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Sample records for 240pu core experiments

  1. ZPR-6 assembly 7 high {sup 240}Pu core experiments : a fast reactor core with mixed (Pu,U)-oxide fuel and a centeral high{sup 240}Pu zone.

    SciTech Connect

    Lell, R. M.; Morman, J. A.; Schaefer, R.W.; McKnight, R.D.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-02-23

    ZPR-6 Assembly 7 (ZPR-6/7) encompasses a series of experiments performed at the ZPR-6 facility at Argonne National Laboratory in 1970 and 1971 as part of the Demonstration Reactor Benchmark Program (Reference 1). Assembly 7 simulated a large sodium-cooled LMFBR with mixed oxide fuel, depleted uranium radial and axial blankets, and a core H/D near unity. ZPR-6/7 was designed to test fast reactor physics data and methods, so configurations in the Assembly 7 program were as simple as possible in terms of geometry and composition. ZPR-6/7 had a very uniform core assembled from small plates of depleted uranium, sodium, iron oxide, U{sub 3}O{sub 8} and Pu-U-Mo alloy loaded into stainless steel drawers. The steel drawers were placed in square stainless steel tubes in the two halves of a split table machine. ZPR-6/7 had a simple, symmetric core unit cell whose neutronic characteristics were dominated by plutonium and {sup 238}U. The core was surrounded by thick radial and axial regions of depleted uranium to simulate radial and axial blankets and to isolate the core from the surrounding room. The ZPR-6/7 program encompassed 139 separate core loadings which include the initial approach to critical and all subsequent core loading changes required to perform specific experiments and measurements. In this context a loading refers to a particular configuration of fueled drawers, radial blanket drawers and experimental equipment (if present) in the matrix of steel tubes. Two principal core configurations were established. The uniform core (Loadings 1-84) had a relatively uniform core composition. The high {sup 240}Pu core (Loadings 85-139) was a variant on the uniform core. The plutonium in the Pu-U-Mo fuel plates in the uniform core contains 11% {sup 240}Pu. In the high {sup 240}Pu core, all Pu-U-Mo plates in the inner core region (central 61 matrix locations per half of the split table machine) were replaced by Pu-U-Mo plates containing 27% {sup 240}Pu in the plutonium

  2. Vertical distributions of radionuclides ((239+240)Pu, (240)Pu/(239)Pu, and (137)Cs) in sediment cores of Lake Bosten in Northwestern China.

    PubMed

    Liao, Haiqing; Bu, Wenting; Zheng, Jian; Wu, Fengchang; Yamada, Masatoshi

    2014-04-01

    Artificial radionuclides ((137)Cs, (239+240)Pu, (241)Pu, (241)Am) deposited in lacustrine sediments have been used for dating as well as radionuclide source identification. In the present work, we investigated the vertical distributions of (239+240)Pu and (137)Cs activities, (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios, and (239+240)Pu/(137)Cs activity ratios in sediment cores collected from Lake Bosten, which is the lake closest to the Lop Nor Chinese Nuclear Weapon Test site in northwestern China. Uniformly high concentrations of (239+240)Pu and (137)Cs were found in the upper layers deposited since 1964 in the sediment cores, and these were controlled by the resuspension of soil containing radionuclides from the nearby land surface. As the Chinese nuclear tests varied remarkably in yield, the mixing of the tropospheric deposition from these tests and the stratospheric deposition of global fallout has led to a (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratio that is similar to that of global fallout and to a (239+240)Pu/(137)Cs activity ratio that is slightly higher than that of global fallout. However, a low (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratio of 0.080 and high (239+240)Pu/(137)Cs activity ratio of 0.087, significantly different from the global fallout values, were observed in one sediment core (07BS10-2), indicating the inhomogenous tropospheric deposition from the Chinese nuclear tests in Lake Bosten during 1967-1973. These results are important to understand the influence of the CNTs on the radionuclide contamination in Lake Bosten.

  3. Plutonium activities and 240Pu/ 239Pu atom ratios in sediment cores from the east China sea and Okinawa Trough: Sources and inventories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhong-liang; Yamada, Masatoshi

    2005-05-01

    Plutonium concentrations and 240Pu/ 239Pu atom ratios in the East China Sea and Okinawa Trough sediment cores were determined by isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after separation using ion-exchange chromatography. The results showed that 240Pu/ 239Pu atom ratios in the East China Sea and Okinawa Trough sediments, ranging from 0.21 to 0.33, were much higher than the reported value of global fallout (0.18). The highest 240Pu/ 239Pu ratios (0.32-0.33) were observed in the deepest Okinawa Trough sediment samples. These ratios suggested the US nuclear weapons tests in the early 1950s at the Pacific Proving Grounds in the Marshall Islands were a major source of plutonium in the East China Sea and Okinawa Trough sediments, in addition to the global fallout source. It was proposed that close-in fallout plutonium was delivered from the Pacific Proving Grounds test sites via early direct tropospheric fallout and transportation by the North Pacific Equatorial Circulation system and Kuroshio Current into the Okinawa Trough and East China Sea. The total 239 + 240 Pu inventories in the cores were about 150-200% of that expected from direct global fallout; about 46-67% of the total inventories were delivered from the Pacific Proving Grounds. Much higher 239 + 240 Pu inventories were observed in the East China Sea sediments than in sediments of the Okinawa Trough, because in the open oceans, part of the 239 + 240 Pu was still retained in the water column, and continued Pu scavenging was higher over the margin than the trough. According to the vertical distributions of 239 + 240 Pu activities and 240Pu/ 239Pu atom ratios in these cores, it was concluded that sediment mixing was the dominant process in controlling profiles of plutonium in this area. Faster mixing in the coastal samples has homogenized the entire 240Pu/ 239Pu ratio record today; slightly slower mixing and less scavenging in the Okinawa Trough have left the surface sediment ratios closer

  4. ZPR-6 assembly 7 high {sup 240} PU core : a cylindrical assemby with mixed (PU, U)-oxide fuel and a central high {sup 240} PU zone.

    SciTech Connect

    Lell, R. M.; Schaefer, R. W.; McKnight, R. D.; Tsiboulia, A.; Rozhikhin, Y.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Inst. of Physics and Power Engineering

    2007-10-01

    Over a period of 30 years more than a hundred Zero Power Reactor (ZPR) critical assemblies were constructed at Argonne National Laboratory. The ZPR facilities, ZPR-3, ZPR-6, ZPR-9 and ZPPR, were all fast critical assembly facilities. The ZPR critical assemblies were constructed to support fast reactor development, but data from some of these assemblies are also well suited to form the basis for criticality safety benchmarks. Of the three classes of ZPR assemblies, engineering mockups, engineering benchmarks and physics benchmarks, the last group tends to be most useful for criticality safety. Because physics benchmarks were designed to test fast reactor physics data and methods, they were as simple as possible in geometry and composition. The principal fissile species was {sup 235}U or {sup 239}Pu. Fuel enrichments ranged from 9% to 95%. Often there were only one or two main core diluent materials, such as aluminum, graphite, iron, sodium or stainless steel. The cores were reflected (and insulated from room return effects) by one or two layers of materials such as depleted uranium, lead or stainless steel. Despite their more complex nature, a small number of assemblies from the other two classes would make useful criticality safety benchmarks because they have features related to criticality safety issues, such as reflection by soil-like material. The term 'benchmark' in a ZPR program connotes a particularly simple loading aimed at gaining basic reactor physics insight, as opposed to studying a reactor design. In fact, the ZPR-6/7 Benchmark Assembly (Reference 1) had a very simple core unit cell assembled from plates of depleted uranium, sodium, iron oxide, U3O8, and plutonium. The ZPR-6/7 core cell-average composition is typical of the interior region of liquid-metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs) of the era. It was one part of the Demonstration Reactor Benchmark Program,a which provided integral experiments characterizing the important features of demonstration

  5. Extension of 239+240Pu sediment geochronology to coarse-grained marine sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuehl, Steven A.; Ketterer, Michael E.; Miselis, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    Sediment geochronology of coastal sedimentary environments dominated by sand has been extremely limited because concentrations of natural and bomb-fallout radionuclides are often below the limit of measurement using standard techniques. ICP-MS analyses of 239+240Pu from two sites representative of traditionally challenging (i.e., low concentration) environments provide a "proof of concept" and demonstrate a new application for bomb-fallout radiotracers in the study of sandy shelf-seabed dynamics. A kasten core from the New Zealand shelf in the Southern Hemisphere (low fallout), and a vibracore from the sandy nearshore of North Carolina (low particle surface area) both reveal measurable 239+240Pu activities at depth. In the case of the New Zealand site, independently verified steady-state sedimentation results in a 239+240Pu profile that mimics the expected atmospheric fallout. The depth profile of 239+240Pu in the North Carolina core is more uniform, indicating significant sediment resuspension, which would be expected in this energetic nearshore environment. This study, for the first time, demonstrates the utility of 239+240Pu in the study of sandy environments, significantly extending the application of bomb-fallout isotopes to coarse-grained sediments, which compose the majority of nearshore regions.

  6. 239,240Pu transport into the Arctic Ocean from underwater nuclear tests in Chernaya Bay, Novaya Zemlya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. N.; Ellis, K. M.; Polyak, L.; Ivanov, G.; Forman, S. L.; Moran, S. B.

    2000-03-01

    Radionuclide measurements have been conducted on sediment, seawater and biota samples collected in Chernaya Bay, on the southern coast of Novaya Zemlya, the site of two underwater nuclear tests conducted in the 1950s. 239,240Pu levels in sediments from the central region of Chernaya Bay exceed concentrations of 15,000 Bq/kg, and are among the highest ever reported for the marine environment. It is estimated that approximately 11 TBq of 239,240Pu from the tests has been retained in the sediments of Chernaya Bay. Plutonium from Chernaya Bay is distinguished by 240Pu/ 239Pu atom ratios of 0.03 that are much lower than ratios of 0.18 typical of global fallout. High levels of 137Cs (Bq/kg) and 60Co (Bq/kg) were also measured in surface sediments in the central regions of Chernaya Bay near the presumed epicentre of the explosions. Applications of a biodiffusion model to excess 210Pb sediment depth profiles indicate that the distribution of 239,240Pu is governed mainly by sediment mixing in this low sedimentation rate (<0.1 cm/yr) regime and, as a result, most of the 239,240Pu has been retained in the upper 20 cm of the sediment column. Elevated levels of 239,240Pu measured in Macoma (104 Bq/kg), Fucus (15 Bq/kg) and polychaete (1292 Bq/kg) from Chernaya Bay, indicate that 239,240Pu levels in the benthos are comparatively high and that significant uptake has occurred in the food chain. Although levels of 239,240Pu in bottom water from Chernaya Bay are high (4.2 Bq/m 3), restricted exchange over the fjord sill limits the present rates of 239,240Pu transport from contaminated sites in Chernaya Bay into the eastern Barents Sea. However, low 240Pu/ 239Pu atom ratios measured in sediment cores collected throughout the eastern Barents Sea indicate that significant offshore transport of plutonium from Chernaya Bay has occurred in the past, probably at the time of the original nuclear tests. The large difference in end member 240Pu/ 239Pu atom ratios for Chernaya Bay fallout (0

  7. Microscopic Calculations of 240Pu Fission

    SciTech Connect

    Younes, W; Gogny, D

    2007-09-11

    Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov calculations have been performed with the Gogny finite-range effective interaction for {sup 240}Pu out to scission, using a new code developed at LLNL. A first set of calculations was performed with constrained quadrupole moment along the path of most probable fission, assuming axial symmetry but allowing for the spontaneous breaking of reflection symmetry of the nucleus. At a quadrupole moment of 345 b, the nucleus was found to spontaneously scission into two fragments. A second set of calculations, with all nuclear moments up to hexadecapole constrained, was performed to approach the scission configuration in a controlled manner. Calculated energies, moments, and representative plots of the total nuclear density are shown. The present calculations serve as a proof-of-principle, a blueprint, and starting-point solutions for a planned series of more comprehensive calculations to map out a large set of scission configurations, and the associated fission-fragment properties.

  8. Vertical distribution and inventories of (239+240)Pu and mercury in Sagua la Grande estuary, Cuba.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Hernández, C M; Martin-Perez, J; Gasco, C; Díaz-Asencio, M; Bolanos-Álvarez, Y; Gómez-Batista, M

    2012-10-01

    The vertical activity distribution and inventories of (239+240)Pu profile and Hg were determined in Sagua la Grande estuary, Cuba. The shape of the (239+240)Pu profile in the core column resembled very closely the history of atmospheric nuclear weapons' testing, and the maximum deposition in 1963 was recorded in the sediment core history. The (239+240)Pu activity concentrations in the surface layer sediments varied from 0.163 to 0.611 mBq g(-1). The inventory of (239+240)Pu was 42 ± 5.6 Bq m(-2), a value close to that expected from direct global fallout. Using the (239+240)Pu as a chronomarker the mass sedimentation rate in the area for the last 60 years was calculated, reaching values of 0.173 g cm(-2) y(-1). The mercury profile reflects the history of anthropogenic pollution in the estuary and perfectly describes the operation of the mercury-cell chlor-alkali plant, for production of NaOH, which began operations in 1980. The inventory of Hg was 2.42 ± 0.19 μg cm(-2). These results contribute to the scarce regional database for pollutants and anthropogenic radionuclides in the Caribbean marine environment, particularly in relation to (239+240)Pu.

  9. The geochemistry of fallout plutonium in the North Atlantic: II. 240Pu /239Pu ratios and their significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buesseler, Ken O.; Sholkovitz, Edward R.

    1987-10-01

    A systematic decrease in the 240Pu /239Pu ratio in marine sediments is found with increasing water depth along a transect of cores between Woods Hole and Bermuda. The 240Pu /239Pu atom ratios range from ≅O.18 on the shelf to ≅O.10 at 5000 m but do not change with depth in individual cores. A model is presented which can account for the range of 240Pu /239Pu ratios found in this and other similar studies ( NOSHKIN and GATROUSIS, 1974; SCOTTet al., 1983). We propose that there have been at least two distinct sources of fallout Pu to this region. The major source of Pu is global stratospheric fallout, characterized by a 240Pu /239Pu ratio of 0.18 and a relatively long residence time in seawater. The second source is characterized by a much lower 240Pu /239Pu ratio, and relative to global fallout it must have been much more efficiently removed from the water column to deep-sea sediments. We suggest that surface-based low yield testing at the Nevada Test Site is the only source of low ratio fallout Pu which could account for the timing, inventories, and refractory characteristics of this second component of fallout Pu inputs to the North Atlantic.

  10. Sedimentary fluxes of 90Sr, 137Cs, 239,240Pu and 210Pb in the East Sea (Sea of Japan).

    PubMed

    Hong, G H; Lee, S H; Kim, S H; Chung, C S; Baskaran, M

    1999-09-30

    Sediment cores collected from the deep basins of the East Sea (Sea of Japan) provide an ongoing and historical record of artificial radionuclides contamination into one of the most highly publicized radioactive waste dumping areas in the world ocean. The depth distributions of 90Sr, 137Cs and 239,240Pu in sediment cores were investigated with the aid of 210Pb-derived sediment accumulation and mixing rates in the deep basins of the East Sea (Sea of Japan). Five box core samples were collected from the northern Yamato Ridge, Korea Plateau, Ulleung and Japan Basins below 1000-m depth. Sediment inventories of 137Cs and 239,240Pu are inversely correlated with water depth and linearly correlated with sediment accumulation rates. The inventories of these nuclides are linearly correlated with the accumulation rates of organic carbon in sediments. The 238Pu/239,240Pu activity ratios in sediments are 0.036 +/- 0.009 suggesting that most of the Pu to the study area is derived from the global fallout. The activity ratios of 239,240Pu/137Cs, and 90Sr/137Cs in bottom sediments are much lower than those of global fallout due to the differences of particle affinity and biological uptake of these nuclides. Sediment inventories of 90Sr and 137Cs constitute < 4% of the anticipated inventories from the global fallout, while those of 239,240Pu constitute 30-150% of the anticipated inventories from the global fallout. The residence time of the dissolved 239,240Pu in the study area is estimated to be 200-400 years based on the sediment inventory and/or sediment accumulation rate, and water column inventory.

  11. Nuclear weapons produced (236)U, (239)Pu and (240)Pu archived in a Porites Lutea coral from Enewetak Atoll.

    PubMed

    Froehlich, M B; Tims, S G; Fallon, S J; Wallner, A; Fifield, L K

    2017-05-16

    A slice from a Porites Lutea coral core collected inside the Enewetak Atoll lagoon, within 15 km of all major nuclear tests conducted at the atoll, was analysed for (236)U, (239)Pu and (240)Pu over the time interval 1952-1964 using a higher time resolution than previously reported for a parallel slice from the same core. In addition two sediment samples from the Koa and Oak craters were analysed. The strong peaks in the concentrations of (236)U and (239)Pu in the testing years are confirmed to be considerably wider than the flushing time of the lagoon. This is likely due to the growth mechanism of the coral. Following the last test in 1958 atom concentrations of both (236)U and (239)Pu decreased from their peak values by more than 95% and showed a seasonal signal thereafter. Between 1959 and 1964 the weighted average of the (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratio is 0.124 ± 0.008 which is similar to that in the lagoon sediments (0.129 ± 0.006) but quite distinct from the global fallout value of ∼0.18. This, and the high (239,240)Pu and (236)U concentrations in the sediments, provides clear evidence that the post-testing signal in the coral is dominated by remobilisation of the isotopes from the lagoon sediments rather than from global fallout. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Measurement of Angular-Momentum-Dependent Fission Probabilities of 240Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koglin, Johnathon; Burke, Jason; Jovanovic, Igor

    2016-09-01

    An experimental technique using the surrogate reaction method has been developed to measure fission probabilities of actinides as a function of angular momentum state of the fissioning nucleus near the fission barrier. In this work, the 240Pu (α ,α' f) reaction was used as a surrogate for 239Pu (n , f) . An array of 12 silicon telescopes positioned at 10 degree intervals from 40 to 140 degrees detect the outgoing reaction particle for identification and measurement of the excitation energy. The angular momentum state is determined by measuring the angular distribution of fission fragments. The expected distributions are predicted from the Wigner d function. An array of 50 photovoltaic (solar) cells detects fission fragments with 10-degree granularity. The solar cells are sensitive to fission fragments but have no response to light ions. Relative contributions from different angular momentum states are extracted from the measured distributions and compared across all α particle scattering angles to determine fission probability at a specific angular momentum state. The first experiment using this technique was recently completed using 37 MeV α particles incident on 240Pu. First results will be discussed. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security under Grant Award Nu.

  13. Energy balance and deformation at scission in 240Pu fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caamaño, Manuel; Farget, Fanny

    2017-07-01

    The experimental determination of the total excitation energy, the total kinetic energy, and the evaporation neutron multiplicity of fully identified fragments produced in transfer-induced fission of 240Pu, combined with reasonable assumptions, permits to extract the intrinsic and collective excitation energy of the fragments as a function of their atomic number, along with their quadrupole deformation and their distance at scission. The results show that the deformation increases with the atomic number, Z, except for a local maximum around Z = 44 and a minimum around Z = 50, associated with the effect of deformed shells at Z ∼ 44, N ∼ 64, and spherical shells in 132Sn, respectively. The distance between the fragments also shows a minimum around Z1 = 44, Z2 = 50, suggesting a mechanism that links the effect of structure with the length of the neck at scission.

  14. Numerical simulation of 137Cs and (239,240)Pu concentrations by an ocean general circulation model.

    PubMed

    Tsumune, Daisuke; Aoyama, Michio; Hirose, Katsumi

    2003-01-01

    We simulated the spatial distributions and the temporal variations of 137Cs and (239,240)Pu concentrations in the ocean by using the ocean general circulation model which was developed by National Center of Atmospheric Research. These nuclides are introduced into seawaters from global fallout due to atmospheric nuclear weapons tests. The distribution of radioactive deposition on the world ocean is estimated from global precipitation data and observed values of annual deposition of radionuclides at the Meteorological Research Institute in Japan and several observed points in New Zealand. Radionuclides from global fallout have been transported by advection, diffusion and scavenging, and this concentration reduces by radioactive decay in the ocean. We verified the results of the model calculations by comparing simulated values of 137Cs and (239,240)Pu in seawater with the observed values included in the Historical Artificial Radionuclides in the HAM database, which has been constructed by the Meteorological Research Institute. The vertical distributions of the calculated 137Cs concentrations were in good agreement and are in good agreement with the observed profiles in the 1960s up to 250 m, in the 1970s up to 500 m, in the 1980s up to 750 m and in the 1990s up to 750 m. However, the calculated 137Cs concentrations were underestimated compared with the observed 137Cs at the deeper layer. This may suggest other transport processes of 137Cs to deep waters. The horizontal distributions of 137Cs concentrations in surface water could be simulated. A numerical tracer release experiment was performed to explain the horizontal distribution pattern. A maximum (239,240)Pu concentration layer occurs at an intermediate depth for both observed and calculated values, which is formed by particle scavenging. The horizontal distributions of the calculated (239,240)Pu concentrations in surface water could be simulated by considering the scavenging effect.

  15. Temporal variation of 240Pu/239Pu atom ratio and 239+240Pu inventory in water columns of the Japan Sea.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masatoshi; Zheng, Jian

    2010-11-01

    The (239+240)Pu concentrations and (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios were determined by alpha spectrometry and double-focusing SF-ICP-MS for seawater samples obtained in 1984 and 1993 from the Yamato and Tsushima Basins of the Japan Sea in the western North Pacific margin. The total (239+240)Pu inventories in the whole water columns were approximately doubled during the period from 1984 to 1993 in the two basins. The increasing rates were estimated to be 5.1 Bq m(-2)yr(-1) in the Yamato Basin and 4.2 Bq m(-2)yr(-1) in the Tsushima Basin and they corresponded to ~0.02% of the annual (239+240)Pu inflow rate into the Japan Sea through the Tsushima Strait. The mean (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios were ~0.240 and significantly higher than the mean global fallout ratio of 0.18. Furthermore, there were no temporal or spatial variations of (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios during this period in the Japan Sea. The total (239+240)Pu inventories originating from the close-in fallout increased from 17.6 Bq m(-2) to 34.6 Bq m(-2) in the Yamato Basin and from 20.1 Bq m(-2) to 34.6 Bq m(-2) in the Tsushima Basin; however, the relative percentage of ~40% from the close-in fallout was unchanged during this period. A likely mechanism for the increasing Pu inventory would be the continuous inflow of the Tsushima Current from the western North Pacific, and the removal of Pu from surface waters by scavenging onto the settling particles, followed by regeneration of Pu from the settling particles during the downward transport. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. 240Pu/239Pu isotopic ratios and 239 + 240Pu total measurements in surface and deep waters around Mururoa and Fangataufa atolls compared with Rangiroa atoll (French Polynesia).

    PubMed

    Chiappini, R; Pointurier, F; Millies-Lacroix, J C; Lepetit, G; Hemet, P

    1999-09-30

    The average values of 240Pu/239Pu mass isotopic ratios of plutonium deposited in Mururoa and Fangataufa atoll sediments by French atmospheric nuclear tests range from 3.5 to 5%. In order to assess the near field and far field influence of those deposits in the open ocean, two water profiles were measured for 239 + 240Pu and 240Pu/239Pu using, for the first time, an Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer which was developed to achieve femtogram detection limits. One site was located at the limit of the French territorial waters, which is 22 km distant from Mururoa. The second site was located close to Rangiroa atoll, at a distance of approximately 1200-km from French nuclear test sites. The sample volumes were approximately 500 litres and plutonium was purified prior to mass spectrometry and alpha spectrometry measurements. In Rangiroa, the 239 + 240Pu profile is comparable with those already determined in world open oceans but the maximum detected activity, 9 mBq/m3 at 500-600 m is a lot lower than those measured in the northern hemisphere. 240Pu/239Pu ratios were measured between 500 and 1000 m and were not statistically different from the typical 0.18 +/- 0.01 ratio which characterises the global fallout. Consequently, any influence of plutonium from the tests in Mururoa and Fangataufa is not apparent at Rangiroa. The vertical distribution of 239 + 240Pu near Mururoa shows similar changes with depth but with a slight increase in concentration. 240Pu/239Pu mass ratios vary with depth, from 7 to 10% in the upper 500 m and in the deep waters (below 1000 m) to 15-16% between 600 and 1000 m. A contribution from plutonium deposited in the sediments at Mururoa and Fangataufa is observed at the limit of territorial waters, especially in surface and deep waters.

  17. Particle mixing rates in sediments of the eastern equatorial Pacific: Evidence from 210Pb, 239,240Pu and 137Cs distributions at MANOP sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, J. Kirk

    1985-05-01

    Particle mixing rates ( DB) calculated from excess 210Pb gradients in sediments of the east equatorial Pacific range from 0.04 to 0.5 cm 2/y, with variation of a factor of 3-4 at a single site. Diffusion of the 236Ra daughter 222Rn may affect 210Pb distributions under conditions of slow mixing and low 210Pb flux to the seafloor, as shown by a siliceous ooze-clay core which contained the fallout radionuclides 239,240Pu and 137Cs but no excess 210Pb (relative to 226Ra). There is no clear relationship between 210Pbderived mixing rates and sediment type, accumulation rate or organic carbon flux to the sediments. Comparison of 210Pb mixing rates with those calculated from 239,240Pu and 137Cs distributions reveals better agreement for a pulse input of the fallout radionuclides ( DB = 0.03-0.4 cm2/ y) than for continuous input at a constant rate ( DB = 0.1-1.6 cm2/ y), although the Pu and 137Cs data are better fit by the latter model. The agreement may be fortuitous because 239,240Pu and 137Cs appear significantly deeper than 210Pb in at least one core. Tracer separation could be caused by particle size-selective mixing by the benthic fauna or by chemical mobilization. If the fallout radionuclides are scavenged from surface waters by large, organic-rich particles such as fecal pellets, their release and migration may result from decomposition of the carrier in surface sediments. Either a relatively unreactive form of Pu (e.g. oxidized Pu) has been released by this process or a one-dimensional model is inadequate to explain its observed penetration into the sediments. Activity ratios of 239,240Pu /137Cs in the sediments decrease with increasing north latitude, and the trend reflects higher fluxes of 239,240Pu near the weapons test site at Christmas Island (2°N). The 239,240Pu /137Cs ratios and fluxes to the sediment (assuming constant input) at the siliceous ooze-red clay site are consistent with published sediment trap data from a nearby site. Thus if fallout

  18. Determination of /sup 239,240/Pu in bottom sediments of the Baltic Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, Yu.V.; Legin, V.K.; Pospelov, Yu.N.; Simonyak, Z.N.

    1988-11-01

    We present a technique for determining the /sup 239,240/Pu content, using /sup 236/Pu as the monitor of chemical yield, in samples of soils and bottom sediments - objects of the external environment. Plutonium is extracted from the matrix material by leaching with a mixture of concentrated acids HCl-HNO/sub 3/, after which it is separated by ion-exchange methods. After electrodeposition onto stainless steel discs the activity of the nuclides of plutonium is measured by the method of alpha-spectrometry. The average chemical yields during the analysis of the samples was 40-60%, the relative standard deviation was 10%, and the lower limit of detectability was 0.3 Bq. We present results of the determination of the /sup 239,240/Pu content in surface samples of bottom sediments from the Gulf of Finland and that past of the Baltic Sea which adjoins the territory of the USSR. It is found that the unit activity of /sup 239,240/Pu in the bottom sediments varies within the limits of 0.4-1.2 Bq/kg and lies at the global level. Global genesis of /sup 239,240/Pu in the bottom sediments of the Gulf of Finland and the open parts of the Baltic Sea is also confirmed by the values which are found for the ratios /sup 238/Pu//sup 239,240/Pu and /sup 239,240/Pu//sup 137/Cs.

  19. Study of neutron-deficient isotopes of Fl in the 239Pu, 240Pu + 48Ca reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voinov, A. A.; Utyonkov, V. K.; Brewer, N. T.; Oganessian, Yu Ts; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Abdullin, F. Sh; Dmitriev, S. N.; Grzywacz, R. K.; Itkis, M. G.; Miernik, K.; Polyakov, A. N.; Roberto, J. B.; Sagaidak, R. N.; Shirokovsky, I. V.; Shumeiko, M. V.; Tsyganov, Yu S.; Subbotin, V. G.; Sukhov, A. M.; Sabelnikov, A. V.; Vostokin, G. K.; Hamilton, J. H.; Stoyer, M. A.; Strauss, S. Y.

    2016-07-01

    The results of the experiments aimed at the synthesis of Fl isotopes in the 239Pu + 48Ca and 240Pu + 48Ca reactions are presented. The experiment was performed using the Dubna gas-filled recoil separator at the U400 cyclotron. In the 239Pu+48Ca experiment one decay of spontaneously fissioning 284Fl was detected at 245-MeV beam energy. In the 240Pu+48Ca experiment three decay chains of 285Fl were detected at 245 MeV and four decays were assigned to 284Fl at the higher 48Ca beam energy of 250 MeV. The α-decay energy of 285Fl was measured for the first time and decay properties of its descendants 281Cn, 277Ds, 273Hs, 269Sg, and 265Rf were determined more precisely. The cross section of the 239Pu(48Ca,3n)284Fl reaction was observed to be about 20 times lower than those predicted by theoretical models and 50 times less than the value measured in the 244Pu+48Ca reaction. The cross sections of the 240Pu(48Ca,4-3n)284,285Fl at both 48Ca energies are similar and exceed that observed in the reaction with lighter isotope 239Pu by a factor of 10. The decay properties of the synthesized nuclei and their production cross sections indicate rapid decrease of stability of superheavy nuclei with departing from the neutron number N=184 predicted to be the next magic number.

  20. Modeling and production of 240Am by deuteron-induced activation of a 240Pu target

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, Erin C.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Wittman, Richard S.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Woods, Vincent T.; VanDevender, Brent A.; Metz, Lori A.; Friese, Judah I.

    2015-02-01

    A novel reaction pathway for production of 240Am is reported. Models of reaction cross-sections in EMPIRE II suggests that deuteron-induced activation of a 240Pu target produces maximum yields of 240Am from 11.5 MeV incident deuterons. This activation had not been previously reported in the literature. A 240Pu target was activated under the modeled optimum conditions to produce 240Am. The modeled cross-section for the 240Pu(d, 2n)240Am reaction is on the order of 20-30 mbarn, but the experimentally estimated value is 5.3 ± 0.2 mbarn. We discuss reasons for the discrepancy as well as production of other Am isotopes that contaminate the final product.

  1. Temporal evolution of (137)Cs, (237)Np, and (239+240)Pu and estimated vertical (239+240)Pu export in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Bressac, M; Levy, I; Chamizo, E; La Rosa, J J; Povinec, P P; Gastaud, J; Oregioni, B

    2017-10-01

    The evolution of (137)Cs, (237)Np and (239+240)Pu at the DYFAMED station (NW Mediterranean) is discussed in relation to physical processes, downward fluxes of particles, and changes in the main input sources. The data set presented in this study represents the first complete (237)Np vertical profiles (0.12-0.27μBqL(-1)), and constitutes a baseline measurement to assess future changes. A similar behavior of Cs and Np has been evidenced, confirming that Np behaves conservatively. While the (137)Cs decrease has been driven by its radioactive decay, the vertical distribution of (237)Np has not substantially changed over the last decade. In the absence of recent major inputs, a homogenization of their vertical distribution occurred, partly due to deep convection events that became more intense during the last decade. In contrast, (239+240)Pu surface levels in the NW Mediterranean waters have fallen in the past four decades by a factor of 5. This decrease in surface has been balanced by higher concentrations in the deep-water layers. A first estimate of the downward (239+240)Pu fluxes in the NW Mediterranean Sea is proposed over more than two decades. This estimation, based on the DYFAMED sediment trap time-series data and published (239+240)Pu flux measurements, suggests that sinking particles have accounted for 60-90% of the upper layer (0-200m) Pu inventory loss over the period 1989-2013. The upper layer residence time of Pu is estimated to be ~28years, twice as long as the residence time estimated for the whole western Mediterranean (~15years). This difference highlights the slow removal of Pu in the open waters of the NW Mediterranean and confirms that most of the Pu removal occurs along the coastal margin where sedimentation rates are high. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Examining (239+240)Pu, (210)Pb and historical events to determine carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus burial in mangrove sediments of Moreton Bay, Australia.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Christian J; Santos, Isaac R; Maher, Damien T; Breithaupt, Joshua L; Smoak, Joseph M; Ketterer, Michael; Call, Mitchell; Sanders, Luciana; Eyre, Bradley D

    2016-01-01

    Two sediment cores were collected in a mangrove forest to construct geochronologies for the previous century using natural and anthropogenic radionuclide tracers. Both sediment cores were dated using (239+240)Pu global fallout signatures as well as (210)Pb, applying both the Constant Initial Concentration (CIC) and the Constant Rate of Supply (CRS) models. The (239+240)Pu and CIC model are interpreted as having comparable sediment accretion rates (SAR) below an apparent mixed region in the upper ∼5 to 10 cm. In contrast, the CRS dating method shows high sediment accretion rates in the uppermost intervals, which is substantially reduced over the lower intervals of the 100-year record. A local anthropogenic nutrient signal is reflected in the high total phosphorus (TP) concentration in younger sediments. The carbon/nitrogen molar ratios and δ(15)N values further support a local anthropogenic nutrient enrichment signal. The origin of these signals is likely the treated sewage discharge to Moreton Bay which began in the early 1970s. While the (239+240)Pu and CIC models can only produce rates averaged over the intervals of interest within the profile, the (210)Pb CRS model identifies elevated rates of sediment accretion, organic carbon (OC), nitrogen (N), and TP burial from 2000 to 2013. From 1920 to 2000, the three dating methods provide similar OC, N and TP burial rates, ∼150, 10 and 2 g m(-2) year(-1), respectively, which are comparable to global averages.

  3. Bioturbation depths, rates and processes in Massachusetts Bay sediments inferred from modeling of 210Pb and 239 + 240Pu profiles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crusius, John; Bothner, Michael H.; Sommerfield, Christopher K.

    2004-01-01

    Profiles of 210Pb and 239 + Pu from sediment cores collected throughout Massachusetts Bay (water depths of 36-192 m) are interpreted with the aid of a numerical sediment-mixing model to infer bioturbation depths, rates and processes. The nuclide data suggest extensive bioturbation to depths of 25-35 cm. Roughly half the cores have 210Pb and 239 + 240Pu profiles that decrease monotonically from the surface and are consistent with biodiffusive mixing. Bioturbation rates are reasonably well constrained by these profiles and vary from ~0.7 to ~40 cm2 yr-1. As a result of this extensive reworking, however, sediment ages cannot be accurately determined from these radionuclides and only upper limits on sedimentation rates (of ~0.3 cm yr-1) can be inferred. The other half of the radionuclide profiles are characterized by subsurface maxima in each nuclide, which cannot be reproduced by biodiffusive mixing models. A numerical model is used to demonstrate that mixing caused by organisms that feed at the sediment surface and defecate below the surface can cause the subsurface maxima, as suggested by previous work. The deep penetration depths of excess 210Pb and 239 + 240Pu suggest either that the organisms release material over a range of >15 cm depth or that biodiffusive mixing mediated by other organisms is occurring at depth. Additional constraints from surficial sediment 234Th data suggest that in this half of the cores, the vast majority of the present-day flux of recent, nuclide-bearing material to these core sites is transported over a timescale of a month or more to a depth of a few centimeters below the sediment surface. As a consequence of the complex mixing processes, surface sediments include material spanning a range of ages and will not accurately record recent changes in contaminant deposition.

  4. Neutron-induced fission cross section of 240Pu from 0.5 MeV to 3 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador-Castiñeira, P.; Bryś, T.; Eykens, R.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Göök, A.; Moens, A.; Oberstedt, S.; Sibbens, G.; Vanleeuw, D.; Vidali, M.; Pretel, C.

    2015-07-01

    240Pu has recently been pointed out by a sensitivity study of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) to be one of the isotopes whose fission cross section lacks accuracy to meet the upcoming needs for the future generation of nuclear power plants (GEN-IV). In the High Priority Request List (HPRL) of the OECD, it is suggested that the knowledge of the 240Pu(n ,f ) cross section should be improved to an accuracy within 1-3 %, compared to the present 5%. A measurement of the 240Pu cross section has been performed at the Van de Graaff accelerator of the Joint Research Center (JRC) Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM) using quasi-monoenergetic neutrons in the energy range from 0.5 MeV to 3 MeV. A twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber (TFGIC) has been used in a back-to-back configuration as fission fragment detector. The 240Pu(n ,f ) cross section has been normalized to three different isotopes: 237Np(n ,f ) , 235U (n ,f ) , and 238U (n ,f ) . Additionally, the secondary standard reactions were benchmarked through measurements against the primary standard reaction 235U (n ,f ) in the same geometry. A comprehensive study of the corrections applied to the data and the associated uncertainties is given. The results obtained are in agreement with previous experimental data at the threshold region. For neutron energies higher than 1 MeV, the results of this experiment are slightly lower than the ENDF/B-VII.1 evaluation, but in agreement with the experiments of Laptev et al. (2004) as well as Staples and Morley (1998).

  5. Large particle flux of 239+240Pu on the continental margin of the East China Sea.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masatoshi; Aono, Tatsuo

    2002-03-15

    Settling particles were collected from three locations in the East China Sea continental margin and analyzed for 239+240Pu. Two types of sediment traps were used, cylindrical traps and conical time-series traps. Surface sediment samples collected from five locations were also analyzed for 239+240Pu. Data from cylindrical traps showed there was a clear tendency for total mass fluxes to increase with depth at all three stations, and there was an especially large increase near the bottom. 239+240Pu concentrations in settling particles increased with depth from 1.76 mBq/g at 97-m depth to 3.0 mBq/g at 120-m depth and ranged from approximately 3 to 4 mBq/g at depths greater than 120 m. 239+240Pu concentrations collected in the near-bottom traps were approximately two times higher than those in the underlying surface sediments. Like total mass fluxes there was a clear tendency for 239+240Pu fluxes to increase with depth at every station, and the highest 239+240Pu fluxes were observed near the bottom. 239+240Pu concentrations in the time-series traps had little variation throughout the sampling period, though the total mass fluxes showed a large variation. A high variability of 239+240Pu fluxes occurred in very short period of time (1/2 day). The large fluxes of 239+240Pu might be attributed to episodic lateral transport of particles that flow down the continental slope with the nepheloid layer which was considered to be significant for 239+240Pu transport on the continental slope in the East China Sea.

  6. A multi-radionuclide approach to evaluate the suitability of (239+240)Pu as soil erosion tracer.

    PubMed

    Meusburger, Katrin; Mabit, Lionel; Ketterer, Michael; Park, Ji-Hyung; Sandor, Tarjan; Porto, Paolo; Alewell, Christine

    2016-10-01

    Fallout radionuclides have been used successfully worldwide as tracers for soil erosion, but relatively few studies exploit the full potential of plutonium (Pu) isotopes. Hence, this study aims to explore the suitability of the plutonium isotopes (239)Pu and (240)Pu as a method to assess soil erosion magnitude by comparison to more established fallout radionuclides such as (137)Cs and (210)Pbex. As test area an erosion affected headwater catchment of the Lake Soyang (South Korea) was selected. All three fallout radionuclides confirmed high erosion rates for agricultural sites (>25tha(-1)yr(-1)). Pu isotopes further allowed determining the origin of the fallout. Both (240)Pu/(239)Pu atomic ratios and (239+240)Pu/(137)Cs activity ratios were close to the global fallout ratio. However, the depth profile of the (239+240)Pu/(137)Cs activity ratios in undisturbed sites showed lower ratios in the top soil increments, which might be due to higher migration rates of (239+240)Pu. The activity ratios further indicated preferential transport of (137)Cs from eroded sites (higher ratio compared to the global fallout) to the depositional sites (smaller ratio). As such the (239+240)Pu/(137)Cs activity ratio offered a new approach to parameterize a particle size correction factor that can be applied when both (137)Cs and (239+240)Pu have the same fallout source. Implementing this particle size correction factor in the conversion of (137)Cs inventories resulted in comparable estimates of soil loss for (137)Cs and (239+240)Pu. The comparison among the different fallout radionuclides highlights the suitability of (239+240)Pu through less preferential transport compared to (137)Cs and the possibility to gain information regarding the origin of the fallout. In conclusion, (239+240)Pu is a promising soil erosion tracer, however, since the behaviour i.e. vertical migration in the soil and lateral transport during water erosion was shown to differ from that of (137)Cs, there is a clear

  7. Deconvolution of (238,239,240)Pu conversion electron spectra measured with a silicon drift detector.

    PubMed

    Pommé, S; Marouli, M; Paepen, J; Marković, N; Pöllänen, R

    2017-09-13

    Internal conversion electron (ICE) spectra of thin (238,239,240)Pu sources, measured with a windowless Peltier-cooled silicon drift detector (SDD), were deconvoluted and relative ICE intensities were derived from the fitted peak areas. Corrections were made for energy dependence of the full-energy-peak counting efficiency, based on Monte Carlo simulations. A good agreement was found with the theoretically expected internal conversion coefficient (ICC) values calculated from the BrIcc database. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Comprehensive appraisal of 239 + 240Pu in soils around Rocky Flats, Colorado.

    PubMed

    Litaor, M I; Ellerbroek, D; Allen, L; Dovala, E

    1995-12-01

    Plutonium contamination of soils around Rocky Flats Environmental & Technology Site, near Golden, Colorado, resulted from past outdoor storage practices and subsequent remobilization due to inadequate cleanup practices. Until now human-health risk assessment has not been performed because of a lack of sufficient information regarding the spatial extent of 239 + 240Pu in soils. The purpose of this work was to elucidate the extent of plutonium contamination in surface soils, and to assess the uncertainty associated with the spatial distribution of 239 + 240Pu around Rocky Flats Environmental & Technology Site. Four data sets were collected or compiled for this investigation: (1) samples collected from 240 plots of 1.01- or 4.05-hectare by compositing 25 evenly-spaced samples from the upper 0.64 cm in each plot; (2) samples collected from the upper 5 cm of soil in 167 of the same 240 plots by compositing 10 samples from the center of each plot; (3) historical data compiled from samples collected between 1969 and 1973, considered to be the most indicative of the original release; and (4) the exhaustive data set that contains the samples from 1, 2, and 3 and other published data sets collected between 1974 and 1994. These latter samples varied in depth and method of sampling. Plutonium activity reported in the exhaustive data set ranged from 0.03 Bq kg-1 to 407,000 Bq kg-1 with a mean of 1,443 Bq kg-1, median of 6.6 Bq kg-1, standard deviation of 18,463 Bq kg-1, and a coefficient of variation of 12.6. The technique of nonparametric indicator kriging was used to model four conditional cumulative distribution functions of 239 + 240Pu in soils around Rocky Flats Environmental & Technology Site. Each of the conditional cumulative distribution functions was used to generate an E-type (mean of the conditional cumulative distribution functions) surface. The resulted surfaces were consistent with the hypothesis that the westerly winds were the dominant mechanism of plutonium

  9. Neutron induced fission cross section measurements of 240Pu and 242Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belloni, F.; Eykens, R.; Heyse, J.; Matei, C.; Moens, A.; Nolte, R.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Richter, S.; Sibbens, G.; Vanleeuw, D.; Wynants, R.

    2017-09-01

    Accurate neutron induced fission cross section of 240Pu and 242Pu are required in view of making nuclear technology safer and more efficient to meet the upcoming needs for the future generation of nuclear power plants (GEN-IV). The probability for a neutron to induce such reactions figures in the NEA Nuclear Data High Priority Request List [1]. A measurement campaign to determine neutron induced fission cross sections of 240Pu and 242Pu at 2.51 MeV and 14.83 MeV has been carried out at the 3.7 MV Van De Graaff linear accelerator at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Braunschweig. Two identical Frisch Grid fission chambers, housing back to back a 238U and a APu target (A = 240 or A = 242), were employed to detect the total fission yield. The targets were molecular plated on 0.25 mm aluminium foils kept at ground potential and the employed gas was P10. The neutron fluence was measured with the proton recoil telescope (T1), which is the German primary standard for neutron fluence measurements. The two measurements were related using a De Pangher long counter and the charge as monitors. The experimental results have an average uncertainty of 3-4% at 2.51 MeV and for 6-8% at 14.81 MeV and have been compared to the data available in literature.

  10. Individual and workplace monitoring measurements made after a 240Pu incident and during the clean-up operations.

    PubMed

    Hochmann, R; Eisenwagner, H; Benesch, T; Hunt, J; Cruz-Suarez, R; Bulyha, S; Schmitzer, C

    2011-03-01

    On 3 August 2008, five glass vials containing around 7 GBq of (240)Pu in nitric acid solution burst in a laboratory operated by the IAEA in Seibersdorf, Austria. The vials were located in a fire-proof safe in the IAEA Safeguards Analytical Laboratory, and the release of the (240)Pu caused an air contamination in the room and in adjoining rooms. Immediate emergency work was carried out, which was then followed by a long period of clean-up operations. A large number of conventional individual and workplace monitoring measurements were carried out immediately after the incident and during the clean-up work. In addition, due to the fact that (240)Pu has a very low background presence in the environment, and that the IAEA laboratories operate an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry system capable of very low levels of detection of this radionuclide, a number of non-conventional measurements were made to detect (240)Pu on, for example, the photographic camera used to document the incident, on nasal swabs from the first responders, etc. Plastic beakers were left in the corridor of the controlled area to accumulate (240)Pu from precipitation to see whether it was possible to detect traces of the radionuclide. This paper presents the measurements obtained, and discusses their relevance to occupational radiation protection.

  11. Suitability of 239+240Pu and 137Cs as tracers for soil erosion assessment in Swiss mountain grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alewell, Christine; Meusburger, Katrin; Juretzko, Gregor; Mabit, Lionel; Ketterer, Michael E.

    2014-05-01

    We compare the suitability of the anthropogenic FRNs, 137Cs and 239+240Pu as soil erosion tracers in two alpine valleys of Switzerland (Ursern Valley, Canton Uri, Central Swiss Alps and Val Piora, Ticino, Southern Alps). We sampled reference and potentially erosive sites in transects along both valleys. 137Cs measurements of soil samples were done with a Li-drifted Germanium detector and 239+240Pu with ICP-MS. Our data indicates a heterogeneous deposition of the 137Cs, since most of the fallout origins from the Chernobyl April/May 1986 accident, when large parts of the European Alps were still snow-covered. In contrast, 239+240Pu fallout originated mainly from 1950's-1960's atmospheric nuclear weapons tests, resulting in a more homogenous distribution and thus seems to be a more suitable tracer in mountainous grasslands. Soil erosion assessment using 239+240Pu as a tracer pointed to a huge dynamic and high heterogeneity of erosive processes (between sedimentation of 0.9 to 6.4 t ha1yr1 and erosion of 2.3 to 14.1 t ha1yr1 in the Ursern Valley and sedimentation of 0.7 to 77 t ha1yr1 and erosion of 1 to 5.3 t ha1yr1at Val Piora). Our study represents a novel, successful application of 239+240Pu as a tracer of soil erosion in a mountain environment.

  12. Transuranic concentrations in reef and pelagic fish from the Marshall Islands. [/sup 239/Pu, /sup 240/Pu

    SciTech Connect

    Noshkin, V.E.; Eagle, R.J.; Wong, K.M.; Jokela, T.A.

    1980-09-01

    Concentrations of /sup 239 + 240/Pu are reported in tissues of several species of reef and pelagic fish caught at 14 different atolls in the northern Marshall Islands. Several regularities that are species dependent are evident in the distribution of /sup 239 + 240/Pu among different body tissues. Concentrations in liver always exceeded those in bone and concentrations were lowest in the muscle of all fish analyzed. A progressive discrimination against /sup 239 + 240/Pu was observed at successive trophic levels at all atolls except Bikini and Enewetak, where it was difficult to conclude if any real difference exists between the average concentration factor for /sup 239 + 240/Pu among all fish, which include bottom feeding and grazing herbivores, bottom feeding carnivores, and pelagic carnivores from different atoll locations. The average concentration of /sup 239 + 240/Pu in the muscle of surgeonfish from Bikini and Enewetak was not significantly different from the average concentrations determined in these fish at the other, lesser contaminated atolls. Concentrations among all 3rd, 4th, and 5th trophic level species are highest at Bikini where higher environmental concentrations are found. The reasons for the anomalously low concentrations in herbivores from Bikini and Enewetak are not known.

  13. Determination of 240Pu/239Pu atom ratio in coastal surface seawaters from the western North Pacific Ocean and Japan Sea.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masatoshi; Zheng, Jian

    2008-01-01

    Surface seawater samples were collected from a site in the vicinity of the nuclear fuel reprocessing facility at Rokkasho, Japan and sites along the Japan Sea coast. (239+240)Pu activities and (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios were determined by alpha-spectrometry and isotope-dilution sector-field ICP-MS. The (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratio with the mean value of 0.227 +/- 0.006 was significantly higher than the mean global fallout ratio of 0.18. The contribution of the Pacific Proving Grounds close-in fallout was estimated to be 33% of the (239+240)Pu.

  14. Inventories of 239+240Pu, 137Cs, and excess 210Pb in sediments from freshwater and brackish lakes in Rokkasho, Japan, adjacent to a spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Shinji; Ohtsuka, Yoshihito; Kondo, Kunio; Hisamatsu, Shun'ichi

    2009-10-01

    We investigated the vertical profiles of (239+240)Pu, (137)Cs, and excess (210)Pb ((210)Pb(ex)) in sediment core samples obtained from two freshwater lakes and two brackish lakes situated near the first commercial spent nuclear fuel reprocessing plant in Rokkasho, Japan, before the final test of the plant using actual spent nuclear fuel. The inventory of (239+240)Pu in those lakes was larger than that in soil in Rokkasho, which indicated the inflow of (239+240)Pu from the catchment area in addition to direct deposition on the lake surfaces. The (137)Cs inventory in sediments of the brackish lakes was lower than that in the soil, which showed that part of the (137)Cs was removed from the sediments by the brackish water or that it was not deposited into the sediments, because of the high solubility of Cs in brackish water. The (137)Cs inventory in sediments of the freshwater lakes was higher than that of the brackish lakes, and comparable with that in soil except for one core sample out of four. The (239+240)Pu/(137)Cs ratio in freshwater lake sediments was higher than that in soil, and that indicated that part of the (137)Cs was lost from the sediments. The low inventory of (137)Cs may be attributable to competition for absorption sites in sediments with ammonium ions formed in the reducing environment which occurs from summer to fall in the sediments. Those data will be used as background data on the artificial radionuclides in the lakes to assess the effect of released radionuclides on their concentrations.

  15. Induced Fission of 240Pu within a Real-Time Microscopic Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgac, Aurel; Magierski, Piotr; Roche, Kenneth J.; Stetcu, Ionel

    2016-03-01

    We describe the fissioning dynamics of 240Pu from a configuration in the proximity of the outer fission barrier to full scission and the formation of the fragments within an implementation of density functional theory extended to superfluid systems and real-time dynamics. The fission fragments emerge with properties similar to those determined experimentally, while the fission dynamics appears to be quite complex, with many excited shape and pairing modes. The evolution is found to be much slower than previously expected, and the ultimate role of the collective inertia is found to be negligible in this fully nonadiabatic treatment of nuclear dynamics, where all collective degrees of freedom (CDOF) are included (unlike adiabatic treatments with a small number of CDOF).

  16. Microscopic modeling of mass and charge distributions in the spontaneous fission of 240Pu

    DOE PAGES

    Sandhukhan, Jhilam; Nazarewicz, Witold; Schunck, Nicolas

    2016-01-20

    We propose a methodology to calculate microscopically the mass and charge distributions of spontaneous fission yields. We combine the multidimensional minimization of collective action for fission with stochastic Langevin dynamics to track the relevant fission paths from the ground-state configuration up to scission. The nuclear potential energy and collective inertia governing the tunneling motion are obtained with nuclear density functional theory in the collective space of shape deformations and pairing. As a result, we obtain a quantitative agreement with experimental data and find that both the charge and mass distributions in the spontaneous fission of 240Pu are sensitive both tomore » the dissipation in collective motion and to adiabatic fission characteristics.« less

  17. Induced Fission of (240)Pu within a Real-Time Microscopic Framework.

    PubMed

    Bulgac, Aurel; Magierski, Piotr; Roche, Kenneth J; Stetcu, Ionel

    2016-03-25

    We describe the fissioning dynamics of ^{240}Pu from a configuration in the proximity of the outer fission barrier to full scission and the formation of the fragments within an implementation of density functional theory extended to superfluid systems and real-time dynamics. The fission fragments emerge with properties similar to those determined experimentally, while the fission dynamics appears to be quite complex, with many excited shape and pairing modes. The evolution is found to be much slower than previously expected, and the ultimate role of the collective inertia is found to be negligible in this fully nonadiabatic treatment of nuclear dynamics, where all collective degrees of freedom (CDOF) are included (unlike adiabatic treatments with a small number of CDOF).

  18. Performance of Cladding on MOX Fuel with Low 240Pu/239Pu Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, Kevin; Blanpain, Patrick; Morris, Robert Noel

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has decided to dispose of a portion of its surplus plutonium by reconstituting it into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and irradiating it in commercial power reactors. As part of fuel qualification, four lead assemblies were manufactured and irradiated to a maximum fuel rod average burnup of 47.3 MWd/kg heavy metal. This was the world s first commercial irradiation of MOX fuel with a 240Pu/239Pu ratio less than 0.10. Five fuel rods with varying burnups and plutonium contents were selected from one of the assemblies and shipped to Oak Ridge National Laboratory for hot cell examination. This paper discusses the results of those examinations with emphasis on cladding performance. Exams relevant to the cladding included visual and eddy current exams, profilometry, microscopy, hydrogen analysis, gallium analysis, and mechanical testing. There was no discernible effect of the type of MOX fuel on the performance of the cladding.

  19. Historical changes in 239Pu and 240Pu sources in sedimentary records in the East China Sea: Implications for provenance and transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinlong; Baskaran, Mark; Hou, Xiaolin; Du, Jinzhou; Zhang, Jing

    2017-05-01

    Concentrations and isotopic compositions of plutonium (Pu) are widely used for its source identification and to determine transport processes of Pu-associated particulate matter and water. We investigated the concentrations of 239Pu and 240Pu and their ratios in a number of sediment samples from the East China Sea (ECS) collected in the summer of 2013 (August 6-28). The 239+240Pu activity concentrations in surface sediment samples were found to range between 0.048 and 0.492 Bq kg-1 and the 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios showed a similar trend as that of the 239, 240Pu activities; the Pu atom ratios ranged from 0.158 to 0.297 and were mostly higher than the mean global fallout value of 0.18. The 239, 240Pu inventories in the ECS varied widely, from 2 to 807 Bq m-2, with the highest values commonly found in the coastal areas. In the Yangtze Estuary, the mean 239+240Pu activity concentration is close to the estimated value of the suspended material from the Yangtze River catchment (0.18 Bq kg-1), and the 240Pu/239Pu atom ratio was found to be ∼0.18, which indicates that the Yangtze River input is the dominant source of Pu for this area. The total annual Yangtze River input of 239+240Pu was estimated to be 2.4 ×1010 Bq, which is small compared to the total amount of 239+240Pu buried, 3.1 ×1013 Bq in the whole ECS. The Pacific Proving Ground input appears to be the dominant source of Pu to the ECS, accounting for 45%-52% of the total inventory. The fractional amount of 239+240Pu scavenged from the total 239+240Pu transported by the Kuroshio Current (KC) and Taiwan Warm Current (TWC) into ECS sediments is estimated to be ∼10%. Our study shows that the 240Pu/239Pu atom ratio is useful not only to obtain a better insight of the biogeochemistry influenced by the KC, but also to trace the long-range transport of other particle-reactive species. Besides, the sedimentation rates obtained based on the penetration depths of 239+240Pu and vertical profiles of excess 210Pb agree

  20. Measurement of fallout radionuclides, (239)(,240)Pu and (137)Cs, in soil and creek sediment: Sydney Basin, Australia.

    PubMed

    Smith, B S; Child, D P; Fierro, D; Harrison, J J; Heijnis, H; Hotchkis, M A C; Johansen, M P; Marx, S; Payne, T E; Zawadzki, A

    2016-01-01

    Soil and sediment samples from the Sydney basin were measured to ascertain fallout radionuclide activity concentrations and atom ratios. Caesium-137 ((137)Cs) was measured using gamma spectroscopy, and plutonium isotopes ((239)Pu and (240)Pu) were quantified using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Fallout radionuclide activity concentrations were variable ranging from 0.6 to 26.1 Bq/kg for (137)Cs and 0.02-0.52 Bq/kg for (239+240)Pu. Radionuclides in creek sediment samples were an order of magnitude lower than in soils. (137)Cs and (239+240)Pu activity concentration in soils were well correlated (r(2) = 0.80) although some deviation was observed in samples collected at higher elevations. Soil ratios of (137)Cs/(239+240)Pu (decay corrected to 1/1/2014) ranged from 11.5 to 52.1 (average = 37.0 ± 12.4) and showed more variability than previous studies. (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios ranged from 0.117 to 0.165 with an average of 0.146 (±0.013) and an error weighted mean of 0.138 (±0.001). These ratios are lower than a previously reported ratio for Sydney, and lower than the global average. However, these ratios are similar to those reported for other sites within Australia that are located away from former weapons testing sites and indicate that atom ratio measurements from other parts of the world are unlikely to be applicable to the Australian context.

  1. Suitability of 239+240Pu and 137Cs as tracers for soil erosion assessment in mountain grasslands.

    PubMed

    Alewell, Christine; Meusburger, Katrin; Juretzko, Gregor; Mabit, Lionel; Ketterer, Michael E

    2014-05-01

    Anthropogenic radionuclides have been distributed globally due to nuclear weapons testing, nuclear accidents, nuclear weapons fabrication, and nuclear fuel reprocessing. While the negative consequences of this radioactive contamination are self-evident, the ubiquitous fallout radionuclides (FRNs) distribution form the basis for the use as tracers in ecological studies, namely for soil erosion assessment. Soil erosion is a major threat to mountain ecosystems worldwide. We compare the suitability of the anthropogenic FRNs, 137Cs and 239+240Pu as soil erosion tracers in two alpine valleys of Switzerland (Urseren Valley, Canton Uri, Central Swiss Alps and Val Piora, Ticino, Southern Alps). We sampled reference and potentially erosive sites in transects along both valleys. 137Cs measurements of soil samples were performed with a Li-drifted Germanium detector and 239+240Pu with ICP-MS. Our data indicates a heterogeneous deposition of the 137Cs, since most of the fallout origins from the Chernobyl April/May 1986 accident, when large parts of the European Alps were still snow-covered. In contrast, 239+240Pu fallout originated mainly from 1950s to 1960s atmospheric nuclear weapons tests, resulting in a more homogenous distribution and thus seems to be a more suitable tracer in mountainous grasslands. Soil erosion assessment using 239+240Pu as a tracer pointed to a huge dynamic and high heterogeneity of erosive processes (between sedimentation of 1.9 and 7 t ha(-1) yr(-1) and erosion of 0.2-16.4 t ha(-1) yr(-1) in the Urseren Valley and sedimentation of 0.4-20.3 t ha(-1) yr(-1) and erosion of 0.1-16.4 t ha(-1) yr(-1) at Val Piora). Our study represents a novel and successful application of 239+240Pu as a tracer of soil erosion in a mountain environment. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Radioecologycal study of {sup 239/240}Pu in Bangka Island and Muria Peninsula: Determination of {sup 239/240}Pu in marine sediment and seawater as part of baseline data collecting for sitting of candidates of first Indonesia NPP

    SciTech Connect

    Suseno, Heny; Wisnubroto, Djarot S.

    2014-03-24

    Radioisotope Pu-239/240 are alpha emitting nuclides important indicators of radioactive contamination of the marine environment. Global fallout is the main source of plutonium in the marine environment. There are very limited study on {sup 239/240}Pu in Indonesia coastal environments. The data of this radioisotopes is needed for baseline data of nuclear power plant (NPP) site candidates both in Bangka Island and Muria Peninsula. Bottom sediments play an important role in radioecological studies of the marine environment because a large proportion of radioactive substances entering the sea is adsorbed over time onto suspended particulate matter and deposited in sediments. Plutonium is particle reactive and deposited in marine sediment. Radioisotope {sup 239/240}Pu was determinated by alpha spectrometry after radiochemical procedure that was performed in both water and marine sediment from Bangka Island and Muria Peninsula. The sediment baseline of concentration {sup 239/240}Pu in Bangka Island and Muria Peninsula were range from 0.013 to 0.021 Bq.kg{sup −1} and 0.018 to 0.024 Bq.kg{sup −1} respectively. The water baseline concentration this isotope were range from 2.73 to 4.05 mBq.m{sup −3} and 2.98 to 4.50 mBq.m{sup −3}.

  3. Radioecologycal study of 239/240Pu in Bangka Island and Muria Peninsula: Determination of 239/240Pu in marine sediment and seawater as part of baseline data collecting for sitting of candidates of first Indonesia NPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suseno, Heny; Wisnubroto, Djarot S.

    2014-03-01

    Radioisotope Pu-239/240 are alpha emitting nuclides important indicators of radioactive contamination of the marine environment. Global fallout is the main source of plutonium in the marine environment. There are very limited study on 239/240Pu in Indonesia coastal environments. The data of this radioisotopes is needed for baseline data of nuclear power plant (NPP) site candidates both in Bangka Island and Muria Peninsula. Bottom sediments play an important role in radioecological studies of the marine environment because a large proportion of radioactive substances entering the sea is adsorbed over time onto suspended particulate matter and deposited in sediments. Plutonium is particle reactive and deposited in marine sediment. Radioisotope 239/240Pu was determinated by alpha spectrometry after radiochemical procedure that was performed in both water and marine sediment from Bangka Island and Muria Peninsula. The sediment baseline of concentration 239/240Pu in Bangka Island and Muria Peninsula were range from 0.013 to 0.021 Bq.kg-1 and 0.018 to 0.024 Bq.kg-1 respectively. The water baseline concentration this isotope were range from 2.73 to 4.05 mBq.m-3 and 2.98 to 4.50 mBq.m-3.

  4. The inflow of 238Pu and (239+240)Pu from the Odra and Pomeranian rivers catchments area to the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Strumińska-Parulska, Dagmara I; Skwarzec, Bogdan; Tuszkowska, Agnieszka

    2012-11-01

    The aim of the work was to estimate plutonium inflow from the Odra River catchments area to the Baltic Sea. The highest activities of (238)Pu and (239+240)Pu were observed in a winter and a spring season. The highest annual surface inflow of (239+240)Pu from the Odra River watershed was observed for a mountain tributary the Bóbr (1230 Bq km(-2) year(-1)). The annual inflow of (238)Pu and (239+240)Pu to the Baltic Sea was estimated at 9.51 MBq and 45.86 MBq respectively and the highest plutonium surface runoff was observed for the Bóbr drainage.

  5. 239,240Pu/137Cs ratios in the water column of the North Pacific: a proxy of biogeochemical processes.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Katsumi; Aoyama, Michio; Povinec, Pavel P

    2009-03-01

    Anthropogenic radionuclides in seawater have been used as transient tracers of processes in the marine environment. Especially, plutonium in seawater is considered to be a valuable tracer of biogeochemical processes due to its particle-reactive properties. However, its behavior in the ocean is also affected by physical processes such as advection, mixing and diffusion. Here we introduce Pu/(137)Cs ratio as a proxy of biogeochemical processes and discuss its trends in the water column of the North Pacific Ocean. We observed that the (239,240)Pu/(137)Cs ratio in seawater exponentially increased with increasing depth (depth range: 100-1000 m). This finding suggests that the profiles of the (239,240)Pu/(137)Cs ratios in shallower waters directly reflect biogeochemical processes in the water column. A half-regeneration depth deduced from the curve fitting the observed data, showed latitudinal and longitudinal distributions, also related to biogeochemical processes in the water column.

  6. The measurement of 240Pu/ 239Pu and 238Pu/ 239Pu isotopic ratios by alpha-particle spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raab, W.; Parus, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    The measurement of the alpha-activity ratio of {238Pu }/{( 239Pu + 240Pu) } is a routine practice in the determination of the isotopic composition of plutonium. However, measurement of the atomic ratio of 240Pu/ 239Pu by alpha-particle spectrometry is hampered due to insufficient energy resolution for the set of closely spaced peaks of these two isotopes. Passivated and implanted, planar silicon (PIPS) detectors have recently become available with an energy resolution of 10 keV or better, which significantly improves the deconvolution of spectra from plutonium samples. A set of alpha sources was prepared on porcelain disks by ignition, and the spectra were accumulated at a gain of approximately 1 keV per channel. The GRPANL computer program as developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was used to analyze the spectra. The isotopic ratios were measured in parallel by mass spectrometry. It was found that the agreement on the ratios of 240Pu/ 239Pu and 238Pu/ 239Pu between mass spectrometry and measurements by PIPS detectors was within ±2%. Half-life values were obtained from the literature (M. Lammer and O. Schwerer, Handbook of Nuclear Data for Safeguards, Rep. INDC(NDS)-248, IAEA, Vienna, 1991; ref. [5]). Other factors were also studied to improve the accuracy of the data. The alpha-particle emission probabilities of highly enriched 239Pu and 240Pu have been measured. The alpha-particle energies obtained in the fitting were in agreement with those in ref. [5]. The fitted energy values were used throughout this work.

  7. Pu-239 and Pu-240 inventories and Pu-240/ Pu-239 atom ratios in the water column off Sanriku, Japan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Masatoshi; Zheng, Jian; Aono, Tatsuo

    2013-04-01

    A magnitude 9.0 earthquake and subsequent tsunami occurred in the Pacific Ocean off northern Honshu, Japan, on 11 March 2011 which caused severe damage to the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. This accident has resulted in a substantial release of radioactive materials to the atmosphere and ocean, and has caused extensive contamination of the environment. However, no information is available on the amounts of radionuclides such as Pu isotopes released into the ocean at this time. Investigating the background baseline concentration and atom ratio of Pu isotopes in seawater is important for assessment of the possible contamination in the marine environment. Pu-239 (half-life: 24,100 years), Pu-240 (half-life: 6,560 years) and Pu-241 (half-life: 14.325 years) mainly have been released into the environment as the result of atmospheric nuclear weapons testing. The atom ratio of Pu-240/Pu-239 is a powerful fingerprint to identify the sources of Pu in the ocean. The Pu-239 and Pu-240 inventories and Pu-240/Pu-239 atom ratios in seawater samples collected in the western North Pacific off Sanriku before the accident at Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant will provide useful background baseline data for understanding the process controlling Pu transport and for distinguishing additional Pu sources. Seawater samples were collected with acoustically triggered quadruple PVC sampling bottles during the KH-98-3 cruise of the R/V Hakuho-Maru. The Pu-240/Pu-239 atom ratios were measured with a double-focusing SF-ICP-MS, which was equipped with a guard electrode to eliminate secondary discharge in the plasma and to enhance overall sensitivity. The Pu-239 and Pu-240 concentrations were 2.07 and 1.67 mBq/m3 in the surface water, respectively, and increased with depth; a subsurface maximum was identified at 750 m depth, and the concentrations decreased with depth, then increased at the bottom layer. The total Pu-239+240 inventory in the entire water column (depth interval 0

  8. Characterization of ^{239,240}Pu Radionuclide Adsorption to Soil Particles and Mineral Dust Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatro, D. P.; Arimoto, R.; McMillan, N. J.; Barnes, M.

    2006-12-01

    The release of ^{239,240}Pu into the environment by nuclear weapons testing 50 years ago initiated the cyclic mobilization of Pu-contaminated soil particles via the resuspension of dust resulting in a widespread distribution of Pu and other radionuclides. It is unclear what enables the aeolian transport of Pu in the environment; plausible hypotheses of Pu binding to dust and soil particles include Pu adsorption to iron oxides/hydroxides, organic acids, or silicate minerals such as clays. To investigate the connections between surface soils, dust and radionuclides, samples of soil and/or dust were collected from the Project Gnome Site in Eddy County, NM, the Jemez Mountains near Los Alamos, NM, and two 50-year old attics and wind-blown dust in Big Spring, TX. This study tests the hypothesis that Pu is adsorbed onto Fe oxides and hydroxides that coat dust/soil particles. The samples are generally low in organic carbon (0.2 - 4.8%, except for the unburned Los Alamos sample at 9.4%), as measured by LOI (Loss On Ignition) at 360 °C. The citrate-bicarbonate-dithionite method (CDB) of Fe oxide removal, first proposed by Mehra and Jackson in 1960, was used to selectively extract Fe oxides from the samples while leaving silicate Fe intact. Chemical digestion of each sample creates two fractions, the extracted supernatant and a solid pellet residue. If the Pu were associated with Fe oxides, then Fe and Pu should both be selectively removed from the bulk sample during the CBD process, leaving the pellet depleted in Fe and Pu and the supernatant enriched. For Fe, this was confirmed by scanning electron microscope and petrographic analyses. Preliminary radiochemical analyses of Pu activity also verify this hypothesis. Pu activity is significantly lower in pellets than bulk samples (Pu activitypellet/Pu activitybulk average = 0.07, range 0.02-0.12); Pu activity in supernatants is significantly higher than in bulk samples (Pu activitysupernatant/Pu activitybulk average = 4

  9. 137Cs, 239+240Pu and 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios in the surface waters of the western North Pacific Ocean, eastern Indian Ocean and their adjacent seas.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masatoshi; Zheng, Jian; Wang, Zhong-Liang

    2006-07-31

    Surface seawater samples were collected along the track of the R/V Hakuho-Maru cruise (KH-96-5) from Tokyo to the Southern Ocean. The (137)Cs activities were determined for the surface waters in the western North Pacific Ocean, the Sulu and Indonesian Seas, the eastern Indian Ocean, the Bay of Bengal, the Andaman Sea, and the South China Sea. The (137)Cs activities showed a wide variation with values ranging from 1.1 Bq m(-3) in the Antarctic Circumpolar Region of the Southern Ocean to 3 Bq m(-3) in the western North Pacific Ocean and the South China Sea. The latitudinal distributions of (137)Cs activity were not reflective of that of the integrated deposition density of atmospheric global fallout. The removal rates of (137)Cs from the surface waters were roughly estimated from the two data sets of Miyake et al. [Miyake Y, Saruhashi K, Sugimura Y, Kanazawa T, Hirose K. Contents of (137)Cs, plutonium and americium isotopes in the Southern Ocean waters. Pap Meteorol Geophys 1988;39:95-113] and this study to be 0.016 yr(-1) in the Sulu and Indonesian Seas, 0.033 yr(-1) in the Bay of Bengal and Andaman Sea, and 0.029 yr(-1) in the South China Sea. These values were much lower than that in the coastal surface water of the western Northwest Pacific Ocean. This was likely due to less horizontal and vertical mixing of water masses and less scavenging. (239+240)Pu activities and (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios were also determined for the surface waters in the western North Pacific Ocean, the Sulu and Indonesian Seas and the South China Sea. The (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios ranged from 0.199+/-0.026 to 0.248+/-0.027 on average, and were significantly higher than the global stratospheric fallout ratio of 0.18. The contributions of the North Pacific Proving Grounds close-in fallout Pu were estimated to be 20% for the western North Pacific Ocean, 39% for the Sulu and Indonesian Seas and 42% for the South China Sea by using the two end-member mixing model. The higher (240)Pu/(239)Pu

  10. Transport of 137Cs and 239,240Pu with ice-rafted debris in the Arctic Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landa, E.R.; Reimnitz, E.; Beals, D.M.; Pochkowski, J.M.; Winn, W.G.; Rigor, I.

    1998-01-01

    Ice rafting is the dominant mechanism responsible for the transport of fine-grained sediments from coastal zones to the deep Arctic Basin. Therefore, the drift of ice-rafted debris (IRD) could be a significant transport mechanism from the shelf to the deep basin for radionuclides originating from nuclear fuel cycle activities and released to coastal Arctic regions of the former Soviet Union. In this study, 28 samples of IRD collected from the Arctic ice pack during expeditions in 1989-95 were analyzed for 137Cs by gamma spectrometry and for 239Pu and 240Pu by thermal ionization mass spectrometry. 137Cs concentrations in the IRD ranged from less than 0.2 to 78 Bq??kg-1 (dry weight basis). The two samples with the highest 137Cs concentrations were collected in the vicinity of Franz Josef Land, and their backward trajectories suggest origins in the Kara Sea. Among the lowest 137Cs values are seven measured on sediments entrained on the North American shelf in 1989 and 1995, and sampled on the shelf less than six months later. Concentrations of 239Pu + 240Pu ranged from about 0.02 to 1.8 Bq??kg-1. The two highest values came from samples collected in the central Canada Basin and near Spitsbergen; calculated backward trajectories suggest at least 14 years of circulation in the Canada Basin in the former case, and an origin near Severnaya Zemlya (at the Kara Sea/Laptev Sea boundary) in the latter case. While most of the IRD samples showed 240Pu/239Pu ratios near the mean global fallout value of 0.185, five of the samples had lower ratios, in the 0.119 to 0.166 range, indicative of mixtures of Pu from fallout and from the reprocessing of weapons-grade Pu. The backward trajectories of these five samples suggest origins in the Kara Sea or near Severnaya Zemlya.

  11. (239)Pu, (240)Pu, and (241)Am determination in hot particles by low level gamma-spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Ramos, M C; Hurtado, S; Chamizo, E; García-Tenorio, R; León-Vintró, L; Mitchell, P I

    2010-06-01

    A nondestructive method based on low-energy, high-resolution photon spectrometry is presented which allows accurate determination of (239)Pu, (240)Pu, and (241)Am (as a daughter of (241)Pu) activities in radioactive particles containing relatively high levels of plutonium isotopes. The proposed method requires only one measurement for the establishment of an absolute efficiency curve. Since the density and composition of the radioactive particles of interest may vary, a self-absorption correction is required for the accurate determination of isotopic activities and ratios. This correction is carried out for each individual particle using the convenient gamma-ray emissions of (241)Am.

  12. Determination of Plutonium Activity Concentrations and 240Pu/239Pu Atom Ratios in Brown Algae (Fucus distichus) Collected from Amchitka Island, Alaska.

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, T F; Brown, T A; Marchetti, A A; Martinelli, R E; Kehl, S R

    2005-05-02

    Plutonium-239 ({sup 239}Pu) and plutonium-240 ({sup 240}Pu) activity concentrations and {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios are reported for Brown Algae (Fucus distichus) collected from the littoral zone of Amchitka Island (Alaska) and at a control site on the Alaskan peninsula. Plutonium isotope measurements were performed in replicate using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). The average {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio observed in dried Fucus d. collected from Amchitka Island was 0.227 {+-} 0.007 (n=5) and compares with the expected {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio in integrated worldwide fallout deposition in the Northern Hemisphere of 0.1805 {+-} 0.0057 (Cooper et al., 2000). In general, the characteristically high {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu content of Fucus d. analyzed in this study appear to indicate the presence of a discernible basin-wide secondary source of plutonium entering the marine environment. Of interest to the study of plutonium source terms within the Pacific basin are reports of elevated {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios in fallout debris from high-yield atmospheric nuclear tests conducted in the Marshall Islands during the 1950s (Diamond et al., 1960), the wide range of {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio values (0.19 to 0.34) observed in sea water, sediments, coral and other environmental media from the North Pacific Ocean (Hirose et al., 1992; Buesseler, 1997) and updated estimates of the relative contributions of close-in and intermediate fallout deposition on oceanic inventories of radionuclidies, especially in the Northern Pacific Ocean (Hamilton, 2004).

  13. Distribution and source of (129)I, (239)(,240)Pu, (137)Cs in the environment of Lithuania.

    PubMed

    Ežerinskis, Ž; Hou, X L; Druteikienė, R; Puzas, A; Šapolaitė, J; Gvozdaitė, R; Gudelis, A; Buivydas, Š; Remeikis, V

    2016-01-01

    Fifty five soil samples collected in the Lithuania teritory in 2011 and 2012 were analyzed for (129)I, (137)Cs and Pu isotopes in order to investigate the level and distribution of artificial radioactivity in Lithuania. The activity and atomic ratio of (238)Pu/((239,24)0)Pu, (129)I/(127)I and (131)I/(137)Cs were used to identify the origin of these radionuclides. The (238)Pu/(239+240)Pu and (240)Pu/(239)Pu ratios in the soil samples analyzed varied in the range of 0.02-0.18 and 0.18-0.24, respectively, suggesting the global fallout as the major source of Pu in Lithuania. The values of 10(-9) to 10(-6) for (129)I/(127)I atomic ratio revealed that the source of (129)I in Lithuania is global fallout in most cases though several sampling sites shows a possible impact of reprocessing releases. Estimated (129)I/(131)I ratio in soil samples from the southern part of Lithuania shows negligible input of the Chernobyl fallout. No correlation of the (137)Cs and Pu isotopes with (129)I was observed, indicating their different sources terms. Results demonstrate uneven distribution of these radionuclides in the Lithuanian territory and several sources of contamination i.e. Chernobyl accident, reprocessing releases and global fallout.

  14. Migration of (137)Cs, (90)Sr, and (239+240)Pu in Mediterranean forests: influence of bioavailability and association with organic acids in soil.

    PubMed

    Guillén, J; Baeza, A; Corbacho, J A; Muñoz-Muñoz, J G

    2015-06-01

    The understanding of downward migration of anthropogenic radionuclides in soil is a key factor in the assessment of their environmental behavior. There are several factors that can affect this process, such as the radionuclide source, their chemical form, soil and environmental characteristics, etc. Two Mediterranean pinewood ecosystems in Spain, which were affected mainly by global fallout, were selected to assess the migration of (137)Cs, (90)Sr, and (239+240)Pu. Using auxiliary modeling (diffusion-convection equation and compartmental model), it followed from field observations that the migration velocities of (90)Sr and (239+240)Pu were similar and higher than that of (137)Cs. The downward migration of radionuclides can be considered a consequence of their association with soil particles. A sequential speciation procedure also confirmed that (90)Sr was the most bioavailable radionuclide followed by (239+240)Pu and (137)Cs. Although this can explain the different velocity of (90)Sr and (137)Cs, bioavailability could not explain by itself the similar velocities of (239+240)Pu and (90)Sr. The presence of organic acids in the soil can also influence the migration of radionuclides attached to them, which decreased in the order: (239+240)Pu > (90)Sr > (137)Cs. Thus, the joint consideration of bioavailable and humic + fulvic acid fractions can explain the observed differences in the downward velocities.

  15. Scavenged (239)Pu, (240)Pu, and (241)Am from snowfalls in the atmosphere settling on Mt. Zugspitze in 2014, 2015 and 2016.

    PubMed

    Gückel, Katharina; Shinonaga, Taeko; Christl, Marcus; Tschiersch, Jochen

    2017-09-19

    Concentrations of (239)Pu, (240)Pu, and (241)Am, and atomic ratio of (240)Pu/(239)Pu in freshly fallen snow on Mt. Zugspitze collected in 2014, 2015 and 2016 were determined by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). For the sub-femtogram (10(-15) g) - level of Pu and Am analysis, a chemical separation procedure combined with AMS was improved and an excellent overall efficiency of about 10(-4) was achieved. The concentration of (239)Pu ranges from 75 ± 13 ag/kg to 2823 ± 84 ag/kg, of (240)Pu from 20.6 ± 5.2 to 601 ± 21 ag/kg, and of (241)Am was found in the range of 16.7 ± 5.0-218.8 ± 8.9 ag/kg. Atomic ratios of (240)Pu/(239)Pu for most samples are comparable to the fallout in middle Europe. One exceptional sample shows a higher Pu concentration. High airborne dust concentration, wind directions, high Cs concentrations and the activity ratio of (239+240)Pu/(137)Cs lead to the conclusion that the sample was influenced by Pu in Saharan dust transported to Mt. Zugspitze.

  16. Accelerator Mass Spectrometric (AMS) Measurements of Plutonium Activity Concentrations and 240Pu/239Pu Atom Ratios In Soil Extracts Supplied by the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring & Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, T F; Brown, T A; Marchetti, A A; Martinelli, R E; Kehl, S R

    2005-02-28

    Plutonium-239 ({sup 239}Pu) and plutonium-239+240 ({sup 239+240}Pu) activities concentrations and {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratios are reported for a series of chemically purified soil extracts received from the Carlsbad Environmental Monitoring & Research Center (CEMRC) in New Mexico. Samples were analyzed without further purification at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). This report also includes a brief description of the AMS system and internal laboratory procedures used to ensure the quality and reliability of the measurement data.

  17. Distribution of nuclear bomb Pu in Nishiyama area, Nagasaki, estimated by accurate and precise determination of 240Pu/239Pu ratio in soils.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, S; Muramatsu, Y; Yamazaki, S; Ban-Nai, T

    2007-01-01

    Plutonium isotopes in forest soils collected in Nishiyama area, Nagasaki, were successfully determined by high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after the treatment with a microwave decomposition system. The (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios observed in the samples in the Nishiyama area were obviously lower than the range of the global fallout. The low ratios (minimum 0.032) observed in Nishiyama area indicated the influence of detonation of the Pu nuclear weapon in 1945. Since the area is contaminated also by global fallout, the (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratio can be more sensitive indicator of bomb-derived Pu than Pu activity concentration.

  18. Measurement of the 240Pu(n,f) cross-section at the CERN n_TOF facility: First results from experimental area II (EAR-2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamatopoulos, A.; Tsinganis, A.; Colonna, N.; Vlastou, R.; Kokkoris, M.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Plompen, A.; Heyse, J.; Žugec, P.; Barbagallo, M.; Calviani, M.; Berthoumieux, E.; Chiaveri, E.; Aberle, O.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Bécares, V.; Bacak, M.; Balibrea, J.; Barros, S.; Bečvář, F.; Beinrucker, C.; Belloni, F.; Billowes, J.; Boccone, V.; Bosnar, D.; Brugger, M.; Caamaño, M.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Cerutti, F.; Cortés, G.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Cosentino, L.; Damone, L. A.; Deo, K.; Diakaki, M.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dressler, R.; Dupont, E.; Durán, I.; Fernández-Domínguez, B.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira, P.; Finocchiaro, P.; Frost, R. J. W.; Furman, V.; Göbel, K.; Gómez-Hornillos, M. B.; García, A. R.; Gheorghe, I.; Glodariu, T.; Gonçalves, I. F.; González, E.; Goverdovski, A.; Griesmayer, E.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Harada, H.; Heftrich, T.; Heinitz, S.; Hernández-Prieto, A.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Katabuchi, T.; Kavrigin, P.; Ketlerov, V.; Khryachkov, V.; Kimura, A.; Kivel, N.; Krtička, M.; Leal-Cidoncha, E.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Lerendegui-Marco, J.; Licata, M.; Meo, S. Lo; Losito, R.; Macina, D.; Marganiec, J.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mastromarco, M.; Matteucci, F.; Mendoza, E.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mingrone, F.; Mirea, M.; Montesano, S.; Musumarra, A.; Nolte, R.; Palomo-Pinto, F. R.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Porras, J. I.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J. M.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Riego-Perez, A.; Robles, M.; Rubbia, C.; Ryan, J. A.; Sabaté-Gilarte, M.; Saxena, A.; Schmidt, S.; Schumann, D.; Sedyshev, P.; Smith, A. G.; Suryanarayana, S. V.; Tagliente, G.; Tain, J. L.; Tarifeño-Saldivia, A.; Tassan-Got, L.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Vlachoudis, V.; Wallner, A.; Warren, S.; Weigand, M.; Weiss, C.; Wright, T.

    2017-09-01

    The accurate knowledge of the neutron-induced fission cross-sections of actinides and other isotopes involved in the nuclear fuel cycle is essential for the design of advanced nuclear systems, such as Generation-IV nuclear reactors. Such experimental data can also provide the necessary feedback for the adjustment of nuclear model parameters used in the evaluation process, resulting in the further development of nuclear fission models. In the present work, the 240Pu(n,f) cross-section was measured at CERN's n_TOF facility relative to the well-known 235U(n,f) cross section, over a wide range of neutron energies, from meV to almost MeV, using the time-of-flight technique and a set-up based on Micromegas detectors. This measurement was the first experiment to be performed at n_TOF's new experimental area (EAR-2), which offers a significantly higher neutron flux compared to the already existing experimental area (EAR-1). Preliminary results as well as the experimental procedure, including a description of the facility and the data handling and analysis, are presented.

  19. References to Studies of 137Cs, 90Sr and 239+240Pu in the Pacific Ocean a Bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Noshkin, V.E.

    2001-02-01

    This report contains a listing of publications known to this author on reported concentrations, reviews and discussions of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr and {sup 239+240}Pu in seawater, sediment and the biota from parts of the North and South Pacific Ocean. Each reference has been assigned an accession number consisting of the first three letters of the first author's last name followed by the first letter of the first name, the year of the publication and an assigned number. Studies in both the coastal areas and the open ocean are included as well as those providing data within lagoons of coral atolls. Some references to the radionuclides in the Indian Ocean are also provided.

  20. Determination of plutonium isotopes (238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu) in environmental samples using radiochemical separation combined with radiometric and mass spectrometric measurements.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yihong; Qiao, Jixin; Hou, Xiaolin; Pan, Shaoming; Roos, Per

    2014-02-01

    This paper reports an analytical method for the determination of plutonium isotopes ((238)Pu, (239)Pu, (240)Pu, (241)Pu) in environmental samples using anion exchange chromatography in combination with extraction chromatography for chemical separation of Pu. Both radiometric methods (liquid scintillation counting and alpha spectrometry) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were applied for the measurement of plutonium isotopes. The decontamination factors for uranium were significantly improved up to 7.5 × 10(5) for 20 g soil compared to the level reported in the literature, this is critical for the measurement of plutonium isotopes using mass spectrometric technique. Although the chemical yield of Pu in the entire procedure is about 55%, the analytical results of IAEA soil 6 and IAEA-367 in this work are in a good agreement with the values reported in the literature or reference values, revealing that the developed method for plutonium determination in environmental samples is reliable. The measurement results of (239+240)Pu by alpha spectrometry agreed very well with the sum of (239)Pu and (240)Pu measured by ICP-MS. ICP-MS can not only measure (239)Pu and (240)Pu separately but also (241)Pu. However, it is impossible to measure (238)Pu using ICP-MS in environmental samples even a decontamination factor as high as 10(6) for uranium was obtained by chemical separation.

  1. 239 + 240Pu and 137Cs concentrations in fish, cephalopods, crustaceans, shellfish, and algae collected around the Japanese coast in the early 1990s.

    PubMed

    Yamada, M; Aono, T; Hirano, S

    1999-10-01

    Marine organisms, i.e. fish, cephalopods, crustaceans, shellfish, and algae, were collected in the early 1990s along the Sea of Japan coast and the Japanese Pacific coast and analyzed for their 239 + 240Pu and 137Cs concentrations. The 239 + 240Pu concentrations in muscle of fish were below 0.4 mBq/kg wet wt. and the lowest among the analyzed marine organisms. Most 137Cs concentrations in muscle of fish ranged from 100 to 300 mBq/kg wet wt. Higher concentrations of 239 + 240Pu, ranging from 1.6 to 5.7 mBq/kg wet wt., were observed in viscera of cephalopods than in their muscle. The 239 + 240Pu concentrations in whole soft tissues of bivalves varied approximately one order of magnitude from 0.8 to 6.1 mBq/kg wet wt., while 137Cs concentrations had little variation, being approximately 60 mBq/kg wet wt. The 239 + 240Pu concentrations in algae had a wide variation, ranging from 1.7 to 42.3 mBq/kg wet wt., and were higher than those of the other marine organisms. No statistically significant difference in mean concentrations of 239 + 240Pu was detected among the whole soft tissues of bivalves, viscera of cephalopods and crustaceans, and whole bodies of cephalopods and crustaceans within the 95% confidence limit. The mean concentrations of 137Cs became higher in the order, cephalopods and crustaceans and bivalves, algae, viscera of fish, muscles of fish. The mean concentrations of 239 + 240Pu were comparable for algae collected along the Japan Sea coast and the Pacific coast. Furthermore, the difference in mean concentrations of 137Cs in algae between the Japan Sea coast and the Pacific coast was not statistically significant within the 95% confidence limit. These results can be considered to indicate no definite influence from radioactive dumping into the Japan Sea by the former USSR and Russia with respect to radioactive pollution of marine organisms collected along the Japanese coast.

  2. 90Sr, 137Cs and (239,240)Pu concentration surface water time series in the Pacific and Indian Oceans--WOMARS results.

    PubMed

    Povinec, Pavel P; Aarkrog, Asker; Buesseler, Ken O; Delfanti, Roberta; Hirose, Katsumi; Hong, Gi Hoon; Ito, Toshimichi; Livingston, Hugh D; Nies, Hartmut; Noshkin, Victor E; Shima, Shigeki; Togawa, Orihiko

    2005-01-01

    Under an IAEA's Co-ordinated Research Project "Worldwide Marine Radioactivity Studies (WOMARS)" 90Sr, 137Cs and (239,240)Pu concentration surface water time series in the Pacific and Indian Oceans have been investigated. The Pacific and Indian Oceans were divided into 17 latitudinal boxes according to ocean circulation, global fallout patterns and the location of nuclear weapons test sites. The present levels and time trends in radionuclide concentrations in surface water for each box were studied and the corresponding effective half-lives were estimated. For the year 2000, the estimated average 90Sr, 137Cs and (239,240)Pu concentrations in surface waters of the Pacific and Indian Oceans varied from 0.1 to 1.5 mBq/L, 0.1 to 2.8 mBq/L, and 0.1 to 5.2 microBq/L, respectively. The mean effective half-lives for 90Sr and 137Cs in surface water were 12+/-1 years for the North, 20+/-1 years for the South and 21+/-2 years for the Equatorial Pacific. For (239,240)Pu the corresponding mean effective half-lives were 7+/-1 years for the North, 12+/-4 years for the South and 10+/-2 years for the Equatorial Pacific. For the Indian Ocean the mean effective half-lives of 137Cs and (239,240)Pu were 21+/-2 years and 9+/-1 years, respectively. There is evidence that fallout removal rates before 1970 were faster than those observed during recent decades. The estimated surface water concentrations of 90Sr, 137Cs and (239,240)Pu in latitudinal belts of the Pacific and Indian Oceans for the year 2000 may be used as the average levels so that any new contribution from nuclear facilities, nuclear weapons test sites, radioactive waste dumping sites and from possible nuclear accidents can be identified.

  3. Use of anthropogenic radioisotopes to estimate rates of soil redistribution by wind II: The potential for future use of 239+240Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Pelt, R. Scott; Ketterer, Michael E.

    2013-06-01

    In the previous paper, the use of soilborne 137Cs from atmospheric fallout to estimate rates of soil redistribution, particularly by wind, was reviewed. This method relies on the assumption that the source of 137Cs in the soil profile is from atmospheric fallout following the period of atmospheric weapons testing so that the temporal and, to a certain extent, the spatial patterns of 137Cs deposition are known. One of the major limitations occurs when local or regional sources of 137Cs contamination mask the pulse from global fallout, making temporal estimates of redistribution difficult or impossible. Like 137Cs, Pu exhibits strong affinity for binding to soil particle surfaces, and therefore, re-distribution of Pu inventory indicates inferred soil re-distribution. Compared to 137Cs, 239Pu and 240Pu offer several important advantages: (a) the two major Pu isotopes have much longer half-lives than 137Cs and (b) the ratio 240Pu/239Pu is used to examine whether the Pu is from stratospheric fallout. In this paper, we review the literature concerning Pu in soil and of current attempts to use this tracer to estimate rates of soil redistribution. We also present preliminary, unpublished data from a pilot study designed to test whether or not 239+240Pu can be used to estimate rates of soil redistribution by wind. Based on similarities of profile distribution and relative inventories between 137Cs measurements and 239+240Pu measurements of split samples from a series of fields with documented wind erosion histories, we conclude that 239+240Pu may well be the anthropogenic radioisotope of choice for future soil redistribution investigations.

  4. (236)U and (239,)(240)Pu ratios from soils around an Australian nuclear weapons test site.

    PubMed

    Tims, S G; Froehlich, M B; Fifield, L K; Wallner, A; De Cesare, M

    2016-01-01

    The isotopes (236)U, (239)Pu and (240)Pu are present in surface soils as a result of global fallout from nuclear weapons tests carried out in the 1950's and 1960's. These isotopes potentially constitute artificial tracers of recent soil erosion and sediment movement. Only Accelerator Mass Spectrometry has the requisite sensitivity to measure all three isotopes at these environmental levels. Coupled with its relatively high throughput capabilities, this makes it feasible to conduct studies of erosion across the geographical extent of the Australian continent. In the Australian context, however, global fallout is not the only source of these isotopes. As part of its weapons development program the United Kingdom carried out a series of atmospheric and surface nuclear weapons tests at Maralinga, South Australia in 1956 and 1957. The tests have made a significant contribution to the Pu isotopic abundances present in the region around Maralinga and out to distances ∼1000 km, and impact on the assessment techniques used in the soil and sediment tracer studies. Quantification of the relative fallout contribution derived from detonations at Maralinga is complicated owing to significant contamination around the test site from numerous nuclear weapons safety trials that were also carried out around the site. We show that (236)U can provide new information on the component of the fallout that is derived from the local nuclear weapons tests, and highlight the potential of (236)U as a new fallout tracer. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [Accumulation of 238, 239 + 240Pu and 241Am in Boar Organs and Tissues on the Territory of the Belarusian Part of the ChNPP Exclusion Zone].

    PubMed

    Bondar, Yu I; Zabrotski, V N; Sadchikov, V I; Kalinin, V N

    2015-01-01

    The paper is devoted to determination of α-emitting radionuclides of 238, 239 + 240Pu and 241Am in liver, lungs, muscular and bone tissues of the boars on the territory of the Belarusian part of the ChNPP exclusion zone. It is shown that the content of Pu and Am isotopes in boar organs and tissues decreases in the following order: liver > bone tissues > lungs ≥ muscular tissues. The results received allow evaluation of penetration of 238, 239 + 240Pu and 241Am through the biological chain "soil-ration-organs and tissues". It is calculated that 1.7% of a boar's ration falls on the soil getting into the stomach with food. Translocation and accumulation coefficients characterizing the transfer of radionuclides through the chain "soil-vegetation-organs and tissues" were calculated. The conclusion about accumulation of Pu in the boar's body is made.

  6. Determination of (235)U, (239)Pu, (240)Pu, and (241)Am in a nuclear bomb particle using a position-sensitive α-γ coincidence technique.

    PubMed

    Peräjärvi, Kari A; Ihantola, Sakari; Pöllänen, Roy C; Toivonen, Harri I; Turunen, Jani A

    2011-02-15

    A nuclear bomb particle containing 1.6 ng of Pu was investigated nondestructively with a position-sensitive α detector and a broad-energy HPGe γ-ray detector. An event-mode data acquisition system was used to record the data. α-γ coincidence counting was shown to be well suited to nondestructive isotope ratio determination. Because of the very small background, the 51.6 keV γ rays of (239)Pu and the 45.2 keV γ rays of (240)Pu were identified, which enabled isotopic ratio calculations. In the present work, the (239)Pu/((239)Pu+(240)Pu) atom ratio was determined to be 0.950 ± 0.010. The uncertainties were much smaller than in the previous more conventional nondestructive studies on this particle. Obtained results are also in good agreement with the data from the destructive mass spectrometric studies obtained previously by other investigators.

  7. Time-resolved record of (236)U and (239,240)Pu isotopes from a coral growing during the nuclear testing program at Enewetak Atoll (Marshall Islands).

    PubMed

    Froehlich, M B; Chan, W Y; Tims, S G; Fallon, S J; Fifield, L K

    2016-12-01

    A comprehensive series of nuclear tests were carried out by the United States at Enewetak Atoll in the Marshall Islands, especially between 1952 and 1958. A Porites Lutea coral that was growing in the Enewetak lagoon within a few km of all of the high-yield tests contains a continuous record of isotopes, which are of interest (e.g. (14)C, (236)U, (239,240)Pu) through the testing period. Prior to the present work, (14)C measurements at ∼2-month resolution had shown pronounced peaks in the Δ(14)C data that coincided with the times at which tests were conducted. Here we report measurements of (236)U and (239,240)Pu on the same coral using accelerator mass spectrometry, and again find prominent peaks in the concentrations of these isotopes that closely follow those in (14)C. Consistent with the (14)C data, the magnitudes of these peaks do not, however, correlate well with the explosive yields of the corresponding tests, indicating that smaller tests probably contributed disproportionately to the debris that fell in the lagoon. Additional information about the different tests can also be obtained from the (236)U/(239)Pu and (240)Pu/(239)Pu ratios, which are found to vary dramatically over the testing period. In particular, the first thermonuclear test, Ivy-Mike, has characteristic (236)U/(239)Pu and (240)Pu/(239)Pu signatures which are diagnostic of the first arrival of nuclear test material in various archives. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of chemical pollution on forms of 137Cs, 90Sr and 239,240Pu in arctic soil studied by sequential extraction.

    PubMed

    Puhakainen, M; Riekkinen, I; Heikkinen, T; Jaakkola, T; Steinnes, E; Rissanen, K; Suomela, M; Thørring, H

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the forms of 137Cs, 90Sr and 239,240Pu occurring in different soil horizons using sequential extraction of samples taken from four sites located along a pollution gradient from the copper-nickel smelter at Monchegorsk in the Kola Peninsula, Russia, and from a reference site in Finnish Lapland in 1997. A selective sequential-leaching procedure was employed using a modification of the method of Tessier, Cambell and Bisson ((1979). Analytical Chemistry, 51, 844-851). For 137Cs the organic (O) and uppermost mineral (E1) layer were studied, for 90Sr and 239,240Pu only the uppermost organic layer (Of). The fraction of 137Cs occurring in readily exchangeable form in the organic layer was about 50% at the reference site and decreased as a function of pollution, being 15% at the most polluted site in the Kola Peninsula. There was a clear positive correlation in the O layer between the distance from the smelter and the percentage of 137Cs extracted in the readily exchangeable fraction (Spearman correlation rsp = 0.7805, p = 0.0001), whereas in the E1 layer no correlation was evident. The distribution of 90Sr in the Of layer was similar at all sites, with the highest amounts occurring in exchangeable form and bound to organic matter, whereas stable Sr showed a somewhat different distribution with the highest amount in the oxide fraction. Most of the 239,240Pu was bound to organic matter. Chemical pollution affected the exchangeable fraction of 239,240Pu, which was about 1% at the most polluted site and 4-6% at the other sites.

  9. Determination of the 240Pu/ 239Pu atomic ratio in soils from Palomares (Spain) by low-energy accelerator mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamizo, E.; García-León, M.; Synal, H.-A.; Suter, M.; Wacker, L.

    2006-08-01

    In 1966, the nuclear fuel of two thermonuclear bombs was released over the Spanish region of Palomares, due to a B52 bomber accident during a refuelling operation. Since then, much effort has been made to assess its impact to the different environmental compartments of this area in South-East Spain, mostly by measuring the 239+240Pu activity concentration and the 238Pu/239+240Pu activity ratio. Nevertheless, these measurements do not give enough information on the problem. In order to recognize unambiguously small traces of the weapon-grade plutonium released in the accident, the ratio of the two major isotopes of plutonium, 240Pu/239Pu, has to be determined. In this work, this ratio has been measured in low- and high-activity samples from Palomares by means of low-energy accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). That way, we will show the potential of the new generation of compact AMS facilities in terms of plutonium characterization at ultra-trace levels.

  10. Plutonium concentration and (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratio in biota collected from Amchitka Island, Alaska: recent measurements using ICP-SFMS.

    PubMed

    Bu, Kaixuan; Cizdziel, James V; Dasher, Douglas

    2013-10-01

    Three underground nuclear tests, including the Unites States' largest, were conducted on Amchitka Island, Alaska. Monitoring of the radiological environment around the island is challenging because of its remote location. In 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) became responsible for the long term maintenance and surveillance of the Amchitka site. The first DOE LM environmental survey occurred in 2011 and is part of a cycle of activities that will occur every 5 years. The University of Alaska Fairbanks, a participant in the 2011 study, provided the lichen (Cladonia spp.), freshwater moss (Fontinalis neomexicanus), kelp (Eualaria fistulosa) and horse mussel (Modiolus modiolus) samples from Amchitka Island and Adak Island (a control site). These samples were analyzed for (239)Pu and (240)Pu concentration and (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratio using inductively coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry (ICP-SFMS). Plutonium concentrations and (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios were generally consistent with previous terrestrial and marine studies in the region. The ((239)+)(240)Pu levels (mBq kg(-1), dry weight) ranged from 3.79 to 57.1 for lichen, 167-700 for kelp, 27.9-148 for horse mussel, and 560-573 for moss. Lichen from Adak Island had higher Pu concentrations than Amchitka Island, the difference was likely the result of the higher precipitation at Adak compared to Amchitka. The (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios were significantly higher in marine samples compared to terrestrial and freshwater samples (t-test, p < 0.001); lichen and moss averaged 0.184 ± 0.007, similar to the integrated global fallout ratio, whereas kelp and mussel (soft tissue) averaged 0.226 ± 0.003. These observations provide supporting evidence that a large input of isotopically heavier Pu occurred into the North Pacific Ocean, likely from the Marshall Island high yield nuclear tests, but other potential sources, such as the Kamchatka Peninsula Rybachiy Naval Base and

  11. Can 239 + 240Pu replace 137Cs as an erosion tracer in agricultural landscapes contaminated with Chernobyl fallout?

    PubMed

    Schimmack, W; Auerswald, K; Bunzl, K

    2001-01-01

    Erosion studies often use 137Cs from the global fallout (main period: 1953-1964) as a tracer in the soil. In many European countries, where 137Cs was deposited in considerable amounts also by the Chernobyl fallout in 1986, the global fallout fraction (GF-Cs) has to be separated from the Chernobyl fraction by means of the isotope 134Cs. In a few years, this will no longer be possible due to the short half-life of 134Cs (2 yr). Because GF-Cs in the soil can then no longer be determined, the potential of using 239 + 240Pu as a tracer is evaluated. This radionuclide originates in most European countries essentially only from the global fallout. The activities and spatial distributions of Pu and GF-Cs were compared in the soil of a steep field (inclination about 20%, area ca. 3 ha, main soil type Dystric Eutrochrept), sampled at 48 nodes of a 25 x 25 m2 grid. The reference values were determined at 12 points adjacent to the field. Their validity was assured by an inventory study of radiocaesium in a 70 ha area surrounding the field sampling 275 nodes of a 50 x 50 m2 grid. In the field studied, the activity concentrations of GF-Cs and Pu in the Ap horizon were not correlated (Spearman correlation coefficient R = 0.20, p > 0.05), and the activity balance of Pu differed from that of GF-Cs. Whereas no net loss of GF-Cs from the field was observed as compared to the reference site, Pu was more mobile with an average loss of ca. 11% per unit area. In addition, the spatial pattern of GF-Cs and Pu in the field differed significantly. The reason may be that due to their different associations with soil constituents, Pu and Cs represent different fractions of the soil, exhibiting different properties with respect to erosion/deposition processes. This indicates that both radionuclides or one of them may not be appropriate to quantity past erosion. When tracer losses are used to calibrate or verify erosion prediction models, systematic deviations may not only stem from model

  12. Determination of (239)Pu, (240)Pu, (241)Pu and (242)Pu at femtogram and attogram levels - evidence for the migration of fallout plutonium in an ombrotrophic peat bog profile.

    PubMed

    Quinto, Francesca; Hrnecek, Erich; Krachler, Michael; Shotyk, William; Steier, Peter; Winkler, Stephan R

    2013-04-01

    The isotopic composition of plutonium ((239)Pu, (240)Pu, (241)Pu and (242)Pu) was investigated in a ∼0.5 m long peat core from an ombrotrophic bog (Black Forest, Germany) using clean room procedures and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). This sophisticated analytical approach was ultimately needed to detect reliably the Pu concentrations present in the peat samples at femtogram (fg) and attogram (ag) levels. The mean (240)Pu/(239)Pu isotopic ratio of 0.19 ± 0.02 (N = 32) in the peat layers, representing approximately the last 80 years, was in good agreement with the accepted value of 0.18 for the global fallout in the Northern Hemisphere. This finding is largely supported by the corresponding and rather constant (241)Pu/(239)Pu (0.0012 ± 0.0005) and (242)Pu/(239)Pu (0.004 ± 0.001) ratios. Since the Pu isotopic composition characteristic of the global fallout was also identified in peat samples pre-dating the period of atmospheric atom bomb testing (AD 1956-AD 1980), migration of Pu within the peat profile is clearly indicated. These results highlight, for the first time, the mobility of Pu in a peat bog with implications for the migration of Pu in other acidic, organic rich environments such as forest soils and other wetland types. These findings constitute a direct observation of the behaviour of Pu at fg and ag levels in the environment. The AMS measurements of Pu concentrations (referring to a corresponding activity of (240+239)Pu from 0.07 mBq g(-1) to 5 mBq g(-1)) essentially confirm our a priori estimates based on existing (241)Am and (137)Cs data in the investigated peat core and agree well with the global fallout levels from the literature. Exclusively employing the Pu isotope ratios established for the peat samples, the date of the Pu irradiation (AD 1956, correctable to AD 1964) was calculated and subsequently compared to the (210)Pb age of the peat layers; this comparison provided an additional hint that global fallout derived Pu is not fixed in

  13. Parity splitting and E1/E2 branching in the alternating parity band of {sup 240}Pu from two-center octupole wave functions using supersymmetric quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Jolos, R. V.; Brentano, P. von

    2011-08-15

    An interpretation is suggested of the recently published experimental data on the alternating parity bands in {sup 240}Pu. The interpretation is based on the assumption that the main role in the description of the properties of the alternating parity bands plays the octupole mode which preserves the axial symmetry. The mathematical technique of the supersymmetric quantum mechanics is used for the realization of the model with the two-center octupole wave functions. A good description of the parity splitting and of the ratio of the dipole and quadrupole transitional moments is obtained for the first two bands.

  14. Determination of 240Pu/239Pu isotopic ratios in human tissues collected from areas around the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site by sector-field high resolution ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, M; Oikawa, S; Sakaguchi, A; Tomita, J; Hoshi, M; Apsalikov, K N

    2008-09-01

    Information on the 240Pu/239Pu isotope ratios in human tissues for people living around the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site (SNTS) was deduced from 9 sets of soft tissues and bones, and 23 other bone samples obtained by autopsy. Plutonium was radiochemically separated and purified, and plutonium isotopes (239Pu and 240Pu) were determined by sector-field high resolution inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. For most of the tissue samples from the former nine subjects, low 240Pu/239Pu isotope ratios were determined: bone, 0.125 +/- 0.018 (0.113-0.145, n = 4); lungs, 0.063 +/- 0.010 (0.051-0.078, n = 5); and liver, 0.148 +/- 0.026 (0.104-0.189, n = 9). Only 239Pu was detected in the kidney samples; the amount of 240Pu was too small to be measured, probably due to the small size of samples analyzed. The mean 240Pu/239Pu isotope ratio for bone samples from the latter 23 subjects was 0.152 +/- 0.034, ranging from 0.088 to 0.207. A significant difference (a two-tailed Student's t test; 95% significant level, alpha = 0.05) between mean 240Pu/239Pu isotope ratios for the tissue samples and for the global fallout value (0.178 +/- 0.014) indicated that weapons-grade plutonium from the atomic bombs has been incorporated into the human tissues, especially lungs, in the residents living around the SNTS. The present 239,240Pu concentrations in bone, lung, and liver samples were, however, not much different from ranges found for human tissues from other countries that were due solely to global fallout during the 1970's-1980's.

  15. Neutron inelastic-scattering cross sections of /sup 232/Th, /sup 233/U, /sup 235/U, /sup 238/U, /sup 239/Pu and /sup 240/Pu. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.

    1982-01-01

    Differential-neutron-emission cross sections of /sup 232/Th, /sup 233/U, /sup 235/U, /sup 238/U, /sup 239/Pu and /sup 240/Pu are measured between approx. = 1.0 and 3.5 MeV with the angle and magnitude detail needed to provide angle-integrated emission cross sections to approx. < 3% accuracies. Emitted-neutron resolutions are quantitatively defined and vary from approx. = 0.1 to 0.35 MeV. The experimental results are corrected for fisson-neutron contributions to obtain pseudo-elastic-neutron-scattering cross sections which, together with the neutron total cross sections, define the non-elastic cross sections to within well specified energy resolutions. These results imply inelastic-neutron-scattering cross sections which are compared with comparable quantities derived from ENDF/B-V. Good general agreement is noted for /sup 232/Th, /sup 233/U, /sup 235/U and /sup 238/U inelastic-scattering values, poor agreement is observed for /sup 240/Pu, and a serious discrepancy exists in the case of /sup 239/Pu.

  16. Measurement of the 240Pu/239Pu mass ratio using a transition-edge-sensor microcalorimeter for total decay energy spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Andrew S; Bond, Evelyn M; Croce, Mark P; Holesinger, Terry G; Kunde, Gerd J; Rabin, Michael W; Wolfsberg, Laura E; Bennett, Douglas A; Hays-Wehle, James P; Schmidt, Dan R; Swetz, Daniel; Ullom, Joel N

    2015-04-07

    We have developed a new category of sensor for measurement of the (240)Pu/(239)Pu mass ratio from aqueous solution samples with advantages over existing methods. Aqueous solution plutonium samples were evaporated and encapsulated inside of a gold foil absorber, and a superconducting transition-edge-sensor microcalorimeter detector was used to measure the total reaction energy (Q-value) of nuclear decays via heat generated when the energy is thermalized. Since all of the decay energy is contained in the absorber, we measure a single spectral peak for each isotope, resulting in a simple spectral analysis problem with minimal peak overlap. We found that mechanical kneading of the absorber dramatically improves spectral quality by reducing the size of radioactive inclusions within the absorber to scales below 50 nm such that decay products primarily interact with atoms of the host material. Due to the low noise performance of the microcalorimeter detector, energy resolution values of 1 keV fwhm (full width at half-maximum) at 5.5 MeV have been achieved, an order of magnitude improvement over α-spectroscopy with conventional silicon detectors. We measured the (240)Pu/(239)Pu mass ratio of two samples and confirmed the results by comparison to mass spectrometry values. These results have implications for future measurements of trace samples of nuclear material.

  17. Multi-isotopic determination of plutonium (239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu and 242Pu) in marine sediments using sector-field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Donard, O F X; Bruneau, F; Moldovan, M; Garraud, H; Epov, V N; Boust, D

    2007-03-28

    Among the transuranic elements present in the environment, plutonium isotopes are mainly attached to particles, and therefore they present a great interest for the study and modelling of particle transport in the marine environment. Except in the close vicinity of industrial sources, plutonium concentration in marine sediments is very low (from 10(-4) ng kg(-1) for (241)Pu to 10 ng kg(-1) for (239)Pu), and therefore the measurement of (238)Pu, (239)Pu, (240)Pu, (241)Pu and (242)Pu in sediments at such concentration level requires the use of very sensitive techniques. Moreover, sediment matrix contains huge amounts of mineral species, uranium and organic substances that must be removed before the determination of plutonium isotopes. Hence, an efficient sample preparation step is necessary prior to analysis. Within this work, a chemical procedure for the extraction, purification and pre-concentration of plutonium from marine sediments prior to sector-field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SF-ICP-MS) analysis has been optimized. The analytical method developed yields a pre-concentrated solution of plutonium from which (238)U and (241)Am have been removed, and which is suitable for the direct and simultaneous measurement of (239)Pu, (240)Pu, (241)Pu and (242)Pu by SF-ICP-MS.

  18. Measurement of the 240Pu/239Pu mass ratio using a transition-edge-sensor microcalorimeter for total decay energy spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Hoover, Andrew S.; Bond, Evelyn M.; Croce, Mark P.; ...

    2015-02-27

    In this study, we have developed a new category of sensor for measurement of the 240Pu/239Pu mass ratio from aqueous solution samples with advantages over existing methods. Aqueous solution plutonium samples were evaporated and encapsulated inside of a gold foil absorber, and a superconducting transition-edge-sensor microcalorimeter detector was used to measure the total reaction energy (Q-value) of nuclear decays via heat generated when the energy is thermalized. Since all of the decay energy is contained in the absorber, we measure a single spectral peak for each isotope, resulting in a simple spectral analysis problem with minimal peak overlap. We foundmore » that mechanical kneading of the absorber dramatically improves spectral quality by reducing the size of radioactive inclusions within the absorber to scales below 50 nm such that decay products primarily interact with atoms of the host material. Due to the low noise performance of the microcalorimeter detector, energy resolution values of 1 keV fwhm (full width at half-maximum) at 5.5 MeV have been achieved, an order of magnitude improvement over α-spectroscopy with conventional silicon detectors. We measured the 240Pu/239Pu mass ratio of two samples and confirmed the results by comparison to mass spectrometry values. These results have implications for future measurements of trace samples of nuclear material.« less

  19. Determination of plutonium isotopes ((238,239,240)Pu) and strontium ((90)Sr) in seafood using alpha spectrometry and liquid scintillation spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shin, Choonshik; Choi, Hoon; Kwon, Hye-Min; Jo, Hye-Jin; Kim, Hye-Jeong; Yoon, Hae-Jung; Kim, Dong-Sul; Kang, Gil-Jin

    2017-10-01

    The present study was carried out to survey the levels of plutonium isotopes ((238)(,)(239)(,)(240)Pu) and strontium ((90)Sr) in domestic seafood in Korea. In current, regulatory authorities have analyzed radionuclides, such as (134)Cs, (137)Cs and (131)I, in domestic and imported food. However, people are concerned about contamination of other radionuclides, such as plutonium and strontium, in food. Furthermore, people who live in Korea have much concern about safety of seafood. Accordingly, in this study, we have investigated the activity concentrations of plutonium and strontium in seafood. For the analysis of plutonium isotopes and strontium, a rapid and reliable method developed from previous study was used. Applicability of the test method was verified by examining recovery, minimum detectable activity (MDA), analytical time, etc. Total 40 seafood samples were analyzed in 2014-2015. As a result, plutonium isotopes ((238)(,)(239)(,)(240)Pu) and strontium ((90)Sr) were not detected or below detection limits in seafood. The detection limits of plutonium isotopes and strontium-90 were 0.01 and 1 Bq/kg, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Second order phase transitions from octupole-nondeformed to octupole-deformed shape in the alternating parity bands of nuclei around 240Pu based on data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolos, R. V.; von Brentano, P.; Jolie, J.

    2012-08-01

    Background: Shape phase transitions in finite quantal systems are very interesting phenomena of general physical interest. There is a very restricted number of the examples of nuclei demonstrating this phenomenon.Purpose: Based on experimental excitation spectra, there is a second order phase transition in the alternating parity bands of some actinide nuclei.Method: The mathematical techniques of supersymmetric quantum mechanics, two-center octupole wave functions ansatz, and the Landau theory of phase transitions are used to analyze the experimental data on alternating parity bands.Results: The potential energy of the octupole collective motion is determined and analyzed for all observed values of the angular momentum of the alternating parity band states in 232Th, 238U, and 240Pu.Conclusion: It is shown that as a function of increasing angular momentum there is a second order phase transition from the octupole-nondeformed to the octupole-deformed shape in the considered nuclei.

  1. Charge distribution of light mass fission products in the fast neutron induced fission of (232)Th, (238)U, (240)Pu and (244)Cm.

    PubMed

    Naik, Haladhara; Singh, Ram Janam; Dange, Shrikant Pandurang

    2017-09-01

    Fractional cumulative yields (FCY) of various light mass fission products in the fast neutron induced fission of (232)Th, (238)U, (240)Pu and (244)Cm have been determined by using the off-line γ-ray spectrometric technique. From present and literature data, width of isobaric charge distribution (σZ), the most probable charge (ZP) and the experimental charge polarization (∆ΖEXPT) as a function of fragment mass were deduced. The ∆ΖEXPT values from the present work for light mass chains and earlier work for heavy mass chains show oscillating nature due to nuclear structure effect. The ∆ΖMPE values based on minimum potential energy surface were theoretically calculated, which shows a systematic decrease trend with the approach of symmetric split due to the liquid drop behaviour of the fissioning nucleus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Nevada test site fallout atom ratios: /sup 240/Pu//sup 239/Pu and /sup 241/Pu//sup 239/Pu

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, H.G.; Barr, D.W.

    1984-02-01

    The exposure of the population in Utah to external gamma radiation from the fallout from nuclear weapons tests carried out between 1951 and 1958 at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) has been reconstructed from recent measurements of /sup 137/Cs and plutonium in soil. The fraction of /sup 137/Cs in the fallout from NTS events was calculated from the total plutonium and the /sup 240/Pu//sup 239/Pu ratios measured in the soil, using the values of 0.180 +- 0.006 and 0.032 +- 0.003 for that ratio in global fallout and NTS fallout, respectively. The total population exposure from NTS events was then calculated on the basis of exposure rates resulting from short-lived radionuclides associated with the /sup 137/Cs at the time of deposition. While the /sup 240/Pu//sup 239/Pu ratio is constant in global fallout, this ratio varies greatly in the fallout from individual events. While the composition of fallout on Utah from NTS events is rather uniform, the Off-Site Radiation Exposure Review Project is currently reconstructing radiation exposures for locations close to NTS where the fallout may be predominantly from one event. Therefore, the authors compiled the pertinent ratios in order to provide information concerning the exposure resulting from any individual event. The plutonium ratios measured at 30 days postshot were compiled from unpublished values in the archives of the Nuclear Chemistry Division of LLNL and INC-11 of LANL. These ratios are pertinent to fallout data. Dates for each event were taken from a publication by the Nevada Operations Office of the Department of Energy. 3 references.

  3. Role of natural organic matter on iodine and (239)(,240)Pu distribution and mobility in environmental samples from the northwestern Fukushima Prefecture, Japan.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chen; Zhang, Saijin; Sugiyama, Yuko; Ohte, Nobuhito; Ho, Yi-Fang; Fujitake, Nobuhide; Kaplan, Daniel I; Yeager, Chris M; Schwehr, Kathleen; Santschi, Peter H

    2016-03-01

    In order to assess how environmental factors are affecting the distribution and migration of radioiodine and plutonium that were emitted from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident, we quantified iodine and (239,240)Pu concentration changes in soil samples with different land uses (urban, paddy, deciduous forest and coniferous forest), as well as iodine speciation in surface water and rainwater. Sampling locations were 53-63 km northwest of the FDNPP within a 75-km radius, in close proximity of each other. A ranking of the land uses by their surface soil (<4 cm) stable (127)I concentrations was coniferous forest > deciduous forest > urban > paddy, and (239,240)Pu concentrations ranked as deciduous forest > coniferous forest > paddy ≥ urban. Both were quite distinct from that of (134)Cs and (137)Cs: urban > coniferous forest > deciduous forest > paddy, indicating differences in their sources, deposition phases, and biogeochemical behavior in these soil systems. Although stable (127)I might not have fully equilibrated with Fukushima-derived (129)I, it likely still works as a proxy for the long-term fate of (129)I. Surficial soil (127)I content was well correlated to soil organic matter (SOM) content, regardless of land use type, suggesting that SOM might be an important factor affecting iodine biogeochemistry. Other soil chemical properties, such as Eh and pH, had strong correlations to soil (127)I content, but only within a given land use (e.g., within urban soils). Organic carbon (OC) concentrations and Eh were positively, and pH was negatively correlated to (127)I concentrations in surface water and rain samples. It is also noticeable that (127)I in the wet deposition was concentrated in both the deciduous and coniferous forest throughfall and stemfall water, respectively, comparing to the bulk rainwater. Further, both forest throughfall and stemflow water consisted exclusively of organo-iodine, suggesting all inorganic iodine in the

  4. Determination of 239Pu and 240Pu isotope ratio for a nuclear bomb particle using X-ray spectrometry in conjunction with γ-ray spectrometry and non-destructive α-particle spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pöllänen, R.; Ruotsalainen, K.; Toivonen, H.

    2009-11-01

    A nuclear bomb particle from Thule containing Pu and U was analyzed using X-ray spectrometry in combination with γ-ray spectrometry and non-destructive α-spectrometry. The main objective was to investigate the possibility to determine the 239Pu and 240Pu isotope ratios. Previously, X-ray spectrometry together with the above-mentioned methods has been successfully applied for radiochemically processed samples, but not for individual particles. In the present paper we demonstrate the power of non-destructive analysis. The 239Pu/( 239Pu+ 240Pu) atom ratio for the Thule particle was determined, using two different approaches, to be 0.93±0.07 and 0.91±0.05. These results are consistent with weapons-grade material and the results obtained by other investigators.

  5. Ultra-trace determination of (90)Sr, (137)Cs, (238)Pu, (239)Pu, and (240)Pu by triple quadruple collision/reaction cell-ICP-MS/MS: Establishing a baseline for global fallout in Qatar soil and sediments.

    PubMed

    Amr, Mohamed A; Helal, Abdul-Fattah I; Al-Kinani, Athab T; Balakrishnan, Perumal

    2016-03-01

    The development of practical, fast, and reliable methods for the ultra-trace determination of anthropogenic radionuclides (90)Sr, (137)Cs, (238)Pu, (239)Pu, and (240)Pu by triple quadruple collision/reaction cell inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (CRC-ICP-MS/MS) were investigated in term of its accuracy and precision for producing reliable results. The radionuclides were extracted from 1 kg of the environmental soil samples by concentrated nitric and hydrochloric acids. The leachate solutions were measured directly by triple quadrupole CRC-ICP-MS/MS. For quality assurance, a chemical separation of the concerned radionuclides was conducted and then measured by single quadrupole-ICP-MS. The developed methods were next applied to measure the anthropogenic radionuclides (90)Sr, (137)Cs, (238)Pu, (239)Pu, and (240)Pu in soil samples collected throughout the State of Qatar. The average concentrations of (90)Sr, (137)Cs, (238)Pu, (239)Pu, and (240)Pu were 0.606 fg/g (3.364 Bq/kg), 0.619 fg/g (2.038 Bq/kg), 0.034 fg/g (0.0195 Bq/kg), 65.59 fg/g (0.150 Bq/kg), and 12.06 fg/g (0.103 Bq/kg), respectively.

  6. Simultaneous determination of radiocesium ((135)Cs, (137)Cs) and plutonium ((239)Pu, (240)Pu) isotopes in river suspended particles by ICP-MS/MS and SF-ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Cao, Liguo; Zheng, Jian; Tsukada, Hirofumi; Pan, Shaoming; Wang, Zhongtang; Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo

    2016-10-01

    Due to radioisotope releases in the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident, long-term monitoring of radiocesium ((135)Cs and (137)Cs) and Pu isotopes ((239)Pu and (240)Pu) in river suspended particles is necessary to study the transport and fate of these long-lived radioisotopes in the land-ocean system. However, it is expensive and technically difficult to collect samples of suspended particles from river and ocean. Thus, simultaneous determination of multi-radionuclides remains as a challenging topic. In this study, for the first time, we report an analytical method for simultaneous determination of radiocesium and Pu isotopes in suspended particles with small sample size (1-2g). Radiocesium and Pu were sequentially pre-concentrated using ammonium molybdophosphate and ferric hydroxide co-precipitation, respectively. After the two-stage ion-exchange chromatography separation from the matrix elements, radiocesium and Pu isotopes were finally determined by ICP-MS/MS and SF-ICP-MS, respectively. The interfering elements of U ((238)U(1)H(+) and (238)U(2)H(+) for (239)Pu and (240)Pu, respectively) and Ba ((135)Ba(+) and (137)Ba(+) for (135)Cs and (137)Cs, respectively) were sufficiently removed with the decontamination factors of 1-8×10(6) and 1×10(4), respectively, with the developed method. Soil reference materials were utilized for method validation, and the obtained (135)Cs/(137)Cs and (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios, and (239+240)Pu activities showed a good agreement with the certified/information values. In addition, the developed method was applied to analyze radiocesium and Pu in the suspended particles of land water samples collected from Fukushima Prefecture after the FDNPP accident. The (135)Cs/(137)Cs atom ratios (0.329-0.391) and (137)Cs activities (23.4-152Bq/g) suggested radiocesium contamination of the suspended particles mainly originated from the accident-released radioactive contaminates, while similar Pu contamination of suspended

  7. Benchmark gas core critical experiment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunze, J. F.; Lofthouse, J. H.; Cooper, C. G.; Hyland, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    A critical experiment with spherical symmetry has been conducted on the gas core nuclear reactor concept. The nonspherical perturbations in the experiment were evaluated experimentally and produce corrections to the observed eigenvalue of approximately 1% delta k. The reactor consisted of a low density, central uranium hexafluoride gaseous core, surrounded by an annulus of void or low density hydrocarbon, which in turn was surrounded with a 97-cm-thick heavy water reflector.

  8. Modelling Deposition and Erosion rates with RadioNuclides (MODERN) - Part 2: A comparison of different models to convert (239+240)Pu inventories into soil redistribution rates at unploughed sites.

    PubMed

    Arata, Laura; Alewell, Christine; Frenkel, Elena; A'Campo-Neuen, Annette; Iurian, Andra-Rada; Ketterer, Michael E; Mabit, Lionel; Meusburger, Katrin

    2016-10-01

    Sheet erosion is one of the major threats to alpine soils. To quantify its role and impact in the degradation processes of alpine grasslands, the application of Fallout Radionuclides (FRN) showed very promising results. The specific characteristics of plutonium 239 + 240 ((239+240)Pu), such as the homogeneous fallout distribution, the long half-life and the cost and time effective measurements make this tracer application for investigating soil degradation in Alpine grasslands more suitable than any other FRN (e.g. (137)Cs). However, the conversion of (239+240)Pu inventories into soil erosion rates remains a challenge. Currently available conversion models have been developed mainly for (137)Cs with later adaptation to other FRN (e.g. Excess (210)Pb, and (7)Be), each model being defined for specific land use (ploughed and/or unploughed) and processes (erosion or deposition). As such, they may fail in describing correctly the distribution of Pu isotopes in the soil. A new conversion model, MODERN, with an adaptable algorithm to estimate erosion and deposition rates from any FRN inventory changes was recently proposed (Arata et al., 2016). In this complementary contribution, the authors compare the application of MODERN to other available conversion models. The results show a good agreement between soil redistribution rates obtained from MODERN and from the models currently used by the FRN scientific community (i.e. the Inventory Method). Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Long-term variation (1986-1998) of post-Chernobyl 90Sr, 137Cs, 238Pu and (239,240)Pu concentrations in air, depositions to ground, resuspension factors and resuspension rates in south Germany.

    PubMed

    Rosner, G; Winkler, R

    2001-06-12

    Annual mean concentrations in air and annual total (wet plus dry) depositions to ground of 90Sr, 137Cs, 238Pu and (239,240)Pu decreased at Neuherberg, south Germany, in the period from July 1986 (i.e. after the end of the initial deposition phase from Chernobyl) to 1998 as follows: 90Sr from 0.77 to 0.05 microBq m(-3), and from 0.82 (1988) to 0.28 Bq m(-2) year(-1); 137Cs from 133 to 2.8 microBq m(-3), and from 116 to 3.8 Bq m(-2) year(-1); 238Pu from 0.95 to 0.063 nBq m(-3), and from 1.0 to 0.23 mBq m(-2) year(-1); (239,240)Pu from 8.1 to 0.53 nBq m(-3), and from 6.4 to 2.1 mBq m(-2) year(-1). The values for the non-caesium radionuclides are compared to the few available data from other stations. After an initial phase which is characterised for a given radionuclide by the varying ratio of the Chernobyl-derived inventory to the earlier, weapons fallout-derived inventory, the time courses of concentrations of 137Cs, 90Sr, 238Pu and (239,240)Pu in air become more or less parallel (from about 1990), despite the considerable differences in the physico-chemical properties of these elements. By contrast, the time series of radionuclide deposition rates show until about 1994 less similarity among each other and with the respective concentration series in air. From 1994, concentrations in air and depositions to ground become nearly constant, or decrease very slowly. At the end of the observation period, resuspension factors between 1.4 x 10(-10) m(-1) and 1.0 x 10(-11) m(-1) are observed for the various nuclides. The time courses of specific activities (Bq g(-1)) as well as the time courses of radionuclide ratios show characteristic differences between air and deposition. The data will be useful in predicting the post-accident behaviour of radionuclides a long time after a large-scale contamination event.

  10. Characterisation of the plutonium isotopic composition of a sediment core from Palomares, Spain, by low-energy AMS and alpha-spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamizo, E.; Jiménez-Ramos, M. C.; Enamorado, S. M.; García-León, M.; García-Tenorio, R.; Mas, J. L.; Masqué, P.; Merino, J.; Sanchez-Cabeza, J. A.

    2010-04-01

    The measurement of plutonium isotopes, 239Pu and 240Pu, at 670 kV on the compact accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) system at the Centro Nacional de Aceleradores (CNA) in Seville, Spain, is now a reality. In this work, we present first Pu AMS results for environmental samples: a sediment core collected in a submarine canyon in the Mediterranean coast of the Spanish region of Palomares, affected by a nuclear accident in 1966. From the study of the 240Pu/ 239Pu atomic ratio profile, showing on average levels lower than 11%, we confirm that the weapon-grade plutonium released on land during the accident, with a characteristic 240Pu/ 239Pu atomic ratio of 5.8%, has found its way into the marine environment. A two-plutonium sources mixture model (Palomares and fallout) is used to elucidate the percentage of the plutonium coming from the accident. As a validation exercise of the Pu AMS measuring technique and in order to obtain the 238Pu/ (239+240)Pu activity ratios, samples were also studied by alpha-spectrometry (AS). The obtained AS 239+240Pu activity concentration results fit in with the AMS ones in a wide dynamic range, thus validating the AMS technique.

  11. Experience with the BEACON core monitoring system

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, C.L. ); Icide, C.A. )

    1992-01-01

    The BEACON operational core support system was developed for use in pressurized water reactors to provide an integrated system to perform reactor core monitoring, core measurement reduction, core analysis and follow, and core predictions. It is based on the very fast and accurate three-dimensional SPNOVA nodal program. The experience to date has shown the importance of an accurate integrated system. The benefits accrued are greater for the total system than the benefits that are possible separately.

  12. Core Knowledge: One Teacher's Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storm, Jeanne

    1993-01-01

    One fifth-grade teacher feels it is unfair if some students learn one thing, while others learn something else. Teachers must agree on some core of specific content and resolve to teach it at appropriate levels. Core Knowledge Sequence for grades 1-6 provides model of grade-by-grade content including literature, U.S. and world civilization,…

  13. Analysis of 236U and plutonium isotopes, 239,240Pu, on the 1 MV AMS system at the Centro Nacional de Aceleradores, as a potential tool in oceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamizo, Elena; López-Lora, Mercedes; Villa, María; Casacuberta, Núria; López-Gutiérrez, José María; Pham, Mai Khanh

    2015-10-01

    The performance of the 1 MV AMS system at the CNA (Centro Nacional de Aceleradores, Seville, Spain) for 236U and 239,240Pu measurements has been extensively investigated. A very promising 236U/238U abundance sensitivity of about 3 × 10-11 has been recently achieved, and background figures for 239Pu of about 106 atoms were reported in the past. These promising results lead to the use of conventional low energy AMS systems for the analysis of 236U and 239Pu and its further application in environmental studies. First 236U results obtained on our AMS system for marine samples (sediments and water) are presented here. Results of two new IAEA reference materials (IAEA-410 and IAEA-412, marine sediments from Pacific Ocean) are reported. The obtained 236U/239Pu atom ratios, of 0.12 and 0.022, respectively, show a dependency with the contamination source (i.e. local fallout from the US tests performed at the Bikini Atoll and general fallout). The results obtained for a third IAEA reference material (IAEA-381, seawater from the Irish Sea), are also presented. In the following, the uranium and plutonium isotopic compositions obtained on a set of 5 intercomparison seawater samples from the Arctic Ocean provided by the ETH Zürich are discussed. By comparing them with the obtained results on the 600 kV AMS facility Tandy at the ETH Zürich, we demonstrate the solidity of the CNA technique for 236U/238U determinations at, at least, 7 × 10-10 level. Finally, these results are discussed in their environmental context.

  14. Plutonium and americium inventories in atmospheric fallout and sediment cores from Blelham Tarn, Cumbria (UK).

    PubMed

    Michel, H; Barci-Funel, G; Dalmasso, J; Ardisson, G; Appleby, P G; Haworth, E; El-Daoushy, F

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to report on the results of a study of 238Pu, 239 + 240Pu and 241Am inventories onto Blelham Tarn in Cumbria (UK). The atmospheric fallout inventory was obtained by analysing soil cores and the results are in good agreement with the literature: 101 Bq m(-2) for 239 + 240Pu; 4.5 Bq m(-2) for 238Pu and 37 Bq m(-2) for 241Am. The sediment core inventory for the whole lake is compared to the atmospheric fallout inventory. The sediment activity is 60-80% higher than the estimated fallout activity, showing a catchment area contribution and in particular the stream input.

  15. Analysis of core soil and water samples from the Cactus Crater Disposal Site at Enewetak atoll

    SciTech Connect

    Robison, W.L.; Noshkin, V.E.

    1981-02-18

    Core soil samples and water samples were collected from the Cactus Crater Disposal Site at Enewetak for analysis of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 239 +240/Pu and /sup 241/Am by both gamma spectroscopy and, through a contractor laboratory, by wet chemistry procedures. The samples processing methods, the analytical methods and the analytical quality control are all procedures developed for the continuing Marshall Island radioecology and dose assessment work.

  16. Evaluation of Measurements of 238Pu, 239Pu and 240Pu in Urine at the Microbecquerel Level Using Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry and Alpha Spectrometry at Los Alamos National Laboratory: Results of a Two Year Comparison Test (LA-UR-06-8055)

    SciTech Connect

    Bores, Norman; Schultz, Michael K

    2008-01-01

    The Intercomparison Studies Program (ISP) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL, Oak Ridge, TN, USA) provides natural-matrix urine quality-assurance/quality-control (QA/QC) samples to radiobioassay analysis laboratories. In 2003, a single laboratory (Los Alamos National Laboratory LANL, Los Alamos NM USA) requested a change in the test-samples provided previously by the ISP. The change was requested to evaluate measurement performance for analyses conducted using thermal-ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Radionuclides included {sup 239}Pu at two activity levels (75-150 {micro}Bq {sm_bullet} sample{sup -1} and 1200-1600 {micro}Bq {sm_bullet} sample{sup -1}) and {sup 238}Pu (3700-7400 {micro}Bq {sm_bullet} sample{sup -1}). In addition, {sup 240}Pu was added to the samples so that the {sup 239+240}Pu specific activity was 3700-7400 {micro}Bq {sm_bullet} sample{sup -1}. In this paper, the results of testing during the period May, 2003 through September, 2005 are presented and discussed.

  17. Drexel's Experience with the Integrated Core.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oller, A. Kathryn

    1978-01-01

    The objectives, coverage, structure, instructional methods, administration, and evaluation of the integrated core curriculum at the Drexel University School of Library and Information Science are discussed. (MBR)

  18. Drexel's Experience with the Integrated Core.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oller, A. Kathryn

    1978-01-01

    The objectives, coverage, structure, instructional methods, administration, and evaluation of the integrated core curriculum at the Drexel University School of Library and Information Science are discussed. (MBR)

  19. Laboratory experiments on the dynamics of the core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Peter

    2011-07-01

    Many innovative laboratory experiments have been used to investigate the fluid dynamics of the Earth's core. Experiments with liquid metals and non-metals range from turbulence and waves in the outer core to creeping flow in the inner core, and include the effects of rotation (steady and variable), thermal and chemical convection, spherical geometry, magnetic fields, melting and solidification. In this review, the strengths and limitations of laboratory fluid experiments are analyzed by comparing their dynamical similarity with the corresponding geophysical processes in the core. Recent advances in several areas are highlighted, including variable rotation dynamics, convection in liquid metals, the effects of magnetic fields on fluid motions, experimental dynamos, flow in the solid inner core, and metal-silicate interactions during core formation.

  20. Laboratory Experiments on the Dynamics of the Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Peter

    2011-08-01

    Many innovative laboratory experiments have been used to investigate the fluid dynamics of the Earth's core. Experiments with liquid metals and non-metals range from turbulence and waves in the outer core to creeping flow in the inner core, and include the effects of rotation (steady and variable), thermal and chemical convection, spherical geometry, magnetic fields, melting and solidification. In this review, the strengths and limitations of laboratory fluid experiments are analyzed by comparing their dynamical similarity with the corresponding geophysical processes in the core. Recent advances in several areas are highlighted, including variable rotation dynamics, convection in liquid metals, the effects of magnetic fields on fluid motions, experimental dynamos, flow in the solid inner core, and metal-silicate interactions during core formation.

  1. ESADA Plutonium Program Critical Experiments: Power Distribution Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Akkurt, H.

    2001-06-12

    In 1967, a series of critical experiments were conducted at the Westinghouse Reactor Evaluation Center (WREC) using mixed-oxide (MOX) PuO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2} and/or UO{sub 2} fuels in various lattices and configurations. These experiments were performed under the joint sponsorship of Empire State Atomic Development Associates (ESADA) plutonium program and Westinghouse. The purpose of these experiments was to develop experimental data useful in validating analytical methods used in the design of plutonium-bearing replacement fuel for water reactors. Three different fuel types were used during the experimental program: two MOX fuels and a low-enriched UO{sub 2} fuel. The MOX fuels were distinguished by their {sup 240}Pu content: 8 wt % {sup 240}Pu and 24 wt % {sup 240}Pu. Both MOX fuels contained 2.0 wt % PuO{sub 2} in natural UO{sub 2}. The UO{sub 2} fuel with 2.72 wt % enrichment was used for comparison with the plutonium data and for use in multiregion experiments.

  2. Chronology of Pu isotopes and 236U in an Arctic ice core.

    PubMed

    Wendel, C C; Oughton, D H; Lind, O C; Skipperud, L; Fifield, L K; Isaksson, E; Tims, S G; Salbu, B

    2013-09-01

    In the present work, state of the art isotopic fingerprinting techniques are applied to an Arctic ice core in order to quantify deposition of U and Pu, and to identify possible tropospheric transport of debris from former Soviet Union test sites Semipalatinsk (Central Asia) and Novaya Zemlya (Arctic Ocean). An ice core chronology of (236)U, (239)Pu, and (240)Pu concentrations, and atom ratios, measured by accelerator mass spectrometry in a 28.6m deep ice core from the Austfonna glacier at Nordaustlandet, Svalbard is presented. The ice core chronology corresponds to the period 1949 to 1999. The main sources of Pu and (236)U contamination in the Arctic were the atmospheric nuclear detonations in the period 1945 to 1980, as global fallout, and tropospheric fallout from the former Soviet Union test sites Novaya Zemlya and Semipalatinsk. Activity concentrations of (239+240)Pu ranged from 0.008 to 0.254 mBq cm(-2) and (236)U from 0.0039 to 0.053 μBq cm(-2). Concentrations varied in concordance with (137)Cs concentrations in the same ice core. In contrast to previous published results, the concentrations of Pu and (236)U were found to be higher at depths corresponding to the pre-moratorium period (1949 to 1959) than to the post-moratorium period (1961 and 1962). The (240)Pu/(239)Pu ratio ranged from 0.15 to 0.19, and (236)U/(239)Pu ranged from 0.18 to 1.4. The Pu atom ratios ranged within the limits of global fallout in the most intensive period of nuclear atmospheric testing (1952 to 1962). To the best knowledge of the authors the present work is the first publication on biogeochemical cycles with respect to (236)U concentrations and (236)U/(239)Pu atom ratios in the Arctic and in ice cores. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Neutronic Benchmarks for the Utilization of Mixed-Oxide Fuel: Joint U.S./Russian Progress Report for Fiscal Year 1997 - Volume 4, Part 2--Saxton Plutonium Program Critical Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Abdurrahman, NM

    2000-10-12

    Critical experiments with water-moderated, single-region PuO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2} or UO{sub 2}, and multiple-region PuO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2}- and UO{sub 2}-fueled cores were performed at the CRX reactor critical facility at the Westinghouse Reactor Evaluation Center (WREC) at Waltz Mill, Pennsylvania in 1965 [1]. These critical experiments were part of the Saxton Plutonium Program. The mixed oxide (MOX) fuel used in these critical experiments and then loaded in the Saxton reactor contained 6.6 wt% PuO{sub 2} in a mixture of PuO{sub 2} and natural UO{sub 2}. The Pu metal had the following isotopic mass percentages: 90.50% {sup 239}Pu; 8.57% {sup 239}Pu; 0.89% {sup 240}Pu; and 0.04% {sup 241}Pu. The purpose of these critical experiments was to verify the nuclear design of Saxton partial plutonium cores while obtaining parameters of fundamental significance such as buckling, control rod worth, soluble poison worth, flux, power peaking, relative pin power, and power sharing factors of MOX and UO{sub 2} lattices. For comparison purposes, the core was also loaded with uranium dioxide fuel rods only. This series is covered by experiments beginning with the designation SX.

  4. Laboratory Experiments on Core Merging and Stratification After Giant Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landeau, M.; Olson, P.; Deguen, R.; Hirsh, B.

    2015-12-01

    The fluid dynamics of core merging after giant impacts in the late stages of accretion provides constraints on metal-silicate equilibration, core stratification, and early magnetic field generation. The energy released during giant impacts, such as those thought to have formed Earth's Moon and the crustal dichotomy on Mars, likely resulted in melting of the impactor and much or all of the protoplanet's mantle. Under these conditions, the liquid core of the impactor migrates through a fully-liquid magma ocean, and merges with the protoplanet's core. Unlike the laminar flow in numerical simulations, liquid impact experiments can produce turbulence, as expected during core formation. We present experiments on liquid blobs of variable density released into another liquid consisting of two immiscible layers, representing the magma ocean and protocore, respectively. The released liquid is denser than the upper layer, immiscible in the upper layer, and miscible in the lower layer. With a shallow upper layer, the relevant regime for giant impacts, a turbulent cloud of released and upper liquids penetrates into the lower layer, collapses and spreads along the interface between the upper and lower layers. This behavior contrasts with the laminar core merging observed in impact simulations or the classical iron rain scenario, and suggests that metal-silicate chemical equilibration extends inside the protocore. Experimental scalings for low-density releases predict that compositional stratification of the core is likely in the aftermath of planet formation, and the stratified layer detected by seismology at the top of Earth's core is compatible with a moon-forming impact. By implication, the early core dynamo had to overcome compositional stratification to initiate.

  5. Experiments on metal-silicate plumes and core formation.

    PubMed

    Olson, Peter; Weeraratne, Dayanthie

    2008-11-28

    Short-lived isotope systematics, mantle siderophile abundances and the power requirements of the geodynamo favour an early and high-temperature core-formation process, in which metals concentrate and partially equilibrate with silicates in a deep magma ocean before descending to the core. We report results of laboratory experiments on liquid metal dynamics in a two-layer stratified viscous fluid, using sucrose solutions to represent the magma ocean and the crystalline, more primitive mantle and liquid gallium to represent the core-forming metals. Single gallium drop experiments and experiments on Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities with gallium layers and gallium mixtures produce metal diapirs that entrain the less viscous upper layer fluid and produce trailing plume conduits in the high-viscosity lower layer. Calculations indicate that viscous dissipation in metal-silicate plumes in the early Earth would result in a large initial core superheat. Our experiments suggest that metal-silicate mantle plumes facilitate high-pressure metal-silicate interaction and may later evolve into buoyant thermal plumes, connecting core formation to ancient hotspot activity on the Earth and possibly on other terrestrial planets.

  6. A method of measurement of (239)Pu, (240)Pu, (241)Pu in high U content marine sediments by sector field ICP-MS and its application to Fukushima sediment samples.

    PubMed

    Bu, Wenting; Zheng, Jian; Guo, Qiuju; Aono, Tatsuo; Tazoe, Hirofumi; Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo; Yamada, Masatoshi

    2014-01-01

    An accurate and precise analytical method is highly needed for the determination of Pu isotopes in marine sediments for the long-term marine environment monitoring that is being done since the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. The elimination of uranium from the sediment samples needs to be carefully checked. We established an analytical method based on anion-exchange chromatography and SF-ICP-MS in this work. A uranium decontamination factor of 2 × 10(6) was achieved, and the U concentrations in the final sample solutions were typically below 4 pg mL(-1), thus no extra correction of (238)U interferences from the Pu spectra was needed. The method was suitable for the analysis of (241)Pu in marine sediments using large sample amounts (>10 g). We validated the method by measuring marine sediment reference materials and our results agreed well with the certified and the literature values. Surface sediments and one sediment core sample collected after the nuclear accident were analyzed. The characterization of (241)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios in the surface sediments and the vertical distribution of Pu isotopes showed that there was no detectable Pu contamination from the nuclear accident in the marine sediments collected 30 km off the plant site.

  7. Fuel and Core Design Experiences in Cofrentes NPP

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Delgado, L.; Lopez-Carbonell, M.T.; Gomez-Bernal, I.

    2002-07-01

    The electricity market deregulation in Spain is increasing the need for innovations in nuclear power generation, which can be achieved in the fuel area by improving fuel and core designs and by introducing vendors competition. Iberdrola has developed the GIRALDA methodology for design and licensing of Cofrentes reloads, and has introduced mixed cores with fuel from different vendors. The application of GIRALDA is giving satisfactory results, and is showing its capability to adequately reproduce the core behaviour. The nuclear design team is acquiring an invaluable experience and a deep knowledge of the core, very useful to support cycle operation. Continuous improvements are expected for the future in design strategies as well as in the application of new technologies to redesign the methodology processes. (authors)

  8. Analysis of C/E results of fission rate ratio measurements in several fast lead VENUS-F cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochetkov, Anatoly; Krása, Antonín; Baeten, Peter; Vittiglio, Guido; Wagemans, Jan; Bécares, Vicente; Bianchini, Giancarlo; Fabrizio, Valentina; Carta, Mario; Firpo, Gabriele; Fridman, Emil; Sarotto, Massimo

    2017-09-01

    During the GUINEVERE FP6 European project (2006-2011), the zero-power VENUS water-moderated reactor was modified into VENUS-F, a mock-up of a lead cooled fast spectrum system with solid components that can be operated in both critical and subcritical mode. The Fast Reactor Experiments for hybrid Applications (FREYA) FP7 project was launched in 2011 to support the designs of the MYRRHA Accelerator Driven System (ADS) and the ALFRED Lead Fast Reactor (LFR). Three VENUS-F critical core configurations, simulating the complex MYRRHA core design and one configuration devoted to the LFR ALFRED core conditions were investigated in 2015. The MYRRHA related cores simulated step by step design peculiarities like the BeO reflector and in pile sections. For all of these cores the fuel assemblies were of a simple design consisting of 30% enriched metallic uranium, lead rodlets to simulate the coolant and Al2O3 rodlets to simulate the oxide fuel. Fission rate ratios of minor actinides such as Np-237, Am-241 as well as Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-242 and U-238 to U-235 were measured in these VENUS-F critical assemblies with small fission chambers in specially designed locations, to determine the spectral indices in the different neutron spectrum conditions. The measurements have been analyzed using advanced computational tools including deterministic and stochastic codes and different nuclear data sets like JEFF-3.1, JEFF-3.2, ENDF/B7.1 and JENDL-4.0. The analysis of the C/E discrepancies will help to improve the nuclear data in the specific energy region of fast neutron reactor spectra.

  9. Little Earth Experiment: An instrument to model planetary cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aujogue, Kélig; Pothérat, Alban; Bates, Ian; Debray, François; Sreenivasan, Binod

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we present a new experimental facility, Little Earth Experiment, designed to study the hydrodynamics of liquid planetary cores. The main novelty of this apparatus is that a transparent electrically conducting electrolyte is subject to extremely high magnetic fields (up to 10 T) to produce electromagnetic effects comparable to those produced by moderate magnetic fields in planetary cores. This technique makes it possible to visualise for the first time the coupling between the principal forces in a convection-driven dynamo by means of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in a geometry relevant to planets. We first present the technology that enables us to generate these forces and implement PIV in a high magnetic field environment. We then show that the magnetic field drastically changes the structure of convective plumes in a configuration relevant to the tangent cylinder region of the Earth's core.

  10. Analysis of actinides in an ombrotrophic peat core - evidence of post-depositional migration of fallout radionuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinto, Francesca; Hrnecek, Erich; Krachler, Michael; Shotyk, William; Steier, Peter; Winkler, Stephan R.

    2013-04-01

    Plutonium (239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu, 242Pu) and uranium (236U, 238U) isotopes were analyzed in an ombrotrophic peat core from the Black Forest, Germany, representing the last 80 years of atmospheric deposition. The reliable determination of these isotopes at ultra-trace levels was possible using ultra-clean laboratory procedures and accelerator mass spectrometry. The 240Pu/239Pu isotopic ratios are constant along the core with a mean value of 0.19 ±0.02 (N = 32). This result is consistent with the acknowledged average 240Pu/239Pu isotopic ratio from global fallout in the Northern Hemisphere. The global fallout origin of Pu is confirmed by the corresponding 241Pu/239Pu (0.0012 ±0.0005) and 242Pu/239Pu (0.004 ± 0.001) isotopic ratios. The identification of the Pu isotopic composition characteristic for global fallout in peat layers pre-dating the period of atmospheric atom bomb testing (AD 1956 - AD 1980) is a clear evidence of the migration of Pu downwards the peat profile. The maximum of global fallout derived 236U is detected in correspondence to the age/depth layer of maximum stratospheric fallout (AD 1963). This finding demonstrates that the 236U bomb peak can be successfully used as an independent chronological marker complementing the 210Pb dating of peat cores. The profiles of the global fallout derived 236U and 239Pu are compared with those of 137Cs and 241Am. As typical of ombrothrophic peat, the temporal fallout pattern of 137Cs is poorly retained. Similarly like for Pu, post-depositional migration of 241Am in peat layers preceding the era of atmospheric nuclear tests is observed.

  11. Core demonstration lead experiments for irradiation in FFTF

    SciTech Connect

    Dittmer, J.O.; Jackson, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    A major new initiative to develop and irradiate a long-life mixed oxide fuel system in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) has been implemented by the Westinghouse Hanford Company at the Hanford Engineering Development Lab. for the US Dept. of Energy. The purpose of this new fuel system, called the Core Demonstration Experiment (CDE), is to demonstrate the capability of achieving a 3-yr life in a prototypical heterogeneous reactor environment under prototypical power and temperature conditions. Three Core Demonstration Lead Experiments (CDLEs) will establish the performance characteristics of entire fuel assemblies of wire-wrapped, large diameter, advanced oxide fuel pins with HT-9 stainless steel alloy cladding and wire wrap and an HT-9 duct. Their performance characteristics provided the basis for design, fabrication, and irradiation of the CDE.

  12. Experiments on the synthesis of superheavy nuclei 284Fl and 285Fl in the Pu,240239+48Ca reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utyonkov, V. K.; Brewer, N. T.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Abdullin, F. Sh.; Dmitriev, S. N.; Grzywacz, R. K.; Itkis, M. G.; Miernik, K.; Polyakov, A. N.; Roberto, J. B.; Sagaidak, R. N.; Shirokovsky, I. V.; Shumeiko, M. V.; Tsyganov, Yu. S.; Voinov, A. A.; Subbotin, V. G.; Sukhov, A. M.; Sabel'nikov, A. V.; Vostokin, G. K.; Hamilton, J. H.; Stoyer, M. A.; Strauss, S. Y.

    2015-09-01

    Irradiations of 239Pu and 240Pu targets with 48Ca beams aimed at the synthesis of Z =114 flerovium isotopes were performed at the Dubna Gas Filled Recoil Separator. A new spontaneously fissioning (SF) isotope 284Fl was produced for the first time in the 240Pu+48Ca (250 MeV) and 239Pu+48Ca (245 MeV) reactions. The cross section of the 239Pu(48Ca,3 n )284Fl reaction channel was about 20 times lower than predicted by theoretical models and about 50 times lower than the maximum fusion-evaporation cross section for the 3 n and 4 n channels measured in the 244Pu+48Ca reaction. In the 240Pu+48Ca experiment, performed at 245 MeV in order to maximize the 3 n -evaporation channel, three decay chains of 285Fl were detected. The α -decay energy of 285Fl was measured for the first time and decay properties of its descendants 281Cn, 277Ds, 273Hs, 269Sg, and 265Rf were determined with higher accuracy. The assignment of SF events observed during the irradiation of the 240Pu target with a 250 MeV 48Ca beam to 284Fl decay is presented and discussed. The cross sections at both 48Ca energies are similar and exceed that observed in the reaction with the lighter isotope 239Pu by a factor of 10. The decay properties of the synthesized nuclei and their production cross sections indicate a rapid decrease of stability of superheavy nuclei as the neutron number decreases from the predicted magic neutron number N =184 .

  13. Source-term evaluations from recent core-melt experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G.W.; Creek, G.E.; Sutton, A.L. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Predicted consequences of hypothetical severe reactor accidents resulting in core meltdown appear to be too conservatively projected because of the simplistic concepts often assumed for the intricate and highly variable phenomena involved. Recent demonstration work on a modest scale (1-kg) has already revealed significant variations in the mode and temperature for clad failure, in the rates of formation of zirconium alloys, in the nature of the UO/sub 2/-ZrO/sub 2/ eutectic mixtures, and in aerosol generation rates. The current series of core-melt demonstration experiments (at the 10-kg scale) seem to confirm that an increase in size of the meltdown mass will lead to an even further reduction in the amount of vaporized components. Source terms that are based on older release evaluations could be up to an order of magnitude too large. 6 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Description and Analysis of Core Samples: The Lunar Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, David S.; Allton, Judith H.

    1997-01-01

    Although no samples yet have been returned from a comet, extensive experience from sampling another solar system body, the Moon, does exist. While, in overall structure, composition, and physical properties the Moon bears little resemblance to what is expected for a comet, sampling the Moon has provided some basic lessons in how to do things which may be equally applicable to cometary samples. In particular, an extensive series of core samples has been taken on the Moon, and coring is the best way to sample a comet in three dimensions. Data from cores taken at 24 Apollo collection stations and 3 Luna sites have been used to provide insight into the evolution of the lunar regolith. It is now well understood that this regolith is very complex and reflects gardening (stirring of grains by micrometeorites), erosion (from impacts and solar wind sputtering), maturation (exposure on the bare lunar surface to solar winds ions and micrometeorite impacts) and comminution of coarse grains into finer grains, blanket deposition of coarse-grained layers, and other processes. All of these processes have been documented in cores. While a cometary regolith should not be expected to parallel in detail the lunar regolith, it is possible that the upper part of a cometary regolith may include textural, mineralogical, and chemical features which reflect the original accretion of the comet, including a form of gardening. Differences in relative velocities and gravitational attraction no doubt made this accretionary gardening qualitatively much different than the lunar version. Furthermore, at least some comets, depending on their orbits, have been subjected to impacts of the uppermost surface by small projectiles at some time in their history. Consequently, a more recent post-accretional gardening may have occurred. Finally, for comets which approach the sun, large scale erosion may have occurred driven by gas loss. The uppermost material of these comets may reflect some of the features

  15. Predicting Activation of Experiments Inside the Annular Core Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, Joseph Isaac

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this thesis is to create a program to quickly estimate the radioactivity and decay of experiments conducted inside of the Annular Core Research Reactor at Sandia National Laboratories and eliminate the need for users to write code. This is achieved by model the neutron fluxes in the reactor’s central cavity where experiments are conducted for 4 different neutron spectra using MCNP. The desired neutron spectrum, experiment material composition, and reactor power level are then input into CINDER2008 burnup code to obtain activation and decay information for every isotope generated. DREAD creates all of the files required for CINDER2008 through user selected inputs in a graphical user interface and executes the program for the user and displays the resulting estimation for dose rate at various distances. The DREAD program was validated by weighing and measuring various experiments in the different spectra and then collecting dose rate information after they were irradiated and comparing it to the dose rates that DREAD predicted. The program provides results with an average of 17% higher estimates than the actual values and takes seconds to execute.

  16. The Core Experience: A Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schonbuch, Stanley S.; And Others

    A Core Program was introduced in the College Discovery Program at Staten Island Community College in fall 1971 to facilitate the breakdown of traditional divisions between academic disciplines, promote greater intimacy in the classroom, and to help students perceive teachers in a more realistic way. Each core was comprised of freshman orientation,…

  17. Core formation conditons in planetesimals: constraints from isotope fractionation experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guignard, J.; Quitté, G.; Toplis, M. J.; Poitrasson, F.

    2016-12-01

    Planetesimals are small objects (10 to 1000 km) early accreted in the history of the solar system which show a wide variety of thermal history due to the initial amount of radiogenic elements [1] (26Al and 60Fe), from a simple metamorphism to a complete metal-silicate differentiation. Moreover, isotope compositions of siderophile element, e.g. Fe, Ni, and W in meteorites spread on a range that can be attributed to the process of core-mantle segregation. We therefore performed isotope fractionation experiments of nickel and tungsten between metal and silicate in a gas-mixing (CO-CO2) vertical furnace, at different temperatures (from 1270°C to 1600°C), oxygen fugacity (from IW+2 to IW-6) and annealing times (from 20 minutes to 48 hours). The starting silicate is an anorthite-diopside eutectic composition glass, synthesize from the respective oxides. The starting metal is either a nickel or tungsten wire according to the element to study. After each experiment, metal and silicate are mechanically separated and digested in acids. Nickel and Tungsten separation have been made according to the methods developed by [2] and [3] and isotopes measurements have been made using a high resolution MC-ICP-MS (Neptune; Thermofisher©). Results show evidence for a strong kinetic isotope fractionation during the first annealing times with a faster diffusion of lightest isotopes than heaviest. Similar mechanism has been already highlighted for iron isotope fractionation between silicate and metal [4]. Chemical and isotopic equilibrium is also reached in our experiments but the time required dependent on the conditions of temperature and oxygen fugacity. Therefore, at equilibrium, metal-silicate isotope fractionation has also been quantified as well its temperature dependence. These experimental data can be used in order to bring new constraints on the metal silicate segregation in the planetesimals early accreted. [1] Lee T., et al., GRL, 3, 41-44 (1976) [2] Quitté G., and Oberli

  18. Experiments pertaining to the formation and equilibration of planetary cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeanloz, Raymond; Knittle, Elise; Williams, Quentin

    1987-01-01

    The phase diagram of FeO was experimentally determined to pressures of 155 GPa and temperatures of 4000 K using shock wave and diamond-cell techniques. Researchers discovered a metallic phase of FeO at pressures greater than 70 GPa and temperatures exceeding 1000 K. The metallization of FeO at high pressures implies that oxygen can be present as the light alloying element of the Earth's outer core, in accord with the geochemical predictions of Ringwood. The high pressures necessry for this metallization suggest that the core has acquired its composition well after the initial stages of the Earth's accretion. The core forming alloy can react chemically with oxides such as those forming the mantle. The core and mantle may never have reached complete chemical equilibrium, however. If this is the case, the core-mantle boundary is likely to be a zone of active chemical reactions.

  19. Gold-Palladium core@shell nanoalloys: experiments and simulations

    PubMed Central

    Spitale, A.; Perez, M. A.; Mejía-Rosales, S.; Yacamán, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we report a facile synthesis route, structural characterization, and full atomistic simulations of gold-palladium nanoalloys. Through aberration corrected-STEM, UV-vis and EDS chemical analysis, we were able to determine that Au(core)-Pd(shell) bimetallic nanoparticles were formed. Using different computational approaches, we were capable to establish how the size of the core and the thickness of the shell will affect the thermodynamic stability of several core-shell nanoalloys. Finally, grand canonical simulations using different sampling procedures were used to study the growth mechanism of Pd atoms on Au seeds of different shape. PMID:25735727

  20. Gold-palladium core@shell nanoalloys: experiments and simulations.

    PubMed

    Spitale, A; Perez, M A; Mejía-Rosales, S; Yacamán, M J; Mariscal, M M

    2015-11-14

    In this work, we report a facile synthesis route, structural characterization, and full atomistic simulations of gold-palladium nanoalloys. Through aberration corrected-STEM, UV-vis spectroscopy and EDS chemical analysis, we were able to determine that Au(core)-Pd(shell) bimetallic nanoparticles were formed. Using different computational approaches, we were capable of establishing how the size of the core and the thickness of the shell will affect the thermodynamic stability of several core-shell nanoalloys. Finally, grand canonical simulations using different sampling procedures were used to study the growth mechanism of Pd atoms on Au seeds of different shapes.

  1. Text and Truth: Reading, Student Experience, and the Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandler, Susan; Hammond, Zaretta

    2012-01-01

    One of the rumors making the rounds of K-12 educators goes something like this: The Common Core State Standards do not allow "prereading"--the pedagogical practice meant to help students better understand a text they are about to read--or for that matter any classroom activities that contextualize a text through outside sources. The interesting…

  2. Text and Truth: Reading, Student Experience, and the Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandler, Susan; Hammond, Zaretta

    2012-01-01

    One of the rumors making the rounds of K-12 educators goes something like this: The Common Core State Standards do not allow "prereading"--the pedagogical practice meant to help students better understand a text they are about to read--or for that matter any classroom activities that contextualize a text through outside sources. The interesting…

  3. Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Deep Burn Core and Fuel Analysis -- Complete Design Selection for the Pebble Bed Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    B. Boer; A. M. Ougouag

    2010-09-01

    The Deep-Burn (DB) concept focuses on the destruction of transuranic nuclides from used light water reactor fuel. These transuranic nuclides are incorporated into TRISO coated fuel particles and used in gas-cooled reactors with the aim of a fractional fuel burnup of 60 to 70% in fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA). This high performance is expected through the use of multiple recirculation passes of the fuel in pebble form without any physical or chemical changes between passes. In particular, the concept does not call for reprocessing of the fuel between passes. In principle, the DB pebble bed concept employs the same reactor designs as the presently envisioned low-enriched uranium core designs, such as the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR-400). Although it has been shown in the previous Fiscal Year (2009) that a PuO2 fueled pebble bed reactor concept is viable, achieving a high fuel burnup, while remaining within safety-imposed prescribed operational limits for fuel temperature, power peaking and temperature reactivity feedback coefficients for the entire temperature range, is challenging. The presence of the isotopes 239-Pu, 240-Pu and 241-Pu that have resonances in the thermal energy range significantly modifies the neutron thermal energy spectrum as compared to a ”standard,” UO2-fueled core. Therefore, the DB pebble bed core exhibits a relatively hard neutron energy spectrum. However, regions within the pebble bed that are near the graphite reflectors experience a locally softer spectrum. This can lead to power and temperature peaking in these regions. Furthermore, a shift of the thermal energy spectrum with increasing temperature can lead to increased absorption in the resonances of the fissile Pu isotopes. This can lead to a positive temperature reactivity coefficient for the graphite moderator under certain operating conditions. The effort of this task in FY 2010 has focused on the optimization of the core to maximize the pebble discharge

  4. Combustion and Energy Transfer Experiments: A Laboratory Model for Linking Core Concepts across the Science Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barreto, Jose C.; Dubetz, Terry A.; Schmidt, Diane L.; Isern, Sharon; Beatty, Thomas; Brown, David W.; Gillman, Edward; Alberte, Randall S.; Egiebor, Nosa O.

    2007-01-01

    Core concepts can be integrated throughout lower-division science and engineering courses by using a series of related, cross-referenced laboratory experiments. Starting with butane combustion in chemistry, the authors expanded the underlying core concepts of energy transfer into laboratories designed for biology, physics, and engineering. This…

  5. Combustion and Energy Transfer Experiments: A Laboratory Model for Linking Core Concepts across the Science Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barreto, Jose C.; Dubetz, Terry A.; Schmidt, Diane L.; Isern, Sharon; Beatty, Thomas; Brown, David W.; Gillman, Edward; Alberte, Randall S.; Egiebor, Nosa O.

    2007-01-01

    Core concepts can be integrated throughout lower-division science and engineering courses by using a series of related, cross-referenced laboratory experiments. Starting with butane combustion in chemistry, the authors expanded the underlying core concepts of energy transfer into laboratories designed for biology, physics, and engineering. This…

  6. Students' Understanding of Analogy after a Core (Chemical Observations, Representations, Experimentation) Learning Cycle, General Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avargil, Shirly; Bruce, Mitchell R. M.; Amar, Franc¸ois G.; Bruce, Alice E.

    2015-01-01

    Students' understanding about analogy was investigated after a CORE learning cycle general chemistry experiment. CORE (Chemical Observations, Representations, Experimentation) is a new three-phase learning cycle that involves (phase 1) guiding students through chemical observations while they consider a series of open-ended questions, (phase 2)…

  7. Students' Understanding of Analogy after a Core (Chemical Observations, Representations, Experimentation) Learning Cycle, General Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avargil, Shirly; Bruce, Mitchell R. M.; Amar, Franc¸ois G.; Bruce, Alice E.

    2015-01-01

    Students' understanding about analogy was investigated after a CORE learning cycle general chemistry experiment. CORE (Chemical Observations, Representations, Experimentation) is a new three-phase learning cycle that involves (phase 1) guiding students through chemical observations while they consider a series of open-ended questions, (phase 2)…

  8. Determination of optimal coring values from psychophysical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyung Jun; Pizlo, Zygmunt; Allebach, Jan P.

    2009-01-01

    The use of color electrophotographic (EP) laser printing systems is growing because of their declining cost. Thus, the print quality of color EP laser printers is more important than ever before. Since text and lines are indispensable to print quality, many studies have proposed methods for measuring these print quality attributes. Toner scatter caused by toner overdevelopment in color EP laser printers can significantly impact print quality. A conventional approach to reduce toner overdevelopment is to restrict the color gamut of printers. However, this can result in undesired color shifts and the introduction of halftone texture in light regions. Coring, defined as a process whereby the colorant level is reduced in the interior of text or characters, is a remedy for these shortcomings. The desired amount of reduction for coring depends on line width and overall nominal colorant level. In previous work, these amounts were chosen on the basis of data on the perception of edge blur that was published over 25 years ago.

  9. Public Experiments and Displays of Virtuosity: The Core-Set Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, H. M.

    1988-01-01

    Makes use of distinctions between experiment and demonstrations to resolve a paradox for the sociology of scientific knowledge. Describes two public tests which illustrate these themes. Discusses types of core-set distortion and suggests a partial solution. (YP)

  10. Public Experiments and Displays of Virtuosity: The Core-Set Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, H. M.

    1988-01-01

    Makes use of distinctions between experiment and demonstrations to resolve a paradox for the sociology of scientific knowledge. Describes two public tests which illustrate these themes. Discusses types of core-set distortion and suggests a partial solution. (YP)

  11. Core analysis in a low permeability sandstone reservoir: Results from the Multiwell Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Sattler, A.R.

    1989-04-01

    Over 4100 ft (1100 ft oriented) of Mesaverde core was taken during the drilling of the three Multiwell Experiment (MWX) wells, for study in a comprehensive core analysis program. This core traversed five separate depositional environments (shoreline/marine, coastal, paludal, fluvial, and paralic), and almost every major sand in the Mesaverde at the site was sampled. This paper summarizes MWX core analysis and describes the petrophysical properties at the MWX site; reservoir parameters, including permeabilities of naturally fractured core; and mechanical rock properties including stress-related measurements. Some correlations are made between reservoir properties and mineralogy/petrology data. Comparisons are made between the properties of lenticular and blanket sandstone morphologies existing at the site. This paper provides an overview of a complete core analysis in a low-permeability sandstone reservoir. 66 refs., 17 figs. , 9 tabs.

  12. Development of a drilling and coring test-bed for lunar subsurface exploration and preliminary experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaomeng; Deng, Zongquan; Quan, Qiquan; Tang, Dewei; Hou, Xuyan; Jiang, Shengyuan

    2014-07-01

    Drill sampling has been widely employed as an effective way to acquire deep samples in extraterrestrial exploration. A novel sampling method, namely, flexible-tube coring, was adopted for the Chang'e mission to acquire drilling cores without damaging stratification information. Since the extraterrestrial environment is uncertain and different from the terrestrial environment, automated drill sampling missions are at risk of failure. The principles of drilling and coring for the lunar subsurface should be fully tested and verified on earth before launch. This paper proposes a test-bed for conducting the aforementioned experiments on earth. The test-bed comprises a rotary-percussive drilling mechanism, penetrating mechanism, drilling medium container, and signal acquisition and control system. For granular soil, coring experiments indicate that the sampling method has a high coring rate greater than 80%. For hard rock, drilling experiments indicate that the percussive frequency greatly affects the drilling efficiency. A multi-layered simulant composed of granular soil and hard rock is built to test the adaptability of drilling and coring. To tackle complex drilling media, an intelligent drilling strategy based on online recognition is proposed to improve the adaptability of the sampling drill. The primary features of this research are the proposal of a scheme for drilling and coring a test-bed for validation on earth and the execution of drilling experiments in complex media.

  13. Language core values in a multicultural setting: An Australian experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolicz, Jerzy J.

    1991-03-01

    While it has been agreed by the members of the European Community (except the UK) that all secondary students should study two EC languages in addition to their own, in Australia the recent emphasis has been on teaching languages for external trade, particularly in the Asian region. This policy over-looks the 13 per cent of the Australian population who already speak a language other than English at home (and a greater number who are second generation immigrants), and ignores the view that it is necessary to foster domestic multiculturalism in order to have fruitful links with other cultures abroad. During the 1980s there have been moves to reinforce the cultural identity of Australians of non-English speaking background, but these have sometimes been half-hearted and do not fully recognise that cultural core values, including language, have to achieve a certain critical mass in order to be sustainable. Without this recognition, semi-assimilation will continue to waste the potential cultural and economic contributions of many citizens, and to lead to frustration and eventual violence. The recent National Agenda for a Multicultural Australia addresses this concern.

  14. Hydrothermal alteration of granite rock cores: experiments and kinetic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuesters, T.; Mueller, T.; Renner, J.

    2016-12-01

    The kinetics of water-rock interactions at elevated temperatures is key for understanding the dynamic evolution of porosity and permeability in natural and industrial systems. The implementation of rate data in numerical models simulating reactive transport is crucial to reliably predict subsurface fluid flow. The vast majority of data are constrained by single phase powder experiments inhering unrealistically high surface areas and hampering consideration of microstructural effects on reaction progress. We present experimental results of batch experiments conducted at 200 °C for up to 60 days on a quartz-monzodiorite and pure water that bridge the gap between powder experiments and complex natural systems. The effect of reactive surface area was modelled by using bulk-rock powders, intact, and thermally cracked rock cubes. Fluid composition was monitored (ICP-MS) and solid products were analysed after each experiment (SEM, EMPA). The evolution of fluid and solid compositions was compared to a self-coded geochemical transport model accounting for dissolution, nucleation, growth and reactive surface area. Experimental and modelling results indicate a fast increase of Na, Ca, K and Si in the fluid related to kinetically controlled dissolution of feldspar (plg and kfs) and quartz. Maximum concentrations of Al, Mg, and Fe are reached within two days followed by a rapid decrease induced by secondary mineral precipitation. The amount and type of secondary phases strongly depend on the host substrate indicating that local fluid composition and substrate surface are the controlling parameters. Observed reaction rates differ strongly between powder and rock cube experiments due to differences in reactive surface area. Combining kinetic data, gained by modelling the experimental results, with new information on substrate-precipitate relationship will aid large scale-transport models to realistically predict chemo-mechanical changes and fluid flow in subsurface systems.

  15. Tritium systems for the tokamak fusion core experiment, TFCX

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, P.A.

    1983-01-01

    Tritium systems, tritium needs and possible tritium release scenarios were assessed for a TFCX class of device, 250 MW, 2 x 10/sup 5/ s of burn, with burn times from 20 s to 300 s. On-site and off-site, continuous and batch processing modes were considered. A reference case, batch processing was developed which fulfills the requirements for plasma physics experiments.

  16. A Methodology for Loading the Advanced Test Reactor Driver Core for Experiment Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cowherd, Wilson M.; Nielsen, Joseph W.; Choe, Dong O.

    2016-11-01

    In support of experiments in the ATR, a new methodology was devised for loading the ATR Driver Core. This methodology will replace the existing methodology used by the INL Neutronic Analysis group to analyze experiments. Studied in this paper was the as-run analysis for ATR Cycle 152B, specifically comparing measured lobe powers and eigenvalue calculations.

  17. Polymers and Cross-Linking: A CORE Experiment to Help Students Think on the Submicroscopic Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Mitchell R. M.; Bruce, Alice E.; Avargil, Shirly; Amar, Francois G.; Wemyss, Thomas M.; Flood, Virginia J.

    2016-01-01

    The Polymers and Cross-Linking experiment is presented via a new three phase learning cycle: CORE (Chemical Observations, Representations, Experimentation), which is designed to model productive chemical inquiry and to promote a deeper understanding about the chemistry operating at the submicroscopic level. The experiment is built on two familiar…

  18. Polymers and Cross-Linking: A CORE Experiment to Help Students Think on the Submicroscopic Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Mitchell R. M.; Bruce, Alice E.; Avargil, Shirly; Amar, Francois G.; Wemyss, Thomas M.; Flood, Virginia J.

    2016-01-01

    The Polymers and Cross-Linking experiment is presented via a new three phase learning cycle: CORE (Chemical Observations, Representations, Experimentation), which is designed to model productive chemical inquiry and to promote a deeper understanding about the chemistry operating at the submicroscopic level. The experiment is built on two familiar…

  19. Analysis of the AP600 core makeup tank experiments using the NOTRUMP code

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, J.C.; Haberstroh, R.C.; Hochreiter, L.E.; Jaroszewicz, J.

    1995-12-31

    The AP600 design utilizes passive methods to perform core and containment cooling functions for a postulated loss of coolant. The core makeup tank (CMT) is an important feature of the AP600 passive safety system. The NOTRUMP code has been compared to the 300-series core makeup tank experiments. It has been observed that the code will capture the correct thermal-hydraulic behavior observed in the experiments. The correlations used for wall film condensation and convective heat transfer to the heated CMT liquid appear to be appropriate for these applications. The code will predict the rapid condensation and mixing thermal-hydraulic behavior observed in the 300-series tests. The NOTRUMP predictions can be noding-dependent since the condensation is extremely dependent on the amount of cold CMT liquid that mixes with the incoming steam flow.

  20. Composition of the core from gallium metal–silicate partitioning experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Blanchard, I.; Badro, J.; Siebert, J.; ...

    2015-07-24

    We present gallium concentration (normalized to CI chondrites) in the mantle is at the same level as that of lithophile elements with similar volatility, implying that there must be little to no gallium in Earth's core. Metal-silicate partitioning experiments, however, have shown that gallium is a moderately siderophile element and should be therefore depleted in the mantle by core formation. Moreover, gallium concentrations in the mantle (4 ppm) are too high to be only brought by the late veneer; and neither pressure, nor temperature, nor silicate composition has a large enough effect on gallium partitioning to make it lithophile. Wemore » therefore systematically investigated the effect of core composition (light element content) on the partitioning of gallium by carrying out metal–silicate partitioning experiments in a piston–cylinder press at 2 GPa between 1673 K and 2073 K. Four light elements (Si, O, S, C) were considered, and their effect was found to be sufficiently strong to make gallium lithophile. The partitioning of gallium was then modeled and parameterized as a function of pressure, temperature, redox and core composition. A continuous core formation model was used to track the evolution of gallium partitioning during core formation, for various magma ocean depths, geotherms, core light element contents, and magma ocean composition (redox) during accretion. The only model for which the final gallium concentration in the silicate Earth matched the observed value is the one involving a light-element rich core equilibrating in a FeO-rich deep magma ocean (>1300 km) with a final pressure of at least 50 GPa. More specifically, the incorporation of S and C in the core provided successful models only for concentrations that lie far beyond their allowable cosmochemical or geophysical limits, whereas realistic O and Si amounts (less than 5 wt.%) in the core provided successful models for magma oceans deeper that 1300 km. In conclusion, these results

  1. Composition of the core from gallium metal–silicate partitioning experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, I.; Badro, J.; Siebert, J.; Ryerson, F. J.

    2015-07-24

    We present gallium concentration (normalized to CI chondrites) in the mantle is at the same level as that of lithophile elements with similar volatility, implying that there must be little to no gallium in Earth's core. Metal-silicate partitioning experiments, however, have shown that gallium is a moderately siderophile element and should be therefore depleted in the mantle by core formation. Moreover, gallium concentrations in the mantle (4 ppm) are too high to be only brought by the late veneer; and neither pressure, nor temperature, nor silicate composition has a large enough effect on gallium partitioning to make it lithophile. We therefore systematically investigated the effect of core composition (light element content) on the partitioning of gallium by carrying out metal–silicate partitioning experiments in a piston–cylinder press at 2 GPa between 1673 K and 2073 K. Four light elements (Si, O, S, C) were considered, and their effect was found to be sufficiently strong to make gallium lithophile. The partitioning of gallium was then modeled and parameterized as a function of pressure, temperature, redox and core composition. A continuous core formation model was used to track the evolution of gallium partitioning during core formation, for various magma ocean depths, geotherms, core light element contents, and magma ocean composition (redox) during accretion. The only model for which the final gallium concentration in the silicate Earth matched the observed value is the one involving a light-element rich core equilibrating in a FeO-rich deep magma ocean (>1300 km) with a final pressure of at least 50 GPa. More specifically, the incorporation of S and C in the core provided successful models only for concentrations that lie far beyond their allowable cosmochemical or geophysical limits, whereas realistic O and Si amounts (less than 5 wt.%) in the core provided successful models for magma oceans deeper that 1300 km. In conclusion, these results offer a

  2. Exploration of Children's Literature Core-Curriculum Alignment with Preservice Teacher Practicum Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Julie A.

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative research, completed through the implementation of a case study, was conducted to explore the benefits of children's literature core-curriculum alignment with preservice teacher practicum experience. The significance of the study was based on four foundation issues: personal reading attitude, addressing the value of using…

  3. Secondary Social Studies Teachers' Experiences Implementing Common Core State Literacy Standards: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Krista Faith Huskey

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to examine the experiences of secondary social studies teachers who implemented Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in history/social studies, science and technical subjects in social studies courses requiring End of Course Tests at secondary schools in one suburban…

  4. Exploration of Children's Literature Core-Curriculum Alignment with Preservice Teacher Practicum Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Julie A.

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative research, completed through the implementation of a case study, was conducted to explore the benefits of children's literature core-curriculum alignment with preservice teacher practicum experience. The significance of the study was based on four foundation issues: personal reading attitude, addressing the value of using…

  5. Secondary Social Studies Teachers' Experiences Implementing Common Core State Literacy Standards: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Krista Faith Huskey

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to examine the experiences of secondary social studies teachers who implemented Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in history/social studies, science and technical subjects in social studies courses requiring End of Course Tests at secondary schools in one suburban…

  6. Numerical simulation and interpretation of the European in-pile core debris bed experiment--

    SciTech Connect

    Stubos, A.K.; Buchlin, J.-M. ); Joly, C. )

    1989-01-01

    The first European in-pile experiment is described. The experiment is designed to study, in the frame of the Post Accident Heat Removal program, the long-term coolability of a liquid-saturated core debris bed with internal heat dissipation. A physical model, along with its mathematical formulation and numerical implementation, is developed and used for the simulation and interpretation of the main stages of the experimental procedure.

  7. Historical contamination recorded in a coastal sediment core

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, T.; Garcia-Romero, B.; Presley, B.; Boothe, P.N.; Baskaran, M.

    1995-12-31

    Organic and inorganic contaminant concentrations were determined in 1 cm sections from a 84 cm long sediment core collected from the submarine Mississippi River Delta (N 28{degree} 55.4827, W 89{degree} 40.6362). A sedimentation rate of 0.8 cm/yr was estimated from {sup 210}Pb and {sup 239,240}PU. Aluminum concentrations had only small fluctuation with depth, indicating approximately constant mineralogy for the entire core. Selected contaminant (Ag, Cd, Cr, Pb, chlordane, DDTs, PCBs, and PAHs) had higher concentration in recent surface sediments compared to older bottom sediments. Total DDT (sum of DDT, DDE, and DDD), PAHs, PCBs, and Pb increased above background concentrations in the mid-1940`s. While, chlordane, Ag, Cd and Cr show increased concentrations above background in the early 1950`s. Most of the contaminants reached maximum concentrations in the late 1970`s or early 1980`s. Interestingly after a decline Pb had an increasing trend over the last several years and total DDTs do not show a decreasing concentration trend. Several organic contaminants show a sharp increase in concentration between 1980 and 1988. Temporal contaminant distribution trends, inferred from depth, are complex. Contaminants in this core do not appear to have decreased in a predictable manner in response to environmental regulations. This may be the results of the complexity of sedimentary processes at this site.

  8. Many-core applications to online track reconstruction in HEP experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Amerio, S.; Bastieri, D.; Corvo, M.; Gianelle, A.; Ketchum, W.; Liu, T.; Lonardo, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Poprocki, S.; Rivera, R.; Tosoratto, L.; Vicini, P.; Wittich, P.

    2013-11-02

    Interest in parallel architectures applied to real time selections is growing in High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments. In this paper we describe performance measurements of Graphic Processing Units (GPUs) and Intel Many Integrated Core architecture (MIC) when applied to a typical HEP online task: the selection of events based on the trajectories of charged particles. We use as benchmark a scaled-up version of the algorithm used at CDF experiment at Tevatron for online track reconstruction – the SVT algorithm – as a realistic test-case for low-latency trigger systems using new computing architectures for LHC experiment. We examine the complexity/performance trade-off in porting existing serial algorithms to many-core devices. Measurements of both data processing and data transfer latency are shown, considering different I/O strategies to/from the parallel devices.

  9. Analysis and experiment of eddy current loss in Homopolar magnetic bearings with laminated rotor cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinji, Sun; Dong, Chen

    2013-08-01

    This paper analyses the eddy current loss in Homopolar magnetic bearings with laminated rotor cores produced by the high speed rotation in order to reduce the power loss for the aerospace applications. The analytical model of rotational power loss is proposed in Homopolar magnetic bearings with laminated rotor cores considering the magnetic circuit difference between Homopolar and Heteropolar magnetic bearings. Therefore, the eddy current power loss can be calculated accurately using the analytical model by magnetic field solutions according to the distribution of magnetic fields around the pole surface and boundary conditions at the surface of the rotor cores. The measurement method of rotational power loss in Homopolar magnetic bearing is proposed, and the results of the theoretical analysis are verified by experiments in the prototype MSCMG. The experimental results show the correctness of calculation results.

  10. Characterization of natural fractures in Mesaverde core from the multiwell experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, S.J.; Lorenz, J.C.

    1988-09-01

    Natural fractures dominate the permeability of tight sandstone reservoirs in the Mesaverde Formation of the Piceance Creek Basin, north-western Colorado. Roughly 1900 natural fractures, detected in 4200 ft of Mesaverde core from the US Department of Energy's Multiwell Experiment (MWX), have been differentiated into 10 different fracture types on the basis of fracture morphology, inclination, the presence of slickensides, the presence of dickite mineralization and/or host lithology. Approximately 75% of the MWX core fractures are dewatering planes in mudstone and are probably unimportant to reservoir permeability. The remaining 25% of the MWX core fractures include 275 mostly calcite-mineralized, vertical extension fractures, 61 irregular, dickite-mineralized extension fractures, 27 mostly calcite-mineralized, horizontal extension fractures, and 90 slickensided, occasionally mineralized shear fractures. These extension and shear fractures are all potentially important to reservoir permeability and consequently productivity. 13 refs., 61 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Core radius and density measurements in N-body experiments Connections with theoretical and observational definitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casertano, S.; Hut, P.

    1985-11-01

    Observers, numerical experimenters, and theorists use a misleadingly similar language when describing star clusters, although the operational definitions of quantities such as core radius and central density differ considerably. These differences are investigated, and a class of coordinate-independent, scale-free measurements for local and global quantities, particularly suited to small N-body systems, are introduced. It is shown, by means of analytical estimates and Monte Carlo experiments, that the quantities measured are closely related to independently defined global parameters, such as the core radius and the core density. Similarities and differences between these and the definitions for corresponding quantities which are used for observations and for theoretical models, considering finite-number effects as well as those systematic discrepancies which persist in the continuum limit, are discussed. This discussion applies both to star clusters and to clusters of galaxies.

  12. A sulfur-poor terrestrial core inferred from metal-silicate partitioning experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suer, Terry-Ann; Siebert, Julien; Remusat, Laurent; Menguy, Nicolas; Fiquet, Guillaume

    2017-07-01

    As a siderophile and a volatile element, sulfur's partitioning behavior allows constraints to be placed on processes in the primitive Earth. Sulfur's core-mantle distribution during Earth's accretion has consequences for core content and implications for volatile accretion. In this study, metal-silicate partitioning experiments of sulfur were conducted in a diamond anvil cell at pressures from 46 to 91 GPa and temperatures between 3100 and 4100 K, conditions that are directly relevant to core segregation in a deep magma ocean. The sulfur partition coefficients measured from these experiments are an order of magnitude less than those obtained from extrapolation of previous results to core formation conditions (e.g., Rose-Weston et al., 2009; Boujibar et al., 2014). These measurements challenge the idea that sulfur becomes a highly siderophile element at high pressures and temperatures. A relationship was derived that describes sulfur's partitioning behavior at the pressure-temperature range of core formation. This relationship combined with an accretion model was used to explore the effects of varying impactor sizes and volatile compositions on the sulfur contents of the Earth's core and mantle. The results show that homogeneous delivery of sulfur throughout accretion would overenrich the mantle in sulfur relative to the present day observations of 200 ± 80 ppm (Lorand et al., 2013) unless the bulk Earth sulfur content is lower than its cosmochemical estimate of ∼6400 ppm (e.g., McDonough, 2003). On the other hand, the mantle's sulfur content is matched if sulfur is delivered with large bodies (3 to 10% Earth mass) during the last 20% of Earth's accretion, combined with a chondritic late veneer of 0.5% Earth mass. These results are conditional on the lowered equilibration efficiency of large impactor cores in a terrestrial magma ocean. In each accretion scenario, the core sulfur content remains below ∼2 wt.% in close agreement with cosmochemical estimates and

  13. Plutonium, cesium and uranium series radionuclides in the Hudson River estuary and other environments. Annual technical progress report, December 1, 1979-November 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, H. J.; Trier, R. M.; Olsen, C. R.

    1980-01-01

    Radionuclide activities were measured in a large number of sediment cores and suspended particle samples throughout the salinity range of the Hudson River estuary. Activities of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 134/Cs and /sup 60/Co determined by gamma spectrometry and /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu and /sup 238/Pu determined by alpha spectrometry indicate reasonably rapid accumulation rates in the sediments of marginal cove areas, and very rapid deposition in the harbor region adjacent to New York City, resulting in /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu accumulations there more than an order of magnitude greater than the fallout delivery rate. Measurable amounts of reactor-derived /sup 134/Cs and /sup 60/Co are found in nearly al sediment samples containing appreciable /sup 137/Cs between 15 km upstream of Indian Point and the downstream extent of our sampling about 70 km south of the reactor. Fallout /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu reaching the Hudson appears to be almost completely retained within the systems by particle deposition, while 70 to 90% of the /sup 137/Cs derived from both reactor releases and fallout has been exported to the coastal waters in solution. Activity levels of /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu in New York harbor sediments indicate a significant source in addition to suspended particles carried down the Hudson. The most likely cause appears to be transport into the estuary of particles from offshore waters having higher specific activities of /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu. Measurements of fallout /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu in a saline lake with a high carbonate ion concentration yielded water column activities about two orders of magnitude greater than has been found for fallout plutonium in other continental waters, indicating extensive mobility in some natural water environments. Experiments using lake water suggest that carbonate ion may indeed be a critical factor in regulating plutonium solubility and that low molecular weight complexes are primarily responsible for enhanced plutonium solubility.

  14. Effectiveness of a Core-Competency-based Program on Residents' Learning and Experience.

    PubMed

    Charles, Lesley; Triscott, Jean; Dobbs, Bonnie; Tian, Peter George; Babenko, Oksana

    2016-06-01

    The Care of the Elderly (COE) Diploma Program is a six-to-twelve-month enhanced skills program taken after two years of core residency training in Family Medicine. In 2010, we developed and implemented a core-competency-based COE Diploma program (CC), in lieu of one based on learning objectives (LO). This study assessed the effectiveness of the core-competency-based program on residents' learning and their training experience as compared to residents trained using learning objectives. The data from the 2007-2013 COE residents were used in the study, with nine and eight residents trained in the LO and CC programs, respectively. Residents' learning was measured using preceptors' evaluations of residents' skills/abilities throughout the program (118 evaluations in total). Residents' rating of training experience was measured using the Graduate's Questionnaire which residents completed after graduation. For residents' learning, overall, there was no significant difference between the two programs. However, when examined as a function of the four CanMEDS roles, there were significant increases in the CC residents' scores for two of the CanMEDS roles: Communicator/Collaborator/Manager and Scholar compared to residents in the LO program. With respect to residents' training experience, seven out of ten program components were rated by the CC residents higher than by the LO residents. The implementation of a COE CC program appears to facilitate resident learning and training experience.

  15. Alternating current dielectrophoresis of core-shell nanoparticles: Experiments and comparison with theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chungja

    Nanoparticles are fascinating where physical and optical properties are related to size. Highly controllable synthesis methods and nanoparticle assembly are essential for highly innovative technological applications. Well-defined shaped and sized nanoparticles enable comparisons between experiments, theory and subsequent new models to explain experimentally observed phenomena. Among nanoparticles, nonhomogeneous core-shell nanoparticles (CSnp) have new properties that arise when varying the relative dimensions of the core and the shell. This CSnp structure enables various optical resonances, and engineered energy barriers, in addition to the high charge to surface ratio. Assembly of homogeneous nanoparticles into functional structures has become ubiquitous in biosensors (i.e. optical labeling), nanocoatings, and electrical circuits. Limited nonhomogenous nanoparticle assembly has only been explored. Many conventional nanoparticle assembly methods exist, but this work explores dielectrophoresis (DEP) as a new method. DEP is particle polarization via non-uniform electric fields while suspended in conductive fluids. Most prior DEP efforts involve microscale particles. Prior work on core-shell nanoparticle assemblies and separately, nanoparticle characterizations with dielectrophoresis and electrorotation, did not systematically explore particle size, dielectric properties (permittivity and electrical conductivity), shell thickness, particle concentration, medium conductivity, and frequency. This work is the first, to the best of our knowledge, to systematically examine these dielectrophoretic properties for core-shell nanoparticles. Further, we conduct a parametric fitting to traditional core-shell models. These biocompatible core-shell nanoparticles were studied to fill a knowledge gap in the DEP field. Experimental results (chapter 5) first examine medium conductivity, size and shell material dependencies of dielectrophoretic behaviors of spherical CSnp into 2D and

  16. Plasma-wall interaction data needs critical to a Burning Core Experiment (BCX)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-11-01

    The Division of Development and Technology has sponsored a four day US-Japan workshop ''Plasma-Wall Interaction Data Needs Critical to a Burning Core Experiment (BCX)'', held at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California on June 24 to 27, 1985. The workshop, which brought together fifty scientists and engineers from the United States, Japan, Germany, and Canada, considered the plasma-material interaction and high heat flux (PMI/HHF) issues for the next generation of magnetic fusion energy devices, the Burning Core Experiment (BCX). Materials options were ranked, and a strategy for future PMI/HHF research was formulated. The foundation for international collaboration and coordination of this research was also established. This volume contains the last three of the five technical sessions. The first of the three is on plasma materials interaction issues, the second is on research facilities and the third is from smaller working group meetings on graphite, beryllium, advanced materials and future collaborations.

  17. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation: Experience with the CoreValve Device.

    PubMed

    Asgar, Anita W; Bonan, Raoul

    2012-01-01

    The field of transcatheter aortic valve implantation has been rapidly evolving. The Medtronic CoreValve first emerged on the landscape in 2004 with initial first human studies, and it is currently being studied in the Pivotal US trial. This article details the current experience with the self-expanding aortic valve with a focus on clinical results and ongoing challenges. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Capillary heterogeneity in sandstones rocks during CO2/water core-flooding experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pini, R.; Krevor, S. C. M.; Krause, M. H.; Benson, S. M.

    2012-04-01

    In the context of CO2 sequestration, deep geological formations are often referred to as capillary systems, due to the important role played by capillary pressure in controlling fluid distribution in their porous structure. For instance, relative permeability and residual trapping curves depend on the character of the capillary pressure curve: the former controls fluid displacement, while the latter describes the amount of CO2 that can be effectively immobilized in the pore space of the rock. Traditional techniques to measure capillary pressure curves on whole cores and with reservoir fluids are time consuming and as a result, the available experimental data set for the CO2/water system is rather scarce. In addition, simulation studies clearly show the importance of capillary heterogeneity at the sub-score scale on CO2 movement, but experimental techniques are needed for quantitative observation of these phenomena. A novel technique has been developed to measure capillary pressure curves both at the core and sub-core (mm) scale using CO2 and water at reservoir conditions. The method consists of carrying out 100% CO2 flooding experiments at increasingly higher flow rates on a core that is initially saturated with water and requires that the wetting-phase pressure is continuous across the outlet face of the sample. The technique is faster than traditional methods that use porous plates and it can be applied in conjunction with steady-state relative permeability measurements. Drainage capillary pressure curves of CO2 and water are measured for two sandstones rock cores with different lithology and grain sorting. Experiments are carried out at 25 and 50C and at 9 MPa pore pressure, while keeping the confining pressure on the core at 12 MPa. Measurements are in good agreement with results from the literature and data from mercury intrusion porosimetry; comparison with the latter allows for the estimation of the interfacial and wetting properties of the CO2/water system

  19. Optimal input experiment design and parameter estimation in core-scale pressure oscillation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potters, M. G.; Mansoori, M.; Bombois, X.; Jansen, J. D.; Van den Hof, P. M. J.

    2016-03-01

    This paper considers Pressure Oscillation (PO) experiments for which we find the minimum experiment time that guarantees user-imposed parameter variance upper bounds and honours actuator limits. The parameters permeability and porosity are estimated with a classical least-squares estimation method for which an expression of the covariance matrix of the estimates is calculated. This expression is used to tackle the optimization problem. We study the Dynamic Darcy Cell experiment set-up (Heller et al., 2002) and focus on data generation using square wave actuator signals, which, as we shall prove, deliver shorter experiment times than sinusoidal ones. Parameter identification is achieved using either inlet pressure/outlet pressure measurements (Heller et al., 2002) or actuator position/outlet pressure measurements, where the latter is a novel approach. The solution to the optimization problem reveals that for both measurement methods an optimal excitation frequency, an optimal inlet volume, and an optimal outlet volume exist. We find that under the same parameter variance bounds and actuator constraints, actuator position/outlet pressure measurements result in required experiment times that are a factor fourteen smaller compared to inlet pressure/outlet pressure measurements. This result is analysed in detail and we find that the dominant effect driving this difference originates from an identifiability problem when using inlet-outlet pressure measurements for joint estimation of permeability and porosity. We illustrate our results with numerical simulations, and show excellent agreement with theoretical expectations.

  20. Episodic specificity induction impacts activity in a core brain network during construction of imagined future experiences.

    PubMed

    Madore, Kevin P; Szpunar, Karl K; Addis, Donna Rose; Schacter, Daniel L

    2016-09-20

    Recent behavioral work suggests that an episodic specificity induction-brief training in recollecting the details of a past experience-enhances performance on subsequent tasks that rely on episodic retrieval, including imagining future experiences, solving open-ended problems, and thinking creatively. Despite these far-reaching behavioral effects, nothing is known about the neural processes impacted by an episodic specificity induction. Related neuroimaging work has linked episodic retrieval with a core network of brain regions that supports imagining future experiences. We tested the hypothesis that key structures in this network are influenced by the specificity induction. Participants received the specificity induction or one of two control inductions and then generated future events and semantic object comparisons during fMRI scanning. After receiving the specificity induction compared with the control, participants exhibited significantly more activity in several core network regions during the construction of imagined events over object comparisons, including the left anterior hippocampus, right inferior parietal lobule, right posterior cingulate cortex, and right ventral precuneus. Induction-related differences in the episodic detail of imagined events significantly modulated induction-related differences in the construction of imagined events in the left anterior hippocampus and right inferior parietal lobule. Resting-state functional connectivity analyses with hippocampal and inferior parietal lobule seed regions and the rest of the brain also revealed significantly stronger core network coupling following the specificity induction compared with the control. These findings provide evidence that an episodic specificity induction selectively targets episodic processes that are commonly linked to key core network regions, including the hippocampus.

  1. Compression After Impact on Honeycomb Core Sandwich Panels With Thin Facesheets. Part 1; Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuigg, Thomas D.; Kapania, Rakesh K.; Scotti, Stephen J.; Walker, Sandra P.

    2012-01-01

    A two part research study has been completed on the topic of compression after impact (CAI) of thin facesheet honeycomb core sandwich panels. The research has focused on both experiments and analysis in an effort to establish and validate a new understanding of the damage tolerance of these materials. Part one, the subject of the current paper, is focused on the experimental testing. Of interest are sandwich panels, with aerospace applications, which consist of very thin, woven S2-fiberglass (with MTM45-1 epoxy) facesheets adhered to a Nomex honeycomb core. Two sets of specimens, which were identical with the exception of the density of the honeycomb core, were tested. Static indentation and low velocity impact using a drop tower are used to study damage formation in these materials. A series of highly instrumented CAI tests was then completed. New techniques used to observe CAI response and failure include high speed video photography, as well as digital image correlation (DIC) for full-field deformation measurement. Two CAI failure modes, indentation propagation, and crack propagation, were observed. From the results, it can be concluded that the CAI failure mode of these panels depends solely on the honeycomb core density.

  2. Core density gradient fluctuation measurement by differential interferometry in the helically symmetric experiment stellaratora)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, C. B.; Brower, D. L.

    2012-10-01

    The interferometer system on the Helically Symmetric eXperiment (HSX) stellarator uses an expanded beam and linear detector array to realize a multichord measurement. Unlike conventional interferometry which determines the plasma phase shift with respect to a reference, directly evaluating the phase between two adjacent chords can be employed to measure the change in plasma phase with impact parameter. This approach provides a measure of the equilibrium density gradient or the density gradient fluctuations and is referred to as differential interferometry. For central chords, measurements are spatially localized due to a geometrical weighting factor and can provide information on core density gradient fluctuations. The measurement requires finite coherence between fluctuations in the two spatially offset chords. This technique is applied on the HSX stellarator to measure both broadband turbulence and coherent modes. Spatial localization is exploited to isolate core turbulence changes associated with change in magnetic configuration or heating location.

  3. Investigations on the Melt Gate Ablation by Ex-Vessel Core Melts in the KAPOOL Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Eppinger, Beatrix; Schmidt-Stiefel, Sike; Tromm, Walter

    2002-07-01

    In future Light Water Reactors (LWR) containment failure should be prevented even for very unlikely core meltdown sequences with reactor pressure vessel (RPV) failure. In the case of such a postulated core meltdown accident in a future LWR the ex-vessel melt shall be retained and cooled in a special compartment inside the containment to exclude significant radioactive release to the environment. In such a case, a gate has to be designed to allow the melt release from the reactor cavity into the compartment. A series of transient experiments has been performed to investigate the melt gate ablation using iron and alumina melts as a simulant for the corium melt. The results of the KAPOOL tests are analyzed with the HEATING5 code in order to evaluate realistic cases of internally heated corium melts and melt gates with the same theoretical tool. (authors)

  4. Episodic specificity induction impacts activity in a core brain network during construction of imagined future experiences

    PubMed Central

    Madore, Kevin P.; Szpunar, Karl K.; Addis, Donna Rose; Schacter, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    Recent behavioral work suggests that an episodic specificity induction—brief training in recollecting the details of a past experience—enhances performance on subsequent tasks that rely on episodic retrieval, including imagining future experiences, solving open-ended problems, and thinking creatively. Despite these far-reaching behavioral effects, nothing is known about the neural processes impacted by an episodic specificity induction. Related neuroimaging work has linked episodic retrieval with a core network of brain regions that supports imagining future experiences. We tested the hypothesis that key structures in this network are influenced by the specificity induction. Participants received the specificity induction or one of two control inductions and then generated future events and semantic object comparisons during fMRI scanning. After receiving the specificity induction compared with the control, participants exhibited significantly more activity in several core network regions during the construction of imagined events over object comparisons, including the left anterior hippocampus, right inferior parietal lobule, right posterior cingulate cortex, and right ventral precuneus. Induction-related differences in the episodic detail of imagined events significantly modulated induction-related differences in the construction of imagined events in the left anterior hippocampus and right inferior parietal lobule. Resting-state functional connectivity analyses with hippocampal and inferior parietal lobule seed regions and the rest of the brain also revealed significantly stronger core network coupling following the specificity induction compared with the control. These findings provide evidence that an episodic specificity induction selectively targets episodic processes that are commonly linked to key core network regions, including the hippocampus. PMID:27601666

  5. Development of Yangbajing air shower core detector for a new EAS hybrid experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jin-Sheng; Huang, Jing; Chen, Ding; Zhang, Ying; Zhai, Liu-Ming; Chen, Xu; Hu, Xiao-Bin; Lin, Yu-Hui; Zhang, Xue-Yao; Feng, Cun-Feng; Jia, Huan-Yu; Zhou, Xun-Xiu; Danzengluobu; Chen, Tian-Lu; Li, Hai-Jin; Liu, Mao-Yuan; Yuan, Ai-Fang

    2015-08-01

    Aiming at the observation of cosmic-ray chemical composition in the “knee” energy region, we have been developing a new type of air-shower core detector (YAC, Yangbajing Air shower Core detector array) to be set up at Yangbajing (90.522° E, 30.102° N, 4300 m above sea level, atmospheric depth: 606 g/m2) in Tibet, China. YAC works together with the Tibet air-shower array (Tibet-III) and an underground water Cherenkov muon detector array (MD) as a hybrid experiment. Each YAC detector unit consists of lead plates of 3.5 cm thickness and a scintillation counter which detects the burst size induced by high energy particles in the air-shower cores. The burst size can be measured from 1 MIP (Minimum Ionization Particle) to 106 MIPs. The first phase of this experiment, named “YAC- I”, consists of 16 YAC detectors each with a size of 40 cm×50 cm and distributed in a grid with an effective area of 10 m2. YAC- I is used to check hadronic interaction models. The second phase of the experiment, called “YAC- II”, consists of 124 YAC detectors with coverage of about 500 m2. The inner 100 detectors of 80 cm×50 cm each are deployed in a 10×10 matrix with a 1.9 m separation; the outer 24 detectors of 100 cm×50 cm each are distributed around these to reject non-core events whose shower cores are far from the YAC- II array. YAC- II is used to study the primary cosmic-ray composition, in particular, to obtain the energy spectra of protons, helium and iron nuclei between 5×1013 eV and 1016 eV, covering the “knee” and also connected with direct observations at energies around 100 TeV. We present the design and performance of YAC- II in this paper. Supported by grants from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (11078002, 11275212, 11165013), the Chinese Academy of Sciences (H9291450S3, Y4293211S5) and the Knowledge Innovation Fund of Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP), China (H95451D0U2, H8515530U1)

  6. Uranium solubility in terrestrial planetary cores: Evidence from high pressure and temperature experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Xuezhao

    Uranium (U) and thorium (Th) are the most important heat producing elements in the Earth and therefore, understanding their migration and distribution within a planet is very important to understand planetary dynamics and evolution. High pressure (P) and temperature (T) experimental data on U and Th behavior related to the deep Earth and planetary interiors is still scarce. This study has concentrated on the solubility of U in liquid Fe, Fe-10wt% S and Fe-35wt% S by compressing and heating a mixture of peridotite, uraninite and pure Fe, Fe-10wt% S or Fe-35wt% S at pressures of 0-15 GPa and temperatures of 1500--2500°C. The experimental results show that U solubility (DU = U in metal phase/U in silicate) increases with increasing P and T, and for molten silicate, DU is 3-5 times higher than that of solid silicate. In addition, a positive correlation between S and DU has been found. At the same time, Si enters the metal phase in all three groups of metal run products. However, a positive correlation between Si concentration in the metal phase and pressure was only found in the pure Fe group. For the molten silicate experiments, the largest D U value achieved is 0.09 at 8 GPa in pure Fe and 0.135 at 7 GPa in Fe-10wt% S group. For the solid silicate experiments, the largest DU value achieved is 0.036 at 14.5 GPa in pure Fe, 0.04 at 7 GPa in Fe-10wt% S and 0.075 at 7 GPa in Fe-35wt% S. Although the cores of Mercury and Venus may contain no S, However, the trend of DU value increasing with increasing P and T in pure Fe indicates that significant U may have entered their cores. For Earth, based on the model of CI chondritic meteorite building material, and if its core formed from a 700-800 km thick magma ocean (P ˜26 GPa at its base), then 2.4 ppb U may have entered its core if it contains no S, and 10.4 ppb U if its core contains 10wt% S. Alternatively, if Earth's core have formed by percolation, then 1 -- 4.2 ppb U may have entered its core if it core contains no S

  7. A core curriculum for international health: evaluating ten years' experience at the University of Arizona.

    PubMed

    Pust, R E; Moher, S P

    1992-02-01

    215 graduates (118 women and 97 men) of the University of Arizona's International Health Core Curriculum received a questionnaire after completion of their clinical practice in order to evaluate the experience of 10 years from 1982-91. The curriculum consisted of a 3- week orientation course given to 4th year medical students with core contents of population, nutrition, and infectious diseases followed up by student evaluation upon completion. 192 students were eligible for the survey of whom 154 completed it yielding an 80% response rate: 139 future physicians and 15 nurses, health educators, and nutritionists. 113 of 154 respondents completed an international health field experience after the course in 43 developing countries: 22% in Africa, 39% in Asia-Pacific, and 39% in Latin American-Caribbean. 79% were in rural and 34% in urban areas. A public health-community medicine program was incorporated in the clinical work at most sites. 95% of them participated in clinical care, 73% in community teaching, and 51% in research and evaluation. The duration of this field experience lasted 6-12 months for 69% of them. The median responses regarding the possibility of postcourse international field work and rating the worth of the course for clinical care, teaching others, and research were well or very well. They also rated the preparation of the course for subsequent work at 43 specific sites as good and dealing with limited resources and cross-culture communication as very good. All were willing to recommend the course to their peers.

  8. The GUINEVERE experiment: First PNS measurements in a lead moderated sub-critical fast core

    SciTech Connect

    Thyebault, H. E.; Billebaud, A.; Chabod, S.; Lecolley, F. R.; Lecouey, J. L.; Lehaut, G.; Marie, N.; Ban, G.

    2012-07-01

    The GUINEVERE (Generation of Uninterrupted Intense Neutrons at the lead Venus Reactor) experimental program is dedicated to the study of Accelerator Driven System reactivity monitoring. It was partly carried out within the EUROTRANS integrated project (EURATOM FP6). GUINEVERE consists in coupling the fast core of the VENUS-F reactor (SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium)), composed of enriched uranium and solid lead, with a T(d,n) neutron source provided by the GENEPI-3C deuteron accelerator. This neutron source can be operated in several modes: pulsed mode, continuous mode and also continuous mode with short beam interruptions (the so called 'beam trips'). In the past, the key questions of the reactivity control and monitoring in a subcritical system were studied in the MUSE experiments (1998-2004). These experiments highlighted the difficulty to determine precisely the reactivity with a single technique. This led to investigate a new strategy which is based on the combination of the relative reactivity monitoring via the core power to beam current relationship with absolute reactivity cross-checks during programmed beam interruptions. Consequently, to determine the reactivity, several dynamical techniques of reactivity determination have to be compared. In addition, their accuracy for absolute reactivity determination must be evaluated using a reference reactivity determination technique (from a critical state: rod drop and MSM measurements). The first sub-critical configuration which was studied was around k{sub eff} = 0.96 (SCI). Pulsed Neutron Source experiments (PNS) were carried out. The neutron population decrease was measured using fission chambers in different locations inside the core and the reflector. Neutron population time decrease was analyzed using fitting techniques and the Area Method Results obtained for the SCI reactivity will be shown, discussed and compared to the reference value given by the MSM method. (authors)

  9. Compression After Impact Experiments and Analysis on Honeycomb Core Sandwich Panels with Thin Facesheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuigg, Thomas D.

    2011-01-01

    A better understanding of the effect of impact damage on composite structures is necessary to give the engineer an ability to design safe, efficient structures. Current composite structures suffer severe strength reduction under compressive loading conditions, due to even light damage, such as from low velocity impact. A review is undertaken to access the current state-of-development in the areas of experimental testing, and analysis methods. A set of experiments on honeycomb core sandwich panels, with thin woven fiberglass cloth facesheets, is described, which includes detailed instrumentation and unique observation techniques.

  10. Core-centering of compound drops in capillary oscillations: Observations on USML-1 experiments in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G.; Anikumar, A. V.; Lee, C. P.; Lin, K. C.

    1994-01-01

    AA Using the existing inviscid theories, an attempt is made to explain the centering of the oscillating liquid shell. Experiments on liquid shells and liquid-core compound drops were conducted using acoustic levitation, in a low-gravity environment during a Space Shuttle flight. It was observed that their inner and outer interfaces became concentric when excited into capillary oscillations. Using the existing inviscid theories, and attempt is made to explain the centering of the oscillating liquid shell. It is concluded that viscosity needs to be considered in order to provide a realistic description of the centering process.

  11. Earth's core-mantle boundary - Results of experiments at high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knittle, Elise; Jeanloz, Raymond

    1991-01-01

    Laboratory experiments document that liquid iron reacts chemically with silicates at high pressures (above 2.4 x 10 to the 10th Pa) and temperatures. In particular, (Mg,Fe)SiO3 perovskite, the most abundant mineral of earth's lower mantle, is expected to react with liquid iron to produce metallic alloys (FeO and FeSi) and nonmetallic silicates (SiO2 stishovite and MgSiO3 perovskite) at the pressures of the core-mantle boundary, 14 x 10 to the 10th Pa. The experimental observations, in conjunction with seismological data, suggest that the lowermost 200 to 300 km of earth's mantle, the D-double-prime layer, may be an extremely heterogeneous region as a result of chemical reactions between the silicate mantle and the liquid iron alloy of earth's core. The combined thermal-chemical-electrical boundary layer resulting from such reactions offers a plausible explanation for the complex behavior of seismic waves near the core-mantle boundary and could influence earth's magnetic field observed at the surface.

  12. EXPERIENCE WITH FPGA-BASED PROCESSOR CORE AS FRONT-END COMPUTER.

    SciTech Connect

    HOFF, L.T.

    2005-10-10

    The RHIC control system architecture follows the familiar ''standard model''. LINUX workstations are used as operator consoles. Front-end computers are distributed around the accelerator, close to equipment being controlled or monitored. These computers are generally based on VMEbus CPU modules running the VxWorks operating system. I/O is typically performed via the VMEbus, or via PMC daughter cards (via an internal PCI bus), or via on-board I/O interfaces (Ethernet or serial). Advances in FPGA size and sophistication now permit running virtual processor ''cores'' within the FPGA logic, including ''cores'' with advanced features such as memory management. Such systems offer certain advantages over traditional VMEbus Front-end computers. Advantages include tighter coupling with FPGA logic, and therefore higher I/O bandwidth, and flexibility in packaging, possibly resulting in a lower noise environment and/or lower cost. This paper presents the experience acquired while porting the RHIC control system to a PowerPC 405 core within a Xilinx FPGA for use in low-level RF control.

  13. A soil flowing characteristics monitoring method in planetary drilling and coring verification experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Junyue; Quan, Qiquan; Jiang, Shengyuan; Chen, Chongbin; Yuan, Fengpei; Deng, Zongquan

    2017-03-01

    Some type of piercing into the subsurface formation is required in future planetary explorations to enhance the understanding of early stars' geological evolution and the origin of life. Compared with other technical methods, drilling & coring, only utilizing the compound locomotion of rotation and penetration, can sample the subsurface soil relatively efficient and convenient. However, given the uncertain mechanical properties of planetary soil, drilling state signals should be monitored online to improve the robustness of drilling system and avoid potential drilling faults. Since the flowing characteristics of interacted soil, such as removal volume, coring height, removal velocity and accumulation angle, directly reveal the drilling conditions, they are enhancing resources to comprehend the sampling phenomenon and can be used to help control the drill tool. This paper proposed a novel soil flowing characteristics (SFC) monitoring method by applying an industrial camera to record the flowing characteristics of removed cuttings and by utilizing an ultrasonic sensor into the hollow auger to monitor the sampled core. Experiments in one typical lunar regolith simulant indicate that the monitored SFC accurately reflects the interaction between the drill tool and soil.

  14. Earth's core-mantle boundary - Results of experiments at high pressures and temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knittle, Elise; Jeanloz, Raymond

    1991-01-01

    Laboratory experiments document that liquid iron reacts chemically with silicates at high pressures (above 2.4 x 10 to the 10th Pa) and temperatures. In particular, (Mg,Fe)SiO3 perovskite, the most abundant mineral of earth's lower mantle, is expected to react with liquid iron to produce metallic alloys (FeO and FeSi) and nonmetallic silicates (SiO2 stishovite and MgSiO3 perovskite) at the pressures of the core-mantle boundary, 14 x 10 to the 10th Pa. The experimental observations, in conjunction with seismological data, suggest that the lowermost 200 to 300 km of earth's mantle, the D-double-prime layer, may be an extremely heterogeneous region as a result of chemical reactions between the silicate mantle and the liquid iron alloy of earth's core. The combined thermal-chemical-electrical boundary layer resulting from such reactions offers a plausible explanation for the complex behavior of seismic waves near the core-mantle boundary and could influence earth's magnetic field observed at the surface.

  15. Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary: Results of Experiments at High Pressures and Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Knittle, E; Jeanloz, R

    1991-03-22

    Laboratory experiments document that liquid iron reacts chemically with silicates at high pressures (>/=2.4 x 10(10) Pascals) and temperatures. In particular, (Mg,Fe)SiO(3) perovskite, the most abundant mineral of Earth's lower mantle, is expected to react with liquid iron to produce metallic alloys (FeO and FeSi) and nonmetallic silicates (SiO(2) stishovite and MgSiO(3) perovskite) at the pressures of the core-mantle boundary, 14 x 10(10) Pascals. The experimental observations, in conjunction with seismological data, suggest that the lowermost 200 to 300 kilometers of Earth's mantle, the D" layer, may be an extremely heterogeneous region as a result of chemical reactions between the silicate mantle and the liquid iron alloy of Earth's core. The combined thermal-chemical-electrical boundary layer resulting from such reactions offers a plausible explanation for the complex behavior of seismic waves near the core-mantle boundary and could influence Earth's magnetic field observed at the surface.

  16. Long-term reactive transport modelling of Berea and chalk core flood experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, A. V.; Godoy, J.; Tonietto, G.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon sequestration in geological structures establishes a long-term chemical system between the dissolved gas, fluids and rocks from the injection site. Thus, the time scale used to assess the progress of chemical reactions is normally between tens and hundreds of years. Geochemical modeling is used in a variety of fields, including environmental protection and remediation, the petroleum industry, and economic geology and it is one of the best alternatives to evaluate the reactions with geochemical data possible injection sites. In this work we used data presented in a recent article (SPE165500) in different scenarios injection with three scales 50, 100, 250 and 1000 years. The experimental data used were from core flood experiment Berea and chalk in a condition similar to those found in the reservoirs of the North Sea. (340 bar and 130 C). The approach used to the lack of appropriate kinetic parameter in reservoir conditions, was the use of experimental data collected in two different conditions (340 bar and 130 C) and (2 Bar at room temperature) after the rocky core. The numerical simulations carried out using the same conditions with two different geochemical softwares PHREEQC and TOUGHREACTS. The results provide a detailed understanding of the system resulting rock-fluid-CO2 in the medium and long term. However, the accuracy of the models is strongly dependent on the mineral primary and secondary cores found in rocks.

  17. Partitioning experiments in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell: volatile content in the Earth's core.

    PubMed

    Jephcoat, Andrew P; Bouhifd, M Ali; Porcelli, Don

    2008-11-28

    The present state of the Earth evolved from energetic events that were determined early in the history of the Solar System. A key process in reconciling this state and the observable mantle composition with models of the original formation relies on understanding the planetary processing that has taken place over the past 4.5Ga. Planetary size plays a key role and ultimately determines the pressure and temperature conditions at which the materials of the early solar nebular segregated. We summarize recent developments with the laser-heated diamond anvil cell that have made possible extension of the conventional pressure limit for partitioning experiments as well as the study of volatile trace elements. In particular, we discuss liquid-liquid, metal-silicate (M-Sil) partitioning results for several elements in a synthetic chondritic mixture, spanning a wide range of atomic number-helium to iodine. We examine the role of the core as a possible host of both siderophile and trace elements and the implications that early segregation processes at deep magma ocean conditions have for current mantle signatures, both compositional and isotopic. The results provide some of the first experimental evidence that the core is the obvious replacement for the long-sought, deep mantle reservoir. If so, they also indicate the need to understand the detailed nature and scale of core-mantle exchange processes, from atomic to macroscopic, throughout the age of the Earth to the present day.

  18. Sulfur-controlled iron isotope fractionation experiments of core formation in planetary bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahar, A.; Hillgren, V. J.; Horan, M. F.; Mesa-Garcia, J.; Kaufman, L. A.; Mock, T. D.

    2015-02-01

    A series of high pressure and temperature experiments were conducted to better constrain the Fe isotope fractionation during core-mantle differentiation in planetesimal and planetary bodies. Synthetic mixtures of oxides and metal having varying amounts of sulfur, approximating terrestrial and Martian compositions, were melted at 1-2 GPa and 1650 °C. Iron isotopic equilibrium between the resulting metal and glass run products was verified for all experiments using the three-isotope technique. Purified Fe from metal and glass was analyzed by multiple-collector ICP-MS in high resolution mode. Iron alloy and silicate glass show a well-resolved Δ57Femetal-silicate of +0.12 ± 0.04‰ in a sulfur-free system. Isotope fractionation increases with sulfur content to +0.43 ± 0.03‰ at 18 wt.% sulfur in the metal. These results cannot be easily interpreted within the context of known Fe isotope ratios in most natural samples of planetary and asteroidal mantles and therefore suggest more complex processes affected the Fe isotope fractionation therein. However, to reconcile Martian meteorite iron isotopic signatures with geophysical models using this new experimental data requires a smaller amount of sulfur in the Martian core than previous estimates, with an upper limit of ∼8 wt.%.

  19. Core turbulent transport in tokamak plasmas: bridging theory and experiment with QuaLiKiz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdelle, C.; Citrin, J.; Baiocchi, B.; Casati, A.; Cottier, P.; Garbet, X.; Imbeaux, F.; Contributors, JET

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear gyrokinetic codes allow for detailed understanding of tokamak core turbulent transport. However, their computational demand precludes their use for predictive profile modeling. An alternative approach is required to bridge the gap between theoretical understanding and prediction of experiments. A quasilinear gyrokinetic model, QuaLiKiz (Bourdelle et al 2007 Phys. Plasmas 14 112501), is demonstrated to be rapid enough to ease systematic interface with experiments. The derivation and approximation of this approach are reviewed. The quasilinear approximation is proven valid over a wide range of core plasma parameters. Examples of profile prediction using QuaLiKiz coupled to the CRONOS integrated modeling code (Artaud et al 2010 Nucl. Fusion 50 043001) are presented. QuaLiKiz is being coupled to other integrated modeling platforms such as ETS and JETTO. QuaLiKiz quasilinear gyrokinetic turbulent heat, particle and angular momentum fluxes are available to all users. It allows for extensive stand-alone interpretative analysis and for first principle based integrated predictive modeling.

  20. Ambulatory care training during core internal medicine residency training: the Canadian experience.

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, P J; Meagher, T W

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the status of ambulatory care training of core internal medicine residents in Canada. DESIGN: Mail survey. PARTICIPANTS: All 16 program directors of internal medicine residency training programs in Canada. OUTCOME MEASURES: The nature and amount of ambulatory care training experienced by residents, information about the faculty tutors, and the sources and types of patients seen by the residents. As well, the program directors were asked for their opinions on the ideal ambulatory care program and the kinds of teaching skills required of tutors. RESULTS: All of the directors responded. Fifteen stated that the ambulatory care program is mandatory, and the other stated that it is an elective. Block rotations are more common than continuity-of-care assignments. In 12 of the programs 10% or less of the overall training time is spent in ambulatory care. In 11 the faculty tutors comprise a mixture of generalists and subspecialists. The tutors simultaneously care for patients and teach residents in the ambulatory care setting in 14 of the schools. Most are paid through fee-for-service billing. The respondents felt that the ideal program should contain a mix of general and subspecialty ambulatory care training. There was no consensus on whether it should be a block or continuity-of-care experience, but the directors felt that consultation and communication skills should be emphasized regardless of which type of experience prevails. CONCLUSIONS: Although there is a widespread commitment to provide core internal medicine residents with experience in ambulatory care, there is little uniformity in how this is achieved in Canadian training programs. PMID:8324688

  1. Plutonium from global fallout recorded in an ice core from the Belukha glacier, Siberian Altai.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Susanne; Bajo, Sixto; Fifield, L Keith; Gäggeler, Heinz W; Papina, Tatyana; Santschi, Peter H; Schotterer, Ulrich; Schwikowski, Margit; Wacker, Lukas

    2004-12-15

    Ice cores from glaciers situated near anthropogenic sources of air pollution provide important archives of the emissions of species with short atmospheric lifetimes. Here we present the history of atmospheric Pu fallout reconstructed from an ice core from the Belukha glacier in the Siberian Altai. Fourteen ice core samples covering the time period 1941-1986 were selected for Pu analysis, chemically processed, and measured using accelerator mass spectrometry. The Pu concentration peaks in 1963, coinciding with the maximum of the nuclear weapons tests and in concordance with the 3H activity concentration peak. The shapes of the 239Pu and 3H profiles reflect two main periods of atmospheric nuclear test activity: premoratorium testing before 1958 and postmoratorium testing in 1961 and 1962. Premoratorium tests contribute about 45% of the integrated Pu inventory. The average 240Pu/239Pu isotopic ratio is 0.18 +/- 0.05, indicating that a large majority of the Pu in the Belukha glacier originates from global stratospheric fallout rather than from direct tropospheric input.

  2. Programming for 1.6 Millon cores: Early experiences with IBM's BG/Q SMP architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glosli, James

    2013-03-01

    With the stall in clock cycle improvements a decade ago, the drive for computational performance has continues along a path of increasing core counts on a processor. The multi-core evolution has been expressed in both a symmetric multi processor (SMP) architecture and cpu/GPU architecture. Debates rage in the high performance computing (HPC) community which architecture best serves HPC. In this talk I will not attempt to resolve that debate but perhaps fuel it. I will discuss the experience of exploiting Sequoia, a 98304 node IBM Blue Gene/Q SMP at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The advantages and challenges of leveraging the computational power BG/Q will be detailed through the discussion of two applications. The first application is a Molecular Dynamics code called ddcMD. This is a code developed over the last decade at LLNL and ported to BG/Q. The second application is a cardiac modeling code called Cardioid. This is a code that was recently designed and developed at LLNL to exploit the fine scale parallelism of BG/Q's SMP architecture. Through the lenses of these efforts I'll illustrate the need to rethink how we express and implement our computational approaches. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  3. Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment: design studies based on superconducting and hybrid toroidal field coils. Design overview

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, C.A.

    1984-10-01

    This document is a design overview that describes the scoping studies and preconceptual design effort performed in FY 1983 on the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) class of device. These studies focussed on devices with all-superconducting toroidal field (TF) coils and on devices with superconducting TF coils supplemented with copper TF coil inserts located in the bore of the TF coils in the shield region. Each class of device is designed to satisfy the mission of ignition and long pulse equilibrium burn. Typical design parameters are: major radius = 3.75 m, minor radius = 1.0 m, field on axis = 4.5 T, plasma current = 7.0 MA. These designs relay on lower hybrid (LHRH) current rampup and heating to ignition using ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF). A pumped limiter has been assumed for impurity control. The present document is a design overview; a more detailed design description is contained in a companion document.

  4. Flowing gas, non-nuclear experiments on the gas core reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunze, J. F.; Suckling, D. H.; Copper, C. G.

    1972-01-01

    Flow tests were conducted on models of the gas core (cavity) reactor. Variations in cavity wall and injection configurations were aimed at establishing flow patterns that give a maximum of the nuclear criticality eigenvalue. Correlation with the nuclear effect was made using multigroup diffusion theory normalized by previous benchmark critical experiments. Air was used to simulate the hydrogen propellant in the flow tests, and smoked air, argon, or freon to simulate the central nuclear fuel gas. All tests were run in the down-firing direction so that gravitational effects simulated the acceleration effect of a rocket. Results show that acceptable flow patterns with high volume fraction for the simulated nuclear fuel gas and high flow rate ratios of propellant to fuel can be obtained. Using a point injector for the fuel, good flow patterns are obtained by directing the outer gas at high velocity along the cavity wall, using louvered or oblique-angle-honeycomb injection schemes.

  5. Flowing gas, non-nuclear experiments on the gas core reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunze, J. F.; Cooper, C. G.; Macbeth, P. J.

    1973-01-01

    Variations in cavity wall and injection configurations of the gas core reactor were aimed at establishing flow patterns that give a maximum of the nuclear criticality eigenvalue. Correlation with the nuclear effect was made using multigroup diffusion theory normalized by previous benchmark critical experiments. Air was used to simulate the hydrogen propellant in the flow tests, and smoked air, argon, or Freon to simulate the central nuclear fuel gas. Tests were run both in the down-firing and upfiring directions. Results showed that acceptable flow patterns with volume fraction for the simulated nuclear fuel gas and high flow rate ratios of propellant to fuel can be obtained. Using a point injector for the fuel, good flow patterns are obtained by directing the outer gas at high velocity long the cavity wall, using louvered injection schemes. Recirculation patterns were needed to stabilize the heavy central gas when different gases are used.

  6. Parametric system studies of candidate TF coil system options for the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX)

    SciTech Connect

    Reiersen, W.T.; Flanagan, C.A.; Miller, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    System studies were performed to determine the sensitivity of hybrid and superconducting toroidal field (TF) coil system options to maximum field at the TF coil and to field enhancement due to resistive insert coils. The studies were performed using Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) design assumptions, guidelines, and criteria and involved iterative execution of the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC) systems code, magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equilibrium code, and EFFI (a code to evaluate magnetic field strength). The results indicate that for TFCX with no minimum wall loading specified, a design point chosen solely on the basis of cost would likely be in the low-field region of design space where the cost advantage of hybrids is least apparent. However, as the desired neutron wall loading increases, the hybrid option suggests an increasing cost advantage over the all-superconducting option; this cost advantage is countered by increased complexity in design - particularly in assembly and maintenance.

  7. Assessing the mineralogy and hydration of rocky cores of satellites: insights from experiments and thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynard, B.; Neri, A.; Sotin, C.

    2016-12-01

    Icy satellites and similar objects likely form from a mixture of hydrated rocky material, such as the CI chondrites, and various amounts of ices. Mass-balance estimates show that hydrous silicates such as serpentine, and brucite, the simple Mg-Fe hydroxide, dominate fully hydrated mineralogy. The inferred iron content of these minerals is, however, very dependent on assumptions of iron redox state, and whether it forms sulfides or segregates into a metal core. From the determination of the moment of inertia inferred from gravity measurements at Jupiter and Saturn by the Galileo and Cassini spacecraft, Ganymede and Europa would have a differentiated iron-rich core whereas Titan and Enceladus would not. Whatever the case, iron content is generally significantly higher than that of the terrestrial ultrabasic rocks used as analogs in modeling of hydrated satellite cores. Thus, we investigated the phase relations of iron-rich ultrabasic systems based on chondritic composition by combining thermodynamic modeling and preliminary high-pressure experiments. Our starting composition model is that of CI carbonaceous chondrites. Stable mineral assemblages are calculated with the PerpleX package (Connolly, 1990), assuming excess water, and various amounts of iron in the silicate phase through varying the amount of iron sulfide (troilite) or iron oxide (magnetite). Results show stable hydrated minerals are serpentine, chlorite, brucite, Na-phlogopite and in extreme cases, talc in the 1.5-5 GPa range relevant to bodies larger than about 1000 km in radius. Dehydration temperatures are extremely sensitive to the iron content, hence on the chosen amount of iron bearing phase (troilite or magnetite), and to a lower extent on average CI composition. An experimental approach was developed to simulate hydrous alteration of CI-like material. A mixture of synthetic silicates, troilite, and organic compounds, to which excess water is added, is used. Mineralogy and composition is checked

  8. Chemical Convention in the Lunar Core from Melting Experiments on the Ironsulfur System

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.; Liu, J.; Chen, B.; Li, Z.; Wang, Y.

    2012-03-26

    By reanalyzing Apollo lunar seismograms using array-processing methods, a recent study suggests that the Moon has a solid inner core and a fluid outer core, much like the Earth. The volume fraction of the lunar inner core is 38%, compared with 4% for the Earth. The pressure at the Moon's core-mantle boundary is 4.8 GPa, and that at the ICB is 5.2 GPa. The partially molten state of the lunar core provides constraints on the thermal and chemical states of the Moon: The temperature at the inner core boundary (ICB) corresponds to the liquidus of the outer core composition, and the mass fraction of the solid core allows us to infer the bulk composition of the core from an estimated thermal profile. Moreover, knowledge on the extent of core solidification can be used to evaluate the role of chemical convection in the origin of early lunar core dynamo. Sulfur is considered an antifreeze component in the lunar core. Here we investigate the melting behavior of the Fe-S system at the pressure conditions of the lunar core, using the multi-anvil apparatus and synchrotron and laboratory-based analytical methods. Our goal is to understand compositionally driven convection in the lunar core and assess its role in generating an internal magnetic field in the early history of the Moon.

  9. Experience of Delphi technique in the process of establishing consensus on core competencies.

    PubMed

    Raghav, Pankaja Ravi; Kumar, Dewesh; Bhardwaj, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    The Department of Community Medicine and Family Medicine (CMFM) has been started as a new model for imparting the components of family medicine and delivering health-care services at primary and secondary levels in all six newly established All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), but there is no competency-based curriculum for it. The paper aims to share the experience of Delphi method in the process of developing consensus on core competencies of the new model of CMFM in AIIMS for undergraduate medical students in India. The study adopted different approaches and methods, but Delphi was the most critical method used in this research. In Delphi, the experts were contacted by e-mail and their feedback on the same was analyzed. Two rounds of Delphi were conducted in which 150 participants were contacted in Delphi-I but only 46 responded. In Delphi-II, 26 participants responded whose responses were finally considered for analysis. Three of the core competencies namely clinician, primary-care physician, and professionalism were agreed by all the participants, and the least agreement was observed in the competencies of epidemiologist and medical teacher. The experts having more experience were less consistent as responses were changed from agree to disagree in more than 15% of participants and 6% changed from disagree to agree. Within the given constraints, the final list of competencies and skills for the discipline of CMFM compiled after the Delphi process will provide a useful insight into the development of competency-based curriculum of the subject.

  10. Implications for Core Formation of the Earth from High Pressure-Temperature Au Partitioning Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, L. R.; Sharp, T. G.; Hervig, R. L.

    2005-01-01

    Siderophile elements in the Earth.s mantle are depleted relative to chondrites. This is most pronounced for the highly siderophile elements (HSEs), which are approximately 400x lower than chondrites. Also remarkable is the relative chondritic abundances of the HSEs. This signature has been interpreted as representing their sequestration into an iron-rich core during the separation of metal from silicate liquids early in the Earth's history, followed by a late addition of chondritic material. Alternative efforts to explain this trace element signature have centered on element partitioning experiments at varying pressures, temperatures, and compositions (P-T-X). However, first results from experiments conducted at 1 bar did not match the observed mantle abundances, which motivated the model described above, a "late veneer" of chondritic material deposited on the earth and mixed into the upper mantle. Alternatively, the mantle trace element signature could be the result of equilibrium partitioning between metal and silicate in the deep mantle, under P-T-X conditions which are not yet completely identified. An earlier model determined that equilibrium between metal and silicate liquids could occur at a depth of approximately 700 km, 27(plus or minus 6) GPa and approximately 2000 (plus or minus 200) C, based on an extrapolation of partitioning data for a variety of moderately siderophile elements obtained at lower pressures and temperatures. Based on Ni-Co partitioning, the magma ocean may have been as deep as 1450 km. At present, only a small range of possible P-T-X trace element partitioning conditions has been explored, necessitating large extrapolations from experimental to mantle conditions for tests of equilibrium models. Our primary objective was to reduce or remove the additional uncertainty introduced by extrapolation by testing the equilibrium core formation hypothesis at P-T-X conditions appropriate to the mantle.

  11. Anatomy of a Metamorphic Core Complex: Preliminary Results of Ruby Mountains Seismic Experiment, Northeastern Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiltz, K. K.; Litherland, M.; Klemperer, S. L.

    2010-12-01

    The Ruby Mountains Seismic Experiment is a 50-station deployment of Earthscope’s Flexible Array installed in June 2010 to study the Ruby Mountain metamorphic core complex, northeastern Nevada. Competing theories of metamorphic core complexes stress the importance of either (1) low-angle detachment faulting and lateral crustal flow, likely leading to horizontal shearing and anisotropy, or (2) vertical diapirism creating dominantly vertical shearing and anisotropy. Our experiment aims to distinguish between these two hypotheses using densely spaced (5 to 10 km) broadband seismometers along two WNW-ESE transects across the Ruby Range and one NNE-SSW transect along the axis of the range. When data acquisition is complete we will image crustal structures and measure velocity and anisotropy with a range of receiver function, shear-wave splitting and surface-wave tomographic methods. In addition to the newly acquired data, existing data can also be used to build understanding of the region. Previous regional studies have interpreted shear-wave splitting in terms of single-layer anisotropy in the mantle, related to a complex flow structure, but previous controlled source studies have identified measurable crustal anisotropy. We therefore attempted to fit existing data to a two-layer model consisting of a weakly anisotropic crustal layer and a more dominant mantle layer. We used “SplitLab” to measure apparent splitting parameters from ELK (a USGS permanent station) and 3 Earthscope Transportable Array stations. There is a clear variation in the splitting parameters with back-azimuth, but existing data do not provide a stable inversion for a two-layer model. Our best forward-model solution is a crustal layer with a fast axis orientation of 357° and 0.3 second delay time and a mantle layer with a 282° fast axis and 1.3 s delay time. Though the direction of the fast axis is consistent with previously published regional results, the 1.3 s delay time is larger than

  12. Experiences modeling ocean circulation problems on a 30 node commodity cluster with 3840 GPU processor cores.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, C.

    2008-12-01

    Low cost graphic cards today use many, relatively simple, compute cores to deliver support for memory bandwidth of more than 100GB/s and theoretical floating point performance of more than 500 GFlop/s. Right now this performance is, however, only accessible to highly parallel algorithm implementations that, (i) can use a hundred or more, 32-bit floating point, concurrently executing cores, (ii) can work with graphics memory that resides on the graphics card side of the graphics bus and (iii) can be partially expressed in a language that can be compiled by a graphics programming tool. In this talk we describe our experiences implementing a complete, but relatively simple, time dependent shallow-water equations simulation targeting a cluster of 30 computers each hosting one graphics card. The implementation takes into account the considerations (i), (ii) and (iii) listed previously. We code our algorithm as a series of numerical kernels. Each kernel is designed to be executed by multiple threads of a single process. Kernels are passed memory blocks to compute over which can be persistent blocks of memory on a graphics card. Each kernel is individually implemented using the NVidia CUDA language but driven from a higher level supervisory code that is almost identical to a standard model driver. The supervisory code controls the overall simulation timestepping, but is written to minimize data transfer between main memory and graphics memory (a massive performance bottle-neck on current systems). Using the recipe outlined we can boost the performance of our cluster by nearly an order of magnitude, relative to the same algorithm executing only on the cluster CPU's. Achieving this performance boost requires that many threads are available to each graphics processor for execution within each numerical kernel and that the simulations working set of data can fit into the graphics card memory. As we describe, this puts interesting upper and lower bounds on the problem sizes

  13. Interpretation of experimental results from the CORA core melt progression experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hohorst, J.K.; Allison, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    Data obtained from the CORA bundle heatup and melting experiments, performed at Kernforschungszentrum, Karlsruhe, Germany, are being analyzed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The analysis is being performed as part of a systematic review of core melt progression experiments for the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission to (a) develop an improved understanding of important phenomena occurring during a severe accident, (b) to validate existing severe accident models, and (c) where necessary, develop improved models. An assessment of the variations in damage progression behavior because of variations in test parameters (a) bundle design and size, (b) system pressure, (c) slow cooling of the damaged bundles in argon versus rapid quenching in water, and (d) bundle inlet temperatures and flow rates is provided in the paper. The influence of uncertainties in important test conditions is also discussed. Specific results presented include (a) bundle temperature, (b) the onset and movement of the oxidation front within the bundle, (c) fuel rod ballooning and rod failure, and (d) melt relocation and associated material interactions between bundle components and structures. 12 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Burn Survivors' Experience of Core Outcomes during Return to Life: a Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Valizadeh, Leila; Lotfi, Mojgan; Salehi, Feridoon

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Burn is one of the main and common health problems that face the victims with significant challenges in their lives. The main purpose of caring and rehabilitating these people is returning them to their previous life situation. Thus, the present study was conducted with the purpose of determining the experience of burn survivors with regard to returning to life in order to be able to obtain new concepts of acceptable implications in the present cultural and religious context. Methods: The present study is a qualitative study that was conducted using qualitative content analysis and in-depth unstructured interviews with 15 burn survivors in 2012 and 2013 in Tabriz. Results: During the process of qualitative analysis, the content of the category "balance", as the core essence of the experience of participants, was extracted according to three sub-categories: a- the physical integration (physiological stability, saving the affected limb), b-connecting to the life stream (self-care, getting accustomed, normalization), and c- return to the existence (sense of inner satisfaction and excellence). Conclusion: The results of this study confirmed the physical, psychological and social scales introduced by other studies. Also proposed the concept "return to the existence", that can be measured by the emergence of a sense of inner satisfaction and excellence in the individual, as one of the key and determinant scales in returning the victims of burn to life. PMID:25717453

  15. Numerical analysis and experiment to identify origin of buckling in rapid cycling synchrotron core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Y.; Kageyama, T.; Akoshima, M.; Torizuka, S.; Tsukamoto, M.; Yamashita, S.; Yoshikawa, N.

    2013-11-01

    The accelerating cavities used in the rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) are loaded with magnetic alloy (MA) cores. Over lengthly periods of RCS operation, significant reductions in the impedance of the cavities resulting from the buckling of the cores were observed. A series of thermal structural simulations and compressive strength tests showed that the buckling can be attributed to the low-viscosity epoxy resin impregnation of the MA core that causes the stiffening of the originally flexible MA-ribbon-wound core. Our results showed that thermal stress can be effectively reduced upon using a core that is not epoxy-impregnated.

  16. Initial experience with a novel EUS-guided core biopsy needle (SharkCore): results of a large North American multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    DiMaio, Christopher J.; Kolb, Jennifer M.; Benias, Petros C.; Shah, Hiral; Shah, Shashin; Haluszka, Oleh; Maranki, Jennifer; Sharzehi, Kaveh; Lam, Eric; Gordon, Stuart R.; Hyder, Sarah M.; Kaimakliotis, Pavlos Z.; Allaparthi, Satya B.; Gress, Frank G.; Sethi, Amrita; Shah, Ashish R.; Nieto, Jose; Kaul, Vivek; Kothari, Shivangi; Kothari, Truptesh H.; Ho, Sammy; Izzy, Manhal J.; Sharma, Neil R.; Watson, Rabindra R.; Muthusamy, V. Raman; Pleskow, Douglas K.; Berzin, Tyler M.; Sawhney, Mandeep; Aljahdi, Emad; Ryou, Marvin; Wong, Clarence K.; Gupta, Parantap; Yang, Dennis; Gonzalez, Susana; Adler, Douglas G.

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: The ability to safely and effectively obtain sufficient tissue for pathologic evaluation by using endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guidance remains a challenge. Novel designs in EUS needles may provide for improved ability to obtain such core biopsies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic yield of core biopsy specimens obtained using a novel EUS needle specifically designed to obtain core biopsies. Patients and methods: Multicenter retrospective review of all EUS-guided fine-needle biopsies obtained using a novel biopsy needle (SharkCore FNB needle, Medtronic, Dublin, Ireland). Data regarding patient demographics, lesion type/location, technical parameters, and diagnostic yield was obtained. Results: A total of 250 lesions were biopsied in 226 patients (Median age 66 years; 113 (50 %) male). Median size of all lesions (mm): 26 (2 – 150). Overall, a cytologic diagnosis was rendered in 81 % specimens with a median number of 3 passes. When rapid onsite cytologic evaluation (ROSE) was used, cytologic diagnostic yield was 126/149 (85 %) with a median number of 3 passes; without ROSE, cytologic diagnostic yield was 31/45 (69 %, P = 0.03) with a median number of 3 passes. Overall, a pathologic diagnosis was rendered in 130/147 (88 %) specimens with a median number of 2 passes. Pathologic diagnostic yield for specific lesion types: pancreas 70/81 (86 %), subepithelial lesion 13/15 (87 %), lymph node 26/28 (93 %). Ten patients (10/226, 4 %) experienced adverse events: 4 acute pancreatitis, 5 pain, 1 fever/cholangitis. Conclusions: Initial experience with a novel EUS core biopsy needle demonstrates excellent pathologic diagnostic yield with a minimum number of passes. PMID:27652304

  17. Localized reactive flow in carbonate rocks: Core-flood experiments and network simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haoyue; Bernabé, Yves; Mok, Ulrich; Evans, Brian

    2016-11-01

    We conducted four core-flood experiments on samples of a micritic, reef limestone from Abu Dhabi under conditions of constant flow rate. The pore fluid was water in equilibrium with CO2, which, because of its lowered pH, is chemically reactive with the limestone. Flow rates were between 0.03 and 0.1 mL/min. The difference between up and downstream pore pressures dropped to final values ≪1 MPa over periods of 3-18 h. Scanning electron microscope and microtomography imaging of the starting material showed that the limestone is mostly calcite and lacks connected macroporosity and that the prevailing pores are few microns large. During each experiment, a wormhole formed by localized dissolution, an observation consistent with the decreases in pressure head between the up and downstream reservoirs. Moreover, we numerically modeled the changes in permeability during the experiments. We devised a network approach that separated the pore space into competing subnetworks of pipes. Thus, the problem was framed as a competition of flow of the reactive fluid among the adversary subnetworks. The precondition for localization within certain time is that the leading subnetwork rapidly becomes more transmissible than its competitors. This novel model successfully simulated features of the shape of the wormhole as it grew from few to about 100 µm, matched the pressure history patterns, and yielded the correct order of magnitude of the breakthrough time. Finally, we systematically studied the impact of changing the statistical parameters of the subnetworks. Larger mean radius and spatial correlation of the leading subnetwork led to faster localization.

  18. Comparative study on neutron data in integral experiments of MYRRHA mockup critical cores in the VENUS-F reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krása, Antonín; Kochetkov, Anatoly; Baeten, Peter; Vittiglio, Guido; Wagemans, Jan; Bécares, Vicente

    2017-09-01

    VENUS-F is a fast, zero-power reactor with 30% wt. metallic uranium fuel and solid lead as coolant simulator. It serves as a mockup of the MYRRHA reactor core. This paper describes integral experiments performed in two critical VENUS-F core configurations (with and without graphite reflector). Discrepancies between experiments and Monte Carlo calculations (MCNP5) of keff, fission rate spatial distribution and reactivity effects (lead void and fuel Doppler) depending on a nuclear data library used (JENDL-4.0, ENDF-B-VII.1, JEFF-3.1.2, 3.2, 3.3T2) are presented.

  19. AN INTEGRAL REACTOR PHYSICS EXPERIMENT TO INFER ACTINIDE CAPTURE CROSS-SECTIONS FROM THORIUM TO CALIFORNIUM WITH ACCELERATOR MASS SPECTROMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    G. Youinou; M. Salvatores; M. Paul; R. Pardo; G. Palmiotti; F. Kondev; G. Imel

    2010-04-01

    The principle of the proposed experiment is to irradiate very pure actinide samples in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at INL and, after a given time, determine the amount of the different transmutation products. The determination of the nuclide densities before and after neutron irradiation will allow inference of effective neutron capture cross-sections. This approach has been used in the past and the novelty of this experiment is that the atom densities of the different transmutation products will be determined using the Accelerator Mass Spectroscopy (AMS) technique at the ATLAS facility located at ANL. It is currently planned to irradiate the following isotopes: 232Th, 235U, 236U, 238U, 237Np, 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu, 242Pu, 241Am, 243Am and 248Cm.

  20. Vertical distribution of anthropogenic radionuclides in cores from contaminated floodplains of the Yenisey River.

    PubMed

    Standring, W J F; Brown, J E; Dowdall, M; Korobova, E M; Linnik, V G; Volosov, A G

    2009-12-01

    The Mining and Chemical Industrial Combine, Zheleznogorsk (MCIC, previously known as Krasnoyarsk-26) on the River Yenisey has contaminated the surrounding environment with anthropogenic radionuclides as a result of discharges of radioactive wastes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the vertical distribution of anthropogenic contamination ((137)Cs and plutonium) within floodplain areas at different distances from the discharge point. Sites were chosen that display different characteristics with respect to periodic inundation with river water. Cs-137 activity concentrations were in the range 23-3770 Bq/kg (dry weight, d.w.); Pu-239,240 activity concentrations were in the range <0.01-14.2 Bq/kg (d.w.). Numerous sample cores exhibited sub-surface maxima which may be related to the historical discharges from the MCIC. Possible evidence indicating the deposition of earlier discharges at MCIC in deeper core layers was observed in the (238)Pu:(239,240)Pu activity ratio data: a Pu signal discernible from global fallout could be observed in numerous samples. Cs-137 and Pu-239,240 activity concentrations were correlated with the silt fraction (% by mass <63 microm) though no significant correlation was observed between (grain-size) normalised (137)Cs activity concentrations and distance downstream from the MCIC.

  1. Subsurface Organics in Aseptic Cores From the MARTE Robotic Drilling Experiment: Ground truth and Contamination Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaccorsi, R.; Stoker, C. R.

    2006-12-01

    The subsurface is the key environment for searching for life on planets lacking surface life. This includes the search for past/present life on Mars where possible subsurface life could exist [1]. The Mars-Analog-Rio-Tinto-Experiment (MARTE) performed a simulation of a Mars robotic drilling at the RT Borehole#7 Site ~6.07m, atop a massive-pyrite deposit from the Iberian Pyritic Belt. The RT site is considered an important analog of Sinus Meridiani on Mars, an ideal model analog for a subsurface Martian setting [2], and a relevant example of deep subsurface microbial community including aerobic and anaerobic chemoautotrophs [4-5]. Searching for microbes or bulk organics of biological origin in a subsurface sample from a planet is a key scientific objective of Robotic drilling missions. During the 2005 Field experiment 28 minicores were robotically handled and subsampled for life detection experiments under anti-contamination protocols. Ground truth included visual observation of cores and lab based Elemental and Isotope Ratios Mass Spectrometry analysis (EA-IRMS) of bulk organics in Hematite and Gohetite-rich gossanized tuffs, gossan and clay layers within 0-6m-depth. C-org and N-tot vary up to four orders of magnitude among the litter (~11Wt%, 0-1cm) and the mineralized (~3Wt%, 1-3cm) layers, and the first 6 m-depth (C-org=0.02-0.38Wt%). Overall, the distribution/ preservation of plant and soil-derived organics (d13C-org = 26 per mil to 24 per mil) is ten times higher (C-org=0.33Wt%) that in hematite-poor clays, or where rootlets are present, than in hematite- rich samples (C-org=<0.01Wt%). This is consistent with ATP assay (Lightning-MVP, Biocontrol) for total biomass in subsurface (Borehole#7 ~6.07m, ~avg. 153RLU) vs. surface soil samples (~1,500-81,449RLU) [5]. However, the in-situ ATP assay failed in detecting presence of roots during the in-situ life detection experiment. Furthermore, cm-sized roots were overlooked during remote observations. Finally, ATP

  2. Calculations of ADS with deep subcritical uranium active cores - comparison with experiments and predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhivkov, P.; Furman, W.; Stoyanov, Ch

    2014-09-01

    The main characteristics of the neutron field formed within the massive (512 kg) natural uranium target assembly (TA) QUINTA irradiated by deuteron beam of JINR Nuclotron with energies 1,2,4, and 8 GeV as well as the spatial distributions and the integral numbers of (n,f), (n,γ) and (n,xn)- reactions were calculated and compared with experimental data [1] . The MCNPX 27e code with ISABEL/ABLA/FLUKA and INCL4/ABLA models of intra-nuclear cascade (INC) and experimental cross-sections of the corresponding reactions were used. Special attention was paid to the elucidation of the role of charged particles (protons and pions) in the fission of natural uranium of TA QUINTA. Extensive calculations have been done for quasi-infinite (with very small neutron leakage) depleted uranium TA BURAN having mass about 20 t which are intended to be used in experiments at Nuclotron in 2014-2016. As in the case of TA QUINTA which really models the central zone of TA BURAN the total numbers of fissions, produced 239Pu nuclei and total neutron multiplicities are predicted to be proportional to proton or deuteron energy up to 12 GeV. But obtained values of beam power gain are practically constant in studied incident energy range and are approximately four. These values are in contradiction with the experimental result [2] obtained for the depleted uranium core weighting three tons at incident proton energy 0.66 GeV.

  3. Daptomycin for the treatment of enterococcal bacteraemia: results from the Cubicin Outcomes Registry and Experience (CORE).

    PubMed

    Mohr, John F; Friedrich, Lawrence V; Yankelev, Sara; Lamp, Kenneth C

    2009-06-01

    Enterococcal infections are a common cause of nosocomial bloodstream infections. Vancomycin resistance and the emergence of linezolid resistance necessitate alternative therapies. Studies in vitro as well as animal and case studies suggest that daptomycin may be effective in enterococcal infections. Patients with positive blood cultures for enterococci in the Cubicin((R)) Outcomes Registry and Experience (CORE) 2005-2006 were identified. Patients with endocarditis, intracardiac foreign body infections or non-speciated enterococci were excluded. Outcome was assessed using protocol-defined criteria. Of 159 patients included in the efficacy population, Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis were isolated in 120 (75.5%) and 39 (24.5%) patients, respectively. Vancomycin resistance was detected in 91% and 23% of patients with E. faecium and E. faecalis infections, respectively. Prior to daptomycin, 94/159 (59.1%) and 35/159 (22.0%) patients had received vancomycin and linezolid, respectively. Daptomycin was first-line therapy in 27/159 cases (17%). Success was observed in 139/159 patients (87%) and in 104/120 (87%) and 35/39 (90%) patients with E. faecium and E. faecalis infections, respectively. Among the safety population (n=211), 20 (9.5%) experienced 28 adverse events possibly related to daptomycin, 8 of which were considered serious. Daptomycin may be a useful agent for treating enterococcal bacteraemia caused by E. faecium or E. faecalis. Further studies are warranted.

  4. Phase I measurements for the HTGR bottom reflector and Core Support Block Neutron-Streaming Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Muckenthaler, F.J.; Holland, L.B.; Hull, J.L.; Manning, J.J.

    1984-07-01

    This report presents the Phase I measurements of the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Bottom Reflector and Core Support Neutron Streaming Experiment conducted at the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility during FY-1983. In this phase the first four of eight segments that comprise the full experimental mockup were utilized. These were: (1) an upper boron pin layer (graphite matrix) followed by a boral shroud; (2) a graphite reflector layer; (3) a graphite coolant crossover layer; and (4) a graphite follow-on layer, all containing coolant holes. A collimated beam from the Tower Shielding Reactor II was used as the neutron source. In order to obtain a spectrum of neutrons more nearly like the spectrum expected from the HTGR, an iron and graphite spectrum modifier was inserted in the TSR-II beam ahead of the experimental mockup. The various experimental configurations tested resulted from the successive addition of the four graphite layers to the mockup. Neutron energy spectra were measured behind the spectrum modifier and the boron pin layer and integral neutron fluxes were measured behind the spectrum modifier and behind each of the four layers. The measurements were divided into two Parts, the two parts differing in the composition of the boron pin layer. During part I, a reference pin pattern was used which consisted of a combination of graphite and boronated graphite pins. During part II, a full pattern of boronated graphite pins was used. The experimental data are presented in both tabular and graphical form.

  5. Spectroscopic properties of photosystem II core complexes from Thermosynechococcus elongatus revealed by single-molecule experiments.

    PubMed

    Brecht, Marc; Skandary, Sepideh; Hellmich, Julia; Glöckner, Carina; Konrad, Alexander; Hussels, Martin; Meixner, Alfred J; Zouni, Athina; Schlodder, Eberhard

    2014-06-01

    In this study we use a combination of absorption, fluorescence and low temperature single-molecule spectroscopy to elucidate the spectral properties, heterogeneities and dynamics of the chlorophyll a (Chla) molecules responsible for the fluorescence emission of photosystem II core complexes (PS II cc) from the cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus. At the ensemble level, the absorption and fluorescence spectra show a temperature dependence similar to plant PS II. We report emission spectra of single PS II cc for the first time; the spectra are dominated by zero-phonon lines (ZPLs) in the range between 680 and 705nm. The single-molecule experiments show unambiguously that different emitters and not only the lowest energy trap contribute to the low temperature emission spectrum. The average emission spectrum obtained from more than hundred single complexes shows three main contributions that are in good agreement with the reported bands F685, F689 and F695. The intensity of F695 is found to be lower than in conventional ensemble spectroscopy. The reason for the deviation might be due to the accumulation of triplet states on the red-most chlorophylls (e.g. Chl29 in CP47) or on carotenoids close to these long-wavelength traps by the high excitation power used in the single-molecule experiments. The red-most emitter will not contribute to the fluorescence spectrum as long as it is in the triplet state. In addition, quenching of fluorescence by the triplet state may lead to a decrease of long-wavelength emission.

  6. "Better to Be a Pessimist": A Narrative Inquiry into Mathematics Teachers' Experience of the Transition to the Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinie, Sherri L.; Kim, Jeong-Hee; Abernathy, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) are a focus of state education policy today influencing curriculum implementation and assessment in public schools. The purpose of this narrative inquiry is to understand how high school mathematics teachers experience the transition period. Based on interviews with mathematics teachers in a high school in…

  7. Transitioning to the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics: A Mixed Methods Study of Elementary Teachers' Experiences and Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swars, Susan Lee; Chestnutt, Cliff

    2016-01-01

    This mixed methods study explored elementary teachers' (n = 73) experiences with and perspectives on the recently implemented Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSS-Mathematics) at a high-needs, urban school. Analysis of the survey, questionnaire, and interview data reveals the findings cluster around: familiarity with and preparation…

  8. Embedding Hands-On Mini Laboratory Experiences in a Core Undergraduate Fluid Mechanics Course: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Duanduan; Ugaz, Victor

    2017-01-01

    Three self-contained mini-labs were integrated into a core undergraduate fluid mechanics course, with the goal of delivering hands-on content in a manner scalable to large class sizes. These mini-labs supported learning objectives involving friction loss in pipes, flow measurement, and centrifugal pump analysis. The hands-on experiments were…

  9. "Better to Be a Pessimist": A Narrative Inquiry into Mathematics Teachers' Experience of the Transition to the Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinie, Sherri L.; Kim, Jeong-Hee; Abernathy, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) are a focus of state education policy today influencing curriculum implementation and assessment in public schools. The purpose of this narrative inquiry is to understand how high school mathematics teachers experience the transition period. Based on interviews with mathematics teachers in a high school in…

  10. Transitioning to the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics: A Mixed Methods Study of Elementary Teachers' Experiences and Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swars, Susan Lee; Chestnutt, Cliff

    2016-01-01

    This mixed methods study explored elementary teachers' (n = 73) experiences with and perspectives on the recently implemented Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSS-Mathematics) at a high-needs, urban school. Analysis of the survey, questionnaire, and interview data reveals the findings cluster around: familiarity with and preparation…

  11. Reflections from an interprofessional education experience: evidence for the core competencies for interprofessional collaborative practice.

    PubMed

    Doll, Joy; Packard, Kathleen; Furze, Jennifer; Huggett, Kathryn; Jensen, Gail; Jorgensen, Diane; Wilken, Marlene; Chelal, Hardeep; Maio, Anna

    2013-03-01

    The Core Competencies for Collaborative Practice identify the skills needed by every health care provider to be successful in implementing interprofessional practice. Health professions students need to build skills for interprofessional practice as emerging professionals. Reflection is a core skill needed for successful interprofessional practices. This study identifies themes from an interprofessional education research project and discusses their congruency with the Competencies.

  12. The "Bain Linguistique": A Core French Experiment at Churchill Alternative School, 1993-94. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wesche, Marjorie; MacFarlane, Alina; Peters, Martine

    This report describes an experimental intensive core French program for grades 5 and 6 at Churchill Alternative School in Ottawa (Canada). The aim was to improve the oral French skills of core French students by providing a period of intensive exposure to French and by increasing the total number of hours in French during one program year from 120…

  13. The "Bain Linguistique": A Core French Experiment at Churchill Alternative School, 1993-94. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wesche, Marjorie; MacFarlane, Alina; Peters, Martine

    This report describes an experimental intensive core French program for grades 5 and 6 at Churchill Alternative School in Ottawa (Canada). The aim was to improve the oral French skills of core French students by providing a period of intensive exposure to French and by increasing the total number of hours in French during one program year from 120…

  14. Experiments on Lunar Core Composition: Phase Equilibrium Analysis of A Multi-Element (Fe-Ni-S-C) System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Go, B. M.; Righter, K.; Danielson, L.; Pando, K.

    2015-01-01

    Previous geochemical and geophysical experiments have proposed the presence of a small, metallic lunar core, but its composition is still being investigated. Knowledge of core composition can have a significant effect on understanding the thermal history of the Moon, the conditions surrounding the liquid-solid or liquid-liquid field, and siderophile element partitioning between mantle and core. However, experiments on complex bulk core compositions are very limited. One limitation comes from numerous studies that have only considered two or three element systems such as Fe-S or Fe-C, which do not supply a comprehensive understanding for complex systems such as Fe-Ni-S-Si-C. Recent geophysical data suggests the presence of up to 6% lighter elements. Reassessments of Apollo seismological analyses and samples have also shown the need to acquire more data for a broader range of pressures, temperatures, and compositions. This study considers a complex multi-element system (Fe-Ni-S-C) for a relevant pressure and temperature range to the Moon's core conditions.

  15. MANTRA: An Integral Reactor Physics Experiment to Infer Actinide Capture Cross-sections from Thorium to Californium with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    G. Youinou; C. McGrath; G. Imel; M. Paul; R. Pardo; F. Kondev; M. Salvatores; G. Palmiotti

    2011-08-01

    The principle of the proposed experiment is to irradiate very pure actinide samples in the Advanced Test Reactor at INL and, after a given time, determine the amount of the different transmutation products. The determination of the nuclide densities before and after neutron irradiation will allow inference of effective neutron capture cross-sections. This approach has been used in the past and the novelty of this experiment is that the atom densities of the different transmutation products will be determined using the Accelerator Mass Spectrometry technique at the ATLAS facility located at ANL. It is currently planned to irradiate the following isotopes: 232Th, 235U, 236U, 238U, 237Np, 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu, 242Pu, 241Am, 243Am, 244Cm and 248Cm.

  16. Core needle biopsy of thyroid nodules - evaluation of diagnostic utility and pain experience.

    PubMed

    Stangierski, Adam; Wolinski, Kosma; Martin, Karolina; Leitgeber, Olena; Ruchala, Marek

    2013-01-01

    A crucial problem in the non-operative diagnosis of thyroid nodules is the significant amount of non-diagnostic biopsies. This is a challenge for practicing endocrinologists especially when the results of the repeated biopsies remain non-diagnostic. The lack of a concrete preoperative diagnosis may result in unnecessary thyroidectomies in patients. Alternatively, it may also lead to the delayed diagnosis of cancer. One method of biopsy specimen acquisition that could potentially increase the diagnostic accuracy of thyroid biopsies is the application of core-needles. The aim of the study was to compare the diagnostic value and patient tolerability of core-needle aspiration biopsies (CNAB) with fine-needle aspiration biopsies (FNAB). The study included patients with thyroid nodular goiter in whom previous conventional FNAB yielded non-diagnostic results. CNABs were performed using 22G core-needles. The control group consisted of patients undergoing conventional FNAB with 25G fine-needles. Pain during core-needle biopsies of thyroid nodules was assessed using the 10-point visual analog scale. There were a total of 30 lesions in 26 patients undergoing CNAB (22 women, 4 men, mean age 48.3) and a total of 59 lesions in 40 patients undergoing FNAB (34 women, 6 men, mean age 57.3). 56.6% of CNABs and 50.8% of FNABs were diagnostic (p=0.60). When assessing pain via the visual analog scale, the median score for biopsies performed with core-needles was four. 60.0% of patients considered the pain of core-needle aspiration biopsies to be similar to the pain experienced during the previous conventional fine-needle aspiration biopsies, while 40% of patients claimed that the pain was more intense. CNAB did not prove to be superior to FNAB. Despite the larger needle gauge used during core-needle biopsies, the patients' tolerability was comparable to conventional fine-needle biopsies.

  17. Energy Deposition and Condition of the Metal Core in Exploding Wire Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkisov, G. S.; Rosenthal, S. E.; Struve, K. W.; McDaniel, D. H.; Waisman, E. M.; Sasorov, P. V.

    2002-11-01

    Measurements of the Joule energy deposition into exploding wire and its relation with condition of the expanding wire core are presented. Wires of nine different metals with diameters of 10-30 microns, have been exploded by fast 150A/ns and slow 20A/ns pulses, in vacuum and in air. It has been shown by interferometry and light emission that expanding wire core has different conditions. The substances with small atomization enthalpy (Ag, Al, Cu, Au) demonstrate full vaporization of the wire core. The refractory metals (Ti, Pt, Mo, W) demonstrates that core consists from vapor and small and hot microparticles. In this case we observe "firework effect" when large radiation from the wire exceed the energy deposition time in a three order of magnitude. For non-refractory metals radiation dropping fast in 100 ns time scale due to effective adiabatic cooling. It is possible if main part of the metal core was vaporized. The interferometrical investigation of the refraction coefficient of expanding metal core is proof this conclusion. It has been shown that energy deposition before surface breakdown dependent strongly from current rate, surface coatings, environment, wire diameter and radial electric field. The regime of wire explosion in vacuum without shunting plasma shell has been realized for fast exploding mode. In this case we observe anomaly high energy deposition in to the wire core exceeding regular value in almost 20 times. The experimental results for Al wire have been compared with ALEGRA 2D MHD simulations. *Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL8500.

  18. Qualification of CASMO5 / SIMULATE-3K against the SPERT-III E-core cold start-up experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Grandi, G.; Moberg, L.

    2012-07-01

    SIMULATE-3K is a three-dimensional kinetic code applicable to LWR Reactivity Initiated Accidents. S3K has been used to calculate several international recognized benchmarks. However, the feedback models in the benchmark exercises are different from the feedback models that SIMULATE-3K uses for LWR reactors. For this reason, it is worth comparing the SIMULATE-3K capabilities for Reactivity Initiated Accidents against kinetic experiments. The Special Power Excursion Reactor Test III was a pressurized-water, nuclear-research facility constructed to analyze the reactor kinetic behavior under initial conditions similar to those of commercial LWRs. The SPERT III E-core resembles a PWR in terms of fuel type, moderator, coolant flow rate, and system pressure. The initial test conditions (power, core flow, system pressure, core inlet temperature) are representative of cold start-up, hot start-up, hot standby, and hot full power. The qualification of S3K against the SPERT III E-core measurements is an ongoing work at Studsvik. In this paper, the results for the 30 cold start-up tests are presented. The results show good agreement with the experiments for the reactivity initiated accident main parameters: peak power, energy release and compensated reactivity. Predicted and measured peak powers differ at most by 13%. Measured and predicted reactivity compensations at the time of the peak power differ less than 0.01 $. Predicted and measured energy release differ at most by 13%. All differences are within the experimental uncertainty. (authors)

  19. FFTF (FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY) REACTOR CHARACTERIZATION PROGRAM ABSOLUTE FISSION RATE MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    FULLER JL; GILLIAM DM; GRUNDL JA; RAWLINS JA; DAUGHTRY JW

    1981-05-01

    Absolute fission rate measurements using modified National Bureau of Standards fission chambers were performed in the Fast Flux Test Facility at two core locations for isotopic deposits of {sup 232}Th, {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, and {sup 241}Pu. Monitor chamber results at a third location were analyzed to support other experiments involving passive dosimeter fission rate determinations.

  20. FFTF (Fast Flux Test Facility) Reactor Characterization Program: Absolute Fission-rate Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, J.L.; Gilliam, D.M.; Grundl, J.A.; Rawlins, J.A.; Daughtry, J.W.

    1981-05-01

    Absolute fission rate measurements using modified National Bureau of Standards fission chambers were performed in the Fast Flux Test Facility at two core locations for isotopic deposits of {sup 232}Th, {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, and {sup 241}Pu. Monitor chamber results at a third location were analyzed to support other experiments involving passive dosimeter fission rate determinations.

  1. CT-Guided Percutaneous Transthoracic Needle Biopsies Using 10G Large-Core Needles: Initial Experience.

    PubMed

    Lalji, Ulrich C; Wildberger, Joachim E; Zur Hausen, Axel; Bendek, Matyas; Dingemans, Anne-Marie C; Hochstenbag, Monique; Das, Marco

    2015-12-01

    Using large-core biopsy needles in CT-guided percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsies (PTNB) may be advantageous in terms of larger specimens, which facilitate more extensive histopathological, immunohistochemical, and molecular examination of tumor tissue. The aim of this study was to evaluate the success rate and safety in CT-guided PTNB using 10G large-core biopsy needles. 35 patients with intrathoracic lesions suspected of malignancy underwent CT-guided PTNB using dedicated large-core biopsy needles (10G Spirotome™, Medinvents, Hasselt, Belgium). Location, tumor size, number of pleural passes, number of biopsies, histologic result, and complications (pneumothorax, bleeding) were recorded. Lesion location varied from pleural to hilar location. Mean tumor size was 3.5 cm (range 0.7-9.2 cm). Only one pleural passage was necessary in all patients. Mean distance from the pleura to the lesion was 2.6 cm (max 9.2 cm). Large-core biopsy (10G) was successful in 88.6%. Pneumothorax was found in 40%. Minor intraparenchymal bleeding was present in 14 patients. No major complications were recorded. Large-core biopsy with 10G did not show higher complication rates compared to literature. It is technically feasible and safe. The obtained larger specimens may especially be helpful for the increasing demands of extensive molecular analysis for stratified patient care.

  2. REVIEWS OF TOPICAL PROBLEMS: Neutrinos from stellar core collapses: present status of experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryazhskaya, Ol'ga G.

    2006-10-01

    The responses of the existing underground detectors to neutrino bursts from collapsing stars evolving in accordance with various models are considered. The interpretation of the results of detecting neutrino radiation from the SN1987A supernova explosion is discussed. A combination of large scintillation counters interlayered with iron slabs (as a target for the electron neutrino interaction) is suggested as a detector for core collapse neutrinos. Bounds for the galactic rate of core collapses based on 28 years of observations by neutrino telescopes of RAS INR, LSD, and LVD detectors are presented.

  3. Are neutron stars with crystalline color-superconducting cores relevant for the LIGO experiment?

    PubMed

    Haskell, B; Andersson, N; Jones, D I; Samuelsson, L

    2007-12-07

    We estimate the maximal deformation that can be sustained by a rotating neutron star with a crystalline color-superconducting quark core. Our results suggest that current gravitational-wave data from the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory have already reached the level where a detection would have been possible over a wide range of the poorly constrained QCD parameters. This leads to the nontrivial conclusion that compact objects do not contain maximally strained color crystalline cores drawn from this range of parameter space. We discuss the uncertainties associated with our simple model and how it can be improved in the future.

  4. Long Term Thawing Experiments on Intact Cores of Arctic Mineral Cryosol: Implications for Greenhouse Gas Feedbacks from Global Warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onstott, T. C.; Stackhouse, B. T.; Lau, C. Y. M.; Whyte, L. G.; Pfiffner, S. M.; Vishnivetskaya, T. A.

    2015-12-01

    Mineral cryosols comprise >87% of Arctic tundra. Much attention has focused on high-organic carbon cryosols and how they will respond to global warming. The biogeochemical processes related to the greenhouse gas release from mineral cryosols, however, have not been fully explored. To this end, seventeen intact cores of active layer and underlying permafrost of mineral cryosol from Axel Heiberg Island, Nunavut, Canada, were subjected to 85 weeks of thawing at 4.5°C under various treatment regimes. The fluxes of CO2 and CH4 across the atmosphere-soil boundary and vertical profiles of the gas and water chemistry and the metagenomes were determined. The flux measurements were compared to those of microcosms and field measurements. The main conclusions were as follows: 1) CO2 emission rates from the intact cores do not behave in the typical fast to slow carbon pool fashion that typify microcosm experiments. The CO2 emission rates from the intact cores were much slower than those from the microcosm initially, but steadily increased with time, overtaking and then exceeding microcosm release rates after one year. 2) The increased CO2 flux from thawing permafrost could not be distinguished from that of control cores until after a full year of thawing. 3) Atmospheric CH4 oxidation was present in all intact cores regardless of whether they are water saturated or not, but after one year it had diminished to the point of being negligible. Over that same time the period the metagenomic data recorded a significant decline in the proportion of high-affinity methanotrophs. 4) Thaw slumps in the cores temporarily increased the CH4 oxidation and the CO2 emission rates. 5) The microbial community structures varied significantly by depth with methanotrophs being more abundant in above 35 cm depth than below 35 cm depth. 6) Other than the diminishment of Type II methanotrophs, the microbial community structure varied little after one week of thawing, nor even after 18 months of thaw.

  5. Environmental Education Teacher's Guide, Junior High School. A Core Experience Study of the Natural Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Dean B.; Willink, Wesley H.

    This Environmental Education Teacher's Guide, developed for use in the junior high school, is designed to familiarize teachers with how an environmental education program can help in their teaching and in achieving the goals of the school. The suggested core activities in this guide are designed to be a motivating way of introducting junior high…

  6. Approaches to Differentiation in the Core Subjects: The Experience of Northern Ireland Primary Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGarvey, Brian; Marriott, Stuart; Morgan, Valerie; Abbott, Lesley

    1998-01-01

    Examined the organization for differentiation in the teaching of core subjects at Key Stages 1 and 2 in primary schools in Northern Ireland. Response to teacher (n=400) and subject coordinator (n=150) surveys showed the ways teachers made provisions for a range of student ability and the teaching strategies used to provide differentiated learning…

  7. Environmental Education Teacher's Guide, Junior High School. A Core Experience Study of the Natural Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Dean B.; Willink, Wesley H.

    This Environmental Education Teacher's Guide, developed for use in the junior high school, is designed to familiarize teachers with how an environmental education program can help in their teaching and in achieving the goals of the school. The suggested core activities in this guide are designed to be a motivating way of introducting junior high…

  8. Environmental Education Teacher's Guide, Junior High School. A Core Experience Study of the Human Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Dean B.; Willink, Wesley H.

    This Environmental Education Teacher's Guide, developed for use in the junior high school, is designed to familiarize teachers with how an environmental education program can help in their teaching and in achieving the goals of the school. The suggested core activities in this guide are designed to be a motivating way of introducing junior high…

  9. Coring experiments with cryogenic water and carbon dioxide ices - toward planetary surface operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garry, J. R. C.; Wright, I. P.

    2004-08-01

    As a prelude to the design of sampling devices able to extract materials from the icy surfaces of comets, outer-planet satellites, and the martian poles, it is necessary to understand some of the physical properties of these ices. To this end we have investigated the mechanical resistance displayed by two ices subjected to coring operations at low temperatures and under vacuum. The ices used in this study were water ice, frozen from liquid water, and carbon dioxide ice grown from its vapour. The coring tool employed had dimensions and required power levels that were comparable to a sample extraction system designed for a present-day spacecraft lander. The specific cutting strength, a parameter that measures the toughness of the material, has been measured while coring these two ices. For water ice this property rose from 25 MJ m -3 at an ice temperature of 250 K, to 60 MJ m -3 at 140 K. At the lower temperature of 140 K, pore-free carbon dioxide ice has also been measured to have a specific cutting strength approximately half that of water ice at the same temperature. These laboratory-based measurements may be used as guides for the power levels needed to core solid water and CO 2 ices at certain rates.

  10. High-resolution Valence and Core Excitation Spectra via First-Principles Calculations and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirley, Eric; Fossard, F.; Gilmore, K.; Hug, G.; Kas, J. J.; Rehr, J. J.; Vila, F.

    We calculate the optical and C K-edge near edge spectra of crystalline and molecular C60 measured with high-resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy. The calculations are carried out using at least three different methods: Bethe-Salpeter calculations using the NIST Bethe-Salpeter Equation solver (NBSE) in the valence and OCEAN (Obtaining Core Excitation with Ab initio methods and NBSE) suite [Gilmore et al., Comp. Phys. Comm., (2015)]; excited-core-hole calculations using XCH [D. Prendergast and G. Galli, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 215502 (2006)]; and constrained occupancy using StoBe (Stockholm-Berlin core-excitation code) [StoBe-deMon version 3.0, K. Hermann et al. (2009)]. They include self-energy effects, lifetime-damping, and Debye-Waller effects. A comparison of spectral features to those observed illustrates the sensitivity of certain features to computation details (e.g., self-energy corrections and core-hole screening). This may point to limitations of various approximations, e.g. in conventional BSE paradigm and/or the incomplete treatment of vibrational effects. Supported in part by DOE BES Grant DE-FG03-97ER45623 (JJR, JJK, FV).

  11. Media Literacy Is Common Sense: Bridging Common Core Standards with the Media Experiences of Digital Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redmond, Theresa

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to investigate the concept of "texts" and how the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) affords teachers opportunities to implement media literacy education, in turn providing developmentally and culturally responsive middle level practice and promoting 21st century skills. This has implications for middle…

  12. Combining N-body accretion simulations with partitioning experiments in a statistical model of terrestrial planet accretion and core formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, R. A.; Ciesla, F.; Campbell, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    The terrestrial planets accreted in a series of increasingly large and violent collisions. Simultaneously, metallic cores segregated from their silicate mantles, acquiring their modern compositions through high pressure (P), high temperature (T) partitioning reactions. Here we present a model that couples these aspects of early planetary evolution, building on recent accretion simulations and experimental results. We have run 100 N-body simulations of terrestrial planet accretion, with Jupiter and Saturn on either circular (CJS) or eccentric (EJS) orbits, to gain insight into the statistics of this highly stochastic process (Fischer and Ciesla, 2014). An Earth (Mars) analogue forms in 84-92% (2-10%) of our simulations. We draw on our recent high P-T metal-silicate partitioning experiments of Ni, Co, V, Cr, Si, and O in a diamond anvil cell to 100 GPa and 5500 K. In our model, N-body simulations describe the delivery, masses, and original locations of planetary building blocks. As planets accrete, their core and mantle compositions are modified by high P-T reactions with each collision (Rubie et al., 2011). By utilizing a large number of N-body simulations, we obtain a statistical view and observe a wide range of outcomes. We use this model to predict the core compositions of Earth-like planets. For partial equilibration of the mantle at 50% of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) pressure, we find that their cores contain 6.9 ± 1.8 wt% Si and 4.8 ± 2.3 wt% O (Figure), with this uncertainty due entirely to variations in accretion history in our 100 simulations. This composition is consistent with the seismologically-inferred density of Earth's core, based on comparisons to high P-T equations of state (Fischer et al., 2011, 2014). Earth analogues experience 0.7 ± 0.1 or 0.9 ± 0.2 log units of oxidation during accretion in EJS or CJS simulations respectively, which is due to both the effects of high P-T partitioning and the temporal evolution of the Earth analogue

  13. Core-concrete interactions using molten UO sub 2 with zirconium on a basaltic basemat: The SURC-2 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Copus, E.R.; Brockmann, J.E.; Simpson, R.B.; Lucero, D.A. ); Blose, R.E. )

    1992-08-01

    An inductively heated experiment, SURC-2, using prototypic U0{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} materials was executed as part of the Integral Core-Concrete Interactions Experiments Program. The purpose of this experimental program was to measure and assess the variety of source terms produced during core debris/concrete interactions. These source terms include thermal energy released to both the reactor basemat and the containment environment, as well as flammable gas, condensable vapor and toxic or radioactive aerosols generated during the course of a severe reactor accident. The SURC-2 experiment eroded a total of 35 cm of basaltic concrete during 160 minutes of sustained interaction using 203.9 kg of prototypic U0{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} core debris material that included 18 kg of Zr metal and 3.4 kg of fission product simulants. The meltpool temperature ranged from 2400--1900{degrees}C during the first 50 minutes of the test followed by steady temperatures of 1750--1800{degrees}C during the middle portion of the test and increased temperatures of 1800--1900{degrees}C during the final 50 minutes of testing. The total erosion during the first 50 minutes was 15 cm with an additional 7 cm during the middle part of the test and 13 cm of ablation during the final 50 minutes. Comprehensive gas flowrates, gas compositions, and aerosol release rates were also measured during the SURC-2 test. When combined with the SURC-1 results, SURC-2 forms a complete data base for prototypic U0{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} core debris interactions with concrete.

  14. Direct containment heating experiments in Zion Nuclear Power Plant Geometry using prototypic core materials, the U2 test

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, J.L.; McUmber, L.M.; Spencer, B.W.

    1993-05-01

    A third Direct Containment Heating (DCH) experiments has been completed which utilizes prototypic core materials. The reactor material tests are a follow on to the Integral Effects Testing (IET) DCH program. The IET series of tests primarily addressed the effect of scale on DCH phenomena. This was accomplished by completing a series of counterpart tests in 1/40 and 1/10th linear scale DCH facilities at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), respectively. The IET experiments modeled the Zion Nuclear Power Plant Geometry. The scale models included representations of the primary system volume, RPV lower head, cavity and instrument tunnel, and the lower containment structures. The experiments were steam driven at nominally 6.2 MPa. Iron-alumina thermite with chromium was used as a core melt simulant in the IET experiments. While the IET experiments at ANL and SNL provided useful data on the effect of scale on DCH phenomena, a significant question concerns the potential experiment distortions introduced by the use of non-prototypic iron/alumina thermite. Therefore, further testing with prototypic materials has been carried out at ANL. A prototypic core melt was produced for the experiment by first mixing powders of uranium, zirconium, iron oxide (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), and chromium trioxide (CrO{sub 3}). When ignited the powders react exothermically to produce a molten mixture. The amounts of each powder were selected to produce the anticipated composition for a core melt following a station blackout: 57.8 mass% UO{sub 2} 10.5 mass% ZrO{sub 2} 14.3 mass% Fe, 13.7 mass% Zr, and 3.7 mass% Cr. Development tests measured the initial melt temperature to be in the range of 2600 - 2700 K. The total thermal specific energy content of the melt at 2700 K is 1.2 MJ/kg compared to 2.25 MJ/kg for the iron-alumina simulant at its measured initial temperature of 2500 K.

  15. Optical properties of gold nanoshells on monodisperse silica cores: Experiment and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanadeev, Vitaly A.; Khlebtsov, Boris N.; Khlebtsov, Nikolai G.

    2017-01-01

    Gold nanoshells (GNSs) on silica cores are widely used in various biomedical applications that need the spectral tunability and controlled absorption/scattering ratio. However, the plasmonic quality of experimental extinction spectra of GNS colloids differs from that predicted by Mie theory. In this work, we fabricated highly monodisperse silica nanospheres to use them further as cores for synthesis of silica/gold nanoshells. Four GNS samples with 116-nm core and gold shell thickness ranging from 16 to 34 nm (116/16, 18, 25, 34) were additionally separated in glycerol gradient solutions to obtain fractions with dominant percentage of single particles or aggregates of various sizes. The separated samples demonstrated extinction spectra with a high extinction maximum to minimum ratio about 3. Optical properties of GNS monomers and aggregates with fixed and random orientations were calculated by Mie theory for polydisperse GNSs, by a generalized multiparticle Mie (GMM) theory for aggregates of separated GNSs, and by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method for aggregates of overlapped GNSs. The extinction spectra of upper fractions from 116/25 and 116/34 samples are shown to be well described by Mie theory for GNSs with polydisperse shell thickness. However, for as prepared 116/16 sample this approach fails because of strong near infrared (NIR) contribution from GNS dimers and trimers. The formation of such aggregates is due to coupling of silica cores at early stages of nanoshell synthesis, thus leading to peanut structures with overlapped gold shells. We suggested TEM-based ensemble model with single particles and small dimer and trimer aggregates, which gives satisfactory agreement between measured and FDTD simulated spectra in the vis-NIR region. Thus, the proposed synthetic technology produces high quality gold nanoshells, which remarkable optical properties are in good agreement with electromagnetic simulations based on TEM data.

  16. Simulation study of core heating properties for recent FIREX-I experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johzaki, Tomoyuki; Kai, Yusuke; Endo, Takuma; Nagatomo, Hideo; Sunahara, Atsushi; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Taguchi, Toshihiro; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Azechi, Hiroshi; Firex Project Team

    2016-10-01

    The demonstration of efficient core heating is the main purpose of FIREX-I project, where Au cone-attached solid ball CD target is used. For the guiding of fast electron beam generated by relativistic laser plasma interactions, the kilo-Tesla-class longitudinal magnetic field is applied by a capacitor-coil target and kJ-class ns-durration high power laser. In addition, to reduce the collisional effect (energy loss and scattering of fast electrons) during propagation in the Au cone tip, we introduced opened-tip cone (tipless cone). To evaluate the core heating properties, we carried out the integrated simulations, which shows the enhancement of core heating efficiency due to the magnetic guiding and opened-tip cone by a factor of three. These simulation results will be shown and be compared with the experimental results. JSPS KAKENHI (26400532, 15H03758, 16H02245, 15K21767), NIFS Collaboration Research program (NIFS12KUGK05, NIFS14KNSS054), and FIREX project.

  17. The Explosion Mechanism of Core-Collapse Supernovae: Progress in Supernova Theory and Experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Foglizzo, Thierry; Kazeroni, Rémi; Guilet, Jérôme; ...

    2015-01-01

    The explosion of core-collapse supernova depends on a sequence of events taking place in less than a second in a region of a few hundred kilometers at the center of a supergiant star, after the stellar core approaches the Chandrasekhar mass and collapses into a proto-neutron star, and before a shock wave is launched across the stellar envelope. Theoretical efforts to understand stellar death focus on the mechanism which transforms the collapse into an explosion. Progress in understanding this mechanism is reviewed with particular attention to its asymmetric character. We highlight a series of successful studies connecting observations of supernovamore » remnants and pulsars properties to the theory of core-collapse using numerical simulations. The encouraging results from first principles models in axisymmetric simulations is tempered by new puzzles in 3D. The diversity of explosion paths and the dependence on the pre-collapse stellar structure is stressed, as well as the need to gain a better understanding of hydrodynamical and MHD instabilities such as SASI and neutrino-driven convection. The shallow water analogy of shock dynamics is presented as a comparative system where buoyancy effects are absent. This dynamical system can be studied numerically and also experimentally with a water fountain. Lastly, we analyse the potential of this complementary research tool for supernova theory. We also review its potential for public outreach in science museums.« less

  18. The Explosion Mechanism of Core-Collapse Supernovae: Progress in Supernova Theory and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Foglizzo, Thierry; Kazeroni, Rémi; Guilet, Jérôme; Masset, Frédéric; González, Matthias; Krueger, Brendan K.; Novak, Jérôme; Faure, Julien; Martin, Noël; Blottiau, Patrick; Peres, Bruno; Durand, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    The explosion of core-collapse supernova depends on a sequence of events taking place in less than a second in a region of a few hundred kilometers at the center of a supergiant star, after the stellar core approaches the Chandrasekhar mass and collapses into a proto-neutron star, and before a shock wave is launched across the stellar envelope. Theoretical efforts to understand stellar death focus on the mechanism which transforms the collapse into an explosion. Progress in understanding this mechanism is reviewed with particular attention to its asymmetric character. We highlight a series of successful studies connecting observations of supernova remnants and pulsars properties to the theory of core-collapse using numerical simulations. The encouraging results from first principles models in axisymmetric simulations is tempered by new puzzles in 3D. The diversity of explosion paths and the dependence on the pre-collapse stellar structure is stressed, as well as the need to gain a better understanding of hydrodynamical and MHD instabilities such as SASI and neutrino-driven convection. The shallow water analogy of shock dynamics is presented as a comparative system where buoyancy effects are absent. This dynamical system can be studied numerically and also experimentally with a water fountain. Lastly, we analyse the potential of this complementary research tool for supernova theory. We also review its potential for public outreach in science museums.

  19. Patient Simulation to Demonstrate Students’ Competency in Core Domain Abilities Prior to Beginning Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Bhutada, Nilesh S.; Feng, Xiaodong

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To implement a simulation-based introductory pharmacy practice experience (IPPE) and determine its effectiveness in assessing pharmacy students’ core domain abilities prior to beginning advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE). Design. A 60-hour IPPE that used simulation-based techniques to provide clinical experiences was implemented. Twenty-eight students were enrolled in this simulation IPPE, while 60 were enrolled in hospital and specialty IPPEs within the region. Assessment. The IPPE assessed 10 out of 11 of the pre-APPE core domain abilities, and on the practical examination, 67% of students passed compared to 52% of students in the control group. Students performed better on all 6 knowledge quizzes after completing the simulation IPPE. Based on scores on the Perception of Preparedness to Perform (PREP) survey, students felt more prepared regarding “technical” aspects after completing the simulation experience (p<0.001). Ninety-six percent of the respondents agreed with the statement “I am more aware of medication errors after this IPPE.” Conclusion. Simulation is an effective method for assessing the pre-APPE abilities of pharmacy students, preparing them for real clinical encounters, and for making them more aware of medication errors and other patient safety issues. PMID:23193340

  20. Partitioning of potassium between silicates and sulphide melts - Experiments relevant to the earth's core.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goettel, K. A.

    1972-01-01

    The partitioning of potassium between roedderite, K2Mg5Si12O30 and an Fe-FeS melt was investigated at temperatures about 40 C above the Fe-FeS eutectic. Roedderite was considered a prime candidate for one of the potassium-bearing phases in the primitive earth because roedderite and merrihueite are the only two silicates containing essential potassium which have been identified in stony meteorites. Application of the results to a primitive chondritic earth is discussed, and it is concluded that extraction of most of the earth's potassium into the Fe-FeS core would occur under the conditions in the early earth.-

  1. North Atlantic simulations in Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments phase II (CORE-II). Part I: Mean states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danabasoglu, Gokhan; Yeager, Steve G.; Bailey, David; Behrens, Erik; Bentsen, Mats; Bi, Daohua; Biastoch, Arne; Böning, Claus; Bozec, Alexandra; Canuto, Vittorio M.; Cassou, Christophe; Chassignet, Eric; Coward, Andrew C.; Danilov, Sergey; Diansky, Nikolay; Drange, Helge; Farneti, Riccardo; Fernandez, Elodie; Fogli, Pier Giuseppe; Forget, Gael; Fujii, Yosuke; Griffies, Stephen M.; Gusev, Anatoly; Heimbach, Patrick; Howard, Armando; Jung, Thomas; Kelley, Maxwell; Large, William G.; Leboissetier, Anthony; Lu, Jianhua; Madec, Gurvan; Marsland, Simon J.; Masina, Simona; Navarra, Antonio; George Nurser, A. J.; Pirani, Anna; y Mélia, David Salas; Samuels, Bonita L.; Scheinert, Markus; Sidorenko, Dmitry; Treguier, Anne-Marie; Tsujino, Hiroyuki; Uotila, Petteri; Valcke, Sophie; Voldoire, Aurore; Wang, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Simulation characteristics from eighteen global ocean-sea-ice coupled models are presented with a focus on the mean Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) and other related fields in the North Atlantic. These experiments use inter-annually varying atmospheric forcing data sets for the 60-year period from 1948 to 2007 and are performed as contributions to the second phase of the Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments (CORE-II). The protocol for conducting such CORE-II experiments is summarized. Despite using the same atmospheric forcing, the solutions show significant differences. As most models also differ from available observations, biases in the Labrador Sea region in upper-ocean potential temperature and salinity distributions, mixed layer depths, and sea-ice cover are identified as contributors to differences in AMOC. These differences in the solutions do not suggest an obvious grouping of the models based on their ocean model lineage, their vertical coordinate representations, or surface salinity restoring strengths. Thus, the solution differences among the models are attributed primarily to use of different subgrid scale parameterizations and parameter choices as well as to differences in vertical and horizontal grid resolutions in the ocean models. Use of a wide variety of sea-ice models with diverse snow and sea-ice albedo treatments also contributes to these differences. Based on the diagnostics considered, the majority of the models appear suitable for use in studies involving the North Atlantic, but some models require dedicated development effort.

  2. Vocational Agriculture I Basic Core. Section C--Supervised Experience Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This curriculum guide contains five units teaching preservice vocational teachers to conduct supervised experience programs. Each unit contains an objective (e.g., "After completing this unit, the student should be able to choose and plan supervised occupational experience programs"); specific objectives (e.g., "State reasons for…

  3. Staying True to the Core: Designing the Future Academic Library Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    In 2014, the practice of user experience design in academic libraries continues to evolve. It is typically applied in the context of interactions with digital interfaces. Some academic librarians are applying user experience approaches more broadly to design both environments and services with human-centered strategies. As the competition for the…

  4. Staying True to the Core: Designing the Future Academic Library Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    In 2014, the practice of user experience design in academic libraries continues to evolve. It is typically applied in the context of interactions with digital interfaces. Some academic librarians are applying user experience approaches more broadly to design both environments and services with human-centered strategies. As the competition for the…

  5. Vocational Agriculture I Basic Core. Section C--Supervised Experience Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Board of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This curriculum guide contains five units teaching preservice vocational teachers to conduct supervised experience programs. Each unit contains an objective (e.g., "After completing this unit, the student should be able to choose and plan supervised occupational experience programs"); specific objectives (e.g., "State reasons for…

  6. Results from core-edge experiments in high Power, high performance plasmas on DIII-D

    DOE PAGES

    Petrie, T. W.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Holcomb, C. T.; ...

    2016-12-24

    Here, significant challenges to reducing divertor heat flux in highly powered near-double null divertor (DND) hybrid plasmas, while still maintaining both high performance metrics and low enough density for application of RF heating, are identified. For these DNDs on DIII-D, the scaling of the peak heat flux at the outer target (q⊥P) ∝ [PSOL x IP]0.92 for PSOL = 8-19 MW and IP = 1.0–1.4 MA, and is consistent with standard ITPA scaling for single-null H-mode plasmas. Two divertor heat flux reduction methods were tested. First, applying the puff-and-pump radiating divertor to DIII-D plasmas may be problematical at high powermore » and H98 (≥ 1.5) due to improvement in confinement time with deuterium gas puffing which can lead to unacceptably high core density under certain conditions. Second, q⊥P for these high performance DNDs was reduced by ≈35% when an open divertor is closed on the common flux side of the outer divertor target (“semi-slot”) but also that heating near the slot opening is a significant source for impurity contamination of the core.« less

  7. High temperature UF6 RF plasma experiments applicable to uranium plasma core reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation was conducted using a 1.2 MW RF induction heater facility to aid in developing the technology necessary for designing a self critical fissioning uranium plasma core reactor. Pure, high temperature uranium hexafluoride (UF6) was injected into an argon fluid mechanically confined, steady state, RF heated plasma while employing different exhaust systems and diagnostic techniques to simulate and investigate some potential characteristics of uranium plasma core nuclear reactors. The development of techniques and equipment for fluid mechanical confinement of RF heated uranium plasmas with a high density of uranium vapor within the plasma, while simultaneously minimizing deposition of uranium and uranium compounds on the test chamber peripheral wall, endwall surfaces, and primary exhaust ducts, is discussed. The material tests and handling techniques suitable for use with high temperature, high pressure, gaseous UF6 are described and the development of complementary diagnostic instrumentation and measurement techniques to characterize the uranium plasma, effluent exhaust gases, and residue deposited on the test chamber and exhaust system components is reported.

  8. Results from core-edge experiments in high Power, high performance plasmas on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Petrie, T. W.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Holcomb, C. T.; Osborne, T. H.; Allen, S. L.; Ferron, J. R.; Guo, H. Y.; Lasnier, C. J.; Leonard, A. W.; Luce, T. C.; Makowski, M. A.; McLean, A. G.; Pace, D. C.; Solomon, W. M.; Turco, F.; VanZeeland, M. A.; Watkins, J. G.

    2016-12-24

    Here, significant challenges to reducing divertor heat flux in highly powered near-double null divertor (DND) hybrid plasmas, while still maintaining both high performance metrics and low enough density for application of RF heating, are identified. For these DNDs on DIII-D, the scaling of the peak heat flux at the outer target (qP) ∝ [PSOL x IP]0.92 for PSOL = 8-19 MW and IP = 1.0–1.4 MA, and is consistent with standard ITPA scaling for single-null H-mode plasmas. Two divertor heat flux reduction methods were tested. First, applying the puff-and-pump radiating divertor to DIII-D plasmas may be problematical at high power and H98 (≥ 1.5) due to improvement in confinement time with deuterium gas puffing which can lead to unacceptably high core density under certain conditions. Second, qP for these high performance DNDs was reduced by ≈35% when an open divertor is closed on the common flux side of the outer divertor target (“semi-slot”) but also that heating near the slot opening is a significant source for impurity contamination of the core.

  9. Active core profile and transport modification by application of ion Bernstein wave power in the Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification

    SciTech Connect

    LeBlanc, B.; Batha, S.; Bell, R.; Bernabei, S.; Blush, L.; de la Luna, E.; Doerner, R.; Dunlap, J.; England, A.; Garcia, I.; Ignat, D.; Isler, R.; Jones, S.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Kugel, H.; Levinton, F.; Luckhardt, S.; Mutoh, T.; Okabayashi, M.; Ono, M.; Paoletti, F.; Paul, S.; Petravich, G.; Post-Zwicker, A.; Sauthoff, N.; Schmitz, L.; Sesnic, S.; Takahashi, H.; Talvard, M.; Tighe, W.; Tynan, G.; von Goeler, S.; Woskov, P.; Zolfaghari, A. )

    1995-03-01

    Application of Ion Bernstein Wave Heating (IBWH) into the Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification (PBX-M) [Phys. Fluids B [bold 2], 1271 (1990)] tokamak stabilizes sawtooth oscillations and generates peaked density profiles. A transport barrier, spatially correlated with the IBWH power deposition profile, is observed in the core of IBWH-assisted neutral beam injection (NBI) discharges. A precursor to the fully developed barrier is seen in the soft x-ray data during edge localized mode (ELM) activity. Sustained IBWH operation is conducive to a regime where the barrier supports large [del][ital n][sub [ital e

  10. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation with Core Valve: First Indian experience of three high surgical risk patients with severe aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Seth, Ashok; Rastogi, Vishal; Kumar, Vijay; Maqbool, Syed; Mustaqueem, Arif; Sekar, V. Ravi

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of aortic stenosis is increasing with aging population. However with multiple co-morbidities and prior procedures in this aging population, more and more patients are being declared unfit for the ‘Gold Standard’ treatment i.e. surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR). Among the patients who are unfit or high risk for aortic valve replacement (AVR) by open heart surgery, transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) has been proven to be a valuable alternative improving survival and quality of life. We report first Indian experience of Core Valve (Medtronic Inc.) implantation in three high surgical risk patients performed on 22nd and 23rd February 2012. PMID:23993000

  11. Active core profile and transport modification by application of ion Bernstein wave power in the Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeBlanc, B.; Batha, S.; Bell, R.; Bernabei, S.; Blush, L.; de la Luna, E.; Doerner, R.; Dunlap, J.; England, A.; Garcia, I.; Ignat, D.; Isler, R.; Jones, S.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Kugel, H.; Levinton, F.; Luckhardt, S.; Mutoh, T.; Okabayashi, M.; Ono, M.; Paoletti, F.; Paul, S.; Petravich, G.; Post-Zwicker, A.; Sauthoff, N.; Schmitz, L.; Sesnic, S.; Takahashi, H.; Talvard, M.; Tighe, W.; Tynan, G.; von Goeler, S.; Woskov, P.; Zolfaghari, A.

    1995-03-01

    Application of Ion Bernstein Wave Heating (IBWH) into the Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification (PBX-M) [Phys. Fluids B 2, 1271 (1990)] tokamak stabilizes sawtooth oscillations and generates peaked density profiles. A transport barrier, spatially correlated with the IBWH power deposition profile, is observed in the core of IBWH-assisted neutral beam injection (NBI) discharges. A precursor to the fully developed barrier is seen in the soft x-ray data during edge localized mode (ELM) activity. Sustained IBWH operation is conducive to a regime where the barrier supports large ∇ne, ∇Te, ∇νφ, and ∇Ti, delimiting the confinement zone. This regime is reminiscent of the H(high) mode, but with a confinement zone moved inward. The core region has better than H-mode confinement while the peripheral region is L(low)-mode-like. The peaked profile enhances NBI core deposition and increases nuclear reactivity. An increase in central Ti results from χi reduction (compared to the H mode) and better beam penetration. Bootstrap current fractions of up to 0.32-0.35 locally and 0.28 overall were obtained when an additional NBI burst is applied to this plasma.

  12. C 1s and N 1s core excitation of aniline: Experiment by electron impact and ab initio calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Duflot, D.; Flament, J.-P.; Giuliani, A.; Heinesch, J.; Grogna, M.; Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.

    2007-05-15

    Core shell excitation spectra of aniline at the carbon and nitrogen 1s edges have been obtained by inner-shell electron energy-loss spectroscopy recorded under scattering conditions where electric dipolar conditions dominate, with higher resolution than in the previous studies. They are interpreted with the aid of ab initio configuration interaction calculations. The spectrum at the C 1s edge is dominated by an intense {pi}{sup *} band. The calculated chemical shift due to the different chemical environment at the carbon 1s edge calculated is in agreement with the experimental observations within a few tenths of an eV. The transition energies of the most intense bands in the C 1s excitation spectrum are discussed at different levels of calculations. In the nitrogen 1s excitation spectrum the most intense bands are due to Rydberg-valence transitions involving the {sigma}{sup *}-type molecular orbitals, in agreement with the experiment. This assignment is different from that of extended Hueckel molecular orbital calculations. The geometries of the core excited states have been calculated and compared to their equivalent core molecules and benzene.

  13. A liquid-metal reactor core demonstration experiment using HT-9

    SciTech Connect

    Bridges, A.E.; Waltar, A.E.; Leggett, R.D.; Baker, R.B. ); Ethridge, J.L. )

    1993-06-01

    The use of the ferritic/martensitic HT-9 alloy as the cladding and duct material for the attainment of the high fuel burnup levels critical to the viability of an economical liquid-metal reactor fuel system. The CDE, a partial core loading of fuel and blanket assemblies in the US Department of Energy's Fast Flux Test Facility, has successfully attained its irradiation exposure goal of 3 yr. Consisting of ten fuel and six blanket assemblies in a heterogeneous core configuration, the CDE has clearly demonstrated the capability of the advanced fuel and blanket designs to attain high burnups and fast fluences. Each CDE fuel assembly consisted of 169 large-diameter fuel pins comprising mixed-oxide annular fuel pellets in sealed HT-9 cladding tubes. Each CDE blanket assembly consisted of 91 large-diameter pins comprising solid depleted uranium dioxide pellets in sealed HT-9 cladding tubes. The maximum-exposure CDE fuel assembly reached a peak pellet burnup of 163,900 MWd/ton metal (M) and a peak fast fluence (E > 0.1 MeV) of 23.3 [times] 10[sup 22] n/cm[sup 2]. The maximum-exposure CDE blanket assembly reached a peak pellet burnup of 43 100 MWd/ton M and a peak fast fluence (E . 0.1 MeV) of 22.8 [times] 10[sup 22] n/cm[sup 2]. Lead test fuel assemblies built to CDE specifications continue their successful irradiation and have attained burnups of > 238,000 MWd/ton M with accumulated fast fluences (E > 0.1 MeV) of > 38 [times] 10[sup 22] n/cm[sup 2]. In-core measurements of HT-9 ducts and withdrawal loads of the assemblies indicate that duct distortion will not be a factor that limits the lifetime of the fuel or blanket assemblies. Comparison of the measured and predicted coolant outlet temperatures from the peak CDE fuel and blanket assemblies indicate the irradiation of the CDE has proceeded as planned. The CDE represents a tremendous success in demonstrating the lifetime capabilities of this advanced oxide system using the HT-9 ferritic alloy for structural materials.

  14. Experiment Provides the Best Look Yet at 'Warm Dense Matter' at Cores of Giant Planets

    SciTech Connect

    2015-03-23

    In an experiment at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, scientists precisely measured the temperature and structure of aluminum as it transitions into a superhot, highly compressed concoction known as “warm dense matter.”

  15. Isotope production target irradiation experience at the annular core research reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Talley, D.G.

    1997-02-01

    As a result of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) recently issued by the Department of Energy, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been selected as the {open_quotes}most appropriate facility{close_quotes} for the production of {sup 99}Mo. The daughter product of {sup 99}Mo is {sup 99m}Tc, a radioisotope used in 36,000 medical procedures per day in the U.S.{close_quote} At SNL, the {sup 99}Mo would be created by the fission process in UO{sub 2} coated {open_quotes}targets{close_quotes} and chemically separated in the SNL Hot Cell Facility (HCF). SNL has recently completed the irradiation of five production targets at its Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR). Following irradiation, four of the targets were chemically processed in the HCF using the Cintichem process.

  16. Monitored Anesthesia Care Versus General Anesthesia: Experience With the Medtronic CoreValve.

    PubMed

    Palermo, Christopher; Degnan, Meredith; Candiotti, Keith; Salerno, Tomas; de Marchena, Eduardo; Rodriguez-Blanco, Yiliam

    2016-10-01

    To compare monitored anesthesia care (MAC) and general anesthesia (GA) for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Retrospective, case-control study. A large university-affiliated hospital system. The study comprised patients who underwent TAVI with the Medtronic CoreValve (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) between 2011 and 2015. None. MAC (n = 44) and GA (n = 21) were compared in 65 patients who underwent TAVI. Baseline characteristics/demographics, hospital stay, intraoperative conditions, and intensive care unit (ICU)/hospital stays were compared using the chi-square test, unpaired t-test, or binomial regression where appropriate. There were no significant differences between patient populations with regard to 30-day mortality, ICU/hospital stay, and complication rates. The GA group used more blood product. The rate of ICU readmission was greater in the GA group but did not reach statistical significance. GA provides no significant advantages over MAC during TAVI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Performance of Core Exit Thermocouple for PWR Accident Management Action in Vessel Top Break LOCA Simulation Experiment at OECD/NEA ROSA Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Takeda, Takeshi; Nakamura, Hideo

    Presented are experiment results of the Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF) conducted at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) with a focus on core exit thermocouple (CET) performance to detect core overheat during a vessel top break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation experiment. The CET temperatures are used to start accident management (AM) action to quickly depressurize steam generator (SG) secondary side in case of core temperature excursion. Test 6-1 is the first test of the OECD/NEA ROSA Project started in 2005, simulating withdraw of a control rod drive mechanism penetration nozzle at the vessel top head. The break size is equivalent to 1.9% cold leg break. The AM action was initiated when CET temperature rose up to 623K. There was no reflux water fallback onto the CETs during the core heat-up period. The core overheat, however, was detected with a time delay of about 230s. In addition, a large temperature discrepancy was observed between the CETs and the hottest core region. This paper clarifies the reasons of time delay and temperature discrepancy between the CETs and heated core during boil-off including three-dimensional steam flows in the core and core exit. The paper discusses applicability of the LSTF CET performance to pressurized water reactor (PWR) conditions and a possibility of alternative indicators for earlier AM action than in Test 6-1 is studied by using symptom-based plant parameters such as a reactor vessel water level detection.

  18. Analysis of wall heat capacity effects on core makup tank drain-down behavior in ROSA/AP600 experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Masaya; Yonomoto, Taisuke; Asaka, Hideaki

    1997-12-01

    The thermal-hydraulic behavior of the core makeup tank (CMT) during scaled integral experiments on the Westinghouse AP600 reactor design was analyzed using the RELAP5/Mod3 (version 5M5) code. The natural circulation rate through the CMT was predicted well, although the prediction of the thermal stratification in the CMT had a problem due to inability to predict multidimensional mixing in the CMT upper regions. The over-scaled CMT metal mass in the experimental facility affected the CMT drain-down behavior in two experiments: (i) a multiple-failure experiment where the system depressurization became extremely slow due to the simulated failure of the ADS valves; and (ii) a relatively-large break experiment where the CMT started draining before thermal stratification developed in the CMT water inventory. In both experiments, the CMT wall became a heat sink and was a large steam condensation site. This had a effect to limit the CMT drain rate. 6 refs., 15 figs.

  19. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) in plutonium analysis.

    PubMed

    Strumińska-Parulska, Dagmara I

    The paper summarizes the results of the (240)Pu/(239)Pu atomic ratio studies in atmospheric fallout samples collected in 1986 over Gdynia (Poland) as well as three Baltic fish species collected in 1997 using the accelerator mass spectrometry. A new generation of AMS has been developed during last years and this method is an efficient and good technique to measure long-lived radioisotopes in the environment and provides the most accurate determination of the atomic ratios between (240)Pu and (239)Pu. The nuclide compositions of plutonium in filter samples correspond to their means of production. AMS measurements of atmospheric fallout collected in April showed sufficient increase of the (240)Pu/(239)Pu atomic ratio from 0.28 from March to 0.47. Also such high increase of (240)Pu/(239)Pu atomic ratio, close to reactor core (240)Pu/(239)Pu atomic ratio, was observed in September and equaled 0.47.

  20. "Real-time" core formation experiments using X-ray tomography at high pressure and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, H. C.; Anzures, B.; Yu, T.; Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The process of differentiation is a defining moment in a planet's history. Direct observation of this process at work is impossible in our solar system because it was complete within the first few tens of millions of years. Geochemical and geophysical evidence points to magma ocean scenarios to explain differentiation of large planets such as Earth. Smaller planets and planetesimals likely never achieved the high temperatures necessary for wide scale melting. In these smaller bodies, silicates may have only partially melted, or not melted at all. Furthermore, isotopic signatures in meteorites suggest that some planetesimals differentiated within just a few million years. Achieving efficient core segregation on this rapid timescale is difficult, particularly in a solid or semi-solid silicate matrix. Direct measurements of metallic melt migration velocities have been difficult due to experimental limitations and most previous work has relied on geometric models based on 2-D observations in quenched samples. We have employed a relatively new technique of in-situ, high pressure, high temperature, X-ray micro-tomography coupled with 3-D numerical simulations to evaluate the efficiency of melt percolation in metal/silicate systems. From this, we can place constraints on the timing of core formation in early solar system bodies. Mixtures of olivine and KLB-1 peridotite and up to 12 vol% FeS were pre-synthesized to achieve an initial equilibrium microstructure of silicate and sulfide. The samples were then were then pressed again to ~2GPa, and heated to ~1300°C to collect X-ray tomography images as the partially molten samples were undergoing shear deformation. The reconstructed 3-D images of melt distribution were used as the input for lattice Boltzmann simulations of fluid flow through the melt network and calculations of permeability and melt migration velocity. Our in-situ x-ray tomography results are complemented by traditional 2-D image analysis and high

  1. Experiment Provides the Best Look Yet at 'Warm Dense Matter' at Cores of Giant Planets

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2017-03-13

    In an experiment at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, scientists precisely measured the temperature and structure of aluminum as it transitions into a superhot, highly compressed concoction known as “warm dense matter.”

  2. The La Verne Experience: A Common Core for Undergraduate and Graduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Devorah

    2014-01-01

    The lasting sense of connection that a graduate feels for his or her alma mater is often rooted in those especially memorable aspects of the college experience--the times spent bonding with friends and faculty, practicing and playing on athletic teams, collaborating with professors on research, and serving as leaders in student government. Such…

  3. Student Teachers' Experiences of Initial Teacher Preparation in England: Core Themes and Variation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobson, Andrew J.; Malderez, Angi; Tracey, Louise; Giannakaki, Marina; Pell, Godfrey; Tomlinson, Peter D.

    2008-01-01

    Drawing on data generated via large-scale survey and in-depth interview methods, this article reports findings which show that being a student teacher in early-twenty-first-century England is a demanding personal experience which requires considerable engagement and commitment in the face of built-in challenges and risks, and which engenders, for…

  4. The La Verne Experience: A Common Core for Undergraduate and Graduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Devorah

    2014-01-01

    The lasting sense of connection that a graduate feels for his or her alma mater is often rooted in those especially memorable aspects of the college experience--the times spent bonding with friends and faculty, practicing and playing on athletic teams, collaborating with professors on research, and serving as leaders in student government. Such…

  5. Simultaneous Determination of Capillary Pressure and Relative Permeability Curves from Core-Flooding Experiments with Various Fluid Pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pini, Ronny; Hingerl, Ferdinand; Benson, Sally

    2013-04-01

    Geological systems are complex and so are the processes that determine the distribution of two (or more) immiscible phases within their porous structure; nevertheless, an empirical relationship between the capillary pressure and saturation, the capillary pressure function, provides the foundation for the theory of multiphase flow in porous media. The simultaneous existence of at least two fluids in a porous rock further implies that the ability of each fluid to flow is reduced by the presence of the other and a so-called relative permeability function has been introduced and defined as the ratio between the effective permeability to the given phase and the absolute permeability of the rock. When coupled to the continuum-scale equations of motion, these two characteristic curves allow for a description of multiphase displacement processes in a variety of natural settings that are related to a wide range of applications, thus including the storage of carbon dioxide into deep saline aquifers. In this study, capillary pressure and relative permeability drainage curves are measured on a single Berea Sandstone core by using three different fluid pairs, namely gCO2/water, gN2/water and scCO2/brine. An important feature of this experimental investigation is that these two multiphase properties are obtained simultaneously during a core-flooding experiment. The applied technique possesses many of the characteristics of a conventional steady-state relative permeability experiment and consists of injecting the nonwetting fluid at increasingly higher flow rates in a core that is initially saturated with the wetting phase, while observing fluid saturations with a medical x-ray CT scanner [Pini et al. 2012]. Injection flow rates are varied so as to cover a sufficiently large range of capillary pressures, whereas fluid-pairs and experimental conditions are selected in order to move across a range interfacial tension values (40-65 mN/m), while maintaining a constant viscosity ratio

  6. Friction experiments on Alpine Fault DFDP core samples: Implications for slip style on plate boundary faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikari, M.; Trütner, S.; Toy, V. G.; Carpenter, B. M.; Kopf, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Alpine Fault is a major plate-boundary fault zone that poses a significant seismic hazard in southern New Zealand, with the next major earthquake expected to be imminent. Core samples from the Alpine Fault were recovered from two Deep Fault Drilling Project pilot boreholes that penetrated the principal slip zone (PSZ). We show here that at room temperature and low effective stress (30 MPa), materials from within and very near the PSZ are weaker than the surrounding cataclasites (μ = 0.45), exhibit velocity-strengthening friction, and also tend to restrengthen (heal) rapidly. Under conditions appropriate for several kilometers depth on the Alpine Fault (100 MPa, 160 °C, fluid-saturated), a cataclasite/gouge sample located very near to the PSZ exhibits μ = 0.67, which is high compared to measurements performed at lower pressures and temperatures for the Alpine Fault and other major fault zones sampled by scientific drilling. Every major lithological unit tested under elevated P-T conditions exhibits both positive and negative values of friction velocity-dependence suggesting that they are all capable of earthquake nucleation. Using representative values of the friction velocity-dependent parameter a-b, the critical slip distance Dc, and previously documented elastic properties of the wall rock, estimated critical nucleation patch lengths may be as low as ~3 m. This small value is consistent with a seismic moment Mo = ~4x1010 or a Mw = ~1, which suggests that events of this size or larger are expected to occur as normal earthquakes and that slow or transient slip events are unlikely in the approximate depth range of 3-7 km. In conjunction with previous geodetic and seismologic observations, our results indicate that the Alpine Fault has a high potential for frictional instability throughout the brittle crust, in contrast with other major fault zones on which the uppermost portion is relatively stable.

  7. Wetting on fractal superhydrophobic surfaces from "core-shell" particles: a comparison of theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Synytska, Alla; Ionov, Leonid; Grundke, Karina; Stamm, Manfred

    2009-03-03

    We report an experimental and theoretical investigation of the wetting behavior of different model polar and nonpolar liquids and their mixtures on superhydrophobic fractal surfaces made of polymer- or silane-coated "core-shell" particles. We compared the experimental results with the theoretical predictions made according to the theories of Onda-Shibuichi (describes wetting on fractal surfaces) and Cassie-Baxter (describes wetting on generic rough composite surfaces). We found that the experimental findings deviate from the behavior predicted by the Onda-Shibuichi model. On the other hand, the wetting properties were found to be close to the predictions made by the Cassie-Baxter model in the hydrophobic region (the intrinsic contact angle on the flat surface is larger than 90 degrees). However, the wetting behavior in the hydrophilic region (the intrinsic contact angle is less than 90 degrees) could not be described by the Onda-Shibuichi or Cassie-Baxter model. The observed inconsistency between the experimental results and theoretical predictions was explained by the formation of metastable states of a liquid droplet on a fabricated fractal surface according to the theory developed by Johnson and Dettre for generic rough surfaces. The entrapments of the liquid droplets in metastable states resulted in superhydrophobic behavior on fractal surfaces as well, made from nonfluorinated material such as polystyrene with a surface free energy of about 30 mJ/m2. This finding is very promising for real industrial applications where fluorinated compounds are willing to be reduced. It can be concluded that employing a texture with fractal geometry is necessary for the design of superhydrophobic coatings. Thereby, extremely lowering the surface free energy of materials by fluorination is not an obligatory factor for the generation of liquid-repellent superhydrophobic materials. We believe that the results we presented in the paper give new insight into the understanding of

  8. Irradiation creep of VTiCr alloy in BR-10 reactor core instrumented experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troyanov, V. M.; Bulkanov, M. G.; Kruglov, A. S.; Krjuchkov, E. A.; Nikulin, M. P.; Pevchykh, J. M.; Rusanov, A. E.; Smirnoff, A. A.; Votinov, S. N.

    1996-10-01

    A thin wall tubular-type speciment of 4%Ti-4%Cr vanadium alloy was tested for creep under irradiation in BR-10 reactor at 713-723 K and at 8.6 × 10 18 n/m 2s fast neutron flux. A fluence at the end of the experiment have reached 5.8 × 10 25 n/m 2. Specimen deformation measurements were performed by a dynamometric method based on a stress relaxation control provided during irradiation under constant load applied. During the experiment 13 deformation curves were obtained for different stress levels ranged up to 165 MPa. At the same time the yield stress of the irradiated specimen was periodically determined. The irradiation creep rate has been found to be proportional to the stress up to 110-120 MPa with the module equal to 3.3 × 10 -12 dpa -1Pa -1. At higher streses, a creep process essentially accelerates. The results on VTiCr alloy are discussed in respect to data obtained for stainless steels in earlier BR-10 reactor experiments.

  9. A Virtual Interface for Recreating a School of Rock Experience: An Inquiry-Driven Approach Towards Describing and Interpreting Deep Ocean Cores and Smear Slides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hoesen, J.; Collins, J.

    2011-12-01

    The School of Rock (SOR) is a professional development program for educators that takes place on the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program's (IODP) JOIDES Resolution and at the core repository at Texas A&M. The program brings formal and informal educators together with scientists, technicians, and IODP staff to learn about and experience ocean drilling science. An essential element of this multi-day program is the utilization of cores and smear slides for making inferences about a variety Earth events. A similar inquiry-based experience can be offered to a broader audience using a virtual experience. Our virtual interface incorporates high-resolution gigapixel images of selected IODP core sections and smear slides. These images can be used with annotations, to provide background information and explain the scientific significance of each core, or without annotation for a guided-inquiry lesson. The primary objective of this project is to provide educators a useful and accessible tool for increasing student understanding of drill core characteristics and how they relate to ocean processes. The interactive nature of the interface also allows teachers and students to explore ocean cores and ancillary smear slides using similar processes and techniques as scientists aboard the JOIDES Resolution or in one of the core repositories.

  10. Transaortic aortic valve replacement using the Edwards Sapien-XT Valve and the Medtronic CoreValve: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Spargias, Konstantinos; Bouboulis, Nikolaos; Halapas, Antonios; Chrissoheris, Michael; Skardoutsos, Spyridon; Nikolaou, Joulia; Tsolakis, Apostolos; Mourmouris, Christos; Pattakos, Stratis

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is now an established treatment for certain patients with severe aortic valve stenosis (AS). However, as the number of patients screened for TAVR increases, many are found to have absolutely no option for peripheral artery access. Transaortic valve replacement (TAoVR) has been proposed as a new alternative route in patients deemed unsuitable for conventional approaches. We present our first series of TAoVR cases using the Edwards Sapien-XT and the Medtronic CoreValve prostheses. Twenty-five (25) symptomatic patients (mean age 78 ± 8 years, mean logistic EuroSCORE I 25 ± 11%) with severe AS underwent TAoVR using the Sapien-XT valve (10 patients) or the CoreValve (15 patients). The mean fluoroscopy time was 15.6 ± 4.2 minutes, the mean time in the intensive care unit was 1.9 ± 1.0 days, and the mean hospital stay was 6.4 ± 1.6 days. The mean effective aortic valve area increased (from 0.68 ± 0.15 cm(2) to 1.82 ± 0.34 cm(2), p<0.001) and the mean transvalvular pressure gradient declined (from 48 ± 15 mmHg to 9 ± 5 mmHg, p<0.05) post implantation. The procedural mortality was 0% and the in-hospital mortality was 4% (one death at day 3 due to cardiogenic shock). The mean NYHA functional class improved from 3.2 ± 0.4 to 1.5 ± 0.9 at 30 days. Our initial experience with the TAoVR approach using both the Edwards Sapien-XT and the Medtronic CoreValve prosthesis demonstrated that it could be performed safely, resulting in substantial acute echocardiographic and early clinical improvement.

  11. Use of plutonium isotope activity ratios in dating recent sediments. [/sup 238/Pu//sup 239/Pu + /sup 240/Pu

    SciTech Connect

    Beasley, T. M.

    1982-01-01

    The majority of plutonium presently in the biosphere has come from the testing of nuclear devices. In the early 1950s, the Pu-238/239+240 activity ratio of fallout debris was > 0.04; in the more extensive test series of 1961 to 1962, the Pu-238/239+240 activity ratios were quite consistent at 0.02 to 0.03 and maximum fallout delivery occurred in mid-1963. A significant perturbation in Pu isotope activity ratios occurred in mid-1966 with the deposition of Pu-238 from the SNAP-9A reentry and burn-up. Recently deposited sediments have recorded these events and where accumulation rates are rapid (> 1 cm/y), changes in Pu isotope activity ratios can be used as a geochronological tool.

  12. Energy dependence of the prompt γ -ray emission from the (d ,p ) -induced fission of *234U and *240Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, S. J.; Zeiser, F.; Wilson, J. N.; Oberstedt, A.; Oberstedt, S.; Siem, S.; Tveten, G. M.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bleuel, D. L.; Brown, J. A.; Crespo Campo, L.; Giacoppo, F.; Görgen, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Hadyńska, K.; Hafreager, A.; Hagen, T. W.; Klintefjord, M.; Laplace, T. A.; Larsen, A. C.; Renstrøm, T.; Sahin, E.; Schmitt, C.; Tornyi, T. G.; Wiedeking, M.

    2017-07-01

    Prompt-fission γ rays are responsible for approximately 5% of the total energy released in fission, and therefore important to understand when modeling nuclear reactors. In this work we present prompt γ -ray emission characteristics in fission as a function of the nuclear excitation energy of the fissioning system. Emitted γ -ray spectra were measured, and γ -ray multiplicities and average and total γ energies per fission were determined for the 233U(d ,p f ) reaction for excitation energies between 4.8 and 10 MeV, and for the 239Pu(d ,p f ) reaction between 4.5 and 9 MeV. The spectral characteristics show no significant change as a function of excitation energy above the fission barrier, despite the fact that an extra ˜5 MeV of energy is potentially available in the excited fragments for γ decay. The measured results are compared with model calculations made for prompt γ -ray emission with the fission model code gef. Further comparison with previously obtained results from thermal neutron induced fission is made to characterize possible differences arising from using the surrogate (d ,p ) reaction.

  13. CALORIMETER-BASED ADJUSTMENT OF MULTIPLICITY DETERMINED 240PU EFF KNOWN-A ANALYSIS FOR THE ASSAY OF PLUTONIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Dubose, F.

    2012-02-21

    In nuclear material processing facilities, it is often necessary to balance the competing demands of accuracy and throughput. While passive neutron multiplicity counting is the preferred method for relatively fast assays of plutonium, the presence of low-Z impurities (fluorine, beryllium, etc.) rapidly erodes the assay precision of passive neutron counting techniques, frequently resulting in unacceptably large total measurement uncertainties. Conversely, while calorimeters are immune to these impurity effects, the long count times required for high accuracy can be a hindrance to efficiency. The higher uncertainties in passive neutron measurements of impure material are driven by the resulting large (>>2) {alpha}-values, defined as the ({alpha},n):spontaneous fission neutron emission ratio. To counter impurity impacts for high-{alpha} materials, a known-{alpha} approach may be adopted. In this method, {alpha} is determined for a single item using a combination of gamma-ray and calorimetric measurements. Because calorimetry is based on heat output, rather than a statistical distribution of emitted neutrons, an {alpha}-value determined in this way is far more accurate than one determined from passive neutron counts. This fixed {alpha} value can be used in conventional multiplicity analysis for any plutonium-bearing item having the same chemical composition and isotopic distribution as the original. With the results of single calorimeter/passive neutron/gamma-ray measurement, these subsequent items can then be assayed with high precision and accuracy in a relatively short time, despite the presence of impurities. A calorimeter-based known-{alpha} multiplicity analysis technique is especially useful when requiring rapid, high accuracy, high precision measurements of multiple plutonium bearing items having a common source. The technique has therefore found numerous applications at the Savannah River Site. In each case, a plutonium (or mixed U/Pu) bearing item is divided into multiple containers. A single item from that batch is then selected for both neutron and calorimetric measurements; all remaining items undergo a neutron measurement only. Using the technique mentioned above, the 'true' {alpha} value determined from the first (calorimeter and passive neutron measured) item is used in multiplicity analysis for all other items in the batch. The justification for using this {alpha} value in subsequent calculations is the assumption that the chemical composition and isotopic distribution of all batch items are the same, giving a constant ({alpha},n):spontaneous fission ratio. This analysis method has been successfully applied to the KIS Facility, significantly improving measurement uncertainties and reducing processing times for numerous items. Comprehensive plans were later developed to extend the use of this method to other applications, including the K-Area Shuffler and the H-Area Pu-Blending Project. While only the feasibility study for the Shuffler has been completed, implementation of the method in the H-Area Pu-Blending Project is currently in progress and has been successfully applied to multiple items. This report serves to document the details of this method in order to serve as a reference for future applications. Also contained herein are specific examples of the application of known-{alpha} multiplicity analysis.

  14. Modeling the water circulation in the North Atlantic in the scope of the CORE-II experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushakov, K. V.; Grankina, T. B.; Ibraev, R. A.

    2016-07-01

    A numerical experiment on the reproduction of the variability in the state of North Atlantic water in 1948-2007 with a spatial resolution of 0.25° has been performed using the global ocean model developed at Institute of Numerical Mathematics, Russian Academy of Sciences (INM RAS), and the Shirshov Institute of Oceanology (IO RAS) (the INM-IO model). The data on the state of the atmosphere, radiation fluxes, and bulk formulas of the CORE-II protocol are used as boundary conditions. Five successive 60-year calculation cycles have been performed in order to obtain the quasi-equilibrium state of a model ocean. For the last 20 years, the main elements of large-scale ocean circulation have been analyzed and compared with the WOA09 atlas data and the results of other models.

  15. Accuracy and underestimation of malignancy of breast core needle biopsy: the Florence experience of over 4000 consecutive biopsies.

    PubMed

    Ciatto, Stefano; Houssami, Nehmat; Ambrogetti, Daniela; Bianchi, Simonetta; Bonardi, Rita; Brancato, Beniamino; Catarzi, Sandra; Risso, Gabriella G

    2007-03-01

    Breast core needle biopsy (CNB) is used for sampling breast lesions in both the screening and diagnostic context. We present the accuracy of breast CNB from a consecutive series of 4035 core biopsies, using methods that minimise selection and verification bias. We calculate accuracy and underestimation of malignancy for both automated (14G) and directional vacuum-assisted (11G) CNB performed under stereotactic or sonographic guidance. Overall sensitivity of CNB is 94.2% (92.9-95.5%) and specificity is 88.1% (86.6-89.6%), positive and negative predictive values are 84.8% (82.9-86.7%) and 95.6% (94.6-96.6%), respectively. In sampling microcalcification, the overall underestimation of malignancy is 26.6% (22.9-30.3%): underestimation is significantly higher for automated CB relative to VAB (chi2 ((df = 1)) = 8.90 , P = 0.002), the absolute difference in underestimation being 14% (5-23%); sensitivity is higher for VAB than automated CB (chi2 ((df = 1)) = 3.28, P = 0.06) but specificity is significantly higher for automated CB (14G) relative to VAB (11G) (chi2 ((df = 1)) = 6.37, P = 0.01), and the overall accuracy of the two methods is similar. Sensitivity of CNB improved with experience (over time and in relation to caseload). Accuracy was not substantially affected by lesion palpability or image-guidance method, and was similar for both masses and calcification but lower for lesions depicted as distortions on mammography. Inadequacy was very low and decreased with greater operator caseload, and was not associated with core gauge or image-guidance method. False negatives occurred in 4.4% (3.4-5.4%) of cases, and where core histology was benign but discordant with (suspicious) imaging and/or clinical findings the likelihood of malignancy was 33.1% (18.5-47.7%), emphasising the importance of correlating all test information in breast diagnosis.

  16. The effect of birthrate granularity on the release-to-birth ratio for the AGR-1 in-core experiment

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. Scates; J. B. Walter; J. T. Maki; J. W. Sterbentz; J. R. Parry

    2014-05-01

    The AGR-1 Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) tristructural-isotropic-particle fuel experiment underwent 13 irradiation intervals from December 2006 until November 2009 within the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor in support of the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant program. During this multi-year experiment, release-to-birth rate ratios were computed at the end of each operating interval to provide information about fuel performance. Fission products released during irradiation were tracked daily by the Fission Product Monitoring System using 8-h measurements. Birth rate calculated by MCNP with ORIGEN for as-run conditions were computed at the end of each irradiation interval. Each time step in MCNP provided neutron flux, reaction rates and AGR-1 compact composition, which were used to determine birth rate using ORIGEN. The initial birth-rate data, consisting of four values for each irradiation interval at the beginning, end, and two intermediate times, were interpolated to obtain values for each 8-h activity. The problem with this method is that any daily changes in heat rates or perturbations, such as shim control movement or core/lobe power fluctuations, would not be reflected in the interpolated data and a true picture of the system would not be presented. At the conclusion of the AGR-1 experiment, great efforts were put forth to compute daily birthrates, which were reprocessed with the 8-h release activity. The results of this study are presented in this paper.

  17. The Effect of Birthrate Granularity on the Release- to- Birth Ratio for the AGR-1 In-core Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dawn Scates; John Walter

    2012-10-01

    The AGR-1 Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) tristructural-isotropic-particle fuel experiment underwent 13 irradiation intervals from December 2006 until November 2009 within the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor in support of the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant program. During this multi-year experiment, release-to-birth rate ratios were computed at the end of each operating interval to provide information about fuel performance. Fission products released during irradiation were tracked daily by the Fission Product Monitoring System using 8-hour measurements. Birth rates calculated by MCNP with ORIGEN for as-run conditions were computed at the end of each irradiation interval. Each time step in MCNP provided neutron flux, reaction rates and AGR-1 compact composition, which were used to determine birth rates using ORIGEN. The initial birth-rate data, consisting of four values for each irradiation interval at the beginning, end, and two intermediate times, were interpolated to obtain values for each 8-hour activity. The problem with this method is that any daily changes in heat rates or perturbations, such as shim control movement or core/lobe power fluctuations, would not be reflected in the interpolated data and a true picture of the system would not be presented. At the conclusion of the AGR-1 experiment, great efforts were put forth to compute daily birthrates, which were reprocessed with the 8-hour release activity. The results of this study are presented in this paper.

  18. Core-flood experiment for transport of reactive fluids in rocks.

    PubMed

    Ott, H; de Kloe, K; van Bakel, M; Vos, F; van Pelt, A; Legerstee, P; Bauer, A; Eide, K; van der Linden, A; Berg, S; Makurat, A

    2012-08-01

    Investigation of the transport of reactive fluids in porous rocks is an intriguing but challenging task and relevant in several areas of science and engineering such as geology, hydrogeology, and petroleum engineering. We designed and constructed an experimental setup to investigate physical and chemical processes caused by the flow of reactive and volatile fluids such as supercritical CO(2) and/or H(2)S in geological formations. Potential applications are geological sequestration of CO(2) in the frame of carbon capture and storage and acid-gas injection for sulfur disposal and/or enhanced oil recovery. The present paper outlines the design criteria and the realization of reactive transport experiments on the laboratory scale. We focus on the spatial and time evolution of rock and fluid composition as a result of chemical rock fluid interaction and the coupling of chemistry and fluid flow in porous rocks.

  19. [Anesthetic management and experience in the transcatheter implantation of the CoreValve(®) self-expanding aortic valve].

    PubMed

    Fernández Suárez, F E; del Valle Fernández, R; González Alvarez, A; Sánchez Lasheras, J; Fernández Sánchez, L; Argüelles Tamargo, L

    2013-10-01

    To analyze the experience and anesthetic management in the transcatheter implantation of the CoreValve(®) self-expanding aortic valve, in a university tertiary hospital. Observational analytical review of data incorporated into a prospectively maintained database of 142 patients diagnosed with severe aortic stenosis who underwent implantation of a CoreValve(®) aortic self-expanding aortic valve between December 2007 and December 2012. The mean age of patients was 82.5±6.1 years and the logistic EuroSCORE was 14.9±11.2. General anesthesia was used in 107 patients (75.3%), with local anesthesia with sedation in 35 (24.6%). Local anesthesia and sedation was associated with a lower requirement of vasoactive drugs (P=.003) during implantation. No statistically significant differences were found between the 2 anesthetic techniques in the duration of the procedure, hospital stay, or morbimortality. The success rate was 97.1%. The most common complication was conduction disorders that required implantation of a permanent pacemaker in 46 patients (32.3%). There was no intraoperative mortality, and all-cause mortality at 30 days was 6.3%, with a one-year survival estimated by the Kaplan-Meier of 83.1%. This study confirms that in patients with severe aortic stenosis and high surgical risk, transcatheter implantation of aortic valve is a safe and effective alternative. Both, general anesthesia and local anesthesia with sedation are valid options, depending on the experience of the team. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  20. A brittle (normal?) shear zone cored in Site C0002 of Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment (IODP Expedition 348)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo-Blanc, Ana; Sample, James; Brown, Kevin; Otsubo, Makoto; Yamamoto, Yuzuru

    2016-04-01

    Integrated Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 348, which belongs to the Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment, conducted riser-drilling to make deeper an existing hole at Site C0002, up to 3058.5 meters below seafloor (mbsf). This site is located 80 km SE of the Kii Peninsula (Japan) in the Kumano forearc basin, in turn situated on top of the Nankai accretionary prism. Cuttings (875.5-3058.5 mbsf) and cores (2163.0-2217.5 mbsf) were collected in the upper Miocene to Pliocene turbiditic silty claystone with few intercalations of sandstone which characterize the accretionary prism lithological units. A remarkably preserved fault zone has been cored around 2205 mbsf (core section Hole C0002P-348-5R-4). It is characterized by 34 cm of fault breccia, in which an anastomosed cataclastic foliation is present. The rocks of the damaged zone are formed by silty claystone with an incipient scaly fabric and scarce levels of sandstones. Extra-large thin sections were made along the whole core section. In the brittle shear zone, they reveal a catalogue of deformation structures characteristic of a high structural level. In particular, almond-type structures and arrays of microfaults cutting the stratification are the most common structures and outline the cataclastic foliation. The occurrence of calcite veins in the recovered cores is limited to this fault zone, which is indicative of its role as fluid path, accompanied by carbonate cementation. Generally fault veins have lower δ18O values than carbonate cements in the sedimentary matrix, consistent with veins forming at higher temperatures and/or from a fluid more strongly depleted in 18O. A continuum of the relationships between calcite veins and cataclastic deformation is observed, from veins that precipitated early in the fault history, with calcite grains broken during subsequent deformation, to late veins which seal the almond-type structures within the claystones. The geometry of the calcite grains within the

  1. Resolving global versus local/regional Pu sources in the environment using sector ICP-MS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ketterer, M.E.; Hafer, K.M.; Link, C.L.; Kolwaite, D.; Wilson, Jim; Mietelski, J.W.

    2004-01-01

    Sector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is a versatile method for the determination of plutonium activities and isotopic compositions in samples containing this element at fallout levels. Typical detection limits for 239+240Pu are 0.1, 0.02 and 0.002 Bq kg -1Pu for samples sizes of 0.5 g, 3 g, and 50 g of soil, respectively. The application of sector ICP-MS-based Pu determinations is demonstrated in studies in sediment chronology, soil Pu inventory and depth distribution, and the provenance of global fallout versus local or regional Pu sources. A sediment core collected from Sloans Lake (Denver, Colorado, USA) exhibits very similar 137Cs and 239+240Pu activity profiles; 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios indicate possible small influences from the Nevada Test Site and/or the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site. An undisturbed soil profile from Lockett Meadow (Flagstaff, Arizona, USA) exhibits an exponential decrease in 239+240Pu activity versus depth; 240Pu/239Pu in the top 3 cm is slightly lower than the global fallout range of 0.180 ?? 0.014 due to possible regional influence of Nevada Test Site fallout. The 239??240Pu inventory at Lockett Meadow is 56 ?? 4 Bq m-2, consistent with Northern Hemisphere mid-latitude fallout. Archived NdF3 sources, prepared from Polish soils, demonstrate that substantial 239+240Pu from the 1986 Chernobyl disaster has been deposited in north eastern regions of Poland; compared to global fallout, Chernobyl Pu exhibits higher abundances of 240Pu and 241Pu. The ratios 240Pu/239pu and 241Pu/239Pu co-vary and range from 0.186-0.348 and 0.0029-0.0412, respectively, in forest soils (241Pu/239Pu = 0.2407??[240Pu/239Pu] - 0.0413; r2 = 0.9924). ?? The Royal Society of Chemistry 2004.

  2. Initial experiences in embedding core competency education in entry-level surgery residents through a nonclinical rotation.

    PubMed

    Kahol, Kanav; Huston, Carrie; Hamann, Jessica; Ferrara, John J

    2011-03-01

    Health care continues to expand in scope and in complexity. In this changing environment, residents are challenged with understanding its intricacies and the impact it will have on their professional activities and careers. Embedding each of the competency elements in residents in a meaningful way remains a challenge for many surgery residency program directors. We established a nonclinical rotation to provide surgery postgraduate year-1 (PGY-1) residents with a structured, multifaceted, largely self-directed curriculum into which each of the 6 core competencies are woven. Posttesting strategies were established for most curricular experiences to ensure to the greatest possible extent that each resident will have achieved an acceptable level of understanding of each of the competency areas before being given credit for the rotation. By uniformly exceeding satisfactory scores on respective objective analyses, residents demonstrated an increased (at least short-term) understanding of each of the assessed competency areas. Our project sought to address a prior lack of opportunity for our residents to develop a sound foundation for our residents in systems-based practice. Our new rotation addresses systems-based practice in several different learning environments, including emergency medical service ride-along, sentinel event participation, and hospice visits. Several research projects have enhanced the overall learning program. Our experience shows that a rotation dedicated to competency training can provide an innovative and engaging means of teaching residents the value of each element.

  3. Initial Experiences in Embedding Core Competency Education in Entry-Level Surgery Residents Through a Nonclinical Rotation

    PubMed Central

    Kahol, Kanav; Huston, Carrie; Hamann, Jessica; Ferrara, John J

    2011-01-01

    Background Health care continues to expand in scope and in complexity. In this changing environment, residents are challenged with understanding its intricacies and the impact it will have on their professional activities and careers. Aim Embedding each of the competency elements in residents in a meaningful way remains a challenge for many surgery residency program directors. Methods We established a nonclinical rotation to provide surgery postgraduate year-1 (PGY-1) residents with a structured, multifaceted, largely self-directed curriculum into which each of the 6 core competencies are woven. Posttesting strategies were established for most curricular experiences to ensure to the greatest possible extent that each resident will have achieved an acceptable level of understanding of each of the competency areas before being given credit for the rotation. Results By uniformly exceeding satisfactory scores on respective objective analyses, residents demonstrated an increased (at least short-term) understanding of each of the assessed competency areas. Conclusion Our project sought to address a prior lack of opportunity for our residents to develop a sound foundation for our residents in systems-based practice. Our new rotation addresses systems-based practice in several different learning environments, including emergency medical service ride-along, sentinel event participation, and hospice visits. Several research projects have enhanced the overall learning program. Our experience shows that a rotation dedicated to competency training can provide an innovative and engaging means of teaching residents the value of each element. PMID:22379529

  4. Reactive Transport Modeling of the CO2 Core Flooding Experiments for the Weyburn CO2 Storage Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Y.; Sholokhova, Y.; Smith, M. M.; Carroll, S.

    2011-12-01

    Geologic CO2 sequestration and storage in hydrocarbon reservoirs such as Weyburn oil field has a large potential to reduce net CO2 released into atmosphere and, therefore, mitigate man-made global warming. One key research area for CO2 sequestration/EOR (enhanced oil recovery) operations, requiring both numerical and experimental investigations, is to develop a good understanding of the chemical rock-fluid interactions induced by CO2 injection that influence rock porosity and permeability evolution, and may potentially alter reservoir performance. In this study we apply a Darcy scale continuum model to simulate reactive transport and mineral-dissolution processes for the core flooding experiments in which the CO2-equilibrated brine is injected into carbonate rock samples of both the Midale Vuggy and Marly units from the Weyburn oil field. The three-dimensional reactive-transport model is developed and constrained based on physical characterization of the Vuggy and Marly flow units (e.g. mineral distribution and pore-space identification) and solution chemistry data, which are obtained from X-ray computed microtomography (XCMT) analysis, and experimental measurements. It is observed experimentally that the mineral dissolution fronts become more unstable in highly heterogeneous Vuggy limestone, ultimately leading to the formation of highly porous flow channels, often referred to as "wormholes". In order to effectively account for strong coupling between flow, reactive transport and mineral dissolution processes, in particular within the wormholes, we employ empirical correlations to quantify the relationships between mineral dissolution and the resulting increases in porosity and permeability. The reactive transport simulations are performed by the Nonisothermal Unsaturated Flow and Transport (NUFT) code, and their results are compared with experimental data. Our simulation results indicate that Darcy-scale based flow and reactive transport models are able to

  5. Wide-Angle Refraction Tomographic Inversion of Mid Cayman Spreading Center and its Oceanic Core Complex, CaySEIS Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, J.; Van Avendonk, H. J.; Hayman, N. W.; Grevemeyer, I.; Peirce, C.; Dannowski, A.; Papenberg, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    The CaySEIS experiment, conducted in April 2015, is a multi-national collaborative seismic study of the Mid Cayman Spreading Center (MCSC), an ultra-slow spreading center [15 mm/yr fr] in the Caribbean Sea. Ultra-slow spreading centers are thought to have very thin crust and a paucity of magmatism due to cooler mantle conditions. However, the suggestion that gabbro-cored oceanic core complexes (OCCs), volcanic deposits, and multiple layers of hydrothermal vents are widespread in the MCSC and other ultra-slow spreading centers has led to questions about the relationship between seafloor spreading rates and magmatism. To investigate this further, we conducted the CaySEIS experiment, with five wide-angle seismic refraction lines parallel and perpendicular to the neovolcanic zone. This analysis is based on two east-west oriented 100-km-long seismic refraction lines, which were each occupied by 18 ocean bottom seismometers. Line 2 lies across the central MCSC and an OCC called Mt. Dent. Line 3 crosses the northern end of the MCSC near the Oriente Transform Zone. With the wide-angle OBS data we can image the seismic velocity structure of Mt. Dent and distinguish between two models of OCCs - either Mt. Dent is composed of mostly gabbro with peridotite lenses identified by a low velocity gradient, or it is composed of mostly peridotite with gabbroic bodies identified by a constant velocity gradient. The crustal structure of both lines gives more insight into the asymmetry of the MCSC and the style of seafloor spreading to the east vs. the west. The 2-D velocity models reveal Mt. Dent has thick crust of 8 km with a low velocity gradient, supporting the magmatic gabbroic origin of OCCs. The surrounding crust to the west of the MCSC is highly variable, with areas of very thin crust. The crust to the east of the MCSC has an approximately constant thickness of 4 km. The development of OCCs may contribute to the crustal heterogeneity of ultra-slow spreading centers.

  6. Characterization of Pu concentration and its isotopic composition in soils of Gansu in northwestern China.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jian; Yamada, Masatoshi; Wu, Fengchang; Liao, Haiqing

    2009-01-01

    The total 239+240Pu activities and 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios in surface soil samples (0-5cm) in the Kumtag Desert in western Gansu Province, and in a soil core sample in Lanzhou were investigated using a sector-field ICP-MS. In the surface soil samples, 239+240Pu activities in fine particles (<150microm) were 1.3-2.1 times of those in coarse particles (150microm-1mm) which ranged from 0.005 to 0.157mBq/g. Atom ratios of 240Pu/239Pu in the surface soils ranged from 0.168 to 0.192 with a mean of 0.182+/-0.008. The mean ratio was similar to the typical global fallout value although the Kumtag Desert was believed to have received close-in fallout derived from Chinese nuclear weapons tests mainly conducted in the 1970s. Furthermore, the mean 240Pu/239Pu atom ratio observed in the soil core sample in Lanzhou was similar to the typical global fallout value. In the soil core sample, 239+240Pu activities in the various layers ranged from 0.012 to 0.23mBq/g, and the inventory of 239+240Pu (32.4Bq/m2, 0-23cm) was slightly lower than that expected from global fallout (42Bq/m2) at the same latitude. Rapid downward migration of Pu isotopes was observed in Lanzhou soil core sample layers. The contribution of the 10-cm deep top layers of surface soils to total inventory was only 17%, while the contribution of deeper layers (10-23cm) was as high as 83%. The 239+240Pu activity levels and 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios in soils in Gansu Province, China are similar to those in atmospheric deposition samples collected in the spring in recent years in Japan.

  7. A laboratory experiment on the behaviour of soil-derived core and intact polar GDGTs in aquatic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterse, F.; Moy, C. M.; Eglinton, T. I.

    2015-02-01

    We have performed incubation experiments in order to examine the behaviour of soil-derived branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether (brGDGT) membrane lipids upon entering an aquatic environment and to evaluate the processes that potentially take place during their fluvial transport from land to sea. We incubated a soil from the Rakaia River catchment on the South Island of New Zealand using Rakaia River water and ocean water collected near the river mouth as inocula for a period of up to 152 days. The concentrations, as well as the relative distribution of brGDGTs derived from intact polar ("living"; IPL) lipids and core ("fossil"; CL) lipids remained unaltered over the course of the experiment. Although the stability of the brGDGTs may be a consequence of the higher than natural soil : water ratio used in the laboratory experiment, the substantial increase (27-72%) in the total pool of isoprenoid GDGTs (isoGDGTs) in all incubation setups, including the control using distilled water, indicates that entering an aquatic environment does influence the behaviour of soil-derived GDGTs. However, the availability of water appears to be more important than its properties. As a consequence of increasing isoGDGT concentrations, a decrease in Branched and Isoprenoid Tetraether (BIT) index values - a proxy for the relative input of fluvially discharged soil material into a marine system - became evident after an incubation period of 30 days, with a maximum final decrease of 0.88 to 0.74 in the experiment with river water. The relative distribution within the isoGDGT pool shows changes with time, suggesting that isoGDGT producers may either have different rates of membrane adaptation or production/degradation, or that preferential release from the soil matrix or a shift in source organism(s) may take place. While the apparent stability of soil brGDGTs during this incubation experiment reinforces their potential as tracers for land-sea transport of soil organic carbon and

  8. Detection of high energy electromagnetic and hadron components of air-shower cores in the new hybrid experiment "Pamir-XXI"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamada, M.; Inoue, N.; Misaki, A.; Ohsawa, A.

    2017-06-01

    In the Chacaltaya hybrid experiment we have shown that the observed characteristics of the events accompanying atmospheric families (a bundle of high energy particles in the air-shower core) can not be well described by current simulations. The atmospheric families detected so far by emulsion chambers (sandwiches of X-ray films and lead plates) are key ingredients in the analysis. But the number of analyzed events with atmospheric family is still small due to the limited size of the experiment. Now a new very large hybrid experiment "PAMIR-XXI" is proposed to be constructed at the Pamirs. The notable feature of the experiment is to construct large hadron calorimeters at the center of air-shower arrays to study the air-shower core in detail. We study the possibility to analyze high energy air-shower cores in the "Pamir-XXI" experiment by using the burst density of scintillation detectors instead of using the family data of emulsion chambers. It is shown that the unusual characteristics of the events observed by the Chacaltaya hybrid experiment can be well seen in the hybrid experiment "PAMIR-XXI" too.

  9. Impact of surface roughness of Au core in Au/Pd core-shell nanoparticles toward formic acid oxidation - Experiment and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chiajen; Huang, Chienwen; Hao, Yaowu; Liu, Fuqiang

    2013-12-01

    The Au/Pd core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized via galvanic replacement of Cu by Pd on hollow Au cores by adding different concentrations of Na2SO3 solution. It was found that the higher concentration of Na2SO3 that was used, the rougher the Au nanospheres became. However, the rougher Au surface may cause more defects in the Pd layers and decrease the catalytic abilities. The Au/Pd NPs synthesized using 0 M Na2SO3 (denoted as 0 M-Au/Pd NPs) have the smoothest Pd surface and demonstrate higher formic acid oxidation (FAO) activity (0.714 mA cm-2, normalized to the surface area of Pd) than other Au/Pd NPs and commercial Pd black (0.47 mA cm-2). Additional electrochemical characterization of the 0 M-Au/Pd NPs also demonstrated lower CO-stripping onset and peak potentials, higher stability (8× improvement in stabilized oxidation current), and superior durability (by 1.6×) than the Pd black. In addition, a simple simulation of FAO was adopted to predict the anodic curve by including reaction intermediates of formate and hydroxyl. The 0 M-Au/Pd NPs were found to show higher formate and lower hydroxyl coverage than the Pd black.

  10. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous splenic biopsy using an 18-G core biopsy needle: our experience with 52 cases

    PubMed Central

    Dawe, Gemma; Tung, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The spleen is more commonly affected in multiorgan disease, but alternative sites are selected for biopsy owing to perceived haemorrhage risk. If these sites are inaccessible or, less commonly, the spleen is the only disease site, then splenic biopsy is considered, with most studies using a 20- to 22-G needle. The primary aim of biopsy is to exclude underlying malignancy or to obtain histological analysis in known malignancy, usually lymphoma, when reclassification is required for therapy. We present, to our knowledge, the largest series of 18-G ultrasound-guided splenic core needle biopsy assessing diagnostic and complication rates. Methods: All ultrasound-guided splenic biopsy cases from May 1990 to May 2015 were identified on the radiology information system. Histological diagnosis and complications were identified from laboratory reports, case notes and discharge summaries to assess diagnostic positive and complication rates. Haemorrhages requiring transfusion, embolization or splenectomy, pneumothorax, other significant intra-abdominal injury or death are classified as major complications, whilst conservative haemorrhage management is considered a minor complication. Results: A total of 52 splenic biopsies were performed in 47 patients. A positive diagnostic yield for all biopsies was 90.4%. The major and minor complication rates were 0% and 1.9% (1/52), respectively. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided 18-G splenic biopsy is a safe and accurate procedure with no added risk of complications when compared with smaller needles or biopsy of other abdominal organs. Advances in knowledge: This is the largest case series of ultrasound-guided splenic biopsy with an 18-G needle, and our experience confirms a high diagnostic yield and a complication rate which compares favourably with the biopsy of other abdominal organs. PMID:26337505

  11. Stable chromium isotopic composition of meteorites and metal-silicate experiments: Implications for fractionation during core formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnand, P.; Williams, H. M.; Parkinson, I. J.; Wood, B. J.; Halliday, A. N.

    2016-02-01

    We present new mass independent and mass dependent Cr isotope compositions for meteorites measured by double spike thermal ionisation mass spectrometry. Small differences in both mass independent 53Cr and 54Cr relative to the Bulk Silicate Earth are reported and are very similar to previously published values. Carbonaceous chondrites are characterised by an excess in 54Cr compared to ordinary and enstatite chondrites which make mass independent Cr isotopes a useful tool for distinguishing between meteoritic groups. Mass dependent stable Cr isotope compositions for the same samples are also reported. Carbonaceous and ordinary chondrites are identical within uncertainty with average δ53 Cr values of - 0.118 ± 0.040 ‰ and - 0.143 ± 0.074 ‰ respectively. The heaviest isotope compositions are recorded by an enstatite chondrite and a CO carbonaceous chondrite, both of which have relatively reduced chemical compositions implying some stable Cr isotope fractionation related to redox processes in the circumstellar disk. The average δ53 Cr values for chondrites are within error of the estimate for the Bulk Silicate Earth (BSE) also determined by double spiking. The lack of isotopic difference between chondritic material and the BSE provides evidence that Cr isotopes were not fractionated during core formation on Earth. A series of high-pressure experiments was also carried out to investigate stable Cr isotope fractionation between metal and silicate and no demonstrable fractionation was observed, consistent with our meteorites data. Mass dependent Cr isotope data for achondrites suggest that Cr isotopes are fractionated during magmatic differentiation and therefore further work is required to constrain the Cr isotopic compositions of the mantles of Vesta and Mars.

  12. Core needle biopsies and surgical excision biopsies in the diagnosis of lymphoma-experience at the Lymph Node Registry Kiel.

    PubMed

    Johl, Alice; Lengfelder, Eva; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Klapper, Wolfram

    2016-08-01

    Current guidelines of the European Society of Medical Oncology recommend surgical excision biopsies of lymph nodes for the diagnosis of lymphoma whenever possible. However, core needle biopsies are increasingly used. We aimed to understand the common practice to choose the method of biopsy in Germany. Furthermore, we wanted to understand performance of surgical excision and core needle biopsies of lymph nodes in the diagnosis of lymphoma. The files of 1510 unselected, consecutive lymph node specimens from a consultation center for lymphoma diagnosis were analyzed. Core needle biopsies were obtained frequently from lymph nodes localized in mediastinal, abdominal, retroperitoneal, or thoracic regions. Patients undergoing core needle biopsies were significantly older and suffered significantly more often from lymphoma than patients undergoing surgical excision biopsies. Although more immunohistochemical tests were ordered by the pathologist for core needle biopsies specimens than for surgical excision biopsies specimens, core needle biopsies did not yield a definite diagnosis in 8.3 % of cases, compared to 2.8 % for SEB (p = 0.0003). Restricting the analysis to cases with a final diagnosis of follicular lymphoma or diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, core needle biopsies identified a simultaneous low- and high-grade lymphoma (transformation) in 3.3 % of cases, compared to 7.6 % for surgical excision biopsies (p = 0.2317). In Germany, core needle biopsies are preferentially used in elderly patients with a high likelihood of suffering from lymphoma. Core needle appeared inferior to surgical excision biopsies at providing a definite diagnosis and at identifying multiple lymphoma differentiations and transformation.

  13. Cognitive Styles, Demographic Attributes, Task Performance and Affective Experiences: An Empirical Investigation into Astrophysics Data System (ADS) Core Users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Rong

    As a primary digital library portal for astrophysics researchers, SAO/NASA ADS (Astrophysics Data System) 2.0 interface features several visualization tools such as Author Network and Metrics. This research study involves 20 ADS long term users who participated in a usability and eye tracking research session. Participants first completed a cognitive test, and then performed five tasks in ADS 2.0 where they explored its multiple visualization tools. Results show that over half of the participants were Imagers and half of the participants were Analytic. Cognitive styles were found to have significant impacts on several efficiency-based measures. Analytic-oriented participants were observed to spent shorter time on web pages and apps, made fewer web page changes than less-Analytic-driving participants in performing common tasks, whereas AI (Analytic-Imagery) participants also completed their five tasks faster than non-AI participants. Meanwhile, self-identified Imagery participants were found to be more efficient in their task completion through multiple measures including total time on task, number of mouse clicks, and number of query revisions made. Imagery scores were negatively associated with frequency of confusion and the observed counts of being surprised. Compared to those who did not claimed to be a visual person, self-identified Imagery participants were observed to have significantly less frequency in frustration and hesitation during their task performance. Both demographic variables and past user experiences were found to correlate with task performance; query revision also correlated with multiple time-based measurements. Considered as an indicator of efficiency, query revisions were found to correlate negatively with the rate of complete with ease, and positively with several time-based efficiency measures, rate of complete with some difficulty, and the frequency of frustration. These results provide rich insights into the cognitive styles of ADS' core

  14. Plasma current start-up experiments without a central solenoid in the iron core STOR-M tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitarai, O.; Tomney, G.; Rohollohi, A.; Lewis, E.; McColl, D.; Xiao, C.; Hirose, A.

    2015-06-01

    Reproducible plasma current start-up without a central solenoid (CS) has been demonstrated using the outer ohmic heating (OH) coils in the iron core STOR-M tokamak (Mitarai et al 2014 Fusion Eng. Des. 89 2467-71). Although the outer OH coil current saturates the iron core eventually, it has been demonstrated that the plasma current can be maintained during the iron core saturation phase. In this work, further studies have been conducted to investigate the effects of the turn number of the outer OH coils (N = 4 or N = 6) in the CS-less discharges and to evaluate the plasma stability with respect to the n-decay index of the vertical magnetic field. For the loose coupling of the iron core with N = 4 turns, the plasma current can be sustained after the additional third capacitor bank is applied near the iron core saturation phase, showing the slow transition from the unsaturated to the partially saturated phase. For the case of stronger coupling of N = 6 turns, the plasma current is increased at the same fast bank voltage, but the main discharge is shortened from 35 to 20 ms. As the magnetizing current is smaller due to stronger coupling between the OH coils and the plasma current, the transition from the unsaturated to the saturated phase is slightly difficult at present. The present experimental results suggest a feasible operation scenario in a future spherical tokamak (ST) at least using loose iron core coupling for smoother transition from the unsaturated to the saturated iron core phase. Thus, a reliable plasma current start-up by the outer OH coils and the current ramp-up to a steady state by additional heating power and vertical field coils could be considered as an operation scenario for future ST reactors with an iron core transformer.

  15. Enhancing the Practicum Experience for Pre-service Chemistry Teachers Through Collaborative CoRe Design with Mentor Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hume, Anne; Berry, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports findings from an ongoing study exploring how the Content Representation (CoRe) design can be used as a tool to help chemistry student teachers begin acquiring the professional knowledge required to become expert chemistry teachers. Phase 2 of the study, reported in this paper, investigated how collaboration with school-based mentors (associate teachers) on teaching practice (practicum) might impact on this process and student teachers' development of their pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). The collaboration involved identifying and discussing pedagogical issues related to a practicum-teaching topic using a student teacher's draft CoRe as a starting point and ongoing focus for the professional dialogue. Practicum offered an opportunity for aspects of student teachers' PCK, as embodied in their draft CoRes, to be explored and expanded upon in classroom programmes with the support and input of associate teachers. The findings were influenced by different contextual factors; however, the student teachers found their CoRes to be very useful frameworks for engaging in focussed professional dialogue with their teaching mentors. They valued the expertise, currency of knowledge and mentoring of their associates and reported positively about the contribution this support made to their PCK development via the CoRe design process and the transformation of the CoRe into classroom teaching.

  16. High-pressure melting experiments on Fe-Si alloys and implications for silicon as a light element in the core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Haruka; Hirose, Kei; Yonemitsu, Kyoko; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2016-12-01

    We carried out melting experiments on Fe-Si alloys to 127 GPa in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell (DAC). On the basis of textural and chemical characterizations of samples recovered from a DAC, a change in eutectic liquid composition in the Fe-FeSi binary system was examined with increasing pressure. The chemical compositions of coexisting liquid and solid phases were quantitatively determined with field-emission-type electron microprobes. The results demonstrate that silicon content in the eutectic liquid decreases with increasing pressure to less than 1.5 ± 0.1 wt.% Si at 127 GPa. If silicon is a single light element in the core, 4.5 to 12 wt.% Si is required in the outer core in order to account for its density deficit from pure iron. However, such a liquid core, whose composition is on the Si-rich side of the eutectic point, crystallizes less dense solid, CsCl (B2)-type phase at the inner core boundary (ICB). Our data also show that the difference in silicon concentration between coexisting solid and liquid is too small to account for the observed density contrast across the ICB. These indicate that silicon cannot be the sole light element in the core. Previous geochemical and cosmochemical arguments, however, strongly require ∼6 wt.% Si in the core. It is possible that the Earth's core originally included ∼6 wt.% Si but then became depleted in silicon by crystallizing SiO2 or MgSiO3.

  17. Combining coring and suction cup data to improve the monitoring of pesticides in sandy vadose zones: a field-release experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, B. M.; Franzmann, P. D.; Rayner, J. L.; Davis, G. B.

    2000-11-01

    Soil coring and vertically and horizontally installed suction cup monitoring techniques were compared during a field release experiment conducted in an urban area of the Swan Coastal Plain of Western Australia. Sodium bromide and low concentrations of diazinon, chlorpyrifos, atrazine and fenamiphos were released into the vadose zone and rates of migration and mass loss with respect to a bromide tracer investigated. Only bromide and atrazine showed significant migration through the vadose zone. The relative half-life mass losses from the vadose zone of the pesticides ranged from 3 to >40 days. The use of soil coring complemented the use of vertically and horizontally installed suction cups for investigating relatively mobile non-volatile compounds, such as atrazine. Data from horizontally installed suction cups accounted for mass losses due to dilution and transport that could not be accounted for by coring, and enabled a better estimate of degradation and migration rates through the vadose zone. From core data alone, atrazine migration rates for the first 0.25 m were underestimated by more than 50% (0.0039 m day -1 compared to 0.013 m day -1), and removal rates (and inferred degradation rates) were overestimated by more than 100% (half-life of 14 days compared to a half-life of 40 days), compared with rates determined by using core data and horizontal suction cup data in combination. Migration rates may have been even further underestimated at greater depths.

  18. Characterization of actinide physics specimens for the US/UK joint experiment in the Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.L.; Botts, J.L.; Cooper, J.H.; Adair, H.L.; Bigelow, J.E.; Raman, S.

    1983-10-01

    The United States and the United Kingdom are engaged in a joint research program in which samples of the higher actinides are irradiated in the Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor in Scotland. The purpose of the porogram is (1) to study the materials behavior of selected higher actinide fuels and (2) to determine the integral cross sections of a wide variety of the higher actinide isotopes. Samples of the actinides are incorporated in fuel pins inserted in the core. For the fuel study, the actinides selected are /sup 241/Am and /sup 244/Cm in the form of Am/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Cm/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and Am/sub 6/Cm(RE)/sub 7/O/sub 21/, where (RE) represents a mixture of lanthanides. For the cross-section determinations, the samples are milligram quantities of actinide oxides of /sup 248/Cm, /sup 246/Cm, /sup 244/Cm, /sup 243/Cm, /sup 243/Am, /sup 241/Am, /sup 244/Pu, /sup 242/Pu, /sup 241/Pu, /sup 240/Pu, /sup 239/Pu, /sup 238/Pu, /sup 237/Np, /sup 238/U, /sup 236/U, /sup 235/U, /sup 234/U, /sup 233/U, /sup 232/Th, /sup 230/Th, and /sup 231/Pa encapsulated in vanadium. Coincident with the irradiations, neutron flux and energy spectral measurements are made with vanadium-encapsulated dosimeter materials located within the same fuel pins.

  19. Preparation of actinide specimens for the US/UK joint experiment in the Dounreay Prototype Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Quinby, T C; Adair, H L; Kobisk, E H

    1982-05-01

    A joint research program involving the United States and the United Kingdom was initiated about four years ago for the purpose of studying the fuel behavior of higher actinides using in-core irradiation in the fast reactor at Dounreay, Scotland. Simultaneously, determination of integral cross sections of a wide variety of higher actinide isotopes (physics specimens) was proposed. Coincidental neutron flux and energy spectral measurements were to be made using vanadium encapsulated dosimetry materials in the immediate region of the fuel pellets and physics samples. The higher actinide samples chosen for the fuel study were /sup 241/Am and /sup 244/Cm in the forms of Am/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Cm/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and Am/sub 6/Cm(RE)/sub 7/O/sub 21/, where (RE) represents a mixture of lanthanides. Milligram quantities of actinide oxides of /sup 248/Cm, /sup 246/Cm, /sup 244/Cm, /sup 243/Cm, /sup 243/Am, /sup 241/Am, /sup 244/Pu, /sup 242/Pu, /sup 241/Pu, /sup 240/Pu, /sup 239/Pu, /sup 238/Pu, /sup 237/Np, /sup 238/U, /sup 236/U, /sup 235/U, /sup 234/U, /sup 233/U, /sup 232/Th, /sup 230/Th, and /sup 231/Pa were encapsulated to obtain nuclear cross section and reaction rate data for these materials.

  20. The Need for Standardized Methods for Measuring the Aorta: Multimodality Core Lab Experience From the GenTAC Registry.

    PubMed

    Asch, Federico M; Yuriditsky, Eugene; Prakash, Siddharth K; Roman, Mary J; Weinsaft, Jonathan W; Weissman, Gaby; Weigold, Wm Guy; Morris, Shaine A; Ravekes, William J; Holmes, Kathryn W; Silberbach, Michael; Milewski, Rita K; Kroner, Barbara L; Whitworth, Ryan; Eagle, Kim A; Devereux, Richard B; Weissman, Neil J

    2016-03-01

    This study sought to evaluate variability in aortic measurements with multiple imaging modalities in clinical centers by comparing with a standardized measuring protocol implemented in a core laboratory. In patients with aortic disease, imaging of thoracic aorta plays a major role in risk stratifying individuals for life-threatening complications and in determining timing of surgical intervention. However, standardization of the procedures for performance of aortic measurements is lacking. To characterize the diversity of methods used in clinical practice, we compared aortic measurements performed by echocardiography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at the 6 GenTAC (National Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions) clinical centers to those performed at the imaging core laboratory in 965 studies. Each center acquired and analyzed their images according to local protocols. The same images were subsequently analyzed blindly by the core laboratory, on the basis of a standardized protocol for all imaging modalities. Paired measurements from clinical centers and core laboratory were compared by mean of differences and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). For all segments of the ascending aorta, echocardiography showed a higher ICC (0.84 to 0.93) than CT (0.84) and MRI (0.82 to 0.90), with smaller mean of differences. MRI showed higher ICC for the arch and descending aorta (0.91 and 0.93). In a mixed adjusted model, the different imaging modalities and clinical centers were identified as sources of variability between clinical and core laboratory measurements, whereas age groups or diagnosis at enrollment were not. By comparing core laboratory with measurements from clinical centers, our study identified important sources of variability in aortic measurements. Furthermore, our findings with regard to CT and MRI suggest a need for imaging societies to work toward the development of

  1. Historical trends of organochlorine pesticides in a sediment core from the Gulf of Batabanó, Cuba.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Hernández, C M; Tolosa, I; Mesa-Albernas, M; Díaz-Asencio, M; Corcho-Alvarado, J A; Sánchez-Cabeza, J A

    2015-10-01

    Sediments can be natural archives to reconstruct the history of pollutant inputs into coastal areas. This is important to improve management strategies and evaluate the success of pollution control measurements. In this work, the vertical distribution of organochlorine pesticides (DDTs, Lindane, HCB, Heptachlor, Aldrin and Mirex) was determined in a sediment core collected from the Gulf of Batabanó, Cuba, which was dated by using the (210)Pb dating method and validated with the (239,240)Pu fallout peak. Results showed significant changes in sediment accumulation during the last 40 years: recent mass accumulation rates (0.321 g cm(-2) yr(-1)) double those estimated before 1970 (0.15 g cm(-2) yr(-1)). This change matches closely land use change in the region (intense deforestation and regulation of the Colon River in the late 1970s). Among pesticides, only DDTs isomers, Lindane and HCB were detected, and ranged from 0.029 to 0.374 ng g(-1) dw for DDTs, from<0.006 to 0.05 ng g(-1) dw for Lindane and from<0.04 to 0.134 ng g(-1) dw for HCB. Heptachlor, Aldrin and Mirex were below the detection limits (∼0.003 ng g(-1)), indicating that these compounds had a limited application in the Coloma watershed. Pesticide contamination was evident since the 1970s. DDTs and HCB records showed that management strategies, namely the banning the use of organochlorine contaminants, led to a concentration decline. However, Lindane, which was restricted in 1990, can still be found in the watershed. According to NOAA guidelines, pesticides concentrations encountered in these sediments are low and probably not having an adverse effect on sediment dwelling organisms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Enhancing the Practicum Experience for Pre-Service Chemistry Teachers through Collaborative CoRe Design with Mentor Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hume, Anne; Berry, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports findings from an ongoing study exploring how the Content Representation (CoRe) design can be used as a tool to help chemistry student teachers begin acquiring the professional knowledge required to become expert chemistry teachers. Phase 2 of the study, reported in this paper, investigated how collaboration with school-based…

  3. The Core of Mentorship: Medical Students' Experiences of One-to-One Mentoring in a Clinical Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalen, Susanne; Ponzer, Sari; Silen, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    Mentoring has been used in different health care educational programmes, but the core of mentorship, i.e., facilitating the development of medical students' professional competence, has not been explored in depth in the literature. In order to create effective and meaningful mentoring programmes, there is a need for deeper knowledge of the meaning…

  4. Vascular complications with transcatheter aortic valve implantation using the 18 Fr Medtronic CoreValve System: the Rotterdam experience.

    PubMed

    Van Mieghem, Nicolas M; Nuis, Rutger-Jan; Piazza, Nicolo; Apostolos, Tzikas; Ligthart, Jurgen; Schultz, Carl; de Jaegere, Peter P; Serruys, Patrick W

    2010-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) requires large bore catheters. Access site complications, therefore, can be a concern. The aim of this study is to present the 30-day incidence of major and minor vascular complications in patients treated with the third generation 18 Fr Medtronic CoreValve System. We prospectively evaluated the vascular complications occurring in all patients treated with the 18 Fr Medtronic CoreValve System between October 2006 and October 2009 in the Thoraxcenter using various proposed definitions. Ninety-nine consecutive patients were treated with TAVI using the 18 Fr Medtronic CoreValve System. Vascular events were encountered in 13 patients (13%), seven of these cases (54%) were related to incomplete arteriotomy closure with the Prostar device which is the default access closure technique in our centre. Depending on how major vascular complications were defined, the incidence varied from 4 to 13%. Blood transfusions in combination with surgical or percutaneous intervention were required in eight cases. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation with the 18 Fr Medtronic CoreValve System(R) has a 4 to 13% vascular complications' rate. More than half of the vascular events were due to incomplete Prostar arteriotomy closure, despite its use by experienced operators. Current percutaneous closure devices for these large arteriotomies seems suboptimal. Uniformity in how to define TAVI related vascular complications is needed.

  5. The Core of Mentorship: Medical Students' Experiences of One-to-One Mentoring in a Clinical Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalen, Susanne; Ponzer, Sari; Silen, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    Mentoring has been used in different health care educational programmes, but the core of mentorship, i.e., facilitating the development of medical students' professional competence, has not been explored in depth in the literature. In order to create effective and meaningful mentoring programmes, there is a need for deeper knowledge of the meaning…

  6. Rx-CADRE (Prescribed Fire Combustion-Atmospheric Dynamics Research Experiments) collaborative research in the core fire sciences

    Treesearch

    D. Jimenez; B. Butler; K. Hiers; R. Ottmar; M. Dickinson; R. Kremens; J. O' Brien; A. Hudak; C. Clements

    2009-01-01

    The Rx-CADRE project was the combination of local and national fire expertise in the field of core fire research. The project brought together approximately 30 fire scientists from six geographic regions and seven diff erent agencies. The project objectives were to demonstrate the capacity for collaborative research by bringing together individuals and teams with a...

  7. "Novel Approach for Maximizing Follow-up in Cosmetic Surgery Clinical Trials: The Ideal Implant Core Trial Experience".

    PubMed

    Mueller, Melissa A; Nichter, Larry S; Hamas, Robert S

    2017-06-12

    High follow-up rates are critical for robust research with minimal bias and particularly important for breast implant Core Studies seeking FDA approval. The Core Study for IDEAL IMPLANT, the most recently FDA-approved breast implant, utilized a novel incentive payment model to achieve higher follow-up rates than in previous breast implant trials. At enrollment, $3,500 was deposited into an independent, irrevocable trust for each of the 502 subjects and invested in a diversified portfolio. If a follow-up visit is missed, the subject is exited from the study and compensated for completed visits, but the remainder of her share of the funds stay in the trust. At the conclusion of the 10-year study, the trust will be divided among those subjects who completed all required follow-up visits. For primary and revision augmentation cohorts, FDA published follow-up rates from Core Studies were compared for all currently available breast implants. Five-year follow-up rates for the IDEAL IMPLANT Core Study are higher for both primary augmentation and revision augmentation cohorts (94.9% and 96.7%, respectively) when compared to all other trials that have used FDA standardized follow-up reporting (MemoryShape,® Allergan 410,® and Sientra® Core Studies). This trial demonstrates the utility of a novel incentive strategy to maximize follow-up in cosmetic surgery patients. This strategy may benefit future cosmetic surgery trials and perhaps any prospective research trial by providing more complete data.

  8. Application of Dredged Materials and Steelmaking Slag as Basal Media to Restore and Create Seagrass Beds: Mesocosm and Core Incubation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukasaki, A.; Suzumura, M.; Tsurushima, N.; Nakazato, T.; Huang, Y.; Tanimoto, T.; Yamada, N.; Nishijima, W.

    2016-02-01

    Seagrass beds stabilize bottom sediments, improve water quality and light conditions, enhance species diversity, and provide habitat complexity in coastal marine environments. Seagrass beds are now experiencing worldwide decline by rapid environmental changes. Possible options of seagrass bed restoration are civil engineering works including mounding to raise the bottom to elevations with suitable light for seagrass growth. Reuse or recycling of dredged materials (DM) and various industrial by-products including steelmaking slags is a beneficial option to restore and create seagrass beds. To evaluate the applicability of DM and dephosphorization slag (Slag) as basal media of seagrass beds, we carried out mesocosm experiments and core incubation experiments in a land-based flow-through seawater tank over a year. During the mesocosm experiment, no difference was found in growth of eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) and macrobenthic community structures between Slag-based sediments and sand-based control experiments, even though Slag-based sediments exhibited substantially higher pH than sand-based sediments. During the core incubation experiment, we investigated detailed variation and distributions of pH and nutrients, and diffusion fluxes of nutrients between the sediment/seawater interface. Though addition of Slag induced high pH up to 10.7 in deep layers (< 5 cm), the surface pH decreased rapidly within 10 days. Concentrations of dissolved inorganic nitrogen were comparable between Slag- and sand-based sediments, whereas dissolved phosphate concentration was substantially reduced by the addition of Slag. The low concentrations of phosphate was likely due to precipitation with calcium under high pH condition. Diffusion fluxes of nutrients from the cores were comparable with those reported in natural coastal systems. It was suggested that the mixture of Slag and DM is applicable as basal media for construction of artificial seagrass beds.

  9. Correlation between active-learning coursework and student retention of core content during advanced pharmacy practice experiences.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Kristy H; Testman, Julie A; Hoyland, Marcella N; Kimble, Angel M; Euler, Mary L

    2013-10-14

    To implement an active-learning approach in a pharmacotherapy course sequence in the second year (P2) and third (P3) year of a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) program and determine whether the pedagogical changes correlated with retention of core content in the fourth year (P4). Class sessions were transitioned from slides-based lectures to discussion-based active-learning pedagogy. A comprehensive examination was created and administered to assess student retention of therapeutic topics taught. Students demonstrated significantly improved overall scores on questions derived from the active-learning pedagogy used in Pharmacotherapy II and III compared to those derived from Pharmacotherapy I in which content was delivered by lecture. The use of active-learning strategies over lecture-based methods in pharmacotherapy courses resulted in higher retention of core content. Students' performance in areas taught using the discussion-based methodology was superior to that which was taught using lecture-based slide presentations.

  10. An integrated petrophysical approach to the sub-basalt imaging problem using well logging data to link measurements from cores and seismic experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagstein, R.; Boldreel, L. O.; Andersen, C.

    2003-04-01

    Flood basalt covered basins exist world wide along continental margins and are increasingly coming into the focus of the hydrocarbon industry as more accessible fields are being depleted. However, it has proved difficult in many places to look through the basalt cover by conventional seismic reflection methods. This stresses the need for a better understanding of the acoustic properties of basalt. The Seismic Faroes Basalt Project (SeiFaBa) was established in 2002 as an integrated study of the sub-basalt image problem. It involves 9 scientific institutions and individuals and is funded collectively by all oil companies operating in the Faroes sector (the Sindri group). The planned fieldwork includes core drilling, wire-line logging, multi-azimuth VSP and surface seismic experiments at land and sea. It is mainly centred around Glyvursnes, a relatively flat promontory near Tórshavn that allows optimal layout of seismic lines and integration of core, log and seismic data. We present the initial task of drilling and logging, which was performed in Oct.-Nov. 2002. A 700 m slim borehole was drilled on the shore of Glyvursnes with wire-line coring technique and an old 660 m borehole (Vestmanna-1) 30 km farther northwest partly blocked by calcite fillings was reopened using the same equipment. An extensive wire-line logging program was subsequently run in both holes. These two holes, together with the existing 3.65-km Lopra-1/1A hole in the southernmost island Suduroy, cover all three Faroes basalt formations and a range of lava compositions and morphologies. We show examples of the correlation of lava flow sequences and wire-logging measurements. Detailed analysis of the new logs is being planned together with laboratory studies of the petrography, rock chemistry and petrophysical properties of core samples with the aim of establishing a log stratigraphy and scale core data to seismic scales.

  11. Sound Speed of Liquid Iron Along the Outer Core Isentrope: New Pre-heated Ramp Compression Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asimow, P. D.; Nguyen, J.; Akin, M. C.; Fatýanov, O. V.

    2015-12-01

    Detailed elasticity data on liquid Fe and candidate molten core alloys should offer new constraints on the under-constrained problem of Earth's core composition. Density, sound speed, and the gradient in sound speed with pressure are each potentially distinct experimental constraints and are each well-known for Earth. The gradient in sound speed, though, has not been used because sound speed depends on both T and P, such that data must be collected or reconstructed along the correct, nearly adiabatic, thermal profile. Reconstruction requires the Grüneisen γ, which is composition-dependent, and data over a large P-T space to allow extrapolation. Both static and dynamic compression methods could be used, but the conditions (140 - 330 GPa and 4000 - 6000 K) are very challenging for static methods and standard shock compression only samples the outer core P-T profile at a single P. Instead we are applying quasi-isentropic dynamic ramp compression, using pre-heating of the target and impedance of the leading edge of a graded-density impactor (GDI) to select a probable outer core isentrope. The target material is melted and raised to a point on the outer core isentrope by the initial shock, then quasi-isentropically ramped to a maximum P by increasing shock impedance of trailing GDI layers. Particle velocity is monitored by photonic doppler velocimetry (PDV) at two step thicknesses at the interface of Fe or Fe-alloy target and MgO windows. The difference in arrival time of each particle velocity at the two steps directly gives the Lagrangian sound speed vs. particle velocity, which is integrated to obtain Pand density. At the writing of this abstract, we have completed one shot of this type. We successfully heated a two-step Fe target in a Mo capsule with MgO windows to 1350 °C, maintaining sufficient alignment and reflectivity to collect PDV signal returns. We characterized the velocity correction factor for PDV observation through MgO windows, and have confirmed

  12. Crystallization Processes in Mercury's Core Inferred from In-situ High-Pressure Melting Experiments in the Fe-S-Si-C System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, A. M.; Van Orman, J. A.; Hauck, S. A., II; Sun, N.; Yu, T.; Wang, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Based upon the high pressure melting temperatures in the Fe-FeS system, an iron "snow" process has been suggested to occur in Mercury's core. However, recent results from the MESSENGER mission indicate very reducing conditions in Mercury, under which a substantial amount of silicon should also dissolve into the core. The presence of Si can significantly modify the chemical and physical properties of Mercury's core (e.g., phase relations, crystallization, density). Moreover, up to 4 wt% C could have been incorporated into the core during the planet formation. In order to test the iron snow hypothesis in a system that is likely to be closer to the actual core composition, we performed in situ high-pressure, high-temperature experiments in the Fe-FeS-Fe2Si-Fe3C system using a multi-anvil press on a synchrotron (Advanced Photon Source, Argonne). To observe low degree eutectic melting, we separated the samples in two parts: (1) an iron rod presaturated with Si and C and (2) a mixture of FeS, Fe2Si and Fe3C. Eutectic melting temperature and phase relations were determined at various pressures between 4.5 and 15.5 GPa using energy dispersive X-ray diffraction and imaging. Temperature was quenched soon after melting in order to preserve the eutectic melt composition. The X-ray images, diffraction spectra and back-scattered electron images of the recovered samples show that eutectic melting occurs in the range of 800 - 900°C in all our experiments. These temperatures are close to the eutectic temperatures in the Fe-FeS-Fe3C system, indicating that Si does not change the eutectic temperatures significantly. Melting therefore occurs at much lower temperature than suggested for the Fe-S-Si system at similar pressures. This difference may be explained by the presence of C and by the higher silicon content in our starting composition. Our experimental setup may also be more suitable for detecting the low degrees of melting in metallic systems. Such low eutectic melting

  13. Anthropogenic plutonium in the North Jiangsu tidal flats of the Yellow Sea in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiyong; Zheng, Jian; Pan, Shaoming; Gao, Jianhua

    2013-08-01

    The (239+240)Pu activities and (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios were analyzed using a double-focusing SF-ICP-MS for sediment core samples obtained in 2007-2008 from the North Jiangsu tidal flats in the Yellow Sea in China. Particular attention was focused on the (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios in the sediment to identify the origins of Pu isotopes. The profiles of (239+240)Pu activities in the sediment cores are similar to those of the (137)Cs activities. The (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios in the tidal flats showed typical global fallout values, indicating that this area did not receive the possible early direct close-in fallout or oceanic current transported Pu from the Pacific Proving Grounds (PPG). If any, the contribution of the PPG source Pu to the total Pu inventory is negligible. This is different from the sediments in the Yangtze River estuary in the East China Sea, where the PPG source Pu contributed ca. 45 % to the total inventory. In addition, the observation of the global fallout origin Pu in the North Jiangsu tidal flats indicated that the nuclear power plant in the region was not causing any alteration/contamination to the (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios. The (239+240)Pu and (137)Cs activities/inventories in the sediment cores showed correlation to the mean clay sediment compositions (fine particles) in the tidal flats. Therefore, mud deposits are served as sinks for the anthropogenic radionuclides in the tidal flats and the Yellow Sea. Integrated with the previously reported spatial distributions of (239+240)Pu and (137)Cs activities in the surface sediments of the Yellow Sea, the mechanism of Pu transport with the ocean currents and the scavenging characteristics in the Yellow Sea were discussed.

  14. The Role of Core Needle Biopsy and Its Impact on Surgical Management in Patients with Medullary Thyroid Cancer: Clinical Experience at 3 Medical Institutions.

    PubMed

    Ha, E J; Baek, J H; Na, D G; Kim, J-h; Kim, J K; Min, H S; Song, D E; Lee, K E; Shong, Y K

    2015-08-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma is an uncommon malignancy that is challenging to diagnose. Our aim was to present our experience using core needle biopsy for the diagnosis of medullary thyroid carcinoma compared with fine-needle aspiration. Between January 2000 and March 2012, 202 thyroid nodules in 191 patients were diagnosed as medullary thyroid cancer by using sonography-guided fine-needle aspiration, core needle biopsy, or surgery. One hundred eighty-three thyroid nodules in 172 patients were included on the basis of the final diagnosis. We evaluated the sensitivity and positive predictive value of fine-needle aspiration and core needle biopsy for the diagnosis of medullary thyroid cancer. We compared the rate of a delayed diagnosis, a diagnostic surgery, and surgery with an incorrect diagnosis for fine-needle aspiration and core needle biopsy and investigated the factors related to the fine-needle aspiration misdiagnosis of medullary thyroid cancer. Fine-needle aspiration showed 43.8% sensitivity and 85.1% positive predictive value for the diagnosis of medullary thyroid cancer; 25.7% (44/171) of patients had a delayed diagnosis, while 18.7% (32/171) underwent an operation for accurate diagnosis, and 20.5% (35/171) underwent an operation with an incorrect diagnosis. Core needle biopsy achieved 100% sensitivity and positive predictive value without a delay in diagnosis (0/22), the need for a diagnostic operation (0/22), or an operation for an incorrect diagnosis (0/22). A calcitonin level of <100 pg/mL was the only significant factor for predicting the fine-needle aspiration misdiagnosis of medullary thyroid cancer (P = .034). Core needle biopsy showed a superior sensitivity and positive predictive value to fine-needle aspiration and could optimize the surgical management in patients with medullary thyroid cancer. Because the ability of fine-needle aspiration to diagnose medullary thyroid cancer significantly decreases in patients with serum calcitonin levels of

  15. Tunnel Closure Experiment, 1997 Test Programme: Core Logging and Laboratory Tests on Diamond Drilled Holes at Jerntoppen

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    clay mineral coatings, I.e., kaolinite or mica. Also chlorite, talc , gypsum, graphite, etc., and small quantitiesof swelling clays. 8-16° 4.0 b...They also have mineral coating; calcite, biotite and rust stains. From core logging observations these joints seem to be short (a few meters) and the...scale features, in that order. c) No rock-wall contact when sheared H Zone containing clay minerals thick enoughto prevent rock-wall contact 1.0 J

  16. Electrically Heated Testing of the Kilowatt Reactor Using Stirling Technology (KRUSTY) Experiment Using a Depleted Uranium Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Maxwell H.; Gibson, Marc A.; Sanzi, James

    2017-01-01

    The Kilopower project aims to develop and demonstrate scalable fission-based power technology for systems capable of delivering 110 kW of electric power with a specific power ranging from 2.5 - 6.5 Wkg. This technology could enable high power science missions or could be used to provide surface power for manned missions to the Moon or Mars. NASA has partnered with the Department of Energys National Nuclear Security Administration, Los Alamos National Labs, and Y-12 National Security Complex to develop and test a prototypic reactor and power system using existing facilities and infrastructure. This technology demonstration, referred to as the Kilowatt Reactor Using Stirling TechnologY (KRUSTY), will undergo nuclear ground testing in the summer of 2017 at the Nevada Test Site. The 1 kWe variation of the Kilopower system was chosen for the KRUSTY demonstration. The concept for the 1 kWe flight system consist of a 4 kWt highly enriched Uranium-Molybdenum reactor operating at 800 degrees Celsius coupled to sodium heat pipes. The heat pipes deliver heat to the hot ends of eight 125 W Stirling convertors producing a net electrical output of 1 kW. Waste heat is rejected using titanium-water heat pipes coupled to carbon composite radiator panels. The KRUSTY test, based on this design, uses a prototypic highly enriched uranium-molybdenum core coupled to prototypic sodium heat pipes. The heat pipes transfer heat to two Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASC-E2s) and six thermal simulators, which simulate the thermal draw of full scale power conversion units. Thermal simulators and Stirling engines are gas cooled. The most recent project milestone was the completion of non-nuclear system level testing using an electrically heated depleted uranium (non-fissioning) reactor core simulator. System level testing at the Glenn Research Center (GRC) has validated performance predictions and has demonstrated system level operation and control in a test configuration that replicates the one

  17. Modulation of mantle plumes and heat flow at the core mantle boundary by plate-scale flow: results from laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonnermann, Helge M.; Jellinek, A. Mark; Richards, Mark A.; Manga, Michael

    2004-09-01

    We report results from analog laboratory experiments, in which a large-scale flow is imposed upon natural convection from a hot boundary layer at the base of a large tank of corn syrup. The experiments show that the subdivision of the convective flow into four regions provides a reasonable conceptual framework for interpreting the effects of large-scale flow on plumes. Region I includes the area of the hot thermal boundary layer (TBL) that is thinned by the large-scale flow, thereby suppressing plumes. Region II encompasses the critically unstable boundary layer where plumes form. Region III is the area above the boundary layer that is devoid of plumes. Region IV comprises the area of hot upwelling and plume conduits. Quantitative analysis of our experiments results in a scaling law for heat flux from the hot boundary and for the spatial extent of plume suppression. When applied to the Earth's core-mantle boundary (CMB), our results suggest that large-scale mantle flow, due to sinking lithospheric plates, can locally thin the TBL and suppress plume formation over large fractions of the CMB. Approximately 30% of heat flow from the core may be due to increased heat flux from plate-scale flow. Furthermore, CMB heat flux is non-uniformly distributed along the CMB, with large areas where heat flux is increased on average by a factor of 2. As a consequence, the convective flow pattern in the outer core may be affected by CMB heat-flux heterogeneity and sensitive to changes in plate-scale mantle flow. Because of plume suppression and 'focusing' of hot mantle from the CMB into zones of upwelling flow, plume conduits (hotspots) are expected to be spatially associated with lower-mantle regions of low seismic velocities, inferred as hot upwelling mantle flow.

  18. Development and calibration of a reactive transport model for carbonate reservoir porosity and permeability changes based on CO2 core-flood experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Smith, Megan M.; Hao, Y.; Carroll, S. A.

    2017-01-02

    Here, beneficial pore space and permeability enhancements are likely to occur as CO2-charged fluids partially dissolve carbonate minerals in carbonate reservoir formations used for geologic CO2 storage. The ability to forecast the extent and impact of changes in porosity and permeability will aid geologic CO2 storage operations and lower uncertainty in estimates of long-term storage capacity. Our work is directed toward developing calibrated reactive transport models that more accurately capture the chemical impacts of CO2-fluid-rock interactions and their effects on porosity and permeability by matching pressure, fluid chemistry, and dissolution features that developed as a result of reaction with CO2-acidifiedmore » brines at representative reservoir conditions. We present new results from experiments conducted on seven core samples from the Arbuckle Dolostone (near Wellington, Kansas, USA, recovered as part of the South-Central Kansas CO2 Demonstration). Cores were obtained from both target reservoir and lower-permeability baffle zones, and together these samples span over 3–4 orders of magnitude of permeability according to downhole measurements. Core samples were nondestructively imaged by X-ray computed tomography and the resulting characterization data were mapped onto a continuum domain to further develop a reactive transport model for a range of mineral and physical heterogeneity. We combine these new results with those from previous experimental studies to more fully constrain the governing equations used in reactive transport models to better estimate the transition of enhanced oil recovery operations to long-term geology CO2 storage. Calcite and dolomite kinetic rate constants (mol m–2 s–1) derived by fitting the results from core-flood experiments range from kcalcite,25C = 10–6.8 to 10–4.6, and kdolomite,25C = 10–7.5 to 10–5.3. The power law-based porosity-permeability relationship is sensitive to the overall pore space heterogeneity of

  19. Benign Papillomas Without Atypia Diagnosed on Core Needle Biopsy: Experience From a Single Institution and Proposed Criteria for Excision

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Anupma; Carkaci, Selin; Gilcrease, Michael Z.; Liu, Ping; Middleton, Lavinia P.; Bassett, Roland L.; Zhang, Jinxia; Zhang, Hong; Coyne, Robin L.; Bevers, Therese B.; Sneige, Nour; Huo, Lei

    2015-01-01

    The management of benign papilloma (BP) without atypia identified on breast core needle biopsy (CNB) is controversial. We describe the clinicopathologic features of 80 patients with such lesions in our institution, with an upgrade rate to malignancy of 3.8%. A multidisciplinary approach to select patients for surgical excision is recommended. Background The management of benign papilloma (BP) without atypia identified on breast core needle biopsy (CNB) is controversial. In this study, we determined the upgrade rate to malignancy for BPs without atypia diagnosed on CNB and whether there are factors associated with upgrade. Methods Through our pathology database search, we studied 80 BPs without atypia identified on CNB from 80 patients from 1997 to 2010, including 30 lesions that had undergone excision and 50 lesions that had undergone ≥ 2 years of radiologic follow-up. Associations between surgery or upgrade to malignancy and clinical, radiologic, and pathologic features were analyzed. Results Mass lesions, lesions sampled by ultrasound-guided CNB, and palpable lesions were associated with surgical excision. All 3 upgraded cases were mass lesions sampled by ultrasound-guided CNB. None of the lesions with radiologic follow-up only were upgraded to malignancy. The overall upgrade rate was 3.8%. None of the clinical, radiologic, or histologic features were predictive of upgrade. Conclusion Because the majority of patients can be safely managed with radiologic surveillance, a selective approach for surgical excision is recommended. Our proposed criteria for excision include pathologic/radiologic discordance or sampling by ultrasound-guided CNB without vacuum assistance when the patient is symptomatic or lesion size is ≥ 1.5 cm. PMID:24119786

  20. Composite Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Spang & Company's new configuration of converter transformer cores is a composite of gapped and ungapped cores assembled together in concentric relationship. The net effect of the composite design is to combine the protection from saturation offered by the gapped core with the lower magnetizing requirement of the ungapped core. The uncut core functions under normal operating conditions and the cut core takes over during abnormal operation to prevent power surges and their potentially destructive effect on transistors. Principal customers are aerospace and defense manufacturers. Cores also have applicability in commercial products where precise power regulation is required, as in the power supplies for large mainframe computers.

  1. Transient climate simulations of the deglaciation 21-9 thousand years before present (version 1) - PMIP4 Core experiment design and boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanovic, Ruza F.; Gregoire, Lauren J.; Kageyama, Masa; Roche, Didier M.; Valdes, Paul J.; Burke, Andrea; Drummond, Rosemarie; Peltier, W. Richard; Tarasov, Lev

    2016-07-01

    The last deglaciation, which marked the transition between the last glacial and present interglacial periods, was punctuated by a series of rapid (centennial and decadal) climate changes. Numerical climate models are useful for investigating mechanisms that underpin the climate change events, especially now that some of the complex models can be run for multiple millennia. We have set up a Paleoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project (PMIP) working group to coordinate efforts to run transient simulations of the last deglaciation, and to facilitate the dissemination of expertise between modellers and those engaged with reconstructing the climate of the last 21 000 years. Here, we present the design of a coordinated Core experiment over the period 21-9 thousand years before present (ka) with time-varying orbital forcing, greenhouse gases, ice sheets and other geographical changes. A choice of two ice sheet reconstructions is given, and we make recommendations for prescribing ice meltwater (or not) in the Core experiment. Additional focussed simulations will also be coordinated on an ad hoc basis by the working group, for example to investigate more thoroughly the effect of ice meltwater on climate system evolution, and to examine the uncertainty in other forcings. Some of these focussed simulations will target shorter durations around specific events in order to understand them in more detail and allow for the more computationally expensive models to take part.

  2. Recent developments in pressure coring

    SciTech Connect

    McFall, A. L.

    1980-01-01

    The current rapid growth in the number of enhanced oil and gas recovery projects has created a strong demand for reservoir data such as true residual oil saturations. The companies providing pressure coring services have moved to fill this need. Two recent developments have emerged with the potential of significantly improving the present performance of pressure coring. Coring bits utilizing synthetic diamond cutters have demonstrated coring rates of one-foot per minute while improving core recovery. It is also apparent that cores of a near-unconsolidated nature are more easily recovered. In addition, a special low invasion fluid that is placed in the core retriever has demonstrated reduced core washing by the drilling mud and a decrease in the complexity of preparing cores for analysis. This paper describes the design, laboratory, and field testing efforts that led to these coring improvements. Also, experience in utilizing these developments while recovering over 100 cores is discussed.

  3. Complications of transrectal ultrasound-guided 12-core prostate biopsy: a single center experience with 2049 patients

    PubMed Central

    Efesoy, Ozan; Bozlu, Murat; Çayan, Selahittin; Akbay, Erdem

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Currently, transrectal ultrasound-guided (TRUS) systematic prostate biopsy is the standard procedure in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. Although TRUS-guided prostate biopsy is a safe method, it is an invasive procedure that is not free from complications. In this prospective study we evaluated the complications of a TRUS-guided 12-core prostate biopsy. Material and methods: The study included 2049 patients undergoing transrectal ultrasound-guided 12-core prostate biopsy used in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. The indications for the prostate biopsy were abnormal digital rectal examination findings and/or an elevated serum total prostate specific antigen (PSA) level (greater than 4 ng/mL). The participants received prophylactic oral ciprofloxacin (500 mg) the night before and the morning of the biopsy, followed by 500 mg orally twice daily for 2 days. To prevent development of voiding disorders, the patients also received oral alpha blockers for 30 days starting the day before the procedure. A Fleet enema was self-administered the night before the procedure for rectal cleansing. The complications were assessed both 10 days and 1 month after the biopsy. Results: The mean age, serum total PSA level and prostate volume of the patients were 65.4±9.6 years, 18.6±22.4 ng/mL and 51.3±22.4 cc, respectively. From these 2.042 biopsies, 596 cases (29.1%) were histopathologically diagnosed as prostate adenocarcinoma. Minor complications, such as hematuria (66.3%), hematospermia (38.8%), rectal bleeding (28.4%), mild to moderate degrees of vasovagal episodes (7.7%), and genitourinary tract infection (6.1%) were noted frequently. Major complications were rare and included urosepsis (0.5%), rectal bleeding requiring intervention (0.3%), acute urinary retention (0.3%), hematuria necessitating transfusion (0.05%), Fournier’s gangrene (0.05%), and myocardial infarction (0.05%). Conclusion: TRUS-guided prostate biopsy is safe for diagnosing prostate cancer with few

  4. Challenging Idealism: Pre-Service Teachers' Core Beliefs Before, During, and after an Extended Field-Based Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, John W.; Chant, Richard H.

    2014-01-01

    Teacher beliefs have for some time been directly linked to teacher actions. What teachers believe about curriculum, pedagogy, their students, and the greater goals of education itself influences their instructional behaviors and resultant decision-making. This study sought to analyze how experiences influence changes in beliefs, can provide…

  5. The Models and Hard Cores: Selective Acculturation and Racial Stratification in Chinese Students' School Experience in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kee, Geok Hwa

    2010-01-01

    Are the academic and social experiences of Chinese Malaysian students as much an outcome of the selective acculturation strategy of their parents as the linguistic assimilation policy of the government? Driven by economic necessity on one hand and pressured by cultural preservation on the other, Chinese parents first send their sons and daughters…

  6. CO2 Exsolution from CO2 Saturated Water: Core-Scale Experiments and Focus on Impacts of Pressure Variations.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ruina; Li, Rong; Ma, Jin; Jiang, Peixue

    2015-12-15

    For CO2 sequestration and utilization in the shallow reservoirs, reservoir pressure changes are due to the injection rate changing, a leakage event, and brine withdrawal for reservoir pressure balance. The amounts of exsolved CO2 which are influenced by the pressure reduction and the subsequent secondary imbibition process have a significant effect on the stability and capacity of CO2 sequestration and utilization. In this study, exsolution behavior of the CO2 has been studied experimentally using a core flooding system in combination with NMR/MRI equipment. Three series of pressure variation profiles, including depletion followed by imbibitions without or with repressurization and repetitive depletion and repressurization/imbibition cycles, were designed to investigate the exsolution responses for these complex pressure variation profiles. We found that the exsolved CO2 phase preferentially occupies the larger pores and exhibits a uniform spatial distribution. The mobility of CO2 is low during the imbibition process, and the residual trapping ratio is extraordinarily high. During the cyclic pressure variation process, the first cycle has the largest contribution to the amount of exsolved CO2. The low CO2 mobility implies a certain degree of self-sealing during a possible reservoir depletion.

  7. The Medical Mission and Modern Core Competency Training: A 10-Year Follow-Up of Resident Experiences in Global Plastic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Yao, Caroline A; Swanson, Jordan; McCullough, Meghan; Taro, Trisa B; Gutierrez, Ricardo; Bradshaw, Allison; Campbell, Alex; Magee, William P; Magee, William P

    2016-09-01

    The emphasis on cultural competency for physicians and surgeons is increasingly important, as communication with both patients and other providers significantly affects individual and system-wide outcomes. International surgical training has been shown to improve leadership skills, cultural competency, and technical proficiency of participants in short-term follow-up. This study explores the long-term impact of international surgical mission experiences on developing participants' core competencies, professional outcomes, and commitment to global health. All 208 plastic and reconstructive surgeons who completed the Operation Smile Regan/Stryker fellowship programs between 2006 and 2015 were surveyed electronically. One hundred sixty-five surveys were returned, for an overall response rate of 79.3 percent. The majority of participants reported that the fellowship positively impacted all six Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies. Most participants who were attending physicians at the time of the survey were practicing general plastic surgery, with 42 percent in an academic/teaching environment, 32 percent in assistant/associate professor positions, and 6 percent in either a program director or department chairman position. The majority currently volunteer on local or international missions, and all respondents would consider volunteering again. Carefully structured and rigorously proctored programs such as the Regan/Stryker Fellowship offer plastic surgery residents the opportunity to gain valuable professional and personal experiences that benefit them long after their service experience. Programs of this nature can not only effectively improve cultural competency of physicians, but also positively influence their attitudes toward leadership and direct that potential to meet the growing need for surgical care in low- and middle-income countries.

  8. Magnetic resonance-guided large-core breast biopsy inside a 1.5-T magnetic resonance scanner using an automatic system: in vitro experiments and preliminary clinical experience in four patients.

    PubMed

    Pfleiderer, Stefan O R; Marx, Christiane; Vagner, Jörg; Franke, Ralf-Peter; Reichenbach, Jürgen R; Kaiser, Werner A

    2005-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility and the precision of magnetic resonance (MR)-guided large-core breast biopsies (LCBB) by using the second prototype of an automatic system (ROBITOM II), which is used to localize lesions while operating at the isocenter of a 1.5-T whole-body scanner. In comparison to the first prototype, ROBITOM II is equipped with a dedicated double breast coil and a high-speed trocar setting unit. In vitro experiments (n = 25) with grapefruit phantoms, which contained multiple vitamin E capsules (12 x 7 mm in size) as artificial lesions, were performed. Four patients with MR-detectable breast lesions underwent biopsy. A trocar was positioned in front of the lesion and inserted into the breast. Specimens were harvested with a coaxial technique by using a 14-G core needle biopsy gun. In all 25 in vitro experiments, capsule material was detected in the specimen cylinder. In 4 patients, the coaxial needle was detected exactly at the expected position. Between 8 and 16 tissue cylinders were harvested. Histologic evaluation resulted in 1 invasive ductal carcinoma and 1 papilloma, which were confirmed after open surgery. One patient who had a proven breast cancer was biopsied for exclusion of multifocal disease. She showed fibrocystic changes, whereas open surgery revealed 3 small areas of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Another patient showed fibroadenoma after biopsy. This patient is in the follow-up period, which has lasted between 3 and 4 months up until now. In this pilot patient study, the feasibility of manipulator-assisted large-core breast biopsy inside a 1.5-T whole-body scanner was demonstrated by using ROBITOM II. The precision of the device was confirmed with in vitro experiments. Although these findings are preliminary and the follow-up period is rather short, they nevertheless represent a successful proof-of-principle of LCBB with ROBITOM II.

  9. Ultraviolet radiation-induced limitation to epilithic microbial growth in arid deserts--dosimetric experiments in the hyperarid core of the Atacama Desert.

    PubMed

    Cockell, Charles S; McKay, Christopher P; Warren-Rhodes, Kim; Horneck, Gerda

    2008-02-27

    Experiments were conducted during November 2003 in the dry core of the Atacama Desert, Yungay, Chile to test the hypothesis that UV radiation, in environments where liquid water is not available, and thus enzymatic repair of UV-induced damage is inhibited, can prevent epilithic colonization. Novel dosimeters made from the cryptoendolithic, desiccation and radiation-resistant cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis sp. isolated from the dry Negev desert, Israel, showed that monolayers of this organism were killed within one day. The diurnal profile of microbial loss of viability was investigated with dosimeters of Bacillus subtilis, which similarly showed cell death within one day. Soil grains obtained from south of Yungay where liquid water is more abundant and transported to the hyperarid core showed killing of indigenous vegetative organisms within one day. Gypsum and mineral grain coverings of 1mm were sufficient to prevent measurable UV-induced damage of Chroococcidiopsis and B. subtilis after 8d exposure. These results show that under extreme desiccation and an ambient UV flux the surface of rocks can potentially be rendered sterile, but that millimetre thick mineral coverings can protect organisms from UV-induced killing, consistent with the observed patterns of lithophytic colonization in the Atacama Desert. These data further show that UV radiation can be an important limiting factor in surface biological rock weathering in arid regions.

  10. Multiple Core Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R.H.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Nuclei of galaxies often show complicated density structures and perplexing kinematic signatures. In the past we have reported numerical experiments indicating a natural tendency for galaxies to show nuclei offset with respect to nearby isophotes and for the nucleus to have a radial velocity different from the galaxy's systemic velocity. Other experiments show normal mode oscillations in galaxies with large amplitudes. These oscillations do not damp appreciably over a Hubble time. The common thread running through all these is that galaxies often show evidence of ringing, bouncing, or sloshing around in unexpected ways, even though they have not been disturbed by any external event. Recent observational evidence shows yet another phenomenon indicating the dynamical complexity of central regions of galaxies: multiple cores (M31, Markarian 315 and 463 for example). These systems can hardly be static. We noted long-lived multiple core systems in galaxies in numerical experiments some years ago, and we have more recently followed up with a series of experiments on multiple core galaxies, starting with two cores. The relevant parameters are the energy in the orbiting clumps, their relative.masses, the (local) strength of the potential well representing the parent galaxy, and the number of cores. We have studied the dependence of the merger rates and the nature of the final merger product on these parameters. Individual cores survive much longer in stronger background potentials. Cores can survive for a substantial fraction of a Hubble time if they travel on reasonable orbits.

  11. Multiple Core Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R.H.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Nuclei of galaxies often show complicated density structures and perplexing kinematic signatures. In the past we have reported numerical experiments indicating a natural tendency for galaxies to show nuclei offset with respect to nearby isophotes and for the nucleus to have a radial velocity different from the galaxy's systemic velocity. Other experiments show normal mode oscillations in galaxies with large amplitudes. These oscillations do not damp appreciably over a Hubble time. The common thread running through all these is that galaxies often show evidence of ringing, bouncing, or sloshing around in unexpected ways, even though they have not been disturbed by any external event. Recent observational evidence shows yet another phenomenon indicating the dynamical complexity of central regions of galaxies: multiple cores (M31, Markarian 315 and 463 for example). These systems can hardly be static. We noted long-lived multiple core systems in galaxies in numerical experiments some years ago, and we have more recently followed up with a series of experiments on multiple core galaxies, starting with two cores. The relevant parameters are the energy in the orbiting clumps, their relative.masses, the (local) strength of the potential well representing the parent galaxy, and the number of cores. We have studied the dependence of the merger rates and the nature of the final merger product on these parameters. Individual cores survive much longer in stronger background potentials. Cores can survive for a substantial fraction of a Hubble time if they travel on reasonable orbits.

  12. Performance and advantages of a soft-core based parallel architecture for energy peak detection in the calorimeter Level 0 trigger for the NA62 experiment at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammendola, R.; Barbanera, M.; Bizzarri, M.; Bonaiuto, V.; Ceccucci, A.; Checcucci, B.; De Simone, N.; Fantechi, R.; Federici, L.; Fucci, A.; Lupi, M.; Paoluzzi, G.; Papi, A.; Piccini, M.; Ryjov, V.; Salamon, A.; Salina, G.; Sargeni, F.; Venditti, S.

    2017-03-01

    The NA62 experiment at CERN SPS has started its data-taking. Its aim is to measure the branching ratio of the ultra-rare decay K+ → π+ν ν̅ . In this context, rejecting the background is a crucial topic. One of the main background to the measurement is represented by the K+ → π+π0 decay. In the 1-8.5 mrad decay region this background is rejected by the calorimetric trigger processor (Cal-L0). In this work we present the performance of a soft-core based parallel architecture built on FPGAs for the energy peak reconstruction as an alternative to an implementation completely founded on VHDL language.

  13. The Joint Aerosol-Monsoon Experiment (JAMEX): A Core Element for the Asian Monsoon Year (2008-2009)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K.M.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the Joint Aerosol-Monsoon Experiment (JAMEX) is to unravel the physical mechanisms and multi-scale interactions associated with aerosol-monsoon water cycle in the Asian Indo-Pacific region towards improved prediction of rainfall in land regions of the Asian monsoon. JAMEX will be planned as a five-year (2007-201 1) multi-national aerosol-monsoon research project, aimed at promoting collaboration, partnership and alignment of ongoing and planned national and international programs. Two coordinated special observing periods (SOP), covering the pre-monsoon (April-May) and the monsoon (June-August) periods is tentatively targeted for 2008 and 2009. The major work on validation and reference site coordination will take place in 2007 through the spring of 2008. A major science workshop is planned after SOP-I1 in 2010. Modeling and satellite data utilization studies will continue throughout the entire period to help in design of the observation arrays and measurement platforms for SOPS. The tentative time schedule, including milestones and research activities is shown in Fig. 1. One of the unique aspects of JAMEX is that it stems from grass-root scientific and societal imperatives, and it bridges a gap in existing national and international research programs. Currently we have identified 10 major national and international projects/programs separately for aerosols and monsoon research planned in the next five years in China, India, Japan, Italy, and the US, that could be potential contributors or partners with JAMEX. These include the Asian-Indo- Pacific Ocean (AIPO) Project and Aerosol Research Project from China, Monsoon Asian Hydro- Atmospheric Science Research and predication Initiative (MAHASRI) from Japan, Continental Tropical Convergence Zone (CTCZ) and Severe Thunderstorm: Observations and Regional Modeling (STORM) from India, Share-Asia from Italy, Atmospheric Brown Cloud (ABC), Pacific Aerosol-Cloud-Dust Experiment (PACDEX), East Asia Study of

  14. The Joint Aerosol-Monsoon Experiment (JAMEX): A Core Element for the Asian Monsoon Year (2008-2009)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, WIlliam K. M.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the Joint Aerosol-Monsoon Experiment (JAMEX) is to unravel the physical mechanisms and multi-scale interactions associated with aerosol-monsoon water cycle in the Asian Indo-Paczj?c region towards improved prediction of rainfall in land regions of the Asian monsoon. JAMEX will be planned as a five-year (2007-201 1) multi-national aerosol-monsoon research project, aimed at promoting collaboration, partnership and alignment of ongoing and planned national and international programs. Two coordinated special observing periods (SOP), covering the pre-monsoon (April-May) and the monsoon (June-August) periods is tentatively targeted for 2008 and 2009. The major work on validation and reference site coordination will take place in 2007 through the spring of 2008. A major science workshop is planned after SOP-I1 in 2010. Modeling and satellite data utilization studies will continue throughout the entire period to help in design of the observation arrays and measurement platforms for SOPS. The tentative time schedule, including milestones and research activities is shown in Fig. 1. One of the unique aspects of JAMEX is that it stems from grass-root scientific and societal imperatives, and it bridges a gap in existing national and international research programs. Currently we have identified 10 major national and international projects/programs separately for aerosols and monsoon research planned in the next five years in China, India, Japan, Italy, and the US, that could be potential contributors or partners with JAMEX. These include the Asian-Indo- Pacific Ocean (AIPO) Project and Aerosol Research Project from China, Monsoon Asian Hydro- Atmospheric Science Research and predication Initiative (MAHASRI) from Japan, Continental Tropical Convergence Zone (CTCZ) and Severe Thunderstorm: Observations and Regional Modeling (STORM) from India, Share-Asia from Italy, Atmospheric Brown Cloud (ABC), Pacific Aerosol-Cloud-Dust Experiment (PACDEX), East Asia Study of

  15. The Joint Aerosol-Monsoon Experiment (JAMEX): A Core Element for the Asian Monsoon Year (2008-2009)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K.M.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the Joint Aerosol-Monsoon Experiment (JAMEX) is to unravel the physical mechanisms and multi-scale interactions associated with aerosol-monsoon water cycle in the Asian Indo-Pacific region towards improved prediction of rainfall in land regions of the Asian monsoon. JAMEX will be planned as a five-year (2007-201 1) multi-national aerosol-monsoon research project, aimed at promoting collaboration, partnership and alignment of ongoing and planned national and international programs. Two coordinated special observing periods (SOP), covering the pre-monsoon (April-May) and the monsoon (June-August) periods is tentatively targeted for 2008 and 2009. The major work on validation and reference site coordination will take place in 2007 through the spring of 2008. A major science workshop is planned after SOP-I1 in 2010. Modeling and satellite data utilization studies will continue throughout the entire period to help in design of the observation arrays and measurement platforms for SOPS. The tentative time schedule, including milestones and research activities is shown in Fig. 1. One of the unique aspects of JAMEX is that it stems from grass-root scientific and societal imperatives, and it bridges a gap in existing national and international research programs. Currently we have identified 10 major national and international projects/programs separately for aerosols and monsoon research planned in the next five years in China, India, Japan, Italy, and the US, that could be potential contributors or partners with JAMEX. These include the Asian-Indo- Pacific Ocean (AIPO) Project and Aerosol Research Project from China, Monsoon Asian Hydro- Atmospheric Science Research and predication Initiative (MAHASRI) from Japan, Continental Tropical Convergence Zone (CTCZ) and Severe Thunderstorm: Observations and Regional Modeling (STORM) from India, Share-Asia from Italy, Atmospheric Brown Cloud (ABC), Pacific Aerosol-Cloud-Dust Experiment (PACDEX), East Asia Study of

  16. The Joint Aerosol-Monsoon Experiment (JAMEX): A Core Element for the Asian Monsoon Year (2008-2009)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, WIlliam K. M.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the Joint Aerosol-Monsoon Experiment (JAMEX) is to unravel the physical mechanisms and multi-scale interactions associated with aerosol-monsoon water cycle in the Asian Indo-Paczj?c region towards improved prediction of rainfall in land regions of the Asian monsoon. JAMEX will be planned as a five-year (2007-201 1) multi-national aerosol-monsoon research project, aimed at promoting collaboration, partnership and alignment of ongoing and planned national and international programs. Two coordinated special observing periods (SOP), covering the pre-monsoon (April-May) and the monsoon (June-August) periods is tentatively targeted for 2008 and 2009. The major work on validation and reference site coordination will take place in 2007 through the spring of 2008. A major science workshop is planned after SOP-I1 in 2010. Modeling and satellite data utilization studies will continue throughout the entire period to help in design of the observation arrays and measurement platforms for SOPS. The tentative time schedule, including milestones and research activities is shown in Fig. 1. One of the unique aspects of JAMEX is that it stems from grass-root scientific and societal imperatives, and it bridges a gap in existing national and international research programs. Currently we have identified 10 major national and international projects/programs separately for aerosols and monsoon research planned in the next five years in China, India, Japan, Italy, and the US, that could be potential contributors or partners with JAMEX. These include the Asian-Indo- Pacific Ocean (AIPO) Project and Aerosol Research Project from China, Monsoon Asian Hydro- Atmospheric Science Research and predication Initiative (MAHASRI) from Japan, Continental Tropical Convergence Zone (CTCZ) and Severe Thunderstorm: Observations and Regional Modeling (STORM) from India, Share-Asia from Italy, Atmospheric Brown Cloud (ABC), Pacific Aerosol-Cloud-Dust Experiment (PACDEX), East Asia Study of

  17. Sampling in the Snow: High School Winter Field Experiences Provide Relevant, Real World Connections Between Scientific Practices and Disciplinary Core Ideas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, E. W.; Burakowski, E. A.

    2014-12-01

    For much of the northern United States, the months surrounding the winter solstice are times of increased darkness, low temperatures, and frozen landscapes. It's a time when many high school science educators, who otherwise would venture outside with their classes, hunker down and are wary of the outdoors. However, a plethora of learning opportunities lies just beyond the classroom. Working collaboratively, a high school science teacher and a snow scientist have developed multiple activities to engage students in the scientific process of collecting, analyzing and interpreting the winter world using snow data to (1) learn about the insulative properties of snow, and (2) to learn about the role of snow cover on winter climate through its reflective properties while participating in a volunteer network that collects snow depth, albedo (reflectivity), and density data. These outdoor field-based snow investigations incorporate Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and disciplinary core ideas, including ESS2.C: The roles of water in Earth's surface processes and ESS2.D: Weather and Climate. Additionally, the lesson plans presented address Common Core State Standards (CCSS) in Mathematics, including the creation and analysis of bar graphs and time series plots (CCSS.Math.HSS-ID.A.1) and xy scatter plots (CCSS.Math.HSS-ID.B.6). High school students participating in the 2013/2014 snow sampling season described their outdoor learning experience as "authentic" and "hands-on" as compared to traditional class indoors. They emphasized that learning outdoors was essential to their understanding of underlying content and concepts because they "learn through actual experience."

  18. [Conduction disturbances and permanent cardiac pacing after transcatheter implantation of the CoreValve aortic bioprosthesis: initial single centre experience].

    PubMed

    Czerwińska, Katarzyna; Hryniewiecki, Tomasz; Oręziak, Artur; Dąbrowski, Maciej; Michałowska, Ilona; Witkowski, Adam; Demkow, Marcin; Stępińska, Janina; Orłowska Baranowska, Ewa; Rużyłło, Witold

    2012-01-01

    The rate of significant conduction disturbances requiring permanent pacemaker implantation (PPI) following surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) is 2-8%. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is an alternative management approach in patients with severe aortic stenosis who are not considered candidates for AVR. The TAVI using the CoreValve (CV) bioprosthesis is associated with a nearly 30% rate of conduction disturbances requiring postprocedural PPI. To provide an initial evaluation of the rate of conduction disturbances and the need for PPI, and to analyse factors that increase the risk of this complication in patients undergoing TAVI using CV bioprosthesis. In addition, we evaluated the rate of permanent conduction disturbances in patients who underwent PPI at one year after TAVI. We studies 22 initial patients in a single centre who underwent CV bioprosthesis implantation in 2009-2010. After exclusion of 6 patients with preprocedural PPI, we ultimately evaluated 16 patients. Uni- and multivariate analyses were performed using χ(2), Fisher, and Wilcoxon tests, and logistic regression analysis was performed using the SAS software. Overall, 8 (50%) patients in our study group required PPI after TAVI (TAVI + PPI), and the remaining 8 patients did not require PPI (TAVI). The most common indication for PPI was complete heart block. The decision to implant a pacemaker was made on average at 9 ± 7 days following TAVI (range 3 to 22 days). When we analysed risk factors for PPI that were unrelated to the TAVI procedure, we found that the TAVI + PPI group was characterised (vs the TAVI group) by a significantly larger diameter of the native aortic valve (p = 0.03) and a larger left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) dimension in the frontal (p = 0.02) and the corresponding frontal dimension in the transverse view (p = 0.01) by computed tomography angiography. Logistic regression analysis showed that the risk of PPI increased more than 2.5 times for each increase

  19. Core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia (CBF-AML) in México: a single institution experience.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Delgado, Guillermo J; Macías-Gallardo, Julio; Lutz-Presno, Julia; Garcés-Eisele, Javier; Hernández-Arizpe, Ana; Montes-Montiel, Maryel; Ruiz-Argüelles, Guillermo J

    2011-01-01

    Twenty one patients with CBF-AML presented prospectively in the Centro de Hematología y Medicina Interna de Puebla (Puebla, México) between February 1995 and March 2010, 14 with the t(8;21)(q22;q22) and 7 with the inv(16)(p13;q22)/t(16;16)(p13;q22); they represent 13% of all cases of AML. The median age of the patients was 24 years (range 1 to 61). Seven of 14 patients with t(8;21)(q22;q22) had an M2 morphology whereas 3/7 with the inv(16) had an M4 morphology; in addition to the myeloid markers identified by flow-cytometry (surface CD13, surface CD33, and cytoplasmic myeloperoxidase) lymphoid markers were identified in the blast cells of 8/14 cases of the t(8;21) patients, but in no patient with the inv(16). Nineteen patients were treated with combined chemotherapy and 16 (84%) achieved a complete molecular remission. Seven patients were auto or allografted. Relapses presented in 10/16 patients. The median probability of overall survival (OS) has not been reached being above 165 months, whereas the 165-month probability of OS and leukemia-free survival was 52%; despite a tendency for a better outcome of patients with the t(8;21), there were no significant differences in survival of patients with either the t(8;21) or the inv(16). In this single institution experience in México, we found that the CBF variants of AML have a similar prevalence as compared with Caucasian populations, that the co-expression of lymphoid markers in the blast cells was frequent in the t(8;21) and that these two AML subtypes were associated with a relatively good long-term prognosis. Further studies are needed to describe with more detail the precise biological features of these molecular subtypes of acute leukemia.

  20. Transition into the improved core confinement mode as a possible mechanism for additional electron heating observed in the lower hybrid current drive experiments at the FT-2 tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashkul, S. I.; Altukhov, A. B.; Gurchenko, A. D.; Gusakov, E. Z.; Dyachenko, V. V.; Esipov, L. A.; Irzak, M. A.; Kantor, M. Yu.; Kouprienko, D. V.; Perevalov, A. A.; Saveliev, A. N.; Stepanov, A. Yu.; Shatalin, S. V.

    2017-07-01

    In experiments on lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) carried out at the FT-2 tokamak, a substantial increase in the central electron temperature T e ( r = 0 cm) from 550 to 700 eV was observed. A complex simulation procedure is used to explain a fairly high LHCD efficiency and the observed additional heating, which can be attributed to a transition into the improved core confinement (ICC) mode. For numerical simulations, data obtained in experiments with deuterium plasma at < n e > = 1.6 × 1019 m-3 were used. Simulations by the GRILL3D, FRTC, and ASTRA codes have shown that the increase in the density and central temperature is apparently caused by a significant suppression of heat transport in the electron component. The mechanism for transition into the improved confinement mode at r < 3 cm can be associated with the broadening of the plasma current channel due to the lower hybrid drive of the current carried by superthermal and runaway electrons. In this case, the magnetic shear s = ( r/ q)( dq/ dr) in the axial region of the plasma column almost vanishes during the RF pulse. In this study, the effect of lower hybrid waves on the plasma parameters, resulting in a transition into the ICC mode, is considered. New experimental and calculated data are presented that evidence in favor of such a transition. Special attention is paid to the existence of a threshold for the transition into the ICC mode in deuterium plasma.

  1. Transient climate simulations of the deglaciation 21-9 thousand years before present; PMIP4 Core experiment design and boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanovic, Ruza; Gregoire, Lauren; Kageyama, Masa; Roche, Didier; Valdes, Paul; Burke, Andrea; Drummond, Rosemarie; Peltier, W. Richard; Tarasov, Lev

    2016-04-01

    The last deglaciation, which marked the transition between the last glacial and present interglacial periods, was punctuated by a series of rapid (centennial and decadal) climate changes. Numerical climate models are useful for investigating mechanisms that underpin the events, especially now that some of the complex models can be run for multiple millennia. We have set up a Paleoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project (PMIP) working group to coordinate efforts to run transient simulations of the last deglaciation, and to facilitate the dissemination of expertise between modellers and those engaged with reconstructing the climate of the last 21 thousand years. Here, we present the design of a coordinated Core simulation over the period 21-9 thousand years before present (ka) with time varying orbital forcing, greenhouse gases, ice sheets, and other geographical changes. A choice of two ice sheet reconstructions is given. Additional focussed simulations will also be coordinated on an ad-hoc basis by the working group, for example to investigate the effect of ice sheet and iceberg meltwater, and the uncertainty in other forcings. Some of these focussed simulations will concentrate on shorter durations around specific events to allow the more computationally expensive models to take part. Ivanovic, R. F., Gregoire, L. J., Kageyama, M., Roche, D. M., Valdes, P. J., Burke, A., Drummond, R., Peltier, W. R., and Tarasov, L.: Transient climate simulations of the deglaciation 21-9 thousand years before present; PMIP4 Core experiment design and boundary conditions, Geosci. Model Dev. Discuss., 8, 9045-9102, doi:10.5194/gmdd-8-9045-2015, 2015.

  2. Metabolic and growth characteristics of novel diverse microbes isolated from deep cores collected at the Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment (NGEE)-Arctic site in Barrow, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, R.; Pettenato, A.; Tas, N.; Hubbard, S. S.; Jansson, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Arctic is characterized by vast amounts of carbon stored in permafrost and is an important focal point for the study of climate change as increasing temperature may accelerate microbially mediated release of Carbon stored in permafrost into the atmosphere as CO2 and CH4. Yet surprisingly, very little is known about the vulnerability of permafrost and response of microorganisms in the permafrost to their changing environment. This deficiency is largely due to the difficulty in study of largely uncultivated and unknown permafrost microbes. As part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment (NGEE) in the Arctic, we collected permafrost cores in an effort to isolate resident microbes. The cores were from the Barrow Environmental Observatory (BEO), located at the northern most location on the Alaskan Arctic Coastal Plain near Barrow, AK, and up to 3m in depth. In this location, permafrost starts from 0.5m in depth and is characterized by variable water content and higher pH than surface soils. Enrichments for heterotrophic bacteria were initiated at 4°C and 1°C in the dark in several different media types, under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Positive enrichments were identified by an increase in optical density and cell counts after incubation period ranging from two to four weeks. After serial transfers into fresh media, individual colonies were obtained on agar surface. Several strains were isolated that include Firmicutes such as Bacillus, Clostridium, Sporosarcina, and Paenibacillus species and Iron-reducing Betaproteobacteria such as Rhodoferax species. In addition, methanogenic enrichments continue to grow and produce methane gas at 2°C. In this study, we present the characterization, carbon substrate utilization, pH, temperature and osmotic tolerance, as well as the effect of increasing climate change parameters on the growth rate and respiratory gas production from these permafrost isolates.

  3. Radioanalytical determination of 239+240Pu and 241Am in bioassay samples by anion exchange and extraction chromatography: Preliminary considerations about the two methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridone, S.; Arginelli, D.; Berton, G.; Bortoluzzi, S.; Canuto, G.; Montalto, M.; Nocente, M.; Vegro, M.

    2006-01-01

    During the radiation protection surveillance of exposed workers samples of urine and faeces were collected. Anion exchange chromatography was used for the separation of Pu. We investigated a technique to purify and separate Pu and Am isotopes using extraction chromatography with TRU resin. We tested different procedures to dissolve organic matter and eliminate interferences for chromatographic elution. At the end of the proces we have succeeded in electroplating the two radionuclides separately. We have also studied extraction chromatography with UTEVA resin to purify Pu isotopes and separate it from natural uranium radioisotopes, present in some biological samples. We validated a method for the determination of Pu in biological samples and a rather constant chemical yield and resolved peaks were obtained. The preliminary studies on TRU resin have indicated that it is possible to combine extraction and anion-exchange chromatography for analysing separately Pu and Am isotopes from the same sample aliquote.

  4. PLANTS AS BIO-MONITORS FOR 137CS, 238PU, 239, 240PU AND 40K AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, E.; Duff, M.; Ferguson, C.

    2010-12-16

    The nuclear fuel cycle generates a considerable amount of radioactive waste, which often includes nuclear fission products, such as strontium-90 ({sup 90}Sr) and cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs), and actinides such as uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu). When released into the environment, large quantities of these radionuclides can present considerable problems to man and biota due to their radioactive nature and, in some cases as with the actinides, their chemical toxicity. Radionuclides are expected to decay at a known rate. Yet, research has shown the rate of elimination from an ecosystem to differ from the decay rate due to physical, chemical and biological processes that remove the contaminant or reduce its biological availability. Knowledge regarding the rate by which a contaminant is eliminated from an ecosystem (ecological half-life) is important for evaluating the duration and potential severity of risk. To better understand a contaminants impact on an environment, consideration should be given to plants. As primary producers, they represent an important mode of contamination transfer from sediments and soils into the food chain. Contaminants that are chemically and/or physically sequestered in a media are less likely to be bio-available to plants and therefore an ecosystem.

  5. R-matrix analysis of the {sup 240}Pu neutron cross sections in the thermal to 5700 eV energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Derrien, H.; Bouland, O.; Larson, N.M.; Leal, L.C.

    1997-08-01

    Resonance analysis of high resolution neutron transmission data and of fission cross sections were performed in the neutron energy range from the thermal regions to 5,700 eV by using the Reich-Moore Bayesian code SAMMY. The experimental data base is described and the method of analysis is given. The experimental data were carefully examined in order to identify more resonances than those found in the current evaluated data files. The statistical properties of the resonance parameters are given. A new set of the average values of the parameters is proposed, which could be used for calculation of the average cross sections in the unresolved resonance region. The resonance parameters are available IN ENDF-6 format at the national or international data centers.

  6. Physical and Chemical Effects of Two-Phase Brine/Supercritical-CO2 Fluid Flow on Clastic Rocks: Real-Time Monitoring and NMR Imaging of Flow-Through Core Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, C. A.; Vogt, S.; Maneval, J. E.; Brox, T.; Skidmore, M. L.; Codd, S. L.; Seymour, J. D.

    2010-12-01

    Sandstone core samples were challenged with a supercritical CO2-saturated brine mixture in a laboratory flow-through core reactor system over a range of temperatures and brine strengths. Cores of quartz arenite from the Berea formation were selected to represent ideal ‘clean’ sandstone These laboratory experiments potentially provide an analog for the acidification of pore fluids near the brine/CO2 interface during CO2 flooding of depleted clastic hydrocarbon reservoirs for carbon sequestration. Flow in the reactor was perpendicular to bedding. Initial experiments were run at 50°C and 100°C with brine concentrations of 1g/L and 10g/L (TDS) to test effects of different temperatures and brine compositions. Real-time monitoring of fluid pH and conductivity provided a measure of reaction rates. Introduction of supercritical CO2 into the brine-saturated cores initiated a reduction in pH accompanied by an increase in conductivity. NMR images of fresh cores were compared with images of challenged cores using a protocol for pixel-by-pixel comparison to determine the effects on bulk pore volume and geometry. Two types of imaging experiments were conducted: multi-slice spin echo and 3-D spin echo images. Multi-slice experiments had a slice thickness of 1.5 mm and an in-plane resolution of 0.27 mm x 0.27 mm, and 3-D experiments had a resolution of 0.47 mm x 0.55 mm x 0.55mm. Imaging results reflected the observed changes in the physical and chemical structure post-challenge. Two-dimensional relaxation correlation experiments were also conducted to probe the pore sizes, connectivity and fluid saturation of the rock cores before and after challenging. Chemical analyses and microscopic examination of the challenged cores will provide a better understanding of alteration in the cores and the changes in the volume, geometry and connectivity of pore space.

  7. Dynamic Instabilities of Simulated Hurricane-like Vortices and Their Impacts on the Core Structure of Hurricanes. Part I: Dry Experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Young C.; Frank, William M.

    2005-11-01

    A series of numerical simulations of dry, axisymmetric hurricane-like vortices is performed to examine the growth of barotropic and baroclinic eddies and their potential impacts on hurricane core structure and intensity. The numerical experiments are performed using the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University National Center for Atmospheric Research (PSU NCAR) Mesoscale Model (MM5) with a 6-km horizontal grid. To examine internal effects on the stability of vortices, all external forcings are eliminated. Axisymmetric vortices that resemble observed hurricane structures are constructed on an f plane, and the experiments are performed without moist and boundary layer processes.Three vortices are designed for this study. A balanced control vortex is built based on the results of a full-physics simulation of Hurricane Floyd (1999). Then, two other axisymmetric vortices, EXP-1 and EXP-2, are constructed by modifying the wind and mass fields of the control vortex. The EXP-1 vortex is designed to satisfy the necessary condition of baroclinic instability, while the EXP-2 vortex satisfies the necessary condition of barotropic instability. These modified vortices are thought to lie within the natural range of structural variability of hurricanes.The EXP-1 and EXP-2 vortices are found to be unstable with respect to small imposed perturbations, while the control vortex is stable. Small perturbations added to the EXP-1 and EXP-2 vortices grow exponentially at the expense of available potential energy and kinetic energy of the primary vortex, respectively. The most unstable normal modes of both vortices are obtained via a numerical method. The most unstable mode of the EXP-1 (baroclinically unstable) vortex vertically tilts against shear, and the maximum growth occurs near a height of 14 km and a radius of 20 km. On the other hand, the most unstable normal mode of the EXP-2 (barotropically unstable) vortex has horizontal tilting against the mean angular velocity shear

  8. The impact of the core transformation process on spirituality, symptom experience, and psychological maturity in a mixed age sample in India: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Braganza, Dinesh; Piedmont, Ralph L

    2015-06-01

    Research indicates that spiritual and religious constructs have the potential to influence a broad range of outcomes such as health, well-being, and meaning, both positively and negatively. This study looked at the effect of an under studied psycho-spiritual approach, Core Transformation (CT), in reducing symptoms and promoting well-being. This study also examined whether the impact of CT would be moderated by age, with older participants evidencing better outcomes. Participants from an Indian convenience sample (N = 189) ranging in age from 18 to 65 (M = 34) received group training in CT and completed a battery of measures pretest and 4 weeks post-training, which included personality, spirituality, and psychosocial outcomes scales. Repeated-measures MANOVAs indicated significant improvements over time for both spirituality and symptom experience. Partial correlation analyses, controlling for the predictive effects of personality, reaffirmed the incremental validity of Spiritual Transcendence and religious variables in predicting symptom change and outcome ratings. CT did not appear to effect participants levels of psychological maturity. Age was not found to mediate any of these relationships, indicating the age universality of CT's therapeutic effects.

  9. Phase Equilibrium Experiments on Potential Lunar Core Compositions: Extension of Current Knowledge to Multi-Component (Fe-Ni-Si-S-C) Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.; Pando, K.; Danielson, L.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous geophysical and geochemical studies have suggested the existence of a small metallic lunar core, but the composition of that core is not known. Knowledge of the composition can have a large impact on the thermal evolution of the core, its possible early dynamo creation, and its overall size and fraction of solid and liquid. Thermal models predict that the current temperature at the core-mantle boundary of the Moon is near 1650 K. Re-evaluation of Apollo seismic data has highlighted the need for new data in a broader range of bulk core compositions in the PT range of the lunar core. Geochemical measurements have suggested a more volatile-rich Moon than previously thought. And GRAIL mission data may allow much better constraints on the physical nature of the lunar core. All of these factors have led us to determine new phase equilibria experimental studies in the Fe-Ni-S-C-Si system in the relevant PT range of the lunar core that will help constrain the composition of Moon's core.

  10. Superobservations: quality control and data thinning of high-resolution Doppler radar observations from field experiments for hurricane inner-core initialization and model verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Y.; Zhang, F.; Sieron, S.; Gamache, J.; Sippel, J. A.; Braun, S. A.; Heymsfield, G. M.

    2012-12-01

    This study presents methods of creating super-observations (SOs) of Doppler radar velocity data from different observing platforms that include the Tail Doppler Radar (TDR) on board of manned aircrafts NOAA and NRL P3's and NOAA G4, as well as the High-altitude Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler (HIWRAP) mounted on the NASA Global Hawk unmanned airborne system. The SOs, which are created in order to quality control and thin the vast set raw Doppler velocity observations, have been and will continuously be used in data assimilation experiments for initializing a hurricane vortex, as well as verification for the performance of hurricane forecasts. The SO techniques that are being designed may account for difference in scanning geometry, data quality and density among different radar platforms, as well as the grid resolution of the assimilating or verifying models. The SOs generated from the NOAA P3 TDR radars have been proven to contain valuable information of the observed tropical cyclones and can be efficiently assimilated into high-resolution convection-permitting hurricane prediction model for the inner-core initialization. The SO technique has been successfully implemented in the NOAA P3 aircrafts that processes the TDR observations in realtime. We are currently developing a similar SO technique for quality control and thinning of the TDR data from the NOAA G4 manned aircraft and the NOAA GH HIWRAP observations. The long flight duration of the Global Hawk gives it a much larger range and on-station capabilities than conventional aircraft, making it a desirable addition to other observing platforms. The performance of the cloud-resolving ensemble hurricane analysis and forecasts that assimilate the SOs during recent field experiments will also be presented.

  11. 24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES FOR A BRASS GATE VALVE BODY MADE ON A CORE BOX, CA. 1950. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  12. OSMOSE experiment representativity studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Aliberti, G.; Klann, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-10-10

    The OSMOSE program aims at improving the neutronic predictions of advanced nuclear fuels through measurements in the MINERVE facility at the CEA-Cadarache (France) on samples containing the following separated actinides: Th-232, U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Np-237, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, Pu-242, Am-241, Am-243, Cm-244 and Cm-245. The goal of the experimental measurements is to produce a database of reactivity-worth measurements in different neutron spectra for the separated heavy nuclides. This database can then be used as a benchmark for integral reactivity-worth measurements to verify and validate reactor analysis codes and integral cross-section values for the isotopes tested. In particular, the OSMOSE experimental program will produce very accurate sample reactivity-worth measurements for a series of actinides in various spectra, from very thermalized to very fast. The objective of the analytical program is to make use of the experimental data to establish deficiencies in the basic nuclear data libraries, identify their origins, and provide guidelines for nuclear data improvements in coordination with international programs. To achieve the proposed goals, seven different neutron spectra can be created in the MINERVE facility: UO2 dissolved in water (representative of over-moderated LWR systems), UO2 matrix in water (representative of LWRs), a mixed oxide fuel matrix, two thermal spectra containing large epithermal components (representative of under-moderated reactors), a moderated fast spectrum (representative of fast reactors which have some slowing down in moderators such as lead-bismuth or sodium), and a very hard spectrum (representative of fast reactors with little moderation from reactor coolant). The different spectra are achieved by changing the experimental lattice within the MINERVE reactor. The experimental lattice is the replaceable central part of MINERVE, which establishes the spectrum at the sample location. This configuration

  13. Temporal record of Pu isotopes in inter-tidal sediments from the northeastern Irish Sea.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Patric; Worsfold, Paul; Keith-Roach, Miranda; Andersen, Morten B; Kershaw, Peter; Leonard, Kins; Choi, Min-Seok; Boust, Dominique; Lesueur, Patrick

    2011-11-01

    A depth profile of (239)Pu and (240)Pu specific activities and isotope ratios was determined in an inter-tidal sediment core from the Esk Estuary in the northeastern Irish Sea. The study site has been impacted with plutonium through routine radionuclide discharges from the Sellafield nuclear reprocessing plant in Cumbria, NW England. A pronounced sub-surface maximum of ~10 k Bq kg(-1) was observed for (239+240)Pu, corresponding to the peak in Pu discharge from Sellafield in 1973, with a decreasing trend with depth down to ~0.04 k Bq kg(-1) in the deeper layers. The depth profile of (239+240)Pu specific activities together with results from gamma-ray spectrometry for (137)Cs and (241)Am was compared with reported releases from the Sellafield plant in order to estimate a reliable sediment chronology. The upper layers (1992 onwards) showed higher (239+240)Pu specific activities than would be expected from the direct input of annual Sellafield discharges, indicating that the main input of Pu is from the time-integrated contaminated mud patch of the northeastern Irish Sea. The (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios ranged from ~0.03 in the deepest layers to >0.20 in the sub-surface layers with an activity-weighted average of 0.181. The decreasing (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratio with depth reflects the changing nature of operations at the Sellafield plant from weapons-grade Pu production to reprocessing spent nuclear fuel with higher burn-up times in the late 1950s. In addition, recent annual (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios in winkles collected during 2003-2008 from three stations along the Cumbrian coastline showed no significant spatial or temporal differences with an overall average of 0.204, which supports the hypothesis of diluted Pu input from the contaminated mud patch. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. North Atlantic Simulations in Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments phase II (CORE-II): Inter-Annual to Decadal Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danabasoglu, G.; Yeager, S. G.; Kim, W. M.; Behrens, E.; Bentsen, M.; Bi, D.; Biastoch, A.; Bleck, R.; Boning, C. W.; Bozec, A.; Canuto, V.; Cassou, C.; Chassignet, E.; Coward, A.; Danilov, S.; Diansky, N.; Drange, H.; Farneti, R.; Fernandez, E.; Fogli, P. G.; Jung, T.; Forget, G.; Fujii, Y.; Griffies, S. M.; Gusev, A. A.; Heimbach, P.; Howard, A. M.; Ilicak, M.; Karspeck, A. R.; Kelley, M.; Large, W.; Leboissetier, A.; Lu, J.; Madec, G.; Marsland, S. J.; Masina, S.; Navarra, A.; Nurser, A. J. G.; Pirani, A.; Romanou, A.; Salas y Mélia, D.; Hunter Samuels, B. L.; Scheinert, M.; Sidorenko, D.; Sun, S.; Treguier, A. M.; Tsujino, H.; Uotila, P.; Valcke, S.; Voldoire, A.; Wang, Q.; Yashayaev, I.

    2016-02-01

    Simulated inter-annual to decadal variability and trends in the North Atlantic for the1958-2007 period from twenty global ocean - sea-ice coupled models are presented.These simulations are performed as contributions to the second phase of the CoordinatedOcean-ice Reference Experiments (CORE-II). A major focus of the present study is the representation of Atlanticmeridional overturning circulation (AMOC) variability in the participating models.Relationships between AMOC variability and those of some other related variables, suchas subpolar mixed layer depths, the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), and the LabradorSea upper-ocean hydrographic properties, are also investigated. In general, AMOCvariability shows three distinct stages. During the first stage that lasts until the mid-to late-1970s, AMOC is relatively steady, remaining lower than its long-term(1958-2007) mean. Thereafter, AMOC intensifies with maximum transports achieved in the mid- to late-1990s. This enhancement isthen followed by a weakening trend until the end of our integration period. Thissequence of low frequency AMOC variability is consistent with previous studies.Regarding strengthening of AMOC between about the mid-1970s and the mid-1990s, our resultssupport a previously identified variability mechanism where AMOC intensification isconnected to increased deep water formation in the subpolar North Atlantic, drivenby NAO-related surface fluxes. The simulations tend to show general agreement in theirrepresentations of, for example, AMOC, sea surface temperature (SST), and subpolar mixed layerdepth variabilities. In particular, the observed variability of the North Atlantic SSTs iscaptured well by all models. These findings indicate that simulated variability andtrends are primarily dictated by the atmospheric datasets which include the influenceof ocean dynamics from nature superimposed onto anthropogenic effects. Despite thesegeneral agreements, there are many differences among the model solutions

  15. Daptomycin in the Clinical Setting: 8-Year Experience with Gram-positive Bacterial Infections from the EU-CORE(SM) Registry.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Ruiz, Armando; Gargalianos-Kakolyris, Panayiotis; Timerman, Artur; Sarma, Jayanta; José González Ramallo, Víctor; Bouylout, Kamel; Trostmann, Uwe; Pathan, Rashidkhan; Hamed, Kamal

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes and safety of daptomycin therapy in patients with serious Gram-positive infections. Patients were enrolled in the European Cubicin(®) Outcomes Registry and Experience (EU-CORE(SM)), a non-interventional, multicenter, observational registry. The real-world data were collected across 18 countries (Europe, Latin America, and Asia) for patients who had received at least one dose of daptomycin between January 2006 and April 2012. Two-year follow-up data were collected until 2014 for patients with endocarditis, intracardiac/intravascular device infection, osteomyelitis, or orthopedic device infection. A total of 6075 patients were enrolled. The most common primary infections were complicated skin and soft tissue infection (31.7%) and bacteremia (20.7%). Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequently reported pathogen (42.9%; methicillin-resistant S. aureus [MRSA], 23.2%), followed by Staphylococcus epidermidis and other coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS, 28.5%). The most commonly prescribed dose of daptomycin was 6 mg/kg/day (43.6%), and the median duration of therapy was 11 (range 1-300) days. Overall clinical success rate was 80.5%, and was similar whether daptomycin was used as first-line (82.9%) or second-line (79.2%) therapy. Clinical success rates were high in patients with S. aureus (83.9%; MRSA 83.0%) and CoNS (including S. epidermidis, 82.5%) infections. The majority of patients with endocarditis or intracardiac/intravascular device infection (86.7%) or osteomyelitis/orthopedic device infection (85.9%) had a sustained response during the 2-year follow-up period. There were no new or unexpected safety findings. Results from real-world clinical experience showed that daptomycin is a valuable therapeutic option in the management of various difficult-to-treat Gram-positive infections. This study was funded by Novartis Pharma AG.

  16. Imaging the local crustal structure of the European Eastern Alps through teleseismic reflections from the Earth's inner core recorded during an active source experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behm, M.

    2016-12-01

    The ALP2002 experiment was a large 3D active seismic experiment to reveal the crustal structure of the Eastern Alps and their neighboring tectonic provinces in Central Europe. The deployment comprised 993 autonomous Reftek Texan recorders equipped with vertical component geophones. The average station spacing was 4.5 km, and the recording instruments were distributed along 14 interlocking profiles with a total line length of 4313 km. During 5 days, 40 explosions in boreholes were fired and recorded within pre-programmed time windows. The limited memory capacity of the recorders allowed for just a few additional backup time windows. Despite the short total recording time of only 17.5 hours within 5 days, one of these backup time windows comprises the registration of the reflection from the earth's inner core (PKiKP phase) originating from an earthquake 130 km offshore Papa New Guinea. This magnitude 5.7 teleseimic event occurred in a depth of 33 km and its epicentral distance to the deployment area is 121.5°. Although the 1C geophones with a natural frequency of 4.5 Hz are not designed to capture the complete characteristics of low-frequency earthquake waveforms, the high-frequency part of the PKiKP wavelet is clearly recorded on all 993 stations. Thus the dataset represents a unique opportunity to study regional and local crustal structures from the analysis of teleseismic events, in particular since the results from the active source data provide calibration and validation. Arrival time analysis is facilitated by the sub-vertical emergence angle of the PKiKP phase. Time corrections for the near surface (< 10 km depth) and the upper mantle structure (50 - 400 km depth) are obtained from previously established seismic 3D models and allow focusing the interpretation on the lower crust and crust-mantle transition. Further, a recently developed blind deconvolution approach is applied to the data for imaging the crustal structure from surface reflections of the PKi

  17. Critical experiments on single-unit spherical plutonium geometries reflected and moderated by oil

    SciTech Connect

    Rothe, R.E.

    1997-05-01

    Experimental critical configurations are reported for several dozen spherical and hemispherical single-unit assemblies of plutonium metal. Most were solid but many were hollow-centered, thick, shell-like geometries. All were constructed of nested plutonium (mostly {sup 2139}Pu) metal hemispherical shells. Three kinds of critical configurations are reported. Two required interpolation and/or extrapolation of data to obtain the critical mass because reflector conditions were essentially infinite. The first finds the plutonium essentially fully reflected by a hydrogen-rich oil; the second is essentially unreflected. The third kind reports the critical oil reflector height above a large plutonium metal assembly of accurately known mass (no interpolation required) when that mass was too great to permit full oil reflection. Some configurations had thicknesses of mild steel just outside the plutonium metal, separating it from the oil. These experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory in the late 1960s. They have not been published in a form suitable for benchmark-quality comparisons against state-of-the-art computational techniques until this paper. The age of the data and other factors lead to some difficulty in reconstructing aspects of the program and may, in turn, decrease confidence in certain details. Whenever this is true, the point is acknowledged. The plutonium metal was alpha-phase {sup 239}Pu containing 5.9 wt-% {sup 240}Pu. All assemblies were formed by nesting 1.667-mm-thick (nominal) bare plutonium metal hemispherical shells, also called hemishells, until the desired configuration was achieved. Very small tolerance gaps machined into radial dimensions reduced the effective density a small amount in all cases. Steel components were also nested hemispherical shells; but these were nominally 3.333-mm thick. Oil was used as the reflector because of its chemical compatibility with plutonium metal.

  18. Core Formation Process and Light Elements in the Planetary Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtani, E.; Sakairi, T.; Watanabe, K.; Kamada, S.; Sakamaki, T.; Hirao, N.

    2015-12-01

    Si, O, and S are major candidates for light elements in the planetary core. In the early stage of the planetary formation, the core formation started by percolation of the metallic liquid though silicate matrix because Fe-S-O and Fe-S-Si eutectic temperatures are significantly lower than the solidus of the silicates. Therefore, in the early stage of accretion of the planets, the eutectic liquid with S enrichment was formed and separated into the core by percolation. The major light element in the core at this stage will be sulfur. The internal pressure and temperature increased with the growth of the planets, and the metal component depleted in S was molten. The metallic melt contained both Si and O at high pressure in the deep magma ocean in the later stage. Thus, the core contains S, Si, and O in this stage of core formation. Partitioning experiments between solid and liquid metals indicate that S is partitioned into the liquid metal, whereas O is weakly into the liquid. Partitioning of Si changes with the metallic iron phases, i.e., fcc iron-alloy coexisting with the metallic liquid below 30 GPa is depleted in Si. Whereas hcp-Fe alloy above 30 GPa coexisting with the liquid favors Si. This contrast of Si partitioning provides remarkable difference in compositions of the solid inner core and liquid outer core among different terrestrial planets. Our melting experiments of the Fe-S-Si and Fe-O-S systems at high pressure indicate the core-adiabats in small planets, Mercury and Mars, are greater than the slope of the solidus and liquidus curves of these systems. Thus, in these planets, the core crystallized at the top of the liquid core and 'snowing core' formation occurred during crystallization. The solid inner core is depleted in both Si and S whereas the liquid outer core is relatively enriched in Si and S in these planets. On the other hand, the core adiabats in large planets, Earth and Venus, are smaller than the solidus and liquidus curves of the systems. The

  19. Authentic to the Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kukral, Nicole; Spector, Stacy

    2012-01-01

    When educators think about what makes learning relevant to students, often they narrow their thinking to electives or career technical education. While these provide powerful opportunities for students to make relevant connections to their learning, they can also create authentic experiences in the core curriculum. In the San Juan Unified School…

  20. Models of the earth's core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Combined inferences from seismology, high-pressure experiment and theory, geomagnetism, fluid dynamics, and current views of terrestrial planetary evolution lead to models of the earth's core with five basic properties. These are that core formation was contemporaneous with earth accretion; the core is not in chemical equilibrium with the mantle; the outer core is a fluid iron alloy containing significant quantities of lighter elements and is probably almost adiabatic and compositionally uniform; the more iron-rich inner solid core is a consequence of partial freezing of the outer core, and the energy release from this process sustains the earth's magnetic field; and the thermodynamic properties of the core are well constrained by the application of liquid-state theory to seismic and labroatory data.

  1. Models of the earth's core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Combined inferences from seismology, high-pressure experiment and theory, geomagnetism, fluid dynamics, and current views of terrestrial planetary evolution lead to models of the earth's core with five basic properties. These are that core formation was contemporaneous with earth accretion; the core is not in chemical equilibrium with the mantle; the outer core is a fluid iron alloy containing significant quantities of lighter elements and is probably almost adiabatic and compositionally uniform; the more iron-rich inner solid core is a consequence of partial freezing of the outer core, and the energy release from this process sustains the earth's magnetic field; and the thermodynamic properties of the core are well constrained by the application of liquid-state theory to seismic and labroatory data.

  2. Models of the Earth's Core.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, D J

    1981-11-06

    Combined inferences from seismology, high-pressure experiment and theory, geomagnetism, fluid dynamics, and current views of terrestrial planetary evolution lead to models of the earth's core with the following properties. Core formation was contemporaneous with earth accretion; the core is not in chemical equilibrium with the mantle; the outer core is a fluid iron alloy containing significant quantities of lighter elements and is probably almost adiabatic and compositionally uniform; the more iron-rich inner solid core is a consequence of partial freezing of the outer core, and the energy release from this process sustains the earth's magnetic field; and the thermodynamic properties of the core are well constrained by the application of liquid-state theory to seismic and laboratory data.

  3. Drilling report and core logs for the 1981 drilling of Kilauea Iki lava lake, Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, with comparative notes on earlier (1967-1979) drilling experiences

    SciTech Connect

    Helz, R.T.; Wright, T.L.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose is: (1) to describe the 1981 drilling of Kilauea Iki lava lake, (2) to present the logs for the drill core recovered during the 1981 drilling, and (3) to present a summary of some of the field observations made during the 1967, 1975, 1976 and 1979 drillings that are relevant to the crystallization history of Kilauea Iki lava lake. This report supplements logs for the 1967-1979 core presented in Helz et al. (1980). 21 references, 4 figures, 4 tables.

  4. Core transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good news for all petroleum geoscientists, mining and environmental scientists, university researchers, and the like: Shell Oil Company has deeded its Midland core and sample repository to the Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) at the University of Texas at Austin. The Midland repository includes more than 1 million linear meters of slab, whole core, and prepared cuttings. Data comprising one of the largest U.S. core collections—the geologic samples from wells drilled in Texas and 39 other states—are now public data and will be incorporated into the existing BEG database. Both Shell and the University of Texas at Austin are affiliated with the American Geological Institute, which assisted in arranging the transfer as part of its goal to establish a National Geoscience Data Repository System at regional centers across the United States.

  5. DEGAS experiments on volcanic glass samples from AND-1B drill core: implications for primary magmatic versus secondary H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heide, K.; Cameron, B. I.; Krans, S. R.

    2012-12-01

    The existence of volcanic glass in the AND-1B drill core erupted subaquesously or even subglacially affords the possibility of constraining water depth by measuring the volatile content of the glass only if primary magmatic H2O contents can be recognized from secondary H2O. The glass samples studied come from Lithostratigraphic Unit (LU) 2 between 92 and 145 m depth. The black and well sorted sands from subunit 2.4 were most likely derived from subaerial Hawaiian/Strombolian type eruptions. The graded bedding exposed in this subunit may result from fallout of tephra through the water column. Glass fragments from six different depths within subunit 2.4 were extracted from AND-1B sediment first by magnetic separation and then approximately 100 mg of the freshest glass fragments were handpicked under a binocular microscope. The six glass separates were heated in a DEGAS-device up to 1450°C in high vacuum and the liberated volatiles were determined by a simultaneous mass spectrometric analysis. This study was focused on the determination of H2O, CO2, H2, HF, H2S, HCl, SO2, and hydrocarbon species. The six degassing experiments were carried out using a special high-vacuum-hot-extraction method combined with aquadrupol mass spectrometer. Measurements were carried out at less than 10-4 to 10-3Pa and a linear heating rate (10K/min) at a temperature range between room temperature to 1450°C. The volatile species were analyzed in multiple ion detection mode. DEGAS experiments occur under highly non-equilibrium conditions so that reverse reactions between volatiles or between volatiles and the melt are largely prevented. For each glass sample, volatile release occurs at different rates and intensities at different temperatures. Based on the gas release profiles obtained, degassing processes take place in three separate temperature ranges. Low temperature degassing occurs at temperatures up to 500°C and likely represents the liberation of surface bounded volatiles such as H2

  6. Impact of touch imprint cytology on imaging-guided core needle biopsies: An experience from a large academic medical center laboratory.

    PubMed

    Li, Zaibo; Tonkovich, Dena; Shen, Rulong

    2016-02-01

    Imaging-guided core needle biopsy is a minimally invasive and effective tissue sampling method. Touch imprint cytology (TIC) can provide immediate on-site preliminary interpretation and adequacy of core needle biopsy. We investigated on-site TICs' impact on minimizing the number of core needle biopsy passes required for diagnosis. Five hundred and sixty imaging-guided CNBs with TICs including 393 malignant lesions, 136 benign lesions, 29 nondiagnostic specimens, and 2 atypical lesions were reviewed for adequacy, preliminary interpretation, final histological diagnosis, and the number of core needle biopsy passes. The adequacy rate determined by on-site TICs was 76%, with 50% for benign lesions, and 88% for malignant lesions. The correlation rate between TICs' preliminary interpretation and histological diagnosis was 91%, with 100% for benign lesions and 89% for malignant lesions. In malignant lesions, the adequacy rate was lowest in cases with sarcomas (58%), followed by hepatocellular carcinoma and renal cell carcinoma. When all cases are stratified by locations, the adequacy rate determined by on-site TICs was lowest in lesions from soft tissue (45%), followed by pelvic mass or kidney. The average number of cores was 4.1 per case in adequate specimens, significantly lower than that in specimens without TICs. In contrast, the average number of cores was 7.1 per case in inadequate specimens, significantly greater than that in specimens without TICs. On-site TICs showed its usefulness in reducing the number of cores required for adequate diagnostic materials. In the meantime, TICs accurately provided preliminary interpretations, especially in adequate malignant carcinoma cases. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Feasibility of using 236U to reconstruct close-in fallout deposition from the Hiroshima atomic bomb.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, A; Kawai, K; Steier, P; Imanaka, T; Hoshi, M; Endo, S; Zhumadilov, K; Yamamoto, M

    2010-10-15

    The first results on the feasibility of using (236)U to reconstruct the level and spatial distribution of close-in fallout deposition from the Hiroshima A-bomb are reported, coupled with the use of global fallout (137)Cs and (239+240)Pu. The results for global fallout (236)U in soil samples (0-30cm) from Ishikawa prefecture showed that the deposition density of (236)U from the global fallout can be accurately evaluated using AMS. All deposited (236)U, (137)Cs and (239+240)Pu appeared to have been recovered using 30-cm cores. It was also noted from the depth profiles for (236)U/(239+240)Pu and (236)U/(137)Cs ratios that the downward behavior of (236)U in the soil was apparently similar to that of (239+240)Pu, while the (137)Cs was liable to be retained in upper layers compared with (236)U and (239+240)Pu. The accumulated levels were 1.78×10(13)atomsm(-2) for (236)U, 4340Bqm(-2) for (137)Cs and 141Bqm(-2) for (239+240)Pu. The ratios of (236)U/(137)Cs and (236)U/(239+240)Pu were (4.10±0.12)×10(9) and (1.26±0.04)×10(11)atomsBq(-1), respectively. Results of (236)U, (137)Cs and (239+240)Pu measurements for the seven soil cores (0-30cm) from Hiroshima were discussed on the basis of ratios of (236)U/(137)Cs and (236)U/(239+240)Pu by comparing with those from the background area in Ishikawa, indicating that the global fallout dominates the current level of (236)U accumulation in soil in the Black-rain area around Hiroshima after the Hiroshima bomb, and the contribution of the close-in fallout (236)U produced by the Hiroshima A-bomb seems difficult to observe.

  8. Core layering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, S. A.; Rubie, D. C.; Hernlund, J. W.; Morbidelli, A.

    2015-12-01

    We have created a planetary accretion and differentiation model that self-consistently builds and evolves Earth's core. From this model, we show that the core grows stably stratified as the result of rising metal-silicate equilibration temperatures and pressures, which increases the concentrations of light element impurities into each newer core addition. This stable stratification would naturally resist convection and frustrate the onset of a geodynamo, however, late giant impacts could mechanically mix the distinct accreted core layers creating large homogenous regions. Within these regions, a geodynamo may operate. From this model, we interpret the difference between the planetary magnetic fields of Earth and Venus as a difference in giant impact histories. Our planetary accretion model is a numerical N-body integration of the Grand Tack scenario [1]—the most successful terrestrial planet formation model to date [2,3]. Then, we take the accretion histories of Earth-like and Venus-like planets from this model and post-process the growth of each terrestrial planet according to a well-tested planetary differentiation model [4,5]. This model fits Earth's mantle by modifying the oxygen content of the pre-cursor planetesimals and embryos as well as the conditions of metal-silicate equilibration. Other non-volatile major, minor and trace elements included in the model are assumed to be in CI chondrite proportions. The results from this model across many simulated terrestrial planet growth histories are robust. If the kinetic energy delivered by larger impacts is neglected, the core of each planet grows with a strong stable stratification that would significantly impede convection. However, if giant impact mixing is very efficient or if the impact history delivers large impacts late, than the stable stratification can be removed. [1] Walsh et al. Nature 475 (2011) [2] O'Brien et al. Icarus 223 (2014) [3] Jacobson & Morbidelli PTRSA 372 (2014) [4] Rubie et al. EPSL 301

  9. North Atlantic Simulations in Coordinated Ocean-Ice Reference Experiments Phase II (CORE-II) . Part II; Inter-Annual to Decadal Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danabasoglu, Gokhan; Yeager, Steve G.; Kim, Who M.; Behrens, Erik; Bentsen, Mats; Bi, Daohua; Biastoch, Arne; Bleck, Rainer; Boening, Claus; Bozec, Alexandra; hide

    2015-01-01

    Simulated inter-annual to decadal variability and trends in the North Atlantic for the 1958-2007 period from twenty global ocean - sea-ice coupled models are presented. These simulations are performed as contributions to the second phase of the Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments (CORE-II). The study is Part II of our companion paper (Danabasoglu et al., 2014) which documented the mean states in the North Atlantic from the same models. A major focus of the present study is the representation of Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) variability in the participating models. Relationships between AMOC variability and those of some other related variables, such as subpolar mixed layer depths, the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), and the Labrador Sea upper-ocean hydrographic properties, are also investigated. In general, AMOC variability shows three distinct stages. During the first stage that lasts until the mid- to late-1970s, AMOC is relatively steady, remaining lower than its long-term (1958-2007) mean. Thereafter, AMOC intensifies with maximum transports achieved in the mid- to late-1990s. This enhancement is then followed by a weakening trend until the end of our integration period. This sequence of low frequency AMOC variability is consistent with previous studies. Regarding strengthening of AMOC between about the mid-1970s and the mid-1990s, our results support a previously identified variability mechanism where AMOC intensification is connected to increased deep water formation in the subpolar North Atlantic, driven by NAO-related surface fluxes. The simulations tend to show general agreement in their representations of, for example, AMOC, sea surface temperature (SST), and subpolar mixed layer depth variabilities. In particular, the observed variability of the North Atlantic SSTs is captured well by all models. These findings indicate that simulated variability and trends are primarily dictated by the atmospheric datasets which include

  10. North Atlantic simulations in Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments phase II (CORE-II). Part II: Inter-annual to decadal variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danabasoglu, Gokhan; Yeager, Steve G.; Kim, Who M.; Behrens, Erik; Bentsen, Mats; Bi, Daohua; Biastoch, Arne; Bleck, Rainer; Böning, Claus; Bozec, Alexandra; Canuto, Vittorio M.; Cassou, Christophe; Chassignet, Eric; Coward, Andrew C.; Danilov, Sergey; Diansky, Nikolay; Drange, Helge; Farneti, Riccardo; Fernandez, Elodie; Fogli, Pier Giuseppe; Forget, Gael; Fujii, Yosuke; Griffies, Stephen M.; Gusev, Anatoly; Heimbach, Patrick; Howard, Armando; Ilicak, Mehmet; Jung, Thomas; Karspeck, Alicia R.; Kelley, Maxwell; Large, William G.; Leboissetier, Anthony; Lu, Jianhua; Madec, Gurvan; Marsland, Simon J.; Masina, Simona; Navarra, Antonio; Nurser, A. J. George; Pirani, Anna; Romanou, Anastasia; Salas y Mélia, David; Samuels, Bonita L.; Scheinert, Markus; Sidorenko, Dmitry; Sun, Shan; Treguier, Anne-Marie; Tsujino, Hiroyuki; Uotila, Petteri; Valcke, Sophie; Voldoire, Aurore; Wang, Qiang; Yashayaev, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Simulated inter-annual to decadal variability and trends in the North Atlantic for the 1958-2007 period from twenty global ocean - sea-ice coupled models are presented. These simulations are performed as contributions to the second phase of the Coordinated Ocean-ice Reference Experiments (CORE-II). The study is Part II of our companion paper (Danabasoglu et al., 2014) which documented the mean states in the North Atlantic from the same models. A major focus of the present study is the representation of Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) variability in the participating models. Relationships between AMOC variability and those of some other related variables, such as subpolar mixed layer depths, the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), and the Labrador Sea upper-ocean hydrographic properties, are also investigated. In general, AMOC variability shows three distinct stages. During the first stage that lasts until the mid- to late-1970s, AMOC is relatively steady, remaining lower than its long-term (1958-2007) mean. Thereafter, AMOC intensifies with maximum transports achieved in the mid- to late-1990s. This enhancement is then followed by a weakening trend until the end of our integration period. This sequence of low frequency AMOC variability is consistent with previous studies. Regarding strengthening of AMOC between about the mid-1970s and the mid-1990s, our results support a previously identified variability mechanism where AMOC intensification is connected to increased deep water formation in the subpolar North Atlantic, driven by NAO-related surface fluxes. The simulations tend to show general agreement in their temporal representations of, for example, AMOC, sea surface temperature (SST), and subpolar mixed layer depth variabilities. In particular, the observed variability of the North Atlantic SSTs is captured well by all models. These findings indicate that simulated variability and trends are primarily dictated by the atmospheric datasets which

  11. Visual Feedback for Rover-based Coring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backes, Paul; Helmick, Daniel; Bajracharya, Max

    2008-01-01

    Technology for coring from a low-mass rover has been developed to enable core sample acquisition where a planetary rover experiences moderate slip during the coring operation. A new stereo vision technique, Absolute Motion Visual Odometry, is used to measure rover slip during coring and the slip is accommodated through corresponding arm pose updating. Coring rate is controlled by feedback of themeasured force of the coring tool against the environment. Test results in the JPL Marsyard show for the first time that coring from a low-mass rover with slip is feasible.

  12. A fast semi-quantitative method for Plutonium determination in an alpine firn/ice core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrieli, J.; Cozzi, G.; Vallelonga, P.; Schwikowski, M.; Sigl, M.; Boutron, C.; Barbante, C.

    2009-04-01

    Plutonium is present in the environment as a consequence of atmospheric nuclear tests carried out in the 1960s, nuclear weapons production and releases by the nuclear industry over the past 50 years. Plutonium, unlike uranium, is essentially anthropogenic and it was first produced and isolated in 1940 by deuteron bombardment of uranium in the cyclotron of Berkeley University. It exists in five main isotopes, 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu, 242Pu, derived from civilian and military sources (weapons production and detonation, nuclear reactors, nuclear accidents). In the environment, 239Pu is the most abundant isotope. Approximately 6 tons of 239Pu have been released into the environment as a result of 541 atmospheric weapon tests Nuclear Pu fallout has been studied in various environmental archives, such as sediments, soil and herbarium grass. Mid-latitude ice cores have been studied as well, on Mont Blanc, the Western Alps and on Belukha Glacier, Siberian Altai. We present a Pu record obtained by analyzing 52 discrete samples of an alpine firn/ice core from Colle Gnifetti (M. Rosa, 4450 m a.s.l.), dating from 1945 to 1991. The239Pu signal was recorded directly, without preliminary cleaning or preconcentration steps, using an ICP-SFMS (Thermo Element2) equipped with a desolvation system (APEX). 238UH+ interferences were negligible for U concentrations lower than 50 ppt as verified both in spiked fresh snow and pre-1940 ice samples. The shape of 239Pu profile reflects the three main periods of atmospheric nuclear weapons testing: the earliest peak starts in 1954/55 to 1958 and includes the first testing period which reached a maximum in 1958. Despite a temporary halt in testing in 1959/60, the Pu concentration decreased only by half with respect to the 1958 peak. In 1961/62 Pu concentrations rapidly increased reaching a maximum in 1963, which was about 40% more intense than the 1958 peak. After the sign of the "Limited Test Ban Treaty" between USA and URSS in 1964, Pu

  13. Concentration and characterization of plutonium in soils of Hubei in central China.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wei; Tims, Stephen G; Fifield, L Keith; Guo, Qiuju

    2010-01-01

    To study the Pu concentration and isotope ratio distributions present in China, the (239+240)Pu total activities and (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios in core soil samples from Hubei Province in central China were investigated using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS). The activities ranged from 0.019 to 0.502 mBqg(-1) and the (239+240)Pu inventories of 45 and approximately 55 Bqm(-2) agree well with that expected from global fallout. The (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios in the soil ranged from 0.172 to 0.220. The ratios are similar to typical global fallout values. Hence, any close-in fallout contribution from the Chinese nuclear weapons tests, mainly conducted in the 1970s, must have either been negligible or had a similar (240)Pu/(239)Pu ratio to that of global fallout. The top 10 cm layer of the soil contributes approximately 90% of the total inventory and the maximum concentrations appeared in the 2-4 cm or 4-6 cm layers. It is suggested that climatic conditions and organic content are the two main factors that affect the vertical migration of plutonium in soil.

  14. Earth's core iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geophysicist J. Michael Brown of Texas A & M University noted recently at the Spring AGU Meeting in Baltimore that the structure and phase of metallic iron at pressures of the earth's inner core (approximately 3.3 Mbar) could have great significance in defining geometrical aspects of the core itself. Brown worked at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory with R.B. McQueen to redetermine the phase relations of metallic iron in a series of new shock-wave experiments. They found the melting point of iron at conditions equal to those at the boundary of the earth's outer (liquid) and inner (solid) cores to be 6000°±500°C (Geophysical Research Letters, 7, 533-536, 1980).

  15. Diagnostic Yield of Computed Tomography-Guided Coaxial Core Biopsy of Undetermined Masses in the Free Retroperitoneal Space: Single-Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Stattaus, Joerg Kalkmann, Janine Kuehl, Hilmar; Metz, Klaus A.; Nowrousian, Mohammad R.; Forsting, Michael Ladd, Susanne C.

    2008-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic yield of core biopsy in coaxial technique under guidance of computed tomography (CT) for retroperitoneal masses. We performed a retrospective analysis of CT-guided coaxial core biopsies of undetermined masses in the non-organ-bound retroperitoneal space in 49 patients. In 37 cases a 15-G guidance needle with a 16-G semiautomated core biopsy system, and in 12 cases a 16-G guidance needle with an 18-G biopsy system, was used. All biopsies were technically successful. A small hematoma was seen in one case, but no relevant complication occurred. With the coaxial technique, up to 4 specimens were obtained from each lesion (mean, 2.8). Diagnostic accuracy in differentiation between malignant and benign diseases was 95.9%. A specific histological diagnosis could be established in 39 of 42 malignant lesions (92.9%). Correct subtyping of malignant lymphoma according to the WHO classification was possible in 87.0%. Benign lesions were correctly identified in seven cases, although a specific diagnosis could only be made in conjunction with clinical and radiological information. In conclusion, CT-guided coaxial core biopsy provides safe and accurate diagnosis of retroperitoneal masses. A specific histological diagnosis, which is essential for choosing the appropriate therapy, could be established in most cases of malignancy.

  16. Potassium-bearing Iron-Nickel Sulfides in Nature and High-Pressure Experiments: Geochemical Consequences of Potassium in the Earth's Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keshav, S.; Corgne, A.; McDonough, W. F.; Fei, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: Potassium (K) as a large ion lithophile element has dominantly been concentrated in the Earth s crust and the mantle through differentiation, and in the form of K-40 contributes to the planet s heat budget. However, whether or not K also enters core-forming phases, has been debated for over three decades. Arguments favoring entry of K in the core are based on: (1) K-sulfide (with Fe, Ni, Cu, Na, and Cl; djerfisherite) found in highly reduced enstatite chondrites (or aubrites, enstatite achondrites); (2) demonstration that K, owing to an s-d electronic switch at high-pressure, exhibits transition- element like character, (3) solubility of measurable K in Fe-Ni-S liquids at high pressure, temperature conditions, and (4) models of cooling of the core that seem to require, besides convection, some form of radioactivity, and thus lending support to the experimental work. In this contribution, we assess the effect of sequestering K in the core, as it is perhaps an element that is a key to reconciling geochemistry, paleomagnetism, accretion, and thermal evolution models for the planet.

  17. Still Learning from the Past: Drawing on California's CLAS Experience to Inform Assessment of the Common Core. Policy and Practice Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knudson, Joel; Hannan, Stephanie; O'Day, Jennifer; Castro, Marina

    2015-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards represent an exciting step forward for California, and for the nation as a whole, in supporting instruction that can better prepare students for college and career success. Concurrent with the transition to the new standards, the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium (SBAC), of which California is a governing…

  18. (Un)Intended Outcomes of the Common Core English Language Arts Standards: A Narrative Inquiry into the Learning Experiences of English Learners' Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mooney, Angela Jean

    2015-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) are a key piece of current reform efforts to reshape the U.S. educational system. Critics contend that the related Revised Publishers' Criteria (RPC), coupled with the authoritative power of the CCSS, will de-professionalize teachers, directing their practice from a distance. The purpose of this qualitative…

  19. Exploring the Dynamic Relationship between the Accelerative Integrated Method (AIM) and the Core French Teachers Who Use It: Why Agency and Experience Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnott, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade, almost 4,000 Canadian schools have moved to using the Accelerative Integrated Method (AIM) for core French (CF) instruction. Following researchers' recommendations (Brumfit, 1984; Lapkin, Mady, & Arnott, 2009; Larsen-Freeman, 1996, 2000; Prahbu, 1990), I am shifting the focus in this case study from product to process. In…

  20. (Un)Intended Outcomes of the Common Core English Language Arts Standards: A Narrative Inquiry into the Learning Experiences of English Learners' Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mooney, Angela Jean

    2015-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) are a key piece of current reform efforts to reshape the U.S. educational system. Critics contend that the related Revised Publishers' Criteria (RPC), coupled with the authoritative power of the CCSS, will de-professionalize teachers, directing their practice from a distance. The purpose of this qualitative…

  1. Pressure Core Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamarina, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Natural gas hydrates form under high fluid pressure and low temperature, and are found in permafrost, deep lakes or ocean sediments. Hydrate dissociation by depressurization and/or heating is accompanied by a multifold hydrate volume expansion and host sediments with low permeability experience massive destructuration. Proper characterization requires coring, recovery, manipulation and testing under P-T conditions within the stability field. Pressure core technology allows for the reliable characterization of hydrate bearing sediments within the stability field in order to address scientific and engineering needs, including the measurement of parameters used in hydro-thermo-mechanical analyses, and the monitoring of hydrate dissociation under controlled pressure, temperature, effective stress and chemical conditions. Inherent sampling effects remain and need to be addressed in test protocols and data interpretation. Pressure core technology has been deployed to study hydrate bearing sediments at several locations around the world. In addition to pressure core testing, a comprehensive characterization program should include sediment analysis, testing of reconstituted specimens (with and without synthetic hydrate), and in situ testing. Pressure core characterization technology can be used to study other gas-charged formations such as deep sea sediments, coal bed methane and gas shales.

  2. Investigation of EAS cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaulov, S. B.; Beyl, P. F.; Beysembaev, R. U.; Beysembaeva, E. A.; Bezshapov, S. P.; Borisov, A. S.; Cherdyntceva, K. V.; Chernyavsky, M. M.; Chubenko, A. P.; Dalkarov, O. D.; Denisova, V. G.; Erlykin, A. D.; Kabanova, N. V.; Kanevskaya, E. A.; Kotelnikov, K. A.; Morozov, A. E.; Mukhamedshin, R. A.; Nam, R. A.; Nesterova, N. M.; Nikolskaya, N. M.; Pavluchenko, V. P.; Piskal, V. V.; Puchkov, V. S.; Pyatovsky, S. E.; Ryabov, V. A.; Sadykov, T. Kh.; Schepetov, A. L.; Smirnova, M. D.; Stepanov, A. V.; Uryson, A. V.; Vavilov, Yu. N.; Vildanov, N. G.; Vildanova, L. I.; Zayarnaya, I. S.; Zhanceitova, J. K.; Zhukov, V. V.

    2017-06-01

    The development of nuclear-electromagnetic cascade models in air in the late forties have shown informational content of the study of cores of extensive air showers (EAS). These investigations were the main goal in different experiments which were carried out over many years by a variety of methods. Outcomes of such investigations obtained in the HADRON experiment using an X-ray emulsion chamber (XREC) as a core detector are considered. The Ne spectrum of EAS associated with γ-ray families, spectra of γ-rays (hadrons) in EAS cores and the Ne dependence of the muon number, ⟨Nμ⟩, in EAS with γ-ray families are obtained for the first time at energies of 1015-1017 eV with this method. A number of new effects were observed, namely, an abnormal scaling violation in hadron spectra which are fundamentally different from model predictions, an excess of muon number in EAS associated with γ-ray families, and the penetrating component in EAS cores. It is supposed that the abnormal behavior of γ-ray spectra and Ne dependence of the muon number are explained by the emergence of a penetrating component in the 1st PCR spectrum `knee' range. Nuclear and astrophysical explanations of the origin of the penetrating component are discussed. The necessity of considering the contribution of a single close cosmic-ray source to explain the PCR spectrum in the knee range is noted.

  3. Visible-near infrared point spectrometry of drill core samples from Río Tinto, Spain: results from the 2005 Mars Astrobiology Research and Technology Experiment (MARTE) drilling exercise.

    PubMed

    Sutter, Brad; Brown, Adrian J; Stoker, Carol R

    2008-10-01

    Sampling of subsurface rock may be required to detect evidence of past biological activity on Mars. The Mars Astrobiology Research and Technology Experiment (MARTE) utilized the Río Tinto region, Spain, as a Mars analog site to test dry drilling technologies specific to Mars that retrieve subsurface rock for biological analysis. This work examines the usefulness of visible-near infrared (VNIR) (450-1000 nm) point spectrometry to characterize ferric iron minerals in core material retrieved during a simulated Mars drilling mission. VNIR spectrometry can indicate the presence of aqueously precipitated ferric iron minerals and, thus, determine whether biological analysis of retrieved rock is warranted. Core spectra obtained during the mission with T1 (893-897 nm) and T2 (644-652 nm) features indicate goethite-dominated samples, while relatively lower wavelength T1 (832-880 nm) features indicate hematite. Hematite/goethite molar ratios varied from 0 to 1.4, and within the 880-898 nm range, T1 features were used to estimate hematite/goethite molar ratios. Post-mission X-ray analysis detected phyllosilicates, which indicates that examining beyond the VNIR (e.g., shortwave infrared, 1000-2500 nm) will enhance the detection of other minerals formed by aqueous processes. Despite the limited spectral range of VNIR point spectrometry utilized in the MARTE Mars drilling simulation project, ferric iron minerals could be identified in retrieved core material, and their distribution served to direct core subsampling for biological analysis.

  4. Developing an academic medical library core journal collection in the (almost) post-print era: the Florida State University College of Medicine Medical Library experience

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, Barbara S.; Nagy, Suzanne P.

    2003-01-01

    The Florida State University (FSU) College of Medicine Medical Library is the first academic medical library to be established since the Web's dramatic appearance during the 1990s. A large customer base for electronic medical information resources is both comfortable with and eager to migrate to the electronic format completely, and vendors are designing radical pricing models that make print journal cancellations economically advantageous. In this (almost) post-print environment, the new FSU Medical Library is being created and will continue to evolve. By analyzing print journal subscription lists of eighteen academic medical libraries with similar missions to the community-based FSU College of Medicine and by entering these and selected quality indicators into a Microsoft Access database, a core list was created. This list serves as a selection guide, as a point for discussion with faculty and curriculum leaders when creating budgets, and for financial negotiations in a broader university environment. After journal titles specific to allied health sciences, veterinary medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, library science, and nursing were eliminated from the list, 4,225 unique journal titles emerged. Based on a ten-point scale including SERHOLD holdings and DOCLINE borrowing activity, a list of 449 core titles is identified. The core list has been saved in spreadsheet format for easy sorting by a number of parameters. PMID:12883565

  5. Developing an academic medical library core journal collection in the (almost) post-print era: the Florida State University College of Medicine Medical Library experience.

    PubMed

    Shearer, Barbara S; Nagy, Suzanne P

    2003-07-01

    The Florida State University (FSU) College of Medicine Medical Library is the first academic medical library to be established since the Web's dramatic appearance during the 1990s. A large customer base for electronic medical information resources is both comfortable with and eager to migrate to the electronic format completely, and vendors are designing radical pricing models that make print journal cancellations economically advantageous. In this (almost) post-print environment, the new FSU Medical Library is being created and will continue to evolve. By analyzing print journal subscription lists of eighteen academic medical libraries with similar missions to the community-based FSU College of Medicine and by entering these and selected quality indicators into a Microsoft Access database, a core list was created. This list serves as a selection guide, as a point for discussion with faculty and curriculum leaders when creating budgets, and for financial negotiations in a broader university environment. After journal titles specific to allied health sciences, veterinary medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, library science, and nursing were eliminated from the list, 4,225 unique journal titles emerged. Based on a ten-point scale including SERHOLD holdings and DOCLINE borrowing activity, a list of 449 core titles is identified. The core list has been saved in spreadsheet format for easy sorting by a number of parameters.

  6. Angular distribution of different vibrational components of the X and B states reached after resonant Auger decay of core-excited H2O: Experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjelte, I.; Karlsson, L.; Svensson, S.; De Fanis, A.; Carravetta, V.; Saito, N.; Kitajima, M.; Tanaka, H.; Yoshida, H.; Hiraya, A.; Koyano, I.; Ueda, K.; Piancastelli, M. N.

    2005-02-01

    Vibrationally resolved spectra have been obtained for the lowest-lying cationic states XB12,AA12, and BB22 of the water molecule reached after participator resonant Auger decay of core-excited states. The angular distribution has been measured of the first four vibrational components of the X state in the photon energy regions including the O 1s →4a1 and the O 1s→2b2 core excitations, and for different portions of the vibrational envelope of the B state in the photon energy region including the O 1s→2b2 core excitation. For the X state, a large relative spread in β values of the different vibrational components is observed across both resonances. For the B state, a very different trend is observed for the high binding energy side and the low binding energy side of the related spectral feature as a function of photon energy. A theoretical method based on the scattering K matrix has been used to calculate both the photoabsorption spectrum and the β values, by taking both interference between direct and resonant photoemission and vibrational/lifetime interference into account. The numerical results show qualitative agreement with the trends detected in the experimental values and explain the conspicuous variations of the β values primarily in terms of coupling between direct and resonant photoemission by interaction terms of different sign for different final vibrational states.

  7. IN-CORE FUEL MANAGEMENT: PWR Core Calculations Using MCRAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PetroviĆ, B. G.

    1991-01-01

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * IN-CORE FUEL MANAGEMENT CALCULATIONS * In-Core Fuel Management * Methodological Problems of In-Core Fuel Management * In-Core Fuel Management Analytical Tools * PENN STATE FUEL MANAGEMENT PACKAGE * Penn State Fuel Management Package (PFMP) * Assembly Data Description (ADD) * Linking PSU-LEOPARD and MCRAC: An Example * MULTICYCLE REACTOR ANALYSIS CODE (MCRAC) * Main Features and Options of MCRAC code * Core geometry * Diffusion equations * 1.5-group model * Multicycle neutronic analysis * Multicycle cost analysis * Criticality search * Power-dependent xenon feedback calculations * Control rod and burnable absorber simulation * Search for LP with flat BOC power distribution * Artificial ADD option * Variable dimensioning technique * RBI version of MCRAC code * Programming changes in PC version * Fuel interchange option * MCRAC Input/Output * General input description * Sample input * Sample output * EXPERIENCE WITH MCRAC CODE * CONCLUSIONS * REFERENCES

  8. Mars: a new core-crystallization regime.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Andrew J; Schmidt, Max W; van Westrenen, Wim; Liebske, Christian

    2007-06-01

    The evolution of the martian core is widely assumed to mirror the characteristics observed for Earth's core. Data from experiments performed on iron-sulfur and iron-nickel-sulfur systems at pressures corresponding to the center of Mars indicate that its core is presently completely liquid and that it will not form an outwardly crystallizing iron-rich inner core, as does Earth. Instead, planetary cooling will lead to core crystallization following either a "snowing-core" model, whereby iron-rich solids nucleate in the outer portions of the core and sink toward the center, or a "sulfide inner-core" model, where an iron-sulfide phase crystallizes to form a solid inner core.

  9. Experiments on the effects of a continuous 16.7 Hz magnetic field on melatonin secretion, core body temperature, and heart rates in humans.

    PubMed

    Griefahn, B; Künemund, C; Blaszkewicz, M; Golka, K; Mehnert, P; Degen, G

    2001-12-01

    The present study investigated the hypothesis that a strong extremely low frequency magnetic field partially suppresses the synthesis of melatonin and subsequently elevates the core body temperature. Seven healthy young men (16-22 years) took part in a control and in an exposure session. Three men experienced first the control and then the exposure session, four men experienced the sessions in reverse order. Control sessions were performed as constant routines, where the participants spent 24 hour periods continuously in bed while air temperature was 18 degrees C, illumination less than 30 lux, and the sound pressure level 50 dBA. The exposure sessions differed from that protocol only between 6 pm and 2 am when a strong extremely low frequency magnetic field was continuously applied (16.7 Hz, 0.2 mT). Assuming that the participants were unable to perceive the field consciously, they were blind against the actual condition. Salivary melatonin levels were determined hourly; body core temperatures and heart rates were registered continuously throughout. Neither of these parameters revealed alterations that can be related to the influence of the magnetic field. The present results, taken together with other investigations using that particular field, lead to the hypothesis that the effects most likely, occur, only after repetitive exposures to intermittent fields.

  10. Transient climate simulations of the deglaciation 21-9 thousand years before present; PMIP4 Core experiment design and boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanovic, R. F.; Gregoire, L. J.; Kageyama, M.; Roche, D. M.; Valdes, P. J.; Burke, A.; Drummond, R.; Peltier, W. R.; Tarasov, L.

    2015-10-01

    The last deglaciation, which marked the transition between the last glacial and present interglacial periods, was punctuated by a series of rapid (centennial and decadal) climate changes. Numerical climate models are useful for investigating mechanisms that underpin the events, especially now that some of the complex models can be run for multiple millennia. We have set up a Paleoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project (PMIP) working group to coordinate efforts to run transient simulations of the last deglaciation, and to facilitate the dissemination of expertise between modellers and those engaged with reconstructing the climate of the last 21 thousand years. Here, we present the design of a coordinated Core simulation over the period 21-9 thousand years before present (ka) with time varying orbital forcing, greenhouse gases, ice sheets, and other geographical changes. A choice of two ice sheet reconstructions is given, but no ice sheet or iceberg meltwater should be prescribed in the Core simulation. Additional focussed simulations will also be coordinated on an ad-hoc basis by the working group, for example to investigate the effect of ice sheet and iceberg meltwater, and the uncertainty in other forcings. Some of these focussed simulations will focus on shorter durations around specific events to allow the more computationally expensive models to take part.

  11. The roles of heritage vs thermal state of the lithosphere in the localization of detachment zones : insights from Mediterranean Core Complexes and numerical experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labrousse, L.; Huet, B.; Le Pourhiet, L.; Burov, E.; Jolivet, L.

    2012-04-01

    The most enigmatic features of metamorphic core complexes (MCC) refer to localized shallow dipping normal detachment shear zones, and preservation of almost flat Moho below the extended crust. Since the seminal work of R. Buck (1991), it is accepted that MCC form during extension of thermally relaxed hot, hence rheologically weak continental lithosphere. Initial Moho temperatures higher than 800°C are indeed predicted by many numerical models, and migmatites found in MCC cores also imply high temperature for the exhumed lower crust. A systematic review of tectonostratigraphies of the described-so-far Mediterranean MCCs shows that the detachment zones did not all develop on top of high-temperature metamorphic domes but some of them formed under much colder thermal conditions. This diversity can be described within a multi-parameter (P,T, strength) domain bound by 3 end-member cases: (1) high temperature core end-member (HT-MCC), representing most studied MCCs, and two cold end-member cases, one defined by (2) localization of crustal detachment in or on top of a preserved metasedimentary high-pressure metamorphic unit (HP-MCC), and (3) another one where the detachment is localized at the base of a high-strength upper unit, such as an obducted mafic sequence (HSU-MCC). Natural cases scatter within this triangular system, with pure HT-MCC cases (such as the Kabylian detachment, Algeria), pure HP-MCC cases (such as the Filabres detachment in the Betics, Spain), while HSU tectonostratigraphy is always coeval with a high-temperature core (eg Nigde, Anatolia) or a high-pressure nappe (in Corsica for instance). The largest core-complex systems, such as Menderes (Turkey), Rhodope (Greece and Bulgaria), and Cyclades (Greece), relate to the three end-member cases. We run thermo-mechanically coupled numerical models of extension of multi-layered lithosphere. In these models we primarily varied the rheological strength of crustal layers and initial thermal conditions to explore

  12. Lunar Polar Coring Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angell, David; Bealmear, David; Benarroche, Patrice; Henry, Alan; Hudson, Raymond; Rivellini, Tommaso; Tolmachoff, Alex

    1990-01-01

    Plans to build a lunar base are presently being studied with a number of considerations. One of the most important considerations is qualifying the presence of water on the Moon. The existence of water on the Moon implies that future lunar settlements may be able to use this resource to produce things such as drinking water and rocket fuel. Due to the very high cost of transporting these materials to the Moon, in situ production could save billions of dollars in operating costs of the lunar base. Scientists have suggested that the polar regions of the Moon may contain some amounts of water ice in the regolith. Six possible mission scenarios are suggested which would allow lunar polar soil samples to be collected for analysis. The options presented are: remote sensing satellite, two unmanned robotic lunar coring missions (one is a sample return and one is a data return only), two combined manned and robotic polar coring missions, and one fully manned core retrieval mission. One of the combined manned and robotic missions has been singled out for detailed analysis. This mission proposes sending at least three unmanned robotic landers to the lunar pole to take core samples as deep as 15 meters. Upon successful completion of the coring operations, a manned mission would be sent to retrieve the samples and perform extensive experiments of the polar region. Man's first step in returning to the Moon is recommended to investigate the issue of lunar polar water. The potential benefits of lunar water more than warrant sending either astronauts, robots or both to the Moon before any permanent facility is constructed.

  13. Core Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Tim

    2016-01-01

    In this article, two lessons are introduced in which students examine Arctic lake sediments from Lake El'gygytgyn in Russia and discover a climate signal in a lake or pond near their own school. The lessons allow students to experience fieldwork, understand lab procedure, practice basic measurement and observation skills, and learn how to…

  14. Core Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Tim

    2016-01-01

    In this article, two lessons are introduced in which students examine Arctic lake sediments from Lake El'gygytgyn in Russia and discover a climate signal in a lake or pond near their own school. The lessons allow students to experience fieldwork, understand lab procedure, practice basic measurement and observation skills, and learn how to…

  15. N2O, NO, N2, and CO2 emissions from tropical savanna and grassland of Northern Australia: an incubation experiment with intact soil cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, C.; Reiser, K.; Dannenmann, M.; Hutley, L. B.; Jacobeit, J.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.

    2014-06-01

    Strong seasonal variability of hygric and thermal soil conditions are a defining environmental feature in Northern Australia. However, how such changes affect the soil-atmosphere exchange of nitrous oxide (N2O), nitric oxide (NO) and dinitrogen (N2) is still not well explored. By incubating intact soil cores from four sites (3 savanna, 1 pasture) under controlled soil temperatures (ST) and soil moisture (SM) we investigated the release of the trace gas fluxes of N2O, NO and carbon dioxide (CO2). Furthermore, the release of N2 due to denitrification was measured using the helium gas flow soil core technique. Under dry pre-incubation conditions NO and N2O emission were very low (<7.0 ± 5.0 μg NO-N m-2 h-1; <0.0 ± 1.4 μg N2O-N m-2 h-1) or in case of N2O, even a net soil uptake was observed. Substantial NO (max: 306.5 μg N m-2 h-1) and relatively small N2O pulse emissions (max: 5.8 ± 5.0 μg N m-2 h-1) were recorded following soil wetting, but these pulses were short-lived, lasting only up to 3 days. The total atmospheric loss of nitrogen was dominated by N2 emissions (82.4-99.3% of total N lost), although NO emissions contributed almost 43.2% at 50% SM and 30 °C ST. N2O emissions were systematically higher for 3 of 12 sample locations, which indicates substantial spatial variability at site level, but on average soils acted as weak N2O sources or even sinks. Emissions were controlled by SM and ST for N2O and CO2, ST and pH for NO, and SM and pH for N2.

  16. [New conduction disturbances and pacemaker indications after CoreValve® transcatheter aortic valve replacement. Incidence and follow up in a single center experience].

    PubMed

    Aversa, Eliana; Muratore, Claudio A; Nemesio, M Laura; Tentori, Maria Cristina; Payaslian, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is currently reserved for patients with symptomatic aortic stenosis and high surgical risk. One major limiting factor related to TAVI procedural complications is conduction abnormalities and the need for permanent pacemaker implantation. Evaluate the incidence of new conduction disturbances and pacemaker indications in patients with TAVI CoreValve® prosthesis (Medtronic Inc. Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States). We included 28 patients, mean age 80 years. ECG parameters were evaluated previous and after implantation. All patients were monitorized during TAVI. Follow up Holter monitoring was performed at one, 6 and 12 months after the procedure and we also evaluated telemetry of implanted pacemaker. In previous ECG we found 7 patients had right bundle branch block and 7 patients had left bundle brunch block (LBBB). The post implant ECG showed 7 new LBBB: 3 during valvuloplasty and 4 on the end of it. Six patients required pacemaker implantation for permanent or paroxysmal complete AV block (CAVB). At one year follow up, 3 patients with LBBB during valvuloplasty had a normal ECG, one still had LBBB and one an asymptomatic CAVB found in Holter monitoring. Conduction abnormalities are frequent after CoreValve® aortic valve prosthesis implantation. The incidence of new LBBB was 25%. CAVB during or post TAVI require PM implantation. New LBBB may need a closer follow up because in a 3% of the cases it may progress to CAVB. Copyright © 2014 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  17. Diagnostic feasibility and safety of CT-guided core biopsy for lung nodules less than or equal to 8 mm: A single-institution experience.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ying-Yueh; Chen, Chun-Ku; Yeh, Yi-Chen; Wu, Mei-Han

    2017-09-07

    This retrospective study evaluated the diagnostic yield and safety of CT-guided core biopsy of pulmonary nodules ≤8 mm. We determined the diagnostic yield and safety profile of CT-guided lung biopsies for 125 pulmonary nodules ≤8 mm. Pathological diagnoses were made by a combination of histopathological examination and imprint cytology. Results were compared with biopsy results for 134 pulmonary nodules >8 and ≤10 mm. Final diagnoses were established in 94 nodules ≤8 mm. The sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy of CT-guided core biopsy for nodules ≤8 mm were 87.1 % (61/70 nodules), 100 % (24/24) and 90.4 % (85/94), respectively. Diagnostic failure rates were comparable for nodules ≤8 mm and nodules >8 mm and ≤10 mm (9/94, 9.6 % and 7/111, 6.3 %, respectively, P=0.385). The rate of tube thoracostomy for nodules ≤8 mm was comparable to that for nodules >8 and ≤10 mm (1.6 % vs. 0.7 %, P=0.611). Nodules ≤6 mm had a higher non-diagnostic result rate of 15.4 % (6/39) than did nodules >8 and ≤10 mm (3.7 %, 5/134, P=0.017). CT-guided pulmonary biopsy is feasible for lung nodules ≤8 mm, especially those >6 mm, and has an acceptable diagnostic yield and safety profile. • CT-guided biopsy of lung nodules ≤8 mm has high diagnostic accuracy. • Safety profiles are similar between nodules ≤8 mm and 8-10 mm. • Nodules ≤6 mm have higher rates of non-diagnostic results in biopsy. • Non-subpleural nodules and old age are risk factors for higher grade haemorrhage. • Biopsy is feasible for diagnosing nodules >6 and ≤8 mm.

  18. Radionuclide tracing of water masses and processes in the water column and sediment in the Algerian Basin.

    PubMed

    Noureddine, A; Benkrid, M; Maoui, R; Menacer, M; Boudjenoun, R; Kadi-hanifi, M; Lee, S-H; Povinec, P P

    2008-08-01

    Caesium-137 and (239,240)PU were analysed in the water column along the Algerian coast. The (137)Cs activity concentration in surface water increased from the west to the east from 1.6 to 3.3 mBq L(-1), documenting a presence of Modified Atlantic Water (MAW) in the region. Higher concentrations observed in deep waters may be due to an intrusion of Levantine Intermediate Water (LIW), which has been carrying higher levels of (137)Cs from Chernobyl accident. The (239,240)Pu sub-surface concentration peaked at about 250 m water depth as a result of biogeochemical processes in the water column. The observed (239,240)Pu/(137)Cs activity ratio at the surface (0.003) was significantly lower than that in global fallout (0.04). This decrease exceeds that expected from radioactive decay of (137)Cs, and confirms that Pu due to its adsorption on sinking particles is more effectively removed from surface layers than is (137)Cs. An increase of the (239,240)Pu/(137)Cs activity ratio with depth suggests that (239,240)Pu, similarly as (137)Cs, should be also transported by advection to maintain the observed ratios in deep waters. An intrusion of LIW may enhance therefore both the (137)Cs and (239,240)Pu concentrations in deep waters. The average (238)Pu/(239+240)Pu activity ratio in seawater was 0.03+/-0.02, confirming a global fallout origin of Pu in the Algerian Basin. Caesium-137 and (239,240)Pu inventories in the water column were estimated to be from 2.7+/-0.5 kBq m(-2) to 3.8+/-0.7 kBq m(-2), and from 13.8+/-2.6 Bq m(-2) to 41+/-7B qm(-2), respectively. The (137)Cs massic activities in surface sediment were almost constant, the average activity was 9.0+/-0.8 Bq kg(-1). Sedimentation rates obtained using the (210)Pb method were from 0.1 to 0.7 cm y(-1), and resulting penetration depths of (137)Cs in the sediment cores were from 15 to over 40 cm. The (137)Cs peaks found in the sediment cores were associated with the Chernobyl accident (1986) and global fallout (1964). The (137

  19. Industrial Guidelines for Undertaking a Hard-Core Employment Program: An Analytic Case Study of the Experience of an Urban Industrial Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feifer, Irwin; And Others

    Based on an analytically evaluative case study of a New York City furniture department store's experiences with a Manpower Administration contract, this report deals with the development and progress of the program as analyzed by one investigator through interviews with almost all of the participants in the program. As a result of the study,…

  20. Layer-by-layer resolved core-level shifts in CaF2 and SrF2 on Si(111): Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotenberg, Eli; Denlinger, J. D.; Leskovar, M.; Hessinger, U.; Olmstead, Marjorie A.

    1994-10-01

    Using x-ray-photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger-electron spectroscopy, we have resolved surface, bulk, and interface Ca and F core-level emission in thin films (3-8 triple layers) of CaF2 and SrF2 on Si(111). We confirmed these assignments using x-ray-photoelectron diffraction (XPD) and surface modification. XPD was also used to identify the growth modes of the films as being either laminar or layer plus islands; in the latter case we have resolved buried and uncovered interface F and Ca/Sr emission. We compare the observed energy differences between surface, bulk, and interface emission to theoretical estimates of the extra-atomic contributions to emission energies. We find excellent agreement considering only the Madelung (electrostatic) potentials for the initial-state contribution and polarization response for the final-state contribution, including the effect of tetragonal strain. Small discrepancies for emission from metal atoms bonded to the Si substrate are interpreted in terms of chemical shifts.

  1. Core decompression for juvenile osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Soto, José A; Price, Charles T

    2011-07-01

    Core decompression may be used as adjunct for treatment in some cases of Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease (LCPD). The primary application is for patients with onset at 12 years of age or older. We recommend classifying these older patients as idiopathic juvenile osteonecrosis and treating them similarly to adults with avascular necrosis. Juvenile osteonecrosis may benefit from core decompression combined with shelf acetabuloplasty during the early stages of necrosis. Younger children with LCPD may benefit from decompression by fenestration of the femoral head. Experience in adult-onset osteonecrosis and our early experience suggest that some patients may benefit from these adjunctive treatments. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Criticality experiments with planar arrays of three-liter bottles containing plutonium nitrate solution

    SciTech Connect

    Durst, B.M.; Clayton, E.D.; Smith, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of these experiments was to provide benchmark data to validate calculational codes used in critically safety assessments of plant configurations. Arrays containing up to as many as sixteen three-liter bottles filled with plutonium nitrate were used in the experiments. A split-table device was used in the final assembly of the arrays. Ths planar arrays were reflected with close fitting plexiglas on each side and on the bottom but not the top surface. The experiments addressed a number of factors effecting criticality: the critical air gap between bottles in an array of fixed number of bottles, the number of bottles required for criticality if the bottles were touching, and the effect on critical array spacing and critical bottle number due to the insertion of an hydrogeneous substance into the air gap between bottles. Each bottle contained about 2.4l of Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 4} solution at a Pu concentration of 105g Pu/l, with the {sup 240}Pu content being 2.9 wt% at a free acid molarity H{sup +} of 5.1. After the initial series of experiments were performed with bottles separated by air gaps, plexiglas shells of varying thicknesses were placed around each bottle to investigate how moderation between bottles affects both the number of bottles required for criticality and the critical spacing between each bottle. The minimum of bottles required for criticality was found to be 10.9 bottles, occurring for a square array with bottles in contact. As the bottles were spaced apart, the critical number increased. For sixteen bottles in a square array, the critical separation between surfaces in both x and y direction was 0.96 cm. The addition of plexiglas around each bottle decreased the critical bottle number, compared to those separated in air, but the critical bottle number, even with interstitial plastic in place was always greater than 10.9 bottles. The most reactive configuration was a tightly packed array of bottles with no intervening material.

  3. Crystallization in Earth's Core after High-Temperature Core Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, K.; Morard, G.; Hernlund, J. W.; Helffrich, G. R.; Ozawa, H.

    2015-12-01

    Recent core formation models based on the metal-silicate partitioning of siderophile elements suggest that the Earth's core was formed by metal segregation at high pressure and high temperature in a deep magma ocean. It is also thought that the simultaneous solubility of silicon and oxygen in liquid iron are strongly enhanced at high pressure and high temperature, such that at the end of accretion the core was rich in both silicon and oxygen. Here we performed crystallization experiments on the Fe-Si binary and Fe-Si-O ternary systems up to core pressure in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. The starting material for the latter was a homogeneous mixture of fine-grain Fe-Si and SiO2 (<1 µm). We prepared cross sections of samples recovered from the DAC using a focused ion beam (FIB) and subsequently performed textural and chemical characterization with field-emission-type electron microprobe (FE-EPMA). Quenched liquid alloy was found at the hottest part coexisting with a solid phase (liquidus phase) at the periphery. These results combined with literature data on the melting phase relations in the Fe-FeO binary system demonstrate that the liquidus field of SiO2 is very wide at the Fe-rich portion of the Fe-Si-O ternary system at the core pressure range. It indicates that the original Fe-Si-O core liquid should have crystallized a large amount SiO2 until it lost either silicon or oxygen. The recent finding of high thermal conductivity of the core suggests that core thermal convection is difficult to sustain without extreme degrees of secular cooling. However, even for modest degrees of joint Si-O incorporation into the early core, the buoyancy released by crystallization of SiO2 is sufficient to overcome thermal stratification and sustain the geodynamo.

  4. Outcomes after transcatheter aortic valve implantation with both Edwards-SAPIEN and CoreValve devices in a single center: the Milan experience.

    PubMed

    Godino, Cosmo; Maisano, Francesco; Montorfano, Matteo; Latib, Azeem; Chieffo, Alaide; Michev, Iassen; Al-Lamee, Rasha; Bande, Marta; Mussardo, Marco; Arioli, Francesco; Ielasi, Alfonso; Cioni, Micaela; Taramasso, Maurizio; Arendar, Irina; Grimaldi, Antonio; Spagnolo, Pietro; Zangrillo, Alberto; La Canna, Giovanni; Alfieri, Ottavio; Colombo, Antonio

    2010-11-01

    Our aim was to assess clinical outcome after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) performed with the 2 commercially available valves with 3 delivery approaches selected in a stepwise fashion. Limited data exist on the results of a comprehensive TAVI program using different valves with transfemoral, transapical, and transaxillary approaches for treatment of severe aortic stenosis. We report 30-day and 6-month outcomes of high-risk patients consecutively treated in a single center with either the Medtronic-CoreValve (MCV) (Medtronic, Minneapolis, Minnesota) or Edwards-SAPIEN valve (ESV) (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, California) delivered via the transfemoral or transaxillary approaches and ESV via the transapical approach. A total of 137 patients underwent TAVI: 107 via transfemoral (46 MCV and 61 ESV), 15 via transaxillary (12 MCV and 3 ESV), and 15 via transapical approach. After the transfemoral approach, the procedural success rate was 93.5%, and major vascular complication rate was 20.6%. No intra-procedural deaths occurred. The procedural success rates of transapical and transaxillary approaches were 86.6% and 93.3%, respectively. The 30-day mortality rate was 0.9% in transfemoral group and 13.3% in transapical, and no deaths occurred after transaxillary access. Cumulative death rate at 6 months was 12.2% in transfemoral, 26.6% in transapical, and 18.2% in transaxillary groups. At multivariable analysis, logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation, body surface area, and history of cerebrovascular disease were significantly associated with an increased risk of major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events. Routine TAVI using both MCV and ESV with a selection of approaches is feasible and allows treatment of a wide range of patients with good overall procedural success rates and 30-day and 6-month outcomes. Copyright © 2010 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Sedimentation in the Southern Okinawa Trough: enhanced particle scavenging and teleconnection between the Equatorial Pacific and western Pacific margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Shih-Yu; Huh, Chih-An; Su, Chih-Chieh; You, Chen-Feng

    2004-11-01

    Owing to its location, geomorphology and hydrodynamic conditions, the southernmost part of the Southern Okinawa Trough (SOT) acts like an efficient receptacle for sediments from Taiwan and the East China Sea shelf. The high sediment flux coupled with the passage, bifurcation, upwelling, swirling and detour of Kuroshio in the SOT area result in intense particle scavenging, with sedimentary inventories of 210Pb and 239, 240Pu far greater than expected from local atmospheric input and in situ water column production. The unusually high inventories, as well as the deposition history of Pu isotopes must be explained by advective transport of Pu westward from the Marshall Islands, the largest source of Pu in the Pacific, by the North Equatorial Current (NEC) followed by northward transport of Kuroshio to the SOT area. The high sedimentation rate in the SOT area enabled us to differentiate the subsurface peak of 239, 240Pu resulting from the global fallout maximum in AD 1963 and the subsurface maximum of 240Pu/239Pu caused by close-in fallout from neutron-rich thermonuclear tests conducted by the US during AD 1952-1954 at the Enewetak and Bikini Atolls. The vertical offset between the subsurface peaks of 239, 240Pu and 240Pu/239Pu in sediments suggests that deposition of the 240Pu/239Pu maximum preceded that of the 239, 240Pu maximum by 3-5 yr and that the transit time of the 240Pu-enriched Pu from its source (at ∼12°N, 162°E) to the SOT area is ∼6 yr. The mean velocity of NEC thus calculated is ∼0.022 m s-1. The present is the key to the past. This study reveals teleconnection between the Equatorial Pacific and the western Pacific margins and suggests that ODP and IMAGES cores recently collected from the SOT area holds great promise for the reconstruction of high-resolution paleoceanographic records along the trajectories of NEC and Kuroshio.

  6. Plutonium in Soils from Northeast China and Its Potential Application for Evaluation of Soil Erosion

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yihong; Qiao, Jixin; Hou, Xiaolin; Pan, Shaoming

    2013-01-01

    Surface and soil core samples from northeast China were analyzed for Pu isotopes. The measured 240Pu/239Pu atomic ratios and 239 + 240Pu/137Cs activity ratios revealed that the global fallout is the dominant source of Pu and 137Cs at these sites. Migration behavior of Pu varying with land type and human activities resulted in different distribution of Pu in surface soils. A sub-surface maximum followed by exponential decline of 239 + 240Pu concentrations was observed in an undisturbed soil core, with a total 239 + 240Pu inventory of 86.9 Bq/m2 and more than 85% accumulated in 0 ~ 20 cm layers. While only half inventory of Pu was obtained in another soil core and no sub-surface maximum value occurred. Erosion of topsoil in the site should be the most possible reason for the significantly lower Pu inventory, which is also supported by the reported 137Cs profiles. These results demonstrated that Pu could be applied as an ideal substitute of 137Cs for soil erosion study in the future. PMID:24336360

  7. Diagnostic value and accuracy of imprint cytology evaluation during image-guided core needle biopsies: Review of our experience at a large academic center.

    PubMed

    Kubik, Melanie J; Bovbel, Alexandra; Goli, Harish; Saremian, Jinous; Siddiqi, Anwer; Masood, Shahla

    2015-10-01

    Several studies have emphasized the value of on-site evaluation of imprint cytology (IC) performed on core needle biopsies (CNB) of breast, prostate, and lung, in terms of adequacy. The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic value and accuracy of rapid on-site IC of CNB specimens performed for liver, lung, lymph node, bone, and soft tissue masses to evaluate whether on-site preliminary diagnosis is sufficiently accurate to allow earlier, more efficient planning of ancillary studies with decreased turnaround time. This morphology-based, retrospective study was approved by our Institutional Review Board. A total of 252 consecutive CNBs with on-site IC on masses of liver, lung, lymph node, bone, and soft tissue were included in this study. IC was reviewed by two cytopathology fellows and two board-certified cytopathologists who gave a categorical diagnosis (malignant/benign/atypical) and exact diagnosis when possible. Preliminary diagnoses were compared with corresponding histological CNB diagnoses. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy were calculated. Of the 252 cases reviewed, 30 cases were classified as atypical by IC and evaluated separately. Of the remaining 222 cases, IC classified an average of 154 (70%) as malignant, 54 (24%) as benign, and 14 (6%) as nondiagnostic. The corresponding distribution of histological diagnoses was 151 (68%) malignant and 71 (32%) benign. Overall correlation of correct IC diagnoses was 80%, with a correlation of 91% in malignant cases and 59% in benign cases. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 96, 74, 92, and 87%, respectively. Diagnostic accuracy was 91%. There was no statistically significant difference in the accuracy of categorical diagnoses between IC and final histologic diagnosis. Atypical cases by IC were more likely to be malignant in lung and liver lesions (71% and 58%, respectively), than in lymph node, bone, or soft tissue lesions

  8. Unraveling the Geologic History of Antarctica Through the Study of Sediment and Rock Cores: The ANDRILL Education and Public Outreach Experience.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rack, F. R.; Huffman, L.; Berg, M.; Levy, R.; Harwood, D.; Lacy, L.

    2007-12-01

    ANDRILL (ANtarctic geological DRILLing) is a multinational collaboration involving more than 250 scientists from Germany, Italy, New Zealand and the United States. The ANDRILL Program has mobilized scientists, technicians, drillers, engineers, students and educators from four member nations to bring world-class science into focus and provide in-depth immersive experiences to educators through the ARISE (ANDRILL Research Immersion for Science Educators) Program and Project Iceberg. During two seasons of scientific drilling, encompassing the McMurdo Ice Shelf (MIS) Project and the Southern McMurdo Sound (SMS) Project, 15 educators have been immersed in ANDRILL science and have participated in both learning and teaching experiences. Blogs, video journals, images and other resources were generated and distributed online to teachers, students and the general public through the ANDRILL website as part of Project Iceberg, which was used as a unifying theme for the outreach effort. The video journals chronicled the journey from Lincoln, Nebraska to Antarctica and introduced viewers to many aspects of the ANDRILL program in an engaging manner. An accompanying guide provided background information, discussion starters, and engaging activities for students and adults alike. Subtitles in German and Italian were used on each of the video journals in addition to the English narrative, and the resulting product was entitled, ANDRILL: A REAL WORLD GEOSCIENCE ADVENTURE. The primary objective was to introduce teachers, students, and the general public to Antarctica and the ANDRILL Program, and to provide preliminary insights into the following questions: How do scientists from around the world come together in the coldest, windiest, driest place on Earth to uncover the secrets that have been shrouded beneath the ice for millions of years? What secrets do the rocks record? How can I join the journey to learn more about Antarctica and ANDRILL?

  9. Core-core and core-valence correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of (1s) core correlation on properties and energy separations was analyzed using full configuration-interaction (FCI) calculations. The Be 1 S - 1 P, the C 3 P - 5 S and CH+ 1 Sigma + or - 1 Pi separations, and CH+ spectroscopic constants, dipole moment and 1 Sigma + - 1 Pi transition dipole moment were studied. The results of the FCI calculations are compared to those obtained using approximate methods. In addition, the generation of atomic natural orbital (ANO) basis sets, as a method for contracting a primitive basis set for both valence and core correlation, is discussed. When both core-core and core-valence correlation are included in the calculation, no suitable truncated CI approach consistently reproduces the FCI, and contraction of the basis set is very difficult. If the (nearly constant) core-core correlation is eliminated, and only the core-valence correlation is included, CASSCF/MRCI approached reproduce the FCI results and basis set contraction is significantly easier.

  10. Argon/UF6 plasma exhaust gas reconstitution experiments using preheated fluorine and on-line diagnostics. [fissioning uranium plasma core reactor design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of employing a flowing, high-temperature, pure fluorine/UF6 regeneration system to efficiently convert a large fraction of the effluent plasma exhaust back to pure UF6 was demonstrated. The custom built T.O.F. mass spectrometer sampling system permitted on-line measurements of the UF6 concentration at different locations in the exhaust system. Negligible amounts ( 100 ppm) of UF6 were detected in the axial bypass exhaust duct and the exhaust ducts downstream of the cryogenic trap system used to collect the UF6, thus verifying the overall system efficiency over a range of operating conditions. Use of a porous Monel duct as part of the exhaust duct system, including provision for injection of pure fluorine, provided a viable technique to eliminate uranium compound residue on the inside surface of the exhaust ducts. Typical uranium compound mass deposition per unit area of duct was 2 micron g/sq cm. This porous duct technique is directly applicable to future uranium compound transfer exhaust systems. Throughout these experiments, additional basic data on the corrosion aspects of hot, pressurized UF6/fluorine were also accumulated.

  11. Counterrotating cores in elliptical galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcella, Marc Comas

    The dynamics of the merger between a high- and a low-elliptical galaxy was studied to understand how kinematically peculiar cores in elliptical galaxies might form. Numerical simulations of mergers provide rotation curves, surface density profiles, surface density contour plots and velocity maps of the merger remnants, as well as diagnostics on the dynamics such as phase-space diagrams. This type of merger can create counterrotating cores. The core of the smaller galaxy, of higher density, is not disrupted by the primary tidal field and sinks to the center of the primary as an independent dynamical subsystem. Core counterrotation occurs only when the initial merger orbit is retrograde with respect to the pin of the primary. The remnant has higher effective radius and lower mean central surface density than the primary galaxy, but a smaller core radius. The adsorption of orbital energy and angular momentum by the primary particles greatly modifies the kinematic structure of the larger galaxy. Twisted rotation axes and isophote twists appear over the whole body of the remnant. These diagnostics may be used to determine whether observed peculiar cores might have formed via an elliptical-elliptical merger. Galaxies with counterrotating cores should show a complex velocity field, isophotal irregularities, and, in general, a slow rotation in the main body of the galaxy. The present experiments are the first galaxy-satellite merger experiments involving an active, rotating secondary. They show that part of the orbital angular momentum is absorbed by the secondary, thus the secondary contributes to its own sinking: the sinking rate depends on the orientation of the secondary spin. Long-slit spectroscopic observations of NGC 3656 are reported.

  12. Geochemical constraints on Earth's core composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebert, Julien

    2016-04-01

    The density of the core as measured from seismic-wave velocities is lower (by 10-15%) than that of pure iron, and therefore the core must also contain some light elements. Geophysical and cosmochemical constraints indicate that obvious candidates for these light elements include silicon, oxygen, and sulfur. These elements have been studied extensively for the past 30 years but a joint solution fulfilling all the requirements imposed by cosmochemistry and geochemistry, seismology, and models of Earth's accretion and core formation is still a highly controversial subject. Here are presented new experimental data in geochemistry used to place constraints on Earth's core composition. Metal-silicate partitioning experiments were performed at pressures and temperatures directly similar to those that prevailed in a deep magma ocean in the early Earth. The results show that core formation can reconcile the observed concentrations of siderophile elements in the silicate mantle with geophysical constraints on light elements in the core. Partitioning results also lead to a core containing less than 1 wt.% of sulfur, inconsistent with a S-rich layer to account for the observed structure of the outer core. Additionally, isotopic fractionations in core formation experiments are presented. This experimental tool merging the fields of experimental petrology and isotope geochemistry represents a promising approach, providing new independent constraints on the nature of light elements in the core.

  13. The Core Journal Concept in Black Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weissinger, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Black Studies scholars have shown interest in the core journal concept. Indeed, the idea of core journals for the study of the Black experience has changed several times since 1940. While Black Studies scholars are citing Black Studies journals with frequency, they also cite traditional disciplinary journals a great deal of the time. However,…

  14. Instructional Leadership and the Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groth, Karla; Bennett-Schmidt, Sally J.

    2013-01-01

    Following the 2012-13 administrators welcome back kick-off meeting, superintendent Pat highlighted the district's plan to roll-out of the new Common Core State Standards (CCSS), including integration of learning experiences that would prepare students for the new Common Core assessments from the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium (SBAC).…

  15. The Core Journal Concept in Black Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weissinger, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Black Studies scholars have shown interest in the core journal concept. Indeed, the idea of core journals for the study of the Black experience has changed several times since 1940. While Black Studies scholars are citing Black Studies journals with frequency, they also cite traditional disciplinary journals a great deal of the time. However,…

  16. HTTF Core Stress Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Brian D. Hawkes; Richard Schultz

    2012-07-01

    In accordance with the need to determine whether cracking of the ceramic core disks which will be constructed and used in the High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) for heatup and cooldown experiments, a set of calculation were performed using Abaqus to investigate the thermal stresses levels and likelihood for cracking. The calculations showed that using the material properties provided for the Greencast 94F ceramic, cracking is predicted to occur. However, this modeling does not predict the size or length of the actual cracks. It is quite likely that cracks will be narrow with rough walls which would impede the flow of coolant gases entering the cracks. Based on data recorded at Oregon State University using Greencast 94F samples that were heated and cooled at prescribed rates, it was concluded that the likelihood that the cracks would be detrimental to the experimental objectives is small.

  17. Academic Rigor: The Core of the Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunner, Judy

    2013-01-01

    Some educators see the Common Core State Standards as reason for stress, most recognize the positive possibilities associated with them and are willing to make the professional commitment to implementing them so that academic rigor for all students will increase. But business leaders, parents, and the authors of the Common Core are not the only…

  18. Academic Rigor: The Core of the Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunner, Judy

    2013-01-01

    Some educators see the Common Core State Standards as reason for stress, most recognize the positive possibilities associated with them and are willing to make the professional commitment to implementing them so that academic rigor for all students will increase. But business leaders, parents, and the authors of the Common Core are not the only…

  19. European core curriculum in neurorehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Sandrini, Giorgio; Binder, Heinrich; Hömberg, Volker; Saltuari, Leopold; Tarkka, Ina; Smania, Nicola; Corradini, Claudio; Giustini, Alessandro; Kätterer, Christian; Picari, Ledina; Diserens, Karin; Koenig, Eberhard; Geurts, Alexander; Anghelescu, Aurelian; Opara, Józef; Tonin, Paolo; Kwakkel, Gert; Golyk, Volodymyr; Onose, Gelu; Pérennou, Dominique; Picelli, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    Summary To date, medical education lacks Europe-wide standards on neurorehabilitation. To address this, the European Federation of NeuroRehabilitation Societies (EFNR) here proposes a postgraduate neurorehabilitation training scheme. In particular, the European medical core curriculum in neurorehabilitation should include a two-year residency in a neurorehabilitation setting where trainees can gain practical experience. Furthermore, it should comprise six modules of classroom training organized as weekend seminars or summer/winter schools. In conclusion, after defining the European medical core curriculum in neurorehabilitation, the next activities of the EFNR will be to try and reach the largest possible consensus on its content among all national societies across Europe in order to further validate it and try to extend it to the other, non-medical, professionals on the neurorehabilitation team in line with their core curricula defined by each professional association. PMID:28676138

  20. Counterrotating Cores in Elliptical Galaxies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcells, Marc Comas

    The dynamics of the merger between a high- and a low-luminosity elliptical galaxy has been studied to understand how kinematically peculiar cores in elliptical galaxies might form. Numerical simulations of mergers provide rotation curves, surface density profiles, surface density contour plots and velocity maps of the merger remnants, as well as diagnostics on the dynamics such as phase-space diagrams. This type of merger can create counterrotating cores. The core of the smaller galaxy, of higher density, is not disrupted by the primary tidal field and sinks to the center of the primary as an independent dynamical subsystem. Core counterrotation occurs only when the initial merger orbit is retrograde with respect to the spin of the primary. The remnant has higher effective radius and lower mean central surface density than the primary galaxy, but a smaller core radius. The adsorption of orbital energy and angular momentum by the primary particles greatly modifies the kinematic structure of the larger galaxy. Twisted rotation axes and isophote twists appear over the whole body of the remnant. These diagnostics may be used to determine whether observed peculiar cores might have formed via an elliptical-elliptical merger. Galaxies with counterrotating cores should show a complex velocity field, isophotal irregularities, and, in general, a slow rotation in the main body of the galaxy. The present experiments are the first galaxy-satellite merger experiments involving an active, rotating secondary. They show that part of the orbital angular momentum is absorbed by the secondary, thus the secondary contributes to its own sinking: the sinking rate depends on the orientation of the secondary spin. Long-slit spectroscopic observations of NGC 3656 are reported. Rotation curves indicate that NGC 3656 contains a core spinning in a direction perpendicular to the rotation in the main body of the galaxy. Velocity reversals at intermediate radii are also observed. These features

  1. Does Mercury have a molten core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peale, S. J.

    1976-01-01

    A feasible nonseismic observational experiment is proposed for determining the existence and extent of a conducting molten core within Mercury. This experiment would utilize the effects of a liquid core on the dynamics of Mercury's rotation; two necessary conditions for performing it are that the core must not follow the mantle's forced librations in longitude but must follow the mantle on the timescale of the 250,000-yr precession. A method is developed by assuming these conditions to be satisfied, and bounds are established on the core viscosity for which they are satisfied. It is shown that the value of the ratio of the moment of inertia of the mantle to the largest principal moment of inertia of the entire planet would indicate whether the core is most probably solid, partially fluid, or entirely fluid. Techniques are suggested for determining the unknowns required to compute the necessary ratio.

  2. Liquid sodium models of the Earth's core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Matthew M.; Stone, Douglas R.; Zimmerman, Daniel S.; Lathrop, Daniel P.

    2015-12-01

    Our understanding of the dynamics of the Earth's core can be advanced by a combination of observation, experiments, and simulations. A crucial aspect of the core is the interplay between the flow of the conducting liquid and the magnetic field this flow sustains via dynamo action. This non-linear interaction, and the presence of turbulence in the flow, precludes direct numerical simulation of the system with realistic turbulence. Thus, in addition to simulations and observations (both seismological and geomagnetic), experiments can contribute insight into the core dynamics. Liquid sodium laboratory experiments can serve as models of the Earth's core with the key ingredients of conducting fluid, turbulent flow, and overall rotation, and can also approximate the geometry of the core. By accessing regions of parameter space inaccessible to numerical studies, experiments can benchmark simulations and reveal phenomena relevant to the Earth's core and other planetary cores. This review focuses on the particular contribution of liquid sodium spherical Couette devices to this subject matter.

  3. Characterization of plutonium in deep-sea sediments of the Sulu and South China Seas.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wei; Zheng, Jian; Guo, Qiuju; Yamada, Masatoshi; Pan, Shaoming

    2010-08-01

    Anthropogenic Pu isotopes are important geochemical tracers for sediment studies. Their distributions and sources in the water columns as well as the sediments of the North Pacific have been intensively studied; however, information about Pu in the Southeast Asian seas is limited. To study the isotopic composition of Pu, and thus to identify its sources, we collected sediment core samples in the South China Sea and the Sulu Sea during the KH-96-5 Cruise of the R/V Hakuho Maru. We analysed the activities of (239+240)Pu and the atom ratios of (240)Pu/(239)Pu using isotope dilution sector-field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SF-ICP-MS). The (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios in the sediments of both areas (inventory weighted mean: 0.251 for the South China Sea and 0.280 for the Sulu Sea) were higher than the global fallout value (0.178+/-0.019), suggesting the existence of Pu from the Pacific Proving Grounds in the North Pacific. Low inventories of (239+240)Pu in sediments were observed in the South China Sea (3.75 Bq/m(2)) and the Sulu Sea (1.38 Bq/m(2)). Most of the Pu input is still present in the water column. Scavenging and benthic mixing processes were considered to be the main processes controlling the distribution of Pu in the deep-sea sediments of both study areas.

  4. Recent organic carbon accumulation (~100 years) along the Cabo Frio, Brazil upwelling region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Christian J.; Caldeira, Pedro P.; Smoak, Joseph M.; Ketterer, Michael E.; Belem, Andre; Mendoza, Ursula M. N.; Cordeiro, Lívia G. M. S.; Silva-Filho, Emmanoel V.; Patchineelam, Sambasiva R.; Albuquerque, Ana Luiza S.

    2014-03-01

    Six sediment cores were obtained from the Cabo Frio shelf region of coastal Brazil to quantify the accumulation of organic carbon in a highly productive upwelling region. The sampled locations, 10-60 km offshore at ~100 m water depth, were investigated for excess 210Pb (210Pbex) as well as 239+240Pu fallout activities to determine sedimentary dynamics. The 210Pbex and 239+240Pu dating models show that the sediment accumulation rates varied substantially throughout this complex hydrodynamic system (0.8-5.5 mm yr-1). Excess 210Pb and 239+240Pu fluxes indicate lateral transport, with varying intensity along the continental shelf. The stations with the greatest 210Pbex and 239+240Pu sediment inventories are also the sites with the highest carbon accumulation rates (CAR). The total organic carbon (TOC) and total nitrogen (TN) contents, along with the δ13C results, indicate that the organic matter deposited in this region is mainly of marine origin. The results of this work suggest that lateral transport, with varying intensity along the shelf, contribute to the large quantities of marine plankton buried at specific depositional settings in the Cabo Frio upwelling region (~1-8 mol of OC cm-2 yr-1).

  5. Coring Sample Acquisition Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddad, Nicolas E.; Murray, Saben D.; Walkemeyer, Phillip E.; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bao, Xiaoqi; Kriechbaum, Kristopher L.; Richardson, Megan; Klein, Kerry J.

    2012-01-01

    A sample acquisition tool (SAT) has been developed that can be used autonomously to sample drill and capture rock cores. The tool is designed to accommodate core transfer using a sample tube to the IMSAH (integrated Mars sample acquisition and handling) SHEC (sample handling, encapsulation, and containerization) without ever touching the pristine core sample in the transfer process.

  6. Toroidal converter core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1977-01-01

    Improved approach consists of cut and uncut cores nested in concentric configuration. Cores are made by winding steel ribbon on mandrel and impregnating with epoxy to bond layers together. Gap is made by cutting across wound and bonded core. Rough ends are ground or lapped.

  7. Core Competence and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Gary; Hooper, Nick

    2000-01-01

    Outlines the concept of core competence and applies it to postcompulsory education in the United Kingdom. Adopts an educational perspective that suggests accreditation as the core competence of universities. This economic approach suggests that the market trend toward lifetime learning might best be met by institutions developing a core competence…

  8. Sources and accumulation of plutonium in a large Western Pacific marginal sea: The South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Wu, Junwen; Dai, Minhan; Xu, Yi; Zheng, Jian

    2018-01-01

    In order to examine the sources of plutonium (Pu) and elaborate its scavenging and accumulation processes, (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios and (239+240)Pu activities in the water column of the South China Sea (SCS) were determined and compared with our previously reported data for the sediments. Consistently high (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios that ranged from 0.184-0.250 (average=0.228±0.015), indicative of non-global fallout Pu sources were observed both in the surface water and at depth during 2012-2014. The spatial distribution of the (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratio in the SCS showed a decreasing trend away from the Luzon Strait, which was very consistent with the introduction pathway of the Kuroshio Current. The Kuroshio had an even heavier Pu isotopic ratio ranging from 0.250-0.263 (average=0.255±0.006), traceable to the non-global fallout Pu signature from the Pacific Proving Grounds (PPG). Using a simple two end-member mixing model, we further revealed that this PPG source contributed 41±17% of the Pu in the SCS water column. The (239+240)Pu activities in the SCS surface seawater varied from 1.59 to 2.94mBqm(-3), with an average of 2.34±0.38mBqm(-3). Such an activity level was ~40% higher than that in the Kuroshio. The distribution of (239+240)Pu in the surface seawater further showed a general trend of increase from the Kuroshio to the SCS basin, suggesting significant accumulation of Pu within the SCS. The (239+240)Pu inventory of the water column in the SCS basin at the SEATS station with a total depth of ~3840m was estimated to be ~29Bqm(-2), which was substantially higher than the sediment core estimates made for the SCS basin (3.75Bqm(-2)) but much lower than the sediment core estimates made for the shelf of the northern SCS (365.6Bqm(-2)). Such differences were determined by the lower scavenging efficiency of Pu in the SCS basin compared to the northern SCS shelf. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. TMI-2 core shipping preparations

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, L.J.; ); Barkanic, R.J. ); Conaway, W.T. II ); Schmoker, D.S. )

    1988-01-01

    Shipping the damaged core from the Unit 2 reactor of Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station near Harrisburg, PA, to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, ID, required development and implementation of a completely new spent fuel transportation system. This paper describes the equipment developed, the planning and activities used to implement the hardware systems into the facilities, and the planning involved in making the rail shipments. It also includes a summary of recommendations resulting from this experience.

  10. Banded transformer cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, C. W. T. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A banded transformer core formed by positioning a pair of mated, similar core halves on a supporting pedestal. The core halves are encircled with a strap, selectively applying tension whereby a compressive force is applied to the core edge for reducing the innate air gap. A dc magnetic field is employed in supporting the core halves during initial phases of the banding operation, while an ac magnetic field subsequently is employed for detecting dimension changes occurring in the air gaps as tension is applied to the strap.

  11. The Earth's Core: How Does It Work? Perspectives in Science. Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington, DC.

    Various research studies designed to enhance knowledge about the earth's core are discussed. Areas addressed include: (1) the discovery of the earth's core; (2) experimental approaches used in studying the earth's core (including shock-wave experiments and experiments at high static pressures), the search for the core's light elements, the…

  12. HYDRATE CORE DRILLING TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    John H. Cohen; Thomas E. Williams; Ali G. Kadaster; Bill V. Liddell

    2002-11-01

    The ''Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost'' project is a three-year endeavor being conducted by Maurer Technology Inc. (MTI), Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The project's goal is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. The project team plans to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope includes drilling and coring one well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 during the winter drilling season. A specially built on-site core analysis laboratory will be used to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. Prior to going to the field, the project team designed and conducted a controlled series of coring tests for simulating coring of hydrate formations. A variety of equipment and procedures were tested and modified to develop a practical solution for this special application. This Topical Report summarizes these coring tests. A special facility was designed and installed at MTI's Drilling Research Center (DRC) in Houston and used to conduct coring tests. Equipment and procedures were tested by cutting cores from frozen mixtures of sand and water supported by casing and designed to simulate hydrate formations. Tests were conducted with chilled drilling fluids. Tests showed that frozen core can be washed out and reduced in size by the action of the drilling fluid. Washing of the core by the drilling fluid caused a reduction in core diameter, making core recovery very difficult (if not impossible). One successful solution was to drill the last 6 inches of core dry (without fluid circulation). These tests demonstrated that it will be difficult to capture core when drilling in permafrost or hydrates without implementing certain safeguards. Among the coring tests was a simulated hydrate formation comprised of coarse, large

  13. Multiple Core Galaxies: Implications for M31

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, B. F.; Miller, R. H.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    It is generally perceived that two cores cannot survive very long within the nuclear regions of a galaxy. The recent HST discovery of a double nucleus in M31 brings this question into prominence. Physical conditions in the nuclear regions of a typical galaxy help a second core survive so it can orbit for a long time, possibly for thousands of orbits. Given the nearly uniform mass density in a core, tidal forces within a core radius are compressive in all directions and help the core survive the buffeting it takes as it orbits near the center of the galaxy. We use numerical experiments to illustrate these physical principles. Modifications to the experimental method allow the full power of the experiments to be concentrated on the nuclear regions. Spatial resolution of about 0.2 parsec comfortably resolves detail within the 1.4 parsec core radius of the second, but brighter, core (P1) in M31. The same physical principles apply in other astronomical situations, such as dumbbell galaxies, galaxies orbiting near the center of a galaxy cluster, and subclustering in galaxy clusters. The experiments also illustrate that galaxy encounters and merging are quite sensitive to external tidal forces, such as those produced by the gravitational potential in a group or cluster of galaxies.

  14. 23. CORE WORKER OPERATING A COREBLOWER THAT PNEUMATICALLY FILLED CORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. CORE WORKER OPERATING A CORE-BLOWER THAT PNEUMATICALLY FILLED CORE BOXES WITH RESIGN IMPREGNATED SAND AND CREATED A CORE THAT THEN REQUIRED BAKING, CA. 1950. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  15. The Cores of Elliptical Galaxies in Coma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucey, John

    1995-07-01

    The cores of galaxies are astrophysically unique. They canhost high energy nuclei, star formation and perhaps even blackholes. HST observations have established that the cores ofellipticals are related to their global properties, and so canbe used as diagnostics of the physical processes occurring atthe time of formation. HST images of galaxy cores havedistinguished two different types of core luminosity profiles:`soft' and `hard' types. It is suggested that luminous, slowlyrotating galaxies have `soft' cores and the less luminousdisky galaxies have `hard' cores. This can be interpreted interms of a formation scenario based on a merger hierarchy inwhich the low luminosity systems experience highly dissipativemergers, but as the luminous systems are assembled the mergersbecome increasingly stellar. In this picture, the type of corea galaxy generates is intimately related to its evolutionaryhistory, i.e. the degree of interaction/merging experiencedand the availability of cold gas. In turn, this should notonly depend on luminosity but also on the galaxy's localenvironment. Here we propose to test the gaseous/stellarmerger picture by imaging a set of Coma cluster ellipticalsfrom a wide range of cluster radii. In the gas poorenvironment of the cluster core there may be insufficent coldgas for the low luminosity galaxies to form `hard' cores.Similarly, at the cluster turnround radius even luminousgalaxies may have experienced a dissipative core formation andpossess

  16. The nature of the earth's core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeanloz, Raymond

    1990-01-01

    The properties of the earth's core are overviewed with emphasis on seismologically determined regions and pressures and seismologically measured density, elastic wave velocities, and gravitational acceleration. Attention is given to solid-state convection of the inner core, and it is noted that though seismological results do not conclusively prove that the inner core is convective, the occurrence and magnitude of seismic anisotropy are explained by the effects of solid-state convection. Igneous petrology and geochemistry of the inner core, a layer at the base of the mantle and contact metasomatism at the core-mantle boundary, and evolution of the core-mantle system are discussed. It is pointed out that high-pressure melting experiments indicate that the temperature of the core is ranging from 4500 to 6500 K, and a major implication of such high temperature is that the tectonics and convection of the mantle, as well as the resulting geological processes observed at the surface, are powered by heat from the core. As a result of the high temperatures, along with the compositional contrast between silicates and iron alloy, the core-mantle boundary is considered to be most chemically active region of the earth.

  17. Core-Cutoff Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gheen, Darrell

    2007-01-01

    A tool makes a cut perpendicular to the cylindrical axis of a core hole at a predetermined depth to free the core at that depth. The tool does not damage the surrounding material from which the core was cut, and it operates within the core-hole kerf. Coring usually begins with use of a hole saw or a hollow cylindrical abrasive cutting tool to make an annular hole that leaves the core (sometimes called the plug ) in place. In this approach to coring as practiced heretofore, the core is removed forcibly in a manner chosen to shear the core, preferably at or near the greatest depth of the core hole. Unfortunately, such forcible removal often damages both the core and the surrounding material (see Figure 1). In an alternative prior approach, especially applicable to toxic or fragile material, a core is formed and freed by means of milling operations that generate much material waste. In contrast, the present tool eliminates the damage associated with the hole-saw approach and reduces the extent of milling operations (and, hence, reduces the waste) associated with the milling approach. The present tool (see Figure 2) includes an inner sleeve and an outer sleeve and resembles the hollow cylindrical tool used to cut the core hole. The sleeves are thin enough that this tool fits within the kerf of the core hole. The inner sleeve is attached to a shaft that, in turn, can be attached to a drill motor or handle for turning the tool. This tool also includes a cutting wire attached to the distal ends of both sleeves. The cutting wire is long enough that with sufficient relative rotation of the inner and outer sleeves, the wire can cut all the way to the center of the core. The tool is inserted in the kerf until its distal end is seated at the full depth. The inner sleeve is then turned. During turning, frictional drag on the outer core pulls the cutting wire into contact with the core. The cutting force of the wire against the core increases with the tension in the wire and

  18. Distribution of artificial radionuclides in deep sediments of the Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Orellana, J; Pates, J M; Masqué, P; Bruach, J M; Sanchez-Cabeza, J A

    2009-01-01

    Artificial radionuclides enter the Mediterranean Sea mainly through atmospheric deposition following nuclear weapons tests and the Chernobyl accident, but also through the river discharge of nuclear facility effluents. Previous studies of artificial radionuclides impact of the Mediterranean Sea have focussed on shallow, coastal sediments. However, deep sea sediments have the potential to store and accumulate pollutants, including artificial radionuclides. Deep sea marine sediment cores were collected from Mediterranean Sea abyssal plains (depth >2000 m) and analysed for (239,240)Pu and (137)Cs to elucidate the concentrations, inventories and sources of these radionuclides in the deepest areas of the Mediterranean. The activity - depth profiles of (210)Pb, together with (14)C dating, indicate that sediment mixing redistributes the artificial radionuclides within the first 2.5 cm of the sedimentary column. The excess (210)Pb inventory was used to normalize (239,240)Pu and (137)Cs inventories for variable sediment fluxes. The (239,240)Pu/(210)Pb(xs) ratio was uniform across the entire sea, with a mean value of 1.24x10(-3), indicating homogeneous fallout of (239,240)Pu. The (137)Cs/(210)Pb(xs) ratio showed differences between the eastern (0.049) and western basins (0.030), clearly significant impact of deep sea sediments from the Chernobyl accident. The inventory ratios of (239,240)Pu/(137)Cs were 0.041 and 0.025 in the western and eastern basins respectively, greater than the fallout ratio, 0.021, showing more efficient scavenging of (239,240)Pu in the water column and major sedimentation of (137)Cs in the eastern basin. Although areas with water depths of >2000 m constitute around 40% of the entire Mediterranean basin, the sediments in these regions only contained 2.7% of the (239,240)Pu and 0.95% of the (137)Cs deposited across the Sea in 2000. These data show that the accumulation of artificial radionuclides in deep Mediterranean environments is much lower than

  19. The fluffy core of Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, James H.

    2015-09-01

    Enceladus is well known for its young south polar terrain, observed by Cassini to emit several GW of heat as well as plumes of vapor and ice. The source of this energy is believed to be tidal dissipation. However, the observed south polar heat flux cannot be sustained over the age of the Solar System. Furthermore, thermal evolution models suggest that any global subsurface ocean should freeze on a timescale of tens to hundreds of My, sharply reducing future tidal heating, unless large amounts of antifreeze are present in the ocean. Here I propose an alternative internal structure for Enceladus, in which the silicate core is fragmented, and that the tidal deformation of the core may be partially controlled by interstitial ice. I find that fragmentation of the core increases tidal dissipation by a factor of 20, consistent with the long-term dynamically sustainable level, even when the interior is completely frozen, but only if the interior starts out warm and tidal heating is strong from the beginning. If this is not the case, radioactive heating will be insufficient to prevent the interior from cooling. Although an ocean need not be present in order for the interior to experience significant tidal heating, all models that dissipate enough heat to prevent runaway cooling are also warm enough to have an ocean. Tidal dissipation in the weak core provides an additional source of heat that may prevent a global subsurface ocean from freezing.

  20. Core sample extractor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akins, James; Cobb, Billy; Hart, Steve; Leaptrotte, Jeff; Milhollin, James; Pernik, Mark

    1989-01-01

    The problem of retrieving and storing core samples from a hole drilled on the lunar surface is addressed. The total depth of the hole in question is 50 meters with a maximum diameter of 100 millimeters. The core sample itself has a diameter of 60 millimeters and will be two meters in length. It is therefore necessary to retrieve and store 25 core samples per hole. The design utilizes a control system that will stop the mechanism at a certain depth, a cam-linkage system that will fracture the core, and a storage system that will save and catalogue the cores to be extracted. The Rod Changer and Storage Design Group will provide the necessary tooling to get into the hole as well as to the core. The mechanical design for the cam-linkage system as well as the conceptual design of the storage device are described.

  1. The core paradox.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, G. C.; Higgins, G. H.

    1973-01-01

    Rebuttal of suggestions from various critics attempting to provide an escape from the seeming paradox originated by Higgins and Kennedy's (1971) proposed possibility that the liquid in the outer core was thermally stably stratified and that this stratification might prove a powerful inhibitor to circulation of the outer core fluid of the kind postulated for the generation of the earth's magnetic field. These suggestions are examined and shown to provide no reasonable escape from the core paradox.

  2. The core paradox.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, G. C.; Higgins, G. H.

    1973-01-01

    Rebuttal of suggestions from various critics attempting to provide an escape from the seeming paradox originated by Higgins and Kennedy's (1971) proposed possibility that the liquid in the outer core was thermally stably stratified and that this stratification might prove a powerful inhibitor to circulation of the outer core fluid of the kind postulated for the generation of the earth's magnetic field. These suggestions are examined and shown to provide no reasonable escape from the core paradox.

  3. Advancing engagement methods for trials: the CORE study relational model of engagement for a stepped wedge cluster randomised controlled trial of experience-based co-design for people living with severe mental illnesses.

    PubMed

    Richard, Lauralie; Piper, Donella; Weavell, Wayne; Callander, Rosemary; Iedema, Rick; Furler, John; Pierce, David; Godbee, Kali; Gunn, Jane; Palmer, Victoria J

    2017-04-08

    Engagement is essential in trials research but is rarely embedded across all stages of the research continuum. The development, use, effectiveness and value of engagement in trials research is poorly researched and understood, and models of engagement are rarely informed by theory. This article describes an innovative methodological approach for the development and application of a relational model of engagement in a stepped wedge designed cluster randomised controlled trial (RCT), the CORE study. The purpose of the model is to embed engagement across the continuum of the trial which will test if an experience-based co-design intervention improves psychosocial recovery for people affected by severe mental illness. The model was developed in three stages and used a structured iterative approach. A context mapping assessment of trial sites was followed by a literature review on recruitment and retention of hard-to-reach groups in complex interventions and RCTs. Relevant theoretical and philosophical underpinnings were identified by an additional review of literature to inform model development and enactment of engagement activities. Policy, organisational and service user data combined with evidence from the literature on barriers to recruitment provided contextual information. Four perspectives support the theoretical framework of the relational model of engagement and this is organised around two facets: the relational and continuous. The relational facet is underpinned by relational ethical theories and participatory action research principles. The continuous facet is supported by systems thinking and translation theories. These combine to enact an ethics of engagement and evoke knowledge mobilisation to reach the higher order goals of the model. Engagement models are invaluable for trials research, but there are opportunities to advance their theoretical development and application, particularly within stepped wedge designed studies where there may be a

  4. Highly accurate measurements of the spontaneous fission half-life of 240,242Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador-Castiñeira, P.; Bryś, T.; Eykens, R.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Moens, A.; Oberstedt, S.; Sibbens, G.; Vanleeuw, D.; Vidali, M.; Pretel, C.

    2013-12-01

    Fast spectrum neutron-induced fission cross-section data for transuranic isotopes are of special demand from the nuclear data community. In particular highly accurate data are needed for the new generation IV nuclear applications. The aim is to obtain precise neutron-induced fission cross sections for 240Pu and 242Pu. To do so, accurate data on spontaneous fission half-lives must be available. Also, minimizing uncertainties in the detector efficiency is a key point. We studied both isotopes by means of a twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber with the goal of improving the present data on the neutron-induced fission cross section. For the two plutonium isotopes the high α-particle decay rates pose a particular problem to experiments due to piling-up events in the counting gas. Argon methane and methane were employed as counting gases, the latter showed considerable improvement in signal generation due to its higher drift velocity. The detection efficiency for both samples was determined, and improved spontaneous fission half-lives were obtained with very low statistical uncertainty (0.13% for 240Pu and 0.04% for 242Pu): for 240Pu, T1/2,SF=1.165×1011 yr (1.1%), and for 242Pu, T1/2,SF=6.74×1010 yr (1.3%). Systematic uncertainties are due to sample mass (0.4% for 240Pu and 0.9% for 242Pu) and efficiency (1%).

  5. Core Research Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hicks, Joshua; Adrian, Betty

    2009-01-01

    The Core Research Center (CRC) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), located at the Denver Federal Center in Lakewood, Colo., currently houses rock core from more than 8,500 boreholes representing about 1.7 million feet of rock core from 35 States and cuttings from 54,000 boreholes representing 238 million feet of drilling in 28 States. Although most of the boreholes are located in the Rocky Mountain region, the geologic and geographic diversity of samples have helped the CRC become one of the largest and most heavily used public core repositories in the United States. Many of the boreholes represented in the collection were drilled for energy and mineral exploration, and many of the cores and cuttings were donated to the CRC by private companies in these industries. Some cores and cuttings were collected by the USGS along with other government agencies. Approximately one-half of the cores are slabbed and photographed. More than 18,000 thin sections and a large volume of analytical data from the cores and cuttings are also accessible. A growing collection of digital images of the cores are also becoming available on the CRC Web site Internet http://geology.cr.usgs.gov/crc/.

  6. Adaptive core simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Khalik, Hany Samy

    The work presented in this thesis is a continuation of a master's thesis research project conducted by the author to gain insight into the applicability of inverse methods to developing adaptive simulation capabilities for core physics problems. Use of adaptive simulation is intended to improve the fidelity and robustness of important core attributes predictions such as core power distribution, thermal margins and core reactivity. Adaptive simulation utilizes a selected set of past and current reactor measurements of reactor observables, i.e. in-core instrumentations readings, to adapt the simulation in a meaningful way. A meaningful adaption will result in high fidelity and robust adapted core simulators models. To perform adaption, we propose an inverse theory approach in which the multitudes of input data to core simulators, i.e. reactor physics and thermal-hydraulic data, are to be adjusted to improve agreement with measured observables while keeping core simulators models unadapted. At a first glance, devising such adaption for typical core simulators models would render the approach impractical. This follows, since core simulators are based on very demanding computational models, i.e. based on complex physics models with millions of input data and output observables. This would spawn not only several prohibitive challenges but also numerous disparaging concerns. The challenges include the computational burdens of the sensitivity-type calculations required to construct Jacobian operators for the core simulators models. Also, the computational burdens of the uncertainty-type calculations required to estimate the uncertainty information of core simulators input data presents a demanding challenge. The concerns however are mainly related to the reliability of the adjusted input data. We demonstrate that the power of our proposed approach is mainly driven by taking advantage of this unfavorable situation. Our contribution begins with the realization that to obtain

  7. Characterization of selected radionuclides in sediment and surface water in Standley Lake, Great Western Reservoir, and Mower Reservoir, Jefferson County, Colorado, 1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clow, D.W.; Johncox, D.A.

    1995-01-01

    Lake sediment and surface water from Standley Lake, Great Western Reservoir, and Mower Reservoir, near Denver, Colorado, were sampled and analyzed for selected radionuclides during August through October, 1992. Sample concentrations were summarized and compared to results from a study conducted in 1983-84. Median plutonium-239,240 (239,240Pu) concentrations in lake-sediment grab samples from Standley Lake, Great Western Reservoir, and Mower Reservoir were 0.037, 0.105, and 0.351 picocuries per gram (pCi/g). The maximum concen- tration of 239,240Pu dissolved in lake water was 0.009 picocuries per liter, substantially below limits suggested by the Colorado Department of Health and the Environment. Dissolved concentrations of gross alpha and uranium isotopes were below National Drinking Water Standards in all water samples. There was no statistically significant difference between 239,240Pu concentration in lake-sediment grab samples collected from Standley Lake in 1983-84 and in 1992; however, there was a small, but statistically significant, difference at Great Western Reservoir (p<0.05). In 1992 at Great Western Reservoir, median 239,240Pu concentrations were 0.040 pCi/g lower than in 1983-84. There was a small, but statistically significant (p<0.05) difference in 239,240Pu concentrations in lake- bottom-sediment cores collected in 1983-84 and in 1992. Measured concentrations tended to be higher in 1983-84 than in 1992. The differences were greatest at concentrations above 1.5 pCi/g; in those samples concentrations were 10 to 30% higher in 1983-84 than in 1992.

  8. Anomalous plutonium isotopic ratios in sediments of Lake Qinghai from the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fengchang; Zheng, Jian; Liao, Haiqing; Yamada, Masatoshi; Wan, Guojiang

    2011-11-01

    The vertical profiles of (239+240)Pu and (137)Cs activities and (240)Pu/(239)Pu isotopic ratios are determined for three sediment cores of Lake Qinghai from the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, China, and compared with those in sediments of another three lakes (Lakes Bosten, Sugan, and Shuangta), the only existing ones closest to Lop Nor area, China's nuclear weapons test site in the northwestern part of the country. The mean inventory of 47.7 ± 18.7 MBq km(-2) for (239+240)Pu activity in Lake Qinghai is comparable to the average value of global fallout expected at the same latitude, yet the mean inventory of 1112.0 ± 78.0 MBq km(-2) for (137)Cs is slightly lower than that of global fallout. Anomalously low (240)Pu/(239)Pu isotopic ratios (0.038-0.125) were found in the 3-6.5 cm deep sediment layers, indicating the trace Pu input from early nuclear weapons research activities at Atomic City in the lake's watershed during the 1950-60s. Model calculation indicated that the Pu input accounted for approximately 5-16% of the total Pu inventory. The observation of low (240)Pu/(239)Pu ratio in the deep sediment layer provided a new time marker for recent sediment dating in the lake and around the area. The results are of great significance to the further understanding of sources, records, and environmental impacts of global and regional nuclear activities in the environment and provide important chronological information for further studies on the water eutrophication process and climatic change, and reconstruction of pollution history of organic contaminants and heavy metals in the watershed of Lake Qinghai.

  9. Seasonal precipitation timing and ice core records

    SciTech Connect

    Steig, E.J.; Grootes, P.M.; Stuiver, M. )

    1994-12-16

    This is a commentary on global circulation model experiments of moisture source changes in Greenland, urging caution in how they are applied because they have important implications for paleoclimate reconstruction from ice cores. The work comes from preliminary find is of a ice core (GISP2) of the authors. The authors conclude that at present anomalies in Greenland ice core records should not be interpreted solely in terms of source region variations. The combined use of oxygen 18, D and ionic species in the new Summit, Greenland cores should make it possible to answer empirically some of the questions raised by the GCM experiments as to the interpretation of oxygen 18 records in terms of temperature. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Core merging and stratification following giant impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landeau, Maylis; Olson, Peter; Deguen, Renaud; Hirsh, Benjamin H.

    2016-10-01

    A stratified layer below the core-mantle boundary has long been suspected on the basis of geomagnetic and seismic observations. It has been suggested that the outermost core has a stratified layer about 100 km thick that could be due to the diffusion of light elements. Recent seismological evidence, however, supports a layer exceeding 300 km in thickness of enigmatic origin. Here we show from turbulent mixing experiments that merging between projectile and planetary core following a giant impact can lead to a stratified layer at the top of the core. Scaling relationships between post-impact core structure and projectile properties suggest that merging between Earth's protocore and a projectile core that is enriched in light elements and 20 times less massive can produce the thick stratification inferred from seismic data. Our experiments favour Moon-forming impact scenarios involving a projectile smaller than the proto-Earth and suggest that entrainment of mantle silicates into the protocore led to metal-silicate equilibration under extreme pressure-temperature conditions. We conclude that the thick stratified layer detected at the top of Earth's core can be explained as a vestige of the Moon-forming giant impact during the late stages of planetary accretion.

  11. Can Psychiatric Rehabilitation Be Core to CORE?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olney, Marjorie F.; Gill, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In this article, we seek to determine whether psychiatric rehabilitation principles and practices have been more fully incorporated into the Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE) standards, the extent to which they are covered in four rehabilitation counseling "foundations" textbooks, and how they are reflected in the…

  12. Can Psychiatric Rehabilitation Be Core to CORE?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olney, Marjorie F.; Gill, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In this article, we seek to determine whether psychiatric rehabilitation principles and practices have been more fully incorporated into the Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE) standards, the extent to which they are covered in four rehabilitation counseling "foundations" textbooks, and how they are reflected in the…

  13. More on the Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Monnica

    2013-01-01

    From a higher education perspective, new "Common Core" standards could improve student college-readiness levels, reduce institutional remediation rates, and close education gaps in and between states. As a national initiative to create common educational standards for students across multiple states, the Common Core State Standards…

  14. Mercury's core evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deproost, Marie-Hélène; Rivoldini, Attilio; Van Hoolst, Tim

    2016-10-01

    Remote sensing data of Mercury's surface by MESSENGER indicate that Mercury formed under reducing conditions. As a consequence, silicon is likely the main light element in the core together with a possible small fraction of sulfur. Compared to sulfur, which does almost not partition into solid iron at Mercury's core conditions and strongly decreases the melting temperature, silicon partitions almost equally well between solid and liquid iron and is not very effective at reducing the melting temperature of iron. Silicon as the major light element constituent instead of sulfur therefore implies a significantly higher core liquidus temperature and a decrease in the vigor of compositional convection generated by the release of light elements upon inner core formation.Due to the immiscibility in liquid Fe-Si-S at low pressure (below 15 GPa), the core might also not be homogeneous and consist of an inner S-poor Fe-Si core below a thinner Si-poor Fe-S layer. Here, we study the consequences of a silicon-rich core and the effect of the blanketing Fe-S layer on the thermal evolution of Mercury's core and on the generation of a magnetic field.

  15. Making an Ice Core.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopaska-Merkel, David C.

    1995-01-01

    Explains an activity in which students construct a simulated ice core. Materials required include only a freezer, food coloring, a bottle, and water. This hands-on exercise demonstrates how a glacier is formed, how ice cores are studied, and the nature of precision and accuracy in measurement. Suitable for grades three through eight. (Author/PVD)

  16. Ice Core Investigations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krim, Jessica; Brody, Michael

    2008-01-01

    What can glaciers tell us about volcanoes and atmospheric conditions? How does this information relate to our understanding of climate change? Ice Core Investigations is an original and innovative activity that explores these types of questions. It brings together popular science issues such as research, climate change, ice core drilling, and air…

  17. NFE Core Bibliographies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Inst. for International Studies in Education.

    This collection of core bibliographies, which expands on an initial bibliography published in 1979 of the core resources housed in the Non-Formal Education Information Center at Michigan State University, comprises a basic stock of materials on nonformal education and women in development that have been contributed by development planners,…

  18. Ice Core Investigations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krim, Jessica; Brody, Michael

    2008-01-01

    What can glaciers tell us about volcanoes and atmospheric conditions? How does this information relate to our understanding of climate change? Ice Core Investigations is an original and innovative activity that explores these types of questions. It brings together popular science issues such as research, climate change, ice core drilling, and air…

  19. More on the Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Monnica

    2013-01-01

    From a higher education perspective, new "Common Core" standards could improve student college-readiness levels, reduce institutional remediation rates, and close education gaps in and between states. As a national initiative to create common educational standards for students across multiple states, the Common Core State Standards…

  20. CORE - Performance Feedback System

    SciTech Connect

    2009-10-02

    CORE is an architecture to bridge the gaps between disparate data integration and delivery of disparate information visualization. The CORE Technology Program includes a suite of tools and user-centered staff that can facilitate rapid delivery of a deployable integrated information to users.

  1. Modular core holder

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, J.; Cole, C.W.; Hamid, S.; Lucas, J.K.

    1991-03-05

    This patent describes a modular core holder. It comprises: a sleeve, forming an internal cavity for receiving a core. The sleeve including segments; support means, overlying the sleeve, for supporting the sleeve; and access means, positioned between at least two of the segments of the sleeve, for allowing measurement of conditions within the internal cavity.

  2. Making an Ice Core.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopaska-Merkel, David C.

    1995-01-01

    Explains an activity in which students construct a simulated ice core. Materials required include only a freezer, food coloring, a bottle, and water. This hands-on exercise demonstrates how a glacier is formed, how ice cores are studied, and the nature of precision and accuracy in measurement. Suitable for grades three through eight. (Author/PVD)

  3. Iowa Core Annual Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    One central component of a great school system is a clear set of expectations, or standards, that educators help all students reach. In Iowa, that effort is known as the Iowa Core. The Iowa Core represents the statewide academic standards, which describe what students should know and be able to do in math, science, English language arts, and…

  4. Mars' core and magnetism.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, D J

    2001-07-12

    The detection of strongly magnetized ancient crust on Mars is one of the most surprising outcomes of recent Mars exploration, and provides important insight about the history and nature of the martian core. The iron-rich core probably formed during the hot accretion of Mars approximately 4.5 billion years ago and subsequently cooled at a rate dictated by the overlying mantle. A core dynamo operated much like Earth's current dynamo, but was probably limited in duration to several hundred million years. The early demise of the dynamo could have arisen through a change in the cooling rate of the mantle, or even a switch in convective style that led to mantle heating. Presently, Mars probably has a liquid, conductive outer core and might have a solid inner core like Earth.

  5. Lunar Core and Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Boggs, D. H.; Ratcliff, J. T.

    2004-01-01

    Variations in rotation and orientation of the Moon are sensitive to solid-body tidal dissipation, dissipation due to relative motion at the fluid-core/solid-mantle boundary, and tidal Love number k2 [1,2]. There is weaker sensitivity to flattening of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) [2,3,4] and fluid core moment of inertia [1]. Accurate Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) measurements of the distance from observatories on the Earth to four retroreflector arrays on the Moon are sensitive to lunar rotation and orientation variations and tidal displacements. Past solutions using the LLR data have given results for dissipation due to solid-body tides and fluid core [1] plus Love number [1-5]. Detection of CMB flattening, which in the past has been marginal but improving [3,4,5], now seems significant. Direct detection of the core moment has not yet been achieved.

  6. Internal core tightener

    DOEpatents

    Brynsvold, Glen V.; Snyder, Jr., Harold J.

    1976-06-22

    An internal core tightener which is a linear actuated (vertical actuation motion) expanding device utilizing a minimum of moving parts to perform the lateral tightening function. The key features are: (1) large contact areas to transmit loads during reactor operation; (2) actuation cam surfaces loaded only during clamping and unclamping operation; (3) separation of the parts and internal operation involved in the holding function from those involved in the actuation function; and (4) preloaded pads with compliant travel at each face of the hexagonal assembly at the two clamping planes to accommodate thermal expansion and irradiation induced swelling. The latter feature enables use of a "fixed" outer core boundary, and thus eliminates the uncertainty in gross core dimensions, and potential for rapid core reactivity changes as a result of core dimensional change.

  7. Lunar Core and Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Boggs, D. H.; Ratcliff, J. T.

    2004-01-01

    Variations in rotation and orientation of the Moon are sensitive to solid-body tidal dissipation, dissipation due to relative motion at the fluid-core/solid-mantle boundary, and tidal Love number k2 [1,2]. There is weaker sensitivity to flattening of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) [2,3,4] and fluid core moment of inertia [1]. Accurate Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) measurements of the distance from observatories on the Earth to four retroreflector arrays on the Moon are sensitive to lunar rotation and orientation variations and tidal displacements. Past solutions using the LLR data have given results for dissipation due to solid-body tides and fluid core [1] plus Love number [1-5]. Detection of CMB flattening, which in the past has been marginal but improving [3,4,5], now seems significant. Direct detection of the core moment has not yet been achieved.

  8. 34. DESPATCH CORE OVENS, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM, BAKES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. DESPATCH CORE OVENS, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM, BAKES CORES THAT ARE NOT MADE ON HEATED OR COLD BOX CORE MACHINES, TO SET BINDING AGENTS MIXED WITH THE SAND CREATING CORES HARD ENOUGH TO WITHSTAND THE FLOW OF MOLTEN IRON INSIDE A MOLD. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  9. Pu, 137Cs and excess 210Pb in Russian Arctic sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskaran, M.; Asbill, Shaunna; Santschi, Peter; Brooks, James; Champ, Michael; Adkinson, Dan; Colmer, Matthew R.; Makeyev, Vyacheslav

    1996-05-01

    The activity ratios of Pu and radiocesium isotopes have been used to delineate the major sources (such as global and close-in (debris) fallout, nuclear fuel reprocessing and fabrication plant effluents) in the environment. We have measured 238Pu, 239,240Pu, 137Cs, and excess 210Pb concentrations in 107 surficial sediments as well as in 5 sediment cores collected in the summer months of 1993 and 1994 from the Ob and Yenisey Rivers (Russia) and the Kara sea. A comparison of the sediment core inventories of 239,240Pu and 137Cs, along with the 238Pu/ 239,240Pu activity ratios, with those expected from global fallout allows us to estimate the relative amounts, if any, of reactor-derived 238Pu and 239,240Pu from the dumped reactor sites in the study area. In surficial sediment samples collected in 1993 and 1994, the 239,240Pu concentrations varied between 4.2 and 856 mBq kg -1, with a mean of 239 mBq kg -1. In samples with a measurable 238Pu, the 238Pu/ 239,240Pu activity ratios varied between 0.010 and 0.069, with an average value of 0.035 ± 0.014. This range can be compared to the average 238Pu/ 239,240Pu activity ratio of 0.030 for the year 1993 from nuclear weapons testing and SNAP fallout obtained from soil studies, indicating very little (≤ 5%) additional sources of 238Pu to the sediments in the study area. The inventories of Pu in the 5 sediment cores from the study area varied between 2.67 ± 0.67 and 24.5 ± 2.2 Bq m -2 with a mean value of 8.83 Bq m -2. The 137Cs concentrations in the upper 3 cm of the sediments varied between below detection limit to 71.4 Bq kg -1, with a mean of 14.9 Bq kg -1. The 137Cs inventories in the 5 sediment cores varied between 156.7 ± 28.3 and 1600 ± 153.3 Bq m -2, with a mean value of 583.3 Bq m -2. The mean ratio of inventories of Pu to that of 137Cs, 0.015, is comparable to the values in other places in the Arctic region. There is a significant correlation between total organic carbon and concentrations of 137Cs, 239,240Pu

  10. Properties of iron under core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. M.

    2003-04-01

    Underlying an understanding of the geodynamo and evolution of the core is knowledge of the physical and chemical properties of iron and iron mixtures under high pressure and temperature conditions. Key properties include the viscosity of the fluid outer core, thermal diffusivity, equations-of-state, elastic properties of solid phases, and phase equilibria for iron and iron-dominated mixtures. As is expected for work that continues to tax technological and intellectual limits, controversy has followed both experimental and theoretical progress in this field. However, estimates for the melting temperature of the inner core show convergence and the equation-of-state for iron as determined in independent experiments and theories are in remarkable accord. Furthermore, although the structure and elastic properties of the solid inner-core phase remains uncertain, theoretical and experimental underpinnings are better understood and substantial progress is likely in the near future. This talk will focus on an identification of properties that are reasonably well known and those that merit further detailed study. In particular, both theoretical and experimental (static and shock wave) determinations of the density of iron under extreme conditions are in agreement at the 1% or better level. The behavior of the Gruneisen parameter (which determines the geothermal gradient and controls much of the outer core heat flux) is constrained by experiment and theory under core conditions for both solid and liquid phases. Recent experiments and theory are suggestive of structure or structures other than the high-pressure hexagonal close-packed (HCP) phase. Various theories and experiments for the elasticity of HCP iron remain in poor accord. Uncontroversial constraints on core chemistry will likely never be possible. However, reasonable bounds are possible on the basis of seismic profiles, geochemical arguments, and determinations of sound velocities and densities at high pressure and

  11. Global Core Plasma Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Dennis L.; Craven, P. D.; Comfort, R. H.

    1999-01-01

    Abstract. The Global Core Plasma Model (GCPM) provides, empirically derived, core plasma density as a function of geomagnetic and solar conditions throughout the inner magnetosphere. It is continuous in value and gradient and is composed of separate models for the ionosphere, the plasmasphere, the plasmapause, the trough, and the polar cap. The relative composition of plasmaspheric H+, He+, and O+ is included in the GCPM. A blunt plasmaspheric bulge and rotation of the bulge with changing geomagnetic conditions is included. The GCPM is an amalgam of density models, intended to serve as a framework for continued improvement as new measurements become available and are used to characterize core plasma density, composition, and temperature.

  12. Global Core Plasma Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Dennis L.; Craven, P. D.; Comfort, R. H.

    1999-01-01

    Abstract. The Global Core Plasma Model (GCPM) provides, empirically derived, core plasma density as a function of geomagnetic and solar conditions throughout the inner magnetosphere. It is continuous in value and gradient and is composed of separate models for the ionosphere, the plasmasphere, the plasmapause, the trough, and the polar cap. The relative composition of plasmaspheric H+, He+, and O+ is included in the GCPM. A blunt plasmaspheric bulge and rotation of the bulge with changing geomagnetic conditions is included. The GCPM is an amalgam of density models, intended to serve as a framework for continued improvement as new measurements become available and are used to characterize core plasma density, composition, and temperature.

  13. Core shroud corner joints

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, Charles B.; Forsyth, David R.

    2013-09-10

    A core shroud is provided, which includes a number of planar members, a number of unitary corners, and a number of subassemblies each comprising a combination of the planar members and the unitary corners. Each unitary corner comprises a unitary extrusion including a first planar portion and a second planar portion disposed perpendicularly with respect to the first planar portion. At least one of the subassemblies comprises a plurality of the unitary corners disposed side-by-side in an alternating opposing relationship. A plurality of the subassemblies can be combined to form a quarter perimeter segment of the core shroud. Four quarter perimeter segments join together to form the core shroud.

  14. Helium in Earth's early core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouhifd, M. A.; Jephcoat, Andrew P.; Heber, Veronika S.; Kelley, Simon P.

    2013-11-01

    The observed escape of the primordial helium isotope, 3He, from the Earth's interior indicates that primordial helium survived the energetic process of planetary accretion and has been trapped within the Earth to the present day. Two distinct reservoirs in the Earth's interior have been invoked to account for variations in the 3He/4He ratio observed at the surface in ocean basalts: a conventional depleted mantle source and a deep, still enigmatic, source that must have been isolated from processing throughout Earth history. The Earth's iron-based core has not been considered a potential helium source because partitioning of helium into metal liquid has been assumed to be negligible. Here we determine helium partitioning in experiments between molten silicates and iron-rich metal liquids at conditions up to 16GPa and 3,000K. Analyses of the samples by ultraviolet laser ablation mass spectrometry yield metal-silicate helium partition coefficients that range between 4.7×10-3 and 1.7×10-2 and suggest that significant quantities of helium may reside in the core. Based on estimated concentrations of primordial helium, we conclude that the early core could have incorporated enough helium to supply deep-rooted plumes enriched in 3He throughout the age of the Earth.

  15. The structure of iron in Earth's inner core.

    PubMed

    Tateno, Shigehiko; Hirose, Kei; Ohishi, Yasuo; Tatsumi, Yoshiyuki

    2010-10-15

    Earth's solid inner core is mainly composed of iron (Fe). Because the relevant ultrahigh pressure and temperature conditions are difficult to produce experimentally, the preferred crystal structure of Fe at the inner core remains uncertain. Static compression experiments showed that the hexagonal close-packed (hcp) structure of Fe is stable up to 377 gigapascals and 5700 kelvin, corresponding to inner core conditions. The observed weak temperature dependence of the c/a axial ratio suggests that hcp Fe is elastically anisotropic at core temperatures. Preferred orientation of the hcp phase may explain previously observed inner core seismic anisotropy.

  16. The need for standardized methods for measuring the aorta: Multimodality Core lab Experience from the National Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions (GenTAC)

    PubMed Central

    Asch, Federico M.; Yuriditsky, Eugene; Prakash, Siddharth K.; Roman, Mary J.; Weinsaft, Jonathan W.; Weissman, Gaby; Weigold, Wm Guy; Morris, Shaine A.; Ravekes, William J.; Holmes, Kathryn W.; Silberbach, Michael; Milewski, Rita K.; Kroner, Barbara L.; Whitworth, Ryan; Eagle, Kim A.; Devereux, Richard B.; Weissman, Neil J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate variability in aortic measurements with multiple imaging modalities in clinical centers by comparing to a standardized measuring protocol implemented in a core lab. Background In patients with aortic disease, imaging of thoracic aorta plays a major role in risk-stratifying individuals for life-threatening complications and in determining timing of surgical intervention. However, standardization of the procedures for performance of aortic measurements is lacking. Methods To characterize the diversity of methods utilized in clinical practice, we compared aortic measurements performed by echo, CT and MRI at the 6 GenTAC clinical centers to those performed at the imaging core lab in 965 studies. Each center acquired and analyzed their images according to local protocols. The same images were subsequently analyzed blindly by the core lab, based on a standardized protocol for all imaging modalities. Paired measurements from clinical centers and core lab were compared by mean of differences and intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). Results For all segments of the ascending aorta echo showed a higher ICC (0.84 to 0.93) than CT (0.84) and MRI (0.82 to 0.9), with smaller mean of differences. MRI showed higher ICC for the arch and descending aorta (0.91 and 0.93). In a mixed adjusted model, the different imaging modalities and clinical centers were identified as sources of variability between clinical and core lab measurements, while age groups or diagnosis at enrollment were not. Conclusion By comparing core lab to clinical center’s measurements, our study identified important sources of variability in aortic measurements. Furthermore, our findings with regard to CT and MRI suggest a need for imaging societies to work toward development of unifying acquisition protocols and common measuring methods. PMID:26897684

  17. Forming Process Simulation of Truss Core Panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokura, Sunao; Hagiwara, Ichiro

    Honeycomb panel is widely used as flooring or wall material in various structure including buildings, aircraft, train and so on due to high stiffness and lightness at present. Honeycomb panel, however, has a disadvantage that adhesive used to glue honeycomb core and top plate may burn by fire. On the other hand truss core panel has equivalent stiffness as honeycomb panel and is expected to be an alternative to honeycomb panel as it is safer for fire. However, in general, difficulty exists to form truss core and forming techniques should be developed for practice use of truss core panel. In this paper, firstly theoretical forming limitation is discussed for tetrahedral truss core . Secondly single stage forming simulation of truss core panel using explicit FEM technique was performed for preliminary investigation to estimate formability and thickness distribution. Finally multi-stage forming simulation was presented and possibility to apply press forming for truss core panel production through the simulation. In addition some results of the simulation was compared with the experiment and good agreement of both results was shown.

  18. Magnetorotational iron core collapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Symbalisty, E. M. D.

    1984-01-01

    During its final evolutionary stages, a massive star, as considered in current astrophysical theory, undergoes rapid collapse, thereby triggering a sequence of a catastrophic event which results in a Type II supernova explosion. A remnant neutron star or a black hole is left after the explosion. Stellar collapse occurs, when thermonuclear fusion has consumed the lighter elements present. At this stage, the core consists of iron. Difficulties arise regarding an appropriate model with respect to the core collapse. The present investigation is concerned with the evolution of a Type II supernova core including the effects of rotation and magnetic fields. A simple neutrino model is developed which reproduced the spherically symmetric results of Bowers and Wilson (1982). Several two-dimensional computational models of stellar collapse are studied, taking into account a case in which a 15 solar masses iron core was artificially given rotational and magnetic energy.

  19. Biospecimen Core Resource - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Biospecimen Core Resource centralized laboratory reviews and processes blood and tissue samples and their associated data using optimized standard operating procedures for the entire TCGA Research Network.

  20. Contaminated Sediment Core Profiling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluating the environmental risk of sites containing contaminated sediments often poses major challenges due in part to the absence of detailed information available for a given location. Sediment core profiling is often utilized during preliminary environmental investigations ...

  1. INTEGRAL core programme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, N.; Schoenfelder, V.; Ubertini, P.; Winkler, C.

    1997-01-01

    The International Gamma Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) mission is described with emphasis on the INTEGRAL core program. The progress made in the planning activities for the core program is reported on. The INTEGRAL mission has a nominal lifetime of two years with a five year extension option. The observing time will be divided between the core program (between 30 and 35 percent during the first two years) and general observations. The core program consists of three main elements: the deep survey of the Galactic plane in the central radian of the Galaxy; frequent scans of the Galactic plane in the search for transient sources, and pointed observations of several selected sources. The allocation of the observation time is detailed and the sensitivities of the observations are outlined.

  2. Core assembly storage structure

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Jr., Charles E.; Brunings, Jay E.

    1988-01-01

    A structure for the storage of core assemblies from a liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor. The structure comprises an enclosed housing having a substantially flat horizontal top plate, a bottom plate and substantially vertical wall members extending therebetween. A plurality of thimble members extend downwardly through the top plate. Each thimble member is closed at its bottom end and has an open end adjacent said top plate. Each thimble member has a length and diameter greater than that of the core assembly to be stored therein. The housing is provided with an inlet duct for the admission of cooling air and an exhaust duct for the discharge of air therefrom, such that when hot core assemblies are placed in the thimbles, the heat generated will by convection cause air to flow from the inlet duct around the thimbles and out the exhaust duct maintaining the core assemblies at a safe temperature without the necessity of auxiliary powered cooling equipment.