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Sample records for 24-nt small interfering

  1. Genome-Wide Analysis of 24-nt siRNAs Dynamic Variations during Rice Superior and Inferior Grain Filling

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Ting; Du, Yanxiu; Zhang, Jing; Li, Junzhou; Liu, Yanxia; Zhao, Yafan; Sun, Hongzheng; Zhao, Quanzhi

    2013-01-01

    24 nt-siRNAs are the most abundant small interfering RNAs in rice grains aside from microRNAs. To investigate the roles that 24 nt-siRNAs played in the poor grain filling of rice inferior grains, dynamic variations of 24 nt-siRNAs in inferior grains were compared with those of superior grains by using small RNA deep sequencing technology. The results showed that 24 nt-siRNAs derived from multiple regions of rice genome, and the maintenance of the two strands of 24 nt-siRNA duplex was a non-random process. The amounts of 24 nt-siRNAs declined with the process of grain filling in both superior and inferior grains, but 24 nt-siRNAs in inferior grains was much higher than that of superior grains in each period we sampled. Bioinformatics prediction indicated that 24 nt-siRNAs targeted on more genes involved in most of the known KEGG rice pathways, such as the starch and sucrose biosynthesis pathway. Combined with digital gene expression profiling of target genes, 24 nt-siRNAs mapped on the antisense strands of exons were specifically investigated, but the abundance of 24 nt-siRNAs did not show negative correlations with their corresponding target genes. The results indicated that 24 nt-siRNAs were not involved in down-regulation of target genes. The potential biological meanings for this inconsistency were probably the results of methylation directed gene expression activation, or competition for small RNA stability methylation. PMID:23593380

  2. Polymers in Small-Interfering RNA Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Singha, Kaushik; Namgung, Ran

    2011-01-01

    This review will cover the current strategies that are being adopted to efficiently deliver small interfering RNA using nonviral vectors, including the use of polymers such as polyethylenimine, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid), polypeptides, chitosan, cyclodextrin, dendrimers, and polymers-containing different nanoparticles. The article will provide a brief and concise account of underlying principle of these polymeric vectors and their structural and functional modifications which were intended to serve different purposes to affect efficient therapeutic outcome of small-interfering RNA delivery. The modifications of these polymeric vectors will be discussed with reference to stimuli-responsiveness, target specific delivery, and incorporation of nanoconstructs such as carbon nanotubes, gold nanoparticles, and silica nanoparticles. The emergence of small-interfering RNA as the potential therapeutic agent and its mode of action will also be mentioned in a nutshell. PMID:21749290

  3. Rotavirus gene silencing by small interfering RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Déctor, Miguel Angel; Romero, Pedro; López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F.

    2002-01-01

    RNA interference is an evolutionarily conserved double-stranded RNA-triggered mechanism for suppressing gene expression. Rotaviruses, the leading cause of severe diarrhea in young children, are formed by three concentric layers of protein, from which the spike protein VP4 projects. Here, we show that a small interfering RNA corresponding to the VP4 gene efficiently inhibits the synthesis of this protein in virus-infected cells. A large proportion of infected cells had no detectable VP4 and the yield of viral progeny was reduced. Most of the virus particles purified from these cells were triple-layered, but lacked VP4, and were poorly infectious. We also show that VP4 might not be required for the last step of virus morphogenesis. The VP4 gene silencing was specific, since the synthesis of VP4 from rotavirus strains that differ in the target sequence was not affected. These findings offer the possibility of carrying out reverse genetics in rotaviruses. PMID:12446562

  4. Therapeutic potential of small interfering RNAs/micro interfering RNA in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Farra, Rossella; Grassi, Mario; Grassi, Gabriele; Dapas, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the predominant form of primary liver cancer and represents the third leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Current available therapeutic approaches are poorly effective, especially for the advanced forms of the disease. In the last year, short double stranded RNA molecules termed small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and micro interfering RNAs (miRNA), emerged as interesting molecules with potential therapeutic value for HCC. The practical use of these molecules is however limited by the identification of optimal molecular targets and especially by the lack of effective and targeted HCC delivery systems. Here we focus our discussion on the most recent advances in the identification of siRNAs/miRNAs molecular targets and on the development of suitable siRNA/miRNAs delivery systems. PMID:26290628

  5. Delivery of Small Interfering RNAs to Cells via Exosomes.

    PubMed

    Wahlgren, Jessica; Statello, Luisa; Skogberg, Gabriel; Telemo, Esbjörn; Valadi, Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are small membrane bound vesicles between 30 and 100 nm in diameter of endocytic origin that are secreted into the extracellular environment by many different cell types. Exosomes play a role in intercellular communication by transferring proteins, lipids, and RNAs to recipient cells.Exosomes from human cells could be used as vectors to provide cells with therapeutic RNAs. Here we describe how exogenous small interfering RNAs may successfully be introduced into various kinds of human exosomes using electroporation and subsequently delivered to recipient cells. Methods used to confirm the presence of siRNA inside exosomes and cells are presented, such as flow cytometry, confocal microscopy, and Northern blot.

  6. RNAi and small interfering RNAs in human disease therapeutic applications

    PubMed Central

    Lares, Monica R.; Rossi, John J.; Ouellet, Dominique L.

    2010-01-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) have shown to effectively down-regulate gene expression in human cells, giving them potential to eradicate disease. Prospects for clinical applications are discussed in this review, along with an overview of recent history and our current understanding of siRNAs used for therapeutic application in human diseases, such as cancer and viral infections. Over recent years, progress has been made in lipids, ligands, nanoparticles, polymers and viral vectors as delivery agents and for gene-based expression of siRNA to enhance the efficacy and specificity of these methods while at the same time reducing toxicity. It has become apparent that given the recent advances in chemistry and delivery, RNAi will soon prove to be an important and widely used therapeutic modality. PMID:20833440

  7. Engineering small interfering RNAs by strategic chemical modification.

    PubMed

    Bramsen, Jesper B; Kjems, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) have revolutionized functional genomics in mammalian cell cultures due to their reliability, efficiency, and ease of use. This success, however, has not fully translated into siRNA applications in vivo and in siRNA therapeutics where initial optimism has been dampened by a lack of efficient delivery strategies and reports of siRNA off-target effects and immunogenicity. Encouragingly, most aspects of siRNA behavior can be addressed by careful engineering of siRNAs incorporating beneficial chemical modifications into discrete nucleotide positions during siRNA synthesis. Here, we review the literature (Subheadings 1 -3) and provide a quick guide (Subheading 4) to how the performance of siRNA can be improved by chemical modification to suit specific applications in vitro and in vivo.

  8. Structural diversity repertoire of gene silencing small interfering RNAs.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chan Il; Kim, Helena Andrade; Dua, Pooja; Kim, Soyoun; Li, Chiang J; Lee, Dong-ki

    2011-06-01

    Since the discovery of double-stranded (ds) RNA-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) phenomenon in Caenorhabditis elegans, specific gene silencing based upon RNAi mechanism has become a novel biomedical tool that has extended our understanding of cell biology and opened the door to an innovative class of therapeutic agents. To silence genes in mammalian cells, short dsRNA referred to as small interfering RNA (siRNA) is used as an RNAi trigger to avoid nonspecific interferon responses induced by long dsRNAs. An early structure-activity relationship study performed in Drosophila melanogaster embryonic extract suggested the existence of strict siRNA structural design rules to achieve optimal gene silencing. These rules include the presence of a 3' overhang, a fixed duplex length, and structural symmetry, which defined the structure of a classical siRNA. However, several recent studies performed in mammalian cells have hinted that the gene silencing siRNA structure could be much more flexible than that originally proposed. Moreover, many of the nonclassical siRNA structural variants reported improved features over the classical siRNAs, including increased potency, reduced nonspecific responses, and enhanced cellular delivery. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in the development of gene silencing siRNA structural variants and discuss these in light of the flexibility of the RNAi machinery in mammalian cells. PMID:21749289

  9. Translocation of Small Interfering RNA and Cholesterol Molecules in Biomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalia, Rajiv

    2013-03-01

    This presentation will focus on all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies of (1) structural and mechanical barriers to translocation of small interfering RNA (siRNA) across a phospholipid bilayer, and (2) flip-flop dynamics of cholesterol (CHOL) molecules across a phospholipid bilayer. In the first case, we find that the siRNA induces a liquid-to-gel phase transformation. In the gel phase we find large compressive lateral stresses in the hydrocarbon chains of lipid molecules, which present a considerable barrier to siRNA passage across the bilayer. In the second case, we study spontaneous CHOL inter-leaflet transport (flip-flop), the effect of this process on mechanical stresses across the bilayer, and the role of CHOL in inducing molecular order in bilayer leaflets. The simulation was run for 15 microseconds and we found 24 CHOL flip-flop events over that duration. On average, a CHOL molecule migrates across the lipid bilayer in about 73 ns after a flip-flop event is triggered. We have calculated diffusion maps and determined free energy surfaces and flip-flop mechanisms for CHOL molecules. Work supported by NSF-OCI-0749360 and NSF-IOS-125317.

  10. Small Interfering RNA Transfection Across a Phospholipid Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Van; Choubey, Amit; Kalia, Rajiv; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2012-02-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules play a pivotal role in silencing gene expression via the RNA interference mechanism. We have performed steered MD simulations to study the transfection of a bare siRNA and siRNA/Oleic Acid (OA) complex across the dipalmitoylphosphatidycholine (DPPC) bilayer at T = 323 K. Bare siRNA induces the formation of frustrated lipid gel domains, whereas in the presence of siRNA/OA complex the membrane is found to be in the liquid-ordered phase. In both cases the stress profiles across the membrane indicate that the membrane is under tension near the head groups and highly compressed at the water-hydrophobic interface. During transfection, the membrane is deformed and the lateral stress is significantly lowered for the bare siRNA and siRNA/OA complex. The bare siRNA transfects through a lipid-nanopore of hydrophilic head-groups and hydrophobic carbon chains, whereas the siRNA/OA complex transfects through a lipid-nanopore of hydrophilic head groups.

  11. Functional Nanostructures for Effective Delivery of Small Interfering RNA Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Cheol Am; Nam, Yoon Sung

    2014-01-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) has proved to be a powerful tool for target-specific gene silencing via RNA interference (RNAi). Its ability to control targeted gene expression gives new hope to gene therapy as a treatment for cancers and genetic diseases. However, siRNA shows poor pharmacological properties, such as low serum stability, off-targeting, and innate immune responses, which present a significant challenge for clinical applications. In addition, siRNA cannot cross the cell membrane for RNAi activity because of its anionic property and stiff structure. Therefore, the development of a safe, stable, and efficient system for the delivery of siRNA therapeutics into the cytoplasm of targeted cells is crucial. Several nanoparticle platforms for siRNA delivery have been developed to overcome the major hurdles facing the therapeutic uses of siRNA. This review covers a broad spectrum of non-viral siRNA delivery systems developed for enhanced cellular uptake and targeted gene silencing in vitro and in vivo and discusses their characteristics and opportunities for clinical applications of therapeutic siRNA. PMID:25285170

  12. Small interfering RNA delivery through positively charged polymer nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragoni, Luca; Ferrari, Raffaele; Lupi, Monica; Cesana, Alberto; Falcetta, Francesca; Ubezio, Paolo; D'Incalci, Maurizio; Morbidelli, Massimo; Moscatelli, Davide

    2016-03-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) is receiving increasing attention with regard to the treatment of many genetic diseases, both acquired and hereditary, such as cancer and diabetes. Being a high molecular weight (MW) polyanion, siRNA is not able to cross a cell membrane, and in addition it is unstable in physiological conditions. Accordingly, a biocompatible nanocarrier able to deliver siRNA into cells is needed. In this work, we synthesized biocompatible positively charged nanoparticles (NPs) following a two-step process that involves ring opening polymerization (ROP) and emulsion free radical polymerization (EFRP). Firstly, we proved the possibility of fine tuning the NPs’ characteristics (e.g. size and surface charge) by changing the synthetic process parameters. Then the capability in loading and delivering undamaged siRNA into a cancer cell cytoplasm has been shown. This latter process occurs through the biodegradation of the polymer constituting the NPs, whose kinetics can be tuned by adjusting the polymer’s MW. Finally, the ability of NPs to carry siRNA inside the cells in order to inhibit their target gene has been demonstrated using green flourescent protein positive cells.

  13. Control of ruminant morbillivirus replication by small interfering RNA.

    PubMed

    Servan de Almeida, Renata; Keita, Djénéba; Libeau, Geneviève; Albina, Emmanuel

    2007-08-01

    Peste-des-petits-ruminants virus (PPRV) and rinderpest virus (RPV) are two morbilliviruses of economic relevance in African and Asian countries. Although efficient vaccines are available for both diseases, they cannot protect the animals before 14 days post-vaccination. In emergencies, it would be desirable to have efficient therapeutics for virus control. Here, two regions are described in the nucleocapsid genes of PPRV and RPV that can be targeted efficiently by synthetic short interfering RNAs (siRNAs), resulting in a >80 % reduction in virus replication. The effects of siRNAs on the production of viral RNA by real-time quantitative PCR, of viral proteins by flow cytometry and of virus particles by appreciation of the cytopathic effect and virus titration were monitored. The findings of this work highlight the potential for siRNA molecules to be developed as therapeutic agents for the treatment of PPRV and RPV infections.

  14. Creation of transgenic rice plants producing small interfering RNA of Rice tungro spherical virus.

    PubMed

    Le, Dung Tien; Chu, Ha Duc; Sasaya, Takahide

    2015-01-01

    Rice tungro spherical virus (RTSV), also known as Rice waika virus, does not cause visible symptoms in infected rice plants. However, the virus plays a critical role in spreading Rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV), which is the major cause of severe symptoms of rice tungro disease. Recent studies showed that RNA interference (RNAi) can be used to develop virus-resistance transgenic rice plants. In this report, we presented simple procedures and protocols needed for the creation of transgenic rice plants capable of producing small interfering RNA specific against RTSV sequences. Notably, our study showed that 60 out of 64 individual hygromycin-resistant lines (putative transgenic lines) obtained through transformation carried transgenes designed for producing hairpin double-stranded RNA. Northern blot analyses revealed the presence of small interfering RNA of 21- to 24-mer in 46 out of 56 confirmed transgenic lines. Taken together, our study indicated that transgenic rice plants carrying an inverted repeat of 500-bp fragments encoding various proteins of RTSV can produce small interfering RNA from the hairpin RNA transcribed from that transgene. In light of recent studies with other viruses, it is possible that some of these transgenic rice lines might be resistant to RTSV.

  15. Incorporation of osteogenic and angiogenic small interfering RNAs into chitosan sponge for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Jia, Sen; Yang, Xinjie; Song, Wen; Wang, Lei; Fang, Kaixiu; Hu, Zhiqiang; Yang, Zihui; Shan, Chun; Lei, Delin; Lu, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Engineered bone substitutes are being extensively explored in response to growing demand. However, the angiogenesis that occurs during bone formation is often overlooked in scaffold design. In this novel study, we incorporated two small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), ie, small interfering RNA targets casein kinase 2 interaction protein 1 (siCkip-1) and small interfering RNA targets soluble VEGF receptor 1 (siFlt-1), which can promote osteogenesis and angiogenesis, into a chitosan sponge. This scaffold could maintain siRNAs for over 2 weeks in neutral phosphate-buffered saline and degraded rapidly in the presence of lysozyme. The chitosan sponge with siCkip-1 and siFlt-1 in vitro bioactivity was investigated using mesenchymal stem cells. Target genes were significantly suppressed, and osteocalcin, alkaline phosphatase, and vascular endothelial growth factor were significantly upregulated. Alizarin Red staining revealed that mineralization of the extracellular matrix was markedly enhanced by dual transfection. Further analysis by immunofluorescence confirmed that the siRNA-modified scaffold simultaneously improved the expression of osteocalcin and von Willebrand factor. In vivo testing in a skull critical-size defect model showed marked bone regeneration in rats treated with siCkip-1 and siFlt-1. In conclusion, chitosan sponge containing osteogenic and angiogenic siRNAs may be used as a scaffold for bone regeneration. The dual siRNA concept may also be useful in the biofunctionalization of other materials. PMID:25429217

  16. Creation of transgenic rice plants producing small interfering RNA of Rice tungro spherical virus

    PubMed Central

    Le, Dung Tien; Chu, Ha Duc; Sasaya, Takahide

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rice tungro spherical virus (RTSV), also known as Rice waika virus, does not cause visible symptoms in infected rice plants. However, the virus plays a critical role in spreading Rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV), which is the major cause of severe symptoms of rice tungro disease. Recent studies showed that RNA interference (RNAi) can be used to develop virus-resistance transgenic rice plants. In this report, we presented simple procedures and protocols needed for the creation of transgenic rice plants capable of producing small interfering RNA specific against RTSV sequences. Notably, our study showed that 60 out of 64 individual hygromycin-resistant lines (putative transgenic lines) obtained through transformation carried transgenes designed for producing hairpin double-stranded RNA. Northern blot analyses revealed the presence of small interfering RNA of 21- to 24-mer in 46 out of 56 confirmed transgenic lines. Taken together, our study indicated that transgenic rice plants carrying an inverted repeat of 500-bp fragments encoding various proteins of RTSV can produce small interfering RNA from the hairpin RNA transcribed from that transgene. In light of recent studies with other viruses, it is possible that some of these transgenic rice lines might be resistant to RTSV. PMID:25984767

  17. Small interfering RNAs as a tool to assign Rho GTPase exchange-factor function in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Gampel, Alexandra; Mellor, Harry

    2002-01-01

    Rho GTPases control a complex network of intracellular signalling pathways. Whereas progress has been made in identifying downstream signalling partners for these proteins, the characterization of Rho upstream regulatory guanine-nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) has been hampered by a lack of suitable research tools. Here we use small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to examine the cellular regulation of the RhoB GTPase, and show that RhoB is activated downstream of the epidermal-growth-factor receptor through the Vav2 exchange factor. These studies demonstrate that siRNAs are an ideal research tool for the assignment of Rho GEF function in vivo. PMID:12113653

  18. Transfer and Expression of Small Interfering RNAs in Mammalian Cells Using Lentiviral Vectors.

    PubMed

    Lebedev, T D; Spirin, P V; Prassolov, V S

    2013-04-01

    RNA interference is a convenient tool for modulating gene expression. The widespread application of RNA interference is made difficult because of the imperfections of the methods used for efficient target cell delivery of whatever genes are under study. One of the most convenient and efficient gene transfer and expression systems is based on the use of lentiviral vectors, which direct the synthesis of small hairpin RNAs (shRNAs), the precursors of siRNAs. The application of these systems enables one to achieve sustainable and long-term shRNA expression in cells. This review considers the adaptation of the processing of artificial shRNA to the mechanisms used by cellular microRNAs and simultaneous expression of several shRNAs as potential approaches for producing lentiviral vectors that direct shRNA synthesis. Approaches to using RNA interference for the treatment of cancer, as well as hereditary and viral diseases, are under active development today. The improvement made to the methods for constructing lentiviral vectors and the investigation into the mechanisms of processing of small interfering RNA allow one to now consider lentiviral vectors that direct shRNA synthesis as one of the most promising tools for delivering small interfering RNAs.

  19. Transfer and Expression of Small Interfering RNAs in Mammalian Cells Using Lentiviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Lebedev, T. D.; Spirin, P. V.; Prassolov, V. S.

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference is a convenient tool for modulating gene expression. The widespread application of RNA interference is made difficult because of the imperfections of the methods used for efficient target cell delivery of whatever genes are under study. One of the most convenient and efficient gene transfer and expression systems is based on the use of lentiviral vectors, which direct the synthesis of small hairpin RNAs (shRNAs), the precursors of siRNAs. The application of these systems enables one to achieve sustainable and long-term shRNA expression in cells. This review considers the adaptation of the processing of artificial shRNA to the mechanisms used by cellular microRNAs and simultaneous expression of several shRNAs as potential approaches for producing lentiviral vectors that direct shRNA synthesis. Approaches to using RNA interference for the treatment of cancer, as well as hereditary and viral diseases, are under active development today. The improvement made to the methods for constructing lentiviral vectors and the investigation into the mechanisms of processing of small interfering RNA allow one to now consider lentiviral vectors that direct shRNA synthesis as one of the most promising tools for delivering small interfering RNAs. PMID:23819033

  20. Small interfering peptide (siP) for in vivo examination of the developing lung interactonome.

    PubMed

    Cohen, J Craig; Killeen, Erin; Chander, Avinash; Takemaru, Ken-Ichi; Larson, Janet E; Treharne, Kate J; Mehta, Anil

    2009-02-01

    To understand the role of reactive oxygen species in mechanosensory control of lung development a new approach to interfere with protein-protein interactions by means of a short interacting peptide was developed. This technology was used in the developing rodent lung to examine the role of NADPH oxidase (NOX), casein kinase 2 (CK2), and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in stretch-induced differentiation. Interactions between these molecules was targeted in an in utero system with recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) containing inserted DNA sequences that express a control peptide or small interfering peptides (siPs) specific for subunit interaction or phosphorylation predicted to be necessary for multimeric enzyme formation. In all cases only siPs with sequences necessary for a predicted normal function were found to interfere with assembly of the multimeric enzyme. A noninterfering control siP to nonessential regions or reporter genes alone had no effect. Physiologically, it was shown that siPs that interfered with the NOX-CFTR-CK2 complex that we call an "interactonome" affected markers of stretch-induced lung organogenesis including Wnt/beta-catenin signaling.

  1. Phytophthora Have Distinct Endogenous Small RNA Populations That Include Short Interfering and microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Fahlgren, Noah; Bollmann, Stephanie R.; Kasschau, Kristin D.; Cuperus, Josh T.; Press, Caroline M.; Sullivan, Christopher M.; Chapman, Elisabeth J.; Hoyer, J. Steen; Gilbert, Kerrigan B.; Grünwald, Niklaus J.; Carrington, James C.

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes, RNA silencing pathways utilize 20-30-nucleotide small RNAs to regulate gene expression, specify and maintain chromatin structure, and repress viruses and mobile genetic elements. RNA silencing was likely present in the common ancestor of modern eukaryotes, but most research has focused on plant and animal RNA silencing systems. Phytophthora species belong to a phylogenetically distinct group of economically important plant pathogens that cause billions of dollars in yield losses annually as well as ecologically devastating outbreaks. We analyzed the small RNA-generating components of the genomes of P. infestans, P. sojae and P. ramorum using bioinformatics, genetic, phylogenetic and high-throughput sequencing-based methods. Each species produces two distinct populations of small RNAs that are predominantly 21- or 25-nucleotides long. The 25-nucleotide small RNAs were primarily derived from loci encoding transposable elements and we propose that these small RNAs define a pathway of short-interfering RNAs that silence repetitive genetic elements. The 21-nucleotide small RNAs were primarily derived from inverted repeats, including a novel microRNA family that is conserved among the three species, and several gene families, including Crinkler effectors and type III fibronectins. The Phytophthora microRNA is predicted to target a family of amino acid/auxin permeases, and we propose that 21-nucleotide small RNAs function at the post-transcriptional level. The functional significance of microRNA-guided regulation of amino acid/auxin permeases and the association of 21-nucleotide small RNAs with Crinkler effectors remains unclear, but this work provides a framework for testing the role of small RNAs in Phytophthora biology and pathogenesis in future work. PMID:24204767

  2. Trans-acting small interfering RNA4: key to nutraceutical synthesis in 1 grape development?

    PubMed Central

    Rock, Christopher D.

    2013-01-01

    The facility and versatility of microRNAs (miRNAs) to evolve and change likely underlies how they have become dominant constituents of eukaryotic genomes. In this opinion article I propose that trans-acting small interfering RNA gene 4 (TAS4) evolution may be important for biosynthesis of polyphenolics, arbuscular symbiosis, and bacterial pathogen etiologies. Expression-based and phylogenetic evidence shows that TAS4 targets two novel grape (Vitis vinifera L.) MYB transcription factors (VvMYBA6, VvMYBA7) that spawn phased siRNAs and likely function in nutraceutical bioflavonoid biosynthesis and fruit development. Characterization of the molecular mechanisms of TAS4 control of plant development and integration into biotic and abiotic stress- and nutrient signaling regulatory networks has applicability to molecular breeding and development of strategies for engineering healthier foods. PMID:23993483

  3. Nodamura virus B2 amino terminal domain sensitivity to small interfering RNA.

    PubMed

    Ali, P Shaik Syed; John, Jasmine; Selvaraj, Manikandan; Kek, Teh Lay; Salleh, Mohd Zaki

    2015-05-01

    Nodamura virus (NoV) B2, a suppressor of RNA interference, binds double stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) corresponding to Dicer substrates and products. Here, we report that the amino terminal domain of NoV B2 (NoV B2 79) specifically binds siRNAs but not dsRNAs. NoV B2 79 oligomerizes on binding to 27 nucleotide siRNA. Mutation of the residues phenylalanine49 and alanine60 to cysteine and methionine, respectively enhances the RNA binding affinity of NoV B2 79. Circular dichroism spectra demonstrated that the wild type and mutant NoV B2 79 have similar secondary structure conformations.

  4. Small interfering RNAs inhibit infectious bursal disease virus replication in Vero cells.

    PubMed

    Sajjanar, B K; Mishra, A; Sonawane, A; Patel, C L; Saxena, A; Dash, B B; Rai, A; Raut, A A

    2011-01-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules are considered to be a promising antiviral therapeutics. This study was performed to analyze the application of siRNA against infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) replication. Two siRNAs were designed to target common coding sequences of four IBDV proteins. Corresponding vectors were constructed to express anti-IBDV short hairpin RNAs (shRNA) that were tested for their antiviral effect in Vero cells. The results showed that expressed shRNA inhibited the virus replication to a significant extent (92%) as determined by the virus titration in cell culture. This outcome demonstrated the effectiveness of RNA interference (RNAi) based mechanism against the IBDV in vitro.

  5. Small interfering ribonucleic acid induces liquid-to-ripple phase transformation in a phospholipid membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Choubey, Amit; Nomura, Ken-ichi; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2014-09-15

    Small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) molecules play a pivotal role in silencing gene expression via the RNA interference mechanism. A key limitation to the widespread implementation of siRNA therapeutics is the difficulty of delivering siRNA-based drugs to cells. Here, we examine changes in the structure and dynamics of a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer in the presence of a siRNA molecule and mechanical barriers to siRNA transfection in the bilayer. Our all-atom molecular dynamics simulation shows that siRNA induces a liquid crystalline-to-ripple phase transformation in the bilayer. The ripple phase consists of a major region of non-interdigitated and a minor region of interdigitated lipid molecules with an intervening kink. In the ripple phase, hydrocarbon chains of lipid molecules have large compressive stresses, which present a considerable barrier to siRNA transfection.

  6. Development of Therapeutic-Grade Small Interfering RNAs by Chemical Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Bramsen, Jesper B.; Kjems, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    Recent successes in clinical trials have provided important proof of concept that small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) indeed constitute a new promising class of therapeutics. Although great efforts are still needed to ensure efficient means of delivery in vivo, the siRNA molecule itself has been successfully engineered by chemical modification to meet initial challenges regarding specificity, stability, and immunogenicity. To date, a great wealth of siRNA architectures and types of chemical modification are available for promoting safe siRNA-mediated gene silencing in vivo and, consequently, the choice of design and modification types can be challenging to individual experimenters. Here we review the literature and devise how to improve siRNA performance by structural design and specific chemical modification to ensure potent and specific gene silencing without unwarranted side-effects and hereby complement the ongoing efforts to improve cell targeting and delivery by other carrier molecules. PMID:22934103

  7. Development of Therapeutic-Grade Small Interfering RNAs by Chemical Engineering.

    PubMed

    Bramsen, Jesper B; Kjems, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    Recent successes in clinical trials have provided important proof of concept that small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) indeed constitute a new promising class of therapeutics. Although great efforts are still needed to ensure efficient means of delivery in vivo, the siRNA molecule itself has been successfully engineered by chemical modification to meet initial challenges regarding specificity, stability, and immunogenicity. To date, a great wealth of siRNA architectures and types of chemical modification are available for promoting safe siRNA-mediated gene silencing in vivo and, consequently, the choice of design and modification types can be challenging to individual experimenters. Here we review the literature and devise how to improve siRNA performance by structural design and specific chemical modification to ensure potent and specific gene silencing without unwarranted side-effects and hereby complement the ongoing efforts to improve cell targeting and delivery by other carrier molecules.

  8. Small interfering RNA delivery by polyethylenimine-functionalised porous silicon nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hasanzadeh Kafshgari, M; Alnakhli, M; Delalat, B; Apostolou, S; Harding, F J; Mäkilä, E; Salonen, J J; Kuss, B J; Voelcker, N H

    2015-12-01

    In this study, thermally hydrocarbonised porous silicon nanoparticles (THCpSiNPs) capped with polyethylenimine (PEI) were fabricated, and their potential for small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery was investigated in an in vitro glioblastoma model. PEI coating following siRNA loading enhanced the sustained release of siRNA, and suppressed burst release effects. The positively-charged surface improved the internalisation of the nanoparticles across the cell membrane. THCpSiNP-mediated siRNA delivery reduced mRNA expression of the MRP1 gene, linked to the resistence of glioblastoma to chemotherapy, by 63% and reduced MRP1-protein levels by 70%. MRP1 siRNA loaded nanoparticles did not induce cytotoxicity in glioblastoma cells, but markedly reduced cell proliferation. In summary, the results demonstrated that non-cytotoxic cationic THCpSiNPs are promising vehicles for therapeutic siRNA delivery.

  9. Systematic coarse-grained modeling of complexation between small interfering RNA and polycations

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Zonghui; Luijten, Erik

    2015-12-28

    All-atom molecular dynamics simulations can provide insight into the properties of polymeric gene-delivery carriers by elucidating their interactions and detailed binding patterns with nucleic acids. However, to explore nanoparticle formation through complexation of these polymers and nucleic acids and study their behavior at experimentally relevant time and length scales, a reliable coarse-grained model is needed. Here, we systematically develop such a model for the complexation of small interfering RNA (siRNA) and grafted polyethyleneimine copolymers, a promising candidate for siRNA delivery. We compare the predictions of this model with all-atom simulations and demonstrate that it is capable of reproducing detailed binding patterns, charge characteristics, and water release kinetics. Since the coarse-grained model accelerates the simulations by one to two orders of magnitude, it will make it possible to quantitatively investigate nanoparticle formation involving multiple siRNA molecules and cationic copolymers.

  10. Nonviral vectors for the delivery of small interfering RNAs to the CNS.

    PubMed

    Posadas, Inmaculada; Guerra, Francisco Javier; Ceña, Valentín

    2010-10-01

    While efficient methods for cell line transfection are well described, for primary neurons a high-yield method different from those relying on viral vectors is lacking. Viral vector-based primary neuronal infection has several drawbacks, including complexity of vector preparation, safety concerns and the generation of immune and inflammatory responses, when used in vivo. This article will cover the different approaches that are being used to efficiently deliver genetic material (both DNA and small interfering RNA) to neuronal tissue using nonviral vectors, including the use of cationic lipids, polyethylenimine derivatives, dendrimers, carbon nanotubes and the combination of carbon-made nanoparticles with dendrimers. The effectiveness, both in vivo and in vitro, of the different methods to deliver genetic material to neural tissue is discussed.

  11. Non-Viral Delivery and Therapeutic Application of Small Interfering RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Nikitenko, N. A.; Prassolov, V. S.

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful method used for gene expression regulation. The increasing knowledge about the molecular mechanism of this phenomenon creates new avenues for the application of the RNAi technology in the treatment of various human diseases. However, delivery of RNA interference mediators, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), to target cells is a major hurdle. Effective and safe pharmacological use of siRNAs requires carriers that can deliver siRNA to its target site and the development of methods for protection of these fragile molecules from in vivo degradation. This review summarizes various strategies for siRNA delivery, including chemical modification and non-viral approaches, such as the polymer-based, peptide-based, lipid-based techniques, and inorganic nanosystems. The advantages, disadvantages, and prospects for the therapeutic application of these methods are also examined in this paper. PMID:24303201

  12. Non-Viral Delivery and Therapeutic Application of Small Interfering RNAs.

    PubMed

    Nikitenko, N A; Prassolov, V S

    2013-07-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful method used for gene expression regulation. The increasing knowledge about the molecular mechanism of this phenomenon creates new avenues for the application of the RNAi technology in the treatment of various human diseases. However, delivery of RNA interference mediators, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), to target cells is a major hurdle. Effective and safe pharmacological use of siRNAs requires carriers that can deliver siRNA to its target site and the development of methods for protection of these fragile molecules from in vivo degradation. This review summarizes various strategies for siRNA delivery, including chemical modification and non-viral approaches, such as the polymer-based, peptide-based, lipid-based techniques, and inorganic nanosystems. The advantages, disadvantages, and prospects for the therapeutic application of these methods are also examined in this paper.

  13. ATP requirements and small interfering RNA structure in the RNA interference pathway.

    PubMed

    Nykänen, A; Haley, B; Zamore, P D

    2001-11-01

    We examined the role of ATP in the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. Our data reveal two ATP-dependent steps and suggest that the RNAi reaction comprises at least four sequential steps: ATP-dependent processing of double-stranded RNA into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), incorporation of siRNAs into an inactive approximately 360 kDa protein/RNA complex, ATP-dependent unwinding of the siRNA duplex to generate an active complex, and ATP-independent recognition and cleavage of the RNA target. Furthermore, ATP is used to maintain 5' phosphates on siRNAs. A 5' phosphate on the target-complementary strand of the siRNA duplex is required for siRNA function, suggesting that cells check the authenticity of siRNAs and license only bona fide siRNAs to direct target RNA destruction.

  14. Inhibition of Bovine herpesvirus multiplication in MDBK cells by small interfering RNAs.

    PubMed

    Narute, P S; Raut, A A; Saini, M; Rai, A; Gupta, P K

    2009-01-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) mediated gene silencing is a promising approach in antiviral therapy. To investigate the antiviral effects of siRNAs on Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) multiplication, we designed and in vitro synthesized two siRNAs (siRNA-1 and siRNA-2) targeting the UL25 gene that is essential for BHV-1 multiplication. siRNA-1 and siRNA-2 inhibited the BoHV-1 multiplication in MDBK cells to a different extent, namely by 11% and 40%, respectively, as demonstrated by virus titers (TCID(50)/ml) determined in cell culture. This indicates that, in general, siRNAs can inhibit BHV-1 multiplication in vitro and could be used also against a BHV-1 infection in vivo following optimization of their application.

  15. Antisense Transcription of Retrotransposons in Drosophila: An Origin of Endogenous Small Interfering RNA Precursors.

    PubMed

    Russo, Joseph; Harrington, Andrew W; Steiniger, Mindy

    2016-01-01

    Movement of transposons causes insertions, deletions, and chromosomal rearrangements potentially leading to premature lethality in Drosophila melanogaster. To repress these elements and combat genomic instability, eukaryotes have evolved several small RNA-mediated defense mechanisms. Specifically, in Drosophila somatic cells, endogenous small interfering (esi)RNAs suppress retrotransposon mobility. EsiRNAs are produced by Dicer-2 processing of double-stranded RNA precursors, yet the origins of these precursors are unknown. We show that most transposon families are transcribed in both the sense (S) and antisense (AS) direction in Dmel-2 cells. LTR retrotransposons Dm297, mdg1, and blood, and non-LTR retrotransposons juan and jockey transcripts, are generated from intraelement transcription start sites with canonical RNA polymerase II promoters. We also determined that retrotransposon antisense transcripts are less polyadenylated than sense. RNA-seq and small RNA-seq revealed that Dicer-2 RNA interference (RNAi) depletion causes a decrease in the number of esiRNAs mapping to retrotransposons and an increase in expression of both S and AS retrotransposon transcripts. These data support a model in which double-stranded RNA precursors are derived from convergent transcription and processed by Dicer-2 into esiRNAs that silence both sense and antisense retrotransposon transcripts. Reduction of sense retrotransposon transcripts potentially lowers element-specific protein levels to prevent transposition. This mechanism preserves genomic integrity and is especially important for Drosophila fitness because mobile genetic elements are highly active.

  16. Antisense Transcription of Retrotransposons in Drosophila: An Origin of Endogenous Small Interfering RNA Precursors.

    PubMed

    Russo, Joseph; Harrington, Andrew W; Steiniger, Mindy

    2016-01-01

    Movement of transposons causes insertions, deletions, and chromosomal rearrangements potentially leading to premature lethality in Drosophila melanogaster. To repress these elements and combat genomic instability, eukaryotes have evolved several small RNA-mediated defense mechanisms. Specifically, in Drosophila somatic cells, endogenous small interfering (esi)RNAs suppress retrotransposon mobility. EsiRNAs are produced by Dicer-2 processing of double-stranded RNA precursors, yet the origins of these precursors are unknown. We show that most transposon families are transcribed in both the sense (S) and antisense (AS) direction in Dmel-2 cells. LTR retrotransposons Dm297, mdg1, and blood, and non-LTR retrotransposons juan and jockey transcripts, are generated from intraelement transcription start sites with canonical RNA polymerase II promoters. We also determined that retrotransposon antisense transcripts are less polyadenylated than sense. RNA-seq and small RNA-seq revealed that Dicer-2 RNA interference (RNAi) depletion causes a decrease in the number of esiRNAs mapping to retrotransposons and an increase in expression of both S and AS retrotransposon transcripts. These data support a model in which double-stranded RNA precursors are derived from convergent transcription and processed by Dicer-2 into esiRNAs that silence both sense and antisense retrotransposon transcripts. Reduction of sense retrotransposon transcripts potentially lowers element-specific protein levels to prevent transposition. This mechanism preserves genomic integrity and is especially important for Drosophila fitness because mobile genetic elements are highly active. PMID:26534950

  17. In vitro evaluation of endothelial exosomes as carriers for small interfering ribonucleic acid delivery.

    PubMed

    Banizs, Anna B; Huang, Tao; Dryden, Kelly; Berr, Stuart S; Stone, James R; Nakamoto, Robert K; Shi, Weibin; He, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Exosomes, one subpopulation of nanosize extracellular vesicles derived from multivesicular bodies, ranging from 30 to 150 nm in size, emerged as promising carriers for small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) delivery, as they are capable of transmitting molecular messages between cells through carried small noncoding RNAs, messenger RNAs, deoxyribonucleic acids, and proteins. Endothelial cells are involved in a number of important biological processes, and are a major source of circulating exosomes. In this study, we prepared exosomes from endothelial cells and evaluated their capacity to deliver siRNA into primary endothelial cells. Exosomes were isolated and purified by sequential centrifugation and ultracentrifugation from cultured mouse aortic endothelial cells. Similar to exosome particles from other cell sources, endothelial exosomes are nanometer-size vesicles, examined by both the NanoSight instrument and transmission electron microscopy. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis confirmed the expression of two exosome markers: CD9 and CD63. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy studies demonstrated that endothelial exosomes were heterogeneously distributed within cells. In a gene-silencing study with luciferase-expressing endothelial cells, exosomes loaded with siRNA inhibited luciferase expression by more than 40%. In contrast, siRNA alone and control siRNA only suppressed luciferase expression by less than 15%. In conclusion, we demonstrated that endothelial exosomes have the capability to accommodate and deliver short foreign nucleic acids into endothelial cells.

  18. In vitro evaluation of endothelial exosomes as carriers for small interfering ribonucleic acid delivery

    PubMed Central

    Banizs, Anna B; Huang, Tao; Dryden, Kelly; Berr, Stuart S; Stone, James R; Nakamoto, Robert K; Shi, Weibin; He, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Exosomes, one subpopulation of nanosize extracellular vesicles derived from multivesicular bodies, ranging from 30 to 150 nm in size, emerged as promising carriers for small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) delivery, as they are capable of transmitting molecular messages between cells through carried small noncoding RNAs, messenger RNAs, deoxyribonucleic acids, and proteins. Endothelial cells are involved in a number of important biological processes, and are a major source of circulating exosomes. In this study, we prepared exosomes from endothelial cells and evaluated their capacity to deliver siRNA into primary endothelial cells. Exosomes were isolated and purified by sequential centrifugation and ultracentrifugation from cultured mouse aortic endothelial cells. Similar to exosome particles from other cell sources, endothelial exosomes are nanometer-size vesicles, examined by both the NanoSight instrument and transmission electron microscopy. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis confirmed the expression of two exosome markers: CD9 and CD63. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy studies demonstrated that endothelial exosomes were heterogeneously distributed within cells. In a gene-silencing study with luciferase-expressing endothelial cells, exosomes loaded with siRNA inhibited luciferase expression by more than 40%. In contrast, siRNA alone and control siRNA only suppressed luciferase expression by less than 15%. In conclusion, we demonstrated that endothelial exosomes have the capability to accommodate and deliver short foreign nucleic acids into endothelial cells. PMID:25214786

  19. A novel albumin nanocomplex containing both small interfering RNA and gold nanorods for synergetic anticancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jin-Ha; Hwang, Hai-Jin; Shin, Seung Won; Choi, Jeong-Woo; Um, Soong Ho; Oh, Byung-Keun

    2015-05-01

    Therapeutic nanocomplexes have been extensively developed for the effective treatment of aggressive cancers because of their outstanding versatility, easy manipulation, and low cytotoxicity. In this study, we describe the synthesis of a novel bovine serum albumin (BSA)-based nanocomplex harboring both Bcl-2-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) and gold (Au) nanorods (siRNA and rods encapsulated in BSA; SREB) with the aim of developing a targeted breast cancer therapeutic. The SREB complexes contained 2 × 105 siRNA molecules and eight Au nanorods per BSA complex and were successively functionalized with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and anti-ErbB-2 antibodies to facilitate active targeting. The synergetic therapeutic activity originating from the two components effectively induced cell death (~80% reduction in viability compared with control cells) in target breast cancer cells after a single dose of laser irradiation. Intracellular SREB nanocomplex decomposition by proteolytic enzymes resulted in simultaneous RNA interference and thermal ablation, thus leading to apoptosis in the targeted cancer cells. Moreover, these therapeutic effects were sustained for approximately 72 hours. The intrinsic biocompatibility, multifunctionality, and potent in vitro anticancer properties of these SREB nanocomplexes indicate that they have great therapeutic potential for in vivo targeted cancer therapy, in addition to other areas of nanomedicine.Therapeutic nanocomplexes have been extensively developed for the effective treatment of aggressive cancers because of their outstanding versatility, easy manipulation, and low cytotoxicity. In this study, we describe the synthesis of a novel bovine serum albumin (BSA)-based nanocomplex harboring both Bcl-2-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) and gold (Au) nanorods (siRNA and rods encapsulated in BSA; SREB) with the aim of developing a targeted breast cancer therapeutic. The SREB complexes contained 2 × 105 siRNA molecules and eight Au

  20. Global Analyses of Small Interfering RNAs from Sour Orange seedlings Infected with Different Citrus tristeza virus Genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    RNA silencing is a sequence-specific regulatory mechanism in development and maintenance of genome integrity and functions in plant antiviral defense mechanisms. Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are key mediators of RNA silencing. To study CTV-host interactions and disease expression, profiles of v...

  1. Antifibrotic effects of Smad4 small interfering RNAs in injured skeletal muscle after acute contusion.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Chen, J; Chen, S; Zhang, Q; Chen, S

    2011-10-01

    Muscle injuries are common musculoskeletal problems encountered in sports medicine clinics. In this study, we examined the effect of lentivirus-mediated small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting Smad4 on the suppression of the fibrosis in injured skeletal muscles. We found that Smad4-siRNA could efficiently knock down the expression of Smad4 in the C2C12 myoblast cells and in the contunded mice gastrocnemius muscle. The expression of mRNA level of Smad4 decreased to 11% and 49% compared to the control group, respectively, and the expression of protein level decreased to 13% and 57% respectively. Moreover, the lentivirus-mediated siRNA was stably transfected only into the skeletal muscle and not into the liver of the animals. In contunded mice gastrocnemius, the collagenous and vimentin-positive area in the Smad4 siRNA group reduced to 36% and 37% compared to the control group, respectively. Furthermore, compared to the scrambled Smad4 siRNA-injected mice and PBS control-injected mice, the muscle function of the mice injected with lentivirus-mediated Smad4 siRNA improved in terms of both fast-twitch and tetanic strength (P<0.05). The results suggest that the gene therapy of inhibiting Smad4 by lentivirus-mediated siRNA could be a useful approach to prevent scar tissue formation and improve the function of injured skeletal muscle. PMID:21913159

  2. Successful silencing of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in human vascular endothelial cells using small interfering RNA.

    PubMed

    Hecke, Anneke; Brooks, Hilary; Meryet-Figuière, Matthieu; Minne, Stephanie; Konstantinides, Stavros; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Lebleu, Bernard; Schäfer, Katrin

    2006-05-01

    Clinical as well as experimental evidence suggests that vascular overexpression of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1, the primary physiological inhibitor of both urokinase and tissue-type plasminogen activator, may be involved in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. We investigated the feasibility, efficacy and functional effects of PAI-1 gene silencing in human vascular endothelial cells using small interfering RNA. Double-stranded 21 bp-RNA molecules targeted at sequences within the human PAI-1 gene were constructed. Successful siRNA transfection of HUVEC was confirmed using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. One of five candidate siRNA sequences reduced PAI-1 mRNA and protein in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Suppression of PAI-1 mRNA was detected up to 72 hours after transfection. Moreover, siRNA treatment reduced the activity of PAI-1 released from HUVEC, and prevented the oxLDL- or LPS-induced upregulation of PAI-1 secretion. Importantly, siRNA treatment did not affect the expression of other endothelial-cell markers. Moreover, downregulation of PAI-1 significantly enhanced the ability of endothelial cells to adhere to vitronectin, and this effect could be reversed upon addition of recombinant PAI-1. SiRNA-mediated reduction of PAI-1 expression may be a promising strategy for dissecting the effects of PAI-1 on vascular homeostasis.

  3. Identification of Survival Genes in Human Glioblastoma Cells by Small Interfering RNA Screening

    PubMed Central

    Thaker, Nikhil G.; Zhang, Fang; McDonald, Peter R.; Shun, Tong Ying; Lewen, Michael D.; Pollack, Ian F.

    2009-01-01

    Target identification and validation remain difficult steps in the drug discovery process, and uncovering the core genes and pathways that are fundamental for cancer cell survival may facilitate this process. Glioblastoma represents a challenging form of cancer for chemotherapy. Therefore, we assayed 16,560 short interfering RNA (siRNA) aimed at identifying which of the 5520 unique therapeutically targetable gene products were important for the survival of human glioblastoma. We analyzed the viability of T98G glioma cells 96 h after siRNA transfection with two orthogonal statistical methods and identified 55 survival genes that encoded proteases, kinases, and transferases. It is noteworthy that 22% (12/55) of the survival genes were constituents of the 20S and 26S proteasome subunits. An expression survey of a panel of glioma cell lines demonstrated expression of the proteasome component PSMB4, and the validity of the proteasome complex as a target for survival inhibition was confirmed in a series of glioma and nonglioma cell lines by pharmacological inhibition and RNA interference. Biological networks were built with the other survival genes using a protein-protein interaction network, which identified clusters of cellular processes, including protein ubiquitination, purine and pyrimidine metabolism, nucleotide excision repair, and NF-κB signaling. The results of this study should broaden our understanding of the core genes and pathways that regulate cell survival; through either small molecule inhibition or RNA interference, we highlight the potential significance of proteasome inhibition. PMID:19783622

  4. Multimeric small interfering ribonucleic acid for highly efficient sequence-specific gene silencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mok, Hyejung; Lee, Soo Hyeon; Park, Ji Won; Park, Tae Gwan

    2010-03-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) with 19-21 base pairs has been recently recognized as a new therapeutic agent for effectively silencing a specific gene on a post-transcription level. For siRNA therapeutics, safe and efficient delivery issues are significant hurdles to clinical applications. Here we present a new class of biologically active siRNA structure based on chemically self-crosslinked and multimerized siRNA through cleavable disulphide linkages. The multimerized siRNA can produce more stable and compact polyelectrolyte complexes with less cytotoxic cationic carriers than naked siRNA because of substantially increased charge densities and the presence of flexible chemical linkers in the backbone. The cleavable and multimerized siRNA shows greatly enhanced gene-silencing efficiencies in vitro and in vivo through a target-messenger-RNA-specific RNA interference processing without significantly eliciting immune induction. This study demonstrates that the multimerized siRNA structure complexed with selected cationic condensing agents can serve as potential gene-silencing therapeutics for treating various diseases.

  5. Inhibition of Anatid Herpes Virus-1 replication by small interfering RNAs in cell culture system.

    PubMed

    Mallanna, Sunil Kumar; Rasool, T J; Sahay, Bikash; Aleyas, Abi George; Ram, Hira; Mondal, Bimalendu; Nautiyal, Binita; Premraj, Avinash; Sreekumar, E; Yadav, M P

    2006-02-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) mediated by double stranded small interfering RNA (siRNA) is a novel mechanism of post-transcriptional gene silencing. It is projected as a potential tool to inhibit viral replication. In the present paper, we demonstrate the suppression of replication of an avian herpes virus (Anatid Herpes Virus-1, AHV-1) by siRNA mediated gene silencing in avian cells. The UL-6 gene of AHV-1 that codes for a protein involved in viral packaging was targeted. Both cocktail and unique siRNAs were attempted to evaluate the inhibitory potential of AHV-1 replication in duck embryo fibroblast (DEF) cell line. DEF cells were chemically transfected with different siRNAs in separate experiments followed by viral infection. The observed reduction in virus replication was evaluated by cytopathic effect, viral titration and quantitative real time PCR (QRT-PCR). Among the three siRNA targets used the unique siRNA UL-B sequence was found to be more potent in antiviral activity than the cocktail and UL6-A-siRNA sequences.

  6. Development of a software tool and criteria evaluation for efficient design of small interfering RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhary, Aparna; Srivastava, Sonam; Garg, Sanjeev

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} The developed tool predicted siRNA constructs with better thermodynamic stability and total score based on positional and other criteria. {yields} Off-target silencing below score 30 were observed for the best siRNA constructs for different genes. {yields} Immunostimulation and cytotoxicity motifs considered and penalized in the developed tool. {yields} Both positional and compositional criteria were observed to be important. -- Abstract: RNA interference can be used as a tool for gene silencing mediated by small interfering RNAs (siRNA). The critical step in effective and specific RNAi processing is the selection of suitable constructs. Major design criteria, i.e., Reynolds's design rules, thermodynamic stability, internal repeats, immunostimulatory motifs were emphasized and implemented in the siRNA design tool. The tool provides thermodynamic stability score, GC content and a total score based on other design criteria in the output. The viability of the tool was established with different datasets. In general, the siRNA constructs produced by the tool had better thermodynamic score and positional properties. Comparable thermodynamic scores and better total scores were observed with the existing tools. Moreover, the results generated had comparable off-target silencing effect. Criteria evaluations with additional criteria were achieved in WEKA.

  7. In vitro inhibition of feline coronavirus replication by small interfering RNAs.

    PubMed

    McDonagh, Phillip; Sheehy, Paul A; Norris, Jacqueline M

    2011-06-01

    Infection with virulent biotypes of feline coronavirus (FCoV) can result in the development of feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), a typically fatal immune mediated disease for which there is currently no effective antiviral treatment. In this study we demonstrate the ability of small interfering RNA (siRNA) mediated RNA interference (RNAi) to inhibit the replication of virulent FCoV strain FIPV WSU 79-1146 in an immortalised feline cell line. A panel of eight synthetic siRNAs targeting four different regions of the FCoV genome were tested for antiviral effects. Efficacy was determined by qRT-PCR of intracellular viral genomic and messenger RNA, TCID50 infectivity assay of extracellular virus, and direct IFA for viral protein expression. All siRNAs demonstrated an inhibitory effect on viral replication in vitro. The two most effective siRNAs, targeting the untranslated 5' leader sequence (L2) and the nucleocapsid gene (N1), resulted in a >95% reduction in extracellular viral titre. Further characterisation of these two siRNAs demonstrated their efficacy when used at low concentrations and in cells challenged with high viral loads. Taken together these findings provide important information for the potential therapeutic application of RNAi in treating FIP.

  8. Inhibition of pathologic immunoglobulin free light chain production by small interfering RNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    Phipps, Jonathan E.; Kestler, Daniel P.; Foster, James S.; Kennel, Stephen J.; Donnell, Robert; Weiss, Deborah T.; Solomon, Alan; Wall, Jonathan S.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Morbidity and mortality occurring in patients with multiple myeloma, AL amyloidosis, and light chain deposition disease can result from the pathologic deposition of monoclonal Ig light chains (LCs) in kidneys and other organs. To reduce synthesis of such components, therapy for these disorders typically has involved anti-plasma cell agents; however, this approach is not always effective and can have adverse consequences. We have investigated another means to achieve this objective; namely, RNA interference (RNAi). Materials and Methods SP2/O mouse myeloma cells were stably transfected with a construct encoding a λ6 LC (Wil) under control of the CMV promoter, while λ2-producing myeloma cell line RPMI 8226 was purchased from the ATCC. Both were treated with small interfering RNA (siRNA) directed specifically to the V, J, or C portions of the molecules and then analyzed by ELISA, flow cytometry and real time PCR. Results Transfected cells were found to constitutively express detectable quantities of mRNA and protein Wil and, after exposure to siRNAs, an ~40% reduction in mRNA and LC production was evidenced at 48 hours. An even greater effect was seen with the 8226 cells. Conclusion Our results have shown that RNAi can markedly reduce LC synthesis and provide the basis for testing the therapeutic potential of this strategy using in vivo experimental models of multiple myeloma. PMID:20637260

  9. Delivery of Small Interfering RNA by Peptide-Targeted Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticle-Supported Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Ashley, Carlee E.; Carnes, Eric C.; Epler, Katharine E.; Padilla, David P.; Phillips, Genevieve K.; Castillo, Robert E.; Wilkinson, Dan C.; Wilkinson, Brian S.; Burgard, Cameron A.; Sewell, Robin M.; Townson, Jason L.; Chackerian, Bryce; Willman, Cheryl L.; Peabody, David S.; Wharton, Walker; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) is severely limited by the availability of delivery platforms that protect siRNA from degradation, deliver it to the target cell with high specificity and efficiency, and promote its endosomal escape and cytosolic dispersion. Here we report that mesoporous silica nanoparticle-supported lipid bilayers (or ‘protocells’), exhibit multiple properties that overcome many of the limitations of existing delivery platforms. Protocells have a 10- to 100-fold greater capacity for siRNA than corresponding lipid nanoparticles and are markedly more stable when incubated under physiological conditions. Protocells loaded with a cocktail of siRNAs bind to cells in a manner dependent on the presence of an appropriate targeting peptide and, through an endocytic pathway followed by endosomal disruption, promote delivery of the silencing nucleotides to the cytoplasm. The expression of each of the genes targeted by the siRNAs was shown to be repressed at the protein level, resulting in a potent induction of growth arrest and apoptosis. Incubation of control cells that lack expression of the antigen recognized by the targeting peptide with siRNA-loaded protocells induced neither repression of protein expression nor apoptosis, indicating the precise specificity of cytotoxic activity. In terms of loading capacity, targeting capabilities, and potency of action, protocells provide unique attributes as a delivery platform for therapeutic oligonucleotides. PMID:22309035

  10. Delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) using the sleeping beauty transposon.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Bradley S

    2010-11-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is an evolutionarily conserved process that silences gene expression through double-stranded RNA species in a sequence-specific manner. Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) can promote sequence-specific degradation and/or translational repression of target RNA by activation of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). Traditionally, silencing in mammalian cells had been achieved by transfection of synthetically derived siRNA duplexes, resulting in transient gene suppression of the target sequence. As the technology was advanced, inhibitory short-hairpin-shaped RNAs (shRNAs) could be produced by transcription from RNA polymerase-III (pol-III)-driven promoters, such as H1, U6, or cytomegalovirus (CMV)-enhanced pol III promoters. Following transcription, the shRNAs are processed by the enzyme Dicer into active siRNA. This approach allows for the continuous production of siRNA within cells using a DNA template and offers increased options for delivery of the pol-III-driven transcriptional units. A number of different viral vectors, as well as plasmid DNAs, have been utilized to deliver shRNA to mammalian cells. Here, the Tc1/mariner DNA transposon Sleeping Beauty (SB) is used as a tool to deliver shRNA-encoding transcriptional units. The SB transposon system uses a "cut-and-paste" mechanism to insert the transposon into random TA dinucleotides within the target genome. The shRNAs are then processed and used for gene knockdown. PMID:21041394

  11. Targeted Delivery of Small Interfering RNA Using Reconstituted High-Density Lipoprotein Nanoparticles12

    PubMed Central

    Shahzad, Mian MK; Mangala, Lingegowda S; Han, Hee Dong; Lu, Chunhua; Bottsford-Miller, Justin; Nishimura, Masato; Mora, Edna M; Lee, Jeong-Won; Stone, Rebecca L; Pecot, Chad V; Thanapprapasr, Duangmani; Roh, Ju-Won; Gaur, Puja; Nair, Maya P; Park, Yun-Yong; Sabnis, Nirupama; Deavers, Michael T; Lee, Ju-Seog; Ellis, Lee M; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; McConathy, Walter J; Prokai, Laszlo; Lacko, Andras G; Sood, Anil K

    2011-01-01

    RNA interference holds tremendous potential as a therapeutic approach, especially in the treatment of malignant tumors. However, efficient and biocompatible delivery methods are needed for systemic delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA). To maintain a high level of growth, tumor cells scavenge high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles by overexpressing its receptor: scavenger receptor type B1 (SR-B1). In this study, we exploited this cellular characteristic to achieve efficient siRNA delivery and established a novel formulation of siRNA by incorporating it into reconstituted HDL (rHDL) nanoparticles. Here, we demonstrate that rHDL nanoparticles facilitate highly efficient systemic delivery of siRNA in vivo, mediated by the SR-B1. Moreover, in therapeutic proof-of-concept studies, these nanoparticles were effective in silencing the expression of two proteins that are key to cancer growth and metastasis (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and focal adhesion kinase) in orthotopic mouse models of ovarian and colorectal cancer. These data indicate that an rHDL nanoparticle is a novel and highly efficient siRNA carrier, and therefore, this novel technology could serve as the foundation for new cancer therapeutic approaches. PMID:21472135

  12. Host Factors Modulating RSV Infection: Use of Small Interfering RNAs to Probe Functional Importance.

    PubMed

    Caly, Leon; Li, Hong-Mei; Jans, David

    2016-01-01

    Although respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in infants and the elderly worldwide [1], the protein-protein interactions between the host cell and virus remain poorly understood. We have used a focused small interfering RNA (siRNA) approach to knock-down and examine the role(s) of various host cell proteins. Here, we describe approaches for casein kinase 2α (CK2α) as a key example. We show how to study the effect of host gene (CK2α) knockdown using siRNA on cell-associated and released virus titers, using both quantitative RT-PCR, which measures the level of viral RNA, and plaque assay, which measures infectious virus directly. Both assays identified reduced viral titers with CK2α gene knock-down, indicating that it is likely required for efficient viral assembly and/or release. Effects were confirmed in RSV infected cells using the specific CK2α inhibitor 4,5,6,7-tetrabromobenzotriazole, revealing a similar reduction in viral titers as CK2α specific siRNA. This demonstrates that siRNA can be used to characterize critical host cell-RSV protein-protein interactions, and establishes CK2α as a future druggable target. PMID:27464690

  13. Mechanisms of immune system activation in mammalians by small interfering RNA (siRNA).

    PubMed

    Mansoori, Behzad; Mohammadi, Ali; Shir Jang, Solmaz; Baradaran, Behzad

    2016-11-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) guided by small interfering RNAs (siRNA), because of its potential to target and silence the expression of specific genes is utilized as an effective tool in a variety of biological applications. RNAi guided by siRNAs is a powerful tool to attain gene silencing in mammalian cells. One of the features which make siRNA as an amazing biological tool is extremely specific knockdown of target genes by degradation of analogous mRNAs. However, various non-specific effects limit the use of RNAi including the activation of innate immunity and inhibition of inadvertent target genes. One of the most common non-specific effects is inducing the innate immune system including cytoplasmic and endosomal activation of innate immune system, potentially offending the single in mammals. This activation is mainly interceded by immune cells, regularly through a Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway. The siRNA sequence association of these pathways changes with the sort and position of the TLR involved. In contrast, non-immune cell activation can also arise generally siRNAs which enter into cytoplasm interacting with cytoplasmic RNA sensors such as retinoic acid-inducible gene I. Here, we explain the off-target effects of siRNAs that activate innate immune system and methods to alleviate them, to help enable impressive application of this exciting technology, Also we bold the aspect of molecular strategies permitting the design of therapeutic siRNAs with minute off-target effects.

  14. Purification of small interfering RNA using nondenaturing anion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Noll, Bernhard; Seiffert, Stephan; Hertel, Frank; Debelak, Harald; Hadwiger, Philipp; Vornlocher, Hans-Peter; Roehl, Ingo

    2011-12-01

    A manufacturing and purification process for duplex oligonucleotides was established, which shortens and simplifies currently used procedures, yielding a product of higher purity. The reported procedure is based on nondenaturing anion-exchange (AEX) chromatography, which is performed on the annealed duplex rather than the individual single strands. The duplex is formed early in the process by annealing of the crude single strands directly after solid-phase synthesis. Two 30 μmol manufacturing runs using duplex purification were performed on 2 different AEX resins and compared with a manufacturing run of the same scale using conventional single-strand chromatography. The same pooling strategy was employed for all purifications. Content of optimal duplex (duplex exclusively comprising full-length single strands) was 90.5% and 90.2% for the batches obtained by duplex purification and 86.1% for the batch obtained by single-strand purification. Maximum chromatographic recoveries were 67% for the duplex purification and 68% for the single-strand purification. Hence, the manufacture of small interfering RNA (siRNA) using duplex purification was simpler and faster than conventional single-strand purification and provided better purity and similar yield of final siRNA.

  15. Production of functional small interfering RNAs by an amino-terminal deletion mutant of human Dicer

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Edward M.; Whisnant, Adam W.; Kornepati, Anand V. R.; Marshall, Joy B.; Bogerd, Hal P.; Cullen, Bryan R.

    2015-01-01

    Although RNA interference (RNAi) functions as a potent antiviral innate-immune response in plants and invertebrates, mammalian somatic cells appear incapable of mounting an RNAi response and few, if any, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) can be detected. To examine why siRNA production is inefficient, we have generated double-knockout human cells lacking both Dicer and protein kinase RNA-activated. Using these cells, which tolerate double-stranded RNA expression, we show that a mutant form of human Dicer lacking the amino-terminal helicase domain can process double-stranded RNAs to produce high levels of siRNAs that are readily detectable by Northern blot, are loaded into RNA-induced silencing complexes, and can effectively and specifically inhibit the expression of cognate mRNAs. Remarkably, overexpression of this mutant Dicer, but not wild-type Dicer, also resulted in a partial inhibition of Influenza A virus—but not poliovirus—replication in human cells. PMID:26621737

  16. Effective plasmid DNA and small interfering RNA delivery to diseased human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Slanina, H; Schmutzler, M; Christodoulides, M; Kim, K S; Schubert-Unkmeir, A

    2012-01-01

    Expression of exogenous DNA or small interfering RNA (siRNA) in vitro is significantly affected by the particular delivery system utilized. In this study, we evaluated the transfection efficiency of plasmid DNA and siRNA into human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) and meningioma cells, which constitute the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier, a target of meningitis-causing pathogens. Chemical transfection methods and various lipofection reagents including Lipofectamin™, FuGene™, or jetPRIME®, as well as physical transfection methods and electroporation techniques were applied. To monitor the transfection efficiencies, HBMEC and meningioma cells were transfected with the reporter plasmid pTagGFP2-actin vector, and efficiency of transfection was estimated by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. We established protocols based on electroporation using Cell Line Nucleofector® Kit V with the Amaxa® Nucleofector® II system from Lonza and the Neon® Transfection system from Invitrogen resulting in up to 41 and 82% green fluorescent protein-positive HBMEC, respectively. Optimal transfection solutions, pulse programs and length were evaluated. We furthermore demonstrated that lipofection is an efficient method to transfect meningioma cells with a transfection efficiency of about 81%. Finally, we applied the successful electroporation protocols to deliver synthetic siRNA to HBMEC and analyzed the role of the actin-binding protein cortactin in Neisseria meningitidis pathogenesis. PMID:23036990

  17. Small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) as a promising tool for ocular therapy

    PubMed Central

    Guzman-Aranguez, A; Loma, P; Pintor, J

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) can be used to inhibit the expression of specific genes in vitro and in vivo, thereby providing an extremely useful tool for investigating gene function. Progress in the understanding of RNAi-based mechanisms has opened up new perspectives in therapeutics for the treatment of several diseases including ocular disorders. The eye is currently considered a good target for RNAi therapy mainly because it is a confined compartment and, therefore, enables local delivery of small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) by topical instillation or direct injection. However, delivery strategies that protect the siRNAs from degradation and are suitable for long-term treatment would be help to improve the efficacy of RNAi-based therapies for ocular pathologies. siRNAs targeting critical molecules involved in the pathogenesis of glaucoma, retinitis pigmentosa and neovascular eye diseases (age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and corneal neovascularization) have been tested in experimental animal models, and clinical trials have been conducted with some of them. This review provides an update on the progress of RNAi in ocular therapeutics, discussing the advantages and drawbacks of RNAi-based therapeutics compared to previous treatments. PMID:23937539

  18. Production of functional small interfering RNAs by an amino-terminal deletion mutant of human Dicer.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Edward M; Whisnant, Adam W; Kornepati, Anand V R; Marshall, Joy B; Bogerd, Hal P; Cullen, Bryan R

    2015-12-15

    Although RNA interference (RNAi) functions as a potent antiviral innate-immune response in plants and invertebrates, mammalian somatic cells appear incapable of mounting an RNAi response and few, if any, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) can be detected. To examine why siRNA production is inefficient, we have generated double-knockout human cells lacking both Dicer and protein kinase RNA-activated. Using these cells, which tolerate double-stranded RNA expression, we show that a mutant form of human Dicer lacking the amino-terminal helicase domain can process double-stranded RNAs to produce high levels of siRNAs that are readily detectable by Northern blot, are loaded into RNA-induced silencing complexes, and can effectively and specifically inhibit the expression of cognate mRNAs. Remarkably, overexpression of this mutant Dicer, but not wild-type Dicer, also resulted in a partial inhibition of Influenza A virus-but not poliovirus-replication in human cells. PMID:26621737

  19. Efficient inhibition of the formation of joint adhesions by ERK2 small interfering RNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Fengfeng; Ruan, Hongjiang; Fan, Cunyi; Zeng, Bingfang; Wang, Chunyang; Wang, Xiang

    2010-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-{beta}1 and fibroblast growth factor-2 play very important roles in fibroblast proliferation and collagen expression. These processes lead to the formation of joint adhesions through the SMAD and MAPK pathways, in which extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)2 is considered to be crucial. Based on these theories, we examined the effects of a lentivirus-mediated small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting ERK2 on the suppression of joint adhesion formation in vivo. The effects were assessed in vivo from different aspects including the adhesion score, histology and joint contracture angle. We found that the adhesions in the ERK2 siRNA group became soft and weak, and were easily stretched. Accordingly, the flexion contracture angles in the ERK2 siRNA group were also reduced (P < 0.05 compared with the control group). The animals appeared healthy, with no signs of impaired wound healing. In conclusion, local delivery of a lentivirus-mediated siRNA targeting ERK2 can ameliorate joint adhesion formation effectively and safely.

  20. A Multi-RNAi Microsponge Platform for Simultaneous Controlled Delivery of Multiple Small Interfering RNAs.

    PubMed

    Roh, Young Hoon; Deng, Jason Z; Dreaden, Erik C; Park, Jae Hyon; Yun, Dong Soo; Shopsowitz, Kevin E; Hammond, Paula T

    2016-03-01

    Packaging multiple small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules into nanostructures at precisely defined ratios is a powerful delivery strategy for effective RNA interference (RNAi) therapy. We present a novel RNA nanotechnology based approach to produce multiple components of polymerized siRNA molecules that are simultaneously self-assembled and densely packaged into composite sponge-like porous microstructures (Multi-RNAi-MSs) by rolling circle transcription. The Multi-RNAi-MSs were designed to contain a combination of multiple polymeric siRNA molecules with precisely controlled stoichiometry within a singular microstructure by manipulating the types and ratios of the circular DNA templates. The Multi-RNAi-MSs were converted into nanosized complexes by polyelectrolyte condensation to manipulate their physicochemical properties (size, shape, and surface charge) for favorable delivery, while maintaining the multifunctional properties of the siRNAs for combined therapeutic effects. These Multi-RNAi-MS systems have great potential in RNAi-mediated biomedical applications, for example, for the treatment of cancer, genetic disorders, and viral infections. PMID:26695874

  1. Nanoparticle-based delivery of small interfering RNA: challenges for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Miele, Evelina; Spinelli, Gian Paolo; Miele, Ermanno; Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Ferretti, Elisabetta; Tomao, Silverio; Gulino, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    During recent decades there have been remarkable advances and profound changes in cancer therapy. Many therapeutic strategies learned at the bench, including monoclonal antibodies and small molecule inhibitors, have been used at the bedside, leading to important successes. One of the most important advances in biology has been the discovery that small interfering RNA (siRNA) is able to regulate the expression of genes, by a phenomenon known as RNA interference (RNAi). RNAi is one of the most rapidly growing fields of research in biology and therapeutics. Much research effort has gone into the application of this new discovery in the treatment of various diseases, including cancer. However, even though these molecules may have potential and strong utility, some limitations make their clinical application difficult, including delivery problems, side effects due to off-target actions, disturbance of physiological functions of the cellular machinery involved in gene silencing, and induction of the innate immune response. Many researchers have attempted to overcome these limitations and to improve the safety of potential RNAi-based therapeutics. Nanoparticles, which are nanostructured entities with tunable size, shape, and surface, as well as biological behavior, provide an ideal opportunity to modify current treatment regimens in a substantial way. These nanoparticles could be designed to surmount one or more of the barriers encountered by siRNA. Nanoparticle drug formulations afford the chance to improve drug bioavailability, exploiting superior tissue permeability, payload protection, and the “stealth” features of these entities. The main aims of this review are: to explain the siRNA mechanism with regard to potential applications in siRNA-based cancer therapy; to discuss the possible usefulness of nanoparticle-based delivery of certain molecules for overcoming present therapeutic limitations; to review the ongoing relevant clinical research with its pitfalls and

  2. Colored petri net modeling of small interfering RNA-mediated messenger RNA degradation

    PubMed Central

    Nickaeen, Niloofar; Moein, Shiva; Heidary, Zarifeh; Ghaisari, Jafar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mathematical modeling of biological systems is an attractive way for studying complex biological systems and their behaviors. Petri Nets, due to their ability to model systems with various levels of qualitative information, have been wildly used in modeling biological systems in which enough qualitative data may not be at disposal. These nets have been used to answer questions regarding the dynamics of different cell behaviors including the translation process. In one stage of the translation process, the RNA sequence may be degraded. In the process of degradation of RNA sequence, small-noncoding RNA molecules known as small interfering RNA (siRNA) match the target RNA sequence. As a result of this matching, the target RNA sequence is destroyed. Materials and Methods: In this context, the process of matching and destruction is modeled using Colored Petri Nets (CPNs). The model is constructed using CPNs which allow tokens to have a value or type on them. Thus, CPN is a suitable tool to model string structures in which each element of the string has a different type. Using CPNs, long RNA, and siRNA strings are modeled with a finite set of colors. The model is simulated via CPN Tools. Results: A CPN model of the matching between RNA and siRNA strings is constructed in CPN Tools environment. Conclusion: In previous studies, a network of stoichiometric equations was modeled. However, in this particular study, we modeled the mechanism behind the silencing process. Modeling this kind of mechanisms provides us with a tool to examine the effects of different factors such as mutation or drugs on the process. PMID:27376039

  3. In silico reconstruction of viral genomes from small RNAs improves virus-derived small interfering RNA profiling.

    PubMed

    Vodovar, Nicolas; Goic, Bertsy; Blanc, Hervé; Saleh, Maria-Carla

    2011-11-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is the essential component of antiviral immunity in invertebrates and plants. One of the landmarks of the antiviral RNAi response is the production of virus-derived small interfering RNA (vsiRNA) from viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). vsiRNAs constitute a fragmented image of the viral genome sequence that results from Dicer cleavage. vsiRNA sequence profiling is used extensively as a surrogate to study the antiviral RNAi response by determining the nature of the viral dsRNA molecules exposed to and processed by the RNAi machinery. The accuracy of these profiles depends on the actual viral genome sequence used as a reference to align vsiRNA reads, and the interpretation of inaccurate profiles can be misleading. Using Flock house virus and Drosophila melanogaster as a model RNAi-competent organism, we show accurate reconstruction of full-length virus reference sequence from vsiRNAs and prediction of the structure of defective interfering particles (DIs). We developed a Perl script, named Paparazzi, that reconstitutes viral genomes through an iterative alignment/consensus call procedure using a related reference sequence as scaffold. As prevalent DI-derived reads introduce artifacts during reconstruction, Paparazzi eliminates DI-specific reads to improve the quality of the reconstructed genome. Paparazzi constitutes a promising alternative to Sanger sequencing in this context and an effective tool to study antiviral RNAi mechanisms by accurately quantifying vsiRNA along the replicating viral genome. We further discuss Paparazzi as a companion tool for virus discovery as it provides full-length genome sequences and corrects for potential artifacts of assembly. PMID:21880776

  4. In Silico Reconstruction of Viral Genomes from Small RNAs Improves Virus-Derived Small Interfering RNA Profiling ▿ † ‡

    PubMed Central

    Vodovar, Nicolas; Goic, Bertsy; Blanc, Hervé; Saleh, Maria-Carla

    2011-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is the essential component of antiviral immunity in invertebrates and plants. One of the landmarks of the antiviral RNAi response is the production of virus-derived small interfering RNA (vsiRNA) from viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). vsiRNAs constitute a fragmented image of the viral genome sequence that results from Dicer cleavage. vsiRNA sequence profiling is used extensively as a surrogate to study the antiviral RNAi response by determining the nature of the viral dsRNA molecules exposed to and processed by the RNAi machinery. The accuracy of these profiles depends on the actual viral genome sequence used as a reference to align vsiRNA reads, and the interpretation of inaccurate profiles can be misleading. Using Flock house virus and Drosophila melanogaster as a model RNAi-competent organism, we show accurate reconstruction of full-length virus reference sequence from vsiRNAs and prediction of the structure of defective interfering particles (DIs). We developed a Perl script, named Paparazzi, that reconstitutes viral genomes through an iterative alignment/consensus call procedure using a related reference sequence as scaffold. As prevalent DI-derived reads introduce artifacts during reconstruction, Paparazzi eliminates DI-specific reads to improve the quality of the reconstructed genome. Paparazzi constitutes a promising alternative to Sanger sequencing in this context and an effective tool to study antiviral RNAi mechanisms by accurately quantifying vsiRNA along the replicating viral genome. We further discuss Paparazzi as a companion tool for virus discovery as it provides full-length genome sequences and corrects for potential artifacts of assembly. PMID:21880776

  5. Delivery of small interfering RNA for inhibition of endothelial cell apoptosis by hypoxia and serum deprivation

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Seung-Woo; Hartle, Lauren; Son, Sun Mi; Yang, Fan; Goldberg, Michael; Xu, Qiaobing; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G.

    2008-11-07

    RNA interference (RNAi) for anti-angiogenic or pro-apoptotic factors in endothelial cells (ECs) has great potential for the treatment of ischemic diseases by promoting angiogenesis or inhibiting apoptosis. Here, we report the utility of small interfering RNA (siRNA) in inhibiting EC apoptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}). siRNA was designed and synthesized targeting tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} receptor-1 (TNFR-1) and Src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-1 (SHP-1). Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cultured under in vitro hypoxic and serum-deprived conditions to simulate in vivo ischemic conditions. Two days after liposomal delivery of siRNA targeting TNFR-1 and SHP-1, significant silencing of each target (TNFR-1; 76.5% and SHP-1; 97.2%) was detected. Under serum-deprived hypoxic (1% oxygen) conditions, TNF-{alpha} expression in HUVECs increased relative to normoxic (20% oxygen) and serum-containing conditions. Despite enhanced TNF-{alpha} expression, suppression of TNFR-1 or SHP-1 by siRNA delivery not only enhanced expression of angiogenic factors (KDR/Flk-1 and eNOS) and anti-apoptotic factor (Bcl-xL) but also reduced expression of a pro-apoptotic factor (Bax). Transfection of TNFR-1 or SHP-1 siRNA significantly decreased the HUVEC apoptosis while significantly enhancing HUVEC proliferation and capillary formation. The present study demonstrates that TNFR-1 and SHP-1 may be useful targets for the treatment of myocardial or hindlimb ischemia.

  6. Acoustic cavitation-mediated delivery of small interfering ribonucleic acids with phase-shift nanoemulsions

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Mark T.; Porter, Tyrone M.

    2015-01-01

    Localized, targeted delivery of small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) has been the foremost hurdle in the use of siRNA for the treatment of various diseases. Major advances have been achieved in the synthesis of siRNA, which has led to greater target messenger RNA (mRNA) silencing and stability in physiological conditions. Although numerous delivery strategies have shown promise, there are still limited options for targeted delivery and release of siRNA administered systemically. In this in vitro study, phase-shift nanoemulsions (PSNE) were explored as cavitation nuclei to facilitate free siRNA delivery to cancer cells via sonoporation. A cell suspension containing varying amounts of PSNE and siRNA was exposed to 5 MHz pulsed ultrasound at fixed settings (6.2 MPa peak negative pressure, 5 cycle pulses, 250 Hz pulse repetition frequency, and total exposure duration of 100 seconds). Inertial cavitation emissions were detected throughout the exposure using a passive cavitation detector. Successful siRNA delivery was achieved (i.e. > 50% cell uptake) with high viability (> 80% viability). The percentage of cells with siRNA uptake was correlated with the amount of inertial cavitation activity generated from vaporized PSNE. The siRNA remained functional after delivery, significantly reducing expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in a stably transfected cell line. These results show that vaporized PSNE can facilitate siRNA entry into the cytosol of a majority of sonicated cells and may provide a non-endosomal route for siRNA delivery. PMID:25979417

  7. Gene silencing in tick cell lines using small interfering or long double-stranded RNA.

    PubMed

    Barry, Gerald; Alberdi, Pilar; Schnettler, Esther; Weisheit, Sabine; Kohl, Alain; Fazakerley, John K; Bell-Sakyi, Lesley

    2013-03-01

    Gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) is an important research tool in many areas of biology. To effectively harness the power of this technique in order to explore tick functional genomics and tick-microorganism interactions, optimised parameters for RNAi-mediated gene silencing in tick cells need to be established. Ten cell lines from four economically important ixodid tick genera (Amblyomma, Hyalomma, Ixodes and Rhipicephalus including the sub-species Boophilus) were used to examine key parameters including small interfering RNA (siRNA), double stranded RNA (dsRNA), transfection reagent and incubation time for silencing virus reporter and endogenous tick genes. Transfection reagents were essential for the uptake of siRNA whereas long dsRNA alone was taken up by most tick cell lines. Significant virus reporter protein knockdown was achieved using either siRNA or dsRNA in all the cell lines tested. Optimum conditions varied according to the cell line. Consistency between replicates and duration of incubation with dsRNA were addressed for two Ixodes scapularis cell lines; IDE8 supported more consistent and effective silencing of the endogenous gene subolesin than ISE6, and highly significant knockdown of the endogenous gene 2I1F6 in IDE8 cells was achieved within 48 h incubation with dsRNA. In summary, this study shows that gene silencing by RNAi in tick cell lines is generally more efficient with dsRNA than with siRNA but results vary between cell lines and optimal parameters need to be determined for each experimental system.

  8. Target delivery of small interfering RNAs with vitamin E-coupled nanoparticles for treating hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Duan, Liang; Yan, Yan; Liu, Jingyi; Wang, Bo; Li, Pu; Hu, Qin; Chen, Weixian

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) represents a promising strategy for the treatment of HCV infection. However, the development of an effective system for in vivo delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to target organ remains a formidable challenge. Here, we develop a unique nanoparticle platform (VE-DC) composed of α-tocopherol (vitamin E) and cholesterol-based cationic liposomes (DOTAP-Chol) for systemic delivery of siRNAs to the liver. A HCV-replicable cell line, Huh7.5.1-HCV, and a transient HCV core expressing cell line, Huh7.5.1-Core, were constructed and used to assess the in vitro anti-HCV activity of VE-DC/siRNAs. A transient in vivo HCV model was also constructed by hydrodynamic injection of pCDNA3.1(+)-3FLAG-Core (pCore-3FLAG) plasmid expressing core protein or pGL3-5'UTR-luciferase (pGL3-5'UTR-luc) plasmid expressing luciferase driven by HCV 5'UTR. Nanoscale VE-DC/siRNA was intravenously injected to assess the liver-targeting property as well as antiviral activity. The nanoscale VE-DC effectively exerted an anti-HCV activity in the in vitro cell models. Post-administration of VE-DC/siRNAs also effectively delivered siRNAs to the liver, suppressing core protein production and firefly luciferase activity, without inducing an innate immunity response or off-target and toxicity effects. The VE-DC platform has high potential as a vehicle for delivery of siRNAs to the liver for gene therapy for targeting hepatitis C. PMID:27113197

  9. Rapid delivery of small interfering RNA by biosurfactant MEL-A-containing liposomes.

    PubMed

    Inoh, Yoshikazu; Furuno, Tadahide; Hirashima, Naohide; Kitamoto, Dai; Nakanishi, Mamoru

    2011-10-28

    The downregulation of gene expression by RNA interference holds great potential for genetic analysis and gene therapy. However, a more efficient delivery system for small interfering RNA (siRNA) into the target cells is required for wide fields such as cell biology, physiology, and clinical application. Non-viral vectors are stronger candidates than viral vectors because they are safer and easier to prepare. We have previously used a new method for gene transfection by combining cationic liposomes with the biosurfactant mannosylerythritol lipid-A (MEL-A). The novel MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes rapidly delivered DNA (plasmids and oligonucleotides) into the cytosol and nucleus through membrane fusion between liposomes and the plasma membrane, and consequently, enhanced the gene transfection efficiency. In this study, we determined the efficiency of MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes for siRNA delivery. We observed that exogenous and endogenous protein expression was suppressed by approximately 60% at 24h after brief (30 min) incubation of target cells with MEL-A-containing cationic liposome/siRNA complexes. Confocal microscopic analysis showed that suppression of protein expression was caused by rapid siRNA delivery into the cytosol. We found that the MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes directly delivered siRNA into the cytoplasm by the membrane fusion in addition to endocytotic pathway whereas Lipofectamine RNAiMax delivered siRNA only by the endocytotic pathway. It seems that the ability to rapidly and directly deliver siRNA into the cytosol using MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes is able to reduce immune responses, cytotoxicity, and other side effects caused by viral vectors in clinical applications. PMID:22001930

  10. CCR5 small interfering RNA ameliorated joint inflammation in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Duan, Hongmei; Yang, Pingting; Fang, Fang; Ding, Shuang; Xiao, Weiguo

    2014-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disease. C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) is found in inflamed synovium of RA patients and is necessary for formation of RA. We aimed to check whether delivery of CCR5-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) via electroporation suppresses local inflammation in arthritis rats. Vectors encoding siRNA that target CCR5 or negative control siRNA were constructed for gene silencing and the silencing effects of suppressing CCR5 expression in synovium examined by western blot. The vector with strongest effect was delivered into the knee joint of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rats by the in vivo electroporation method 7, 10, 13, and 16 days after immunization with Complete Freund's adjuvant. During an observation of 28 days, behavior, paw swelling, arthritis and histopathologic scoring were estimated. The expression level of CCR5 in synovium was evaluated by western blot and real-time PCR. Anti-CCR5 D1 siRNA was effectively inhibited CCR5 expression in vitro. Moreover, delivery of the siRNA into inflammatory joint also suppressed the expression of CCR5 in vivo and markedly suppressed paw swelling and inflammation. Local electroporation of anti-CCR5 siRNA into the left inflamed joints could achieve the silencing of CCR5 gene and alleviate local inflammation just in the knee joint injected with siRNA other than the opposite joint. Inhibition of CCR5 expression may provide a potential for treatment of RA.

  11. Infrared multiphoton dissociation of small-interfering RNA anions and cations.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Myles W; Li, Na; Ellington, Andrew D; Brodbelt, Jennifer S

    2010-04-01

    Infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) on a linear ion trap mass spectrometer is applied for the sequencing of small interfering RNA (siRNA). Both single-strand siRNAs and duplex siRNA were characterized by IRMPD, and the results were compared with that obtained by traditional ion trap-based collision induced dissociation (CID). The single-strand siRNA anions were observed to dissociate via cleavage of the 5' P-O bonds yielding c- and y-type product ions as well as undergo neutral base loss. Full sequence coverage of the siRNA anions was obtained by both IRMPD and CID. While the CID mass spectra were dominated by base loss ions, accounting for approximately 25% to 40% of the product ion current, these ions were eliminated through secondary dissociation by increasing the irradiation time in the IRMPD mass spectra to produce higher abundances of informative sequence ions. With longer irradiation times, however, internal ions corresponding to cleavage of two 5' P-O bonds began to populate the product ion mass spectra as well as higher abundances of [a - Base] and w-type ions. IRMPD of siRNA cations predominantly produced c- and y-type ions with minimal contributions of [a - Base] and w-type ions to the product ion current; the presence of only two complementary series of product ions in the IRMPD mass spectra simplified spectral interpretation. In addition, IRMPD produced high abundances of protonated nucleobases, [G + H](+), [A + H](+), and [C + H](+), which were not detected in the CID mass spectra due to the low-mass cut-off associated with conventional CID in ion traps. CID and IRMPD using short irradiation times of duplex siRNA resulted in strand separation, similar to the dissociation trends observed for duplex DNA. With longer irradiation times, however, the individual single-strands underwent secondary dissociation to yield informative sequence ions not obtained by CID.

  12. Optimized in vivo transfer of small interfering RNA targeting dermal tissue using in vivo surface electroporation.

    PubMed

    Broderick, Kate E; Chan, Amy; Lin, Feng; Shen, Xuefei; Kichaev, Gleb; Khan, Amir S; Aubin, Justin; Zimmermann, Tracy S; Sardesai, Niranjan Y

    2012-01-01

    Electroporation (EP) of mammalian tissue is a technique that has been used successfully in the clinic for the delivery of genetic-based vaccines in the form of DNA plasmids. There is great interest in platforms which efficiently deliver RNA molecules such as messenger RNA and small interfering RNA (siRNA) to mammalian tissue. However, the in vivo delivery of RNA enhanced by EP has not been extensively characterized. This paper details the optimization of electrical parameters for a novel low-voltage EP method to deliver oligonucleotides (both DNA and RNA) to dermal tissue in vivo. Initially, the electrical parameters were optimized for dermal delivery of plasmid DNA encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) using this novel surface dermal EP device. While all investigated parameters resulted in visible transfection, voltage parameters in the 10 V range elicited the most robust signal. The parameters optimized for DNA, were then assessed for translation of successful electrotransfer of siRNA into dermal tissue. Robust tagged-siRNA transfection in skin was detected. We then assessed whether these parameters translated to successful transfer of siRNA resulting in gene knockdown in vivo. Using a reporter gene construct encoding GFP and tagged siRNA targeting the GFP message, we show simultaneous transfection of the siRNA to the skin via EP and the concomitant knockdown of the reporter gene signal. The siRNA delivery was accomplished with no evidence of injection site inflammation or local tissue damage. The minimally invasive low-voltage EP method is thus capable of efficiently delivering both DNA and RNA molecules to dermal tissue in a tolerable manner. PMID:23344722

  13. Identification of Druggable Targets for Radiation Mitigation Using a Small Interfering RNA Screening Assay

    PubMed Central

    Zellefrow, Crystal D.; Sharlow, Elizabeth R.; Epperly, Michael W.; Reese, Celeste E.; Shun, Tongying; Lira, Ana; Greenberger, Joel S.; Lazo, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Currently, there is a serious absence of pharmaceutically attractive small molecules that mitigate the lethal effects of an accidental or intentional public exposure to toxic doses of ionizing radiation. Moreover, cellular systems that emulate the radiobiologically relevant cell populations and that are suitable for high-throughput screening have not been established. Therefore, we examined two human pluripotent embryonal carcinoma cell lines for use in an unbiased phenotypic small interfering RNA (siRNA) assay to identify proteins with the potential of being drug targets for the protection of human cell populations against clinically relevant ionizing radiation doses that cause acute radiation syndrome. Of the two human cell lines tested, NCCIT cells had optimal growth characteristics in a 384 well format, exhibited radiation sensitivity (D0 = 1.3 ± 0.1 Gy and ñ = 2.0 ± 0.6) comparable to the radiosensitivity of stem cell populations associated with human death within 30 days after total-body irradiation. Moreover, they internalized siRNA after 4 Gy irradiation enabling siRNA library screening. Therefore, we used the human NCCIT cell line for the radiation mitigation study with a siRNA library that silenced 5,520 genes known or hypothesized to be potential therapeutic targets. Exploiting computational methodologies, we identified 113 siRNAs with potential radiomitigative properties, which were further refined to 29 siRNAs with phosphoinositide-3-kinase regulatory subunit 1 (p85α) being among the highest confidence candidate gene products. Colony formation assays revealed radiation mitigation when the phosphoinositide-3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 was given after irradiation of 32D cl 3 cells (D0 = 1.3 ± 0.1 Gy and ñ = 2.3 ± 0.3 for the vehicle control treated cells compared to D0 = 1.2 ± 0.1 Gy and ñ = 6.0 ± 0.8 for the LY294002 treated cells, P = 0.0004). LY294002 and two other PI3K inhibitors, PI 828 and GSK 1059615, also mitigated radiation

  14. Delivery of small interfering RNAs in human cervical cancer cells by polyethylenimine-functionalized carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yuan-Pin; Lin, I.-Jou; Chen, Chih-Chen; Hsu, Yi-Chiang; Chang, Chi-Chang; Lee, Mon-Juan

    2013-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes are capable of penetrating the cell membrane and are widely considered as potential carriers for gene or drug delivery. Because the C-C and C=C bonds in carbon nanotubes are nonpolar, functionalization is required for carbon nanotubes to interact with genes or drugs as well as to improve their biocompatibility. In this study, polyethylenimine (PEI)-functionalized single-wall (PEI-NH-SWNTs) and multiwall carbon nanotubes (PEI-NH-MWNTs) were produced by direct amination method. PEI functionalization increased the positive charge on the surface of SWNTs and MWNTs, allowing carbon nanotubes to interact electrostatically with the negatively charged small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and to serve as nonviral gene delivery reagents. PEI-NH-MWNTs and PEI-NH-SWNTs had a better solubility in water than pristine carbon nanotubes, and further removal of large aggregates by centrifugation produced a stable suspension of reduced particle size and improved homogeneity and dispersity. The amount of grafted PEI estimated by thermogravimetric analysis was 5.08% ( w/ w) and 5.28% ( w/ w) for PEI-NH-SWNTs and PEI-NH-MWNTs, respectively. For the assessment of cytotoxicity, various concentrations of PEI-NH-SWNTs and PEI-NH-MWNTs were incubated with human cervical cancer cells, HeLa-S3, for 48 h. PEI-NH-SWNTs and PEI-NH-MWNTs induced cell deaths in a dose-dependent manner but were less cytotoxic compared to pure PEI. As determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay, siRNAs directed against glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (siGAPDH) were completely associated with PEI-NH-SWNTs or PEI-NH-MWNTs at a PEI-NH-SWNT/siGAPDH or PEI-NH-MWNT/siGAPDH mass ratio of 80:1 or 160:1, respectively. Furthermore, PEI-NH-SWNTs and PEI-NH-MWNTs successfully delivered siGAPDH into HeLa-S3 cells at PEI-NH-SWNT/siGAPDH and PEI-NH-MWNT/siGAPDH mass ratios of 1:1 to 20:1, resulting in suppression of the mRNA level of GAPDH to an extent similar to that of DharmaFECT, a common transfection

  15. Nanoparticles for targeted delivery of therapeutics and small interfering RNAs in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Varshosaz, Jaleh; Farzan, Maryam

    2015-11-14

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the 5(th) most common malignancy which is responsible for more than half million annual mortalities; also, it is the third leading cause of cancer related death. Unfavorable systemic side-effects of chemotherapeutic agents and susceptibility to the degradation of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), which can knock down a specific gene involved in the disease, have hampered their clinical application. So, it could be beneficial to develop an efficient carrier for the stabilization and specific delivery of drugs and siRNA to cells. Targeted nanoparticles have gained considerable attention as an efficient drug and gene delivery system, which is due to their capability in achieving the highest accumulation of cytotoxic agents in tumor tissue, modifiable drug pharmacokinetic- and bio-distribution, improved effectiveness of treatment, and limited side-effects. Recent studies have shed more light on the advantages of novel drug loaded carrier systems vs free drugs. Most of the animal studies have reported improvement in treatment efficacy and survival rate using novel carrier systems. Targeted delivery may be achieved passively or actively. In passive targeting, no ligand as homing device is used, while targeting is achieved by incorporating the therapeutic agent into a macromolecule or nanoparticle that passively reaches the target organ. However, in active targeting, the therapeutic agent or carrier system is conjugated to a tissue or cell-specific receptor which is over-expressed in a special malignancy using a ligand called a homing device. This review covers a broad spectrum of targeted nanoparticles as therapeutic and non-viral siRNA delivery systems, which are developed for enhanced cellular uptake and targeted gene silencing in vitro and in vivo and their characteristics and opportunities for the clinical applications of drugs and therapeutic siRNA are discussed in this article. Asialoglycoprotein receptors, low-density lipoprotein

  16. A comparison of two cellular delivery mechanisms for small interfering RNA.

    PubMed

    Valiunas, Virginijus; Wang, Hong-Zhang; Li, Ling; Gordon, Chris; Valiuniene, Laima; Cohen, Ira S; Brink, Peter R

    2015-02-01

    Cellular delivery of small interfering RNAs to target cells of a tissue has the potential to travel by two intercellular pathways. For intimately apposed cells gap junctions allow transport exclusive of the extracellular space. For cells not in intimate contact, exocytotic release of vesicular contents and subsequent retrieval via endocytosis of exosomes and other vesicular contents represent an alternative intercellular delivery system that utilizes the extracellular space. Previous studies have shown siRNA/miRNA transfer from a delivery cell to a target cell via gap junction channels. We hypothesized that siRNA can be delivered via gap junctions and downregulate the expression of a reporter gene, the cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel gene (mHCN2), in the recipient cells of cell pairs. Whole-cell patch clamp was used to measure the mHCN2-induced current and junctional conductance. The target cells were HEK293 cells that endogenously express Cx43 or HeLaCx43 cells, both transfected with mHCN2. The source cells were HEK293 or HeLaCx43 cells transfected with fluorescent-labeled siRNA targeting mHCN2. We found that siRNA targeting mHCN2 resulted in significant downregulation of mHCN2 currents both in single cells and the recipient cell of a cell pair. In addition we also documented downregulation in target cells that were not in contact with source cells suggesting an extracellular-mediated delivery. To test further for extracellular delivery HEK293/HCN2 or HeLaCx43/HCN2 cells were cultured in medium collected from HEK293 or HeLaCx43 cells transfected with fluorescent-labeled siRNA or fluorescent-labeled morpholino designed to target HCN2. After 24 h single HEK293/HCN2 or HeLaCx43cells showed accumulation of siRNA. The mHCN2 currents were also down regulated in cells with siRNA uptake. Application of 200 nmol/L Bafilomycin A1, which has been shown to affect endosome acidification and endocytotic activity, resulted in a smaller accumulation of fluorescent

  17. Rapid delivery of small interfering RNA by biosurfactant MEL-A-containing liposomes

    SciTech Connect

    Inoh, Yoshikazu; Furuno, Tadahide; Hirashima, Naohide; Kitamoto, Dai; Nakanishi, Mamoru

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We use MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes for siRNA delivery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes can efficiently and rapidly deliver siRNA into the cytoplasm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rapid delivery of siRNA is due to the membrane fusion between liposomes and plasma membrane. -- Abstract: The downregulation of gene expression by RNA interference holds great potential for genetic analysis and gene therapy. However, a more efficient delivery system for small interfering RNA (siRNA) into the target cells is required for wide fields such as cell biology, physiology, and clinical application. Non-viral vectors are stronger candidates than viral vectors because they are safer and easier to prepare. We have previously used a new method for gene transfection by combining cationic liposomes with the biosurfactant mannosylerythritol lipid-A (MEL-A). The novel MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes rapidly delivered DNA (plasmids and oligonucleotides) into the cytosol and nucleus through membrane fusion between liposomes and the plasma membrane, and consequently, enhanced the gene transfection efficiency. In this study, we determined the efficiency of MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes for siRNA delivery. We observed that exogenous and endogenous protein expression was suppressed by approximately 60% at 24 h after brief (30 min) incubation of target cells with MEL-A-containing cationic liposome/siRNA complexes. Confocal microscopic analysis showed that suppression of protein expression was caused by rapid siRNA delivery into the cytosol. We found that the MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes directly delivered siRNA into the cytoplasm by the membrane fusion in addition to endocytotic pathway whereas Lipofectamine Trade-Mark-Sign RNAiMax delivered siRNA only by the endocytotic pathway. It seems that the ability to rapidly and directly deliver siRNA into the cytosol using MEL-A-containing cationic

  18. Nanoparticles for targeted delivery of therapeutics and small interfering RNAs in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Varshosaz, Jaleh; Farzan, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the 5th most common malignancy which is responsible for more than half million annual mortalities; also, it is the third leading cause of cancer related death. Unfavorable systemic side-effects of chemotherapeutic agents and susceptibility to the degradation of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), which can knock down a specific gene involved in the disease, have hampered their clinical application. So, it could be beneficial to develop an efficient carrier for the stabilization and specific delivery of drugs and siRNA to cells. Targeted nanoparticles have gained considerable attention as an efficient drug and gene delivery system, which is due to their capability in achieving the highest accumulation of cytotoxic agents in tumor tissue, modifiable drug pharmacokinetic- and bio-distribution, improved effectiveness of treatment, and limited side-effects. Recent studies have shed more light on the advantages of novel drug loaded carrier systems vs free drugs. Most of the animal studies have reported improvement in treatment efficacy and survival rate using novel carrier systems. Targeted delivery may be achieved passively or actively. In passive targeting, no ligand as homing device is used, while targeting is achieved by incorporating the therapeutic agent into a macromolecule or nanoparticle that passively reaches the target organ. However, in active targeting, the therapeutic agent or carrier system is conjugated to a tissue or cell-specific receptor which is over-expressed in a special malignancy using a ligand called a homing device. This review covers a broad spectrum of targeted nanoparticles as therapeutic and non-viral siRNA delivery systems, which are developed for enhanced cellular uptake and targeted gene silencing in vitro and in vivo and their characteristics and opportunities for the clinical applications of drugs and therapeutic siRNA are discussed in this article. Asialoglycoprotein receptors, low-density lipoprotein

  19. [Small interfering RNA delivery mediated by mPEG-PCL-g-PEI polymer nanoparticles].

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Lü, Ming; Gao, Zhong-Gao; Jin, Ming-Ji; Yang, Chang-Qing

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to report the synthesis of the mPEG-PCL-g-PEI copolymers as small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery vector, and exploration of the siRNA delivery potential of mPEG-PCL-g-PEI in vitro. The diblock copolymers mPEG-PCL-OH was prepared through the ring-opening polymerization. Then, the hydroxyl terminal (-OH) of mPEG-PCL-OH was chemically converted into the carboxy (-COOH) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) in turn to prepare mPEG-PCL-NHS. The branched PEI was reacted with mPEG-PCL-NHS to synthesize the ternary copolymers mPEG-PCL-g-PEI. The structure of mPEG-PCL-g-PEI copolymers was characterized with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The mPEG-PCL-g-PEI/siRNA nanoparticles were prepared by complex coacervation, and the nanoparticles size and zeta potential were determined, separately. The cytotoxicities of mPEG-PCL-g-PEI/siRNA nanoparticles and PEI/siRNA nanoparticles were compared through cells MTT assays in vitro. The inhibition efficiencies of firefly luciferase gene expression by mPEG-PCL-g-PEI/ siRNA nanoparticle at various N/P ratios were investigated through cell transfection in vitro. The experimental results suggested that the ternary (mPEG5k-PCL(1.2k))1.4-g-PEI(10k) copolymers were successfully synthesized. (mPEG(5k)-PCL(1.2k))1.4-g-PEI(10k) could condense siRNA into nanoparticles (50-200 nm) with positive zeta potential. MTT assay results showed that the cytotoxicity of (mPEG(5k)-PCL(1.2k))1.4-g-PEI(10k)/siRNA nanoparticles was significantly lower than that of PEI(10k)/siRNA nanoparticles (P < 0.05). The expression of firefly luciferase gene could be significantly down-regulated at a range of N/P ratio from 50 to 150 (P < 0.01), and maximally inhibited at the N/P ratio of 125. The mPEG-PCL-g-PEI polymers could delivery siRNA into cells to inhibit the expression of target gene with very low cytotoxicity, which suggested that mPEG-PCL-g-PEI could serve

  20. The exosome and trans-acting small interfering RNAs regulate cuticular wax biosynthesis during Arabidopsis inflorescence stem development.

    PubMed

    Lam, Patricia; Zhao, Lifang; Eveleigh, Nathan; Yu, Yu; Chen, Xuemei; Kunst, Ljerka

    2015-02-01

    The primary aerial surfaces of land plants are covered with a cuticle, a protective layer composed of the cutin polyester matrix and cuticular waxes. Previously, we discovered a unique mechanism of regulating cuticular wax biosynthesis during Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) stem elongation that involves ECERIFERUM7 (CER7), a core subunit of the exosome. Because loss-of-function mutations in CER7 result in reduced expression of the wax biosynthetic gene CER3, we proposed that CER7 is involved in degrading a messenger RNA encoding a CER3 repressor. To identify this putative repressor, we performed a cer7 suppressor screen that resulted in the isolation of the posttranscriptional gene-silencing components RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE1 and SUPPRESSOR OF GENE SILENCING3, indicating that small RNAs regulate CER3 expression. To establish the identity of the effector RNA species and determine whether these RNAs control CER3 transcript levels directly, we cloned additional genes identified in our suppressor screen and performed next-generation sequencing of small RNA populations that differentially accumulate in the cer7 mutant in comparison with the wild type. Our results demonstrate that the trans-acting small interfering RNA class of small RNAs are the effector molecules involved in direct silencing of CER3 and that the expression of five additional genes (EARLY RESPONSE TO DEHYDRATION14, AUXIN RESISTANT1, a translation initiation factor SUI1 family protein, and two genes of unknown function) is controlled by both CER7 and trans-acting small interfering RNAs.

  1. Small interfering RNA silencing of interleukin-6 in mesenchymal stromal cells inhibits multiple myeloma cell growth.

    PubMed

    Teoh, Hoon Koon; Chong, Pei Pei; Abdullah, Maha; Sekawi, Zamberi; Tan, Geok Chin; Leong, Chooi Fun; Cheong, Soon Keng

    2016-01-01

    Studies demonstrated that mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) from bone marrow stroma produced high concentration of interleukin-6 (IL-6) that promoted multiple myeloma cell growth. In view of the failure of IL-6 monoclonal antibody therapy to demonstrate substantial clinical responses in early clinical trials, more effective methods are needed in order to disrupt the favourable microenvironment provided by the bone marrow stroma. In this study, we evaluated the short interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated silencing of IL-6 in MSC and the efficacy of these genetically modified MSC, with IL-6 suppression, on inhibition of U266 multiple myeloma cell growth. IL-6 mRNA and protein were significantly suppressed by 72h post IL-6 siRNA transfection without affecting the biological properties of MSC. Here we show significant inhibition of cell growth and IL-6 production in U266 cells co-cultured with MSC transfected with IL-6 siRNA when compared to U266 cells co-cultured with control MSC. We also show that the tumour volume and mitotic index of tumours in nude mice co-injected with U266 and MSC transfected with IL-6 siRNA were significantly reduced compared to tumours of mice co-injected with control MSC. Our results suggest potential use of RNA interference mediated therapy for multiple myeloma.

  2. Inhibition of West Nile Virus Replication by Retrovirus-Delivered Small Interfering RNA in Human Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yongbo; Wu, Chengxiang; Wu, Jianguo; Nerurkar, Vivek R.; Yanagihara, Richard; Lu, Yuanan

    2010-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) has been responsible for the largest outbreaks of arboviral encephalitis in U.S. history. No specific drug is currently available for the effective treatment of WNV infection. To exploit RNA interference as a potential therapeutic approach, a Moloney murine leukemia virus-based retrovirus vector was used to effectively deliver WNV-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) into human neuroblastoma HTB-11 cells. Viral plaque assays demonstrated that transduced cells were significantly refractory to WNV replication, as compared to untransduced control cells (P< 0.05), which correlated with the reduced expression of target viral genes and respective viral proteins. Therefore, retrovirus-mediated delivery of siRNA for gene silencing can be used to study the specific functions of viral genes associated with replication and may have potential therapeutic applications. PMID:18360908

  3. Recent In Vivo Evidences of Particle-Based Delivery of Small-Interfering RNA (siRNA) into Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Small-interfering RNA (siRNA) is both a powerful tool in research and a promising therapeutic platform to modulate expression of disease-related genes. Malignant tumors are attractive disease targets for nucleic acid-based therapies. siRNA directed against oncogenes, and genes driving metastases or angiogenesis have been evaluated in animal models and in some cases, in humans. The outcomes of these studies indicate that drug delivery is a significant limiting factor. This review provides perspectives on in vivo validated nanoparticle-based siRNA delivery systems. Results of recent advances in liposomes and polymeric and inorganic formulations illustrate the need for mutually optimized attributes for performance in systemic circulation, tumor interstitial space, plasma membrane, and endosomes. Physiochemical properties conducive to efficient siRNA delivery are summarized and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:25221632

  4. Phytophthora have distinct endogenous small RNA populations that include short interfering and microRNAs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In eukaryotes, RNA silencing pathways utilize 20–30-nucleotide small RNAs to regulate gene expression, specify and maintain chromatin structure, and repress viruses and mobile genetic elements. RNA silencing was likely present in the common ancestor of modern eukaryotes, but most research has focuse...

  5. Filamentous pathogen effectors interfering with small RNA silencing in plant hosts.

    PubMed

    Ye, Wenwu; Ma, Wenbo

    2016-08-01

    Filamentous eukaryotic pathogens including fungi and oomycetes are major threats of plant health. During the co-evolutionary arms race with the hosts, these pathogens have evolved a large repertoire of secreted virulence proteins, called effectors, to facilitate colonization and infection. Many effectors are believed to directly manipulate targeted processes inside the host cells; and a fundamental function of the effectors is to dampen immunity. Recent evidence suggests that the destructive oomycete pathogens in the genus Phytophthora encode RNA silencing suppressors. These effectors play an important virulence role during infection, likely through their inhibitory effect on host small RNA-mediated defense. PMID:27104934

  6. Small Interfering RNA Pathway Modulates Initial Viral Infection in Midgut Epithelium of Insect after Ingestion of Virus

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Hanhong; Chen, Hongyan; Liu, Yuyan; Jiang, Chaoyang; Mao, Qianzhuo; Jia, Dongsheng; Chen, Qian

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Numerous viruses are transmitted in a persistent manner by insect vectors. Persistent viruses establish their initial infection in the midgut epithelium, from where they disseminate to the midgut visceral muscles. Although propagation of viruses in insect vectors can be controlled by the small interfering RNA (siRNA) antiviral pathway, whether the siRNA pathway can control viral dissemination from the midgut epithelium is unknown. Infection by a rice virus (Southern rice black streaked dwarf virus [SRBSDV]) of its incompetent vector (the small brown planthopper [SBPH]) is restricted to the midgut epithelium. Here, we show that the siRNA pathway is triggered by SRBSDV infection in continuously cultured cells derived from the SBPH and in the midgut of the intact insect. Knockdown of the expression of the core component Dicer-2 of the siRNA pathway by RNA interference strongly increased the ability of SRBSDV to propagate in continuously cultured SBPH cells and in the midgut epithelium, allowing viral titers in the midgut epithelium to reach the threshold (1.99 × 109 copies of the SRBSDV P10 gene/μg of midgut RNA) needed for viral dissemination into the SBPH midgut muscles. Our results thus represent the first elucidation of the threshold for viral dissemination from the insect midgut epithelium. Silencing of Dicer-2 further facilitated the transmission of SRBSDV into rice plants by SBPHs. Taken together, our results reveal the new finding that the siRNA pathway can control the initial infection of the insect midgut epithelium by a virus, which finally affects the competence of the virus's vector. IMPORTANCE Many viral pathogens that cause significant global health and agricultural problems are transmitted via insect vectors. The first bottleneck in viral infection, the midgut epithelium, is a principal determinant of the ability of an insect species to transmit a virus. Southern rice black streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV) is restricted exclusively to the

  7. Distinct mechanisms determine transposon inheritance and methylation via small interfering RNA and histone modification.

    PubMed

    Lippman, Zachary; May, Bruce; Yordan, Cristy; Singer, Tatjana; Martienssen, Rob

    2003-12-01

    Heritable, but reversible, changes in transposable element activity were first observed in maize by Barbara McClintock in the 1950s. More recently, transposon silencing has been associated with DNA methylation, histone H3 lysine-9 methylation (H3mK9), and RNA interference (RNAi). Using a genetic approach, we have investigated the role of these modifications in the epigenetic regulation and inheritance of six Arabidopsis transposons. Silencing of most of the transposons is relieved in DNA methyltransferase (met1), chromatin remodeling ATPase (ddm1), and histone modification (sil1) mutants. In contrast, only a small subset of the transposons require the H3mK9 methyltransferase KRYPTONITE, the RNAi gene ARGONAUTE1, and the CXG methyltransferase CHROMOMETHYLASE3. In crosses to wild-type plants, epigenetic inheritance of active transposons varied from mutant to mutant, indicating these genes differ in their ability to silence transposons. According to their pattern of transposon regulation, the mutants can be divided into two groups, which suggests that there are distinct, but interacting, complexes or pathways involved in transposon silencing. Furthermore, different transposons tend to be susceptible to different forms of epigenetic regulation. PMID:14691539

  8. Small interfering RNA pathway modulates persistent infection of a plant virus in its insect vector

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Hanhong; Wang, Haitao; Chen, Qian; Chen, Hongyan; Jia, Dongsheng; Mao, Qianzhuo; Wei, Taiyun

    2016-01-01

    Plant reoviruses, rhabdoviruses, tospoviruses, and tenuiviruses are transmitted by insect vectors in a persistent-propagative manner. How such persistent infection of plant viruses in insect vectors is established and maintained remains poorly understood. In this study, we used rice gall dwarf virus (RGDV), a plant reovirus, and its main vector leafhopper Recilia dorsalis as a virus–insect system to determine how the small interference (siRNA) pathway modulates persistent infection of a plant virus in its insect vector. We showed that a conserved siRNA antiviral response was triggered by the persistent replication of RGDV in cultured leafhopper cells and in intact insects, by appearance of virus-specific siRNAs, primarily 21-nt long, and the increased expression of siRNA pathway core components Dicer-2 and Argonaute-2. Silencing of Dicer-2 using RNA interference strongly suppressed production of virus-specific siRNAs, promoted viral accumulation, and caused cytopathological changes in vitro and in vivo. When the viral accumulation level rose above a certain threshold of viral genome copy (1.32 × 1014 copies/μg insect RNA), the infection of the leafhopper by RGDV was lethal rather than persistent. Taken together, our results revealed a new finding that the siRNA pathway in insect vector can modulate persistent infection of plant viruses. PMID:26864546

  9. Distinct mechanisms determine transposon inheritance and methylation via small interfering RNA and histone modification.

    PubMed

    Lippman, Zachary; May, Bruce; Yordan, Cristy; Singer, Tatjana; Martienssen, Rob

    2003-12-01

    Heritable, but reversible, changes in transposable element activity were first observed in maize by Barbara McClintock in the 1950s. More recently, transposon silencing has been associated with DNA methylation, histone H3 lysine-9 methylation (H3mK9), and RNA interference (RNAi). Using a genetic approach, we have investigated the role of these modifications in the epigenetic regulation and inheritance of six Arabidopsis transposons. Silencing of most of the transposons is relieved in DNA methyltransferase (met1), chromatin remodeling ATPase (ddm1), and histone modification (sil1) mutants. In contrast, only a small subset of the transposons require the H3mK9 methyltransferase KRYPTONITE, the RNAi gene ARGONAUTE1, and the CXG methyltransferase CHROMOMETHYLASE3. In crosses to wild-type plants, epigenetic inheritance of active transposons varied from mutant to mutant, indicating these genes differ in their ability to silence transposons. According to their pattern of transposon regulation, the mutants can be divided into two groups, which suggests that there are distinct, but interacting, complexes or pathways involved in transposon silencing. Furthermore, different transposons tend to be susceptible to different forms of epigenetic regulation.

  10. Small interfering RNA pathway modulates persistent infection of a plant virus in its insect vector.

    PubMed

    Lan, Hanhong; Wang, Haitao; Chen, Qian; Chen, Hongyan; Jia, Dongsheng; Mao, Qianzhuo; Wei, Taiyun

    2016-01-01

    Plant reoviruses, rhabdoviruses, tospoviruses, and tenuiviruses are transmitted by insect vectors in a persistent-propagative manner. How such persistent infection of plant viruses in insect vectors is established and maintained remains poorly understood. In this study, we used rice gall dwarf virus (RGDV), a plant reovirus, and its main vector leafhopper Recilia dorsalis as a virus-insect system to determine how the small interference (siRNA) pathway modulates persistent infection of a plant virus in its insect vector. We showed that a conserved siRNA antiviral response was triggered by the persistent replication of RGDV in cultured leafhopper cells and in intact insects, by appearance of virus-specific siRNAs, primarily 21-nt long, and the increased expression of siRNA pathway core components Dicer-2 and Argonaute-2. Silencing of Dicer-2 using RNA interference strongly suppressed production of virus-specific siRNAs, promoted viral accumulation, and caused cytopathological changes in vitro and in vivo. When the viral accumulation level rose above a certain threshold of viral genome copy (1.32 × 10(14) copies/μg insect RNA), the infection of the leafhopper by RGDV was lethal rather than persistent. Taken together, our results revealed a new finding that the siRNA pathway in insect vector can modulate persistent infection of plant viruses. PMID:26864546

  11. Zwitterionic Poly(carboxybetaine)-based Cationic Liposomes for Effective Delivery of Small Interfering RNA Therapeutics without Accelerated Blood Clearance Phenomenon

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Liu, Ruiyuan; Shi, Yuanjie; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Zhang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    For efficient delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to the target diseased site in vivo, it is important to design suitable vehicles to control the blood circulation of siRNA. It has been shown that surface modification of cationic liposome/siRNA complexes (lipoplexes) with polyethylene glycol (PEG) could enhance the circulation time of lipoplexes. However, the first injection of PEGylated lipoplexes in vivo induces accelerated blood clearance and enhances hepatic accumulation of the following injected PEGylated lipoplexes, which is known as the accelerated blood clearance (ABC) phenomenon. Herein, we developed zwitterionic poly(carboxybetaine) (PCB) modified lipoplexes for the delivery of siRNA therapeutics, which could avoid protein adsorption and enhance the stability of lipoplexes as that for PEG. Quite different from the PEGylation, the PCBylated lipoplexes could avoid ABC phenomenon, which extended the blood circulation time and enhanced the tumor accumulation of lipoplexes in vivo. After accumulation in tumor site, the PCBylation could promote the cellular uptake and endosomal/lysosomal escape of lipoplexes due to its unique chemical structure and pH-sensitive ability. With excellent tumor accumulation, cellular uptake and endosomal/lysosomal escape abilities, the PCBylated lipoplexes significantly inhibited tumor growth and induced tumor cell apoptosis. PMID:25825598

  12. Intra-airway administration of small interfering RNA targeting plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 attenuates allergic asthma in mice.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Shintaro; Hattori, Noboru; Senoo, Tadashi; Onari, Yojiro; Iwamoto, Hiroshi; Kanehara, Masashi; Ishikawa, Nobuhisa; Fujitaka, Kazunori; Haruta, Yoshinori; Murai, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Akihito; Kohno, Nobuoki

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), a major inhibitor of the fibrinolytic system, may promote the development of asthma. To further investigate the significance of PAI-1 in the pathogenesis of asthma and determine the possibility that PAI-1 could be a therapeutic target for asthma, this study was conducted. First, PAI-1 levels in induced sputum (IS) from asthmatic subjects and healthy controls were measured. In asthmatic subjects, IS PAI-1 levels were elevated, compared with that of healthy controls, and were significantly higher in patients with long-duration asthma compared with short-duration asthma. PAI-1 levels were also found to correlate with IS transforming growth factor-β levels. Then, acute and chronic asthma models induced by ovalbumin were established in PAI-1-deficient mice and wild-type mice that received intra-airway administrations of small interfering RNA against PAI-1 (PAI-1-siRNA). We could demonstrate that eosinophilic airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness were reduced in an acute asthma model, and airway remodeling was suppressed in a chronic asthma model in both PAI-1-deficient mice and wild-type mice that received intra-airway administration of PAI-1-siRNA. These results indicate that PAI-1 is strongly involved in the pathogenesis of asthma, and intra-airway administration of PAI-1-siRNA may be able to become a new therapeutic approach for asthma.

  13. Inhibition of PARP1 by small interfering RNA enhances docetaxel activity against human prostate cancer PC3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wenqi; Kong, Zhenzhen; Duan, Xiaolu; Zhu, Hanliang; Li, Shujue; Zeng, Shaohua; Liang, Yeping; Iliakis, George; Gui, Zhiming; Yang, Dong

    2013-12-06

    Highlights: •PARP1 siRNA enhances docetaxel’s activity against PC3 cells. •PARP1 siRNA enhances docetaxel’s activity against EGFR/Akt/FOXO1 pathway. •PARP1 siRNA and PARP1 inhibitor differently affect the phosphorylation and expression of FOXO1. -- Abstract: Though poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) inhibitors have benefits in combination with radiotherapy in prostate cancers, few is known about the exactly role and underlying mechanism of PARP1 in combination with chemotherapy agents. Here our data revealed that inhibition of PARP1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) could enhance docetaxel’s activity against PC3 cells, which is associated with an accelerate repression of EGF/Akt/FOXO1 signaling pathway. Our results provide a novel role of PARP1 in transcription regulation of EGFR/Akt/FOXO1 signaling pathway and indicate that PARP1 siRNA combined with docetaxel can be an innovative treatment strategy to potentially improve outcomes in CRPC patients.

  14. Subcellular distribution of small interfering RNA: directed delivery through RNA polymerase III expression cassettes and localization by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Paul, Cynthia P

    2005-01-01

    Reduction in the expression of specific genes through small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) is dependent on the colocalization of siRNAs with other components of the RNA interference (RNAi) pathways within the cell. The expression of siRNAs within cells from cassettes that are derived from genes transcribed by RNA polymerase III (pol III) and provide for selective subcellular distribution of their products can be used to direct siRNAs to the cellular pathways. Expression from the human U6 promoter, resulting in siRNA accumulation in the nucleus, is effective in reducing gene expression, whereas cytoplasmic and nucleolar localization of the siRNA when expressed from the 5S or 7 SL promoters is not effective. The distribution of siRNA within the cell is determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Although the long uninterrupted duplex of siRNA makes it difficult to detect with DNA oligonucleotide probes, labeled oligonucleotide probes with 2'-O-methyl RNA backbones provide the stability needed for a strong signal. These methods contribute to studies of the interconnected cellular RNAi pathways and are useful in adapting RNAi as a tool to determine gene function and develop RNA-based therapeutics. PMID:15644179

  15. Therapeutic Potential of a Combination of Two Gene-Specific Small Interfering RNAs against Clinical Strains of Acanthamoeba▿

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob; Martín-Navarro, Carmen M.; López-Arencibia, Atteneri; Santana-Morales, María A.; Afonso-Lehmann, Raquel N.; Maciver, Sutherland K.; Valladares, Basilio; Martínez-Carretero, Enrique

    2010-01-01

    Pathogenic strains of the genus Acanthamoeba are causative agents of severe infections, such as fatal encephalitis and a sight-threatening amoebic keratitis. Antimicrobial therapy for these infections is generally empirical, and patient recovery is often problematic, due to the existence of a highly resistant cyst stage in these amoebae. In previous studies, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against the catalytic domains of extracellular serine proteases and glycogen phosphorylase from Acanthamoeba were designed and evaluated for future therapeutic use. The silencing of proteases resulted in Acanthamoeba failing to degrade human corneal cells, and silencing of glycogen phosphorylase caused amoebae to be unable to form mature cysts. After the siRNA design and concentration were optimized in order to avoid toxicity problems, cultures of Acanthamoeba were treated with a combination of both siRNAs, and cells were evaluated under an inverted microscope. This siRNA-based treatment dramatically affected the growth rate and cellular survival of the amoebae. These results were observed less than 48 h after the initiation of the treatment. In order to check possible toxic effects of the siRNA combination, three eukaryotic cell lines (HeLa, murine macrophages, and osteosarcoma cells) were treated with the same molecules, and cytotoxicity was examined by measuring lactate dehydrogenase release. The future use of the combination of these siRNAs is proposed as a potential therapeutic approach against pathogenic strains of Acanthamoeba. PMID:20855732

  16. The use of small interfering RNAs to inhibit adipocyte differentiation in human preadipocytes and fetal-femur-derived mesenchymal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y.; Mirmalek-Sani, S.-H.; Yang, X.; Zhang, J.; Oreffo, R.O.C. . E-mail: roco@soton.ac.uk

    2006-06-10

    RNA interference (RNAi) has been used in functional genomics and offers innovative approaches in the development of novel therapeutics. Human mesenchymal stem cells offer a unique cell source for tissue engineering/regeneration strategies. The current study examined the potential of small interfering RNAs (siRNA) against human peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) to suppress adipocyte differentiation (adipogenesis) in human preadipocytes and fetal-femur-derived mesenchymal cells. Adipogenesis was investigated using cellular and biochemical analysis. Transient transfection with PPAR{gamma}-siRNA using a liposomal-based strategy resulted in a significant inhibition of adipogenesis in human preadipocytes and fetal-femur-derived mesenchymal cells, compared to controls (cell, liposomal and negative siRNA). The inhibitory effect of PPAR{gamma}-siRNA was supported by testing human PPAR{gamma} mRNA and adipogenic associated genes using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to adiponectin receptor 1 and 2 as well as examination of fatty acid binding protein 3 (FABP{sub 3}) expression, an adipocyte-specific marker. The current studies indicate that PPAR{gamma}-siRNA is a useful tool to study adipogenesis in human cells, with potential applications both therapeutic and in the elucidation of mesenchymal cell differentiation in the modulation of cell differentiation in human mesenchymal cells.

  17. 5'-C-Malonyl RNA: Small Interfering RNAs Modified with 5'-Monophosphate Bioisostere Demonstrate Gene Silencing Activity.

    PubMed

    Zlatev, Ivan; Foster, Donald J; Liu, Jingxuan; Charisse, Klaus; Brigham, Benjamin; Parmar, Rubina G; Jadhav, Vasant; Maier, Martin A; Rajeev, Kallanthottathil G; Egli, Martin; Manoharan, Muthiah

    2016-04-15

    5'-Phosphorylation is a critical step in the cascade of events that leads to loading of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) into the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) to elicit gene silencing. 5'-Phosphorylation of exogenous siRNAs is generally accomplished by a cytosolic Clp1 kinase, and in most cases, the presence of a 5'-monophosphate on synthetic siRNAs is not a prerequisite for activity. Chemically introduced, metabolically stable 5'-phosphate mimics can lead to higher metabolic stability, increased RISC loading, and higher gene silencing activities of chemically modified siRNAs. In this study, we report the synthesis of 5'-C-malonyl RNA, a 5'-monophosphate bioisostere. A 5'-C-malonyl-modified nucleotide was incorporated at the 5'-terminus of chemically modified RNA oligonucleotides using solid-phase synthesis. In vitro silencing activity, in vitro metabolic stability, and in vitro RISC loading of 5'-C-malonyl siRNA was compared to corresponding 5'-phosphorylated and 5'-nonphosphorylated siRNAs. The 5'-C-malonyl siRNAs showed sustained or improved in vitro gene silencing and high levels of Ago2 loading and conferred dramatically improved metabolic stability to the antisense strand of the siRNA duplexes. In silico modeling studies indicate a favorable fit of the 5'-C-malonyl group within the 5'-phosphate binding pocket of human Ago2MID domain.

  18. Caenorhabditis elegans RSD-2 and RSD-6 promote germ cell immortality by maintaining small interfering RNA populations.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Aisa; Sarkies, Peter; Simon, Matt; Doebley, Anna-Lisa; Goldstein, Leonard D; Hedges, Ashley; Ikegami, Kohta; Alvares, Stacy M; Yang, Liwei; LaRocque, Jeannine R; Hall, Julie; Miska, Eric A; Ahmed, Shawn

    2014-10-14

    Germ cells are maintained in a pristine non-aging state as they proliferate over generations. Here, we show that a novel function of the Caenorhabditis elegans RNA interference proteins RNAi spreading defective (RSD)-2 and RSD-6 is to promote germ cell immortality at high temperature. rsd mutants cultured at high temperatures became progressively sterile and displayed loss of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that target spermatogenesis genes, simple repeats, and transposons. Desilencing of spermatogenesis genes occurred in late-generation rsd mutants, although defective spermatogenesis was insufficient to explain the majority of sterility. Increased expression of repetitive loci occurred in both germ and somatic cells of late-generation rsd mutant adults, suggesting that desilencing of many heterochromatic segments of the genome contributes to sterility. Nuclear RNAi defective (NRDE)-2 promotes nuclear silencing in response to exogenous double-stranded RNA, and our data imply that RSD-2, RSD-6, and NRDE-2 function in a common transgenerational nuclear silencing pathway that responds to endogenous siRNAs. We propose that RSD-2 and RSD-6 promote germ cell immortality at stressful temperatures by maintaining transgenerational epigenetic inheritance of endogenous siRNA populations that promote genome silencing. PMID:25258416

  19. Automated parallel synthesis of 5'-triphosphate oligonucleotides and preparation of chemically modified 5'-triphosphate small interfering RNA.

    PubMed

    Zlatev, Ivan; Lackey, Jeremy G; Zhang, Ligang; Dell, Amy; McRae, Kathy; Shaikh, Sarfraz; Duncan, Richard G; Rajeev, Kallanthottathil G; Manoharan, Muthiah

    2013-02-01

    A fully automated chemical method for the parallel and high-throughput solid-phase synthesis of 5'-triphosphate and 5'-diphosphate oligonucleotides is described. The desired full-length oligonucleotides were first constructed using standard automated DNA/RNA solid-phase synthesis procedures. Then, on the same column and instrument, efficient implementation of an uninterrupted sequential cycle afforded the corresponding unmodified or chemically modified 5'-triphosphates and 5'-diphosphates. The method was readily translated into a scalable and high-throughput synthesis protocol compatible with the current DNA/RNA synthesizers yielding a large variety of unique 5'-polyphosphorylated oligonucleotides. Using this approach, we accomplished the synthesis of chemically modified 5'-triphosphate oligonucleotides that were annealed to form small-interfering RNAs (ppp-siRNAs), a potentially interesting class of novel RNAi therapeutic tools. The attachment of the 5'-triphosphate group to the passenger strand of a siRNA construct did not induce a significant improvement in the in vitro RNAi-mediated gene silencing activity nor a strong specific in vitro RIG-I activation. The reported method will enable the screening of many chemically modified ppp-siRNAs, resulting in a novel bi-functional RNAi therapeutic platform. PMID:23260577

  20. Efficient protection and transfection of small interfering RNA by cationic shell-crosslinked knedel-like nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yuefei; Fang, Huafeng; Zhang, Ke; Shrestha, Ritu; Wooley, Karen L; Taylor, John-Stephen A

    2013-04-01

    Despite the great potential of small interfering RNA (siRNA) as a therapeutic agent, progress in this area has been hampered by a lack of efficient biocompatible transfection agents. Recently, cationic shell-crosslinked knedel-like nanoparticles (cSCKs) were found to possess lower cytotoxicity and better transfection ability for phosphorothioate ODNs and plasmid DNA than the commonly used cationic lipid-based agent Lipofectamine. To determine the usefulness of cSCKs for siRNA transfection, a small library of cSCKs with varying percentage of primary and tertiary amines was assessed for its ability to bind to siRNA, inhibit siRNA degradation in human serum, and to transfect HeLa and mouse macrophage cell lines. The silencing efficiency in HeLa cells was greatest with the cSCK with 100% primary amines (pa100) as determined by their viability following transfection with cytotoxic and non-cytotoxic siRNAs. cSCK-pa100 showed greater silencing efficiency than Lipofectamine 2000 in the HeLa cells, as well in 293T and human bronchial epithelial (HEK) cells, but was comparable in human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells and human mammary epithelial (MCF10a) cells. cSCK-pa100 also showed greater silencing of iNOS expression than Lipofectamine 2000 in a mouse macrophage cell line, and provided greater protection from serum degradation, demonstrating its potential usefulness as an siRNA transfection agent. The siRNA silencing of iNOS at lower concentrations of siRNA could be enhanced by complexation with the fusogenic GALA peptide, which was shown to enhance endosomal escape following uptake.

  1. Transient transfection of macrophage migration inhibitory factor small interfering RNA disrupts the biological behavior of oral squamous carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jie; Quan, Jingjing; Xia, Xuefeng

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is closely associated with tumorigenesis. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of MIF on the proliferation, migration and colony formation of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), and to quantify the protein expression levels of MIF in OSCC tissue samples. Firstly, small interfering (si)RNA was used to knock down the gene expression of MIF in Tca8113, HN5 and SCC25 OSCC cells. Secondly, proliferation, migration and colony formation of the OSCC cells were determined by MTT, transmigration and colony formation assays, respectively. Western blotting was performed to detect changes in the protein expression levels of the epithelial mesenchymal transition markers, Twist‑related protein 1 (Twist1), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)‑2 and MMP‑9. Finally, immunohistochemistry was used to examine the protein expression of MIF in OSCC tissue samples. The results demonstrated that siRNA against MIF significantly downregulated the expression levels of MIF in all OSCC cells, and decreased their proliferation and migration ability. Colony formation ability was also inhibited in the OSCC cells following transfection with MIF siRNA. Furthermore, western blotting demonstrated that the protein expression of Twist1 was decreased similarly to those of MIF. The protein expression of MMP‑2 revealed no change, whereas that of MMP‑9 decreased. The protein expression of MIF was detected in OSCC tissue samples with staining predominantly located in the cell membrane and cytoplasm. The present study demonstrated that MIF may be important in the pathogenesis and progression of OSCC, and indicated its potential therapeutic value. PMID:26549761

  2. Molecular analysis of central feeding regulation by neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons with NPY receptor small interfering RNAs (siRNAs).

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Hiroshi

    2012-11-01

    Hypothalamic neuropeptides play important roles in central feeding behavior. Among them, neuropeptide Y (NPY) has the strongest orexigenic action. It is synthesized in NPY-expressing neurons in the arcuate nucleus (ARC), which projects to other nuclei, mainly to the paraventricular nucleus (PVN). PVN, which possesses NPY-Y1, -Y2 and -Y4, -Y5 receptors, is considered as feeding center for central feeding behavior. Herein I review recent results on feeding behavior obtained by gene knockdown technologies. The small interfering RNA (siRNA) plasmid-based vectors, which drive transcription of siRNA by U6 RNA polymerase III promoter to produce knockdown of the NPY and its receptor (Y1, Y2, Y4 and Y5) genes, were stereotaxically injected into mouse ARC and PVN. Feeding behaviors were measured for 6days after siRNA vector injection. NPY and its receptor mRNA levels were decreased, which were measured by RT-PCR and in situ hybridization, and simultaneous decrease in their proteins was also detected in separate nuclei by immunohistochemistry. In the NPY system, decrease in NPY, Y1 and Y5 expressions in specialized nuclei diminished central feeding behavior, whereas decrease in Y2 or Y4 expression in both ARC or PVN did not affect feeding behavior. Thus, specialized change in expressions of NPY and its receptors (especially Y1 and Y5) are important for regulation of endogenous feeding behavior in central regulation. Further analysis of NPY receptors may provide better understanding of feeding behavior and of potential therapeutic targets.

  3. NBS1 knockdown by small interfering RNA increases ionizing radiation mutagenesis and telomere association in human cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ying; Lim, Chang U K.; Williams, Eli S.; Zhou, Junqing; Zhang, Qinming; Fox, Michael H.; Bailey, Susan M.; Liber, Howard L.

    2005-01-01

    Hypomorphic mutations which lead to decreased function of the NBS1 gene are responsible for Nijmegen breakage syndrome, a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disorder that imparts an increased predisposition to development of malignancy. The NBS1 protein is a component of the MRE11/RAD50/NBS1 complex that plays a critical role in cellular responses to DNA damage and the maintenance of chromosomal integrity. Using small interfering RNA transfection, we have knocked down NBS1 protein levels and analyzed relevant phenotypes in two closely related human lymphoblastoid cell lines with different p53 status, namely wild-type TK6 and mutated WTK1. Both TK6 and WTK1 cells showed an increased level of ionizing radiation-induced mutation at the TK and HPRT loci, impaired phosphorylation of H2AX (gamma-H2AX), and impaired activation of the cell cycle checkpoint regulating kinase, Chk2. In TK6 cells, ionizing radiation-induced accumulation of p53/p21 and apoptosis were reduced. There was a differential response to ionizing radiation-induced cell killing between TK6 and WTK1 cells after NBS1 knockdown; TK6 cells were more resistant to killing, whereas WTK1 cells were more sensitive. NBS1 deficiency also resulted in a significant increase in telomere association that was independent of radiation exposure and p53 status. Our results provide the first experimental evidence that NBS1 deficiency in human cells leads to hypermutability and telomere associations, phenotypes that may contribute to the cancer predisposition seen among patients with this disease.

  4. Small interfering RNA targeting the nonstructural gene 1 transcript inhibits influenza A virus replication in experimental mice.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Roopali; Khanna, Madhu; Kumar, Prashant; Kumar, Binod; Sharma, Sonal; Gupta, Neha; Saxena, Latika

    2012-12-01

    Nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) of influenza A viruses counteracts the host immune response against the influenza viruses by not only inhibiting the nuclear export and maturation of host cell messenger RNA (mRNA), but by also blocking the double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase-mediated inhibition of viral RNA translation. Reduction of NS1 gene product in the host cell may be a potent antiviral strategy to provide protection against the influenza virus infection. We used small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) synthesized against the viral mRNA to down regulate the NS1 gene and observed its effect on inhibition of virus replication. When NS1 gene-specific siRNA were transfected in Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells followed by influenza A virus infection, approximately 60% inhibition in intracellular levels of NS1 RNA was observed. When siRNA was administered in BALB/c mice, 92% reduction in the levels of NS1 gene expression in mice lungs was observed. A significant reduction in the lung virus titers and cytokine levels was also detected in the presence of siRNAs as compared with the untreated control. The study was validated by the use of selectively disabled mutants of each set of siRNA. Our findings suggest that siRNA targeted against NS1 gene of influenza A virus can provide considerable protection to the virus-infected host cells and may be used as potential candidates for nucleic acid-based antiviral therapy for prevention of influenza A virus infection.

  5. Suppression of Breast Cancer Cell Migration by Small Interfering RNA Delivered by Polyethylenimine-Functionalized Graphene Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yuan-Pin; Hung, Chao-Ming; Hsu, Yi-Chiang; Zhong, Cai-Yan; Wang, Wan-Rou; Chang, Chi-Chang; Lee, Mon-Juan

    2016-05-01

    The carbon-based nanomaterial graphene can be chemically modified to associate with various molecules such as chemicals and biomolecules and developed as novel carriers for drug and gene delivery. In this study, a nonviral gene transfection reagent was produced by functionalizing graphene oxide (GO) with a polycationic polymer, polyethylenimine (PEI), to increase the biocompatibility of GO and to transfect small interfering RNA (siRNA) against C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4), a biomarker associated with cancer metastasis, into invasive breast cancer cells. PEI-functionalized GO (PEI-GO) was a homogeneous aqueous solution that remained in suspension during storage at 4 °C for at least 6 months. The particle size of PEI-GO was 172 ± 4.58 and 188 ± 5.00 nm at 4 and 25 °C, respectively, and increased slightly to 262 ± 17.6 nm at 37 °C, but remained unaltered with time. Binding affinity of PEI-GO toward siRNA was assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), in which PEI-GO and siRNA were completely associated at a PEI-GO:siRNA weight ratio of 2:1 and above. The invasive breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, was transfected with PEI-GO in complex with siRNAs against CXCR4 (siCXCR4). Suppression of the mRNA and protein expression of CXCR4 by the PEI-GO/siCXCR4 complex was confirmed by real-time PCR and western blot analysis. In addition, the metastatic potential of MDA-MB-231 cells was attenuated by the PEI-GO/siCXCR4 complex as demonstrated in wound healing assay. Our results suggest that PEI-GO is effective in the delivery of siRNA and may contribute to targeted gene therapy to suppress cancer metastasis.

  6. Effects of small interfering RNA inhibit Class I phosphoinositide 3-kinase on human gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bao-Song; Yu, Li-Yan; Zhao, Kui; Wu, Yong-You; Cheng, Xiao-Li; Wu, Yong; Zhong, Feng-Yun; Gong, Wei; Chen, Qiang; Xing, Chun-Gen

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated inhibition of Class I phosphoinositide 3-kinase (Class I PI3K) signal transduction on the proliferation, apoptosis, and autophagy of gastric cancer SGC7901 and MGC803 cells. METHODS: We constructed the recombinant replication adenovirus PI3K(I)-RNA interference (RNAi)-green fluorescent protein (GFP) and control adenovirus NC-RNAi-GFP, and infected it into human gastric cancer cells. MTT assay was used to determine the growth rate of the gastric cancer cells. Activation of autophagy was monitored with monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining after adenovirus PI3K(I)-RNAi-GFP and control adenovirus NC-RNAi-GFP treatment. Immunofluorescence staining was used to detect the expression of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3). Mitochondrial membrane potential was measured using the fluorescent probe JC-1. The expression of autophagy was monitored with MDC, LC3 staining, and transmission electron microscopy. Western blotting was used to detect p53, Beclin-1, Bcl-2, and LC3 protein expression in the culture supernatant. RESULTS: The viability of gastric cancer cells was inhibited after siRNA targeting to the Class I PI3K blocked Class I PI3K signal pathway. MTT assays revealed that, after SGC7901 cancer cells were treated with adenovirus PI3K(I)-RNAi-GFP, the rate of inhibition reached 27.48% ± 2.71% at 24 h, 41.92% ± 2.02% at 48 h, and 50.85% ± 0.91% at 72 h. After MGC803 cancer cells were treated with adenovirus PI3K(I)-RNAi-GFP, the rate of inhibition reached 24.39% ± 0.93% at 24 h, 47.00% ± 0.87% at 48 h, and 70.30% ± 0.86% at 72 h (P < 0.05 compared to control group). It was determined that when 50 MOI, the transfection efficiency was 95% ± 2.4%. Adenovirus PI3K(I)-RNAi-GFP (50 MOI) induced mitochondrial dysfunction and activated cell apoptosis in SGC7901 cells, and the results described here prove that RNAi of Class I PI3K induced apoptosis in SGC7901 cells

  7. P-SAMS: a web site for plant artificial microRNA and synthetic trans-acting small interfering RNA design

    PubMed Central

    Fahlgren, Noah; Hill, Steven T.; Carrington, James C.; Carbonell, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Summary: The Plant Small RNA Maker Site (P-SAMS) is a web tool for the simple and automated design of artificial miRNAs (amiRNAs) and synthetic trans-acting small interfering RNAs (syn-tasiRNAs) for efficient and specific targeted gene silencing in plants. P-SAMS includes two applications, P-SAMS amiRNA Designer and P-SAMS syn-tasiRNA Designer. The navigation through both applications is wizard-assisted, and the job runtime is relatively short. Both applications output the sequence of designed small RNA(s), and the sequence of the two oligonucleotides required for cloning into ‘B/c’ compatible vectors. Availability and implementation: The P-SAMS website is available at http://p-sams.carringtonlab.org. Contact: acarbonell@ibmcp.upv.es or nfahlgren@danforthcenter.org PMID:26382195

  8. Novel and Recently Evolved MicroRNA Clusters Regulate Expansive F-BOX Gene Networks through Phased Small Interfering RNAs in Wild Diploid Strawberry.

    PubMed

    Xia, Rui; Ye, Songqing; Liu, Zongrang; Meyers, Blake C; Liu, Zhongchi

    2015-09-01

    The wild strawberry (Fragaria vesca) has recently emerged as an excellent model for cultivated strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) as well as other Rosaceae fruit crops due to its short seed-to-fruit cycle, diploidy, and sequenced genome. Deep sequencing and parallel analysis of RNA ends were used to identify F. vesca microRNAs (miRNAs) and their target genes, respectively. Thirty-eight novel and 31 known miRNAs were identified. Many known miRNAs targeted not only conserved mRNA targets but also developed new target genes in F. vesca. Significantly, two new clusters of miRNAs were found to collectively target 94 F-BOX (FBX) genes. One of the miRNAs in the new cluster is 22 nucleotides and triggers phased small interfering RNA production from six FBX genes, which amplifies the silencing to additional FBX genes. Comparative genomics revealed that the main novel miRNA cluster evolved from duplications of FBX genes. Finally, conserved trans-acting siRNA pathways were characterized and confirmed with distinct features. Our work identified novel miRNA-FBX networks in F. vesca and shed light on the evolution of miRNAs/phased small interfering RNA networks that regulate large gene families in higher plants. PMID:26143249

  9. Novel and Recently Evolved MicroRNA Clusters Regulate Expansive F-BOX Gene Networks through Phased Small Interfering RNAs in Wild Diploid Strawberry.

    PubMed

    Xia, Rui; Ye, Songqing; Liu, Zongrang; Meyers, Blake C; Liu, Zhongchi

    2015-09-01

    The wild strawberry (Fragaria vesca) has recently emerged as an excellent model for cultivated strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) as well as other Rosaceae fruit crops due to its short seed-to-fruit cycle, diploidy, and sequenced genome. Deep sequencing and parallel analysis of RNA ends were used to identify F. vesca microRNAs (miRNAs) and their target genes, respectively. Thirty-eight novel and 31 known miRNAs were identified. Many known miRNAs targeted not only conserved mRNA targets but also developed new target genes in F. vesca. Significantly, two new clusters of miRNAs were found to collectively target 94 F-BOX (FBX) genes. One of the miRNAs in the new cluster is 22 nucleotides and triggers phased small interfering RNA production from six FBX genes, which amplifies the silencing to additional FBX genes. Comparative genomics revealed that the main novel miRNA cluster evolved from duplications of FBX genes. Finally, conserved trans-acting siRNA pathways were characterized and confirmed with distinct features. Our work identified novel miRNA-FBX networks in F. vesca and shed light on the evolution of miRNAs/phased small interfering RNA networks that regulate large gene families in higher plants.

  10. Inhibition of basal JNK activity by small interfering RNAs enhances cisplatin sensitivity and decreases DNA repair in T98G glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Parra, Eduardo; Gutiérrez, Luis; Ferreira, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of basal Jun kinase (JNK) activity by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) enhances cisplatin sensitivity and decreases DNA repair in T98G glioblastoma cells. Although the JNK pathway has been extensively studied in recent years, little is known concerning the signaling pathways that control their expression in glioma cells. The aim of the present study was to assess the role of c-Jun-NH2-terminal kinases (JNKs) in the regulation of T98G glioblastoma cells treated with cisplatin in the presence or absence of siRNAs against JNK1 and JNK2. Addition of either small interfering JNK1-siRNA or JNK2-siRNA induced decreased DNA repair and sensitized the T98G glioblastoma cells to the DNA damaging drug cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum). This effect was associated with reduced cell survival and loss of anchorage‑independent colony formation. The results indicate that effective inhibition of the JNK pathway significantly sensitizes glioblastoma cells to cisplatin, a compound of proven clinical value whose spectrum of application is limited by resistance phenomena.

  11. Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Replication in Primary Macrophages by Using Tat- or CCR5-Specific Small Interfering RNAs Expressed from a Lentivirus Vector

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ming-Ta M.; Coburn, Glen A.; McClure, Myra O.; Cullen, Bryan R.

    2003-01-01

    Although several groups have demonstrated that RNA interference, induced by transfection of small interfering RNA (siRNA) duplexes, can protect cells against a viral challenge in culture, this protection is transient. Here, we describe lentivirus expression vectors that can stably express siRNAs at levels sufficient to block virus replication. We have used these vectors to stably express siRNAs specific for the essential human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Tat transcription factor or specific for a cellular coreceptor, CCR5, that is required for infection by the majority of primary HIV-1 isolates. These lentivirus vectors are shown to protect cells, including primary macrophages, against HIV-1 infection in culture by inducing selective degradation of their target mRNA species. These data suggest that it should be possible to block the expression of specific viral or cellular genes in vivo by using viral vectors to stably express the appropriate siRNAs. PMID:14581533

  12. Binding of small interfering RNA molecules is crucial for RNA interference suppressor activity of rice hoja blanca virus NS3 in plants.

    PubMed

    Hemmes, Hans; Kaaij, Lucas; Lohuis, Dick; Prins, Marcel; Goldbach, Rob; Schnettler, Esther

    2009-07-01

    The NS3 protein of rice hoja blanca virus represents a viral suppressor of RNA interference (RNAi) that sequesters small interfering (si)RNAs in vitro. To determine whether this siRNA binding property is the critical determinant for the suppressor activity of NS3, NS3 was altered by alanine point mutations and the resulting mutant proteins were tested for both siRNA binding ability and RNAi suppressor activity in plants. Alanine substitutions of lysine residues at positions 173-175 resulted in mutant proteins that lost both their affinity for siRNAs and their RNAi suppressor activity in planta. This indicates that siRNA binding of NS3 is indeed essential for the suppressor function of NS3 and that residues at positions 173-175 are involved in the siRNA binding and suppressor activities. PMID:19282433

  13. Adenoviral overexpression and small interfering RNA suppression demonstrate that plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 produces elevated collagen accumulation in normal and keloid fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Tuan, Tai-Lan; Hwu, Paul; Ho, Wendy; Yiu, Peter; Chang, Richard; Wysocki, Annette; Benya, Paul D

    2008-11-01

    Keloids are tumor-like skin scars that grow as a result of the aberrant healing of skin injuries, with no effective treatment. We provide new evidence that both overexpression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and elevated collagen accumulation are intrinsic features of keloid fibroblasts and that these characteristics are causally linked. Using seven strains each of early passage normal and keloid fibroblasts, the keloid strains exhibited inherently elevated collagen accumulation and PAI-1 expression in serum-free, 0.1% ITS+ culture; larger increases in these parameters occurred when cells were cultured in 3% serum. To demonstrate a causal relationship between PAI-1 overexpression and collagen accumulation, normal fibroblasts were infected with PAI-1-expressing adenovirus. Such cells exhibited a two- to fourfold increase in the accumulation of newly synthesized collagen in a viral dose-dependent fashion in both monolayers and fibrin gel, provisional matrix-like cultures. Three different PAI-1-targeted small interfering RNAs, alone or in combination, produced greater than an 80% PAI-1 knockdown and reduced collagen accumulation in PAI-1-overexpressing normal or keloid fibroblasts. A vitronectin-binding mutant of PAI-1 was equipotent with wild-type PAI-1 in inducing collagen accumulation, whereas a complete protease inhibitor mutant retained approximately 50% activity. Thus, PAI-1 may use more than its protease inhibitory activity to control keloid collagen accumulation. PAI-1-targeted interventions, such as small interfering RNA and lentiviral short hairpin RNA-containing microRNA sequence suppression reported here, may have therapeutic utility in the prevention of keloid scarring.

  14. Comprehensive Annotation of Physcomitrella patens Small RNA Loci Reveals That the Heterochromatic Short Interfering RNA Pathway Is Largely Conserved in Land Plants.

    PubMed

    Coruh, Ceyda; Cho, Sung Hyun; Shahid, Saima; Liu, Qikun; Wierzbicki, Andrzej; Axtell, Michael J

    2015-08-01

    Many plant small RNAs are sequence-specific negative regulators of target mRNAs and/or chromatin. In angiosperms, the two most abundant endogenous small RNA populations are usually 21-nucleotide microRNAs (miRNAs) and 24-nucleotide heterochromatic short interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Heterochromatic siRNAs are derived from repetitive regions and reinforce DNA methylation at targeted loci. The existence and extent of heterochromatic siRNAs in other land plant lineages has been unclear. Using small RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) of the moss Physcomitrella patens, we identified 1090 loci that produce mostly 23- to 24-nucleotide siRNAs. These loci are mostly in intergenic regions with dense DNA methylation. Accumulation of siRNAs from these loci depends upon P. patens homologs of DICER-LIKE3 (DCL3), RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE2, and the largest subunit of DNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE IV, with the largest subunit of a Pol V homolog contributing to expression at a smaller subset of the loci. A MINIMAL DICER-LIKE (mDCL) gene, which lacks the N-terminal helicase domain typical of DCL proteins, is specifically required for 23-nucleotide siRNA accumulation. We conclude that heterochromatic siRNAs, and their biogenesis pathways, are largely identical between angiosperms and P. patens, with the notable exception of the P. patens-specific use of mDCL to produce 23-nucleotide siRNAs.

  15. Comprehensive Annotation of Physcomitrella patens Small RNA Loci Reveals That the Heterochromatic Short Interfering RNA Pathway Is Largely Conserved in Land Plants[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Coruh, Ceyda; Cho, Sung Hyun; Shahid, Saima; Liu, Qikun; Wierzbicki, Andrzej; Axtell, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Many plant small RNAs are sequence-specific negative regulators of target mRNAs and/or chromatin. In angiosperms, the two most abundant endogenous small RNA populations are usually 21-nucleotide microRNAs (miRNAs) and 24-nucleotide heterochromatic short interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Heterochromatic siRNAs are derived from repetitive regions and reinforce DNA methylation at targeted loci. The existence and extent of heterochromatic siRNAs in other land plant lineages has been unclear. Using small RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) of the moss Physcomitrella patens, we identified 1090 loci that produce mostly 23- to 24-nucleotide siRNAs. These loci are mostly in intergenic regions with dense DNA methylation. Accumulation of siRNAs from these loci depends upon P. patens homologs of DICER-LIKE3 (DCL3), RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE2, and the largest subunit of DNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE IV, with the largest subunit of a Pol V homolog contributing to expression at a smaller subset of the loci. A MINIMAL DICER-LIKE (mDCL) gene, which lacks the N-terminal helicase domain typical of DCL proteins, is specifically required for 23-nucleotide siRNA accumulation. We conclude that heterochromatic siRNAs, and their biogenesis pathways, are largely identical between angiosperms and P. patens, with the notable exception of the P. patens-specific use of mDCL to produce 23-nucleotide siRNAs. PMID:26209555

  16. Therapeutic targeting of polo-like kinase 1 using RNA-interfering nanoparticles (iNOPs) for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    McCarroll, Joshua A; Dwarte, Tanya; Baigude, Huricha; Dang, Jason; Yang, Lu; Erlich, Rafael B; Kimpton, Kathleen; Teo, Joann; Sagnella, Sharon M; Akerfeldt, Mia C; Liu, Jie; Phillips, Phoebe A; Rana, Tariq M; Kavallaris, Maria

    2015-05-20

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains the most common cause of cancer death worldwide due its resistance to chemotherapy and aggressive tumor growth. Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) is a serine-threonine protein kinase which is overexpressed in cancer cells, and plays a major role in regulating tumor growth. A number of PLK1 inhibitors are in clinical trial; however, poor tumor bioavailability and off-target effects limit their efficacy. Short-interfering-RNA (siRNA) holds promise as a class of therapeutics, which can selectively silence disease-causing genes. However, siRNA cannot enter cells without a delivery vehicle. Herein, we investigated whether RNAi-interfering nanoparticles could deliver siRNA to NSCLC cells and silence PLK1 expression in vitro and in vivo. iNOP-7 was non-toxic, and delivered siRNA with high efficiency to NSCLC cells. iNOP-7-PLK1 siRNA silenced PLK1 expression and reduced NSCLC growth in vitro. Notably, iNOP-7 delivered siRNA to orthotopic lung tumors in mice, and administration of iNOP-7-PLK1 siRNA reduced lung tumor burden. These novel data show that iNOP-7 can deliver siRNA against PLK1 to NSCLC cells, and decrease cell proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. iNOP-7-PLK1 siRNA may provide a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of NSCLC as well as other cancers which aberrantly express this gene.

  17. Small interfering RNAs targeting peste des petits ruminants virus M mRNA increase virus-mediated fusogenicity and inhibit viral replication in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fuxiao; Wu, Xiaodong; Zou, Yanli; Li, Lin; Liu, Shan; Chi, Tianying; Wang, Zhiliang

    2015-11-01

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR), caused by peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV), is an acute or subacute, highly contagious and economically important disease of small ruminants. The PPRV is classified into the genus Morbillivirus in the family Paramyxoviridae. The PPRV matrix (M) protein possesses an intrinsic ability to bind to lipid membranes, and plays a crucial role in viral assembly and further budding. In this study, three different small interfering RNAs (siRNA) were designed on the basis of translated region for PPRV Nigeria 75/1M mRNA, and were subsequently synthesized for their transfection into Vero-SLAM cells, followed by infection with PPRVs. The results showed that two out of three siRNAs robustly induced cell-to-cell fusion as early as 36h post-infection with PPRVs, effectively suppressed expression of the M protein by interference for the M mRNA, and eventually inhibited viral replication in vitro. These findings led us to speculate that siRNA-mediated knockdown of the M protein would alter its interaction with viral glycoproteins, thus exacerbating intercellular fusion but hampering virus release. PMID:26318517

  18. The system with zwitterionic lactose-based surfactant for complexation and delivery of small interfering ribonucleic acid—A structural and spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skupin, Michalina; Sobczak, Krzysztof; Zieliński, Ryszard; Kozak, Maciej

    2016-05-01

    Systems suitable for the effective preparation of complexes with siRNA (small interfering RNA) are at the center of interest in the area of research work on the delivery of the RNA-based drugs (RNA-therapeutics). This article presents results of a study on the structural effects associated with siRNA complexation by a surfactant comprising a lactose group (N-(3-propanesulfone)-N-dodecyl-amino-beta-D-lactose hydrochloride, LA12). The double stranded siRNA oligomer (21 base pairs) used in this study is responsible for silencing a gene that can be important in the therapy of myotonic dystrophy type 1. The obtained siRNA/LA12 lipoplexes were studied using the methods of small angle scattering of synchrotron radiation, circular dichroism spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and electrophoretic mobility tests. Lipoplexes form in solution stable lamellar or cubic phases. The surfactant selected for the study shows much lower cytotoxicity and good complexation abilities of siRNA than dicationic or polycationic surfactants.

  19. Arabidopsis RNASE THREE LIKE2 Modulates the Expression of Protein-Coding Genes via 24-Nucleotide Small Interfering RNA-Directed DNA Methylation[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hachet, Mélanie; Comella, Pascale; Zytnicki, Matthias; Vaucheret, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    RNaseIII enzymes catalyze the cleavage of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and have diverse functions in RNA maturation. Arabidopsis thaliana RNASE THREE LIKE2 (RTL2), which carries one RNaseIII and two dsRNA binding (DRB) domains, is a unique Arabidopsis RNaseIII enzyme resembling the budding yeast small interfering RNA (siRNA)-producing Dcr1 enzyme. Here, we show that RTL2 modulates the production of a subset of small RNAs and that this activity depends on both its RNaseIII and DRB domains. However, the mode of action of RTL2 differs from that of Dcr1. Whereas Dcr1 directly cleaves dsRNAs into 23-nucleotide siRNAs, RTL2 likely cleaves dsRNAs into longer molecules, which are subsequently processed into small RNAs by the DICER-LIKE enzymes. Depending on the dsRNA considered, RTL2-mediated maturation either improves (RTL2-dependent loci) or reduces (RTL2-sensitive loci) the production of small RNAs. Because the vast majority of RTL2-regulated loci correspond to transposons and intergenic regions producing 24-nucleotide siRNAs that guide DNA methylation, RTL2 depletion modifies DNA methylation in these regions. Nevertheless, 13% of RTL2-regulated loci correspond to protein-coding genes. We show that changes in 24-nucleotide siRNA levels also affect DNA methylation levels at such loci and inversely correlate with mRNA steady state levels, thus implicating RTL2 in the regulation of protein-coding gene expression. PMID:26764378

  20. Arabidopsis RNASE THREE LIKE2 Modulates the Expression of Protein-Coding Genes via 24-Nucleotide Small Interfering RNA-Directed DNA Methylation.

    PubMed

    Elvira-Matelot, Emilie; Hachet, Mélanie; Shamandi, Nahid; Comella, Pascale; Sáez-Vásquez, Julio; Zytnicki, Matthias; Vaucheret, Hervé

    2016-02-01

    RNaseIII enzymes catalyze the cleavage of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and have diverse functions in RNA maturation. Arabidopsis thaliana RNASE THREE LIKE2 (RTL2), which carries one RNaseIII and two dsRNA binding (DRB) domains, is a unique Arabidopsis RNaseIII enzyme resembling the budding yeast small interfering RNA (siRNA)-producing Dcr1 enzyme. Here, we show that RTL2 modulates the production of a subset of small RNAs and that this activity depends on both its RNaseIII and DRB domains. However, the mode of action of RTL2 differs from that of Dcr1. Whereas Dcr1 directly cleaves dsRNAs into 23-nucleotide siRNAs, RTL2 likely cleaves dsRNAs into longer molecules, which are subsequently processed into small RNAs by the DICER-LIKE enzymes. Depending on the dsRNA considered, RTL2-mediated maturation either improves (RTL2-dependent loci) or reduces (RTL2-sensitive loci) the production of small RNAs. Because the vast majority of RTL2-regulated loci correspond to transposons and intergenic regions producing 24-nucleotide siRNAs that guide DNA methylation, RTL2 depletion modifies DNA methylation in these regions. Nevertheless, 13% of RTL2-regulated loci correspond to protein-coding genes. We show that changes in 24-nucleotide siRNA levels also affect DNA methylation levels at such loci and inversely correlate with mRNA steady state levels, thus implicating RTL2 in the regulation of protein-coding gene expression. PMID:26764378

  1. Satellite RNA-derived small interfering RNA satsiR-12 targeting the 3' untranslated region of Cucumber mosaic virus triggers viral RNAs for degradation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hui; Duan, Cheng-Guo; Hou, Wei-Na; Du, Quan-Sheng; Lv, Dian-Qiu; Fang, Rong-Xiang; Guo, Hui-Shan

    2011-12-01

    RNA silencing provides protection against RNA viruses by targeting both the helper virus and its satellite RNA (satRNA). Virus-derived small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs) bound with Argonaute (AGO) proteins are presumed participants in the silencing process. Here, we show that a vsiRNA targeted to virus RNAs triggers the host RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 6 (RDR6)-mediated degradation of viral RNAs. We confirmed that satRNA-derived small interfering RNAs (satsiRNAs) could be associated with different AGO proteins in planta. The most frequently cloned satsiRNA, satsiR-12, was predicted to imperfectly match to Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) RNAs in the upstream area of the 3' untranslated region (3' UTR). Moreover, an artificial satsiR-12 (asatsiR-12) mediated cleavage of a green fluorescent protein (GFP) sensor construct harboring the satsiR-12 target site. asatsiR-12 also mediated reduction of viral RNAs in 2b-deficient CMV (CMVΔ2b)-infected Nicotiana benthamiana. The reduction was not observed in CMVΔ2b-infected RDR6i plants, in which RDR6 was silenced. Following infection with 2b-containing CMV, the reduction in viral RNAs was not observed in plants of either genotype, indicating that the asatsiR-12-mediated reduction of viral RNAs in the presence of RDR6 was inhibited by the 2b protein. Our results suggest that satsiR-12 targeting the 3' UTR of CMV RNAs triggered RDR6-dependent antiviral silencing. Competition experiments with wild-type CMV RNAs and anti-satsiR-12 mutant RNA1 in the presence of 2b and satRNA demonstrate the inhibitory effect of the 2b protein on the satsiR-12-related degradation of CMV RNAs, revealing a substantial suppressor function of the 2b protein in native CMV infection. Our data provide evidence for the important biological functions of satsiRNAs in homeostatic interactions among the host, virus, and satRNA in the final outcome of viral infection.

  2. Resistance to Ditylenchus destructor Infection in Sweet Potato by the Expression of Small Interfering RNAs Targeting unc-15, a Movement-Related Gene.

    PubMed

    Fan, Weijuan; Wei, Zhaorong; Zhang, Min; Ma, Peiyong; Liu, Guiling; Zheng, Jianli; Guo, Xiaoding; Zhang, Peng

    2015-11-01

    Stem nematode (Ditylenchus destructor) is one of most serious diseases that limit the productivity and quality of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas), a root crop with worldwide importance for food security and nutrition improvement. Hence, there is a global demand for developing sweet potato varieties that are resistant to the disease. In this study, we have investigated the interference of stem nematode infectivity by the expression of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in transgenic sweet potato that are homologous to the unc-15 gene, which affects the muscle protein paramyosin of the pathogen. The production of double-stranded RNAs and siRNAs in transgenic lines with a single transgene integration event was verified by Northern blot analysis. The expression of unc-15 was reduced dramatically in stem nematodes collected from the inoculated storage roots of transgenic plants, and the infection areas of their storage roots were dramatically smaller than that of wild-type (WT). Compared with the WT, the transgenic plants showed increased yield in the stem nematode-infested field. Our results demonstrate that the expression of siRNAs targeting the unc-15 gene of D. destructor is an effective approach in improving stem nematode resistance in sweet potato, in adjunct with the global integrated pest management programs. PMID:26034810

  3. Insights into the therapeutic potential of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α small interfering RNA in malignant melanoma delivered via folate-decorated cationic liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhongjian; Zhang, Tianpeng; Wu, Baojian; Zhang, Xingwang

    2016-01-01

    Malignant melanoma (MM) represents the most dangerous form of skin cancer, and its incidence is expected to rise in the coming time. However, therapy for MM is limited by low topical drug concentration and multidrug resistance. This article aimed to develop folate-decorated cationic liposomes (fc-LPs) for hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) small interfering (siRNA) delivery, and to evaluate the potential of such siRNA/liposome complexes in MM therapy. HIF-1α siRNA-loaded fc-LPs (siRNA-fc-LPs) were prepared by a film hydration method followed by siRNA incubation. Folate decoration of liposomes was achieved by incorporation of folate/oleic acid-diacylated oligochitosans. The resulting siRNA-fc-LPs were 95.3 nm in size with a ζ potential of 2.41 mV. The liposomal vectors exhibited excellent loading capacity and protective effect toward siRNA. The in vitro cell transfection efficiency was almost parallel to the commercially available Lipofectamine™ 2000. Moreover, the anti-melanoma activity of HIF-1α siRNA was significantly enhanced through fc-LPs. Western blot analysis and apoptosis test demonstrated that siRNA-fc-LPs substantially reduced the production of HIF-1α-associated protein and induced the apoptosis of hypoxia-tolerant melanoma cells. Our designed liposomal vectors might be applicable as siRNA delivery vehicle to systemically or topically treat MM. PMID:27042054

  4. Assessing delivery and quantifying efficacy of small interfering ribonucleic acid therapeutics in the skin using a dual-axis confocal microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ra, Hyejun; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, Emilio; Smith, Bryan R.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Kino, Gordon S.; Solgaard, Olav; Kaspar, Roger L.; Contag, Christopher H.

    2010-05-01

    Transgenic reporter mice and advances in imaging instrumentation are enabling real-time visualization of cellular mechanisms in living subjects and accelerating the development of novel therapies. Innovative confocal microscope designs are improving their utility for microscopic imaging of fluorescent reporters in living animals. We develop dual-axis confocal (DAC) microscopes for such in vivo studies and create mouse models where fluorescent proteins are expressed in the skin for the purpose of advancing skin therapeutics and transdermal delivery tools. Three-dimensional image volumes, through the different skin compartments of the epidermis and dermis, can be acquired in several seconds with the DAC microscope in living mice, and are comparable to histologic analyses of reporter protein expression patterns in skin sections. Intravital imaging with the DAC microscope further enables visualization of green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene expression in the skin over time, and quantification of transdermal delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) and therapeutic efficacy. Visualization of transdermal delivery of nucleic acids will play an important role in the development of innovative strategies for treating skin pathologies.

  5. Resistance to Ditylenchus destructor Infection in Sweet Potato by the Expression of Small Interfering RNAs Targeting unc-15, a Movement-Related Gene.

    PubMed

    Fan, Weijuan; Wei, Zhaorong; Zhang, Min; Ma, Peiyong; Liu, Guiling; Zheng, Jianli; Guo, Xiaoding; Zhang, Peng

    2015-11-01

    Stem nematode (Ditylenchus destructor) is one of most serious diseases that limit the productivity and quality of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas), a root crop with worldwide importance for food security and nutrition improvement. Hence, there is a global demand for developing sweet potato varieties that are resistant to the disease. In this study, we have investigated the interference of stem nematode infectivity by the expression of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in transgenic sweet potato that are homologous to the unc-15 gene, which affects the muscle protein paramyosin of the pathogen. The production of double-stranded RNAs and siRNAs in transgenic lines with a single transgene integration event was verified by Northern blot analysis. The expression of unc-15 was reduced dramatically in stem nematodes collected from the inoculated storage roots of transgenic plants, and the infection areas of their storage roots were dramatically smaller than that of wild-type (WT). Compared with the WT, the transgenic plants showed increased yield in the stem nematode-infested field. Our results demonstrate that the expression of siRNAs targeting the unc-15 gene of D. destructor is an effective approach in improving stem nematode resistance in sweet potato, in adjunct with the global integrated pest management programs.

  6. Gene silencing in primary and metastatic tumors by small interfering RNA delivery in mice: quantitative analysis using melanoma cells expressing firefly and sea pansy luciferases.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yuki; Nishikawa, Makiya; Kobayashi, Naoki; Takakura, Yoshinobu

    2005-07-20

    Silencing of oncogenes or other genes contributing to tumor malignancy or progression by RNA interference (RNAi) offers a promising approach to treating tumor patients. To achieve RNAi-based tumor therapy, a small interfering RNA (siRNA) or siRNA-expressing vector needs to be delivered to tumor cells, but little information about its in vivo delivery has been reported. In this study, we examined whether the expression of the target gene in tumor cells can be suppressed by the delivery of RNAi effectors to primary and metastatic tumor cells. To quantitatively evaluate the RNAi effects in tumor cells, mouse melanoma B16-BL6 cells were stably transfected with both firefly (a model target gene) and sea pansy (an internal standard gene) luciferase genes to obtain B16-BL6/dual Luc cells. The target gene expression in subcutaneous primary tumors of B16-BL6/dual Luc cells was significantly suppressed by direct injection of the RNAi effectors followed by electroporation. The expression in metastatic hepatic tumors was also significantly reduced by an intravenous injection of either RNAi effector by the hydrodynamics-based procedure. These results indicate that the both RNAi effectors have a potential to silence target gene in tumor cells in vivo when successfully delivered to tumor cells. PMID:15936841

  7. Small interfering-RNA to protein kinase C-delta reduces the proinflammatory effects of human C-reactive protein in biobreeding diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Jialal, I; Machha, A; Devaraj, S

    2013-04-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1DM) is a proinflammatory state characterized by increased C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. Previously we reported that human CRP accentuated macrophage activity in spontaneously diabetic biobreeding (BB) rats and also increased protein kinase C (PKC) delta. Hence we tested the effect of molecular inhibition of PKC delta on plasma and macrophage proinflammatory biomarkers using small interfering (si)RNA to PKC delta. Prior to administration of human CRP, daily for 3 days to diabetic rats, scrambled siRNA or siRNA to PKC delta was also delivered for the 3 days, and the animals were sacrificed on day 4. Peritoneal macrophages and plasma were obtained. Compared to scrambled siRNA, siRNA to PKC delta resulted in a significant decrease in biomediators of inflammation in plasma and from macrophages (IL-1, TNF-alpha, IL-6, MCP-1, KC/IL-8, and PAI -1). However, siRNA to PKC delta has no effect on superoxide release from macrophages. In conclusion, our novel data suggests that siRNA to PKC delta attenuates the proinflammatory effect of human CRP in spontaneously diabetic BB rats and could have implications with regard to attenuating inflammation and vascular complications in T1DM.

  8. Effective inhibition of mRNA accumulation and protein expression of H5N1 avian influenza virus NS1 gene in vitro by small interfering RNAs.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Hanwei; Du, Li; Hao, Yongchang; Cheng, Ying; Luo, Jing; Kuang, Wenhua; Zhang, Donglin; Lei, Ming; Jia, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Xiaoru; Qi, Chao; He, Hongxuan; Wang, Fengyang

    2013-07-01

    Avian influenza has emerged as a devastating disease and may cross species barrier and adapt to a new host, causing enormous economic loss and great public health threats, and non-structural protein 1 (NS1) is a multifunctional non-structural protein of avian influenza virus (AIV) that counters cellular antiviral activities and is a virulence factor. RNA interference (RNAi) provides a powerful promising approach to inhibit viral infection specifically. To explore the possibility of using RNAi as a strategy against AIV infection, after the fusion protein expression plasmids pNS1-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), which contain the EGFP reporter gene and AIV NS1 as silencing target, were constructed and NS1-EGFP fusion protein expressing HEK293 cell lines were established, four small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting NS1 gene were designed, synthesized, and used to transfect the stable cell lines. Flow cytometry, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and Western blot were performed to assess the expression level of NS1. The results suggested that sequence-dependent specific siRNAs effectively inhibited mRNA accumulation and protein expression of AIV NS1 in vitro. These findings provide useful information for the development of RNAi-based prophylaxis and therapy for AIV infection.

  9. An Efficient Method for Electroporation of Small Interfering RNAs into ENCODE Project Tier 1 GM12878 and K562 Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Muller, Ryan Y; Hammond, Ming C; Rio, Donald C; Lee, Yeon J

    2015-12-01

    The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Project aims to identify all functional sequence elements in the human genome sequence by use of high-throughput DNA/cDNA sequencing approaches. To aid the standardization, comparison, and integration of data sets produced from different technologies and platforms, the ENCODE Consortium selected several standard human cell lines to be used by the ENCODE Projects. The Tier 1 ENCODE cell lines include GM12878, K562, and H1 human embryonic stem cell lines. GM12878 is a lymphoblastoid cell line, transformed with the Epstein-Barr virus, that was selected by the International HapMap Project for whole genome and transcriptome sequencing by use of the Illumina platform. K562 is an immortalized myelogenous leukemia cell line. The GM12878 cell line is attractive for the ENCODE Projects, as it offers potential synergy with the International HapMap Project. Despite the vast amount of sequencing data available on the GM12878 cell line through the ENCODE Project, including transcriptome, chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing for histone marks, and transcription factors, no small interfering siRNA-mediated knockdown studies have been performed in the GM12878 cell line, as cationic lipid-mediated transfection methods are inefficient for lymphoid cell lines. Here, we present an efficient and reproducible method for transfection of a variety of siRNAs into the GM12878 and K562 cell lines, which subsequently results in targeted protein depletion.

  10. Co-injection of a targeted, reversibly masked endosomolytic polymer dramatically improves the efficacy of cholesterol-conjugated small interfering RNAs in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wong, So C; Klein, Jason J; Hamilton, Holly L; Chu, Qili; Frey, Christina L; Trubetskoy, Vladimir S; Hegge, Julia; Wakefield, Darren; Rozema, David B; Lewis, David L

    2012-12-01

    Effective in vivo delivery of small interfering (siRNA) has been a major obstacle in the development of RNA interference therapeutics. One of the first attempts to overcome this obstacle utilized intravenous injection of cholesterol-conjugated siRNA (chol-siRNA). Although studies in mice revealed target gene knockdown in the liver, delivery was relatively inefficient, requiring 3 daily injections of 50 mg/kg of chol-siRNA to obtain measurable reduction in gene expression. Here we present a new delivery approach that increases the efficacy of the chol-siRNA over 500-fold and allows over 90% reduction in target gene expression in mice and, for the first time, high levels of gene knockdown in non-human primates. This improved efficacy is achieved by the co-injection of a hepatocyte-targeted and reversibly masked endosomolytic polymer. We show that knockdown is absolutely dependent on the presence of hepatocyte-targeting ligand on the polymer, the cognate hepatocyte receptor, and the cholesterol moiety of the siRNA. Importantly, we provide evidence that this increase in efficacy is not dependent on interactions between the chol-siRNA with the polymer prior to injection or in the bloodstream. The simplicity of the formulation and efficacy of this mode of siRNA delivery should prove beneficial in the use of siRNA as a therapeutic.

  11. Co-Injection of a Targeted, Reversibly Masked Endosomolytic Polymer Dramatically Improves the Efficacy of Cholesterol-Conjugated Small Interfering RNAs In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wong, So C.; Klein, Jason J.; Hamilton, Holly L.; Chu, Qili; Frey, Christina L.; Trubetskoy, Vladimir S.; Hegge, Julia; Wakefield, Darren; Rozema, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Effective in vivo delivery of small interfering (siRNA) has been a major obstacle in the development of RNA interference therapeutics. One of the first attempts to overcome this obstacle utilized intravenous injection of cholesterol-conjugated siRNA (chol-siRNA). Although studies in mice revealed target gene knockdown in the liver, delivery was relatively inefficient, requiring 3 daily injections of 50 mg/kg of chol-siRNA to obtain measurable reduction in gene expression. Here we present a new delivery approach that increases the efficacy of the chol-siRNA over 500-fold and allows over 90% reduction in target gene expression in mice and, for the first time, high levels of gene knockdown in non-human primates. This improved efficacy is achieved by the co-injection of a hepatocyte-targeted and reversibly masked endosomolytic polymer. We show that knockdown is absolutely dependent on the presence of hepatocyte-targeting ligand on the polymer, the cognate hepatocyte receptor, and the cholesterol moiety of the siRNA. Importantly, we provide evidence that this increase in efficacy is not dependent on interactions between the chol-siRNA with the polymer prior to injection or in the bloodstream. The simplicity of the formulation and efficacy of this mode of siRNA delivery should prove beneficial in the use of siRNA as a therapeutic. PMID:23181701

  12. In vivo quantification of formulated and chemically modified small interfering RNA by heating-in-Triton quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (HIT qRT-PCR)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background While increasing numbers of small interfering RNA (siRNA) therapeutics enter into clinical trials, the quantification of siRNA from clinical samples for pharmacokinetic studies remains a challenge. This challenge is even more acute for the quantification of chemically modified and formulated siRNAs such as those typically required for systemic delivery. Results Here, we describe a novel method, heating-in-Triton quantitative reverse transcription PCR (HIT qRT-PCR) that improves upon the stem-loop RT-PCR technique for the detection of formulated and chemically modified siRNAs from plasma and tissue. The broad dynamic range of this assay spans five orders of magnitude and can detect as little as 70 pg duplex in 1 g of liver or in 1 ml of plasma. We have used this assay to quantify intravenously administrated siRNA in rodents and have reliably correlated target reduction with tissue drug concentrations. We were able to detect siRNA in rat liver for at least 10 days post injection and determined that for a modified factor VII (FVII) siRNA, on average, approximately 500 siRNA molecules per cell are required to achieve a 50% target reduction. Conclusions HIT qRT-PCR is a novel approach that simplifies the in vivo quantification of siRNA and provides a highly sensitive and reproducible tool to measure the silencing efficiency of chemically modified and formulated siRNAs. PMID:20731861

  13. Host-virus interaction: the antiviral defense function of small interfering RNAs can be enhanced by host microRNA-7 in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Liu, Dongyun; Zhang, Sheng; Wei, Xiujuan; Song, Jie; Zhang, Yupei; Jin, Min; Shen, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xinwei; Feng, Zhichun; Li, Junwen

    2015-01-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) directed against poliovirus (PV) and other viruses effectively inhibit viral replication and have been developed as antiviral agents. Here, we demonstrate that a specific siRNA targeting the region between nucleotides 100–125 (siRNA-100) from the 5′-untranslated region (5′-UTR) of PV plays a critical role in inhibiting PV replication. Our data demonstrate that siRNA-100 treatment can greatly reduce PV titers, resulting in up-regulation of host microRNA-7 (miR-7), which in turn, leads to enhance inhibition of PV infection further. Moreover, our results suggest that siRNA-100 can also impair the spread of PV to uninfected cells by increasing host resistance to PV, resulting in decreasing necrosis and cytopathic effects (CPE) levels, as well as prolonging the survival of infected cells. Indeed, the active antiviral effect of siRNA-100 was potentially supplemented by the activity of miR-7, and both of them can serve as stabilizing factors for maintenance of cellular homeostasis. Results of this study identify a molecular mechanism of RNAi for antiviral defense, and extend our knowledge of the complex interplay between host and PV, which will provide a basis for the development of effective RNAi-based therapies designed to inhibit PV replication and protect host cells. PMID:26067353

  14. Small interfering RNAs targeting viral structural envelope protein genes and the 5ʹ-UTR inhibit replication of bovine viral diarrhea virus in MDBK cells.

    PubMed

    Mishra, N; Rajukumar, K; Kalaiyarasu, S; Behera, S P; Nema, R K; Dubey, S C

    2011-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDVs) are important pathogens of cattle that occur worldwide, and for which no antiviral therapy is available. In the present study, the inhibitory effect of small interfering (si) RNAs on bovine viral diarrhea virus 1 (BVDV-1) replication in cultured bovine cells was explored. Four synthetic siRNAs were designed to target structural envelope region genes (Erns, E1, and E2) and one cocktail of siRNA was generated to target the 5ʹ-UTR of the BVDV-1 genome. The inhibitory effects of siRNAs were assessed by determination of infectious viral titer, viral antigen and viral RNA. The siRNA cocktail and three of the synthetic siRNAs produced moderate anti-BVDV-1 effect in vitro as shown by 25%-40% reduction in BVDV-1 antigen production, 7.9-19.9-fold reduction in viral titer and 21-48-fold reduction in BVDV-1 RNA copy number. Our findings suggest that siRNA cocktail targeted at the 5ʹ-UTR is a stronger inhibitor of BVDV-1 replication and the targets for siRNA inhibition can be extended to BVDV-1 structural envelope protein genes.

  15. Small interfering RNA-mediated selective knockdown of Na(V)1.8 tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channel reverses mechanical allodynia in neuropathic rats.

    PubMed

    Dong, X-W; Goregoaker, S; Engler, H; Zhou, X; Mark, L; Crona, J; Terry, R; Hunter, J; Priestley, T

    2007-05-11

    The biophysical properties of a tetrodotoxin resistant (TTXr) sodium channel, Na(V)1.8, and its restricted expression to the peripheral sensory neurons suggest that blocking this channel might have therapeutic potential in various pain states and may offer improved tolerability compared with existing sodium channel blockers. However, the role of Na(V)1.8 in nociception cannot be tested using a traditional pharmacological approach with small molecules because currently available sodium channel blockers do not distinguish between sodium channel subtypes. We sought to determine whether small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) might be capable of achieving the desired selectivity. Using Northern blot analysis and membrane potential measurement, several siRNAs were identified that were capable of a highly-selective attenuation of Na(V)1.8 message as well as functional expression in clonal ND7/23 cells which were stably transfected with the rat Na(V)1.8 gene. Functional knockdown of the channel was confirmed using whole-cell voltage-clamp electrophysiology. One of the siRNA probes showing a robust knockdown of Na(V)1.8 current was evaluated for in vivo efficacy in reversing an established tactile allodynia in the rat chronic constriction nerve-injury (CCI) model. The siRNA, which was delivered to lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) via an indwelling epidural cannula, caused a significant reduction of Na(V)1.8 mRNA expression in lumbar 4 and 5 (L4-L5) DRG neurons and consequently reversed mechanical allodynia in CCI rats. We conclude that silencing of Na(V)1.8 channel using a siRNA approach is capable of producing pain relief in the CCI model and further support a role for Na(V)1.8 in pathological sensory dysfunction. PMID:17367951

  16. T cell treatment with small interfering RNA for suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 modulates allergic airway responses in a murine model of asthma.

    PubMed

    Moriwaki, Atsushi; Inoue, Hiromasa; Nakano, Takako; Matsunaga, Yuko; Matsuno, Yukiko; Matsumoto, Takafumi; Fukuyama, Satoru; Kan-O, Keiko; Matsumoto, Koichiro; Tsuda-Eguchi, Miyuki; Nagakubo, Daisuke; Yoshie, Osamu; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Kubo, Masato; Nakanishi, Yoichi

    2011-04-01

    CD4(+) T cells, particularly T helper (Th) 2 cells, play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of allergic asthma. Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins control the balance of CD4(+) T cell differentiation. Mice that lack SOCS3 in T cells by crossing SOCS3-floxed mice with Lck-Cre-transgenic mice have reduced allergen-induced eosinophilia in the airways. Here, we studied the effects of SOCS3 silencing with small interfering (si) RNA in primary CD4(+) T cells on Th2 cell differentiation and on asthmatic responses in mice. Th2 cells were generated from ovalbumin (OVA)-specific T cell receptor-transgenic mice in vitro and transferred into recipient mice. Transfection of SOCS3-specific siRNA attenuated Th2 response in vitro. Adoptive transfer of SOCS3-siRNA T cells exhibited markedly suppressed airway hyperresponsiveness and eosinophilia after OVA challenge, with a concomitant decrease in OVA-specific CD4(+) T cell accumulation in the airways. To investigate the mechanism of this impaired CD4(+) T cell accumulation, we inactivated SOCS3 of T cells by crossing SOCS3-floxed (SOCS3(flox/flox)) mice with CD4-Cre transgenic mice. CD4-Cre × SOCS3(flox/flox) mice exhibited fewer IL-4-producing cells and more reduced eosinophil infiltration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids than control mice in a model of OVA-induced asthma. Expression of CCR3 and CCR4 in CD4(+) T cells was decreased in CD4-Cre × SOCS3(flox/flox) mice. CCR4 expression was also decreased in CD4(+) T cells after transfer of SOCS3 siRNA-treated T cells. These findings suggest that the therapeutic modulation of SOCS3 expression in CD4(+) T cells might be effective in preventing the development of allergic asthma.

  17. Small interfering RNAs targeted to interleukin-4 and respiratory syncytial virus reduce airway inflammation in a mouse model of virus-induced asthma exacerbation.

    PubMed

    Khaitov, Musa R; Shilovskiy, Igor P; Nikonova, Aleksandra A; Shershakova, Nadezda N; Kamyshnikov, Oleg Y; Babakhin, Alexander A; Zverev, Vitaly V; Johnston, Sebastian L; Khaitov, Rakhim M

    2014-07-01

    Asthma exacerbations are caused primarily by viral infections. Antisense and small interfering RNA (siRNA) technologies have gained attention as potential antiasthma and antiviral approaches. In this study we analyzed whether gene silencing of interleukin (IL)-4 expression and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) replication by RNA interference is able to suppress allergen- and virus-induced responses in a mouse model of virus-induced asthma exacerbation. Knockdown efficacy of IL-4 siRNA molecules was analyzed in the human HEK293T cell line by cotransfection of six different siRNAs with a plasmid carrying mouse IL-4. The most potent siRNA was then used in a mouse model of RSV-induced asthma exacerbation. BALB/c mice were sensitized intraperitoneally with ovalbumin (OVA) and then infected 12 days later intranasally with RSV Long strain (1×10(6) TCID50/mouse), followed 1 day later by intranasal challenge with OVA for 3 days. Mice were pretreated intranasally three times with either siRNA to IL-4 or GFP control, 2 days before, and on the first two OVA challenge days. siRNAs to RSV or rhinovirus control were inoculated intranasally once, 3 hr before RSV infection. Combined anti-IL-4 and anti-RSV siRNAs were able to significantly reduce total cell counts and eosinophilia in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, development of airway hyperresponsiveness, and airway inflammation and to downregulate IL-4 mRNA expression and RSV viral RNA, but to upregulate IFN-γ levels in lung tissues. We conclude that anti-helper T cells type 2 and antiviral siRNAs may constitute a new therapeutic approach for treatment of virus induced asthma exacerbations.

  18. Inhibition of Dengue Virus Infections in Cell Cultures and in AG129 Mice by a Small Interfering RNA Targeting a Highly Conserved Sequence ▿

    PubMed Central

    Stein, David A.; Perry, Stuart T.; Buck, Michael D.; Oehmen, Christopher S.; Fischer, Matthew A.; Poore, Elizabeth; Smith, Jessica L.; Lancaster, Alissa M.; Hirsch, Alec J.; Slifka, Mark K.; Nelson, Jay A.; Shresta, Sujan; Früh, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    The dengue viruses (DENVs) exist as numerous genetic strains that are grouped into four antigenically distinct serotypes. DENV strains from each serotype can cause severe disease and threaten public health in tropical and subtropical regions worldwide. No licensed antiviral agent to treat DENV infections is currently available, and there is an acute need for the development of novel therapeutics. We found that a synthetic small interfering RNA (siRNA) (DC-3) targeting the highly conserved 5′ cyclization sequence (5′CS) region of the DENV genome reduced, by more than 100-fold, the titers of representative strains from each DENV serotype in vitro. To determine if DC-3 siRNA could inhibit DENV in vivo, an “in vivo-ready” version of DC-3 was synthesized and tested against DENV-2 by using a mouse model of antibody-dependent enhancement of infection (ADE)-induced disease. Compared with the rapid weight loss and 5-day average survival time of the control groups, mice receiving the DC-3 siRNA had an average survival time of 15 days and showed little weight loss for approximately 12 days. DC-3-treated mice also contained significantly less virus than control groups in several tissues at various time points postinfection. These results suggest that exogenously introduced siRNA combined with the endogenous RNA interference processing machinery has the capacity to prevent severe dengue disease. Overall, the data indicate that DC-3 siRNA represents a useful research reagent and has potential as a novel approach to therapeutic intervention against the genetically diverse dengue viruses. PMID:21795337

  19. Evaluation of in vitro inhibitory potential of small interfering RNAs directed against various regions of foot-and-mouth disease virus genome.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, Jajati Keshari; Sanyal, Aniket; Hemadri, Divakar; Tosh, Chakradhar; Kumar, R Manoj; Bandyopadhyay, Santanu Kumar

    2005-04-15

    India is endemic for foot-and-mouth disease and it continues to be a major threat to the livestock industry despite vaccination programmes. In the present study, the ability of specific small interfering (si)RNAs directed against different genomic regions of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) to inhibit virus replication in BHK-21 cells was examined. For preliminary evaluation of possible siRNA-mediated FMDV inhibition, a cocktail of several unique populations of 12-30bp siRNAs were successfully produced corresponding to three target regions located at structural (VP3-VP1), non-structural (2A-2C), and non-structural-untranslated (3D-3'UTR) region of serotype Asia1. Once the populations of siRNAs generated were found to reduce the virus titre significantly, two highly conserved 21bp siRNA duplexes were designed by analysing all FMDV sequence entries available in public-domain databases. In virus titration assay, more than 99% inhibition of virus yield for all the four serotypes (type Asia1, O, A, and C) could be demonstrated in cells transfected with each of the FMDV-specific siRNAs at 24h post-infection, compared to control cells transfected with scrambled siRNA. This was well supported by reduction in OD values in FMDV-specific sandwich ELISA. Although 100-fold reduction in virus titre with siRNA1 is substantial considering the transfection efficiency and fixed level of input siRNA, siRNA2 emerged to be a better choice as target where more than 300-fold reduction was observed and its inhibitory effect extended up to 48 h post-infection against all the serotypes. Interestingly, in the present study type A virus (IND 17/77) had a single mismatch at position 2 in the siRNA2 target region but it did not abrogate the inhibitory effect.

  20. Transgenic banana plants expressing small interfering RNAs targeted against viral replication initiation gene display high-level resistance to banana bunchy top virus infection.

    PubMed

    Shekhawat, Upendra K S; Ganapathi, Thumballi R; Hadapad, Ashok B

    2012-08-01

    The banana aphid-transmitted Banana bunchy top virus (BBTV) is the most destructive viral pathogen of bananas and plantains worldwide. Lack of natural sources of resistance to BBTV has necessitated the exploitation of proven transgenic technologies for obtaining BBTV-resistant banana cultivars. In this study, we have explored the concept of using intron-hairpin-RNA (ihpRNA) transcripts corresponding to viral master replication initiation protein (Rep) to generate BBTV-resistant transgenic banana plants. Two ihpRNA constructs namely ihpRNA-Rep and ihpRNA-ProRep generated using Rep full coding sequence or Rep partial coding sequence together with its 5' upstream regulatory region, respectively, and castor bean catalase intron were successfully transformed into banana embryogenic cells. ihpRNA-Rep- and ihpRNA-ProRep-derived transgenic banana plants, selected based on preliminary screening for efficient reporter gene expression, were completely resistant to BBTV infection as indicated by the absence of disease symptoms after 6 months of viruliferous aphid inoculation. The resistance to BBTV infection was also evident by the inability to detect cDNAs coding for viral coat protein, movement protein and Rep protein by RT-PCR from inoculated transgenic leaf extracts. Southern analysis of the two groups of transgenics showed that ihpRNA transgene was stably integrated into the banana genome. The detection of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) derived from the ihpRNA transgene sequence in transformed BBTV-resistant plants positively established RNA interference as the mechanism underlying the observed resistance to BBTV. Efficient screening of optimal transformants in this vegetatively propagated non-segregating fruit crop ensured that all the transgenic plants assayed were resistant to BBTV infection. PMID:22552945

  1. Cellular delivery of small interfering RNA by a non-covalently attached cell-penetrating peptide: quantitative analysis of uptake and biological effect

    PubMed Central

    Veldhoen, Sandra; Laufer, Sandra D.; Trampe, Alexander; Restle, Tobias

    2006-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have evolved as promising new tools to deliver nucleic acids into cells. So far, the majority of these delivery systems require a covalent linkage between carrier and cargo. To exploit the higher flexibility of a non-covalent strategy, we focused on the characterisation of a novel carrier peptide termed MPGα, which spontaneously forms complexes with nucleic acids. Using a luciferase-targeted small interfering RNA (siRNA) as cargo, we optimised the conditions for MPGα-mediated transfection of mammalian cells. In this system, reporter gene activity could be inhibited up to 90% with an IC50 value in the sub-nanomolar range. As a key issue, we addressed the cellular uptake mechanism of MPGα/siRNA complexes applying various approaches. First, transfection of HeLa cells with MPGα/siRNA complexes in the presence of several inhibitors of endocytosis showed a significant reduction of the RNA interference (RNAi) effect. Second, confocal laser microscopy revealed a punctual intracellular pattern rather than a diffuse distribution of fluorescently labelled RNA-cargo. These data provide strong evidence of an endocytotic pathway contributing significantly to the uptake of MPGα/siRNA complexes. Finally, we quantified the intracellular number of siRNA molecules after MPGα-mediated transfection. The amount of siRNA required to induce half maximal RNAi was 10 000 molecules per cell. Together, the combination of methods provided allows for a detailed side by side quantitative analysis of cargo internalisation and related biological effects. Thus, the overall efficiency of a given delivery technique as well as the mechanism of uptake can be assessed. PMID:17135188

  2. Effects of brain IKKβ gene silencing by small interfering RNA on P-glycoprotein expression and brain damage in the rat kainic acid-induced seizure model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Nian; Liu, Hao; Zhang, Yan-Fang; Su, Ling-Ying; Liu, Xin-Hong; Li, Le-Chao; Hao, Jin-Bo; Huang, Xian-Jing; Di, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance mediated by over-expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in brain is an important mechanism accounting for the drug-therapy failure in epilepsy. Over-expression of P-gp in epilepsy rat brain may be regulated by inflammation and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation. Inhibitory κ B kinase subunit β (IKKβ) is an up-stream molecular controlling NF-κB activation. With the small interfering RNA (siRNA) technique and kainic acid (KA)-induced rat epileptic seizure model, the present study was aimed to further evaluate the role of NF-κB inhibition, via blocking IKKβ gene transcription, in the epileptic brain P-gp over-expression, seizure susceptibility, and post-seizure brain damage. siRNA targeting IKKβ was administered to rats via intracerebroventricular injection before seizure induction by KA microinjection; scrambled siRNA was used as control. Brain mRNA and protein levels of IKKβ and P-gp were detected by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. NF-κB activity was measured by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Latency to grade III or V seizure onset was recorded, brain damage was evaluated by neuronal cell counting and epileptiform activity was monitored by electroencephalography. IKKβ siRNA pre-treatment inhibited NF-κB activation and abolished P-gp over-expression in KA-induced epileptic rat brain, accompanied by decreased seizure susceptibility. These findings suggested that epileptogenic-induced P-gp over-expression could be regulated by IKKβ through the NF-κB pathway. PMID:24040792

  3. Silencing tumor necrosis factor-alpha in vitro from small interfering RNA-decorated titanium nanotube array can facilitate osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhenlin; Hu, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Dawei; Zhuo, Mengchuan; Cheng, Jiwei; Xu, Xingping; Xing, Yongming; Fan, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Titanium implants are known for their bone bonding ability. However, the osseointegration may be severely disturbed in the inflammation environment. In order to enhance osseointegration of the implant in an inflamed environment, the small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) was used to functionalize titanium surface for gene silencing. The chitosan–tripolyphosphate–hyaluronate complexes were used to formulate nanoparticles (NPs) with siRNA, which were adsorbed directly by the anodized titanium surface. The surface characterization was analyzed by scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscopy, as well as contact angle measurement. The fluorescence microscope was used to monitor the degradation of the layer. The coculture system was established with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) grown directly on functionalized titanium surface and RAW264.7 cells (preactivated by lipopolysaccharide) grown upside in a transwell chamber. The transfection and knockdown efficiency of TNF-α in RAW264.7 cells were determined by fluorescence microscope, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The cytoskeleton and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs were also analyzed. Regular vertical aligned nanotubes (~100 nm diameter and ~300 nm length) were generated after anodization of polished titanium. After loading with NPs, the nanotubes were filled and covered by a layer of amorphous particles. The surface topography changed and wettability decreased after covering with NPs. As expected, a burst degradation of the film was observed, which could provide sufficient NPs in the released supernatant and result in transfection and knockdown effects in RAW264.7 cells. The cytoskeleton arrangement of MSCs was elongated and the osteogenic differentiation was also significantly improved on NPs loading surface. In conclusion, the siRNA decorated titanium implant could simultaneously suppress inflammation and improve

  4. In vivo study of Dicer-2-mediated immune response of the small interfering RNA pathway upon systemic infections of virulent and avirulent viruses in Bombus terrestris.

    PubMed

    Niu, Jinzhi; Smagghe, Guy; De Coninck, Dieter I M; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Deforce, Dieter; Meeus, Ivan

    2016-03-01

    Recent studies suggest a potent role of the small interfering RNA (siRNA) pathway in the control of bee viruses and its usefulness to tackle these viral diseases. However, the involvement of the siRNA pathway in the defense against different bee viruses is still poorly understood. Therefore, in this report, we comprehensively analyzed the response of the siRNA pathway in bumblebees of Bombus terrestris to systemic infections of the virulent Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) and the avirulent slow bee paralysis virus (SBPV). Our results showed that IAPV and SBPV infections induced the expression of Dicer-2. IAPV infections also triggered the production of predominantly 22 nt-long virus-derived siRNAs (vsiRNAs). Intriguingly, these 22 nt-long vsiRNAs showed a high proportion of antigenomic IAPV sequences. Conversely, these predominantly 22 nt-long vsiRNAs of SBPV were not detected in SBPV infected bees. Furthermore, an "RNAi-of-RNAi" experiment on Dicer-2 did not result in altered genome copy numbers of IAPV (n = 17-18) and also not of SBPV (n = 11-12). Based on these results, we can speculate about the importance of the siRNA pathway in bumblebees for the antiviral response. During infection of IAPV, this pathway is probably recruited but it might be insufficient to control viral infection in our experimental setup. The host can control SBPV infection, but aside from the induction of Dicer-2 expression, no further evidence of the antiviral activity of the siRNA pathway was observed. This report may also enhance the current understanding of the siRNA pathway in the innate immunity of non-model insects upon different viral infections.

  5. In vivo study of Dicer-2-mediated immune response of the small interfering RNA pathway upon systemic infections of virulent and avirulent viruses in Bombus terrestris.

    PubMed

    Niu, Jinzhi; Smagghe, Guy; De Coninck, Dieter I M; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Deforce, Dieter; Meeus, Ivan

    2016-03-01

    Recent studies suggest a potent role of the small interfering RNA (siRNA) pathway in the control of bee viruses and its usefulness to tackle these viral diseases. However, the involvement of the siRNA pathway in the defense against different bee viruses is still poorly understood. Therefore, in this report, we comprehensively analyzed the response of the siRNA pathway in bumblebees of Bombus terrestris to systemic infections of the virulent Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) and the avirulent slow bee paralysis virus (SBPV). Our results showed that IAPV and SBPV infections induced the expression of Dicer-2. IAPV infections also triggered the production of predominantly 22 nt-long virus-derived siRNAs (vsiRNAs). Intriguingly, these 22 nt-long vsiRNAs showed a high proportion of antigenomic IAPV sequences. Conversely, these predominantly 22 nt-long vsiRNAs of SBPV were not detected in SBPV infected bees. Furthermore, an "RNAi-of-RNAi" experiment on Dicer-2 did not result in altered genome copy numbers of IAPV (n = 17-18) and also not of SBPV (n = 11-12). Based on these results, we can speculate about the importance of the siRNA pathway in bumblebees for the antiviral response. During infection of IAPV, this pathway is probably recruited but it might be insufficient to control viral infection in our experimental setup. The host can control SBPV infection, but aside from the induction of Dicer-2 expression, no further evidence of the antiviral activity of the siRNA pathway was observed. This report may also enhance the current understanding of the siRNA pathway in the innate immunity of non-model insects upon different viral infections. PMID:26711439

  6. Inhibition of Coxsackievirus B3 Replication by Small Interfering RNAs Requires Perfect Sequence Match in the Central Region of the Viral Positive Strand

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ji; Cheung, Paul K. M.; Zhang, Huifang M.; Chau, David; Yang, Decheng

    2005-01-01

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) is the most common causal agent of viral myocarditis, but existing drug therapies are of limited value. Application of small interfering RNA (siRNA) in knockdown of gene expression is an emerging technology in antiviral gene therapy. To investigate whether RNA interference (RNAi) can protect against CVB3 infection, we evaluated the effects of RNAi on viral replication in HeLa cells and murine cardiomyocytes by using five CVB3-specific siRNAs targeting distinct regions of the viral genome. The most effective one is siRNA-4, targeting the viral protease 2A, achieving a 92% inhibition of CVB3 replication. The specific RNAi effects could last at least 48 h, and cell viability assay revealed that 90% of siRNA-4-pretreated cells were still alive and lacked detectable viral protein expression 48 h postinfection. Moreover, administration of siRNAs after viral infection could also effectively inhibit viral replication, indicating its therapeutic potential. Further evaluation by combination found that no enhanced inhibitory effects were observed when siRNA-4 was cotransfected with each of the other four candidates. In mutational analysis of the mechanisms of siRNA action, we found that siRNA functions by targeting the positive strand of virus and requires a perfect sequence match in the central region of the target, but mismatches were more tolerated near the 3′ end than the 5′ end of the antisense strand. These findings reveal an effective target for CVB3 silencing and provide a new possibility for antiviral intervention. PMID:15681418

  7. Downregulation of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) utilizing adenovirus-mediated transfer of small interfering RNA (siRNA) in a novel spinal metastatic melanoma model.

    PubMed

    Tsung, Andrew J; Kargiotis, Odysseas; Chetty, Chandramu; Lakka, Sajani S; Gujrati, Meena; Spomar, Daniel G; Dinh, Dzung H; Rao, Jasti S

    2008-03-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) comprise a class of secreted zinc-dependent endopeptidases implicated in the metastatic potential of tumor cells due to their ability to degrade the extracellular matrix (ECM) and basement membrane. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) has been detected in high levels and correlates with invasiveness in human melanoma. We have studied the effect of adenovirus-mediated transfer of small interfering RNA (siRNA) against MMP-2 in the human melanoma cell line A2058. The delivery of these double-stranded RNA molecules represents an efficient technology in silencing disease-causing genes with known sequences at the post-transcriptional level. siRNA against MMP-2 mRNA (Ad-MMP-2) was found to decrease MMP-2 protein expression and activity in melanoma cells as demonstrated by western blotting and gelatin zymography. Furthermore, infection of cells with Ad-MMP-2 inhibited cellular migration and invasion as indicated by spheroid and matrigel assays. We also observed dose-dependent suppression of vascular network formation in an angiogenesis assay. Finally, we developed a nude mouse spinal metastatic model to investigate the local effects of tumor metastasis. Intravenous tail vein injection with Ad-MMP-2 on days 5, 9 and 11 after tumor implantation resulted in complete retention of neurological function as compared to control and scrambled vector (Ad-SV)-treated groups that showed complete paraplegia by day 14+/-2 days. Hematoxylin and eosin staining revealed decreased tumor size in the Ad-MMP-2-treated animals. This novel experimental model revealed that adenoviral-mediated transfer of RNA interference against MMP-2 results in the retention of neurological function and significantly inhibited tumor growth.

  8. Selective inhibition of FLICE-like inhibitory protein expression with small interfering RNA oligonucleotides is sufficient to sensitize tumor cells for TRAIL-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Siegmund, Daniela; Hadwiger, Philipp; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Vornlocher, Hans-Peter; Wajant, Harald

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Most tumors express death receptors and their activation represents a potential selective approach in cancer treatment. The most promising candidate for tumor selective death receptor-activation is tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)/Apo2L, which activates the death receptors TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2, and induces apoptosis preferentially in tumor cells but not in normal tissues. However, many cancer cells are not or only moderately sensitive towards TRAIL and require cotreatment with irradiation or chemotherapy to yield a therapeutically reasonable apoptotic response. Because chemotherapy can have a broad range of unwanted side effects, more specific means for sensitizing tumor cells for TRAIL are desirable. The expression of the cellular FLICE-like inhibitory protein (cFLIP) is regarded as a major cause of TRAIL resistance. We therefore analyzed the usefulness of targeting FLIP to sensitize tumor cells for TRAIL-induced apoptosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: To selectively interfere with expression of cFLIP short double-stranded RNA oligonucleotides (small interfering RNAs [siRNAs]) were introduced in the human cell lines SV80 and KB by electroporation. Effects of siRNA on FLIP expression were analyzed by Western blotting and RNase protection assay and correlated with TRAIL sensitivity upon stimulation with recombinant soluble TRAIL and TRAIL-R1- and TRAIL-R2-specific agonistic antibodies. RESULTS: FLIP expression can be inhibited by RNA interference using siRNAs, evident from reduced levels of FLIP-mRNA and FLIP protein. Inhibition of cFLIP expression sensitizes cells for apoptosis induction by TRAIL and other death ligands. In accordance with the presumed function of FLIP as an inhibitor of death receptor-induced caspase-8 activation, down-regulation of FLIP by siRNAs enhanced TRAIL-induced caspase-8 activation. CONCLUSION: Inhibition of FLIP expression was sufficient to sensitize tumor cells for TRAIL-induced apoptosis. The

  9. Systemic delivery of therapeutic small interfering RNA using a pH-triggered amphiphilic poly-L-lysine nanocarrier to suppress prostate cancer growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jianfeng; Cheng, Woei Ping; Gu, Jingxia; Ding, Caixia; Qu, Xiaozhong; Yang, Zhenzhong; O'Driscoll, Caitriona

    2012-04-11

    Prostate cancer is associated with high mortality and new therapeutic strategies are necessary for improved patient outcome. The utilisation of potent, sequence-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) to facilitate down-regulation of complementary mRNA sequences in vitro and in vivo has stimulated the development of siRNA-based cancer therapies. However, the lack of an effective siRNA delivery system significantly retards clinical application. Amphiphilic polycations with 'stealth' capacity have previously been synthesised by PEGylation of poly-l-lysine-cholic acid (PLL-CA). The benzoic imine linker between PEG and PLL-CA was designed to be stable at physiological pH but cleavable at lower pHs, consistent with the extracellular environment of tumours and the interior of endosomes/lysosomes. The selective hydrolysis of the PEG linker at these targeted sites should provide enhanced cellular uptake and endosomal escape while simultaneously ensuring prolonged blood circulation times. In this study, physicochemical profiling demonstrated nano-complex formation between the PLL derivatives and siRNA (200-280 nm in diameter). At physiological pH only a slight cationic surface charge (<20 mV) was detected, due to the masking effect of the PEG. In contrast, significantly higher positive charges (∼20 to 30 mV and >40 mV) were detected upon hydrolysis of the PEG linker at acidic pHs (pH=6.8 and 5.5, respectively). The PEGylated complexes were stable in serum without significant aggregation or decomplexation of siRNA for up to 48 h. At the cellular level, PEG-PLLs were comparable with the commercial carrier INTERFRin, in terms of cellular uptake, endosomal escape and in vitro reporter gene knockdown. In vivo, utilising a mouse model grafted with prostate carcinoma, significant tumour suppression was achieved using PEGylated complexes without marked toxicity or undesirable immunological response, this was accompanied by a simultaneous reduction in target mRNA levels. In summary

  10. Shock-induced poration, cholesterol flip-flop and small interfering RNA transfection in a phospholipid membrane: Multimillion atom, microsecond molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choubey, Amit

    performing a 15 mus all-atom MD simulation of a DPPC-CHOL bilayer. We find that the CHOL flip-flop rates are on the sub microsecond timescale. These results are verified by performing various independent parallel replica (PR) simulations. Our PR simulations provide significant boost in sampling of the flip-flop events. We observe that the CHOL flip-flop can induce membrane order, regulate membrane-bending energy, and facilitate membrane relaxation. The rapid flip-flop rates reported here have important implications for the role of CHOL in mechanical properties of cell membranes, formation of domains, and maintaining CHOL concentration asymmetry in plasma membrane. Our PR approach can reach submillisecond time scales and bridge the gap between MD simulations and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experiments on CHOL flip-flop dynamics in membranes. The last project deals with transfection barriers encountered by a bare small interfering RNA (siRNA) in a phospholipid bilayer. SiRNA molecules play a pivotal role in therapeutic applications. A key limitation to the widespread implementation of siRNA-based therapeutics is the difficulty of delivering siRNA-based drugs to cells. We have examined structural and mechanical barriers to siRNA passage across a phospholipid bilayer using all-atom MD simulations. We find that the electrostatic interaction between the anionic siRNA and head groups of phospholipid molecules induces a phase transformation from the liquid crystalline to ripple phase. Steered MD simulations reveal that the siRNA transfection through the ripple phase requires a force of ˜ 1.5 nN.

  11. Effects of 5‑fluorouracil and class III phosphoinositide 3‑kinase small interfering RNA combination therapy on SGC7901 human gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bao-Song; Sun, Jia-Lei; Gong, Wei; Zhang, Xing-Ding; Wu, Yong-You; Xing, Chun-Gen

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of small interfering RNA‑mediated inhibition of Class III phosphoinositide 3‑kinase (PI3K) signal transduction on the proliferation, apoptosis and autophagy of SGC7901 gastric cancer cells. The present study also aimed to examine the contribution of autophagic inhibition to the antitumor effects of 5‑fluorouracil (5‑FU). A PI3K(III)‑RNA interference (i)‑green fluorescent protein (GFP) recombinant replication adenovirus (AD) and the negative control (NC)‑RNAi‑GFP control AD were constructed and infected into SGC7901 cells. A methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay was used to determine the growth rate of the SGC7901 cells. Immunofluorescent staining was used to detect microtubule‑associated protein 1 light chain 3 expression. The mitochondrial membrane potential was measured using the JC‑1 fluorescent probe. Autophagic expression was monitored with MDC staining and transmission electron microscopy. The results revealed that following combination treatment of the SGC7901 gastric cancer cells with 5‑FU + PI3K(III)‑RNAi‑AD, the optical density absorbance values at 24, 48 and 72 h were 0.17 ± 1.64, 0.13 ± 4.64 and 0.11 ± 3.56%, respectively, with cell viability inhibition ratios of 45.89 ± 6.67, 72.57 ± 9.48 and 87.51 ± 4.65%, respectively. As compared with the other treatment groups, the inhibition rate in the combined treatment group was significantly higher (P<0.05). The percentages of the cells with green fluorescence in the combined treatment group were 74.4 ± 3.86 (24 h), 82.3 ± 1.84 (48 h) and 92.5 ± 1.1% (72 h), which were larger than those of the other groups. The percentage of cells with green fluorescence became larger, which indicated that the mitochondrion membrane potential had been reduced to a greater extent. MDC staining revealed that the number of autophagic vacuoles in the cells (measured at 24, 48 and 72 h) decreased gradually with time, with more autophagic

  12. Connexin43 knockdown in bone marrow‑derived dendritic cells by small interfering RNA leads to a diminished T-cell stimulation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fuling; Yan, Hui; Nie, Wencheng; Zhu, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells, the most powerful type of antigen‑presenting cells, have the unique ability to induce primary immune responses. Connexin43 expression is upregulated to increase gap junctions when immune cells are exposed to inflammatory factors. The present study applied small‑interfering RNA (siRNA) to decrease connexin43 expression. The results showed that silencing of connexin43 using siRNA resulted in arrest of bone marrow‑derived dendritic cell (BM‑DC) maturation as evidenced by reduced expression of major histocompatibility complex II, CD40, CD80 and CD86. Functionally, connexin43‑silenced BM‑DC showed a markedly decreased capability to induce T-cell stimulation. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that antigens present on BM‑DCs can be suppressed by connexin43 knockdown in BM‑DCs. The present study therefore presented an effective method to modulate the immunology of BM‑DCs.

  13. PUNCTATE VASCULAR EXPRESSION1 Is a Novel Maize Gene Required for Leaf Pattern Formation That Functions Downstream of the Trans-Acting Small Interfering RNA Pathway1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaolan; Douglas, Ryan N.; Strable, Josh; Lee, Michelle; Buckner, Brent; Janick-Buckner, Diane; Schnable, Patrick S.; Timmermans, Marja C.P.; Scanlon, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    The maize (Zea mays) gene RAGGED SEEDLING2-R (RGD2-R) encodes an ARGONAUTE7-like protein required for the biogenesis of trans-acting small interfering RNA, which regulates the accumulation of AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR3A transcripts in shoots. Although dorsiventral polarity is established in the narrow and cylindrical leaves of rgd2-R mutant plants, swapping of adaxial/abaxial epidermal identity occurs and suggests a model wherein RGD2 is required to coordinate dorsiventral and mediolateral patterning in maize leaves. Laser microdissection-microarray analyses of the rgd2-R mutant shoot apical meristem identified a novel gene, PUNCTATE VASCULAR EXPRESSION1 (PVE1), that is down-regulated in rgd2-R mutant apices. Transcripts of PVE1 provide an early molecular marker for vascular morphogenesis. Reverse genetic analyses suggest that PVE1 functions during vascular development and in mediolateral and dorsiventral patterning of maize leaves. Molecular genetic analyses of PVE1 and of rgd2-R;pve1-M2 double mutants suggest a model wherein PVE1 functions downstream of RGD2 in a pathway that intersects and interacts with the trans-acting small interfering RNA pathway. PMID:22669891

  14. Identification of RNA helicases in human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) replication - a targeted small interfering RNA library screen using pseudotyped and WT HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Williams, Claire A; Abbink, Truus E M; Jeang, Kuan-Teh; Lever, Andrew M L

    2015-06-01

    Central to the development of new treatments for human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) is a more thorough understanding of the viral life cycle and the cellular cofactors upon which this depends. Targeting cellular proteins and their interaction with HIV-1 has the potential to reduce the problem of emerging viral resistance to drugs as mutational escape is more difficult. We performed a short interfering RNA (siRNA) library screen targeting 59 cellular RNA helicases, assessing the effect on both viral capsid protein production and infectious virion formation. Five RNA helicases were identified which, when knocked down, reproducibly decreased infectious particle production: DDX5, DDX10, DDX17, DDX28 and DDX52. Two of these proteins (DDX5 and DDX17) have known roles in HIV-1 replication. A further helicase (DDX10) was a positive hit from a previous genome-wide siRNA screen; however, DDX28 and DDX52 have not previously been implicated as essential cofactors for HIV-1.

  15. Synthesis of small interfering RNAs containing acetal-type nucleoside analogs at their 3'-ends and analysis of their silencing activity and their ability to bind to the Argonaute2 PAZ domain.

    PubMed

    Inada, Natsumi; Nakamoto, Kosuke; Yokogawa, Takashi; Ueno, Yoshihito

    2015-10-20

    In this study, we aimed to create small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) with increased silencing activities and nuclease resistance properties. Therefore, we designed and synthesized five types of siRNA containing acetal-type nucleoside analogs at their 3'-dangling ends. We found that the siRNA containing 1-O-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)-β-D-ribofuranose at the 3'-dangling end was the most potent among the synthesized siRNAs and showed more resistance to nucleolytic degradation by a 3' exonuclease than a natural RNA did. Thus, modification of siRNAs by addition of 1-O-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)-β-D-ribofuranose may hold promise as a means of improving the silencing activity and nuclease resistance of siRNAs.

  16. Inducible and reversible suppression of Npm1 gene expression using stably integrated small interfering RNA vector in mouse embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Beibei; Lu Rui; Wang Weicheng; Jin Ying . E-mail: yjin@sibs.ac.cn

    2006-09-08

    The tetracycline (Tc)-inducible small interference RNA (siRNA) is a powerful tool for studying gene function in mammalian cells. However, the system is infrequently utilized in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Here, we present First application of the Tc-inducible, stably integrated plasmid-based siRNA system in mouse ES cells to down-regulate expression of Npm1, an essential gene for embryonic development. The physiological role of Npm1 in ES cells has not been defined. Our data show that the knock-down of Npm1 expression by this siRNA system was not only highly efficient, but also Tc- dose- and induction time-dependent. Particularly, the down-regulation of Npm1 expression was reversible. Importantly, suppression of Npm1 expression in ES cells resulted in reduced cell proliferation. Taken together, this system allows for studying gene function in a highly controlled manner, otherwise difficult to achieve in ES cells. Moreover, our results demonstrate that Npm1 is essential for ES cell proliferation.

  17. Deep Sequencing of Viroid-Derived Small RNAs from Grapevine Provides New Insights on the Role of RNA Silencing in Plant-Viroid Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Gisel, Andreas; Moxon, Simon; Dalmay, Tamas; Bisztray, György; Di Serio, Francesco; Burgyán, József

    2009-01-01

    Background Viroids are circular, highly structured, non-protein-coding RNAs that, usurping cellular enzymes and escaping host defense mechanisms, are able to replicate and move through infected plants. Similarly to viruses, viroid infections are associated with the accumulation of viroid-derived 21–24 nt small RNAs (vd-sRNAs) with the typical features of the small interfering RNAs characteristic of RNA silencing, a sequence-specific mechanism involved in defense against invading nucleic acids and in regulation of gene expression in most eukaryotic organisms. Methodology/Principal Findings To gain further insights on the genesis and possible role of vd-sRNAs in plant-viroid interaction, sRNAs isolated from Vitis vinifera infected by Hop stunt viroid (HSVd) and Grapevine yellow speckle viroid 1 (GYSVd1) were sequenced by the high-throughput platform Solexa-Illumina, and the vd-sRNAs were analyzed. The large majority of HSVd- and GYSVd1-sRNAs derived from a few specific regions (hotspots) of the genomic (+) and (−) viroid RNAs, with a prevalence of those from the (−) strands of both viroids. When grouped according to their sizes, vd-sRNAs always assumed a distribution with prominent 21-, 22- and 24-nt peaks, which, interestingly, mapped at the same hotspots. Conclusions/Significance These findings show that different Dicer-like enzymes (DCLs) target viroid RNAs, preferentially accessing to the same viroid domains. Interestingly, our results also suggest that viroid RNAs may interact with host enzymes involved in the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway, indicating more complex scenarios than previously thought for both vd-sRNAs genesis and possible interference with host gene expression. PMID:19890399

  18. Silencing expression of the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase by small interfering RNA sensitizes human cells for radiation-induced chromosome damage, cell killing, and mutation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, Yuanlin; Zhang, Qinming; Nagasawa, Hatsumi; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Liber, Howard L.; Bedford, Joel S.

    2002-01-01

    Targeted gene silencing in mammalian cells by RNA interference (RNAi) using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) was recently described by Elbashir et al. (S. M. Elbashir et al., Nature (Lond.), 411: 494-498, 2001). We have used this methodology in several human cell strains to reduce expression of the Prkdc (DNA-PKcs) gene coding for the catalytic subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) that is involved in the nonhomologous end joining of DNA double-strand breaks. We have also demonstrated a radiosensitization for several phenotypic endpoints of radiation damage. In low-passage normal human fibroblasts, siRNA knock-down of DNA-PKcs resulted in a reduced capacity for restitution of radiation-induced interphase chromosome breaks as measured by premature chromosome condensation, an increased yield of acentric chromosome fragments at the first postirradiation mitosis, and an increased radiosensitivity for cell killing. For three strains of related human lymphoblasts, DNA-PKcs-targeted siRNA transfection resulted in little or no increase in radiosensitivity with respect to cell killing, a 1.5-fold decrease in induced mutant yield in TK6- and p53-null NH32 cells, but about a 2-fold increase in induced mutant yield in p53-mutant WTK1 cells at both the hypoxanthine quanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) and the thymidine kinase loci.

  19. Control of collagen production in mouse chondrocytes by using a combination of bone morphogenetic protein-2 and small interfering RNA targeting Col1a1 for hydrogel-based tissue-engineered cartilage.

    PubMed

    Perrier-Groult, Emeline; Pasdeloup, Marielle; Malbouyres, Marilyne; Galéra, Philippe; Mallein-Gerin, Frédéric

    2013-08-01

    Because articular cartilage does not self-repair, tissue-engineering strategies should be considered to regenerate this tissue. Autologous chondrocyte implantation is already used for treatment of focal damage of articular cartilage. Unfortunately, this technique includes a step of cell amplification, which results in dedifferentiation of chondrocytes, with expression of type I collagen, a protein characteristic of fibrotic tissues. Therefore, the risk of producing a fibrocartilage exists. The aim of this study was to propose a new strategy for authorizing the recovery of the differentiated status of the chondrocytes after their amplification on plastic. Because the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 and the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 are cytokines both proposed as stimulants for cartilage repair, we undertook a detailed comparative analysis of their biological effects on chondrocytes. As a cellular model, we used mouse chondrocytes after their expansion on plastic and we tested the capability of BMP-2 or TGF-β1 to drive their redifferentiation, with special attention given to the nature of the proteins synthesized by the cells. To prevent any fibrotic character of the newly synthesized extracellular matrix, we silenced type I collagen by transfecting small interfering RNA (siRNA) into the chondrocytes, before their exposure to BMP-2 or TGF-β1. Our results showed that addition of siRNA targeting the mRNA encoded by the Col1a1 gene (Col1a1 siRNA) and BMP-2 represents the most efficient combination to control the production of cartilage-characteristic collagen proteins. To go one step further toward scaffold-based cartilage engineering, Col1a1 siRNA-transfected chondrocytes were encapsulated in agarose hydrogel and cultured in vitro for 1 week. The analysis of the chondrocyte-agarose constructs by using real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western-blotting, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy techniques demonstrated that the BMP-2/Col1a1 si

  20. A small interfering RNA targeting vascular endothelial growth factor efficiently inhibits growth of VX2 cells and VX2 tumor model of hepatocellular carcinoma in rabbit by transarterial embolization-mediated siRNA delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yu; Guo, Chuan-Gen; Yang, Zheng-Gang; Sun, Jun-Hui; Zhang, Min-Ming; Fu, Cai-Yun

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hepatocellular carcinoma is currently the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide with an increasing incidence. Objective The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of vascular endothelial growth factor small interfering RNA (VEGF-siRNA) on rabbit VX2 carcinoma cell viability in vitro and the effect of transarterial embolization (TAE)-mediated VEGF-siRNA delivery on the growth of rabbit VX2 liver-transplanted model in vivo. Methods Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and Western blot technologies were used to detect the expression level of VEGF. TAE and computed tomography scan were used to deliver the VEGF-siRNA and detect the tumor volume in vivo, respectively. Microvessel density was detected by immunohistochemistry with CD34 antibody. A biochemical autoanalyzer was used to evaluate the hepatic and renal toxicity. Results The designed VEGF-siRNAs could effectively decrease the expression levels of VEGF mRNA and protein in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, the viability of rabbit VX2 carcinoma cells was reduced by 38.5%±7.3% (VEGF-siRNA no 1) and 30.0%±5.8% (VEGF-siRNA no 3) at 48 hours after transfection. Moreover, in rabbit VX2 liver-transplanted model, the growth ratios of tumors at 28 days after TAE-mediated siRNA delivery were 155.18%±19.42% in the control group, 79.67%±19.63% in the low-dose group, and 36.09%±15.73% in the high-dose group, with significant differences among these three groups. Microvessel density dropped to 34.22±4.01 and 22.63±4.07 in the low-dose group and high-dose group, respectively, compared with the control group (57.88±5.67), with significant differences among these three groups. Furthermore, inoculation of VX2 tumor into the liver itself at later stage induced significant increase in alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase, indicating an obvious damage of liver functions, while treatment of VX2 tumor via TAE

  1. Control of Collagen Production in Mouse Chondrocytes by Using a Combination of Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 and Small Interfering RNA Targeting Col1a1 for Hydrogel-Based Tissue-Engineered Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Perrier-Groult, Emeline; Pasdeloup, Marielle; Malbouyres, Marilyne; Galéra, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Because articular cartilage does not self-repair, tissue-engineering strategies should be considered to regenerate this tissue. Autologous chondrocyte implantation is already used for treatment of focal damage of articular cartilage. Unfortunately, this technique includes a step of cell amplification, which results in dedifferentiation of chondrocytes, with expression of type I collagen, a protein characteristic of fibrotic tissues. Therefore, the risk of producing a fibrocartilage exists. The aim of this study was to propose a new strategy for authorizing the recovery of the differentiated status of the chondrocytes after their amplification on plastic. Because the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 and the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 are cytokines both proposed as stimulants for cartilage repair, we undertook a detailed comparative analysis of their biological effects on chondrocytes. As a cellular model, we used mouse chondrocytes after their expansion on plastic and we tested the capability of BMP-2 or TGF-β1 to drive their redifferentiation, with special attention given to the nature of the proteins synthesized by the cells. To prevent any fibrotic character of the newly synthesized extracellular matrix, we silenced type I collagen by transfecting small interfering RNA (siRNA) into the chondrocytes, before their exposure to BMP-2 or TGF-β1. Our results showed that addition of siRNA targeting the mRNA encoded by the Col1a1 gene (Col1a1 siRNA) and BMP-2 represents the most efficient combination to control the production of cartilage-characteristic collagen proteins. To go one step further toward scaffold-based cartilage engineering, Col1a1 siRNA-transfected chondrocytes were encapsulated in agarose hydrogel and cultured in vitro for 1 week. The analysis of the chondrocyte–agarose constructs by using real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western-blotting, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy techniques demonstrated that the BMP-2/Col1a1 si

  2. Comparative analysis of the small RNA transcriptomes of Pinus contorta and Oryza sativa.

    PubMed

    Morin, Ryan D; Aksay, Gozde; Dolgosheina, Elena; Ebhardt, H Alexander; Magrini, Vincent; Mardis, Elaine R; Sahinalp, S Cenk; Unrau, Peter J

    2008-04-01

    The diversity of microRNAs and small-interfering RNAs has been extensively explored within angiosperms by focusing on a few key organisms such as Oryza sativa and Arabidopsis thaliana. A deeper division of the plants is defined by the radiation of the angiosperms and gymnosperms, with the latter comprising the commercially important conifers. The conifers are expected to provide important information regarding the evolution of highly conserved small regulatory RNAs. Deep sequencing provides the means to characterize and quantitatively profile small RNAs in understudied organisms such as these. Pyrosequencing of small RNAs from O. sativa revealed, as expected, approximately 21- and approximately 24-nt RNAs. The former contained known microRNAs, and the latter largely comprised intergenic-derived sequences likely representing heterochromatin siRNAs. In contrast, sequences from Pinus contorta were dominated by 21-nt small RNAs. Using a novel sequence-based clustering algorithm, we identified sequences belonging to 18 highly conserved microRNA families in P. contorta as well as numerous clusters of conserved small RNAs of unknown function. Using multiple methods, including expressed sequence folding and machine learning algorithms, we found a further 53 candidate novel microRNA families, 51 appearing specific to the P. contorta library. In addition, alignment of small RNA sequences to the O. sativa genome revealed six perfectly conserved classes of small RNA that included chloroplast transcripts and specific types of genomic repeats. The conservation of microRNAs and other small RNAs between the conifers and the angiosperms indicates that important RNA silencing processes were highly developed in the earliest spermatophytes. Genomic mapping of all sequences to the O. sativa genome can be viewed at http://microrna.bcgsc.ca/cgi-bin/gbrowse/rice_build_3/.

  3. Seed Sequence-Matched Controls Reveal Limitations of Small Interfering RNA Knockdown in Functional and Structural Studies of Hepatitis C Virus NS5A-MOBKL1B Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hyo-Young; Gu, Meigang; Buehler, Eugen; MacDonald, Margaret R.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a widespread human pathogen causing liver cirrhosis and cancer. Similar to the case for other viruses, HCV depends on host and viral factors to complete its life cycle. We used proteomic and yeast two-hybrid approaches to elucidate host factors involved in HCV nonstructural protein NS5A function and found that MOBKL1B interacts with NS5A. Initial experiments with small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown suggesting a role in HCV replication led us to examine the interaction using biochemical and structural approaches. As revealed by a cocrystal structure of a core MOBKL1B-NS5A peptide complex at 1.95 Å, NS5A binds to a hydrophobic patch on the MOBKL1B surface. Biosensor binding assays identified a highly conserved, 18-amino-acid binding site in domain II of NS5A, which encompasses residues implicated in cyclophilin A (CypA)-dependent HCV RNA replication. However, a CypA-independent HCV variant had reduced replication in MOBKL1B knockdown cells, even though its NS5A does not interact with MOBKL1B. These discordant results prompted more extensive studies of MOBKL1B gene knockdowns, which included additional siRNAs and specifically matched seed sequence siRNA controls. We found that reduced virus replication after treating cells with MOBKL1B siRNA was actually due to off-target inhibition, which indicated that the initial finding of virus replication dependence on the MOBKL1B-NS5A interaction was incorrect. Ultimately, using several approaches, we found no relationship of the MOBKL1B-NS5A interaction to virus replication. These findings collectively serve as a reminder to investigators and scientific reviewers of the pervasive impact of siRNA off-target effects on interpretation of biological data. IMPORTANCE Our study illustrates an underappreciated shortcoming of siRNA gene knockdown technology. We initially identified a cellular protein, MOBKL1B, as a binding partner with the NS5A protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV). MOBKL1B si

  4. Genome-Wide Characterization of Maize Small RNA Loci and Their Regulation in the required to maintain repression6-1 (rmr6-1) Mutant and Long-Term Abiotic Stresses1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lunardon, Alice; Forestan, Cristian; Farinati, Silvia; Axtell, Michael J.; Varotto, Serena

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous small RNAs (sRNAs) contribute to gene regulation and genome homeostasis, but their activities and functions are incompletely known. The maize genome has a high number of transposable elements (TEs; almost 85%), some of which spawn abundant sRNAs. We performed sRNA and total RNA sequencing from control and abiotically stressed B73 wild-type plants and rmr6-1 mutants. RMR6 encodes the largest subunit of the RNA polymerase IV complex and is responsible for accumulation of most 24-nucleotide (nt) small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). We identified novel MIRNA loci and verified miR399 target conservation in maize. RMR6-dependent 23-24 nt siRNA loci were specifically enriched in the upstream region of the most highly expressed genes. Most genes misregulated in rmr6-1 did not show a significant correlation with loss of flanking siRNAs, but we identified one gene supporting existing models of direct gene regulation by TE-derived siRNAs. Long-term drought correlated with changes of miRNA and sRNA accumulation, in particular inducing down-regulation of a set of sRNA loci in the wild-typeleaf. PMID:26747286

  5. Comparative analysis of virus-specific small RNA profiles of three biologically distinct strains of Potato virus Y in infected potato (Solanum tuberosum) cv. Russet Burbank.

    PubMed

    Naveed, Khalid; Mitter, Neena; Harper, Artemus; Dhingra, Amit; Pappu, Hanu R

    2014-10-13

    Deep sequencing technology has enabled the analysis of small RNA profiles of virus-infected plants and could provide insights into virus-host interactions. Potato virus Y is an economically important viral pathogen of potato worldwide. In this study, we investigated the nature and relative levels of virus-derived small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs) in potato cv. Russet Burbank infected with three biologically distinct and economically important strains of PVY, the ordinary strain (PVY-O), tobacco veinal-necrotic strain (PVY-N) and tuber necrotic strain (PVY-NTN). The analysis showed an overall abundance of vsiRNAs of 20-24nt in PVY-infected plants. Considerable differences were present in the distribution of vsiRNAs as well as total small RNAs. The 21nt class was the most prevalent in PVY-infected plants irrespective of the virus strain, whereas in healthy potato plants, the 24nt class was the most dominant. vsiRNAs were derived from every position in the PVY genome, though certain hotspots were identified for each of the PVY strains. Among the three strains used, the population of vsiRNAs of different size classes was relatively different with PVY-NTN accumulating the highest level of vsiRNAs, while PVY-N infected plants had the least population of vsiRNAs. Unique vsiRNAs mapping to PVY genome in PVY-infected plants amounted to 3.13, 1.93 and 1.70% for NTN, N and O, respectively. There was a bias in the generation of vsiRNAs from the plus strand of the genome in comparison to the negative strand. The highest number of total vsiRNAs was from the cytoplasmic inclusion protein gene (CI) in PVY-O and PVY-NTN strains, whereas from PVY-N, the NIb gene produced maximum total vsiRNAs. These findings indicate that the three PVY strains interact differently in the same host genetic background and provided insights into virus-host interactions in an important food crop. PMID:25036885

  6. Comparative analysis of virus-specific small RNA profiles of three biologically distinct strains of Potato virus Y in infected potato (Solanum tuberosum) cv. Russet Burbank.

    PubMed

    Naveed, Khalid; Mitter, Neena; Harper, Artemus; Dhingra, Amit; Pappu, Hanu R

    2014-10-13

    Deep sequencing technology has enabled the analysis of small RNA profiles of virus-infected plants and could provide insights into virus-host interactions. Potato virus Y is an economically important viral pathogen of potato worldwide. In this study, we investigated the nature and relative levels of virus-derived small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs) in potato cv. Russet Burbank infected with three biologically distinct and economically important strains of PVY, the ordinary strain (PVY-O), tobacco veinal-necrotic strain (PVY-N) and tuber necrotic strain (PVY-NTN). The analysis showed an overall abundance of vsiRNAs of 20-24nt in PVY-infected plants. Considerable differences were present in the distribution of vsiRNAs as well as total small RNAs. The 21nt class was the most prevalent in PVY-infected plants irrespective of the virus strain, whereas in healthy potato plants, the 24nt class was the most dominant. vsiRNAs were derived from every position in the PVY genome, though certain hotspots were identified for each of the PVY strains. Among the three strains used, the population of vsiRNAs of different size classes was relatively different with PVY-NTN accumulating the highest level of vsiRNAs, while PVY-N infected plants had the least population of vsiRNAs. Unique vsiRNAs mapping to PVY genome in PVY-infected plants amounted to 3.13, 1.93 and 1.70% for NTN, N and O, respectively. There was a bias in the generation of vsiRNAs from the plus strand of the genome in comparison to the negative strand. The highest number of total vsiRNAs was from the cytoplasmic inclusion protein gene (CI) in PVY-O and PVY-NTN strains, whereas from PVY-N, the NIb gene produced maximum total vsiRNAs. These findings indicate that the three PVY strains interact differently in the same host genetic background and provided insights into virus-host interactions in an important food crop.

  7. Novel microRNAs uncovered by deep sequencing of small RNA transcriptomes in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and Brachypodium distachyon (L.) Beauv

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brachypodium distachyon is a promising model for studying temperate grasses, most importantly wheat. Small RNA (smRNAs), especially 21 nt and 24 nt smRNAs, play essential roles in plant development and physiology. We performed seep sequencing of smRNA repertoires in Brachypodium and wheat and found ...

  8. Small RNAs in plants: recent development and application for crop improvement.

    PubMed

    Kamthan, Ayushi; Chaudhuri, Abira; Kamthan, Mohan; Datta, Asis

    2015-01-01

    The phenomenon of RNA interference (RNAi) which involves sequence-specific gene regulation by small non-coding RNAs, i.e., small interfering RNA (siRNA) and microRNA (miRNA) has emerged as one of most powerful approaches for crop improvement. RNAi based on siRNA is one of the widely used tools of reverse genetics which aid in revealing gene functions in many species. This technology has been extensively applied to alter the gene expression in plants with an aim to achieve desirable traits. RNAi has been used for enhancing the crop yield and productivity by manipulating the gene involved in biomass, grain yield and enhanced shelf life of fruits and vegetables. It has also been applied for developing resistance against various biotic (bacteria, fungi, viruses, nematodes, insects) and abiotic stresses (drought, salinity, cold, etc.). Nutritional improvements of crops have also been achieved by enriching the crops with essential amino acids, fatty acids, antioxidants and other nutrients beneficial for human health or by reducing allergens or anti-nutrients. microRNAs are key regulators of important plant processes like growth, development, and response to various stresses. In spite of similarity in size (20-24 nt), miRNA differ from siRNA in precursor structures, pathway of biogenesis, and modes of action. This review also highlights the miRNA based genetic modification technology where various miRNAs/artificial miRNAs and their targets can be utilized for improving several desirable plant traits. microRNA based strategies are much efficient than siRNA-based RNAi strategies due to its specificity and less undesirable off target effects. As per the FDA guidelines, small RNA (sRNA) based transgenics are much safer for consumption than those over-expressing proteins. This review thereby summarizes the emerging advances and achievement in the field of sRNAs and its application for crop improvement. PMID:25883599

  9. Small RNAs in plants: recent development and application for crop improvement

    PubMed Central

    Kamthan, Ayushi; Chaudhuri, Abira; Kamthan, Mohan; Datta, Asis

    2015-01-01

    The phenomenon of RNA interference (RNAi) which involves sequence-specific gene regulation by small non-coding RNAs, i.e., small interfering RNA (siRNA) and microRNA (miRNA) has emerged as one of most powerful approaches for crop improvement. RNAi based on siRNA is one of the widely used tools of reverse genetics which aid in revealing gene functions in many species. This technology has been extensively applied to alter the gene expression in plants with an aim to achieve desirable traits. RNAi has been used for enhancing the crop yield and productivity by manipulating the gene involved in biomass, grain yield and enhanced shelf life of fruits and vegetables. It has also been applied for developing resistance against various biotic (bacteria, fungi, viruses, nematodes, insects) and abiotic stresses (drought, salinity, cold, etc.). Nutritional improvements of crops have also been achieved by enriching the crops with essential amino acids, fatty acids, antioxidants and other nutrients beneficial for human health or by reducing allergens or anti-nutrients. microRNAs are key regulators of important plant processes like growth, development, and response to various stresses. In spite of similarity in size (20–24 nt), miRNA differ from siRNA in precursor structures, pathway of biogenesis, and modes of action. This review also highlights the miRNA based genetic modification technology where various miRNAs/artificial miRNAs and their targets can be utilized for improving several desirable plant traits. microRNA based strategies are much efficient than siRNA-based RNAi strategies due to its specificity and less undesirable off target effects. As per the FDA guidelines, small RNA (sRNA) based transgenics are much safer for consumption than those over-expressing proteins. This review thereby summarizes the emerging advances and achievement in the field of sRNAs and its application for crop improvement. PMID:25883599

  10. Mobile small RNAs regulate genome-wide DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    Lewsey, Mathew G.; Hardcastle, Thomas J.; Melnyk, Charles W.; Molnar, Attila; Valli, Adrián; Urich, Mark A.; Nery, Joseph R.; Baulcombe, David C.; Ecker, Joseph R.

    2016-01-01

    RNA silencing at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels regulates endogenous gene expression, controls invading transposable elements (TEs), and protects the cell against viruses. Key components of the mechanism are small RNAs (sRNAs) of 21–24 nt that guide the silencing machinery to their nucleic acid targets in a nucleotide sequence-specific manner. Transcriptional gene silencing is associated with 24-nt sRNAs and RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) at cytosine residues in three DNA sequence contexts (CG, CHG, and CHH). We previously demonstrated that 24-nt sRNAs are mobile from shoot to root in Arabidopsis thaliana and confirmed that they mediate DNA methylation at three sites in recipient cells. In this study, we extend this finding by demonstrating that RdDM of thousands of loci in root tissues is dependent upon mobile sRNAs from the shoot and that mobile sRNA-dependent DNA methylation occurs predominantly in non-CG contexts. Mobile sRNA-dependent non-CG methylation is largely dependent on the DOMAINS REARRANGED METHYLTRANSFERASES 1/2 (DRM1/DRM2) RdDM pathway but is independent of the CHROMOMETHYLASE (CMT)2/3 DNA methyltransferases. Specific superfamilies of TEs, including those typically found in gene-rich euchromatic regions, lose DNA methylation in a mutant lacking 22- to 24-nt sRNAs (dicer-like 2, 3, 4 triple mutant). Transcriptome analyses identified a small number of genes whose expression in roots is associated with mobile sRNAs and connected to DNA methylation directly or indirectly. Finally, we demonstrate that sRNAs from shoots of one accession move across a graft union and target DNA methylation de novo at normally unmethylated sites in the genomes of root cells from a different accession. PMID:26787884

  11. Mobile small RNAs regulate genome-wide DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Lewsey, Mathew G; Hardcastle, Thomas J; Melnyk, Charles W; Molnar, Attila; Valli, Adrián; Urich, Mark A; Nery, Joseph R; Baulcombe, David C; Ecker, Joseph R

    2016-02-01

    RNA silencing at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels regulates endogenous gene expression, controls invading transposable elements (TEs), and protects the cell against viruses. Key components of the mechanism are small RNAs (sRNAs) of 21-24 nt that guide the silencing machinery to their nucleic acid targets in a nucleotide sequence-specific manner. Transcriptional gene silencing is associated with 24-nt sRNAs and RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) at cytosine residues in three DNA sequence contexts (CG, CHG, and CHH). We previously demonstrated that 24-nt sRNAs are mobile from shoot to root in Arabidopsis thaliana and confirmed that they mediate DNA methylation at three sites in recipient cells. In this study, we extend this finding by demonstrating that RdDM of thousands of loci in root tissues is dependent upon mobile sRNAs from the shoot and that mobile sRNA-dependent DNA methylation occurs predominantly in non-CG contexts. Mobile sRNA-dependent non-CG methylation is largely dependent on the DOMAINS REARRANGED METHYLTRANSFERASES 1/2 (DRM1/DRM2) RdDM pathway but is independent of the CHROMOMETHYLASE (CMT)2/3 DNA methyltransferases. Specific superfamilies of TEs, including those typically found in gene-rich euchromatic regions, lose DNA methylation in a mutant lacking 22- to 24-nt sRNAs (dicer-like 2, 3, 4 triple mutant). Transcriptome analyses identified a small number of genes whose expression in roots is associated with mobile sRNAs and connected to DNA methylation directly or indirectly. Finally, we demonstrate that sRNAs from shoots of one accession move across a graft union and target DNA methylation de novo at normally unmethylated sites in the genomes of root cells from a different accession. PMID:26787884

  12. Strand-asymmetric endogenous Tetrahymena small RNA production requires a previously uncharacterized uridylyltransferase protein partner

    PubMed Central

    Talsky, Kristin Benjamin; Collins, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Many eukaryotes initiate pathways of Argonaute-bound small RNA (sRNA) production with a step that specifically targets sets of aberrant and/or otherwise deleterious transcripts for recognition by an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase complex (RDRC). The biogenesis of 23- to 24-nt sRNAs in growing Tetrahymena occurs by physical and functional coupling of the growth-expressed Dicer, Dcr2, with one of three RDRCs each containing the single genome-encoded RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, Rdr1. Tetrahymena RDRCs contain an active uridylyltransferase, either Rdn1 or Rdn2, and Rdn1 RDRCs also contain the Rdf1 and Rdf2 proteins. Although Rdn2 is nonessential and RDRC-specific, Rdn1 is genetically essential and interacts with a non-RDRC protein of 124 kDa. Here we characterize this 124-kDa protein, designated RNA silencing protein 1 (Rsp1), using endogenous locus tagging, affinity purification, and functional assays, as well as gene-knockout studies. We find that Rsp1 associates with Rdn1-Rdf1 or Rdn1-Rdf2 subcomplexes as an alternative to Rdr1, creating Rsp1 complexes (RSPCs) that are physically separate from RDRCs. The uridylyltransferase activity of Rdn1 is greatly reduced in RSPCs compared with RDRCs, suggesting enzyme regulation by the alternative partners. Surprisingly, despite the loss of all known RDRC-generated classes of endogenous sRNAs, RSP1 gene knockout was tolerated in growing cells. A minority class of Dcr2-dependent sRNAs persists in cells lacking Rsp1 with increased size heterogeneity. These findings bring new insights about the essential and nonessential functions of RNA silencing in Tetrahymena, about mechanisms of endogenous small interfering RNA production, and about the roles of cellular uridylyltransferases. PMID:22706992

  13. High-Throughput Sequencing of RNA Silencing-Associated Small RNAs in Olive (Olea europaea L.)

    PubMed Central

    Donaire, Livia; Pedrola, Laia; de la Rosa, Raúl; Llave, César

    2011-01-01

    Small RNAs (sRNAs) of 20 to 25 nucleotides (nt) in length maintain genome integrity and control gene expression in a multitude of developmental and physiological processes. Despite RNA silencing has been primarily studied in model plants, the advent of high-throughput sequencing technologies has enabled profiling of the sRNA component of more than 40 plant species. Here, we used deep sequencing and molecular methods to report the first inventory of sRNAs in olive (Olea europaea L.). sRNA libraries prepared from juvenile and adult shoots revealed that the 24-nt class dominates the sRNA transcriptome and atypically accumulates to levels never seen in other plant species, suggesting an active role of heterochromatin silencing in the maintenance and integrity of its large genome. A total of 18 known miRNA families were identified in the libraries. Also, 5 other sRNAs derived from potential hairpin-like precursors remain as plausible miRNA candidates. RNA blots confirmed miRNA expression and suggested tissue- and/or developmental-specific expression patterns. Target mRNAs of conserved miRNAs were computationally predicted among the olive cDNA collection and experimentally validated through endonucleolytic cleavage assays. Finally, we use expression data to uncover genetic components of the miR156, miR172 and miR390/TAS3-derived trans-acting small interfering RNA (tasiRNA) regulatory nodes, suggesting that these interactive networks controlling developmental transitions are fully operational in olive. PMID:22140484

  14. Nanostructures created by interfered femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Chang, Yun-Ching; Yao, Jimmy; Luo, Claire; Yin, Shizhuo; Ruffin, Paul; Brantley, Christina; Edwards, Eugene

    2011-10-01

    The method by applying the interfered femtosecond laser to create nanostructured copper (Cu) surface has been studied. The nanostructure created by direct laser irradiation is also realized for comparison. Results show that more uniform and finer nanostructures with sphere shape and feature size around 100 nm can be induced by the interfered laser illumination comparing with the direct laser illumination. This offers an alternative fabrication approach that the feature size and the shape of the laser induced metallic nanostructures can be highly controlled, which can extremely improve its performance in related application such as the colorized metal, catalyst, SERS substrate, and etc.

  15. Genome-wide profiling of Populus small RNAs

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Short RNAs, and in particular microRNAs, are important regulators of gene expression both within defined regulatory pathways and at the epigenetic scale. We investigated the short RNA (sRNA) population (18-24 nt) of the transcriptome of green leaves from the sequenced Populus trichocarpa using a concatenation strategy in combination with 454 sequencing. Results The most abundant size class of sRNAs were 24 nt. Long Terminal Repeats were particularly associated with 24 nt sRNAs. Additionally, some repetitive elements were associated with 22 nt sRNAs. We identified an sRNA hot-spot on chromosome 19, overlapping a region containing both the proposed sex-determining locus and a major cluster of NBS-LRR genes. A number of phased siRNA loci were identified, a subset of which are predicted to target PPR and NBS-LRR disease resistance genes, classes of genes that have been significantly expanded in Populus. Additional loci enriched for sRNA production were identified and characterised. We identified 15 novel predicted microRNAs (miRNAs), including miRNA*sequences, and identified a novel locus that may encode a dual miRNA or a miRNA and short interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Conclusions The short RNA population of P. trichocarpa is at least as complex as that of Arabidopsis thaliana. We provide a first genome-wide view of short RNA production for P. trichocarpa and identify new, non-conserved miRNAs. PMID:20021695

  16. Interfering with Gendered Development: A Timely Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaise, Mindy

    2014-01-01

    Instead of relying on colonial and Western developmental logic to understand and research gender, this paper proposes interfering as a strategy toward generating gender knowledges that are more inclusive to other-than-Western concepts and contexts. This paper shows how post-developmental perspectives interfere with psychological and biological…

  17. Dynamics of small RNA profiles of virus and host origin in wheat cultivars synergistically infected by Wheat streak mosaic virus and Triticum mosaic virus: virus infection caused a drastic shift in the endogenous small RNA profile.

    PubMed

    Tatineni, Satyanarayana; Riethoven, Jean-Jack M; Graybosch, Robert A; French, Roy; Mitra, Amitava

    2014-01-01

    Co-infection of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) by Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV, a Tritimovirus) and Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV, a Poacevirus) of the family Potyviridae causes synergistic interaction. In this study, the effects of the synergistic interaction between WSMV and TriMV on endogenous and virus-derived small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs) were examined in susceptible ('Arapahoe') and temperature-sensitive resistant ('Mace') wheat cultivars at 18°C and 27°C. Single and double infections in wheat caused a shift in the profile of endogenous small RNAs from 24 nt being the most predominant in healthy plants to 21 nt in infected wheat. Massive amounts of 21 and 22 nt vsiRNAs accumulated in singly and doubly infected Arapahoe at both temperatures and in Mace at 27°C but not 18°C. The plus- and minus-sense vsiRNAs were distributed throughout the genomic RNAs in Arapahoe at both temperature regimens and in Mace at 27°C, although some regions served as hot-spots, spawning an excessive number of vsiRNAs. The vsiRNA peaks were conserved among cultivars, suggesting that the Dicer-like enzymes in susceptible and resistant cultivars similarly accessed the genomic RNAs of WSMV or TriMV. Accumulation of large amounts of vsiRNAs in doubly infected plants suggests that the silencing suppressor proteins encoded by TriMV and WSMV do not prevent the formation of vsiRNAs; thus, the synergistic effect observed is independent from RNA-silencing mediated vsiRNA biogenesis. The high-resolution map of endogenous and vsiRNAs from WSMV- and/or TriMV-infected wheat cultivars may form a foundation for understanding the virus-host interactions, the effect of synergistic interactions on host defense, and virus resistance mechanisms in wheat.

  18. Dynamics of Small RNA Profiles of Virus and Host Origin in Wheat Cultivars Synergistically Infected by Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus and Triticum Mosaic Virus: Virus Infection Caused a Drastic Shift in the Endogenous Small RNA Profile

    PubMed Central

    Tatineni, Satyanarayana; Riethoven, Jean-Jack M.; Graybosch, Robert A.; French, Roy; Mitra, Amitava

    2014-01-01

    Co-infection of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) by Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV, a Tritimovirus) and Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV, a Poacevirus) of the family Potyviridae causes synergistic interaction. In this study, the effects of the synergistic interaction between WSMV and TriMV on endogenous and virus-derived small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs) were examined in susceptible (‘Arapahoe’) and temperature-sensitive resistant (‘Mace’) wheat cultivars at 18°C and 27°C. Single and double infections in wheat caused a shift in the profile of endogenous small RNAs from 24 nt being the most predominant in healthy plants to 21 nt in infected wheat. Massive amounts of 21 and 22 nt vsiRNAs accumulated in singly and doubly infected Arapahoe at both temperatures and in Mace at 27°C but not 18°C. The plus- and minus-sense vsiRNAs were distributed throughout the genomic RNAs in Arapahoe at both temperature regimens and in Mace at 27°C, although some regions served as hot-spots, spawning an excessive number of vsiRNAs. The vsiRNA peaks were conserved among cultivars, suggesting that the Dicer-like enzymes in susceptible and resistant cultivars similarly accessed the genomic RNAs of WSMV or TriMV. Accumulation of large amounts of vsiRNAs in doubly infected plants suggests that the silencing suppressor proteins encoded by TriMV and WSMV do not prevent the formation of vsiRNAs; thus, the synergistic effect observed is independent from RNA-silencing mediated vsiRNA biogenesis. The high-resolution map of endogenous and vsiRNAs from WSMV- and/or TriMV-infected wheat cultivars may form a foundation for understanding the virus-host interactions, the effect of synergistic interactions on host defense, and virus resistance mechanisms in wheat. PMID:25365307

  19. Adaptive antenna arrays for weak interfering signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, I. J.

    1985-01-01

    The interference protection provided by adaptive antenna arrays to an Earth station or satellite receive antenna system is studied. The case where the interference is caused by the transmission from adjacent satellites or Earth stations whose signals inadverently enter the receiving system and interfere with the communication link is considered. Thus, the interfering signals are very weak. To increase the interference suppression, one can either decrease the thermal noise in the feedback loops or increase the gain of the auxiliary antennas in the interfering signal direction. Both methods are examined. It is shown that one may have to reduce the noise correlation to impractically low values and if directive auxiliary antennas are used, the auxiliary antenna size may have to be too large. One can, however, combine the two methods to achieve the specified interference suppression with reasonable requirements of noise decorrelation and auxiliary antenna size. Effects of the errors in the steering vector on the adaptive array performance are studied.

  20. Scheduling in multibeam satellites with interfering zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopal, I. S.; Wong, C. K.; Bonuccelli, M. A.

    1983-08-01

    The traffic scheduling problem in a satellite-switched time-division multiple-access (SS/TDMA) system with interfering beams is studied. A two-step approach to this problem is investigated, in which the first step is the assignment of orthogonal polarization to reduce the interference and the second step is the scheduling of traffic, taking into account the 'resultant' interference. It is shown that the first step can be solved in polynomial time in most cases, while the second step is proved to be NP-complete, even for very simple patterns. Several suboptimal algorithms are suggested for this second step, and it is shown by experimental trials on randomly generated traffic patterns that on the average these algorithms produce close to optimal solutions.

  1. 32 CFR 1903.8 - Interfering with Agency functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Interfering with Agency functions. 1903.8 Section 1903.8 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY CONDUCT ON AGENCY INSTALLATIONS § 1903.8 Interfering with Agency functions. The following are...

  2. 32 CFR 1903.8 - Interfering with Agency functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Interfering with Agency functions. 1903.8 Section 1903.8 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY CONDUCT ON AGENCY INSTALLATIONS § 1903.8 Interfering with Agency functions. The following are...

  3. 32 CFR 1903.8 - Interfering with Agency functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Interfering with Agency functions. 1903.8 Section 1903.8 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY CONDUCT ON AGENCY INSTALLATIONS § 1903.8 Interfering with Agency functions. The following are...

  4. 32 CFR 1903.8 - Interfering with Agency functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Interfering with Agency functions. 1903.8 Section 1903.8 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY CONDUCT ON AGENCY INSTALLATIONS § 1903.8 Interfering with Agency functions. The following are...

  5. 36 CFR 2.32 - Interfering with agency functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Interfering with agency functions. 2.32 Section 2.32 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RESOURCE PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 2.32 Interfering with agency functions. (a)...

  6. 36 CFR 2.32 - Interfering with agency functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Interfering with agency functions. 2.32 Section 2.32 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RESOURCE PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 2.32 Interfering with agency functions. (a)...

  7. 36 CFR 2.32 - Interfering with agency functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Interfering with agency functions. 2.32 Section 2.32 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RESOURCE PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 2.32 Interfering with agency functions. (a)...

  8. 36 CFR 2.32 - Interfering with agency functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Interfering with agency functions. 2.32 Section 2.32 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RESOURCE PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 2.32 Interfering with agency functions. (a)...

  9. 36 CFR 2.32 - Interfering with agency functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Interfering with agency functions. 2.32 Section 2.32 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RESOURCE PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 2.32 Interfering with agency functions. (a)...

  10. 32 CFR 234.6 - Interfering with agency functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Interfering with agency functions. 234.6 Section 234.6 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS CONDUCT ON THE PENTAGON RESERVATION § 234.6 Interfering with agency functions. The following...

  11. 32 CFR 234.6 - Interfering with agency functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Interfering with agency functions. 234.6 Section 234.6 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS CONDUCT ON THE PENTAGON RESERVATION § 234.6 Interfering with agency functions. The following...

  12. 32 CFR 234.6 - Interfering with agency functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Interfering with agency functions. 234.6 Section 234.6 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS CONDUCT ON THE PENTAGON RESERVATION § 234.6 Interfering with agency functions. The following...

  13. 32 CFR 234.6 - Interfering with agency functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Interfering with agency functions. 234.6 Section 234.6 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS CONDUCT ON THE PENTAGON RESERVATION § 234.6 Interfering with agency functions. The following...

  14. 32 CFR 1903.8 - Interfering with Agency functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Interfering with Agency functions. 1903.8 Section 1903.8 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY CONDUCT ON AGENCY INSTALLATIONS § 1903.8 Interfering with Agency functions. The following are...

  15. Removal of interfering substances in samples prepared for two-dimensional (2-D) electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Berkelman, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Biological samples may contain contaminants that interfere with analysis by two-dimensional (2-D) electrophoresis. Lysates or biological fluids are complex mixtures that contain a wide variety of nonprotein substances in addition to the proteins to be analyzed. These substances often interfere with the resolution of the electrophoretic separation or the visualization of the result. Macromolecules (e.g., polysaccharides and DNA) can interfere with electrophoretic separation by clogging gel pores. Small ionic molecules can impair isoelectric focusing (IEF) separation by rendering the sample too conductive. Other substances (e.g., phenolics and lipids) can bind to proteins, influencing their electrophoretic properties or solubility. In many cases, measures to remove interfering substances can result in significantly clearer 2-D patterns with more visible spots and better resolution. It should be borne in mind, however, that analysis of samples by 2-D electrophoresis is usually most successful and informative when performed with minimally processed samples, so it is important that any steps taken to remove interfering substance be appropriate to the sample and only performed when necessary. Procedures for the removal of interfering substances therefore represent a compromise between removing nonprotein contaminants, and minimizing interference with the integrity and relative abundances of the sample proteins. This chapter presents a number of illustrative examples of optimized sample preparation methods in which specific interfering substances are removed by a variety of different strategies.

  16. Peptides Interfering 3A Protein Dimerization Decrease FMDV Multiplication

    PubMed Central

    de la Torre, Beatriz G.; Valle, Javier; Andreu, David; Sobrino, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Nonstructural protein 3A is involved in relevant functions in foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) replication. FMDV 3A can form homodimers and preservation of the two hydrophobic α-helices (α1 and α2) that stabilize the dimer interface is essential for virus replication. In this work, small peptides mimicking residues involved in the dimer interface were used to interfere with dimerization and thus gain insight on its biological function. The dimer interface peptides α1, α2 and that spanning the two hydrophobic α-helices, α12, impaired in vitro dimer formation of a peptide containing the two α-helices, this effect being higher with peptide α12. To assess the effect of dimer inhibition in cultured cells, the interfering peptides were N-terminally fused to a heptaarginine (R7) sequence to favor their intracellular translocation. Thus, when fused to R7, interference peptides (100 μM) were able to inhibit dimerization of transiently expressed 3A, the higher inhibitions being found with peptides α1 and α12. The 3A dimerization impairment exerted by the peptides correlated with significant, specific reductions in the viral yield recovered from peptide-treated FMDV infected cells. In this case, α2 was the only peptide producing significant reductions at concentrations lower than 100 μM. Thus, dimer interface peptides constitute a tool to understand the structure-function relationship of this viral protein and point to 3A dimerization as a potential antiviral target. PMID:26505190

  17. Characterization of defective interfering RNAs associated with RNA plant viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, T.J. . School of Biological Sciences); Jackson, A.O. . Dept. of Plant Pathology)

    1993-01-01

    Our lab was the first to describe and characterize a defective interfering RNA (DI RNAs or DIs) in association with a small RNA plant virus. The features of the DIs that we discovered in infections of tomato bushy stunt virus were compatible with the properties of DIs identified in many animal virus infections. Animal virologists have generally recognized the importance of studying DIs because they are invaluable tools for identifying cis-acting sequences important in virus multiplication and because they offer the opportunity to elucidate mechanisms involved in viral persistence and disease attenuation. Hence our discovery offered a comparably valuable tool for use in plant virus studies for the first time. Since the original observation with TBSV, we discovered the second example of plant viral DI RNAs associated with turnip crinkle virus (TCV), and many other reports have now appeared characterizing DI and DI-like RNAs in other plant viral infections. We are seeking to improve our understanding of the mechanisms of DI generation and the precise nature of the RNA sequences necessary for DI replication and encapsidation. We also want to address the nature of the DI mediated symptom attenuation and interference effects in plants, and to determine the feasibility of using transgenic plants constitutively expressing DI RNAs for disease control. The progress made on each of these objectives is summarized along with the proposed experiments for the continuation period.

  18. 47 CFR 73.185 - Computation of interfering signal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... interfering station to be considered as pertinent to transmission by one reflection. To provide for variation... angle than the pertinent angle for one reflection, the method of calculating interference will not...

  19. 47 CFR 73.185 - Computation of interfering signal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... interfering station to be considered as pertinent to transmission by one reflection. To provide for variation... angle than the pertinent angle for one reflection, the method of calculating interference will not...

  20. 47 CFR 73.185 - Computation of interfering signal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... interfering station to be considered as pertinent to transmission by one reflection. To provide for variation... angle than the pertinent angle for one reflection, the method of calculating interference will not...

  1. Nicotiana Small RNA Sequences Support a Host Genome Origin of Cucumber Mosaic Virus Satellite RNA

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Neil A.; Schumann, Ulrike; Fang, Yuan-Yuan; Dennis, Elizabeth S.; Zhang, Ren; Guo, Hui-Shan; Wang, Ming-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Satellite RNAs (satRNAs) are small noncoding subviral RNA pathogens in plants that depend on helper viruses for replication and spread. Despite many decades of research, the origin of satRNAs remains unknown. In this study we show that a β-glucuronidase (GUS) transgene fused with a Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) Y satellite RNA (Y-Sat) sequence (35S-GUS:Sat) was transcriptionally repressed in N. tabacum in comparison to a 35S-GUS transgene that did not contain the Y-Sat sequence. This repression was not due to DNA methylation at the 35S promoter, but was associated with specific DNA methylation at the Y-Sat sequence. Both northern blot hybridization and small RNA deep sequencing detected 24-nt siRNAs in wild-type Nicotiana plants with sequence homology to Y-Sat, suggesting that the N. tabacum genome contains Y-Sat-like sequences that give rise to 24-nt sRNAs capable of guiding RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) to the Y-Sat sequence in the 35S-GUS:Sat transgene. Consistent with this, Southern blot hybridization detected multiple DNA bands in Nicotiana plants that had sequence homology to Y-Sat, suggesting that Y-Sat-like sequences exist in the Nicotiana genome as repetitive DNA, a DNA feature associated with 24-nt sRNAs. Our results point to a host genome origin for CMV satRNAs, and suggest novel approach of using small RNA sequences for finding the origin of other satRNAs. PMID:25568943

  2. Transgenic resistance to Bamboo mosaic virus by expression of interfering satellite RNA.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kuan-Yu; Hsu, Yau-Heiu; Chen, Hsin-Chuan; Lin, Na-Sheng

    2013-09-01

    Plant genetic engineering has broadened the options for plant virus resistance and is mostly based on pathogen-derived resistance. Previously, we have shown that interfering satellite RNA (satRNA) of Bamboo mosaic virus (satBaMV) greatly reduces Bamboo mosaic virus (BaMV) accumulation and BaMV-induced symptoms in co-inoculated plants. Here, we generated a nonviral source of virus-resistant transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana and Arabidopsis thaliana by introducing interfering satBaMV. Asymptomatic transgenic N. benthamiana lines were highly resistant to BaMV virion and viral RNA infection, and the expression of the transgene BSL6 was higher in asymptomatic than mildly symptomatic lines. In addition, BaMV- and satBaMV-specific small RNAs were detectable only after BaMV challenge, and their levels were associated with genomic viral RNA or satRNA levels. By transcriptomic analysis, the salicylic acid (SA) signalling pathway was not induced in satBaMV transgenic A. thaliana in mock conditions, suggesting that two major antiviral mechanisms, RNA silencing and SA-mediated resistance, are not involved directly in transgenic satBaMV-mediated BaMV interference. In contrast, resistance is associated with the level of the interfering satBaMV transgene. We propose satBaMV-mediated BaMV interference in transgenic plants by competition for replicase with BaMV. PMID:23675895

  3. Transcription factors interfering with dedifferentiation induce cell type-specific transcriptional profiles

    PubMed Central

    Hikichi, Takafusa; Matoba, Ryo; Ikeda, Takashi; Watanabe, Akira; Yamamoto, Takuya; Yoshitake, Satoko; Tamura-Nakano, Miwa; Kimura, Takayuki; Kamon, Masayoshi; Shimura, Mari; Kawakami, Koichi; Okuda, Akihiko; Okochi, Hitoshi; Inoue, Takafumi; Suzuki, Atsushi; Masui, Shinji

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are able to regulate differentiation-related processes, including dedifferentiation and direct conversion, through the regulation of cell type-specific transcriptional profiles. However, the functional interactions between the TFs regulating different transcriptional profiles are not well understood. Here, we show that the TFs capable of inducing cell type-specific transcriptional profiles prevent the dedifferentiation induced by TFs for pluripotency. Of the large number of TFs expressed in a neural-lineage cell line, we identified a subset of TFs that, when overexpressed, strongly interfered with the dedifferentiation triggered by the procedure to generate induced pluripotent stem cells. This interference occurred through a maintenance mechanism of the cell type-specific transcriptional profile. Strikingly, the maintenance activity of the interfering TF set was strong enough to induce the cell line-specific transcriptional profile when overexpressed in a heterologous cell type. In addition, the TFs that interfered with dedifferentiation in hepatic-lineage cells involved TFs with known induction activity for hepatic-lineage cells. Our results suggest that dedifferentiation suppresses a cell type-specific transcriptional profile, which is primarily maintained by a small subset of TFs capable of inducing direct conversion. We anticipate that this functional correlation might be applicable in various cell types and might facilitate the identification of TFs with induction activity in efforts to understand differentiation. PMID:23550161

  4. 36 CFR 1002.32 - Interfering with agency functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Interfering with agency functions. 1002.32 Section 1002.32 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST RESOURCE PROTECTION... maintain order and control public access and movement during fire fighting operations, search and...

  5. 36 CFR 1002.32 - Interfering with agency functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Interfering with agency functions. 1002.32 Section 1002.32 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST RESOURCE PROTECTION... maintain order and control public access and movement during fire fighting operations, search and...

  6. 36 CFR 1002.32 - Interfering with agency functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Interfering with agency functions. 1002.32 Section 1002.32 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST RESOURCE PROTECTION... maintain order and control public access and movement during fire fighting operations, search and...

  7. 36 CFR 1002.32 - Interfering with agency functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Interfering with agency functions. 1002.32 Section 1002.32 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST RESOURCE PROTECTION... maintain order and control public access and movement during fire fighting operations, search and...

  8. 36 CFR 1002.32 - Interfering with agency functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Interfering with agency functions. 1002.32 Section 1002.32 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST RESOURCE PROTECTION... maintain order and control public access and movement during fire fighting operations, search and...

  9. Spin O decay angular distribution for interfering mesons in electroproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Funsten, H.; Gilfoyle, G.

    1994-04-01

    Self analyzing meson electroproduction experiments are currently being planned for the CEBAF CLAS detector. These experiments deduce the spin polarization of outgoing unstable spin s (?)0 mesons from their decay angular distribution, W({theta},{psi}). The large angular acceptance of the CLAS detector permits kinematic tracking of a sufficient number of these events to accurately determine electroproduction amplitudes from the deduced polarization. Maximum polarization information is obtained from W({theta},{psi}) for decay into spin 0 daughters. The helicity of the decaying meson is transferred to the daughter`s relative orbital angular momentum m-projection; none is {open_quotes}absorbed{close_quotes} into daughter helicities. The decaying meson`s helicity maximally appears in W({theta},{psi}). W({theta},{psi}) for spin 0 daughters has been derived for (1) vector meson electroproduction and (2) general interfering mesons produced by incident pions. This paper derives W({theta},{psi}) for electroproduction of two interfering mesons that decay into spin 0 daughters. An application is made to the case of interfering scalar and vector mesons. The derivation is an extension of work by Schil using the general decay formalism of Martin. The expressions can be easily extended to the case of N interfering mesons since interference occurs pairwise in the observable W ({theta},{psi}), a quadratic function of the meson amplitudes. The derivation uses the virtual photon density matrix of Schil which is transformed by a meson electroproduction transition operator, T. The resulting density matrix for the interfering mesons is then converted into a corresponding statistical tensor and contracted into the efficiency tensor for spin 0 daughters.

  10. Un coronographe interférentiel achromatique coaxial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay, Jean; Fressin, François; Rivet, Jean-Pierre; Rabbia, Yves; Buisset, Christophe

    2005-12-01

    xml:lang="fr">RésuméDans le but de parvenir à l'imagerie à haute dynamique d'objets comme les exoplanètes, nous présentons ici un nouveau concept de coronographe stellaire interférentiel, le « CIAXE ». Il est dérivé du « CIA », le Coronographe Interférentiel Achromatique. Le CIAXE se distingue de son prédécesseur par une combinaison optique originale, simplifiée, très compacte et totalement coaxiale. En effet, à la différence du CIA classique qui est dérivé de l'interféromètre de Michelson, le CIAXE délivre son faisceau de sortie sur le même axe que le faisceau d'entrée, ce qui facilitera grandement son insertion au sein de l'instrumentation focale d'un télescope. Un tel dispositif pourrait constituer une avancée en matière d'instrumentation focale pour la recherche d'exoplanètes. Pour citer cet article : J. Gay et al., C. R. Physique 6 (2005).

  11. Comparative Small RNA Analysis of Pollen Development in Autotetraploid and Diploid Rice.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Shahid, Muhammad Qasim; Wu, Jinwen; Wang, Lan; Liu, Xiangdong; Lu, Yonggen

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play key roles in plant reproduction. However, knowledge on microRNAome analysis in autotetraploid rice is rather limited. Here, high-throughput sequencing technology was employed to analyze miRNAomes during pollen development in diploid and polyploid rice. A total of 172 differentially expressed miRNAs (DEM) were detected in autotetraploid rice compared to its diploid counterpart, and 57 miRNAs were specifically expressed in autotetraploid rice. Of the 172 DEM, 115 and 61 miRNAs exhibited up- and down-regulation, respectively. Gene Ontology analysis on the targets of up-regulated DEM showed that they were enriched in transport and membrane in pre-meiotic interphase, reproduction in meiosis, and nucleotide binding in single microspore stage. osa-miR5788 and osa-miR1432-5p_R+1 were up-regulated in meiosis and their targets revealed interaction with the meiosis-related genes, suggesting that they may involve in the genes regulation associated with the chromosome behavior. Abundant 24 nt siRNAs associated with transposable elements were found in autotetraploid rice during pollen development; however, they significantly declined in diploid rice, suggesting that 24 nt siRNAs may play a role in pollen development. These findings provide a foundation for understanding the effect of polyploidy on small RNA expression patterns during pollen development that cause pollen sterility in autotetraploid rice. PMID:27077850

  12. Comparative Small RNA Analysis of Pollen Development in Autotetraploid and Diploid Rice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Shahid, Muhammad Qasim; Wu, Jinwen; Wang, Lan; Liu, Xiangdong; Lu, Yonggen

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play key roles in plant reproduction. However, knowledge on microRNAome analysis in autotetraploid rice is rather limited. Here, high-throughput sequencing technology was employed to analyze miRNAomes during pollen development in diploid and polyploid rice. A total of 172 differentially expressed miRNAs (DEM) were detected in autotetraploid rice compared to its diploid counterpart, and 57 miRNAs were specifically expressed in autotetraploid rice. Of the 172 DEM, 115 and 61 miRNAs exhibited up- and down-regulation, respectively. Gene Ontology analysis on the targets of up-regulated DEM showed that they were enriched in transport and membrane in pre-meiotic interphase, reproduction in meiosis, and nucleotide binding in single microspore stage. osa-miR5788 and osa-miR1432-5p_R+1 were up-regulated in meiosis and their targets revealed interaction with the meiosis-related genes, suggesting that they may involve in the genes regulation associated with the chromosome behavior. Abundant 24 nt siRNAs associated with transposable elements were found in autotetraploid rice during pollen development; however, they significantly declined in diploid rice, suggesting that 24 nt siRNAs may play a role in pollen development. These findings provide a foundation for understanding the effect of polyploidy on small RNA expression patterns during pollen development that cause pollen sterility in autotetraploid rice. PMID:27077850

  13. Chitosan/interfering RNA nanoparticle mediated gene silencing in disease vector mosquito larvae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Mysore, Keshava; Flannery, Ellen; Michel, Kristin; Severson, David W; Zhu, Kun Yan; Duman-Scheel, Molly

    2015-03-25

    Vector mosquitoes inflict more human suffering than any other organism-and kill more than one million people each year. The mosquito genome projects facilitated research in new facets of mosquito biology, including functional genetic studies in the primary African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae and the dengue and yellow fever vector Aedes aegypti. RNA interference- (RNAi-) mediated gene silencing has been used to target genes of interest in both of these disease vector mosquito species. Here, we describe a procedure for preparation of chitosan/interfering RNA nanoparticles that are combined with food and ingested by larvae. This technically straightforward, high-throughput, and relatively inexpensive methodology, which is compatible with long double stranded RNA (dsRNA) or small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules, has been used for the successful knockdown of a number of different genes in A. gambiae and A. aegypti larvae. Following larval feedings, knockdown, which is verified through qRT-PCR or in situ hybridization, can persist at least through the late pupal stage. This methodology may be applicable to a wide variety of mosquito and other insect species, including agricultural pests, as well as other non-model organisms. In addition to its utility in the research laboratory, in the future, chitosan, an inexpensive, non-toxic and biodegradable polymer, could potentially be utilized in the field.

  14. Defective Interfering Particles of Poliovirus I. Isolation and Physical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Charles N.; Smoler, Donna; Wimmer, Eckard; Baltimore, David

    1971-01-01

    A class of defective interfering (DI) poliovirus particles has been identified. The first was found as a contaminant of a viral stock; others have been isolated by serial passage at a high multiplicity of infection. The DI particles are less dense than standard virus and sediment more slowly. Their ribonucleic acid (RNA) sediments more slowly than standard RNA and has a higher electrophoretic mobility. Competition hybridization experiments with double-stranded viral RNA indicate that DI RNA is 80 to 90% of the length of standard RNA. The proteins of DI particles are indistinguishable from those of standard poliovirus. PMID:4329564

  15. β-sheet interfering molecules acting against β-amyloid aggregation and fibrillogenesis.

    PubMed

    Francioso, Antonio; Punzi, Pasqualina; Boffi, Alberto; Lori, Clorinda; Martire, Sara; Giordano, Cesare; D'Erme, Maria; Mosca, Luciana

    2015-04-15

    β-Sheet aggregates and amyloid fibrils rising from conformational changes of proteins are observed in several pathological human conditions. These structures are organized in β-strands that can reciprocally interact by hydrophobic and π-π interactions. The amyloid aggregates can give rise to pathological conditions through complex biochemical mechanisms whose physico-chemical nature has been understood in recent times. This review focuses on the various classes of natural and synthetic small molecules able to act against β-amyloid fibrillogenesis and toxicity that may represent new pharmacological tools in Alzheimer's diseases. Some peptides, named 'β-sheet breaker peptides', are able to hamper amyloid aggregation and fibrillogenesis by interfering with and destabilizing the non native β-sheet structures. Other natural compounds, like polyphenols or indolic molecules such as melatonin, can interfere with β-amyloid peptide pathogenicity by inhibiting aggregation and counteracting oxidative stress that is a key hallmark in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25769517

  16. Differentially expressed small RNAs in Arabidopsis galls formed by Meloidogyne javanica: a functional role for miR390 and its TAS3-derived tasiRNAs.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Javier; Barcala, Marta; García, Alejandra; Rio-Machín, Ana; Medina, Clémence; Jaubert-Possamai, Stephanie; Favery, Bruno; Maizel, Alexis; Ruiz-Ferrer, Virginia; Fenoll, Carmen; Escobar, Carolina

    2016-03-01

    Root-knot nematodes (RKNs) induce inside the vascular cylinder the giant cells (GCs) embedded in the galls. The distinctive gene repression in early-developing GCs could be facilitated by small RNAs (sRNA) such as miRNAs, and/or epigenetic mechanisms mediated by 24nt-sRNAs, rasiRNAs and 21-22nt-sRNAs. Therefore, the sRNA-population together with the role of the miR390/TAS3/ARFs module were studied during early gall/GC formation. Three sRNA libraries from 3-d-post-inoculation (dpi) galls induced by Meloidogyne javanica in Arabidopsis and three from uninfected root segments were sequenced following Illumina-Solexa technology. pMIR390a::GUS and pTAS3::GUS lines were assayed for nematode-dependent promoter activation. A sensor line indicative of TAS3-derived tasiRNAs binding to the ARF3 sequence (pARF3:ARF3-GUS) together with a tasiRNA-resistant ARF3 line (pARF3:ARF3m-GUS) were used for functional analysis. The sRNA population showed significant differences between galls and controls, with high validation rate and correspondence with their target expression: 21-nt sRNAs corresponding mainly to miRNAs were downregulated, whilst 24-nt-sRNAs from the rasiRNA family were mostly upregulated in galls. The promoters of MIR390a and TAS3, active in galls, and the pARF3:ARF3-GUS line, indicated a role of TAS3-derived-tasiRNAs in galls. The regulatory module miR390/TAS3 is necessary for proper gall formation possibly through auxin-responsive factors, and the abundance of 24-nt sRNAs (mostly rasiRNAs) constitutes a gall hallmark.

  17. Possible tests of detailed balance with interfering proton resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, J.M.; Bybee, C.R.; Mitchell, G.E.

    1993-10-01

    Bunakov and Weidenmueller proposed that larger enhancements of detailed-balance violation bay be observed near two interfering resonances. We identified 49 pairs of adjacent resonances which have the same spin and parity in our large collection of (p,{alpha}) resonance data in the s-d shell. For each of these pairs, collision matrix elements were derived following the R-matrix approach of Moldauer. The differential cross sections for the reactions (p,{alpha}) and ({alpha}p{sub o}) were calculated using experimental values for the partial widths. The magnitude of detailed-balance violation shows strong energy and angle dependence and a variation of several orders of magnitude between particular pairs of resonances. Our results suggest that this approach to detailed balance tests is much more sensitive than were previous measurements. A figure-of-merit has been evaluated to compare different resonance pairs.

  18. Discrimination against interfering signals at the Poker Flat MST radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    Several on line and off line data processing techniques are used to remove interfering signals due to ground clutter, aircraft, instrumental effects, and external transmissions from the desired atmospheric echoes of Mesosphere Stratosphere, Troposphere (MST) radar. The on line, real time techniques are necessarily simple in order to minimize processing delays. This algorithm examines the individual Doppler spectra which are computed every two to four seconds (for oblique antenna beams). The total spectral power in each individual spectrum is computed by summing all the spectral points. If this integrated power increases from one spectrum to the next by a factor greater than a preselected threshold, then that spectrum is not added to the spectral sum. Succeeding spectra are compared to the last acceptable spectrum. Only a certain maximum number of spectra are allowed to be rejected in succession.

  19. A self-interfering clock as a "which path" witness.

    PubMed

    Margalit, Yair; Zhou, Zhifan; Machluf, Shimon; Rohrlich, Daniel; Japha, Yonathan; Folman, Ron

    2015-09-11

    In Einstein's general theory of relativity, time depends locally on gravity; in standard quantum theory, time is global-all clocks "tick" uniformly. We demonstrate a new tool for investigating time in the overlap of these two theories: a self-interfering clock, comprising two atomic spin states. We prepare the clock in a spatial superposition of quantum wave packets, which evolve coherently along two paths into a stable interference pattern. If we make the clock wave packets "tick" at different rates, to simulate a gravitational time lag, the clock time along each path yields "which path" information, degrading the pattern's visibility. In contrast, in standard interferometry, time cannot yield "which path" information. This proof-of-principle experiment may have implications for the study of time and general relativity and their impact on fundamental effects such as decoherence and the emergence of a classical world. PMID:26249229

  20. Adaptive array for weak interfering signals: Geostationary satellite experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steadman, Karl

    The performance of an experimental adaptive array is evaluated using signals from an existing geostationary satellite interference environment. To do this, an earth station antenna was built to receive signals from various geostationary satellites. In these experiments the received signals have a frequency of approximately 4 GHz (C-band) and have a bandwidth of over 35 MHz. These signals are downconverted to a 69 MHz intermediate frequency in the experimental system. Using the downconverted signals, the performance of the experimental system for various signal scenarios is evaluated. In this situation, due to the inherent thermal noise, qualitative instead of quantitative test results are presented. It is shown that the experimental system can null up to two interfering signals well below the noise level. However, to avoid the cancellation of the desired signal, the use a steering vector is needed. Various methods to obtain an estimate of the steering vector are proposed.

  1. A self-interfering clock as a "which path" witness.

    PubMed

    Margalit, Yair; Zhou, Zhifan; Machluf, Shimon; Rohrlich, Daniel; Japha, Yonathan; Folman, Ron

    2015-09-11

    In Einstein's general theory of relativity, time depends locally on gravity; in standard quantum theory, time is global-all clocks "tick" uniformly. We demonstrate a new tool for investigating time in the overlap of these two theories: a self-interfering clock, comprising two atomic spin states. We prepare the clock in a spatial superposition of quantum wave packets, which evolve coherently along two paths into a stable interference pattern. If we make the clock wave packets "tick" at different rates, to simulate a gravitational time lag, the clock time along each path yields "which path" information, degrading the pattern's visibility. In contrast, in standard interferometry, time cannot yield "which path" information. This proof-of-principle experiment may have implications for the study of time and general relativity and their impact on fundamental effects such as decoherence and the emergence of a classical world.

  2. Adenovirus Virus-Associated RNA Is Processed to Functional Interfering RNAs Involved in Virus Production

    PubMed Central

    Aparicio, Oscar; Razquin, Nerea; Zaratiegui, Mikel; Narvaiza, Iñigo; Fortes, Puri

    2006-01-01

    Posttranscriptional gene silencing allows sequence-specific control of gene expression. Specificity is guaranteed by small antisense RNAs such as microRNAs (miRNAs) or small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Functional miRNAs derive from longer double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) molecules that are cleaved to pre-miRNAs in the nucleus and are transported by exportin 5 (Exp 5) to the cytoplasm. Adenovirus-infected cells express virus-associated (VA) RNAs, which are dsRNA molecules similar in structure to pre-miRNAs. VA RNAs are also transported by Exp 5 to the cytoplasm, where they accumulate. Here we show that small RNAs derived from VA RNAs (svaRNAs), similar to miRNAs, can be found in adenovirus-infected cells. VA RNA processing to svaRNAs requires neither viral replication nor viral protein expression, as evidenced by the fact that svaRNA accumulation can be detected in cells transfected with VA sequences. svaRNAs are efficiently bound by Argonaute 2, the endonuclease of the RNA-induced silencing complex, and behave as functional siRNAs, in that they inhibit the expression of reporter genes with complementary sequences. Blocking svaRNA-mediated inhibition affects efficient adenovirus production, indicating that svaRNAs are required for virus viability. Thus, svaRNA-mediated silencing could represent a novel mechanism used by adenoviruses to control cellular or viral gene expression. PMID:16415015

  3. Characterization of a defective interfering RNA that contains a mosaic of a plant viral genome

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, T.J.; Jackson, A.O.

    1991-01-01

    Our lab was the first to describe and characterize a defective interfering RNA (DI RNAs or DIs) in association with a small RNA plant virus. The features of the DIs that we discovered in infections of tomato bushy stunt virus were compatible with the properties of DIs identified in many animal virus infections. Animal virologists have generally recognized the importance of studying DIs because they are invaluable tools for identifying cis-acting sequences important in virus multiplication and because they offer the opportunity to elucidate mechanisms involved in viral persistence and disease attenuation. Hence our discovery offered a comparably valuable tool for use in plant virus studies for the first time. Since then, we have also discovered the second example of plant viral DI RNAs associated with turnip crinkle virus (TCV), a virus structurally related to TBSV. We proposed a thorough characterization of this unique class of symptom modulating RNAs with the overall objective of identifying viral RNA nucleotide, sequences involved in such fundamental processes as virus replication and encapsidation as well as the degree of symptom expression resulting from the viral-DI-host interaction. The proposed research focused on the molecular characterization of the DI RNAs and the helper virus. We had demonstrated that the DIs were collinear deletion mutants of the genome of a cherry strain of tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV). We had also shown that these low molecular weight RNAs interfered with the helper plant virus and modulated disease expression by preventing the development of a lethal necrotic disease in susceptible host plants. We also suggested that by exploring the mechanisms associated with the symptom attenuation effect, we might be able to devise novel strategies useful for engineering viral disease resistance.

  4. Ebola virus defective interfering particles and persistent infection.

    PubMed

    Calain, P; Monroe, M C; Nichol, S T

    1999-09-15

    Ebola virus (Zaire subtype) is associated with high mortality disease outbreaks that commonly involve human to human transmission. Surviving patients can show evidence of prolonged virus persistence. The potential for Ebola virus to generate defective interfering (DI) particles and establish persistent infections in tissue culture was investigated. It was found that serial undiluted virus passages quickly resulted in production of an evolving population of virus minireplicons possessing both deletion and copyback type DI genome rearrangements. The tenth undiluted virus passage resulted in the establishment of virus persistently infected cell lines. Following one or two crises, these cells were stably maintained for several months with continuous shedding of infectious virus. An analysis of the estimated genome lengths of a selected set of the Ebola virus minireplicons and standard filoviruses revealed no obvious genome length rule, such as "the rule of six" found for the phylogenetically related Paramyxovirinae subfamily viruses. Minimal promoters for Ebola virus replication were found to be contained within 156 and 177 nucleotide regions of the genomic and antigenomic RNA 3' termini, respectively, based on the length of authentic termini retained in the naturally occurring minireplicons analyzed. In addition, using UV-irradiated preparations of virus released from persistently infected cells, it was demonstrated that Ebola virus DI particles could potentially be used as natural minireplicons to assay standard virus support functions. PMID:10489346

  5. Short interfering RNA guide strand modifiers from computational screening.

    PubMed

    Onizuka, Kazumitsu; Harrison, Jason G; Ball-Jones, Alexi A; Ibarra-Soza, José M; Zheng, Yuxuan; Ly, Diana; Lam, Walter; Mac, Stephanie; Tantillo, Dean J; Beal, Peter A

    2013-11-13

    Short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are promising drug candidates for a wide range of targets including those previously considered "undruggable". However, properties associated with the native RNA structure limit drug development, and chemical modifications are necessary. Here we describe the structure-guided discovery of functional modifications for the guide strand 5'-end using computational screening with the high-resolution structure of human Ago2, the key nuclease on the RNA interference pathway. Our results indicate the guide strand 5'-end nucleotide need not engage in Watson-Crick (W/C) H-bonding but must fit the general shape of the 5'-end binding site in MID/PIWI domains of hAgo2 for efficient knockdown. 1,2,3-Triazol-4-yl bases formed from the CuAAC reaction of azides and 1-ethynylribose, which is readily incorporated into RNA via the phosphoramidite, perform well at the guide strand 5'-end. In contrast, purine derivatives with modified Hoogsteen faces or N2 substituents are poor choices for 5'-end modifications. Finally, we identified a 1,2,3-triazol-4-yl base incapable of W/C H-bonding that performs well at guide strand position 12, where base pairing to target was expected to be important. This work expands the repertoire of functional nucleotide analogues for siRNAs. PMID:24152142

  6. Small Interfering RNA-Mediated Connexin Gene Knockdown in Vascular Endothelial and Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Good, Miranda E; Begandt, Daniela; DeLalio, Leon J; Johnstone, Scott R; Isakson, Brant E

    2016-01-01

    Global knockout of vascular connexins can result in premature/neonatal death, severe developmental complications, or compensatory up-regulation of different connexin isoforms. Thus, specific connexin gene knockdown using RNAi-mediated technologies is a technique that allows investigators to efficiently monitor silencing effects of single or multiple connexin gene products. The present chapter describes the transient knockdown of connexins in vitro and ex vivo for cells of the blood vessel wall. In detail, different transfection methods for primary endothelial cells and ex vivo thoracodorsal arteries are described. Essential controls for validating transfection efficiency as well as targeted gene knockdown are explained. These protocols provide researchers with the ability to modify connexin gene expression levels in a multitude of experimental setups. PMID:27207287

  7. Effective Small Interfering RNA Therapy to Treat CLCN7-dependent Autosomal Dominant Osteopetrosis Type 2

    PubMed Central

    Capulli, Mattia; Maurizi, Antonio; Ventura, Luca; Rucci, Nadia; Teti, Anna

    2015-01-01

    In about 70% of patients affected by autosomal dominant osteopetrosis type 2 (ADO2), osteoclast activity is reduced by heterozygous mutations of the CLCN7 gene, encoding the ClC-7 chloride/hydrogen antiporter. CLCN7G215R-, CLCN7R767W-, and CLCN7R286W-specific siRNAs silenced transfected mutant mRNA/EGFP in HEK293 cells, in RAW264.7 cells and in human osteoclasts, with no change of CLCN7WT mRNA and no effect of scrambled siRNA on the mutant transcripts. Osteoclasts from Clcn7G213R ADO2 mice showed reduced bone resorption, a condition rescued by Clcn7G213R-specific siRNA. Treatment of ADO2 mice with Clcn7G213R-specific siRNA induced increase of bone resorption variables and decrease of trabecular bone mass, leading to an overall improvement of the osteopetrotic bone phenotype. Treatment did not induce overt adverse effects and was effective also with siRNAs specific for other mutants. These results demonstrate that a siRNA-based experimental treatment of ADO2 is feasible, and underscore a translational impact for future strategy to cure this therapeutically neglected form of osteopetrosis. PMID:26325626

  8. Small Interfering RNA Targeted to ASPP2 Promotes Progression of Experimental Proliferative Vitreoretinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yu-Jing; Huang, Lv-Zhen; Li, Xiao-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Background. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is vital in proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) development. Apoptosis-stimulating proteins of p53 (ASPP2) have recently been reported to participate in EMT. However, the role of ASPP2 in PVR pathogenesis has not been identified. Methods. Immunohistochemistry was used to investigate the expression of ASPP2 in epiretinal membranes of PVR patients. ARPE-19 cells were transfected with ASPP2-siRNA, followed with measurement of cell cytotoxicity, proliferation, and migration ability. EMT markers and related inflammatory and fibrosis cytokines were measured by western blot or flow cytometry. Additionally, PVR rat models were induced by intravitreal injection of ARPE-19 cells transfected with ASPP2-siRNA and evaluated accordingly. Results. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed less intense expression of ASPP2 in PVR membranes. ASPP2 knockdown facilitated the proliferation and migration of RPE cells and enhanced the expression of mesenchymal markers such as alpha smooth muscle actin, fibronectin, and ZEB1. Meanwhile, ASPP2-siRNA increased EMT-related and inflammatory cytokines, including TGF-β, CTGF, VEGF, TNF-α, and interleukins. PVR severities were more pronounced in the rat models with ASPP2-siRNA treatment. Conclusions. ASPP2 knockdown promoted EMT of ARPE-19 cells in vitro and exacerbated the progression of experimental PVR in vivo, possibly via inflammatory and fibrosis cytokines. PMID:27378826

  9. A small interfering RNA targeting Lnk accelerates bone fracture healing with early neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Yohei; Ii, Masaaki; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Kawamoto, Atsuhiko; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Akimaru, Hiroshi; Mifune, Yutaka; Shoji, Taro; Fukui, Tomoaki; Asahi, Michio; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Asahara, Takayuki

    2013-09-01

    Lnk, an intracellular adapter protein, is expressed in hematopoietic cell lineages, which has recently been proved as an essential inhibitory signaling molecule for stem cell self-renewal in the stem cell factor-c-Kit signaling pathway with enhanced hematopoietic and osteogenic reconstitution in Lnk-deficient mice. Moreover, the therapeutic potential of hematopoietic stem/endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) for fracture healing has been demonstrated with mechanistic insight into vasculogenesis/angiogenesis and osteogenesis enhancement in the fracture sites. We report here, Lnk siRNA-transfected endothelial commitment of c-kit+/Sca-1+/lineage- subpopulations of bone marrow cells have high EPC colony-forming capacity exhibiting endothelial markers, VE-Cad, VEGF and Ang-1. Lnk siRNA-transfected osteoblasts also show highly osteoblastic capacity. In vivo, locally transfected Lnk siRNA could successfully downregulate the expression of Lnk at the fracture site up to 1 week, and radiological and histological examination showed extremely accelerated fracture healing in Lnk siRNA-transfected mice. Moreover, Lnk siRNA-transfected mice exhibited sufficient therapeutic outcomes with intrinstic enhancement of angiogenesis and osteogenesis, specifically, the mice demonstrated better blood flow recovery in the sites of fracture. In our series of experiments, we clarified that a negatively regulated Lnk system contributed to a favorable circumstance for fracture healing by enhancing vasculogenesis/angiogenesis and osteogenesis. These findings suggest that downregulation of Lnk system may have the clinical potential for faster fracture healing, which contributes to the reduction of delayed unions or non-unions.

  10. Inhibitory effect of survivin-targeting small interfering RNA on gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Y H; Chen, M; Zhang, M; Zhang, X Q; Zhang, S; Yu, C G; Xu, Z M; Zou, X P

    2014-01-01

    A pair of inverted repeated sequences of the gene survivin was designed for stable double-stranded RNA establishment. After stable transfection, the biological behaviors of gastric cancer cells were observed. The interference rates of survivin-targeting siRNA (siRNA-survivin) in BGC823, MKN45, SGC7901, and cisplatin-resistant SGC7901 groups were 55.363 ± 3.974, 71.433 ± 3.774, 69.433 ± 7.336, and 76.767 ± 3.541%, respectively, compared with those in the control group. After siRNA-survivin interference, survivin protein expression noticeably decreased, apoptotic rates markedly increased, and cell proliferation was inhibited to varying degrees. Mitochondrial cytochrome C protein expression decreased and the levels of cytoplasmic cytochrome C and caspase-3 increased, which showed significant differences compared with values before transfection. pRNA-shSU eukaryotic expression vectors were constructed. After plasmid transfection, green fluorescent protein expression increased and survivin protein expression noticeably increased in BGC823 and SGC7901. siRNA-survivin promotes GC cell apoptosis and inhibits cell proliferation by downregulating survivin mRNA and protein expression. The underlying mechanisms are correlated with a decrease in mitochondrial cytochrome C and cytoplasmic cytochrome C and caspase-3. PMID:25177958

  11. Bridging small interfering RNA with giant therapeutic outcomes using nanometric liposomes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Yuvraj; Tomar, Sandeep; Khan, Shariq; Meher, Jaya Gopal; Pawar, Vivek K; Raval, Kavit; Sharma, Komal; Singh, Pankaj K; Chaurasia, Mohini; Surendar Reddy, B; Chourasia, Manish K

    2015-12-28

    The scope of RNAi based therapeutics is unquestionable. However, if we dissect the current trend of clinical trials for afore mentioned drug class, some stark trends appear: 1) naked siRNA only exerts influence in topical mode whilst systemic delivery requires a carrier and 2) even after two decades of extensive efforts, not even a single siRNA containing product is commercially available. It was therefore felt that a perspective simplifying the unique intricacies of working with a merger of siRNA and liposomes from a pharmaceutical viewpoint could draw the attention of a wider array of interested researchers. We begin from the beginning and attempt to conduit the gap between theoretical logic and experimental/actual constraints. This, in turn could stimulate the next generation of investigators, gearing them to tackle the conundrum, which is siRNA delivery.

  12. Non-Viral Nanoparticle Delivers Small Interfering RNA to Macrophages In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mei; Gao, Yunxiang; Caja, Kevin; Zhao, Bocheng; Kim, Julian A.

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are increasingly being viewed as therapeutic target for various cancers and many inflammatory diseases. Sequence specific gene reduction by siRNA represents an attractive approach to modulate macrophage function. However, delivery of the therapeutic siRNA into macrophages by non-viral nanoparticles has been a major technical challenge. In this study, we developed a glucan-based siRNA carrier system (BG34-10-Re-I) and demonstrated that the BG34-10-Re-I can effectively assemble siRNA into uniformly distributed nanoparticles of the novel core-shell structure. The BG34-10-Re-I/siRNA nanoparticles effectively reduced gene expression of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in primary macrophages at both protein and mRNA level. The nanoparticles also mediated a sustained reduction of MIF within primary macrophages. Moreover, systemic injection of the nanoparticles into the Balb/c mice bearing 4T1 mammary tumors resulted in the MIF reduction in tumor-associated macrophages. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that the glucan-shell and the siRNA-core structure contribute to the effective delivery of MIF siRNA to macrophages both in vitro and in vivo. This study represents the first development of the primary macrophage MIF gene targeted non-viral nanoparticle system for both in vitro and in vivo applications. PMID:25799489

  13. Efficient delivery of small interfering RNA into injured spinal cords in rats by photomechanical waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Takahiro; Sato, Shunichi; Toyooka, Terushige; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Obara, Minoru

    2011-03-01

    In the central nervous system, lack of axonal regeneration leads to permanent functional disabilities. In spinal cord injury (SCI), the over-expressions of intermediate filament (IF) proteins, such as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin, are mainly involved in glial scar formation; these proteins work as both physical and biochemical barriers to axonal regeneration. Thus, silencing of these IF proteins would be an attractive strategy to treat SCI. In this study, we first attempted to deliver fluorescent probe-labeled siRNAs into injured spinal cords in rats by applying photomechanical waves (PMWs) to examine the capability of PMWs as a tool for siRNA delivery. Intense fluorescence from siRNAs was observed in much broader regions in the spinal cords with PMW application when compared with those with siRNA injection alone. Based on this result, we delivered siRNAs for GFAP and vimentin into injured spinal tissues in rats by applying PMWs. The treatment resulted in efficient silencing of the proteins at five days after SCI and a decrease of the cavity area in the injured tissue at three weeks after SCI when compared with those with siRNA injection alone. These results demonstrate the capability of PMWs for efficient delivery of siRNAs into injured spinal cords and treatment of SCIs.

  14. Conifers have a unique small RNA silencing signature

    PubMed Central

    Dolgosheina, Elena V.; Morin, Ryan D.; Aksay, Gozde; Sahinalp, S. Cenk; Magrini, Vincent; Mardis, Elaine R.; Mattsson, Jim; Unrau, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    Plants produce small RNAs to negatively regulate genes, viral nucleic acids, and repetitive elements at either the transcriptional or post-transcriptional level in a process that is referred to as RNA silencing. While RNA silencing has been extensively studied across the different phyla of the animal kingdom (e.g., mouse, fly, worm), similar studies in the plant kingdom have focused primarily on angiosperms, thus limiting evolutionary studies of RNA silencing in plants. Here we report on an unexpected phylogenetic difference in the size distribution of small RNAs among the vascular plants. By extracting total RNA from freshly growing shoot tissue, we conducted a survey of small RNAs in 24 vascular plant species. We find that conifers, which radiated from the other seed-bearing plants ∼260 million years ago, fail to produce significant amounts of 24-nucleotide (nt) RNAs that are known to guide DNA methylation and heterochromatin formation in angiosperms. Instead, they synthesize a diverse population of small RNAs that are exactly 21-nt long. This finding was confirmed by high-throughput sequencing of the small RNA sequences from a conifer, Pinus contorta. A conifer EST search revealed the presence of a novel Dicer-like (DCL) family, which may be responsible for the observed change in small RNA expression. No evidence for DCL3, an enzyme that matures 24-nt RNAs in angiosperms, was found. We hypothesize that the diverse class of 21-nt RNAs found in conifers may help to maintain organization of their unusually large genomes. PMID:18566193

  15. Differential Expression of Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus-Derived Viral Small RNAs in Infected Commercial and Experimental Host Plants

    PubMed Central

    Mitter, Neena; Koundal, Vikas; Williams, Sarah; Pappu, Hanu

    2013-01-01

    Background Viral small RNAs (vsiRNAs) in the infected host can be generated from viral double-stranded RNA replicative intermediates, self-complementary regions of the viral genome or from the action of host RNA-dependent RNA polymerases on viral templates. The vsiRNA abundance and profile as well as the endogenous small RNA population can vary between different hosts infected by the same virus influencing viral pathogenicity and host response. There are no reports on the analysis of vsiRNAs of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), a segmented negative stranded RNA virus in the family Bunyaviridae, with two of its gene segments showing ambisense gene arrangement. The virus causes significant economic losses to numerous field and horticultural crops worldwide. Principal Findings Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV)-specific vsiRNAs were characterized by deep sequencing in virus-infected experimental host Nicotiana benthamiana and a commercial, susceptible host tomato. The total small (s) RNA reads in TSWV-infected tomato sample showed relatively equal distribution of 21, 22 and 24 nt, whereas N. benthamiana sample was dominated by 24 nt total sRNAs. The number of vsiRNA reads detected in tomato was many a magnitude (~350:1) higher than those found in N. benthamiana, however the profile of vsiRNAs in terms of relative abundance 21, 22 and 24 nt class size was similar in both the hosts. Maximum vsiRNA reads were obtained for the M RNA segment of TSWV while the largest L RNA segment had the least number of vsiRNAs in both tomato and N. benthamiana. Only the silencing suppressor, NSs, of TSWV recorded higher antisense vsiRNA with respect to the coding frame among all the genes of TSWV. Significance Details of the origin, distribution and abundance of TSWV vsiRNAs could be useful in designing efficient targets for exploiting RNA interference for virus resistance. It also has major implications toward our understanding of the differential processing of vsiRNAs in antiviral

  16. Characterization of defective interfering RNAs associated with RNA plant viruses. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, T.J.; Jackson, A.O.

    1993-04-01

    Our lab was the first to describe and characterize a defective interfering RNA (DI RNAs or DIs) in association with a small RNA plant virus. The features of the DIs that we discovered in infections of tomato bushy stunt virus were compatible with the properties of DIs identified in many animal virus infections. Animal virologists have generally recognized the importance of studying DIs because they are invaluable tools for identifying cis-acting sequences important in virus multiplication and because they offer the opportunity to elucidate mechanisms involved in viral persistence and disease attenuation. Hence our discovery offered a comparably valuable tool for use in plant virus studies for the first time. Since the original observation with TBSV, we discovered the second example of plant viral DI RNAs associated with turnip crinkle virus (TCV), and many other reports have now appeared characterizing DI and DI-like RNAs in other plant viral infections. We are seeking to improve our understanding of the mechanisms of DI generation and the precise nature of the RNA sequences necessary for DI replication and encapsidation. We also want to address the nature of the DI mediated symptom attenuation and interference effects in plants, and to determine the feasibility of using transgenic plants constitutively expressing DI RNAs for disease control. The progress made on each of these objectives is summarized along with the proposed experiments for the continuation period.

  17. La Crosse virus nonstructural protein NSs counteracts the effects of short interfering RNA.

    PubMed

    Soldan, Samantha S; Plassmeyer, Matthew L; Matukonis, Meghan K; González-Scarano, Francisco

    2005-01-01

    Through a process known as RNA interference (RNAi), double-stranded short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) silence gene expression in a sequence-specific manner. Recently, several viral proteins, including the nonstructural protein NSs of tomato spotted wilt virus (a plant-infecting bunyavirus), the interferon antagonist protein NS1 of influenza virus, and the E3L protein of vaccinia virus, have been shown to function as suppressors of RNAi, presumably as a counterdefense against cellular mechanisms that decrease viral production. La Crosse virus (LACV), a member of the California serogroup of orthobunyaviruses, has a trisegmented negative-stranded genome comprised of large (L), medium (M), and small (S) segments. To develop a strategy for segment-specific inhibition of transcription, we designed 13 synthetic siRNAs targeting specific RNA segments of the LACV genome that decreased LACV replication and antigen expression in mammalian (293T) and insect (C6/36) cells. Furthermore, NSs, a LACV nonstructural protein, markedly inhibited RNAi directed both against an LACV M segment construct and against a host gene (glyeraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase), suggesting a possible role for this viral protein in the suppression of RNA silencing. Segment-specific siRNAs will be useful as a tool to analyze LACV transcription and replication and to obtain recombinant viruses. Additionally, NSs will help us to identify molecular pathways involved in RNAi and further define its role in the innate immune system.

  18. Proposal for a uniform nomenclature for defective interfering viruses of vesicular stomatitis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Reichmann, M E; Bishop, D H; Brown, F; Crick, J; Holland, J J; Kang, C Y; Lazzarini, R; Moyer, S; Perrault, J; Prevec, L; Pringle, C R; Wagner, R R; Youngner, J S; Huang, A S

    1980-01-01

    Defective interfering particles of vesicular stomatitis virus have been named according to their parental derivation and to their genomic length and physical properties. This suggested uniform nomenclature can be adapted for other virus systems. PMID:6247514

  19. Sedimentation analysis of the RNAs isolated from interfering particles of Lassa and Machupo viruses.

    PubMed

    Lukashevich, I S; Trofimov, N M; Golubev, V P; Maryankova, R F

    1985-12-01

    Vero cells chronically infected with Lassa virus as well as BHK-21 cells chronically infected with Machupo virus produced particles interfering with the replication of homologous, but not heterogeneous viruses. RNAs of standard virus particles contained 4 sedimentation classes of molecules: 28-31 S, 22-24S, 18 S and 4-6 S. The 28-31 S molecules were not present among the RNAs of interfering particles of Lassa and Machupo viruses.

  20. [The influence of interfered circadian rhythm on pregnancy and neonatal rats].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Jun; Sheng, Wen-Jie; Guo, Yin-Hua; Tan, Yong

    2015-10-25

    The aim of this study was to observe the influence of interfered circadian rhythm on pregnancy of rats and growth of neonatal rats, and to explore the relationship between the interfered circadian rhythm and the changes of melatonin and progesterone. Continuous light was used to inhibit melatonin secretion and therefore the interfered circadian rhythm animal model was obtained. The influence of interfered circadian rhythm on delivery of pregnant rats was observed. Serum was collected from rats during different stages of pregnancy to measure the concentrations of melatonin and progesterone. In order to observe the embryo resorption rate, half of pregnant rats were randomly selected to undergo a laparotomy, and the remainder was used to observe delivery and assess the growth of neonatal rats after delivery. The results showed that the interfered circadian rhythm induced adverse effects on pregnancy outcomes, including an increase of embryo resorption rate and a decrease in the number of live births; inhibited the secretion of melatonin along with decreased serum progesterone level; prolonged the stage of labor, but not the duration of pregnancy; and disturbed the fetal intrauterine growth and the growth of neonatal rats. The results suggest that interfered circadian rhythm condition made by continuous light could make adverse effects on both pregnant rats and neonatal rats. The results of our study may provide a way to modulate pregnant women's circadian rhythm and a possibility of application of melatonin on pregnant women.

  1. Analysis of small RNA production patterns among the two potato spindle tuber viroid variants in tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Adkar-Purushothama, Charith Raj; Perreault, Jean-Pierre; Sano, Teruo

    2015-12-01

    In order to analyze the production of small RNA (sRNA) by viroids upon infecting the plants, the tomato plants (Solanum lycopersicum cultivar Rutgers) were inoculated with the variants of Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd). After 21-days of postinoculation, total RNA was extracted and subjected for deep-sequencing using Illumina HiSeq platform. The primers were trimmed and only 21- to 24-nt long sRNAs were filtered after quality check of the raw data. The filtered sRNA population was then mapped against both the genomic (+) and antigenomic (-) strands of the respective PSTVd variants using standard pattern-matching algorithm. The profiling of viroid derived sRNA (vd-sRNA) revealed that the viroids are susceptible to host RNA silencing mechanism. High-throughput sequence data linked to this project have been deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database under accession number GSE69225.

  2. Roles of Interfering Radiation Emitted from Decaying Pulses Obeying Soliton Equations Belonging to the Ablowitz-Kaup-Newell-Segur Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujishima, Hironobu; Yajima, Tetsu

    2015-06-01

    The nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation under the box-type initial condition, which models general multiple pulses deviating from pure solitons, is analyzed. Following the approximation by splitting the initial pulse into many small bins [G. Boffetta and A. R. Osborne, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0021-9991(92)90370-E, J. Comp. Phys. 102, 252 (1992)], we can analyze the Zakharov-Shabat eigenvalue problem to construct transfer matrices connecting the Jost functions in each interval without direct numerical computation. We can obtain analytical expressions for the scattering data that describe interfering radiation emitted from initial pulses. The number of solitons that appear in the final stage is predicted theoretically, and the condition generating an unusual wave such as a double-pole soliton is derived. Numerical analyses under box-type initial conditions are also performed to show that the interplay between the tails from decaying pulses can affect the asymptotic profile.

  3. Fangchinoline Inhibits Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Replication by Interfering with gp160 Proteolytic Processing

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Zhitao; Lu, Yimei; Liao, Qingjiao; Wu, Yang; Chen, Xulin

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy has led to a significant reduction in the morbidity and mortality of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients. However, the emergence of drug resistance has resulted in the failure of treatments in large numbers of patients and thus necessitates the development of new classes of anti-HIV drugs. In this study, more than 200 plant-derived small-molecule compounds were evaluated in a cell-based HIV-1 antiviral screen, resulting in the identification of a novel HIV-1 inhibitor (fangchinoline). Fangchinoline, a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid isolated from Radix Stephaniae tetrandrae, exhibited antiviral activity against HIV-1 laboratory strains NL4-3, LAI and BaL in MT-4 and PM1 cells with a 50% effective concentration ranging from 0.8 to 1.7 µM. Mechanism-of-action studies showed that fangchinoline did not exhibit measurable antiviral activity in TZM-b1 cells but did inhibit the production of infectious virions in HIV-1 cDNA transfected 293T cells, which suggests that the compound targets a late event in infection cycle. Furthermore, the antiviral effect of fangchinoline seems to be HIV-1 enve1ope-dependent, as the production of infectious HIV-1 particles packaged with a heterologous envelope, the vesicular stomatitis virus G glycoprotein, was unaffected by fangchinoline. Western blot analysis of HIV envelope proteins expressed in transfected 293T cells and in isolated virions showed that fangchinoline inhibited HIV-1 gp160 processing, resulting in reduced envelope glycoprotein incorporation into nascent virions. Collectively, our results demonstrate that fangchinoline inhibits HIV-1 replication by interfering with gp160 proteolytic processing. Fangchinoline may serve as a starting point for developing a new HIV-1 therapeutic approach. PMID:22720080

  4. Fangchinoline inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication by interfering with gp160 proteolytic processing.

    PubMed

    Wan, Zhitao; Lu, Yimei; Liao, Qingjiao; Wu, Yang; Chen, Xulin

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy has led to a significant reduction in the morbidity and mortality of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients. However, the emergence of drug resistance has resulted in the failure of treatments in large numbers of patients and thus necessitates the development of new classes of anti-HIV drugs. In this study, more than 200 plant-derived small-molecule compounds were evaluated in a cell-based HIV-1 antiviral screen, resulting in the identification of a novel HIV-1 inhibitor (fangchinoline). Fangchinoline, a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid isolated from Radix Stephaniae tetrandrae, exhibited antiviral activity against HIV-1 laboratory strains NL4-3, LAI and BaL in MT-4 and PM1 cells with a 50% effective concentration ranging from 0.8 to 1.7 µM. Mechanism-of-action studies showed that fangchinoline did not exhibit measurable antiviral activity in TZM-b1 cells but did inhibit the production of infectious virions in HIV-1 cDNA transfected 293T cells, which suggests that the compound targets a late event in infection cycle. Furthermore, the antiviral effect of fangchinoline seems to be HIV-1 envelope-dependent, as the production of infectious HIV-1 particles packaged with a heterologous envelope, the vesicular stomatitis virus G glycoprotein, was unaffected by fangchinoline. Western blot analysis of HIV envelope proteins expressed in transfected 293T cells and in isolated virions showed that fangchinoline inhibited HIV-1 gp160 processing, resulting in reduced envelope glycoprotein incorporation into nascent virions. Collectively, our results demonstrate that fangchinoline inhibits HIV-1 replication by interfering with gp160 proteolytic processing. Fangchinoline may serve as a starting point for developing a new HIV-1 therapeutic approach. PMID:22720080

  5. Silencing of host genes directed by virus-derived short interfering RNAs in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xunyang; Li, Wan-Xiang; Lu, Rui

    2012-11-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) processed from viral replication intermediates by RNase III-like enzyme Dicer guide sequence-specific antiviral silencing in fungi, plants, and invertebrates. In plants, virus-derived siRNAs (viRNAs) can target and silence cellular transcripts and, in some cases, are responsible for the induction of plant diseases. Currently it remains unclear whether viRNAs are also capable of modulating the expression of cellular genes in the animal kingdom, although animal virus-encoded microRNAs (miRNAs) are known to guide efficient silencing of host genes, thereby facilitating virus replication. In this report, we showed that viRNAs derived from a modified nodavirus triggered potent silencing of homologous cellular transcripts produced by the endogenous gene or transgene in the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans. Like that found in plants, virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) in C. elegans also involves RRF-1, a worm RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) that is known to produce single-stranded secondary siRNAs in a Dicer-independent manner. We further demonstrated that VIGS in C. elegans is inheritable, suggesting that VIGS has the potential to generate profound epigenetic consequences in future generations. Altogether, these findings, for the first time, confirmed that viRNAs have the potential to modulate host gene expression in the animal kingdom. Most importantly, the success in uncoupling the trigger and the target of the antiviral silencing would allow for the exploration of novel features of virus-host interactions mediated by viRNAs in the animal kingdom. PMID:22896621

  6. Interfering effects of multitasking on muscle activity in the upper extremity.

    PubMed

    Au, Alvin K; Keir, Peter J

    2007-10-01

    Multitasking, where workers are required to perform multiple physical tasks with various levels of cognitive load is common in today's workplace. Simultaneous physical and mental demands are thought to cause task interference and likely increase muscle activity. To test the interfering effects of multitasking, 16 healthy participants performed hand and shoulder exertions with combinations of four grip conditions (no grip, 30% grip with low precision, 30% grip with high precision, and maximal grip) and three shoulder conditions at 90 degrees abduction (maintaining posture, 40% force-controlled moment, 40% posture-controlled moment), with and without the Stroop test while surface EMG was recorded from eight upper extremity muscles. Both 40% MVC shoulder moments increased extrinsic forearm muscle activity by 2-4% MVE (p<0.01). Grip exertion at 30% MVC reduced anterior and middle deltoid activity by 2% MVE (p<0.01). Exerting a constant force against the transducer (force-controlled) required 3-4% MVE greater middle and posterior deltoid activity (p<0.001) compared to supporting an equivalent inertial load at the same shoulder angle (posture-controlled). Performing the mental task (Stroop test) concurrently with either 40% MVC shoulder moments significantly increased trapezius activity by nearly 2% MVE (p<0.05). Interestingly, the Stroop test also reduced all deltoid activity by 1% MVE (p<0.05). The addition of both the Stroop test and force-control shoulder exertion independently reduced maximal grip force by 7% and 10% MVC, respectively. These results suggest that more complex workplace tasks may act to increase muscle load or interfere with task performance. These small but significant findings may play a role in the development of long-term musculoskeletal disorders in the workplace.

  7. Identification and characterization of a viroid resembling apple dimple fruit viroid in fig (Ficus carica L.) by next generation sequencing of small RNAs.

    PubMed

    Chiumenti, M; Torchetti, E M; Di Serio, F; Minafra, A

    2014-08-01

    Viroids are small (246-401 nt) circular and non coding RNAs infecting higher plants. They are targeted by host Dicer-like enzymes (DCLs) that generate small RNAs of 21-24 nt (sRNAs), which are involved in the host RNA silencing pathways. The accumulation in plant tissues of such viroid-derived small RNAs (vd-sRNAs) is a clear sign of an ongoing viroid infection. In this study, next generation sequencing of a sRNAs library and assembling of the sequenced vd-sRNAs were instrumental for the identification of a viroid resembling apple dimple fruit viroid (ADFVd) in a fig accession. After confirming by molecular methods the presence of this viroid in the fig tree, its population was characterized, showing that the ADFVd master sequence from fig diverges from that of the ADFVd reference variant from apple. Moreover, since this viroid accumulates at a low level in fig, a semi-nested RT-PCR assay was developed for detecting it in other fig accessions. ADFVd seems to have a wider host range than thought before and this poses questions about its epidemiology. A further characterization of ADFVd-sRNAs showed similar accumulation of (+) or (-) vd-sRNAs that mapped on the viroid genome generating hotspot profiles. Moreover, similarly to other nuclear-replicating viroids, vd-sRNAs of 21, 22 and 24 nt in size prevailed in the distribution profiles. Altogether, these data support the involvement of double-stranded RNAs and different DCLs, targeting the same restricted viroid regions, in the genesis of ADFVd-sRNAs.

  8. Characterization of a defective interfering RNA that contains a mosaic of a plant viral genome. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, T.J.; Jackson, A.O.

    1991-12-31

    Our lab was the first to describe and characterize a defective interfering RNA (DI RNAs or DIs) in association with a small RNA plant virus. The features of the DIs that we discovered in infections of tomato bushy stunt virus were compatible with the properties of DIs identified in many animal virus infections. Animal virologists have generally recognized the importance of studying DIs because they are invaluable tools for identifying cis-acting sequences important in virus multiplication and because they offer the opportunity to elucidate mechanisms involved in viral persistence and disease attenuation. Hence our discovery offered a comparably valuable tool for use in plant virus studies for the first time. Since then, we have also discovered the second example of plant viral DI RNAs associated with turnip crinkle virus (TCV), a virus structurally related to TBSV. We proposed a thorough characterization of this unique class of symptom modulating RNAs with the overall objective of identifying viral RNA nucleotide, sequences involved in such fundamental processes as virus replication and encapsidation as well as the degree of symptom expression resulting from the viral-DI-host interaction. The proposed research focused on the molecular characterization of the DI RNAs and the helper virus. We had demonstrated that the DIs were collinear deletion mutants of the genome of a cherry strain of tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV). We had also shown that these low molecular weight RNAs interfered with the helper plant virus and modulated disease expression by preventing the development of a lethal necrotic disease in susceptible host plants. We also suggested that by exploring the mechanisms associated with the symptom attenuation effect, we might be able to devise novel strategies useful for engineering viral disease resistance.

  9. Identification of genes required for Cf-dependent hypersensitive cell death by combined proteomic and RNA interfering analyses

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qiu-Fang; Cheng, Wei-Shun; Zhang, Zhi-Xin; Xu, You-Ping; Zhou, Xue-Ping; Cai, Xin-Zhong

    2012-01-01

    Identification of hypersensitive cell death (HCD) regulators is essential to dissect the molecular mechanisms underlying plant disease resistance. In this study, combined proteomic and RNA interfering (RNAi) analyses were employed to identify genes required for the HCD conferred by the tomato resistance gene Cf-4 and the Cladosporium fulvum avirulence gene Avr4. Forty-nine proteins differentially expressed in the tomato seedlings mounting and those not mounting Cf-4/Avr4-dependent HCD were identified through proteomic analysis. Among them were a variety of defence-related proteins including a cysteine protease, Pip1, an operative target of another C. fulvum effector, Avr2. Additionally, glutathione-mediated antioxidation is a major response to Cf-4/Avr4-dependent HCD. Functional analysis through tobacco rattle virus-induced gene silencing and transient RNAi assays of the chosen 16 differentially expressed proteins revealed that seven genes, which encode Pip1 homologue NbPip1, a SIPK type MAP kinase Nbf4, an asparagine synthetase NbAsn, a trypsin inhibitor LeMir-like protein NbMir, a small GTP-binding protein, a late embryogenesis-like protein, and an ASR4-like protein, were required for Cf-4/Avr4-dependent HCD. Furthermore, the former four genes were essential for Cf-9/Avr9-dependent HCD; NbPip1, NbAsn, and NbMir, but not Nbf4, affected a nonadaptive bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae-induced HCD in Nicotiana benthamiana. These data demonstrate that Pip1 and LeMir may play a general role in HCD and plant immunity and that the application of combined proteomic and RNA interfering analyses is an efficient strategy to identify genes required for HCD, disease resistance, and probably other biological processes in plants. PMID:22275387

  10. Temperature Measurement of a Miniature Ceramic Heater in the Presence of an Extended Interfering Background Radiation Source Using a Multiwavelength Pyrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    Temperature measurement of small (millimeter size) objects is generally difficult and demanding. Measurement involving ceramic materials using the traditional one- and two-color pyrometer is difficult because of their complex optical properties, such as low emissivity which may vary with both temperature and wavelength. Pyrometry applications in an environment with an interfering radiation source of extended dimension adds extra complexity to the process. We show that the multiwavelength pyrometer successfully measured the temperatures of a millimeter (mm) size ceramic heater under these demanding conditions.

  11. 9 CFR 354.49 - Interfering with an inspector or employee of Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interfering with an inspector or employee of Service. 354.49 Section 354.49 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION...

  12. 9 CFR 354.49 - Interfering with an inspector or employee of Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Interfering with an inspector or employee of Service. 354.49 Section 354.49 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS...

  13. Validation of Learning Effort Algorithm for Real-Time Non-Interfering Based Diagnostic Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Pi-Shan; Chang, Te-Jeng

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this research is to validate the algorithm of learning effort which is an indicator of a new real-time and non-interfering based diagnostic technique. IC3 Mentor, the adaptive e-learning platform fulfilling the requirements of intelligent tutor system, was applied to 165 university students. The learning records of the subjects…

  14. In vitro transcription activities of Pol IV, Pol V and RDR2 reveal coupling of Pol IV and RDR2 for dsRNA synthesis in plant RNA silencing

    SciTech Connect

    Haag, Jeremy R.; Ream, Thomas S.; Marasco, Michelle; Nicora, Carrie D.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2012-12-14

    In Arabidopsis, RNA-dependent DNA methylation and transcriptional silencing involves three nuclear RNA polymerases that are biochemically undefined: the presumptive DNA-dependent RNA polymerases, Pol IV and Pol V and the putative RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, RDR2. Here, we demonstrate their RNA polymerase activities in vitro. Unlike Pol II, Pols IV and V require an RNA primer, are insensitive to alpha-amanitin and differ in their ability to displace non-template DNA during transcription. Biogenesis of 24 nt small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) requires both Pol IV and RDR2, which physically associate in vivo. Pol IV does not require RDR2 for activity, but RDR2 is nonfunctional in the absence of associated Pol IV, suggesting that their coupling explains the channeling of Pol IV transcripts into double-stranded RNAs that are then diced into 24 nt siRNAs.

  15. Replication of murine coronavirus defective interfering RNA from negative-strand transcripts.

    PubMed

    Joo, M; Banerjee, S; Makino, S

    1996-09-01

    The positive-strand defective interfering (DI) RNA of the murine coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus (MHV), when introduced into MHV-infected cells, results in DI RNA replication and accumulation. We studied whether the introduction of negative-strand transcripts of MHV DI RNA would also result in replication. At a location downstream of the T7 promoter and upstream of the human hepatitis delta virus ribozyme domain, we inserted a complete cDNA clone of MHV DI RNA in reverse orientation; in vitro-synthesized RNA from this plasmid yielded a negative-strand RNA copy of the MHV DI RNA. When the negative-strand transcripts of the DI RNA were expressed in MHV-infected cells by a vaccinia virus T7 expression system, positive-strand DI RNAs accumulated in the plasmid-transfected cells. DI RNA replication depended on the expression of T7 polymerase and on the presence of the T7 promoter. Transfection of in vitro-synthesized negative-strand transcripts into MHV-infected cells and serial passage of virus samples from RNA-transfected cells also resulted in accumulation of the DI RNA. Positive-strand DI RNA transcripts were undetectable in sample preparations of the in vitro-synthesized negative-strand DI RNA transcripts, and DI RNA did not accumulate after cotransfection of a small amount of positive-strand DI RNA and truncated-replication-disabled negative-strand transcripts; clearly, the DI RNA replicated from the transfected negative-strand transcripts and not from minute amounts of positive-strand DI RNAs that might be envisioned as artifacts of T7 transcription. Sequence analysis of positive-strand DI RNAs in the cells transfected with negative-strand transcripts showed that DI RNAs maintained the DI-specific unique sequences introduced within the leader sequence. These data indicated that positive-strand DI RNA synthesis occurred from introduced negative-strand transcripts in the MHV-infected cells; this demonstration, using MHV, of DI RNA replication from transfected

  16. 36 CFR 261.3 - Interfering with a Forest officer, volunteer, or human resource program enrollee or giving false...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... officer, volunteer, or human resource program enrollee or giving false report to a Forest officer. 261.3... General Prohibitions § 261.3 Interfering with a Forest officer, volunteer, or human resource program..., intimidating, or intentionally interfering with any Forest officer, volunteer, or human resource...

  17. Minimum description length approach for unsupervised spectral unmixing of multiple interfering gas species.

    PubMed

    Fade, Julien; Lefebvre, Sidonie; Cézard, Nicolas

    2011-07-18

    We address an original statistical method for unsupervised identification and concentration estimation of spectrally interfering gas components of unknown nature and number. We show that such spectral unmixing can be efficiently achieved using information criteria derived from the Minimum Description Length (MDL) principle, outperforming standard information criteria such as AICc or BIC. In the context of spectroscopic applications, we also show that the most efficient MDL technique implemented shows good robustness to experimental artifacts.

  18. Pitfall in cannabinoid analysis--detection of a previously unrecognized interfering compound in human serum.

    PubMed

    Toennes, Stefan W; Hanisch, Stephanie; Pogoda, Werner; Wunder, Cora; Paulke, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    In clinical and forensic toxicology, high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) is increasingly used since it allows the development of sensitive and fast drug analysis procedures. During development of a LC-MS/MS method for determination of the psychoactive cannabinoid Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and of its two metabolites 11-hydroxy-THC (THCOH) and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH) in serum, a previously unrecognized interfering compound was detected. Extending the fast gradient elution program by an isocratic phase leads to sufficient separation of the interfering compound, initially co-eluting with THCCOOH and exhibiting the same fragments. For characterization, product ion scans and precursor ion scans were performed. Samples from cannabis users were analyzed to estimate the abundance of the interfering compound. The mass spectrometric experiments showed that the interfering compound exhibited the same molecular mass as THCCOOH and a similar fragmentation pattern except for relative fragment intensities. This compound was exclusively detectable in authentic samples. Concentrations were in the range of 4.5 to 51 % (median 14.6 %, n = 73) of those of THCCOOH. After further optimization of the gradient, the method was sufficiently selective and sensitive and validation parameters were within acceptance limits. A new compound related to cannabis use was detected in human serum, and data suggest an isomeric structure to THCCOOH. Considering the rather high amounts observed, it was surprising that this compound had not been detected previously. Further studies on its structure and origin are necessary. PMID:25391576

  19. Removing interfering clutter associated with radar pulses that an airborne radar receives from a radar transponder

    DOEpatents

    Ormesher, Richard C.; Axline, Robert M.

    2008-12-02

    Interfering clutter in radar pulses received by an airborne radar system from a radar transponder can be suppressed by developing a representation of the incoming echo-voltage time-series that permits the clutter associated with predetermined parts of the time-series to be estimated. These estimates can be used to estimate and suppress the clutter associated with other parts of the time-series.

  20. Small silencing RNAs: an expanding universe.

    PubMed

    Ghildiyal, Megha; Zamore, Phillip D

    2009-02-01

    Since the discovery in 1993 of the first small silencing RNA, a dizzying number of small RNA classes have been identified, including microRNAs (miRNAs), small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs). These classes differ in their biogenesis, their modes of target regulation and in the biological pathways they regulate. There is a growing realization that, despite their differences, these distinct small RNA pathways are interconnected, and that small RNA pathways compete and collaborate as they regulate genes and protect the genome from external and internal threats.

  1. Thiophenone Attenuates Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli O103:H2 Virulence by Interfering with AI-2 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Valen Rukke, Håkon; Benneche, Tore; Aamdal Scheie, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Interference with bacterial quorum sensing communication provides an anti-virulence strategy to control pathogenic bacteria. Here, using the Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) O103:H2, we showed for the first time that thiophenone TF101 reduced expression of lsrB; the gene encoding the AI-2 receptor. Combined results of transcriptional and phenotypic analyses suggested that TF101 interfere with AI-2 signalling, possibly by competing with AI-2 for binding to LsrB. This is supported by in silico docking prediction of thiophenone TF101 in the LsrB pocket. Transcriptional analyses furthermore showed that thiophenone TF101 interfered with expression of the virulence genes eae and fimH. In addition, TF101 reduced AI-2 induced E. coli adhesion to colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. TF101, on the other hand, did not affect epinephrine or norepinephrine enhanced E. coli adhesion. Overall, our results showed that thiophenone TF101 interfered with virulence expression in E. coli O103:H2, suggestedly by interfering with AI-2 mediated quorum sensing. We thus conclude that thiophenone TF101 might represent a promising future anti-virulence agent in the fight against pathogenic E. coli. PMID:27309855

  2. Detecting and Eliminating Interfering Organic Compounds in Waters Analyzed for Isotopic Composition by Crds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, B. A.; Hsiao, G. S.; Rella, C.

    2010-12-01

    Optical spectroscopy based CRDS technology for isotopic analysis of δD and δ18O directly from liquid water has greatly increased the number and type of liquid samples analyzed. This increase has also revealed a previously unrecognized sample contamination problem. Recently West[1] and Brand[2] identified samples containing ethanol, methanol, plant extracts and other organic compounds analyzed by CRDS and other spectroscopy based techniques as yielding erroneous results for δD and δ18O (especially δD) due to spectroscopic interference. Not all organic compounds generate interference. Thus, identifying which samples are contaminated by which organic compounds is of key importance for data credibility and correction. To address this problem a new approach in the form of a software suite, ChemCorrect™, has been developed. A chemometrics component uses a spectral library of water isotopologues and interfering organic compounds to best fit the measured spectra. The best fit values provide a quantitative assay of the actual concentrations of the various species and are then evaluated to generate a visual flag indicating samples affected by organic contamination. Laboratory testing of samples spiked with known quantities of interfering organic compounds such as methanol, ethanol, and terpenes was performed. The software correctly flagged and identified type of contamination for all the spiked samples without any false positives. Furthermore the reported values were a linear function of actual concentration with an R^2>0.99 even for samples which contained multiple organic compounds. Further testing was carried out against a range of industrial chemical compounds which can contaminate ground water as well as a variety of plant derived waters and juices which were also analyzed by IRMS. The excellent results obtained give good insight into which organic compounds cause interference and which classes of plants are likely to contain interfering compounds. Finally

  3. Uptake, efficacy, and systemic distribution of naked, inhaled short interfering RNA (siRNA) and locked nucleic acid (LNA) antisense.

    PubMed

    Moschos, Sterghios A; Frick, Manfred; Taylor, Bruce; Turnpenny, Paul; Graves, Helen; Spink, Karen G; Brady, Kevin; Lamb, David; Collins, David; Rockel, Thomas D; Weber, Markus; Lazari, Ovadia; Perez-Tosar, Luis; Fancy, Sally A; Lapthorn, Chris; Green, Martin X; Evans, Steve; Selby, Matthew; Jones, Gareth; Jones, Lyn; Kearney, Sarah; Mechiche, Houria; Gikunju, Diana; Subramanian, Romesh; Uhlmann, Eugen; Jurk, Marion; Vollmer, Jörg; Ciaramella, Giuseppe; Yeadon, Michael

    2011-12-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) and small interfering RNA (siRNA) promise specific correction of disease-causing gene expression. Therapeutic implementation, however, has been forestalled by poor delivery to the appropriate tissue, cell type, and subcellular compartment. Topical administration is considered to circumvent these issues. The availability of inhalation devices and unmet medical need in lung disease has focused efforts in this tissue. We report the development of a novel cell sorting method for quantitative, cell type-specific analysis of siRNA, and locked nucleic acid (LNA) ASO uptake and efficacy after intratracheal (i.t.) administration in mice. Through fluorescent dye labeling, we compare the utility of this approach to whole animal and whole tissue analysis, and examine the extent of tissue distribution. We detail rapid systemic access and renal clearance for both therapeutic classes and lack of efficacy at the protein level in lung macrophages, epithelia, or other cell types. We nevertheless observe efficient redirection of i.t. administered phosphorothioate (PS) LNA ASO to the liver and kidney leading to targeted gene knockdown. These data suggest delivery remains a key obstacle to topically administered, naked oligonucleotide efficacy in the lung and introduce inhalation as a potentially viable alternative to injection for antisense administration to the liver and kidneys.

  4. Arthropod viruses and small RNAs.

    PubMed

    Vijayendran, Diveena; Airs, Paul M; Dolezal, Kelly; Bonning, Bryony C

    2013-10-01

    The recently characterized small RNAs provide a new paradigm for physiological studies. These molecules have been shown to be integral players in processes as diverse as development and innate immunity against bacteria and viruses in eukaryotes. Several of the well-characterized small RNAs including small interfering RNAs, microRNAs and PIWI-interacting RNAs are emerging as important players in mediating arthropod host-virus interactions. Understanding the role of small RNAs in arthropod host-virus molecular interactions will facilitate manipulation of these pathways for both management of arthropod pests of agricultural and medical importance, and for protection of beneficial arthropods such as honey bees and shrimp. This review highlights recent research on the role of small RNAs in arthropod host-virus interactions with reference to other host-pathogen systems. PMID:23932976

  5. The expanding world of small RNAs in plants

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Filipe; Martienssen, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Plant genomes produce a variety of small RNAs that function in distinct, yet overlapping, genetic and epigenetic silencing pathways. However, the abundance and diversity of small RNA classes varies in different plant species, suggesting co-evolution between environmental adaptations and gene silencing mechanisms. Small RNA biogenesis in plants is well understood, but we are just beginning to uncover their intricate regulation and activity. Here, we discuss the biogenesis of plant small RNAs, such as microRNAs, secondary small-interfering RNAs and heterochromatic small-interfering RNAs, and their diverse cellular and developmental functions, including reproductive transitions, genomic imprinting and paramutation. We also discuss the diversification of small RNA-directed silencing pathways through the expansion of RNA-dependent RNA polymerases, Dicer and Argonaute proteins. PMID:26530390

  6. Ribozyme-enhanced single-stranded Ago2-processed interfering RNA triggers efficient gene silencing with fewer off-target effects

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Renfu; Zhang, Fengjuan; Xu, Beiying; Xi, Hairui; Zhang, Xue; Wang, Weihua; Wu, Ligang

    2015-01-01

    Short-hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) are widely used to produce small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) for gene silencing. Here we design an alternative siRNA precursor, named single-stranded, Argonaute 2 (Ago2)-processed interfering RNA (saiRNA), containing a 16–18 bp stem and a loop complementary to the target transcript. The introduction of a self-cleaving ribozyme derived from hepatitis delta virus to the 3′ end of the transcribed saiRNA dramatically improves its silencing activity by generating a short 3′ overhang that facilitates the efficient binding of saiRNA to Ago2. The same ribozyme also enhances the activity of Dicer-dependent shRNAs. Unlike a classical shRNA, the strand-specific cleavage of saiRNA by Ago2 during processing eliminates the passenger strand and prevents the association of siRNA with non-nucleolytic Ago proteins. As a result, off-target effects are reduced. In addition, saiRNA exhibits less competition with the biogenesis of endogenous miRNAs. Therefore, ribozyme-enhanced saiRNA provides a reliable tool for RNA interference applications. PMID:26455506

  7. Small interfering RNA against transcription factor STAT6 leads to increased cholesterol synthesis in lung cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Richa; Chhabra, Ravindresh; Saini, Neeru

    2011-01-01

    STAT6 transcription factor has become a potential molecule for therapeutic intervention because it regulates broad range of cellular processes in a large variety of cell types. Although some target genes and interacting partners of STAT6 have been identified, its exact mechanism of action needs to be elucidated. In this study, we sought to further characterize the molecular interactions, networks, and functions of STAT6 by profiling the mRNA expression of STAT6 silenced human lung cells (NCI-H460) using microarrays. Our analysis revealed 273 differentially expressed genes after STAT6 silencing. Analysis of the gene expression data with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) software revealed Gene expression, Cell death, Lipid metabolism as the functions associated with highest rated network. Cholesterol biosynthesis was among the most enriched pathways in IPA as well as in PANTHER analysis. These results have been validated by real-time PCR and cholesterol assay using scrambled siRNA as a negative control. Similar findings were also observed with human type II pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells, A549. In the present study we have, for the first time, shown the inverse relationship of STAT6 with the cholesterol biosynthesis in lung cancer cells. The present findings are potentially significant to advance the understanding and design of therapeutics for the pathological conditions where both STAT6 and cholesterol biosynthesis are implicated viz. asthma, atherosclerosis etc.

  8. Small-Interfering RNAs from Natural Antisense Transcripts Derived from a Cellulose Synthase Gene Modulate Cell Wall Biosynthesis in Barley

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Viral-induced gene silencing of members of the cellulose synthase/cellulose synthase-like (CesA/Csl) gene superfamily in barley (Hordeum vulgare cv. Blackhulless) using the Barley Stripe Mosaic Virus reduced theincorporation of D-14C-Glc into cellulose and into mixed-linkage (1'3),(1'4)-'-D-glucans ...

  9. Small interfering RNA targeting ILK inhibits metastasis in human tongue cancer cells through repression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Yu; Qi, Jin; Deng, Shixiong; Wang, Cheng; Zhang, Luyu; Chen, Junxia

    2013-08-01

    Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is a multifunctional serine/threonine kinase. Accumulating evidences suggest that ILK are involved in cell–matrix interactions, cell proliferation, invasion, migration, angiogenesis and Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT). However, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. EMT has been postulated as a prerequisite for metastasis. The reports have demonstrated that EMT was implicated in metastasis of oral squamous cell carcinomas. Therefore, here we further postulate that ILK might participate in EMT of tongue cancer. We showed that ILK siRNA inhibited EMT with low N-cadherin, Vimentin, Snail, Slug and Twist as well as high E-cadherin expression in vivo and in vitro. We found that knockdown of ILK inhibited cell proliferation, migration and invasion as well as changed cell morphology. We also demonstrated that ILK siRNA inhibited phosphorylation of downstream signaling targets Akt and GSK3β as well as reduced expression of MMP2 and MMP9. Furthermore, we found that the tongue tumor with high metastasis capability showed higher ILK, Vimentin, Snail, Slug and Twist as well as lower E-cadherin expression in clinical specimens. Finally, ILK siRNA led to the suppression for tumorigenesis and metastasis in vivo. Our findings suggest that ILK could be a novel diagnostic and therapeutic target for tongue cancer. Highlights: • ILK siRNA influences cell morphology, cell cycle, migration and invasion. • ILK siRNA affects the expression of proteins associated with EMT. • ILK expression is related to EMT in clinical human tongue tumors. • ILK siRNA inhibits metastasis of the tongue cancer cells through suppressing EMT.

  10. A small-scale, inexpensive method for detecting formaldehyde or methanol in biochemical reactions containing interfering substances.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wen Zhi; Adamec, Jiri; Weeks, Donald P

    2013-11-15

    A simple, inexpensive microdistillation device is described for capturing methanol or formaldehyde as end products of biochemical reactions or in environmental samples. We demonstrate that the microdistillation protocol, coupled with the use of alcohol oxidase and the formaldehyde-sensitive reagent Purpald (4-amino-3-hydrazino-5-mercapto-1,2,4-triazole), serves as a quick and inexpensive alternative to chromatographic and mass spectrometer analyses for determining if formaldehyde or methanol is a product of reactions that contain substances that interfere with the Purpald reaction. These techniques were used to affirm formaldehyde as the end product of the dicamba monooxygenase-catalyzed O-demethylation of the herbicide dicamba (2-methoxy-3,6-dichlorobenzoic acid). PMID:23938775

  11. A small-scale, inexpensive method for detecting formaldehyde or methanol in biochemical reactions containing interfering substances.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wen Zhi; Adamec, Jiri; Weeks, Donald P

    2013-11-15

    A simple, inexpensive microdistillation device is described for capturing methanol or formaldehyde as end products of biochemical reactions or in environmental samples. We demonstrate that the microdistillation protocol, coupled with the use of alcohol oxidase and the formaldehyde-sensitive reagent Purpald (4-amino-3-hydrazino-5-mercapto-1,2,4-triazole), serves as a quick and inexpensive alternative to chromatographic and mass spectrometer analyses for determining if formaldehyde or methanol is a product of reactions that contain substances that interfere with the Purpald reaction. These techniques were used to affirm formaldehyde as the end product of the dicamba monooxygenase-catalyzed O-demethylation of the herbicide dicamba (2-methoxy-3,6-dichlorobenzoic acid).

  12. Survivin-specific small interfering RNAs enhance sensitivity of glioma U-87MG cells to paclitaxel by promoting apoptosis☆

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yunliang; Liu, Yanbo; Shen, Weigao; Zhang, Bo; Liu, Qun

    2012-01-01

    A survivin siRNA expression vector was transfected into glioma U-87MG cells and these cells were then treated with paclitaxel. The results showed that survivin-specific siRNA combined with paclitaxel treatment synergistically inhibited glioma U-87MG cell proliferation and promoted apoptosis. This treatment also inhibited the expression of the cell cycle regulatory proteins, survivin, cyclinD1, c-Myc and CDK4 and enhanced the sensitivity of U-87MG cells to paclitaxel. PMID:25722690

  13. Endogenous, tissue-specific short interfering RNAs silence the chalcone synthase gene family in glycine max seed coats.

    PubMed

    Tuteja, Jigyasa H; Zabala, Gracia; Varala, Kranthi; Hudson, Matthew; Vodkin, Lila O

    2009-10-01

    Two dominant alleles of the I locus in Glycine max silence nine chalcone synthase (CHS) genes to inhibit function of the flavonoid pathway in the seed coat. We describe here the intricacies of this naturally occurring silencing mechanism based on results from small RNA gel blots and high-throughput sequencing of small RNA populations. The two dominant alleles of the I locus encompass a 27-kb region containing two perfectly repeated and inverted clusters of three chalcone synthase genes (CHS1, CHS3, and CHS4). This structure silences the expression of all CHS genes, including CHS7 and CHS8, located on other chromosomes. The CHS short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) sequenced support a mechanism by which RNAs transcribed from the CHS inverted repeat form aberrant double-stranded RNAs that become substrates for dicer-like ribonuclease. The resulting primary siRNAs become guides that target the mRNAs of the nonlinked, highly expressed CHS7 and CHS8 genes, followed by subsequent amplification of CHS7 and CHS8 secondary siRNAs by RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Most remarkably, this silencing mechanism occurs only in one tissue, the seed coat, as shown by the lack of CHS siRNAs in cotyledons and vegetative tissues. Thus, production of the trigger double-stranded RNA that initiates the process occurs in a specific tissue and represents an example of naturally occurring inhibition of a metabolic pathway by siRNAs in one tissue while allowing expression of the pathway and synthesis of valuable secondary metabolites in all other organs/tissues of the plant.

  14. Heterophilic antibodies interfering with radioimmunoassay. A false-positive pregnancy test

    SciTech Connect

    Vladutiu, A.O.; Sulewski, J.M.; Pudlak, K.A.; Stull, C.G.

    1982-11-19

    A young woman with amenorrhea had a consistently positive pregnancy test result (serum radioimmunoassay measurement of ..beta..-human chorionic gonadotropin hormone). No fetal or placental tissue was found after uterine curettage and exploratory laparotomy. The false-positive pregnancy test result was due to heterophilic antibovine and antigoat antibodies in the patient's serum. These antibodies interfered with radioimmunoassays using goat antibodies. This case shows that serum heterophilic antibodies can interfere with immunoassays and result in unnecessary diagnostic procedures and/or unnecessary treatment.

  15. Competition at the Wireless Sensor Network MAC Layer: Low Power Probing interfering with X-MAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharias, Sven; Newe, Thomas

    2011-08-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) combine sensors with computer networks and enable very dense, in-situ and live measurements of data over a large area. Since this emerging technology has the potential to be embedded almost everywhere for numberless applications, interference between different networks can become a serious issue. For most WSNs, it is assumed today that the network medium access is non-competitive. On the basis of X-MAC interfered by Low Power Probing, this paper shows the danger and the effects of different sensor networks communicating on a single wireless channel of the 2.4 GHz band, which is used by the IEEE 802.15.4 standard.

  16. R-matrix study of ionization in barium via two-photon interfering routes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aymar, M.; Luc-Koenig, E.; Lecomte, J. M.; Millet, M.; Lyras, A.

    2000-02-01

    A quantitative analysis of part of the experimental data reported by Wang, Chen and Elliott [1,3] who studied in barium coherent control through two-color resonant interfering paths is reported. Dynamics of the two-color photoionization process, described as an adiabatic process in the rotating wave approximation, is governed by the coherent excitation of the 6s6p and 6s7p 1P1 intermediate states. Interference effects are found to play a minor role. The required atomic parameters are obtained from a theoretical approach based on a combination of jj-coupled eigenchannel R-matrix and Multichannel Quantum Defect Theory.

  17. Experimental quantum teleportation and multiphoton entanglement via interfering narrowband photon sources

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Jian; Zhang Han; Peng Chengzhi; Chen Zengbing; Bao Xiaohui; Chen Shuai; Pan Jianwei

    2009-10-15

    In this paper, we report a realization of synchronization-free quantum teleportation and narrowband three-photon entanglement through interfering narrowband photon sources. Since both the single-photon and the entangled photon pair utilized are completely autonomous, it removes the requirement of high-demanding synchronization techniques in long-distance quantum communication with pulsed spontaneous parametric down-conversion sources. The frequency linewidth of the three-photon entanglement realized is on the order of several MHz, which matches the requirement of atomic ensemble based quantum memories. Such a narrowband multiphoton source will have applications in some advanced quantum communication protocols and linear optical quantum computation.

  18. Polymer-stabilized blue-phase liquid crystal grating cured with interfered visible light.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yachao; Li, Yan; Chen, Chao Ping; Liu, Shuxin; Rong, Na; Li, Weihuan; Li, Xiao; Zhou, Pengcheng; Lu, Jiangang; Liu, Ruili; Su, Yikai

    2015-07-27

    In this paper, we demonstrate a holographic polymer-stabilized blue-phase liquid crystal grating fabricated using a visible laser. As blue phase is stabilized by the interfered light, polymer-concentration gradient is achieved simultaneously. With the application of a uniform vertical electric field, periodic index distribution is obtained due to polymer-concentration gradient. The grating exhibits several attractive features such as polarization-independency, a broad temperature range, sub-millisecond response, simple fabrication, and low cost, thus holding great potential for photonics applications. PMID:26367659

  19. An experimental SMI adaptive antenna array simulator for weak interfering signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dilsavor, Ronald S.; Gupta, Inder J.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental sample matrix inversion (SMI) adaptive antenna array for suppressing weak interfering signals is described. The experimental adaptive array uses a modified SMI algorithm to increase the interference suppression. In the modified SMI algorithm, the sample covariance matrix is redefined to reduce the effect of thermal noise on the weights of an adaptive array. This is accomplished by subtracting a fraction of the smallest eigenvalue of the original covariance matrix from its diagonal entries. The test results obtained using the experimental system are compared with theoretical results. The two show a good agreement.

  20. Silencing-associated and meiosis-specific small RNA pathways in Paramecium tetraurelia

    PubMed Central

    Lepère, Gersende; Nowacki, Mariusz; Serrano, Vincent; Gout, Jean-François; Guglielmi, Gérard; Duharcourt, Sandra; Meyer, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Distinct small RNA pathways are involved in the two types of homology-dependent effects described in Paramecium tetraurelia, as shown by a functional analysis of Dicer and Dicer-like genes and by the sequencing of small RNAs. The siRNAs that mediate post-transcriptional gene silencing when cells are fed with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) were found to comprise two subclasses. DCR1-dependent cleavage of the inducing dsRNA generates ∼23-nt primary siRNAs from both strands, while a different subclass of ∼24-nt RNAs, characterized by a short untemplated poly-A tail, is strictly antisense to the targeted mRNA, suggestive of secondary siRNAs that depend on an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. An entirely distinct pathway is responsible for homology-dependent regulation of developmental genome rearrangements after sexual reproduction. During early meiosis, the DCL2 and DCL3 genes are required for the production of a highly complex population of ∼25-nt scnRNAs from all types of germline sequences, including both strands of exons, introns, intergenic regions, transposons and Internal Eliminated Sequences. A prominent 5′-UNG signature, and a minor fraction showing the complementary signature at positions 21–23, indicate that scnRNAs are cleaved from dsRNA precursors as duplexes with 2-nt 3′ overhangs at both ends, followed by preferential stabilization of the 5′-UNG strand. PMID:19103667

  1. Silencing-associated and meiosis-specific small RNA pathways in Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Lepère, Gersende; Nowacki, Mariusz; Serrano, Vincent; Gout, Jean-François; Guglielmi, Gérard; Duharcourt, Sandra; Meyer, Eric

    2009-02-01

    Distinct small RNA pathways are involved in the two types of homology-dependent effects described in Paramecium tetraurelia, as shown by a functional analysis of Dicer and Dicer-like genes and by the sequencing of small RNAs. The siRNAs that mediate post-transcriptional gene silencing when cells are fed with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) were found to comprise two subclasses. DCR1-dependent cleavage of the inducing dsRNA generates approximately 23-nt primary siRNAs from both strands, while a different subclass of approximately 24-nt RNAs, characterized by a short untemplated poly-A tail, is strictly antisense to the targeted mRNA, suggestive of secondary siRNAs that depend on an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. An entirely distinct pathway is responsible for homology-dependent regulation of developmental genome rearrangements after sexual reproduction. During early meiosis, the DCL2 and DCL3 genes are required for the production of a highly complex population of approximately 25-nt scnRNAs from all types of germline sequences, including both strands of exons, introns, intergenic regions, transposons and Internal Eliminated Sequences. A prominent 5'-UNG signature, and a minor fraction showing the complementary signature at positions 21-23, indicate that scnRNAs are cleaved from dsRNA precursors as duplexes with 2-nt 3' overhangs at both ends, followed by preferential stabilization of the 5'-UNG strand. PMID:19103667

  2. Differential RNAi responses of Nicotiana benthamiana individuals transformed with a hairpin-inducing construct during Plum pox virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Montes, Christian; Castro, Álvaro; Barba, Paola; Rubio, Julia; Sánchez, Evelyn; Carvajal, Denisse; Aguirre, Carlos; Tapia, Eduardo; DelÍ Orto, Paola; Decroocq, Veronique; Prieto, Humberto

    2014-10-01

    Gene silencing and large-scale small RNA analysis can be used to develop RNA interference (RNAi)-based resistance strategies for Plum pox virus (PPV), a high impact disease of Prunus spp. In this study, a pPPViRNA hairpin-inducing vector harboring two silencing motif-rich regions of the PPV coat protein (CP) gene was evaluated in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana (NB) plants. Wild-type NB plants infected with a chimeric PPV virus (PPV::GFP) exhibited affected leaves with mosaic chlorosis congruent to GFP fluorescence at 21 day post-inoculation; transgenic lines depicted a range of phenotypes from fully resistant to susceptible. ELISA values and GFP fluorescence intensities were used to select transgenic-resistant (TG-R) and transgenic-susceptible (TG-S) lines for further characterization of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) by large-scale small RNA sequencing. In infected TG-S and untransformed (WT) plants, the observed siRNAs were nearly exclusively 21- and 22-nt siRNAs that targeted the whole PPV::GFP genome; 24-nt siRNAs were absent in these individuals. Challenged TG-R plants accumulated a full set of 21- to 24-nt siRNAs that were primarily associated with the selected motif-rich regions, indicating that a trans-acting siRNAs process prevented viral multiplication. BLAST analysis identified 13 common siRNA clusters targeting the CP gene. 21-nt siRNA sequences were associated with the 22-nt siRNAs and the scarce 23- and 24-nt molecules in TG-S plants and with most of the observed 22-, 23-, and 24-nt siRNAs in TG-R individuals. These results validate the use of a multi-hot spot silencing vector against PPV and elucidate the molecules by which hairpin-inducing vectors initiate RNAi in vivo.

  3. Differential RNAi responses of Nicotiana benthamiana individuals transformed with a hairpin-inducing construct during Plum pox virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Montes, Christian; Castro, Álvaro; Barba, Paola; Rubio, Julia; Sánchez, Evelyn; Carvajal, Denisse; Aguirre, Carlos; Tapia, Eduardo; DelÍ Orto, Paola; Decroocq, Veronique; Prieto, Humberto

    2014-10-01

    Gene silencing and large-scale small RNA analysis can be used to develop RNA interference (RNAi)-based resistance strategies for Plum pox virus (PPV), a high impact disease of Prunus spp. In this study, a pPPViRNA hairpin-inducing vector harboring two silencing motif-rich regions of the PPV coat protein (CP) gene was evaluated in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana (NB) plants. Wild-type NB plants infected with a chimeric PPV virus (PPV::GFP) exhibited affected leaves with mosaic chlorosis congruent to GFP fluorescence at 21 day post-inoculation; transgenic lines depicted a range of phenotypes from fully resistant to susceptible. ELISA values and GFP fluorescence intensities were used to select transgenic-resistant (TG-R) and transgenic-susceptible (TG-S) lines for further characterization of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) by large-scale small RNA sequencing. In infected TG-S and untransformed (WT) plants, the observed siRNAs were nearly exclusively 21- and 22-nt siRNAs that targeted the whole PPV::GFP genome; 24-nt siRNAs were absent in these individuals. Challenged TG-R plants accumulated a full set of 21- to 24-nt siRNAs that were primarily associated with the selected motif-rich regions, indicating that a trans-acting siRNAs process prevented viral multiplication. BLAST analysis identified 13 common siRNA clusters targeting the CP gene. 21-nt siRNA sequences were associated with the 22-nt siRNAs and the scarce 23- and 24-nt molecules in TG-S plants and with most of the observed 22-, 23-, and 24-nt siRNAs in TG-R individuals. These results validate the use of a multi-hot spot silencing vector against PPV and elucidate the molecules by which hairpin-inducing vectors initiate RNAi in vivo. PMID:24964777

  4. Quantifying BTEX in aqueous solutions with potentially interfering hydrocarbons using a partially selective sensor array.

    PubMed

    Cooper, J S; Kiiveri, H; Hubble, L J; Chow, E; Webster, M S; Müller, K-H; Sosa-Pintos, A; Bendavid, A; Raguse, B; Wieczorek, L

    2015-05-01

    Partially selective gold nanoparticle sensors have the sensitivity and selectivity to discriminate and quantify benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, p-xylene and naphthalene (BTEXN) at concentrations relevant to the US Environmental Protection Agency. In this paper we demonstrate that gold nanoparticle chemiresistors can do so in the presence of 16 other hydrocarbons and that they did not reduce the discriminating power of the array. A two-level full factorial designed experiment was performed on unary, binary, ternary, quaternary, quinary combinations of BTEXN analytes with and without the possibly interfering hydrocarbons. The nominal component concentration of the mixtures was 100 μg L(-1), equivalent to approximately 100 parts per billion (ppb). Concentrations predicted with the random forests method had an average root mean square error of 10-20% of the component concentrations. This level of accuracy was achieved regardless of whether or not the 16 possibly interfering hydrocarbons were present. This work shows that the sensitivity and selectivity of gold nanoparticles chemiresistor sensors towards BTEXN analytes are not unduly affected by the other hydrocarbons that are expected to be present at a petroleum remediation site. PMID:25768651

  5. UV inactivation of the biological activity of defective interfering particles generated by vesicular stomatitis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Bay, P H; Reichmann, M E

    1979-01-01

    UV inactivation of vesicular stomatitis virus and its defective interfering (DI) particles was measured in order to obtain the target size for interference. In the case of DI particles whose genomes mapped at the 5' end of the virion RNA, this target size corresponded to the entire DI particle RNA molecule regardless of whether it amounted to 10, 30, or 50% of the viral genome. These data were interpreted as demonstrating that both termini of the DI particle RNAs were required for their replication and for interference with virion RNA replication. The unique heat-resistant DI particle, with an RNA molecule corresponding to the 3' half of the viral genome, exhibited an inactivation target size of approximately 42% of its RNA molecule with respect to both homotypic and heterotypic interference. Unlike other DI particles, this particle interfered with virion primary transcription. The unusual inactivation target size of the heat-resistant DI particle was interpreted as being a compromise between the requirements for replication of its genome and those for interference with virion primary transcription. PMID:229271

  6. Dobson spectrophotometer total ozone measurement errors caused by interfering absorbing species such as SO2, NO2, and photochemically produced O3 in polluted air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komhyr, W. D.; Evans, R. D.

    1980-02-01

    Total ozone measurements made with Dobson spectrophotometers in polluted air are subject to errors caused by interfering trace gas species that absorb solar ultraviolet radiation. While such interference is probably non-existent or small at the majority of Dobson instrument stations throughout the world, errors of up to 25% and 5%, resulting from absorption by SO2 and NO2 respectively, may occur occasionally at a few stations located in extremely polluted atmospheres. Interference by other absorbers, including N2O5, H2O2, HNO3, acetyldehyde, acetone, and acrolein has been found to be negligible. Ozone produced photochemically in polluted near-surface air may occasionally constitute from 5% to 10% of the atmospheric total ozone column. Such ozone interferes with measurements of atmospheric background total ozone.

  7. Mesure par interférométrie laser du mouvement d'une particule proche d'une paroi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assou, Y.; Joyeux, D.; Azouni, A.; Feuillebois, F.

    1991-02-01

    An experimental technique based on laser interferometry is used to obtain the displacement of a sphere towards a plane wall in a viscous fluid : it consists in inserting the sphere in an interferometric system, in such a way that the displacement of the sphere changes the state of interference. An important feature of the setup is that the shape, the roughness, and the positioning of the sphere in the optical path are relatively uncritical. The spheres used in the experiment are bearing balls, 4 and 5 × 10^{-3} m in diameter. The accuracy on the sphere displacement is of the order of 2 × 10^{-8} m. The interference signal is digitalized and stored in a microcomputer. The data are then processed to yield the friction coefficient f^T_zz of the sphere in its motion very close to the wall. The variation of f^T_zz with the non-dimensional gap \\varepsilon (ratio of the gap to the sphere radius) show three regions: (i) One in which a is small but at least 10 times larger than the non-dimensional rugosity (ratio of the scale of rugosity to the sphere radius) ; there is then a very good agreement with the result valid for a smooth sphere f^T_zz = 1/\\varepsilon from lubrication theory. (ii) When \\varepsilon decreases to the order of the non-dimensional rugosity, the friction coefficient is then smaller than 1/\\varepsilon. The technique thus opens a way to study the effects of rugosity in hydrodynamics. (iii) The technique allows to measure gaps of the order of 10^{-8} m and could thus be used in future studies of short ranges forces. On utilise une technique expérimentale basée sur l'interférométrie laser pour déterminer le déplacement d'une sphère s'approchant d'une paroi plane dans un fluide visqueux: la technique consiste à insérer la sphère dans un système interférométrique, de façon que son déplacement change l'état d'interférence détecté. Une particularité importante du montage utilisé est que la forme, l'état de surface, le positionnement

  8. A new small accelerator for radiocarbon dating

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, M.; Huber, R.; Jacob, S. A. W.; Synal, H.-A.; Schroeder, J. B.

    1999-06-10

    A new small and compact radiocarbon dating facility based on a 500 kV Pelletron accelerator has been built. The novel feature is that it operates with 1{sup +} ions. The interfering molecules are destroyed by collisions in the gas stripper. The results of first test measurements demonstrate that stability, background and transmission are equal to the performance of conventional AMS systems based on larger accelerators.

  9. Which Depressive Symptoms and Medication Side Effects Are Perceived by Patients as Interfering Most with Occupational Functioning?

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Raymond W.; Michalak, Erin E.; Bond, David J.; Tam, Edwin M.; Axler, Auby; Yatham, Lakshmi N.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with significant impairment in occupational functioning. This study sought to determine which depressive symptoms and medication side effects were perceived by patients with MDD to have the greatest interference on work functioning. Methods. 164 consecutive patients with MDD by DSM-IV criteria completed a standard assessment that included a self-rated questionnaire about the degree to which symptoms and side effects interfered with work functioning. Results. The symptoms perceived by patients as interfering most with work functioning were fatigue and low energy, insomnia, concentration and memory problems, anxiety, and irritability. The medication side effects rated as interfering most with work functioning were daytime sedation, insomnia, headache, and agitation/anxiety. There were no differences between men and women in symptoms or side effects that were perceived as interfering with work functioning. Limitations. This was a cross-sectional study; only subjective assessments of work functioning were obtained; the fact that patients were using varied medications acts as a potential confound. Conclusions. Specific depressive symptoms and medication side effects were perceived by patients as interfering more with occupational functioning than others. These factors should be considered in treatment selection (e.g., in the choice of antidepressant) in working patients with MDD. PMID:22611491

  10. Insights into the Complexity of Weak Intermolecular Interactions Interfering in Host-Guest Systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dawei; Chatelet, Bastien; Serrano, Eloisa; Perraud, Olivier; Dutasta, Jean-Pierre; Robert, Vincent; Martinez, Alexandre

    2015-10-01

    The recognition properties of heteroditopic hemicryptophane hosts towards anions, cations, and neutral pairs, combining both cation-π and anion-π interaction sites, were investigated to probe the complexity of interfering weak intermolecular interactions. It is suggested from NMR experiments, and supported by CASSCF/CASPT2 calculations, that the binding constants of anions can be modulated by a factor of up to 100 by varying the fluorination sites on the electron-poor aromatic rings. Interestingly, this subtle chemical modification can also reverse the sign of cooperativity in ion-pair recognition. Wavefunction calculations highlight how short- and long-range interactions interfere in this recognition process, suggesting that a disruption of anion-π interactions can occur in the presence of a co-bound cation. Such molecules can be viewed as prototypes for examining complex processes controlled by the competition of weak interactions.

  11. Suppressing interfering scattered signals in swept-frequency radar measurements by using frequency domain Wiener filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, David E.; Staton, Leo D.

    1991-01-01

    A novel approach to the reduction of scattered, interfering signals that corrupt measurements of the signal backscattered from radar targets of interest is being developed. It is being explored with sphere measurements in an indoor microwave radar range. This method is based on the concept of Wiener filtering (which minimizes the difference between the signal plus noise and the desired signal in the time domain). In contrast to the traditional Wiener filter, in which the time domain error between two sequences are minimized, the approach reported uses the frequency domain phasor amplitudes of a swept frequency signal. It minimizes the difference (least-mean-square-magnitude) between the signal-plus-noise and the signal complex phasors, across the entire spectrum.

  12. Establishing an Infrastructure for High-Throughput Short-Interfering RNA Screening.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hongwei; Sereduk, Chris; Tang, Nanyun

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a readily available research tool that can be used to accelerate the identification and functional validation of a multitude of new candidate drug targets by experimentally perturbing gene expression and function. High-throughput RNAi technology using libraries of short-interfering RNA (siRNA) makes it possible to rapidly identify genes and biomarkers associated with biological processes such as diseases or a cellular response to therapy. Thus, RNAi-based screening is an extremely powerful technology that can provide tremendous insights into the mechanisms of action and contexts of vulnerability of a particular drug treatment. This chapter describes the infrastructure requirements needed to successfully perform HT-RNAi screening. Information on the methodology, instrumentation, experimental design, and workflow aspects is provided, as well as insights on how to successfully implement a high-throughput RNAi screen. PMID:27581280

  13. The inter-kingdom volatile signal indole promotes root development by interfering with auxin signalling.

    PubMed

    Bailly, Aurélien; Groenhagen, Ulrike; Schulz, Stefan; Geisler, Markus; Eberl, Leo; Weisskopf, Laure

    2014-12-01

    Recently, emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) has emerged as a mode of communication between bacteria and plants. Although some bacterial VOCs that promote plant growth have been identified, their underlying mechanism of action is unknown. Here we demonstrate that indole, which was identified using a screen for Arabidopsis growth promotion by VOCs from soil-borne bacteria, is a potent plant-growth modulator. Its prominent role in increasing the plant secondary root network is mediated by interfering with the auxin-signalling machinery. Using auxin reporter lines and classic auxin physiological and transport assays we show that the indole signal invades the plant body, reaches zones of auxin activity and acts in a polar auxin transport-dependent bimodal mechanism to trigger differential cellular auxin responses. Our results suggest that indole, beyond its importance as a bacterial signal molecule, can serve as a remote messenger to manipulate plant growth and development. PMID:25227998

  14. The detection of defective interfering Rubella virions by a modified hemadsorption technique.

    PubMed

    Pope, D D; Bohn, E M; Van Alstyne, D

    1983-01-01

    Rubella virus (RV) has been titrated in murine fibroblasts in monolayer cultures using a modified hemadsorption assay. Infected monolayers were incubated in the presence of sheep erythrocytes for 24 h: after the tissue culture slides were washed, the hemadsorption foci were clearly visible on microscopic examination. When serial doubling dilutions of virus suspensions were assayed in this way the decline in the number of hemadsorbing units was proportional to the fractional power of the concn. These data suggest that this simple titration of Rubella virus may be useful in the detection of defective interfering (DI) virions in Rubella populations. The detection of DI Rubella virions by more time-consuming and expensive techniques including isopycnic centrifugation, ribonucleic acid extraction, 125I-labelling, polyacrylamide slab gel electrophoresis, and autoradiography have been described. The clinical importance of defective virions and the need for an inexpensive, rapid means of detecting them are discussed.

  15. The inter-kingdom volatile signal indole promotes root development by interfering with auxin signalling.

    PubMed

    Bailly, Aurélien; Groenhagen, Ulrike; Schulz, Stefan; Geisler, Markus; Eberl, Leo; Weisskopf, Laure

    2014-12-01

    Recently, emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) has emerged as a mode of communication between bacteria and plants. Although some bacterial VOCs that promote plant growth have been identified, their underlying mechanism of action is unknown. Here we demonstrate that indole, which was identified using a screen for Arabidopsis growth promotion by VOCs from soil-borne bacteria, is a potent plant-growth modulator. Its prominent role in increasing the plant secondary root network is mediated by interfering with the auxin-signalling machinery. Using auxin reporter lines and classic auxin physiological and transport assays we show that the indole signal invades the plant body, reaches zones of auxin activity and acts in a polar auxin transport-dependent bimodal mechanism to trigger differential cellular auxin responses. Our results suggest that indole, beyond its importance as a bacterial signal molecule, can serve as a remote messenger to manipulate plant growth and development.

  16. Fabrication of Optoelectronic Devices in Lithium Fluoride Crystals by Interfering Femtosecond Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurobori, Toshio; Obayashi, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Kenji; Hirose, Yukio; Sakai, Toshiaki; Aoshima, Shin-ichiro

    2008-01-01

    Fine-pitched microgratings either on or beneath surface of bulk lithium fluoride (LiF) are holographically fabricated by interfering with the second harmonic (400 nm) of a mode-locked Ti:sapphire oscillator-amplifier laser. The laser-active F2 and F3+ color centers in LiF are excellent candidates for producing visible laser action from the green-to-red spectral range when excited with a single wavelength. Here a green distributed feedback (DFB) laser action with a narrower oscillating linewidth is demonstrated by utilizing simultaneous formation of the F3+ color centers and waveguide with the microgratings encoded by interference of 400 nm femtosecond laser pulses. In addition, the possibility of a dual-beam DFB laser based on these color centers in LiF is discussed.

  17. Variable selectivity of the Hitachi chemistry analyzer chloride ion-selective electrode toward interfering ions.

    PubMed

    Wang, T; Diamandis, E P; Lane, A; Baines, A D

    1994-02-01

    Chloride measurements by ion-selective electrodes are vulnerable to interference by anions such as iodide, thiocyanate, nitrate, and bromide. We have found that the degree of interference of these anions on the Hitachi chemistry analyzer chloride electrode varies from electrode to electrode and this variation can even occur within the same lot of membrane. This variation is not dependent upon the length of time the cartridge has been in the analyzer because no correlation existed between the usage time and the electrode response to interfering ions. Neither is this variation due to the deterioration of the electrode because all electrodes tested had calibration slopes within the manufacturer's specification. Our study, however, showed that even after repeated exposure to a plasma sample containing 2 mM thiocyanate, the chloride electrode was still able to accurately measure the chloride in plasma without thiocyanate, thus confirming that a carryover effect does not exist from a previous thiocyanate-containing sample.

  18. A self-interfering clock as a “which path” witness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margalit, Yair; Zhou, Zhifan; Machluf, Shimon; Rohrlich, Daniel; Japha, Yonathan; Folman, Ron

    2015-09-01

    In Einstein’s general theory of relativity, time depends locally on gravity; in standard quantum theory, time is global—all clocks “tick” uniformly. We demonstrate a new tool for investigating time in the overlap of these two theories: a self-interfering clock, comprising two atomic spin states. We prepare the clock in a spatial superposition of quantum wave packets, which evolve coherently along two paths into a stable interference pattern. If we make the clock wave packets “tick” at different rates, to simulate a gravitational time lag, the clock time along each path yields “which path” information, degrading the pattern’s visibility. In contrast, in standard interferometry, time cannot yield “which path” information. This proof-of-principle experiment may have implications for the study of time and general relativity and their impact on fundamental effects such as decoherence and the emergence of a classical world.

  19. The Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus Matrix Protein PPXY Late Domain Drives the Production of Defective Interfering Particles

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Christopher M.; Eisenhauer, Philip; Bruce, Emily A.; Weir, Marion E.; King, Benjamin R.; Klaus, Joseph P.; Krementsov, Dimitry N.; Shirley, David J.; Ballif, Bryan A.; Botten, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Arenaviruses cause severe diseases in humans but establish asymptomatic, lifelong infections in rodent reservoirs. Persistently-infected rodents harbor high levels of defective interfering (DI) particles, which are thought to be important for establishing persistence and mitigating virus-induced cytopathic effect. Little is known about what drives the production of DI particles. We show that neither the PPXY late domain encoded within the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) matrix protein nor a functional endosomal sorting complex transport (ESCRT) pathway is absolutely required for the generation of standard infectious virus particles. In contrast, DI particle release critically requires the PPXY late domain and is ESCRT-dependent. Additionally, the terminal tyrosine in the PPXY motif is reversibly phosphorylated and our findings indicate that this posttranslational modification may regulate DI particle formation. Thus we have uncovered a new role for the PPXY late domain and a possible mechanism for its regulation. PMID:27010636

  20. [Characteristics of the acoustic field of interfering reflections and the echolocation hearing of the dolphin].

    PubMed

    Riabov, V A

    2008-01-01

    A model of the acoustic field of interfering reflections from steel cylinders was developed. Analysis of the model showed the availability of great potential resources for a decrease of the influence of unwanted echoes and hence for increasing the signal-to-clatter ratio. The conformity of the available models of the echolocation hearing of the dolphin to the acoustic field of the clatter was considered. The participation of mandidle mental foramens in conducting the echo to the cochlea was considered. In this case the hearing aperture is determined by the dimensions of mental foramens, while the hearing base is determined by the distance between the mental foramens of the left and right mandible halves. There are good reasons to believe that the optimal dimensions of the aperture and the base of echolocation hearing of Odontoceti essentially increase the effectiveness of defense of their sonar from reverberation.

  1. Cloned Defective Interfering Influenza RNA and a Possible Pan-Specific Treatment of Respiratory Virus Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dimmock, Nigel J.; Easton, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Defective interfering (DI) genomes are characterised by their ability to interfere with the replication of the virus from which they were derived, and other genetically compatible viruses. DI genomes are synthesized by nearly all known viruses and represent a vast natural reservoir of antivirals that can potentially be exploited for use in the clinic. This review describes the application of DI virus to protect from virus-associated diseases in vivo using as an example a highly active cloned influenza A DI genome and virus that protects broadly in preclinical trials against different subtypes of influenza A and against non-influenza A respiratory viruses. This influenza A-derived DI genome protects by two totally different mechanisms: molecular interference with influenza A replication and by stimulating innate immunity that acts against non-influenza A viruses. The review considers what is needed to develop DI genomes to the point of entry into clinical trials. PMID:26184282

  2. Adaptive Array for Weak Interfering Signals: Geostationary Satellite Experiments. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steadman, Karl

    1989-01-01

    The performance of an experimental adaptive array is evaluated using signals from an existing geostationary satellite interference environment. To do this, an earth station antenna was built to receive signals from various geostationary satellites. In these experiments the received signals have a frequency of approximately 4 GHz (C-band) and have a bandwidth of over 35 MHz. These signals are downconverted to a 69 MHz intermediate frequency in the experimental system. Using the downconverted signals, the performance of the experimental system for various signal scenarios is evaluated. In this situation, due to the inherent thermal noise, qualitative instead of quantitative test results are presented. It is shown that the experimental system can null up to two interfering signals well below the noise level. However, to avoid the cancellation of the desired signal, the use a steering vector is needed. Various methods to obtain an estimate of the steering vector are proposed.

  3. Protótipo do primeiro interferômetro brasileiro - BDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecatto, J. R.; Fernandes, F. C. R.; Neri, J. A. C. F.; Bethi, N.; Felipini, N. S.; Madsen, F. R. H.; Andrade, M. C.; Soares, A. C.; Alonso, E. M. B., Sawant, H. S.

    2004-04-01

    A interferometria é uma poderosa ferramenta usada para investigar estruturas espaciais de fontes astrofísicas fornecendo uma riqueza de detalhes inatingível pelas técnicas convencionais de imageamento. Em particular, a interferometria com ondas de rádio abre o horizonte de conhecimento do Universo nesta ampla banda do espectro eletromagnético, que vai de cerca de 20 kHz até centenas de GHz já próximo ao infravermelho, e que está acessível a partir de instrumentos instalados em solo. Neste trabalho, apresentamos o interferômetro designado por Arranjo Decimétrico Brasileiro (BDA). Trata-se do primeiro interferômetro a ser desenvolvido no Brasil e América Latina que já está em operação na fase de protótipo. Apresentamos o desenvolvimento realizado até o momento, o sítio de instalação do instrumento, o protótipo e os principais resultados dos testes de sua operação, as perspectivas futuras e a ciência a ser desenvolvida com o instrumento nas fases II e III. Neste trabalho é dada ênfase ao desenvolvimento, testes de operação e principais resultados do protótipo. É discutida brevemente a ciência que pode ser feita com o instrumento. Tanto os detalhes técnicos quanto os principais parâmetros estimados para o instrumento nas próximas fases de desenvolvimento e o desempenho do protótipo serão publicados em breve.

  4. Systemic delivery of siRNA in pumpkin by a plant PHLOEM SMALL RNA-BINDING PROTEIN 1-ribonucleoprotein complex.

    PubMed

    Ham, Byung-Kook; Li, Gang; Jia, Weitao; Leary, Julie A; Lucas, William J

    2014-11-01

    In plants, the vascular system, specifically the phloem, functions in delivery of small RNA (sRNA) to exert epigenetic control over developmental and defense-related processes. Although the importance of systemic sRNA delivery has been established, information is currently lacking concerning the nature of the protein machinery involved in this process. Here, we show that a PHLOEM SMALL-RNA BINDING PROTEIN 1 (PSRP1) serves as the basis for formation of an sRNA ribonucleoprotein complex (sRNPC) that delivers sRNA (primarily 24 nt) to sink organs. Assembly of this complex is facilitated through PSRP1 phosphorylation by a phloem-localized protein kinase, PSRPK1. During long-distance transport, PSRP1-sRNPC is stable against phloem phosphatase activity. Within target tissues, phosphatase activity results in disassembly of PSRP1-sRNPC, a process that is probably required for unloading cargo sRNA into surrounding cells. These findings provide an insight into the mechanism involved in delivery of sRNA associated with systemic gene silencing in plants.

  5. Herpes simplex type 1 defective interfering particles do not affect the antiviral activity of acyclovir, foscarnet and adenine arabinoside.

    PubMed

    Harmenberg, J G; Svensson, L T

    1988-03-01

    The concentration of defective interfering particles (DI-particles) of herpes simplex type 1 virus was analysed by electron microscopy and plaque titration. Fifteen consecutive passages of undiluted virus in green monkey kidney cells were followed. No relationship was found between the concentration of DI-particles and the activity of antiviral substances such as acyclovir, foscarnet and adenine arabinoside.

  6. 36 CFR 261.3 - Interfering with a Forest officer, volunteer, or human resource program enrollee or giving false...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Interfering with a Forest officer, volunteer, or human resource program enrollee or giving false report to a Forest officer. 261.3 Section 261.3 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...

  7. 36 CFR 261.3 - Interfering with a Forest officer, volunteer, or human resource program enrollee or giving false...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Interfering with a Forest officer, volunteer, or human resource program enrollee or giving false report to a Forest officer. 261.3 Section 261.3 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...

  8. 36 CFR 261.3 - Interfering with a Forest officer, volunteer, or human resource program enrollee or giving false...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Interfering with a Forest officer, volunteer, or human resource program enrollee or giving false report to a Forest officer. 261.3 Section 261.3 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...

  9. 36 CFR 261.3 - Interfering with a Forest officer, volunteer, or human resource program enrollee or giving false...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Interfering with a Forest officer, volunteer, or human resource program enrollee or giving false report to a Forest officer. 261.3 Section 261.3 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...

  10. Copsin, a Novel Peptide-based Fungal Antibiotic Interfering with the Peptidoglycan Synthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Essig, Andreas; Hofmann, Daniela; Münch, Daniela; Gayathri, Savitha; Künzler, Markus; Kallio, Pauli T.; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Wider, Gerhard; Schneider, Tanja; Aebi, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Fungi and bacteria compete with an arsenal of secreted molecules for their ecological niche. This repertoire represents a rich and inexhaustible source for antibiotics and fungicides. Antimicrobial peptides are an emerging class of fungal defense molecules that are promising candidates for pharmaceutical applications. Based on a co-cultivation system, we studied the interaction of the coprophilous basidiomycete Coprinopsis cinerea with different bacterial species and identified a novel defensin, copsin. The polypeptide was recombinantly produced in Pichia pastoris, and the three-dimensional structure was solved by NMR. The cysteine stabilized α/β-fold with a unique disulfide connectivity, and an N-terminal pyroglutamate rendered copsin extremely stable against high temperatures and protease digestion. Copsin was bactericidal against a diversity of Gram-positive bacteria, including human pathogens such as Enterococcus faecium and Listeria monocytogenes. Characterization of the antibacterial activity revealed that copsin bound specifically to the peptidoglycan precursor lipid II and therefore interfered with the cell wall biosynthesis. In particular, and unlike lantibiotics and other defensins, the third position of the lipid II pentapeptide is essential for effective copsin binding. The unique structural properties of copsin make it a possible scaffold for new antibiotics. PMID:25342741

  11. Cell type-specific delivery of short interfering RNAs by dye-functionalised theranostic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Press, Adrian T.; Traeger, Anja; Pietsch, Christian; Mosig, Alexander; Wagner, Michael; Clemens, Mark G.; Jbeily, Nayla; Koch, Nicole; Gottschaldt, Michael; Bézière, Nicolas; Ermolayev, Volodymyr; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Popp, Jürgen; Kessels, Michael M.; Qualmann, Britta; Schubert, Ulrich S.; Bauer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Efficient delivery of short interfering RNAs reflects a prerequisite for the development of RNA interference therapeutics. Here, we describe highly specific nanoparticles, based on near infrared fluorescent polymethine dye-derived targeting moieties coupled to biodegradable polymers. The fluorescent dye, even when coupled to a nanoparticle, mimics a ligand for hepatic parenchymal uptake transporters resulting in hepatobiliary clearance of approximately 95% of the dye within 45 min. Body distribution, hepatocyte uptake and excretion into bile of the dye itself, or dye-coupled nanoparticles can be tracked by intravital microscopy or even non-invasively by multispectral optoacoustic tomography. Efficacy of delivery is demonstrated in vivo using 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase siRNA as an active payload resulting in a reduction of plasma cholesterol levels if siRNA was formulated into dye-functionalised nanoparticles. This suggests that organ-selective uptake of a near infrared dye can be efficiently transferred to theranostic nanoparticles allowing novel possibilities for personalised silencing of disease-associated genes. PMID:25470305

  12. Sub-micron period metal lattices fabricated by interfering ultraviolet femtosecond laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, Yoshiki; Matsuba, Yoshiki; Miyanaga, Noriaki

    2016-05-01

    The interference pattern of a femtosecond laser has been utilized to fabricate nanostructures in the lattice. In this paper, SH (second-harmonic) waves (λ = 392.5 {{nm}}) of a femtosecond laser were applied to four beams interfering laser processing using a demagnification system as a beam correlator. The lattice constant of the resultant matrix was shortened to 760 nm. The unit structures fabricated on gold thin films were nanoholes, nanobumps, nanodrops or nanowhiskers, and their unit size was minimized compared to the case with a greater lattice constant formed by fundamental wavelengths. The radius of a nanoball on top of a nanodrop was between 42 and 76 nm, and the radius of metallic hole arrays (MHA) was 220 nm. The energy efficiency of the laser increased by 4.79 times due to better absorption coefficient of gold at ultraviolet wavelengths. In addition, the smallest lattice constant was estimated with the use of a commercial plano-convex fused-silica lens and a NIR (near-infrared) achromatic lens.

  13. Mutant p53 inhibits miRNA biogenesis by interfering with the microprocessor complex.

    PubMed

    Garibaldi, F; Falcone, E; Trisciuoglio, D; Colombo, T; Lisek, K; Walerych, D; Del Sal, G; Paci, P; Bossi, G; Piaggio, G; Gurtner, A

    2016-07-21

    Downregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) is commonly observed in cancers and promotes tumorigenesis suggesting that miRNAs may function as tumor suppressors. However, the mechanism through which miRNAs are regulated in cancer, and the connection between oncogenes and miRNA biogenesis remain poorly understood. The TP53 tumor-suppressor gene is mutated in half of human cancers resulting in an oncogene with gain-of-function activities. Here we demonstrate that mutant p53 (mutp53) oncoproteins modulate the biogenesis of a subset of miRNAs in cancer cells inhibiting their post-transcriptional maturation. Interestingly, among these miRNAs several are also downregulated in human tumors. By confocal, co-immunoprecipitation and RNA-chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments, we show that endogenous mutp53 binds and sequesters RNA helicases p72/82 from the microprocessor complex, interfering with Drosha-pri-miRNAs association. In agreement with this, the overexpression of p72 leads to an increase of mature miRNAs levels. Moreover, functional experiments demonstrate the oncosuppressive role of mutp53-dependent miRNAs (miR-517a, -519a, -218, -105). Our study highlights a previously undescribed mechanism by which mutp53 interferes with Drosha-p72/82 association leading, at least in part, to miRNA deregulation observed in cancer.

  14. Clofarabine Acts as Radiosensitizer In Vitro and In Vivo by Interfering With DNA Damage Response

    SciTech Connect

    Cariveau, Mickael J.; Stackhouse, Murray; Cui Xiaoli; Tiwari, Kamal; Waud, William; Secrist, John A.; Xu Bo

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Combination treatment with radiotherapy and chemotherapy has emerged as the dominant form of cancer adjuvant regimens in recent years. Clofarabine, a newly approved drug for pediatric leukemia, is a second-generation purine nucleoside analogue that can block DNA synthesis and inhibit DNA repair. Therefore, we hypothesized that clofarabine could work synergistically with radiotherapy to increase the tumor cell response. Methods and Materials: The effects of clofarabine on radiosensitivity have been established in several tumor cell lines in vitro and in vivo using colony-forming assays and tumor xenografts. The effect of clofarabine on the DNA damage response was also studied in vitro by measuring {gamma}-H2AX focus formation. Results: Clonogenic survival was significantly reduced in irradiated cells treated with clofarabine, demonstrating the strong radiosensitizing effect of clofarabine. Furthermore, clofarabine displayed a radiosensitizing effect that was greater than gemcitabine or 5-fluorouracil. We also found that low doses of clofarabine can prolong the presence of radiation-induced {gamma}-H2AX nuclear focus formation, and high doses of clofarabine can induce DNA double-strand breaks, suggesting that clofarabine can interfere with DNA damage response pathways. In addition, clofarabine-induced radiosensitization was also established in vivo using a colorectal cancer model, DLD-1, in athymic nude mice. When combined with fractionated radiotherapy, a moderate dose of clofarabine led to a significant increase in tumor growth inhibition. Conclusion: Clofarabine acts as a powerful radiosensitizer both in vitro and in vivo by interfering with the DNA damage response.

  15. A Novel p19 Fusion Protein as a Delivery Agent for Short-interfering RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Danielson, Dana C; Sachrajda, Natalie; Wang, Wei; Filip, Roxana; Pezacki, John Paul

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is the biological mechanism that allows targeted gene knockdown through the addition of exogenous short-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to cells and organisms. RNAi has revolutionized cell biology and holds enormous potential for human therapy. One of the major challenges facing RNAi as a therapy is achieving efficient and nontoxic delivery of siRNAs into the cell cytoplasm, since their highly anionic character precludes their passage across the cell membrane unaided. Herein, we report a novel fusion protein between the tombusviral p19 protein, which binds siRNAs with picomolar affinity, and the “TAT” peptide (RKKRRQRRRR), which is derived from the transactivator of transcription (TAT) protein of the human immunodeficiency virus and acts as a cell-penetrating peptide. We demonstrate that this fusion protein, 2x-p19-TAT, delivers siRNAs into the cytoplasm of human hepatoma cells where they elicit potent and sustained gene knockdown activity without toxic effects. PMID:27045207

  16. Thermal tweezers for manipulation of adatoms and nanoparticles on surfaces heated by interfering laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, Daniel R.; Gramotnev, Dmitri K.; Gramotnev, Galina

    2008-09-15

    We conduct the detailed numerical investigation of a nanomanipulation and nanofabrication technique--thermal tweezers with dynamic evolution of surface temperature, caused by absorption of interfering laser pulses in a thin metal film or any other absorbing surface. This technique uses random Brownian forces in the presence of strong temperature modulation (surface thermophoresis) for effective manipulation of particles/adatoms with nanoscale resolution. Substantial redistribution of particles on the surface is shown to occur with the typical size of the obtained pattern elements of {approx}100 nm, which is significantly smaller than the wavelength of the incident pulses used (532 nm). It is also demonstrated that thermal tweezers based on surface thermophoresis of particles/adatoms are much more effective in achieving permanent high maximum-to-minimum concentration ratios than bulk thermophoresis, which is explained by the interaction of diffusing particles with the periodic lattice potential on the surface. Typically required pulse regimes including pulse lengths and energies are also determined. The approach is applicable for reproducing any holographically achievable surface patterns, and can thus be used for engineering properties of surfaces including nanopatterning and design of surface metamaterials.

  17. Estimating divergently routed nonlinearly interfering channel powers using cross phase modulation.

    PubMed

    Chin, Hou-Man; Thakur, Manoj P; Thomsen, Benn C; Savory, Seb J

    2014-10-20

    The deployment of coherent transceivers in legacy networks requires significant investment in installation. We propose a method enabling autonomous (re-)configuration of an optical channel, which would be advantageous in legacy networks and necessary in proposed future networks utilizing a flexible frequency grid and software defined components such as reconfigurable optical add drop multiplexers (ROADM). We consider potential interfering optical channels propagating with the prospective channel along part of the fiber link which are dropped before arrival at the receiver. The method uses a commercially available line card transmitting a 40Gbit/s polarization multiplexed quadrature phase shift keying (PM-QPSK) probe channel to characterize an optical channel. The power of the nearest neighboring channels is then inferred by examining its bit error rate (BER) which is impacted by cross phase modulation (XPM) from the aggressor channels. In a 4 node network with 2 ROADMs using up to 6 aggressor OOK channels, we successfully deduce the neighboring channel power down to -2 dBm, and an extra improvement down to -3.5 dBm is gained, by measuring at an offset to the international telecommunication union (ITU) grid which also reveals inequality in neighbor channel powers.

  18. Multiwavelength pyrometer for gray and non-gray surfaces in the presence of interfering radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel L. P. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A method and apparatus for detecting the temperature of gray and non-gray bodies in the presence of interfering radiation are presented. A gray body has a constant emissivity less than 1 and a non-gray body has an emissivity which varies with wavelength. The emissivity and reflectivity of the surface is determined over a range of wavelengths. Spectra are also measured of the extraneous interference radiation source and the surface of the object to be measured in the presence of the extraneous interference radiation source. An auxiliary radiation source is used to determine the reflectivity of the surface and also the emissivity. The measured spectrum of the surfaces in the presence of the extraneous interference radiation source is set equal to the emissivity of the surface multiplied by a Planck function containing a temperature term T plus the surface reflectivity multiplied by the spectrum of the extraneous interference radiation source. The equation is then solved for T to determine the temperature of the surface.

  19. Better-ear glimpsing efficiency with symmetrically-placed interfering talkers.

    PubMed

    Brungart, Douglas S; Iyer, Nandini

    2012-10-01

    In listening tasks where a target speech signal is spatially separated from a masking voice, listeners can often gain a substantial advantage in performance by attending to the ear with the better signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). However, this better-ear strategy becomes much more complicated when a target talker located in front of the listener is masked by interfering talkers positioned at symmetric locations to the left and right of the target. When this happens, there are no long-term SNR advantages at either ear and the only binaural SNR advantages available are the result of complicated better-ear glimpses that vary as a function of frequency and rapidly switch back and forth between the two ears according to the natural fluctuations in the relative levels of the two masking voices. In this study, a signal processing technique was used to take the better-ear glimpses that would ordinarily be randomly distributed across the two ears in a binaural speech signal and move them all into the same ear. This resulted in a monaural signal that contained all the information available to an ideal listener using an optimal binaural glimpsing strategy. Speech intelligibility was measured with these optimized monaural stimuli and compared to performance with unprocessed binaural speech stimuli. Performance was similar in these two conditions, suggesting that listeners with normal hearing are able to efficiently extract information from better-ear glimpses that fluctuate rapidly across frequency and across the two ears.

  20. Interfering EZH2 Expression Reverses the Cisplatin Resistance in Human Ovarian Cancer by Inhibiting Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yang; Jin, Long; Liu, Jia-Hua; Sui, Yu-Xia; Han, Li-Li; Shen, Xiao-Li

    2016-09-01

    We aimed to determine the effects of the inhibition of enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) gene expression on the cisplatin resistance of the human ovarian cancer cell line, SKOV3/DDP, and to identify the underlying mechanisms. SKOV3/DDP cells were stably transfected with pSUPER-EZH2 (EZH2 RNA interference plasmid) or pcDNA3.1-EZH2 (EZH2 gene overexpression plasmid) using the lipofection method. Real-time fluorescence quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blotting confirmed that EZH2 expression was downregulated in pSUPER-EZH2-transfected cells. Flow cytometry revealed that EZH2 inhibition did not induce apoptosis, but significantly inhibited autophagy. In addition, it significantly increased the expression of the cellular senescence-signaling proteins p14(ARF), p16(INK4a), p53, pRb, and p21, and significantly decreased the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)1, CDK2, and H3K27me3. Cellular senescence was characterized by a significant increase in the G0/G1 ratio and the restoration of sensitivity to cisplatin in the drug-resistant cells. These findings suggest that interfering with EZH2 expression can inhibit SKOV3/DDP cell autophagy and reverse resistance to cisplatin. The underlying mechanisms could be associated with the regulation of the cellular senescence-signaling pathway. PMID:27610467

  1. Evaluation of short-interfering RNAs treatment in experimental rabies due to wild-type virus.

    PubMed

    Appolinario, Camila Michele; Allendorf, Susan Dora; Peres, Marina Gea; Fonseca, Clovis Reynaldo; Vicente, Acacia Ferreira; Antunes, João Marcelo Azevedo de Paula; Pantoja, José Carlos Figueiredo; Megid, Jane

    2015-01-01

    We have evaluated the efficacy of short-interfering RNAs targeting the nucleoprotein gene and also the brain immune response in treated and non-treated infected mice. Mice were inoculated with wild-type virus, classified as dog (hv2) or vampire bat (hv3) variants and both groups were treated or left as controls. No difference was observed in the lethality rate between treated and non-treated groups, although clinical evaluation of hv2 infected mice showed differences in the severity of clinical disease (p=0.0006). Evaluation of brain immune response 5 days post-inoculation in treated hv2 group showed no difference among the analyzed genes, whereas after 10 days post-inoculation there was increased expression of 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase 1, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 12, interferon gamma, and C-X-C motif chemokine 10 associated with higher expression of N gene in the same period (p<0.0001). In hv2 non-treated group only higher interferon beta expression was found at day 5. The observed differences in results of the immune response genes between treated and non-treated groups is not promising as they had neither impact on mortality nor even a reduction in the expression of N gene in siRNA treated animals. This finding suggests that the use of pre-designed siRNA alone may not be useful in rabies treatment. PMID:26254692

  2. Evaluation of short-interfering RNAs treatment in experimental rabies due to wild-type virus.

    PubMed

    Appolinario, Camila Michele; Allendorf, Susan Dora; Peres, Marina Gea; Fonseca, Clovis Reynaldo; Vicente, Acacia Ferreira; Antunes, João Marcelo Azevedo de Paula; Pantoja, José Carlos Figueiredo; Megid, Jane

    2015-01-01

    We have evaluated the efficacy of short-interfering RNAs targeting the nucleoprotein gene and also the brain immune response in treated and non-treated infected mice. Mice were inoculated with wild-type virus, classified as dog (hv2) or vampire bat (hv3) variants and both groups were treated or left as controls. No difference was observed in the lethality rate between treated and non-treated groups, although clinical evaluation of hv2 infected mice showed differences in the severity of clinical disease (p=0.0006). Evaluation of brain immune response 5 days post-inoculation in treated hv2 group showed no difference among the analyzed genes, whereas after 10 days post-inoculation there was increased expression of 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase 1, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 12, interferon gamma, and C-X-C motif chemokine 10 associated with higher expression of N gene in the same period (p<0.0001). In hv2 non-treated group only higher interferon beta expression was found at day 5. The observed differences in results of the immune response genes between treated and non-treated groups is not promising as they had neither impact on mortality nor even a reduction in the expression of N gene in siRNA treated animals. This finding suggests that the use of pre-designed siRNA alone may not be useful in rabies treatment.

  3. Cell type-specific delivery of short interfering RNAs by dye-functionalised theranostic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Press, Adrian T.; Traeger, Anja; Pietsch, Christian; Mosig, Alexander; Wagner, Michael; Clemens, Mark G.; Jbeily, Nayla; Koch, Nicole; Gottschaldt, Michael; Bézière, Nicolas; Ermolayev, Volodymyr; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Popp, Jürgen; Kessels, Michael M.; Qualmann, Britta; Schubert, Ulrich S.; Bauer, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Efficient delivery of short interfering RNAs reflects a prerequisite for the development of RNA interference therapeutics. Here, we describe highly specific nanoparticles, based on near infrared fluorescent polymethine dye-derived targeting moieties coupled to biodegradable polymers. The fluorescent dye, even when coupled to a nanoparticle, mimics a ligand for hepatic parenchymal uptake transporters resulting in hepatobiliary clearance of approximately 95% of the dye within 45 min. Body distribution, hepatocyte uptake and excretion into bile of the dye itself, or dye-coupled nanoparticles can be tracked by intravital microscopy or even non-invasively by multispectral optoacoustic tomography. Efficacy of delivery is demonstrated in vivo using 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase siRNA as an active payload resulting in a reduction of plasma cholesterol levels if siRNA was formulated into dye-functionalised nanoparticles. This suggests that organ-selective uptake of a near infrared dye can be efficiently transferred to theranostic nanoparticles allowing novel possibilities for personalised silencing of disease-associated genes.

  4. Defective interfering viruses and their impact on vaccines and viral vectors.

    PubMed

    Frensing, Timo

    2015-05-01

    Defective interfering particles (DIPs) have been found for many important viral pathogens and it is believed that most viruses generate DIPs. This article reviews the current knowledge of the generation and amplification of DIPs, which possess deletions in the viral genome but retain the ability to replicate in the presence of a complete helper virus. In addition, mechanisms are discussed by which DIPs interfere with the replication of their helper virus leading to the production of mainly progeny DIPs by coinfected cells. Even though DIPs cannot replicate on their own, they are biologically active and it is well known that they have a huge impact on virus replication, evolution, and pathogenesis. Moreover, defective genomes are potent inducers of the innate immune response. Yet, little attention has been paid to DIPs in recent years and their impact on biotechnological products such as vaccines and viral vectors remains elusive in most cases. With a focus on influenza virus, this review demonstrates that DIPs are important for basic research on viruses and for the production of viral vaccines and vectors. Reducing the generation and/or amplification of DIPs ensures reproducible results as well as high yields and consistent product quality in virus production.

  5. Broad-Spectrum Protection against Tombusviruses Elicited by Defective Interfering RNAs in Transgenic Plants

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Teresa; Borja, Marisé; Scholthof, Herman B.; Feldstein, Paul A.; Morris, T. Jack; Jackson, Andrew O.

    1999-01-01

    We have designed a DNA cassette to transcribe defective interfering (DI) RNAs of tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) and have investigated their potential to protect transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants from tombusvirus infections. To produce RNAs with authentic 5′ and 3′ termini identical to those of the native B10 DI RNA, the DI RNA sequences were flanked by ribozymes (RzDI). When RzDI RNAs transcribed in vitro were mixed with parental TBSV transcripts and inoculated into protoplasts or plants, they became amplified, reduced the accumulation of the parental RNA, and mediated attenuation of the lethal syndrome characteristic of TBSV infections. Analysis of F1 and F2 RzDI transformants indicated that uninfected plants expressed the DI RNAs in low abundance, but these RNAs were amplified to very high levels during TBSV infection. By two weeks postinoculation with TBSV, all untransformed N. benthamiana plants and transformed negative controls died. Although infection of transgenic RzDI plants initially induced moderate to severe symptoms, these plants subsequently recovered, flowered, and set seed. Plants from the same transgenic lines also exhibited broad-spectrum protection against related tombusviruses but remained susceptible to a distantly related tombus-like virus and to unrelated viruses. PMID:10233970

  6. Amiodarone and metabolite MDEA inhibit Ebola virus infection by interfering with the viral entry process.

    PubMed

    Salata, Cristiano; Baritussio, Aldo; Munegato, Denis; Calistri, Arianna; Ha, Huy Riem; Bigler, Laurent; Fabris, Fabrizio; Parolin, Cristina; Palù, Giorgio; Mirazimi, Ali

    2015-07-01

    Ebola virus disease (EVD) is one of the most lethal transmissible infections characterized by a high fatality rate, and a treatment has not been developed yet. Recently, it has been shown that cationic amphiphiles, among them the antiarrhythmic drug amiodarone, inhibit filovirus infection. In the present work, we investigated how amiodarone interferes with Ebola virus infection. Wild-type Sudan ebolavirus and recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus, pseudotyped with the Zaire ebolavirus glycoprotein, were used to gain further insight into the ability of amiodarone to affect Ebola virus infection. We show that amiodarone decreases Ebola virus infection at concentrations close to those found in the sera of patients treated for arrhythmias. The drug acts by interfering with the fusion of the viral envelope with the endosomal membrane. We also show that MDEA, the main amiodarone metabolite, contributes to the antiviral activity. Finally, studies with amiodarone analogues indicate that the antiviral activity is correlated with drug ability to accumulate into and interfere with the endocytic pathway. Considering that it is well tolerated, especially in the acute setting, amiodarone appears to deserve consideration for clinical use in EVD.

  7. High Density Lipoproteins for the Systemic Delivery of short interfering RNA

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Kaylin M.; Thaxton, C. Shad

    2014-01-01

    Introduction RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful mechanism for gene silencing with the potential to greatly impact the development of new therapies for many human diseases. Short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) may be the ideal molecules for therapeutic RNAi. However, therapeutic siRNAs face significant challenges that must be overcome prior to widespread clinical use. Many efforts have been made to overcome the hurdles associated with systemic administration of siRNA; however, current approaches are still limited. As such, there is an urgent need to develop new strategies for siRNA delivery that have the potential to impact a broad spectrum of systemic diseases. Areas covered This review focuses on the promise of siRNA therapies and highlights current siRNA delivery methods. With an eye toward new strategies, this review first introduces high density lipoproteins (HDL) and their natural functions, and then transitions into how HDLs may provide significant opportunities as next generation siRNA delivery vehicles. Importantly, this review describes how synthetic HDLs leverage the natural ability of HDL to stabilize and deliver siRNAs. Expert Opinion HDLs are natural nanoparticles that are critical to understanding the systemic delivery of therapeutic nucleic acids, like siRNA. Methods to synthesize biomimetic HDLs are being explored and data demonstrate that this type of delivery vehicle may be highly beneficial for targeted and efficacious systemic delivery of siRNAs. PMID:24313310

  8. The aftermath of rash action: sleep-interfering counterfactual thoughts and emotions.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Ralph E; Van der Linden, Martial

    2009-08-01

    A consistent body of evidence suggests that excessive cognitive activity at bedtime is a key factor in insomnia. It is generally assumed that sleep-interfering cognitions are affect laden, but still little is known about the precise nature of the affective processes that are involved. The present study sought to explore the role of counterfactual thinking and counterfactual emotions (regret, shame, and guilt) in insomnia as a function of impulsivity. It was hypothesized that when retiring for the night, individuals scoring high on urgency review their rash daytime behavior and are therefore likely to engage in counterfactual thinking and to experience associated feelings of regret, shame, and guilt. A sample of 101 undergraduate students completed three questionnaires: the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale, the Bedtime Counterfactual Processing Questionnaire, and the Insomnia Severity Index. Results indicated that both urgency and counterfactual processing were related to insomnia severity and that the effect of urgency on insomnia was mediated by counterfactual processing. These findings reveal for the first time that impulsivity relates to counterfactual cognitive-affective processing and that this type of processing contributes to sleep disturbances. PMID:19653778

  9. Characterization of the Small RNA Transcriptome of the Marine Coccolithophorid, Emiliania huxleyi

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; Gamarra, Jaime; Castro, Steven; Carrasco, Estela; Hernandez, Aaron; Mock, Thomas; Hadaegh, Ahmad R.; Read, Betsy A.

    2016-01-01

    Small RNAs (smRNAs) control a variety of cellular processes by silencing target genes at the transcriptional or post-transcription level. While extensively studied in plants, relatively little is known about smRNAs and their targets in marine phytoplankton, such as Emiliania huxleyi (E. huxleyi). Deep sequencing was performed of smRNAs extracted at different time points as E. huxleyi cells transition from logarithmic to stationary phase growth in batch culture. Computational analyses predicted 18 E. huxleyi specific miRNAs. The 18 miRNA candidates and their precursors vary in length (18–24 nt and 71–252 nt, respectively), genome copy number (3–1,459), and the number of genes targeted (2–107). Stem-loop real time reverse transcriptase (RT) PCR was used to validate miRNA expression which varied by nearly three orders of magnitude when growth slows and cells enter stationary phase. Stem-loop RT PCR was also used to examine the expression profiles of miRNA in calcifying and non-calcifying cultures, and a small subset was found to be differentially expressed when nutrients become limiting and calcification is enhanced. In addition to miRNAs, endogenous small RNAs such as ra-siRNAs, ta-siRNAs, nat-siRNAs, and piwiRNAs were predicted along with the machinery for the biogenesis and processing of si-RNAs. This study is the first genome-wide investigation smRNAs pathways in E. huxleyi. Results provide new insights into the importance of smRNAs in regulating aspects of physiological growth and adaptation in marine phytoplankton and further challenge the notion that smRNAs evolved with multicellularity, expanding our perspective of these ancient regulatory pathways. PMID:27101007

  10. Self-recognition mechanism between skin and suckers prevents octopus arms from interfering with each other.

    PubMed

    Nesher, Nir; Levy, Guy; Grasso, Frank W; Hochner, Binyamin

    2014-06-01

    Controlling movements of flexible arms is a challenging task for the octopus because of the virtually infinite number of degrees of freedom (DOFs) [1, 2]. Octopuses simplify this control by using stereotypical motion patterns that reduce the DOFs, in the control space, to a workable few [2]. These movements are triggered by the brain and are generated by motor programs embedded in the peripheral neuromuscular system of the arm [3-5]. The hundreds of suckers along each arm have a tendency to stick to almost any object they contact [6-9]. The existence of this reflex could pose significant problems with unplanned interactions between the arms if not appropriately managed. This problem is likely to be accentuated because it is accepted that octopuses are "not aware of their arms" [10-14]. Here we report of a self-recognition mechanism that has a novel role in motor control, restraining the arms from interfering with each other. We show that the suckers of amputated arms never attach to octopus skin because a chemical in the skin inhibits the attachment reflex of the suckers. The peripheral mechanism appears to be overridden by central control because, in contrast to amputated arms, behaving octopuses sometime grab amputated arms. Surprisingly, octopuses seem to identify their own amputated arms, as they treat arms of other octopuses like food more often than their own. This self-recognition mechanism is a novel peripheral component in the embodied organization of the adaptive interactions between the octopus's brain, body, and environment [15, 16].

  11. Self-recognition mechanism between skin and suckers prevents octopus arms from interfering with each other.

    PubMed

    Nesher, Nir; Levy, Guy; Grasso, Frank W; Hochner, Binyamin

    2014-06-01

    Controlling movements of flexible arms is a challenging task for the octopus because of the virtually infinite number of degrees of freedom (DOFs) [1, 2]. Octopuses simplify this control by using stereotypical motion patterns that reduce the DOFs, in the control space, to a workable few [2]. These movements are triggered by the brain and are generated by motor programs embedded in the peripheral neuromuscular system of the arm [3-5]. The hundreds of suckers along each arm have a tendency to stick to almost any object they contact [6-9]. The existence of this reflex could pose significant problems with unplanned interactions between the arms if not appropriately managed. This problem is likely to be accentuated because it is accepted that octopuses are "not aware of their arms" [10-14]. Here we report of a self-recognition mechanism that has a novel role in motor control, restraining the arms from interfering with each other. We show that the suckers of amputated arms never attach to octopus skin because a chemical in the skin inhibits the attachment reflex of the suckers. The peripheral mechanism appears to be overridden by central control because, in contrast to amputated arms, behaving octopuses sometime grab amputated arms. Surprisingly, octopuses seem to identify their own amputated arms, as they treat arms of other octopuses like food more often than their own. This self-recognition mechanism is a novel peripheral component in the embodied organization of the adaptive interactions between the octopus's brain, body, and environment [15, 16]. PMID:24835454

  12. Schinus terebinthifolius Leaf Extract Causes Midgut Damage, Interfering with Survival and Development of Aedes aegypti Larvae.

    PubMed

    Procópio, Thamara Figueiredo; Fernandes, Kenner Morais; Pontual, Emmanuel Viana; Ximenes, Rafael Matos; de Oliveira, Aline Rafaella Cardoso; Souza, Carolina de Santana; Melo, Ana Maria Mendonça de Albuquerque; Navarro, Daniela Maria do Amaral Ferraz; Paiva, Patrícia Maria Guedes; Martins, Gustavo Ferreira; Napoleão, Thiago Henrique

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a leaf extract from Schinus terebinthifolius was evaluated for effects on survival, development, and midgut of A. aegypti fourth instar larvae (L4), as well as for toxic effect on Artemia salina. Leaf extract was obtained using 0.15 M NaCl and evaluated for phytochemical composition and lectin activity. Early L4 larvae were incubated with the extract (0.3-1.35%, w/v) for 8 days, in presence or absence of food. Polymeric proanthocyanidins, hydrolysable tannins, heterosid and aglycone flavonoids, cinnamic acid derivatives, traces of steroids, and lectin activity were detected in the extract, which killed the larvae at an LC50 of 0.62% (unfed larvae) and 1.03% (fed larvae). Further, the larvae incubated with the extract reacted by eliminating the gut content. No larvae reached the pupal stage in treatments at concentrations between 0.5% and 1.35%, while in the control (fed larvae), 61.7% of individuals emerged as adults. The extract (1.0%) promoted intense disorganization of larval midgut epithelium, including deformation and hypertrophy of cells, disruption of microvilli, and vacuolization of cytoplasms, affecting digestive, enteroendocrine, regenerative, and proliferating cells. In addition, cells with fragmented DNA were observed. Separation of extract components by solid phase extraction revealed that cinnamic acid derivatives and flavonoids are involved in larvicidal effect of the extract, being the first most efficient in a short time after larvae treatment. The lectin present in the extract was isolated, but did not show deleterious effects on larvae. The extract and cinnamic acid derivatives were toxic to A. salina nauplii, while the flavonoids showed low toxicity. S. terebinthifolius leaf extract caused damage to the midgut of A. aegypti larvae, interfering with survival and development. The larvicidal effect of the extract can be attributed to cinnamic acid derivatives and flavonoids. The data obtained using A. salina indicates that caution

  13. Novel Strategy To Protect against Influenza Virus-Induced Pneumococcal Disease without Interfering with Commensal Colonization.

    PubMed

    Greene, Christopher J; Marks, Laura R; Hu, John C; Reddinger, Ryan; Mandell, Lorrie; Roche-Hakansson, Hazeline; King-Lyons, Natalie D; Connell, Terry D; Hakansson, Anders P

    2016-06-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae commonly inhabits the nasopharynx as a member of the commensal biofilm. Infection with respiratory viruses, such as influenza A virus, induces commensal S. pneumoniae to disseminate beyond the nasopharynx and to elicit severe infections of the middle ears, lungs, and blood that are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Current preventive strategies, including the polysaccharide conjugate vaccines, aim to eliminate asymptomatic carriage with vaccine-type pneumococci. However, this has resulted in serotype replacement with, so far, less fit pneumococcal strains, which has changed the nasopharyngeal flora, opening the niche for entry of other virulent pathogens (e.g., Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, and potentially Haemophilus influenzae). The long-term effects of these changes are unknown. Here, we present an attractive, alternative preventive approach where we subvert virus-induced pneumococcal disease without interfering with commensal colonization, thus specifically targeting disease-causing organisms. In that regard, pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA), a major surface protein of pneumococci, is a promising vaccine target. Intradermal (i.d.) immunization of mice with recombinant PspA in combination with LT-IIb(T13I), a novel i.d. adjuvant of the type II heat-labile enterotoxin family, elicited strong systemic PspA-specific IgG responses without inducing mucosal anti-PspA IgA responses. This response protected mice from otitis media, pneumonia, and septicemia and averted the cytokine storm associated with septic infection but had no effect on asymptomatic colonization. Our results firmly demonstrated that this immunization strategy against virally induced pneumococcal disease can be conferred without disturbing the desirable preexisting commensal colonization of the nasopharynx. PMID:27001538

  14. Schinus terebinthifolius Leaf Extract Causes Midgut Damage, Interfering with Survival and Development of Aedes aegypti Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Procópio, Thamara Figueiredo; Fernandes, Kenner Morais; Pontual, Emmanuel Viana; Ximenes, Rafael Matos; de Oliveira, Aline Rafaella Cardoso; Souza, Carolina de Santana; Melo, Ana Maria Mendonça de Albuquerque; Navarro, Daniela Maria do Amaral Ferraz; Paiva, Patrícia Maria Guedes; Martins, Gustavo Ferreira; Napoleão, Thiago Henrique

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a leaf extract from Schinus terebinthifolius was evaluated for effects on survival, development, and midgut of A. aegypti fourth instar larvae (L4), as well as for toxic effect on Artemia salina. Leaf extract was obtained using 0.15 M NaCl and evaluated for phytochemical composition and lectin activity. Early L4 larvae were incubated with the extract (0.3–1.35%, w/v) for 8 days, in presence or absence of food. Polymeric proanthocyanidins, hydrolysable tannins, heterosid and aglycone flavonoids, cinnamic acid derivatives, traces of steroids, and lectin activity were detected in the extract, which killed the larvae at an LC50 of 0.62% (unfed larvae) and 1.03% (fed larvae). Further, the larvae incubated with the extract reacted by eliminating the gut content. No larvae reached the pupal stage in treatments at concentrations between 0.5% and 1.35%, while in the control (fed larvae), 61.7% of individuals emerged as adults. The extract (1.0%) promoted intense disorganization of larval midgut epithelium, including deformation and hypertrophy of cells, disruption of microvilli, and vacuolization of cytoplasms, affecting digestive, enteroendocrine, regenerative, and proliferating cells. In addition, cells with fragmented DNA were observed. Separation of extract components by solid phase extraction revealed that cinnamic acid derivatives and flavonoids are involved in larvicidal effect of the extract, being the first most efficient in a short time after larvae treatment. The lectin present in the extract was isolated, but did not show deleterious effects on larvae. The extract and cinnamic acid derivatives were toxic to A. salina nauplii, while the flavonoids showed low toxicity. S. terebinthifolius leaf extract caused damage to the midgut of A. aegypti larvae, interfering with survival and development. The larvicidal effect of the extract can be attributed to cinnamic acid derivatives and flavonoids. The data obtained using A. salina indicates that caution

  15. Common and distinct regions of defective-interfering RNAs of Sindbis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Monroe, S S; Schlesinger, S

    1984-01-01

    Defective-interfering (DI) particles are helper-dependent deletion mutants which interfere specifically with the replication of the homologous standard virus. Serial passaging of alphaviruses in cultured cells leads to the accumulation of DI particles whose genomic RNAs are heterogeneous in size and sequence composition. In an effort to examine the sequence organization of an individual DI RNA species generated from Sindbis virus, we isolated and sequenced a representative cDNA clone derived from a Sindbis DI RNA population. Our data showed that: (i) the 3' end of the DI RNA template was identical to the 50 nucleotides at the 3' end of the standard RNA; (ii) the majority (75%) of the DI RNA template was derived from the 1,200 5'-terminal nucleotides of the standard RNA and included repeats of these sequences; and (iii) the 5' end of the DI RNA template was not derived from the standard RNA, but is nearly identical to a cellular tRNAAsp (S. S. Monroe and S. Schlesinger, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 80:3279-3283, 1983). We have also utilized restriction fragments from cloned DNAs to probe by blot hybridization for the presence of conserved sequences in several independently derived DI RNA populations. These studies indicated that: (i) a 51-nucleotide conserved sequence located close to the 5' end of several alphavirus RNAs was most likely retained in the DI RNAs; (ii) the junction region containing the 5' end of the subgenomic 26S mRNA was deleted from the DI RNAs; and (iii) the presence of tRNAAsp sequences was a common occurrence in Sindbis virus DI RNAs derived by passaging in chicken embryo fibroblasts. Images PMID:6699940

  16. Breast cancer drugs dampen vascular functions by interfering with nitric oxide signaling in endothelium

    SciTech Connect

    Gajalakshmi, Palanivel; Priya, Mani Krishna; Pradeep, Thangaraj; Behera, Jyotirmaya; Muthumani, Kandasamy; Madhuwanti, Srinivasan; Saran, Uttara; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2013-06-01

    the treatments of breast cancer drugs. • Breast cancer drugs induce vasoconstriction by interfering with NO pathway. • NO donors, cGMP analogs rescue breast cancer drug induced endothelial dysfunctions.

  17. Short-interfering RNA-mediated silencing of thioredoxin reductase 1 alters the sensitivity of HeLa cells toward cadmium.

    PubMed

    Nishimoto, Michie; Sakaue, Motoharu; Hara, Shuntaro

    2006-03-01

    The mammalian thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) is a selenocysteine-containing flavoprotein that regulates the thioredoxin system, one of the major systems that maintain the intracellular redox balance. We previously reported that cytosolic TrxR (TrxR1), one of three mammalian TrxR isozymes, was induced by treatment with cadmium. In the present study, to study the role of cadmium-induced TrxR1 in cellular defense, we silenced the expression of TrxR1 in HeLa cells by using small interfering RNA and examined the effect of TrxR1 silencing on the sensitivity of the cells toward cadmium. We found that the gene silencing of TrxR1 had a dual effect on cadmium-induced cell death, depending on the concentration of cadmium. The TrxR1 silencing increased the sensitivity toward a low dose (less than 10 microM) of cadmium but decreased the sensitivity toward a high dose of cadmium. These results suggested that TrxR1 might play an important role in the cellular defense system against cadmium in two ways. TrxR1 might rescue the cells from a low dose of cadmium-induced moderate injury, while it might promote the death of cells severely injured by a high dose of cadmium.

  18. Conflicting Selection Pressures Will Constrain Viral Escape from Interfering Particles: Principles for Designing Resistance-Proof Antivirals.

    PubMed

    Rast, Luke I; Rouzine, Igor M; Rozhnova, Ganna; Bishop, Lisa; Weinberger, Ariel D; Weinberger, Leor S

    2016-05-01

    The rapid evolution of RNA-encoded viruses such as HIV presents a major barrier to infectious disease control using conventional pharmaceuticals and vaccines. Previously, it was proposed that defective interfering particles could be developed to indefinitely control the HIV/AIDS pandemic; in individual patients, these engineered molecular parasites were further predicted to be refractory to HIV's mutational escape (i.e., be 'resistance-proof'). However, an outstanding question has been whether these engineered interfering particles-termed Therapeutic Interfering Particles (TIPs)-would remain resistance-proof at the population-scale, where TIP-resistant HIV mutants may transmit more efficiently by reaching higher viral loads in the TIP-treated subpopulation. Here, we develop a multi-scale model to test whether TIPs will maintain indefinite control of HIV at the population-scale, as HIV ('unilaterally') evolves toward TIP resistance by limiting the production of viral proteins available for TIPs to parasitize. Model results capture the existence of two intrinsic evolutionary tradeoffs that collectively prevent the spread of TIP-resistant HIV mutants in a population. First, despite their increased transmission rates in TIP-treated sub-populations, unilateral TIP-resistant mutants are shown to have reduced transmission rates in TIP-untreated sub-populations. Second, these TIP-resistant mutants are shown to have reduced growth rates (i.e., replicative fitness) in both TIP-treated and TIP-untreated individuals. As a result of these tradeoffs, the model finds that TIP-susceptible HIV strains continually outcompete TIP-resistant HIV mutants at both patient and population scales when TIPs are engineered to express >3-fold more genomic RNA than HIV expresses. Thus, the results provide design constraints for engineering population-scale therapies that may be refractory to the acquisition of antiviral resistance. PMID:27152856

  19. Conflicting Selection Pressures Will Constrain Viral Escape from Interfering Particles: Principles for Designing Resistance-Proof Antivirals

    PubMed Central

    Rast, Luke I.; Rouzine, Igor M.; Rozhnova, Ganna; Bishop, Lisa; Weinberger, Ariel D.; Weinberger, Leor S.

    2016-01-01

    The rapid evolution of RNA-encoded viruses such as HIV presents a major barrier to infectious disease control using conventional pharmaceuticals and vaccines. Previously, it was proposed that defective interfering particles could be developed to indefinitely control the HIV/AIDS pandemic; in individual patients, these engineered molecular parasites were further predicted to be refractory to HIV’s mutational escape (i.e., be ‘resistance-proof’). However, an outstanding question has been whether these engineered interfering particles—termed Therapeutic Interfering Particles (TIPs)—would remain resistance-proof at the population-scale, where TIP-resistant HIV mutants may transmit more efficiently by reaching higher viral loads in the TIP-treated subpopulation. Here, we develop a multi-scale model to test whether TIPs will maintain indefinite control of HIV at the population-scale, as HIV (‘unilaterally’) evolves toward TIP resistance by limiting the production of viral proteins available for TIPs to parasitize. Model results capture the existence of two intrinsic evolutionary tradeoffs that collectively prevent the spread of TIP-resistant HIV mutants in a population. First, despite their increased transmission rates in TIP-treated sub-populations, unilateral TIP-resistant mutants are shown to have reduced transmission rates in TIP-untreated sub-populations. Second, these TIP-resistant mutants are shown to have reduced growth rates (i.e., replicative fitness) in both TIP-treated and TIP-untreated individuals. As a result of these tradeoffs, the model finds that TIP-susceptible HIV strains continually outcompete TIP-resistant HIV mutants at both patient and population scales when TIPs are engineered to express >3-fold more genomic RNA than HIV expresses. Thus, the results provide design constraints for engineering population-scale therapies that may be refractory to the acquisition of antiviral resistance. PMID:27152856

  20. Study on demodulated signal distribution and acoustic pressure phase sensitivity of a self-interfered distributed acoustic sensing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Ying; Yang, Yuan-Hong; Wang, Chen; Liu, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Chang; Peng, Gang-Ding

    2016-06-01

    We propose a demodulated signal distribution theory for a self-interfered distributed acoustic sensing system. The distribution region of Rayleigh backscattering including the acoustic sensing signal in the sensing fiber is investigated theoretically under different combinations of both the path difference and pulse width Additionally we determine the optimal solution between the path difference and pulse width to obtain the maximum phase change per unit length. We experimentally test this theory and realize a good acoustic pressure phase sensitivity of  -150 dB re rad/(μPa·m) of fiber in the frequency range from 200 Hz to 1 kHz.

  1. A novel phosphoserine motif in the LCMV matrix protein Z regulates the release of infectious virus and defective interfering particles.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Christopher M; Eisenhauer, Philip; Bruce, Emily A; Beganovic, Vedran; King, Benjamin R; Weir, Marion E; Ballif, Bryan A; Botten, Jason

    2016-09-01

    We report that the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) matrix protein, which drives viral budding, is phosphorylated at serine 41 (S41). A recombinant (r)LCMV bearing a phosphomimetic mutation (S41D) was impaired in infectious and defective interfering (DI) particle release, while a non-phosphorylatable mutant (S41A) was not. The S41D mutant was disproportionately impaired in its ability to release DI particles relative to infectious particles. Thus, DI particle production by LCMV may be dynamically regulated via phosphorylation of S41.

  2. Divergent patterns of endogenous small RNA populations from seed and vegetative tissues of Glycine max

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Small non-coding RNAs (smRNAs) are known to have major roles in gene regulation in eukaryotes. In plants, knowledge of the biogenesis and mechanisms of action of smRNA classes including microRNAs (miRNAs), short interfering RNAs (siRNAs), and trans-acting siRNAs (tasiRNAs) has been gaine...

  3. Small RNAs regulate plant responses to filamentous pathogens.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Tung; Zhai, Yi; Ma, Wenbo

    2016-08-01

    Small RNAs are central players of RNA silencing in eukaryotes. These short RNA molecules (20-25 nucleotides in length) repress target gene expression based on sequence complementarity. While small RNAs are well-known for their essential function in regulating growth and development, recent research has revealed that they also influence plant immunity. Extensive changes in small RNA accumulation have been observed during infection. This review focuses on specific small RNA changes that are involved in plant responses to filamentous eukaryotic pathogens including fungi and oomycetes. We describe how changes in small RNA accumulation influence plant immunity and summarize the cellular processes affected by these small RNAs. In particular, we discuss secondary small interfering RNAs that directly modulate the expression of defense-related genes. PMID:27208726

  4. Potential misinterpretation of the nutritional value of dietary fiber: correcting fiber digestibility values for nondietary gut-interfering material.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Carlos A; Henare, Sharon J; Rutherfurd, Shane M; Moughan, Paul J

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this review is to identify the origin and implications of a nondietary material present in digesta and feces that interferes with the determination of dietary fiber in gastrointestinal contents. Negative values for ileal and fecal digestibility of dietary fiber are commonly reported in the literature for monogastric animal species, including humans. As negative values are not possible physiologically, this suggests the existence of a nondietary material in the gastrointestinal contents and feces that interferes with the accurate determination of dietary fiber digestibility when conventional methods of fiber determination are applied. To date, little attention has been given to this nondietary interfering material, which appears to be influenced by the type and concentration of fiber in the diet. Interestingly, estimates of dietary fiber digestibility increase substantially when corrected for the nondietary interfering material, which suggests that currently reported values underestimate the digestibility of dietary fiber and may misrepresent where, in the digestive tract, fermentation of fiber occurs. A new perspective of dietary fiber digestion in the gastrointestinal tract is developing, leading to a better understanding of the contribution of dietary fiber to health.

  5. Small Wins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhatigan, James J.; Schuh, John H.

    2003-01-01

    Examines how it easy for people to overlook small successes when they are overwhelmed by and preoccupied with large projects and goals. Explores the concept of "small wins" in organizational theory, which have the potential to become a prominent part of institutional culture and impact organizational behavior and change. (GCP)

  6. Small Cultures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holliday, Adrian

    1999-01-01

    Presents a notion of small culture as an alternative to what has become the default notion of large culture in applied linguistics, social science, and popular usage. A small-culture view of English-language curriculum settings reveals mismatches between professional-academic and organizational cultures at the mezzo level of the institution. (VWL)

  7. Specific argonautes selectively bind small RNAs derived from potato spindle tuber viroid and attenuate viroid accumulation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Minoia, Sofia; Carbonell, Alberto; Di Serio, Francesco; Gisel, Andreas; Carrington, James C; Navarro, Beatriz; Flores, Ricardo

    2014-10-01

    The identification of viroid-derived small RNAs (vd-sRNAs) of 21 to 24 nucleotides (nt) in plants infected by viroids (infectious non-protein-coding RNAs of just 250 to 400 nt) supports their targeting by Dicer-like enzymes, the first host RNA-silencing barrier. However, whether viroids, like RNA viruses, are also targeted by the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) remains controversial. At the RISC core is one Argonaute (AGO) protein that, guided by endogenous or viral sRNAs, targets complementary RNAs. To examine whether AGO proteins also load vd-sRNAs, leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana infected by potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) were agroinfiltrated with plasmids expressing epitope-tagged versions of AGO1, AGO2, AGO3, AGO4, AGO5, AGO6, AGO7, AGO9, and AGO10 from Arabidopsis thaliana. Immunoprecipitation analyses of the agroinfiltrated halos revealed that all AGOs except AGO6, AGO7, and AGO10 associated with vd-sRNAs: AGO1, AGO2, and AGO3 preferentially with those of 21 and 22 nt, while AGO4, AGO5, and AGO9 additionally bound those of 24 nt. Deep-sequencing analyses showed that sorting of vd-sRNAs into AGO1, AGO2, AGO4, and AGO5 depended essentially on their 5'-terminal nucleotides, with the profiles of the corresponding AGO-loaded vd-sRNAs adopting specific hot spot distributions along the viroid genome. Furthermore, agroexpression of AGO1, AGO2, AGO4, and AGO5 on PSTVd-infected tissue attenuated the level of the genomic RNAs, suggesting that they, or their precursors, are RISC targeted. In contrast to RNA viruses, PSTVd infection of N. benthamiana did not affect miR168-mediated regulation of the endogenous AGO1, which loaded vd-sRNAs with specificity similar to that of its A. thaliana counterpart. Importance: To contain invaders, particularly RNA viruses, plants have evolved an RNA-silencing mechanism relying on the generation by Dicer-like (DCL) enzymes of virus-derived small RNAs of 21 to 24 nucleotides (nt) that load and guide Argonaute (AGO) proteins to

  8. Construction of p66Shc gene interfering lentivirus vectors and its effects on alveolar epithelial cells apoptosis induced by hyperoxia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chan; Dong, Wen-Bin; Zhao, Shuai; Li, Qing-Ping; Kang, Lan; Lei, Xiao-Ping; Guo, Lin; Zhai, Xue-Song

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to observe the inhibitive effects of p66Shc gene interfering lentivirus vectors on the expression of p66Shc, and to explore its effects on alveolar epithelial cells apoptosis induced by hyperoxia. Methods The gene sequences were cloned into the pLenR-GPH-shRNA lentiviral vector, which was selected by Genebank searches. The pLenR-GPH-shRNA and lentiviral vector packaging plasmid mix were cotransfected into 293T cells to package lentiviral particles. Culture virus supernatant was harvested, and then the virus titer was determined by serial dilution assay. A549 cells were transduced with the constructed lentiviral vectors, and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot were used to evaluate p66Shc expression. This study is divided into a control group, a hyperoxia group, an A549-p66ShcshRNA hyperoxia group, and a negative lentivirus group. Cell apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry after 24 hours; the expression of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) and caspase-9 were detected by immunohistochemistry assay. The production of reactive oxygen species and cellular mitochondria membrane potential (ΔΨm) were determined by fluorescence microscopy. Results We successfully established the p66Shc gene interfering lentivirus vectors, A549-p66ShcshRNA. The A549-p66ShcshRNA was transfected into alveolar epithelial cells, and the inhibitive effects on the expression of p66Shc were observed. Both RT-PCR and Western blot demonstrated downregulation of p66Shc expression in A549 cells. In the A549-p66ShcshRNA hyperoxia group, we found dampened oxidative stress. A549-p66ShcshRNA can cause p66Shc gene silencing, reduce mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation, reduce membrane potential decrease, reduce the apoptosis of A549 cells, and reduce alveolar epithelial cell injury, while the lentiviral empty vector group had no such changes. Conclusion p66Shc gene interfering lentivirus vector can affect the

  9. Comparative analysis of virus-derived small RNAs within cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) infected with cassava brown streak viruses.

    PubMed

    Ogwok, Emmanuel; Ilyas, Muhammad; Alicai, Titus; Rey, Marie E C; Taylor, Nigel J

    2016-04-01

    Infection of plant cells by viral pathogens triggers RNA silencing, an innate antiviral defense mechanism. In response to infection, small RNAs (sRNAs) are produced that associate with Argonaute (AGO)-containing silencing complexes which act to inactivate viral genomes by posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS). Deep sequencing was used to compare virus-derived small RNAs (vsRNAs) in cassava genotypes NASE 3, TME 204 and 60444 infected with the positive sense single-stranded RNA (+ssRNA) viruses cassava brown streak virus (CBSV) and Ugandan cassava brown streak virus (UCBSV), the causal agents of cassava brown streak disease (CBSD). An abundance of 21-24nt vsRNAs was detected and mapped, covering the entire CBSV and UCBSV genomes. The 21nt vsRNAs were most predominant, followed by the 22 nt class with a slight bias toward sense compared to antisense polarity, and a bias for adenine and uracil bases present at the 5'-terminus. Distribution and frequency of vsRNAs differed between cassava genotypes and viral genomes. In susceptible genotypes TME 204 and 60444, CBSV-derived sRNAs were seen in greater abundance than UCBSV-derived sRNAs. NASE 3, known to be resistant to UCBSV, accumulated negligible UCBSV-derived sRNAs but high populations of CBSV-derived sRNAs. Transcript levels of cassava homologues of AGO2, DCL2 and DCL4, which are central to the gene-silencing complex, were found to be differentially regulated in CBSV- and UCBSV-infected plants across genotypes, suggesting these proteins play a role in antiviral defense. Irrespective of genotype or viral pathogen, maximum populations of vsRNAs mapped to the cytoplasmic inclusion, P1 and P3 protein-encoding regions. Our results indicate disparity between CBSV and UCBSV host-virus interaction mechanisms, and provide insight into the role of virus-induced gene silencing as a mechanism of resistance to CBSD.

  10. A novel class of heat-responsive small RNAs derived from the chloroplast genome of Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Non-coding small RNAs play critical roles in various cellular processes in a wide spectrum of eukaryotic organisms. Their responses to abiotic stress have become a popular topic of economic and scientific importance in biological research. Several studies in recent years have reported a small number of non-coding small RNAs that map to chloroplast genomes. However, it remains uncertain whether small RNAs are generated from chloroplast genome and how they respond to environmental stress, such as high temperature. Chinese cabbage is an important vegetable crop, and heat stress usually causes great losses in yields and quality. Under heat stress, the leaves become etiolated due to the disruption and disassembly of chloroplasts. In an attempt to determine the heat-responsive small RNAs in chloroplast genome of Chinese cabbage, we carried out deep sequencing, using heat-treated samples, and analysed the proportion of small RNAs that were matched to chloroplast genome. Results Deep sequencing provided evidence that a novel subset of small RNAs were derived from the chloroplast genome of Chinese cabbage. The chloroplast small RNAs (csRNAs) include those derived from mRNA, rRNA, tRNA and intergenic RNA. The rRNA-derived csRNAs were preferentially located at the 3'-ends of the rRNAs, while the tRNA-derived csRNAs were mainly located at 5'-termini of the tRNAs. After heat treatment, the abundance of csRNAs decreased in seedlings, except those of 24 nt in length. The novel heat-responsive csRNAs and their locations in the chloroplast were verified by Northern blotting. The regulation of some csRNAs to the putative target genes were identified by real-time PCR. Our results reveal that high temperature suppresses the production of some csRNAs, which have potential roles in transcriptional or post-transcriptional regulation. Conclusions In addition to nucleus, the chloroplast is another important organelle that generates a number of small RNAs. Many members of cs

  11. Peptides interfering with protein-protein interactions in the ethylene signaling pathway delay tomato fruit ripening

    PubMed Central

    Bisson, Melanie M. A.; Kessenbrock, Mareike; Müller, Lena; Hofmann, Alexander; Schmitz, Florian; Cristescu, Simona M.; Groth, Georg

    2016-01-01

    The plant hormone ethylene is involved in the regulation of several processes with high importance for agricultural applications, e.g. ripening, aging and senescence. Previous work in our group has identified a small peptide (NOP-1) derived from the nuclear localization signal of the Arabidopsis ethylene regulator ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE-2 (EIN2) C-terminal part as efficient inhibitor of ethylene responses. Here, we show that NOP-1 is also able to efficiently disrupt EIN2-ETR1 complex formation in tomato, indicating that the NOP-1 inhibition mode is conserved across plant species. Surface application of NOP-1 on green tomato fruits delays ripening similar to known inhibitors of ethylene perception (MCP) and ethylene biosynthesis (AVG). Fruits treated with NOP-1 showed similar ethylene production as untreated controls underlining that NOP-1 blocks ethylene signaling by targeting an essential interaction in this pathway, while having no effect on ethylene biosynthesis. PMID:27477591

  12. Peptides interfering with protein-protein interactions in the ethylene signaling pathway delay tomato fruit ripening.

    PubMed

    Bisson, Melanie M A; Kessenbrock, Mareike; Müller, Lena; Hofmann, Alexander; Schmitz, Florian; Cristescu, Simona M; Groth, Georg

    2016-01-01

    The plant hormone ethylene is involved in the regulation of several processes with high importance for agricultural applications, e.g. ripening, aging and senescence. Previous work in our group has identified a small peptide (NOP-1) derived from the nuclear localization signal of the Arabidopsis ethylene regulator ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE-2 (EIN2) C-terminal part as efficient inhibitor of ethylene responses. Here, we show that NOP-1 is also able to efficiently disrupt EIN2-ETR1 complex formation in tomato, indicating that the NOP-1 inhibition mode is conserved across plant species. Surface application of NOP-1 on green tomato fruits delays ripening similar to known inhibitors of ethylene perception (MCP) and ethylene biosynthesis (AVG). Fruits treated with NOP-1 showed similar ethylene production as untreated controls underlining that NOP-1 blocks ethylene signaling by targeting an essential interaction in this pathway, while having no effect on ethylene biosynthesis. PMID:27477591

  13. Argonaute: The executor of small RNA function.

    PubMed

    Azlan, Azali; Dzaki, Najat; Azzam, Ghows

    2016-08-20

    The discovery of small non-coding RNAs - microRNA (miRNA), short interfering RNA (siRNA) and PIWI-interacting RNA (piRNA) - represents one of the most exciting frontiers in biology specifically on the mechanism of gene regulation. In order to execute their functions, these small RNAs require physical interactions with their protein partners, the Argonaute (AGO) family proteins. Over the years, numerous studies have made tremendous progress on understanding the roles of AGO in gene silencing in various organisms. In this review, we summarize recent progress of AGO-mediated gene silencing and other cellular processes in which AGO proteins have been implicated with a particular focus on progress made in flies, humans and other model organisms as compliment. PMID:27569398

  14. Interfering polysialyltransferase ST8SiaII/STX mRNA inhibits neurite growth during early hippocampal development.

    PubMed

    Brocco, Marcela A; Frasch, Alberto C C

    2006-08-21

    Polysialic acid (PSA) attached to NCAM is involved in cell-cell interactions participating in structural and functional plasticity of neuronal circuits. Two polysialyltransferases, ST8SiaII/STX and ST8SiaIV/PST, polysialylate NCAM. We previously suggested that ST8SiaII/STX is the key enzyme for polysialylation in hippocampus. Here, polysialyltransferase mRNA interference experiments showed that, knock down of ST8SiaIV/PST transcripts did not affect PSA expression, but PSA was almost absent from neuronal surfaces when ST8SiaII/STX mRNA was interfered. Non-polysialylated neurons bore a similar number of neurites per cell than polysialylated neurons. However, non-polysialylated processes were shorter and a lower density of synaptophysin clusters accompanied this reduced neuritic growth. Therefore, ST8SiaII/STX expression is essential to allow a correct neuritic development at initial stages of hippocampus ontogeny.

  15. Solid-liquid-solid process for forming free-standing gold nanowhisker superlattice by interfering femtosecond laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, Y.; Miyanaga, N.; Momoo, K.; Hiromoto, T.

    2013-06-01

    One-dimensional nanomaterial superlattices are fundamental components in plasmonics, nanophotonics, and nanoelectronics. Bottom-up techniques such as vapour-liquid-solid (VLS) and chemosynthesis have been used to fabricate the structure but are nonoptimal for controlling alignment and size. Here we report the fabrication of gold nanowhisker superlattice, based on a novel mechanism termed solid-liquid-solid (SLS). An interfering femtosecond laser pulse induces fluid flows of nanosize gold, which is followed by droplets pinching off from them and freezing of a free-standing nanowhisker superlattice fixed on a substrate. The shape is defined by liquid motion and not by crystallographic growth although its structure is polycrystalline. The smallest curvature radius of its vertex was 3.4 nm, which is one-half of the smallest nanorods fabricated by chemosynthesis. SLS process is a superior alternative to sequential bottom-up processes involving catalyst fabrication, bottom-up synthesis, purification, alignment, stabilization, and preservation.

  16. Reprint of "Modeling the intracellular replication of influenza A virus in the presence of defective interfering RNAs.

    PubMed

    Laske, Tanja; Heldt, Frank Stefan; Hoffmann, Helene; Frensing, Timo; Reichl, Udo

    2016-06-15

    Like many other viral pathogens, influenza A viruses can form defective interfering particles (DIPs). These particles carry a large internal deletion in at least one of their genome segments. Thus, their replication depends on the co-infection of cells by standard viruses (STVs), which supply the viral protein(s) encoded by the defective segment. However, DIPs also interfere with STV replication at the molecular level and, despite considerable research efforts, the mechanism of this interference remains largely elusive. Here, we present a mechanistic mathematical model for the intracellular replication of DIPs. In this model, we account for the common hypothesis that defective interfering RNAs (DI RNAs) possess a replication advantage over full-length (FL) RNAs due to their reduced length. By this means, the model captures experimental data from yield reduction assays and from studies testing different co-infection timings. In addition, our model predicts that one important aspect of interference is the competition for viral proteins, namely the heterotrimeric viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) and the viral nucleoprotein (NP), which are needed for encapsidation of naked viral RNA. Moreover, we find that there may be an optimum for both the DI RNA synthesis rate and the time point of successive co-infection of a cell by DIPs and STVs. Comparing simulations for the growth of DIPs with a deletion in different genome segments suggests that DI RNAs derived from segments which encode for the polymerase subunits are more competitive than others. Overall, our model, thus, helps to elucidate the interference mechanism of DI RNAs and provides a novel hypothesis why DI RNAs derived from the polymerase-encoding segments are more abundant in DIP preparations. PMID:27208847

  17. Maternal supportive and interfering control as predictors of adaptive and social development in children with and without developmental delays

    PubMed Central

    Green, S.; Caplan, B.; Baker, B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Parents of children with developmental delays (DD) have been found to use more controlling behaviour with their children than parents of children with typical development (TD). While controlling behaviour is related to poorer developmental outcomes in TD children, there is little research on how it predicts outcomes in DD children. Furthermore, existing research tends to use inconsistent or non-specific definitions of controlling behaviour, often combining parent control which follows the child’s goal (e.g. supportive direction) and that which interferes with the child’s goal (e.g. interference). Methods Participants were 200 mother–child dyads observed at child age 3, with follow-up assessments of adaptive behaviour and social skills administered at child ages 5 and 6, respectively. We coded the frequency of both types of controlling behaviour based on mothers’ interactions with their children with TD (n = 113) or DD (n = 87) at age 3. Results Mothers in the DD group used more interfering but not more supportive directive acts compared to mothers in the TD group. Adaptive behaviour was assessed at child age 5 and social skills were assessed at age 6. Higher frequency of supportive directive acts predicted better adaptive functioning for the TD group and better social skills for the DD group. Higher frequency of interfering acts predicted lower adaptive and social skills for children with DD but not with TD. Conclusions Results are discussed in terms of the differential developmental needs of children with and without DD as well as implications for early intervention. PMID:23865770

  18. Microscopie interférentielle X-UV : un outil pour l'étude des endommagements des surfaces optiques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamelot, G.; Ros, D.; Cassou, K.; Kazamias, S.; Klisnick, A.; Kozlová, M.; Mocek, T.; Homer, P.; Polan, J.; Stupka, M.

    2006-12-01

    Nous présentons des résultats récents concernant des premières investigations de microscopie interférentielle par laser X-UV d'endommagement optique. Le laser X-UV utilisé est un laser collisionnel en régime quasi-stationnaire émettant à 21.2 nm, développé au Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS, Prague, République Tchèque). Des échantillons de silice fondue de haute qualité, avec ou sans rayure, étaient irradiées en face avant par un laser bleu, correspondant au 3selectfontfontsize{7{9}{textrm{ème}}} harmonique du laser à iode du PALS (1.315 μ m), servant également à réaliser le laser X-UV à 21.2 nm. Celui-ci était utilisé, 5 ns après l'irradiation pour réaliser une imagerie microscopique et interférentielle de la face arrière de l'échantillon. Les résultats font apparaître des déformations locales transitoires. Des premières analyses mettent en évidence une probable variation de la rugosité de la surface. Cette démonstration expérimentale encourageante ouvre la voie à de futures investigations, notamment sur notre prochaine installation laser : LASERIX.

  19. Prognostic significance of minimal residual disease in infants with acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated within the Interfant-99 protocol.

    PubMed

    Van der Velden, V H J; Corral, L; Valsecchi, M G; Jansen, M W J C; De Lorenzo, P; Cazzaniga, G; Panzer-Grümayer, E R; Schrappe, M; Schrauder, A; Meyer, C; Marschalek, R; Nigro, L L; Metzler, M; Basso, G; Mann, G; Den Boer, M L; Biondi, A; Pieters, R; Van Dongen, J J M

    2009-06-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in infants younger than 1 year is a rare but relatively homogeneous disease ( approximately 80% MLL gene rearranged, approximately 70% CD10-negative) when compared with childhood and adult ALL. Several studies in children and adults with ALL have shown that minimal residual disease (MRD) status is a strong and independent prognostic factor. We therefore evaluated the prognostic significance of MRD in infant ALL. Ninety-nine infant patients treated according to the Interfant-99 protocol were included in this study. MRD was analyzed by real-time quantitative PCR analysis of rearranged immunoglobulin genes, T-cell receptor genes and MLL genes at various time points (TP) during therapy. Higher MRD levels at the end of induction (TP2) and consolidation (TP3) were significantly associated with lower disease-free survival. Combined MRD information at TP2 and TP3 allowed recognition of three patients groups that significantly differed in outcome. All MRD-high-risk patients (MRD levels > or =10(-4) at TP3; 26% of patients) relapsed. MRD-low-risk patients (MRD level <10(-4) at both TP2 and TP3) constituted 44% of patients and showed a relapse-rate of only 13%, whereas remaining patients (MRD-medium-risk patients; 30% of patients) had a relapse rate of 31%. Comparison between the current Interfant-06 stratification at diagnosis and the here presented MRD-based stratification showed that both stratifications recognized different subgroups of patients. These data indicate that MRD diagnostics has added value for recognition of risk groups in infant ALL and that MRD diagnostics can be used for treatment intervention in infant ALL as well.

  20. Comparison of distribution and activity of nanoparticles with short interfering DNA (Dbait) in various living systems.

    PubMed

    Berthault, N; Maury, B; Agrario, C; Herbette, A; Sun, J-S; Peyrieras, N; Dutreix, M

    2011-10-01

    Introducing small DNA molecules (Dbait) impairs the repair of damaged chromosomes and provides a new method for enhancing the efficiency of radiotherapy in radio-resistant tumors. The radiosensitizing activity is dependent upon the efficient delivery of Dbait molecules into the tumor cells. Different strategies have been compared, to improve this key step. We developed a pipeline of assays to select the most efficient nanoparticles and administration protocols before preclinical assays: (i) molecular analyses of complexes formed with Dbait molecules, (ii) cellular tests for Dbait uptake and activity, (iii) live zebrafish embryo confocal microscopy monitoring for in vivo distribution and biological activity of the nanoparticles and (iv) tumor growth and survival measurement on mice with xenografted tumors. Two classes of nanoparticles were compared, polycationic polymers with linear or branched polyethylenimine (PEI) and covalently attached cholesterol (coDbait). The most efficient Dbait transfection was observed with linear PEI complexes, in vitro and in vivo. Doses of coDbait ten-fold higher than PEI/Dbait nanoparticles, and pretreatment with chloroquine, were required to obtain the same antitumoral effect on xenografted melanoma. However, with a 22-fold lower 'efficacy dose/toxicity dose' ratio as compared with Dbait/PEI, coDbait was selected for clinical trials. PMID:21799529

  1. Exploiting Quorum Sensing Interfering Strategies in Gram-Negative Bacteria for the Enhancement of Environmental Applications

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiwei; Li, Chenghua

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a widespread intercellular form of communication to coordinate physiological processes and cooperative activities of bacteria at the population level, and it depends on the production, secretion, and detection of small diffusible autoinducers, such as acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs), auto-inducing oligo-peptides (AIPs) and autoinducer 2. In this review, the function of QS autoinducers of gram-negative bacteria in different aspects of wastewater treatment systems is examined. Based on research primarily performed over the past 10 years, QS involvement in the formation of biofilm and aerobic granules and changes of the microbial community and degradation/transformation pathways is discussed. In particular, the QS pathway in the role of bacterial infections and disease prevention in aquaculture is addressed. Interference of QS autoinducer-regulated pathways is considered potential treatment for a variety of environmentally related problems. This review is expected to serve as a stepping stone for further study and development strategies based on the mediation of QS-regulated pathways to enhance applications in both wastewater treatment systems and aquaculture. PMID:26779175

  2. PITPs as Targets for Selectively Interfering With Phosphoinositide Signaling in Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nile, Aaron H.; Tripathi, Ashutosh; Yuan, Peihua; Mousley, Carl J.; Suresh, Sundari; Wallace, Iain Michael; Shah, Sweety D.; Pohlhaus, Denise Teotico; Temple, Brenda; Nislow, Corey; Giaever, Guri; Tropsha, Alexander; Davis, Ronald W.; St Onge, Robert P.; Bankaitis, Vytas A.

    2013-01-01

    Sec14-like phosphatidylinositol transfer proteins (PITPs) integrate diverse territories of intracellular lipid metabolism with stimulated phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate production, and are discriminating portals for interrogating phosphoinositide signaling. Yet, neither Sec14-like PITPs, nor PITPs in general, have been exploited as targets for chemical inhibition for such purposes. Herein, we validate the first small molecule inhibitors (SMIs) of the yeast PITP Sec14. These SMIs are nitrophenyl(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl)methanones (NPPMs), and are effective inhibitors in vitro and in vivo. We further establish Sec14 is the sole essential NPPM target in yeast, that NPPMs exhibit exquisite targeting specificities for Sec14 (relative to related Sec14-like PITPs), propose a mechanism for how NPPMs exert their inhibitory effects, and demonstrate NPPMs exhibit exquisite pathway selectivity in inhibiting phosphoinositide signaling in cells. These data deliver proof-of-concept that PITP-directed SMIs offer new and generally applicable avenues for intervening with phosphoinositide signaling pathways with selectivities superior to those afforded by contemporary lipid kinase-directed strategies. PMID:24292071

  3. The hub protein loquacious connects the microRNA and short interfering RNA pathways in mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Haac, Mary Etna; Anderson, Michelle A.E.; Eggleston, Heather; Myles, Kevin M.; Adelman, Zach N.

    2015-01-01

    Aedes aegypti mosquitoes vector several arboviruses of global health significance, including dengue viruses and chikungunya virus. RNA interference (RNAi) plays an important role in antiviral immunity, gene regulation and protection from transposable elements. Double-stranded RNA binding proteins (dsRBPs) are important for efficient RNAi; in Drosophila functional specialization of the miRNA, endo-siRNA and exo-siRNA pathway is aided by the dsRBPs Loquacious (Loqs-PB, Loqs-PD) and R2D2, respectively. However, this functional specialization has not been investigated in other dipterans. We were unable to detect Loqs-PD in Ae. aegypti; analysis of other dipteran genomes demonstrated that this isoform is not conserved outside of Drosophila. Overexpression experiments and small RNA sequencing following depletion of each dsRBP revealed that R2D2 and Loqs-PA cooperate non-redundantly in siRNA production, and that these proteins exhibit an inhibitory effect on miRNA levels. Conversely, Loqs-PB alone interacted with mosquito dicer-1 and was essential for full miRNA production. Mosquito Loqs interacted with both argonaute 1 and 2 in a manner independent of its interactions with dicer. We conclude that the functional specialization of Loqs-PD in Drosophila is a recently derived trait, and that in other dipterans, including the medically important mosquitoes, Loqs-PA participates in both the miRNA and endo-siRNA based pathways. PMID:25765650

  4. Management of nonmatrix interfering peaks in a chiral high-performance liquid chromatographic assay produced by solid-phase extraction of rat plasma.

    PubMed

    Kagel, J R; Rossi, D T; Lathia, C D

    1997-02-28

    PD 146923, under evaluation as an alkylating radiosensitizing drug, contains one chiral center and one chemically reactive aziridine ring. A method was developed to evaluate possible in vivo enantiomeric inversion of PD 146923 in rat plasma. Normal-phase chiral HPLC was necessary to separate the enantiomers, but a typical aqueous-based solid-phase extraction (SPE) was needed to isolate the analytes from plasma. SPE at higher analyte concentrations removed all interfering peaks and gave acceptable recoveries. However, peaks (A-G) from seven new components interfering with analyte detection at lower concentrations were produced by SPE. The interfering peaks overlapped each other, so some were not observed until other, more intense interfering peaks had been managed. The low separation efficiency of the chiral column precluded management of interfering peaks by modifying chromatographic parameters. Chemical reactivity of the analytes forced the use of mild conditions for management of interfering peaks. Peaks A-F were: (A) water from the SPE cartridge; (B) SPE sorbent endcapping; (C, E and F) nonvolatile salts of the SPE elution acid reacting with bases from the injection solvent or with unidentified bases from the SPE cartridge; (D and G) analyte degradation products. This study identifies the nonmatrix peaks coeluting with the analytes, and describes how an aqueous-based SPE method was developed for isolating these very polar, highly reactive analytes in plasma for separation in a normal-phase chiral HPLC assay. Additionally, B, C, E or F probably are present in many other solid-phase extractions, but are not observed because of polarity or solubility properties.

  5. Analysis of the small interfering RNA profiles of randomly inserted pTRM-TRI6 Fusarium graminearum mutants and their DON related phenotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) production by Fusarium graminearum requires activation of the trichothecene pathway in which TRI5 catalyzes the first step of trichothecene synthesis and TRI6 is a transcription factor activates the pathway. RNA interference (RNAi) has emerged as a useful fungal genetics tool f...

  6. A therapeutic trial of human melanomas with combined small interfering RNAs targeting adaptor molecules p130Cas and paxillin activated under expression of ganglioside GD3.

    PubMed

    Makino, Yusuke; Hamamura, Kazunori; Takei, Yoshifumi; Bhuiyan, Robiul Hasan; Ohkawa, Yuki; Ohmi, Yuhsuke; Nakashima, Hideyuki; Furukawa, Keiko; Furukawa, Koichi

    2016-08-01

    We previously demonstrated that focal adhesion kinase (FAK), p130Cas and paxillin are crucially involved in the enhanced malignant properties under expression of ganglioside GD3 in melanoma cells. Therefore, molecules existing in the GD3-mediated signaling pathway could be considered as suitable targets for therapeutic intervention in malignant melanoma. The aim of this study was to determine whether blockade of p130Cas and/or paxillin by RNAi suppresses melanoma growth. We found a suitable dose (40 μM siRNA, 25 μl/tumor) of the siRNA to suppress p130Cas in the xenografts generated in nu/nu mice. Based on these results, we performed intratumoral (i.t.) treatment with anti-p130Cas and/or anti-paxillin siRNAs mixed with atelocollagen as a drug delivery system in a xenograft tumor of a human melanoma cell line, SK-MEL-28. Mixture of atelocollagen (1.75%) and an siRNA (500 or 1000 pmol/tumor) was injected into the tumors every 3 days after the first injection. An siRNA against human p130Cas markedly suppressed tumor growth of the xenograft in a dose-dependent manner, whereas siRNA against human paxillin slightly inhibited the tumor growth. A control siRNA against firefly luciferase showed no effect. To our surprise, siRNA against human p130Cas (500 or 1000 pmol/tumor) combined with siRNA against human paxillin dramatically suppressed tumor growth. In agreement with the tumor suppression effects of the anti-p130Cas siRNA, reduction in Ki-67 positive cell number as well as in p130Cas expression was demonstrated by immunohistostaining. These results suggested that blockade of GD3-mediated growth signaling pathways by siRNAs might be a novel and promising therapeutic strategy against malignant melanomas, provided signaling molecules such as p130Cas and paxillin are significantly expressed in individual cases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Glycans in personalised medicine" Guest Editor: Professor Gordan Lauc. PMID:27068854

  7. A therapeutic trial of human melanomas with combined small interfering RNAs targeting adaptor molecules p130Cas and paxillin activated under expression of ganglioside GD3.

    PubMed

    Makino, Yusuke; Hamamura, Kazunori; Takei, Yoshifumi; Bhuiyan, Robiul Hasan; Ohkawa, Yuki; Ohmi, Yuhsuke; Nakashima, Hideyuki; Furukawa, Keiko; Furukawa, Koichi

    2016-08-01

    We previously demonstrated that focal adhesion kinase (FAK), p130Cas and paxillin are crucially involved in the enhanced malignant properties under expression of ganglioside GD3 in melanoma cells. Therefore, molecules existing in the GD3-mediated signaling pathway could be considered as suitable targets for therapeutic intervention in malignant melanoma. The aim of this study was to determine whether blockade of p130Cas and/or paxillin by RNAi suppresses melanoma growth. We found a suitable dose (40 μM siRNA, 25 μl/tumor) of the siRNA to suppress p130Cas in the xenografts generated in nu/nu mice. Based on these results, we performed intratumoral (i.t.) treatment with anti-p130Cas and/or anti-paxillin siRNAs mixed with atelocollagen as a drug delivery system in a xenograft tumor of a human melanoma cell line, SK-MEL-28. Mixture of atelocollagen (1.75%) and an siRNA (500 or 1000 pmol/tumor) was injected into the tumors every 3 days after the first injection. An siRNA against human p130Cas markedly suppressed tumor growth of the xenograft in a dose-dependent manner, whereas siRNA against human paxillin slightly inhibited the tumor growth. A control siRNA against firefly luciferase showed no effect. To our surprise, siRNA against human p130Cas (500 or 1000 pmol/tumor) combined with siRNA against human paxillin dramatically suppressed tumor growth. In agreement with the tumor suppression effects of the anti-p130Cas siRNA, reduction in Ki-67 positive cell number as well as in p130Cas expression was demonstrated by immunohistostaining. These results suggested that blockade of GD3-mediated growth signaling pathways by siRNAs might be a novel and promising therapeutic strategy against malignant melanomas, provided signaling molecules such as p130Cas and paxillin are significantly expressed in individual cases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Glycans in personalised medicine" Guest Editor: Professor Gordan Lauc.

  8. Design and validation of small interfering RNA on respiratory syncytial virus M2-2 gene: A potential approach in RNA interference on viral replication.

    PubMed

    Chin, V K; Atika Aziz, Nur A; Hudu, Shuaibu A; Harmal, Nabil S; Syahrilnizam, A; Jalilian, Farid A; Zamberi, S

    2016-10-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract infection in infants and young children globally and is a significant pathogen of the elderly and immunocompromised. The M2-2 protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is particularly important in regulation of viral RNA transcription and replication that could be a potential anti-viral candidate against RSV infection. In this study, we designed and validated siRNAs that specifically target the RSV M2-2 gene. Four siRNAs targeting different regions of the M2-2 gene were designed using web tool. In-vitro evaluation of silencing effect was performed by using RSV infected Vero cell line. Viral M2-2 linked GFP recombinant plasmid was co-transfected with non-targeted siRNA, Pooled siRNA, siRNA 1, siRNA 2, siRNA 3 and siRNA 4 using synthetic cationic polymer. The silencing effect of M2-2 gene at the protein level was measured both qualitatively and quantitatively by using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Meanwhile, the silencing effect at the mRNA level was assessed by using RT-qPCR. This study showed that all four designed siRNAs can effectively and efficiently silence M2-2 gene. siRNA 2 showed the highest (98%) silencing effect on protein level and siRNA 4 with 83.1% at the mRNA level. The viral assay showed no significant cytopathic effects observed after 6days post-infection with siRNAs. In conclusion, this study showed the effectiveness of siRNA in silencing M2-2 gene both at the protein and mRNA level which could potentially be used as a novel therapeutic agent in the treatment of RSV infection. However, further study is warranted to investigate the silencing effect of M2-2 protein and inhibition of RSV infection. PMID:27432115

  9. Induction of CML28-specific cytotoxic T cell responses using co-transfected dendritic cells with CML28 DNA vaccine and SOCS1 small interfering RNA expression vector

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Hongsheng; Zhang Donghua . E-mail: hanson2008@gmail.com; Wang Yaya; Dai Ming; Zhang Lu; Liu Wenli; Liu Dan; Tan Huo; Huang Zhenqian

    2006-08-18

    CML28 is an attractive target for antigen-specific immunotherapy. SOCS1 represents an inhibitory control mechanism for DC antigen presentation and the magnitude of adaptive immunity. In this study, we evaluated the potential for inducing CML28-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) responses by dendritic cells (DCs)-based vaccination. We constructed a CML28 DNA vaccine and a SOCS1 siRNA vector and then cotransfect monocyte-derived DCs. Flow cytometry analysis showed gene silencing of SOCS1 resulted in higher expressions of costimulative moleculars in DCs. Mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) indicated downregulation of SOCS1 stronger capability to stimulate proliferation of responder cell in DCs. The CTL assay revealed transfected DCs effectively induced autologous CML28-specific CTL responses and the lytic activities induced by SOCS1-silenced DCs were significantly higher compared with those induced by SOCS1-expressing DCs. These results in our study indicates gene silencing of SOCS1 remarkably enhanced the cytotoxicity efficiency of CML28 DNA vaccine in DCs.

  10. Design and validation of small interfering RNA on respiratory syncytial virus M2-2 gene: A potential approach in RNA interference on viral replication.

    PubMed

    Chin, V K; Atika Aziz, Nur A; Hudu, Shuaibu A; Harmal, Nabil S; Syahrilnizam, A; Jalilian, Farid A; Zamberi, S

    2016-10-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract infection in infants and young children globally and is a significant pathogen of the elderly and immunocompromised. The M2-2 protein of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is particularly important in regulation of viral RNA transcription and replication that could be a potential anti-viral candidate against RSV infection. In this study, we designed and validated siRNAs that specifically target the RSV M2-2 gene. Four siRNAs targeting different regions of the M2-2 gene were designed using web tool. In-vitro evaluation of silencing effect was performed by using RSV infected Vero cell line. Viral M2-2 linked GFP recombinant plasmid was co-transfected with non-targeted siRNA, Pooled siRNA, siRNA 1, siRNA 2, siRNA 3 and siRNA 4 using synthetic cationic polymer. The silencing effect of M2-2 gene at the protein level was measured both qualitatively and quantitatively by using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Meanwhile, the silencing effect at the mRNA level was assessed by using RT-qPCR. This study showed that all four designed siRNAs can effectively and efficiently silence M2-2 gene. siRNA 2 showed the highest (98%) silencing effect on protein level and siRNA 4 with 83.1% at the mRNA level. The viral assay showed no significant cytopathic effects observed after 6days post-infection with siRNAs. In conclusion, this study showed the effectiveness of siRNA in silencing M2-2 gene both at the protein and mRNA level which could potentially be used as a novel therapeutic agent in the treatment of RSV infection. However, further study is warranted to investigate the silencing effect of M2-2 protein and inhibition of RSV infection.

  11. The Gathering Storm: Federal Laws That Have a Serious Potential of Interfering with the Mission and Character of Evangelical Christian Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davids, James A.

    2012-01-01

    In the early 1980s, the University of Notre Dame Law School's Center for Constitutional Studies surveyed 801 religiously affiliated colleges to determine which federal laws and regulations had a "serious potential" of interfering with the character and mission of the schools. From the 226 responses, the Center identified 11 issues,…

  12. Surface α-1,3-glucan facilitates fungal stealth infection by interfering with innate immunity in plants.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Takashi; Sakaguchi, Ayumu; Nishizawa, Yoko; Kouzai, Yusuke; Minami, Eiichi; Yano, Shigekazu; Koga, Hironori; Meshi, Tetsuo; Nishimura, Marie

    2012-01-01

    Plants evoke innate immunity against microbial challenges upon recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), such as fungal cell wall chitin. Nevertheless, pathogens may circumvent the host PAMP-triggered immunity. We previously reported that the ascomycete Magnaporthe oryzae, a famine-causing rice pathogen, masks cell wall surfaces with α-1,3-glucan during invasion. Here, we show that the surface α-1,3-glucan is indispensable for the successful infection of the fungus by interfering with the plant's defense mechanisms. The α-1,3-glucan synthase gene MgAGS1 was not essential for infectious structure development but was required for infection in M. oryzae. Lack or degradation of surface α-1,3-glucan increased fungal susceptibility towards chitinase, suggesting the protective role of α-1,3-glucan against plants' antifungal enzymes during infection. Furthermore, rice plants secreting bacterial α-1,3-glucanase (AGL-rice) showed strong resistance not only to M. oryzae but also to the phylogenetically distant ascomycete Cochlioborus miyabeanus and the polyphagous basidiomycete Rhizoctonia solani; the histocytochemical analysis of the latter two revealed that α-1,3-glucan also concealed cell wall chitin in an infection-specific manner. Treatment with α-1,3-glucanase in vitro caused fragmentation of infectious hyphae in R. solani but not in M. oryzae or C. miyabeanus, indicating that α-1,3-glucan is also involved in maintaining infectious structures in some fungi. Importantly, rapid defense responses were evoked (a few hours after inoculation) in the AGL-rice inoculated with M. oryzae, C. miyabeanus and R. solani as well as in non-transgenic rice inoculated with the ags1 mutant. Taken together, our results suggest that α-1,3-glucan protected the fungal cell wall from degradative enzymes secreted by plants even from the pre-penetration stage and interfered with the release of PAMPs to delay innate immune defense responses. Because α-1,3-glucan is

  13. Influenza Virus Reassortment Is Enhanced by Semi-infectious Particles but Can Be Suppressed by Defective Interfering Particles.

    PubMed

    Fonville, Judith M; Marshall, Nicolle; Tao, Hui; Steel, John; Lowen, Anice C

    2015-10-01

    A high particle to infectivity ratio is a feature common to many RNA viruses, with ~90-99% of particles unable to initiate a productive infection under low multiplicity conditions. A recent publication by Brooke et al. revealed that, for influenza A virus (IAV), a proportion of these seemingly non-infectious particles are in fact semi-infectious. Semi-infectious (SI) particles deliver an incomplete set of viral genes to the cell, and therefore cannot support a full cycle of replication unless complemented through co-infection. In addition to SI particles, IAV populations often contain defective-interfering (DI) particles, which actively interfere with production of infectious progeny. With the aim of understanding the significance to viral evolution of these incomplete particles, we tested the hypothesis that SI and DI particles promote diversification through reassortment. Our approach combined computational simulations with experimental determination of infection, co-infection and reassortment levels following co-inoculation of cultured cells with two distinct influenza A/Panama/2007/99 (H3N2)-based viruses. Computational results predicted enhanced reassortment at a given % infection or multiplicity of infection with increasing semi-infectious particle content. Comparison of experimental data to the model indicated that the likelihood that a given segment is missing varies among the segments and that most particles fail to deliver ≥1 segment. To verify the prediction that SI particles augment reassortment, we performed co-infections using viruses exposed to low dose UV. As expected, the introduction of semi-infectious particles with UV-induced lesions enhanced reassortment. In contrast to SI particles, inclusion of DI particles in modeled virus populations could not account for observed reassortment outcomes. DI particles were furthermore found experimentally to suppress detectable reassortment, relative to that seen with standard virus stocks, most likely by

  14. Influenza Virus Reassortment Is Enhanced by Semi-infectious Particles but Can Be Suppressed by Defective Interfering Particles

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Hui; Steel, John; Lowen, Anice C.

    2015-01-01

    A high particle to infectivity ratio is a feature common to many RNA viruses, with ~90–99% of particles unable to initiate a productive infection under low multiplicity conditions. A recent publication by Brooke et al. revealed that, for influenza A virus (IAV), a proportion of these seemingly non-infectious particles are in fact semi-infectious. Semi-infectious (SI) particles deliver an incomplete set of viral genes to the cell, and therefore cannot support a full cycle of replication unless complemented through co-infection. In addition to SI particles, IAV populations often contain defective-interfering (DI) particles, which actively interfere with production of infectious progeny. With the aim of understanding the significance to viral evolution of these incomplete particles, we tested the hypothesis that SI and DI particles promote diversification through reassortment. Our approach combined computational simulations with experimental determination of infection, co-infection and reassortment levels following co-inoculation of cultured cells with two distinct influenza A/Panama/2007/99 (H3N2)-based viruses. Computational results predicted enhanced reassortment at a given % infection or multiplicity of infection with increasing semi-infectious particle content. Comparison of experimental data to the model indicated that the likelihood that a given segment is missing varies among the segments and that most particles fail to deliver ≥1 segment. To verify the prediction that SI particles augment reassortment, we performed co-infections using viruses exposed to low dose UV. As expected, the introduction of semi-infectious particles with UV-induced lesions enhanced reassortment. In contrast to SI particles, inclusion of DI particles in modeled virus populations could not account for observed reassortment outcomes. DI particles were furthermore found experimentally to suppress detectable reassortment, relative to that seen with standard virus stocks, most likely by

  15. Small satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, P.; Veverka, J.; Dermott, S.

    1986-01-01

    Satellites smaller than Mimas (r = 195 km) are distinguished by irregular overall shapes and by rough limb topography. Material properties and impact cratering dominate the shaping of these objects. Long fragmentation histories can produce a variety of internal structures, but so far there is no direct evidence that any small satellite is an equilibrium ellipsoid made up of noncohesive gravitationally bound rubble. One many bodies that orbit close to their primary the tidal and rotational components of surface gravity strongly affect the directions of local g and thereby affect the redistribution of regolith by mass wasting. Downslope movement of regolith is extensive on Deimos, and is probably effective on many other small satellites. It is shown that in some cases observed patterns of downslope mass wasting cold produce useful constraints on the satellite's mean density. The diversity of features seen in the few high-resolution images of small satellites currently available suggests that these objects have undergone complex histories of cratering, fragmentation, and regolith evolution.

  16. Genome-wide identification of endogenous RNA-directed DNA methylation loci associated with abundant 21-nucleotide siRNAs in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jian-Hua; Fang, Yuan-Yuan; Duan, Cheng-Guo; Fang, Rong-Xiang; Ding, Shou-Wei; Guo, Hui-Shan

    2016-01-01

    In Arabidopsis, the 24-nucleotide (nt) small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) mediates RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) and transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) of transposable elements (TEs). In the present study, we examined genome-wide changes in DNA methylation and siRNA accumulation in Arabidopsis induced by expression of the Cucumber mosaic virus silencing suppressor protein 2b known to directly bind to both the 21/24-nt siRNAs as well as their associated Argonaute proteins. We demonstrated a genome-wide reduction of CHH and CHG methylation in the 2b-transgenic plants. We found that 2b suppressed RdDM not only at the previously annotated loci directed by 24-nt siRNAs but also a new set of loci associated with 21/22-nt siRNAs. Further analysis showed that the reduced methylation of TEs and coding genes targeted by 21/22-nt siRNAs was associated with sequestration of the duplex siRNAs by the 2b protein but not with changes in either siRNA production or transcription. Notably, we detected both the deletion and/or the transposition of multicopy TEs associated with 2b-induced hypomethylation, suggesting potential TE reactivation. We propose that the silencing of many TEs in Arabidopsis is controlled by the 24- and 21-nt endogenous siRNAs analogous to Drosophila TE silencing by PIWI-interacting RNAs and siRNAs. PMID:27786269

  17. 5-Fluorouracil sensitizes colorectal tumor cells towards double stranded DNA breaks by interfering with homologous recombination repair

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, Upadhyayula Sai; Dyczkowski, Jerzy; Beißbarth, Tim; Gaedcke, Jochen; Mansour, Wael Y.; Borgmann, Kerstin; Dobbelstein, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Malignant tumors of the rectum are treated by neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy. This involves a combination of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and double stranded DNA-break (DSB)-inducing radiotherapy. Here we explored how 5-FU cooperates with DSB-induction to achieve sustainable DNA damage in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. After DSB induction by neocarzinostatin, phosphorylated histone 2AX (γ-H2AX) rapidly accumulated but then largely vanished within a few hours. In contrast, when CRC cells were pre-treated with 5-FU, gammaH2AX remained for at least 24 hours. GFP-reporter assays revealed that 5-FU decreases the efficiency of homologous recombination (HR) repair. However, 5-FU did not prevent the initial steps of HR repair, such as the accumulation of RPA and Rad51 at nuclear foci. Thus, we propose that 5-FU interferes with the continuation of HR repair, e. g. the synthesis of new DNA strands. Two key mediators of HR, Rad51 and BRCA2, were found upregulated in CRC biopsies as compared to normal mucosa. Inhibition of HR by targeting Rad51 enhanced DNA damage upon DSB-inducing treatment, outlining an alternative way of enhancing therapeutic efficacy. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that interfering with HR represents a key mechanism to enhance the efficacy when treating CRC with DNA-damaging therapy. PMID:25909291

  18. Deacetylase inhibitors repress STAT5-mediated transcription by interfering with bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) protein function.

    PubMed

    Pinz, Sophia; Unser, Samy; Buob, Dominik; Fischer, Philipp; Jobst, Belinda; Rascle, Anne

    2015-04-20

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription STAT5 is essential for the regulation of proliferation and survival genes. Its activity is tightly regulated through cytokine signaling and is often upregulated in cancer. We showed previously that the deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) inhibits STAT5-mediated transcription by preventing recruitment of the transcriptional machinery at a step following STAT5 binding to DNA. The mechanism and factors involved in this inhibition remain unknown. We now show that deacetylase inhibitors do not target STAT5 acetylation, as we initially hypothesized. Instead, they induce a rapid increase in global histone acetylation apparently resulting in the delocalization of the bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) protein Brd2 and of the Brd2-associated factor TBP to hyperacetylated chromatin. Treatment with the BET inhibitor (+)-JQ1 inhibited expression of STAT5 target genes, supporting a role of BET proteins in the regulation of STAT5 activity. Accordingly, chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that Brd2 is associated with the transcriptionally active STAT5 target gene Cis and is displaced upon TSA treatment. Our data therefore indicate that Brd2 is required for the proper recruitment of the transcriptional machinery at STAT5 target genes and that deacetylase inhibitors suppress STAT5-mediated transcription by interfering with Brd2 function.

  19. A Defective Interfering Influenza RNA Inhibits Infectious Influenza Virus Replication in Human Respiratory Tract Cells: A Potential New Human Antiviral

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Claire M.; Scott, Paul D.; O’Callaghan, Christopher; Easton, Andrew J.; Dimmock, Nigel J.

    2016-01-01

    Defective interfering (DI) viruses arise during the replication of influenza A virus and contain a non-infective version of the genome that is able to interfere with the production of infectious virus. In this study we hypothesise that a cloned DI influenza A virus RNA may prevent infection of human respiratory epithelial cells with infection by influenza A. The DI RNA (244/PR8) was derived by a natural deletion process from segment 1 of influenza A/PR/8/34 (H1N1); it comprises 395 nucleotides and is packaged in the DI virion in place of a full-length genome segment 1. Given intranasally, 244/PR8 DI virus protects mice and ferrets from clinical influenza caused by a number of different influenza A subtypes and interferes with production of infectious influenza A virus in cells in culture. However, evidence that DI influenza viruses are active in cells of the human respiratory tract is lacking. Here we show that 244/PR8 DI RNA is replicated by an influenza A challenge virus in human lung diploid fibroblasts, bronchial epithelial cells, and primary nasal basal cells, and that the yield of challenge virus is significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner indicating that DI influenza virus has potential as a human antiviral. PMID:27556481

  20. Alkylrhodamines enhance the toxicity of clotrimazole and benzalkonium chloride by interfering with yeast pleiotropic ABC-transporters.

    PubMed

    Knorre, Dmitry A; Besedina, Elizaveta; Karavaeva, Iuliia E; Smirnova, Ekaterina A; Markova, Olga V; Severin, Fedor F

    2016-06-01

    ABC-transporters with broad substrate specificity are responsible for pathogenic yeast resistance to antifungal compounds. Here we asked whether highly hydrophobic chemicals with delocalized positive charge can be used to overcome the resistance. Such molecules efficiently penetrate the plasma membrane and accumulate inside the cells. We reasoned that these properties can convert an active efflux of the compounds into a futile cycle thus interfering with the extrusion of the antibiotics. To test this, we studied the effects of several alkylated rhodamines on the drug resistance of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae We found that octylrhodamine synergetically increases toxicity of Pdr5p substrate-clotrimazole, while the others were less effective. Next, we compared the contributions of three major pleiotropic ABC-transporters (Pdr5p, Yor1p, Snq2p) on the accumulation of the alkylated rhodamines. While all of the tested compounds were extruded by Pdr5p, Yor1p and Snq2p showed narrower substrate specificity. Interestingly, among the tested alkylated rhodamines, inactivation of Pdr5p had the strongest effect on the accumulation of octylrhodamine inside the cells, which is consistent with the fact that clotrimazole is a substrate of Pdr5p. As alkylated rhodamines were shown to be non-toxic on mice, our study makes them potential components of pharmacological antifungal compositions. PMID:27044313

  1. Dimethyl Cardamonin Exhibits Anti-inflammatory Effects via Interfering with the PI3K-PDK1-PKCα Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wan-Guo; He, Hao; Yao, Jing-Yun; Zhu, Yi-Xiang; Lu, Yan-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Consumption of herbal tea [flower buds of Cleistocalyx operculatus (Roxb.) Merr. et Perry (Myrtaceae)] is associated with health beneficial effects against multiple diseases including diabetes, asthma, and inflammatory bowel disease. Emerging evidences have reported that High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is considered as a key “late” proinflammatory factor by its unique secretion pattern in aforementioned diseases. Dimethyl cardamonin (2′,4′-dihydroxy-6′-methoxy-3′,5′-dimethylchalcone, DMC) is a major ingredient of C. operculatus flower buds. In this study, the anti-inflammatory effects of DMC and its underlying molecular mechanisms were investigated on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced macrophages. DMC notably suppressed the mRNA expressions of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and HMGB1, and also markedly decreased their productions in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Intriguingly, DMC could notably reduce LPS-stimulated HMGB1 secretion and its nucleo-cytoplasmic translocation. Furthermore, DMC dose-dependently inhibited the activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1), and protein kinase C alpha (PKCα). All these data demonstrated that DMC had anti-inflammatory effects through reducing both early (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) and late (HMGB1) cytokines expressions via interfering with the PI3K-PDK1-PKCα signaling pathway. PMID:26535080

  2. A Defective Interfering Influenza RNA Inhibits Infectious Influenza Virus Replication in Human Respiratory Tract Cells: A Potential New Human Antiviral.

    PubMed

    Smith, Claire M; Scott, Paul D; O'Callaghan, Christopher; Easton, Andrew J; Dimmock, Nigel J

    2016-01-01

    Defective interfering (DI) viruses arise during the replication of influenza A virus and contain a non-infective version of the genome that is able to interfere with the production of infectious virus. In this study we hypothesise that a cloned DI influenza A virus RNA may prevent infection of human respiratory epithelial cells with infection by influenza A. The DI RNA (244/PR8) was derived by a natural deletion process from segment 1 of influenza A/PR/8/34 (H1N1); it comprises 395 nucleotides and is packaged in the DI virion in place of a full-length genome segment 1. Given intranasally, 244/PR8 DI virus protects mice and ferrets from clinical influenza caused by a number of different influenza A subtypes and interferes with production of infectious influenza A virus in cells in culture. However, evidence that DI influenza viruses are active in cells of the human respiratory tract is lacking. Here we show that 244/PR8 DI RNA is replicated by an influenza A challenge virus in human lung diploid fibroblasts, bronchial epithelial cells, and primary nasal basal cells, and that the yield of challenge virus is significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner indicating that DI influenza virus has potential as a human antiviral. PMID:27556481

  3. Anion sensing and interfering behaviors of electrolyte-insulator-semiconductor sensors with nitrogen plasma-treated samarium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Yu-Ren; Wang, Jer-Chyi; Chan, Ya-Ting

    2015-04-01

    In this article, we demonstrate a samarium oxide (Sm2O3) electrolyte-insulator-semiconductor (EIS) sensor with nitrogen plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) treatment for anion sensing and interfering characterization. Chloride (Cl-), nitrite (NO2-), and nitrate (NO3-) ions were detected, and the sensitivity was about 49.75 mV/pCl, 53.8 mV/pNO2, and 56.19 mV/pNO3, respectively. Ion sensitivity was enhanced with the increase in ionic radius of the target ion. Titration was performed to analyze the interference of anions. To assess interferences from these ions (Cl-, NO2-, and NO3-), selectivity coefficients obtained by fixed interference method (FIM) measurements were presented. In result, the coefficients indicate that the interference can be ignored. Furthermore, characteristics of drift demonstrates that the sample exhibits long-term stability for significantly lower drift of chloride, nitrite, and nitrate ions, respectively. The Sm2O3 EIS sensor with nitrogen PIII treatment exhibits superior anion sensitivity, selectivity, and stability; therefore, this sensor is suitable for future biosensing applications.

  4. Development and preclinical efficacy of novel transforming growth factor-β1 short interfering RNAs for pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro-Gabazza, Corina N; Kobayashi, Tetsu; Boveda-Ruiz, Daniel; Takagi, Takehiro; Toda, Masaaki; Gil-Bernabe, Paloma; Miyake, Yasushi; Yasukawa, Atsushi; Matsuda, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Noboru; Saito, Hiromitsu; Yano, Yutaka; Fukuda, Ayako; Hasegawa, Tetsuya; Toyobuku, Hidekazu; Rennard, Stephen I; Wagner, Peter D; Morser, John; Takei, Yoshiyuki; Taguchi, Osamu; Gabazza, Esteban C

    2012-03-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a chronic devastating disease of unknown etiology. No therapy is currently available. A growing body of evidence supports the role of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 as the major player in the pathogenesis of the disease. However, attempts to control its expression and to improve the outcome of pulmonary fibrosis have been disappointing. We tested the hypothesis that TGF-β1 is the dominant factor in the acute and chronic phases of pulmonary fibrosis and developed short interfering (si)RNAs directed toward molecules implicated in the disease. This study developed novel sequences of siRNAs targeting the TGF-β1 gene and evaluated their therapeutic efficacy in two models of pulmonary fibrosis: a model induced by bleomycin and a novel model of the disease developed spontaneously in mice overexpressing the full length of human TGF-β1 in the lungs. Intrapulmonary delivery of aerosolized siRNAs of TGF-β1 with sequences common to humans and rodents significantly inhibited bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in the acute and chronic phases of the disease and in a dose-dependent manner. Aerosolized human-specific siRNA also efficiently inhibited pulmonary fibrosis, improved lung function, and prolonged survival in human TGF-β1 transgenic mice. Mice showed no off-target effects after intratracheal administration of siRNA. These results suggest the applicability of these novel siRNAs as tools for treating pulmonary fibrosis in humans. PMID:22033267

  5. Sequence Analysis of In Vivo Defective Interfering-Like RNA of Influenza A H1N1 Pandemic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Saira, Kazima; Lin, Xudong; DePasse, Jay V.; Halpin, Rebecca; Twaddle, Alan; Stockwell, Timothy; Angus, Brian; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Delfino, Marina; Dugan, Vivien; Dwyer, Dominic E.; Freiberg, Matthew; Horban, Andrzej; Losso, Marcelo; Lynfield, Ruth; Wentworth, Deborah N.; Holmes, Edward C.; Davey, Richard; Wentworth, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Influenza virus defective interfering (DI) particles are naturally occurring noninfectious virions typically generated during in vitro serial passages in cell culture of the virus at a high multiplicity of infection. DI particles are recognized for the role they play in inhibiting viral replication and for the impact they have on the production of infectious virions. To date, influenza virus DI particles have been reported primarily as a phenomenon of cell culture and in experimentally infected embryonated chicken eggs. They have also been isolated from a respiratory infection of chickens. Using a sequencing approach, we characterize several subgenomic viral RNAs from human nasopharyngeal specimens infected with the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus. The distribution of these in vivo-derived DI-like RNAs was similar to that of in vitro DIs, with the majority of the defective RNAs generated from the PB2 (segment 1) of the polymerase complex, followed by PB1 and PA. The lengths of the in vivo-derived DI-like segments also are similar to those of known in vitro DIs, and the in vivo-derived DI-like segments share internal deletions of the same segments. The presence of identical DI-like RNAs in patients linked by direct contact is compatible with transmission between them. The functional role of DI-like RNAs in natural infections remains to be established. PMID:23678180

  6. Cyclin D1 blocks the anti-proliferative function of RUNX3 by interfering with RUNX3-p300 interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Iwatani, Kazunori; Fujimoto, Tetsuhiro; Ito, Takaaki

    2010-09-24

    Research highlights: {yields} Cyclin D1 interacts with RUNX3 and inhibits the interaction and collaboration of RUNX3 with coactivator p300. {yields} Cyclin D1 blocks the ability of RUNX3 to induce the expression of cdk inhibitor p21. {yields} Cyclin D1 releases cancer cells from the inhibition of proliferation induced by RUNX3. -- Abstract: Transcriptional function of cyclin D1, whose deregulation is frequently observed in human cancers, has been suggested to contribute to cancer formation. In the present study, we show that cyclin D1 protein inhibits RUNX3 activity by directly binding to it and interfering with its interaction with p300 interaction in lung cancer cells. Cyclin D1 inhibits p300-dependent RUNX3 acetylation and negatively regulates cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) inhibitor p21 expression. These transcriptional effects of cyclin D1 do not require cdk4/6 kinase activation. We propose that cyclin D1 provides a transcriptional switch that allows the tumor suppressor activity of RUNX3 to be repressed in cancer cells. Since RUNX3 plays tumor suppressive roles in a wide range of cancers, a non-canonical cyclin D1 function may be critical for neoplastic transformation of the epithelial cells in which RUNX3 regulates proliferation.

  7. The evolving world of small RNAs from RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei-Ling; Weng, Kuo-Feng; Shih, Shin-Ru; Brewer, Gary

    2016-09-01

    RNA virus infection in plants and invertebrates can produce virus-derived small RNAs. These RNAs share features with host endogenous small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). They can potentially mediate RNA interference (RNAi) and related RNA silencing pathways, resulting in specific antiviral defense. Although most RNA silencing components such as Dicer, Ago2, and RISC are conserved among eukaryotic hosts, whether RNA virus infection in mammals can generate functional small RNAs that act in antiviral defense remains under discussion. Here, we review recent studies on the molecular and biochemical features of viral siRNAs and other virus-derived small RNAs from infected plants, arthropods, nematodes, and vertebrates and discuss the genetic pathways for their biogenesis and their roles in antiviral activity. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:575-588. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1351 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27046163

  8. The evolving world of small RNAs from RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei-Ling; Weng, Kuo-Feng; Shih, Shin-Ru; Brewer, Gary

    2016-09-01

    RNA virus infection in plants and invertebrates can produce virus-derived small RNAs. These RNAs share features with host endogenous small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). They can potentially mediate RNA interference (RNAi) and related RNA silencing pathways, resulting in specific antiviral defense. Although most RNA silencing components such as Dicer, Ago2, and RISC are conserved among eukaryotic hosts, whether RNA virus infection in mammals can generate functional small RNAs that act in antiviral defense remains under discussion. Here, we review recent studies on the molecular and biochemical features of viral siRNAs and other virus-derived small RNAs from infected plants, arthropods, nematodes, and vertebrates and discuss the genetic pathways for their biogenesis and their roles in antiviral activity. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:575-588. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1351 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  9. Correction methodology for the spectral interfering γ-rays overlapping to the analytical peaks used in the analysis of 232Th.

    PubMed

    Yücel, H; Köse, E; Esen, A N; Bor, D

    2011-06-01

    In the γ-ray spectrometric analysis of the radionuclides, a correction factor is generally required for the spectral interfering γ-rays in determining the net areas of the analytical peaks because some interfering γ-rays often might contribute to the analytical peaks of interest. In present study, a correction methodology for the spectral interfering γ-rays (CSI) is described. In particular, in the analysis of (232)Th contained in samples, the interfering γ-rays due to (226)Ra, (235)U, (238)U and their decay products often overlap to the peaks of interest from (232)Th decay products, and vise versa. For the validation of the proposed CSI method, several certified reference materials (CRM) containing U and Th were measured by using a 76.5% efficient n-type Ge detector. The required correction factors were quantified for spectral interference, self-absorption and true coincidence summing (TCS) effects for the relevant γ-rays. The measured results indicate that if one ignores the contributions of the interfering γ-rays to the analytical peaks at 583.2 keV of (208)Tl and 727.3 keV of (212)Bi, this leads to a significantly systematic influence on the resulted activities of (232)Th. The correction factors required for spectral interference and TCS effects are estimated to be ∼13.6% and ∼15.4% for 583.2 keV peak. For the 727.3 keV peak, the correction factor is estimated to be ∼15% for spectral interference, and ∼5% for the TCS effects at the presently used detection geometry. On the other hand, the measured results also indicate that ignoring the contribution of the interfering γ-rays to the areas of the analytical peaks at 860.6 keV of (208)Tl, 338.3 and 911.2 keV of (228)Ac does not lead to any significant systematic influence on the (232)Th analysis. Because these factors are remained generally less than ∼5%, i.e., within overall uncertainty limits. The present study also showed that in view of both the spectral interference and TCS effects, the

  10. A distinct small RNA pathway silences selfish genetic elements in the germline.

    PubMed

    Vagin, Vasily V; Sigova, Alla; Li, Chengjian; Seitz, Hervé; Gvozdev, Vladimir; Zamore, Phillip D

    2006-07-21

    In the Drosophila germline, repeat-associated small interfering RNAs (rasiRNAs) ensure genomic stability by silencing endogenous selfish genetic elements such as retrotransposons and repetitive sequences. Whereas small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) derive from both the sense and antisense strands of their double-stranded RNA precursors, rasiRNAs arise mainly from the antisense strand. rasiRNA production appears not to require Dicer-1, which makes microRNAs (miRNAs), or Dicer-2, which makes siRNAs, and rasiRNAs lack the 2',3' hydroxy termini characteristic of animal siRNA and miRNA. Unlike siRNAs and miRNAs, rasiRNAs function through the Piwi, rather than the Ago, Argonaute protein subfamily. Our data suggest that rasiRNAs protect the fly germline through a silencing mechanism distinct from both the miRNA and RNA interference pathways.

  11. Non-healing foot ulcers in diabetic patients: general and local interfering conditions and management options with advanced wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Uccioli, Luigi; Izzo, Valentina; Meloni, Marco; Vainieri, Erika; Ruotolo, Valeria; Giurato, Laura

    2015-04-01

    Medical knowledge about wound management has improved as recent studies have investigated the healing process and its biochemical background. Despite this, foot ulcers remain an important clinical problem, often resulting in costly, prolonged treatment. A non-healing ulcer is also a strong risk factor for major amputation. Many factors can interfere with wound healing, including the patient's general health status (i.e., nutritional condition indicated by albumin levels) or drugs such as steroids that can interfere with normal healing. Diabetic complications (i.e., renal insufficiency) may delay healing and account for higher amputation rates observed in diabetic patients under dialysis treatment. Wound environment (e.g., presence of neuropathy, ischaemia, and infection) may significantly influence healing by interfering with the physiological healing cascade and adding local release of factors that may worsen the wound. The timely and well-orchestrated release of factors regulating the healing process, observed in acute wounds, is impaired in non-healing wounds that are blocked in a chronic inflammatory phase without progressing to healing. This chronic phase is characterised by elevated protease activity (EPA) of metalloproteinases (MMPs) and serine proteases (e.g., human neutrophil elastase) that interfere with collagen synthesis, as well as growth factor release and action. EPA (mainly MMP 9, MMP-8 and elastase) and inflammatory factors present in the wound bed (such as IL-1, IL-6, and TNFa) account for the catabolic state of non-healing ulcers. The availability of wound dressings that modulate EPA has added new therapeutic options for treating non-healing ulcers. The literature confirms advantages obtained by reducing protease activity in the wound bed, with better outcomes achieved by using these dressings compared with traditional ones. New technologies also allow a physician to know the status of the wound bed environment, particularly EPA, in a clinical

  12. Depletion of SAM50 Specifically Targets BCR-ABL-Expressing Leukemic Stem and Progenitor Cells by Interfering with Mitochondrial Functions.

    PubMed

    Capala, Marta E; Pruis, Maurien; Vellenga, Edo; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2016-03-01

    A high proliferation rate of malignant cells requires an increased energy production, both by anaerobic glucose metabolism and mitochondrial respiration. Moreover, increased levels of mitochondria-produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) promote survival of transformed cells and contribute to the disease progression both in solid tumors and leukemia. Consequently, interfering with mitochondrial metabolism has been used as a strategy to specifically target leukemic cells. SAM50 is a mitochondrial outer membrane protein involved in the formation of mitochondrial intermembrane space bridging (MIB) complex. Although the importance of SAM50 in maintaining MIB integrity and in the assembly of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes has been described, its specific role in the normal and leukemic hematopoietic cells remains unknown. We observed that human leukemic cells display a specific dependency on SAM50 expression, as downregulation of SAM50 in BCR-ABL-expressing, but not normal CD34(+) human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) caused a significant decrease in growth, colony formation, and replating capacity. Mitochondrial functions of BCR-ABL-expressing HSPCs were compromised, as seen by a decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and respiration. This effect of SAM50 downregulation was recapitulated in normal HSPCs exposed to cytokine-rich culture conditions that stimulate proliferation. Both oncogene-transduced and cytokine-stimulated HSPCs showed increased mitochondrial membrane potential and increased ROS levels compared to their normal counterparts. Therefore, we postulate that human leukemic HSPCs are highly dependent on the proper functioning of mitochondria and that disruption of mitochondrial integrity may aid in targeting leukemic cells. PMID:26855047

  13. Short interfering RNA strand selection is independent of dsRNA processing polarity during RNAi in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Preall, Jonathan B; He, Zhengying; Gorra, Jeffrey M; Sontheimer, Erik J

    2006-03-01

    Short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) guide mRNA cleavage during RNA interference (RNAi). Only one siRNA strand assembles into the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), with preference given to the strand whose 5' terminus has lower base-pairing stability. In Drosophila, Dcr-2/R2D2 processes siRNAs from longer double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) and also nucleates RISC assembly, suggesting that nascent siRNAs could remain bound to Dcr-2/R2D2. In vitro, Dcr-2/R2D2 senses base-pairing asymmetry of synthetic siRNAs and dictates strand selection by asymmetric binding to the duplex ends. During dsRNA processing, Dicer (Dcr) liberates siRNAs from dsRNA ends in a manner dictated by asymmetric enzyme-substrate interactions. Because Dcr-2/R2D2 is unlikely to sense base-pairing asymmetry of an siRNA that is embedded within a precursor, it is not clear whether processed siRNAs strictly follow the thermodynamic asymmetry rules or whether processing polarity can affect strand selection. We use a Drosophila in vitro system in which defined siRNAs with known asymmetry can be generated from longer dsRNA precursors. These dsRNAs permit processing specifically from either the 5' or the 3' end of the thermodynamically favored strand of the incipient siRNA. Combined dsRNA-processing/mRNA-cleavage assays indicate that siRNA strand selection is independent of dsRNA processing polarity during Drosophila RISC assembly in vitro.

  14. Variations of the 3' protruding ends in synthetic short interfering RNA (siRNA) tested by microinjection in Drosophila embryos.

    PubMed

    Boutla, Alexandra; Delidakis, Christos; Livadaras, Ioannis; Tabler, Martin

    2003-01-01

    Short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are the processing product originating from long double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) that are cleaved by the RNase III-like ribonuclease Dicer. As siRNAs mediate cleavage of specific single-stranded target RNAs, they are essential intermediates of RNA interference (RNAi). When applied in synthetic form, siRNAs likewise can induce the silencing process in the absence of long dsRNAs. Here, we tested variations of a conventional synthetic siRNA that had been used successfully to silence the Drosophila notch gene. The variants had two 3 ' -terminal deoxynucleotides in their protruding single-stranded ends. In one case, the deoxynulceotides would match to the notch mRNA, whereas the other variant had nonmatching deoxy-T residues, representing a widely used siRNA design. siRNAs with different combinations of sense and antisense strands were injected into Drosophila embryos at two different concentrations. We found that the all-ribonucleotide siRNA gave the best inhibition of notch expression. The combination of two modified strands with 3 ' -terminal deoxynucleotides was effective, but if combined with a sense or antisense ribostrand, the efficacy dropped. The siRNAs with nonmatching 3 ' -terminal TT residues showed a reduced silencing potential, which became evident at low concentration. An siRNA with a nonmatching 3 ' -terminal ribonucleotide in the antisense strand retained most of its silencing potential in accordance with the hypothesis that primer extension for generation of ssRNA from single-stranded mRNA does not operate in Drosophila.

  15. Identification and annotation of small RNA genes using ShortStack

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, Saima; Axtell, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Highly parallel sequencing of cDNA derived from endogenous small RNAs (small RNA-seq) is a key method that has accelerated understanding of regulatory small RNAs in eukaryotes. Eukaryotic regulatory small RNAs, which include microRNAs (miRNAs), short interfering RNAs (siRNAs), and Piwi-associated RNAs (piRNAs), typically derive from the processing of longer precursor RNAs. Alignment of small RNA-seq data to a reference genome allows the inference of the longer precursor and thus the annotation of small RNA producing genes. ShortStack is a program that was developed to comprehensively analyze reference-aligned small RNA-seq data, and output detailed and useful annotations of the causal small RNA-producing genes. Here, we provide a step- by-step tutorial of ShortStack usage with the goal of introducing new users to the software and pointing out some common pitfalls. PMID:24139974

  16. Methylation interactions in Arabidopsis hybrids require RNA-directed DNA methylation and are influenced by genetic variation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingzhu; Wang, Dong; Lang, Zhaobo; He, Li; Yang, Lan; Zeng, Liang; Li, Yanqiang; Zhao, Cheng; Huang, Huan; Zhang, Heng; Zhang, Huiming; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2016-07-19

    DNA methylation is a conserved epigenetic mark in plants and many animals. How parental alleles interact in progeny to influence the epigenome is poorly understood. We analyzed the DNA methylomes of Arabidopsis Col and C24 ecotypes, and their hybrid progeny. Hybrids displayed nonadditive DNA methylation levels, termed methylation interactions, throughout the genome. Approximately 2,500 methylation interactions occurred at regions where parental DNA methylation levels are similar, whereas almost 1,000 were at differentially methylated regions in parents. Methylation interactions were characterized by an abundance of 24-nt small interfering RNAs. Furthermore, dysfunction of the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway abolished methylation interactions but did not affect the increased biomass observed in hybrid progeny. Methylation interactions correlated with altered genetic variation within the genome, suggesting that they may play a role in genome evolution. PMID:27382183

  17. High-Throughput Single-Cell Kinetics of Virus Infections in the Presence of Defective Interfering Particles

    PubMed Central

    Akpinar, Fulya; Timm, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Defective interfering particles (DIPs) are virus mutants that lack essential genes for growth. In coinfections with helper virus, the diversion of viral proteins to the replication and packaging of DIP genomes can interfere with virus production. Mounting cases of DIPs and DIP-like genomes in clinical and natural isolates, as well as growing interest in DIP-based therapies, underscore a need to better elucidate how DIPs work. DIP activity is primarily measured by its inhibition of virus infection yield, an endpoint that masks the dynamic and potentially diverse individual cell behaviors. Using vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) as a model, we coinfected BHK cells with VSV DIPs and recombinant helper virus carrying a gene encoding a red fluorescent protein (RFP) whose expression correlates with the timing and level of virus release. For single cells within a monolayer, 10 DIPs per cell suppressed the reporter expression in only 1.2% of the cells. In most cells, it slowed and reduced viral gene expression, manifested as a shift in mean latent time from 4 to 6 h and reduced virus yields by 10-fold. For single cells isolated in microwells, DIP effects were more pronounced, reducing virus yields by 100-fold and extending latent times to 12 h, including individual instances above 20 h. Together, these results suggest that direct or indirect cell-cell interactions prevent most coinfected cells from being completely suppressed by DIPs. Finally, a gamma distribution model captures well how the infection kinetics quantitatively depends on the DIP dose. Such models will be useful for advancing a predictive biology of DIP-associated virus growth and infection spread. IMPORTANCE During the last century, basic studies in virology have focused on developing a molecular mechanistic understanding of how infectious viruses reproduce in their living host cells. However, over the last 10 years, the advent of deep sequencing and other powerful technologies has revealed in

  18. Roles of small RNAs in the immune defense mechanisms of crustaceans.

    PubMed

    He, Yaodong; Ju, Chenyu; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2015-12-01

    Small RNAs, 21-24 nucleotides in length, are non-coding RNAs found in most multicellular organisms, as well as in some viruses. There are three main types of small RNAs including microRNA (miRNA), small-interfering RNA (siRNA), and piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA). Small RNAs play key roles in the genetic regulation of eukaryotes; at least 50% of all eukaryote genes are the targets of small RNAs. In recent years, studies have shown that some unique small RNAs are involved in the immune response of crustaceans, leading to lower or higher immune responses to infections and diseases. SiRNAs could be used as therapy for virus infection. In this review, we provide an overview of the diverse roles of small RNAs in the immune defense mechanisms of crustaceans. PMID:26210184

  19. Hsc70/Hsp90 chaperone machinery mediates ATP-dependent RISC loading of small RNA duplexes.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Shintaro; Kobayashi, Maki; Yoda, Mayuko; Sakaguchi, Yuriko; Katsuma, Susumu; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Tomari, Yukihide

    2010-07-30

    Small silencing RNAs--small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) or microRNAs (miRNAs)--direct posttranscriptional gene silencing of their mRNA targets as guides for the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). Both siRNAs and miRNAs are born double stranded. Surprisingly, loading these small RNA duplexes into Argonaute proteins, the core components of RISC, requires ATP, whereas separating the two small RNA strands within Argonaute does not. Here we show that the Hsc70/Hsp90 chaperone machinery is required to load small RNA duplexes into Argonaute proteins, but not for subsequent strand separation or target cleavage. We envision that the chaperone machinery uses ATP and mediates a conformational opening of Ago proteins so that they can receive bulky small RNA duplexes. Our data suggest that the chaperone machinery may serve as the driving force for the RISC assembly pathway.

  20. Direct atomic absorption determination of cadmium and lead in strongly interfering matrices by double vaporization with a two-step electrothermal atomizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinshtein, Ilia L.; Vilpan, Yuri A.; Saraev, Alexei V.; Vasilieva, Lubov A.

    2001-03-01

    Thermal pretreatment of a sample using double vaporization in a two-step atomizer with a purged vaporizer makes possible the direct analysis of samples with strongly interfering matrices including solids. A porous-graphite capsule or a filter inserted into the vaporizer is used for solid sample analysis. The technique was used for the direct determination of Cd and Pb in human urine, potatoes, wheat, bovine liver, milk powder, grass-cereal mixtures, caprolactam, bituminous-shale and polyvinyl chloride plastic without chemical modification or any other sample pretreatment.

  1. A small RNA response at DNA ends in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Michalik, Katharina M; Böttcher, Romy; Förstemann, Klaus

    2012-10-01

    Small RNAs have been implicated in numerous cellular processes, including effects on chromatin structure and the repression of transposons. We describe the generation of a small RNA response at DNA ends in Drosophila that is analogous to the recently reported double-strand break (DSB)-induced RNAs or Dicer- and Drosha-dependent small RNAs in Arabidopsis and vertebrates. Active transcription in the vicinity of the break amplifies this small RNA response, demonstrating that the normal messenger RNA contributes to the endogenous small interfering RNAs precursor. The double-stranded RNA precursor forms with an antisense transcript that initiates at the DNA break. Breaks are thus sites of transcription initiation, a novel aspect of the cellular DSB response. This response is specific to a double-strand break since nicked DNA structures do not trigger small RNA production. The small RNAs are generated independently of the exact end structure (blunt, 3'- or 5'-overhang), can repress homologous sequences in trans and may therefore--in addition to putative roles in repair--exert a quality control function by clearing potentially truncated messages from genes in the vicinity of the break.

  2. Chemometrics-assisted high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection strategy to solve varying interfering patterns from different chromatographic columns and sample matrices for beverage analysis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiao-Li; Wu, Hai-Long; Gu, Hui-Wen; Hu, Yong; Wang, Li; Xia, Hui; Xiang, Shou-Xia; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2016-02-26

    This work reports a chemometrics-assisted high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) strategy to solve varying interfering patterns from different chromatographic columns and sample matrices for the rapid simultaneous determination of six synthetic colorants in five kinds of beverages with little sample pretreatment. The investigation was performed using two types of LC columns under the same elution conditions. Although analytes using different columns have different co-elution patterns that appear more seriously in complex backgrounds, all colorants were properly resolved by alternating trilinear decomposition (ATLD) method and accurate chromatographic elution profiles, spectral profiles as well as relative concentrations were obtained. The results were confirmed by those obtained from traditional HPLC-UV method at a particular wavelength and the results of both methods were consistent with each other. All results demonstrated that the proposed chemometrics-assisted HPLC-DAD method is accurate, economical and universal, and can be promisingly applied to solve varying interfering patterns from different chromatographic columns and sample matrices for the analysis of complex food samples.

  3. Review of Adverse Events Associated With False Glucose Readings Measured by GDH-PQQ–Based Glucose Test Strips in the Presence of Interfering Sugars

    PubMed Central

    Frias, Juan P.; Lim, Christine G.; Ellison, John M.; Montandon, Carol M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the implications of falsely elevated glucose readings measured with glucose dehydrogenase pyrroloquinolinequinone (GDH-PQQ) test strips. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We conducted a review of the Food and Drug Administration's Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience database and medical literature for adverse events (AEs) associated with falsely elevated glucose readings with GDH-PQQ test strips in the presence of interfering sugars. RESULTS Eighty-two reports were identified: 16 (20%) were associated with death, 46 (56%) with severe hypoglycemia, and 12 (15%) with nonsevere hypoglycemia. In eight reports (10%), the AE was not described. Forty-two events (51%) occurred in the U.S. Although most events occurred in hospitalized patients, at least 14 (17%) occurred in outpatients. Agents most commonly associated with AEs were icodextrin-containing peritoneal dialysate and maltose-containing intravenous immune globulin. CONCLUSIONS GDH-PQQ test strips pose a safety risk to insulin-using patients treated with agents containing or metabolized to interfering sugars. PMID:20351227

  4. Rhesus monkeys kidney cells persistently infected with Simian Virus 40: production of defective interfering virus and acquisition of the transformed phenotype.

    PubMed

    Norkin, L C

    1976-09-01

    Monolayer cultures of LLC-MK2 rhesus monkey kidney cells became persistently infected with simian virus 40 (SV40) when infected at a multiplicity of infection of 100 plaque-forming units/cell. A stable carrier state developed characterized by extensive viral proliferation without obvious cytopathic effect other than the slow growth of these cultures. By 11 weeks all cells produced the SV40 T antigen. In contrast, less than 5% of the cells produced V antigen. Virus-free clonal isolates were obtained by cloning in SV40 antiserum. Continuous cultivation in antiserum resulted in a temporary cure of unclone cultures. When virus did eventually reappear in the "cured" cultures the titers remained low. The virus produced by the carrier culture was defective at both 31 and 37% c, and it interfered with the growth of standard s40 during mixed infection of CV-1 green monkey kidney cells. All of the interfering activity in carrier culture homogenates could be sedimented by centrifugation at 109,000 x g for 3 h. These cultures were completely susceptible to vesicular stomatitis virus. Extensive viral deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis occurred in CV-1 cells infected with carrier culture virus. Carrier culture homogenates are only slightly less cytopathic to CV-1 cells than standard SV40. The carrier culture express several properties of SV40 transformation.

  5. FIA-automated system used to electrochemically measure nitrite and its interfering chemicals through a 1-2 DAB / Au electrode: gain of sensitivity at upper potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, F. L.; dos Santos Filho, S. G.; Fontes, M. B. A.

    2013-03-01

    The measurement of nitrite and its interfering-chemicals (paracetamol, ascorbic acid and uric acid) was performed employing a Flow-injection Analysis (FIA) system, which was automated using solenoid valves and air-pump. It is very important to quantify nitrite from river water, food and biologic fluids due to its antibacterial capacity in moderated concentrations, or its toxicity for human health even at low concentrations (> 20 μmol L-1 in blood fluids). Electrodes of the electrochemical planar sensor were defined by silk-screen technology. The measuring electrode was made from gold paste covered with 1-2 cis Diaminobenzene (DAB), which allowed good selectivity, linearity, repeatability, stability and optimized gain of sensitivity at 0.5 VAg/AgCl Nafion®117 (6.93 μA mol-1 L mm-2) compared to 0.3 VAg/AgCl Nafion® 117. The reference electrode was obtained from silver/palladium paste modified with chloride and covered with Nafion® 117. The auxiliary electrode was made from platinum paste. It was noteworthy that nitrite response adds to the response of the studied interfering-chemicals and it is predominant for concentrations lower than 175 μmol L-1.

  6. Novel spectrophotometric determination of chloramphenicol and dexamethasone in the presence of non labeled interfering substances using univariate methods and multivariate regression model updating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegazy, Maha A.; Lotfy, Hayam M.; Rezk, Mamdouh R.; Omran, Yasmin Rostom

    2015-04-01

    Smart and novel spectrophotometric and chemometric methods have been developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of a binary mixture of chloramphenicol (CPL) and dexamethasone sodium phosphate (DSP) in presence of interfering substances without prior separation. The first method depends upon derivative subtraction coupled with constant multiplication. The second one is ratio difference method at optimum wavelengths which were selected after applying derivative transformation method via multiplying by a decoding spectrum in order to cancel the contribution of non labeled interfering substances. The third method relies on partial least squares with regression model updating. They are so simple that they do not require any preliminary separation steps. Accuracy, precision and linearity ranges of these methods were determined. Moreover, specificity was assessed by analyzing synthetic mixtures of both drugs. The proposed methods were successfully applied for analysis of both drugs in their pharmaceutical formulation. The obtained results have been statistically compared to that of an official spectrophotometric method to give a conclusion that there is no significant difference between the proposed methods and the official ones with respect to accuracy and precision.

  7. Novel spectrophotometric determination of chloramphenicol and dexamethasone in the presence of non labeled interfering substances using univariate methods and multivariate regression model updating.

    PubMed

    Hegazy, Maha A; Lotfy, Hayam M; Rezk, Mamdouh R; Omran, Yasmin Rostom

    2015-04-01

    Smart and novel spectrophotometric and chemometric methods have been developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of a binary mixture of chloramphenicol (CPL) and dexamethasone sodium phosphate (DSP) in presence of interfering substances without prior separation. The first method depends upon derivative subtraction coupled with constant multiplication. The second one is ratio difference method at optimum wavelengths which were selected after applying derivative transformation method via multiplying by a decoding spectrum in order to cancel the contribution of non labeled interfering substances. The third method relies on partial least squares with regression model updating. They are so simple that they do not require any preliminary separation steps. Accuracy, precision and linearity ranges of these methods were determined. Moreover, specificity was assessed by analyzing synthetic mixtures of both drugs. The proposed methods were successfully applied for analysis of both drugs in their pharmaceutical formulation. The obtained results have been statistically compared to that of an official spectrophotometric method to give a conclusion that there is no significant difference between the proposed methods and the official ones with respect to accuracy and precision.

  8. Toll-like receptor 9 agonist IMO cooperates with everolimus in renal cell carcinoma by interfering with tumour growth and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Damiano, V; Rosa, R; Formisano, L; Nappi, L; Gelardi, T; Marciano, R; Cozzolino, I; Troncone, G; Agrawal, S; Veneziani, B M; De Placido, S; Bianco, R; Tortora, G

    2013-01-01

    Background: Targeting the mammalian target of rapamycin by everolimus is a successful approach for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) therapy. The Toll-like receptor 9 agonist immune modulatory oligonucleotide (IMO) exhibits direct antitumour and antiangiogenic activity and cooperates with both epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitors. Methods: We tested the combination of IMO and everolimus on models of human RCC with different Von-Hippel Lindau (VHL) gene status, both in vitro and in nude mice. We studied their direct antiangiogenic effects on human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Results: Both IMO and everolimus inhibited in vitro growth and survival of RCC cell lines, and their combination produced a synergistic inhibitory effect. Moreover, everolimus plus IMO interfered with EGFR-dependent signaling and reduced VEGF secretion in both VHL wild-type and mutant cells. In RCC tumour xenografts, IMO plus everolimus caused a potent and long-lasting cooperative antitumour activity, with reduction of tumour growth, prolongation of mice survival and inhibition of signal transduction. Furthermore, IMO and everolimus impaired the main endothelial cell functions. Conclusion: A combined treatment with everolimus and IMO is effective in VHL wild-type and mutant models of RCC by interfering with tumour growth and angiogenesis, thus representing a potentially effective, rationale-based combination to be translated in the clinical setting. PMID:23571736

  9. Small Scale Organic Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horak, V.; Crist, DeLanson R.

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the advantages of using small scale experimentation in the undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory. Describes small scale filtration techniques as an example of a semi-micro method applied to small quantities of material. (MLH)

  10. Small bowel resection

    MedlinePlus

    Small intestine surgery; Bowel resection - small intestine; Resection of part of the small intestine; Enterectomy ... her hand inside your belly to feel the intestine or remove the diseased segment. Your belly is ...

  11. Small bowel bacterial overgrowth

    MedlinePlus

    Overgrowth - intestinal bacteria; Bacterial overgrowth - intestine; Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth; SIBO ... Most of the time, the small intestine does not have a high number ... in the small intestine may use up the nutrients needed by the ...

  12. Lung cancer - small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  13. Small RNA profiles from virus-infected fresh market vegetables.

    PubMed

    Frizzi, Alessandra; Zhang, Yuanji; Kao, John; Hagen, Charles; Huang, Shihshieh

    2014-12-10

    Functional small RNAs, such as short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs), exist in freshly consumed fruits and vegetables. These siRNAs can be derived either from endogenous sequences or from viruses that infect them. Symptomatic tomatoes, watermelons, zucchini, and onions were purchased from grocery stores and investigated by small RNA sequencing. By aligning the obtained small RNA sequences to sequences of known viruses, four different viruses were identified as infecting these fruits and vegetables. Many of these virally derived small RNAs along with endogenous small RNAs were found to be highly complementary to human genes. However, the established history of safe consumption of these vegetables suggests that this sequence homology has little biological relevance. By extension, these results provide evidence for the safe use by humans and animals of genetically engineered crops using RNA-based suppression technologies, especially vegetable crops with virus resistance conferred by expression of siRNAs or miRNAs derived from viral sequences. PMID:25389086

  14. Corticosterone suppresses vasotocin-enhanced clasping behavior in male rough-skinned newts by novel mechanisms interfering with V1a receptor availability and receptor-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Davis, Audrey; Abraham, Emily; McEvoy, Erin; Sonnenfeld, Sarah; Lewis, Christine; Hubbard, Catherine S; Dolence, E Kurt; Rose, James D; Coddington, Emma

    2015-03-01

    In rough-skinned newts, Taricha granulosa, exposure to an acute stressor results in the rapid release of corticosterone (CORT), which suppresses the ability of vasotocin (VT) to enhance clasping behavior. CORT also suppresses VT-induced spontaneous activity and sensory responsiveness of clasp-controlling neurons in the rostromedial reticular formation (Rf). The cellular mechanisms underlying this interaction remain unclear. We hypothesized that CORT blocks VT-enhanced clasping by interfering with V1a receptor availability and/or VT-induced endocytosis. We administered a physiologically active fluorescent VT conjugated to Oregon Green (VT-OG) to the fourth ventricle 9 min after an intraperitoneal injection of CORT (0, 10, 40 μg/0.1mL amphibian Ringers). The brains were collected 30 min post-VT-OG, fixed, and imaged with confocal microscopy. CORT diminished the number of endocytosed vesicles, percent area containing VT-OG, sum intensity of VT-OG, and the amount of VT-V1a within each vesicle; indicating that CORT was interfering with V1a receptor availability and VT-V1a receptor-mediated endocytosis. CORT actions were brain location-specific and season-dependent in a manner that is consistent with the natural and context-dependent expression of clasping behavior. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the Rf to CORT was much higher in animals during the breeding season, arguing for ethologically appropriate seasonal variation in CORT's ability to prevent VT-induced endocytosis. Our data are consistent with the time course and interaction effects of CORT and VT on clasping behavior and neurophysiology. CORT interference with VT-induced endocytosis may be a common mechanism employed by hormones across taxa for mediating rapid context- and season-specific behavioral responses.

  15. Dynamique et interférence de paquets d'ondes dans les atomes et dimères d'alcalins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchene, M. A.

    2002-11-01

    (saturation regime, chirped pulse, ...) that allow us to determine the advantages and limits of this technique. In the case of molecules, the interaction of the two-pulse sequence leads to the interference of vibrational wave packets. We analyse and discuss in this case the effects of a thermal distribution of initial states on the temporal coherent control signal. Ce travail porte sur l'étude expérimentale résolue en temps de la dynamique atomique et moléculaire prenant place sur une échelle de temps femtoseconde. Il présente deux orientations distinctes et complémentaires. La première concerne l'étude de la dynamique de paquets d'ondes dans des atomes et dimères d'alcalins (K, K2) par des méthodes pompe-sonde. Dans le cas du potassium atomique le paquet d'ondes est une superposition des états de structure fine de l'état 4p et représente un paquet de spin électronique. Nous observons la dynamique de ce paquet d'ondes au cours du temps et montrons que celle-ci correspond à une inversion du sens d'orientation du spin. Le formalisme théorique des états brillants et noirs est particulièrement adapté à la description de ce type de dynamique. Nous présentons alors une méthode originale qui, tirant avantage du mouvement d'inversion du spin, permet de produire des électrons polarisés en spin à l'échelle femtoseconde. Dans le cas des molécules, le paquet d'ondes créé est une superposition d'états vibrationnels. Nous présentons les résultats d'une étude systématique de la dynamique de paquet d'ondes vibrationnel dans les états électroniques A^1Σ^+_u et 2^1Pi_g. Le signal pompe-sonde dépend alors de la compétition entre les dynamiques associées aux paquets d'ondes créés dans les deux états électroniques. La deuxième partie traite d'expériences d'interférences de paquets d'ondes dans des systèmes similaires (K, Cs, Cs2). Cette technique, complémentaire de la première, consiste à faire interagir une séquence de deux impulsions

  16. Small Claims Court.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKitric, Eloise; Davis, Janet

    The study examined individuals and companies who used small claims courts and the results of decisions reached in small claims cases. A review of studies including an empirical study of two Ohio small claims courts monitored for 12 months made it clear that small claims courts need to be examined to determine if utilization and accessibility to…

  17. Correction partielle des Effets de la Turbulence atmosphérique en Interférométrie optique: Traitement des Données et Développement d'Optiques adaptatives pour l'Interféromètre GI2T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vérinaud, Christophe

    2000-11-01

    Dans le domaine de la haute résolution angulaire en astronomie, les techniques de l'interférométrie optique et de l'optique adaptative sont en plein essor. La principale limitation de l'interférométrie est laturbulence atmosphérique qui entraîne des pertes de cohérence importantes, préjudiciables à la sensibilité et à la précision des mesures. L'optique adaptative appliquée à l'interférométrie va permettre un gain en sensibilité considérable. Le but de cette thèse est l'étude de l'influence de l'optique adaptative sur les mesures interférométriques et son application au Grand Interféromètre à DeuxTélescopes (GI2T) situé sur le Mont Calern dans le sud de la France. Deux problèmes principaux sont étudiés de manière théorique par des développements analytiques et des simulations numériques: le premier est le contrôle en temps réel de la variation des différences de marche optique, encore appelée piston différentiel, induite par l'optique adaptative ; le deuxième problème important est la calibration des mesures de contraste des franges dans le cas de la correction partielle. Je limite mon étude au cas d'un interféromètre multi-modes en courtes poses, mode de fonctionnement principal du GI2T également prévu sur le Very Large Telescope Interferometer installé au Cerro Paranal au Chili. Je développe une méthode de calibration des pertes de cohérence spatio-temporelles connaissant la fonction de structure des fronts d'onde corrigés. Je montre en particulier qu'il est possible d'estimer fréquence par fréquence la densité spectrale des images en courtes poses, méthode très utile pour augmenter la couverture du plan des fréquences spatiales dans l'observation d'objets étendus. La dernière partie de ce mémoire est consacrée au développements instrumentaux auxquels j'ai participé. J'ai développé un banc de qualification du système d'optique adaptative à courbure destiné au GI2T et j'ai étudié l

  18. A Monoclonal Antibody (MCPR3-7) Interfering with the Activity of Proteinase 3 by an Allosteric Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Hinkofer, Lisa C.; Seidel, Susanne A. I.; Korkmaz, Brice; Silva, Francisco; Hummel, Amber M.; Braun, Dieter; Jenne, Dieter E.; Specks, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Proteinase 3 (PR3) is an abundant serine protease of neutrophil granules and a major target of autoantibodies (PR3 anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies) in granulomatosis with polyangiitis. Some of the PR3 synthesized by promyelocytes in the bone marrow escapes the targeting to granules and occurs on the plasma membrane of naive and primed neutrophils. This membrane-associated PR3 antigen may represent pro-PR3, mature PR3, or both forms. To discriminate between mature PR3 and its inactive zymogen, which have different conformations, we generated and identified a monoclonal antibody called MCPR3-7. It bound much better to pro-PR3 than to mature PR3. This monoclonal antibody greatly reduced the catalytic activity of mature PR3 toward extended peptide substrates. Using diverse techniques and multiple recombinant PR3 variants, we characterized its binding properties and found that MCPR3-7 preferentially bound to the so-called activation domain of the zymogen and changed the conformation of mature PR3, resulting in impaired catalysis and inactivation by α1-proteinase inhibitor (α1-antitrypsin). Noncovalent as well as covalent complexation between PR3 and α1-proteinase inhibitor was delayed in the presence of MCPR3-7, but cleavage of certain thioester and paranitroanilide substrates with small residues in the P1 position was not inhibited. We conclude that MCPR3-7 reduces PR3 activity by an allosteric mechanism affecting the S1′ pocket and further prime side interactions with substrates. In addition, MCPR3-7 prevents binding of PR3 to cellular membranes. Inhibitory antibodies targeting the activation domain of PR3 could be exploited as highly selective inhibitors of PR3, scavengers, and clearers of the PR3 autoantigen in granulomatosis with polyangiitis. PMID:23902773

  19. Small RNAs in angiosperms: sequence characteristics, distribution and generation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dijun; Meng, Yijun; Ma, Xiaoxia; Mao, Chuanzao; Bai, Youhuang; Cao, Junjie; Gu, Haibin; Wu, Ping; Chen, Ming

    2010-06-01

    High-throughput sequencing (HTS) has opened up a new era for small RNA (sRNA) exploration. Using HTS data for a global survey of sRNAs in 26 angiosperms, elevated GC contents were detected in the monocots, whereas the 5(')-terminal compositions were quite uniform among the angiosperms. Chromosome-wide distribution patterns of sRNAs were investigated by using scrolling-window analysis. We performed de novo natural antisense transcript (NAT) prediction, and found that the overlapping regions of trans-NATs, but not cis-NATs, were hotspots for sRNA generation. One cis-NAT generates phased natural antisense short interfering RNAs (nat-siRNAs) specifically from flowers in Arabidopsis, while one in rice produces phased nat-siRNAs from grains, suggesting their organ-specific regulatory roles. PMID:20378553

  20. Small RNAs in angiosperms: sequence characteristics, distribution and generation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dijun; Meng, Yijun; Ma, Xiaoxia; Mao, Chuanzao; Bai, Youhuang; Cao, Junjie; Gu, Haibin; Wu, Ping; Chen, Ming

    2010-06-01

    High-throughput sequencing (HTS) has opened up a new era for small RNA (sRNA) exploration. Using HTS data for a global survey of sRNAs in 26 angiosperms, elevated GC contents were detected in the monocots, whereas the 5(')-terminal compositions were quite uniform among the angiosperms. Chromosome-wide distribution patterns of sRNAs were investigated by using scrolling-window analysis. We performed de novo natural antisense transcript (NAT) prediction, and found that the overlapping regions of trans-NATs, but not cis-NATs, were hotspots for sRNA generation. One cis-NAT generates phased natural antisense short interfering RNAs (nat-siRNAs) specifically from flowers in Arabidopsis, while one in rice produces phased nat-siRNAs from grains, suggesting their organ-specific regulatory roles.

  1. Transcriptional evidence for small RNA regulation of pupal diapause in the flesh fly, Sarcophaga bullata.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Julie A; Clark, Jennifer; Diakoff, Stephen J; Denlinger, David L

    2013-10-01

    Understanding the molecular basis of diapause, a phenotypically plastic, alternative developmental pathway, is key to predicting the seasonal distribution of economically and medically important insect species. Small regulatory RNAs, including piwi-related RNAs, small-interfering RNAs, and miRNAs, represent one type of epigenetic process that can alter the phenotype of organisms independent of changes in genome sequence. We hypothesize that small RNAs regulate pupal diapause and a maternal block of diapause in the flesh fly Sarcophaga bullata. We assessed the relative abundance of eight genes related to small RNA biogenesis and function using qRT-PCR in pre-diapause and diapause stages compared to their non-diapause counterparts. Elevated mRNA expression of piwi and spindle-E, as well as argonaute2 and r2d2, in photosensitive 1st instar larvae reared in diapause-inducing conditions indicate involvement of the piwi-associated RNA and small-interfering RNA pathways, respectively, in programming the switch from direct development to a developmental pathway that includes diapause. Two genes, related to the microRNA pathway, argonaute1 and loquacious, are upregulated during pupal diapause, suggesting a role for this pathway in maintaining diapause. Substantial reduction in transcript abundance of small RNA-related genes in photosensitive 1st instar larvae from mothers with a diapause history compared to those from mothers with no diapause history also suggest a role for small RNA pathways in regulating a diapause maternal effect in S. bullata. Together, the results point to a role for small RNAs in regulating the developmental trajectory in this species.

  2. Small bowel resection - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Eat small amounts of food several times a day. DO NOT eat 3 big meals. You should: Space out your small meals. Wait the same amount of time between each one. Add new foods back into your diet slowly, one ...

  3. Small Intestine Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your small intestine is the longest part of your digestive system - about twenty feet long! It connects your stomach to ... many times to fit inside your abdomen. Your small intestine does most of the digesting of the foods ...

  4. Small Business Pedagogic Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billett, Stephen; Hernon-Tinning, Barnie; Ehrich, Lisa

    2003-01-01

    Understanding how learning for small businesses should best proceed constitutes a worthwhile, yet challenging, pedagogic project. In order to maintain their viability, small businesses need to be able to respond to new practices and tasks. Yet small businesses seem neither attracted to nor to value the kinds of taught courses that are the standard…

  5. Small Colleges, Big Missions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, W. A., Jr., Ed.

    This monograph by the members of the American Association of Community Colleges' Commission on Small and/or Rural Community Colleges shares small and rural community college experiences. In "Leaders through Community Service," Jacqueline D. Taylor provides a model for how small and rural community colleges can be involved in building leaders…

  6. Cytoskeleton-Dependent Transport as a Potential Target for Interfering with Post-transcriptional HuR mRNA Regulons.

    PubMed

    Eberhardt, Wolfgang; Badawi, Amel; Biyanee, Abhiruchi; Pfeilschifter, Josef

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitous mRNA binding protein human antigen R (HuR), a member of the embryonal lethal abnormal vision protein family has a critical impact on the post-transcriptional control of AU-rich element bearing mRNA regulons implied in inflammation, senescence, and carcinogenesis. HuR in addition to mRNA stability can affect many other aspects of mRNA processing including splicing, polyadenylation, translation, modulation of miRNA repression, and intracellular mRNA trafficking. Since many of the identified HuR mRNA targets ("HuR mRNA regulons") encode tumor-related proteins, HuR is not only discussed as an useful biomarker but also as promising therapeutic target for treatment of various human cancers. HuR which is most abundantly localized in the nucleus is translocated to the cytoplasm which is fundamental for most of the described HuR functions on target mRNAs. Accordingly, an elevation in cytoplasmic HuR was found in many tumors and correlated with a high grade of malignancy and a poor prognosis of patients. Therefore, direct interference with the intracellular trafficking of HuR offers an attractive approach to intervene with pathologically deregulated HuR functions. Data from several laboratories implicate that the integrity of the cytoskeleton is critical for HuR-mediated intracellular mRNA localization and translation. This review will particularly focus on drugs which have proven a direct inhibitory effect on HuR translocation. Based on the results from those studies, we will also discuss on the principle value of targeting cytoskeleton-dependent transport of HuR by natural or synthetic inhibitors as a potential therapeutic avenue for interfering with dysregulated post-transcriptional HuR mRNA regulons and related tumor cell functions. In spite of that, interfering with cytoplasmic HuR transport could highlight a so far underestimated action of microtubule inhibitors clinically used for cancer chemotherapy. PMID:27582706

  7. Cytoskeleton-Dependent Transport as a Potential Target for Interfering with Post-transcriptional HuR mRNA Regulons.

    PubMed

    Eberhardt, Wolfgang; Badawi, Amel; Biyanee, Abhiruchi; Pfeilschifter, Josef

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitous mRNA binding protein human antigen R (HuR), a member of the embryonal lethal abnormal vision protein family has a critical impact on the post-transcriptional control of AU-rich element bearing mRNA regulons implied in inflammation, senescence, and carcinogenesis. HuR in addition to mRNA stability can affect many other aspects of mRNA processing including splicing, polyadenylation, translation, modulation of miRNA repression, and intracellular mRNA trafficking. Since many of the identified HuR mRNA targets ("HuR mRNA regulons") encode tumor-related proteins, HuR is not only discussed as an useful biomarker but also as promising therapeutic target for treatment of various human cancers. HuR which is most abundantly localized in the nucleus is translocated to the cytoplasm which is fundamental for most of the described HuR functions on target mRNAs. Accordingly, an elevation in cytoplasmic HuR was found in many tumors and correlated with a high grade of malignancy and a poor prognosis of patients. Therefore, direct interference with the intracellular trafficking of HuR offers an attractive approach to intervene with pathologically deregulated HuR functions. Data from several laboratories implicate that the integrity of the cytoskeleton is critical for HuR-mediated intracellular mRNA localization and translation. This review will particularly focus on drugs which have proven a direct inhibitory effect on HuR translocation. Based on the results from those studies, we will also discuss on the principle value of targeting cytoskeleton-dependent transport of HuR by natural or synthetic inhibitors as a potential therapeutic avenue for interfering with dysregulated post-transcriptional HuR mRNA regulons and related tumor cell functions. In spite of that, interfering with cytoplasmic HuR transport could highlight a so far underestimated action of microtubule inhibitors clinically used for cancer chemotherapy.

  8. Cytoskeleton-Dependent Transport as a Potential Target for Interfering with Post-transcriptional HuR mRNA Regulons

    PubMed Central

    Eberhardt, Wolfgang; Badawi, Amel; Biyanee, Abhiruchi; Pfeilschifter, Josef

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitous mRNA binding protein human antigen R (HuR), a member of the embryonal lethal abnormal vision protein family has a critical impact on the post-transcriptional control of AU-rich element bearing mRNA regulons implied in inflammation, senescence, and carcinogenesis. HuR in addition to mRNA stability can affect many other aspects of mRNA processing including splicing, polyadenylation, translation, modulation of miRNA repression, and intracellular mRNA trafficking. Since many of the identified HuR mRNA targets (“HuR mRNA regulons”) encode tumor-related proteins, HuR is not only discussed as an useful biomarker but also as promising therapeutic target for treatment of various human cancers. HuR which is most abundantly localized in the nucleus is translocated to the cytoplasm which is fundamental for most of the described HuR functions on target mRNAs. Accordingly, an elevation in cytoplasmic HuR was found in many tumors and correlated with a high grade of malignancy and a poor prognosis of patients. Therefore, direct interference with the intracellular trafficking of HuR offers an attractive approach to intervene with pathologically deregulated HuR functions. Data from several laboratories implicate that the integrity of the cytoskeleton is critical for HuR-mediated intracellular mRNA localization and translation. This review will particularly focus on drugs which have proven a direct inhibitory effect on HuR translocation. Based on the results from those studies, we will also discuss on the principle value of targeting cytoskeleton-dependent transport of HuR by natural or synthetic inhibitors as a potential therapeutic avenue for interfering with dysregulated post-transcriptional HuR mRNA regulons and related tumor cell functions. In spite of that, interfering with cytoplasmic HuR transport could highlight a so far underestimated action of microtubule inhibitors clinically used for cancer chemotherapy. PMID:27582706

  9. Silencing tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) with short interfering RNA reveals a role for TIMP-1 in hepatic stellate cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Fowell, Andrew J.; Collins, Jane E.; Duncombe, Dale R.; Pickering, Judith A.; Rosenberg, William M.C.; Benyon, R. Christopher

    2011-04-08

    Research highlights: {yields} Myofibroblastic, activated hepatic stellate cells (HSC) play a pivotal role in the development of liver fibrosis. {yields} We used short interfering RNA (siRNA) to investigate the effects of autocrine TIMP-1 and -2 on HSC proliferation. {yields} Specific silencing of TIMP-1, but not TIMP-2, significantly reduces HSC proliferation and is associated with reduced Akt phosphorylation. {yields} TIMP-1 is localised in part to the HSC nucleus. {yields} TIMP-1 might promote liver fibrosis by means other than its previously described anti-apoptotic effect on HSC. -- Abstract: Myofibroblastic, activated hepatic stellate cells (HSC) play a pivotal role in the development of liver fibrosis through the secretion of fibrillar collagens and the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 and -2. TIMPs are believed to promote hepatic fibrosis by inhibiting both matrix degradation and apoptosis of HSC. In other cell types, there is evidence that TIMP-1 has effects on proliferation, however the role of TIMPs in the regulation of HSC proliferation remains unexplored. Therefore, we have used short interfering RNA (siRNA) to investigate the effects of autocrine TIMP-1 and -2 on HSC proliferation. TIMP-1 and -2 siRNA were highly effective, producing peak target protein knockdown compared to negative control siRNA of 92% and 63%, respectively. Specific silencing of TIMP-1, using siRNA, significantly reduced HSC proliferation. TIMP-1 was localised in part to the HSC nucleus and TIMP-1 siRNA resulted in loss of both cytoplasmic and nuclear TIMP-1. Attenuated proliferation was associated with reduced Akt phosphorylation and was partially rescued by addition of recombinant TIMP-1. We have revealed a novel autocrine mitogenic effect of TIMP-1 on HSC, which may involve Akt-dependent and specific nuclear mechanisms of action. We suggest that TIMP-1 might promote liver fibrosis by means other than its previously described anti-apoptotic effect on HSC. Moreover

  10. PACT- and RIG-I-Dependent Activation of Type I Interferon Production by a Defective Interfering RNA Derived from Measles Virus Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Ting-Hin; Kew, Chun; Lui, Pak-Yin; Chan, Chi-Ping; Satoh, Takashi; Akira, Shizuo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The live attenuated measles virus vaccine is highly immunostimulatory. Identification and characterization of its components that activate the innate immune response might provide new strategies and agents for the rational design and development of chemically defined adjuvants. In this study, we report on the activation of type I interferon (IFN) production by a defective interfering (DI) RNA isolated from the Hu-191 vaccine strain of measles virus. We found that the Hu-191 virus induced IFN-β much more potently than the Edmonston strain. In the search for IFN-inducing species in Hu-191, we identified a DI RNA specifically expressed by this strain. This DI RNA, which was of the copy-back type, was predicted to fold into a hairpin structure with a long double-stranded stem region of 206 bp, and it potently induced the expression of IFN-β. Its IFN-β-inducing activity was further enhanced when both cytoplasmic RNA sensor RIG-I and its partner, PACT, were overexpressed. On the contrary, this activity was abrogated in cells deficient in PACT or RIG-I. The DI RNA was found to be associated with PACT in infected cells. In addition, both the 5′-di/triphosphate end and the double-stranded stem region on the DI RNA were essential for its activation of PACT and RIG-I. Taken together, our findings support a model in which a viral DI RNA is sensed by PACT and RIG-I to initiate an innate antiviral response. Our work might also provide a foundation for identifying physiological PACT ligands and developing novel adjuvants or antivirals. IMPORTANCE The live attenuated measles virus vaccine is one of the most successful human vaccines and has largely contained the devastating impact of a highly contagious virus. Identifying the components in this vaccine that stimulate the host immune response and understanding their mechanism of action might help to design and develop better adjuvants, vaccines, antivirals, and immunotherapeutic agents. We identified and characterized

  11. Three groups of transposable elements with contrasting copy number dynamics and host responses in the maize (Zea mays ssp. mays) genome.

    PubMed

    Diez, Concepcion M; Meca, Esteban; Tenaillon, Maud I; Gaut, Brandon S

    2014-04-01

    Most angiosperm nuclear DNA is repetitive and derived from silenced transposable elements (TEs). TE silencing requires substantial resources from the plant host, including the production of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Thus, the interaction between TEs and siRNAs is a critical aspect of both the function and the evolution of plant genomes. Yet the co-evolutionary dynamics between these two entities remain poorly characterized. Here we studied the organization of TEs within the maize (Zea mays ssp mays) genome, documenting that TEs fall within three groups based on the class and copy numbers. These groups included DNA elements, low copy RNA elements and higher copy RNA elements. The three groups varied statistically in characteristics that included length, location, age, siRNA expression and 24:22 nucleotide (nt) siRNA targeting ratios. In addition, the low copy retroelements encompassed a set of TEs that had previously been shown to decrease expression within a 24 nt siRNA biogenesis mutant (mop1). To investigate the evolutionary dynamics of the three groups, we estimated their abundance in two landraces, one with a genome similar in size to that of the maize reference and the other with a 30% larger genome. For all three accessions, we assessed TE abundance as well as 22 nt and 24 nt siRNA content within leaves. The high copy number retroelements are under targeted similarly by siRNAs among accessions, appear to be born of a rapid bust of activity, and may be currently transpositionally dead or limited. In contrast, the lower copy number group of retrolements are targeted more dynamically and have had a long and ongoing history of transposition in the maize genome. PMID:24743518

  12. POZ domain transcription factor, FBI-1, represses transcription of ADH5/FDH by interacting with the zinc finger and interfering with DNA binding activity of Sp1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Kee; Suh, Dongchul; Edenberg, Howard J; Hur, Man-Wook

    2002-07-26

    The POZ domain is a protein-protein interaction motif that is found in many transcription factors, which are important for development, oncogenesis, apoptosis, and transcription repression. We cloned the POZ domain transcription factor, FBI-1, that recognizes the cis-element (bp -38 to -22) located just upstream of the core Sp1 binding sites (bp -22 to +22) of the ADH5/FDH minimal promoter (bp -38 to +61) in vitro and in vivo, as revealed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. The ADH5/FDH minimal promoter is potently repressed by the FBI-1. Glutathione S-transferase fusion protein pull-down showed that the POZ domains of FBI-1, Plzf, and Bcl-6 directly interact with the zinc finger DNA binding domain of Sp1. DNase I footprinting assays showed that the interaction prevents binding of Sp1 to the GC boxes of the ADH5/FDH promoter. Gal4-POZ domain fusions targeted proximal to the GC boxes repress transcription of the Gal4 upstream activator sequence-Sp1-adenovirus major late promoter. Our data suggest that POZ domain represses transcription by interacting with Sp1 zinc fingers and by interfering with the DNA binding activity of Sp1.

  13. An Artificially Designed Interfering lncRNA Expressed by Oncolytic Adenovirus Competitively Consumes OncomiRs to Exert Antitumor Efficacy in Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoya; Su, Yinghan; Sun, Bin; Ji, Weidan; Peng, Zhangxiao; Xu, Yang; Wu, Mengchao; Su, Changqing

    2016-07-01

    Endogenous miRNAs, especially oncogenic miRNAs (OncomiR), have been molecular targets for cancer therapy. We generated an artificially designed interfering long noncoding RNA (lncRNAi), which contains the sequences that can complementarily bind to multiple OncomiRs and is expressed by cancer-selectively replicating adenovirus. The adenovirus-expressed lncRNAi with high levels in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells competes with OncomiR target genes to bind to and consume OncomiRs, thereby achieving the targeted anti-HCC efficacy. With the targeting replication of adenovirus in HCC cells, lncRNAi was highly expressed and resulted in decreased abilities of proliferation, migration, and invasion, induced cell-cycle changes and apoptosis, and markedly changed the cellular mRNA and miRNA expression profiles in HCC cells. The optimal antitumor effect was also demonstrated on HCC cell line xenograft models and HCC patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tumor models in nude mice. This strategy has established a technology platform with a reliable therapeutic effect for HCC therapy. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(7); 1436-51. ©2016 AACR.

  14. Tumor necrosis factor alpha represses bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling by interfering with the DNA binding of Smads through the activation of NF-kappaB.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Masato; Fukushima, Hidefumi; Shin, Masashi; Katagiri, Takenobu; Doi, Takahiro; Takahashi, Tetsu; Jimi, Eijiro

    2009-12-18

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) induce not only bone formation in vivo but also osteoblast differentiation of mesenchymal cells in vitro. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) inhibits both osteoblast differentiation and bone formation induced by BMPs. However, the molecular mechanisms of these inhibitions remain unknown. In this study, we found that TNFalpha inhibited the alkaline phosphatase activity and markedly reduced BMP2- and Smad-induced reporter activity in MC3T3-E1 cells. TNFalpha had no effect on the phosphorylation of Smad1, Smad5, and Smad8 or on the nuclear translocation of the Smad1-Smad4 complex. In p65-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts, overexpression of p65, a subunit of NF-kappaB, inhibited BMP2- and Smad-induced reporter activity in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, this p65-mediated inhibition of BMP2- and Smad-responsive promoter activity was restored after inhibition of NF-kappaB by the overexpression of the dominant negative IkappaBalpha. Although TNFalpha failed to affect receptor-dependent formation of the Smad1-Smad4 complex, p65 associated with the complex. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and electrophoresis mobility shift assays revealed that TNFalpha suppressed the DNA binding of Smad proteins to the target gene. Importantly, the specific NF-kappaB inhibitor, BAY11-7082, abolished these phenomena. These results suggest that TNFalpha inhibits BMP signaling by interfering with the DNA binding of Smads through the activation of NF-kappaB.

  15. Shp-2 contributes to anti-RSV activity in human pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells by interfering with the IFN-α-induced Jak/Stat1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Saisai; Zheng, Gang; Zhao, Lifang; Xu, Feng; Qian, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Src homology phosphotyrosyl phosphatase 2 (Shp-2) is a ubiquitously expressed protein that is involved in a variety of cellular processes, including antiviral interferon signalling pathways. In this study, we investigated the role of Shp-2 in the host cell interactions of human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). We report significant changes in the expression of Shp-2 in human pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells (A549) upon RSV infection. We also report that blocking Shp-2 does not affect viral replication or virus-induced interferon-alpha (IFN-α) production. Interestingly, whereas A549 cells were activated by IFN-α, the blocking of Shp-2 resulted in increased viral replication that was associated with the reduced expression of the IFN-stimulated genes of 2′,5′-oligoadenylate synthetases and Mx1, and the concomitant inhibition of Stat1 tyrosine phosphorylation. Our findings suggest that Shp-2 contributes to the control of RSV replication and progeny production in pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells by interfering with IFN-α-induced Jak/Stat1 pathway activation rather than by affecting the production of IFN-α itself. PMID:26119280

  16. A differentially pumped dual linear quadrupole ion trap (DLQIT) mass spectrometer: a mass spectrometer capable of MS(n) experiments free from interfering reactions.

    PubMed

    Owen, Benjamin C; Jarrell, Tiffany M; Schwartz, Jae C; Oglesbee, Rob; Carlsen, Mark; Archibold, Enada F; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2013-12-01

    A novel differentially pumped dual linear quadrupole ion trap (DLQIT) mass spectrometer was designed and built to facilitate tandem MS experiments free from interfering reactions. The instrument consists of two differentially pumped Thermo Scientific linear quadrupole ion trap (LQIT) systems that have been connected via an ion transfer octupole encased in a machined manifold. Tandem MS experiments can be performed in the front trap and then the resulting product ions can be transferred via axial ejection into the back trap for further, independent tandem MS experiments in a differentially pumped area. This approach allows the examination of consecutive collision-activated dissociation (CAD) and ion-molecule reactions without unwanted side reactions that often occur when CAD and ion-molecule reactions are examined in the same space. Hence, it greatly facilitates investigations of ion structures. In addition, the overall lower pressure of the DLQIT, as compared to commercial LQIT instruments, results in a reduction of unwanted side reactions with atmospheric contaminants, such as water and oxygen, in CAD and ion-molecule experiments. PMID:24171553

  17. Aggravation of radio interference effects on a dual polarized Earth-space link by two adjacent interfering satellites under rain fades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panagopoulos, A. D.; Kritikos, T. D.; Kanellopoulos, J. D.

    2005-10-01

    Interference phenomena affecting the performance and availability of an Earth-space system are of utmost importance for the reliable design of a satellite communication network. Commercial satellite networks operate or will operate at Ku, Ka, and V frequency bands, in which rain is the dominant fading mechanism. Nominal interference induced on an Earth-space link by an adjacent satellite network operating at the same frequency is further aggravated because of the potential existing differential rain attenuation, as well as the rain and ice crystals depolarization valid for a frequency reuse system. In the present paper, an existing model, predicting the degradation of the total carrier-to-interference ratio under rain fade conditions, is properly modified considering interference effects by two adjacent satellites. The method is based on a convective rain cell model and the lognormal assumption for the point rain rate statistics. The obtained numerical results indicate the significant impact of the second interfering satellite on the aggravation of radio interference effects. Also presented are some simple mathematical formulas for the prediction of the carrier-to-interference ratio, based on the above theoretical results, appropriate for use by the system designer for back of the envelope computations.

  18. Effectiveness of Cyantraniliprole for Managing Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) and Interfering with Transmission of Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus on Tomato.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Rafael; Schuster, David J; Peres, Natalia A; Mangandi, Jozer; Hasing, Tomas; Trexler, Fred; Kalb, Steve; Portillo, Héctor E; Marçon, Paula C; Annan, I B

    2015-06-01

    Cyantraniliprole is the second xylem-systemic active ingredient in the new anthranilic diamide class. Greenhouse (2006), growth chamber (2007), and field studies (2009-2010) were conducted to determine the efficacy of cyantraniliprole for managing Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) biotype B and in interfering with transmission of tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) by this whitefly. Cyantraniliprole applied as soil treatments (200 SC) or foliar sprays (100 OD) provided excellent adult whitefly control, TYLCV suppression, and reduced oviposition and nymph survival, comparable to current standards. The positive results observed in these greenhouse experiments with a high level of insect pressure (10× the field threshold of one adult per plant) and disease pressure (five adults per plant, with a high level of confidence that TYLCV virulent adults were used), indicate a great potential for cyantraniliprole to be used in a whitefly management program. Field evaluations of soil drench treatments confirmed the suppression of TYLCV transmission demonstrated in the greenhouse studies. Field studies in 2009 and 2010 showed that cyantraniliprole (200 SC) provided TYLCV suppression for 2 wk after a drench application, when using a susceptible (2009) or imidacloprid-tolerant (2010) whitefly population. Cyantraniliprole was demonstrated to be a promising tool for management of TYLCV in tomato production, which is very difficult and expensive, and which has limited options. The integration of cyantraniliprole into a resistance management program will help to ensure the continued sustainability of this and current insecticides used for the management of insect vectors, including whiteflies and the TYLCV they spreads. PMID:26470209

  19. Exogenous carbon monoxide inhibits neutrophil infiltration in LPS-induced sepsis by interfering with FPR1 via p38 MAPK but not GRK2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Qin, Weiting; Song, Mingming; Zhang, Yisen; Sun, Bingwei

    2016-06-01

    Excessive neutrophil infiltration in vital organs is life-threatening to patients who suffer from sepsis. We identified a critical role of exogenous carbon monoxide (CO) in the inhibition of neutrophil infiltration during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced sepsis. CO delivered from carbon monoxide-releasing molecule 2 (CORM-2) dramatically increased the survival rate of C57BL/6 mice subjected to LPS in vivo. CORM-2 significantly suppressed neutrophil infiltration in liver and lung as well as markers of inflammatory responses. Affymetrix GeneChip array analysis revealed that the increased expression of chemoattractant receptor formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) may contribute to the excessive neutrophil infiltration. The under agarose migration assay demonstrated that LPS stimulation promoted migration to the ligand of FPR1, N-Formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP) but that CORM-2 treatment inhibited this promotion. Further studies demonstrated that CORM-2 internalized FPR1 by inhibiting p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) but not G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2), which may explain the inhibitory effect of CORM-2 on LPS-stimulated neutrophils. In summary, our study demonstrates that exogenous CO inhibits sepsis-induced neutrophil infiltration by interfering with FPR1 via p38 MAPK but not GRK2.

  20. Improvement of an automatic HPLC system for nitropolycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: removal of an interfering peak and increase in the number of analytes.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ning; Toriba, Akira; Kizu, Ryoichi; Hayakawa, Kazuichi

    2003-02-01

    An automatic HPLC system for analyzing nitropolycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAHs, nitroarenes) in airborne particulates was previously described (Anal. Chim. Acta, 2001, 445, 20). Some problems with this system were that it generated a peak originating from an ascorbic acid solution that elutes at a retention time close to that of 1,6-dinitropyrene (DNP), and that it was able to analyze only 1,3-, 1,6-, 1,8-DNPs and 1-nitropyrene (I-NP). Here, we describe an improved system that effectively removes the interfering peak by introducing an ODS column just after the pump for the ascorbic acid solution, and which is capable of analyzing several additional compounds (2-, 4-NPs, 2-nitrofluorene. 6-nitrochrysene, 7-nitrobenz[a]anthracene, 3-nitroperylene and 6-nitrobenzo[a]pyrene etc.). The improved sensitivities were achieved by concentrating the compounds in a benzene-ethanol extract from airborne particulates, by increasing the loading time of the sample solution from 20 to 38 min, and by increasing the flow rate of an ascorbic acid solution from 1.3 to 1.8 mL/min. PMID:12608754

  1. Exogenous carbon monoxide inhibits neutrophil infiltration in LPS-induced sepsis by interfering with FPR1 via p38 MAPK but not GRK2

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Qin, Weiting; Song, Mingming; Zhang, Yisen; Sun, Bingwei

    2016-01-01

    Excessive neutrophil infiltration in vital organs is life-threatening to patients who suffer from sepsis. We identified a critical role of exogenous carbon monoxide (CO) in the inhibition of neutrophil infiltration during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced sepsis. CO delivered from carbon monoxide-releasing molecule 2 (CORM-2) dramatically increased the survival rate of C57BL/6 mice subjected to LPS in vivo. CORM-2 significantly suppressed neutrophil infiltration in liver and lung as well as markers of inflammatory responses. Affymetrix GeneChip array analysis revealed that the increased expression of chemoattractant receptor formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) may contribute to the excessive neutrophil infiltration. The under agarose migration assay demonstrated that LPS stimulation promoted migration to the ligand of FPR1, N-Formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP) but that CORM-2 treatment inhibited this promotion. Further studies demonstrated that CORM-2 internalized FPR1 by inhibiting p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) but not G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2), which may explain the inhibitory effect of CORM-2 on LPS-stimulated neutrophils. In summary, our study demonstrates that exogenous CO inhibits sepsis-induced neutrophil infiltration by interfering with FPR1 via p38 MAPK but not GRK2. PMID:27144520

  2. Rapid and Efficient Isolation of High-Quality Small RNAs from Recalcitrant Plant Species Rich in Polyphenols and Polysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Jinji; Guo, Jianrong; Fan, Zaifeng

    2014-01-01

    Small RNAs, including microRNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), are important regulators of plant development and gene expression. The acquisition of high-quality small RNAs is the first step in the study of its expression and function analysis, yet the extraction method of small RNAs in recalcitrant plant tissues with various secondary metabolites is not well established, especially for tropical and subtropical plant species rich in polysaccharides and polyphenols. Here, we developed a simple and efficient method for high quality small RNAs extraction from recalcitrant plant species. Prior to RNA isolation, a precursory step with a CTAB-PVPP buffer system could efficiently remove compounds and secondary metabolites interfering with RNAs from homogenized lysates. Then, total RNAs were extracted by Trizol reagents followed by a differential precipitation of high-molecular-weight (HMW) RNAs using polyethylene glycol (PEG) 8000. Finally, small RNAs could be easily recovered from supernatant by ethanol precipitation without extra elimination steps. The isolated small RNAs from papaya showed high quality through a clear background on gel and a distinct northern blotting signal with miR159a probe, compared with other published protocols. Additionally, the small RNAs extracted from papaya were successfully used for validation of both predicted miRNAs and the putative conserved tasiARFs. Furthermore, the extraction method described here was also tested with several other subtropical and tropical plant tissues. The purity of the isolated small RNAs was sufficient for such applications as end-point stem-loop RT-PCR and northern blotting analysis, respectively. The simple and feasible extraction method reported here is expected to have excellent potential for isolation of small RNAs from recalcitrant plant tissues rich in polyphenols and polysaccharides. PMID:24787387

  3. Combination of small RNAs for skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kim, NaJung; Yoo, James J; Atala, Anthony; Lee, Sang Jin

    2016-03-01

    Selectively controlling the expression of the target genes through RNA interference (RNAi) has significant therapeutic potential for injuries or diseases of tissues. We used this strategy to accelerate and enhance skeletal muscle regeneration for the treatment of muscular atrophy. In this study, we used myostatin small interfering (si)RNA (siGDF-8), a major inhibitory factor in the development and postnatal regeneration of skeletal muscle and muscle-specific microRNAs (miR-1 and -206) to further accelerate muscle regeneration. This combination of 3 small RNAs significantly improved the gene expression of myogenic regulatory factors in vitro, suggesting myogenic activation. Moreover, cell proliferation and myotube formation improved without compromising each other, which indicates the myogenic potential of this combination of small RNAs. The recovery of chemically injured tibialis anterior muscles in rats was significantly accelerated, both functionally and structurally. This novel combination of siRNA and miRNAs has promising therapeutic potential to improve in situ skeletal muscle regeneration.

  4. Development of Small RNA Delivery Systems for Lung Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Yu; Kuwano, Kazuyoshi; Ochiya, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has emerged as a powerful tool for studying target identification and holds promise for the development of therapeutic gene silencing. Recent advances in RNAi delivery and target selection provide remarkable opportunities for translational medical research. The induction of RNAi relies on small silencing RNAs, which affect specific messenger RNA (mRNA) degradation. Two types of small RNA molecules, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs), have a central function in RNAi technology. The success of RNAi-based therapeutic delivery may be dependent upon uncovering a delivery route, sophisticated delivery carriers, and nucleic acid modifications. Lung cancer is still the leading cause of cancer death worldwide, for which novel therapeutic strategies are critically needed. Recently, we have reported a novel platform (PnkRNA™ and nkRNA®) to promote naked RNAi approaches through inhalation without delivery vehicles in lung cancer xenograft models. We suggest that a new class of RNAi therapeutic agent and local drug delivery system could also offer a promising RNAi-based strategy for clinical applications in cancer therapy. In this article, we show recent strategies for an RNAi delivery system and suggest the possible clinical usefulness of RNAi-based therapeutics for lung cancer treatment. PMID:25756380

  5. Small turbines, big unknown

    SciTech Connect

    Gipe, P.

    1995-07-01

    While financial markets focus on the wheeling and dealing of the big wind companies, the small wind turbine industry quietly keeps churning out its smaller but effective machines. Some, the micro turbines, are so small they can be carried by hand. Though worldwide sales of small wind turbines fall far short of even one large windpower plant, figures reach $8 million to $10 million annually and could be as much as twice that if batteries and engineering services are included.

  6. Self-Interfering Wave Packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colas, David; Laussy, Fabrice P.

    2016-01-01

    We study the propagation of noninteracting polariton wave packets. We show how two qualitatively different concepts of mass that arise from the peculiar polariton dispersion lead to a new type of particlelike object from noninteracting fields—much like self-accelerating beams—shaped by the Rabi coupling out of Gaussian initial states. A divergence and change of sign of the diffusive mass results in a "mass wall" on which polariton wave packets bounce back. Together with the Rabi dynamics, this yields propagation of ultrafast subpackets and ordering of a spacetime crystal.

  7. Interfering with Bacterial Quorum Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Kerstin; Steinbach, Anke; Helms, Volkhard

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) describes the exchange of chemical signals in bacterial populations to adjust the bacterial phenotypes according to the density of bacterial cells. This serves to express phenotypes that are advantageous for the group and ensure bacterial survival. To do so, bacterial cells synthesize autoinducer (AI) molecules, release them to the environment, and take them up. Thereby, the AI concentration reflects the cell density. When the AI concentration exceeds a critical threshold in the cells, the AI may activate the expression of virulence-associated genes or of luminescent proteins. It has been argued that targeting the QS system puts less selective pressure on these pathogens and should avoid the development of resistant bacteria. Therefore, the molecular components of QS systems have been suggested as promising targets for developing new anti-infective compounds. Here, we review the QS systems of selected gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, namely, Vibrio fischeri, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus, and discuss various antivirulence strategies based on blocking different components of the QS machinery. PMID:26819549

  8. Self-Interfering Wave Packets.

    PubMed

    Colas, David; Laussy, Fabrice P

    2016-01-15

    We study the propagation of noninteracting polariton wave packets. We show how two qualitatively different concepts of mass that arise from the peculiar polariton dispersion lead to a new type of particlelike object from noninteracting fields-much like self-accelerating beams-shaped by the Rabi coupling out of Gaussian initial states. A divergence and change of sign of the diffusive mass results in a "mass wall" on which polariton wave packets bounce back. Together with the Rabi dynamics, this yields propagation of ultrafast subpackets and ordering of a spacetime crystal. PMID:26824554

  9. Is Small Business Doomed?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Business Education Forum, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Provides a sampling of viewpoints from businessmen, economists, futurists, and government experts on the future of small business presented at hearings before the Subcommittee on Antitrust, Consumers, and Employment, Committee on Small Business, House of Representatives. Problems of taxes, the economy, and government regulations are discussed from…

  10. Small Animal Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livesey, Dennis W.; Fong, Stephen

    This small animal care course guide is designed for students who will be seeking employment in veterinary hospitals, kennels, grooming shops, pet shops, and small-animal laboratories. The guide begins with an introductory section that gives the educational philosophy of the course, job categories and opportunities, units of instruction required…

  11. Small Group Inquiry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koller, Martin M.

    Learning in small groups is a practical way to bring about behavior change. The inquiry learning process is perceived to be the most natural and scientific way of learning. Skills developed include those of problem-solving task analysis, decision-making, value formation and adaptability. The art of small group interaction is developed. Factual…

  12. IBM Small Business Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Business Machines Corp., Armonk, NY.

    A telephone survey conducted March 15-22, 1991, examined how small businesses are currently performing. Interviewees were 400 small business owners randomly selected from a Dun and Bradstreet list of companies with 50 or fewer employees. Major findings were as follows: (1) owners were survivors, highly confident in their own abilities, and…

  13. Industrial Education. "Small Engines".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parma City School District, OH.

    Part of a series of curriculum guides dealing with industrial education in junior high schools, this guide provides the student with information and manipulative experiences on small gasoline engines. Included are sections on shop adjustment, safety, small engines, internal combustion, engine construction, four stroke engines, two stroke engines,…

  14. Sensitive Small Area Photometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levenson, M. D.

    1970-01-01

    Describes a simple photometer capable of measuring small light intensities over small areas. The inexpensive, easy-to- construct instrument is intended for use in a student laboratory to measure the light intensities in a diffraction experiment from single or multiple slits. Typical experimental results are presented along with the theoretical…

  15. Big Project, Small Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schon, Jennifer A.; Eitel, Karla B.; Bingaman, Deirdre; Miller, Brant G.; Rittenburg, Rebecca A.

    2014-01-01

    Donnelly, Idaho, is a small town surrounded by private ranches and Forest Service property. Through the center of Donnelly runs Boulder Creek, a small tributary feeding into Cascade Lake Reservoir. Boulder Creek originates from a mountain lake north of Donnelly. Since 1994 it has been listed as "impaired" by the Environmental Protection…

  16. Small Schools, Big Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halsey, R. John

    2011-01-01

    Historically, small schools have played a very important role in the provision of schooling in Australia. Numerically, using an enrollment of 200 or less, small schools represent approximately 45% of the schools in Australia. Population growth and the consequences of this, in particular for food production, water and energy, mean that the…

  17. Veterans in Small Business.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Community and Junior Colleges, Washington, DC. National Small Business Training Network.

    These materials provide information on conducting small business training seminars for veterans. First, a discussion is presented of the development of the guide based on 1983 field testing of the seminar and evaluations conducted by Small Business Administration (SBA) officials, the seminar contracts, and trainers. The next sections deal with the…

  18. Small Wind Information (Postcard)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative maintains a website section devoted to information about small wind turbines for homeowners, ranchers, and small businesses. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to this online resource.

  19. The Small Business Tradition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dicke, Thomas S.

    1996-01-01

    Recognizes and discusses the special place that small business occupies, not only in American history, but also in American thought and culture. Examines the various conflicts between big and small business. Notes that the division of territory, products, and services between the two is largely defined by economies of scale. (MJP)

  20. Identification of small RNAs in late developmental stage of rice anthers.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Tomoaki; Kaneko, Fumi; Kazama, Tomohiko; Suwabe, Keita; Suzuki, Go; Makino, Amane; Mae, Tadahiko; Endo, Makoto; Kawagishi-Kobayashi, Makiko; Watanabe, Masao

    2008-06-01

    Small RNAs including microRNA (miRNA) and small interfering RNA (siRNA) are known as repressors of gene expression. There are many plant proteins involved in small RNA-mediated gene silencing, such as Dicer ribonucleases and RNA-dependent RNA polymerases. However, most of these proteins have been reported to be absent in the late developmental stage of the plant male gamete, pollen. In order to clarify the existence of the small RNAs during maturation of pollen, we cloned and sequenced small RNAs from rice anthers including tricellular pollen. From fifty six candidates of small RNAs, we identified two known miRNAs (miR166 and miR167), eight potential miRNAs, and ten putative heterochromatic siRNAs (hc-siRNAs). RNA gel blot analyses clearly showed that miR166 and miR167 were accumulated in the uninuclear pollen stage of anther development and remained until the tricellular pollen stage. Our cloning and RNA gel blot analyses of small RNAs led us to propose a possible function of small RNA-mediated gene regulation for the development of male gametes in rice.

  1. Technology for small spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This report gives the results of a study by the National Research Council's Panel on Small Spacecraft Technology that reviewed NASA's technology development program for small spacecraft and assessed technology within the U.S. government and industry that is applicable to small spacecraft. The panel found that there is a considerable body of advanced technology currently available for application by NASA and the small spacecraft industry that could provide substantial improvement in capability and cost over those technologies used for current NASA small spacecraft. These technologies are the result of developments by commercial companies, Department of Defense agencies, and to a lesser degree NASA. The panel also found that additional technologies are being developed by these same entities that could provide additional substantial improvement if development is successfully completed. Recommendations for future technology development efforts by NASA across a broad technological spectrum are made.

  2. The Slicer Activity of ARGONAUTE1 Is Required Specifically for the Phasing, Not Production, of Trans-Acting Short Interfering RNAs in Arabidopsis[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Marchais, Antonin; Poulsen, Christian; Hauptmann, Judith; Meister, Gunter

    2016-01-01

    ARGONAUTE1 (AGO1) mediates posttranscriptional silencing by microRNAs (miRNAs) and short interfering RNAS (siRNAs). AGO1-catalyzed RNA cleavage (slicing) represses miRNA targets, but current models also highlight the roles of slicing in formation of siRNAs and siRNA-AGO1 complexes. miRNA-guided slicing is required for biogenesis of phased, trans-acting siRNAs (tasiRNAs), whose cleaved precursor fragments are converted to double-stranded RNA by RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 6 (RDR6). In addition, unwinding of duplex siRNA bound to AGO1 requires passenger strand cleavage in vitro. In this study, we analyze how mutation of four metal ion-coordinating residues of Arabidopsis thaliana AGO1 affects slicer activity in vitro and siRNA function in vivo. We show that while all four residues are required for slicer activity, they do not contribute equally to catalysis. Moreover, passenger strand cleavage is required for assembly of active AGO1-siRNA complexes in vivo, and many AGO1-bound siRNAs are trimmed in the absence of slicer activity. Remarkably, seedlings defective in AGO1 slicer activity produce abundant siRNAs from tasiRNA loci in vivo. These siRNAs depend on RDR6 and SUPPRESSOR OF GENE SILENCING3, but unlike wild-type tasiRNAs, they are unphased. These results demonstrate that slicing is solely required for phase definition of tasiRNAs, and they strongly support recruitment of RDR6 by AGO1 rather than by cleavage fragments. PMID:27354557

  3. Integrative effect of defective interfering RNA accumulation and helper virus attenuation is responsible for the persistent infection of Japanese encephalitis virus in BHK-21 cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo Young; Choi, Eunmi; Jeong, Yong Seok

    2013-11-01

    Persistence of RNA viruses is often, but not always, associated with the production of defective interfering (DI) particles. To investigate possible roles of DI particles and helper viruses in RNA virus persistence, persistent infection with Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) was established in baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) cells. At the 6th and 7th serial undiluted passages of JEV on BHK-21 cells, viral persistence was established spontaneously with DI RNA generation. Seven cell clones exhibiting persistent infection were obtained from the initial BHK-21 cell batches exhibiting JEV persistence, and maintained for over 400 days. Most cell clones produced infectious particles (10(1) -10(5)  PFU/ml) continuously, expressed viral proteins, and resisted homologous superinfection. Two helper viruses, chvBS6-3 and chvBS7-1, were isolated from two of the seven cell clones, and characterized to investigate their roles in JEV persistence. While chvBS6-3 was restored to its full cytopathicity in the absence of DI RNA, chvBS7-1 exhibited almost no cytopathicity, regardless of DI RNA co-replication. Attenuation of chvBS7-1 did not appear to be due to inadequate adsorption or genome replication, but due to inefficient egress of the assembled progeny virions, suggesting altered helper virus emergence during JEV persistence in BHK-21 cells. These observations suggest that at least two mechanisms are involved in JEV persistence; a DI RNA-dependent mechanism, where DI RNA co-replication nullifies the helper virus's cytopathicity, or a DI RNA-independent mechanism, where the helper virus is self-attenuated. This study provides a useful in vitro tool for understanding the mechanisms underlying RNA virus persistent infections.

  4. Tomato cultivar tolerant to Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus infection induces virus-specific short interfering RNA accumulation and defence-associated host gene expression.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Pranav Pankaj; Rai, Neeraj K; Chakraborty, Supriya; Singh, Major; Chandrappa, Prasanna H; Ramesh, Bandarupalli; Chattopadhyay, Debasis; Prasad, Manoj

    2010-07-01

    Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV) infection causes significant yield loss in tomato. The availability of a conventional tolerance source against this virus is limited in tomato. To understand the molecular mechanism of virus tolerance in tomato, the abundance of viral genomic replicative intermediate molecules and virus-directed short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) by the host plant in a naturally tolerant cultivar H-88-78-1 and a susceptible cultivar Punjab Chhuhara at different time points after agroinfection was studied. We report that less abundance of viral replicative intermediate in the tolerant cultivar may have a correlation with a relatively higher accumulation of virus-specific siRNAs. To study defence-related host gene expression in response to ToLCNDV infection, the suppression subtractive hybridization technique was used. A library was prepared from tolerant cultivar H-88-78-1 between ToLCNDV-inoculated and Agrobacterium mock-inoculated plants of this cultivar at 21 days post-inoculation (dpi). A total of 106 nonredundant transcripts was identified and classified into 12 different categories according to their putative functions. By reverse Northern analysis and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), we identified the differential expression pattern of 106 transcripts, 34 of which were up-regulated (>2.5-fold induction). Of these, eight transcripts showed more than four fold induction. qRT-PCR analysis was carried out to obtain comparative expression profiling of these eight transcripts between Punjab Chhuhara and H-88-78-1 on ToLCNDV infection. The expression patterns of these transcripts showed a significant increase in differential expression in the tolerant cultivar, mostly at 14 and 21 dpi, in comparison with that in the susceptible cultivar, as analysed by qRT-PCR. The probable direct and indirect relationship of siRNA accumulation and up-regulated transcripts with the ToLCNDV tolerance mechanism is discussed. PMID

  5. The cytoskeletal inhibitors latrunculin A and blebbistatin exert antitumorigenic properties in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells by interfering with intracellular HuR trafficking.

    PubMed

    Doller, Anke; Badawi, Amel; Schmid, Tobias; Brauss, Thilo; Pleli, Thomas; zu Heringdorf, Dagmar Meyer; Piiper, Albrecht; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Eberhardt, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The impact of the RNA-binding protein HuR for the post-transcriptional deregulation of tumor-relevant genes is well established. Despite of elevations in HuR expression levels, an increase in cytoplasmic HuR abundance in many cases correlates with a high grade of malignancy. Here, we demonstrated that administration of the actin-depolymerizing macrolide latrunculin A, or blebbistatin, an inhibitor of myosin II ATPase activity, caused a dose- and time-dependent reduction in the high cytoplasmic HuR content of HepG2 and Huh7 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. Subcellular fractionation revealed that in addition, both inhibitors strongly attenuated cytoskeletal and membrane-bound HuR abundance and conversely increased the HuR amount in nuclear cell fractions. Concomitant with changes in intracellular HuR localization, both cytoskeletal inhibitors markedly decreased the half-lives of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), cyclin A and cyclin D1 encoding mRNAs resulting in a significant reduction in their expression levels in HepG2 cells. Importantly, a similar reduction in the expression of these HuR targets was achieved by a RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdown of either HuR or nonmuscle myoin IIA. Using polysomal fractionation, we further demonstrate that the decrease in cytoplasmic HuR by latrunculin A or blebbistatin is accompanied by a marked change in the allocation of HuR and its mRNA cargo from polysomes to ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles. Functionally, the basal migration and prostaglandin E2 synthesis are similarly impaired in inhibitor-treated and stable HuR-knockdown HepG2 cells. Our data demonstrate that interfering with the actomyosin-dependent HuR trafficking may comprise a valid therapeutic option for antagonizing pathologic posttranscriptional gene expression by HuR and furthermore emphasize the potential benefit of HuR inhibitory strategies for treatment of HCC.

  6. Sulforaphane reduces vascular inflammation in mice and prevents TNF-α-induced monocyte adhesion to primary endothelial cells through interfering with the NF-κB pathway

    PubMed Central

    Nallasamy, Palanisamy; Si, Hongwei; Babu, Pon Velayutham Anandh; Pan, Dengke; Fu, Yu; Brooke, Elizabeth A.S.; Shah, Halley; Zhen, Wei; Zhu, Hong; Liu, Dongmin; Li, Yunbo; Jia, Zhenquan

    2014-01-01

    Sulforaphane, a naturally-occurring isothiocyanate present in cruciferous vegetables, has received wide attention for its potential to improve vascular function in vitro. However, its effect in vivo and the molecular mechanism of sulforaphane at physiological concentrations remain unclear. Here, we report that a sulforaphane concentration as low as 0.5 μM significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced adhesion of monocytes to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), a key event in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis both in static and under flow conditions. Such physiological concentrations of sulforaphane also significantly suppressed TNF-α-induced production of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), adhesion molecule sVCAM-1 and sE-Selectin, key mediators in the regulation of enhanced endothelial cell-monocyte interaction. Furthermore, sulforaphane inhibited TNF-α-induced NF-κB transcriptional activity, IκBα degradation and subsequent NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation in endothelial cells, suggesting that sulforaphane can inhibit inflammation by suppressing NF-κB signaling. In an animal study, sulforaphane (300 ppm) in a mouse diet significantly abolished TNF-α-increased ex vivo monocyte adhesion and circulating adhesion molecules and chemokines in C57BL/6 mice. Histology showed that sulforaphane treatment significantly prevented the eruption of endothelial lining in the intima layer of the aorta and preserved elastin fibers’ delicate organization as shown by Verhoeff-van Gieson staining. Immunohistochemistry studies showed that sulforaphane treatment also reduced VCAM-1 and monocytes-derived F4/80-positive macrophages in the aorta of TNF-α-treated mice. In conclusion, sulforaphane at physiological concentrations protects against TNF-α-induced vascular endothelial inflammation, in both in vitro and in vivo models. This anti-inflammatory effect of sulforaphane may be, at least in part, associated with interfering with the NF-κB pathway. PMID:24880493

  7. Plumbagin exhibits an anti-proliferative effect in human osteosarcoma cells by downregulating FHL2 and interfering with Wnt/β-catenin signalling

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yuan-Liang; Meng, Xiang-Qi; Ma, Long-Jun; Yuan, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Plumbagin, a naphthoquinone constituent of Plumbago zeylanica L. (Plumbaginaceae) is widely used in traditional Chinese medicine as an antifungal, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory agent. Plumbagin is known to exhibit proapoptotic, antiangiogenic and antimetastatic effects in cancer cells. The transcriptional co-factor four and a half LIM domains 2 (FHL2) is a multifunctional adaptor protein that is involved in the regulation of gene expression, signal transduction and cell proliferation and differentiation, and also acts as a tumor suppressor or oncoprotein depending on the tissue microenvironment. The present study investigated the effect of plumbagin on FHL2 expression, Wnt/β-catenin signalling and its anti-proliferative activity in various human osteosarcoma cell lines, including SaOS2, MG63, HOS and U2OS. The cells were exposed to plumbagin and the expression of FHL2 was evaluated using western blot analysis. Furthermore, the anti-proliferative effect of plumbagin was evaluated using a 3-(4,5 dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. In addition, since FHL2 is involved in Wnt/β-catenin signaling, the effect of plumbagin on β-catenin and its primary target genes, including v-myc avian myelocytomatosis viral oncogene homolog (c-Myc) and WNT1 inducible signaling pathway protein-1 (WISP-1), was evaluated using western blot analysis. It was observed that plumbagin suppressed the expression of FHL2 and exhibited significant anti-proliferative activity in osteosarcoma cells. It also attenuated Wnt/β-catenin signalling by downregulating β-catenin and its target genes, including c-Myc and WISP-1. In conclusion, plumbagin demonstrated anti-proliferative activity in osteosarcoma cells by downregulating FHL2 and interfering with Wnt/β-catenin signalling. PMID:27446400

  8. A novel betapartitivirus RnPV6 from Rosellinia necatrix tolerates host RNA silencing but is interfered by its defective RNAs.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Sotaro; Lin, Yu-Hsin; Kondo, Hideki; Kanematsu, Satoko; Suzuki, Nobuhiro

    2016-07-01

    The family Partitiviridae comprises of five genera with bi-segmented dsRNA genomes that accommodate members infecting plants, fungi or protists. All partitiviruses with only a few exceptions cause asymptomatic infections. We report the characterization of a novel betapartitivirus termed Rosellinia necatrix partitivirus 6 (RnPV6) from a field isolate of a plant pathogenic fungus, white root rot fungus. RnPV6 has typical partitivirus features: dsRNA1 and dsRNA2 are 2462 and 2499bps in length encoding RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and capsid protein. Purified particles are spherical with a diameter of 30nm. Taking advantage of infectivity as virions, RnPV6 was introduced into a model filamentous fungal host, chestnut blight fungus to investigate virus/host interactions. Unlike other partitiviruses tested previously, RnPV6 induced profound phenotypic alterations with symptoms characterized by a reduced growth rate and enhanced pigmentation and was tolerant to host RNA silencing. In addition, a variety of defective RNAs derived from dsRNA1 appear after virion transfection. These sub-viral RNAs were shown to interfere with RnPV6 replication, at least for that of cognate segment dsRNA1. Presence of these sub-viral elements resulted in reduced symptom expression by RnPV6, suggesting their nature as defective-interfering RNAs. The features of RnPV6 are similar to but distinct from those of a previously reported alphapartitivirus, Rosellinia necatrix partitivirus 2 that is susceptible to RNA silencing.

  9. S-Carvone Suppresses Cellulase-Induced Capsidiol Production in Nicotiana tabacum by Interfering with Protein Isoprenylation1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Huchelmann, Alexandre; Gastaldo, Clément; Veinante, Mickaël; Zeng, Ying; Heintz, Dimitri; Tritsch, Denis; Schaller, Hubert; Rohmer, Michel; Bach, Thomas J.; Hemmerlin, Andréa

    2014-01-01

    S-Carvone has been described as a negative regulator of mevalonic acid (MVA) production by interfering with 3-hydroxy-3-methyl glutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) activity, a key player in isoprenoid biosynthesis. The impact of this monoterpene on the production of capsidiol in Nicotiana tabacum, an assumed MVA-derived sesquiterpenoid phytoalexin produced in response to elicitation by cellulase, was investigated. As expected, capsidiol production, as well as early stages of elicitation such as hydrogen peroxide production or stimulation of 5-epi-aristolochene synthase activity, were repressed. Despite the lack of capsidiol synthesis, apparent HMGR activity was boosted. Feeding experiments using (1-13C)Glc followed by analysis of labeling patterns by 13C-NMR, confirmed an MVA-dependent biosynthesis; however, treatments with fosmidomycin, an inhibitor of the MVA-independent 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) isoprenoid pathway, unexpectedly down-regulated the biosynthesis of this sesquiterpene as well. We postulated that S-carvone does not directly inhibit the production of MVA by inactivating HMGR, but possibly targets an MEP-derived isoprenoid involved in the early steps of the elicitation process. A new model is proposed in which the monoterpene blocks an MEP pathway–dependent protein geranylgeranylation necessary for the signaling cascade. The production of capsidiol was inhibited when plants were treated with some inhibitors of protein prenylation or by further monoterpenes. Moreover, S-carvone hindered isoprenylation of a prenylable GFP indicator protein expressed in N. tabacum cell lines, which can be chemically complemented with geranylgeraniol. The model was further validated using N. tabacum cell extracts or recombinant N. tabacum protein prenyltransferases expressed in Escherichia coli. Our study endorsed a reevaluation of the effect of S-carvone on plant isoprenoid metabolism. PMID:24367019

  10. A novel betapartitivirus RnPV6 from Rosellinia necatrix tolerates host RNA silencing but is interfered by its defective RNAs.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Sotaro; Lin, Yu-Hsin; Kondo, Hideki; Kanematsu, Satoko; Suzuki, Nobuhiro

    2016-07-01

    The family Partitiviridae comprises of five genera with bi-segmented dsRNA genomes that accommodate members infecting plants, fungi or protists. All partitiviruses with only a few exceptions cause asymptomatic infections. We report the characterization of a novel betapartitivirus termed Rosellinia necatrix partitivirus 6 (RnPV6) from a field isolate of a plant pathogenic fungus, white root rot fungus. RnPV6 has typical partitivirus features: dsRNA1 and dsRNA2 are 2462 and 2499bps in length encoding RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and capsid protein. Purified particles are spherical with a diameter of 30nm. Taking advantage of infectivity as virions, RnPV6 was introduced into a model filamentous fungal host, chestnut blight fungus to investigate virus/host interactions. Unlike other partitiviruses tested previously, RnPV6 induced profound phenotypic alterations with symptoms characterized by a reduced growth rate and enhanced pigmentation and was tolerant to host RNA silencing. In addition, a variety of defective RNAs derived from dsRNA1 appear after virion transfection. These sub-viral RNAs were shown to interfere with RnPV6 replication, at least for that of cognate segment dsRNA1. Presence of these sub-viral elements resulted in reduced symptom expression by RnPV6, suggesting their nature as defective-interfering RNAs. The features of RnPV6 are similar to but distinct from those of a previously reported alphapartitivirus, Rosellinia necatrix partitivirus 2 that is susceptible to RNA silencing. PMID:26494168

  11. Defective interfering influenza viruses and host cells: establishment and maintenance of persistent influenza virus infection in MDBK and HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    De, B K; Nayak, D P

    1980-12-01

    WSN (H0N1) influenza virus upon undiluted passages in different species of cells, namely, bovine kidney (MDBK), chicken embryo (CEF), and HeLa cells, produced a varying amount of defective interfering (DI) virus which correlated well with the ability of the species of cell to produce infectious virus. However, the nature of the influenza DI viral RNA produced from a single clonal stock was essentially identical in all three cells types, suggesting that these cells do not exert a great selective pressure in the amplification of specific DI viral RNAs either at early or late passages. DI viruses produced from one subtype (H0N1) could interfere with the replication of infectious viruses belonging to other subtypes (H1N1, H3N2). DI viral RNAs could also replicate with the helper function of other subtype viruses. The persistent infection of MDBK and HeLa cells could be initiated by coinfecting cells with both temperature-sensitive mutants (ts-) and DI influenza viruses. Persistently infected cultures cultures at early passages (up to passage 7) showed a cyclical pattern of cell lysis and virus production (crisis), whereas, at later passages (after passage 20), they produced little or no virus and were resistant to infection by homologous virus but not by heterologous virus. The majority of persistently infected cells, however, contained the complete viral genome since they expressed viral antigens and produced infectious centers. Selection of a slow-growing temperature-sensitive variant rather than the presence of DI virus or interferon appears to be critical in maintaining persistent influenza infection in these cells.

  12. Induction of dendritic cell production of type I and type III interferons by wild-type and vaccine strains of measles virus: role of defective interfering RNAs.

    PubMed

    Shivakoti, Rupak; Siwek, Martina; Hauer, Debra; Schultz, Kimberly L W; Griffin, Diane E

    2013-07-01

    The innate immune response to viral infection frequently includes induction of type I interferons (IFN), but many viruses have evolved ways to block this response and increase virulence. In vitro studies of IFN production after infection of susceptible cells with measles virus (MeV) have often reported greater IFN synthesis after infection with vaccine than with wild-type strains of MeV. However, the possible presence in laboratory virus stocks of 5' copy-back defective interfering (DI) RNAs that induce IFN independent of the standard virus has frequently confounded interpretation of data from these studies. To further investigate MeV strain-dependent differences in IFN induction and the role of DI RNAs, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs) were infected with the wild-type Bilthoven strain and the vaccine Edmonston-Zagreb strain with and without DI RNAs. Production of type I IFN, type III IFN, and the interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) Mx and ISG56 by infected cells was assessed with a flow cytometry-based IFN bioassay, quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR), and immunoassays. Bilthoven infected moDCs less efficiently than Edmonston-Zagreb. Presence of DI RNAs in vaccine stocks resulted in greater maturation of moDCs, inhibition of virus replication, and induction of higher levels of IFN and ISGs. Production of type I IFN, type III IFN, and ISG mRNA and protein was determined by both the level of infection and the presence of DI RNAs. At the same levels of infection and in the absence of DI RNA, IFN induction was similar between wild-type and vaccine strains of MeV. PMID:23678166

  13. Small intestinal ischemia and infarction

    MedlinePlus

    ... small intestine; Atherosclerosis - small intestine; Hardening of the arteries - small intestine ... Embolus: Blood clots can block one of the arteries supplying the intestine. People who have had a ...

  14. Pol IV-Dependent siRNA Production is Reduced in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi; Kendall, Timmy; Mosher, Rebecca A

    2013-01-01

    Plants produce a diverse array of small RNA molecules capable of gene regulation, including Pol IV-dependent short interfering (p4-si)RNAs that trigger transcriptional gene silencing. Small RNA transcriptomes are available for many plant species, but mutations affecting the synthesis of Pol IV-dependent siRNAs are characterized only in Arabidopsis and maize, leading to assumptions regarding nature of p4-siRNAs in all other species. We have identified a mutation in the largest subunit of Pol IV, NRPD1, that impacts Pol IV activity in Brassica rapa, an agriculturally important relative of the reference plant Arabidopsis. Using this mutation we characterized the Pol IV-dependent and Pol IV-independent small RNA populations in B. rapa. In addition, our analysis demonstrates reduced production of p4-siRNAs in B. rapa relative to Arabidopsis. B. rapa genomic regions are less likely to generate p4-siRNAs than Arabidopsis but more likely to generate Pol IV-independent siRNAs, including 24 nt RNAs mapping to transposable elements. These observations underscore the diversity of small RNAs produced by plants and highlight the importance of genetic studies during small RNA analysis.

  15. Pol IV-Dependent siRNA Production is Reduced in Brassica rapa

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yi; Kendall, Timmy; Mosher, Rebecca A.

    2013-01-01

    Plants produce a diverse array of small RNA molecules capable of gene regulation, including Pol IV-dependent short interfering (p4-si)RNAs that trigger transcriptional gene silencing. Small RNA transcriptomes are available for many plant species, but mutations affecting the synthesis of Pol IV-dependent siRNAs are characterized only in Arabidopsis and maize, leading to assumptions regarding nature of p4-siRNAs in all other species. We have identified a mutation in the largest subunit of Pol IV, NRPD1, that impacts Pol IV activity in Brassica rapa, an agriculturally important relative of the reference plant Arabidopsis. Using this mutation we characterized the Pol IV-dependent and Pol IV-independent small RNA populations in B. rapa. In addition, our analysis demonstrates reduced production of p4-siRNAs in B. rapa relative to Arabidopsis. B. rapa genomic regions are less likely to generate p4-siRNAs than Arabidopsis but more likely to generate Pol IV-independent siRNAs, including 24 nt RNAs mapping to transposable elements. These observations underscore the diversity of small RNAs produced by plants and highlight the importance of genetic studies during small RNA analysis. PMID:24833221

  16. SmallSat Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petropulos, Dolores; Bittner, David; Murawski, Robert; Golden, Bert

    2015-01-01

    The SmallSat has an unrealized potential in both the private industry and in the federal government. Currently over 70 companies, 50 universities and 17 governmental agencies are involved in SmallSat research and development. In 1994, the U.S. Army Missile and Defense mapped the moon using smallSat imagery. Since then Smart Phones have introduced this imagery to the people of the world as diverse industries watched this trend. The deployment cost of smallSats is also greatly reduced compared to traditional satellites due to the fact that multiple units can be deployed in a single mission. Imaging payloads have become more sophisticated, smaller and lighter. In addition, the growth of small technology obtained from private industries has led to the more widespread use of smallSats. This includes greater revisit rates in imagery, significantly lower costs, the ability to update technology more frequently and the ability to decrease vulnerability of enemy attacks. The popularity of smallSats show a changing mentality in this fast paced world of tomorrow. What impact has this created on the NASA communication networks now and in future years? In this project, we are developing the SmallSat Relational Database which can support a simulation of smallSats within the NASA SCaN Compatability Environment for Networks and Integrated Communications (SCENIC) Modeling and Simulation Lab. The NASA Space Communications and Networks (SCaN) Program can use this modeling to project required network support needs in the next 10 to 15 years. The SmallSat Rational Database could model smallSats just as the other SCaN databases model the more traditional larger satellites, with a few exceptions. One being that the smallSat Database is designed to be built-to-order. The SmallSat database holds various hardware configurations that can be used to model a smallSat. It will require significant effort to develop as the research material can only be populated by hand to obtain the unique data

  17. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Dukowicz, Andrew C.; Levine, Gary M.

    2007-01-01

    Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), defined as excessive bacteria in the small intestine, remains a poorly understood disease. Initially thought to occur in only a small number of patients, it is now apparent that this disorder is more prevalent than previously thought. Patients with SIBO vary in presentation, from being only mildly symptomatic to suffering from chronic diarrhea, weight loss, and malabsorption. A number of diagnostic tests are currently available, although the optimal treatment regimen remains elusive. Recently there has been renewed interest in SIBO and its putative association with irritable bowel syndrome. In this comprehensive review, we will discuss the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of SIBO. PMID:21960820

  18. More than 40% of those not taking antiseizure medication with recent seizures reported that epilepsy or its treatment interfered with their recent activities, 2010 and 2013 US National Health Interview Surveys.

    PubMed

    Kobau, Rosemarie; Cui, Wanjun; Zack, Matthew M

    2016-09-01

    From the combined 2010 and 2013 National Health Interview Surveys, we estimated US national age-standardized prevalence of adults with active epilepsy who reported that a nervous system/sensory organ condition caused a limitation (e.g., walking; memory; or physical, mental, or emotional problems) and, separately, that epilepsy interfered with their activities (e.g., working, schooling, or socializing) during the 30days preceding the survey. Sixty-one percent of adults who took antiseizure medication and had recent seizures and 51% of those who took medication and had no seizures reported having limitations caused by a nervous system/sensory organ condition. Sixty-two percent of adults who took antiseizure medication and had recent seizures and 20% of those who took medication and had no seizures reported that epilepsy or its treatment interfered with their recent activities. Forty-one percent of those who did not take medication and had recent seizures also reported that epilepsy interfered with their activities. To reduce activity limitations in people with epilepsy, health and social service providers can ensure that adequate policies and practices that promote access to high quality care and social participation are in effect in organizations and communities. PMID:27459033

  19. Small islands adrift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petherick, Anna

    2015-07-01

    With the charismatic former president of the Maldives, Mohamed Nasheed, behind bars on a widely derided terrorism charge, Anna Petherick asks whether small island states can really make themselves heard in Paris.

  20. Small intestine (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The small intestine is the portion of the digestive system most responsible for absorption of nutrients from food into the bloodstream. The pyloric sphincter governs the passage of partly digested food ...

  1. Small-x physics

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, A.H.

    1997-06-01

    After a brief review of the kinematics of deep inelastic lepton-proton scattering, the parton model is described. Small-x behavior coming from DGLAP evolution and from BFKL evolution is discussed, and the two types of evolution are contrasted and compared. Then a more detailed discussion of BFKL dynamics is given. The phenomenology of small-x physics is discussed with an emphasis on ways in which BFKL dynamics may be discussed and measured. 45 refs., 12 figs.

  2. Horizontal Transfer of Small RNAs to and from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Han, Lu; Luan, Yu-Shi

    2015-01-01

    Genetic information is traditionally thought to be transferred from parents to offspring. However, there is evidence indicating that gene transfer can also occur from microbes to higher species, such as plants, invertebrates, and vertebrates. This horizontal transfer can be carried out by small RNAs (sRNAs). sRNAs have been recently reported to move across kingdoms as mobile signals, spreading silencing information toward targeted genes. sRNAs, especially microRNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), are non-coding molecules that control gene expression at the transcriptional or post-transcriptional level. Some sRNAs act in a cross-kingdom manner between animals and their parasites, but little is known about such sRNAs associated with plants. In this report, we provide a brief introduction to miRNAs that are transferred from plants to mammals/viruses and siRNAs that are transferred from microbes to plants. Both miRNAs and siRNAs can exert corresponding functions in the target organisms. Additionally, we provide information concerning a host-induced gene silencing system as a potential application that utilizes the transgenic trafficking of RNA molecules to silence the genes of interacting organisms. Moreover, we lay out the controversial views regarding cross-kingdom miRNAs and call for better methodology and experimental design to confirm this unique function of miRNAs. PMID:26697056

  3. Horizontal Transfer of Small RNAs to and from Plants.

    PubMed

    Han, Lu; Luan, Yu-Shi

    2015-01-01

    Genetic information is traditionally thought to be transferred from parents to offspring. However, there is evidence indicating that gene transfer can also occur from microbes to higher species, such as plants, invertebrates, and vertebrates. This horizontal transfer can be carried out by small RNAs (sRNAs). sRNAs have been recently reported to move across kingdoms as mobile signals, spreading silencing information toward targeted genes. sRNAs, especially microRNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), are non-coding molecules that control gene expression at the transcriptional or post-transcriptional level. Some sRNAs act in a cross-kingdom manner between animals and their parasites, but little is known about such sRNAs associated with plants. In this report, we provide a brief introduction to miRNAs that are transferred from plants to mammals/viruses and siRNAs that are transferred from microbes to plants. Both miRNAs and siRNAs can exert corresponding functions in the target organisms. Additionally, we provide information concerning a host-induced gene silencing system as a potential application that utilizes the transgenic trafficking of RNA molecules to silence the genes of interacting organisms. Moreover, we lay out the controversial views regarding cross-kingdom miRNAs and call for better methodology and experimental design to confirm this unique function of miRNAs. PMID:26697056

  4. Small non-coding RNAs and aptamers in diagnostics and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Marissa; Zhang, Yijuan; Zhang, Xiaoting

    2015-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs) such as small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), microRNAs (miRNAs) and RNA aptamers have recently emerged as highly versatile and valuable tools in disease diagnostics and therapeutics, largely due to their key regulatory functions in many human diseases including cancer, viral infections, genetic disorders, etc. Recent technological advancements as described in the previous chapters have greatly aided the discovery of sncRNAs and their applications for disease detection and therapy. Here, we describe the advantages of using sncRNAs as diagnostic and therapeutic tools, followed by some of the most recent examples of their use and a vision for the future perspectives.

  5. The cytoskeletal inhibitors latrunculin A and blebbistatin exert antitumorigenic properties in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells by interfering with intracellular HuR trafficking

    SciTech Connect

    Doller, Anke; Badawi, Amel

    2015-01-01

    The impact of the RNA-binding protein HuR for the post-transcriptional deregulation of tumor-relevant genes is well established. Despite of elevations in HuR expression levels, an increase in cytoplasmic HuR abundance in many cases correlates with a high grade of malignancy. Here, we demonstrated that administration of the actin-depolymerizing macrolide latrunculin A, or blebbistatin, an inhibitor of myosin II ATPase activity, caused a dose- and time-dependent reduction in the high cytoplasmic HuR content of HepG2 and Huh7 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. Subcellular fractionation revealed that in addition, both inhibitors strongly attenuated cytoskeletal and membrane-bound HuR abundance and conversely increased the HuR amount in nuclear cell fractions. Concomitant with changes in intracellular HuR localization, both cytoskeletal inhibitors markedly decreased the half-lives of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), cyclin A and cyclin D{sub 1} encoding mRNAs resulting in a significant reduction in their expression levels in HepG2 cells. Importantly, a similar reduction in the expression of these HuR targets was achieved by a RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdown of either HuR or nonmuscle myoin IIA. Using polysomal fractionation, we further demonstrate that the decrease in cytoplasmic HuR by latrunculin A or blebbistatin is accompanied by a marked change in the allocation of HuR and its mRNA cargo from polysomes to ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles. Functionally, the basal migration and prostaglandin E{sub 2} synthesis are similarly impaired in inhibitor-treated and stable HuR-knockdown HepG2 cells. Our data demonstrate that interfering with the actomyosin-dependent HuR trafficking may comprise a valid therapeutic option for antagonizing pathologic posttranscriptional gene expression by HuR and furthermore emphasize the potential benefit of HuR inhibitory strategies for treatment of HCC. - Highlights: • We tested the effects of latrunculin A and blebbistatin on

  6. MINERVA: Small Planets from Small Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Johnson, John Asher; Wright, Jason; McCrady, Nate; Swift, Jonathan; Bottom, Michael; Plavchan, Peter; Riddle, Reed; Muirhead, Philip S.; Herzig, Erich; Myles, Justin; Blake, Cullen H.; Eastman, Jason; Beatty, Thomas G.; Lin, Brian; Zhao, Ming; Gardner, Paul; Falco, Emilio; Criswell, Stephen; Nava, Chantanelle; Robinson, Connor; Hedrick, Richard; Ivarsen, Kevin; Hjelstrom, Annie; Vera, Jon De; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    The Kepler mission has shown that small planets are extremely common. It is likely that nearly every star in the sky hosts at least one rocky planet. We just need to look hard enough-but this requires vast amounts of telescope time. MINERVA (MINiature Exoplanet Radial Velocity Array) is a dedicated exoplanet observatory with the primary goal of discovering rocky, Earth-like planets orbiting in the habitable zone of bright, nearby stars. The MINERVA team is a collaboration among UNSW Australia, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Penn State University, University of Montana, and the California Institute of Technology. The four-telescope MINERVA array will be sited at the F.L. Whipple Observatory on Mt Hopkins in Arizona, USA. Full science operations will begin in mid-2015 with all four telescopes and a stabilised spectrograph capable of high-precision Doppler velocity measurements. We will observe ~100 of the nearest, brightest, Sun-like stars every night for at least five years. Detailed simulations of the target list and survey strategy lead us to expect new low-mass planets.

  7. Small Intestinal Infections.

    PubMed

    Munot, Khushboo; Kotler, Donald P

    2016-06-01

    Small intestinal infections are extremely common worldwide. They may be bacterial, viral, or parasitic in etiology. Most are foodborne or waterborne, with specific etiologies differing by region and with diverse pathophysiologies. Very young, very old, and immune-deficient individuals are the most vulnerable to morbidity or mortality from small intestinal infections. There have been significant advances in diagnostic sophistication with the development and early application of molecular diagnostic assays, though these tests have not become mainstream. The lack of rapid diagnoses combined with the self-limited nature of small intestinal infections has hampered the development of specific and effective treatments other than oral rehydration. Antibiotics are not indicated in the absence of an etiologic diagnosis, and not at all in the case of some infections. PMID:27168147

  8. [Small-Bowel Cancer].

    PubMed

    Kagaya, Yuka; Sakamoto, Hirotsugu; Yamamoto, Hironori

    2016-05-01

    Diagnosis of small-bowel cancer has become easier thanks to the development of both balloon-assisted endoscopy and capsule endoscopy. Balloon-assisted endoscopy allows not only for observation of the deep intestine but also for biopsies and for establishing a histological diagnosis. Although endoscopic diagnosis is reported to improve the prognosis of small-bowel cancer by early detection, it is still difficult and the prognosis in general is poor. Surgery and chemotherapy protocols for this disease are similar to those for colon cancer. At present, the response rate to chemotherapy for small-bowel cancer is low. There is an urgent need in this patient population to establish a new diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm using balloon-assisted endoscopy and capsule endoscopy. PMID:27210079

  9. Small Animal Retinal Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, WooJhon; Drexler, Wolfgang; Fujimoto, James G.

    Developing and validating new techniques and methods for small animal imaging is an important research area because there are many small animal models of retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and glaucoma [1-6]. Because the retina is a multilayered structure with distinct abnormalities occurring in different intraretinal layers at different stages of disease progression, there is a need for imaging techniques that enable visualization of these layers individually at different time points. Although postmortem histology and ultrastructural analysis can be performed for investigating microscopic changes in the retina in small animal models, this requires sacrificing animals, which makes repeated assessment of the same animal at different time points impossible and increases the number of animals required. Furthermore, some retinal processes such as neurovascular coupling cannot be fully characterized postmortem.

  10. A Small as Possible

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tibbitts, Scott

    2003-01-01

    This story begins with a bit of serendipity: I was on a trip to see a Shuttle launch and I happened to sit next to a guy who was in charge of batteries for Space Systems/Loral. He told me that they needed to create a new battery bypass switch, the device that takes a battery out of commission if it goes bad. After discussing the conversation back at my company, we decided that we could create the switch. We contacted the folks at Loral and they said, 'Okay, let s see what you can come up with. We need it as small as possible.' We asked, 'How small?' They said, 'We need it as small as you can possibly make it.'

  11. Small Bowel Transplant

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Objective The Medical Advisory Secretariat undertook a review of the evidence on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of small bowel transplant in the treatment of intestinal failure. Small Bowel Transplantation Intestinal failure is the loss of absorptive capacity of the small intestine that results in an inability to meet the nutrient and fluid requirements of the body via the enteral route. Patients with intestinal failure usually receive nutrients intravenously, a procedure known as parenteral nutrition. However, long-term parenteral nutrition is associated with complications including liver failure and loss of venous access due to recurrent infections. Small bowel transplant is the transplantation of a cadaveric intestinal allograft for the purpose of restoring intestinal function in patients with irreversible intestinal failure. The transplant may involve the small intestine alone (isolated small bowel ISB), the small intestine and the liver (SB-L) when there is irreversible liver failure, or multiple organs including the small bowel (multivisceral MV or cluster). Although living related donor transplant is being investigated at a limited number of centres, cadaveric donors have been used in most small bowel transplants. The actual transplant procedure takes approximately 12-18 hours. After intestinal transplant, the patient is generally placed on prophylactic antibiotic medication and immunosuppressive regimen that, in the majority of cases, would include tacrolimus, corticosteroids and an induction agent. Close monitoring for infection and rejection are essential for early treatment. Medical Advisory Secretariat Review The Medical Advisory Secretariat undertook a review of 35 reports from 9 case series and 1 international registry. Sample size of the individual studies ranged from 9 to 155. As of May 2001, 651 patients had received small bowel transplant procedures worldwide. According to information from the Canadian Organ Replacement

  12. How Small are Small Stars Really?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-11-01

    VLT Interferometer Measures the Size of Proxima Centauri and Other Nearby Stars [1] Summary At a distance of only 4.2 light-years, Proxima Centauri is the nearest star to the Sun currently known [2]. It is visible as an 11-magnitude object in the southern constellation of Centaurus and is the faintest member of a triple system, together with Alpha Centauri , the brightest (double) star in this constellation. Proxima Centauri is a very-low-mass star, in fact barely massive enough to burn hydrogen to helium in its interior. It is about seven times smaller than the Sun, and the surface temperature is "only" about 3000 degrees, about half of that of our own star. Consequently, it is also much fainter - the intrinsic brightness is only 1/150th of that of our Sun. Low-mass stars are very interesting objects , also because the physical conditions in their interiors have much in common with those of giant planets, like Jupiter in our solar system. A determination of the sizes of the smallest stars has been impossible until now because of their general faintness and lack of adequate instrumentation. However, astronomers have long been keen to move forward in this direction, since such measurements would provide indirect, crucial information about the behaviour of matter under extreme conditions. When the first observations with the VLT Interferometer (VLTI), combining the light from two of the 8.2-m VLT Unit Telescopes (ANTU and MELIPAL), were made one year ago ( ESO PR 23/01 ), interferometric measurements were also obtained of Proxima Centauri . They formed part of the VLTI commissioning and the data were soon released to the ESO community, cf. the special website. Now, an international team of astronomers from Switzerland, France and ESO/Chile has successfully analysed these observations by means of newly developed, advanced software. For the first time ever, they obtained a highly accurate measurement of the size of such a small star . Three other small stars were also

  13. Small Public Library Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearlmutter, Jane; Nelson, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Anyone at the helm of a small public library knows that every little detail counts. But juggling the responsibilities that are part and parcel of the job is far from easy. Finally, here's a handbook that includes everything administrators need to keep a handle on library operations, freeing them up to streamline and improve how the organization…

  14. Benign small bowel tumor.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, J M; Melvin, D B; Gray, G; Thorbjarnarson, B

    1975-01-01

    The clinical record and histologic sections of 84 cases of benign small bowel tumor are reviewed. Manifestations of systemic diseases, congenital anomalies, and lesions of either the ileocecal valve or periampullary region were excluded. In the same time span there were 96 small bowel malignancies. Clinical presentation, pathologic findings, management and result are compared to the collected published experience of about 2000 cases. There were 36 leiomyomas, 22 lipomas, 9 angiomas, 6 neurofibromas and 4 fibromas. Thirty-six men and 48 women were affected; the majority in their fifth and sixth decade. Seventy-eight were operative and 6 autopsy diagnoses. The most common symptom was obstruction (42%) followed by hemorrhage (34%) and pain (22%), relative frequency differing for the various specific tumors. There were rarely significant physical findings. A diagnosis of small bowel tumor was made radiologically in 30 patients. Because of the nonspecificity of other signs and symptoms, an acute awareness of the possibility of small bowel tumor is mandatory for preoperative anticipation of the diagnosis. Local resection was performed in all with no deaths or significant postoperative complications. PMID:1078626

  15. Small Business Innovations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Under an Army Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant, Symbiotics, Inc. developed a software system that permits users to upgrade products from standalone applications so they can communicate in a distributed computing environment. Under a subsequent NASA SBIR grant, Symbiotics added additional tools to the SOCIAL product to enable NASA to coordinate conventional systems for planning Shuttle launch support operations. Using SOCIAL, data may be shared among applications in a computer network even when the applications are written in different programming languages. The product was introduced to the commercial market in 1993 and is used to monitor and control equipment for operation support and to integrate financial networks. The SBIR program was established to increase small business participation in federal R&D activities and to transfer government research to industry. InQuisiX is a reuse library providing high performance classification, cataloging, searching, browsing, retrieval and synthesis capabilities. These form the foundation for software reuse, producing higher quality software at lower cost and in less time. Software Productivity Solutions, Inc. developed the technology under Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) projects funded by NASA and the Army and is marketing InQuisiX in conjunction with Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC). The SBIR program was established to increase small business participation in federal R&D activities and to transfer government research to industry.

  16. Small satellite radiometric measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P.G.

    1991-01-01

    A critical need for the Mission to Planet Earth is to provide continuous, well-calibrated radiometric data for the radiation budget. This paper describes a new, compact, flexible radiometer which will provide both spectrally integrated data and data in selected spectral bands. The radiometer design is suitable for use on small satellites, aircraft, or remotely piloted vehicles (RPVs). 12 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Small Intestine Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... small intestine cancer include unexplained weight loss and abdominal pain. These and other signs and symptoms may be ... doctor if you have any of the following: Pain or cramps in the middle of the abdomen. Weight loss with no known reason. A lump ...

  18. Small intestinal fungal overgrowth.

    PubMed

    Erdogan, Askin; Rao, Satish S C

    2015-04-01

    Small intestinal fungal overgrowth (SIFO) is characterized by the presence of excessive number of fungal organisms in the small intestine associated with gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. Candidiasis is known to cause GI symptoms particularly in immunocompromised patients or those receiving steroids or antibiotics. However, only recently, there is emerging literature that an overgrowth of fungus in the small intestine of non-immunocompromised subjects may cause unexplained GI symptoms. Two recent studies showed that 26 % (24/94) and 25.3 % (38/150) of a series of patients with unexplained GI symptoms had SIFO. The most common symptoms observed in these patients were belching, bloating, indigestion, nausea, diarrhea, and gas. The underlying mechanism(s) that predisposes to SIFO is unclear but small intestinal dysmotility and use of proton pump inhibitors has been implicated. However, further studies are needed; both to confirm these observations and to examine the clinical relevance of fungal overgrowth, both in healthy subjects and in patients with otherwise unexplained GI symptoms. Importantly, whether eradication or its treatment leads to resolution of symptoms remains unclear; at present, a 2-3-week course of antifungal therapy is recommended and may be effective in improving symptoms, but evidence for eradication is lacking. PMID:25786900

  19. Deburring small intersecting holes

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1980-08-01

    Deburring intersecting holes is one of the most difficult deburring tasks faced by many industries. Only 14 of the 37 major deburring processes are applicable to most intersecting hole applications. Only five of these are normally applicable to small or miniature holes. Basic process capabilities and techniques used as a function of hole sizes and intersection depths are summarized.

  20. Pancreatic small cell cancer.

    PubMed

    El Rassy, Elie; Tabchi, Samer; Kourie, Hampig Raphael; Assi, Tarek; Chebib, Ralph; Farhat, Fadi; Kattan, Joseph

    2016-06-01

    Small cell carcinoma (SCC) is most commonly associated with lung cancer. Extra-pulmonary SCC can originate in virtually any organ system, with the gastrointestinal tract being the most common site of involvement. We review the clinical presentation, pathogenesis, histology, imaging modalities and optimal therapeutic management of PSCC in light of available evidence. PMID:26566245