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Sample records for 24-nt small interfering

  1. Loss of RNA–Dependent RNA Polymerase 2 (RDR2) Function Causes Widespread and Unexpected Changes in the Expression of Transposons, Genes, and 24-nt Small RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yi; Lisch, Damon R.; Ohtsu, Kazuhiro; Scanlon, Michael J.; Nettleton, Dan; Schnable, Patrick S.

    2009-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) comprise a substantial portion of many eukaryotic genomes and are typically transcriptionally silenced. RNA–dependent RNA polymerase 2 (RDR2) is a component of the RNA–directed DNA methylation (RdDM) silencing pathway. In maize, loss of mediator of paramutation1 (mop1) encoded RDR2 function results in reactivation of transcriptionally silenced Mu transposons and a substantial reduction in the accumulation of 24 nt short-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that recruit RNA silencing components. An RNA–seq experiment conducted on shoot apical meristems (SAMs) revealed that, as expected based on a model in which RDR2 generates 24 nt siRNAs that suppress expression, most differentially expressed DNA TEs (78%) were up-regulated in the mop1 mutant. In contrast, most differentially expressed retrotransposons (68%) were down-regulated. This striking difference suggests that distinct silencing mechanisms are applied to different silencing templates. In addition, >6,000 genes (24% of analyzed genes), including nearly 80% (286/361) of genes in chromatin modification pathways, were differentially expressed. Overall, two-thirds of differentially regulated genes were down-regulated in the mop1 mutant. This finding suggests that RDR2 plays a significant role in regulating the expression of not only transposons, but also of genes. A re-analysis of existing small RNA data identified both RDR2–sensitive and RDR2–resistant species of 24 nt siRNAs that we hypothesize may at least partially explain the complex changes in the expression of genes and transposons observed in the mop1 mutant. PMID:19936292

  2. Loss of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 2 (RDR2) function causes widespread and unexpected changes in the expression of transposons, genes, and 24-nt small RNAs.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yi; Lisch, Damon R; Ohtsu, Kazuhiro; Scanlon, Michael J; Nettleton, Daniel; Schnable, Patrick S

    2009-11-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) comprise a substantial portion of many eukaryotic genomes and are typically transcriptionally silenced. RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 2 (RDR2) is a component of the RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) silencing pathway. In maize, loss of mediator of paramutation1 (mop1) encoded RDR2 function results in reactivation of transcriptionally silenced Mu transposons and a substantial reduction in the accumulation of 24 nt short-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that recruit RNA silencing components. An RNA-seq experiment conducted on shoot apical meristems (SAMs) revealed that, as expected based on a model in which RDR2 generates 24 nt siRNAs that suppress expression, most differentially expressed DNA TEs (78%) were up-regulated in the mop1 mutant. In contrast, most differentially expressed retrotransposons (68%) were down-regulated. This striking difference suggests that distinct silencing mechanisms are applied to different silencing templates. In addition, >6,000 genes (24% of analyzed genes), including nearly 80% (286/361) of genes in chromatin modification pathways, were differentially expressed. Overall, two-thirds of differentially regulated genes were down-regulated in the mop1 mutant. This finding suggests that RDR2 plays a significant role in regulating the expression of not only transposons, but also of genes. A re-analysis of existing small RNA data identified both RDR2-sensitive and RDR2-resistant species of 24 nt siRNAs that we hypothesize may at least partially explain the complex changes in the expression of genes and transposons observed in the mop1 mutant.

  3. Landscape of Fluid Sets of Hairpin-Derived 21-/24-nt-Long Small RNAs at Seed Set Uncovers Special Epigenetic Features in Picea glauca

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Conifers’ exceptionally large genome (20–30 Gb) is scattered with 60% retrotransposon (RT) components and we have little knowledge on their origin and evolutionary implications. RTs may impede the expression of flanking genes and provide sources of the formation of novel small RNA (sRNAs) populations to constrain events of transposon (TE) proliferation/transposition. Here we show a declining expression of 24-nt-long sRNAs and low expression levels of their key processing gene, pgRTL2 (RNASE THREE LIKE 2) at seed set in Picea glauca. The sRNAs in 24-nt size class are significantly less enriched in type and read number than 21-nt sRNAs and have not been documented in other species. The architecture of MIR loci generating highly expressed 24-/21-nt sRNAs is featured by long terminal repeat—retrotransposons (LTR-RTs) in families of Ty3/Gypsy and Ty1/Copia elements. This implies that the production of sRNAs may be predominantly originated from TE fragments on chromosomes. Furthermore, a large proportion of highly expressed 24-nt sRNAs does not have predictable targets against unique genes in Picea, suggestive of their potential pathway in DNA methylation modifications on, for instance, TEs. Additionally, the classification of computationally predicted sRNAs suggests that 24-nt sRNA targets may bear particular functions in metabolic processes while 21-nt sRNAs target genes involved in many different biological processes. This study, therefore, directs our attention to a possible extrapolation that lacking of 24-nt sRNAs at the late conifer seed developmental phase may result in less constraints in TE activities, thus contributing to the massive expansion of genome size. PMID:28082604

  4. Changes in 24-nt siRNA levels in Arabidopsis hybrids suggest an epigenetic contribution to hybrid vigor.

    PubMed

    Groszmann, Michael; Greaves, Ian K; Albertyn, Zayed I; Scofield, Graham N; Peacock, William J; Dennis, Elizabeth S

    2011-02-08

    Intraspecific hybrids between the Arabidopsis thaliana accessions C24 and Landsberg erecta have strong heterosis. The reciprocal hybrids show a decreased level of 24-nt small RNA (sRNA) relative to the parents with the decrease greatest for those loci where the parents had markedly different 24-nt sRNA levels. The genomic regions with reduced 24-nt sRNA levels were largely associated with genes and their flanking regions indicating a potential effect on gene expression. We identified several examples of genes with altered 24-nt sRNA levels that showed correlated changes in DNA methylation and expression levels. We suggest that such epigenetically generated differences in gene activity may contribute to hybrid vigor and that the epigenetic diversity between ecotypes provides increased allelic (epi-allelic) variability that could contribute to heterosis.

  5. Therapeutic potential of small interfering RNAs/micro interfering RNA in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Farra, Rossella; Grassi, Mario; Grassi, Gabriele; Dapas, Barbara

    2015-08-14

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the predominant form of primary liver cancer and represents the third leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Current available therapeutic approaches are poorly effective, especially for the advanced forms of the disease. In the last year, short double stranded RNA molecules termed small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and micro interfering RNAs (miRNA), emerged as interesting molecules with potential therapeutic value for HCC. The practical use of these molecules is however limited by the identification of optimal molecular targets and especially by the lack of effective and targeted HCC delivery systems. Here we focus our discussion on the most recent advances in the identification of siRNAs/miRNAs molecular targets and on the development of suitable siRNA/miRNAs delivery systems.

  6. Delivery of Small Interfering RNAs to Cells via Exosomes.

    PubMed

    Wahlgren, Jessica; Statello, Luisa; Skogberg, Gabriel; Telemo, Esbjörn; Valadi, Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are small membrane bound vesicles between 30 and 100 nm in diameter of endocytic origin that are secreted into the extracellular environment by many different cell types. Exosomes play a role in intercellular communication by transferring proteins, lipids, and RNAs to recipient cells.Exosomes from human cells could be used as vectors to provide cells with therapeutic RNAs. Here we describe how exogenous small interfering RNAs may successfully be introduced into various kinds of human exosomes using electroporation and subsequently delivered to recipient cells. Methods used to confirm the presence of siRNA inside exosomes and cells are presented, such as flow cytometry, confocal microscopy, and Northern blot.

  7. PMS1T, producing phased small-interfering RNAs, regulates photoperiod-sensitive male sterility in rice

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yourong; Yang, Jiangyi; Mathioni, Sandra M.; Yu, Jinsheng; Shen, Jianqiang; Yang, Xuefei; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Qinghua; Cai, Zhaoxia; Xu, Caiguo; Li, Xianghua; Xiao, Jinghua; Zhang, Qifa

    2016-01-01

    Phased small-interfering RNAs (phasiRNAs) are a special class of small RNAs, which are generated in 21- or 24-nt intervals from transcripts of precursor RNAs. Although phasiRNAs have been found in a range of organisms, their biological functions in plants have yet to be uncovered. Here we show that phasiRNAs generated by the photopheriod-sensetive genic male sterility 1 (Pms1) locus were associated with photoperiod-sensitive male sterility (PSMS) in rice, a germplasm that started the two-line hybrid rice breeding. The Pms1 locus encodes a long-noncoding RNA PMS1T that was preferentially expressed in young panicles. PMS1T was targeted by miR2118 to produce 21-nt phasiRNAs that preferentially accumulated in the PSMS line under long-day conditions. A single nucleotide polymorphism in PMS1T nearby the miR2118 recognition site was critical for fertility change, likely leading to differential accumulation of the phasiRNAs. This result suggested possible roles of phasiRNAs in reproductive development of rice, demonstrating the potential importance of this RNA class as regulators in biological processes. PMID:27965387

  8. Small interfering RNA-based molecular therapy of cancers

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wei; Chen, Wangbing; Yu, Wendan; Huang, Wenlin; Deng, Wuguo

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has become a gold standard for validating gene function in basic life science research and provides a promising therapeutic modality for cancer and other diseases. This mini-review focuses on the potential of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in anticancer treatment, including the establishment and screening of cancer-associated siRNA libraries and their applications in anticancer drug target discovery and cancer therapy. This article also describes the current delivery approaches of siRNAs using lipids, polymers, and, in particular, gold nanoparticles to induce significant gene silencing and tumor growth regression. PMID:23327796

  9. Engineering small interfering RNAs by strategic chemical modification.

    PubMed

    Bramsen, Jesper B; Kjems, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) have revolutionized functional genomics in mammalian cell cultures due to their reliability, efficiency, and ease of use. This success, however, has not fully translated into siRNA applications in vivo and in siRNA therapeutics where initial optimism has been dampened by a lack of efficient delivery strategies and reports of siRNA off-target effects and immunogenicity. Encouragingly, most aspects of siRNA behavior can be addressed by careful engineering of siRNAs incorporating beneficial chemical modifications into discrete nucleotide positions during siRNA synthesis. Here, we review the literature (Subheadings 1 -3) and provide a quick guide (Subheading 4) to how the performance of siRNA can be improved by chemical modification to suit specific applications in vitro and in vivo.

  10. Small interfering RNA delivery through positively charged polymer nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragoni, Luca; Ferrari, Raffaele; Lupi, Monica; Cesana, Alberto; Falcetta, Francesca; Ubezio, Paolo; D'Incalci, Maurizio; Morbidelli, Massimo; Moscatelli, Davide

    2016-03-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) is receiving increasing attention with regard to the treatment of many genetic diseases, both acquired and hereditary, such as cancer and diabetes. Being a high molecular weight (MW) polyanion, siRNA is not able to cross a cell membrane, and in addition it is unstable in physiological conditions. Accordingly, a biocompatible nanocarrier able to deliver siRNA into cells is needed. In this work, we synthesized biocompatible positively charged nanoparticles (NPs) following a two-step process that involves ring opening polymerization (ROP) and emulsion free radical polymerization (EFRP). Firstly, we proved the possibility of fine tuning the NPs’ characteristics (e.g. size and surface charge) by changing the synthetic process parameters. Then the capability in loading and delivering undamaged siRNA into a cancer cell cytoplasm has been shown. This latter process occurs through the biodegradation of the polymer constituting the NPs, whose kinetics can be tuned by adjusting the polymer’s MW. Finally, the ability of NPs to carry siRNA inside the cells in order to inhibit their target gene has been demonstrated using green flourescent protein positive cells.

  11. Translocation of Small Interfering RNA and Cholesterol Molecules in Biomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalia, Rajiv

    2013-03-01

    This presentation will focus on all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies of (1) structural and mechanical barriers to translocation of small interfering RNA (siRNA) across a phospholipid bilayer, and (2) flip-flop dynamics of cholesterol (CHOL) molecules across a phospholipid bilayer. In the first case, we find that the siRNA induces a liquid-to-gel phase transformation. In the gel phase we find large compressive lateral stresses in the hydrocarbon chains of lipid molecules, which present a considerable barrier to siRNA passage across the bilayer. In the second case, we study spontaneous CHOL inter-leaflet transport (flip-flop), the effect of this process on mechanical stresses across the bilayer, and the role of CHOL in inducing molecular order in bilayer leaflets. The simulation was run for 15 microseconds and we found 24 CHOL flip-flop events over that duration. On average, a CHOL molecule migrates across the lipid bilayer in about 73 ns after a flip-flop event is triggered. We have calculated diffusion maps and determined free energy surfaces and flip-flop mechanisms for CHOL molecules. Work supported by NSF-OCI-0749360 and NSF-IOS-125317.

  12. Functional Nanostructures for Effective Delivery of Small Interfering RNA Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Cheol Am; Nam, Yoon Sung

    2014-01-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) has proved to be a powerful tool for target-specific gene silencing via RNA interference (RNAi). Its ability to control targeted gene expression gives new hope to gene therapy as a treatment for cancers and genetic diseases. However, siRNA shows poor pharmacological properties, such as low serum stability, off-targeting, and innate immune responses, which present a significant challenge for clinical applications. In addition, siRNA cannot cross the cell membrane for RNAi activity because of its anionic property and stiff structure. Therefore, the development of a safe, stable, and efficient system for the delivery of siRNA therapeutics into the cytoplasm of targeted cells is crucial. Several nanoparticle platforms for siRNA delivery have been developed to overcome the major hurdles facing the therapeutic uses of siRNA. This review covers a broad spectrum of non-viral siRNA delivery systems developed for enhanced cellular uptake and targeted gene silencing in vitro and in vivo and discusses their characteristics and opportunities for clinical applications of therapeutic siRNA. PMID:25285170

  13. Functional nanostructures for effective delivery of small interfering RNA therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Hong, Cheol Am; Nam, Yoon Sung

    2014-01-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) has proved to be a powerful tool for target-specific gene silencing via RNA interference (RNAi). Its ability to control targeted gene expression gives new hope to gene therapy as a treatment for cancers and genetic diseases. However, siRNA shows poor pharmacological properties, such as low serum stability, off-targeting, and innate immune responses, which present a significant challenge for clinical applications. In addition, siRNA cannot cross the cell membrane for RNAi activity because of its anionic property and stiff structure. Therefore, the development of a safe, stable, and efficient system for the delivery of siRNA therapeutics into the cytoplasm of targeted cells is crucial. Several nanoparticle platforms for siRNA delivery have been developed to overcome the major hurdles facing the therapeutic uses of siRNA. This review covers a broad spectrum of non-viral siRNA delivery systems developed for enhanced cellular uptake and targeted gene silencing in vitro and in vivo and discusses their characteristics and opportunities for clinical applications of therapeutic siRNA.

  14. Small interfering RNA of alkaline phosphatase inhibits matrix mineralization.

    PubMed

    Kotobuki, Noriko; Matsushima, Asako; Kato, Youichi; Kubo, Yoko; Hirose, Motohiro; Ohgushi, Hajime

    2008-05-01

    To investigate the cascade of matrix mineralization, cells expressing high and low alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were separated from human osteoblast-like (HOS) cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting with an ALP antibody. After these cells had been recloned from single cells and then cultured under osteogenic conditions, high-ALP-expressing HOS (H-HOS) cells showed matrix mineralization, but low-ALP-expressing HOS (L-HOS) cells did not. The interaction among osteogenic-related genes, such as runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2), collagen type I alpha1 chain (COL1A1), tissue non-specific ALP, and osteocalcin (OCN), is well known as being related to matrix mineralization. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed that the gene expression of ALP was higher in H-HOS cells than in L-HOS, whereas the gene expression of RUNX2, COL1A1, and OCN was lower in H-HOS cells than in L-HOS cells. When small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) of these osteogenic-related genes were introduced into H-HOS cells by transfection, only ALP siRNA inhibited matrix mineralization. Furthermore, the expression of not only the ALP gene, but also the COL1A1 and RUNX2 genes was influenced by the inhibition of ALP, although the expression of OCN was not affected by the inhibition of ALP. We have been able to confirm that the ALP gene is a strong candidate as the trigger of matrix mineralization. These results indicate the usefulness of cloned osteogenic cells in investigating the molecular mechanisms of matrix mineralization, the function of which can be modulated by using a variety of siRNAs.

  15. Small interfering peptides as a novel way of transcriptional control.

    PubMed

    Yun, Ju; Kim, Sang-Gyu; Hong, Shinyoung; Park, Chung-Mo

    2008-09-01

    Transcription factors are key components of transcriptional regulatory networks governing virtually all aspects of plant growth and developmental processes. Their activities are regulated at various steps, including gene transcription, posttranscriptional mRNA metabolism, posttranslational modifications, nucleocytoplasmic transport, and controlled proteolytic cleavage of membrane-anchored, dormant forms. Dynamic protein dimerization also plays a critical role in this process. An exquisite regulatory scheme has recently been proposed to modulate the action of transcription factors. Small peptides possessing a protein dimerization motif but lacking the DNA-binding motif form nonfunctional heterodimers with a group of specific TFs, inhibiting their transcriptional activation activities. Extensive searches for small proteins that have a similar structural organization in the databases revealed that small peptide-mediated transcription control is not an exceptional case but would be a regulatory mechanism occurring widespread in the Arabidopsis genome.

  16. Interaction between cationic agents and small interfering RNA and DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unksov, I. N.; Slita, A. V.; Petrova, A. V.; Pereviazko, I.; Bakulev, V. M.; Rolich, V. I.; Bondarenko, A. B.; Kasyanenko, N. A.

    2016-11-01

    Azobenzene containing surfactant AzoTAB was used for investigation of binding in cationic- agent + nucleic acid in NaCl salt aqueous solutions. Two nucleic acids, macromolecular DNA and small interfering RNA, were examined upon the interaction with the surfactant. For DNA the interaction was studied using spectral methods and the methods of viscometry and flow birefringence measurement. For siRNA the possibility of surfactant-based delivery was checked in vitro.

  17. Creation of transgenic rice plants producing small interfering RNA of Rice tungro spherical virus.

    PubMed

    Le, Dung Tien; Chu, Ha Duc; Sasaya, Takahide

    2015-01-01

    Rice tungro spherical virus (RTSV), also known as Rice waika virus, does not cause visible symptoms in infected rice plants. However, the virus plays a critical role in spreading Rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV), which is the major cause of severe symptoms of rice tungro disease. Recent studies showed that RNA interference (RNAi) can be used to develop virus-resistance transgenic rice plants. In this report, we presented simple procedures and protocols needed for the creation of transgenic rice plants capable of producing small interfering RNA specific against RTSV sequences. Notably, our study showed that 60 out of 64 individual hygromycin-resistant lines (putative transgenic lines) obtained through transformation carried transgenes designed for producing hairpin double-stranded RNA. Northern blot analyses revealed the presence of small interfering RNA of 21- to 24-mer in 46 out of 56 confirmed transgenic lines. Taken together, our study indicated that transgenic rice plants carrying an inverted repeat of 500-bp fragments encoding various proteins of RTSV can produce small interfering RNA from the hairpin RNA transcribed from that transgene. In light of recent studies with other viruses, it is possible that some of these transgenic rice lines might be resistant to RTSV.

  18. Small interfering RNAs as a tool to assign Rho GTPase exchange-factor function in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Gampel, Alexandra; Mellor, Harry

    2002-01-01

    Rho GTPases control a complex network of intracellular signalling pathways. Whereas progress has been made in identifying downstream signalling partners for these proteins, the characterization of Rho upstream regulatory guanine-nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) has been hampered by a lack of suitable research tools. Here we use small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to examine the cellular regulation of the RhoB GTPase, and show that RhoB is activated downstream of the epidermal-growth-factor receptor through the Vav2 exchange factor. These studies demonstrate that siRNAs are an ideal research tool for the assignment of Rho GEF function in vivo. PMID:12113653

  19. Systematic coarse-grained modeling of complexation between small interfering RNA and polycations

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Zonghui; Luijten, Erik

    2015-12-28

    All-atom molecular dynamics simulations can provide insight into the properties of polymeric gene-delivery carriers by elucidating their interactions and detailed binding patterns with nucleic acids. However, to explore nanoparticle formation through complexation of these polymers and nucleic acids and study their behavior at experimentally relevant time and length scales, a reliable coarse-grained model is needed. Here, we systematically develop such a model for the complexation of small interfering RNA (siRNA) and grafted polyethyleneimine copolymers, a promising candidate for siRNA delivery. We compare the predictions of this model with all-atom simulations and demonstrate that it is capable of reproducing detailed binding patterns, charge characteristics, and water release kinetics. Since the coarse-grained model accelerates the simulations by one to two orders of magnitude, it will make it possible to quantitatively investigate nanoparticle formation involving multiple siRNA molecules and cationic copolymers.

  20. Photochemically induced gene silencing using small interfering RNA molecules in combination with lipid carriers.

    PubMed

    Bøe, S; Longva, A S; Hovig, E

    2007-01-01

    Novel strategies for efficient delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules with a potential for targeting are required for development of RNA interference (RNAi) therapeutics. Here, we present a strategy that is based on delivery of siRNA molecules through the endocytic pathway, in order to develop a method for site-specific gene silencing. To achieve this, we combined the use of cationic lipids and photochemical internalization (PCI). Using the human S100A4 gene as a model system, we obtained potent gene silencing in four tested human cancer cell lines following PCI induction when using the cationic lipid jetSI-ENDO. Gene silencing was shown at both the RNA and protein levels, with no observed PCI toxicity when using the jetSI reagent and an optimized PCI protocol. This novel induction method opens for in vivo site-specific delivery of siRNA molecules toward a sequence of interest.

  1. RNA Interference against Animal Viruses: How Morbilliviruses Generate Extended Diversity To Escape Small Interfering RNA Control

    PubMed Central

    Holz, Carine L.; Albina, Emmanuel; Minet, Cécile; Lancelot, Renaud; Kwiatek, Olivier; Libeau, Geneviève

    2012-01-01

    Viruses are serious threats to human and animal health. Vaccines can prevent viral diseases, but few antiviral treatments are available to control evolving infections. Among new antiviral therapies, RNA interference (RNAi) has been the focus of intensive research. However, along with the development of efficient RNAi-based therapeutics comes the risk of emergence of resistant viruses. In this study, we challenged the in vitro propensity of a morbillivirus (peste des petits ruminants virus), a stable RNA virus, to escape the inhibition conferred by single or multiple small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against conserved regions of the N gene. Except with the combination of three different siRNAs, the virus systematically escaped RNAi after 3 to 20 consecutive passages. The genetic modifications involved consisted of single or multiple point nucleotide mutations and a deletion of a stretch of six nucleotides, illustrating that this virus has an unusual genomic malleability. PMID:22072768

  2. Dermal/transdermal delivery of small interfering RNA and antisense oligonucleotides- advances and hurdles.

    PubMed

    Ita, Kevin

    2017-03-01

    A diverse array of nucleic acids has been studied by several researchers for the management of several diseases. Among these compounds, small interfering RNA and antisense oligonucleotides have attracted considerable attention. Antisense oligonucleotides are synthetic single stranded strings of nucleic acids that bind to RNA and thereby alter or reduce expression of the target RNA while siRNAs, on the other hand, are double-stranded RNA molecules which can hybridize with a specific mRNA sequence and block the translation of numerous genes. One of the main obstacles in the dermal or transdermal delivery of these compounds is their low skin permeability. In this review, various techniques used to enhance the delivery of these molecules into or across the skin are described and in some cases, the correlation between enhanced dermal/transdermal delivery and therapeutic efficacy is highlighted.

  3. Development of RNA interference-based therapeutics and application of multi-target small interfering RNAs.

    PubMed

    Li, Tiejun; Wu, Meihua; Zhu, York Yuanyuan; Chen, Jianxin; Chen, Li

    2014-08-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has been proven in recent years to be a newly advanced and powerful tool for development of therapeutic agents toward various unmet medical needs such as cancer, in particular, a great attention has been paid to the development of antineoplastic agents. Recent success in clinical trials related to RNAi-based therapeutics on cancer and ocular disease has validated that small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) constitute a new promising class of therapeutics. Currently, a great wealth of multi-target based siRNA structural modifications is available for promoting siRNA-mediated gene silencing with low side effects. Here, the latest developments in RNAi-based therapeutics and novel structural modifications described for siRNAs--in particular multi-target siRNAs--are reviewed.

  4. Systematic coarse-grained modeling of complexation between small interfering RNA and polycations

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Zonghui

    2015-01-01

    All-atom molecular dynamics simulations can provide insight into the properties of polymeric gene-delivery carriers by elucidating their interactions and detailed binding patterns with nucleic acids. However, to explore nanoparticle formation through complexation of these polymers and nucleic acids and study their behavior at experimentally relevant time and length scales, a reliable coarse-grained model is needed. Here, we systematically develop such a model for the complexation of small interfering RNA (siRNA) and grafted polyethyleneimine copolymers, a promising candidate for siRNA delivery. We compare the predictions of this model with all-atom simulations and demonstrate that it is capable of reproducing detailed binding patterns, charge characteristics, and water release kinetics. Since the coarse-grained model accelerates the simulations by one to two orders of magnitude, it will make it possible to quantitatively investigate nanoparticle formation involving multiple siRNA molecules and cationic copolymers. PMID:26723631

  5. Artificial microRNAs and synthetic trans-acting small interfering RNAs interfere with viroid infection.

    PubMed

    Carbonell, Alberto; Daròs, José-Antonio

    2016-12-27

    Artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs) and synthetic trans-acting small interfering RNAs (syn-tasiRNAs) are two classes of artificial small RNAs (sRNAs) engineered to silence endogenous transcripts as well as viral RNAs in plants. Here, we explore the possibility of using amiRNAs and syn-tasiRNAs to specifically interfere with infections by viroids, small (250-400 nt) non-coding circular RNAs with compact secondary structure infecting a wide range of plant species. The combined use of recent high-throughput methods for artificial sRNA construct generation and of the Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd)/Nicotiana benthamiana pathosystem allowed for the simple and time-effective screening of multiple artificial sRNAs targeting sites distributed along PSTVd RNAs of (+) or (-) polarity. The majority of amiRNAs were highly active in agroinfiltrated leaves when co-expressed with an infectious PSTVd transcript, as were syn-tasiRNAs derived from a construct including the five most effective amiRNA sequences. A comparative analysis showed that the effects of the most effective amiRNA and of the syn-tasiRNAs were similar in agroinfiltrated leaves, as well as in upper non-agroinfiltrated leaves where PSTVd accumulation was significantly delayed. These results suggest that amiRNAs and syn-tasiRNAs can be used effectively to control viroid infections in plants. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Antisense Transcription of Retrotransposons in Drosophila: An Origin of Endogenous Small Interfering RNA Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Joseph; Harrington, Andrew W.; Steiniger, Mindy

    2016-01-01

    Movement of transposons causes insertions, deletions, and chromosomal rearrangements potentially leading to premature lethality in Drosophila melanogaster. To repress these elements and combat genomic instability, eukaryotes have evolved several small RNA-mediated defense mechanisms. Specifically, in Drosophila somatic cells, endogenous small interfering (esi)RNAs suppress retrotransposon mobility. EsiRNAs are produced by Dicer-2 processing of double-stranded RNA precursors, yet the origins of these precursors are unknown. We show that most transposon families are transcribed in both the sense (S) and antisense (AS) direction in Dmel-2 cells. LTR retrotransposons Dm297, mdg1, and blood, and non-LTR retrotransposons juan and jockey transcripts, are generated from intraelement transcription start sites with canonical RNA polymerase II promoters. We also determined that retrotransposon antisense transcripts are less polyadenylated than sense. RNA-seq and small RNA-seq revealed that Dicer-2 RNA interference (RNAi) depletion causes a decrease in the number of esiRNAs mapping to retrotransposons and an increase in expression of both S and AS retrotransposon transcripts. These data support a model in which double-stranded RNA precursors are derived from convergent transcription and processed by Dicer-2 into esiRNAs that silence both sense and antisense retrotransposon transcripts. Reduction of sense retrotransposon transcripts potentially lowers element-specific protein levels to prevent transposition. This mechanism preserves genomic integrity and is especially important for Drosophila fitness because mobile genetic elements are highly active. PMID:26534950

  7. Delivery of antiviral small interfering RNA with gold nanoparticles inhibits dengue virus infection in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Amber M.; Shi, Yongliang; Acharya, Dhiraj; Douglas, Jessica R.; Cooley, Amanda; Anderson, John F.; Huang, Faqing

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection in humans can cause flu-like illness, life-threatening haemorrhagic fever or even death. There is no specific anti-DENV therapeutic or approved vaccine currently available, partially due to the possibility of antibody-dependent enhancement reaction. Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that target specific viral genes are considered a promising therapeutic alternative against DENV infection. However, in vivo, siRNAs are vulnerable to degradation by serum nucleases and rapid renal excretion due to their small size and anionic character. To enhance siRNA delivery and stability, we complexed anti-DENV siRNAs with biocompatible gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and tested them in vitro. We found that cationic AuNP–siRNA complexes could enter Vero cells and significantly reduce DENV serotype 2 (DENV-2) replication and infectious virion release under both pre- and post-infection conditions. In addition, RNase-treated AuNP–siRNA complexes could still inhibit DENV-2 replication, suggesting that AuNPs maintained siRNA stability. Collectively, these results demonstrated that AuNPs were able to efficiently deliver siRNAs and control infection in vitro, indicating a novel anti-DENV strategy. PMID:24828333

  8. A novel albumin nanocomplex containing both small interfering RNA and gold nanorods for synergetic anticancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jin-Ha; Hwang, Hai-Jin; Shin, Seung Won; Choi, Jeong-Woo; Um, Soong Ho; Oh, Byung-Keun

    2015-05-01

    Therapeutic nanocomplexes have been extensively developed for the effective treatment of aggressive cancers because of their outstanding versatility, easy manipulation, and low cytotoxicity. In this study, we describe the synthesis of a novel bovine serum albumin (BSA)-based nanocomplex harboring both Bcl-2-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) and gold (Au) nanorods (siRNA and rods encapsulated in BSA; SREB) with the aim of developing a targeted breast cancer therapeutic. The SREB complexes contained 2 × 105 siRNA molecules and eight Au nanorods per BSA complex and were successively functionalized with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and anti-ErbB-2 antibodies to facilitate active targeting. The synergetic therapeutic activity originating from the two components effectively induced cell death (~80% reduction in viability compared with control cells) in target breast cancer cells after a single dose of laser irradiation. Intracellular SREB nanocomplex decomposition by proteolytic enzymes resulted in simultaneous RNA interference and thermal ablation, thus leading to apoptosis in the targeted cancer cells. Moreover, these therapeutic effects were sustained for approximately 72 hours. The intrinsic biocompatibility, multifunctionality, and potent in vitro anticancer properties of these SREB nanocomplexes indicate that they have great therapeutic potential for in vivo targeted cancer therapy, in addition to other areas of nanomedicine.Therapeutic nanocomplexes have been extensively developed for the effective treatment of aggressive cancers because of their outstanding versatility, easy manipulation, and low cytotoxicity. In this study, we describe the synthesis of a novel bovine serum albumin (BSA)-based nanocomplex harboring both Bcl-2-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) and gold (Au) nanorods (siRNA and rods encapsulated in BSA; SREB) with the aim of developing a targeted breast cancer therapeutic. The SREB complexes contained 2 × 105 siRNA molecules and eight Au

  9. Transvascular delivery of small interfering RNA to the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Priti; Wu, Haoquan; McBride, Jodi L; Jung, Kyeong-Eun; Kim, Moon Hee; Davidson, Beverly L; Lee, Sang Kyung; Shankar, Premlata; Manjunath, N

    2007-07-05

    A major impediment in the treatment of neurological diseases is the presence of the blood-brain barrier, which precludes the entry of therapeutic molecules from blood to brain. Here we show that a short peptide derived from rabies virus glycoprotein (RVG) enables the transvascular delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to the brain. This 29-amino-acid peptide specifically binds to the acetylcholine receptor expressed by neuronal cells. To enable siRNA binding, a chimaeric peptide was synthesized by adding nonamer arginine residues at the carboxy terminus of RVG. This RVG-9R peptide was able to bind and transduce siRNA to neuronal cells in vitro, resulting in efficient gene silencing. After intravenous injection into mice, RVG-9R delivered siRNA to the neuronal cells, resulting in specific gene silencing within the brain. Furthermore, intravenous treatment with RVG-9R-bound antiviral siRNA afforded robust protection against fatal viral encephalitis in mice. Repeated administration of RVG-9R-bound siRNA did not induce inflammatory cytokines or anti-peptide antibodies. Thus, RVG-9R provides a safe and noninvasive approach for the delivery of siRNA and potentially other therapeutic molecules across the blood-brain barrier.

  10. Small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) as a promising tool for ocular therapy

    PubMed Central

    Guzman-Aranguez, A; Loma, P; Pintor, J

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) can be used to inhibit the expression of specific genes in vitro and in vivo, thereby providing an extremely useful tool for investigating gene function. Progress in the understanding of RNAi-based mechanisms has opened up new perspectives in therapeutics for the treatment of several diseases including ocular disorders. The eye is currently considered a good target for RNAi therapy mainly because it is a confined compartment and, therefore, enables local delivery of small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) by topical instillation or direct injection. However, delivery strategies that protect the siRNAs from degradation and are suitable for long-term treatment would be help to improve the efficacy of RNAi-based therapies for ocular pathologies. siRNAs targeting critical molecules involved in the pathogenesis of glaucoma, retinitis pigmentosa and neovascular eye diseases (age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and corneal neovascularization) have been tested in experimental animal models, and clinical trials have been conducted with some of them. This review provides an update on the progress of RNAi in ocular therapeutics, discussing the advantages and drawbacks of RNAi-based therapeutics compared to previous treatments. PMID:23937539

  11. Inhibition of pathologic immunoglobulin free light chain production by small interfering RNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    Phipps, Jonathan E.; Kestler, Daniel P.; Foster, James S.; Kennel, Stephen J.; Donnell, Robert; Weiss, Deborah T.; Solomon, Alan; Wall, Jonathan S.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Morbidity and mortality occurring in patients with multiple myeloma, AL amyloidosis, and light chain deposition disease can result from the pathologic deposition of monoclonal Ig light chains (LCs) in kidneys and other organs. To reduce synthesis of such components, therapy for these disorders typically has involved anti-plasma cell agents; however, this approach is not always effective and can have adverse consequences. We have investigated another means to achieve this objective; namely, RNA interference (RNAi). Materials and Methods SP2/O mouse myeloma cells were stably transfected with a construct encoding a λ6 LC (Wil) under control of the CMV promoter, while λ2-producing myeloma cell line RPMI 8226 was purchased from the ATCC. Both were treated with small interfering RNA (siRNA) directed specifically to the V, J, or C portions of the molecules and then analyzed by ELISA, flow cytometry and real time PCR. Results Transfected cells were found to constitutively express detectable quantities of mRNA and protein Wil and, after exposure to siRNAs, an ~40% reduction in mRNA and LC production was evidenced at 48 hours. An even greater effect was seen with the 8226 cells. Conclusion Our results have shown that RNAi can markedly reduce LC synthesis and provide the basis for testing the therapeutic potential of this strategy using in vivo experimental models of multiple myeloma. PMID:20637260

  12. Systemic delivery of small interfering RNA by use of targeted polycation liposomes for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Kenjo, Eriya; Asai, Tomohiro; Yonenaga, Norihito; Ando, Hidenori; Ishii, Takayuki; Hatanaka, Kentaro; Shimizu, Kosuke; Urita, Yugo; Dewa, Takehisa; Nango, Mamoru; Tsukada, Hideo; Oku, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    Novel polycation liposomes decorated with cyclic(Cys-Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe) peptide (cyclicRGD)-polyethylene glycol (PEG) (RGD-PEG-polycation liposomes (PCL)) were previously developed for cancer therapy based on RNA interference. Here, we demonstrate the in vivo delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to tumors by use of RGD-PEG-PCL in B16F10 melanoma-bearing mice. Pharmacokinetic data obtained by positron emission tomography showed that cholesterol-conjugated siRNA formulated in RGD-PEG-PCL markedly accumulated in the tumors. Delivered by RGD-PEG-PCL, a therapeutic cocktail of siRNAs composed of cholesterol-conjugated siRNAs for c-myc, MDM2, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were able to significantly inhibit the growth of B16F10 melanoma both in vitro and in vivo. These data suggest that targeted delivery of siRNAs by use of RGD-PEG-PCL has considerable potential for cancer treatment.

  13. Design, simplified cloning, and in-silico analysis of multisite small interfering RNA-targeting cassettes

    PubMed Central

    Baghban-Kohnehrouz, Bahram; Nayeri, Shahnoush

    2016-01-01

    Multiple gene silencing is being required to target and tangle metabolic pathways in eukaryotes and researchers have to develop a subtle method for construction of RNA interference (RNAi) cassettes. Although, several vectors have been developed due to different screening and cloning strategies but still some potential limitations remain to be dissolved. Here, we worked out a simple cloning strategy to develop multisite small interfering RNA (siRNA) cassette from different genes by two cloning steps. In this method, effective siRNA sites in the target messenger RNAs (mRNAs) were determined using in silico analysis and consecutively arranged to reduce length of inverted repeats. Here, we used one-step (polymerase chain reaction) PCR by designed long primer sets covering the selected siRNA sites. Rapid screening, cost-effective and shorten procedure are advantages of this method compare to PCR classic cloning. Validity of constructs was confirmed by optimal centroid secondary structures with high stability in plants. PMID:27844018

  14. Intravaginal gene silencing using biodegradable polymer nanoparticles densely loaded with small-interfering RNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodrow, Kim A.; Cu, Yen; Booth, Carmen J.; Saucier-Sawyer, Jennifer K.; Wood, Monica J.; Mark Saltzman, W.

    2009-06-01

    Vaginal instillation of small-interfering RNA (siRNA) using liposomes has led to silencing of endogenous genes in the genital tract and protection against challenge from infectious disease. Although siRNA lipoplexes are easily formulated, several of the most effective transfection agents available commercially may be toxic to the mucosal epithelia and none are able to provide controlled or sustained release. Here, we demonstrate an alternative approach using nanoparticles composed entirely of FDA-approved materials. To render these materials effective for gene silencing, we developed novel approaches to load them with high amounts of siRNA. A single dose of siRNA-loaded nanoparticles to the mouse female reproductive tract caused efficient and sustained gene silencing. Knockdown of gene expression was observed proximal (in the vaginal lumen) and distal (in the uterine horns) to the site of topical delivery. In addition, nanoparticles penetrated deep into the epithelial tissue. This is the first report demonstrating that biodegradable polymer nanoparticles are effective delivery vehicles for siRNA to the vaginal mucosa.

  15. Application of biodegradable dendrigraft poly-l-lysine to a small interfering RNA delivery system.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Yukinobu; Kuramoto, Haruka; Mieda, Yukari; Muro, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Hiroo; Kurosaki, Tomoaki; Sakaguchi, Miako; Nakamura, Tadahiro; Kitahara, Takashi; Sasaki, Hitoshi

    2017-01-01

    Dendrigraft poly-l-lysine (DGL), including its central core, consists entirely of lysine, hence it is completely biodegradable. We applied DGL in a small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery system. Binary complexes with siRNA and DGL had particle sizes of 23-73 nm and ζ-potentials of 34-42 mV. The siRNA-DGL complexes showed significant silencing effects in a mouse colon carcinoma cell line expressing luciferase (Colon26/Luc cells). The siRNA-DGL complexes induced slight cytotoxicity and hematological toxicity at a high charge ratio of DGL to siRNA, probably because of their cationic charges. Therefore, we recharged the siRNA-DGL complexes with γ-polyglutamic acid (γ-PGA), a biodegradable anionic compound, which was reported to reduce the cytotoxicity of cationic complexes. The ternary complexes showed particle sizes of 35-47 nm at a charge ratio of greater than 14 to siRNA with negative charges. Strong silencing effects of the ternary complexes were observed in Colon26/Luc cells without cytotoxicity or hematological toxicity. The cellular uptake and degradation of the binary and ternary complexes were confirmed by fluorescence microscopy. The ternary complexes suppressed luciferase activity in the tumor after direct injection into the tumors of mice bearing Colon26/Luc cells. Thus, a potentially important siRNA delivery system was constructed using biodegradable DGL.

  16. Efficient inhibition of the formation of joint adhesions by ERK2 small interfering RNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Fengfeng; Ruan, Hongjiang; Fan, Cunyi; Zeng, Bingfang; Wang, Chunyang; Wang, Xiang

    2010-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-{beta}1 and fibroblast growth factor-2 play very important roles in fibroblast proliferation and collagen expression. These processes lead to the formation of joint adhesions through the SMAD and MAPK pathways, in which extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)2 is considered to be crucial. Based on these theories, we examined the effects of a lentivirus-mediated small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting ERK2 on the suppression of joint adhesion formation in vivo. The effects were assessed in vivo from different aspects including the adhesion score, histology and joint contracture angle. We found that the adhesions in the ERK2 siRNA group became soft and weak, and were easily stretched. Accordingly, the flexion contracture angles in the ERK2 siRNA group were also reduced (P < 0.05 compared with the control group). The animals appeared healthy, with no signs of impaired wound healing. In conclusion, local delivery of a lentivirus-mediated siRNA targeting ERK2 can ameliorate joint adhesion formation effectively and safely.

  17. High molecular weight RNAs and small interfering RNAs induce systemic posttranscriptional gene silencing in plants

    PubMed Central

    Klahre, Ulrich; Crété, Patrice; Leuenberger, Sabrina A.; Iglesias, Victor A.; Meins, Frederick

    2002-01-01

    Posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS) in transgenic plants is an epigenetic form of RNA degradation related to PTGS and RNA interference (RNAi) in fungi and animals. Evidence suggests that transgene loci and RNA viruses can generate double-stranded RNAs similar in sequence to the transcribed region of target genes, which then undergo endonucleolytic cleavage to generate small interfering RNAs (siRNA) that promote degradation of cognate RNAs. The silent state in transgenic plants and in Caenorhabditis elegans can spread systemically, implying that mobile silencing signals exist. Neither the chemical nature of these signals nor their exact source in the PTGS pathway is known. Here, we use a positive marker system and real-time monitoring of green fluorescent protein expression to show that large sense, antisense, and double-stranded RNAs as well as double-stranded siRNAs delivered biolistically into plant cells trigger silencing capable of spreading locally and systemically. Systemically silenced leaves show greatly reduced levels of target RNA and accumulate siRNAs, confirming that RNA can induce systemic PTGS. The induced siRNAs represent parts of the target RNA that are outside of the region of homology with the triggering siRNA. Our results imply that siRNAs themselves or intermediates induced by siRNAs could comprise silencing signals and that these signals induce self-amplifying production of siRNAs. PMID:12181491

  18. Development of a software tool and criteria evaluation for efficient design of small interfering RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhary, Aparna; Srivastava, Sonam; Garg, Sanjeev

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} The developed tool predicted siRNA constructs with better thermodynamic stability and total score based on positional and other criteria. {yields} Off-target silencing below score 30 were observed for the best siRNA constructs for different genes. {yields} Immunostimulation and cytotoxicity motifs considered and penalized in the developed tool. {yields} Both positional and compositional criteria were observed to be important. -- Abstract: RNA interference can be used as a tool for gene silencing mediated by small interfering RNAs (siRNA). The critical step in effective and specific RNAi processing is the selection of suitable constructs. Major design criteria, i.e., Reynolds's design rules, thermodynamic stability, internal repeats, immunostimulatory motifs were emphasized and implemented in the siRNA design tool. The tool provides thermodynamic stability score, GC content and a total score based on other design criteria in the output. The viability of the tool was established with different datasets. In general, the siRNA constructs produced by the tool had better thermodynamic score and positional properties. Comparable thermodynamic scores and better total scores were observed with the existing tools. Moreover, the results generated had comparable off-target silencing effect. Criteria evaluations with additional criteria were achieved in WEKA.

  19. Delivery of Small Interfering RNA by Peptide-Targeted Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticle-Supported Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Ashley, Carlee E.; Carnes, Eric C.; Epler, Katharine E.; Padilla, David P.; Phillips, Genevieve K.; Castillo, Robert E.; Wilkinson, Dan C.; Wilkinson, Brian S.; Burgard, Cameron A.; Sewell, Robin M.; Townson, Jason L.; Chackerian, Bryce; Willman, Cheryl L.; Peabody, David S.; Wharton, Walker; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) is severely limited by the availability of delivery platforms that protect siRNA from degradation, deliver it to the target cell with high specificity and efficiency, and promote its endosomal escape and cytosolic dispersion. Here we report that mesoporous silica nanoparticle-supported lipid bilayers (or ‘protocells’), exhibit multiple properties that overcome many of the limitations of existing delivery platforms. Protocells have a 10- to 100-fold greater capacity for siRNA than corresponding lipid nanoparticles and are markedly more stable when incubated under physiological conditions. Protocells loaded with a cocktail of siRNAs bind to cells in a manner dependent on the presence of an appropriate targeting peptide and, through an endocytic pathway followed by endosomal disruption, promote delivery of the silencing nucleotides to the cytoplasm. The expression of each of the genes targeted by the siRNAs was shown to be repressed at the protein level, resulting in a potent induction of growth arrest and apoptosis. Incubation of control cells that lack expression of the antigen recognized by the targeting peptide with siRNA-loaded protocells induced neither repression of protein expression nor apoptosis, indicating the precise specificity of cytotoxic activity. In terms of loading capacity, targeting capabilities, and potency of action, protocells provide unique attributes as a delivery platform for therapeutic oligonucleotides. PMID:22309035

  20. Delivery of small interfering RNA by peptide-targeted mesoporous silica nanoparticle-supported lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Ashley, Carlee E; Carnes, Eric C; Epler, Katharine E; Padilla, David P; Phillips, Genevieve K; Castillo, Robert E; Wilkinson, Dan C; Wilkinson, Brian S; Burgard, Cameron A; Kalinich, Robin M; Townson, Jason L; Chackerian, Bryce; Willman, Cheryl L; Peabody, David S; Wharton, Walker; Brinker, C Jeffrey

    2012-03-27

    The therapeutic potential of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) is severely limited by the availability of delivery platforms that protect siRNA from degradation, deliver it to the target cell with high specificity and efficiency, and promote its endosomal escape and cytosolic dispersion. Here we report that mesoporous silica nanoparticle-supported lipid bilayers (or "protocells") exhibit multiple properties that overcome many of the limitations of existing delivery platforms. Protocells have a 10- to 100-fold greater capacity for siRNA than corresponding lipid nanoparticles and are markedly more stable when incubated under physiological conditions. Protocells loaded with a cocktail of siRNAs bind to cells in a manner dependent on the presence of an appropriate targeting peptide and, through an endocytic pathway followed by endosomal disruption, promote delivery of the silencing nucleotides to the cytoplasm. The expression of each of the genes targeted by the siRNAs was shown to be repressed at the protein level, resulting in a potent induction of growth arrest and apoptosis. Incubation of control cells that lack expression of the antigen recognized by the targeting peptide with siRNA-loaded protocells induced neither repression of protein expression nor apoptosis, indicating the precise specificity of cytotoxic activity. In terms of loading capacity, targeting capabilities, and potency of action, protocells provide unique attributes as a delivery platform for therapeutic oligonucleotides.

  1. Colored petri net modeling of small interfering RNA-mediated messenger RNA degradation

    PubMed Central

    Nickaeen, Niloofar; Moein, Shiva; Heidary, Zarifeh; Ghaisari, Jafar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mathematical modeling of biological systems is an attractive way for studying complex biological systems and their behaviors. Petri Nets, due to their ability to model systems with various levels of qualitative information, have been wildly used in modeling biological systems in which enough qualitative data may not be at disposal. These nets have been used to answer questions regarding the dynamics of different cell behaviors including the translation process. In one stage of the translation process, the RNA sequence may be degraded. In the process of degradation of RNA sequence, small-noncoding RNA molecules known as small interfering RNA (siRNA) match the target RNA sequence. As a result of this matching, the target RNA sequence is destroyed. Materials and Methods: In this context, the process of matching and destruction is modeled using Colored Petri Nets (CPNs). The model is constructed using CPNs which allow tokens to have a value or type on them. Thus, CPN is a suitable tool to model string structures in which each element of the string has a different type. Using CPNs, long RNA, and siRNA strings are modeled with a finite set of colors. The model is simulated via CPN Tools. Results: A CPN model of the matching between RNA and siRNA strings is constructed in CPN Tools environment. Conclusion: In previous studies, a network of stoichiometric equations was modeled. However, in this particular study, we modeled the mechanism behind the silencing process. Modeling this kind of mechanisms provides us with a tool to examine the effects of different factors such as mutation or drugs on the process. PMID:27376039

  2. In silico reconstruction of viral genomes from small RNAs improves virus-derived small interfering RNA profiling.

    PubMed

    Vodovar, Nicolas; Goic, Bertsy; Blanc, Hervé; Saleh, Maria-Carla

    2011-11-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is the essential component of antiviral immunity in invertebrates and plants. One of the landmarks of the antiviral RNAi response is the production of virus-derived small interfering RNA (vsiRNA) from viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). vsiRNAs constitute a fragmented image of the viral genome sequence that results from Dicer cleavage. vsiRNA sequence profiling is used extensively as a surrogate to study the antiviral RNAi response by determining the nature of the viral dsRNA molecules exposed to and processed by the RNAi machinery. The accuracy of these profiles depends on the actual viral genome sequence used as a reference to align vsiRNA reads, and the interpretation of inaccurate profiles can be misleading. Using Flock house virus and Drosophila melanogaster as a model RNAi-competent organism, we show accurate reconstruction of full-length virus reference sequence from vsiRNAs and prediction of the structure of defective interfering particles (DIs). We developed a Perl script, named Paparazzi, that reconstitutes viral genomes through an iterative alignment/consensus call procedure using a related reference sequence as scaffold. As prevalent DI-derived reads introduce artifacts during reconstruction, Paparazzi eliminates DI-specific reads to improve the quality of the reconstructed genome. Paparazzi constitutes a promising alternative to Sanger sequencing in this context and an effective tool to study antiviral RNAi mechanisms by accurately quantifying vsiRNA along the replicating viral genome. We further discuss Paparazzi as a companion tool for virus discovery as it provides full-length genome sequences and corrects for potential artifacts of assembly.

  3. Evaluation of locked nucleic acid-modified small interfering RNA in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mook, Olaf R; Baas, Frank; de Wissel, Marit B; Fluiter, Kees

    2007-03-01

    RNA interference has become widely used as an experimental tool to study gene function. In addition, small interfering RNA (siRNA) may have great potential for the treatment of diseases. Recently, it was shown that siRNA can be used to mediate gene silencing in mouse models. Locally administered siRNAs entered the first clinical trials, but strategies for successful systemic delivery of siRNA are still under development. Challenges still exist about the stability, delivery, and therapeutic efficacy of siRNA. In the present study, we compare the efficacy of two methods of systemic siRNA delivery and the effects of siRNA modifications using locked nucleic acids (LNA) in a xenograft cancer model. Low volume tail vein bolus injections and continuous s.c. delivery using osmotic minipumps yielded similar uptake levels of unmodified siRNA by tumor xenografts. Both routes of administration mediated sequence-specific inhibition of two unrelated targets inside tumor xenografts. Previous studies have shown that LNA can be incorporated into the sense strand of siRNA while the efficacy is retained. Modification of siRNA targeting green fluorescent protein with LNA results in a significant increase in serum stability and thus may be beneficial for clinical applications. We show that minimal 3' end LNA modifications of siRNA are effective in stabilization of siRNA. Multiple LNA modifications in the accompanying strand further increase the stability but negate the efficacy in vitro and in vivo. In vivo, LNA-modified siRNA reduced off-target gene regulation compared with nonmodified siRNA. End-modified siRNA targeting green fluorescent protein provides a good trade-off between stability and efficacy in vivo using the two methods of systemic delivery in the nude mouse model. Therefore, LNA-modified siRNA should be preferred over unmodified siRNA.

  4. [In vivo imaging of liposomal small interfering RNA (siRNA) trafficking by positron emission tomography].

    PubMed

    Ando, Hidenori; Yonenaga, Norihito; Asai, Tomohiro; Hatanaka, Kentaro; Koide, Hiroyuki; Tsuzuku, Takuma; Harada, Norihiro; Tsukada, Hideo; Oku, Naoto

    2012-01-01

    In the development of nucleic acid medicines such as small interfering RNA (siRNA) drugs, one problem is how to study the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, since the precise in vivo behavior of siRNA is hard to detect. In this research, to establish a highly sensitive detection system of siRNA biodistribution in the whole body, the technology of positron imaging was applied. First, a one-step synthetic method in which double-stranded siRNA was directly labeled by a positron emitter, (18)F, was developed. By using [(18)F]-labeled siRNA ([(18)F]-siRNA), the complex of siRNA and polycation liposomes (PCL) containing dicetylphosphate tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA-PCL) was prepared. Then, the biodistribution of the siRNA after intravenous administration to mice was analyzed by planar positron imaging system (PPIS). As a result, whereas naked [(18)F]-siRNA was immediately excreted in mouse bladder after administration, the complex with cationic liposome (CL) was trapped in the lungs. Furthermore, [(18)F]-siRNA carried with PEGylated CL (PL) was distributed throughout the body, suggesting that it circulated in the bloodstream for an extended period of time. Additionally, PET imaging revealed more detailed biodistribution of the siRNA than in vivo imaging system (IVIS) because PET imaging is not affected by the depth variation of target tissues. On the other hand, to induce high accumulation of siRNAs against c-myc, MDM2, and VEGF in tumor tissue, a tumor-targeting probe, RGD peptide, was grafted at the top of PEG chain in PEGylated TEPA-PCL and the effect of the complex on experimental lung metastasis of B16 melanoma was examined. The complex suppressed the progression of tumor. We believe that the positron imaging data would support the development of siRNA agent for clinical use.

  5. CCR5 small interfering RNA ameliorated joint inflammation in rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Duan, Hongmei; Yang, Pingting; Fang, Fang; Ding, Shuang; Xiao, Weiguo

    2014-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disease. C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) is found in inflamed synovium of RA patients and is necessary for formation of RA. We aimed to check whether delivery of CCR5-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) via electroporation suppresses local inflammation in arthritis rats. Vectors encoding siRNA that target CCR5 or negative control siRNA were constructed for gene silencing and the silencing effects of suppressing CCR5 expression in synovium examined by western blot. The vector with strongest effect was delivered into the knee joint of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rats by the in vivo electroporation method 7, 10, 13, and 16 days after immunization with Complete Freund's adjuvant. During an observation of 28 days, behavior, paw swelling, arthritis and histopathologic scoring were estimated. The expression level of CCR5 in synovium was evaluated by western blot and real-time PCR. Anti-CCR5 D1 siRNA was effectively inhibited CCR5 expression in vitro. Moreover, delivery of the siRNA into inflammatory joint also suppressed the expression of CCR5 in vivo and markedly suppressed paw swelling and inflammation. Local electroporation of anti-CCR5 siRNA into the left inflamed joints could achieve the silencing of CCR5 gene and alleviate local inflammation just in the knee joint injected with siRNA other than the opposite joint. Inhibition of CCR5 expression may provide a potential for treatment of RA.

  6. In Vivo Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Small Interfering RNA Nanodelivery to Pancreatic Islets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Moore, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic islet transplantation is a promising therapeutic approach for type 1 diabetes.However, recent advances in islet transplantation are limited by significant graft loss after transplantation. Multiple immunological and nonimmunological factors contribute to this loss. Novel therapies that could target the core reasons for the islet graft loss are desperately needed. Small interfering RNA can be used to inhibit the expression of virtually any gene with single-nucleotide specificity including genes responsible for islet damage. Applying adequate delivery of siRNA molecules to pancreatic islets prior to transplantation holds a great potential for improving the survival of islet grafts. Noninvasive imaging provides means for monitoring the survival of transplanted islets in real time. Here, we summarize the approach that has been developed to deliver siRNA to pancreatic islets in conjunction with tracking of the graft outcome by in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We synthesize a nano-sized theranostic agent consisting of magnetic nanoparticles (MN), a reporter for MRI, labeled with Cy5.5 dye for near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging, and conjugated to siRNA molecule targeting genes that are harmful to islet grafts. Pre-labeling of islets by MN-Cy5.5-siRNA allowed us to monitor the survival of transplanted islet grafts by MRI and NIRF imaging and resulted in efficient silencing of the target genes in vivo. This novel approach combines a therapeutic effect provided by RNA interference technology with in vivo MR imaging and is expected to significantly improve the outcome of islet transplantation in patients with type 1 diabetes.

  7. Delivery of small interfering RNA for inhibition of endothelial cell apoptosis by hypoxia and serum deprivation

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Seung-Woo; Hartle, Lauren; Son, Sun Mi; Yang, Fan; Goldberg, Michael; Xu, Qiaobing; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G.

    2008-11-07

    RNA interference (RNAi) for anti-angiogenic or pro-apoptotic factors in endothelial cells (ECs) has great potential for the treatment of ischemic diseases by promoting angiogenesis or inhibiting apoptosis. Here, we report the utility of small interfering RNA (siRNA) in inhibiting EC apoptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}). siRNA was designed and synthesized targeting tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} receptor-1 (TNFR-1) and Src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-1 (SHP-1). Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cultured under in vitro hypoxic and serum-deprived conditions to simulate in vivo ischemic conditions. Two days after liposomal delivery of siRNA targeting TNFR-1 and SHP-1, significant silencing of each target (TNFR-1; 76.5% and SHP-1; 97.2%) was detected. Under serum-deprived hypoxic (1% oxygen) conditions, TNF-{alpha} expression in HUVECs increased relative to normoxic (20% oxygen) and serum-containing conditions. Despite enhanced TNF-{alpha} expression, suppression of TNFR-1 or SHP-1 by siRNA delivery not only enhanced expression of angiogenic factors (KDR/Flk-1 and eNOS) and anti-apoptotic factor (Bcl-xL) but also reduced expression of a pro-apoptotic factor (Bax). Transfection of TNFR-1 or SHP-1 siRNA significantly decreased the HUVEC apoptosis while significantly enhancing HUVEC proliferation and capillary formation. The present study demonstrates that TNFR-1 and SHP-1 may be useful targets for the treatment of myocardial or hindlimb ischemia.

  8. Detection of small interfering RNA (siRNA) by mass spectrometry procedures in doping controls.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Andreas; Walpurgis, Katja; Delahaut, Philippe; Kohler, Maxie; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Uncovering manipulation of athletic performance via small interfering (si)RNA is an emerging field in sports drug testing. Due to the potential to principally knock down every target gene in the organism by means of the RNA interference pathway, this facet of gene doping has become a realistic scenario. In the present study, two distinct model siRNAs comprising 21 nucleotides were designed as double strands which were perfect counterparts to a sequence of the respective messenger RNA coding the muscle regulator myostatin of Rattus norvegicus. Several modified nucleotides were introduced in both the sense and the antisense strand comprising phosphothioates, 2'-O-methylation, 2'-fluoro-nucleotides, locked nucleic acids and a cholesterol tag at the 3'-end. The model siRNAs were applied to rats at 1 mg/kg (i.v.) and blood as well as urine samples were collected. After isolation of the RNA by means of a RNA purification kit, the target analytes were detected by liquid chromatography - high resolution/high accuracy mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS). Analytes were detected as modified nucleotides after alkaline hydrolysis, as intact oligonucleotide strands (top-down) and by means of denaturing SDS-PAGE analysis. The gel-separated siRNA was further subjected to in-gel hydrolysis with different RNases and subsequent identification of the fragments by untargeted LC-HRMS analysis (bottom-up, 'experimental RNomics'). Combining the results of all approaches, the identification of several 3'-truncated urinary metabolites was accomplished and target analytes were detected up to 24 h after a single administration. Simultaneously collected blood samples yielded no promising results. The methods were validated and found fit-for-purpose for doping controls.

  9. An Atelocollagen Coating for Efficient Local Gene Silencing by Using Small Interfering RNA.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Olivia; Nothdurft, Dimitrios; Perle, Nadja; Neumann, Bernd; Behring, Andreas; Degenkolbe, Ilka; Walker, Tobias; Schlensak, Christian; Wendel, Hans Peter; Nolte, Andrea

    2017-03-17

    In the last decades, many efforts have been made to counteract adverse effects after stenting atherosclerotic coronary arteries. A breakthrough in better vascular wall regeneration was noted in the new era of drug-eluting stents. A novel personalized approach is the development of gene-eluting stents promising an alteration in gene expression involved in regeneration. We investigated a coating system consisting of the polymer atelocollagen (ATCOL) and a specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) for intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) found on the surface of defective endothelial cells (ECs). We demonstrated very high cell viability, in which EA.hy926 grew on 0.008% or 0.032% ATCOL layers. Additionally, hemocompatibility assays proved the biocompatibility of this coating. The highest transfection efficiency with EA.hy926 was achieved with 5 μg siRNA immobilized in ATCOL after 2 days. The release of fluorescent-labeled siRNA was about 9 days. Long-term knockdown of ICAM-1 was analyzed by flow cytometry, revealing that the coating with 0.008% ATCOL and 5 μg siICAM-1 provoked gene silencing up to 8 days. 5'-RNA ligase-mediated rapid amplification of cDNA ends PCR (RLM-RACE-PCR) demonstrated the specificity of our established ATCOL gene-silencing coating, meaning that our coating is well suited for further investigations in in vivo studies. Herein, we would like to demonstrate that our ATCOL is well-suited for better artery wall regeneration after stent implantation.

  10. A Convenient In Vivo Model Using Small Interfering RNA Silencing to Rapidly Assess Skeletal Gene Function

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen; Liu, Can; Hai, Bao; Du, Guohong; Wang, Hong; Leng, Huijie; Xu, Yingsheng; Song, Chunli

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult to study bone in vitro because it contains various cell types that engage in cross-talk. Bone biologically links various organs, and it has thus become increasingly evident that skeletal physiology must be studied in an integrative manner in an intact animal. We developed a model using local intraosseous small interfering RNA (siRNA) injection to rapidly assess the effects of a target gene on the local skeletal environment. In this model, 160-g male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated for 1–2 weeks. The left tibia received intraosseous injection of a parathyroid hormone 1 receptor (Pth1r) or insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (Igf-1r) siRNA transfection complex loaded in poloxamer 407 hydrogel, and the right tibia received the same volume of control siRNA. All the tibias received an intraosseous injection of recombinant human parathyroid hormone (1–34) (rhPTH (1–34)) or insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). Calcein green and alizarin red were injected 6 and 2 days before euthanasia, respectively. IGF-1R and PTH1R expression levels were detected via RT-PCR assays and immunohistochemistry. Bone mineral density (BMD), microstructure, mineral apposition rates (MARs), and strength were determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, micro-CT, histology and biomechanical tests. The RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry results revealed that IGF-1R and PTH1R expression levels were dramatically diminished in the siRNA-treated left tibias compared to the right tibias (both p<0.05). Using poloxamer 407 hydrogel as a controlled-release system prolonged the silencing effect of a single dose of siRNA; the mRNA expression levels of IGF-1R were lower at two weeks than at one week (p<0.01). The BMD, bone microstructure parameters, MAR and bone strength were significantly decreased in the left tibias compared to the right tibias (all p<0.05). This simple and convenient local intraosseous siRNA injection model achieved gene silencing with very small quantities of si

  11. Rapid delivery of small interfering RNA by biosurfactant MEL-A-containing liposomes

    SciTech Connect

    Inoh, Yoshikazu; Furuno, Tadahide; Hirashima, Naohide; Kitamoto, Dai; Nakanishi, Mamoru

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We use MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes for siRNA delivery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes can efficiently and rapidly deliver siRNA into the cytoplasm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rapid delivery of siRNA is due to the membrane fusion between liposomes and plasma membrane. -- Abstract: The downregulation of gene expression by RNA interference holds great potential for genetic analysis and gene therapy. However, a more efficient delivery system for small interfering RNA (siRNA) into the target cells is required for wide fields such as cell biology, physiology, and clinical application. Non-viral vectors are stronger candidates than viral vectors because they are safer and easier to prepare. We have previously used a new method for gene transfection by combining cationic liposomes with the biosurfactant mannosylerythritol lipid-A (MEL-A). The novel MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes rapidly delivered DNA (plasmids and oligonucleotides) into the cytosol and nucleus through membrane fusion between liposomes and the plasma membrane, and consequently, enhanced the gene transfection efficiency. In this study, we determined the efficiency of MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes for siRNA delivery. We observed that exogenous and endogenous protein expression was suppressed by approximately 60% at 24 h after brief (30 min) incubation of target cells with MEL-A-containing cationic liposome/siRNA complexes. Confocal microscopic analysis showed that suppression of protein expression was caused by rapid siRNA delivery into the cytosol. We found that the MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes directly delivered siRNA into the cytoplasm by the membrane fusion in addition to endocytotic pathway whereas Lipofectamine Trade-Mark-Sign RNAiMax delivered siRNA only by the endocytotic pathway. It seems that the ability to rapidly and directly deliver siRNA into the cytosol using MEL-A-containing cationic

  12. Delivery of small interfering RNAs in human cervical cancer cells by polyethylenimine-functionalized carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuan-Pin; Lin, I-Jou; Chen, Chih-Chen; Hsu, Yi-Chiang; Chang, Chi-Chang; Lee, Mon-Juan

    2013-06-06

    Carbon nanotubes are capable of penetrating the cell membrane and are widely considered as potential carriers for gene or drug delivery. Because the C-C and C=C bonds in carbon nanotubes are nonpolar, functionalization is required for carbon nanotubes to interact with genes or drugs as well as to improve their biocompatibility. In this study, polyethylenimine (PEI)-functionalized single-wall (PEI-NH-SWNTs) and multiwall carbon nanotubes (PEI-NH-MWNTs) were produced by direct amination method. PEI functionalization increased the positive charge on the surface of SWNTs and MWNTs, allowing carbon nanotubes to interact electrostatically with the negatively charged small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and to serve as nonviral gene delivery reagents. PEI-NH-MWNTs and PEI-NH-SWNTs had a better solubility in water than pristine carbon nanotubes, and further removal of large aggregates by centrifugation produced a stable suspension of reduced particle size and improved homogeneity and dispersity. The amount of grafted PEI estimated by thermogravimetric analysis was 5.08% (w/w) and 5.28% (w/w) for PEI-NH-SWNTs and PEI-NH-MWNTs, respectively. For the assessment of cytotoxicity, various concentrations of PEI-NH-SWNTs and PEI-NH-MWNTs were incubated with human cervical cancer cells, HeLa-S3, for 48 h. PEI-NH-SWNTs and PEI-NH-MWNTs induced cell deaths in a dose-dependent manner but were less cytotoxic compared to pure PEI. As determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay, siRNAs directed against glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (siGAPDH) were completely associated with PEI-NH-SWNTs or PEI-NH-MWNTs at a PEI-NH-SWNT/siGAPDH or PEI-NH-MWNT/siGAPDH mass ratio of 80:1 or 160:1, respectively. Furthermore, PEI-NH-SWNTs and PEI-NH-MWNTs successfully delivered siGAPDH into HeLa-S3 cells at PEI-NH-SWNT/siGAPDH and PEI-NH-MWNT/siGAPDH mass ratios of 1:1 to 20:1, resulting in suppression of the mRNA level of GAPDH to an extent similar to that of DharmaFECT, a common transfection

  13. Delivery of small interfering RNAs in human cervical cancer cells by polyethylenimine-functionalized carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yuan-Pin; Lin, I.-Jou; Chen, Chih-Chen; Hsu, Yi-Chiang; Chang, Chi-Chang; Lee, Mon-Juan

    2013-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes are capable of penetrating the cell membrane and are widely considered as potential carriers for gene or drug delivery. Because the C-C and C=C bonds in carbon nanotubes are nonpolar, functionalization is required for carbon nanotubes to interact with genes or drugs as well as to improve their biocompatibility. In this study, polyethylenimine (PEI)-functionalized single-wall (PEI-NH-SWNTs) and multiwall carbon nanotubes (PEI-NH-MWNTs) were produced by direct amination method. PEI functionalization increased the positive charge on the surface of SWNTs and MWNTs, allowing carbon nanotubes to interact electrostatically with the negatively charged small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and to serve as nonviral gene delivery reagents. PEI-NH-MWNTs and PEI-NH-SWNTs had a better solubility in water than pristine carbon nanotubes, and further removal of large aggregates by centrifugation produced a stable suspension of reduced particle size and improved homogeneity and dispersity. The amount of grafted PEI estimated by thermogravimetric analysis was 5.08% ( w/ w) and 5.28% ( w/ w) for PEI-NH-SWNTs and PEI-NH-MWNTs, respectively. For the assessment of cytotoxicity, various concentrations of PEI-NH-SWNTs and PEI-NH-MWNTs were incubated with human cervical cancer cells, HeLa-S3, for 48 h. PEI-NH-SWNTs and PEI-NH-MWNTs induced cell deaths in a dose-dependent manner but were less cytotoxic compared to pure PEI. As determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay, siRNAs directed against glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (siGAPDH) were completely associated with PEI-NH-SWNTs or PEI-NH-MWNTs at a PEI-NH-SWNT/siGAPDH or PEI-NH-MWNT/siGAPDH mass ratio of 80:1 or 160:1, respectively. Furthermore, PEI-NH-SWNTs and PEI-NH-MWNTs successfully delivered siGAPDH into HeLa-S3 cells at PEI-NH-SWNT/siGAPDH and PEI-NH-MWNT/siGAPDH mass ratios of 1:1 to 20:1, resulting in suppression of the mRNA level of GAPDH to an extent similar to that of DharmaFECT, a common transfection

  14. Nanoparticles for targeted delivery of therapeutics and small interfering RNAs in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Varshosaz, Jaleh; Farzan, Maryam

    2015-11-14

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the 5(th) most common malignancy which is responsible for more than half million annual mortalities; also, it is the third leading cause of cancer related death. Unfavorable systemic side-effects of chemotherapeutic agents and susceptibility to the degradation of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), which can knock down a specific gene involved in the disease, have hampered their clinical application. So, it could be beneficial to develop an efficient carrier for the stabilization and specific delivery of drugs and siRNA to cells. Targeted nanoparticles have gained considerable attention as an efficient drug and gene delivery system, which is due to their capability in achieving the highest accumulation of cytotoxic agents in tumor tissue, modifiable drug pharmacokinetic- and bio-distribution, improved effectiveness of treatment, and limited side-effects. Recent studies have shed more light on the advantages of novel drug loaded carrier systems vs free drugs. Most of the animal studies have reported improvement in treatment efficacy and survival rate using novel carrier systems. Targeted delivery may be achieved passively or actively. In passive targeting, no ligand as homing device is used, while targeting is achieved by incorporating the therapeutic agent into a macromolecule or nanoparticle that passively reaches the target organ. However, in active targeting, the therapeutic agent or carrier system is conjugated to a tissue or cell-specific receptor which is over-expressed in a special malignancy using a ligand called a homing device. This review covers a broad spectrum of targeted nanoparticles as therapeutic and non-viral siRNA delivery systems, which are developed for enhanced cellular uptake and targeted gene silencing in vitro and in vivo and their characteristics and opportunities for the clinical applications of drugs and therapeutic siRNA are discussed in this article. Asialoglycoprotein receptors, low-density lipoprotein

  15. Nanoparticles for targeted delivery of therapeutics and small interfering RNAs in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Varshosaz, Jaleh; Farzan, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the 5th most common malignancy which is responsible for more than half million annual mortalities; also, it is the third leading cause of cancer related death. Unfavorable systemic side-effects of chemotherapeutic agents and susceptibility to the degradation of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), which can knock down a specific gene involved in the disease, have hampered their clinical application. So, it could be beneficial to develop an efficient carrier for the stabilization and specific delivery of drugs and siRNA to cells. Targeted nanoparticles have gained considerable attention as an efficient drug and gene delivery system, which is due to their capability in achieving the highest accumulation of cytotoxic agents in tumor tissue, modifiable drug pharmacokinetic- and bio-distribution, improved effectiveness of treatment, and limited side-effects. Recent studies have shed more light on the advantages of novel drug loaded carrier systems vs free drugs. Most of the animal studies have reported improvement in treatment efficacy and survival rate using novel carrier systems. Targeted delivery may be achieved passively or actively. In passive targeting, no ligand as homing device is used, while targeting is achieved by incorporating the therapeutic agent into a macromolecule or nanoparticle that passively reaches the target organ. However, in active targeting, the therapeutic agent or carrier system is conjugated to a tissue or cell-specific receptor which is over-expressed in a special malignancy using a ligand called a homing device. This review covers a broad spectrum of targeted nanoparticles as therapeutic and non-viral siRNA delivery systems, which are developed for enhanced cellular uptake and targeted gene silencing in vitro and in vivo and their characteristics and opportunities for the clinical applications of drugs and therapeutic siRNA are discussed in this article. Asialoglycoprotein receptors, low-density lipoprotein

  16. Laser‐Triggered Small Interfering RNA Releasing Gold Nanoshells against Heat Shock Protein for Sensitized Photothermal Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaohui; Li, Siwen; Zhang, Min; Ma, Yi; Liu, Yuxi; Gao, Weidong; Zhang, Jiaqi

    2016-01-01

    The resistance of cancer cells to photothermal therapy is closely related to the overexpression of heat shock proteins (HSPs), which are abnormally upregulated when cells are under lethal stresses. Common strategies that use small molecule inhibitors against HSPs to enhance hyperthermia effect lack spatial and temporal control of drug release, leading to unavoidable systemic toxicity. Herein, a versatile photothermal platform is developed which is composed of a hollow gold nanoshell core densely packed with small interfering RNAs against heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70). Upon near infrared light irradiation, the small interfering RNAs can detach from gold surface specifically and escape from endosomes for Hsp70 silencing. Meanwhile, the temperature increases for hyperthermia therapy due to the high photothermal efficiency of the nanoshells. Efficient downregulation of Hsp70 after light activation is achieved in vitro and in vivo. Ultimately, the light‐controlled dual functional nanosystem, with the effects of Hsp70 silencing and temperature elevation, results in sensitized photothermal therapy in nude mice model under mild temperature. This strategy smartly combines the localized photothermal therapy with controlled Hsp70 silencing, and has great potential for clinical translation with a simple and easily controlled structure. PMID:28251053

  17. Laser-Triggered Small Interfering RNA Releasing Gold Nanoshells against Heat Shock Protein for Sensitized Photothermal Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaohui; Li, Siwen; Zhang, Min; Ma, Yi; Liu, Yuxi; Gao, Weidong; Zhang, Jiaqi; Gu, Yueqing

    2017-02-01

    The resistance of cancer cells to photothermal therapy is closely related to the overexpression of heat shock proteins (HSPs), which are abnormally upregulated when cells are under lethal stresses. Common strategies that use small molecule inhibitors against HSPs to enhance hyperthermia effect lack spatial and temporal control of drug release, leading to unavoidable systemic toxicity. Herein, a versatile photothermal platform is developed which is composed of a hollow gold nanoshell core densely packed with small interfering RNAs against heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70). Upon near infrared light irradiation, the small interfering RNAs can detach from gold surface specifically and escape from endosomes for Hsp70 silencing. Meanwhile, the temperature increases for hyperthermia therapy due to the high photothermal efficiency of the nanoshells. Efficient downregulation of Hsp70 after light activation is achieved in vitro and in vivo. Ultimately, the light-controlled dual functional nanosystem, with the effects of Hsp70 silencing and temperature elevation, results in sensitized photothermal therapy in nude mice model under mild temperature. This strategy smartly combines the localized photothermal therapy with controlled Hsp70 silencing, and has great potential for clinical translation with a simple and easily controlled structure.

  18. The Exosome and Trans-Acting Small Interfering RNAs Regulate Cuticular Wax Biosynthesis during Arabidopsis Inflorescence Stem Development1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Patricia; Zhao, Lifang; Eveleigh, Nathan; Yu, Yu; Chen, Xuemei

    2015-01-01

    The primary aerial surfaces of land plants are covered with a cuticle, a protective layer composed of the cutin polyester matrix and cuticular waxes. Previously, we discovered a unique mechanism of regulating cuticular wax biosynthesis during Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) stem elongation that involves ECERIFERUM7 (CER7), a core subunit of the exosome. Because loss-of-function mutations in CER7 result in reduced expression of the wax biosynthetic gene CER3, we proposed that CER7 is involved in degrading a messenger RNA encoding a CER3 repressor. To identify this putative repressor, we performed a cer7 suppressor screen that resulted in the isolation of the posttranscriptional gene-silencing components RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE1 and SUPPRESSOR OF GENE SILENCING3, indicating that small RNAs regulate CER3 expression. To establish the identity of the effector RNA species and determine whether these RNAs control CER3 transcript levels directly, we cloned additional genes identified in our suppressor screen and performed next-generation sequencing of small RNA populations that differentially accumulate in the cer7 mutant in comparison with the wild type. Our results demonstrate that the trans-acting small interfering RNA class of small RNAs are the effector molecules involved in direct silencing of CER3 and that the expression of five additional genes (EARLY RESPONSE TO DEHYDRATION14, AUXIN RESISTANT1, a translation initiation factor SUI1 family protein, and two genes of unknown function) is controlled by both CER7 and trans-acting small interfering RNAs. PMID:25502190

  19. Poly(glycerol methacrylate)-based degradable nanoparticles for delivery of small interfering RNA.

    PubMed

    Morsi, Noha G; Ali, Shimaa M; Elsonbaty, Sherouk S; Afifi, Ahmed A; Hamad, Mostafa A; Gao, Hui; Elsabahy, Mahmoud

    2017-04-07

    Nucleic acids therapeutic efficiency is generally limited by their low stability and intracellular bioavailability, and by the toxicity of the carriers used to deliver them to the target sites. Aminated poly(glycerol methacrylate) polymers are biodegradable and pH-sensitive polymers that have been used previously to deliver antisense oligonucleotide and show high transfection efficiency. The purpose of this study is to compare the efficiency and toxicity of aminated linear poly(glycerol methacrylate) (ALT) biodegradable polymer to the most commonly used cationic degradable (i.e. chitosan) and non-degradable (i.e. polyethylenimine (PEI)) polymers for delivery of short interfering RNA (siRNA). ALT, PEI and chitosan polymers were able to form nanosized particles with siRNA. Size, size-distribution and zeta-potential were measured over a wide range of nitrogen-to-phosphate (N/P) ratios, and the stability of the formed nanoparticles in saline and upon freeze-drying was also assessed. No significant cytotoxicity at the range of the tested concentrations of ALT and chitosan nanoparticles was observed, whereas the non-degradable PEI showed significant toxicity in huh-7 hepatocyte-derived carcinoma cell line. The safety profiles of the degradable polymers (ALT and chitosan) over non-degradable PEI were demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. In addition, ALT nanoparticles were able to deliver siRNA in vivo with significantly higher efficiency than chitosan nanoparticles. The results in the present study give evidence of the great implications of ALT nanoparticles in biomedical applications due to their biocompatibility, low cytotoxicity, high stability and simple preparation method.

  20. Recent In Vivo Evidences of Particle-Based Delivery of Small-Interfering RNA (siRNA) into Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Small-interfering RNA (siRNA) is both a powerful tool in research and a promising therapeutic platform to modulate expression of disease-related genes. Malignant tumors are attractive disease targets for nucleic acid-based therapies. siRNA directed against oncogenes, and genes driving metastases or angiogenesis have been evaluated in animal models and in some cases, in humans. The outcomes of these studies indicate that drug delivery is a significant limiting factor. This review provides perspectives on in vivo validated nanoparticle-based siRNA delivery systems. Results of recent advances in liposomes and polymeric and inorganic formulations illustrate the need for mutually optimized attributes for performance in systemic circulation, tumor interstitial space, plasma membrane, and endosomes. Physiochemical properties conducive to efficient siRNA delivery are summarized and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:25221632

  1. Phytophthora have distinct endogenous small RNA populations that include short interfering and microRNAs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In eukaryotes, RNA silencing pathways utilize 20–30-nucleotide small RNAs to regulate gene expression, specify and maintain chromatin structure, and repress viruses and mobile genetic elements. RNA silencing was likely present in the common ancestor of modern eukaryotes, but most research has focuse...

  2. Filamentous pathogen effectors interfering with small RNA silencing in plant hosts.

    PubMed

    Ye, Wenwu; Ma, Wenbo

    2016-08-01

    Filamentous eukaryotic pathogens including fungi and oomycetes are major threats of plant health. During the co-evolutionary arms race with the hosts, these pathogens have evolved a large repertoire of secreted virulence proteins, called effectors, to facilitate colonization and infection. Many effectors are believed to directly manipulate targeted processes inside the host cells; and a fundamental function of the effectors is to dampen immunity. Recent evidence suggests that the destructive oomycete pathogens in the genus Phytophthora encode RNA silencing suppressors. These effectors play an important virulence role during infection, likely through their inhibitory effect on host small RNA-mediated defense.

  3. Small Interfering RNA Pathway Modulates Initial Viral Infection in Midgut Epithelium of Insect after Ingestion of Virus

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Hanhong; Chen, Hongyan; Liu, Yuyan; Jiang, Chaoyang; Mao, Qianzhuo; Jia, Dongsheng; Chen, Qian

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Numerous viruses are transmitted in a persistent manner by insect vectors. Persistent viruses establish their initial infection in the midgut epithelium, from where they disseminate to the midgut visceral muscles. Although propagation of viruses in insect vectors can be controlled by the small interfering RNA (siRNA) antiviral pathway, whether the siRNA pathway can control viral dissemination from the midgut epithelium is unknown. Infection by a rice virus (Southern rice black streaked dwarf virus [SRBSDV]) of its incompetent vector (the small brown planthopper [SBPH]) is restricted to the midgut epithelium. Here, we show that the siRNA pathway is triggered by SRBSDV infection in continuously cultured cells derived from the SBPH and in the midgut of the intact insect. Knockdown of the expression of the core component Dicer-2 of the siRNA pathway by RNA interference strongly increased the ability of SRBSDV to propagate in continuously cultured SBPH cells and in the midgut epithelium, allowing viral titers in the midgut epithelium to reach the threshold (1.99 × 109 copies of the SRBSDV P10 gene/μg of midgut RNA) needed for viral dissemination into the SBPH midgut muscles. Our results thus represent the first elucidation of the threshold for viral dissemination from the insect midgut epithelium. Silencing of Dicer-2 further facilitated the transmission of SRBSDV into rice plants by SBPHs. Taken together, our results reveal the new finding that the siRNA pathway can control the initial infection of the insect midgut epithelium by a virus, which finally affects the competence of the virus's vector. IMPORTANCE Many viral pathogens that cause significant global health and agricultural problems are transmitted via insect vectors. The first bottleneck in viral infection, the midgut epithelium, is a principal determinant of the ability of an insect species to transmit a virus. Southern rice black streaked dwarf virus (SRBSDV) is restricted exclusively to the

  4. Small interfering RNA pathway modulates persistent infection of a plant virus in its insect vector.

    PubMed

    Lan, Hanhong; Wang, Haitao; Chen, Qian; Chen, Hongyan; Jia, Dongsheng; Mao, Qianzhuo; Wei, Taiyun

    2016-02-11

    Plant reoviruses, rhabdoviruses, tospoviruses, and tenuiviruses are transmitted by insect vectors in a persistent-propagative manner. How such persistent infection of plant viruses in insect vectors is established and maintained remains poorly understood. In this study, we used rice gall dwarf virus (RGDV), a plant reovirus, and its main vector leafhopper Recilia dorsalis as a virus-insect system to determine how the small interference (siRNA) pathway modulates persistent infection of a plant virus in its insect vector. We showed that a conserved siRNA antiviral response was triggered by the persistent replication of RGDV in cultured leafhopper cells and in intact insects, by appearance of virus-specific siRNAs, primarily 21-nt long, and the increased expression of siRNA pathway core components Dicer-2 and Argonaute-2. Silencing of Dicer-2 using RNA interference strongly suppressed production of virus-specific siRNAs, promoted viral accumulation, and caused cytopathological changes in vitro and in vivo. When the viral accumulation level rose above a certain threshold of viral genome copy (1.32 × 10(14) copies/μg insect RNA), the infection of the leafhopper by RGDV was lethal rather than persistent. Taken together, our results revealed a new finding that the siRNA pathway in insect vector can modulate persistent infection of plant viruses.

  5. Characterization of Small Interfering RNAs Derived from the Geminivirus/Betasatellite Complex Using Deep Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiuling; Wang, Yu; Guo, Wei; Xie, Yan; Xie, Qi; Fan, Longjiang; Zhou, Xueping

    2011-01-01

    Background Small RNA (sRNA)-guided RNA silencing is a critical antiviral defense mechanism employed by a variety of eukaryotic organisms. Although the induction of RNA silencing by bipartite and monopartite begomoviruses has been described in plants, the nature of begomovirus/betasatellite complexes remains undefined. Methodology/Principal Findings Solanum lycopersicum plant leaves systemically infected with Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV) alone or together with its associated betasatellite (TYLCCNB), and Nicotiana benthamiana plant leaves systemically infected with TYLCCNV alone, or together with TYLCCNB or with mutant TYLCCNB were harvested for RNA extraction; sRNA cDNA libraries were then constructed and submitted to Solexa-based deep sequencing. Both sense and anti-sense TYLCCNV and TYLCCNB-derived sRNAs (V-sRNAs and S-sRNAs) accumulated preferentially as 22 nucleotide species in infected S. lycopersicum and N. benthamiana plants. High resolution mapping of V-sRNAs and S-sRNAs revealed heterogeneous distribution of V-sRNA and S-sRNA sequences across the TYLCCNV and TYLCCNB genomes. In TYLCCNV-infected S. lycopersicum or N. benthamiana and TYLCCNV and βC1-mutant TYLCCNB co-infected N. benthamiana plants, the primary TYLCCNV targets were AV2 and the 5′ terminus of AV1. In TYLCCNV and betasatellite-infected plants, the number of V-sRNAs targeting this region decreased and the production of V-sRNAs increased corresponding to the overlapping regions of AC2 and AC3, as well as the 3′ terminal of AC1. βC1 is the primary determinant mediating symptom induction and also the primary silencing target of the TYLCCNB genome even in its mutated form. Conclusions/Significance We report the first high-resolution sRNA map for a monopartite begomovirus and its associated betasatellite using Solexa-based deep sequencing. Our results suggest that viral transcript might act as RDR substrates resulting in dsRNA and secondary siRNA production. In addition, the

  6. Small-interfering RNA (siRNA)-based functional micro- and nanostructures for efficient and selective gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Hyeon; Chung, Bong Hyun; Park, Tae Gwan; Nam, Yoon Sung; Mok, Hyejung

    2012-07-17

    Because of RNA's ability to encode structure and functional information, researchers have fabricated diverse geometric structures from this polymer at the micro- and nanoscale. With their tunable structures, rigidity, and biocompatibility, novel two-dimensional and three-dimensional RNA structures can serve as a fundamental platform for biomedical applications, including engineered tissues, biosensors, and drug delivery vehicles. The discovery of the potential of small-interfering RNA (siRNA) has underscored the applications of RNA-based micro- and nanostructures in medicine. Small-interfering RNA (siRNA), synthetic double-stranded RNA consisting of approximately 21 base pairs, suppresses problematic target genes in a sequence-specific manner via inherent RNA interference (RNAi) processing. As a result, siRNA offers a potential strategy for treatment of many human diseases. However, due to inefficient delivery to cells and off-target effects, the clinical application of therapeutic siRNA has been very challenging. To address these issues, researchers have studied a variety of nanocarrier systems for siRNA delivery. In this Account, we describe several strategies for efficient siRNA delivery and selective gene silencing. We took advantage of facile chemical conjugation and complementary hybridization to design novel siRNA-based micro- and nanostructures. Using chemical crosslinkers and hydrophobic/hydrophilic polymers at the end of siRNA, we produced various RNA-based structures, including siRNA block copolymers, micelles, linear siRNA homopolymers, and microhydrogels. Because of their increased charge density and flexibility compared with conventional siRNA, these micro- and nanostructures can form polyelectrolyte complexes with poorly charged and biocompatible cationic carriers that are both more condensed and more homogenous than the complexes formed in other carrier systems. In addition, the fabricated siRNA-based structures are linked by cleavable disulfide

  7. The use of small interfering RNAs to inhibit adipocyte differentiation in human preadipocytes and fetal-femur-derived mesenchymal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y.; Mirmalek-Sani, S.-H.; Yang, X.; Zhang, J.; Oreffo, R.O.C. . E-mail: roco@soton.ac.uk

    2006-06-10

    RNA interference (RNAi) has been used in functional genomics and offers innovative approaches in the development of novel therapeutics. Human mesenchymal stem cells offer a unique cell source for tissue engineering/regeneration strategies. The current study examined the potential of small interfering RNAs (siRNA) against human peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) to suppress adipocyte differentiation (adipogenesis) in human preadipocytes and fetal-femur-derived mesenchymal cells. Adipogenesis was investigated using cellular and biochemical analysis. Transient transfection with PPAR{gamma}-siRNA using a liposomal-based strategy resulted in a significant inhibition of adipogenesis in human preadipocytes and fetal-femur-derived mesenchymal cells, compared to controls (cell, liposomal and negative siRNA). The inhibitory effect of PPAR{gamma}-siRNA was supported by testing human PPAR{gamma} mRNA and adipogenic associated genes using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to adiponectin receptor 1 and 2 as well as examination of fatty acid binding protein 3 (FABP{sub 3}) expression, an adipocyte-specific marker. The current studies indicate that PPAR{gamma}-siRNA is a useful tool to study adipogenesis in human cells, with potential applications both therapeutic and in the elucidation of mesenchymal cell differentiation in the modulation of cell differentiation in human mesenchymal cells.

  8. Therapeutic Potential of a Combination of Two Gene-Specific Small Interfering RNAs against Clinical Strains of Acanthamoeba▿

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob; Martín-Navarro, Carmen M.; López-Arencibia, Atteneri; Santana-Morales, María A.; Afonso-Lehmann, Raquel N.; Maciver, Sutherland K.; Valladares, Basilio; Martínez-Carretero, Enrique

    2010-01-01

    Pathogenic strains of the genus Acanthamoeba are causative agents of severe infections, such as fatal encephalitis and a sight-threatening amoebic keratitis. Antimicrobial therapy for these infections is generally empirical, and patient recovery is often problematic, due to the existence of a highly resistant cyst stage in these amoebae. In previous studies, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against the catalytic domains of extracellular serine proteases and glycogen phosphorylase from Acanthamoeba were designed and evaluated for future therapeutic use. The silencing of proteases resulted in Acanthamoeba failing to degrade human corneal cells, and silencing of glycogen phosphorylase caused amoebae to be unable to form mature cysts. After the siRNA design and concentration were optimized in order to avoid toxicity problems, cultures of Acanthamoeba were treated with a combination of both siRNAs, and cells were evaluated under an inverted microscope. This siRNA-based treatment dramatically affected the growth rate and cellular survival of the amoebae. These results were observed less than 48 h after the initiation of the treatment. In order to check possible toxic effects of the siRNA combination, three eukaryotic cell lines (HeLa, murine macrophages, and osteosarcoma cells) were treated with the same molecules, and cytotoxicity was examined by measuring lactate dehydrogenase release. The future use of the combination of these siRNAs is proposed as a potential therapeutic approach against pathogenic strains of Acanthamoeba. PMID:20855732

  9. Down-regulation of survivin expression by small interfering RNA induces pancreatic cancer cell apoptosis and enhances its radiosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Hai-Tao; Xue, Xing-Huan; Dai, Zhi-Jun; Wang, Xi-Jing; Li, Ang; Qin, Zhao-Yin

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the inhibitory effect of small interfering RNA (siRNA) on the expression of survivin in pancreatic cancer cell line PC-2 and the role of siRNA in inducing PC-2 cell apoptosis and enhancing its radiosensitivity. METHODS: A siRNA plasmid expression vector against survivin was constructed and transfected into PC-2 cells with LipofectamineTM 2000. The down regulation of survivin expression was detected by semi-quantitive RT-PCR and immunohistochemical SP method and the role of siRNA in inducing PC-2 cell apoptosis and enhancing its radiosensitivity was detected by flow cytometry. RESULTS: The sequence-specific siRNA efficiently and specifically down-regulated the expression of survivin at both mRNA and protein levels. The expression inhibition ratio was 81.25% at mRNA level detected by semi-quantitive RT-PCR and 74.24% at protein level detected by immunohistochemical method. Forty-eight hours after transfection,apoptosis was induced in 7.03% cells by siRNA and in 14.58% cells by siRNA combined with radiation. CONCLUSION: The siRNA plasmid expression vector against survivin can inhibit the expression of survivin in PC-2 cells efficiently and specifically. Inhibiting the expression of survivin can induce apoptosis of PC-2 cells and enhance its radiosensitivity significantly. RNAi against survivin is of potential value in gene therapy of pancreatic cancer. PMID:16718816

  10. Susceptibility of PTEN-positive metastatic tumors to small interfering RNA targeting the mammalian target of rapamycin.

    PubMed

    Koide, Hiroyuki; Asai, Tomohiro; Kato, Hiroki; Yonenaga, Norihito; Yokota, Masafumi; Ando, Hidenori; Dewa, Takehisa; Nango, Mamoru; Maeda, Noriyuki; Oku, Naoto

    2015-01-01

    PTEN-positive tumors are not susceptible to the treatment with rapamycin, an inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Here, we determined the susceptibility of PTEN-positive cells to small interfering RNA for mTOR (si-mTOR) by using a novel liposomal delivery system. We prepared dicetyl phosphate-tetraethylenepentamine-based polycation liposomes (TEPA-PCL) decorated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) grafting Ala-Pro-Arg-Pro-Gly (APRPG), a VRGFR-1-targeting peptide. APRPG-PEG-decorated TEPA-PCL carrying si-mTOR (APRPG-TEPA-PCL/si-mTOR) had an antiproliferative effect against B16F10 murine melanoma cells (PTEN-positive) and significantly inhibited both the proliferation and tube formation of mouse 2H-11 endothelial-like cells (PTEN-positive). APRPG-TEPA-PCL/si-mTOR treatment did not induce Akt phosphorylation (Ser473) in either B16F10 or 2H-11 cells although there was strong phosphorylation of Akt in response to rapamycin treatment. Intravenous injection of APRPG-TEPA-PCL/si-mTOR significantly suppressed the tumor growth compared with rapamycin treatment in mice bearing B16F10 melanoma. These findings suggest that APRPG-TEPA-PCL/si-mTOR is useful for the treatment of PTEN-positive tumors.

  11. In plants, decapping prevents RDR6-dependent production of small interfering RNAs from endogenous mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Martínez de Alba, Angel Emilio; Moreno, Ana Beatriz; Gabriel, Marc; Mallory, Allison C; Christ, Aurélie; Bounon, Rémi; Balzergue, Sandrine; Aubourg, Sebastien; Gautheret, Daniel; Crespi, Martin D; Vaucheret, Hervé; Maizel, Alexis

    2015-03-11

    Cytoplasmic degradation of endogenous RNAs is an integral part of RNA quality control (RQC) and often relies on the removal of the 5' cap structure and their subsequent 5' to 3' degradation in cytoplasmic processing (P-)bodies. In parallel, many eukaryotes degrade exogenous and selected endogenous RNAs through post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS). In plants, PTGS depends on small interfering (si)RNAs produced after the conversion of single-stranded RNAs to double-stranded RNAs by the cellular RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 6 (RDR6) in cytoplasmic siRNA-bodies. PTGS and RQC compete for transgene-derived RNAs, but it is unknown whether this competition also occurs for endogenous transcripts. We show that the lethality of decapping mutants is suppressed by impairing RDR6 activity. We establish that upon decapping impairment hundreds of endogenous mRNAs give rise to a new class of rqc-siRNAs, that over-accumulate when RQC processes are impaired, a subset of which depending on RDR6 for their production. We observe that P- and siRNA-bodies often are dynamically juxtaposed, potentially allowing for cross-talk of the two machineries. Our results suggest that the decapping of endogenous RNA limits their entry into the PTGS pathway. We anticipate that the rqc-siRNAs identified in decapping mutants represent a subset of a larger ensemble of endogenous siRNAs.

  12. In plants, decapping prevents RDR6-dependent production of small interfering RNAs from endogenous mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Martínez de Alba, Angel Emilio; Moreno, Ana Beatriz; Gabriel, Marc; Mallory, Allison C.; Christ, Aurélie; Bounon, Rémi; Balzergue, Sandrine; Aubourg, Sebastien; Gautheret, Daniel; Crespi, Martin D.; Vaucheret, Hervé; Maizel, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    Cytoplasmic degradation of endogenous RNAs is an integral part of RNA quality control (RQC) and often relies on the removal of the 5′ cap structure and their subsequent 5′ to 3′ degradation in cytoplasmic processing (P-)bodies. In parallel, many eukaryotes degrade exogenous and selected endogenous RNAs through post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS). In plants, PTGS depends on small interfering (si)RNAs produced after the conversion of single-stranded RNAs to double-stranded RNAs by the cellular RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 6 (RDR6) in cytoplasmic siRNA-bodies. PTGS and RQC compete for transgene-derived RNAs, but it is unknown whether this competition also occurs for endogenous transcripts. We show that the lethality of decapping mutants is suppressed by impairing RDR6 activity. We establish that upon decapping impairment hundreds of endogenous mRNAs give rise to a new class of rqc-siRNAs, that over-accumulate when RQC processes are impaired, a subset of which depending on RDR6 for their production. We observe that P- and siRNA-bodies often are dynamically juxtaposed, potentially allowing for cross-talk of the two machineries. Our results suggest that the decapping of endogenous RNA limits their entry into the PTGS pathway. We anticipate that the rqc-siRNAs identified in decapping mutants represent a subset of a larger ensemble of endogenous siRNAs. PMID:25694514

  13. Zwitterionic poly(carboxybetaine)-based cationic liposomes for effective delivery of small interfering RNA therapeutics without accelerated blood clearance phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Liu, Ruiyuan; Shi, Yuanjie; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Zhang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    For efficient delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to the target diseased site in vivo, it is important to design suitable vehicles to control the blood circulation of siRNA. It has been shown that surface modification of cationic liposome/siRNA complexes (lipoplexes) with polyethylene glycol (PEG) could enhance the circulation time of lipoplexes. However, the first injection of PEGylated lipoplexes in vivo induces accelerated blood clearance and enhances hepatic accumulation of the following injected PEGylated lipoplexes, which is known as the accelerated blood clearance (ABC) phenomenon. Herein, we developed zwitterionic poly(carboxybetaine) (PCB) modified lipoplexes for the delivery of siRNA therapeutics, which could avoid protein adsorption and enhance the stability of lipoplexes as that for PEG. Quite different from the PEGylation, the PCBylated lipoplexes could avoid ABC phenomenon, which extended the blood circulation time and enhanced the tumor accumulation of lipoplexes in vivo. After accumulation in tumor site, the PCBylation could promote the cellular uptake and endosomal/lysosomal escape of lipoplexes due to its unique chemical structure and pH-sensitive ability. With excellent tumor accumulation, cellular uptake and endosomal/lysosomal escape abilities, the PCBylated lipoplexes significantly inhibited tumor growth and induced tumor cell apoptosis.

  14. Promoted adipogenesis of rat mesenchymal stem cells by transfection of small interfering RNA complexed with a cationized dextran.

    PubMed

    Nagane, Kentaro; Jo, Jun-ichiro; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the possibility of small interfering RNA (siRNA) complexed with a cationized dextran of nonviral carrier to biologically modify the adipogenesis extent of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Spermine was chemically introduced to the hydroxyl groups of dextran to prepare the cationized dextran (spermine-dextran). The spermine-dextran could form a complex with siRNA, and the physicochemical properties were changed by the molecular weight of dextran, the molar percentage of spermine introduced to dextran, and the molar ratio of nitrogen molecule of spermine-dextran to the phosphorous ones of siRNA (N/P ratio). The gene expression level of luciferase or green fluorescence protein was significantly suppressed by transfection with the complex of spermine-dextran and siRNA. The gene expression level by the complex decreased with an increase in the extent of complex internalized. Biochemical experiments revealed that culture in an adipogenic differentiation medium allowed MSC to differentiate into adipogenic cells. However, upon culturing with siRNA of anti-transcription coactivator containing PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) for osteogenic differentiation complexed with the spermine-dextran, the adipogenesis of MSC was further promoted. It is concluded that the spemine-dextran was a promising nonviral carrier to suppress the expression level of differentiation gene, resulting in the modification of cell differentiation direction.

  15. Caenorhabditis elegans RSD-2 and RSD-6 promote germ cell immortality by maintaining small interfering RNA populations.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Aisa; Sarkies, Peter; Simon, Matt; Doebley, Anna-Lisa; Goldstein, Leonard D; Hedges, Ashley; Ikegami, Kohta; Alvares, Stacy M; Yang, Liwei; LaRocque, Jeannine R; Hall, Julie; Miska, Eric A; Ahmed, Shawn

    2014-10-14

    Germ cells are maintained in a pristine non-aging state as they proliferate over generations. Here, we show that a novel function of the Caenorhabditis elegans RNA interference proteins RNAi spreading defective (RSD)-2 and RSD-6 is to promote germ cell immortality at high temperature. rsd mutants cultured at high temperatures became progressively sterile and displayed loss of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that target spermatogenesis genes, simple repeats, and transposons. Desilencing of spermatogenesis genes occurred in late-generation rsd mutants, although defective spermatogenesis was insufficient to explain the majority of sterility. Increased expression of repetitive loci occurred in both germ and somatic cells of late-generation rsd mutant adults, suggesting that desilencing of many heterochromatic segments of the genome contributes to sterility. Nuclear RNAi defective (NRDE)-2 promotes nuclear silencing in response to exogenous double-stranded RNA, and our data imply that RSD-2, RSD-6, and NRDE-2 function in a common transgenerational nuclear silencing pathway that responds to endogenous siRNAs. We propose that RSD-2 and RSD-6 promote germ cell immortality at stressful temperatures by maintaining transgenerational epigenetic inheritance of endogenous siRNA populations that promote genome silencing.

  16. Zwitterionic Poly(carboxybetaine)-based Cationic Liposomes for Effective Delivery of Small Interfering RNA Therapeutics without Accelerated Blood Clearance Phenomenon

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Liu, Ruiyuan; Shi, Yuanjie; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Zhang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    For efficient delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to the target diseased site in vivo, it is important to design suitable vehicles to control the blood circulation of siRNA. It has been shown that surface modification of cationic liposome/siRNA complexes (lipoplexes) with polyethylene glycol (PEG) could enhance the circulation time of lipoplexes. However, the first injection of PEGylated lipoplexes in vivo induces accelerated blood clearance and enhances hepatic accumulation of the following injected PEGylated lipoplexes, which is known as the accelerated blood clearance (ABC) phenomenon. Herein, we developed zwitterionic poly(carboxybetaine) (PCB) modified lipoplexes for the delivery of siRNA therapeutics, which could avoid protein adsorption and enhance the stability of lipoplexes as that for PEG. Quite different from the PEGylation, the PCBylated lipoplexes could avoid ABC phenomenon, which extended the blood circulation time and enhanced the tumor accumulation of lipoplexes in vivo. After accumulation in tumor site, the PCBylation could promote the cellular uptake and endosomal/lysosomal escape of lipoplexes due to its unique chemical structure and pH-sensitive ability. With excellent tumor accumulation, cellular uptake and endosomal/lysosomal escape abilities, the PCBylated lipoplexes significantly inhibited tumor growth and induced tumor cell apoptosis. PMID:25825598

  17. Noninvasive Imaging of Lipid Nanoparticle–Mediated Systemic Delivery of Small-Interfering RNA to the Liver

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Weikang; Davide, Joseph P; Cai, Mingmei; Zhang, Guo-Jun; South, Victoria J; Matter, Andrea; Ng, Bruce; Zhang, Ye; Sepp-Lorenzino, Laura

    2010-01-01

    Mouse models with liver-specific expression of firefly luciferase were developed that enable a noninvasive and longitudinal assessment of small-interfering RNA (siRNA)–mediated gene silencing in hepatocytes of live animals via bioluminescence imaging. Using these models, a set of lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) with different compositions of cationic lipids, polyethylene glycol (PEG), and cholesterol, were tested for their abilities in delivering a luciferase siRNA to the liver via systemic administration. A dose-dependent luciferase knockdown by LNP/siRNA assemblies was measured by in vivo bioluminescence imaging, which correlated well with the results from parallel ex vivo analyses of luciferase mRNA and protein levels in the liver. RNA interference (RNAi)–mediated target silencing was further confirmed by the detection of RNAi-specific target mRNA cleavage. A single dose of LNP02L at 3 mg/kg (siRNA) caused 90% reduction of luciferase expression and the target repression lasted for at least 10 days. With identical components, LNPs containing 2% PEG are more potent than those with 5.4% PEG. Our results demonstrate that these liver-luciferase mouse models provide a powerful tool for a high-throughput evaluation of hepatic delivery platforms by noninvasive imaging and that the molar ratio of PEG lipid can affect the efficacy of LNPs in silencing liver targets via systemic administration. PMID:20628357

  18. Noninvasive imaging of lipid nanoparticle-mediated systemic delivery of small-interfering RNA to the liver.

    PubMed

    Tao, Weikang; Davide, Joseph P; Cai, Mingmei; Zhang, Guo-Jun; South, Victoria J; Matter, Andrea; Ng, Bruce; Zhang, Ye; Sepp-Lorenzino, Laura

    2010-09-01

    Mouse models with liver-specific expression of firefly luciferase were developed that enable a noninvasive and longitudinal assessment of small-interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated gene silencing in hepatocytes of live animals via bioluminescence imaging. Using these models, a set of lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) with different compositions of cationic lipids, polyethylene glycol (PEG), and cholesterol, were tested for their abilities in delivering a luciferase siRNA to the liver via systemic administration. A dose-dependent luciferase knockdown by LNP/siRNA assemblies was measured by in vivo bioluminescence imaging, which correlated well with the results from parallel ex vivo analyses of luciferase mRNA and protein levels in the liver. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated target silencing was further confirmed by the detection of RNAi-specific target mRNA cleavage. A single dose of LNP02L at 3 mg/kg (siRNA) caused 90% reduction of luciferase expression and the target repression lasted for at least 10 days. With identical components, LNPs containing 2% PEG are more potent than those with 5.4% PEG. Our results demonstrate that these liver-luciferase mouse models provide a powerful tool for a high-throughput evaluation of hepatic delivery platforms by noninvasive imaging and that the molar ratio of PEG lipid can affect the efficacy of LNPs in silencing liver targets via systemic administration.

  19. Efficient Protection and Transfection of Small Interfering RNA by Cationic Shell-Crosslinked Knedel-Like Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yuefei; Fang, Huafeng; Zhang, Ke; Shrestha, Ritu; Wooley, Karen L.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the great potential of small interfering RNA (siRNA) as a therapeutic agent, progress in this area has been hampered by a lack of efficient biocompatible transfection agents. Recently, cationic shell-crosslinked knedel-like nanoparticles (cSCKs) were found to possess lower cytotoxicity and better transfection ability for phosphorothioate ODNs and plasmid DNA than the commonly used cationic lipid-based agent Lipofectamine. To determine the usefulness of cSCKs for siRNA transfection, a small library of cSCKs with varying percentage of primary and tertiary amines was assessed for its ability to bind to siRNA, inhibit siRNA degradation in human serum, and to transfect HeLa and mouse macrophage cell lines. The silencing efficiency in HeLa cells was greatest with the cSCK with 100% primary amines (pa100) as determined by their viability following transfection with cytotoxic and non-cytotoxic siRNAs. cSCK-pa100 showed greater silencing efficiency than Lipofectamine 2000 in the HeLa cells, as well in 293T and human bronchial epithelial (HEK) cells, but was comparable in human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells and human mammary epithelial (MCF10a) cells. cSCK-pa100 also showed greater silencing of iNOS expression than Lipofectamine 2000 in a mouse macrophage cell line, and provided greater protection from serum degradation, demonstrating its potential usefulness as an siRNA transfection agent. The siRNA silencing of iNOS at lower concentrations of siRNA could be enhanced by complexation with the fusogenic GALA peptide, which was shown to enhance endosomal escape following uptake. PMID:23557117

  20. Inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor by small interfering RNA upregulates differentiation, maturation and function of dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    WANG, HAIYAN; ZHANG, LUPING; ZHANG, SHAOYAN; LI, YANNIAN

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secreted by MCF-7 breast cancer cells on the differentiation, maturation and function of dendritic cells (DCs). Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) directed against the VEGF gene were designed and transfected into MCF-7 breast cancer cells at an optimal concentration (100 nmol/l) using cationic liposome transfection reagent, whereas the control group was transfected with only transfection reagent. Western blot analysis and ELISA were used to determine VEGF protein expression and VEGF concentration, respectively. Mononuclear cells were cultured with the culture supernatants from primary MCF-7 cells (control group) and siRNA-treated MCF-7 cells (siRNA group). The DC phenotypes, including CD1a, CD80, CD83, CD86 and HLA-DR, were evaluated by flow cytometry. The MTT assay was used to assess the cytotoxicity of DC-mediated tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) against MCF-7 cells in the two different culture supernatants. The VEGF-targeted constructed siRNA inhibited VEGF expression in MCF-7 cells. Cultivation with the culture supernatants from MCF-7 cells treated with siRNA affected DC morphology. DCs in the siRNA group exhibited a significantly higher expression of CD86, CD80, CD83 and HLA-DR compared to the cells in the control group, whereas the expression of CD1a in the siRNA group was significantly lower compared to that in the control group. The cytotoxic activity of CTLs mediated by DCs was significantly altered by siRNA transfection. These results indicated that VEGF may play a significant role in tumor development, progression and immunosuppression. PMID:25452786

  1. NBS1 knockdown by small interfering RNA increases ionizing radiation mutagenesis and telomere association in human cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ying; Lim, Chang U K.; Williams, Eli S.; Zhou, Junqing; Zhang, Qinming; Fox, Michael H.; Bailey, Susan M.; Liber, Howard L.

    2005-01-01

    Hypomorphic mutations which lead to decreased function of the NBS1 gene are responsible for Nijmegen breakage syndrome, a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disorder that imparts an increased predisposition to development of malignancy. The NBS1 protein is a component of the MRE11/RAD50/NBS1 complex that plays a critical role in cellular responses to DNA damage and the maintenance of chromosomal integrity. Using small interfering RNA transfection, we have knocked down NBS1 protein levels and analyzed relevant phenotypes in two closely related human lymphoblastoid cell lines with different p53 status, namely wild-type TK6 and mutated WTK1. Both TK6 and WTK1 cells showed an increased level of ionizing radiation-induced mutation at the TK and HPRT loci, impaired phosphorylation of H2AX (gamma-H2AX), and impaired activation of the cell cycle checkpoint regulating kinase, Chk2. In TK6 cells, ionizing radiation-induced accumulation of p53/p21 and apoptosis were reduced. There was a differential response to ionizing radiation-induced cell killing between TK6 and WTK1 cells after NBS1 knockdown; TK6 cells were more resistant to killing, whereas WTK1 cells were more sensitive. NBS1 deficiency also resulted in a significant increase in telomere association that was independent of radiation exposure and p53 status. Our results provide the first experimental evidence that NBS1 deficiency in human cells leads to hypermutability and telomere associations, phenotypes that may contribute to the cancer predisposition seen among patients with this disease.

  2. A genome-wide survey of small interfering RNA and microRNA pathway genes in a galling insect.

    PubMed

    Shreve, Jacob T; Shukle, Richard H; Subramanyam, Subhashree; Johnson, Alisha J; Schemerhorn, Brandon J; Williams, Christie E; Stuart, Jeffrey J

    2013-03-01

    Deployment of resistance (R) genes is the most effective control for Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor (Say); however, deployment of R genes results in an increased frequency of pest genotypes that display virulence to them. RNA interference (RNAi) is a useful reverse genetics tool for studying such insect virulence pathways, but requires a systemic phenotype, which is not found in all species. In an effort to correlate our observed weak RNAi phenotype in M. destructor with a genetic basis, we have aggregated and compared RNAi related genes across M. destructor, three other insect species, and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We report here the annotation of the core genes in the small interfering RNA (siRNA) and microRNA (miRNA) pathways in M. destructor. While most of the miRNA pathway genes were highly conserved across the species studied, the siRNA pathway genes showed increased relative variability in comparison to the miRNA pathway. In particular, the Piwi/Argonaute/Zwille (PAZ) domain of Dicer-2 (DCR-2) had the least amount of sequence similarity of any domain among species surveyed, with a trend of increased conservation in those species with amenable systemic RNAi. A homolog of the systemic interference defective-1 (Sid-1) gene of C. elegans was also not annotated in the M. destructor genome. Indeed, it is of interest that a Sid-1 homolog has not been detected in any dipteran species to date. We hypothesize the sequence architecture of the PAZ domain in the M. destructor DCR-2 protein is related to reduced efficacy of this enzyme and this taken together with the lack of a Sid-1 homolog may account for the weak RNAi response observed to date in this species as well as other dipteran species.

  3. Effects of small interfering RNA targeting sphingosine kinase-1 gene on the animal model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Yu, Qian; Lai, Tian-bao; Yang, Yang; Li, Gang; Sun, Sheng-gang

    2013-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related, progressive neurodegenerative disorder that occurs gradually and results in memory, behavior, and personality changes. Abnormal sphingolipid metabolism was reported in AD previously. This study aimed to investigate whether sphK1 could exacerbate the accumulation of amyloid protein (Aβ) and sharpen the learning and memory ability of the animal model of AD using siRNA interference. An adenovirus vector expressing small interfering RNA (siRNA) against the sphK1 gene (sphK1-siRNA) was designed, and the effects of sphK1-siRNA on the APP/PS1 mouse four weeks after treatment with sphK1-siRNA hippocampal injection were examined. SphK1 protein expression was confirmed by using Western blotting and ceramide content coupled with S1P secretion was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Aβ load was detected by immunohistochemical staining and ELISA. Morris water maze was adopted to test the learning and memory ability of the APP/PS1 mice. A significant difference in the expression of sphK1 protein and mRNA was observed between the siRNA group and the control group. Aβ load in transfected mice was accelerated in vivo, with significant aggravation of the learning and memory ability. The sphK1 gene modulation in the Aβ load and the learning and memory ability in the animal model of AD may be important for the treatment of AD.

  4. Suppression of Breast Cancer Cell Migration by Small Interfering RNA Delivered by Polyethylenimine-Functionalized Graphene Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yuan-Pin; Hung, Chao-Ming; Hsu, Yi-Chiang; Zhong, Cai-Yan; Wang, Wan-Rou; Chang, Chi-Chang; Lee, Mon-Juan

    2016-05-01

    The carbon-based nanomaterial graphene can be chemically modified to associate with various molecules such as chemicals and biomolecules and developed as novel carriers for drug and gene delivery. In this study, a nonviral gene transfection reagent was produced by functionalizing graphene oxide (GO) with a polycationic polymer, polyethylenimine (PEI), to increase the biocompatibility of GO and to transfect small interfering RNA (siRNA) against C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4), a biomarker associated with cancer metastasis, into invasive breast cancer cells. PEI-functionalized GO (PEI-GO) was a homogeneous aqueous solution that remained in suspension during storage at 4 °C for at least 6 months. The particle size of PEI-GO was 172 ± 4.58 and 188 ± 5.00 nm at 4 and 25 °C, respectively, and increased slightly to 262 ± 17.6 nm at 37 °C, but remained unaltered with time. Binding affinity of PEI-GO toward siRNA was assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), in which PEI-GO and siRNA were completely associated at a PEI-GO:siRNA weight ratio of 2:1 and above. The invasive breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, was transfected with PEI-GO in complex with siRNAs against CXCR4 (siCXCR4). Suppression of the mRNA and protein expression of CXCR4 by the PEI-GO/siCXCR4 complex was confirmed by real-time PCR and western blot analysis. In addition, the metastatic potential of MDA-MB-231 cells was attenuated by the PEI-GO/siCXCR4 complex as demonstrated in wound healing assay. Our results suggest that PEI-GO is effective in the delivery of siRNA and may contribute to targeted gene therapy to suppress cancer metastasis.

  5. Biodistribution of Small Interfering RNA at the Organ and Cellular Levels after Lipid Nanoparticle-mediated Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Bin; Keough, Ed; Matter, Andrea; Leander, Karen; Young, Stephanie; Carlini, Ed; Sachs, Alan B.; Tao, Weikang; Abrams, Marc; Howell, Bonnie; Sepp-Lorenzino, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Chemically stabilized small interfering RNA (siRNA) can be delivered systemically by intravenous injection of lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) in rodents and primates. The biodistribution and kinetics of LNP–siRNA delivery in mice at organ and cellular resolution have been studied using immunofluorescence (IF) staining and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). At 0.5 and 2 hr post tail vein injection of Cy5-labeled siRNA encapsulated in LNP, the organ rank-order of siRNA levels is liver > spleen > kidney, with only negligible accumulation in duodenum, lung, heart, and brain. Similar conclusions were drawn by using qPCR to measure tissue siRNA levels as a secondary end point. siRNA levels in these tissues decreased by more than 10-fold after 24 hr. Within the liver, LNPs delivered siRNA to hepatocytes, Kupffer cells, and sinusoids in a time-dependent manner, as revealed by IF staining and signal quantitation methods established using OPERA/Columbus software. siRNA first accumulated in liver sinusoids and trafficked to hepatocytes by 2 hr post dose, corresponding to the onset of target mRNA silencing. Fluorescence in situ hybridization methods were used to detect both strands of siRNA in fixed tissues. Collectively, the authors have implemented a platform to evaluate biodistribution of siRNA across cell types and across tissues in vivo, with the objective of elucidating the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic relationship to guide optimization of delivery vehicles. PMID:21804077

  6. Identification and characterization of two novel classes of small RNAs in the mouse germline: retrotransposon-derived siRNAs in oocytes and germline small RNAs in testes

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Toshiaki; Takeda, Atsushi; Tsukiyama, Tomoyuki; Mise, Kazuyuki; Okuno, Tetsuro; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Minami, Naojiro; Imai, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    Small RNAs ranging in size between 18 and 30 nucleotides (nt) are found in many organisms including yeasts, plants, and animals. Small RNAs are involved in the regulation of gene expression through translational repression, mRNA degradation, and chromatin modification. In mammals, microRNAs (miRNAs) are the only small RNAs that have been well characterized. Here, we have identified two novel classes of small RNAs in the mouse germline. One class consists of ∼20- to 24-nt small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) from mouse oocytes, which are derived from retroelements including LINE, SINE, and LTR retrotransposons. Addition of retrotransposon-derived sequences to the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of a reporter mRNA destabilizes the mRNA significantly when injected into full-grown oocytes. These results suggest that retrotransposons are suppressed through the RNAi pathway in mouse oocytes. The other novel class of small RNAs is 26- to 30-nt germline small RNAs (gsRNAs) from testes. gsRNAs are expressed during spermatogenesis in a developmentally regulated manner, are mapped to the genome in clusters, and have strong strand bias. These features are reminiscent of Tetrahymena ∼23- to 24-nt small RNAs and Caenorhabditis elegans X-cluster small RNAs. A conserved novel small RNA pathway may be present in diverse animals. PMID:16766679

  7. P-SAMS: a web site for plant artificial microRNA and synthetic trans-acting small interfering RNA design

    PubMed Central

    Fahlgren, Noah; Hill, Steven T.; Carrington, James C.; Carbonell, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Summary: The Plant Small RNA Maker Site (P-SAMS) is a web tool for the simple and automated design of artificial miRNAs (amiRNAs) and synthetic trans-acting small interfering RNAs (syn-tasiRNAs) for efficient and specific targeted gene silencing in plants. P-SAMS includes two applications, P-SAMS amiRNA Designer and P-SAMS syn-tasiRNA Designer. The navigation through both applications is wizard-assisted, and the job runtime is relatively short. Both applications output the sequence of designed small RNA(s), and the sequence of the two oligonucleotides required for cloning into ‘B/c’ compatible vectors. Availability and implementation: The P-SAMS website is available at http://p-sams.carringtonlab.org. Contact: acarbonell@ibmcp.upv.es or nfahlgren@danforthcenter.org PMID:26382195

  8. Inhibition of basal JNK activity by small interfering RNAs enhances cisplatin sensitivity and decreases DNA repair in T98G glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Parra, Eduardo; Gutiérrez, Luis; Ferreira, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of basal Jun kinase (JNK) activity by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) enhances cisplatin sensitivity and decreases DNA repair in T98G glioblastoma cells. Although the JNK pathway has been extensively studied in recent years, little is known concerning the signaling pathways that control their expression in glioma cells. The aim of the present study was to assess the role of c-Jun-NH2-terminal kinases (JNKs) in the regulation of T98G glioblastoma cells treated with cisplatin in the presence or absence of siRNAs against JNK1 and JNK2. Addition of either small interfering JNK1-siRNA or JNK2-siRNA induced decreased DNA repair and sensitized the T98G glioblastoma cells to the DNA damaging drug cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum). This effect was associated with reduced cell survival and loss of anchorage‑independent colony formation. The results indicate that effective inhibition of the JNK pathway significantly sensitizes glioblastoma cells to cisplatin, a compound of proven clinical value whose spectrum of application is limited by resistance phenomena.

  9. Deep Sequencing of Virus-Derived Small Interfering RNAs and RNA from Viral Particles Shows Highly Similar Mutational Landscapes of a Plant Virus Population

    PubMed Central

    Rupar, Matevž; Gutierrez-Aguirre, Ion; Curk, Tomaž; Kreuze, Jan F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT RNA viruses exist within a host as a population of mutant sequences, often referred to as quasispecies. Within a host, sequences of RNA viruses constitute several distinct but interconnected pools, such as RNA packed in viral particles, double-stranded RNA, and virus-derived small interfering RNAs. We aimed to test if the same representation of within-host viral population structure could be obtained by sequencing different viral sequence pools. Using ultradeep Illumina sequencing, the diversity of two coexisting Potato virus Y sequence pools present within a plant was investigated: RNA isolated from viral particles and virus-derived small interfering RNAs (the derivatives of a plant RNA silencing mechanism). The mutational landscape of the within-host virus population was highly similar between both pools, with no notable hotspots across the viral genome. Notably, all of the single-nucleotide polymorphisms with a frequency of higher than 1.6% were found in both pools. Some unique single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with very low frequencies were found in each of the pools, with more of them occurring in the small RNA (sRNA) pool, possibly arising through genetic drift in localized virus populations within a plant and the errors introduced during the amplification of silencing signal. Sequencing of the viral particle pool enhanced the efficiency of consensus viral genome sequence reconstruction. Nonhomologous recombinations were commonly detected in the viral particle pool, with a hot spot in the 3′ untranslated and coat protein regions of the genome. We stress that they present an important but often overlooked aspect of virus population diversity. IMPORTANCE This study is the most comprehensive whole-genome characterization of a within-plant virus population to date and the first study comparing diversity of different pools of viral sequences within a host. We show that both virus-derived small RNAs and RNA from viral particles could be used for

  10. Caenorhabditis elegans RIG-I Homolog Mediates Antiviral RNA Interference Downstream of Dicer-Dependent Biogenesis of Viral Small Interfering RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Coffman, Stephanie R.; Lu, Jinfeng; Guo, Xunyang; Zhong, Jing; Broitman-Maduro, Gina; Li, Wan-Xiang; Lu, Rui; Maduro, Morris

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dicer enzymes process virus-specific double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to initiate specific antiviral defense by related RNA interference (RNAi) pathways in plants, insects, nematodes, and mammals. Antiviral RNAi in Caenorhabditis elegans requires Dicer-related helicase 1 (DRH-1), not found in plants and insects but highly homologous to mammalian retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs), intracellular viral RNA sensors that trigger innate immunity against RNA virus infection. However, it remains unclear if DRH-1 acts analogously to initiate antiviral RNAi in C. elegans. Here, we performed a forward genetic screen to characterize antiviral RNAi in C. elegans. Using a mapping-by-sequencing strategy, we uncovered four loss-of-function alleles of drh-1, three of which caused mutations in the helicase and C-terminal domains conserved in RLRs. Deep sequencing of small RNAs revealed an abundant population of Dicer-dependent virus-derived small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs) in drh-1 single and double mutant animals after infection with Orsay virus, a positive-strand RNA virus. These findings provide further genetic evidence for the antiviral function of DRH-1 and illustrate that DRH-1 is not essential for the sensing and Dicer-mediated processing of the viral dsRNA replicative intermediates. Interestingly, vsiRNAs produced by drh-1 mutants were mapped overwhelmingly to the terminal regions of the viral genomic RNAs, in contrast to random distribution of vsiRNA hot spots when DRH-1 is functional. As RIG-I translocates on long dsRNA and DRH-1 exists in a complex with Dicer, we propose that DRH-1 facilitates the biogenesis of vsiRNAs in nematodes by catalyzing translocation of the Dicer complex on the viral long dsRNA precursors. PMID:28325765

  11. The Initiation of Epigenetic Silencing of Active Transposable Elements Is Triggered by RDR6 and 21-22 Nucleotide Small Interfering RNAs1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Nuthikattu, Saivageethi; McCue, Andrea D.; Panda, Kaushik; Fultz, Dalen; DeFraia, Christopher; Thomas, Erica N.; Slotkin, R. Keith

    2013-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) are mobile fragments of DNA that are repressed in both plant and animal genomes through the epigenetic inheritance of repressed chromatin and expression states. The epigenetic silencing of TEs in plants is mediated by a process of RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM). Two pathways of RdDM have been identified: RNA Polymerase IV (Pol IV)-RdDM, which has been shown to be responsible for the de novo initiation, corrective reestablishment, and epigenetic maintenance of TE and/or transgene silencing; and RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase6 (RDR6)-RdDM, which was recently identified as necessary for maintaining repression for a few TEs. We have further characterized RDR6-RdDM using a genome-wide search to identify TEs that generate RDR6-dependent small interfering RNAs. We have determined that TEs only produce RDR6-dependent small interfering RNAs when transcriptionally active, and we have experimentally identified two TE subfamilies as direct targets of RDR6-RdDM. We used these TEs to test the function of RDR6-RdDM in assays for the de novo initiation, corrective reestablishment, and maintenance of TE silencing. We found that RDR6-RdDM plays no role in maintaining TE silencing. Rather, we found that RDR6 and Pol IV are two independent entry points into RdDM and epigenetic silencing that perform distinct functions in the silencing of TEs: Pol IV-RdDM functions to maintain TE silencing and to initiate silencing in an RNA Polymerase II expression-independent manner, while RDR6-RdDM functions to recognize active Polymerase II-derived TE mRNA transcripts to both trigger and correctively reestablish TE methylation and epigenetic silencing. PMID:23542151

  12. A ruler protein in a complex for antiviral defense determines the length of small interfering CRISPR RNAs.

    PubMed

    Hatoum-Aslan, Asma; Samai, Poulami; Maniv, Inbal; Jiang, Wenyan; Marraffini, Luciano A

    2013-09-27

    Small RNAs undergo maturation events that precisely determine the length and structure required for their function. CRISPRs (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) encode small RNAs (crRNAs) that together with CRISPR-associated (cas) genes constitute a sequence-specific prokaryotic immune system for anti-viral and anti-plasmid defense. crRNAs are subject to multiple processing events during their biogenesis, and little is known about the mechanism of the final maturation step. We show that in the Staphylococcus epidermidis type III CRISPR-Cas system, mature crRNAs are measured in a Cas10·Csm ribonucleoprotein complex to yield discrete lengths that differ by 6-nucleotide increments. We looked for mutants that impact this crRNA size pattern and found that an alanine substitution of a conserved aspartate residue of Csm3 eliminates the 6-nucleotide increments in the length of crRNAs. In vitro, recombinant Csm3 binds RNA molecules at multiple sites, producing gel-shift patterns that suggest that each protein binds 6 nucleotides of substrate. In vivo, changes in the levels of Csm3 modulate the crRNA size distribution without disrupting the 6-nucleotide periodicity. Our data support a model in which multiple Csm3 molecules within the Cas10·Csm complex bind the crRNA with a 6-nucleotide periodicity to function as a ruler that measures the extent of crRNA maturation.

  13. Comprehensive Annotation of Physcomitrella patens Small RNA Loci Reveals That the Heterochromatic Short Interfering RNA Pathway Is Largely Conserved in Land Plants[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Coruh, Ceyda; Cho, Sung Hyun; Shahid, Saima; Liu, Qikun; Wierzbicki, Andrzej; Axtell, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Many plant small RNAs are sequence-specific negative regulators of target mRNAs and/or chromatin. In angiosperms, the two most abundant endogenous small RNA populations are usually 21-nucleotide microRNAs (miRNAs) and 24-nucleotide heterochromatic short interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Heterochromatic siRNAs are derived from repetitive regions and reinforce DNA methylation at targeted loci. The existence and extent of heterochromatic siRNAs in other land plant lineages has been unclear. Using small RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) of the moss Physcomitrella patens, we identified 1090 loci that produce mostly 23- to 24-nucleotide siRNAs. These loci are mostly in intergenic regions with dense DNA methylation. Accumulation of siRNAs from these loci depends upon P. patens homologs of DICER-LIKE3 (DCL3), RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE2, and the largest subunit of DNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE IV, with the largest subunit of a Pol V homolog contributing to expression at a smaller subset of the loci. A MINIMAL DICER-LIKE (mDCL) gene, which lacks the N-terminal helicase domain typical of DCL proteins, is specifically required for 23-nucleotide siRNA accumulation. We conclude that heterochromatic siRNAs, and their biogenesis pathways, are largely identical between angiosperms and P. patens, with the notable exception of the P. patens-specific use of mDCL to produce 23-nucleotide siRNAs. PMID:26209555

  14. Therapeutic targeting of polo-like kinase 1 using RNA-interfering nanoparticles (iNOPs) for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    McCarroll, Joshua A; Dwarte, Tanya; Baigude, Huricha; Dang, Jason; Yang, Lu; Erlich, Rafael B; Kimpton, Kathleen; Teo, Joann; Sagnella, Sharon M; Akerfeldt, Mia C; Liu, Jie; Phillips, Phoebe A; Rana, Tariq M; Kavallaris, Maria

    2015-05-20

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains the most common cause of cancer death worldwide due its resistance to chemotherapy and aggressive tumor growth. Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) is a serine-threonine protein kinase which is overexpressed in cancer cells, and plays a major role in regulating tumor growth. A number of PLK1 inhibitors are in clinical trial; however, poor tumor bioavailability and off-target effects limit their efficacy. Short-interfering-RNA (siRNA) holds promise as a class of therapeutics, which can selectively silence disease-causing genes. However, siRNA cannot enter cells without a delivery vehicle. Herein, we investigated whether RNAi-interfering nanoparticles could deliver siRNA to NSCLC cells and silence PLK1 expression in vitro and in vivo. iNOP-7 was non-toxic, and delivered siRNA with high efficiency to NSCLC cells. iNOP-7-PLK1 siRNA silenced PLK1 expression and reduced NSCLC growth in vitro. Notably, iNOP-7 delivered siRNA to orthotopic lung tumors in mice, and administration of iNOP-7-PLK1 siRNA reduced lung tumor burden. These novel data show that iNOP-7 can deliver siRNA against PLK1 to NSCLC cells, and decrease cell proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. iNOP-7-PLK1 siRNA may provide a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of NSCLC as well as other cancers which aberrantly express this gene.

  15. The system with zwitterionic lactose-based surfactant for complexation and delivery of small interfering ribonucleic acid—A structural and spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skupin, Michalina; Sobczak, Krzysztof; Zieliński, Ryszard; Kozak, Maciej

    2016-05-01

    Systems suitable for the effective preparation of complexes with siRNA (small interfering RNA) are at the center of interest in the area of research work on the delivery of the RNA-based drugs (RNA-therapeutics). This article presents results of a study on the structural effects associated with siRNA complexation by a surfactant comprising a lactose group (N-(3-propanesulfone)-N-dodecyl-amino-beta-D-lactose hydrochloride, LA12). The double stranded siRNA oligomer (21 base pairs) used in this study is responsible for silencing a gene that can be important in the therapy of myotonic dystrophy type 1. The obtained siRNA/LA12 lipoplexes were studied using the methods of small angle scattering of synchrotron radiation, circular dichroism spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and electrophoretic mobility tests. Lipoplexes form in solution stable lamellar or cubic phases. The surfactant selected for the study shows much lower cytotoxicity and good complexation abilities of siRNA than dicationic or polycationic surfactants.

  16. Rootstock-to-scion transfer of transgene-derived small interfering RNAs and their effect on virus resistance in nontransgenic sweet cherry.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dongyan; Song, Guo-qing

    2014-12-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are silencing signals in plants. Virus-resistant transgenic rootstocks developed through siRNA-mediated gene silencing may enhance virus resistance of nontransgenic scions via siRNAs transported from the transgenic rootstocks. However, convincing evidence of rootstock-to-scion movement of siRNAs of exogenous genes in woody plants is still lacking. To determine whether exogenous siRNAs can be transferred, nontransgenic sweet cherry (scions) was grafted on transgenic cherry rootstocks (TRs), which was transformed with an RNA interference (RNAi) vector expressing short hairpin RNAs of the genomic RNA3 of Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV-hpRNA). Small RNA sequencing was conducted using bud tissues of TRs and those of grafted (rootstock/scion) trees, locating at about 1.2 m above the graft unions. Comparison of the siRNA profiles revealed that the PNRSV-hpRNA was efficient in producing siRNAs and eliminating PNRSV in the TRs. Furthermore, our study confirmed, for the first time, the long-distance (1.2 m) transfer of PNRSV-hpRNA-derived siRNAs from the transgenic rootstock to the nontransgenic scion in woody plants. Inoculation of nontransgenic scions with PNRSV revealed that the transferred siRNAs enhanced PNRSV resistance of the scions grafted on the TRs. Collectively, these findings provide the foundation for 'using transgenic rootstocks to produce products of nontransgenic scions in fruit trees'.

  17. Use of small interfering ribonucleic acids to inhibit the adipogenic effect of alcohol on human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiang; Zhang, Hui; Pei, Fu-xing; Chen, Zhi-yu; Wang, Guang-lin; Shen, Bin; Yang, Jing; Zhou, Zong-ke; Kong, Qing-quan

    2010-10-01

    This study tested the potential of small interfering RNAs (siRNA) targeting human peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) to repress the adipogenic effect of alcohol on human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal cells (hBMSCs). hBMSCs were cultured from hip replacement surgery patients (n = 10). PPARγ-siRNA was transiently transfected into hBMSCs cultured in ostogenic media containing 50 mM alcohol by using a liposome-based strategy. Oil red O staining was used to test the development of differentiated adipocytes, and Alizarin red staining was used to test mineral deposition. Marker genes of adipogenesis (PPARγ2 and aP2) and osteogenesis (Osf2/Cbfa1) were examined through real time RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. Collagen type I, alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin protein synthesis of cultures were also assayed. Data were presented as mean ± SD. Differences between the means of the treatment groups were determined with ANOVA. PPARγ-siRNA transfection resulted in significantly lower adipocyte number, increased matrix mineralisation, repressed adipogenic gene markers, up-regulated osteogenic gene marker and bone matrix protein synthesis in the PPARγ-siRNA group compared to controls (P < 0.05). PPARγ-siRNA is a useful strategy to inhibit the adipogenic effect and the osteogenic repression of alcohol on hBMSCs. This may be a novel therapeutic intervention for osteopenic disorders in alcoholism and other conditions.

  18. Topical Anti-Nuclear Factor-Kappa B Small Interfering RNA with Functional Peptides Containing Sericin-Based Hydrogel for Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kanazawa, Takanori; Shizawa, Yuki; Takeuchi, Mayu; Tamano, Kuniko; Ibaraki, Hisako; Seta, Yasuo; Takashima, Yuuki; Okada, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    The small interfering RNA (siRNA) is suggested to offer a novel means of treating atopic dermatitis (AD) because it allows the specific silencing of genes related to AD pathogenesis. In our previous study, we found that siRNA targeted against RelA, an important nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) subdomain, with functional peptides, showed therapeutic effects in a mouse model of AD. In the present study, to develop a topical skin application against AD, we prepared a hydrogel containing anti-RelA siRNA and functional peptides and determined the intradermal permeation and the anti-AD effects in an AD mouse model. We selected the silk protein, sericin (SC), which is a versatile biocompatible biomaterial to prepare hydrogel as an aqueous gel base. We found that the siRNA was more widely delivered to the site of application in AD-induced ear skin of mice after topical application via the hydrogel containing functional peptides than via the preparation without functional peptides. In addition, the ear thickness and clinical skin severity of the AD-induced mice treated with hydrogel containing anti-RelA siRNA with functional peptides improved more than that of mice treated with the preparation formulated with negative siRNA. PMID:26371030

  19. An Efficient Method for Electroporation of Small Interfering RNAs into ENCODE Project Tier 1 GM12878 and K562 Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Muller, Ryan Y; Hammond, Ming C; Rio, Donald C; Lee, Yeon J

    2015-12-01

    The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Project aims to identify all functional sequence elements in the human genome sequence by use of high-throughput DNA/cDNA sequencing approaches. To aid the standardization, comparison, and integration of data sets produced from different technologies and platforms, the ENCODE Consortium selected several standard human cell lines to be used by the ENCODE Projects. The Tier 1 ENCODE cell lines include GM12878, K562, and H1 human embryonic stem cell lines. GM12878 is a lymphoblastoid cell line, transformed with the Epstein-Barr virus, that was selected by the International HapMap Project for whole genome and transcriptome sequencing by use of the Illumina platform. K562 is an immortalized myelogenous leukemia cell line. The GM12878 cell line is attractive for the ENCODE Projects, as it offers potential synergy with the International HapMap Project. Despite the vast amount of sequencing data available on the GM12878 cell line through the ENCODE Project, including transcriptome, chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing for histone marks, and transcription factors, no small interfering siRNA-mediated knockdown studies have been performed in the GM12878 cell line, as cationic lipid-mediated transfection methods are inefficient for lymphoid cell lines. Here, we present an efficient and reproducible method for transfection of a variety of siRNAs into the GM12878 and K562 cell lines, which subsequently results in targeted protein depletion.

  20. Assessing delivery and quantifying efficacy of small interfering ribonucleic acid therapeutics in the skin using a dual-axis confocal microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ra, Hyejun; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, Emilio; Smith, Bryan R.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Kino, Gordon S.; Solgaard, Olav; Kaspar, Roger L.; Contag, Christopher H.

    2010-05-01

    Transgenic reporter mice and advances in imaging instrumentation are enabling real-time visualization of cellular mechanisms in living subjects and accelerating the development of novel therapies. Innovative confocal microscope designs are improving their utility for microscopic imaging of fluorescent reporters in living animals. We develop dual-axis confocal (DAC) microscopes for such in vivo studies and create mouse models where fluorescent proteins are expressed in the skin for the purpose of advancing skin therapeutics and transdermal delivery tools. Three-dimensional image volumes, through the different skin compartments of the epidermis and dermis, can be acquired in several seconds with the DAC microscope in living mice, and are comparable to histologic analyses of reporter protein expression patterns in skin sections. Intravital imaging with the DAC microscope further enables visualization of green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene expression in the skin over time, and quantification of transdermal delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) and therapeutic efficacy. Visualization of transdermal delivery of nucleic acids will play an important role in the development of innovative strategies for treating skin pathologies.

  1. Combined integrin phosphoproteomic analyses and small interfering RNA--based functional screening identify key regulators for cancer cell adhesion and migration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanling; Lu, Bingwen; Yang, Qingkai; Fearns, Colleen; Yates, John R; Lee, Jiing-Dwan

    2009-04-15

    Integrins interact with extracellular matrix (ECM) and deliver intracellular signaling for cell proliferation, survival, and motility. During tumor metastasis, integrin-mediated cell adhesion to and migration on the ECM proteins are required for cancer cell survival and adaptation to the new microenvironment. Using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture-mass spectrometry, we profiled the phosphoproteomic changes induced by the interactions of cell integrins with type I collagen, the most common ECM substratum. Integrin-ECM interactions modulate phosphorylation of 517 serine, threonine, or tyrosine residues in 513 peptides, corresponding to 357 proteins. Among these proteins, 33 key signaling mediators with kinase or phosphatase activity were subjected to small interfering RNA-based functional screening. Three integrin-regulated kinases, DBF4, PAK2, and GRK6, were identified for their critical role in cell adhesion and migration possibly through their regulation of actin cytoskeleton arrangement. Altogether, we not only depict an integrin-modulated phosphorylation network during cell-ECM protein interactions but also reveal novel regulators for cell adhesion and migration.

  2. Suppression of wingless-type MMTV integration site family, member 1 expression by small interfering RNA inhibits U251 glioma cell growth in vitro

    PubMed Central

    DONG, LUN; DUAN, XIAO-CHUN; HAN, CHONG-XU; ZHANG, HENGZHU; WU, YONGKANG

    2015-01-01

    A Wingless-type MMTV integration site family, member 1 (Wnt-1) RNA interference expression vector was constructed during the present study, which was used to transfect the glioma U251 cell line and investigate its effect on glioma. Two 21-base oligonucleotides complementary to the coding sequence that was flanking the loop sequence were designed to form a DNA hairpin template for the target small interfering RNA (siRNA). The siRNA templates were cloned into the siRNA expression vector, pGPU6/green fluorescent protein (GFP)/Neo and the sequence was confirmed by DNA sequencing. The pGPU6/GFP/Neo-short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-Wnt-1 vector was subsequently transfected into U251 cells, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis were used to evaluate the Wnt-1 gene silencing effect on U251 cell growth by MTT assay and flow cytometry. The Wnt-1 protein expression was significantly reduced following transfection with the recombinant plasmid, as determined by western blot analysis of the transfected U251 cells. This transfection exhibited a significantly higher death rate, as shown by MTT. Thus, the present study demonstrated that the pGPU6/GFP/Neo-shRNA-Wnt-1 vector inhibited Wnt-1 protein expression. However, further investigations regarding the Wnt signaling pathway in glioma pathogenesis are required. PMID:25435937

  3. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) suppressed cyclin D1 expression and hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao-Hui; Jian, Wei-Hua; Wu, Zhao-Feng; Zhao, Jie; Wang, Hua; Li, Wen; Xia, Jin-Tang

    2014-07-30

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), a proinflammatory and immunoregulatory chemokine, plays important roles in cancer-related biological processes. However, few studies have focused on the clinical relevance of MIF and cyclin D1 expression in hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HCCs). In this study, MIF and cyclin D1 expression levels in HCC tissues and cell lines were significantly upregulated compared with adjacent normal tissues or a normal liver cell line. In HCC specimens, MIF expression positively correlated with cyclin D1 expression. Additionally, MIF and cyclin D1 expression positively correlated with tumor size. MIF knockdown inhibited the proliferation of PLC and HepG2 cells and promoted apoptosis. However, small interfering RNA (siRNA) against MIF did not influence the cell cycle in these cells. In an in vivo xenograft model, MIF knockdown reduced the tumor growth rate. The expression levels of Bcl-2, p-caspase-3, BIM and Bax were upregulated, while the expression levels of cyclin D1, p-Akt and p-ERK were downregulated in MIF-knockdown cells. These findings indicate that MIF siRNA reduces proliferation and increases apoptosis in HCC cells. MIF knockdown inhibits the expression of growth-related proteins and induces the expression of apoptosis-related proteins, supporting a role for MIF as a novel therapeutic target for HCC.

  4. An Efficient Method for Electroporation of Small Interfering RNAs into ENCODE Project Tier 1 GM12878 and K562 Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Ryan Y.; Hammond, Ming C.

    2015-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Project aims to identify all functional sequence elements in the human genome sequence by use of high-throughput DNA/cDNA sequencing approaches. To aid the standardization, comparison, and integration of data sets produced from different technologies and platforms, the ENCODE Consortium selected several standard human cell lines to be used by the ENCODE Projects. The Tier 1 ENCODE cell lines include GM12878, K562, and H1 human embryonic stem cell lines. GM12878 is a lymphoblastoid cell line, transformed with the Epstein-Barr virus, that was selected by the International HapMap Project for whole genome and transcriptome sequencing by use of the Illumina platform. K562 is an immortalized myelogenous leukemia cell line. The GM12878 cell line is attractive for the ENCODE Projects, as it offers potential synergy with the International HapMap Project. Despite the vast amount of sequencing data available on the GM12878 cell line through the ENCODE Project, including transcriptome, chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing for histone marks, and transcription factors, no small interfering siRNA-mediated knockdown studies have been performed in the GM12878 cell line, as cationic lipid-mediated transfection methods are inefficient for lymphoid cell lines. Here, we present an efficient and reproducible method for transfection of a variety of siRNAs into the GM12878 and K562 cell lines, which subsequently results in targeted protein depletion. PMID:26543439

  5. Suppression of metastasis of human pancreatic cancer cells to the liver by small interfering RNA-mediated targeting of the midkine gene

    PubMed Central

    YU, LI; FAN, YU; CHEN, BAODING; HU, YUE; GAO, YINA; WEI, DA

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to ascertain whether suppression of midkine (MK) expression in pancreatic cancer cells inhibits metastasis to the liver. Human pancreatic cancer AsPC-1 cells were transfected with small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting MK. siRNA against MK was observed to reduce the expression of MK mRNA and protein in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, and to decrease the number of migrating and tissue-penetrating cells in a concentration-dependent manner (P<0.005). Extracellular vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) concentrations were markedly reduced for the siRNA-transfected cells compared with those that were non-siRNA-transfected. The liver transmission rate and tumor nodule number in the animals harboring the siRNA-transfected cells were lower compared with those in the animals harboring the non-siRNA-transfected cells (P<0.005). These data indicate that metastasis of pancreatic cancer cells to the liver requires the expression of MK. The downregulation of VEGF expression is essential to the mechanism whereby suppression of MK expression constrains the metastasis of pancreatic cancer cells to the liver. PMID:24179520

  6. A 28-day oral toxicity evaluation of small interfering RNAs and a long double-stranded RNA targeting vacuolar ATPase in mice.

    PubMed

    Petrick, Jay S; Moore, William M; Heydens, William F; Koch, Michael S; Sherman, James H; Lemke, Shawna L

    2015-02-01

    New biotechnology-derived crop traits have been developed utilizing the natural process of RNA interference (RNAi). However, plant-produced double stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) are not known to present a hazard to mammals because numerous biological barriers limit uptake and potential for activity. To evaluate this experimentally, dsRNA sequences matching the mouse vATPase gene (an established target for control of corn rootworms) were evaluated in a 28-day toxicity study with mice. Test groups were orally gavaged with escalating doses of either a pool of four 21-mer vATPase small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) or a 218-base pair vATPase dsRNA. There were no treatment-related effects on body weight, food consumption, clinical observations, clinical chemistry, hematology, gross pathology, or histopathology endpoints. The highest dose levels tested were considered to be the no observed adverse effect levels (NOAELs) for the 21-mer siRNAs (48 mg/kg/day) and the 218 bp dsRNA (64 mg/kg/day). As an additional exploratory endpoint, vATPase gene expression, was evaluated in selected gastrointestinal tract and systemic tissues. The results of this assay did not indicate treatment-related suppression of vATPase. The results of this study indicate that orally ingested dsRNAs, even those targeting a gene in the test species, do not produce adverse health effects in mammals.

  7. Small interfering RNAs expressed from a Pol III promoter suppress the EWS/Fli-1 transcript in an Ewing sarcoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Dohjima, Taikoh; Lee, Nan Sook; Li, Haitang; Ohno, Takatoshi; Rossi, John J

    2003-06-01

    The EWS/Fli-1 fusion gene encodes an oncogenic fusion protein. The fusion is a product of the translocation t(11;22) (q24;q12), which is detected in 85% of Ewing sarcoma and primitive neuroectodermal tumor cells. Utilizing intracellularly expressed 21- to 23-nucleotide small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting the EWS/Fli-1 fusion transcript in an Ewing sarcoma cell line, we achieved a greater than 80% reduction in the EWS/Fli-1 transcript. The reduction in transcript levels was accompanied by growth inhibition of an Ewing cell line. In addition to quantitating the reduction of the fusion transcript, we carefully monitored reduction of the endogenous EWS and Fli-1 mRNAs as well. One of the two siRNAs targeted to the fusion transcript also partially downregulated the Fli-1 mRNA, further potentiating the growth inhibition. These results highlight both the power of siRNAs and the potential side reactions that need to be carefully monitored. In addition, these results provide the first demonstration of expressed siRNAs downregulating an oncogenic fusion transcript. The results and observations from these studies should prove useful in targeting other fusion transcripts characteristic of sarcomas and erythroleukemias.

  8. Insights into the therapeutic potential of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α small interfering RNA in malignant melanoma delivered via folate-decorated cationic liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhongjian; Zhang, Tianpeng; Wu, Baojian; Zhang, Xingwang

    2016-01-01

    Malignant melanoma (MM) represents the most dangerous form of skin cancer, and its incidence is expected to rise in the coming time. However, therapy for MM is limited by low topical drug concentration and multidrug resistance. This article aimed to develop folate-decorated cationic liposomes (fc-LPs) for hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) small interfering (siRNA) delivery, and to evaluate the potential of such siRNA/liposome complexes in MM therapy. HIF-1α siRNA-loaded fc-LPs (siRNA-fc-LPs) were prepared by a film hydration method followed by siRNA incubation. Folate decoration of liposomes was achieved by incorporation of folate/oleic acid-diacylated oligochitosans. The resulting siRNA-fc-LPs were 95.3 nm in size with a ζ potential of 2.41 mV. The liposomal vectors exhibited excellent loading capacity and protective effect toward siRNA. The in vitro cell transfection efficiency was almost parallel to the commercially available Lipofectamine™ 2000. Moreover, the anti-melanoma activity of HIF-1α siRNA was significantly enhanced through fc-LPs. Western blot analysis and apoptosis test demonstrated that siRNA-fc-LPs substantially reduced the production of HIF-1α-associated protein and induced the apoptosis of hypoxia-tolerant melanoma cells. Our designed liposomal vectors might be applicable as siRNA delivery vehicle to systemically or topically treat MM. PMID:27042054

  9. Type I Interferons Impede Short Hairpin RNA-Mediated RNAi via Inhibition of Dicer-Mediated Processing to Small Interfering RNA.

    PubMed

    Machitani, Mitsuhiro; Sakurai, Fuminori; Wakabayashi, Keisaku; Takayama, Kosuke; Tachibana, Masashi; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2017-03-17

    RNAi by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) is a powerful tool not only for studying gene functions in various organisms, including mammals, but also for the treatment of severe disorders. However, shRNA-expressing vectors can induce type I interferon (IFN) expression by activation of innate immune responses, leading to off-target effects and unexpected side effects. Several strategies have been developed to prevent type I IFN induction. On the other hand, it has remained unclear whether type I IFNs have effects on shRNA-mediated RNAi. Here, we show that the type I IFNs significantly inhibit shRNA-mediated RNAi. Treatment with recombinant human IFN-α significantly inhibited shRNA-mediated knockdown of target genes, while it did not inhibit small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown. Following treatment with IFN-α, increased and decreased copy numbers of shRNA and its processed form, respectively, were found in the cells transfected with shRNA-expressing plasmids. Dicer protein levels were not altered by IFN-α. These results indicate that type I IFNs inhibit shRNA-mediated RNAi via inhibition of dicer-mediated processing of shRNA to siRNA. Our findings should provide important clues for efficient RNAi-mediated knockdown of target genes in both basic researches and clinical gene therapy.

  10. Caenorhabditis elegans RIG-I Homolog Mediates Antiviral RNA Interference Downstream of Dicer-Dependent Biogenesis of Viral Small Interfering RNAs.

    PubMed

    Coffman, Stephanie R; Lu, Jinfeng; Guo, Xunyang; Zhong, Jing; Jiang, Hongshan; Broitman-Maduro, Gina; Li, Wan-Xiang; Lu, Rui; Maduro, Morris; Ding, Shou-Wei

    2017-03-21

    Dicer enzymes process virus-specific double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to initiate specific antiviral defense by related RNA interference (RNAi) pathways in plants, insects, nematodes, and mammals. Antiviral RNAi in Caenorhabditis elegans requires Dicer-related helicase 1 (DRH-1), not found in plants and insects but highly homologous to mammalian retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs), intracellular viral RNA sensors that trigger innate immunity against RNA virus infection. However, it remains unclear if DRH-1 acts analogously to initiate antiviral RNAi in C. elegans Here, we performed a forward genetic screen to characterize antiviral RNAi in C. elegans Using a mapping-by-sequencing strategy, we uncovered four loss-of-function alleles of drh-1, three of which caused mutations in the helicase and C-terminal domains conserved in RLRs. Deep sequencing of small RNAs revealed an abundant population of Dicer-dependent virus-derived small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs) in drh-1 single and double mutant animals after infection with Orsay virus, a positive-strand RNA virus. These findings provide further genetic evidence for the antiviral function of DRH-1 and illustrate that DRH-1 is not essential for the sensing and Dicer-mediated processing of the viral dsRNA replicative intermediates. Interestingly, vsiRNAs produced by drh-1 mutants were mapped overwhelmingly to the terminal regions of the viral genomic RNAs, in contrast to random distribution of vsiRNA hot spots when DRH-1 is functional. As RIG-I translocates on long dsRNA and DRH-1 exists in a complex with Dicer, we propose that DRH-1 facilitates the biogenesis of vsiRNAs in nematodes by catalyzing translocation of the Dicer complex on the viral long dsRNA precursors.IMPORTANCE The helicase and C-terminal domains of mammalian RLRs sense intracellular viral RNAs to initiate the interferon-regulated innate immunity against RNA virus infection. Both of the domains from

  11. Silencing tumor necrosis factor-alpha in vitro from small interfering RNA-decorated titanium nanotube array can facilitate osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhenlin; Hu, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Dawei; Zhuo, Mengchuan; Cheng, Jiwei; Xu, Xingping; Xing, Yongming; Fan, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Titanium implants are known for their bone bonding ability. However, the osseointegration may be severely disturbed in the inflammation environment. In order to enhance osseointegration of the implant in an inflamed environment, the small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) was used to functionalize titanium surface for gene silencing. The chitosan–tripolyphosphate–hyaluronate complexes were used to formulate nanoparticles (NPs) with siRNA, which were adsorbed directly by the anodized titanium surface. The surface characterization was analyzed by scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscopy, as well as contact angle measurement. The fluorescence microscope was used to monitor the degradation of the layer. The coculture system was established with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) grown directly on functionalized titanium surface and RAW264.7 cells (preactivated by lipopolysaccharide) grown upside in a transwell chamber. The transfection and knockdown efficiency of TNF-α in RAW264.7 cells were determined by fluorescence microscope, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The cytoskeleton and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs were also analyzed. Regular vertical aligned nanotubes (~100 nm diameter and ~300 nm length) were generated after anodization of polished titanium. After loading with NPs, the nanotubes were filled and covered by a layer of amorphous particles. The surface topography changed and wettability decreased after covering with NPs. As expected, a burst degradation of the film was observed, which could provide sufficient NPs in the released supernatant and result in transfection and knockdown effects in RAW264.7 cells. The cytoskeleton arrangement of MSCs was elongated and the osteogenic differentiation was also significantly improved on NPs loading surface. In conclusion, the siRNA decorated titanium implant could simultaneously suppress inflammation and improve

  12. Small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) and lysosomal trafficking regulator (LYST) induce growth inhibition and apoptosis in human multiple myeloma cells: A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Bong, Ivyna Pau Ni; Ng, Ching Ching; Fakiruddin, Shaik Kamal; Lim, Moon Nian; Zakaria, Zubaidah

    2016-11-10

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignancy of B lymphocytes or plasma cells. Our array-based comparative genomic hybridization findings revealed chromosomal gains at 7q22.3 and 1q42.3, where nicotinamide (NAM) phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) and lysosomal trafficking regulator (LYST) genes are localized, respectively. This led us to further study the functions of these genes in myeloma cells. NAMPT is a key enzyme involved in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide salvage pathway, and it is frequently overexpressed in human cancers. In contrast, little is known about the function of LYST in cancer. The expression of LYST is shown to affect lysosomal size, granule size, and autophagy in human cells. In this study, the effects of small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated silencing of NAMPT and LYST on cell proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated in RPMI 8226 myeloma cells. Transfection efficiencies were determined by quantitative real time reverse transcriptase PCR. Cell proliferation was determined using MTT assay, while apoptosis was analyzed with flow cytometry using Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide assay. The NAMPT protein expression in siRNA-treated cells was estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Our results showed that NAMPT and LYST were successfully knockdown by siRNA transfection (p < 0.05). NAMPT or LYST gene silencing significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in RPMI 8226 cells (p < 0.05). Silencing of NAMPT gene also decreased NAMPT protein levels (p < 0.01). Our study demonstrated that NAMPT and LYST play pivotal roles in the molecular pathogenesis of MM. This is the first report describing the possible functions of LYST in myelomagenesis and its potential role as a therapeutic target in MM.

  13. Small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) and lysosomal trafficking regulator (LYST) induce growth inhibition and apoptosis in human multiple myeloma cells: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Bong, Ivyna Pau Ni; Ng, Ching Ching; Fakiruddin, Shaik Kamal; Lim, Moon Nian; Zakaria, Zubaidah

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignancy of B lymphocytes or plasma cells. Our array-based comparative genomic hybridization findings revealed chromosomal gains at 7q22.3 and 1q42.3, where nicotinamide (NAM) phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) and lysosomal trafficking regulator (LYST) genes are localized, respectively. This led us to further study the fprotein expression in unctions of these genes in myeloma cells. NAMPT is a key enzyme involved in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide salvage pathway, and it is frequently overexpressed in human cancers. In contrast, little is known about the function of LYST in cancer. The expression of LYST is shown to affect lysosomal size, granule size, and autophagy in human cells. In this study, the effects of small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated silencing of NAMPT and LYST on cell proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated in RPMI 8226 myeloma cells. Transfection efficiencies were determined by quantitative real time reverse transcriptase PCR. Cell proliferation was determined using MTT assay, while apoptosis was analyzed with flow cytometry using Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide assay. The NAMPT protein expression in siRNA-treated cells was estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Our results showed that NAMPT and LYST were successfully knockdown by siRNA transfection (p < 0.05). NAMPT or LYST gene silencing significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in RPMI 8226 cells (p < 0.05). Silencing of NAMPT gene also decreased NAMPT protein levels (p < 0.01). Our study demonstrated that NAMPT and LYST play pivotal roles in the molecular pathogenesis of MM. This is the first report describing the possible functions of LYST in myelomagenesis and its potential role as a therapeutic target in MM. PMID:27754828

  14. Suppression of NHE1 by small interfering RNA inhibits HIF-1α-induced angiogenesis in vitro via modulation of calpain activity.

    PubMed

    Mo, Xian-Gang; Chen, Qing-Wei; Li, Xing-Sheng; Zheng, Min-Ming; Ke, Da-Zhi; Deng, Wei; Li, Gui-Qiong; Jiang, Jin; Wu, Zhi-Qin; Wang, Li; Wang, Peng; Yang, Yan; Cao, Guang-Yi

    2011-03-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) orchestrates angiogenesis under hypoxic conditions mainly due to increased expression of such target genes as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Na+/H+exchanger-1 (NHE1), a potential HIF target gene product, plays a pivotal role in proliferation, survival, migration, adhesion and so on. However, it is unknown whether NHE1 is involved in HIF-1α-induced angiogenesis. This present study demonstrated that the expression of NHE1 was much higher in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) infected with adenovirus encoding HIF-1α (rAd-HIF) than with vacuum adenovirus (vAd). HIF-1α also increased the expression of VEGF, the expression and activity of calpains, and the intracellular pH. Moreover, small interfering RNA targeting NHE1 (NHE1 siRNA) dramatically decreased the expression of NHE1 and thus lowered the intracellular pH, and it also attenuated the protein expression of calpain-2 but not calpain-1, resulting in the lower calpain activity. Furthermore, HIF-1α enhanced the proliferation, migration and Matrigel tube formation, which were inhibited by NHE1 siRNA. Finally, the inhibitory effect of NHE1 siRNA was reversed by VEGF and the reversibility of the later was abrogated by the calpain inhibitor ALLM. In conclusion, the findings have revealed that NHE1 might participate in HIF-1-induced angiogenesis due, at least in part, to the alteration of the calpain activity, suggesting that NHE1 as well as calpains might represent a potential target of controlling angiogenesis in response to the hypoxic stress under various pathological conditions.

  15. Small interfering RNA library screen of human kinases and phosphatases identifies polo-like kinase 1 as a promising new target for the treatment of pediatric rhabdomyosarcomas.

    PubMed

    Hu, Kaiji; Lee, Cathy; Qiu, Dexin; Fotovati, Abbas; Davies, Alastair; Abu-Ali, Samah; Wai, Daniel; Lawlor, Elizabeth R; Triche, Timothy J; Pallen, Catherine J; Dunn, Sandra E

    2009-11-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma, consisting of alveolar (aRMS) and embryonal (eRMS) subtypes, is the most common type of sarcoma in children. Currently, there are no targeted drug therapies available for rhabdomyosarcoma. In searching for new molecular therapeutic targets, we carried out genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) library screens targeting human phosphatases (n = 206) and kinases (n = 691) initially against an aRMS cell line, RH30. Sixteen phosphatases and 50 kinases were identified based on growth inhibition after 72 hours. Inhibiting polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) had the most remarkable impact on growth inhibition (approximately 80%) and apoptosis on all three rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines tested, namely, RH30, CW9019 (aRMS), and RD (eRMS), whereas there was no effect on normal muscle cells. The loss of PLK1 expression and subsequent growth inhibition correlated with decreased p-CDC25C and Cyclin B1. Increased expression of WEE 1 was also noted. The induction of apoptosis after PLK1 silencing was confirmed by increased p-H2AX, propidium iodide uptake, and chromatin condensation, as well as caspase-3 and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. Pediatric Ewing's sarcoma (TC-32), neuroblastoma (IMR32 and KCNR), and glioblastoma (SF188) models were also highly sensitive to PLK1 inhibition. Finally, based on cDNA microarray analyses, PLK1 mRNA was overexpressed (>1.5 fold) in 10 of 10 rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines and in 47% and 51% of primary aRMS (17 of 36 samples) and eRMS (21 of 41 samples) tumors, respectively, compared with normal muscles. Similarly, pediatric Ewing's sarcoma, neuroblastoma, and osteosarcoma tumors expressed high PLK1. We conclude that PLK1 could be a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of a wide range of pediatric solid tumors including rhabdomyosarcoma.

  16. Effects of silencing S100A8 and S100A9 with small interfering RNA on the migration of CNE1 nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lin-Lin; Huang, Yuan-Jiao; Yi, Xiang; Yan, Xue-Min; Cai, Yan; He, Qin; Han, Zi-Jian

    2015-06-01

    The calcium-binding S100 proteins are involved in functions such as cell growth, differentiation, migration, adhesion and signal transduction. S100A8 and S100A9 are highly expressed in a variety of tumor cells, and are implicated in tumor development and progression. However, the role of S100A8 and S100A9 in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cell migration is unclear. The present study investigated the effect of S100A8 and S100A9 on migration using a NPC cell line, CNE1. The CNE1 cells were transfected with S100A8 or S100A9 small interfering RNA (siRNA). Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) was used to detect S100A8 and S100A9 gene expression. Following the downregulation of S100A8 or S100A9, the effects on cell migration were determined using wound-healing assays. The expression of matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP7), a member of the MMP family that is associated with tumor cell invasion and migration, was also detected by RT-qPCR. S100A8 and S100A9 siRNAs effectively suppressed S100A8 and S100A9 gene expression, and substantially inhibited the migration of the CNE1 cells. In addition, MMP7 expression was reduced to varying extents in S100A8 and S100A9 siRNA-treated cells compared with controls. Thus, S100A8 and S100A9 promoted the migration of CNE1 NPC cells.

  17. Transgenic banana plants expressing small interfering RNAs targeted against viral replication initiation gene display high-level resistance to banana bunchy top virus infection.

    PubMed

    Shekhawat, Upendra K S; Ganapathi, Thumballi R; Hadapad, Ashok B

    2012-08-01

    The banana aphid-transmitted Banana bunchy top virus (BBTV) is the most destructive viral pathogen of bananas and plantains worldwide. Lack of natural sources of resistance to BBTV has necessitated the exploitation of proven transgenic technologies for obtaining BBTV-resistant banana cultivars. In this study, we have explored the concept of using intron-hairpin-RNA (ihpRNA) transcripts corresponding to viral master replication initiation protein (Rep) to generate BBTV-resistant transgenic banana plants. Two ihpRNA constructs namely ihpRNA-Rep and ihpRNA-ProRep generated using Rep full coding sequence or Rep partial coding sequence together with its 5' upstream regulatory region, respectively, and castor bean catalase intron were successfully transformed into banana embryogenic cells. ihpRNA-Rep- and ihpRNA-ProRep-derived transgenic banana plants, selected based on preliminary screening for efficient reporter gene expression, were completely resistant to BBTV infection as indicated by the absence of disease symptoms after 6 months of viruliferous aphid inoculation. The resistance to BBTV infection was also evident by the inability to detect cDNAs coding for viral coat protein, movement protein and Rep protein by RT-PCR from inoculated transgenic leaf extracts. Southern analysis of the two groups of transgenics showed that ihpRNA transgene was stably integrated into the banana genome. The detection of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) derived from the ihpRNA transgene sequence in transformed BBTV-resistant plants positively established RNA interference as the mechanism underlying the observed resistance to BBTV. Efficient screening of optimal transformants in this vegetatively propagated non-segregating fruit crop ensured that all the transgenic plants assayed were resistant to BBTV infection.

  18. Silencing tumor necrosis factor-alpha in vitro from small interfering RNA-decorated titanium nanotube array can facilitate osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenlin; Hu, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Dawei; Zhuo, Mengchuan; Cheng, Jiwei; Xu, Xingping; Xing, Yongming; Fan, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Titanium implants are known for their bone bonding ability. However, the osseointegration may be severely disturbed in the inflammation environment. In order to enhance osseointegration of the implant in an inflamed environment, the small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) was used to functionalize titanium surface for gene silencing. The chitosan-tripolyphosphate-hyaluronate complexes were used to formulate nanoparticles (NPs) with siRNA, which were adsorbed directly by the anodized titanium surface. The surface characterization was analyzed by scanning electron microscope, atomic force microscopy, as well as contact angle measurement. The fluorescence microscope was used to monitor the degradation of the layer. The coculture system was established with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) grown directly on functionalized titanium surface and RAW264.7 cells (preactivated by lipopolysaccharide) grown upside in a transwell chamber. The transfection and knockdown efficiency of TNF-α in RAW264.7 cells were determined by fluorescence microscope, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The cytoskeleton and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs were also analyzed. Regular vertical aligned nanotubes (~100 nm diameter and ~300 nm length) were generated after anodization of polished titanium. After loading with NPs, the nanotubes were filled and covered by a layer of amorphous particles. The surface topography changed and wettability decreased after covering with NPs. As expected, a burst degradation of the film was observed, which could provide sufficient NPs in the released supernatant and result in transfection and knockdown effects in RAW264.7 cells. The cytoskeleton arrangement of MSCs was elongated and the osteogenic differentiation was also significantly improved on NPs loading surface. In conclusion, the siRNA decorated titanium implant could simultaneously suppress inflammation and improve

  19. Small Interfering RNAs That Trigger Posttranscriptional Gene Silencing Are Not Required for the Histone H3 Lys9 Methylation Necessary for Transgenic Tandem Repeat Stabilization in Neurospora crassa†

    PubMed Central

    Chicas, Agustin; Forrest, Emma C.; Sepich, Silvia; Cogoni, Carlo; Macino, Giuseppe

    2005-01-01

    In Neurospora crassa, the introduction of a transgene can lead to small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS) of homologous genes. siRNAs can also guide locus-specific methylation of Lys9 of histone H3 (Lys9H3) in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Here we tested the hypothesis that transgenically derived siRNAs may contemporaneously both activate the PTGS mechanism and induce chromatin modifications at the transgene and the homologous endogenous gene. We carried out chromatin immunoprecipitation using a previously characterized albino-1 (al-1) silenced strain but detected no alterations in the pattern of histone modifications at the endogenous al-1 locus, suggesting that siRNAs produced from the transgenic locus do not trigger modifications in trans of those histones tested. Instead, we found that the transgenic locus was hypermethylated at Lys9H3 in our silenced strain and remained hypermethylated in the quelling defective mutants (qde), further demonstrating that the PTGS machinery is dispensable for Lys9H3 methylation. However, we found that a mutant in the histone Lys9H3 methyltransferase dim-5 was unable to maintain PTGS, with transgenic copies being rapidly lost, resulting in reversion of the silenced phenotype. These results indicate that the defect in PTGS of the Δdim-5 strain is due to the inability to maintain the transgene in tandem, suggesting a role for DIM-5 in stabilizing such repeated sequences. We conclude that in Neurospora, siRNAs produced from the transgenic locus are used in the RNA-induced silencing complex-mediated PTGS pathway and do not communicate with an RNAi-induced initiation of transcriptional gene silencing complex to effect chromatin-based silencing. PMID:15831483

  20. Small interfering RNAs that trigger posttranscriptional gene silencing are not required for the histone H3 Lys9 methylation necessary for transgenic tandem repeat stabilization in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Chicas, Agustin; Forrest, Emma C; Sepich, Silvia; Cogoni, Carlo; Macino, Giuseppe

    2005-05-01

    In Neurospora crassa, the introduction of a transgene can lead to small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS) of homologous genes. siRNAs can also guide locus-specific methylation of Lys9 of histone H3 (Lys9H3) in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Here we tested the hypothesis that transgenically derived siRNAs may contemporaneously both activate the PTGS mechanism and induce chromatin modifications at the transgene and the homologous endogenous gene. We carried out chromatin immunoprecipitation using a previously characterized albino-1 (al-1) silenced strain but detected no alterations in the pattern of histone modifications at the endogenous al-1 locus, suggesting that siRNAs produced from the transgenic locus do not trigger modifications in trans of those histones tested. Instead, we found that the transgenic locus was hypermethylated at Lys9H3 in our silenced strain and remained hypermethylated in the quelling defective mutants (qde), further demonstrating that the PTGS machinery is dispensable for Lys9H3 methylation. However, we found that a mutant in the histone Lys9H3 methyltransferase dim-5 was unable to maintain PTGS, with transgenic copies being rapidly lost, resulting in reversion of the silenced phenotype. These results indicate that the defect in PTGS of the Deltadim-5 strain is due to the inability to maintain the transgene in tandem, suggesting a role for DIM-5 in stabilizing such repeated sequences. We conclude that in Neurospora, siRNAs produced from the transgenic locus are used in the RNA-induced silencing complex-mediated PTGS pathway and do not communicate with an RNAi-induced initiation of transcriptional gene silencing complex to effect chromatin-based silencing.

  1. Impact of CHK2-small interfering RNA on CpG ODN7909-enhanced radiosensitivity in lung cancer A549 cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Liu, Xiaoqun; Qiao, Tiankui; Yuan, Sujuan

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the impact of checkpoint kinase 2 (CHK2)-small interfering RNA (CHK2-siRNA) on the enhancement of radiosensitivity by CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) 7909 in lung cancer A549 cells. Methods The A549 cells were randomly divided into five groups: control, CpG, X-ray, CpG + X-ray, and CHK2-siRNA + CpG + X-ray. Cell colonization was observed using inverted microscopy. Cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. CHK2 expression was detected by Western blot. CHK2-siRNA was adopted to silence the expression of CHK2. Results The level of CHK2 phosphorylation was higher in the CpG + X-ray group than in the X-ray group. Increases in G2/mitotic (M) phase arrest and apoptosis and a decrease of cell survival rate in the CpG + X-ray group were statistically significant (P < 0.05) when compared with the CHK2-siRNA + CpG + X-ray group in which the expression of CHK2 was obviously inhibited. The combination of CpG ODN7909 and X-ray irradiation was found to enhance the mitotic death of A549 cells. The sensitization enhancement ratio of mean death dose (D0) was 1.42 in the CpG + X-ray group, which was higher than that of the CHK2-siRNA + CpG + X-ray group, in which D0 was 1.05. Conclusion To a certain extent, the impact of a combination of CpG ODN7909 and X-ray on G2/M phase arrest, apoptosis, and rate of cell survival was attenuated by CHK2-siRNA in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells, indicating that increased phosphorylation of CHK2 might be a radiosensitive pathway. PMID:23233807

  2. In vivo study of Dicer-2-mediated immune response of the small interfering RNA pathway upon systemic infections of virulent and avirulent viruses in Bombus terrestris.

    PubMed

    Niu, Jinzhi; Smagghe, Guy; De Coninck, Dieter I M; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Deforce, Dieter; Meeus, Ivan

    2016-03-01

    Recent studies suggest a potent role of the small interfering RNA (siRNA) pathway in the control of bee viruses and its usefulness to tackle these viral diseases. However, the involvement of the siRNA pathway in the defense against different bee viruses is still poorly understood. Therefore, in this report, we comprehensively analyzed the response of the siRNA pathway in bumblebees of Bombus terrestris to systemic infections of the virulent Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) and the avirulent slow bee paralysis virus (SBPV). Our results showed that IAPV and SBPV infections induced the expression of Dicer-2. IAPV infections also triggered the production of predominantly 22 nt-long virus-derived siRNAs (vsiRNAs). Intriguingly, these 22 nt-long vsiRNAs showed a high proportion of antigenomic IAPV sequences. Conversely, these predominantly 22 nt-long vsiRNAs of SBPV were not detected in SBPV infected bees. Furthermore, an "RNAi-of-RNAi" experiment on Dicer-2 did not result in altered genome copy numbers of IAPV (n = 17-18) and also not of SBPV (n = 11-12). Based on these results, we can speculate about the importance of the siRNA pathway in bumblebees for the antiviral response. During infection of IAPV, this pathway is probably recruited but it might be insufficient to control viral infection in our experimental setup. The host can control SBPV infection, but aside from the induction of Dicer-2 expression, no further evidence of the antiviral activity of the siRNA pathway was observed. This report may also enhance the current understanding of the siRNA pathway in the innate immunity of non-model insects upon different viral infections.

  3. Delivery of Small Interfering RNA to Inhibit Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Zebrafish Using Natural Brain Endothelia Cell-Secreted Exosome Nanovesicles for the Treatment of Brain Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tianzhi; Fogarty, Brittany; LaForge, Bret; Aziz, Salma; Pham, Thuy; Lai, Leanne; Bai, Shuhua

    2017-03-01

    Although small interfering RNA (siRNA) holds great therapeutic promise, its delivery to the disease site remains a paramount obstacle. In this study, we tested whether brain endothelial cell-derived exosomes could deliver siRNA across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in zebrafish. Natural exosomes were isolated from brain endothelial bEND.3 cell culture media and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) siRNA was loaded in exosomes with the assistance of a transfection reagent. While fluorescence-activated cell flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry staining studies indicated that wild-type exosomes significantly increased the uptake of fluorescence-labeled siRNA in the autologous brain endothelial cells, decreased fluorescence intensity was observed in the cells treated with the tetraspanin CD63 antibody-blocked exosome-delivered formulation (p < 0.05). In the transport study, exosomes also enhanced the permeability of rhodamine 123 in a co-cultured monolayer of brain endothelial bEND.3 cell and astrocyte. Inhibition at the expression of VEGF RNA and protein levels was observed in glioblastoma-astrocytoma U-87 MG cells treated with exosome-delivered siRNAs. Imaging results showed that exosome delivered more siRNAs across the BBB in Tg(fli1:GFP) zebrafish. In a xenotransplanted brain tumor model, exosome-delivered VEGF siRNAs decreased the fluorescence intensity of labeled cancer cells in the brain of zebrafish. Brain endothelial cell-derived exosomes could be potentially used as a natural carrier for the brain delivery of exogenous siRNA.

  4. The 21-nucleotide, but not 22-nucleotide, viral secondary small interfering RNAs direct potent antiviral defense by two cooperative argonautes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xian-Bing; Jovel, Juan; Udomporn, Petchthai; Wang, Ying; Wu, Qingfa; Li, Wan-Xiang; Gasciolli, Virginie; Vaucheret, Herve; Ding, Shou-Wei

    2011-04-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana defense against distinct positive-strand RNA viruses requires production of virus-derived secondary small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) by multiple RNA-dependent RNA polymerases. However, little is known about the biogenesis pathway and effector mechanism of viral secondary siRNAs. Here, we describe a mutant of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV-Δ2b) that is silenced predominantly by the RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE6 (RDR6)-dependent viral secondary siRNA pathway. We show that production of the viral secondary siRNAs targeting CMV-Δ2b requires SUPPRESSOR OF GENE SILENCING3 and DICER-LIKE4 (DCL4) in addition to RDR6. Examination of 25 single, double, and triple mutants impaired in nine ARGONAUTE (AGO) genes combined with coimmunoprecipitation and deep sequencing identifies an essential function for AGO1 and AGO2 in defense against CMV-Δ2b, which act downstream the biogenesis of viral secondary siRNAs in a nonredundant and cooperative manner. Our findings also illustrate that dicing of the viral RNA precursors of primary and secondary siRNA is insufficient to confer virus resistance. Notably, although DCL2 is able to produce abundant viral secondary siRNAs in the absence of DCL4, the resultant 22-nucleotide viral siRNAs alone do not guide efficient silencing of CMV-Δ2b. Possible mechanisms for the observed qualitative difference in RNA silencing between 21- and 22-nucleotide secondary siRNAs are discussed.

  5. A Novel Repeat-Associated Small Interfering RNA-Mediated Silencing Pathway Downregulates Complementary Sense gypsy Transcripts in Somatic Cells of the Drosophila Ovary▿

    PubMed Central

    Pélisson, Alain; Sarot, Emeline; Payen-Groschêne, Geneviève; Bucheton, Alain

    2007-01-01

    Replication of the gypsy endogenous retrovirus involves contamination of the female germ line by adjacent somatic tissues. This is prevented by flam, an as-yet-uncloned heterochromatic pericentromeric locus, at the level of transcript accumulation in these somatic ovarian tissues. We tested the effect of a presumptive RNA silencing mechanism on the accumulation of RNAs produced by constructs containing various gypsy sequences and report that the efficiency of silencing is indeed correlated with the amount of complementary RNAs, 25 to 30 nucleotides in length, in the ovary. For instance, while these RNAs were found to display a three- to fivefold excess of the antisense strands, only the transcripts that contain the complementary sense gypsy sequences could be repressed, indicating that they are targeted at the RNA, not DNA, level. Their size and asymmetry in strand polarity are typical of the novel repeat-associated small interfering RNA (rasiRNA)-mediated pathway, recently suspected to prevent the deleterious expression of selfish DNA specifically in the germ line. Unlike microRNAs (but like rasiRNAs and, surprisingly, siRNAs as well), gypsy rasiRNAs are modified at the 3′ end. The rasiRNA-associated protein Piwi (but not Aub) is required for gypsy silencing, whereas Dicer-2 (which makes siRNAs) is not. In contrast, piwi, aub, and flam do not appear to affect somatic siRNA-mediated silencing. The amount of gypsy rasiRNAs is genetically determined by the flam locus in a provirus copy number-independent manner and is triggered in the somatic tissues by some pericentromeric provirus(es), which are thereby able to protect the germ line from retroviral invasion. PMID:17135323

  6. Molecular characterization of geminivirus-derived small RNAs in different plant species

    PubMed Central

    Akbergenov, Rashid; Si-Ammour, Azeddine; Blevins, Todd; Amin, Imran; Kutter, Claudia; Vanderschuren, Herve; Zhang, Peng; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Meins, Frederick; Hohn, Thomas; Pooggin, Mikhail M.

    2006-01-01

    DNA geminiviruses are thought to be targets of RNA silencing. Here, we characterize small interfering (si) RNAs—the hallmarks of silencing—associated with Cabbage leaf curl begomovirus in Arabidopsis and African cassava mosaic begomovirus in Nicotiana benthamiana and cassava. We detected 21, 22 and 24 nt siRNAs of both polarities, derived from both the coding and the intergenic regions of these geminiviruses. Genetic evidence showed that all the 24 nt and a substantial fraction of the 22 nt viral siRNAs are generated by the dicer-like proteins DCL3 and DCL2, respectively. The viral siRNAs were 5′ end phosphorylated, as shown by phosphatase treatments, and methylated at the 3′-nucleotide, as shown by HEN1 miRNA methylase-dependent resistance to β-elimination. Similar modifications were found in all types of endogenous and transgene-derived siRNAs tested, but not in a major fraction of siRNAs from a cytoplasmic RNA tobamovirus. We conclude that several distinct silencing pathways are involved in DNA virus-plant interactions. PMID:16421273

  7. Allele Dependent Silencing of Collagen Type I Using Small Interfering RNAs Targeting 3'UTR Indels - a Novel Therapeutic Approach in Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Lindahl, Katarina; Kindmark, Andreas; Laxman, Navya; Åström, Eva; Rubin, Carl-Johan; Ljunggren, Östen

    2013-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta, also known as “brittle bone disease”, is a heterogeneous disorder of connective tissue generally caused by dominant mutations in the genes COL1A1 and COL1A2, encoding the α1 and α2 chains of type I (pro)collagen. Symptomatic patients are usually prescribed bisphosphonates, but this treatment is neither curative nor sufficient. A promising field is gene silencing through RNA interference. In this study small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) were designed to target each allele of 3'UTR insertion/deletion polymorphisms (indels) in COL1A1 (rs3840870) and COL1A2 (rs3917). For both indels, the frequency of heterozygous individuals was determined to be approximately 50% in Swedish cohorts of healthy controls as well as in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta. Cultures of primary human bone derived cells were transfected with siRNAs through magnet-assisted transfection. cDNA from transfected cells was sequenced in order to measure targeted allele/non-targeted allele ratios and the overall degree of silencing was assessed by quantitative PCR. Successful allele dependent silencing was observed, with promising results for siRNAs complementary to both the insertion and non-insertion harboring alleles. In COL1A1 cDNA the indel allele ratios were shifted from 1 to 0.09 and 0.19 for the insertion and non-insertion allele respectively while the equivalent resulting ratios for COL1A2 were 0.05 and 0.01. Reductions in mRNA abundance were also demonstrated; in cells treated with siRNAs targeting the COL1A1 alleles the average COL1A1 mRNA levels were reduced 65% and 78% compared to negative control levels and in cells treated with COL1A2 siRNAs the average COL1A2 mRNA levels were decreased 26% and 49% of those observed in the corresponding negative controls. In conclusion, allele dependent silencing of collagen type I utilizing 3'UTR indels common in the general population constitutes a promising mutation independent therapeutic approach for osteogenesis

  8. Small interfering RNA knockdown of mini-TyrRS and mini-TrpRS effects angiogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells in hypoxic culture.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Rui; Chen, Yu-Cheng; Zeng, Zhi; Liu, Rui; Qiang, Ou; Jiang, Xiao-Fei; Liu, Xiao-Xia; Li, Xian; Wang, Hao-Yu

    2008-03-01

    Aim We studied the role of mini-TyrRS and mini-TrpRS in angiogenesis by using small interfering RNA-mediated mini-TyrRS/mini-TrpRS knockout in hypoxic culture of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Methods SiRNA was used as the main method to inhibited the gene function. Silencing efficiency was assayed by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. The angiogenic activity in vitro was evaluated by transwell migration assay and Matrigel-induced capillary tube formation in hypoxic culture. Cell proliferation was determined by crystal violet staining. Results The results showed that levels of the mini-TyrRS/mini-TrpRS gene and protein in mock transfection group and negative control group were higher, but noticeably decreased in experimental group. However, no significant difference was detected between mock transfection group and negative control group, but there was a statistically significant difference compared with experimental group. For mini-TyrRS-siRNA group, the cell migration, tube formation and the rate of cell proliferation were respectively inhibited by (47.4, 56.3, 65.4, 73.7%), (60.5, 69.1, 75.9, 83.6%) and (40.4, 56.2, 61.2, 68.0%). For mini-TrpRS-siRNA, were respectively increased by (18.0, 33.8, 45.1, 56.4%), (18.3, 31.2, 40.3, 45.7%) and (8.4, 26.4, 38.2, 46.6%). Conclusion These results indicated that angiogenesis is either stimulated by mini-TyrRS or inhibited by mini-TrpRS in matrigel models in hypoxic culture, raising the possibility that mini-TyrRS stimulates a common downstream signaling event. Thus, naturally occurring fragments of two proteins involved in translation, TyrRS and TrpRS, have opposing activity on endothelial cell angiogenesis in the matrigel assays. The opposing activities of the two tRNA synthetases suggest tight regulation of the balance between pro- and anti-angiogenic stimuli.

  9. High-Throughput Small Interfering RNA Screening Identifies Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Class II Alpha as Important for Production of Human Cytomegalovirus Virions

    PubMed Central

    Polachek, William S.; Moshrif, Hanan F.; Franti, Michael; Coen, Donald M.; Sreenu, Vattipally B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT High-throughput small interfering RNA (siRNA) screening is a useful methodology to identify cellular factors required for virus replication. Here we utilized a high-throughput siRNA screen based on detection of a viral antigen by microscopy to interrogate cellular protein kinases and phosphatases for their importance during human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) replication and identified the class II phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase class II alpha (PI3K-C2A) as being involved in HCMV replication. Confirming this observation, infected cells treated with either pooled or individual siRNAs targeting PI3K-C2A mRNA produced approximately 10-fold less infectious virus than the controls. Western blotting and quantitative PCR analysis of infected cells treated with siRNAs indicated that depletion of PI3K-C2A slightly reduced the accumulation of late but not immediate early or early viral antigens and had no appreciable effect on viral DNA synthesis. Analysis of siRNA-treated cells by electron microscopy and Western blotting indicated that PI3K-C2A was not required for the production of viral capsids but did lead to increased numbers of enveloped capsids in the cytoplasm that had undergone secondary envelopment and a reduction in the amount of viral particles exiting the cell. Therefore, PI3K-C2A is a factor important for HCMV replication and has a role in the production of HCMV virions. IMPORTANCE There is limited information about the cellular factors required for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) replication. Therefore, to identify proteins involved in HCMV replication, we developed a methodology to conduct a high-throughput siRNA screen of HCMV-infected cells. From our screening data, we focused our studies on the top hit from our screen, the lipid kinase phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase class II alpha (PI3K-C2A), as its role in HCMV replication was unknown. Interestingly, we found that PI3K-C2A is important for the production of HCMV virions and is involved in virion production

  10. Signal-to-noise analysis for detection sensitivity of small absorbing heterogeneity in turbid media with single-source and dual-interfering-source.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Mu, C; Intes, X; Chance, B

    2001-08-13

    Previous studies have suggested that the phased-array detection can achieve high sensitivity in detecting and localizing inhomogeneities embedded in turbid media by illuminating with dual interfering sources. In this paper, we analyze the sensitivity of single-source and dual-interfering-source (phased array) systems with signal-to-noise ratio criteria. Analytical solutions are presented to investigate the sensitivity of detection using different degrees of absorption perturbation by varying the size and contrast of the object under similar configurations for single- and dual-source systems. The results suggest that dual-source configuration can provide higher detection sensitivity. The relation between the amplitude and phase signals for both systems is also analyzed using a vector model. The results can be helpful for optimizing the experimental design by combining the advantages of both single- and dual-source systems in object detection and localization.

  11. Shock-induced poration, cholesterol flip-flop and small interfering RNA transfection in a phospholipid membrane: Multimillion atom, microsecond molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choubey, Amit

    performing a 15 mus all-atom MD simulation of a DPPC-CHOL bilayer. We find that the CHOL flip-flop rates are on the sub microsecond timescale. These results are verified by performing various independent parallel replica (PR) simulations. Our PR simulations provide significant boost in sampling of the flip-flop events. We observe that the CHOL flip-flop can induce membrane order, regulate membrane-bending energy, and facilitate membrane relaxation. The rapid flip-flop rates reported here have important implications for the role of CHOL in mechanical properties of cell membranes, formation of domains, and maintaining CHOL concentration asymmetry in plasma membrane. Our PR approach can reach submillisecond time scales and bridge the gap between MD simulations and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) experiments on CHOL flip-flop dynamics in membranes. The last project deals with transfection barriers encountered by a bare small interfering RNA (siRNA) in a phospholipid bilayer. SiRNA molecules play a pivotal role in therapeutic applications. A key limitation to the widespread implementation of siRNA-based therapeutics is the difficulty of delivering siRNA-based drugs to cells. We have examined structural and mechanical barriers to siRNA passage across a phospholipid bilayer using all-atom MD simulations. We find that the electrostatic interaction between the anionic siRNA and head groups of phospholipid molecules induces a phase transformation from the liquid crystalline to ripple phase. Steered MD simulations reveal that the siRNA transfection through the ripple phase requires a force of ˜ 1.5 nN.

  12. Binding of tobamovirus replication protein with small RNA duplexes.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Yukio; Inaba, Naoko; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Takeda, Atsushi; Tagami, Yuko; Watanabe, Yuichiro

    2007-08-01

    The sequence profiles of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in Arabidopsis infected with the crucifer tobamovirus tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-Cg were determined by using a small RNA cloning technique. The majority of TMV-derived siRNAs were 21 nt in length. The size of the most abundant endogenous small RNAs in TMV-infected plants was 21 nt, whilst in mock-inoculated plants, it was 24 nt. Northern blot analysis revealed that some microRNAs (miRNAs) accumulated more in TMV-infected plants than in mock-inoculated plants. The question of whether the TMV-Cg-encoded 126K replication protein, an RNA-silencing suppressor, caused small RNA enrichment was examined. Transient expression of the replication protein did not change the pattern of miRNA processing. However, miRNA, miRNA* (the opposite strand of the miRNA duplex) and hairpin-derived siRNA all co-immunoprecipitated with the replication protein. Gel mobility-shift assays indicated that the replication protein binds small RNA duplexes. These results suggest that the tobamovirus replication protein functions as a silencing suppressor by binding small RNA duplexes, changing the small RNA profile in infected plants.

  13. PUNCTATE VASCULAR EXPRESSION1 Is a Novel Maize Gene Required for Leaf Pattern Formation That Functions Downstream of the Trans-Acting Small Interfering RNA Pathway1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaolan; Douglas, Ryan N.; Strable, Josh; Lee, Michelle; Buckner, Brent; Janick-Buckner, Diane; Schnable, Patrick S.; Timmermans, Marja C.P.; Scanlon, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    The maize (Zea mays) gene RAGGED SEEDLING2-R (RGD2-R) encodes an ARGONAUTE7-like protein required for the biogenesis of trans-acting small interfering RNA, which regulates the accumulation of AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR3A transcripts in shoots. Although dorsiventral polarity is established in the narrow and cylindrical leaves of rgd2-R mutant plants, swapping of adaxial/abaxial epidermal identity occurs and suggests a model wherein RGD2 is required to coordinate dorsiventral and mediolateral patterning in maize leaves. Laser microdissection-microarray analyses of the rgd2-R mutant shoot apical meristem identified a novel gene, PUNCTATE VASCULAR EXPRESSION1 (PVE1), that is down-regulated in rgd2-R mutant apices. Transcripts of PVE1 provide an early molecular marker for vascular morphogenesis. Reverse genetic analyses suggest that PVE1 functions during vascular development and in mediolateral and dorsiventral patterning of maize leaves. Molecular genetic analyses of PVE1 and of rgd2-R;pve1-M2 double mutants suggest a model wherein PVE1 functions downstream of RGD2 in a pathway that intersects and interacts with the trans-acting small interfering RNA pathway. PMID:22669891

  14. Synthesis of small interfering RNAs containing acetal-type nucleoside analogs at their 3'-ends and analysis of their silencing activity and their ability to bind to the Argonaute2 PAZ domain.

    PubMed

    Inada, Natsumi; Nakamoto, Kosuke; Yokogawa, Takashi; Ueno, Yoshihito

    2015-10-20

    In this study, we aimed to create small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) with increased silencing activities and nuclease resistance properties. Therefore, we designed and synthesized five types of siRNA containing acetal-type nucleoside analogs at their 3'-dangling ends. We found that the siRNA containing 1-O-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)-β-D-ribofuranose at the 3'-dangling end was the most potent among the synthesized siRNAs and showed more resistance to nucleolytic degradation by a 3' exonuclease than a natural RNA did. Thus, modification of siRNAs by addition of 1-O-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)-β-D-ribofuranose may hold promise as a means of improving the silencing activity and nuclease resistance of siRNAs.

  15. MicroRNA superfamilies descended from miR390 and their roles in secondary small interfering RNA biogenesis in eudicots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MiRNAs have been demonstrated to regulate diverse biological processes through cleavage of gene transcripts. Some of miRNAs acquire additional function and their cleavage can incite production of secondary small RNAs which possibly provoke a novel regulatory cascade. In this study, we investigated...

  16. Polo-like kinase-1 as a novel target in neoplastic mast cells: demonstration of growth-inhibitory effects of small interfering RNA and the Polo-like kinase-1 targeting drug BI 2536

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Barbara; Gleixner, Karoline V.; Cerny-Reiterer, Sabine; Herrmann, Harald; Winter, Viviane; Hadzijusufovic, Emir; Ferenc, Veronika; Schuch, Karina; Mirkina, Irina; Horny, Hans-Peter; Pickl, Winfried F.; Müllauer, Leonhard; Willmann, Michael; Valent, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background In advanced systemic mastocytosis the response of neoplastic mast cells to conventional drugs is poor and the prognosis is bad. Current research is, therefore, attempting to identify novel drug targets in neoplastic mast cells. Polo-like kinase-1 is a serine/threonine kinase that plays an essential role in mitosis and has recently been introduced as a new target in myeloid leukemias and solid tumors. Design and Methods In the present study, we analyzed the expression and function of Polo-like kinase-1 in neoplastic mast cells in systemic mastocytosis. Results As determined by immunostaining, primary neoplastic mast cells as well as the human mast cell leukemia cell line HMC-1 displayed phosphorylated Polo-like kinase-1. In addition, neoplastic mast cells expressed Polo-like kinase-1 mRNA. Polo-like kinase-1-specific small interfering RNA induced apoptosis in neoplastic mast cells, whereas no effect was seen with a control small interfering RNA. BI 2536, a drug targeting Polo-like kinase-1, was found to inhibit proliferation in HMC-1 cells in a dose-dependent manner. BI 2536 also inhibited the growth of primary neoplastic mast cells and cells of the canine mastocytoma cell line C2. The growth-inhibitory effects of BI 2536 on neoplastic mast cells were found to be associated with mitotic arrest and subsequent apoptosis. Finally, BI 2536 was found to synergize with the KIT-targeting kinase inhibitor midostaurin (PKC412) in inhibiting the growth of neoplastic mast cells. In control experiments, BI 2536 did not induce apoptosis in normal cultured mast cells. Conclusions Collectively, our data show that Polo-like kinase-1 is a potential therapeutic target in neoplastic mast cells. Targeting Polo-like kinase-1 may be an attractive pharmacological concept in the management of advanced systemic mastocytosis. PMID:21242189

  17. In vivo efficacy and off-target effects of locked nucleic acid (LNA) and unlocked nucleic acid (UNA) modified siRNA and small internally segmented interfering RNA (sisiRNA) in mice bearing human tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Mook, Orf; Vreijling, Jeroen; Wengel, Suzy L; Wengel, Jesper; Zhou, Chuanzheng; Chattopadhyaya, Jyoti; Baas, Frank; Fluiter, Kees

    2010-07-01

    The clinical use of small interfering RNA (siRNA) is hampered by poor uptake by tissues and instability in circulation. In addition, off-target effects pose a significant additional problem for therapeutic use of siRNA. Chemical modifications of siRNA have been reported to increase stability and reduce off-target effects enabling possible therapeutic use of siRNA. Recently a large scale direct comparison of the impact of 21 different types of novel chemical modifications on siRNA efficiency and cell viability was published.1 It was found that several types of chemical modifications could enhance siRNA activity beyond that of an unmodified siRNA in vitro. In addition, a novel siRNA design, termed small internally segmented interfering RNA (sisiRNA), composed of an intact antisense strand and segmented guide strand stabilized using LNA was shown to be effective in cell based assays. In the present study we examined the in vivo efficacy of the LNA and UNA modified siRNA and sisiRNA in a mouse model bearing human tumor xenografts. We studied the biodistribution and efficacy of target knockdown in the mouse model. In addition we used whole genome profiling to assess the off-target effects in the liver of the mouse and the tumor xenografts. We report that LNA and UNA modified siRNA and sisiRNA improve the efficacy in target knockdown as compared with unmodified siRNA in the tumor xenografts without formulation. However, the level of off-target gene regulation in both the tumor and the liver correlated with the increase in efficacy in target knockdown, unless the seed region of the siRNA was modified.

  18. Silencing expression of the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase by small interfering RNA sensitizes human cells for radiation-induced chromosome damage, cell killing, and mutation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, Yuanlin; Zhang, Qinming; Nagasawa, Hatsumi; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Liber, Howard L.; Bedford, Joel S.

    2002-01-01

    Targeted gene silencing in mammalian cells by RNA interference (RNAi) using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) was recently described by Elbashir et al. (S. M. Elbashir et al., Nature (Lond.), 411: 494-498, 2001). We have used this methodology in several human cell strains to reduce expression of the Prkdc (DNA-PKcs) gene coding for the catalytic subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) that is involved in the nonhomologous end joining of DNA double-strand breaks. We have also demonstrated a radiosensitization for several phenotypic endpoints of radiation damage. In low-passage normal human fibroblasts, siRNA knock-down of DNA-PKcs resulted in a reduced capacity for restitution of radiation-induced interphase chromosome breaks as measured by premature chromosome condensation, an increased yield of acentric chromosome fragments at the first postirradiation mitosis, and an increased radiosensitivity for cell killing. For three strains of related human lymphoblasts, DNA-PKcs-targeted siRNA transfection resulted in little or no increase in radiosensitivity with respect to cell killing, a 1.5-fold decrease in induced mutant yield in TK6- and p53-null NH32 cells, but about a 2-fold increase in induced mutant yield in p53-mutant WTK1 cells at both the hypoxanthine quanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) and the thymidine kinase loci.

  19. A genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen reveals nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)-independent regulators of NOD2-induced interleukin-8 (IL-8) secretion.

    PubMed

    Warner, Neil; Burberry, Aaron; Pliakas, Maria; McDonald, Christine; Núñez, Gabriel

    2014-10-10

    NOD2 encodes an intracellular multidomain pattern recognition receptor that is the strongest known genetic risk factor in the pathogenesis of Crohn disease (CD), a chronic relapsing inflammatory disorder of the intestinal tract. NOD2 functions as a sensor for bacterial cell wall components and activates proinflammatory and antimicrobial signaling pathways. Here, using a genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen, we identify numerous genes that regulate secretion of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-8 in response to NOD2 activation. Moreover, many of the identified IL-8 regulators are linked by protein-protein interactions, revealing subnetworks of highly connected IL-8 regulators implicated in processes such as vesicle formation, mRNA stability, and protein ubiquitination and trafficking. A TNFα counterscreen to induce IL-8 secretion in an NOD2-independent manner reveals that the majority of the identified regulators affect IL-8 secretion irrespective of the initiating stimuli. Using immortalized macrophages, we validate the ubiquitin protease, USP8, and the endosomal sorting protein, VPS28, as negative regulators of NOD2-induced cytokine secretion. Interestingly, several genes that affect NOD2-induced IL-8 secretion are present in loci associated with CD risk by genome-wide association studies, supporting a role for the NOD2/IL-8 pathway, and not just NOD2, in the pathogenesis of CD. Overall, this screen provides a valuable resource in the advancement of our understanding of the genes that regulate the secretion of IL-8.

  20. Genome-wide screening for components of small interfering RNA (siRNA) and micro-RNA (miRNA) pathways in the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens (Hemiptera: Delphacidae).

    PubMed

    Xu, H-J; Chen, T; Ma, X-F; Xue, J; Pan, P-L; Zhang, X-C; Cheng, J-A; Zhang, C-X

    2013-12-01

    The brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens, is a major rice pest in Asia, and accumulated evidence indicates that this species is susceptible to RNA interference (RNAi); however, the mechanism underlying RNAi and parental RNAi has not yet been determined. We comprehensively investigated the repertoire of core genes involved in small interfering RNA (siRNA) and micro-RNA (miRNA) pathways in the BPH by comparing its newly assembled transcriptome and genome with those of Drosophila melanogaster, Tribolium castaneum and Caenorhabditis elegans. Our analysis showed that the BPH possesses one drosha and two Dicer (dcr) genes, three dsRNA-binding motif protein genes, two Argonaute (ago) genes, two Eri-1-like genes (eri-1), and a Sid-1-like gene (sid-1). Additionally, we report for first time that parental RNAi might occur in this species, and siRNA pathway and Sid-1 were required for high efficiency of systemic RNAi triggered by exogenous dsRNA. Furthermore, our results also demonstrated that the miRNA pathway was involved in BPH metamorphosis as depletion of the ago1 or dcr1 gene severely impaired ecdysis. The BPH might be a good model system to study the molecular mechanism of systemic RNAi in hemimetabolous insects, and RNAi has potential to be developed to control this pest in agricultural settings.

  1. Heterochromatin, small RNA and post-fertilization dysgenesis in allopolyploid and interploid hybrids of Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Martienssen, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary In manylants, including Arabidopsis, hybrids between species and subspecies encounter postfertilization barriers in which hybrid seed fail to develop, or else give rise to infertile progeny. In Arabidopsis, some of these barriers are sensitive to ploidy and to the epigenetic status of donor and recipient genomes. Recently, a role has been proposed for heterochromatin in reprogramming events that occur in reproductive cells, as well as in the embryo and endosperm after fertilization. 21 nt small interfering RNA (siRNA) from activated transposable elements accumulate in pollen, and are translocated from companion vegetative cells into the sperm, while in the maturing seed 24 nt siRNA are primarily maternal in origin. Thus maternal and paternal genomes likely contribute differing small RNA to the zygote and to the endosperm. As heterochromatic sequences also differ radically between, and within, species, small RNA sequences will diverge in hybrids. If transposable elements in the seed are not targeted by small RNA from the pollen, or vice versa, this could lead to hybrid seed failure, in a mechanism reminiscent of hybrid dysgenesis in Drosophila. Heterochromatin also plays a role in apomixis and nucleolar dominance, and may utilize a similar mechanism. PMID:20409176

  2. Suppression of Antiviral Silencing by Cucumber Mosaic Virus 2b Protein in Arabidopsis Is Associated with Drastically Reduced Accumulation of Three Classes of Viral Small Interfering RNAs[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Pendon, Juan A.; Li, Feng; Li, Wan-Xiang; Ding, Shou-Wei

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the genetic pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana targeted during infection by cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) 2b protein, known to suppress non-cell-autonomous transgene silencing and salicylic acid (SA)–mediated virus resistance. We show that 2b expressed from the CMV genome drastically reduced the accumulation of 21-, 22-, and 24-nucleotide classes of viral small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) produced by Dicer-like4 (DCL4), DCL2, and DCL3, respectively. The defect of a CMV 2b–deletion mutant (CMV-Δ2b) in plant infection was efficiently rescued in Arabidopsis mutants producing neither 21- nor 22-nucleotide viral siRNAs. Since genetic analysis further identifies a unique antiviral role for DCL3 upstream of DCL4, our data indicate that inhibition of the accumulation of distinct viral siRNAs plays a key role in 2b suppression of antiviral silencing. Strikingly, disease symptoms caused by CMV-Δ2b in Arabidopsis mutants defective in antiviral silencing were as severe as those caused by CMV, demonstrating an indirect role for the silencing suppressor activity in virus virulence. We found that production of CMV siRNAs without 2b interference depended largely on RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 1 (RDR1) inducible by SA. Given the known role of RDR6-dependent transgene siRNAs in non-cell-autonomous silencing, our results suggest a model in which 2b inhibits the production of RDR1-dependent viral siRNAs that confer SA-dependent virus resistance by directing non-cell-autonomous antiviral silencing. PMID:17586651

  3. MicroRNA-Targeted and Small Interfering RNA–Mediated mRNA Degradation Is Regulated by Argonaute, Dicer, and RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase in Arabidopsis[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Ronemus, Michael; Vaughn, Matthew W.; Martienssen, Robert A.

    2006-01-01

    ARGONAUTE1 (AGO1) of Arabidopsis thaliana mediates the cleavage of microRNA (miRNA)-targeted mRNAs, and it has also been implicated in the posttranscriptional silencing of transgenes and the maintenance of chromatin structure. Mutations in AGO1 severely disrupt plant development, indicating that miRNA function and possibly other aspects of RNA interference are essential for maintaining normal patterns of gene expression. Using microarrays, we found that 1 to 6% of genes display significant expression changes in several alleles of ago1 at multiple developmental stages, with the majority showing higher levels. Several classes of known miRNA targets increased markedly in ago1, whereas others showed little or no change. Cleavage of mRNAs within miRNA-homologous sites was reduced but not abolished in an ago1 -null background, indicating that redundant slicer activity exists in Arabidopsis. Small interfering RNAs and larger 30- to 60-nucleotide RNA fragments corresponding to highly upregulated miRNA target genes accumulated in wild-type plants but not in ago1, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase mutants rdr2 and rdr6, or the Dicer-like mutants dcl1 and dcl3. Both sense and antisense RNAs corresponding to these miRNA targets accumulated in the ago1 and dcl1 backgrounds. These results indicate that a subset of endogenous mRNA targets of RNA interference may be regulated through a mechanism of second-strand RNA synthesis and degradation initiated by or in addition to miRNA-mediated cleavage. PMID:16798886

  4. A small interfering RNA targeting vascular endothelial growth factor efficiently inhibits growth of VX2 cells and VX2 tumor model of hepatocellular carcinoma in rabbit by transarterial embolization-mediated siRNA delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yu; Guo, Chuan-Gen; Yang, Zheng-Gang; Sun, Jun-Hui; Zhang, Min-Ming; Fu, Cai-Yun

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hepatocellular carcinoma is currently the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide with an increasing incidence. Objective The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of vascular endothelial growth factor small interfering RNA (VEGF-siRNA) on rabbit VX2 carcinoma cell viability in vitro and the effect of transarterial embolization (TAE)-mediated VEGF-siRNA delivery on the growth of rabbit VX2 liver-transplanted model in vivo. Methods Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and Western blot technologies were used to detect the expression level of VEGF. TAE and computed tomography scan were used to deliver the VEGF-siRNA and detect the tumor volume in vivo, respectively. Microvessel density was detected by immunohistochemistry with CD34 antibody. A biochemical autoanalyzer was used to evaluate the hepatic and renal toxicity. Results The designed VEGF-siRNAs could effectively decrease the expression levels of VEGF mRNA and protein in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, the viability of rabbit VX2 carcinoma cells was reduced by 38.5%±7.3% (VEGF-siRNA no 1) and 30.0%±5.8% (VEGF-siRNA no 3) at 48 hours after transfection. Moreover, in rabbit VX2 liver-transplanted model, the growth ratios of tumors at 28 days after TAE-mediated siRNA delivery were 155.18%±19.42% in the control group, 79.67%±19.63% in the low-dose group, and 36.09%±15.73% in the high-dose group, with significant differences among these three groups. Microvessel density dropped to 34.22±4.01 and 22.63±4.07 in the low-dose group and high-dose group, respectively, compared with the control group (57.88±5.67), with significant differences among these three groups. Furthermore, inoculation of VX2 tumor into the liver itself at later stage induced significant increase in alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase, indicating an obvious damage of liver functions, while treatment of VX2 tumor via TAE

  5. Four plant Dicers mediate viral small RNA biogenesis and DNA virus induced silencing

    PubMed Central

    Blevins, Todd; Rajeswaran, Rajendran; Shivaprasad, Padubidri V.; Beknazariants, Daria; Si-Ammour, Azeddine; Park, Hyun-Sook; Vazquez, Franck; Robertson, Dominique; Meins, Frederick; Hohn, Thomas; Pooggin, Mikhail M.

    2006-01-01

    Like other eukaryotes, plants use DICER-LIKE (DCL) proteins as the central enzymes of RNA silencing, which regulates gene expression and mediates defense against viruses. But why do plants like Arabidopsis express four DCLs, a diversity unmatched by other kingdoms? Here we show that two nuclear DNA viruses (geminivirus CaLCuV and pararetrovirus CaMV) and a cytoplasmic RNA tobamovirus ORMV are differentially targeted by subsets of DCLs. DNA virus-derived small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) of specific size classes (21, 22 and 24 nt) are produced by all four DCLs, including DCL1, known to process microRNA precursors. Specifically, DCL1 generates 21 nt siRNAs from the CaMV leader region. In contrast, RNA virus infection is mainly affected by DCL4. While the four DCLs are partially redundant for CaLCuV-induced mRNA degradation, DCL4 in conjunction with RDR6 and HEN1 specifically facilitates extensive virus-induced silencing in new growth. Additionally, we show that CaMV infection impairs processing of endogenous RDR6-derived double-stranded RNA, while ORMV prevents HEN1-mediated methylation of small RNA duplexes, suggesting two novel viral strategies of silencing suppression. Our work highlights the complexity of virus interaction with host silencing pathways and suggests that DCL multiplicity helps mediate plant responses to diverse viral infections. PMID:17090584

  6. Comparative analysis of virus-specific small RNA profiles of three biologically distinct strains of Potato virus Y in infected potato (Solanum tuberosum) cv. Russet Burbank.

    PubMed

    Naveed, Khalid; Mitter, Neena; Harper, Artemus; Dhingra, Amit; Pappu, Hanu R

    2014-10-13

    Deep sequencing technology has enabled the analysis of small RNA profiles of virus-infected plants and could provide insights into virus-host interactions. Potato virus Y is an economically important viral pathogen of potato worldwide. In this study, we investigated the nature and relative levels of virus-derived small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs) in potato cv. Russet Burbank infected with three biologically distinct and economically important strains of PVY, the ordinary strain (PVY-O), tobacco veinal-necrotic strain (PVY-N) and tuber necrotic strain (PVY-NTN). The analysis showed an overall abundance of vsiRNAs of 20-24nt in PVY-infected plants. Considerable differences were present in the distribution of vsiRNAs as well as total small RNAs. The 21nt class was the most prevalent in PVY-infected plants irrespective of the virus strain, whereas in healthy potato plants, the 24nt class was the most dominant. vsiRNAs were derived from every position in the PVY genome, though certain hotspots were identified for each of the PVY strains. Among the three strains used, the population of vsiRNAs of different size classes was relatively different with PVY-NTN accumulating the highest level of vsiRNAs, while PVY-N infected plants had the least population of vsiRNAs. Unique vsiRNAs mapping to PVY genome in PVY-infected plants amounted to 3.13, 1.93 and 1.70% for NTN, N and O, respectively. There was a bias in the generation of vsiRNAs from the plus strand of the genome in comparison to the negative strand. The highest number of total vsiRNAs was from the cytoplasmic inclusion protein gene (CI) in PVY-O and PVY-NTN strains, whereas from PVY-N, the NIb gene produced maximum total vsiRNAs. These findings indicate that the three PVY strains interact differently in the same host genetic background and provided insights into virus-host interactions in an important food crop.

  7. Small RNAs in plants: recent development and application for crop improvement.

    PubMed

    Kamthan, Ayushi; Chaudhuri, Abira; Kamthan, Mohan; Datta, Asis

    2015-01-01

    The phenomenon of RNA interference (RNAi) which involves sequence-specific gene regulation by small non-coding RNAs, i.e., small interfering RNA (siRNA) and microRNA (miRNA) has emerged as one of most powerful approaches for crop improvement. RNAi based on siRNA is one of the widely used tools of reverse genetics which aid in revealing gene functions in many species. This technology has been extensively applied to alter the gene expression in plants with an aim to achieve desirable traits. RNAi has been used for enhancing the crop yield and productivity by manipulating the gene involved in biomass, grain yield and enhanced shelf life of fruits and vegetables. It has also been applied for developing resistance against various biotic (bacteria, fungi, viruses, nematodes, insects) and abiotic stresses (drought, salinity, cold, etc.). Nutritional improvements of crops have also been achieved by enriching the crops with essential amino acids, fatty acids, antioxidants and other nutrients beneficial for human health or by reducing allergens or anti-nutrients. microRNAs are key regulators of important plant processes like growth, development, and response to various stresses. In spite of similarity in size (20-24 nt), miRNA differ from siRNA in precursor structures, pathway of biogenesis, and modes of action. This review also highlights the miRNA based genetic modification technology where various miRNAs/artificial miRNAs and their targets can be utilized for improving several desirable plant traits. microRNA based strategies are much efficient than siRNA-based RNAi strategies due to its specificity and less undesirable off target effects. As per the FDA guidelines, small RNA (sRNA) based transgenics are much safer for consumption than those over-expressing proteins. This review thereby summarizes the emerging advances and achievement in the field of sRNAs and its application for crop improvement.

  8. Small RNAs in plants: recent development and application for crop improvement

    PubMed Central

    Kamthan, Ayushi; Chaudhuri, Abira; Kamthan, Mohan; Datta, Asis

    2015-01-01

    The phenomenon of RNA interference (RNAi) which involves sequence-specific gene regulation by small non-coding RNAs, i.e., small interfering RNA (siRNA) and microRNA (miRNA) has emerged as one of most powerful approaches for crop improvement. RNAi based on siRNA is one of the widely used tools of reverse genetics which aid in revealing gene functions in many species. This technology has been extensively applied to alter the gene expression in plants with an aim to achieve desirable traits. RNAi has been used for enhancing the crop yield and productivity by manipulating the gene involved in biomass, grain yield and enhanced shelf life of fruits and vegetables. It has also been applied for developing resistance against various biotic (bacteria, fungi, viruses, nematodes, insects) and abiotic stresses (drought, salinity, cold, etc.). Nutritional improvements of crops have also been achieved by enriching the crops with essential amino acids, fatty acids, antioxidants and other nutrients beneficial for human health or by reducing allergens or anti-nutrients. microRNAs are key regulators of important plant processes like growth, development, and response to various stresses. In spite of similarity in size (20–24 nt), miRNA differ from siRNA in precursor structures, pathway of biogenesis, and modes of action. This review also highlights the miRNA based genetic modification technology where various miRNAs/artificial miRNAs and their targets can be utilized for improving several desirable plant traits. microRNA based strategies are much efficient than siRNA-based RNAi strategies due to its specificity and less undesirable off target effects. As per the FDA guidelines, small RNA (sRNA) based transgenics are much safer for consumption than those over-expressing proteins. This review thereby summarizes the emerging advances and achievement in the field of sRNAs and its application for crop improvement. PMID:25883599

  9. Viral small RNAs reveal the genomic variations of three grapevine vein clearing virus quasispecies populations.

    PubMed

    Howard, Susanne; Qiu, Wenping

    2017-02-02

    Viral small RNAs (vsRNAs) include viral small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs) that are initiators and products of RNA silencing, and small RNAs that are derived from viral RNAs with function still unknown. Sequencing of vsRNAs allows assembling of viral genomes and revelation of viral population variations at genomic levels. Grapevine vein clearing virus (GVCV) is a new member of the family Caulimoviridae whose DNA genome is replicated by reverse transcription of pre-genomic RNA molecules. In this short report, three genomic sequences of GVCV were assembled from vsRNAs that were isolated and sequenced from three individual grapevines in commercial vineyards and compared to the GVCV-CHA reference genome. Profiles of single nucleotide polymorphism among three viral populations indicated a closer relatedness between two populations in different grape cultivars at the same location than those in the same grape cultivar at different locations, suggesting the spread of GVCV populations among vineyards of close proximity. Classic types of vsiRNAs (21-nt, 22-nt, and 24-nt) were found in the three GVCV vsiRNA populations, but these did not produce alignment hotspots on the GVCV-CHA reference genome. The number of 36-nt reads is the highest among vsRNAs, the role of these vsRNAs remains unclear. The analysis of vsRNAs provides a first holistic picture of genomic variations among GVCV viral quasispecies populations that help monitor epidemics and evolution of GVCV populations, an emerging virus that is becoming a threat to grape production in the Midwest region of the USA.

  10. High-Throughput Sequencing of RNA Silencing-Associated Small RNAs in Olive (Olea europaea L.)

    PubMed Central

    Donaire, Livia; Pedrola, Laia; de la Rosa, Raúl; Llave, César

    2011-01-01

    Small RNAs (sRNAs) of 20 to 25 nucleotides (nt) in length maintain genome integrity and control gene expression in a multitude of developmental and physiological processes. Despite RNA silencing has been primarily studied in model plants, the advent of high-throughput sequencing technologies has enabled profiling of the sRNA component of more than 40 plant species. Here, we used deep sequencing and molecular methods to report the first inventory of sRNAs in olive (Olea europaea L.). sRNA libraries prepared from juvenile and adult shoots revealed that the 24-nt class dominates the sRNA transcriptome and atypically accumulates to levels never seen in other plant species, suggesting an active role of heterochromatin silencing in the maintenance and integrity of its large genome. A total of 18 known miRNA families were identified in the libraries. Also, 5 other sRNAs derived from potential hairpin-like precursors remain as plausible miRNA candidates. RNA blots confirmed miRNA expression and suggested tissue- and/or developmental-specific expression patterns. Target mRNAs of conserved miRNAs were computationally predicted among the olive cDNA collection and experimentally validated through endonucleolytic cleavage assays. Finally, we use expression data to uncover genetic components of the miR156, miR172 and miR390/TAS3-derived trans-acting small interfering RNA (tasiRNA) regulatory nodes, suggesting that these interactive networks controlling developmental transitions are fully operational in olive. PMID:22140484

  11. Interfering with Gendered Development: A Timely Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaise, Mindy

    2014-01-01

    Instead of relying on colonial and Western developmental logic to understand and research gender, this paper proposes interfering as a strategy toward generating gender knowledges that are more inclusive to other-than-Western concepts and contexts. This paper shows how post-developmental perspectives interfere with psychological and biological…

  12. Adaptive antenna arrays for weak interfering signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, I. J.

    1985-01-01

    The interference protection provided by adaptive antenna arrays to an Earth station or satellite receive antenna system is studied. The case where the interference is caused by the transmission from adjacent satellites or Earth stations whose signals inadverently enter the receiving system and interfere with the communication link is considered. Thus, the interfering signals are very weak. To increase the interference suppression, one can either decrease the thermal noise in the feedback loops or increase the gain of the auxiliary antennas in the interfering signal direction. Both methods are examined. It is shown that one may have to reduce the noise correlation to impractically low values and if directive auxiliary antennas are used, the auxiliary antenna size may have to be too large. One can, however, combine the two methods to achieve the specified interference suppression with reasonable requirements of noise decorrelation and auxiliary antenna size. Effects of the errors in the steering vector on the adaptive array performance are studied.

  13. Dynamics of small RNA profiles of virus and host origin in wheat cultivars synergistically infected by Wheat streak mosaic virus and Triticum mosaic virus: virus infection caused a drastic shift in the endogenous small RNA profile.

    PubMed

    Tatineni, Satyanarayana; Riethoven, Jean-Jack M; Graybosch, Robert A; French, Roy; Mitra, Amitava

    2014-01-01

    Co-infection of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) by Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV, a Tritimovirus) and Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV, a Poacevirus) of the family Potyviridae causes synergistic interaction. In this study, the effects of the synergistic interaction between WSMV and TriMV on endogenous and virus-derived small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs) were examined in susceptible ('Arapahoe') and temperature-sensitive resistant ('Mace') wheat cultivars at 18°C and 27°C. Single and double infections in wheat caused a shift in the profile of endogenous small RNAs from 24 nt being the most predominant in healthy plants to 21 nt in infected wheat. Massive amounts of 21 and 22 nt vsiRNAs accumulated in singly and doubly infected Arapahoe at both temperatures and in Mace at 27°C but not 18°C. The plus- and minus-sense vsiRNAs were distributed throughout the genomic RNAs in Arapahoe at both temperature regimens and in Mace at 27°C, although some regions served as hot-spots, spawning an excessive number of vsiRNAs. The vsiRNA peaks were conserved among cultivars, suggesting that the Dicer-like enzymes in susceptible and resistant cultivars similarly accessed the genomic RNAs of WSMV or TriMV. Accumulation of large amounts of vsiRNAs in doubly infected plants suggests that the silencing suppressor proteins encoded by TriMV and WSMV do not prevent the formation of vsiRNAs; thus, the synergistic effect observed is independent from RNA-silencing mediated vsiRNA biogenesis. The high-resolution map of endogenous and vsiRNAs from WSMV- and/or TriMV-infected wheat cultivars may form a foundation for understanding the virus-host interactions, the effect of synergistic interactions on host defense, and virus resistance mechanisms in wheat.

  14. Screening for N-AHSL-Based-Signaling Interfering Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Uroz, Stéphane; Oger, Phil M

    2017-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS)-based signaling is a widespread pathway used by bacteria for the regulation of functions involved in their relation to the environment or their host. QS relies upon the production, accumulation and perception of small diffusable molecules by the bacterial population, hence linking high gene expression with high cell population densities. Among the different QS signal molecules, an important class of signal molecules is the N-acyl homoserine lactone (N-AHSL). In pathogens such as Erwinia or Pseudomonas, N-AHSL based QS is crucial to overcome the host defenses and ensure a successful infection. Interfering with QS-regulation allows the algae Delisea pulcra to avoid surface colonization by bacteria. Thus, interfering the QS-regulation of pathogenic bacteria is a promising antibiotic-free antibacterial therapeutic strategy. To date, two N-AHSL lactonases and one amidohydrolase families of N-ASHL degradation enzymes have been characterized and have proven to be efficient in vitro to control N-AHSL-based QS-regulated functions in pathogens. In this chapter, we provide methods to screen individual clones or bacterial strains as well as pool of clones for genomic and metagenomic libraries, that can be used to identify strains or clones carrying N-ASHL degradation enzymes.

  15. Lipid nanoparticles for short interfering RNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Leung, Alex K K; Tam, Yuen Yi C; Cullis, Pieter R

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of RNA interference (RNAi) in mammalian cells has created a new class of therapeutics based on the reversible silencing of specific disease-causing genes. This therapeutic potential depends on the ability to deliver inducers of RNAi, such as short-interfering RNA (siRNA) and micro-RNA (miRNA), to cells of target tissues. This chapter reviews various challenges and delivery strategies for siRNA, with a particular focus on the development of lipid nanoparticle (LNP) delivery technologies. Currently, LNP delivery systems are the most advanced technology for systemic delivery of siRNA, with numerous formulations under various stages of clinical trials. We also discuss methods to improve gene silencing potency of LNP-siRNA, as well as application of LNP technologies beyond siRNA to the encapsulation of other nucleic acids such as mRNA and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR).

  16. 32 CFR 1903.8 - Interfering with Agency functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Interfering with Agency functions. 1903.8 Section 1903.8 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY CONDUCT ON AGENCY INSTALLATIONS § 1903.8 Interfering with Agency functions. The following are...

  17. 32 CFR 1903.8 - Interfering with Agency functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Interfering with Agency functions. 1903.8 Section 1903.8 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY CONDUCT ON AGENCY INSTALLATIONS § 1903.8 Interfering with Agency functions. The following are...

  18. 32 CFR 1903.8 - Interfering with Agency functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Interfering with Agency functions. 1903.8 Section 1903.8 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY CONDUCT ON AGENCY INSTALLATIONS § 1903.8 Interfering with Agency functions. The following are...

  19. 32 CFR 1903.8 - Interfering with Agency functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Interfering with Agency functions. 1903.8 Section 1903.8 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY CONDUCT ON AGENCY INSTALLATIONS § 1903.8 Interfering with Agency functions. The following are...

  20. 32 CFR 1903.8 - Interfering with Agency functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Interfering with Agency functions. 1903.8 Section 1903.8 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY CONDUCT ON AGENCY INSTALLATIONS § 1903.8 Interfering with Agency functions. The following are...

  1. Effect of template size on accumulation of defective interfering RNAs in protoplasts.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, C; Simon, A E

    1994-01-01

    A turnip protoplast system has been used to study the effects of template size and sequence on the replication and/or stability of a small defective interfering (DI) RNA associated with turnip crinkle virus. Our results indicated that as little as a single base difference in the size of the molecule in some regions, rather than the specific sequence, affected the level of DI RNA accumulating in protoplasts. Images PMID:7966644

  2. Characterization of defective interfering RNAs associated with RNA plant viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, T.J. . School of Biological Sciences); Jackson, A.O. . Dept. of Plant Pathology)

    1993-01-01

    Our lab was the first to describe and characterize a defective interfering RNA (DI RNAs or DIs) in association with a small RNA plant virus. The features of the DIs that we discovered in infections of tomato bushy stunt virus were compatible with the properties of DIs identified in many animal virus infections. Animal virologists have generally recognized the importance of studying DIs because they are invaluable tools for identifying cis-acting sequences important in virus multiplication and because they offer the opportunity to elucidate mechanisms involved in viral persistence and disease attenuation. Hence our discovery offered a comparably valuable tool for use in plant virus studies for the first time. Since the original observation with TBSV, we discovered the second example of plant viral DI RNAs associated with turnip crinkle virus (TCV), and many other reports have now appeared characterizing DI and DI-like RNAs in other plant viral infections. We are seeking to improve our understanding of the mechanisms of DI generation and the precise nature of the RNA sequences necessary for DI replication and encapsidation. We also want to address the nature of the DI mediated symptom attenuation and interference effects in plants, and to determine the feasibility of using transgenic plants constitutively expressing DI RNAs for disease control. The progress made on each of these objectives is summarized along with the proposed experiments for the continuation period.

  3. The Drosophila hairpin RNA pathway generates endogenous short interfering RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, Katsutomo; Chung, Wei-Jen; Ruby, J. Graham; Guo, Huili; Bartel, David P.; Lai, Eric C.

    2009-01-01

    In contrast to microRNAs and Piwi-associated RNAs, short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are seemingly dispensable for host-directed gene regulation in Drosophila. This notion is based on the fact that mutants lacking the core siRNA-generating enzyme Dicer-2 or the predominant siRNA effector Argonaute 2 are viable, fertile and of relatively normal morphology1,2. Moreover, endogenous Drosophila siRNAs have not yet been identified. Here we report that siRNAs derived from long hairpin RNA genes (hpRNAs) programme Slicer complexes that can repress endogenous target transcripts. The Drosophila hpRNA pathway is a hybrid mechanism that combines canonical RNA interference factors (Dicer-2, Hen1 (known as CG12367) and Argonaute 2) with a canonical microRNA factor (Loquacious) to generate ~21-nucleotide siRNAs. These novel regulatory RNAs reveal unexpected complexity in the sorting of small RNAs, and open a window onto the biological usage of endogenous RNA interference in Drosophila. PMID:18463630

  4. 47 CFR 73.185 - Computation of interfering signal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... interfering station to be considered as pertinent to transmission by one reflection. To provide for variation... angle than the pertinent angle for one reflection, the method of calculating interference will not...

  5. 47 CFR 73.185 - Computation of interfering signal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... interfering station to be considered as pertinent to transmission by one reflection. To provide for variation... angle than the pertinent angle for one reflection, the method of calculating interference will not...

  6. 47 CFR 73.185 - Computation of interfering signal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... interfering station to be considered as pertinent to transmission by one reflection. To provide for variation... angle than the pertinent angle for one reflection, the method of calculating interference will not...

  7. 47 CFR 73.185 - Computation of interfering signal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... interfering station to be considered as pertinent to transmission by one reflection. To provide for variation... angle than the pertinent angle for one reflection, the method of calculating interference will not...

  8. 36 CFR 2.32 - Interfering with agency functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Interfering with agency functions. 2.32 Section 2.32 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... authorized to maintain order and control public access and movement during fire fighting operations,...

  9. 36 CFR 1002.32 - Interfering with agency functions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Interfering with agency functions. 1002.32 Section 1002.32 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PRESIDIO TRUST RESOURCE PROTECTION... maintain order and control public access and movement during fire fighting operations, search and...

  10. On the use of short-interfering RNA to study alcohol-related genes.

    PubMed

    Adams, Christopher A; Zawada, W Michael

    2008-01-01

    One strategy to determine the contribution of individual genes to the development of complex traits and behaviors such as alcohol consumption is to reduce or completely eliminate the activity of those genes in the cells or organism under investigation and then study the effects of this modification. But how can a single specific gene be inactivated? One strategy that has been developed in recent years is the use of small, artificially generated molecules called short-interfering RNAs (siRNAs). This article briefly describes the principles of this strategy and presents some initial results obtained with this approach.

  11. Spin O decay angular distribution for interfering mesons in electroproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Funsten, H.; Gilfoyle, G.

    1994-04-01

    Self analyzing meson electroproduction experiments are currently being planned for the CEBAF CLAS detector. These experiments deduce the spin polarization of outgoing unstable spin s (?)0 mesons from their decay angular distribution, W({theta},{psi}). The large angular acceptance of the CLAS detector permits kinematic tracking of a sufficient number of these events to accurately determine electroproduction amplitudes from the deduced polarization. Maximum polarization information is obtained from W({theta},{psi}) for decay into spin 0 daughters. The helicity of the decaying meson is transferred to the daughter`s relative orbital angular momentum m-projection; none is {open_quotes}absorbed{close_quotes} into daughter helicities. The decaying meson`s helicity maximally appears in W({theta},{psi}). W({theta},{psi}) for spin 0 daughters has been derived for (1) vector meson electroproduction and (2) general interfering mesons produced by incident pions. This paper derives W({theta},{psi}) for electroproduction of two interfering mesons that decay into spin 0 daughters. An application is made to the case of interfering scalar and vector mesons. The derivation is an extension of work by Schil using the general decay formalism of Martin. The expressions can be easily extended to the case of N interfering mesons since interference occurs pairwise in the observable W ({theta},{psi}), a quadratic function of the meson amplitudes. The derivation uses the virtual photon density matrix of Schil which is transformed by a meson electroproduction transition operator, T. The resulting density matrix for the interfering mesons is then converted into a corresponding statistical tensor and contracted into the efficiency tensor for spin 0 daughters.

  12. Chitosan/interfering RNA nanoparticle mediated gene silencing in disease vector mosquito larvae

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin; Mysore, Keshava; Flannery, Ellen; Michel, Kristin; Severson, David W.; Zhu, Kun Yan

    2015-01-01

    SHORT ABSTRACT Here we describe a procedure for inhibiting gene function in disease vector mosquitoes through the use of chitosan/interfering RNA nanoparticles that are ingested by larvae. LONG ABSTRACT Vector mosquitoes inflict more human suffering than any other organism—and kill more than one million people each year. The mosquito genome projects facilitated research in new facets of mosquito biology, including functional genetic studies in the primary African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae and the dengue and yellow fever vector Aedes aegypti. RNA interference- (RNAi-) mediated gene silencing has been used to target genes of interest in both of these disease vector mosquito species. Here, we describe a procedure for preparation of chitosan/interfering RNA nanoparticles that are combined with food and ingested by larvae. This technically straightforward, high-throughput, and relatively inexpensive methodology, which is compatible with long double stranded RNA (dsRNA) or small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules, has been used for the successful knockdown of a number of different genes in A. gambiae and A. aegypti larvae. Following larval feedings, knockdown, which is verified through qRT-PCR or in situ hybridization, can persist at least through the late pupal stage. This methodology may be applicable to a wide variety of mosquito and other insect species, including agricultural pests, as well as other non-model organisms. In addition to its utility in the research laboratory, in the future, chitosan, an inexpensive, non-toxic and biodegradable polymer, could potentially be utilized in the field. PMID:25867635

  13. Two-Pronged Approach to Overcome Spectroscopically Interfering Organic Compounds with Isotopic Water Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Nabil; Hsiao, Gregor; Chapellet-Volpini, London; Vu, Danthu

    2013-04-01

    The ability to measure the stable isotopes of hydrogen (dD) and oxygen (d18O) has become much more accessible with the advent of Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) laser optical devices. These small and inexpensive analyzers have led to a significant increase in the acquisition of data from a variety of studies in the fields of groundwater, watershed, and other water source applications. However for some samples, such as those linked to fracking, mining, and other activities where higher than normal concentrations of organic materials are to be found, optical spectroscopy may require an adaptation from current methodologies in order to ensure data confidence. That is because CRDS is able to measure all the components within a spectral region - which will include the spectral characteristics of the isotopologues of water as well as the available features from interfering organic molecules. Although, at the first level, the information from the organic material provides spectral overlaps that can perturb the isotopic ratios, a more thorough review shows that these features are a source of information that will be inherently useful. This presentation will examine the approaches developed within the past year to allow for more accurate analyses of such samples by optical methods. The first approach uses an advanced spectroscopic model to flag the presence of organic material in the sample. Signals from known interfering compounds (i.e., alcohols, ketones, aldehydes, short-chain hydrocarbons, etc.) are incorporated into the overall fit of the measured spectra used to calculate the concentration of the individual isotopes. The second approach uses physical treatment of the sample to break down the organic molecules into non-interfering species. The vaporized liquid or solid sample travels through a cartridge packed with an oxidation catalyst. The interfering organic molecules will undergo high temperature oxidation using O2 present in the air carrier gas stream prior

  14. Transcriptional responses of zebrafish embryos exposed to potential sonic hedgehog pathway interfering compounds deviate from expression profiles of cyclopamine.

    PubMed

    Büttner, Anita; Busch, Wibke; Klüver, Nils; Giannis, Athanassios; Scholz, Stefan

    2012-04-01

    The molecular responses of two small molecules, SANT-2 and GANT-61, potentially interfering with the sonic hedgehog pathway (Shh) have been studied in zebrafish embryos by microarray analysis. For both compounds and the positive reference cyclopamine previous reporter gene assays for the transcription factor Gli1 have indicated an inhibition of the hedgehog signaling pathway. In zebrafish embryos a typical phenotype (cyclopia) associated with Shh interference was only observed for cyclopamine. Furthermore, only cyclopamine led to the repression of genes specifically associated with hedgehog signaling and confirmed published microarray data. In contrast to these data hspb11 was additionally identified as the most pronounced down-regulated genes for exposure to cyclopamine. No or different effects on gene expression patterns were provoked by SANT-2 or GANT-61, respectively. Reasons for the discrepancies between cellular reporter and the zebrafish embryo assay and potential implications for the identification of compounds interfering with specific developmental pathways are discussed.

  15. Comparative Small RNA Analysis of Pollen Development in Autotetraploid and Diploid Rice.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Shahid, Muhammad Qasim; Wu, Jinwen; Wang, Lan; Liu, Xiangdong; Lu, Yonggen

    2016-04-12

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play key roles in plant reproduction. However, knowledge on microRNAome analysis in autotetraploid rice is rather limited. Here, high-throughput sequencing technology was employed to analyze miRNAomes during pollen development in diploid and polyploid rice. A total of 172 differentially expressed miRNAs (DEM) were detected in autotetraploid rice compared to its diploid counterpart, and 57 miRNAs were specifically expressed in autotetraploid rice. Of the 172 DEM, 115 and 61 miRNAs exhibited up- and down-regulation, respectively. Gene Ontology analysis on the targets of up-regulated DEM showed that they were enriched in transport and membrane in pre-meiotic interphase, reproduction in meiosis, and nucleotide binding in single microspore stage. osa-miR5788 and osa-miR1432-5p_R+1 were up-regulated in meiosis and their targets revealed interaction with the meiosis-related genes, suggesting that they may involve in the genes regulation associated with the chromosome behavior. Abundant 24 nt siRNAs associated with transposable elements were found in autotetraploid rice during pollen development; however, they significantly declined in diploid rice, suggesting that 24 nt siRNAs may play a role in pollen development. These findings provide a foundation for understanding the effect of polyploidy on small RNA expression patterns during pollen development that cause pollen sterility in autotetraploid rice.

  16. Comparative Small RNA Analysis of Pollen Development in Autotetraploid and Diploid Rice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Shahid, Muhammad Qasim; Wu, Jinwen; Wang, Lan; Liu, Xiangdong; Lu, Yonggen

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play key roles in plant reproduction. However, knowledge on microRNAome analysis in autotetraploid rice is rather limited. Here, high-throughput sequencing technology was employed to analyze miRNAomes during pollen development in diploid and polyploid rice. A total of 172 differentially expressed miRNAs (DEM) were detected in autotetraploid rice compared to its diploid counterpart, and 57 miRNAs were specifically expressed in autotetraploid rice. Of the 172 DEM, 115 and 61 miRNAs exhibited up- and down-regulation, respectively. Gene Ontology analysis on the targets of up-regulated DEM showed that they were enriched in transport and membrane in pre-meiotic interphase, reproduction in meiosis, and nucleotide binding in single microspore stage. osa-miR5788 and osa-miR1432-5p_R+1 were up-regulated in meiosis and their targets revealed interaction with the meiosis-related genes, suggesting that they may involve in the genes regulation associated with the chromosome behavior. Abundant 24 nt siRNAs associated with transposable elements were found in autotetraploid rice during pollen development; however, they significantly declined in diploid rice, suggesting that 24 nt siRNAs may play a role in pollen development. These findings provide a foundation for understanding the effect of polyploidy on small RNA expression patterns during pollen development that cause pollen sterility in autotetraploid rice. PMID:27077850

  17. β-sheet interfering molecules acting against β-amyloid aggregation and fibrillogenesis.

    PubMed

    Francioso, Antonio; Punzi, Pasqualina; Boffi, Alberto; Lori, Clorinda; Martire, Sara; Giordano, Cesare; D'Erme, Maria; Mosca, Luciana

    2015-04-15

    β-Sheet aggregates and amyloid fibrils rising from conformational changes of proteins are observed in several pathological human conditions. These structures are organized in β-strands that can reciprocally interact by hydrophobic and π-π interactions. The amyloid aggregates can give rise to pathological conditions through complex biochemical mechanisms whose physico-chemical nature has been understood in recent times. This review focuses on the various classes of natural and synthetic small molecules able to act against β-amyloid fibrillogenesis and toxicity that may represent new pharmacological tools in Alzheimer's diseases. Some peptides, named 'β-sheet breaker peptides', are able to hamper amyloid aggregation and fibrillogenesis by interfering with and destabilizing the non native β-sheet structures. Other natural compounds, like polyphenols or indolic molecules such as melatonin, can interfere with β-amyloid peptide pathogenicity by inhibiting aggregation and counteracting oxidative stress that is a key hallmark in Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Enhancement of focusing properties by interfering spatial bending beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Xu, Yongzheng; Qu, Yu; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Li; Zhang, Zhongyue

    2016-12-01

    In this study, two slits were designed symmetrically on a metal film to excite surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs), and two groups of parallel dielectric rectangles were designed over a metal film to convert the SPPs into double mirror-symmetric spatial bending beams. The high-energy far-field focused beams were achieved by interfering double mirror-symmetric spatial bending beams using the finite-element method The focusing properties of the proposed structure are enhanced compared with the conventional metal grating structures. Furthermore, the effects of the structural parameters on the focusing properties were investigated Results show that the focusing properties of the proposed structure rely on the structural parameters of dielectric rectangles and on the distance between the dielectric rectangles and the metal film. The position of the focusing spot relies on the distance between two slits. These findings can be applied in the fields of biology imaging, nanolithography, optical data storage and photo-biomedical detection.

  19. Discrimination against interfering signals at the Poker Flat MST radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    Several on line and off line data processing techniques are used to remove interfering signals due to ground clutter, aircraft, instrumental effects, and external transmissions from the desired atmospheric echoes of Mesosphere Stratosphere, Troposphere (MST) radar. The on line, real time techniques are necessarily simple in order to minimize processing delays. This algorithm examines the individual Doppler spectra which are computed every two to four seconds (for oblique antenna beams). The total spectral power in each individual spectrum is computed by summing all the spectral points. If this integrated power increases from one spectrum to the next by a factor greater than a preselected threshold, then that spectrum is not added to the spectral sum. Succeeding spectra are compared to the last acceptable spectrum. Only a certain maximum number of spectra are allowed to be rejected in succession.

  20. Interfering ribonucleic acids that suppress expression of multiple unrelated genes

    PubMed Central

    Passioura, Toby; Gozar, Mary M; Goodchild, Amber; King, Andrew; Arndt, Greg M; Poidinger, Michael; Birkett, Donald J; Rivory, Laurent P

    2009-01-01

    Background Short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) have become the research tool of choice for gene suppression, with human clinical trials ongoing. The emphasis so far in siRNA therapeutics has been the design of one siRNA with complete complementarity to the intended target. However, there is a need for multi-targeting interfering RNA in diseases in which multiple gene products are of importance. We have investigated the possibility of using a single short synthetic duplex RNA to suppress the expression of VEGF-A and ICAM-1; genes implicated in the progression of ocular neovascular diseases such as diabetic retinopathy. Results Duplex RNA were designed to have incomplete complementarity with the 3'UTR sequences of both target genes. One such duplex, CODEMIR-1, was found to suppress VEGF and ICAM-1 by 90 and 60%, respectively in ARPE-19 cells at a transfected concentration of 40 ng/mL. Use of a cyan fusion reporter with target sites constructed in its 3'UTR demonstrated that the repression of VEGF and ICAM-1 by CODEMIR-1 was indeed due to interaction with the target sequence. An exhaustive analysis of sequence variants of CODEMIR-1 demonstrated a clear positive correlation between activity against VEGF (but not ICAM-1) and the length of the contiguous complementary region (from the 5' end of the guide strand). Various strategies, including the use of inosine bases at the sites of divergence of the target sequences were investigated. Conclusion Our work demonstrates the possibility of designing multitargeting dsRNA to suppress more than one disease-altering gene. This warrants further investigation as a possible therapeutic approach. PMID:19531249

  1. Characterization of a defective interfering RNA that contains a mosaic of a plant viral genome

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, T.J.; Jackson, A.O.

    1991-01-01

    Our lab was the first to describe and characterize a defective interfering RNA (DI RNAs or DIs) in association with a small RNA plant virus. The features of the DIs that we discovered in infections of tomato bushy stunt virus were compatible with the properties of DIs identified in many animal virus infections. Animal virologists have generally recognized the importance of studying DIs because they are invaluable tools for identifying cis-acting sequences important in virus multiplication and because they offer the opportunity to elucidate mechanisms involved in viral persistence and disease attenuation. Hence our discovery offered a comparably valuable tool for use in plant virus studies for the first time. Since then, we have also discovered the second example of plant viral DI RNAs associated with turnip crinkle virus (TCV), a virus structurally related to TBSV. We proposed a thorough characterization of this unique class of symptom modulating RNAs with the overall objective of identifying viral RNA nucleotide, sequences involved in such fundamental processes as virus replication and encapsidation as well as the degree of symptom expression resulting from the viral-DI-host interaction. The proposed research focused on the molecular characterization of the DI RNAs and the helper virus. We had demonstrated that the DIs were collinear deletion mutants of the genome of a cherry strain of tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV). We had also shown that these low molecular weight RNAs interfered with the helper plant virus and modulated disease expression by preventing the development of a lethal necrotic disease in susceptible host plants. We also suggested that by exploring the mechanisms associated with the symptom attenuation effect, we might be able to devise novel strategies useful for engineering viral disease resistance.

  2. Dowsing can be interfered with by radio frequency radiation.

    PubMed

    Huttunen, Paavo; Niinimaa, Ahti; Myllylä, Risto

    2012-04-01

    The soil radiation, watercourses and ores have been located for centuries by sensitive persons, dowsers. An ideomotoric explanation of the dowsing reaction, with no physical interaction, has been accepted. Our present re-analyses of some such results have shown, that there could be a physical phenomenon connecting the human reactions in field experiments, where the test subjects walked or were sitting in a slow-moving car, with the windows covered, and a dowsing rod in their hands was recorded. The correlations between the reaction points by test subjects in the moving car and the points by walking along the same path were highly significant. The correlation was not seen in all test locations. The distance between the test location and the radio tower, and the incidence angle of the transmitted radio wave, possibly had an effect on results. We hypothesize that the experiments carried out in the 20th century were interfered with by man-made radio frequency radiation, mainly FM radio and TV broadcasting, as test subjects' bodies absorbed the radio waves and unconscious hand movement reactions took place following the standing waves or intensity variations due to multipath propagation.

  3. Effective Small Interfering RNA Therapy to Treat CLCN7-dependent Autosomal Dominant Osteopetrosis Type 2

    PubMed Central

    Capulli, Mattia; Maurizi, Antonio; Ventura, Luca; Rucci, Nadia; Teti, Anna

    2015-01-01

    In about 70% of patients affected by autosomal dominant osteopetrosis type 2 (ADO2), osteoclast activity is reduced by heterozygous mutations of the CLCN7 gene, encoding the ClC-7 chloride/hydrogen antiporter. CLCN7G215R-, CLCN7R767W-, and CLCN7R286W-specific siRNAs silenced transfected mutant mRNA/EGFP in HEK293 cells, in RAW264.7 cells and in human osteoclasts, with no change of CLCN7WT mRNA and no effect of scrambled siRNA on the mutant transcripts. Osteoclasts from Clcn7G213R ADO2 mice showed reduced bone resorption, a condition rescued by Clcn7G213R-specific siRNA. Treatment of ADO2 mice with Clcn7G213R-specific siRNA induced increase of bone resorption variables and decrease of trabecular bone mass, leading to an overall improvement of the osteopetrotic bone phenotype. Treatment did not induce overt adverse effects and was effective also with siRNAs specific for other mutants. These results demonstrate that a siRNA-based experimental treatment of ADO2 is feasible, and underscore a translational impact for future strategy to cure this therapeutically neglected form of osteopetrosis. PMID:26325626

  4. A small interfering RNA targeting Lnk accelerates bone fracture healing with early neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Yohei; Ii, Masaaki; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Kawamoto, Atsuhiko; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Akimaru, Hiroshi; Mifune, Yutaka; Shoji, Taro; Fukui, Tomoaki; Asahi, Michio; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Asahara, Takayuki

    2013-09-01

    Lnk, an intracellular adapter protein, is expressed in hematopoietic cell lineages, which has recently been proved as an essential inhibitory signaling molecule for stem cell self-renewal in the stem cell factor-c-Kit signaling pathway with enhanced hematopoietic and osteogenic reconstitution in Lnk-deficient mice. Moreover, the therapeutic potential of hematopoietic stem/endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) for fracture healing has been demonstrated with mechanistic insight into vasculogenesis/angiogenesis and osteogenesis enhancement in the fracture sites. We report here, Lnk siRNA-transfected endothelial commitment of c-kit+/Sca-1+/lineage- subpopulations of bone marrow cells have high EPC colony-forming capacity exhibiting endothelial markers, VE-Cad, VEGF and Ang-1. Lnk siRNA-transfected osteoblasts also show highly osteoblastic capacity. In vivo, locally transfected Lnk siRNA could successfully downregulate the expression of Lnk at the fracture site up to 1 week, and radiological and histological examination showed extremely accelerated fracture healing in Lnk siRNA-transfected mice. Moreover, Lnk siRNA-transfected mice exhibited sufficient therapeutic outcomes with intrinstic enhancement of angiogenesis and osteogenesis, specifically, the mice demonstrated better blood flow recovery in the sites of fracture. In our series of experiments, we clarified that a negatively regulated Lnk system contributed to a favorable circumstance for fracture healing by enhancing vasculogenesis/angiogenesis and osteogenesis. These findings suggest that downregulation of Lnk system may have the clinical potential for faster fracture healing, which contributes to the reduction of delayed unions or non-unions.

  5. Interfering with DNA Damage Signals: Radiosensitizing Prostate Cancer using Small Peptides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-01

    2 can be phosphorylated on other serine sites by casein kinase I (CKI) and CKII, cdc2, and mitogen-activated protein kinases (15, 29). Though...E R H ILL LIB R A R Y on July 25, 2008 m cb.asm .org D ow nloaded from PP1 (23) and can be dephosphorylated by PP1. Despite these findings, it is...study in vivo activation of PP1 toward its sub- strates, we assessed the dephosphorylation of histone H1, a process mediated by PP1 (24). A flow

  6. Ultradeformable cationic liposomes for delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) into human primary melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Geusens, B; Lambert, J; De Smedt, S C; Buyens, K; Sanders, N N; Van Gele, M

    2009-02-10

    The aim of this work was to develop a system that can deliver siRNA into cells present in the human epidermis. More specifically, we wanted to block the expression of a specific Myosin Va exon F containing isoform that is physiologically involved in melanosome transport in human melanocytes. Therefore, we prepared and investigated the capacity of ultradeformable cationic liposomes (UCLs) to deliver siRNA in hard-to-transfect human primary melanocytes. UCLs were formulated from different w:w ratios (6:1, 8:1 and 10:1) of the cationic lipid 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium propane (DOTAP) and the edge activator sodium cholate. Subsequently, UCL/siRNA complexes were prepared and their particle size, surface charge, deformability, cytotoxicity, transfection efficiency and long-term stability were tested. The best results were obtained with UCLs composed of a DOTAP/NaChol ratio of 6:1 (w:w) which are promising for future in vivo experiments.

  7. Small interfering RNA therapy against carbohydrate sulfotransferase 15 inhibits cardiac remodeling in rats with dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kenichi; Arumugam, Somasundaram; Sreedhar, Remya; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan A; Nakamura, Takashi; Nakamura, Masahiko; Harima, Meilei; Yoneyama, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Kenji

    2015-07-01

    Carbohydrate sulfotransferase 15 (CHST15) is a sulfotransferase responsible for biosynthesis of chondroitin sulfate E (CS-E), which plays important roles in numerous biological events such as biosynthesis of proinflammatory cytokines. However, the effects of CHST15 siRNA in rats with chronic heart failure (CHF) after experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) have not yet been investigated. CHF was elicited in Lewis rats by immunization with cardiac myosin, and after immunization, the rats were divided into two groups and treated with either CHST15 siRNA (2μg/week) or vehicle. Age matched normal rats without immunizations were also included in this study. After 7weeks of treatment, we investigated the effects of CHST15 siRNA on cardiac function, proinflammatory cytokines, and cardiac remodeling in EAM rats. Myocardial functional parameters measured by hemodynamic and echocardiographic studies were significantly improved by CHST15 siRNA treatment in rats with CHF compared with that of vehicle-treated CHF rats. CHST15 siRNA significantly reduced cardiac fibrosis, and hypertrophy and its marker molecules (left ventricular (LV) mRNA expressions of transforming growth factor beta1, collagens I and III, and atrial natriuretic peptide) compared with vehicle-treated CHF rats. CHF-induced increased myocardial mRNA expressions of proinflammatory cytokines [interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β], monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and -9), and CHST15 were also suppressed by the treatment with CHST15 siRNA. Western blotting study has confirmed the results obtained from mRNA analysis as CHST15 siRNA treated rats expressed reduced levels of inflammatory and cardiac remodeling marker proteins. Our results demonstrate for the first time, that CHST15 siRNA treatment significantly improved LV function and ameliorated the progression of cardiac remodeling in rats with CHF after EAM.

  8. Interfering with DNA Damage Signals: Radiosensitizing Prostate Cancer Using Small Peptides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    Dickinson), penicillin (100U/ml), streptomycin ( 100μg/ml), 10% FBS in DMEM medium. The top layer contains 1 ml of 0.3% Nobel agar, penicillin (100Ug...de- fects, chromosomal instability, and hypersensitivity in re- sponse to IR. ATM is remarkable for its large size and the existence of a sequence in...a hypersensitivity to IR (Shi- loh, 1997). NBS1 forms a complex with Mre11 and Rad50 to be called the MRN complex. MRN is highly conserved, and it

  9. Efficient delivery of small interfering RNA into injured spinal cords in rats by photomechanical waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Takahiro; Sato, Shunichi; Toyooka, Terushige; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Obara, Minoru

    2011-03-01

    In the central nervous system, lack of axonal regeneration leads to permanent functional disabilities. In spinal cord injury (SCI), the over-expressions of intermediate filament (IF) proteins, such as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin, are mainly involved in glial scar formation; these proteins work as both physical and biochemical barriers to axonal regeneration. Thus, silencing of these IF proteins would be an attractive strategy to treat SCI. In this study, we first attempted to deliver fluorescent probe-labeled siRNAs into injured spinal cords in rats by applying photomechanical waves (PMWs) to examine the capability of PMWs as a tool for siRNA delivery. Intense fluorescence from siRNAs was observed in much broader regions in the spinal cords with PMW application when compared with those with siRNA injection alone. Based on this result, we delivered siRNAs for GFAP and vimentin into injured spinal tissues in rats by applying PMWs. The treatment resulted in efficient silencing of the proteins at five days after SCI and a decrease of the cavity area in the injured tissue at three weeks after SCI when compared with those with siRNA injection alone. These results demonstrate the capability of PMWs for efficient delivery of siRNAs into injured spinal cords and treatment of SCIs.

  10. Bridging small interfering RNA with giant therapeutic outcomes using nanometric liposomes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Yuvraj; Tomar, Sandeep; Khan, Shariq; Meher, Jaya Gopal; Pawar, Vivek K; Raval, Kavit; Sharma, Komal; Singh, Pankaj K; Chaurasia, Mohini; Surendar Reddy, B; Chourasia, Manish K

    2015-12-28

    The scope of RNAi based therapeutics is unquestionable. However, if we dissect the current trend of clinical trials for afore mentioned drug class, some stark trends appear: 1) naked siRNA only exerts influence in topical mode whilst systemic delivery requires a carrier and 2) even after two decades of extensive efforts, not even a single siRNA containing product is commercially available. It was therefore felt that a perspective simplifying the unique intricacies of working with a merger of siRNA and liposomes from a pharmaceutical viewpoint could draw the attention of a wider array of interested researchers. We begin from the beginning and attempt to conduit the gap between theoretical logic and experimental/actual constraints. This, in turn could stimulate the next generation of investigators, gearing them to tackle the conundrum, which is siRNA delivery.

  11. Conifers have a unique small RNA silencing signature

    PubMed Central

    Dolgosheina, Elena V.; Morin, Ryan D.; Aksay, Gozde; Sahinalp, S. Cenk; Magrini, Vincent; Mardis, Elaine R.; Mattsson, Jim; Unrau, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    Plants produce small RNAs to negatively regulate genes, viral nucleic acids, and repetitive elements at either the transcriptional or post-transcriptional level in a process that is referred to as RNA silencing. While RNA silencing has been extensively studied across the different phyla of the animal kingdom (e.g., mouse, fly, worm), similar studies in the plant kingdom have focused primarily on angiosperms, thus limiting evolutionary studies of RNA silencing in plants. Here we report on an unexpected phylogenetic difference in the size distribution of small RNAs among the vascular plants. By extracting total RNA from freshly growing shoot tissue, we conducted a survey of small RNAs in 24 vascular plant species. We find that conifers, which radiated from the other seed-bearing plants ∼260 million years ago, fail to produce significant amounts of 24-nucleotide (nt) RNAs that are known to guide DNA methylation and heterochromatin formation in angiosperms. Instead, they synthesize a diverse population of small RNAs that are exactly 21-nt long. This finding was confirmed by high-throughput sequencing of the small RNA sequences from a conifer, Pinus contorta. A conifer EST search revealed the presence of a novel Dicer-like (DCL) family, which may be responsible for the observed change in small RNA expression. No evidence for DCL3, an enzyme that matures 24-nt RNAs in angiosperms, was found. We hypothesize that the diverse class of 21-nt RNAs found in conifers may help to maintain organization of their unusually large genomes. PMID:18566193

  12. Dynamic changes of small RNAs in rice spikelet development reveal specialized reproductive phasiRNA pathways

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Qili; Yang, Li; Liang, Wanqi; Zhang, Dabing; Meyers, Blake C.

    2016-01-01

    Dissection of the genetic pathways and mechanisms by which anther development occurs in grasses is crucial for both a basic understanding of plant development and for examining traits of agronomic importance such as male sterility. In rice, MULTIPLE SPOROCYTES1 (MSP1), a leucine-rich-repeat receptor kinase, plays an important role in anther development by limiting the number of sporocytes. OsTDL1a (a TPD1-like gene in rice) encodes a small protein that acts as a cofactor of MSP1 in the same regulatory pathway. In this study, we analyzed small RNA and mRNA changes in different stages of spikelets from wild-type rice, and from msp1 and ostdl1a mutants. Analysis of the small RNA data identified miRNAs demonstrating differential abundances. miR2275 was depleted in the two rice mutants; this miRNA is specifically enriched in anthers and functions to trigger the production of 24-nt phased secondary siRNAs (phasiRNAs) from PHAS loci. We observed that the 24-nt phasiRNAs as well as their precursor PHAS mRNAs were also depleted in the two mutants. An analysis of co-expression identified three Argonaute-encoding genes (OsAGO1d, OsAGO2b, and OsAGO18) that accumulate transcripts coordinately with phasiRNAs, suggesting a functional relationship. By mRNA in situ analysis, we demonstrated a strong correlation between the spatiotemporal pattern of these OsAGO transcripts and phasiRNA accumulations. PMID:27702997

  13. Characterization of defective interfering RNAs associated with RNA plant viruses. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, T.J.; Jackson, A.O.

    1993-04-01

    Our lab was the first to describe and characterize a defective interfering RNA (DI RNAs or DIs) in association with a small RNA plant virus. The features of the DIs that we discovered in infections of tomato bushy stunt virus were compatible with the properties of DIs identified in many animal virus infections. Animal virologists have generally recognized the importance of studying DIs because they are invaluable tools for identifying cis-acting sequences important in virus multiplication and because they offer the opportunity to elucidate mechanisms involved in viral persistence and disease attenuation. Hence our discovery offered a comparably valuable tool for use in plant virus studies for the first time. Since the original observation with TBSV, we discovered the second example of plant viral DI RNAs associated with turnip crinkle virus (TCV), and many other reports have now appeared characterizing DI and DI-like RNAs in other plant viral infections. We are seeking to improve our understanding of the mechanisms of DI generation and the precise nature of the RNA sequences necessary for DI replication and encapsidation. We also want to address the nature of the DI mediated symptom attenuation and interference effects in plants, and to determine the feasibility of using transgenic plants constitutively expressing DI RNAs for disease control. The progress made on each of these objectives is summarized along with the proposed experiments for the continuation period.

  14. [The influence of interfered circadian rhythm on pregnancy and neonatal rats].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Jun; Sheng, Wen-Jie; Guo, Yin-Hua; Tan, Yong

    2015-10-25

    The aim of this study was to observe the influence of interfered circadian rhythm on pregnancy of rats and growth of neonatal rats, and to explore the relationship between the interfered circadian rhythm and the changes of melatonin and progesterone. Continuous light was used to inhibit melatonin secretion and therefore the interfered circadian rhythm animal model was obtained. The influence of interfered circadian rhythm on delivery of pregnant rats was observed. Serum was collected from rats during different stages of pregnancy to measure the concentrations of melatonin and progesterone. In order to observe the embryo resorption rate, half of pregnant rats were randomly selected to undergo a laparotomy, and the remainder was used to observe delivery and assess the growth of neonatal rats after delivery. The results showed that the interfered circadian rhythm induced adverse effects on pregnancy outcomes, including an increase of embryo resorption rate and a decrease in the number of live births; inhibited the secretion of melatonin along with decreased serum progesterone level; prolonged the stage of labor, but not the duration of pregnancy; and disturbed the fetal intrauterine growth and the growth of neonatal rats. The results suggest that interfered circadian rhythm condition made by continuous light could make adverse effects on both pregnant rats and neonatal rats. The results of our study may provide a way to modulate pregnant women's circadian rhythm and a possibility of application of melatonin on pregnant women.

  15. Roles of Interfering Radiation Emitted from Decaying Pulses Obeying Soliton Equations Belonging to the Ablowitz-Kaup-Newell-Segur Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujishima, Hironobu; Yajima, Tetsu

    2015-06-01

    The nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation under the box-type initial condition, which models general multiple pulses deviating from pure solitons, is analyzed. Following the approximation by splitting the initial pulse into many small bins [G. Boffetta and A. R. Osborne, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0021-9991(92)90370-E, J. Comp. Phys. 102, 252 (1992)], we can analyze the Zakharov-Shabat eigenvalue problem to construct transfer matrices connecting the Jost functions in each interval without direct numerical computation. We can obtain analytical expressions for the scattering data that describe interfering radiation emitted from initial pulses. The number of solitons that appear in the final stage is predicted theoretically, and the condition generating an unusual wave such as a double-pole soliton is derived. Numerical analyses under box-type initial conditions are also performed to show that the interplay between the tails from decaying pulses can affect the asymptotic profile.

  16. Metabolism studies of unformulated internally [3H]-labeled short interfering RNAs in mice.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Jesper; Litherland, Karine; Faller, Thomas; van de Kerkhof, Esther; Natt, François; Hunziker, Jürg; Krauser, Joel; Swart, Piet

    2013-06-01

    Absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion properties of two unformulated model short interfering RNA (siRNAs) were determined using a single internal [(3)H]-radiolabeling procedure, in which the full-length oligonucleotides were radiolabeled by Br/(3)H -exchange. Tissue distribution, excretion, and mass balance of radioactivity were investigated in male CD-1 mice after a single intravenous administration of the [(3)H]siRNAs, at a target dose level of 5 mg/kg. Quantitative whole-body autoradiography and liquid scintillation counting techniques were used to determine tissue distribution. Radiochromatogram profiles were determined in plasma, tissue extracts, and urine. Metabolites were separated by liquid chromatography and identified by radiodetection and high-resolution accurate mass spectrometry. In general, there was little difference in the distribution of total radiolabeled components after administration of the two unformulated [(3)H]siRNAs. The radioactivity was rapidly and widely distributed throughout the body and remained detectable in all tissues investigated at later time points (24 and 48 hours for [(3)H]MRP4 (multidrug resistance protein isoform 4) and [(3)H]SSB (Sjögren Syndrome antigen B) siRNA, respectively). After an initial rapid decrease, concentrations of total radiolabeled components in dried blood decreased at a much slower rate. A nearly complete mass balance was obtained for the [(3)H]SSB siRNA, and renal excretion was the main route of elimination (38%). The metabolism of the two model siRNAs was rapid and extensive. Five minutes after administration, no parent compound could be detected in plasma. Instead, radiolabeled nucleosides resulting from nuclease hydrolysis were observed. In the metabolism profiles obtained from various tissues, only radiolabeled nucleosides were found, suggesting that siRNAs are rapidly metabolized and that the distribution pattern of total radiolabeled components can be ascribed to small molecular

  17. [Discrimination of spectral patterns of sound signals in conditions of interfering noise].

    PubMed

    Supin, A Ia

    2007-06-01

    The method of probes with rippled spectra makes possible to measure the frequency resolving power (FRP) of human hearing using no frequency-selective masking techniques. This allows studying the influence of interfering noises on the FRP. In conditions of diotic presentation (parallel to both ears), FRP markedly decreases on- or low-frequency noise markedly decreases FRP. The dependence of this effect on sound intensity and noise-to-probe ratio is different for the on- and low-frequence noise, which indicates different mechanisms of action of these two kinds of interfering noise. However, in both cases, a loud enough interfering noise results in complete inability to discriminate the fine spectral pattern of the probe. On the contrary, in conditions of dichotic presentation (the probe to one ear and the noise to the other), the interfering noise does not influence FRP noticeably within a wide range of frequency relations of the probe and noise and noise-to-probe level ratios. Thus, almost entire dichotic release of influence of interfering noise on FRP takes place. This feature can be used for designing bearing aids.

  18. Preparation and electromagnetic waves attenuation performances of infrared-interfering composite smog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiang-cui; Liu, Qing-hai; Dai, Meng-yan; Shi, Wei-dong; Fang, Guo-feng; Zhang, Tong

    2016-10-01

    The infrared-interfering composite smog material is prepared by a heating and agitating device in aqueous solutions and then sprayed into a cloud chamber for six minutes to form smog using gas-water mixing spray system. The attenuation performances of the smog to visible light, 1.06μm laser, 3-5μm infrared and 8-14μm infrared are evaluated, and compared with those of other testing materials. The results show that the sprayed smog have the best attenuation performances and the longest interfering time to visible light, 1.06μm laser, 3-5μm infrared and 8-14μm infrared. Therefore, the infrared-interfering composite smog material in the form of aqueous solution is the new smoke obscurant materials that are environment-friendly and possess broad application prospects in some aspects such as visible light, laser and infrared countermeasures.

  19. Métrologie d'indice par interférométrie EUV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rossi, S.; Joyeux, D.; Delmotte, F.; Ea-Kim, B.

    2006-12-01

    Nous décrivons la détermination directe des indices de matériaux en fonction de la longueur d'onde par interférométrie dans la gamme spectrale EUV (10-50 nm). L'interféromètre de type division de front d'onde est un bimiroir de Fresnel. Le principe consiste à mesurer le décalage des franges entre le côté de l'interférogramme qui a vu l'échantillon et le côté référence sans échantillon. Une analyse de Fourier permet d'extraire l'épaisseur optique du matériau. Nous présentons les premiers résultats de la mesure d'indice du molybdène avec l'instrument réalisé.

  20. SMI adaptive antenna arrays for weak interfering signals. [Sample Matrix Inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Inder J.

    1986-01-01

    The performance of adaptive antenna arrays in the presence of weak interfering signals (below thermal noise) is studied. It is shown that a conventional adaptive antenna array sample matrix inversion (SMI) algorithm is unable to suppress such interfering signals. To overcome this problem, the SMI algorithm is modified. In the modified algorithm, the covariance matrix is redefined such that the effect of thermal noise on the weights of adaptive arrays is reduced. Thus, the weights are dictated by relatively weak signals. It is shown that the modified algorithm provides the desired interference protection.

  1. Small RNAs in spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Ram Prakash; Kotaja, Noora

    2014-01-25

    Spermatogenesis is characterized by meiotic divisions and major morphological changes to produce spermatozoa that are capable of independent movement and fertilization of an egg. Male germ cell differentiation is governed by orchestrated, phase-specific gene expression patterns that are tightly controlled at transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. Post-transcriptional regulation of protein-coding mRNAs becomes prominent during the late steps of spermatogenesis when the compacting sperm nucleus becomes transcriptionally inhibited. Small non-coding RNAs are important regulators of gene expression that mainly function post-transcriptionally to control the properties of their target mRNAs. Male germ cells express several classes of small RNAs, including Dicer-dependent microRNAs (miRNAs) and endogenous small interfering RNAs (endo-siRNAs), as well as Dicer-independent piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs). Increasing evidence supports the essential role of small RNA-mediated RNA regulation in normal spermatogenesis and male fertility.

  2. Characterization of a defective interfering RNA that contains a mosaic of a plant viral genome. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, T.J.; Jackson, A.O.

    1991-12-31

    Our lab was the first to describe and characterize a defective interfering RNA (DI RNAs or DIs) in association with a small RNA plant virus. The features of the DIs that we discovered in infections of tomato bushy stunt virus were compatible with the properties of DIs identified in many animal virus infections. Animal virologists have generally recognized the importance of studying DIs because they are invaluable tools for identifying cis-acting sequences important in virus multiplication and because they offer the opportunity to elucidate mechanisms involved in viral persistence and disease attenuation. Hence our discovery offered a comparably valuable tool for use in plant virus studies for the first time. Since then, we have also discovered the second example of plant viral DI RNAs associated with turnip crinkle virus (TCV), a virus structurally related to TBSV. We proposed a thorough characterization of this unique class of symptom modulating RNAs with the overall objective of identifying viral RNA nucleotide, sequences involved in such fundamental processes as virus replication and encapsidation as well as the degree of symptom expression resulting from the viral-DI-host interaction. The proposed research focused on the molecular characterization of the DI RNAs and the helper virus. We had demonstrated that the DIs were collinear deletion mutants of the genome of a cherry strain of tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV). We had also shown that these low molecular weight RNAs interfered with the helper plant virus and modulated disease expression by preventing the development of a lethal necrotic disease in susceptible host plants. We also suggested that by exploring the mechanisms associated with the symptom attenuation effect, we might be able to devise novel strategies useful for engineering viral disease resistance.

  3. 7 CFR 56.72 - Interfering with a grader or employee of the AMS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interfering with a grader or employee of the AMS. 56... a grader or employee of the AMS. Any interference with or obstruction or any attempted interference or obstruction of or assault upon any graders, licensees, or employees of the AMS in the...

  4. Validation of Learning Effort Algorithm for Real-Time Non-Interfering Based Diagnostic Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Pi-Shan; Chang, Te-Jeng

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this research is to validate the algorithm of learning effort which is an indicator of a new real-time and non-interfering based diagnostic technique. IC3 Mentor, the adaptive e-learning platform fulfilling the requirements of intelligent tutor system, was applied to 165 university students. The learning records of the subjects…

  5. Small RNAs, DNA methylation and transposable elements in wheat

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background More than 80% of the wheat genome is composed of transposable elements (TEs). Since active TEs can move to different locations and potentially impose a significant mutational load, their expression is suppressed in the genome via small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs). sRNAs guide silencing of TEs at the transcriptional (mainly 24-nt sRNAs) and post-transcriptional (mainly 21-nt sRNAs) levels. In this study, we report the distribution of these two types of sRNAs among the different classes of wheat TEs, the regions targeted within the TEs, and their impact on the methylation patterns of the targeted regions. Results We constructed an sRNA library from hexaploid wheat and developed a database that included our library and three other publicly available sRNA libraries from wheat. For five completely-sequenced wheat BAC contigs, most perfectly matching sRNAs represented TE sequences, suggesting that a large fraction of the wheat sRNAs originated from TEs. An analysis of all wheat TEs present in the Triticeae Repeat Sequence database showed that sRNA abundance was correlated with the estimated number of TEs within each class. Most of the sRNAs perfectly matching miniature inverted repeat transposable elements (MITEs) belonged to the 21-nt class and were mainly targeted to the terminal inverted repeats (TIRs). In contrast, most of the sRNAs matching class I and class II TEs belonged to the 24-nt class and were mainly targeted to the long terminal repeats (LTRs) in the class I TEs and to the terminal repeats in CACTA transposons. An analysis of the mutation frequency in potentially methylated sites revealed a three-fold increase in TE mutation frequency relative to intron and untranslated genic regions. This increase is consistent with wheat TEs being preferentially methylated, likely by sRNA targeting. Conclusions Our study examines the wheat epigenome in relation to known TEs. sRNA-directed transcriptional and post-transcriptional silencing plays important roles in

  6. Temperature Measurement of a Miniature Ceramic Heater in the Presence of an Extended Interfering Background Radiation Source Using a Multiwavelength Pyrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    Temperature measurement of small (millimeter size) objects is generally difficult and demanding. Measurement involving ceramic materials using the traditional one- and two-color pyrometer is difficult because of their complex optical properties, such as low emissivity which may vary with both temperature and wavelength. Pyrometry applications in an environment with an interfering radiation source of extended dimension adds extra complexity to the process. We show that the multiwavelength pyrometer successfully measured the temperatures of a millimeter (mm) size ceramic heater under these demanding conditions.

  7. Identification and characterization of a viroid resembling apple dimple fruit viroid in fig (Ficus carica L.) by next generation sequencing of small RNAs.

    PubMed

    Chiumenti, M; Torchetti, E M; Di Serio, F; Minafra, A

    2014-08-08

    Viroids are small (246-401 nt) circular and non coding RNAs infecting higher plants. They are targeted by host Dicer-like enzymes (DCLs) that generate small RNAs of 21-24 nt (sRNAs), which are involved in the host RNA silencing pathways. The accumulation in plant tissues of such viroid-derived small RNAs (vd-sRNAs) is a clear sign of an ongoing viroid infection. In this study, next generation sequencing of a sRNAs library and assembling of the sequenced vd-sRNAs were instrumental for the identification of a viroid resembling apple dimple fruit viroid (ADFVd) in a fig accession. After confirming by molecular methods the presence of this viroid in the fig tree, its population was characterized, showing that the ADFVd master sequence from fig diverges from that of the ADFVd reference variant from apple. Moreover, since this viroid accumulates at a low level in fig, a semi-nested RT-PCR assay was developed for detecting it in other fig accessions. ADFVd seems to have a wider host range than thought before and this poses questions about its epidemiology. A further characterization of ADFVd-sRNAs showed similar accumulation of (+) or (-) vd-sRNAs that mapped on the viroid genome generating hotspot profiles. Moreover, similarly to other nuclear-replicating viroids, vd-sRNAs of 21, 22 and 24 nt in size prevailed in the distribution profiles. Altogether, these data support the involvement of double-stranded RNAs and different DCLs, targeting the same restricted viroid regions, in the genesis of ADFVd-sRNAs.

  8. 36 CFR 261.3 - Interfering with a Forest officer, volunteer, or human resource program enrollee or giving false...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... officer, volunteer, or human resource program enrollee or giving false report to a Forest officer. 261.3... General Prohibitions § 261.3 Interfering with a Forest officer, volunteer, or human resource program..., intimidating, or intentionally interfering with any Forest officer, volunteer, or human resource...

  9. 36 CFR 261.3 - Interfering with a Forest officer, volunteer, or human resource program enrollee or giving false...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... officer, volunteer, or human resource program enrollee or giving false report to a Forest officer. 261.3... General Prohibitions § 261.3 Interfering with a Forest officer, volunteer, or human resource program..., intimidating, or intentionally interfering with any Forest officer, volunteer, or human resource...

  10. Nematode endogenous small RNA pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hoogstrate, Suzanne W; Volkers, Rita JM; Sterken, Mark G; Kammenga, Jan E; Snoek, L Basten

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of small RNA silencing pathways has greatly extended our knowledge of gene regulation. Small RNAs have been presumed to play a role in every field of biology because they affect many biological processes via regulation of gene expression and chromatin remodeling. Most well-known examples of affected processes are development, fertility, and maintenance of genome stability. Here we review the role of the three main endogenous small RNA silencing pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans: microRNAs, endogenous small interfering RNAs, and PIWI-interacting RNAs. After providing an entry-level overview on how these pathways function, we discuss research on other nematode species providing insight into the evolution of these small RNA pathways. In understanding the differences between the endogenous small RNA pathways and their evolution, a more comprehensive picture is formed of the functions and effects of small RNAs. PMID:25340013

  11. Short peptides interfering with signaling pathways as new therapeutic tools for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Ellert-Miklaszewska, Aleksandra; Poleszak, Katarzyna; Kaminska, Bozena

    2017-01-01

    Short peptides have many advantages, such as low molecular weight, selectivity for a specific target, organelles or cells with minimal toxicity. We describe properties of short peptides, which interfere with communication networks in tumor cells and within microenvironment of malignant gliomas, the most common brain tumors. We focus on ligand/receptor axes and intracellular signaling pathways critical for gliomagenesis that could be targeted with interfering peptides. We review structures and efficacy of organelle-specific and cell-penetrating peptides and describe diverse chemical modifications increasing proteolytic stability and protecting synthetic peptides against degradation. We report results of application of short peptides in glioma therapy clinical trials, their rises and falls. The most advanced examples of therapeutics such as short interfering peptides combined with cell-penetrating peptides that show good effectiveness in disease models are presented. It is foreseen that identification of peptides with better clinical properties may improve their success rates in clinical trials.

  12. Pitfall in cannabinoid analysis--detection of a previously unrecognized interfering compound in human serum.

    PubMed

    Toennes, Stefan W; Hanisch, Stephanie; Pogoda, Werner; Wunder, Cora; Paulke, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    In clinical and forensic toxicology, high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) is increasingly used since it allows the development of sensitive and fast drug analysis procedures. During development of a LC-MS/MS method for determination of the psychoactive cannabinoid Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and of its two metabolites 11-hydroxy-THC (THCOH) and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH) in serum, a previously unrecognized interfering compound was detected. Extending the fast gradient elution program by an isocratic phase leads to sufficient separation of the interfering compound, initially co-eluting with THCCOOH and exhibiting the same fragments. For characterization, product ion scans and precursor ion scans were performed. Samples from cannabis users were analyzed to estimate the abundance of the interfering compound. The mass spectrometric experiments showed that the interfering compound exhibited the same molecular mass as THCCOOH and a similar fragmentation pattern except for relative fragment intensities. This compound was exclusively detectable in authentic samples. Concentrations were in the range of 4.5 to 51 % (median 14.6 %, n = 73) of those of THCCOOH. After further optimization of the gradient, the method was sufficiently selective and sensitive and validation parameters were within acceptance limits. A new compound related to cannabis use was detected in human serum, and data suggest an isomeric structure to THCCOOH. Considering the rather high amounts observed, it was surprising that this compound had not been detected previously. Further studies on its structure and origin are necessary.

  13. Removing interfering clutter associated with radar pulses that an airborne radar receives from a radar transponder

    DOEpatents

    Ormesher, Richard C.; Axline, Robert M.

    2008-12-02

    Interfering clutter in radar pulses received by an airborne radar system from a radar transponder can be suppressed by developing a representation of the incoming echo-voltage time-series that permits the clutter associated with predetermined parts of the time-series to be estimated. These estimates can be used to estimate and suppress the clutter associated with other parts of the time-series.

  14. In vitro transcription activities of Pol IV, Pol V and RDR2 reveal coupling of Pol IV and RDR2 for dsRNA synthesis in plant RNA silencing

    SciTech Connect

    Haag, Jeremy R.; Ream, Thomas S.; Marasco, Michelle; Nicora, Carrie D.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2012-12-14

    In Arabidopsis, RNA-dependent DNA methylation and transcriptional silencing involves three nuclear RNA polymerases that are biochemically undefined: the presumptive DNA-dependent RNA polymerases, Pol IV and Pol V and the putative RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, RDR2. Here, we demonstrate their RNA polymerase activities in vitro. Unlike Pol II, Pols IV and V require an RNA primer, are insensitive to alpha-amanitin and differ in their ability to displace non-template DNA during transcription. Biogenesis of 24 nt small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) requires both Pol IV and RDR2, which physically associate in vivo. Pol IV does not require RDR2 for activity, but RDR2 is nonfunctional in the absence of associated Pol IV, suggesting that their coupling explains the channeling of Pol IV transcripts into double-stranded RNAs that are then diced into 24 nt siRNAs.

  15. Multiwavelength pyrometry for nongray surfaces in the presence of interfering radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel

    1992-01-01

    A NASA developed multiwavelength pyrometry technique for nongray surfaces was extended to also measure surface temperature in the presence of interfering radiation. This radiation is produced by heat lamps used to raise the temperature of the surface. The necessary instruments are a spectral radiometer, an auxiliary radiation source, and a computer. Four radiation spectra are recorded: (1) the unobstructed spectrum characterizing an auxiliary radiation source; (2) the unobstructed spectrum characterizing the interfering radiation; (3) the radiation spectrum consisting of surface emission plus the interfering radiation; and (4) a spectrum consisting of the radiations of (3) plus the reflected radiation due to the incidence of the auxiliary radiation source on this surface. With these spectra, application of two variable, nonlinear, least squares, curve fitting computer software determines the surface temperature and the spectral emissivity. Use of the method to measure the surface temperature of silicon carbide under a simulated interference condition is shown at a low temperature just above ambient. The instrumentation necessary to extend the method to elevated temperatures is discussed.

  16. Thiophenone Attenuates Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli O103:H2 Virulence by Interfering with AI-2 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Valen Rukke, Håkon; Benneche, Tore; Aamdal Scheie, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Interference with bacterial quorum sensing communication provides an anti-virulence strategy to control pathogenic bacteria. Here, using the Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) O103:H2, we showed for the first time that thiophenone TF101 reduced expression of lsrB; the gene encoding the AI-2 receptor. Combined results of transcriptional and phenotypic analyses suggested that TF101 interfere with AI-2 signalling, possibly by competing with AI-2 for binding to LsrB. This is supported by in silico docking prediction of thiophenone TF101 in the LsrB pocket. Transcriptional analyses furthermore showed that thiophenone TF101 interfered with expression of the virulence genes eae and fimH. In addition, TF101 reduced AI-2 induced E. coli adhesion to colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. TF101, on the other hand, did not affect epinephrine or norepinephrine enhanced E. coli adhesion. Overall, our results showed that thiophenone TF101 interfered with virulence expression in E. coli O103:H2, suggestedly by interfering with AI-2 mediated quorum sensing. We thus conclude that thiophenone TF101 might represent a promising future anti-virulence agent in the fight against pathogenic E. coli. PMID:27309855

  17. The Influence of Interfering Substances on the Antimicrobial Activity of Selected Quaternary Ammonium Compounds.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Paula A; Lemos, Madalena; Mergulhão, Filipe; Melo, Luís; Simões, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Standard cleaning processes may not remove all the soiling typically found in food industry, such as carbohydrates, fats, or proteins. Contaminants have a high impact in disinfection as their presence may reduce the activity of disinfectants. The influence of alginic acid, bovine serum albumin, yeast extract, and humic acids was assessed on the antimicrobial activities of benzalkonium chloride and cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide against Bacillus cereus vegetative cells and Pseudomonas fluorescens. The bacteria (single and consortium) were exposed to surfactants (single and combined) in the absence and presence of potential disinfection interfering substances. The antimicrobial effects of the surfactants were assessed based on the bacterial respiratory activity measured by oxygen uptake rate due to glucose oxidation. The tested surfactants were efficient against both bacteria (single and consortium) with minimum bactericidal concentrations ranging from 3 to 35 mg·L(-1). The strongest effect was caused by humic acids that severely quenched antimicrobial action, increasing the minimum bactericidal concentration of the surfactants on P. fluorescens and the consortium. The inclusion of the other interfering substances resulted in mild interferences in the antibacterial activity. This study clearly demonstrates that humic acids should be considered as an antimicrobial interfering substance in the development of disinfection strategies.

  18. Small silencing RNAs: an expanding universe

    PubMed Central

    Ghildiyal, Megha; Zamore, Phillip D.

    2009-01-01

    Since the discovery in 1993 of the first small silencing RNA, a dizzying number of small RNA classes have been identified, including microRNAs (miRNAs), small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs). These classes differ in their biogenesis, modes of target regulation and in the biological pathways they regulate. There is a growing realization that, despite their differences, these distinct small RNA pathways are interconnected and that small RNA pathways compete and collaborate as they regulate genes and protect the genome from external and internal threats. PMID:19148191

  19. Small silencing RNAs: an expanding universe.

    PubMed

    Ghildiyal, Megha; Zamore, Phillip D

    2009-02-01

    Since the discovery in 1993 of the first small silencing RNA, a dizzying number of small RNA classes have been identified, including microRNAs (miRNAs), small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs). These classes differ in their biogenesis, their modes of target regulation and in the biological pathways they regulate. There is a growing realization that, despite their differences, these distinct small RNA pathways are interconnected, and that small RNA pathways compete and collaborate as they regulate genes and protect the genome from external and internal threats.

  20. Small interfering RNA targeting ILK inhibits metastasis in human tongue cancer cells through repression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Yu; Qi, Jin; Deng, Shixiong; Wang, Cheng; Zhang, Luyu; Chen, Junxia

    2013-08-01

    Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is a multifunctional serine/threonine kinase. Accumulating evidences suggest that ILK are involved in cell–matrix interactions, cell proliferation, invasion, migration, angiogenesis and Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT). However, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. EMT has been postulated as a prerequisite for metastasis. The reports have demonstrated that EMT was implicated in metastasis of oral squamous cell carcinomas. Therefore, here we further postulate that ILK might participate in EMT of tongue cancer. We showed that ILK siRNA inhibited EMT with low N-cadherin, Vimentin, Snail, Slug and Twist as well as high E-cadherin expression in vivo and in vitro. We found that knockdown of ILK inhibited cell proliferation, migration and invasion as well as changed cell morphology. We also demonstrated that ILK siRNA inhibited phosphorylation of downstream signaling targets Akt and GSK3β as well as reduced expression of MMP2 and MMP9. Furthermore, we found that the tongue tumor with high metastasis capability showed higher ILK, Vimentin, Snail, Slug and Twist as well as lower E-cadherin expression in clinical specimens. Finally, ILK siRNA led to the suppression for tumorigenesis and metastasis in vivo. Our findings suggest that ILK could be a novel diagnostic and therapeutic target for tongue cancer. Highlights: • ILK siRNA influences cell morphology, cell cycle, migration and invasion. • ILK siRNA affects the expression of proteins associated with EMT. • ILK expression is related to EMT in clinical human tongue tumors. • ILK siRNA inhibits metastasis of the tongue cancer cells through suppressing EMT.

  1. Prevention of airway inflammation with topical cream containing imiquimod and small interfering RNA for natriuretic peptide receptor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoqin; Xu, Weidong; Mohapatra, Subhra; Kong, Xiaoyuan; Li, Xu; Lockey, Richard F; Mohapatra, Shyam S

    2008-01-01

    Background Asthma is a complex disease, characterized by reversible airway obstruction, hyperresponsiveness and chronic inflammation. Principle pharmacologic treatments for asthma include bronchodilating beta2-agonists and anti-inflammatory glucocorticosteroids; but these agents do not target the main cause of the disease, the generation of pathogenic Th2 cells. We previously reported reduction in allergic inflammation in mice deficient in the ANP receptor NPRA. Here we determined whether siRNA for natriuretic peptide receptor A (siNPRA) protected against asthma when administered transdermally. Methods Imiquimod cream mixed with chitosan nanoparticles containing either siRNA green indicator (siGLO) or siNPRA was applied to the skin of mice. Delivery of siGLO was confirmed by fluorescence microscopy. The anti-inflammatory activity of transdermal siNPRA was tested in OVA-sensitized mice by measuring airway hyperresponsiveness, eosinophilia, lung histopathology and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Results SiGLO appearing in the lung proved the feasibility of transdermal delivery. In a mouse asthma model, BALB/c mice treated with imiquimod cream containing siNPRA chitosan nanoparticles showed significantly reduced airway hyperresponsiveness, eosinophilia, lung histopathology and pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-5 in lung homogenates compared to controls. Conclusion These results demonstrate that topical cream containing imiquimod and siNPRA nanoparticles exerts an anti-inflammatory effect and may provide a new and simple therapy for asthma. PMID:18279512

  2. Drosophila oncogene Gas41 is an RNA interference modulator that intersects heterochromatin and the small interfering RNA pathway.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Sumit G; Bag, Indira; Sengupta, Saswati; Pal-Bhadra, Manika; Bhadra, Utpal

    2015-01-01

    Glioma amplified sequence41 (Gas41) is a highly conserved putative transcription factor that is frequently abundant in human gliomas. Gas41 shows oncogenic activity by promoting cell growth and viability. In the present study, we show that Gas41 is required for proper functioning of RNA interference (RNAi) machinery in the nuclei, although three basic structural domains of RNAi components PAZ, PIWI and dsRNA with respect to binding are absent in the structural sequences. Variations of structural domains are highly conserved among prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Gas41 interacts with cytological RNase III enzyme Dicer1 both biochemically and genetically. However, Drosophila Gas41 functions as chromatin remodeler and interacts with different heterochromatin markers and repeat-induced transgene silencing by modulating position effect variegation. We also show that transcriptional inactive Gas41 mutant interferes with the functional assembly of heterochromatin-associated proteins, dimethylated lysine 9 of histone H3 and heterochromatic protein 1 in developing embryos. A reduction of heterochromatic markers is accompanied by the mini-w promoter sequence in Gas41 mutants. These findings suggest that Drosophila Gas41 guides the repeat associated gene silencing and the Dicer1 interaction, thereby depicting a new role for Gas41. Gas41 is a critical RNAi component. In Drosophila, Gas41 plays a dual role. On the one hand, it appears to participate with Dicer 1 in the RNAi pathway and, alternatively, it also participates in repeat-induced gene silencing by accumulating heterochromatin proteins at the mini-w array promoters. Therefore, it represents an intriguing and apparently paradoxical new finding in RNA technology with respect to the process of heterochromatin gene silencing.

  3. Small Interfering RNA Targeting Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter Improves Cardiomyocyte Cell Viability in Hypoxia/Reoxygenation Injury by Reducing Calcium Overload

    PubMed Central

    Oropeza-Almazán, Yuriana; Vázquez-Garza, Eduardo; Chapoy-Villanueva, Héctor; Torre-Amione, Guillermo

    2017-01-01

    Intracellular Ca2+ mishandling is an underlying mechanism in hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) injury that results in mitochondrial dysfunction and cardiomyocytes death. These events are mediated by mitochondrial Ca2+ (mCa2+) overload that is facilitated by the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) channel. Along this line, we evaluated the effect of siRNA-targeting MCU in cardiomyocytes subjected to H/R injury. First, cardiomyocytes treated with siRNA demonstrated a reduction of MCU expression by 67%, which resulted in significant decrease in mitochondrial Ca2+ transport. siRNA treated cardiomyocytes showed decreased mitochondrial permeability pore opening and oxidative stress trigger by Ca2+ overload. Furthermore, after H/R injury MCU silencing decreased necrosis and apoptosis levels by 30% and 50%, respectively, and resulted in reduction in caspases 3/7, 9, and 8 activity. Our findings are consistent with previous conclusions that demonstrate that MCU activity is partly responsible for cellular injury induced by H/R and support the concept of utilizing siRNA-targeting MCU as a potential therapeutic strategy. PMID:28337252

  4. A genome-wide survey of small interfering RNA and micro RNA pathway genes in a galling insect

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mayetiola destructor (Say), Hessian fly, is a significant pest of wheat in most production regions worldwide. Deployment of resistance (R) genes is the most effective control for this pest; however, deployment of R genes results in an increased frequency of pest genotypes that display virulence to t...

  5. Regulation of protein degradation by insulin-degrading enzyme: analysis by small interfering RNA-mediated gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Fawcett, Janet; Permana, Paska A; Levy, Jennifer L; Duckworth, William C

    2007-12-01

    Proteins are vital to the overall structure of cells and to the function of cells in the form of enzymes. Thus the control of protein metabolism is among the most important aspects of cellular metabolism. Insulin's major effect on protein metabolism in the adult animal is inhibition of protein degradation. This is via inhibition of proteasome activity via an interaction with insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE). IDE is responsible for the majority of cellular insulin degradation. We hypothesized that a reduction in IDE would reduce insulin degradation and insulin's ability to inhibit protein degradation. HepG2 cells were transfected with siRNA against human IDE and insulin degradation and protein degradation measured. Both IDE mRNA and protein were reduced by >50% in the IDE siRNA transfected cells. Insulin degradation was reduced by approximately 50%. Cells were labeled with [3H]-leucine to investigate protein degradation. Short-lived protein degradation was unchanged in the cells with reduced IDE expression. Long-lived and very-long-lived protein degradation was reduced in the cells with reduced IDE expression (14.0+/-0.16 vs. 12.5+/-0.07%/4h (long-lived), 9.6+/-2.2% vs. 7.3+/-0.2%/3h (very-long-lived), control vs. IDE transfected, respectively, P<0.005). The inhibition of protein degradation by insulin was reduced 37-76% by a decreased expression of IDE in HepG2 cells. This shows that IDE is involved in cellular insulin metabolism and provides further evidence that insulin inhibits protein degradation via an interaction with IDE.

  6. Gas Chromatographic/Mass Spectrometric Differentiation of Atenolol, Metoprolol, Propranolol, and an Interfering Metabolite Product of Metoprolol

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-01

    all of the PFPA- beta - blockers and with the interfering metabolite product. Therefore, this metabolite product could be misidentified as atenolol...commonly used and chemically/structurally similar beta - blockers and a co-eluting interfering metabolite product of metoprolol. Therefore, these mass...ions can be used for differentiating and simultaneously analyzing these beta - blockers in biological samples. 17. Key Words 18. Distribution

  7. Ribozyme-enhanced single-stranded Ago2-processed interfering RNA triggers efficient gene silencing with fewer off-target effects

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Renfu; Zhang, Fengjuan; Xu, Beiying; Xi, Hairui; Zhang, Xue; Wang, Weihua; Wu, Ligang

    2015-01-01

    Short-hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) are widely used to produce small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) for gene silencing. Here we design an alternative siRNA precursor, named single-stranded, Argonaute 2 (Ago2)-processed interfering RNA (saiRNA), containing a 16–18 bp stem and a loop complementary to the target transcript. The introduction of a self-cleaving ribozyme derived from hepatitis delta virus to the 3′ end of the transcribed saiRNA dramatically improves its silencing activity by generating a short 3′ overhang that facilitates the efficient binding of saiRNA to Ago2. The same ribozyme also enhances the activity of Dicer-dependent shRNAs. Unlike a classical shRNA, the strand-specific cleavage of saiRNA by Ago2 during processing eliminates the passenger strand and prevents the association of siRNA with non-nucleolytic Ago proteins. As a result, off-target effects are reduced. In addition, saiRNA exhibits less competition with the biogenesis of endogenous miRNAs. Therefore, ribozyme-enhanced saiRNA provides a reliable tool for RNA interference applications. PMID:26455506

  8. Polymer-stabilized blue-phase liquid crystal grating cured with interfered visible light.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yachao; Li, Yan; Chen, Chao Ping; Liu, Shuxin; Rong, Na; Li, Weihuan; Li, Xiao; Zhou, Pengcheng; Lu, Jiangang; Liu, Ruili; Su, Yikai

    2015-07-27

    In this paper, we demonstrate a holographic polymer-stabilized blue-phase liquid crystal grating fabricated using a visible laser. As blue phase is stabilized by the interfered light, polymer-concentration gradient is achieved simultaneously. With the application of a uniform vertical electric field, periodic index distribution is obtained due to polymer-concentration gradient. The grating exhibits several attractive features such as polarization-independency, a broad temperature range, sub-millisecond response, simple fabrication, and low cost, thus holding great potential for photonics applications.

  9. Experimental quantum teleportation and multiphoton entanglement via interfering narrowband photon sources

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Jian; Zhang Han; Peng Chengzhi; Chen Zengbing; Bao Xiaohui; Chen Shuai; Pan Jianwei

    2009-10-15

    In this paper, we report a realization of synchronization-free quantum teleportation and narrowband three-photon entanglement through interfering narrowband photon sources. Since both the single-photon and the entangled photon pair utilized are completely autonomous, it removes the requirement of high-demanding synchronization techniques in long-distance quantum communication with pulsed spontaneous parametric down-conversion sources. The frequency linewidth of the three-photon entanglement realized is on the order of several MHz, which matches the requirement of atomic ensemble based quantum memories. Such a narrowband multiphoton source will have applications in some advanced quantum communication protocols and linear optical quantum computation.

  10. Heterophilic antibodies interfering with radioimmunoassay. A false-positive pregnancy test

    SciTech Connect

    Vladutiu, A.O.; Sulewski, J.M.; Pudlak, K.A.; Stull, C.G.

    1982-11-19

    A young woman with amenorrhea had a consistently positive pregnancy test result (serum radioimmunoassay measurement of ..beta..-human chorionic gonadotropin hormone). No fetal or placental tissue was found after uterine curettage and exploratory laparotomy. The false-positive pregnancy test result was due to heterophilic antibovine and antigoat antibodies in the patient's serum. These antibodies interfered with radioimmunoassays using goat antibodies. This case shows that serum heterophilic antibodies can interfere with immunoassays and result in unnecessary diagnostic procedures and/or unnecessary treatment.

  11. Three interfering beams in laser Doppler velocimetry for particle position and microflow velocity profile measurements.

    PubMed

    Onofri, Fabrice

    2006-05-10

    It is proposed to use three interfering and coplanar laser beams to form the probe volume of laser Doppler systems. This allows us to obtain, for each particle crossing this probe volume, a Doppler signal whose frequency amplitude spectrum exhibits two characteristic peaks. Electromagnetic calculations and experimental validations clearly demonstrate that we can estimate simultaneously, from the analysis of these two frequency peaks, the particle position along the optical axis and one velocity component. This technique is expected to have great potentialities for velocity profile measurements in microfluidic or boundary layer flows, as well as for the sizing of spherical particles.

  12. Competition at the Wireless Sensor Network MAC Layer: Low Power Probing interfering with X-MAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharias, Sven; Newe, Thomas

    2011-08-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) combine sensors with computer networks and enable very dense, in-situ and live measurements of data over a large area. Since this emerging technology has the potential to be embedded almost everywhere for numberless applications, interference between different networks can become a serious issue. For most WSNs, it is assumed today that the network medium access is non-competitive. On the basis of X-MAC interfered by Low Power Probing, this paper shows the danger and the effects of different sensor networks communicating on a single wireless channel of the 2.4 GHz band, which is used by the IEEE 802.15.4 standard.

  13. The expanding world of small RNAs in plants

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Filipe; Martienssen, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Plant genomes produce a variety of small RNAs that function in distinct, yet overlapping, genetic and epigenetic silencing pathways. However, the abundance and diversity of small RNA classes varies in different plant species, suggesting co-evolution between environmental adaptations and gene silencing mechanisms. Small RNA biogenesis in plants is well understood, but we are just beginning to uncover their intricate regulation and activity. Here, we discuss the biogenesis of plant small RNAs, such as microRNAs, secondary small-interfering RNAs and heterochromatic small-interfering RNAs, and their diverse cellular and developmental functions, including reproductive transitions, genomic imprinting and paramutation. We also discuss the diversification of small RNA-directed silencing pathways through the expansion of RNA-dependent RNA polymerases, Dicer and Argonaute proteins. PMID:26530390

  14. Iduna Protects the Brain from Glutamate Excitotoxicity and Stroke by Interfering with Parthanatos

    PubMed Central

    Andrabi, Shaida A.; Kang, Ho Chul; Haince, Jean-François; Lee, Yun-Il; Zhang, Jian; Chi, Zhikai; West, Andrew B.; Koehler, Raymond C.; Poirier, Guy G.; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.

    2013-01-01

    Glutamate acting on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors plays an important role in neurodegenerative diseases and neuronal injury following stroke, through activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 and generation of the death molecule poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymer. Here we identify Iduna, a novel NMDA receptor-induced survival gene that is neuroprotective against glutamate NMDA receptor mediated excitotoxicity both in vitro and in vivo and against stroke through interfering with PAR polymer induced cell death (parthanatos). Iduna’s protective effects are independent and downstream of PARP-1 activity. Iduna is a PAR polymer binding protein and mutations at the PAR polymer binding site abolishes the PAR binding activity of Iduna and attenuates its protective actions. Iduna is protective in vivo against NMDA-induced excitotoxicity and middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO)-induced stroke in mice. These results define Iduna as the first endogenous inhibitor of parthanatos. Interfering with PAR polymer signaling offers a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of neurologic disorders. PMID:21602803

  15. Modulation of somatosensory evoked magnetic fields by intensity of interfering stimuli in human somatosensory cortex: an MEG study.

    PubMed

    Lim, Manyoel; Kim, June Sic; Chung, Chun Kee

    2012-07-02

    Somatosensory evoked responses are known to be modulated by previous interfering stimuli. Here, we first investigated the modulatory effects of interfering stimuli with different intensities on somatosensory evoked magnetic field in human primary (S1) and secondary (S2) somatosensory cortices. In the control condition of the study, test stimulus, set to strong intensity, was delivered to the left median nerve. Interfering stimuli with three different levels of intensity from weak (WI) through moderate (MI) and finally to strong (SI) were interspersed to the left median nerve between the test stimuli in each interfering condition. The cortical responses to the test stimulus were modeled with equivalent current dipoles in the contralateral S1 and bilateral S2 cortices from 17 subjects. The amplitude of the N20m deflection from the S1 was not changed by any interfering stimuli, whereas the amplitude of later P35m deflection was reduced by MI stimulus. The amplitude of P60m deflection was reduced by MI and SI stimuli. The extent of amplitude reduction of the bilateral S2 response was markedly increased as intensity of interfering stimuli increased from weak to moderate, but further reduction by the SI stimuli compared to MI stimuli was not observed. Those results indicated that somatosensory cortical activation in the S1 (P35m and P60m) and S2 were modulated by intensity of interfering stimuli. Our findings of a greater gating effect on the bilateral S2 compared to the contralateral S1 indicate that S2 may play an important role in temporal integration of different intensity levels of somatosensory inputs.

  16. Mesure par interférométrie laser du mouvement d'une particule proche d'une paroi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assou, Y.; Joyeux, D.; Azouni, A.; Feuillebois, F.

    1991-02-01

    An experimental technique based on laser interferometry is used to obtain the displacement of a sphere towards a plane wall in a viscous fluid : it consists in inserting the sphere in an interferometric system, in such a way that the displacement of the sphere changes the state of interference. An important feature of the setup is that the shape, the roughness, and the positioning of the sphere in the optical path are relatively uncritical. The spheres used in the experiment are bearing balls, 4 and 5 × 10^{-3} m in diameter. The accuracy on the sphere displacement is of the order of 2 × 10^{-8} m. The interference signal is digitalized and stored in a microcomputer. The data are then processed to yield the friction coefficient f^T_zz of the sphere in its motion very close to the wall. The variation of f^T_zz with the non-dimensional gap \\varepsilon (ratio of the gap to the sphere radius) show three regions: (i) One in which a is small but at least 10 times larger than the non-dimensional rugosity (ratio of the scale of rugosity to the sphere radius) ; there is then a very good agreement with the result valid for a smooth sphere f^T_zz = 1/\\varepsilon from lubrication theory. (ii) When \\varepsilon decreases to the order of the non-dimensional rugosity, the friction coefficient is then smaller than 1/\\varepsilon. The technique thus opens a way to study the effects of rugosity in hydrodynamics. (iii) The technique allows to measure gaps of the order of 10^{-8} m and could thus be used in future studies of short ranges forces. On utilise une technique expérimentale basée sur l'interférométrie laser pour déterminer le déplacement d'une sphère s'approchant d'une paroi plane dans un fluide visqueux: la technique consiste à insérer la sphère dans un système interférométrique, de façon que son déplacement change l'état d'interférence détecté. Une particularité importante du montage utilisé est que la forme, l'état de surface, le positionnement

  17. A steady and oscillatory kernel function method for interfering surfaces in subsonic, transonic and supersonic flow. [prediction analysis techniques for airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, A. M., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The theory, results and user instructions for an aerodynamic computer program are presented. The theory is based on linear lifting surface theory, and the method is the kernel function. The program is applicable to multiple interfering surfaces which may be coplanar or noncoplanar. Local linearization was used to treat nonuniform flow problems without shocks. For cases with imbedded shocks, the appropriate boundary conditions were added to account for the flow discontinuities. The data describing nonuniform flow fields must be input from some other source such as an experiment or a finite difference solution. The results are in the form of small linear perturbations about nonlinear flow fields. The method was applied to a wide variety of problems for which it is demonstrated to be significantly superior to the uniform flow method. Program user instructions are given for easy access.

  18. Asymmetric purine-pyrimidine distribution in cellular small RNA population of papaya

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The small RNAs (sRNA) are a regulatory class of RNA mainly represented by the 21 and 24-nucleotide size classes. The cellular sRNAs are processed by RNase III family enzyme dicer (Dicer like in plant) from a self-complementary hairpin loop or other type of RNA duplexes. The papaya genome has been sequenced, but its microRNAs and other regulatory RNAs are yet to be analyzed. Results We analyzed the genomic features of the papaya sRNA population from three sRNA deep sequencing libraries made from leaves, flowers, and leaves infected with Papaya Ringspot Virus (PRSV). We also used the deep sequencing data to annotate the micro RNA (miRNA) in papaya. We identified 60 miRNAs, 24 of which were conserved in other species, and 36 of which were novel miRNAs specific to papaya. In contrast to the Chargaff’s purine-pyrimidine equilibrium, cellular sRNA was significantly biased towards a purine rich population. Of the two purine bases, higher frequency of adenine was present in 23nt or longer sRNAs, while 22nt or shorter sRNAs were over represented by guanine bases. However, this bias was not observed in the annotated miRNAs in plants. The 21nt species were expressed from fewer loci but expressed at higher levels relative to the 24nt species. The highly expressed 21nt species were clustered in a few isolated locations of the genome. The PRSV infected leaves showed higher accumulation of 21 and 22nt sRNA compared to uninfected leaves. We observed higher accumulation of miRNA* of seven annotated miRNAs in virus-infected tissue, indicating the potential function of miRNA* under stressed conditions. Conclusions We have identified 60 miRNAs in papaya. Our study revealed the asymmetric purine-pyrimidine distribution in cellular sRNA population. The 21nt species of sRNAs have higher expression levels than 24nt sRNA. The miRNA* of some miRNAs shows higher accumulation in PRSV infected tissues, suggesting that these strands are not totally functionally redundant. The

  19. Variable selectivity of the Hitachi chemistry analyzer chloride ion-selective electrode toward interfering ions.

    PubMed

    Wang, T; Diamandis, E P; Lane, A; Baines, A D

    1994-02-01

    Chloride measurements by ion-selective electrodes are vulnerable to interference by anions such as iodide, thiocyanate, nitrate, and bromide. We have found that the degree of interference of these anions on the Hitachi chemistry analyzer chloride electrode varies from electrode to electrode and this variation can even occur within the same lot of membrane. This variation is not dependent upon the length of time the cartridge has been in the analyzer because no correlation existed between the usage time and the electrode response to interfering ions. Neither is this variation due to the deterioration of the electrode because all electrodes tested had calibration slopes within the manufacturer's specification. Our study, however, showed that even after repeated exposure to a plasma sample containing 2 mM thiocyanate, the chloride electrode was still able to accurately measure the chloride in plasma without thiocyanate, thus confirming that a carryover effect does not exist from a previous thiocyanate-containing sample.

  20. The Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus Matrix Protein PPXY Late Domain Drives the Production of Defective Interfering Particles

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Christopher M.; Eisenhauer, Philip; Bruce, Emily A.; Weir, Marion E.; King, Benjamin R.; Klaus, Joseph P.; Krementsov, Dimitry N.; Shirley, David J.; Ballif, Bryan A.; Botten, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Arenaviruses cause severe diseases in humans but establish asymptomatic, lifelong infections in rodent reservoirs. Persistently-infected rodents harbor high levels of defective interfering (DI) particles, which are thought to be important for establishing persistence and mitigating virus-induced cytopathic effect. Little is known about what drives the production of DI particles. We show that neither the PPXY late domain encoded within the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) matrix protein nor a functional endosomal sorting complex transport (ESCRT) pathway is absolutely required for the generation of standard infectious virus particles. In contrast, DI particle release critically requires the PPXY late domain and is ESCRT-dependent. Additionally, the terminal tyrosine in the PPXY motif is reversibly phosphorylated and our findings indicate that this posttranslational modification may regulate DI particle formation. Thus we have uncovered a new role for the PPXY late domain and a possible mechanism for its regulation. PMID:27010636

  1. Insights into the Complexity of Weak Intermolecular Interactions Interfering in Host-Guest Systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dawei; Chatelet, Bastien; Serrano, Eloisa; Perraud, Olivier; Dutasta, Jean-Pierre; Robert, Vincent; Martinez, Alexandre

    2015-10-05

    The recognition properties of heteroditopic hemicryptophane hosts towards anions, cations, and neutral pairs, combining both cation-π and anion-π interaction sites, were investigated to probe the complexity of interfering weak intermolecular interactions. It is suggested from NMR experiments, and supported by CASSCF/CASPT2 calculations, that the binding constants of anions can be modulated by a factor of up to 100 by varying the fluorination sites on the electron-poor aromatic rings. Interestingly, this subtle chemical modification can also reverse the sign of cooperativity in ion-pair recognition. Wavefunction calculations highlight how short- and long-range interactions interfere in this recognition process, suggesting that a disruption of anion-π interactions can occur in the presence of a co-bound cation. Such molecules can be viewed as prototypes for examining complex processes controlled by the competition of weak interactions.

  2. Adaptive Array for Weak Interfering Signals: Geostationary Satellite Experiments. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steadman, Karl

    1989-01-01

    The performance of an experimental adaptive array is evaluated using signals from an existing geostationary satellite interference environment. To do this, an earth station antenna was built to receive signals from various geostationary satellites. In these experiments the received signals have a frequency of approximately 4 GHz (C-band) and have a bandwidth of over 35 MHz. These signals are downconverted to a 69 MHz intermediate frequency in the experimental system. Using the downconverted signals, the performance of the experimental system for various signal scenarios is evaluated. In this situation, due to the inherent thermal noise, qualitative instead of quantitative test results are presented. It is shown that the experimental system can null up to two interfering signals well below the noise level. However, to avoid the cancellation of the desired signal, the use a steering vector is needed. Various methods to obtain an estimate of the steering vector are proposed.

  3. Cloned Defective Interfering Influenza RNA and a Possible Pan-Specific Treatment of Respiratory Virus Diseases.

    PubMed

    Dimmock, Nigel J; Easton, Andrew J

    2015-07-08

    Defective interfering (DI) genomes are characterised by their ability to interfere with the replication of the virus from which they were derived, and other genetically compatible viruses. DI genomes are synthesized by nearly all known viruses and represent a vast natural reservoir of antivirals that can potentially be exploited for use in the clinic. This review describes the application of DI virus to protect from virus-associated diseases in vivo using as an example a highly active cloned influenza A DI genome and virus that protects broadly in preclinical trials against different subtypes of influenza A and against non-influenza A respiratory viruses. This influenza A-derived DI genome protects by two totally different mechanisms: molecular interference with influenza A replication and by stimulating innate immunity that acts against non-influenza A viruses. The review considers what is needed to develop DI genomes to the point of entry into clinical trials.

  4. Interfering TAL effectors of Xanthomonas oryzae neutralize R-gene-mediated plant disease resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Zhiyuan; Ji, Chonghui; Liu, Bo; Zou, Lifang; Chen, Gongyou; Yang, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Plant pathogenic bacteria of the genus Xanthomonas possess transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) that activate transcription of disease susceptibility genes in the host, inducing a state of disease. Here we report that some isolates of the rice pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae use truncated versions of TALEs (which we term interfering TALEs, or iTALEs) to overcome disease resistance. In comparison with typical TALEs, iTALEs lack a transcription activation domain but retain nuclear localization motifs and are expressed from genes that were previously considered pseudogenes. We show that the rice gene Xa1, encoding a nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat protein, confers resistance against X. oryzae isolates by recognizing multiple TALEs. However, the iTALEs present in many isolates interfere with the otherwise broad-spectrum resistance conferred by Xa1. Our findings illustrate how bacterial effectors that trigger disease resistance in the host can evolve to interfere with the resistance process and, thus, promote disease. PMID:27811915

  5. A self-interfering clock as a “which path” witness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margalit, Yair; Zhou, Zhifan; Machluf, Shimon; Rohrlich, Daniel; Japha, Yonathan; Folman, Ron

    2015-09-01

    In Einstein’s general theory of relativity, time depends locally on gravity; in standard quantum theory, time is global—all clocks “tick” uniformly. We demonstrate a new tool for investigating time in the overlap of these two theories: a self-interfering clock, comprising two atomic spin states. We prepare the clock in a spatial superposition of quantum wave packets, which evolve coherently along two paths into a stable interference pattern. If we make the clock wave packets “tick” at different rates, to simulate a gravitational time lag, the clock time along each path yields “which path” information, degrading the pattern’s visibility. In contrast, in standard interferometry, time cannot yield “which path” information. This proof-of-principle experiment may have implications for the study of time and general relativity and their impact on fundamental effects such as decoherence and the emergence of a classical world.

  6. Nanograting formation on metals in air with interfering femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Miyazaki, Kenzo E-mail: kmiyazaki@wind.ocn.ne.jp; Miyaji, Godai; Inoue, Toshishige

    2015-08-17

    It is demonstrated that a homogeneous nanograting having the groove period much smaller than the laser wavelength (∼800 nm) can be fabricated on metals in air through ablation induced by interfering femtosecond laser pulses (100 fs at a repetition rate of 10 Hz). Morphological changes on stainless steel and Ti surfaces, observed with an increase in superimposed shots of the laser pulses at a low fluence, have shown that the nanograting is developed through bonding structure change at the interference fringes, plasmonic near-field ablation to create parallel grooves on the fringe, and subsequent excitation of surface plasmon polaritons to regulate the groove intervals at 1/3 or 1/4 of the fringe period over the whole irradiated area. Calculation for a model target having a thin oxide layer on the metal substrate reproduces well the observed groove periods and explains the mechanism for the nanograting formation.

  7. Protótipo do primeiro interferômetro brasileiro - BDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecatto, J. R.; Fernandes, F. C. R.; Neri, J. A. C. F.; Bethi, N.; Felipini, N. S.; Madsen, F. R. H.; Andrade, M. C.; Soares, A. C.; Alonso, E. M. B., Sawant, H. S.

    2004-04-01

    A interferometria é uma poderosa ferramenta usada para investigar estruturas espaciais de fontes astrofísicas fornecendo uma riqueza de detalhes inatingível pelas técnicas convencionais de imageamento. Em particular, a interferometria com ondas de rádio abre o horizonte de conhecimento do Universo nesta ampla banda do espectro eletromagnético, que vai de cerca de 20 kHz até centenas de GHz já próximo ao infravermelho, e que está acessível a partir de instrumentos instalados em solo. Neste trabalho, apresentamos o interferômetro designado por Arranjo Decimétrico Brasileiro (BDA). Trata-se do primeiro interferômetro a ser desenvolvido no Brasil e América Latina que já está em operação na fase de protótipo. Apresentamos o desenvolvimento realizado até o momento, o sítio de instalação do instrumento, o protótipo e os principais resultados dos testes de sua operação, as perspectivas futuras e a ciência a ser desenvolvida com o instrumento nas fases II e III. Neste trabalho é dada ênfase ao desenvolvimento, testes de operação e principais resultados do protótipo. É discutida brevemente a ciência que pode ser feita com o instrumento. Tanto os detalhes técnicos quanto os principais parâmetros estimados para o instrumento nas próximas fases de desenvolvimento e o desempenho do protótipo serão publicados em breve.

  8. Low-Fidelity Polymerases of Alphaviruses Recombine at Higher Rates To Overproduce Defective Interfering Particles

    PubMed Central

    Poirier, Enzo Z.; Mounce, Bryan C.; Rozen-Gagnon, Kathryn; Hooikaas, Peter Jan; Stapleford, Kenneth A.; Moratorio, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Low-fidelity RNA-dependent RNA polymerases for many RNA virus mutators have been shown to confer attenuated phenotypes, presumably due to increased mutation rates. Additionally, for many RNA viruses, replication to high titers results in the production of defective interfering particles (DIs) that also attenuate infection. We hypothesized that fidelity, recombination, and DI production are tightly linked. We show that a Sindbis virus mutator replicating at a high multiplicity of infection manifests an earlier and greater accumulation of DIs than its wild-type counterpart. The isolated DIs interfere with the replication of full-length virus in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, the ability of the mutator virus to overproduce DIs could be linked to an increased recombination frequency. These data confirm that RNA-dependent RNA polymerase fidelity and recombination are inversely correlated for this mutator. Our findings suggest that defective interference resulting from higher recombination rates may be more detrimental to RNA virus mutators than the increase in mutational burden. IMPORTANCE Replication, adaptation, and evolution of RNA viruses rely in large part on their low-fidelity RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Viruses artificially modified in their polymerases to decrease fidelity (mutator viruses) are attenuated in vivo, demonstrating the important role of fidelity in viral fitness. However, attenuation was attributed solely to the modification of the viral mutation rate and the accumulation of detrimental point mutations. In this work, we described an additional phenotype of mutator viruses: an increased recombination rate leading to defective interfering particle (DI) overproduction. Because DIs are known for their inhibitory effect on viral replication, our work suggests that fidelity variants may be attenuated in vivo via several mechanisms. This has important implications in the development of fidelity variants as live attenuated vaccine strains

  9. Differential RNAi responses of Nicotiana benthamiana individuals transformed with a hairpin-inducing construct during Plum pox virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Montes, Christian; Castro, Álvaro; Barba, Paola; Rubio, Julia; Sánchez, Evelyn; Carvajal, Denisse; Aguirre, Carlos; Tapia, Eduardo; DelÍ Orto, Paola; Decroocq, Veronique; Prieto, Humberto

    2014-10-01

    Gene silencing and large-scale small RNA analysis can be used to develop RNA interference (RNAi)-based resistance strategies for Plum pox virus (PPV), a high impact disease of Prunus spp. In this study, a pPPViRNA hairpin-inducing vector harboring two silencing motif-rich regions of the PPV coat protein (CP) gene was evaluated in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana (NB) plants. Wild-type NB plants infected with a chimeric PPV virus (PPV::GFP) exhibited affected leaves with mosaic chlorosis congruent to GFP fluorescence at 21 day post-inoculation; transgenic lines depicted a range of phenotypes from fully resistant to susceptible. ELISA values and GFP fluorescence intensities were used to select transgenic-resistant (TG-R) and transgenic-susceptible (TG-S) lines for further characterization of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) by large-scale small RNA sequencing. In infected TG-S and untransformed (WT) plants, the observed siRNAs were nearly exclusively 21- and 22-nt siRNAs that targeted the whole PPV::GFP genome; 24-nt siRNAs were absent in these individuals. Challenged TG-R plants accumulated a full set of 21- to 24-nt siRNAs that were primarily associated with the selected motif-rich regions, indicating that a trans-acting siRNAs process prevented viral multiplication. BLAST analysis identified 13 common siRNA clusters targeting the CP gene. 21-nt siRNA sequences were associated with the 22-nt siRNAs and the scarce 23- and 24-nt molecules in TG-S plants and with most of the observed 22-, 23-, and 24-nt siRNAs in TG-R individuals. These results validate the use of a multi-hot spot silencing vector against PPV and elucidate the molecules by which hairpin-inducing vectors initiate RNAi in vivo.

  10. A new small accelerator for radiocarbon dating

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, M.; Huber, R.; Jacob, S. A. W.; Synal, H.-A.; Schroeder, J. B.

    1999-06-10

    A new small and compact radiocarbon dating facility based on a 500 kV Pelletron accelerator has been built. The novel feature is that it operates with 1{sup +} ions. The interfering molecules are destroyed by collisions in the gas stripper. The results of first test measurements demonstrate that stability, background and transmission are equal to the performance of conventional AMS systems based on larger accelerators.

  11. Biochemical requirements for two Dicer-like activities from wheat germ.

    PubMed

    Shivaprasad, Padubidri V; Hohn, Thomas; Akbergenov, Rashid

    2015-01-01

    RNA silencing pathways were first discovered in plants. Through genetic analysis, it has been established that the key silencing components called Dicer-like (DCL) genes have been shown to cooperatively process RNA substrates of multiple origin into distinct 21, 22 and 24 nt small RNAs. However, only few detailed biochemical analysis of the corresponding complexes has been carried out in plants, mainly due to the large unstable complexes that are hard to obtain or reconstitute in heterologous systems. Reconstitution of activity needs thorough understanding of all protein partners in the complex, something that is still an ongoing process in plant systems. Here, we use biochemical analysis to uncover properties of two previously identified native dicer-like activities from wheat germ. We find that standard wheat germ extract contains Dicer-like enzymes that convert double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into two classes of small interfering RNAs of 21 and 24 nt in size. The 21 nt dicing activity, likely an siRNA producing complex known as DCL4, is 950 kDa-1.2 mDa in size and is highly unstable during purification processes but has a rather vast range for activity. On the contrary, the 24 nt dicing complex, likely the DCL3 activity, is relatively stable and comparatively smaller in size, but has stricter conditions for effective processing of dsRNA substrates. While both activities could process completely complementary dsRNA albeit with varying abilities, we show that DCL3-like 24 nt producing activity is equally good in processing incompletely complementary RNAs.

  12. AI-2 quorum-sensing inhibitors affect the starvation response and reduce virulence in several Vibrio species, most likely by interfering with LuxPQ.

    PubMed

    Brackman, Gilles; Celen, Shari; Baruah, Kartik; Bossier, Peter; Van Calenbergh, Serge; Nelis, Hans J; Coenye, Tom

    2009-12-01

    The increase of disease outbreaks caused by Vibrio species in aquatic organisms as well as in humans, together with the emergence of antibiotic resistance in Vibrio species, has led to a growing interest in alternative disease control measures. Quorum sensing (QS) is a mechanism for regulating microbial gene expression in a cell density-dependent way. While there is good evidence for the involvement of auto-inducer 2 (AI-2)-based interspecies QS in the control of virulence in multiple Vibrio species, only few inhibitors of this system are known. From the screening of a small panel of nucleoside analogues for their ability to disturb AI-2-based QS, an adenosine derivative with a p-methoxyphenylpropionamide moiety at C-3' emerged as a promising hit. Its mechanism of inhibition was elucidated by measuring the effect on bioluminescence in a series of Vibrio harveyi AI-2 QS mutants. Our results indicate that this compound, as well as a truncated analogue lacking the adenine base, block AI-2-based QS without interfering with bacterial growth. The active compounds affected neither the bioluminescence system as such nor the production of AI-2, but most likely interfered with the signal transduction pathway at the level of LuxPQ in V. harveyi. The most active nucleoside analogue (designated LMC-21) was found to reduce the Vibrio species starvation response, to affect biofilm formation in Vibrio anguillarum, Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio cholerae, to reduce pigment and protease production in V. anguillarum, and to protect gnotobiotic Artemia from V. harveyi-induced mortality.

  13. 36 CFR 261.3 - Interfering with a Forest officer, volunteer, or human resource program enrollee or giving false...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Interfering with a Forest officer, volunteer, or human resource program enrollee or giving false report to a Forest officer. 261.3 Section 261.3 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...

  14. 36 CFR 261.3 - Interfering with a Forest officer, volunteer, or human resource program enrollee or giving false...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Interfering with a Forest officer, volunteer, or human resource program enrollee or giving false report to a Forest officer. 261.3 Section 261.3 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...

  15. 36 CFR 261.3 - Interfering with a Forest officer, volunteer, or human resource program enrollee or giving false...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Interfering with a Forest officer, volunteer, or human resource program enrollee or giving false report to a Forest officer. 261.3 Section 261.3 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...

  16. Multiwavelength pyrometer for gray and non-gray surfaces in the presence of interfering radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Daniel L. P. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A method and apparatus for detecting the temperature of gray and non-gray bodies in the presence of interfering radiation are presented. A gray body has a constant emissivity less than 1 and a non-gray body has an emissivity which varies with wavelength. The emissivity and reflectivity of the surface is determined over a range of wavelengths. Spectra are also measured of the extraneous interference radiation source and the surface of the object to be measured in the presence of the extraneous interference radiation source. An auxiliary radiation source is used to determine the reflectivity of the surface and also the emissivity. The measured spectrum of the surfaces in the presence of the extraneous interference radiation source is set equal to the emissivity of the surface multiplied by a Planck function containing a temperature term T plus the surface reflectivity multiplied by the spectrum of the extraneous interference radiation source. The equation is then solved for T to determine the temperature of the surface.

  17. Complex dynamics of defective interfering baculoviruses during serial passage in insect cells.

    PubMed

    Zwart, Mark P; Pijlman, Gorben P; Sardanyés, Josep; Duarte, Jorge; Januário, Cristina; Elena, Santiago F

    2013-03-01

    Defective interfering (DI) viruses are thought to cause oscillations in virus levels, known as the 'Von Magnus effect'. Interference by DI viruses has been proposed to underlie these dynamics, although experimental tests of this idea have not been forthcoming. For the baculoviruses, insect viruses commonly used for the expression of heterologous proteins in insect cells, the molecular mechanisms underlying DI generation have been investigated. However, the dynamics of baculovirus populations harboring DIs have not been studied in detail. In order to address this issue, we used quantitative real-time PCR to determine the levels of helper and DI viruses during 50 serial passages of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) in Sf21 cells. Unexpectedly, the helper and DI viruses changed levels largely in phase, and oscillations were highly irregular, suggesting the presence of chaos. We therefore developed a simple mathematical model of baculovirus-DI dynamics. This theoretical model reproduced patterns qualitatively similar to the experimental data. Although we cannot exclude that experimental variation (noise) plays an important role in generating the observed patterns, the presence of chaos in the model dynamics was confirmed with the computation of the maximal Lyapunov exponent, and a Ruelle-Takens-Newhouse route to chaos was identified at decreasing production of DI viruses, using mutation as a control parameter. Our results contribute to a better understanding of the dynamics of DI baculoviruses, and suggest that changes in virus levels over passages may exhibit chaos.

  18. Estimating divergently routed nonlinearly interfering channel powers using cross phase modulation.

    PubMed

    Chin, Hou-Man; Thakur, Manoj P; Thomsen, Benn C; Savory, Seb J

    2014-10-20

    The deployment of coherent transceivers in legacy networks requires significant investment in installation. We propose a method enabling autonomous (re-)configuration of an optical channel, which would be advantageous in legacy networks and necessary in proposed future networks utilizing a flexible frequency grid and software defined components such as reconfigurable optical add drop multiplexers (ROADM). We consider potential interfering optical channels propagating with the prospective channel along part of the fiber link which are dropped before arrival at the receiver. The method uses a commercially available line card transmitting a 40Gbit/s polarization multiplexed quadrature phase shift keying (PM-QPSK) probe channel to characterize an optical channel. The power of the nearest neighboring channels is then inferred by examining its bit error rate (BER) which is impacted by cross phase modulation (XPM) from the aggressor channels. In a 4 node network with 2 ROADMs using up to 6 aggressor OOK channels, we successfully deduce the neighboring channel power down to -2 dBm, and an extra improvement down to -3.5 dBm is gained, by measuring at an offset to the international telecommunication union (ITU) grid which also reveals inequality in neighbor channel powers.

  19. Sub-micron period metal lattices fabricated by interfering ultraviolet femtosecond laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, Yoshiki; Matsuba, Yoshiki; Miyanaga, Noriaki

    2016-05-01

    The interference pattern of a femtosecond laser has been utilized to fabricate nanostructures in the lattice. In this paper, SH (second-harmonic) waves (λ = 392.5 {{nm}}) of a femtosecond laser were applied to four beams interfering laser processing using a demagnification system as a beam correlator. The lattice constant of the resultant matrix was shortened to 760 nm. The unit structures fabricated on gold thin films were nanoholes, nanobumps, nanodrops or nanowhiskers, and their unit size was minimized compared to the case with a greater lattice constant formed by fundamental wavelengths. The radius of a nanoball on top of a nanodrop was between 42 and 76 nm, and the radius of metallic hole arrays (MHA) was 220 nm. The energy efficiency of the laser increased by 4.79 times due to better absorption coefficient of gold at ultraviolet wavelengths. In addition, the smallest lattice constant was estimated with the use of a commercial plano-convex fused-silica lens and a NIR (near-infrared) achromatic lens.

  20. Copsin, a novel peptide-based fungal antibiotic interfering with the peptidoglycan synthesis.

    PubMed

    Essig, Andreas; Hofmann, Daniela; Münch, Daniela; Gayathri, Savitha; Künzler, Markus; Kallio, Pauli T; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Wider, Gerhard; Schneider, Tanja; Aebi, Markus

    2014-12-12

    Fungi and bacteria compete with an arsenal of secreted molecules for their ecological niche. This repertoire represents a rich and inexhaustible source for antibiotics and fungicides. Antimicrobial peptides are an emerging class of fungal defense molecules that are promising candidates for pharmaceutical applications. Based on a co-cultivation system, we studied the interaction of the coprophilous basidiomycete Coprinopsis cinerea with different bacterial species and identified a novel defensin, copsin. The polypeptide was recombinantly produced in Pichia pastoris, and the three-dimensional structure was solved by NMR. The cysteine stabilized α/β-fold with a unique disulfide connectivity, and an N-terminal pyroglutamate rendered copsin extremely stable against high temperatures and protease digestion. Copsin was bactericidal against a diversity of Gram-positive bacteria, including human pathogens such as Enterococcus faecium and Listeria monocytogenes. Characterization of the antibacterial activity revealed that copsin bound specifically to the peptidoglycan precursor lipid II and therefore interfered with the cell wall biosynthesis. In particular, and unlike lantibiotics and other defensins, the third position of the lipid II pentapeptide is essential for effective copsin binding. The unique structural properties of copsin make it a possible scaffold for new antibiotics.

  1. Interfering with free recall of words: Detrimental effects of phonological competition.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Myra A; Wammes, Jeffrey D; Priselac, Sandra; Moscovitch, Morris

    2016-09-01

    We examined the effect of different distracting tasks, performed concurrently during memory retrieval, on recall of a list of words. By manipulating the type of material and processing (semantic, orthographic, and phonological) required in the distracting task, and comparing the magnitude of memory interference produced, we aimed to infer the kind of representation upon which retrieval of words depends. In Experiment 1, identifying odd digits concurrently during free recall disrupted memory, relative to a full attention condition, when the numbers were presented orthographically (e.g. nineteen), but not numerically (e.g. 19). In Experiment 2, a distracting task that required phonological-based decisions to either word or picture material produced large, but equivalent effects on recall of words. In Experiment 3, phonological-based decisions to pictures in a distracting task disrupted recall more than when the same pictures required semantically-based size estimations. In Experiment 4, a distracting task that required syllable decisions to line drawings interfered significantly with recall, while an equally difficult semantically-based color-decision task about the same line drawings, did not. Together, these experiments demonstrate that the degree of memory interference experienced during recall of words depends primarily on whether the distracting task competes for phonological representations or processes, and less on competition for semantic or orthographic or material-specific representations or processes.

  2. Cell type-specific delivery of short interfering RNAs by dye-functionalised theranostic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Press, Adrian T.; Traeger, Anja; Pietsch, Christian; Mosig, Alexander; Wagner, Michael; Clemens, Mark G.; Jbeily, Nayla; Koch, Nicole; Gottschaldt, Michael; Bézière, Nicolas; Ermolayev, Volodymyr; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Popp, Jürgen; Kessels, Michael M.; Qualmann, Britta; Schubert, Ulrich S.; Bauer, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Efficient delivery of short interfering RNAs reflects a prerequisite for the development of RNA interference therapeutics. Here, we describe highly specific nanoparticles, based on near infrared fluorescent polymethine dye-derived targeting moieties coupled to biodegradable polymers. The fluorescent dye, even when coupled to a nanoparticle, mimics a ligand for hepatic parenchymal uptake transporters resulting in hepatobiliary clearance of approximately 95% of the dye within 45 min. Body distribution, hepatocyte uptake and excretion into bile of the dye itself, or dye-coupled nanoparticles can be tracked by intravital microscopy or even non-invasively by multispectral optoacoustic tomography. Efficacy of delivery is demonstrated in vivo using 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase siRNA as an active payload resulting in a reduction of plasma cholesterol levels if siRNA was formulated into dye-functionalised nanoparticles. This suggests that organ-selective uptake of a near infrared dye can be efficiently transferred to theranostic nanoparticles allowing novel possibilities for personalised silencing of disease-associated genes.

  3. Mutant p53 inhibits miRNA biogenesis by interfering with the microprocessor complex.

    PubMed

    Garibaldi, F; Falcone, E; Trisciuoglio, D; Colombo, T; Lisek, K; Walerych, D; Del Sal, G; Paci, P; Bossi, G; Piaggio, G; Gurtner, A

    2016-07-21

    Downregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) is commonly observed in cancers and promotes tumorigenesis suggesting that miRNAs may function as tumor suppressors. However, the mechanism through which miRNAs are regulated in cancer, and the connection between oncogenes and miRNA biogenesis remain poorly understood. The TP53 tumor-suppressor gene is mutated in half of human cancers resulting in an oncogene with gain-of-function activities. Here we demonstrate that mutant p53 (mutp53) oncoproteins modulate the biogenesis of a subset of miRNAs in cancer cells inhibiting their post-transcriptional maturation. Interestingly, among these miRNAs several are also downregulated in human tumors. By confocal, co-immunoprecipitation and RNA-chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments, we show that endogenous mutp53 binds and sequesters RNA helicases p72/82 from the microprocessor complex, interfering with Drosha-pri-miRNAs association. In agreement with this, the overexpression of p72 leads to an increase of mature miRNAs levels. Moreover, functional experiments demonstrate the oncosuppressive role of mutp53-dependent miRNAs (miR-517a, -519a, -218, -105). Our study highlights a previously undescribed mechanism by which mutp53 interferes with Drosha-p72/82 association leading, at least in part, to miRNA deregulation observed in cancer.

  4. Interfering with multimerization of netrin-1 receptors triggers tumor cell death

    PubMed Central

    Mille, Frédéric; Llambi, Fabien; Guix, Catherine; Delloye-Bourgeois, Céline; Guenebeaud, Céline; Castro-Obregon, Susana; Bredesen, Dale E.; Thibert, Chantal; Mehlen, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Netrin-1 was recently proposed to control tumorigenesis by inhibiting apoptosis induced by the dependence receptors DCC (Deleted in colorectal cancer) and UNC5H. While a loss of these dependence receptors’ expression has been described as a selective advantage for tumor growth and progression in numerous cancers, recent observations have shown that some tumors may utilize an alternative strategy to block dependence receptor-induced programmed cell death: the autocrine expression of netrin-1. This alternative strategy has been observed in a large fraction of aggressive breast cancers, neuroblastoma, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, and lung cancer. This observation is of potential interest regarding future targeted therapy, since in such cases interfering with the ability of netrin-1 to inhibit DCC or UNC5H-induced cell death is associated with apoptosis of netrin-1-expressing tumor cells in vitro, and with inhibition of tumor growth or metastasis in different mouse tumor models. The understanding of the mechanism by which netrin-1 inhibits cell death is therefore of interest. Here, we show that netrin-1 triggers the multimerization of both DCC and UNC5H2 receptors, and that multimerization of the intracellular domain of DCC and UNC5H2 is the critical step to inhibit the pro-apoptotic effects of both of these receptors. Taking advantage of this property, we utilized a recombinant specific domain of DCC that (i) interacts with netrin-1 and (ii) inhibits netrin-1- induced multimerization, to trigger apoptosis in netrin-dependent tumor cells. PMID:19543238

  5. Plasma exosomes can deliver exogenous short interfering RNA to monocytes and lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wahlgren, Jessica; Karlson, Tanya De L.; Brisslert, Mikael; Vaziri Sani, Forugh; Telemo, Esbjörn; Sunnerhagen, Per; Valadi, Hadi

    2012-01-01

    Despite the promise of RNA interference (RNAi) and its potential, e.g. for use in cancer therapy, several technical obstacles must first be overcome. The major hurdle of RNAi-based therapeutics is to deliver nucleic acids across the cell’s plasma membrane. This study demonstrates that exosome vesicles derived from humans can deliver short interfering RNA (siRNA) to human mononuclear blood cells. Exosomes are nano-sized vesicles of endocytic origin that are involved in cell-to-cell communication, i.e. antigen presentation, tolerance development and shuttle RNA (mainly mRNA and microRNA). Having tested different strategies, an optimized method (electroporation) was used to introduce siRNA into human exosomes of various origins. Plasma exosomes (exosomes from peripheral blood) were used as gene delivery vector (GDV) to transport exogenous siRNA to human blood cells. The vesicles effectively delivered the administered siRNA into monocytes and lymphocytes, causing selective gene silencing of mitogen-activated protein kinase 1. These data suggest that human exosomes can be used as a GDV to provide cells with heterologous nucleic acids such as therapeutic siRNAs. PMID:22618874

  6. Methylmalonate inhibits succinate-supported oxygen consumption by interfering with mitochondrial succinate uptake.

    PubMed

    Mirandola, S R; Melo, D R; Schuck, P F; Ferreira, G C; Wajner, M; Castilho, R F

    2008-02-01

    The effect of methylmalonate (MMA) on mitochondrial succinate oxidation has received great attention since it could present an important role in energy metabolism impairment in methylmalonic acidaemia. In the present work, we show that while millimolar concentrations of MMA inhibit succinate-supported oxygen consumption by isolated rat brain or muscle mitochondria, there is no effect when either a pool of NADH-linked substrates or N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylendiamine (TMPD)/ascorbate were used as electron donors. Interestingly, the inhibitory effect of MMA, but not of malonate, on succinate-supported brain mitochondrial oxygen consumption was minimized when nonselective permeabilization of mitochondrial membranes was induced by alamethicin. In addition, only a slight inhibitory effect of MMA was observed on succinate-supported oxygen consumption by inside-out submitochondrial particles. In agreement with these observations, brain mitochondrial swelling experiments indicate that MMA is an important inhibitor of succinate transport by the dicarboxylate carrier. Under our experimental conditions, there was no evidence of malonate production in MMA-treated mitochondria. We conclude that MMA inhibits succinate-supported mitochondrial oxygen consumption by interfering with the uptake of this substrate. Although succinate generated outside the mitochondria is probably not a sig-nificant contributor to mitochondrial energy generation, the physiopathological implications of MMA-induced inhibition of substrate transport by the mitochondrial dicarboxylate carrier are discussed.

  7. Short-interfering RNAs Induce Retinal Degeneration via TLR3 and IRF3

    PubMed Central

    Kleinman, Mark E; Kaneko, Hiroki; Cho, Won Gil; Dridi, Sami; Fowler, Benjamin J; Blandford, Alexander D; Albuquerque, Romulo JC; Hirano, Yoshio; Terasaki, Hiroko; Kondo, Mineo; Fujita, Takashi; Ambati, Balamurali K; Tarallo, Valeria; Gelfand, Bradley D; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Baffi, Judit Z; Ambati, Jayakrishna

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of sequence-specific gene silencing by endogenous double-stranded RNAs (dsRNA) has propelled synthetic short-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to the forefront of targeted pharmaceutical engineering. The first clinical trials utilized 21-nucleotide (nt) siRNAs for the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Surprisingly, these compounds were not formulated for cell permeation, which is required for bona fide RNA interference (RNAi). We showed that these “naked” siRNAs suppress neovascularization in mice not via RNAi but via sequence-independent activation of cell surface Toll-like receptor-3 (TLR3). Here, we demonstrate that noninternalized siRNAs induce retinal degeneration in mice by activating surface TLR3 on retinal pigmented epithelial cells. Cholesterol conjugated siRNAs capable of cell permeation and triggering RNAi also induce the same phenotype. Retinal degeneration was not observed after treatment with siRNAs shorter than 21-nts. Other cytosolic dsRNA sensors are not critical to this response. TLR3 activation triggers caspase-3-mediated apoptotic death of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) via nuclear translocation of interferon regulatory factor-3. While this unexpected adverse effect of siRNAs has implications for future clinical trials, these findings also introduce a new preclinical model of geographic atrophy (GA), a late stage of dry AMD that causes blindness in millions worldwide. PMID:21988875

  8. Defective interfering viruses and their impact on vaccines and viral vectors.

    PubMed

    Frensing, Timo

    2015-05-01

    Defective interfering particles (DIPs) have been found for many important viral pathogens and it is believed that most viruses generate DIPs. This article reviews the current knowledge of the generation and amplification of DIPs, which possess deletions in the viral genome but retain the ability to replicate in the presence of a complete helper virus. In addition, mechanisms are discussed by which DIPs interfere with the replication of their helper virus leading to the production of mainly progeny DIPs by coinfected cells. Even though DIPs cannot replicate on their own, they are biologically active and it is well known that they have a huge impact on virus replication, evolution, and pathogenesis. Moreover, defective genomes are potent inducers of the innate immune response. Yet, little attention has been paid to DIPs in recent years and their impact on biotechnological products such as vaccines and viral vectors remains elusive in most cases. With a focus on influenza virus, this review demonstrates that DIPs are important for basic research on viruses and for the production of viral vaccines and vectors. Reducing the generation and/or amplification of DIPs ensures reproducible results as well as high yields and consistent product quality in virus production.

  9. Better-ear glimpsing efficiency with symmetrically-placed interfering talkers.

    PubMed

    Brungart, Douglas S; Iyer, Nandini

    2012-10-01

    In listening tasks where a target speech signal is spatially separated from a masking voice, listeners can often gain a substantial advantage in performance by attending to the ear with the better signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). However, this better-ear strategy becomes much more complicated when a target talker located in front of the listener is masked by interfering talkers positioned at symmetric locations to the left and right of the target. When this happens, there are no long-term SNR advantages at either ear and the only binaural SNR advantages available are the result of complicated better-ear glimpses that vary as a function of frequency and rapidly switch back and forth between the two ears according to the natural fluctuations in the relative levels of the two masking voices. In this study, a signal processing technique was used to take the better-ear glimpses that would ordinarily be randomly distributed across the two ears in a binaural speech signal and move them all into the same ear. This resulted in a monaural signal that contained all the information available to an ideal listener using an optimal binaural glimpsing strategy. Speech intelligibility was measured with these optimized monaural stimuli and compared to performance with unprocessed binaural speech stimuli. Performance was similar in these two conditions, suggesting that listeners with normal hearing are able to efficiently extract information from better-ear glimpses that fluctuate rapidly across frequency and across the two ears.

  10. Clofarabine Acts as Radiosensitizer In Vitro and In Vivo by Interfering With DNA Damage Response

    SciTech Connect

    Cariveau, Mickael J.; Stackhouse, Murray; Cui Xiaoli; Tiwari, Kamal; Waud, William; Secrist, John A.; Xu Bo

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Combination treatment with radiotherapy and chemotherapy has emerged as the dominant form of cancer adjuvant regimens in recent years. Clofarabine, a newly approved drug for pediatric leukemia, is a second-generation purine nucleoside analogue that can block DNA synthesis and inhibit DNA repair. Therefore, we hypothesized that clofarabine could work synergistically with radiotherapy to increase the tumor cell response. Methods and Materials: The effects of clofarabine on radiosensitivity have been established in several tumor cell lines in vitro and in vivo using colony-forming assays and tumor xenografts. The effect of clofarabine on the DNA damage response was also studied in vitro by measuring {gamma}-H2AX focus formation. Results: Clonogenic survival was significantly reduced in irradiated cells treated with clofarabine, demonstrating the strong radiosensitizing effect of clofarabine. Furthermore, clofarabine displayed a radiosensitizing effect that was greater than gemcitabine or 5-fluorouracil. We also found that low doses of clofarabine can prolong the presence of radiation-induced {gamma}-H2AX nuclear focus formation, and high doses of clofarabine can induce DNA double-strand breaks, suggesting that clofarabine can interfere with DNA damage response pathways. In addition, clofarabine-induced radiosensitization was also established in vivo using a colorectal cancer model, DLD-1, in athymic nude mice. When combined with fractionated radiotherapy, a moderate dose of clofarabine led to a significant increase in tumor growth inhibition. Conclusion: Clofarabine acts as a powerful radiosensitizer both in vitro and in vivo by interfering with the DNA damage response.

  11. Systemic delivery of siRNA in pumpkin by a plant PHLOEM SMALL RNA-BINDING PROTEIN 1-ribonucleoprotein complex.

    PubMed

    Ham, Byung-Kook; Li, Gang; Jia, Weitao; Leary, Julie A; Lucas, William J

    2014-11-01

    In plants, the vascular system, specifically the phloem, functions in delivery of small RNA (sRNA) to exert epigenetic control over developmental and defense-related processes. Although the importance of systemic sRNA delivery has been established, information is currently lacking concerning the nature of the protein machinery involved in this process. Here, we show that a PHLOEM SMALL-RNA BINDING PROTEIN 1 (PSRP1) serves as the basis for formation of an sRNA ribonucleoprotein complex (sRNPC) that delivers sRNA (primarily 24 nt) to sink organs. Assembly of this complex is facilitated through PSRP1 phosphorylation by a phloem-localized protein kinase, PSRPK1. During long-distance transport, PSRP1-sRNPC is stable against phloem phosphatase activity. Within target tissues, phosphatase activity results in disassembly of PSRP1-sRNPC, a process that is probably required for unloading cargo sRNA into surrounding cells. These findings provide an insight into the mechanism involved in delivery of sRNA associated with systemic gene silencing in plants.

  12. Schinus terebinthifolius Leaf Extract Causes Midgut Damage, Interfering with Survival and Development of Aedes aegypti Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Procópio, Thamara Figueiredo; Fernandes, Kenner Morais; Pontual, Emmanuel Viana; Ximenes, Rafael Matos; de Oliveira, Aline Rafaella Cardoso; Souza, Carolina de Santana; Melo, Ana Maria Mendonça de Albuquerque; Navarro, Daniela Maria do Amaral Ferraz; Paiva, Patrícia Maria Guedes; Martins, Gustavo Ferreira; Napoleão, Thiago Henrique

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a leaf extract from Schinus terebinthifolius was evaluated for effects on survival, development, and midgut of A. aegypti fourth instar larvae (L4), as well as for toxic effect on Artemia salina. Leaf extract was obtained using 0.15 M NaCl and evaluated for phytochemical composition and lectin activity. Early L4 larvae were incubated with the extract (0.3–1.35%, w/v) for 8 days, in presence or absence of food. Polymeric proanthocyanidins, hydrolysable tannins, heterosid and aglycone flavonoids, cinnamic acid derivatives, traces of steroids, and lectin activity were detected in the extract, which killed the larvae at an LC50 of 0.62% (unfed larvae) and 1.03% (fed larvae). Further, the larvae incubated with the extract reacted by eliminating the gut content. No larvae reached the pupal stage in treatments at concentrations between 0.5% and 1.35%, while in the control (fed larvae), 61.7% of individuals emerged as adults. The extract (1.0%) promoted intense disorganization of larval midgut epithelium, including deformation and hypertrophy of cells, disruption of microvilli, and vacuolization of cytoplasms, affecting digestive, enteroendocrine, regenerative, and proliferating cells. In addition, cells with fragmented DNA were observed. Separation of extract components by solid phase extraction revealed that cinnamic acid derivatives and flavonoids are involved in larvicidal effect of the extract, being the first most efficient in a short time after larvae treatment. The lectin present in the extract was isolated, but did not show deleterious effects on larvae. The extract and cinnamic acid derivatives were toxic to A. salina nauplii, while the flavonoids showed low toxicity. S. terebinthifolius leaf extract caused damage to the midgut of A. aegypti larvae, interfering with survival and development. The larvicidal effect of the extract can be attributed to cinnamic acid derivatives and flavonoids. The data obtained using A. salina indicates that caution

  13. Novel Strategy To Protect against Influenza Virus-Induced Pneumococcal Disease without Interfering with Commensal Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Christopher J.; Marks, Laura R.; Hu, John C.; Reddinger, Ryan; Mandell, Lorrie; Roche-Hakansson, Hazeline; King-Lyons, Natalie D.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae commonly inhabits the nasopharynx as a member of the commensal biofilm. Infection with respiratory viruses, such as influenza A virus, induces commensal S. pneumoniae to disseminate beyond the nasopharynx and to elicit severe infections of the middle ears, lungs, and blood that are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Current preventive strategies, including the polysaccharide conjugate vaccines, aim to eliminate asymptomatic carriage with vaccine-type pneumococci. However, this has resulted in serotype replacement with, so far, less fit pneumococcal strains, which has changed the nasopharyngeal flora, opening the niche for entry of other virulent pathogens (e.g., Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, and potentially Haemophilus influenzae). The long-term effects of these changes are unknown. Here, we present an attractive, alternative preventive approach where we subvert virus-induced pneumococcal disease without interfering with commensal colonization, thus specifically targeting disease-causing organisms. In that regard, pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA), a major surface protein of pneumococci, is a promising vaccine target. Intradermal (i.d.) immunization of mice with recombinant PspA in combination with LT-IIb(T13I), a novel i.d. adjuvant of the type II heat-labile enterotoxin family, elicited strong systemic PspA-specific IgG responses without inducing mucosal anti-PspA IgA responses. This response protected mice from otitis media, pneumonia, and septicemia and averted the cytokine storm associated with septic infection but had no effect on asymptomatic colonization. Our results firmly demonstrated that this immunization strategy against virally induced pneumococcal disease can be conferred without disturbing the desirable preexisting commensal colonization of the nasopharynx. PMID:27001538

  14. Self-recognition mechanism between skin and suckers prevents octopus arms from interfering with each other.

    PubMed

    Nesher, Nir; Levy, Guy; Grasso, Frank W; Hochner, Binyamin

    2014-06-02

    Controlling movements of flexible arms is a challenging task for the octopus because of the virtually infinite number of degrees of freedom (DOFs) [1, 2]. Octopuses simplify this control by using stereotypical motion patterns that reduce the DOFs, in the control space, to a workable few [2]. These movements are triggered by the brain and are generated by motor programs embedded in the peripheral neuromuscular system of the arm [3-5]. The hundreds of suckers along each arm have a tendency to stick to almost any object they contact [6-9]. The existence of this reflex could pose significant problems with unplanned interactions between the arms if not appropriately managed. This problem is likely to be accentuated because it is accepted that octopuses are "not aware of their arms" [10-14]. Here we report of a self-recognition mechanism that has a novel role in motor control, restraining the arms from interfering with each other. We show that the suckers of amputated arms never attach to octopus skin because a chemical in the skin inhibits the attachment reflex of the suckers. The peripheral mechanism appears to be overridden by central control because, in contrast to amputated arms, behaving octopuses sometime grab amputated arms. Surprisingly, octopuses seem to identify their own amputated arms, as they treat arms of other octopuses like food more often than their own. This self-recognition mechanism is a novel peripheral component in the embodied organization of the adaptive interactions between the octopus's brain, body, and environment [15, 16].

  15. Daily enteral feeding practice on the ICU: attainment of goals and interfering factors

    PubMed Central

    Binnekade, JM; Tepaske, R; Bruynzeel, P; Mathus-Vliegen, EMH; de Hann, RJ

    2005-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the daily feeding practice of enterally fed patients in an intensive care unit (ICU) and to study the impact of preset factors in reaching predefined optimal nutritional goals. Methods The feeding practice of all ICU patients receiving enteral nutrition for at least 48 hours was recorded during a 1-year period. Actual intake was expressed as the percentage of the prescribed volume of formula (a success is defined as 90% or more). Prescribed volume (optimal intake) was guided by protocol but adjusted to individual patient conditions by the intensivist. The potential barriers to the success of feeding were assessed by multivariate analysis. Results Four-hundred-and-three eligible patients had a total of 3,526 records of feeding days. The desired intake was successful in 52% (1,842 of 3,526) of feeding days. The percentage of successful feeding days increased from 39% (124 of 316) on day 1 to 51% (112 of 218) on day 5. Average ideal protein intake was 54% (95% confidence interval (CI) 52 to 55), energy intake was 66% (95% CI 65 to 68) and volume 75% (95% CI 74 to 76). Factors impeding successful nutrition were the use of the feeding tube to deliver contrast, the need for prokinetic drugs, a high Therapeutic Intervention Score System category and elective admissions. Conclusion The records revealed an unsatisfactory feeding process. A better use of relative successful volume intake, namely increasing the energy and protein density, could enhance the nutritional yield. Factors such as an improper use of tubes and feeding intolerance were related to failure. Meticulous recording of intake and interfering factors helps to uncover inadequacies in ICU feeding practice. PMID:15987393

  16. Silica nanoparticles induce cardiotoxicity interfering with energetic status and Ca(2+) handling in adult rat cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Beltrán, Carlos Enrique; Bernal-Ramírez, Judith; Lozano, Omar; Oropeza-Almazán, Yuriana; Castillo, Elena Cristina; Garza, Jesús Roberto; García, Noemí; Vela, Jorge; García-García, Alejandra; Ortega, Eduardo; Torre-Amione, Guillermo; Ornelas-Soto, Nancy; García-Rivas, Gerardo

    2017-04-01

    unknown. Here, the cardiotoxicity of silica nanoparticles in rat myocytes has been described for the first time, showing an impairment of mitochondrial function that interfered directly with Ca(2+) handling.

  17. Breast cancer drugs dampen vascular functions by interfering with nitric oxide signaling in endothelium

    SciTech Connect

    Gajalakshmi, Palanivel; Priya, Mani Krishna; Pradeep, Thangaraj; Behera, Jyotirmaya; Muthumani, Kandasamy; Madhuwanti, Srinivasan; Saran, Uttara; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2013-06-01

    the treatments of breast cancer drugs. • Breast cancer drugs induce vasoconstriction by interfering with NO pathway. • NO donors, cGMP analogs rescue breast cancer drug induced endothelial dysfunctions.

  18. Characterization of the Small RNA Transcriptome of the Marine Coccolithophorid, Emiliania huxleyi

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; Gamarra, Jaime; Castro, Steven; Carrasco, Estela; Hernandez, Aaron; Mock, Thomas; Hadaegh, Ahmad R.; Read, Betsy A.

    2016-01-01

    Small RNAs (smRNAs) control a variety of cellular processes by silencing target genes at the transcriptional or post-transcription level. While extensively studied in plants, relatively little is known about smRNAs and their targets in marine phytoplankton, such as Emiliania huxleyi (E. huxleyi). Deep sequencing was performed of smRNAs extracted at different time points as E. huxleyi cells transition from logarithmic to stationary phase growth in batch culture. Computational analyses predicted 18 E. huxleyi specific miRNAs. The 18 miRNA candidates and their precursors vary in length (18–24 nt and 71–252 nt, respectively), genome copy number (3–1,459), and the number of genes targeted (2–107). Stem-loop real time reverse transcriptase (RT) PCR was used to validate miRNA expression which varied by nearly three orders of magnitude when growth slows and cells enter stationary phase. Stem-loop RT PCR was also used to examine the expression profiles of miRNA in calcifying and non-calcifying cultures, and a small subset was found to be differentially expressed when nutrients become limiting and calcification is enhanced. In addition to miRNAs, endogenous small RNAs such as ra-siRNAs, ta-siRNAs, nat-siRNAs, and piwiRNAs were predicted along with the machinery for the biogenesis and processing of si-RNAs. This study is the first genome-wide investigation smRNAs pathways in E. huxleyi. Results provide new insights into the importance of smRNAs in regulating aspects of physiological growth and adaptation in marine phytoplankton and further challenge the notion that smRNAs evolved with multicellularity, expanding our perspective of these ancient regulatory pathways. PMID:27101007

  19. Frizzled2 signaling regulates growth of high-risk neuroblastomas by interfering with β-catenin-dependent and β-catenin-independent signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zins, Karin; Schäfer, Romana; Paulus, Patrick; Dobler, Silvia; Fakhari, Nazak; Sioud, Mouldy; Aharinejad, Seyedhossein; Abraham, Dietmar

    2016-01-01

    Frizzled2 (FZD2) is a receptor for Wnts and may activate both canonical and non-canonical Wnt signaling pathways in cancer. However, no studies have reported an association between FZD2 signaling and high-risk NB so far. Here we report that FZD2 signaling pathways are critical to NB growth in MYCN-single copy SK-N-AS and MYCN-amplified SK-N-DZ high-risk NB cells. We demonstrate that stimulation of FZD2 by Wnt3a and Wnt5a regulates β-catenin-dependent and –independent Wnt signaling factors. FZD2 blockade suppressed β-catenin-dependent signaling activity and increased phosphorylation of PKC, AKT and ERK in vitro, consistent with upregulation of β-catenin-independent signaling activity. Finally, FZD2 small interfering RNA knockdown suppressed tumor growth in murine NB xenograft models associated with suppressed β-catenin-dependent signaling and a less vascularized phenotype in both NB xenografts. Together, our study suggests a role for FZD2 in high-risk NB cell growth and provides a potential candidate for therapeutic inhibition in FZD2-expressing NB patients. PMID:27323822

  20. Study on demodulated signal distribution and acoustic pressure phase sensitivity of a self-interfered distributed acoustic sensing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Ying; Yang, Yuan-Hong; Wang, Chen; Liu, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Chang; Peng, Gang-Ding

    2016-06-01

    We propose a demodulated signal distribution theory for a self-interfered distributed acoustic sensing system. The distribution region of Rayleigh backscattering including the acoustic sensing signal in the sensing fiber is investigated theoretically under different combinations of both the path difference and pulse width Additionally we determine the optimal solution between the path difference and pulse width to obtain the maximum phase change per unit length. We experimentally test this theory and realize a good acoustic pressure phase sensitivity of  -150 dB re rad/(μPa·m) of fiber in the frequency range from 200 Hz to 1 kHz.

  1. Deep sequencing of small RNAs in plants: applied bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    Studholme, David J

    2012-01-01

    Small RNAs, including microRNA and short-interfering RNAs, play important roles in plants. In recent years, developments in sequencing technology have enabled the large-scale discovery of sRNAs in various cells, tissues and developmental stages and in response to various stresses. This review describes the bioinformatics challenges to analysing these large datasets of short-RNA sequences and some of the solutions to those challenges.

  2. Potential misinterpretation of the nutritional value of dietary fiber: correcting fiber digestibility values for nondietary gut-interfering material.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Carlos A; Henare, Sharon J; Rutherfurd, Shane M; Moughan, Paul J

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this review is to identify the origin and implications of a nondietary material present in digesta and feces that interferes with the determination of dietary fiber in gastrointestinal contents. Negative values for ileal and fecal digestibility of dietary fiber are commonly reported in the literature for monogastric animal species, including humans. As negative values are not possible physiologically, this suggests the existence of a nondietary material in the gastrointestinal contents and feces that interferes with the accurate determination of dietary fiber digestibility when conventional methods of fiber determination are applied. To date, little attention has been given to this nondietary interfering material, which appears to be influenced by the type and concentration of fiber in the diet. Interestingly, estimates of dietary fiber digestibility increase substantially when corrected for the nondietary interfering material, which suggests that currently reported values underestimate the digestibility of dietary fiber and may misrepresent where, in the digestive tract, fermentation of fiber occurs. A new perspective of dietary fiber digestion in the gastrointestinal tract is developing, leading to a better understanding of the contribution of dietary fiber to health.

  3. Protein extraction for two-dimensional electrophoresis from olive leaf, a plant tissue containing high levels of interfering compounds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Scali, Monica; Vignani, Rita; Spadafora, Antonia; Sensi, Elisabetta; Mazzuca, Silvia; Cresti, Mauro

    2003-07-01

    The purpose of this research is to establish a routine procedure for the application of proteomic analysis to olive tree. Olive leaf tissue is notoriously recalcitrant to common protein extraction methods due to high levels of interfering compounds. We developed a protocol for isolating proteins suitable for two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) from olive leaf. The remarkable characteristics of the protocol include: (i) additional grinding dry acetone powder of leaf tissue to a finer extent, (ii) after extensive organic solvent washes to remove pigments, lipids etc., using aqueous tricholoroacetic acid washes to remove water-soluble contaminants, and (iii) phenol extraction of proteins in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. The final protein preparation is free of interfering compounds based on its well-resolved 2-DE patterns. The protocol can be completed within 3 h, and protein yield is approximately 2.49 mg.g(-1) of aged leaf. We also evaluated the protocol by immunoblotting with anti-tyrosinate alpha-tubulin antibody. To our knowledge, this is the first time that a protocol for protein extraction from olive leaf appears to give satisfactory and reproducible results. The protocol is expected to be applicable to other recalcitrant plant tissues and could be of interest to laboratories involved in plant proteomics.

  4. Interfering with pH regulation in tumours as a therapeutic strategy.

    PubMed

    Neri, Dario; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2011-09-16

    The high metabolic rate of tumours often leads to acidosis and hypoxia in poorly perfused regions. Tumour cells have thus evolved the ability to function in a more acidic environment than normal cells. Key pH regulators in tumour cells include: isoforms 2, 9 and 12 of carbonic anhydrase, isoforms of anion exchangers, Na+/HCO3- co-transporters, Na+/H+ exchangers, monocarboxylate transporters and the vacuolar ATPase. Both small molecules and antibodies targeting these pH regulators are currently at various stages of clinical development. These antitumour mechanisms are not exploited by the classical cancer drugs and therefore represent a new anticancer drug discovery strategy.

  5. Small RNAs regulate plant responses to filamentous pathogens.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Tung; Zhai, Yi; Ma, Wenbo

    2016-08-01

    Small RNAs are central players of RNA silencing in eukaryotes. These short RNA molecules (20-25 nucleotides in length) repress target gene expression based on sequence complementarity. While small RNAs are well-known for their essential function in regulating growth and development, recent research has revealed that they also influence plant immunity. Extensive changes in small RNA accumulation have been observed during infection. This review focuses on specific small RNA changes that are involved in plant responses to filamentous eukaryotic pathogens including fungi and oomycetes. We describe how changes in small RNA accumulation influence plant immunity and summarize the cellular processes affected by these small RNAs. In particular, we discuss secondary small interfering RNAs that directly modulate the expression of defense-related genes.

  6. Targeting Micrornas With Small Molecules: A Novel Approach to Treating Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    ribozymes and the DNAzymes, small interfering RNAs and short hairpin RNAs, and anti-miRNA agents such as antisense oligo- nucleotides, locked nucleic...of the antagomir Preclinical studies Ribozymes or DNAzymes A ribozyme , or RNA enzyme, is an RNA molecule that can catalyze a chemical reaction. A

  7. Divergent patterns of endogenous small RNA populations from seed and vegetative tissues of Glycine max

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Small non-coding RNAs (smRNAs) are known to have major roles in gene regulation in eukaryotes. In plants, knowledge of the biogenesis and mechanisms of action of smRNA classes including microRNAs (miRNAs), short interfering RNAs (siRNAs), and trans-acting siRNAs (tasiRNAs) has been gaine...

  8. Peptides interfering with protein-protein interactions in the ethylene signaling pathway delay tomato fruit ripening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisson, Melanie M. A.; Kessenbrock, Mareike; Müller, Lena; Hofmann, Alexander; Schmitz, Florian; Cristescu, Simona M.; Groth, Georg

    2016-08-01

    The plant hormone ethylene is involved in the regulation of several processes with high importance for agricultural applications, e.g. ripening, aging and senescence. Previous work in our group has identified a small peptide (NOP-1) derived from the nuclear localization signal of the Arabidopsis ethylene regulator ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE-2 (EIN2) C-terminal part as efficient inhibitor of ethylene responses. Here, we show that NOP-1 is also able to efficiently disrupt EIN2-ETR1 complex formation in tomato, indicating that the NOP-1 inhibition mode is conserved across plant species. Surface application of NOP-1 on green tomato fruits delays ripening similar to known inhibitors of ethylene perception (MCP) and ethylene biosynthesis (AVG). Fruits treated with NOP-1 showed similar ethylene production as untreated controls underlining that NOP-1 blocks ethylene signaling by targeting an essential interaction in this pathway, while having no effect on ethylene biosynthesis.

  9. Peptides interfering with protein-protein interactions in the ethylene signaling pathway delay tomato fruit ripening

    PubMed Central

    Bisson, Melanie M. A.; Kessenbrock, Mareike; Müller, Lena; Hofmann, Alexander; Schmitz, Florian; Cristescu, Simona M.; Groth, Georg

    2016-01-01

    The plant hormone ethylene is involved in the regulation of several processes with high importance for agricultural applications, e.g. ripening, aging and senescence. Previous work in our group has identified a small peptide (NOP-1) derived from the nuclear localization signal of the Arabidopsis ethylene regulator ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE-2 (EIN2) C-terminal part as efficient inhibitor of ethylene responses. Here, we show that NOP-1 is also able to efficiently disrupt EIN2-ETR1 complex formation in tomato, indicating that the NOP-1 inhibition mode is conserved across plant species. Surface application of NOP-1 on green tomato fruits delays ripening similar to known inhibitors of ethylene perception (MCP) and ethylene biosynthesis (AVG). Fruits treated with NOP-1 showed similar ethylene production as untreated controls underlining that NOP-1 blocks ethylene signaling by targeting an essential interaction in this pathway, while having no effect on ethylene biosynthesis. PMID:27477591

  10. Construction of p66Shc gene interfering lentivirus vectors and its effects on alveolar epithelial cells apoptosis induced by hyperoxia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chan; Dong, Wen-Bin; Zhao, Shuai; Li, Qing-Ping; Kang, Lan; Lei, Xiao-Ping; Guo, Lin; Zhai, Xue-Song

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to observe the inhibitive effects of p66Shc gene interfering lentivirus vectors on the expression of p66Shc, and to explore its effects on alveolar epithelial cells apoptosis induced by hyperoxia. Methods The gene sequences were cloned into the pLenR-GPH-shRNA lentiviral vector, which was selected by Genebank searches. The pLenR-GPH-shRNA and lentiviral vector packaging plasmid mix were cotransfected into 293T cells to package lentiviral particles. Culture virus supernatant was harvested, and then the virus titer was determined by serial dilution assay. A549 cells were transduced with the constructed lentiviral vectors, and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot were used to evaluate p66Shc expression. This study is divided into a control group, a hyperoxia group, an A549-p66ShcshRNA hyperoxia group, and a negative lentivirus group. Cell apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry after 24 hours; the expression of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) and caspase-9 were detected by immunohistochemistry assay. The production of reactive oxygen species and cellular mitochondria membrane potential (ΔΨm) were determined by fluorescence microscopy. Results We successfully established the p66Shc gene interfering lentivirus vectors, A549-p66ShcshRNA. The A549-p66ShcshRNA was transfected into alveolar epithelial cells, and the inhibitive effects on the expression of p66Shc were observed. Both RT-PCR and Western blot demonstrated downregulation of p66Shc expression in A549 cells. In the A549-p66ShcshRNA hyperoxia group, we found dampened oxidative stress. A549-p66ShcshRNA can cause p66Shc gene silencing, reduce mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation, reduce membrane potential decrease, reduce the apoptosis of A549 cells, and reduce alveolar epithelial cell injury, while the lentiviral empty vector group had no such changes. Conclusion p66Shc gene interfering lentivirus vector can affect the

  11. Exploiting Quorum Sensing Interfering Strategies in Gram-Negative Bacteria for the Enhancement of Environmental Applications

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiwei; Li, Chenghua

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a widespread intercellular form of communication to coordinate physiological processes and cooperative activities of bacteria at the population level, and it depends on the production, secretion, and detection of small diffusible autoinducers, such as acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs), auto-inducing oligo-peptides (AIPs) and autoinducer 2. In this review, the function of QS autoinducers of gram-negative bacteria in different aspects of wastewater treatment systems is examined. Based on research primarily performed over the past 10 years, QS involvement in the formation of biofilm and aerobic granules and changes of the microbial community and degradation/transformation pathways is discussed. In particular, the QS pathway in the role of bacterial infections and disease prevention in aquaculture is addressed. Interference of QS autoinducer-regulated pathways is considered potential treatment for a variety of environmentally related problems. This review is expected to serve as a stepping stone for further study and development strategies based on the mediation of QS-regulated pathways to enhance applications in both wastewater treatment systems and aquaculture. PMID:26779175

  12. Comparison of distribution and activity of nanoparticles with short interfering DNA (Dbait) in various living systems.

    PubMed

    Berthault, N; Maury, B; Agrario, C; Herbette, A; Sun, J-S; Peyrieras, N; Dutreix, M

    2011-10-01

    Introducing small DNA molecules (Dbait) impairs the repair of damaged chromosomes and provides a new method for enhancing the efficiency of radiotherapy in radio-resistant tumors. The radiosensitizing activity is dependent upon the efficient delivery of Dbait molecules into the tumor cells. Different strategies have been compared, to improve this key step. We developed a pipeline of assays to select the most efficient nanoparticles and administration protocols before preclinical assays: (i) molecular analyses of complexes formed with Dbait molecules, (ii) cellular tests for Dbait uptake and activity, (iii) live zebrafish embryo confocal microscopy monitoring for in vivo distribution and biological activity of the nanoparticles and (iv) tumor growth and survival measurement on mice with xenografted tumors. Two classes of nanoparticles were compared, polycationic polymers with linear or branched polyethylenimine (PEI) and covalently attached cholesterol (coDbait). The most efficient Dbait transfection was observed with linear PEI complexes, in vitro and in vivo. Doses of coDbait ten-fold higher than PEI/Dbait nanoparticles, and pretreatment with chloroquine, were required to obtain the same antitumoral effect on xenografted melanoma. However, with a 22-fold lower 'efficacy dose/toxicity dose' ratio as compared with Dbait/PEI, coDbait was selected for clinical trials.

  13. Detailed balance study of time reversal invariance with interfering resonances*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, G. E.; Bilpuch, E. G.; Bybee, C. R.; Drake, J. M.; Shriner, J. F.

    1993-06-01

    Bunakov and Weidenmüller suggested that large enhancement of time reversal invariance violation may be observed near two interfering resonances via a test of detailed balance. In our (p, α) resonance data on 23Na, 27Al, 31P, 35Cl, and 39K, there are 33 pairs of adjacent resonances which have the same spin and parity. The difference in the differential cross sections for the (p, α 0) and (α, p 0) reactions was calculated for these resonance pairs using experimental values for the partial widths. The collision matrix elements were obtained for a Hamiltonian H = H0 + iH', following the approach of Moldauer. The differences show striking dependence on energy and angle and on the particular pair of resonances, with the relative sensitivity of the detailed balance test varying by many orders of magnitude. These preliminary results indicate that this class of experiments may be more sensitive than previous detailed balance tests.

  14. Template free synthesis of free-standing silver nanowhisker and nanocrown superlattice by interfering femtosecond laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, Yoshiki; Miyanaga, Noriaki; Momoo, Kazuma; Hiromoto, Takuya

    2014-09-01

    We report the fabrication and control of a nanostructure superlattice of silver using a solid-liquid-solid (SLS) mechanism induced on a silver thin film by interfering femtosecond laser irradiation. An interference pattern induces fluid flows of silver, which is followed by freezing of a free-standing nanowhisker, nanobump, or nanocrown superlattice fixed on a substrate. The smallest curvature radius of the nanowhisker’s apex was 4 nm, which is smaller than one-fifth of the silver nanorods fabricated by chemosynthesis. The SLS process is a superior alternative to sequential bottom-up processes involving bottom-up synthesis of nanorods, purification, alignment or self-assembling, stabilization, and preservation.

  15. Microscopie interférentielle X-UV : un outil pour l'étude des endommagements des surfaces optiques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamelot, G.; Ros, D.; Cassou, K.; Kazamias, S.; Klisnick, A.; Kozlová, M.; Mocek, T.; Homer, P.; Polan, J.; Stupka, M.

    2006-12-01

    Nous présentons des résultats récents concernant des premières investigations de microscopie interférentielle par laser X-UV d'endommagement optique. Le laser X-UV utilisé est un laser collisionnel en régime quasi-stationnaire émettant à 21.2 nm, développé au Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS, Prague, République Tchèque). Des échantillons de silice fondue de haute qualité, avec ou sans rayure, étaient irradiées en face avant par un laser bleu, correspondant au 3selectfontfontsize{7{9}{textrm{ème}}} harmonique du laser à iode du PALS (1.315 μ m), servant également à réaliser le laser X-UV à 21.2 nm. Celui-ci était utilisé, 5 ns après l'irradiation pour réaliser une imagerie microscopique et interférentielle de la face arrière de l'échantillon. Les résultats font apparaître des déformations locales transitoires. Des premières analyses mettent en évidence une probable variation de la rugosité de la surface. Cette démonstration expérimentale encourageante ouvre la voie à de futures investigations, notamment sur notre prochaine installation laser : LASERIX.

  16. Prognostic significance of minimal residual disease in infants with acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated within the Interfant-99 protocol.

    PubMed

    Van der Velden, V H J; Corral, L; Valsecchi, M G; Jansen, M W J C; De Lorenzo, P; Cazzaniga, G; Panzer-Grümayer, E R; Schrappe, M; Schrauder, A; Meyer, C; Marschalek, R; Nigro, L L; Metzler, M; Basso, G; Mann, G; Den Boer, M L; Biondi, A; Pieters, R; Van Dongen, J J M

    2009-06-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in infants younger than 1 year is a rare but relatively homogeneous disease ( approximately 80% MLL gene rearranged, approximately 70% CD10-negative) when compared with childhood and adult ALL. Several studies in children and adults with ALL have shown that minimal residual disease (MRD) status is a strong and independent prognostic factor. We therefore evaluated the prognostic significance of MRD in infant ALL. Ninety-nine infant patients treated according to the Interfant-99 protocol were included in this study. MRD was analyzed by real-time quantitative PCR analysis of rearranged immunoglobulin genes, T-cell receptor genes and MLL genes at various time points (TP) during therapy. Higher MRD levels at the end of induction (TP2) and consolidation (TP3) were significantly associated with lower disease-free survival. Combined MRD information at TP2 and TP3 allowed recognition of three patients groups that significantly differed in outcome. All MRD-high-risk patients (MRD levels > or =10(-4) at TP3; 26% of patients) relapsed. MRD-low-risk patients (MRD level <10(-4) at both TP2 and TP3) constituted 44% of patients and showed a relapse-rate of only 13%, whereas remaining patients (MRD-medium-risk patients; 30% of patients) had a relapse rate of 31%. Comparison between the current Interfant-06 stratification at diagnosis and the here presented MRD-based stratification showed that both stratifications recognized different subgroups of patients. These data indicate that MRD diagnostics has added value for recognition of risk groups in infant ALL and that MRD diagnostics can be used for treatment intervention in infant ALL as well.

  17. Structure and Gene-Silencing Mechanisms of Small Noncoding RNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Chia-Ying; Rana, Tariq M.

    Small (19-31-nucleotides) noncoding RNAs were identified in the past 10 years for their distinct function in gene silencing. The best known gene-silencing phenomenon, RNA interference (RNAi), is triggered in a sequence-specific manner by endogenously produced or exogenously introduced small doubled-stranded RNAs. As knowledge of the structure and function of the RNAi machinery has expanded, this phenomenon has become a powerful tool for biochemical research; it has enormous potential for therapeutics. This chapter summarizes significant aspects of three major classes of small noncoding, regulatory RNAs: small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), microRNAs (miRNAs), and Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs). Here, we focus on the biogenesis of these small RNAs, their structural features and coupled effectors as well as the mechanisms of each small regulatory RNA pathway which reveal fascinating ways by which gene silencing is controlled and fine-tuned at an epigenetic level.

  18. Synthetic Multivariate Models to Accommodate Unmodeled Interfering Components During Quantitative Spectral Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Haaland, David M.

    1999-07-14

    The analysis precision of any multivariate calibration method will be severely degraded if unmodeled sources of spectral variation are present in the unknown sample spectra. This paper describes a synthetic method for correcting for the errors generated by the presence of unmodeled components or other sources of unmodeled spectral variation. If the spectral shape of the unmodeled component can be obtained and mathematically added to the original calibration spectra, then a new synthetic multivariate calibration model can be generated to accommodate the presence of the unmodeled source of spectral variation. This new method is demonstrated for the presence of unmodeled temperature variations in the unknown sample spectra of dilute aqueous solutions of urea, creatinine, and NaCl. When constant-temperature PLS models are applied to spectra of samples of variable temperature, the standard errors of prediction (SEP) are approximately an order of magnitude higher than that of the original cross-validated SEPs of the constant-temperature partial least squares models. Synthetic models using the classical least squares estimates of temperature from pure water or variable-temperature mixture sample spectra reduce the errors significantly for the variable temperature samples. Spectrometer drift adds additional error to the analyte determinations, but a method is demonstrated that can minimize the effect of drift on prediction errors through the measurement of the spectra of a small subset of samples during both calibration and prediction. In addition, sample temperature can be predicted with high precision with this new synthetic model without the need to recalibrate using actual variable-temperature sample data. The synthetic methods eliminate the need for expensive generation of new calibration samples and collection of their spectra. The methods are quite general and can be applied using any known source of spectral variation and can be used with any multivariate

  19. Analysis of the small interfering RNA profiles of randomly inserted pTRM-TRI6 Fusarium graminearum mutants and their DON related phenotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) production by Fusarium graminearum requires activation of the trichothecene pathway in which TRI5 catalyzes the first step of trichothecene synthesis and TRI6 is a transcription factor activates the pathway. RNA interference (RNAi) has emerged as a useful fungal genetics tool f...

  20. Small molecule schweinfurthins selectively inhibit cancer cell proliferation and mTOR/AKT signaling by interfering with trans-Golgi-network trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Xingfeng; Zheng, Wanjun; Sugi, Naoko Hata; Agarwala, Kishan L; Xu, Qunli; Wang, Zichun; Tendyke, Karen; Lee, Winnie; Parent, Lana; Li, Wei; Cheng, Hongsheng; Shen, Yongchun; Taylor, Noel; Dezso, Zoltan; Du, Hong; Kotake, Yoshihiko; Zhao, Nanding; Wang, John; Postema, Maarten; Woodall-Jappe, Mary; Takase, Yasutaka; Uenaka, Toshimitsu; Kingston, David G I; Nomoto, Kenichi

    2015-01-01

    Natural compound schweinfurthins are of considerable interest for novel therapy development because of their selective anti-proliferative activity against human cancer cells. We previously reported the isolation of highly active schweinfurthins E-H, and in the present study, mechanisms of the potent and selective anti-proliferation were investigated. We found that schweinfurthins preferentially inhibited the proliferation of PTEN deficient cancer cells by indirect inhibition of AKT phosphorylation. Mechanistically, schweinfurthins and their analogs arrested trans-Golgi-network trafficking, an intracellular vesicular trafficking system, resulting in the induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress and the suppression of both lipid raft-mediated PI3K activation and mTOR/RheB complex formation, which collectively led to an effective inhibition of mTOR/AKT signaling. The trans-Golgi-network traffic arresting effect of schweinfurthins was associated with their in vitro binding activity to oxysterol-binding proteins that are known to regulate intracellular vesicular trafficking. Moreover, schweinfurthins were found to be highly toxic toward PTEN-deficient B cell lymphoma cells, and displayed 2 orders of magnitude lower activity toward normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and primary fibroblasts in vitro. These results revealed a previously unrecognized role of schweinfurthins in regulating trans-Golgi-network trafficking, and linked mechanistically this cellular effect with mTOR/AKT signaling and with cancer cell survival and growth. Our findings suggest the schweinfurthin class of compounds as a novel approach to modulate oncogenic mTOR/AKT signaling for cancer treatment. PMID:25729885

  1. Induction of CML28-specific cytotoxic T cell responses using co-transfected dendritic cells with CML28 DNA vaccine and SOCS1 small interfering RNA expression vector

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Hongsheng; Zhang Donghua . E-mail: hanson2008@gmail.com; Wang Yaya; Dai Ming; Zhang Lu; Liu Wenli; Liu Dan; Tan Huo; Huang Zhenqian

    2006-08-18

    CML28 is an attractive target for antigen-specific immunotherapy. SOCS1 represents an inhibitory control mechanism for DC antigen presentation and the magnitude of adaptive immunity. In this study, we evaluated the potential for inducing CML28-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) responses by dendritic cells (DCs)-based vaccination. We constructed a CML28 DNA vaccine and a SOCS1 siRNA vector and then cotransfect monocyte-derived DCs. Flow cytometry analysis showed gene silencing of SOCS1 resulted in higher expressions of costimulative moleculars in DCs. Mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) indicated downregulation of SOCS1 stronger capability to stimulate proliferation of responder cell in DCs. The CTL assay revealed transfected DCs effectively induced autologous CML28-specific CTL responses and the lytic activities induced by SOCS1-silenced DCs were significantly higher compared with those induced by SOCS1-expressing DCs. These results in our study indicates gene silencing of SOCS1 remarkably enhanced the cytotoxicity efficiency of CML28 DNA vaccine in DCs.

  2. Postexposure Application of Fas Receptor Small-Interfering RNA to Suppress Sulfur Mustard-Induced Apoptosis in Human Airway Epithelial Cells: Implication for a Therapeutic Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    pathogenic mechanisms, e.g., DNA damage, are initiated without much delay but the tissue injury is not seen until after a lag period of 12 to 24 hours...measured at 450 nm using a ThermoMax microplate reader (MDS Analytical Technologies, Sunnyvale, CA). The recombi - nant human FasL/TNFSF6 produced in CHO...alkylating form that reacts readily with cellular functional molecules (e.g., DNA , RNA, proteins, etc.) to initiate its toxic mecha- nisms. At body temperature

  3. Connexin-specific cell-to-cell transfer of short interfering RNA by gap junctions

    PubMed Central

    Valiunas, V; Polosina, YY; Miller, H; Potapova, IA; Valiuniene, L; Doronin, S; Mathias, RT; Robinson, RB; Rosen, MR; Cohen, IS; Brink, PR

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether oligonucleotides the size of siRNA are permeable to gap junctions and whether a specific siRNA for DNA polymerase β (pol β) can move from one cell to another via gap junctions, thus allowing one cell to inhibit gene expression in another cell directly. To test this hypothesis, fluorescently labelled oligonucleotides (morpholinos) 12, 16 and 24 nucleotides in length were synthesized and introduced into one cell of a pair using a patch pipette. These probes moved from cell to cell through gap junctions composed of connexin 43 (Cx43). Moreover, the rate of transfer declined with increasing length of the oligonucleotide. To test whether siRNA for pol β was permeable to gap junctions we used three cell lines: (1) NRK cells that endogenously express Cx43; (2) Mβ16tsA cells, which express Cx32 and Cx26 but not Cx43; and (3) connexin-deficient N2A cells. NRK and Mβ16tsA cells were each divided into two groups, one of which was stably transfected to express a small hairpin RNA (shRNA), which gives rise to siRNA that targets pol β. These two pol β knockdown cell lines (NRK-kcdc and Mβ16tsA-kcdc) were co-cultured with labelled wild type, NRK-wt or Mβ16tsA-wt cells or N2A cells. The levels of pol β mRNA and protein were determined by semiquantitative RT-PCR and immunoblotting. Co-culture of Mβ16tsA-kcdc cells with Mβ16tsA-wt, N2A or NRK-wt cells had no effect on pol β levels in these cells. Similarly, co-culture of NRK-kcdc with N2A cells had no effect on pol β levels in the N2A cells. In contrast, co-culture of NRK-kcdc with NRK-wt cells resulted in a significant reduction in pol β in the wt cells. The inability of Mβ16tsA-kcdc cells to transfer siRNA is consistent with the fact that oligonucleotides of the 12 nucleotide length were not permeable to Cx32/Cx26 channels. This suggested that Cx43 but not Cx32/Cx26 channels allowed the cell-to-cell movement of the siRNA. These results support the novel hypothesis

  4. Comparative analysis of virus-derived small RNAs within cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) infected with cassava brown streak viruses.

    PubMed

    Ogwok, Emmanuel; Ilyas, Muhammad; Alicai, Titus; Rey, Marie E C; Taylor, Nigel J

    2016-04-02

    Infection of plant cells by viral pathogens triggers RNA silencing, an innate antiviral defense mechanism. In response to infection, small RNAs (sRNAs) are produced that associate with Argonaute (AGO)-containing silencing complexes which act to inactivate viral genomes by posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS). Deep sequencing was used to compare virus-derived small RNAs (vsRNAs) in cassava genotypes NASE 3, TME 204 and 60444 infected with the positive sense single-stranded RNA (+ssRNA) viruses cassava brown streak virus (CBSV) and Ugandan cassava brown streak virus (UCBSV), the causal agents of cassava brown streak disease (CBSD). An abundance of 21-24nt vsRNAs was detected and mapped, covering the entire CBSV and UCBSV genomes. The 21nt vsRNAs were most predominant, followed by the 22 nt class with a slight bias toward sense compared to antisense polarity, and a bias for adenine and uracil bases present at the 5'-terminus. Distribution and frequency of vsRNAs differed between cassava genotypes and viral genomes. In susceptible genotypes TME 204 and 60444, CBSV-derived sRNAs were seen in greater abundance than UCBSV-derived sRNAs. NASE 3, known to be resistant to UCBSV, accumulated negligible UCBSV-derived sRNAs but high populations of CBSV-derived sRNAs. Transcript levels of cassava homologues of AGO2, DCL2 and DCL4, which are central to the gene-silencing complex, were found to be differentially regulated in CBSV- and UCBSV-infected plants across genotypes, suggesting these proteins play a role in antiviral defense. Irrespective of genotype or viral pathogen, maximum populations of vsRNAs mapped to the cytoplasmic inclusion, P1 and P3 protein-encoding regions. Our results indicate disparity between CBSV and UCBSV host-virus interaction mechanisms, and provide insight into the role of virus-induced gene silencing as a mechanism of resistance to CBSD.

  5. Beneficial role of a nonpathogenic orbi-like virus: studies on the interfering effect of M14 virus in mice and mosquitoes infected with Japanese encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    Huang, C H; Liang, H C; Jia, F L

    1985-01-01

    M14 virus, isolated from Culex tritaeniorhynchus mosquitoes collected in a Beijing suburb, was identified as a noncytopathogenic orbi-like virus. It was found to interfere with the growth of Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus, a mosquito-borne virus which infects humans, pigs, and horses in much of Asia, including China. JE virus is transmitted by C. tritaeniorhynchus mosquitoes and causes encephalitis in humans and horses and abortion in pigs. Because it had potential as an interfering agent for the biological control of JE, the M14 virus was characterized and its interfering effect was studied in mice and in C. tritaeniorhynchus mosquitoes.

  6. Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program. FY 1991 Program Solicitation 91.2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-01

    of the small high (603) 624- 8208 technology business into the Department of Defense marketplace. The small and disadvantaged business NASA/Florida...ARMY 82 example a collision avoidance system or a proximity fuze. It may also be useful to have a system which detects the target’s relative velocity...chemistry parameters without interfering with on-going testing. Rf and/or photonic methods of monitoring such parameters as electron density and collision

  7. Small Families

    MedlinePlus

    ... more emphasis on careers for women, more effective methods of contraception, and the rising cost of rearing and educating children. There are some very clear benefits to having a small family; Each child receives more parental attention and educational advantages, which generally raise her self- ...

  8. Small RNA deep sequencing identifies novel and salt-stress-regulated microRNAs from roots of Medicago sativa and Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Long, Rui-Cai; Li, Ming-Na; Kang, Jun-Mei; Zhang, Tie-Jun; Sun, Yan; Yang, Qing-Chuan

    2015-05-01

    Small 21- to 24-nucleotide (nt) ribonucleic acids (RNAs), notably the microRNA (miRNA), are emerging as a posttranscriptional regulation mechanism. Salt stress is one of the primary abiotic stresses that cause the crop losses worldwide. In saline lands, root growth and function of plant are determined by the action of environmental salt stress through specific genes that adapt root development to the restrictive condition. To elucidate the role of miRNAs in salt stress regulation in Medicago, we used a high-throughput sequencing approach to analyze four small RNA libraries from roots of Zhongmu-1 (Medicago sativa) and Jemalong A17 (Medicago truncatula), which were treated with 300 mM NaCl for 0 and 8 h. Each library generated about 20 million short sequences and contained predominantly small RNAs of 24-nt length, followed by 21-nt and 22-nt small RNAs. Using sequence analysis, we identified 385 conserved miRNAs from 96 families, along with 68 novel candidate miRNAs. Of all the 68 predicted novel miRNAs, 15 miRNAs were identified to have miRNA*. Statistical analysis on abundance of sequencing read revealed specific miRNA showing contrasting expression patterns between M. sativa and M. truncatula roots, as well as between roots treated for 0 and 8 h. The expression of 10 conserved and novel miRNAs was also quantified by quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The miRNA precursor and target genes were predicted by bioinformatics analysis. We concluded that the salt stress related conserved and novel miRNAs may have a large variety of target mRNAs, some of which might play key roles in salt stress regulation of Medicago.

  9. The Gathering Storm: Federal Laws That Have a Serious Potential of Interfering with the Mission and Character of Evangelical Christian Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davids, James A.

    2012-01-01

    In the early 1980s, the University of Notre Dame Law School's Center for Constitutional Studies surveyed 801 religiously affiliated colleges to determine which federal laws and regulations had a "serious potential" of interfering with the character and mission of the schools. From the 226 responses, the Center identified 11 issues, three…

  10. The extracellular adherence protein (Eap) of Staphylococcus aureus inhibits wound healing by interfering with host defense and repair mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Athanasopoulos, Athanasios N; Economopoulou, Matina; Orlova, Valeria V; Sobke, Astrid; Schneider, Darius; Weber, Holger; Augustin, Hellmut G; Eming, Sabine A; Schubert, Uwe; Linn, Thomas; Nawroth, Peter P; Hussain, Muzaffar; Hammes, Hans-Peter; Herrmann, Mathias; Preissner, Klaus T; Chavakis, Triantafyllos

    2006-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen interfering with host-cell functions. Impaired wound healing is often observed in S aureus-infected wounds, yet, the underlying mechanisms are poorly defined. Here, we identify the extracellular adherence protein (Eap) of S aureus to be responsible for impaired wound healing. In a mouse wound-healing model wound closure was inhibited in the presence of wild-type S aureus and this effect was reversible when the wounds were incubated with an isogenic Eap-deficient strain. Isolated Eap also delayed wound closure. In the presence of Eap, recruitment of inflammatory cells to the wound site as well as neovascularization of the wound were prevented. In vitro, Eap significantly reduced intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1)-dependent leukocyte-endothelial interactions and diminished the consequent activation of the proinflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB) in leukocytes associated with a decrease in expression of tissue factor. Moreover, Eap blocked alphav-integrin-mediated endothelial-cell migration and capillary tube formation, and neovascularization in matrigels in vivo. Collectively, the potent anti-inflammatory and antiangiogenic properties of Eap provide an underlying mechanism that may explain the impaired wound healing in S aureus-infected wounds. Eap may also serve as a lead compound for new anti-inflammatory and antiangiogenic therapies in several pathologies.

  11. Short Interfering RNA Inhibits Rift Valley Fever Virus Replication and Degradation of Protein Kinase R in Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Faburay, Bonto; Richt, Juergen A

    2016-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a mosquito-borne zoonotic pathogen causing severe outbreaks in humans and livestock in sub-Saharan Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. Human infections are characterized by fever, sometimes leading to encephalitis, retinitis, hemorrhagic fever, and occasionally death. There are currently no fully licensed vaccines or effective therapies for human use. Gene silencing mediated by double-stranded short interfering RNA (siRNA) is a sequence-specific, highly conserved mechanism in eukaryotes, which serves as an antiviral defense mechanism. Here, we demonstrate that siRNA duplexes directed against the RVFV nucleoprotein can effectively inhibit RVFV replication in human (MRC5 cells) and African green monkey cells (Vero E6 cells). Using these cells, we demonstrate that individual or complex siRNAs, targeting the RVFV nucleoprotein gene completely abrogate viral protein expression and prevent degradation of the host innate antiviral factor, protein kinase R (PKR). Importantly, pre-treatment of cells with the nucleoprotein-specific siRNAs markedly reduces the virus titer. The antiviral effect of the siRNAs was not attributable to interferon or the interferon response effector molecule, PKR. Thus, the antiviral activity of RVFV nucleoprotein-specific siRNAs may provide novel therapeutic strategy against RVFV infections in animals and humans.

  12. A novel bio-electronic tongue using different cellobiose dehydrogenases to resolve mixtures of various sugars and interfering analytes.

    PubMed

    Cipri, Andrea; Schulz, Christopher; Ludwig, Roland; Gorton, Lo; Del Valle, Manel

    2016-05-15

    A novel application of cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH) as sensing element for a Bioelectronic Tongue (BioET) system has been tested. In this work CDHs from various fungi, which exhibit different substrate specificities, were used to discriminate between lactose and glucose in presence of the interfering matrix compound Ca(2+) in various mixtures. This work exploits the advantage of an electronic tongue system with practically zero pre-treatment of samples and operation at low voltages in a direct electron transfer mode. The Artificial Neural Network (ANN) used in the BioET system to interpret the voltammetric data was able to provide a correct prediction of the concentrations of the analytes considered. Correlation coefficients in the comparison of obtained vs. expected concentrations were highly significant, especially for lactose (R(2)=0.975) and Ca(2+) (R(2)=0.945). This BioET application has a high potential especially for the food and dairy industry and also, if further miniaturised in screen printed format, for its in-situ use.

  13. Excessive production and extreme editing of human metapneumovirus defective interfering RNA is associated with type I IFN induction.

    PubMed

    van den Hoogen, Bernadette G; van Boheemen, Sander; de Rijck, Jonneke; van Nieuwkoop, Stefan; Smith, Derek J; Laksono, Brigitta; Gultyaev, Alexander; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Fouchier, Ron A M

    2014-08-01

    Type I IFN production is one of the hallmarks of host innate immune responses upon virus infection. Whilst most respiratory viruses carry IFN antagonists, reports on human metapneumovirus (HMPV) have been conflicting. Using deep sequencing, we have demonstrated that HMPV particles accumulate excessive amounts of defective interfering RNA (DIs) rapidly upon in vitro passage, and that these are associated with IFN induction. Importantly, the DIs were edited extensively; up to 70% of the original A and T residues had mutated to G or C, respectively. Such high editing rates of viral RNA have not, to our knowledge, been reported before. Bioinformatics and PCR assays indicated that adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) was the most likely editing enzyme. HMPV thus has an unusually high propensity to generate DIs, which are edited at an unprecedented high frequency. The conflicting published data on HMPV IFN induction and antagonism are probably explained by DIs in virus stocks. The interaction of HMPV DIs with the RNA-editing machinery and IFN responses warrants further investigation.

  14. A Defective Interfering Influenza RNA Inhibits Infectious Influenza Virus Replication in Human Respiratory Tract Cells: A Potential New Human Antiviral

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Claire M.; Scott, Paul D.; O’Callaghan, Christopher; Easton, Andrew J.; Dimmock, Nigel J.

    2016-01-01

    Defective interfering (DI) viruses arise during the replication of influenza A virus and contain a non-infective version of the genome that is able to interfere with the production of infectious virus. In this study we hypothesise that a cloned DI influenza A virus RNA may prevent infection of human respiratory epithelial cells with infection by influenza A. The DI RNA (244/PR8) was derived by a natural deletion process from segment 1 of influenza A/PR/8/34 (H1N1); it comprises 395 nucleotides and is packaged in the DI virion in place of a full-length genome segment 1. Given intranasally, 244/PR8 DI virus protects mice and ferrets from clinical influenza caused by a number of different influenza A subtypes and interferes with production of infectious influenza A virus in cells in culture. However, evidence that DI influenza viruses are active in cells of the human respiratory tract is lacking. Here we show that 244/PR8 DI RNA is replicated by an influenza A challenge virus in human lung diploid fibroblasts, bronchial epithelial cells, and primary nasal basal cells, and that the yield of challenge virus is significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner indicating that DI influenza virus has potential as a human antiviral. PMID:27556481

  15. A Defective Interfering Influenza RNA Inhibits Infectious Influenza Virus Replication in Human Respiratory Tract Cells: A Potential New Human Antiviral.

    PubMed

    Smith, Claire M; Scott, Paul D; O'Callaghan, Christopher; Easton, Andrew J; Dimmock, Nigel J

    2016-08-22

    Defective interfering (DI) viruses arise during the replication of influenza A virus and contain a non-infective version of the genome that is able to interfere with the production of infectious virus. In this study we hypothesise that a cloned DI influenza A virus RNA may prevent infection of human respiratory epithelial cells with infection by influenza A. The DI RNA (244/PR8) was derived by a natural deletion process from segment 1 of influenza A/PR/8/34 (H1N1); it comprises 395 nucleotides and is packaged in the DI virion in place of a full-length genome segment 1. Given intranasally, 244/PR8 DI virus protects mice and ferrets from clinical influenza caused by a number of different influenza A subtypes and interferes with production of infectious influenza A virus in cells in culture. However, evidence that DI influenza viruses are active in cells of the human respiratory tract is lacking. Here we show that 244/PR8 DI RNA is replicated by an influenza A challenge virus in human lung diploid fibroblasts, bronchial epithelial cells, and primary nasal basal cells, and that the yield of challenge virus is significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner indicating that DI influenza virus has potential as a human antiviral.

  16. Short Interfering RNA Inhibits Rift Valley Fever Virus Replication and Degradation of Protein Kinase R in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Faburay, Bonto; Richt, Juergen A.

    2016-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a mosquito-borne zoonotic pathogen causing severe outbreaks in humans and livestock in sub-Saharan Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. Human infections are characterized by fever, sometimes leading to encephalitis, retinitis, hemorrhagic fever, and occasionally death. There are currently no fully licensed vaccines or effective therapies for human use. Gene silencing mediated by double-stranded short interfering RNA (siRNA) is a sequence-specific, highly conserved mechanism in eukaryotes, which serves as an antiviral defense mechanism. Here, we demonstrate that siRNA duplexes directed against the RVFV nucleoprotein can effectively inhibit RVFV replication in human (MRC5 cells) and African green monkey cells (Vero E6 cells). Using these cells, we demonstrate that individual or complex siRNAs, targeting the RVFV nucleoprotein gene completely abrogate viral protein expression and prevent degradation of the host innate antiviral factor, protein kinase R (PKR). Importantly, pre-treatment of cells with the nucleoprotein-specific siRNAs markedly reduces the virus titer. The antiviral effect of the siRNAs was not attributable to interferon or the interferon response effector molecule, PKR. Thus, the antiviral activity of RVFV nucleoprotein-specific siRNAs may provide novel therapeutic strategy against RVFV infections in animals and humans. PMID:27933051

  17. SIRT1 inhibits EV71 genome replication and RNA translation by interfering with the viral polymerase and 5'UTR RNA.

    PubMed

    Han, Yang; Wang, Lvyin; Cui, Jin; Song, Yu; Luo, Zhen; Chen, Junbo; Xiong, Ying; Zhang, Qi; Liu, Fang; Ho, Wenzhe; Liu, Yingle; Wu, Kailang; Wu, Jianguo

    2016-12-15

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) possesses a single-stranded positive RNA genome that contains a single open reading frame (ORF) flanked by a 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) and a polyadenylated 3'UTR. Here, we demonstrated that EV71 activates the production of silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (SIRT1), a histone deacetylase (HDAC). EV71 further stimulates SIRT1 sumoylation and deacetylase activity, and enhances SIRT1 translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. More interestingly, activated SIRT1 subsequently binds with the EV71 3D(pol) protein (a viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, RdRp) to repress the acetylation and RdRp activity of 3D(pol), resulting in the attenuation of viral genome replication. Moreover, SIRT1 interacts with the cloverleaf structure of the EV71 RNA 5'UTR to inhibit viral RNA transcription, and binds to the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) of the EV71 5'UTR to attenuate viral RNA translation. Thus, EV71 stimulates SIRT1 production and activity, which in turn represses EV71 genome replication by inhibiting viral polymerase, and attenuates EV71 RNA transcription and translation by interfering with viral RNA. These results uncover a new function of SIRT1 and reveal a new mechanism underlying the regulation of EV71 replication.

  18. The mitochondrion interfering compound NPC-26 exerts potent anti-pancreatic cancer cell activity in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yang-Yang; Zhuang, Yi-Huang; Cai, Wen-Jie; Liu, Yan; Zou, Wen-Bing

    2016-11-01

    The development of novel anti-pancreatic cancer agents is extremely important. Here, we investigated the anti-pancreatic cancer activity by NPC-26, a novel mitochondrion interfering compound. We showed that NPC-26 was anti-proliferative and cytotoxic to human pancreatic cancer cells, possibly via inducing caspase-9-dependent cell apoptosis. Pharmacological inhibition or shRNA-mediated silence of caspase-9 attenuated NPC-26-induced pancreatic cancer cell death and apoptosis. Further, NPC-26 treatment led to mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening in the cancer cells, which was evidenced by mitochondrial depolarization, ANT-1(adenine nucleotide translocator-1)-Cyp-D (cyclophilin-D) association and oxidative phosphorylation disturbance. mPTP blockers (cyclosporin and sanglifehrin A) or shRNA-mediated knockdown of key mPTP components (Cyp-D and ANT-1) dramatically attenuated NPC-26-induced pancreatic cancer cell apoptosis. Importantly, we showed that NPC-26, at a low concentration, potentiated gemcitabine-induced mPTP opening and subsequent pancreatic cancer cell apoptosis. In vivo, NPC-26 intraperitoneal injection significantly suppressed the growth of PANC-1 xenograft tumors in nude mice. Meanwhile, NPC-26 sensitized gemcitabine-mediated anti-pancreatic cancer activity in vivo. In summary, the results of this study suggest that NPC-26, alone or together with gemcitabine, potently inhibits pancreatic cancer cells possibly via disrupting mitochondrion.

  19. Cyclin D1 blocks the anti-proliferative function of RUNX3 by interfering with RUNX3-p300 interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Iwatani, Kazunori; Fujimoto, Tetsuhiro; Ito, Takaaki

    2010-09-24

    Research highlights: {yields} Cyclin D1 interacts with RUNX3 and inhibits the interaction and collaboration of RUNX3 with coactivator p300. {yields} Cyclin D1 blocks the ability of RUNX3 to induce the expression of cdk inhibitor p21. {yields} Cyclin D1 releases cancer cells from the inhibition of proliferation induced by RUNX3. -- Abstract: Transcriptional function of cyclin D1, whose deregulation is frequently observed in human cancers, has been suggested to contribute to cancer formation. In the present study, we show that cyclin D1 protein inhibits RUNX3 activity by directly binding to it and interfering with its interaction with p300 interaction in lung cancer cells. Cyclin D1 inhibits p300-dependent RUNX3 acetylation and negatively regulates cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) inhibitor p21 expression. These transcriptional effects of cyclin D1 do not require cdk4/6 kinase activation. We propose that cyclin D1 provides a transcriptional switch that allows the tumor suppressor activity of RUNX3 to be repressed in cancer cells. Since RUNX3 plays tumor suppressive roles in a wide range of cancers, a non-canonical cyclin D1 function may be critical for neoplastic transformation of the epithelial cells in which RUNX3 regulates proliferation.

  20. Alkylrhodamines enhance the toxicity of clotrimazole and benzalkonium chloride by interfering with yeast pleiotropic ABC-transporters.

    PubMed

    Knorre, Dmitry A; Besedina, Elizaveta; Karavaeva, Iuliia E; Smirnova, Ekaterina A; Markova, Olga V; Severin, Fedor F

    2016-06-01

    ABC-transporters with broad substrate specificity are responsible for pathogenic yeast resistance to antifungal compounds. Here we asked whether highly hydrophobic chemicals with delocalized positive charge can be used to overcome the resistance. Such molecules efficiently penetrate the plasma membrane and accumulate inside the cells. We reasoned that these properties can convert an active efflux of the compounds into a futile cycle thus interfering with the extrusion of the antibiotics. To test this, we studied the effects of several alkylated rhodamines on the drug resistance of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae We found that octylrhodamine synergetically increases toxicity of Pdr5p substrate-clotrimazole, while the others were less effective. Next, we compared the contributions of three major pleiotropic ABC-transporters (Pdr5p, Yor1p, Snq2p) on the accumulation of the alkylated rhodamines. While all of the tested compounds were extruded by Pdr5p, Yor1p and Snq2p showed narrower substrate specificity. Interestingly, among the tested alkylated rhodamines, inactivation of Pdr5p had the strongest effect on the accumulation of octylrhodamine inside the cells, which is consistent with the fact that clotrimazole is a substrate of Pdr5p. As alkylated rhodamines were shown to be non-toxic on mice, our study makes them potential components of pharmacological antifungal compositions.

  1. Pitfalls and fallacies interfering with correct identification of embryonic stem cells implanted into the brain after experimental traumatic injury.

    PubMed

    Molcanyi, Marek; Bosche, Bert; Kraitsy, Klaus; Patz, Silke; Zivcak, Jozef; Riess, Peter; El Majdoub, Faycal; Hescheler, Jürgen; Goldbrunner, Roland; Schäfer, Ute

    2013-04-30

    Cell-therapy was proposed to be a promising tool in case of death or impairment of specific cell types. Correct identification of implanted cells became crucial when evaluating the success of transplantation therapy. Various methods of cell labeling have been employed in previously published studies. The use of intrinsic signaling of green fluorescent protein (GFP) has led to a well known controversy in the field of cardiovascular research. We encountered similar methodological pitfalls after transplantation of GFP-transfected embryonic stem cells into rat brains following traumatic brain injury (TBI). As the identification of implanted graft by intrinsic autofluorescence failed, anti-GFP labeling coupled to fluorescent and conventional antibodies was needed to visualize the implanted cells. Furthermore, different cell types with strong intrinsic autofluorescence were found at the sites of injury and transplantation, thus mimicking the implanted stem cells. GFP-positive stem cells were correctly localized, using advanced histological techniques. The activation of microglia/macrophages, accompanying the transplantation post TBI, was shown to be a significant source of artefacts, interfering with correct identification of implanted stem cells. Dependent on the strategy of stem cell tracking, the phagocytosis of implanted cells as observed in this study, might also impede the interpretation of results. Critical appraisal of previously published data as well as a review of different histological techniques provide tools for a more accurate identification of transplanted stem cells.

  2. SARS Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Inhibits Type I Interferon Production by Interfering with TRIM25-Mediated RIG-I Ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yong; Li, Wei; Gao, Ting; Cui, Yan; Jin, Yanwen; Li, Ping; Ma, Qingjun; Liu, Xuan; Cao, Cheng

    2017-02-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a respiratory disease caused by a coronavirus (SARS-CoV) that is characterized by atypical pneumonia. The nucleocapsid protein (N protein) of SARS-CoV plays an important role in inhibition of type I interferon (IFN) production via an unknown mechanism. In this study, the SARS-CoV N protein was found to bind to the SPRY domain of the tripartite motif protein 25 (TRIM25) E3 ubiquitin ligase, thereby interfering with the association between TRIM25 and retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) and inhibiting TRIM25-mediated RIG-I ubiquitination and activation. Type I IFN production induced by poly I:C or Sendai virus (SeV) was suppressed by the SARS-CoV N protein. SARS-CoV replication was increased by over-expression of the full-length N protein but not N (1-361), which could not interact with TRIM25. These findings provide an insightful interpretation of the SARS-CoV-mediated host innate immune suppression caused by the N protein.

  3. Efficacy of RNA interference knockdown using aerosolized short interfering RNAs bound to nanoparticles in three diverse aphid species.

    PubMed

    Thairu, M W; Skidmore, I H; Bansal, R; Nováková, E; Hansen, T E; Li-Byarlay, H; Wickline, S A; Hansen, A K

    2017-03-17

    RNA interference (RNAi) has emerged as a promising method for validating gene function; however, its utility in nonmodel insects has proven problematic, with delivery methods being one of the main obstacles. This study investigates a novel method of RNAi delivery in aphids, the aerosolization of short interfering RNA (siRNA)-nanoparticle complexes. By using nanoparticles as a siRNA carrier, the likelihood of cellular uptake is increased, when compared to methods previously used in insects. To determine the efficacy of this RNAi delivery system, siRNAs were aerosolized with and without nanoparticles in three aphid species: Acyrthosiphon pisum, Aphis glycines and Schizaphis graminum. The genes targeted for knockdown were carotene dehydrogenase (tor), which is important for pigmentation in Ac. pisum, and branched chain-amino acid transaminase (bcat), which is essential in the metabolism of branched-chain amino acids in all three aphid species. Overall, we observed modest gene knockdown of tor in Ac. pisum and moderate gene knockdown of bcat in Ap. glycines along with its associated phenotype. We also determined that the nanoparticle emulsion significantly increased the efficacy of gene knockdown. Overall, these results suggest that the aerosolized siRNA-nanoparticle delivery method is a promising new high-throughput and non-invasive RNAi delivery method in some aphid species.

  4. Accumulation of defective interfering viral particles in only a few passages in Vero cells attenuates mumps virus neurovirulence.

    PubMed

    Šantak, Maja; Markušić, Maja; Balija, Maja Lang; Kopač, Sandra Keć; Jug, Renata; Örvell, Claes; Tomac, Jelena; Forčić, Dubravko

    2015-03-01

    Immunization programs have implemented live attenuated mumps vaccines which reduced mumps incidence ≥97%. Some of the vaccine strains were abandoned due to unwanted side effects and the genetic marker of attenuation has not been identified so far. Our hypothesis was that non-infectious viral particles, in particular defective interfering particles (DIPs), contribute to neuroattenuation. We showed that non-infectious particles of the mumps vaccine L-Zagreb attenuated neurovirulence of wild type mumps virus 9218/Zg98. Then, we attenuated recent wild type mumps virus MuVi/Zagreb.HRV/28.12 in Vero cells through 16 passages but already the fifth passage (p5) showed accumulation of DIPs and attenuated neurovirulence in a newborn rat model when compared to the second passage (p2). Sequence analysis of the p2 and p5 revealed a single mutation in the 5' untranslated region of the HN gene. Analysis of the expression level of the HN protein showed that this mutation does not affect the expression of the protein. We conclude that the passages of MuVi/Zagreb.HRV/28.12 in Vero cells for only three passages accumulated DIPs which attenuate neurovirulence. These findings reveal DIPs as a very promising and general neuroattenuating factor which should be considered in the rational design of the new mumps vaccine.

  5. Competition between small RNAs: a quantitative view.

    PubMed

    Loinger, Adiel; Shemla, Yael; Simon, Itamar; Margalit, Hanah; Biham, Ofer

    2012-04-18

    Two major classes of small regulatory RNAs--small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and microRNA (miRNAs)--are involved in a common RNA interference processing pathway. Small RNAs within each of these families were found to compete for limiting amounts of shared components, required for their biogenesis and processing. Association with Argonaute (Ago), the catalytic component of the RNA silencing complex, was suggested as the central mechanistic point in RNA interference machinery competition. Aiming to better understand the competition between small RNAs in the cell, we present a mathematical model and characterize a range of specific cell and experimental parameters affecting the competition. We apply the model to competition between miRNAs and study the change in the expression level of their target genes under a variety of conditions. We show quantitatively that the amount of Ago and miRNAs in the cell are dominant factors contributing greatly to the competition. Interestingly, we observe what to our knowledge is a novel type of competition that takes place when Ago is abundant, by which miRNAs with shared targets compete over them. Furthermore, we use the model to examine different interaction mechanisms that might operate in establishing the miRNA-Ago complexes, mainly those related to their stability and recycling. Our model provides a mathematical framework for future studies of competition effects in regulation mechanisms involving small RNAs.

  6. Correction methodology for the spectral interfering γ-rays overlapping to the analytical peaks used in the analysis of 232Th.

    PubMed

    Yücel, H; Köse, E; Esen, A N; Bor, D

    2011-06-01

    In the γ-ray spectrometric analysis of the radionuclides, a correction factor is generally required for the spectral interfering γ-rays in determining the net areas of the analytical peaks because some interfering γ-rays often might contribute to the analytical peaks of interest. In present study, a correction methodology for the spectral interfering γ-rays (CSI) is described. In particular, in the analysis of (232)Th contained in samples, the interfering γ-rays due to (226)Ra, (235)U, (238)U and their decay products often overlap to the peaks of interest from (232)Th decay products, and vise versa. For the validation of the proposed CSI method, several certified reference materials (CRM) containing U and Th were measured by using a 76.5% efficient n-type Ge detector. The required correction factors were quantified for spectral interference, self-absorption and true coincidence summing (TCS) effects for the relevant γ-rays. The measured results indicate that if one ignores the contributions of the interfering γ-rays to the analytical peaks at 583.2 keV of (208)Tl and 727.3 keV of (212)Bi, this leads to a significantly systematic influence on the resulted activities of (232)Th. The correction factors required for spectral interference and TCS effects are estimated to be ∼13.6% and ∼15.4% for 583.2 keV peak. For the 727.3 keV peak, the correction factor is estimated to be ∼15% for spectral interference, and ∼5% for the TCS effects at the presently used detection geometry. On the other hand, the measured results also indicate that ignoring the contribution of the interfering γ-rays to the areas of the analytical peaks at 860.6 keV of (208)Tl, 338.3 and 911.2 keV of (228)Ac does not lead to any significant systematic influence on the (232)Th analysis. Because these factors are remained generally less than ∼5%, i.e., within overall uncertainty limits. The present study also showed that in view of both the spectral interference and TCS effects, the

  7. Small RNA-Mediated Epigenetic Myostatin Silencing.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Thomas C; Andaloussi, Samir El; Morris, Kevin V; McClorey, Graham; Wood, Matthew Ja

    2012-05-15

    Myostatin (Mstn) is a secreted growth factor that negatively regulates muscle mass and is therefore a potential pharmacological target for the treatment of muscle wasting disorders such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Here we describe a novel Mstn blockade approach in which small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) complementary to a promoter-associated transcript induce transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) in two differentiated mouse muscle cell lines. Silencing is sensitive to treatment with the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A, and the silent state chromatin mark H3K9me2 is enriched at the Mstn promoter following siRNA transfection, suggesting epigenetic remodeling underlies the silencing effect. These observations suggest that long-term epigenetic silencing may be feasible for Mstn and that TGS is a promising novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of muscle wasting disorders.

  8. Non-healing foot ulcers in diabetic patients: general and local interfering conditions and management options with advanced wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Uccioli, Luigi; Izzo, Valentina; Meloni, Marco; Vainieri, Erika; Ruotolo, Valeria; Giurato, Laura

    2015-04-01

    Medical knowledge about wound management has improved as recent studies have investigated the healing process and its biochemical background. Despite this, foot ulcers remain an important clinical problem, often resulting in costly, prolonged treatment. A non-healing ulcer is also a strong risk factor for major amputation. Many factors can interfere with wound healing, including the patient's general health status (i.e., nutritional condition indicated by albumin levels) or drugs such as steroids that can interfere with normal healing. Diabetic complications (i.e., renal insufficiency) may delay healing and account for higher amputation rates observed in diabetic patients under dialysis treatment. Wound environment (e.g., presence of neuropathy, ischaemia, and infection) may significantly influence healing by interfering with the physiological healing cascade and adding local release of factors that may worsen the wound. The timely and well-orchestrated release of factors regulating the healing process, observed in acute wounds, is impaired in non-healing wounds that are blocked in a chronic inflammatory phase without progressing to healing. This chronic phase is characterised by elevated protease activity (EPA) of metalloproteinases (MMPs) and serine proteases (e.g., human neutrophil elastase) that interfere with collagen synthesis, as well as growth factor release and action. EPA (mainly MMP 9, MMP-8 and elastase) and inflammatory factors present in the wound bed (such as IL-1, IL-6, and TNFa) account for the catabolic state of non-healing ulcers. The availability of wound dressings that modulate EPA has added new therapeutic options for treating non-healing ulcers. The literature confirms advantages obtained by reducing protease activity in the wound bed, with better outcomes achieved by using these dressings compared with traditional ones. New technologies also allow a physician to know the status of the wound bed environment, particularly EPA, in a clinical

  9. Taurine blocks ATP-sensitive potassium channels of rat skeletal muscle fibres interfering with the sulphonylurea receptor.

    PubMed

    Tricarico, D; Barbieri, M; Camerino, D C

    2000-06-01

    Taurine is a sulphonic aminoacid present in high amounts in various tissues including cardiac and skeletal muscles showing different properties such as antioxidative, antimyotonic and anti-schaemic effects. The cellular mechanism of action of taurine is under investigation and appears to involve the interaction of the sulphonic aminoacid with several ion channels. Using the patch-clamp technique we studied the effects of taurine in rat skeletal muscle fibres on ATP-sensitive K(+) channel (K(ATP)) immediately after excision and on channels that underwent rundown. The cytoplasmic application of 20 mM of taurine reduced the K(ATP) current; this effect was reverted by washout of the drug solution. In this experimental condition the IC(50) was 20.1 mM. After rundown, taurine inhibited the K(ATP) current with similar efficacy. Competition experiments showed that taurine shifted the dose-response inhibition curve of glybenclamide to the left on the log-dose axis without significantly affecting those of ATP or Ca(2+) ion. Single channel recording revealed that taurine affects the close state of the channel prolonging it and reducing the bursts duration. Our data indicate that taurine inhibits the muscular K(ATP) channel interfering with the glybenclamide site on the sulphonylurea receptor of the channel or on the site allosterically coupled to it. During ischaemia and hypoxia, the skeletal and heart muscles undergo several changes; for example, the activation of K(ATP) channels and loss of the intracellular taurine content. The depletion of taurine during ischaemia would contribute to the early activation of K(ATP) channels and salvage the intracellular ATP content.

  10. Alcohol dysregulates corticotropin-releasing-hormone (CRH) promoter activity by interfering with the negative glucocorticoid response element (nGRE).

    PubMed

    Przybycien-Szymanska, Magdalena M; Mott, Natasha N; Pak, Toni R

    2011-01-01

    EtOH exposure in male rats increases corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) mRNA in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), a brain region responsible for coordinating stress and anxiety responses. In this study we identified the molecular mechanisms involved in mediating these effects by examining the direct effects of EtOH on CRH promoter activity in a neuronal cell line derived from the PVN (IVB). In addition, we investigated the potential interactions of EtOH and glucocorticoids on the CRH promoter by concomitantly treating cells with EtOH and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist RU486, and by sequentially deleting GR binding sites within glucocorticoid response element (GRE) on the CRH promoter. Cells were transiently transfected with a firefly luciferase reporter construct containing 2.5 kb of the rat wild type (WT) or mutated CRH promoter. Our results showed that EtOH treatment induced a biphasic response in CRH promoter activity. EtOH exposure for 0.5 h significantly decreased promoter activity compared to vehicle treated controls, whereas promoter activity was significantly increased after 2.0 h of EtOH exposure. Treatment with RU486, or deletion of the GR binding sites 1 and 2 within the GRE, abolished the EtOH-induced increase in the promoter activity, however did not affect EtOH-induced decrease in CRH promoter activity at an earlier time point. Overall, our data suggest that alcohol exposure directly regulates CRH promoter activity by interfering with the normal feedback mechanisms of glucocorticoids mediated by GR signaling at the GRE site of the CRH promoter.

  11. TPGS2k/PLGA nanoparticles for overcoming multidrug resistance by interfering mitochondria of human alveolar adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong-Fang; Rong, Wen-Ting; Lu, Yu; Hou, Jie; Qi, Shan-Shan; Xiao, Qing; Zhang, Jue; You, Jin; Yu, Shu-Qin; Xu, Qian

    2015-02-25

    In this study, we successfully synthesized d-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 2000 succinate (TPGS2k) and prepared TPGS2k-modified poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (TPGS2k/PLGA NPs) loaded with 7-ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin (SN-38), designated TPGS2k/PLGA/SN-38 NPs. Characterization measurements showed that TPGS2k/PLGA/SN-38 NPs displayed flat and spheroidal particles with diameters of 80-104 nm. SN-38 was encapsulated in TPGS2k emulsified PLGA NPs with the entrapment efficiency and loading rates of SN-38 83.6 and 7.85%, respectively. SN-38 could release constantly from TPGS2k/PLGA/SN-38 NPs in vitro. TPGS2k/PLGA/SN-38 NPs induced significantly higher cytotoxicity on A549 cells and the multidrug resistance (MDR) cell line (A549/DDP cells and A549/Taxol cells) compared with free SN-38. Further studies on the mechanism of the NPs in increasing the death of MDR cells showed that following the SN-38 releasing into cytoplasm the remaining TPGS2k/PLGA NPs could reverse the P-gp mediated MDR via interfering with the structure and function of mitochondria and rather than directly inhibiting the enzymatic activity of P-gp ATPase. Therefore, TPGS2k/PLGA NPs can reduce the generation of ATP and the release of energy for the requisite of P-gp efflux transporters. The results indicated that TPGS2k/PLGA NPs could become the nanopharmaceutical materials with the capability to reversal MDR and improve anticancer effects of some chemotherapy drugs as P-gp substrates.

  12. Mesure de profils sans contact mécanique par interférométrie acoustique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olive, F.; Waintal, A.; Buévoz, J. L.; Reynaud, J. C.

    1992-10-01

    The analysis of the Acoustical Material Signature is mandatory in order to explain the image formation in an acoustical microscope. We have developed and experimental setup including a dedicated electronic system which allows for the measurement of the phase of the reflected acoustical signal, with respect to a fixed reference. As a consequence, the acoustical microscope can be operated as an interferometer allowing the characterization of micron size mechanical profiles without contact other than the water droplet which permits the acoustical coupling between the lens and the sample. The method has been evaluated on numerous patterns etched on different materials. In all the measurement accuracy was at least similar to results obtained by means of the best mechanical profilometers. L'analyse de la signature acoustique des matériaux est indispensable à la compréhension des images de microscopie acoustique. Nous avons développé un dispositif expérimental dont l'électronique originale permet la mesure de la phase du signal acoustique réfléchi, par rapport à uen référence fixe. Le microscope acoustique peut ainsi être utilisé comme un interféromètre, dont la principale application est la mesure de profils mécaniques, de dimensions microniques, sans contact si ce n'est avec la goutte d'eau qui assure le couplage de l'onde acoustique entre la lentille et l'échantillon. Les performances de la méthode ont été évaluées sur plusieurs motifs gravés sur différents matériaux. Dans tous les cas, la précision des mesures est au moins égale à celle obtenue par les meilleurs profilomètres mécaniques.

  13. Genome-wide identification of endogenous RNA-directed DNA methylation loci associated with abundant 21-nucleotide siRNAs in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jian-Hua; Fang, Yuan-Yuan; Duan, Cheng-Guo; Fang, Rong-Xiang; Ding, Shou-Wei; Guo, Hui-Shan

    2016-01-01

    In Arabidopsis, the 24-nucleotide (nt) small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) mediates RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) and transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) of transposable elements (TEs). In the present study, we examined genome-wide changes in DNA methylation and siRNA accumulation in Arabidopsis induced by expression of the Cucumber mosaic virus silencing suppressor protein 2b known to directly bind to both the 21/24-nt siRNAs as well as their associated Argonaute proteins. We demonstrated a genome-wide reduction of CHH and CHG methylation in the 2b-transgenic plants. We found that 2b suppressed RdDM not only at the previously annotated loci directed by 24-nt siRNAs but also a new set of loci associated with 21/22-nt siRNAs. Further analysis showed that the reduced methylation of TEs and coding genes targeted by 21/22-nt siRNAs was associated with sequestration of the duplex siRNAs by the 2b protein but not with changes in either siRNA production or transcription. Notably, we detected both the deletion and/or the transposition of multicopy TEs associated with 2b-induced hypomethylation, suggesting potential TE reactivation. We propose that the silencing of many TEs in Arabidopsis is controlled by the 24- and 21-nt endogenous siRNAs analogous to Drosophila TE silencing by PIWI-interacting RNAs and siRNAs. PMID:27786269

  14. [Study on second filtering algorithm based on tracing the interfering spectral peaks of radar non-contact life-parameter detection system].

    PubMed

    Lu, Guohua; Yang, Guosheng; Wang, Jianqi; Ni, Ansheng; Jing, Xijing

    2006-08-01

    To develop a filtering algorithm which could trace the spectral peaks of the interference and which was used to extract the breath signal with the same band interference in radar non-contact life-detecting system, second filtering algorithm was studied. Through first filtering,the probable interfering spectral peaks (ISP) could be detected by Yule-Walker spectrum estimating and could be located by calculating the coefficients of normalized cross-correlation function according to standard breath signal. Thus the breath signal could be extracted through a second filtering. By using the second filtering algorithm (SFA), the same band interfering spectral peaks with breath signal could be recognized and inhibited. So we conclude that the same band mono-ISP could be inhibited by using SFA and breath signals could be effectively extracted.

  15. Determination of benzalkonium chloride in the presence of interfering alkaloids and polymeric substrates by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Marsh, D F; Takahashi, L T

    1983-05-01

    A specific assay for the analysis of benzalkonium chloride in the presence of interfering substances was conducted. The approach involved complexing benzalkonium chloride in an ophthalmic system with methyl orange, extraction of the complex into 1,2-dichloroethane, and subsequent analysis by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Since the method separates each homologue of benzalkonium chloride, homologues not resident in the ophthalmic system were added as internal standards to improve both recovery and precision in the method.

  16. The small RNA-based odyssey of epigenetic information in plants: from cells to species.

    PubMed

    Mirouze, Marie

    2012-12-01

    In the past years a plethora of roles for small RNAs (sRNAs) have been revealed in developmental biology, physiology, pathogen interactions, and more recently in genome stability and transposon control. sRNAs have a repressive impact on gene expression by directly interfering with endogenous mRNAs or virus RNA, or by maintaining heterochromatin. In plants, the most abundant sRNAs are by far the ones produced from heterochromatic loci and playing a role in epigenetic regulation. Here, I review some specific examples of the roles of these sRNAs belonging to the class of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in controlling the epigenetic regulation of the genome. I will highlight their role as mediators of epigenetic information at various organization levels: between two alleles within a single cell, two tissues within an organism, two individuals or two generations within a species, and even two species within a kingdom.

  17. RNA interference in the nucleus: roles for small RNAs in transcription, epigenetics and beyond.

    PubMed

    Castel, Stephane E; Martienssen, Robert A

    2013-02-01

    A growing number of functions are emerging for RNA interference (RNAi) in the nucleus, in addition to well-characterized roles in post-transcriptional gene silencing in the cytoplasm. Epigenetic modifications directed by small RNAs have been shown to cause transcriptional repression in plants, fungi and animals. Additionally, increasing evidence indicates that RNAi regulates transcription through interaction with transcriptional machinery. Nuclear small RNAs include small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) and are implicated in nuclear processes such as transposon regulation, heterochromatin formation, developmental gene regulation and genome stability.

  18. Roles of small RNAs in the immune defense mechanisms of crustaceans.

    PubMed

    He, Yaodong; Ju, Chenyu; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2015-12-01

    Small RNAs, 21-24 nucleotides in length, are non-coding RNAs found in most multicellular organisms, as well as in some viruses. There are three main types of small RNAs including microRNA (miRNA), small-interfering RNA (siRNA), and piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA). Small RNAs play key roles in the genetic regulation of eukaryotes; at least 50% of all eukaryote genes are the targets of small RNAs. In recent years, studies have shown that some unique small RNAs are involved in the immune response of crustaceans, leading to lower or higher immune responses to infections and diseases. SiRNAs could be used as therapy for virus infection. In this review, we provide an overview of the diverse roles of small RNAs in the immune defense mechanisms of crustaceans.

  19. Direct atomic absorption determination of cadmium and lead in strongly interfering matrices by double vaporization with a two-step electrothermal atomizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinshtein, Ilia L.; Vilpan, Yuri A.; Saraev, Alexei V.; Vasilieva, Lubov A.

    2001-03-01

    Thermal pretreatment of a sample using double vaporization in a two-step atomizer with a purged vaporizer makes possible the direct analysis of samples with strongly interfering matrices including solids. A porous-graphite capsule or a filter inserted into the vaporizer is used for solid sample analysis. The technique was used for the direct determination of Cd and Pb in human urine, potatoes, wheat, bovine liver, milk powder, grass-cereal mixtures, caprolactam, bituminous-shale and polyvinyl chloride plastic without chemical modification or any other sample pretreatment.

  20. Endogenous small RNAs in grain: semi-quantification and sequence homology to human and animal genes.

    PubMed

    Ivashuta, Sergey I; Petrick, Jay S; Heisel, Sara E; Zhang, Yuanji; Guo, Liang; Reynolds, Tracey L; Rice, James F; Allen, Edwards; Roberts, James K

    2009-02-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) are effector molecules of RNA interference (RNAi), a highly conserved RNA-based gene suppression mechanism in plants, mammals and other eukaryotes. Endogenous RNAi-based gene suppression has been harnessed naturally and through conventional breeding to achieve desired plant phenotypes. The present study demonstrates that endogenous small RNAs, such as siRNAs and miRNAs, are abundant in soybean seeds, corn kernels, and rice grain, plant tissues that are traditionally used for food and feed. Numerous endogenous plant small RNAs were found to have perfect complementarity to human genes as well as those of other mammals. The abundance of endogenous small RNA molecules in grain from safely consumed food and feed crops such as soybean, corn, and rice and the homology of a number of these dietary small RNAs to human and animal genomes and transcriptomes establishes a history of safe consumption for dietary small RNAs.

  1. A small RNA response at DNA ends in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Michalik, Katharina M; Böttcher, Romy; Förstemann, Klaus

    2012-10-01

    Small RNAs have been implicated in numerous cellular processes, including effects on chromatin structure and the repression of transposons. We describe the generation of a small RNA response at DNA ends in Drosophila that is analogous to the recently reported double-strand break (DSB)-induced RNAs or Dicer- and Drosha-dependent small RNAs in Arabidopsis and vertebrates. Active transcription in the vicinity of the break amplifies this small RNA response, demonstrating that the normal messenger RNA contributes to the endogenous small interfering RNAs precursor. The double-stranded RNA precursor forms with an antisense transcript that initiates at the DNA break. Breaks are thus sites of transcription initiation, a novel aspect of the cellular DSB response. This response is specific to a double-strand break since nicked DNA structures do not trigger small RNA production. The small RNAs are generated independently of the exact end structure (blunt, 3'- or 5'-overhang), can repress homologous sequences in trans and may therefore--in addition to putative roles in repair--exert a quality control function by clearing potentially truncated messages from genes in the vicinity of the break.

  2. Small noncoding RNAs: biogenesis, function, and emerging significance in toxicology.

    PubMed

    Choudhuri, Supratim

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, the discovery of small ncRNAs (noncoding RNAs) has unveiled a slew of powerful riboregulators of gene expression. So far, many different types of small ncRNAs have been described. Of these, miRNAs (microRNAs), siRNAs (small interfering RNAs), and piRNAs (Piwi-interacting RNAs) have been studied in more detail. A significant fraction of genes in most organisms and tissues is targets of these small ncRNAs. Because these tiny RNAs are turning out to be important regulators of gene and genome expression, their aberrant expression profiles are expected to be associated with cellular dysfunction and disease. In fact, an ever-increasing number of studies have implicated miRNAs and siRNAs in human health and disease ranging from metabolic disorders to diseases of various organ systems as well as various forms of cancer. Nevertheless, despite the flurry of research on these small ncRNAs, many aspects of their biology still remain to be understood. The following discussion focuses on some aspects of the biogenesis and function of small ncRNAs with major emphasis on miRNAs since these are the most widespread endogenous small ncRNAs that have been called "micromanagers" of gene expression. Their emerging significance in toxicology is also discussed.

  3. Endogenous small RNAs and antibacterial immunity in plants.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hailing

    2008-08-06

    Small RNAs are non-coding regulatory RNA molecules that control gene expression by mediating mRNA degradation, translational inhibition, or chromatin modification. Virus-derived small RNAs induce silencing of viral RNAs and are essential for antiviral defense in both animal and plant systems. The role of host endogenous small RNAs on antibacterial immunity has only recently been recognized. Host disease resistance and defense responses are achieved by activation and repression of a large array of genes. Certain endogenous small RNAs in plants, including microRNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), are induced or repressed in response to pathogen attack and subsequently regulate the expression of genes involved in disease resistance and defense responses by mediating transcriptional or post-transcriptional gene silencing. Thus, these small RNAs play an important role in gene expression reprogramming in plant disease resistance and defense responses. This review focuses on the recent findings of plant endogenous small RNAs in antibacterial immunity.

  4. Isolation and detection of small RNAs from plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Smith, Neil A; Eamens, Andrew L

    2012-01-01

    In plants, several classes of non-coding small RNA (sRNA) have been shown to be important regulators of gene expression in a wide variety of biological processes. The two main classes of sRNA, the small-interfering RNA (siRNA) and microRNA (miRNA) classes, are well documented and several experimental approaches have been developed to allow for their routine isolation and detection from plant tissues. Here, we describe the current methods used for the isolation of total RNA and the subsequent enrichment of low-molecular-weight (LMW) RNA species, as well as to outline how sRNAs are detected from such nucleic acid preparations.

  5. Chemometrics-assisted high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection strategy to solve varying interfering patterns from different chromatographic columns and sample matrices for beverage analysis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiao-Li; Wu, Hai-Long; Gu, Hui-Wen; Hu, Yong; Wang, Li; Xia, Hui; Xiang, Shou-Xia; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2016-02-26

    This work reports a chemometrics-assisted high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) strategy to solve varying interfering patterns from different chromatographic columns and sample matrices for the rapid simultaneous determination of six synthetic colorants in five kinds of beverages with little sample pretreatment. The investigation was performed using two types of LC columns under the same elution conditions. Although analytes using different columns have different co-elution patterns that appear more seriously in complex backgrounds, all colorants were properly resolved by alternating trilinear decomposition (ATLD) method and accurate chromatographic elution profiles, spectral profiles as well as relative concentrations were obtained. The results were confirmed by those obtained from traditional HPLC-UV method at a particular wavelength and the results of both methods were consistent with each other. All results demonstrated that the proposed chemometrics-assisted HPLC-DAD method is accurate, economical and universal, and can be promisingly applied to solve varying interfering patterns from different chromatographic columns and sample matrices for the analysis of complex food samples.

  6. FIA-automated system used to electrochemically measure nitrite and its interfering chemicals through a 1-2 DAB / Au electrode: gain of sensitivity at upper potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, F. L.; dos Santos Filho, S. G.; Fontes, M. B. A.

    2013-03-01

    The measurement of nitrite and its interfering-chemicals (paracetamol, ascorbic acid and uric acid) was performed employing a Flow-injection Analysis (FIA) system, which was automated using solenoid valves and air-pump. It is very important to quantify nitrite from river water, food and biologic fluids due to its antibacterial capacity in moderated concentrations, or its toxicity for human health even at low concentrations (> 20 μmol L-1 in blood fluids). Electrodes of the electrochemical planar sensor were defined by silk-screen technology. The measuring electrode was made from gold paste covered with 1-2 cis Diaminobenzene (DAB), which allowed good selectivity, linearity, repeatability, stability and optimized gain of sensitivity at 0.5 VAg/AgCl Nafion®117 (6.93 μA mol-1 L mm-2) compared to 0.3 VAg/AgCl Nafion® 117. The reference electrode was obtained from silver/palladium paste modified with chloride and covered with Nafion® 117. The auxiliary electrode was made from platinum paste. It was noteworthy that nitrite response adds to the response of the studied interfering-chemicals and it is predominant for concentrations lower than 175 μmol L-1.

  7. Rhesus monkeys kidney cells persistently infected with Simian Virus 40: production of defective interfering virus and acquisition of the transformed phenotype.

    PubMed

    Norkin, L C

    1976-09-01

    Monolayer cultures of LLC-MK2 rhesus monkey kidney cells became persistently infected with simian virus 40 (SV40) when infected at a multiplicity of infection of 100 plaque-forming units/cell. A stable carrier state developed characterized by extensive viral proliferation without obvious cytopathic effect other than the slow growth of these cultures. By 11 weeks all cells produced the SV40 T antigen. In contrast, less than 5% of the cells produced V antigen. Virus-free clonal isolates were obtained by cloning in SV40 antiserum. Continuous cultivation in antiserum resulted in a temporary cure of unclone cultures. When virus did eventually reappear in the "cured" cultures the titers remained low. The virus produced by the carrier culture was defective at both 31 and 37% c, and it interfered with the growth of standard s40 during mixed infection of CV-1 green monkey kidney cells. All of the interfering activity in carrier culture homogenates could be sedimented by centrifugation at 109,000 x g for 3 h. These cultures were completely susceptible to vesicular stomatitis virus. Extensive viral deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis occurred in CV-1 cells infected with carrier culture virus. Carrier culture homogenates are only slightly less cytopathic to CV-1 cells than standard SV40. The carrier culture express several properties of SV40 transformation.

  8. Novel spectrophotometric determination of chloramphenicol and dexamethasone in the presence of non labeled interfering substances using univariate methods and multivariate regression model updating.

    PubMed

    Hegazy, Maha A; Lotfy, Hayam M; Rezk, Mamdouh R; Omran, Yasmin Rostom

    2015-04-05

    Smart and novel spectrophotometric and chemometric methods have been developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of a binary mixture of chloramphenicol (CPL) and dexamethasone sodium phosphate (DSP) in presence of interfering substances without prior separation. The first method depends upon derivative subtraction coupled with constant multiplication. The second one is ratio difference method at optimum wavelengths which were selected after applying derivative transformation method via multiplying by a decoding spectrum in order to cancel the contribution of non labeled interfering substances. The third method relies on partial least squares with regression model updating. They are so simple that they do not require any preliminary separation steps. Accuracy, precision and linearity ranges of these methods were determined. Moreover, specificity was assessed by analyzing synthetic mixtures of both drugs. The proposed methods were successfully applied for analysis of both drugs in their pharmaceutical formulation. The obtained results have been statistically compared to that of an official spectrophotometric method to give a conclusion that there is no significant difference between the proposed methods and the official ones with respect to accuracy and precision.

  9. Novel spectrophotometric determination of chloramphenicol and dexamethasone in the presence of non labeled interfering substances using univariate methods and multivariate regression model updating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegazy, Maha A.; Lotfy, Hayam M.; Rezk, Mamdouh R.; Omran, Yasmin Rostom

    2015-04-01

    Smart and novel spectrophotometric and chemometric methods have been developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of a binary mixture of chloramphenicol (CPL) and dexamethasone sodium phosphate (DSP) in presence of interfering substances without prior separation. The first method depends upon derivative subtraction coupled with constant multiplication. The second one is ratio difference method at optimum wavelengths which were selected after applying derivative transformation method via multiplying by a decoding spectrum in order to cancel the contribution of non labeled interfering substances. The third method relies on partial least squares with regression model updating. They are so simple that they do not require any preliminary separation steps. Accuracy, precision and linearity ranges of these methods were determined. Moreover, specificity was assessed by analyzing synthetic mixtures of both drugs. The proposed methods were successfully applied for analysis of both drugs in their pharmaceutical formulation. The obtained results have been statistically compared to that of an official spectrophotometric method to give a conclusion that there is no significant difference between the proposed methods and the official ones with respect to accuracy and precision.

  10. Chitinase activity in the epidermis of the fiddler crab, Uca pugilator, as an in vivo screen for molt-interfering xenobiotics.

    PubMed

    Zou, Enmin; Bonvillain, Ryan

    2004-12-01

    We describe an in vivo screening assay that uses epidermal chitinase activity as the endpoint following a 7-day exposure of Uca pugilator to test chemicals. Chitinase, a chitinolytic enzyme, is the end product of endocrine cascades of a multi-hormonal system for control of crustacean molting. Wherever a molt-interfering agent adversely impacts the Y-organ-ecdysteroid receptor axis, the effect should be manifested by the activity of chitinase in the epidermis. Therefore, epidermal chitinase activity is an ideal endpoint for molt-interfering effects of xenobiotics. The validity of epidermal chitinase activity being used for such a purpose is supported by our finding that two injections of 20-hydroxyecdysone at 25 microg/g live weight induced a twofold increase in chitinase activity in the epidermis of U. pugilator. A total of nine chemicals were screened for molting hormone and anti-molting activities. o,p'-DDT was found to significantly inhibit epidermal chitinase activity while kepone and methoxychlor exhibited a tendency of inhibition of enzymatic activity. None of the remaining six chemicals, namely, p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (p,p'-DDT), atrazine, tributyltin (TBT), methoprene, dieldrin and permethrin, had an effect on epidermal chitinase activity.

  11. Review of Adverse Events Associated With False Glucose Readings Measured by GDH-PQQ–Based Glucose Test Strips in the Presence of Interfering Sugars

    PubMed Central

    Frias, Juan P.; Lim, Christine G.; Ellison, John M.; Montandon, Carol M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the implications of falsely elevated glucose readings measured with glucose dehydrogenase pyrroloquinolinequinone (GDH-PQQ) test strips. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We conducted a review of the Food and Drug Administration's Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience database and medical literature for adverse events (AEs) associated with falsely elevated glucose readings with GDH-PQQ test strips in the presence of interfering sugars. RESULTS Eighty-two reports were identified: 16 (20%) were associated with death, 46 (56%) with severe hypoglycemia, and 12 (15%) with nonsevere hypoglycemia. In eight reports (10%), the AE was not described. Forty-two events (51%) occurred in the U.S. Although most events occurred in hospitalized patients, at least 14 (17%) occurred in outpatients. Agents most commonly associated with AEs were icodextrin-containing peritoneal dialysate and maltose-containing intravenous immune globulin. CONCLUSIONS GDH-PQQ test strips pose a safety risk to insulin-using patients treated with agents containing or metabolized to interfering sugars. PMID:20351227

  12. Echinococcus multilocularis primary cells: improved isolation, small-scale cultivation and RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Spiliotis, Markus; Mizukami, Chiaki; Oku, Yuzaburo; Kiss, Ferenc; Brehm, Klaus; Gottstein, Bruno

    2010-11-01

    In this study we demonstrate RNA interference mediated knock-down of target gene expression in Echinococcus multilocularis primary cells on both the transcriptional and translational level. In addition, we report on an improved method for generating E. multilocularis primary cell mini-aggregates from in vitro cultivated metacestode vesicles, and on the cultivation of small numbers of small interfering RNA-transfected cells in vitro over an extended period of time. This allows assessments on the effects of RNA interference performed on Echinococcus primary cells with regard to growth, proliferation, differentiation of the parasite and the formation of novel metacestode vesicles in vitro.

  13. Lung cancer - small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  14. Small Scale Organic Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horak, V.; Crist, DeLanson R.

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the advantages of using small scale experimentation in the undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory. Describes small scale filtration techniques as an example of a semi-micro method applied to small quantities of material. (MLH)

  15. Study of physical conditions in protoplanetary disks by interferometry. Theory, instrumentation and first observations. -- étude des conditions physiques dans les disques protoplanétaires par interférométrie. Théorie, instrumentation et premières observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malbet, Fabien

    2007-10-01

    és afin de montrer la richesse des renseignements obtenus. Finalement je trace les contours d'un programme de recherche qui permettra tout d'abord de maximiser le retour astrophysique sur un instrument comme le VLTI, puis d'obtenir de premières images interférométriques de ces environnements circumstellaires. Je propose aussi la réalisation d'un instrument de seconde génération qui permettra de fournir des images interférométriques détaillées de ces sources compactes par synthèse d'ouverture. Stars are forming when clouds of gas and dust collapse. In the close environment of the new star, the matter is concentrated in an equatorial plane which is called protoplanetary disk. The astronomers think that planets are formed within this mass of gas and dust orbiting around the star. To probe these disks at scales corresponding to the orbits of the future planets, it is necessary to observe at very high spatial resolution in the infrared wavelength domain. Infrared interferometry is therefore an ideal tool to study the physical conditions in protoplanetary disks. In this document, I describe the first steps of infrared interferometry, from the beginning of the small interferometers PTI and IOTA until the construction of the AMBER instrument at the focus of the VLT Interferometer. I describe also the results of a technological research track, particularly attractive in the case of infrared interferometry, and coming from the information freeway: the integrated optics applies to the combination of several beams in astronomy. I show then how from observations obtained from these instruments, it is possible to constrain the physics of disks around young stars. Thanks to the spectral resolution recently available on these instruments, for the first time, we can separate the physical phenomena as different as accretion of matter onto the star and the ejection of particles by winds whose precise origin is still not well known. The results presented in this document were

  16. Small bowel bacterial overgrowth

    MedlinePlus

    Overgrowth - intestinal bacteria; Bacterial overgrowth - intestine; Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth; SIBO ... intestine does not have a high number of bacteria. Excess bacteria in the small intestine may use ...

  17. Fabrication of a two-dimensional periodic microflower array by three interfered femtosecond laser pulses on Al:ZnO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Feng, D. H.; Jia, T. Q.; Y He, H.; Xiong, P. X.; Hou, S. S.; Zhou, K.; Sun, Z. R.; Xu, Z. Z.

    2010-04-01

    A two-dimensional periodic microflower array was fabricated on Al:ZnO thin films by the irradiation of three interfered 800 nm femtosecond laser beams. The petals of the microflowers are ~200 nm in size, and the intervals between the nanopetals are about 100 nm. These values are significantly smaller than the laser wavelength and its diffraction-limited scale. The evolution of microflowers with different laser fluences and irradiation times was analyzed. Theoretical analysis indicates that the interferential intensity and polarization distribution together account for the formation of microflowers with subwavelength petals. Flower periodicity with a period of microns was determined by the interferential intensity distribution, while nanopetal structures and their orientations were attributed to the interferential polarization distribution.

  18. Corticosterone suppresses vasotocin-enhanced clasping behavior in male rough-skinned newts by novel mechanisms interfering with V1a receptor availability and receptor-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Davis, Audrey; Abraham, Emily; McEvoy, Erin; Sonnenfeld, Sarah; Lewis, Christine; Hubbard, Catherine S; Dolence, E Kurt; Rose, James D; Coddington, Emma

    2015-03-01

    In rough-skinned newts, Taricha granulosa, exposure to an acute stressor results in the rapid release of corticosterone (CORT), which suppresses the ability of vasotocin (VT) to enhance clasping behavior. CORT also suppresses VT-induced spontaneous activity and sensory responsiveness of clasp-controlling neurons in the rostromedial reticular formation (Rf). The cellular mechanisms underlying this interaction remain unclear. We hypothesized that CORT blocks VT-enhanced clasping by interfering with V1a receptor availability and/or VT-induced endocytosis. We administered a physiologically active fluorescent VT conjugated to Oregon Green (VT-OG) to the fourth ventricle 9 min after an intraperitoneal injection of CORT (0, 10, 40 μg/0.1mL amphibian Ringers). The brains were collected 30 min post-VT-OG, fixed, and imaged with confocal microscopy. CORT diminished the number of endocytosed vesicles, percent area containing VT-OG, sum intensity of VT-OG, and the amount of VT-V1a within each vesicle; indicating that CORT was interfering with V1a receptor availability and VT-V1a receptor-mediated endocytosis. CORT actions were brain location-specific and season-dependent in a manner that is consistent with the natural and context-dependent expression of clasping behavior. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the Rf to CORT was much higher in animals during the breeding season, arguing for ethologically appropriate seasonal variation in CORT's ability to prevent VT-induced endocytosis. Our data are consistent with the time course and interaction effects of CORT and VT on clasping behavior and neurophysiology. CORT interference with VT-induced endocytosis may be a common mechanism employed by hormones across taxa for mediating rapid context- and season-specific behavioral responses.

  19. Étude d'un dispositif interférométrique simple pour la génération de faisceaux polarisés radialement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passilly, N.; de Saint Denis, R.; Aït-Ameur, K.; Treussart, F.; Hierle, R.; Roch, J.-F.

    2006-10-01

    Nous présentons l'étude théorique et expérimentale d'une technique interférométrique de conversion d'un faisceau gaussien polarisé linéairement en un faisceau annulaire polarisé radialement. Le dispositif expérimental réalise la sommation de deux faisceaux TEM{01} et TEM{10} polarisés orthogonalement obtenus à partir d'éléments optiques diffractifs simples disposés dans les bras d'un interféromètre de Mach-Zehnder vectoriel. Nous montrons que la qualité de la transformation dépend de la distance par rapport à la sortie de l'interféromètre ainsi que de la taille du faisceau incident.

  20. Correction partielle des Effets de la Turbulence atmosphérique en Interférométrie optique: Traitement des Données et Développement d'Optiques adaptatives pour l'Interféromètre GI2T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vérinaud, Christophe

    2000-11-01

    Dans le domaine de la haute résolution angulaire en astronomie, les techniques de l'interférométrie optique et de l'optique adaptative sont en plein essor. La principale limitation de l'interférométrie est laturbulence atmosphérique qui entraîne des pertes de cohérence importantes, préjudiciables à la sensibilité et à la précision des mesures. L'optique adaptative appliquée à l'interférométrie va permettre un gain en sensibilité considérable. Le but de cette thèse est l'étude de l'influence de l'optique adaptative sur les mesures interférométriques et son application au Grand Interféromètre à DeuxTélescopes (GI2T) situé sur le Mont Calern dans le sud de la France. Deux problèmes principaux sont étudiés de manière théorique par des développements analytiques et des simulations numériques: le premier est le contrôle en temps réel de la variation des différences de marche optique, encore appelée piston différentiel, induite par l'optique adaptative ; le deuxième problème important est la calibration des mesures de contraste des franges dans le cas de la correction partielle. Je limite mon étude au cas d'un interféromètre multi-modes en courtes poses, mode de fonctionnement principal du GI2T également prévu sur le Very Large Telescope Interferometer installé au Cerro Paranal au Chili. Je développe une méthode de calibration des pertes de cohérence spatio-temporelles connaissant la fonction de structure des fronts d'onde corrigés. Je montre en particulier qu'il est possible d'estimer fréquence par fréquence la densité spectrale des images en courtes poses, méthode très utile pour augmenter la couverture du plan des fréquences spatiales dans l'observation d'objets étendus. La dernière partie de ce mémoire est consacrée au développements instrumentaux auxquels j'ai participé. J'ai développé un banc de qualification du système d'optique adaptative à courbure destiné au GI2T et j'ai étudié l

  1. Small Molecule-Mediated Cleavage of RNA in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Lirui

    2013-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) control gene expression by triggering the degradation of a mRNA via recruitment of RNase H or the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), respectively.[1] These approaches are hampered, however, by the poor cellular permeability of oligonucleotides. A small molecule approach to cleave RNA targets could obviate uptake issues. Several compounds can induce RNA cleavage in vitro,[2] however, to the best of our knowledge no small molecules have been previously described to cleave RNA in living cells. Herein, we describe the development of a potentially general approach to design small molecules that specifically cleave an RNA in a living cell, affecting biological function. Specifically, a designed, modularly assembled small molecule that binds the RNA that causes myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1)[3] was appended with a moiety that generates hydroxyl radicals upon irradiation. Cleavage of the transcript improves DM1-associated defects in cell culture, and compounds are non-toxic at an efficacious dose as determined by a MTT viability assay. This approach may allow for the site-specific cleavage and inactivation of other cellular RNAs.[4] Compounds that bind to and cleave RNA have the potential to serve as chemical genetics probes of function or lead therapeutics with spatial and temporal control. PMID:23280953

  2. Conserved themes in small-RNA-mediated transposon control

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Angélique; Hannon, Gregory J.

    2010-01-01

    Eukaryotes are engaged in a constant struggle against transposable elements, which have invaded and profoundly shaped their genomes. Over the past decade, a growing body of evidence has pointed to a role for small RNAs in transposon defense. Although the strategies used in different organisms vary in their details, they have strikingly similar general properties. Basically, all mechanisms consist of three components. First, transposon detection prompts the production of small RNAs, which are Piwi-interacting RNAs in some organisms and small interfering RNAs in others. Second, the population of small RNAs targeting active transposons is amplified through an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase-based or Slicer-based mechanism. Third, small RNAs are incorporated into Argonaute- or Piwi-containing effector complexes, which target transposon transcripts for post-transcriptional silencing and/or target transposon DNA for repressive chromatin modification and DNA methylation. These properties produce robust systems that limit the catastrophic consequences of transposon mobilization, which can result in the accumulation of deleterious mutations, changes in gene expression patterns, and conditions such as gonadal hypotrophy and sterility. PMID:18282709

  3. Big impacts by small RNAs in plant development.

    PubMed

    Chuck, George; Candela, Héctor; Hake, Sarah

    2009-02-01

    The identification and study of small RNAs, including microRNAs and trans-acting small interfering RNAs, have added a layer of complexity to the many pathways that regulate plant development. These molecules, which function as negative regulators of gene expression, are now known to have greatly expanded roles in a variety of developmental processes affecting all major plant structures, including meristems, leaves, roots, and inflorescences. Mutants with specific developmental phenotypes have also advanced our knowledge of the biogenesis and mode of action of these diverse small RNAs. In addition, previous models on the cell autonomy of microRNAs may have to be revised as more data accumulate supporting their long distance transport. As many of these small RNAs appear to be conserved across different species, knowledge gained from one species is expected to have general application. However, a few surprising differences in small RNA function seem to exist between monocots and dicots regarding meristem initiation and sex determination. Integrating these unique functions into the overall scheme for plant growth will give a more complete picture of how they have evolved as unique developmental systems.

  4. Small RNA profiles from virus-infected fresh market vegetables.

    PubMed

    Frizzi, Alessandra; Zhang, Yuanji; Kao, John; Hagen, Charles; Huang, Shihshieh

    2014-12-10

    Functional small RNAs, such as short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs), exist in freshly consumed fruits and vegetables. These siRNAs can be derived either from endogenous sequences or from viruses that infect them. Symptomatic tomatoes, watermelons, zucchini, and onions were purchased from grocery stores and investigated by small RNA sequencing. By aligning the obtained small RNA sequences to sequences of known viruses, four different viruses were identified as infecting these fruits and vegetables. Many of these virally derived small RNAs along with endogenous small RNAs were found to be highly complementary to human genes. However, the established history of safe consumption of these vegetables suggests that this sequence homology has little biological relevance. By extension, these results provide evidence for the safe use by humans and animals of genetically engineered crops using RNA-based suppression technologies, especially vegetable crops with virus resistance conferred by expression of siRNAs or miRNAs derived from viral sequences.

  5. Small RNA Detection by in Situ Hybridization Methods

    PubMed Central

    Urbanek, Martyna O.; Nawrocka, Anna U.; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J.

    2015-01-01

    Small noncoding RNAs perform multiple regulatory functions in cells, and their exogenous mimics are widely used in research and experimental therapies to interfere with target gene expression. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are the most thoroughly investigated representatives of the small RNA family, which includes short interfering RNAs (siRNAs), PIWI-associated RNA (piRNAs), and others. Numerous methods have been adopted for the detection and characterization of small RNAs, which is challenging due to their short length and low level of expression. These include molecular biology methods such as real-time RT-PCR, northern blotting, hybridization to microarrays, cloning and sequencing, as well as single cell miRNA detection by microscopy with in situ hybridization (ISH). In this review, we focus on the ISH method, including its fluorescent version (FISH), and we present recent methodological advances that facilitated its successful adaptation for small RNA detection. We discuss relevant technical aspects as well as the advantages and limitations of ISH. We also refer to numerous applications of small RNA ISH in basic research and molecular diagnostics. PMID:26068454

  6. A small molecule enhances RNA interference and promotes microRNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Ge; Li, Yujing; Zhang, Junliang; Li, Wendi; Szulwach, Keith E; Duan, Ranhui; Faghihi, Mohammad A; Khalil, Ahmad M; Lu, Lianghua; Paroo, Zain; Chan, Anthony W S; Shi, Zhangjie; Liu, Qinghua; Wahlestedt, Claes; He, Chuan; Jin, Peng

    2010-01-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) are sequence-specific post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Although major components of the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway have been identified, regulatory mechanisms for this pathway remain largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that the RNAi pathway can be modulated intracellularly by small molecules. We have developed a cell-based assay to monitor the activity of the RNAi pathway and find that the small-molecule enoxacin (Penetrex) enhances siRNA-mediated mRNA degradation and promotes the biogenesis of endogenous miRNAs. We show that this RNAi-enhancing activity depends on the trans-activation-responsive region RNA-binding protein. Our results provide a proof-of-principle demonstration that small molecules can be used to modulate the activity of the RNAi pathway. RNAi enhancers may be useful in the development of research tools and therapeutics. PMID:18641635

  7. Small Intestine Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your small intestine is the longest part of your digestive system - about twenty feet long! It connects your stomach to ... many times to fit inside your abdomen. Your small intestine does most of the digesting of the foods ...

  8. Small intestine (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The small intestine is the portion of the digestive system most responsible for absorption of nutrients from food into the ... the duodenum. This short first portion of the small intestine is followed by the jejunum and the ileum. ...

  9. Small bowel resection - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... chap 26. Read More Colon cancer Crohn disease Intestinal obstruction Small bowel resection Patient Instructions Bland diet Crohn ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Intestinal Cancer Intestinal Obstruction Small Intestine Disorders Browse the Encyclopedia A.D. ...

  10. Small Libraries, Big Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts,Gary

    2005-01-01

    Small libraries don't have the resources to adopt every new technology. It is important that small libraries operate strategically, adopting only those technologies that are the most beneficial to their patrons.

  11. Small Business Pedagogic Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billett, Stephen; Hernon-Tinning, Barnie; Ehrich, Lisa

    2003-01-01

    Understanding how learning for small businesses should best proceed constitutes a worthwhile, yet challenging, pedagogic project. In order to maintain their viability, small businesses need to be able to respond to new practices and tasks. Yet small businesses seem neither attracted to nor to value the kinds of taught courses that are the standard…

  12. Cytoskeleton-Dependent Transport as a Potential Target for Interfering with Post-transcriptional HuR mRNA Regulons

    PubMed Central

    Eberhardt, Wolfgang; Badawi, Amel; Biyanee, Abhiruchi; Pfeilschifter, Josef

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitous mRNA binding protein human antigen R (HuR), a member of the embryonal lethal abnormal vision protein family has a critical impact on the post-transcriptional control of AU-rich element bearing mRNA regulons implied in inflammation, senescence, and carcinogenesis. HuR in addition to mRNA stability can affect many other aspects of mRNA processing including splicing, polyadenylation, translation, modulation of miRNA repression, and intracellular mRNA trafficking. Since many of the identified HuR mRNA targets (“HuR mRNA regulons”) encode tumor-related proteins, HuR is not only discussed as an useful biomarker but also as promising therapeutic target for treatment of various human cancers. HuR which is most abundantly localized in the nucleus is translocated to the cytoplasm which is fundamental for most of the described HuR functions on target mRNAs. Accordingly, an elevation in cytoplasmic HuR was found in many tumors and correlated with a high grade of malignancy and a poor prognosis of patients. Therefore, direct interference with the intracellular trafficking of HuR offers an attractive approach to intervene with pathologically deregulated HuR functions. Data from several laboratories implicate that the integrity of the cytoskeleton is critical for HuR-mediated intracellular mRNA localization and translation. This review will particularly focus on drugs which have proven a direct inhibitory effect on HuR translocation. Based on the results from those studies, we will also discuss on the principle value of targeting cytoskeleton-dependent transport of HuR by natural or synthetic inhibitors as a potential therapeutic avenue for interfering with dysregulated post-transcriptional HuR mRNA regulons and related tumor cell functions. In spite of that, interfering with cytoplasmic HuR transport could highlight a so far underestimated action of microtubule inhibitors clinically used for cancer chemotherapy. PMID:27582706

  13. Silencing tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) with short interfering RNA reveals a role for TIMP-1 in hepatic stellate cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Fowell, Andrew J.; Collins, Jane E.; Duncombe, Dale R.; Pickering, Judith A.; Rosenberg, William M.C.; Benyon, R. Christopher

    2011-04-08

    Research highlights: {yields} Myofibroblastic, activated hepatic stellate cells (HSC) play a pivotal role in the development of liver fibrosis. {yields} We used short interfering RNA (siRNA) to investigate the effects of autocrine TIMP-1 and -2 on HSC proliferation. {yields} Specific silencing of TIMP-1, but not TIMP-2, significantly reduces HSC proliferation and is associated with reduced Akt phosphorylation. {yields} TIMP-1 is localised in part to the HSC nucleus. {yields} TIMP-1 might promote liver fibrosis by means other than its previously described anti-apoptotic effect on HSC. -- Abstract: Myofibroblastic, activated hepatic stellate cells (HSC) play a pivotal role in the development of liver fibrosis through the secretion of fibrillar collagens and the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 and -2. TIMPs are believed to promote hepatic fibrosis by inhibiting both matrix degradation and apoptosis of HSC. In other cell types, there is evidence that TIMP-1 has effects on proliferation, however the role of TIMPs in the regulation of HSC proliferation remains unexplored. Therefore, we have used short interfering RNA (siRNA) to investigate the effects of autocrine TIMP-1 and -2 on HSC proliferation. TIMP-1 and -2 siRNA were highly effective, producing peak target protein knockdown compared to negative control siRNA of 92% and 63%, respectively. Specific silencing of TIMP-1, using siRNA, significantly reduced HSC proliferation. TIMP-1 was localised in part to the HSC nucleus and TIMP-1 siRNA resulted in loss of both cytoplasmic and nuclear TIMP-1. Attenuated proliferation was associated with reduced Akt phosphorylation and was partially rescued by addition of recombinant TIMP-1. We have revealed a novel autocrine mitogenic effect of TIMP-1 on HSC, which may involve Akt-dependent and specific nuclear mechanisms of action. We suggest that TIMP-1 might promote liver fibrosis by means other than its previously described anti-apoptotic effect on HSC. Moreover

  14. PACT- and RIG-I-Dependent Activation of Type I Interferon Production by a Defective Interfering RNA Derived from Measles Virus Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Ting-Hin; Kew, Chun; Lui, Pak-Yin; Chan, Chi-Ping; Satoh, Takashi; Akira, Shizuo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The live attenuated measles virus vaccine is highly immunostimulatory. Identification and characterization of its components that activate the innate immune response might provide new strategies and agents for the rational design and development of chemically defined adjuvants. In this study, we report on the activation of type I interferon (IFN) production by a defective interfering (DI) RNA isolated from the Hu-191 vaccine strain of measles virus. We found that the Hu-191 virus induced IFN-β much more potently than the Edmonston strain. In the search for IFN-inducing species in Hu-191, we identified a DI RNA specifically expressed by this strain. This DI RNA, which was of the copy-back type, was predicted to fold into a hairpin structure with a long double-stranded stem region of 206 bp, and it potently induced the expression of IFN-β. Its IFN-β-inducing activity was further enhanced when both cytoplasmic RNA sensor RIG-I and its partner, PACT, were overexpressed. On the contrary, this activity was abrogated in cells deficient in PACT or RIG-I. The DI RNA was found to be associated with PACT in infected cells. In addition, both the 5′-di/triphosphate end and the double-stranded stem region on the DI RNA were essential for its activation of PACT and RIG-I. Taken together, our findings support a model in which a viral DI RNA is sensed by PACT and RIG-I to initiate an innate antiviral response. Our work might also provide a foundation for identifying physiological PACT ligands and developing novel adjuvants or antivirals. IMPORTANCE The live attenuated measles virus vaccine is one of the most successful human vaccines and has largely contained the devastating impact of a highly contagious virus. Identifying the components in this vaccine that stimulate the host immune response and understanding their mechanism of action might help to design and develop better adjuvants, vaccines, antivirals, and immunotherapeutic agents. We identified and characterized

  15. Complexes of Sendai virus NP-P and P-L proteins are required for defective interfering particle genome replication in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Horikami, S M; Curran, J; Kolakofsky, D; Moyer, S A

    1992-01-01

    We present evidence that the formation of NP-P and P-L protein complexes is essential for replication of the genome of Sendai defective interfering (DI-H) virus in vitro, using extracts of cells expressing these viral proteins from plasmids. Optimal replication of DI-H nucleocapsid RNA required extracts of cells transfected with critical amounts and ratios of each of the plasmids and was three- to fivefold better than replication with a control extract prepared from a natural virus infection. Extracts in which NP and P proteins were coexpressed supported replication of the genome of purified DI-H virus which contained endogenous polymerase proteins, but extracts in which NP and P were expressed separately and then mixed were inactive. Similarly, the P and L proteins must be coexpressed for biological activity. The replication data thus suggest that two protein complexes, NP-P and P-L, are required for nucleocapsid RNA replication and that these complexes must form during or soon after synthesis of the proteins. Biochemical evidence in support of the formation of each complex includes coimmunoprecipitation of both proteins of each complex with an antibody specific for one component and cosedimentation of the subunits of each complex. We propose that the P-L complex serves as the RNA polymerase and NP-P is required for encapsidation of newly synthesized RNA. Images PMID:1321276

  16. POZ domain transcription factor, FBI-1, represses transcription of ADH5/FDH by interacting with the zinc finger and interfering with DNA binding activity of Sp1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Kee; Suh, Dongchul; Edenberg, Howard J; Hur, Man-Wook

    2002-07-26

    The POZ domain is a protein-protein interaction motif that is found in many transcription factors, which are important for development, oncogenesis, apoptosis, and transcription repression. We cloned the POZ domain transcription factor, FBI-1, that recognizes the cis-element (bp -38 to -22) located just upstream of the core Sp1 binding sites (bp -22 to +22) of the ADH5/FDH minimal promoter (bp -38 to +61) in vitro and in vivo, as revealed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. The ADH5/FDH minimal promoter is potently repressed by the FBI-1. Glutathione S-transferase fusion protein pull-down showed that the POZ domains of FBI-1, Plzf, and Bcl-6 directly interact with the zinc finger DNA binding domain of Sp1. DNase I footprinting assays showed that the interaction prevents binding of Sp1 to the GC boxes of the ADH5/FDH promoter. Gal4-POZ domain fusions targeted proximal to the GC boxes repress transcription of the Gal4 upstream activator sequence-Sp1-adenovirus major late promoter. Our data suggest that POZ domain represses transcription by interacting with Sp1 zinc fingers and by interfering with the DNA binding activity of Sp1.

  17. SIRT1 inhibits EV71 genome replication and RNA translation by interfering with the viral polymerase and 5′UTR RNA

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yang; Wang, Lvyin; Cui, Jin; Song, Yu; Luo, Zhen; Chen, Junbo; Xiong, Ying; Zhang, Qi; Liu, Fang; Ho, Wenzhe; Liu, Yingle; Wu, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enterovirus 71 (EV71) possesses a single-stranded positive RNA genome that contains a single open reading frame (ORF) flanked by a 5′ untranslated region (5′UTR) and a polyadenylated 3′UTR. Here, we demonstrated that EV71 activates the production of silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (SIRT1), a histone deacetylase (HDAC). EV71 further stimulates SIRT1 sumoylation and deacetylase activity, and enhances SIRT1 translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. More interestingly, activated SIRT1 subsequently binds with the EV71 3Dpol protein (a viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, RdRp) to repress the acetylation and RdRp activity of 3Dpol, resulting in the attenuation of viral genome replication. Moreover, SIRT1 interacts with the cloverleaf structure of the EV71 RNA 5′UTR to inhibit viral RNA transcription, and binds to the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) of the EV71 5′UTR to attenuate viral RNA translation. Thus, EV71 stimulates SIRT1 production and activity, which in turn represses EV71 genome replication by inhibiting viral polymerase, and attenuates EV71 RNA transcription and translation by interfering with viral RNA. These results uncover a new function of SIRT1 and reveal a new mechanism underlying the regulation of EV71 replication. PMID:27875274

  18. Exogenous carbon monoxide inhibits neutrophil infiltration in LPS-induced sepsis by interfering with FPR1 via p38 MAPK but not GRK2

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Qin, Weiting; Song, Mingming; Zhang, Yisen; Sun, Bingwei

    2016-01-01

    Excessive neutrophil infiltration in vital organs is life-threatening to patients who suffer from sepsis. We identified a critical role of exogenous carbon monoxide (CO) in the inhibition of neutrophil infiltration during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced sepsis. CO delivered from carbon monoxide-releasing molecule 2 (CORM-2) dramatically increased the survival rate of C57BL/6 mice subjected to LPS in vivo. CORM-2 significantly suppressed neutrophil infiltration in liver and lung as well as markers of inflammatory responses. Affymetrix GeneChip array analysis revealed that the increased expression of chemoattractant receptor formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) may contribute to the excessive neutrophil infiltration. The under agarose migration assay demonstrated that LPS stimulation promoted migration to the ligand of FPR1, N-Formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP) but that CORM-2 treatment inhibited this promotion. Further studies demonstrated that CORM-2 internalized FPR1 by inhibiting p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) but not G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2), which may explain the inhibitory effect of CORM-2 on LPS-stimulated neutrophils. In summary, our study demonstrates that exogenous CO inhibits sepsis-induced neutrophil infiltration by interfering with FPR1 via p38 MAPK but not GRK2. PMID:27144520

  19. Inhibition of immunologic injury of cultured cells infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus: role of defective interfering virus in regulating viral antigenic expression

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, RM; Oldstone, MBA

    1977-01-01

    The expression of viral antigens on the surfaces of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV)-infected L-929 cells peaked 2-4 days postinfection and thereafter precipitously declined. Little or no viral antigen was expressed on the plasma membrane surfaces of persistently infected cells, but LCMV antigens were clearly present in the cytoplasms of most of those cells. Cells early after acute infection (days 2-4) were lysed by both virus-specific antibody and complement (C) and immune T lymphocytes. To the contrary, antibody and C did not kill persistently infected cells, but T lymphocytes did kill such cells although at a lower efficiency than acutely infected cells. The expression of viral antigens on the surfaces of infected cells was regulated by the virus- cell interaction in the absence of immune reagents and was closely associated with defective interfering (DI) LCMV interference. DI LCMV, per se, blocked the synthesis and cell surface expression of LCMV antigens, and DI LCMV generation immediately preceded a precipitous reduction in cell surface antigenicity during the acute infection. Persistently infected cells produced DI LCMV but no detectable S LCMV. Peritoneal cells isolated from mice persistently infected with LCMV resembled cultured persistently infected cells in their reduced expression of cell surface antigens and their resistance to LCMV superinfection. It is proposed that DI virus-mediated interference with viral protein synthesis may allow cells to escape immune surveillance during persistent infections. PMID:301173

  20. Effectiveness of Cyantraniliprole for Managing Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) and Interfering with Transmission of Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus on Tomato.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Rafael; Schuster, David J; Peres, Natalia A; Mangandi, Jozer; Hasing, Tomas; Trexler, Fred; Kalb, Steve; Portillo, Héctor E; Marçon, Paula C; Annan, I B

    2015-06-01

    Cyantraniliprole is the second xylem-systemic active ingredient in the new anthranilic diamide class. Greenhouse (2006), growth chamber (2007), and field studies (2009-2010) were conducted to determine the efficacy of cyantraniliprole for managing Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) biotype B and in interfering with transmission of tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) by this whitefly. Cyantraniliprole applied as soil treatments (200 SC) or foliar sprays (100 OD) provided excellent adult whitefly control, TYLCV suppression, and reduced oviposition and nymph survival, comparable to current standards. The positive results observed in these greenhouse experiments with a high level of insect pressure (10× the field threshold of one adult per plant) and disease pressure (five adults per plant, with a high level of confidence that TYLCV virulent adults were used), indicate a great potential for cyantraniliprole to be used in a whitefly management program. Field evaluations of soil drench treatments confirmed the suppression of TYLCV transmission demonstrated in the greenhouse studies. Field studies in 2009 and 2010 showed that cyantraniliprole (200 SC) provided TYLCV suppression for 2 wk after a drench application, when using a susceptible (2009) or imidacloprid-tolerant (2010) whitefly population. Cyantraniliprole was demonstrated to be a promising tool for management of TYLCV in tomato production, which is very difficult and expensive, and which has limited options. The integration of cyantraniliprole into a resistance management program will help to ensure the continued sustainability of this and current insecticides used for the management of insect vectors, including whiteflies and the TYLCV they spreads.

  1. Respiratory syncytial virus infection in Fischer 344 rats is attenuated by short interfering RNA against the RSV-NS1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiaoyuan; Zhang, Weidong; Lockey, Richard F; Auais, Alexander; Piedimonte, Giovanni; Mohapatra, Shyam S

    2007-01-01

    Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes severe bronchiolitis and is a risk factor for asthma. Since there is no commercially available vaccine against RSV, a short interfering RNA against the RSV-NS1gene (siNS1) was developed and its potential for decreasing RSV infection and infection-associated inflammation in rats was tested. Methods Plasmids encoding siNS1 or an unrelated siRNA were complexed with a chitosan nanoparticle delivery agent and administered intranasally. Control animals received a plasmid for a non-specific siRNA. After expression of the plasmid in lung cells for 24 hours, the rats were intranasally infected with RSV. Results Prophylaxis with siNS1 significantly reduced lung RSV titers and airway hyperreactivity to methacholine challenge compared to the control group. Lung sections from siNS1-treated rats showed a sizable reduction in goblet cell hyperplasia and in lung infiltration by inflammatory cells, both characteristics of asthma. Also, bronchoalveolar lavage samples from siNS1-treated animals had fewer eosinophils. Treatment of rats with siNS1 prior to RSV exposure was effective in reducing virus titers in the lung and in preventing the inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness associated with the infection that has been linked to development of asthma. Conclusion The use of siNS1 prophylaxis may be an effective method for preventing RSV bronchiolitis and potentially reducing the later development of asthma associated with severe respiratory infections. PMID:17270047

  2. Protein quantification and its tolerance for different interfering reagents using the BCA-method with regard to 2D SDS PAGE.

    PubMed

    Krieg, Rene C; Dong, Yan; Schwamborn, Kristina; Knuechel, Ruth

    2005-10-31

    Measuring the protein content of a sample is a mandatory and frequently practiced procedure in the lab. Although the procedure is quite simple and convenient to perform with commercially available kits, incompatible reagents in the lysate can cause problems in the quality of measurement. Unfortunately these reagents are cornerstones of high efficiency lysing buffers, e.g. high amounts of urea or beta-mercaptoethanol. In this study we addressed the tolerance of the well-known BCA-assay (bicinchoninic acid) to various reagents in different concentrations, with special regard to a subsequent 2D-gelelectrophoresis. As a result, the kit is incompatible with the recipes of regular 2D-buffers. Also, when mixing two different reagents interfering effects will occur in a non-predictable way. Therefore we established a new method to quantify protein content in lysates ready for 2D-gelelectrophoresis: by mixing an aliquot with SDS, an equilibration is performed to that the sample can be run on a regular 1D SDS PAGE. Image analysis following fluorescence staining (SYPRO Ruby) reveals the absolute protein content in comparison to a BSA dilution curve processed accordingly.

  3. Serenoa repens (Permixon) inhibits the 5alpha-reductase activity of human prostate cancer cell lines without interfering with PSA expression.

    PubMed

    Habib, Fouad K; Ross, Margaret; Ho, Clement K H; Lyons, Valerie; Chapman, Karen

    2005-03-20

    The phytotherapeutic agent Serenoa repens is an effective dual inhibitor of 5alpha-reductase isoenzyme activity in the prostate. Unlike other 5alpha-reductase inhibitors, Serenoa repens induces its effects without interfering with the cellular capacity to secrete PSA. Here, we focussed on the possible pathways that might differentiate the action of Permixon from that of synthetic 5alpha-reductase inhibitors. We demonstrate that Serenoa repens, unlike other 5alpha-reductase inhibitors, does not inhibit binding between activated AR and the steroid receptor-binding consensus in the promoter region of the PSA gene. This was shown by a combination of techniques: assessment of the effect of Permixon on androgen action in the LNCaP prostate cancer cell line revealed no suppression of AR and maintenance of PSA protein expression at control levels. This was consistent with reporter gene experiments showing that Permixon failed to interfere with AR-mediated transcriptional activation of PSA and that both testosterone and DHT were equally effective at maintaining this activity. Our results demonstrate that despite Serenoa repens effective inhibition of 5alpha-reductase activity in the prostate, it did not suppress PSA secretion. Therefore, we confirm the therapeutic advantage of Serenoa repens over other 5alpha-reductase inhibitors as treatment with the phytotherapeutic agent will permit the continuous use of PSA measurements as a useful biomarker for prostate cancer screening and for evaluating tumour progression.

  4. Interfering with Bacterial Quorum Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Kerstin; Steinbach, Anke; Helms, Volkhard

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) describes the exchange of chemical signals in bacterial populations to adjust the bacterial phenotypes according to the density of bacterial cells. This serves to express phenotypes that are advantageous for the group and ensure bacterial survival. To do so, bacterial cells synthesize autoinducer (AI) molecules, release them to the environment, and take them up. Thereby, the AI concentration reflects the cell density. When the AI concentration exceeds a critical threshold in the cells, the AI may activate the expression of virulence-associated genes or of luminescent proteins. It has been argued that targeting the QS system puts less selective pressure on these pathogens and should avoid the development of resistant bacteria. Therefore, the molecular components of QS systems have been suggested as promising targets for developing new anti-infective compounds. Here, we review the QS systems of selected gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, namely, Vibrio fischeri, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus, and discuss various antivirulence strategies based on blocking different components of the QS machinery. PMID:26819549

  5. Self-Interfering Wave Packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colas, David; Laussy, Fabrice P.

    2016-01-01

    We study the propagation of noninteracting polariton wave packets. We show how two qualitatively different concepts of mass that arise from the peculiar polariton dispersion lead to a new type of particlelike object from noninteracting fields—much like self-accelerating beams—shaped by the Rabi coupling out of Gaussian initial states. A divergence and change of sign of the diffusive mass results in a "mass wall" on which polariton wave packets bounce back. Together with the Rabi dynamics, this yields propagation of ultrafast subpackets and ordering of a spacetime crystal.

  6. Chaos Driven by Interfering Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrard, S.; Labousse, M.; Fort, E.; Couder, Y.

    2014-09-01

    The transmission of information can couple two entities of very different nature, one of them serving as a memory for the other. Here we study the situation in which information is stored in a wave field and serves as a memory that pilots the dynamics of a particle. Such a system can be implemented by a bouncing drop generating surface waves sustained by a parametric forcing. The motion of the resulting "walker" when confined in a harmonic potential well is generally disordered. Here we show that these trajectories correspond to chaotic regimes characterized by intermittent transitions between a discrete set of states. At any given time, the system is in one of these states characterized by a double quantization of size and angular momentum. A low dimensional intermittency determines their respective probabilities. They thus form an eigenstate basis of decomposition for what would be observed as a superposition of states if all measurements were intrusive.

  7. Small Business Procurement Event

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-13

    Small Business Procurement Event 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK...distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES NDIA 27th Navy Gold Coast Small Business Procurement Event , 12-13 Aug 2014, San Diego, CA. 14. ABSTRACT...18 Target the Small Business Accessible Market within the Department of the Navy $77.8B Department of the Navy Total SB Eligible Spend

  8. Small Wastewater Systems Research

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Small communities face barriers to building and maintaining effective wastewater treatment services, challenges include financial/economic limitations, lack of managerial training and geographic isolation/remoteness.

  9. Peptides Used in the Delivery of Small Noncoding RNA

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is an endogenous process in which small noncoding RNAs, including small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs), post-transcriptionally regulate gene expressions. In general, siRNA and miRNA/miRNA mimics are similar in nature and activity except their origin and specificity. Although both siRNAs and miRNAs have been extensively studied as novel therapeutics for a wide range of diseases, the large molecular weight, anionic surface charges, instability in blood circulation, and intracellular trafficking to the RISC after cellular uptake have hindered the translation of these RNAs from bench to clinic. As a result, a great variety of delivery systems have been investigated for safe and effective delivery of small noncoding RNAs. Among these systems, peptides, especially cationic peptides, have emerged as a promising type of carrier due to their inherent ability to condense negatively charged RNAs, ease of synthesis, controllable size, and tunable structure. In this review, we will focus on three major types of cationic peptides, including poly(l-lysine) (PLL), protamine, and cell penetrating peptides (CPP), as well as peptide targeting ligands that have been extensively used in RNA delivery. The delivery strategies, applications, and limitations of these cationic peptides in siRNA/miRNA delivery will be discussed. PMID:25157701

  10. Small RNAs of Sequoia sempervirens during rejuvenation and phase change.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y-T; Shen, C-H; Lin, W-D; Chu, H-A; Huang, B-L; Kuo, C-I; Yeh, K-W; Huang, L-C; Chang, I-F

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the population of small RNAs (sRNAs) was studied in the gymnosperm Sequoia sempervirens during phase changes, specifically in the juvenile, adult and rejuvenated plants obtained in vitro. The potential target genes of Sequoia sRNAs were predicted through bioinformatics. Rejuvenation is a pivotal process in woody plants that enables them to regain their growth potential, which results in the recovery of physiologic and molecular characteristics that were lost when the juveniles mature into adult plants. The results from the five repeated graftings of juvenile, adult and rejuvenated plants in vitro showed that sRNAs could be classified into structural RNAs (Group I), small interfering RNAs (Group II), annotated microRNAs (Group III, and unannotated sRNAs (Group IV). The results indicate that only 573 among 15,485,415 sRNAs (Groups III and IV) had significantly different expression patterns associated with rejuvenation and phase change. A total of 215 sRNAs exhibited up-regulated expression patterns in adult shoots, and 358 sRNAs were down-regulated. Expression profiling and prediction of possible target genes of these unique small RNAs indicate possible functions in the control of photosynthetic efficiency and rooting competence abundance during plant rejuvenation. Moreover, the increase in SsmiR156 and decrease in SsmiR172 during plant rejuvenation suggested that these two microRNAs extensively affect phase transition.

  11. Small RNAs Originated from Pseudogenes: cis- or trans-Acting?

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xingyi; Zhang, Zhaolei; Gerstein, Mark B.; Zheng, Deyou

    2009-01-01

    Pseudogenes are significant components of eukaryotic genomes, and some have acquired novel regulatory roles. To date, no study has characterized rice pseudogenes systematically or addressed their impact on the structure and function of the rice genome. In this genome-wide study, we have identified 11,956 non-transposon-related rice pseudogenes, most of which are from gene duplications. About 12% of the rice protein-coding genes, half of which are in singleton families, have a pseudogene paralog. Interestingly, we found that 145 of these pseudogenes potentially gave rise to antisense small RNAs after examining ∼1.5 million small RNAs from developing rice grains. The majority (>50%) of these antisense RNAs are 24-nucleotides long, a feature often seen in plant repeat-associated small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) produced by RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RDR2) and Dicer-like protein 3 (DCL3), suggesting that some pseudogene-derived siRNAs may be implicated in repressing pseudogene transcription (i.e., cis-acting). Multiple lines of evidence, however, indicate that small RNAs from rice pseudogenes might also function as natural antisense siRNAs either by interacting with the complementary sense RNAs from functional parental genes (38 cases) or by forming double-strand RNAs with transcripts of adjacent paralogous pseudogenes (2 cases) (i.e., trans-acting). Further examinations of five additional small RNA libraries revealed that pseudogene-derived antisense siRNAs could be produced in specific rice developmental stages or physiological growth conditions, suggesting their potentially important roles in normal rice development. In summary, our results show that pseudogenes derived from protein-coding genes are prevalent in the rice genome, and a subset of them are strong candidates for producing small RNAs with novel regulatory roles. Our findings suggest that pseudogenes of exapted functions may be a phenomenon ubiquitous in eukaryotic organisms. PMID:19649160

  12. IBM Small Business Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Business Machines Corp., Armonk, NY.

    A telephone survey conducted March 15-22, 1991, examined how small businesses are currently performing. Interviewees were 400 small business owners randomly selected from a Dun and Bradstreet list of companies with 50 or fewer employees. Major findings were as follows: (1) owners were survivors, highly confident in their own abilities, and…

  13. Industrial Education. "Small Engines".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parma City School District, OH.

    Part of a series of curriculum guides dealing with industrial education in junior high schools, this guide provides the student with information and manipulative experiences on small gasoline engines. Included are sections on shop adjustment, safety, small engines, internal combustion, engine construction, four stroke engines, two stroke engines,…

  14. Sensitive Small Area Photometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levenson, M. D.

    1970-01-01

    Describes a simple photometer capable of measuring small light intensities over small areas. The inexpensive, easy-to- construct instrument is intended for use in a student laboratory to measure the light intensities in a diffraction experiment from single or multiple slits. Typical experimental results are presented along with the theoretical…

  15. Small Schools, Big Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halsey, R. John

    2011-01-01

    Historically, small schools have played a very important role in the provision of schooling in Australia. Numerically, using an enrollment of 200 or less, small schools represent approximately 45% of the schools in Australia. Population growth and the consequences of this, in particular for food production, water and energy, mean that the…

  16. Small Wind Information (Postcard)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative maintains a website section devoted to information about small wind turbines for homeowners, ranchers, and small businesses. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to this online resource.

  17. Big Project, Small Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schon, Jennifer A.; Eitel, Karla B.; Bingaman, Deirdre; Miller, Brant G.; Rittenburg, Rebecca A.

    2014-01-01

    Donnelly, Idaho, is a small town surrounded by private ranches and Forest Service property. Through the center of Donnelly runs Boulder Creek, a small tributary feeding into Cascade Lake Reservoir. Boulder Creek originates from a mountain lake north of Donnelly. Since 1994 it has been listed as "impaired" by the Environmental Protection…

  18. Small Animal Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livesey, Dennis W.; Fong, Stephen

    This small animal care course guide is designed for students who will be seeking employment in veterinary hospitals, kennels, grooming shops, pet shops, and small-animal laboratories. The guide begins with an introductory section that gives the educational philosophy of the course, job categories and opportunities, units of instruction required…

  19. Small Groups in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suessmuth, Patrick

    1974-01-01

    Small groups can sometimes be difficult to set up and work with properly. A number of tips for small group instruction are divided into seven areas: (1) presenting tasks; (2) group seating; (3) task time; (4) answering questions; (5) teacher's role in observing groups; (6) group noise level patterns; and (7) serial take-ups. (BP)

  20. Small Soil Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seevers, Elmer R.

    1978-01-01

    Describes an inexpensive technique for providing student opportunities to observe and identify the variety of small animals living in the first few inches below the surface of the soil. A classification key to some small soil animals is also presented. (HM)

  1. Ginsenoside metabolite compound K exerts joint-protective effect by interfering with synoviocyte function mediated by TNF-α and Tumor necrosis factor receptor type 2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Chen, Jingyu; Luo, Xuexia; Zhang, Ying; Si, Ming; Wu, Huaxun; Yan, Chang; Wei, Wei

    2016-01-15

    Ginsenoside metabolite compound K (CK), metabolite of the ginsenoside, is considered to exert numerous pharmacological efficacies of ginsenoside, including anti-inflammation and immunoregulatory effects. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a multi-systemic autoimmune disease characterized by hyperplastic synovial membrane and systemic inflammation, which ultimately lead to progressive destructive inflammatory arthropathy. To evaluate the potential joint-protective effects of CK and the underlying mechanism, adjuvant arthritis (AA) was induced by complete Freund's adjuvant in rats. After the onset of arthritis, The effect of CK on AA rats was evaluated by histopathology of the joint. The proliferation of fibroblast-like synoviocyte(FLS) was assayed by the Cell Counting Kit-8.The migration of FLS was assayed by transwell migration assay. Cytokines in the supernatant from FLS were measured by ELISA kit. Expression of Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Type 1(TNFR1) and Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Type 2(TNFR2) were detected by immunostaining analysis and western blot analysis. CK (80mg/kg) significantly ameliorated the histopathological change of joint in AA rats, balanced the RANKL/OPG ratio and attenuated the proliferation and migration of AA-FLS. CK suppressed the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and downregulated the expression of TNFR2 on AA-FLS. In vitro CK also significantly suppressed proliferation, migration and secretion of AA-FLS mediated by TNF-α. Further studies showed that the effects of CK on AA-FLS were reversed by using glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist (mifepristone). Our data suggest that CK exerts joint-protective effect by interfering with synoviocyte function mediated by TNF-α and TNFR2, and this effect may be mediated by GR.

  2. Human translocation liposarcoma-CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) homologous protein (TLS-CHOP) oncoprotein prevents adipocyte differentiation by directly interfering with C/EBPbeta function.

    PubMed

    Adelmant, G; Gilbert, J D; Freytag, S O

    1998-06-19

    Human translocation liposarcoma (TLS)-CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) homologous protein (CHOP) is a fusion oncoprotein found specifically in a malignant tumor of adipose tissue and results from a t(12;16) translocation that fuses the amino-terminal part of TLS to the entire coding region of CHOP. Being that CHOP is a member of the C/EBP transcription factor family, proteins that comprise part of the adipocyte differentiation machinery, we examined whether TLS-CHOP blocked adipocyte differentiation by directly interfering with C/EBP function. Using a single-step retroviral infection protocol, either wild-type or mutant TLS-CHOP were co-expressed along with C/EBPbeta in naïve NIH3T3 cells, and their ability to inhibit C/EBPbeta-driven adipogenesis was determined. TLS-CHOP was extremely effective at blocking adipocyte differentiation when expressed at a level comparable to that observed in human myxoid liposarcoma. This effect of TLS-CHOP required a functional leucine zipper domain and correlated with its ability to heterodimerize with C/EBPbeta and inhibit C/EBPbeta DNA binding and transactivation activity in situ. In contrast, the TLS-CHOP basic region was dispensable, making it unlikely that the inhibitory effect of TLS-CHOP is attributable to unscheduled gene expression resulting from TLS-CHOP's putative transactivation activity. Another adipogenic transcription factor, PPARgamma2, was able to rescue TLS-CHOP-inhibited cells, indicating that TLS-CHOP interferes primarily with C/EBPbeta-driven adipogenesis and not with other requisite events of the adipocyte differentiation program. Together, the results demonstrate that TLS-CHOP blocks adipocyte differentiation by directly preventing C/EBPbeta from binding to and transactivating its target genes. Moreover, they provide strong support for the thesis that a blockade to normal differentiation is an important aspect of the cancer process.

  3. The Slicer Activity of ARGONAUTE1 Is Required Specifically for the Phasing, Not Production, of Trans-Acting Short Interfering RNAs in Arabidopsis[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Marchais, Antonin; Poulsen, Christian; Hauptmann, Judith; Meister, Gunter

    2016-01-01

    ARGONAUTE1 (AGO1) mediates posttranscriptional silencing by microRNAs (miRNAs) and short interfering RNAS (siRNAs). AGO1-catalyzed RNA cleavage (slicing) represses miRNA targets, but current models also highlight the roles of slicing in formation of siRNAs and siRNA-AGO1 complexes. miRNA-guided slicing is required for biogenesis of phased, trans-acting siRNAs (tasiRNAs), whose cleaved precursor fragments are converted to double-stranded RNA by RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 6 (RDR6). In addition, unwinding of duplex siRNA bound to AGO1 requires passenger strand cleavage in vitro. In this study, we analyze how mutation of four metal ion-coordinating residues of Arabidopsis thaliana AGO1 affects slicer activity in vitro and siRNA function in vivo. We show that while all four residues are required for slicer activity, they do not contribute equally to catalysis. Moreover, passenger strand cleavage is required for assembly of active AGO1-siRNA complexes in vivo, and many AGO1-bound siRNAs are trimmed in the absence of slicer activity. Remarkably, seedlings defective in AGO1 slicer activity produce abundant siRNAs from tasiRNA loci in vivo. These siRNAs depend on RDR6 and SUPPRESSOR OF GENE SILENCING3, but unlike wild-type tasiRNAs, they are unphased. These results demonstrate that slicing is solely required for phase definition of tasiRNAs, and they strongly support recruitment of RDR6 by AGO1 rather than by cleavage fragments. PMID:27354557

  4. Small GTPases and cilia.

    PubMed

    Li, Yujie; Hu, Jinghua

    2011-01-01

    Small GTPases are key molecular switches that bind and hydrolyze GTP in diverse membrane- and cytoskeleton-related cellular processes. Recently, mounting evidences have highlighted the role of various small GTPases, including the members in Arf/Arl, Rab, and Ran subfamilies, in cilia formation and function. Once overlooked as an evolutionary vestige, the primary cilium has attracted more and more attention in last decade because of its role in sensing various extracellular signals and the association between cilia dysfunction and a wide spectrum of human diseases, now called ciliopathies. Here we review recent advances about the function of small GTPases in the context of cilia, and the correlation between the functional impairment of small GTPases and ciliopathies. Understanding of these cellular processes is of fundamental importance for broadening our view of cilia development and function in normal and pathological states and for providing valuable insights into the role of various small GTPases in disease processes, and their potential as therapeutic targets.

  5. Technology for small spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This report gives the results of a study by the National Research Council's Panel on Small Spacecraft Technology that reviewed NASA's technology development program for small spacecraft and assessed technology within the U.S. government and industry that is applicable to small spacecraft. The panel found that there is a considerable body of advanced technology currently available for application by NASA and the small spacecraft industry that could provide substantial improvement in capability and cost over those technologies used for current NASA small spacecraft. These technologies are the result of developments by commercial companies, Department of Defense agencies, and to a lesser degree NASA. The panel also found that additional technologies are being developed by these same entities that could provide additional substantial improvement if development is successfully completed. Recommendations for future technology development efforts by NASA across a broad technological spectrum are made.

  6. Three groups of transposable elements with contrasting copy number dynamics and host responses in the maize (Zea mays ssp. mays) genome.

    PubMed

    Diez, Concepcion M; Meca, Esteban; Tenaillon, Maud I; Gaut, Brandon S

    2014-04-01

    Most angiosperm nuclear DNA is repetitive and derived from silenced transposable elements (TEs). TE silencing requires substantial resources from the plant host, including the production of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Thus, the interaction between TEs and siRNAs is a critical aspect of both the function and the evolution of plant genomes. Yet the co-evolutionary dynamics between these two entities remain poorly characterized. Here we studied the organization of TEs within the maize (Zea mays ssp mays) genome, documenting that TEs fall within three groups based on the class and copy numbers. These groups included DNA elements, low copy RNA elements and higher copy RNA elements. The three groups varied statistically in characteristics that included length, location, age, siRNA expression and 24:22 nucleotide (nt) siRNA targeting ratios. In addition, the low copy retroelements encompassed a set of TEs that had previously been shown to decrease expression within a 24 nt siRNA biogenesis mutant (mop1). To investigate the evolutionary dynamics of the three groups, we estimated their abundance in two landraces, one with a genome similar in size to that of the maize reference and the other with a 30% larger genome. For all three accessions, we assessed TE abundance as well as 22 nt and 24 nt siRNA content within leaves. The high copy number retroelements are under targeted similarly by siRNAs among accessions, appear to be born of a rapid bust of activity, and may be currently transpositionally dead or limited. In contrast, the lower copy number group of retrolements are targeted more dynamically and have had a long and ongoing history of transposition in the maize genome.

  7. SmallSat Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petropulos, Dolores; Bittner, David; Murawski, Robert; Golden, Bert

    2015-01-01

    The SmallSat has an unrealized potential in both the private industry and in the federal government. Currently over 70 companies, 50 universities and 17 governmental agencies are involved in SmallSat research and development. In 1994, the U.S. Army Missile and Defense mapped the moon using smallSat imagery. Since then Smart Phones have introduced this imagery to the people of the world as diverse industries watched this trend. The deployment cost of smallSats is also greatly reduced compared to traditional satellites due to the fact that multiple units can be deployed in a single mission. Imaging payloads have become more sophisticated, smaller and lighter. In addition, the growth of small technology obtained from private industries has led to the more widespread use of smallSats. This includes greater revisit rates in imagery, significantly lower costs, the ability to update technology more frequently and the ability to decrease vulnerability of enemy attacks. The popularity of smallSats show a changing mentality in this fast paced world of tomorrow. What impact has this created on the NASA communication networks now and in future years? In this project, we are developing the SmallSat Relational Database which can support a simulation of smallSats within the NASA SCaN Compatability Environment for Networks and Integrated Communications (SCENIC) Modeling and Simulation Lab. The NASA Space Communications and Networks (SCaN) Program can use this modeling to project required network support needs in the next 10 to 15 years. The SmallSat Rational Database could model smallSats just as the other SCaN databases model the more traditional larger satellites, with a few exceptions. One being that the smallSat Database is designed to be built-to-order. The SmallSat database holds various hardware configurations that can be used to model a smallSat. It will require significant effort to develop as the research material can only be populated by hand to obtain the unique data

  8. Small satellite product assurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demontlivault, J.; Cadelec, Jacques

    1993-01-01

    In order to increase the interest in small satellites, their cost must be reduced; reducing product assurance costs induced by quality requirements is a major objective. For a logical approach, small satellites are classified in three main categories: satellites for experimental operations with a short lifetime, operational satellites manufactured in small mass with long lifetime requirements, operational satellites (long lifetime required), of which only a few models are produced. The various requirements as regards the product assurance are examined for each satellite category: general requirements for space approach, reliability, electronic components, materials and processes, quality assurance, documentation, tests, and management. Ideal product assurance system integrates quality teams and engineering teams.

  9. Small Bowel Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Thomas; Zaanan, Aziz; Mary, Florence; Afchain, Pauline; Manfredi, Sylvain; Evans, Thomas Ronald Jeffry

    2016-09-01

    Small bowel adenocarcinomas (SBAs) are rare tumors, but their incidence is increasing. The most common primary location is the duodenum. Even though SBAs are more often sporadic, some diseases are risk factors. Early diagnosis of small bowel adenocarcinoma remains difficult, despite significant radiologic and endoscopic progress. After R0 surgical resection, the main prognostic factor is lymph node invasion. An international randomized trial (BALLAD [Benefit of Adjuvant Chemotherapy For Small Bowel Adenocarcinoma] study) will evaluate the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy. For metastatic disease, retrospectives studies suggest that platinum-based chemotherapy is the most effective treatment. Phase II studies are ongoing to evaluate targeted therapy in metastatic SBA.

  10. How small are small mutation rates?

    PubMed

    Wu, Bin; Gokhale, Chaitanya S; Wang, Long; Traulsen, Arne

    2012-04-01

    We consider evolutionary game dynamics in a finite population of size N. When mutations are rare, the population is monomorphic most of the time. Occasionally a mutation arises. It can either reach fixation or go extinct. The evolutionary dynamics of the process under small mutation rates can be approximated by an embedded Markov chain on the pure states. Here we analyze how small the mutation rate should be to make the embedded Markov chain a good approximation by calculating the difference between the real stationary distribution and the approximated one. While for a coexistence game, where the best reply to any strategy is the opposite strategy, it is necessary that the mutation rate μ is less than N (-1/2)exp[-N] to ensure that the approximation is good, for all other games, it is sufficient if the mutation rate is smaller than (N ln N)(-1). Our results also hold for a wide class of imitation processes under arbitrary selection intensity.

  11. Small bowel resection

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause inflammation include regional ileitis , regional enteritis , and Crohn disease . Cancer Carcinoid tumor Injuries to the small intestine ... you have a chronic condition, such as cancer, Crohn disease or ulcerative colitis, you may need ongoing medical ...

  12. Small islands adrift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petherick, Anna

    2015-07-01

    With the charismatic former president of the Maldives, Mohamed Nasheed, behind bars on a widely derided terrorism charge, Anna Petherick asks whether small island states can really make themselves heard in Paris.

  13. Small-x physics

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, A.H.

    1997-06-01

    After a brief review of the kinematics of deep inelastic lepton-proton scattering, the parton model is described. Small-x behavior coming from DGLAP evolution and from BFKL evolution is discussed, and the two types of evolution are contrasted and compared. Then a more detailed discussion of BFKL dynamics is given. The phenomenology of small-x physics is discussed with an emphasis on ways in which BFKL dynamics may be discussed and measured. 45 refs., 12 figs.

  14. The cytoskeletal inhibitors latrunculin A and blebbistatin exert antitumorigenic properties in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells by interfering with intracellular HuR trafficking

    SciTech Connect

    Doller, Anke; Badawi, Amel

    2015-01-01

    The impact of the RNA-binding protein HuR for the post-transcriptional deregulation of tumor-relevant genes is well established. Despite of elevations in HuR expression levels, an increase in cytoplasmic HuR abundance in many cases correlates with a high grade of malignancy. Here, we demonstrated that administration of the actin-depolymerizing macrolide latrunculin A, or blebbistatin, an inhibitor of myosin II ATPase activity, caused a dose- and time-dependent reduction in the high cytoplasmic HuR content of HepG2 and Huh7 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. Subcellular fractionation revealed that in addition, both inhibitors strongly attenuated cytoskeletal and membrane-bound HuR abundance and conversely increased the HuR amount in nuclear cell fractions. Concomitant with changes in intracellular HuR localization, both cytoskeletal inhibitors markedly decreased the half-lives of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), cyclin A and cyclin D{sub 1} encoding mRNAs resulting in a significant reduction in their expression levels in HepG2 cells. Importantly, a similar reduction in the expression of these HuR targets was achieved by a RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdown of either HuR or nonmuscle myoin IIA. Using polysomal fractionation, we further demonstrate that the decrease in cytoplasmic HuR by latrunculin A or blebbistatin is accompanied by a marked change in the allocation of HuR and its mRNA cargo from polysomes to ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles. Functionally, the basal migration and prostaglandin E{sub 2} synthesis are similarly impaired in inhibitor-treated and stable HuR-knockdown HepG2 cells. Our data demonstrate that interfering with the actomyosin-dependent HuR trafficking may comprise a valid therapeutic option for antagonizing pathologic posttranscriptional gene expression by HuR and furthermore emphasize the potential benefit of HuR inhibitory strategies for treatment of HCC. - Highlights: • We tested the effects of latrunculin A and blebbistatin on

  15. Bombyx small RNAs: genomic defense system against transposons in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Kawaoka, Shinpei; Hayashi, Nobumitsu; Katsuma, Susumu; Kishino, Hirohisa; Kohara, Yuji; Mita, Kazuei; Shimada, Toru

    2008-12-01

    Selfish genetic elements called transposons can insert themselves at new locations in host genomes to modify gene structure and alter gene expression. Expansion of transposons can occur when novel transposition events are transmitted to subsequent generations after germline hopping. Therefore, organisms seem likely to have evolved defense mechanisms to silence transposons in the germline. Recently, small RNAs interacting with Piwi proteins (piwi-interacting RNAs: piRNAs) have been demonstrated to be involved in genomic defense mechanism against transposons. Here, we show that piRNA-like small RNAs are present abundantly in the Bombyx ovary. We cloned 38,493 kinds of Bombyx small RNA from the ovary and performed functional characterization. Bombyx small RNAs showed a unimodal length distribution with a peak at 28nt and a strong bias for U at the 5' end. We found that 12,869 kinds of Bombyx small RNAs were associated with transposons or repetitive sequences. We classified them as repeat-associated small interfering RNAs (rasiRNAs), a subclass of piRNAs. Notably, antisense rasiRNAs have a strong bias toward U at 5' ends; in contrast, sense rasiRNAs have a strong bias toward A at nucleotide position 10, indicating that the piRNA amplification loop proposed in Drosophila is evolutionarily conserved in Bombyx. These results suggest that Bombyx small RNAs regulate transposon activity.

  16. Spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles repeatedly cycle through Cajal bodies.

    PubMed

    Stanek, David; Pridalová-Hnilicová, Jarmila; Novotný, Ivan; Huranová, Martina; Blazíková, Michaela; Wen, Xin; Sapra, Aparna K; Neugebauer, Karla M

    2008-06-01

    The Cajal body (CB) is a nuclear structure closely associated with import and biogenesis of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs). Here, we tested whether CBs also contain mature snRNPs and whether CB integrity depends on the ongoing snRNP splicing cycle. Sm proteins tagged with photoactivatable and color-maturing variants of fluorescent proteins were used to monitor snRNP behavior in living cells over time; mature snRNPs accumulated in CBs, traveled from one CB to another, and they were not preferentially replaced by newly imported snRNPs. To test whether CB integrity depends on the snRNP splicing cycle, two human orthologues of yeast proteins involved in distinct steps in spliceosome disassembly after splicing, hPrp22 and hNtr1, were depleted by small interfering RNA treatment. Surprisingly, depletion of either protein led to the accumulation of U4/U6 snRNPs in CBs, suggesting that reassembly of the U4/U6.U5 tri-snRNP was delayed. Accordingly, a relative decrease in U5 snRNPs compared with U4/U6 snRNPs was observed in CBs, as well as in nuclear extracts of treated cells. Together, the data show that particular phases of the spliceosome cycle are compartmentalized in living cells, with reassembly of the tri-snRNP occurring in CBs.

  17. Horizontal Transfer of Small RNAs to and from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Han, Lu; Luan, Yu-Shi

    2015-01-01

    Genetic information is traditionally thought to be transferred from parents to offspring. However, there is evidence indicating that gene transfer can also occur from microbes to higher species, such as plants, invertebrates, and vertebrates. This horizontal transfer can be carried out by small RNAs (sRNAs). sRNAs have been recently reported to move across kingdoms as mobile signals, spreading silencing information toward targeted genes. sRNAs, especially microRNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), are non-coding molecules that control gene expression at the transcriptional or post-transcriptional level. Some sRNAs act in a cross-kingdom manner between animals and their parasites, but little is known about such sRNAs associated with plants. In this report, we provide a brief introduction to miRNAs that are transferred from plants to mammals/viruses and siRNAs that are transferred from microbes to plants. Both miRNAs and siRNAs can exert corresponding functions in the target organisms. Additionally, we provide information concerning a host-induced gene silencing system as a potential application that utilizes the transgenic trafficking of RNA molecules to silence the genes of interacting organisms. Moreover, we lay out the controversial views regarding cross-kingdom miRNAs and call for better methodology and experimental design to confirm this unique function of miRNAs. PMID:26697056

  18. Small RNAs and regulation of transposons in plants.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hidetaka

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference is now a well-recognized post-transcriptional mechanism for regulation of gene expression in both animals and plants. In this process, microRNAs (miRNAs) direct silencing complexes to complementary RNA sequences, leading to either degradation or repression of translation. Plants also contain another type of small RNA, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), that play a role in gene silencing by directing cytosine methylation activities of complementary DNA sequences and thus, differ from miRNAs. This nuclear regulation system is referred to as RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM). In plant genomes, transposable elements were initially thought to be regulated by DNA methylation alone. However, several recent reports have revealed that siRNAs and RdDM also play crucial roles in silencing of transposons and endogenous repeats. It is also becoming apparent that transposons are subjected to different levels of regulation in response to developmental and environmental cues. Transposons are tightly regulated in germ cells to protect the host genome from transgenerational mutagenic activity. In plants, transposons are also activated by biotic and abiotic stress. The regulation of transposons in these different situations has been associated with both the DNA methylation and siRNA-mediated regulation systems, suggesting that plants likely evolved "multi-lock" systems for transposon regulation to ensure tight control during the developmental phase and environmental changes.

  19. Characterization and comparative profiling of the small RNA transcriptomes in two phases of locust

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yuanyuan; Chen, Shuang; Yang, Pengcheng; Ma, Zongyuan; Kang, Le

    2009-01-01

    Background All the reports on insect small RNAs come from holometabolous insects whose genome sequence data are available. Therefore, study of hemimetabolous insect small RNAs could provide more insights into evolution and function of small RNAs in insects. The locust is an important, economically harmful hemimetabolous insect. Its phase changes, as a phenotypic plasticity, result from differential gene expression potentially regulated at both the post-transcriptional level, mediated by small RNAs, and the transcriptional level. Results Here, using high-throughput sequencing, we characterize the small RNA transcriptome in the locust. We identified 50 conserved microRNA families by similarity searching against miRBase, and a maximum of 185 potential locust-specific microRNA family candidates were identified using our newly developed method independent of locust genome sequence. We also demonstrate conservation of microRNA*, and evolutionary analysis of locust microRNAs indicates that the generation of miRNAs in locusts is concentrated along three phylogenetic tree branches: bilaterians, coelomates, and insects. Our study identified thousands of endogenous small interfering RNAs, some of which were of transposon origin, and also detected many Piwi-interacting RNA-like small RNAs. Comparison of small RNA expression patterns of the two phases showed that longer small RNAs were expressed more abundantly in the solitary phase and that each category of small RNAs exhibited different expression profiles between the two phases. Conclusions The abundance of small RNAs in the locust might indicate a long evolutionary history of post-transcriptional gene expression regulation, and differential expression of small RNAs between the two phases might further disclose the molecular mechanism of phase changes. PMID:19146710

  20. Pol IV-Dependent siRNA Production is Reduced in Brassica rapa

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yi; Kendall, Timmy; Mosher, Rebecca A.

    2013-01-01

    Plants produce a diverse array of small RNA molecules capable of gene regulation, including Pol IV-dependent short interfering (p4-si)RNAs that trigger transcriptional gene silencing. Small RNA transcriptomes are available for many plant species, but mutations affecting the synthesis of Pol IV-dependent siRNAs are characterized only in Arabidopsis and maize, leading to assumptions regarding nature of p4-siRNAs in all other species. We have identified a mutation in the largest subunit of Pol IV, NRPD1, that impacts Pol IV activity in Brassica rapa, an agriculturally important relative of the reference plant Arabidopsis. Using this mutation we characterized the Pol IV-dependent and Pol IV-independent small RNA populations in B. rapa. In addition, our analysis demonstrates reduced production of p4-siRNAs in B. rapa relative to Arabidopsis. B. rapa genomic regions are less likely to generate p4-siRNAs than Arabidopsis but more likely to generate Pol IV-independent siRNAs, including 24 nt RNAs mapping to transposable elements. These observations underscore the diversity of small RNAs produced by plants and highlight the importance of genetic studies during small RNA analysis. PMID:24833221

  1. MINERVA: Small Planets from Small Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Johnson, John Asher; Wright, Jason; McCrady, Nate; Swift, Jonathan; Bottom, Michael; Plavchan, Peter; Riddle, Reed; Muirhead, Philip S.; Herzig, Erich; Myles, Justin; Blake, Cullen H.; Eastman, Jason; Beatty, Thomas G.; Lin, Brian; Zhao, Ming; Gardner, Paul; Falco, Emilio; Criswell, Stephen; Nava, Chantanelle; Robinson, Connor; Hedrick, Richard; Ivarsen, Kevin; Hjelstrom, Annie; Vera, Jon De; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    The Kepler mission has shown that small planets are extremely common. It is likely that nearly every star in the sky hosts at least one rocky planet. We just need to look hard enough-but this requires vast amounts of telescope time. MINERVA (MINiature Exoplanet Radial Velocity Array) is a dedicated exoplanet observatory with the primary goal of discovering rocky, Earth-like planets orbiting in the habitable zone of bright, nearby stars. The MINERVA team is a collaboration among UNSW Australia, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Penn State University, University of Montana, and the California Institute of Technology. The four-telescope MINERVA array will be sited at the F.L. Whipple Observatory on Mt Hopkins in Arizona, USA. Full science operations will begin in mid-2015 with all four telescopes and a stabilised spectrograph capable of high-precision Doppler velocity measurements. We will observe ~100 of the nearest, brightest, Sun-like stars every night for at least five years. Detailed simulations of the target list and survey strategy lead us to expect new low-mass planets.

  2. Small Animal Retinal Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, WooJhon; Drexler, Wolfgang; Fujimoto, James G.

    Developing and validating new techniques and methods for small animal imaging is an important research area because there are many small animal models of retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and glaucoma [1-6]. Because the retina is a multilayered structure with distinct abnormalities occurring in different intraretinal layers at different stages of disease progression, there is a need for imaging techniques that enable visualization of these layers individually at different time points. Although postmortem histology and ultrastructural analysis can be performed for investigating microscopic changes in the retina in small animal models, this requires sacrificing animals, which makes repeated assessment of the same animal at different time points impossible and increases the number of animals required. Furthermore, some retinal processes such as neurovascular coupling cannot be fully characterized postmortem.

  3. A Small as Possible

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tibbitts, Scott

    2003-01-01

    This story begins with a bit of serendipity: I was on a trip to see a Shuttle launch and I happened to sit next to a guy who was in charge of batteries for Space Systems/Loral. He told me that they needed to create a new battery bypass switch, the device that takes a battery out of commission if it goes bad. After discussing the conversation back at my company, we decided that we could create the switch. We contacted the folks at Loral and they said, 'Okay, let s see what you can come up with. We need it as small as possible.' We asked, 'How small?' They said, 'We need it as small as you can possibly make it.'

  4. Small-world networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strogatz, Steven

    Everyone is familiar with the small-world phenomenon: soon after meeting a stranger, we are often suprised to discover that we have a mutual friend, or that we are somehow linked by a short chain of friends. In this talk, I'll present evidence that the small-world phenomenon is more than a curiosity of social networks — it is actually a general property of large, sparse networks whose topology is neither completely regular nor completely random. To check this idea, Duncan Watts and I have analyzed three networks of scientific interest: the neural network of the nematode worm C. elegans, the electrical power grid of the western United States, and the collaboration graph of actors in feature films. All three are small worlds, in the sense that the average number of "handshakes" separating any two members is extremely small (close to the theoretical lower limit set by a random graph). Yet at the same time, all three networks exhibit much more local clustering than a random net, demonstrating that they are not random. I'll also discuss a class of model networks that interpolate between regular lattices and random graphs. Previous theoretical research on complex systems in a wide range of disciplines has focused almost exclusively on networks that are either regular or random. Real networks often lie somewhere in between. Our mathematical model shows that networks in this middle ground tend to exhibit the small-world phenomenon, thanks to the presence of a few long-range edges that link parts of the graph that would otherwise be far apart. Furthermore, we find that when various dynamical systems are coupled in a small-world fashion, they exhibit much greater propagation speed, computational power, and synchronizability than their locally connected, regular counterparts. We explore the implications of these results for simple models of disease spreading, global computation in cellular automata, and collective locking of biological oscillators.

  5. Tracking Small Artists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, James C.; Klette, Reinhard; Chen, Chia-Yen

    Tracks of small animals are important in environmental surveillance, where pattern recognition algorithms allow species identification of the individuals creating tracks. These individuals can also be seen as artists, presented in their natural environments with a canvas upon which they can make prints. We present tracks of small mammals and reptiles which have been collected for identification purposes, and re-interpret them from an esthetic point of view. We re-classify these tracks not by their geometric qualities as pattern recognition algorithms would, but through interpreting the 'artist', their brush strokes and intensity. We describe the algorithms used to enhance and present the work of the 'artists'.

  6. Programming in the small.

    PubMed

    Gersten, David B; Langer, Steve G

    2011-02-01

    Academic medical centers, in general, and radiation oncology research, in particular, rely heavily on custom software tools and applications. The code development is typically the responsibility of a single individual or at most a small team. Often these individuals are not professional programmers but physicists, students, and physicians. While they possess domain expertise and algorithm knowledge, they often are not fully aware of general "safe coding" practices--nor do they need the full complexity familiar in large commercial software projects to succeed. Rather, some simple guidelines we refer to as "programming in the small" can be used.

  7. Small Bowel Transplant

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Objective The Medical Advisory Secretariat undertook a review of the evidence on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of small bowel transplant in the treatment of intestinal failure. Small Bowel Transplantation Intestinal failure is the loss of absorptive capacity of the small intestine that results in an inability to meet the nutrient and fluid requirements of the body via the enteral route. Patients with intestinal failure usually receive nutrients intravenously, a procedure known as parenteral nutrition. However, long-term parenteral nutrition is associated with complications including liver failure and loss of venous access due to recurrent infections. Small bowel transplant is the transplantation of a cadaveric intestinal allograft for the purpose of restoring intestinal function in patients with irreversible intestinal failure. The transplant may involve the small intestine alone (isolated small bowel ISB), the small intestine and the liver (SB-L) when there is irreversible liver failure, or multiple organs including the small bowel (multivisceral MV or cluster). Although living related donor transplant is being investigated at a limited number of centres, cadaveric donors have been used in most small bowel transplants. The actual transplant procedure takes approximately 12-18 hours. After intestinal transplant, the patient is generally placed on prophylactic antibiotic medication and immunosuppressive regimen that, in the majority of cases, would include tacrolimus, corticosteroids and an induction agent. Close monitoring for infection and rejection are essential for early treatment. Medical Advisory Secretariat Review The Medical Advisory Secretariat undertook a review of 35 reports from 9 case series and 1 international registry. Sample size of the individual studies ranged from 9 to 155. As of May 2001, 651 patients had received small bowel transplant procedures worldwide. According to information from the Canadian Organ Replacement

  8. How Small are Small Stars Really?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-11-01

    VLT Interferometer Measures the Size of Proxima Centauri and Other Nearby Stars [1] Summary At a distance of only 4.2 light-years, Proxima Centauri is the nearest star to the Sun currently known [2]. It is visible as an 11-magnitude object in the southern constellation of Centaurus and is the faintest member of a triple system, together with Alpha Centauri , the brightest (double) star in this constellation. Proxima Centauri is a very-low-mass star, in fact barely massive enough to burn hydrogen to helium in its interior. It is about seven times smaller than the Sun, and the surface temperature is "only" about 3000 degrees, about half of that of our own star. Consequently, it is also much fainter - the intrinsic brightness is only 1/150th of that of our Sun. Low-mass stars are very interesting objects , also because the physical conditions in their interiors have much in common with those of giant planets, like Jupiter in our solar system. A determination of the sizes of the smallest stars has been impossible until now because of their general faintness and lack of adequate instrumentation. However, astronomers have long been keen to move forward in this direction, since such measurements would provide indirect, crucial information about the behaviour of matter under extreme conditions. When the first observations with the VLT Interferometer (VLTI), combining the light from two of the 8.2-m VLT Unit Telescopes (ANTU and MELIPAL), were made one year ago ( ESO PR 23/01 ), interferometric measurements were also obtained of Proxima Centauri . They formed part of the VLTI commissioning and the data were soon released to the ESO community, cf. the special website. Now, an international team of astronomers from Switzerland, France and ESO/Chile has successfully analysed these observations by means of newly developed, advanced software. For the first time ever, they obtained a highly accurate measurement of the size of such a small star . Three other small stars were also

  9. The Phloem-Delivered RNA Pool Contains Small Noncoding RNAs and Interferes with Translation1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shoudong; Sun, Li; Kragler, Friedrich

    2009-01-01

    In plants, the vascular tissue contains the enucleated sieve tubes facilitating long-distance transport of nutrients, hormones, and proteins. In addition, several mRNAs and small interfering RNAs/microRNAs were shown to be delivered via sieve tubes whose content is embodied by the phloem sap (PS). A number of these phloem transcripts are transported from source to sink tissues and function at targeted tissues. To gain additional insights into phloem-delivered RNAs and their potential role in signaling, we isolated and characterized PS RNA molecules distinct from microRNAs/small interfering RNAs with a size ranging from 30 to 90 bases. We detected a high number of full-length and phloem-specific fragments of noncoding RNAs such as tRNAs, ribosomal RNAs, and spliceosomal RNAs in the PS of pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima). In vitro assays show that small quantities of PS RNA molecules efficiently inhibit translation in an unspecific manner. Proof of concept that PS-specific tRNA fragments may interfere with ribosomal activity was obtained with artificially produced tRNA fragments. The results are discussed in terms of a functional role for long distance delivered noncoding PS RNAs. PMID:19261735

  10. Automating Small Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swan, James

    1996-01-01

    Presents a four-phase plan for small libraries strategizing for automation: inventory and weeding, data conversion, implementation, and enhancements. Other topics include selecting a system, MARC records, compatibility, ease of use, industry standards, searching capabilities, support services, system security, screen displays, circulation modules,…

  11. Closed Small Cell Clouds

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... (right)   The structure of tightly packed "closed cells" in a layer of marine stratocumulus over the southeastern Pacific Ocean ... into interesting structures such as those shown here. These cells are notably small, with diameters ranging from 10-15 kilometers, instead ...

  12. Small Schools Reform Narratives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehman, Beth M.; Berghoff, Beth

    2013-01-01

    This study explored complicated personal narratives of school reform generated by participants in response to a particular small schools reform initiative. Narrative data was dialogically generated in interviews with nine past participants of an urban high school conversion project planned and implemented over a span of five years toward the goal…

  13. Measuring Small Leak Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, D. E.; Stephenson, J. G.

    1983-01-01

    Hole sizes deduced from pressure measurements. Measuring apparatus consists of pitot tube attached to water-filled manometer. Compartment tested is pressurized with air. Pitot probe placed at known distance from leak. Dynamic pressure of jet measured at that point and static pressure measured in compartment. Useful in situations in which small leaks are tolerable but large leaks are not.

  14. Small Business Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Wendell, Ed.

    Intended as a resource for both experienced businesspeople and those new to business, this annotated bibliography provides a list of books, pamphlets, periodicals, and videotapes of value in solving specific business problems. The bibliography begins with a list of resources recommended for the library of every small business and a survey of…

  15. Small satellite radiometric measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P.G.

    1991-01-01

    A critical need for the Mission to Planet Earth is to provide continuous, well-calibrated radiometric data for the radiation budget. This paper describes a new, compact, flexible radiometer which will provide both spectrally integrated data and data in selected spectral bands. The radiometer design is suitable for use on small satellites, aircraft, or remotely piloted vehicles (RPVs). 12 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Small Business Innovations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Under an Army Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant, Symbiotics, Inc. developed a software system that permits users to upgrade products from standalone applications so they can communicate in a distributed computing environment. Under a subsequent NASA SBIR grant, Symbiotics added additional tools to the SOCIAL product to enable NASA to coordinate conventional systems for planning Shuttle launch support operations. Using SOCIAL, data may be shared among applications in a computer network even when the applications are written in different programming languages. The product was introduced to the commercial market in 1993 and is used to monitor and control equipment for operation support and to integrate financial networks. The SBIR program was established to increase small business participation in federal R&D activities and to transfer government research to industry. InQuisiX is a reuse library providing high performance classification, cataloging, searching, browsing, retrieval and synthesis capabilities. These form the foundation for software reuse, producing higher quality software at lower cost and in less time. Software Productivity Solutions, Inc. developed the technology under Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) projects funded by NASA and the Army and is marketing InQuisiX in conjunction with Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC). The SBIR program was established to increase small business participation in federal R&D activities and to transfer government research to industry.

  17. Small Town Renewal Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenyon, Peter

    Over the last 2 decades, the loss of population and businesses in many small, inland, and remote Australian rural communities has intensified, largely because of the stress and uncertainty of volatile world commodity markets. This manual presents a range of survival and revival strategies that some communities have used to build resilient…

  18. Deburring small intersecting holes

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1980-08-01

    Deburring intersecting holes is one of the most difficult deburring tasks faced by many industries. Only 14 of the 37 major deburring processes are applicable to most intersecting hole applications. Only five of these are normally applicable to small or miniature holes. Basic process capabilities and techniques used as a function of hole sizes and intersection depths are summarized.

  19. Small Gas Engine Repair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut State Dept. of Education, Hartford. Div. of Vocational-Technical Schools.

    Instructional materials are provided for a small gas engine course. A list of objectives appears first, followed by a list of internal parts and skills/competencies related to those parts for engine work, ignition and electrical systems, fuel system, crankcase lubrication system, arc welding skills, and gas welding skills. Outlines are provided…

  20. Modeling Small Group Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draskovic, I.; Holdrinet, R.; Bulte, J.; Bolhuis, S.; Van Leeuwe, J.

    2004-01-01

    This article presents findings from an empirical study on the relations between the variables comprising learning mechanisms in small collaborative groups. Variables comprising the central learning mechanisms component were "task related interactions," "knowledge elaborations," and "subjective estimation of knowledge acquisition." Student related…

  1. Small School Distributive Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Bill

    Information on an atypical 1966-67 Distributive Education pilot program in New Mexico was given. The program was unique since one instructor conducted this program in two schools which were in separate rural districts (Dexter and Hagerman). Since both communities were primarily agricultural, with small student populations, the cost of such a…

  2. Small Public Library Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearlmutter, Jane; Nelson, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Anyone at the helm of a small public library knows that every little detail counts. But juggling the responsibilities that are part and parcel of the job is far from easy. Finally, here's a handbook that includes everything administrators need to keep a handle on library operations, freeing them up to streamline and improve how the organization…

  3. Small Wonders Close Encounters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kniseley, MacGregor; Capraro, Karen

    2013-01-01

    This article introduces students to the world of digital microscopy. Looking at small objects through a digital microscope is like traveling through a foreign country for the first time. The experience is new, engaging, and exciting. A handheld digital microscope is an essential tool in a 21st century teacher's toolkit and the perfect tool to…

  4. Small is beautiful

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannister, Nigel; Eves, Stuart

    2009-12-01

    MEETING REPORT While the great space observatories have provided much of the headline news in astronomy and astrophysics in recent years, they are not the whole story. Nigel Bannister reports on an RAS Specialist Discussion Meeting on ``Astronomy with Small Satellites''.

  5. 77 FR 30227 - Small Business Size Regulations, Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program and Small...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-22

    ... BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 13 CFR Part 121 Small Business Size Regulations, Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Program AGENCY: U.S. Small Business... to amend its regulations governing size and eligibility for the Small Business Innovation...

  6. 78 FR 11745 - Small Business Size Regulations, Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program and Small...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-20

    ... / Wednesday, February 20, 2013 / Rules and Regulations#0;#0; ] SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 13 CFR Part 121 RIN 3245-AG46 Small Business Size Regulations, Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Program; Correction AGENCY: U.S. Small Business...

  7. Small Multiples with Gaps.

    PubMed

    Meulemans, Wouter; Dykes, Jason; Slingsby, Aidan; Turkay, Cagatay; Wood, Jo

    2017-01-01

    Small multiples enable comparison by providing different views of a single data set in a dense and aligned manner. A common frame defines each view, which varies based upon values of a conditioning variable. An increasingly popular use of this technique is to project two-dimensional locations into a gridded space (e.g. grid maps), using the underlying distribution both as the conditioning variable and to determine the grid layout. Using whitespace in this layout has the potential to carry information, especially in a geographic context. Yet, the effects of doing so on the spatial properties of the original units are not understood. We explore the design space offered by such small multiples with gaps. We do so by constructing a comprehensive suite of metrics that capture properties of the layout used to arrange the small multiples for comparison (e.g. compactness and alignment) and the preservation of the original data (e.g. distance, topology and shape). We study these metrics in geographic data sets with varying properties and numbers of gaps. We use simulated annealing to optimize for each metric and measure the effects on the others. To explore these effects systematically, we take a new approach, developing a system to visualize this design space using a set of interactive matrices. We find that adding small amounts of whitespace to small multiple arrays improves some of the characteristics of 2D layouts, such as shape, distance and direction. This comes at the cost of other metrics, such as the retention of topology. Effects vary according to the input maps, with degree of variation in size of input regions found to be a factor. Optima exist for particular metrics in many cases, but at different amounts of whitespace for different maps. We suggest multiple metrics be used in optimized layouts, finding topology to be a primary factor in existing manually-crafted solutions, followed by a trade-off between shape and displacement. But the rich range of possible

  8. Small Animal Bone Biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Vashishth, Deepak

    2008-01-01

    Animal models, in particular mice, offer the possibility of naturally achieving or genetically engineering a skeletal phenotype associated with disease and conducting destructive fracture tests on bone to determine the resulting change in bone’s mechanical properties. Several recent developments, including nano- and micro- indentation testing, microtensile and microcompressive testing, and bending tests on notched whole bone specimens, offer the possibility to mechanically probe small animal bone and investigate the effects of aging, therapeutic treatments, disease, and genetic variation. In contrast to traditional strength tests on small animal bones, fracture mechanics tests display smaller variation and therefore offer the possibility of reducing sample sizes. This article provides an analysis of what such tests measure and proposes methods to reduce errors associated with testing smaller than ideal specimens. PMID:18672104

  9. Using machine learning and high-throughput RNA sequencing to classify the precursors of small non-coding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Ryvkin, Paul; Leung, Yuk Yee; Ungar, Lyle H; Gregory, Brian D; Wang, Li-San

    2014-05-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing allow researchers to examine the transcriptome in more detail than ever before. Using a method known as high-throughput small RNA-sequencing, we can now profile the expression of small regulatory RNAs such as microRNAs and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) with a great deal of sensitivity. However, there are many other types of small RNAs (<50nt) present in the cell, including fragments derived from snoRNAs (small nucleolar RNAs), snRNAs (small nuclear RNAs), scRNAs (small cytoplasmic RNAs), tRNAs (transfer RNAs), and transposon-derived RNAs. Here, we present a user's guide for CoRAL (Classification of RNAs by Analysis of Length), a computational method for discriminating between different classes of RNA using high-throughput small RNA-sequencing data. Not only can CoRAL distinguish between RNA classes with high accuracy, but it also uses features that are relevant to small RNA biogenesis pathways. By doing so, CoRAL can give biologists a glimpse into the characteristics of different RNA processing pathways and how these might differ between tissue types, biological conditions, or even different species. CoRAL is available at http://wanglab.pcbi.upenn.edu/coral/.

  10. Small arms ammunition

    DOEpatents

    Huerta, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    An elongate projectile for small arms use has a single unitary mass with a hollow nose cavity defined by a sharp rigid cutting edge adapted to make initial contact with the target surface and cut therethrough. The projectile then enters the target mass in an unstable flight mode. The projectile base is substantially solid such that the nose cavity, while relatively deep, does not extend entirely through the base and the projectile center of gravity is aft of its geometric center.

  11. Small Business Innovations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of QASE RT is to enable system analysts and software engineers to evaluate performance and reliability implications of design alternatives. The program resulted from two Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) projects. After receiving a description of the system architecture and workload from the user, QASE RT translates the system description into simulation models and executes them. Simulation provides detailed performance evaluation. The results of the evaluations are service and response times, offered load and device utilizations and functional availability.

  12. Small Business Innovations (MISER)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Lightwave Electronics Corporation, Mountain View, CA, developed the Series 120 and 122 non-planner diode pumped ring lasers based on a low noise ring laser with voltage tuning that they delivered to Jet Propulsion Laboratory under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract. The voltage tuning feature allows "phase-locking" the lasers, making them "electronic," similar to radio and microwave electronic oscillators. The Series 120 and 122 can be applied to fiber sensing, coherent communications and laser radar.

  13. Small Business Innovations (Photodetector)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Epitaxx, Inc. of Princeton, NJ, developed the Epitaxx Near Infrared Room Temperature Indium-Gallium-Arsenide (InGaAs) Photodetector based on their Goddard Space Flight Center Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract work to develop a linear detector array for satellite imaging applications using InGaAs alloys that didn't need to be cooled to (difficult and expensive) cryogenic temperatures. The photodetectors can be used for remote sensing, fiber optic and laser position-sensing applications.

  14. Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The smaller of two nearby companions of the Milky Way Galaxy that can be seen with the naked eye in the southern hemisphere sky and which are named after the Portuguese navigator, Ferdinand Magellan. Located in the constellation of Tucana, at a distance of about 190 000 light-years, the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) has an angular diameter of about three degrees, about half the apparent diameter o...

  15. Small Angle Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Volker S

    2012-01-01

    Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) probes structural details at the nanometer scale in a non-destructive way. This article gives an introduction to scientists who have no prior small-angle scattering knowledge, but who seek a technique that allows elucidating structural information in challenging situations that thwart approaches by other methods. SANS is applicable to a wide variety of materials including metals and alloys, ceramics, concrete, glasses, polymers, composites and biological materials. Isotope and magnetic interactions provide unique methods for labeling and contrast variation to highlight specific structural features of interest. In situ studies of a material s responses to temperature, pressure, shear, magnetic and electric fields, etc., are feasible as a result of the high penetrating power of neutrons. SANS provides statistical information on significant structural features averaged over the probed sample volume, and one can use SANS to quantify with high precision the structural details that are observed, for example, in electron microscopy. Neutron scattering is non-destructive; there is no need to cut specimens into thin sections, and neutrons penetrate deeply, providing information on the bulk material, free from surface effects. The basic principles of a SANS experiment are fairly simple, but the measurement, analysis and interpretation of small angle scattering data involves theoretical concepts that are unique to the technique and that are not widely known. This article includes a concise description of the basics, as well as practical know-how that is essential for a successful SANS experiment.

  16. Small Business Innovations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract resulted in a series of commercially available lasers, which have application in fiber optic communications, difference frequency generation, fiber optic sensing and general laboratory use. Developed under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract, the Phase Doppler Particles Analyzer is a non-disruptive, highly accurate laser-based method of determining particle size, number density, trajectory, turbulence and other information about particles passing through a measurement probe volume. The system consists of an optical transmitter and receiver, signal processor and computer with data acquisition and analysis software. A variety of systems are offered for applications including spray characterization for paint, and agricultural and other sprays. The Microsizer, a related product, is used in medical equipment manufacturing and analysis of contained flows. High frequency components and subsystems produced by Millitech Corporation are marketed for both research and commercial use. These systems, which operate in the upper portion of the millimeter wave, resulted from a number of Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) projects. By developing very high performance mixers and multipliers, the company has advanced the state of the art in sensitive receiver technology. Components are used in receivers and transceivers for monitoring chlorine monoxides, ozone, in plasma characterization and in material properties characterization.

  17. Astronomy with Small Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paczynski, Bohdan

    2006-06-01

    While there are more than a dozen telescopes larger than 10 meters there is plenty of interesting astronomy which can be done with much smaller instruments. Notice that the existing SDSS, and the future PanSTARRS and LSST saturate at 15 mag. An example of interesting science is provided with ASAS (All Sky Automated Survey) which used aperture of 7 cm to discover over 50,000 variable stars brighter than 14 mag, covering almost 3/4 of the sky. Most of these are new discoveries.ASAS like instruments are most likely more efficient in a search for afterglows following gamma-ray bursts (GRB) than CFHT and its Megacam. In fact it should be possible to detect the afterglows without a GRB trigger by imaging all visible sky every 15 minutes down to 16 mag using a number of ASAS-like instruments.Another example of small instruments being essential, is their ability to detect 'killer asteroids' prior to their impact. It will take a number of small instruments, somewhat more powerful than ASAS, to detect boulders as small as 10 - 20 meters at a distance of several days prior to their impact. This will provide time to evacuate a region in case of Tunguska-like event, or to provide news of a spectacular but harmless event in case of a more modest impact.

  18. Small non-coding RNAs as novel therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Rossbach, M

    2010-06-01

    RNA interference (RNAi), an evolutionarily conserved sequence-specific post-transcriptional gene silencing mechanism, is triggered by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) that results in the degradation of homologous mRNA or in the inhibition of mRNA translation. The naturally occurring triggers for the RNAi pathway are small regulatory RNAs, including small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), processed from longer dsRNAs by the RNAse III enzyme Dicer, and microRNAs (miRNAs), generated in a regulated multistep process from endogenous primary transcripts (pri-miRNA). These primary transcripts are capped, polyadenylated and spliced, thus resembling conventional mRNAs. It is estimated that miRNAs regulate more than one third of all cellular mRNAs, and bioinformatic data indicate that each miRNA can control hundreds of gene targets. Thus, there are likely to be few biological processes not regulated by miRNAs. Although the biological functions of miRNAs are not completely revealed, there is growing evidence that miRNA pathways are a new mechanism of gene regulation in both normal and diseased conditions. Recent evidence has shown that miRNA mutations or aberrant expression patterns correlate with various diseases, such as cancer, viral infections, cardiovascular or neurodegenerative diseases and indicates that miRNAs can function as tumor suppressors and oncogenes. MiRNAs have not only emerged as a powerful tool for gene regulation studies but also for the development of novel drugs. Since they do not encode proteins, they are not traditional therapeutic targets of small-molecule inhibitors and thus comprise a novel class of therapeutics. This article will focus on the current progress in drug discovery using the miRNA strategy.

  19. Eccentricity of small exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Eylen, Vincent; Albrecht, Simon

    2015-12-01

    Solar system planets move on almost circular orbits. In strong contrast, many massive gas giant exoplanets travel on highly elliptical orbits, whereas the shape of the orbits of smaller, more terrestrial, exoplanets remained largely elusive. This is because the stellar radial velocity caused by these small planets is extremely challenging to measure. Knowing the eccentricity distribution in systems of small planets would be important as it holds information about the planet's formation and evolution. Furthermore the location of the habitable zone depends on eccentricity, and eccentricity also influences occurrence rates inferred for these planets because planets on circular orbits are less likely to transit. We make these eccentricity measurements of small planets using photometry from the Kepler satellite and utilizing a method relying on Kepler's second law, which relates the duration of a planetary transit to its orbital eccentricity, if the stellar density is known.I present a sample of 28 multi-planet systems with precise asteroseismic density measurements, which host 74 planets with an average radius of 2.6 R_earth. We find that the eccentricity of planets in these systems is low and can be described by a Rayleigh distribution with sigma = 0.049 +- 0.013. This is in full agreement with solar system eccentricities, but in contrast to the eccentricity distributions previously derived for exoplanets from radial velocity studies. I further report the first results on the eccentricities of over 50 Kepler single-planet systems, and compare them with the multi-planet systems. I close the talk by showing how transit durations help distinguish between false positives and true planets, and present six new planets.

  20. Small Business Innovations (Helicopters)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The amount of engine power required for a helicopter to hover is an important, but difficult, consideration in helicopter design. The EHPIC program model produces converged, freely distorted wake geometries that generate accurate analysis of wake-induced downwash, allowing good predictions of rotor thrust and power requirements. Continuum Dynamics, Inc., the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) company that developed EHPIC, also produces RotorCRAFT, a program for analysis of aerodynamic loading of helicopter blades in forward flight. Both helicopter codes have been licensed to commercial manufacturers.

  1. Small obstacle avoidance sensor.

    PubMed

    Vollmerhausen, Richard H

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a laser ranging sensor that is suitable for applications like small unmanned aerial vehicles. The hardware consists of a diode emitter array and line-scan charge coupled devices. A structured-light technique measures ranges up to 30 meters for 64 field angles in a 90 degree field of view. Operation is eye safe, and the laser wavelength is not visible to night vision goggles. This paper describes a specific sensor design in order to illustrate performance for a given package size.

  2. Supernumerary small ring chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Kaffe, S; Kim, H J; Hsu, L Y; Brill, C B; Hirschhorn, K

    1977-01-01

    A supernumerary small ring chromosome was found in 30% of cultured peripheral leucocytes and 50% of skin fibroblasts in a 6-year-old boy with mild mental retardation and midline cleft palate. The extra chromosome appeared to carry a densely staining region on Giemsa banding. The banding patterns of the remaining 46 chromosomes were normal. C banding indicated that the ring chromosome contained mainly centromeric constitutive heterochromatin. Chromosome analysis of both parents showed normal karyotypes by both conventional and banding techniques; thus the origin of the ring chromosome could not be determined. Images PMID:604496

  3. Rapid small lot manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Harrigan, R.W.

    1998-05-09

    The direct connection of information, captured in forms such as CAD databases, to the factory floor is enabling a revolution in manufacturing. Rapid response to very dynamic market conditions is becoming the norm rather than the exception. In order to provide economical rapid fabrication of small numbers of variable products, one must design with manufacturing constraints in mind. In addition, flexible manufacturing systems must be programmed automatically to reduce the time for product change over in the factory and eliminate human errors. Sensor based machine control is needed to adapt idealized, model based machine programs to uncontrolled variables such as the condition of raw materials and fabrication tolerances.

  4. Small Business Innovations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The PER-Force Handcontroller was originally developed for the International Space Station under a Johnson Space Center Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract. Produced by Cybernet Systems Corporation, the unit is a force-reflecting system that manipulates robots or objects by "feel." The Handcontroller moves in six degrees of freedom, with real and virtual reality forces simulated by a 3-D molecular modeling software package. It is used in molecular modeling in metallurgy applications, satellite docking research, and in research on military unmanned ground vehicles.

  5. Small Unit Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    best demonstrated value for small (< AA size) lithium - thionyl - chloride batteries (Halpert 1993). Equation (2-3) shows that the solar power...However, this energy den- sity this is only ~ 3 times larger than the demonstrated performance of the best lithium batteries , and the fuel cells are...Units 13 2.2.2 ASIC Capability 15 2.2.3 Power and Size 17 2.2.4 Cost 19 2.3 Power Sources 20 2.3.1 Batteries 21 2.3.2 Solar Augmentation

  6. Small Business Innovations (Cryostat)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    General Pneumatics Corporation, Scottsdale, AZ, developed an anti- clogging cryostat that liquifies gases by expansion for high pressure through a nozzle to produce cryorefrigeration based on their Kennedy Space Center Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) work to develop a Joule-Thomson (JT) expansion valve that is less susceptible to clogging by particles or condensed contaminants in the flow than a non-contaminating compressor in a closed cycle Linde-Hampson cryocooler used to generate cryogenic cooling for infrared sensors, super conductors, supercooled electronics and cryosurgery.

  7. NIF small mirror mount

    SciTech Connect

    McCarville, T

    1999-07-01

    A number of small mirror mounts have been identified that meet the stringent stability, wave front, and cleanliness standards of the NIF. These requirements are similar to those required in other performance critical optical design applications. Future design teams would conserve time and effort if recognized standards were established for mirror mount design and performance characteristics. Standards for stability, physical features, wave front distortion, and cleanliness would simplify the qualification process considerably. At this point such standards are not difficult to define, as the technical support work has been performed repeatedly by mirror mount consumers and suppliers.

  8. Small circuits for cryptography.

    SciTech Connect

    Torgerson, Mark Dolan; Draelos, Timothy John; Schroeppel, Richard Crabtree; Miller, Russell D.; Anderson, William Erik

    2005-10-01

    This report examines a number of hardware circuit design issues associated with implementing certain functions in FPGA and ASIC technologies. Here we show circuit designs for AES and SHA-1 that have an extremely small hardware footprint, yet show reasonably good performance characteristics as compared to the state of the art designs found in the literature. Our AES performance numbers are fueled by an optimized composite field S-box design for the Stratix chipset. Our SHA-1 designs use register packing and feedback functionalities of the Stratix LE, which reduce the logic element usage by as much as 72% as compared to other SHA-1 designs.

  9. Small modulation ellipsometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ducharme, Stephen P. (Inventor); El Hajj, Hassanayn M. (Inventor); Johs, Blaine D. (Inventor); Woollam, John A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    In an ellipsometer, a phase-modulated, polarized light beam is applied to a sample, electrical signals are obtained representing the orthogonal planes of polarization of the light after it has interacted with the sample and the constants of the sample are calculated from the two resulting electrical signals. The phase modulation is sufficiently small so that the calibration errors are negligible. For this purpose, the phase modulator phase modulates the light within a range of no more than ten degrees modulations peak to peak. The two electrical signals are expanded by Fourier analysis and the coefficients thereof utilized to calculate psi and delta.

  10. Small Landslide in Kasei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    21 February 2004 The finger-shaped lobe just right of center in this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image is the deposit of a small landslide that came down a dark, layered slope. Landslides are common on Mars in areas of steep topography; this one is located in the Kasei Valles region near 23.9oN, 67.1oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left; the picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide.

  11. Small satellite space operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiss, Keith

    1994-01-01

    CTA Space Systems has played a premier role in the development of the 'lightsat' programs of the 80's and 90's. The high costs and development times associated with conventional LEO satellite design, fabrication, launch, and operations continue to motivate the development of new methodologies, techniques, and generally low cost and less stringently regulated satellites. These spacecraft employ low power 'lightsat' communications (versus TDRSS for NASA's LEO's) and typically fly missions with payload/experiment suites that can succeed, for example, without heavily redundant backup systems and large infrastructures of personnel and ground support systems. Such small yet adaptable satellites are also typified by their very short contract-to-launch times (often one to two years). This paper reflects several of the methodologies and perspectives of our successful involvement in these innovative programs and suggests how they might relieve NASA's mounting pressures to reduce the cost of both the spacecraft and their companion mission operations. It focuses on the use of adaptable, sufficiently powerful yet inexpensive PC-based ground systems for wide ranging user terminal (UT) applications and master control facilities for mission operations. These systems proved themselves in successfully controlling more than two dozen USAF, USN, and ARPA satellites at CTA/SS. UT versions have linked with both GEO and LEO satellites and functioned autonomously in relay roles often in remote parts of the world. LEO applications particularly illustrate the efficacy of these concepts since a user can easily mount a lightweight antenna, usually an omni or helix with light duty rotors and PC-based drivers. A few feet of coax connected to a small transceiver module (the size of a small PC) and a serial line to an associated PC establishes a communications link and together with the PC constitute a viable ground station. Applications included geomagnetic mapping; spaceborne solid state

  12. SmallSat Lab

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-05

    CubeSat. Mr. Alvarez worked with four students on the PCB layout for the solar panels and the construction of the 6U CubeSat mockup . Support for Mr...Hull and Mr. Alvarez was $49k including fringe benefits. !! Purchases: During this time period a license for MatLab software and the Princeton...Satellite ToolBox was purchased using funds from this award. This software adds tremendous capability to the SmallSat Lab by enabling students to analyze

  13. Cytoplasmic RNA viruses as potential vehicles for the delivery of therapeutic small RNAs.

    PubMed

    Usme-Ciro, Jose A; Campillo-Pedroza, Natalia; Almazán, Fernando; Gallego-Gomez, Juan C

    2013-06-07

    Viral vectors have become the best option for the delivery of therapeutic genes in conventional and RNA interference-based gene therapies. The current viral vectors for the delivery of small regulatory RNAs are based on DNA viruses and retroviruses/lentiviruses. Cytoplasmic RNA viruses have been excluded as viral vectors for RNAi therapy because of the nuclear localization of the microprocessor complex and the potential degradation of the viral RNA genome during the excision of any virus-encoded pre-microRNAs. However, in the last few years, the presence of several species of small RNAs (e.g., virus-derived small interfering RNAs, virus-derived short RNAs, and unusually small RNAs) in animals and cell cultures that are infected with cytoplasmic RNA viruses has suggested the existence of a non-canonical mechanism of microRNA biogenesis. Several studies have been conducted on the tick-borne encephalitis virus and on the Sindbis virus in which microRNA precursors were artificially incorporated and demonstrated the production of mature microRNAs. The ability of these viruses to recruit Drosha to the cytoplasm during infection resulted in the efficient processing of virus-encoded microRNA without the viral genome entering the nucleus. In this review, we discuss the relevance of these findings with an emphasis on the potential use of cytoplasmic RNA viruses as vehicles for the efficient delivery of therapeutic small RNAs.

  14. Structural insights into mechanisms of the small RNA methyltransferase HEN1

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Ying; Ji, Lijuan; Huang, Qichen; Vassylyev, Dmitry G.; Chen, Xuemei; Ma, Jin-Biao

    2010-02-22

    RNA silencing is a conserved regulatory mechanism in fungi, plants and animals that regulates gene expression and defence against viruses and transgenes. Small silencing RNAs of {approx}20-30 nucleotides and their associated effector proteins, the Argonaute family proteins, are the central components in RNA silencing. A subset of small RNAs, such as microRNAs and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in plants, Piwi-interacting RNAs in animals and siRNAs in Drosophila, requires an additional crucial step for their maturation; that is, 2'-O-methylation on the 3' terminal nucleotide. A conserved S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent RNA methyltransferase, HUA ENHANCER 1 (HEN1), and its homologues are responsible for this specific modification. Here we report the 3.1 {angstrom} crystal structure of full-length HEN1 from Arabidopsis in complex with a 22-nucleotide small RNA duplex and cofactor product S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine. Highly cooperative recognition of the small RNA substrate by multiple RNA binding domains and the methyltransferase domain in HEN1 measures the length of the RNA duplex and determines the substrate specificity. Metal ion coordination by both 2' and 3' hydroxyls on the 3'-terminal nucleotide and four invariant residues in the active site of the methyltransferase domain suggests a novel Mg{sup 2+}-dependent 2'-O-methylation mechanism.

  15. Small RNAs: the qualified candidates for gene manipulation in diverse clinical pathologies.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Indu Pal; Chopra, Kanwaljit; Rishi, Parveen; Puri, Sanjeev; Sharma, Gaurav

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, RNA interference (RNAi) has become a tool of choice to analyze and target the in vitro and in vivo function of mammalian genes. RNAi down-regulates gene expression by inducing enzyme-dependent degradation of targeted mRNA. This can be achieved using small double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs), including small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), micro RNAs, and piwi RNAs. These active, small dsRNAs can regulate endogenous genes in both somatic and germ cells such that they can defend the genome from invasive nucleic acids. Extension of the concept of RNAi to preclinical studies indicates its probable application in the treatment of cancers, viral infections, arterial stenosis, and genetic disorders. Exciting results from ongoing clinical trials have raised the expectations of the scientific community for the use of RNAi in "real cures". Rational pharmaceutical design of these molecules can further open a Pandora's box of newer therapeutic options. However, efficient delivery of these small dsRNAs to target tissues or cells and their unanticipated nonspecific effects comprise a few important issues that still need to be addressed. In this review, we offer an overview of different small dsRNAs, their biogenesis, and their applicability in therapeutics. Current delivery strategies and formulation techniques to achieve the desired transfection capability and RNAi products in clinical trials are also discussed.

  16. Small engine technology programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedzwiecki, Richard W.

    1990-01-01

    Described here is the small engine technology program being sponsored at the Lewis Research Center. Small gas turbine research is aimed at general aviation, commuter aircraft, rotorcraft, and cruise missile applications. The Rotary Engine program is aimed at supplying fuel flexible, fuel efficient technology to the general aviation industry, but also has applications to other missions. The Automotive Gas Turbine (AGT) and Heavy-Duty Diesel Transport Technology (HDTT) programs are sponsored by DOE. The Compound Cycle Engine program is sponsored by the Army. All of the programs are aimed towards highly efficient engine cycles, very efficient components, and the use of high temperature structural ceramics. This research tends to be generic in nature and has broad applications. The HDTT, rotary technology, and the compound cycle programs are all examining approaches to minimum heat rejection, or 'adiabatic' systems employing advanced materials. The AGT program is also directed towards ceramics application to gas turbine hot section components. Turbomachinery advances in the gas turbine programs will benefit advanced turbochargers and turbocompounders for the intermittent combustion systems, and the fundamental understandings and analytical codes developed in the research and technology programs will be directly applicable to the system projects.

  17. Small engine technology programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedzwiecki, Richard W.

    1987-01-01

    Small engine technology programs being conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center are described. Small gas turbine research is aimed at general aviation, commutercraft, rotorcraft, and cruise missile applications. The Rotary Engine Program is aimed at supplying fuel flexible, fuel efficient technology to the general aviation industry, but also has applications to other missions. There is a strong element of synergism between the various programs in several respects. All of the programs are aimed towards highly efficient engine cycles, very efficient components, and the use of high temperature structural ceramics. This research tends to be generic in nature and has broad applications. The Heavy Duty Diesel Transport (HDTT), rotary technology, and the compound cycle programs are all examining approached to minimum heat rejection, or adiabatic systems employing advanced materials. The Automotive Gas Turbine (AGT) program is also directed towards ceramics application to gas turbine hot section components. Turbomachinery advances in the gas turbines will benefit advanced turbochargers and turbocompounders for the intermittent combustion systems, and the fundamental understandings and analytical codes developed in the research and technology programs will be directly applicable to the system projects.

  18. Small RNA transcriptomes of mangroves evolve adaptively in extreme environments

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Ming; Lin, Xingqin; Xie, Munan; Wang, Yushuai; Shen, Xu; Liufu, Zhongqi; Wu, Chung-I; Shi, Suhua; Tang, Tian

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and endogenous small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are key players in plant stress responses. Here, we present the sRNA transcriptomes of mangroves Bruguiera gymnorrhiza and Kandelia candel. Comparative computational analyses and target predictions revealed that mangroves exhibit distinct sRNA regulatory networks that differ from those of glycophytes. A total of 32 known and three novel miRNA families were identified. Conserved and mangrove-specific miRNA targets were predicted; the latter were widely involved in stress responses. The known miRNAs showed differential expression between the mangroves and glycophytes, reminiscent of the adaptive stress-responsive changes in Arabidopsis. B. gymnorrhiza possessed highly abundant but less conserved TAS3 trans-acting siRNAs (tasiRNAs) in addition to tasiR-ARFs, with expanded potential targets. Our results indicate that the evolutionary alteration of sRNA expression levels and the rewiring of sRNA-regulatory networks are important mechanisms underlying stress adaptation. We also identified sRNAs that are involved in salt and/or drought tolerance and nutrient homeostasis as possible contributors to mangrove success in stressful environments. PMID:27278626

  19. Small RNA transcriptomes of mangroves evolve adaptively in extreme environments.

    PubMed

    Wen, Ming; Lin, Xingqin; Xie, Munan; Wang, Yushuai; Shen, Xu; Liufu, Zhongqi; Wu, Chung-I; Shi, Suhua; Tang, Tian

    2016-06-09

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and endogenous small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are key players in plant stress responses. Here, we present the sRNA transcriptomes of mangroves Bruguiera gymnorrhiza and Kandelia candel. Comparative computational analyses and target predictions revealed that mangroves exhibit distinct sRNA regulatory networks that differ from those of glycophytes. A total of 32 known and three novel miRNA families were identified. Conserved and mangrove-specific miRNA targets were predicted; the latter were widely involved in stress responses. The known miRNAs showed differential expression between the mangroves and glycophytes, reminiscent of the adaptive stress-responsive changes in Arabidopsis. B. gymnorrhiza possessed highly abundant but less conserved TAS3 trans-acting siRNAs (tasiRNAs) in addition to tasiR-ARFs, with expanded potential targets. Our results indicate that the evolutionary alteration of sRNA expression levels and the rewiring of sRNA-regulatory networks are important mechanisms underlying stress adaptation. We also identified sRNAs that are involved in salt and/or drought tolerance and nutrient homeostasis as possible contributors to mangrove success in stressful environments.

  20. Stochastic Control Problems where Small Intervention Costs Have Big Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Oksendal, B.

    1999-11-15

    We study an impulse control problem where the cost of interfering in a stochastic system with an impulse of size {zeta} element of R is given by c+{lambda} vertical bar {zeta} vertical bar , where c and {lambda} are positive constants. We call {lambda} the proportional cost coefficient and c the intervention cost . We find the value/cost function V{sub c} for this problem for each c>0 and we show that lim{sub c{sup yields}{sub 0}+}V{sub c}=W , where W is the value function for the corresponding singular stochastic control problem. Our main result is that dV{sub c}/dc = {infinity} at c=0. This illustrates that the introduction of an intervention cost c>0 , however small, into a system can have a big effect on the value function: the increase in the value function is in no proportion to the increase in c (from c=0 )

  1. Small Impact Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    22 June 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a small impact crater with a 'butterfly' ejecta pattern. The butterfly pattern results from an oblique impact. Not all oblique impacts result in an elliptical crater, but they can result in a non-radial pattern of ejecta distribution. The two-toned nature of the ejecta -- with dark material near the crater and brighter material further away -- might indicate the nature of subsurface materials. Below the surface, there may be a layer of lighter-toned material, underlain by a layer of darker material. The impact throws these materials out in a pattern that reflects the nature of the underlying layers.

    Location near: 3.7oN, 348.2oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Autumn

  2. Small Business Innovations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract to Kennedy Space Center, EIC Laboratories invented a Raman Spectrograph with fiber optic sampling for space applications such as sensing hazardous fuel vapors and making on-board rapid analyses of chemicals and minerals. Raman spectroscopy is a laser-based measurement technique that provides through a unique vibrational spectrum a molecular 'fingerprint,' and can function in aqueous environments. EIC combined optical fiber technology with Raman methods to develop sensors that can be operated at a distance from the spectrographic analysis instruments and the laser excitation source. EIC refined and commercialized the technology to create the Fiber Optic Raman Spectrograph and the RamanProbe. Commercial applications range from process control to monitoring hazardous materials.

  3. Modular small hydro configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-09-01

    Smaller sites (those under 750 kilowatts) which previously were not attractive to develop using equipment intended for application at larger scale sites, were the focal point in the conception of a system which utilizes standard industrial components which are generally available within short procurement times. Such components were integrated into a development scheme for sites having 20 feet to 150 feet of head. The modular small hydro configuration maximizes the use of available components and minimizes modification of existing civil works. A key aspect of the development concept is the use of a vertical turbine multistage pump, used in the reverse mode as a hydraulic turbine. The configuration allows for automated operation and control of the hydroelectric facilities with sufficient flexibility for inclusion of potential hydroelectric sites into dispersed storage and generation (DSG) utility grid systems.

  4. Small transport aircraft technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, L. J.

    1983-01-01

    Information on commuter airline trends and aircraft developments is provided to upgrade the preliminary findings of a NASA-formed small transport aircraft technology (STAT) team, established to determine whether the agency's research and development programs could help commuter aircraft manufacturers solve technical problems related to passenger acceptance and use of 19- to 50-passenger aircraft. The results and conclusions of the full set of completed STAT studies are presented. These studies were performed by five airplane manufacturers, five engine manufacturers, and two propeller manufacturers. Those portions of NASA's overall aeronautics research and development programs which are applicable to commuter aircraft design are summarized. Areas of technology that might beneficially be expanded or initiated to aid the US commuter aircraft manufacturers in the evolution of improved aircraft for the market are suggested.

  5. Small Syrian Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-498, 29 September 2003

    Today, 29 September 2003, is the first day of southern summer, and the first day of northern winter on Mars. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a small volcano in Syria Planum near 12.9oS, 102.7oW. The volcano and surrounding terrain have been thickly mantled by dust; this dust has subsequently been eroded so that it appears textured rather than smooth. The thin, light streaks that crisscross the image are the tracks left by passing dust devils. Not all dust devils on Mars make streaks, and not all streaks are darker than their surroundings--those found in Syria Planum are invariably lighter in tone. The picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) across; sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  6. [Is allastrim small pox?].

    PubMed

    Tiexeira, L A

    2000-01-01

    Between 1910 and 1913, two renowned physicians in the city of Sao Paulo found themselves engaged in a scientific controversy regarding the classification of a disease then assailing the state. Antonio Carini, director of the Instituto Pasteur de Sao Paulo, believed the illness to be small pox, while Emilio Ribas, director of the Servico Sanitario, claimed it was allastrim, or milk pox. The controversy started in the Sociedade de Medicina e Cirurgia but later migrated to other forums and came to incorporate other figures as well. This presentation and discussion of the polemic is meant as a contribution to our understanding of the process by which a scientific consensus is constructed and solidified within the field of the biomedical sciences.

  7. Friction at small displacement.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, W. E.; Aronstein, J.

    1972-01-01

    Low contact resistance between metal surfaces is often observed in spite of interposed lubricant and/or oxide films. To study this effect an apparatus is used with which normal force and tangential microdisplacement are applied between a small lead rider and a gold flat with various surface film conditions. Under nonoxidized and nonlubricated conditions, and with either oxide or stearic acid lubricant film alone, friction is high and contact resistance is low. With oxide and lubricant together, friction is much lower and slide is smooth, but contact resistance remains low and Ohm's law is obeyed. The results are consistent with Greenwood's theory of contact resistance for a cluster of minute metallic contact spots within the load-supporting area. The contact resistance of such a cluster is indistinguishable, for practical purposes, from that given by complete metallic contact.

  8. Small caliber guided projectile

    DOEpatents

    Jones, James F.; Kast, Brian A.; Kniskern, Marc W.; Rose, Scott E.; Rohrer, Brandon R.; Woods, James W.; Greene, Ronald W.

    2010-08-24

    A non-spinning projectile that is self-guided to a laser designated target and is configured to be fired from a small caliber smooth bore gun barrel has an optical sensor mounted in the nose of the projectile, a counterbalancing mass portion near the fore end of the projectile and a hollow tapered body mounted aft of the counterbalancing mass. Stabilizing strakes are mounted to and extend outward from the tapered body with control fins located at the aft end of the strakes. Guidance and control electronics and electromagnetic actuators for operating the control fins are located within the tapered body section. Output from the optical sensor is processed by the guidance and control electronics to produce command signals for the electromagnetic actuators. A guidance control algorithm incorporating non-proportional, "bang-bang" control is used to steer the projectile to the target.

  9. Small Active Radiation Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, Gautam D.

    2004-01-01

    A device, named small active radiation monitor, allows on-orbit evaluations during periods of increased radiation, after extravehicular activities, or at predesignated times for crews on such long-duration space missions as on the International Space Station. It also permits direct evaluation of biological doses, a task now performed using a combination of measurements and potentially inaccurate simulations. Indeed the new monitor can measure a full array of radiation levels, from soft x-rays to hard galactic cosmic-ray particles. With refinement, it will benefit commercial (nuclear power-plant workers, airline pilots, medical technicians, physicians/dentists, and others) and military personnel as well as the astronauts for whom thermoluminescent dosimeters are inadequate. Civilian and military personnel have long since graduated from film badges to thermoluminescent dosimeters. Once used, most dosimeters must be returned to a central facility for processing, a step that can take days or even weeks. While this suffices for radiation workers for whom exposure levels are typically very low and of brief duration, it does not work for astronauts. Even in emergencies and using express mail, the results can often be delayed by as much as 24 hours. Electronic dosimeters, which are the size of electronic oral thermometers, and tattlers, small electronic dosimeters that sound an alarm when the dose/dose rate exceeds preset values, are also used but suffer disadvantages similar to those of thermoluminescent dosimeters. None of these devices fully answers the need of rapid monitoring during the space missions. Instead, radiation is monitored by passive detectors, which are read out after the missions. Unfortunately, these detectors measure only the absorbed dose and not the biologically relevant dose equivalent. The new monitor provides a real-time readout, a time history of radiation exposures (both absorbed dose and biologically relevant dose equivalent), and a count of the

  10. Epigenetic reprogramming and small RNA silencing of transposable elements in pollen

    PubMed Central

    Slotkin, R. Keith; Vaughn, Matthew; Tanurdžic, Miloš; Borges, Filipe; Becker, Jörg D.; Feijó, José A.; Martienssen, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The mutagenic activity of transposable elements (TEs) is suppressed by epigenetic silencing and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), especially in gametes that would transmit transposed elements to the next generation. In pollen from the model plant Arabidopsis, we show that TEs are unexpectedly reactivated and transpose, but only in the pollen vegetative nucleus, which accompanies the sperm cells but does not provide DNA to the fertilized zygote. TE expression coincides with down-regulation of the heterochromatin remodeler DECREASE IN DNA METHYLATION 1 and of most TE siRNAs. However, 21 nucleotide siRNA from Athila retrotransposons is generated in pollen and accumulates in sperm, indicating that siRNA from TEs activated in the vegetative nucleus can target silencing in gametes. We propose a conserved role for reprogramming in germline companion cells, such as nurse cells in insects and vegetative nuclei in plants, to reveal intact TEs in the genome and regulate their activity in gametes. PMID:19203581

  11. Small RNAs tackle large viruses: RNA interference-based antiviral defense against DNA viruses in insects.

    PubMed

    Bronkhorst, Alfred W; Miesen, Pascal; van Rij, Ronald P

    2013-01-01

    The antiviral RNA interference (RNAi) pathway processes viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into viral small interfering RNAs (vsiRNA) that guide the recognition and cleavage of complementary viral target RNAs. In RNA virus infections, viral replication intermediates, dsRNA genomes or viral structured RNAs have been implicated as Dicer-2 substrates. In a recent publication, we demonstrated that a double-stranded DNA virus, Invertebrate iridescent virus 6, is a target of the Drosophila RNAi machinery, and we proposed that overlapping converging transcripts base pair to form the dsRNA substrates for vsiRNA biogenesis. Here, we discuss the role of RNAi in antiviral defense to DNA viruses in Drosophila and other invertebrate model systems.

  12. Myosin VI small insert isoform maintains exocytosis by tethering secretory granules to the cortical actin.

    PubMed

    Tomatis, Vanesa M; Papadopulos, Andreas; Malintan, Nancy T; Martin, Sally; Wallis, Tristan; Gormal, Rachel S; Kendrick-Jones, John; Buss, Folma; Meunier, Frédéric A

    2013-02-04

    Before undergoing neuroexocytosis, secretory granules (SGs) are mobilized and tethered to the cortical actin network by an unknown mechanism. Using an SG pull-down assay and mass spectrometry, we found that myosin VI was recruited to SGs in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Interfering with myosin VI function in PC12 cells reduced the density of SGs near the plasma membrane without affecting their biogenesis. Myosin VI knockdown selectively impaired a late phase of exocytosis, consistent with a replenishment defect. This exocytic defect was selectively rescued by expression of the myosin VI small insert (SI) isoform, which efficiently tethered SGs to the cortical actin network. These myosin VI SI-specific effects were prevented by deletion of a c-Src kinase phosphorylation DYD motif, identified in silico. Myosin VI SI thus recruits SGs to the cortical actin network, potentially via c-Src phosphorylation, thereby maintaining an active pool of SGs near the plasma membrane.

  13. Pharicin A, a novel natural ent-kaurene diterpenoid, induces mitotic arrest and mitotic catastrophe of cancer cells by interfering with BubR1 function.

    PubMed

    Xu, Han-Zhang; Huang, Ying; Wu, Ying-Li; Zhao, Yong; Xiao, Wei-Lie; Lin, Qi-Shan; Sun, Han-Dong; Dai, Wei; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2010-07-15

    In this study, we report the functional characterization of a new ent-kaurene diterpenoid termed pharicin A, which was originally isolated from Isodon, a perennial shrub frequently used in Chinese folk medicine for tumor treatment. Pharicin A induces mitotic arrest in leukemia and solid tumor-derived cells identified by their morphology, DNA content and mitotic marker analyses. Pharicin A-induced mitotic arrest is associated with unaligned chromosomes, aberrant BubR1 localization and deregulated spindle checkpoint activation. Pharicin A directly binds to BubR1 in vitro, which is correlated with premature sister chromatid separation in vivo. Pharicin A also induces mitotic arrest in paclitaxel-resistant Jurkat and U2OS cells. Combined, our study strongly suggests that pharicin A represents a novel class of small molecule compounds capable of perturbing mitotic progression and initiating mitotic catastrophe, which merits further preclinical and clinical investigations for cancer drug development.

  14. Small intestine contrast injection (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and throat, through the stomach into the small intestine. When in place, contrast dye is introduced and ... means of demonstrating whether or not the small intestine is normal when abnormality is suspected.

  15. Small intestine aspirate and culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/article/003731.htm Small intestine aspirate and culture To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Small intestine aspirate and culture is a lab test to check for infection ...

  16. Small rover exploration capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salotti, Jean-Marc; Laithier, Corentin; Machut, Benoit; Marie, Aurélien; Bruneau, Audrey; Grömer, Gernot; Foing, Bernard H.

    2015-05-01

    For a human mission to the Moon or Mars, an important question is to determine the best strategy for the choice of surface vehicles. Recent studies suggest that the first missions to Mars will be strongly constrained and that only small unpressurized vehicles will be available. We analyze the exploration capabilities and limitations of small surface vehicles from the user perspective. Following the “human centered design” paradigm, the team focused on human systems interactions and conducted the following experiments: - Another member of our team participated in the ILEWG EuroMoonMars 2013 simulation at the Mars Desert Research Station in Utah during the same period of time. Although the possible traverses were restricted, a similar study with analog space suits and quads has been carried out. - Other experiments have been conducted in an old rock quarry close to Bordeaux, France. An expert in the use of quads for all types of terrains performed a demonstration and helped us to characterize the difficulties, the risks and advantages and drawbacks of different vehicles and tools. The vehicles that will be used on the surface of Mars have not been defined yet. Nevertheless, the results of our project already show that using a light and unpressurized vehicle (in the order of 150 kg) for the mobility on the Martian surface can be a true advantage. Part of the study was dedicated to the search for appropriate tools that could be used to make

  17. Genome-wide analysis for discovery of new rice miRNA reveals natural antisense miRNA (nat-miRNAs)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Small RNAs (21-24nt) are involved in gene regulation through translation inhibition, mRNA cleavage, or directing chromatin modifications. In rice, currently ~240 miRNAs have been annotated. We sequenced more than four million small RNAs from rice and identified another 24 miRNA genes. Among these, w...

  18. All Shops Great and Small.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carman, Bernard R.

    1994-01-01

    The functions of public relations offices are described for four small colleges and one small private school: Spelman College (Georgia); North Harris County College (Texas); Scripps College (California); Lafayette College (Pennsylvania); and Maumee Valley Country Day School (Ohio). Focus is on creative and effective use of a small staff and…

  19. Small Business Management. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This instructor's guide, which is designed to assist teachers in providing instruction and technical support to small business owners and managers, contains 17 competency-based units of instruction on the following areas that both small business instructors and small business owners have deemed critical to the success of any business:…

  20. Small scale sanitation technologies.

    PubMed

    Green, W; Ho, G

    2005-01-01

    Small scale systems can improve the sustainability of sanitation systems as they more easily close the water and nutrient loops. They also provide alternate solutions to centrally managed large scale infrastructures. Appropriate sanitation provision can improve the lives of people with inadequate sanitation through health benefits, reuse products as well as reduce ecological impacts. In the literature there seems to be no compilation of a wide range of available onsite sanitation systems around the world that encompasses black and greywater treatment plus stand-alone dry and urine separation toilet systems. Seventy technologies have been identified and classified according to the different waste source streams. Sub-classification based on major treatment methods included aerobic digestion, composting and vermicomposting, anaerobic digestion, sand/soil/peat filtration and constructed wetlands. Potential users or suppliers of sanitation systems can choose from wide range of technologies available and examine the different treatment principles used in the technologies. Sanitation systems need to be selected according to the local social, economic and environmental conditions and should aim to be sustainable.