Science.gov

Sample records for 24-micron light detected

  1. He-Ne laser frequencies near 2.4 microns and their application to hydrogen fluoride detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberhardt, J. E.; Pryor, A. W.

    1983-06-01

    Eberhardt and Pryor (1982) have reported that emission near 2.40 microns from an He-Ne laser coincides very closely with the 1R(5) absorption frequency of hydrogen fluoride and may, therefore, be used to monitor the presence of HF in the atmosphere. The mismatch between the center frequency of the laser line and that of the 1R(5) HF absorption line appears to be on the order of 100 MHz and, therefore, is negligible when the HF line is broadened to a width of approximately 1000 MHz in the atmosphere. The absorption cross section (2.0 x 10 to the -18th sq cm/HF molecule in the atmosphere) is sufficient to detect HF at a level of approximately 20 microgram/cu m in a 500 m atmospheric path. It is found that three frequencies near 2.4 microns can be conveniently obtained from an He-Ne laser.

  2. Spitzer 24 Micron Observations of Optical/Near-Infrared-Selected Extremely Red Galaxies: Evidence for Assembly of Massive Galaxies at Z approximately equal to 1-2?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yan, Lin; Choi, Philip I.; Fadda, D.; Marleau, F. R.; Soifer, B. T.; Im, M.; Armus, L.; Frayer, D. T.; Storrie-Lombardi, L. J.; Thompson, D. J.; Teplitz, H. I.; Helou, G.; Appleton, P. N.; Chapman, S.; Fan, F.; Heinrichsen, I.; Lacy, M.; Shupe, D. L.; Squires, G. K.; Surace, J.; Wilson, G.

    2004-01-01

    We carried out direct measurement of the fraction of dusty sources in a sample of extremely red galaxies with (R - Ks) >= 5.3 mag and Ks < 20:2 mag, using 24 micron data from the Spitzer Space Telescope. Combining deep 24 micron Ks- and R-band data over an area of 64 arcmin(sup 2) in ELAIS N1 of the Spitzer First Look Survey (FLS), we find that 50% +/- 6% of our extremely red object (ERO) sample have measurable 24 micron flux above the 3 (sigma) flux limit of 40 (micro)Jy. This flux limit corresponds to a star formation rate (SFR) of 12 solar masses per year 1, much more sensitive than any previous long-wavelength measurement. The 24 micron-detected EROs have 24 micron/2.2 micron and 24 micron/0.7 micron flux ratios consistent with infrared luminous, dusty sources at z >= 1, and are an order of magnitude too red to be explained by an infrared quiescent spiral or a pure old stellar population at any redshift. Some of these 24 micron-detected EROs could be active galactic nuclei; however, the fraction among the whole ERO sample is probably small, 10%-20%, as suggested by deep X-ray observations as well as optical spectroscopy. Keck optical spectroscopy of a sample of similarly selected EROs in the FLS field suggests that most of the EROs in ELAIS N1 are probably at z 1. The mean 24 micron flux (167 (micro)Jy) of the 24 micron-detected ERO sample roughly corresponds to the rest-frame 12 micron luminosity, (nu)L(nu)(12 micron, of 3x10(exp 10)(deg) solar luminosities at z 1. Using the c IRAS (nu)L(nu)(12 (micron) and infrared luminosity LIR(8-1000 (micron), we infer that the (LIR) of the 24 micron- detected EROs is 3 x 10(exp 11) and 1 x 10(exp 12) solar luminosities at z = 1.0 and similar to that of local luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) and ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs). The corresponding SFR would be roughly 50-170 solar masses per year. If the timescale of this starbursting phase is on the order of 108 yr as inferred for the local LIRGs and ULIRGs, the

  3. Statistics of 24 Micron Field Asteroids in the Spitzer Space Telescope Taurus Legacy Science Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hines, Dean C.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.; Padgett, D. L.; Brooke, T. Y.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Rebull, L. M.; McCabe, C.; Huard, T. L.; Fukagawa, M.; Terebey, S.; Hillenbrand, L. A.; Guedel, M.; Audard, M.; Monin, J.; Guieu, S.; Knapp, G. R.; Evans, N. J., II; Taurus Spitzer Legacy Science Team

    2007-12-01

    We report on field asteroids detected in MIPS 24 micron scan maps from the Taurus legacy science survey. The data were acquired in two observation epochs separated by 3-6 hours, and reach a 5-sigma sensitivity near 1 mJy - sufficient to detect main-belt objects with diameters below 1 km. We find a source density of about 250 asteroids per square degree on the ecliptic plane, with a cumulative brightness distribution which follows a -1.2 power law in flux density. We relate this to the intrinsic asteroid size distribution using a Monte Carlo model of the main belt population and the standard thermal model to predict the observed flux density distribution. An intrinsic size distribution with power-law slope of -2.3 with radius produces an observed brightness distribution that matches the Spitzer results. This result is in good agreement with previous determinations from the Sloan survey for objects in this size range. We further discuss how our analysis can be extended to other large area Spitzer surveys to enable us to characterize the source counts and size distributions over a range of ecliptic latitudes, and to search for radial differences within the main belt. Support for this work was provided by NASA to the Spitzer GO-1 and GO-3 Taurus survey projects (PIDs 3584 & 30816). The Spitzer Space Telescope is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under a contract with NASA.

  4. 2.4 Micron Cutoff AlGaAsSb/InGaAsSb Phototransistors for Shortwave IR Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Abedin, Nurul; Sulima, Oleg V.; Swaminathan, Krishna; Ismail, Syed; Singh, Upendra N.

    2006-01-01

    Shortwave infrared detectors are critical for several applications including remote sensing and optical communications. Several detectors are commercially available for this wavelength range, but they lack sufficient gain, which limits their detectivity. The characterization results of an AlGaAsSb/InGaAsSb phototransistor for shortwave IR application are reported. The phototransistor is grown using molecular beam epitaxy technique. Spectral response measurements showed a uniform responsivity between 1.2 and 2.4 micron region with a mean value of 1000 A/W. A maximum detectivity of 3.4 X 10(exp 11) cmHz1/2/W was obtained at 2 micron at -20 C and 1.3 V.

  5. Test and evaluation of the 2.4-micron photorefractor ocular screening system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    An improved 2.4-m photorefractor ocular screening system was tested and evaluated. The photorefractor system works on the principal of obtaining a colored photograph of both human eyes; and, by analysis of the retinal reflex images, certain ocular defects can be detected such a refractive error, strabismus, and lens obstructions. The 2.4-m photorefractory system uses a 35-mm camera with a telephoto lens and an electronic flash attachment. Retinal reflex images obtained from the new 2.4-m system are significantly improved over earlier systems in image quality. Other features were also improved, notably portability and reduction in mass. A total of 706 school age children were photorefracted, 211 learning disabled and 495 middle school students. The total students having abnormal retinal reflexes were 156 or 22 percent, and 133 or 85 percent of the abnormal had refractive error indicated. Ophthalmological examination was performed on 60 of these students and refractive error was verified in 57 or 95 percent of those examined. The new 2.4-m system has a NASA patent pending and is authorized by the FDA. It provides a reliable means of rapidly screening the eyes of children and young adults for vision problems. It is especially useful for infants and other non-communicative children who cannot be screened by the more conventional methods such as the familiar E chart.

  6. Polarized light detection in spiders.

    PubMed

    Dacke, M; Doan, T A; O'Carroll, D C

    2001-07-01

    We describe here the detection of polarized light by the simple eyes of spiders. Using behavioural, morphological, electrophysiological and optical studies, we show that spiders have evolved two different mechanisms to resolve the e-vector of light. Wolf spiders (Lycosidae), are able to turn in response to rotation of a polarized pattern at the zenith of their visual fields, and we also describe a strip in the ventral retina of the principal (anterio-median) eyes that views this location and has receptors tiered into two layers. This provides each pair of receptors with a similar optical solution to that provided by the 'dorsal rim area' of the insect compound eye. In contrast, gnaphosid spiders have evolved a pair of lensless secondary eyes for the detection of polarized light. These two eyes, each sensitive to orthogonal directions of polarization, are perfectly designed to integrate signals from the larger part of the sky and cooperate to analyse the polarization of light. Built-in polarizers help to improve signal purity. Similar organisation in the eyes of several other spider families suggests that these two mechanisms are not restricted to only a few families.

  7. Portable light detection system for the blind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilber, R. L.; Carpenter, B. L.

    1973-01-01

    System can be used to detect "ready" light on automatic cooking device, to tell if lights are on for visitors, or to tell whether it is daylight or dark outside. Device is actuated like flashlight. Light impinging on photo cell activates transistor which energizes buzzer to indicate presence of light.

  8. Visible light communication based motion detection.

    PubMed

    Sewaiwar, Atul; Tiwari, Samrat Vikramaditya; Chung, Yeon-Ho

    2015-07-13

    In this paper, a unique and novel visible light communication based motion detection is presented. The proposed motion detection is performed based on white light LEDs and an array of photodetectors from existing visible light communication (VLC) links, thus providing VLC with three functionalities of illumination, communication and motion detection. The motion is detected by observing the pattern created by intentional obstruction of the VLC link. Experimental and simulation results demonstrate the validity of the proposed VLC based motion detection technique. The VLC based motion detection can benefit smart devices control in VLC based smart home environments.

  9. Traffic Light Detection Using Conic Section Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinyalmdary, S.; Yilmaz, A.

    2016-06-01

    Traffic lights detection and their state recognition is a crucial task that autonomous vehicles must reliably fulfill. Despite scientific endeavors, it still is an open problem due to the variations of traffic lights and their perception in image form. Unlike previous studies, this paper investigates the use of inaccurate and publicly available GIS databases such as OpenStreetMap. In addition, we are the first to exploit conic section geometry to improve the shape cue of the traffic lights in images. Conic section also enables us to estimate the pose of the traffic lights with respect to the camera. Our approach can detect multiple traffic lights in the scene, it also is able to detect the traffic lights in the absence of prior knowledge, and detect the traffics lights as far as 70 meters. The proposed approach has been evaluated for different scenarios and the results show that the use of stereo cameras significantly improves the accuracy of the traffic lights detection and pose estimation.

  10. Window flaw detection by backscatter lighting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crockett, L. K.; Minton, F. R.

    1978-01-01

    Portable fiber-optic probe detects tiny flaws in transparent materials. Probe transmits light through surface to illuminate interior of material by backscattering off its edges. Light-sensitive contact paper records scratch pattern. Technique can be used for rapid visual checks. Flexible fiber optics are safely used in explosive or flammable areas; they present no hazard of breakage or contamination in controlled environments.

  11. Detecting ticks on light versus dark clothing.

    PubMed

    Stjernberg, Louise; Berglund, Johan

    2005-01-01

    It is a common belief that ticks are more visible and easier to detect on light clothing in comparison with dark clothing. We studied which of the clothing, light or dark, had the least attractive effect on Ixodes ricinus, thus minimizing exposure and thereby in theory helping to prevent tick-borne diseases in humans. 10 participants, exposed by walking in tick endemic areas, wore alternately light and dark clothing before every new exposure. Nymphal and adult ticks on the clothing were collected and counted. In total, 886 nymphal ticks were collected. The overall mean in found ticks between both groups differed significantly, with 20.8 more ticks per person on light clothing. All participants had more ticks on light clothing in all periods of exposure. Dark clothing seems to attract fewer ticks.

  12. Light Scattering based detection of food pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The current methods for detecting foodborne pathogens are mostly destructive (i.e., samples need to be pretreated), and require time, personnel, and laboratories for analyses. Optical methods including light scattering based techniques have gained a lot of attention recently due to its their rapid a...

  13. Optical detection dental disease using polarized light

    DOEpatents

    Everett, Matthew J.; Colston, Jr., Billy W.; Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Fried, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    A polarization sensitive optical imaging system is used to detect changes in polarization in dental tissues to aid the diagnosis of dental disease such as caries. The degree of depolarization is measured by illuminating the dental tissue with polarized light and measuring the polarization state of the backscattered light. The polarization state of this reflected light is analyzed using optical polarimetric imaging techniques. A hand-held fiber optic dental probe is used in vivo to direct the incident beam to the dental tissue and collect the reflected light. To provide depth-resolved characterization of the dental tissue, the polarization diagnostics may be incorporated into optical coherence domain reflectometry and optical coherence tomography (OCDR/OCT) systems, which enables identification of subsurface depolarization sites associated with demineralization of enamel or bone.

  14. Ultraviolet light detection using an optical microcavity.

    PubMed

    Harker, Audrey; Mehrabani, Simin; Armani, Andrea M

    2013-09-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light exposure is connected to both physical and psychological diseases. As such, there is significant interest in developing sensors that can detect UV light in the mW/cm2 intensity range with a high signal-to-noise ratio. In this Letter, we demonstrate a UV sensor based on a silica integrated optical microcavity that has a linear operating response in both the forward and backward directions from 14 to 53 mW/cm2. The sensor response agrees with the developed predictive theory based on a thermodynamic model. Additionally, the signal-to-noise ratio is above 100 at physiologically relevant intensity levels.

  15. Object detectability at increased ambient lighting conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Pollard, Benjamin J.; Chawla, Amarpreet S.; Delong, David M.; Hashimoto, Noriyuki; Samei, Ehsan

    2008-06-15

    Under typical dark conditions encountered in diagnostic reading rooms, a reader's pupils will contract and dilate as the visual focus intermittently shifts between the high luminance display and the darker background wall, resulting in increased visual fatigue and the degradation of diagnostic performance. A controlled increase of ambient lighting may, however, reduce the severity of these pupillary adjustments by minimizing the difference between the luminance level to which the eyes adapt while viewing an image (L{sub adp}) and the luminance level of diffusely reflected light from the area surrounding the display (L{sub s}). Although ambient lighting in reading rooms has conventionally been kept at a minimum to maintain the perceived contrast of film images, proper Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) calibration of modern medical-grade liquid crystal displays can compensate for minor lighting increases with very little loss of image contrast. This paper describes two psychophysical studies developed to evaluate and refine optimum reading room ambient lighting conditions through the use of observational tasks intended to simulate real clinical practices. The first study utilized the biologic contrast response of the human visual system to determine a range of representative L{sub adp} values for typical medical images. Readers identified low contrast horizontal objects in circular foregrounds of uniform luminance (5, 12, 20, and 30 cd/m{sup 2}) embedded within digitized mammograms. The second study examined the effect of increased ambient lighting on the detection of subtle objects embedded in circular foregrounds of uniform luminance (5, 12, and 35 cd/m{sup 2}) centered within a constant background of 12 cd/m{sup 2} luminance. The images were displayed under a dark room condition (1 lux) and an increased ambient lighting level (50 lux) such that the luminance level of the diffusely reflected light from the background wall was approximately

  16. Object detectability at increased ambient lighting conditions.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Benjamin J; Chawla, Amarpreet S; Delong, David M; Hashimoto, Noriyuki; Samei, Ehsan

    2008-06-01

    Under typical dark conditions encountered in diagnostic reading rooms, a reader's pupils will contract and dilate as the visual focus intermittently shifts between the high luminance display and the darker background wall, resulting in increased visual fatigue and the degradation of diagnostic performance. A controlled increase of ambient lighting may, however, reduce the severity of these pupillary adjustments by minimizing the difference between the luminance level to which the eyes adapt while viewing an image (L(adp)) and the luminance level of diffusely reflected light from the area surrounding the display (L(s)). Although ambient lighting in reading rooms has conventionally been kept at a minimum to maintain the perceived contrast of film images, proper Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) calibration of modern medical-grade liquid crystal displays can compensate for minor lighting increases with very little loss of image contrast. This paper describes two psychophysical studies developed to evaluate and refine optimum reading room ambient lighting conditions through the use of observational tasks intended to simulate real clinical practices. The first study utilized the biologic contrast response of the human visual system to determine a range of representative L(adp) values for typical medical images. Readers identified low contrast horizontal objects in circular foregrounds of uniform luminance (5, 12, 20, and 30 cd/m2) embedded within digitized mammograms. The second study examined the effect of increased ambient lighting on the detection of subtle objects embedded in circular foregrounds of uniform luminance (5, 12, and 35 cd/m2) centered within a constant background of 12 cd/m2 luminance. The images were displayed under a dark room condition (1 lux) and an increased ambient lighting level (50 lux) such that the luminance level of the diffusely reflected light from the background wall was approximately equal to the image L(adp) value of

  17. First Light from Extrasolar Planets and Implications for Astrobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, L. Jeremy; Seager, Sara; Harrington, Joseph; Deming, Drake

    2005-01-01

    The first light from an extrasolar planet was recently detected. These results, obtained for two transiting extrasolar planets at different infrared wavelengths, open a new era in the field of extrasolar planet detection and characterization because for the first time we can now detect planets beyond the solar system directly. Using the Spitzer Space Telescope at 24 microns, we observed the modulation of combined light (star plus planet) from the HD 209458 system as the planet disappeared behind the star during secondary eclipse and later re-emerged, thereby isolating the light from the planet. We obtained a planet-to-star ratio of 0.26% at 24 microns, corresponding to a brightness temperature of 1130 + / - 150 K. We will describe this result in detail, explain what it can tell us about the atmosphere of HD 209458 b, and discuss implications for the field of astrobiology. These results represent a significant step on the path to detecting terrestrial planets around other stars and in understanding their atmospheres in terms of composition and temperature.

  18. Shedding New Light on Early Caries Detection

    PubMed Central

    Choo-Smith, Lin-P'ing; Dong, Cecilia C.S.; Cleghorn, Blaine; Hewko, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Dental caries continues to be a common chronic disease among various population groups. Patient care can be improved with detection at the earliest stage. However, current techniques do not have sufficient sensitivity and specificity. We discuss 2 new methods — optical coherence tomography (OCT) and polarized Raman spectroscopy (PRS) — that are potentially useful for early caries detection and monitoring. OCT produces morphologic depth images of near-surface tissue structures with a resolution that is an order of magnitude greater than ultrasound imaging. Based on measurement of back-scattered near infrared light, OCT shows that sound enamel causes high-intensity back-scattering at the tooth surface that decreases rapidly with depth. In contrast, incipient lesions cause higher light back-scattering at the tooth surface and subsurface scattering indicative of porosity caused by demineralization. The scatter region within the enamel correlates well with the classical triangular shape of subsurface lesions observed in histologic sections. OCT imaging not only allows identification of incipient lesions, but also provides information on surface integrity and lesion depth. PRS furnishes biochemical information about the tooth's composition, mineral content and crystallinity. The depolarization ratio derived from the dominant phosphate peak of hydroxyapatite in sound teeth is consistently lower than that from incipient caries. This difference is attributed to the change in enamel crystallite morphology or orientation that occurs with acid demineralization. Thus, PRS can be used to confirm suspect lesions determined by OCT and rule out false-positive signals from non-carious anomalies. The combination of OCT and PRS provides a new detection method with high sensitivity and specificity that will improve caries management and patient care. Future studies are aimed at developing intraoral probes to validate the findings in vivo. PMID:19126361

  19. Detection of light transformations and concomitant changes in surface albedo.

    PubMed

    Gerhard, Holly E; Maloney, Laurence T

    2010-07-16

    We report two experiments demonstrating that (1) observers are sensitive to information about changes in the light field not captured by local scene statistics and that (2) they can use this information to enhance detection of changes in surface albedo. Observers viewed scenes consisting of matte surfaces at many orientations illuminated by a collimated light source. All surfaces were achromatic, all lights neutral. In the first experiment, observers attempted to discriminate small changes in direction of the collimated light source (light transformations) from matched changes in the albedos of all surfaces (non-light transformations). Light changes and non-light changes shared the same local scene statistics and edge ratios, but the latter were not consistent with any change in direction to the collimated source. We found that observers could discriminate light changes as small as 5 degrees with sensitivity d' > 1 and accurately judge the direction of change. In a second experiment, we measured observers' ability to detect a change in the surface albedo of an isolated surface patch during either a light change or a surface change. Observers were more accurate in detecting isolated albedo changes during light changes. Measures of sensitivity d' were more than twice as great.

  20. Light mediators in dark matter direct detections

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tai; Miao, Sen; Zhou, Yu-Feng

    2015-03-17

    In an extended effective operator framework, we investigate in detail the effects of light mediators on the event spectra of dark matter (DM)-nucleus scatterings. The presence of light mediators changes the interpretation of the current experimental data, especially the determination of DM particle mass. We show by analytic and numerical illustrations that in general for all the operators relevant to spin-independent scatterings, the DM particle mass allowed by a given set of experimental data increases significantly when the mediator particle becomes lighter. For instance, in the case of CDMS-II-Si experiment, the allowed DM particle mass can reach ∼50 (100) GeV at 68% (90%) confidence level, which is much larger than ∼10 GeV in the case with contact interactions. The increase of DM particle mass saturates when the mediator mass is below O(10) MeV. The upper limits from other experiments such as SuperCDMS, CDMSlite, CDEX, XENON10/100, LUX, PandaX etc. all tend to be weaker toward high DM mass regions. In a combined analysis, we show that the presence of light mediators can partially relax the tension in the current results of CDMS-II-Si, SuperCDMS and LUX.

  1. Light mediators in dark matter direct detections

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tai; Miao, Sen; Zhou, Yu-Feng E-mail: miaosen@itp.ac.cn

    2015-03-01

    In an extended effective operator framework, we investigate in detail the effects of light mediators on the event spectra of dark matter (DM)-nucleus scatterings. The presence of light mediators changes the interpretation of the current experimental data, especially the determination of DM particle mass. We show by analytic and numerical illustrations that in general for all the operators relevant to spin-independent scatterings, the DM particle mass allowed by a given set of experimental data increases significantly when the mediator particle becomes lighter. For instance, in the case of CDMS-II-Si experiment, the allowed DM particle mass can reach ∼ 50 (100)  GeV at 68% (90%) confidence level, which is much larger than 0∼ 1 GeV in the case with contact interactions. The increase of DM particle mass saturates when the mediator mass is below O(10) MeV . The upper limits from other experiments such as SuperCDMS, CDMSlite, CDEX, XENON10/100, LUX, PandaX etc. all tend to be weaker toward high DM mass regions. In a combined analysis, we show that the presence of light mediators can partially relax the tension in the current results of CDMS-II-Si, SuperCDMS and LUX.

  2. A Bayesian approach to traffic light detection and mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinyalamdary, Siavash; Yilmaz, Alper

    2017-03-01

    Automatic traffic light detection and mapping is an open research problem. The traffic lights vary in color, shape, geolocation, activation pattern, and installation which complicate their automated detection. In addition, the image of the traffic lights may be noisy, overexposed, underexposed, or occluded. In order to address this problem, we propose a Bayesian inference framework to detect and map traffic lights. In addition to the spatio-temporal consistency constraint, traffic light characteristics such as color, shape and height is shown to further improve the accuracy of the proposed approach. The proposed approach has been evaluated on two benchmark datasets and has been shown to outperform earlier studies. The results show that the precision and recall rates for the KITTI benchmark are 95.78 % and 92.95 % respectively and the precision and recall rates for the LARA benchmark are 98.66 % and 94.65 % .

  3. Method of Detecting Coliform Bacteria from Reflected Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of detecting coliform bacteria in water from reflected light, and also includes devices for the measurement, calculation and transmission of data relating to that method.

  4. Detecting light in whispering-gallery-mode resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy (Inventor); Maleki, Lutfollah (Inventor); Mohageg, Makan (Inventor); Le, Thanh M. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An optical device including a whispering gallery mode (WGM) optical resonator configured to support one or more whispering gallery modes; and a photodetector optically coupled to an exterior surface of the optical resonator to receive evanescent light from the optical resonator to detect light inside the optical resonator.

  5. Light echo detection of circumstellar disks around flaring stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaidos, Eric J.

    1994-01-01

    Light echoes can be used to detect and characterize disks around flaring stars. Such disks are thought to be a hallmark of planet formation but are very difficult to detect by ordinary means. Dwarf emission-line M stars experience flares with luminosities comparable to their quiescent photospheres on time scales of minutes, less than the light travel time across a disk many astronomical units in extent; they are thus ideal candidates for such a search. Bromley (1992) calculated that the detection of Jupiter-sized companions using light echoes requires photometric accuracies better than 1 part in 10(exp 6). However, a disk consisting of grains or small bodies will scatter a much larger fraction of the light than a planet of similar mass. I estimate the light echo amplitutdes from plausible geometries of circumstellar material and present simulation light curves. The light echo amplitudes are typically 1% of the flare and I conclude that such events will be detected best in cases where the flare is eclipsed by the star. An examination of the time scales associated with internal processes in a protoplanetary disks around dM stars indicates that any primordial disks may become undetectable in 10(exp 4) years and will have completely disappeared by 10(exp 8) years, the estimated age of dMe stars in the solar neighborhood. However, searches for light echoes might constrain the amount of material continuing to fall into these young stellar systems in the form of comet-like objects.

  6. 14 CFR 25.1403 - Wing icing detection lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Wing icing detection lights. 25.1403... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 25.1403 Wing icing... ice on the parts of the wings that are critical from the standpoint of ice accumulation....

  7. 14 CFR 25.1403 - Wing icing detection lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Wing icing detection lights. 25.1403... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 25.1403 Wing icing... ice on the parts of the wings that are critical from the standpoint of ice accumulation....

  8. 14 CFR 25.1403 - Wing icing detection lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Wing icing detection lights. 25.1403... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 25.1403 Wing icing... ice on the parts of the wings that are critical from the standpoint of ice accumulation....

  9. 14 CFR 25.1403 - Wing icing detection lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Wing icing detection lights. 25.1403... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 25.1403 Wing icing... ice on the parts of the wings that are critical from the standpoint of ice accumulation....

  10. 14 CFR 25.1403 - Wing icing detection lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Wing icing detection lights. 25.1403... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 25.1403 Wing icing... ice on the parts of the wings that are critical from the standpoint of ice accumulation....

  11. Limitations for heterodyne detection of Brillouin scattered light

    SciTech Connect

    Allemeier, R.T.; Wagner, J.W.; Telschow, K.L.

    1995-01-01

    One means by which elastic properties of a material may be determined is measuring sound wave velocities in the material, from which elastic moduli of interest can be computed. Velocity can be measured by conventional piezoelectric transduction techniques, by applying laser ultrasonics, or by using Brillouin-scattering methods. Brillouin-scattering techniques for determining the sound wave velocity are particularly attractive since they are completely noninvasive. Only a probe beam of light is required since the thermal energy in the material provides the elastic motion. Heterodyne methods for detection of Brillouin-scattered light are considered one possible means to increase the speed of the scattered light frequency detection. Results of experiments with simulated Brillouin scattering suggest that heterodyne detection of the Brillouin-scattered light is feasible. Experiments to detect Brillouin-scattered light, with water as the scattering medium, were designed and interpreted using the results of the simulated scattering experiments. Overall, results showed that it is difficult to narrow the linewidth for Brillouin scattering to an acceptable level. The results given indicate that heterodyne detection of the Brillouin components requires detection bandwidths that are quite small, perhaps 10 Hz or lower. These small bandwidths can be routinely achieved using lock-in amplifier techniques.

  12. Nanofabrication of Metallic Nanostructures and Integration with Light Detection Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Liang

    Metallic nanostructures have been investigated with various applications especially for integration with light detection devices. The incident light can be manipulated by those nanostructures to enhance light absorption therefor improve device performance. However, previous studies focused on optical design. The electrical properties of these integrated light detection devices have not been fully considered. The photon generated carriers transport and collection are critical for light detection devices as well. An optimized device platform considering from both the optical and electrical aspects to fully utilize these nanostructures is highly desired for future light detection devices. This dissertation targeted on three objectives, beginning with the fabrication process development of various nanostructures on different substrates. High quality nanostructures were achieved with minimum 20nm gap and 45nm line width. The second objective was developing the metallic fishnet nanostructures integrated Schottky contact a-Si solar cell to improve both light absorption and photon generated carrier collection. The fishnet was designed as the light trapping structure and 2D connected top contact to collect carriers. The third objective was developing metallic nanostructures integrated GeSn photodetectors. The H shape nano antennas were integrated on GeSn photodetectors. Multiple resonant absorption peaks at infrared range were observed using spectroscopic ellipsometry. However, there was no obvious photoresponse value improvement of developed solar cells and H shape antennas integrated GeSn photodetectors. For further investigation, interdigitated electrodes integrated GeSn photodetectors were designed. With less carrier transit time, the responsivity value of the integrated Ge0.991Sn0.009 photodetector was 72muA/W at 1.55mum at room temperature which was 6 times higher comparing to device without integration. Meanwhile, with the increased carrier life time by decreasing

  13. CLASSiC: Cherenkov light detection with silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adriani, Oscar; Albergo, Sebastiano; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Sciuto, Antonella; Starodubtsev, Oleksandr; Tricomi, Alessia

    2017-02-01

    We present the CLASSiC R&D for the development of a silicon carbide (SiC) based avalanche photodiode for the detection of Cherenkov light. SiC is a wide-bandgap semiconductor material, which can be used to make photodetectors that are insensitive to visible light. A SiC based light detection device has a peak sensitivity in the deep UV, making it ideal for Cherenkov light. Moreover, the visible blindness allows such a device to disentangle Cherenkov light and scintillation light in all those materials that scintillate above 400 nm. Within CLASSiC, we aim at developing a device with single photon sensitivity, having in mind two main applications. One is the use of the SiC APD in a new generation ToF PET scanner concept, using the Cherenov light emitted by the electrons following 511 keV gamma ray absorption as a time-stamp. Cherenkov is intrinsically faster than scintillation and could provide an unprecedentedly precise time-stamp. The second application concerns the use of SiC APD in a dual readout crystal based hadronic calorimeter, where the Cherenkov component is used to measure the electromagnetic fraction on an event by event basis. We will report on our progress towards the realization of the SiC APD devices, the strategies that are being pursued toward the realization of these devices and the preliminary results on prototypes in terms of spectral response, quantum efficiency, noise figures and multiplication.

  14. Detection of a spinning object using light's orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Lavery, Martin P J; Speirits, Fiona C; Barnett, Stephen M; Padgett, Miles J

    2013-08-02

    The linear Doppler shift is widely used to infer the velocity of approaching objects, but this shift does not detect rotation. By analyzing the orbital angular momentum of the light scattered from a spinning object, we observed a frequency shift proportional to product of the rotation frequency of the object and the orbital angular momentum of the light. This rotational frequency shift was still present when the angular momentum vector was parallel to the observation direction. The multiplicative enhancement of the frequency shift may have applications for the remote detection of rotating bodies in both terrestrial and astronomical settings.

  15. Detection of Temporally Coherent Light at Low Signal Levels.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-01-01

    In writing this expression we assume normal incidence upon a planar cathode. For our analysis we make the simplifying assumption that I is...following analysis for simplicity in interpreting certain results. The objective of this investigation has been to find means of detecting coherent... analysis to consider the process. 6.1 Definition of Signal In attempting to detect temporally coherent light in a noncoherent background from the photon

  16. Scintillation Light Detection System in LArIAT

    SciTech Connect

    Kryczynski, Pawel

    2016-02-29

    The LArIAT experiment is currently taking data at Fermilab using a Liquid Argon TPC, with the aim of studying particle interactions and characterizing detector response for neutrino detectors using argon. In parallel, it serves as a test-bench to develop and evaluate the performance of the simulation, reconstruction, and analysis software used in LAr neutrino experiments. LArIAT also takes advantage of the scintillating capabilities of liquid argon and will evaluate the feasibility of using the light signal to determine calorimetric information and particle identification. To test this possibility, a scintillation light detection system consisting of high Quantum Efficiency (QE) PMT and Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) devices is installed in the cryostat, viewing the interior of the TPC. Light collection efficiency is maximized by means of lining the walls with reflector foils covered by a wavelength shifter layer. Collecting the light reflected at the boundaries of the active volume greatly improves also the uniformity of the light yield. Presented here are initial results of the LArIAT light detection system calibration together with the preliminary results of the dedicated simulation and its application in future LAr TPC experiments

  17. Detecting an Extended Light Source through a Lens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litaker, E. T.; Machacek, J. R.; Gay, T. J.

    2011-01-01

    We present a Monte Carlo simulation of a cylindrical luminescent volume and a typical lens-detector system. The results of this simulation yield a graphically simple picture of the regions within the cylindrical volume from which this system detects light. Because the cylindrical volume permits large angles of incidence, we use a modification of…

  18. 1 to 2.4 microns spectrum and orbital properties of the Giant Planet Beta Pictoris b obtained with the Gemini Planet Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pueyo, Laurent; Chilcote, Jeffrey; Millar-Blanchaer, Max; Barman, Travis; Fitzgerald, Michael P.; Graham, James R.; Larkin, James; Kalas, Paul G.; dawson, Rebekah; Wang, Jason; Perrin, Marshall; Moon, Dae-Sik; Macintosh, Bruce

    2015-12-01

    We present a low-resolution multi-band spectrum of the planetary companion to the nearby young star beta Pictoris using the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI). GPI is designed to image and provide low-resolution spectra of Jupiter sized, self-luminous planetary companions around young nearby stars. While H-bandis the primary workhorse for the GPI Exoplanet Survey, the instrument is capable of observing in the near infrared covering Y, J, H, and K bands. These observations of Beta Pic Pictoris b were taken covering multiple bands as part of GPI’s verification and commissioning phase in 2013 and 2014. Using atmospheric models along with the H-band data we recently reported an effective temperature of 1600-1700 K and a surface gravity of log (g) = 3.5-4.5 (cgs units). A similar exercise was also carried out by an independent team using the J band data, and did yield similar conclusions. These values agree well with ”hot-start” predictions from planetary evolution models for a gas giant with mass between 10 and 12 M Jup and age between 10 and 20 Myr. Here we revisit these conclusions in light of a joint analysis of these two datasets along with the longer wavelength GPI spectrum in K band, and present refined constraints on the atmospheric properties of this giant planet. In addition, we present an updated orbit for Beta Pictoris b based on astrometric measurements taken using commissioning and subsequent monitoring observations, spanning 14 months. The planet has a semi-major axis of 9.2 (+1.5 -0.4) AU, with an eccentricity e≤ 0.26. The position angle of the ascending node is Ω=31.75 deg±0.15, offset from both the outer main disk and the inner disk seen in the GPI image. We finally discuss these properties in the context of planet-disk dynamical interactions.

  19. Real-Time Walk Light Detection with a Mobile Phone.

    PubMed

    Ivanchenko, Volodymyr; Coughlan, James; Shen, Huiying

    2010-07-01

    Crossing an urban traffic intersection is one of the most dangerous activities of a blind or visually impaired person's travel. Building on past work by the authors on the issue of proper alignment with the crosswalk, this paper addresses the complementary issue of knowing when it is time to cross. We describe a prototype portable system that alerts the user in real time once the Walk light is illuminated. The system runs as a software application on an off-the-shelf Nokia N95 mobile phone, using computer vision algorithms to analyze video acquired by the built-in camera to determine in real time if a Walk light is currently visible. Once a Walk light is detected, an audio tone is sounded to alert the user. Experiments with a blind volunteer subject at urban traffic intersections demonstrate proof of concept of the system, which successfully alerted the subject when the Walk light appeared.

  20. Feature matching method in shaped light mode VFD defect detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Xuanhong; Dai, Shuguang; Mu, Pingan

    2010-08-01

    In recent years, Vacuum Fluorescent Display (VFD) module in the car audio panel has been widely used. However, due to process reasons, VFD display production process will produce defects, not only affect the appearance, but also affect the display correctly. So building a car VFD display panel defect detection system is of great significance. Machine vision technology is introduced into the automotive VFD display defect detection in order to achieve fast and accurate detection of defects. Shaped light mode is a typical flaw detection mode which is based on characteristics of vehicle VFD panel. According to the image features, learning of the gray matching and feature matching method, we integrated use of feature matching method and the gray level matching method to achieve defect detection.

  1. Efficient color face detection algorithm under different lighting conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Tze-Yin; Lam, Kin-Man; Wong, Kwok-Wai

    2006-01-01

    We present an efficient and reliable algorithm to detect human faces in an image under different lighting conditions. In our algorithm, skin-colored pixels are identified using a region-based approach, which can provide more reliable skin color segmentation under various lighting conditions. In addition, to compensate for extreme lighting conditions, a color compensation scheme is proposed, and the distributions of the skin-color components under various illuminations are modeled by means of the maximum-likelihood method. With the skin-color regions detected, a ratio method is proposed to determine the possible positions of the eyes in the image. Two eye candidates form a possible face region, which is then verified as a face or not by means of a two-stage procedure with an eigenmask. Finally, the face boundary region of a face candidate is further verified by a probabilistic approach to reduce the chance of false alarms. Experimental results based on the HHI MPEG-7 face database, the AR face database, and the CMU pose, illumination, and expression (PIE) database show that this face detection algorithm is efficient and reliable under different lighting conditions and facial expressions.

  2. The Language of Planetary Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This graph of data from NASA's Spitzer Space telescope shows changes in the infrared light output of two star-planet systems (one above, one below) located hundreds of light-years away. The data were taken while the planets, called HD 209458b and TrES-1, disappeared behind their stars in what is called a 'secondary eclipse.' The dip seen in the center of each graph represents the time when the planets were eclipsed, and tells astronomers exactly how much light they emit.

    Why a secondary eclipse? When a planet transits, or passes in front of, its star, it partially blocks the light of the star. When the planet swings around behind the star, the star completely blocks its light. This drop in total light can be measured to determine the amount of light coming from just the planet.

    Why infrared? In visible light, the glare of a star overwhelms its planetary companion and the little light the planet reflects. In infrared, a star shines less brightly, and its planet gives off its own internal light, or heat radiation, making the planet easier to detect.

    By observing these secondary eclipses at different infrared wavelengths, astronomers can obtain the planet's temperature, and, in the future, they may be able to pick out chemicals sprinkled throughout a planet's atmosphere. The technique also reveals whether a planet's orbit is elongated or circular.

    This strategy will not work for all known extrasolar planets. It is ideally suited to study those Jupiter-sized planets previously discovered to cross, or transit, between us and the Sun-like stars they orbit, out to distances of 500 light-years. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope was the first to successfully employ this technique.

    The data of HD 209458b were taken by Spitzer's multiband imaging photometer using the 24-micron array. The data of TrES-1 were taken by Spitzer's infrared array camera using the 8-micron array.

  3. Sky light polarization detection with linear polarizer triplet in light field camera inspired by insect vision.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjing; Cao, Yu; Zhang, Xuanzhe; Liu, Zejin

    2015-10-20

    Stable information of a sky light polarization pattern can be used for navigation with various advantages such as better performance of anti-interference, no "error cumulative effect," and so on. But the existing method of sky light polarization measurement is weak in real-time performance or with a complex system. Inspired by the navigational capability of a Cataglyphis with its compound eyes, we introduce a new approach to acquire the all-sky image under different polarization directions with one camera and without a rotating polarizer, so as to detect the polarization pattern across the full sky in a single snapshot. Our system is based on a handheld light field camera with a wide-angle lens and a triplet linear polarizer placed over its aperture stop. Experimental results agree with the theoretical predictions. Not only real-time detection but simple and costless architecture demonstrates the superiority of the approach proposed in this paper.

  4. Diffuse light tomography to detect blood vessels using Tikhonov regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazanci, Huseyin O.; Jacques, Steven L.

    2016-04-01

    Detection of blood vessels within light-scattering tissues involves detection of subtle shadows as blood absorbs light. These shadows are diffuse but measurable by a set of source-detector pairs in a spatial array of sources and detectors on the tissue surface. The measured shadows can reconstruct the internal position(s) of blood vessels. The tomographic method involves a set of Ns sources and Nd detectors such that Nsd = Ns x Nd source-detector pairs produce Nsd measurements, each interrogating the tissue with a unique perspective, i.e., a unique region of sensitivity to voxels within the tissue. This tutorial report describes the reconstruction of the image of a blood vessel within a soft tissue based on such source-detector measurements, by solving a matrix equation using Tikhonov regularization. This is not a novel contribution, but rather a simple introduction to a well-known method, demonstrating its use in mapping blood perfusion.

  5. Experimental detection of transverse particle movement with structured light

    PubMed Central

    Rosales-Guzmán, Carmelo; Hermosa, Nathaniel; Belmonte, Aniceto; Torres, Juan P.

    2013-01-01

    One procedure widely used to detect the velocity of a moving object is by using the Doppler effect. This is the perceived change in frequency of a wave caused by the relative motion between the emitter and the detector, or between the detector and a reflecting target. The relative movement, in turn, generates a time-varying phase which translates into the detected frequency shift. The classical longitudinal Doppler effect is sensitive only to the velocity of the target along the line-of-sight between the emitter and the detector (longitudinal velocity), since any transverse velocity generates no frequency shift. This makes the transverse velocity undetectable in the classical scheme. Although there exists a relativistic transverse Doppler effect, it gives values that are too small for the typical velocities involved in most laser remote sensing applications. Here we experimentally demonstrate a novel way to detect transverse velocities. The key concept is the use of structured light beams. These beams are unique in the sense that their phases can be engineered such that each point in its transverse plane has an associated phase value. When a particle moves across the beam, the reflected light will carry information about the particle's movement through the variation of the phase of the light that reaches the detector, producing a frequency shift associated with the movement of the particle in the transverse plane. PMID:24085150

  6. Direct detection of exothermic dark matter with light mediator

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Chao-Qiang; Huang, Da; Lee, Chun-Hao; Wang, Qing

    2016-08-05

    We study the dark matter (DM) direct detection for the models with the effects of the isospin-violating couplings, exothermic scatterings, and/or the lightness of the mediator, proposed to relax the tension between the CDMS-Si signals and null experiments. In the light of the new updates of the LUX and CDMSlite data, we find that many of the previous proposals are now ruled out, including the Ge-phobic exothermic DM model and the Xe-phobic DM one with a light mediator. We also examine the exothermic DM models with a light mediator but without the isospin violation, and we are unable to identify any available parameter space that could simultaneously satisfy all the experiments. The only models that can partially relax the inconsistencies are the Xe-phobic exothermic DM models with or without a light mediator. But even in this case, a large portion of the CDMS-Si regions of interest has been constrained by the LUX and SuperCDMS data.

  7. Detecting faint echoes in stellar-flare light curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bromley, Benjamin C.

    1992-01-01

    Observational considerations are discussed for detecting echoes from flare-star photospheres and from stellar or planetary companions. Synthetic spectra are used to determine optimal conditions for the recovery of echoes in flare light curves. The most detectable echoes are expected to appear in broadband observations of the UV continuum. Short-lived flares are ideal for resolving echoes from the flare-star photosphere and may provide constraints for stellar-flare models. Strong outbursts may be used to detect stellar or planetary companions of a flare star. However, the possible planetary configurations that may be probed by this method are limited to Jupiter-size objects in tight orbits about the parent star.

  8. Detecting light long-lived particle produced by cosmic ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Peng-Fei; Zhu, Shou-Hua

    2010-03-01

    We investigate the possibility of detecting light long-lived particle (LLP) produced by high energy cosmic ray colliding with atmosphere. The LLP may penetrate the atmosphere and decay into a pair of muons near/in the neutrino telescope. Such muons can be treated as the detectable signal for neutrino telescope. This study is motivated by recent cosmic electron/positron observations which suggest the existence of O(TeV) dark matter and new light O(GeV) particle. It indicates that dark sector may be complicated, and there may exist more than one light particles, for example, the dark gauge boson A‧ and associated dark Higgs boson h‧. In this work, we discuss the scenario with A‧ heavier than h‧ and h‧ is treated as LLP. Based on our numerical estimation, we find that the large volume neutrino telescope IceCube has the capacity to observe several tens of di-muon events per year for favorable parameters if the decay length of LLP can be comparable with the depth of atmosphere. The challenge here is how to suppress the muon backgrounds induced by cosmic rays and atmospheric neutrinos.

  9. Enhanced detection of broadband incoherent light with nanoridge plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Hyeon; Yeo, Jong-Souk

    2015-04-08

    Emerging photonic integrated circuit technologies require integrative functionality at ultrahigh speed and dimensional compatibility with ultrasmall electronics. Plasmonics offers a promise of addressing these challenges with novel nanophotonic approaches for on-chip information processing or sensing applications. Short communication range and strong light-matter interaction enabled by on-chip plasmonics allow us to extend beyond a conventional approach of integrating coherent and narrowband light source. Such hybrid electronic and photonic interconnection desires a on-chip photodetector that is highly responsive to broadband incoherent light, yet provides elegant design for nanoscale integration. Here we demonstrate an ultracompact broadband photodetection with greatly enhanced photoresponsivity using plasmonic nanoridge geometry. The nanoridge photodetector confines a wide spectrum of electromagnetic energy in a nanostructure through the excitation of multiple plasmons, which thus enables the detection of weak and broadband light. With nanoscale design, material, and dimensional compatibility for the integration, the nanoridge photodetector opens up a new possibility of highly sensitive on-chip photodetection for future integrated circuits and sensing applications.

  10. Effect of increased ambient lighting on detectability: a psychophysical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chawla, Amarpreet S.; Pollard, Benjamin; Samei, Ehsan; Hashimoto, Noriyuki

    2007-03-01

    Last year in this conference, we presented a theoretical analysis of how ambient lighting in dark reading rooms could be moderately increased without compromising the interpretation of images displayed on LCDs. Based on that analysis, in this paper we present results of two psychophysical experiments which were designed to verify those theoretical predictions. The first experiment was designed to test how an increase in ambient lighting affects the detection of subtle objects at different luminance levels, particularly at lower luminance levels. Towards that end, images of targets consisting of low-contrast objects were shown to seven observers, first under a dark room illumination condition of 1 lux and then under a higher room illumination condition of 50 lux. The targets had three base luminance values of 1, 12 and 35 cd/m2 and were embedded in a uniform background. The uniform background was set to 12 cd/m2 which enabled fixing L adp, the visual adaptation luminance value when looking at the display, to 12 cd/m2. This value also matched the luminance value of about 12 cd/m2 reflected off the wall surrounding the LCD at the higher ambient lighting condition. The task of the observers was to detect and classify the displayed objects under the two room lighting conditions. The results indicated that the detection rate in dark area (base luminance of 1 cd/m2) increased by 15% when the ambient illumination is increased from 1 to 50 lux. The increase was not conclusive for targets embedded in higher luminance regions, but there was no evidence to the contrary either. The second experiment was designed to investigate the adaptation luminance value of the eye when viewing typical mammograms. It was found that, for a typical display luminance calibration, this value might lie between 12 and 20 cd/m2. Findings from the two experiments provide justification for a controlled increase of ambient lighting to improve ergonomic viewing conditions in darkly lit reading rooms

  11. THE CENTER OF LIGHT: SPECTROASTROMETRIC DETECTION OF EXOMOONS

    SciTech Connect

    Agol, Eric; Jansen, Tiffany; Lacy, Brianna; Robinson, Tyler D.; Meadows, Victoria

    2015-10-10

    Direct imaging of extrasolar planets with future space-based coronagraphic telescopes may provide a means of detecting companion moons at wavelengths where the moon outshines the planet. We propose a detection strategy based on the positional variation of the center of light with wavelength, “spectroastrometry.” This new application of this technique could be used to detect an exomoon, to determine the exomoon’s orbit and the mass of the host exoplanet, and to disentangle the spectra of the planet and moon. We consider two model systems, for which we discuss the requirements for detection of exomoons around nearby stars. We simulate the characterization of an Earth–Moon analog system with spectroastrometry, showing that the orbit, the planet mass, and the spectra of both bodies can be recovered. To enable the detection and characterization of exomoons we recommend that coronagraphic telescopes should extend in wavelength coverage to 3 μm, and should be designed with spectroastrometric requirements in mind.

  12. Mid-ultraviolet light-emitting diode detects dipicolinic acid.

    SciTech Connect

    Bogart, Katherine Huderle Andersen; Lee, Stephen Roger; Temkin, Henryk; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Dasgupta, Purnendu K.; Li, Qingyang; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Fischer, Arthur Joseph

    2005-06-01

    Dipicolinic acid (DPA, 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid) is a substance uniquely present in bacterial spores such as that from anthrax (B. anthracis). It is known that DPA can be detected by the long-lived fluorescence of its terbium chelate; the best limit of detection (LOD) reported thus far using a large benchtop gated fluorescence instrument using a pulsed Xe lamp is 2 nM. We use a novel AlGaN light-emitting diode (LED) fabricated on a sapphire substrate that has peak emission at 291 nm. Although the overlap of the emission band of this LED with the absorption band of Tb-DPA ({lambda}{sub max} doublet: 273, 279 nm) is not ideal, we demonstrate that a compact detector based on this LED and an off-the-shelf gated photodetection module can provide an LOD of 0.4 nM, thus providing a basis for convenient early warning detectors.

  13. Detecting Phycocynanin-Pigmented Microbes in Reflected Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, Robert K.

    2008-01-01

    A recently invented method of measuring concentrations of phycocynanin-pigmented algae and bacteria in water is based on measurement of the spectrum of reflected sunlight. When present in sufficiently high concentrations, phycocynanin-pigmented microorganisms can be hazardous to the health of humans who use, and of animals that depend on, an affected body of water. The present method is intended to satisfy a need for a rapid, convenient means of detecting hazardous concentrations of phycocynanin-pigmented microorganisms. Rapid detection will speed up the issuance of public health warnings and performance of corrective actions. The method involves the measurement of light reflected from a body of water in at least two, but preferably five wavelength bands. In one version of the method, the five wavelength bands are bands 1, 3, 4, 5, and 7 of the Thematic Mapper (TM) multispectral imaging instrument aboard the Landsat-7 satellite (see table). In principle, other wavelength bands indicative of phycocynanin could be used alternatively or in addition to these five. Moreover, although the method was originally intended specifically for processing Landsat- 7 TM data, it is equally applicable to processing of data from other satellite-borne instruments or from airborne, hand-held, buoy-mounted, tower-mounted, or otherwise mounted instruments that measure radiances of light reflected from water in the wavelength bands of interest.

  14. Enhanced oil spill detection sensors in low-light environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allik, Toomas H.; Ramboyong, Len; Roberts, Mark; Walters, Mark; Soyka, Thomas J.; Dixon, Roberta; Cho, Jay

    2016-05-01

    Although advances have been made in oil spill remote detection, many electro-optic sensors do not provide real-time images, do not work well under degraded visual environments, nor provide a measure of extreme oil thickness in marine environments. A joint program now exists between BSEE and NVESD that addresses these capability gaps in remote sensing of oil spills. Laboratory experiments, calibration techniques, and field tests were performed at Fort Belvoir, Virginia; Santa Barbara, California; and the Ohmsett Test Facility in Leonardo, New Jersey. Weathered crude oils were studied spectroscopically and characterized with LWIR, and low-light-level visible/NIR, and SWIR cameras. We designed and fabricated an oil emulsion thickness calibration cell for spectroscopic analysis and ground truth, field measurements. Digital night vision cameras provided real-time, wide-dynamic-range imagery, and were able to detect and recognize oil from full sun to partial moon light. The LWIR camera provided quantitative oil analysis (identification) for >1 mm thick crude oils both day and night. Two filtered, co-registered, SWIR cameras were used to determine whether oil thickness could be measured in real time. Spectroscopic results revealed that oil emulsions vary with location and weathered state and some oils (e.g., ANS and Santa Barbara seeps) do not show the spectral rich features from archived Deep Water Horizon hyperspectral data. Multi-sensor imagery collected during the 2015 USCG Airborne Oil Spill Remote Sensing and Reporting Exercise and the design of a compact, multiband imager are discussed.

  15. Robust sky light polarization detection with an S-wave plate in a light field camera.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xuanzhe; Cao, Yu; Liu, Haibo; Liu, Zejin

    2016-05-01

    The sky light polarization navigator has many advantages, such as low cost, no decrease in accuracy with continuous operation, etc. However, current celestial polarization measurement methods often suffer from low performance when the sky is covered by clouds, which reduce the accuracy of navigation. In this paper we introduce a new method and structure based on a handheld light field camera and a radial polarizer, composed of an S-wave plate and a linear polarizer, to detect the sky light polarization pattern across a wide field of view in a single snapshot. Each micro-subimage has a special intensity distribution. After extracting the texture feature of these subimages, stable distribution information of the angle of polarization under a cloudy sky can be obtained. Our experimental results match well with the predicted properties of the theory. Because the polarization pattern is obtained through image processing, rather than traditional methods based on mathematical computation, this method is less sensitive to errors of pixel gray value and thus has better anti-interference performance.

  16. Detection of circular polarization in light scattered from photosynthetic microbes

    PubMed Central

    Sparks, William B.; Hough, James; Germer, Thomas A.; Chen, Feng; DasSarma, Shiladitya; DasSarma, Priya; Robb, Frank T.; Manset, Nadine; Kolokolova, Ludmilla; Reid, Neill; Macchetto, F. Duccio; Martin, William

    2009-01-01

    The identification of a universal biosignature that could be sensed remotely is critical to the prospects for success in the search for life elsewhere in the universe. A candidate universal biosignature is homochirality, which is likely to be a generic property of all biochemical life. Because of the optical activity of chiral molecules, it has been hypothesized that this unique characteristic may provide a suitable remote sensing probe using circular polarization spectroscopy. Here, we report the detection of circular polarization in light scattered by photosynthetic microbes. We show that the circular polarization appears to arise from circular dichroism of the strong electronic transitions of photosynthetic absorption bands. We conclude that circular polarization spectroscopy could provide a powerful remote sensing technique for generic life searches. PMID:19416893

  17. Direct detection of light ''Ge-phobic'' exothermic dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Gelmini, Graciela B.; Georgescu, Andreea; Huh, Ji-Haeng E-mail: a.georgescu@physics.ucla.edu

    2014-07-01

    We present comparisons of direct dark matter (DM) detection data for light WIMPs with exothermic scattering with nuclei (exoDM), both assuming the Standard Halo Model (SHM) and in a halo model–independent manner. Exothermic interactions favor light targets, thus reducing the importance of upper limits derived from xenon targets, the most restrictive of which is at present the LUX limit. In our SHM analysis the CDMS-II-Si and CoGeNT regions become allowed by these bounds, however the recent SuperCDMS limit rejects both regions for exoDM with isospin-conserving couplings. An isospin-violating coupling of the exoDM, in particular one with a neutron to proton coupling ratio of -0.8 (which we call ''Ge-phobic''), maximally reduces the DM coupling to germanium and allows the CDMS-II-Si region to become compatible with all bounds. This is also clearly shown in our halo-independent analysis.

  18. Detecting skin malignancy using elastic light scattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canpolat, Murat; Akman, Ayşe; Çiftçioğlu, M. Akif; Alpsoy, Erkan

    2007-07-01

    We have used elastic light scattering spectroscopy to differentiate between malign and benign skin lesions. The system consists of a UV spectrometer, a single optical fiber probe and a laptop. The single optical fiber probe was used for both delivery and detection of white light to tissue and from the tissue. The single optical fiber probe received singly scattered photons rather than diffused photons in tissue. Therefore, the spectra are correlated with morphological differences of the cells. It has been shown that spectra of malign skin lesions are different than spectra of benign skin lesions. While slopes of the spectra taken on benign lesions or normal skin tissues were positive, slopes of the spectra taken on malign skin lesions tissues were negative. In vivo experiments were conducted on 20 lesions from 18 patients (11 men with mean age of 68 +/- 9 years and 7 women with mean age of 52 +/- 20 years) applied to the Department of Dermatology and Venerology. Before the biopsy, spectra were taken on the lesion and adjacent (approximately 1 cm distant) normal-appearing skin. Spectra of the normal skin were used as a control group. The spectra were correlated to the pathology results with sensitivity and specificity of 82% and 89%, respectively. Due to small diameter of fiber probe and limited number of sampling (15), some positive cases are missed, which is lowered the sensitivity of the system. The results are promising and could suggest that the system may be able to detect malignant skin lesion non-invasively and in real time.

  19. Detection of diffuse sea floor venting using structured light imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inglis, G.; Smart, C.; Roman, C.; Carey, S.

    2011-12-01

    Efficiently identifying and localizing diffuse sea floor venting at hydrothermal and cold seep sites is often difficult. Actively venting fluids are usually identified by a temperature induced optical shimmering seen during direct visual inspections or in video data collected by vehicles working close to the sea floor. Relying on such direct methods complicates establishing spatial relations between areas within a survey covering a broad area. Our recent work with a structured light laser system has shown that venting can also be detected in the image data in an automated fashion. A structured light laser system consists of a camera and sheet laser projected at the sea floor. The camera and laser are fixed to a rigid calibrated mount such that the optical axis of the camera and the laser plane intersect at some distance away from the camera, typically 2 to 5 meters. The position of the laser line, visible on the sea floor in the image, can be extracted using standard computer vision techniques (Fig. 1) and used to determine the height of the bottom along the laser line. By collecting images in a survey pattern at a high frame rate, typically 20 to 30 Hz, a bathymetric map can be produced using the individual profiles. In the presence of venting, temperature anomalies refract the laser sheet such that it does not project a crisp and clear line on the sea floor. The laser will instead appear blurred and visible over a larger section of the image. By processing the images to segment out clear laser lines from refracted lines it is possible to identify areas of venting. Our initial approach uses calculated image moments relative to the peak intensity level detected in each column of the image matrix. In the presence of venting the calculated moments differ from those of the undistorted laser shining on the sea floor. Test results from the Kolumbo submarine volcano near Santorini, Greece demonstrate this approach and show the utility of the method for survey work. Test

  20. Electrically detected magnetic resonance in organic light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehme, Christoph

    2013-03-01

    Due to the built-in weak spin-orbit coupling of carbon based materials, electronic transitions in organic semiconductors are subjected to strong spin-selection rules that are responsible for a number of interesting electron spin- and even nuclear spin-dependent electrical and optical properties of these materials, including device efficiencies of organic light emitting diodes and solar cells or magnetoresistive and magneto-optic effects. In recent years, we have studied how these effects work and how they can be utilized for organic semiconductor device improvement and new device applications. Our focus has been in particular on the effects of spin on π-conjugated polymer based bipolar injection devices (more commonly known as organic light emitting diodes, OLEDs). In OLEDs, spin-interactions between recombining charge carriers do not only control electroluminescence rates but also the magnetoresistance. We have shown that spin-coherence can be observed through current measurements and that these effects can be utilized for a coherent, pulsed electrically detected magnetic resonance spectroscopy (pEDMR) which enables us to encode the qualitative nature of spin-dependent mechanisms (the polaron pair mechanism and the triplet polaron recombination) and the their dynamical nature (spin-relaxation, electronic relaxation, hopping times). The insights gained from these studies have led to the invention of a robust absolute magnetic field sensor based on organic thin film materials with absolute sensitivities of <50nT/Hz1/2. Acknowledgment is made to the DOE (#DESC0000909) and NSF through a MRSEC Project (#1121252) and a CAREER Project (#0953225).

  1. Tracking Honey Bees Using LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) Technology

    SciTech Connect

    BENDER, SUSAN FAE ANN; RODACY, PHILIP J.; SCHMITT, RANDAL L.; HARGIS JR., PHILIP J.; JOHNSON, MARK S.; KLARKOWSKI, JAMES R.; MAGEE, GLEN I.; BENDER, GARY LEE

    2003-01-01

    The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has recognized that biological and chemical toxins are a real and growing threat to troops, civilians, and the ecosystem. The Explosives Components Facility at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been working with the University of Montana, the Southwest Research Institute, and other agencies to evaluate the feasibility of directing honeybees to specific targets, and for environmental sampling of biological and chemical ''agents of harm''. Recent work has focused on finding and locating buried landmines and unexploded ordnance (UXO). Tests have demonstrated that honeybees can be trained to efficiently and accurately locate explosive signatures in the environment. However, it is difficult to visually track the bees and determine precisely where the targets are located. Video equipment is not practical due to its limited resolution and range. In addition, it is often unsafe to install such equipment in a field. A technology is needed to provide investigators with the standoff capability to track bees and accurately map the location of the suspected targets. This report documents Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) tests that were performed by SNL. These tests have shown that a LIDAR system can be used to track honeybees. The LIDAR system can provide both the range and coordinates of the target so that the location of buried munitions can be accurately mapped for subsequent removal.

  2. Magnetoluminescent light switches--dual modality in DNA detection.

    PubMed

    Smolensky, Eric D; Peterson, Katie L; Weitz, Evan A; Lewandowski, Cutler; Pierre, Valérie C

    2013-06-19

    The synthesis and properties of two responsive magnetoluminescent iron oxide nanoparticles for dual detection of DNA by MRI and luminescence spectroscopy are presented. These magnetoluminescent agents consist of iron oxide nanoparticles conjugated with metallointercalators via a polyethylene glycol linker. Two metallointercalators were investigated: Ru(bpy')(phen)(dppz), which turns on upon DNA intercalation, and Eu-DOTA-Phen, which turns off. The characteristic light-switch responses of the metallointercalators are not affected by the iron oxide nanoparticles; upon binding to DNA the luminescence of the ruthenium complexes increases by ca. 20-fold, whereas that of the europium complex is >95% quenched. Additionally, the 17-20 nm magnetite cores, having permeable PEG coatings and stable dopamide anchors, render the two constructs efficient responsive contrast agents for MRI with unbound longitudinal and transverse relaxivities of 12.4-9.2 and 135-128 mM(-1)(Fe)s(-1), respectively. Intercalation of the metal complexes in DNA results in the formation of large clusters of nanoparticles with a resultant decrease of both r1 and r2 by 32-63% and 24-38%, respectively. The potential application of these responsive magnetoluminescent assemblies and their reversible catch-and-release properties for the purification of DNA is presented.

  3. Direct detection of light anapole and magnetic dipole DM

    SciTech Connect

    Nobile, Eugenio Del; Gelmini, Graciela B.; Huh, Ji-Haeng; Gondolo, Paolo E-mail: gelmini@physics.ucla.edu E-mail: jhhuh@physics.ucla.edu

    2014-06-01

    We present comparisons of direct detection data for ''light WIMPs'' with an anapole moment interaction (ADM) and a magnetic dipole moment interaction (MDM), both assuming the Standard Halo Model (SHM) for the dark halo of our galaxy and in a halo-independent manner. In the SHM analysis we find that a combination of the 90% CL LUX and CDMSlite limits or the new 90% CL SuperCDMS limit by itself exclude the parameter space regions allowed by DAMA, CoGeNT and CDMS-II-Si data for both ADM and MDM. In our halo-independent analysis the new LUX bound excludes the same potential signal regions as the previous XENON100 bound. Much of the remaining signal regions is now excluded by SuperCDMS, while the CDMSlite limit is much above them. The situation is of strong tension between the positive and negative search results both for ADM and MDM. We also clarify the confusion in the literature about the ADM scattering cross section.

  4. Supervised detection of anomalous light curves in massive astronomical catalogs

    SciTech Connect

    Nun, Isadora; Pichara, Karim; Protopapas, Pavlos; Kim, Dae-Won

    2014-09-20

    The development of synoptic sky surveys has led to a massive amount of data for which resources needed for analysis are beyond human capabilities. In order to process this information and to extract all possible knowledge, machine learning techniques become necessary. Here we present a new methodology to automatically discover unknown variable objects in large astronomical catalogs. With the aim of taking full advantage of all information we have about known objects, our method is based on a supervised algorithm. In particular, we train a random forest classifier using known variability classes of objects and obtain votes for each of the objects in the training set. We then model this voting distribution with a Bayesian network and obtain the joint voting distribution among the training objects. Consequently, an unknown object is considered as an outlier insofar it has a low joint probability. By leaving out one of the classes on the training set, we perform a validity test and show that when the random forest classifier attempts to classify unknown light curves (the class left out), it votes with an unusual distribution among the classes. This rare voting is detected by the Bayesian network and expressed as a low joint probability. Our method is suitable for exploring massive data sets given that the training process is performed offline. We tested our algorithm on 20 million light curves from the MACHO catalog and generated a list of anomalous candidates. After analysis, we divided the candidates into two main classes of outliers: artifacts and intrinsic outliers. Artifacts were principally due to air mass variation, seasonal variation, bad calibration, or instrumental errors and were consequently removed from our outlier list and added to the training set. After retraining, we selected about 4000 objects, which we passed to a post-analysis stage by performing a cross-match with all publicly available catalogs. Within these candidates we identified certain known

  5. Method of Detecting Coliform Bacteria and Escherichia Coli Bacteria from Reflected Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, Robert (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of detecting coliform bacteria in water from reflected light and a method of detecting Eschericha Coli bacteria in water from reflected light, and also includes devices for the measurement, calculation and transmission of data relating to that method.

  6. Conditional homodyne detection of light with squeezed quadrature fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Vines, Justin; Vyas, Reeta; Singh, Surendra

    2006-08-15

    We discuss the detection of field quadrature fluctuations in conditional homodyne detection experiments and possible sources of error in such an experiment. We also present modifications to these experiments to help eliminate such errors and extend their range of applicability.

  7. Vacuum fluctuations and the conditional homodyne detection of squeezed light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmichael, H. J.; Nha, Hyunchul

    2004-08-01

    Conditional homodyne detection of quadrature squeezing is compared with standard nonconditional detection. Whereas the latter identifies nonclassicality in a quantitative way, as a reduction of the noise power below the shot noise level, conditional detection makes a qualitative distinction between vacuum state squeezing and squeezed classical noise. Implications of this comparison for the realistic interpretation of vacuum fluctuations (stochastic electrodynamics) are discussed.

  8. Detection Method of Three Events to Window and Key Using Light Sensor for Crime Prevention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamawaki, Akira; Katakami, Takayuki; Kitazono, Yuhki; Serikawa, Seiichi

    The three events to the window and the key occurring when a thief attempts to intrude into the house are detected by the different sensors conventionally. This paper proposes a method detecting the three events by using the simple light-sensor consisting of an infrared LED and a photodiode. In the experiments, the light sensor shows the different tendencies that can detect each event. This fact indicates that our proposal can realize a sensor module more efficiently instead of using different sensors.

  9. New Directions in the Detection of Polarized Light

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    systems. Within the core biologi - cal papers, there are descriptions of retinal anatomy, neurophysiological studies, behavioural evidence and...through patient behavioural observation, careful electrophysiological work and elegant biology , pioneering much of the navigation and functional...Kraft, P., Evangelista, C., Dacke, M., Labhart, T. & Srinivasan, M. V. 2011 Honeybee navigation: following routes using polarized-light cues. Phil

  10. Detection for flatness of large surface based on structured light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wenyan; Cao, Xuedong; Long, Kuang; Peng, Zhang

    2016-09-01

    In order to get flatness of a large plane, this paper set up a measurement system, composed by Line Structured Light, imaging system, CCD, etc. Line Structured Light transmits parallel fringes at a proper angle onto the plane which is measured; the imaging system and CCD locate above the plane to catch the fringes. When the plane is perfect, CCD will catch straight fringes; however, the real plane is not perfect; according to the theory of projection, the fringes caught by CCD will be distorted by convex and concave. Extract the center of line fringes to obtain the distortion of the fringe, according to the functional relationship between the distortion of fringes and the height which is measured, then we will get flatness of the entire surface. Data from experiment approached the analysis of theory. In the simulation, the vertical resolution is 0.0075 mm per pixel when measuring a plane of 400mm×400mm, choosing the size of CCD 4096×4096, at the angle 85°. Helped by sub-pixel, the precision will get the level of submicron. There are two obvious advantages: method of surface sampling can increase the efficiency for auto-repairing of machines; considering the center of fringe is required mainly in this system, as a consequence, there is no serious demand for back light.

  11. Procedure to detect impervious surfaces using satellite images and light detection and ranging (lidar) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Cuenca, B.; Alonso-Rodríguez, M. C.; Domenech-Tofiño, E.; Valcárcel Sanz, N.; Delgado-Hernández, J.; Peces-Morera, Juan José; Arozarena-Villar, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    The detection of impervious surfaces is an important issue in the study of urban and rural environments. Imperviousness refers to water's inability to pass through a surface. Although impervious surfaces represent a small percentage of the Earth's surface, knowledge of their locations is relevant to planning and managing human activities. Impervious structures are primarily manmade (e.g., roads and rooftops). Impervious surfaces are an environmental concern because many processes that modify the normal function of land, air, and water resources are initiated during their construction. This paper presents a novel method of identifying impervious surfaces using satellite images and light detection and ranging (LIDAR) data. The inputs for the procedure are SPOT images formed by four spectral bands (corresponding to red, green, near-infrared and mid-infrared wavelengths), a digital terrain model, and an .las file. The proposed method computes five decision indexes from the input data to classify the studied area into two categories: impervious (subdivided into buildings and roads) and non-impervious surfaces. The impervious class is divided into two subclasses because the elements forming this category (mainly roads and rooftops) have different spectral and height properties, and it is difficult to combine these elements into one group. The classification is conducted using a decision tree procedure. For every decision index, a threshold is set for which every surface is considered impervious or non-impervious. The proposed method has been applied to four different regions located in the north, center, and south of Spain, providing satisfactory results for every dataset.

  12. Enhanced UV light detection using wavelength-shifting properties of Silicon nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magill, S.; Nayfeh, M.; Fizari, M.; Malloy, J.; Maximenko, Y.; Xie, J.; Yu, H.

    2015-05-01

    Detection of UV photons is becoming increasingly necessary with the use of noble gases and liquids in elementary particle experiments. Cerenkov light in crystals and glasses, scintillation light in neutrino, dark matter, and rare decay experiments all require sensitivity to UV photons. New sensor materials are needed that can directly detect UV photons and/or absorb UV photons and re-emit light in the visible range measurable by existing photosensors. It has been shown that silicon nanoparticles are sensitive to UV light in a wavelength range around ~ 200 nm. UV light is absorbed and re-emitted at wavelengths in the visible range depending on the size of the nanoparticles. Initial tests of the wavelength-shifting properties of silicon nanoparticles are presented here that indicate by placing a film of nanoparticles in front of a standard visible-wavelength detecting photosensor, the response of the sensor is significantly enhanced at wavelengths < 320 nm.

  13. Method and apparatus for detecting phycocyanin-pigmented algae and bacteria from reflected light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, Robert (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of detecting phycocyanin algae or bacteria in water from reflected light, and also includes devices for the measurement, calculation and transmission of data relating to that method.

  14. Method and apparatus for detecting phycocyanin-pigmented algae and bacteria from reflected light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, Robert (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of detecting phycocyanin algae or bacteria in water from reflected light, and also includes devices for the measurement, calculation and transmission of data relating to that method.

  15. Cancer detection using NIR elastic light scattering and tissue fluorescence imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, S G; Staggs, M; Radousky, H B; Gandour-Edwards, R; deVere White, R

    2000-12-04

    Near infrared imaging using elastic light scattering and tissue fluorescence under long-wavelength laser excitation are explored for cancer detection. Various types of normal and malignant human tissue samples were utilized in this investigation.

  16. Solution-processed hybrid materials for light detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adinolfi, Valerio

    Inorganic semiconductors form the foundation of modern electronics and optoelectronics. These materials benefit from excellent optoelectronic properties, but applications are generally limited due to high cost of fabrication. More recently, organic semiconductors have emerged as a low-cost alternative for light emitting devices. Organic materials benefit from facile, low temperature fabrication and offer attractive features such as flexibility and transparency. However, these materials are inherently limited by poor electronic transport. In recent years, new materials have been developed to overcome the dichotomy between performance and the cost. Hybrid organic--inorganic semiconductors combine the superior electronic properties of inorganic materials with the facile assembly of organic systems to yield high-performance, low-cost electronics. This dissertation focuses on the development of solution-processed light detectors using hybrid material systems, particularly colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) and hybrid perovskites. First, advanced architectures for colloidal quantum dot light detectors are presented. These devices overcome the responsivity--speed--dark current trade-off that has limited past reports of CQD-based devices. The photo-junction field effect transistors presented in this work decrease the dark current of CQD detectors by two orders of magnitude, ultimately reducing power consumption (100x) and noise current (10x). The detector simultaneously benefits from high gain (˜10 electrons/photon) and fast time response (˜ 10 mus). This represents the first CQD-based three-terminal-junction device reported in the literature. Building on this success, hybrid perovskite devices are then presented. This material system has become a focal point of the semiconductor research community due to its relatively unexplored nature and attractive optoelectronic properties. Herein we present the first extensive electronic characterization of single crystal organolead

  17. Detecting quantum coherence of Bose gases in optical lattices by scattering light intensity in cavity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoji; Xu, Xu; Yin, Lan; Liu, W M; Chen, Xuzong

    2010-07-19

    We propose a new method of detecting quantum coherence of a Bose gas trapped in a one-dimensional optical lattice by measuring the light intensity from Raman scattering in cavity. After pump and displacement process, the intensity or amplitude of scattering light is different for different quantum states of a Bose gas, such as superfluid and Mott-Insulator states. This method can also be useful to detect quantum states of atoms with two components in an optical lattice.

  18. Neural networks improve brain cancer detection with Raman spectroscopy in the presence of light artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jermyn, Michael; Desroches, Joannie; Mercier, Jeanne; St-Arnaud, Karl; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Petrecca, Kevin; Leblond, Frederic

    2016-03-01

    It is often difficult to identify cancer tissue during brain cancer (glioma) surgery. Gliomas invade into areas of normal brain, and this cancer invasion is frequently not detected using standard preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This results in enduring invasive cancer following surgery and leads to recurrence. A hand-held Raman spectroscopy is able to rapidly detect cancer invasion in patients with grade 2-4 gliomas. However, ambient light sources can produce spectral artifacts which inhibit the ability to distinguish between cancer and normal tissue using the spectral information available. To address this issue, we have demonstrated that artificial neural networks (ANN) can accurately classify invasive cancer versus normal brain tissue, even when including measurements with significant spectral artifacts from external light sources. The non-parametric and adaptive model used by ANN makes it suitable for detecting complex non-linear spectral characteristics associated with different tissues and the confounding presence of light artifacts. The use of ANN for brain cancer detection with Raman spectroscopy, in the presence of light artifacts, improves the robustness and clinical translation potential for intraoperative use. Integration with the neurosurgical workflow is facilitated by accounting for the effect of light artifacts which may occur, due to operating room lights, neuronavigation systems, windows, or other light sources. The ability to rapidly detect invasive brain cancer under these conditions may reduce residual cancer remaining after surgery, and thereby improve patient survival.

  19. The lizard celestial compass detects linearly polarized light in the blue.

    PubMed

    Beltrami, Giulia; Parretta, Antonio; Petrucci, Ferruccio; Buttini, Paola; Bertolucci, Cristiano; Foà, Augusto

    2012-09-15

    The present study first examined whether ruin lizards, Podarcis sicula, are able to orientate using plane-polarized light produced by an LCD screen. Ruin lizards were trained and tested indoors, inside a hexagonal Morris water maze positioned under an LCD screen producing white polarized light with a single E-vector, which provided an axial cue. White polarized light did not include wavelengths in the UV. Lizards orientated correctly either when tested with E-vector parallel to the training axis or after 90 deg rotation of the E-vector direction, thus validating the apparatus. Further experiments examined whether there is a preferential region of the light spectrum to perceive the E-vector direction of polarized light. For this purpose, lizards reaching learning criteria under white polarized light were subdivided into four experimental groups. Each group was tested for orientation under a different spectrum of plane-polarized light (red, green, cyan and blue) with equalized photon flux density. Lizards tested under blue polarized light orientated correctly, whereas lizards tested under red polarized light were completely disoriented. Green polarized light was barely discernible by lizards, and thus insufficient for a correct functioning of their compass. When exposed to cyan polarized light, lizard orientation performances were optimal, indistinguishable from lizards detecting blue polarized light. Overall, the present results demonstrate that perception of linear polarization in the blue is necessary - and sufficient - for a proper functioning of the sky polarization compass of ruin lizards. This may be adaptively important, as detection of polarized light in the blue improves functioning of the polarization compass under cloudy skies, i.e. when the alternative celestial compass based on detection of the sun disk is rendered useless because the sun is obscured by clouds.

  20. Circularly polarized light detection with hot electrons in chiral plasmonic metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Coppens, Zachary J.; Besteiro, Lucas V.; Wang, Wenyi; Govorov, Alexander O.; Valentine, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Circularly polarized light is utilized in various optical techniques and devices. However, using conventional optical systems to generate, analyse and detect circularly polarized light involves multiple optical elements, making it challenging to realize miniature and integrated devices. While a number of ultracompact optical elements for manipulating circularly polarized light have recently been demonstrated, the development of an efficient and highly selective circularly polarized light photodetector remains challenging. Here we report on an ultracompact circularly polarized light detector that combines large engineered chirality, realized using chiral plasmonic metamaterials, with hot electron injection. We demonstrate the detector's ability to distinguish between left and right hand circularly polarized light without the use of additional optical elements. Implementation of this photodetector could lead to enhanced security in fibre and free-space communication, as well as emission, imaging and sensing applications for circularly polarized light using a highly integrated photonic platform. PMID:26391292

  1. Detecting Super-Thin Clouds With Polarized Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Wenbo; Videen, Gorden; Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2014-01-01

    We report a novel method for detecting cloud particles in the atmosphere. Solar radiation backscattered from clouds is studied with both satellite data and a radiative transfer model. A distinct feature is found in the angle of linear polarization of solar radiation that is backscattered from clouds. The dominant backscattered electric field from the clear-sky Earth-atmosphere system is nearly parallel to the Earth surface. However, when clouds are present, this electric field can rotate significantly away from the parallel direction. Model results demonstrate that this polarization feature can be used to detect super-thin cirrus clouds having an optical depth of only 0.06 and super-thin liquid water clouds having an optical depth of only 0.01. Such clouds are too thin to be sensed using any current passive satellite instruments.

  2. Optical biopsy - a new armamentarium to detect disease using light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Yang; Alfano, Robert R.

    2015-03-01

    Optical spectroscopy has been considered a promising method for cancer detection for past thirty years because of its advantages over the conventional diagnostic methods of no tissue removal, minimal invasiveness, rapid diagnoses, less time consumption and reproducibility since the first use in 1984. It offers a new armamentarium. Human tissue is mainly composed of extracellular matrix of collagen fiber, proteins, fat, water, and epithelial cells with key molecules in different structures. Tissues contain a number of key fingerprint native endogenous fluorophore molecules, such as tryptophan, collagen, elastin, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and porphyrins. It is well known that abnormalities in metabolic activity precede the onset of a lot of main diseases: carcinoma, diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis, Alzheimer, and Parkinson's disease, etc. Optical spectroscopy may help in detecting various disorders. Conceivably the biochemical or morphologic changes that cause the spectra variations would appear earlier than the histological aberration. Therefore, "optical biopsy" holds a great promise as clinical tool for diagnosing early stage of carcinomas and other deceases by combining with available photonic technology (e.g. optical fibers, photon detectors, spectrographs spectroscopic ratiometer, fiber-optic endomicroscope and nasopharyngoscope) for in vivo use. This paper focuses on various methods available to detect spectroscopic changes in tissues, for example to distinguish cancerous prostate tissues and/or cells from normal prostate tissues and/or cells. The methods to be described are fluorescence, stokes shift, scattering, Raman, and time-resolved spectroscopy will be reviewed. The underlying physical and biological basis for these optical approaches will be discussed with examples. The idea is to present some of the salient works to show the usefulness and methods of Optical Biopsy for cancer detection and

  3. Detecting Close-In Extrasolar Giant Planets with the Kepler Photometer via Scattered Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, J. M.; Doyle, L. R.; Kepler Discovery Mission Team

    2003-05-01

    NASA's Kepler Mission will be launched in 2007 primarily to search for transiting Earth-sized planets in the habitable zones of solar-like stars. In addition, it will be poised to detect the reflected light component from close-in extrasolar giant planets (CEGPs) similar to 51 Peg b. Here we use the DIARAD/SOHO time series along with models for the reflected light signatures of CEGPs to evaluate Kepler's ability to detect such planets. We examine the detectability as a function of stellar brightness, stellar rotation period, planetary orbital inclination angle, and planetary orbital period, and then estimate the total number of CEGPs that Kepler will detect over its four year mission. The analysis shows that intrinsic stellar variability of solar-like stars is a major obstacle to detecting the reflected light from CEGPs. Monte Carlo trials are used to estimate the detection threshold required to limit the total number of expected false alarms to no more than one for a survey of 100,000 stellar light curves. Kepler will likely detect 100-760 51 Peg b-like planets by reflected light with orbital periods up to 7 days. LRD was supported by the Carl Sagan Chair at the Center for the Study of Life in the Universe, a division of the SETI Institute. JMJ received support from the Kepler Mission Photometer and Science Office at NASA Ames Research Center.

  4. Confidence measurement in the light of signal detection theory

    PubMed Central

    Massoni, Sébastien; Gajdos, Thibault; Vergnaud, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    We compare three alternative methods for eliciting retrospective confidence in the context of a simple perceptual task: the Simple Confidence Rating (a direct report on a numerical scale), the Quadratic Scoring Rule (a post-wagering procedure), and the Matching Probability (MP; a generalization of the no-loss gambling method). We systematically compare the results obtained with these three rules to the theoretical confidence levels that can be inferred from performance in the perceptual task using Signal Detection Theory (SDT). We find that the MP provides better results in that respect. We conclude that MP is particularly well suited for studies of confidence that use SDT as a theoretical framework. PMID:25566135

  5. Confidence measurement in the light of signal detection theory.

    PubMed

    Massoni, Sébastien; Gajdos, Thibault; Vergnaud, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    We compare three alternative methods for eliciting retrospective confidence in the context of a simple perceptual task: the Simple Confidence Rating (a direct report on a numerical scale), the Quadratic Scoring Rule (a post-wagering procedure), and the Matching Probability (MP; a generalization of the no-loss gambling method). We systematically compare the results obtained with these three rules to the theoretical confidence levels that can be inferred from performance in the perceptual task using Signal Detection Theory (SDT). We find that the MP provides better results in that respect. We conclude that MP is particularly well suited for studies of confidence that use SDT as a theoretical framework.

  6. Light-induced fluorescence endoscopy (LIFE) imaging system for early cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Haishan; MacAulay, Calum E.; Lam, Stephen; Palcic, Branko

    1999-09-01

    This paper summarizes our experiences on the development of a Light Induced Fluorescence Endoscopy (LIFE) imaging system for early cancer detection in the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract. The system utilizes tissue autofluorescence to provide real time video imaging of the examined organ. No exogenous fluorescent tumor markers are needed. It is used by a physician in adjunct to conventional white-light endoscopy. Suspicious areas are identified in pseudo color to guide biopsy. A multi- center clinical trial has demonstrated that in the lung, the relative sensitivity of white-light imaging + LIFE imaging vs. white-light imaging alone was 6.3 for intraepithelial neoplastic lesion detection and 2.71 when invasive carcinomas were also included. The following issues will be discussed: (1) spectroscopy study design for imaging system development; (2) architecture of the imaging systems; (3) different imaging modalities (white-light imaging, dual channel fluorescence imaging, and combined fluorescence/reflectance imaging); and (4) clinical applications.

  7. Detection research on low light level target with joint transform correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Su; Shang, Jiyang; Chen, Chi; Wang, Wensheng

    2011-08-01

    Low light level target detection has received more attentions in varieties of domains in recent years. In this paper we use hybrid optoelectronic joint transform correlator(HOJTC) for detecting and recognizing low light level target. It is thought to be one of the most effective methods in target detection. But because of the cluttered backgrounds and strong noises of the low light level target, it always can not be detected successfully. In order to solve this problem efficiently, firstly we choose sym4 wavelet function to achieve the purpose of wavelet de-noising. After that edge extraction processing is used to distinguish the useful target from the cluttered backgrounds with Sobel operator. At last processed targets can be put into HOJTC to obtain a pair of correlation peaks clearly. To prove this method, many experiments of low light level targets have been implemented with computer simulation method and optical experiment method. As an example a low light level image "deer" is presented. The results show that the low light level target can be detected from the cluttered backgrounds and strong noises with wavelet de-noising and Sobel operator successfully.

  8. Smartphone-based low light detection for bioluminescence application

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Huisung; Jung, Youngkee; Doh, Iyll-Joon; Lozano-Mahecha, Roxana Andrea; Applegate, Bruce; Bae, Euiwon

    2017-01-01

    We report a smartphone-based device and associated imaging-processing algorithm to maximize the sensitivity of standard smartphone cameras, that can detect the presence of single-digit pW of radiant flux intensity. The proposed hardware and software, called bioluminescent-based analyte quantitation by smartphone (BAQS), provides an opportunity for onsite analysis and quantitation of luminescent signals from biological and non-biological sensing elements which emit photons in response to an analyte. A simple cradle that houses the smartphone, sample tube, and collection lens supports the measuring platform, while noise reduction by ensemble averaging simultaneously lowers the background and enhances the signal from emitted photons. Five different types of smartphones, both Android and iOS devices, were tested, and the top two candidates were used to evaluate luminescence from the bioluminescent reporter Pseudomonas fluorescens M3A. The best results were achieved by OnePlus One (android), which was able to detect luminescence from ~106 CFU/mL of the bio-reporter, which corresponds to ~107 photons/s with 180 seconds of integration time. PMID:28067287

  9. Smartphone-based low light detection for bioluminescence application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Huisung; Jung, Youngkee; Doh, Iyll-Joon; Lozano-Mahecha, Roxana Andrea; Applegate, Bruce; Bae, Euiwon

    2017-01-01

    We report a smartphone-based device and associated imaging-processing algorithm to maximize the sensitivity of standard smartphone cameras, that can detect the presence of single-digit pW of radiant flux intensity. The proposed hardware and software, called bioluminescent-based analyte quantitation by smartphone (BAQS), provides an opportunity for onsite analysis and quantitation of luminescent signals from biological and non-biological sensing elements which emit photons in response to an analyte. A simple cradle that houses the smartphone, sample tube, and collection lens supports the measuring platform, while noise reduction by ensemble averaging simultaneously lowers the background and enhances the signal from emitted photons. Five different types of smartphones, both Android and iOS devices, were tested, and the top two candidates were used to evaluate luminescence from the bioluminescent reporter Pseudomonas fluorescens M3A. The best results were achieved by OnePlus One (android), which was able to detect luminescence from ~106 CFU/mL of the bio-reporter, which corresponds to ~107 photons/s with 180 seconds of integration time.

  10. Smartphone-based low light detection for bioluminescence application.

    PubMed

    Kim, Huisung; Jung, Youngkee; Doh, Iyll-Joon; Lozano-Mahecha, Roxana Andrea; Applegate, Bruce; Bae, Euiwon

    2017-01-09

    We report a smartphone-based device and associated imaging-processing algorithm to maximize the sensitivity of standard smartphone cameras, that can detect the presence of single-digit pW of radiant flux intensity. The proposed hardware and software, called bioluminescent-based analyte quantitation by smartphone (BAQS), provides an opportunity for onsite analysis and quantitation of luminescent signals from biological and non-biological sensing elements which emit photons in response to an analyte. A simple cradle that houses the smartphone, sample tube, and collection lens supports the measuring platform, while noise reduction by ensemble averaging simultaneously lowers the background and enhances the signal from emitted photons. Five different types of smartphones, both Android and iOS devices, were tested, and the top two candidates were used to evaluate luminescence from the bioluminescent reporter Pseudomonas fluorescens M3A. The best results were achieved by OnePlus One (android), which was able to detect luminescence from ~10(6) CFU/mL of the bio-reporter, which corresponds to ~10(7) photons/s with 180 seconds of integration time.

  11. Magnetoresistance detected spin collectivity in organic light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malissa, Hans; Waters, David P.; Joshi, Gajadhar; Kavand, Marzieh; Limes, Mark E.; Burn, Paul L.; Lupton, John M.; Boehme, Christoph

    Organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) typically refers to the significant change in the conductivity of thin layers of organic semiconductors at low static magnetic fields (< 10 mT). When radio frequency (rf) radiation is applied to an organic semiconductor under bipolar injection, and in the presence of small magnetic fields B, magnetic resonance can occur, which is observed as a change of the OMAR effect [Baker et al., Nat. Commun. 3, 898 (2012)]. When B and the resonant driving field are stronger than local hyperfine fields, an ultrastrong coupling regime emerges, which is marked by collective spin effects analogous to the optical Dicke effect [Roundy and Raikh, Phys. Rev. B 88, 125206 (2013)]. Experimentally, this collective behavior of spins can be probed in the steady state OMAR of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) at room temperature by observation of a sign reversal of the OMAR change under rf irradiation. Furthermore, in the presence of strong driving fields, an ac Zeeman effect can be observed through OMAR [Waters et al., Nat. Phys. 11, 910 (2015)], a unique window to observe room temperature macroscopic spin quantum coherence.

  12. Investigation of light scattering as a technique for detecting discrete soot particles in a luminous flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The practicability of using a classical light-scattering technique, involving comparison of angular scattering intensity patterns with theoretically determined Mie and Rayleight patterns, to detect discrete soot particles (diameter less than 50 nm) in premixed propane/air and propane/oxygen-helium flames is considered. The experimental apparatus employed in this investigation included a laser light source, a flat-flame burner, specially coated optics, a cooled photomultiplier detector, and a lock-in voltmeter readout. Although large, agglomerated soot particles were detected and sized, it was not possible to detect small, discrete particles. The limiting factor appears to be background scattering by the system's optics.

  13. Monolithic multi-color light emission/detection device

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, Mark W.

    1995-01-01

    A single-crystal, monolithic, tandem, multi-color optical transceiver device is described, including (a) an InP substrate having upper and lower surfaces, (b) a first junction on the upper surface of the InP substrate, (c) a second junction on the first junction. The first junction is preferably GaInAsP of defined composition, and the second junction is preferably InP. The two junctions are lattice matched. The second junction has a larger energy band gap than the first junction. Additional junctions having successively larger energy band gaps may be included. The device is capable of simultaneous and distinct multi-color emission and detection over a single optical fiber.

  14. Monolithic multi-color light emission/detection device

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, M.W.

    1995-02-21

    A single-crystal, monolithic, tandem, multi-color optical transceiver device is described, including (a) an InP substrate having upper and lower surfaces, (b) a first junction on the upper surface of the InP substrate, (c) a second junction on the first junction. The first junction is preferably GaInAsP of defined composition, and the second junction is preferably InP. The two junctions are lattice matched. The second junction has a larger energy band gap than the first junction. Additional junctions having successively larger energy band gaps may be included. The device is capable of simultaneous and distinct multi-color emission and detection over a single optical fiber. 5 figs.

  15. Light magnetic dark matter in direct detection searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Nobile, Eugenio; Kouvaris, Chris; Panci, Paolo; Sannino, Francesco; Virkajärvi, Jussi

    2012-08-01

    We study a fermionic Dark Matter particle carrying magnetic dipole moment and analyze its impact on direct detection experiments. In particular we show that it can accommodate the DAMA, CoGeNT and CRESST experimental results. Assuming conservative bounds, this candidate is shown not to be ruled out by the CDMS, XENON and PICASSO experiments. We offer an analytic understanding of how the long-range interaction modifies the experimental allowed regions, in the cross section versus Dark Matter mass parameter space, with respect to the typically assumed contact interaction. Finally, in the context of a symmetric Dark Matter sector, we determine the associated thermal relic density, and further provide relevant constraints imposed by indirect searches and colliders.

  16. Using Ethyl Glucuronide in Urine to Detect Light and Heavy Drinking in Alcohol Dependent Outpatients

    PubMed Central

    McDonell, Michael G.; Skalisky, Jordan; Leickly, Emily; McPherson, Sterling; Battalio, Samuel; Nepom, Jenny R.; Srebnik, Debra; Roll, John; Ries, Richard K.

    2015-01-01

    Aims This study investigated which ethyl glucuronide immunoassay (EtG-I) cutoff best detects heavy versus light drinking over five days in alcohol dependent outpatients. Methods A total of 121 adults with alcohol use disorders and co-occurring psychiatric disorders taking part in an alcohol treatment study. Participants provided self-reported drinking data and urine samples three time per week for 16-weeks (total samples = 2761). Agreement between low (100 ng/mL, 200 ng/mL), and moderate (500 ng/mL) EtG-I cutoffs and light (women ≤3 standard drinks, men ≤ 4 standard drinks) and heavy drinking (women >3, men >4 standard drinks) were calculated over one to five days. Results The 100 ng/mL cutoff detected >76% of light drinking for two days, and 66% at five days. The 100 ng/mL cutoff detected 84% (1 day) to 79% (5 days) of heavy drinking. The 200 ng/mL cutoff detected >55% of light drinking across five days and >66% of heavy drinking across five days. A 500 ng/mL cutoff identified 68% of light drinking and 78% of heavy drinking for one day, with detection of light (2–5 days <58%) and heavy drinking (2–5 days <71%) decreasing thereafter. Relative to 100 ng/mL, the 200 ng/mL and 500 ng/mL cutoffs were less likely to result in false positives. Conclusions An EtG-I cutoff of 100 ng/mL is most likely to detect heavy drinking for up to five days and any drinking during the previous two days. Cutoffs of ≥ 500 ng/mL are likely to only detect heavy drinking during the previous day. PMID:26475403

  17. Design and analysis of particles detecting system based on near forward light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Xiao-Jun; Li, Xiao; Yu, Jia-Xin

    2016-01-01

    A novel design based on near forward light scattering detection system to measure size and concentration distribution of particles in liquids is reported. According to theory of Mie scattering, the influence of relative refractive index, particles size and wavelength on the detection results are discussed. A green optical fiber laser with 532nm was used as the excited light source. As a key part in the detection system, the focusing system using a lens structure to confine light sensitive area with Gauss distribution less than 80 μm2. The lateral size of the sample cell is limited to 100μm. In order to measure the particles in non-overlapping state and improve the accuracy and repeatability, a novel structure in the sample cell was used and particle velocity through the sample cell was controlled by high precision stepper motor control system of micro circulation pump. Particle light scattering signal acquisition was completed by the poly lens combination system, according to the receiving angle relative to the measured particle, which can adjust the light scattering direction to obtain better particles light scattering signal. Photoelectric signal conversion, amplification and acquisition are all the devices with high precision. The measurement results showed that the measurement system was accurate and stable when the particles size in the range of 0.5-5μm.

  18. Waveguide detection of right-angle-scattered light in flow cytometry

    DOEpatents

    Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.

    2000-01-01

    A transparent flow cell is used as an index-guided optical waveguide. A detector for the flow cell but not the liquid stream detects the Right-Angle-Scattered (RAS) Light exiting from one end of the flow cell. The detector(s) could view the trapped RAS light from the flow cell either directly or through intermediate optical light guides. If the light exits one end of the flow cell, then the other end of the flow cell can be given a high-reflectivity coating to approximately double the amount of light collected. This system is more robust in its alignment than the traditional flow cytometry systems which use imaging optics, such as microscope objectives.

  19. The effect of increased ambient lighting on detection accuracy in uniform and anatomical backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, Benjamin J.; Chawla, Amarpreet S.; Hashimoto, Noriyuki; Samei, Ehsan

    2008-03-01

    Under typical dark conditions found in reading rooms, a reader's pupils will contract and dilate as the visual focus intermittently shifts between the high luminance monitor and the darker background wall, resulting in increased visual fatigue and the degradation of diagnostic performance. A controlled increase of ambient lighting may, however, minimize these visual adjustments and potentially improve reader comfort and accuracy. This paper details results from two psychophysical studies designed to determine the effect of a controlled ambient lighting increase on observer detection of subtle objects and lesions viewed on a DICOM-calibrated medical-grade LCD. The first study examined the effect of increased ambient lighting on detection of subtle objects embedded within a uniform background, while the second study examined observer detection performance of subtle cancerous lesions in mammograms and chest radiographs. In both studies, observers were presented with images under a dark room condition (1 lux) and an increased room illuminance level (50 lux) for which the luminance level of the diffusely reflected light from the background wall was approximately equal to that of the displayed image. The display was calibrated to an effective luminance ratio of 409 for both lighting conditions. Observer detection performance under each room illuminance condition was then compared. Identification of subtle objects embedded within the uniform background improved from 59% to 67%, while detection time decreased slightly with additional illuminance. An ROC analysis of the anatomical image results revealed that observer AUC values remained constant while detection time decreased under increased illuminance. The results provide evidence that an ambient lighting increase may be possible without compromising diagnostic efficacy.

  20. Production and Detection of Very Light Spin-zero Bosons at Optical Frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    A. V. Afanasev; O. K. Baker; K. W. McFarlane; G. H. Biallas; J. R. Boyce; Michelle D. Shinn

    2006-07-06

    The PVLAS collaboration has observed rotation of the plane of polarization of light passing through a magnetic field in vacuum and have proposed that the effect is due to interaction of photons with very light spin-zero bosons. This would represent new physics beyond the Standard Model, and hence it is of high interest to test this hypothesis. We describe a proposed test of the PVLAS result, and ways of producing, detecting, and studying such bosons with light in the optical frequency range. Novel features include methods for measurements of boson mass, interaction strengths, and decay- or oscillation-lengths with techniques not available in the x-ray region.

  1. Steel-surface defect detection using a switching-lighting scheme.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yong-Ju; Choi, Doo-Chul; Lee, Sang Jun; Yun, Jong Pil; Kim, Sang Woo

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a novel filtering scheme combined with a lighting method is proposed for defect detection in steel surfaces. A steel surface has non-uniform brightness and various shaped defects, which cause difficulties in defect detection. To solve this problem we propose a sub-optimal filtering that is combined with a switching-lighting method. First, dual-light switching lighting (DLSL) is explained, which decreases the effect of non-uniformity of surface brightness and improves the detection accuracy. By using the DLSL method, defects are represented as alternated black and white patterns regardless of the size, shape, or orientation of defects. Therefore, defects can be detected by finding alternated black and white patterns. Second, we propose a scheme for detecting defects in steel-surface images acquired using the DLSL method. The presence of scales strongly affects the optical properties of the surface. Moreover, the textures of steel-plate images vary greatly because of the temperature and grade of steel. Therefore, conventional filter-design methods are not effective for different image textures. A sub-optimal scheme based on an optimized general-finite impulse-response filter is also proposed. Finally, experimental results conducted on steel-surface images from an actual steel-production line show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  2. Detection of argan oil adulteration with vegetable oils by high-performance liquid chromatography-evaporative light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Salghi, Rachid; Armbruster, Wolfgang; Schwack, Wolfgang

    2014-06-15

    Triacylglycerol profiles were selected as indicator of adulteration of argan oils to carry out a rapid screening of samples for the evaluation of authenticity. Triacylglycerols were separated by high-performance liquid chromatography-evaporative light scattering detection. Different peak area ratios were defined to sensitively detect adulteration of argan oil with vegetable oils such as sunflower, soy bean, and olive oil up to the level of 5%. Based on four reference argan oils, mean limits of detection and quantitation were calculated to approximately 0.4% and 1.3%, respectively. Additionally, 19 more argan oil reference samples were analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography-refractive index detection, resulting in highly comparative results. The overall strategy demonstrated a good applicability in practise, and hence a high potential to be transferred to routine laboratories.

  3. Interface engineering: broadband light and low temperature gas detection abilities using a nano-heterojunction device.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chien-Min; Hsu, Ching-Han; Liu, Yi-Wei; Chien, Tzu-Chiao; Sung, Chun-Han; Yeh, Ping-Hung

    2015-12-21

    Herein, we have designed a nano-heterojunction device using interface defects and band bending effects, which can have broadband light detection (from 365-940 nm) and low operating temperature (50 °C) gas detection abilities. The broadband light detection mechanism occurs because of the defects and band bending between the heterojunction interface. We have demonstrated this mechanism using CoSi2/SnO2, CoSi2/TiO2, Ge/SnO2 and Ge/TiO2 nano-heterojunction devices, and all these devices show broadband light detection ability. Furthermore, the nano-heterojunction of the nano-device has a local Joule-heating effect. For gas detection, the results show that the nano-heterojunction device presents a high detection ability. The reset time and sensitivity of the nano-heterojunction device are an order faster and larger than Schottky-contacted devices (previous works), which is due to the local Joule-heating effect between the interface of the nano-heterojunction. Based on the abovementioned idea, we can design diverse nano-devices for widespread use.

  4. Research on photodiode detector-based spatial transient light detection and processing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Meiying; Wang, Hu; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Hui; Nan, Meng

    2016-10-01

    In order to realize real-time signal identification and processing of spatial transient light, the features and the energy of the captured target light signal are first described and quantitatively calculated. Considering that the transient light signal has random occurrence, a short duration and an evident beginning and ending, a photodiode detector based spatial transient light detection and processing system is proposed and designed in this paper. This system has a large field of view and is used to realize non-imaging energy detection of random, transient and weak point target under complex background of spatial environment. Weak signal extraction under strong background is difficult. In this paper, considering that the background signal changes slowly and the target signal changes quickly, filter is adopted for signal's background subtraction. A variable speed sampling is realized by the way of sampling data points with a gradually increased interval. The two dilemmas that real-time processing of large amount of data and power consumption required by the large amount of data needed to be stored are solved. The test results with self-made simulative signal demonstrate the effectiveness of the design scheme. The practical system could be operated reliably. The detection and processing of the target signal under the strong sunlight background was realized. The results indicate that the system can realize real-time detection of target signal's characteristic waveform and monitor the system working parameters. The prototype design could be used in a variety of engineering applications.

  5. Improved detection of induced seismicity using beamforming techniques: application to traffic light systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Stephen; Verdon, James; Kendal, J.-Michael; Hill, Phil

    2016-04-01

    Unconventional methods of hydrocarbon extraction, such as hydraulic fracturing, have the potential to reactivate existing faults, causing induced seismicity. Traffic Light Schemes have been implemented in some regions; these systems ensure that drilling activities are paused or shut-down if seismic events larger than a given magnitude are induced. In particular, the United Kingdom has imposed a traffic light scheme based on magnitude thresholds of Ml = 0.0 and Ml = 0.5 for the amber and red limits, respectively. Therefore, an effective traffic light scheme in the UK requires monitoring arrays capable of detecting events with Ml < 0.0. However, achieving such low detection thresholds can be challenging where ambient noise levels are high, such as in the UK. We have developed an algorithm capable of robustly detecting and locating small magnitude events, which are characterised by very low signal-to-noise ratios using small arrays of surface broadband seismometers. We compute STA/LTA functions for each trace, time shift them by theoretical travel-times for a given event location, and combine them via a linear stack. We test our method using a dataset from a surface array of Güralp 3T broadband seismometers that recorded hydraulic fracturing activities in the central United States. Our beamforming and stacking approach identified a total of 20 events, compared to only 4 events detected by traditional picking methods. We therefore suggest that our approach is suitable for use with low magnitude traffic light schemes, especially in noisy environments.

  6. A portable optical waveguide resonance light-scattering scanner for microarray detection.

    PubMed

    Xing, Xuefeng; Liu, Wanyao; Li, Tao; Xing, Shu; Fu, Xueqi; Wu, Dongyang; Liu, Dianjun; Wang, Zhenxin

    2016-01-07

    In the present work, a portable and low-cost planar waveguide based resonance light scattering (RLS) scanner (termed as: PW-RLS scanner) has been developed for microarray detection. The PW-RLS scanner employs a 2 × 4 white light emitting diode array (WLEDA) as the excitation light source, a folded optical path with a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) as the signal/image acquisition device and stepper motors with gear drives as the mechanical drive system. The biological binding/recognizing events on the microarray can be detected with an evanescent waveguide-directed illumination and light-scattering label (e.g., nanoparticles) while the microarray slide acts as an evanescent waveguide substrate. The performance of the as-developed PW-RLS scanner has been evaluated by analyzing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) risk genes. Highly selective and sensitive (less than 1% allele frequency at the attomole-level) T2DM risk gene detection is achieved using single-stranded DNA functionalized gold nanoparticles (ssDNA-GNPs) as detection probes. Additionally, the successful simultaneous analysis of 15 T2DM patient genotypes suggests that the device has great potential for the realization of a personalized diagnostic test for a given disease or patient follow-up.

  7. Investigation of a new light imaging technique to detect incipient caries in teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wist, Abund O.; Moon, Peter; Herr, Steven L.; Fatouros, Panos P.

    1994-05-01

    Dental x-ray systems are at this time the best method to locate carious lesions but it is difficult to detect them when they are small. Light imaging systems in the past have shown to be more sensitive than x-ray system to carious lesions but one has difficulty in determining the characteristics of these lesions especially when they are small. We developed a new light imaging technique which makes it much easier to determine the size and depth of lesions on most areas of the teeth even though still modifications on the present setup will be necessary to detect them as easily also on occlusal surfaces. This technique is based on a raster scan of the teeth with narrow collimated light beams. The investigation shows that even the area of small incipient lesions (< 0.1 mm2) can be measured and their depth estimated.

  8. Modes of formation of lunar light plains and the detection of cryptomaria deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Head, James W.; Mustard, John; Antonenko, Irene; Hawke, B. Ray

    1993-01-01

    The early volcanic and impact histories of the Moon are closely linked and the record preserved in surface morphology and samples is tightly convolved because of the interaction of the two processes. The deconvolution of the record is an important goal in order to assess early volcanic flux and the mode of emplacement of large crater and basin deposits. For example, lunar light plains have been variously interpreted as volcanic, impact, and volcanic covered by impact deposits. The development of criteria for the determination of the origin of light plains and the detection of cryptomaria is a key to the deconvolution of this early record. We outline the various hypotheses for the origin of and potential modes of occurrence of light plains and cryptomaria, and develop criteria for their recognition and documentation. We use the example of the Schiller-Schickard and Balmer cryptomaria to illustrate the application of these techniques to the problem of light plains interpretation and cryptomaria documentation.

  9. Real-time image difference detection using a polarization rotation spacial light modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin (Inventor); Liu, Hua-Kuang (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An image difference detection system is described, of the type wherein two created image representations such as transparencies representing the images to be compared lie coplanar, while light passes through the two transparencies and is formed into coincident images at the image plane for comparison. The two transparencies are formed by portions of a polarization rotation spacial light modulator display such as a multi-pixel liquid crystal display or a magneto optical rotation type. In a system where light passing through the two transparencies is polarized in transverse directions to enable the use of a Wollaston prism to bring the images into coincidence, a liquid crystal display can be used which is devoid of polarizing sheets that would interfere with transverse polarizing of the light passing through the two transparencies.

  10. Real-time image difference detection using a polarization rotation spacial light modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin (Inventor); Liu, Hua-Kuang (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    An image difference detection system is described, of the type wherein two created image representations such as transparencies representing the images to be compared lie coplanar, while light passes through the two transparencies and is formed into coincident images at the image plane for comparison. The two transparencies are formed by portions of a polarization-rotation spatial light modulator display such as a multi-pixel liquid crystal display or a magnetooptical rotation type display. In a system where light passing through the two transparencies is polarized in transverse directions to enable the use of a Wollaston prism to bring the images into coincidence, a liquid crystal display can be used which is devoid of polarizing sheets that would interfere with transverse polarizing of the light passing through the two transparencies.

  11. Determination of 1-deoxynojirimycin in mulberry leaves using hydrophilic interaction chromatography with evaporative light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Toshiyuki; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Saito, Yuko; Yamagishi, Kenji; Suzuki, Masahiro; Yamaki, Kohji; Shinmoto, Hiroshi; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2004-03-24

    A simple and rapid method for determining 1-deoxynojirimycin (DNJ), a potent glucosidase inihibitor present in mulberry leaves (Morus alba and Morus bombysis), by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to an evaporative light scattering detector (ELSD) has been developed. DNJ was separated from an extract of mulberry leaves on a TSKgel Amide-80 column, which is a representative column for hydrophilic interaction chromatography. During postcolumn detection, DNJ was detected by ELSD and concurrently identified by mass spectrometry. The detection limit was 100 ng. This method is sufficiently sensitive for determining DNJ in mulberry leaves and other related products.

  12. Elastic light single-scattering spectroscopy for detection of dysplastic tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canpolat, Murat; Denkçeken, Tuba; Akman, Ayşe.; Alpsoy, Erkan; Tuncer, Recai; Akyüz, Mahmut; Baykara, Mehmet; Yücel, Selçuk; Başsorgun, Ibrahim; ćiftçioǧlu, M. Akif; Gökhan, Güzide Ayşe.; Gürer, ElifInanç; Peştereli, Elif; Karaveli, Šeyda

    2013-11-01

    Elastic light single-scattering spectroscopy (ELSSS) system has been developed and tested in diagnosis of cancerous tissues of different organs. ELSSS system consists of a miniature visible light spectrometer, a single fiber optical probe, a halogen tungsten light source and a laptop. Measurements were performed on excised brain, skin, cervix and prostate tumor specimens and surrounding normal tissues. Single fiber optical probe with a core diameter of 100 μm was used to deliver white light to and from tissue. Single optical fiber probe mostly detects singly scattered light from tissue rather than diffused light. Therefore, measured spectra are sensitive to size of scatters in tissue such as cells, nuclei, mitochondria and other organelles of cells. Usually, nuclei of tumor cells are larger than nuclei of normal cells. Therefore, spectrum of singly scattered light of tumor tissue is different than normal tissue. The spectral slopes were shown to be positive for normal brain, skin and prostate and cervix tissues and negative for the tumors of the same tissues. Signs of the spectral slopes were used as a discrimination parameter to differentiate tumor from normal tissues for the three organ tissues. Sensitivity and specificity of the system in differentiation between tumors from normal tissues were 93% and %100 for brain, 87% and 85% for skin, 93.7% and 46.1% for cervix and 98% and 100% for prostate.

  13. Real-time detection of concealed chemical hazards under ambient light conditions using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cletus, Biju; Olds, William; Fredericks, Peter M; Jaatinen, Esa; Izake, Emad L

    2013-07-01

    Current concerns regarding terrorism and international crime highlight the need for new techniques for detecting unknown and hazardous substances. A novel Raman spectroscopy-based technique, spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS), was recently devised for noninvasively probing the contents of diffusely scattering and opaque containers. Here, we demonstrate a modified portable SORS sensor for detecting concealed substances in-field under different background lighting conditions. Samples including explosive precursors, drugs, and an organophosphate insecticide (chemical warfare agent surrogate) were concealed inside diffusely scattering packaging including plastic, paper, and cloth. Measurements were carried out under incandescent and fluorescent light as well as under daylight to assess the suitability of the probe for different real-life conditions. In each case, it was possible to identify the substances against their reference Raman spectra in less than 1 min. The developed sensor has potential for rapid detection of concealed hazardous substances in airports, mail distribution centers, and customs checkpoints.

  14. Ensemble Learning Method for Outlier Detection and its Application to Astronomical Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nun, Isadora; Protopapas, Pavlos; Sim, Brandon; Chen, Wesley

    2016-09-01

    Outlier detection is necessary for automated data analysis, with specific applications spanning almost every domain from financial markets to epidemiology to fraud detection. We introduce a novel mixture of the experts outlier detection model, which uses a dynamically trained, weighted network of five distinct outlier detection methods. After dimensionality reduction, individual outlier detection methods score each data point for “outlierness” in this new feature space. Our model then uses dynamically trained parameters to weigh the scores of each method, allowing for a finalized outlier score. We find that the mixture of experts model performs, on average, better than any single expert model in identifying both artificially and manually picked outliers. This mixture model is applied to a data set of astronomical light curves, after dimensionality reduction via time series feature extraction. Our model was tested using three fields from the MACHO catalog and generated a list of anomalous candidates. We confirm that the outliers detected using this method belong to rare classes, like Novae, He-burning, and red giant stars; other outlier light curves identified have no available information associated with them. To elucidate their nature, we created a website containing the light-curve data and information about these objects. Users can attempt to classify the light curves, give conjectures about their identities, and sign up for follow up messages about the progress made on identifying these objects. This user submitted data can be used further train of our mixture of experts model. Our code is publicly available to all who are interested.

  15. Shadow Detection Based on Regions of Light Sources for Object Extraction in Nighttime Video

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gil-beom; Lee, Myeong-jin; Lee, Woo-Kyung; Park, Joo-heon; Kim, Tae-Hwan

    2017-01-01

    Intelligent video surveillance systems detect pre-configured surveillance events through background modeling, foreground and object extraction, object tracking, and event detection. Shadow regions inside video frames sometimes appear as foreground objects, interfere with ensuing processes, and finally degrade the event detection performance of the systems. Conventional studies have mostly used intensity, color, texture, and geometric information to perform shadow detection in daytime video, but these methods lack the capability of removing shadows in nighttime video. In this paper, a novel shadow detection algorithm for nighttime video is proposed; this algorithm partitions each foreground object based on the object’s vertical histogram and screens out shadow objects by validating their orientations heading toward regions of light sources. From the experimental results, it can be seen that the proposed algorithm shows more than 93.8% shadow removal and 89.9% object extraction rates for nighttime video sequences, and the algorithm outperforms conventional shadow removal algorithms designed for daytime videos. PMID:28327515

  16. Statistical Optimization of Evaporative Light Scattering Detection for Molten Sucrose Octaacetate and Comparison With Ultraviolet Diode Array Detection Validation Parameters Using Tandem HPLC Ultraviolet Diode Array Detection/Evaporative Light Scattering Detection-Specific Stability-Indicating Method.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Rudrangi; Ghanta, Ajay; Haware, Rahul V; Johnson, Paul R; Stagner, William C

    2016-12-01

    A sucrose octaacetate (SOA) gradient HPLC evaporative light scattering detection (ELSD) and low-wavelength UV-diode array detection (UV-DAD)-specific stability-indicating method development and validation comparison is reported. A central composite response surface design and multicriteria optimization was used to maximize molten SOA area-under-the-curve response and signal-to-noise ratio. The ELSD data were also analyzed using multivariate principal component analysis, analysis of variance, and standard least squares effects modeling. The method suitability and validation parameters of both methods were compared. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report that validates an ELSD method using a molten analyte. SOA exhibited a low molar absorptivity of 439 absorption units/cm/M in water at 210 nm requiring low-wavelength UV-DAD detection. The low-wavelength UV-DAD method provided substantially better intraday and interday precision, intraday and interday goodness-of-fit, detection limit, and quantitation limit than ELSD. ELSD exhibited a 60-fold greater area-under-the-curve response, better resolution, and 58% more theoretical plates. On balance, the UV-DAD method was chosen for SOA chemical kinetic studies. This study illustrates that ELSD may not always be the best alternative to gradient HPLC low-wavelength UV detection.

  17. Optical and mechanical detection of near-field light by atomic force microscopy using a piezoelectric cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Nobuo; Kobayashi, Kei; Watanabe, Shunji; Fujii, Toru; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we developed an atomic force microscopy (AFM) system with scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) using a microfabricated force-sensing cantilever with a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin film. Both optical and mechanical detection techniques were adopted in SNOM to detect scattered light induced by the interaction of the PZT cantilever tip apex and evanescent light, and SNOM images were obtained for each detection scheme. The mechanical detection technique did allow for a clear observation of the light scattered from the PZT cantilever without the interference observed by the optical detection technique, which used an objective lens, a pinhole, and a photomultiplier tube.

  18. Hybrid light transport model based bioluminescence tomography reconstruction for early gastric cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xueli; Liang, Jimin; Hu, Hao; Qu, Xiaochao; Yang, Defu; Chen, Duofang; Zhu, Shouping; Tian, Jie

    2012-03-01

    Gastric cancer is the second cause of cancer-related death in the world, and it remains difficult to cure because it has been in late-stage once that is found. Early gastric cancer detection becomes an effective approach to decrease the gastric cancer mortality. Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) has been applied to detect early liver cancer and prostate cancer metastasis. However, the gastric cancer commonly originates from the gastric mucosa and grows outwards. The bioluminescent light will pass through a non-scattering region constructed by gastric pouch when it transports in tissues. Thus, the current BLT reconstruction algorithms based on the approximation model of radiative transfer equation are not optimal to handle this problem. To address the gastric cancer specific problem, this paper presents a novel reconstruction algorithm that uses a hybrid light transport model to describe the bioluminescent light propagation in tissues. The radiosity theory integrated with the diffusion equation to form the hybrid light transport model is utilized to describe light propagation in the non-scattering region. After the finite element discretization, the hybrid light transport model is converted into a minimization problem which fuses an l1 norm based regularization term to reveal the sparsity of bioluminescent source distribution. The performance of the reconstruction algorithm is first demonstrated with a digital mouse based simulation with the reconstruction error less than 1mm. An in situ gastric cancer-bearing nude mouse based experiment is then conducted. The primary result reveals the ability of the novel BLT reconstruction algorithm in early gastric cancer detection.

  19. Light illumination and detection patterns for fluorescence diffuse optical tomography based on compressive sensing.

    PubMed

    Jin, An; Yazici, Birsen; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2014-06-01

    Fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (FDOT) is an emerging molecular imaging modality that uses near infrared light to excite the fluorophore injected into tissue; and to reconstruct the fluorophore concentration from boundary measurements. The FDOT image reconstruction is a highly ill-posed inverse problem due to a large number of unknowns and limited number of measurements. However, the fluorophore distribution is often very sparse in the imaging domain since fluorophores are typically designed to accumulate in relatively small regions. In this paper, we use compressive sensing (CS) framework to design light illumination and detection patterns to improve the reconstruction of sparse fluorophore concentration. Unlike the conventional FDOT imaging where spatially distributed light sources illuminate the imaging domain one at a time and the corresponding boundary measurements are used for image reconstruction, we assume that the light sources illuminate the imaging domain simultaneously several times and the corresponding boundary measurements are linearly filtered prior to image reconstruction. We design a set of optical intensities (illumination patterns) and a linear filter (detection pattern) applied to the boundary measurements to improve the reconstruction of sparse fluorophore concentration maps. We show that the FDOT sensing matrix can be expressed as a columnwise Kronecker product of two matrices determined by the excitation and emission light fields. We derive relationships between the incoherence of the FDOT forward matrix and these two matrices, and use these results to reduce the incoherence of the FDOT forward matrix. We present extensive numerical simulation and the results of a real phantom experiment to demonstrate the improvements in image reconstruction due to the CS-based light illumination and detection patterns in conjunction with relaxation and greedy-type reconstruction algorithms.

  20. Interferometric apparatus and method for detection and characterization of particles using light scattered therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Johnston, Roger G.

    1988-01-01

    Interferometric apparatus and method for detection and characterization of particles using light scattered therefrom. Differential phase measurements on scattered light from particles are possible using the two-frequency Zeeman effect laser which emits two frequencies of radiation 250 kHz apart. Excellent discrimination and reproducibility for various pure pollen and bacterial samples in suspension have been observed with a single polarization element. Additionally, a 250 kHz beat frequency was recorded from an individual particle traversing the focused output from the laser in a flow cytometer.

  1. A novel standby mode detection scheme with light load efficiency improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jiajun; Chen, Houpeng; Wang, Qian; Li, Xi; Fan, Xi; Miao, Jie; Song, Zhitang

    2016-10-01

    A novel standby mode scheme with light load efficiency improvement is proposed in this paper, which is especially suitable for modern boost dc-dc converters powered by Li-ion battery. The proposed output load estimator is able to accurately reflect the output load current under light load condition once inductor current enters in the discontinuous conduction mode (DCM). Our experimental results show that the proposed boost dc-dc converter can automatically select approximate PWM switching frequency according to the detected information of the proposed output load estimator, regardless of power supply and inductor value.

  2. Apparatus and method for detection and characterization of particles using light scattered therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Johnston, R.G.

    1987-03-23

    Apparatus and method for detection and characterization of particles using light scattered therefrom. Differential phase measurements on scattered light from particles are possible using the two-frequency Zeeman effect laser which emits two frequencies of radiation 250 kHz apart. Excellent discrimination and reproducibility for various pure pollen and bacterial samples in suspension have been observed with a single polarization element. Additionally, a 250 kHz beat frequency was recorded from an individual particle traversing the focused output from the laser in a flow cytometer. 13 figs.

  3. Room-temperature efficient light detection by amorphous Ge quantum wells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this work, ultrathin amorphous Ge films (2 to 30 nm in thickness) embedded in SiO2 layers were grown by magnetron sputtering and employed as proficient light sensitizer in photodetector devices. A noteworthy modification of the visible photon absorption is evidenced due to quantum confinement effects which cause both a blueshift (from 0.8 to 1.8 eV) in the bandgap and an enhancement (up to three times) in the optical oscillator strength of confined carriers. The reported quantum confinement effects have been exploited to enhance light detection by Ge quantum wells, as demonstrated by photodetectors with an internal quantum efficiency of 70%. PMID:23496870

  4. The use of an alternative light source to detect semen in clinical forensic medical practice.

    PubMed

    Lincoln, C A; McBride, P M; Turbett, G R; Garbin, C D; MacDonald, E J

    2006-05-01

    One of the primary aims of forensic examination in sexual offences is to detect and recover biological material that will link the offender with the complainant. One potentially valuable method by which trace biological evidence may be identified in other forensic settings is via the use of an Alternate Light Source (ALS). The aim of this study was to determine whether or not there was any potential benefit in using an ALS as an adjunct in sexual assault examinations to aid the detection of forensically relevant areas on the body which are not identifiable on visual inspection for sampling. We present two case reports, which illustrate the potential value of using an ALS in clinical forensic medical practice as an adjunct in sexual assault examinations to detect potentially forensically useful areas of skin to sample for semen. Prior to introducing the ALS into our clinical forensic medical practice, we undertook a number of simple laboratory studies to determine a protocol for its use. Semen is known to fluoresce using an ALS at a wavelength of 450 nm. Although we did not conduct a rigorous scientific evaluation of the technique, we evaluated the use of an ALS to detect semen on a range of inanimate surfaces as well as human skin. On all surfaces, visibility of fluorescence was increased by reduced distance of light source from the surface and increased concentration of semen on the surface, but was not noticeably affected by the angle at which the light source was held in relation to the surface.

  5. Optical fiber light-emitting diode-induced fluorescence detection for capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shulin; Yuan, Hongyan; Xiao, Dan

    2006-02-01

    A highly sensitive optical fiber light-emitting diode (LED)-induced fluorescence detector for CE has been constructed and evaluated. In this detector, a violet or blue LED was used as the excitation source and an optical fiber with 40 microm OD was used to transmit the excitation light. The upper end of the fiber was inserted into the separation capillary and was situated right at the detection window. Fluorescence emission was collected by a 40 x microscope objective, focused on a spatial filter, and passed through a cutoff filter before reaching the photomultiplier tube. Output signals were recorded and processed with a computer using in-house written software. The present CE/fluorescence detector deploys a simple and inexpensive optical system that requires only an LED as the light source. Its utility was successfully demonstrated by the separation and determination of amino acids (AAs) labeled with naphthalene-2,3-dicarboxaldehyde (NDA) and FITC. Low detection limits were obtained ranging from 17 to 23 nM for NDA-tagged AAs and 8 to 12 nM for FITC-labeled AAs (S/N=3). By virtue of such valuable features as low cost, convenience, and miniaturization, the presented detection scheme was proven to be attractive for sensitive fluorescence detection in CE.

  6. A study on anti-light disturbance in laser position detecting to welding seam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Nan-sheng; Guo, Chang-rong; Liu, Ming-you

    2006-02-01

    Laser position detecting to weld seam is based on the principle of structured light measuring. The intense arc, combusting gas and spatters influence the acquisition of weld seam image in the process of welding. Therefore, the problem of anti-light disturbance is studied in four aspects. First, the forming factors of the light disturbance such as the arc and the melting cell radiation and so on is studied from the viewpoint of the distribution of spectrum energy. Matching the narrow-band filter with the wavelength of laser can obstruct the ultraviolet and infrared radiation. Secondly, the influence brought by the reflection on the surface of steel plate is studied and a neutral filter is used to absorb the light disturbance and then the signal-to-noise ratio of an image is improved. Thirdly, there are still some stripes of spatters on image after compound filtering. For calculating the position of weld seam, the technology of digital image processing is also adopted. And finally, obstructing the light disturbance by a mechanical part is also an important measure. A baffle installed between the welding torch and the laser sensor can effectively obstruct some of the spatters. After taking the above four aspects measures, the light disturbance is better eliminated and a clear image is acquired. It can be used to track the weld seam by crawling arc welding robot.

  7. A novel method for detecting light source for digital images forensic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, A. K.; Mitra, S. K.; Agrawal, R.

    2011-06-01

    Manipulation in image has been in practice since centuries. These manipulated images are intended to alter facts — facts of ethics, morality, politics, sex, celebrity or chaos. Image forensic science is used to detect these manipulations in a digital image. There are several standard ways to analyze an image for manipulation. Each one has some limitation. Also very rarely any method tried to capitalize on the way image was taken by the camera. We propose a new method that is based on light and its shade as light and shade are the fundamental input resources that may carry all the information of the image. The proposed method measures the direction of light source and uses the light based technique for identification of any intentional partial manipulation in the said digital image. The method is tested for known manipulated images to correctly identify the light sources. The light source of an image is measured in terms of angle. The experimental results show the robustness of the methodology.

  8. Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernon, C. G.

    2016-09-01

    Preface; 1. Historical; 2. Waves and wave-motion; 3. The behaviour of ripples; 4. The behaviour of light; 5. Refraction through glass blocks and prisms; 6. The imprinting of curvatures; 7. Simple mathematical treatment; 8. More advanced mathematical treatment; 9. The velocity of light; 10. The spectrum and colour; 11. Geometrical optics; 12. The eye and optical instruments; 13. Sources of light; 14. Interference, diffraction and polarisation; 15. Suggestions for class experiments; Index.

  9. Detection of UV light based on chemically stimulated luminescence of crystal phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grankin, D. V.; Grankin, V. P.; Martysh, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    High-efficiency accommodation of heterogeneous-reaction energy via an electronic channel and the possibility of using this effect to design an ionizing (UV) radiation detector based on chemically stimulated luminescence have been investigated. Preliminary irradiation of a ZnS sample by UV light is found to cause a luminescence flash under subsequent exposure of the sample surface to a flux of hydrogen atoms. The flash intensity depends on the UV excitation level and increases by several orders of magnitude in comparison with an unirradiated sample. It is shown that a new method for detecting UV light using chemically stimulated luminescence of crystal phosphors accumulating light yield can be developed based on this effect.

  10. Cherenkov light detection as a velocity selector for uranium fission products at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Enomoto, A.; Kouno, J.; Yamaki, S.; Matsunaga, S.; Suzaki, F.; Suzuki, T.; Abe, Y.; Nagae, D.; Okada, S.; Ozawa, A.; Saito, Y.; Sawahata, K.; Kitagawa, A.; Sato, S.

    2014-12-01

    The in-flight particle separation capability of intermediate-energy radioactive ion (RI) beams produced at a fragment separator can be improved with the Cherenkov light detection technique. The cone angle of Cherenkov light emission varies as a function of beam velocity. This can be exploited as a velocity selector for secondary beams. Using heavy ion beams available at the HIMAC synchrotron facility, the Cherenkov light angular distribution was measured for several thin radiators with high refractive indices (n = 1.9 2.1). A velocity resolution of 10-3 was achieved for a 56Fe beam with an energy of 500 MeV/nucleon. Combined with the conventional rigidity selection technique coupled with energy-loss analysis, the present method will enable the efficient selection of an exotic species from huge amounts of various nuclides, such as uranium fission products at the BigRIPS fragment separator located at the RI Beam Factory.

  11. Detecting and locating light atoms from high-resolution STEM images: The quest for a single optimal design.

    PubMed

    Gonnissen, J; De Backer, A; den Dekker, A J; Sijbers, J; Van Aert, S

    2016-11-01

    In the present paper, the optimal detector design is investigated for both detecting and locating light atoms from high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (HR STEM) images. The principles of detection theory are used to quantify the probability of error for the detection of light atoms from HR STEM images. To determine the optimal experiment design for locating light atoms, use is made of the so-called Cramér-Rao Lower Bound (CRLB). It is investigated if a single optimal design can be found for both the detection and location problem of light atoms. Furthermore, the incoming electron dose is optimised for both research goals and it is shown that picometre range precision is feasible for the estimation of the atom positions when using an appropriate incoming electron dose under the optimal detector settings to detect light atoms.

  12. Alternate light sources in the detection of bone after an accelerated fire: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Gallant, Amber S

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the ability of alternate light sources to detect bone that has been exposed to fire when identification of bone remains is difficult to ascertain. It is intended as a tool for fire investigators to quickly determine whether an area should be considered a forensic scene. After being subjected to a test burn, pig bones were viewed and photographed with the use of a laser, and later compared with a UV light source. A secondary study observing stages of a human cremation was conducted to assess how various levels of burnt flesh affect the ability of bone to fluoresce utilizing a laser. Both studies demonstrated success in detecting bone while fluorescing with a molten lava type of appearance that has the potential to distinguish bone from its surrounding environment. Limitations and recommendations are discussed by the author including the need for future studies to expand on this research.

  13. Detection of gravity waves by phase modulation of the light from a distant star

    SciTech Connect

    Lesovik, G.B.; Mounutcharyan, V.; Lebedev, A.V.; Martin, T.

    2005-06-15

    We propose a novel method for detecting gravitational waves (GW), where a light signal emitted from a distant star interacts with a local (also distant) GW source and travels towards the Earth, where it is detected. While traveling in the field of the GW, the light acquires specific phase modulation (which we account in the eikonal approximation). This phase modulation can be considered as a coherent spreading of the given initial photons energy over a set of satellite lines, spaced at the frequency of GW (from quantum point of view it is multigraviton absorption and emission processes). This coherent state of photons with the energy distributed among the set of equidistant lines, can be analyzed and identified on Earth either by passing the signal through a Fabry-Perot filter or by monitoring the intensity-intensity correlations at different times.

  14. The Flashlight Fish Anomalops katoptron Uses Bioluminescent Light to Detect Prey in the Dark

    PubMed Central

    Hellinger, Jens; Jägers, Peter; Donner, Marcel; Sutt, Franziska; Mark, Melanie D.; Senen, Budiono; Tollrian, Ralph

    2017-01-01

    Bioluminescence is a fascinating phenomenon occurring in numerous animal taxa in the ocean. The reef dwelling splitfin flashlight fish (Anomalops katoptron) can be found in large schools during moonless nights in the shallow water of coral reefs and in the open surrounding water. Anomalops katoptron produce striking blink patterns with symbiotic bacteria in their sub-ocular light organs. We examined the blink frequency in A. katoptron under various laboratory conditions. During the night A. katoptron swims in schools roughly parallel to their conspecifics and display high blink frequencies of approximately 90 blinks/minute with equal on and off times. However, when planktonic prey was detected in the experimental tank, the open time increased compared to open times in the absence of prey and the frequency decreased to 20% compared to blink frequency at night in the absence of planktonic prey. During the day when the school is in a cave in the reef tank the blink frequency decreases to approximately 9 blinks/minute with increasing off-times of the light organ. Surprisingly the non-luminescent A. katoptron with non-functional light organs displayed the same blink frequencies and light organ open/closed times during the night and day as their luminescent conspecifics. In the presence of plankton non-luminescent specimens showed no change in the blink frequency and open/closed times compared to luminescent A. katoptron. Our experiments performed in a coral reef tank show that A. katoptron use bioluminescent illumination to detect planktonic prey and that the blink frequency of A. katoptron light organs follow an exogenous control by the ambient light. PMID:28178297

  15. The Flashlight Fish Anomalops katoptron Uses Bioluminescent Light to Detect Prey in the Dark.

    PubMed

    Hellinger, Jens; Jägers, Peter; Donner, Marcel; Sutt, Franziska; Mark, Melanie D; Senen, Budiono; Tollrian, Ralph; Herlitze, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Bioluminescence is a fascinating phenomenon occurring in numerous animal taxa in the ocean. The reef dwelling splitfin flashlight fish (Anomalops katoptron) can be found in large schools during moonless nights in the shallow water of coral reefs and in the open surrounding water. Anomalops katoptron produce striking blink patterns with symbiotic bacteria in their sub-ocular light organs. We examined the blink frequency in A. katoptron under various laboratory conditions. During the night A. katoptron swims in schools roughly parallel to their conspecifics and display high blink frequencies of approximately 90 blinks/minute with equal on and off times. However, when planktonic prey was detected in the experimental tank, the open time increased compared to open times in the absence of prey and the frequency decreased to 20% compared to blink frequency at night in the absence of planktonic prey. During the day when the school is in a cave in the reef tank the blink frequency decreases to approximately 9 blinks/minute with increasing off-times of the light organ. Surprisingly the non-luminescent A. katoptron with non-functional light organs displayed the same blink frequencies and light organ open/closed times during the night and day as their luminescent conspecifics. In the presence of plankton non-luminescent specimens showed no change in the blink frequency and open/closed times compared to luminescent A. katoptron. Our experiments performed in a coral reef tank show that A. katoptron use bioluminescent illumination to detect planktonic prey and that the blink frequency of A. katoptron light organs follow an exogenous control by the ambient light.

  16. Separation of monosaccharides by hydrophilic interaction chromatography with evaporative light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Göran; Winge, Stefan; Sandberg, Helena

    2005-10-28

    Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) was used to separate monosaccharides that are common in N-linked oligosaccharides in glycoproteins and other compounds. A TSKgel Amide-80 column was eluted with 82% acetonitrile, in 5 mM ammonium formate (pH 5.5). Column temperature was 60 degrees C and evaporative light scattering was used for detection (ELSD). With this method, L-fucose, D-galactose, D-mannose, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, N-acetylneuraminic acid, and D-glucuronic acid were separated, with detection limits of 0.3-0.5 microg for each monosaccharide, and intermediate precisions were 3-6% RSD (n=6).

  17. Tumor detection strategy using ZnO light-emitting nanoprobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sheng-Chieh; Shen, Yi-Chun; Lu, Tzu-Chun; Yang, Tsung-Lin; Huang, Jian-Jang

    2012-02-01

    Traditional methods of detecting cancer cells, such as fluorescence, have their limits and can hardly be used for identification during tumor resection. Here we report an alternative tumor detection technology using ZnO nanorods bonded to antibodies as cancer cell probes. Our experiment shows that antibodies toward epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) can be connected to ZnO nanorods and to EGFR receptors of SCC (squamous cell carcinoma). The cancer cell can be recognized by the naked eye or an optical microscope with the help of purple light emission from ZnO/EGFR antibody probes. On the other hand, for cells with less EGFR expression, in our case Hs68, no purple light was observed as the probes were washed off. From the photoluminescent spectra, the peak intensity ratio between the purple light (from ZnO at the wavelength 377 nm) and the green band (from the autofluorescence of cells) is much higher with the presence in SCC, as compared with Hs68. The ZnO/EGFR antibody probes have the potential to be applied to surgery for real-time tumor cell identification. The cancer cells will be excised with the help of purple light emission.

  18. White light phase shifting interferometry and color fringe analysis for the detection of contaminants in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, Vishesh; Singh, Veena; Ahmad, Azeem; Singh, Gyanendra; Mehta, Dalip Singh

    2016-03-01

    We report white light phase shifting interferometry in conjunction with color fringe analysis for the detection of contaminants in water such as Escherichia coli (E.coli), Campylobacter coli and Bacillus cereus. The experimental setup is based on a common path interferometer using Mirau interferometric objective lens. White light interferograms are recorded using a 3-chip color CCD camera based on prism technology. The 3-chip color camera have lesser color cross talk and better spatial resolution in comparison to single chip CCD camera. A piezo-electric transducer (PZT) phase shifter is fixed with the Mirau objective and they are attached with a conventional microscope. Five phase shifted white light interferograms are recorded by the 3-chip color CCD camera and each phase shifted interferogram is decomposed into the red, green and blue constituent colors, thus making three sets of five phase shifted intererograms for three different colors from a single set of white light interferogram. This makes the system less time consuming and have lesser effect due to surrounding environment. Initially 3D phase maps of the bacteria are reconstructed for red, green and blue wavelengths from these interferograms using MATLAB, from these phase maps we determines the refractive index (RI) of the bacteria. Experimental results of 3D shape measurement and RI at multiple wavelengths will be presented. These results might find applications for detection of contaminants in water without using any chemical processing and fluorescent dyes.

  19. Non-contact detection of cardiac rate based on visible light imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Huishi; Zhao, Yuejin; Dong, Liquan

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a non-contact method to detect human cardiac rate at a distance. This detection is based on the general lighting condition. Using the video signal of human face region captured by webcam, we acquire the cardiac rate based on the PhotoPlethysmoGraphy theory. In this paper, the cardiac rate detecting method is mainly in view of the blood's different absorptivities of the lights various wavelengths. Firstly, we discompose the video signal into RGB three color signal channels and choose the face region as region of interest to take average gray value. Then, we draw three gray-mean curves on each color channel with time as variable. When the imaging device has good fidelity of color, the green channel signal shows the PhotoPlethysmoGraphy information most clearly. But the red and blue channel signals can provide more other physiological information on the account of their light absorptive characteristics of blood. We divide red channel signal by green channel signal to acquire the pulse wave. With the passband from 0.67Hz to 3Hz as a filter of the pulse wave signal and the frequency spectrum superimposed algorithm, we design frequency extracted algorithm to achieve the cardiac rate. Finally, we experiment with 30 volunteers, containing different genders and different ages. The results of the experiments are all relatively agreeable. The difference is about 2bmp. Through the experiment, we deduce that the PhotoPlethysmoGraphy theory based on visible light can also be used to detect other physiological information.

  20. Relative Navigation Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) Sensor Development Test Objective (DTO) Performance Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennehy, Cornelius J.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) received a request from the NASA Associate Administrator (AA) for Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD), to quantitatively evaluate the individual performance of three light detection and ranging (LIDAR) rendezvous sensors flown as orbiter's development test objective on Space Transportation System (STS)-127, STS-133, STS-134, and STS-135. This document contains the outcome of the NESC assessment.

  1. Defects detection for rough magnetic tiles surface based on light sectioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuwei; Tao, Jiayuan; Chen, Xiangcheng; Wang, Keyi

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic tile as a kind of product of mass production and wide application in electronic motors, and defects detection is a major issue in its production line. In this paper, a machine vision method based on black-stripe projection is presented to deal with this issue. Because of magnetic tile surface with black colors, rough structure and complex grinding textures, we abandon intensity imaging and resort to light sectioning methods which provides more reliable and abundant surface information. In order to suppress the speckle diffraction effect caused by laser light source, we used the light-emitting diode (LED) with incoherent characteristics. The black-stripe images were captured by a high-speed camera. A fast algorithm was developed to extract and compare both edges of the black-stripe, which could detect defects and eliminate the effects of vibrations. The experimental results show that the simple and fast processing method proposed in this paper can detect the structural defects such as micro pits and micro cracks.

  2. Separation and detection of plasmalogen in marine invertebrates by high-performance liquid chromatography with evaporative light-scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Shinji; Abe, Akihiro; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Kinoshita, Mikio; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2014-12-01

    We have developed a new method for determining ethanolamine plasmalogen contents in marine invertebrates. This quantification method involves derivatization of ethanolamine glycerophospholipid (EtnGpl) subclasses, alkenylacyl (plasmalogen), diacyl, and alkylacyl subclasses, by enzyme treatment and acetylation, followed by separation and detection by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with evaporative light-scattering detection (ELSD). This method enabled complete separation of the subclasses, and the limit of detection for plasmalogen was 200 ng (260 pmol). The peak area of plasmalogen by ELSD was unaffected by the degree of unsaturated fatty acids in EtnGpl, in contrast to ultraviolet (UV) detection. Thus, this method enables accurate determination of plasmalogen contents in various species containing marine products possessing abundant polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). The method developed here was applied to marine invertebrates available in Japan. The examined marine invertebrates showed a wide range of plasmalogen contents ranging from 19 to 504 μmol/100 g wet wt. The plasmalogen levels in samples except those of class Cephalopoda and Crustacea were more than 60 mol% of EtnGpl.

  3. Efficacy of light based detection systems for early detection of oral cancer and oral potentially malignant disorders: Systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Reddy-Kantharaj, Yashoda-Bhoomi; Rakesh, Nagaraju; Janardhan-Reddy, Sujatha; Sahu, Shashikant

    2016-01-01

    Background Earlier detection of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMD) is essential for dental professionals to improve patient survival rates. The aim of this systematic review is to to evaluate the effectiveness of devices that utilise the principles of chemiluminescence and tissue autofluorescence as adjuncts in the detection of OSCC and OPMD. Material and Methods The electronic retrieval systems and databases searched for relevant articles were PubMed [MEDLINE] and Science direct. The search was for limited articles published in English or with an English abstract and articles published during the period from January 2005 to April 2014. Clinical trials utilized ViziLite, Microlux TM/DL and Visual Enhanced Light scope (VELscope) for early detection of OPMD and OSCC. Results Twenty primary studies published satisfied our criteria for selection - 10 utilised chemiluminescence and 10 tissue autofluorescence. Senstivity of Vizilite for detecting OSCC nad OPMD ranged from 77.1 % to 100% and specificity was low that ranged from 0% to 27.8%.Most have shown that chemiluminescence increases the brightness and margins of oral mucosal white lesions and thus assist in identification of mucosal lesions not considered under Conventional visual examination. However, it preferentially detects leukoplakia and may fail to spot red patches. Clinical trials demonstrated that sensitivity of VELscope in detecting malignancy and OPMD ranged from 22 % to 100 % and specificity ranged from 16 % to 100%. Most studies concluded that VELscope can help the experienced clinician to find oral precursor malignant lesions. But it couldnot differentiate between dysplasia and benign inflammatory conditions. Conclusions Both devices are simple, non-invasive test of the oral mucosa but are suited for clinicians with sufficient experience and training. More clinical trials in future should be conducted to establish optical imaging as an efficacious adjunct

  4. Confocal Light Absorption and Scattering Spectroscopic (CLASS) imaging: From cancer detection to sub-cellular function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Le

    Light scattering spectroscopy (LSS), an optical technique that relates the spectroscopic properties of light elastically scattered by small particles to their size, refractive index and shape, has been recently successfully employed for sensing morphological and biochemical properties of epithelial tissues and cells in vivo. LSS does not require exogenous markers, is non-invasive, and, due to its multispectral nature, can sense biological structures well beyond the diffraction limit. All that makes LSS be a very good candidate to be used both in clinical medicine for in vivo detection of disease and in cell biology to monitor cell function on the organelle scale. Recently we developed two LSS-based imaging modalities: clinical Polarized LSS (PLSS) Endoscopic Technique for locating early pre-cancerous changes in GI tract and Confocal Light Absorption and Scattering Spectroscopic (CLASS) Microscopy for studying cells in vivo without exogenous markers. One important application of the clinical PLSS endoscopic instrument, a noncontact scanning imaging device compatible with the standard clinical endoscopes and capable of detecting dysplastic changes, is to serve as a guide for biopsy in Barrett's esophagus (BE). The instrument detects parallel and perpendicular components of the polarized light, backscattered from epithelial tissues, and determines characteristics of epithelial nuclei from the residual spectra. It also can find tissue oxygenation, hemoglobin content and other properties from the diffuse light component. By rapidly scanning esophagus the PLSS endoscopic instrument makes sure the entire BE portion is scanned and examined for the presence of dysplasia. CLASS microscopy, on the other hand, combines principles of light scattering spectroscopy (LSS) with confocal microscopy. Its main purpose is to image cells on organelle scale in vivo without the use of exogenous labels which may affect the cell function. The confocal geometry selects specific region and

  5. Detection of Time Lags between Quasar Continuum Emission Bands Based On Pan-STARRS Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yan-Fei; Green, Paul J.; Greene, Jenny E.; Morganson, Eric; Shen, Yue; Pancoast, Anna; MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Anderson, Scott F.; Brandt, W. N.; Grier, C. J.; Rix, H.-W.; Ruan, John J.; Protopapas, Pavlos; Scott, Caroline; Burgett, W. S.; Hodapp, K. W.; Huber, M. E.; Kaiser, N.; Kudritzki, R. P.; Magnier, E. A.; Metcalfe, N.; Tonry, J. T.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.

    2017-02-01

    We study the time lags between the continuum emission of quasars at different wavelengths, based on more than four years of multi-band (g, r, i, z) light curves in the Pan-STARRS Medium Deep Fields. As photons from different bands emerge from different radial ranges in the accretion disk, the lags constrain the sizes of the accretion disks. We select 240 quasars with redshifts of z ≈ 1 or z ≈ 0.3 that are relatively emission-line free. The light curves are sampled from day to month timescales, which makes it possible to detect lags on the scale of the light crossing time of the accretion disks. With the code JAVELIN, we detect typical lags of several days in the rest frame between the g band and the riz bands. The detected lags are ∼2–3 times larger than the light crossing time estimated from the standard thin disk model, consistent with the recently measured lag in NGC 5548 and microlensing measurements of quasars. The lags in our sample are found to increase with increasing luminosity. Furthermore, the increase in lags going from g ‑ r to g ‑ i and then to g ‑ z is slower than predicted in the thin disk model, particularly for high-luminosity quasars. The radial temperature profile in the disk must be different from what is assumed. We also find evidence that the lags decrease with increasing line ratios between ultraviolet Fe ii lines and Mg ii, which may point to changes in the accretion disk structure at higher metallicity.

  6. The use of an alternate light source for detecting bones underwater.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Angi M; Horn, Kevin J; Smith, Victoria A

    2014-07-01

    When searching underwater crime scenes or disaster scenes for fragmentary human remains, it may be advantageous for forensic divers to be able to detect the presence of bones and teeth among other marine materials (such as shells and rocks). In terrestrial environments, this can typically be accomplished by visual and instrumental methods, but underwater conditions make it difficult to employ detection and sorting techniques in these environments. This study investigates fluorescence of bones and teeth and other marine materials using a submersible alternate light source (ALS) and concludes that an ALS can be a useful tool for detecting bones and teeth in underwater searches as well in terrestrial searches and laboratory environments. The results could impact the methods and equipment used by forensic divers and forensic anthropologists when searching for skeletal remains, potentially increasing the quantity and efficiency of forensic evidence recovered.

  7. Fast, Large-Area, Wide-Bandgap UV Photodetector for Cherenkov Light Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.

    2013-01-01

    Due to limited resources available for power and space for payloads, miniaturizing and integrating instrumentation is a high priority for addressing the challenges of manned and unmanned deep space missions to high Earth orbit (HEO), near Earth objects (NEOs), Lunar and Martian orbits and surfaces, and outer planetary systems, as well as improvements to high-altitude aircraft safety. New, robust, and compact detectors allow future instrumentation packages more options in satisfying specific mission goals. A solid-state ultraviolet (UV) detector was developed with a theoretical fast response time and large detection area intended for application to Cherenkov detectors. The detector is based on the wide-bandgap semiconductor zinc oxide (ZnO), which in a bridge circuit can detect small, fast pulses of UV light like those required for Cherenkov detectors. The goal is to replace the role of photomultiplier tubes in Cherenkov detectors with these solid-state devices, saving on size, weight, and required power. For improving detection geometry, a spherical detector to measure high atomic number and energy (HZE) ions from any direction has been patented as part of a larger space radiation detector system. The detector will require the development of solid-state UV photodetectors fast enough (2 ns response time or better) to detect the shockwave of Cherenkov light emitted as the ions pass through a quartz, sapphire, or acrylic ball. The detector must be small enough to fit in the detector system structure, but have an active area large enough to capture enough Cherenkov light from the sphere. The detector is fabricated on bulk single-crystal undoped ZnO. Inter - digitated finger electrodes and contact pads are patterned via photolithography, and formed by sputtered metal of silver, platinum, or other high-conductivity metal.

  8. Drosophila TRPA1 isoforms detect UV light via photochemical production of H2O2

    PubMed Central

    Guntur, Ananya R.; Gu, Pengyu; Takle, Kendra; Chen, Jingyi; Xiang, Yang; Yang, Chung-Hui

    2015-01-01

    The transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1) channel is an evolutionarily conserved detector of temperature and irritant chemicals. Here, we show that two specific isoforms of TRPA1 in Drosophila are H2O2 sensitive and that they can detect strong UV light via sensing light-induced production of H2O2. We found that ectopic expression of these H2O2-sensitive Drosophila TRPA1 (dTRPA1) isoforms conferred UV sensitivity to light-insensitive HEK293 cells and Drosophila neurons, whereas expressing the H2O2-insensitive isoform did not. Curiously, when expressed in one specific group of motor neurons in adult flies, the H2O2-sensitive dTRPA1 isoforms were as competent as the blue light-gated channelrhodopsin-2 in triggering motor output in response to light. We found that the corpus cardiacum (CC) cells, a group of neuroendocrine cells that produce the adipokinetic hormone (AKH) in the larval ring gland endogenously express these H2O2-sensitive dTRPA1 isoforms and that they are UV sensitive. Sensitivity of CC cells required dTRPA1 and H2O2 production but not conventional phototransduction molecules. Our results suggest that specific isoforms of dTRPA1 can sense UV light via photochemical production of H2O2. We speculate that UV sensitivity conferred by these isoforms in CC cells may allow young larvae to activate stress response—a function of CC cells—when they encounter strong UV, an aversive stimulus for young larvae. PMID:26443856

  9. Drosophila TRPA1 isoforms detect UV light via photochemical production of H2O2.

    PubMed

    Guntur, Ananya R; Gu, Pengyu; Takle, Kendra; Chen, Jingyi; Xiang, Yang; Yang, Chung-Hui

    2015-10-20

    The transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1) channel is an evolutionarily conserved detector of temperature and irritant chemicals. Here, we show that two specific isoforms of TRPA1 in Drosophila are H2O2 sensitive and that they can detect strong UV light via sensing light-induced production of H2O2. We found that ectopic expression of these H2O2-sensitive Drosophila TRPA1 (dTRPA1) isoforms conferred UV sensitivity to light-insensitive HEK293 cells and Drosophila neurons, whereas expressing the H2O2-insensitive isoform did not. Curiously, when expressed in one specific group of motor neurons in adult flies, the H2O2-sensitive dTRPA1 isoforms were as competent as the blue light-gated channelrhodopsin-2 in triggering motor output in response to light. We found that the corpus cardiacum (CC) cells, a group of neuroendocrine cells that produce the adipokinetic hormone (AKH) in the larval ring gland endogenously express these H2O2-sensitive dTRPA1 isoforms and that they are UV sensitive. Sensitivity of CC cells required dTRPA1 and H2O2 production but not conventional phototransduction molecules. Our results suggest that specific isoforms of dTRPA1 can sense UV light via photochemical production of H2O2. We speculate that UV sensitivity conferred by these isoforms in CC cells may allow young larvae to activate stress response--a function of CC cells--when they encounter strong UV, an aversive stimulus for young larvae.

  10. The varying effects of ambient lighting on low contrast detection tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEntee, Mark F.; Martin, Barbara

    2010-02-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to determine if there is a significant difference between the detection of low-contrast objects on 1MP review monitor and 3MP primary monitor. METHOD: The monitors compared were a 1MP NEC Multisync 1980SXi and a 3MP Barco Coronis MFGD 3420. The low-contrast detectability of these monitors was compared at a high ambient light setting (73 lx) equivalent to that of a ward or intensive care unit in the clinical setting and a low setting (20 lx) which reflected that used in reporting rooms in standard practice. The comparison was made using a CDRAD test tool and visualisation of nasogastric tubes and a central line. RESULTS: Image quality results for both the psychophysical and diagnostic performance test were substantially higher for the 3MP monitor than those obtained for the 1MP. Significant differences p<=0.000 existed between the IQF results for the 2 monitors. Image quality results were higher at the lower ambient light setting for both monitors. CONCLUSION: Contrast visualisation is significantly improved through the use of primary monitors. Review monitors are adequate for the visualisation of lines an NG tubes in low and high light settings.

  11. Detection of internal structure by scattered light intensity: Application to kidney cell sorting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goolsby, C. L.; Kunze, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    Scattered light measurements in flow cytometry were sucessfully used to distinguish cells on the basis of differing morphology and internal structure. Differences in scattered light patterns due to changes in internal structure would be expected to occur at large scattering angles. Practically, the results of these calculations suggest that in experimental situations an array of detectors would be useful. Although in general the detection of the scattered light intensity at several intervals within the 10 to 60 region would be sufficient, there are many examples where increased sensitivity could be acheived at other angles. The ability to measure at many different angular intervals would allow the experimenter to empirically select the optimum intervals for the varying conditions of cell size, N/C ratio, granule size and internal structure from sample to sample. The feasibility of making scattered light measurements at many different intervals in flow cytometry was demonstrated. The implementation of simplified versions of these techniques in conjunction with independant measurements of cell size could potentially improve the usefulness of flow cytometry in the study of the internal structure of cells.

  12. Morphological Background Detection and Illumination Normalization of Text Image with Poor Lighting

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guocheng; Wang, Yiwen; Li, Hui; Chen, Xuanqi; Lu, Haitao; Ma, Yanpeng; Peng, Chun; Wang, Yijun; Tang, Linyao

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, some morphological transformations are used to detect the unevenly illuminated background of text images characterized by poor lighting, and to acquire illumination normalized result. Based on morphologic Top-Hat transform, the uneven illumination normalization algorithm has been carried out, and typically verified by three procedures. The first procedure employs the information from opening based Top-Hat operator, which is a classical method. In order to optimize and perfect the classical Top-Hat transform, the second procedure, featuring the definition of multi direction illumination notion, utilizes opening by reconstruction and closing by reconstruction based on multi direction structuring elements. Finally, multi direction images are merged to the final even illumination image. The performance of the proposed algorithm is illustrated and verified through the processing of different ideal synthetic and camera collected images, with backgrounds characterized by poor lighting conditions. PMID:25426639

  13. Morphological background detection and illumination normalization of text image with poor lighting.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guocheng; Wang, Yiwen; Li, Hui; Chen, Xuanqi; Lu, Haitao; Ma, Yanpeng; Peng, Chun; Wang, Yijun; Tang, Linyao

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, some morphological transformations are used to detect the unevenly illuminated background of text images characterized by poor lighting, and to acquire illumination normalized result. Based on morphologic Top-Hat transform, the uneven illumination normalization algorithm has been carried out, and typically verified by three procedures. The first procedure employs the information from opening based Top-Hat operator, which is a classical method. In order to optimize and perfect the classical Top-Hat transform, the second procedure, featuring the definition of multi direction illumination notion, utilizes opening by reconstruction and closing by reconstruction based on multi direction structuring elements. Finally, multi direction images are merged to the final even illumination image. The performance of the proposed algorithm is illustrated and verified through the processing of different ideal synthetic and camera collected images, with backgrounds characterized by poor lighting conditions.

  14. Polyp detection rates using magnification with narrow band imaging and white light

    PubMed Central

    Gilani, Nooman; Stipho, Sally; Panetta, James D; Petre, Sorin; Young, Michele A; Ramirez, Francisco C

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare the yield of adenomas between narrow band imaging and white light when using high definition/magnification. METHODS: This prospective, non-randomized comparative study was performed at the endoscopy unit of veteran affairs medical center in Phoenix, Arizona. Consecutive patients undergoing first average risk colorectal cancer screening colonoscopy were selected. Two experienced gastroenterologists performed all the procedures that were blinded to each other’s findings. Demographic details were recorded. Data are presented as mean ± SEM. Proportional data were compared using the χ2 test and means were compared using the Student’s t test. Tandem colonoscopy was performed in a sequential and segmental fashion using one of 3 strategies: white light followed by narrow band imaging [Group A: white light (WL) → narrow band imaging (NBI)]; narrow band imaging followed by white light (Group B: NBI → WL) and, white light followed by white light (Group C: WL → WL). Detection rate of missed polyps and adenomas were evaluated in all three groups. RESULTS: Three hundred patients were studied (100 in each Group). Although the total time for the colonoscopy was similar in the 3 groups (23.8 ± 0.7, 22.2 ± 0.5 and 24.1 ± 0.7 min for Groups A, B and C, respectively), it reached statistical significance between Groups B and C (P < 0.05). The cecal intubation time in Groups B and C was longer than for Group A (6.5 ± 0.4 min and 6.5 ± 0.4 min vs 4.9 ± 0.3 min; P < 0.05). The withdrawal time for Groups A and C was longer than Group B (18.9 ± 0.7 min and 17.6 ± 0.6 min vs 15.7 ± 0.4 min; P < 0.05). Overall miss rate for polyps and adenomas detected in three groups during the second look was 18% and 17%, respectively (P = NS). Detection rate for polyps and adenomas after first look with white light was similar irrespective of the light used during the second look (WL → WL: 13.7% for polyps, 12.6% for adenomas; WL → NBI: 14.2% for polyps, 11.3% for

  15. In vivo light scattering for the detection of cancerous and precancerous lesions of the cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Mourant, Judith R

    2008-01-01

    A noninvasive optical diagnostic system for detection of cancerous and precancerous lesions of the cervix was evaluated in vivo. The optical system included a fiber-optic probe designed to measure polarized and unpolarized light transport properties of a small volume of tissue. An algorithm for diagnosing tissue based on the optical measurements was developed that used four optical properties, three of which were related to light scattering properties and the fourth of which was related to hemoglobin concentration. A sensitivity of {approx}77% and specificities in the mid 60% range were obtained for separating high grade squamous intraepithelial lesions and cancer from other pathologies and normal tissue. The use of different cross-validation methods in algorithm development is analyzed, and the relative difficulties of diagnosing certain pathologies are assessed. Furthermore, the robustness of the optical system for use by different doctors and to changes in fiber-optic probe are also assessed, and potential improvements in the optical system are discussed.

  16. An imaging technique for detection and absolute calibration of scintillation light

    SciTech Connect

    Pappalardo, Alfio; Cosentino, Luigi; Finocchiaro, Paolo

    2010-03-15

    Triggered by the need of a detection system to be used in experiments of nuclear fusion in laser-generated plasmas, we developed an imaging technique for the measurement and calibration of the scintillation light yield of scintillating materials. As in such experiments, all the reaction products are generated in an ultrashort time frame, the event-by-event data acquisition scheme is not feasible. As an alternative to the emulsion technique (or the equivalent CR39 sheets) we propose a scintillating screen readout by means of a high performance charge coupled device camera. Even though it is not strictly required in the particular application, this technique allows the absolute calibration of the scintillation light yield.

  17. Research on the detection system of liquid concentration base on birefringence light transmission method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tianze; Zhang, Xia; Hou, Luan; Jiang, Chuan

    2010-10-01

    The characteristics of the beam transmitting in the optical fiber and the liquid medium are analyzed in this paper. On this basis, a new type of semiconductor optical position sensitive detector is used for a receiving device, a light transmission method of birefringence is presented,and a set of opto-electrical detection system which is applied to detect liquid concentration is designed. The system is mainly composed of semiconductor lasers,optical systems, Psd signal conditioning circuit, Single-chip System, A/D conversion circuit and display circuit. Through theoretical analysis and experimental simulations, the accuracy of this system has been verified. Some main factors affecting the test results are analyzed detailedly in this paper. The experiments show that the temperature drift and the light intensity have a very small impact on this system. The system has some advantages, such as the simple structure, high sensitivity, good stability, fast response time, high degree of automation, and so on. It also can achieve the real-time detection of liquid concentration conveniently and accurately. The system can be widely applied in chemical, food, pharmacy and many other industries. It has broad prospects of application.

  18. The "Polar Light Sign" is a useful tool to detect discrete membranous supravalvular mitral stenosis.

    PubMed

    Hertwig, Christine; Haas, Nikolaus A; Habash, Sheeraz; Hanslik, Andreas; Kececioglu, Deniz; Sandica, Eugen; Laser, Kai-Thorsten

    2015-02-01

    Mitral valve stenosis caused by a discrete supravalvular membrane is a rare congenital malformation haemodynamically leading to significant mitral valve stenosis. When the supravalvular mitral stenosis consists of a discrete supravalvular membrane adherent to the mitral valve, it is usually not clearly detectable by routine echocardiography. We report about the typical echocardiographic finding in three young patients with this rare form of a discrete membranous supravalvular stenosis caused by a membrane adherent to the mitral valve. These cases present a typical echocardiographic feature in colour Doppler generated by the pathognomonic supramitral flow acceleration. Whereas typical supravalvular mitral stenosis caused by cor triatriatum or a clearly visible supravalvular ring is easily detectable by echocardiography, a discrete supravalvular membrane adjacent to the mitral valve leaflets resembling valvular mitral stenosis is difficult to differentiate by routine echocardiography. In our opinion, this colour phenomenon does resemble the visual impression of polar lights in the northern hemisphere; owing to its typical appearance, it may therefore be named as "Polar Light Sign". This phenomenon may help to detect this anatomical entity by echocardiography in time and therefore improve the prognosis for repair.

  19. Detailed characterization of hyaluronan using aqueous size exclusion chromatography with triple detection and multiangle light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Patricia S; Maziarz, E Peter; Liu, X Michael

    2012-10-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) has attracted great interest and attention from ophthalmic surgical and eye care companies owing to its unique properties. A more complete understanding of HA biopolymers has, therefore, become increasingly critical as thorough characterization of raw materials helps promote product quality and process control. Often, such detailed information requires the use of a combination of analytical techniques. In this study, we compared size exclusion chromatography (SEC) with online multiangle light scattering (SEC-MALS) and SEC with triple detection (SEC-TD) experiments for HA analysis. Three lots of commercially available eye drop grade HA were characterized by SEC-MALS and SEC-TD. The absolute molecular weight averages, molecular weight distribution, radius of gyration, and solution conformation of the three HA lots were determined and compared by the two techniques. In addition, the intrinsic viscosity and intrinsic viscosity distribution were measured by SEC-TD.

  20. Low Light CMOS Contact Imager with an Integrated Poly-Acrylic Emission Filter for Fluorescence Detection

    PubMed Central

    Dattner, Yonathan; Yadid-Pecht, Orly

    2010-01-01

    This study presents the fabrication of a low cost poly-acrylic acid (PAA) based emission filter integrated with a low light CMOS contact imager for fluorescence detection. The process involves the use of PAA as an adhesive for the emission filter. The poly-acrylic solution was chosen due its optical transparent properties, adhesive properties, miscibility with polar protic solvents and most importantly its bio-compatibility with a biological environment. The emission filter, also known as an absorption filter, involves dissolving an absorbing specimen in a polar protic solvent and mixing it with the PAA to uniformly bond the absorbing specimen and harden the filter. The PAA is optically transparent in solid form and therefore does not contribute to the absorbance of light in the visible spectrum. Many combinations of absorbing specimen and polar protic solvents can be derived, yielding different filter characteristics in different parts of the spectrum. We report a specific combination as a first example of implementation of our technology. The filter reported has excitation in the green spectrum and emission in the red spectrum, utilizing the increased quantum efficiency of the photo sensitive sensor array. The thickness of the filter (20 μm) was chosen by calculating the desired SNR using Beer-Lambert’s law for liquids, Quantum Yield of the fluorophore and the Quantum Efficiency of the sensor array. The filters promising characteristics make it suitable for low light fluorescence detection. The filter was integrated with a fully functional low noise, low light CMOS contact imager and experimental results using fluorescence polystyrene micro-spheres are presented. PMID:22399920

  1. Detection of Changes on and below the Surface in Epithelium Mucosal Tissue Structure using Scattered Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taslidere, Ezgi

    The aim of this work is to answer the question of whether it is possible to detect changes on and below the surface in epithelium tissue structure using light reflected from the tissue over an area (2-D scan) illuminated by an optical sensor (fiber) emitting light at either one wavelength or with white light. Towards that end we model the 2-D reflected scans using a Stochastic Decomposition Method (SDM). The emphasis in this work is on the novelty of the proposed model and its theoretical pinning and foundation. The model is biologically motivated by the stochastic textural nature of the tissue. We model the textural content (which relates to tissue morphology) that manifests itself in the 2-D scans. Unlike previous works that analyze the scattered signal at one spot at various wavelengths, our method statistically analyzes 2-D scans of light scattering data over an area, and extracts from the data features (SDM parameters) that change with changes in the tissue morphology. The examination of an area rather than a spot not only leads to a more reliable calculation of the extracted parameters using single techniques (e.g. nuclear size distribution), but it also leads to the computation of additional information embedded in the spatial texture that our decomposition technique arrives at by modeling the hidden correlations that are obtained only by interrogating a wide sample area. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt at modeling the scattered light over an area using a stochastic decomposition model that allows for the assessment of correlation and textural characteristics that otherwise could not be revealed when the analysis of the scattering signal is a function of wavelength or angle. We also come up with a segmentation technique to raise a flag on the fly when a transition occurs between different mucosal architectures on the surface. The segmentation is based on a novel difference metric for detecting an abrupt change in the parameters

  2. Detecting apoptosis in vivo and ex vivo using spectroscopic OCT and dynamic light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Golnaz; Giles, Anoja; Mariampillai, Adrian; Yang, Victor X. D.; Czarnota, Gregory J.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2014-03-01

    We present an in vivo implementation of a multi-parametric technique for detecting apoptosis using optical coherence tomography in a mouse tumor model. Solid tumors were grown from acute myeloid leukemia cells in the hind leg of SCID mice and treated with a single dose of cisplatin and dexamethasone to induce apoptosis. Both spectral features and speckle decorrelation times indicated good consistency between control mice and reasonable agreement with in vitro measurements. The integrated backscatter increased significantly in tumors responding to treatment while the spectral slope and decorrelation time did not show significant changes. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using spectroscopic OCT and dynamic light scattering for treatment monitoring in vivo.

  3. Detection of amplitude modulation with squeezed light for sensitivity beyond the shot-noise limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Min; Wu, Ling-An; Kimble, H. J.

    1988-06-01

    An improvement in precision beyond the limit set by the vacuum-state or zero-point fluctuations of the electromagnetic field is reported for the detection of amplitude modulation encoded on a weak signal beam. The improvement is achieved by employing the squeezed light from an optical parametric oscillator to reduce the level of fluctuations below the shot-noise limit. An increase in signal-to-noise ratio of 2.5 dB relative to the shot-noise limit is demonstrated.

  4. Detection techniques using multispectral data to index soil erosional status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelletier, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    Indexing techniques that can be used to detect soil erosion utilizing the known band widths of the Landsat MSS and TM sensors are identified. The indexing techniques focus on iron oxides, clays, and organic matter as properties revealing soil erosional status. For data aquisition, a Collins visible and infrared intelligent spectrometer was used to collect data from 0.4-24 microns. Pressed polytetrafluorethylene was used as the reflectance standard and was aquired at the same time that the sample data were aquired.

  5. Updating the M Dwarf Planet Occurrence Rate by Injecting and Detecting Transits in Kepler Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressing, Courtney D.; Charbonneau, D.

    2014-01-01

    The primary goal of the Kepler mission is to constrain the occurrence rate of planets around stars with a range of spectral types. Previously, we estimated the M dwarf planet occurrence rate by revising the stellar parameters of the Kepler M dwarfs and analyzing the first six quarters of Kepler data. We found that there are 0.90 Earth-size (0.5-1.4 Earth radius) planets with periods <50 days per small star. We also found an occurrence rate of 0.15 Earth-size planets within the habitable zone per small star, implying a most probable distance of 13 pc to the nearest transiting potentially habitable planet. Our previous estimate of the occurrence rate assumed 100% detection efficiency at SNR=7.1 sigma, but the occurrence rate would have been underestimated if the actual detection efficiency is lower. In order to more accurately model the detection efficiency, we have developed a customized transit search pipeline tailored for application to M dwarfs. We measure the detection efficiency of our pipeline by injecting known transit signals into Kepler light curves and attempting to recover the signals. We are currently conducting a search for additional transiting planets using our pipeline and will compare our list of detected candidates to the candidates found by the Kepler team. We will then combine our more sophisticated model for the detection threshold and the list of planet candidates found using an additional ten quarters of Kepler data with our revised stellar parameters to present an updated measurement of the planet occurrence rate for M dwarfs. Our revised measurement will help enable predictions of the population of planets that will be detected by ongoing and future planet surveys such as MEarth and the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite.

  6. Adaptive threshold device for detection of reflections based visible light communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Changeez; Taherpour, Abbas

    2017-04-01

    One of the major restriction of existing visible light communication (VLC) systems is the limitation of channel transmission bandwidth which can be used in such systems. In this paper, an optimal and a suboptimal receiver are proposed to increase the on-off keying (OOK) transmission rate and hence to increase bandwidth efficiency of VLC system when a multiple reflections channel model is used to characterize the impacts of reflections in VLC signal propagation. Optimal detector consists of a simple receiver with a memory to find the optimal threshold based on the previous detected data. The error probability of the proposed detector is derived in the closed form and compared with the simulation results. It is demonstrated that the proposed detectors can improve the transmitting bandwidth close to the 3-dB bandwidth of the LOS channel model (which is several hundred MHz), whereas bit-error-rate (BER) remains low, in particular where the optimal detection is utilized.

  7. Detection of early carious lesions using contrast enhancement with coherent light scattering (speckle imaging)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deana, A. M.; Jesus, S. H. C.; Koshoji, N. H.; Bussadori, S. K.; Oliveira, M. T.

    2013-07-01

    Currently, dental caries still represent one of the chronic diseases with the highest prevalence and present in most countries. The interaction between light and teeth (absorption, scattering and fluorescence) is intrinsically connected to the constitution of the dental tissue. Decay induced mineral loss introduces a shift in the optical properties of the affected tissue; therefore, study of these properties may produce novel techniques aimed at the early diagnosis of carious lesions. Based on the optical properties of the enamel, we demonstrate the application of first-order spatial statistics in laser speckle imaging, allowing the detection of carious lesions in their early stages. A highlight of this noninvasive, non-destructive, real time and cost effective approach is that it allows a dentist to detect a lesion even in the absence of biofilm or moisture.

  8. A general purpose feature extractor for light detection and ranging data.

    PubMed

    Li, Yangming; Olson, Edwin B

    2010-01-01

    Feature extraction is a central step of processing Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) data. Existing detectors tend to exploit characteristics of specific environments: corners and lines from indoor (rectilinear) environments, and trees from outdoor environments. While these detectors work well in their intended environments, their performance in different environments can be poor. We describe a general purpose feature detector for both 2D and 3D LIDAR data that is applicable to virtually any environment. Our method adapts classic feature detection methods from the image processing literature, specifically the multi-scale Kanade-Tomasi corner detector. The resulting method is capable of identifying highly stable and repeatable features at a variety of spatial scales without knowledge of environment, and produces principled uncertainty estimates and corner descriptors at same time. We present results on both software simulation and standard datasets, including the 2D Victoria Park and Intel Research Center datasets, and the 3D MIT DARPA Urban Challenge dataset.

  9. Dual wavelength multiple-angle light scattering system for cryptosporidium detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buaprathoom, S.; Pedley, S.; Sweeney, S. J.

    2012-06-01

    A simple, dual wavelength, multiple-angle, light scattering system has been developed for detecting cryptosporidium suspended in water. Cryptosporidium is a coccidial protozoan parasite causing cryptosporidiosis; a diarrheal disease of varying severity. The parasite is transmitted by ingestion of contaminated water, particularly drinking-water, but also accidental ingestion of bathing-water, including swimming pools. It is therefore important to be able to detect these parasites quickly, so that remedial action can be taken to reduce the risk of infection. The proposed system combines multiple-angle scattering detection of a single and two wavelengths, to collect relative wavelength angle-resolved scattering phase functions from tested suspension, and multivariate data analysis techniques to obtain characterizing information of samples under investigation. The system was designed to be simple, portable and inexpensive. It employs two diode lasers (violet InGaN-based and red AlGaInP-based) as light sources and silicon photodiodes as detectors and optical components, all of which are readily available. The measured scattering patterns using the dual wavelength system showed that the relative wavelength angle-resolved scattering pattern of cryptosporidium oocysts was significantly different from other particles (e.g. polystyrene latex sphere, E.coli). The single wavelength set up was applied for cryptosporidium oocysts'size and relative refractive index measurement and differential measurement of the concentration of cryptosporidium oocysts suspended in water and mixed polystyrene latex sphere suspension. The measurement results showed good agreement with the control reference values. These results indicate that the proposed method could potentially be applied to online detection in a water quality control system.

  10. Chemical sensing of in situ extracted organics by direct detection of mode-filtered light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Synovec, Robert E.; Bruckner, Carsten A.; Burgess, Lloyd W.; Foster, M. D.

    1994-10-01

    A novel chemical analyzer is described in which an optical fiber is inserted into a transparent capillary tube, such that the inner diameter of the tube is only a few microns larger than the outer diameter of the fiber cladding. This configuration is referred to as a torus column. When a sample volume is introduced to the torus column at a low flow rate, propagated light is mode-filtered due to a change in the critical angle at the core/clad interface, as a result of in-situ extracted chemical species. Conventionally, chemical species extracted into the cladding are sensed as a change in the transmitted light at the end of the fiber. An alternative approach, measuring this mode-filtered light directly along the side of the fiber, is reported. The new approach has a signal-to-noise advantage over the conventional approach. The result is a low volume sensor that temporally separates, as well as detects, chemical species that partition into the fiber cladding. The temporal information enhances sensor performance, providing first order information for subsequent data analysis. We have examined the modulation of the critical angle by chemical species of interest at steady-state concentrations, and as transient concentration profiles that were shifted in time. In summary, the analyzer has chemical selectivity provided by differences in the refractive index, distribution coefficient, and transient time of the concentration profile of each chemical species in a sample. The chemical analyzer should be a promising tool for process and environmental monitoring.

  11. Silicon Photomultipliers, A New Device For Low Light Level Photon Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Moser, Hans-Guenther

    2006-10-27

    Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) are novel detectors for low level light detection based on arrays of avalanche photodiodes operating in Geiger mode. Offering good characteristics (fast response, high gain, photon counting capability, insensitivity to magnetic fields, low voltage operation) they have the potential to replace classical photomultipliers (PMT) in many applications. Drawbacks are dark rate and optical cross talk. Though their quantum efficiency is already comparable or better than that of bialkali PMT it is still limited by the structures on the light sensitive front surface. A new concept, presently developed at the Max-Planck semiconductor laboratory, allows boosting the efficiency to almost 100%. Using a fully depleted substrate the light enters through the unstructured backside. A drift diode structure collects the electrons on a small 'point like' avalanche structure for multiplication. Engineering the thin entrance window at the backside using antireflective layers a high efficiency can be achieved in a wide wavelength range (300-1000nm). The paper will summarize the status of front illuminated SiPMs and report on the development of the backside illuminated devices.

  12. Singlet oxygen signatures are detected independent of light or chloroplasts in response to multiple stresses.

    PubMed

    Mor, Avishai; Koh, Eugene; Weiner, Lev; Rosenwasser, Shilo; Sibony-Benyamini, Hadas; Fluhr, Robert

    2014-05-01

    The production of singlet oxygen is typically associated with inefficient dissipation of photosynthetic energy or can arise from light reactions as a result of accumulation of chlorophyll precursors as observed in fluorescent (flu)-like mutants. Such photodynamic production of singlet oxygen is thought to be involved in stress signaling and programmed cell death. Here we show that transcriptomes of multiple stresses, whether from light or dark treatments, were correlated with the transcriptome of the flu mutant. A core gene set of 118 genes, common to singlet oxygen, biotic and abiotic stresses was defined and confirmed to be activated photodynamically by the photosensitizer Rose Bengal. In addition, induction of the core gene set by abiotic and biotic selected stresses was shown to occur in the dark and in nonphotosynthetic tissue. Furthermore, when subjected to various biotic and abiotic stresses in the dark, the singlet oxygen-specific probe Singlet Oxygen Sensor Green detected rapid production of singlet oxygen in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) root. Subcellular localization of Singlet Oxygen Sensor Green fluorescence showed its accumulation in mitochondria, peroxisomes, and the nucleus, suggesting several compartments as the possible origins or targets for singlet oxygen. Collectively, the results show that singlet oxygen can be produced by multiple stress pathways and can emanate from compartments other than the chloroplast in a light-independent manner. The results imply that the role of singlet oxygen in plant stress regulation and response is more ubiquitous than previously thought.

  13. Computational modeling and experimental characterization of bacterial microcolonies for rapid detection using light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Nan

    A label-free and nondestructive optical elastic forward light scattering method has been extended for the analysis of microcolonies for food-borne bacteria detection and identification. To understand the forward light scattering phenomenon, a model based on the scalar diffraction theory has been employed: a bacterial colony is considered as a biological spatial light modulator with amplitude and phase modulation to the incoming light, which continues to propagate to the far-field to form a distinct scattering 'fingerprint'. Numerical implementation via angular spectrum method (ASM) and Fresnel approximation have been carried out through Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) to simulate this optical model. Sampling criteria to achieve unbiased and un-aliased simulation results have been derived and the effects of violating these conditions have been studied. Diffraction patterns predicted by these two methods (ASM and Fresnel) have been compared to show their applicability to different simulation settings. Through the simulation work, the correlation between the colony morphology and its forward scattering pattern has been established to link the number of diffraction rings and the half cone angle with the diameter and the central height of the Gaussian-shaped colonies. In order to experimentally prove the correlation, a colony morphology analyzer has been built and used to characterize the morphology of different bacteria genera and investigate their growth dynamics. The experimental measurements have demonstrated the possibility of differentiating bacteria Salmonella, Listeria, Escherichia in their early growth stage (100˜500 µm) based on their phenotypic characteristics. This conclusion has important implications in microcolony detection, as most bacteria of our interest need much less incubation time (8˜12 hours) to grow into this size range. The original forward light scatterometer has been updated to capture scattering patterns from microcolonies. Experiments have

  14. The Kepler Cepheid V1154 Cyg revisited: light curve modulation and detection of granulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derekas, A.; Plachy, E.; Molnár, L.; Sódor, Á.; Benkő, J. M.; Szabados, L.; Bognár, Zs.; Csák, B.; Szabó, Gy. M.; Szabó, R.; Pál, A.

    2017-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the bright Cepheid-type variable star V1154 Cygni using 4 yr of continuous observations by the Kepler space telescope. We detected 28 frequencies using the standard Fourier transform method. We identified modulation of the main pulsation frequency and its harmonics with a period of ˜159 d. This modulation is also present in the Fourier parameters of the light curve and the O - C diagram. We detected another modulation with a period of about 1160 d. The star also shows significant power in the low-frequency region that we identified as granulation noise. The effective time-scale of the granulation agrees with the extrapolated scalings of red giant stars. Non-detection of solar-like oscillations indicates that the pulsation inhibits other oscillations. We obtained new radial velocity observations that are in a perfect agreement with previous years data, suggesting that there is no high-mass star companion of V1154 Cygni. Finally, we discuss the possible origin of the detected frequency modulations.

  15. Detection of fast flying nanoparticles by light scattering over a large volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettazzi, F.; Bäumer, S.; van der Donck, J.; Deutz, A.

    2015-06-01

    is a well-known detection method which is applied in many different scientific and technology domains including atmospheric physics, environmental control, and biology. It allows contactless and remote detection of sub-micron size particles. However, methods for detecting a single fast moving particle smaller than 100 nm are lacking. In the present work we report a preliminary design study of an inline large area detector for nanoparticles larger than 50 nm which move with velocities up to 100 m/s. The detector design is based on light scattering using commercially available components. The presented design takes into account all challenges connected to the inline implementation of the scattering technique in the system: the need for the detector to have a large field of view to cover a volume with a footprint commensurate to an area of 100mm x 100mm, the necessity to sense nanoparticles transported at high velocity, and the requirement of large capture rate with a false detection as low as one false positive per week. The impact of all these stringent requirements on the expected sensitivity and performances of the device is analyzed by mean of a dedicated performance model.

  16. Validation of ultraviolet, infrared, and narrow band light alternate light sources for detection of bruises in a pigskin model.

    PubMed

    Olds, Kelly; Byard, Roger W; Winskog, Calle; Langlois, Neil E I

    2016-12-01

    Alternate light sources such as ultraviolet, narrow band, and infrared have been used in an attempt to reveal the presence of bruising that is not otherwise apparent (inapparent). The following study evaluates the ability of alternate light sources to enhance visibility of bruises by employing an objective assessment of digital photography images in conjunction with histology. A pigskin model was employed with bruises created by injection of blood to be not visible or barely visible (inapparent) under white light. The pigskin was photographed using alternate light source illumination. Images were assessed using the program Fiji(®) to measure enhancement in terms of bruise length (cm). Photography results were compared with histology to confirm the presence of bruising. Violet and blue light sources produced the greatest enhancement, both with a p < 0.0001. Regions that were not bruises were also enhanced with light sources in this study, indicating that light sources are not specific, and that their use to enhance the visibility of bruising should be undertaken with caution.

  17. Hyperspectral Image-Based Night-Time Vehicle Light Detection Using Spectral Normalization and Distance Mapper for Intelligent Headlight Control.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heekang; Kwon, Soon; Kim, Sungho

    2016-07-08

    This paper proposes a vehicle light detection method using a hyperspectral camera instead of a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) or Complementary metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS) camera for adaptive car headlamp control. To apply Intelligent Headlight Control (IHC), the vehicle headlights need to be detected. Headlights are comprised from a variety of lighting sources, such as Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs), High-intensity discharge (HID), and halogen lamps. In addition, rear lamps are made of LED and halogen lamp. This paper refers to the recent research in IHC. Some problems exist in the detection of headlights, such as erroneous detection of street lights or sign lights and the reflection plate of ego-car from CCD or CMOS images. To solve these problems, this study uses hyperspectral images because they have hundreds of bands and provide more information than a CCD or CMOS camera. Recent methods to detect headlights used the Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM), Spectral Correlation Mapper (SCM), and Euclidean Distance Mapper (EDM). The experimental results highlight the feasibility of the proposed method in three types of lights (LED, HID, and halogen).

  18. Hyperspectral Image-Based Night-Time Vehicle Light Detection Using Spectral Normalization and Distance Mapper for Intelligent Headlight Control

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Heekang; Kwon, Soon; Kim, Sungho

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a vehicle light detection method using a hyperspectral camera instead of a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) or Complementary metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS) camera for adaptive car headlamp control. To apply Intelligent Headlight Control (IHC), the vehicle headlights need to be detected. Headlights are comprised from a variety of lighting sources, such as Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs), High-intensity discharge (HID), and halogen lamps. In addition, rear lamps are made of LED and halogen lamp. This paper refers to the recent research in IHC. Some problems exist in the detection of headlights, such as erroneous detection of street lights or sign lights and the reflection plate of ego-car from CCD or CMOS images. To solve these problems, this study uses hyperspectral images because they have hundreds of bands and provide more information than a CCD or CMOS camera. Recent methods to detect headlights used the Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM), Spectral Correlation Mapper (SCM), and Euclidean Distance Mapper (EDM). The experimental results highlight the feasibility of the proposed method in three types of lights (LED, HID, and halogen). PMID:27399720

  19. Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Audin, L.

    1994-12-31

    EPAct covers a vast territory beyond lighting and, like all legislation, also contains numerous {open_quotes}favors,{close_quotes} compromises, and even some sleight-of-hand. Tucked away under Title XIX, for example, is an increase from 20% to 28% tax on gambling winnings, effective January 1, 1993 - apparently as a way to help pay for new spending listed elsewhere in the bill. Overall, it is a landmark piece of legislation, about a decade overdue. It remains to be seen how the Federal Government will enforce upgrading of state (or even their own) energy codes. There is no mention of funding for {open_quotes}energy police{close_quotes} in EPAct. Merely creating such a national standard, however, provides a target for those who sincerely wish to create an energy-efficient future.

  20. Automatic Detection of Diseased Tomato Plants Using Thermal and Stereo Visible Light Images

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Shan-e-Ahmed; Prince, Gillian; Clarkson, John P.; Rajpoot, Nasir M.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate and timely detection of plant diseases can help mitigate the worldwide losses experienced by the horticulture and agriculture industries each year. Thermal imaging provides a fast and non-destructive way of scanning plants for diseased regions and has been used by various researchers to study the effect of disease on the thermal profile of a plant. However, thermal image of a plant affected by disease has been known to be affected by environmental conditions which include leaf angles and depth of the canopy areas accessible to the thermal imaging camera. In this paper, we combine thermal and visible light image data with depth information and develop a machine learning system to remotely detect plants infected with the tomato powdery mildew fungus Oidium neolycopersici. We extract a novel feature set from the image data using local and global statistics and show that by combining these with the depth information, we can considerably improve the accuracy of detection of the diseased plants. In addition, we show that our novel feature set is capable of identifying plants which were not originally inoculated with the fungus at the start of the experiment but which subsequently developed disease through natural transmission. PMID:25861025

  1. POLARIZED REFLECTED LIGHT FROM THE EXOPLANET HD189733b: FIRST MULTICOLOR OBSERVATIONS AND CONFIRMATION OF DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Berdyugina, S. V.; Berdyugin, A. V.; Piirola, V.; Fluri, D. M. E-mail: andber@utu.fi E-mail: fluri@astro.phys.ethz.ch

    2011-02-10

    We report the first multicolor polarimetric measurements (UBV bands) for the hot Jupiter HD189733b and confirm our previously reported detection of polarization in the B band. The wavelength dependence of polarization indicates the dominance of Rayleigh scattering with a peak in the blue B and U bands of {approx}10{sup -4} {+-} 10{sup -5} and at least a factor of two lower signal in the V band. The Rayleigh-like wavelength dependence, also detected in the transmitted light during transits, implies a rapid decrease of the polarization signal toward longer wavelengths. Therefore, the nondetection by Wiktorowicz, based on a measurement integrated within a broad passband covering the V band and partly covering the B and R bands, is inconclusive and consistent with our detection in B. We discuss possible sources of the polarization and demonstrate that effects of incomplete cancellation of stellar limb polarization due to starspots or tidal perturbations are negligible as compared with scattering polarization in the planetary atmosphere. We compare the observations with a Rayleigh-Lambert model and determine effective radii and geometrical albedos for different wavelengths. We find a close similarity of the wavelength-dependent geometrical albedo with that of the Neptune atmosphere, which is known to be strongly influenced by Rayleigh and Raman scattering. Our result establishes polarimetry as a reliable means for directly studying exoplanetary atmospheres.

  2. Indirect detection of light neutralino dark matter in the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrer, Francesc; Krauss, Lawrence M.; Profumo, Stefano

    2006-12-01

    We explore the prospects for indirect detection of neutralino dark matter in supersymmetric models with an extended Higgs sector (next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model, or NMSSM). We compute, for the first time, one-loop amplitudes for NMSSM neutralino pair annihilation into two photons and two gluons, and point out that extra diagrams (with respect to the minimal supersymmetric standard model, or MSSM), featuring a potentially light CP-odd Higgs boson exchange, can strongly enhance these radiative modes. Expected signals in neutrino telescopes due to the annihilation of relic neutralinos in the Sun and in the Earth are evaluated, as well as the prospects of detection of a neutralino annihilation signal in space-based gamma-ray, antiproton and positron search experiments, and at low-energy antideuteron searches. We find that in the low mass regime the signals from capture in the Earth are enhanced compared to the MSSM, and that NMSSM neutralinos have a remote possibility of affecting solar dynamics. Also, antimatter experiments are an excellent probe of galactic NMSSM dark matter. We also find enhanced two-photon decay modes that make the possibility of the detection of a monochromatic gamma-ray line within the NMSSM more promising than in the MSSM, although likely below the sensitivity of next generation gamma-ray telescopes.

  3. Comparison of serum free light chain and urine electrophoresis for the detection of the light chain component of monoclonal immunoglobulins in light chain and intact immunoglobulin multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Dejoie, Thomas; Attal, Michel; Moreau, Philippe; Harousseau, Jean-Luc; Avet-Loiseau, Herve

    2016-03-01

    Response criteria for multiple myeloma are based upon changes in monoclonal protein levels quantified using serum and/or urine protein electrophoresis. The latter lacks sensitivity at low monoclonal protein levels and since 2001, the serum free light chain test has been available and its clinical utility proven, yet guidelines have not recommended it as a replacement for urine assessment. Herein we evaluated responses using serum free light chain measurements and serum and urine electrophoresis after 2 and 4 cycles of therapy and after stem cell transplantation in 25 light chain and 157 intact immunoglobulin myeloma patients enrolled in the IFM 2007-02 MM trial. All 25 light chain patients had measurable disease by serum free light chain and urine methods at presentation. By contrast 98 out of 157 intact immunoglobulin patients had measurable disease by serum free light chain compared to 55 out of 157 by urine electrophoresis. In all patients there was substantial agreement between predicate (serum/urine protein electrophoresis) and test (serum protein electrophoresis and serum free light chain) methods for response assessment (Weighted Kappa=0.83). Urine immunofixation became negative in 47% light chain and 43% intact immunoglobulin patients after 2 cycles of therapy. At this time the serum free light chain ratio normalised in only 11% and 27% patients, respectively. In summary we found good agreement between methods for response assessment, but the serum free light chain test provided greater sensitivity than urine electrophoresis for monitoring. To our knowledge this is the first report comparing both methods for response assignment based on the International Myeloma Working Group guidelines. (Clinical Trials Register.eu identifier: 2007-005204-40).

  4. Light Fermionic Dark Matter and its Possible Detection in Neutrino Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kile, Jennifer

    2010-02-10

    We explore the potential for the direct detection of light fermionic dark matter in neutrino detectors. We consider the possible observation of the process fp->e{sup +}n, where f is a dark matter fermion, in a model-independent manner. All operators of dimension six or lower which can contribute to this process are listed, and we place constraints on these operators from decays of f which contain gamma rays or electrons. One operator is found which is sufficiently weakly constrained that it could give observable interactions in neutrino detectors. We find that Super-Kamiokande can probe the new physics scale for this operator up to O(100 TeV).

  5. Planet detection and spectroscopy in visible light with a single aperture telescope and a nulling coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao, Michael; Serabyn, Eugene; Levine, Bruce Martin; Beichman, Charles; Liu, Duncan; Martin, Stefan; Orton, Glen; Mennesson, Bertrand; Morgan, Rhonda; Velusamy, Thangasamy; Wallace, J. Kent; Unwin, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    This talk describes a new concept for visible direct detection of Earth like extra solar planets using a nulling coronagraph instrument behind a 4m telescope in space. In the baseline design, a 4 beam nulling interferometer is synthesized from the telescope pupil, producing a very deep theta^4null which is then filtered by a coherent array of single mode fibers to suppress the residual scattered light. With perfect optics, the stellar leakage is less than 1e-11 of the starlight at the location of the planet. With diffraction limited telescope optics (lambda/20), suppression of the starlight to 1e-10 is possible. The concept is described along with the key advantages over more traditional approaches such as apodized aperture telescopes and Lyot type coronagraphs.

  6. The resolution of point sources of light as analyzed by quantum detection theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helstrom, C. W.

    1972-01-01

    The resolvability of point sources of incoherent light is analyzed by quantum detection theory in terms of two hypothesis-testing problems. In the first, the observer must decide whether there are two sources of equal radiant power at given locations, or whether there is only one source of twice the power located midway between them. In the second problem, either one, but not both, of two point sources is radiating, and the observer must decide which it is. The decisions are based on optimum processing of the electromagnetic field at the aperture of an optical instrument. In both problems the density operators of the field under the two hypotheses do not commute. The error probabilities, determined as functions of the separation of the points and the mean number of received photons, characterize the ultimate resolvability of the sources.

  7. Resolution of point sources of light as analyzed by quantum detection theory.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helstrom, C. W.

    1973-01-01

    The resolvability of point sources of incoherent thermal light is analyzed by quantum detection theory in terms of two hypothesis-testing problems. In the first, the observer must decide whether there are two sources of equal radiant power at given locations, or whether there is only one source of twice the power located midway between them. In the second problem, either one, but not both, of two point sources is radiating, and the observer must decide which it is. The decisions are based on optimum processing of the electromagnetic field at the aperture of an optical instrument. In both problems the density operators of the field under the two hypotheses do not commute. The error probabilities, determined as functions of the separation of the points and the mean number of received photons, characterize the ultimate resolvability of the sources.

  8. Simultaneous determination of ibuprofen and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) using HPLC and evaporative light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Madelaine R; Ford, James L; Powell, Mark W

    2002-11-07

    Ibuprofen may be crystallised in the presence of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) to improve its physical properties. This, however, creates problems with the simultaneous analysis of each ingredient. The analytical method developed utilised high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a stationary phase designed for carbohydrate separation (GylcoSep N) and a mobile phase comprising methanol and water. Evaporative light scattering detection (ELSD) proved a suitable method for the analysis of both HPMC and ibuprofen. Data showed that HPMC and ibuprofen could be quantified in each other's presence. Validation studies indicated that the method was adequately accurate and precise. Baseline resolution was achieved between the two components. HPMC (1.1% w/w) was retained in ibuprofen crystals obtained from alcoholic HPMC suspensions.

  9. Dual-wavelength light scattering for selective detection of volcanic ash particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurányi, Z.; Burtscher, H.; Loepfe, M.; Nenkov, M.; Weingartner, E.

    2015-08-01

    A new method is presented in this paper which analyses the scattered light of individual aerosol particles simultaneously at two different wavelengths in order to retrieve information on the particle type. We show that dust-like particles, such as volcanic ash, can be unambiguously discriminated from water droplets on a single particle level. As a future application of this method, the detection of volcanic ash particles should be possible in a humid atmosphere in the presence of cloud droplets. We show an example, how the characteristic behaviour of pure water's refractive index can be used to separate water droplets and dust-like particles which are commonly found in the micrometer size-range in the ambient air. The low real part of the water's refractive index around 2700-2800 nm results in low scattered light intensities compared to e.g. the visible wavelength range and this feature can be used for the particle identification. The two-wavelength measurement setup was theoretically and experimentally tested and studied. Theoretical calculations were done using Mie theory. Comparing the ratio of the scattered light at the two wavelengths (R value) for water droplets and different dust types (basalt, andesite, African mineral dust, sand, volcanic ash, pumice) showed at least 9 times higher values (on average 70 times) for water droplets than for the dust types at any diameter within the particle size range of 2-20 μm. The envisaged measurement setup was built up into a laboratory prototype and was tested with different types of aerosols. We generated aerosols from the following powders simulating dust-like particles: cement dust, ISO 12103-1 A1 Ultrafine Test Dust and Ash from the 2012 eruption of the Etna volcano. Our measurements verified the theoretical considerations, the median experimental R value is 8-21 times higher for water than for the "dust" particles.

  10. Light dark matter in superfluid helium: Detection with multi-excitation production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapen, Simon; Lin, Tongyan; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2017-03-01

    We examine in depth a recent proposal to utilize superfluid helium for direct detection of sub-MeV mass dark matter. For sub-keV recoil energies, nuclear scattering events in liquid helium primarily deposit energy into long-lived phonon and roton quasiparticle excitations. If the energy thresholds of the detector can be reduced to the meV scale, then dark matter as light as ˜MeV can be reached with ordinary nuclear recoils. If, on the other hand, two or more quasiparticle excitations are directly produced in the dark matter interaction, the kinematics of the scattering allows sensitivity to dark matter as light as ˜keV at the same energy resolution. We present in detail the theoretical framework for describing excitations in superfluid helium, using it to calculate the rate for the leading dark matter scattering interaction, where an off-shell phonon splits into two or more higher-momentum excitations. We validate our analytic results against the measured and simulated dynamic response of superfluid helium. Finally, we apply this formalism to the case of a kinetically mixed hidden photon in the superfluid, both with and without an external electric field to catalyze the processes.

  11. Direct detection signatures of self-interacting dark matter with a light mediator

    SciTech Connect

    Nobile, Eugenio Del; Kaplinghat, Manoj; Yu, Hai-Bo

    2015-10-27

    Self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) is a simple and well-motivated scenario that could explain long-standing puzzles in structure formation on small scales. If the required self-interaction arises through a light mediator (with mass ∼10 MeV) in the dark sector, this new particle must be unstable to avoid overclosing the universe. The decay of the light mediator could happen due to a weak coupling of the hidden and visible sectors, providing new signatures for direct detection experiments. The SIDM nuclear recoil spectrum is more peaked towards low energies compared to the usual case of contact interactions, because the mediator mass is comparable to the momentum transfer of nuclear recoils. We show that the SIDM signal could be distinguished from that of DM particles with contact interactions by considering the time-average energy spectrum in experiments employing different target materials, or the average and modulated spectra in a single experiment. Using current limits from LUX and SuperCDMS, we also derive strong bounds on the mixing parameter between hidden and visible sector.

  12. Direct detection of light “Ge-phobic” exothermic dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Gelmini, Graciela B.; Georgescu, Andreea; Huh, Ji-Haeng

    2014-07-15

    We present comparisons of direct dark matter (DM) detection data for light WIMPs with exothermic scattering with nuclei (exoDM), both assuming the Standard Halo Model (SHM) and in a halo model — independent manner. Exothermic interactions favor light targets, thus reducing the importance of upper limits derived from xenon targets, the most restrictive of which is at present the LUX limit. In our SHM analysis the CDMS-II-Si and CoGeNT regions become allowed by these bounds, however the recent SuperCDMS limit rejects both regions for exoDM with isospin-conserving couplings. An isospin-violating coupling of the exoDM, in particular one with a neutron to proton coupling ratio of −0.8 (which we call “Ge-phobic”), maximally reduces the DM coupling to germanium and allows the CDMS-II-Si region to become compatible with all bounds. This is also clearly shown in our halo-independent analysis.

  13. Halo-independent analysis of direct detection data for light WIMPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Nobile, Eugenio; Gelmini, Graciela B.; Gondolo, Paolo; Huh, Ji-Haeng

    2013-10-01

    We present a halo-independent analysis of direct detection data on ``light WIMPs," i.e. weakly interacting massive particles with mass close to or below 10 GeV/c2. We include new results from silicon CDMS detectors (bounds and excess events), the latest CoGeNT acceptances, and recent measurements of low sodium quenching factors in NaI crystals. We focus on light WIMPs with spin-independent isospin-conserving and isospin-violating interactions with nucleons. For these dark matter candidates we find that a low quenching factor would make the DAMA modulation incompatible with a reasonable escape velocity for the dark matter halo, and that the tension among experimental data tightens in both the isospin-conserving and isospin-violating scenarios. We also find that a new although milder tension appears between the CoGeNT and DAMA annual modulations on one side and the silicon excess events on the other, in that it seems difficult to interpret them as the modulated and unmodulated aspects of the same WIMP dark matter signal.

  14. Direct detection signatures of self-interacting dark matter with a light mediator

    SciTech Connect

    Nobile, Eugenio Del; Kaplinghat, Manoj; Yu, Hai-Bo E-mail: mkapling@uci.edu

    2015-10-01

    Self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) is a simple and well-motivated scenario that could explain long-standing puzzles in structure formation on small scales. If the required self-interaction arises through a light mediator (with mass ∼ 10 MeV) in the dark sector, this new particle must be unstable to avoid overclosing the universe. The decay of the light mediator could happen due to a weak coupling of the hidden and visible sectors, providing new signatures for direct detection experiments. The SIDM nuclear recoil spectrum is more peaked towards low energies compared to the usual case of contact interactions, because the mediator mass is comparable to the momentum transfer of nuclear recoils. We show that the SIDM signal could be distinguished from that of DM particles with contact interactions by considering the time-average energy spectrum in experiments employing different target materials, or the average and modulated spectra in a single experiment. Using current limits from LUX and SuperCDMS, we also derive strong bounds on the mixing parameter between hidden and visible sector.

  15. The effect of light intensity on prey detection behavior in two Lake Malawi cichlids, Aulonocara stuartgranti and Tramitichromis sp.

    PubMed

    Schwalbe, Margot A B; Webb, Jacqueline F

    2015-04-01

    Two sand-dwelling cichlids from Lake Malawi (Aulonocara stuartgranti, Tramitichromis sp.) that feed on benthic invertebrates, but have different lateral line phenotypes, use lateral line and/or visual cues to detect prey under light versus dark conditions. The current study examined how ecologically relevant variation in light intensity [0-800 lux (lx)] influences detection of prey (mobile, immobile) in each species by analyzing six behavioral parameters. Both species fed at light intensities ≥1 lx and trends in behavior among light intensities were informative. However, prey type and/or time of day (but not light intensity) predicted all four parameters analyzed with generalized linear mixed models in A. stuartgranti, whereas the interaction of light intensity and time of day predicted three of these parameters in Tramitichromis sp. Data suggest that the critical light intensity is 1-12 lx for both species, that the integration of visual and lateral line input explains differences in detection of mobile and immobile prey and behavioral changes at the transition from 1 to 0 lx in A. stuartgranti, and that Tramitichromis sp. likely uses binocular vision to locate prey. Differences in the sensory biology of species that exploit similar prey will have important implications for the trophic ecology of African cichlid fishes.

  16. Detection of composite resin restorations using an ultraviolet light-emitting diode flashlight during forensic dental identification.

    PubMed

    Guzy, Gerald; Clayton, Mary Ann

    2013-06-01

    With the increased use of composite resin and the decreased use of amalgam as a dental restorative material, the forensic dental identification of unidentified human remains has become more difficult. Various methods have been used to detect the presence of composite resin restorations including dyes, forensic alternative light sources, quantitative light-induced fluorescence, and ultraviolet lights. Although these methods may be helpful, the expense of the equipment, the electrical requirements, and the need for water to wash the dye from the mouth may make these methods impractical especially in a temporary morgue situation during a mass disaster. The fluorescent properties of composite resins, when exposed to ultraviolet light, are well documented. Standard tube ultraviolet lights have been used to detect the presence of composite resin, but these lights are large and bulky, and the tubes are fragile. The development of ultraviolet light emitting diode flashlights has provided forensic odontologists with a tool that is small, inexpensive, and battery operated. The two forensic dental identification cases described here demonstrate the value of ultraviolet light emitting diode flashlights as an adjunct to a careful clinical and radiographic examination.

  17. Delayed examination of synovial fluid by ordinary and polarised light microscopy to detect and identify crystals

    PubMed Central

    Galvez, J; Saiz, E; Linares, L; Climent, A; Marras, C; Pina, M; Castellon, P

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To determine the reliability of a delay in the microscopic examination of synovial fluid (SF) to detect and identify crystals. Methods: Ninety one SF samples were examined, 31 with monosodium urate (MSU) crystals, 30 with crystals of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD), and 30 containing no crystals. The specimens were stored with EDTA, sodium heparin, and without anticoagulant at 4°C before examination at 24 and 72 hours with ordinary and polarised light microscopy. Another aliquot of the same samples was stored in a plastic container without anticoagulant at -80°C and examined after two months. Results: When the samples stored at 4°C were re-examined after 24 hours, intracellular crystals of MSU were seen in 90/93 (97%) cases where they had been identified previously and 89/93 (96%) cases after 72 hours. Similarly, CPPD crystals were identified in 90/90 (100%) and 87/90 (97%) cases after 24 and 72 hours. Examination of the samples stored at -80°C showed intracellular MSU crystals in 25/31 (81%) of cases and CPPD crystals in 25/30 (83%). No crystals were seen in any sample which had previously been diagnosed as crystal-free. Conclusions: Deferred microscopic examination of refrigerated or deep frozen SF provides a strong probability of detecting MSU or CPPD crystals if these are present initially. PMID:11959769

  18. Quantitative analysis of phosphatidylcholine molecular species using HPLC and light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Brouwers, J F; Gadella, B M; van Golde, L M; Tielens, A G

    1998-02-01

    A number of HPLC chromatographic procedures can be used to separate intact molecular species of phosphatidylcholine (PC), but on-line quantification has remained problematic due to insensitivity of UV-detection for saturated species. Here, a new method is presented, separating all major PC molecular species from a variety of biological samples in intact form using a single, short and isocratic run. Species were separated on two RP18 reverse-phase columns in series and all species displayed an exponential relation between retention time and the percentage of acetonitrile or triethylamine in the mobile phase, allowing optimization of the mobile phase on a theoretical base, rather than on time-consuming test-runs. The use of triethylamine as a volatile additive instead of choline chloride allowed the use of light scattering detection. On a molar base, the response of the detector was invariant between species and allowed quantification of as little as 50 pmoles. The method was tested using phosphatidylcholines with widely different molecular species patterns, such a PC from rat liver, porcine pulmonary surfactant, bovine heart, boar sperm cells, and the parasite Schistosoma mansoni. As only volatile components are present in the solvents, individual molecular species can easily be recovered in pure form from the column effluent, enabling their further analysis (e.g., scintillation counting).

  19. High-speed quasi-balanced detection OFDM in visible light communication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanquan; Chi, Nan; Wang, Yiguang; Li, Rongling; Huang, Xingxing; Yang, Chao; Zhang, Ziran

    2013-11-18

    In this paper, we proposed and experimentally demonstrated a novel quasi-balanced detection (QBD) technique in orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) visible light communication (VLC) system. By employing opposite signals to odd and even consecutive symbols, the nonlinearity distortion, and direct current can be eliminated efficiently. Additionally, the sensitivity of receiver can also be improved by 3dB, thus a longer transmission distance and high-order modulation formats can be received. We achieved physical data rate of 2.1-Gb/s enabled by wavelength-division-multiplexing (WDM), pre- and post-equalization, and the resulting bit error ratios (BERs) were below the FEC limit of 3.8x10(-3). The distance was above 2.5 meters that was long enough for indoor communication. Compared with conventional direct-detection optical (DDO-OFDM) and asymmetrically-clipped optical (ACO-OFDM), the BER can be enhanced by 22.2dB and 20.8dB, respectively, which shows great potential in short range and low cost access network.

  20. Automatic detection of cone photoreceptors in split detector adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope images

    PubMed Central

    Cunefare, David; Cooper, Robert F.; Higgins, Brian; Katz, David F.; Dubra, Alfredo; Carroll, Joseph; Farsiu, Sina

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of the cone photoreceptor mosaic in the living retina is potentially useful for early diagnosis and prognosis of many ocular diseases. Non-confocal split detector based adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) imaging reveals the cone photoreceptor inner segment mosaics often not visualized on confocal AOSLO imaging. Despite recent advances in automated cone segmentation algorithms for confocal AOSLO imagery, quantitative analysis of split detector AOSLO images is currently a time-consuming manual process. In this paper, we present the fully automatic adaptive filtering and local detection (AFLD) method for detecting cones in split detector AOSLO images. We validated our algorithm on 80 images from 10 subjects, showing an overall mean Dice’s coefficient of 0.95 (standard deviation 0.03), when comparing our AFLD algorithm to an expert grader. This is comparable to the inter-observer Dice’s coefficient of 0.94 (standard deviation 0.04). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first validated, fully-automated segmentation method which has been applied to split detector AOSLO images. PMID:27231641

  1. Lenslet Array to Further Suppress Star Light for Direct Exoplanet Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, Qian; McElwain, Michael; Shiri, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Direct imaging plays a key role in the detection and characterization of exoplanets orbiting within its host star's habitable zone. Many innovative ideas for starlight suppression and wavefront control have been proposed and developed over the past decade. However, several technological challenges still lie ahead to achieve the required contrast, including controlling the observatory pointing performance, fabricating occulting masks with tight optical tolerances, developing wavefront control algorithms, controlling stray light, advancing single photon detecting detectors, and integrated system-level issues. This paper explores how a lenslet array and pinhole mask may be implemented to further suppress uncorrected starlight that leaks through the occulting mask. An external occulter, or star shade, is simulated to demonstrate this concept, although this approach can be implemented for internal coronagraphs as well. We describe how to use simple relay optics to control the scene near the inner working angle and the level of the suppression expected. Furthermore, if the lenslet array is the input to an integral field spectrograph, as planned for the WFIRST mission, the spectral content of the exoplanet atmospheres can be obtained to determine if the observed planet is habitable and ultimately, if it is inhabited.

  2. Three factors limiting the reliable detection of light by retinal ganglion cells of the cat

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, H. B.; Levick, W. R.

    1969-01-01

    1. Responses of cat retinal ganglion cells have been examined with a view to specifying the characteristics that limit the detection of light stimuli. 2. Threshold is defined as the weakest stimulus that can be reliably detected by examination of the output from a retinal ganglion cell; it depends upon (a) the quantum/spike ratio, which is the mean number of additional quantal absorptions required to produce an additional impulse, (b) the temporal course of the response, which determines the time interval within which the maintained discharge is modified, and (c) the statistical distribution of the number of impulses that occur in this time interval in the absence of the stimulus. 3. The quantum/spike ratio changes greatly when adapting luminance is changed, and this is the predominant factor accounting for changes in increment threshold. 4. The time course of the response changes with adaptation level and area of the stimulus. This may account for the changes in temporal integration that occur in analogous psychophysical experiments. 5. Changes in the irregularity of the maintained discharge also affect the threshold of single ganglion cells. This is only a minor factor in the conditions of most of our experiments, but it may be important when unstabilized images and non-equilibrium adaptation conditions are encountered. PMID:5761942

  3. Automatic detection of cone photoreceptors in split detector adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope images.

    PubMed

    Cunefare, David; Cooper, Robert F; Higgins, Brian; Katz, David F; Dubra, Alfredo; Carroll, Joseph; Farsiu, Sina

    2016-05-01

    Quantitative analysis of the cone photoreceptor mosaic in the living retina is potentially useful for early diagnosis and prognosis of many ocular diseases. Non-confocal split detector based adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) imaging reveals the cone photoreceptor inner segment mosaics often not visualized on confocal AOSLO imaging. Despite recent advances in automated cone segmentation algorithms for confocal AOSLO imagery, quantitative analysis of split detector AOSLO images is currently a time-consuming manual process. In this paper, we present the fully automatic adaptive filtering and local detection (AFLD) method for detecting cones in split detector AOSLO images. We validated our algorithm on 80 images from 10 subjects, showing an overall mean Dice's coefficient of 0.95 (standard deviation 0.03), when comparing our AFLD algorithm to an expert grader. This is comparable to the inter-observer Dice's coefficient of 0.94 (standard deviation 0.04). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first validated, fully-automated segmentation method which has been applied to split detector AOSLO images.

  4. Detection of Biomass in New York City Aerosols: Light Scattering and Optical Fluorescence Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niebauer, M.; Alimova, A.; Katz, A.; Xu, M.; Rudolph, E.; Steiner, J.; Alfano, R. R.

    2005-12-01

    Optical spectroscopy is an ideal method for detecting bacteria and spores in real time. Optical fluorescence spectroscopy examination of New York City aerosols is used to quantify the mass of bacteria spores present in air masses collected at 14 liters/minute onto silica fiber filters, and on silica fiber ribbons using an Environmental Beta Attenuation Monitor manufactured by MetOne Instruments configured for the PM2.5 fraction. Dipicolinic acid (DPA), a molecule found primarily in bacterial spores, is the most characteristic component of spores in trial experiments on over 200 collected aerosol samples. DPA is extracted from the spores using a heat bath and chelated with Terbium. The DPA:Tb is detected by measuring its characteristic fluorescence with emission bands at 490, 545 and 585 nm for 270 nm excitation. Light scattering also measures the size distribution for a number of a variety of bacteria - Bacillus subtilis (rod shaped), Staphylococcus aureus (spherical) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (short rods) establishing that optical techniques satisfactorily distinguish populations based on their variable morphology. Size and morphology are obtained by applying a variation of the Gaussian Ray Approximation theory of anomalous diffraction theory to an analysis of the transmission spectra in the range of 0.4 to 1.0 microns. In test experiments, the refractive index of the inner spore core of Bacillus subtilis decreases from 1.51 to 1.39 while the spore radius enlarges from 0.38 to 0.6 micrometers. Optical determinations are verified by oil-immersion techniques and by scanning electron microscope measurements. Characterization of spores, germinating spore materials, and bacteria is considered vital to tracing bacteria in the environment, for the development of life-detection systems for planetary exploration, monitoring pathogens in environmental systems, and for the preparation of anti-terrorism strategies.

  5. Optimal experimental design for the detection of light atoms from high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy images

    SciTech Connect

    Gonnissen, J.; De Backer, A.; Martinez, G. T.; Van Aert, S.; Dekker, A. J. den; Rosenauer, A.; Sijbers, J.

    2014-08-11

    We report an innovative method to explore the optimal experimental settings to detect light atoms from scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images. Since light elements play a key role in many technologically important materials, such as lithium-battery devices or hydrogen storage applications, much effort has been made to optimize the STEM technique in order to detect light elements. Therefore, classical performance criteria, such as contrast or signal-to-noise ratio, are often discussed hereby aiming at improvements of the direct visual interpretability. However, when images are interpreted quantitatively, one needs an alternative criterion, which we derive based on statistical detection theory. Using realistic simulations of technologically important materials, we demonstrate the benefits of the proposed method and compare the results with existing approaches.

  6. Effect of light intensity on food detection in captive great fruit-eating bats, Artibeus lituratus (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae).

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Eduardo de A; Pessoa, Valdir F; Aguiar, Ludmilla M S; Pessoa, Daniel M A

    2014-11-01

    Bats are known for their well-developed echolocation. However, several experiments focused on the bat visual system have shown evidence of the importance of visual cues under specific luminosity for different aspects of bat biology, including foraging behavior. This study examined the foraging abilities of five female great fruit-eating bats, Artibeus lituratus, under different light intensities. Animals were given a series of tasks to test for discrimination between a food target against an inedible background, under light levels similar to the twilight illumination (18lx), the full moon (2lx) and complete darkness (0lx). We found that the bats required a longer time frame to detect targets under a light intensity similar to twilight, possibly due to inhibitory effects present under a more intense light level. Additionally, bats were more efficient at detecting and capturing targets under light conditions similar to the luminosity of a full moon, suggesting that visual cues were important for target discrimination. These results demonstrate that light intensity affects foraging behavior and enables the use of visual cues for food detection in frugivorous bats. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neotropical Behaviour.

  7. Event Detection Using Mobile Phone Mass GPS Data and Their Reliavility Verification by Dmsp/ols Night Light Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuki, Akiyama; Satoshi, Ueyama; Ryosuke, Shibasaki; Adachi, Ryuichiro

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we developed a method to detect sudden population concentration on a certain day and area, that is, an "Event," all over Japan in 2012 using mass GPS data provided from mobile phone users. First, stay locations of all phone users were detected using existing methods. Second, areas and days where Events occurred were detected by aggregation of mass stay locations into 1-km-square grid polygons. Finally, the proposed method could detect Events with an especially large number of visitors in the year by removing the influences of Events that occurred continuously throughout the year. In addition, we demonstrated reasonable reliability of the proposed Event detection method by comparing the results of Event detection with light intensities obtained from the night light images from the DMSP/OLS night light images. Our method can detect not only positive events such as festivals but also negative events such as natural disasters and road accidents. These results are expected to support policy development of urban planning, disaster prevention, and transportation management.

  8. Assessment of Intrathecal Free Light Chain Synthesis: Comparison of Different Quantitative Methods with the Detection of Oligoclonal Free Light Chains by Isoelectric Focusing and Affinity-Mediated Immunoblotting

    PubMed Central

    Kušnierová, Pavlína; Švagera, Zdeněk; Všianský, František; Byrtusová, Monika; Hradílek, Pavel; Kurková, Barbora; Zapletalová, Olga; Bartoš, Vladimír

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to compare various methods for free light chain (fLC) quantitation in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum and to determine whether quantitative CSF measurements could reliably predict intrathecal fLC synthesis. In addition, we wished to determine the relationship between free kappa and free lambda light chain concentrations in CSF and serum in various disease groups. Methods We analysed 166 paired CSF and serum samples by at least one of the following methods: turbidimetry (Freelite™, SPAPLUS), nephelometry (N Latex FLC™, BN ProSpec), and two different (commercially available and in-house developed) sandwich ELISAs. The results were compared with oligoclonal fLC detected by affinity-mediated immunoblotting after isoelectric focusing. Results Although the correlations between quantitative methods were good, both proportional and systematic differences were discerned. However, no major differences were observed in the prediction of positive oligoclonal fLC test. Surprisingly, CSF free kappa/free lambda light chain ratios were lower than those in serum in about 75% of samples with negative oligoclonal fLC test. In about a half of patients with multiple sclerosis and clinically isolated syndrome, profoundly increased free kappa/free lambda light chain ratios were found in the CSF. Conclusions Our results show that using appropriate method-specific cut-offs, different methods of CSF fLC quantitation can be used for the prediction of intrathecal fLC synthesis. The reason for unexpectedly low free kappa/free lambda light chain ratios in normal CSFs remains to be elucidated. Whereas CSF free kappa light chain concentration is increased in most patients with multiple sclerosis and clinically isolated syndrome, CSF free lambda light chain values show large interindividual variability in these patients and should be investigated further for possible immunopathological and prognostic significance. PMID:27846293

  9. A broadband absorption spectrometer using light emitting diodes for ultrasensitive, in situ trace gas detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langridge, Justin M.; Ball, Stephen M.; Shillings, Alexander J. L.; Jones, Roderic L.

    2008-12-01

    A broadband absorption spectrometer has been developed for highly sensitive and target-selective in situ trace gas measurements. The instrument employs two distinct modes of operation: (i) broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (BBCEAS) is used to quantify the concentration of gases in sample mixtures from their characteristic absorption features, and (ii) periodic measurements of the cavity mirrors' reflectivity are made using step-scan phase shift cavity ringdown spectroscopy (PSCRDS). The latter PSCRDS method provides a stand-alone alternative to the more usual method of determining mirror reflectivities by measuring BBCEAS absorption spectra for calibration samples of known composition. Moreover, the instrument's two modes of operation use light from the same light emitting diode transmitted through the cavity in the same optical alignment, hence minimizing the potential for systematic errors between mirror reflectivity determinations and concentration measurements. The ability of the instrument to quantify absorber concentrations is tested in instrument intercomparison exercises for NO2 (versus a laser broadband cavity ringdown spectrometer) and for H2O (versus a commercial hygrometer). A method is also proposed for calculating effective absorption cross sections for fitting the differential structure in BBCEAS spectra due to strong, narrow absorption lines that are under-resolved and hence exhibit non-Beer-Lambert law behavior at the resolution of the BBCEAS measurements. This approach is tested on BBCEAS spectra of water vapor's 4v+δ absorption bands around 650 nm. The most immediate analytical application of the present instrument is in quantifying the concentration of reactive trace gases in the ambient atmosphere. The instrument's detection limits for NO3 as a function of integration time are considered in detail using an Allan variance analysis. Experiments under laboratory conditions produce a 1σ detection limit of 0.25 pptv for a 10 s

  10. Rayleigh light scattering detection of three α1-adrenoceptor antagonists coupled with high performance liquid chromatograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ai Ping; Peng, Huanjun; Peng, Jing Dong; Zhou, Ming Qiong; Zhang, Jing

    2015-08-01

    Herein, a Rayleigh light-scattering (RLS) detection method combined with high performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC) without any post-column probe was developed for the separation and determination of three α1-adrenoceptor antagonists. The quantitative analysis is benefiting from RLS signal enhancement upon addition of methanol which induced molecular aggregation to form an hydrophobic interface between aggregates and water that produce a sort of superficial enhanced scattering effect. A good chromatographic separation among the compounds was achieved using a Gemini 5u C18 reversed phase column (250 mm × 4.6 mm; 4 μm) with a mobile phase consisting of methanol and ammonium acetate-formic acid buffer solution (25 mM; pH = 3.0) at the flow rate of 0.7 mL min-1. The RLS signal was monitored at λex = λem = 354 nm. A limit of detection (LOD) of 0.065-0.70 μg L-1 was reached and a linear range was found between peak height and concentration in the range of 0.75-15 μg L-1 for doxazosin mesylate (DOX), 0.075-3.0 μg L-1 for prazosin hydrochloride (PRH), and 0.25-5 μg L-1 for terazosin hydrochloride (TEH), with linear regression coefficients all above 0.999. Recoveries from spiked urine samples were 88.4-99.0% which is within acceptable limits. The proposed method is convenient, reliable and sensitive which has been used successfully in human urine samples.

  11. Non-invasive detection of laser-induced retinal injury through the vitreous using dynamic light scattering (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Naiman, Melissa; Bouhenni, Rachida; Dunmire, Jeffery; Liu, Ying; Rafiq, Qundeel; Edward, Deepak; Gothard, David

    2016-03-01

    Laser radiation entering the eye has the potential of damaging the retina. As an inflammatory response, the proteins can rush to the lesion site created by laser exposure. We explore the hypothesis if these proteins can be detected non-invasively. In this preliminary study, we developed a new brief-case size dynamic light scattering instrument to detect these proteins in-vivo in the rabbit vitreous. The results were validated with bio-chemical analysis.

  12. Enhanced peroxidase-like activity of MoS2/graphene oxide hybrid with light irradiation for glucose detection.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jian; Weng, Jian

    2017-03-15

    Construction of novel enzyme-free mimetic is very important in improving the sensitivity of biosensor. Here, an intrinsic peroxidase-like activity of MoS2 and graphene oxide (MoS2/GO) hybrid is demonstrated and the hybrid is also used to detect glucose with high sensitivity. Firstly, the peroxidase-like activity of hydrid is compared with that of two components alone, the mixture of two components and horseradish peroxidase. The results show that the hydrid has highest catalytic activity and the Michaelis constant of this hybrid is 4.35 times lower and the maximal reaction velocity is 3.34 times higher than those of horseradish peroxidase, respectively. Electrochemical technologies are used to investigate the enhancing mechanism. The results show that the excellently catalytic performance could be attributed to the fast electron transfer on the surface of MoS2/GO and the synergistic interaction of two components. Secondly, the effect of visible light and near-infrared light on the peroxidase-like activity of hybrid is also investigated. The results show that the limit of detection for H2O2 can be reduced from 10nM to 2.5nM with visible light. Thirdly, the hybrid is further used to detect glucose in serum with and without light. The results show that the hybrid has high selectivity and sensitivity for glucose detection in serum and the limit of detection for glucose is reduced from 0.83μM to 65nM with visible light. Therefore, the hybrid may have a potential application in glucose detection in serum with high sensitivity and selectivity.

  13. Light-emitting diode and laser fluorescence-based devices in detecting occlusal caries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Jonas A.; Hug, Isabel; Neuhaus, Klaus W.; Lussi, Adrian

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the performance of two light-emitting diode (LED)- and two laser fluorescence-based devices in detecting occlusal caries in vitro. Ninety-seven permanent molars were assessed twice by two examiners using two LED- (Midwest Caries - MID and VistaProof - VP) and two laser fluorescence-based (DIAGNOdent 2095 - LF and DIAGNOdent pen 2190 - LFpen) devices. After measuring, the teeth were histologically prepared and classified according to lesion extension. At D1 the specificities were 0.76 (LF and LFpen), 0.94 (MID), and 0.70 (VP); the sensitivities were 0.70 (LF), 0.62 (LFpen), 0.31 (MID), and 0.75 (VP). At D3 threshold the specificities were 0.88 (LF), 0.87 (LFpen), 0.90 (MID), and 0.70 (VP); the sensitivities were 0.63 (LF and LFpen), 0.70 (MID), and 0.96 (VP). Spearman's rank correlations with histology were 0.56 (LF), 0.51 (LFpen), 0.55 (MID), and 0.58 (VP). Inter- and intraexaminer ICC values were high and varied from 0.83 to 0.90. Both LF devices seemed to be useful auxiliary tools to the conventional methods, presenting good reproducibility and better accuracy at D3 threshold. MID was not able to differentiate sound surfaces from enamel caries and VP still needs improvement on the cut-off limits for its use.

  14. Ultrasensitive and label-free molecular level detection enabled by light phase control in magnetoplasmonic nanoantennas

    PubMed Central

    Maccaferri, Nicolò; Gregorczyk, Keith; de Oliveira, Thales V. A. G.; Kataja, Mikko; van Dijken, Sebastiaan; Pirzadeh, Zhaleh; Dmitriev, Alexandre; Åkerman, Johan; Knez, Mato; Vavassori, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Systems allowing label-free molecular detection are expected to have enormous impact on biochemical sciences. Research focuses on materials and technologies based on exploiting localized surface plasmon resonances in metallic nanostructures. The reason for this focused attention is their suitability for single molecule sensing, arising from intrinsically nanoscopic sensing volume, and the high sensitivity to the local environment. Here we propose an alternative route, which enables radically improved sensitivity compared torecently reported plasmon-based sensors. Such high sensitivity is achieved by exploiting the control of the phase of light in magnetoplasmonic nanoantennas. We demonstrate a manifold improvement of refractometric sensing figure-of-merit. Most remarkably, we show a raw surface sensitivity (i.e., without applying fitting procedures) of two orders of magnitude higher than the current values reported for nanoplasmonic sensors. Such sensitivity corresponds to a mass of ~0.8 ag per nanoantenna of polyamide-6.6 (n=1.51), which is representative for a large variety of polymers, peptides and proteins. PMID:25639190

  15. Investigating Spatial Interpolation of Light Detection and Ranging Data for Analyzing Fluvial Geomorphic Properties of Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besaw, L. E.; Pelletier, K.; Morrissey, L. A.; Rizzo, D. M.

    2007-12-01

    Streams are intricate components of the landscape system that vary across temporal and spatial scales while transporting and storing water, sediment, energy, nutrients as well as aquatic and terrestrial species from one part of the system to another. Such changes have traditionally been captured with extensive expert assessment and/or remote sensing analysis (i.e. photo interpretation). In collaboration with the Vermont Agency of Natural Resources River Management Program, this study aims to enhance the capabilities of traditional remote sensing studies by incorporating Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data in the geomorphic assessment of fluvial channels to quantify stream adjustment properties and gain insight into a stream's state of dynamic equilibrium with greater accuracy than traditional methods. A series of 18 digital elevation models (DEM) were generated using three interpolation methods (inverse distance weighting (IDW), natural neighbor (NN), and ordinary kriging), varying raster grid cell sizes (1, 2 and 3m) and different amounts of LiDAR data (bare earth data alone and bare earth with additional reflective data that reduce the mean point spacing) and compared with survey data (n = 689) to determine the optimal interpolation parameters for an agricultural study area, a portion of Allen Brook watershed in northern Vermont. Through analytical comparison, 1m IDW with the additional reflective data was the optimal method for minimizing error metrics but 1m NN (with additional reflective data) was best for retaining maximum elevation range, computational simplicity, and identifying small stream channels.

  16. Narrowband Light Detection via Internal Quantum Efficiency Manipulation of Organic Photodiodes

    DOE PAGES

    Armin, A.; Jansen-van Vuuren, R. D.; Kopidakis, N.; ...

    2015-02-01

    Spectrally selective light detection is vital for full-colour and near-infrared (NIR) imaging and machine vision. This is not possible with traditional broadband-absorbing inorganic semiconductors without input filtering, and is yet to be achieved for narrowband absorbing organic semiconductors. We demonstrate the first sub-100 nm full-width-at-half-maximum visible-blind red and NIR photodetectors with state-of-the-art performance across critical response metrics. These devices are based on organic photodiodes with optically thick junctions. Paradoxically, we use broadband-absorbing organic semiconductors and utilize the electro-optical properties of the junction to create the narrowest NIR-band photoresponses yet demonstrated. In this context, these photodiodes outperform the encumbent technology (inputmore » filtered inorganic semiconductor diodes) and emerging technologies such as narrow absorber organic semiconductors or quantum nanocrystals. The design concept allows for response tuning and is generic for other spectral windows. Furthermore, it is materialagnostic and applicable to other disordered and polycrystalline semiconductors.« less

  17. Automated bare earth extraction technique for complex topography in light detection and ranging surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, Terry H.; Magruder, Lori A.; Neuenschwander, Amy L.; Bradford, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Bare earth extraction is an important component to light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data analysis in terms of terrain classification. The challenge in providing accurate digital surface models is augmented when there is diverse topography within the data set or complex combinations of vegetation and built structures. Few existing algorithms can handle substantial terrain diversity without significant editing or user interaction. This effort presents a newly developed methodology that provides a flexible, adaptable tool capable of integrating multiple LiDAR data attributes for an accurate terrain assessment. The terrain extraction and segmentation (TEXAS) approach uses a third-order spatial derivative for each point in the digital surface model to determine the curvature of the terrain rather than rely solely on the slope. The utilization of the curvature has shown to successfully preserve ground points in areas of steep terrain as they typically exhibit low curvature. Within the framework of TEXAS, the contiguous sets of points with low curvatures are grouped into regions using an edge-based segmentation method. The process does not require any user inputs and is completely data driven. This technique was tested on a variety of existing LiDAR surveys, each with varying levels of topographic complexity.

  18. Light-sheet photoacoustic microscopy (LIS-PAM) with optical ultrasound detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuster, Robert; Slezak, Paul; Paltauf, Guenther

    2016-03-01

    Photoacoustic (or optoacoustic) microscopy has great potential as a diagnostic tool in biomedical research. For in vivo imaging, an important requirement is to keep the measurement time as short as possible. In light-sheet photoacoustic microscopy (LIS-PAM) a cylindrical lens illuminates a thin section perpendicular to the sample surface with a short laser pulse and a projection of the excited acoustic wave pattern leaving the sample is recorded with a camera. From the recorded data, a B-scan photoacoustic image is obtained by applying a two-dimensional reconstruction algorithm, without requiring any mechanical scanning. Hence, LIS-PAM is capable of real-time B-scan imaging with acoustical resolution within the individual B-scans and optical out of plane resolution up to a depth limited by optical diffusion. A 3D image is composed of reconstructed B-scan images recorded while scanning the excitation line along the sample surface. Using a camera with 200 Hz frame rate a C-scan image (5x5 mm2 field of view) can be recorded in less than 5 seconds (without averaging). The achievable sensitivity and resolution of the optical phase contrast detection system were estimated theoretically with 0.34 kPa mm without averaging and 30 μm, respectively. A first experiment on a phantom that mimics tissue properties shows the applicability of this technique for in-vivo imaging.

  19. Point light source detection characteristics of a SEC vidicon digital TV camera.

    PubMed

    Dargis, A B

    1978-03-01

    Optimization of the point source detection properties of a Secondary Electron Conduction (SEC) vidicon TV camera tube as a detector of point light sources such as star fields or certain optical spectra requires the accurate determination of peak height, half-peak width, background, and location of the point image. Two perpendicular Gaussian curves have been used to define a point image, allowing changes in the parameters of these Gaussian curves to be used in the study of SEC vidicon point source properties as a function of electrical and optical parameters. Peak height was shown to depend on priming time and a method was developed to reduce the priming time by almost an order of magnitude by momentarily raising the target voltage during priming. Power supply specifications needed for 0.1 pixel (picture element) addressing accuracy were found to be +/-0.03 V. Focus current was optimized to obtain the best sensitivity and resolution over the entire target. Peak height, background, and half-peak width were found to be strongly dependent on readout beam current. Target voltage, over the limited range examined, was found to affect only the gain without compromising other image parameters, so that any value could be used, consistent with gain and sensitivity required.

  20. Silicon photomultipliers for improved detection of low light levels in miniature near-infrared spectroscopy instruments

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, R.; Braun, F.; Achtnich, T.; Lambercy, O.; Gassert, R.; Wolf, M.

    2013-01-01

    Silicon photomultipliers are novel solid state photodetectors that recently became commercially available. The goal of this paper was to investigate their suitability for low light level detection in miniaturized functional near-infrared spectroscopy instruments. Two measurement modules with a footprint of 26×26 mm2 were built, and the signal-to-noise ratio was assessed for variable source-detector separations between 25 and 65 mm on phantoms with similar optical properties to those of a human head. These measurements revealed that the signal-to-noise ratio of the raw signal was superior to an empirically derived design requirement for source-detector separations up to 50 mm. An arterial arm occlusion was also performed on one of the authors in vivo, to induce reproducible hemodynamic changes which confirmed the validity of the measured signals. The proposed use of silicon photomultipliers in functional near-infrared spectroscopy bears large potential for future development of precise, yet compact and modular instruments, and affords improvements of the source-detector separation by 67% compared to the commonly used 30 mm. PMID:23667783

  1. Determination of propafenone hydrochloride by flow-injection analysis coupled with resonance light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaoli; Xu, Dongpo; Liu, Shaopu; Liu, Zhongfang; Liu, Sa

    2009-01-01

    A simple, sensitive and rapid flow injection analysis (FIA) method with resonance light scattering (RLS) was described for the determination of propafenone (PPF). The method was based on the ion-association reaction of 12-tungstophosphoric acid (TP) with propafenone. In pH 1.0 acidic medium, TP reacted with PPF to form an ion-associate complex, which resulted in a significant enhancement of RLS intensity. The maximum scattering peak was located at 340 nm, the RLS intensity was proportional to the concentration of PPF in the range 0.003-9.0 microg/mL, and the detection limit (3sigma) of 1.0 ng/mL was obtained at a sampling rate of 60 samples/h. The feasible reaction conditions and FIA parameters for the system were optimized. The method proposed in this paper shows satisfactory reproducibility with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 2.1% for 10 successive determinations of 2.0 microg/mL PPF. The present method had been successfully applied to the determination of PPF in serum samples and pharmaceutical samples. The results obtained were in agreement with the method used in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia.

  2. Narrowband light detection via internal quantum efficiency manipulation of organic photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armin, Ardalan; Jansen-van Vuuren, Ross D.; Kopidakis, Nikos; Burn, Paul L.; Meredith, Paul

    2015-02-01

    Spectrally selective light detection is vital for full-colour and near-infrared (NIR) imaging and machine vision. This is not possible with traditional broadband-absorbing inorganic semiconductors without input filtering, and is yet to be achieved for narrowband absorbing organic semiconductors. We demonstrate the first sub-100 nm full-width-at-half-maximum visible-blind red and NIR photodetectors with state-of-the-art performance across critical response metrics. These devices are based on organic photodiodes with optically thick junctions. Paradoxically, we use broadband-absorbing organic semiconductors and utilize the electro-optical properties of the junction to create the narrowest NIR-band photoresponses yet demonstrated. In this context, these photodiodes outperform the encumbent technology (input filtered inorganic semiconductor diodes) and emerging technologies such as narrow absorber organic semiconductors or quantum nanocrystals. The design concept allows for response tuning and is generic for other spectral windows. Furthermore, it is material-agnostic and applicable to other disordered and polycrystalline semiconductors.

  3. Narrowband Light Detection via Internal Quantum Efficiency Manipulation of Organic Photodiodes

    SciTech Connect

    Armin, A.; Jansen-van Vuuren, R. D.; Kopidakis, N.; Burn, P. L.; Meredith, P.

    2015-02-01

    Spectrally selective light detection is vital for full-colour and near-infrared (NIR) imaging and machine vision. This is not possible with traditional broadband-absorbing inorganic semiconductors without input filtering, and is yet to be achieved for narrowband absorbing organic semiconductors. We demonstrate the first sub-100 nm full-width-at-half-maximum visible-blind red and NIR photodetectors with state-of-the-art performance across critical response metrics. These devices are based on organic photodiodes with optically thick junctions. Paradoxically, we use broadband-absorbing organic semiconductors and utilize the electro-optical properties of the junction to create the narrowest NIR-band photoresponses yet demonstrated. In this context, these photodiodes outperform the encumbent technology (input filtered inorganic semiconductor diodes) and emerging technologies such as narrow absorber organic semiconductors or quantum nanocrystals. The design concept allows for response tuning and is generic for other spectral windows. Furthermore, it is materialagnostic and applicable to other disordered and polycrystalline semiconductors.

  4. Clinical Detection of Pre-Cataractous Lens Protein Changes using Dynamic Light Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Datiles, Manuel B.; Ansari, Rafat R.; Suh, Kwang I.; Vitale, Susan; Reed, George F.; Zigler, J. Samuel; Ferris., Frederick L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To use Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) to clinically assess early pre-cataractous lens protein changes. Methods We performed a cross sectional study in 380 eyes of 235 subjects aged 7–86 years with AREDS clinical lens nuclear grades ranging from 0–3.8. A DLS device was used to assess α-crystallin, a molecular chaperone protein shown to bind other damaged lens proteins, preventing their aggregation. The outcome measure was the α-crystallin index (ACI), a measure of unbound α-crystallin in each lens. The association of ACI with increasing nuclear opacity and aging was determined. Results There was a significant decrease in ACI associated with increasing grades of lens nuclear opacity (p<0.0001). There are significant losses of α-crystallin even in clinically clear lenses associated with aging (p<0.0001). The standard error of measurement was 3%. Conclusions DLS clinically detects loss of α-crystallin proteins even in clinically clear lenses. ACI measurements may be useful in identifying patients at high risk for developing cataract, and as an outcome variable in clinical lens studies. Clinical Relevance Our studies suggest that the ACI may be a useful measure of the protective α-crystallin molecular chaperone reserve present in a lens, analogous to creatinine clearance in estimating renal function reserve. PMID:19064850

  5. Accelerated light-induced degradation for detecting copper contamination in p-type silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Inglese, Alessandro Savin, Hele; Lindroos, Jeanette

    2015-08-03

    Copper is a harmful metal impurity that significantly impacts the performance of silicon-based devices if present in active regions. In this contribution, we propose a fast method consisting of simultaneous illumination and annealing for the detection of copper contamination in p-type silicon. Our results show that, within minutes, such method is capable of producing a significant reduction of the minority carrier lifetime. A spatial distribution map of copper contamination can then be obtained through the lifetime values measured before and after degradation. In order to separate the effect of the light-activated copper defects from the other metastable complexes in low resistivity Cz-silicon, we carried out a dark anneal at 200 °C, which is known to fully recover the boron-oxygen defect. Similar to the boron-oxygen behavior, we show that the dark anneal also recovers the copper defects. However, the recovery is only partial and it can be used to identify the possible presence of copper contamination.

  6. Light Detection and Ranging-Based Terrain Navigation: A Concept Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Jacob; UijtdeHaag, Maarten; vanGraas, Frank; Young, Steve

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of Airborne Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) equipment for terrain navigation. Airborne LiDAR is a relatively new technology used primarily by the geo-spatial mapping community to produce highly accurate and dense terrain elevation maps. In this paper, the term LiDAR refers to a scanning laser ranger rigidly mounted to an aircraft, as opposed to an integrated sensor system that consists of a scanning laser ranger integrated with Global Positioning System (GPS) and Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) data. Data from the laser range scanner and IMU will be integrated with a terrain database to estimate the aircraft position and data from the laser range scanner will be integrated with GPS to estimate the aircraft attitude. LiDAR data was collected using NASA Dryden's DC-8 flying laboratory in Reno, NV and was used to test the proposed terrain navigation system. The results of LiDAR-based terrain navigation shown in this paper indicate that airborne LiDAR is a viable technology enabler for fully autonomous aircraft navigation. The navigation performance is highly dependent on the quality of the terrain databases used for positioning and therefore high-resolution (2 m post-spacing) data was used as the terrain reference.

  7. Characterizing Protein Complexes with UV absorption, Light Scattering, and Refractive Index Detection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trainoff, Steven

    2009-03-01

    Many modern pharmaceuticals and naturally occurring biomolecules consist of complexes of proteins and polyethylene glycol or carbohydrates. In the case of vaccine development, these complexes are often used to induce or amplify immune responses. For protein therapeutics they are used to modify solubility and function, or to control the rate of degradation and elimination of a drug from the body. Characterizing the stoichiometry of these complexes is an important industrial problem that presents a formidable challenge to analytical instrument designers. Traditional analytical methods, such as using florescent tagging, chemical assays, and mass spectrometry perturb the system so dramatically that the complexes are often destroyed or uncontrollably modified by the measurement. A solution to this problem consists of fractionating the samples and then measuring the fractions using sequential non-invasive detectors that are sensitive to different components of the complex. We present results using UV absorption, which is primarily sensitive to the protein fraction, Light Scattering, which measures the total weight average molar mass, and Refractive Index detection, which measures the net concentration. We also present a solution of the problem inter-detector band-broadening problem that has heretofore made this approach impractical. Presented will be instrumentation and an analysis method that overcome these obstacles and make this technique a reliable and robust way of non-invasively characterizing these industrially important compounds.

  8. Rapid detection of Bordetella pertussis by real-time PCR using SYBR green I and a LightCycler instrument.

    PubMed

    Poddar, S K

    2004-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay in real-time for detection of B. pertussis using SYBR green I as the reporter fluorophore and LightCycler instrument (a thermocycler coupled to a fluorescence detection device) was established and evaluated. The amplified amplicon using series diluted control prototype strain (ATCC strain #9797) of B. pertussis was analyzed for the fluorescent melting profile, and melting temperature (Tm) was determined. When examined, amplicons using a representative set of clinical isolates of B. pertussis were found to have the same Tm value (86 +/- 0.5 degrees C, the specificity parameter of detection) as the control prototype strain as expected. Amplified product was also analyzed and detected by agarose gel electrophoresis. The detection limit by fluorescent profile and Tm analysis was 10-fold better than that detected by agarose gel analysis.

  9. Large PAHs detected in fine particulate matter emitted from light-duty gasoline vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddle, Sarah G.; Jakober, Chris A.; Robert, Michael A.; Cahill, Thomas M.; Charles, M. Judith; Kleeman, Michael J.

    Emission factors of large PAHs with 6-8 aromatic rings with molecular weights (MW) of 300-374 were measured from 16 light-duty gasoline-powered vehicles (LDGV) and one heavy-duty diesel-powered vehicle (HDDV) operated under realistic driving conditions. LDGVs emitted PAH isomers of MW 302, 326, 350, and 374, while the HDDV did not emit these compounds. This suggests that large PAHs may be useful tracers for the source apportionment of gasoline-powered motor vehicle exhaust in the atmosphere. Emission rates of MW 302, 326, and 350 isomers from LDGVs equipped with three-way catalysts (TWCs) ranged from 2 to 10 (μg L -1 fuel burned), while emissions from LDGVs classified as low emission vehicles (LEVs) were almost a factor of 10 lower. MW 374 PAH isomers were not quantified due to the lack of a quantification-grade standard. The reduced emissions associated with the LEVs are likely attributable to improved vapor recovery during the "cold-start" phase of the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) driving cycle before the catalyst reaches operating temperature. Approximately 2 (μg g -1 PM) of MW 326 and 350 PAH isomer groups were found in the National Institute of Standards and Technology standard reference material (SRM)#1649 (Urban Dust). The pattern of the MW 302, 326, and 350 isomers detected in SRM#1649 qualitatively matched the ratio of these compounds detected in the exhaust of TWC LDGVs suggesting that each gram of Urban Dust SRM contained 5-10 mg of PM originally emitted from gasoline-powered motor vehicles. Large PAHs made up 24% of the total LEV PAH emissions and 39% of the TWC PAH emissions released from gasoline-powered motor vehicles. Recent studies have shown certain large PAH isomers have greater toxicity than benzo[ a]pyrene. Even though the specific toxicity measurements on PAHs with MW >302 have yet to be performed, the detection of significant amounts of MW 326 and 350 PAHs in motor vehicle exhaust in the current study suggests that these compounds may pose

  10. Detection of neurotransmitters by a light scattering technique based on seed-mediated growth of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Li; Dong, Shaojun

    2008-03-01

    A simple light scattering detection method for neurotransmitters has been developed, based on the growth of gold nanoparticles. Neurotransmitters (dopamine, L-dopa, noradrenaline and adrenaline) can effectively function as active reducing agents for generating gold nanoparticles, which result in enhanced light scattering signals. The strong light scattering of gold nanoparticles then allows the quantitative detection of the neurotransmitters simply by using a common spectrofluorometer. In particular, Au-nanoparticle seeds were added to facilitate the growth of nanoparticles, which was found to enhance the sensing performance greatly. Using this light scattering technique based on the seed-mediated growth of gold nanoparticles, detection limits of 4.4 × 10-7 M, 3.5 × 10-7 M, 4.1 × 10-7 M, and 7.7 × 10-7 M were achieved for dopamine, L-dopa, noradrenaline and adrenaline, respectively. The present strategy can be extended to detect other biologically important molecules in a very fast, simple and sensitive way, and may have potential applications in a wide range of fields.

  11. Can acoustic emission detect the initiation of fatigue cracks: Application to high-strength light alloys used in aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathias, C.; Brinet, B.; Sertour, G.

    1978-01-01

    Acoustic emission was used for the detection of fatigue cracking in a number of high-strength light alloys used in aeronautical structures. Among the features studied were: the influence of emission frequency, the effect of surface oxidation, and the influence of grains. It was concluded that acoustic emission is an effective nondestructive technique for evaluating the initiation of fatigue cracking in such materials.

  12. Changes of vitamins A and E in the rat retina under light and dark conditions detected with TOF-SIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amemiya, T.; Gong, H.; Takaya, K.; Tozu, M.; Ohashi, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Vitamin A is a key material for visual function and its metabolism is always important topics in visual sciences. TOF-SIMS (SIMS: secondary ion mass spectrometry) can detect organic materials and elements in relation to the cell and tissue. Changes of vitamin A distribution in the rat retina under light and dark adaptations were detected with TOF-SIMS. Vitamin A is present in combination with polyunsaturated fatty acids in the living cell. Vitamin E participates in the membrane stability. Thus we examined not only vitamin A, but also vitamin E. In light condition, vitamins A and E were increased in the photoreceptor cell. These findings suggest that these vitamins are increased in the light exposed retina.

  13. Stray light control for asteroid detection at low solar elongation for the NEOSSat micro-satellite telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isbrucker, Victor; Stauder, John; Laurin, Denis; Hollinger, Allan

    2012-09-01

    The Near Earth Object Surveillance Satellite (NEOSSat) is a small satellite dedicated to finding near Earth asteroids. Its surveying strategy consists of imaging areas of the sky to low solar elongation, while in a sun synchronous polar orbit (dawn-dusk). A high performance baffle will control stray light mainly due to Earth shine. Observation scenarios require solar shielding down to 45 degree solar elongation over a wide range of ecliptic latitudes. In order to detect the faintest objects (approx 20th v mag) given a 15 cm telescope and CCD detection system, background from stray light is a critical operational concern. The required attenuation is in the order of 10-12. The requirement was verified by analyses; testing was not attempted because the level of attenuation is difficult to measure reliably. We report consistent results of stray light optical modelling from two independent analyses. Launch is expected for late 2012.

  14. Wavelet-based filter methods for the detection of small transiting planets: Application to Kepler and K2 light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grziwa, Sascha; Korth, Judith; Paetzold, Martin; KEST

    2016-10-01

    The Rheinisches Institut für Umweltforschung (RIU-PF) has developed the software package EXOTRANS for the detection of transits of exoplanets in stellar light curves. This software package was in use during the CoRoT space mission (2006-2013). EXOTRANS was improved by different wavelet-based filter methods during the following years to separate stellar variation, orbital disturbances and instrumental effects from stellar light curves taken by space telescopes (Kepler, K2, TESS and PLATO). The VARLET filter separates faint transit signals from stellar variations without using a-priori information about the target star. VARLET considers variations by frequency, amplitude and shape simultaneously. VARLET is also able to extract most instrumental jumps and glitches. The PHALET filter separates periodic features independent of their shape and is used with the intention to separate diluting stellar binaries. It is also applied for the multi transit search. Stellar light curves of the K2 mission are constructed from the processing of target pixel files which corrects disturbances caused by the reduced pointing precision of the Kepler telescope after the failure of two gyroscopes. The combination of target pixel file processing with both filter techniques and the proven detection pipeline EXOTRANS lowers the detection limit, reduces false alarms and simplifies the detection of faint transits in light curves of the K2 mission. Using EXOTRANS many new candidates were detected in K2 light curves by using EXOTRANS which were successfully confirmed by ground-based follow-up observation of the KEST collaboration. New candidates and confirmed planets are presented.

  15. Detection of kappa and lambda light chain monoclonal proteins in human serum: automated immunoassay versus immunofixation electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Jaskowski, Troy D; Litwin, Christine M; Hill, Harry R

    2006-02-01

    Recently, turbidimetric immunoassays for detecting and quantifying kappa and lambda free light chains (FLC) have become available and are promoted as being more sensitive than immunofixation electrophoresis (IFE) in detecting FLC monoclonal proteins. In this study, we assessed the ability of these turbidimetric assays to detect serum monoclonal proteins involving both free and heavy-chain-bound kappa and lambda light chains compared to standard immunofixation electrophoresis. Sera demonstrating a restricted band of protein migration (other than a definite M spike) by serum protein electrophoresis (SPE), which may represent early monoclonal proteins, were also examined. When compared to IFE, percent agreement, sensitivity, and specificity for the kappa-FLC and lambda-FLC were 94.6, 72.9, and 99.5% and 98.5, 91.4, and 99.7%, respectively, in detecting monoclonal proteins involving free and heavy-chain-bound light chains. The majority of sera (73.7%) demonstrating a restricted band of protein migration on SPE demonstrated abnormal IFE patterns suggestive of multiple myeloma or monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance, but gave normal kappa/lambda FLC ratios using the turbidimetric immunoassays. In conclusion, the kappa and lambda FLC assays are significantly less sensitive (72.9 to 91.4%) than IFE, but specific in detecting serum monoclonal proteins. Moreover, the kappa/lambda ratio has little value in routine screening since the majority of sera with abnormal IFE patterns had normal kappa/lambda FLC ratios.

  16. Evidence for a spectroscopic direct detection of reflected light from 51 Pegasi b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, J. H. C.; Santos, N. C.; Figueira, P.; Faria, J. P.; Montalto, M.; Boisse, I.; Ehrenreich, D.; Lovis, C.; Mayor, M.; Melo, C.; Pepe, F.; Sousa, S. G.; Udry, S.; Cunha, D.

    2015-04-01

    Context. The detection of reflected light from an exoplanet is a difficult technical challenge at optical wavelengths. Even though this signal is expected to replicate the stellar signal, not only is it several orders of magnitude fainter, but it is also hidden among the stellar noise. Aims: We apply a variant of the cross-correlation technique to HARPS observations of 51 Peg to detect the reflected signal from planet 51 Peg b. Methods: Our method makes use of the cross-correlation function (CCF) of a binary mask with high-resolution spectra to amplify the minute planetary signal that is present in the spectra by a factor proportional to the number of spectral lines when performing the cross correlation. The resulting cross-correlation functions are then normalized by a stellar template to remove the stellar signal. Carefully selected sections of the resulting normalized CCFs are stacked to increase the planetary signal further. The recovered signal allows probing several of the planetary properties, including its real mass and albedo. Results: We detect evidence for the reflected signal from planet 51 Peg b at a significance of 3σnoise. The detection of the signal permits us to infer a real mass of 0.46+0.06-0.01 MJup (assuming a stellar mass of 1.04 MSun) for the planet and an orbital inclination of 80+10-19 degrees. The analysis of the data also allows us to infer a tentative value for the (radius-dependent) geometric albedo of the planet. The results suggest that 51Peg b may be an inflated hot Jupiter with a high albedo (e.g., an albedo of 0.5 yields a radius of 1.9 ± 0.3 RJup for a signal amplitude of 6.0 ± 0.4 × 10-5). Conclusions: We confirm that the method we perfected can be used to retrieve an exoplanet's reflected signal, even with current observing facilities. The advent of next generation of instruments (e.g. VLT-ESO/ESPRESSO) and observing facilities (e.g. a new generation of ELT telescopes) will yield new opportunities for this type of technique

  17. Iron oxide nanozyme catalyzed synthesis of fluorescent polydopamine for light-up Zn2+ detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Biwu; Han, Xiao; Liu, Juewen

    2016-07-01

    Fluorescent polydopamine (FPD) is an interesting material with excellent biocompatibility. However, its preparation is currently a lengthy and potentially dangerous process. We herein employ magnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles as a peroxidase-mimicking nanozyme to produce FPD under mild conditions. Different from previous protocols using multiple steps with up to 6% (~2 M) H2O2, this preparation takes place in a single step with just 5 mM H2O2 at room temperature. The oxidized product shows excitation-wavelength-dependent emission peaks, similar to previous reports. The reaction kinetics, pH, temperature, and ionic strength are individually optimized. Among a diverse range of other nanomaterials tested, including Fe2O3, CeO2, CoO, Co3O4, NiO, TiO2, gold nanoparticles, and graphene oxide, Fe2O3 and graphene oxide yielded relatively weak emission, while the rest of the materials failed to produce FPD. The Fe3O4 nanoparticles retained ~90% catalytic activity even after ten cycles of synthesis. Finally, Zn2+ can enhance the fluorescence of FPD under 360 nm excitation but not under 480 nm excitation, leading to a sensitive light-up sensor with a detection limit of 60 nM Zn2+. Therefore, this work has demonstrated not only a novel use of nanozymes, but also an interesting application of FPD.Fluorescent polydopamine (FPD) is an interesting material with excellent biocompatibility. However, its preparation is currently a lengthy and potentially dangerous process. We herein employ magnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles as a peroxidase-mimicking nanozyme to produce FPD under mild conditions. Different from previous protocols using multiple steps with up to 6% (~2 M) H2O2, this preparation takes place in a single step with just 5 mM H2O2 at room temperature. The oxidized product shows excitation-wavelength-dependent emission peaks, similar to previous reports. The reaction kinetics, pH, temperature, and ionic strength are individually optimized. Among a diverse range

  18. A framework for automatic feature extraction from airborne light detection and ranging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jianhua

    Recent advances in airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) technology allow rapid and inexpensive measurements of topography over large areas. Airborne LIDAR systems usually return a 3-dimensional cloud of point measurements from reflective objects scanned by the laser beneath the flight path. This technology is becoming a primary method for extracting information of different kinds of geometrical objects, such as high-resolution digital terrain models (DTMs), buildings and trees, etc. In the past decade, LIDAR gets more and more interest from researchers in the field of remote sensing and GIS. Compared to the traditional data sources, such as aerial photography and satellite images, LIDAR measurements are not influenced by sun shadow and relief displacement. However, voluminous data pose a new challenge for automated extraction the geometrical information from LIDAR measurements because many raster image processing techniques cannot be directly applied to irregularly spaced LIDAR points. In this dissertation, a framework is proposed to filter out information about different kinds of geometrical objects, such as terrain and buildings from LIDAR automatically. They are essential to numerous applications such as flood modeling, landslide prediction and hurricane animation. The framework consists of several intuitive algorithms. Firstly, a progressive morphological filter was developed to detect non-ground LIDAR measurements. By gradually increasing the window size and elevation difference threshold of the filter, the measurements of vehicles, vegetation, and buildings are removed, while ground data are preserved. Then, building measurements are identified from no-ground measurements using a region growing algorithm based on the plane-fitting technique. Raw footprints for segmented building measurements are derived by connecting boundary points and are further simplified and adjusted by several proposed operations to remove noise, which is caused by irregularly

  19. Supercritical fluid extraction of lipids from linseed with on-line evaporative light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Abrahamsson, Victor; Rodriguez-Meizoso, Irene; Turner, Charlotta

    2015-01-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) is a green alternative method of extraction for neutral lipids in seeds compared to conventional methods utilizing organic solvents. In this work, a novel method where SFE is hyphenated with an evaporative light scattering detector is presented. The method was subsequently applied to determine lipid content in crushed linseed. The new method enables rapid quantification of extracted lipids as well as be ability to continuously monitor the extraction rate in real-time, thus being able to determine the time point of completed extraction. Both the detector and the method was validated. The results show that any of several tested oils can be used to calibrate the detection method for the determination of lipids extraction from linseed. The overall method repeatability and intermediate precision was 2.6% relative standard deviations. The extracted amount was significantly less than that obtained using the standard method of Soxhlet with petroleum ether, 26.0±0.4% (95% CI, n=9) compared to 32.3±1.3% (95% CI, n=3) of extracted amounts. It was found that channeling effects were present, and by either performing sequential repeated extractions with decompression in-between or by using a relatively large vessel a more complete extraction could be obtained. Interestingly, a substantially higher extracted amount (approximately 50%) was obtained compared to both a single extraction by SFE and the Soxhlet method. Therefore, it is recommended that an additional extraction including a rapid decompression in-between should be included in the validation of a method using supercritical fluid extraction, in order to either rule out channeling effects or to acquire a full recovery.

  20. Backscattering target detection in a turbid medium by use of circularly and linearly polarized light.

    PubMed

    Kartazayeva, S A; Ni, Xiaohui; Alfano, R R

    2005-05-15

    The polarization properties of the backscattered light from a turbid medium containing large-diameter (10.143-microm) and small-diameter (0.202-microm) spherical polystyrene particles are studied. It is shown that the difference in the polarization properties of the emerging light that originates at the target and that is backscattered from the medium allows for improvement of image contrast by use of polarized light. Based on the images obtained by the CCD camera, the polarization memory effect with circularly polarized light is demonstrated to have an advantage over the linear polarization technique in imaging a highly reflective target inside a turbid medium containing large particles.

  1. Detection of light and vibration modulates bioluminescence intensity in the glowworm, Arachnocampa flava.

    PubMed

    Mills, Rebecca; Popple, Julie-Anne; Veidt, Martin; Merritt, David John

    2016-04-01

    Glowworms are larval fungus gnats that emit light from a specialised abdominal light organ. The light attracts small arthropod prey to their web-like silk snares. Larvae glow throughout the night and can modulate their bioluminescence in response to sensory input. To better understand light output regulation and its ecological significance, we examined the larvae's reaction to light exposure, vibration and sound. Exposure to a 5-min light pulse in the laboratory causes larvae to exponentially decrease their light output over 5-10 min until they completely switch off. They gradually return to pre-exposure levels but do not show a rebound. Larvae are most sensitive to ultraviolet light, then blue, green and red. Vibration of the larval snares results in a several-fold increase in bioluminescence over 20-30 s, followed by an exponential return to pre-exposure levels over 15-30 min. Under some conditions, larvae can respond to vibration by initiating bioluminescence when they are not glowing; however, the response is reduced compared to when they are glowing. We propose that inhibitory and excitatory mechanisms combine to modulate bioluminescence intensity by regulating biochemical reactions or gating the access of air to the light organ.

  2. Comparing visual prey detection among species of piscivorous salmonids: effects of light and low turbidities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mazur, Michael M.; Beauchamp, David A.

    2003-01-01

    Differences in reaction distance to prey fish by piscivorous salmonids can alter predator–prey interactions under different visual conditions. We compared reaction distances of three piscivorous salmonids commonly found in western lakes: cutthroat trout, Oncorhynchus clarki utah, rainbow trout, O. mykiss, and the nonnative lake char, Salvelinus namaycush. Reaction distances to salmonid prey were measured as functions of light and turbidity in a controlled laboratory setting. In addition, predation rates and swimming speeds of lake char preying on juvenile cutthroat trout were measured experimentally under a range of light levels. Reaction distances for cutthroat trout and rainbow trout increased rapidly as light levels increased, reaching relatively constant reaction distances at higher light levels. Reaction distances for lake char were similar to cutthroat trout and rainbow trout at the lower light levels; however, lake char reaction distances continued to increase with increasing light intensity to asymptote at distances 65% higher than those for both cutthroat and rainbow trout. Predation rates by lake char were low for the darkest light levels, increased rapidly under low light levels (0.50–0.75 lx), and then declined to an intermediate rate at all higher light levels. Swimming speeds by lake char also increased rapidly from extremely low light conditions to a peak and declined to an intermediate level at light levels above 1.00 lx. These results suggest that, above the saturation intensity threshold, piscivorous lake char react to fish prey at greater distances than do cutthroat trout and rainbow trout. These differences may help explain the decline of native trout following the introductions of nonnative lake char in lakes and reservoirs of western North America.

  3. Detection of load application onto an optical fiber through changes in speckle patterns in an output light spot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Makoto; Takeda, Ryo; Fujioka, Yuki

    2016-10-01

    For the purpose of investigating possibilities of utilizing, for sensing application, changes in speckle patterns to be observed in an output light spot from an optical fiber due to external disturbance, a certain level of load was applied onto an optical fiber through which laser beams emitted from a laser diode were propagating, and changes in the speckle patterns in the output light spot were investigated. In order to realize effective load application onto the optical fiber, a load application section was provided in which several ridges were intentionally provided onto opposite flat plates. A jacket-covered communication-grade multi-mode glass optical fiber was placed in the load application section so that corrugated bending of the fiber was intentionally induced via load application due to the ridges. A PV cell panel was irradiated with the output light spot from the optical fiber containing the speckle patterns therein. When weights were placed in the load application section, an output voltage from the PV cell panel was changed, indicating that the load application onto the optical fiber can be detected with this detection setup. Removal of the once-placed weights was also detected via changes in the PV cell panel output. Then, the load application onto the optical fiber and its removal was successfully detected via turn-on/off operations of an LED which was controlled in accordance with the changes in the output voltage level from the PV cell panel, in other words, through the changes in the speckle patterns.

  4. 'Traffic light' immunochromatographic test based on multicolor quantum dots for the simultaneous detection of several antibiotics in milk.

    PubMed

    Taranova, N A; Berlina, A N; Zherdev, A V; Dzantiev, B B

    2015-01-15

    An immunochromatographic test was developed for the simultaneous detection of several compounds in a complex sample matrix. The system was designed in a 'traffic light' format comprising three lines of different colors on a test strip, thereby providing an easy tool with which to identify an analyte of interest based on the visible color of the line formed (qualitative analysis), and to determine the amount of the analytes present based on the fluorescence intensity of the lines (quantitative analysis). For the development of the multicolor immunochromatographic test, we used antibodies against antibiotics of three different classes as selective binders. Each antibody was labeled with water-soluble quantum dots with emission maximum at either 525, 585, or 625 nm. The test system exhibited high sensitivity, with limits of detection for ofloxacin, chloramphenicol, and streptomycin of 0.3, 0.12, and 0.2 ng mL(-1), respectively. These values are 80-200 times lower than those achievable with ELISA using the same antibodies. Using the 'traffic light' assay, these antibiotics could be detected in milk samples within 10 min without any sample preparation. The 'traffic light' assay also demonstrated a high degree of analyte detection when testing spiked milk samples (92-101%) and accuracy (quantitation error <8% of the mean).

  5. Fast and direct quantification of underivatized muscone by ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled with evaporative light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Jin, Cheng; Yan, Chunxia; Luo, Yun; Li, Baocai; He, Jing; Xiao, Xiaohe

    2013-06-01

    A new reversed phase ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled with evaporative light scattering detection is developed for the fast and direct quantification of underivatized muscone in precious herbal medicine musk. Separation of muscone was achieved on a Waters Acquity BEH C18 (50 × 2.1 mm id, 1.7 μm) column. The runtime was as short as 5 min. The mode of evaporative light scattering detection was set at Impact On. The influence of evaporative light scattering detection condition on sensitivity was investigated. The optimized condition was: drift tube temperature at 30°C, gas flow rate 4.2 L/min. The method was validated with respect to the precision, sensitivity, accuracy, linearity, stability, and robustness were measured in this paper. The calibration curves showed good linear regression (r = 0.9914) within the test range. The recovery rate was 98.6%. The limit of detection for muscone was 2.0 ng. The validated method was rapid, simple, reproducible, and convenient for the quantification of muscone in musk and the related products.

  6. High Resolution Trichromatic Road Surface Scanning with a Line Scan Camera and Light Emitting Diode Lighting for Road-Kill Detection.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Gil; Ribeiro, A Fernando; Sillero, Neftalí; Gonçalves-Seco, Luís; Silva, Cristiano; Franch, Marc; Trigueiros, Paulo

    2016-04-19

    This paper presents a road surface scanning system that operates with a trichromatic line scan camera with light emitting diode (LED) lighting achieving road surface resolution under a millimeter. It was part of a project named Roadkills-Intelligent systems for surveying mortality of amphibians in Portuguese roads, sponsored by the Portuguese Science and Technology Foundation. A trailer was developed in order to accommodate the complete system with standalone power generation, computer image capture and recording, controlled lighting to operate day or night without disturbance, incremental encoder with 5000 pulses per revolution attached to one of the trailer wheels, under a meter Global Positioning System (GPS) localization, easy to utilize with any vehicle with a trailer towing system and focused on a complete low cost solution. The paper describes the system architecture of the developed prototype, its calibration procedure, the performed experimentation and some obtained results, along with a discussion and comparison with existing systems. Sustained operating trailer speeds of up to 30 km/h are achievable without loss of quality at 4096 pixels' image width (1 m width of road surface) with 250 µm/pixel resolution. Higher scanning speeds can be achieved by lowering the image resolution (120 km/h with 1 mm/pixel). Computer vision algorithms are under development to operate on the captured images in order to automatically detect road-kills of amphibians.

  7. High Resolution Trichromatic Road Surface Scanning with a Line Scan Camera and Light Emitting Diode Lighting for Road-Kill Detection

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Gil; Ribeiro, A. Fernando; Sillero, Neftalí; Gonçalves-Seco, Luís; Silva, Cristiano; Franch, Marc; Trigueiros, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a road surface scanning system that operates with a trichromatic line scan camera with light emitting diode (LED) lighting achieving road surface resolution under a millimeter. It was part of a project named Roadkills—Intelligent systems for surveying mortality of amphibians in Portuguese roads, sponsored by the Portuguese Science and Technology Foundation. A trailer was developed in order to accommodate the complete system with standalone power generation, computer image capture and recording, controlled lighting to operate day or night without disturbance, incremental encoder with 5000 pulses per revolution attached to one of the trailer wheels, under a meter Global Positioning System (GPS) localization, easy to utilize with any vehicle with a trailer towing system and focused on a complete low cost solution. The paper describes the system architecture of the developed prototype, its calibration procedure, the performed experimentation and some obtained results, along with a discussion and comparison with existing systems. Sustained operating trailer speeds of up to 30 km/h are achievable without loss of quality at 4096 pixels’ image width (1 m width of road surface) with 250 µm/pixel resolution. Higher scanning speeds can be achieved by lowering the image resolution (120 km/h with 1 mm/pixel). Computer vision algorithms are under development to operate on the captured images in order to automatically detect road-kills of amphibians. PMID:27104535

  8. Ultra-high resolution of radiocesium distribution detection based on Cherenkov light imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Ogata, Yoshimune; Kawachi, Naoki; Suzui, Nobuo; Yin, Yong-Gen; Fujimaki, Shu

    2015-03-01

    After the nuclear disaster in Fukushima, radiocesium contamination became a serious scientific concern and research of its effects on plants increased. In such plant studies, high resolution images of radiocesium are required without contacting the subjects. Cherenkov light imaging of beta radionuclides has inherently high resolution and is promising for plant research. Since 137Cs and 134Cs emit beta particles, Cherenkov light imaging will be useful for the imaging of radiocesium distribution. Consequently, we developed and tested a Cherenkov light imaging system. We used a high sensitivity cooled charge coupled device (CCD) camera (Hamamatsu Photonics, ORCA2-ER) for imaging Cherenkov light from 137Cs. A bright lens (Xenon, F-number: 0.95, lens diameter: 25 mm) was mounted on the camera and placed in a black box. With a 100-μm 137Cs point source, we obtained 220-μm spatial resolution in the Cherenkov light image. With a 1-mm diameter, 320-kBq 137Cs point source, the source was distinguished within 2-s. We successfully obtained Cherenkov light images of a plant whose root was dipped in a 137Cs solution, radiocesium-containing samples as well as line and character phantom images with our imaging system. Cherenkov light imaging is promising for the high resolution imaging of radiocesium distribution without contacting the subject.

  9. Validation of alternate light sources for detection of bruises in non-embalmed and embalmed cadavers.

    PubMed

    Olds, Kelly; Byard, Roger W; Winskog, Calle; Langlois, Neil E I

    2017-03-01

    Bruising is frequently documented in cases of violence for use as forensic evidence. However, bruises can be overlooked if they are not visible to the naked eye. Alternate light sources such as ultraviolet, narrow band, and infrared have been used in an attempt to reveal the presence of bruising that is not otherwise apparent. However, there is a significant gap in knowledge surrounding this technique as it has not been validated against histology to confirm that bruising is genuinely being enhanced. A recent study evaluated the ability of alternate light sources to enhance visibility of bruises using a pigskin model. However, histological confirmation of bruising in humans using these light sources has not yet been performed. In this study, embalmed and non-embalmed human cadavers were used. Bodies were surveyed with alternate light sources, and enhanced regions that were unapparent under white light were photographed with the alternate light sources and sampled for histological assessment. Immunohistochemical staining for the red blood cell surface protein glycophorin was used determine if the enhanced area was a bruise (defined by the presence of extravasated erythrocytes). Photographs of areas confirmed to be bruises were analyzed using the program Fiji to measure enhancement, which was defined as an increase in the measured transverse diameter. In the non-embalmed and the embalmed cadavers violet alternate light produced the greatest enhancement of histologically confirmed bruises, followed by blue (both p < 0.0001). Regions that were not confirmed as bruises also enhanced, indicating that light sources may not be specific. This suggests that the use of light sources to enhance the visibility of bruising should be undertaken with caution and further studies are required.

  10. Automatic instrument for chemical processing to detect microorganism in biological samples by measuring light reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelbaugh, B. N.; Picciolo, G. L.; Chappelle, E. W.; Colburn, M. E. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An automated apparatus is reported for sequentially assaying urine samples for the presence of bacterial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) that comprises a rotary table which carries a plurality of sample containing vials and automatically dispenses fluid reagents into the vials preparatory to injecting a light producing luciferase-luciferin mixture into the samples. The device automatically measures the light produced in each urine sample by a bioluminescence reaction of the free bacterial adenosine triphosphate with the luciferase-luciferin mixture. The light measured is proportional to the concentration of bacterial adenosine triphosphate which, in turn, is proportional to the number of bacteria present in the respective urine sample.

  11. Debris Disks in Aggregate: Using Hubble Space Telescope Coronagraphic Imagery to Understand the Scattered-Light Disk Detection Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Carol A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite more than a decade of coronagraphic imaging of debris disk candidate stars, only 16 have been imaged in scattered light. Since imaged disks provide our best insight into processes which sculpt disks, and can provide signposts of the presence of giant planets at distances which would elude radial velocity and transit surveys, we need to understand under what conditions we detect the disks in scattered light, how these disks differ from the majority of debris disks, and how to increase the yield of disks which are imaged with 0.1" angular resolution. In this talk, I will review what we have learned from a shallow HSTINICMOS NIR survey of debris disks, and present first results from our on-going HST /STIS optical imaging of bright scattered-light disks.

  12. High-sensitivity photovoltaic responses in manganite-based heterojunctions on Si substrates for weak light detection.

    PubMed

    Zhao, S S; Ni, H; Zhao, K; Zhao, S Q; Kong, Y C; Wong, H K

    2011-06-10

    We have fabricated and characterized a weak light photodetector in a heterojunction composed of manganite La0.4Ca0.6MnO3 and n-type Si. High-sensitivity photoresponse properties were investigated. The responsivities of open-circuit photovoltage and short-circuit photocurrent reach ∼1000  V/mJ and ∼30  A/mJ, respectively, without any amplification bias under irradiation by 20-ps-wide and 355, 532, and 1064-nm-wavelength laser pulses in nanojoule to microjoule order. The present results demonstrate that the manganite-based heterojunction on Si substrate has potential applications in weak light detection from ultraviolet to near-infrared light.

  13. On-the-fly detection of changes on and below the surface in epithelium mucosal tissue architecture from scattered light.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Fernand S; Taslidere, Ezgi; Murthy, Sreekant

    2011-04-01

    In this paper we present a technique to raise a flag on the fly when a transition occurs between different mucosal architectures on or below the surface. The segmentation is based on a novel difference metric for detecting an abrupt change in the parameters extracted from a Stochastic Decomposition Method (SDM) that models the scattered light reflected from the mucosal tissue structure over an area (2-D scan) illuminated by an optical sensor (fiber) emitting light at either one wavelength or with white light. This work has the potential to enhance the endoscopist's ability to locate and identify abnormal mucosal architectures in particular when the disease is developing below the surface and hence becoming hidden during colonoscopy or endoscopic examination. It also has also potential in helping deciding as to when and where to take biopsies; steps that should lead to improvement in the diagnostic yield.

  14. Human detection based on the generation of a background image by using a far-infrared light camera.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Eun Som; Choi, Jong-Suk; Lee, Ji Hoon; Shin, Kwang Yong; Kim, Yeong Gon; Le, Toan Thanh; Park, Kang Ryoung

    2015-03-19

    The need for computer vision-based human detection has increased in fields, such as security, intelligent surveillance and monitoring systems. However, performance enhancement of human detection based on visible light cameras is limited, because of factors, such as nonuniform illumination, shadows and low external light in the evening and night. Consequently, human detection based on thermal (far-infrared light) cameras has been considered as an alternative. However, its performance is influenced by the factors, such as low image resolution, low contrast and the large noises of thermal images. It is also affected by the high temperature of backgrounds during the day. To solve these problems, we propose a new method for detecting human areas in thermal camera images. Compared to previous works, the proposed research is novel in the following four aspects. One background image is generated by median and average filtering. Additional filtering procedures based on maximum gray level, size filtering and region erasing are applied to remove the human areas from the background image. Secondly, candidate human regions in the input image are located by combining the pixel and edge difference images between the input and background images. The thresholds for the difference images are adaptively determined based on the brightness of the generated background image. Noise components are removed by component labeling, a morphological operation and size filtering. Third, detected areas that may have more than two human regions are merged or separated based on the information in the horizontal and vertical histograms of the detected area. This procedure is adaptively operated based on the brightness of the generated background image. Fourth, a further procedure for the separation and removal of the candidate human regions is performed based on the size and ratio of the height to width information of the candidate regions considering the camera viewing direction and perspective

  15. Development of new devices for detection of gastric cancer on laparoscopic surgery using near-infrared light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inada, Shunko A.; Fuchi, Shingo; Mori, Kensaku; Hasegawa, Junichi; Misawa, Kazunari; Nakanishi, Hayao

    2015-03-01

    In recent year, for the treatment of gastric cancer the laparoscopic surgery is performed, which has good benefits, such as low-burden, low-invasive and the efficacy is equivalent to the open surgery. For identify location of the tumor intraperitoneally for extirpation of the gastric cancer, several points of charcoal ink is injected around the primary tumor. However, in the time of laparoscopic operation, it is difficult to estimate specific site of primary tumor, because the injected charcoal ink diffusely spread to the area distant from the tumor in the stomach. Therefore, a broad area should be resected which results in a great stress for the patients. To overcome this problem, we focused in the near-infrared wavelength of 1000nm band which have high biological transmission. In this study, we developed a fluorescent clip which was realized with glass phosphor (Yb3+, Nd3+ doped to Bi2O3-B2O3 based glasses. λp: 976 nm, FWHM: 100 nm, size: 2x1x3 mm) and the laparoscopic fluorescent detection system for clip-derived near-infrared light. To evaluate clinical performance of a fluorescent clip and the laparoscopic fluorescent detection system, we used resected stomach (thickness: 13 mm) from the patients. Fluorescent clip was fixed on the gastric mucosa, and an excitation light (λ: 808 nm) was irradiated from outside of stomach for detection of fluorescence through stomach wall. As a result, fluorescence emission from the clip was successfully detected. Furthermore, we confirmed that detection sensitivity of the emission of fluorescence from the clip depends on the output power of the excitation light. We conformed that the fluorescent clip in combination with laparoscopic fluorescent detection system is very useful method to identify the exact location of the primary gastric cancer.

  16. Impacts of Light Precipitation Detection with Dual Frequency Radar on Global Precipitation Measurement Core Observatory (GPM/DPR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayabu, Y. N.; Hamada, A.; Oki, R.; Kachi, M.; Kubota, T.; Iguchi, T.; Shige, S.; Nakamura, K.

    2014-12-01

    The Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) on board the GPM Core Observatory consists of Ku-band (13.6 GHz) and Ka-band (35.5 GHz) radars, with an improved minimum detection sensitivity of precipitation compared to the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Precipitation Radar (TRMM PR). We have studied impacts of improved detection sensitivity with the GPM DPR compared with the TRMM PR. One example of light precipitation is, a scattered rainfall around a trough over the subtropical South Pacific Ocean, which consists of weak but erect precipitation reaching over the melting level of ~2.5 km and trailing precipitation above, which reaches as high as 5km. Another example is a light anvil precipitation spreading from convective cores of a storm in the upper troposphere, overcasting shallow convective precipitation below. The ability of globally detecting such light precipitation will improve our knowledge of precipitation processes. Utilizing an early version of the DPR product, a quick evaluation on statistical impacts of increasing the detection sensitivity from 17dBZ to 12dBZ has been performed. Here, 17dBZ is the value which is mostly accepted as the performed detection sensitivity of the TRMM PR, and 12dBZ is the guaranteed sensitivity for GPM Ka-band radar. For the near surface precipitation, impacts are significant in terms of numbers, but limited to several regions in terms of the rainfall volume. Volume impacts are much larger at the upper troposphere, which is indicated by the detection of the anvil precipitation, for example. The upper level improvements are mostly found where the deep precipitation systems exist. Quantitative discussions utilizing the latest version of the DPR data, which is scheduled to be released to the public in September, will be presented at the session.

  17. Human Detection Based on the Generation of a Background Image by Using a Far-Infrared Light Camera

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Eun Som; Choi, Jong-Suk; Lee, Ji Hoon; Shin, Kwang Yong; Kim, Yeong Gon; Le, Toan Thanh; Park, Kang Ryoung

    2015-01-01

    The need for computer vision-based human detection has increased in fields, such as security, intelligent surveillance and monitoring systems. However, performance enhancement of human detection based on visible light cameras is limited, because of factors, such as nonuniform illumination, shadows and low external light in the evening and night. Consequently, human detection based on thermal (far-infrared light) cameras has been considered as an alternative. However, its performance is influenced by the factors, such as low image resolution, low contrast and the large noises of thermal images. It is also affected by the high temperature of backgrounds during the day. To solve these problems, we propose a new method for detecting human areas in thermal camera images. Compared to previous works, the proposed research is novel in the following four aspects. One background image is generated by median and average filtering. Additional filtering procedures based on maximum gray level, size filtering and region erasing are applied to remove the human areas from the background image. Secondly, candidate human regions in the input image are located by combining the pixel and edge difference images between the input and background images. The thresholds for the difference images are adaptively determined based on the brightness of the generated background image. Noise components are removed by component labeling, a morphological operation and size filtering. Third, detected areas that may have more than two human regions are merged or separated based on the information in the horizontal and vertical histograms of the detected area. This procedure is adaptively operated based on the brightness of the generated background image. Fourth, a further procedure for the separation and removal of the candidate human regions is performed based on the size and ratio of the height to width information of the candidate regions considering the camera viewing direction and perspective

  18. Analysis of gemcitabine liposome injection by HPLC with evaporative light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qinmei; Liu, Liucheng; Zhang, Dengshan; Fan, XingFeng

    2012-12-01

    Gemcitabine liposome injection (i.e., stealth liposomes) has facilitated the targeting of gemcitabine for cancer treatment. We systemically reviewed liposome-based drug-delivery systems, which can improve pharmacokinetics, reduce side effects, and potentially increase tumor uptake, for pancreatic cancer therapy. A novel liposomal formulation, which allows for higher tumor-targeting efficiencies and can be used in current clinical trials to treat this challenging disease, has gained great popularity and attention. In this work, a simple, rapid high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was developed for the simultaneous determination of N-(carbonyl-methoxypolyethylene glycol 2000)-1, 2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine sodium salt and neutral colipids cholesterol and hydrogenated soy phosphatidylcholine or distearoyl phosphatidylcholine. Because of the poor ultraviolet absorbance of the lipids, evaporative light-scattering detection (ELSD) was used to monitor the separation. The separation was carried out on a YMC-Pack column (YMC Co., Ltd., Kyoto, Japan). Lipids were eluted using binary linear gradients starting from a mixture of 80% A and 20% B to 100% B in 10 minutes, followed by a 6-minute plateau at 100% B, where A is chloroform/isopropyl alcohol/diethylamine/trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) (50:50:0.01:0.0025) and B is chloroform/isopropyl alcohol/H₂O/diethylamine/TFA (41:50:9:0.01:0.0025). The mobile phase composition was then changed back to initial solvent mixture in 1 minute, and the column was equilibrated for 13 minutes before every subsequent run. Then, 0.025% (v/v) TFA was added into the mobile phase to enhance the retaining of the stealth lipids. This newly developed method enabled direct analysis of liposomes without solvent lipid extraction and was validated to be linear, precise, accurate, specific, and sensitive. The method has been successfully employed in a wide range of lipid-based formulation screening, process development, and

  19. Modeling and Maximum Likelihood Fitting of Gamma-Ray and Radio Light Curves of Millisecond Pulsars Detected with Fermi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, T. J.; Harding, A. K.; Venter, C.

    2012-01-01

    Pulsed gamma rays have been detected with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) from more than 20 millisecond pulsars (MSPs), some of which were discovered in radio observations of bright, unassociated LAT sources. We have fit the radio and gamma-ray light curves of 19 LAT-detected MSPs in the context of geometric, outermagnetospheric emission models assuming the retarded vacuum dipole magnetic field using a Markov chain Monte Carlo maximum likelihood technique. We find that, in many cases, the models are able to reproduce the observed light curves well and provide constraints on the viewing geometries that are in agreement with those from radio polarization measurements. Additionally, for some MSPs we constrain the altitudes of both the gamma-ray and radio emission regions. The best-fit magnetic inclination angles are found to cover a broader range than those of non-recycled gamma-ray pulsars.

  20. Design of chlorophyll-a and turbidity sensor based on fluorescence induction and scattering-light detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Keke; Liu, Shixuan; Chen, Shizhe; Qi, Yong; Miao, Bin; Yan, Xingkui; Bai, Xuejiao

    2014-07-01

    The chlorophyll-a and turbidity sensor based on the principles of fluorescence induction and scattering-light detection is designed. Using fluorescence induction technology, scattering-light detection technology and weak signal detection technology, chlorophyll-a concentration measurement and turbidity measurement in seawater are integrated in a set of testing equipment to implement software and hardware reuse and improve the integration of the device, which has the features of small size and easy operation. The comparative experiments and repetitive experiments are completed with ALEC ACLW-CAR chlorophyll / turbidity sensor. Experiment results show that chlorophyll-a concentration, turbidity and the system output values have good linear relationships, and the fitting coefficients are 0.999. Repeatability standard deviations of chlorophyll-a detection and turbidity detection are better than 0.08 μg/L and 0.04 FTU, respectively, and the accuracy of the device within +/- 2%. Chlorophyll-a and turbidity in-situ monitoring in seawater can be achieved using this testing equipment.

  1. Toward hydrogen detection at room temperature with printed ZnO nanoceramics films activated with halogen lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Van Son; Jubera, Véronique; Garcia, Alain; Debéda, Hélène

    2015-12-01

    Though semiconducting properties of ZnO have been extensively investigated under hazardous gases, research is still necessary for low-cost sensors working at room temperature. Study of printed ZnO nanopowders-based sensors has been undertaken for hydrogen detection. A ZnO paste made with commercial nanopowders is deposited onto interdigitated Pt electrodes and sintered at 400 °C. The ZnO layer structure and morphology are first examined by XRD, SEM, AFM and emission/excitation spectra prior to the study of the effect of UV-light on the electrical conduction of the semiconductor oxide. The response to hydrogen exposure is subsequently examined, showing that low UV-light provided by halogen lighting enhances the gas response and allows detection at room temperature with gas responses similar to those obtained in dark conditions at 150 °C. A gas response of 44% (relative change in current) under 300 ppm is obtained at room temperature. Moreover, it is demonstrated that very low UV-light power (15 μW/mm2) provided by the halogen lamp is sufficient to give sensitivities as high as those for much higher powers obtained with a UV LED (7.7 mW/mm2). These results are comparable to those obtained by others for 1D or 2D ZnO nanostructures working at room temperature or at temperatures up to 250 °C.

  2. Detection prospects of light NMSSM Higgs pseudoscalar via cascades of heavier scalars from vector boson fusion and Higgs-strahlung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bomark, N.-E.; Moretti, S.; Roszkowski, L.

    2016-10-01

    A detection at the large hadron collider of a light Higgs pseudoscalar would, if interpreted in a supersymmetric framework, be a smoking gun signature of non-minimal supersymmetry. In this work in the framework of the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model we focus on vector boson fusion and Higgs-strahlung production of heavier scalars that subsequently decay into pairs of light pseudoscalars. We demonstrate that although these channels have in general very limited reach, they are viable for the detection of light pseudoscalars in some parts of parameter space and can serve as an important complementary probe to the dominant gluon-fusion production mode. We also demonstrate that in a Higgs factory these channels may reach sensitivities comparable to or even exceeding the gluon fusion channels at the Large Hadron Collider, thus possibly rendering this our best option to discover a light pseudoscalar. It is also worth mentioning that for the singlet dominated scalar this may be the only way to measure its couplings to gauge bosons. Especially promising are channels where the initial scalar is radiated off a W as these events have relatively high rates and provide substantial background suppression due to leptons from the W. We identify three benchmark points that well represent the above scenarios. Assuming that the masses of the scalars and pseudoscalars are already measured in the gluon-fusion channel, the event kinematics can be further constrained, hence significantly improving detection prospects. This is especially important in the Higgs-strahlung channels with rather heavy scalars, and results in possible detection at 200 fb-1 for the most favoured parts of the parameter space.

  3. Lighting analysis of diffusely illuminated tableaus in realist paintings: an application to detecting "compositing" in the portraits of Garth Herrick

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stork, David G.; Johnson, Micah K.

    2009-02-01

    The problem of estimating the direction of point-source illumination in digital photographs has been studied extensively, and the cast-shadow and occluding-contour algorithms have been used to detect tampering and compositing; differences between the lighting directions estimated from different objects indicate that at least one of them was composited into the image. Such methods have also been applied to the analysis of realist paintings to estimate the position of illuminants within a tableau and thereby test for artists' use of optical aids. Recently, the occluding-contour algorithm has been enhanced to address the case of diffuse illumination, for instance from light passing through several windows, from multiple lamps, and so forth. Here, the pattern of lightness along the occluding contour of an object is expressed as a weighted sum of spherical harmonics. Significant differences between the coefficients extracted from different objects indicates that they were recorded under different illumination conditions, and thus that one or more was likely composited into the image. We apply this technique to the analysis of diffuse lighting in realist paintings, focussing on the portraits of the contemporary American realist Garth Herrick. Herrick often works with multiple photographs as referents, for instance a photograph of the portrait subject and a different photograph of the background. There is no guarantee that the two lighting conditions are the same, nor that Herrick can perceive or compensate for such lighting discrepancies when executing his painting. We tested for lighting consistency throughout two of his paintings: one based on a single photographic referent, and another "composited," i.e., based on two photographic referents. Our algorithms found great illumination consistency in the first painting and significant inconsistencies in the second painting-inconsistencies difficult to discern by eye. As such, our methods reveal this artist's working

  4. ASYMMETRY IN THE OUTBURST OF SN 1987A DETECTED USING LIGHT ECHO SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Sinnott, B.; Welch, D. L.; Sutherland, P. G.; Rest, A.; Bergmann, M.

    2013-04-10

    We report direct evidence for asymmetry in the early phases of SN 1987A via optical spectroscopy of five fields of its light echo system. The light echoes allow the first few hundred days of the explosion to be reobserved, with different position angles providing different viewing angles to the supernova. Light echo spectroscopy therefore allows a direct spectroscopic comparison of light originating from different regions of the photosphere during the early phases of SN 1987A. Gemini multi-object spectroscopy of the light echo fields shows fine structure in the H{alpha} line as a smooth function of position angle on the near-circular light echo rings. H{alpha} profiles originating from the northern hemisphere of SN 1987A show an excess in redshifted emission and a blue knee, while southern hemisphere profiles show an excess of blueshifted H{alpha} emission and a red knee. This fine structure is reminiscent of the 'Bochum event' originally observed for SN 1987A, but in an exaggerated form. Maximum deviation from symmetry in the H{alpha} line is observed at position angles 16 Degree-Sign and 186 Degree-Sign , consistent with the major axis of the expanding elongated ejecta. The asymmetry signature observed in the H{alpha} line smoothly diminishes as a function of viewing angle away from the poles of the elongated ejecta. We propose an asymmetric two-sided distribution of {sup 56}Ni most dominant in the southern far quadrant of SN 1987A as the most probable explanation of the observed light echo spectra. This is evidence that the asymmetry of high-velocity {sup 56}Ni in the first few hundred days after explosion is correlated to the geometry of the ejecta some 25 years later.

  5. Real-time multi-analyte label-free detection of proteins by white light reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrou, Panagiota; Koukouvinos, Georgios; Drygiannakis, Dimitrios; Goustouridis, Dimitris; Raptis, Ioannis; Misiakos, Konstantinos; Kakabakos, Sotirios E.

    2014-03-01

    Label-free optical sensors are considered ideal for biomedical analysis since they provide the advantages of multiplex and real-time detection. They still suffer; however, from lower sensitivity and/or more sophisticated equipment as compared to indirect detection methods. Here, we propose a label-free sensor based on White Light Reflectance Spectroscopy that overcomes the limitation of high cost and low detection sensitivity. The optical setup consists of a VIS-NIR light source, a spectrometer and a reflection probe. The sensor is Si with 1-μm thick thermal SiO2 and functionalized with antibodies. The incident light is directed vertically to sensor surface and the reflected interference spectrum is recorded through the spectrometer. The evolution of the biomolecular reactions are monitored in real-time by monitoring the shifts in the interference spectrum. Up to seven different reactions sites have been created onto the same sensing surface allowing for multi-analyte determinations. The analytical capabilities of the proposed sensor were demonstrated through the development of a sensitive immunoassay for the detection of C-Reactive Protein (CRP) in human serum samples. CRP, a biomarker related to acute inflammatory incidents, it has attracted particular interest as a marker of inflammation associated with cardiovascular diseases. The lowest CRP concentration detected was 10 ng/mL, and the dynamic range of the assay was extended up to 500 ng/mL. Regeneration of antibody coated sensing areas for up to 20 times without loss of immobilized antibody reactivity is also presented. In conclusion, the proposed sensing system is characterized by low cost, high assay sensitivity and, reliability.

  6. The research and development of the non-contact detection of the tubing internal thread with a line structured light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yuanyuan; Xu, Yingying; Hao, Qun; Hu, Yao

    2013-12-01

    The tubing internal thread plays an irreplaceable role in the petroleum equipment. The unqualified tubing can directly lead to leakage, slippage and bring huge losses for oil industry. For the purpose of improving efficiency and precision of tubing internal thread detection, we develop a new non-contact tubing internal thread measurement system based on the laser triangulation principle. Firstly, considering that the tubing thread had a small diameter and relatively smooth surface, we built a set of optical system with a line structured light to irradiate the internal thread surface and obtain an image which contains the internal thread profile information through photoelectric sensor. Secondly, image processing techniques were used to do the edge detection of the internal thread from the obtained image. One key method was the sub-pixel technique which greatly improved the detection accuracy under the same hardware conditions. Finally, we restored the real internal thread contour information on the basis of laser triangulation method and calculated tubing thread parameters such as the pitch, taper and tooth type angle. In this system, the profile of several thread teeth can be obtained at the same time. Compared with other existing scanning methods using point light and stepper motor, this system greatly improves the detection efficiency. Experiment results indicate that this system can achieve the high precision and non-contact measurement of the tubing internal thread.

  7. [Ring-like figures in the fundus oculi detected by ophthalmoscopy in transformed light].

    PubMed

    Vodovozov, A M; Sverdlin, S M

    1992-01-01

    Examinations of the fundus oculi in red-free polarized light, carried out in 19 patients (12 with albinism and 7 with the albinotic type of the fundus oculi) have revealed for the first time a peculiar ring-like figure. Since there is no evidence that this figure is formed by retinal folds, the authors suppose that it may result from light wave interference. Light waves on the fundus oculi of albinos may be reflected not only by the internal border membrane, but by Bruch's membrane or sclera as well. These waves, overlapping each other, form a figure identical to Newton's interference rings. The presence of a ring-like figure in the centre of the fundus oculi may be regarded as an additional clinical sign of albinism of the fundus oculi. Together with other signs, this phenomenon may be used as a marker of albinism gene carriership.

  8. Applications of Optical Sensors to the Detection of Light Scattered from Gelling Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulone, Donatella; Manno, Mauro; San Biagio, Pier Luigi; Martorana, Vincenzo

    Visible light, scattered within an angle of few degrees, (Small Angle Light Scattering, SALS) yields information on the spatial correlations and dynamical properties on the scale of the micrometers. In this way a quick and non-invasive characterization of a variety of samples is feasible. Lately the SALS instruments have been built around multielement optical sensors (CCD, CMOS), allowing the simultaneous measurement of the complete structure factor even during fast kinetics. An assessment of some sensor matrices of different technology will be presented. The omolecular assemblies produced by polysaccharides or proteins can be functional or dysfunctional, their properties being either desirable or detrimental. Anyhow, their morphology often depends, in a very delicate way, on the presence of cosolutes, on the thermal history, on the biopolymer concentration etc. We present some applications of low angle dynamic and static light scattering to the study of gelling systems (agarose, pectin, insulin).

  9. White-light interferometers with polarizing optics for length measurements with an applicable zero-point detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, V.; Emam, S.; Manske, E.

    2015-08-01

    For absolute length and form measurements at a large working distance (>150 mm) two special interferometers, a tandem interferometer and a Michelson interferometer with achromatic polarizing optics are constructed. In our experiments, both consist of a combination of one low-coherence interferometer and one laser interferometer. For the low-coherence interferometer part, a simple white-light source with less than 100 µW optical power output is chosen. It bases upon a low-cost fiber-coupled near-infrared LED with a large spectral width (FWHM > 68 nm at 825 nm). The use of achromatic polarizing optics such as broadband polarizing beamsplitters and achromatic quarter-wave plates in the low-coherence interferometer parts increases the contrast level of the white-light signal fringe pattern to nearly 100%. Furthermore, the fringe pattern in a polarized interferometer has no subsignatures and is unique. Hence, different algorithms are tested for signal processing and automated zero-point detection of the white-light signature. The software for an automated measurement is tested in a standard room without thermal control and without damped oscillation. Therefore, in experiments with the tandem interferometer, it was possible to measure the zero-point position of a white-light signature with a peak-to-peak difference of 154 nm under uncontrolled environmental conditions without thermal stabilization. The white-light Michelson interferometer with polarizing achromatic optics allows zero-point detections with a standard deviation (mean value) of less than 15 nm. The drift is proved through measurement results.

  10. Acoustic Emission and Guided Ultrasonic Waves for Detection and Continuous Monitoring of Cracks in Light Water Reactor Components

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Coble, Jamie B.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Watson, Bruce E.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2012-06-28

    Acoustic emission (AE) and guided ultrasonic waves (GUW) are considered for continuous monitoring and detection of cracks in Light Water Reactor (LWR) components. In this effort, both techniques are applied to the detection and monitoring of fatigue crack growth in a full scale pipe component. AE results indicated crack initiation and rapid growth in the pipe, and significant GUW responses were observed in response to the growth of the fatigue crack. After initiation, the crack growth was detectable with AE for approximately 20,000 cycles. Signals associated with initiation and rapid growth where distinguished based on total rate of activity and differences observed in the centroid frequency of hits. An intermediate stage between initiation and rapid growth was associated with significant energy emissions, though few hits. GUW exhibit a nearly monotonic trend with crack length with an exception of measurements obtained at 41 mm and 46 mm.

  11. Rapid and sensitive detection of cholera toxin using gold nanoparticle-based simple colorimetric and dynamic light scattering assay.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sadia Afrin; DeGrasse, Jeffrey A; Yakes, Betsy Jean; Croley, Timothy R

    2015-09-10

    Herein, a rapid and simple gold nanoparticle based colorimetric and dynamic light scattering (DLS) assay for the sensitive detection of cholera toxin has been developed. The developed assay is based on the distance dependent properties of gold nanoparticles which cause aggregation of antibody-conjugated gold nanoparticles in the presence of cholera toxin resulting discernible color change. This aggregation induced color change caused a red shift in the plasmon band of nanoparticles which was measured by UV-Vis spectroscopy. In addition, we employed DLS assay to monitor the extent of aggregation in the presence of different concentration of cholera toxin. Our assay can visually detect as low as 10 nM of cholera toxin which is lower than the previously reported colorimetric methods. The reported assay is very fast and showed an excellent specificity against other diarrhetic toxins. Moreover, we have demonstrated the feasibility of our method for cholera toxin detection in local lake water.

  12. Neural networks improve brain cancer detection with Raman spectroscopy in the presence of operating room light artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jermyn, Michael; Desroches, Joannie; Mercier, Jeanne; Tremblay, Marie-Andrée; St-Arnaud, Karl; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Petrecca, Kevin; Leblond, Frederic

    2016-09-01

    Invasive brain cancer cells cannot be visualized during surgery and so they are often not removed. These residual cancer cells give rise to recurrences. In vivo Raman spectroscopy can detect these invasive cancer cells in patients with grade 2 to 4 gliomas. The robustness of this Raman signal can be dampened by spectral artifacts generated by lights in the operating room. We found that artificial neural networks (ANNs) can overcome these spectral artifacts using nonparametric and adaptive models to detect complex nonlinear spectral characteristics. Coupling ANN with Raman spectroscopy simplifies the intraoperative use of Raman spectroscopy by limiting changes required to the standard neurosurgical workflow. The ability to detect invasive brain cancer under these conditions may reduce residual cancer remaining after surgery and improve patient survival.

  13. Portable Chemical Agent Detection System: Differential Reflectometer and Light Scattering Approaches

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-15

    photofragmentation coupled with luminol chemiluminescence, and direct photoluminescence spectroscopy have been utilized and micro- and macro-mechanical systems for...via efficient photofragmentation of explosive vapors with subsequent detection using the most sensitive available technique, luminol or ozone...and the design and optimization of a highly sensitive ozone or luminol -chemiluminescence detection system. Finally, all aspects of the instrument need

  14. "Light-tagged" bacteriophage as a diagnostic tool for the detection of phytopathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Detection of the phytopathogen Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis, the causeal agent of bacterial blight of crucifers is essential for managing this disease. A phage-based diagnostic assay was developed that detected and identify P. cannabina pv. alisalensis from cultures and diseased plant spec...

  15. Road Lane Detection by Discriminating Dashed and Solid Road Lanes Using a Visible Light Camera Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Toan Minh; Hong, Hyung Gil; Vokhidov, Husan; Park, Kang Ryoung

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing need for road lane detection used in lane departure warning systems and autonomous vehicles, many studies have been conducted to turn road lane detection into a virtual assistant to improve driving safety and reduce car accidents. Most of the previous research approaches detect the central line of a road lane and not the accurate left and right boundaries of the lane. In addition, they do not discriminate between dashed and solid lanes when detecting the road lanes. However, this discrimination is necessary for the safety of autonomous vehicles and the safety of vehicles driven by human drivers. To overcome these problems, we propose a method for road lane detection that distinguishes between dashed and solid lanes. Experimental results with the Caltech open database showed that our method outperforms conventional methods. PMID:27548176

  16. Detection of Picogram Quantities of Botulinus Toxin-B Using the Light Addressable Potentiometric Sensor.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    this report. All assays were performed on the Light Addressable Potentiometric Sensor. Results indicate a near linear dose response curve for...increasing the amounts of BoTX (10-1,000 pg). The presence of 1-30 ng of toxin resulted in a dose response curve that yielded high output signals (>4,000

  17. Young Infants Detect the Direction of Biological Motion in Point-Light Displays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhlmeier, Valerie A.; Troje, Nikolaus F.; Lee, Vivian

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, we examined if young infants can extract information regarding the directionality of biological motion. We report that 6-month-old infants can differentiate leftward and rightward motions from a movie depicting the sagittal view of an upright human point-light walker, walking as if on a treadmill. Inversion of the stimuli…

  18. Development of an integrated direct-contacting optical-fiber microchip with light-emitting diode-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changchun; Cui, Dafu; Chen, Xing

    2007-11-02

    In this paper, one poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) sandwich microchip integrated with one direct-contacting optical fiber was fabricated by using a thin-casting method. This novel integrated PDMS sandwich microchip included top glass plate, PDMS membrane replica with microfluidic networks and optical fiber, flat PDMS membrane and bottom glass plate. As the tip of excitation optical fiber completely contacted with the separation microchannel in this integrated microchip, it not only increased the excitation light intensity to achieve the high sensitivity, but also reduced the diameter of excitation beam to obtain high resolution. In addition, we found that this rigid PDMS sandwich microchip structure effectively prevented PDMS microchannel distortion from rigid optical fiber, and provided a substantial convenience for microchips manipulating. A blue light-emitting diode (LED) was applied as excitation source by using optical fiber to couple excitation light into its direct-contacting microchannel for fluorescence detection. The performances of this integrated PDMS sandwich microchip was demonstrated by separating the mixture of sodium fluorescein (SF) and fluorescein isothiocyanate isomer I (FITC), and showed a higher sensitive and resolution than those obtained from the conventional integrated optical-fiber PDMS microchip with a 100-microm distance between fiber tip and separation microchannel. Additionally, the reproducibility of this integrated microchip with LED-induced fluorescence detection was also examined by separation of a mixture of FITC-labeled amino acids.

  19. A light efficiency uniformity detection system for medical rigid endoscope based on image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yakun; Liu, Ming; Liu, Xiaohua; Zhao, Yuejin; Dong, Liquan; Hui, Mei; Zhai, Xiaohao; Li, Yonghui; Zhou, Peng

    2015-08-01

    Light efficiency uniformity is a very important parameter of medical rigid endoscope. This paper introduces a new system based on image processing to test the light efficiency uniformity of medical rigid endoscope. Employing an electric machinery to reduce the human intervention, so that the precision of measuring and automation degree are improved. We collect the image with a digital CCD camera and display it on the screen of a computer, which can avoid visual fatigue from the direct observation through the rigid endoscope. To perform the image processing on a computer, we adopt a self-developed image processing software, by which the test results can be obtained from PC itself. The processes of our self-developed image processing software include: gray-scale transformation, image pretreatment and image binarization; calculate the center and equivalent radius of the field of view (FOV); plot the curve, through which the ratio of edge and center in different field and the center axisymmetric of light efficiency can be both calculated. It concludes that the relative self-effect of illumination light luminosity is the foremost factor affecting the uniformity, and these endoscopes are all qualified with the max deviation of the center axisymmetric less than 20%. The results of our study prove that this system can test the light efficiency uniformity of medical rigid endoscope quickly, expediently and accurately, and it contains more information instead of only reflecting a particular field of the FOV, what's more, it applies to different types, length and angles of view of medical rigid endoscope.

  20. Chemical fingerprinting of Shexiang Baoxin Pill and simultaneous determination of its major constituents by HPLC with evaporative light scattering detection and electrospray mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shi-Kai; Zhang, Wei-Dong; Liu, Run-Hui; Zhan, Yong-Cheng

    2006-07-01

    High-performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) with evaporative light scattered detection (ELSD) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometric detection (ESI-MS) was employed to establish chemical fingerprint of Shexiang Baoxin Pill (SBP) and to simultaneously determinate its seven major constituents, including cholic acid, deoxycholic acid, ursodeoxycholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid, cinobufagin, recibufogenin, and ginsenoside Rb1. The analysis was performed on a C18 column with water-acetonitrile gradient elution, and the investigated constituents were authenticated by comparing their retention times and mass spectra with those of reference compounds. The proposed method was applied to analyze nine SBP samples and produced data with acceptable linearity, precision, stability and accuracy. Both the chemical fingerprints and quantification data were used to evaluate the quality of various SBP products. The proposed method allows obtaining chemical fingerprint and quantification of multi-components in one run, and therefore can be readily utilized as a comprehensive quality control approach for traditional Chinese medicine.

  1. Light intensity stabilization based on the second harmonic of the photoelastic modulator detection in the atomic magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Duan, Lihong; Fang, Jiancheng; Li, Rujie; Jiang, Liwei; Ding, Ming; Wang, Wei

    2015-12-14

    The fluctuations of the probe light intensity seriously affect the performance of the sensitive atomic magnetometer. Here we propose a novel method for the intensity stabilization based on the second harmonic component of the photoelastic modulator (PEM) detection in the atomic magnetometer. The method not only could be used to eliminate the intensity fluctuations of the laser source, but also remove the fluctuations from the optical components caused by the environment. A relative fluctuation of the light intensity of 0.035% was achieved and the corresponding fluctuation of the output signal of the atomic magnetometer has decreased about two orders of magnitude from 4.06% to 0.041%. As the scheme proposed here only contains optical devices and does not require additional feedback controlled equipments, it is especially suitable for the integration of the atomic magnetometer.

  2. Study of SiPM custom arrays for scintillation light detection in a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervi, T.; Babicz, M. E.; Bonesini, M.; Falcone, A.; Kose, U.; Nessi, M.; Menegolli, A.; Pietropaolo, F.; Raselli, G. L.; Rossella, M.; Torti, M.; Zani, A.

    2017-03-01

    Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LAr-TPC) technique has been established as one of the most promising for the next generation of experiments dedicated to neutrino and rare-event physics. LAr-TPCs have the fundamental feature to be able to both collect the charge and the scintillation light produced after the passage of a ionizing particle inside the Argon volume. Scintillation light is traditionally detected by large surface Photo-Multiplier Tubes (PMTs) working at cryogenic temperature. Silicon Photo-Multipliers (SiPMs) are semiconductor-based devices with performances comparable to the PMT ones, but with very small active areas. For this reason we built a prototype array composed by SiPMs connected in different electrical configurations. We present results on preliminary tests made with four SiPMs, connected both in parallel and in series configurations, deployed into a 50 liters LAr-TPC exposed to cosmic rays at CERN.

  3. Simultaneous Determination of Four Active Ingredients in Sargentodoxa cuneata by HPLC Coupled with Evaporative Light Scattering Detection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Di-Hua; Lv, Yuan-Shan; Liu, Jun-Hong; Yang, Lei; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Shu-Kun; Zhuo, Yu-Zhen

    2016-01-01

    A HPLC coupled with evaporative light scattering detection method had been developed for the simultaneous determination of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethyl alcohol glycoside, salidroside, chlorogenic acid, and liriodendrin in the stem of Sargentodoxa cuneata. With a C18 column, the analysis was performed using acetonitrile and 0.2% formic acid aqueous solution as mobile phase in gradient program at a flow rate of 0.9 mL/min. The optimum drift tube temperature of evaporative light scattering detection was at 105°C with the air flow rate of 2.5 L/min. The calibration curves showed good linearity during the test ranges. This method was validated for limits of detection and quantification, precision, and reproducibility. The recoveries were within the range of 96.39%–104.64%. The relative standard deviations of intraday and interday precision were less than 2.90% and 3.30%, respectively. The developed method can be successfully used to quantify the four analytes in the stem of Sargentodoxa cuneata from various regions in China. PMID:27313618

  4. Simultaneous Determination of Four Active Ingredients in Sargentodoxa cuneata by HPLC Coupled with Evaporative Light Scattering Detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Di-Hua; Lv, Yuan-Shan; Liu, Jun-Hong; Yang, Lei; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Shu-Kun; Zhuo, Yu-Zhen

    2016-01-01

    A HPLC coupled with evaporative light scattering detection method had been developed for the simultaneous determination of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethyl alcohol glycoside, salidroside, chlorogenic acid, and liriodendrin in the stem of Sargentodoxa cuneata. With a C18 column, the analysis was performed using acetonitrile and 0.2% formic acid aqueous solution as mobile phase in gradient program at a flow rate of 0.9 mL/min. The optimum drift tube temperature of evaporative light scattering detection was at 105°C with the air flow rate of 2.5 L/min. The calibration curves showed good linearity during the test ranges. This method was validated for limits of detection and quantification, precision, and reproducibility. The recoveries were within the range of 96.39%-104.64%. The relative standard deviations of intraday and interday precision were less than 2.90% and 3.30%, respectively. The developed method can be successfully used to quantify the four analytes in the stem of Sargentodoxa cuneata from various regions in China.

  5. DNA-Directed Assembly of Nanogold Dimers: A Unique Dynamic Light Scattering Sensing Probe for Transcription Factor Detection

    PubMed Central

    Seow, Nianjia; Tan, Yen Nee; Yung, Lin-Yue Lanry; Su, Xiaodi

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a unique DNA-assembled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) dimer for dynamic light scattering (DLS) sensing of transcription factors, exemplified by estrogen receptor (ER) that binds specifically to a double-stranded (ds) DNA sequence containing estrogen response element (ERE). Here, ERE sequence is incorporated into the DNA linkers to bridge the AuNPs dimer for ER binding. Coupled with DLS, this AuNP dimer-based DLS detection system gave distinct readout of a single ‘complex peak’ in the presence of the target molecule (i.e., ER). This unique signature marked the first time that such nanostructures can be used to study transcription factor-DNA interactions, which DLS alone cannot do. This was also unlike previously reported AuNP-DLS assays that gave random and broad distribution of particles size upon target binding. In addition, the ERE-containing AuNP dimers could also suppress the light-scattering signal from the unbound proteins and other interfering factors (e.g., buffer background), and has potential for sensitive detection of target proteins in complex biological samples such as cell lysates. In short, the as-developed AuNP dimer probe coupled with DLS is a simple (mix and test), rapid (readout in ~5 min) and sensitive (low nM levels of ER) platform to detect sequence-specific protein-DNA binding event. PMID:26678946

  6. DNA-Directed Assembly of Nanogold Dimers: A Unique Dynamic Light Scattering Sensing Probe for Transcription Factor Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seow, Nianjia; Tan, Yen Nee; Yung, Lin-Yue Lanry; Su, Xiaodi

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a unique DNA-assembled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) dimer for dynamic light scattering (DLS) sensing of transcription factors, exemplified by estrogen receptor (ER) that binds specifically to a double-stranded (ds) DNA sequence containing estrogen response element (ERE). Here, ERE sequence is incorporated into the DNA linkers to bridge the AuNPs dimer for ER binding. Coupled with DLS, this AuNP dimer-based DLS detection system gave distinct readout of a single ‘complex peak’ in the presence of the target molecule (i.e., ER). This unique signature marked the first time that such nanostructures can be used to study transcription factor-DNA interactions, which DLS alone cannot do. This was also unlike previously reported AuNP-DLS assays that gave random and broad distribution of particles size upon target binding. In addition, the ERE-containing AuNP dimers could also suppress the light-scattering signal from the unbound proteins and other interfering factors (e.g., buffer background), and has potential for sensitive detection of target proteins in complex biological samples such as cell lysates. In short, the as-developed AuNP dimer probe coupled with DLS is a simple (mix and test), rapid (readout in ~5 min) and sensitive (low nM levels of ER) platform to detect sequence-specific protein-DNA binding event.

  7. Detection of Ciprofloxacin-Resistant Yersinia pestis by Fluorogenic PCR Using the LightCycler

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    laboratory envi- ronment. Most recently, Wilson et al. (29) developed a 5’ nuclease assay to detect Cpr in Campylobacter jejuni by PCR allelic...Mansfield, and J. E. Linz. 2000. Identification of ciprofloxacin-resistant Campylobacter jejuni by use of a fiuorogenic PCR assay. J. Clin. Microbiol. 38...Li, B. Swaminathan, and F. Angulo. 1999. Ciprofioxacin resistance in Campylobacter jejuni isolates: detection of gyrA resistance mu- tations by

  8. Energy resolution and efficiency of phonon-mediated kinetic inductance detectors for light detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardani, L.; Colantoni, I.; Cruciani, A.; Di Domizio, S.; Vignati, M.; Bellini, F.; Casali, N.; Castellano, M. G.; Coppolecchia, A.; Cosmelli, C.; Tomei, C.

    2015-08-01

    The development of sensitive cryogenic light detectors is of primary interest for bolometric experiments searching for rare events like dark matter interactions or neutrino-less double beta decay. Thanks to their good energy resolution and the natural multiplexed read-out, Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs) are particularly suitable for this purpose. To efficiently couple KIDs-based light detectors to the large crystals used by the most advanced bolometric detectors, active surfaces of several cm2 are needed. For this reason, we are developing phonon-mediated detectors. In this paper, we present the results obtained with a prototype consisting of four 40 nm thick aluminum resonators patterned on a 2 × 2 cm2 silicon chip, and calibrated with optical pulses and X-rays. The detector features a noise resolution σE = 154 ± 7 eV and an (18 ± 2)% efficiency.

  9. Fully Printed Flexible Single-Chip RFID Tag with Light Detection Capabilities

    PubMed Central

    Falco, Aniello; Salmerón, Jose F.; Loghin, Florin C.; Lugli, Paolo; Rivadeneyra, Almudena

    2017-01-01

    A printed passive radiofrequency identification (RFID) tag in the ultra-high frequency band for light and temperature monitoring is presented. The whole tag has been manufactured by printing techniques on a flexible substrate. Antenna and interconnects are realized with silver nanoparticles via inkjet printing. A sprayed photodetector performs the light monitoring, whereas temperature measurement comes from an in-built sensor in the silicon RFID chip. One of the advantages of this system is the digital read-out and transmission of the sensors information on the RFID tag that ensures reliability. Furthermore, the use of printing techniques allows large-scale manufacturing and the direct fabrication of the tag on the desired surface. This work proves for the first time the feasibility of the embedment of large-scale organic photodetectors onto inkjet printed RFID tags. Here, we solve the problem of integration of different manufacturing techniques to develop an optimal final sensor system. PMID:28282850

  10. Fully Printed Flexible Single-Chip RFID Tag with Light Detection Capabilities.

    PubMed

    Falco, Aniello; Salmerón, Jose F; Loghin, Florin C; Lugli, Paolo; Rivadeneyra, Almudena

    2017-03-08

    A printed passive radiofrequency identification (RFID) tag in the ultra-high frequency band for light and temperature monitoring is presented. The whole tag has been manufactured by printing techniques on a flexible substrate. Antenna and interconnects are realized with silver nanoparticles via inkjet printing. A sprayed photodetector performs the light monitoring, whereas temperature measurement comes from an in-built sensor in the silicon RFID chip. One of the advantages of this system is the digital read-out and transmission of the sensors information on the RFID tag that ensures reliability. Furthermore, the use of printing techniques allows large-scale manufacturing and the direct fabrication of the tag on the desired surface. This work proves for the first time the feasibility of the embedment of large-scale organic photodetectors onto inkjet printed RFID tags. Here, we solve the problem of integration of different manufacturing techniques to develop an optimal final sensor system.

  11. Increasing detection range and minimizing polarization mixing with circularly polarized light through scattering environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Laan, J. D.; Scrymgeour, D. A.; Kemme, S. A.; Dereniak, E. L.

    2014-05-01

    We present both simulation and experimental results showing that circularly polarized light maintains its degree of polarization better than linearly polarized light in scattering environments. This is specifically true in turbid environments like fog and clouds. In contrast to previous studies that propagate single wavelengths through broad particle-size distributions, this work identifies regions where circular polarization persists further than linear by systematically surveying different wavelengths through monodisperse particle diameters. For monodisperse polystyrene microspheres in water, for particle diameters of 0.99 and 1.925 microns and varying optical depths, we show that circular polarization's ability to persist through multiple scattering events is enhanced by as much as a factor of four, when compared to that of linear polarization. These particle diameters correspond to size parameters found for infrared wavelengths and marine and continental fog particle distributions. The experimental results are compared to Monte Carlo simulations for all scattering environments investigated.

  12. Impaired light detection of the circadian clock in a zebrafish melanoma model

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Noémie; Diaz-de-Cerio, Natalia; Whitmore, David

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock controls the timing of the cell cycle in healthy tissues and clock disruption is known to increase tumourigenesis. Melanoma is one of the most rapidly increasing forms of cancer and the precise molecular circadian changes that occur in a melanoma tumor are unknown. Using a melanoma zebrafish model, we have explored the molecular changes that occur to the circadian clock within tumors. We have found disruptions in melanoma clock gene expression due to a major impairment to the light input pathway, with a parallel loss of light-dependent activation of DNA repair genes. Furthermore, the timing of mitosis in tumors is perturbed, as well as the regulation of certain key cell cycle regulators, such that cells divide arhythmically. The inability to co-ordinate DNA damage repair and cell division is likely to promote further tumourigenesis and accelerate melanoma development. PMID:25832911

  13. Edge-detected detail enhancement through synthesis of multi-light images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jinghong; Li, Zhengguo; Rahardja, Susanto; Yao, Susu

    2010-01-01

    A collaborative image processing method is proposed to enhance the shape and details of a scene through synthesizing a set of multi-light images that capture a scene with fixed view-point but various lighting positions. A very challenging problem is to remove the artifacts due to shadow edges from the synthesized image. To address this problem, a simple Sobel filter based method is provided by utilizing the feature of multi-light images in which the shadow edges are usually not overlapped. A detail layer that contains the details of all images is firstly constructed by using a gradient domain method and a quadratic filter. Then a base layer is produced by using only one input image. The detail layer is finally added to the base layer to produce the desired detail enhanced image. Using this method, the details lost in the shadow of original input image can be reproduced by the details of other images and the sense of depth is preserved well in the synthesized image. Interactivities are also provided for users to adjust the appearance of the detail enhanced image according to their preferences.

  14. Organic Light-Emitting Devices (OLEDS) and Their Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance (ODMR)

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Gang

    2003-01-01

    Organic Light-Emitting Devices (OLEDs), both small molecular and polymeric have been studied extensively since the first efficient small molecule OLED was reported by Tang and VanSlyke in 1987. Burroughes' report on conjugated polymer-based OLEDs led to another track in OLED development. These developments have resulted in full color, highly efficient (up to {approx} 20% external efficiency 60 lm/W power efficiency for green emitters), and highly bright (> 140,000 Cd/m{sup 2} DC, {approx}2,000,000 Cd/m{sup 2} AC), stable (>40,000 hr at 5 mA/cm{sup 2}) devices. OLEDs are Lambertian emitters, which intrinsically eliminates the view angle problem of liquid crystal displays (LCDs). Thus OLEDs are beginning to compete with the current dominant LCDs in information display. Numerous companies are now active in this field, including large companies such as Pioneer, Toyota, Estman Kodak, Philipps, DuPont, Samsung, Sony, Toshiba, and Osram, and small companies like Cambridge Display Technology (CDT), Universal Display Corporation (UDC), and eMagin. The first small molecular display for vehicular stereos was introduced in 1998, and polymer OLED displays have begun to appear in commercial products. Although displays are the major application for OLEDs at present, they are also candidates for nest generation solid-state lighting. In this case the light source needs to be white in most cases. Organic transistors, organic solar cells, etc. are also being developed vigorously.

  15. Light detection with spectral analysis at the Legnaro nuclear microprobe: Applications in material and earth sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vittone, E.; Lo Giudice, A.; Manfredotti, C.; Egeni, G.; Rudello, V.; Rossi, P.; Gennaro, G.; Pratesi, G.; Corazza, M.

    2001-07-01

    Among the numerous ion beam analytical (IBA) techniques available for material characterisation, ionoluminescence (IL) has not attracted the interest that it should deserve. Although the importance of IL technique, particularly if combined with other IBA techniques, has been widely proven, very few apparatuses to analyse light emission spectra have been installed at the microbeam facilities. In this paper we present the new IL apparatus installed at the Legnaro (LNL) Ion Microbeam Facility. The system is a modification of the OXFORD MONOCL2 apparatus for cathodoluminescence. Light collection is performed by using a retractable parabolic mirror located at a very short distance from the sample, with a small aperture to allow the ion beam to hit the sample. Accurate positioning of the retractable mirror directly coupled to a chamber mounted high-resolution monochromator allows for high light collection efficiency. This design assures that IL can be used with low beam currents (<1 pA) with the consequent reduction of the radiation damage, which often occurs during ionoluminescence measurements. A summary of some meaningful results obtained with such an apparatus is presented. The combination of IL/PIXE was used to characterise natural silica glass, known as Libyan Desert Glass, and cubic BN grains; polycristalline CVD diamond has been studied by a synergetic combination of IBICC/IL technique.

  16. Light helicity detection in MOS-based spin-photodiodes: An analytical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantoni, M.; Rinaldi, C.

    2016-09-01

    In a metal-oxide-semiconductor-based spin-photodiode, the helicity of an incoming light is efficiently converted into an electrical signal by exploiting (i) the helicity dependence of the degree of optical spin orientation for photogenerated carriers in the semiconductor and (ii) the spin-dependent tunneling transmission of the insulating barrier between the semiconductor and a ferromagnetic metal. Here, we propose a theoretical model for predicting the electrical response of the device to a circularly polarized light, by integrating the Fert-Jaffrès framework [A. Fert and H. Jaffrès, Phys. Rev. B 64, 184420 (2001)] with a helicity-dependent photo-generation term. A figure of merit, related to the variation of the electrical response to the switching of the light helicity from right to left, is defined, and its dependence on the constitutive parameters of the device (barrier resistivity and spin selectivity, semiconductor resistivity and spin diffusion length) is shown. Finally, a simple analytical formula for identifying the optimal resistance barrier leading to the maximum efficiency is found and experimentally validated on Fe/MgO/Ge spin-photodiodes.

  17. Derivation of Burn Scar Depths with Airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) in Indonesian Peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballhorn, U.; Siegert, F.

    2009-04-01

    more CO2 per year than the fourth-largest industrial nation, Germany, saved to achieve its Kyoto target. Since 1990, emissions from peat burning and peat decomposition have exceeded that of above ground biomass deforestation. These numbers show how important it is to have more accurate estimations for peat burn depth in the future. Until now few field measurements were made, which would require to know the fire affected area in advance or ignite peatland on purpose. Furthermore fire scars are quickly covered by regenerating vegetation. Another problem is the lack of a method without actually having to go into the field (e.g. through remote sensing techniques), due to the fact that many of the fire locations are remote and very difficult to access. We investigated if airborne light detection and ranging (LIDAR), an active laser pulse technology by which the height of objects can be precisely measured, can be used to determine the amount of peat burned during a fire event. From a LIDAR data set acquired in Central Kalimantan, Borneo, in 2007, one year after severe fires resulting from the 2006 El Niño drought, we calculated that the average depth of a burn scar was 0.30 ± 0.15 m .This was achieved through the construction of digital terrain models (DTMs) by interpolating the LIDAR ground return signals in burnt and adjacent unburned peatland. These calculated depths were compared to in situ measurements, which came to similar results. We believe that the method presented here to estimate burnt peat depth has the potential to considerably improve the accuracy of regional and global carbon emission models but would also be helpful for monitoring projects under the Kyoto Protocol like the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) or the proposed Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD) mechanism.

  18. Rapid molecular detection of invasive species in ballast and harbor water by integrating environmental DNA and light transmission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Egan, Scott P; Grey, Erin; Olds, Brett; Feder, Jeffery L; Ruggiero, Steven T; Tanner, Carol E; Lodge, David M

    2015-04-07

    Invasive species introduced via the ballast water of commercial ships cause enormous environmental and economic damage worldwide. Accurate monitoring for these often microscopic and morphologically indistinguishable species is challenging but critical for mitigating damages. We apply eDNA sampling, which involves the filtering and subsequent DNA extraction of microscopic bits of tissue suspended in water, to ballast and harbor water sampled during a commercial ship's 1400 km voyage through the North American Great Lakes. Using a lab-based gel electrophoresis assay and a rapid, field-ready light transmission spectroscopy (LTS) assay, we test for the presence of two invasive species: quagga (Dreissena bugensis) and zebra (D. polymorpha) mussels. Furthermore, we spiked a set of uninfested ballast and harbor samples with zebra mussel tissue to further test each assay's detection capabilities. In unmanipulated samples, zebra mussel was not detected, while quagga mussel was detected in all samples at a rate of 85% for the gel assay and 100% for the LTS assay. In the spiked experimental samples, both assays detected zebra mussel in 94% of spiked samples and 0% of negative controls. Overall, these results demonstrate that eDNA sampling is effective for monitoring ballast-mediated invasions and that LTS has the potential for rapid, field-based detection.

  19. Error analysis and system implementation for structured light stereo vision 3D geometric detection in large scale condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Li; Zhang, Xuping; Wang, Jiaqi; Zhang, Yixin; Wang, Shun; Zhu, Fan

    2012-11-01

    Stereo vision based 3D metrology technique is an effective approach for relatively large scale object's 3D geometric detection. In this paper, we present a specified image capture system, which implements LVDS interface embedded CMOS sensor and CAN bus to ensure synchronous trigger and exposure. We made an error analysis for structured light vision measurement in large scale condition, based on which we built and tested the system prototype both indoor and outfield. The result shows that the system is very suitable for large scale metrology applications.

  20. Comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography with evaporative light-scattering detection for the analysis of triacylglycerols in Borago officinalis.

    PubMed

    Mondello, Luigi; Beccaria, Marco; Donato, Paola; Cacciola, Francesco; Dugo, Giovanni; Dugo, Paola

    2011-03-01

    An optimized 2-D liquid chromatography (LC×LC) set-up, based on the different selectivities of a silver ion (Ag) and a non-aqueous reversed phase (NARP), employed in the first (D1) and the second dimension (D2), respectively, in combination with evaporative light-scattering detection (ELSD), has been developed for the analysis of the triacylglycerol (TAG) fraction in a Borago officinalis oil. The 2-D set-up, thanks to the complementary separation selectivity provided by the two columns, allowed to distribute 78 TAGs throughout the 2-D LC retention plane otherwise unachievable by 1-D LC.

  1. High definition versus standard definition white light endoscopy for detecting dysplasia in patients with Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Sami, S S; Subramanian, V; Butt, W M; Bejkar, G; Coleman, J; Mannath, J; Ragunath, K

    2015-01-01

    High-definition endoscopy systems provide superior image resolution. The aim of this study was to assess the utility of high definition compared with standard definition endoscopy system for detecting dysplastic lesions in patients with Barrett's esophagus. A retrospective cohort study of patients with non-dysplastic Barrett's esophagus undergoing routine surveillance was performed. Data were retrieved from the central hospital electronic database. Procedures performed for non-surveillance indications, Barrett's esophagus Prague C0M1 classification with no specialized intestinal metaplasia on histology, patients diagnosed with any dysplasia or cancer on index endoscopy, and procedures using advanced imaging techniques were excluded. Logistic regression models were constructed to estimate adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals comparing outcomes with standard definition and high-definition systems. The high definition was superior to standard definition system in targeted detection of all dysplastic lesions (odds ratio 3.27, 95% confidence interval 1.27-8.40) as well as overall dysplasia detected on both random and target biopsies (odds ratio 2.36, 95% confidence interval 1.50-3.72). More non-dysplastic lesions were detected with the high-definition system (odds ratio 1.16, 95% confidence interval 1.01-1.33). There was no difference between high definition and standard definition endoscopy in the overall (random and target) high-grade dysplasia or cancers detected (odds ratio 0.93, 95% confidence interval 0.83-1.04). Trainee endoscopists, number of biopsies taken, and male sex were all significantly associated with a higher yield for dysplastic lesions. The use of the high-definition endoscopy system is associated with better targeted detection of any dysplasia during routine Barrett's esophagus surveillance. However, high-definition endoscopy cannot replace random biopsies at present time.

  2. Quantifying the momentum correlation between two light beams by detecting one.

    PubMed

    Hochrainer, Armin; Lahiri, Mayukh; Lapkiewicz, Radek; Lemos, Gabriela Barreto; Zeilinger, Anton

    2017-02-14

    We report a measurement of the transverse momentum correlation between two photons by detecting only one of them. Our method uses two identical sources in an arrangement in which the phenomenon of induced coherence without induced emission is observed. In this way, we produce an interference pattern in the superposition of one beam from each source. We quantify the transverse momentum correlation by analyzing the visibility of this pattern. Our approach might be useful for the characterization of correlated photon pair sources and may lead to an experimental measure of continuous variable entanglement, which relies on the detection of only one of two entangled particles.

  3. Quantifying the momentum correlation between two light beams by detecting one

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochrainer, Armin; Lahiri, Mayukh; Lapkiewicz, Radek; Barreto Lemos, Gabriela; Zeilinger, Anton

    2017-02-01

    We report a measurement of the transverse momentum correlation between two photons by detecting only one of them. Our method uses two identical sources in an arrangement in which the phenomenon of induced coherence without induced emission is observed. In this way, we produce an interference pattern in the superposition of one beam from each source. We quantify the transverse momentum correlation by analyzing the visibility of this pattern. Our approach might be useful for the characterization of correlated photon pair sources and may lead to an experimental measure of continuous variable entanglement, which relies on the detection of only one of two entangled particles.

  4. Effectiveness of fire-detection systems in light-water-reactor facilities

    SciTech Connect

    DiNenno, P.J.; Dungan, K.W.

    1981-08-01

    This report presents a critical review of methods for evaluating fire detection system capabilities. These capabilities must include some measurement of success. The problem of evaluating the effectiveness in terms of probability of success or certainty of success of fire detection systems must be answered either to enable the correct selection of system when a need is identified, or to assess the acceptability of an existing system in meeting an identified need. These methods are complementary to a hazards analysis, which identifies the need, but can be quite independent in their development and use.

  5. Phase sensitive detection of light reflected from a Fabry{endash}P{acute e}rot interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bava, E.; Massari, F.

    1996-05-01

    We present an analysis of the Fabry{endash}P{acute e}rot response to a phase-modulated light in the reflection mode, by considering the general problem of the lock-in detection at the {ital p}th harmonics of the rf modulating frequency. Suitable frequency modulation conditions for servo-locking purposes are obtained and the values of modulation index which maximize the sensitivity for the first, third, and fifth harmonics are found. Moreover, we investigate the effects of the residual amplitude modulation introduced by the electro-optic frequency modulator, the presence of laser amplitude and frequency noise, and the dependence of the achievable closed-loop frequency fluctuation spectrum on the modulation index and detection noise. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Ultra-low power anti-crosstalk collision avoidance light detection and ranging using chaotic pulse position modulation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jie, Hao; Ma-li, Gong; Peng-fei, Du; Bao-jie, Lu; Fan, Zhang; Hai-tao, Zhang; Xing, Fu

    2016-07-01

    A novel concept of collision avoidance single-photon light detection and ranging (LIDAR) for vehicles has been demonstrated, in which chaotic pulse position modulation is applied on the transmitted laser pulses for robust anti-crosstalk purposes. Besides, single-photon detectors (SPD) and time correlated single photon counting techniques are adapted, to sense the ultra-low power used for the consideration of compact structure and eye safety. Parameters including pulse rate, discrimination threshold, and number of accumulated pulses have been thoroughly analyzed based on the detection requirements, resulting in specified receiver operating characteristics curves. Both simulation and indoor experiments were performed to verify the excellent anti-crosstalk capability of the presented collision avoidance LIDAR despite ultra-low transmitting power. Project supported by Tsinghua University Initiative Scientific Research Program, China (Grant No. 2014z21035).

  7. Nanocrystallized CdS beneath the surface of a photoconductor for detection of UV light with picowatt sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Keng-Te; Chen, Hsuen-Li; Lai, Yu-Sheng; Liu, Yu-Lun; Tseng, Yi-Chuan; Lin, Cheng-Hsi

    2014-11-26

    In this study, we demonstrated that the improvement of detection capability of cadmium sulfide (CdS) photoconductors in the ultraviolet (UV) regime is much larger than that in the visible regime, suggesting that the deep UV laser-treated CdS devices are very suitable for low-light detection in the UV regime. We determined that a nanocrystallized CdS photoconductor can behave as a picowatt-sensitive detector in the UV regime after ultra-shallow-region crystallization of the CdS film upon a single shot from a KrF laser. Photoluminescence and Raman spectra revealed that laser treatment increased the degree of crystallization of the CdS and led to the effective removal of defects in the region of a few tens nanometers beneath the surface of CdS, confirming the result by the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. Optical simulations suggested that UV light was almost completely absorbed in the shallow region beneath the surface of the CdS films, consistent with the observed region that underwent major crystal structure transformation. Accordingly, we noted a dramatic enhancement in responsivity of the CdS devices in the UV regime. Under a low bias voltage (1 mV), the treated CdS device provided a high responsivity of 74.7 A W(-1) and a detectivity of 1.0×10(14) Jones under illumination with a power density of 1.9 nW cm(-2). Even when the power of the UV irradiation on the device was only 3.5 pW, the device exhibited extremely high responsivity (7.3×10(5) A W(-1)) and detectivity (3.5×10(16) Jones) under a bias voltage of 1 V. Therefore, the strategy proposed in this study appears to have great potential for application in the development of CdS photoconductors for picowatt-level detection of UV light with low power consumption.

  8. Can we detect, monitor, and characterize volcanic activity using 'off the shelf' webcams and low-light cameras?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrild, M.; Webley, P. W.; Dehn, J.

    2015-12-01

    The ability to detect and monitor precursory events, thermal signatures, and ongoing volcanic activity in near-realtime is an invaluable tool. Volcanic hazards often range from low level lava effusion to large explosive eruptions, easily capable of ejecting ash to aircraft cruise altitudes. Using ground based remote sensing to detect and monitor this activity is essential, but the required equipment is often expensive and difficult to maintain, which increases the risk to public safety and the likelihood of financial impact. Our investigation explores the use of 'off the shelf' cameras, ranging from computer webcams to low-light security cameras, to monitor volcanic incandescent activity in near-realtime. These cameras are ideal as they operate in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) portions of the electromagnetic spectrum, are relatively cheap to purchase, consume little power, are easily replaced, and can provide telemetered, near-realtime data. We focus on the early detection of volcanic activity, using automated scripts that capture streaming online webcam imagery and evaluate each image according to pixel brightness, in order to automatically detect and identify increases in potentially hazardous activity. The cameras used here range in price from 0 to 1,000 and the script is written in Python, an open source programming language, to reduce the overall cost to potential users and increase the accessibility of these tools, particularly in developing nations. In addition, by performing laboratory tests to determine the spectral response of these cameras, a direct comparison of collocated low-light and thermal infrared cameras has allowed approximate eruption temperatures to be correlated to pixel brightness. Data collected from several volcanoes; (1) Stromboli, Italy (2) Shiveluch, Russia (3) Fuego, Guatemala (4) Popcatépetl, México, along with campaign data from Stromboli (June, 2013), and laboratory tests are presented here.

  9. Colour detection thresholds as a function of chromatic adaptation and light level.

    PubMed

    Jennings, B J; Barbur, J L

    2010-09-01

    Colour threshold discrimination ellipses were measured for a number of states of chromatic adaptation and a range of luminance levels using the Colour Assessment and Diagnosis (CAD) test. An analysis of these results was carried out by examining the cone excitation signals along the cardinal axes that correspond to detection thresholds in the +L-M (reddish), -L+M (greenish), +S (bluish) and -S (yellowish) colour directions. The results reveal a strong linear relationship between the excitations induced by the adapting background field in each cone class and the corresponding changes needed for threshold detection. These findings suggest that the cone excitation change for threshold detection of colour signals is always the same for a given background excitation level (in any cone class), independent of the excitations generated in the other cone classes. These observations have been used to develop a model to predict colour detection thresholds for any specified background luminance and chromaticity within the range of values investigated in this study (e.g., luminances in the range 0.3 to 31 cd.m(-2) and chromaticities within the gamut of typical CRT displays). Predicted colour thresholds were found to be in close agreement with measured values with errors that do not, in general, exceed the measured within-subject variability.

  10. Noise and spurious pulses for Cherenkov light detection with 10-inch and 3-inch photomultipliers

    SciTech Connect

    Giordano, V.; Aiello, S.; Leonora, E. E-mail: Valentina.Giordano@ct.infn.it; Collaboration: KM3NeT Collaboration

    2014-11-18

    A large number of large photocathode area photomultipliers are widely used in astroparticle physics detectors to measure Cherenkov light in media like water or ice. In neutrino telescopes the key element of the detector is the optical module, which consists of one or more photodetectors inside a transparent pressure-resistant glass sphere. The glass sphere serves as mechanical protection while ensuring good light transmission. The performance of the telescope is largely dependent on the presence of noise pulses present on the anode of the photomultipliers. A study was conducted of noise pulses of Hamamatsu 10-inch and 3-inch diameter photomultipliers measuring time and charge distributions of dark pulses, pre-pulses, delayed pulses, and after-pulses. In particular, an analysis on multiple after-pulses was performed on both photomultiplier models. A digital oscilloscope was used to acquire all the pulses after the main pulse during a time window of 16μs for an off-line analysis to determine the charge and time spectra and a correlation between the arrival times and the charge of each after-pulse.

  11. Energy resolution and efficiency of phonon-mediated kinetic inductance detectors for light detection

    SciTech Connect

    Cardani, L.; Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A.; Cruciani, A.; Vignati, M.; Bellini, F.; Casali, N.; Cosmelli, C.; Di Domizio, S.; Castellano, M. G.; Tomei, C.

    2015-08-31

    The development of sensitive cryogenic light detectors is of primary interest for bolometric experiments searching for rare events like dark matter interactions or neutrino-less double beta decay. Thanks to their good energy resolution and the natural multiplexed read-out, Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs) are particularly suitable for this purpose. To efficiently couple KIDs-based light detectors to the large crystals used by the most advanced bolometric detectors, active surfaces of several cm{sup 2} are needed. For this reason, we are developing phonon-mediated detectors. In this paper, we present the results obtained with a prototype consisting of four 40 nm thick aluminum resonators patterned on a 2 × 2 cm{sup 2} silicon chip, and calibrated with optical pulses and X-rays. The detector features a noise resolution σ{sub E} = 154 ± 7 eV and an (18 ± 2)% efficiency.

  12. Validity of Particle-Counting Method Using Laser-Light Scattering for Detecting Platelet Aggregation in Diabetic Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakadate, Hiromichi; Sekizuka, Eiichi; Minamitani, Haruyuki

    We aimed to study the validity of a new analytical approach that reflected the phase from platelet activation to the formation of small platelet aggregates. We hoped that this new approach would enable us to use the particle-counting method with laser-light scattering to measure platelet aggregation in healthy controls and in diabetic patients without complications. We measured agonist-induced platelet aggregation for 10 min. Agonist was added to the platelet-rich plasma 1 min after measurement started. We compared the total scattered light intensity from small aggregates over a 10-min period (established analytical approach) and that over a 2-min period from 1 to 3 min after measurement started (new analytical approach). Consequently platelet aggregation in diabetics with HbA1c ≥ 6.5% was significantly greater than in healthy controls by both analytical approaches. However, platelet aggregation in diabetics with HbA1c < 6.5%, i.e. patients in the early stages of diabetes, was significantly greater than in healthy controls only by the new analytical approach, not by the established analytical approach. These results suggest that platelet aggregation as detected by the particle-counting method using laser-light scattering could be applied in clinical examinations by our new analytical approach.

  13. Acoustic emission and guided ultrasonic waves for detection and continuous monitoring of cracks in light water reactor components

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, R. M.; Coble, J.; Ramuhalli, P.; Watson, B.; Cumblidge, S. E.; Doctor, S. R.; Bond, L. J.

    2012-07-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) and guided ultrasonic waves (GUW) are considered for continuous monitoring and detection of cracks in Light Water Reactor (LWR) components. In this effort, both techniques are applied to the detection and monitoring of fatigue crack growth in a full scale pipe component. AE results indicated crack initiation and rapid growth in the pipe, and significant GUW responses were observed in response to the growth of the fatigue crack. After initiation, the crack growth was detectable with AE for approximately 20,000 cycles. Signals associated with initiation and rapid growth were distinguished based on total rate of activity and differences observed in the centroid frequency of hits. An intermediate stage between initiation and rapid growth was associated with significant energy emissions, though few hits. GUW exhibit a nearly monotonic trend with crack length with an exception of measurements obtained at crack lengths of 41 mm and 46 mm. Coupling variability and shadowing by the electro-discharge machining (EDM) starter notch set the lower limit of detectability. (authors)

  14. [Determination of amygdalin content in Semen Armeniacae Amarum by high-performance liquid chromatography with evaporative light-scattering detection].

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhao-hui; You, Wen-wei; He, Feng

    2005-12-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography with evaporative light-scattering detection (HPLC-ELSD) was employed for determination of amygdalin content in Semen Armeniacae Amarum. The detection was performed with the column of Hypersil-ODS (4.6 mm x 250 mm, 5 microm) and column temperature of 25 degrees C. The mobile phase was methanol-water (70:30) with flow rate of 0.5 ml/min. Evaporative light-scattering detector was used and the drift tube temperature was set at 98 degrees Celsius with the gas flow rate of 3.2 L/min. A standard curve was generated, which was linear in the range of 1.0-15.1 microg for amygdalin content (r=0.999 9). The average recovery of amygdalin was 99.0% with RSD of 2.9% (n=5). Besides simplicity and rapidness, the method yields accurate and reproducible results and can therefore be used in the quality control of Semen Armeniacae Amarum.

  15. A resonance light scattering sensor based on bioinspired molecularly imprinted polymers for selective detection of papain at trace levels.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Lv, Sifang; Chen, Feng; Liu, Chan; Cai, Changqun; Chen, Chunyan; Chen, Xiaoming

    2016-03-17

    A novel resonance light scattering sensor based on the molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) technique was developed for specific recognition of the trace quantities of papain (Pap). In this sensor, as the specific recognition element, an excellent biocompatibility of protein-imprinted polymer without fluorescent materials was easily prepared, which based on the effective synthesis of mussel-inspired bionic polydopamine (PDA) on the surface of SiO2 nanoparticles (SiO2@PDA NPs). This recognition element could capture the target protein selectively, which led to the enhancement of resonance light scattering intensity with the increasing of the target protein concentration. The sensor was applied to determine Pap in the linear concentration range of 2.0-20.0 nM with a correlation coefficient r = 0.9966, and a low detection limit of 0.63 nM. The relative standard deviation for 14 nM of Pap was 1.02% (n = 7). In addition, the specificity study confirmed the resultant Pap-imprinted SiO2@PDA NPs had a high-selectivity to Pap, and the practical analytical performance was further examined by evaluating the detection of Pap in the dietary supplement with satisfactory results, with good recoveries of 97.5-105.3%.

  16. Nanoantenna harmonic sensor: theoretical analysis of contactless detection of molecules with light.

    PubMed

    Farhat, Mohamed; Cheng, Mark M C; Le, Khai Q; Chen, Pai-Yen

    2015-10-16

    The nonlinear harmonic sensor is a popular wireless sensor and radiofrequency identification (RFID) technique, which allows high-performance sensing in a severe interference/clutter background by transmitting a radio wave and detecting its modulated higher-order harmonics. Here we introduce the concept and design of optical harmonic tags based on nonlinear nanoantennas that can contactlessly detect electronic (e.g. electron affinity) and optical (e.g. relative permittivity) characteristics of molecules. By using a dual-resonance gold-molecule-silver nanodipole antenna within the quantum mechanical realm, the spectral form of the second-harmonic scattering can sensitively reveal the physical properties of molecules, paving a new route towards optical molecular sensors and optical identification (OPID) of biological, genetic, and medical events for the 'Internet of Nano-Things'.

  17. Nanoantenna harmonic sensor: theoretical analysis of contactless detection of molecules with light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Mohamed; Cheng, Mark M. C.; Le, Khai Q.; Chen, Pai-Yen

    2015-10-01

    The nonlinear harmonic sensor is a popular wireless sensor and radiofrequency identification (RFID) technique, which allows high-performance sensing in a severe interference/clutter background by transmitting a radio wave and detecting its modulated higher-order harmonics. Here we introduce the concept and design of optical harmonic tags based on nonlinear nanoantennas that can contactlessly detect electronic (e.g. electron affinity) and optical (e.g. relative permittivity) characteristics of molecules. By using a dual-resonance gold-molecule-silver nanodipole antenna within the quantum mechanical realm, the spectral form of the second-harmonic scattering can sensitively reveal the physical properties of molecules, paving a new route towards optical molecular sensors and optical identification (OPID) of biological, genetic, and medical events for the ‘Internet of Nano-Things’.

  18. Final LDRD report : development of advanced UV light emitters and biological agent detection strategies.

    SciTech Connect

    Figiel, Jeffrey James; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Banas, Michael Anthony; Farrow, Darcie; Armstrong, Andrew M.; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Schmitt, Randal L.

    2007-12-01

    We present the results of a three year LDRD project which has focused on the development of novel, compact, ultraviolet solid-state sources and fluorescence-based sensing platforms that apply such devices to the sensing of biological and nuclear materials. We describe our development of 270-280 nm AlGaN-based semiconductor UV LEDs with performance suitable for evaluation in biosensor platforms as well as our development efforts towards the realization of a 340 nm AlGaN-based laser diode technology. We further review our sensor development efforts, including evaluation of the efficacy of using modulated LED excitation and phase sensitive detection techniques for fluorescence detection of bio molecules and uranyl-containing compounds.

  19. A General Purpose Feature Extractor for Light Detection and Ranging Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-17

    Similarly, the family of stochastic gradient descent (SGD) algorithms [15,16] and Gauss - Seidel relaxation [17,18] have runtimes that are directly...proposed method . The observation positions are indicated by the black triangle. Grey ellipses indicate 3δ uncertainties and numbers and letters are index of...detector for both 2D and 3D LIDAR data that is applicable to virtually any environment. Our method adapts classic feature detection methods from the image

  20. Detection of Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Light by a Photoacoustic Detector

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    1 Optoacoustic Spectroscopy and Detection, Ed. Y.H. Pao, Academic Press, N.Y., N.Y., p.25 (1977). 2 M.G. Rockley, Applied Spectroscopy , 34, 405 (1980...combustion of hexane in an open flame3 . 3 M.S. Akhter, A.R. Chugtai, and D.M. Smith, Applied Spectroscopy , 39, 143 (1985). 9 It was estimated that 80% of

  1. Studies on the propagnation of light from a light-emitting diode through a glass tube and development of an opto-sensor for the continuous detection of liquid level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manik, Nabinbaran; Mukherjee, S. C.; Basu, A. N.

    2001-12-01

    The authors develop a new technique for continuous measurement of liquid level by an optosensor. The objectives are (i) to study the propagation of light from a light- emitting diode (LED) through a glass tube and (ii) based on this principle, to develop a continuous liquid level sensor. The attenuation of light from an LED through a glass tube with distance has been investigated and an empirical relation for it has been established. The result is applied to the detection of water level. The sensor comprises a hollow glass tube with a combined LED-photodetector assembly (the optosensor) and a light reflector inside the tube. The reflector floats on the liquid surface, and light emitted from the LED is detected after reflection from it. The detected light intensity varies with the distance between the optosensor and the reflector. The position of the float changes with the variation of the liquid level. The present level sensor can detect a change of liquid level at distances up to 80 cm with an accuracy of the order of 0.5 mm.

  2. The Cosmic Microwave Background: Detection and Interpretation of the First Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    A host of astrophysical observations suggest the early Universe was incredibly hot, dense, and homogeneous. A powerful and useful probe of this epoch is provided by the relic radiation, which we refer to today as the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). Precision maps of this light contain the earliest glimpse of the Universe after the Big Bang and signatures of the evolution of its contents. By exploiting these clues, constraints on the age, mass density, detailed composition, and geometry of the Universe can be made. A brief survey of the evolution of the radiometric and polarimetric imaging systems used in advancing our understanding of the early Universe will be reviewed. A survey of detector technologies, instrumentation techniques, and experimental challenges encountered in these efforts will be presented.

  3. Efficiency of integrated waveguide probes for the detection of light backscattered from weakly scattering media.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Nur; Civitci, Fehmi; Wörhoff, Kerstin; de Ridder, René M; Pollnau, Markus; Driessen, Alfred

    2011-02-20

    A semianalytical model for light collection by integrated waveguide probes is developed by extending previous models used to describe fiber probes. The efficiency of waveguide probes is compared to that of different types of fiber probes for different thicknesses of a weakly scattering sample. The simulation results show that integrated probes have a collection efficiency that is higher than that of small-core fiber probes, and, in the particular case of thin samples, also exceeds the collection efficiency of large-core highly multimode fiber probes. An integrated waveguide probe with one excitation and eight collector waveguides is fabricated and applied to excite and collect luminescence from a ruby rod. The experimental results are in good agreement with the simulation and validate the semianalytical model.

  4. Light-matter decoupling and A2 term detection in superconducting circuits

    PubMed Central

    García-Ripoll, J. J.; Peropadre, B.; De Liberato, S.

    2015-01-01

    The spontaneous and stimulated emission of a superconducting qubit in the presence of propagating microwaves originates from an effective light-matter interaction that, similarly to the case of the atomic case, can contain a diamagnetic term proportional to the square vector potential A2. In the present work we prove that an increase in the strength of the diamagnetic term leads to an effective decoupling of the qubit from the electromagnetic field, and that this effect is observable at any range of qubit-photon coupling. To measure this effect we propose to use a transmon suspended over a transmission line, where the relative strength of the A2 term is controlled by the qubit-line separation. We show that the spontaneous emission rate of the suspended transmon onto the line can, at short distances, increase with such a separation, instead of decreasing. PMID:26530139

  5. Light-emission-based biosensor for detection of food pathogens: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ashutosh; Singh, Rakesh K.; Bhunia, Arun K.

    2001-03-01

    Rapid detection, identification and enumeration of pathogenic microorganisms is highly important to the food industry to address the food safety concerns. Biosensors are devices that promise to achieve these objectives, these analytical devices can accurately and selectively estimate the levels of foodborne pathogens. The most widely applied biosensors are based on the optical properties like absorption, fluorescence, reflection, refraction, dispersion etc. This review is done to provide an overview of optic based biosensor and their application in the area of food safety. Working principles of Surface plasmon resonance , resonant mirror and fiber optic based biosensor are described in the article. Resonant mirror based biosensor has been used for the estimation of S. aureus, it was proven selective for the strain being tested (Cowan-1). The sensitivity of the assay was increased by using colloidal-gold conjugates in sandwich assay format. An integrated fiber optic based biosensor is used for detection of Salmonella typhimurium reducing the detection time to 30 min. Fiber optic based biosensors offer advantage of compactness, flexibility , resistance to electrical noise and small probe size.

  6. Light emitting diode, photodiode-based fluorescence detection system for DNA analysis with microchip electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Hall, Gordon H; Glerum, D Moira; Backhouse, Christopher J

    2016-02-01

    Electrophoretic separation of fluorescently end-labeled DNA after a PCR serves as a gold standard in genetic diagnostics. Because of their size and cost, instruments for this type of analysis have had limited market uptake, particularly for point-of-care applications. This might be changed through a higher level of system integration and lower instrument costs that can be realized through the use of LEDs for excitation and photodiodes for detection--if they provide sufficient sensitivity. Here, we demonstrate an optimized microchip electrophoresis instrument using polymeric fluidic chips with fluorescence detection of end-labeled DNA with a LOD of 0.15 nM of Alexa Fluor 532. This represents orders of magnitude improvement over previously reported instruments of this type. We demonstrate the system with an electrophoretic separation of two PCR products and their respective primers. We believe that this is the first LED-induced fluorescence microchip electrophoresis system with photodiode-based detection that could be used for standard applications of PCR and electrophoresis.

  7. Pulsed lasers versus continuous light sources in capillary electrophoresis and fluorescence detection studies: Photodegradation pathways and models.

    PubMed

    Boutonnet, Audrey; Morin, Arnaud; Petit, Pierre; Vicendo, Patricia; Poinsot, Véréna; Couderc, François

    2016-03-17

    Pulsed lasers are widely used in capillary electrophoresis (CE) studies to provide laser induced fluorescence (LIF) detection. Unfortunately pulsed lasers do not give linear calibration curves over a wide range of concentrations. While this does not prevent their use in CE/LIF studies, the non-linear behavior must be understood. Using 7-hydroxycoumarin (7-HC) (10-5000 nM), Tamra (10-5000 nM) and tryptophan (1-200 μM) as dyes, we observe that continuous lasers and LEDs result in linear calibration curves, while pulsed lasers give polynomial ones. The effect is seen with both visible light (530 nm) and with UV light (355 nm, 266 nm). In this work we point out the formation of byproducts induced by pulsed laser upon irradiation of 7-HC. Their separation by CE using two Zeta LIF detectors clearly shows that this process is related to the first laser detection. All of these photodegradation products can be identified by an ESI-/MS investigation and correspond to at least two 7HC dimers. By using the photodegradation model proposed by Heywood and Farnsworth (2010) and by taking into account the 7-HC results and the fact that in our system we do not have a constant concentration of fluorophore, it is possible to propose a new photochemical model of fluorescence in LIF detection. The model, like the experiment, shows that it is difficult to obtain linear quantitation curves with pulsed lasers while UV-LEDs used in continuous mode have this advantage. They are a good alternative to UV pulsed lasers. An application involving the separation and linear quantification of oligosaccharides labeled with 2-aminobezoic acid is presented using HILIC and LED (365 nm) induced fluorescence.

  8. Light triggered detection of aminophenyl phosphate with a quantum dot based enzyme electrode

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    An electrochemical sensor for p-aminophenyl phosphate (pAPP) is reported. It is based on the electrochemical conversion of 4-aminophenol (4AP) at a quantum dot (QD) modified electrode under illumination. Without illumination no electron transfer and thus no oxidation of 4AP can occur. pAPP as substrate is converted by the enzyme alkaline phosphatase (ALP) to generate 4AP as a product. The QDs are coupled via 1,4-benzenedithiol (BDT) linkage to the surface of a gold electrode and thus allow potential-controlled photocurrent generation. The photocurrent is modified by the enzyme reaction providing access to the substrate detection. In order to develop a photobioelectrochemical sensor the enzyme is immobilized on top of the photo-switchable layer of the QDs. Immobilization of ALP is required for the potential possibility of spatially resolved measurements. Geometries with immobilized ALP are compared versus having the ALP in solution. Data indicate that functional immobilization with layer-by-layer assembly is possible. Enzymatic activity of ALP and thus the photocurrent can be described by Michaelis- Menten kinetics. pAPP is detected as proof of principle investigation within the range of 25 μM - 1 mM. PMID:21982200

  9. Detecting the Attenuation of Blazar Gamma-ray Emission by Extragalactic Background Light with GLAST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Andrew; Ritz, Steven

    1999-01-01

    Gamma rays with energy above 10 GeV interact with optical-UV photons resulting in pair production. Therefore, a large sample of high redshift sources of these gamma rays can be used to probe the extragalactic background starlight (EBL) by examining the redshift dependence of the attenuation of the flux above 10 GeV. GLAST, the next generation high-energy gamma-ray telescope, will for the first time have the unique capability to detect thousands of gamma-ray blazars up to redshifts of at least z = 4, with enough angular resolution to allow identification of a large fraction of their optical counterparts. By combining recent determinations of the gamma-ray blazar luminosity function, recent calculations of the high energy gamma-ray opacity due to EBL absorption, and the expected GLAST instrument performance to produce simulated samples of blazars that GLAST would detect, including their redshifts and fluxes, we demonstrate that these blazars have the potential to be a highly effective probe of the EBL.

  10. Construction and evaluation of an automated light directed protein-detecting microarray synthesizer.

    PubMed

    Marthandan, N; Klyza, S; Li, S; Kwon, Y U; Kodadek, T; Garner, H R

    2008-03-01

    We have designed, constructed, and evaluated an automated instrument that has produced high-density arrays with more than 30 000 peptide features within a 1.5 cm(2) area of a glass slide surface. These arrays can be used for high throughput library screening for protein binding ligands, for potential drug candidate molecules, or for discovering biomarkers. The device consists of a novel fluidics system, a relay control electrical system, an optics system that implements Texas Instruments' digital micromirror device (DMD), and a microwave source for accelerated synthesis of peptide arrays. The instrument implements two novel solid phase chemical synthesis strategies for producing peptide and peptoid arrays. Biotin-streptavidin and DNP anti-DNP (dinitrophenol) models of antibody small molecule interactions were used to demonstrate and evaluate the instrument's capability to produce high-density protein detecting arrays. Several screening assay and detection schemes were explored with various levels of efficiency and assays with sensitivity of 10 nM were also possible.

  11. Monte Carlo modeling (MCML) of light propagation in skin layers for detection of fat thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilubol, Chonnipa; Treerattrakoon, Kiatnida; Mohammed, Waleed S.

    2010-05-01

    Nowadays, most activities require lesser physical actions, which could ultimately lead to accumulation of excessive body fat. The main roles of body fat are to store energy and acts as various kinds of insulators for the body. The thickness of fat layers can be measured to indicate fat-body weight ratio. Exceeding the body-mass index (BMI) could lead to many illnesses regarding obesity. Consequently, many studies have proposed various principles and techniques to measure the amount of fat within one's body. In this paper, infrared interactance in skin layers is studied for investigation of the influence of fat thickness upon photon travelling pattern in skin tissues using Monte Carlo model (MCML). Photon propagation is numerically simulated in simplified multi-layered tissues. The optical coefficients of each skin layers are accounted for different traveling paths of photons that move through random motion. The thickness of fat layer is varied, and changing in optical parameters is observed. Then the statistically obtained data are computed and analyzed for the effect of the fat layer upon reflection percentage using different wavelengths. The calculations have shown increment in the slope of change of reflection percentage versus fat thickness, when using infrared compare to visible light. This technique can be used to construct a mobile device that is capable of measuring the volume fraction of melanin and blood in the epidermis layer and dermis layer, to calculate for the necessary optical coefficients that would be necessary for measurement of fat thickness.

  12. Integrated fluorescence detection of labeled biomolecules using a prism-like PDMS microfluidic chip and lateral light excitation.

    PubMed

    Novo, Pedro; Chu, Virginia; Conde, João Pedro

    2014-06-21

    Microfabricated amorphous silicon photodiodes were integrated with prism-like PDMS microfluidics for the detection and quantification of fluorescence signals. The PDMS device was fabricated with optical quality surfaces and beveled sides. A 405 nm laser beam perpendicular to the lateral sides of the microfluidic device excites the fluorophores in the microchannel at an angle of 70° to the normal to the microchannel/photodiode surface. This configuration, which makes use of the total internal reflection of the excitation beam and the isotropy of the fluorescence emission, minimizes the intensity of excitation light that reaches the integrated photodetector. A difference of two orders of magnitude was achieved in the reduction of the detection noise level as compared with a normally incident excitation configuration. A limit-of-detection of 5.6 × 10(10) antibodies per square centimeter was achieved using antibodies labeled with a model organic fluorophore. Furthermore, the results using the lateral excitation scheme are in good proportionality agreement with those by fluorescence quantification using wide-field fluorescence microscopy.

  13. Detection range enhancement using circularly polarized light in scattering environments for infrared wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    van der Laan, J. D.; Scrymgeour, D. A.; Kemme, S. A.; Dereniak, E. L.

    2015-03-13

    We find for infrared wavelengths there are broad ranges of particle sizes and refractive indices that represent fog and rain where the use of circular polarization can persist to longer ranges than linear polarization. Using polarization tracking Monte Carlo simulations for varying particle size, wavelength, and refractive index, we show that for specific scene parameters circular polarization outperforms linear polarization in maintaining the intended polarization state for large optical depths. This enhancement with circular polarization can be exploited to improve range and target detection in obscurant environments that are important in many critical sensing applications. Specifically, circular polarization persists better than linear for radiation fog in the short-wave infrared, for advection fog in the short-wave infrared and the long-wave infrared, and large particle sizes of Sahara dust around the 4 micron wavelength.

  14. Detection range enhancement using circularly polarized light in scattering environments for infrared wavelengths

    DOE PAGES

    van der Laan, J. D.; Sandia National Lab.; Scrymgeour, D. A.; ...

    2015-03-13

    We find for infrared wavelengths there are broad ranges of particle sizes and refractive indices that represent fog and rain where the use of circular polarization can persist to longer ranges than linear polarization. Using polarization tracking Monte Carlo simulations for varying particle size, wavelength, and refractive index, we show that for specific scene parameters circular polarization outperforms linear polarization in maintaining the intended polarization state for large optical depths. This enhancement with circular polarization can be exploited to improve range and target detection in obscurant environments that are important in many critical sensing applications. Specifically, circular polarization persists bettermore » than linear for radiation fog in the short-wave infrared, for advection fog in the short-wave infrared and the long-wave infrared, and large particle sizes of Sahara dust around the 4 micron wavelength.« less

  15. A new approach for detection and analysis of urinary proteins: dynamic light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shaoxin; Xing, Da; Tan, Shichi

    2004-07-01

    Using a modified dynamic light scattering (DLS) apparatus we had measured and analyzed the Human Serum Albumin (HSA), a main composition of human urinary proteins when people suffer from nephropathy. The HSA radius had been examined by measuring diffusion coefficient of HSA for different concentrations and pH values. The designed and established experimental setup for DLS consists of a high-stability Ti:Sapphire ring laser, a single photon counting module with a high-sensitive avalanche tube and a gradient-index lens coupled single-mode fiber at 90° geometry for collecting scattering photons. The results of diffusion coefficient of HSA at different concentrations and pH values indicated that, the first, Coulomb interaction between the charged proteins acted as a main contribution to the diffusion coefficient; the second, at the isoelectric point (pH 5.2) the Coulomb effect vanished and the diffusion coefficient of protein reached its minimum. At the isoelectric point the diffusion coefficient linearly decreased with the escalation of the protein concentration. The main reason was that, the Coulomb interactions among the proteins become decrease; and the attractive potential increased relatively. Within the concentration range of 5 mg/ml-40mg/ml, and at wavelength of 532 nm, it was found mutual diffusion coefficient Dm = D0[1-(0.00194 +/- 0.00008)C], where D0 = (6.74 +/- 0.01)x10-7 cm2/s extrapolated to zero concentration at 23°C and C is in units of mg/ml. The measured radius of HSA is 3.44 +/- 0.01 nm. Furthermore, with a multi-particle analysis cord, we can examine the dimension and content of different species proteins in urinary solution. This technique may potentially provide a new means for early diagnosis of nephropathy.

  16. Asymmetric flow field flow fractionation with light scattering detection - an orthogonal sensitivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Galyean, Anne A; Filliben, James J; Holbrook, R David; Vreeland, Wyatt N; Weinberg, Howard S

    2016-11-18

    Asymmetric flow field flow fractionation (AF(4)) has several instrumental factors that may have a direct effect on separation performance. A sensitivity analysis was applied to ascertain the relative importance of AF(4) primary instrument factor settings for the separation of a complex environmental sample. The analysis evaluated the impact of instrumental factors namely, cross flow, ramp time, focus flow, injection volume, and run buffer concentration on the multi-angle light scattering measurement of natural organic matter (NOM) molar mass (MM). A 2((5-1)) orthogonal fractional factorial design was used to minimize analysis time while preserving the accuracy and robustness in the determination of the main effects and interactions between any two instrumental factors. By assuming that separations resulting in smaller MM measurements would be more accurate, the analysis produced a ranked list of effects estimates for factors and interactions of factors based on their relative importance in minimizing the MM. The most important and statistically significant AF(4) instrumental factors were buffer concentration and cross flow. The least important was ramp time. A parallel 2((5-2)) orthogonal fractional factorial design was also employed on five environmental factors for synthetic natural water samples containing silver nanoparticles (NPs), namely: NP concentration, NP size, NOM concentration, specific conductance, and pH. None of the water quality characteristic effects or interactions were found to be significant in minimizing the measured MM; however, the interaction between NP concentration and NP size was an important effect when considering NOM recovery. This work presents a structured approach for the rigorous assessment of AF(4) instrument factors and optimal settings for the separation of complex samples utilizing efficient orthogonal factional factorial design and appropriate graphical analysis.

  17. An AOTF-LDTOF Spectrometer Suite for In Situ Organic Detection and Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanover, N.; Glenar, D. A.; Voelz, D.; Xiao, X.; Tawalbeh, R.; Boston, P.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Getty, S.

    2009-12-01

    We discuss the development of a miniature near-infrared point spectrometer, operating in the 2-4 micron region, based on acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) technology. This instrument may be used to screen and corroborate analyses of samples containing organic biomarkers or mineralogical signatures suggestive of extant or extinct organic material collected in situ from planetary surfaces. AOTF technology has the potential to enable significant near-IR spectroscopic diagnostic capability without exceeding the resources of a small surface laboratory. An optically bright, broadband emitter and AOTF combination is used as a tunable narrowband light source, the light from which is guided to a small (~0.04 cm^2) sample area using large (600 micron) diameter infrared fibers. AOTFs have been demonstrated to be rugged and radiation-hard devices, but their principal advantage is rapid wavelength change and the ability to sample at arbitrarily chosen wavelengths, which maximizes information content. Spectrum acquisition is performed using a sensitive point detector. Samples with evidence of organics or other species of astrobiological interest may be further analyzed using a co-focused time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS), using laser desorption (LD) to sample and ionize complex molecules directly from the sample surface. The combined instrument geometry allows the LDTOF to quickly verify and identify any reduced organics detected in the rapid AOTF survey of the identical sample. The combination of an AOTF IR point spectrometer with LDTOF thus provides a very practical and efficient astrobiology investigation that is compact and rugged enough for a lander platform targeted for Mars, an asteroid, or icy moons of the outer solar system. This work is supported by NASA's ASTID and EPSCoR programs through grant numbers NNX08AY44G and NNX08AV85A, respectively.

  18. Dense surface reconstruction based on the fusion of monocular vision and three-dimensional flash light detection and ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Gangtao; Du, Xiaoping; Zhao, Jiguang; Chen, Hang; Song, Jianjun; Song, Yishuo

    2015-07-01

    A dense surface reconstruction approach based on the fusion of monocular vision and three-dimensional (3-D) flash light detection and ranging (LIDAR) is proposed. The texture and geometry information can be obtained simultaneously and quickly for stationary or moving targets with the proposed method. Primarily, our 2-D/3-D fusion imaging system including cameras calibration and an intensity-range image registration algorithm is designed. Subsequently, the adaptive block intensity-range Markov random field (MRF) with optimizing weights is presented to improve the sparse range data from 3-D flash LIDAR. Then the energy function is minimized quickly by conjugate gradient algorithm for each neighborhood system instead of the whole MRF. Finally, the experiments with standard depth datasets and real 2-D/3-D images demonstrate the validity and capability of the proposed scheme.

  19. Visual and light scattering spectrometric method for the detection of melamine using uracil 5'-triphosphate sodium modified gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liang, Lijiao; Zhen, Shujun; Huang, Chengzhi

    2017-02-15

    A highly selective method was presented for colorimetric determination of melamine using uracil 5'-triphosphate sodium modified gold nanoparticles (UTP-Au NPs) in this paper. Specific hydrogen-bonding interaction between uracil base (U) and melamine resulted in the aggregation of AuNPs, displaying variations of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) features such as color change from red to blue and enhanced localized surface plasmon resonance light scattering (LSPR-LS) signals. Accordingly, the concentration of melamine could be quantified based on naked eye or a spectrometric method. This method was simple, inexpensive, environmental friendly and highly selective, which has been successfully used for the detection of melamine in pretreated liquid milk products with high recoveries.

  20. Rapid detection and molecular differentiation of toxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae and Corynebacterium ulcerans strains by LightCycler PCR.

    PubMed

    Sing, Andreas; Berger, Anja; Schneider-Brachert, Wulf; Holzmann, Thomas; Reischl, Udo

    2011-07-01

    The systemic symptoms of diphtheria are caused by the tox-encoded diphtheria toxin (DT) which is produced by toxigenic Corynebacterium spp. Besides the classical agent C. diphtheriae, the zoonotic pathogen C. ulcerans has increasingly been reported as an emerging pathogen for diphtheria. The reliable detection of toxigenic Corynebacterium spp. is of substantial importance for both diphtheria surveillance in the public health sector and the clinical workup of a patient with diphtherialike symptoms. Since the respective tox genes of C. diphtheriae and C. ulcerans differ from each other in both DNA and amino acid sequence, both tox genes should be covered by novel real-time PCR methods. We describe the development and validation of a LightCycler PCR assay which reliably recognizes tox genes from both C. diphtheriae and C. ulcerans and differentiates the respective target genes by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) hybridization probe melting curve analysis.

  1. CO2 gas detection properties of a TIO2/Al2O3 heterostructure under UV light irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaduman, Irmak; Demir, Mehmet; Yıldız, Dilber Esra; Acar, Selim

    2015-05-01

    Al/TiO2/p-Si and Al/TİO2/Al2O3/p-Si samples were prepared using the atomic layer deposition method (ALD) and their gas sensing properties were investigated. The electrical properties of the samples were studied using a two probe method in the temperature range 25-230 °C and at room temperature UV conditions. The TiO2/Al2O3 heterojunction sample exhibited an excellent gas sensing response to CO2 gas at room temperature and improved the effect of UV light irradiation. The results showed that heterostructures helped to improve the gas sensor properties, affected the sensing at room temperature and thus guided the design of photocatalysts. The TiO2/Al2O3 heterojunction prepared using this method can be used as a material for semiconductor gas sensors detecting poisonous gases like CO2 at room temperature with high sensitivity and selectivity.

  2. Modeling and simulation of a 3D-CMOS silicon photodetector for low-intensity light detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabri Alirezaei, Iman; Burte, Edmund P.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a design and simulation of a novel high performance 3D-silicon photodetector for implementing in the low intensity light detection at room temperature (300K). The photodetector is modeled by inspiration of general MEMS fabrication to make a 3D- structure in the silicon substrate using a bulk micromachining process, and based on a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology. The design includes a vertical n+/p junction as an optical window for lateral illumination. The simulation is carried out using COMSOL Multiphysics relying on theoretical and physical concepts, and then, the assessment of the results is done by the numerical analysis with SILVACO (Atlas) device simulator. Light is regarded as a monochromatic beam with a wavelength of 633nm that is placed 1μm far from the optical window. The simulation is considered under the reverse bias dc voltage in the steadystate. We present photocurrent-voltage (Iph-V) characteristics under different light intensities (2… 10[mW/cm2]), and dark current-voltage (Id-V) characteristics. Comparative studies of sensitivity dependence on the dopant concentration in the substrate as an intrinsic region are accomplished utilizing two different p-type silicon substrates with 1×1015 [1/cm3] and 4×1012 [1/cm3] doping concentration. Moreover, the sensitivity is evaluated with respect to the active substrate thickness. The simulated results confirmed that the high optical sensitivity of the photodetector with low dark current can be realized in this model.

  3. Dual-wavelength light-scattering technique for selective detection of volcanic ash particles in the presence of water droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurányi, Z.; Burtscher, H.; Loepfe, M.; Nenkov, M.; Weingartner, E.

    2015-12-01

    A new method is presented in this paper which analyses the scattered light of individual aerosol particles simultaneously at two different wavelengths in order to retrieve information on the particle type. We show that dust-like particles, such as volcanic ash, can be unambiguously discriminated from water droplets on a single-particle level. As a future application of this method, the detection of volcanic ash particles should be possible in a humid atmosphere in the presence of cloud droplets. The characteristic behaviour of pure water's refractive index can be used to separate water droplets and dust-like particles which are commonly found in the micrometre size range in the ambient air. The low real part of the water's refractive index around 2700-2800 nm results in low scattered light intensities compared to e.g. the visible wavelength range, and this feature can be used for the desired particle identification. The two-wavelength measurement set-up was theoretically and experimentally tested and studied. Theoretical calculations were done using Mie theory. Comparing the ratio of the scattered light at the two wavelengths (visible-to-IR (infrared), R value) for water droplets and different dust types (basalt, andesite, African mineral dust, sand, volcanic ash, pumice) showed at least 9-times-higher values (on average 70 times) for water droplets than for the dust types at any diameter within the particle size range of 2-20 μm. The envisaged measurement set-up was built up into a laboratory prototype and was tested with different types of aerosols. We generated aerosols from the following powders, simulating dust-like particles: cement dust, ISO 12103-1 A1 Ultrafine Test Dust and ash from the 2012 eruption of the Etna volcano. Our measurements verified the theoretical considerations; the median experimental R value is 8-21 times higher for water than for the "dust" particles.

  4. A New Clinical Instrument for The Early Detection of Cataract Using Dynamic Light Scattering and Corneal Topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Datiles, Manuel B., III; King, James F.

    2000-01-01

    A growing cataract can be detected at the molecular level using the technique of dynamic light scattering (DLS). However, the success of this method in clinical use depends upon the precise control of the scattering volume inside a patient's eye and especially during patient's repeat visits. This is important because the scattering volume (cross-over region between the scattered fight and incident light) inside the eye in a high-quality DLS set-up is very small (few microns in dimension). This precise control holds the key for success in the longitudinal studies of cataract and during anti-cataract drug screening. We have circumvented these problems by fabricating a new DLS fiber optic probe with a working distance of 40 mm and by mounting it inside a cone of a corneal analyzer. This analyzer is frequently used in mapping the corneal topography during PRK (photorefractive keratectomy) and LASIK (laser in situ keratomileusis) procedures in shaping of the cornea to correct myopia. This new instrument and some preliminary clinical tests on one of us (RRA) showing the data reproducibility are described.

  5. A light-emitting diode- (LED-) based absorption sensor for simultaneous detection of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide

    DOE PAGES

    Thurmond, Kyle; Loparo, Zachary; Partridge, Jr., William P.; ...

    2016-04-18

    Here, a sensor was developed for simultaneous measurements of carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO2) fluctuations in internal combustion engine exhaust gases. This sensor utilizes low-cost and compact light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that emit in the 3–5 µm wavelength range. An affordable, fast response sensor that can measure these gases has a broad application that can lead to more efficient, fuel-flexible engines and regulation of harmful emissions. Light emission from LEDs is spectrally broader and more spatially divergent when compared to that of lasers, which presented many design challenges. Optical design studies addressed some of the non-ideal characteristics of themore » LED emissions. Measurements of CO and CO2 were conducted using their fundamental absorption bands centered at 4.7 µm and 4.3 µm, respectively, while a 3.6 µm reference LED was used to account for scattering losses (due to soot, window deposits, etc.) common to the three measurement LEDs. Instrument validation and calibration was performed using a laboratory flow cell and bottled-gas mixtures. The sensor was able to detect CO2 and CO concentration changes as small as 30 ppm and 400 ppm, respectively. Because of the many control and monitor species with infra-red absorption features, which can be measured using the strategy described, this work demonstrates proof of concept for a wider range of fast (250 Hz) and low-cost sensors for gas measurement and process monitoring.« less

  6. Comprehensive approach to breast cancer detection using light: photon localization by ultrasound modulation and tissue characterization by spectral discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Fay A.; Tomlinson, Harold W.; Brooksby, Glen W.

    1993-09-01

    A new technique called Ultrasound Tagging of Light (UTL) for imaging breast tissue is described. In this approach, photon localization in turbid tissue is achieved by cross- modulating a laser beam with focussed, pulsed ultrasound. Light which passes through the ultrasound focal spot is `tagged' with the frequency of the ultrasound pulse. The experimental system uses an Argon-Ion laser, a single PIN photodetector, and a 1 MHz fixed-focus pulsed ultrasound transducer. The utility of UTL as a photon localization technique in scattering media is examined using tissue phantoms consisting of gelatin and intralipid. In a separate study, in vivo optical reflectance spectrophotometry was performed on human breast tumors implanted intramuscularly and subcutaneously in nineteen nude mice. The validity of applying a quadruple wavelength breast cancer discrimination metric (developed using breast biopsy specimens) to the in vivo condition was tested. A scatter diagram for the in vivo model tumors based on this metric is presented using as the `normal' controls the hands and fingers of volunteers. Tumors at different growth stages were studied; these tumors ranged in size from a few millimeters to two centimeters. It is expected that when coupled with a suitable photon localization technique like UTL, spectral discrimination methods like this one will prove useful in the detection of breast cancer by non-ionizing means.

  7. Direct detection of scattered light gaps in the transitional disk around HD 97048 with VLT/SPHERE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginski, C.; Stolker, T.; Pinilla, P.; Dominik, C.; Boccaletti, A.; de Boer, J.; Benisty, M.; Biller, B.; Feldt, M.; Garufi, A.; Keller, C. U.; Kenworthy, M.; Maire, A. L.; Ménard, F.; Mesa, D.; Milli, J.; Min, M.; Pinte, C.; Quanz, S. P.; van Boekel, R.; Bonnefoy, M.; Chauvin, G.; Desidera, S.; Gratton, R.; Girard, J. H. V.; Keppler, M.; Kopytova, T.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Langlois, M.; Rouan, D.; Vigan, A.

    2016-11-01

    Aims: We studied the well-known circumstellar disk around the Herbig Ae/Be star HD 97048 with high angular resolution to reveal undetected structures in the disk which may be indicative of disk evolutionary processes such as planet formation. Methods: We used the IRDIS near-IR subsystem of the extreme adaptive optics imager SPHERE at the ESO/VLT to study the scattered light from the circumstellar disk via high resolution polarimetry and angular differential imaging. Results: We imaged the disk in unprecedented detail and revealed four ring-like brightness enhancements and corresponding gaps in the scattered light from the disk surface with radii between 39 au and 341 au. We derived the inclination and position angle as well as the height of the scattering surface of the disk from our observational data. We found that the surface height profile can be described by a single power law up to a separation 270 au. Using the surface height profile we measured the scattering phase function of the disk and found that it is consistent with theoretical models of compact dust aggregates. We discuss the origin of the detected features and find that low mass (≤1 MJup) nascent planets are a possible explanation. Based on data collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile (ESO Programs 096.C-0248, 096.C-0241, 077.C-0106).

  8. Light and/or atomic beams to detect ultraweak gravitational effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartaglia, Angelo; Belfi, Jacopo; Beverini, Nicolò; Di Virgilio, Angela; Ortolan, Antonello; Porzio, Alberto; Ruggiero, Matteo Luca

    2014-06-01

    We shall review the opportunities lent by ring lasers and atomic beams interferometry in order to reveal gravitomagnetic effects on Earth. Both techniques are based on the asymmetric propagation of waves in the gravitational field of a rotating mass; actually the times of flight for co- or counter-rotating closed paths turn out to be different. After discussing properties and limitations of the two approaches we shall describe the proposed GINGER experiment which is being developed for the Gran Sasso National Laboratories in Italy. The experimental apparatus will consist of a three-dimensional array of square rings, 6m × 6m, that is planned to reach a sensitivity in the order of 1prad/√Hertz or better. This sensitivity would be one order of magnitude better than the best existing ring, which is the G-ring in Wettzell, Bavaria, and would allow for the terrestrial detection of the Lense-Thirring effect and possibly of deviations from General Relativity. The possibility of using either the ring laser approach or atomic interferometry in a space mission will also be considered. The technology problems are under experimental study using both the German G-ring and the smaller G-Pisa ring, located at the Gran Sasso.

  9. Trimodal detection of early childhood caries using laser light scanning and fluorescence spectroscopy: clinical prototype

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Amy S.; Ridge, Jeremy S.; Nelson, Leonard Y.; Berg, Joel H.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. There is currently a need for a safe and effective way to detect and diagnose early stages of childhood caries. A multimodal optical clinical prototype for diagnosing caries demineralization in vivo has been developed. The device can be used to quickly image and screen for any signs of demineralized enamel by obtaining high-resolution and high-contrast surface images using a 405-nm laser as the illumination source, as well as obtaining autofluorescence and bacterial fluorescence images. When a suspicious region of demineralization is located, the device also performs dual laser fluorescence spectroscopy using 405- and 532-nm laser excitation. An autofluorescence ratio of the two excitation lasers is computed and used to quantitatively diagnose enamel health. The device was tested on five patients in vivo as well as on 28 extracted teeth with clinically diagnosed carious lesions. The device was able to provide detailed images that highlighted the lesions identified by the clinicians. The autofluorescence spectroscopic ratios obtained from the extracted teeth successfully quantitatively discriminated between sound and demineralized enamel. PMID:23986369

  10. Age Dating Merger Events in Early Type Galaxies via the Detection of AGB Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bothun, G.

    2005-01-01

    A thorough statistical analysis of the J-H vs. H-K color plane of all detected early type galaxies in the 2MASS catalog with velocities less than 5000 km/s has been performed. This all sky survey is not sensitive to one particular galactic environment and therefore a representative range of early type galaxy environments have been sampled. Virtually all N-body simulation so major mergers produces a central starburst due to rapid collection of gas. This central starburst is of sufficient amplitude to change the stellar population in the central regions of the galaxy. Intermediate age populations are given away by the presence of AGB stars which will drive the central colors redder in H-K relative to the J- H baseline. This color anomaly has a lifetime of 2-5 billion years depending on the amplitude of the initial starburst Employing this technique on the entire 2MASS sample (several hundred galaxies) reveals that the AGB signature occurs less than 1% of the time. This is a straightforward indication that virtually all nearby early type galaxies have not had a major merger occur within the last few billion years.

  11. Detection range enhancement using circularly polarized light in scattering environments for infrared wavelengths.

    PubMed

    van der Laan, J D; Scrymgeour, D A; Kemme, S A; Dereniak, E L

    2015-03-20

    We find for infrared wavelengths that there are broad ranges of particle sizes and refractive indices that represent fog and rain, where circular polarization can persist to longer ranges than linear polarization. Using polarization tracking Monte Carlo simulations for varying particle size, wavelength, and refractive index, we show that, for specific scene parameters, circular polarization outperforms linear polarization in maintaining the illuminating polarization state for large optical depths. This enhancement with circular polarization can be exploited to improve range and target detection in obscurant environments that are important in many critical sensing applications. Initially, researchers employed polarization-discriminating schemes, often using linearly polarized active illumination, to further distinguish target signals from the background noise. More recently, researchers have investigated circular polarization as a means to separate signal from noise even more. Specifically, we quantify both linearly and circularly polarized active illumination and show here that circular polarization persists better than linear for radiation fog in the short-wave infrared, for advection fog in the short-wave and long-wave infrared, and large particle sizes of Sahara dust around the 4 μm wavelength. Conversely, we quantify where linear polarization persists better than circular polarization for some limited particle sizes of radiation fog in the long-wave infrared, small particle sizes of Sahara dust for wavelengths of 9-10.5 μm, and large particle sizes of Sahara dust through the 8-11 μm wavelength range in the long-wave infrared.

  12. Simultaneous light emission and detection of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well diodes for in-plane visible light communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongjin; Xu, Yin; Yang, Yongchao; Gao, Xumin; Zhu, Bingcheng; Cai, Wei; Yuan, Jialei; Zhang, Rong; Zhu, Hongbo

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication, and experimental characterization of monolithically integrated p-n junction InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well diodes (MQWDs) and suspended waveguides. Suspended MQWDs can be used as transmitters and receivers simultaneously, and suspended waveguides are used for light coupling to create an in-plane visible light communication system. Compared to the waveguide with separation trench, the calculated total light efficiency is increased from 18% to 22% for the continuous waveguide. The MQWDs are characterized by their typical current-voltage performance, and the pulse excitation measurements confirm that the InGaN/GaN MQWDs can achieve the light emission and photodetection at the same time. The photocurrent measurements indicate that the photocurrent is modulated by a bias voltage and that the photons are being supplied from another transmitter. An experimental demonstration is presented showing that the proposed device works well for in-plane full-duplex communication using visible light.

  13. Determination of terpene trilactones in Ginkgo biloba solid oral dosage forms using HPLC with evaporative light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Dubber, M-J; Kanfer, I

    2006-04-11

    A reversed phase high performance liquid chromatographic method with evaporative light scattering detection (RP-HPLC-ELSD) was developed for the quantitative determination of the terpene trilactones, ginkgolide A, B, C and J and the sesquiterpene, bilobalide in Ginkgo biloba solid oral dosage forms. Separation was achieved using a minibore Phenomenex Luna (5 microm) C18 column with dimensions 250 mm x 2.00 mm maintained at a temperature of 45 degrees C. A simple gradient method using a mobile phase of methanol:water and a flow rate of 350 microl/min facilitated baseline separation of the selected marker compounds within 14 min. The ELSD parameters affecting the detector response were optimized prior to the validation. The limits of detection and quantification were 31.25 and 62.50 ng, respectively. The percentage relative errors of the recovery ranged between -3.16 and +1.88 and both intra-day and inter-day percentage standard deviations were all better than 6%. This method was used to assay commercially available Ginkgo biloba products and proved to be suitable for the routine analysis of such products for quality control purposes.

  14. Multiple detection of single nucleotide polymorphism by microarray-based resonance light scattering assay with enlarged gold nanoparticle probes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jiaxue; Ma, Lan; Lei, Zhen; Wang, Zhenxin

    2016-03-07

    The mapping of specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in patients' genome is a critical process for the development of personalized therapy. In this work, a DNA microarray-based resonance light scattering (RLS) assay has been developed for multiplexed detection of breast cancer related SNPs with high sensitivity and selectivity. After hybridization of the desired target single-stranded DNAs (ssDNAs) with the ssDNA probes on a microarray, the polyvalent ssDNA modified 13 nm gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are employed to label the hybridization reaction through the formation of a three-stranded DNA system. The H2O2-mediated enlargement of GNPs is then used to enhance the RLS signal. The microarray-based RLS assay provides a detection limit of 10 pM (S/N = 3) for the target ssDNA and determines an allele frequency as low as 1.0% in the target ssDNA cocktail. Combined with an asymmetric PCR technique, the proposed assay shows good accuracy and sensitivity in profiling 4 SNPs related to breast cancer of three selected cell lines.

  15. Resonance light scattering detection of fructose bisphosphates using uranyl-salophen complex-modified gold nanoparticles as optical probe.

    PubMed

    Li, Shijun; Liao, Lifu; Wu, Rurong; Yang, Yanyan; Xu, Li; Xiao, Xilin; Nie, Changming

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we report a resonance light scattering (RLS) method for the determination of fructose bisphosphates (FBPs) in water solution using fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (F-1,6-BP) as a model analyte without the procedure of extracting target analyte. The method used a type of modified gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as optical probe. The modified GNPs are uranyl-salophen-cysteamine-GNPs (U-Sal-Cy-GNPs) which are obtained through the acylation reaction of carboxylated salophen with cysteamine-capped GNPs (Cy-GNPs) to form Sal-Cy-GNPs and then the chelation reaction of uranyl with tetradentate ligand salophen in the Sal-Cy-GNPs. A FBP molecule is used easily to connect two U-Sal-Cy-GNPs to cause the aggregation of the GNPs by utilizing the specific affinity of uranyl-salophen complex to phosphate group, resulting in the production of strong RLS signal from the system. The amount of FBPs can be determined through detecting the RLS intensity change of the system. A linear range was found to be 2.5 to 75 nmol/L with a detection limit of 0.91 nmol/L under optimal conditions. The method has been successfully used to determine FBPs in real samples with the recoveries of 96.5-103.5 %.

  16. A Light-Addressable Potentiometric Sensor for Odorant Detection Using Single Bioengineered Olfactory Sensory Neurons as Sensing Element.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chunsheng; Du, Liping; Tian, Yulan; Zhang, Xi; Wang, Ping

    2017-01-01

    A light-addressable potentiometric sensor (LAPS), a silicon-based surface potential detector, is combined with bioengineered olfactory sensory neurons (OSN) for odorant detection. A LAPS chip is used as a transducer to monitor cell membrane potential changes. In addition, a focused movable laser with a diameter comparable to cell sizes is employed to select the desirable single cell for measurement under a microscope. Bioengineered OSNs are coupled to the LAPS surface and employed as sensing elements, which are prepared by the expression of an olfactory receptor of C. elegans, ODR-10, on the plasma membrane of rat primary OSNs via transient transfection. The responses of bioengineered OSNs to diacetyl, isoamyl acetate, and acetic acid are monitored by extracellular recording using the LAPS chip. Features of the recorded extracellular potential firings are analyzed in frequency and time domains. We have shown that bioengineered OSNs can generate specific response signals upon the stimulation of diacetyl, which is the natural ligand of ODR-10. Moreover, different concentrations of diacetyl can elicit different temporal firing patterns in bioengineered OSNs, which permits the concentration detection of specific odorant molecules in solution.

  17. All-Printable ZnO Quantum Dots/Graphene van der Waals Heterostructures for Ultrasensitive Detection of Ultraviolet Light.

    PubMed

    Gong, Maogang; Liu, Qingfeng; Cook, Brent; Kattel, Bhupal; Wang, Ti; Chan, Wai-Lun; Ewing, Dan; Casper, Matthew; Stramel, Alex; Wu, Judy Z

    2017-03-24

    In ZnO quantum dot/graphene heterojunction photodetectors, fabricated by printing quantum dots (QDs) directly on the graphene field-effect transistor (GFET) channel, the combination of the strong quantum confinement in ZnO QDs and the high charge mobility in graphene allows extraordinary quantum efficiency (or photoconductive gain) in visible-blind ultraviolet (UV) detection. Key to the high performance is a clean van der Waals interface to facilitate an efficient charge transfer from ZnO QDs to graphene upon UV illumination. Here, we report a robust ZnO QD surface activation process and demonstrate that a transition from zero to extraordinarily high photoresponsivity of 9.9 × 10(8) A/W and a photoconductive gain of 3.6 × 10(9) can be obtained in ZnO QDs/GFET heterojunction photodetectors, as the ZnO QDs surface is systematically engineered using this process. The high figure-of-merit UV detectivity D* in exceeding 1 × 10(14) Jones represents more than 1 order of magnitude improvement over the best reported previously on ZnO nanostructure-based UV detectors. This result not only sheds light on the critical role of the van der Waals interface in affecting the optoelectronic process in ZnO QDs/GFET heterojunction photodetectors but also demonstrates the viability of printing quantum devices of high performance and low cost.

  18. A no-moving-parts sensor for the detection of eye fixation using polarised light and retinal birefringence information.

    PubMed

    Gramatikov, Boris I; Guyton, David L

    2017-01-26

    Polarised near-infra-red light is reflected from the foveal area in a detectable bow-tie pattern of polarisation states, offering the opportunity for eye tracking. A coaxial optical transducer was developed, consisting of a laser diode, a polariser, a filter, and a photodetector. Several such transducers may be used to interrogate different spots on the retina, thus eliminating the requirement for scanning systems with moving parts. To test the signal quality obtainable, using just one transducer, a test subject was asked to fixate successively on twelve targets located on a circle around the transducer, to simulate the retina's being interrogated by twelve sensors placed on a 3(0) diameter circle surrounding the projection of the fovea. The resulting signal is close to the "ideal" sine wave that would have been recorded from a propeller-type birefringence pattern from a human fovea. The transducer can be used in the detection of fixation for medical and other purposes. It does not require calibration, strict restrictions on head position, or head-mounted appliances.

  19. Evaluation of the LightCycler methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) advanced test for detection of MRSA nasal colonization.

    PubMed

    Yam, W C; Siu, Gilman K H; Ho, P L; Ng, T K; Que, T L; Yip, K T; Fok, Cathie P K; Chen, Jonathan H K; Cheng, Vincent C C; Yuen, K Y

    2013-09-01

    Rapid detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) nasal colonization is crucial for the prevention and control of MRSA infections in health care settings. The LightCycler MRSA Advanced Test (Roche Diagnostics) is a commercially available real-time PCR assay for direct detection of MRSA nasal colonization by targeting of the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec)-orfX junction. The diagnostic performance of the assay was compared with that of ChromID MRSA agar (bioMérieux) culture and an in-house duplex real-time PCR assay. Among 1,246 nasal swab specimens collected from 2 general hospitals in Hong Kong, 174 (14%) were considered true positive for MRSA. Chromogenic culture and the in-house real-time PCR assay identified 147 (84.5%) and 133 (76.4%) true-positive cases with specificities of 100% and 98.6%, respectively. Based on the target melting temperature (Tm) values (57.0 to 62.0 °C) defined by the manufacturer, the LightCycler MRSA Advanced Test identified only 85 (48.9%) true-positive specimens. Interestingly, an additional 60 (34.5%) true-positive specimens were detected despite atypical Tm values of 55 °C, providing overall sensitivity and specificity values of 83.3% and 99%, respectively. Among isolates with Tm values of 55 °C, most were typed as clonal complex 45 (CC45). By sequence analysis of the SCCmec-orfX junction, characteristic single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified only in isolates with Tm values of 55°C and not in those with typical Tm values. It is conceivable that those SNPs were located inside the target region of the proprietary hybridization probes, which resulted in a Tm shift in the melting curve analysis. Our study highlights the importance of a global evaluation of commercial kits so that the interpretation algorithm covers different lineages of MRSA clones prevalent in various geographical regions.

  20. Gas sensing based on detection of light radiation from a region of modified cladding (nanocrystalline ZnO) of an optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devendiran, S.; Sastikumar, D.

    2017-03-01

    A new type of fiber optic gas sensor is proposed by detecting a light radiated from a region of cladding modified with metal oxide (nanocrystalline ZnO). The intensity of radiated light is found to vary with different gasses and concentrations. Sensing characteristics are studied for ammonia, methanol, ethanol and acetone gasses. Gas sensitivity of the proposed sensor is compared with clad-modified fiber optic gas sensor. The new sensor exhibits enhanced sensitivity. Time response characteristics of the sensor are reported.

  1. Monitoring and Detecting the Cigarette Beetle (Coleoptera: Anobiidae) Using Ultraviolet (LED) Direct and Reflected Lights and/or Pheromone Traps in a Laboratory and a Storehouse.

    PubMed

    Miyatake, Takahisa; Yokoi, Tomoyuki; Fuchikawa, Taro; Korehisa, Nobuyoshi; Kamura, Toru; Nanba, Kana; Ryouji, Shinsuke; Kamioka, Nagisa; Hironaka, Mantaro; Osada, Midori; Hariyama, Takahiko; Sasaki, Rikiya; Shinoda, Kazutaka

    2016-10-19

    The cigarette beetle, Lasioderma serricorne (F.), is an important stored-product pest worldwide because it damages dry foods. Detection and removal of the female L. serricorne will help to facilitate the control of the insect by removal of the egg-laying populations. In this manuscript, we examined the responses by L. serricorne to direct and reflected light in transparent cube (50 m(3)) set in a chamber (200 m(3)) and a stored facility with both direct and reflected UV-LED lights. The study also examined the responses by the beetles to light in the presence or absence of pheromone in traps that are placed at different heights. Reflected light attracted more beetles than the direct light in the experimental chamber, but the direct light traps attracted more beetles than the reflected light traps in the storehouse. Pheromone traps attracted only males; UV-LED traps attracted both sexes. The UV-LED traps with a pheromone, i.e., combined trap, attracted more males than UV-LED light traps without a pheromone, whereas the attraction of UV-LED traps with and without the pheromone was similar in females. The results suggest that UV-LED light trap combined with a sex pheromone is the best solution for monitoring and controlling L. serricorne.

  2. Simultaneous qualification and quantification of eight triterpenoids in radix achyranthis bidentatae by high-performance liquid chromatography with evaporative light scattering detection and mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Li, Ping; Li, Hui-Jun; Song, Yue; Bi, Zhi-Ming; Li, Yan-Jing

    2007-04-01

    An HPLC with evaporative light scattering detection (ELSD) and ESI-MS was established for the simultaneous determination of eight triterpenoids in Radix Achyranthis Bidentatae. The optimal chromatographic conditions were achieved on a Zorbax C18 column by linear gradient elution with 0.08% v/v aqueous formic acid and ACN as the mobile phase at the flow rate of 0.8 mL/min. Temperature for the detector drift tube was set at 101 degrees C and the nitrogen flow rate was 2.8 L/min. The identities of the analytes were accomplished by comparing retention times and mass data with those of reference compounds. The validation of the method included tests of linearity, sensitivity, repeatability, recovery, and stability. All the calibration curves of the eight triterpenoids showed good linear regression (R2 >0.997) within the test ranges. The method provides desirable repeatability with overall intra- and interday variations of less than 4.9%. The obtained recoveries varied between 93.6 and 98.1% while the RSDs were below 3.9% (n = 3). The analysis results indicate that the content of investigated triterpenoids in Radix Achyranthis Bidentatae from different locations was greatly diverse, and the triterpenoids could be used as chemical markers for the discrimination of genuine and ungenuine crude drugs.

  3. Optical detection of honeybees by use of wing-beat modulation of scattered laser light for locating explosives and land mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repasky, Kevin S.; Shaw, Joseph A.; Scheppele, Ryan; Melton, Christopher; Carsten, John L.; Spangler, Lee H.

    2006-03-01

    An instrument is demonstrated that can be used for optical detection of honeybees in a cluttered environment. The instrument uses a continuous-wave diode laser with a center wavelength of 808 nm and an output power of 28 mW as the laser transmitter source. Light scattered from moving honeybee wings will produce an intensity-modulated signal at a characteristic wing-beat frequency (170-270 Hz) that can be used to detect the honeybees against a cluttered background. The optical detection of honeybees has application in the biological detection of land mines and explosives, as was recently demonstrated.

  4. A Light-Emitting Diode- (LED-) Based Absorption Sensor for Simultaneous Detection of Carbon Monoxide and Carbon Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Thurmond, Kyle; Loparo, Zachary; Partridge, William; Vasu, Subith S

    2016-06-01

    A sensor was developed for simultaneous measurements of carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO2) fluctuations in internal combustion engine exhaust gases. This sensor utilizes low-cost and compact light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that emit in the 3-5 µm wavelength range. An affordable, fast response sensor that can measure these gases has a broad application that can lead to more efficient, fuel-flexible engines and regulation of harmful emissions. Light emission from LEDs is spectrally broader and more spatially divergent when compared to that of lasers, which presented many design challenges. Optical design studies addressed some of the non-ideal characteristics of the LED emissions. Measurements of CO and CO2 were conducted using their fundamental absorption bands centered at 4.7 µm and 4.3 µm, respectively, while a 3.6 µm reference LED was used to account for scattering losses (due to soot, window deposits, etc.) common to the three measurement LEDs. Instrument validation and calibration was performed using a laboratory flow cell and bottled-gas mixtures. The sensor was able to detect CO2 and CO concentration changes as small as 30 ppm and 400 ppm, respectively. Because of the many control and monitor species with infra-red absorption features, which can be measured using the strategy described, this work demonstrates proof of concept for a wider range of fast (250 Hz) and low-cost sensors for gas measurement and process monitoring.

  5. A light-emitting diode- (LED-) based absorption sensor for simultaneous detection of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Thurmond, Kyle; Loparo, Zachary; Partridge, Jr., William P.; Vasu, Subith S.

    2016-04-18

    Here, a sensor was developed for simultaneous measurements of carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO2) fluctuations in internal combustion engine exhaust gases. This sensor utilizes low-cost and compact light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that emit in the 3–5 µm wavelength range. An affordable, fast response sensor that can measure these gases has a broad application that can lead to more efficient, fuel-flexible engines and regulation of harmful emissions. Light emission from LEDs is spectrally broader and more spatially divergent when compared to that of lasers, which presented many design challenges. Optical design studies addressed some of the non-ideal characteristics of the LED emissions. Measurements of CO and CO2 were conducted using their fundamental absorption bands centered at 4.7 µm and 4.3 µm, respectively, while a 3.6 µm reference LED was used to account for scattering losses (due to soot, window deposits, etc.) common to the three measurement LEDs. Instrument validation and calibration was performed using a laboratory flow cell and bottled-gas mixtures. The sensor was able to detect CO2 and CO concentration changes as small as 30 ppm and 400 ppm, respectively. Because of the many control and monitor species with infra-red absorption features, which can be measured using the strategy described, this work demonstrates proof of concept for a wider range of fast (250 Hz) and low-cost sensors for gas measurement and process monitoring.

  6. Intense pulsed light induced platinum-gold alloy formation on carbon nanotubes for non-enzymatic glucose detection.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jongeun; Kim, Kyunghyun; Kim, Hak-Sung; Hahn, H Thomas; Lashmore, David

    2010-10-15

    We demonstrated a novel method for the formation of alloy nano-islands on carbon nanotube (CNT). The two metal layers (Pt, Au) were sputtered on CNTs and the intense pulsed light (IPL) was irradiated on the metal layers. The absorbed light provides enough energy for the diffusion mixing between Pt and Au, forming Pt-Au alloy phase. While the alloy is being formed by the IPL irradiation, the metal layers are broken into nano-islands on CNT due to the surface energy minimization between the metal layers and CNT. The surface characterizations of the Pt-Au/CNT were performed with X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Different compositions of alloy nanoparticles were obtained by adjusting the deposition thicknesses of Pt and Au on CNT. Pt50Au50/CNT electrode showed the highest glucose oxidation current peak among Pt, Pt70Au30, Pt50Au50, Pt30Au70, and Au/CNT electrodes while the electroactive surface areas of them are kept to be similar (average surface area=7.00 cm2, coefficient of variation=0.06). The amperometric response of Pt50Au50/CNT electrode to the glucose concentrations showed a wide linear range up to 24.44 mM with a high detection sensitivity of 10.71 μA mM(-1) cm(-2). Reproducibility and long-term stability of the Pt-Au/CNT electrode were also proven in the experiments.

  7. Design and evaluation of capillary coupled with optical fiber light-emitting diode induced fluorescence detection for capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hongyun; Li, Meng; Guo, Lihong; Yuan, Hongyan; Wang, Chunling; Xiao, Dan

    2013-09-01

    A new detector, capillary coupled with optical fiber LED-induced fluorescence detector (CCOF-LED-IFD, using CCOF for short), is introduced for CE. The strategy of the present work was that the optical fiber and separation capillary were, in the parallel direction, fastened in a fixation capillary with larger inner diameter. By employing larger inner diameter, the fixation capillary allowed the large diameter of the optical fiber to be inserted into it. By transmitting an enhanced excitation light through the optical fiber, the detection sensitivity was improved. The advantages of the CCOF-CE system were validated by the detection of riboflavin, and the results were compared to those obtained by the in-capillary common optical fiber LED-induced fluorescence detector (IC-COF-LED-IFD, using COF for short). The LODs of CCOF-CE and COF-CE were 0.29 nM and 11.0 nM (S/N = 3), respectively. The intraday (n = 6) repeatability and interday (n = 6) reproducibility of migration time and corresponding peak area for both types of CE were all less than 1.10 and 3.30%, respectively. The accuracy of the proposed method was judged by employing standard addition method, and recoveries obtained were in the range of 98.0-102.4%. The results indicated that the sensitivity of the proposed system was largely improved, and that its reproducibility and accuracy were satisfactory. The proposed system was successfully applied to separate and determine riboflavin in real sample.

  8. Light-Weight Multispectral Uav Sensors and Their Capabilities for Predicting Grain Yield and Detecting Plant Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nebiker, S.; Lack, N.; Abächerli, M.; Läderach, S.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we investigate the performance of new light-weight multispectral sensors for micro UAV and their application to selected tasks in agronomical research and agricultural practice. The investigations are based on a series of flight campaigns in 2014 and 2015 covering a number of agronomical test sites with experiments on rape, barley, onion, potato and other crops. In our sensor comparison we included a high-end multispectral multiSPEC 4C camera with bandpass colour filters and reference channel in zenith direction and a low-cost, consumer-grade Canon S110 NIR camera with Bayer pattern colour filters. Ground-based reference measurements were obtained using a terrestrial hyperspectral field spectrometer. The investigations show that measurements with the high-end system consistently match very well with ground-based field spectrometer measurements with a mean deviation of just 0.01-0.04 NDVI values. The low-cost system, while delivering better spatial resolutions, expressed significant biases. The sensors were subsequently used to address selected agronomical questions. These included crop yield estimation in rape and barley and plant disease detection in potato and onion cultivations. High levels of correlation between different vegetation indices and reference yield measurements were obtained for rape and barley. In case of barley, the NDRE index shows an average correlation of 87% with reference yield, when species are taken into account. With high geometric resolutions and respective GSDs of down to 2.5 cm the effects of a thrips infestation in onion could be analysed and potato blight was successfully detected at an early stage of infestation.

  9. Mangrove Plantation Forest Assessment Using Structural Attributes Derived from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faelga, R. A. G.; Paringit, E. C.; Perez, G. J. P.; Ibanez, C. A. G.; Argamosa, R. A. L.; Posilero, M. A. V.; Zaragosa, G. P.; Tandoc, F. A. M.; Malabanan, M. V.

    2016-06-01

    Estimating the structural and functional attributes of forests is integral in performing management strategies and for understanding forest ecosystem functions. Field sampling methods through plot level is one of the known strategies in forest studies; however, these methods have its limitations and are prone to subjected biases. Remote Sensing data, particularly that of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) can be utilized to alleviate the limitations of extracting forest structure parameters. The study aims to characterize a Rhizophoraceae-dominated mangrove forest plantation. Point cloud distribution within a 1-hectare plot was processed by utilizing thirty (30) samples of 5x5 meter plots, which were analysed for the characterization and forest structure assessment. Point densities were grouped at intervals of 10% of the plot's maximum height (Height at Bincentile or HBn) to determine where the clustering of points occur per plot. The result shows that most of the points are clustered at HBn with height values ranging from 2.98 to 4.15 meters for plots located at the middle part of the forest, with a standard deviation of 1.78 to 3.69, respectively. On the other hand, sample plots that are located at the periphery part of the forest shows that the point clustering occurs at different heights ranging from 1.71 meters to 4.43 meters, with standard deviation values ranging from 1.69 to 3.81.Plots that are located along the fringes of the forest reflect a stunted clustering of points, while plots that explicitly show mangrove trimmings and cuts reflect even distribution in terms of point density within each HBn. Both species present in the area (R. mucronata and R. apiculata) exhibits similar clustering, which could represent detection of Rhizophoraceae mangroves.

  10. Analysis of non-phthalates plasticizers on porous graphitic carbon by supercritical fluid chromatography using evaporative light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Vaccher, Claude; Decaudin, Bertrand; Sautou, Valérie; Lecoeur, Marie

    2014-09-12

    The analysis of several plasticizers, widely used in the production of medical devices, was investigated on porous graphitic carbon (PGC) stationary phase in supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) with an evaporative light scattering detector (ELSD). Due to strong interaction of compounds with the PGC support, solvents of strong eluotropic strength were added to the CO2 supercritical fluid. The effect of alkyl chain (pentane, hexane, heptane) and chlorinated (CH2Cl2, CHCl3, CCl4) solvents was studied on the retention and on the ELSD detection of plasticizers. A co-solvent mixture composed of CHCl3/heptane, eluted under gradient mode, allowed a significant improvement of the ELSD response compared to the use of each solvent individually. Then, a central composite design (CCD) was implemented to optimize both the separation and the detection of plasticizers. The parameters involved were the outlet pressure, the gradient slope, the co-solvent composition and the drift tube temperature of the ELSD. After optimization, baseline separation of plasticizers was achieved in 7min and best signal-to-noise ratios were obtained with outlet pressure and drift tube temperature of ELSD set at 200bar and 31°C, respectively. The co-solvent mixture was also composed of CHCl3/heptane (35/65 v/v) and a gradient from 15 to 60% of co-solvent in 2.2min was employed. The results demonstrated that CCD is a powerful tool for the optimization of SFC/ELSD method and the response surface model analysis can provide statistical understandings of the significant factors required to achieve optimal separation and ELSD sensitivity.

  11. Detection of silver nanoparticles in cells by flow cytometry using light scatter and far-red fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Zucker, R M; Daniel, K M; Massaro, E J; Karafas, S J; Degn, L L; Boyes, W K

    2013-10-01

    The cellular uptake of different sized silver nanoparticles (AgNP) (10, 50, and 75 nm) coated with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) or citrate on a human derived retinal pigment epithelial cell line (ARPE-19) was detected by flow cytometry following 24-h incubation of the cells with AgNP. A dose dependent increase of side scatter and far red fluorescence was observed with both PVP and citrate-coated 50 nm or 75 nm silver particles. Using five different flow cytometers, a far red fluorescence signal in the 700-800 nm range increased as much as 100 times background as a ratio comparing the intensity measurements of treated sample and controls. The citrate-coated silver nanoparticles (AgNP) revealed slightly more side scatter and far red fluorescence than did the PVP coated silver nanoparticles. This increased far red fluorescence signal was observed with 50 and 75 nm particles, but not with 10 nm particles. Morphological evaluation by dark field microscopy showed silver particles (50 and 75 nm) clumped and concentrated around the nucleus. One possible hypothesis to explain the emission of far red fluorescence from cells incubated with silver nanoparticles is that the silver nanoparticles inside cells agglomerate into small nano clusters that form surface plasmon resonance which interacts with laser light to emit a strong far red fluorescence signal. The results demonstrate that two different parameters (side scatter and far red fluorescence) on standard flow cytometers can be used to detect and observe metallic nanoparticles inside cells. The strength of the far red fluorescence suggests that it may be particularly useful for applications that require high sensitivity. © Published 2013 Wiley-Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Confocal Cornea Microscopy Detects Involvement of Corneal Nerve Fibers in a Patient with Light-Chain Amyloid Neuropathy Caused by Multiple Myeloma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Dietrich; Schmidt-Wilcke, Tobias; Greiner, Tineke; Maier, Christoph; Schargus, Marc; Tegenthoff, Martin; Vorgerd, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the subbasal corneal plexus detected by confocal cornea microscopy (CCM) have been described for various types of neuropathy. An involvement of these nerves within light-chain (AL) amyloid neuropathy (a rare cause of polyneuropathy) has never been shown. Here, we report on a case of a patient suffering from neuropathy caused by AL amyloidosis and underlying multiple myeloma. Small-fiber damage was detected by CCM. PMID:27482195

  13. Separation and quantification of beer carbohydrates by high-performance liquid chromatography with evaporative light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Luciana C; Silva, Filipe; Ferreira, Isabel M P L V O; Trugo, L C

    2005-02-18

    An HPLC method with an evaporative light scattering detector was optimized and validated for quantification of carbohydrates in beer. The chromatographic separation was achieved using a Spherisorb NH2, 5 microm chromatographic column and gradient elution with acetonitrile/water. The determinations were performed in the linear range of 0.05-5.0 g/L for fructose, 0.05-5.0 g/L for glucose, 0.05-15.0 g/L for maltose, 0.05-10.0 g/L for maltotriose, and 0.05-5.0 g/L for maltotetraose. The detection limits were 0.005 g/L for fructose, 0.008 g/L for glucose, and 0.01 g/L for maltose, maltotriose, and maltotetraose. The reliability of the method in terms of precision and accuracy was evaluated in three beer matrices, low alcohol beer, 6% alcohol beer, and beer made with part of adjuncts (4.5% alcohol). Relative standard deviations (RSDs) ranged between 1.59 and 5.95% (n = 10), and recoveries ranged between 94 and 98.4%.

  14. Basic study of charring detection at the laser catheter-tip using back scattering light measurement during therapeutic laser irradiation in blood.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Mei; Ito, Arisa; Kajihara, Takuro; Matsuo, Hiroki; Arai, Tsunenori

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate transient process of the charring at the laser catheter-tip in blood during therapeutic laser irradiation by the back scattering light measurement to detect precursor state of the charring. We took account of using photodynamic therapy for arrhythmia in blood through the laser catheter. We observed the influence of the red laser irradiation (λ=663 nm) upon the shape of red blood cells (RBCs). The RBCs aggregation, round formation, and hemolysis were took place sequentially before charring. With a model blood sandwiched between glass plates simulated as a catheter-tip boundary, we measured diffuse-reflected-light power and transmitted-light power simultaneously and continuously by a microscopic optics during the laser irradiation. We found that measured light power changes were originated with RBCs shape change induced by temperature rise due to the laser irradiation. A gentle peak following a slow descending was observed in the diffuse-reflected-light power history. This history might indicate the precursor state of the charring, in which the hemolysis might be considered to advance rapidly. We think that the measurement of diffuse-reflected-light power history might be able to detect precursor state of charring at the catheter-tip in blood.

  15. Attenuation of UV Light in Mars Analog Minerals: Implications for Organic Detection with the SHERLOC Mars 2020 Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrier, Brandi; Beegle, Luther; Bhartia, Rohit; Abbey, William

    2016-10-01

    SHERLOC is an instrument that is part of the Mars 2020 payload. It utilizes a deep UV laser (248.6 nm) to induce Raman and fluorescence in organics and minerals [1]. Samples of interest are spatially scanned with the laser to stimulate fluorescence emissions and Raman scattering from the sample. Specifically, fluorescence is generated from electronic transitions in aromatic organics and Raman scatter is generated from vibrational bonds in both organics and minerals [2]. SHERLOC will be used on Mars to identify, in situ, interesting samples for sample caching and potential subsequent return to Earth.The mineral transparency at the wavelengths of interest (~250-400 nm) for both the incident laser light and the sample specific photons from fluorescence emission or Raman scattering will affect the interrogation volume of analysis and thus constrain the limits of detection.The attenuation rates of UV photons in bulk mineral samples have been determined as a function of mineral layer thickness for Mojave Mars Simulant basalt (MMS), gypsum (calcium sulfate), kaolinite (a clay mineral) and Bishop Tuff (a rhyolitic tuff). UV attenuation curves were determined by placing mineral pellets of varying thickness between a 1000-W Xe arc lamp and a radiometrically calibrated UV spectrometer. Results show that although UV transmission drops off quickly as a function of depth, there is some penetration of UV photons even at depths of several hundred microns.We have also used a SHERLOC-like laser system to detect aromatic and aliphatic organics under thin layers of these minerals at different depths below the surface. Results indicate that detection of certain organics may be possible at depths of 250um or greater below the mineral surface, allowing for a greater interrogation volume than previously assumed for SHERLOC.1. Beegle, Luther et al. "SHERLOC: Scanning Habitable Environments with Raman & Luminescence for Organics & Chemicals." 2015 IEEE Aerospace Conference. IEEE, 2015. 1

  16. Topographic data of selected areas along the Alabama River near Montgomery, Alabama, collected using mobile terrestrial light detection and ranging (T-LiDAR) technology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimbrow, D.R.

    2014-01-01

    Topographic data at selected areas within the Alabama River flood plain near Montgomery, Alabama, were collected using a truck-mounted mobile terrestrial light detection and ranging system. These data were collected for inclusion in a flood inundation model developed by the National Weather Service in Birmingham, Alabama. Data are presented as ArcGIS point shapefiles with the extension .shp.

  17. Detection of 15 dB Squeezed States of Light and their Application for the Absolute Calibration of Photoelectric Quantum Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahlbruch, Henning; Mehmet, Moritz; Danzmann, Karsten; Schnabel, Roman

    2016-09-01

    Squeezed states of light belong to the most prominent nonclassical resources. They have compelling applications in metrology, which has been demonstrated by their routine exploitation for improving the sensitivity of a gravitational-wave detector since 2010. Here, we report on the direct measurement of 15 dB squeezed vacuum states of light and their application to calibrate the quantum efficiency of photoelectric detection. The object of calibration is a customized InGaAs positive intrinsic negative (p-i-n) photodiode optimized for high external quantum efficiency. The calibration yields a value of 99.5% with a 0.5% (k =2 ) uncertainty for a photon flux of the order 1 017 s-1 at a wavelength of 1064 nm. The calibration neither requires any standard nor knowledge of the incident light power and thus represents a valuable application of squeezed states of light in quantum metrology.

  18. Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (OLEDs) and Optically-Detected Magnetic Resonance (ODMR) studies on organic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Min

    2011-01-01

    Organic semiconductors have evolved rapidly over the last decades and currently are considered as the next-generation technology for many applications, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) in flat-panel displays (FPDs) and solid state lighting (SSL), and organic solar cells (OSCs) in clean renewable energy. This dissertation focuses mainly on OLEDs. Although the commercialization of the OLED technology in FPDs is growing and appears to be just around the corner for SSL, there are still several key issues that need to be addressed: (1) the cost of OLEDs is very high, largely due to the costly current manufacturing process; (2) the efficiency of OLEDs needs to be improved. This is vital to the success of OLEDs in the FPD and SSL industries; (3) the lifetime of OLEDs, especially blue OLEDs, is the biggest technical challenge. All these issues raise the demand for new organic materials, new device structures, and continued lower-cost fabrication methods. In an attempt to address these issues, we used solution-processing methods to fabricate highly efficient small molecule OLEDs (SMOLEDs); this approach is costeffective in comparison to the more common thermal vacuum evaporation. We also successfully made efficient indium tin oxide (ITO)-free SMOLEDs to further improve the efficiency of the OLEDs. We employed the spin-dependent optically-detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) technique to study the luminescence quenching processes in OLEDs and organic materials in order to understand the intrinsic degradation mechanisms. We also fabricated polymer LEDs (PLEDs) based on a new electron-accepting blue-emitting polymer and studied the effect of molecular weight on the efficiency of PLEDs. All these studies helped us to better understand the underlying relationship between the organic semiconductor materials and the OLEDs’ performance, and will subsequently assist in further enhancing the efficiency of OLEDs. With strongly improved device performance (in addition to

  19. Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (OLEDs) and Optically-Detected Magnetic Resonance (ODMR) studies on organic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Min

    Organic semiconductors have evolved rapidly over the last decades and currently are considered as the next-generation technology for many applications, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) in flat-panel displays (FPDs) and solid state lighting (SSL), and organic solar cells (OSCs) in clean renewable energy. This dissertation focuses mainly on OLEDs. Although the commercialization of the OLED technology in FPDs is growing and appears to be just around the corner for SSL, there are still several key issues that need to be addressed: (1) the cost of OLEDs is very high, largely due to the costly current manufacturing process; (2) the efficiency of OLEDs needs to be improved. This is vital to the success of OLEDs in the FPD and SSL industries; (3) the lifetime of OLEDs, especially blue OLEDs, is the biggest technical challenge. All these issues raise the demand for new organic materials, new device structures, and continued lower-cost fabrication methods. In an attempt to address these issues, we used solution-processing methods to fabricate highly efficient small molecule OLEDs (SMOLEDs); this approach is cost-effective in comparison to the more common thermal vacuum evaporation. We also successfully made efficient indium tin oxide (ITO)-free SMOLEDs to further improve the efficiency of the OLEDs. We employed the spin-dependent optically-detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) technique to study the luminescence quenching processes in OLEDs and organic materials in order to understand the intrinsic degradation mechanisms. We also fabricated polymer LEDs (PLEDs) based on a new electron-accepting blue-emitting polymer and studied the effect of molecular weight on the efficiency of PLEDs. All these studies helped us to better understand the underlying relationship between the organic semiconductor materials and the OLEDs' performance, and will subsequently assist in further enhancing the efficiency of OLEDs. With strongly improved device performance (in addition to

  20. Usefulness of gold nanoparticles as labels for the determination of gliadins by immunoaffinity chromatography with light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Molina-Delgado, M A; Aguilar-Caballos, M P; Gómez-Hens, A

    2011-10-15

    A simple and fast immunoaffinity method is proposed for the determination of gliadins for the first time using gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as labels. The tracer used consists in a gliadin-AuNP conjugate prepared by the adsorption of gliadins onto the nanoparticle surface. Two AuNP sizes with diameters of 10nm and 20 nm were assayed to compare the behaviour of the corresponding tracer in the assay. The method relies on the injection in a commercial Protein G column of a preincubated mixture containing gliadins, polyclonal anti-gliadin antibodies, and the gliadin-AuNP tracer. This approach allows the separation of free and bound tracer fractions without any additional elution step, and the direct measurement of the resonance light scattering intensity of the free tracer through the peak height of the immunochromatogram, which is proportional to the analyte concentration. The immunocolumn can be used up to 25 times without eluting and it can be regenerated for at least 20 times. The dynamic ranges of the calibration graphs and the detection limits are 0.5-15.0 and 1.5-15.0 μg mL(-1) gliadins, and 0.2 μg mL(-1) and 0.8 μg mL(-1) gliadins, using 20-nm and 10-nm Au-NPs as labels, respectively. The precision, expressed as relative standard deviation, ranges between 2.7% and 2.9% using 20-nm AuNPs and 4% and 6.1% for 10-nm AuNPs. The method has been applied to the determination of the prolamin fraction in beer samples, obtaining recovery values in the range 71.2% and 101.7%.

  1. [Characterization of mid-subtropical evergreen broad-leaved forest gap based on light detection and ranging (LiDAR)].

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Tan, Chang; Wang, Hong; Zhang, Jiang; Wan, Ying; Long, Jiang-ping; Liu, Rui-xi

    2015-12-01

    Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) is an active remote sensing technology for acqui- ring three-dimensional structure parameters of vegetation canopy with high accuracy over multiple spatial scales, which is greatly important to the promotion of forest disturbance ecology and the ap- plication on gaps. This paper focused on mid-subtropical evergreen broadleaved forest in Hunan Province, and small footprint LiDAR point data were adopted to identify canopy gaps. and measure geomagnetic characteristics of gaps. The optimal grid model resolution and interpolation methods were chosen to generate canopy height model, and the computer graphics processing was adopted to estimate characteristics of gaps which involved gap size, canopy height and gap shape index, then field investigation was utilized to validate the estimation results. The results showed that the gap rec- ognition rate was 94.8%, and the major influencing factors were gap size and gap maker type. Line- ar correlation was observed between LiDAR estimation and field investigation, and the R² values of gap size and canopy height case were 0.962 and 0.878, respectively. Compared with field investiga- tion, the size of mean estimated gap was 19.9% larger and the mean estimated canopy height was 9.9% less. Gap density was 12.8 gaps · hm⁻² and the area of gaps occupied 13.3% of the forest area. The average gap size, canopy height and gap shape index were 85.06 m², 15.33 m and 1.71, respectively. The study site usually contained small gaps in which the edge effect was not obvious.

  2. A comparison of Lagrangian model estimates to light detection and ranging (LIDAR) measurements of dust plumes from field tilling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junming; Hiscox, April L; Miller, David R; Meyer, Thomas H; Sammis, Ted W

    2009-11-01

    A Lagrangian particle model has been adapted to examine human exposures to particulate matter < or = 10 microm (PM10) in agricultural settings. This paper reports the performance of the model in comparison to extensive measurements by elastic LIDAR (light detection and ranging). For the first time, the LIDAR measurements allowed spatially distributed and time dynamic measurements to be used to test the predictions of a field-scale model. The model outputs, which are three-dimensional concentration distribution maps from an agricultural disking operation, were compared with the LIDAR-scanned images. The peak cross-correlation coefficient and the offset distance of the measured and simulated plumes were used to quantify both the intensity and location accuracy. The appropriate time averaging and changes in accuracy with height of the plume were examined. Inputs of friction velocity, Monin-Obukhov length, and wind direction (1 sec) were measured with a three-axis sonic anemometer at a single point in the field (at 1.5-m height). The Lagrangian model of Wang et al. predicted the near-field concentrations of dust plumes emitted from a field disking operation with an overall accuracy of approximately 0.67 at 3-m height. Its average offset distance when compared with LIDAR measurements was approximately 38 m, which was 6% of the average plume moving distance during the simulation periods. The model is driven by weather measurements, and its near-field accuracy is highest when input time averages approach the turbulent flow time scale (3-70 sec). The model accuracy decreases with height because of smoothing and errors in the input wind field, which is modeled rather than measured at heights greater than the measurement anemometer. The wind steadiness parameter (S) can be used to quantify the combined effects of wind speed and direction on model accuracy.

  3. Built-in hyperspectral camera for smartphone in visible, near-infrared and middle-infrared lights region (second report): sensitivity improvement of Fourier-spectroscopic imaging to detect diffuse reflection lights from internal human tissues for healthcare sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Natsumi; Hosono, Satsuki; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2016-05-01

    We proposed the snapshot-type Fourier spectroscopic imaging for smartphone that was mentioned in 1st. report in this conference. For spectroscopic components analysis, such as non-invasive blood glucose sensors, the diffuse reflection lights from internal human skins are very weak for conventional hyperspectral cameras, such as AOTF (Acousto-Optic Tunable Filter) type. Furthermore, it is well known that the spectral absorption of mid-infrared lights or Raman spectroscopy especially in long wavelength region is effective to distinguish specific biomedical components quantitatively, such as glucose concentration. But the main issue was that photon energies of middle infrared lights and light intensities of Raman scattering are extremely weak. For improving sensitivity of our spectroscopic imager, the wide-field-stop & beam-expansion method was proposed. Our line spectroscopic imager introduced a single slit for field stop on the conjugate objective plane. Obviously to increase detected light intensities, the wider slit width of the field stop makes light intensities higher, regardless of deterioration of spatial resolutions. Because our method is based on wavefront-division interferometry, it becomes problems that the wider width of single slit makes the diffraction angle narrower. This means that the narrower diameter of collimated objective beams deteriorates visibilities of interferograms. By installing the relative inclined phaseshifter onto optical Fourier transform plane of infinity corrected optical systems, the collimated half flux of objective beams derived from single-bright points on objective surface penetrate through the wedge prism and the cuboid glass respectively. These two beams interfere each other and form the infererogram as spatial fringe patterns. Thus, we installed concave-cylindrical lens between the wider slit and objective lens as a beam expander. We successfully obtained the spectroscopic characters of hemoglobin from reflected lights from

  4. Three-dimensional imaging, change detection, and stability assessment during the centerline trench levee seepage experiment using terrestrial light detection and ranging technology, Twitchell Island, California, 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bawden, Gerald W.; Howle, James; Bond, Sandra; Shriro, Michelle; Buck, Peter

    2014-01-01

    A full scale field seepage test was conducted on a north-south trending levee segment of a now bypassed old meander belt on Twitchell Island, California, to understand the effects of live and decaying root systems on levee seepage and slope stability. The field test in May 2012 was centered on a north-south trench with two segments: a shorter control segment and a longer seepage test segment. The complete length of the trench area measured 40.4 meters (m) near the levee centerline with mature trees located on the waterside and landside of the levee flanks. The levee was instrumented with piezometers and tensiometers to measure positive and negative porewater pressures across the levee after the trench was flooded with water and held at a constant hydraulic head during the seepage test—the results from this component of the experiment are not discussed in this report. We collected more than one billion three-dimensional light detection and ranging (lidar) data points before, during, and after the centerline seepage test to assess centimeter-scale stability of the two trees and the levee crown. During the seepage test, the waterside tree toppled (rotated 20.7 degrees) into the water. The landside tree rotated away from the levee by 5 centimeters (cm) at a height of 2 m on the tree. The paved surface of the levee crown had three regions that showed subsidence on the waterside of the trench—discussed as the northern, central, and southern features. The northern feature is an elongate region that subsided 2.1 cm over an area with an average width of 1.35 m that extends 15.8 m parallel to the trench from the northern end of the trench to just north of the trench midpoint, and is associated with a crack 1 cm in height that formed during the seepage test on the trench wall. The central subsidence feature is a semicircular region on the waterside of the trench that subsided by as much as 6.2 cm over an area 3.4 m wide and 11.2 m long. The southern feature is an elongate

  5. 2-4 micron spectrophotometric observations of compact H II regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soifer, B. T.; Russell, R. W.; Merrill, K. M.

    1976-01-01

    Spectrophotometric observations from 2 to 4 microns of the compact H II regions W51-IRS 2, K3-50, and NGC 7538 are reported. Spectral features observed include hydrogen recombination lines and an absorption attributed to interstellar ice. Extinctions to the various sources are derived based on the observed hydrogen lines and radio fluxes. Thermal dust emission is found to dominate free-free and bound-free emission for wavelengths not less than 2 microns. The ice absorption is analyzed and compared with the extinction and 10 microns silicate absorption. A 3.3 micron emission feature (potentially due to the same material as in NGC 7027) was observed.

  6. MEMS-based extreme adaptive optics for planet detection

    SciTech Connect

    Macintosh, B A; Graham, J R; Oppenheimer, B; Poyneer, L; Sivaramakrishnan, A; Veran, J

    2005-11-18

    The next major step in the study of extrasolar planets will be the direct detection, resolved from their parent star, of a significant sample of Jupiter-like extrasolar giant planets. Such detection will open up new parts of the extrasolar planet distribution and allow spectroscopic characterization of the planets themselves. Detecting Jovian planets at 5-50 AU scale orbiting nearby stars requires adaptive optics systems and coronagraphs an order of magnitude more powerful than those available today--the realm of ''Extreme'' adaptive optics. We present the basic requirements and design for such a system, the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI.) GPI will require a MEMS-based deformable mirror with good surface quality, 2-4 micron stroke (operated in tandem with a conventional low-order ''woofer'' mirror), and a fully-functional 48-actuator-diameter aperture.

  7. Label-free antibody detection using band edge fringes in SOI planar photonic crystal waveguides in the slow-light regime.

    PubMed

    García-Rupérez, Jaime; Toccafondo, Veronica; Bañuls, María José; Castelló, Javier García; Griol, Amadeu; Peransi-Llopis, Sergio; Maquieira, Ángel

    2010-11-08

    We report experimental results of label-free anti-bovine serum albumin (anti-BSA) antibody detection using a SOI planar photonic crystal waveguide previously bio-functionalized with complementary BSA antigen probes. Sharp fringes appearing in the slow-light regime near the edge of the guided band are used to perform the sensing. We have modeled the presence of these band edge fringes and demonstrated the possibility of using them for sensing purposes by performing refractive index variations detection, achieving a sensitivity of 174.8 nm/RIU. Then, label-free anti-BSA biosensing experiments have been carried out, estimating a surface mass density detection limit below 2.1 pg/mm2 and a total mass detection limit below 0.2 fg.

  8. Sensitive Electrochemiluminescence Immunosensor for Detection of N-Acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase Based on a "Light-Switch" Molecule Combined with DNA Dendrimer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haijun; Yuan, Yali; Zhuo, Ying; Chai, Yaqin; Yuan, Ruo

    2016-06-07

    Here, a novel "light-switch" molecule of Ru (II) complex ([Ru(dcbpy)2dppz](2+)-DPEA) with self-enhanced electrochemiluminescence (ECL) property is proposed, which is almost nonemissive in aqueous solution but is brightly luminescent when it intercalates into DNA duplex. Owing to less energy loss and shorter electron-transfer distance, the intramolecular ECL reaction between the luminescent [Ru(dcbpy)2dppz](2+) and coreactive tertiary amine group in N,N-diisopropylethylenediamine (DPEA) makes the obtained "light-switch" molecule possess much higher light-switch efficiency compared with the traditional "light-switch" molecule. For increasing the loading amount and further enhancing the luminous efficiency of the "light-switch" molecule, biotin labeled DNA dendrimer (the fourth generation, G4) is prepared from Y-shape DNA by a step-by-step assembly strategy, which provides abundant intercalated sites for [Ru(dcbpy)2dppz](2+)-DPEA. Meanwhile, the obtained nanocomposite (G4-[Ru(dcbpy)2dppz](2+)-DPEA) could well bind with streptavidin labeled detection antibody (SA-Ab2) due to the existence of abundant biotin. Through sandwiched immunoreaction, an ECL immunosensor was fabricated for sensitive determination of N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase (NAG), a typical biomarker for diabetic nephropathy (DN). The detemination linear range was 0.1 pg mL(-1) to 1 ng mL(-1), and the detection limit was 0.028 pg mL(-1). The developed strategy combining the ECL self-enhanced "light-switch" molecular and DNA nanotechnology offers an effective signal amplification mean and provides ample potential for further bioanalysis and clinical study.

  9. Study of the shower maximum depth by the method of detection of the EAS Cerenkov light pulse shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aliev, N.; Alimov, T.; Kakhkharov, M.; Khakimov, N.; Makhmudov, B. M.; Rakhimova, N.; Tashpulatov, R.; Khristiansen, G. B.; Prosin, V. V.; Zhukov, V. Y.

    1985-01-01

    The results of processing the data on the shape of the EAS Cerenkov light pulses recorded by the extensive air showers (EAS) array are presented. The pulse FWHM is used to find the mean depth of EAS maximum.

  10. Narrow band (light) imaging of oral mucosa in routine dental patients. Part I: Assessment of value in detection of mucosal changes.

    PubMed

    Truelove, Edmond L; Dean, David; Maltby, Samuel; Griffith, Matthew; Huggins, Kimberly; Griffith, Mickealla; Taylor, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the value of adding narrow band (light) imaging (NBI) to the standard oral soft tissue examination process used to detect mucosal change. A total of 620 dental patients who came to the clinic for regular dental evaluation or for treatment of acute dental problems were given a standard oral soft tissue examination by dental students under faculty supervision. The results of the white light examination were recorded after the tissues were examined with NBI, at which point areas with a loss of fluorescence (LOF) were recorded. The nature of the tissue change was classified clinically as normal variation, inflammatory, traumatic, dysplastic, or other, and patients were categorized depending on their clinical findings: normal, need follow-up visit, or immediate biopsy. Risk factors related to oral dysplasia also were recorded. The addition of NBI added between one and two minutes to the examination process. Of the 620 examinations, an area with an LOF suggestive of pathology was detected in 69 subjects (11.1%). After a second immediate evaluation, 28 of the 69 subjects were scheduled for follow-up or biopsy. None of the lesions discovered in these 28 subjects had been detected using standard (white light) examination. Adding NBI to the routine clinical examination resulted in detection of changes not seen with white light examination in 11.1% of patients; of these, a small but important number were found to have otherwise undetected persistent changes representing inflammatory lesions or potentially dangerous oral dysplasia. Adding NBI as an adjunctive diagnostic procedure improved the quality and outcome of the examination process.

  11. Examination of a Novel Method for Non-Contact, Low-Cost, and Automated Heart-Rate Detection in Ambient Light Using Photoplethysmographic Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Examination of a Novel Method for Non-Contact, Low-Cost, and Automated Heart-Rate Detection in Ambient Light Using Photoplethysmographic...Laboratory Adelphi, MD 20783-1138 ARL-TR-7136 October 2014 Examination of a Novel Method for Non-Contact, Low-Cost, and Automated Heart...REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) October 2014 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Examination of a Novel Method for

  12. Detection of normal B-cell precursors that give rise to colonies producing both kappa and lambda light immunoglobulin chains.

    PubMed Central

    Sauter, H; Paige, C J

    1987-01-01

    The pre-B-cell cloning assay is an in vitro differentiation system in which B-lymphocyte precursors expand and generate colonies containing immunoglobulin-secreting cells. Analysis of surface characteristics, growth requirements, and kinetics suggested that these cells represent early stages of the B-cell differentiation pathway. Here we describe a modification of the assay, which allowed us to determine the differentiative potential of these clonable pre-B cells. Using a nitrocellulose protein-transfer technique, we studied immunoglobulin light chain expression in colonies derived from fetal mouse liver B-cell precursors; in particular, we explored whether the B-cell precursors are already committed to the expression of a particular light chain gene at the initiation of culture. Our results show that fetal liver-derived B-cell progenitors generate colonies in vitro that secrete kappa and lambda light chains at a ratio similar to that found in colonies derived from adult splenic B cells. Further, we document the existence of colonies that are derived from single cells and that simultaneously secrete both types of light chains. This indicates that the progenitors of (kappa + lambda)-producing colonies are light chain-uncommitted at the initiation of culture. These cells are able to rearrange their light chain genes in vitro and differentiate along the B-cell pathway to form colonies secreting both kappa and lambda chains. PMID:3110779

  13. Solution-processed PCDTBT capped low-voltage InGaZnO{sub x} thin film phototransistors for visible-light detection

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Han; Xiao, Yubin; Chen, Zefeng; Xu, Wangying; Long, Mingzhu; Xu, Jian-Bin

    2015-06-15

    The effects of visible-light detection based on solution processed poly[N-9′′-hepta-decanyl-2,7-carbazole-alt-5,5-(4′,7′-di-2-thienyl-2′,1′, 3′benzothiadiazole) (PCDTBT) capped InGaZnOx (IGZO) phototransistors with Al{sub 2}O{sub x} serving as gate dielectric are investigated in this paper. The high-k dielectric is used to lower the device operating voltage down to 2 V. Photons emitted from laser sources with the wavelengths (λ) of 532 nm and 635 nm are absorbed through the layer of PCDTBT to generate electron-hole-pairs (EHPs). After the separation of EHPs, electrons are injected into IGZO layer through the p-n junction formed between the IGZO (n-type semiconductor) and the PCDTBT (p-type semiconductor). The photo-generated carriers boost the drain current of the transistors as well as bring about the negative threshold voltage shift. Significant enhanced detection performance is achieved under the laser wavelength of 532 nm. The highest photoresponsivity reaches up to 20 A/W, while the photoresponse rise time comes to 10 ms and the fall time comes to approximate 76 ms, which is much faster than trap assisted IGZO visible light detection. The fabricated phototransistors favor the application of visible-light detectors and/or optical switches.

  14. Erosion monitoring along the Coosa River below Logan Martin Dam near Vincent, Alabama, using terrestrial light detection and ranging (T-LiDAR) technology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimbrow, Dustin R.; Lee, Kathryn G.

    2013-01-01

    Alabama Power operates a series of dams on the Coosa River in east central Alabama. These dams form six reservoirs that provide power generation, flood control, recreation, economic opportunity, and fish and wildlife habitats to the region. The Logan Martin Reservoir is located approximately 45 kilometers east of Birmingham and borders Saint Clair and Talladega Counties. Discharges below the reservoir are controlled by power generation at Logan Martin Dam, and there has been an ongoing concern about the stability of the streambanks downstream of the dam. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Alabama Power conducted a scientific investigation of the geomorphic conditions of a 115-meter length of streambank along the Coosa River by using tripod-mounted terrestrial light detection and ranging technology. Two surveys were conducted before and after the winter flood season of 2010 to determine the extent and magnitude of geomorphic change. A comparison of the terrestrial light detection and ranging datasets indicated that approximately 40 cubic meters of material had been eroded from the upstream section of the study area. The terrestrial light detection and ranging data included in this report consist of electronic point cloud files containing several million georeferenced data points, as well as a surface model measuring changes between scans.

  15. Range-resolved optical detection of honeybees by use of wing-beat modulation of scattered light for locating land mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, David S.; Nehrir, Amin R.; Repasky, Kevin S.; Shaw, Joseph A.; Carlsten, John L.

    2007-05-01

    An imaging lidar instrument with the capability of measuring the frequency response of a backscattered return signal up to 3.6 kHz is demonstrated. The instrument uses a commercial microchip frequency-doubled pulsed Nd:YAG laser with a 7.2 kHz pulse repetition rate, a pulse duration of less than 1 ns, and a pulse energy of greater than 10 μJ. A 15.2 cm commercial telescope is used to collect the backscattered signal, and a photomultiplier tube is used to monitor the scattered light. This instrument is designed for range- and angle-resolved optical detection of honeybees for explosives and land-mine detection. The instrument is capable of distinguishing between the scattered light from honeybees and other sources through the frequency content of the return signal caused by the wing-beat modulation of the backscattered light. Detection of honeybees near a bee hive and spatial mapping of honeybee densities near feeders are demonstrated.

  16. Phylogenetic and transcriptomic analyses reveal the evolution of bioluminescence and light detection in marine deep-sea shrimps of the family Oplophoridae (Crustacea: Decapoda).

    PubMed

    Wong, Juliet M; Pérez-Moreno, Jorge L; Chan, Tin-Yam; Frank, Tamara M; Bracken-Grissom, Heather D

    2015-02-01

    Bioluminescence is essential to the survival of many organisms, particularly in the deep sea where light is limited. Shrimp of the family Oplophoridae exhibit a remarkable mechanism of bioluminescence in the form of a secretion used for predatory defense. Three of the ten genera possess an additional mode of bioluminescence in the form of light-emitting organs called photophores. Phylogenetic analyses can be useful for tracing the evolution of bioluminescence, however, the few studies that have attempted to reconcile the relationships within Oplophoridae have generated trees with low-resolution. We present the most comprehensive phylogeny of Oplophoridae to date, with 90% genera coverage using seven genes (mitochondrial and nuclear) across 30 oplophorid species. We use our resulting topology to trace the evolution of bioluminescence within Oplophoridae. Previous studies have suggested that oplophorid visual systems may be tuned to differentiate the separate modes of bioluminescence. While all oplophorid shrimp possess a visual pigment sensitive to blue-green light, only those bearing photophores have an additional pigment sensitive to near-ultraviolet light. We attempt to characterize opsins, visual pigment proteins essential to light detection, in two photophore-bearing species (Systellaspis debilis and Oplophorus gracilirostris) and make inferences regarding their function and evolutionary significance.

  17. Hierarchical scheme for detecting the rotating MIMO transmission of the in-door RGB-LED visible light wireless communications using mobile-phone camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shih-Hao; Chow, Chi-Wai

    2015-01-01

    Multiple-input and multiple-output (MIMO) scheme can extend the transmission capacity for the light-emitting-diode (LED) based visible light communication (VLC) systems. The MIMO VLC system that uses the mobile-phone camera as the optical receiver (Rx) to receive MIMO signal from the n×n Red-Green-Blue (RGB) LED array is desirable. The key step of decoding this signal is to detect the signal direction. If the LED transmitter (Tx) is rotated, the Rx may not realize the rotation and transmission error can occur. In this work, we propose and demonstrate a novel hierarchical transmission scheme which can reduce the computation complexity of rotation detection in LED array VLC system. We use the n×n RGB LED array as the MIMO Tx. In our study, a novel two dimensional Hadamard coding scheme is proposed. Using the different LED color layers to indicate the rotation, a low complexity rotation detection method can be used for improving the quality of received signal. The detection correction rate is above 95% in the indoor usage distance. Experimental results confirm the feasibility of the proposed scheme.

  18. Partial Spreading of a Laser Beam into a Light Sheet by Shock Waves and Its Use as a Shock Detection Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, J.

    1994-01-01

    It is observed that when a laser beam is allowed to fall on a shock surface at a grazing incidence, a small part of the beam spreads out in a thin, diverging sheet of light normal to the surface, and both upstream and downstream of the shock. The phenomenon is visualized by observing a cross section of the light sheet on a screen placed normal to the laser path after it touches a shock. The light sheet disappears when the beam is moved to any other locations where there is no shock or the beam pierces the shock surface, i.e., at a non-grazing incidence. The spread angle of the light sheet is considerably higher than the angle by which the beam may bend as it passes through the shock, which produces a small difference of refractive index. Various details indicate that the spread light is a result of diffraction of a small part of the laser beam by the shock whose thickness is nearly the same as that of the laser wavelength. Shocks formed in underexpanded free jets of fully expanded Mach numbers 1.4 to 1.8 are used for this experiment. The above optical phenomenon is used as the basis of a novel shock detection technique which depends on sensing the spread light using a photomultiplier tube (PMT). The locations of the shock surfaces in the underexpanded supersonic jet, obtained using this technique, match with those inferred from the Schlieren photographs and velocity measurements. Moreover, if the shock oscillates, a periodic PMT signal is obtained which provides information about the frequency and amplitude of shock motion.

  19. NMR (¹H) analysis of crude extracts detects light stress in Beta vulgaris and Spinacia oleracea leaves.

    PubMed

    Guadagno, Carmela Rosaria; Della Greca, Marina; Virzo De Santo, Amalia; D'Ambrosio, Nicola

    2013-07-01

    In highlight stress conditions, the mechanism of non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of chlorophyll fluorescence is triggered at the chloroplast level. This process allows thermal quenching of the excessive excitation energy and it is strictly related to the efficiency of the xanthophyll cycle. Nowadays, the utilization of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy provides a powerful complementary way for the identification and quantitative analysis of plant metabolites either in vivo or in tissue extracts. Seeing that the oxidative damage caused by light stress in plants and the consequent involvement of pigments are widely studied, NMR spectroscopy can be utilized to compare crude leaf extract at different levels of light stress, allowing an analysis of these compounds. In this paper, the identification of possible relationships between light stress and ¹H NMR signal variations is discussed. The analysis of the ¹H NMR (1D) spectra of two agronomic species (Spinacia oleracea and Beta vulgaris) exposed to different light intensities is presented. In particular, change in carotenoids and xanthophylls signals are analyzed.

  20. Characterization of a rapid, blue light-mediated change in detectable phosphorylation of a plasma membrane protein from etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L. ) seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Short, T.W.; Briggs, W.R. )

    1990-01-01

    When crude microsomal membranes from apical stem segments of etiolated Pisum sativum L. cv Alaska are mixed in vitro with {gamma}-({sup 32}P)ATP, a phosphorylated band of apparent molecular mass 120 kilodaltons can be detected on autoradiographs of sodium dodecyl sulfate electrophoresis gels. If the stem sections are exposed to blue light immediately prior to membrane isolation, this band is not evident. Comparisons of the kinetics, tissue distribution, and dark recovery of the phosphorylation response with those published for blue light mediated phototropism or rapid growth inhibition indicate that the phosphorylation could be linked to one or both of the reactions described. However, the fluence-response relationships for the change in detectable phosphorylation match quite closely those reported for phototropism but not those for growth inhibition. Blue light has also been found to regulate the capacity for in vitro phosphorylation of a second protein. It has an apparent molecular mass of 84 kilodaltons and is localized primarily in basal stem sections.

  1. Reliable Detection and Smart Deletion of Malassez Counting Chamber Grid in Microscopic White Light Images for Microbiological Applications.

    PubMed

    Denimal, Emmanuel; Marin, Ambroise; Guyot, Stéphane; Journaux, Ludovic; Molin, Paul

    2015-08-01

    In biology, hemocytometers such as Malassez slides are widely used and are effective tools for counting cells manually. In a previous work, a robust algorithm was developed for grid extraction in Malassez slide images. This algorithm was evaluated on a set of 135 images and grids were accurately detected in most cases, but there remained failures for the most difficult images. In this work, we present an optimization of this algorithm that allows for 100% grid detection and a 25% improvement in grid positioning accuracy. These improvements make the algorithm fully reliable for grid detection. This optimization also allows complete erasing of the grid without altering the cells, which eases their segmentation.

  2. Detection of light-induced changes of intracellular ionized calcium concentration in Limulus ventral photoreceptors using arsenazo III

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J. E.; Brown, P. K.; Pinto, L. H.

    1977-01-01

    1. The metallochromic indicator dye, arsenazo III, was injected intracellularly into Limulus ventral photoreceptor cells to concentrations greater than 1 mM. 2. The absorption spectrum (450-750 nm) of the dye in single dark-adapted cells was measured by a scanning microspectrophotometer. When a cell was light-adapted, the absorption of the dye changed; the difference spectrum had two maxima at about 610 and 660 nm, a broad minimum at about 540 nm and an isosbestic point at about 585 nm. 3. When intracellular calcium concentration was raised in dark-adapted cells previously injected with arsenazo III, the difference spectum had two maxima at about 610 and 660 nm, a broad minimum at about 530 nm and an isosbestic point at about 585 nm. The injection of Mg2+ into dark-adapted cells previously injected with the dye induced a difference spectrum that had a single maximum at about 620 nm. Also, decreasing the intracellular pH of cells previously injected with the dye induced a difference spectrum that had a minimum at about 620 nm. The evidence suggests that there is a rise of intracellular ionized calcium when a Limulus ventral photoreceptor is light-adapted. 4. The intracellular calcium concentration, [Ca2+]1, in light-adapted photoreceptors was estimated to reach at least 10-4 M by compaing the light-induced difference spectra measured in ventral photoreceptors with a standard curve determined in microcuvettes containing 2mM arsenazo III in 400 mM-KCl, 1 mM-MgCl2 and 25 mM MOPS at pH 7·0. 5. In cells injected to less than 3 mM arsenazo III, light induced a transient decrease in optical transmission at 660 nm (T660). This decrease in T660 indicates that illumination of a ventral photoreceptor normally causes a transient increase of [Ca2+]1. 6. Arsenazo III was found to be sensitive, selective and rapid enough to measure light-induced changes of intracellular ionized calcium in Limulus ventral photoreceptor cells. PMID:17732

  3. High-precision topography measurement through accurate in-focus plane detection with hybrid digital holographic microscope and white light interferometer module.

    PubMed

    Liżewski, Kamil; Tomczewski, Sławomir; Kozacki, Tomasz; Kostencka, Julianna

    2014-04-10

    High-precision topography measurement of micro-objects using interferometric and holographic techniques can be realized provided that the in-focus plane of an imaging system is very accurately determined. Therefore, in this paper we propose an accurate technique for in-focus plane determination, which is based on coherent and incoherent light. The proposed method consists of two major steps. First, a calibration of the imaging system with an amplitude object is performed with a common autofocusing method using coherent illumination, which allows for accurate localization of the in-focus plane position. In the second step, the position of the detected in-focus plane with respect to the imaging system is measured with white light interferometry. The obtained distance is used to accurately adjust a sample with the precision required for the measurement. The experimental validation of the proposed method is given for measurement of high-numerical-aperture microlenses with subwavelength accuracy.

  4. Detection of unlabeled particles in the low micrometer size range using light scattering and hydrodynamic 3D focusing in a microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Guisheng; Jensen, Thomas G; Kutter, Jörg P

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we describe a microfluidic device composed of integrated microoptical elements and a two-layer microchannel structure for highly sensitive light scattering detection of micro/submicrometer-sized particles. In the two-layer microfluidic system, a sample flow stream is first constrained in the out-of-plane direction into a narrow sheet, and then focused in-plane into a small core region, obtaining on-chip three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic focusing. All the microoptical elements, including waveguides, microlens, and fiber-to-waveguide couplers, and the in-plane focusing channels are fabricated in one SU-8 layer by standard photolithography. The channels for out-of-plane focusing are made in a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) layer by a single cast using a SU-8 master. Numerical and experimental results indicate that the device can realize 3D hydrodynamic focusing reliably over a wide range of Reynolds numbers (0.5 < Re < 20). Polystyrene particles of three sizes (2, 1, and 0.5 μm) were measured in the microfluidic device with integrated optics, demonstrating the feasibility of this approach to detect particles in the low micrometer size range by light scattering detection.

  5. Characterization of peroxides formed by riboflavin and light exposure of milk. Detection of urate hydroperoxide as a novel oxidation product.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Morten R; Huvaere, Kevin; Skibsted, Leif H; Stagsted, Jan

    2010-01-13

    Characterization of peroxides by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) of milk following exposure to riboflavin and light showed that hydrogen peroxide was the most abundant peroxide formed since it could be removed by catalase. Formation of peroxides after separation by SEC showed that hydrogen peroxide formation was primarily increased in the presence of caseins and ascorbate, although whey proteins also were found to contribute. Caseins and beta-lactoglobulin also formed catalase-resistant peroxides, presumably protein hydroperoxides. A catalase-resistant and unstable peroxide was observed in fractions containing urate. Experiments performed with pure urate suggested that urate radicals reacted further with superoxide leading to a urate hydroperoxide. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy using spin-traps showed that the presence of oxygen was required for urate radical formation, which could be assigned as nitrogen-centered radicals. These results suggest a new route during light-induced oxidation sensitized by flavins, in effect making urate pro-oxidative.

  6. Probing multi-scale self-similarity of tissue structures using light scattering spectroscopy: prospects in pre-cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Subhasri; Das, Nandan K.; Kumar, Satish; Mohapatra, Sonali; Pradhan, Asima; Panigrahi, Prasanta K.; Ghosh, Nirmalya

    2013-02-01

    Multi-resolution analysis on the spatial refractive index inhomogeneities in the connective tissue regions of human cervix reveals clear signature of multifractality. We have thus developed an inverse analysis strategy for extraction and quantification of the multifractality of spatial refractive index fluctuations from the recorded light scattering signal. The method is based on Fourier domain pre-processing of light scattering data using Born approximation, and its subsequent analysis through Multifractal Detrended Fluctuation Analysis model. The method has been validated on several mono- and multi-fractal scattering objects whose self-similar properties are user controlled and known a-priori. Following successful validation, this approach has initially been explored for differentiating between different grades of precancerous human cervical tissues.

  7. Precise 3D Lug Pose Detection Sensor for Automatic Robot Welding Using a Structured-Light Vision System

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Byung; Lee, Seung Hun; Lee, Il Jae

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we propose a precise 3D lug pose detection sensor for automatic robot welding of a lug to a huge steel plate used in shipbuilding, where the lug is a handle to carry the huge steel plate. The proposed sensor consists of a camera and four laser line diodes, and its design parameters are determined by analyzing its detectable range and resolution. For the lug pose acquisition, four laser lines are projected on both lug and plate, and the projected lines are detected by the camera. For robust detection of the projected lines against the illumination change, the vertical threshold, thinning, Hough transform and separated Hough transform algorithms are successively applied to the camera image. The lug pose acquisition is carried out by two stages: the top view alignment and the side view alignment. The top view alignment is to detect the coarse lug pose relatively far from the lug, and the side view alignment is to detect the fine lug pose close to the lug. After the top view alignment, the robot is controlled to move close to the side of the lug for the side view alignment. By this way, the precise 3D lug pose can be obtained. Finally, experiments with the sensor prototype are carried out to verify the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed sensor. PMID:22400007

  8. Measurements of incoherent light and background structure at exo-Earth detection levels in the High Contrast Imaging Testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cady, Eric; Shaklan, Stuart

    2014-08-01

    A major component of the estimation and correction of starlight at very high contrasts is the creation of a dark hole: a region in the vicinity of the core of the stellar point spread function (PSF) where speckles in the PSF wings have been greatly attenuated, up to a factor of 1010 for the imaging of terrestrial exoplanets. At these very high contrasts, removing these speckles requires distinguishing between light from the stellar PSF scattered by instrument imperfections, which may be partially corrected across a broad band using deformable mirrors in the system, from light from other sources which generally may not. These other sources may be external or internal to the instrument (e.g. planets, exozodiacal light), but in either case, their distinguishing characteristic is their inability to interfere coherently with the PSF. In the following we discuss the estimation, structure, and expected origin of this incoherent" signal, primarily in the context of a series of experiments made with a linear band-limited mask in Jan-Mar 2013. We find that the incoherent" signal at moderate contrasts is largely estimation error of the coherent signal, while at very high contrasts it represents a true floor which is stable over week-timescales.

  9. Multicenter evaluation of the LightCycler methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) advanced test as a rapid method for detection of MRSA in nasal surveillance swabs.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Lance R; Liesenfeld, Oliver; Woods, Christopher W; Allen, Stephen D; Pombo, David; Patel, Parul A; Mehta, Maitry S; Nicholson, Bradly; Fuller, DeAnna; Onderdonk, Andrew

    2010-05-01

    The rate of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection continues to rise in many health care settings. Rapid detection of MRSA colonization followed by appropriate isolation can reduce transmission and infection. We compared the performance of the new Roche LightCycler MRSA advanced test to that of the BD GeneOhm MRSA test and culture. Double-headed swabs were used to collect anterior nasal specimens from each subject. For both tests, DNA was extracted and real-time PCR was performed according to manufacturer's instructions. For culture, one swab of the pair was plated directly to CHROMagar MRSA. The swab paired with the BD GeneOhm MRSA test was also placed into an enrichment broth and then plated to CHROMagar MRSA. Colonies resembling staphylococci were confirmed as S. aureus by standard methods. Discrepant specimens had further testing with additional attempts to grow MRSA as well as sample amplicon sequencing. Agreement between results for the two swabs was 99.3% for those with valid results. A total of 1,402 specimens were tested using direct culture detection of MRSA as the gold standard; 187 were culture positive for MRSA. The LightCycler MRSA advanced test had relative sensitivity and specificity of 95.2% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 91.1% to 97.8%) and 96.4% (95% CI: 95.2% to 97.4%), respectively. The BD GeneOhm assay had relative sensitivity and specificity of 95.7% (95% CI: 91.7% to 98.1%) and 91.7% (95% CI: 90.0% to 93.2%), respectively. Following discrepancy analysis, the relative sensitivities of the LightCycler MRSA advanced test and the BD GeneOhm MRSA assay were 92.2 and 93.2%, respectively; relative specificities were 98.9 and 94.2%, respectively. Specificity was significantly better (P<0.001) with the LightCycler MRSA advanced test. The sensitivity of direct culture was 80.4%. The LightCycler MRSA advanced test is a useful tool for sensitive and rapid detection of MRSA nasal colonization.

  10. [Influence of "optical illusion" on detectability in diagnosis for head CT images: participation of optical illusion of light perception in medical image reading and diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Henmi, Shuichi

    2006-07-20

    Even if the visual impression of the photographic density of the brain in head CT images is shown as physically the same, it is known that optical illusions of lightness perception (assimilation, contrast, picture frame effect, etc.) occur and that practical density can be observed psychologically differently, according to differences in the color of the skull and background, and differences in cases (differences in picture pattern). Therefore, in this study, in order to clarify the influence of optical illusion on detectability in diagnosis, the author attempted to compare detectability in four sample cases, consisting of acute cerebral infarction (1), acute epidural hematoma (1), and chronic subdural hematoma (2), using visual subjective evaluation. In the case of acute cerebral infarction, there was no significant difference in detectability between the original image and the virtual images. Further, it clarified that the original head CT image (acute epidural hematoma) with the high-density hematoma recognized at the marginal limited part of the brain was inferior to virtual images in detectability, while it clarified that the original head CT image (chronic subdural hematoma) with the low-density hematoma was superior to virtual images in detectability, because of visual psychological emphasis on the difference of the film contrast between the hematoma and white skull.

  11. Simultaneous detection of five different DNA targets by real-time Taqman PCR using the Roche LightCycler480: Application in viral molecular diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Molenkamp, Richard; van der Ham, Alwin; Schinkel, Janke; Beld, Marcel

    2007-05-01

    One of the most interesting aspects of real-time PCR based on the detection of fluorophoric labeled oligonucleotides is the possibility of being able to detect conveniently multiple targets in the same PCR reaction. Recently, Roche Diagnostics launched a real-time PCR platform, the LightCycler480 (LC480), which should be well suited for multiplex real-time PCR analysis. In this paper the performance of the LC480 and accompanying software for the detection of five different targets was analyzed. Target DNAs mixed at equimolar concentrations were detected reproducibly and quantitatively. In addition, mixing different concentrations of the five targets demonstrated that the LC480 is capable of providing quantitative results for a mixture of DNA sequences without losing sensitivity. When applied to the practice of molecular diagnosis of four respiratory viral infections the multiplex assay showed almost complete concordance with corresponding single-target PCRs. The application of multiplex PCR for the detection of multiple pathogens within the same sample will provide a major contribution to the efficiency, logistics and cost-effectiveness of molecular diagnostics.

  12. No-Light Light Bulbs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modern Schools, 1976

    1976-01-01

    A thumbnail sketch of some of the light bulbs manufactured for a purpose other than seeing. These "dark" lamps perform varied tasks including keeping food fresh, detecting and preventing disease, spurring plant growth, heating, and copying printed material. (Author/MLF)

  13. Single-Step DNA Detection Assay Monitoring Dual-Color Light Scattering from Individual Metal Nanoparticle Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Efficiently detecting DNA sequences within a limited time is vital for disease screening and public health monitoring. This calls for a new method that combines high sensitivity, fast read-out time, and easy manipulation of the sample, avoiding the extensive steps of DNA amplification, purification, or grafting to a surface. Here, we introduce photon cross-correlation spectroscopy as a new method for specific DNA sensing with high sensitivity in a single-step homogeneous solution phase. Our approach is based on confocal dual-color illumination and detection of the scattering intensities from individual silver nanoparticles and gold nanorods. In the absence of the target DNA, the nanoparticles move independently and their respective scattering signals are uncorrelated. In the presence of the target DNA, the probe-functionalized gold and silver nanoparticles assemble via DNA hybridization with the target, giving rise to temporal coincidence between the signals scattered by each nanoparticle. The degree of coincidence accurately quantifies the amount of target DNA. To demonstrate the efficiency of our technique, we detect a specific DNA sequence of sesame, an allergenic food ingredient, for a range of concentration from 5 pM to 1.5 nM with a limit of detection of 1 pM. Our method is sensitive and specific enough to detect single nucleotide deletion and mismatch. With the dual-color scattering signals being much brighter than fluorescence-based analogs, the analysis is fast, quantitative, and simple to operate, making it valuable for biosensing applications. PMID:28261666

  14. Laboratory Studies to Assess the Potential for Detection of Light Non-aqueous Phase Liquid in Contaminated Soils with Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryar, T. R.; Knight, R. J.; Nielsen, T. P.

    2001-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the conditions necessary for the detection of LNAPL (Light Non-aqueous Phase Liquid) in contaminated soils using NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) measurements. The study used toluene as the LNAPL and well characterized kaolinite and sand samples as the porous media; proton NMR measurements were made on partially saturated sand, clay and sand-clay mixtures. Proton NMR has the advantage over other surface geophysical techniques that it only responds to H atoms. However, since water is ubiquitous in the near surface, one of our main concerns was whether the signal from water would interfere with the detection of organic contaminants. We established that water and toluene were not resolved for sand or sand-clay mixtures with paramagnetic iron impurities less than or equal to 1.5 mg/g. However, for a sand-clay mixture for which the iron concentration was 1.9 mg/g, the two fluids were clearly resolved by laboratory NMR. These levels of paramagnetic materials are common in soils, especially those with some clay content. Provided that the soil has sufficient paramagnetic content for contaminant signal to be distinguishable from that of water, we found that the detection limit improves with signal to noise ratio (S/N) of the NMR data. For detection of LNAPL in the presence of water, NMR was capable of detecting as little as 20 mg toluene/g water, under ideal conditions in the laboratory. When we reduced signal quality to S/N = 80, the detection limit was only 140 mg toluene/g water. We also showed with synthetic data that the currently available surface loop NMR instrument (capable of S/N ~5) would be incapable of distinguishing organic contaminant at any concentration from water. The instrument would have to be improved to S/N = 20 to reliably detect even 1g LNAPL/g water.

  15. The Face-to-Face Light Detection Paradigm: A New Methodology for Investigating Visuospatial Attention Across Different Face Regions in Live Face-to-Face Communication Settings

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Laura A.; Malloy, Daniel M.; Cone, John M.; Hendrickson, David L.

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a novel paradigm for studying the cognitive processes used by listeners within interactive settings. This paradigm places the talker and the listener in the same physical space, creating opportunities for investigations of attention and comprehension processes taking place during interactive discourse situations. An experiment was conducted to compare results from previous research using videotaped stimuli to those obtained within the live face-to-face task paradigm. A headworn apparatus is used to briefly display LEDs on the talker’s face in four locations as the talker communicates with the participant. In addition to the primary task of comprehending speeches, participants make a secondary task light detection response. In the present experiment, the talker gave non-emotionally-expressive speeches that were used in past research with videotaped stimuli. Signal detection analysis was employed to determine which areas of the face received the greatest focus of attention. Results replicate previous findings using videotaped methods. PMID:21113354

  16. The pulsed light inactivation of veterinary relevant microbial biofilms and the use of a RTPCR assay to detect parasite species within biofilm structures

    PubMed Central

    Garvey, M.; Coughlan, G.; Murphy, N.; Rowan, N.

    2016-01-01

    The presence of pathogenic organisms namely parasite species and bacteria in biofilms in veterinary settings, is a public health concern in relation to human and animal exposure. Veterinary clinics represent a significant risk factor for the transfer of pathogens from housed animals to humans, especially in cases of wound infection and the shedding of faecal matter. This study aims to provide a means of detecting veterinary relevant parasite species in bacterial biofilms, and to provide a means of disinfecting these biofilms. A real time PCR assay was utilized to detect parasite DNA in Bacillus cereus biofilms on stainless steel and PVC surfaces. Results show that both Cryptosporidium and Giardia attach to biofilms in large numbers (100-1000 oo/cysts) in as little as 72 hours. Pulsed light successfully inactivated all test species (Listeria, Salmonella, Bacillus, Escherichia) in planktonic and biofilm form with an increase in inactivation for every increase in UV dose. PMID:26862516

  17. Polarized light scattering as a means of detecting heat and UV-induced changes in bacteria and bacterial spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van De Merwe, Willem P.; Bronk, Burt V.

    1993-07-01

    In the present paper we report on initial attempts to correlate changes in polarized light scattering signals from bacteria and bacterial spores with changes in physical parameters as a result of heat and UV exposure. Clear reproducible changes can be observed, but quantitative correlation such as measuring the degree of germination or survivability needs further study. Average cell size changes can be measured quickly in bacteria such as after UV exposure or during the growth cycle, making the used technique very valuable to monitor changes. Computer modelling is needed to distinguish effects caused by size changes and by changes in index of refraction.

  18. Detection of Silver Nanoparticles in Cells by Flow Cytometry Using Light Scattering and Far-red Fluorescence

    EPA Science Inventory

    The cellular uptake of different sized silver nanoparticles (l0 nm, 50 nm, and 75nm) coated with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) or citrate in ARPE-19 cells following 24 hour incubation was detected by side scatter through the use of a flow cytometer. A large far red fluorescence sign...

  19. Detection of Silver and TiO2 Nanoparticles using Light Scatter by Flow Cytometry and Darkfield Microscopy

    EPA Science Inventory

    Titanium Dioxide (Ti02) and Silver (Ag) nanoparticles are used in many domestic applications, including sunscreens and paints. Evaluation of the potential hazard of manmade nanomaterials has been hampered by a limited ability to detect and measure nanoparticles in cells. In the p...

  20. Temporal signatures of the Cherenkov light induced by extensive air showers of cosmic rays detected with the Yakutsk array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. A.; Timofeev, L. V.

    2016-05-01

    We analyze temporal characteristics of signals from the wide field-of-view (WFOV) Cherenkov telescope (CT) detecting extensive air showers (EAS) of cosmic rays (CRs) in coincidence with surface detectors of the Yakutsk array. Our aim is to reveal causal relationships between measured characteristics and physical properties of EAS.

  1. Relative light yield and temporal response of a stilbene-doped bibenzyl organic scintillator for neutron detection

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J. A.; Goldblum, B. L. Brickner, N. M.; Daub, B. H.; Kaufman, G. S.; Bibber, K. van; Vujic, J.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bleuel, D. L.; Caggiano, J. A.; Hatarik, R.; Phillips, T. W.; Zaitseva, N. P.; Wender, S. A.

    2014-05-21

    The neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) diagnostics used to characterize implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has necessitated the development of novel scintillators that exhibit a rapid temporal response and high light yield. One such material, a bibenzyl-stilbene mixed single-crystal organic scintillator grown in a 99.5:0.5 ratio in solution, has become the standard scintillator used for nTOF diagnostics at NIF. The prompt fluorescence lifetime and relative light yield as a function of proton energy were determined to calibrate this material as a neutron detector. The temporal evolution of the intensity of the prompt fluorescent response was modeled using first-order reaction kinetics and the prompt fluorescence decay constant was determined to be 2.46 ± 0.01 (fit) ± 0.13 (systematic) ns. The relative response of the bibenzyl-stilbene mixed crystal generated by recoiling protons was measured, and results were analyzed using Birks' relation to quantify the non-radiative quenching of excitation energy in the scintillator.

  2. Early detection of cataract and response to pantethine therapy with non-invasive static and dynamic light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; King, James F.; Seeberger, Teri; Clark, John I.

    2003-07-01

    Cataractogenesis is a risk factor for space travelers. Here on earth, half of all blindness is due to cataracts. At this time, the only known treatment is surgical removal of the lens. In this paper, we present static and dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements of early onset of cataract before it has any effect on vision and to test the effectiveness of pantethine as an anticataract agent in reversing cataracts. In this preliminary study, experiments were conducted on 12 rodents. Static measurements were performed by scanning the animal eye (cornea to retina) at a laser power of 80 microwatts to collect photons or scattered intensity in steps of 10 microns. The rodents studied were control, selenite injected, and selenite plus pantethine injected. Selenite was used to induce cataracts. Static and dynamic changes (increase in light scatter and crystalline size) in the lenses are quantitatively measured as early as 1 day post selenite injections. Scattering intensity and DLS measurements from lenses of animals administered pantethine resembled controls. These subtle molecular changes are not noticeable when the animals are examined with conventional ophthalmic instruments because their lenses remain transparent. Acknowledgements: Technical support from C.Ganders, University of Washington, Seattle, NEI research grant EY04542 (JIC) and support under a NASA-NEI/NIH interagency agreement (RRA) are greatly appreciated. JFK works for QSS Inc. at NASA GRC.

  3. Visible-light driven photoelectrochemical immunosensor for insulin detection based on MWCNTs@SnS2@CdS nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yixin; Zhang, Yifeng; Wu, Dan; Fan, Dawei; Pang, Xuehui; Zhang, Yong; Ma, Hongmin; Sun, Xu; Wei, Qin

    2016-12-15

    In this work, a label-free photoelectrochemical (PEC) immunosensor was developed for ultrasensitive detection of insulin based on MWCNTs@SnS2@CdS nanocomposites. As graphene-like 2D nanomaterial, SnS2 nanosheets loaded on the conducting framework of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were adopted for the construction of immunosensor for the first time, providing a favorable substrate for in-situ growth of CdS nanocrystal that had suitable band structure matching well with SnS2. The well-matched band structure of these two metal sulfides effectively inhibited the recombination of photogenerated electron-hole pairs, thus improving the photo-to-current conversion efficiency. Besides, the introduction of MWCNTs facilitated electron transfer across the surface of electrodes, leading to a further increment of photocurrent. The as constructed label-free PEC immunosensor based on MWCNTs@SnS2@CdS nanocomposites exhibited excellent PEC performance for the detection of insulin. The concentrations of insulin could be directly detected based on the decrement of photocurrent that was brought by the increased steric hindrances due to the formation of antigen-antibody immunocomplexes. Under the optimal conditions, the PEC immunosensor had a sensitive response to insulin in a linear range of 0.1pgmL(-1) to 5ngmL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.03pgmL(-1). Meanwhile, good stability and selectivity were achieved as well. The design and fabrication of this PEC immunosensor based on MWCNTs@SnS2@CdS nanocomposites not only provided an ideal platform for the detection of insulin, but also opened up a new avenue for the development of immunosensor for some other biomarkers analysis.

  4. Detection and comparison of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by chlorophyllin metal (Fe, Mg and Cu) complexes under ultrasonic and visible-light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Guo, Yuwei; Gao, Jingqun; Jin, Xudong; Wang, Zhiqiu; Wang, Baoxin; Li, Kai; Li, Ying

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, in order to examine the mechanisms of sonodynamic and photodynamic reactions, the chlorophyllin metal (Chl-M (M=Fe, Mg and Cu)) complexes were irradiated by ultrasound (US) and visible-light (VL), respectively, and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were detected by the method of Oxidation-Extraction Spectrometry (OES). That is, the 1,5-diphenyl carbazide (DPCI) is oxidized by the generated ROS into 1,5-diphenyl carbazone (DPCO), which can display a various visible absorption around 563 nm wavelength. Besides, some influence parameters on the generation of ROS were also reviewed. The results demonstrated an apparent synergistic effect of Chl-M and ultrasonic or visible-light irradiation for the generation of ROS. Moreover, the quantities of generated ROS increase with the increase of (ultrasonic or visible-light) irradiation time and Chl-M (M=Fe, Mg and Cu) concentration. Finally, several quenchers were used to determine the kind of the generated ROS. It is wished that this paper might offer some valuable references for the study on the sonodynamic therapy (SDT) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) mechanisms and the application of Chl-M in tumor treatment.

  5. Change detection and characterization of volcanic activity using ground based low-light and near infrared cameras to monitor incandescence and thermal signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrild, M.; Webley, P.; Dehn, J.

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge and understanding of precursory events and thermal signatures are vital for monitoring volcanogenic processes, as activity can often range from low level lava effusion to large explosive eruptions, easily capable of ejecting ash up to aircraft cruise altitudes. Using ground based remote sensing techniques to monitor and detect this activity is essential, but often the required equipment and maintenance is expensive. Our investigation explores the use of low-light cameras to image volcanic activity in the visible to near infrared (NIR) portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. These cameras are ideal for monitoring as they are cheap, consume little power, are easily replaced and can provide near real-time data. We focus here on the early detection of volcanic activity, using automated scripts, that capture streaming online webcam imagery and evaluate image pixel brightness values to determine relative changes and flag increases in activity. The script is written in Python, an open source programming language, to reduce the overall cost to potential consumers and increase the application of these tools across the volcanological community. In addition, by performing laboratory tests to determine the spectral response of these cameras, a direct comparison of collocated low-light and thermal infrared cameras has allowed approximate eruption temperatures and effusion rates to be determined from pixel brightness. The results of a field campaign in June, 2013 to Stromboli volcano, Italy, are also presented here. Future field campaigns to Latin America will include collaborations with INSIVUMEH in Guatemala, to apply our techniques to Fuego and Santiaguito volcanoes.

  6. Change detection and characterization of volcanic activity using ground based low-light and near infrared cameras to monitor incandescence and thermal signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrild, Martin; Webley, Peter; Dehn, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge and understanding of precursory events and thermal signatures are vital for monitoring volcanogenic processes, as activity can often range from low level lava effusion to large explosive eruptions, easily capable of ejecting ash up to aircraft cruise altitudes. Using ground based remote sensing techniques to monitor and detect this activity is essential, but often the required equipment and maintenance is expensive. Our investigation explores the use of low-light cameras to image volcanic activity in the visible to near infrared (NIR) portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. These cameras are ideal for monitoring as they are cheap, consume little power, are easily replaced and can provide near real-time data. We focus here on the early detection of volcanic activity, using automated scripts, that capture streaming online webcam imagery and evaluate image pixel brightness values to determine relative changes and flag increases in activity. The script is written in Python, an open source programming language, to reduce the overall cost to potential consumers and increase the application of these tools across the volcanological community. In addition, by performing laboratory tests to determine the spectral response of these cameras, a direct comparison of collocated low-light and thermal infrared cameras has allowed approximate eruption temperatures and effusion rates to be determined from pixel brightness. The results of a field campaign in June, 2013 to Stromboli volcano, Italy, are also presented here. Future field campaigns to Latin America will include collaborations with INSIVUMEH in Guatemala, to apply our techniques to Fuego and Santiaguito volcanoes.

  7. A robust generic method for grid detection in white light microscopy Malassez blade images in the context of cell counting.

    PubMed

    Marin, Ambroise; Denimal, Emmanuel; Guyot, Stéphane; Journaux, Ludovic; Molin, Paul

    2015-02-01

    In biology, cell counting is a primary measurement and it is usually performed manually using hemocytometers such as Malassez blades. This work is tedious and can be automated using image processing. An algorithm based on Fourier transform filtering and the Hough transform was developed for Malassez blade grid extraction. This facilitates cell segmentation and counting within the grid. For the present work, a set of 137 images with high variability was processed. Grids were accurately detected in 98% of these images.

  8. An automatic high precision registration method between large area aerial images and aerial light detection and ranging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Q.; Xie, D.; Sun, Y.

    2015-06-01

    The integration of digital aerial photogrammetry and Light Detetion And Ranging (LiDAR) is an inevitable trend in Surveying and Mapping field. We calculate the external orientation elements of images which identical with LiDAR coordinate to realize automatic high precision registration between aerial images and LiDAR data. There are two ways to calculate orientation elements. One is single image spatial resection using image matching 3D points that registered to LiDAR. The other one is Position and Orientation System (POS) data supported aerotriangulation. The high precision registration points are selected as Ground Control Points (GCPs) instead of measuring GCPs manually during aerotriangulation. The registration experiments indicate that the method which registering aerial images and LiDAR points has a great advantage in higher automation and precision compare with manual registration.

  9. Interfacial electron transfer of P3HT/PDI/ZnO nanocomposite and its application in visible-light detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lina; Lin, Hongtao; Wu, Yishi; Zhuo, Shuping

    2016-09-01

    Photoinduced interfacial electron transfer plays a key role in photoactive organic/inorganic hybrid nanomaterials and remains elusive with regard to interfacial energy level alignment. In this study, n-type organic semiconductor 1,6,7,12-tetrachloro-3,4,9,10-Perylenetetracarboxylicdiimide (PDI) molecules bearing carboxylic acid groups at nitrogen positions were grafted onto the surface of the Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles, and then blended with p-type poly (3-hexylthiophene) P3HT. The addition of PDI facilitates the charge transfer process from P3HT to ZnO, which was characterized by steady-state spectroscopy and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. High performance visible-light detector based on P3HT/PDI/ZnO has been fabricated. This provides guidelines for the construction of optoelectronic devices.

  10. Detection and modeling of leakage current in AlGaN-based deep ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Moseley, Michael William; Allerman, Andrew A.; Crawford, Mary H.; Wierer, Jonathan; Smith, Michael L.; Armstrong, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    Current-voltage (IV) characteristics of two AlGaN-based deep ultraviolet (DUV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with differing densities of open-core threading dislocations (nanopipes) are analyzed. A three-diode circuit is simulated to emulate the IV characteristics of the DUV-LEDs, but is only able to accurately model the lower leakage current, lower nanopipe density DUV-LED. It was found that current leakage through the nanopipes in these structures is rectifying, despite nanopipes being previously established as inherently n-type. Using defect-sensitive etching, the nanopipes are revealed to terminate within the p-type GaN capping layer of the DUV-LEDs. The circuit model is modified to account for another p-n junction between the n-type nanopipes and the p-type GaN, and an excellent fit to the IV characteristics of the leaky DUV-LED is achieved.

  11. Roche/BIOTECON Diagnostics LightCycler foodproof L. monocytogenes detection kit in combination with ShortPrep foodproof II Kit. Performance-Tested Method 070401.

    PubMed

    Junge, Benjamin; Berghof-Jäger, Kornelia

    2006-01-01

    A method was developed for the detection of L. monocytogenes in food based on real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). This advanced PCR method was designed to reduce the time needed to achieve results from PCR reactions and to enable the user to monitor the amplification of the PCR product simultaneously, in real-time. After DNA isolation using the Roche/BIOTECON Diagnostics ShortPrep foodproof II Kit (formerly called Listeria ShortPrep Kit) designed for the rapid preparation of L. monocytogenes DNA for direct use in PCR, the real-time detection of L. monocytogenes DNA is performed by using the Roche/BIOTECON Diagnostics LightCycler foodproof L. monocytogenes Detection Kit. This kit provides primers and hybridization probes for sequence-specific detection, convenient premixed reagents, and different controls for reliable interpretation of results. For repeatability studies, 20 different foods, covering the 15 food groups recommended from the AOAC Research Institute (AOAC RI) for L. monocytogenes detection were analyzed: raw meats, fresh produce/vegetables, processed meats, seafood, egg and egg products, dairy (cultured/noncultured), spices, dry foods, fruit/juices, uncooked pasta, nuts, confectionery, pet food, food dyes and colorings, and miscellaneous. From each food 20, samples were inoculated with a low level (1-10 colony-forming units (CFU)/25 g) and 20 samples with a high level (10-50 CFU/25 g) of L. monocytogenes. Additionally, 5 uninoculated samples were prepared from each food. The food samples were examined with the test kits and in correlation with the cultural methods according to U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Bacteriological Analytical Manual (BAM) or U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)/Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook. After 48 h of incubation, the PCR method in all cases showed equal or better results than the reference cultural FDA/BAM or USDA/FSIS methods. Fifteen out of 20 tested food types

  12. Bili lights

    MedlinePlus

    Phototherapy for jaundice; Bilirubin - bili lights; Neonatal care - bili lights; Newborn care - bili lights ... Phototherapy involves shining fluorescent light from the bili lights on bare skin. A specific wavelength of light can break down bilirubin into a form that ...

  13. Gastric cancer detection based on blood plasma surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy excited by polarized laser light.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shangyuan; Chen, Rong; Lin, Juqiang; Pan, Jianji; Wu, Yanan; Li, Yongzeng; Chen, Jiesi; Zeng, Haishan

    2011-03-15

    We have recently applied surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for blood plasma analysis for non-invasive nasopharyngeal cancer detection and obtained good preliminary results. The aim of this study was to develop a more robust SERS spectroscopy based blood plasma analysis method for non-invasive gastric cancer detection. The effect of different laser polarizations (non-polarized, linear-polarized, right-handed circularly polarized, and left-handed circularly polarized) on blood plasma SERS spectroscopy was explored for the first time. Silver nanoparticles as the SERS-substrate were directly mixed with blood plasma to enhance the Raman scattering of various biomolecular constituents. High quality SERS spectra were obtained using a fiber optic probe and a dispersive type near infrared Raman system. Blood plasma samples from gastric cancer patients (n=32) and healthy subjects (n=33) were analyzed. The diagnostic performance for differentiating gastric cancer plasma from normal plasma was evaluated. Principal component analysis combined with linear discriminant analysis (LDA) of the obtained spectral data was used to develop diagnostic algorithms. Classification results obtained from cross-validation of the LDA model based on the four spectral data sets of different laser polarizations demonstrated different diagnostic sensitivities and specificities: 71.9% and 72.7% for non-polarized laser excitation, 75% and 87.9% for linear-polarized laser excitation, 81.3% and 78.8% for right-handed circularly polarized laser excitation, 100% and 97% for left-handed circularly polarized laser excitation. The results from this exploratory study demonstrated that plasma SERS spectroscopy with left-handed circularly polarized laser excitation has great promise of becoming a clinically useful diagnostic tool for non-invasive gastric cancer detection.

  14. Design of flow chamber with electronic cell volume capability and light detection optics for multilaser flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Schuette, W H; Shackney, S E; Plowman, F A; Tipton, H W; Smith, C A; MacCollum, M A

    1984-11-01

    A multibeam optical detection system has been developed with a high optical efficiency, achieved through a reduction in the number of optical interfaces employed in the system. This reduction is made possible by a combination of employing simple lenses, gluing the objective lens directly upon the face of the flow cuvette and the extraction of only one fluorescence signal from each laser beam. A modified flow chamber is also described that includes fluidic resistance elements for the elimination of most of the electric shielding normally associated with electronic cell volume measurements.

  15. Novel Light-Upon-Extension Real-Time PCR Assay for Simultaneous Detection, Quantification, and Genogrouping of Group A Rotavirus▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Nordgren, Johan; Bucardo, Filemón; Svensson, Lennart; Lindgren, Per-Eric

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a light-upon-extension (LUX) real-time PCR assay for detection, quantification, and genogrouping of group A rotavirus (RV), the most common cause of acute gastroenteritis in children. The LUX system uses a fluorophore attached to one primer and having a self-quenching hairpin structure, making it cost-effective and specific. We designed genogroup-specific primers having different fluorophores, making it possible to differentiate between the two main genogroups of human group A RVs. The assay was applied on clinical stool specimens from Sweden and Central America (n = 196) and compared to immunological and conventional PCR assays. The genogrouping ability was further validated against a subset of clinical specimens, which had been genogrouped using monoclonal antibodies. Our real-time PCR assay detected and quantified all positive specimens (n = 145) and exhibited higher sensitivity than immunological assays and conventional PCR. The assay exhibited a wide dynamic range, detecting from 5 to >107 genes per PCR, resulting in a theoretical lower detection limit of <10,000 viruses per gram of stool. No cross-reaction was observed with specimens containing norovirus, sapovirus, astrovirus, or adenovirus. In total, 22 (15%) of the positive clinical specimens were identified as genogroup I, 122 (84%) were identified as genogroup II, and 1 specimen was found to contain a mix of both genogroups. All genogroup I-positive specimens were associated with capsid glycoprotein 2 (G2). No significant difference in viral load was found between genogroups or geographic region. The detection and quantification, combined with the genogrouping ability, make this assay a valuable tool both for diagnostics and for molecular epidemiological investigations. PMID:20220154

  16. Visible light photoelectrochemical aptasensor for adenosine detection based on CdS/PPy/g-C3N4 nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yixin; Ma, Hongmin; Zhang, Yong; Pang, Xuehui; Fan, Dawei; Wu, Dan; Wei, Qin

    2016-12-15

    In this work, a label-free photoelectrochemical (PEC) aptasensor was developed for adenosine detection based on CdS/PPy/g-C3N4 nanocomposites. The CdS/g-C3N4 heterojunction effectively prevented the photogenerated charges recombination of g-C3N4 and self-photocorrosion processes of CdS, improving photo-to-current conversion efficiency. The introduced polypyrrole (PPy) nanoparticles could lead to a more effective separation of photogenerated charges, thus resulting in a further increasing of photocurrent. The CdS/PPy/g-C3N4 was firstly employed as the photoactive materials for fabrication of aptasensor, and SH-aptamer was then adsorbed on the CdS/PPy/g-C3N4 modified electrodes through S-Cd bond. With increasing of adenosine concentration, the photocurrent decreased as the formation of SH-aptamer-adenosine bioaffinity complexes. Under optimal conditions, the PEC aptasensor had a sensitive response to adenosine in a linear range of 0.3nmolL(-1) to 200nmolL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.1nmolL(-1). Besides, the as-proposed aptasensor has also been applied in human serum samples analysis. The aptasensor exhibits high sensitivity and good stability, thus opening up a new promising PEC platform for some other small molecules analysis.

  17. Experimental detection of high-order or fractional orbital angular momentum of light based on a robust mode converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Wuhong; Chen, Lixiang

    2016-03-01

    Based on our constructed robust π/2 mode converter, we report a concise yet high-efficient experiment to realize the detection of both high-order and fractional orbital angular momentum (OAM). The π/2 mode converter that consists of a pair of cylindrical lens is actually not new. However, our experiment shows clearly its excellent robustness, as we have detected the high-order OAM numbers up to ℓ = 100 carried by standard Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) modes. The observed patterns of two-dimensional optical lattices indicate that the radial index p of LG beams can be straightforwardly inferred as well. The versatility of the converter is also manifested by input modified LG beams carrying tunable fractional OAM, where we observe the output lattices exhibiting an interesting evolvement from Hermite-Gaussian mode HG m , 0 to its adjacent HG m + 1 , 0 . Numeric simulations based on OAM eigen-mode decomposition support the experimental results. Our demonstration has potential in both classical and quantum information applications where high OAM modes are needed.

  18. Excluding the light dark matter window of a 331 model using LHC and direct dark matter detection data

    SciTech Connect

    Cogollo, D.; Gonzalez-Morales, Alma X.; Queiroz, Farinaldo S.; Teles, P. Rebello E-mail: alxogonz@ucsc.edu E-mail: patricia.rebello.teles@cern.ch

    2014-11-01

    We sift the impact of the recent Higgs precise measurements, and recent dark matter direct detection results, on the dark sector of an electroweak extension of the Standard Model that has a complex scalar as dark matter. We find that in this model the Higgs decays with a large branching ratio into dark matter particles, and charged scalars when these are kinematically available, for any coupling strength differently from the so called Higgs portal. Moreover, we compute the abundance and spin-independent WIMP-nucleon scattering cross section, which are driven by the Higgs and Z{sup '} boson processes. We decisively exclude the 1–500 GeV dark matter window and find the most stringent lower bound in the literature on the scale of symmetry breaking of the model namely 10 TeV, after applying the LUX-2013 limit. Interestingly, the projected XENON1T constraint will be able to rule out the entire 1 GeV–1000 GeV dark matter mass range. Lastly, for completeness, we compute the charged scalar production cross section at the LHC and comment on the possibility of detection at current and future LHC runnings.

  19. Colorimetric and dynamic light scattering detection of DNA sequences by using positively charged gold nanospheres: a comparative study with gold nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pylaev, T. E.; Khanadeev, V. A.; Khlebtsov, B. N.; Dykman, L. A.; Bogatyrev, V. A.; Khlebtsov, N. G.

    2011-07-01

    We introduce a new genosensing approach employing CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide)-coated positively charged colloidal gold nanoparticles (GNPs) to detect target DNA sequences by using absorption spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering. The approach is compared with a previously reported method employing unmodified CTAB-coated gold nanorods (GNRs). Both approaches are based on the observation that whereas the addition of probe and target ssDNA to CTAB-coated particles results in particle aggregation, no aggregation is observed after addition of probe and nontarget DNA sequences. Our goal was to compare the feasibility and sensitivity of both methods. A 21-mer ssDNA from the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 HIV-1 U5 long terminal repeat (LTR) sequence and a 23-mer ssDNA from the Bacillus anthracis cryptic protein and protective antigen precursor (pagA) genes were used as ssDNA models. In the case of GNRs, unexpectedly, the colorimetric test failed with perfect cigar-like particles but could be performed with dumbbell and dog-bone rods. By contrast, our approach with cationic CTAB-coated GNPs is easy to implement and possesses excellent feasibility with retention of comparable sensitivity—a 0.1 nM concentration of target cDNA can be detected with the naked eye and 10 pM by dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements. The specificity of our method is illustrated by successful DLS detection of one-three base mismatches in cDNA sequences for both DNA models. These results suggest that the cationic GNPs and DLS can be used for genosensing under optimal DNA hybridization conditions without any chemical modifications of the particle surface with ssDNA molecules and signal amplification. Finally, we discuss a more than two-three-order difference in the reported estimations of the detection sensitivity of colorimetric methods (0.1 to 10-100 pM) to show that the existing aggregation models are inconsistent with the detection limits of about 0.1-1 pM DNA and that

  20. Detection and modeling of leakage current in AlGaN-based deep ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    DOE PAGES

    Moseley, Michael William; Allerman, Andrew A.; Crawford, Mary H.; ...

    2015-03-01

    Current-voltage (IV) characteristics of two AlGaN-based deep ultraviolet (DUV) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with differing densities of open-core threading dislocations (nanopipes) are analyzed. A three-diode circuit is simulated to emulate the IV characteristics of the DUV-LEDs, but is only able to accurately model the lower leakage current, lower nanopipe density DUV-LED. It was found that current leakage through the nanopipes in these structures is rectifying, despite nanopipes being previously established as inherently n-type. Using defect-sensitive etching, the nanopipes are revealed to terminate within the p-type GaN capping layer of the DUV-LEDs. The circuit model is modified to account for another p-nmore » junction between the n-type nanopipes and the p-type GaN, and an excellent fit to the IV characteristics of the leaky DUV-LED is achieved.« less

  1. Quantitation of polysorbate 20 in protein solutions using mixed-mode chromatography and evaporative light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Daniel; Zhang, Taylor; Kao, Yung-Hsiang

    2008-12-26

    An HPLC assay requiring no complex sample preparation for the measurement of polysorbate 20 in protein solutions was developed. An on-off chromatography technique was employed involving a mixed-mode stationary phase (Waters Oasis MAX, mixed-mode anion-exchange and reversed-phase sorbent) to quantify polysorbate 20 in solutions containing >100mg/mL of protein. With 2% formic acid mobile phase, proteins are typically positive charged and are not retained because of electrostatic repulsions from the quaternary amine in the mixed-mode resin. Other formulation components elute in void volume because of their hydrophilicity. Hydrophobic polysorbate 20 is retained, eluted with a step gradient and quantified as a single peak using an evaporative light scattering detector. The performance of the assay is evaluated according to International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) guidelines and shown to be suitable for polysorbate quantitation. Accuracy (96-108%) and repeatability (2.3% RSD) were demonstrated using protein samples spiked with polysorbate 20. This method was used to accurately measure polysorbate 20 in at least 25 different protein solutions spanning a wide range of formulations. Although the majority of the data reported here target polysorbate 20, this methodology can also be used to assay other common non-ionic surfactants such as polysorbate 80, Brij, Igepal, and Triton X-100.

  2. Novel Light-Upon-Extension Real-Time PCR Assays for Detection and Quantification of Genogroup I and II Noroviruses in Clinical Specimens▿

    PubMed Central

    Nordgren, Johan; Bucardo, Filemón; Dienus, Olaf; Svensson, Lennart; Lindgren, Per-Eric

    2008-01-01

    Norovirus is now recognized as the leading cause of nonbacterial acute gastroenteritis in adults, causing numerous outbreaks worldwide. We have developed two novel light-upon-extension (LUX) real-time PCR assays for detection and quantification of norovirus genogroups I and II. The LUX system uses a fluorophore attached to one primer having a self-quenching hairpin structure, making it cost-effective and specific. The assays were evaluated against clinical stool specimens (n = 103) from Sweden and Nicaragua and compared to established methods. The norovirus assay detected more positive stool specimens (47/103) than conventional PCR (39/103) and corresponded to a TaqMan real-time PCR, with the exception of one specimen. Furthermore, the assays correctly identified all (n = 11) coded control specimens in a reference panel containing various genogroups and genotypes. Both LUX real-time PCR assays had a wide dynamic range, detecting from ≤101 to 107 genes per reaction, resulting in a theoretical lower limit of ≤∼20 000 viruses per gram of stool. No cross-reactivity was noticed with specimens containing other enteric viruses, and by using melting curve analysis we could differentiate between norovirus genogroups I and II. PMID:17959761

  3. Gold nanoparticle-based simple colorimetric and ultrasensitive dynamic light scattering assay for the selective detection of Pb(II) from paints, plastics, and water samples.

    PubMed

    Beqa, Lule; Singh, Anant Kumar; Khan, Sadia Afrin; Senapati, Dulal; Arumugam, Sri Ranjini; Ray, Paresh Chandra

    2011-03-01

    Pb (II) is a common water pollutant with high toxicity. According to the CDC, about 310,000 U.S. children of ages 1-5 have high levels of lead in their blood that it is due to the exposure to lead from plastic toys and other products. As a result, the development of ultrasensitive assays for the real-time detection of Pb(II) from plastic toys and paints is very important for water controlling, clinical toxicology and industrial processes. Driven by the need to detect trace amounts of Pb(II) from water samples, we report a label-free, highly selective and ultra sensitive glutathione modified gold nanoparticle based dynamic light scattering (DLS) probe for Pb(II) recognition in 100 ppt level from aqueous solution with excellent discrimination against other heavy metals. The sensitivity of our assay to detect Pb(II) level in water is almost 2 orders of magnitude higher than the EPA standard limit. We have also demonstrated that our DLS assay is capable of measuring the amount of Pb(II) in paint, plastic toys, and water from MS river. A possible mechanism and operating principles of our DLS assay have been discussed. Ultimately, this nanotechnology driven assay could have enormous potential applications in rapid, on-site monitoring of Pb(II) from day-to-day sample.

  4. We Detect Blue Light Phenomena Correlating with Environmental and Weather Changes, and Historic Native Americans or Their Place Names.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochs, Michael Ann; Mc Leod, Roger D.; Mc Leod, Edward M.

    2003-10-01

    Katahdin (Christ Cathar Spirit-signal stronghold) in Maine is sacred to the Penobscot Indian Nation. That mountain complex, and areas like Ellis Pond, ME and Penley Hill/Anasagunticook (adherent of Jesus Christ Spirit-signal doctor church) of the Mexico/Rumford/Mountain Valley region, also in Maine, have an association with historic Native Americans like the medicine woman Molocket/Molly Ockett. We have observed that these and other regions generate electromagnetic field (EMF) signals, which we can detect visually and in other ways. Such signals have sometimes been associated with significant and dynamic weather phenomena. Ohio's Serpent Mound and associated regions, or those now occupied by the Hopi Indian Nation, formerly an ancient Anasazi site, or areas of the current and earlier Mayan Nations, or the Nazca Plateau of Peru, may generate signals correlating with climate change, that may impact our technology, as in major power blackouts.

  5. N-doped TiO2 based visible light activated label-free photoelectrochemical biosensor for detection of Hg(2+) through quenching of photogenerated electrons.

    PubMed

    Han, Qianqian; Wang, Kewei; Xu, Lijun; Yan, Xiang; Zhang, Kunchi; Chen, Xing; Wang, Qinglin; Zhang, Lan; Pei, Renjun

    2015-06-21

    A novel photoelectrochemical (PEC) biosensor was fabricated based on N-doped TiO2 for the detection of Hg(2+) through the quenching of photogenerated electrons. The N-doped TiO2 was synthesized by a sol-gel method with urea and tetrabutyl titanate as the N and Ti sources. Compared with the undoped TiO2, the N-doped TiO2 showed an enhanced photocurrent response under visible light (λ > 420 nm). The sensing surface was functionalized with 5'-amino-modified T-rich oligonucleotides. The photoelectrochemical biosensor bound Hg(2+) on the surface by a highly specific T-Hg(2+)-T recognition. Hg(2+) on the surface of the N-doped TiO2 film withdrew the photogenerated electrons and decreased the recorded current signal. The dynamic linear range for Hg(2+) has been determined to be as low as 2-6 μM.

  6. Visual and light scattering spectrometric method for the detection of melamine using uracil 5‧-triphosphate sodium modified gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Lijiao; Zhen, Shujun; Huang, Chengzhi

    2017-02-01

    A highly selective method was presented for colorimetric determination of melamine using uracil 5‧-triphosphate sodium modified gold nanoparticles (UTP-Au NPs) in this paper. Specific hydrogen-bonding interaction between uracil base (U) and melamine resulted in the aggregation of AuNPs, displaying variations of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) features such as color change from red to blue and enhanced localized surface plasmon resonance light scattering (LSPR-LS) signals. Accordingly, the concentration of melamine could be quantified based on naked eye or a spectrometric method. This method was simple, inexpensive, environmental friendly and highly selective, which has been successfully used for the detection of melamine in pretreated liquid milk products with high recoveries.

  7. First light of the VLT planet finder SPHERE. I. Detection and characterization of the substellar companion GJ 758 B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigan, A.; Bonnefoy, M.; Ginski, C.; Beust, H.; Galicher, R.; Janson, M.; Baudino, J.-L.; Buenzli, E.; Hagelberg, J.; D'Orazi, V.; Desidera, S.; Maire, A.-L.; Gratton, R.; Sauvage, J.-F.; Chauvin, G.; Thalmann, C.; Malo, L.; Salter, G.; Zurlo, A.; Antichi, J.; Baruffolo, A.; Baudoz, P.; Blanchard, P.; Boccaletti, A.; Beuzit, J.-L.; Carle, M.; Claudi, R.; Costille, A.; Delboulbé, A.; Dohlen, K.; Dominik, C.; Feldt, M.; Fusco, T.; Gluck, L.; Girard, J.; Giro, E.; Gry, C.; Henning, T.; Hubin, N.; Hugot, E.; Jaquet, M.; Kasper, M.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Langlois, M.; Le Mignant, D.; Llored, M.; Madec, F.; Martinez, P.; Mawet, D.; Mesa, D.; Milli, J.; Mouillet, D.; Moulin, T.; Moutou, C.; Origné, A.; Pavlov, A.; Perret, D.; Petit, C.; Pragt, J.; Puget, P.; Rabou, P.; Rochat, S.; Roelfsema, R.; Salasnich, B.; Schmid, H.-M.; Sevin, A.; Siebenmorgen, R.; Smette, A.; Stadler, E.; Suarez, M.; Turatto, M.; Udry, S.; Vakili, F.; Wahhaj, Z.; Weber, L.; Wildi, F.

    2016-03-01

    GJ 758 B is a brown dwarf companion to a nearby (15.76%) solar-type, metal-rich (M / H = + 0.2 dex) main-sequence star (G9V) that was discovered with Subaru/HiCIAO in 2009. From previous studies, it has drawn attention as being the coldest (~600 K) companion ever directly imaged around a neighboring star. We present new high-contrast data obtained during the commissioning of the SPHERE instrument at the Very Large Telescope (VLT). The data was obtained in Y-, J-, H-, and Ks-bands with the dual-band imaging (DBI) mode of IRDIS, thus providing a broad coverage of the full near-infrared (near-IR) range at higher contrast and better spectral sampling than previously reported. In this new set of high-quality data, we report the re-detection of the companion, as well as the first detection of a new candidate closer-in to the star. We use the new eight photometric points for an extended comparison of GJ 758 B with empirical objects and four families of atmospheric models. From comparison to empirical object, we estimate a T8 spectral type, but none of the comparison objects can accurately represent the observed near-IR fluxes of GJ 758 B. From comparison to atmospheric models, we attribute a Teff = 600 ± 100 K, but we find that no atmospheric model can adequately fit all the fluxes of GJ 758 B. The lack of exploration of metal enrichment in model grids appears as a major limitation that prevents an accurate estimation of the companion physical parameters. The photometry of the new candidate companion is broadly consistent with L-type objects, but a second epoch with improved photometry is necessary to clarify its status. The new astrometry of GJ 758 B shows a significant proper motion since the last epoch. We use this result to improve the determination of the orbital characteristics using two fitting approaches: Least-Squares Monte Carlo and Markov chain Monte Carlo. We confirm the high-eccentricity of the orbit (peak at 0.5), and find a most likely semi-major axis of

  8. Detection of Possible Quasi-periodic Oscillations in the Long-term Optical Light Curve of the BL Lac Object OJ 287

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatta, G.; Zola, S.; Stawarz, Ł.; Ostrowski, M.; Winiarski, M.; Ogłoza, W.; Dróżdż, M.; Siwak, M.; Liakos, A.; Kozieł-Wierzbowska, D.; Gazeas, K.; Debski, B.; Kundera, T.; Stachowski, G.; Paliya, V. S.

    2016-11-01

    The detection of periodicity in the broadband non-thermal emission of blazars has so far been proven to be elusive. However, there are a number of scenarios that could lead to quasi-periodic variations in blazar light curves. For example, an orbital or thermal/viscous period of accreting matter around central supermassive black holes could, in principle, be imprinted in the multi-wavelength emission of small-scale blazar jets, carrying such crucial information about plasma conditions within the jet launching regions. In this paper, we present the results of our time series analysis of the ˜9.2 yr long, and exceptionally well-sampled, optical light curve of the BL Lac object OJ 287. The study primarily used the data from our own observations performed at the Mt. Suhora and Kraków Observatories in Poland, and at the Athens Observatory in Greece. Additionally, SMARTS observations were used to fill some of the gaps in the data. The Lomb-Scargle periodogram and the weighted wavelet Z-transform methods were employed to search for possible quasi-periodic oscillations in the resulting optical light curve of the source. Both methods consistently yielded a possible quasi-periodic signal around the periods of ˜400 and ˜800 days, the former with a significance (over the underlying colored noise) of ≥slant 99 % . A number of likely explanations for this are discussed, with preference given to a modulation of the jet production efficiency by highly magnetized accretion disks. This supports previous findings and the interpretation reported recently in the literature for OJ 287 and other blazar sources.

  9. THE VERY EARLY LIGHT CURVE OF SN 2015F IN NGC 2442: A POSSIBLE DETECTION OF SHOCK-HEATED COOLING EMISSION AND CONSTRAINTS ON SN Ia PROGENITOR SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Im, Myungshin; Choi, Changsu; Kim, Jae-Woo; Yoon, Sung-Chul; Ehgamberdiev, Shuhrat A.; Monard, Libert A. G.; Sung, Hyun-Il E-mail: changsu@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2015-11-15

    The main progenitor candidates of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are white dwarfs in binary systems where the companion star is another white dwarf (double degenerate (DD) system) or a less-evolved, non-degenerate star with R{sub *} ≳ 0.1 R{sub ⊙} (single degenerate system). However, no direct observational evidence exists to tell us which progenitor system is more common. Recent studies suggest that the light curve of a supernova shortly after its explosion can be used to set a limit on the progenitor size, R{sub *}. Here, we report high-cadence monitoring observations of SN 2015F, a normal SN Ia in the galaxy NGC 2442, starting about 84 days before the first light time. Using our daily cadence data, we capture the emergence of the radioactively powered light curve; more importantly, with >97.4% confidence, we detect possible dim precursor emission that appears roughly 1.5 days before the rise of the radioactively powered emission. The signal is consistent with theoretical expectations for a progenitor system involving a companion star with R{sub *} ≃ 0.1–1 R{sub ⊙} or a prompt explosion of a DD system, but is inconsistent with the typically invoked size of a white dwarf progenitor of R{sub *} ∼ 0.01 R{sub ⊙}. Upper limits on the precursor emission also constrain the progenitor size to be R{sub *} ≲ 0.1 R{sub ⊙} with a companion star size of R{sub *} ≲ 1.0 R{sub ⊙}, excluding a very large companion star in the progenitor system. Additionally, we find that the distance to SN 2015F is 23.9 ± 0.4 Mpc.

  10. The Very Early Light Curve of SN 2015F in NGC 2442: A Possible Detection of Shock-heated Cooling Emission and Constraints on SN Ia Progenitor System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Myungshin; Choi, Changsu; Yoon, Sung-Chul; Kim, Jae-Woo; Ehgamberdiev, Shuhrat A.; Monard, Libert A. G.; Sung, Hyun-Il

    2015-11-01

    The main progenitor candidates of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are white dwarfs in binary systems where the companion star is another white dwarf (double degenerate (DD) system) or a less-evolved, non-degenerate star with R* ≳ 0.1 R⊙ (single degenerate system). However, no direct observational evidence exists to tell us which progenitor system is more common. Recent studies suggest that the light curve of a supernova shortly after its explosion can be used to set a limit on the progenitor size, R*. Here, we report high-cadence monitoring observations of SN 2015F, a normal SN Ia in the galaxy NGC 2442, starting about 84 days before the first light time. Using our daily cadence data, we capture the emergence of the radioactively powered light curve; more importantly, with >97.4% confidence, we detect possible dim precursor emission that appears roughly 1.5 days before the rise of the radioactively powered emission. The signal is consistent with theoretical expectations for a progenitor system involving a companion star with R* ≃ 0.1-1 R⊙ or a prompt explosion of a DD system, but is inconsistent with the typically invoked size of a white dwarf progenitor of R* ˜ 0.01 R⊙. Upper limits on the precursor emission also constrain the progenitor size to be R* ≲ 0.1 R⊙ with a companion star size of R* ≲ 1.0 R⊙, excluding a very large companion star in the progenitor system. Additionally, we find that the distance to SN 2015F is 23.9 ± 0.4 Mpc.

  11. Partial solubility parameters of lactose, mannitol and saccharose using the modified extended Hansen method and evaporation light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Peña, M A; Daali, Y; Barra, J; Bustamante, P

    2000-02-01

    The modified extended Hansen method was tested for the first time to determine partial solubility parameters of non-polymeric pharmaceutical excipients. The method was formerly tested with drug molecules, and is based upon a regression analysis of the logarithm of the mole fraction solubility of the solute against the partial solubility parameters of a series of solvents of different chemical classes. Two monosaccharides and one disaccharide (lactose monohydrate, saccharose and mannitol) were chosen. The solubility of these compounds was determined in a series of solvents ranging from nonpolar to polar and covering a wide range of the solubility parameter scale. Sugars do not absorb at the UV-vis region, and the saturated solutions were assayed with a recent chromatographic technique coupled to an evaporative light scattering detector. This technique was suitable to determine the concentration dissolved in most solvents. The modified extended Hansen method provided better results than the original approach. The best model was the four parameter equation, which includes the dispersion delta d, dipolar delta p, acidic delta a and basic delta b partial solubility parameters. The partial solubility parameters obtained, expressed as MPa1/2, were delta d = 17.6, delta p = 28.7, delta h = 19, delta a = 14.5, delta b = 12.4, delta T = 32.8 for lactose, delta d = 16.2, delta p = 24.5, delta h = 14.6, delta a = 8.7, delta b = 12.2, delta T = 32.8 for mannitol and delta d = 17.1, delta p = 18.5, delta h = 13, delta a = 11.3, delta b = 7.6, delta T = 28.4 for saccharose. The high total solubility parameters delta T obtained agree with the polar nature of the sugars. The dispersion parameters delta d are quite similar for the three sugars indicating that the polar delta p and hydrogen bonding parameters (delta h, delta a, delta b) are responsible for the variation in the total solubility parameters delta T obtained, as also found for drugs. The results suggest that the method

  12. Dynamic Light-Scattering Probe Used for the Very Early Detection of Cataracts and to Measure Response to Therapy (or Treatment)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansari,Rafat R.; Clark, John I.; King, James F.

    2002-01-01

    Half of all blindness worldwide is due to cataracts, and 34 million Americans over the age of 65 have cataracts. This figure is expected to rise to 70 million by the year 2030. Currently, no medical treatment is available to prevent or halt the progression of a cataract; nor is there any way to reverse a cataract once it has been detected by conventional methods. The only known treatment is surgical removal of the lens. It is estimated that over $5 billion will be spent this year for the treatment of cataract patients in the United States alone. According to Carl Kupfer, M.D., former Director of the National Eye Institute at the National Institutes of Health, "A delay in cataract formation of about 10 years would reduce the prevalence of visually disabling cataracts by about 45 percent." However, this vision remains a dream because of the lack of objective methods that can be used to detect cataracts very early and, hence, can be used for screening potential anticataract drugs. This is about to change. The National Eye Institute and NASA entered into a formal interagency agreement in late 1996 to develop and test a dynamic light-scattering (DLS) device to detect the earliest changes due to cataract formation. The new DLS probe developed by Dr. Ansari at the NASA Glenn Research Center is several orders of magnitude more sensitive than conventional clinical systems. This ultrahigh sensitivity enables the probe to detect the onset of a cataract before it has any effect on vision and allows researchers to test the effectiveness of anticataract drugs in reversing cataracts. This device (see the following illustration) was originally designed to study transport phenomena in microgravity fluid physics experiments onboard the space shuttle orbiters and space station. It will be very useful in testing anticataract drugs to halt or reverse the progression of cataracts during longitudinal clinical trials.

  13. Screening of cellulases for biofuel production: online monitoring of the enzymatic hydrolysis of insoluble cellulose using high-throughput scattered light detection.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Gernot; Wulfhorst, Helene; Zeithammel, Erik U; Elinidou, Efthimia; Spiess, Antje C; Büchs, Jochen

    2011-01-01

    A new prospective cellulase assay simultaneously combining high-throughput, online analysis and insoluble cellulosic substrates is described. The hydrolysis of three different insoluble cellulosic substrates, catalysed by a commercial cellulase preparation from Trichoderma reesei (Celluclast), was monitored using the BioLector - allowing online monitoring of scattered light intensities in a continuously shaken microtiter plate. Cellulase activities could be quantitatively assayed using the BioLector. At low cellulase/cellulose ratios, the Michaelis-Menten parameters of the cellulase mixture were mainly affected by the crystallinity index of the cellulose. Here, the apparent maximum cellulase activities inversely correlated with the crystallinity index of the cellulose. At high cellulase/cellulose ratios the particle size of the cellulose, defining the external surface area accessible to the cellulases, was the key determining factor for cellulase activity. The developed technique was also successfully applied to evaluate the pH optimum of cellulases. Moreover, the non-hydrolytic deagglomeration of cellulose particles was investigated, for the first time, using high-throughput scattered light detection. In conclusion, this cellulase assay ideally links high-throughput, online analysis and realistic insoluble cellulosic substrates in one simple system. It will considerably simplify and accelerate fundamental research on cellulase screening.

  14. Self-assembly-induced far-red/near-infrared fluorescence light-up for detecting and visualizing specific protein-Peptide interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huaimin; Liu, Jie; Han, Aitian; Xiao, Nannan; Xue, Zhaosheng; Wang, Gang; Long, Jiafu; Kong, Deling; Liu, Bin; Yang, Zhimou; Ding, Dan

    2014-02-25

    Understanding specific protein-peptide interactions could offer a deep insight into the development of therapeutics for many human diseases. In this work, we designed and synthesized a far-red/near-infrared (FR/NIR) fluorescence light-up probe (DBT-2EEGWRESAI) by simply integrating two tax-interacting protein-1 (TIP-1)-specific peptide ligands (EEGWRESAI) with one 4,7-di(thiophen-2-yl)-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole (DBT) unit. We first demonstrated that DBT is an environment-sensitive fluorophore with FR/NIR fluorescence due to its strong charge transfer character in the excited state. Thanks to the environmental sensitivity of DBT, the probe DBT-2EEGWRESAI is very weakly fluorescent in aqueous solution but lights up its fluorescence when the probe specifically binds to TIP-1 protein or polyprotein (ULD-TIP-1 tetramer). It is found that the DBT-2EEGWRESAI/TIP-1 protein and the DBT-2EEGWRESAI/ULD-TIP-1 tetramer could self-assemble into spherical nanocomplexes and a nanofiber network, respectively, which lead to probe fluorescence turn-on through providing DBT with a hydrophobic microenvironment. By virtue of the self-assembly-induced FR/NIR fluorescence turn-on, DBT-2EEGWRESAI can detect and visualize specific protein/polyprotein-peptide interactions in both solution and live bacteria in a high contrast and selective manner.

  15. Simultaneous determination of seven major diterpenoids in Siegesbeckia pubescens Makino by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with evaporative light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Huo, Linan; Jiang, Zhen; Li, Huining; Wang, Mingsheng; Ye, Xiaoxia; Ji, Bin; Guo, Xingjie

    2012-10-01

    A novel HPLC method with evaporative light scattering detection was developed for the simultaneous quantification of seven major diterpenoids of two types, including ent-pimarane type: Kirenol, Hythiemoside B, Darutigenol, and ent-kaurane type: ent-16β,17,18-trihydroxy-kauran-19-oic acid, ent-17,18-dihydroxy-kauran-19-oic acid, ent-16β,17-dihydroxy-kauran-19-oic acid, 16α-hydro-ent-kauran-17,19-dioic acid in the aerial parts of Siegesbeckia pubescens Makino, an important traditional Chinese medicinal herb. Chromatographic separation was achieved on a Waters Symmetry Shield(TM) RP18 column (250 mm× 4.6 mm id, 5 μm) with a gradient mobile phase (A: 0.3% v/v aqueous formic acid and B: acetonitrile) at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. The drift tube temperature of evaporative light scattering detection was set at 103°C, and nitrogen flow rate was 3.0 L/min. The method was validated for accuracy, precision, LOD, and LOQ. All calibration curves showed a good linear relationship (r > 0.999) in test range. Precision was evaluated by intra- and interday tests that showed RSDs were less than 3.5%. Accuracy validation showed that the recovery was between 96.5 and 102.0% with RSDs below 2.8%. The validated method was successfully applied to determine the contents of seven diterpenoids in the different parts of Siegesbeckia pubescens Makino from two sources and to determine the contents of ent-pimarane, ent-kaurane, and total diterpenoids.

  16. In situ, real-time detection of soot particles coated with NaCl using 193 nm light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J. H.; Stipe, C. B.; Koshland, C. P.; Lucas, D.

    2006-09-01

    We report in situ, real-time detection of soot particles coated with NaCl using excimer laser fragmentation fluorescence spectroscopy (ELFFS). Carbon atom fluorescence at 248 nm and the Na D-line at 589 nm are used as signatures of soot and NaCl, respectively. Soot particles are encapsulated with a NaCl layer in a well-controlled inverted flame burner. NaCl particles are injected into the methane-air co-flow flame to coat the soot particles. ArF laser irradiation of the coated particles in an air stream at 1.14 J/cm2 produces fluorescence from Na, C, and CH. At 0.69 J/cm2, which is slightly above the fluorescence threshold, but not enough for considerable fragmentation of the particles, Na D-line persists with little carbon and no CH observed. These results suggest that the photolytic fragmentation-fluorescence using 193 nm excitation can be effectively used for in situ, real-time chemical analysis of core-shell nanoparticles.

  17. A new way to detect the interaction of DNA and anticancer drugs based on the decreased resonance light scattering signal and its potential application.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhanguang; Song, Tianhe; Peng, Yurui; Chen, Xi; Chen, Junhui; Zhang, Guomin; Qian, Sihua

    2011-10-07

    A novel assay has been developed to detect the interaction of DNA and anticancer drugs based on the decreased resonance light scattering (RLS) technique. The proposed method can be used to study those drugs which do not produce a RLS-signal after binding to DNA. RLS was used to monitor the interaction of five anticancer drugs with DNA. The reaction between anticancer drugs and DNA took place in BR buffer solution. From the RLS assay, the sequence of five anticancer drugs activities was as follows: CTX < MTX < Pt < MMC < 5-Fu. Mammary cancer cell DNA (mcDNA) was involved to validate the RLS assay. The results showed that the sensitivities of the five anticancer drugs targeting both mcDNA and ctDNA increased in the same order. However the sensitivity of each drug to mcDNA was higher than that to ctDNA It is a significant innovation of the RLS method to detect the interaction of DNA and anticancer drugs and to obtain drug sensitivity, which provides new strategies to screen DNA targeted anticancer drugs.

  18. Simultaneous determination of sodium saccharin, aspartame, acesulfame-K and sucralose in food consumed in Korea using high-performance liquid chromatography and evaporative light-scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngsun; Do, Byungkyung; Lee, Gunyoung; Lim, Ho Soo; Yun, Sang Soon; Kwon, Hoonjeong

    2017-02-17

    Four artificial sweeteners, i.e., sodium saccharin, aspartame, acesulfame-K and sucralose, are permitted for use in Korea, and recent regulatory changes have expanded the number of food categories in which they may be used. Four artificial sweeteners were determined simultaneously in more than 900 food items from 30 food categories that are commercially available in Korean markets, including both domestic and imported products, using high-performance liquid chromatography and evaporative light-scattering detection (ELSD). A new procedure using 75% acetone to remove fat was applied for sample preparation. The levels detected in all samples were below the maximum permitted use levels established in Korea. Despite the increased number of categories, the only one in which sodium saccharin was newly found was takju, an alcoholic beverage. Sodium saccharin was not found in other beverages in the food analysis or in the food label survey, even though its use was reported in a previous study, suggesting that consumer preference outweighs regulatory decisions. When the analytical results were combined with food-consumption data obtained from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2010-14, the estimated daily intakes of all the sweeteners were considered safe.

  19. Mobile terrestrial light detection and ranging (T-LiDAR) survey of areas on Dauphin Island, Alabama, in the aftermath of Hurricane Isaac, 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimbrow, Dustin R.

    2014-01-01

    Topographic survey data of areas on Dauphin Island on the Alabama coast were collected using a truck-mounted mobile terrestrial light detection and ranging system. This system is composed of a high frequency laser scanner in conjunction with an inertial measurement unit and a position and orientation computer to produce highly accurate topographic datasets. A global positioning system base station was set up on a nearby benchmark and logged vertical and horizontal position information during the survey for post-processing. Survey control points were also collected throughout the study area to determine residual errors. Data were collected 5 days after Hurricane Isaac made landfall in early September 2012 to document sediment deposits prior to clean-up efforts. Three data files in ASCII text format with the extension .xyz are included in this report, and each file is named according to both the acquisition date and the relative geographic location on Dauphin Island (for example, 20120903_Central.xyz). Metadata are also included for each of the files in both Extensible Markup Language with the extension .xml and ASCII text formats. These topographic data can be used to analyze the effects of storm surge on barrier island environments and also serve as a baseline dataset for future change detection analyses.

  20. Airborne light detection and ranging laser return intensity-based investigation into crown-inside? A case study on Quercus robur trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi; Zhang, Lifu; Wang, Cheng

    2016-04-01

    The significance of laser return intensity has been widely verified in airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR)-based forest canopy mapping, but this does not mean that all of its roles have been played. People still ask such questions as "Is it possible using this optical attribute of lasers to investigate individual tree-crown insides wherein laser intensity data are typically yielded in complicated echo-triggering modes?" To answer this question, this study examined the characteristics of the intensities of the laser points within 10 Quercus robur trees by fitting their peak amplitudes into default Gaussian distributions and then analyzing the resulting asymmetric tails. Exploratory data analyses showed that the laser points lying within the distribution tails can indicate primary tree branches in a sketchy way. This suggests that the question can be positively answered, and the traditional restriction of airborne LiDAR in canopy mapping at the crown level has been broken. Overall, this study found a unique way to detect primary tree branches in airborne LiDAR data and pointed out how to explore more ways this optical intensity attribute of airborne LiDAR data can measure tree organs at fine scales and further learn their properties.

  1. A virus resonance light scattering sensor based on mussel-inspired molecularly imprinted polymers for high sensitive and high selective detection of Hepatitis A Virus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Gong, Hang; Chen, Chunyan; Chen, Xiaoming; Cai, Changqun

    2017-01-15

    We described a novel resonance light scattering (RLS) sensor for the specific recognition of trace quantities of Hepatitis A Virus (HAV); the sensor was based on a mussel-inspired hepatitis molecularly imprinted polymer. As a recognition element, polydopamine (PDA)-coated totivirus-imprinted polymer was introduced on the surface of SiO2 nanoparticles (virus-imprinted SiO2@PDA NPs) using an efficient one-step synthesis method. The target virus was selectively captured by the imprinted polymer films, thereby increasing the RLS intensity. A simple fluorescence spectrophotometer was employed to measure the changes in the intensity. The enhanced RLS intensity (∆IRLS) was proportional to the concentration of HAV in the range of 0.04-6.0nmol∙L(-1), with a low limit of detection of 8.6pmol∙L(-1). The selectivity study confirmed that the resultant HAV-imprinted SiO2@PDA NPs possessed high selectivity for HAV. The sensor was successfully applied for the direct detection of additional HAV from a 20,000-fold dilution of human serum. The proposed strategy is simple, eco-friendly, highly selective, and sensitive.

  2. [Simultaneous determination of 17 underivatized amino acids in donkey-hide glue by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography-evaporative light-scattering detection].

    PubMed

    Yan, Dan; Han, Yumei; Dong, Xiaoping

    2006-07-01

    An analytical method to determine 17 underivatized amino acids in donkey-hide glue was established with reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with evaporative light-scattering detection (ELSD). A Prevail C18 column was used with the mobile phase of acetonitrile-0.7% trifluoroacetic acid containing 5.0 mmol/L heptafluorobutyric acid. Under the condition of solvent gradient elution, the temperature of drift tube was 115 degrees C and the gas flow rate was 2.5 L/min. The 17 amino acids were separated within 25 min. The good linearities between the logarithm of peak area and logarithm of mass concentration of amino acids were obtained in a range of mass concentrations from 0.073 g/L to 2.327 g/L. The recoveries of 17 amino acids were 93.5% - 104.8% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 0.58% - 2.88%. The lowest detection limits of amino acids were from 18.2 mg/L to 54.6 mg/L with 3 times the signal to noise ratio. This HPLC-ELSD method is rapid, simple and accurate. It can be used for the direct determination of 17 underivatized amino acids in donkey-hide glue. It also serves as a good reference for the determination of amino acids in other fields, such as pharmaceutical analysis.

  3. Profiling and quantifying polar lipids in milk by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled with evaporative light-scattering and mass spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Russo, Marina; Cichello, Filomena; Ragonese, Carla; Donato, Paola; Cacciola, Francesco; Dugo, Paola; Mondello, Luigi

    2013-05-01

    In this work, a high-performance liquid chromatography with evaporative light scattering detection method has been developed and applied for quantification of the polar content of the lipid fraction in milk samples of different origin. From a chromatographic stand-point, a 4.6-mm I.D. hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography column was employed to attain a baseline separation of major phospholipid classes contained in the various milk samples tested. Quantitative analysis was performed by the external calibration method using reference material solutions in the 5-100 mg/L concentration range. Analytical recoveries ranging from 57 to 100%, and repeatability data lower than 8.04% were obtained on a skimmed cow's milk sample. The crude cow milk was the most abundant (0.04%) in phospholipids and donkey milk was the poorest (0.004%). Quantitative differences were determined in the phospholipid content of the milk samples tested. Finally, characterization of phospholipid profile and fatty acid composition of the different samples was carried out by an ion trap-time of flight mass spectrometer and gas chromatography coupled to flame ionization and mass spectrometry detection. A thorough screening of the polar lipid composition of milk samples of different origin is here outlined, for the first time.

  4. Active standoff detection of CH4 and N2O leaks using hard-target backscattered light using an open-path quantum cascade laser sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Adrian; Thomas, Benjamin; Castillo, Paulo; Gross, Barry; Moshary, Fred

    2016-05-01

    Fugitive gas emissions from agricultural or industrial plants and gas pipelines are an important environmental concern as they contribute to the global increase of greenhouse gas concentrations. Moreover, they are also a security and safety concern because of possible risk of fire/explosion or toxicity. This study presents standoff detection of CH4 and N2O leaks using a quantum cascade laser open-path system that retrieves path-averaged concentrations by collecting the backscattered light from a remote hard target. It is a true standoff system and differs from other open-path systems that are deployed as point samplers or long-path transmission systems that use retroreflectors. The measured absorption spectra are obtained using a thermal intra-pulse frequency chirped DFB quantum cascade laser at ~7.7 µm wavelength range with ~200 ns pulse width. Making fast time resolved observations, the system simultaneously realizes high spectral resolution and range to the target, resulting in path-averaged concentration retrieval. The system performs measurements at high speed ~15 Hz and sufficient range (up to 45 m, ~148 feet) achieving an uncertainty of 3.1 % and normalized sensitivity of 3.3 ppm m Hz-1/2 for N2O and 9.3 % and normalized sensitivity of 30 ppm m Hz-1/2 for CH4 with a 0.31 mW average power QCL. Given these characteristics, this system is promising for mobile or multidirectional search and remote detection of gas leaks.

  5. Simultaneous determination of saponins and isoflavones in soybean (Glycine max L.) by reversed-phase liquid chromatography with evaporative light-scattering and ultraviolet detection.

    PubMed

    Ganzera, Markus; Stuppner, Hermann; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2004-01-01

    The first validated analytical method permitting the simultaneous qualitative and quantitative determination of isoflavones and saponins in soy has been developed. It combines liquid chromatography with an ultraviolet and evaporative light-scattering detector (ELSD). Within less than 30 min, 6 isoflavones (detected at 254 nm) and 4 triterpene saponins (monitored with the ELSD) were baseline separated, using a reversed-phase C18 column and a mobile phase consisting of water and acetonitrile, both containing 0.025% triflouroacetic acid. The method was validated for limit of detection (LOD), linearity, repeatability, precision, and accuracy. LOD was 3.2-6.0 ng/mL for isoflavones and 10.4-14.2 microg/mL for saponins, and linearity was indicated by R2-values of 0.997 and higher. Intra- and interday precisions of the assay were below 7.0% for all of the compounds except for one, which was only present in trace amounts in the samples. Repeatability was indicated by very stable retention times and relative standard deviations well below 4.0% for multiple injections (n = 3). Accuracy was confirmed by recovery rates between 96.8 and 101.0%, respectively. Different sample matrixes were successfully analyzed, proving the wide range of applicability of this method, including soybeans, capsules, liquids, and instant soy drinks.

  6. Simultaneous determination of flavonoids, isochlorogenic acids and triterpenoids in Ilex hainanensis Using high performance liquid chromatography coupled with diode array and evaporative light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Peng, Bo; Qiao, Chun-Feng; Zhao, Jing; Huang, Wei-Hua; Hu, De-Jun; Liu, Hua-Gang; Li, Shao-Ping

    2013-03-04

    A high performance liquid chromatography coupled with diode array and evaporative light scattering detection (HPLC-DAD-ELSD) method for simultaneous determination of eight major bioactive compounds including two flavonoids (rutin and eriodictyol-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside), two isochlorogenic acids (isochlorogenic acid A and isochlorogenic acid C) and four triterpenoids (ilexhainanoside D, ilexsaponin A1, ilexgenin A and ursolic acid) in Ilex hainanensis has been developed for the first time. The 283 nm wavelength was chosen for determination of two flavonoids and two isochlorogenic acids. ELSD was applied to determine four triterpenoids. The analysis was performed on an Agilent Zorbax SB-C18 column (250 × 4.6 mm i.d., 5 µm) with gradient elution of 0.2% formic acid in water and acetonitrile. The method was validated for linearity, limit of detection, limit of quantification, precision, repeatability and accuracy. The proposed method has been successfully applied for simultaneous quantification of the analytes in four samples of Ilex hainanensis, which is helpful for quality control of this plant.

  7. Determination of penicillamine in pharmaceuticals and human plasma by capillary electrophoresis with in-column fiber optics light-emitting diode induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiupei; Yuan, Hongyan; Wang, Chunling; Su, Xiaodong; Hu, Li; Xiao, Dan

    2007-10-18

    In this paper, a capillary electrophoresis (CE) system with in-column fiber optics light-emitting diode (LED) induced fluorescence detection was developed for the determination of penicillamine (PA). The influence of buffer concentration, buffer pH, applied voltage and injection time was systematically investigated. Optimum separation conditions were obtained with 10 mM borate buffer at pH 9.1, applied voltage 20 kV and 8 s hydrodynamic injection at 30 mbar. The detection system displayed linear dynamic range from 3.2 x 10(-7) to 4.8 x 10(-5) mol L(-1) with a correlation coefficient of 0.9991 and good repeatability (R.S.D.=2.46%). The method was applied to the determination of PA in commercial tablets and human plasma, which the recoveries of standard PA added to tablets and human plasma sample were found to be in the range of 96.26-102.68 and 91.10-99.35%, respectively. The proposed method is cheap, rapid, easy, and accurate, and can be successfully applied to the formulation analysis and bioanalysis.

  8. Comparison of Stability-Indicating LC Methods Using Light Scattering and Photodiode Array Detection with Monolithic Column for Determination of Quinapril and Hydrochlorothiazide.

    PubMed

    de Diego, Marta; Godoy, Ricardo; Mennickent, Sigrid; Vergara, Carola; Charnock, Henry; Hernández, Camilo

    2016-09-01

    Rapid stability-indicating LC methods for simultaneous analysis of quinapril and hydrochlorothiazide were developed, validated and compared using evaporative light scattering detection (ELSD) and diode array detection (DAD). For the separation of quinapril, hydrochlorothiazide and its major degradation products, a monolithic column was used and the analytes were eluted within 7 min, applying gradient mobile phase in both methods. Quinapril was subjected to hydrolytic, oxidative, thermal, humidity and photolytic stress conditions. Degradation products were well resolved from main peaks and from each other, proving the stability-indicating power of the methods. The response with DAD was linear and the response with ELSD was fitted to a power function, for quinapril and hydrochlorothiazide concentrations of 20-160 and 12.5-100 µg mL(-1), respectively. DAD method achieved better precision than ELSD method, the LOQ of DAD was lower and the accuracy of the methods was similar. Quinapril degrade by hydrolysis and thermal stress, showing the formation of quinaprilat and quinapril diketopiperazine as degradants, which were identified by MS-MS. The methods were successfully applied to quantify quinapril and hydrochlorothiazide in commercial tablets. LC-DAD and LC-ELSD methods are suitable to assess the stability and routine analysis of quinapril and hydrochlorothiazide in pharmaceutical industry.

  9. Lighting: Green Light.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maniccia, Dorine

    2003-01-01

    Explains that by using sustainable (green) building practices, schools and universities can make their lighting systems more efficient, noting that embracing green design principles can help schools attract students. Discusses lighting-control technologies (occupancy sensing technology, daylighting technology, and scheduling based technologies),…

  10. Airborne Light Detection and Ranging (lidar) Derived Deformation from the MW 6.0 24 August, 2014 South Napa Earthquake Estimated by Two and Three Dimensional Point Cloud Change Detection Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyda, A. W.; Zhang, X.; Glennie, C. L.; Hudnut, K.; Brooks, B. A.

    2016-06-01

    Remote sensing via LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) has proven extremely useful in both Earth science and hazard related studies. Surveys taken before and after an earthquake for example, can provide decimeter-level, 3D near-field estimates of land deformation that offer better spatial coverage of the near field rupture zone than other geodetic methods (e.g., InSAR, GNSS, or alignment array). In this study, we compare and contrast estimates of deformation obtained from different pre and post-event airborne laser scanning (ALS) data sets of the 2014 South Napa Earthquake using two change detection algorithms, Iterative Control Point (ICP) and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The ICP algorithm is a closest point based registration algorithm that can iteratively acquire three dimensional deformations from airborne LiDAR data sets. By employing a newly proposed partition scheme, "moving window," to handle the large spatial scale point cloud over the earthquake rupture area, the ICP process applies a rigid registration of data sets within an overlapped window to enhance the change detection results of the local, spatially varying surface deformation near-fault. The other algorithm, PIV, is a well-established, two dimensional image co-registration and correlation technique developed in fluid mechanics research and later applied to geotechnical studies. Adapted here for an earthquake with little vertical movement, the 3D point cloud is interpolated into a 2D DTM image and horizontal deformation is determined by assessing the cross-correlation of interrogation areas within the images to find the most likely deformation between two areas. Both the PIV process and the ICP algorithm are further benefited by a presented, novel use of urban geodetic markers. Analogous to the persistent scatterer technique employed with differential radar observations, this new LiDAR application exploits a classified point cloud dataset to assist the change detection algorithms. Ground

  11. Detecting Light Hydrocarbon Microseepages and related Intra-sedimentary Structures at the São Francisco Basin, Brazil, using Airborne Geophysical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curto, J. B.; Pires, A. C.; Silva, A.; Crosta, A. P.

    2011-12-01

    The use of indirect techniques for the detection of light hydrocarbons occurrences on the surface, named as microseepages, has been used to augment hydrocarbon exploration. Surveys developed for this type of application are normally targeted at mapping the effects that microseepages cause on the environment. In Brazil, most available airborne geophysical surveys were not appropriately designed for this type of application and, thus far they have been mostly used to define the main basin structural features. Existing microseepages are known in Remanso do Fogo area (Minas Gerais State, Brazil), located in São Francisco Basin, where the Quaternary sedimentary cover made the identification of new occurrences and associated controlling structures quite difficult. This study investigates the spatial distribution of hydrocarbon related structures in shallower to intra-sedimentary depths in the Remanso do Fogo area, using airborne magnetic and gamma-ray spectrometry data. These data were managed by the ANP (Brazilian Petroleum National Agency) and conducted by Lasa Engineering & Surveys in 2006. In the study area, data were acquired along north-south flight lines spaced 500 m apart and along orthogonal tie lines flown 4 Km apart at a terrain clearance of 100 m. The geophysical data were processed using techniques developed to suppress the influence of regional geological signatures. For the magnetic data, this study focuses on the enhancement of intra-sedimentary structures and possible near surface accumulations of diagenetic magnetic minerals, provided by hydrocarbon related chemical reactions. The amplitude of the analytic signal, calculated with second order derivatives, combined with the total horizontal gradient of the subtraction between the 1200 and 400 meter upward continuations, illuminated the NW and EW magnetic lineaments, which are partially related to the microseepages and the drainage of the area. The distinction of near-surface and deeper signatures also

  12. Simultaneous determination of 10 components in Bu-Zhong-Yi-Qi Wan by solid phase extraction-high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection and evaporative light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Hu, Fang; Zhu, Ruijuan; Liu, Xiaohua; Yang, Yinglai; Li, Can; Feng, Shilan; Li, Yingdong

    2015-01-01

    An effective, accurate and reliable method for the simultaneous separation and determination of 10 major components in Chinese medicine Bu-Zhong-Yi-Qi Wan (BZYQW) was developed and validated using solid phase extraction column-high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection-evaporative light scattering detection (SPE-HPLC-DAD-ELSD). The chromatographic separation was performed on a Spursil™ C18 column (250 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 µm) at 30°C with an acetonitrile-water gradient as mobile phase. The DAD detection wavelength 254 nm was utilized for the quantitative analysis. The drift tube temperature and the carrier gas flow rate of the ELSD detection was set at 110.5°C and 3.1 mL/min. The total run time is 103 min, these determined components peak out within 81 min. Excellent linear behaviors over the investigated concentration ranges were observed with the values of r(2) higher than 0.9990 for all the analytes. The Linear range over hesperidin, senkyunolide I, senkyunolide H, ononin, calycosin, formononetin, ligustilide, butylene phthalide, astragaloside IV, astragaloside I is 4.50-94.50 µg/mL, 22.75-364.00 µg/mL, 2.30-45.00 µg/mL, 11.76-125.14 µg/mL, 4.62-50.35 µg/mL, 1.90-28.93 µg/mL, 1.29-159.00 µg/mL, 2.90-36.00 µg/mL, 35.40-192.40 µg/mL, 41.40-96.60 µg/mL, respectively. The method was validated by its repeatability [relative standard deviation (RSD) < 3.54%] and intra-day (RSD < 2.11%) and inter-day precision (RSD < 3.45%). The limits of detection and quantification of each component were in the ranges of 0.04-10.24 and 0.12-39.22 µg/mL, respectively. The average recovery yields of the 10 compounds ranged from 95.79 to 101.25%. The validated method was successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of these principal components in 10 commercial samples of BZYQW from different manufacturers.

  13. Radar Detectability of Light Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-04-01

    the aircraft is mounted on a structure that enables the viewing angle (aspect) presented to the radar to be varied. For each aircraft type, the RCS...environment; there are no spurious reflections from the ground or from the supporting structure ; and the effects of propeller rotation, small aircraft...motions due to c-ntrol action or atmospheric turbulence, and structural deflections due to inertial and aerodynamic loading, are properly represented

  14. Determination of stigmasterol, beta-sitosterol and stigmastanol in oral dosage forms using high performance liquid chromatography with evaporative light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Nair, V D P; Kanfer, I; Hoogmartens, J

    2006-06-07

    A validated and repeatable high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method with online evaporative light scattering (ELSD) was developed for the analysis of two sterols, stigmasterol, beta-sitosterol and a stanol, stigmastanol, found to be common in many herbal formulations and health care supplements. The method is based on the separation of the three marker compounds on a C8 column (Phenomenex Luna, 5 microm, 150 mmx4.6 mm i.d.) using methanol:water (95:5 v/v) as the mobile phase, and a flow rate of 1 ml/min to separate all the marker compounds within 12 min. Cholesterol (50 microg/ml) was used as internal standard and methanol as the extraction solvent. The ELSD response parameters were optimised and the limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) were calculated to be 2 and 5 microg/ml, respectively, which is more sensitive than obtained by photo diode array detection (5 and 7 microg/ml). Using ELSD, the percentage relative standard deviation (%R.S.D.) of intra-day and inter-day (3 days) precision for each marker was better than 3%, the accuracy data were within 97-103% and the recovery data were found to be within 95-107% for the five commercially available products examined. This method was used to assay commercially available products formulated as oral dosage forms purported to contain African Potato and associated sterols and stanol and proved to be suitable for the routine analysis and quality control of such products.

  15. ATR-FTIR detection of metal-sensitive structural changes in the light-harvesting 1 reaction center complex from the thermophilic purple sulfur bacterium Thermochromatium tepidum.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Kimura, Yukihiro; Arikawa, Teruhisa; Wang-Otomo, Zheng-Yu; Ohno, Takashi

    2013-12-17

    Thermochromatium tepidum grows at the highest temperature among purple bacteria, and the light-harvesting 1 reaction center (LH1-RC) complex enhances the thermal stability by utilizing Ca(2+), although the molecular mechanism has yet to be resolved. Here, we applied perfusion-induced attenuated total reflection (ATR) Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to highly purified LH1-RC complexes from Tch. tepidum and detected for the first time metal-sensitive fine structural changes involved in the enhanced thermal stability of this complex. The Tch. tepidum LH1-RC complex exhibited Sr(2+)/Ca(2+) ATR-FTIR difference bands that reflect changes in the polypeptide backbones and amino acid residues upon the replacement of native Ca(2+) with Sr(2+). The difference bands also appeared in the following Ca(2+)/Sr(2+) difference spectra with almost identical intensities but inverse signs, demonstrating that the structural changes induced by the metal exchange are fully reversible. In contrast, these ATR-FTIR signals were faintly detected in the mesophilic counterpart Allochromatium vinosum . A comparative analysis using LH1 complexes lacking the RCs strongly indicated that the metal-sensitive bands originate from polypeptide backbones and amino acid residues near the putative Ca(2+)-binding site at the C-terminal region of the Tch. tepidum LH1 complexes. Structural changes induced by Sr(2+) and Ba(2+) substitutions were essentially identical. However, Cd(2+) substitution exhibited unique structural modifications, which may be responsible for the severely deteriorated thermal stability of Cd(2+)-substituted complexes. Possible assignments for the present ATR-FTIR signals and their relation with the molecular mechanism of enhancing the thermal stability of Tch. tepidum LH1-RC proteins are discussed on the basis of the recent structural information on the Ca(2+)-binding site.

  16. Determination of phospholipids in milk samples by means of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled to evaporative light scattering and mass spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Donato, Paola; Cacciola, Francesco; Cichello, Filomena; Russo, Marina; Dugo, Paola; Mondello, Luigi

    2011-09-16

    The combined use of the state-of-the-art hybrid mass spectrometers together with high efficient liquid chromatography could surely be a useful tool for such a challenging task, as phospholipids (PLs) analysis. In this research, we used hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (150 mm×2.1 mm I.D., 2.7 μm d.p. partially porous column) to achieve the separation of major PLs classes in cow's and donkey's milk samples. Solid-phase extraction (SPE) was performed in order to pre-concentrate minor PLs from non polar lipids (triacylglycerols) and the recovery for the extraction method was assayed on a milk sample, fortified with 5 μg/mL of SM pure standard, and analyzed in triplicate. A value of 89.99% was calculated, with a coefficient of variation (CV%) of 1.93. A 70-min long stepwise gradient of water/acetonitrile afforded baseline separation of PLs classes, at 50 μL/min flow rate. Accurate detection by an ion trap-time of flight (IT-TOF) mass spectrometer (in both positive and negative ionization mode) allowed to fully characterize the distinctive phospholipid profile and fatty acid composition of cow's and donkey's milk, the latter being analyzed for the first time. Evaporative light scattering detection was further employed to attain the quantitative evaluation of major PLs classes identified, by the external calibration method using reference material solutions in the 5-200 μg/mL concentration range. Major difference between the two analyzed samples consisted in the total PLs amount, which in cow's milk was determined as over 20-fold higher than the donkey's.

  17. Analysis of risedronate and related substances by ion-pair reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with evaporative light-scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lifeng

    2010-01-01

    A simple method has been developed for the analysis of risedronate and related substances by ion-pair reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RPLC) with evaporative light-scattering detection (ELSD). After optimization of the chromatographic conditions, satisfactory separation of the compounds was achieved on an Intersil C(8) column with an isocratic mobile phase: 8:4:88 (v/v) acetonitrile-methanol-12 mM ammonium acetate buffer containing 35 mM n-amylamine (pH 7.0). The mobile-phase flow rate was 1.0 mL min(-1). The calibration plot was linear in the range of 352 to 1760 microg mL(-1) for risedronate. The precision and reproducibility were 0.3 and 0.5%, respectively. The average recovery of risedronate was 100.4% and the RSD was 0.6%. The method was validated and shown to be precise, accurate, and specific for the assay of risedronate in both bulk material and dosage forms. The proposed liquid-chromatographic method can be satisfactorily used for the quality control of risedronate.

  18. Association of Sand Dust Particles with Pulmonary Function and Respiratory Symptoms in Adult Patients with Asthma in Western Japan Using Light Detection and Ranging: A Panel Study.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masanari; Noma, Hisashi; Kurai, Jun; Shimizu, Atsushi; Sano, Hiroyuki; Kato, Kazuhiro; Mikami, Masaaki; Ueda, Yasuto; Tatsukawa, Toshiyuki; Ohga, Hideki; Yamasaki, Akira; Igishi, Tadashi; Kitano, Hiroya; Shimizu, Eiji

    2015-10-16

    Light detection and ranging (LIDAR) can estimate daily volumes of sand dust particles from the East Asian desert to Japan. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between sand dust particles and pulmonary function, and respiratory symptoms in adult patients with asthma. One hundred thirty-seven patients were included in the study. From March 2013 to May 2013, the patients measured their morning peak expiratory flow (PEF) and kept daily lower respiratory symptom diaries. A linear mixed model was used to estimate the correlation of the median daily levels of sand dust particles, symptoms scores, and PEF. A heavy sand dust day was defined as an hourly concentration of sand dust particles of >0.1 km(-1). By this criterion, there were 8 heavy sand dust days during the study period. Elevated sand dust particles levels were significantly associated with the symptom score (0.04; 95% confidence interval (CI); 0.03, 0.05), and this increase persisted for 5 days. There was no significant association between PEF and heavy dust exposure (0.01 L/min; 95% CI, -0.62, 0.11). The present study found that sand dust particles were significantly associated with worsened lower respiratory tract symptoms in adult patients with asthma, but not with pulmonary function.

  19. Comparison of multialkali and GaAs photocathode detectors for Joint European Torus edge light detection and ranging Thomson scattering profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempenaars, M.; Nielsen, P.; Pasqualotto, R.; Gowers, C.; Beurskens, M.

    2004-10-01

    The Joint European Torus (JET) tokamak has two light detection and ranging (LIDAR) Thomson scattering systems, one for the core and one dedicated to the edge Te and ne profiles. The LIDAR scheme is unique to JET and is envisaged for use on ITER. The system's spatial resolution is defined by the convolution product of its components: laser pulse duration, detector response time, and digitizer speed. The original multialkali photocathode microchannel plate photomultipliers dictated the response time, resulting in a 12 cm spatial resolution along the line of sight. In the edge LIDAR system, this is improved by aligning the line of sight with the flux surfaces, thus improving the effective spatial resolution to 2 cm depending on the plasma configuration. To meet demands for better edge gradient resolution, an upgrade to higher quantum efficiency detectors was proposed. Four GaAs photocathode detectors have been procured, two of which surpass expectations. These detectors are shown to have a more than two times higher effective quantum efficiency and their response time is at least twice as fast as the multialkali detectors. Combined with a fast digitizer this improves the spatial resolution by a factor of two, down to one centimeter effective, depending on plasma configuration.

  20. Comparison of high-performance liquid chromatography and supercritical fluid chromatography using evaporative light scattering detection for the determination of plasticizers in medical devices.

    PubMed

    Lecoeur, Marie; Decaudin, Bertrand; Guillotin, Yoann; Sautou, Valérie; Vaccher, Claude

    2015-10-23

    Recently, interest in supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) has increased due to its high throughput and the development of new system improving chromatographic performances. However, most papers dealt with fundamental studies and chiral applications and only few works described validation process of SFC method. Likewise, evaporative light scattering detection (ELSD) has been widely employed in liquid chromatography but only a few recent works presented its quantitative performances hyphenated with SFC apparatus. The present paper discusses about the quantitative performances of SFC-ELSD compared to HPLC-ELSD, for the determination of plasticizers (ATBC, DEHA, DEHT and TOTM) in PVC tubing used as medical devices. After the development of HPLC-ELSD, both methods were evaluated based on the total error approach using accuracy profile. The results show that HPLC-ELSD was more precise than SFC-ELSD but lower limits of quantitation were obtained by SFC. Hence, HPLC was validated in the ± 10% acceptance limits whereas SFC lacks of accuracy to quantify plasticizers. Finally, both methods were used to determine the composition of plasticized-PVC medical devices. Results demonstrated that SFC and HPLC both hyphenated with ELSD provided similar results.

  1. Determination and quantitation of five cucurbitane triterpenoids in Momordica charantia by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with evaporative light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Hong; Avula, Bharathi; Liu, Yi; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2008-02-01

    A simple and specific analytical method for the quantitative determination of five cucurbitane-type triterpenoids isolated from the fruit of Momordica charantia is developed. The triterpenoids present in the fruits of Momordica charantia are separated with an acetonitrile (0.1% acetic acid)-water (0.1% acetic acid)-methanol (0.1% acetic acid) gradient at a flow rate of 0.5 mL/min. The high-performance liquid chromatography separation was performed on a Phenomenex C18 reversed-phase column. By using an evaporative light scattering detector, the main triterpenoids of Momordica charantia could be detected at levels as low as 10 microg/mL. The method was validated for precision, repeatability, and accuracy. The relative standard deviation was between 0.6-4.4%. The method was sensitive, quick, and accurate for the determination of main triterpenes and saponins in Momordica charantia, and can be used for quality control of Momordica charantia and its related dietary supplements.

  2. Association of Sand Dust Particles with Pulmonary Function and Respiratory Symptoms in Adult Patients with Asthma in Western Japan Using Light Detection and Ranging: A Panel Study

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Masanari; Noma, Hisashi; Kurai, Jun; Shimizu, Atsushi; Sano, Hiroyuki; Kato, Kazuhiro; Mikami, Masaaki; Ueda, Yasuto; Tatsukawa, Toshiyuki; Ohga, Hideki; Yamasaki, Akira; Igishi, Tadashi; Kitano, Hiroya; Shimizu, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    Light detection and ranging (LIDAR) can estimate daily volumes of sand dust particles from the East Asian desert to Japan. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between sand dust particles and pulmonary function, and respiratory symptoms in adult patients with asthma. One hundred thirty-seven patients were included in the study. From March 2013 to May 2013, the patients measured their morning peak expiratory flow (PEF) and kept daily lower respiratory symptom diaries. A linear mixed model was used to estimate the correlation of the median daily levels of sand dust particles, symptoms scores, and PEF. A heavy sand dust day was defined as an hourly concentration of sand dust particles of >0.1 km−1. By this criterion, there were 8 heavy sand dust days during the study period. Elevated sand dust particles levels were significantly associated with the symptom score (0.04; 95% confidence interval (CI); 0.03, 0.05), and this increase persisted for 5 days. There was no significant association between PEF and heavy dust exposure (0.01 L/min; 95% CI, −0.62, 0.11). The present study found that sand dust particles were significantly associated with worsened lower respiratory tract symptoms in adult patients with asthma, but not with pulmonary function. PMID:26501307

  3. Comparison of multialkali and GaAs photocathode detectors for Joint European Torus edge light detection and ranging Thomson scattering profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Kempenaars, M.; Nielsen, P.; Pasqualotto, R.; Gowers, C.; Beurskens, M.

    2004-10-01

    The Joint European Torus (JET) tokamak has two light detection and ranging (LIDAR) Thomson scattering systems, one for the core and one dedicated to the edge T{sub e} and n{sub e} profiles. The LIDAR scheme is unique to JET and is envisaged for use on ITER. The system's spatial resolution is defined by the convolution product of its components: laser pulse duration, detector response time, and digitizer speed. The original multialkali photocathode microchannel plate photomultipliers dictated the response time, resulting in a 12 cm spatial resolution along the line of sight. In the edge LIDAR system, this is improved by aligning the line of sight with the flux surfaces, thus improving the effective spatial resolution to 2 cm depending on the plasma configuration. To meet demands for better edge gradient resolution, an upgrade to higher quantum efficiency detectors was proposed. Four GaAs photocathode detectors have been procured, two of which surpass expectations. These detectors are shown to have a more than two times higher effective quantum efficiency and their response time is at least twice as fast as the multialkali detectors. Combined with a fast digitizer this improves the spatial resolution by a factor of two, down to one centimeter effective, depending on plasma configuration.

  4. Fundamental research on the label-free detection of protein adsorption using near-infrared light-responsive plasmonic metal nanoshell arrays with controlled nanogap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Shuhei; Zettsu, Nobuyuki; Endo, Katsuyoshi; Yamamura, Kazuya

    2013-06-01

    In this work, we focused on the label-free detection of simple protein binding using near-infrared light-responsive plasmonic nanoshell arrays with a controlled interparticle distance. The nanoshell arrays were fabricated by a combination of colloidal self-assembly and subsequent isotropic helium plasma etching under atmospheric pressure. The diameter, interparticle distance, and shape of nanoshells can be tuned with nanometric accuracy by changing the experimental conditions. The Au, Ag, and Cu nanoshell arrays, having a 240-nm diameter (inner, 200-nm polystyrene (PS) core; outer, 20-nm metal shell) and an 80-nm gap distance, exhibited a well-defined localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) peak at the near-infrared region. PS@Au nanoshell arrays showed a 55-nm red shift of the maximum LSPR wavelength of 885 nm after being exposed to a solution of bovine serum albumin (BSA) proteins for 18 h. On the other hand, in the case of Cu nanoshell arrays before/after incubation to the BSA solution, we found a 30-nm peak shifting. We could evaluate the difference in LSPR sensing performance by changing the metal materials.

  5. Determination of multicomponent contents in Calculus bovis by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-evaporative light scattering detection and its application for quality control.

    PubMed

    Kong, Weijun; Jin, Cheng; Xiao, Xiaohe; Zhao, Yanling; Liu, Wei; Li, Zulun; Zhang, Ping

    2010-06-01

    A fast ultra-performance liquid chromatography-evaporative light scattering detection (UPLC-ELSD) method was established for simultaneous quantification of seven components in natural Calculus bovis (C. bovis) and its substitutes or spurious breeds. On a Waters Acquity UPLC BEH C(18) column, seven analytes were efficiently separated using 0.2% aqueous formic acid-acetonitrile as the mobile phase in a gradient program. The evaporator tube temperature of ELSD was set at 100 degrees C with the nebulizing gas flow-rate of 1.9 L/min. The results showed that this established UPLC-ELSD method was validated to be sensitive, precise and accurate with the LODs of seven analytes at 2-11 ng, and the overall intra-day and inter-day variations less than 3.0%. The recovery of the method was in the range of 97.8-101.6%, with RSD less than 3.0%. Further results of PCA on the contents of seven investigated analytes suggested that compounds of cholic acid, deoxycholic acid and chenodeoxycholic acid or cholesterol should be added as chemical markers to UPLC analysis of C. bovis samples for quality control and to discriminate natural C. bovis sample and its substitutes or some spurious breeds, then normalize the use of natural C. bovis and ensure its clinical efficacy.

  6. A new gas detection technique utilizing amplified spontaneous emission light source from a ? co-doped silica fibre in the 2.0 ?m region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Kyunghwan; Morse, T. F.; Kilian, A.

    1998-09-01

    A new technique for the measurement of the concentration of gas species is presented. The method is based on absorption spectroscopy in the infrared region utilizing a high-power broad band amplified spontaneous emission source from an optical fibre. Vibrational bands of 0957-0233/9/9/007/img8 gas in the range 1.9-2.1 0957-0233/9/9/007/img9m were measured and the relative intensities of bands were calibrated in terms of concentration. The amplified spontaneous emission from a 0957-0233/9/9/007/img10 co-doped silica fibre pumped near 800 nm was used as a light source that consisted of the 0957-0233/9/9/007/img11 transition of the 0957-0233/9/9/007/img12 ion and the 0957-0233/9/9/007/img13 transition of the 0957-0233/9/9/007/img14 ion with a full width at half maximum of 225 nm and total output power over 1 mW. The technique has potential for the simultaneous detection of multiple gas species due to its high spectral energy density over a wide wavelength band in the infrared where the vibrational overtones of gas molecules are located.

  7. Immunohistochemical detection of autophagy-related microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) in the cerebellums of dogs naturally infected with canine distemper virus.

    PubMed

    Kabak, Y B; Sozmen, M; Yarim, M; Guvenc, T; Karayigit, M O; Gulbahar, M Y

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the expression of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) protein in the cerebellums of dogs infected with canine distemper virus (CDV) using immunohistochemistry to detect autophagy. The cerebellums of 20 dogs infected with CDV were used. Specimens showing demyelination of white matter were considered to have an acute infection, whereas specimens showing signs of severe perivascular cuffing and demyelination of white matter were classified as having chronic CDV. Cerebellar sections were immunostained with CDV and LC3 antibodies. The cytoplasm of Purkinje cells, granular layer cells, motor neurons in large cerebellar ganglia and some neurons in white matter were positive for the LC3 antibody in both the control and CDV-infected dogs. In the infected cerebellums, however, white matter was immunostained more intensely, particularly the neurons and gemistocytic astrocytes in the demyelinated areas, compared to controls. Autophagy also was demonstrated in CDV-positive cells using double immunofluorescence staining. Our findings indicate that increased autophagy in the cerebellum of dogs naturally infected with CDV may play a role in transferring the virus from cell to cell.

  8. Selective detection of the structural changes upon photoreactions of several redox cofactors in photosystem II by means of light-induced ATR-FTIR difference spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, Tatsunori; Noguchi, Takumi

    2007-04-01

    Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy was applied for the first time to detect the structural changes upon photoreactions of redox cofactors in photosystem II (PSII). The PSII-enriched membranes from spinach were adsorbed on the surface of a silicon prism, and FTIR measurements of various redox cofactors were performed for the same sample but under different conditions by exchanging buffers in a flow cell. Light-induced FTIR difference spectra upon redox reactions of the oxygen-evolving Mn cluster, the primary quinone electron acceptor Q A, the redox-active tyrosine Y D, the primary electron acceptor pheophytin, and the primary electron donor chlorophyll P680 were successively recorded in buffers including different redox reagents and inhibitors. All of these cofactors remained active in the PSII membranes on the silicon surface, and the resultant spectra were basically identical to those previously recorded by the conventional transmission method. These ATR-FTIR measurements enable accurate comparison between reactions of different active sites in a single PSII sample. The present results demonstrated that the ATR-FTIR spectroscopy is a useful technique for investigation of the reaction mechanism of PSII.

  9. Size exclusion chromatography with evaporative light scattering detection as a method for speciation analysis of polydimethylsiloxanes. II. Validation of the method for analysis of pharmaceutical formulations.

    PubMed

    Mojsiewicz-Pieńkowska, Krystyna

    2011-12-05

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the usefulness of the size exclusion chromatography with evaporative light scattering detection (SEC-ELSD) method in the identification and quantitative analysis of polydimethylsiloxanes (PDMS). The process of validation for the method was conducted, and the values obtained were compared with the acceptance criteria. Particularly important was the conclusion that SEC-ELSD method showed a high specificity for PDMS. PDMS is an organosilicon polymer and for this reason, it does not exist as a concrete chemical species. Depending on the length of the chain, PDMS can be toxic for organism. So far, the SEC-ELSD method has not been applied for the control of pharmaceutical products containing such PDMS as dimeticone or simeticone. The safety of use and effectiveness of such pharmaceutical products relies on the control of their quality. Therefore, the analytical methods and procedures that meet acceptance criteria for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the PDMS should be used. In the case of the analysis of pharmaceutical products, the acceptance criteria are established and recommended by, for example, the Pharmacopoeias, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) and the World Health Organization (WHO). The progress of knowledge, however, requires the development of new analytical tools which are able to solve incoming problems. In the case of pharmaceutical formulations containing PDMS, which are used not only by adults but also by children, it is necessary to use analytical methods which are characterized by a high specificity.

  10. Roadmap on structured light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina; Forbes, Andrew; Berry, M. V.; Dennis, M. R.; Andrews, David L.; Mansuripur, Masud; Denz, Cornelia; Alpmann, Christina; Banzer, Peter; Bauer, Thomas; Karimi, Ebrahim; Marrucci, Lorenzo; Padgett, Miles; Ritsch-Marte, Monika; Litchinitser, Natalia M.; Bigelow, Nicholas P.; Rosales-Guzmán, C.; Belmonte, A.; Torres, J. P.; Neely, Tyler W.; Baker, Mark; Gordon, Reuven; Stilgoe, Alexander B.; Romero, Jacquiline; White, Andrew G.; Fickler, Robert; Willner, Alan E.; Xie, Guodong; McMorran, Benjamin; Weiner, Andrew M.

    2017-01-01

    Structured light refers to the generation and application of custom light fields. As the tools and technology to create and detect structured light have evolved, steadily the applications have begun to emerge. This roadmap touches on the key fields within structured light from the perspective of experts in those areas, providing insight into the current state and the challenges their respective fields face. Collectively the roadmap outlines the venerable nature of structured light research and the exciting prospects for the future that are yet to be realized.

  11. Photometric flow injection determination of phosphate on a PDMS microchip using an optical detection system assembled with an organic light emitting diode and an organic photodiode.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rong; Ishimatsu, Ryoichi; Yahiro, Masayuki; Adachi, Chihaya; Nakano, Koji; Imato, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    A compact photometric detector was constructed from an organic light emitting diode (OLED) based on a europium complex, europium(diben-zoylmethanato)3(bathophenanthroline) (Eu(DBM)3bath), as the light source and an organic photodiode (OPD) fabricated from a hetero-junction of two layers of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)/fullerene (C60) as the photo-detector on a microchip prepared from poly(dimethylsiloxan) (PDMS) and was applied to the determination of phosphate. The OLED and the OPD were fabricated by a vapor deposition method on an indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate with the following layered structure; Glass (0.7 mm)/ITO (110 nm)/4,4'-bis[N-(1-naphthyl)-N-phenyl amino]-biphenyl (α-NPD) (30 nm)/4,4'-di(N-carbazolyl)biphenyl (CBP): Eu(3+) (8 wt%, 30 nm)/bathocuproine (BCP) (30 nm)/aluminum tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) (Alq3) (25 nm)/magnesium and silver (MgAg) (100 nm)/Ag (10nm) and Glass (0.7 mm)/ITO (110 nm)/CuPc (35 nm)/C60 (50 nm)/BCP (10 nm)/Ag (50 nm), respectively. The OLED based on the europium complex emitted a sharp light at the wavelength of 612 nm with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 8 nm. The performance of the photometric detector assembled was evaluated based on measurements of the absorbance of different concentrations of malachite green (MG) solutions for a batch system with 1cm long path length. The molar absorptive coefficient of the MG solution, calculated from the photocurrent of the OPD, was in good agreement with the value reported in the literature. A microchip with two inlets and one outlet U-shaped channel was prepared by a conventional photolithograph method. The OLED and the OPD were configured so as to face each other through the PDMS microchip in parallel in order to align the light axis of the OLED and the OPD with the flow cell (optical path length of 5mm), which was located at the end of outlet. For the determination of phosphate, an ion-association reaction between MG and a molybdenum-phosphate complex was utilized

  12. Detection of related substances in polyene phosphatidyl choline extracted from soybean and in its commercial capsule by comprehensive supercritical fluid chromatography with mass spectrometry compared with HPLC with evaporative light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qikun; Liu, Wanjun; Li, Xiaoting; Zhang, Tianhong; Wang, Yongjun; Liu, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    Supercritical fluid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry was used to comprehensively profile polyene phosphatidyl choline (PPC) extracted from soybean. We achieved an efficient chromatographic analysis using a BEH-2EP column (3 × 100 mm(2) , 1.7 μm) with a mobile phase consisting of CO2 and a cosolvent in gradient combination at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. The cosolvent consisted of methanol, acetonitrile, and water (containing 10 mM ammonium acetate and 0.2% formic acid). The total single-run time was 7 min. We used this method to accurately detect ten different phospholipids (PLs) during extraction. The limits of quantification for phosphatidyl choline, lyso-phosphatidylcholine (LPC), phosphatidic acid (PA), sphingomyelin, phosphatidyl glycerol, phosphatidyl inositol (PI), cholesterol, cardiolipin, phosphatidyl serine, and phosphatidyl ethanolamine (PE) were 20.6, 19.52, 1.21, 2.38, 0.50, 2.28, 54.3, 0.60, 0.65, and 4.85 ng/mL, respectively. However, adopting the high-performance liquid chromatography with evaporative light scattering detection method issued by the China Food and Drug Administration, only PA, LPC, PE, PI, and PPC could be analyzed accurately, and the limits of quantification were 33.89, 60.5, 30.3, 10.9, and 61.79 μg/mL, respectively. The total single-run time was at the least 20 min. Consequently, the supercritical fluid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry method was more suitable for the analysis of related PLs.

  13. Exotic Light Nuclei

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerny, Joseph; Poskanzer, Arthur M.

    1978-01-01

    Among the light elements, nuclei with unequal numbers of protons and neutrons are highly unstable. Some survive just long enough to be detected and exhibit unusual regimes of radioactive decay. ( Autor/MA)

  14. LIGHT-PENCIL COORDINATE POSITIONER,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    information sources such as radar and IFF PPI repeaters and computer displays. A light pencil which detects and controls a positionand intensity...position the video gate which extracts desired signals from the radar/IFF returns without requiring the operator to hold the pencil in position. The light ...to-one light pencil motion to marker motion. Except for the light detection photomultipler, the entire design is solid state. (Author)

  15. Cavity-enhanced AlGaAs/GaAs resonant tunneling photodetectors for telecommunication wavelength light detection at 1.3 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfenning, Andreas; Hartmann, Fabian; Langer, Fabian; Kamp, Martin; Höfling, Sven; Worschech, Lukas

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate a cavity-enhanced photodetector at the telecommunication wavelength of λ = 1.3 μm based