiac baroreflex response and elimination of orthostatic hypotension 24 hours after acute exercise in paraplegics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelke, K. A.; Shea, J. D.; Doerr, D. F.; Convertino, V. A.

    1992-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that an acute bout of maximal exercise can ameliorate orthostatic hypotension consequent to prolonged wheelchair confinement, we evaluated heart rate (HR), systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure responses during 15 minutes of 70 degrees head-up tilt (HUT) in 10 paraplegic subjects 24 hours after arm crank exercise designed to elicit maximal effort, and during a control (no exercise) conditions. Additionally, the carotid baroreceptor stimulus-cardiac response relationship was determined by measurement of R-R interval during external application of graded pressures to the carotid sinuses. One week separated the treatment conditions. The maximum slope of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex response was increased (p = 0.049) by exercise (6.2 +/- 1.7 msec/mmHg) compared to control (3.3 +/- 0.6). During control HUT, HR increased from 61 +/- 1 to 90 +/- 7 bpm (p = 0.001) while SBP decreased from 118 +/- 5 to 106 +/- 9 mmHg (p = 0.025). During HUT 24 hours after exercise, HR increased from 60 +/- 2 to 90 +/- 4 bpm (p = 0.001), but the reduction in SBP was essentially eliminated (116 +/- 5 to 113 +/- 5 mmHg).

  15. Transcranial direct current stimulation augments perceptual sensitivity and 24-hour retention in a complex threat detection task.

    PubMed

    Falcone, Brian; Coffman, Brian A; Clark, Vincent P; Parasuraman, Raja

    2012-01-01

    We have previously shown that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) improved performance of a complex visual perceptual learning task (Clark et al. 2012). However, it is not known whether tDCS can enhance perceptual sensitivity independently of non-specific, arousal-linked changes in response bias, nor whether any such sensitivity benefit can be retained over time. We examined the influence of stimulation of the right inferior frontal cortex using tDCS on perceptual learning and retention in 37 healthy participants, using signal detection theory to distinguish effects on perceptual sensitivity (d') from response bias (ß). Anodal stimulation with 2 mA increased d', compared to a 0.1 mA sham stimulation control, with no effect on ß. On completion of training, participants in the active stimulation group had more than double the perceptual sensitivity of the control group. Furthermore, the performance enhancement was maintained for 24 hours. The results show that tDCS augments both skill acquisition and retention in a complex detection task and that the benefits are rooted in an improvement in sensitivity (d'), rather than changes in response bias (ß). Stimulation-driven acceleration of learning and its retention over 24 hours may result from increased activation of prefrontal cortical regions that provide top-down attentional control signals to object recognition areas.

  16. Comparison of Interviewer-Administered and Automated Self-Administered 24-Hour Dietary Recalls in 3 Diverse Integrated Health Systems.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Frances E; Dixit-Joshi, Sujata; Potischman, Nancy; Dodd, Kevin W; Kirkpatrick, Sharon I; Kushi, Lawrence H; Alexander, Gwen L; Coleman, Laura A; Zimmerman, Thea P; Sundaram, Maria E; Clancy, Heather A; Groesbeck, Michelle; Douglass, Deirdre; George, Stephanie M; Schap, TusaRebecca E; Subar, Amy F

    2015-06-15

    Twenty-four-hour dietary recalls provide high-quality intake data but have been prohibitively expensive for large epidemiologic studies. This study's goal was to assess whether the web-based Automated Self-Administered 24-Hour Recall (ASA24) performs similarly enough to the standard interviewer-administered, Automated Multiple-Pass Method (AMPM) 24-hour dietary recall to be considered a viable alternative. In 2010-2011, 1,081 adults from 3 integrated health systems in Detroit, Michigan; Marshfield, Wisconsin; and Kaiser-Permanente Northern California participated in a field trial. A quota design ensured a diverse sample by sex, age, and race/ethnicity. Each participant was asked to complete 2 recalls and was randomly assigned to 1 of 4 protocols differing by type of recall and administration order. For energy, the mean intakes were 2,425 versus 2,374 kcal for men and 1,876 versus 1,906 kcal for women by AMPM and ASA24, respectively. Of 20 nutrients/food groups analyzed and controlling for false discovery rate, 87% were judged equivalent at the 20% bound. ASA24 was preferred over AMPM by 70% of the respondents. Attrition was lower in the ASA24/AMPM study group than in the AMPM/ASA24 group, and it was lower in the ASA24/ASA24 group than in the AMPM/AMPM group. ASA24 offers the potential to collect high-quality dietary intake information at low cost with less attrition.

  17. Predictors of poor blood pressure control assessed by 24 hour monitoring in patients with type B acute aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Delsart, Pascal; Midulla, Marco; Sobocinski, Jonathan; Achere, Charles; Haulon, Stephan; Claisse, Gonzague; Mounier-Vehier, Claire

    2012-01-01

    The chronic management of post-acute aortic dissection (AD) of the descending aorta (Type B) is based on optimal control of blood pressure (BP), with a target BP < 135/80 mmHg. The aim of our study was to determine and verify effective blood pressure control with an objective measurement method and to identify predicting factors. Methods We collected data from 26 patients hospitalized in the acute phase of a Type B AD between 2006 and 2009. Two groups were defined according to 24 hour BP monitoring results at follow-up. Group 1 consisted of patients with a controlled BP (<130/80 mmHg), and Group 2 consisted of patients with an uncontrolled BP. Results Thirty four percent of patients showed an uncontrolled BP at checkup. Vascular history before AD (P = 0.06), high baseline BP trend (P = 0.01 for systolic and P = 0.08 for diastolic), and greater diameter of the descending aorta (P = 0.02) were associated with poor BP control. Conclusion Prognosis after AD is associated with BP control. Therefore, 24 hour BP monitoring can be made. PMID:22272072

  18. Genesis of home care in Brazil at the start of the twentieth century.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Stefanie Griebeler; Kruse, Maria Henriqueta Luce

    2016-06-01

    Objective to discuss the conditions that enabled home care at the beginning of the twentieth century. Method study of the genealogic inspiration on home care. The empirical material consisted of legal documents on the subject that were published in the Official Journal. The documents were studied using analytical tools, such as Power, Discipline and Biopolitics, which were inspired in Foucault. Results two analytical categories were established, "home inspection: visiting nurses and tuberculosis" and "records: political and economic apparatus". Final considerations tuberculosis, the new profession of visiting nurses, inspection records and the detailed analysis of the cities grant home care a nature of surveillance, inspection and control to conduct the behaviour of individuals.

  19. Are you speaking French in Japan? Home care's 21st-century leadership model.

    PubMed

    Conn, C D; Seago, M L

    1995-10-01

    Home care leadership is headed for change in the 21st century in demographics as well as legislative issues. With the influx of men into a female-dominated industry, leadership in home care will need to integrate the language of traditional male and female culture into a workable management style.

  20. Physical Activity and Beverages in Home- and Center-Based Child Care Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tandon, Pooja S.; Garrison, Michelle M.; Christakis, Dimitri A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To describe and compare obesity prevention practices related to physical activity and beverages in home- and center-based child care programs. Methods: A telephone survey of licensed home- and center-based child care programs in Florida, Massachusetts, Michigan, and Washington between October and December 2008. Results: Most programs…