Science.gov

Sample records for 24-micron light detected

  1. Spitzer 24 Micron Observations of Optical/Near-Infrared-Selected Extremely Red Galaxies: Evidence for Assembly of Massive Galaxies at Z approximately equal to 1-2?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yan, Lin; Choi, Philip I.; Fadda, D.; Marleau, F. R.; Soifer, B. T.; Im, M.; Armus, L.; Frayer, D. T.; Storrie-Lombardi, L. J.; Thompson, D. J.; Teplitz, H. I.; Helou, G.; Appleton, P. N.; Chapman, S.; Fan, F.; Heinrichsen, I.; Lacy, M.; Shupe, D. L.; Squires, G. K.; Surace, J.; Wilson, G.

    2004-01-01

    We carried out direct measurement of the fraction of dusty sources in a sample of extremely red galaxies with (R - Ks) >= 5.3 mag and Ks < 20:2 mag, using 24 micron data from the Spitzer Space Telescope. Combining deep 24 micron Ks- and R-band data over an area of 64 arcmin(sup 2) in ELAIS N1 of the Spitzer First Look Survey (FLS), we find that 50% +/- 6% of our extremely red object (ERO) sample have measurable 24 micron flux above the 3 (sigma) flux limit of 40 (micro)Jy. This flux limit corresponds to a star formation rate (SFR) of 12 solar masses per year 1, much more sensitive than any previous long-wavelength measurement. The 24 micron-detected EROs have 24 micron/2.2 micron and 24 micron/0.7 micron flux ratios consistent with infrared luminous, dusty sources at z >= 1, and are an order of magnitude too red to be explained by an infrared quiescent spiral or a pure old stellar population at any redshift. Some of these 24 micron-detected EROs could be active galactic nuclei; however, the fraction among the whole ERO sample is probably small, 10%-20%, as suggested by deep X-ray observations as well as optical spectroscopy. Keck optical spectroscopy of a sample of similarly selected EROs in the FLS field suggests that most of the EROs in ELAIS N1 are probably at z 1. The mean 24 micron flux (167 (micro)Jy) of the 24 micron-detected ERO sample roughly corresponds to the rest-frame 12 micron luminosity, (nu)L(nu)(12 micron, of 3x10(exp 10)(deg) solar luminosities at z 1. Using the c IRAS (nu)L(nu)(12 (micron) and infrared luminosity LIR(8-1000 (micron), we infer that the (LIR) of the 24 micron- detected EROs is 3 x 10(exp 11) and 1 x 10(exp 12) solar luminosities at z = 1.0 and similar to that of local luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) and ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs). The corresponding SFR would be roughly 50-170 solar masses per year. If the timescale of this starbursting phase is on the order of 108 yr as inferred for the local LIRGs and ULIRGs, the

  2. The 2.4 micron spectrum of Comet Halley - A search for H2 emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, W. H.; Wolstencroft, R. D.; Lutz, B. L.

    1989-02-01

    A 2.4-micron spectrum of Comet Halley was obtained on April 1, 1986 with the UKIRT scanning Fabry-Perot-CVF equipped with an InSb detector. From the ratio of the measured flux from comet Halley to Zeta Her in the 8.8 x 10 to the -4th micron bandwidth, Comet Halley produced a detected flux of about 1.3 x 10 to the 5th photons/sec with a 1-sigma variance of 385 photons. The flux detected in the same spectral region by Maillard et al. (1986) agrees with the measurements reported here to within a factor of two. The data obtained are examined from the standpoint of the possible mechanisms of H2 production.

  3. The 2.4 micron spectrum of Comet Halley - A search for H2 emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. Hayden; Wolstencroft, Ramon D.; Lutz, Barry L.

    1989-01-01

    A 2.4-micron spectrum of Comet Halley was obtained on April 1, 1986 with the UKIRT scanning Fabry-Perot-CVF equipped with an InSb detector. From the ratio of the measured flux from comet Halley to Zeta Her in the 8.8 x 10 to the -4th micron bandwidth, Comet Halley produced a detected flux of about 1.3 x 10 to the 5th photons/sec with a 1-sigma variance of 385 photons. The flux detected in the same spectral region by Maillard et al. (1986) agrees with the measurements reported here to within a factor of two. The data obtained are examined from the standpoint of the possible mechanisms of H2 production.

  4. Statistics Of 24 Micron Field Asteroids In Spitzer Space Telescope Legacy Science Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Hines, D. C.; Padgett, D. L.; Brooke, T. Y.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Shupe, D.; Rebull, L.; Spiesman, W.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Evans, N. J., II; Lonsdale, C. J.

    2006-09-01

    We report on field asteroids detected in MIPS 24 micron scan maps of 50 square degrees from three separate surveys near the ecliptic plane. The data were acquired in two observation epochs separated by 3-6 hours, and reach a 5-sigma sensitivity near 1 mJy - sufficient to detect main-belt objects with diameters below 1 km. We find a source density of about 250 and 50 asteroids per square degree at ecliptic latitudes of 0 and 10 degrees, respectively. The cumulative brightness distribution follows a -1.2 power law in flux density. We relate this to the intrinsic asteroid size distribution using a Monte Carlo model of the main belt population and the standard thermal model to predict the observed flux density distribution. An intrinsic size distribution with power-law slope of -2.3 with radius produces an observed brightness distribution that matches the Spitzer results. This result is in good agreement with previous determinations from the Sloan survey for objects in this size range. Ongoing work with these data will allow us to characterize the source counts and size distributions in a third field at 18 degrees ecliptic latitude, and to search for radial differences within the main belt. Support for this work was provided by NASA to the Spitzer GO-1 Taurus survey project (PID 3584), and the c2d and SWIRE Legacy Science projects. The Spitzer Space Telescope is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under a contract with NASA.

  5. Large Scale Structure at 24 Microns in the SWIRE Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masci, F. J.; SWIRE Team

    2006-12-01

    We present initial results of galaxy clustering at 24μm by analyzing statistics of the projected galaxy distribution from counts-in-cells. This study focuses on the ELAIS-North1 SWIRE field. The sample covers ≃5.9 deg2 and contains 24,715 sources detected at 24μm to a 5.6σ limit of 250μJy (in the lowest coverage regions). We have explored clustering as a function of 3.6 - 24μm and 24μm flux density using angular-averaged two-point correlation functions derived from the variance of counts-in-cells on scales 0°.05-0°.7. Using a power-law parameterization, w2(θ)=A(θ/deg)1-γ, we find [A,γ] = [(5.43±0.20)×10-4,2.01±0.02] for the full sample (1σ errors throughout). We have inverted Limber's equation and estimated a spatial correlation length of r0=3.32±0.19 h-1Mpc for the full sample, assuming stable clustering and a redshift model consistent with observed 24μm counts. We also find that blue [fν(24)/fν(3.6)≤5.5] and red [fν(24)/fν(3.6)≥6.5] galaxies have the lowest and highest r0 values respectively, implying that redder galaxies are more clustered (by a factor of ≈3 on scales ⪆0°.2). Overall, the clustering estimates are smaller than those derived from optical surveys, but in agreement with results from IRAS and ISO in the mid-infrared. This extends the notion to higher redshifts that infrared selected surveys show weaker clustering than optical surveys.

  6. 2.4 Micron Cutoff AlGaAsSb/InGaAsSb Phototransistors for Shortwave IR Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Abedin, Nurul; Sulima, Oleg V.; Swaminathan, Krishna; Ismail, Syed; Singh, Upendra N.

    2006-01-01

    Shortwave infrared detectors are critical for several applications including remote sensing and optical communications. Several detectors are commercially available for this wavelength range, but they lack sufficient gain, which limits their detectivity. The characterization results of an AlGaAsSb/InGaAsSb phototransistor for shortwave IR application are reported. The phototransistor is grown using molecular beam epitaxy technique. Spectral response measurements showed a uniform responsivity between 1.2 and 2.4 micron region with a mean value of 1000 A/W. A maximum detectivity of 3.4 X 10(exp 11) cmHz1/2/W was obtained at 2 micron at -20 C and 1.3 V.

  7. Lithography light source fault detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Matthew; Pantel, Erica; Nelissen, Patrick; Moen, Jeffrey; Tincu, Eduard; Dunstan, Wayne; Brown, Daniel

    2010-04-01

    High productivity is a key requirement for today's advanced lithography exposure tools. Achieving targets for wafers per day output requires consistently high throughput and availability. One of the keys to high availability is minimizing unscheduled downtime of the litho cell, including the scanner, track and light source. From the earliest eximer laser light sources, Cymer has collected extensive performance data during operation of the source, and this data has been used to identify the root causes of downtime and failures on the system. Recently, new techniques have been developed for more extensive analysis of this data to characterize the onset of typical end-of-life behavior of components within the light source and allow greater predictive capability for identifying both the type of upcoming service that will be required and when it will be required. The new techniques described in this paper are based on two core elements of Cymer's light source data management architecture. The first is enhanced performance logging features added to newer-generation light source software that captures detailed performance data; and the second is Cymer OnLine (COL) which facilitates collection and transmission of light source data. Extensive analysis of the performance data collected using this architecture has demonstrated that many light source issues exhibit recognizable patterns in their symptoms. These patterns are amenable to automated identification using a Cymer-developed model-based fault detection system, thereby alleviating the need for detailed manual review of all light source performance information. Automated recognition of these patterns also augments our ability to predict the performance trending of light sources. Such automated analysis provides several efficiency improvements for light source troubleshooting by providing more content-rich standardized summaries of light source performance, along with reduced time-to-identification for previously

  8. Test and evaluation of the 2.4-micron photorefractor ocular screening system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, J. R.

    1985-01-01

    An improved 2.4-m photorefractor ocular screening system was tested and evaluated. The photorefractor system works on the principal of obtaining a colored photograph of both human eyes; and, by analysis of the retinal reflex images, certain ocular defects can be detected such a refractive error, strabismus, and lens obstructions. The 2.4-m photorefractory system uses a 35-mm camera with a telephoto lens and an electronic flash attachment. Retinal reflex images obtained from the new 2.4-m system are significantly improved over earlier systems in image quality. Other features were also improved, notably portability and reduction in mass. A total of 706 school age children were photorefracted, 211 learning disabled and 495 middle school students. The total students having abnormal retinal reflexes were 156 or 22 percent, and 133 or 85 percent of the abnormal had refractive error indicated. Ophthalmological examination was performed on 60 of these students and refractive error was verified in 57 or 95 percent of those examined. The new 2.4-m system has a NASA patent pending and is authorized by the FDA. It provides a reliable means of rapidly screening the eyes of children and young adults for vision problems. It is especially useful for infants and other non-communicative children who cannot be screened by the more conventional methods such as the familiar E chart.

  9. Portable light detection system for the blind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilber, R. L.; Carpenter, B. L.

    1973-01-01

    System can be used to detect "ready" light on automatic cooking device, to tell if lights are on for visitors, or to tell whether it is daylight or dark outside. Device is actuated like flashlight. Light impinging on photo cell activates transistor which energizes buzzer to indicate presence of light.

  10. Visible light communication based motion detection.

    PubMed

    Sewaiwar, Atul; Tiwari, Samrat Vikramaditya; Chung, Yeon-Ho

    2015-07-13

    In this paper, a unique and novel visible light communication based motion detection is presented. The proposed motion detection is performed based on white light LEDs and an array of photodetectors from existing visible light communication (VLC) links, thus providing VLC with three functionalities of illumination, communication and motion detection. The motion is detected by observing the pattern created by intentional obstruction of the VLC link. Experimental and simulation results demonstrate the validity of the proposed VLC based motion detection technique. The VLC based motion detection can benefit smart devices control in VLC based smart home environments. PMID:26191937

  11. Traffic Light Detection Using Conic Section Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinyalmdary, S.; Yilmaz, A.

    2016-06-01

    Traffic lights detection and their state recognition is a crucial task that autonomous vehicles must reliably fulfill. Despite scientific endeavors, it still is an open problem due to the variations of traffic lights and their perception in image form. Unlike previous studies, this paper investigates the use of inaccurate and publicly available GIS databases such as OpenStreetMap. In addition, we are the first to exploit conic section geometry to improve the shape cue of the traffic lights in images. Conic section also enables us to estimate the pose of the traffic lights with respect to the camera. Our approach can detect multiple traffic lights in the scene, it also is able to detect the traffic lights in the absence of prior knowledge, and detect the traffics lights as far as 70 meters. The proposed approach has been evaluated for different scenarios and the results show that the use of stereo cameras significantly improves the accuracy of the traffic lights detection and pose estimation.

  12. Window flaw detection by backscatter lighting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crockett, L. K.; Minton, F. R.

    1978-01-01

    Portable fiber-optic probe detects tiny flaws in transparent materials. Probe transmits light through surface to illuminate interior of material by backscattering off its edges. Light-sensitive contact paper records scratch pattern. Technique can be used for rapid visual checks. Flexible fiber optics are safely used in explosive or flammable areas; they present no hazard of breakage or contamination in controlled environments.

  13. Light emission, light detection and strain sensing with nanocrystalline graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riaz, Adnan; Pyatkov, Feliks; Alam, Asiful; Dehm, Simone; Felten, Alexandre; Chakravadhanula, Venkata S. K.; Flavel, Benjamin S.; Kübel, Christian; Lemmer, Uli; Krupke, Ralph

    2015-08-01

    Graphene is of increasing interest for optoelectronic applications exploiting light detection, light emission and light modulation. Intrinsically, the light-matter interaction in graphene is of a broadband type. However, by integrating graphene into optical micro-cavities narrow-band light emitters and detectors have also been demonstrated. These devices benefit from the transparency, conductivity and processability of the atomically thin material. To this end, we explore in this work the feasibility of replacing graphene with nanocrystalline graphene, a material which can be grown on dielectric surfaces without catalyst by graphitization of polymeric films. We have studied the formation of nanocrystalline graphene on various substrates and under different graphitization conditions. The samples were characterized by resistance, optical transmission, Raman and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and electron microscopy measurements. The conducting and transparent wafer-scale material with nanometer grain size was also patterned and integrated into devices for studying light-matter interaction. The measurements show that nanocrystalline graphene can be exploited as an incandescent emitter and bolometric detector similar to crystalline graphene. Moreover the material exhibits piezoresistive behavior which makes nanocrystalline graphene interesting for transparent strain sensors.

  14. Light emission, light detection and strain sensing with nanocrystalline graphene.

    PubMed

    Riaz, Adnan; Pyatkov, Feliks; Alam, Asiful; Dehm, Simone; Felten, Alexandre; Chakravadhanula, Venkata S K; Flavel, Benjamin S; Kübel, Christian; Lemmer, Uli; Krupke, Ralph

    2015-08-14

    Graphene is of increasing interest for optoelectronic applications exploiting light detection, light emission and light modulation. Intrinsically, the light-matter interaction in graphene is of a broadband type. However, by integrating graphene into optical micro-cavities narrow-band light emitters and detectors have also been demonstrated. These devices benefit from the transparency, conductivity and processability of the atomically thin material. To this end, we explore in this work the feasibility of replacing graphene with nanocrystalline graphene, a material which can be grown on dielectric surfaces without catalyst by graphitization of polymeric films. We have studied the formation of nanocrystalline graphene on various substrates and under different graphitization conditions. The samples were characterized by resistance, optical transmission, Raman and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and electron microscopy measurements. The conducting and transparent wafer-scale material with nanometer grain size was also patterned and integrated into devices for studying light-matter interaction. The measurements show that nanocrystalline graphene can be exploited as an incandescent emitter and bolometric detector similar to crystalline graphene. Moreover the material exhibits piezoresistive behavior which makes nanocrystalline graphene interesting for transparent strain sensors. PMID:26207014

  15. Optical detection dental disease using polarized light

    DOEpatents

    Everett, Matthew J.; Colston, Jr., Billy W.; Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Fried, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    A polarization sensitive optical imaging system is used to detect changes in polarization in dental tissues to aid the diagnosis of dental disease such as caries. The degree of depolarization is measured by illuminating the dental tissue with polarized light and measuring the polarization state of the backscattered light. The polarization state of this reflected light is analyzed using optical polarimetric imaging techniques. A hand-held fiber optic dental probe is used in vivo to direct the incident beam to the dental tissue and collect the reflected light. To provide depth-resolved characterization of the dental tissue, the polarization diagnostics may be incorporated into optical coherence domain reflectometry and optical coherence tomography (OCDR/OCT) systems, which enables identification of subsurface depolarization sites associated with demineralization of enamel or bone.

  16. Flexible detection optics for light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taratuta, Victor G.; Hurd, Alan J.; Meyer, Robert B.

    1984-05-01

    We have designed and built a compact, modular apparatus for the collection, viewing, and detection of scattered light for less than 1200, based on a commercially available optical bench. The novelty of our instrument is that it has the flexibility of modular design while allowing the user to see exactly what is happening: both the real image of the sample and the spatial coherence of the scattered light can be examined. There is built-in control over polarization, filtering, magnification, and other parameters.

  17. Ultraviolet light detection using an optical microcavity.

    PubMed

    Harker, Audrey; Mehrabani, Simin; Armani, Andrea M

    2013-09-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light exposure is connected to both physical and psychological diseases. As such, there is significant interest in developing sensors that can detect UV light in the mW/cm2 intensity range with a high signal-to-noise ratio. In this Letter, we demonstrate a UV sensor based on a silica integrated optical microcavity that has a linear operating response in both the forward and backward directions from 14 to 53 mW/cm2. The sensor response agrees with the developed predictive theory based on a thermodynamic model. Additionally, the signal-to-noise ratio is above 100 at physiologically relevant intensity levels. PMID:23988974

  18. Shedding New Light on Early Caries Detection

    PubMed Central

    Choo-Smith, Lin-P'ing; Dong, Cecilia C.S.; Cleghorn, Blaine; Hewko, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Dental caries continues to be a common chronic disease among various population groups. Patient care can be improved with detection at the earliest stage. However, current techniques do not have sufficient sensitivity and specificity. We discuss 2 new methods — optical coherence tomography (OCT) and polarized Raman spectroscopy (PRS) — that are potentially useful for early caries detection and monitoring. OCT produces morphologic depth images of near-surface tissue structures with a resolution that is an order of magnitude greater than ultrasound imaging. Based on measurement of back-scattered near infrared light, OCT shows that sound enamel causes high-intensity back-scattering at the tooth surface that decreases rapidly with depth. In contrast, incipient lesions cause higher light back-scattering at the tooth surface and subsurface scattering indicative of porosity caused by demineralization. The scatter region within the enamel correlates well with the classical triangular shape of subsurface lesions observed in histologic sections. OCT imaging not only allows identification of incipient lesions, but also provides information on surface integrity and lesion depth. PRS furnishes biochemical information about the tooth's composition, mineral content and crystallinity. The depolarization ratio derived from the dominant phosphate peak of hydroxyapatite in sound teeth is consistently lower than that from incipient caries. This difference is attributed to the change in enamel crystallite morphology or orientation that occurs with acid demineralization. Thus, PRS can be used to confirm suspect lesions determined by OCT and rule out false-positive signals from non-carious anomalies. The combination of OCT and PRS provides a new detection method with high sensitivity and specificity that will improve caries management and patient care. Future studies are aimed at developing intraoral probes to validate the findings in vivo. PMID:19126361

  19. First Light from Extrasolar Planets and Implications for Astrobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, L. Jeremy; Seager, Sara; Harrington, Joseph; Deming, Drake

    2005-01-01

    The first light from an extrasolar planet was recently detected. These results, obtained for two transiting extrasolar planets at different infrared wavelengths, open a new era in the field of extrasolar planet detection and characterization because for the first time we can now detect planets beyond the solar system directly. Using the Spitzer Space Telescope at 24 microns, we observed the modulation of combined light (star plus planet) from the HD 209458 system as the planet disappeared behind the star during secondary eclipse and later re-emerged, thereby isolating the light from the planet. We obtained a planet-to-star ratio of 0.26% at 24 microns, corresponding to a brightness temperature of 1130 + / - 150 K. We will describe this result in detail, explain what it can tell us about the atmosphere of HD 209458 b, and discuss implications for the field of astrobiology. These results represent a significant step on the path to detecting terrestrial planets around other stars and in understanding their atmospheres in terms of composition and temperature.

  20. 14 CFR 25.1403 - Wing icing detection lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Wing icing detection lights. 25.1403... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 25.1403 Wing icing detection lights. Unless operations at night in known or forecast icing conditions are prohibited by...

  1. 14 CFR 25.1403 - Wing icing detection lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Wing icing detection lights. 25.1403... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 25.1403 Wing icing detection lights. Unless operations at night in known or forecast icing conditions are prohibited by...

  2. 14 CFR 25.1403 - Wing icing detection lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Wing icing detection lights. 25.1403... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 25.1403 Wing icing detection lights. Unless operations at night in known or forecast icing conditions are prohibited by...

  3. TPB-coated light guides for liquid argon TPC light detection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignarra, C. M.

    2013-10-01

    Light detection systems in Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LArTPCs) require the detection of the 128 nm light produced during argon scintillation. Most detectors use Tetraphenyl Butadiene (TPB) to shift the wavelength of the light into a range visible to Photomultiplier Tubes (PMTs). These proceedings summarize characterizations of light-guides coated with a matrix of TPB in UV transmitting acrylic which are more compact than existing LArTPC light collection systems.

  4. Detection of light transformations and concomitant changes in surface albedo

    PubMed Central

    Gerhard, Holly E.; Maloney, Laurence T.

    2010-01-01

    We report two experiments demonstrating that (1) observers are sensitive to information about changes in the light field not captured by local scene statistics and that (2) they can use this information to enhance detection of changes in surface albedo. Observers viewed scenes consisting of matte surfaces at many orientations illuminated by a collimated light source. All surfaces were achromatic, all lights neutral. In the first experiment, observers attempted to discriminate small changes in direction of the collimated light source (light transformations) from matched changes in the albedos of all surfaces (non-light transformations). Light changes and non-light changes shared the same local scene statistics and edge ratios, but the latter were not consistent with any change in direction to the collimated source. We found that observers could discriminate light changes as small as 5 degrees with sensitivity d′ > 1 and accurately judge the direction of change. In a second experiment, we measured observers' ability to detect a change in the surface albedo of an isolated surface patch during either a light change or a surface change. Observers were more accurate in detecting isolated albedo changes during light changes. Measures of sensitivity d′ were more than twice as great. PMID:20884599

  5. Light mediators in dark matter direct detections

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tai; Miao, Sen; Zhou, Yu-Feng

    2015-03-17

    In an extended effective operator framework, we investigate in detail the effects of light mediators on the event spectra of dark matter (DM)-nucleus scatterings. The presence of light mediators changes the interpretation of the current experimental data, especially the determination of DM particle mass. We show by analytic and numerical illustrations that in general for all the operators relevant to spin-independent scatterings, the DM particle mass allowed by a given set of experimental data increases significantly when the mediator particle becomes lighter. For instance, in the case of CDMS-II-Si experiment, the allowed DM particle mass can reach ∼50 (100) GeV at 68% (90%) confidence level, which is much larger than ∼10 GeV in the case with contact interactions. The increase of DM particle mass saturates when the mediator mass is below O(10) MeV. The upper limits from other experiments such as SuperCDMS, CDMSlite, CDEX, XENON10/100, LUX, PandaX etc. all tend to be weaker toward high DM mass regions. In a combined analysis, we show that the presence of light mediators can partially relax the tension in the current results of CDMS-II-Si, SuperCDMS and LUX.

  6. Method of Detecting Coliform Bacteria from Reflected Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of detecting coliform bacteria in water from reflected light, and also includes devices for the measurement, calculation and transmission of data relating to that method.

  7. Particle detection by a light-scattering technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kormanyos, S.; Mastroeni, J.

    1972-01-01

    Instrument measures concentration of small particles in aqueous medium in terms of amount of light scattered and degree to which light transmission is attenuated. Sensitivity to small particles is optimized because both scattered and transmitted illumination levels are detected by photodiodes.

  8. Light echo detection of circumstellar disks around flaring stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaidos, Eric J.

    1994-01-01

    Light echoes can be used to detect and characterize disks around flaring stars. Such disks are thought to be a hallmark of planet formation but are very difficult to detect by ordinary means. Dwarf emission-line M stars experience flares with luminosities comparable to their quiescent photospheres on time scales of minutes, less than the light travel time across a disk many astronomical units in extent; they are thus ideal candidates for such a search. Bromley (1992) calculated that the detection of Jupiter-sized companions using light echoes requires photometric accuracies better than 1 part in 10(exp 6). However, a disk consisting of grains or small bodies will scatter a much larger fraction of the light than a planet of similar mass. I estimate the light echo amplitutdes from plausible geometries of circumstellar material and present simulation light curves. The light echo amplitudes are typically 1% of the flare and I conclude that such events will be detected best in cases where the flare is eclipsed by the star. An examination of the time scales associated with internal processes in a protoplanetary disks around dM stars indicates that any primordial disks may become undetectable in 10(exp 4) years and will have completely disappeared by 10(exp 8) years, the estimated age of dMe stars in the solar neighborhood. However, searches for light echoes might constrain the amount of material continuing to fall into these young stellar systems in the form of comet-like objects.

  9. 14 CFR 25.1403 - Wing icing detection lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Wing icing detection lights. 25.1403... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 25.1403 Wing icing... ice on the parts of the wings that are critical from the standpoint of ice accumulation....

  10. 14 CFR 25.1403 - Wing icing detection lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Wing icing detection lights. 25.1403... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Lights § 25.1403 Wing icing... ice on the parts of the wings that are critical from the standpoint of ice accumulation....

  11. Detecting light in whispering-gallery-mode resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy (Inventor); Maleki, Lutfollah (Inventor); Mohageg, Makan (Inventor); Le, Thanh M. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An optical device including a whispering gallery mode (WGM) optical resonator configured to support one or more whispering gallery modes; and a photodetector optically coupled to an exterior surface of the optical resonator to receive evanescent light from the optical resonator to detect light inside the optical resonator.

  12. Light-Activated Pharmaceuticals: Mechanisms and Detection

    PubMed Central

    Kessel, David; Reiners, John

    2013-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy relies on the interaction between light, oxygen and a photosensitizing agent. Its medical significance relates to the ability of certain agents, usually based on porphyrin or phthalocyanine structures, to localize somewhat selectively in neoplastic cells and their vasculature. Subsequent irradiation, preferably at a sufficiently high wavelength to have a significant pathway through tissues, results in a photophysical reaction whereby the excited state of the photosensitizing agent transfers energy to molecular oxygen and results in the formation of reactive oxygen species. Analogous reactive nitrogen species are also formed. These contain both nitrogen and oxygen atoms. The net result is both direct tumor cell death and a shutdown of the tumor vasculature. Other processes may also occur that promote the anti-tumor response but these are outside the scope of this review. PMID:23990688

  13. Light-Activated Pharmaceuticals: Mechanisms and Detection.

    PubMed

    Kessel, David; Reiners, John

    2012-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy relies on the interaction between light, oxygen and a photosensitizing agent. Its medical significance relates to the ability of certain agents, usually based on porphyrin or phthalocyanine structures, to localize somewhat selectively in neoplastic cells and their vasculature. Subsequent irradiation, preferably at a sufficiently high wavelength to have a significant pathway through tissues, results in a photophysical reaction whereby the excited state of the photosensitizing agent transfers energy to molecular oxygen and results in the formation of reactive oxygen species. Analogous reactive nitrogen species are also formed. These contain both nitrogen and oxygen atoms. The net result is both direct tumor cell death and a shutdown of the tumor vasculature. Other processes may also occur that promote the anti-tumor response but these are outside the scope of this review. PMID:23990688

  14. Display conditions and lesion detectability: effect of background light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razavi, Mahmood; Hall, Theodore R.; Aberle, Denise R.; Hayrapetian, Alek S.; Loloyan, Mansur; Eldredge, Sandra L.

    1990-08-01

    We assessed the effect of high background light on observer performance for the detection of a variety of chest radiographic abnormalities. Five observers reviewed 66 digital hard copy chest images formatted to 1 1 x 14 inch size under two display conditions: 1) on a specially prepared 1 1 x 14 inch illuminated panel with no peripheral light and 2) on a standard viewing panel designed for 14 x 17 inch radiographs. The images contained one - or more of the following conditions: pneumothorax, interstitial disease, nodules, alveolar process, or no abnormality. The results of receiver operator characteristic analysis show that extraneous light does reduce observer performance and the detectability of nodules, interstitial disease.

  15. Intrusion detection robust to slow and abrupt lighting changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, Aleksej; Vesin, Jean-Marc; Reymond, Florian

    1996-03-01

    In this communication we present an image based object detection algorithm which is applied to intrusion detection. The algorithm is based on the comparison of input edges and temporally filtered edges of the background. It is characterized by very low computational and memory loads, high sensitivity to the presence of physical intruders and high robustness to slow and abrupt lighting changes. The algorithm is implementable on a cheap digital signal processor. It was tested on a data base of about one thousand gray-level CIF-format frames representing static scenes with various contents (light sources, intruders, lighting changes), and neither false alarm nor detection failure occurred. The number of parameters involved by the algorithm is very low, and their values do not require a fine tuning. The same set of parameters performs equally well in different conditions: different scenes, various lighting changes, various object sizes.

  16. Detecting Lateral Motion using Light's Orbital Angular Momentum.

    PubMed

    Cvijetic, Neda; Milione, Giovanni; Ip, Ezra; Wang, Ting

    2015-01-01

    Interrogating an object with a light beam and analyzing the scattered light can reveal kinematic information about the object, which is vital for applications ranging from autonomous vehicles to gesture recognition and virtual reality. We show that by analyzing the change in the orbital angular momentum (OAM) of a tilted light beam eclipsed by a moving object, lateral motion of the object can be detected in an arbitrary direction using a single light beam and without object image reconstruction. We observe OAM spectral asymmetry that corresponds to the lateral motion direction along an arbitrary axis perpendicular to the plane containing the light beam and OAM measurement axes. These findings extend OAM-based remote sensing to detection of non-rotational qualities of objects and may also have extensions to other electromagnetic wave regimes, including radio and sound. PMID:26493681

  17. Limitations for heterodyne detection of Brillouin scattered light

    SciTech Connect

    Allemeier, R.T.; Wagner, J.W.; Telschow, K.L.

    1995-01-01

    One means by which elastic properties of a material may be determined is measuring sound wave velocities in the material, from which elastic moduli of interest can be computed. Velocity can be measured by conventional piezoelectric transduction techniques, by applying laser ultrasonics, or by using Brillouin-scattering methods. Brillouin-scattering techniques for determining the sound wave velocity are particularly attractive since they are completely noninvasive. Only a probe beam of light is required since the thermal energy in the material provides the elastic motion. Heterodyne methods for detection of Brillouin-scattered light are considered one possible means to increase the speed of the scattered light frequency detection. Results of experiments with simulated Brillouin scattering suggest that heterodyne detection of the Brillouin-scattered light is feasible. Experiments to detect Brillouin-scattered light, with water as the scattering medium, were designed and interpreted using the results of the simulated scattering experiments. Overall, results showed that it is difficult to narrow the linewidth for Brillouin scattering to an acceptable level. The results given indicate that heterodyne detection of the Brillouin components requires detection bandwidths that are quite small, perhaps 10 Hz or lower. These small bandwidths can be routinely achieved using lock-in amplifier techniques.

  18. Image sensor for object detection using modulated light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taruki, H.; Ohno, A.; Ono, F.; Hamamoto, T.; Sasaki, T.; Shirai, T.; Sakai, M.

    2007-02-01

    We have been investigating a system to detect moving objects correctly at the place where luminous intensity is changing because of the influence of incident light such as sunlight, fluorescent light and car headlight. The object detection system consists of a smart image sensor and a modulated LED light, and it is possible to suppress the influence of the change of background light by using a different value between two image values when the LED light is turned on and off. Because the speed of modulation is high for accurate detection of moving objects, electric charges from a photodiode are distributed into two capacitors by switching in sync with the LED light in a pixel circuit of the sensor. Also, the sensor has a subtraction function by a current mirror circuit to reduce the same charges from two capacitors before saturation. By the frequent subtractions, it is possible to increase only the influence of the modulated light and reconstruct wide dynamic range images at outside of the sensor by using the information of subtractions and the voltage value of each capacitor.

  19. Detection of a spinning object using light's orbital angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Lavery, Martin P J; Speirits, Fiona C; Barnett, Stephen M; Padgett, Miles J

    2013-08-01

    The linear Doppler shift is widely used to infer the velocity of approaching objects, but this shift does not detect rotation. By analyzing the orbital angular momentum of the light scattered from a spinning object, we observed a frequency shift proportional to product of the rotation frequency of the object and the orbital angular momentum of the light. This rotational frequency shift was still present when the angular momentum vector was parallel to the observation direction. The multiplicative enhancement of the frequency shift may have applications for the remote detection of rotating bodies in both terrestrial and astronomical settings. PMID:23908234

  20. Scintillation light detection system in LArIAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryczynski, P.

    2016-02-01

    The LArIAT experiment is currently taking data at Fermilab using a Liquid Argon TPC, with the aim of studying particle interactions and characterizing detector response for neutrino detectors using argon. In parallel, it serves as a test-bench to develop and evaluate the performance of the simulation, reconstruction, and analysis software used in LAr neutrino experiments. LArIAT also takes advantage of the scintillating capabilities of liquid argon and will evaluate the feasibility of using the light signal to determine calorimetric information and particle identification. To test this possibility, a scintillation light detection system consisting of high Quantum Efficiency (QE) PMT and Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) devices is installed in the cryostat, viewing the interior of the TPC. Light collection efficiency is maximized by means of lining the walls with reflector foils covered by a wavelength shifter layer. Collecting the light reflected at the boundaries of the active volume greatly improves also the uniformity of the light yield. Presented here are initial results of the LArIAT light detection system calibration together with the preliminary results of the dedicated simulation and its application in future LAr TPC experiments

  1. ARAPUCA a new device for liquid argon scintillation light detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, A. A.; Segreto, E.

    2016-02-01

    We present a totally innovative device for the detection of liquid argon scintillation light, that has been named ARAPUCA (Argon R&D Advanced Program at UniCAmp). It is composed of a passive light collector and of active devices. The latters are standard SiPMs that operate at liquid argon temperature, while the passive collector is based on a new technology, never explored in this field before. It is a photon trap, that allows to collect light with extremely high efficiency. The total detection efficiency of the device can be tuned by modifying the ratio between the area of the active devices (SiPM) and the area of the optical window. For example, it will allow to reach a detection efficiency at the level of 1% on a surface of 50 × 50 cm2 with an active coverage of 2 × 2 cm2 (two/three large area SiPM). It is also a cheap device, since the major part of its cost is represented by the active devices. For these reason this appears to be the ideal device for scintillation light detection in large Time Projection Chambers. With appropriate modifications it can be used also in next generation Dark Matter detectors.

  2. Detecting an Extended Light Source through a Lens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litaker, E. T.; Machacek, J. R.; Gay, T. J.

    2011-01-01

    We present a Monte Carlo simulation of a cylindrical luminescent volume and a typical lens-detector system. The results of this simulation yield a graphically simple picture of the regions within the cylindrical volume from which this system detects light. Because the cylindrical volume permits large angles of incidence, we use a modification of…

  3. Resonant tunneling diode with a multiplication region for light detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yu; Wang, Guanglong; Ni, Haiqiao; Chen, Jianhui; Gao, Fengqi; Qiao, Zhongtao; Niu, Zhichuan

    2014-11-01

    A resonant tunneling diode (RTD) with a multiplication region is designed for light detection in this paper. Via adding a n+-i-p+ multiplication region, we focus on promoting the photocurrent and light sensitivity of the detector. Through the calculation of the multiplication factor, the thickness of the multiplication region is determined. The influence factors of the electric field and potential distribution of the detector are investigated, thereby the thickness and doping concentration of the doped layers besides the double-barrier structure (DBS) are decided. Detectors with and without a multiplication region are fabricated from semiconductor heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The current-voltage (I-V) and light sensitivity tests show that the detector with a multiplication region has better performance in peak photocurrent and light sensitivity.

  4. ZnO light-emitting nanoprobes for tumor detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yung-Tsan; Shen, Yi-Chun; Yang, Sheng-Chieh; Yang, Tsung-Lin; Huang, Jian-Jang

    2013-02-01

    Tumor detection is a significant health issue, but it is still a limit to identify cancer cells during tumor resection by using traditional methods such as fluorescence. In this study, zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods bonded to antibodies was investigated as nanoprobes for sensing cancer cells. The result shows that antibodies toward epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) can be connected to ZnO nanorods and EGFR receptors of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The cancer cells can be recognized via the observation of purple light emission from these probes by using naked eye or an optical microscope. By contrast, the HS68 cells with less EGFR expression had no purple light emission as the probes were washed off. Besides, from the photoluminescent spectra, the intensity ratio between the purple light (from ZnO nanorods) and green band (from the autofluorescence of cells) is much higher in SCC than in HS68 cells, which suggest that the cancer cells can be detected by comparing the peak intensity ratio. The probes have the potential clinical application for real-time tumor detection, and the cancer cells can be excised more precisely with the help of purple light emission.

  5. A Demonstration of Light Guides for Light Detection in Liquid Argon TPCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignarra, C. M.

    Liquid Argon (LAr) Time Projection Chambers (TPCs) are a developing technology that is becoming a popular choice for neutrino and dark matter experiments due to the low cost of the LAr as a target material and the high signal effciency and background rejection that these detectors can achieve. When excited by a passing charged particle created in a neutrino interaction, argon produces scintillation light at 128 nm. Several types of systems exist for detecting this light. Most involve shifting the wavelength of the light using Tetraphenyl Butadiene (TPB), resulting in visible light which is detected by a PMT.I will discuss our work on a new system under development for light detection in LAr which uses acrylic lightguides. The lightguides are coated with a thin film consisting of TPB embedded in polystyrene. This system could provide a solution to some of the issues associated with scaling existing systems for a larger future LAr detector. Though we are only in the preliminary stages of this R&D, we have shown that the results are already suffcient for triggering.

  6. Sky light polarization detection with linear polarizer triplet in light field camera inspired by insect vision.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjing; Cao, Yu; Zhang, Xuanzhe; Liu, Zejin

    2015-10-20

    Stable information of a sky light polarization pattern can be used for navigation with various advantages such as better performance of anti-interference, no "error cumulative effect," and so on. But the existing method of sky light polarization measurement is weak in real-time performance or with a complex system. Inspired by the navigational capability of a Cataglyphis with its compound eyes, we introduce a new approach to acquire the all-sky image under different polarization directions with one camera and without a rotating polarizer, so as to detect the polarization pattern across the full sky in a single snapshot. Our system is based on a handheld light field camera with a wide-angle lens and a triplet linear polarizer placed over its aperture stop. Experimental results agree with the theoretical predictions. Not only real-time detection but simple and costless architecture demonstrates the superiority of the approach proposed in this paper. PMID:26560386

  7. Spitzer 24micron Observations of Optical/Near-IR Selected Extremely Red Galaxies: Evidence for Assembly of Massive Galaxies at z approximately 1 - 2?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yan, Lin; Choi, Philip I.; Fadda, D.; Marleau, F. R.; Soifer, B. T.; Im, M.; Armus, L.; Frayer, D. T.; Storrie-Lombardi, L. J.; Thompson, D. J.; Teplitz, H. I.; Helou, G.; Appleton, P. N.; Chapman, S.; Fan, F.; Heinrichsen, I.; Lacy, M.; Shupe, D. L; Squires, G. K.; Surace, J.; G., Wilson

    2004-01-01

    We carried out the direct measurement of the fraction of dusty sources in a sample of extremely red galaxies with (R-K(sub s)) greater than or equal to 5.3 mag and K(sub s) less than 20.2 mag, using from the Spitzer Space Telescope. Combining deep 24 micrometers, K(sub s)- and R-band data over an area of approximately 64 sq.arcmin in the ELAIS N1 field of the Spitzer First Look Survey (FLS), we find that 50 +/- 60% of our ERO sample have measurable 24 micrometer flux above the 3(sigma) flux limit of 40 microns Jy. This flux limit corresponds to a SFR of 12 solar mass/yr at z approximately 1, much mo previous long wavelength measurement. The 24fJ,m-detected EROs have 24-to2.2 and 24-to-0.7micrometr flux ratios consistent with infrared luminous, dusty sources at z approx. 1, and an order of magnitude too red to be explained by an infrared quiescent spiral or a pure old stellar population at any redshift. Some of these 24 micrometer-detected EROs could be AGN, however, the fraction among the whole ERO sample is probably small, 10-20%, as suggested by deep X-ray observations as well as optical spectroscopy. Keck optical spectroscopy of a sample of similarly selected EROs in the FLS field suggests that most of the EROs in ELAIS Nl are probably at z approx. 1.

  8. 1 to 2.4 microns spectrum and orbital properties of the Giant Planet Beta Pictoris b obtained with the Gemini Planet Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pueyo, Laurent; Chilcote, Jeffrey; Millar-Blanchaer, Max; Barman, Travis; Fitzgerald, Michael P.; Graham, James R.; Larkin, James; Kalas, Paul G.; dawson, Rebekah; Wang, Jason; Perrin, Marshall; Moon, Dae-Sik; Macintosh, Bruce

    2015-12-01

    We present a low-resolution multi-band spectrum of the planetary companion to the nearby young star beta Pictoris using the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI). GPI is designed to image and provide low-resolution spectra of Jupiter sized, self-luminous planetary companions around young nearby stars. While H-bandis the primary workhorse for the GPI Exoplanet Survey, the instrument is capable of observing in the near infrared covering Y, J, H, and K bands. These observations of Beta Pic Pictoris b were taken covering multiple bands as part of GPI’s verification and commissioning phase in 2013 and 2014. Using atmospheric models along with the H-band data we recently reported an effective temperature of 1600-1700 K and a surface gravity of log (g) = 3.5-4.5 (cgs units). A similar exercise was also carried out by an independent team using the J band data, and did yield similar conclusions. These values agree well with ”hot-start” predictions from planetary evolution models for a gas giant with mass between 10 and 12 M Jup and age between 10 and 20 Myr. Here we revisit these conclusions in light of a joint analysis of these two datasets along with the longer wavelength GPI spectrum in K band, and present refined constraints on the atmospheric properties of this giant planet. In addition, we present an updated orbit for Beta Pictoris b based on astrometric measurements taken using commissioning and subsequent monitoring observations, spanning 14 months. The planet has a semi-major axis of 9.2 (+1.5 -0.4) AU, with an eccentricity e≤ 0.26. The position angle of the ascending node is Ω=31.75 deg±0.15, offset from both the outer main disk and the inner disk seen in the GPI image. We finally discuss these properties in the context of planet-disk dynamical interactions.

  9. Diffuse light tomography to detect blood vessels using Tikhonov regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazanci, Huseyin O.; Jacques, Steven L.

    2016-04-01

    Detection of blood vessels within light-scattering tissues involves detection of subtle shadows as blood absorbs light. These shadows are diffuse but measurable by a set of source-detector pairs in a spatial array of sources and detectors on the tissue surface. The measured shadows can reconstruct the internal position(s) of blood vessels. The tomographic method involves a set of Ns sources and Nd detectors such that Nsd = Ns x Nd source-detector pairs produce Nsd measurements, each interrogating the tissue with a unique perspective, i.e., a unique region of sensitivity to voxels within the tissue. This tutorial report describes the reconstruction of the image of a blood vessel within a soft tissue based on such source-detector measurements, by solving a matrix equation using Tikhonov regularization. This is not a novel contribution, but rather a simple introduction to a well-known method, demonstrating its use in mapping blood perfusion.

  10. Light-detection electronics for a Raman lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leser, R. J.; Salzman, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    A light-detection system for an optical radar, or lidar, unit to be used for remote temperature and composition measurements was designed, built, and bench tested. This detection system processes three return signal wavelengths: two Raman wavelengths, and the Rayleigh-Mie wavelength at 694.3 nanometers. Means of coping with photomultiplier tube instabilities and limitations are discussed. Circuits for gain control, ranging, and digitizing are included. The phototube gains can be switched fully on in 80 meters (450 nsec) or off in 30 meters (200 nsec) of range. The range circuit processes signals from 0.1 to 2 kilometers, with an estimated range resolution of less than 5 meters.

  11. Light detection and the wavelength shifter deposition in DEAP-3600

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broerman, B.; Retière, F.

    2016-02-01

    The Dark matter Experiment using Argon Pulse-shape discrimination (DEAP) uses liquid argon as a target medium to perform a direct-detection dark matter search. The 3600 kg liquid argon target volume is housed in a spherical acrylic vessel and viewed by a surrounding array of photomultiplier tubes. Ionizing particles in the argon volume produce scintillation light which must be wavelength shifted to be detected by the photomultiplier tubes. Argon scintillation and wavelength shifting, along with details on the application of the wavelength shifter to the inner surface of the acrylic vessel are presented.

  12. Improved TPB-coated light guides for liquid argon TPC light detection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Z.; Bugel, L.; Collin, G.; Conrad, J. M.; Jones, B. J. P.; Moon, J.; Toups, M.; Wongjirad, T.

    2015-08-01

    Scintillation light produced in liquid argon (LAr) must be shifted from 128 nm to visible wavelengths in light detection systems used for liquid argon time-projection chambers (LArTPCs). To date, LArTPC light collection systems have employed tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB) coatings on photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) or plates placed in front of the PMTs. Recently, a new approach using TPB-coated light guides was proposed. In this paper, we report on light guides with improved attenuation lengths above 100 cm when measured in air. This is an important step in the development of meter-scale light guides for future LArTPCs. Improvements come from using a new acrylic-based coating, diamond-polished cast UV transmitting acrylic bars, and a hand-dipping technique to coat the bars. We discuss a model for connecting bar response in air to response in liquid argon and compare this to data taken in liquid argon. The good agreement between the prediction of the model and the measured response in liquid argon demonstrates that characterization in air is sufficient for quality control of bar production. This model can be used in simulations of light guides for future experiments.

  13. Spectroscopic direct detection of reflected light from extrasolar planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, J. H. C.; Figueira, P.; Santos, N. C.; Lovis, C.

    2013-12-01

    At optical wavelengths, an exoplanet's signature is essentially reflected light from the host star - several orders of magnitude fainter. Since it is superimposed on the star spectrum its detection has been a difficult observational challenge. However, the development of a new generation of instruments like Echelle Spectrograph for Rocky Exoplanets and Stable Spectroscopic Observations (ESPRESSO) and next-generation telescopes like the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) put us in a privileged position to detect these planets' reflected light as we will have access to extremely high signal-to-noise ratio spectra. With this work, we propose an alternative approach for the direct detection of the reflected light of an exoplanet. We simulated observations with ESPRESSO at Very Large Telescope (VLT) and high-resolution spectrograph (HIRES) at E-ELT of several star+planet systems, encompassing 10 h of the most favourable orbital phases. To the simulated spectra we applied the cross-correlation function to operate in a much higher signal-to-noise ratio domain than when compared with the spectra. The use of the cross-correlation function permitted us to recover the simulated planet signals at a level above 3σnoise significance on several prototypical (e.g. Neptune-type planet with a 2 d orbit with the VLT at 4.4σnoise significance) and real planetary systems (e.g. 55 Cnc e with the E-ELT at 4.9σnoise significance). Even by using a more pessimistic approach to the noise level estimation, where systematics in the spectra increase the noise 2-3 times, the detection of the reflected light from large close-orbit planets is possible. We have also shown that this kind of study is currently within reach of current instruments and telescopes (e.g. 51 Peg b with the VLT at 5.2σnoise significance), although at the limit of their capabilities.

  14. Experimental detection of transverse particle movement with structured light.

    PubMed

    Rosales-Guzmán, Carmelo; Hermosa, Nathaniel; Belmonte, Aniceto; Torres, Juan P

    2013-01-01

    One procedure widely used to detect the velocity of a moving object is by using the Doppler effect. This is the perceived change in frequency of a wave caused by the relative motion between the emitter and the detector, or between the detector and a reflecting target. The relative movement, in turn, generates a time-varying phase which translates into the detected frequency shift. The classical longitudinal Doppler effect is sensitive only to the velocity of the target along the line-of-sight between the emitter and the detector (longitudinal velocity), since any transverse velocity generates no frequency shift. This makes the transverse velocity undetectable in the classical scheme. Although there exists a relativistic transverse Doppler effect, it gives values that are too small for the typical velocities involved in most laser remote sensing applications. Here we experimentally demonstrate a novel way to detect transverse velocities. The key concept is the use of structured light beams. These beams are unique in the sense that their phases can be engineered such that each point in its transverse plane has an associated phase value. When a particle moves across the beam, the reflected light will carry information about the particle's movement through the variation of the phase of the light that reaches the detector, producing a frequency shift associated with the movement of the particle in the transverse plane. PMID:24085150

  15. The Language of Planetary Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This graph of data from NASA's Spitzer Space telescope shows changes in the infrared light output of two star-planet systems (one above, one below) located hundreds of light-years away. The data were taken while the planets, called HD 209458b and TrES-1, disappeared behind their stars in what is called a 'secondary eclipse.' The dip seen in the center of each graph represents the time when the planets were eclipsed, and tells astronomers exactly how much light they emit.

    Why a secondary eclipse? When a planet transits, or passes in front of, its star, it partially blocks the light of the star. When the planet swings around behind the star, the star completely blocks its light. This drop in total light can be measured to determine the amount of light coming from just the planet.

    Why infrared? In visible light, the glare of a star overwhelms its planetary companion and the little light the planet reflects. In infrared, a star shines less brightly, and its planet gives off its own internal light, or heat radiation, making the planet easier to detect.

    By observing these secondary eclipses at different infrared wavelengths, astronomers can obtain the planet's temperature, and, in the future, they may be able to pick out chemicals sprinkled throughout a planet's atmosphere. The technique also reveals whether a planet's orbit is elongated or circular.

    This strategy will not work for all known extrasolar planets. It is ideally suited to study those Jupiter-sized planets previously discovered to cross, or transit, between us and the Sun-like stars they orbit, out to distances of 500 light-years. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope was the first to successfully employ this technique.

    The data of HD 209458b were taken by Spitzer's multiband imaging photometer using the 24-micron array. The data of TrES-1 were taken by Spitzer's infrared array camera using the 8-micron array.

  16. Direct detection of exothermic dark matter with light mediator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Chao-Qiang; Huang, Da; Lee, Chun-Hao; Wang, Qing

    2016-08-01

    We study the dark matter (DM) direct detection for the models with the effects of the isospin-violating couplings, exothermic scatterings, and/or the lightness of the mediator, proposed to relax the tension between the CDMS-Si signals and null experiments. In the light of the new updates of the LUX and CDMSlite data, we find that many of the previous proposals are now ruled out, including the Ge-phobic exothermic DM model and the Xe-phobic DM one with a light mediator. We also examine the exothermic DM models with a light mediator but without the isospin violation, and we are unable to identify any available parameter space that could simultaneously satisfy all the experiments. The only models that can partially relax the inconsistencies are the Xe-phobic exothermic DM models with or without a light mediator. But even in this case, a large portion of the CDMS-Si regions of interest has been constrained by the LUX and SuperCDMS data.

  17. White-Light Nulling Interferometers for Detecting Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennesson, Bertrand; Serabyn, Eugene; Shao, Michael; Levine, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    A report proposes the development of a white-light nulling interferometer to be used in conjunction with a singleaperture astronomical telescope that would be operated in outer space. When such a telescope is aimed at a given star, the interferometer would suppress the light of that star while passing enough light from planets (if any) orbiting the star, to enable imaging or spectroscopic examination of the planets. In a nulling interferometer, according to the proposal, scattered light would be suppressed by spatial filtering in an array of single-mode optical fibers rather than by requiring optical surfaces to be accurate within 1/4,000 wavelength as in a coronagraph or an apodized telescope. As a result, angstrom-level precision would be needed in only the small nulling combiner, and not in large, meter-sized optics. The nulling interferometer could work as an independent instrument in space or in conjunction with a coronagraphic system to detect planets outside our solar system.

  18. Identification of Cyanobacteriochromes Detecting Far-Red Light.

    PubMed

    Rockwell, Nathan C; Martin, Shelley S; Lagarias, J Clark

    2016-07-19

    The opacity of mammalian tissue to visible light and the strong attenuation of infrared light by water at ≥900 nm have contributed to growing interest in the development of far-red and near-infrared absorbing tools for visualizing and actuating responses within live cells. Here we report the discovery of cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs) responsive to light in this far-red window. CBCRs are linear tetrapyrrole (bilin)-based light sensors distantly related to plant phytochrome sensors. Our studies reveal far-red (λmax = 725-755 nm)/orange (λmax = 590-600 nm) and far-red/red (λmax = 615-685 nm) photoswitches that are small (<200 amino acids) and can be genetically reconstituted in living cells. Phylogenetic analysis and characterization of additional CBCRs demonstrated that far-red/orange CBCRs evolved after a complex transition from green/red CBCRs known for regulating complementary chromatic acclimation. Incorporation of different bilin chromophores demonstrated that tuning mechanisms responsible for red-shifted chromophore absorption act at the A-, B-, and/or C-rings, whereas photoisomerization occurs at the D-ring. Two such proteins exhibited detectable fluorescence extending well into the near-infrared region. This work extends the spectral window of CBCRs to the edge of the infrared, raising the possibility of using CBCRs in synthetic biology applications in the far-red region of the spectrum. PMID:27295035

  19. Enhanced detection of LED runway/approach lights for EVS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, J. Richard

    2008-04-01

    The acquisition of approach and runway lights by an imager is critical to landing-credit operations with EVS. Using a GPS clock, LED sources are pulsed at one-half the EVS video rate of 60 Hz or more. The camera then uses synchronous (lock-in) detection to store the imaged lights in alternate frames, with digital subtraction of the background for each respective frame-pair. Range and weather penetration, limited only by detector background shot-noise (or camera system noise at night), substantially exceed that of the human eye. An alternative is the use of short-wave infrared cameras with eyesafe laser diode emitters. Also, runway identification may be encoded on the pulses. With standardized cameras and emitters, an "instrument qualified visual range" may be established. The concept extends to portable beacons at austere airfields, and to see-and-avoid sensing of other aircraft including UAVs.

  20. Detection of internal browning in apples by light transmittance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upchurch, Bruce L.; Throop, James A.; Aneshansley, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01

    Light transmittance in the 450 to 1050 nanometer (nm) region was evaluated as a nondestructive technique for identifying apples with internal browning. Shorter wavelengths of light (< 800 nm) were attenuated more than longer wavelengths (> 800 nm). A transmission difference between 720 and 810 nm was used to segregate apples with internal browning from good apples. Only 7.4% of the apples were misclassified in a training set. When applied to a larger validation set, 8.0% of the apples with internal browning were misclassified. For both sets, the only apples misclassified were those with very slight browning that was very difficult to detect visually were misclassified, but none of the apples with slight to severe browning was misclassified. For nondefective apples, 6.1% were identified as having internal browning, because bruises and internal browning had the same effect on the spectral composition.

  1. Light dark matter detection prospects at neutrino experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Jason; Learned, John G.; Smith, Stefanie

    2009-12-01

    We consider the prospects for the detection of relatively light dark matter through direct annihilation to neutrinos. We specifically focus on the detection possibilities of water Cherenkov and liquid scintillator neutrino detection devices. We find, in particular, that liquid scintillator detectors may potentially provide excellent detection prospects for dark matter in the 4-10 GeV mass range. These experiments can provide excellent corroborative checks of the DAMA/LIBRA annual modulation signal, but may yield results for low mass dark matter in any case. We identify important tests of the ratio of electron to muon neutrino events (and neutrino versus antineutrino events), which discriminate against background atmospheric neutrinos. In addition, the fraction of events which arise from muon neutrinos or antineutrinos (Rμ and Rμ¯) can potentially yield information about the branching fractions of hypothetical dark matter annihilations into different neutrino flavors. These results apply to neutrinos from secondary and tertiary decays as well, but will suffer from decreased detectability.

  2. The Center of Light: Spectroastrometric Detection of Exomoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agol, Eric; Jansen, Tiffany; Lacy, Brianna; Robinson, Tyler D.; Meadows, Victoria

    2015-10-01

    Direct imaging of extrasolar planets with future space-based coronagraphic telescopes may provide a means of detecting companion moons at wavelengths where the moon outshines the planet. We propose a detection strategy based on the positional variation of the center of light with wavelength, “spectroastrometry.” This new application of this technique could be used to detect an exomoon, to determine the exomoon’s orbit and the mass of the host exoplanet, and to disentangle the spectra of the planet and moon. We consider two model systems, for which we discuss the requirements for detection of exomoons around nearby stars. We simulate the characterization of an Earth-Moon analog system with spectroastrometry, showing that the orbit, the planet mass, and the spectra of both bodies can be recovered. To enable the detection and characterization of exomoons we recommend that coronagraphic telescopes should extend in wavelength coverage to 3 μm, and should be designed with spectroastrometric requirements in mind.

  3. Mid-ultraviolet light-emitting diode detects dipicolinic acid.

    SciTech Connect

    Bogart, Katherine Huderle Andersen; Lee, Stephen Roger; Temkin, Henryk; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Dasgupta, Purnendu K.; Li, Qingyang; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Fischer, Arthur Joseph

    2005-06-01

    Dipicolinic acid (DPA, 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid) is a substance uniquely present in bacterial spores such as that from anthrax (B. anthracis). It is known that DPA can be detected by the long-lived fluorescence of its terbium chelate; the best limit of detection (LOD) reported thus far using a large benchtop gated fluorescence instrument using a pulsed Xe lamp is 2 nM. We use a novel AlGaN light-emitting diode (LED) fabricated on a sapphire substrate that has peak emission at 291 nm. Although the overlap of the emission band of this LED with the absorption band of Tb-DPA ({lambda}{sub max} doublet: 273, 279 nm) is not ideal, we demonstrate that a compact detector based on this LED and an off-the-shelf gated photodetection module can provide an LOD of 0.4 nM, thus providing a basis for convenient early warning detectors.

  4. Presentation attack detection for face recognition using light field camera.

    PubMed

    Raghavendra, R; Raja, Kiran B; Busch, Christoph

    2015-03-01

    The vulnerability of face recognition systems isa growing concern that has drawn the interest from both academic and research communities. Despite the availability of a broad range of face presentation attack detection (PAD)(or countermeasure or antispoofing) schemes, there exists no superior PAD technique due to evolution of sophisticated presentation attacks (or spoof attacks). In this paper, we present a new perspective for face presentation attack detection by introducing light field camera (LFC). Since the use of a LFC can record the direction of each incoming ray in addition to the intensity, it exhibits an unique characteristic of rendering multiple depth(or focus) images in a single capture. Thus, we present a novel approach that involves exploring the variation of the focus between multiple depth (or focus) images rendered by the LFC that in turn can be used to reveal the presentation attacks. To this extent, we first collect a new face artefact database using LFC that comprises of 80 subjects. Face artefacts are generated by simulating two widely used attacks, such as photo print and electronic screen attack. Extensive experiments carried out on the light field face artefact database have revealed the outstanding performance of the proposed PAD scheme when benchmarked with various well established state-of-the-art schemes. PMID:25622320

  5. Enhanced oil spill detection sensors in low-light environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allik, Toomas H.; Ramboyong, Len; Roberts, Mark; Walters, Mark; Soyka, Thomas J.; Dixon, Roberta; Cho, Jay

    2016-05-01

    Although advances have been made in oil spill remote detection, many electro-optic sensors do not provide real-time images, do not work well under degraded visual environments, nor provide a measure of extreme oil thickness in marine environments. A joint program now exists between BSEE and NVESD that addresses these capability gaps in remote sensing of oil spills. Laboratory experiments, calibration techniques, and field tests were performed at Fort Belvoir, Virginia; Santa Barbara, California; and the Ohmsett Test Facility in Leonardo, New Jersey. Weathered crude oils were studied spectroscopically and characterized with LWIR, and low-light-level visible/NIR, and SWIR cameras. We designed and fabricated an oil emulsion thickness calibration cell for spectroscopic analysis and ground truth, field measurements. Digital night vision cameras provided real-time, wide-dynamic-range imagery, and were able to detect and recognize oil from full sun to partial moon light. The LWIR camera provided quantitative oil analysis (identification) for >1 mm thick crude oils both day and night. Two filtered, co-registered, SWIR cameras were used to determine whether oil thickness could be measured in real time. Spectroscopic results revealed that oil emulsions vary with location and weathered state and some oils (e.g., ANS and Santa Barbara seeps) do not show the spectral rich features from archived Deep Water Horizon hyperspectral data. Multi-sensor imagery collected during the 2015 USCG Airborne Oil Spill Remote Sensing and Reporting Exercise and the design of a compact, multiband imager are discussed.

  6. Detecting Phycocynanin-Pigmented Microbes in Reflected Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, Robert K.

    2008-01-01

    A recently invented method of measuring concentrations of phycocynanin-pigmented algae and bacteria in water is based on measurement of the spectrum of reflected sunlight. When present in sufficiently high concentrations, phycocynanin-pigmented microorganisms can be hazardous to the health of humans who use, and of animals that depend on, an affected body of water. The present method is intended to satisfy a need for a rapid, convenient means of detecting hazardous concentrations of phycocynanin-pigmented microorganisms. Rapid detection will speed up the issuance of public health warnings and performance of corrective actions. The method involves the measurement of light reflected from a body of water in at least two, but preferably five wavelength bands. In one version of the method, the five wavelength bands are bands 1, 3, 4, 5, and 7 of the Thematic Mapper (TM) multispectral imaging instrument aboard the Landsat-7 satellite (see table). In principle, other wavelength bands indicative of phycocynanin could be used alternatively or in addition to these five. Moreover, although the method was originally intended specifically for processing Landsat- 7 TM data, it is equally applicable to processing of data from other satellite-borne instruments or from airborne, hand-held, buoy-mounted, tower-mounted, or otherwise mounted instruments that measure radiances of light reflected from water in the wavelength bands of interest.

  7. Plasmonic light harvesting for multicolor infrared thermal detection.

    PubMed

    Mao, Feilong; Xie, Jinjin; Xiao, Shiyi; Komiyama, Susumu; Lu, Wei; Zhou, Lei; An, Zhenghua

    2013-01-14

    Here we combined experiments and theory to study the optical properties of a plasmonic cavity consisting of a perforated metal film and a flat metal sheet separated by a semiconductor spacer. Three different types of optical modes are clearly identified-the propagating and localized surface plasmons on the perforated metal film and the Fabry-Perot modes inside the cavity. Interactions among them lead to a series of hybridized eigenmodes exhibiting excellent spectral tunability and spatially distinct field distributions, making the system particularly suitable for multicolor infrared light detections. As an example, we design a two-color detector protocol with calculated photon absorption efficiencies enhanced by more than 20 times at both colors, reaching ~42.8% at f1 = 20.0THz (15μm in wavelength) and ~46.2% at f2 = 29.5THz (~10.2μm) for a 1μm total thickness of sandwiched quantum wells. PMID:23388923

  8. Unattended vehicle detection for automatic traffic light control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel Hady, Aya Salama; Moustafa, Mohamed

    2013-12-01

    Machine vision based traffic light control depends mainly on measuring traffic statistics at cross roads. Most of the previous studies have not taken unattended vehicles into consideration when calculating either the traffic density or the traffic flow. In this paper, we propose incorporating unattended vehicles into a new metric for measuring the traffic congestion. In addition to the vehicle motion analysis, opening the driver's side door is an important indicator that this vehicle is going to be unattended. Therefore, we focus in this paper on presenting how to detect this event for stationary vehicles from a live camera or a video feed. Through a set of experiments, we have found out that a Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) feature-descriptor with a Support Vector Machines (SVM) classifier was able to successfully classify open-door vehicles from closed-door ones in 96.7% of our test dataset.

  9. Detection of circular polarization in light scattered from photosynthetic microbes

    PubMed Central

    Sparks, William B.; Hough, James; Germer, Thomas A.; Chen, Feng; DasSarma, Shiladitya; DasSarma, Priya; Robb, Frank T.; Manset, Nadine; Kolokolova, Ludmilla; Reid, Neill; Macchetto, F. Duccio; Martin, William

    2009-01-01

    The identification of a universal biosignature that could be sensed remotely is critical to the prospects for success in the search for life elsewhere in the universe. A candidate universal biosignature is homochirality, which is likely to be a generic property of all biochemical life. Because of the optical activity of chiral molecules, it has been hypothesized that this unique characteristic may provide a suitable remote sensing probe using circular polarization spectroscopy. Here, we report the detection of circular polarization in light scattered by photosynthetic microbes. We show that the circular polarization appears to arise from circular dichroism of the strong electronic transitions of photosynthetic absorption bands. We conclude that circular polarization spectroscopy could provide a powerful remote sensing technique for generic life searches. PMID:19416893

  10. Detecting skin malignancy using elastic light scattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canpolat, Murat; Akman, Ayşe; Çiftçioğlu, M. Akif; Alpsoy, Erkan

    2007-07-01

    We have used elastic light scattering spectroscopy to differentiate between malign and benign skin lesions. The system consists of a UV spectrometer, a single optical fiber probe and a laptop. The single optical fiber probe was used for both delivery and detection of white light to tissue and from the tissue. The single optical fiber probe received singly scattered photons rather than diffused photons in tissue. Therefore, the spectra are correlated with morphological differences of the cells. It has been shown that spectra of malign skin lesions are different than spectra of benign skin lesions. While slopes of the spectra taken on benign lesions or normal skin tissues were positive, slopes of the spectra taken on malign skin lesions tissues were negative. In vivo experiments were conducted on 20 lesions from 18 patients (11 men with mean age of 68 +/- 9 years and 7 women with mean age of 52 +/- 20 years) applied to the Department of Dermatology and Venerology. Before the biopsy, spectra were taken on the lesion and adjacent (approximately 1 cm distant) normal-appearing skin. Spectra of the normal skin were used as a control group. The spectra were correlated to the pathology results with sensitivity and specificity of 82% and 89%, respectively. Due to small diameter of fiber probe and limited number of sampling (15), some positive cases are missed, which is lowered the sensitivity of the system. The results are promising and could suggest that the system may be able to detect malignant skin lesion non-invasively and in real time.

  11. Robust sky light polarization detection with an S-wave plate in a light field camera.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xuanzhe; Cao, Yu; Liu, Haibo; Liu, Zejin

    2016-05-01

    The sky light polarization navigator has many advantages, such as low cost, no decrease in accuracy with continuous operation, etc. However, current celestial polarization measurement methods often suffer from low performance when the sky is covered by clouds, which reduce the accuracy of navigation. In this paper we introduce a new method and structure based on a handheld light field camera and a radial polarizer, composed of an S-wave plate and a linear polarizer, to detect the sky light polarization pattern across a wide field of view in a single snapshot. Each micro-subimage has a special intensity distribution. After extracting the texture feature of these subimages, stable distribution information of the angle of polarization under a cloudy sky can be obtained. Our experimental results match well with the predicted properties of the theory. Because the polarization pattern is obtained through image processing, rather than traditional methods based on mathematical computation, this method is less sensitive to errors of pixel gray value and thus has better anti-interference performance. PMID:27140364

  12. Direct detection of light ''Ge-phobic'' exothermic dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Gelmini, Graciela B.; Georgescu, Andreea; Huh, Ji-Haeng E-mail: a.georgescu@physics.ucla.edu

    2014-07-01

    We present comparisons of direct dark matter (DM) detection data for light WIMPs with exothermic scattering with nuclei (exoDM), both assuming the Standard Halo Model (SHM) and in a halo model–independent manner. Exothermic interactions favor light targets, thus reducing the importance of upper limits derived from xenon targets, the most restrictive of which is at present the LUX limit. In our SHM analysis the CDMS-II-Si and CoGeNT regions become allowed by these bounds, however the recent SuperCDMS limit rejects both regions for exoDM with isospin-conserving couplings. An isospin-violating coupling of the exoDM, in particular one with a neutron to proton coupling ratio of -0.8 (which we call ''Ge-phobic''), maximally reduces the DM coupling to germanium and allows the CDMS-II-Si region to become compatible with all bounds. This is also clearly shown in our halo-independent analysis.

  13. Tracking Honey Bees Using LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) Technology

    SciTech Connect

    BENDER, SUSAN FAE ANN; RODACY, PHILIP J.; SCHMITT, RANDAL L.; HARGIS JR., PHILIP J.; JOHNSON, MARK S.; KLARKOWSKI, JAMES R.; MAGEE, GLEN I.; BENDER, GARY LEE

    2003-01-01

    The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has recognized that biological and chemical toxins are a real and growing threat to troops, civilians, and the ecosystem. The Explosives Components Facility at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been working with the University of Montana, the Southwest Research Institute, and other agencies to evaluate the feasibility of directing honeybees to specific targets, and for environmental sampling of biological and chemical ''agents of harm''. Recent work has focused on finding and locating buried landmines and unexploded ordnance (UXO). Tests have demonstrated that honeybees can be trained to efficiently and accurately locate explosive signatures in the environment. However, it is difficult to visually track the bees and determine precisely where the targets are located. Video equipment is not practical due to its limited resolution and range. In addition, it is often unsafe to install such equipment in a field. A technology is needed to provide investigators with the standoff capability to track bees and accurately map the location of the suspected targets. This report documents Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) tests that were performed by SNL. These tests have shown that a LIDAR system can be used to track honeybees. The LIDAR system can provide both the range and coordinates of the target so that the location of buried munitions can be accurately mapped for subsequent removal.

  14. Magnetoluminescent light switches--dual modality in DNA detection.

    PubMed

    Smolensky, Eric D; Peterson, Katie L; Weitz, Evan A; Lewandowski, Cutler; Pierre, Valérie C

    2013-06-19

    The synthesis and properties of two responsive magnetoluminescent iron oxide nanoparticles for dual detection of DNA by MRI and luminescence spectroscopy are presented. These magnetoluminescent agents consist of iron oxide nanoparticles conjugated with metallointercalators via a polyethylene glycol linker. Two metallointercalators were investigated: Ru(bpy')(phen)(dppz), which turns on upon DNA intercalation, and Eu-DOTA-Phen, which turns off. The characteristic light-switch responses of the metallointercalators are not affected by the iron oxide nanoparticles; upon binding to DNA the luminescence of the ruthenium complexes increases by ca. 20-fold, whereas that of the europium complex is >95% quenched. Additionally, the 17-20 nm magnetite cores, having permeable PEG coatings and stable dopamide anchors, render the two constructs efficient responsive contrast agents for MRI with unbound longitudinal and transverse relaxivities of 12.4-9.2 and 135-128 mM(-1)(Fe)s(-1), respectively. Intercalation of the metal complexes in DNA results in the formation of large clusters of nanoparticles with a resultant decrease of both r1 and r2 by 32-63% and 24-38%, respectively. The potential application of these responsive magnetoluminescent assemblies and their reversible catch-and-release properties for the purification of DNA is presented. PMID:23692333

  15. Direct detection of light anapole and magnetic dipole DM

    SciTech Connect

    Nobile, Eugenio Del; Gelmini, Graciela B.; Huh, Ji-Haeng; Gondolo, Paolo E-mail: gelmini@physics.ucla.edu E-mail: jhhuh@physics.ucla.edu

    2014-06-01

    We present comparisons of direct detection data for ''light WIMPs'' with an anapole moment interaction (ADM) and a magnetic dipole moment interaction (MDM), both assuming the Standard Halo Model (SHM) for the dark halo of our galaxy and in a halo-independent manner. In the SHM analysis we find that a combination of the 90% CL LUX and CDMSlite limits or the new 90% CL SuperCDMS limit by itself exclude the parameter space regions allowed by DAMA, CoGeNT and CDMS-II-Si data for both ADM and MDM. In our halo-independent analysis the new LUX bound excludes the same potential signal regions as the previous XENON100 bound. Much of the remaining signal regions is now excluded by SuperCDMS, while the CDMSlite limit is much above them. The situation is of strong tension between the positive and negative search results both for ADM and MDM. We also clarify the confusion in the literature about the ADM scattering cross section.

  16. Detection of building changes from aerial images and light detection and ranging (LIDAR) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liang-Chien; Lin, Li-Jer

    2010-11-01

    Building models are built to provide three-dimensional (3-D) spatial information, which is needed in a variety of applications including city planning, construction management, location-based services of urban infrastructures, and the like. However, 3-D building models have to be updated on a timely manner to meet the changing demand. Rather than reconstructing building models for the entire area, it would be more convenient and effective to only update parts of the areas where there were changes. This paper aims at developing a new method, namely double-threshold strategy, to find such changes within 3-D building models in the region of interest with the aid of light detection and ranging (LIDAR) data. The proposed modeling scheme comprises three steps, namely, data pre-processing, change detection in building areas, and validation. In the first step for data pre-processing, data registration was carried out based on multi-source data. The second step for data pre-processing requires using the triangulation of an irregular network of data points collected by Light Detection And Ranging (LIDAR), focusing on those locations containing walls or other above-ground objects that were ever removed. Then, change detection in the building models can be made possible for finding differences in height by comparing the LIDAR point measurements and the estimates of the building models. The results may be further refined using spectral and feature information collected from aerial imagery. A double-threshold strategy was applied to cope with the highly sensitive thresholding often encountered when using the rule-based approach. Finally, ground truth data were used for model validation. Research findings clearly indicate that the double-threshold strategy improves the overall accuracy from 93.1% to 95.9%.

  17. Supervised Detection of Anomalous Light Curves in Massive Astronomical Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nun, Isadora; Pichara, Karim; Protopapas, Pavlos; Kim, Dae-Won

    2014-09-01

    The development of synoptic sky surveys has led to a massive amount of data for which resources needed for analysis are beyond human capabilities. In order to process this information and to extract all possible knowledge, machine learning techniques become necessary. Here we present a new methodology to automatically discover unknown variable objects in large astronomical catalogs. With the aim of taking full advantage of all information we have about known objects, our method is based on a supervised algorithm. In particular, we train a random forest classifier using known variability classes of objects and obtain votes for each of the objects in the training set. We then model this voting distribution with a Bayesian network and obtain the joint voting distribution among the training objects. Consequently, an unknown object is considered as an outlier insofar it has a low joint probability. By leaving out one of the classes on the training set, we perform a validity test and show that when the random forest classifier attempts to classify unknown light curves (the class left out), it votes with an unusual distribution among the classes. This rare voting is detected by the Bayesian network and expressed as a low joint probability. Our method is suitable for exploring massive data sets given that the training process is performed offline. We tested our algorithm on 20 million light curves from the MACHO catalog and generated a list of anomalous candidates. After analysis, we divided the candidates into two main classes of outliers: artifacts and intrinsic outliers. Artifacts were principally due to air mass variation, seasonal variation, bad calibration, or instrumental errors and were consequently removed from our outlier list and added to the training set. After retraining, we selected about 4000 objects, which we passed to a post-analysis stage by performing a cross-match with all publicly available catalogs. Within these candidates we identified certain known

  18. Supervised detection of anomalous light curves in massive astronomical catalogs

    SciTech Connect

    Nun, Isadora; Pichara, Karim; Protopapas, Pavlos; Kim, Dae-Won

    2014-09-20

    The development of synoptic sky surveys has led to a massive amount of data for which resources needed for analysis are beyond human capabilities. In order to process this information and to extract all possible knowledge, machine learning techniques become necessary. Here we present a new methodology to automatically discover unknown variable objects in large astronomical catalogs. With the aim of taking full advantage of all information we have about known objects, our method is based on a supervised algorithm. In particular, we train a random forest classifier using known variability classes of objects and obtain votes for each of the objects in the training set. We then model this voting distribution with a Bayesian network and obtain the joint voting distribution among the training objects. Consequently, an unknown object is considered as an outlier insofar it has a low joint probability. By leaving out one of the classes on the training set, we perform a validity test and show that when the random forest classifier attempts to classify unknown light curves (the class left out), it votes with an unusual distribution among the classes. This rare voting is detected by the Bayesian network and expressed as a low joint probability. Our method is suitable for exploring massive data sets given that the training process is performed offline. We tested our algorithm on 20 million light curves from the MACHO catalog and generated a list of anomalous candidates. After analysis, we divided the candidates into two main classes of outliers: artifacts and intrinsic outliers. Artifacts were principally due to air mass variation, seasonal variation, bad calibration, or instrumental errors and were consequently removed from our outlier list and added to the training set. After retraining, we selected about 4000 objects, which we passed to a post-analysis stage by performing a cross-match with all publicly available catalogs. Within these candidates we identified certain known

  19. Comparison between charged aerosol detection and light scattering detection for the analysis of Leishmania membrane phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Ramos, R Godoy; Libong, D; Rakotomanga, M; Gaudin, K; Loiseau, P M; Chaminade, P

    2008-10-31

    The performance of charged aerosol detection (CAD) was compared to evaporative light scattering detection (ELSD) for the analysis of Leishmania membrane phospholipid (PL) classes by NP-HPLC. In both methods, a PVA-Sil column was used for the determination of the major Leishmania membrane PLs, phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylglycerol, cardiolipin, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylethathanolamine, phosphatidylserine, lysophosphatidylethathanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, sphingomyelin and lysophosphatidylcholine in the same analysis. Although the response of both detection methods can be fitted to a power function, CAD response can also be described by a linear model with determination coefficients (R(2)) ranging from 0.993 to 0.998 for an injected mass of 30 ng to 20.00 microg. CAD appeared to be directly proportional when a restricted range was used and it was found to be more sensitive at lowest mass range than ELSD. With HPLC-ELSD the limits of detection (LODs) were between 71 and 1195 ng and the limits of quantification (LOQs) were between 215 and 3622 ng. With HPLC-CAD, the LODs were between 15 and 249 ng whereas the limits of quantification (LOQs) were between 45 and 707 ng. The accuracy of the methods ranged from 62.8 to 115.8% and from 58.4 to 110.5% for ELSD and CAD, respectively. The HPLC-CAD method is suitable to assess the influence of miltefosine on the composition of Leishmania membrane phospholipids. PMID:18823632

  20. Linearity evaluation in absorbance detection: the use of light-emitting diodes for on-capillary detection in capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Macka, M; Andersson, P; Haddad, P R

    1996-12-01

    A model which takes into account both stray light and polychromatic light was used to predict and evaluate linearity in on-capillary detection in capillary electrophoresis (CE). According to the model the stray light is the major factor which determines linearity under typical CE operating conditions. By calculating theoretical absorbance versus concentration plots, the influence of different levels of stray light and polychromatic light on linearity is demonstrated. Experimentally, six light-emitting diodes (LEDs) in the range from 563 to 654 nm were examined as light sources for on-capillary detection in CE. Fitting theoretical curves to measured linearity plots enabled determination of the values of both effective path length and stray light for a particular detection system. The detector linearity for the four LEDs was compared to mercury and tungsten lamps used with interference filters. For potassium permanganate as the test compound, the linear range for a 563 nm LED was two times greater than that for a mercury lamp operated at 546 nm. The relatively poor linearity of the mercury lamp detector is explained by its high level of stray light. The noise of the LED563-based detector was the same as for the mercury lamp, whereas the other LEDs of higher light intensity gave approximately half the noise of the mercury lamp. The lowest noise level of 3 x 10(-5) AU was obtained for the LED at 554 nm (determined at a detector time constant of 0.1 s). PMID:9034772

  1. Method of Detecting Coliform Bacteria and Escherichia Coli Bacteria from Reflected Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, Robert (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of detecting coliform bacteria in water from reflected light and a method of detecting Eschericha Coli bacteria in water from reflected light, and also includes devices for the measurement, calculation and transmission of data relating to that method.

  2. ''Magic'' Energies for Detecting Light Elements with Resonant Alpha Particle Backscattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wetteland, C.J.; Maggiore, C.J.; Tesmer, J.R.; He, X-M.; Lee, D-H.

    1998-11-04

    Resonant backscattering is widely used to improve the detection limit of the light elements such as B, C, N and O. One disadvantage, however, is that several incident energies are normally needed if the sample contains a number of the light elements. There are ''magic'' energies at which several light elements can be detected simultaneously with suitable sensitivities. When these energies are used along with the elastic recoil detection of hydrogen, multiple elements can be detected without changing the beam energy, and the analysis time is greatly reduced. These reactions along with examples will be discussed.

  3. Face Liveness Detection Using a Light Field Camera

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sooyeon; Ban, Yuseok; Lee, Sangyoun

    2014-01-01

    A light field camera is a sensor that can record the directions as well as the colors of incident rays. This camera is widely utilized from 3D reconstruction to face and iris recognition. In this paper, we suggest a novel approach for defending spoofing face attacks, like printed 2D facial photos (hereinafter 2D photos) and HD tablet images, using the light field camera. By viewing the raw light field photograph from a different standpoint, we extract two special features which cannot be obtained from the conventional camera. To verify the performance, we compose light field photograph databases and conduct experiments. Our proposed method achieves at least 94.78% accuracy or up to 99.36% accuracy under different types of spoofing attacks. PMID:25436651

  4. Face liveness detection using a light field camera.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sooyeon; Ban, Yuseok; Lee, Sangyoun

    2014-01-01

    A light field camera is a sensor that can record the directions as well as the colors of incident rays. This camera is widely utilized from 3D reconstruction to face and iris recognition. In this paper, we suggest a novel approach for defending spoofing face attacks, like printed 2D facial photos (hereinafter 2D photos) and HD tablet images, using the light field camera. By viewing the raw light field photograph from a different standpoint, we extract two special features which cannot be obtained from the conventional camera. To verify the performance, we compose light field photograph databases and conduct experiments. Our proposed method achieves at least 94.78% accuracy or up to 99.36% accuracy under different types of spoofing attacks. PMID:25436651

  5. Theoretical study on balanced homodyne detection technique in preparation of squeezed states of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Wenyan; Feng, Fei; Song, Jia-zheng; Zhang, Tong-yi

    2013-08-01

    We analyze the balanced homodyne detection technique in the detection of squeezed light, which is controlled by dither locking scheme. We discuss how the balanced homodyne detection efficiency influences the detected degree of squeezing. Also, fluctuation in the relative phase between the local beam and the squeezed light is discussed, since a little phase fluctuation would decrease the detected degree of squeezing greatly. Then, the dither locking technique is studied in detail, which is used to lock the relative phase between the local beam and the squeezed light. The simulation experiments and theoretically results show that the balanced homodyne detection technique and the dither locking scheme are efficient methods to get more accurate degree of squeezing in the preparation of the squeezed states of light.

  6. Procedure to detect impervious surfaces using satellite images and light detection and ranging (lidar) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Cuenca, B.; Alonso-Rodríguez, M. C.; Domenech-Tofiño, E.; Valcárcel Sanz, N.; Delgado-Hernández, J.; Peces-Morera, Juan José; Arozarena-Villar, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    The detection of impervious surfaces is an important issue in the study of urban and rural environments. Imperviousness refers to water's inability to pass through a surface. Although impervious surfaces represent a small percentage of the Earth's surface, knowledge of their locations is relevant to planning and managing human activities. Impervious structures are primarily manmade (e.g., roads and rooftops). Impervious surfaces are an environmental concern because many processes that modify the normal function of land, air, and water resources are initiated during their construction. This paper presents a novel method of identifying impervious surfaces using satellite images and light detection and ranging (LIDAR) data. The inputs for the procedure are SPOT images formed by four spectral bands (corresponding to red, green, near-infrared and mid-infrared wavelengths), a digital terrain model, and an .las file. The proposed method computes five decision indexes from the input data to classify the studied area into two categories: impervious (subdivided into buildings and roads) and non-impervious surfaces. The impervious class is divided into two subclasses because the elements forming this category (mainly roads and rooftops) have different spectral and height properties, and it is difficult to combine these elements into one group. The classification is conducted using a decision tree procedure. For every decision index, a threshold is set for which every surface is considered impervious or non-impervious. The proposed method has been applied to four different regions located in the north, center, and south of Spain, providing satisfactory results for every dataset.

  7. Effect of Age and Glaucoma on the Detection of Darks and Lights

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Linxi; Sendek, Caroline; Davoodnia, Vandad; Lashgari, Reza; Dul, Mitchell W.; Zaidi, Qasim; Alonso, Jose-Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We have shown previously that normal observers detect dark targets faster and more accurately than light targets, when presented in noisy backgrounds. We investigated how these differences in detection time and accuracy are affected by age and ganglion cell pathology associated with glaucoma. Methods We asked 21 glaucoma patients, 21 age-similar controls, and 5 young control observers to report as fast as possible the number of 1 to 3 light or dark targets. The targets were positioned at random in a binary noise background, within the central 30° of the visual field. Results We replicate previous findings that darks are detected faster and more accurately than lights. We extend these findings by demonstrating that differences in detection of darks and lights are found reliably across different ages and in observers with glaucoma. We show that differences in detection time increase at a rate of approximately 55 msec/dB at early stages of glaucoma and then remain constant at later stages at approximately 800 msec. In normal subjects, differences in detection time increase with age at a rate of approximately 8 msec/y. We also demonstrate that the accuracy to detect lights and darks is significantly correlated with the severity of glaucoma and that the mean detection time is significantly longer for subjects with glaucoma than age-similar controls. Conclusions We conclude that differences in detection of darks and lights can be demonstrated over a wide range of ages, and asymmetries in dark/light detection increase with age and early stages of glaucoma. PMID:26513506

  8. Method and apparatus for detecting phycocyanin-pigmented algae and bacteria from reflected light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, Robert (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of detecting phycocyanin algae or bacteria in water from reflected light, and also includes devices for the measurement, calculation and transmission of data relating to that method.

  9. Method and apparatus for detecting phycocyanin-pigmented algae and bacteria from reflected light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, Robert (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of detecting phycocyanin algae or bacteria in water from reflected light, and also includes devices for the measurement, calculation and transmission of data relating to that method.

  10. Dynamic light scattering (DLS)-based immunoassay for ultra-sensitive detection of tumor marker protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Ma, Jiehua; Fan, Qiongxuan; Tao, Yaqin; Li, Genxi

    2016-06-14

    A novel dynamic light scattering (DLS)-based immunoassay that utilizes manganese dioxide nanosheet-modified gold nanoparticles (MnO2-GNPs) as an activatable nanoprobe has been developed to detect tumor markers down to femtomolar levels. PMID:27247980

  11. Cancer detection using NIR elastic light scattering and tissue fluorescence imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, S G; Staggs, M; Radousky, H B; Gandour-Edwards, R; deVere White, R

    2000-12-04

    Near infrared imaging using elastic light scattering and tissue fluorescence under long-wavelength laser excitation are explored for cancer detection. Various types of normal and malignant human tissue samples were utilized in this investigation.

  12. Detection of characteristic eye points in non-ideal light conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiśniewska, Joanna; Galiński, Grzegorz

    2015-09-01

    Detection of characteristic eye points under challenging light conditions is a non-trivial task. Difficulty of this task increase even more when low resolution images are used. This article introduces an adaptive solution for detection of characteristic eye points in mentioned conditions. First, light normalization algorithm is performed. Then, face and eye detection followed by determination of eye status (namely: open or closed) is done. Finally, an adaptive method for pupil and eye corners detection is developed by comparing some existing methods. Experimental results show the outperformance of the proposed method.

  13. Terrestrial Planet Finder, Planet Detection Test-Bed: Latest Results of Planet Light Detection in the Presence of Starlight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Stefan R.; Booth, Andrew J.

    2008-01-01

    The Terrestrial Planet Finder, Planet Detection Test-bed is a lab based simulation of the optics and control systems for the Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer mission. The test-bed supports starlight nulling at 10um infrared wavelengths, with fringe tracking at 2um wavelengths and angle and shear tracking at visible wavelengths. It further allows injection of simulated planet light in the presence of the nulled star light, to allow testing of planet detection methods. We will describe the detailed construction and operation of the test-bed from an optical and control system perspective. We will also report the latest results for narrow band nulls, and the detection of broad band planet light in the presence of nulled starlight.

  14. Neural networks improve brain cancer detection with Raman spectroscopy in the presence of light artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jermyn, Michael; Desroches, Joannie; Mercier, Jeanne; St-Arnaud, Karl; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Petrecca, Kevin; Leblond, Frederic

    2016-03-01

    It is often difficult to identify cancer tissue during brain cancer (glioma) surgery. Gliomas invade into areas of normal brain, and this cancer invasion is frequently not detected using standard preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This results in enduring invasive cancer following surgery and leads to recurrence. A hand-held Raman spectroscopy is able to rapidly detect cancer invasion in patients with grade 2-4 gliomas. However, ambient light sources can produce spectral artifacts which inhibit the ability to distinguish between cancer and normal tissue using the spectral information available. To address this issue, we have demonstrated that artificial neural networks (ANN) can accurately classify invasive cancer versus normal brain tissue, even when including measurements with significant spectral artifacts from external light sources. The non-parametric and adaptive model used by ANN makes it suitable for detecting complex non-linear spectral characteristics associated with different tissues and the confounding presence of light artifacts. The use of ANN for brain cancer detection with Raman spectroscopy, in the presence of light artifacts, improves the robustness and clinical translation potential for intraoperative use. Integration with the neurosurgical workflow is facilitated by accounting for the effect of light artifacts which may occur, due to operating room lights, neuronavigation systems, windows, or other light sources. The ability to rapidly detect invasive brain cancer under these conditions may reduce residual cancer remaining after surgery, and thereby improve patient survival.

  15. Detecting Super-Thin Clouds With Polarized Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Wenbo; Videen, Gorden; Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2014-01-01

    We report a novel method for detecting cloud particles in the atmosphere. Solar radiation backscattered from clouds is studied with both satellite data and a radiative transfer model. A distinct feature is found in the angle of linear polarization of solar radiation that is backscattered from clouds. The dominant backscattered electric field from the clear-sky Earth-atmosphere system is nearly parallel to the Earth surface. However, when clouds are present, this electric field can rotate significantly away from the parallel direction. Model results demonstrate that this polarization feature can be used to detect super-thin cirrus clouds having an optical depth of only 0.06 and super-thin liquid water clouds having an optical depth of only 0.01. Such clouds are too thin to be sensed using any current passive satellite instruments.

  16. Detection of partial polarization of light beams with dipolar nanocubes.

    PubMed

    Leppänen, Lasse-Petteri; Saastamoinen, Kimmo; Lehtolahti, Joonas; Friberg, Ari T; Setälä, Tero

    2016-01-25

    We confirm experimentally that the degree and state of polarization of a random, partially polarized electromagnetic beam can be obtained by probing the field with a nanoscatterer. We use a gold nanocube on silicon substrate as a local scatterer and detect the polarization characteristics of the scattered far field, which enables us to deduce the state of partial polarization of the field at the nanoprobe site. In contrast to previous beam characterization methods where spatial resolution is limited by the pixel size of the detector, the accuracy of the current technique is specified by the particle size. Our work is the first step towards polarization-state detection of random optical near fields for which the use of nanoprobes is required. PMID:26832527

  17. Optical biopsy - a new armamentarium to detect disease using light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Yang; Alfano, Robert R.

    2015-03-01

    Optical spectroscopy has been considered a promising method for cancer detection for past thirty years because of its advantages over the conventional diagnostic methods of no tissue removal, minimal invasiveness, rapid diagnoses, less time consumption and reproducibility since the first use in 1984. It offers a new armamentarium. Human tissue is mainly composed of extracellular matrix of collagen fiber, proteins, fat, water, and epithelial cells with key molecules in different structures. Tissues contain a number of key fingerprint native endogenous fluorophore molecules, such as tryptophan, collagen, elastin, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and porphyrins. It is well known that abnormalities in metabolic activity precede the onset of a lot of main diseases: carcinoma, diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis, Alzheimer, and Parkinson's disease, etc. Optical spectroscopy may help in detecting various disorders. Conceivably the biochemical or morphologic changes that cause the spectra variations would appear earlier than the histological aberration. Therefore, "optical biopsy" holds a great promise as clinical tool for diagnosing early stage of carcinomas and other deceases by combining with available photonic technology (e.g. optical fibers, photon detectors, spectrographs spectroscopic ratiometer, fiber-optic endomicroscope and nasopharyngoscope) for in vivo use. This paper focuses on various methods available to detect spectroscopic changes in tissues, for example to distinguish cancerous prostate tissues and/or cells from normal prostate tissues and/or cells. The methods to be described are fluorescence, stokes shift, scattering, Raman, and time-resolved spectroscopy will be reviewed. The underlying physical and biological basis for these optical approaches will be discussed with examples. The idea is to present some of the salient works to show the usefulness and methods of Optical Biopsy for cancer detection and

  18. Circularly polarized light detection with hot electrons in chiral plasmonic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Coppens, Zachary J.; Besteiro, Lucas V.; Wang, Wenyi; Govorov, Alexander O.; Valentine, Jason

    2015-09-01

    Circularly polarized light is utilized in various optical techniques and devices. However, using conventional optical systems to generate, analyse and detect circularly polarized light involves multiple optical elements, making it challenging to realize miniature and integrated devices. While a number of ultracompact optical elements for manipulating circularly polarized light have recently been demonstrated, the development of an efficient and highly selective circularly polarized light photodetector remains challenging. Here we report on an ultracompact circularly polarized light detector that combines large engineered chirality, realized using chiral plasmonic metamaterials, with hot electron injection. We demonstrate the detector's ability to distinguish between left and right hand circularly polarized light without the use of additional optical elements. Implementation of this photodetector could lead to enhanced security in fibre and free-space communication, as well as emission, imaging and sensing applications for circularly polarized light using a highly integrated photonic platform.

  19. Circularly polarized light detection with hot electrons in chiral plasmonic metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Coppens, Zachary J; Besteiro, Lucas V; Wang, Wenyi; Govorov, Alexander O; Valentine, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Circularly polarized light is utilized in various optical techniques and devices. However, using conventional optical systems to generate, analyse and detect circularly polarized light involves multiple optical elements, making it challenging to realize miniature and integrated devices. While a number of ultracompact optical elements for manipulating circularly polarized light have recently been demonstrated, the development of an efficient and highly selective circularly polarized light photodetector remains challenging. Here we report on an ultracompact circularly polarized light detector that combines large engineered chirality, realized using chiral plasmonic metamaterials, with hot electron injection. We demonstrate the detector's ability to distinguish between left and right hand circularly polarized light without the use of additional optical elements. Implementation of this photodetector could lead to enhanced security in fibre and free-space communication, as well as emission, imaging and sensing applications for circularly polarized light using a highly integrated photonic platform. PMID:26391292

  20. Circularly polarized light detection with hot electrons in chiral plasmonic metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Coppens, Zachary J.; Besteiro, Lucas V.; Wang, Wenyi; Govorov, Alexander O.; Valentine, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Circularly polarized light is utilized in various optical techniques and devices. However, using conventional optical systems to generate, analyse and detect circularly polarized light involves multiple optical elements, making it challenging to realize miniature and integrated devices. While a number of ultracompact optical elements for manipulating circularly polarized light have recently been demonstrated, the development of an efficient and highly selective circularly polarized light photodetector remains challenging. Here we report on an ultracompact circularly polarized light detector that combines large engineered chirality, realized using chiral plasmonic metamaterials, with hot electron injection. We demonstrate the detector's ability to distinguish between left and right hand circularly polarized light without the use of additional optical elements. Implementation of this photodetector could lead to enhanced security in fibre and free-space communication, as well as emission, imaging and sensing applications for circularly polarized light using a highly integrated photonic platform. PMID:26391292

  1. Detecting Close-In Extrasolar Giant Planets with the Kepler Photometer via Scattered Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, J. M.; Doyle, L. R.; Kepler Discovery Mission Team

    2003-05-01

    NASA's Kepler Mission will be launched in 2007 primarily to search for transiting Earth-sized planets in the habitable zones of solar-like stars. In addition, it will be poised to detect the reflected light component from close-in extrasolar giant planets (CEGPs) similar to 51 Peg b. Here we use the DIARAD/SOHO time series along with models for the reflected light signatures of CEGPs to evaluate Kepler's ability to detect such planets. We examine the detectability as a function of stellar brightness, stellar rotation period, planetary orbital inclination angle, and planetary orbital period, and then estimate the total number of CEGPs that Kepler will detect over its four year mission. The analysis shows that intrinsic stellar variability of solar-like stars is a major obstacle to detecting the reflected light from CEGPs. Monte Carlo trials are used to estimate the detection threshold required to limit the total number of expected false alarms to no more than one for a survey of 100,000 stellar light curves. Kepler will likely detect 100-760 51 Peg b-like planets by reflected light with orbital periods up to 7 days. LRD was supported by the Carl Sagan Chair at the Center for the Study of Life in the Universe, a division of the SETI Institute. JMJ received support from the Kepler Mission Photometer and Science Office at NASA Ames Research Center.

  2. Detection of falsification of security documents using white light interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, Shigeru; Nakanishi, Shoichi; Itoh, Masahide; Yatagai, Toyohiko

    2010-04-01

    In order to verify the authenticity of security documents, we propose the measurement of the surface distortion of the cover film of security documents. Surface shapes of films of 31 genuine documents and 29 counterfeit documents were measured by using a white light interferometer. Differences between the surface features of a genuine security document and those of a counterfeit one were studied. Roughness and peak-valley density were the two features used to characterize the measured surface shape. Only 2 out of 29 counterfeit documents could not be distinguished from the genuine ones by film distortion analysis. The likelihood ratio of this method in the authentication of genuine documents was 14.5. This implies that the proposed method is useful for authentication of genuine documents.

  3. Research on spaceborne low light detection based on EMCCD and CMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xingxing; Liu, Jinguo; Zhou, Huaide; Zhang, Boyan

    2015-10-01

    Electron Multiplying Charge Coupled Device(EMCCD) can realize read out noise of less than 1e- by promoting gain of charges with the charge multiplication principle and is suitable for low light imaging. With the development of back Illuminated CMOS technology CMOS with high quantum efficiency and less than 1.5e- read noise has been developed by Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics(CIOMP). Spaceborne low light detection cameras based on EMCCD CCD201 and based on CMOS were respectively established and system noise models were founded. Low light detection performance as well as principle of spaceborne camera based on EMCCD and spaceborne camera based on CMOS were compared and analyzed. Results of analysis indicated that signal to noise(SNR) of spaceborne low light detection camera based on EMCCD would be 23.78 as radiance at entrance pupil of the camera was as low as 10-9 W/cm2/sr/μm at the focal plane temperature of 20°C. Spaceborne low light detection camera worked in starring mode and the integration time was 2 second. SNR of low light detection camera based on CMOS would be 27.42 under the same conditions. If cooling systems were used and the temperature was lowered from 20°C to -20°C, SNR of low light detection camera based on EMCCD would be improved to 27.533 while SNR of low light detection camera based on CMOS would be improved to 27.79.

  4. A Novel Molecular Solution for Ultraviolet Light Detection in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Stacey L; Charlie, Nicole K; Milfort, Marie C; Brown, Brandon S; Gravlin, Christen N; Knecht, Jamie E; Miller, Kenneth G

    2008-01-01

    For many organisms the ability to transduce light into cellular signals is crucial for survival. Light stimulates DNA repair and metabolism changes in bacteria, avoidance responses in single-cell organisms, attraction responses in plants, and both visual and nonvisual perception in animals. Despite these widely differing responses, in all of nature there are only six known families of proteins that can transduce light. Although the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans has none of the known light transduction systems, we show here that C. elegans strongly accelerates its locomotion in response to blue or shorter wavelengths of light, with maximal responsiveness to ultraviolet light. Our data suggest that C. elegans uses this light response to escape the lethal doses of sunlight that permeate its habitat. Short-wavelength light drives locomotion by bypassing two critical signals, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and diacylglycerol (DAG), that neurons use to shape and control behaviors. C. elegans mutants lacking these signals are paralyzed and unresponsive to harsh physical stimuli in ambient light, but short-wavelength light rapidly rescues their paralysis and restores normal levels of coordinated locomotion. This light response is mediated by LITE-1, a novel ultraviolet light receptor that acts in neurons and is a member of the invertebrate Gustatory receptor (Gr) family. Heterologous expression of the receptor in muscle cells is sufficient to confer light responsiveness on cells that are normally unresponsive to light. Our results reveal a novel molecular solution for ultraviolet light detection and an unusual sensory modality in C. elegans that is unlike any previously described light response in any organism. PMID:18687026

  5. Stray light suppression of optical and mechanical system for telescope detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Ma, Wenli

    2013-09-01

    During telescope detection, there is atmosphere overflow and other stray light affecting the system which leads to background disturbance. Thus reduce the detection capability of the system. So it is very necessary to design mechanical structure to suppress the stray light for the telescope detection system. It can both improve the signal-to-noise and contrast of the object. This paper designs the optical and mechanical structure of the 400mm telescope. And then the main baffle, baffle vane, field stop and coating technology are used to eliminate the effect of stray light on the optical and mechanical system. Finally, software is used to analyze and simulate stray light on the whole optical and mechanical system. Using PST as the evaluating standard, separate and integrated analysis of the suppressing effect of main baffle, baffle vane and field aperture is completed. And also get the results of PST before and after eliminating the stray light. Meanwhile, the results of stray light analysis can be used to guide the design of the optical and mechanical structure. The analysis results demonstrate that reasonable optical and mechanical structure and stray light suppression measure can highly reduce the PST and also improve the detection capability of the telescope system, and the designed outside baffle, inside baffle, vanes and coating technique etc. can decrease the PST approximately 1 to 3 level.

  6. Light-induced fluorescence endoscopy (LIFE) imaging system for early cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Haishan; MacAulay, Calum E.; Lam, Stephen; Palcic, Branko

    1999-09-01

    This paper summarizes our experiences on the development of a Light Induced Fluorescence Endoscopy (LIFE) imaging system for early cancer detection in the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract. The system utilizes tissue autofluorescence to provide real time video imaging of the examined organ. No exogenous fluorescent tumor markers are needed. It is used by a physician in adjunct to conventional white-light endoscopy. Suspicious areas are identified in pseudo color to guide biopsy. A multi- center clinical trial has demonstrated that in the lung, the relative sensitivity of white-light imaging + LIFE imaging vs. white-light imaging alone was 6.3 for intraepithelial neoplastic lesion detection and 2.71 when invasive carcinomas were also included. The following issues will be discussed: (1) spectroscopy study design for imaging system development; (2) architecture of the imaging systems; (3) different imaging modalities (white-light imaging, dual channel fluorescence imaging, and combined fluorescence/reflectance imaging); and (4) clinical applications.

  7. Magnetoresistance detected spin collectivity in organic light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malissa, Hans; Waters, David P.; Joshi, Gajadhar; Kavand, Marzieh; Limes, Mark E.; Burn, Paul L.; Lupton, John M.; Boehme, Christoph

    Organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) typically refers to the significant change in the conductivity of thin layers of organic semiconductors at low static magnetic fields (< 10 mT). When radio frequency (rf) radiation is applied to an organic semiconductor under bipolar injection, and in the presence of small magnetic fields B, magnetic resonance can occur, which is observed as a change of the OMAR effect [Baker et al., Nat. Commun. 3, 898 (2012)]. When B and the resonant driving field are stronger than local hyperfine fields, an ultrastrong coupling regime emerges, which is marked by collective spin effects analogous to the optical Dicke effect [Roundy and Raikh, Phys. Rev. B 88, 125206 (2013)]. Experimentally, this collective behavior of spins can be probed in the steady state OMAR of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) at room temperature by observation of a sign reversal of the OMAR change under rf irradiation. Furthermore, in the presence of strong driving fields, an ac Zeeman effect can be observed through OMAR [Waters et al., Nat. Phys. 11, 910 (2015)], a unique window to observe room temperature macroscopic spin quantum coherence.

  8. Investigation of light scattering as a technique for detecting discrete soot particles in a luminous flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The practicability of using a classical light-scattering technique, involving comparison of angular scattering intensity patterns with theoretically determined Mie and Rayleight patterns, to detect discrete soot particles (diameter less than 50 nm) in premixed propane/air and propane/oxygen-helium flames is considered. The experimental apparatus employed in this investigation included a laser light source, a flat-flame burner, specially coated optics, a cooled photomultiplier detector, and a lock-in voltmeter readout. Although large, agglomerated soot particles were detected and sized, it was not possible to detect small, discrete particles. The limiting factor appears to be background scattering by the system's optics.

  9. Monolithic multi-color light emission/detection device

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, M.W.

    1995-02-21

    A single-crystal, monolithic, tandem, multi-color optical transceiver device is described, including (a) an InP substrate having upper and lower surfaces, (b) a first junction on the upper surface of the InP substrate, (c) a second junction on the first junction. The first junction is preferably GaInAsP of defined composition, and the second junction is preferably InP. The two junctions are lattice matched. The second junction has a larger energy band gap than the first junction. Additional junctions having successively larger energy band gaps may be included. The device is capable of simultaneous and distinct multi-color emission and detection over a single optical fiber. 5 figs.

  10. Monolithic multi-color light emission/detection device

    DOEpatents

    Wanlass, Mark W.

    1995-01-01

    A single-crystal, monolithic, tandem, multi-color optical transceiver device is described, including (a) an InP substrate having upper and lower surfaces, (b) a first junction on the upper surface of the InP substrate, (c) a second junction on the first junction. The first junction is preferably GaInAsP of defined composition, and the second junction is preferably InP. The two junctions are lattice matched. The second junction has a larger energy band gap than the first junction. Additional junctions having successively larger energy band gaps may be included. The device is capable of simultaneous and distinct multi-color emission and detection over a single optical fiber.

  11. Light magnetic dark matter in direct detection searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Nobile, Eugenio; Kouvaris, Chris; Panci, Paolo; Sannino, Francesco; Virkajärvi, Jussi

    2012-08-01

    We study a fermionic Dark Matter particle carrying magnetic dipole moment and analyze its impact on direct detection experiments. In particular we show that it can accommodate the DAMA, CoGeNT and CRESST experimental results. Assuming conservative bounds, this candidate is shown not to be ruled out by the CDMS, XENON and PICASSO experiments. We offer an analytic understanding of how the long-range interaction modifies the experimental allowed regions, in the cross section versus Dark Matter mass parameter space, with respect to the typically assumed contact interaction. Finally, in the context of a symmetric Dark Matter sector, we determine the associated thermal relic density, and further provide relevant constraints imposed by indirect searches and colliders.

  12. Velocity of detectable information in faster-than-light pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorrah, Ahmed H.; Mojahedi, Mo

    2014-09-01

    The velocity of detectable information (signal velocity) in a medium capable of supporting abnormal (superluminal or negative) group velocities is calculated. This is carried out by tracking the time instant at which the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at the detector output reaches a predetermined threshold while considering the total classical and quantum noise of the channel in addition to the detector noise. Furthermore, the method of steepest descent is incorporated to systematically study various forms of pulse reshaping associated with superluminal propagation and its effect on SNR. By studying the behavior of SNR as a function of both space and time, the present analysis predicts the existence of a cutoff distance beyond which signal velocity of a superluminal pulse is delayed as compared to a companion pulse traveling the same distance in vacuum. Finally, the interplay between the relative strength of the medium-generated noise and the detector noise and its effect on signal velocity is discussed.

  13. Detecting new very light bosons by Cherenkov telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Roncadelli, Marco; De Angelis, Alessandro; Mansutti, Oriana; Persic, Massimo

    2010-03-26

    A generic prediction of several extensions of the Standard Model of elementary-particle interactions is the existence of axion-like particles (ALPs), namely very light spin-zero bosons characterized by a two-photon coupling. While elusive in laboratory experiments, ALPs can give rise to observable astrophysical effects for their relevant parameters in experimentally allowed ranges. We show that the unexpectedly low opacity of the Universe inferred by the Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes since 2006 from blazar observations above 100 GeV can be explained naturally within the De Angelis, Roncadelli and Mansutti--hereafter DARMA--scenario, namely in terms of photon-ALP oscillations occurring in extragalactic magnetic fields. We work out the implications of the DARMA scenario for the VHE gamma-ray spectra of blazars by contemplating all of them at once, so that the emitted GAMMA{sub em} and observed GAMMA{sub obs} spectral indices can be correlated. We demonstrate that by assuming the same nominal value GAMMA{sub em}approx =2.4 for all VHE blazars, the predicted observed spectral index GAMMA{sub obs}{sup DARMA} actually fits all observations. Moreover, GAMMA{sub obs}{sup DARMA} becomes independent of redshift for sufficiently far-away sources. Our prediction can be tested with the satellite-borne Fermi/LAT detector as well as with the ground-based IACTs H.E.S.S., MAGIC, CANGAROO III, VERITAS and the Extensive Air Shower arrays ARGO-YBJ and MILAGRO.

  14. Improved TPB-coated Light Guides for Liquid Argon TPC Light Detection Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Zander

    2015-04-01

    This talk will discuss the outcome of recent research and development of wavelength-shifting lightguides for LArTPCs. The response of the lightguides was characterized in both air and liquid argon. Attenuation lengths over 100cm were consistently measured in air, which is an important step in the development of meter-scale lightguides for future LArTPCs. Additionally, good agreement was found between simulations and measurements performed in air and liquid argon. Such agreement indicates that characterization in air is sufficient for quality control of lightguide production. Zander Moss for the MIT Light Collection R&D Group.

  15. Enhanced optical waveguide light mode spectroscopy via detection of fluorophore absorbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halter, Martin; Gabi, Michael; Textor, Marcus; Vörös, Janos; Grandin, H. Michelle

    2006-10-01

    A novel technique based on surface sensitive absorbance detection using an optical waveguide light mode spectroscopy (OWLS) instrument is presented. The proof of concept for this extension of a standard technique is demonstrated by painting an increasing number of ink lines on a waveguide, perpendicular to the light path, while monitoring the outcoupled light intensity. Furthermore, by the adsorption of poly(L-lysine)-graft-poly(ethylene glycol) as a model system with contents of 5%, 10%, 25%, and 50% labeled polymer, the in situ performance is demonstrated, and the absorbance signal is calibrated such that it can be converted into adsorbed mass. The simultaneous detection of labeled and label-free species allows for the study of complex experimental setups whereby monitoring of adsorption, desorption, and even exchange processes becomes possible. The sensitivity of the absorbance detection exceeds standard OWLS by one to two orders of magnitude.

  16. Lighting.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-09-01

    Since lighting accounts for about one-third of the energy used in commercial buildings, there is opportunity to conserve. There are two ways to reduce lighting energy use: modify lighting systems so that they used less electricity and/or reduce the number of hours the lights are used. This booklet presents a number of ways to do both. Topics covered include: reassessing lighting levels, reducing lighting levels, increasing bulb & fixture efficiency, using controls to regulate lighting, and taking advantage of daylight.

  17. Investigation of a light imaging system to detect small lesions in thick tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wist, Abund O.; Moon, Peter; Herr, Steven L.; Fatouros, Panos P.

    1995-02-01

    A light imaging system is being developed which can at this time detect and characterize small lesions on the surface and deep inside a tooth or tissue. It depends on the existence of light photons which can fully traverse a tooth in a straight path and therefore can make -- similar to x rays -- a clear shadow of a pathology on the receiver. To observe the very weak, transmitted, unscattered light rays a special patented system has been developed using collimated, narrow light beams and a highly sensitive, post collimated receiver which are rasterscanned over the entire sample. The image can be transferred in analog form to a film or observed after digitization on a 256 grayshade monitor. The light image can be observed in a regular or slower high sensitivity mode.

  18. Waveguide detection of right-angle-scattered light in flow cytometry

    DOEpatents

    Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.

    2000-01-01

    A transparent flow cell is used as an index-guided optical waveguide. A detector for the flow cell but not the liquid stream detects the Right-Angle-Scattered (RAS) Light exiting from one end of the flow cell. The detector(s) could view the trapped RAS light from the flow cell either directly or through intermediate optical light guides. If the light exits one end of the flow cell, then the other end of the flow cell can be given a high-reflectivity coating to approximately double the amount of light collected. This system is more robust in its alignment than the traditional flow cytometry systems which use imaging optics, such as microscope objectives.

  19. Production and Detection of Very Light Spin-zero Bosons at Optical Frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    A. V. Afanasev; O. K. Baker; K. W. McFarlane; G. H. Biallas; J. R. Boyce; Michelle D. Shinn

    2006-07-06

    The PVLAS collaboration has observed rotation of the plane of polarization of light passing through a magnetic field in vacuum and have proposed that the effect is due to interaction of photons with very light spin-zero bosons. This would represent new physics beyond the Standard Model, and hence it is of high interest to test this hypothesis. We describe a proposed test of the PVLAS result, and ways of producing, detecting, and studying such bosons with light in the optical frequency range. Novel features include methods for measurements of boson mass, interaction strengths, and decay- or oscillation-lengths with techniques not available in the x-ray region.

  20. Detection of argan oil adulteration with vegetable oils by high-performance liquid chromatography-evaporative light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Salghi, Rachid; Armbruster, Wolfgang; Schwack, Wolfgang

    2014-06-15

    Triacylglycerol profiles were selected as indicator of adulteration of argan oils to carry out a rapid screening of samples for the evaluation of authenticity. Triacylglycerols were separated by high-performance liquid chromatography-evaporative light scattering detection. Different peak area ratios were defined to sensitively detect adulteration of argan oil with vegetable oils such as sunflower, soy bean, and olive oil up to the level of 5%. Based on four reference argan oils, mean limits of detection and quantitation were calculated to approximately 0.4% and 1.3%, respectively. Additionally, 19 more argan oil reference samples were analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography-refractive index detection, resulting in highly comparative results. The overall strategy demonstrated a good applicability in practise, and hence a high potential to be transferred to routine laboratories. PMID:24491744

  1. Photon-number-resolved detection of photon-subtracted thermal light.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yanhua; Becerra, Francisco E; Glebov, Boris L; Wen, Jianming; Lita, Adriana E; Calkins, Brice; Gerrits, Thomas; Fan, Jingyun; Nam, Sae Woo; Migdall, Alan

    2013-07-01

    We examine the photon statistics of photon-subtracted thermal light using photon-number-resolved detection. We demonstrate experimentally that the photon number distribution transforms from a Bose-Einstein distribution to a Poisson distribution as the number of subtracted photons increases. We also show that second- and higher-order photon correlation functions can be directly determined from the photon-number-resolved detection measurements of a single optical beam. PMID:23811867

  2. "Light-tagged" bacteriophage as a diagnostic tool for the detection of phytopathogens.

    PubMed

    Schofield, David; Bull, Carolee T; Rubio, Isael; Wechter, W Patrick; Westwater, Caroline; Molineux, Ian J

    2013-01-01

    Detection of the phytopathogen Pseudomonas cannabina pv alisalensis, the causal agent of bacterial blight of crucifers is essential for managing this disease. A phage-based diagnostic assay was developed that detects and identifies P. cannabina pv alisalensis from cultures and diseased plant specimens. A recombinant "light-tagged" reporter phage was generated by integrating the luxAB genes into the P. cannabina pv alisalensis phage PBSPCA1 genome. PBSPCA1::luxAB is viable, stable and detects P. cannabina pv alisalensis within minutes and with high sensitivity by conferring a bioluminescent signal. Detection is dependent on cell viability since cells treated with a bactericidal disinfectant are unable to elicit a signal. Importantly, the reporter phage detects P. cannabina pv alisalensis from diseased plant specimens indicating the potential of the diagnostic for disease identification. The reporter phage displays promise for the rapid and specific diagnostic detection of cultivated isolates, and infected plant specimens. PMID:22990589

  3. Improved detection of induced seismicity using beamforming techniques: application to traffic light systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Stephen; Verdon, James; Kendal, J.-Michael; Hill, Phil

    2016-04-01

    Unconventional methods of hydrocarbon extraction, such as hydraulic fracturing, have the potential to reactivate existing faults, causing induced seismicity. Traffic Light Schemes have been implemented in some regions; these systems ensure that drilling activities are paused or shut-down if seismic events larger than a given magnitude are induced. In particular, the United Kingdom has imposed a traffic light scheme based on magnitude thresholds of Ml = 0.0 and Ml = 0.5 for the amber and red limits, respectively. Therefore, an effective traffic light scheme in the UK requires monitoring arrays capable of detecting events with Ml < 0.0. However, achieving such low detection thresholds can be challenging where ambient noise levels are high, such as in the UK. We have developed an algorithm capable of robustly detecting and locating small magnitude events, which are characterised by very low signal-to-noise ratios using small arrays of surface broadband seismometers. We compute STA/LTA functions for each trace, time shift them by theoretical travel-times for a given event location, and combine them via a linear stack. We test our method using a dataset from a surface array of Güralp 3T broadband seismometers that recorded hydraulic fracturing activities in the central United States. Our beamforming and stacking approach identified a total of 20 events, compared to only 4 events detected by traditional picking methods. We therefore suggest that our approach is suitable for use with low magnitude traffic light schemes, especially in noisy environments.

  4. A portable optical waveguide resonance light-scattering scanner for microarray detection.

    PubMed

    Xing, Xuefeng; Liu, Wanyao; Li, Tao; Xing, Shu; Fu, Xueqi; Wu, Dongyang; Liu, Dianjun; Wang, Zhenxin

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, a portable and low-cost planar waveguide based resonance light scattering (RLS) scanner (termed as: PW-RLS scanner) has been developed for microarray detection. The PW-RLS scanner employs a 2 × 4 white light emitting diode array (WLEDA) as the excitation light source, a folded optical path with a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) as the signal/image acquisition device and stepper motors with gear drives as the mechanical drive system. The biological binding/recognizing events on the microarray can be detected with an evanescent waveguide-directed illumination and light-scattering label (e.g., nanoparticles) while the microarray slide acts as an evanescent waveguide substrate. The performance of the as-developed PW-RLS scanner has been evaluated by analyzing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) risk genes. Highly selective and sensitive (less than 1% allele frequency at the attomole-level) T2DM risk gene detection is achieved using single-stranded DNA functionalized gold nanoparticles (ssDNA-GNPs) as detection probes. Additionally, the successful simultaneous analysis of 15 T2DM patient genotypes suggests that the device has great potential for the realization of a personalized diagnostic test for a given disease or patient follow-up. PMID:26567521

  5. Modes of formation of lunar light plains and the detection of cryptomaria deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Head, James W.; Mustard, John; Antonenko, Irene; Hawke, B. Ray

    1993-01-01

    The early volcanic and impact histories of the Moon are closely linked and the record preserved in surface morphology and samples is tightly convolved because of the interaction of the two processes. The deconvolution of the record is an important goal in order to assess early volcanic flux and the mode of emplacement of large crater and basin deposits. For example, lunar light plains have been variously interpreted as volcanic, impact, and volcanic covered by impact deposits. The development of criteria for the determination of the origin of light plains and the detection of cryptomaria is a key to the deconvolution of this early record. We outline the various hypotheses for the origin of and potential modes of occurrence of light plains and cryptomaria, and develop criteria for their recognition and documentation. We use the example of the Schiller-Schickard and Balmer cryptomaria to illustrate the application of these techniques to the problem of light plains interpretation and cryptomaria documentation.

  6. Real-time image difference detection using a polarization rotation spacial light modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin (Inventor); Liu, Hua-Kuang (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An image difference detection system is described, of the type wherein two created image representations such as transparencies representing the images to be compared lie coplanar, while light passes through the two transparencies and is formed into coincident images at the image plane for comparison. The two transparencies are formed by portions of a polarization rotation spacial light modulator display such as a multi-pixel liquid crystal display or a magneto optical rotation type. In a system where light passing through the two transparencies is polarized in transverse directions to enable the use of a Wollaston prism to bring the images into coincidence, a liquid crystal display can be used which is devoid of polarizing sheets that would interfere with transverse polarizing of the light passing through the two transparencies.

  7. Real-time image difference detection using a polarization rotation spacial light modulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin (Inventor); Liu, Hua-Kuang (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    An image difference detection system is described, of the type wherein two created image representations such as transparencies representing the images to be compared lie coplanar, while light passes through the two transparencies and is formed into coincident images at the image plane for comparison. The two transparencies are formed by portions of a polarization-rotation spatial light modulator display such as a multi-pixel liquid crystal display or a magnetooptical rotation type display. In a system where light passing through the two transparencies is polarized in transverse directions to enable the use of a Wollaston prism to bring the images into coincidence, a liquid crystal display can be used which is devoid of polarizing sheets that would interfere with transverse polarizing of the light passing through the two transparencies.

  8. Elastic light single-scattering spectroscopy for detection of dysplastic tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canpolat, Murat; Denkçeken, Tuba; Akman, Ayşe.; Alpsoy, Erkan; Tuncer, Recai; Akyüz, Mahmut; Baykara, Mehmet; Yücel, Selçuk; Başsorgun, Ibrahim; ćiftçioǧlu, M. Akif; Gökhan, Güzide Ayşe.; Gürer, ElifInanç; Peştereli, Elif; Karaveli, Šeyda

    2013-11-01

    Elastic light single-scattering spectroscopy (ELSSS) system has been developed and tested in diagnosis of cancerous tissues of different organs. ELSSS system consists of a miniature visible light spectrometer, a single fiber optical probe, a halogen tungsten light source and a laptop. Measurements were performed on excised brain, skin, cervix and prostate tumor specimens and surrounding normal tissues. Single fiber optical probe with a core diameter of 100 μm was used to deliver white light to and from tissue. Single optical fiber probe mostly detects singly scattered light from tissue rather than diffused light. Therefore, measured spectra are sensitive to size of scatters in tissue such as cells, nuclei, mitochondria and other organelles of cells. Usually, nuclei of tumor cells are larger than nuclei of normal cells. Therefore, spectrum of singly scattered light of tumor tissue is different than normal tissue. The spectral slopes were shown to be positive for normal brain, skin and prostate and cervix tissues and negative for the tumors of the same tissues. Signs of the spectral slopes were used as a discrimination parameter to differentiate tumor from normal tissues for the three organ tissues. Sensitivity and specificity of the system in differentiation between tumors from normal tissues were 93% and %100 for brain, 87% and 85% for skin, 93.7% and 46.1% for cervix and 98% and 100% for prostate.

  9. Real-time detection of concealed chemical hazards under ambient light conditions using Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cletus, Biju; Olds, William; Fredericks, Peter M; Jaatinen, Esa; Izake, Emad L

    2013-07-01

    Current concerns regarding terrorism and international crime highlight the need for new techniques for detecting unknown and hazardous substances. A novel Raman spectroscopy-based technique, spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS), was recently devised for noninvasively probing the contents of diffusely scattering and opaque containers. Here, we demonstrate a modified portable SORS sensor for detecting concealed substances in-field under different background lighting conditions. Samples including explosive precursors, drugs, and an organophosphate insecticide (chemical warfare agent surrogate) were concealed inside diffusely scattering packaging including plastic, paper, and cloth. Measurements were carried out under incandescent and fluorescent light as well as under daylight to assess the suitability of the probe for different real-life conditions. In each case, it was possible to identify the substances against their reference Raman spectra in less than 1 min. The developed sensor has potential for rapid detection of concealed hazardous substances in airports, mail distribution centers, and customs checkpoints. PMID:23692353

  10. Ensemble Learning Method for Outlier Detection and its Application to Astronomical Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nun, Isadora; Protopapas, Pavlos; Sim, Brandon; Chen, Wesley

    2016-09-01

    Outlier detection is necessary for automated data analysis, with specific applications spanning almost every domain from financial markets to epidemiology to fraud detection. We introduce a novel mixture of the experts outlier detection model, which uses a dynamically trained, weighted network of five distinct outlier detection methods. After dimensionality reduction, individual outlier detection methods score each data point for “outlierness” in this new feature space. Our model then uses dynamically trained parameters to weigh the scores of each method, allowing for a finalized outlier score. We find that the mixture of experts model performs, on average, better than any single expert model in identifying both artificially and manually picked outliers. This mixture model is applied to a data set of astronomical light curves, after dimensionality reduction via time series feature extraction. Our model was tested using three fields from the MACHO catalog and generated a list of anomalous candidates. We confirm that the outliers detected using this method belong to rare classes, like Novae, He-burning, and red giant stars; other outlier light curves identified have no available information associated with them. To elucidate their nature, we created a website containing the light-curve data and information about these objects. Users can attempt to classify the light curves, give conjectures about their identities, and sign up for follow up messages about the progress made on identifying these objects. This user submitted data can be used further train of our mixture of experts model. Our code is publicly available to all who are interested.

  11. Optical and mechanical detection of near-field light by atomic force microscopy using a piezoelectric cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Nobuo; Kobayashi, Kei; Watanabe, Shunji; Fujii, Toru; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we developed an atomic force microscopy (AFM) system with scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) using a microfabricated force-sensing cantilever with a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin film. Both optical and mechanical detection techniques were adopted in SNOM to detect scattered light induced by the interaction of the PZT cantilever tip apex and evanescent light, and SNOM images were obtained for each detection scheme. The mechanical detection technique did allow for a clear observation of the light scattered from the PZT cantilever without the interference observed by the optical detection technique, which used an objective lens, a pinhole, and a photomultiplier tube.

  12. A visible light imaging device for cardiac rate detection with reduced effect of body movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiaotian; Liu, Ming; Zhao, Yuejin

    2014-09-01

    A visible light imaging system to detect human cardiac rate is proposed in this paper. A color camera and several LEDs, acting as lighting source, were used to avoid the interference of ambient light. From people's forehead, the cardiac rate could be acquired based on photoplethysmography (PPG) theory. The template matching method was used after the capture of video. The video signal was discomposed into three signal channels (RGB) and the region of interest was chosen to take the average gray value. The green channel signal could provide an excellent waveform of pulse wave on the account of green lights' absorptive characteristics of blood. Through the fast Fourier transform, the cardiac rate was exactly achieved. But the research goal was not just to achieve the cardiac rate accurately. With the template matching method, the effects of body movement are reduced to a large extent, therefore the pulse wave can be detected even while people are in the moving state and the waveform is largely optimized. Several experiments are conducted on volunteers, and the results are compared with the ones gained by a finger clamped pulse oximeter. The contrast results between these two ways are exactly agreeable. This method to detect the cardiac rate and the pulse wave largely reduces the effects of body movement and can probably be widely used in the future.

  13. Spectral Imaging with Scattered Light: From Early Cancer Detection to Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Le; Turzhitsky, Vladimir; Chuttani, Ram; Pleskow, Douglas; Goldsmith, Jeffrey D.; Guo, Lianyu; Vitkin, Edward; Itzkan, Irving; Hanlon, Eugene B.

    2012-01-01

    This article reports the evolution of scanning spectral imaging techniques using scattered light for minimally invasive detection of early cancerous changes in tissue and cell biology applications. Optical spectroscopic techniques have shown promising results in the diagnosis of disease on a cellular scale. They do not require tissue removal, can be performed in vivo, and allow for real time diagnoses. Fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy are most effective in revealing molecular properties of tissue. Light scattering spectroscopy (LSS) relates the spectroscopic properties of light elastically scattered by small particles, such as epithelial cell nuclei and organelles, to their size, shape and refractive index. It is capable of characterizing the structural properties of tissue on cellular and sub-cellular scales. However, in order to be useful in the detection of early cancerous changes which are otherwise not visible to the naked eye, it must rapidly survey a comparatively large area while simultaneously detecting these cellular changes. Both goals are achieved by combining LSS with spatial scanning imaging. Two examples are described in this article. The first reviews a clinical system for screening patients with Barrett’s esophagus. The second presents a novel advancement in confocal light absorption and scattering spectroscopic (CLASS) microscopy. PMID:23087592

  14. Hybrid light transport model based bioluminescence tomography reconstruction for early gastric cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xueli; Liang, Jimin; Hu, Hao; Qu, Xiaochao; Yang, Defu; Chen, Duofang; Zhu, Shouping; Tian, Jie

    2012-03-01

    Gastric cancer is the second cause of cancer-related death in the world, and it remains difficult to cure because it has been in late-stage once that is found. Early gastric cancer detection becomes an effective approach to decrease the gastric cancer mortality. Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) has been applied to detect early liver cancer and prostate cancer metastasis. However, the gastric cancer commonly originates from the gastric mucosa and grows outwards. The bioluminescent light will pass through a non-scattering region constructed by gastric pouch when it transports in tissues. Thus, the current BLT reconstruction algorithms based on the approximation model of radiative transfer equation are not optimal to handle this problem. To address the gastric cancer specific problem, this paper presents a novel reconstruction algorithm that uses a hybrid light transport model to describe the bioluminescent light propagation in tissues. The radiosity theory integrated with the diffusion equation to form the hybrid light transport model is utilized to describe light propagation in the non-scattering region. After the finite element discretization, the hybrid light transport model is converted into a minimization problem which fuses an l1 norm based regularization term to reveal the sparsity of bioluminescent source distribution. The performance of the reconstruction algorithm is first demonstrated with a digital mouse based simulation with the reconstruction error less than 1mm. An in situ gastric cancer-bearing nude mouse based experiment is then conducted. The primary result reveals the ability of the novel BLT reconstruction algorithm in early gastric cancer detection.

  15. Sensitive detection of cancer cells using light-mediated apta-PCR.

    PubMed

    Civit, Laia; Pinto, Alessandro; Rodrigues-Correia, Alexandre; Heckel, Alexander; O'Sullivan, Ciara K; Mayer, Günter

    2016-03-15

    Apta-PCR is an ultrasensitive assay in which aptamers are exploited not only as biomolecular recognition elements, but also as reporter labels for amplification via real-time PCR. This methodology has been successfully applied to the detection of proteins, achieving limits of detection in the picomolar range. The introduction of caged aptamers that bear photo-labile groups, so called cages, at strategic positions so that their tertiary structure and thus their binding properties can be controlled by light, facilitates a more robust and attractive assay in terms of sample conservation and reusability. In this work, we report for the first time the use of caged aptamers for cell detection in an apta-PCR assay. Specifically, a sandwich format is used combining the capture of B-cells by an antibody with the specific detection of Burkitt's lymphoma cancer cells by a caged aptamer, acting as a reporter probe. Elution of the aptamer bound to the cancer cells is performed by light and the number of cells is then correlated with the amount of eluted caged aptamer using real-time PCR analysis. The reported technique shows an excellent sensitivity, achieving detection of as few as 77 cells, and due to the inherent robustness of the assay, this detection platform can be reused for further analyses, demonstrating potential applicability in proteomics and clinical diagnostics. PMID:26615953

  16. Interferometric apparatus and method for detection and characterization of particles using light scattered therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Johnston, Roger G.

    1988-01-01

    Interferometric apparatus and method for detection and characterization of particles using light scattered therefrom. Differential phase measurements on scattered light from particles are possible using the two-frequency Zeeman effect laser which emits two frequencies of radiation 250 kHz apart. Excellent discrimination and reproducibility for various pure pollen and bacterial samples in suspension have been observed with a single polarization element. Additionally, a 250 kHz beat frequency was recorded from an individual particle traversing the focused output from the laser in a flow cytometer.

  17. Room-temperature efficient light detection by amorphous Ge quantum wells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this work, ultrathin amorphous Ge films (2 to 30 nm in thickness) embedded in SiO2 layers were grown by magnetron sputtering and employed as proficient light sensitizer in photodetector devices. A noteworthy modification of the visible photon absorption is evidenced due to quantum confinement effects which cause both a blueshift (from 0.8 to 1.8 eV) in the bandgap and an enhancement (up to three times) in the optical oscillator strength of confined carriers. The reported quantum confinement effects have been exploited to enhance light detection by Ge quantum wells, as demonstrated by photodetectors with an internal quantum efficiency of 70%. PMID:23496870

  18. Apparatus and method for detection and characterization of particles using light scattered therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Johnston, R.G.

    1987-03-23

    Apparatus and method for detection and characterization of particles using light scattered therefrom. Differential phase measurements on scattered light from particles are possible using the two-frequency Zeeman effect laser which emits two frequencies of radiation 250 kHz apart. Excellent discrimination and reproducibility for various pure pollen and bacterial samples in suspension have been observed with a single polarization element. Additionally, a 250 kHz beat frequency was recorded from an individual particle traversing the focused output from the laser in a flow cytometer. 13 figs.

  19. A novel method for detecting light source for digital images forensic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, A. K.; Mitra, S. K.; Agrawal, R.

    2011-06-01

    Manipulation in image has been in practice since centuries. These manipulated images are intended to alter facts — facts of ethics, morality, politics, sex, celebrity or chaos. Image forensic science is used to detect these manipulations in a digital image. There are several standard ways to analyze an image for manipulation. Each one has some limitation. Also very rarely any method tried to capitalize on the way image was taken by the camera. We propose a new method that is based on light and its shade as light and shade are the fundamental input resources that may carry all the information of the image. The proposed method measures the direction of light source and uses the light based technique for identification of any intentional partial manipulation in the said digital image. The method is tested for known manipulated images to correctly identify the light sources. The light source of an image is measured in terms of angle. The experimental results show the robustness of the methodology.

  20. Detection of UV light based on chemically stimulated luminescence of crystal phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grankin, D. V.; Grankin, V. P.; Martysh, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    High-efficiency accommodation of heterogeneous-reaction energy via an electronic channel and the possibility of using this effect to design an ionizing (UV) radiation detector based on chemically stimulated luminescence have been investigated. Preliminary irradiation of a ZnS sample by UV light is found to cause a luminescence flash under subsequent exposure of the sample surface to a flux of hydrogen atoms. The flash intensity depends on the UV excitation level and increases by several orders of magnitude in comparison with an unirradiated sample. It is shown that a new method for detecting UV light using chemically stimulated luminescence of crystal phosphors accumulating light yield can be developed based on this effect.

  1. Two schemes for characterization and detection of the squeezed light: dynamical Casimir effect and nonlinear materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotfipour, H.; Allameh, Z.; Roknizadeh, R.; Heydari, H.

    2016-03-01

    Using two different schemes, a non-classical-squeezed state of light is detected and characterized. In the first scheme, in a one-dimensional cavity with a moving mirror (non-stationary Casimir effect) in the principal mode, we study the photon generation rate for two modes (squeezed and coherent state) of a driving field. Since the cavity with the moving mirror (similar to an optomechanical system) can be considered an analogue to a Kerr-like medium, in the second scheme, the probability amplitude for multi-photon absorption in a nonlinear (Kerr) medium will be quantum mechanically calculated. It is shown that because of the presence of nonlinear effects, the responses of these two systems to the squeezed versus coherent state are considerably distinguishable. The drastic difference between the results of these two states of light can be viewed as a proposal for detecting non-classical states.

  2. Alternate light sources in the detection of bone after an accelerated fire: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Gallant, Amber S

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the ability of alternate light sources to detect bone that has been exposed to fire when identification of bone remains is difficult to ascertain. It is intended as a tool for fire investigators to quickly determine whether an area should be considered a forensic scene. After being subjected to a test burn, pig bones were viewed and photographed with the use of a laser, and later compared with a UV light source. A secondary study observing stages of a human cremation was conducted to assess how various levels of burnt flesh affect the ability of bone to fluoresce utilizing a laser. Both studies demonstrated success in detecting bone while fluorescing with a molten lava type of appearance that has the potential to distinguish bone from its surrounding environment. Limitations and recommendations are discussed by the author including the need for future studies to expand on this research. PMID:22994928

  3. Non-contact detection of cardiac rate based on visible light imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Huishi; Zhao, Yuejin; Dong, Liquan

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a non-contact method to detect human cardiac rate at a distance. This detection is based on the general lighting condition. Using the video signal of human face region captured by webcam, we acquire the cardiac rate based on the PhotoPlethysmoGraphy theory. In this paper, the cardiac rate detecting method is mainly in view of the blood's different absorptivities of the lights various wavelengths. Firstly, we discompose the video signal into RGB three color signal channels and choose the face region as region of interest to take average gray value. Then, we draw three gray-mean curves on each color channel with time as variable. When the imaging device has good fidelity of color, the green channel signal shows the PhotoPlethysmoGraphy information most clearly. But the red and blue channel signals can provide more other physiological information on the account of their light absorptive characteristics of blood. We divide red channel signal by green channel signal to acquire the pulse wave. With the passband from 0.67Hz to 3Hz as a filter of the pulse wave signal and the frequency spectrum superimposed algorithm, we design frequency extracted algorithm to achieve the cardiac rate. Finally, we experiment with 30 volunteers, containing different genders and different ages. The results of the experiments are all relatively agreeable. The difference is about 2bmp. Through the experiment, we deduce that the PhotoPlethysmoGraphy theory based on visible light can also be used to detect other physiological information.

  4. Relative Navigation Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) Sensor Development Test Objective (DTO) Performance Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennehy, Cornelius J.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) received a request from the NASA Associate Administrator (AA) for Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD), to quantitatively evaluate the individual performance of three light detection and ranging (LIDAR) rendezvous sensors flown as orbiter's development test objective on Space Transportation System (STS)-127, STS-133, STS-134, and STS-135. This document contains the outcome of the NESC assessment.

  5. Radially polarized light for detection and nanolocalization of dielectric particles on a planar substrate.

    PubMed

    Roy, S; Ushakova, K; van den Berg, Q; Pereira, S F; Urbach, H P

    2015-03-13

    A fast noninvasive method based on scattering from a focused radially polarized light to detect and localize subwavelength nanoparticles on a substrate is presented. The technique relies on polarization matching in the far field between scattered and spurious reflected fields. Results show a localization uncertainty of ≈10^{-4}λ^{2} is possible for a particle of area ≈λ^{2}/16. The effect of simple pupil shaping is also shown. PMID:25815935

  6. White light phase shifting interferometry and color fringe analysis for the detection of contaminants in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, Vishesh; Singh, Veena; Ahmad, Azeem; Singh, Gyanendra; Mehta, Dalip Singh

    2016-03-01

    We report white light phase shifting interferometry in conjunction with color fringe analysis for the detection of contaminants in water such as Escherichia coli (E.coli), Campylobacter coli and Bacillus cereus. The experimental setup is based on a common path interferometer using Mirau interferometric objective lens. White light interferograms are recorded using a 3-chip color CCD camera based on prism technology. The 3-chip color camera have lesser color cross talk and better spatial resolution in comparison to single chip CCD camera. A piezo-electric transducer (PZT) phase shifter is fixed with the Mirau objective and they are attached with a conventional microscope. Five phase shifted white light interferograms are recorded by the 3-chip color CCD camera and each phase shifted interferogram is decomposed into the red, green and blue constituent colors, thus making three sets of five phase shifted intererograms for three different colors from a single set of white light interferogram. This makes the system less time consuming and have lesser effect due to surrounding environment. Initially 3D phase maps of the bacteria are reconstructed for red, green and blue wavelengths from these interferograms using MATLAB, from these phase maps we determines the refractive index (RI) of the bacteria. Experimental results of 3D shape measurement and RI at multiple wavelengths will be presented. These results might find applications for detection of contaminants in water without using any chemical processing and fluorescent dyes.

  7. Efficacy of light based detection systems for early detection of oral cancer and oral potentially malignant disorders: Systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Reddy-Kantharaj, Yashoda-Bhoomi; Rakesh, Nagaraju; Janardhan-Reddy, Sujatha; Sahu, Shashikant

    2016-01-01

    Background Earlier detection of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMD) is essential for dental professionals to improve patient survival rates. The aim of this systematic review is to to evaluate the effectiveness of devices that utilise the principles of chemiluminescence and tissue autofluorescence as adjuncts in the detection of OSCC and OPMD. Material and Methods The electronic retrieval systems and databases searched for relevant articles were PubMed [MEDLINE] and Science direct. The search was for limited articles published in English or with an English abstract and articles published during the period from January 2005 to April 2014. Clinical trials utilized ViziLite, Microlux TM/DL and Visual Enhanced Light scope (VELscope) for early detection of OPMD and OSCC. Results Twenty primary studies published satisfied our criteria for selection - 10 utilised chemiluminescence and 10 tissue autofluorescence. Senstivity of Vizilite for detecting OSCC nad OPMD ranged from 77.1 % to 100% and specificity was low that ranged from 0% to 27.8%.Most have shown that chemiluminescence increases the brightness and margins of oral mucosal white lesions and thus assist in identification of mucosal lesions not considered under Conventional visual examination. However, it preferentially detects leukoplakia and may fail to spot red patches. Clinical trials demonstrated that sensitivity of VELscope in detecting malignancy and OPMD ranged from 22 % to 100 % and specificity ranged from 16 % to 100%. Most studies concluded that VELscope can help the experienced clinician to find oral precursor malignant lesions. But it couldnot differentiate between dysplasia and benign inflammatory conditions. Conclusions Both devices are simple, non-invasive test of the oral mucosa but are suited for clinicians with sufficient experience and training. More clinical trials in future should be conducted to establish optical imaging as an efficacious adjunct

  8. Confocal Light Absorption and Scattering Spectroscopic (CLASS) imaging: From cancer detection to sub-cellular function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Le

    Light scattering spectroscopy (LSS), an optical technique that relates the spectroscopic properties of light elastically scattered by small particles to their size, refractive index and shape, has been recently successfully employed for sensing morphological and biochemical properties of epithelial tissues and cells in vivo. LSS does not require exogenous markers, is non-invasive, and, due to its multispectral nature, can sense biological structures well beyond the diffraction limit. All that makes LSS be a very good candidate to be used both in clinical medicine for in vivo detection of disease and in cell biology to monitor cell function on the organelle scale. Recently we developed two LSS-based imaging modalities: clinical Polarized LSS (PLSS) Endoscopic Technique for locating early pre-cancerous changes in GI tract and Confocal Light Absorption and Scattering Spectroscopic (CLASS) Microscopy for studying cells in vivo without exogenous markers. One important application of the clinical PLSS endoscopic instrument, a noncontact scanning imaging device compatible with the standard clinical endoscopes and capable of detecting dysplastic changes, is to serve as a guide for biopsy in Barrett's esophagus (BE). The instrument detects parallel and perpendicular components of the polarized light, backscattered from epithelial tissues, and determines characteristics of epithelial nuclei from the residual spectra. It also can find tissue oxygenation, hemoglobin content and other properties from the diffuse light component. By rapidly scanning esophagus the PLSS endoscopic instrument makes sure the entire BE portion is scanned and examined for the presence of dysplasia. CLASS microscopy, on the other hand, combines principles of light scattering spectroscopy (LSS) with confocal microscopy. Its main purpose is to image cells on organelle scale in vivo without the use of exogenous labels which may affect the cell function. The confocal geometry selects specific region and

  9. Squeezed light for the interferometric detection of high-frequency gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnabel, R.; Harms, J.; Strain, K. A.; Danzmann, K.

    2004-03-01

    The quantum noise of the light field is a fundamental noise source in interferometric gravitational-wave detectors. Injected squeezed light is capable of reducing the quantum noise contribution to the detector noise floor to values that surpass the so-called standard quantum limit (SQL). In particular, squeezed light is useful for the detection of gravitational waves at high frequencies where interferometers are typically shot-noise limited, although the SQL might not be beaten in this case. We theoretically analyse the quantum noise of the signal-recycled laser interferometric gravitational-wave detector GEO 600 with additional input and output optics, namely frequency-dependent squeezing of the vacuum state of light entering the dark port and frequency-dependent homodyne detection. We focus on the frequency range between 1 kHz and 10 kHz, where, although signal recycled, the detector is still shot-noise limited. It is found that the GEO 600 detector with present design parameters will benefit from frequency-dependent squeezed light. Assuming a squeezing strength of -6 dB in quantum noise variance, the interferometer will become thermal noise limited up to 4 kHz without further reduction of bandwidth. At higher frequencies the linear noise spectral density of GEO 600 will still be dominated by shot noise and improved by a factor of 106dB/20dB ap 2 according to the squeezing strength assumed. The interferometer might reach a strain sensitivity of 6 × 10-23 above 1 kHz (tunable) with a bandwidth of around 350 Hz. We propose a scheme to implement the desired frequency-dependent squeezing by introducing an additional optical component into GEO 600's signal-recycling cavity.

  10. The use of an alternate light source for detecting bones underwater.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Angi M; Horn, Kevin J; Smith, Victoria A

    2014-07-01

    When searching underwater crime scenes or disaster scenes for fragmentary human remains, it may be advantageous for forensic divers to be able to detect the presence of bones and teeth among other marine materials (such as shells and rocks). In terrestrial environments, this can typically be accomplished by visual and instrumental methods, but underwater conditions make it difficult to employ detection and sorting techniques in these environments. This study investigates fluorescence of bones and teeth and other marine materials using a submersible alternate light source (ALS) and concludes that an ALS can be a useful tool for detecting bones and teeth in underwater searches as well in terrestrial searches and laboratory environments. The results could impact the methods and equipment used by forensic divers and forensic anthropologists when searching for skeletal remains, potentially increasing the quantity and efficiency of forensic evidence recovered. PMID:24666117

  11. Fast, Large-Area, Wide-Bandgap UV Photodetector for Cherenkov Light Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D.; Wrbanek, Susan Y.

    2013-01-01

    Due to limited resources available for power and space for payloads, miniaturizing and integrating instrumentation is a high priority for addressing the challenges of manned and unmanned deep space missions to high Earth orbit (HEO), near Earth objects (NEOs), Lunar and Martian orbits and surfaces, and outer planetary systems, as well as improvements to high-altitude aircraft safety. New, robust, and compact detectors allow future instrumentation packages more options in satisfying specific mission goals. A solid-state ultraviolet (UV) detector was developed with a theoretical fast response time and large detection area intended for application to Cherenkov detectors. The detector is based on the wide-bandgap semiconductor zinc oxide (ZnO), which in a bridge circuit can detect small, fast pulses of UV light like those required for Cherenkov detectors. The goal is to replace the role of photomultiplier tubes in Cherenkov detectors with these solid-state devices, saving on size, weight, and required power. For improving detection geometry, a spherical detector to measure high atomic number and energy (HZE) ions from any direction has been patented as part of a larger space radiation detector system. The detector will require the development of solid-state UV photodetectors fast enough (2 ns response time or better) to detect the shockwave of Cherenkov light emitted as the ions pass through a quartz, sapphire, or acrylic ball. The detector must be small enough to fit in the detector system structure, but have an active area large enough to capture enough Cherenkov light from the sphere. The detector is fabricated on bulk single-crystal undoped ZnO. Inter - digitated finger electrodes and contact pads are patterned via photolithography, and formed by sputtered metal of silver, platinum, or other high-conductivity metal.

  12. Drosophila TRPA1 isoforms detect UV light via photochemical production of H2O2

    PubMed Central

    Guntur, Ananya R.; Gu, Pengyu; Takle, Kendra; Chen, Jingyi; Xiang, Yang; Yang, Chung-Hui

    2015-01-01

    The transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1) channel is an evolutionarily conserved detector of temperature and irritant chemicals. Here, we show that two specific isoforms of TRPA1 in Drosophila are H2O2 sensitive and that they can detect strong UV light via sensing light-induced production of H2O2. We found that ectopic expression of these H2O2-sensitive Drosophila TRPA1 (dTRPA1) isoforms conferred UV sensitivity to light-insensitive HEK293 cells and Drosophila neurons, whereas expressing the H2O2-insensitive isoform did not. Curiously, when expressed in one specific group of motor neurons in adult flies, the H2O2-sensitive dTRPA1 isoforms were as competent as the blue light-gated channelrhodopsin-2 in triggering motor output in response to light. We found that the corpus cardiacum (CC) cells, a group of neuroendocrine cells that produce the adipokinetic hormone (AKH) in the larval ring gland endogenously express these H2O2-sensitive dTRPA1 isoforms and that they are UV sensitive. Sensitivity of CC cells required dTRPA1 and H2O2 production but not conventional phototransduction molecules. Our results suggest that specific isoforms of dTRPA1 can sense UV light via photochemical production of H2O2. We speculate that UV sensitivity conferred by these isoforms in CC cells may allow young larvae to activate stress response—a function of CC cells—when they encounter strong UV, an aversive stimulus for young larvae. PMID:26443856

  13. Changing Amplitudes: Detecting RR Lyrae Light Curve Shape Variations in the Galactic Disk and Inner Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lee, Nathan M.; Kinemuchi, K.; Pepper, J.; Rodriguez, J. E.

    2014-01-01

    In this poster we will discuss our ongoing program to use extant light curves from the Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT) survey to find and characterize RR Lyrae (RRL) stars in the disk and inner halo of the Milky Way. RRL stars are of particular interest because they are standard candles and can be used to map out structure in the galaxy. The periods and shape of RRL light curves also contain information about their Oosterhoff type, which can probe galactic formation history, and metallicity respectively. Although there have been several large photometric surveys for RR Lyrae in the nearby galaxy (OGLE, NSVS, ASAS, and MACHO to name a few), they have each been limited in either sky coverage or number of epochs. The KELT survey represents a new generation of surveys that has many epochs over a large portion of the sky. KELT samples 60% of the sky in both northern and southern hemispheres, and has a long-time-baseline of 4-8 years with a very high cadence rate of less than 20 minutes. This translates into 4,000 to 9,000 epochs per light curve with completeness out to 3 kpc from the Sun. Recent results from both Kepler and ground based surveys results suggest that as many as 50% of RR Lyrae stars show long-term modulation of their light curve shapes (Blazhko effect). These stars combined with RRL stars that pulsate in more than one mode give a sample of objects that the KELT survey is uniquely suited to explore. This poster concentrates on a pilot project to examine RRL stars in a limited number of KELT fields. In particular, we focus on, detecting RR Lyrae, developing a light curve shape-metallicity relationship in the KELT band-pass, and some initial characterization of RRL with either amplitude-modulated or period-modulated light curves.

  14. Detection of internal structure by scattered light intensity: Application to kidney cell sorting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goolsby, C. L.; Kunze, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    Scattered light measurements in flow cytometry were sucessfully used to distinguish cells on the basis of differing morphology and internal structure. Differences in scattered light patterns due to changes in internal structure would be expected to occur at large scattering angles. Practically, the results of these calculations suggest that in experimental situations an array of detectors would be useful. Although in general the detection of the scattered light intensity at several intervals within the 10 to 60 region would be sufficient, there are many examples where increased sensitivity could be acheived at other angles. The ability to measure at many different angular intervals would allow the experimenter to empirically select the optimum intervals for the varying conditions of cell size, N/C ratio, granule size and internal structure from sample to sample. The feasibility of making scattered light measurements at many different intervals in flow cytometry was demonstrated. The implementation of simplified versions of these techniques in conjunction with independant measurements of cell size could potentially improve the usefulness of flow cytometry in the study of the internal structure of cells.

  15. Research on the detection system of liquid concentration base on birefringence light transmission method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tianze; Zhang, Xia; Hou, Luan; Jiang, Chuan

    2010-10-01

    The characteristics of the beam transmitting in the optical fiber and the liquid medium are analyzed in this paper. On this basis, a new type of semiconductor optical position sensitive detector is used for a receiving device, a light transmission method of birefringence is presented,and a set of opto-electrical detection system which is applied to detect liquid concentration is designed. The system is mainly composed of semiconductor lasers,optical systems, Psd signal conditioning circuit, Single-chip System, A/D conversion circuit and display circuit. Through theoretical analysis and experimental simulations, the accuracy of this system has been verified. Some main factors affecting the test results are analyzed detailedly in this paper. The experiments show that the temperature drift and the light intensity have a very small impact on this system. The system has some advantages, such as the simple structure, high sensitivity, good stability, fast response time, high degree of automation, and so on. It also can achieve the real-time detection of liquid concentration conveniently and accurately. The system can be widely applied in chemical, food, pharmacy and many other industries. It has broad prospects of application.

  16. GeSn waveguide structures for efficient light detection and emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, You-Long; Huang, Yu-Hui; Chen, Shao-Wei; Chang, Guo-En

    2015-02-01

    We report the fabrication and characterization of GeSn waveguide structures on Si substrates grown by molecular beam epitaxy for efficient light-detection and emission. For photodetectors, GeSn waveguide structures exhibit a higher optical response compared to a reference Ge device as revealed by the photocurrent experiments. For light-emission, room-temperature photoluminescence experiments show a redshifted emission wavelength for the GeSn samples compared to the Ge reference sample due to the Sn incorporation. Besides, we observe ripple characteristics in the amplified spontaneous emission spectrum of the GeSn waveguide structure, which are attributed to the waveguide modes. Those results suggest that GeSn waveguide structures are promising for high-performance Si-based lightdetectors and emitters integrable with Si electronics.

  17. In vivo light scattering for the detection of cancerous and precancerous lesions of the cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Mourant, Judith R

    2008-01-01

    A noninvasive optical diagnostic system for detection of cancerous and precancerous lesions of the cervix was evaluated in vivo. The optical system included a fiber-optic probe designed to measure polarized and unpolarized light transport properties of a small volume of tissue. An algorithm for diagnosing tissue based on the optical measurements was developed that used four optical properties, three of which were related to light scattering properties and the fourth of which was related to hemoglobin concentration. A sensitivity of {approx}77% and specificities in the mid 60% range were obtained for separating high grade squamous intraepithelial lesions and cancer from other pathologies and normal tissue. The use of different cross-validation methods in algorithm development is analyzed, and the relative difficulties of diagnosing certain pathologies are assessed. Furthermore, the robustness of the optical system for use by different doctors and to changes in fiber-optic probe are also assessed, and potential improvements in the optical system are discussed.

  18. An imaging technique for detection and absolute calibration of scintillation light

    SciTech Connect

    Pappalardo, Alfio; Cosentino, Luigi; Finocchiaro, Paolo

    2010-03-15

    Triggered by the need of a detection system to be used in experiments of nuclear fusion in laser-generated plasmas, we developed an imaging technique for the measurement and calibration of the scintillation light yield of scintillating materials. As in such experiments, all the reaction products are generated in an ultrashort time frame, the event-by-event data acquisition scheme is not feasible. As an alternative to the emulsion technique (or the equivalent CR39 sheets) we propose a scintillating screen readout by means of a high performance charge coupled device camera. Even though it is not strictly required in the particular application, this technique allows the absolute calibration of the scintillation light yield.

  19. Morphological background detection and illumination normalization of text image with poor lighting.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guocheng; Wang, Yiwen; Li, Hui; Chen, Xuanqi; Lu, Haitao; Ma, Yanpeng; Peng, Chun; Wang, Yijun; Tang, Linyao

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, some morphological transformations are used to detect the unevenly illuminated background of text images characterized by poor lighting, and to acquire illumination normalized result. Based on morphologic Top-Hat transform, the uneven illumination normalization algorithm has been carried out, and typically verified by three procedures. The first procedure employs the information from opening based Top-Hat operator, which is a classical method. In order to optimize and perfect the classical Top-Hat transform, the second procedure, featuring the definition of multi direction illumination notion, utilizes opening by reconstruction and closing by reconstruction based on multi direction structuring elements. Finally, multi direction images are merged to the final even illumination image. The performance of the proposed algorithm is illustrated and verified through the processing of different ideal synthetic and camera collected images, with backgrounds characterized by poor lighting conditions. PMID:25426639

  20. Polyp detection rates using magnification with narrow band imaging and white light

    PubMed Central

    Gilani, Nooman; Stipho, Sally; Panetta, James D; Petre, Sorin; Young, Michele A; Ramirez, Francisco C

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare the yield of adenomas between narrow band imaging and white light when using high definition/magnification. METHODS: This prospective, non-randomized comparative study was performed at the endoscopy unit of veteran affairs medical center in Phoenix, Arizona. Consecutive patients undergoing first average risk colorectal cancer screening colonoscopy were selected. Two experienced gastroenterologists performed all the procedures that were blinded to each other’s findings. Demographic details were recorded. Data are presented as mean ± SEM. Proportional data were compared using the χ2 test and means were compared using the Student’s t test. Tandem colonoscopy was performed in a sequential and segmental fashion using one of 3 strategies: white light followed by narrow band imaging [Group A: white light (WL) → narrow band imaging (NBI)]; narrow band imaging followed by white light (Group B: NBI → WL) and, white light followed by white light (Group C: WL → WL). Detection rate of missed polyps and adenomas were evaluated in all three groups. RESULTS: Three hundred patients were studied (100 in each Group). Although the total time for the colonoscopy was similar in the 3 groups (23.8 ± 0.7, 22.2 ± 0.5 and 24.1 ± 0.7 min for Groups A, B and C, respectively), it reached statistical significance between Groups B and C (P < 0.05). The cecal intubation time in Groups B and C was longer than for Group A (6.5 ± 0.4 min and 6.5 ± 0.4 min vs 4.9 ± 0.3 min; P < 0.05). The withdrawal time for Groups A and C was longer than Group B (18.9 ± 0.7 min and 17.6 ± 0.6 min vs 15.7 ± 0.4 min; P < 0.05). Overall miss rate for polyps and adenomas detected in three groups during the second look was 18% and 17%, respectively (P = NS). Detection rate for polyps and adenomas after first look with white light was similar irrespective of the light used during the second look (WL → WL: 13.7% for polyps, 12.6% for adenomas; WL → NBI: 14.2% for polyps, 11.3% for

  1. Morphological Background Detection and Illumination Normalization of Text Image with Poor Lighting

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guocheng; Wang, Yiwen; Li, Hui; Chen, Xuanqi; Lu, Haitao; Ma, Yanpeng; Peng, Chun; Wang, Yijun; Tang, Linyao

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, some morphological transformations are used to detect the unevenly illuminated background of text images characterized by poor lighting, and to acquire illumination normalized result. Based on morphologic Top-Hat transform, the uneven illumination normalization algorithm has been carried out, and typically verified by three procedures. The first procedure employs the information from opening based Top-Hat operator, which is a classical method. In order to optimize and perfect the classical Top-Hat transform, the second procedure, featuring the definition of multi direction illumination notion, utilizes opening by reconstruction and closing by reconstruction based on multi direction structuring elements. Finally, multi direction images are merged to the final even illumination image. The performance of the proposed algorithm is illustrated and verified through the processing of different ideal synthetic and camera collected images, with backgrounds characterized by poor lighting conditions. PMID:25426639

  2. Low Light CMOS Contact Imager with an Integrated Poly-Acrylic Emission Filter for Fluorescence Detection

    PubMed Central

    Dattner, Yonathan; Yadid-Pecht, Orly

    2010-01-01

    This study presents the fabrication of a low cost poly-acrylic acid (PAA) based emission filter integrated with a low light CMOS contact imager for fluorescence detection. The process involves the use of PAA as an adhesive for the emission filter. The poly-acrylic solution was chosen due its optical transparent properties, adhesive properties, miscibility with polar protic solvents and most importantly its bio-compatibility with a biological environment. The emission filter, also known as an absorption filter, involves dissolving an absorbing specimen in a polar protic solvent and mixing it with the PAA to uniformly bond the absorbing specimen and harden the filter. The PAA is optically transparent in solid form and therefore does not contribute to the absorbance of light in the visible spectrum. Many combinations of absorbing specimen and polar protic solvents can be derived, yielding different filter characteristics in different parts of the spectrum. We report a specific combination as a first example of implementation of our technology. The filter reported has excitation in the green spectrum and emission in the red spectrum, utilizing the increased quantum efficiency of the photo sensitive sensor array. The thickness of the filter (20 μm) was chosen by calculating the desired SNR using Beer-Lambert’s law for liquids, Quantum Yield of the fluorophore and the Quantum Efficiency of the sensor array. The filters promising characteristics make it suitable for low light fluorescence detection. The filter was integrated with a fully functional low noise, low light CMOS contact imager and experimental results using fluorescence polystyrene micro-spheres are presented. PMID:22399920

  3. Detection of Changes on and below the Surface in Epithelium Mucosal Tissue Structure using Scattered Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taslidere, Ezgi

    The aim of this work is to answer the question of whether it is possible to detect changes on and below the surface in epithelium tissue structure using light reflected from the tissue over an area (2-D scan) illuminated by an optical sensor (fiber) emitting light at either one wavelength or with white light. Towards that end we model the 2-D reflected scans using a Stochastic Decomposition Method (SDM). The emphasis in this work is on the novelty of the proposed model and its theoretical pinning and foundation. The model is biologically motivated by the stochastic textural nature of the tissue. We model the textural content (which relates to tissue morphology) that manifests itself in the 2-D scans. Unlike previous works that analyze the scattered signal at one spot at various wavelengths, our method statistically analyzes 2-D scans of light scattering data over an area, and extracts from the data features (SDM parameters) that change with changes in the tissue morphology. The examination of an area rather than a spot not only leads to a more reliable calculation of the extracted parameters using single techniques (e.g. nuclear size distribution), but it also leads to the computation of additional information embedded in the spatial texture that our decomposition technique arrives at by modeling the hidden correlations that are obtained only by interrogating a wide sample area. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt at modeling the scattered light over an area using a stochastic decomposition model that allows for the assessment of correlation and textural characteristics that otherwise could not be revealed when the analysis of the scattering signal is a function of wavelength or angle. We also come up with a segmentation technique to raise a flag on the fly when a transition occurs between different mucosal architectures on the surface. The segmentation is based on a novel difference metric for detecting an abrupt change in the parameters

  4. Detecting apoptosis in vivo and ex vivo using spectroscopic OCT and dynamic light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Golnaz; Giles, Anoja; Mariampillai, Adrian; Yang, Victor X. D.; Czarnota, Gregory J.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2014-03-01

    We present an in vivo implementation of a multi-parametric technique for detecting apoptosis using optical coherence tomography in a mouse tumor model. Solid tumors were grown from acute myeloid leukemia cells in the hind leg of SCID mice and treated with a single dose of cisplatin and dexamethasone to induce apoptosis. Both spectral features and speckle decorrelation times indicated good consistency between control mice and reasonable agreement with in vitro measurements. The integrated backscatter increased significantly in tumors responding to treatment while the spectral slope and decorrelation time did not show significant changes. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using spectroscopic OCT and dynamic light scattering for treatment monitoring in vivo.

  5. Simultaneous quantitation of tobramycin and colistin sulphate by HPLC with evaporative light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Clarot, I; Storme-Paris, I; Chaminade, P; Estevenon, O; Nicolas, A; Rieutord, A

    2009-08-15

    A rapid and simple method for the simultaneous determination of tobramycin and colistin sulphate in a pharmaceutical formulation by reversed phase HPLC and evaporative light scattering detection is described. Chromatographic separation was carried out in gradient mode using a Zorbax SB C18 column (150mmx4mm, 3.5microm) with mobile phases of acetonitrile and water containing trifluoroacetic at 1ml/min. The method was validated using methodology described by the International Conference of Harmonization. The method was shown to be specific, precise, accurate and linear. Real samples were analyzed to demonstrate the applicability of the chromatographic method in a routine use. PMID:19372021

  6. Multiply scattered light tomography and confocal imaging: detecting neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsner, Ann E.; Miura, Masahiro; Burns, Stephen Allan; Beausencourt, E.; Kunze, C.; Kelley, L. M.; Walker, J. P.; Wing, G. L.; Raskauskas, P. A.; Fletcher, D. C.; Zhou, Qienyuan; Dreher, Andreas W.

    2000-07-01

    A novel technique, Multiply Scattered Light Tomography (MSLT), and confocal Infrared Imaging are used to provide diagnostic information using a comfortable, rapid, and noninvasive method. We investigated these techniques in detecting neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration. The MSLT used a Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VCSEL) at 850 nm, while the confocal imaging technique used either the VCSEL or a 790 nm laser diode. Both were implemented into the topographical scanning system (TopSS, Laser Diagnostic Technologies, Inc.) Confocal imaging with both lasers provided different information about neovascularization as a function of focal plane, and different also from MSLT.

  7. Light neutralino dark matter: direct/indirect detection and collider searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Tao; Liu, Zhen; Su, Shufang

    2014-08-01

    We study the neutralino being the Lightest Supersymmetric Particle (LSP) as a cold Dark Matter (DM) candidate with a mass less than 40 GeV in the framework of the Next-to-Minimal-Supersymmetric-Standard-Model (NMSSM). We find that with the current collider constraints from LEP, the Tevatron and the LHC, there are three types of light DM solutions consistent with the direct/indirect searches as well as the relic abundance considerations: ( i) A 1, H 1-funnels, ( ii) stau coannihilation and ( iii) sbottom coannihilation. Type-( i) may take place in any theory with a light scalar (or pseudo-scalar) near the LSP pair threshold; while Type-( ii) and ( iii) could occur in the framework of Minimal-Supersymmetric-Standard-Model (MSSM) as well. We present a comprehensive study on the properties of these solutions and point out their immediate relevance to the experiments of the underground direct detection such as superCDMS and LUX/LZ, and the astro-physical indirect search such as Fermi-LAT. We also find that the decays of the SM-like Higgs boson may be modified appreciably and the new decay channels to the light SUSY particles may be sizable. The new light CP-even and CP-odd Higgs bosons will decay to a pair of LSPs as well as other observable final states, leading to interesting new Higgs phenomenology at colliders. For the light sfermion searches, the signals would be very challenging to observe at the LHC given the current bounds. However, a high energy and high luminosity lepton collider, such as the ILC, would be able to fully cover these scenarios by searching for events with large missing energy plus charged tracks or displaced vertices.

  8. Detection techniques using multispectral data to index soil erosional status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelletier, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    Indexing techniques that can be used to detect soil erosion utilizing the known band widths of the Landsat MSS and TM sensors are identified. The indexing techniques focus on iron oxides, clays, and organic matter as properties revealing soil erosional status. For data aquisition, a Collins visible and infrared intelligent spectrometer was used to collect data from 0.4-24 microns. Pressed polytetrafluorethylene was used as the reflectance standard and was aquired at the same time that the sample data were aquired.

  9. Analysis of the Spitzer/MIPS24 Light Curve of the M-Dwarf Eclipsing Binary GU Boo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Braun, Kaspar; van Belle, G. T.; Ciardi, D. R.; Wachter, S.; Hoard, D. W.

    2006-12-01

    We present a carefully controlled set of Spitzer 24 micron MIPS time series observations of the M-dwarf eclipsing binary star GU Bootes. These observations serve to characterize the MIPS-24 observing techniques of the spacecraft, precisely establishing the photometric repeatability of this instrument at the tens of microJy level. The data aim to substantiate the previously reported and upcoming observations of extrasolar planet transits at similar flux levels. A further science return is the long wavelength (and thus limb darkening-independent) characterization of such a low-mass object's light curve, allowing for improved characterization of the components' linear radii and other aspects of their surface morphologies. In this presentation, we show GU Boo's 24 micron light curve and give our estimates concerning astrophysical parameters of the binary system. We furthermore give a detailed description of our analysis methods and discuss the comparison between our results and previous optical studies of this system.

  10. Ultrasensitive and fast detection of denaturation of milk by Coherent backscattering of light

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Manish; Singh, Dilip K.; Senthilkumaran, P.; Joseph, Joby; Kandpal, H. C.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, Coherence backscattering (CBS) of light has been used to detect the onset of denaturation of milk. The CBS cone shape and its enhancement factor are found to be highly sensitive to the physical state of the milk particles. The onset of denaturing of milk not visible to the naked eye, can be easily detected from changes in the CBS cone shape. The onset of denaturation is confirmed by spectral changes in Raman spectra from these milk samples. Further, the possibility to estimate the dilution of milk by water as an adulterant is demonstrated. The method reported has a broad scope in industry for making an inline ultrafast cost effective sensor for milk quality monitoring during production and before consumption. PMID:25435102

  11. A General Purpose Feature Extractor for Light Detection and Ranging Data

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yangming; Olson, Edwin B.

    2010-01-01

    Feature extraction is a central step of processing Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) data. Existing detectors tend to exploit characteristics of specific environments: corners and lines from indoor (rectilinear) environments, and trees from outdoor environments. While these detectors work well in their intended environments, their performance in different environments can be poor. We describe a general purpose feature detector for both 2D and 3D LIDAR data that is applicable to virtually any environment. Our method adapts classic feature detection methods from the image processing literature, specifically the multi-scale Kanade-Tomasi corner detector. The resulting method is capable of identifying highly stable and repeatable features at a variety of spatial scales without knowledge of environment, and produces principled uncertainty estimates and corner descriptors at same time. We present results on both software simulation and standard datasets, including the 2D Victoria Park and Intel Research Center datasets, and the 3D MIT DARPA Urban Challenge dataset. PMID:22163474

  12. Detection of early carious lesions using contrast enhancement with coherent light scattering (speckle imaging)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deana, A. M.; Jesus, S. H. C.; Koshoji, N. H.; Bussadori, S. K.; Oliveira, M. T.

    2013-07-01

    Currently, dental caries still represent one of the chronic diseases with the highest prevalence and present in most countries. The interaction between light and teeth (absorption, scattering and fluorescence) is intrinsically connected to the constitution of the dental tissue. Decay induced mineral loss introduces a shift in the optical properties of the affected tissue; therefore, study of these properties may produce novel techniques aimed at the early diagnosis of carious lesions. Based on the optical properties of the enamel, we demonstrate the application of first-order spatial statistics in laser speckle imaging, allowing the detection of carious lesions in their early stages. A highlight of this noninvasive, non-destructive, real time and cost effective approach is that it allows a dentist to detect a lesion even in the absence of biofilm or moisture.

  13. The Peptide Microarray-Based Resonance Light Scattering Assay for Sensitively Detecting Intracellular Kinase Activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Liu, Xia; Liu, Dianjun; Wang, Zhenxin

    2016-01-01

    The peptide microarray technology is a robust, reliable, and efficient technique for large-scale determination of enzyme activities, and high-throughput profiling of substrate/inhibitor specificities of enzymes. Here, the activities of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) in different cell lysates have been detected by a peptide microarray-based resonance light scattering (RLS) assay with gold nanoparticle (GNP) probes. Highly sensitive detection of PKA activity in 0.1 μg total cell proteins of SHG-44 (human glioma cell) cell lysate (corresponding to 200 cells) is achieved by a selected peptide substrate. The experimental results also demonstrate that the RLS assay can be employed to evaluate the chemical regulation of intracellular kinase activity. PMID:26490469

  14. A general purpose feature extractor for light detection and ranging data.

    PubMed

    Li, Yangming; Olson, Edwin B

    2010-01-01

    Feature extraction is a central step of processing Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) data. Existing detectors tend to exploit characteristics of specific environments: corners and lines from indoor (rectilinear) environments, and trees from outdoor environments. While these detectors work well in their intended environments, their performance in different environments can be poor. We describe a general purpose feature detector for both 2D and 3D LIDAR data that is applicable to virtually any environment. Our method adapts classic feature detection methods from the image processing literature, specifically the multi-scale Kanade-Tomasi corner detector. The resulting method is capable of identifying highly stable and repeatable features at a variety of spatial scales without knowledge of environment, and produces principled uncertainty estimates and corner descriptors at same time. We present results on both software simulation and standard datasets, including the 2D Victoria Park and Intel Research Center datasets, and the 3D MIT DARPA Urban Challenge dataset. PMID:22163474

  15. Real-time detection of airborne asbestos by light scattering from magnetically re-aligned fibers.

    PubMed

    Stopford, Christopher; Kaye, Paul H; Greenaway, Richard S; Hirst, Edwin; Ulanowski, Zbigniew; Stanley, Warren R

    2013-05-01

    Inadvertent inhalation of asbestos fibers and the subsequent development of incurable cancers is a leading cause of work-related deaths worldwide. Currently, there is no real-time in situ method for detecting airborne asbestos. We describe an optical method that seeks to address this deficiency. It is based on the use of laser light scattering patterns to determine the change in angular alignment of individual airborne fibers under the influence of an applied magnetic field. Detection sensitivity estimates are given for both crocidolite (blue) and chrysotile (white) asbestos. The method has been developed with the aim of providing a low-cost warning device to trades people and others at risk from inadvertent exposure to airborne asbestos. PMID:23669992

  16. Dual wavelength multiple-angle light scattering system for cryptosporidium detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buaprathoom, S.; Pedley, S.; Sweeney, S. J.

    2012-06-01

    A simple, dual wavelength, multiple-angle, light scattering system has been developed for detecting cryptosporidium suspended in water. Cryptosporidium is a coccidial protozoan parasite causing cryptosporidiosis; a diarrheal disease of varying severity. The parasite is transmitted by ingestion of contaminated water, particularly drinking-water, but also accidental ingestion of bathing-water, including swimming pools. It is therefore important to be able to detect these parasites quickly, so that remedial action can be taken to reduce the risk of infection. The proposed system combines multiple-angle scattering detection of a single and two wavelengths, to collect relative wavelength angle-resolved scattering phase functions from tested suspension, and multivariate data analysis techniques to obtain characterizing information of samples under investigation. The system was designed to be simple, portable and inexpensive. It employs two diode lasers (violet InGaN-based and red AlGaInP-based) as light sources and silicon photodiodes as detectors and optical components, all of which are readily available. The measured scattering patterns using the dual wavelength system showed that the relative wavelength angle-resolved scattering pattern of cryptosporidium oocysts was significantly different from other particles (e.g. polystyrene latex sphere, E.coli). The single wavelength set up was applied for cryptosporidium oocysts'size and relative refractive index measurement and differential measurement of the concentration of cryptosporidium oocysts suspended in water and mixed polystyrene latex sphere suspension. The measurement results showed good agreement with the control reference values. These results indicate that the proposed method could potentially be applied to online detection in a water quality control system.

  17. Detection of fast flying nanoparticles by light scattering over a large volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettazzi, F.; Bäumer, S.; van der Donck, J.; Deutz, A.

    2015-06-01

    is a well-known detection method which is applied in many different scientific and technology domains including atmospheric physics, environmental control, and biology. It allows contactless and remote detection of sub-micron size particles. However, methods for detecting a single fast moving particle smaller than 100 nm are lacking. In the present work we report a preliminary design study of an inline large area detector for nanoparticles larger than 50 nm which move with velocities up to 100 m/s. The detector design is based on light scattering using commercially available components. The presented design takes into account all challenges connected to the inline implementation of the scattering technique in the system: the need for the detector to have a large field of view to cover a volume with a footprint commensurate to an area of 100mm x 100mm, the necessity to sense nanoparticles transported at high velocity, and the requirement of large capture rate with a false detection as low as one false positive per week. The impact of all these stringent requirements on the expected sensitivity and performances of the device is analyzed by mean of a dedicated performance model.

  18. Multianalyte detection using fiber optic particle plasmon resonance sensor based on plasmonic light scattering interrogation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hsing-Ying; Huang, Chen-Han; Chau, Lai-Kwan

    2013-05-01

    A highly sensitive fiber optic particle plasmon resonance sensor (FO-PPR) is demonstrated for label-free biochemical detection. The sensing strategy relies on interrogating the plasmonic scattering of light from gold nanoparticles on the optical fiber in response to the surrounding refractive index changes or molecular binding events. The refractive index resolution is estimated to be 3.8 × 10-5 RIU. The limit of detection for anti-DNP antibody spiked in buffer is 1.2 × 10-9 g/ml (5.3 pM) by using the DNP-functionalized FO-PPR sensor. The image processing of simultaneously recorded plasmonic scattering photographs at different compartments of the sensor is also demonstrated. Results suggest that the compact sensor can perform multiple independent measurements simultaneously by means of monitoring the plasmonic scattering intensity via photodiodes or a CCD. The potential of using a combination of different kinds of noble metal nanoparticles with different types of functionalized probes in multiple cascaded detection windows on a single fiber to become an inexpensive and ultrasensitive linear-array sensing platform for higher-throughput biochemical detection is provided.

  19. Fibre coupled micro-light emitting diode array light source with integrated band-pass filter for fluorescence detection in miniaturised analytical systems.

    PubMed

    Vaculovičová, Markéta; Akther, Mahbub; Maaskant, Pleun; Brabazon, Dermot; Macka, Mirek

    2015-04-29

    In this work, a new type of miniaturized fibre-coupled solid-state light source is demonstrated as an excitation source for fluorescence detection in capillary electrophoresis. It is based on a parabolically shaped micro-light emitting diode (μ-LED) array with a custom band-pass optical interference filter (IF) deposited at the back of the LED substrate. The GaN μ-LED array consisted of 270 individual μ-LED elements with a peak emission at 470 nm, each about 14 μm in diameter and operated as a single unit. Light was extracted through the transparent substrate material, and coupled to an optical fibre (OF, 400 μm in diameter, numerical aperture NA=0.37), to form an integrated μ-LED-IF-OF light source component. This packaged μ-LED-IF-OF light source emitted approximately 225 μW of optical power at a bias current of 20 mA. The bandpass IF filter was designed to reduce undesirable LED light emissions in the wavelength range above 490 nm. Devices with and without IF were compared in terms of the optical power output, spectral characteristics as well as LOD values. While the IF consisted of only 7.5 pairs (15 layers) of SiO2/HfO2 layers, it resulted in an improvement of the baseline noise as well as the detection limit measured using fluorescein as test analyte, both by approximately one order of magnitude, with a LOD of 1×10(-8) mol L(-1) obtained under optimised conditions. The μ-LED-IF-OF light source was then demonstrated for use in capillary electrophoresis with fluorimetric detection. The limits of detection obtained by this device were compared to those obtained with a commercial fibre coupled LED device. PMID:25847165

  20. Silicon Photomultipliers, A New Device For Low Light Level Photon Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Moser, Hans-Guenther

    2006-10-27

    Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) are novel detectors for low level light detection based on arrays of avalanche photodiodes operating in Geiger mode. Offering good characteristics (fast response, high gain, photon counting capability, insensitivity to magnetic fields, low voltage operation) they have the potential to replace classical photomultipliers (PMT) in many applications. Drawbacks are dark rate and optical cross talk. Though their quantum efficiency is already comparable or better than that of bialkali PMT it is still limited by the structures on the light sensitive front surface. A new concept, presently developed at the Max-Planck semiconductor laboratory, allows boosting the efficiency to almost 100%. Using a fully depleted substrate the light enters through the unstructured backside. A drift diode structure collects the electrons on a small 'point like' avalanche structure for multiplication. Engineering the thin entrance window at the backside using antireflective layers a high efficiency can be achieved in a wide wavelength range (300-1000nm). The paper will summarize the status of front illuminated SiPMs and report on the development of the backside illuminated devices.

  1. Detection of free immunoglobulin light chains in cerebrospinal fluids of patients with central nervous system lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Schroers, Roland; Baraniskin, Alexander; Heute, Christoph; Kuhnhenn, Jan; Alekseyev, Andriy; Schmiegel, Wolff; Schlegel, Uwe; Pels, Hendrik-Johannes

    2010-09-01

    Diagnosis of central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma depends on histopathology of brain biopsies, because no reliable disease marker in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) has been identified yet. B-cell lymphomas such as CNS lymphomas are clonally restricted and express either kappa or lambda immunoglobulin light chains. The aim of this study was to find out a potential diagnostic value of free immunoglobulin light chains released into the CSF of CNS lymphoma patients. Kappa (kappa) and lambda (lambda) free immunoglobulin light chains (FLC) were measured in CSF and serum samples collected from 21 patients with primary and secondary CNS lymphomas and 14 control patients with different neurologic disorders. FLC concentrations and ratios were compared between patient groups and were further analyzed in correlation with clinical, cytopathological, and radiological findings. FLC concentrations for all patients were lower in CSF when compared to serum. In patients with CNS lymphoma, the FLC ratios in CSF were higher (range 392-0.3) compared to control patients (range 3.0-0.3). Irrespective of cytopathological proven lymphomatous meningitis, in 11/21 lymphoma CSF samples the FLC ratios were markedly above 3.0 indicating a clonally restricted B-cell population. Increased FLC ratios in CSF were found in those patients showing subependymal lymphoma contact as detected in magnetic resonance imaging. In summary, this is the first report demonstrating that a significant proportion of patients with CNS lymphomas display a markedly increased FLC ratio in the CSF. PMID:20528903

  2. Polarimetric detection of cached objects and chiral solutes by light scattering in turbid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, Mark P.; Strange, Wayne

    2000-12-01

    Photoelastic modulation (PEM) and synchronous detection of laser light scattered from an optically dense turbid medium can reveal the presence and topographical features of embedded targets invisible to naked-eye observation under ambient illumination, as well as provide a quantitative measure of the optical rotation, and therefore the concentration, of chiral constituents dissolved in a turbid fluid. A 544 nm helium-neon probe beam phase-modulated at f = 50 kHz was scanned across the front surface of a scattering cell containing an optically dense suspension of micron-sized polystyrene microspheres and different types of embedded targets. Backscattered light was analyzed for signals at the modulation frequency 1(f) and first harmonic I(2f), which gave nearly instantaneous measures (i.e. approximately over a modulation period T = 1 7 is) of the difference in intensities of orthogonal states of circular and linear polarizations, respectively. Examination of different targets showed sensitivity of polarimetnc imaging to edges, surface texture, and absorption. In another set of experiments the optical rotation and degree ofpolarization ofphase-modulated light was observed by forward, lateral, and back scattering from solutions of the enantiomer D-glucose containing a suspension of polystyrene microspheres. Optical rotations increased linearly with glucose concentration at a rate dependent on the microsphere concentration, and were large even at optical thicknesses sufficiently great to extinguish transmission of the incident beam. Applications of the techniques to remote viewing and biochemical analyses can be envisioned..

  3. New clinical instrument for the early detection of cataract using dynamic light scattering and corneal topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Datiles, Manuel B., III; King, James F.

    2000-06-01

    A growing cataract can be detected at the molecular level using the technique of dynamic light scattering (DLS). However, the success of this method in clinical use depends upon the precise control of the scattering volume inside a patient's eye and especially during patient's repeat visits. This is important because the scattering volume (cross-over region between the scattered light and incident light) inside the eye in a high-quality DLS set-up is very small (few microns in dimension). This precise control holds the key for success in the longitudinal studies of cataract and during anti-cataract drug screening. We have circumvented these problems by fabricating a new DLS fiber optic probe with a working distance of 40 mm and by mounting it inside a cone of a corneal analyzer. This analyzer is frequently used in mapping the corneal topography during PRK (photorefractive keratectomy) and LASIK (laser in situ keratomileusis) procedures in shaping of the cornea to correct myopia. This new instrument and some preliminary clinical tests on one of us (RRA) showing the data reproducibility are described.

  4. Image-processing algorithms for detecting and counting vehicles waiting at a traffic light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Rocha, Ernesto; Palacios, Rafael

    2010-10-01

    Traffic lights at most road intersections operate on a fixed timing schedule that leads to suboptimal traffic management, with unnecessary delays, higher fuel consumption, and higher emissions. Traffic management can be improved by installing inductive loops; however, installation involves temporary road closures and high maintenance costs, especially if there is normally a lot of heavy traffic on the road. We present a vehicle detection and counting system based on digital image-processing techniques. These images can be taken by digital cameras installed at the top of existing traffic lights. By using the proposed approach, it is possible to detect the number of vehicles waiting on each side of the intersection, hence, providing the necessary information for optimal traffic management. Results achieved after testing this methodology on three real intersections are promising, attaining high accuracy during the day (98.8%) and the night (91.3%) while counting several vehicles at the same time. Hence, the system is equivalent to installing multiple inductive loops in all the streets of the intersection, but with lower installation and maintenance costs. After integrating the proposed algorithms into a traffic-management system, it was possible to reduce fuel and CO2 emissions by half compared to the standard fixed-time scheduler.

  5. Computational modeling and experimental characterization of bacterial microcolonies for rapid detection using light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Nan

    A label-free and nondestructive optical elastic forward light scattering method has been extended for the analysis of microcolonies for food-borne bacteria detection and identification. To understand the forward light scattering phenomenon, a model based on the scalar diffraction theory has been employed: a bacterial colony is considered as a biological spatial light modulator with amplitude and phase modulation to the incoming light, which continues to propagate to the far-field to form a distinct scattering 'fingerprint'. Numerical implementation via angular spectrum method (ASM) and Fresnel approximation have been carried out through Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) to simulate this optical model. Sampling criteria to achieve unbiased and un-aliased simulation results have been derived and the effects of violating these conditions have been studied. Diffraction patterns predicted by these two methods (ASM and Fresnel) have been compared to show their applicability to different simulation settings. Through the simulation work, the correlation between the colony morphology and its forward scattering pattern has been established to link the number of diffraction rings and the half cone angle with the diameter and the central height of the Gaussian-shaped colonies. In order to experimentally prove the correlation, a colony morphology analyzer has been built and used to characterize the morphology of different bacteria genera and investigate their growth dynamics. The experimental measurements have demonstrated the possibility of differentiating bacteria Salmonella, Listeria, Escherichia in their early growth stage (100˜500 µm) based on their phenotypic characteristics. This conclusion has important implications in microcolony detection, as most bacteria of our interest need much less incubation time (8˜12 hours) to grow into this size range. The original forward light scatterometer has been updated to capture scattering patterns from microcolonies. Experiments have

  6. Detection of dinoflagellates by the light scattering properties of the chiral structure of their chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianping; Kattawar, George W.

    2013-12-01

    One of the most prominent properties of dinoflagellates is their large sized and highly chromosome-laden nucleus, which contains dozens of cylindrically shaped chromosomes. With such high chromatic concentration, these chromosomes condense into ordered helical structures and were claimed to be responsible for the large circular polarization effects observed in the light scattering from dinoflagellates. In previous research, a thin helix model of a chromosome was used to compare the Discrete Dipole Approximation (DDA) and the analytical Born approximation calculations. However, for such a simplified model only modest qualitative agreements with experimental measurements were achieved. Moreover, only one chromosome in one nucleus was simulated, overlooking the effects of interactions between chromosomes. In this work, we adopt the helical plywood liquid crystal model with a capsule shape, in which parallel fibrils lie in plains perpendicular to the helix axis and the orientations of these fibrils twist at a constant angle between two neighboring layers. The ADDA code is applied to calculate the 16 Mueller matrix elements of light scattering from a single chromosome and from the nucleus, which is composed of a collection of randomly positioned and randomly orientated chromosomes. Special attention is paid to the S14 Mueller matrix element, which describes the ability of differentiating left and right circularly polarized light. Our results show that large S14 back scattering signals from the dinoflagellate nucleus results from the underlying helical structures of its chromosomes. These signals are sensitive to the light wavelength and pitch of the chromatic helix, the latter of which is species specific. Therefore, detecting back scattering S14 signal could be a promising method to monitor dinoflagellates such as Karenia brevis, the causal agent of the Florida red tide.

  7. Detection and characterization of flaws in segments of light water reactor pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, K.V.; Cunningham, R.A. Jr.; McClung, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    Studies have been conducted to determine flaw density in segments cut from light water reactor (LWR) pressure vessels as part of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program. Segments from the Hope Creek Unit 2 vessil and the Pilgrim Unit 2 Vessel were purchased from salvage dealers. Hope Creek was a boiling water reactor (BWR) design and Pilgrim was a pressurized water reactor (PWR) design. Neither were ever placed in service. Objectives were to evaluate these LWR segments for flaws with ultrasonic and liquid penetrant techniques. Both objectives were successfully completed. One significant indication was detected in a Hope Creek seam weld by ultrasonic techniques and characterized by further analyses terminating with destructive correlation. This indication (with a through-wall dimension of approx.6 mm (approx.0.24 in.)) was detected in only 3 m (10 ft) of weldment and offers extremely limited data when compared to the extent of welding even in a single pressure vessel. However, the detection and confirmation of the flaw in the arbitrarily selected sections implies the Marshall report estimates (and others) are nonconservative for such small flaws. No significant indications were detected in the Pilgrim material by ultrasonic techniques. Unfortunately, the Pilgrim segments contained relatively little weldment; thus, we limited our ultrasonic examinations to the cladding and subcladding regions. Fluorescent liquid penetrant inspection of the cladding surfaces for both LWR segments detected no significant indications (i.e., for a total of approximately 6.8 m/sup 2/ (72 ft/sup 2/) of cladding surface).

  8. Hyperspectral Image-Based Night-Time Vehicle Light Detection Using Spectral Normalization and Distance Mapper for Intelligent Headlight Control.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heekang; Kwon, Soon; Kim, Sungho

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a vehicle light detection method using a hyperspectral camera instead of a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) or Complementary metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS) camera for adaptive car headlamp control. To apply Intelligent Headlight Control (IHC), the vehicle headlights need to be detected. Headlights are comprised from a variety of lighting sources, such as Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs), High-intensity discharge (HID), and halogen lamps. In addition, rear lamps are made of LED and halogen lamp. This paper refers to the recent research in IHC. Some problems exist in the detection of headlights, such as erroneous detection of street lights or sign lights and the reflection plate of ego-car from CCD or CMOS images. To solve these problems, this study uses hyperspectral images because they have hundreds of bands and provide more information than a CCD or CMOS camera. Recent methods to detect headlights used the Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM), Spectral Correlation Mapper (SCM), and Euclidean Distance Mapper (EDM). The experimental results highlight the feasibility of the proposed method in three types of lights (LED, HID, and halogen). PMID:27399720

  9. Hyperspectral Image-Based Night-Time Vehicle Light Detection Using Spectral Normalization and Distance Mapper for Intelligent Headlight Control

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Heekang; Kwon, Soon; Kim, Sungho

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a vehicle light detection method using a hyperspectral camera instead of a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) or Complementary metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS) camera for adaptive car headlamp control. To apply Intelligent Headlight Control (IHC), the vehicle headlights need to be detected. Headlights are comprised from a variety of lighting sources, such as Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs), High-intensity discharge (HID), and halogen lamps. In addition, rear lamps are made of LED and halogen lamp. This paper refers to the recent research in IHC. Some problems exist in the detection of headlights, such as erroneous detection of street lights or sign lights and the reflection plate of ego-car from CCD or CMOS images. To solve these problems, this study uses hyperspectral images because they have hundreds of bands and provide more information than a CCD or CMOS camera. Recent methods to detect headlights used the Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM), Spectral Correlation Mapper (SCM), and Euclidean Distance Mapper (EDM). The experimental results highlight the feasibility of the proposed method in three types of lights (LED, HID, and halogen). PMID:27399720

  10. High-speed two-dimensional bar-code detection system with time-sharing laser light emission method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakaumi, Hiroo; Nagasawa, Chikao

    2000-12-01

    A novel twodimensional bar-code detection system with time-sharing light emission laser diodes is proposed. A bias current allowing the laser diode to improve the light output rise time is optimized to slightly below the threshold of the diode, so that channel cross-talk among three-layer bar-code signals caused by the bias light can be kept small and a high-speed pulse modulation drive operation can be achieved. A prototype system for a three-layer bar code has achieved an effective scanning speed two and nine tenths times that of conventional scanners. It is estimated from the detection range that the number of time-sharing light emission laser diodes can be increased to at least four, when the current detection amplifier with a bandwidth of 6.4 MHz is used.

  11. Intra-operative brain tumor detection using elastic light single-scattering spectroscopy: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canpolat, Murat; Akyüz, Mahmut; Gökhan, Güzide Ayşe; Gürer, Elif Inanç; Tuncer, Recai

    2009-09-01

    We have investigated the potential application of elastic light single-scattering spectroscopy (ELSSS) as an adjunctive tool for intraoperative rapid detection of brain tumors and demarcation of the tumor from the surrounding normal tissue. Measurements were performed on 29 excised tumor specimens from 29 patients. There were 21 instances of low-grade tumors and eight instances of high-grade tumors. Normal gray matter and white matter brain tissue specimens of four epilepsy patients were used as a control group. One low-grade and one high-grade tumor were misclassified as normal brain tissue. Of the low- and high-grade tumors, 20 out of 21 and 7 out of 8 were correctly classified by the ELSSS system, respectively. One normal white matter tissue margin was detected in a high-grade tumor, and three normal tissue margins were detected in three low-grade tumors using spectroscopic data analysis and confirmed by histopathology. The spectral slopes were shown to be positive for normal white matter brain tissue and negative for normal gray matter and tumor tissues. Our results indicate that signs of spectral slopes may enable the discrimination of brain tumors from surrounding normal white matter brain tissue with a sensitivity of 93% and specificity of 100%.

  12. Refining Techniques for the Spectroscopic Detection of Reflected Light from Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Arpita; Bender, Chad; Mahadevan, Suvrath

    2015-12-01

    The detection of reflected light from exoplanets provides a direct measure of planetary mass as well as a powerful probe of atmospheric composition and albedo. However, close-in giant planets which provide the largest planet-to-star flux ratios are dim in the optical. With contrasts at the level of 10^-5, the direct detection of these present a severe technical challenge to current instruments, and require both large aperture telescopes for high signal-to-noise ratio observations, and a stabilized spectrograph for stable instrument profiles. Leveraging the heritage and stability of the HARPS spectrograph, Martins et al (2015) recently published evidence of a direct detection of the historic exoplanet 51 Peg b, using the stellar mask cross-correlation technique. We attempt to expand upon their results with independent spectral and CCF reductions, using a two-template cross-correlation technique that can potentially be tuned to match the planetary signal and probe models of the albedo. By cross-correlating against a spectrum rather than a mask, we access the full information content in the lines, but must ensure proper telluric correction to mitigate the possibility of overwhelming the small planetary signal with terrestrial features. We are on the verge of confidently recovering planetary albedos for close-in giant planets, while also refining predictive and analytical tools that will come into their full capability with the arrival of the next generation of planet characterizing instruments, such as ESPRESSO on VLT and HIRES on E-ELT.

  13. Automatic Detection of Diseased Tomato Plants Using Thermal and Stereo Visible Light Images

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Shan-e-Ahmed; Prince, Gillian; Clarkson, John P.; Rajpoot, Nasir M.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate and timely detection of plant diseases can help mitigate the worldwide losses experienced by the horticulture and agriculture industries each year. Thermal imaging provides a fast and non-destructive way of scanning plants for diseased regions and has been used by various researchers to study the effect of disease on the thermal profile of a plant. However, thermal image of a plant affected by disease has been known to be affected by environmental conditions which include leaf angles and depth of the canopy areas accessible to the thermal imaging camera. In this paper, we combine thermal and visible light image data with depth information and develop a machine learning system to remotely detect plants infected with the tomato powdery mildew fungus Oidium neolycopersici. We extract a novel feature set from the image data using local and global statistics and show that by combining these with the depth information, we can considerably improve the accuracy of detection of the diseased plants. In addition, we show that our novel feature set is capable of identifying plants which were not originally inoculated with the fungus at the start of the experiment but which subsequently developed disease through natural transmission. PMID:25861025

  14. Indirect detection of light neutralino dark matter in the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrer, Francesc; Krauss, Lawrence M.; Profumo, Stefano

    2006-12-01

    We explore the prospects for indirect detection of neutralino dark matter in supersymmetric models with an extended Higgs sector (next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model, or NMSSM). We compute, for the first time, one-loop amplitudes for NMSSM neutralino pair annihilation into two photons and two gluons, and point out that extra diagrams (with respect to the minimal supersymmetric standard model, or MSSM), featuring a potentially light CP-odd Higgs boson exchange, can strongly enhance these radiative modes. Expected signals in neutrino telescopes due to the annihilation of relic neutralinos in the Sun and in the Earth are evaluated, as well as the prospects of detection of a neutralino annihilation signal in space-based gamma-ray, antiproton and positron search experiments, and at low-energy antideuteron searches. We find that in the low mass regime the signals from capture in the Earth are enhanced compared to the MSSM, and that NMSSM neutralinos have a remote possibility of affecting solar dynamics. Also, antimatter experiments are an excellent probe of galactic NMSSM dark matter. We also find enhanced two-photon decay modes that make the possibility of the detection of a monochromatic gamma-ray line within the NMSSM more promising than in the MSSM, although likely below the sensitivity of next generation gamma-ray telescopes.

  15. POLARIZED REFLECTED LIGHT FROM THE EXOPLANET HD189733b: FIRST MULTICOLOR OBSERVATIONS AND CONFIRMATION OF DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Berdyugina, S. V.; Berdyugin, A. V.; Piirola, V.; Fluri, D. M. E-mail: andber@utu.fi E-mail: fluri@astro.phys.ethz.ch

    2011-02-10

    We report the first multicolor polarimetric measurements (UBV bands) for the hot Jupiter HD189733b and confirm our previously reported detection of polarization in the B band. The wavelength dependence of polarization indicates the dominance of Rayleigh scattering with a peak in the blue B and U bands of {approx}10{sup -4} {+-} 10{sup -5} and at least a factor of two lower signal in the V band. The Rayleigh-like wavelength dependence, also detected in the transmitted light during transits, implies a rapid decrease of the polarization signal toward longer wavelengths. Therefore, the nondetection by Wiktorowicz, based on a measurement integrated within a broad passband covering the V band and partly covering the B and R bands, is inconclusive and consistent with our detection in B. We discuss possible sources of the polarization and demonstrate that effects of incomplete cancellation of stellar limb polarization due to starspots or tidal perturbations are negligible as compared with scattering polarization in the planetary atmosphere. We compare the observations with a Rayleigh-Lambert model and determine effective radii and geometrical albedos for different wavelengths. We find a close similarity of the wavelength-dependent geometrical albedo with that of the Neptune atmosphere, which is known to be strongly influenced by Rayleigh and Raman scattering. Our result establishes polarimetry as a reliable means for directly studying exoplanetary atmospheres.

  16. Automatic detection of diseased tomato plants using thermal and stereo visible light images.

    PubMed

    Raza, Shan-e-Ahmed; Prince, Gillian; Clarkson, John P; Rajpoot, Nasir M

    2015-01-01

    Accurate and timely detection of plant diseases can help mitigate the worldwide losses experienced by the horticulture and agriculture industries each year. Thermal imaging provides a fast and non-destructive way of scanning plants for diseased regions and has been used by various researchers to study the effect of disease on the thermal profile of a plant. However, thermal image of a plant affected by disease has been known to be affected by environmental conditions which include leaf angles and depth of the canopy areas accessible to the thermal imaging camera. In this paper, we combine thermal and visible light image data with depth information and develop a machine learning system to remotely detect plants infected with the tomato powdery mildew fungus Oidium neolycopersici. We extract a novel feature set from the image data using local and global statistics and show that by combining these with the depth information, we can considerably improve the accuracy of detection of the diseased plants. In addition, we show that our novel feature set is capable of identifying plants which were not originally inoculated with the fungus at the start of the experiment but which subsequently developed disease through natural transmission. PMID:25861025

  17. Aptamer-based Resonance Light Scattering for Sensitive Detection of Acetamiprid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chengke; Chen, Dan; Wang, Qingqing; Wang, Qiuxia

    2016-01-01

    In this work, an aptasensor-based resonance light-scattering (RLS) method was developed for the sensitive and selective detection of acetamiprid. The ABA (acetamiprid binding aptamer)-stabilized gold nanoparticles (ABA-AuNPs) were used as a probe. Highly specific single-strand DNA (ssDNA, i.e, aptamers) that bind to acetamiprid with high affinity were employed to discriminate other pesticides, such as edifenphos, kanamycin, metribuzin et. al. The sensing approach is based on a specific interaction between acetamiprid and ABA. Aggregation of AuNPs was specifically induced by the desorption of the ABA from the surface of AuNPs, which caused the RLS signal intensity to be enhanced at 700 nm. The alteration of AuNPs' aggregation has been successfully optimized by controlling several conditions. Under the optimal conditions, the RLS intensity changes (I/I0) of AuNPs were linearly correlated with the acetamiprid concentration in the range of 0 - 100 nM. The detection limit is 1.2 nM (3σ). This method had also been used for acetamiprid detection in lake water samples. PMID:27396657

  18. Miniaturized high throughput detection system for capillary array electrophoresis on chip with integrated light emitting diode array as addressed ring-shaped light source.

    PubMed

    Ren, Kangning; Liang, Qionglin; Mu, Xuan; Luo, Guoan; Wang, Yiming

    2009-03-01

    A novel miniaturized, portable fluorescence detection system for capillary array electrophoresis (CAE) on a microfluidic chip was developed, consisting of a scanning light-emitting diode (LED) light source and a single point photoelectric sensor. Without charge coupled detector (CCD), lens, fibers and moving parts, the system was extremely simplified. Pulsed driving of the LED significantly increased the sensitivity, and greatly reduced the power consumption and photobleaching effect. The highly integrated system was robust and easy to use. All the advantages realized the concept of a portable micro-total analysis system (micro-TAS), which could work on a single universal serial bus (USB) port. Compared with traditional CAE detecting systems, the current system could scan the radial capillary array with high scanning rate. An 8-channel CAE of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled arginine (Arg) on chip was demonstrated with this system, resulting in a limit of detection (LOD) of 640 amol. PMID:19224025

  19. Direct detection of the cosmic neutrino background including light sterile neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. F.; Xing, Zhi-Zhong; Luo, Shu

    2010-09-01

    Current cosmological data drop an interesting hint about the existence of sub-eV sterile neutrinos, which should be a part of the cosmic neutrino background (CνB). We point out that such light sterile neutrinos may leave a distinct imprint on the electron energy spectrum in the capture of relic electron neutrinos by means of radioactive beta-decaying nuclei. We examine possible signals of sterile neutrinos relative to active neutrinos, characterized by their masses and sensitive to their number densities, in the reaction ν+H3→He3+e- against the corresponding tritium beta decay. We stress that this kind of direct laboratory detection of the CνB and its sterile component might not be hopeless in the long term.

  20. Hardware-in-the-loop projector system for light detection and ranging sensor testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hajin J.; Naumann, Charles B.; Cornell, Michael C.

    2012-08-01

    Efforts in developing a synthetic environment for testing light detection and ranging (LADAR) sensors in a hardware-in-the-loop simulation are continuing at the Aviation and Missile Research, Engineering, and Development Center of the U.S. Army Research, Engineering and Development Command (RDECOM). Current activities have concentrated on evaluating the optical projection techniques for the LADAR synthetic environment. Schemes for generating the optical signals representing the individual pixels of the projection are of particular interest. Several approaches have been investigated and tested with emphasis on operating wavelength, intensity dynamic range and uniformity, and flexibility in pixel waveform generation. This paper will discuss some of the results from these current efforts at RDECOM's System Simulation and Development Directorate's Electro Optical Technology Development Laboratory.

  1. Optical detection of charge carriers in multilayer organic light-emitting diodes: Experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Book, K.; Nikitenko, V. R.; Bässler, H.; Elschner, A.

    2001-03-01

    We have investigated a multilayer organic light-emitting diode with 1,3,5-tris (N,N-bis-(4-methoxyphenyl)aminophenyl)-benzene acting as the hole transporting layer (HTL) and tris (8-hydroxy-quinolinolato) aluminum (Alq3) as the electron transporting layer. Positive charge carriers in the HTL were detected optically as a function of the applied bias. It was found that a hole injecting layer, consisting of 3,4 polyethylene-dioxy-thiophene doped with polystyrenesulfonate, forms an ohmic contact to the HTL by inducing a thin layer of holes in the interfacial region. An analytical model is developed to describe the observed carrier concentrations as well as the current-brightness-voltage characteristics quantitatively.

  2. Resolution of point sources of light as analyzed by quantum detection theory.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helstrom, C. W.

    1973-01-01

    The resolvability of point sources of incoherent thermal light is analyzed by quantum detection theory in terms of two hypothesis-testing problems. In the first, the observer must decide whether there are two sources of equal radiant power at given locations, or whether there is only one source of twice the power located midway between them. In the second problem, either one, but not both, of two point sources is radiating, and the observer must decide which it is. The decisions are based on optimum processing of the electromagnetic field at the aperture of an optical instrument. In both problems the density operators of the field under the two hypotheses do not commute. The error probabilities, determined as functions of the separation of the points and the mean number of received photons, characterize the ultimate resolvability of the sources.

  3. The resolution of point sources of light as analyzed by quantum detection theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helstrom, C. W.

    1972-01-01

    The resolvability of point sources of incoherent light is analyzed by quantum detection theory in terms of two hypothesis-testing problems. In the first, the observer must decide whether there are two sources of equal radiant power at given locations, or whether there is only one source of twice the power located midway between them. In the second problem, either one, but not both, of two point sources is radiating, and the observer must decide which it is. The decisions are based on optimum processing of the electromagnetic field at the aperture of an optical instrument. In both problems the density operators of the field under the two hypotheses do not commute. The error probabilities, determined as functions of the separation of the points and the mean number of received photons, characterize the ultimate resolvability of the sources.

  4. Direct detection of magnetostatic wave excitations in magnetostatic wave device structures by Brillouin light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, G.; Patton, C. E.

    1985-10-01

    The technique of Brillouin light scattering has been used to detect magnetostatic wave (MSW) excitations in MSW microwave device structures. The present results are for a signal-to-noise enhancer consisting of a microstrip transmission line in contact with a yttrium iron garnet film with the applied magnetic field parallel to the microstrip line. At low input microwave power levels, the MSW spectra at 4 GHz consisted of surface excitations with wave numbers from about 80 to 470/cm, with the propagation direction perpendicular to the microstrip line. At high power levels, parametric half-frequency MSW excitations were observed, accompanied by a decrease in the scattering of the surface MSW excitations at the pump frequency.

  5. Dual-wavelength light scattering for selective detection of volcanic ash particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurányi, Z.; Burtscher, H.; Loepfe, M.; Nenkov, M.; Weingartner, E.

    2015-08-01

    A new method is presented in this paper which analyses the scattered light of individual aerosol particles simultaneously at two different wavelengths in order to retrieve information on the particle type. We show that dust-like particles, such as volcanic ash, can be unambiguously discriminated from water droplets on a single particle level. As a future application of this method, the detection of volcanic ash particles should be possible in a humid atmosphere in the presence of cloud droplets. We show an example, how the characteristic behaviour of pure water's refractive index can be used to separate water droplets and dust-like particles which are commonly found in the micrometer size-range in the ambient air. The low real part of the water's refractive index around 2700-2800 nm results in low scattered light intensities compared to e.g. the visible wavelength range and this feature can be used for the particle identification. The two-wavelength measurement setup was theoretically and experimentally tested and studied. Theoretical calculations were done using Mie theory. Comparing the ratio of the scattered light at the two wavelengths (R value) for water droplets and different dust types (basalt, andesite, African mineral dust, sand, volcanic ash, pumice) showed at least 9 times higher values (on average 70 times) for water droplets than for the dust types at any diameter within the particle size range of 2-20 μm. The envisaged measurement setup was built up into a laboratory prototype and was tested with different types of aerosols. We generated aerosols from the following powders simulating dust-like particles: cement dust, ISO 12103-1 A1 Ultrafine Test Dust and Ash from the 2012 eruption of the Etna volcano. Our measurements verified the theoretical considerations, the median experimental R value is 8-21 times higher for water than for the "dust" particles.

  6. Direct detection signatures of self-interacting dark matter with a light mediator

    SciTech Connect

    Nobile, Eugenio Del; Kaplinghat, Manoj; Yu, Hai-Bo

    2015-10-27

    Self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) is a simple and well-motivated scenario that could explain long-standing puzzles in structure formation on small scales. If the required self-interaction arises through a light mediator (with mass ∼10 MeV) in the dark sector, this new particle must be unstable to avoid overclosing the universe. The decay of the light mediator could happen due to a weak coupling of the hidden and visible sectors, providing new signatures for direct detection experiments. The SIDM nuclear recoil spectrum is more peaked towards low energies compared to the usual case of contact interactions, because the mediator mass is comparable to the momentum transfer of nuclear recoils. We show that the SIDM signal could be distinguished from that of DM particles with contact interactions by considering the time-average energy spectrum in experiments employing different target materials, or the average and modulated spectra in a single experiment. Using current limits from LUX and SuperCDMS, we also derive strong bounds on the mixing parameter between hidden and visible sector.

  7. Direct detection of light “Ge-phobic” exothermic dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Gelmini, Graciela B.; Georgescu, Andreea; Huh, Ji-Haeng

    2014-07-15

    We present comparisons of direct dark matter (DM) detection data for light WIMPs with exothermic scattering with nuclei (exoDM), both assuming the Standard Halo Model (SHM) and in a halo model — independent manner. Exothermic interactions favor light targets, thus reducing the importance of upper limits derived from xenon targets, the most restrictive of which is at present the LUX limit. In our SHM analysis the CDMS-II-Si and CoGeNT regions become allowed by these bounds, however the recent SuperCDMS limit rejects both regions for exoDM with isospin-conserving couplings. An isospin-violating coupling of the exoDM, in particular one with a neutron to proton coupling ratio of −0.8 (which we call “Ge-phobic”), maximally reduces the DM coupling to germanium and allows the CDMS-II-Si region to become compatible with all bounds. This is also clearly shown in our halo-independent analysis.

  8. Halo-independent analysis of direct detection data for light WIMPs

    SciTech Connect

    Nobile, Eugenio Del; Gelmini, Graciela B.; Huh, Ji-Haeng; Gondolo, Paolo E-mail: gelmini@physics.ucla.edu E-mail: jhhuh@physics.ucla.edu

    2013-10-01

    We present a halo-independent analysis of direct detection data on ''light WIMPs'', i.e. weakly interacting massive particles with mass close to or below 10 GeV/c{sup 2}. We include new results from silicon CDMS detectors (bounds and excess events), the latest CoGeNT acceptances, and recent measurements of low sodium quenching factors in NaI crystals. We focus on light WIMPs with spin-independent isospin-conserving and isospin-violating interactions with nucleons. For these dark matter candidates we find that a low quenching factor would make the DAMA modulation incompatible with a reasonable escape velocity for the dark matter halo, and that the tension among experimental data tightens in both the isospin-conserving and isospin-violating scenarios. We also find that a new although milder tension appears between the CoGeNT and DAMA annual modulations on one side and the silicon excess events on the other, in that it seems difficult to interpret them as the modulated and unmodulated aspects of the same WIMP dark matter signal.

  9. Direct detection signatures of self-interacting dark matter with a light mediator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Nobile, Eugenio; Kaplinghat, Manoj; Yu, Hai-Bo

    2015-10-01

    Self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) is a simple and well-motivated scenario that could explain long-standing puzzles in structure formation on small scales. If the required self-interaction arises through a light mediator (with mass ~ 10 MeV) in the dark sector, this new particle must be unstable to avoid overclosing the universe. The decay of the light mediator could happen due to a weak coupling of the hidden and visible sectors, providing new signatures for direct detection experiments. The SIDM nuclear recoil spectrum is more peaked towards low energies compared to the usual case of contact interactions, because the mediator mass is comparable to the momentum transfer of nuclear recoils. We show that the SIDM signal could be distinguished from that of DM particles with contact interactions by considering the time-average energy spectrum in experiments employing different target materials, or the average and modulated spectra in a single experiment. Using current limits from LUX and SuperCDMS, we also derive strong bounds on the mixing parameter between hidden and visible sector.

  10. Comparison of serum free light chain and urine electrophoresis for the detection of the light chain component of monoclonal immunoglobulins in light chain and intact immunoglobulin multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Dejoie, Thomas; Attal, Michel; Moreau, Philippe; Harousseau, Jean-Luc; Avet-Loiseau, Herve

    2016-01-01

    Response criteria for multiple myeloma are based upon changes in monoclonal protein levels quantified using serum and/or urine protein electrophoresis. The latter lacks sensitivity at low monoclonal protein levels and since 2001, the serum free light chain test has been available and its clinical utility proven, yet guidelines have not recommended it as a replacement for urine assessment. Herein we evaluated responses using serum free light chain measurements and serum and urine electrophoresis after 2 and 4 cycles of therapy and after stem cell transplantation in 25 light chain and 157 intact immunoglobulin myeloma patients enrolled in the IFM 2007-02 MM trial. All 25 light chain patients had measurable disease by serum free light chain and urine methods at presentation. By contrast 98 out of 157 intact immunoglobulin patients had measurable disease by serum free light chain compared to 55 out of 157 by urine electrophoresis. In all patients there was substantial agreement between predicate (serum/urine protein electrophoresis) and test (serum protein electrophoresis and serum free light chain) methods for response assessment (Weighted Kappa=0.83). Urine immunofixation became negative in 47% light chain and 43% intact immunoglobulin patients after 2 cycles of therapy. At this time the serum free light chain ratio normalised in only 11% and 27% patients, respectively. In summary we found good agreement between methods for response assessment, but the serum free light chain test provided greater sensitivity than urine electrophoresis for monitoring. To our knowledge this is the first report comparing both methods for response assignment based on the International Myeloma Working Group guidelines. PMID:26635032

  11. Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Audin, L.

    1994-12-31

    EPAct covers a vast territory beyond lighting and, like all legislation, also contains numerous {open_quotes}favors,{close_quotes} compromises, and even some sleight-of-hand. Tucked away under Title XIX, for example, is an increase from 20% to 28% tax on gambling winnings, effective January 1, 1993 - apparently as a way to help pay for new spending listed elsewhere in the bill. Overall, it is a landmark piece of legislation, about a decade overdue. It remains to be seen how the Federal Government will enforce upgrading of state (or even their own) energy codes. There is no mention of funding for {open_quotes}energy police{close_quotes} in EPAct. Merely creating such a national standard, however, provides a target for those who sincerely wish to create an energy-efficient future.

  12. Derivative of the light frequency shift as a measure of spacetime curvature for gravitational wave detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Congedo, Giuseppe

    2015-04-01

    The measurement of frequency shifts for light beams exchanged between two test masses nearly in free fall is at the heart of gravitational-wave detection. It is envisaged that the derivative of the frequency shift is in fact limited by differential forces acting on those test masses. We calculate the derivative of the frequency shift with a fully covariant, gauge-independent and coordinate-free method. This method is general and does not require a congruence of nearby beams' null geodesics as done in previous work. We show that the derivative of the parallel transport is the only means by which gravitational effects shows up in the frequency shift. This contribution is given as an integral of the Riemann tensor—the only physical observable of curvature—along the beam's geodesic. The remaining contributions are the difference of velocities, the difference of nongravitational forces, and finally fictitious forces, either locally at the test masses or nonlocally integrated along the beam's geodesic. As an application relevant to gravitational-wave detection, we work out the frequency shift in the local Lorentz frame of nearby geodesics.

  13. Shoreline extraction from light detection and ranging digital elevation model data and aerial images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousef, Amr; Iftekharuddin, Khan M.; Karim, Mohammad A.

    2014-01-01

    There is an increased demand for understanding the accurate position of the shorelines. The automatic extraction of shorelines utilizing the digital elevation models (DEMs) obtained from light detection and ranging (LiDAR), aerial images, and multispectral images has become very promising. In this article, we develop two innovative algorithms that can effectively extract shorelines depending on the available data sources. The first is a multistep morphological technique that works on LiDAR DEM with respect to a tidal datum, whereas the second depends on the availability of training data to extract shorelines from LiDAR DEM fused with aerial images. Unlike similar techniques, the morphological approach detects and eliminates the outliers that result from waves, etc., by means of an anomaly test with neighborhood constraints. Additionally, it eliminates docks, bridges, and fishing piers along the extracted shorelines by means of Hough transform. The second approach extracts the shoreline by means of color space conversion of the aerial images and the support vector machines classifier to segment the fused data into water and land. We perform Monte-Carlo simulations to estimate the confidence interval for the error in shoreline position. Compared with other relevant techniques in literature, the proposed methods offer better accuracy in shoreline extraction.

  14. Three factors limiting the reliable detection of light by retinal ganglion cells of the cat

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, H. B.; Levick, W. R.

    1969-01-01

    1. Responses of cat retinal ganglion cells have been examined with a view to specifying the characteristics that limit the detection of light stimuli. 2. Threshold is defined as the weakest stimulus that can be reliably detected by examination of the output from a retinal ganglion cell; it depends upon (a) the quantum/spike ratio, which is the mean number of additional quantal absorptions required to produce an additional impulse, (b) the temporal course of the response, which determines the time interval within which the maintained discharge is modified, and (c) the statistical distribution of the number of impulses that occur in this time interval in the absence of the stimulus. 3. The quantum/spike ratio changes greatly when adapting luminance is changed, and this is the predominant factor accounting for changes in increment threshold. 4. The time course of the response changes with adaptation level and area of the stimulus. This may account for the changes in temporal integration that occur in analogous psychophysical experiments. 5. Changes in the irregularity of the maintained discharge also affect the threshold of single ganglion cells. This is only a minor factor in the conditions of most of our experiments, but it may be important when unstabilized images and non-equilibrium adaptation conditions are encountered. PMID:5761942

  15. Light WIMP Direct Detection Rates in Simulations of the Milky Way and Sagittarius Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purcell, Chris W.

    2013-07-01

    I discuss the analysis of self-consistent N-body simulations of the Milky Way disk and the ongoing disruption of the Sagittarius dwarf satellite, toward the study of the effect of Sagittarius tidal debris on dark matter detection experiments. We find that the nearby Sagittarius debris is likely to have a non-negligible influence on dark matter detection experiments even when the stellar debris is centered several kpc from the solar neighborhood. Relative to models without an infalling Sagittarius dwarf, the Sagittarius dark matter debris in our models induces an energy-dependent enhancement of direct search event rates of as much as ~20 - 45%, an energy-dependent reduction in the amplitude of the annual modulation of the event rate by as much as a factor of two, a shift in the phase of the annual modulation by as much as ~20 days, and a shift in the recoil energy at which the modulation reverses phase. These influences of Sagittarius are of general interest in the interpretation of dark matter searches, but may be particularly important in the case of relatively light (m_X < 20 GeV) dark matter because the Sagittarius stream impacts the solar system at high speed compared to the primary halo dark matter.

  16. Automatic detection of cone photoreceptors in split detector adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope images

    PubMed Central

    Cunefare, David; Cooper, Robert F.; Higgins, Brian; Katz, David F.; Dubra, Alfredo; Carroll, Joseph; Farsiu, Sina

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of the cone photoreceptor mosaic in the living retina is potentially useful for early diagnosis and prognosis of many ocular diseases. Non-confocal split detector based adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) imaging reveals the cone photoreceptor inner segment mosaics often not visualized on confocal AOSLO imaging. Despite recent advances in automated cone segmentation algorithms for confocal AOSLO imagery, quantitative analysis of split detector AOSLO images is currently a time-consuming manual process. In this paper, we present the fully automatic adaptive filtering and local detection (AFLD) method for detecting cones in split detector AOSLO images. We validated our algorithm on 80 images from 10 subjects, showing an overall mean Dice’s coefficient of 0.95 (standard deviation 0.03), when comparing our AFLD algorithm to an expert grader. This is comparable to the inter-observer Dice’s coefficient of 0.94 (standard deviation 0.04). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first validated, fully-automated segmentation method which has been applied to split detector AOSLO images. PMID:27231641

  17. Lenslet Array to Further Suppress Star Light for Direct Exoplanet Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, Qian; McElwain, Michael; Shiri, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Direct imaging plays a key role in the detection and characterization of exoplanets orbiting within its host star's habitable zone. Many innovative ideas for starlight suppression and wavefront control have been proposed and developed over the past decade. However, several technological challenges still lie ahead to achieve the required contrast, including controlling the observatory pointing performance, fabricating occulting masks with tight optical tolerances, developing wavefront control algorithms, controlling stray light, advancing single photon detecting detectors, and integrated system-level issues. This paper explores how a lenslet array and pinhole mask may be implemented to further suppress uncorrected starlight that leaks through the occulting mask. An external occulter, or star shade, is simulated to demonstrate this concept, although this approach can be implemented for internal coronagraphs as well. We describe how to use simple relay optics to control the scene near the inner working angle and the level of the suppression expected. Furthermore, if the lenslet array is the input to an integral field spectrograph, as planned for the WFIRST mission, the spectral content of the exoplanet atmospheres can be obtained to determine if the observed planet is habitable and ultimately, if it is inhabited.

  18. Automatic detection of cone photoreceptors in split detector adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope images.

    PubMed

    Cunefare, David; Cooper, Robert F; Higgins, Brian; Katz, David F; Dubra, Alfredo; Carroll, Joseph; Farsiu, Sina

    2016-05-01

    Quantitative analysis of the cone photoreceptor mosaic in the living retina is potentially useful for early diagnosis and prognosis of many ocular diseases. Non-confocal split detector based adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) imaging reveals the cone photoreceptor inner segment mosaics often not visualized on confocal AOSLO imaging. Despite recent advances in automated cone segmentation algorithms for confocal AOSLO imagery, quantitative analysis of split detector AOSLO images is currently a time-consuming manual process. In this paper, we present the fully automatic adaptive filtering and local detection (AFLD) method for detecting cones in split detector AOSLO images. We validated our algorithm on 80 images from 10 subjects, showing an overall mean Dice's coefficient of 0.95 (standard deviation 0.03), when comparing our AFLD algorithm to an expert grader. This is comparable to the inter-observer Dice's coefficient of 0.94 (standard deviation 0.04). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first validated, fully-automated segmentation method which has been applied to split detector AOSLO images. PMID:27231641

  19. Increased Detection of Colorectal Polyps in Screening Colonoscopy Using High Definition i-SCAN Compared with Standard White Light

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woo Jung; Park, Sang Young; Park, Iksoo; Lee, Wook Jin; Park, Jaechan; Chon, Nuri; Oh, Tak Geun; Kim, Kwang Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of high definition (HD) i-SCAN for colorectal polyp detection in screening colonoscopy. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the records of 501 patients who had undergone screening colonoscopy performed by three endoscopists with either HD i-SCAN (n=149) or standard white light (n=352) from January 2, 2014 through June 30, 2014. Patient information and inter-endoscopist variation as well as polyp number, endoscopic findings, and pathologic characteristics were reviewed. Results: The detection rates of colorectal and neoplastic polyps were significantly higher using HD i-SCAN than standard white light colonoscopy (52% vs. 38.1%, p=0.004 for colorectal polyps; and 37.2% vs. 27.9%, p=0.041 for neoplastic polyps). Analysis of endoscopic findings revealed no difference in detected polyp size between HD i-SCAN and standard white light colonoscopy (4.59±2.35 mm vs. 4.82±2.81 mm, p=0.739), but non-protruding polyps were more commonly detected by i-SCAN than by standard white light colonoscopy (24.6% vs. 13.5%, p=0.007). Conclusions: Colonoscopy using HD i-SCAN had a significantly higher detection rate of colorectal polyps, including neoplastic polyps, because of improved sensitivity for detecting non-protruding lesions. PMID:26855927

  20. Detection of Biomass in New York City Aerosols: Light Scattering and Optical Fluorescence Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niebauer, M.; Alimova, A.; Katz, A.; Xu, M.; Rudolph, E.; Steiner, J.; Alfano, R. R.

    2005-12-01

    Optical spectroscopy is an ideal method for detecting bacteria and spores in real time. Optical fluorescence spectroscopy examination of New York City aerosols is used to quantify the mass of bacteria spores present in air masses collected at 14 liters/minute onto silica fiber filters, and on silica fiber ribbons using an Environmental Beta Attenuation Monitor manufactured by MetOne Instruments configured for the PM2.5 fraction. Dipicolinic acid (DPA), a molecule found primarily in bacterial spores, is the most characteristic component of spores in trial experiments on over 200 collected aerosol samples. DPA is extracted from the spores using a heat bath and chelated with Terbium. The DPA:Tb is detected by measuring its characteristic fluorescence with emission bands at 490, 545 and 585 nm for 270 nm excitation. Light scattering also measures the size distribution for a number of a variety of bacteria - Bacillus subtilis (rod shaped), Staphylococcus aureus (spherical) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (short rods) establishing that optical techniques satisfactorily distinguish populations based on their variable morphology. Size and morphology are obtained by applying a variation of the Gaussian Ray Approximation theory of anomalous diffraction theory to an analysis of the transmission spectra in the range of 0.4 to 1.0 microns. In test experiments, the refractive index of the inner spore core of Bacillus subtilis decreases from 1.51 to 1.39 while the spore radius enlarges from 0.38 to 0.6 micrometers. Optical determinations are verified by oil-immersion techniques and by scanning electron microscope measurements. Characterization of spores, germinating spore materials, and bacteria is considered vital to tracing bacteria in the environment, for the development of life-detection systems for planetary exploration, monitoring pathogens in environmental systems, and for the preparation of anti-terrorism strategies.

  1. Reusable light-emitting-diode induced chemiluminescence aptasensor for highly sensitive and selective detection of riboflavin.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shuxia; Zhang, Xinfeng; Liu, Weiwei; Sun, Yonghua; Zhang, Heliang

    2013-05-15

    A novel reusable chemiluminescence aptasensor was developed based on aptamer recognition coupled with light-emitting-diode induced chemiluminescence (LED-CL) detection. The sensing approach was based on the design that the model analyte riboflavin (Rf) in sample solutions was captured by the immobilized aptamers and then eluted simply with alkaline luminol solution to catalyze the CL reaction between luminol and dissolved oxygen under high power LED irradiation. This design allowed a very simple (branch-free) flow way for the CL sensing system. The CL intensity versus the Rf concentration was linear in the range from 0.03 to 5ngmL(-1) with a limit of detection (LOD) down low to 8pgmL(-1). Without renewing the aptamer, the relative standard deviation (RSD) for seven consecutive detections is 2.33%; the sensor also showed good stability without performance deterioration after >100 times use. Up to 10000-fold of K(+), Na(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and Fe(3+), 5000-fold for glucose and bovine serum albumin, 1000-fold of uric acid, 1500-fold of ascorbic acid (added with Fe(3+)), 100-fold of flavin mononucleotide and 200-fold of flavin adenine dinucleotide caused no significant interference with the determination of 0.5ngmL(-1) Rf. The sensor was applied for analysis of Rf in urine and food samples with the recovery of 94-103%. The advantages of reusability, simplicity, high sensitivity and selectivity provided by the LED-CL aptasensor will make it a good alternative tool for biological and food analysis. PMID:23298628

  2. Optimal experimental design for the detection of light atoms from high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy images

    SciTech Connect

    Gonnissen, J.; De Backer, A.; Martinez, G. T.; Van Aert, S.; Dekker, A. J. den; Rosenauer, A.; Sijbers, J.

    2014-08-11

    We report an innovative method to explore the optimal experimental settings to detect light atoms from scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images. Since light elements play a key role in many technologically important materials, such as lithium-battery devices or hydrogen storage applications, much effort has been made to optimize the STEM technique in order to detect light elements. Therefore, classical performance criteria, such as contrast or signal-to-noise ratio, are often discussed hereby aiming at improvements of the direct visual interpretability. However, when images are interpreted quantitatively, one needs an alternative criterion, which we derive based on statistical detection theory. Using realistic simulations of technologically important materials, we demonstrate the benefits of the proposed method and compare the results with existing approaches.

  3. Effect of light intensity on food detection in captive great fruit-eating bats, Artibeus lituratus (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae).

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Eduardo de A; Pessoa, Valdir F; Aguiar, Ludmilla M S; Pessoa, Daniel M A

    2014-11-01

    Bats are known for their well-developed echolocation. However, several experiments focused on the bat visual system have shown evidence of the importance of visual cues under specific luminosity for different aspects of bat biology, including foraging behavior. This study examined the foraging abilities of five female great fruit-eating bats, Artibeus lituratus, under different light intensities. Animals were given a series of tasks to test for discrimination between a food target against an inedible background, under light levels similar to the twilight illumination (18lx), the full moon (2lx) and complete darkness (0lx). We found that the bats required a longer time frame to detect targets under a light intensity similar to twilight, possibly due to inhibitory effects present under a more intense light level. Additionally, bats were more efficient at detecting and capturing targets under light conditions similar to the luminosity of a full moon, suggesting that visual cues were important for target discrimination. These results demonstrate that light intensity affects foraging behavior and enables the use of visual cues for food detection in frugivorous bats. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neotropical Behaviour. PMID:25153795

  4. Event Detection Using Mobile Phone Mass GPS Data and Their Reliavility Verification by Dmsp/ols Night Light Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuki, Akiyama; Satoshi, Ueyama; Ryosuke, Shibasaki; Adachi, Ryuichiro

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we developed a method to detect sudden population concentration on a certain day and area, that is, an "Event," all over Japan in 2012 using mass GPS data provided from mobile phone users. First, stay locations of all phone users were detected using existing methods. Second, areas and days where Events occurred were detected by aggregation of mass stay locations into 1-km-square grid polygons. Finally, the proposed method could detect Events with an especially large number of visitors in the year by removing the influences of Events that occurred continuously throughout the year. In addition, we demonstrated reasonable reliability of the proposed Event detection method by comparing the results of Event detection with light intensities obtained from the night light images from the DMSP/OLS night light images. Our method can detect not only positive events such as festivals but also negative events such as natural disasters and road accidents. These results are expected to support policy development of urban planning, disaster prevention, and transportation management.

  5. Detection of sarcocystosis in goats in Malaysia by light microscopy, histology, and PCR.

    PubMed

    Kutty, Methil Kannan; Latif, Baha; Muslim, Azdayanti; Hussaini, Jamal; Daher, Aqil Mohammad; Heo, Chong Chin; Abdullah, Sulaiman

    2015-04-01

    A number of methods have been used for the detection of the presence of microsarcocysts in animals, but little information exists on the value between the various methods. This study therefore examined for Sarcocystis spp. using three different methods in 105 samples of skeletal muscle collected from goats slaughtered in an abattoir in Selangor, Malaysia from January to February 2014. Three methods were used, direct light microscopy of squashed fresh muscle tissues; histological examination of fixed, sectioned, and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-stained samples of muscle; and molecular identification by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Of the 105 tissue samples, 55 (52.38 %) were positive by light microscopy (LM), 46 (43.8 %) by histology, and 95 (90.48 %) by PCR. Only 29 (27.6 %) and 5 (4.76 %) samples were positive and negative, respectively, by all three methods. The cysts were elongated to a spindle shape with a mean size of 393.30 × 81.6 μm and containing banana-shaped bradyzoites of size 12.32 × 2.08 μm. The wall of the cyst was radially striated with a thickness of 2.83 μm. Samples were tested for the presence of Sarcocystis-specific 18S rRNA and were identified as Sarcocystis capracanis. Of the three methods used, the PCR test appears to be the most useful method for the diagnosis of sarcocystosis especially for species identification. PMID:25740651

  6. A broadband absorption spectrometer using light emitting diodes for ultrasensitive, in situ trace gas detection

    SciTech Connect

    Langridge, Justin M.; Shillings, Alexander J. L.; Jones, Roderic L.; Ball, Stephen M.

    2008-12-15

    A broadband absorption spectrometer has been developed for highly sensitive and target-selective in situ trace gas measurements. The instrument employs two distinct modes of operation: (i) broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (BBCEAS) is used to quantify the concentration of gases in sample mixtures from their characteristic absorption features, and (ii) periodic measurements of the cavity mirrors' reflectivity are made using step-scan phase shift cavity ringdown spectroscopy (PSCRDS). The latter PSCRDS method provides a stand-alone alternative to the more usual method of determining mirror reflectivities by measuring BBCEAS absorption spectra for calibration samples of known composition. Moreover, the instrument's two modes of operation use light from the same light emitting diode transmitted through the cavity in the same optical alignment, hence minimizing the potential for systematic errors between mirror reflectivity determinations and concentration measurements. The ability of the instrument to quantify absorber concentrations is tested in instrument intercomparison exercises for NO{sub 2} (versus a laser broadband cavity ringdown spectrometer) and for H{sub 2}O (versus a commercial hygrometer). A method is also proposed for calculating effective absorption cross sections for fitting the differential structure in BBCEAS spectra due to strong, narrow absorption lines that are under-resolved and hence exhibit non-Beer-Lambert law behavior at the resolution of the BBCEAS measurements. This approach is tested on BBCEAS spectra of water vapor's 4v+{delta} absorption bands around 650 nm. The most immediate analytical application of the present instrument is in quantifying the concentration of reactive trace gases in the ambient atmosphere. The instrument's detection limits for NO{sub 3} as a function of integration time are considered in detail using an Allan variance analysis. Experiments under laboratory conditions produce a 1{sigma} detection limit

  7. Grating light reflection spectroelectrochemistry for detection of trace amounts of aromatic hydrocarbons in water

    SciTech Connect

    KELLY,MICHAEL J.; SWEATT,WILLIAM C.; KEMME,SHANALYN A.; KASUNIC,K.J.; BLAIR,DIANNA S.; ZAIDI,S.H.; MCNEIL,J.R.; BURGESS,L.W.; BRODSKY,A.M.; SMITH,S.A.

    2000-04-01

    Grating light reflection spectroscopy (GLRS) is an emerging technique for spectroscopic analysis and sensing. A transmission diffraction grating is placed in contact with the sample to be analyzed, and an incident light beam is directed onto the grating. At certain angles of incidence, some of the diffracted orders are transformed from traveling waves to evanescent waves. This occurs at a specific wavelength that is a function of the grating period and the complex index of refraction of the sample. The intensities of diffracted orders are also dependent on the sample's complex index of refraction. The authors describe the use of GLRS, in combination with electrochemical modulation of the grating, for the detection of trace amounts of aromatic hydrocarbons. The diffraction grating consisted of chromium lines on a fused silica substrate. The depth of the grating lines was 1 {micro}m, the grating period was 1 {micro}m, and the duty cycle was 50%. Since chromium was not suitable for electrochemical modulation of the analyte concentration, a 200 nm gold layer was deposited over the entire grating. This gold layer slightly degraded the transmission of the grating, but provided satisfactory optical transparency for the spectroelectrochemical experiments. The grating was configured as the working electrode in an electrochemical cell containing water plus trace amounts of the aromatic hydrocarbon analytes. The grating was then electrochemically modulated via cyclic voltammetry waveforms, and the normalized intensity of the zero order reflection was simultaneously measured. The authors discuss the lower limits of detection (LLD) for two analytes, 7-dimethylamino-1,2-benzophenoxazine (Meldola's Blue dye) and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), probed with an incident HeNe laser beam ({lambda} = 543.5 nm) at an incident angle of 52.5{degree}. The LLD for 7-dimethylamino-1,2-benzophenoxazine is approximately 50 parts per billion (ppb), while the LLD for TNT is approximately 50 parts

  8. Enhancement of light yield and stability of radio-pure tetraphenyl-butadiene based coatings for VUV light detection in cryogenic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudis, L.; Benato, G.; Dressler, R.; Piastra, F.; Usoltsev, I.; Walter, M.

    2015-09-01

    The detection of VUV scintillation light in (liquid) argon (LAr) detectors commonly includes a reflector with a fluorescent coating, converting UV photons to visible light. The light yield of these detectors depends directly on the conversion efficiency. Several coating/reflector combinations were produced using VM2000, a specular reflecting multi-layer polymer, and Tetratex®, a diffuse reflecting PTFE fabric, as reflector foils. The light yield of these coatings was optimised and has been measured in a dedicated liquid argon setup built at the University of Zurich. It employs a small, 1.3 kg LAr cell viewed by a 3-inch, low radioactivity PMT of type R11065-10 from Hamamatsu. The cryogenic stability of these coatings was additionally studied. The optimum reflector/coating combination was found to be Tetratex® dip-coated with Tetraphenyl-butadiene with a thickness of 0.9 mg/cm2, resulting in a 3.6 times higher light yield compared to uncoated VM2000. Its performance was stable in long-term measurements, performed up to 100 days in liquid argon. This coated reflector was also investigated concerning radioactive impurities and found to be suitable for current and upcoming low-background experiments. Therefore it is used for the liquid argon veto in Phase II of the GERDA neutrinoless double beta decay experiment.

  9. Non-invasive detection of laser-induced retinal injury through the vitreous using dynamic light scattering (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Naiman, Melissa; Bouhenni, Rachida; Dunmire, Jeffery; Liu, Ying; Rafiq, Qundeel; Edward, Deepak; Gothard, David

    2016-03-01

    Laser radiation entering the eye has the potential of damaging the retina. As an inflammatory response, the proteins can rush to the lesion site created by laser exposure. We explore the hypothesis if these proteins can be detected non-invasively. In this preliminary study, we developed a new brief-case size dynamic light scattering instrument to detect these proteins in-vivo in the rabbit vitreous. The results were validated with bio-chemical analysis.

  10. Rayleigh light scattering detection of three α1-adrenoceptor antagonists coupled with high performance liquid chromatograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ai Ping; Peng, Huanjun; Peng, Jing Dong; Zhou, Ming Qiong; Zhang, Jing

    2015-08-01

    Herein, a Rayleigh light-scattering (RLS) detection method combined with high performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC) without any post-column probe was developed for the separation and determination of three α1-adrenoceptor antagonists. The quantitative analysis is benefiting from RLS signal enhancement upon addition of methanol which induced molecular aggregation to form an hydrophobic interface between aggregates and water that produce a sort of superficial enhanced scattering effect. A good chromatographic separation among the compounds was achieved using a Gemini 5u C18 reversed phase column (250 mm × 4.6 mm; 4 μm) with a mobile phase consisting of methanol and ammonium acetate-formic acid buffer solution (25 mM; pH = 3.0) at the flow rate of 0.7 mL min-1. The RLS signal was monitored at λex = λem = 354 nm. A limit of detection (LOD) of 0.065-0.70 μg L-1 was reached and a linear range was found between peak height and concentration in the range of 0.75-15 μg L-1 for doxazosin mesylate (DOX), 0.075-3.0 μg L-1 for prazosin hydrochloride (PRH), and 0.25-5 μg L-1 for terazosin hydrochloride (TEH), with linear regression coefficients all above 0.999. Recoveries from spiked urine samples were 88.4-99.0% which is within acceptable limits. The proposed method is convenient, reliable and sensitive which has been used successfully in human urine samples.

  11. Narrowband light detection via internal quantum efficiency manipulation of organic photodiodes.

    PubMed

    Armin, Ardalan; Jansen-van Vuuren, Ross D; Kopidakis, Nikos; Burn, Paul L; Meredith, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Spectrally selective light detection is vital for full-colour and near-infrared (NIR) imaging and machine vision. This is not possible with traditional broadband-absorbing inorganic semiconductors without input filtering, and is yet to be achieved for narrowband absorbing organic semiconductors. We demonstrate the first sub-100 nm full-width-at-half-maximum visible-blind red and NIR photodetectors with state-of-the-art performance across critical response metrics. These devices are based on organic photodiodes with optically thick junctions. Paradoxically, we use broadband-absorbing organic semiconductors and utilize the electro-optical properties of the junction to create the narrowest NIR-band photoresponses yet demonstrated. In this context, these photodiodes outperform the encumbent technology (input filtered inorganic semiconductor diodes) and emerging technologies such as narrow absorber organic semiconductors or quantum nanocrystals. The design concept allows for response tuning and is generic for other spectral windows. Furthermore, it is material-agnostic and applicable to other disordered and polycrystalline semiconductors. PMID:25721323

  12. Ultrasensitive and label-free molecular level detection enabled by light phase control in magnetoplasmonic nanoantennas

    PubMed Central

    Maccaferri, Nicolò; Gregorczyk, Keith; de Oliveira, Thales V. A. G.; Kataja, Mikko; van Dijken, Sebastiaan; Pirzadeh, Zhaleh; Dmitriev, Alexandre; Åkerman, Johan; Knez, Mato; Vavassori, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Systems allowing label-free molecular detection are expected to have enormous impact on biochemical sciences. Research focuses on materials and technologies based on exploiting localized surface plasmon resonances in metallic nanostructures. The reason for this focused attention is their suitability for single molecule sensing, arising from intrinsically nanoscopic sensing volume, and the high sensitivity to the local environment. Here we propose an alternative route, which enables radically improved sensitivity compared torecently reported plasmon-based sensors. Such high sensitivity is achieved by exploiting the control of the phase of light in magnetoplasmonic nanoantennas. We demonstrate a manifold improvement of refractometric sensing figure-of-merit. Most remarkably, we show a raw surface sensitivity (i.e., without applying fitting procedures) of two orders of magnitude higher than the current values reported for nanoplasmonic sensors. Such sensitivity corresponds to a mass of ~0.8 ag per nanoantenna of polyamide-6.6 (n=1.51), which is representative for a large variety of polymers, peptides and proteins. PMID:25639190

  13. Narrowband light detection via internal quantum efficiency manipulation of organic photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armin, Ardalan; Jansen-van Vuuren, Ross D.; Kopidakis, Nikos; Burn, Paul L.; Meredith, Paul

    2015-02-01

    Spectrally selective light detection is vital for full-colour and near-infrared (NIR) imaging and machine vision. This is not possible with traditional broadband-absorbing inorganic semiconductors without input filtering, and is yet to be achieved for narrowband absorbing organic semiconductors. We demonstrate the first sub-100 nm full-width-at-half-maximum visible-blind red and NIR photodetectors with state-of-the-art performance across critical response metrics. These devices are based on organic photodiodes with optically thick junctions. Paradoxically, we use broadband-absorbing organic semiconductors and utilize the electro-optical properties of the junction to create the narrowest NIR-band photoresponses yet demonstrated. In this context, these photodiodes outperform the encumbent technology (input filtered inorganic semiconductor diodes) and emerging technologies such as narrow absorber organic semiconductors or quantum nanocrystals. The design concept allows for response tuning and is generic for other spectral windows. Furthermore, it is material-agnostic and applicable to other disordered and polycrystalline semiconductors.

  14. Characterizing Protein Complexes with UV absorption, Light Scattering, and Refractive Index Detection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trainoff, Steven

    2009-03-01

    Many modern pharmaceuticals and naturally occurring biomolecules consist of complexes of proteins and polyethylene glycol or carbohydrates. In the case of vaccine development, these complexes are often used to induce or amplify immune responses. For protein therapeutics they are used to modify solubility and function, or to control the rate of degradation and elimination of a drug from the body. Characterizing the stoichiometry of these complexes is an important industrial problem that presents a formidable challenge to analytical instrument designers. Traditional analytical methods, such as using florescent tagging, chemical assays, and mass spectrometry perturb the system so dramatically that the complexes are often destroyed or uncontrollably modified by the measurement. A solution to this problem consists of fractionating the samples and then measuring the fractions using sequential non-invasive detectors that are sensitive to different components of the complex. We present results using UV absorption, which is primarily sensitive to the protein fraction, Light Scattering, which measures the total weight average molar mass, and Refractive Index detection, which measures the net concentration. We also present a solution of the problem inter-detector band-broadening problem that has heretofore made this approach impractical. Presented will be instrumentation and an analysis method that overcome these obstacles and make this technique a reliable and robust way of non-invasively characterizing these industrially important compounds.

  15. Accelerated light-induced degradation for detecting copper contamination in p-type silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Inglese, Alessandro Savin, Hele; Lindroos, Jeanette

    2015-08-03

    Copper is a harmful metal impurity that significantly impacts the performance of silicon-based devices if present in active regions. In this contribution, we propose a fast method consisting of simultaneous illumination and annealing for the detection of copper contamination in p-type silicon. Our results show that, within minutes, such method is capable of producing a significant reduction of the minority carrier lifetime. A spatial distribution map of copper contamination can then be obtained through the lifetime values measured before and after degradation. In order to separate the effect of the light-activated copper defects from the other metastable complexes in low resistivity Cz-silicon, we carried out a dark anneal at 200 °C, which is known to fully recover the boron-oxygen defect. Similar to the boron-oxygen behavior, we show that the dark anneal also recovers the copper defects. However, the recovery is only partial and it can be used to identify the possible presence of copper contamination.

  16. Light Detection and Ranging-Based Terrain Navigation: A Concept Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Jacob; UijtdeHaag, Maarten; vanGraas, Frank; Young, Steve

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of Airborne Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) equipment for terrain navigation. Airborne LiDAR is a relatively new technology used primarily by the geo-spatial mapping community to produce highly accurate and dense terrain elevation maps. In this paper, the term LiDAR refers to a scanning laser ranger rigidly mounted to an aircraft, as opposed to an integrated sensor system that consists of a scanning laser ranger integrated with Global Positioning System (GPS) and Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) data. Data from the laser range scanner and IMU will be integrated with a terrain database to estimate the aircraft position and data from the laser range scanner will be integrated with GPS to estimate the aircraft attitude. LiDAR data was collected using NASA Dryden's DC-8 flying laboratory in Reno, NV and was used to test the proposed terrain navigation system. The results of LiDAR-based terrain navigation shown in this paper indicate that airborne LiDAR is a viable technology enabler for fully autonomous aircraft navigation. The navigation performance is highly dependent on the quality of the terrain databases used for positioning and therefore high-resolution (2 m post-spacing) data was used as the terrain reference.

  17. Light-sheet photoacoustic microscopy (LIS-PAM) with optical ultrasound detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuster, Robert; Slezak, Paul; Paltauf, Guenther

    2016-03-01

    Photoacoustic (or optoacoustic) microscopy has great potential as a diagnostic tool in biomedical research. For in vivo imaging, an important requirement is to keep the measurement time as short as possible. In light-sheet photoacoustic microscopy (LIS-PAM) a cylindrical lens illuminates a thin section perpendicular to the sample surface with a short laser pulse and a projection of the excited acoustic wave pattern leaving the sample is recorded with a camera. From the recorded data, a B-scan photoacoustic image is obtained by applying a two-dimensional reconstruction algorithm, without requiring any mechanical scanning. Hence, LIS-PAM is capable of real-time B-scan imaging with acoustical resolution within the individual B-scans and optical out of plane resolution up to a depth limited by optical diffusion. A 3D image is composed of reconstructed B-scan images recorded while scanning the excitation line along the sample surface. Using a camera with 200 Hz frame rate a C-scan image (5x5 mm2 field of view) can be recorded in less than 5 seconds (without averaging). The achievable sensitivity and resolution of the optical phase contrast detection system were estimated theoretically with 0.34 kPa mm without averaging and 30 μm, respectively. A first experiment on a phantom that mimics tissue properties shows the applicability of this technique for in-vivo imaging.

  18. Silicon photomultipliers for improved detection of low light levels in miniature near-infrared spectroscopy instruments.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, R; Braun, F; Achtnich, T; Lambercy, O; Gassert, R; Wolf, M

    2013-05-01

    Silicon photomultipliers are novel solid state photodetectors that recently became commercially available. The goal of this paper was to investigate their suitability for low light level detection in miniaturized functional near-infrared spectroscopy instruments. Two measurement modules with a footprint of 26×26 mm(2) were built, and the signal-to-noise ratio was assessed for variable source-detector separations between 25 and 65 mm on phantoms with similar optical properties to those of a human head. These measurements revealed that the signal-to-noise ratio of the raw signal was superior to an empirically derived design requirement for source-detector separations up to 50 mm. An arterial arm occlusion was also performed on one of the authors in vivo, to induce reproducible hemodynamic changes which confirmed the validity of the measured signals. The proposed use of silicon photomultipliers in functional near-infrared spectroscopy bears large potential for future development of precise, yet compact and modular instruments, and affords improvements of the source-detector separation by 67% compared to the commonly used 30 mm. PMID:23667783

  19. A force measurement instrument for optical tweezers based on the detection of light momentum changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farré, Arnau; Marsà, Ferran; Montes-Usategui, Mario

    2014-09-01

    In this work, we present and discuss several developments implemented in an instrument that uses the detection of the light momentum change for measuring forces in an optical trap. A system based on this principle provides a direct determination of this magnitude regardless of the positional response of the sample under the effect of an external force, and it is therefore to be preferred when in situ calibrations of the trap stiffness are not attainable or are difficult to achieve. The possibility to obtain this information without relying upon a harmonic model of the force is more general and can be used in a wider range of situations. Forces can be measured on non-spherical samples or non-Gaussian beams, on complex and changing environments, such as the interior of cells, or on samples with unknown properties (size, viscosity, etc.). However, the practical implementation of the method entails some difficulties due to the strict conditions in the design and operation of an instrument based on this method. We have focused on some particularly conflicting points. We developed a process and a mechanism to determine and systematically set the correct axial position of the device. We further analyzed and corrected the non-uniform transmittance of the optical system and we finally compensated for the variations in the sensor responsivity with temperature. With all these improvements, we obtained an accuracy of ~5% in force measurements for samples of different kinds.

  20. Iron oxide nanozyme catalyzed synthesis of fluorescent polydopamine for light-up Zn(2+) detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Biwu; Han, Xiao; Liu, Juewen

    2016-07-14

    Fluorescent polydopamine (FPD) is an interesting material with excellent biocompatibility. However, its preparation is currently a lengthy and potentially dangerous process. We herein employ magnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles as a peroxidase-mimicking nanozyme to produce FPD under mild conditions. Different from previous protocols using multiple steps with up to 6% (∼2 M) H2O2, this preparation takes place in a single step with just 5 mM H2O2 at room temperature. The oxidized product shows excitation-wavelength-dependent emission peaks, similar to previous reports. The reaction kinetics, pH, temperature, and ionic strength are individually optimized. Among a diverse range of other nanomaterials tested, including Fe2O3, CeO2, CoO, Co3O4, NiO, TiO2, gold nanoparticles, and graphene oxide, Fe2O3 and graphene oxide yielded relatively weak emission, while the rest of the materials failed to produce FPD. The Fe3O4 nanoparticles retained ∼90% catalytic activity even after ten cycles of synthesis. Finally, Zn(2+) can enhance the fluorescence of FPD under 360 nm excitation but not under 480 nm excitation, leading to a sensitive light-up sensor with a detection limit of 60 nM Zn(2+). Therefore, this work has demonstrated not only a novel use of nanozymes, but also an interesting application of FPD. PMID:27364882

  1. Detecting positive surgical margins of prostate tissues using elastic light single-scattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canpolat, Murat; Denkçeken, Tuba; Başsorgun, Ibrahim; Yücel, Selçuk; Çiftçioğlu, M. A.; Baykara, Mehment

    2011-09-01

    Elastic light single-scattering spectroscopy (ELSSS) system with a single optical fiber probe was employed to differentiate cancerous prostate tissue from non-cancerous prostate tissue ex-vivo just after radical prostatectomy. First, ELSSS spectra were acquired from cancerous prostate tissue to define its spectral features. Then, spectra were acquired from surgical margins of excised prostate tissue to detect positive surgical margins based on the spectral features of the spectra taken from cancerous prostate tissues. Of the total 128 tissue samples were evaluated from 18 patients by ELSSS system. Comparing of histopathology results and ELSSS measurements revealed that sign of the spectral slopes of cancerous prostate tissue is negative and non-cancerous tissue is positive in the wavelength range from 450 to 750 nm. Sign of the spectral slopes were used as a discrimination parameter between cancerous and non-cancerous prostate tissues. Based on the correlation between histopathology results and sign of the spectral slopes, ELSSS system differentiates cancerous prostate tissue from non-cancerous with a sensitivity of 0.97 and a specificity of 0.87.

  2. Detecting positive surgical margins of prostate tissues using elastic light single-scattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canpolat, Murat; Denkçeken, Tuba; Başsorgun, İbrahim; Yücel, Selçuk; Çiftçioğlu, M. A.; Baykara, Mehment

    2012-02-01

    Elastic light single-scattering spectroscopy (ELSSS) system with a single optical fiber probe was employed to differentiate cancerous prostate tissue from non-cancerous prostate tissue ex-vivo just after radical prostatectomy. First, ELSSS spectra were acquired from cancerous prostate tissue to define its spectral features. Then, spectra were acquired from surgical margins of excised prostate tissue to detect positive surgical margins based on the spectral features of the spectra taken from cancerous prostate tissues. Of the total 128 tissue samples were evaluated from 18 patients by ELSSS system. Comparing of histopathology results and ELSSS measurements revealed that sign of the spectral slopes of cancerous prostate tissue is negative and non-cancerous tissue is positive in the wavelength range from 450 to 750 nm. Sign of the spectral slopes were used as a discrimination parameter between cancerous and non-cancerous prostate tissues. Based on the correlation between histopathology results and sign of the spectral slopes, ELSSS system differentiates cancerous prostate tissue from non-cancerous with a sensitivity of 0.97 and a specificity of 0.87.

  3. Probing Solid-State Nanopores with Light for the Detection of Unlabeled Analytes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Nanopore sensing has enabled label-free single-molecule measurements on a wide variety of analytes, including DNA, RNA, and protein complexes. Much progress has been made toward biotechnological applications; however, electrically probing the ion current introduces nonideal noise components. Here we further develop a method to couple an ionic current to a photon-by-photon counting of fluorescent signal from Ca2+-sensitive dyes and demonstrate label-free optical detection of biopolymer translocation through solid-state nanopores using TIRF and confocal microscopy. We show that by fine adjustment of the CaCl2 gradient, EGTA concentration, and voltage, the optical signals can be localized to the immediate vicinity of the pore. Consequently, the noise spectral density distribution in the optical signal exhibits a nearly flat distribution throughout the entire frequency range. With the use of high-speed photon counting devices in confocal microscopy and higher photon count rates using stronger light sources, we can improve the signal-to-noise ratio of signal acquisition, while the use of wide-field imaging in TIRF can allow for simultaneous quantitative imaging of large arrays of nanopores. PMID:25363680

  4. Non-invasive timing of gas gun projectiles with light detection and ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, P. M.; Bartram, B. D.; Gibson, L. L.; Wu, M.; Dattelbaum, D. M.

    2014-05-01

    We have developed a Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) diagnostic to track the position of a projectile inside of a gas gun launch tube in real-time. This capability permits the generation of precisely timed trigger pulses useful for triggering high-latency diagnostics such as a flash lamp-pumped laser. An initial feasibility test was performed using a 72 mm bore diameter single-stage gas gun routinely used for dynamic research at Los Alamos. A 655 nm pulsed diode laser operating at a pulse repetition rate of 100 kHz was used to interrogate the position of the moving projectile in real-time. The position of the projectile in the gun barrel was tracked over a distance of ~ 3 meters prior to impact. The position record showed that the projectile moved at a velocity of 489 m/s prior to impacting the target. This velocity was in good agreement with independent measurements of the projectile velocity by photon Doppler velocimetry and timing of the passage of the projectile through optical marker beams positioned at the muzzle of the gun. The time-to-amplitude conversion electronics used enable the LIDAR data to be processed in real-time to generate trigger pulses at preset separations between the projectile and target.

  5. Light-emitting diode and laser fluorescence-based devices in detecting occlusal caries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Jonas A.; Hug, Isabel; Neuhaus, Klaus W.; Lussi, Adrian

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the performance of two light-emitting diode (LED)- and two laser fluorescence-based devices in detecting occlusal caries in vitro. Ninety-seven permanent molars were assessed twice by two examiners using two LED- (Midwest Caries - MID and VistaProof - VP) and two laser fluorescence-based (DIAGNOdent 2095 - LF and DIAGNOdent pen 2190 - LFpen) devices. After measuring, the teeth were histologically prepared and classified according to lesion extension. At D1 the specificities were 0.76 (LF and LFpen), 0.94 (MID), and 0.70 (VP); the sensitivities were 0.70 (LF), 0.62 (LFpen), 0.31 (MID), and 0.75 (VP). At D3 threshold the specificities were 0.88 (LF), 0.87 (LFpen), 0.90 (MID), and 0.70 (VP); the sensitivities were 0.63 (LF and LFpen), 0.70 (MID), and 0.96 (VP). Spearman's rank correlations with histology were 0.56 (LF), 0.51 (LFpen), 0.55 (MID), and 0.58 (VP). Inter- and intraexaminer ICC values were high and varied from 0.83 to 0.90. Both LF devices seemed to be useful auxiliary tools to the conventional methods, presenting good reproducibility and better accuracy at D3 threshold. MID was not able to differentiate sound surfaces from enamel caries and VP still needs improvement on the cut-off limits for its use.

  6. Bone Fragment Detection in Chicken Breast Fillets using Diffuse Scattering Patterns of Back-Illuminated Structured Light

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper is concerned with the detection of bone fragments embedded in de-boned skinless chicken breast fillets by modeling images made by back-lighting and embedded bone fragments. Imaging of chicken fillets is often dominated by strongly multiple scattering properties of the fillets. Thus, res...

  7. Visible-light driven biofuel cell based on hierarchically branched titanium dioxide nanorods photoanode for tumor marker detection.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chaomin; Zhang, Lina; Wang, Yanhu; Yu, Jinghua; Song, Xianrang

    2016-09-15

    In this work, a novel sensing platform based on visible light driven biofuel cell (BFC) has been facilely designed for sensitive detection of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) with the photo-response bioanode, realizing the dual route energy conversion of light energy and chemical energy to electricity. The hierarchical branched TiO2 nanorods (B-TiO2 NRs) decorated with CdS quantum dots (QDs) act as the substrate to confine glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) for the visible light driven glucose oxidation at the bioanode. Three dimensional flowers like hierarchical carbon/gold nanoparticles/bilirubin oxidase (3D FCM/AuNPs/BOD) bioconjugate served as biocatalyst for O2 reduction at the biocathode. With an increase in the concentration of PSA, the amount of BOD labels on biocathode increases, thus leading to the higher current output of the as-proposed visible light driven BFC. Based on this, this sensing platform provide great performance in sensitivity and specificity, increasing linear detection range from 0.3pgmL(-1) to 7μgmL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.1pgmL(-1). Most importantly, our new sensing strategy provided a simple and inexpensive sensing platform for tumor markers detection, suggesting its wide potential applications for clinical diagnostics. PMID:27135937

  8. Detection of neurotransmitters by a light scattering technique based on seed-mediated growth of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Li; Dong, Shaojun

    2008-03-01

    A simple light scattering detection method for neurotransmitters has been developed, based on the growth of gold nanoparticles. Neurotransmitters (dopamine, L-dopa, noradrenaline and adrenaline) can effectively function as active reducing agents for generating gold nanoparticles, which result in enhanced light scattering signals. The strong light scattering of gold nanoparticles then allows the quantitative detection of the neurotransmitters simply by using a common spectrofluorometer. In particular, Au-nanoparticle seeds were added to facilitate the growth of nanoparticles, which was found to enhance the sensing performance greatly. Using this light scattering technique based on the seed-mediated growth of gold nanoparticles, detection limits of 4.4 × 10-7 M, 3.5 × 10-7 M, 4.1 × 10-7 M, and 7.7 × 10-7 M were achieved for dopamine, L-dopa, noradrenaline and adrenaline, respectively. The present strategy can be extended to detect other biologically important molecules in a very fast, simple and sensitive way, and may have potential applications in a wide range of fields.

  9. Comparison of LightCycler PCR, rapid antigen immunoassay, and culture for detection of group A streptococci from throat swabs.

    PubMed

    Uhl, J R; Adamson, S C; Vetter, E A; Schleck, C D; Harmsen, W S; Iverson, L K; Santrach, P J; Henry, N K; Cockerill, F R

    2003-01-01

    We compared the performance characteristics of a real-time PCR method, the LightCycler Strep-A assay (Roche Applied Science, Indianapolis, Ind.), to those of a rapid antigen immunoassay, the Directigen 1-2-3 Group A Strep Test kit (BD Diagnostic Systems, Sparks, Md.), and a standard culture method for detection of group A streptococci (GAS) from 384 throat swabs. The LightCycler PCR produced more positive results (n = 58) than either culture (n = 55) or the Directigen immunoassay (n = 31). The results of the LightCycler PCR and the Directigen method were independently compared to the results of the accepted "gold standard," bacterial culture. The sensitivities, specificities, and positive and negative predictive values for this comparison were as follows: for the Directigen method, 55, 99, 97, and 93%, respectively; for the LightCycler PCR, 93, 98, 88, and 99%, respectively. In no case was a throat swab positive by both the LightCycler PCR and the Directigen method but negative by culture. The medical histories of patients whose throat swabs were negative by culture but positive by either the LightCycler PCR (n = 7) or the Directigen method (n = 1) were reviewed. All of these patients had signs or symptoms compatible with GAS disease, and therefore, all of these discordant positive results (along with positive results by either the Directigen method or the LightCycler PCR that agreed with the culture results) were counted as true positives for statistical analysis. For this analysis, the LightCycler PCR detected more true-positive results than the culture method (58 versus 55 swabs); however, this difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.5465). In contrast, statistically significantly more true-positive results occurred by culture than by the Directigen method (55 versus 31 swabs; P < 0.0001) and by the LightCycler PCR than by the Directigen method (58 versus 31 swabs; P < 0.0001). The LightCycler PCR is a suitable stand-alone method for the detection of

  10. Comparison of LightCycler PCR, Rapid Antigen Immunoassay, and Culture for Detection of Group A Streptococci from Throat Swabs

    PubMed Central

    Uhl, J. R.; Adamson, S. C.; Vetter, E. A.; Schleck, C. D.; Harmsen, W. S.; Iverson, L. K.; Santrach, P. J.; Henry, N. K.; Cockerill, F. R.

    2003-01-01

    We compared the performance characteristics of a real-time PCR method, the LightCycler Strep-A assay (Roche Applied Science, Indianapolis, Ind.), to those of a rapid antigen immunoassay, the Directigen 1-2-3 Group A Strep Test kit (BD Diagnostic Systems, Sparks, Md.), and a standard culture method for detection of group A streptococci (GAS) from 384 throat swabs. The LightCycler PCR produced more positive results (n = 58) than either culture (n = 55) or the Directigen immunoassay (n = 31). The results of the LightCycler PCR and the Directigen method were independently compared to the results of the accepted “gold standard,” bacterial culture. The sensitivities, specificities, and positive and negative predictive values for this comparison were as follows: for the Directigen method, 55, 99, 97, and 93%, respectively; for the LightCycler PCR, 93, 98, 88, and 99%, respectively. In no case was a throat swab positive by both the LightCycler PCR and the Directigen method but negative by culture. The medical histories of patients whose throat swabs were negative by culture but positive by either the LightCycler PCR (n = 7) or the Directigen method (n = 1) were reviewed. All of these patients had signs or symptoms compatible with GAS disease, and therefore, all of these discordant positive results (along with positive results by either the Directigen method or the LightCycler PCR that agreed with the culture results) were counted as true positives for statistical analysis. For this analysis, the LightCycler PCR detected more true-positive results than the culture method (58 versus 55 swabs); however, this difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.5465). In contrast, statistically significantly more true-positive results occurred by culture than by the Directigen method (55 versus 31 swabs; P < 0.0001) and by the LightCycler PCR than by the Directigen method (58 versus 31 swabs; P < 0.0001). The LightCycler PCR is a suitable stand-alone method for the

  11. Detection of kappa and lambda light chain monoclonal proteins in human serum: automated immunoassay versus immunofixation electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Jaskowski, Troy D; Litwin, Christine M; Hill, Harry R

    2006-02-01

    Recently, turbidimetric immunoassays for detecting and quantifying kappa and lambda free light chains (FLC) have become available and are promoted as being more sensitive than immunofixation electrophoresis (IFE) in detecting FLC monoclonal proteins. In this study, we assessed the ability of these turbidimetric assays to detect serum monoclonal proteins involving both free and heavy-chain-bound kappa and lambda light chains compared to standard immunofixation electrophoresis. Sera demonstrating a restricted band of protein migration (other than a definite M spike) by serum protein electrophoresis (SPE), which may represent early monoclonal proteins, were also examined. When compared to IFE, percent agreement, sensitivity, and specificity for the kappa-FLC and lambda-FLC were 94.6, 72.9, and 99.5% and 98.5, 91.4, and 99.7%, respectively, in detecting monoclonal proteins involving free and heavy-chain-bound light chains. The majority of sera (73.7%) demonstrating a restricted band of protein migration on SPE demonstrated abnormal IFE patterns suggestive of multiple myeloma or monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance, but gave normal kappa/lambda FLC ratios using the turbidimetric immunoassays. In conclusion, the kappa and lambda FLC assays are significantly less sensitive (72.9 to 91.4%) than IFE, but specific in detecting serum monoclonal proteins. Moreover, the kappa/lambda ratio has little value in routine screening since the majority of sera with abnormal IFE patterns had normal kappa/lambda FLC ratios. PMID:16467338

  12. Evidence for a spectroscopic direct detection of reflected light from 51 Pegasi b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, J. H. C.; Santos, N. C.; Figueira, P.; Faria, J. P.; Montalto, M.; Boisse, I.; Ehrenreich, D.; Lovis, C.; Mayor, M.; Melo, C.; Pepe, F.; Sousa, S. G.; Udry, S.; Cunha, D.

    2015-04-01

    Context. The detection of reflected light from an exoplanet is a difficult technical challenge at optical wavelengths. Even though this signal is expected to replicate the stellar signal, not only is it several orders of magnitude fainter, but it is also hidden among the stellar noise. Aims: We apply a variant of the cross-correlation technique to HARPS observations of 51 Peg to detect the reflected signal from planet 51 Peg b. Methods: Our method makes use of the cross-correlation function (CCF) of a binary mask with high-resolution spectra to amplify the minute planetary signal that is present in the spectra by a factor proportional to the number of spectral lines when performing the cross correlation. The resulting cross-correlation functions are then normalized by a stellar template to remove the stellar signal. Carefully selected sections of the resulting normalized CCFs are stacked to increase the planetary signal further. The recovered signal allows probing several of the planetary properties, including its real mass and albedo. Results: We detect evidence for the reflected signal from planet 51 Peg b at a significance of 3σnoise. The detection of the signal permits us to infer a real mass of 0.46+0.06-0.01 MJup (assuming a stellar mass of 1.04 MSun) for the planet and an orbital inclination of 80+10-19 degrees. The analysis of the data also allows us to infer a tentative value for the (radius-dependent) geometric albedo of the planet. The results suggest that 51Peg b may be an inflated hot Jupiter with a high albedo (e.g., an albedo of 0.5 yields a radius of 1.9 ± 0.3 RJup for a signal amplitude of 6.0 ± 0.4 × 10-5). Conclusions: We confirm that the method we perfected can be used to retrieve an exoplanet's reflected signal, even with current observing facilities. The advent of next generation of instruments (e.g. VLT-ESO/ESPRESSO) and observing facilities (e.g. a new generation of ELT telescopes) will yield new opportunities for this type of technique

  13. Iron oxide nanozyme catalyzed synthesis of fluorescent polydopamine for light-up Zn2+ detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Biwu; Han, Xiao; Liu, Juewen

    2016-07-01

    Fluorescent polydopamine (FPD) is an interesting material with excellent biocompatibility. However, its preparation is currently a lengthy and potentially dangerous process. We herein employ magnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles as a peroxidase-mimicking nanozyme to produce FPD under mild conditions. Different from previous protocols using multiple steps with up to 6% (~2 M) H2O2, this preparation takes place in a single step with just 5 mM H2O2 at room temperature. The oxidized product shows excitation-wavelength-dependent emission peaks, similar to previous reports. The reaction kinetics, pH, temperature, and ionic strength are individually optimized. Among a diverse range of other nanomaterials tested, including Fe2O3, CeO2, CoO, Co3O4, NiO, TiO2, gold nanoparticles, and graphene oxide, Fe2O3 and graphene oxide yielded relatively weak emission, while the rest of the materials failed to produce FPD. The Fe3O4 nanoparticles retained ~90% catalytic activity even after ten cycles of synthesis. Finally, Zn2+ can enhance the fluorescence of FPD under 360 nm excitation but not under 480 nm excitation, leading to a sensitive light-up sensor with a detection limit of 60 nM Zn2+. Therefore, this work has demonstrated not only a novel use of nanozymes, but also an interesting application of FPD.Fluorescent polydopamine (FPD) is an interesting material with excellent biocompatibility. However, its preparation is currently a lengthy and potentially dangerous process. We herein employ magnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles as a peroxidase-mimicking nanozyme to produce FPD under mild conditions. Different from previous protocols using multiple steps with up to 6% (~2 M) H2O2, this preparation takes place in a single step with just 5 mM H2O2 at room temperature. The oxidized product shows excitation-wavelength-dependent emission peaks, similar to previous reports. The reaction kinetics, pH, temperature, and ionic strength are individually optimized. Among a diverse range

  14. Direct detection and quantification of Alternaria alternata lycopersici toxins using high-performance liquid chromatography-evaporative light-scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li; Du, Liangcheng

    2006-03-01

    Alternaria alternata lycopersici toxins are produced by the tomato pathogenic fungus A. alternata f. sp. lycopersici. They are primary determinants for stem canker disease of tomato and induce apoptosis in animals and plants. Due to the lack of a UV chromophore, their detection has relied on derivatizations or immunoassays, which require tedious pre-assay processes. Here, we describe a method for direct and quantitative detection of the toxins. The method employs an evaporative light-scattering detector (ELSD) coupled to HPLC. It gives a linear response in the range of 400-4000 ng toxin, with a detection limit of about 6 ng/mul. The detection of all major toxin congeners by HPLC-ESLD was confirmed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Thus, the method provides a simple and sensitive tool for the studies of this group of host-specific mycotoxins. PMID:16014317

  15. Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells detect light with a vitamin A-based photopigment, melanopsin

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yingbin; Zhong, Haining; Wang, Min-Hua H.; Luo, Dong-Gen; Liao, Hsi-Wen; Maeda, Hidetaka; Hattar, Samer; Frishman, Laura J.; Yau, King-Wai

    2005-01-01

    In mammals, intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) mediate non-image-forming visual functions such as pupillary light reflex (PLR) and circadian photoentrainment. This photosensitivity requires melanopsin, an invertebrate opsin-like protein expressed by the ipRGCs. The precise role of melanopsin remains uncertain. One suggestion has been that melanopsin may be a photoisomerase, serving to regenerate an unidentified pigment in ipRGCs. This possibility was echoed by a recent report that melanopsin is expressed also in the mouse retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), a key center for regeneration of rod and cone pigments. To address this question, we studied mice lacking RPE65, a protein essential for the regeneration of rod and cone pigments. Rpe65-/- ipRGCs were ≈20- to 40-fold less photosensitive than normal at both single-cell and behavioral (PLR) levels but were rescued by exogenous 9-cis-retinal (an 11-cis-retinal analog), indicating the requirement of a vitamin A-based chromophore for ipRGC photosensitivity. In contrast, 9-cis-retinal was unable to restore intrinsic photosensitivity to melanopsin-ablated ipRGCs, arguing against melanopsin functioning merely in photopigment regeneration. Interestingly, exogenous all-trans-retinal was also able to rescue the low sensitivity of rpe65-/- ipRGCs, suggesting that melanopsin could be a bistable pigment. Finally, we detected no melanopsin in the RPE and no changes in rod and cone sensitivities due to melanopsin ablation. Together, these results strongly suggest that melanopsin is the photopigment in the ipRGCs. PMID:16014418

  16. A ratiometric fluorescent probe for hyaluronidase detection via hyaluronan-induced formation of red-light emitting excimers.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qinghua; Zeng, Fang; Wu, Shuizhu

    2016-05-15

    Hyaluronidase (HAase), which is involved in various physiological and pathological processes, can selectively degrade hyaluronan (HA) into small fragments, and it has been reported as a diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for bladder cancer. Herein, a facile ratiometric fluorescent sensing system for HAase has been developed, which is based on hyaluronan-induced formation of red-light emitting excimers and can realize sensitive detection of HAase with a detection limit of 0.007 U/mL. A positively-charged pyrene analog (N-Py) has been synthesized and then mixed with the negatively-charged HA, due to electrostatic interaction between the two components, aggregation along with the N-Py excimers readily form which emits red light. While in the presence of HAase, the enzyme catalyzes the hydrolysis of HA into small fragments, which in turn triggers disassembly of excimers; consequently the N-Py excimer emission turns into monomer emission. The emission ratio resulted from the excimer-monomer transition can be used as the sensing signal for detecting HAase. The probe features visible-light excitation and red light emission (excimer), which is conducive to reducing possible interference from autofluorescence of biological samples. Furthermore, the assay system can be successfully used to determine HAase in human urine samples with satisfactory accuracy. This strategy may provide a suitable sensitive and accurate assay for HAase as well as an effective approach for developing fluorescent ratiometric assays for other enzymes. PMID:26774093

  17. Detection of light and vibration modulates bioluminescence intensity in the glowworm, Arachnocampa flava.

    PubMed

    Mills, Rebecca; Popple, Julie-Anne; Veidt, Martin; Merritt, David John

    2016-04-01

    Glowworms are larval fungus gnats that emit light from a specialised abdominal light organ. The light attracts small arthropod prey to their web-like silk snares. Larvae glow throughout the night and can modulate their bioluminescence in response to sensory input. To better understand light output regulation and its ecological significance, we examined the larvae's reaction to light exposure, vibration and sound. Exposure to a 5-min light pulse in the laboratory causes larvae to exponentially decrease their light output over 5-10 min until they completely switch off. They gradually return to pre-exposure levels but do not show a rebound. Larvae are most sensitive to ultraviolet light, then blue, green and red. Vibration of the larval snares results in a several-fold increase in bioluminescence over 20-30 s, followed by an exponential return to pre-exposure levels over 15-30 min. Under some conditions, larvae can respond to vibration by initiating bioluminescence when they are not glowing; however, the response is reduced compared to when they are glowing. We propose that inhibitory and excitatory mechanisms combine to modulate bioluminescence intensity by regulating biochemical reactions or gating the access of air to the light organ. PMID:26897608

  18. Comparing visual prey detection among species of piscivorous salmonids: effects of light and low turbidities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mazur, Michael M.; Beauchamp, David A.

    2003-01-01

    Differences in reaction distance to prey fish by piscivorous salmonids can alter predator–prey interactions under different visual conditions. We compared reaction distances of three piscivorous salmonids commonly found in western lakes: cutthroat trout, Oncorhynchus clarki utah, rainbow trout, O. mykiss, and the nonnative lake char, Salvelinus namaycush. Reaction distances to salmonid prey were measured as functions of light and turbidity in a controlled laboratory setting. In addition, predation rates and swimming speeds of lake char preying on juvenile cutthroat trout were measured experimentally under a range of light levels. Reaction distances for cutthroat trout and rainbow trout increased rapidly as light levels increased, reaching relatively constant reaction distances at higher light levels. Reaction distances for lake char were similar to cutthroat trout and rainbow trout at the lower light levels; however, lake char reaction distances continued to increase with increasing light intensity to asymptote at distances 65% higher than those for both cutthroat and rainbow trout. Predation rates by lake char were low for the darkest light levels, increased rapidly under low light levels (0.50–0.75 lx), and then declined to an intermediate rate at all higher light levels. Swimming speeds by lake char also increased rapidly from extremely low light conditions to a peak and declined to an intermediate level at light levels above 1.00 lx. These results suggest that, above the saturation intensity threshold, piscivorous lake char react to fish prey at greater distances than do cutthroat trout and rainbow trout. These differences may help explain the decline of native trout following the introductions of nonnative lake char in lakes and reservoirs of western North America.

  19. A matter of time: improvement of visual temporal processing during training-induced restoration of light detection performance

    PubMed Central

    Poggel, Dorothe A.; Treutwein, Bernhard; Sabel, Bernhard A.; Strasburger, Hans

    2015-01-01

    The issue of how basic sensory and temporal processing are related is still unresolved. We studied temporal processing, as assessed by simple visual reaction times (RT) and double-pulse resolution (DPR), in patients with partial vision loss after visual pathway lesions and investigated whether vision restoration training (VRT), a training program designed to improve light detection performance, would also affect temporal processing. Perimetric and campimetric visual field tests as well as maps of DPR thresholds and RT were acquired before and after a 3 months training period with VRT. Patient performance was compared to that of age-matched healthy subjects. Intact visual field size increased during training. Averaged across the entire visual field, DPR remained constant while RT improved slightly. However, in transition zones between the blind and intact areas (areas of residual vision) where patients had shown between 20 and 80% of stimulus detection probability in pre-training visual field tests, both DPR and RT improved markedly. The magnitude of improvement depended on the defect depth (or degree of intactness) of the respective region at baseline. Inter-individual training outcome variability was very high, with some patients showing little change and others showing performance approaching that of healthy controls. Training-induced improvement of light detection in patients with visual field loss thus generalized to dynamic visual functions. The findings suggest that similar neural mechanisms may underlie the impairment and subsequent training-induced functional recovery of both light detection and temporal processing. PMID:25717307

  20. Prospects for detecting dark matter with neutrino telescopes in light of recent results from direct detection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Halzen, Francis; Hooper, Dan; /Fermilab

    2005-10-01

    Direct detection dark matter experiments, lead by the CDMS collaboration, have placed increasingly stronger constraints on the cross sections for elastic scattering of WIMPs on nucleons. These results impact the prospects for the indirect detection of dark matter using neutrino telescopes. With this in mind, we revisit the prospects for detecting neutrinos produced by the annihilation of WIMPs in the Sun. We find that the latest bounds do not seriously limit the models most accessible to next generation kilometer-scale neutrino telescopes such as IceCube. This is largely due to the fact that models with significant spin-dependent couplings to protons are the least constrained and, at the same time, the most promising because of the efficient capture of WIMPs in the Sun. We identify models where dark matter particles are beyond the reach of any planned direct detection experiments while within reach of neutrino telescopes. In summary, we find that, even when contemplating recent direct detection results, neutrino telescopes still have the opportunity to play an important as well as complementary role in the search for particle dark matter.

  1. High Resolution Trichromatic Road Surface Scanning with a Line Scan Camera and Light Emitting Diode Lighting for Road-Kill Detection.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Gil; Ribeiro, A Fernando; Sillero, Neftalí; Gonçalves-Seco, Luís; Silva, Cristiano; Franch, Marc; Trigueiros, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a road surface scanning system that operates with a trichromatic line scan camera with light emitting diode (LED) lighting achieving road surface resolution under a millimeter. It was part of a project named Roadkills-Intelligent systems for surveying mortality of amphibians in Portuguese roads, sponsored by the Portuguese Science and Technology Foundation. A trailer was developed in order to accommodate the complete system with standalone power generation, computer image capture and recording, controlled lighting to operate day or night without disturbance, incremental encoder with 5000 pulses per revolution attached to one of the trailer wheels, under a meter Global Positioning System (GPS) localization, easy to utilize with any vehicle with a trailer towing system and focused on a complete low cost solution. The paper describes the system architecture of the developed prototype, its calibration procedure, the performed experimentation and some obtained results, along with a discussion and comparison with existing systems. Sustained operating trailer speeds of up to 30 km/h are achievable without loss of quality at 4096 pixels' image width (1 m width of road surface) with 250 µm/pixel resolution. Higher scanning speeds can be achieved by lowering the image resolution (120 km/h with 1 mm/pixel). Computer vision algorithms are under development to operate on the captured images in order to automatically detect road-kills of amphibians. PMID:27104535

  2. High Resolution Trichromatic Road Surface Scanning with a Line Scan Camera and Light Emitting Diode Lighting for Road-Kill Detection

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Gil; Ribeiro, A. Fernando; Sillero, Neftalí; Gonçalves-Seco, Luís; Silva, Cristiano; Franch, Marc; Trigueiros, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a road surface scanning system that operates with a trichromatic line scan camera with light emitting diode (LED) lighting achieving road surface resolution under a millimeter. It was part of a project named Roadkills—Intelligent systems for surveying mortality of amphibians in Portuguese roads, sponsored by the Portuguese Science and Technology Foundation. A trailer was developed in order to accommodate the complete system with standalone power generation, computer image capture and recording, controlled lighting to operate day or night without disturbance, incremental encoder with 5000 pulses per revolution attached to one of the trailer wheels, under a meter Global Positioning System (GPS) localization, easy to utilize with any vehicle with a trailer towing system and focused on a complete low cost solution. The paper describes the system architecture of the developed prototype, its calibration procedure, the performed experimentation and some obtained results, along with a discussion and comparison with existing systems. Sustained operating trailer speeds of up to 30 km/h are achievable without loss of quality at 4096 pixels’ image width (1 m width of road surface) with 250 µm/pixel resolution. Higher scanning speeds can be achieved by lowering the image resolution (120 km/h with 1 mm/pixel). Computer vision algorithms are under development to operate on the captured images in order to automatically detect road-kills of amphibians. PMID:27104535

  3. Human Detection Based on the Generation of a Background Image by Using a Far-Infrared Light Camera

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Eun Som; Choi, Jong-Suk; Lee, Ji Hoon; Shin, Kwang Yong; Kim, Yeong Gon; Le, Toan Thanh; Park, Kang Ryoung

    2015-01-01

    The need for computer vision-based human detection has increased in fields, such as security, intelligent surveillance and monitoring systems. However, performance enhancement of human detection based on visible light cameras is limited, because of factors, such as nonuniform illumination, shadows and low external light in the evening and night. Consequently, human detection based on thermal (far-infrared light) cameras has been considered as an alternative. However, its performance is influenced by the factors, such as low image resolution, low contrast and the large noises of thermal images. It is also affected by the high temperature of backgrounds during the day. To solve these problems, we propose a new method for detecting human areas in thermal camera images. Compared to previous works, the proposed research is novel in the following four aspects. One background image is generated by median and average filtering. Additional filtering procedures based on maximum gray level, size filtering and region erasing are applied to remove the human areas from the background image. Secondly, candidate human regions in the input image are located by combining the pixel and edge difference images between the input and background images. The thresholds for the difference images are adaptively determined based on the brightness of the generated background image. Noise components are removed by component labeling, a morphological operation and size filtering. Third, detected areas that may have more than two human regions are merged or separated based on the information in the horizontal and vertical histograms of the detected area. This procedure is adaptively operated based on the brightness of the generated background image. Fourth, a further procedure for the separation and removal of the candidate human regions is performed based on the size and ratio of the height to width information of the candidate regions considering the camera viewing direction and perspective

  4. Development of new devices for detection of gastric cancer on laparoscopic surgery using near-infrared light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inada, Shunko A.; Fuchi, Shingo; Mori, Kensaku; Hasegawa, Junichi; Misawa, Kazunari; Nakanishi, Hayao

    2015-03-01

    In recent year, for the treatment of gastric cancer the laparoscopic surgery is performed, which has good benefits, such as low-burden, low-invasive and the efficacy is equivalent to the open surgery. For identify location of the tumor intraperitoneally for extirpation of the gastric cancer, several points of charcoal ink is injected around the primary tumor. However, in the time of laparoscopic operation, it is difficult to estimate specific site of primary tumor, because the injected charcoal ink diffusely spread to the area distant from the tumor in the stomach. Therefore, a broad area should be resected which results in a great stress for the patients. To overcome this problem, we focused in the near-infrared wavelength of 1000nm band which have high biological transmission. In this study, we developed a fluorescent clip which was realized with glass phosphor (Yb3+, Nd3+ doped to Bi2O3-B2O3 based glasses. λp: 976 nm, FWHM: 100 nm, size: 2x1x3 mm) and the laparoscopic fluorescent detection system for clip-derived near-infrared light. To evaluate clinical performance of a fluorescent clip and the laparoscopic fluorescent detection system, we used resected stomach (thickness: 13 mm) from the patients. Fluorescent clip was fixed on the gastric mucosa, and an excitation light (λ: 808 nm) was irradiated from outside of stomach for detection of fluorescence through stomach wall. As a result, fluorescence emission from the clip was successfully detected. Furthermore, we confirmed that detection sensitivity of the emission of fluorescence from the clip depends on the output power of the excitation light. We conformed that the fluorescent clip in combination with laparoscopic fluorescent detection system is very useful method to identify the exact location of the primary gastric cancer.

  5. In-situ volumetric topography of IC chips for defect detection using infrared confocal measurement with active structured light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liang-Chia; Le, Manh-Trung; Cong Phuc, Dao; Lin, Shyh-Tsong

    2014-09-01

    The article presents the development of in-situ integrated circuit (IC) chip defect detection techniques for automated clipping detection by proposing infrared imaging and full-field volumetric topography. IC chip inspection, especially held during or post IC packaging, has become an extremely critical procedure in IC fabrication to assure manufacturing quality and reduce production costs. To address this, in the article, microscopic infrared imaging using an electromagnetic light spectrum that ranges from 0.9 to 1.7 µm is developed to perform volumetric inspection of IC chips, in order to identify important defects such as silicon clipping, cracking or peeling. The main difficulty of infrared (IR) volumetric imaging lies in its poor image contrast, which makes it incapable of achieving reliable inspection, as infrared imaging is sensitive to temperature difference but insensitive to geometric variance of materials, resulting in difficulty detecting and quantifying defects precisely. To overcome this, 3D volumetric topography based on 3D infrared confocal measurement with active structured light, as well as light refractive matching principles, is developed to detect defects the size, shape and position of defects in ICs. The experimental results show that the algorithm is effective and suitable for in-situ defect detection of IC semiconductor packaging. The quality of defect detection, such as measurement repeatability and accuracy, is addressed. Confirmed by the experimental results, the depth measurement resolution can reach up to 0.3 µm, and the depth measurement uncertainty with one standard deviation was verified to be less than 1.0% of the full-scale depth-measuring range.

  6. Impacts of Light Precipitation Detection with Dual Frequency Radar on Global Precipitation Measurement Core Observatory (GPM/DPR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayabu, Y. N.; Hamada, A.; Oki, R.; Kachi, M.; Kubota, T.; Iguchi, T.; Shige, S.; Nakamura, K.

    2014-12-01

    The Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) on board the GPM Core Observatory consists of Ku-band (13.6 GHz) and Ka-band (35.5 GHz) radars, with an improved minimum detection sensitivity of precipitation compared to the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Precipitation Radar (TRMM PR). We have studied impacts of improved detection sensitivity with the GPM DPR compared with the TRMM PR. One example of light precipitation is, a scattered rainfall around a trough over the subtropical South Pacific Ocean, which consists of weak but erect precipitation reaching over the melting level of ~2.5 km and trailing precipitation above, which reaches as high as 5km. Another example is a light anvil precipitation spreading from convective cores of a storm in the upper troposphere, overcasting shallow convective precipitation below. The ability of globally detecting such light precipitation will improve our knowledge of precipitation processes. Utilizing an early version of the DPR product, a quick evaluation on statistical impacts of increasing the detection sensitivity from 17dBZ to 12dBZ has been performed. Here, 17dBZ is the value which is mostly accepted as the performed detection sensitivity of the TRMM PR, and 12dBZ is the guaranteed sensitivity for GPM Ka-band radar. For the near surface precipitation, impacts are significant in terms of numbers, but limited to several regions in terms of the rainfall volume. Volume impacts are much larger at the upper troposphere, which is indicated by the detection of the anvil precipitation, for example. The upper level improvements are mostly found where the deep precipitation systems exist. Quantitative discussions utilizing the latest version of the DPR data, which is scheduled to be released to the public in September, will be presented at the session.

  7. Ultra-high resolution of radiocesium distribution detection based on Cherenkov light imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Ogata, Yoshimune; Kawachi, Naoki; Suzui, Nobuo; Yin, Yong-Gen; Fujimaki, Shu

    2015-03-01

    After the nuclear disaster in Fukushima, radiocesium contamination became a serious scientific concern and research of its effects on plants increased. In such plant studies, high resolution images of radiocesium are required without contacting the subjects. Cherenkov light imaging of beta radionuclides has inherently high resolution and is promising for plant research. Since 137Cs and 134Cs emit beta particles, Cherenkov light imaging will be useful for the imaging of radiocesium distribution. Consequently, we developed and tested a Cherenkov light imaging system. We used a high sensitivity cooled charge coupled device (CCD) camera (Hamamatsu Photonics, ORCA2-ER) for imaging Cherenkov light from 137Cs. A bright lens (Xenon, F-number: 0.95, lens diameter: 25 mm) was mounted on the camera and placed in a black box. With a 100-μm 137Cs point source, we obtained 220-μm spatial resolution in the Cherenkov light image. With a 1-mm diameter, 320-kBq 137Cs point source, the source was distinguished within 2-s. We successfully obtained Cherenkov light images of a plant whose root was dipped in a 137Cs solution, radiocesium-containing samples as well as line and character phantom images with our imaging system. Cherenkov light imaging is promising for the high resolution imaging of radiocesium distribution without contacting the subject.

  8. On-the-fly detection of changes on and below the surface in epithelium mucosal tissue architecture from scattered light.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Fernand S; Taslidere, Ezgi; Murthy, Sreekant

    2011-04-01

    In this paper we present a technique to raise a flag on the fly when a transition occurs between different mucosal architectures on or below the surface. The segmentation is based on a novel difference metric for detecting an abrupt change in the parameters extracted from a Stochastic Decomposition Method (SDM) that models the scattered light reflected from the mucosal tissue structure over an area (2-D scan) illuminated by an optical sensor (fiber) emitting light at either one wavelength or with white light. This work has the potential to enhance the endoscopist's ability to locate and identify abnormal mucosal architectures in particular when the disease is developing below the surface and hence becoming hidden during colonoscopy or endoscopic examination. It also has also potential in helping deciding as to when and where to take biopsies; steps that should lead to improvement in the diagnostic yield. PMID:20648519

  9. Debris Disks in Aggregate: Using Hubble Space Telescope Coronagraphic Imagery to Understand the Scattered-Light Disk Detection Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, Carol A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite more than a decade of coronagraphic imaging of debris disk candidate stars, only 16 have been imaged in scattered light. Since imaged disks provide our best insight into processes which sculpt disks, and can provide signposts of the presence of giant planets at distances which would elude radial velocity and transit surveys, we need to understand under what conditions we detect the disks in scattered light, how these disks differ from the majority of debris disks, and how to increase the yield of disks which are imaged with 0.1" angular resolution. In this talk, I will review what we have learned from a shallow HSTINICMOS NIR survey of debris disks, and present first results from our on-going HST /STIS optical imaging of bright scattered-light disks.

  10. Automatic instrument for chemical processing to detect microorganism in biological samples by measuring light reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelbaugh, B. N.; Picciolo, G. L.; Chappelle, E. W.; Colburn, M. E. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An automated apparatus is reported for sequentially assaying urine samples for the presence of bacterial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) that comprises a rotary table which carries a plurality of sample containing vials and automatically dispenses fluid reagents into the vials preparatory to injecting a light producing luciferase-luciferin mixture into the samples. The device automatically measures the light produced in each urine sample by a bioluminescence reaction of the free bacterial adenosine triphosphate with the luciferase-luciferin mixture. The light measured is proportional to the concentration of bacterial adenosine triphosphate which, in turn, is proportional to the number of bacteria present in the respective urine sample.

  11. Modeling and Maximum Likelihood Fitting of Gamma-Ray and Radio Light Curves of Millisecond Pulsars Detected with Fermi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, T. J.; Harding, A. K.; Venter, C.

    2012-01-01

    Pulsed gamma rays have been detected with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) from more than 20 millisecond pulsars (MSPs), some of which were discovered in radio observations of bright, unassociated LAT sources. We have fit the radio and gamma-ray light curves of 19 LAT-detected MSPs in the context of geometric, outermagnetospheric emission models assuming the retarded vacuum dipole magnetic field using a Markov chain Monte Carlo maximum likelihood technique. We find that, in many cases, the models are able to reproduce the observed light curves well and provide constraints on the viewing geometries that are in agreement with those from radio polarization measurements. Additionally, for some MSPs we constrain the altitudes of both the gamma-ray and radio emission regions. The best-fit magnetic inclination angles are found to cover a broader range than those of non-recycled gamma-ray pulsars.

  12. Dual detection of ultraviolet and visible lights using a DNA-CTMA/GaN photodiode with electrically different polarity.

    PubMed

    Reddy, M Siva Pratap; Kim, Bong-Joong; Jang, Ja-Soon

    2014-01-13

    We demonstrated the dual-detectable DNA-CTMA/n-GaN photodiode (DG-PD) for ultraviolet and visible lights. Halogen and UV lamps are employed to recognize the visible and UV wavelength, respectively. The DG-PD under dark condition has a negative-bias shift of current-voltage (I-V) curves by 0.78 V compared to reference diode without DNA. However, the I-V curves move towards positive bias side by 0.75 V and 1.02 V for the halogen- and UV-exposed photodiode, respectively. These cause electrically different polarity and amount for halogen- and UV-induced photocurrents, indicating that the DNA-CTMA on n-GaN is quite effective for recognizing visible and UV lights as a dual-detectable photodiode. The formation and charge transport mechanisms are also discussed. PMID:24515050

  13. Diffuse-light absorption spectroscopy by fiber optics for detecting and quantifying the adulteration of extra virgin olive oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignani, A. G.; Ciaccheri, L.; Ottevaere, H.; Thienpont, H.; Conte, L.; Marega, M.; Cichelli, A.; Attilio, C.; Cimato, A.

    2010-09-01

    A fiber optic setup for diffuse-light absorption spectroscopy in the wide 400-1700 nm spectral range is experimented for detecting and quantifying the adulteration of extra virgin olive oil caused by lower-grade olive oils. Absorption measurements provide spectral fingerprints of authentic and adulterated oils. A multivariate processing of spectroscopic data is applied for discriminating the type of adulterant and for predicting its fraction.

  14. Trace detection of light elements by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS): Applications to non-conducting materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khater, Mohamed A.

    2013-10-01

    The existence as well as concentration of light (low-atomic number) elements is directly related to some of the most important properties of almost all materials. Thus, the development of a direct, fast, and sensitive spectroscopic method for the analytical quantification of these elements is considered an important continuing challenge in many fields. In this report, results obtained from previous as well as most recent studies regarding trace detection of light elements in non-conducting materials by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique are reviewed for the first time. Firstly, we introduce investigations performed in the far- and vacuum-UV as well as UV-visible-NIR spectral domains, and cover many non-conducting materials including gases, aerosols, soil, cement, and selected organic compounds. The report also demonstrates important analytical results for the elements lithium, beryllium, boron, carbon, fluorine, phosphorus, sulfur, and chlorine. In addition, key characterization information relating to a specific element in a given matrix and state is summarized in such a way that relevant resources can easily be traced. Furthermore, in order to facilitate tracking down the evolution of the technique for a particular material category, a chronological order has been devised. In the second part of the review, the latest developments and advances in instrumentation and methodologies of the LIBS technique, particularly in the realm of light elements detection, are discussed. The sensitive detection of light elements in the UV-VIS-NIR is still unsatisfactory, and more work is needed in order to achieve better analytical performance in terms of precision, accuracy and limits of detection. The author anticipates that significant sensitivity improvements should be realized by combining LIBS, employing femtosecond laser pulses, with other diagnostic techniques based on probing the plasma via diode lasers.

  15. Detection of metal vapour in the high-current phase of a pseudospark switch by resonance absorption of laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lins, Günter; Verleger, Jobst

    1996-03-01

    The electron emission mechanism which is active at the cathode of a pseudospark switch leads to thermal overloading of emission sites followed by the evaporation of cathode material. As a consequence, metal vapour should be present very shortly after the beginning of current flow. However, it has never been possible to observe metal vapour by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) prior to the cessation of current. In the present work resonance absorption of laser light was used to detect molybdenum vapour from the cathode during the high-current phase of a pseudospark switch. To observe the narrow-band absorption the laser light which had passed the switch was introduced into a molybdenum hollow cathode lamp where it caused fluorescence from molybdenum vapour. The intensity of the fluorescence light from the hollow cathode lamp was proportional to the intensity of the laser light left after the absorption process in the pseudospark. For a current amplitude of 12 kA and a pulse duration of 0022-3727/29/3/040/img1, it is shown that molybdenum vapour is definitely present shortly after the current maximum, well before the current stops flowing. The neutral vapour density in the high-current phase is estimated to amount to at least 0022-3727/29/3/040/img2. It is concluded that LIF fails to detect metal vapour prior to the cessation of current, mainly because the fluorescence process is severely disturbed by electronic collisions which deplete the upper fluorescence level.

  16. Real-time multi-analyte label-free detection of proteins by white light reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrou, Panagiota; Koukouvinos, Georgios; Drygiannakis, Dimitrios; Goustouridis, Dimitris; Raptis, Ioannis; Misiakos, Konstantinos; Kakabakos, Sotirios E.

    2014-03-01

    Label-free optical sensors are considered ideal for biomedical analysis since they provide the advantages of multiplex and real-time detection. They still suffer; however, from lower sensitivity and/or more sophisticated equipment as compared to indirect detection methods. Here, we propose a label-free sensor based on White Light Reflectance Spectroscopy that overcomes the limitation of high cost and low detection sensitivity. The optical setup consists of a VIS-NIR light source, a spectrometer and a reflection probe. The sensor is Si with 1-μm thick thermal SiO2 and functionalized with antibodies. The incident light is directed vertically to sensor surface and the reflected interference spectrum is recorded through the spectrometer. The evolution of the biomolecular reactions are monitored in real-time by monitoring the shifts in the interference spectrum. Up to seven different reactions sites have been created onto the same sensing surface allowing for multi-analyte determinations. The analytical capabilities of the proposed sensor were demonstrated through the development of a sensitive immunoassay for the detection of C-Reactive Protein (CRP) in human serum samples. CRP, a biomarker related to acute inflammatory incidents, it has attracted particular interest as a marker of inflammation associated with cardiovascular diseases. The lowest CRP concentration detected was 10 ng/mL, and the dynamic range of the assay was extended up to 500 ng/mL. Regeneration of antibody coated sensing areas for up to 20 times without loss of immobilized antibody reactivity is also presented. In conclusion, the proposed sensing system is characterized by low cost, high assay sensitivity and, reliability.

  17. ASYMMETRY IN THE OUTBURST OF SN 1987A DETECTED USING LIGHT ECHO SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Sinnott, B.; Welch, D. L.; Sutherland, P. G.; Rest, A.; Bergmann, M.

    2013-04-10

    We report direct evidence for asymmetry in the early phases of SN 1987A via optical spectroscopy of five fields of its light echo system. The light echoes allow the first few hundred days of the explosion to be reobserved, with different position angles providing different viewing angles to the supernova. Light echo spectroscopy therefore allows a direct spectroscopic comparison of light originating from different regions of the photosphere during the early phases of SN 1987A. Gemini multi-object spectroscopy of the light echo fields shows fine structure in the H{alpha} line as a smooth function of position angle on the near-circular light echo rings. H{alpha} profiles originating from the northern hemisphere of SN 1987A show an excess in redshifted emission and a blue knee, while southern hemisphere profiles show an excess of blueshifted H{alpha} emission and a red knee. This fine structure is reminiscent of the 'Bochum event' originally observed for SN 1987A, but in an exaggerated form. Maximum deviation from symmetry in the H{alpha} line is observed at position angles 16 Degree-Sign and 186 Degree-Sign , consistent with the major axis of the expanding elongated ejecta. The asymmetry signature observed in the H{alpha} line smoothly diminishes as a function of viewing angle away from the poles of the elongated ejecta. We propose an asymmetric two-sided distribution of {sup 56}Ni most dominant in the southern far quadrant of SN 1987A as the most probable explanation of the observed light echo spectra. This is evidence that the asymmetry of high-velocity {sup 56}Ni in the first few hundred days after explosion is correlated to the geometry of the ejecta some 25 years later.

  18. The research and development of the non-contact detection of the tubing internal thread with a line structured light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yuanyuan; Xu, Yingying; Hao, Qun; Hu, Yao

    2013-12-01

    The tubing internal thread plays an irreplaceable role in the petroleum equipment. The unqualified tubing can directly lead to leakage, slippage and bring huge losses for oil industry. For the purpose of improving efficiency and precision of tubing internal thread detection, we develop a new non-contact tubing internal thread measurement system based on the laser triangulation principle. Firstly, considering that the tubing thread had a small diameter and relatively smooth surface, we built a set of optical system with a line structured light to irradiate the internal thread surface and obtain an image which contains the internal thread profile information through photoelectric sensor. Secondly, image processing techniques were used to do the edge detection of the internal thread from the obtained image. One key method was the sub-pixel technique which greatly improved the detection accuracy under the same hardware conditions. Finally, we restored the real internal thread contour information on the basis of laser triangulation method and calculated tubing thread parameters such as the pitch, taper and tooth type angle. In this system, the profile of several thread teeth can be obtained at the same time. Compared with other existing scanning methods using point light and stepper motor, this system greatly improves the detection efficiency. Experiment results indicate that this system can achieve the high precision and non-contact measurement of the tubing internal thread.

  19. Detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasias and cancers in cervical tissue by in vivo light scattering.

    PubMed

    Mourant, Judith R; Bocklage, Thérese J; Powers, Tamara M; Greene, Heather M; Dorin, Maxine H; Waxman, Alan G; Zsemlye, Meggan M; Smith, Harriet O

    2009-10-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the utility of in vivo elastic light scattering measurements to identify cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CIN) 2/3 and cancers in women undergoing colposcopy and to determine the effects of patient characteristics such as menstrual status on the elastic light scattering spectroscopic measurements. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A fiber optic probe was used to measure light transport in the cervical epithelium of patients undergoing colposcopy. Spectroscopic results from 151 patients were compared with histopathology of the measured and biopsied sites. A method of classifying the measured sites into two clinically relevant categories was developed and tested using five-fold cross-validation. RESULTS: Statistically significant effects by age at diagnosis, menopausal status, timing of the menstrual cycle, and oral contraceptive use were identified, and adjustments based upon these measurements were incorporated in the classification algorithm. A sensitivity of 77±5% and a specificity of 62±2% were obtained for separating CIN 2/3 and cancer from other pathologies and normal tissue. CONCLUSIONS: The effects of both menstrual status and age should be taken into account in the algorithm for classifying tissue sites based on elastic light scattering spectroscopy. When this is done, elastic light scattering spectroscopy shows good potential for real-time diagnosis of cervical tissue at colposcopy. Guiding biopsy location is one potential near-term clinical application area, while facilitating "see and treat" protocols is a longer term goal. Improvements in accuracy are essential. PMID:20694193

  20. The Detection of a Light Echo from Type Ia SN 2007af in NGC 5584

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdov, Dina; Leising, M. D.; Milne, P.; Riess, A. G.

    2013-06-01

    We report the discovery of a light echo (LE) at t ~1000 days past maximum from the normal Type Ia supernova (SNe Ia) SN 2007af in the spiral galaxy NGC 5584. The presence of a LE is supported by photometric data and analysis of the images acquired during the Cepheid campaign using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Camera 3 (Riess et al. 2011). The F350 and F555 images show a distinct ring-like structure with an additional central source. The images, taken months apart, show an evolution of the ring structure, which is consistent with a growing light echo in time. We find an angular radius of the outer echo to be ~0.29'' - 0.36''. Using the Cepheid distance to NGC 5584 of 24 Mpc, we find the dust illuminated by the light echo to be at a distance ~800 pc from the supernova. This rare discovery adds to the select few light echoes found in Type Ia SNe: SN 1572, SN 1991T, SN 1995E, SN 1998bu, and SN 2006X. Light echoes are powerful tools that probe the environment around supernovae, determine dust properties and characteristics, and could provide constraints on the progenitors, which are not fully understood for SN Ia.

  1. A Stopped-Flow Apparatus with Light-Scattering Detection and Its Application to Biochemical Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Riesner, Detlev; Buenemann, Hans

    1973-01-01

    A stopped-flow apparatus utilizing light-scattering for following the progress of a reaction is described. The method is applicable to all reactions that result in a significant change of the average molecular weight. It was possible due to several modifications of a conventional stopped-flow system to obtain a sensitivity comparable to that of commercial instruments for static light-scattering measurements. Experiments on three reactions are reported: association and dissociation of mercury ligands with DNA, dissociation of the dimers of DNA-dependent RNA polymerase, and complex formation of tRNASer (yeast) with the cognate aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase. The changes in the intensities of the scattered light are calculated and compared with the measured amplitudes. PMID:4577138

  2. Coronal streamers as detected with the SPARTAN 201-01 white light coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Richard; Guhathakurta, Madhulika

    1994-01-01

    The preliminary results concerning the fine scale structure analysis of the streamers on the east limb and the region between these streamers, as well as their morphological and physical characteristics are presented. The results were obtained using white light polarized brightness data. The solar corona was observed with an externally occulted white light coronagraph carried on the SPARTAN 201-01 spacecraft for a 47 h period beginning on DOY 101, 1993. At this phase of the solar magnetic activity cycle there were well developed coronal helmet streamers located over both the east and west limbs of the sun. The photometric properties of one streamer found near the south east limb of the sun are similar to those measured of helmet streamers at the time of the 1973 total eclipse by both the ground based white light coronal camera and the Skylab externally occulted coronagraph.

  3. Acoustic Emission and Guided Ultrasonic Waves for Detection and Continuous Monitoring of Cracks in Light Water Reactor Components

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Coble, Jamie B.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Watson, Bruce E.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2012-06-28

    Acoustic emission (AE) and guided ultrasonic waves (GUW) are considered for continuous monitoring and detection of cracks in Light Water Reactor (LWR) components. In this effort, both techniques are applied to the detection and monitoring of fatigue crack growth in a full scale pipe component. AE results indicated crack initiation and rapid growth in the pipe, and significant GUW responses were observed in response to the growth of the fatigue crack. After initiation, the crack growth was detectable with AE for approximately 20,000 cycles. Signals associated with initiation and rapid growth where distinguished based on total rate of activity and differences observed in the centroid frequency of hits. An intermediate stage between initiation and rapid growth was associated with significant energy emissions, though few hits. GUW exhibit a nearly monotonic trend with crack length with an exception of measurements obtained at 41 mm and 46 mm.

  4. Simultaneous determination of major bioactive components in Qingkailing injection by high-performance liquid chromatography with evaporative light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shi-Kai; Xin, Wen-Feng; Luo, Guo-An; Wang, Yi-Ming; Cheng, Yi-Yu

    2005-11-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography with evaporative light scattering detection (HPLC/ELSD) was established for simultaneous determination of seven major bioactive components of Qingkailing injection including adenosine, geniposide, chlorogenic acid, baicalin, ursodeoxycholic acid, cholic acid, and hyodeoxycholic acid. The proposed method was applied to analyze ten various Qingkailing injections and produced data with acceptable linearity, repeatability, precision and accuracy having a limit of detection (LOD) of 10-50 ng. In comparison with UV detection, HPLC/ELSD permits the determination of non-chromophoric compounds without prior derivatization, and shows good compatibility to the multi-components of complex analytes. The proposed method is a useful alternative for routine analysis in the quality control of traditional Chinese medicine. PMID:16272719

  5. "Light-tagged" bacteriophage as a diagnostic tool for the detection of phytopathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Detection of the phytopathogen Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis, the causeal agent of bacterial blight of crucifers is essential for managing this disease. A phage-based diagnostic assay was developed that detected and identify P. cannabina pv. alisalensis from cultures and diseased plant spec...

  6. Road Lane Detection by Discriminating Dashed and Solid Road Lanes Using a Visible Light Camera Sensor.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Toan Minh; Hong, Hyung Gil; Vokhidov, Husan; Park, Kang Ryoung

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing need for road lane detection used in lane departure warning systems and autonomous vehicles, many studies have been conducted to turn road lane detection into a virtual assistant to improve driving safety and reduce car accidents. Most of the previous research approaches detect the central line of a road lane and not the accurate left and right boundaries of the lane. In addition, they do not discriminate between dashed and solid lanes when detecting the road lanes. However, this discrimination is necessary for the safety of autonomous vehicles and the safety of vehicles driven by human drivers. To overcome these problems, we propose a method for road lane detection that distinguishes between dashed and solid lanes. Experimental results with the Caltech open database showed that our method outperforms conventional methods. PMID:27548176

  7. Methods for gully characterization in agricultural croplands using ground-based light detection and ranging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gullies constitute an important source of sediment from agricultural fields. In order to properly understand gully formation and evolution over time, as well as, sediment yield, detailed topographic representations of agricultural fields are required. New technologies such as ground-based Light Dete...

  8. Young Infants Detect the Direction of Biological Motion in Point-Light Displays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhlmeier, Valerie A.; Troje, Nikolaus F.; Lee, Vivian

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, we examined if young infants can extract information regarding the directionality of biological motion. We report that 6-month-old infants can differentiate leftward and rightward motions from a movie depicting the sagittal view of an upright human point-light walker, walking as if on a treadmill. Inversion of the stimuli…

  9. Chemical fingerprinting of Shexiang Baoxin Pill and simultaneous determination of its major constituents by HPLC with evaporative light scattering detection and electrospray mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shi-Kai; Zhang, Wei-Dong; Liu, Run-Hui; Zhan, Yong-Cheng

    2006-07-01

    High-performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) with evaporative light scattered detection (ELSD) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometric detection (ESI-MS) was employed to establish chemical fingerprint of Shexiang Baoxin Pill (SBP) and to simultaneously determinate its seven major constituents, including cholic acid, deoxycholic acid, ursodeoxycholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid, cinobufagin, recibufogenin, and ginsenoside Rb1. The analysis was performed on a C18 column with water-acetonitrile gradient elution, and the investigated constituents were authenticated by comparing their retention times and mass spectra with those of reference compounds. The proposed method was applied to analyze nine SBP samples and produced data with acceptable linearity, precision, stability and accuracy. Both the chemical fingerprints and quantification data were used to evaluate the quality of various SBP products. The proposed method allows obtaining chemical fingerprint and quantification of multi-components in one run, and therefore can be readily utilized as a comprehensive quality control approach for traditional Chinese medicine. PMID:16819233

  10. A light efficiency uniformity detection system for medical rigid endoscope based on image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yakun; Liu, Ming; Liu, Xiaohua; Zhao, Yuejin; Dong, Liquan; Hui, Mei; Zhai, Xiaohao; Li, Yonghui; Zhou, Peng

    2015-08-01

    Light efficiency uniformity is a very important parameter of medical rigid endoscope. This paper introduces a new system based on image processing to test the light efficiency uniformity of medical rigid endoscope. Employing an electric machinery to reduce the human intervention, so that the precision of measuring and automation degree are improved. We collect the image with a digital CCD camera and display it on the screen of a computer, which can avoid visual fatigue from the direct observation through the rigid endoscope. To perform the image processing on a computer, we adopt a self-developed image processing software, by which the test results can be obtained from PC itself. The processes of our self-developed image processing software include: gray-scale transformation, image pretreatment and image binarization; calculate the center and equivalent radius of the field of view (FOV); plot the curve, through which the ratio of edge and center in different field and the center axisymmetric of light efficiency can be both calculated. It concludes that the relative self-effect of illumination light luminosity is the foremost factor affecting the uniformity, and these endoscopes are all qualified with the max deviation of the center axisymmetric less than 20%. The results of our study prove that this system can test the light efficiency uniformity of medical rigid endoscope quickly, expediently and accurately, and it contains more information instead of only reflecting a particular field of the FOV, what's more, it applies to different types, length and angles of view of medical rigid endoscope.

  11. Use of dynamic light scattering and Scheimpflug imaging for the early detection of cataracts.

    PubMed

    Ansari, R R; Datiles, M B

    1999-01-01

    Cataract is a leading cause of blindness. Diabetes and glycemic conditions enhance the chances of developing cataracts early. At clinical stage cataracts are detected and documented by slit-lamp biomicroscopy and Scheimpflug photography. A compact fiber optic probe, developed for space experiments, was mounted on a Scheimpflug imaging system. The probe detects and documents cataracts at pre-clinical stage noninvasively and quantitatively. The early detection at the molecular level may lead to medical treatment of cataracts, better control of glycemia, and diabetes mellitus. PMID:11475288

  12. HIV detection by in-situ hybridization based on confocal reflected light microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Louis C.; Jericevic, Zeljko; Cuellar, Roland; Paddock, Stephen W.; Lewis, Dorothy E.

    1991-05-01

    Elucidation of the pathogenesis of AIDS is confounded by the finding that few actively infected CD4+ cells (1 in 104-105) can be detected in the peripheral blood, even though there is dramatic depletion (often >90%) of CD4+ cells as the disease progresses. A sensitive, 35S-based human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) mRNA in situ hybridization technique was coupled with a new detection method, confocal laser scanning microscopy, to examine transcriptionally active HIV-infected cells from individuals at different disease stages. An algorithm for image segmentation and analysis has been developed to determine the proportion of HIV-positive cells. Data obtained using this improved detection method suggest that there are more HIV mRNA-producing cells in HIV-infected individuals than previously thought, based on other detection methods.

  13. DNA-Directed Assembly of Nanogold Dimers: A Unique Dynamic Light Scattering Sensing Probe for Transcription Factor Detection

    PubMed Central

    Seow, Nianjia; Tan, Yen Nee; Yung, Lin-Yue Lanry; Su, Xiaodi

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a unique DNA-assembled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) dimer for dynamic light scattering (DLS) sensing of transcription factors, exemplified by estrogen receptor (ER) that binds specifically to a double-stranded (ds) DNA sequence containing estrogen response element (ERE). Here, ERE sequence is incorporated into the DNA linkers to bridge the AuNPs dimer for ER binding. Coupled with DLS, this AuNP dimer-based DLS detection system gave distinct readout of a single ‘complex peak’ in the presence of the target molecule (i.e., ER). This unique signature marked the first time that such nanostructures can be used to study transcription factor-DNA interactions, which DLS alone cannot do. This was also unlike previously reported AuNP-DLS assays that gave random and broad distribution of particles size upon target binding. In addition, the ERE-containing AuNP dimers could also suppress the light-scattering signal from the unbound proteins and other interfering factors (e.g., buffer background), and has potential for sensitive detection of target proteins in complex biological samples such as cell lysates. In short, the as-developed AuNP dimer probe coupled with DLS is a simple (mix and test), rapid (readout in ~5 min) and sensitive (low nM levels of ER) platform to detect sequence-specific protein-DNA binding event. PMID:26678946

  14. DNA-Directed Assembly of Nanogold Dimers: A Unique Dynamic Light Scattering Sensing Probe for Transcription Factor Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seow, Nianjia; Tan, Yen Nee; Yung, Lin-Yue Lanry; Su, Xiaodi

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a unique DNA-assembled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) dimer for dynamic light scattering (DLS) sensing of transcription factors, exemplified by estrogen receptor (ER) that binds specifically to a double-stranded (ds) DNA sequence containing estrogen response element (ERE). Here, ERE sequence is incorporated into the DNA linkers to bridge the AuNPs dimer for ER binding. Coupled with DLS, this AuNP dimer-based DLS detection system gave distinct readout of a single ‘complex peak’ in the presence of the target molecule (i.e., ER). This unique signature marked the first time that such nanostructures can be used to study transcription factor-DNA interactions, which DLS alone cannot do. This was also unlike previously reported AuNP-DLS assays that gave random and broad distribution of particles size upon target binding. In addition, the ERE-containing AuNP dimers could also suppress the light-scattering signal from the unbound proteins and other interfering factors (e.g., buffer background), and has potential for sensitive detection of target proteins in complex biological samples such as cell lysates. In short, the as-developed AuNP dimer probe coupled with DLS is a simple (mix and test), rapid (readout in ~5 min) and sensitive (low nM levels of ER) platform to detect sequence-specific protein-DNA binding event.

  15. Simultaneous Determination of Four Active Ingredients in Sargentodoxa cuneata by HPLC Coupled with Evaporative Light Scattering Detection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Di-Hua; Lv, Yuan-Shan; Liu, Jun-Hong; Yang, Lei; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Shu-Kun; Zhuo, Yu-Zhen

    2016-01-01

    A HPLC coupled with evaporative light scattering detection method had been developed for the simultaneous determination of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethyl alcohol glycoside, salidroside, chlorogenic acid, and liriodendrin in the stem of Sargentodoxa cuneata. With a C18 column, the analysis was performed using acetonitrile and 0.2% formic acid aqueous solution as mobile phase in gradient program at a flow rate of 0.9 mL/min. The optimum drift tube temperature of evaporative light scattering detection was at 105°C with the air flow rate of 2.5 L/min. The calibration curves showed good linearity during the test ranges. This method was validated for limits of detection and quantification, precision, and reproducibility. The recoveries were within the range of 96.39%–104.64%. The relative standard deviations of intraday and interday precision were less than 2.90% and 3.30%, respectively. The developed method can be successfully used to quantify the four analytes in the stem of Sargentodoxa cuneata from various regions in China. PMID:27313618

  16. Simultaneous Determination of Four Active Ingredients in Sargentodoxa cuneata by HPLC Coupled with Evaporative Light Scattering Detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Di-Hua; Lv, Yuan-Shan; Liu, Jun-Hong; Yang, Lei; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Shu-Kun; Zhuo, Yu-Zhen

    2016-01-01

    A HPLC coupled with evaporative light scattering detection method had been developed for the simultaneous determination of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethyl alcohol glycoside, salidroside, chlorogenic acid, and liriodendrin in the stem of Sargentodoxa cuneata. With a C18 column, the analysis was performed using acetonitrile and 0.2% formic acid aqueous solution as mobile phase in gradient program at a flow rate of 0.9 mL/min. The optimum drift tube temperature of evaporative light scattering detection was at 105°C with the air flow rate of 2.5 L/min. The calibration curves showed good linearity during the test ranges. This method was validated for limits of detection and quantification, precision, and reproducibility. The recoveries were within the range of 96.39%-104.64%. The relative standard deviations of intraday and interday precision were less than 2.90% and 3.30%, respectively. The developed method can be successfully used to quantify the four analytes in the stem of Sargentodoxa cuneata from various regions in China. PMID:27313618

  17. Determination of free and amidated bile acids by high-performance liquid chromatography with evaporative light-scattering mass detection.

    PubMed

    Roda, A; Cerrè, C; Simoni, P; Polimeni, C; Vaccari, C; Pistillo, A

    1992-09-01

    A simple reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatographic method for a simultaneous analysis of free, glycine- and taurine-amidated bile acids is described. The resolution of ursodeoxycholic, cholic, chenodeocycholic, deoxycholic, and lithocholic acids, either free or amidated with glycine and taurine, is achieved using a C-18 octadecylsilane column (30 cm length, 4 micron particle size) with a gradient elution of aqueous methanol (65----75%) containing 15 mM ammonium acetate, pH 5.40, at 37 degrees C. The separated bile acids are detected with a new evaporative light-scattering mass detector and by absorbance at 200 nm. A complete resolution of the 16 bile acids, including the internal standard nor-deoxycholic acid, is obtained within 55 min. Using the light-scattering mass detector, amidated bile acids and, for the first time, free bile acids can be detected with similar detection limits in the order of 2-7 nmol. The new detector improves the baseline and the signal-to-noise ratio over the UV detection as it is not affected by impurities present in the samples with higher molar absorptivity than bile acids or by the change in the mobile phase composition during the gradient. The method fulfills all the standard requirements of precision and accuracy and the linearity of the mass detector is over 5 decade the detection limit. The new method has been used for the direct analysis of bile acid in stools and bile with only a preliminary clean-up procedure using a C-18 reverse phase extraction. PMID:1402406

  18. Energy resolution and efficiency of phonon-mediated kinetic inductance detectors for light detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardani, L.; Colantoni, I.; Cruciani, A.; Di Domizio, S.; Vignati, M.; Bellini, F.; Casali, N.; Castellano, M. G.; Coppolecchia, A.; Cosmelli, C.; Tomei, C.

    2015-08-01

    The development of sensitive cryogenic light detectors is of primary interest for bolometric experiments searching for rare events like dark matter interactions or neutrino-less double beta decay. Thanks to their good energy resolution and the natural multiplexed read-out, Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs) are particularly suitable for this purpose. To efficiently couple KIDs-based light detectors to the large crystals used by the most advanced bolometric detectors, active surfaces of several cm2 are needed. For this reason, we are developing phonon-mediated detectors. In this paper, we present the results obtained with a prototype consisting of four 40 nm thick aluminum resonators patterned on a 2 × 2 cm2 silicon chip, and calibrated with optical pulses and X-rays. The detector features a noise resolution σE = 154 ± 7 eV and an (18 ± 2)% efficiency.

  19. Detecting axial heterogeneity of birefringence in layered turbid media using polarized light imaging

    PubMed Central

    Alali, Sanaz; Wang, Yuting; Vitkin, I. Alex

    2012-01-01

    The structural anisotropy of biological tissues can be quantified using polarized light imaging in terms of birefringence; however, birefringence varies axially in anisotropic layered tissues. This may present ambiguity in result interpretation for techniques whose birefringence results are averaged over the sampling volume. To explore this issue, we extended the polarization sensitive Monte Carlo code to model bi-layered turbid media with varying uniaxial birefringence in the two layers. Our findings demonstrate that the asymmetry degree (ASD) between the off-diagonal Mueller matrix elements of heterogeneously birefringent samples is higher than the homogenously birefringent (uniaxial) samples with the same effective retardance (magnitude and orientation). We experimentally verified the validity of ASD as a birefringence heterogeneity measure by performing polarized light measurements of bi-layered elastic and scattering polyacrylamide phantoms. PMID:23243575

  20. Rapid molecular detection of invasive species in ballast and harbor water by integrating environmental DNA and light transmission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Egan, Scott P; Grey, Erin; Olds, Brett; Feder, Jeffery L; Ruggiero, Steven T; Tanner, Carol E; Lodge, David M

    2015-04-01

    Invasive species introduced via the ballast water of commercial ships cause enormous environmental and economic damage worldwide. Accurate monitoring for these often microscopic and morphologically indistinguishable species is challenging but critical for mitigating damages. We apply eDNA sampling, which involves the filtering and subsequent DNA extraction of microscopic bits of tissue suspended in water, to ballast and harbor water sampled during a commercial ship's 1400 km voyage through the North American Great Lakes. Using a lab-based gel electrophoresis assay and a rapid, field-ready light transmission spectroscopy (LTS) assay, we test for the presence of two invasive species: quagga (Dreissena bugensis) and zebra (D. polymorpha) mussels. Furthermore, we spiked a set of uninfested ballast and harbor samples with zebra mussel tissue to further test each assay's detection capabilities. In unmanipulated samples, zebra mussel was not detected, while quagga mussel was detected in all samples at a rate of 85% for the gel assay and 100% for the LTS assay. In the spiked experimental samples, both assays detected zebra mussel in 94% of spiked samples and 0% of negative controls. Overall, these results demonstrate that eDNA sampling is effective for monitoring ballast-mediated invasions and that LTS has the potential for rapid, field-based detection. PMID:25686279

  1. Derivation of Burn Scar Depths with Airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) in Indonesian Peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballhorn, U.; Siegert, F.

    2009-04-01

    more CO2 per year than the fourth-largest industrial nation, Germany, saved to achieve its Kyoto target. Since 1990, emissions from peat burning and peat decomposition have exceeded that of above ground biomass deforestation. These numbers show how important it is to have more accurate estimations for peat burn depth in the future. Until now few field measurements were made, which would require to know the fire affected area in advance or ignite peatland on purpose. Furthermore fire scars are quickly covered by regenerating vegetation. Another problem is the lack of a method without actually having to go into the field (e.g. through remote sensing techniques), due to the fact that many of the fire locations are remote and very difficult to access. We investigated if airborne light detection and ranging (LIDAR), an active laser pulse technology by which the height of objects can be precisely measured, can be used to determine the amount of peat burned during a fire event. From a LIDAR data set acquired in Central Kalimantan, Borneo, in 2007, one year after severe fires resulting from the 2006 El Niño drought, we calculated that the average depth of a burn scar was 0.30 ± 0.15 m .This was achieved through the construction of digital terrain models (DTMs) by interpolating the LIDAR ground return signals in burnt and adjacent unburned peatland. These calculated depths were compared to in situ measurements, which came to similar results. We believe that the method presented here to estimate burnt peat depth has the potential to considerably improve the accuracy of regional and global carbon emission models but would also be helpful for monitoring projects under the Kyoto Protocol like the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) or the proposed Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD) mechanism.

  2. Improved method on image detection at low light level using a sinusoidal-shaped-function signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Zhao, Longfei; Zhou, Mei; Wang, Mengjun; Lin, Ling

    2015-10-01

    This study proposes an improved method which employs the shaped-function technology and Discrete Fourier Series Transform (DFST)-based algorithm to improve the subjective impression at low light level. A sinusoidal wave light signal which is generated in the low frequency range plays the role of a shaped-function signal. The basic procedure of the proposed method is that an LED with a time-varying (sinusoidal) beam is used to illuminate the image sensor evenly. Then, a DFST-based algorithm is employed to remove the sinusoidal wave signal from the captured images for restoring the low-light-level image signal with a low gray resolution. The main purpose of this method was to improve gray-level resolution and signal-to-noise ratio of the acquired image and process the image data in real time by sliding the window. The derivation processes and experiments verify that the improved method not only can reveal a better result than the algorithms we have proposed before, but also have a better performance on the imaging speed.

  3. Organic Light-Emitting Devices (OLEDS) and Their Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance (ODMR)

    SciTech Connect

    Gang Li

    2003-12-12

    Organic Light-Emitting Devices (OLEDs), both small molecular and polymeric have been studied extensively since the first efficient small molecule OLED was reported by Tang and VanSlyke in 1987. Burroughes' report on conjugated polymer-based OLEDs led to another track in OLED development. These developments have resulted in full color, highly efficient (up to {approx} 20% external efficiency 60 lm/W power efficiency for green emitters), and highly bright (> 140,000 Cd/m{sup 2} DC, {approx}2,000,000 Cd/m{sup 2} AC), stable (>40,000 hr at 5 mA/cm{sup 2}) devices. OLEDs are Lambertian emitters, which intrinsically eliminates the view angle problem of liquid crystal displays (LCDs). Thus OLEDs are beginning to compete with the current dominant LCDs in information display. Numerous companies are now active in this field, including large companies such as Pioneer, Toyota, Estman Kodak, Philipps, DuPont, Samsung, Sony, Toshiba, and Osram, and small companies like Cambridge Display Technology (CDT), Universal Display Corporation (UDC), and eMagin. The first small molecular display for vehicular stereos was introduced in 1998, and polymer OLED displays have begun to appear in commercial products. Although displays are the major application for OLEDs at present, they are also candidates for nest generation solid-state lighting. In this case the light source needs to be white in most cases. Organic transistors, organic solar cells, etc. are also being developed vigorously.

  4. Light detection with spectral analysis at the Legnaro nuclear microprobe: Applications in material and earth sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vittone, E.; Lo Giudice, A.; Manfredotti, C.; Egeni, G.; Rudello, V.; Rossi, P.; Gennaro, G.; Pratesi, G.; Corazza, M.

    2001-07-01

    Among the numerous ion beam analytical (IBA) techniques available for material characterisation, ionoluminescence (IL) has not attracted the interest that it should deserve. Although the importance of IL technique, particularly if combined with other IBA techniques, has been widely proven, very few apparatuses to analyse light emission spectra have been installed at the microbeam facilities. In this paper we present the new IL apparatus installed at the Legnaro (LNL) Ion Microbeam Facility. The system is a modification of the OXFORD MONOCL2 apparatus for cathodoluminescence. Light collection is performed by using a retractable parabolic mirror located at a very short distance from the sample, with a small aperture to allow the ion beam to hit the sample. Accurate positioning of the retractable mirror directly coupled to a chamber mounted high-resolution monochromator allows for high light collection efficiency. This design assures that IL can be used with low beam currents (<1 pA) with the consequent reduction of the radiation damage, which often occurs during ionoluminescence measurements. A summary of some meaningful results obtained with such an apparatus is presented. The combination of IL/PIXE was used to characterise natural silica glass, known as Libyan Desert Glass, and cubic BN grains; polycristalline CVD diamond has been studied by a synergetic combination of IBICC/IL technique.

  5. GAMMA-RAY LIGHT CURVES AND VARIABILITY OF BRIGHT FERMI-DETECTED BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Antolini, E.; Bonamente, E.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Ballet, J.; Bastieri, D.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P. E-mail: stefano.ciprini@pg.infn.i E-mail: stefan@astro.su.s E-mail: stefan@astro.su.s E-mail: sarac@slac.stanford.ed

    2010-10-10

    This paper presents light curves as well as the first systematic characterization of variability of the 106 objects in the high-confidence Fermi Large Area Telescope Bright AGN Sample (LBAS). Weekly light curves of this sample, obtained during the first 11 months of the Fermi survey (2008 August 4-2009 July 4), are tested for variability and their properties are quantified through autocorrelation function and structure function analysis. For the brightest sources, 3 or 4 day binned light curves are extracted in order to determine power density spectra (PDSs) and to fit the temporal structure of major flares. More than 50% of the sources are found to be variable with high significance, where high states do not exceed 1/4 of the total observation range. Variation amplitudes are larger for flat spectrum radio quasars and low/intermediate synchrotron frequency peaked BL Lac objects. Autocorrelation timescales derived from weekly light curves vary from four to a dozen of weeks. Variable sources of the sample have weekly and 3-4 day bin light curves that can be described by 1/f {sup {alpha}} PDS, and show two kinds of gamma-ray variability: (1) rather constant baseline with sporadic flaring activity characterized by flatter PDS slopes resembling flickering and red noise with occasional intermittence and (2)-measured for a few blazars showing strong activity-complex and structured temporal profiles characterized by long-term memory and steeper PDS slopes, reflecting a random walk underlying mechanism. The average slope of the PDS of the brightest 22 FSRQs and of the 6 brightest BL Lacs is 1.5 and 1.7, respectively. The study of temporal profiles of well-resolved flares observed in the 10 brightest LBAS sources shows that they generally have symmetric profiles and that their total duration vary between 10 and 100 days. Results presented here can assist in source class recognition for unidentified sources and can serve as reference for more detailed analysis of the

  6. Comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography with evaporative light-scattering detection for the analysis of triacylglycerols in Borago officinalis.

    PubMed

    Mondello, Luigi; Beccaria, Marco; Donato, Paola; Cacciola, Francesco; Dugo, Giovanni; Dugo, Paola

    2011-03-01

    An optimized 2-D liquid chromatography (LC×LC) set-up, based on the different selectivities of a silver ion (Ag) and a non-aqueous reversed phase (NARP), employed in the first (D1) and the second dimension (D2), respectively, in combination with evaporative light-scattering detection (ELSD), has been developed for the analysis of the triacylglycerol (TAG) fraction in a Borago officinalis oil. The 2-D set-up, thanks to the complementary separation selectivity provided by the two columns, allowed to distribute 78 TAGs throughout the 2-D LC retention plane otherwise unachievable by 1-D LC. PMID:21413146

  7. Characterization of the Hamamatsu S8664 avalanche photodiode for X-ray and VUV-light detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lux, T.; Freitas, E. D. C.; Amaro, F. D.; Ballester, O.; Jover-Manas, G. V.; Martín, C.; Monteiro, C. M. B.; Sánchez, F.; Rico, J.

    2012-09-01

    We present the first operation of the VUV-sensitive avalanche photodiode (APD) from Hamamatsu to xenon scintillation light and to direct X-rays of 22.1 keV and 5.9 keV. A large non-linear response was observed for the direct X-ray detection. At 415 V APD bias voltage it was of about 30% for 22.1 keV and about 45% for 5.9 keV. The quantum efficiency for 172 nm photons has been measured to be 69±15%.

  8. Detection of Extended Emission from Fornax A and Measurement of the Extragalactic Background Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magill, Jeffrey; McConville, William; Georganopoulos, Markos; Meyer, Eileen; Perkins, Jeremy; Stawarz, Lukasz; Fermi-LAT Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Prior to the launch of Fermi in 2008, the radio galaxy Fornax A was identified as one of the few extragalactic objects that might be detected as spatially extended above 100 MeV. However, even though it was detected with high confidence in the first 2 years of the mission, it was not determined to be an extended source. Recently, the Fermi-LAT collaboration developed a new event-level analysis called Pass 8 which yields a larger acceptance, a better angular and energy resolution, as well as smaller systematic uncertainties. The improvements provided with Pass 8 combined with a longer exposure means that the spatial extension of Fornax A is significantly detected, making it only the second extragalactic gamma-ray source so far to show extent. Details of this measurement will be presented along with modeling of the emission above 100 MeV.

  9. Light-scattering detection of quantum phases of ultracold atoms in optical lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Ye Jinwu; Zhang, J. M.; Liu, W. M.; Zhang Keye; Li Yan; Zhang Weiping

    2011-05-15

    Ultracold atoms loaded on optical lattices can provide unprecedented experimental systems for the quantum simulations and manipulations of many quantum phases. However, so far, how to detect these quantum phases effectively remains an outstanding challenge. Here, we show that the optical Bragg scattering of cold atoms loaded on optical lattices can be used to detect many quantum phases, which include not only the conventional superfluid and Mott insulating phases, but also other important phases, such as various kinds of charge density wave (CDW), valence bond solid (VBS), CDW supersolid (CDW-SS) and Valence bond supersolid (VB-SS).

  10. Effectiveness of fire-detection systems in light-water-reactor facilities

    SciTech Connect

    DiNenno, P.J.; Dungan, K.W.

    1981-08-01

    This report presents a critical review of methods for evaluating fire detection system capabilities. These capabilities must include some measurement of success. The problem of evaluating the effectiveness in terms of probability of success or certainty of success of fire detection systems must be answered either to enable the correct selection of system when a need is identified, or to assess the acceptability of an existing system in meeting an identified need. These methods are complementary to a hazards analysis, which identifies the need, but can be quite independent in their development and use.

  11. Selection and characterization of DNA aptamers for the development of light-up biosensor to detect Cd(II).

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongyan; Cheng, Hui; Wang, Jine; Xu, Lijun; Chen, Hongxia; Pei, Renjun

    2016-07-01

    In order to develop a facile, cost-effective and quick-testing light-up biosensor with excellent specificity for cadmium ions (Cd(II)) detection, a modified selection method based on target-induced release of strands was used to isolate aptamers of Cd (II) with high specificity. Circular Dichroism (CD) data confirmed that one of the selected aptamers underwent a distinct conformational change on addition of Cd (II). A biosensor for Cd(II) was developed based on the Cd(II)-induced release of fluorescence-labeled aptamer from complex with a quencher-labeled short complementary sequence. The sensing platform displayed a Cd(II) concentration-dependent increase of fluorescence intensity in the low micromolar range and had an excellent selectivity in the presence of various interfering metal ions. Such biosensor could potentially be used for the detection of Cd(II) in environmental samples. PMID:27154706

  12. Ultra-low power anti-crosstalk collision avoidance light detection and ranging using chaotic pulse position modulation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jie, Hao; Ma-li, Gong; Peng-fei, Du; Bao-jie, Lu; Fan, Zhang; Hai-tao, Zhang; Xing, Fu

    2016-07-01

    A novel concept of collision avoidance single-photon light detection and ranging (LIDAR) for vehicles has been demonstrated, in which chaotic pulse position modulation is applied on the transmitted laser pulses for robust anti-crosstalk purposes. Besides, single-photon detectors (SPD) and time correlated single photon counting techniques are adapted, to sense the ultra-low power used for the consideration of compact structure and eye safety. Parameters including pulse rate, discrimination threshold, and number of accumulated pulses have been thoroughly analyzed based on the detection requirements, resulting in specified receiver operating characteristics curves. Both simulation and indoor experiments were performed to verify the excellent anti-crosstalk capability of the presented collision avoidance LIDAR despite ultra-low transmitting power. Project supported by Tsinghua University Initiative Scientific Research Program, China (Grant No. 2014z21035).

  13. [Diol column as stationary phase for high performance liquid chromatographic analysis of carbohydrates in drinks with evaporative light scattering detection].

    PubMed

    Wei, Y; Guo, L; Ding, M Y

    2001-11-01

    A high performance liquid chromatographic method with a diol column and evaporative light scattering detector (ELSD) was established for the direct analysis of fructose, glucose, sucrose, maltose and raffinose in mixture. A separation column (Lichrospher 100 Diol, 250 mm x 4.0 mm i.d., 5 microns, Hewlett-Packard, USA) and a guard column (Zorbax Rx-SIL, 12.5 mm x 4.6 mm i.d., 5 microns) were used. The mobile phase was a mixture of dichloromethane-methanol (3.2:1, volume ratio). Regression equations revealed linear relationship (correlation coefficients: 0.995-0.999) between the mass of carbohydrates injected and the peak area of carbohydrates detected by ELSD. The detection limits of ELSD (S/N = 3) were about 0.20 microgram for all carbohydrates. This system could be used for the routine analysis of simple carbohydrates in some common drinks on market. PMID:12545463

  14. Can we detect, monitor, and characterize volcanic activity using 'off the shelf' webcams and low-light cameras?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrild, M.; Webley, P. W.; Dehn, J.

    2015-12-01

    The ability to detect and monitor precursory events, thermal signatures, and ongoing volcanic activity in near-realtime is an invaluable tool. Volcanic hazards often range from low level lava effusion to large explosive eruptions, easily capable of ejecting ash to aircraft cruise altitudes. Using ground based remote sensing to detect and monitor this activity is essential, but the required equipment is often expensive and difficult to maintain, which increases the risk to public safety and the likelihood of financial impact. Our investigation explores the use of 'off the shelf' cameras, ranging from computer webcams to low-light security cameras, to monitor volcanic incandescent activity in near-realtime. These cameras are ideal as they operate in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) portions of the electromagnetic spectrum, are relatively cheap to purchase, consume little power, are easily replaced, and can provide telemetered, near-realtime data. We focus on the early detection of volcanic activity, using automated scripts that capture streaming online webcam imagery and evaluate each image according to pixel brightness, in order to automatically detect and identify increases in potentially hazardous activity. The cameras used here range in price from 0 to 1,000 and the script is written in Python, an open source programming language, to reduce the overall cost to potential users and increase the accessibility of these tools, particularly in developing nations. In addition, by performing laboratory tests to determine the spectral response of these cameras, a direct comparison of collocated low-light and thermal infrared cameras has allowed approximate eruption temperatures to be correlated to pixel brightness. Data collected from several volcanoes; (1) Stromboli, Italy (2) Shiveluch, Russia (3) Fuego, Guatemala (4) Popcatépetl, México, along with campaign data from Stromboli (June, 2013), and laboratory tests are presented here.

  15. Low noise, IR-blind organohalide perovskite photodiodes for visible light detection and imaging.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qianqian; Armin, Ardalan; Lyons, Dani M; Burn, Paul L; Meredith, Paul

    2015-03-25

    Solution-processed organohalide perov-skite photodiodes that have performance metrics matching silicon, but are infrared-blind are reported. The perovskite photodiodes operate in the visible band, have low dark current and noise, high specific detectivity, large linear dynamic range, and fast temporal response. Their properties make them promising candidates for imaging applications. PMID:25677496

  16. Lights and shadows of anti-HLA antibodies detected by solid-phase assay.

    PubMed

    Picascia, Antonietta; Sabia, Chiara; Grimaldi, Vincenzo; Montesano, Maria Lourdes; Sommese, Linda; Schiano, Concetta; Napoli, Claudio

    2014-11-01

    Recently, management of patients awaiting solid organ transplantation has taken advantages after the development of more sensitive and accurate solid phase assays which have supported the historic complement dependent cytotoxicity. This approach has allowed the detection of antibodies in patients previously considered negative. The use of the single antigen beads resulted in a more accurate anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibody characterization. The detection of anti-HLA antibodies specific for C, DQ and DP loci that were not so well characterized has been possible through the implementation of the single antigen assay. The assessment of HLA compatibility has been expanded through the introduction of "epitope matching" concept and the definition of the unacceptable antigens for a more adequate evaluation of donor-recipient compatibility. However, the clinical impact of pre-formed and de novo anti-HLA antibodies detected by solid phase assays is still controversial due to the drawback related to result interpretation. Until today, the unresolved issues concern if all antibodies affect the medium and long term clinical outcome. An open debate on the clinical relevance of anti-HLA antibodies detected by single-antigen beads highlights needing to further investigations. Here, we describe the novel applications and the improvements of the solid-phase assay use. PMID:25171913

  17. First detection of optical light from SNR G279.0+1.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stupar, M.; Parker, Q. A.

    2009-04-01

    This is the initial paper in a series presenting the first optical detections and subsequent follow-up spectroscopy of known southern Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs) previously discovered in the radio. These new detections come from the Anglo-Australian Observatory (AAO)/United Kingdom Schmidt Telescope Hα survey of the southern Galactic plane which has opened up fresh opportunities to study Galactic remnants. Here, we present the first optical imaging and follow-up spectra of Galactic SNR G279.0+1.1 where a series of 14 small-scale fragmented groups of Hα filaments have been discovered in a area centred on G279.0+1.1. Individually they are somewhat inconspicuous but collectively they are completely enclosed within the overall radio contours of this known SNR. Three of these filamentary groupings are particularly prominent and optical spectra have been obtained across two of them. Their morphological structure and spectral characteristics are typical of optically detected SNR filaments. A very strong [SII] emission relative to Hα has been detected with [SII]/Hα > 0.7 and 1.1, confirming strong, shock-heated emission. This is sufficient to classify these filaments in the likely SNR domain and therefore indicating a direct connection with the radio remnant. Other typical SNR emission lines such as [OII] at 3727Å, Hβ, [OIII] at 4959 and 5007Å, Hα and [NII] at 6548 and 6584Å were also detected, lending strong support to an SNR origin of these optical filaments. The value and insights that these optical data can provide for known remnants are discussed along with their relevance to the Galactic nitrogen abundance. A serendipitous discovery of an adjacent HII region is also briefly described.

  18. Energy resolution and efficiency of phonon-mediated kinetic inductance detectors for light detection

    SciTech Connect

    Cardani, L.; Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A.; Cruciani, A.; Vignati, M.; Bellini, F.; Casali, N.; Cosmelli, C.; Di Domizio, S.; Castellano, M. G.; Tomei, C.

    2015-08-31

    The development of sensitive cryogenic light detectors is of primary interest for bolometric experiments searching for rare events like dark matter interactions or neutrino-less double beta decay. Thanks to their good energy resolution and the natural multiplexed read-out, Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs) are particularly suitable for this purpose. To efficiently couple KIDs-based light detectors to the large crystals used by the most advanced bolometric detectors, active surfaces of several cm{sup 2} are needed. For this reason, we are developing phonon-mediated detectors. In this paper, we present the results obtained with a prototype consisting of four 40 nm thick aluminum resonators patterned on a 2 × 2 cm{sup 2} silicon chip, and calibrated with optical pulses and X-rays. The detector features a noise resolution σ{sub E} = 154 ± 7 eV and an (18 ± 2)% efficiency.

  19. Development of Gas Proportional Scintillation Counter for Light Heavy-Ion Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Hohara, Sin-ya; Imamura, Minoru; Kin, Tadahiro; Yamashita, Yusuke; Maki, Daiske; Saiho, Fuminobu; Ikeda, Katsuhiko; Uozumi, Yusuke; Matoba, Masaru

    2005-05-24

    In recent years, nuclear data have been needed in the medical field. Nuclear data induced by light heavy ions are especially needed at high precision for cancer treatment, although there are not enough usable data at present.We have a plan to measure light heavy-ion nuclear data with a dE-E detector. Low density is needed for the dE detector. We have two options for the dE detector: a semiconductor detector (SSD) and a Gas Counter. On one hand, SSD has good energy resolution, but on the other hand, it is expensive and its decay time is on the 100-microsecond order. A Gas Counter is inexpensive, and a Gas Proportional Scintillation Counter (GPSC) has fast decay time. Then, we developed a GPSC for the dE detector, and its evaluation experiment was carried out at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC).We will report the results of the experiment with the performance of the GPSC.

  20. Seeing double: the frequency and detectability of double-peaked superluminous supernova light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholl, M.; Smartt, S. J.

    2016-03-01

    The discovery of double-peaked light curves in some superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) offers an important new clue to their origins. We examine the published photometry of all Type Ic SLSNe, finding 14 objects with constraining data or limits around the time of explosion. Of these, eight (including the already identified SN 2006oz and LSQ14bdq) show plausible flux excess at the earliest epochs, which deviate by 2-9σ from polynomial fits to the rising light curves. Simple scaling of the LSQ14bdq data show that they are all consistent with a similar double-peaked structure. PS1-10pm provides multicolour UV data indicating a temperature of Tbb = 25000 ± 5000 K during the early `bump' phase. We find that a double-peak cannot be excluded in any of the other six objects, and that this behaviour may be ubiquitous. The homogeneity of the observed bumps is unexpected for interaction-powered models. Engine-powered models can explain the observations if all progenitors have extended radii or the central engine drives shock breakout emission several days after the supernova explosion.

  1. Noise and spurious pulses for Cherenkov light detection with 10-inch and 3-inch photomultipliers

    SciTech Connect

    Giordano, V.; Aiello, S.; Leonora, E. E-mail: Valentina.Giordano@ct.infn.it; Collaboration: KM3NeT Collaboration

    2014-11-18

    A large number of large photocathode area photomultipliers are widely used in astroparticle physics detectors to measure Cherenkov light in media like water or ice. In neutrino telescopes the key element of the detector is the optical module, which consists of one or more photodetectors inside a transparent pressure-resistant glass sphere. The glass sphere serves as mechanical protection while ensuring good light transmission. The performance of the telescope is largely dependent on the presence of noise pulses present on the anode of the photomultipliers. A study was conducted of noise pulses of Hamamatsu 10-inch and 3-inch diameter photomultipliers measuring time and charge distributions of dark pulses, pre-pulses, delayed pulses, and after-pulses. In particular, an analysis on multiple after-pulses was performed on both photomultiplier models. A digital oscilloscope was used to acquire all the pulses after the main pulse during a time window of 16μs for an off-line analysis to determine the charge and time spectra and a correlation between the arrival times and the charge of each after-pulse.

  2. Acoustic emission and guided ultrasonic waves for detection and continuous monitoring of cracks in light water reactor components

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, R. M.; Coble, J.; Ramuhalli, P.; Watson, B.; Cumblidge, S. E.; Doctor, S. R.; Bond, L. J.

    2012-07-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) and guided ultrasonic waves (GUW) are considered for continuous monitoring and detection of cracks in Light Water Reactor (LWR) components. In this effort, both techniques are applied to the detection and monitoring of fatigue crack growth in a full scale pipe component. AE results indicated crack initiation and rapid growth in the pipe, and significant GUW responses were observed in response to the growth of the fatigue crack. After initiation, the crack growth was detectable with AE for approximately 20,000 cycles. Signals associated with initiation and rapid growth were distinguished based on total rate of activity and differences observed in the centroid frequency of hits. An intermediate stage between initiation and rapid growth was associated with significant energy emissions, though few hits. GUW exhibit a nearly monotonic trend with crack length with an exception of measurements obtained at crack lengths of 41 mm and 46 mm. Coupling variability and shadowing by the electro-discharge machining (EDM) starter notch set the lower limit of detectability. (authors)

  3. Highly sensitive analysis of flavonoids by zwitterionic microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography coupled with light-emitting diode-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wan; Hu, Shuai-Shuai; Li, Xing-Ying; Pang, Xiao-Qing; Cao, Jun; Ye, Li-Hong; Dai, Han-Bin; Liu, Xiao-Juan; Da, Jian-Hua; Chu, Chu

    2014-09-01

    A rapid zwitterionic microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography (ZI-MEEKC) approach coupled with light-emitting-diode-induced fluorescence (LED-IF, 480nm) detection was proposed for the analysis of flavonoids. In the optimization process, we systematically investigated the separation conditions, including the surfactants, cosurfactants, pH, buffers and fluorescence parameters. It was found that the baseline separation of the seven flavonoids was obtained in less than 5min with a running buffer consisting of 92.9% (v/v) 5mM sodium borate, 0.6% (w/v) ZI surfactant, 0.5% (w/v) ethyl acetate and 6.0% (w/v) 1-butanol. High sensitivity was obtained by the application of LED-IF detection. The limits of detection for seven flavonoids were in the range of 3.30×10(-8) to 2.15×10(-6)molL(-1) without derivatization. Ultimately, the detection method was successfully applied to the analysis of flavonoids in hawthorn plant and food products with satisfactory results. PMID:25047822

  4. On-chip detection of non-classical light by scalable integration of single-photon detectors

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Faraz; Mower, Jacob; Harris, Nicholas C.; Bellei, Francesco; Dane, Andrew; Lee, Catherine; Hu, Xiaolong; Kharel, Prashanta; Marsili, Francesco; Assefa, Solomon; Berggren, Karl K.; Englund, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Photonic-integrated circuits have emerged as a scalable platform for complex quantum systems. A central goal is to integrate single-photon detectors to reduce optical losses, latency and wiring complexity associated with off-chip detectors. Superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) are particularly attractive because of high detection efficiency, sub-50-ps jitter and nanosecond-scale reset time. However, while single detectors have been incorporated into individual waveguides, the system detection efficiency of multiple SNSPDs in one photonic circuit—required for scalable quantum photonic circuits—has been limited to <0.2%. Here we introduce a micrometer-scale flip-chip process that enables scalable integration of SNSPDs on a range of photonic circuits. Ten low-jitter detectors are integrated on one circuit with 100% device yield. With an average system detection efficiency beyond 10%, and estimated on-chip detection efficiency of 14–52% for four detectors operated simultaneously, we demonstrate, to the best of our knowledge, the first on-chip photon correlation measurements of non-classical light. PMID:25575346

  5. Validity of Particle-Counting Method Using Laser-Light Scattering for Detecting Platelet Aggregation in Diabetic Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakadate, Hiromichi; Sekizuka, Eiichi; Minamitani, Haruyuki

    We aimed to study the validity of a new analytical approach that reflected the phase from platelet activation to the formation of small platelet aggregates. We hoped that this new approach would enable us to use the particle-counting method with laser-light scattering to measure platelet aggregation in healthy controls and in diabetic patients without complications. We measured agonist-induced platelet aggregation for 10 min. Agonist was added to the platelet-rich plasma 1 min after measurement started. We compared the total scattered light intensity from small aggregates over a 10-min period (established analytical approach) and that over a 2-min period from 1 to 3 min after measurement started (new analytical approach). Consequently platelet aggregation in diabetics with HbA1c ≥ 6.5% was significantly greater than in healthy controls by both analytical approaches. However, platelet aggregation in diabetics with HbA1c < 6.5%, i.e. patients in the early stages of diabetes, was significantly greater than in healthy controls only by the new analytical approach, not by the established analytical approach. These results suggest that platelet aggregation as detected by the particle-counting method using laser-light scattering could be applied in clinical examinations by our new analytical approach.

  6. Intrinsic enzyme mimicking activity of gold nanoclusters upon visible light triggering and its application for colorimetric trypsin detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang-Li; Jin, Lu-Yi; Dong, Yu-Ming; Wu, Xiu-Ming; Li, Zai-Jun

    2015-02-15

    In this research, a novel enzyme mimetics based on the photochemical property of gold nanoclusters was demonstrated. It was found that the bovine serum albumin (BSA) stabilized red or blue emitting gold nanoclusters (Au NCs) exhibited enzyme-like activity under visible light irradiation. The BSA-Au NCs had better stability against stringent conditions compared to natural enzyme. In addition, the photostimulated enzyme mimetics of BSA-Au NCs showed several unprecedented advantages over natural peroxidase or other existing alternatives based on nanomaterials, such as the independence of hydrogen peroxide on activity and the easily regulated activity by light irradiation. The mechanism of the photoresponsive enzyme-like activity of BSA-Au NCs was investigated. The photoactivated BSA-Au NCs was designed to develop a facile, cheap, and rapid colorimetric assay to detect trypsin through trypsin digestion of the protein template of BSA-stabilized Au NCs. The limit of detection for trypsin was 0.6 μg/mL, which was much lower than the average level of trypsin in patient's urine or serum. PMID:25310483

  7. Detection of two-mode compression and degree of entanglement in continuous variables in parametric scattering of light

    SciTech Connect

    Rytikov, G. O.; Chekhova, M. V.

    2008-12-15

    Generation of 'twin beams' (of light with two-mode compression) in single-pass optical parametric amplifier (a crystal with a nonzero quadratic susceptibility) is considered. Radiation at the output of the nonlinear crystal is essentially multimode, which raises the question about the effect of the detection volume on the extent of suppression of noise from the difference photocurrent of the detectors. In addition, the longitudinal as well as transverse size of the region in which parametric transformation takes place is of fundamental importance. It is shown that maximal suppression of noise from difference photocurrent requires a high degree of entanglement of two-photon light at the outlet of the parametric amplifier, which is defined by Federov et al. [Phys. Rev. A 77, 032336 (2008)] as the ratio of the intensity distribution width to the correlation function width. The detection volume should be chosen taking into account both these quantities. Various modes of single-pass generation of twin beams (noncollinear frequency-degenerate and collinear frequency-nondegenerate synchronism of type I, as well as collinear frequency-degenerate synchronism of type II) are considered in connection with the degree of entanglement.

  8. A resonance light scattering sensor based on bioinspired molecularly imprinted polymers for selective detection of papain at trace levels.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Lv, Sifang; Chen, Feng; Liu, Chan; Cai, Changqun; Chen, Chunyan; Chen, Xiaoming

    2016-03-17

    A novel resonance light scattering sensor based on the molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) technique was developed for specific recognition of the trace quantities of papain (Pap). In this sensor, as the specific recognition element, an excellent biocompatibility of protein-imprinted polymer without fluorescent materials was easily prepared, which based on the effective synthesis of mussel-inspired bionic polydopamine (PDA) on the surface of SiO2 nanoparticles (SiO2@PDA NPs). This recognition element could capture the target protein selectively, which led to the enhancement of resonance light scattering intensity with the increasing of the target protein concentration. The sensor was applied to determine Pap in the linear concentration range of 2.0-20.0 nM with a correlation coefficient r = 0.9966, and a low detection limit of 0.63 nM. The relative standard deviation for 14 nM of Pap was 1.02% (n = 7). In addition, the specificity study confirmed the resultant Pap-imprinted SiO2@PDA NPs had a high-selectivity to Pap, and the practical analytical performance was further examined by evaluating the detection of Pap in the dietary supplement with satisfactory results, with good recoveries of 97.5-105.3%. PMID:26920781

  9. Postcolumn reactor using a laser-drilled capillary for light-emitting diode-induced fluorescence detection in CE.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Daisuke; Kaneta, Takashi; Imasaka, Totaro

    2007-11-01

    This study investigated a novel postcolumn reactor for fluorescence detection in CE. A laser-drilled capillary, with an aperture made by laser ablation, was used for mixing derivatization reagents with the analytes separated by CZE. The derivatization reagents, o-phthaldialdehyde (OPA), and 2-mercaptoethanol, were introduced into the capillary through the aperture and reacted with the analytes after CZE separation. High voltages were applied to both the inlet reservoir and the reservoir filled with the derivatization reagents. Thus, the flow rate of the derivatization reagents was controlled by the electric potential that was applied to the reservoir of the derivatization reagents. A UV light-emitting diode was used as an excitation light source for the fluorescence detection of OPA derivatives. A commercially available tee connector was compared with the laser-drilled capillary. The results implied that the dead volume of the laser-drilled capillary was less than that of the tee connector, since the laser-drilled capillary suppressed band broadening more efficiently. The LODs for amino acids were determined to be approximately 5 microM. The method was applied to the determination of amino acids in a Japanese beverage. PMID:17948271

  10. Detection of G-Quadruplex Formation via Light Scattering of Defined Gold Nanoassemblies Modulated by Molecular Hairpins.

    PubMed

    Seow, Nianjia; Kirk, Yingjie; Yung, Lin-Yue Lanry

    2016-05-18

    G-quadruplexes are of great scientific interest, as these unique DNA structures play key regulatory roles in cell replication, such as safeguarding against uncontrolled cellular divisions. The quadruplexes have also been applied for detecting DNA and protein biomarkers via methods like fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and gold nanoparticle (AuNP) aggregation. As an alternative and complementary platform to the established molecular techniques for the study of quadruplexes, we have developed a strategy coupling poly-G (PG)-mediated quadruplex formation with AuNP assembly detectable via dynamic light scattering (DLS). The presence of quadruplex-forming sequences also uniquely modifies the AuNP nanoassembly readout on DLS. In addition, molecular hairpins co-attached onto the AuNP together with PG successfully modulated the quadruplex-induced nanoassembly. Through molecular beacon-based fluorescence restoration and light scattering signal changes, the open/closed conformations of the hairpins are leveraged to tune the size of the quadruplex-mediated nanoassembly. PMID:27135402

  11. Nanoantenna harmonic sensor: theoretical analysis of contactless detection of molecules with light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Mohamed; Cheng, Mark M. C.; Le, Khai Q.; Chen, Pai-Yen

    2015-10-01

    The nonlinear harmonic sensor is a popular wireless sensor and radiofrequency identification (RFID) technique, which allows high-performance sensing in a severe interference/clutter background by transmitting a radio wave and detecting its modulated higher-order harmonics. Here we introduce the concept and design of optical harmonic tags based on nonlinear nanoantennas that can contactlessly detect electronic (e.g. electron affinity) and optical (e.g. relative permittivity) characteristics of molecules. By using a dual-resonance gold-molecule-silver nanodipole antenna within the quantum mechanical realm, the spectral form of the second-harmonic scattering can sensitively reveal the physical properties of molecules, paving a new route towards optical molecular sensors and optical identification (OPID) of biological, genetic, and medical events for the ‘Internet of Nano-Things’.

  12. Final LDRD report : development of advanced UV light emitters and biological agent detection strategies.

    SciTech Connect

    Figiel, Jeffrey James; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Banas, Michael Anthony; Farrow, Darcie; Armstrong, Andrew M.; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Schmitt, Randal L.

    2007-12-01

    We present the results of a three year LDRD project which has focused on the development of novel, compact, ultraviolet solid-state sources and fluorescence-based sensing platforms that apply such devices to the sensing of biological and nuclear materials. We describe our development of 270-280 nm AlGaN-based semiconductor UV LEDs with performance suitable for evaluation in biosensor platforms as well as our development efforts towards the realization of a 340 nm AlGaN-based laser diode technology. We further review our sensor development efforts, including evaluation of the efficacy of using modulated LED excitation and phase sensitive detection techniques for fluorescence detection of bio molecules and uranyl-containing compounds.

  13. Nanoantenna harmonic sensor: theoretical analysis of contactless detection of molecules with light.

    PubMed

    Farhat, Mohamed; Cheng, Mark M C; Le, Khai Q; Chen, Pai-Yen

    2015-10-16

    The nonlinear harmonic sensor is a popular wireless sensor and radiofrequency identification (RFID) technique, which allows high-performance sensing in a severe interference/clutter background by transmitting a radio wave and detecting its modulated higher-order harmonics. Here we introduce the concept and design of optical harmonic tags based on nonlinear nanoantennas that can contactlessly detect electronic (e.g. electron affinity) and optical (e.g. relative permittivity) characteristics of molecules. By using a dual-resonance gold-molecule-silver nanodipole antenna within the quantum mechanical realm, the spectral form of the second-harmonic scattering can sensitively reveal the physical properties of molecules, paving a new route towards optical molecular sensors and optical identification (OPID) of biological, genetic, and medical events for the 'Internet of Nano-Things'. PMID:26403614

  14. Automatic CME front edge detection from STEREO white-light coronagraph images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirnosov, Vladimir; Chang, Lin-Ching; Pulkkinen, Antti

    2015-08-01

    The coronagraph images captured by a Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) Ahead/Behind (A/B) spacecraft allow tracking of a coronal mass ejection (CME) from two different viewpoints and reconstructing its propagation in three-dimensional space. The reconstruction can be done using a triangulation technique that requires a CME front edge location. There are currently no robust automatic CME front edge detection methods that can be integrated with the triangulation technique. In this paper, we propose a novel automatic method to detect the front edge of the CME using STEREO coronagraph 2 red-colored Red, Green, Blue color model images. Our method consists of two modules: preprocessing and classification. The preprocessing module decomposes each coronagraph image into its three channels and uses only the red channel image for CME segmentation. The output of the preprocessing module is a set of segmented running-difference binary images which is fed into the classification module. These images are then transformed into polar coordinates followed by CME front edge detection based on the distance that CME travels in the field of view. The proposed method was validated against a manual method using total 56 CME events, 28 from STEREO A and 28 from STEREO B, captured in the period from 1 January 2008 to 16 August 2009. The results show that the proposed method is effective for CME front edge detection. The proposed method is useful in quantitative CME processing and analysis and will be immediately applicable to assist automatic triangulation method for real-time space weather forecasting.

  15. Light-emission-based biosensor for detection of food pathogens: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ashutosh; Singh, Rakesh K.; Bhunia, Arun K.

    2001-03-01

    Rapid detection, identification and enumeration of pathogenic microorganisms is highly important to the food industry to address the food safety concerns. Biosensors are devices that promise to achieve these objectives, these analytical devices can accurately and selectively estimate the levels of foodborne pathogens. The most widely applied biosensors are based on the optical properties like absorption, fluorescence, reflection, refraction, dispersion etc. This review is done to provide an overview of optic based biosensor and their application in the area of food safety. Working principles of Surface plasmon resonance , resonant mirror and fiber optic based biosensor are described in the article. Resonant mirror based biosensor has been used for the estimation of S. aureus, it was proven selective for the strain being tested (Cowan-1). The sensitivity of the assay was increased by using colloidal-gold conjugates in sandwich assay format. An integrated fiber optic based biosensor is used for detection of Salmonella typhimurium reducing the detection time to 30 min. Fiber optic based biosensors offer advantage of compactness, flexibility , resistance to electrical noise and small probe size.

  16. Light emitting diode, photodiode-based fluorescence detection system for DNA analysis with microchip electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Hall, Gordon H; Glerum, D Moira; Backhouse, Christopher J

    2016-02-01

    Electrophoretic separation of fluorescently end-labeled DNA after a PCR serves as a gold standard in genetic diagnostics. Because of their size and cost, instruments for this type of analysis have had limited market uptake, particularly for point-of-care applications. This might be changed through a higher level of system integration and lower instrument costs that can be realized through the use of LEDs for excitation and photodiodes for detection--if they provide sufficient sensitivity. Here, we demonstrate an optimized microchip electrophoresis instrument using polymeric fluidic chips with fluorescence detection of end-labeled DNA with a LOD of 0.15 nM of Alexa Fluor 532. This represents orders of magnitude improvement over previously reported instruments of this type. We demonstrate the system with an electrophoretic separation of two PCR products and their respective primers. We believe that this is the first LED-induced fluorescence microchip electrophoresis system with photodiode-based detection that could be used for standard applications of PCR and electrophoresis. PMID:26412502

  17. Actinic detection of multilayer defects on EUV mask blanks using LPP light source and dark-field imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tezuka, Yoshihiro; Ito, Masaaki; Terasawa, Tsuneo; Tomie, Toshihisa

    2004-05-01

    The development of defect-free mask blanks including inspection is one of the big challenges for the implementation of extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL), especially when the introduction of EUVL is rescheduled to a later technology node. Among others, inspection of multilayer coated mask blanks with no oversight of critical defects and with minimal detection of false defects is a challenging issue for providing mask blanks free of defects or with thorough characterization of any existing defects. MIRAI Project has been developing a novel actinic (at-wavelength) inspection tool for detecting critical multilayer defects using a dark-field imaging and a laser-produced plasma (LPP) light source, expecting better sensitivity and better correlation with printability. The first experimental set up is completed for proof-of-concept (POC) demonstration using 20x Schwarzschild imaging optics and a backsideilluminated CCD. An in-house LPP light source is integrated to optimally illuminate the area of interest by EUV with a wavelength of 13.5nm. For its illuminator, a multilayer-coated elliptical mirror is used to illuminate a mask blank with the EUV that is collected within a wide solid angle from the light source. The first EUV dark-field image is obtained from a mask blank with programmed multilayer defects which are manufactured by locating well-defined patterns before depositing Mo/Si multilayer on EUV mask substrate. All the fabricated multilayer defects down to 70nm in width and 3.5nm in height are detected as clear signals that are distinguishable from the background intensity arising from the scattering by the surface roughness of the multilayer-coated mask blank. We have also detected a phase defect as low as 2nm in height. False defect count was not only zero within the area of view but also statistically confirmed to be less than one within the whole area of a mask blank assuming the extrapolation of observed fluctuation of background intensity is applicable

  18. The Cosmic Microwave Background: Detection and Interpretation of the First Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    A host of astrophysical observations suggest the early Universe was incredibly hot, dense, and homogeneous. A powerful and useful probe of this epoch is provided by the relic radiation, which we refer to today as the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). Precision maps of this light contain the earliest glimpse of the Universe after the Big Bang and signatures of the evolution of its contents. By exploiting these clues, constraints on the age, mass density, detailed composition, and geometry of the Universe can be made. A brief survey of the evolution of the radiometric and polarimetric imaging systems used in advancing our understanding of the early Universe will be reviewed. A survey of detector technologies, instrumentation techniques, and experimental challenges encountered in these efforts will be presented.

  19. High-temperature micro liquid chromatography for lipid molecular species analysis with evaporative light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Hazotte, Aurélie; Libong, Danielle; Chaminade, Pierre

    2007-01-26

    The need for a rapid and sensitive chromatographic technique for analyzing lipid molecular species, has led to the development of an high-temperature micro liquid chromatographic system (HTLC) coupled to an evaporative light scattering detector. The increased diffusion coefficients and reduced viscosity at higher temperatures allowed lipids to be analyzed rapidly with solvents differing from those classically used in lipids chemistry. Hypercarb, a reverse phase material, was used for its different properties including heat resistance in high temperature micro HPLC. We have investigated the temperature effect on kinetic performances in HTLC, established pure solvents eluent strength at high temperature and studied different classes of lipids with seven pure solvents. We found that it was possible to use alcohols solvents in the mobile phase to elute lipids without the use of chlorinated solvents. A quick and simple method was developed to analyze a complex lipid simple, ceramide type III and type IV. PMID:17161844

  20. Detection of defects on apple using B-spline lighting correction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiangbo; Huang, Wenqian; Guo, Zhiming

    To effectively extract defective areas in fruits, the uneven intensity distribution that was produced by the lighting system or by part of the vision system in the image must be corrected. A methodology was used to convert non-uniform intensity distribution on spherical objects into a uniform intensity distribution. A basically plane image with the defective area having a lower gray level than this plane was obtained by using proposed algorithms. Then, the defective areas can be easily extracted by a global threshold value. The experimental results with a 94.0% classification rate based on 100 apple images showed that the proposed algorithm was simple and effective. This proposed method can be applied to other spherical fruits.

  1. Light-matter decoupling and A2 term detection in superconducting circuits

    PubMed Central

    García-Ripoll, J. J.; Peropadre, B.; De Liberato, S.

    2015-01-01

    The spontaneous and stimulated emission of a superconducting qubit in the presence of propagating microwaves originates from an effective light-matter interaction that, similarly to the case of the atomic case, can contain a diamagnetic term proportional to the square vector potential A2. In the present work we prove that an increase in the strength of the diamagnetic term leads to an effective decoupling of the qubit from the electromagnetic field, and that this effect is observable at any range of qubit-photon coupling. To measure this effect we propose to use a transmon suspended over a transmission line, where the relative strength of the A2 term is controlled by the qubit-line separation. We show that the spontaneous emission rate of the suspended transmon onto the line can, at short distances, increase with such a separation, instead of decreasing. PMID:26530139

  2. A new protocol to detect light elements in estuarine sediments by X-ray microanalysis (SEM/EDS).

    PubMed

    Miguens, Flavio Costa; de Oliveira, Martha Lima; Marins, Rozane Valente; de Lacerda, Luiz Drude

    2010-01-01

    The analytical scanning electron microscope (SEM) has been used to determine the presence and distribution of atomic elements in mineralogy. However, the detection of light elements such as carbon is difficult to obtain with standard energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) and usual proceedings for SEM. This study proposes a new protocol to detect calcium carbonate by SEM/EDS using sediments from the Jaguaribe River estuary, NE Brazil, as a model. Handmade gold mounting discs (Au stubs) were used as sample support and samples were adhered with inexpensive glue (Loctite Super_Bonder) or directly disposed on the Au stubs. CaCO(3) and NaCl for chemical analysis were used as control and counterproof to the carbon adhesive tape. Control salts EDS analyses indicate that the method was efficient to detect light elements. Sediments obtained from different depths in the core sampled at the Jaguaribe River estuary consist of particles and aggregates with diverse morphology that covers a wide range of particle or aggregate size. Morphology and dimensions were similar for all core depths. Analysis of samples disposed on gold mounting disc without glue showed that sediment bulk particles usually presented small particles adhering on the surface. Clay minerals were predominant but silica was also often identified. Calcium was a trace element in a small number of sediment bulk particles. Biological and non-biological calcium carbonates, including nanoparticles, were identified in all core depths. X-ray emitted from Au stub did not interfere in the CaCO(3) EDS analysis. Calcium carbonate particles from sediments were identified using this novel approach. PMID:20388618

  3. Infrared light detection using a whispering-gallery-mode optical microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Jiangang E-mail: ozdemir@seas.wustl.edu Ozdemir, Sahin Kaya E-mail: ozdemir@seas.wustl.edu Yang, Lan E-mail: ozdemir@seas.wustl.edu

    2014-04-28

    We demonstrate a thermal infrared (IR) detector based on an ultra-high-quality-factor (Q) whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) microtoroidal silica resonator and investigate its performance to detect IR radiation at 10 μm wavelength. The bandwidth and the sensitivity of the detector are dependent on the power of a probe laser and the detuning between the probe laser and the resonance frequency of the resonator. The microtoroid IR sensor achieved a noise-equivalent-power (NEP) of 7.46 nW, corresponding to an IR intensity of 0.095 mW/cm{sup 2}.

  4. In-vacuum scattered light reduction with black cupric oxide surfaces for sensitive fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Norrgard, E B; Sitaraman, N; Barry, J F; McCarron, D J; Steinecker, M H; DeMille, D

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a simple and easy method for producing low-reflectivity surfaces that are ultra-high vacuum compatible, may be baked to high temperatures, and are easily applied even on complex surface geometries. Black cupric oxide (CuO) surfaces are chemically grown in minutes on any copper surface, allowing for low-cost, rapid prototyping, and production. The reflective properties are measured to be comparable to commercially available products for creating optically black surfaces. We describe a vacuum apparatus which uses multiple blackened copper surfaces for sensitive, low-background detection of molecules using laser-induced fluorescence. PMID:27250404

  5. Light triggered detection of aminophenyl phosphate with a quantum dot based enzyme electrode

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    An electrochemical sensor for p-aminophenyl phosphate (pAPP) is reported. It is based on the electrochemical conversion of 4-aminophenol (4AP) at a quantum dot (QD) modified electrode under illumination. Without illumination no electron transfer and thus no oxidation of 4AP can occur. pAPP as substrate is converted by the enzyme alkaline phosphatase (ALP) to generate 4AP as a product. The QDs are coupled via 1,4-benzenedithiol (BDT) linkage to the surface of a gold electrode and thus allow potential-controlled photocurrent generation. The photocurrent is modified by the enzyme reaction providing access to the substrate detection. In order to develop a photobioelectrochemical sensor the enzyme is immobilized on top of the photo-switchable layer of the QDs. Immobilization of ALP is required for the potential possibility of spatially resolved measurements. Geometries with immobilized ALP are compared versus having the ALP in solution. Data indicate that functional immobilization with layer-by-layer assembly is possible. Enzymatic activity of ALP and thus the photocurrent can be described by Michaelis- Menten kinetics. pAPP is detected as proof of principle investigation within the range of 25 μM - 1 mM. PMID:21982200

  6. Monte Carlo modeling (MCML) of light propagation in skin layers for detection of fat thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilubol, Chonnipa; Treerattrakoon, Kiatnida; Mohammed, Waleed S.

    2010-05-01

    Nowadays, most activities require lesser physical actions, which could ultimately lead to accumulation of excessive body fat. The main roles of body fat are to store energy and acts as various kinds of insulators for the body. The thickness of fat layers can be measured to indicate fat-body weight ratio. Exceeding the body-mass index (BMI) could lead to many illnesses regarding obesity. Consequently, many studies have proposed various principles and techniques to measure the amount of fat within one's body. In this paper, infrared interactance in skin layers is studied for investigation of the influence of fat thickness upon photon travelling pattern in skin tissues using Monte Carlo model (MCML). Photon propagation is numerically simulated in simplified multi-layered tissues. The optical coefficients of each skin layers are accounted for different traveling paths of photons that move through random motion. The thickness of fat layer is varied, and changing in optical parameters is observed. Then the statistically obtained data are computed and analyzed for the effect of the fat layer upon reflection percentage using different wavelengths. The calculations have shown increment in the slope of change of reflection percentage versus fat thickness, when using infrared compare to visible light. This technique can be used to construct a mobile device that is capable of measuring the volume fraction of melanin and blood in the epidermis layer and dermis layer, to calculate for the necessary optical coefficients that would be necessary for measurement of fat thickness.

  7. Detection of a Light Echo from the Otherwise Normal SN 2007af

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdov, D.; Leising, M. D.; Milne, P. A.; Pearcy, J.; Riess, A. G.; Macri, L. M.; Bryngelson, G. L.; Garnavich, P. M.

    2015-05-01

    We present the discovery of a light echo from SN 2007af, a normal Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) in NGC 5584. Hubble Space Telescope images taken three years post explosion reveal two separate echoes: an outer echo and an extended central region, which we propose to be an inner echo for which details are unresolved. Multiple images were obtained in the F160W, F350LP, F555W, and F814W using the Wide Field Camera 3. If the outer echo is produced by an interstellar dust sheet perpendicular to the line of sight, it is located ∼800 pc in front of the SN. The dust for the inner echo is 0.45 pc \\lt d\\lt 90 pc away from the SN. The inner echo color is consistent with typical interstellar dust wavelength-dependent scattering cross-sections, while the outer echo is redder than predicted. Both dust sheets, if in the foreground, are optically thin for scattering, and the outer echo sheet thickness is consistent with the inferred extinction from peak brightness. Whether the inner echo is from interstellar or circumstellar dust is ambiguous. Overall, the echo characteristics are quite similar to previously observed SN Ia echoes.

  8. Detection of precancerous cervical conditions using elastic light single-scattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canpolat, Murat; Denkceken, Tuba; Karaveli, Seyda; Pestereli, Elif; Erdoğan, Gülgün; Özel, Deniz; Bilge, Uğur; Simsek, Tayup

    2010-02-01

    We have investigated the potential application of elastic light single-scattering spectroscopy (ELSSS) as an adjunctive tool for screening of cervical precancerous lesions non-invasively and in real time. Ex-vivo measurements were performed on 95 cervix biopsy tissue of 60 patients. Normal cervix tissue from 10 patients after hysterectomy was used as a control group. Correlation between ELSSS spectra and histopathology results were investigated. It was found that the spectral slope was positive for all the spectra taken on normal cervix tissue samples from the control group. We assumed that if there is only one spectrum with a negative spectral slope among the all spectra taken on a biopsy specimen, the biopsy specimen is pathologically abnormal. This shows that pap smear and ELSSS results are in good agreement. Most biopsy tissue samples had both positive and negative spectral slopes. Therefore, we calculated the percentage of negative spectral slopes and hypothesized that this was correlated to dysplastic percentage of the epithelial tissue of the biopsy material. The ROC curve was calculated using the dysplastic percentage and high squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) and low squamous intraepitherlial lesions (LSIL) biopsy specimens were differentiated from non HSIL and LSIL with a sensitivity and specificity of 70.4% and 66.7% respectively, with p < 0.05.

  9. Dextrin characterization by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography--pulsed amperometric detection and size-exclusion chromatography--multi-angle light scattering--refractive index detection.

    PubMed

    White, D Richard; Hudson, Patricia; Adamson, Julie T

    2003-05-16

    Starch hydrolysis products, or dextrins, are widely used throughout the food industry for their functional properties. Dextrins are saccharide polymers linked primarily by alpha-(1 --> 4) D-glucose units and are prepared by partial hydrolysis of starch. Hydrolysis can be accomplished by the use of acid, enzymes, or by a combination of both. The hydrolysis products are typically characterized by the "dextrose equivalent" (DE), which refers to the total reducing power of all sugars present relative to glucose. While the DE gives the supplier and buyer a rough guide to the bulk properties of the material, the physiochemical properties of dextrins are dependent on the overall oligosaccharide profile. High-performance anion-exchange chromatography (HPAEC) with pulsed amperometric detection and size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) with multi-angle light-scattering and refractive index detection were used to characterize dextrins from commercial sources. HPAEC was used to acquire the oligosaccharide profile, and SEC to obtain an overall molar mass distribution. These methods in combination extended our understanding of the relationship between oligosaccharide profile, DE, and the hydrolysis process. Data from the two techniques enabled a method for estimating the DE that gave results in reasonable agreement with the accepted titration method. PMID:12830879

  10. Detection range enhancement using circularly polarized light in scattering environments for infrared wavelengths

    DOE PAGESBeta

    van der Laan, J. D.; Sandia National Lab.; Scrymgeour, D. A.; Kemme, S. A.; Dereniak, E. L.

    2015-03-13

    We find for infrared wavelengths there are broad ranges of particle sizes and refractive indices that represent fog and rain where the use of circular polarization can persist to longer ranges than linear polarization. Using polarization tracking Monte Carlo simulations for varying particle size, wavelength, and refractive index, we show that for specific scene parameters circular polarization outperforms linear polarization in maintaining the intended polarization state for large optical depths. This enhancement with circular polarization can be exploited to improve range and target detection in obscurant environments that are important in many critical sensing applications. Specifically, circular polarization persists bettermore » than linear for radiation fog in the short-wave infrared, for advection fog in the short-wave infrared and the long-wave infrared, and large particle sizes of Sahara dust around the 4 micron wavelength.« less

  11. Detection range enhancement using circularly polarized light in scattering environments for infrared wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    van der Laan, J. D.; Scrymgeour, D. A.; Kemme, S. A.; Dereniak, E. L.

    2015-03-13

    We find for infrared wavelengths there are broad ranges of particle sizes and refractive indices that represent fog and rain where the use of circular polarization can persist to longer ranges than linear polarization. Using polarization tracking Monte Carlo simulations for varying particle size, wavelength, and refractive index, we show that for specific scene parameters circular polarization outperforms linear polarization in maintaining the intended polarization state for large optical depths. This enhancement with circular polarization can be exploited to improve range and target detection in obscurant environments that are important in many critical sensing applications. Specifically, circular polarization persists better than linear for radiation fog in the short-wave infrared, for advection fog in the short-wave infrared and the long-wave infrared, and large particle sizes of Sahara dust around the 4 micron wavelength.

  12. Detection of nonlocal spin entanglement by light emission from a superconducting p -n junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroer, Alexander; Recher, Patrik

    2015-08-01

    We model a superconducting p -n junction in which the n and the p sides are contacted through two optical quantum dots (QDs), each embedded into a photonic nanocavity. Whenever a Cooper pair is transferred from the n side to the p side, two photons are emitted. When the two electrons of a Cooper pair are transported through different QDs, polarization-entangled photons are created, provided that the Cooper pairs retain their spin singlet character while being spatially separated on the two QDs. We show that a Clauser-Holt-Shimony-Horne (CHSH) Bell-type measurement is able to detect the entanglement of the photons over a broad range of microscopic parameters, even in the presence of parasitic processes and imperfections.

  13. Optical Fiber Infrasound Sensor Arrays: Signal Detection and Characterization Capabilities in Light Wind Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, K.; Zumberge, M.; Berger, J.; Matoza, R.; Hedlin, M.; Shearer, P.

    2006-12-01

    Optical fiber infrasound sensors (OFIS) are long compliant tubes wrapped with two optical fibers that measure pressure variation with laser interferometry. Initial work suggested that this sensor has, in low-wind conditions, a lower noise floor above 1 Hz than a traditional microbarometer sensor with a pipe-array wind filter. More recent progress has been made in two other practical areas. First, we have increased reliability and the recorded signal fidelity. Noise caused by ambient temperature changes has been reduced by burial of the OFIS beneath a foot of coarse gravel and by employing a polarization diversity detector. We are currently experimenting with a thermally-controlled OFIS that would eliminate the need for burial of an OFIS. Second, we have been developing OFIS configurations, techniques, and software for signal phase velocity determination. Because the pressure variation is integrated along the length of the tube, the instrument response is a function of the orientation of the OFIS relative to that of the signal wavefront. We show with synthetic data and real data recorded at Pinion Flat Observatory in southern California how to exploit this spectral property to determine the phase velocity of infrasound signals. This type of analysis allows us to use an array that has a smaller surface area than typical microbarometer arrays with wind filters. For signals with very low signal to noise ratios, using circular OFIS in a traditional triangular array geometry works better. We also present preliminary evidence that the response of linear and circular OFIS to light wind is less pronounced than that of traditional sensors connected to a circular porous-hose wind filter.

  14. An AOTF-LDTOF Spectrometer Suite for In Situ Organic Detection and Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanover, N.; Glenar, D. A.; Voelz, D.; Xiao, X.; Tawalbeh, R.; Boston, P.; Brinckerhoff, W. B.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Getty, S.

    2009-12-01

    We discuss the development of a miniature near-infrared point spectrometer, operating in the 2-4 micron region, based on acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) technology. This instrument may be used to screen and corroborate analyses of samples containing organic biomarkers or mineralogical signatures suggestive of extant or extinct organic material collected in situ from planetary surfaces. AOTF technology has the potential to enable significant near-IR spectroscopic diagnostic capability without exceeding the resources of a small surface laboratory. An optically bright, broadband emitter and AOTF combination is used as a tunable narrowband light source, the light from which is guided to a small (~0.04 cm^2) sample area using large (600 micron) diameter infrared fibers. AOTFs have been demonstrated to be rugged and radiation-hard devices, but their principal advantage is rapid wavelength change and the ability to sample at arbitrarily chosen wavelengths, which maximizes information content. Spectrum acquisition is performed using a sensitive point detector. Samples with evidence of organics or other species of astrobiological interest may be further analyzed using a co-focused time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS), using laser desorption (LD) to sample and ionize complex molecules directly from the sample surface. The combined instrument geometry allows the LDTOF to quickly verify and identify any reduced organics detected in the rapid AOTF survey of the identical sample. The combination of an AOTF IR point spectrometer with LDTOF thus provides a very practical and efficient astrobiology investigation that is compact and rugged enough for a lander platform targeted for Mars, an asteroid, or icy moons of the outer solar system. This work is supported by NASA's ASTID and EPSCoR programs through grant numbers NNX08AY44G and NNX08AV85A, respectively.

  15. Dual-wavelength light-scattering technique for selective detection of volcanic ash particles in the presence of water droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurányi, Z.; Burtscher, H.; Loepfe, M.; Nenkov, M.; Weingartner, E.

    2015-12-01

    A new method is presented in this paper which analyses the scattered light of individual aerosol particles simultaneously at two different wavelengths in order to retrieve information on the particle type. We show that dust-like particles, such as volcanic ash, can be unambiguously discriminated from water droplets on a single-particle level. As a future application of this method, the detection of volcanic ash particles should be possible in a humid atmosphere in the presence of cloud droplets. The characteristic behaviour of pure water's refractive index can be used to separate water droplets and dust-like particles which are commonly found in the micrometre size range in the ambient air. The low real part of the water's refractive index around 2700-2800 nm results in low scattered light intensities compared to e.g. the visible wavelength range, and this feature can be used for the desired particle identification. The two-wavelength measurement set-up was theoretically and experimentally tested and studied. Theoretical calculations were done using Mie theory. Comparing the ratio of the scattered light at the two wavelengths (visible-to-IR (infrared), R value) for water droplets and different dust types (basalt, andesite, African mineral dust, sand, volcanic ash, pumice) showed at least 9-times-higher values (on average 70 times) for water droplets than for the dust types at any diameter within the particle size range of 2-20 μm. The envisaged measurement set-up was built up into a laboratory prototype and was tested with different types of aerosols. We generated aerosols from the following powders, simulating dust-like particles: cement dust, ISO 12103-1 A1 Ultrafine Test Dust and ash from the 2012 eruption of the Etna volcano. Our measurements verified the theoretical considerations; the median experimental R value is 8-21 times higher for water than for the "dust" particles.

  16. Age Dating Merger Events in Early Type Galaxies via the Detection of AGB Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bothun, G.

    2005-01-01

    A thorough statistical analysis of the J-H vs. H-K color plane of all detected early type galaxies in the 2MASS catalog with velocities less than 5000 km/s has been performed. This all sky survey is not sensitive to one particular galactic environment and therefore a representative range of early type galaxy environments have been sampled. Virtually all N-body simulation so major mergers produces a central starburst due to rapid collection of gas. This central starburst is of sufficient amplitude to change the stellar population in the central regions of the galaxy. Intermediate age populations are given away by the presence of AGB stars which will drive the central colors redder in H-K relative to the J- H baseline. This color anomaly has a lifetime of 2-5 billion years depending on the amplitude of the initial starburst Employing this technique on the entire 2MASS sample (several hundred galaxies) reveals that the AGB signature occurs less than 1% of the time. This is a straightforward indication that virtually all nearby early type galaxies have not had a major merger occur within the last few billion years.

  17. Light and/or atomic beams to detect ultraweak gravitational effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartaglia, Angelo; Belfi, Jacopo; Beverini, Nicolò; Di Virgilio, Angela; Ortolan, Antonello; Porzio, Alberto; Ruggiero, Matteo Luca

    2014-06-01

    We shall review the opportunities lent by ring lasers and atomic beams interferometry in order to reveal gravitomagnetic effects on Earth. Both techniques are based on the asymmetric propagation of waves in the gravitational field of a rotating mass; actually the times of flight for co- or counter-rotating closed paths turn out to be different. After discussing properties and limitations of the two approaches we shall describe the proposed GINGER experiment which is being developed for the Gran Sasso National Laboratories in Italy. The experimental apparatus will consist of a three-dimensional array of square rings, 6m × 6m, that is planned to reach a sensitivity in the order of 1prad/√Hertz or better. This sensitivity would be one order of magnitude better than the best existing ring, which is the G-ring in Wettzell, Bavaria, and would allow for the terrestrial detection of the Lense-Thirring effect and possibly of deviations from General Relativity. The possibility of using either the ring laser approach or atomic interferometry in a space mission will also be considered. The technology problems are under experimental study using both the German G-ring and the smaller G-Pisa ring, located at the Gran Sasso.

  18. Trimodal detection of early childhood caries using laser light scanning and fluorescence spectroscopy: clinical prototype

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Amy S.; Ridge, Jeremy S.; Nelson, Leonard Y.; Berg, Joel H.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. There is currently a need for a safe and effective way to detect and diagnose early stages of childhood caries. A multimodal optical clinical prototype for diagnosing caries demineralization in vivo has been developed. The device can be used to quickly image and screen for any signs of demineralized enamel by obtaining high-resolution and high-contrast surface images using a 405-nm laser as the illumination source, as well as obtaining autofluorescence and bacterial fluorescence images. When a suspicious region of demineralization is located, the device also performs dual laser fluorescence spectroscopy using 405- and 532-nm laser excitation. An autofluorescence ratio of the two excitation lasers is computed and used to quantitatively diagnose enamel health. The device was tested on five patients in vivo as well as on 28 extracted teeth with clinically diagnosed carious lesions. The device was able to provide detailed images that highlighted the lesions identified by the clinicians. The autofluorescence spectroscopic ratios obtained from the extracted teeth successfully quantitatively discriminated between sound and demineralized enamel. PMID:23986369

  19. Prostate cancer detection using combined auto-fluorescence and light reflectance spectroscopy: ex vivo study of human prostates

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vikrant; Olweny, Ephrem O.; Kapur, Payal; Cadeddu, Jeffrey A.; Roehrborn, Claus G.; Liu, Hanli

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the capability of detecting prostate cancer (PCa) using auto-fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy (AFLS) and light reflectance spectroscopy (LRS). AFLS used excitation at 447 nm with four emission wavelengths (532, 562, 632, and 684 nm), where their lifetimes and weights were analyzed using a double exponent model. LRS was measured between 500 and 840 nm and analyzed by a quantitative model to determine hemoglobin concentrations and light scattering. Both AFLS and LRS were taken on n = 724 distinct locations from both prostate capsular (nc = 185) and parenchymal (np = 539) tissues, including PCa tissue, benign peripheral zone tissue and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), of fresh ex vivo radical prostatectomy specimens from 37 patients with high volume, intermediate-to-high-grade PCa (Gleason score, GS ≥7). AFLS and LRS parameters from parenchymal tissues were analyzed for statistical testing and classification. A feature selection algorithm based on multinomial logistic regression was implemented to identify critical parameters in order to classify high-grade PCa tissue. The regression model was in turn used to classify PCa tissue at the individual aggressive level of GS = 7,8,9. Receiver operating characteristic curves were generated and used to determine classification accuracy for each tissue type. We show that our dual-modal technique resulted in accuracies of 87.9%, 90.1%, and 85.1% for PCa classification at GS = 7, 8, 9 within parenchymal tissues, and up to 91.1%, 91.9%, and 94.3% if capsular tissues were included for detection. Possible biochemical and physiological mechanisms causing signal differences in AFLS and LRS between PCa and benign tissues were also discussed. PMID:24877012

  20. A New Clinical Instrument for The Early Detection of Cataract Using Dynamic Light Scattering and Corneal Topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Datiles, Manuel B., III; King, James F.

    2000-01-01

    A growing cataract can be detected at the molecular level using the technique of dynamic light scattering (DLS). However, the success of this method in clinical use depends upon the precise control of the scattering volume inside a patient's eye and especially during patient's repeat visits. This is important because the scattering volume (cross-over region between the scattered fight and incident light) inside the eye in a high-quality DLS set-up is very small (few microns in dimension). This precise control holds the key for success in the longitudinal studies of cataract and during anti-cataract drug screening. We have circumvented these problems by fabricating a new DLS fiber optic probe with a working distance of 40 mm and by mounting it inside a cone of a corneal analyzer. This analyzer is frequently used in mapping the corneal topography during PRK (photorefractive keratectomy) and LASIK (laser in situ keratomileusis) procedures in shaping of the cornea to correct myopia. This new instrument and some preliminary clinical tests on one of us (RRA) showing the data reproducibility are described.

  1. Detection range enhancement using circularly polarized light in scattering environments for infrared wavelengths.

    PubMed

    van der Laan, J D; Scrymgeour, D A; Kemme, S A; Dereniak, E L

    2015-03-20

    We find for infrared wavelengths that there are broad ranges of particle sizes and refractive indices that represent fog and rain, where circular polarization can persist to longer ranges than linear polarization. Using polarization tracking Monte Carlo simulations for varying particle size, wavelength, and refractive index, we show that, for specific scene parameters, circular polarization outperforms linear polarization in maintaining the illuminating polarization state for large optical depths. This enhancement with circular polarization can be exploited to improve range and target detection in obscurant environments that are important in many critical sensing applications. Initially, researchers employed polarization-discriminating schemes, often using linearly polarized active illumination, to further distinguish target signals from the background noise. More recently, researchers have investigated circular polarization as a means to separate signal from noise even more. Specifically, we quantify both linearly and circularly polarized active illumination and show here that circular polarization persists better than linear for radiation fog in the short-wave infrared, for advection fog in the short-wave and long-wave infrared, and large particle sizes of Sahara dust around the 4 μm wavelength. Conversely, we quantify where linear polarization persists better than circular polarization for some limited particle sizes of radiation fog in the long-wave infrared, small particle sizes of Sahara dust for wavelengths of 9-10.5 μm, and large particle sizes of Sahara dust through the 8-11 μm wavelength range in the long-wave infrared. PMID:25968509

  2. Elimination of light scatter interference in dual-laser flow cytometry by synchronous detection of emitted fluorescence: theory and demonstration using simulated signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinkamp, John A.; Keij, Jan F.

    1999-06-01

    Light scatter is often a source of interference in dual-laser excitation experiments by flow cytometry. If the two laser beams are not adequately separated or optical masking is not used, and if gated sequential fluorescence signal detection is not employed, light scatter from particles/cells as they pass across one beam can interfere in the fluorescence measurement channel of the other laser excitation beam. In this study we discuss the problem and present the theory for improving fluorescence measurements in dual-laser flow cytometry by use of modulated laser excitation and synchronous (phase- sensitive) detection of the resulting fluorescence emission to eliminate light scatter interference from particles/cells. Fluorescence emission from particles/cells generated by the first laser beam (unmodulated cw) is measured using conventional means (detection channel no. 1). Light scatter interference from particles/cells as they pass across the first laser excitation beam, whose wavelength lies in the fluorescence measurement region of detection channel no. 2, is rejected by the synchronously tuned phase-sensitive channel no. 2 detector, whereas the fluorescence emission corresponding to laser no. 2 excitation is detected and measured. The efficacy of the technology in relation to analytical cytology measurements is demonstrated using simulated fluorescence and light scatter signals.

  3. Simultaneous determination of sucralose and related compounds by high-performance liquid chromatography with evaporative light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wenwu; Wang, Nani; Zhang, Peimin; Zhang, Jiajie; Wu, Shuchao; Zhu, Yan

    2016-08-01

    Sucralose is widely used in food and beverages as sweetener. Current synthesis approaches typically provide sucralose products with varying levels of related chlorinated carbohydrates which can affect the taste and flavor-modifying properties of sucralose. Quantification of related compounds in sucralose is often hampered by the lack of commercially available standards. In this work, nine related compounds were purified (purity>97%) and identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), then a rapid and simple HPLC coupled with evaporative light scattering detection (ELSD) method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of sucralose and related compounds. Under optimized conditions, the method showed good linearity in the range of 2-600μgmL(-1) with determination coefficients R(2)⩾0.9990. Moreover, low limits of detection in the range of 0.5-2.0μgmL(-1) and good repeatability (RSD<3%, n=6) were obtained. Recoveries were from 96.8% to 101.2%. Finally, the method has been successfully applied to sucralose quality control and purification process monitoring. PMID:26988513

  4. No detectable reiteration of genes coding for mouse MOPC 41 immunoglobulin light-chain mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Farace, M G; Aellen, M F; Briand, P A; Faust, C H; Vassalli, P; Mach, B

    1976-01-01

    RNA fractions rich in immunoglobulin light (L)-chain mRNA were isolated from mouse myeloma MOPC 41 by procedures previously described, and chemically labeled with 125I. These RNA fractions were hybridized with MOPC 41 DNA under conditions of DNA excess. Hybridization conditions were chosen under which the entire sequence of the L-chain mRNA probe, thus including the variable region, remains available for hybridization throughout the reaction. The hybridization (C0t) curve showed double transition kinetics, with one component corresponding to about 250 gene copies and the other to about two to four copies. In contrast, when MOPC 41 L-chain mRNA was further purified as a single band by gel elecptrophoresis in 99% formamide, the hybridization curve showed only a single transition, corresponding to about two to four genes, with the disappearance of the "reiterated" component. That component resulted therefore from contaminating RNA species. The data indicate that no reiteration can be detected by RNase or by hydroxylapatite for the genes corresponding to the entire sequence of MOPC 41 L-chain mRNA, including the untranslated segments, within the limits of detectability of short reiterated segments. It thus appears that there is only one or very few genes corresponding to the 41 L-chain variable region "subgroup" in MOPC 41 DNA. The possibility that the variable genes of plasmocytes might result frm a combination of several nonreiterated germline genes is discussed. Images PMID:815907

  5. Automatic detection of small bowel tumors in endoscopic capsule images by ROI selection based on discarded lightness information.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Pedro M; Ramos, Jaime; Lima, Carlos S

    2015-08-01

    This paper addresses the problem of automatic detection of tumoral frames in endoscopic capsule videos by using features directly extracted from the color space. We show that tumor can be appropriately discriminated from normal tissue by using only color information histogram measures from the Lab color space and that light saturated regions are usually classified as tumoral regions when color based discriminative procedures are used. These regions are correctly classified if lightening is discarded becoming the tissue classifier based only on the color differences a and b of the Lab color space. While current state of the art systems for small bowel tumor detection usually rely on the processing of the whole frame regarding features extraction this paper proposes the use of fully automatic segmentation in order to select regions likely to contain tumoral tissue. Classification is performed by using Support Vector Machine (SVM) and Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) by using features from color channels a and b of the Lab color space. The proposed algorithm outperforms in more than 5% a series of other algorithms based on features obtained from the higher frequency components selected from Wavelets and Curvelets transforms while saving important computational resources. In a matter of fact the proposed algorithm is more than 25 times faster than algorithms requiring wavelet/curvelet and co-occurrence computations. PMID:26736929

  6. Multiple detection of single nucleotide polymorphism by microarray-based resonance light scattering assay with enlarged gold nanoparticle probes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jiaxue; Ma, Lan; Lei, Zhen; Wang, Zhenxin

    2016-03-01

    The mapping of specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in patients' genome is a critical process for the development of personalized therapy. In this work, a DNA microarray-based resonance light scattering (RLS) assay has been developed for multiplexed detection of breast cancer related SNPs with high sensitivity and selectivity. After hybridization of the desired target single-stranded DNAs (ssDNAs) with the ssDNA probes on a microarray, the polyvalent ssDNA modified 13 nm gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are employed to label the hybridization reaction through the formation of a three-stranded DNA system. The H2O2-mediated enlargement of GNPs is then used to enhance the RLS signal. The microarray-based RLS assay provides a detection limit of 10 pM (S/N = 3) for the target ssDNA and determines an allele frequency as low as 1.0% in the target ssDNA cocktail. Combined with an asymmetric PCR technique, the proposed assay shows good accuracy and sensitivity in profiling 4 SNPs related to breast cancer of three selected cell lines. PMID:26899365

  7. 3D imaging of biofilms on implants by detection of scattered light with a scanning laser optical tomograph

    PubMed Central

    Heidrich, Marko; Kühnel, Mark P.; Kellner, Manuela; Lorbeer, Raoul-Amadeus; Lange, Tineke; Winkel, Andreas; Stiesch, Meike; Meyer, Heiko; Heisterkamp, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Biofilms – communities of microorganisms attached to surfaces – are a constant threat for long-term success in modern implantology. The application of laser scanning microscopy (LSM) has increased the knowledge about microscopic properties of biofilms, whereas a 3D imaging technique for the large scale visualization of bacterial growth and migration on curved and non-transparent surfaces is not realized so far. Towards this goal, we built a scanning laser optical tomography (SLOT) setup detecting scattered laser light to image biofilm on dental implant surfaces. SLOT enables the visualization of living biofilms in 3D by detecting the wavelength-dependent absorption of non-fluorescent stains like e.g. reduced triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) accumulated within metabolically active bacterial cells. Thus, the presented system allows the large scale investigation of vital biofilm structure and in vitro development on cylindrical and non-transparent objects without the need for fluorescent vital staining. We suggest SLOT to be a valuable tool for the structural and volumetric investigation of biofilm formation on implants with sizes up to several millimeters. PMID:22076261

  8. Simultaneous qualification and quantification of eight triterpenoids in radix achyranthis bidentatae by high-performance liquid chromatography with evaporative light scattering detection and mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Li, Ping; Li, Hui-Jun; Song, Yue; Bi, Zhi-Ming; Li, Yan-Jing

    2007-04-01

    An HPLC with evaporative light scattering detection (ELSD) and ESI-MS was established for the simultaneous determination of eight triterpenoids in Radix Achyranthis Bidentatae. The optimal chromatographic conditions were achieved on a Zorbax C18 column by linear gradient elution with 0.08% v/v aqueous formic acid and ACN as the mobile phase at the flow rate of 0.8 mL/min. Temperature for the detector drift tube was set at 101 degrees C and the nitrogen flow rate was 2.8 L/min. The identities of the analytes were accomplished by comparing retention times and mass data with those of reference compounds. The validation of the method included tests of linearity, sensitivity, repeatability, recovery, and stability. All the calibration curves of the eight triterpenoids showed good linear regression (R2 >0.997) within the test ranges. The method provides desirable repeatability with overall intra- and interday variations of less than 4.9%. The obtained recoveries varied between 93.6 and 98.1% while the RSDs were below 3.9% (n = 3). The analysis results indicate that the content of investigated triterpenoids in Radix Achyranthis Bidentatae from different locations was greatly diverse, and the triterpenoids could be used as chemical markers for the discrimination of genuine and ungenuine crude drugs. PMID:17536729

  9. Optical detection of honeybees by use of wing-beat modulation of scattered laser light for locating explosives and land mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repasky, Kevin S.; Shaw, Joseph A.; Scheppele, Ryan; Melton, Christopher; Carsten, John L.; Spangler, Lee H.

    2006-03-01

    An instrument is demonstrated that can be used for optical detection of honeybees in a cluttered environment. The instrument uses a continuous-wave diode laser with a center wavelength of 808 nm and an output power of 28 mW as the laser transmitter source. Light scattered from moving honeybee wings will produce an intensity-modulated signal at a characteristic wing-beat frequency (170-270 Hz) that can be used to detect the honeybees against a cluttered background. The optical detection of honeybees has application in the biological detection of land mines and explosives, as was recently demonstrated.

  10. Label-free detection of DNA using a light-addressable potentiometric sensor modified with a positively charged polyelectrolyte layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chunsheng; Bronder, Thomas; Poghossian, Arshak; Werner, Carl Frederik; Schöning, Michael J.

    2015-03-01

    A multi-spot (16 spots) light-addressable potentiometric sensor (MLAPS) consisting of an Al-p-Si-SiO2 structure modified with a weak polyelectrolyte layer of PAH (poly(allylamine hydrochloride)) was applied for the label-free electrical detection of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) immobilization and hybridization by the intrinsic molecular charge for the first time. To achieve a preferentially flat orientation of DNA strands and thus, to reduce the distance between the DNA charge and MLAPS surface, the negatively charged probe single-stranded DNAs (ssDNA) were electrostatically adsorbed onto the positively charged PAH layer using a simple layer-by-layer (LbL) technique. In this way, more DNA charge can be positioned within the Debye length, yielding a higher sensor signal. The surface potential changes in each spot induced due to the surface modification steps (PAH adsorption, probe ssDNA immobilization, hybridization with complementary target DNA (cDNA), non-specific adsorption of mismatched ssDNA) were determined from the shifts of photocurrent-voltage curves along the voltage axis. A high sensor signal of 83 mV was registered after immobilization of probe ssDNA onto the PAH layer. The hybridization signal increases from 5 mV to 32 mV with increasing the concentration of cDNA from 0.1 nM to 5 μM. In contrast, a small signal of 5 mV was recorded in the case of non-specific adsorption of fully mismatched ssDNA (5 μM). The obtained results demonstrate the potential of the MLAPS in combination with the simple and rapid LbL immobilization technique as a promising platform for the future development of multi-spot light-addressable label-free DNA chips with direct electrical readout.A multi-spot (16 spots) light-addressable potentiometric sensor (MLAPS) consisting of an Al-p-Si-SiO2 structure modified with a weak polyelectrolyte layer of PAH (poly(allylamine hydrochloride)) was applied for the label-free electrical detection of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) immobilization

  11. Immunoglobulin heavy/light chain analysis enhances the detection of residual disease and monitoring of multiple myeloma patients

    PubMed Central

    Batinić, Josip; Perić, Zinaida; Šegulja, Dragana; Last, James; Prijić, Sanja; Dubravčić, Klara; Volarić, Lidija; Sertić, Dubravka; Radman, Ivo; Bašić-Kinda, Sandra; Matišić, Danica; Batinić, Drago; Labar, Boris; Nemet, Damir

    2015-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the clinical utility of incorporating a novel heavy/light chain immunoassay (HLC) into the existing methods for the assessment of multiple myeloma (MM) patients. Methods Convenience sera samples from 90 previously treated IgG and IgA MM patients in different disease stages were analyzed. The study was conducted in Clinical Hospital Center Zagreb between 2011 and 2013. The collected sera were analyzed by standard laboratory techniques (serum protein electrophoresis, quantification of total immunoglobulins, serum immunofixation, serum free light chain [FLC] assay) and HLC assay. Results HLC ratios outside the normal range were found in 58 of 90 patients, including 28 out of 61 patients with total immunoglobulin measurements within the normal range and 5 out of 23 patients in complete response. Both elevated HLC isotype level and abnormal HLC ratio correlated with the parameters of tumor burden, including percentage of plasma cells in the bone marrow (P < 0.001 and P = 0.002, respectively) and an abnormal serum FLC ratio (for both P < 0.001). In addition, abnormal HLC isotype level correlated with serum beta-2-microglobulin level (P = 0.038). In terms of prognosis, abnormal HLC isotype level and abnormal HLC ratio were significantly associated with shorter overall survival (P < 0.001 and P = 0.002, respectively). Interestingly, suppression of the uninvolved (polyclonal) isotype pair, but not other non-myeloma immunoglobulin isotypes, was also associated with a shorter overall survival (P = 0.021). In a multivariate analysis, an abnormal HLC ratio and β2-microglobulin level >3.5mg/L were independent risk factors for survival. Conclusion The new HLC assay has greater sensitivity in detecting monoclonal protein, correlates with tumor burden markers, and affects patients' outcome. PMID:26088851

  12. Label-free detection of DNA using a light-addressable potentiometric sensor modified with a positively charged polyelectrolyte layer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chunsheng; Bronder, Thomas; Poghossian, Arshak; Werner, Carl Frederik; Schöning, Michael J

    2015-04-14

    A multi-spot (16 spots) light-addressable potentiometric sensor (MLAPS) consisting of an Al-p-Si-SiO2 structure modified with a weak polyelectrolyte layer of PAH (poly(allylamine hydrochloride)) was applied for the label-free electrical detection of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) immobilization and hybridization by the intrinsic molecular charge for the first time. To achieve a preferentially flat orientation of DNA strands and thus, to reduce the distance between the DNA charge and MLAPS surface, the negatively charged probe single-stranded DNAs (ssDNA) were electrostatically adsorbed onto the positively charged PAH layer using a simple layer-by-layer (LbL) technique. In this way, more DNA charge can be positioned within the Debye length, yielding a higher sensor signal. The surface potential changes in each spot induced due to the surface modification steps (PAH adsorption, probe ssDNA immobilization, hybridization with complementary target DNA (cDNA), non-specific adsorption of mismatched ssDNA) were determined from the shifts of photocurrent-voltage curves along the voltage axis. A high sensor signal of 83 mV was registered after immobilization of probe ssDNA onto the PAH layer. The hybridization signal increases from 5 mV to 32 mV with increasing the concentration of cDNA from 0.1 nM to 5 μM. In contrast, a small signal of 5 mV was recorded in the case of non-specific adsorption of fully mismatched ssDNA (5 μM). The obtained results demonstrate the potential of the MLAPS in combination with the simple and rapid LbL immobilization technique as a promising platform for the future development of multi-spot light-addressable label-free DNA chips with direct electrical readout. PMID:25771844

  13. A Light-Emitting Diode- (LED-) Based Absorption Sensor for Simultaneous Detection of Carbon Monoxide and Carbon Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Thurmond, Kyle; Loparo, Zachary; Partridge, William; Vasu, Subith S

    2016-06-01

    A sensor was developed for simultaneous measurements of carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO2) fluctuations in internal combustion engine exhaust gases. This sensor utilizes low-cost and compact light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that emit in the 3-5 µm wavelength range. An affordable, fast response sensor that can measure these gases has a broad application that can lead to more efficient, fuel-flexible engines and regulation of harmful emissions. Light emission from LEDs is spectrally broader and more spatially divergent when compared to that of lasers, which presented many design challenges. Optical design studies addressed some of the non-ideal characteristics of the LED emissions. Measurements of CO and CO2 were conducted using their fundamental absorption bands centered at 4.7 µm and 4.3 µm, respectively, while a 3.6 µm reference LED was used to account for scattering losses (due to soot, window deposits, etc.) common to the three measurement LEDs. Instrument validation and calibration was performed using a laboratory flow cell and bottled-gas mixtures. The sensor was able to detect CO2 and CO concentration changes as small as 30 ppm and 400 ppm, respectively. Because of the many control and monitor species with infra-red absorption features, which can be measured using the strategy described, this work demonstrates proof of concept for a wider range of fast (250 Hz) and low-cost sensors for gas measurement and process monitoring. PMID:27091903

  14. Confocal Cornea Microscopy Detects Involvement of Corneal Nerve Fibers in a Patient with Light-Chain Amyloid Neuropathy Caused by Multiple Myeloma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Dietrich; Schmidt-Wilcke, Tobias; Greiner, Tineke; Maier, Christoph; Schargus, Marc; Tegenthoff, Martin; Vorgerd, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Changes in the subbasal corneal plexus detected by confocal cornea microscopy (CCM) have been described for various types of neuropathy. An involvement of these nerves within light-chain (AL) amyloid neuropathy (a rare cause of polyneuropathy) has never been shown. Here, we report on a case of a patient suffering from neuropathy caused by AL amyloidosis and underlying multiple myeloma. Small-fiber damage was detected by CCM. PMID:27482195

  15. Determination of antioxidant additives in foodstuffs by direct measurement of gold nanoparticle formation using resonance light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Andreu-Navarro, A; Fernández-Romero, J M; Gómez-Hens, A

    2011-06-10

    The capability of antioxidant compounds to reduce gold(III) to gold nanoparticles has been kinetically studied in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide using stopped-flow mixing technique and resonance light scattering as detection system. This study has given rise to a simple and rapid method for the determination of several synthetic and natural antioxidants used as additives in foodstuff samples. The formation of AuNPs was monitored by measuring the initial reaction-rate of the system in about 5s, using an integration time of 0.1s. Dynamic ranges of the calibration graphs and detection limits, obtained with standard solutions of the analytes, were (μmolL⁻¹): gallic acid (0.04-0.59, 0.01), propyl gallate (0.04-1.41, 0.01), octyl gallate (0.03-0.35, 0.08), dodecyl gallate (0.02-0.30, 0.007), butylated hydroxyanisol (0.07-0.39, 0.009), butylated hydroxytoluene (0.04-0.32, 0.01), ascorbic acid (0.11-1.72, 0.03) and sodium citrate (0.07-1.29, 0.02). The regression coefficients were higher than 0.994 in all instances. The precision of the method, expressed as RSD%, was established at two concentration levels of each analyte, with values ranging between 0.6 and 4.8%. The practical usefulness of the developed method was demonstrated by the determination of several antioxidant additives in foodstuff samples, which were extracted, appropriately diluted and assayed, obtaining recoveries between 95.4 and 99.5%. The results obtained were validated using two reference methods. PMID:21601026

  16. Quantum dot-functionalized porous ZnO nanosheets as a visible light induced photoelectrochemical platform for DNA detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenjing; Hao, Qing; Wang, Wei; Bao, Lei; Lei, Jianping; Wang, Quanbo; Ju, Huangxian

    2014-02-01

    This work reports the synthesis of novel CdTe quantum dot (QD)-functionalized porous ZnO nanosheets via a covalent binding method with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane as a linker. The functional nanosheets showed an excellent visible-light absorbency and much higher photoelectrochemical activity than both CdTe QDs and ZnO nanosheets due to the porous structure and appropriate band alignment between the CdTe QDs and ZnO nanosheets. Using hydrogen peroxide as an electron acceptor the nanosheet-modified electrode showed a sensitive photocurrent response. This speciality led to a novel methodology for the design of hydrogen peroxide-related biosensors by the formation or consumption of hydrogen peroxide. Using biotin-labeled DNA as capture probe, a model biosensor was proposed by immobilizing the probe on a nanosheet-modified electrode to recognize target DNA in the presence of an assistant DNA, which produced a ``Y'' junction structure to trigger a restriction endonuclease-aided target recycling. The target recycling resulted in the release of biotin labeled to the immobilized DNA from the nanosheet-modified electrode, thus decreased the consumption of hydrogen peroxide by horseradish peroxidase-mediated electrochemical reduction after binding the left biotin with horseradish peroxidase-labeled streptavidin, which produced an increasing photoelectrochemical response. The `signal on' strategy for photoelectrochemical detection of DNA showed a low detection limit down to the subfemtomole level and good specificity to single-base mismatched oligonucleotides. The sensitized porous ZnO nanosheets are promising for applications in both photovoltaic devices and photoelectrochemical biosensing.

  17. Light-Weight Multispectral Uav Sensors and Their Capabilities for Predicting Grain Yield and Detecting Plant Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nebiker, S.; Lack, N.; Abächerli, M.; Läderach, S.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we investigate the performance of new light-weight multispectral sensors for micro UAV and their application to selected tasks in agronomical research and agricultural practice. The investigations are based on a series of flight campaigns in 2014 and 2015 covering a number of agronomical test sites with experiments on rape, barley, onion, potato and other crops. In our sensor comparison we included a high-end multispectral multiSPEC 4C camera with bandpass colour filters and reference channel in zenith direction and a low-cost, consumer-grade Canon S110 NIR camera with Bayer pattern colour filters. Ground-based reference measurements were obtained using a terrestrial hyperspectral field spectrometer. The investigations show that measurements with the high-end system consistently match very well with ground-based field spectrometer measurements with a mean deviation of just 0.01-0.04 NDVI values. The low-cost system, while delivering better spatial resolutions, expressed significant biases. The sensors were subsequently used to address selected agronomical questions. These included crop yield estimation in rape and barley and plant disease detection in potato and onion cultivations. High levels of correlation between different vegetation indices and reference yield measurements were obtained for rape and barley. In case of barley, the NDRE index shows an average correlation of 87% with reference yield, when species are taken into account. With high geometric resolutions and respective GSDs of down to 2.5 cm the effects of a thrips infestation in onion could be analysed and potato blight was successfully detected at an early stage of infestation.

  18. Isolation of ceramide fractions from skin sample by subcritical chromatography with packed silica and evaporative light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Lesellier, Eric; Gaudin, Karen; Chaminade, Pierre; Tchapla, Alain; Baillet, Arlette

    2003-10-17

    Separative method of lipid classes from the stratum corneum was developed with packed silica and supercritical CO2 containing 10% of methanol at 15 degrees C, 15 MPa and 3 ml min(-1). The elution order of lipid classes was first esterified cholesterol, triglycerides, squalene co-eluted in a single peak, then free fatty acids, free cholesterol, ceramides and finally glycosylceramides. The ceramides were eluted in several fractions which depended on the number of hydroxyl groups in the molecule, i.e. more hydroxyl groups were contained in ceramides, more important was the retention. Moreover, the retention was not altered by the presence of carbon double bond and variation of the alkyl chain length. The ceramide response with the evaporative light scattering detector was improved by turning the influence of the solvent nature on the response to advantage. Therefore, addition of various solvents with or without triethylamine and formic acid were tested in post-column due to the incompatibility of such modifiers with silica stationary phase. Thereby the solvent conditions for the separation and the detection can be adjusted almost independently. The response was greatly increased by post-column addition of 1% (v/v) triethylamine and its equivalent amount of formic acid in dichloromethane introduced at 0.1 ml min(-1) into the mobile phase. This device had allowed the detection of 400 ng of ceramide with a S/N = 21, whereas no peak was observed in absence of the post-column addition. Finally, the method was applied to the treatment of skin sample which led to highly enriched ceramide fraction. PMID:14601832

  19. Mangrove Plantation Forest Assessment Using Structural Attributes Derived from Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faelga, R. A. G.; Paringit, E. C.; Perez, G. J. P.; Ibanez, C. A. G.; Argamosa, R. A. L.; Posilero, M. A. V.; Zaragosa, G. P.; Tandoc, F. A. M.; Malabanan, M. V.

    2016-06-01

    Estimating the structural and functional attributes of forests is integral in performing management strategies and for understanding forest ecosystem functions. Field sampling methods through plot level is one of the known strategies in forest studies; however, these methods have its limitations and are prone to subjected biases. Remote Sensing data, particularly that of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) can be utilized to alleviate the limitations of extracting forest structure parameters. The study aims to characterize a Rhizophoraceae-dominated mangrove forest plantation. Point cloud distribution within a 1-hectare plot was processed by utilizing thirty (30) samples of 5x5 meter plots, which were analysed for the characterization and forest structure assessment. Point densities were grouped at intervals of 10% of the plot's maximum height (Height at Bincentile or HBn) to determine where the clustering of points occur per plot. The result shows that most of the points are clustered at HBn with height values ranging from 2.98 to 4.15 meters for plots located at the middle part of the forest, with a standard deviation of 1.78 to 3.69, respectively. On the other hand, sample plots that are located at the periphery part of the forest shows that the point clustering occurs at different heights ranging from 1.71 meters to 4.43 meters, with standard deviation values ranging from 1.69 to 3.81.Plots that are located along the fringes of the forest reflect a stunted clustering of points, while plots that explicitly show mangrove trimmings and cuts reflect even distribution in terms of point density within each HBn. Both species present in the area (R. mucronata and R. apiculata) exhibits similar clustering, which could represent detection of Rhizophoraceae mangroves.

  20. Quantum dot-functionalized porous ZnO nanosheets as a visible light induced photoelectrochemical platform for DNA detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenjing; Hao, Qing; Wang, Wei; Bao, Lei; Lei, Jianping; Wang, Quanbo; Ju, Huangxian

    2014-03-01

    This work reports the synthesis of novel CdTe quantum dot (QD)-functionalized porous ZnO nanosheets via a covalent binding method with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane as a linker. The functional nanosheets showed an excellent visible-light absorbency and much higher photoelectrochemical activity than both CdTe QDs and ZnO nanosheets due to the porous structure and appropriate band alignment between the CdTe QDs and ZnO nanosheets. Using hydrogen peroxide as an electron acceptor the nanosheet-modified electrode showed a sensitive photocurrent response. This speciality led to a novel methodology for the design of hydrogen peroxide-related biosensors by the formation or consumption of hydrogen peroxide. Using biotin-labeled DNA as capture probe, a model biosensor was proposed by immobilizing the probe on a nanosheet-modified electrode to recognize target DNA in the presence of an assistant DNA, which produced a "Y" junction structure to trigger a restriction endonuclease-aided target recycling. The target recycling resulted in the release of biotin labeled to the immobilized DNA from the nanosheet-modified electrode, thus decreased the consumption of hydrogen peroxide by horseradish peroxidase-mediated electrochemical reduction after binding the left biotin with horseradish peroxidase-labeled streptavidin, which produced an increasing photoelectrochemical response. The 'signal on' strategy for photoelectrochemical detection of DNA showed a low detection limit down to the subfemtomole level and good specificity to single-base mismatched oligonucleotides. The sensitized porous ZnO nanosheets are promising for applications in both photovoltaic devices and photoelectrochemical biosensing. PMID:24457595

  1. Bayesian hierarchical spatial models to improve forest variable prediction and mapping with Light Detection and Ranging data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Jessica Lynne

    Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data has shown great potential to estimate spatially explicit forest variables, including above-ground biomass, stem density, tree height, and more. Due to its ability to garner information about the vertical and horizontal structure of forest canopies effectively and efficiently, LiDAR sensors have played a key role in the development of operational air and space-borne instruments capable of gathering information about forest structure at regional, continental, and global scales. Combining LiDAR datasets with field-based validation measurements to build predictive models is becoming an attractive solution to the problem of quantifying and mapping forest structure for private forest land owners and local, state, and federal government entities alike. As with any statistical model using spatially indexed data, the potential to violate modeling assumptions resulting from spatial correlation is high. This thesis explores several different modeling frameworks that aim to accommodate correlation structures within model residuals. The development is motivated using LiDAR and forest inventory datasets. Special attention is paid to estimation and propagation of parameter and model uncertainty through to prediction units. Inference follows a Bayesian statistical paradigm. Results suggest the proposed frameworks help ensure model assumptions are met and prediction performance can be improved by pursuing spatially enabled models.

  2. Deriving a flow coherent surface for runoff simulation in urban areas using light detection and ranging data and multispectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Almeida Pereira, Gabriel Henrique; Centeno, Jorge Antonio Silva

    2014-01-01

    This work addresses the topic of flow direction and flow accumulation simulations in urban areas over digital surface models derived from light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data and multispectral high-resolution imagery. LiDAR data are very dense point clouds that include many objects that, in a 2 1/2-dimensional model, may become false obstacles for runoff, such as power lines or treetops. The presence of such obstacles is a problem for the flow paths simulation, especially in urban areas. We describe a methodology to produce a surface model more suitable for runoff modeling, by filtering objects that are above the surface and should not influence the flow paths. In a first step, thin obstacles are suppressed by applying mathematical morphology to a raster surface model. In a second step, satellite multispectral data and LiDAR data are classified using a support vector machine to identify trees, which are also removed from the digital model, and produce a more coherent surface model for runoff simulation. To simulate and evaluate the results, the flow-routing algorithm Dinfinity was used. The results show that the filtering is necessary to achieve a better characterization of runoff paths and allows identifying places where runoff may accumulate, causing floods or other problems.

  3. Sensitive detection of glucose in human serum with oligonucleotide modified gold nanoparticles by using dynamic light scattering technique.

    PubMed

    Miao, Xiangmin; Ling, Liansheng; Shuai, Xintao

    2013-03-15

    Dynamic light scattering based sensor for glucose was developed with oligonucleotide functionalized gold nanoparticles (Oligo-AuNPs). Oligonucleotide 5'-SH-(A)(12)-AGACAAGAGAGG-3' (Oligo 1) modified AuNPs and oligonucleotide 5'-CAACAGAGAACG-(A)(12)-HS-3' (Oligo 2) modified AuNPs could hybridize with oligonulceotide 5'-CGTTCTCTGTTGCCTCTCTTGTCT-3' (Oligo 3), which resulted in the aggregation of Oligo-AuNPs probes, and triggered the increase of their average diameter. However, Oligo 3 could be cleaved into DNA fragments by the mixture of glucose, glucose oxidase (GOD) and Fe(2+), and the DNA fragments could not hybridize with Oligo-AuNPs probes. Under the conditions of 3.7 nM Oligo 1-AuNPs, 3.7 nM Oligo 2-AuNPs, 8.0 μg/mL GOD, 100 nM Oligo 3 and 900 nM Fe(2+), the average diameter of Oligo-AuNPs probes decreased linearly with the increasing concentration of glucose over the range from 50 pmol/L to 5.0 nmol/L, with a detection limit of 38 pmol/L (3σ/slope). Moreover, five sugars had no effect on the average diameter of mixture of Oligo-AuNPs probes, GOD and Fe(2+), which demonstrated the good selectivity of the assay. PMID:23084753

  4. Influences of Probe’s Morphology for Metal Ion Detection Based on Light-Addressable Potentiometric Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Chen; Zhou, Shuang; Yin, Xuebo; Gu, Yajun; Jia, Yunfang

    2016-01-01

    The sensing mechanism of binding Hg2+ into thymine-thymine (T-T) mismatched base pairs was introduced into a light-addressable potentiometric sensor (LAPS) with anti-Hg2+ aptamer as the sensing units. Three kinds of T-rich single-strand DNA (ssDNA) chains with different spacer lengths, from 0 to 12 –CH2 groups, were designed to investigate surface charge and morphological effects on the LAPS’ output. First, by comparing the responding of LAPS modified with three kinds of ssDNA, it was found that the best performance for Hg2+ sensing was exhibited by the probe without –CH2 groups. The detection limit of Hg2+ ion was 1 ppt under the optimal condition. Second, the cooperative effects of surface charge and morphology on the output were observed by the controlled experiments. The two effects were the negative charge balanced by metal cations and the morphological changing caused by the formation of T-Hg2+-T structure. In conclusion, not only the influences of the aptamer probe’s morphology and surface charge was investigated on the platform of LAPS, but also sensing Hg2+ ions was achieved for the first time by the presented aptamer LAPS. PMID:27187412

  5. Research on corrosion detection for steel reinforced concrete structures using the fiber optical white light interferometer sensing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuefeng; Cui, Yanjun; Wei, Heming; Kong, Xianglong; Zhang, Pinglei; Sun, Changsen

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, a novel kind of steel rebar corrosion monitoring technique for steel reinforced concrete structures is proposed, designed, and tested. The technique is based on the fiber optical white light interferometer (WLI) sensing technique. Firstly, a feasibility test was carried out using an equal-strength beam for comparison of strain sensing ability between the WLI and a fiber Bragg grating (FBG). The comparison results showed that the sensitivity of the WLI is sufficient for corrosion expansion strain monitoring. Then, two WLI corrosion sensors (WLI-CSs) were designed, fabricated, and embedded into concrete specimens to monitor expansion strain caused by steel rebar corrosion. Their performance was studied in an accelerated electrochemical corrosion test. Experimental results show that expansion strain along the fiber optical coil winding area can be detected and measured accurately by the proposed sensor. The advantages of the proposed monitoring technique allow for quantitative corrosion expansion monitoring to be executed in real time for reinforced concrete structures and with low cost.

  6. Detection system of acid rain pollution using light-induced delayed fluorescence of plant leaf in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Lizhang; Xing, Da

    2006-09-01

    Photosynthetic apparatus is susceptible to environmental stress. Light-induced delayed fluorescence (DF) in plant is an intrinsic label of the efficiency of charge separation at P680 in photosystem II (PS II). In this investigation, we have developed a biosensor that can accurately inspect acid rain pollution by means of DF in vivo. Compared with traditional methods, the proposed technique can continuously monitor environmental changes, making fast, real-time and noninvasive inspection possible. The biosensor is an all-weather measuring instrument; it has its own illumination power and utilizes intrinsic DF as the measurement marker. With soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) seedling as a testing model, which is sensitive to acid rain pollution, the relationship that delayed fluorescence properties and capability of photosynthetic apparatus after being affected by simulated acid rain with different pH value was studied. The current investigation has revealed that the changes of delayed fluorescence (equation available in paper) can probably characterize the pollution degree of simulated acid rain, Inspecting the changes in DF characteristics (φ i) of plant leaf in vivo may be a new approach for the detection of acid rain pollution and its impact on the ecosystem.

  7. Evaluation of a simple method for visual detection of microprecipitates in blends of parenteral drug solutions using a focused (tyndall) light beam.

    PubMed

    Veggeland, Turid; Brandl, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The formation of microprecipitates (sub visible particles) is a critical factor when blending parenteral drug solutions prior to or during intravenous administration to a patient. In cases where compatibility is not documented, analytical screening of such mixtures for physical incompatibility would give a safer foundation for secure administration of such blends to patients. The aim of this article is to report our experiences with visual screening using a focused (Tyndall) light beam for the detection of micro precipitates within blends of drug solutions, a method which may be used in any hospital pharmacy without use of advanced analytical instrumentation. A selection of clinically applied drug solutions was tested for precipitation upon blending in a proportion of 1:1. In order to reduce potential background particle burden, the solutions were filtered through 0.2 micrometer pore size filters prior to mixing. To detect potential precipitation, the solutions were visually inspected using two different types of focused light beams, a 75-watt white, focused light source and a HeNe pocket laser-pointer, for light scattering. For comparison, a light obscuration particle counter test was performed as described in the European Pharmacopeia. An experimental set-up is described, and a detailed protocol is suggested for a method able to detect micro precipitates in drug solution blends by using focused (Tyndall) light. The performance of this method for selected blends is reported in comparison to the Pharmacopeial light obscuration particle count test. Despite the fact that visual inspection using Tyndall light is a simple and low-cost method, it was found sensitive for detecting minute amounts of sub visible particles with detection sensitivity close to the light obscuration particle counting limits stated by the European Pharmacopeia. In cases where an electronic particle counter is not accessible, a sensitive warning signal may be obtained from this approach

  8. Topographic data of selected areas along the Alabama River near Montgomery, Alabama, collected using mobile terrestrial light detection and ranging (T-LiDAR) technology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimbrow, D.R.

    2014-01-01

    Topographic data at selected areas within the Alabama River flood plain near Montgomery, Alabama, were collected using a truck-mounted mobile terrestrial light detection and ranging system. These data were collected for inclusion in a flood inundation model developed by the National Weather Service in Birmingham, Alabama. Data are presented as ArcGIS point shapefiles with the extension .shp.

  9. Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (OLEDs) and Optically-Detected Magnetic Resonance (ODMR) studies on organic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Min

    2011-01-01

    Organic semiconductors have evolved rapidly over the last decades and currently are considered as the next-generation technology for many applications, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) in flat-panel displays (FPDs) and solid state lighting (SSL), and organic solar cells (OSCs) in clean renewable energy. This dissertation focuses mainly on OLEDs. Although the commercialization of the OLED technology in FPDs is growing and appears to be just around the corner for SSL, there are still several key issues that need to be addressed: (1) the cost of OLEDs is very high, largely due to the costly current manufacturing process; (2) the efficiency of OLEDs needs to be improved. This is vital to the success of OLEDs in the FPD and SSL industries; (3) the lifetime of OLEDs, especially blue OLEDs, is the biggest technical challenge. All these issues raise the demand for new organic materials, new device structures, and continued lower-cost fabrication methods. In an attempt to address these issues, we used solution-processing methods to fabricate highly efficient small molecule OLEDs (SMOLEDs); this approach is costeffective in comparison to the more common thermal vacuum evaporation. We also successfully made efficient indium tin oxide (ITO)-free SMOLEDs to further improve the efficiency of the OLEDs. We employed the spin-dependent optically-detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) technique to study the luminescence quenching processes in OLEDs and organic materials in order to understand the intrinsic degradation mechanisms. We also fabricated polymer LEDs (PLEDs) based on a new electron-accepting blue-emitting polymer and studied the effect of molecular weight on the efficiency of PLEDs. All these studies helped us to better understand the underlying relationship between the organic semiconductor materials and the OLEDs’ performance, and will subsequently assist in further enhancing the efficiency of OLEDs. With strongly improved device performance (in addition to

  10. Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (OLEDs) and Optically-Detected Magnetic Resonance (ODMR) studies on organic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Min

    Organic semiconductors have evolved rapidly over the last decades and currently are considered as the next-generation technology for many applications, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) in flat-panel displays (FPDs) and solid state lighting (SSL), and organic solar cells (OSCs) in clean renewable energy. This dissertation focuses mainly on OLEDs. Although the commercialization of the OLED technology in FPDs is growing and appears to be just around the corner for SSL, there are still several key issues that need to be addressed: (1) the cost of OLEDs is very high, largely due to the costly current manufacturing process; (2) the efficiency of OLEDs needs to be improved. This is vital to the success of OLEDs in the FPD and SSL industries; (3) the lifetime of OLEDs, especially blue OLEDs, is the biggest technical challenge. All these issues raise the demand for new organic materials, new device structures, and continued lower-cost fabrication methods. In an attempt to address these issues, we used solution-processing methods to fabricate highly efficient small molecule OLEDs (SMOLEDs); this approach is cost-effective in comparison to the more common thermal vacuum evaporation. We also successfully made efficient indium tin oxide (ITO)-free SMOLEDs to further improve the efficiency of the OLEDs. We employed the spin-dependent optically-detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) technique to study the luminescence quenching processes in OLEDs and organic materials in order to understand the intrinsic degradation mechanisms. We also fabricated polymer LEDs (PLEDs) based on a new electron-accepting blue-emitting polymer and studied the effect of molecular weight on the efficiency of PLEDs. All these studies helped us to better understand the underlying relationship between the organic semiconductor materials and the OLEDs' performance, and will subsequently assist in further enhancing the efficiency of OLEDs. With strongly improved device performance (in addition to

  11. Prototype of a porous ZnO SPV-based sensor for PCB detection at room temperature under visible light illumination.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingtao; Meng, Guowen; Huang, Qing; Yin, Zhijun; Wu, Mingzai; Zhang, Zhuo; Kong, Mingguang

    2010-08-17

    To detect polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), a prototype of a porous ZnO sensor based on the surface photovoltage (SPV) mechanism working under visible light illumination at room temperature has been presented. The SPV of the porous ZnO sensor can be remarkably reduced under visible light illumination after PCB adsorption, and the reduction of amplitude is proportional to the population of adsorbed PCB molecules. We propose that the reduction of SPV response is due to trapping of the electrons in the surface states by the adsorbed PCBs. The lower detection limits of this new prototype sensor reach at least 2.2 micromol/L for PCB29 and 1.1 micromol/L for PCB101, respectively. So, it demonstrates great potential for practical application in trace detection of PCBs. PMID:20695623

  12. A comparison of Lagrangian model estimates to light detection and ranging (LIDAR) measurements of dust plumes from field tilling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junming; Hiscox, April L; Miller, David R; Meyer, Thomas H; Sammis, Ted W

    2009-11-01

    A Lagrangian particle model has been adapted to examine human exposures to particulate matter < or = 10 microm (PM10) in agricultural settings. This paper reports the performance of the model in comparison to extensive measurements by elastic LIDAR (light detection and ranging). For the first time, the LIDAR measurements allowed spatially distributed and time dynamic measurements to be used to test the predictions of a field-scale model. The model outputs, which are three-dimensional concentration distribution maps from an agricultural disking operation, were compared with the LIDAR-scanned images. The peak cross-correlation coefficient and the offset distance of the measured and simulated plumes were used to quantify both the intensity and location accuracy. The appropriate time averaging and changes in accuracy with height of the plume were examined. Inputs of friction velocity, Monin-Obukhov length, and wind direction (1 sec) were measured with a three-axis sonic anemometer at a single point in the field (at 1.5-m height). The Lagrangian model of Wang et al. predicted the near-field concentrations of dust plumes emitted from a field disking operation with an overall accuracy of approximately 0.67 at 3-m height. Its average offset distance when compared with LIDAR measurements was approximately 38 m, which was 6% of the average plume moving distance during the simulation periods. The model is driven by weather measurements, and its near-field accuracy is highest when input time averages approach the turbulent flow time scale (3-70 sec). The model accuracy decreases with height because of smoothing and errors in the input wind field, which is modeled rather than measured at heights greater than the measurement anemometer. The wind steadiness parameter (S) can be used to quantify the combined effects of wind speed and direction on model accuracy. PMID:19947118

  13. Digital microbiology: detection and classification of unknown bacterial pathogens using a label-free laser light scatter-sensing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajwa, Bartek; Dundar, M. Murat; Akova, Ferit; Patsekin, Valery; Bae, Euiwon; Tang, Yanjie; Dietz, J. Eric; Hirleman, E. Daniel; Robinson, J. Paul; Bhunia, Arun K.

    2011-06-01

    The majority of tools for pathogen sensing and recognition are based on physiological or genetic properties of microorganisms. However, there is enormous interest in devising label-free and reagentless biosensors that would operate utilizing the biophysical signatures of samples without the need for labeling and reporting biochemistry. Optical biosensors are closest to realizing this goal and vibrational spectroscopies are examples of well-established optical label-free biosensing techniques. A recently introduced forward-scatter phenotyping (FSP) also belongs to the broad class of optical sensors. However, in contrast to spectroscopies, the remarkable specificity of FSP derives from the morphological information that bacterial material encodes on a coherent optical wavefront passing through the colony. The system collects elastically scattered light patterns that, given a constant environment, are unique to each bacterial species and/or serovar. Both FSP technology and spectroscopies rely on statistical machine learning to perform recognition and classification. However, the commonly used methods utilize either simplistic unsupervised learning or traditional supervised techniques that assume completeness of training libraries. This restrictive assumption is known to be false for real-life conditions, resulting in unsatisfactory levels of accuracy, and consequently limited overall performance for biodetection and classification tasks. The presented work demonstrates preliminary studies on the use of FSP system to classify selected serotypes of non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing E. coli in a nonexhaustive framework, that is, without full knowledge about all the possible classes that can be encountered. Our study uses a Bayesian approach to learning with a nonexhaustive training dataset to allow for the automated and distributed detection of unknown bacterial classes.

  14. [Characterization of mid-subtropical evergreen broad-leaved forest gap based on light detection and ranging (LiDAR)].

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Tan, Chang; Wang, Hong; Zhang, Jiang; Wan, Ying; Long, Jiang-ping; Liu, Rui-xi

    2015-12-01

    Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) is an active remote sensing technology for acqui- ring three-dimensional structure parameters of vegetation canopy with high accuracy over multiple spatial scales, which is greatly important to the promotion of forest disturbance ecology and the ap- plication on gaps. This paper focused on mid-subtropical evergreen broadleaved forest in Hunan Province, and small footprint LiDAR point data were adopted to identify canopy gaps. and measure geomagnetic characteristics of gaps. The optimal grid model resolution and interpolation methods were chosen to generate canopy height model, and the computer graphics processing was adopted to estimate characteristics of gaps which involved gap size, canopy height and gap shape index, then field investigation was utilized to validate the estimation results. The results showed that the gap rec- ognition rate was 94.8%, and the major influencing factors were gap size and gap maker type. Line- ar correlation was observed between LiDAR estimation and field investigation, and the R² values of gap size and canopy height case were 0.962 and 0.878, respectively. Compared with field investiga- tion, the size of mean estimated gap was 19.9% larger and the mean estimated canopy height was 9.9% less. Gap density was 12.8 gaps · hm⁻² and the area of gaps occupied 13.3% of the forest area. The average gap size, canopy height and gap shape index were 85.06 m², 15.33 m and 1.71, respectively. The study site usually contained small gaps in which the edge effect was not obvious. PMID:27111996

  15. Performance of a simple UV LED light source in the capillary electrophoresis of inorganic anions with indirect detection using a chromate background electrolyte.

    PubMed

    King, Marion; Paull, Brett; Haddad, Paul R; Macka, Miroslav

    2002-12-01

    Light emitting diodes (LEDs) are known to be excellent light sources for detectors in liquid chromatography and capillary electromigration separation techniques, but to date only LEDs emitting in the visible range have been used. In this work, a UV LED was investigated as a simple alternative light source to standard mercury or deuterium lamps for use in indirect photometric detection of inorganic anions using capillary electrophoresis with a chromate background electrolyte (BGE). The UV LED used had an emission maximum at 379.5 nm, a wavelength at which chromate absorbs strongly and exhibits a 47% higher molar absorptivity than at 254 nm when using a standard mercury light source. The noise, sensitivity and linearity of the LED detector were evaluated and all exhibited superior performance to the mercury light source (up to 70% decrease in noise, up to 26.2% increase in sensitivity, and over 100% increase in linear range). Using the LED detector with a simple chromate-diethanolamine background electrolyte, limits of detection for the common inorganic anions, Cl-, NO3-, SO4(2-), F- and PO4(3-) ranged from 3 to 14 microg L(-1), using electrostatic injection at -5 kV for 5 s. PMID:12537359

  16. Three-dimensional imaging, change detection, and stability assessment during the centerline trench levee seepage experiment using terrestrial light detection and ranging technology, Twitchell Island, California, 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bawden, Gerald W.; Howle, James; Bond, Sandra; Shriro, Michelle; Buck, Peter

    2014-01-01

    A full scale field seepage test was conducted on a north-south trending levee segment of a now bypassed old meander belt on Twitchell Island, California, to understand the effects of live and decaying root systems on levee seepage and slope stability. The field test in May 2012 was centered on a north-south trench with two segments: a shorter control segment and a longer seepage test segment. The complete length of the trench area measured 40.4 meters (m) near the levee centerline with mature trees located on the waterside and landside of the levee flanks. The levee was instrumented with piezometers and tensiometers to measure positive and negative porewater pressures across the levee after the trench was flooded with water and held at a constant hydraulic head during the seepage test—the results from this component of the experiment are not discussed in this report. We collected more than one billion three-dimensional light detection and ranging (lidar) data points before, during, and after the centerline seepage test to assess centimeter-scale stability of the two trees and the levee crown. During the seepage test, the waterside tree toppled (rotated 20.7 degrees) into the water. The landside tree rotated away from the levee by 5 centimeters (cm) at a height of 2 m on the tree. The paved surface of the levee crown had three regions that showed subsidence on the waterside of the trench—discussed as the northern, central, and southern features. The northern feature is an elongate region that subsided 2.1 cm over an area with an average width of 1.35 m that extends 15.8 m parallel to the trench from the northern end of the trench to just north of the trench midpoint, and is associated with a crack 1 cm in height that formed during the seepage test on the trench wall. The central subsidence feature is a semicircular region on the waterside of the trench that subsided by as much as 6.2 cm over an area 3.4 m wide and 11.2 m long. The southern feature is an elongate

  17. Built-in hyperspectral camera for smartphone in visible, near-infrared and middle-infrared lights region (second report): sensitivity improvement of Fourier-spectroscopic imaging to detect diffuse reflection lights from internal human tissues for healthcare sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Natsumi; Hosono, Satsuki; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2016-05-01

    We proposed the snapshot-type Fourier spectroscopic imaging for smartphone that was mentioned in 1st. report in this conference. For spectroscopic components analysis, such as non-invasive blood glucose sensors, the diffuse reflection lights from internal human skins are very weak for conventional hyperspectral cameras, such as AOTF (Acousto-Optic Tunable Filter) type. Furthermore, it is well known that the spectral absorption of mid-infrared lights or Raman spectroscopy especially in long wavelength region is effective to distinguish specific biomedical components quantitatively, such as glucose concentration. But the main issue was that photon energies of middle infrared lights and light intensities of Raman scattering are extremely weak. For improving sensitivity of our spectroscopic imager, the wide-field-stop & beam-expansion method was proposed. Our line spectroscopic imager introduced a single slit for field stop on the conjugate objective plane. Obviously to increase detected light intensities, the wider slit width of the field stop makes light intensities higher, regardless of deterioration of spatial resolutions. Because our method is based on wavefront-division interferometry, it becomes problems that the wider width of single slit makes the diffraction angle narrower. This means that the narrower diameter of collimated objective beams deteriorates visibilities of interferograms. By installing the relative inclined phaseshifter onto optical Fourier transform plane of infinity corrected optical systems, the collimated half flux of objective beams derived from single-bright points on objective surface penetrate through the wedge prism and the cuboid glass respectively. These two beams interfere each other and form the infererogram as spatial fringe patterns. Thus, we installed concave-cylindrical lens between the wider slit and objective lens as a beam expander. We successfully obtained the spectroscopic characters of hemoglobin from reflected lights from

  18. MEMS-based extreme adaptive optics for planet detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macintosh, Bruce; Graham, James; Oppenheimer, Ben; Poyneer, Lisa; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Veran, Jean-Pierre

    2006-01-01

    The next major step in the study of extrasolar planets will be the direct detection, resolved from their parent star, of a significant sample of Jupiter-like extrasolar giant planets. Such detection will open up new parts of the extrasolar planet distribution and allow spectroscopic characterization of the planets themselves. Detecting Jovian planets at 5-50 AU scale orbiting nearby stars requires adaptive optics systems and coronagraphs an order of magnitude more powerful than those available today - the realm of "Extreme" adaptive optics. We present the basic requirements and design for such a system, the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI.) GPI will require a MEMS-based deformable mirror with good surface quality, 2-4 micron stroke (operated in tandem with a conventional low-order "woofer" mirror), and a fully-functional 48-actuator-diameter aperture.

  19. MEMS-based extreme adaptive optics for planet detection

    SciTech Connect

    Macintosh, B A; Graham, J R; Oppenheimer, B; Poyneer, L; Sivaramakrishnan, A; Veran, J

    2005-11-18

    The next major step in the study of extrasolar planets will be the direct detection, resolved from their parent star, of a significant sample of Jupiter-like extrasolar giant planets. Such detection will open up new parts of the extrasolar planet distribution and allow spectroscopic characterization of the planets themselves. Detecting Jovian planets at 5-50 AU scale orbiting nearby stars requires adaptive optics systems and coronagraphs an order of magnitude more powerful than those available today--the realm of ''Extreme'' adaptive optics. We present the basic requirements and design for such a system, the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI.) GPI will require a MEMS-based deformable mirror with good surface quality, 2-4 micron stroke (operated in tandem with a conventional low-order ''woofer'' mirror), and a fully-functional 48-actuator-diameter aperture.

  20. Effects of artificial lighting on the detection of plant stress with spectral reflectance remote sensing in bioregenerative life support systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuerger, Andrew C.; Richards, Jeffrey T.

    2006-09-01

    Plant-based life support systems that utilize bioregenerative technologies have been proposed for long-term human missions to both the Moon and Mars. Bioregenerative life support systems will utilize higher plants to regenerate oxygen, water, and edible biomass for crews, and are likely to significantly lower the ‘equivalent system mass’ of crewed vehicles. As part of an ongoing effort to begin the development of an automatic remote sensing system to monitor plant health in bioregenerative life support modules, we tested the efficacy of seven artificial illumination sources on the remote detection of plant stresses. A cohort of pepper plants (Capsicum annuum L.) were grown 42 days at 25 °C, 70% relative humidity, and 300 μmol m-2 s-1 of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR; from 400 to 700 nm). Plants were grown under nutritional stresses induced by irrigating subsets of the plants with 100, 50, 25, or 10% of a standard nutrient solution. Reflectance spectra of the healthy and stressed plants were collected under seven artificial lamps including two tungsten halogen lamps, plus high pressure sodium, metal halide, fluorescent, microwave, and red/blue light emitting diode (LED) sources. Results indicated that several common algorithms used to estimate biomass and leaf chlorophyll content were effective in predicting plant stress under all seven illumination sources. However, the two types of tungsten halogen lamps and the microwave illumination source yielded linear models with the highest residuals and thus the highest predictive capabilities of all lamps tested. The illumination sources with the least predictive capabilities were the red/blue LEDs and fluorescent lamps. Although the red/blue LEDs yielded the lowest residuals for linear models derived from the remote sensing data, the LED arrays used in these experiments were optimized for plant productivity and not the collection of remote sensing data. Thus, we propose that if adjusted to optimize the

  1. Revised and Improved Fault Maps of Washoe County, Nevada using Light Detecting and Ranging (LiDAR) Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brailo, C.; Kent, G.; Wesnousky, S. G.; Kell, A. M.; Pierce, I.; Ruhl, C. J.; Smith, K. D.

    2014-12-01

    A new Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) survey images the fault network of Truckee Meadows region of western Nevada, including the Reno/Sparks metropolitan area in Washoe County. The airborne LiDAR imagery (1485 sq. km) is being used to create high quality bare-earth digital elevation models that were previously unattainable in vegetated, populated or alpine terrain. LiDAR gives us an opportunity to improve fault maps that may be outdated or incomplete in the area. Here we show LiDAR imagery of a large section of Washoe County and highlight areas where this imagery may be useful in revising current fault maps. Conflicting stress regimes, with strike-slip regions overlapping extensional domains in the Walker Lane Deformation Belt, complicate regional tectonics of Washoe County. In this region east of the Sierra Nevada batholith, approximately 20-25% of Pacific-North American plate motion (mostly right-lateral shear) is accommodated along the Walker Lane. There is ample evidence of Magnitude 6-7 earthquakes in or surrounding the Truckee Meadows region as recently as the late 1800s and it is possible that earthquakes of this size may occur here in the near future. Accurate mapping of faults and associated earthquake hazards in populated areas is critically important for earthquake mitigation and preparedness, and furthers our understanding of regional tectonics. The new LiDAR data confirms the presence of many previously mapped faults, simplifies areas that may be presently over-complicated by current maps, and identifies faults that were previously unmapped. Current and future research will also focus on dating of glacial outwash terraces and alluvial fans, particularly in the Mogul area and Mt. Rose pediment. Coupled with comprehensive fault maps and displacement measurements improved by this new LiDAR dataset, these data may allow researchers to get more accurate slip rate estimates on faults in this region, and may support the hypothesis that some faults in the

  2. Sensitive Electrochemiluminescence Immunosensor for Detection of N-Acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase Based on a "Light-Switch" Molecule Combined with DNA Dendrimer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haijun; Yuan, Yali; Zhuo, Ying; Chai, Yaqin; Yuan, Ruo

    2016-06-01

    Here, a novel "light-switch" molecule of Ru (II) complex ([Ru(dcbpy)2dppz](2+)-DPEA) with self-enhanced electrochemiluminescence (ECL) property is proposed, which is almost nonemissive in aqueous solution but is brightly luminescent when it intercalates into DNA duplex. Owing to less energy loss and shorter electron-transfer distance, the intramolecular ECL reaction between the luminescent [Ru(dcbpy)2dppz](2+) and coreactive tertiary amine group in N,N-diisopropylethylenediamine (DPEA) makes the obtained "light-switch" molecule possess much higher light-switch efficiency compared with the traditional "light-switch" molecule. For increasing the loading amount and further enhancing the luminous efficiency of the "light-switch" molecule, biotin labeled DNA dendrimer (the fourth generation, G4) is prepared from Y-shape DNA by a step-by-step assembly strategy, which provides abundant intercalated sites for [Ru(dcbpy)2dppz](2+)-DPEA. Meanwhile, the obtained nanocomposite (G4-[Ru(dcbpy)2dppz](2+)-DPEA) could well bind with streptavidin labeled detection antibody (SA-Ab2) due to the existence of abundant biotin. Through sandwiched immunoreaction, an ECL immunosensor was fabricated for sensitive determination of N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase (NAG), a typical biomarker for diabetic nephropathy (DN). The detemination linear range was 0.1 pg mL(-1) to 1 ng mL(-1), and the detection limit was 0.028 pg mL(-1). The developed strategy combining the ECL self-enhanced "light-switch" molecular and DNA nanotechnology offers an effective signal amplification mean and provides ample potential for further bioanalysis and clinical study. PMID:27185239

  3. The effect of the light size and telecommunication rate on homodyne detection efficiency in the satellite-to-ground laser communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaoping; Sun, Jianfeng; Zhi, Yanan; Lu, Wei; Xu, Qian; Liu, Liren

    2013-09-01

    Atmospheric turbulence influences the wave-front, and reduces homodyne detection efficiency and bit error rate in the Satellite-to-Ground Laser Communication. Free-space differential interference structure based on differential phase shift keying (DPSK) is applied in the optical signal receiver. The free-space Mach-Zehnder delay interferometer without lens is suited for differential delay which is equal to the one bit period. Differential information is obtained by the subtraction of the two successive wave-front phases when made to interfere. Differential distance at the interference receiver is varied with transmission rate from satellite to ground. And through the receiving telescope, the spot size of incident signal light within the interference became small than before, which influences the interference efficiency of the two unequal branches. So that, it is significant for increasing homodyne efficiency to determine the optical signal rate and choose the magnification of receiving telescope. In this paper, the effect of the spot size of incident light and transmission data rate on homodyne detection efficiency is analysed. By the simulation result of efficiency in different spot size and transmission date of incident light, the homodyne efficiency will be predicted in the given data rate and light spot size on the basis of experiment setup. And application condition of free-space differential structure at DPSK differential receiver is proposed.

  4. Study of the shower maximum depth by the method of detection of the EAS Cerenkov light pulse shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aliev, N.; Kakhkharov, M.; Khakimov, N.; Makhmudov, B. M.; Rakhimova, N.; Tashpulatov, R.; Khristiansen, G. B.; Prosin, V. V.; Alimov, T.; Zhukov, V. Y.

    1985-01-01

    The results of processing the data on the shape of the EAS Cerenkov light pulses recorded by the extensive air showers (EAS) array are presented. The pulse FWHM is used to find the mean depth of EAS maximum.

  5. Solution-processed PCDTBT capped low-voltage InGaZnO{sub x} thin film phototransistors for visible-light detection

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Han; Xiao, Yubin; Chen, Zefeng; Xu, Wangying; Long, Mingzhu; Xu, Jian-Bin

    2015-06-15

    The effects of visible-light detection based on solution processed poly[N-9′′-hepta-decanyl-2,7-carbazole-alt-5,5-(4′,7′-di-2-thienyl-2′,1′, 3′benzothiadiazole) (PCDTBT) capped InGaZnOx (IGZO) phototransistors with Al{sub 2}O{sub x} serving as gate dielectric are investigated in this paper. The high-k dielectric is used to lower the device operating voltage down to 2 V. Photons emitted from laser sources with the wavelengths (λ) of 532 nm and 635 nm are absorbed through the layer of PCDTBT to generate electron-hole-pairs (EHPs). After the separation of EHPs, electrons are injected into IGZO layer through the p-n junction formed between the IGZO (n-type semiconductor) and the PCDTBT (p-type semiconductor). The photo-generated carriers boost the drain current of the transistors as well as bring about the negative threshold voltage shift. Significant enhanced detection performance is achieved under the laser wavelength of 532 nm. The highest photoresponsivity reaches up to 20 A/W, while the photoresponse rise time comes to 10 ms and the fall time comes to approximate 76 ms, which is much faster than trap assisted IGZO visible light detection. The fabricated phototransistors favor the application of visible-light detectors and/or optical switches.

  6. Erosion monitoring along the Coosa River below Logan Martin Dam near Vincent, Alabama, using terrestrial light detection and ranging (T-LiDAR) technology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimbrow, Dustin R.; Lee, Kathryn G.

    2013-01-01

    Alabama Power operates a series of dams on the Coosa River in east central Alabama. These dams form six reservoirs that provide power generation, flood control, recreation, economic opportunity, and fish and wildlife habitats to the region. The Logan Martin Reservoir is located approximately 45 kilometers east of Birmingham and borders Saint Clair and Talladega Counties. Discharges below the reservoir are controlled by power generation at Logan Martin Dam, and there has been an ongoing concern about the stability of the streambanks downstream of the dam. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Alabama Power conducted a scientific investigation of the geomorphic conditions of a 115-meter length of streambank along the Coosa River by using tripod-mounted terrestrial light detection and ranging technology. Two surveys were conducted before and after the winter flood season of 2010 to determine the extent and magnitude of geomorphic change. A comparison of the terrestrial light detection and ranging datasets indicated that approximately 40 cubic meters of material had been eroded from the upstream section of the study area. The terrestrial light detection and ranging data included in this report consist of electronic point cloud files containing several million georeferenced data points, as well as a surface model measuring changes between scans.

  7. Range-resolved optical detection of honeybees by use of wing-beat modulation of scattered light for locating land mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, David S.; Nehrir, Amin R.; Repasky, Kevin S.; Shaw, Joseph A.; Carlsten, John L.

    2007-05-01

    An imaging lidar instrument with the capability of measuring the frequency response of a backscattered return signal up to 3.6 kHz is demonstrated. The instrument uses a commercial microchip frequency-doubled pulsed Nd:YAG laser with a 7.2 kHz pulse repetition rate, a pulse duration of less than 1 ns, and a pulse energy of greater than 10 μJ. A 15.2 cm commercial telescope is used to collect the backscattered signal, and a photomultiplier tube is used to monitor the scattered light. This instrument is designed for range- and angle-resolved optical detection of honeybees for explosives and land-mine detection. The instrument is capable of distinguishing between the scattered light from honeybees and other sources through the frequency content of the return signal caused by the wing-beat modulation of the backscattered light. Detection of honeybees near a bee hive and spatial mapping of honeybee densities near feeders are demonstrated.

  8. Solution-processed PCDTBT capped low-voltage InGaZnOx thin film phototransistors for visible-light detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Han; Xiao, Yubin; Chen, Zefeng; Xu, Wangying; Long, Mingzhu; Xu, Jian-Bin

    2015-06-01

    The effects of visible-light detection based on solution processed poly[N-9''-hepta-decanyl-2,7-carbazole-alt-5,5-(4',7'-di-2-thienyl-2',1',3'benzothiadiazole) (PCDTBT) capped InGaZnOx (IGZO) phototransistors with Al2Ox serving as gate dielectric are investigated in this paper. The high-k dielectric is used to lower the device operating voltage down to 2 V. Photons emitted from laser sources with the wavelengths (λ) of 532 nm and 635 nm are absorbed through the layer of PCDTBT to generate electron-hole-pairs (EHPs). After the separation of EHPs, electrons are injected into IGZO layer through the p-n junction formed between the IGZO (n-type semiconductor) and the PCDTBT (p-type semiconductor). The photo-generated carriers boost the drain current of the transistors as well as bring about the negative threshold voltage shift. Significant enhanced detection performance is achieved under the laser wavelength of 532 nm. The highest photoresponsivity reaches up to 20 A/W, while the photoresponse rise time comes to 10 ms and the fall time comes to approximate 76 ms, which is much faster than trap assisted IGZO visible light detection. The fabricated phototransistors favor the application of visible-light detectors and/or optical switches.

  9. Separation and characterization of oligomeric hindered amine light stabilizers using high-performance liquid chromatography with UV and quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Hintersteiner, Ingrid; Reisinger, Michael; Himmelsbach, Markus; Buchberger, Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    Hindered amine light stabilizers are an important class of stabilizers that protect synthetic polymers from degradation and thus from changing mechanical and optical properties. The current study presents an HPLC method capable of separating oligomeric hindered amine light stabilizers on a commercially available stationary phase, employing an MS-compatible novel mobile phase. Based on the exact masses observed with Q-TOF-MS, a comprehensive characterization of five different types of oligomeric hindered amine light stabilizers was achieved, leading to structural information not included in the datasheets provided by the suppliers. For the different investigated hindered amine light stabilizers, a number of recurring units up to 17 and a molecular weight of 5200 g/mol were detected. Furthermore, the analysis of stabilizer extracts of processed polypropylene samples containing different types of hindered amine light stabilizers revealed significant differences in the oligomeric pattern between standards and polymer samples. Thus, changes in the analytes' oligomeric pattern resulting from processing or aging of polymer materials can be monitored with the presented method. PMID:26778637

  10. Visible light emission and UV light detection properties of solution-grown ZnO/polymer heterojunction diodes on stainless steel foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhshani, A. E.

    2014-08-01

    Heterojunction devices were prepared from ZnO films grown by successive chemical solution deposition on flexible stainless steel substrate and from p-type polymer films of PEDOT:PSS. The effect of air annealing and H2O2 treatment of ZnO on the optoelectronic properties of devices were investigated. Various techniques were utilized for the characterization of ZnO films and the evaluation of devices. Devices with diode type current-voltage and capacitance-voltage characteristics can be fabricated if the hydroxyl content of the as-grown ZnO is removed by annealing the film in air (400 °C, 20 min). H2O2 treatment of ZnO for 10 min followed by air annealing yields a high resistivity interfacial layer required for the device to exhibit visible electroluminescence. A typical light emitting diode shows a current rectification factor of ∼100 (±2 V), ideality factor of 3.0, barrier height of 1.1 eV and reverse-bias breakdown voltage of -36 V. Fabricated diodes show self-powered visible-blind UV photodetection characteristics in the wavelength range of 274-375 nm.

  11. Hierarchical scheme for detecting the rotating MIMO transmission of the in-door RGB-LED visible light wireless communications using mobile-phone camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shih-Hao; Chow, Chi-Wai

    2015-01-01

    Multiple-input and multiple-output (MIMO) scheme can extend the transmission capacity for the light-emitting-diode (LED) based visible light communication (VLC) systems. The MIMO VLC system that uses the mobile-phone camera as the optical receiver (Rx) to receive MIMO signal from the n×n Red-Green-Blue (RGB) LED array is desirable. The key step of decoding this signal is to detect the signal direction. If the LED transmitter (Tx) is rotated, the Rx may not realize the rotation and transmission error can occur. In this work, we propose and demonstrate a novel hierarchical transmission scheme which can reduce the computation complexity of rotation detection in LED array VLC system. We use the n×n RGB LED array as the MIMO Tx. In our study, a novel two dimensional Hadamard coding scheme is proposed. Using the different LED color layers to indicate the rotation, a low complexity rotation detection method can be used for improving the quality of received signal. The detection correction rate is above 95% in the indoor usage distance. Experimental results confirm the feasibility of the proposed scheme.

  12. Partial Spreading of a Laser Beam into a Light Sheet by Shock Waves and Its Use as a Shock Detection Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, J.

    1994-01-01

    It is observed that when a laser beam is allowed to fall on a shock surface at a grazing incidence, a small part of the beam spreads out in a thin, diverging sheet of light normal to the surface, and both upstream and downstream of the shock. The phenomenon is visualized by observing a cross section of the light sheet on a screen placed normal to the laser path after it touches a shock. The light sheet disappears when the beam is moved to any other locations where there is no shock or the beam pierces the shock surface, i.e., at a non-grazing incidence. The spread angle of the light sheet is considerably higher than the angle by which the beam may bend as it passes through the shock, which produces a small difference of refractive index. Various details indicate that the spread light is a result of diffraction of a small part of the laser beam by the shock whose thickness is nearly the same as that of the laser wavelength. Shocks formed in underexpanded free jets of fully expanded Mach numbers 1.4 to 1.8 are used for this experiment. The above optical phenomenon is used as the basis of a novel shock detection technique which depends on sensing the spread light using a photomultiplier tube (PMT). The locations of the shock surfaces in the underexpanded supersonic jet, obtained using this technique, match with those inferred from the Schlieren photographs and velocity measurements. Moreover, if the shock oscillates, a periodic PMT signal is obtained which provides information about the frequency and amplitude of shock motion.

  13. Time-Resolved Detection of Light-Induced Dimerization of Monomeric Aureochrome-1 and Change in Affinity for DNA.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Yuki; Nakasone, Yusuke; Nakatani, Yoichi; Hisatomi, Osamu; Terazima, Masahide

    2016-08-01

    Aureochrome (Aureo) is a recently discovered blue light sensor protein initially from Vaucheria frigida, in which it controls blue light-dependent branch formation and/or development of a sex organ by a light-dependent change in the affinity for DNA. Although photochemical reactions of Aureo-LOV (LOV is a C-terminal light-oxygen-voltage domain) and the N-terminal truncated construct containing a bZIP (N-terminal basic leucine zipper domain) and a LOV domain have previously been reported, the reaction kinetics of the change in affinity for DNA have never been elucidated. The reactions of Aureo where the cysteines are replaced by serines (AureoCS) as well as the kinetics of the change in affinity for a target DNA are investigated in the time-domain. The dimerization rate constant is obtained as 2.8 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1), which suggests that the photoinduced dimerization occurs in the LOV domain and the bZIP domain dimerizes using the interaction with DNA. Surprisingly, binding with the target DNA is completed very quickly, 7.7 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1), which is faster than the protein dimerization rate. It is proposed that the nonspecific electrostatic interaction, which is observed as a weak binding with DNA, may play a role in the efficient searching for the target sequence within the DNA. PMID:27404115

  14. Characterization of a rapid, blue light-mediated change in detectable phosphorylation of a plasma membrane protein from etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L. ) seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Short, T.W.; Briggs, W.R. )

    1990-01-01

    When crude microsomal membranes from apical stem segments of etiolated Pisum sativum L. cv Alaska are mixed in vitro with {gamma}-({sup 32}P)ATP, a phosphorylated band of apparent molecular mass 120 kilodaltons can be detected on autoradiographs of sodium dodecyl sulfate electrophoresis gels. If the stem sections are exposed to blue light immediately prior to membrane isolation, this band is not evident. Comparisons of the kinetics, tissue distribution, and dark recovery of the phosphorylation response with those published for blue light mediated phototropism or rapid growth inhibition indicate that the phosphorylation could be linked to one or both of the reactions described. However, the fluence-response relationships for the change in detectable phosphorylation match quite closely those reported for phototropism but not those for growth inhibition. Blue light has also been found to regulate the capacity for in vitro phosphorylation of a second protein. It has an apparent molecular mass of 84 kilodaltons and is localized primarily in basal stem sections.

  15. Pyrene Derivative Emitting Red or near-Infrared Light with Monomer/Excimer Conversion and Its Application to Ratiometric Detection of Hypochlorite.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yinglong; Wang, Jun; Zeng, Fang; Huang, Shuailing; Huang, Jing; Xie, Huiting; Yu, Changmin; Wu, Shuizhu

    2016-01-20

    Fluorescent sensors are attractive and versatile tools for both chemical sensing and biological imaging. Herein, a novel pyrene derivative fluorophore, Py-Cy, possessing the monomer/excimer conversion feature, was synthesized; and the design rationale for this fluorophore is combination of extending conjugation length and incorporating donor-π-acceptor structure. The positively charged Py-Cy shows quite good water solubility and exhibits absorption in the visible-light range, and its monomer and excimer emit red light and near-infrared light respectively, which is extremely beneficial for biosensing or bioimaging. To explore the potential utilization of this new fluorophore, we choose hypochlorite as a model analyte, which can break the double bond in the molecular structure, thereby generating the water-insoluble pyrenecarboxaldehyde; this process correspondingly leads to fluorescence changes and thus affords the ratiometric fluorescent detection of hypochlorite in real samples and cell imaging. The approach offers new insights for designing other fluorophores which emit red or near-infrared light and for devising technically simple ratiometric fluorescent sensors. PMID:26701212

  16. Detection of light-induced changes of intracellular ionized calcium concentration in Limulus ventral photoreceptors using arsenazo III

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J. E.; Brown, P. K.; Pinto, L. H.

    1977-01-01

    1. The metallochromic indicator dye, arsenazo III, was injected intracellularly into Limulus ventral photoreceptor cells to concentrations greater than 1 mM. 2. The absorption spectrum (450-750 nm) of the dye in single dark-adapted cells was measured by a scanning microspectrophotometer. When a cell was light-adapted, the absorption of the dye changed; the difference spectrum had two maxima at about 610 and 660 nm, a broad minimum at about 540 nm and an isosbestic point at about 585 nm. 3. When intracellular calcium concentration was raised in dark-adapted cells previously injected with arsenazo III, the difference spectum had two maxima at about 610 and 660 nm, a broad minimum at about 530 nm and an isosbestic point at about 585 nm. The injection of Mg2+ into dark-adapted cells previously injected with the dye induced a difference spectrum that had a single maximum at about 620 nm. Also, decreasing the intracellular pH of cells previously injected with the dye induced a difference spectrum that had a minimum at about 620 nm. The evidence suggests that there is a rise of intracellular ionized calcium when a Limulus ventral photoreceptor is light-adapted. 4. The intracellular calcium concentration, [Ca2+]1, in light-adapted photoreceptors was estimated to reach at least 10-4 M by compaing the light-induced difference spectra measured in ventral photoreceptors with a standard curve determined in microcuvettes containing 2mM arsenazo III in 400 mM-KCl, 1 mM-MgCl2 and 25 mM MOPS at pH 7·0. 5. In cells injected to less than 3 mM arsenazo III, light induced a transient decrease in optical transmission at 660 nm (T660). This decrease in T660 indicates that illumination of a ventral photoreceptor normally causes a transient increase of [Ca2+]1. 6. Arsenazo III was found to be sensitive, selective and rapid enough to measure light-induced changes of intracellular ionized calcium in Limulus ventral photoreceptor cells. PMID:17732

  17. Detection of unlabeled particles in the low micrometer size range using light scattering and hydrodynamic 3D focusing in a microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Guisheng; Jensen, Thomas G; Kutter, Jörg P

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we describe a microfluidic device composed of integrated microoptical elements and a two-layer microchannel structure for highly sensitive light scattering detection of micro/submicrometer-sized particles. In the two-layer microfluidic system, a sample flow stream is first constrained in the out-of-plane direction into a narrow sheet, and then focused in-plane into a small core region, obtaining on-chip three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic focusing. All the microoptical elements, including waveguides, microlens, and fiber-to-waveguide couplers, and the in-plane focusing channels are fabricated in one SU-8 layer by standard photolithography. The channels for out-of-plane focusing are made in a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) layer by a single cast using a SU-8 master. Numerical and experimental results indicate that the device can realize 3D hydrodynamic focusing reliably over a wide range of Reynolds numbers (0.5 < Re < 20). Polystyrene particles of three sizes (2, 1, and 0.5 μm) were measured in the microfluidic device with integrated optics, demonstrating the feasibility of this approach to detect particles in the low micrometer size range by light scattering detection. PMID:22740459

  18. Ratiometric two-photon excited photoluminescence of quantum dots triggered by near-infrared-light for real-time detection of nitric oxide release in situ.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hui; Gui, Rijun; Sun, Jie; Wang, Yanfeng

    2016-05-30

    Probe-donor integrated nanocomposites were developed from conjugating silica-coated Mn(2+):ZnS quantum dots (QDs) with MoS2 QDs and photosensitive nitric oxide (NO) donors (Fe4S3(NO)7(-), RBS). Under excitation with near-infrared (NIR) light at 808 nm, the Mn(2+):ZnS@SiO2/MoS2-RBS nanocomposites showed the dual-emissive two-photon excited photoluminescence (TPEPL) that induced RBS photolysis to release NO in situ. NO caused TPEPL quenching of Mn(2+):ZnS QDs, but it produced almost no impact on the TPEPL of MoS2 QDs. Hence, the nanocomposites were developed as a novel QDs-based ratiometric TPEPL probe for real-time detection of NO release in situ. The ratiometric TPEPL intensity is nearly linear (R(2) = 0.9901) with NO concentration in the range of 0.01∼0.8 μM, which corresponds to the range of NO release time (0∼15 min). The detection limit was calculated to be approximately 4 nM of NO. Experimental results confirmed that this novel ratiometric TPEPL probe possessed high selectivity and sensitivity for the detection of NO against potential competitors, and especially showed high detection performance for NIR-light triggered NO release in tumor intracellular microenvironments. These results would promote the development of versatile probe-donor integrated systems, also providing a facile and efficient strategy to real-time detect the highly controllable drug release in situ, especially in physiological microenvironments. PMID:27154831

  19. Probing multi-scale self-similarity of tissue structures using light scattering spectroscopy: prospects in pre-cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Subhasri; Das, Nandan K.; Kumar, Satish; Mohapatra, Sonali; Pradhan, Asima; Panigrahi, Prasanta K.; Ghosh, Nirmalya

    2013-02-01

    Multi-resolution analysis on the spatial refractive index inhomogeneities in the connective tissue regions of human cervix reveals clear signature of multifractality. We have thus developed an inverse analysis strategy for extraction and quantification of the multifractality of spatial refractive index fluctuations from the recorded light scattering signal. The method is based on Fourier domain pre-processing of light scattering data using Born approximation, and its subsequent analysis through Multifractal Detrended Fluctuation Analysis model. The method has been validated on several mono- and multi-fractal scattering objects whose self-similar properties are user controlled and known a-priori. Following successful validation, this approach has initially been explored for differentiating between different grades of precancerous human cervical tissues.

  20. Separation and characterization of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) latex particles by asymmetric flow field flow fractionation with light-scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Collins, Melissa E; Soto-Cantu, Erick; Cueto, Rafael; Russo, Paul S

    2014-04-01

    Poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) latex particles have been analyzed and sorted according to size using asymmetric flow field flow fractionation (AF4) coupled with multiple-angle light scattering (MALS). Characterization of fractions by regular and depolarized dynamic light scattering confirmed that smaller particles elute prior to larger ones, as expected for field flow fractionation. The measured radii of the optically and geometrically anisotropic particles are consistent with those determined from transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A certain amount of heterogeneity remains in the fractions, but their uniformity for use as diffusion probes is improved. Full characterization of PTFE colloids will require a difficult assessment of the distribution, even within fractions, of the optical anisotropy. A general method to obtain number versus size distributions is presented. This approach is valid even when an online concentration detector is not available or ineffective. The procedure is adaptable to particles of almost any regular shape. PMID:24635125

  1. Postcolumn fluorescence as an alternative to evaporative light scattering detection for ceramide analysis with gradient elution in non-aqueous reversed-phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J Y; Chaminade, P; Gaudin, K; Prognon, P; Baillet, A; Ferrier, D

    1999-10-22

    Ceramide analysis was developed with gradient elution in non-aqueous reversed-phase liquid chromatography with evaporative light scattering detection (ELSD) or postcolumn fluorescence detection. Fluorescence detection (excitation, 360 nm; emission, 425 nm) after postcolumn formation of mixed assemblies between eluted ceramides and 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene was developed. In comparison with ELSD, fluorescence detection allows a better detection of the minor species ceramide from ceramide type III (commercial mixture of non-hydroxy fatty acid-sphingosine) and appears to be more sensitive for quantitation of ceramides at low concentrations. The fluorescence response is linear over a wide range of injected amount of ceramide III (expressed as stearoyl-phytosphingosine): 10 ng to 1000 ng. The response of ELSD is non linear but can be linearized in double logarithmic coordinates for calculations over a narrow range, e.g. between 10 to 350 ng ceramide III injected. The lower quantitation limits of these two detectors are similar: 5 ng ceramide III was injected. PMID:10563420

  2. Reliable Detection and Smart Deletion of Malassez Counting Chamber Grid in Microscopic White Light Images for Microbiological Applications.

    PubMed

    Denimal, Emmanuel; Marin, Ambroise; Guyot, Stéphane; Journaux, Ludovic; Molin, Paul

    2015-08-01

    In biology, hemocytometers such as Malassez slides are widely used and are effective tools for counting cells manually. In a previous work, a robust algorithm was developed for grid extraction in Malassez slide images. This algorithm was evaluated on a set of 135 images and grids were accurately detected in most cases, but there remained failures for the most difficult images. In this work, we present an optimization of this algorithm that allows for 100% grid detection and a 25% improvement in grid positioning accuracy. These improvements make the algorithm fully reliable for grid detection. This optimization also allows complete erasing of the grid without altering the cells, which eases their segmentation. PMID:26072694

  3. Extragalactic Synchrotron Transients in the Era of Wide-field Radio Surveys. I. Detection Rates and Light Curve Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Brian D.; Williams, P. K. G.; Berger, Edo

    2015-06-01

    The impending era of wide-field radio surveys has the potential to revolutionize our understanding of astrophysical transients. Here we evaluate the prospects of a wide range of planned and hypothetical radio surveys using the properties and volumetric rates of known and hypothetical classes of extragalactic synchrotron radio transients (e.g., on-axis and off-axis gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), supernovae, tidal disruption events, compact object mergers). Utilizing these sources and physically motivated considerations we assess the allowed phase space of radio luminosity and peak timescale for extragalactic transients. We also include for the first time effects such as redshift evolution of the rates, K-corrections, and non-Euclidean luminosity distance, which affect the detection rates of the most sensitive surveys. The number of detected events is calculated by means of a Monte Carlo method, using the various survey properties (depth, cadence, area) and realistic detection criteria that include a cut on the minimum variability of the transients during the survey and an assessment of host galaxy contamination. We find that near-term GHz frequency surveys (ASKAP/VAST, Very Large Array Sky Survey) will detect few events: ≲ 30-50 on- and off-axis long GRBs (LGRBs) and off-axis tidal disruption events, and ∼ 50-100 neutron star binary mergers if ∼ 0.5% of the mergers result in a stable millisecond magnetar. Low-frequency surveys (e.g., LOFAR) are unlikely to detect any transients, while a hypothetical large-scale mm survey may detect ∼40 on-axis LGRBs. On the other hand, we find that SKA1 surveys at ∼ 0.1-1 GHz have the potential to uncover thousands of transients, mainly on-axis and off-axis LGRBs, on-axis short GRBs, off-axis TDEs, and neutron star binary mergers with magnetar remnants.

  4. Extracting constraints from direct detection searches of supersymmetric dark matter in the light of null results from the LHC in the squark sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riffard, Q.; Mayet, F.; Bélanger, G.; Genest, M.-H.; Santos, D.

    2016-02-01

    The comparison of the results of direct detection of dark matter, obtained with various target nuclei, requires model-dependent, or even arbitrary, assumptions. Indeed, to draw conclusions either the spin-dependent (SD) or the spin-independent (SI) interaction has to be neglected. In the light of the null results from supersymmetry searches at the LHC, the squark sector is pushed to high masses. We show that for a squark sector at the TeV scale, the framework used to extract constraints from direct detection searches can be redefined as the number of free parameters is reduced. Moreover, the correlation observed between SI and SD proton cross sections constitutes a key issue for the development of the next generation of dark matter detectors.

  5. The Face-to-Face Light Detection Paradigm: A New Methodology for Investigating Visuospatial Attention Across Different Face Regions in Live Face-to-Face Communication Settings

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Laura A.; Malloy, Daniel M.; Cone, John M.; Hendrickson, David L.

    2009-01-01

    We introduce a novel paradigm for studying the cognitive processes used by listeners within interactive settings. This paradigm places the talker and the listener in the same physical space, creating opportunities for investigations of attention and comprehension processes taking place during interactive discourse situations. An experiment was conducted to compare results from previous research using videotaped stimuli to those obtained within the live face-to-face task paradigm. A headworn apparatus is used to briefly display LEDs on the talker’s face in four locations as the talker communicates with the participant. In addition to the primary task of comprehending speeches, participants make a secondary task light detection response. In the present experiment, the talker gave non-emotionally-expressive speeches that were used in past research with videotaped stimuli. Signal detection analysis was employed to determine which areas of the face received the greatest focus of attention. Results replicate previous findings using videotaped methods. PMID:21113354

  6. The pulsed light inactivation of veterinary relevant microbial biofilms and the use of a RTPCR assay to detect parasite species within biofilm structures

    PubMed Central

    Garvey, M.; Coughlan, G.; Murphy, N.; Rowan, N.

    2016-01-01

    The presence of pathogenic organisms namely parasite species and bacteria in biofilms in veterinary settings, is a public health concern in relation to human and animal exposure. Veterinary clinics represent a significant risk factor for the transfer of pathogens from housed animals to humans, especially in cases of wound infection and the shedding of faecal matter. This study aims to provide a means of detecting veterinary relevant parasite species in bacterial biofilms, and to provide a means of disinfecting these biofilms. A real time PCR assay was utilized to detect parasite DNA in Bacillus cereus biofilms on stainless steel and PVC surfaces. Results show that both Cryptosporidium and Giardia attach to biofilms in large numbers (100-1000 oo/cysts) in as little as 72 hours. Pulsed light successfully inactivated all test species (Listeria, Salmonella, Bacillus, Escherichia) in planktonic and biofilm form with an increase in inactivation for every increase in UV dose. PMID:26862516

  7. Simultaneous determination of jujuboside A, B and betulinic acid in semen Ziziphi spinosae by high performance liquid chromatography-evaporative light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingchun; Zhang, Yanqing; Xie, Junbo

    2008-12-15

    A reverse phase high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method with evaporative light scattering detection (ELSD) was developed for simultaneous determination of jujuboside A, B and betulinic acid in semen Ziziphi spinosae. The analysis was performed by gradient elution, using an aqueous mobile phase (containing 0.1% acetic acid) modified by acetonitrile. The evaporator tube temperature of ELSD was set at 45 degrees C, and with the nebulizing gas flow-rate of 1.8l/min. The method was validated for accuracy, reproducibility, precision and limits of detection and quantification. Quantification of the three active compounds in semen Ziziphi spinosae from different locations was performed by this method, which provides a new tool for quality assessment of semen Ziziphi spinosae. PMID:18977107

  8. The fluorescence detection of glutathione by ∙OH radicals' elimination with catalyst of MoS2/rGO under full spectrum visible light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Ma, Weiguang; Han, Dongxue; Wang, Lingnan; Wu, Tongshun; Niu, Li

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a new method for the detection of glutathione (GSH) was designed based on the ∙OH radicals' elimination system due to the reducing ability of GSH for the first time. Fluorescence method with terephthalic acid (TA) as the probe was employed for the quantification of ∙OH radicals' production and elimination. Experimental conditions of ∙OH radicals' production were optimized in detail, and ∙OH radicals were found to be efficiently produced by the excellent catalysis performance of MoS2/rGO under full spectrum visible light irradiation. The introduction of GSH make fluorescent intensity decrease due to the elimination of ∙OH radicals. For the present fluorescence based GSH sensor, a wide detection range of 60.0-700.0 µM and excellent selectivity have been achieved. Furthermore, it has been successfully employed for the determination of GSH in commercial drug tablets and human serum. PMID:26452861

  9. Detection of Silver Nanoparticles in Cells by Flow Cytometry Using Light Scattering and Far-red Fluorescence

    EPA Science Inventory

    The cellular uptake of different sized silver nanoparticles (l0 nm, 50 nm, and 75nm) coated with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) or citrate in ARPE-19 cells following 24 hour incubation was detected by side scatter through the use of a flow cytometer. A large far red fluorescence sign...

  10. Detection of Silver and TiO2 Nanoparticles using Light Scatter by Flow Cytometry and Darkfield Microscopy

    EPA Science Inventory

    Titanium Dioxide (Ti02) and Silver (Ag) nanoparticles are used in many domestic applications, including sunscreens and paints. Evaluation of the potential hazard of manmade nanomaterials has been hampered by a limited ability to detect and measure nanoparticles in cells. In the p...

  11. InGaAs triangular barrier photodiodes for high-responsivity detection of near-infrared light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimura, Kazuya; Ohmori, Masato; Noda, Takeshi; Kojima, Tomoya; Kado, Sakunari; Vitushinskiy, Pavel; Iwata, Naotaka; Sakaki, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    InGaAs triangular barrier (TB) structures of various barrier thicknesses have been formed on InP substrates. With them, we have fabricated TB photodiodes that yield a very high responsivity of 2.3 × 104 A/W at 100 K for the 1312 nm light of 320 fW power. By passivating the diode surface with polyimide, the dark current has been markedly reduced. Diodes with thicker barriers show higher sensitivity and responsivity, reflecting the enhancement of the barrier lowering effect by photogenerated holes.

  12. A RP-LC method with evaporative light scattering detection for the assay of simethicone in pharmaceutical formulations.

    PubMed

    Moore, Douglas E; Liu, Tina X; Miao, William G; Edwards, Alison; Elliss, Russell

    2002-09-01

    A reversed-phase liquid chromatographic method has been developed and validated for the determination of the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) component of Simethicone, which is used as an anti-foaming agent in pharmaceutical formulations. The method involves acidification to neutralise antacid components of the formulation, then a single extraction of the PDMS with dichloromethane. This is followed by separation with a reversed-phase column using an acetonitrile-chloroform solvent gradient, and quantification by an evaporative light scattering detector. An assay precision of 3% was achieved in intraday and interday determinations. No interference was found from the aluminium and magnesium hydroxide components of antacid formulations. PMID:12191712

  13. No-Light Light Bulbs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modern Schools, 1976

    1976-01-01

    A thumbnail sketch of some of the light bulbs manufactured for a purpose other than seeing. These "dark" lamps perform varied tasks including keeping food fresh, detecting and preventing disease, spurring plant growth, heating, and copying printed material. (Author/MLF)

  14. Relative light yield and temporal response of a stilbene-doped bibenzyl organic scintillator for neutron detection

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J. A.; Goldblum, B. L. Brickner, N. M.; Daub, B. H.; Kaufman, G. S.; Bibber, K. van; Vujic, J.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bleuel, D. L.; Caggiano, J. A.; Hatarik, R.; Phillips, T. W.; Zaitseva, N. P.; Wender, S. A.

    2014-05-21

    The neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) diagnostics used to characterize implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has necessitated the development of novel scintillators that exhibit a rapid temporal response and high light yield. One such material, a bibenzyl-stilbene mixed single-crystal organic scintillator grown in a 99.5:0.5 ratio in solution, has become the standard scintillator used for nTOF diagnostics at NIF. The prompt fluorescence lifetime and relative light yield as a function of proton energy were determined to calibrate this material as a neutron detector. The temporal evolution of the intensity of the prompt fluorescent response was modeled using first-order reaction kinetics and the prompt fluorescence decay constant was determined to be 2.46 ± 0.01 (fit) ± 0.13 (systematic) ns. The relative response of the bibenzyl-stilbene mixed crystal generated by recoiling protons was measured, and results were analyzed using Birks' relation to quantify the non-radiative quenching of excitation energy in the scintillator.

  15. Relative light yield and temporal response of a stilbene-doped bibenzyl organic scintillator for neutron detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. A.; Goldblum, B. L.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bleuel, D. L.; Brickner, N. M.; Caggiano, J. A.; Daub, B. H.; Kaufman, G. S.; Hatarik, R.; Phillips, T. W.; Wender, S. A.; van Bibber, K.; Vujic, J.; Zaitseva, N. P.

    2014-05-01

    The neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) diagnostics used to characterize implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has necessitated the development of novel scintillators that exhibit a rapid temporal response and high light yield. One such material, a bibenzyl-stilbene mixed single-crystal organic scintillator grown in a 99.5:0.5 ratio in solution, has become the standard scintillator used for nTOF diagnostics at NIF. The prompt fluorescence lifetime and relative light yield as a function of proton energy were determined to calibrate this material as a neutron detector. The temporal evolution of the intensity of the prompt fluorescent response was modeled using first-order reaction kinetics and the prompt fluorescence decay constant was determined to be 2.46 ± 0.01 (fit) ± 0.13 (systematic) ns. The relative response of the bibenzyl-stilbene mixed crystal generated by recoiling protons was measured, and results were analyzed using Birks' relation to quantify the non-radiative quenching of excitation energy in the scintillator.

  16. Early detection of cataract and response to pantethine therapy with non-invasive static and dynamic light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; King, James F.; Seeberger, Teri; Clark, John I.

    2003-07-01

    Cataractogenesis is a risk factor for space travelers. Here on earth, half of all blindness is due to cataracts. At this time, the only known treatment is surgical removal of the lens. In this paper, we present static and dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements of early onset of cataract before it has any effect on vision and to test the effectiveness of pantethine as an anticataract agent in reversing cataracts. In this preliminary study, experiments were conducted on 12 rodents. Static measurements were performed by scanning the animal eye (cornea to retina) at a laser power of 80 microwatts to collect photons or scattered intensity in steps of 10 microns. The rodents studied were control, selenite injected, and selenite plus pantethine injected. Selenite was used to induce cataracts. Static and dynamic changes (increase in light scatter and crystalline size) in the lenses are quantitatively measured as early as 1 day post selenite injections. Scattering intensity and DLS measurements from lenses of animals administered pantethine resembled controls. These subtle molecular changes are not noticeable when the animals are examined with conventional ophthalmic instruments because their lenses remain transparent. Acknowledgements: Technical support from C.Ganders, University of Washington, Seattle, NEI research grant EY04542 (JIC) and support under a NASA-NEI/NIH interagency agreement (RRA) are greatly appreciated. JFK works for QSS Inc. at NASA GRC.

  17. Light-Addressable Measurement of in Vivo Tissue Oxygenation in an Unanesthetized Zebrafish Embryo via Phase-Based Phosphorescence Lifetime Detection

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shih-Hao; Yu, Chu-Hung; Chien, Yi-Lung

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a digital light modulation system that utilizes a modified commercial projector equipped with a laser diode as a light source for quantitative measurements of in vivo tissue oxygenation in an unanesthetized zebrafish embryo via phase-based phosphorescence lifetime detection. The oxygen-sensitive phosphorescent probe (Oxyphor G4) was first inoculated into the bloodstream of 48 h post-fertilization (48 hpf) zebrafish embryos via the circulation valley to rapidly disperse probes throughout the embryo. The unanesthetized zebrafish embryo was introduced into the microfluidic device and immobilized on its lateral side by using a pneumatically actuated membrane. By controlling the illumination pattern on the digital micromirror device in the projector, the modulated excitation light can be spatially projected to illuminate arbitrarily-shaped regions of tissue of interest for in vivo oxygen measurements. We have successfully measured in vivo oxygen changes in the cardiac region and cardinal vein of a 48 hpf zebrafish embryo that experience hypoxia and subsequent normoxic conditions. Our proposed platform provides the potential for the real-time investigation of oxygen distribution in tissue microvasculature that relates to physiological stimulation and diseases in a developing organism. PMID:25856326

  18. Simultaneous determination of multiple platycosides with a single reference standard in Platycodi Radix by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with evaporative light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yu; Zhang, Feng; Tao, Hongxun; Wang, Wei; Sun, Lianna; Chen, Wansheng; Wang, Changhong

    2015-11-01

    A traditional external standard method using HPLC coupled with evaporative light scattering detection has been developed for fast and accurate determination of seven platycosides in Platycodi Radix. However, inevitable difficulties in reference standards preparation process, which are quite costly and time consuming, have made its application limited. To avoid this inconvenience, a simultaneous determination of multiple components with a single reference standard strategy, which could be realized by calibrating the standard curve with internal standard and response factors, was introduced to the HPLC coupled with evaporative light scattering detection method. This is the first time that an incorporation of these two methods has been realized. Among seven ingredients, platycodin D was selected as the internal standard for its relatively easy preparation and low cost. Moreover, according to the investigation on concentration-dependent effects over response factors and robustness test, platycoside E, deapioplatycodin D, platycodin D, and polygalacin D2 were chosen to be the indicators for this novel method. The present method has not shown statistically significant differences with a traditional external standard method as verified sample analysis by the F-test (p = 95%, n = 6). PMID:26331296

  19. Change detection and characterization of volcanic activity using ground based low-light and near infrared cameras to monitor incandescence and thermal signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrild, Martin; Webley, Peter; Dehn, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge and understanding of precursory events and thermal signatures are vital for monitoring volcanogenic processes, as activity can often range from low level lava effusion to large explosive eruptions, easily capable of ejecting ash up to aircraft cruise altitudes. Using ground based remote sensing techniques to monitor and detect this activity is essential, but often the required equipment and maintenance is expensive. Our investigation explores the use of low-light cameras to image volcanic activity in the visible to near infrared (NIR) portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. These cameras are ideal for monitoring as they are cheap, consume little power, are easily replaced and can provide near real-time data. We focus here on the early detection of volcanic activity, using automated scripts, that capture streaming online webcam imagery and evaluate image pixel brightness values to determine relative changes and flag increases in activity. The script is written in Python, an open source programming language, to reduce the overall cost to potential consumers and increase the application of these tools across the volcanological community. In addition, by performing laboratory tests to determine the spectral response of these cameras, a direct comparison of collocated low-light and thermal infrared cameras has allowed approximate eruption temperatures and effusion rates to be determined from pixel brightness. The results of a field campaign in June, 2013 to Stromboli volcano, Italy, are also presented here. Future field campaigns to Latin America will include collaborations with INSIVUMEH in Guatemala, to apply our techniques to Fuego and Santiaguito volcanoes.

  20. Change detection and characterization of volcanic activity using ground based low-light and near infrared cameras to monitor incandescence and thermal signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrild, M.; Webley, P.; Dehn, J.

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge and understanding of precursory events and thermal signatures are vital for monitoring volcanogenic processes, as activity can often range from low level lava effusion to large explosive eruptions, easily capable of ejecting ash up to aircraft cruise altitudes. Using ground based remote sensing techniques to monitor and detect this activity is essential, but often the required equipment and maintenance is expensive. Our investigation explores the use of low-light cameras to image volcanic activity in the visible to near infrared (NIR) portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. These cameras are ideal for monitoring as they are cheap, consume little power, are easily replaced and can provide near real-time data. We focus here on the early detection of volcanic activity, using automated scripts, that capture streaming online webcam imagery and evaluate image pixel brightness values to determine relative changes and flag increases in activity. The script is written in Python, an open source programming language, to reduce the overall cost to potential consumers and increase the application of these tools across the volcanological community. In addition, by performing laboratory tests to determine the spectral response of these cameras, a direct comparison of collocated low-light and thermal infrared cameras has allowed approximate eruption temperatures and effusion rates to be determined from pixel brightness. The results of a field campaign in June, 2013 to Stromboli volcano, Italy, are also presented here. Future field campaigns to Latin America will include collaborations with INSIVUMEH in Guatemala, to apply our techniques to Fuego and Santiaguito volcanoes.

  1. A robust generic method for grid detection in white light microscopy Malassez blade images in the context of cell counting.

    PubMed

    Marin, Ambroise; Denimal, Emmanuel; Guyot, Stéphane; Journaux, Ludovic; Molin, Paul

    2015-02-01

    In biology, cell counting is a primary measurement and it is usually performed manually using hemocytometers such as Malassez blades. This work is tedious and can be automated using image processing. An algorithm based on Fourier transform filtering and the Hough transform was developed for Malassez blade grid extraction. This facilitates cell segmentation and counting within the grid. For the present work, a set of 137 images with high variability was processed. Grids were accurately detected in 98% of these images. PMID:25510177

  2. Towards determination of absolute molar mass of cellulose polymer by size exclusion chromatography with mulitple angle laser light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Pawcenis, Dominika; Thomas, Jacob L; Łojewski, Tomasz; Milczarek, Jakub M; Łojewska, Joanna

    2015-08-28

    The study focuses on determination of a set of crucial parameters for molar mass calculation of cellulose from the results of size exclusion chromatography coupled with multiple angle laser light scattering (MALLS) and differential refractive index (DRI) detectors. In the present work, cellulose has been derivatised to obtain cellulose tricarbanilate (CTC) soluble in tetrahydrofuran (THF). The parameters of Rayleigh scattering in the MALLS detector: refractive index increment (dn/dc) and second virial coefficient (A2) of CTC in THF were determined for laser wavelength 658nm. In order to avoid errors resulting from cellulose derivatisation by-products present in the CTC solution, the so called "on-line" method of measuring dn/dc and A2 was applied. Based on the A2 determination, its influence on cellulose molar mass calculations and cellulose molecular dimensions were critically assessed. The latter includes evaluation of artificially aged cellulose towards conceivable branching by conformation plot analysis. PMID:26210115

  3. An automatic high precision registration method between large area aerial images and aerial light detection and ranging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Q.; Xie, D.; Sun, Y.

    2015-06-01

    The integration of digital aerial photogrammetry and Light Detetion And Ranging (LiDAR) is an inevitable trend in Surveying and Mapping field. We calculate the external orientation elements of images which identical with LiDAR coordinate to realize automatic high precision registration between aerial images and LiDAR data. There are two ways to calculate orientation elements. One is single image spatial resection using image matching 3D points that registered to LiDAR. The other one is Position and Orientation System (POS) data supported aerotriangulation. The high precision registration points are selected as Ground Control Points (GCPs) instead of measuring GCPs manually during aerotriangulation. The registration experiments indicate that the method which registering aerial images and LiDAR points has a great advantage in higher automation and precision compare with manual registration.

  4. Detection and characterization of stacking faults by light beam induced current mapping and scanning infrared microscopy in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vève-Fossati, C.; Martinuzzi, S.

    1998-08-01

    Non destructive techniques like scanning infrared microscopy and light beam induced current mapping are used to reveal the presence of stacking faults in heat treated Czochralski grown silicon wafers. In oxidized or contaminated samples, scanning infrared microscopy reveals that stacking faults grow around oxygen precipitates. This could be due to an aggregation of silicon self-interstitials emitted by the growing precipitates in the (111) plane. Light beam induced current maps show that the dislocations which surround the stacking faults are the main source of recombination centers, especially when they are decorated by a fast diffuser like copper. Des techniques non destructives telles que la microscopie infrarouge à balayage et la cartographie de photocourant induit par un spot lumineux ont été utilisées pour révéler la présence de fautes d'empilement après traitements thermiques, dans des plaquettes de silicium préparées par tirage Czochralski. Dans des échantillons oxydés ou contaminés, la microscopie infrarouge à balayage révèle des fautes d'empilement qui se développent autour des précipités d'oxygène. Cela peut être dû à la formation d'un agglomérat d'auto-interstitiels de silicium émis par la croissance des précipités dans les plans (111). Les cartographies de photocourant montrent que les dislocations qui entourent les fautes d'empilement sont la principale source de centres de recombinaison, et cela tout particulièrement quand ces fautes sont décorées par un diffuseur rapide tel que le cuivre.

  5. System and method for ultrafast optical signal detecting via a synchronously coupled anamorphic light pulse encoded laterally

    DOEpatents

    Heebner, John E.

    2010-08-03

    In one general embodiment, a method for ultrafast optical signal detecting is provided. In operation, a first optical input signal is propagated through a first wave guiding layer of a waveguide. Additionally, a second optical input signal is propagated through a second wave guiding layer of the waveguide. Furthermore, an optical control signal is applied to a top of the waveguide, the optical control signal being oriented diagonally relative to the top of the waveguide such that the application is used to influence at least a portion of the first optical input signal propagating through the first wave guiding layer of the waveguide. In addition, the first and the second optical input signals output from the waveguide are combined. Further, the combined optical signals output from the waveguide are detected. In another general embodiment, a system for ultrafast optical signal recording is provided comprising a waveguide including a plurality of wave guiding layers, an optical control source positioned to propagate an optical control signal towards the waveguide in a diagonal orientation relative to a top of the waveguide, at least one optical input source positioned to input an optical input signal into at least a first and a second wave guiding layer of the waveguide, and a detector for detecting at least one interference pattern output from the waveguide, where at least one of the interference patterns results from a combination of the optical input signals input into the first and the second wave guiding layer. Furthermore, propagation of the optical control signal is used to influence at least a portion of the optical input signal propagating through the first wave guiding layer of the waveguide.

  6. A calibration-independent laser-induced incandescence technique for soot measurement by detecting absolute light intensity.

    PubMed

    Snelling, David R; Smallwood, Gregory J; Liu, Fengshan; Gülder, Omer L; Bachalo, William D

    2005-11-01

    Laser-induced incandescence (LII) has proved to be a useful diagnostic tool for spatially and temporally resolved measurement of particulate (soot) volume fraction and primary particle size in a wide range of applications, such as steady flames, flickering flames, and Diesel engine exhausts. We present a novel LII technique for the determination of soot volume fraction by measuring the absolute incandescence intensity, avoiding the need for ex situ calibration that typically uses a source of particles with known soot volume fraction. The technique developed in this study further extends the capabilities of existing LII for making practical quantitative measurements of soot. The spectral sensitivity of the detection system is determined by calibrating with an extended source of known radiance, and this sensitivity is then used to interpret the measured LII signals. Although it requires knowledge of the soot temperature, either from a numerical model of soot particle heating or experimentally determined by detecting LII signals at two different wavelengths, this technique offers a calibration-independent procedure for measuring soot volume fraction. Application of this technique to soot concentration measurements is demonstrated in a laminar diffusion flame. PMID:16270566

  7. Experimental detection of high-order or fractional orbital angular momentum of light based on a robust mode converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Wuhong; Chen, Lixiang

    2016-03-01

    Based on our constructed robust π/2 mode converter, we report a concise yet high-efficient experiment to realize the detection of both high-order and fractional orbital angular momentum (OAM). The π/2 mode converter that consists of a pair of cylindrical lens is actually not new. However, our experiment shows clearly its excellent robustness, as we have detected the high-order OAM numbers up to ℓ = 100 carried by standard Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) modes. The observed patterns of two-dimensional optical lattices indicate that the radial index p of LG beams can be straightforwardly inferred as well. The versatility of the converter is also manifested by input modified LG beams carrying tunable fractional OAM, where we observe the output lattices exhibiting an interesting evolvement from Hermite-Gaussian mode HG m , 0 to its adjacent HG m + 1 , 0 . Numeric simulations based on OAM eigen-mode decomposition support the experimental results. Our demonstration has potential in both classical and quantum information applications where high OAM modes are needed.

  8. A visible light photoelectrochemical sensor for tumor marker detection using tin dioxide quantum dot-graphene as labels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanhu; Li, Meng; Zhu, Yuanna; Ge, Shenguang; Yu, Jinghua; Yan, Mei; Song, Xianrang

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, a simple and sensitive sandwich-type photoelectrochemical (PEC) immunosensor for measurement of biomarkers on a gold nanoparticle-modified indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode through electrodeposition for point-of-care testing was developed by using a tin dioxide quantum dot-graphene nanocomposite (G-SnO2) as an excellent label with amplification techniques. The capture antibody (Ab1) was firstly immobilized on the gold nanoparticle-modified ITO electrode due to the covalent conjugation, then the antigen and the AuNP/PDDA-G-SnO2 nanocomposite nanoparticle labeled signal antibody (Ab2) were conjugated successively to form a sandwich-type immunocomplex through a specific interaction. Under irradiation with a common ultraviolet lamp (∼365 nm, price $50), the SnO2 NPs were excited and underwent charge-separation to yield electrons (e(-)) and holes (h(+)). As the holes were scavenged by ascorbic acid (AA), the electrons were transferred to the ITO electrode through RGO to generate a photocurrent. The photocurrents were proportional to the CEA concentrations, and the linear range of the developed immunosensor was from 0.005 to 10 ng mL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.036 pg mL(-1). The proposed sensor shows high sensitivity, stability, reproducibility, and can become a promising platform for other biomolecular detection. PMID:24133676

  9. Excluding the light dark matter window of a 331 model using LHC and direct dark matter detection data

    SciTech Connect

    Cogollo, D.; Gonzalez-Morales, Alma X.; Queiroz, Farinaldo S.; Teles, P. Rebello E-mail: alxogonz@ucsc.edu E-mail: patricia.rebello.teles@cern.ch

    2014-11-01

    We sift the impact of the recent Higgs precise measurements, and recent dark matter direct detection results, on the dark sector of an electroweak extension of the Standard Model that has a complex scalar as dark matter. We find that in this model the Higgs decays with a large branching ratio into dark matter particles, and charged scalars when these are kinematically available, for any coupling strength differently from the so called Higgs portal. Moreover, we compute the abundance and spin-independent WIMP-nucleon scattering cross section, which are driven by the Higgs and Z{sup '} boson processes. We decisively exclude the 1–500 GeV dark matter window and find the most stringent lower bound in the literature on the scale of symmetry breaking of the model namely 10 TeV, after applying the LUX-2013 limit. Interestingly, the projected XENON1T constraint will be able to rule out the entire 1 GeV–1000 GeV dark matter mass range. Lastly, for completeness, we compute the charged scalar production cross section at the LHC and comment on the possibility of detection at current and future LHC runnings.

  10. Colorimetric and dynamic light scattering detection of DNA sequences by using positively charged gold nanospheres: a comparative study with gold nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pylaev, T. E.; Khanadeev, V. A.; Khlebtsov, B. N.; Dykman, L. A.; Bogatyrev, V. A.; Khlebtsov, N. G.

    2011-07-01

    We introduce a new genosensing approach employing CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide)-coated positively charged colloidal gold nanoparticles (GNPs) to detect target DNA sequences by using absorption spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering. The approach is compared with a previously reported method employing unmodified CTAB-coated gold nanorods (GNRs). Both approaches are based on the observation that whereas the addition of probe and target ssDNA to CTAB-coated particles results in particle aggregation, no aggregation is observed after addition of probe and nontarget DNA sequences. Our goal was to compare the feasibility and sensitivity of both methods. A 21-mer ssDNA from the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 HIV-1 U5 long terminal repeat (LTR) sequence and a 23-mer ssDNA from the Bacillus anthracis cryptic protein and protective antigen precursor (pagA) genes were used as ssDNA models. In the case of GNRs, unexpectedly, the colorimetric test failed with perfect cigar-like particles but could be performed with dumbbell and dog-bone rods. By contrast, our approach with cationic CTAB-coated GNPs is easy to implement and possesses excellent feasibility with retention of comparable sensitivity—a 0.1 nM concentration of target cDNA can be detected with the naked eye and 10 pM by dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements. The specificity of our method is illustrated by successful DLS detection of one-three base mismatches in cDNA sequences for both DNA models. These results suggest that the cationic GNPs and DLS can be used for genosensing under optimal DNA hybridization conditions without any chemical modifications of the particle surface with ssDNA molecules and signal amplification. Finally, we discuss a more than two-three-order difference in the reported estimations of the detection sensitivity of colorimetric methods (0.1 to 10-100 pM) to show that the existing aggregation models are inconsistent with the detection limits of about 0.1-1 pM DNA and that

  11. Detection of reflected Cherenkov light from extensive air showers in the SPHERE experiment as a method of studying superhigh energy cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, R. A.; Aulova, T. V.; Bonvech, E. A.; Galkin, V. I.; Dzhatdoev, T. A.; Podgrudkov, D. A.; Roganova, T. M.; Chernov, D. V.

    2015-01-01

    Although a large number of experiments were carried out during the last few decades, the uncertainty in the spectrum of all nuclei of primary cosmic rays (PCRs) with superhigh energies is still high, and the results of many experiments on nuclear composition of PCRs are contradictory. An overview of the SPHERE experiment on detecting Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation from extensive air shower (EAS) reflected from a ground snow surface is given. A number of experimental studies implementing this method are presented and their results are analyzed. Some other popular methods of studying PCRs with superhigh energies ( E 0 > 1015 eV) and their main advantages and drawbacks are briefly considered. The detecting equipment of the SPHERE-2 experiment and the technique of its calibration are considered. The optical properties of snow, which are important for experiments on reflected Cherenkov light (CL) from EAS, are discussed and the history of observing reflected EAS CL is described. The algorithm of simulating the detector response and calculating the fiducial acceptance of shower detection is described. The procedure of processing the experimental data with a subsequent reconstruction of the spectrum of all PCR nuclei and analysis of the mass composition is shown. The first results of reconstructing the spectrum and separating groups of cosmic-ray nuclei with high energies in the SPHERE-2 experiment are presented. Main sources of systematic errors are considered. The prospects of developing the technique of observation of reflected EAS CL in future experiments are discussed.

  12. [Simultaneous determination of monosaccharides, disaccharides, oligosaccharides and sugar alcohols in foods by high performance liquid chromatography with evaporative light-scattering detection].

    PubMed

    Ding, Hongliu; Li, Can; Jin, Ping; Yuan, Lihong; Yao, Yongqing; Chen, Ying; Li, Pei

    2013-08-01

    A simple and efficient method was established based on high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to separate and detect thirteen analytes of monosaccharides, disaccharides, oligosaccharides and sugar alcohols (xylose, fructose, glucose, sucrose, maltose, lactose, 1-kestose, nystose, 1F-fructofuranosyl nystose, erythritol, mannitol, xylitol, maltitol) in foods. The separation was performed on an NH2 column with the gradient elution of acetonitrile-water as the mobile phases. The analytes were detected by an evaporative light-scattering detector (ELSD). All the thirteen sugars had good linearities within 0.1 - 5 g/L with the correlation coefficients between 0.9901 - 0.9996. The limits of detection (LOD) were all less than 0.1 g/L. The precisions of the method expressed as RSDs were in the range of 2.69% -7.21%. The recoveries of the thirteen analytes spiked in real samples ranged from 96.1% to 105.2%. This method was applied to the actual sample testings and the results showed the food labels were greatly different from the actual compositions. PMID:24369618

  13. [Simultaneous determination of five synthetic sweeteners in food by solid phase extraction-high performance liquid chromatography-evaporative light scattering detection].

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Wang, Yan; Wang, Yuhong; Zhou, Junyi; Yan, Chao

    2012-03-01

    A high performance liquid chromatographic method with evaporative light scattering detection (HPLC-ELSD) was developed for the simultaneous determination of five synthetic sweeteners (acesulfame-K, saccharin sodium, sodium cyclamate, sucralose and aspartame) in food. The sweeteners were extracted by 0.1% (v/v) formic acid buffer solution. The extract of sample was cleaned up and concentrated with solid phase extraction (SPE) cartridge. Then the sweeteners were separated on a C18 column (3 microm) using 0.1% (v/v) formic acid buffer (adjusted to pH = 3.5 with aqueous ammonia solution)-methanol (61: 39, v/v) as mobile phase, and finally detected by ELSD. The results showed that the reasonable linearity was achieved for all the analytes over the range of 30 - 1000 mg/L with the correlation coefficients (r) greater than 0.997. The recoveries for the five sweeteners ranged from 85.6% to 109.0% at three spiked concentrations with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) lower than 4.0%. The limits of detection (LODs, S/N = 3) were 2.5 mg/L for both acesulfame-K and sucralose, 3 mg/L for saccharin sodium, 10 mg/L for sodium cyclamate, and 5 mg/L for aspartame. The method is simple, sensitive and low cost, and has been successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of the five synthetic sweeteners in food. PMID:22715696

  14. Pharmacokinetic detection of penicillin excreted in urine using a totally internally reflected resonance light scattering technique with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cheng Zhi; Feng, Ping; Li, Yuan Fang; Tan, Ke Jun

    2005-05-01

    A quantitative analysis method for penicillins including ampicillin (AmP), benzyl penicillin (BP), oxacillin (OA) and amoxycillin (AmO) is proposed that makes use of the totally internally reflected resonance light scattering (TIR-RLS) signal from the penicillin at the H2O/CCl4 interface in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTMAB), and enables the pharmacokinetics of penicillin taken orally and excreted through urine to be monitored. Penicillin is coadsorbed with CTMAB at the H2O/CCl4 interface in neutral solution, resulting in the formation of ion associates that display greatly enhanced TIR-RLS signals (maximum at 368-372 nm). This enhanced TIR-RLS intensity was found to be proportional to the penicillin concentration over the range 0.2 x 10(-6) to 2.2 x 10(-6) mol L(-1), with limits of determination (3sigma) of 5.0 x 10(-8) to 7.0 x 10(-8) mol L(-1). Pharmacokinetics studies performed using the present method show that the excretion of orally-taken ampicillin through urine has a half-time of 1.05 h and an excremental quantum over 8 h of 49.3%, respectively. PMID:15900456

  15. We Detect Blue Light Phenomena Correlating with Environmental and Weather Changes, and Historic Native Americans or Their Place Names.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochs, Michael Ann; Mc Leod, Roger D.; Mc Leod, Edward M.

    2003-10-01

    Katahdin (Christ Cathar Spirit-signal stronghold) in Maine is sacred to the Penobscot Indian Nation. That mountain complex, and areas like Ellis Pond, ME and Penley Hill/Anasagunticook (adherent of Jesus Christ Spirit-signal doctor church) of the Mexico/Rumford/Mountain Valley region, also in Maine, have an association with historic Native Americans like the medicine woman Molocket/Molly Ockett. We have observed that these and other regions generate electromagnetic field (EMF) signals, which we can detect visually and in other ways. Such signals have sometimes been associated with significant and dynamic weather phenomena. Ohio's Serpent Mound and associated regions, or those now occupied by the Hopi Indian Nation, formerly an ancient Anasazi site, or areas of the current and earlier Mayan Nations, or the Nazca Plateau of Peru, may generate signals correlating with climate change, that may impact our technology, as in major power blackouts.

  16. Detection of melanomas by digital imaging of spectrally resolved ultraviolet light-induced autofluorescence of human skin.

    PubMed

    Chwirot, B W; Chwirot, S; Redziński, J; Michniewicz, Z

    1998-10-01

    Digital images of autofluorescence excited with 366 nm Hg line were recorded in a narrow 475 nm band for 408 pigmented lesions of the skin (90 melanomas, 205 common melanocytic and dysplastic naevi, 113 lesions of different kinds) and analysed photometrically with respect to spatial distribution of intensity to differentiate between melanomas and other melanocytic lesions. Earlier reports describing patterns of intensity distributions characteristic for melanomas have not been confirmed in this study. However, our evaluations showed that an algorithm based on ratios of maximum intensity recorded outside the lesions and minimum intensity found within them, allows melanomas to be detected with a sensitivity of 82.5%, a specificity of 78.6% and a positive predictive value of 58.9% (melanomas versus common and dysplastic naevi) or 76.7% (melanomas versus other pigmented lesions). The method is now being tested in a multicentre study involving three groups in three different cities in Poland. PMID:9893661

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detection of the murine brain response to light: temporal differentiation and negative functional MRI changes.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, W; Plyka, I; Li, H; Eisenstein, E M; Volkow, N D; Springer, C S

    1996-01-01

    Using a 9.4 T MRI instrument, we have obtained images of the mouse brain response to photic stimulation during a period between deep anesthesia and the early stages of arousal. The large image enhancements we observe (often >30%) are consistent with literature results extrapolated to 9.4 T. However, there are also two unusual aspects to our findings. (i) The visual area of the brain responds only to changes in stimulus intensity, suggesting that we directly detect operations of the M visual system pathway. Such a channel has been observed in mice by invasive electrophysiology, and described in detail for primates. (ii) Along with the typical positive response in the area of the occipital portion of the brain containing the visual cortex, another area displays decreased signal intensity upon stimulation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 PMID:8650215

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detection of the murine brain response to light: Temporal differentiation and negative functional MRI changes

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Wei; Palyka, I.; Li, HaiFang

    1996-06-11

    Using a 9.4 T MRI instrument, we have obtained images of the mouse brain response to photic stimulation during a period between deep anesthesia and the early stages of arousal. The large image enhancements we observe (often >30%) are consistent with literature results extrapolated to 9.4 T. However, there are also two unusual aspects to our findings. (i) The visual area of the brain responds only to changes in stimulus intensity, suggesting that we directly detect operations of the M visual system pathway. Such a channel has been observed in mice by invasive electrophysiology, and described in detail for primates. (ii) Along with the typical positive response in the area of the occipital portion of the brain containing the visual cortex; another area displays decreased signal intensity upon stimulation. 41 refs., 4 figs.

  19. In-line geometric fault detection in car parts based on structured light projection and image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couweleers, Fred; Skotheim, Oystein; Schulerud, Helene; Kaspersen, Kristin

    2003-05-01

    An inspection system is developed to replace manual inspection in a production line for car parts. The system, based on projected structured light, combining Gray code and phase shifting and using B/W CCD cameras and multi-media data projectors, provides robust height measurement images with a high resolution. By carefully observing a number of parameters, it is possible to attain this high resolution in a large measurement volume even with low-cost, off-the-shelf components. We have been able to achieve a noise floor in the phase determination of 30 mrad, which is better than the much reported 1 part in 10,000. The use of 4 cameras, 3 projectors and a turning operation allows total coverage of the complex shape part. A model of normal parts is designed using height measurement images of normal parts. This model represents both expected part dimensions in all camera views as well as normal variations. In order to compare measurements of new parts with the model, an alignment of the images is performed. The deviations between the measured part and the model are analyzed. Deviations outside the normal variation are classified as faults. The system is thus able to find geometrical faults as small as 2x2x0.25 mm in a part that measures roughly 400x400 mm and can decide whether or not to remove a part from the production line. Integrating optical metrology, image processing and robotics, we are able to design a complete system for in-line inspection of car parts with total coverage that is able to keep up with the production cycle time.

  20. First light of the VLT planet finder SPHERE. I. Detection and characterization of the substellar companion GJ 758 B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigan, A.; Bonnefoy, M.; Ginski, C.; Beust, H.; Galicher, R.; Janson, M.; Baudino, J.-L.; Buenzli, E.; Hagelberg, J.; D'Orazi, V.; Desidera, S.; Maire, A.-L.; Gratton, R.; Sauvage, J.-F.; Chauvin, G.; Thalmann, C.; Malo, L.; Salter, G.; Zurlo, A.; Antichi, J.; Baruffolo, A.; Baudoz, P.; Blanchard, P.; Boccaletti, A.; Beuzit, J.-L.; Carle, M.; Claudi, R.; Costille, A.; Delboulbé, A.; Dohlen, K.; Dominik, C.; Feldt, M.; Fusco, T.; Gluck, L.; Girard, J.; Giro, E.; Gry, C.; Henning, T.; Hubin, N.; Hugot, E.; Jaquet, M.; Kasper, M.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Langlois, M.; Le Mignant, D.; Llored, M.; Madec, F.; Martinez, P.; Mawet, D.; Mesa, D.; Milli, J.; Mouillet, D.; Moulin, T.; Moutou, C.; Origné, A.; Pavlov, A.; Perret, D.; Petit, C.; Pragt, J.; Puget, P.; Rabou, P.; Rochat, S.; Roelfsema, R.; Salasnich, B.; Schmid, H.-M.; Sevin, A.; Siebenmorgen, R.; Smette, A.; Stadler, E.; Suarez, M.; Turatto, M.; Udry, S.; Vakili, F.; Wahhaj, Z.; Weber, L.; Wildi, F.

    2016-03-01

    GJ 758 B is a brown dwarf companion to a nearby (15.76%) solar-type, metal-rich (M / H = + 0.2 dex) main-sequence star (G9V) that was discovered with Subaru/HiCIAO in 2009. From previous studies, it has drawn attention as being the coldest (~600 K) companion ever directly imaged around a neighboring star. We present new high-contrast data obtained during the commissioning of the SPHERE instrument at the Very Large Telescope (VLT). The data was obtained in Y-, J-, H-, and Ks-bands with the dual-band imaging (DBI) mode of IRDIS, thus providing a broad coverage of the full near-infrared (near-IR) range at higher contrast and better spectral sampling than previously reported. In this new set of high-quality data, we report the re-detection of the companion, as well as the first detection of a new candidate closer-in to the star. We use the new eight photometric points for an extended comparison of GJ 758 B with empirical objects and four families of atmospheric models. From comparison to empirical object, we estimate a T8 spectral type, but none of the comparison objects can accurately represent the observed near-IR fluxes of GJ 758 B. From comparison to atmospheric models, we attribute a Teff = 600 ± 100 K, but we find that no atmospheric model can adequately fit all the fluxes of GJ 758 B. The lack of exploration of metal enrichment in model grids appears as a major limitation that prevents an accurate estimation of the companion physical parameters. The photometry of the new candidate companion is broadly consistent with L-type objects, but a second epoch with improved photometry is necessary to clarify its status. The new astrometry of GJ 758 B shows a significant proper motion since the last epoch. We use this result to improve the determination of the orbital characteristics using two fitting approaches: Least-Squares Monte Carlo and Markov chain Monte Carlo. We confirm the high-eccentricity of the orbit (peak at 0.5), and find a most likely semi-major axis of

  1. Dynamic Light-Scattering Probe Used for the Very Early Detection of Cataracts and to Measure Response to Therapy (or Treatment)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansari,Rafat R.; Clark, John I.; King, James F.

    2002-01-01

    Half of all blindness worldwide is due to cataracts, and 34 million Americans over the age of 65 have cataracts. This figure is expected to rise to 70 million by the year 2030. Currently, no medical treatment is available to prevent or halt the progression of a cataract; nor is there any way to reverse a cataract once it has been detected by conventional methods. The only known treatment is surgical removal of the lens. It is estimated that over $5 billion will be spent this year for the treatment of cataract patients in the United States alone. According to Carl Kupfer, M.D., former Director of the National Eye Institute at the National Institutes of Health, "A delay in cataract formation of about 10 years would reduce the prevalence of visually disabling cataracts by about 45 percent." However, this vision remains a dream because of the lack of objective methods that can be used to detect cataracts very early and, hence, can be used for screening potential anticataract drugs. This is about to change. The National Eye Institute and NASA entered into a formal interagency agreement in late 1996 to develop and test a dynamic light-scattering (DLS) device to detect the earliest changes due to cataract formation. The new DLS probe developed by Dr. Ansari at the NASA Glenn Research Center is several orders of magnitude more sensitive than conventional clinical systems. This ultrahigh sensitivity enables the probe to detect the onset of a cataract before it has any effect on vision and allows researchers to test the effectiveness of anticataract drugs in reversing cataracts. This device (see the following illustration) was originally designed to study transport phenomena in microgravity fluid physics experiments onboard the space shuttle orbiters and space station. It will be very useful in testing anticataract drugs to halt or reverse the progression of cataracts during longitudinal clinical trials.

  2. High-sensitivity detection of CH radicals in flames by use of a diode-laser-based near-ultraviolet light source.

    PubMed

    Peterson, K A; Oh, D B

    1999-05-15

    CH radical distributions in ethylene-air and methane-air diffusion flames are mapped by wavelength-modulation absorption spectroscopy (WMS). Tunable, wavelength-modulated 426-nm light is generated by frequency doubling of a modulated 852-nm distributed Bragg reflector diode laser. Absorbances of 5 x 10(-5) are measured with second-harmonic (2f) WMS with a signal-to-noise ratio of 3:1 in a 3-Hz measurement bandwidth. The feasibility of simultaneous line-of-sight absorption and spatially resolved laser-induced-fluorescence detection with a single excitation beam is also demonstrated. This near-UV source is suitable for microgravity drop-tower experiments and other applications in which compact, rugged, energy-efficient instrumentation is required. PMID:18073817

  3. The Very Early Light Curve of SN 2015F in NGC 2442: A Possible Detection of Shock-heated Cooling Emission and Constraints on SN Ia Progenitor System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Myungshin; Choi, Changsu; Yoon, Sung-Chul; Kim, Jae-Woo; Ehgamberdiev, Shuhrat A.; Monard, Libert A. G.; Sung, Hyun-Il

    2015-11-01

    The main progenitor candidates of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are white dwarfs in binary systems where the companion star is another white dwarf (double degenerate (DD) system) or a less-evolved, non-degenerate star with R* ≳ 0.1 R⊙ (single degenerate system). However, no direct observational evidence exists to tell us which progenitor system is more common. Recent studies suggest that the light curve of a supernova shortly after its explosion can be used to set a limit on the progenitor size, R*. Here, we report high-cadence monitoring observations of SN 2015F, a normal SN Ia in the galaxy NGC 2442, starting about 84 days before the first light time. Using our daily cadence data, we capture the emergence of the radioactively powered light curve; more importantly, with >97.4% confidence, we detect possible dim precursor emission that appears roughly 1.5 days before the rise of the radioactively powered emission. The signal is consistent with theoretical expectations for a progenitor system involving a companion star with R* ≃ 0.1-1 R⊙ or a prompt explosion of a DD system, but is inconsistent with the typically invoked size of a white dwarf progenitor of R* ˜ 0.01 R⊙. Upper limits on the precursor emission also constrain the progenitor size to be R* ≲ 0.1 R⊙ with a companion star size of R* ≲ 1.0 R⊙, excluding a very large companion star in the progenitor system. Additionally, we find that the distance to SN 2015F is 23.9 ± 0.4 Mpc.

  4. Bladder cancer detection by fluorescence imaging with Hexvix: optimization of the excitation light during high magnification cystoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovisa, Blaise; Jichlinski, Patrice; Aymon, Daniela; Weber, Bernd-Claus; van den Bergh, Hubert; Wagnières, Georges

    2009-07-01

    Fluorescence cystoscopy has been recently acknowledged as a useful method to detect early superficial bladder cancer, even flat lesions. After the instillation of hexaminolevulinic acid (Hexvix®) in the bladder for about an hour, photoactivable porphyrins (PaP), mainly protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) accumulate in the cancerous cells. Although we observe a selective production of PpIX and an outstanding sensitivity of this method, false positive (FP) lesions negatively impact its specificity. Carcinogenesis often combines with angiogenesis, and thus changes in vascular architecture. Therefore, the visualization of the vascular modifications on the fluorescence positive sites is likely to differentiate false and true positive (TP). New methods including high magnification (HM) cystoscopy are being investigated by our group, and will yield a reduced number of biopsies and a better characterization of the fluorescence positive sites. In this study, we are using a dedicated rigid cystoscope, allowing conventional magnification during "macroscopic" observation, as well as image acquisition with HM when the endoscope is in contact with the tissue. Each observed site is biopsied and described by histopathological analysis. The vascular organization (tortuosity, vascular loops, vascular area and diameter) of the fluorescence positive sites was characterized in situ. Intrinsic contrast between the vessels and the tissue was enhanced with an optimization of the spectral design. Preliminary results are presented here.

  5. Partial solubility parameters of lactose, mannitol and saccharose using the modified extended Hansen method and evaporation light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Peña, M A; Daali, Y; Barra, J; Bustamante, P

    2000-02-01

    The modified extended Hansen method was tested for the first time to determine partial solubility parameters of non-polymeric pharmaceutical excipients. The method was formerly tested with drug molecules, and is based upon a regression analysis of the logarithm of the mole fraction solubility of the solute against the partial solubility parameters of a series of solvents of different chemical classes. Two monosaccharides and one disaccharide (lactose monohydrate, saccharose and mannitol) were chosen. The solubility of these compounds was determined in a series of solvents ranging from nonpolar to polar and covering a wide range of the solubility parameter scale. Sugars do not absorb at the UV-vis region, and the saturated solutions were assayed with a recent chromatographic technique coupled to an evaporative light scattering detector. This technique was suitable to determine the concentration dissolved in most solvents. The modified extended Hansen method provided better results than the original approach. The best model was the four parameter equation, which includes the dispersion delta d, dipolar delta p, acidic delta a and basic delta b partial solubility parameters. The partial solubility parameters obtained, expressed as MPa1/2, were delta d = 17.6, delta p = 28.7, delta h = 19, delta a = 14.5, delta b = 12.4, delta T = 32.8 for lactose, delta d = 16.2, delta p = 24.5, delta h = 14.6, delta a = 8.7, delta b = 12.2, delta T = 32.8 for mannitol and delta d = 17.1, delta p = 18.5, delta h = 13, delta a = 11.3, delta b = 7.6, delta T = 28.4 for saccharose. The high total solubility parameters delta T obtained agree with the polar nature of the sugars. The dispersion parameters delta d are quite similar for the three sugars indicating that the polar delta p and hydrogen bonding parameters (delta h, delta a, delta b) are responsible for the variation in the total solubility parameters delta T obtained, as also found for drugs. The results suggest that the method

  6. Bili lights

    MedlinePlus

    Phototherapy for jaundice; Bilirubin - bili lights; Neonatal care - bili lights; Newborn care - bili lights ... Phototherapy involves shining fluorescent light from the bili lights on bare skin. A specific wavelength of light can break down bilirubin into a form that ...

  7. Simultaneous determination of seven major diterpenoids in Siegesbeckia pubescens Makino by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with evaporative light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Huo, Linan; Jiang, Zhen; Li, Huining; Wang, Mingsheng; Ye, Xiaoxia; Ji, Bin; Guo, Xingjie

    2012-10-01

    A novel HPLC method with evaporative light scattering detection was developed for the simultaneous quantification of seven major diterpenoids of two types, including ent-pimarane type: Kirenol, Hythiemoside B, Darutigenol, and ent-kaurane type: ent-16β,17,18-trihydroxy-kauran-19-oic acid, ent-17,18-dihydroxy-kauran-19-oic acid, ent-16β,17-dihydroxy-kauran-19-oic acid, 16α-hydro-ent-kauran-17,19-dioic acid in the aerial parts of Siegesbeckia pubescens Makino, an important traditional Chinese medicinal herb. Chromatographic separation was achieved on a Waters Symmetry Shield(TM) RP18 column (250 mm× 4.6 mm id, 5 μm) with a gradient mobile phase (A: 0.3% v/v aqueous formic acid and B: acetonitrile) at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. The drift tube temperature of evaporative light scattering detection was set at 103°C, and nitrogen flow rate was 3.0 L/min. The method was validated for accuracy, precision, LOD, and LOQ. All calibration curves showed a good linear relationship (r > 0.999) in test range. Precision was evaluated by intra- and interday tests that showed RSDs were less than 3.5%. Accuracy validation showed that the recovery was between 96.5 and 102.0% with RSDs below 2.8%. The validated method was successfully applied to determine the contents of seven diterpenoids in the different parts of Siegesbeckia pubescens Makino from two sources and to determine the contents of ent-pimarane, ent-kaurane, and total diterpenoids. PMID:22887919

  8. A 128 × 128 Pixel Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor Image Sensor with an Improved Pixel Architecture for Detecting Modulated Light Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Koji; Oya, Yu; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Nunoshita, Masahiro; Ohta, Jun; Watanabe, Kunihiro

    A complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor for the detection of modulated light under background illumination has been developed. When an object is illuminated by a modulated light source under background illumination the sensor enables the object alone to be captured. This paper describes improvements in pixel architecture for reducing fixed pattern noise (FPN) and improving the sensitivity of the image sensor. The improved 128 × 128 pixel CMOS image sensor with a column parallel analog-to-digital converter (ADC) circuit was fabricated using 0.35-mm CMOS technology. The resulting captured images are shown and the properties of improved pixel architecture are described. The image sensor has FPN of 1/28 that of the previous image sensor and an improved pixel architecture comprising a common in-pixel amp and a correlated double sampling (CDS) circuit. The use of a split photogate increases the sensitivity of the image sensor to 1.3 times that of the previous image sensor.

  9. Simultaneous determination of nine intense sweeteners in foodstuffs by high performance liquid chromatography and evaporative light scattering detection--development and single-laboratory validation.

    PubMed

    Wasik, Andrzej; McCourt, Josephine; Buchgraber, Manuela

    2007-07-20

    A high performance liquid chromatographic method with evaporative light scattering detection (HPLC-ELSD) has been developed for the simultaneous determination of multiple sweeteners, i.e., acesulfame-K, alitame, aspartame, cyclamic acid, dulcin, neotame, neohesperidine dihydrochalcone, saccharin and sucralose in carbonated and non-carbonated soft drinks, canned or bottled fruits and yoghurt. The procedure involves an extraction of the nine sweeteners with a buffer solution, sample clean-up using solid-phase extraction cartridges followed by an HPLC-ELSD analysis. The trueness of the method was satisfactory with recoveries ranging from 93 to 109% for concentration levels around the maximum usable dosages for authorised sweeteners and from 100 to 112% for unauthorised compounds at concentration levels close to the limit of quantification (LOQs). Precision measures showed mean repeatability values of <4% (expressed as relative standard deviation) for highly concentrated samples and <5% at concentration levels close to the LOQs. Intermediate precision was in most cases <8%. The limits of detection (LODs) were below 15 microg g(-1) and the LOQs below 30 microg g(-1) in all three matrices. Only dulcin showed slightly higher values, i.e., LODs around 30 microg g(-1) and LOQs around 50 microg g(-1) PMID:17540386

  10. Mobile terrestrial light detection and ranging (T-LiDAR) survey of areas on Dauphin Island, Alabama, in the aftermath of Hurricane Isaac, 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimbrow, Dustin R.

    2014-01-01

    Topographic survey data of areas on Dauphin Island on the Alabama coast were collected using a truck-mounted mobile terrestrial light detection and ranging system. This system is composed of a high frequency laser scanner in conjunction with an inertial measurement unit and a position and orientation computer to produce highly accurate topographic datasets. A global positioning system base station was set up on a nearby benchmark and logged vertical and horizontal position information during the survey for post-processing. Survey control points were also collected throughout the study area to determine residual errors. Data were collected 5 days after Hurricane Isaac made landfall in early September 2012 to document sediment deposits prior to clean-up efforts. Three data files in ASCII text format with the extension .xyz are included in this report, and each file is named according to both the acquisition date and the relative geographic location on Dauphin Island (for example, 20120903_Central.xyz). Metadata are also included for each of the files in both Extensible Markup Language with the extension .xml and ASCII text formats. These topographic data can be used to analyze the effects of storm surge on barrier island environments and also serve as a baseline dataset for future change detection analyses.

  11. Active standoff detection of CH4 and N2O leaks using hard-target backscattered light using an open-path quantum cascade laser sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Adrian; Thomas, Benjamin; Castillo, Paulo; Gross, Barry; Moshary, Fred

    2016-05-01

    Fugitive gas emissions from agricultural or industrial plants and gas pipelines are an important environmental concern as they contribute to the global increase of greenhouse gas concentrations. Moreover, they are also a security and safety concern because of possible risk of fire/explosion or toxicity. This study presents standoff detection of CH4 and N2O leaks using a quantum cascade laser open-path system that retrieves path-averaged concentrations by collecting the backscattered light from a remote hard target. It is a true standoff system and differs from other open-path systems that are deployed as point samplers or long-path transmission systems that use retroreflectors. The measured absorption spectra are obtained using a thermal intra-pulse frequency chirped DFB quantum cascade laser at ~7.7 µm wavelength range with ~200 ns pulse width. Making fast time resolved observations, the system simultaneously realizes high spectral resolution and range to the target, resulting in path-averaged concentration retrieval. The system performs measurements at high speed ~15 Hz and sufficient range (up to 45 m, ~148 feet) achieving an uncertainty of 3.1 % and normalized sensitivity of 3.3 ppm m Hz-1/2 for N2O and 9.3 % and normalized sensitivity of 30 ppm m Hz-1/2 for CH4 with a 0.31 mW average power QCL. Given these characteristics, this system is promising for mobile or multidirectional search and remote detection of gas leaks.

  12. Automatic threshold-setting method for iris detection for brown eyes in an eye-gaze interface system with a visible light camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, Kohichi; Niino, Shingo

    2015-03-01

    This study describes the improvement of an eye-gaze interface system with a visible light camera. The current system detects the center of the iris from a captured eye image using image processing. During the initial stages of system use, a display window is provided to set the threshold values of the image's saturation and intensity, which is used to manually adjust the appearance of the iris region. In this study, we propose an automatic threshold setting method. The optimum threshold value for the saturation is obtained by discriminant analysis and that for the intensity is determined by finding the value that yields the same number of accumulated pixels in the detected region as threshold processing of the saturation. In our experiments with subjects with brown eyes, the automatic method obtained good threshold values in most cases. Furthermore, an adjustment function to overcome under- or over-estimated saturation threshold values is also proposed. This function provides a more robust automatic threshold setting. In experiments, we compared our automatic setting method with conventional manual techniques, which showed that the automatic method is useful for reducing the time required for threshold setting and its pointing accuracy is comparable to that of the manual approach.

  13. Comparison of Stability-Indicating LC Methods Using Light Scattering and Photodiode Array Detection with Monolithic Column for Determination of Quinapril and Hydrochlorothiazide.

    PubMed

    de Diego, Marta; Godoy, Ricardo; Mennickent, Sigrid; Vergara, Carola; Charnock, Henry; Hernández, Camilo

    2016-09-01

    Rapid stability-indicating LC methods for simultaneous analysis of quinapril and hydrochlorothiazide were developed, validated and compared using evaporative light scattering detection (ELSD) and diode array detection (DAD). For the separation of quinapril, hydrochlorothiazide and its major degradation products, a monolithic column was used and the analytes were eluted within 7 min, applying gradient mobile phase in both methods. Quinapril was subjected to hydrolytic, oxidative, thermal, humidity and photolytic stress conditions. Degradation products were well resolved from main peaks and from each other, proving the stability-indicating power of the methods. The response with DAD was linear and the response with ELSD was fitted to a power function, for quinapril and hydrochlorothiazide concentrations of 20-160 and 12.5-100 µg mL(-1), respectively. DAD method achieved better precision than ELSD method, the LOQ of DAD was lower and the accuracy of the methods was similar. Quinapril degrade by hydrolysis and thermal stress, showing the formation of quinaprilat and quinapril diketopiperazine as degradants, which were identified by MS-MS. The methods were successfully applied to quantify quinapril and hydrochlorothiazide in commercial tablets. LC-DAD and LC-ELSD methods are suitable to assess the stability and routine analysis of quinapril and hydrochlorothiazide in pharmaceutical industry. PMID:27165572

  14. Determination of surface-adsorbed excipients of various types on drug particles prepared by antisolvent precipitation using HPLC with evaporative light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Anne; Elema, Michiel Ringkjøbing; Hansen, Tue; Müllertz, Anette; Hovgaard, Lars

    2007-08-15

    A common challenge in the development of new drug substances is poor dissolution characteristics related to low aqueous solubility. One approach to overcome this problem is antisolvent precipitation in the presence of polymers or surfactants, which may enhance the dissolution rate through reduced particle size and increased wettability. In this study, a simple method based on size exclusion chromatography (SEC) with evaporative light scattering detection (ELSD) was developed for the determination of polymers and surfactants adsorbed to drug particles prepared by antisolvent precipitation of the poorly water-soluble model drug Lu 28-179. Detection of many polymeric excipients and surfactants is problematic due to the lack of UV-absorbing chromophores, but ELSD proved successful for the direct determination of the investigated compounds. A mixed mode column was used to effectively separate each of the excipient structures from the drug. The mobile phase comprised acetonitrile-ammonium formate (20mM; pH 6.5) (50:50, v/v) at a flow-rate of 0.6 ml/min. Qualification studies showed that the method was adequately sensitive and precise with limits of detection between 0.72 and 4.32 microg/ml. Linearity of the calibration curves was achieved by log-log modelling. The method was applied for determination of nine polymeric excipients and surfactants adsorbed to particles of the model drug. The extent of excipient adsorption varied between 0.07 and 1.39% (w/w) of the total particle weight. PMID:17531425

  15. Detection of Cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA in EDTA Whole-Blood Samples: Evaluation of the Quantitative artus CMV LightCycler PCR Kit in Conjunction with Automated Sample Preparation▿

    PubMed Central

    Michelin, Birgit D. A.; Hadžisejdić, Ita; Bozic, Michael; Grahovac, Maja; Hess, Markus; Grahovac, Blaženka; Marth, Egon; Kessler, Harald H.

    2008-01-01

    Whole blood has been found to be a reliable matrix for the detection and quantitation of cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA. In this study, the performance of the artus CMV LightCycler (LC) PCR kit in conjunction with automated sample preparation on a BioRobot EZ1 workstation was evaluated. The accuracy, linearity, analytical sensitivity, and inter- and intra-assay variations were determined. A total of 102 clinical EDTA whole-blood samples were investigated, and results were compared with those obtained with the in vitro diagnostics (IVD)/Conformité Européene (CE)-labeled CMV HHV6,7,8 R-gene quantification kit. When the accuracy of the new kit was tested, seven of eight results were found to be within ±0.5 log10 unit of the expected panel results. Determination of linearity resulted in a quasilinear curve over more than 5 log units. The lower limit of detection of the assay was determined to be 139 copies/ml in EDTA whole blood. The interassay variation ranged from 15 to 58%, and the intra-assay variation ranged from 7 to 35%. When clinical samples were tested and the results were compared with those of the routinely used IVD/CE-labeled assay, 53 samples tested positive and 13 samples tested negative by both of the assays. One sample was found to be positive with the artus CMV LC PCR kit only, and 35 samples tested positive with the routinely used assay only. The majority of discrepant results were found with low-titer samples. In conclusion, use of the artus CMV LC PCR kit in conjunction with automated sample preparation on the BioRobot EZ1 workstation may be suitable for the detection and quantitation of CMV DNA in EDTA whole blood in the routine low-throughput laboratory; however, low-positive results may be missed by this assay. PMID:18272703

  16. Airborne Light Detection and Ranging (lidar) Derived Deformation from the MW 6.0 24 August, 2014 South Napa Earthquake Estimated by Two and Three Dimensional Point Cloud Change Detection Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyda, A. W.; Zhang, X.; Glennie, C. L.; Hudnut, K.; Brooks, B. A.

    2016-06-01

    Remote sensing via LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) has proven extremely useful in both Earth science and hazard related studies. Surveys taken before and after an earthquake for example, can provide decimeter-level, 3D near-field estimates of land deformation that offer better spatial coverage of the near field rupture zone than other geodetic methods (e.g., InSAR, GNSS, or alignment array). In this study, we compare and contrast estimates of deformation obtained from different pre and post-event airborne laser scanning (ALS) data sets of the 2014 South Napa Earthquake using two change detection algorithms, Iterative Control Point (ICP) and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The ICP algorithm is a closest point based registration algorithm that can iteratively acquire three dimensional deformations from airborne LiDAR data sets. By employing a newly proposed partition scheme, "moving window," to handle the large spatial scale point cloud over the earthquake rupture area, the ICP process applies a rigid registration of data sets within an overlapped window to enhance the change detection results of the local, spatially varying surface deformation near-fault. The other algorithm, PIV, is a well-established, two dimensional image co-registration and correlation technique developed in fluid mechanics research and later applied to geotechnical studies. Adapted here for an earthquake with little vertical movement, the 3D point cloud is interpolated into a 2D DTM image and horizontal deformation is determined by assessing the cross-correlation of interrogation areas within the images to find the most likely deformation between two areas. Both the PIV process and the ICP algorithm are further benefited by a presented, novel use of urban geodetic markers. Analogous to the persistent scatterer technique employed with differential radar observations, this new LiDAR application exploits a classified point cloud dataset to assist the change detection algorithms. Ground

  17. Quantitative characterization of gold nanoparticles by field-flow fractionation coupled online with light scattering detection and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Bjørn; Loeschner, Katrin; Hadrup, Niels; Mortensen, Alicja; Sloth, Jens J; Koch, Christian Bender; Larsen, Erik H

    2011-04-01

    An analytical platform coupling asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AF(4)) with multiangle light scattering (MALS), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) was established and used for separation and quantitative determination of size and mass concentration of nanoparticles (NPs) in aqueous suspension. Mixtures of three polystyrene (PS) NPs between 20 and 100 nm in diameter and mixtures of three gold (Au) NPs between 10 and 60 nm in diameter were separated by AF(4). The geometric diameters of the separated PS NPs and the hydrodynamic diameters of the Au and PS NPs were determined online by MALS and DLS, respectively. The three separated Au NPs were quantified by ICPMS and recovered at 50-95% of the injected masses, which ranged between approximately 8-80 ng of each nanoparticle size. Au NPs adhering to the membrane in the separation channel was found to be a major cause for incomplete recoveries. The lower limit of detection (LOD) ranged between 0.02 ng Au and 0.4 ng Au, with increasing LOD by increasing nanoparticle diameter. The analytical platform was applied to characterization of Au NPs in livers of rats, which were dosed with 10 nm, 60 nm, or a mixture of 10 and 60 nm nanoparticles by intravenous injection. The homogenized livers were solubilized in tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH), and the recovery of Au NPs from the livers amounted to 86-123% of their total Au content. In spite of successful stabilization with bovine serum albumin even in alkaline medium, separation of the Au NPs by AF(4) was not possible due to association with undissolved remains of the alkali-treated liver tissues as demonstrated by electron microscopy images. PMID:21355549

  18. Identification of inorganic improvised explosive devices by analysis of postblast residues using portable capillary electrophoresis instrumentation and indirect photometric detection with a light-emitting diode.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Joseph P; Evenhuis, Christopher J; Johns, Cameron; Kazarian, Artaches A; Breadmore, Michael C; Macka, Miroslav; Hilder, Emily F; Guijt, Rosanne M; Dicinoski, Greg W; Haddad, Paul R

    2007-09-15

    A commercial portable capillary electrophoresis (CE) instrument has been used to separate inorganic anions and cations found in postblast residues from improvised explosive devices (IEDs) of the type used frequently in terrorism attacks. The purpose of this analysis was to identify the type of explosive used. The CE instrument was modified for use with an in-house miniaturized light-emitting diode (LED) detector to enable sensitive indirect photometric detection to be employed for the detection of 15 anions (acetate, benzoate, carbonate, chlorate, chloride, chlorite, cyanate, fluoride, nitrate, nitrite, perchlorate, phosphate, sulfate, thiocyanate, thiosulfate) and 12 cations (ammonium, monomethylammonium, ethylammonium, potassium, sodium, barium, strontium, magnesium, manganese, calcium, zinc, lead) as the target analytes. These ions are known to be present in postblast residues from inorganic IEDs constructed from ammonium nitrate/fuel oil mixtures, black powder, and chlorate/perchlorate/sugar mixtures. For the analysis of cations, a blue LED (470 nm) was used in conjunction with the highly absorbing cationic dye, chrysoidine (absorption maximum at 453 nm). A nonaqueous background electrolyte comprising 10 mM chrysoidine in methanol was found to give greatly improved baseline stability in comparison to aqueous electrolytes due to the increased solubility of chrysoidine and its decreased adsorption onto the capillary wall. Glacial acetic acid (0.7% v/v) was added to ensure chrysoidine was protonated and to enhance separation selectivity by means of complexation with transition metal ions. The 12 target cations were separated in less than 9.5 min with detection limits of 0.11-2.30 mg/L (calculated at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3). The anions separation system utilized a UV LED (370 nm) in conjunction with an aqueous chromate electrolyte (absorption maximum at 371 nm) consisting of 10 mM chromium(VI) oxide and 10 mM sodium chromate, buffered with 40 mM tris

  19. Detecting Light Hydrocarbon Microseepages and related Intra-sedimentary Structures at the São Francisco Basin, Brazil, using Airborne Geophysical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curto, J. B.; Pires, A. C.; Silva, A.; Crosta, A. P.

    2011-12-01

    The use of indirect techniques for the detection of light hydrocarbons occurrences on the surface, named as microseepages, has been used to augment hydrocarbon exploration. Surveys developed for this type of application are normally targeted at mapping the effects that microseepages cause on the environment. In Brazil, most available airborne geophysical surveys were not appropriately designed for this type of application and, thus far they have been mostly used to define the main basin structural features. Existing microseepages are known in Remanso do Fogo area (Minas Gerais State, Brazil), located in São Francisco Basin, where the Quaternary sedimentary cover made the identification of new occurrences and associated controlling structures quite difficult. This study investigates the spatial distribution of hydrocarbon related structures in shallower to intra-sedimentary depths in the Remanso do Fogo area, using airborne magnetic and gamma-ray spectrometry data. These data were managed by the ANP (Brazilian Petroleum National Agency) and conducted by Lasa Engineering & Surveys in 2006. In the study area, data were acquired along north-south flight lines spaced 500 m apart and along orthogonal tie lines flown 4 Km apart at a terrain clearance of 100 m. The geophysical data were processed using techniques developed to suppress the influence of regional geological signatures. For the magnetic data, this study focuses on the enhancement of intra-sedimentary structures and possible near surface accumulations of diagenetic magnetic minerals, provided by hydrocarbon related chemical reactions. The amplitude of the analytic signal, calculated with second order derivatives, combined with the total horizontal gradient of the subtraction between the 1200 and 400 meter upward continuations, illuminated the NW and EW magnetic lineaments, which are partially related to the microseepages and the drainage of the area. The distinction of near-surface and deeper signatures also

  20. Lighting: Green Light.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maniccia, Dorine

    2003-01-01

    Explains that by using sustainable (green) building practices, schools and universities can make their lighting systems more efficient, noting that embracing green design principles can help schools attract students. Discusses lighting-control technologies (occupancy sensing technology, daylighting technology, and scheduling based technologies),…

  1. MOA 2010-BLG-477Lb: CONSTRAINING THE MASS OF A MICROLENSING PLANET FROM MICROLENSING PARALLAX, ORBITAL MOTION, AND DETECTION OF BLENDED LIGHT

    SciTech Connect

    Bachelet, E.; Fouque, P.; Shin, I.-G.; Han, C.; Gould, A.; Dong, Subo; Marshall, J.; Skowron, J.; Menzies, J. W.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Marquette, J.-B.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Heyrovsky, D.; Street, R. A.; Sumi, T.; Udalski, A.; Abe, L.; Agabi, K.; Albrow, M. D.; Collaboration: PLANET Collaboration; FUN muCollaboration; MOA Collaboration; OGLE Collaboration; RoboNet Collaboration; MiNDSTEp Consortium; and others

    2012-07-20

    Microlensing detections of cool planets are important for the construction of an unbiased sample to estimate the frequency of planets beyond the snow line, which is where giant planets are thought to form according to the core accretion theory of planet formation. In this paper, we report the discovery of a giant planet detected from the analysis of the light curve of a high-magnification microlensing event MOA 2010-BLG-477. The measured planet-star mass ratio is q = (2.181 {+-} 0.004) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} and the projected separation is s = 1.1228 {+-} 0.0006 in units of the Einstein radius. The angular Einstein radius is unusually large {theta}{sub E} = 1.38 {+-} 0.11 mas. Combining this measurement with constraints on the 'microlens parallax' and the lens flux, we can only limit the host mass to the range 0.13 < M/M{sub Sun} < 1.0. In this particular case, the strong degeneracy between microlensing parallax and planet orbital motion prevents us from measuring more accurate host and planet masses. However, we find that adding Bayesian priors from two effects (Galactic model and Keplerian orbit) each independently favors the upper end of this mass range, yielding star and planet masses of M{sub *} = 0.67{sup +0.33}{sub -0.13} M{sub Sun} and m{sub p} = 1.5{sup +0.8}{sub -0.3} M{sub JUP} at a distance of D = 2.3 {+-} 0.6 kpc, and with a semi-major axis of a = 2{sup +3}{sub -1} AU. Finally, we show that the lens mass can be determined from future high-resolution near-IR adaptive optics observations independently from two effects, photometric and astrometric.

  2. Landslide-susceptibility analysis using light detection and ranging-derived digital elevation models and logistic regression models: a case study in Mizunami City, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liang-Jie; Sawada, Kazuhide; Moriguchi, Shuji

    2013-01-01

    To mitigate the damage caused by landslide disasters, different mathematical models have been applied to predict landslide spatial distribution characteristics. Although some researchers have achieved excellent results around the world, few studies take the spatial resolution of the database into account. Four types of digital elevation model (DEM) ranging from 2 to 20 m derived from light detection and ranging technology to analyze landslide susceptibility in Mizunami City, Gifu Prefecture, Japan, are presented. Fifteen landslide-causative factors are considered using a logistic-regression approach to create models for landslide potential analysis. Pre-existing landslide bodies are used to evaluate the performance of the four models. The results revealed that the 20-m model had the highest classification accuracy (71.9%), whereas the 2-m model had the lowest value (68.7%). In the 2-m model, 89.4% of the landslide bodies fit in the medium to very high categories. For the 20-m model, only 83.3% of the landslide bodies were concentrated in the medium to very high classes. When the cell size decreases from 20 to 2 m, the area under the relative operative characteristic increases from 0.68 to 0.77. Therefore, higher-resolution DEMs would provide better results for landslide-susceptibility mapping.

  3. Gold nanoparticle-biotinylated liposome hybrids as analytical reagents for biotin determination using a competitive assay and resonance light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Román-Pizarro, Vanessa; Fernández-Romero, Juan Manuel; Gómez-Hens, Agustina

    2012-09-15

    The preparation of hybrid nanostructures formed by gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) into biotinylated liposomes and their analytical application are presented. The surface of negatively charged AuNPs was modified with 1-dodecanethiol and the NPs were encapsulated into biotinylated liposomes using the rapid solvent evaporation method. Liposomes were resized by both mechanical shaking and ultrasound treatments and filled liposomes were separated from empty liposomes using sucrose density gradient centrifugation. The analytical usefulness of AuNP-liposome hybrids as amplification probes for biotin determination was checked using the competitive affinity reaction based on the avidin-biotin interaction and biotilynated phospholipids for the synthesis of the liposome hybrids. The method was automatized using a flow system and measuring the resonance light scattering signal. The dynamic range of the calibration graph was 0.001-20 μg mL(-1), (r(2)=0.9998, n=14), with a detection limit of 0.3 ng mL(-1). The precision, expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD%), was lower than 5% and the sampling frequency was 9 h(-1). The approach has been applied to the determination of biotin in food samples, with recovery values ranging between 88.2 and 105.2%. PMID:22967591

  4. Comparison of high-performance liquid chromatography and supercritical fluid chromatography using evaporative light scattering detection for the determination of plasticizers in medical devices.

    PubMed

    Lecoeur, Marie; Decaudin, Bertrand; Guillotin, Yoann; Sautou, Valérie; Vaccher, Claude

    2015-10-23

    Recently, interest in supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) has increased due to its high throughput and the development of new system improving chromatographic performances. However, most papers dealt with fundamental studies and chiral applications and only few works described validation process of SFC method. Likewise, evaporative light scattering detection (ELSD) has been widely employed in liquid chromatography but only a few recent works presented its quantitative performances hyphenated with SFC apparatus. The present paper discusses about the quantitative performances of SFC-ELSD compared to HPLC-ELSD, for the determination of plasticizers (ATBC, DEHA, DEHT and TOTM) in PVC tubing used as medical devices. After the development of HPLC-ELSD, both methods were evaluated based on the total error approach using accuracy profile. The results show that HPLC-ELSD was more precise than SFC-ELSD but lower limits of quantitation were obtained by SFC. Hence, HPLC was validated in the ± 10% acceptance limits whereas SFC lacks of accuracy to quantify plasticizers. Finally, both methods were used to determine the composition of plasticized-PVC medical devices. Results demonstrated that SFC and HPLC both hyphenated with ELSD provided similar results. PMID:26386620

  5. Fundamental research on the label-free detection of protein adsorption using near-infrared light-responsive plasmonic metal nanoshell arrays with controlled nanogap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Shuhei; Zettsu, Nobuyuki; Endo, Katsuyoshi; Yamamura, Kazuya

    2013-06-01

    In this work, we focused on the label-free detection of simple protein binding using near-infrared light-responsive plasmonic nanoshell arrays with a controlled interparticle distance. The nanoshell arrays were fabricated by a combination of colloidal self-assembly and subsequent isotropic helium plasma etching under atmospheric pressure. The diameter, interparticle distance, and shape of nanoshells can be tuned with nanometric accuracy by changing the experimental conditions. The Au, Ag, and Cu nanoshell arrays, having a 240-nm diameter (inner, 200-nm polystyrene (PS) core; outer, 20-nm metal shell) and an 80-nm gap distance, exhibited a well-defined localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) peak at the near-infrared region. PS@Au nanoshell arrays showed a 55-nm red shift of the maximum LSPR wavelength of 885 nm after being exposed to a solution of bovine serum albumin (BSA) proteins for 18 h. On the other hand, in the case of Cu nanoshell arrays before/after incubation to the BSA solution, we found a 30-nm peak shifting. We could evaluate the difference in LSPR sensing performance by changing the metal materials.

  6. Determination of nine intense sweeteners in foodstuffs by high-performance liquid chromatography and evaporative light-scattering detection: interlaboratory study.

    PubMed

    Buchgraber, Manuela; Wasik, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    An interlaboratory trial was conducted to validate an analytical method based on high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis with evaporative light-scattering detection for the simultaneous determination of 9 intense sweeteners, i.e., acesulfame-K, alitame, aspartame, cyclamic acid, dulcin, neotame, neohesperidine dihydrochalcone, saccharin, and sucralose in carbonated and noncarbonated soft drinks and canned or bottled fruits. Seven laboratories participated in the validation study. The majority of the samples fortified with levels close to the limit of quantification had relative standard deviation for reproducibility (RSDR) values <15%. In most cases, the recovery rates ranged between 90 and 105%, demonstrating satisfactory performance of the method. For samples fortified at levels comparable to the prescribed legal limits stipulated in the current European Union legislation, the method produces acceptably accurate, repeatable, and reproducible results. Trueness, expressed in terms of recovery rates, was demonstrated in most cases by values ranging from 90 to 108%. Comparability of results obtained by individual testing laboratories was good (RSDR values <10%) for the majority of results. Moreover, HorRat values of <1.1 suggested good performance of the method for all sweeteners and matrixes tested. PMID:19382579

  7. Comparison of multialkali and GaAs photocathode detectors for Joint European Torus edge light detection and ranging Thomson scattering profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Kempenaars, M.; Nielsen, P.; Pasqualotto, R.; Gowers, C.; Beurskens, M.

    2004-10-01

    The Joint European Torus (JET) tokamak has two light detection and ranging (LIDAR) Thomson scattering systems, one for the core and one dedicated to the edge T{sub e} and n{sub e} profiles. The LIDAR scheme is unique to JET and is envisaged for use on ITER. The system's spatial resolution is defined by the convolution product of its components: laser pulse duration, detector response time, and digitizer speed. The original multialkali photocathode microchannel plate photomultipliers dictated the response time, resulting in a 12 cm spatial resolution along the line of sight. In the edge LIDAR system, this is improved by aligning the line of sight with the flux surfaces, thus improving the effective spatial resolution to 2 cm depending on the plasma configuration. To meet demands for better edge gradient resolution, an upgrade to higher quantum efficiency detectors was proposed. Four GaAs photocathode detectors have been procured, two of which surpass expectations. These detectors are shown to have a more than two times higher effective quantum efficiency and their response time is at least twice as fast as the multialkali detectors. Combined with a fast digitizer this improves the spatial resolution by a factor of two, down to one centimeter effective, depending on plasma configuration.

  8. Effects of metal/Ge contact and surface passivation on direct band gap light emission and detection for asymmetric metal/Ge/metal diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maekura, Takayuki; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Wang, Dong

    2016-04-01

    Direct band gap electroluminescence (EL) and light detection were studied at room temperature for n-type bulk germanium (Ge) by using fin-type asymmetric lateral metal/Ge/metal diodes. HfGe/Ge and PtGe/Ge contacts were used for injecting holes. Electron cyclotron resonance plasma oxidation and physical vapor deposition bilayer passivation (BLP) methods were employed for passivating the surface of the active region. A high EL intensity and a low dark current intensity were observed for the sample with PtGe/Ge contact and BLP, owing to the small/large barrier height of holes/electrons for PtGe/Ge contact, respectively, and the low density of interface states for the active region with BLP. The local-heating-induced redshift of the EL peak for the sample with PtGe/Ge contact is smaller than that for the sample with HfGe/Ge contact, owing to the lower parasitic resistance of PtGe/Ge contact. The diode with PtGe/Ge contact and BLP shows an on/off ratio of ∼104 and a responsivity of 0.70 A/W, corresponding to an external quantum efficiency of 56.0% under a wavelength of 1.55 µm.

  9. Fundamental research on the label-free detection of protein adsorption using near-infrared light-responsive plasmonic metal nanoshell arrays with controlled nanogap.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Shuhei; Zettsu, Nobuyuki; Endo, Katsuyoshi; Yamamura, Kazuya

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we focused on the label-free detection of simple protein binding using near-infrared light-responsive plasmonic nanoshell arrays with a controlled interparticle distance. The nanoshell arrays were fabricated by a combination of colloidal self-assembly and subsequent isotropic helium plasma etching under atmospheric pressure. The diameter, interparticle distance, and shape of nanoshells can be tuned with nanometric accuracy by changing the experimental conditions. The Au, Ag, and Cu nanoshell arrays, having a 240-nm diameter (inner, 200-nm polystyrene (PS) core; outer, 20-nm metal shell) and an 80-nm gap distance, exhibited a well-defined localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) peak at the near-infrared region. PS@Au nanoshell arrays showed a 55-nm red shift of the maximum LSPR wavelength of 885 nm after being exposed to a solution of bovine serum albumin (BSA) proteins for 18 h. On the other hand, in the case of Cu nanoshell arrays before/after incubation to the BSA solution, we found a 30-nm peak shifting. We could evaluate the difference in LSPR sensing performance by changing the metal materials. PMID:23758903

  10. Association of Sand Dust Particles with Pulmonary Function and Respiratory Symptoms in Adult Patients with Asthma in Western Japan Using Light Detection and Ranging: A Panel Study

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Masanari; Noma, Hisashi; Kurai, Jun; Shimizu, Atsushi; Sano, Hiroyuki; Kato, Kazuhiro; Mikami, Masaaki; Ueda, Yasuto; Tatsukawa, Toshiyuki; Ohga, Hideki; Yamasaki, Akira; Igishi, Tadashi; Kitano, Hiroya; Shimizu, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    Light detection and ranging (LIDAR) can estimate daily volumes of sand dust particles from the East Asian desert to Japan. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between sand dust particles and pulmonary function, and respiratory symptoms in adult patients with asthma. One hundred thirty-seven patients were included in the study. From March 2013 to May 2013, the patients measured their morning peak expiratory flow (PEF) and kept daily lower respiratory symptom diaries. A linear mixed model was used to estimate the correlation of the median daily levels of sand dust particles, symptoms scores, and PEF. A heavy sand dust day was defined as an hourly concentration of sand dust particles of >0.1 km−1. By this criterion, there were 8 heavy sand dust days during the study period. Elevated sand dust particles levels were significantly associated with the symptom score (0.04; 95% confidence interval (CI); 0.03, 0.05), and this increase persisted for 5 days. There was no significant association between PEF and heavy dust exposure (0.01 L/min; 95% CI, −0.62, 0.11). The present study found that sand dust particles were significantly associated with worsened lower respiratory tract symptoms in adult patients with asthma, but not with pulmonary function. PMID:26501307

  11. Selective detection of the structural changes upon photoreactions of several redox cofactors in photosystem II by means of light-induced ATR-FTIR difference spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, Tatsunori; Noguchi, Takumi

    2007-04-01

    Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy was applied for the first time to detect the structural changes upon photoreactions of redox cofactors in photosystem II (PSII). The PSII-enriched membranes from spinach were adsorbed on the surface of a silicon prism, and FTIR measurements of various redox cofactors were performed for the same sample but under different conditions by exchanging buffers in a flow cell. Light-induced FTIR difference spectra upon redox reactions of the oxygen-evolving Mn cluster, the primary quinone electron acceptor Q A, the redox-active tyrosine Y D, the primary electron acceptor pheophytin, and the primary electron donor chlorophyll P680 were successively recorded in buffers including different redox reagents and inhibitors. All of these cofactors remained active in the PSII membranes on the silicon surface, and the resultant spectra were basically identical to those previously recorded by the conventional transmission method. These ATR-FTIR measurements enable accurate comparison between reactions of different active sites in a single PSII sample. The present results demonstrated that the ATR-FTIR spectroscopy is a useful technique for investigation of the reaction mechanism of PSII.

  12. Determination of multicomponent contents in Calculus bovis by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-evaporative light scattering detection and its application for quality control.

    PubMed

    Kong, Weijun; Jin, Cheng; Xiao, Xiaohe; Zhao, Yanling; Liu, Wei; Li, Zulun; Zhang, Ping

    2010-06-01

    A fast ultra-performance liquid chromatography-evaporative light scattering detection (UPLC-ELSD) method was established for simultaneous quantification of seven components in natural Calculus bovis (C. bovis) and its substitutes or spurious breeds. On a Waters Acquity UPLC BEH C(18) column, seven analytes were efficiently separated using 0.2% aqueous formic acid-acetonitrile as the mobile phase in a gradient program. The evaporator tube temperature of ELSD was set at 100 degrees C with the nebulizing gas flow-rate of 1.9 L/min. The results showed that this established UPLC-ELSD method was validated to be sensitive, precise and accurate with the LODs of seven analytes at 2-11 ng, and the overall intra-day and inter-day variations less than 3.0%. The recovery of the method was in the range of 97.8-101.6%, with RSD less than 3.0%. Further results of PCA on the contents of seven investigated analytes suggested that compounds of cholic acid, deoxycholic acid and chenodeoxycholic acid or cholesterol should be added as chemical markers to UPLC analysis of C. bovis samples for quality control and to discriminate natural C. bovis sample and its substitutes or some spurious breeds, then normalize the use of natural C. bovis and ensure its clinical efficacy. PMID:20155752

  13. Association of Sand Dust Particles with Pulmonary Function and Respiratory Symptoms in Adult Patients with Asthma in Western Japan Using Light Detection and Ranging: A Panel Study.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masanari; Noma, Hisashi; Kurai, Jun; Shimizu, Atsushi; Sano, Hiroyuki; Kato, Kazuhiro; Mikami, Masaaki; Ueda, Yasuto; Tatsukawa, Toshiyuki; Ohga, Hideki; Yamasaki, Akira; Igishi, Tadashi; Kitano, Hiroya; Shimizu, Eiji

    2015-10-01

    Light detection and ranging (LIDAR) can estimate daily volumes of sand dust particles from the East Asian desert to Japan. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between sand dust particles and pulmonary function, and respiratory symptoms in adult patients with asthma. One hundred thirty-seven patients were included in the study. From March 2013 to May 2013, the patients measured their morning peak expiratory flow (PEF) and kept daily lower respiratory symptom diaries. A linear mixed model was used to estimate the correlation of the median daily levels of sand dust particles, symptoms scores, and PEF. A heavy sand dust day was defined as an hourly concentration of sand dust particles of >0.1 km(-1). By this criterion, there were 8 heavy sand dust days during the study period. Elevated sand dust particles levels were significantly associated with the symptom score (0.04; 95% confidence interval (CI); 0.03, 0.05), and this increase persisted for 5 days. There was no significant association between PEF and heavy dust exposure (0.01 L/min; 95% CI, -0.62, 0.11). The present study found that sand dust particles were significantly associated with worsened lower respiratory tract symptoms in adult patients with asthma, but not with pulmonary function. PMID:26501307

  14. Immunohistochemical detection of autophagy-related microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) in the cerebellums of dogs naturally infected with canine distemper virus.

    PubMed

    Kabak, Y B; Sozmen, M; Yarim, M; Guvenc, T; Karayigit, M O; Gulbahar, M Y

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the expression of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) protein in the cerebellums of dogs infected with canine distemper virus (CDV) using immunohistochemistry to detect autophagy. The cerebellums of 20 dogs infected with CDV were used. Specimens showing demyelination of white matter were considered to have an acute infection, whereas specimens showing signs of severe perivascular cuffing and demyelination of white matter were classified as having chronic CDV. Cerebellar sections were immunostained with CDV and LC3 antibodies. The cytoplasm of Purkinje cells, granular layer cells, motor neurons in large cerebellar ganglia and some neurons in white matter were positive for the LC3 antibody in both the control and CDV-infected dogs. In the infected cerebellums, however, white matter was immunostained more intensely, particularly the neurons and gemistocytic astrocytes in the demyelinated areas, compared to controls. Autophagy also was demonstrated in CDV-positive cells using double immunofluorescence staining. Our findings indicate that increased autophagy in the cerebellum of dogs naturally infected with CDV may play a role in transferring the virus from cell to cell. PMID:26179070

  15. Photometric flow injection determination of phosphate on a PDMS microchip using an optical detection system assembled with an organic light emitting diode and an organic photodiode.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rong; Ishimatsu, Ryoichi; Yahiro, Masayuki; Adachi, Chihaya; Nakano, Koji; Imato, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    A compact photometric detector was constructed from an organic light emitting diode (OLED) based on a europium complex, europium(diben-zoylmethanato)3(bathophenanthroline) (Eu(DBM)3bath), as the light source and an organic photodiode (OPD) fabricated from a hetero-junction of two layers of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)/fullerene (C60) as the photo-detector on a microchip prepared from poly(dimethylsiloxan) (PDMS) and was applied to the determination of phosphate. The OLED and the OPD were fabricated by a vapor deposition method on an indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate with the following layered structure; Glass (0.7 mm)/ITO (110 nm)/4,4'-bis[N-(1-naphthyl)-N-phenyl amino]-biphenyl (α-NPD) (30 nm)/4,4'-di(N-carbazolyl)biphenyl (CBP): Eu(3+) (8 wt%, 30 nm)/bathocuproine (BCP) (30 nm)/aluminum tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) (Alq3) (25 nm)/magnesium and silver (MgAg) (100 nm)/Ag (10nm) and Glass (0.7 mm)/ITO (110 nm)/CuPc (35 nm)/C60 (50 nm)/BCP (10 nm)/Ag (50 nm), respectively. The OLED based on the europium complex emitted a sharp light at the wavelength of 612 nm with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 8 nm. The performance of the photometric detector assembled was evaluated based on measurements of the absorbance of different concentrations of malachite green (MG) solutions for a batch system with 1cm long path length. The molar absorptive coefficient of the MG solution, calculated from the photocurrent of the OPD, was in good agreement with the value reported in the literature. A microchip with two inlets and one outlet U-shaped channel was prepared by a conventional photolithograph method. The OLED and the OPD were configured so as to face each other through the PDMS microchip in parallel in order to align the light axis of the OLED and the OPD with the flow cell (optical path length of 5mm), which was located at the end of outlet. For the determination of phosphate, an ion-association reaction between MG and a molybdenum-phosphate complex was utilized

  16. Detection of related substances in polyene phosphatidyl choline extracted from soybean and in its commercial capsule by comprehensive supercritical fluid chromatography with mass spectrometry compared with HPLC with evaporative light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qikun; Liu, Wanjun; Li, Xiaoting; Zhang, Tianhong; Wang, Yongjun; Liu, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    Supercritical fluid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry was used to comprehensively profile polyene phosphatidyl choline (PPC) extracted from soybean. We achieved an efficient chromatographic analysis using a BEH-2EP column (3 × 100 mm(2) , 1.7 μm) with a mobile phase consisting of CO2 and a cosolvent in gradient combination at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. The cosolvent consisted of methanol, acetonitrile, and water (containing 10 mM ammonium acetate and 0.2% formic acid). The total single-run time was 7 min. We used this method to accurately detect ten different phospholipids (PLs) during extraction. The limits of quantification for phosphatidyl choline, lyso-phosphatidylcholine (LPC), phosphatidic acid (PA), sphingomyelin, phosphatidyl glycerol, phosphatidyl inositol (PI), cholesterol, cardiolipin, phosphatidyl serine, and phosphatidyl ethanolamine (PE) were 20.6, 19.52, 1.21, 2.38, 0.50, 2.28, 54.3, 0.60, 0.65, and 4.85 ng/mL, respectively. However, adopting the high-performance liquid chromatography with evaporative light scattering detection method issued by the China Food and Drug Administration, only PA, LPC, PE, PI, and PPC could be analyzed accurately, and the limits of quantification were 33.89, 60.5, 30.3, 10.9, and 61.79 μg/mL, respectively. The total single-run time was at the least 20 min. Consequently, the supercritical fluid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry method was more suitable for the analysis of related PLs. PMID:26614404

  17. Species discrimination of Radix Bupleuri through the simultaneous determination of ten saikosaponins by high performance liquid chromatography with evaporative light scattering detection and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaehyun; Yang, Dong-Hyug; Suh, Joon Hyuk; Kim, Unyong; Eom, Han Young; Kim, Junghyun; Lee, Mi Young; Kim, Jinwoong; Han, Sang Beom

    2011-12-15

    A simple, rapid and robust high performance liquid chromatography-evaporative light scattering detection (HPLC-ELSD) method was established for the species discrimination and quality evaluation of Radix Bupleuri through the simultaneous determination of ten saikosaponins, namely saikosaponin-a, -b(1), -b(2), -b(3), -b(4), -c, -d, -g, -h, and -i. These compounds were chromatographed on an Ascentis(®) Express C18 column with a gradient elution of acetonitrile and water containing 0.1% acetic acid at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. Saikosaponins were monitored by ELSD, which was operated at a 50°C drift tube temperature and 3.0 bar nebulizer gas (N(2)) pressure. The developed method was validated with respect to linearity, intra- and inter-day accuracy and precision, limit of quantification (LOQ), recovery, robustness and stability, thereby showing good precision and accuracy, with intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation less than 15% at all concentrations. Furthermore, a high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS) method was developed to certify the existence of ten saikosaponins, as well as to confirm the reliability of ELSD. The extraction conditions of saikosaponins from Radix Bupleuri were also optimized by investigating the effect of extraction methods (sonication, reflux and maceration) and various solvents on the extraction efficiencies for saikosaponins. Sonication with 70% methanol for 40 min was found to be simple and effective for extraction of major saikosaponins. This analytical method was applied to determine saikosaponin profiles in 20 real samples consisting of four Bupleurum species, namely B. falcatum, B. chinense, B. sibiricum and the poisonous B. longiradiatum. It was found that three major saikosaponin-a, -c and -d were the major constituents in B. falcatum, B. chinense, and B. longiradiatum, while one major saikosaponin (saikosaponin-c) was not identified from B. sibiricum. In addition, no

  18. Size exclusion chromatography with evaporative light scattering detection as a method for speciation analysis of polydimethylsiloxanes. II. Validation of the method for analysis of pharmaceutical formulations.

    PubMed

    Mojsiewicz-Pieńkowska, Krystyna

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the usefulness of the size exclusion chromatography with evaporative light scattering detection (SEC-ELSD) method in the identification and quantitative analysis of polydimethylsiloxanes (PDMS). The process of validation for the method was conducted, and the values obtained were compared with the acceptance criteria. Particularly important was the conclusion that SEC-ELSD method showed a high specificity for PDMS. PDMS is an organosilicon polymer and for this reason, it does not exist as a concrete chemical species. Depending on the length of the chain, PDMS can be toxic for organism. So far, the SEC-ELSD method has not been applied for the control of pharmaceutical products containing such PDMS as dimeticone or simeticone. The safety of use and effectiveness of such pharmaceutical products relies on the control of their quality. Therefore, the analytical methods and procedures that meet acceptance criteria for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the PDMS should be used. In the case of the analysis of pharmaceutical products, the acceptance criteria are established and recommended by, for example, the Pharmacopoeias, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) and the World Health Organization (WHO). The progress of knowledge, however, requires the development of new analytical tools which are able to solve incoming problems. In the case of pharmaceutical formulations containing PDMS, which are used not only by adults but also by children, it is necessary to use analytical methods which are characterized by a high specificity. PMID:21840148

  19. Cavity-enhanced AlGaAs/GaAs resonant tunneling photodetectors for telecommunication wavelength light detection at 1.3 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfenning, Andreas; Hartmann, Fabian; Langer, Fabian; Kamp, Martin; Höfling, Sven; Worschech, Lukas

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate a cavity-enhanced photodetector at the telecommunication wavelength of λ = 1.3 μm based on a resonant tunneling diode (RTD). The cavity-enhanced RTD photodetector consists of three integral parts: First, a Ga0.89In0.11N0.04As0.96 absorption layer that can be grown lattice-matched on GaAs and which is light-active in the near infrared spectral region due to its reduced bandgap energy. Second, an Al0.6Ga0.4As/GaAs double barrier resonant tunneling structure (RTS) that serves as high gain internal amplifier of weak electric signals caused by photogenerated electron-hole pairs within the GaInNAs absorption layer. Third, an optical distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) cavity consisting of five top and seven bottom alternating GaAs/AlAs mirror pairs, which provides an enhanced quantum efficiency at the resonance wavelength. The samples were grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Electro-optical properties of the RTDs were studied at room temperature. From the reflection-spectrum the optical resonance at λ = 1.29 μm was extracted. The current-voltage characteristics were studied in the dark and under illumination and a wellpronounced photo-response was found and is attributed to accumulation of photogenerated holes in the vicinity of the RTS. The maximum photocurrent was found at the optical resonance of 1.29 μm. At resonance, a sensitivity of S = 3.97 × 104 A/W was observed. From the sensitivity, a noise equivalent power of NEP = 1.18 × 10-16 W/Hz1/2, and a specific detectivity of D∗ ≅ 6.74 × 1012 cm Hz1/2/W were calculated. For a single absorbed photon a photocurrent of ISP = 50 pA was determined.

  20. Revisiting a universal airborne light detection and ranging approach for tropical forest carbon mapping: scaling-up from tree to stand to landscape.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Grégoire; Sabatier, Daniel; Rutishauser, Ervan

    2014-06-01

    Airborne laser scanning provides continuous coverage mapping of forest canopy height and thereby is a powerful tool to scale-up above-ground biomass (AGB) estimates from stand to landscape. A critical first step is the selection of the plot variables which can be related to light detection and ranging (LiDAR) statistics. A universal approach was previously proposed which combines local and regional estimates of basal area (BA) and wood density with LiDAR-derived canopy height to map carbon at a regional scale (Asner et al. in Oecologia 168:1147-1160, 2012). Here we explore the contribution of stem diameter distribution, specific wood density and height-diameter (H-D) allometry to forest stand AGB and propose an alternative model. By applying the new model to a large tropical forest data set we show that an appropriate choice of input variables is essential to minimize prediction error of stand AGB which will propagate at larger scale. Stem number (N) and average stem cross-sectional area should be used instead of BA when scaling from tree to plot. Stand quadratic mean diameter above the census threshold diameter size should be preferred over stand mean diameter as it reduces the prediction error of stand AGB by a factor of ten. Wood density should be weighted by stem volume per species instead of BA. LiDAR-derived statistics should prove useful for estimating local H-D allometries as well as mapping N and the mean quadratic diameter above 10 cm at the landscape level. Prior stratification into forest types is likely to improve both estimation procedures significantly and is considered the foremost current challenge. PMID:24615493